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Full text of "Spalding's base ball guide, and official league book for ... : a complete hand book of the national game of base ball .."

Spalding's 

official 

base ball 

guide 



GV877 

.S73 

1908 



CV 877 

.S73 

1908 



DING^^TR A D E - M A R K 

EES IfelbJ ACCEPT NO 

^ MAB ^^ SUBSTITUTE g\ 






aiding Practice" Infielders' Glove 

Good quality white velvet tanned leather, 
ished: inside hump. , Each. $1.25 

„ ru ^ing " Interscholastic " Infielders* Glove 
No. 13. White velvet tanned leather, correctly pad- 
ded and very durable. . . . Each. $1.00 
Spalding " Regulation " Infielders' Glove 
No. 15. Brown tanned leather, correctly padded and 
well made; leather lined . Each, $1.00 
Spalding "Regulation" Infielders* Glove 
No. 15R. Black tanned leather, leather lined, $1.00 

Spalding " Public School " Infielders' Glove 
No. 12. Pull size, white velvet tan leather. Ea.. 75c, 

Spalding " League Junior " Infielders' Glove 

No, 16R. Black leather, lightly padded but extra 

long, leather lined . Each, 75c. 

Spalding " Junior " Infielders* Glove 

No. 16. Full size, white vel. tan lea. . ex. long. Ea. 50c 

Spalding "Boys' Amateur" Infielders' Glove 

No. 14. - Youths' prof style; buck tan white leather, 

padded inside humn, leather lined, Each, 50c, 

Spalding "Boys' Favorite"* Infielders' Glove 

No, 19. Made of buck tanned white leather, ligntly 

I padded and size suitable for larger boys Each. 25c, 

Spalding "Boys' Delighi" Intfelders' Glove 
No. 18 Maae of buck tanned white leather, pad- 
ded and with inside hump. . . Each 25c. 
ALL STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 

Spalding Inflated Body Protectors 

We were the first to introduce an inflated body protector, made 
under the Gray patent, and the method used then has been re- 
tained in the improved style, with the addition of a special break 
at the bottom which makes it more pliable and convenient. Made 

of best rubber, inflated with air. 
No. 3-0. Full protection; large size. Covering of special imported 
material, and in every particular the best protector made. $8.00 
No. 2-0. Full protection; large size. Best grade covering and a 

very durable protector Each, $6.00 

No. 0. League. Same in every particular as we have been supply- 
ing for years to most of the prominent League catchers. $5.00 
No 1. Amateur. Quality and design same as we have been fur- 
nisking for years past ; full size. .... Each, $4.00 
No. M. Interscholastic. Full size and very well made. Each, $3.00 
No. 2. Youths'. Well made and good size. . . Each, $ .1.50 

Spalding Umpires' Body Protectors 
Best quality. Give length and width required when ordering. 
No. 1. Large size. Ea.. $10.00 | No. S. Special design. Ea., $10.00 

fJ^aldivn T*nsp PnlJ Cn+alnat'o Mailed "Prpp. 



Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



London 
England 



New York 

Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 



Philadelphia Chicago 
Washington Cleveland 
New Orleans Detroit 



Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



lLJ!IJrl 



GUARANTEES 
iL^_ QUALITY 




lasna 



ACCEPT NO 
SUBJSflTUTE ^y,' 






"Sun Protecting'* Mask 

No. 4-0. Finest steel wire, extra heavy 
black finish. Molded leather chin-strap; 
hair-filled pads, including forehead pad 
and special elastic head -band. $4.00 

"Special Soldered" Mask 
No. 6-0. Each crossing of the wire very heavily 
soldered. Black finish, continuous padding on 
sides; detachable cloth sun-shade. Each, $4.00 
"Week Protecting" Mask 
No. 3-0. Affords absolute protection to the neck 
without interfering. Finest steel wire; pads 

hair-filled Each, $3.50 

"National Association" Mask 
No. 2-0. Extra heavy best annealed steel wire: 
hair-filled padding . . . Each, $2.50 
"Semi-Pro" League Mask 
No. 0-P. Extra heavy best annealed steel wire, 
continuous side pads, leather . Each, $2.50 
"Regulation League" Masks 
No. OX. Men's size, heavy annealed steel wire. 
Improved leather covered pads. Each, $2.00 
No. OXB. Same as OX, for youths. Each, $1.75 
No. 0. Men's, heavy annealed steel wire. " $1.50 

"Amateur" No. A Mask 

No. A. Men's size, black enameled steel wire, 

leather covered pads, forehead pad. Each, $1.00 

"Boys' Amateur" No. B Mask 

No. B. Same as No. A, for youths. Each, $1.00 

"Regulation" No. L Mask 
No. L. Men's, bright wire, same as "Amateur 
No. A," no head or chin-piece. Each, 75c. 
"Youths'" No. C Mask 
No.C. Bright wire, well made, 
leather covered pads. 50c. 
No. D. Bright wire, good 
mask for boys. Each, 25c. 
Umpires' Mask 
No. 5-0. Has neck-protecting 
attachment and special ear 
protection, nicely padded; 
no heavier than the regu- 
lar style. . Each, $5.00 



ex ^ i *i& 









Communications addressed to 






Montreal 
Canada 


A. G. SPALDING &, BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 


London 
England 




For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 




New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 


Boston 1 Philadelphia 
Pittsburg Washington 
Baltimore New Orleans 


Chicago 1 Cincinnati 

Cleveland Kansas City 

Detroit 1 St. Louis 


San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



°s^ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY /J*. 



No. 87— Athletic Primer. 

Edited by J. £. Sullivan, President 
of the Amateur Athletic Union. Tells 
how to organize an athletic club, how- 
to conduct an athletic meeting, and 
gives rules for the government of ath- 
letic meetings; contents also include 
directions for building a track and lay- 
ing out athletic grounds, and a very 
instructive article on training; fully 
illustrated with pictures of leading 
athletes. Price 10 cents. 

No. 252— How to Sprint. 

A complete and detailed account of 
how to train for the short distances. 
Every athlete who aspires to be a 
sprinter can study this book to advan- 
tage and gain useful knowledge. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 255— How to Run lOO 
Yards. 



By J. W. Morton, the noted British 
champion. Many of Mr. Morton's 
methods of training are novel to 
American athletes, but his success is 
the best tribute to their worth. Illus 
trated with photographs of Mr. Morton 
in action, taken especially for this 
book. Price 10 cents. 

No. 174— Distance and Cross- 
country Running:. 

By George Orton, the famous Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania runner. The 
quarter, half, mile, the longer dis 
lances, and cross-country running and 
steeplechasing, with instructions for 
training; pictures of leading athletes 
in action, with comments by the editor. 10 cents. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 55— Official Sportin* 
Rules. 

Contains rules not found in other 
publications for the government of 
many sports; rules for wrestling, 
shuffleboard, snowshoeing, profes- 
sional racing, pigeon shooting, dog 
racing, pistol and revolver shooting, 
British water polo rules, Rugby foot 
ball rules. Price 10 cents. 



ATHLETIC 



AUXILIARIES. 

Handbook 



No. 295— Official 
of the A.A.U. 

The A. A. U. is the governing body 
of athletes in the United States of 
America, and all games must be held 
under its rules, which are exclusively 
published in this handbook, and a copy 
should be in the hands of every athlete 
and every club officer in America. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 259— Weight Throwing. 

Probably no other man in the world 
l has had the varied and long experience 
f of James S. Mitchel, the author, in the 
weight throwing department of ath- 
letics. The book gives valuable infor- 
mation not only for the novice, but for 
i the expert as well. Illustrated. Price 
[10 cents. 

'(No. 246— Athletic Training 
for Schoolboys. 

p| By Geo. W. Orton. Each event in the 
intercollegiate programme is treated 
\ )f separately, both as regards method 

>f training and form. Illustrated. 

Price 10 cents. 



No. 292— Official Intercolle- 
giate A.A.A.A. Handbook. 

Contains constitution, by-laws, and 
laws of athletics; records from 1876 to 
date. Price 10 cents. 

No. 302— Official Y.M.C.A. 

"Handbook. 

Contains the official rules governing 
all sports under the jurisdiction of the 
Y. M. C. A., official Y. M. C. A. scoring 
tables, pantathlon rules, pictures of 
leading Y. M. C. A. athletes. Price 



No. 301— Official Handbook 
of the Public Schools 
Athletic League. 

Contains the official rules that govern 
all the contests of the league, and con- 
stitution, by-laws and officers. Edited 
by Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick, superin- 
tendent of physical education in the 
New York public schools. Illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 298— Intercollegiate 
Cross Country Handbook. 

Contains constitution and by-laws, 
list of officers, and records of the asso- 
ciation. Price 10 cents. 



<^\ SPALDING 



ATHLETIC 



LIBRARY/^ 



Group XIII. Athletic 
Accomplishments 

No. 177— How to Swim. 

Will interest the expert as well as 
the novice; the illustrations were made 
from photographs especially posed, 
showing' the swimmer in clear water; 
a valuable feature is the series of 
"land drill " exercises for the beginner. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 296— Speed Swimming. 

By Champion C. M. Daniels of the 
New York Athletic Club team, holder 
of numerous American records, and the 
best swimmer in America qualifier 1 to 
write on the subject. Any boy should 
be able to increase his speed in the 
water after reading Champion Daniels' 
instructions on the subject. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 128— How to Row. 

By E. J. Giannini, of the New York 
Athletic Club, one of America's most 
famous amateur oarsmen and cham- 
pions. Shows how to hold the oars, 
the finish of the stroke and other valu- 
able information. Price 10 cents. 

No. 23— Canoeing;. 

Paddling, sailing, cruising and rac- 
ing canoes and their uses; with hints 
on rig and management; the choice of 
a canoe; sailing canoes, racing regula- 
tions; canoeing and camping. Fully 
illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 209— How to Become a 
Skater. 

Contains advice for beginners; how 
to become a figure skater, showing how 
to do all the different tricks of the best 
figure skaters. Pictures of prominent 
skaters and numerous diagrams. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 282-Official Roller 
Skating Guide. 

Directions for becoming a fancy and 
trick roller skater, and rules for roller 
skating. Pictures of prominent trick 
skaters in action. Price 10 cents. 



No. 178 — How to Train for 
Bicycling. 

Gives methods of the best riders 
when training for long or short distance 
races; hints on training. Revised and 
up-to-date in every particular. Price 
10 cents. 

Group XIV. sjjrts 

No. 140— Wrestling. 

Catch-as-catch-can style. Seventy 
illustrations of the different holds, pho- 
tographed especially and so described 
that anybody can with little effort learn 
every one. Price 10 cents. 

No. 18— Fencing. 

By Dr. Edward Breck, of Boston, 
editor of the Swordsman, and a promi- 
nent amateur fencer. A book that has 
stood the test of time, and is universally 
acknowledged to be a standard work. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 162— Boxing Guide. 

Contains over 70 pages of illustrations 
showing all the latest blows, posed 
especially for this book under the super- 
vision of a well-known instructor of 
boxing, who makes a specialty of teach- 
ing and knows how to impart his 
knowledge. Price 10 cents. 

No. 165— The Art of Fencing. 

By Regis and Louis Senac, of New 
York, famous instructors and leading 
authorities on the subject. Gives in 
detail how every move should be made. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 236— How to Wrestle. 

The most complete and up-to-date 
book on wrestling ever published. 
Edited by F. R. Toombs, and devoted 
principally to special poses and illustra- 
tions by George Hackenschmidt, the 
" Russian Lion." Price 10 cents. 

No. 102— Ground Tumbling. 

Any boy, by reading this book and 
following the instructions, can become 
proficent. Price 10 cents. 



"^X SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY/^ 



No. 289-— Tumbling for Ama- 
teurs. 

Specially compiled for amateurs by 
Dr. James T. Gwathmey. Every variety 
of the pastime explained by text and 
pictures, over 100 different positions 
being shown. Price 10 cents. 

No. 191— How to Punch the 
Bag. 

The best treatise on bag punching 
that has ever been printed. Every va- 
riety of blow used in training is shown 
and explained, with a chapter on fancy 
bag punching by a well-known theatri- 
cal bag puncher. Price 10 cents, 

No. 143— Indian Clubs and 

D umb-Bells. 

By America's amateur champion club 
swinger, J. H. Dougherty. It is clearly 
illustrated, by which any novice can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

No. 200— Dnmb-Bells. 

The best work on dumb-bells that 
has ever been offered. By Prof. G. 
Bojus, of New York. Contains 200 
photographs. Should be in the hands 
of every teacher and pupil of physical 
culture, and is invaluable for home 
exercise. Price 10 cehts. 

No. 262— Medicine Ball Ex- 
ercises. 

A series of plain and practical exer- 
cises with the medicine ball, suitable 
for boys and girls, business and profes- 
sional men, in and out of gymnasium. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 29— Pulley Weight Exer- 
cises. 

By Dr. Henry S. Anderson, instructor 
in heavy gymnastics Yale gymnasium. 
In conjunction with a chest machine 
anyone with this book can become 
perfectly developed. Price 10 cents. 

No. 233— Jiu Jitsu. 

Each move thoroughly explained and 
illustrated with numerous full-page 
pictures of Messrs. A. Minami and K. 
Koyama, two of the most famous ex- 
ponents of the art of Jiu Jitsu, who 
posed especially for this book. Price 
10 cents. 



No. 166— How to Swing In- 
dian Clubs. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. By follow- 
ing the directions carefully anyone can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

Group XV. Gymnastics 

No. 104— The Grading of 
Gymnastic Exercises. 

By G. M. Martin. A book that should 
be in the hands of every physical direc- 
tor of the Y. M. C. A., school, club, col- 
lege, etc. Price 10 cents. 

No. 214— Graded Calisthen- 
ics and Du nib-Bell Drills. 

For years it has been the custom in 
most gymnasiums of memorizing a set 
drill, which was never varied. Conse- 
quently the beginner was given the 
same kind and amount as the older 
member. With a view to giving uni- 
formity the present treatise is at- 
tempted. Price 10 cents. 

No. 254 — Barnjum Bar Bell 
Drill. 

Edited by Dr. R. Tait McKenzie, 
Director Physical Training, University 
of Pennsylvania. Profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 158 — Indoor and Outdoox 
Gymnastic Games. 

A book that will prove valuable to in- 
door and outdoor gymnasiums, schools, 
outings and gatherings where there 
are a number to be amused. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 124 — How to Become a 
Gymnast. 

By Robert Stoll, of the New York 
A. p., the American champion on the 
flying rings from 1885 to 1892. Any boy 
can easily become proficient with a 
little practice. Price 10 cents. 

No. 287— Fancy Dumb Bell 
and Marching Drills. 

All concede that games and recreative 
exercises during the adolescent period 
are preferable to set drills and monoton- 
ous movements. These drills, while de- 
signed primarily for boys, can be used 
successfully with girls and men and 
women. Profusely illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 



<^\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY //* 



I 



Group XIII. Athletic 
Accomplishments 

No. 177— How to Swim. 

Will interest the expert as well as 
the novice; the illustrations were made 
from photographs especially posed, 
showing the swimmer in clear water; 
a valuable feature is the series of 
' 'land drill " exercises for the beginner. 
Price 10 cents. 

No, 296— Speed Swimming. 

By Champion C. M. Daniels of the 
New York Athletic Club team, holder 
of numerous American records, and the 
best swimmer in America qualifier 1 to 
write on the subject. Any boy should 
be able to increase his speed in the 
water after reading Champion Daniels' 
instructions on the subject. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 128— How to Row. 

By E. J. Giannini, of the New York 
Athletic Club, one of America's most 
famous amateur oarsmen and cham- 
pions. Shows how to hold the oars, 
the finish of the stroke and other valu- 
able information. Price 10 cents. 

No. 23— Canoeing. 

Paddling, sailing, cruising and rac- 
ing canoes and their uses; with hints 
on rig and management; the choice of 
a canoe; sailing canoes, racing regula- 
tions; canoeing and camping. Fully 
illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 209— How to Become a 
Skater. 

Contains advice for beginners; how 
to become a figure skater, showing how 
to do all the different tricks of the best 
figure skaters. Pictures of prominent 
skaters and numerous diagrams. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 282-Official Roller 
Skating Gnide. 

Directions for becoming a fancy and 
trick roller skater, and rules for roller 
skating. Pictures of prominent trick 
skaters in action. Price 10 cents. 



No. 178— How to Train for 
Bicycling. 

Gives methods of the best riders 
when training for long or short distance 
races; hints on training. Revised and 
up-to-date in every particular. Price 
10 cents. 

Group XIV. SD orts 

No. 140— Wrestling. 

Catch-as-catch-can style. Seventy ~* 
illustrations of the different holds, pho- 
tographed especially and so described 
that anybody can with little effort learn , 
every one. Price 10 cents. 

No. 18— Fencing. 

By Dr. Edward Breck, of Boston, 
editor of the Swordsman, and a promi- 
nent amateur fencer. A book that has 
stood the test of time, and is universally 
acknowledged to be a standard work. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 162— Boxing Gnide. 

Contains over 70 pages of illustrations 
showing all the latest blows, posed 
especially for this book under the super- 
vision of a well-known instructor of 
boxing, who makes a specialty of teach- 
ing and knows how to impart his 
knowledge. Price 10 cents. 

No. 165— The Art of Fencing. 

By Regis and Louis Senac, of New 
York, famous instructors and leading 
authorities on the subject. Gives in 
detail how every move should be made. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 236— How to Wrestle. 

The most complete and up-to-date 
book on wrestling ever published. 
Edited by F. R. Toombs, and devoted 
principally to special poses and illustra- 
tions by George Hackenschmidt, the 
" Russian Lion." Price 10 cents. 

No. 102— Ground Tumbling. 

Any boy. by reading this book and 
following the instructions, can become 
proficent. Price 10 cents. 



C ^V\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY fr> 



No. 389— Tumbling for Ama- 
teurs. 

Specially compiled for amateurs by 
Dr. James T. Gwathmey. Every variety 
of the pastime explained by text and 
pictures, over 100 different positions 
being shown. Price 10 cents. 

No. 191— How to Punch the 
Bag:. 

The best treatise on bag punching 
that has ever been printed. Every va- 
riety of blow used in training is shown 
and explained, with a chapter on fancy 
bag punching by a well-known theatri- 
cal bag puncher. Price 10 cents, 

No. 143— Indian Clubs and 
Dumb-Hells. 

By America's amateur champion club 
swinger, J. H. Dougherty. It is clearly 
illustrated, by which any novice can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

No. 200— Dumb-Bells. 

The best work on dumb-bells that 
has ever been offered. By Prof. G. 
Bojus, of New York. Contains 200 
photographs. Should be in the hands 
of every teacher and pupil of physical 
culture, and is invaluable for home 
exercise. Price 10 cehts. 

No. 262— Medicine Ball Ex- 
ercises. 

A series of plain and practical exer- 
cises with the medicine ball, suitable 
for boys and girls, business and profes- 
sional men, in and out of gymnasium. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 29— Pulley Weight Exer- 
cises. 

By Dr. Henry S. Anderson, instructor 
i in heavy gymnastics Yale gymnasium. 
I In conjunction with a chest machine 
s anyone with this book can become 
t perfectly developed. Price 10 cents. 

No. 233— Jiu Jitsu. 

Each move thoroughly explained and 
illustrated with numerous full-page 

j pictures of Messrs. A. Minami and K. 

I Koyama, two of the most famous ex- 
ponents of the art of Jiu Jitsu, who 
posed especially for this book. Price 
10 cents. 



No. 166— How to Swing: In- 
dian Clubs. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. By follow- 
ing the directions carefully anyone can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

Group XV. Gymnastics 

No. 104— The Grading: of 
Gymnastic Exercises. 

By G. M. Martin. A book that should 
be in the hands of every physical direc- 
tor of the Y. M. C. A., school, club, col- 
lege, etc. Price 10 cents. 

No. 214— Graded Calisthen- 
ics and Dunib-Bell Drills. 
For years it has been the custom in 
most gymnasiums of memorizing a set 
drill, which was never varied. Conse- 
quently the beginner was given the 
same kind and amount as the older 
member. With a view to giving uni- 
formity the present treatise is at- 
tempted. Price 10 cents. 

No. 254— Barnjum Bar Bell 
Drill. 

Edited by Dr. R. Tait McKenzie, 
Director Physical Training, University 
of Pennsylvania. Profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 158 — Indoor and Outdooi 
Gymnastic Games. 

A book that will prove valuable to in- 
door and outdoor gymnasiums, schools, 
outings and gatherings where there 
are a number to be amused. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 124 — How to Become a 
Gymnast. 

By Robert Stoll, of the New York 
A. C., the American champion on the 
flying rings from 1885 to 1892. Any boy 
can easily become proficient with a 
little practice. Price 10 cents. 

No. 287— Fancy Dumb Bell 
and Marching: Drills. 

All concede that games and recreative 
exercises during the adolescent period 
are preferable to set drills and monoton- 
ous movements. These drills, while de- 
signed primarily for boys, can be used 
successfully with girls and men and 
women. Profusely illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 



«^\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY /7* 



___ Physical 
Group XVI. culture 

No. 161— Ten Minutes* Exer- 
cise for Busy Men. 

By Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick, Direc- 
tor of Physical Training in the New 
York Public Schools. A concise and 
complete course of physical education. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 208— Physical Education 
and Hygiene. 

This is the fifth of the Physical 
Training series, by Prof. E. B. Warman 
(see Nos. 142, 149, 166. 185. 213. 261. 290). 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 149— The Care of the Body. 

A book that all who value health 
should read and follow its instructions. 
By Prof. E. B. Warman, the well-known 
lecturer and authority on physical cul- 
ture. Price 10 cents. 

No. 142— Physical Training: 
Simplified. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. A complete, 
thorough and practical book where the 
whole man is considered— brain and 
body. Price 10 cents. 

No. 185— Health Hints. 

By Prof, E. B. Warman. Health in- 
fluenced by insulation; health influ- 
enced by underwear; health influenced 
by color; exercise. Price 10 cents. 

No. 213— 285 Health Answers. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. Contents: 
ventilating a bedroom; ventilating a 
house; how to obtain pure air; bathing; 
salt water baths at home; a substitute 
for ice water; to cure insomnia, etc., 
etc Price 10 cents. 



No. 238— Muscle Building:. 

By Dr. L. H. Gulick, Director of Phy- 
sical Training in the New York Public 
Schools. A complete treatise on the 
correct method of acquiring strength. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 234— School Tactics and 
Maze Running-. 

A series of drills for the use of schools. 
Edited by Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick, 
Director of Physical Training in the 
New York Public Schools. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 261— Tensing Exercises. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. The "Ten- 
sing" or "Resisting" system of mus- 
cular exercises is the most thorough, 
the most complete, the most satisfac- 
tory, and the most fascinating of sys- 
tems. Price 10 cents. 

No. 285— Health; by Muscu- 
lar Gymnastics. 

With hints on right living. By W. J. 
Cromie. If one will practice the exer- 
cises and observe the hints therein 
contained, he will be amply repaid for 
so doing. Price 10 cents. 

No. 288— Indigestion Treated 
by Gymnastics 

By W. J. Cromie. If the hints there- 
in contained are observed and the 
exercises faithfully performed great 
relief will be experienced. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 290— Get Well; Keep 
Well. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman, author of a 
number of books in the Spalding Ath- 
letic Library on physical training. 
Price 10 cents. 



A. G. SPALDING 

Fhom Photograph Taken in- Saw Francisco 
ur November, 1879 




SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 
Group I. No. 1 



1 



Spalding's 

Official D 

1 Base Ball Guide g 

THIRTY - SECOND YEAR 

1908 | 

D D 

Edited by Henry Chadwick 

@ ; . D 

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
21 Warren Street, New York 




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(LIBRARY of CONGRESS 
! two Copies Haceivta 
MAt 28 1*08 

JU^JMIK'K- ClM* 

CUSS# XXc. wo. 

2" r q 4 f 

COPY 8. 



C*V.ST7 



Copyright, 1908 

BY 

American Sports Publishing Company 
New York 



Preface 

Since the first issue of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide 
In 1877, it has been — what its name implies — the Guide to our 
national game. It occupies a unique position and is universally 
recognized as the leading authority on Base Ball. Those who 
have followed the Guide for the past thirty years or more can 
better grasp the great advancement made in the game since 
that early period. 

The extraordinary growth of the game has demanded a 
gradual increase in the size of the Guide, until last year it 
reached such unwieldy proportions that it became absolutely 
necessary to devise some plan whereby its constantly expanding 
pages could be kept within reasonable bounds. How to accom- 
plish this without detracting from the interest and scope of the 
Guide was a problem that demanded our most serious thought. 
The problem was successfully solved by the issuance in January 
last of a new Base Ball Annual, entitled "Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Record," which, as its name implies, is a complete 
record book, containing all the statistical details of the game, 
which formerly took up so many pages in the Guide. The first 
issue of the Record not only contains the complete records of 
clubs and averages of all professional players operating under 
the National Agreement for 1907, but in addition the book con- 
tains carefully prepared records and averages made up from 
official sources, covering organized professional Base Ball from 
its commencement in 1871 to 1907, inclusive. 

Judging from the enormous sale of the first issue of the 
Record we are convinced that this innovation has met the 
approval of the Base Ball public. The objections that have 
been urged against withholding the annual records and aver- 
ages for the past season until the issuance of the Guide in 
April, have been met and overcome by the publishing of the 
Record book in January. 

In future Spalding's Official Base Ball Record will be 
published annually in January, containing all of the records of 
the past, and thus enable the Guide, which will continue to 
be issued annually in April, to devote its pages to the present 
and future of the game. Several pages from the Record, in 
more or less abbreviated form, appear in this issue of the 
Guide. 

By this innovation the Guide is improved and given a wider 
scope for its particular field. The Guide of 1908 continues to 
publish the Official Playing Rules of the game ; detailed 
account of the sensational World's Series between the respec- 
tive champions of the two major leagues ; historical and edi- 
torial articles by the veteran editor of the Guide, Mr. Henry 
Chadwick, and others ; together with many illustrations, which 
have been such a prominent feature in this book in the past. 

As publishers of the Guide, we take this occasion to con- 
gratulate our veteran editor, Mr. Henry Chadwick, who this 
year completes his twenty-eighth year as editor of the Guide, 
on his very valuable work in connection with this book, which 
we believe to be the most complete and ideal Base Ball Guide 
that he ever edited. 

JAMES E. SULLIVAN, 
President American Sports Publishing Company. 




HENRY CHAD WICK 

"The Father of Base Ball" 
From a photograph taken in his eightieth year, 1903, hy Frank Pearsall, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mr Henry Chadwick, the youngest brother of the late Sir Edwin Chadwick, 
the eminent sanitary philosopher of England, was born at Jessamine Cot- 
tage, St. Thomas, Exeter, England, October 5th, 1824. Mr. Chadwick, with 
his father, Mr. James Chadwick, removed to New York in 1837, where he 
has since resided. Mr. Chadwick is a journalist by inheritance, as his 
father was for many years editor of the 'Western Times of Exeter. 



Contents 

PAGB 

American League- 
All- America Team, 1900-1907 348 

Batting rank of players who hold the three highest percentages 

in their respective Fielding positions, 1900-1907 349 

Batting Records, 1907 350 

Championship Winners, 1900-1907 348 

Club Standing, 1907 350 

Fielding rank of players who hold the three highest percentages 

in their respective positions, 1900-1907 349 

Fielding Records, 1907 352 

Pitching Records, 190/ 354 

Season of 1907 1 43 

Three Leading Batsmen Each Year, 1900-1907 350 

Base Ball Playing Rules, Official 301 

Index, Ready Reference, to 298 

Base Ball, Origin of 35 

\Base Ball Playing Rules, .Origin and Early Evolution of the 282 

Base Ball Playing Rules, Spalding's Simplified- 
Ball 287 

Ball Ground-How to Lay It Out 286 

Balls, Providing 288 

Balls, Soiling 288 

Base Running Rules 293 

Bat Regulation - 287 

Batting Rules 291 

Benches, Players' 288 

Coaching Rules 296 

Definitions, General 297 

Field for Play, Fitness of 2S9 

Field Rules 288 

Game, Regulation 289 

Gloves and Mitts, Regulation 287 

Ground Rules 296 

Innings, Choice of <-°9 

Players, Number and Position of • 288 

Players, Substitute 289 

Pitching Rules 2t0 

Runs, Scoring of £™ 

Scoring Rules 297 

Umpire's Authority £-'7 

Umpires' Duties 29b 

Uniforms £»» 

Diagram, Correct, of a Ball Field 300 

Editorial Comments ? 

Major Leagues' Season, Notes of the ^ ' 9 

Murnane Paragraphs • • • • • • ~ 81 

National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues- 
American Association 1 j>9 

Central League ^ 

Connecticut League jgt> 

Eastern Illinois League ^ 

Cotton States League ■> ™ 

Eastern League • J°* 

Gulf Coast League *%> 

Indiana-Illinois-Iowa League 1»< 

Interstate League * '•* 

Iowa League £«J 

New England League £° 

New York League -£' 

Northern Copper League * y » 



National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues— (Con.) page 

North Texas League 263 

Northwestern League 265 

Ohio-Pennsylvania League 201 

Oklahoma- Arkansas- Kansas League 255 

Pacific Coast League 223 

Pennsylvania-Ohio-Maryland League 253 

South Atlantic League 261 

Southern Association 229 

South Carolina League 268 

Southern Michigan Association 209 

Texas League 268 

Tri-State League 213 

Virginia League 243 

Western Association 247 

Western Canada League 241 

Western League 237 

Western Pennsylvania League 251 

Wisconsin-Illinois League 257 

List of players in each league who hold the highest averages 

in Batting and Fielding in their respective positions, 1907 355 

Leading Batter in Each League, 1907 361 

Leading Pitcher in Each League, 1907 361 

National League — 

All- America Teams, five-year periods, 1871-1907 336 

Batting Averages, 1907 343 

Batting rank of players who hold the three highest percentages in 

their respective Fielding positions, 1871-1907 342 

Batting Records-three leaders each year, 1871-1907 339 

Batters who have had .400 or over since 1871 341 

Campaign of 1907 117 

Club Standing, 1907 343 

Fielding Averages, 1907 345 

Fielding rank of players who hold the three highest percentages 

in their respective positions, 1871-1907 342 

Pitching Records, 1907 346 

Winners of National Base Ball Championship of the United 
States. 1871-1907 335 

Public Schools Athletic League 271 

Public Schools Athletic League Championship, Cleveland 276 

Public Schools Athletic League Championship, New York 277 

Record, Spalding's Official Base Ball 334 

Rules, Official Playing 301 

Index to Playing 329 

Secretary's Report 157 

Schedules — 

American Association 364 

American League 363 

National League 362 

New England League 367 

South Atlantic League 366 

Southern Association 365 

What a Base Ball Club Needs 368 

World's Championship Series of 1907— 51 

Account of the 51 

Biographies of the Winners of the 101 

How We Won the 81 

Opinions of Leading Authorities on the 95 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 7 

Editorial Comment 

Bt Hejtht Ceadwick 

It is worthy of special note that last December was one of 
the most notable months on record for its exceptional hap- 
penings, which, in one respect, beat all previous records, so 
far as we can remember ; and that was in case of the won- 
derful fine weather we metropolitan folks enjoyed on Christmas 
day. In fact, it was a day of days for outdoor sports and 
pastimes, so lovely was the warm, bright, sunshiny day on the 
great holiday occasion. 

Winter sports were outside the pale of performance, there 
being no ice for skating or curling except at the artificial ice 
rinks. But how .the Base Ball "kids" of the great city did 
revel in roller skating on the hundred and odd miles of the 
asphalted streets of the city ; while the Prospect Park ball 
grounds saw a crowd of cricketers. Base Ball players and 
foot ballists practicing on the green forty-acre field. That 
fact alone shows what exceptional weather prevailed. Of 
course, we merely refer to the games center of the metropolis. 
But the fine weather marked other cities and towns through- 
out the country, but not to the enjoyable extent which it did 
on Christmas Day in Greater New York. 

In this era of the great popularity of outdoor athletic sports, 
Americans can pride themselves on the possession of the most 
popular field game known to modern civilization, viz.. our Na- 
tional Game of Base Ball. It can be truthfully said that there 
is no field sport now in vogue in America that equals Base Ball, 
either as an exciting game to witness, or as one affording ample 
opportunities for healthy, manly, and recreative exercise. In 
comparison with every other field game known in the existing 
arena of outdoor sports, Base Ball especially bears off the palm 
in all those features which are calculated to secure the popular 
favor of the American public. 

In this regard our National game of Base Ball comes into 
play, too, with telling effect, as the one single field sport, above 
all others, admirably adapted for the use of the students of our 
colleges and public schools ; in fact, in every way is our glori- 
ous game suited to the American character. It is full of ex- 
citement, is quickly played, and it not only requires vigor of 
constitution, and manly courage and pluck ; but also mental 
ability to a considerable extent, to excel in the game. Moreover, 
Base Ball, when played in its integrity, is entirely free from 
the objectionable features which too frequently characterize 
other prominent field sports of the country. 

The Base Ball fraternity of the early days of the game's 
history had a great drawback to the successful progress of 
their game, in the very inferior quality of the ball they had 
to use. Just think, you players of to-day, of having to handle 
a ball ten inches in circumference and six ounces in weight, 
hit hard to you from the bat, with 2% ounces of rubber in 
its composition, compared with the perfect regulation ball of 
the present period, made by machinery and of the best quality 
of material. 

When Base Ball was first introduced by the Knickerbocker 
Base Ball Club of New York in 1845, the ball used was of home 
make, an uneven and rather crude affair, and constructed with 
strips of old rubber shoes as a base and wound with old stock- 
ing yarn and covered with cowhide. 



8 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDIDE. 

In the decade of the fifties two ball makers of New York 
and Brooklyn made all the balls needed, as the few clubs of 
the metropolis did not play over a dozen match games a 
season. The Brooklyn Atlantics used the Harvey Ross balls, 
and the New York clubs at Hoboken those made by shoemaker 
Van Horn of New York during his leisure hours. Now we 
have a perfect ball, made in a large factory, of the best ma- 
terial and on scientific principles. The days of "lively" balls 
for batting and "dead" balls for fielding are gone forever. The 
former yielded twenty or thirty runs to an innings, and the 
latter not a run in twenty-four innings. 

□ □ □ 

A NEEDED AMENDMENT TO THE SCORING 
RULES 

The existing system of making out the yearly averages of the 
several professional Base Ball leagues is entirely worthless as 
data affording a criterion of excellence of play in the various 
departments of the game ; especially is this the case as regards 
the batting and pitching. For instance, the only test of effective 
skill at the bat is the data of base runners forwarded by base 
hits, with its percentage ; whereas the averages used up to date 
give the palm to the batsman who excels in "percentage of base 
hits," without regard to the runners forwarded around the bases 
by such hits. The former is mere "record batting," while the 
latter is the true criterion of "team work at the bat" — the 
acme of scientific batting. In the pitching averages, too, the 
existing test of skill in pitching is the percentage of victories 
pitched in only, whereas the true test of effective work in the 
box lies in the percentage of base hits scored off the pitching, 
unaided by base stealing; and runs scored by base hits alone are 
the only runs that are earned off the pitching alone ; and even 
then they are not to be charged against the pitcher as earned 
runs if the base hits are scored after the pitcher has offered his 
fielding support three plain chances for outs by catches or by 
sharp fielding, which have not been accepted through fielding 
errors. 

In the decade of the early eighties I advocated the adoption, 
by the Rules Committee of the period, of an amendment to the 
scoring rules of the National League, of a rule giving credit 
to batsmen for the forwarding of base runners by base hits, 
and by this means to secure data for a true criterion of 
excellence in batting ; no reliable data for that purpose having 
been placed in the code. 

Through the influence of the late Mr. Charles A. Byrne of 
the Brooklyn Club, and President Young, my amendment was 
adopted, but the "star" players of that period did not fancy 
the rule, they preferring the easier method of getting at the 
alleged best batting average by means of the percentage of 
base hits only, even if a single base runner was not forwarded 
by a hit. So my amendment was removed from the code by 
the majority vote of the magnates before half the season was 
over. Ever since then the rule of deciding the question of the 
batting leadership of each season has been governed by the 
scoring rule of giving the palm in batting to the batsman who 
led in percentage of base hits only, regardless of whether the 
base hits made by the so-called "champion batsman" sent in a 
single base runner or not. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. $• 

THE GROWTH OF ORGANIZED BASE BALL 

Up to the 3*ear 1858, when the first National' Association was 
organized, the condition of things in the world of Amateur 
Base Ball may be said to have been, more or less, of a chaotic 
nature; Base Ball clubs sprang into existence somewhat slowly 
at first, and only in the large cities : and these city clubs were 
independent of each other, there being nothing to regulate their 
season's contests on the field together, such as an association 
of clubs, and then, too, they, one and all, played under varied 
rules. 

The advent of what is now known as "Organized Base Ball" 
dates its progress from the organization of the first National 
Base Ball Association in 1858, and this association governed 
the fraternity up to the time of the recognition of professional 
ball plaving under the rule of the first National Association of 
Professional Base Ball Players in New York in 1871, which was 
organized through the joint efforts of Mr. N. E. Young of Wash- 
ington, D. C, and the editor of the Guide. But it was not until 
1876 that what may be justly called "Organized Base Ball'" 
really sprang into active existence, and that was brought about 
by the organization in that year of the National League of 
Clubs. 

D □ □ 

THE EFFECTS OF SPORTS ON BOYS 

In our book of "Sports of American Boys," written a 
quarter of a century ago and published by Routledge & Sons 
of New York and London in 1884, we had the following para- 
graph. It "hits the nail on the head" for the existing period : 

"There is one thing in connection with the subject of youth- 
ful sports which merits special attention, and that is the ten- 
dency of the boys of the period to forego such pastimes and to- 
replace them with habits of their leisure hours, which are at 
war alike with health and morality. Far too many of our 
American boys jump from the games of their early school days 
before they have got out of their teens into the vicious ways 
of fast young men. For this reason parents and guardians 
cannot do better than to foster a love of outdoor games among 
their boys, if only as a means of keeping them out of the mis- 
chievous habits they are so prone to indulge in when not at 
their school desks or actively engaged in physical recreation 
suitable to their age. It is a sad sight to see boys of from 
twelve to fifteen years of age with cigarettes in their mouths, 
canes in their hands, and with precocious appetites for stimu- 
lants, visiting, during their leisure hours, race courses, pool 
rooms, variety saloons and other vicious places of public 
amusements, when they should be either on their regular play- 
ground, enjoying their boyish games, or out in the fields par- 
ticipating in a higher class of youthful sports. There is a sort 
of electric battery of physical force in the composition of boys 
of healthy nhysiques, which must be allowed an avenue of 
escape or evil consequences are likely to ensue ; and it is better 
to guide the direction of this explosive material than to allow 
it to have its own way in its working off. In other words, 
it is not judicious to allow wild play to a boy's excess of 
animal spirits; nor is it advisable to check the overflow too 
suddenly. Train up your boys in the way they should go — 
alike on the playground or in the field of sport, as in the school 
Of morality — and maturity will assuredly find them the right 
kind of men for progressive humanity." 



10 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

BASE BALL TEAMS ADVERTISE A TOWN 

The experience of the new century annals of* professional 
Base Ball, as regards the beneficial effects of advertising a 
town or small city, on account of its having a professional 
Base Ball club located in its midst, or of a town or city being 
connected with a Base Ball league or association, has prac- 
tically taught a lesson to business people of small cities and 
towns, which the intelligent and progressive class of hotel 
and storekeepers of a country town have not been slow of late 
years to avail themselves, for such business men have realized 
the advantage above referred to. 

In small towns and villages the scores of games are usually 
published in the local newspapers. This helps the places where 
the games are played, and when the winner of the champion- 
ship is known the impression prevails that the victory is due 
to the enthusiasm and support given by the "rooters" of the 
place in which such team is located. 

We know of many small country towns which would never 
have been known or heard of outside of their own immediate 
vicinity, but for its Base Ball club and team. The fact is, if 
the business people of a town, not previously benefited by 
having a Base Ball club and a good enclosed ground, were to 
get their best men together for organization purposes, they 
would soon realize what an advertising medium a well-managed 
professional club is to the hotels, boarding houses and stores. 

In the old days, when professional Base Ball was. unknown, 
a general impression prevailed in the fraternity that the, 
strongest nine that could be placed in the field was a "picked 
nine," that is, a nine composed of players noted for their 
special excellence in playing their respective home positions. 
But the late veteran Harry Wright exposed the fallacy of this 
opinion very plainly — as we had done years before — when, at 
Cincinnati in the sixties, he practically developed the great 
possibilities of team-work in a nine as the only avenue to 
success in pennant-winning, as he did still more effectively in 
Boston in the seventies ; and nowadays a picked nine stands no 
show against a trained nine with its team-work players in 
position. 

□ a d 

THE BENEFITS OF THE BOARD OF 
COMMISSION 

Organized professional Base Ball of the present decade, in 
the best application of the term, has found in the now noted 
trio of members of the existing Board of Commission, repre- 
sented in the persons of Messrs. Herrmann, Pulliam and John- 
son, a combination of executive ability, exceptional in the ex- 
treme ; inasmuch as the practical working of the Board has 
been marked by a degree of governmental force characteristic 
of a happy combination of "fair play" and the "courage of 
their convictions," immensely advantageous to professional Base 
Ball of the period. 

It is well to remember, in these rather exciting times, that 
to President Johnson of the American League we are indebted 
for the beginning of the just war upon the still existing evil 
of "kicking against the decisions of the umpire" in the game, 
and to President Pulliam of the old National League do we owe 
the introduction of the policy of placing in the hands of the 
league's president the power to suppress the abuses of pro* 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. H 

fessional Base Ball, which previous presidents of the league 
were powerless to remove ; while in President Herrmann we 
have, as chairman of the Board, a most worthy gentleman, who 
has been justly described as being "the man of the hour and 
the place, and it was a fortunate day for the national game 
when he entered its inner councils inasmuch as his great 
achievements, supplemented by his irreproachable character, thus 
giving the Base Ball world a leader, like Chevalier Bayard, 
'without fear and without reproach.' " 

□ D D 
STRONG DISCIPLINE NEEDED 

Our readers will naturally ask the question, "How about the 
promise of the season of 1908? All we can say in reply is, 
that if the magnates of the National Association and the two 
major leagues will act with the full courage of their convic- 
tions, and carry out true business principles in the manage- 
ment of their leagues, associations and individual clubs, they 
will succeed in their business financially far better than they 
did even in 1907. But to achieve such a desirable result they 
must not only war upon outlawry in leagues as well as in 
the club ranks and especially must they handle without gloves 
the violators of the rules of discipline in governing their 
players, by ''making the punishment fit the crime" far better 
than the majority of them did in 1907. 

This course of action' has been made a necessity by the 
present critical condition of the money markets of the country ; 
otherwise bankruptcy is likely to be the penalty. The fact is, 
organized Base Ball is threatened by the selfish greed of a 
small minority class who throw sentiment to the winds in 
their blind efforts to make their leagues and associations mere 
money-making machines, at the cost of the high reputation 
the old National League has earned for itself during the past 
thirty-odd years of its existence. 

□ □ □ 

INTER-LEAGUE EXHIBITION GAMES USELESS 

The class of professional exhibition games, which were 
played in 1907 by the clubs of the two major leagues, may be 
truthfully said to have been of but little use as comparative 
trials of skill between the several competitive club teams, 
owing to the faulty arrangements for playing a series of inter- 
city championship games. In the first place the professional 
spring season is not the time for such a class of exhibition 
games ; and secondly, as played in 1907, both in the spring 
and in the fall, the arrangements for playing them were 
lacking, as a rule, in the spirit of that official authority which 
makes - the world's championship series at the close of the 
regular season so valuable in every way and so exceedingly 
popular. 

In no single instance is it advisable to arrange any series 
of exhibition games during the spring season between any two 
club teams of the major leagues. Such games are unwise as 
a mere business policy ; but especially are they objectionable 
from the fact that they open the door to a charge of "hippo- 
droming" tactics, whether such charge be false or true. Then, 
too. the result of victory or defeat on either side practically 
settles no point of superior or inferior strength of the rival 
teams, as the circumstances of their being played during the 



12 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

i experimental month of the regular season prohibits fair judg- 
ment of the comparative strength of the contesting teams. So 
in every way are these spring season games between rival 
major league teams objectionable, and an injury to organized 
Base Ball. _ _ _ 

□ □ □ 

THE ADVANTAGES OF PRESIDENT HERRMANN'S 
"FIELD DAY" TOURNAMENT 

There was no event connected with the season of 1907 which 
was more successful or more advantageous to the game of 
Base Ball than that introduced by Mr. August Herrmann, the 
popular President of the National League club of Cincinnati. 
We refer to the first "Field Day Tournament" known in the 
annals of the game, which was held at Cincinnati on September 
11, 1907, under the auspices of the Cincinnati club and Presi- 
dent Herrmann. In every way was it a creditable success, and 
an event which will henceforth vie in its attractions and the 
honors to be achieved with the now great annual occurrence 
of the post-season world's championship contests of October 
each year. 

The Base Ball "Field Day" was an experiment, but one so suc- 
cessful as to ensure its annual occurrence in the future. More- 
over, it was made evident that the programme of the "Field 
Day" event can be advantageously improved to quite an extent, 
as suggested by that prince of business managers, our veteran 
friend, Mr. Frank Bancroft, whose observations on the working 
of the inaugural "Field Day" presented several new and at- 
tractive features for the "Field Day," to take place next 
. September. 

In Mr. Bancroft's comment on the "Field Day" of last 
September, in a special letter to Sporting Life, he says : 

"Billy Sullivan, catcher for the White Sox. suggested a scheme 
to me which I believe is a good one. He said that in the 
accurate throwing contest the catcher should throw to all three 
bases, having three trials at each, and then take the average, 
having the targets about the size of a man's body, with lines 
to indicate the score, same as is on an arrow target. This 
scheme I myself believe is a much better one than that tried 
■ at Cincinnati." 

In regard to prizes for the competitions, Mr. Bancroft sug- 
gests that three prizes be given in each event, so that the second 
and third men would get something for their efforts. "I would 
suggest that $200 be given for the first prize, $100 for the 
second and $50 for the third. The medals, prizes and all would 
not figure more than $2,500, which could easily be paid out 
of the gate receipts, and what fund was left over could go 
toward defraying expenses for other field day events to be 
held in the future. Another event I would add would be a 
100 yards straightaway dash for base runners in the league. 
This would give the fans a line on the fastest men in the vari- 
ous leagues. Everybody knows that some of the fastest sprint- 
ers in America are ball players. I would permit the men in 
this event to appear in regular running togs and shoes so that 
they would not be handicapped with heavy Base Ball suits." 

Of course these "Field Day" events would be the great field 
attractions of the season of each club in each league of organ- 
ized Base Ball and the final test of excellence in carrying off 
the honors in the great tourney of September to settle the 
•question of winning the palm of the Base Ball honors, as in 
'the case of the World's Championship games. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. J5 

AN OPEN LETTER TO THE MAGNATES OF 
PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL 

In regard to the efforts that were made by the enemies of 
organized professional Base Ball in the early part of the sea- 
son of 1908, we deemed it advisable to make special reference 
to the existing necessity for the National Commission to adopt 
coercive measures against the small minority of the advocates- 
of Outlaw Leagues and Associations, which endeavored, in pur- 
suit of their selfish ends, to invade the territory of the National 
Agreement clubs. We did it in the form of an open letter to 
the magnates of the National Agreement Clubs, which rea^s 0* 
follows : • 

"The organic structure of a governmental power, to be thor- 
oughly effective in its practical operation, necessarily must be, 
in a measure, arbitrary in its action ; especially in a case where 
the basis of the government is to promote and conserve the- 
best interests of the institution it represents. This funda- 
mental rule applies, with strong force, to an organization 
devoted to any special field of sport ; in the matter of con- 
trolling its laws and regulations ; and particularly does it 
apply to organized professional Base 'Ball, as practically exem- 
plified under the government of the National Agreement con- 
trolling the National Association of Professional Leagues, and' 
the two major leagues. 

"The governing power at large in professional Base Ball is 
the controlling force of the National Agreement ; and the laws 
enacted to carry into practical effect the principle of the 
mutual club agreement in question, constitutes the government 
of 'organized Base Ball.' To protect and enforce the laws of 
this agreement, organized Base Ball must oppose all forms of 
disorganization, such as are presented by what is rightly 
termed 'outlaw' Base Ball. In accordance with this funda- 
mental law the National Association and the two existing 
major leagues, now comprising the professional Base Ball gov- 
ernment, the former constituting the majority body, and 
the latter that of the minority, it follows, as a matter of 
necessity, that the legal government must war upon all such 
opposing leagues or associations as repudiate the rules and 
regulations of the existing national agreement of the profes- 
sional Base Ball clubs of regularly organized Base Ball. 

"In fact, the existing state of affairs in professional Base- 
Ball is now similar to that of the United States government 
in carrying out its war upon any outlaw act of rebellion against 
the established government of the country. In other words, 
the National Association and the major leagues are now called' 
upon to war at once and decisively upon all forms of outlaw 
disorganization. "Henry Chadwick, 

"Editor of Spalding's Base Ball Guide." 

□ □ □ 

CHANGING OF PITCHERS DURING A GAME 

In a special article which we wrote for the New York Clipper 
in the decade of the eighties on the "Point of Play in the Game," 
we made pointed allusion to the strategic movement of changing 
pitchers during certain critical periods of a Base Ball contest 
as an important phase of good team management in a match: 
game. 



14 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

It is rather a difficult question to decide sometimes as to the 
right time to remove a pitcher from the box. Every pitcher, 
no matter what his ability, is apt at times to become tem- 
porarily "rattled" in his box work, and this weakening process 
may only be a chance affair that will last only an inning ; in 
which case it would be hardly wise to change him unless a 
skilled strategist is at command to fill his position. Time and 
again pitchers were last season removed from the box when 
only less effective players were at hand to replace them. Then, 
too, others were replaced simply because the manager got mad 
at the pitcher's apparently poor box work. The manager should 
always be sure that the pitcher has really been badly 
''punished" — that is, base hjts are being easily made off his 
pitching — before he removes him. otherwise he will act un- 
justly. If a pitcher gives the field chances for outs which are 
not accepted, he is not "punished." It is only where base hits 
after base hits are made, without chances being given for outs, 
that the pitcher can be said to have his pitching "punished." 

In the matter of changing pitchers, we advocate the rules 
being so changed as tc allow a pitcher to be put in the box 
a second time in the same game, so as to allow him time to 
recover from a temporary "rattling" in the box. This is done 
in cricket by changing bowlers, and should be a rule in our 
national game. 

□ D □ 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PROFES- 
SIONAL BASE BALL LEAGUES 

The facts in regard to the origin of "The National Associa- 
tion of Professional Base Ball Leagues" are rather difficult of 
attainment ; but a brief reference to such information as is con- 
tained in the Official Guide of the Association for 1902, pub- 
lished by the American Sports Publishing Company that year, 
will suffice for the introductory chapter on the subject of the 
rise and progress of the National Association. Clipping from 
the Guide in question, we find that minor league history began 
in 1883, the year that the New York and Philadelphia clubs 
first entered the National League. In that year the National 
League and the American Association entered into an agree- 
ment to settle all disputes between the League and the Asso- 
ciation through the agency of a "Board of Arbitration," con- 
sisting of a committee of three from each organization. This 
agreement was afterward extended so as to include the only 
important minor league then in existence, viz., the Northwestern 
League, the agreement then becoming a tripartite document. 
This mutual agreement was signed by Mr. A. G. Mills, then 
President of the National League, and President H. G. Mc- 
Knight of the American Association, together with Elias 
Mattez, President of the Northwestern League, the then ruling 
power of the Western Base Ball clubs. In that year. 1883, 
the National League had the clubs of Boston, Providence, New 
York and Philadelphia for its Eastern quartette, and the Buf- 
falo, Chicago, Cleveland, and Detroit clubs for its Western 
cities. The American Association's clubs were the Pittsburg. 
Columbus. Louisville, Cincinnati. St. Louis. Brooklyn, Metropol- 
itan and Baltimore clubs, while the Northwestern League had 
the Bay City. Fort Wayne, Grand Rapids, Peoria, Springfield, 
O.. Toledo, Quincy and Saginaw clubs. These three leagues 
dominated the professional Base Ball of that period. It was in 
1884 that the old Union Association sprang into a brief exist- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 15 

ence, replacing in rivalry the Northwestern League, which lost 
club after club, and Anally gave place to the newly organized 
Eastern League in the minor league arena of the period. 

Up to the first year of the decade of the '90s, minor league 
clubs increased in number and importance, professional Base 
Ball at that period being practically controlled by the old and 
wealthy National League. Then came into existence, in 1890, 
a condition of professional Base Ball affairs which- resulted 
in a demoralization of the business, which came near bankriapt- 
ing professional Base Ball itself. One effect of the great irevolt 
or "strike" of the players in 1890, was almost the ruination 
of the minor leagues and in self defence, they began to plan for 
protection. But it took nearly the whole of the decade off 
the nineties, before the majority class of professional leagues 
and associations were strong enough to effectively combine to- 
gether for defence against the wealth and power of the Na- 
tional League, in strengthening their twelve-club teams by 
tempting minor league players to violate their club allegiance 
through the offer of increased salaries. But it would take 
pages to cover the history of the minor leagues through the 
period of their costly experience from the season of 1890 to 
that of the advent of the new century's first decade. Suffice it 
to say that in 1901 a condition of business affairs in profes- 
sional Base Ball government was reached which afforded the 
best magnates of the minor leagues an opportunity to "declare 
their independence," as it were, and to organize a government 
of their own in the form of the organization of the new 
"National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues," 
thereby giving the majority class of leagues self government for 
the first time in the annals of minor league organizations 

□ □ □ 

NOTABLE RECORD OF THE CHICAGO CLUB 

The brilliant success of the old Chicago club of the National 
League in 1907 calls for a special reference record of what 
the club has done in its pennant-race campaigns since its 
inaugural year of professional existence in 1871. And, by the 
way, it was the old champion nine of the Chicago club of 1870 
which followed up the achievements of the old Brooklyn Atlan- 
tics, the latter being the first and only club of the period to 
defeat the late Harry Wright's grand old Cincinnati "Red 
Stockings" : the Chicago club winning the professional cham- 
pionship over the combined trio of victors in the arena of the 
seventies, the Cincinnatis, the Atlanties and the Eckfords, 
which they did in September, 1870. 

It was in 1876 that the Chicago team won the championship 
of the National League, the effective pitching off Mr. A. G. 
Spalding, combined with James White's fine catching, together 
with the good field support given the "battery" team, being the 
cause, aided by Spalding's excellent team management. Ele then 
retired from active service in the field, and devoted his whole 
attention to his athletic goods business-, which he started in 
1876, and which has become the greatest establishment of the 
kind in the world. In 1877 Anson was appointed manager of 
the Chicagos, and from that year to 1897, inclusive, he won 
five pennant races, ended three seasons in second place, and 
did not end a season outside the ranks of the first division 
clubs until 1892, this noteworthy record yet having to be 
equalled. 



16 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Below we give the full record of the Chicago club since it 
entered the first professional National Association in 1871 : 

Fin- No. of 
Year Won Lost Played P.C. ished Clubs Manager 

1871 16 9 25 .640 3 8 Wood 

1872* 10 

1873* 8 

1874 19 30 49 .388 5 8 Wood 

1875 30 37 67 .448 6 13 Ferguson 

1876 42 14 56 .788 1 8 Spalding 

1877 18 30 48 .375 5 6 Anson 

1878 30 30 60 .500 4. 6 Anson 

1879 44 32 76 .579 3 8 Anson 

1880 67 17 84 .798 1 8 Anson 

1881 56 28 84 .667 1 8 Anson 

1882 . 55 29 84 .655 1 8 Anson 

1883 59 39 98 .602 2 8 Anson 

1884 62 50 112 .446 4 8 Anson 

1885 87 25 112 .776 1 8 Anson 

1886 90 34 124 .725 1 8 Anson 

1887 71 50 121 .587 3 8 Anson 

1888 77 58 125 .578 2 8 Anson 

1889 67 55 122 .508 3 8 Anson 

1890 S3 53 136 .610 2 8 Anson 

1891 82 53 135 .607 2 8 Anson 

1892 70 76 146 .479 7 12 Anson 

1893 51 75 126 .445 9 12 Anson 

1894 57 75 132 .432 8 12 Anson 

1895 72 58 130 .554 4 12 Anson 

1896 71 57 128 .555 5 12 Anson 

1897 59 73 132 .447 9 12 Anson 

1898 85 65 140 .567 4 12 Burns 

3899 75 73 148 .507 8 12 Burns 

1900 65 75 140 .474 6 8 Hart 

1901 53 86 139 .381 6 8 Loftus 

1902 68 69 137 .497 5 8 Selee 

1903 82 56 139 .594 3 8 Selee 

1904 : 93 60 153 .608 2 8 Selee 

1905 92 61 153 .601 3 8 Selee 

1906 116 36 147 .765 1 8 Chance 

1907 107 45 152 .704 1 8 Chance 

* The great fire in Chicago stopped the club's record. 

□ □ D 
THE RULE OF OVERRUNNING FIRST BASE 

The old rule of Base Ball of overrunning first base, which 
was first introduced in the code of playing rules of the game 
in the early seventies, in these days of serious accidents from 
sliding to bases, is rapidly coming into light as a rule that can 
be most advantageously extended so as to apply to the three 
other bases outside of first. When the old rule in question 
was adopted, a noted expert in base running advocated in con- 
vention the application of the rule to second, third, and home 
bases, and we heartily seconded his motion at the time. Of 
its value time has since proved its great ability beyond ques- 
tion. In regard to the rule's extension, we were reminded of 
the existing fact of the number of injuries sustained from 
sliding to bases by a remark made last February by Manager 
Mack of the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League, 
who said that "players who were noted for sliding to bases 
last season, had suffered greatly from a number of ugly cuts on 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. || 

their hips and thighs, sustained in sliding to bases, and seT- 
eral places which had to be lanced by the club's surgeon to 
take matter out that gathered from chronic sores." 

Besides these injurious effects of sliding to bases, there is 
the great drawback resulting from the habit of its increasing 
the difficulties of the umpire judging base plays in running: 
bases, the trouble being double in most cases. The umpire can, 
with greater ease, correctly judge the fact of the runner's first 
touching a base in overrunning all four of the bases, as in 
the case of first base as now, than is possible in the case of 
sliding to the base ; while all the injuries from sliding would 
cease. Prettier play in base running would follow. 

One season's trial of the extension of the old rule to all 
the bases would suffice to prove its value. 

□ □ □ 

A SUGGESTION FROM CONSERVATIVE OLD 
ENGLAND 

A correspondent of the New York Times of February 24, 
1908, called attention to the new movement which is advocated 
in England, calculated to afford the working classes in Eng- 
land more time from work hours for outdoor recreation than 
they now have. Briefly, the new scheme is this : At 2 o'clock 
on the four Sunday mornings of April, the clock is to be put 
forward twenty minutes each time. In the autumn a reverse 
process is to be performed. That is all. but the simplicity of 
the operation covers very far-reaching results. 

For example, because the clock is advanced eighty minutes, 
the men who now go to work at 8 o'clock would, from May 
on to the autumn, begin operations at twenty minutes before 
seven, and would find it no hardship, for the day dawns an 
hour earlier. The benefit comes in at the close of the day. 
The eight-hour man, who now stops at 4 :30 P. M., would get 
through his labor at 3 :U> o'clock, and would have every after- 
noon free from then until dark. 

The clerks, who now cease at 5 o'clock, would shut down at 
3 :40 P. M., and those who now work until 6 o'clock would 
get away at 4 :40. And so with everything else. During the 
spring and summer all work would be begun eighty minutes 
earlier, and closed accordingly. 

The writer says : " The inestimable profit ensuing is 
Utopian in its possibilities. Think of the advantage to sport. 
Suppose it were possible for the workingmen of our city (to go 
no further afield) to get out into the fields every day for 
two or three hours of sunshine play. How the Base Ball 
diamonds would, be crowded. How the rivers and hays would 
be filled with craft. How the parks would overflow with fami- 
lies enjoying the cool of the afternoons. 

"But sport is only the least of the advantages. Who can 
estimate the value to the health of a community which would 
spend only the minimum of waking time under artificial light? 
It would take a mathematical genius to calculate the money 
that would be saved in the mere item of lighting, by gas, elec- 
tricity, and oil." 

□ D □ 

TOO MANY PLAYERS CARRIED 

Mr. Frank DeHass Robison of the St. Louis " Cardinals " 
is one of the most conservative of the veteran class of the 



18 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

National League magnates, and he thus comments, in his 
sound, common sense way, on the existing abuse in major 
league club management, of signing players in the spring: 

"Every club in the big leagues carries too many men and 
also takes too many untried players South in the Spring. In 
my opinion sixteen players for each team are enough for any 
club to carry throughout the year and, except in rare in- 
stances, that number should be enough for any club to take 
to the training camp. There is no sense in * taking half a 
dozen or more unknowns down South. The chances are that 
where three or four men are being tried out for one position 
the worst one of the lot will be retained, for it may be that 
he will show up a little better than the others in the spring, 
while the discards will prove his superior later on. I would 
merely take enough men South to fill each position with one 
or two utility players. I would say to them : 'You are sure 
of your places if you deliver the goods. I know you can 
deliver if you keep in shape, so it is up to you to get into 
condition and stay that way. Now get out and hustle !' 

"That's the way we did in the 'good old days.' We never 
loaded up in the spring with a dozen experiments. We knew 
on January 1 how our team would line up for the season. We 
also knew that we could depend on these men all the year. 
The more players you have sitting on the bench the more 
injuries you are going to have among the regulars. If the 
latter know that there are men waiting for a chance to get 
into the game they will take a vacation whenever they can, 

Eroviding they can offer some slight injury as an excuse to 
oodwink their manager." 
President Dovey of the new school of league magnates en- 
dorses the views of the veteran Robison, with the difference 
that he would have the limit set at eighteen players. We hope 
that the National Commission will back up these efforts of 
Messrs. Robison and Dovey to establish a fixed limit of players 
for each club team and thereby do away with the abuse in 
question, 

□ □ a 

THE BASE BALL FAMILY OF THE SPALDINGS 

The theme of this chapter relates to the great good that 
has been accomplished "by Mr. A. G. Spalding in promoting in 
every way the best interests and the general welfare of profes- 
sional organized Base Ball, from the date of his entry in the 
professional arena in 1871 to his ceasing to take active field 
service in the game at the close of 1876, and also up to the 
culminating year of 1907. 

Just here comes in, by way of preface, a paragraph giving in 
brief the pedigree of the Spalding family, so far as Mr. Albert 
Goodwill Spalding's ancestry is concerned. In brief it is as 
follows : 

Mr. Spalding dates his American ancestry from the time 
of the colonization of the country bordering upon Massachusetts 
Bay, the first of the English Spalding emigrants of the family 
being Edward and Edmund Spalding, who arrived in Virginia 
in 1619. Some years later Edward went to the Massachusetts 
Bay colony, his brother, Edmund, settling in Maryland in Lord 
Baltimore's colony, leaving Edward as the English progenitor 
of the New England Spaldings. 

Genealogical history of the family records the fact that the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 19 

first offspring of Edward Spalding and his wife, Margaret, were 
Edward and Grace Spalding. They were born in the decade 
of the forties of 1600, Bra in tree, Mass., being their birthplace. 

The early English home of the Spalding family dates back to 
the possession of the Spalding Manor belonging to the Earl of 
Marcea before the conquest. The Manor comprised two 
churches, with twenty-four mansions and eighty cottages, and 
was known as the Town of Spalding. Edward Spalding of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony of 1625 was "a brave and sturdy 
pioneer," who left behind him a train of descendants, eminent 
in all the prominent walks of American life. 

As a race the Spaldings have always been possessed of great 
physical vigor. Their geographical influence is widespread, there 
being towns named Spalding in Illinois. Michigan, Wisconsin, 
Missouri, Ohio, Nebraska, Alabama and Iowa, and also in Maine. 
In the industrial and commercial world of America the name 
of Spalding holds a high place, as, for instance, Jesse Spalding, 
one of the greatest of our Western lumber merchants ; Col. Z. S. 
Spalding, well known in the sugar industry of Hawaii, and 
the Hon. Nathan W. Spalding, formerly Mayor of San Fran- 
cisco. 

In science and medicine, too, there were Doctors Matthias and 
Lyman Spalding, who attained prominence ; Dr. Abraham Spald- 
ing of the Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D. C. ; also Dr. 
James Spalding, president of the Vermont State Medical So- 
ciety. In fact, the family name is also familiar in the service 
of the church and the state and in colonial and revolutionary 
wars of the past, as in the great Civil War, from the time of 
Bunker Hill to the capture of the old colonial and State 
Capital of Richmond, Va., not forgetting the youthful Spalding 
Brothers of Chicago, the founders of the greatest sporting goods 
house of the civilized world. The noted brothers, Albert and 
Walter Spalding, of the house in question, are striking personal 
examples of the great energy, enterprise and "Yankee push" of 
the Western youths sprung from New England ancestry of 
three centuries ago. 

It would require a small book of a hundred pages or two 
to tell the full story of Mr. Spalding's Base Ball career from 
the time we first knew him in 1867 up to the present year, 
but in this chapter the intention is to glance over our scrap 
books of tbe past forty years and make brief reference to 
the salient points of Albert G. Spalding's notable Base Ball 
life. 

Let me begin the sketch by quoting a letter I received from 
him as far back as February. 1876, as it is, from a Base Ball 
point of view, quite an historical document and illustrates 
the confidence and enthusiasm in which Mr. Spalding entered 
into the National League at its inception. Here is his inter- 
esting letter. It will be seen that it was written on a letter 
sheet of the old Chicago Base Ball Association which sprang 
into existence in 1872 : 

CHICAGO BASE BALL ASSOCIATION. 
(Incorporated in 1872.) 
W. A. Hulbert, President. 
Chas. S. Bartlett, Treasurer. 
A. G. Spalding, Secretary and Manager. 

Chicago, February 27, 1876. 
Friend Chadwick: 

Your letter of a recent date was received about ten days ago, and 
should have been answered before, but a press of private business. 



'20 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

in the way of store hunting, house hunting, furnishing, etc., has kept 
me very busy since I have been here. I got into my house last Wed- 
nesday, and am now beginning to get settled. I am going to open a 
Base Ball emporium here in conjunction with my younger brother, 
J. Walter Spalding, at No. 118 Randolph Street. I have not got 
fairly going yet, but will soon, and then shall want to advertise in 
the "Clipper." 

I have read your comments on the new National League and note 
what you have said in regard to it. As I had a hand "in preparing 
the Constitution and Playing Rules as adopted by the League, I do 
not feel that I am in a position to argue on its merits. I fully 
believe the principles of the League to be right and shall do all I can 
to make it a success, for in my judgment on the success of this 
movement depends the future of reputable professional Base Ball 
playing. Perhaps some of the rules and regulations therein contained 
may be too drastic, and upon application prove unfeasible, but of 
course experience will cause future legislation to change whatever 
crudities may now exist. The fact of the eight leading clubs of the 
country from the cities of Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Boston, 
Hartford, Cincinnati, St. Louis and Louisville, represented by their 
best men, having signed and agreed /to abide by the new League Con- 
stitution is sufficient guarantee to me that the thing is sound and 
bound to succeed. 

McVey, Glenn, Addy, Barnes and myself are now here, and we have 
been improving the fine weather by practicing on our grounds. Anson, 
Peters, Cone and Andrus will be here next week, and all will be on 
hand by March 15. Our first championship game takes place at 
Louisville April 15. 

If I can be of any assistance to you in any way, command me. 

Yours in haste, 

A. G. SPALDING. 

In this connection the opinion held of Mr. Spalding by the 
National League may be judged by its electing him Honorary 
Member. Here is the resolution of the league bearing upon the 
appointment : 

TO A. G. SPALDING. 

The National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs has this day 
unanimously conferred upon you its honorary membership. While the 
compliment is the highest in its gift, and has been tendered but once 
in its previous history, it is inadequate to express the League's ap- 
preciation of your long and honorable service in its councils, contem- 
poraneous with its own existence as an organization. 

Your connection with the great national game of Base Ball, whether 
as player, manager, legislator or counselor, has been clean and open, 
bold and aggressive, candid and upright, conciliatory and reformatory, 
unselfish and cosmopolitan. 

Unaffected by the petty calumnies of envy and mediocrity, you have, 
with unerring judgment, ever advocated high principle rather than 
temporary expediency, observance of law in preference to rich rev- 
enues for its violation, and the League — inheritor of your policy — is 
to-day the acknowledged sponsor and conservator of honest Base Ball. 
Insolvent, as is every admirer of the national pastime, to repay you 
in kind for your many labors and sacrifices in the great cause, the 
National League, as the exponent- of universal sentiment, can at least 
convey to you the best wishes of all for your personal welfare, and 
the hope that its title of honorary membership will be the affectionate 
link that will bind and perpetuate your future co-operation in its 
councils and legislation. 

We quote herewith from Mr. Spalding's own account of the 
beginning of his firm's present world-wide business: 

"Albert G. and J. Walter Spalding commenced business 
March 1. 1876, at Chicago, under the firm name of A. G. Spald- 
ing & Bro., with a limited capital. Two years later their 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 21 

brother-in-law, William T. Brown, came into the business, and 
the firm name was changed to A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

"The business was founded on the athletic reputation of 
Mr. A. G. Spalding, who acquired a national prominence in 
the realm of sport, as captain and pitcher of the Forest Citys 
of Rockford, 111. (1865-70), the original Boston Base Ball 
Club (Champions of the United States, 1871-75). and the 
Chicago Ball Club (1876-7), first Champions of the National 
League. He was also one of the original organizers, and for 
many years a director, of the National League of America, the 
premier Base Ball organization of the world. Mr. Spalding has 
taken an important part in Base Ball affairs ever since it 
became the National Game of the United States at the close 
of the Civil War in 1865." 

In regard to the Base Ball tours in which Mr. Spalding has 
taken an active part, it is an interesting fact that in 1874 
he led the Boston and Athletic clubs through a tour of Great 
Britain, with the idea of introducing Base Ball in England, 
but the attempt was not a success, the reason being that the 
English people had not then become so much Americanized as 
they are now ; and our "Yankee game" was too fast for them. 
It "wasn't English, you know ;" besides which, they did not 
want to encourage any rival to their own national game of 
cricket. Our Base Ball players, however, taught their cricket- 
ers how to field better than they had done, and they did not 
lose a single match of the six at cricket which they played in 
England and Ireland on their tour. 

But the great event of Mr. Spalding's life was the world's 
tour, which he projected in 1888 and carried out to a brilliant 
conclusion in 1889. 

It would take chapters of reminiscent attraction to tell the 
story of the greatest Base Ball event in Mr. Spalding's half 
century of life, but we have intrenched too far on the space 
we have at command in the Guide already. One matter must 
be referred to, however, and that is his address made on the occa- 
sion of the presentation of the Spalding Trophy to the victorious 
Base Ball team of Public School No. 46, of Manhattan, which won 
the championship of the Public Schools Athletic League of New 
York for the season of 1905. Mr. Spalding said : 

"I congratulate the boys of this school, and in fact all the 
boys of Greater New York, in having such a remarkable organi- 
zation as the Public Schools Athletic League to direct your 
athletic sports, arrange your competitions, supply suitable 
grounds and conveniences, all of which would be impossible 
in a crowded city like New York without the assistance of such 
an organization. 

"This Public Schools Athletic League is an original and very 
unique organization, and because of its scope and magnitude, 
may properly be considered as one of the most remarkable 
athletic organizations in the world, for I know of no other 
athletic association that has a hundred thousand boys and 
young men under its jurisdiction. 

"Having been connected with athletic sports in one way 
and another for over forty years, I am naturally very much 
interested in all kinds of athletics, but without disparagement 
to any other sport, I don't mind admitting to you that my 
first and last love is the American national game of Base Ball. 

"This is an athletic age. Americans are becoming famous 
as the most skillful athletes in the world. While we are here 
this afternoon our returning victorious athletes from the recent 



22 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Olympian games at Athens are approaching New York harbor 
with their brows covered with tbe laurel wreaths of victory 
won at the Stadium in the ancient city of Athens in Greece, 
the birthplace of athletic sports. 

"At Washington there sits in the executive chair our first 
athletic president, whose sportsmanlike qualities, energy and 
'square deal' brand of integrity is an inspiration to the boys 
of this country. 

"Because of the athletic spirit that is permeating the boys 
of our nation, future generations will see more honesty and 
less hypocrisy in high places, will hear more of square deal 
and less of graft, for the spirit underlying all athletic sports 
is fair play, honesty and integrity." 

After dwelling to a considerable extent on the early history 
of the game, and especially on the rise and progress of pro- 
fessional Base Ball, Mr. Spalding continued his address as 
follows : 

"Now for the special object of this occasion : About a year 
ago the officials of the Public Schools Athletic League, through 
its worthy secretary, Dr. Gulick, honored me with a request 
to furnish a suitable trophy to be emblematical of the Base 
Ball championship, and to be competed for annually by the 
representative teams of the various public schools of Greater 
New York. This Trophy, while the property of the Public 
Schools Athletic League, is to be held in trust by the team 
winning it until the following year, when it will again be 
open for competition. The Base Ball team from PubliciSchoo! 
No. 46, Manhattan, won the Base Ball championship in 1905 
over 103 competitors, an athletic feat which all the boys in 
this school can feel proud of. 

"Mr. Henry Chadwick, who enjoys the title of 'Father of 
Base Ball,' was to have presented this Trophy to-day, but his 
ill health prevented his appearance, so this pleasant duty has 
fallen to me. 

"It now gives me great pleasure to present this Trophy to 
Public School No. 46, the winners of the Base Ball champion- 
ship for 1905. I will ask your principal, Mr. Boylan, to accept 
this trophy with my congratulations to the winners of 1905, 
and with the hope that it will serve its purpose in assisting 
in the promotion of clean athletic sports in the public schools 
of Greater New York. May the best team always win it." 

□ □ □ 

AN UNPRECEDENTED GAME OF BASE BALL BY 

PUBLIC SCHOOL NINES 

We had the pleasure of witnessing the concluding game of 
the series of contests for the Base Ball championship of the 
Public Schools Athletic League, which took place at the Polo 
grounds, in Manhattan, on June 8, 1907 ; and we have to state 
that it was the most enjoyable game, professional or amateur, 
that we attended during the past season in the metropolitan 
district. In every respect was it an exceptional event, espe- 
cially so as regards the playing of the game itself and the 
model conduct of the players. 

In the first place the Polo grounds had been turned over to 
the boys for the final game in the tournament, in which 106 
different teams had played for premier honors. The various 
schools had played in districts, and the district winners had 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 23 

played for the borough championships. Then the borough 
winners met in interborough contests, until there was none 
left for first position but No. 10 of Brooklyn and No. 24 of 
Manhattan. No. 10 had won the Spalding championship trophy 
last year, but Manhattan had played so finely in the pre- 
liminary games that all schoolboys on the island were confi- 
dent that they would lower the pride of the players from 
across the bridge. 

There was a great clamor for tickets to the game, and 
every train and car that reached the grounds was crowded 
with an eager, chattering mob of little fellows, all keen and 
alert and vociferously proclaiming the merits of their respec- 
tive favorites. Fully ten thousand of them finally filled the 
stands of the big field, while in the upper tier of boxes were 
gathered the parents and guardians of the contesting school 
boys of the two nines on the field, with their sisters and their 
cousins and their aunts ; together with a special representation 
of the adult patrons of the game, who love to see Base Ball 
played in the spirit it should be, and not in the style of the 
"kicking" class of roughs, who comprise the objectionable minor- 
ity of the professional exemplars of the game. 

This eventful contest of the Public School season of the 
year, was arranged with all the seal of officialdom placed upon 
it. and it was Superintendent of Schools Maxwell himself who 
threw out the first white ball with which the youngsters played. 
We necessarily have to be brief in our description of this most 
exceptional game of ball, for it was exceptional in being 
markedly the largest assemblage of spectators ever seen at a 
public school game in Base Ball history in the metropolis. It 
was especially exceptional in the exhibition of the beauties of 
the game given by the contesting nines, and particularly so, 
marked as the contest was, by the manly conduct of the boy 
exemplars throughout the exciting contest, and the model 
method of playing they presented for the professional class to 
copy from. 

The match being played on the home grounds, the Manhattan 
side had the choice of innings, and under the established rule 
they sent the Brooklyn side to the bat. The one, two, three 
order of retirement marked the first three innings on each side, 
and of course the excitement became intense. One-third of the 
game had been played and not a single run scored, so effective 
was the pitching, and so ably was it supported in every posi- 
tion on the field. It was not until the fourth inning that the 
first run was scored and that was by Woods of Brooklyn, after 
a nice single hit and a good steal, but not earned off the 
pitching. In the fifth inning, too, after two men were out, 
the brothers Williams, by two pretty safe taps, got in another 
run. On the part of the Manhattans, however, not a base hit 
was scored off Quigley's effective pitching until the sixth 
inning, when Heller made a safe tap, but he was left, as 
Snyder struck out for the second time. 

Two interesting batting incidents marked the latter part of 
the game. At the beginning of the eighth inning King made 
a safe tap, and McGrath — who had taken O'Hara's place — - 
forwarded him to second base on a pretty bunt, and a sacri- 
fice by Rose cleared first base. 

Then it was that the Manhattanites began to cheer, for 
things did look promising for a rally at the bat. But Heller 
popped up a fly, and then young Anderson came to the bat 
with two out and runners on second and third. "Oh for a 
single hit," was the cry of the Manhattan boys. But unluckily 



24 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Anderson wielded too heavy a bat for his size, and the little 
fellow struck out, and away went the hopes of 24's boys for 
just one run to make a blank score. 

Then came Brooklyn's ninth inning, and Schratweiser led off 
with a safe tap, and as Woods followed with his third safe hit. 
Brooklyn stock took another jump, especially as Dobbin added 
a good hit. But those who followed couldn't bat, and the last 
inning of No. 10 left the totals stilT at 2 to 0. Now came the 
New Yorkers' last chance of a rally, but Quigley's pitching 
was too good for them, and their last and ninth blank was 
scored, and No. 10 had won the coveted Spalding prize. 

D □ □ 
BASE BALL IN THE CANAL ZONE 

The following interesting account of Base Ball on the Isthmus 
was sent to the editor by the ex-President. Dr. John H. Purnell: 

The Isthmian Base Ball League was started in 1905, with 
three teams playing — the Panama Athletic Club, the Governors, 
and the I. C. C. An official organization was not effected until 
the fall of 1906, when a league composed of seven teams was 
formed, with Dr. John H. Purnell as president. The teams 
were as follows : I. C. C, Empire, Ancon. Panama Athletic 
Club. Gorgona, Cristobal, and the Marines. Two of these teams, 
the Marines and the Panama Athletic Club, failed to complete 
the season. The Marines' standing in the league was taken by 
a new club, the Kangaroos. 

In the earlier part of the season, which opened January 1, 
1907, Cristobal and the I. C. C. appeared to be the strongest 
teams. A few weeks of play, however, demonstrated that the 
Cristobals were destined to bring up the rear end of the pro- 
cession. This club lost a number of good players, and owing 
to the lack of a park in which to practice, the team failed to 
get any benefit which might be derived from team play. The 
I. C. C. team maintained the lead by a safe margin until late 
in May, when it struck a decided slump, and Empire forged 
ahead. This team made quite a phenomenal run, winning four- 
teen straight games. As the season neared the close in July, 
it was apparent that the race was to be between Empire and 
the I. C. C. However, both Gorgona and Ancon were playing 
good, hard, consistent ball, and .demonstrated their ability by 
winning the majority of their games towards the close of the 
season. 

When only two games were to be played, it looked as though 
the pennant was going to Empire, but her defeat at the hands 
of Ancon, and the I. C. C.'s winning from Gorgona, tied the 
two leaders for first place, necessitating a post-season series of 
three games. 

Interest was at fever heat at this time on account of the 
closeness of the race and the natural rivalry of the two teams, 
Empire and Culebra. both being situated in the heart of the 
Culebra Cut, only one mile apart. The post-season series re- 
sulted in the I. C. C. team winning two games to Empire's one, 
giving the former the championship. A handsome silver cup 
was presented to the winning team by Maduro-Lupi Company, 
Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros.' representatives on the Isthrmjg 

The season wound up with the clubs standing in the f&T 
lowing order : p q p q 

I. C. C 607 Ancon 500 

Empire 625 Kangaroos 450 

Gorgona 600 Cristobal 250 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 25 

The league was handicapped by the lack of parks, only two 
being available, and by the necessity of playing only on Sun- 
days and holidays, the players in the league all being Isthmian 
Canal employes who are on duty six days in the week. The 
league was composed of only semi-professionals, but a fast 
quality of ball was shown, ranking well with the minor leagues 
in the United States. A seven-club league has been formed for 
the season of 1907-1908, composed of the following teams : 
Ancon, I. C. C, Motive-Power, Empire, Gorgona, Kangaroos 
and Gatun. A faster quality of ball will certainly be played 
than during the season just closed. Quite a number of players 
from Classes A and B leagues in the States have been signed 
with the different teams, and from the present outlook it will 
be an even race. The schedule consists of a series of eighty- 
four games, extending from December 22, 1907, to June 14, 
1908. 

Base Ball on the Isthmus is as yet in its infancy, although 
the noble game was played during the French Canal times, but 
then there was no regular league formed. Now it is firmly 
established, and from year to year the Isthmian Base Ball 
League will doubtless grow stronger as interest increases. 

At a meeting held on November 3, 1907, the Spalding Official 
National League Ball was unanimously adopted, and at the 
same meeting Lieut.-Col. George W. Goethals, Chairman and 
Chief Engineer of the Isthmian Canal Commission, was elected 
president of the Isthmian Base Ball League for the season of 
1907-1908, his election assuring the success of Base Ball on 
the Isthmus. 

□ □ D 

BASE BALL IN THE PHILIPPINES 

The national game is rapidly extending its sphere of active 
operations in our American colonial possessions. Witness its 
growth in the Philippine Islands, where it was first introduced 
at Manila after our war with Spain, during the occupation of 
the Islands by the American army. Mr George W. Moore, 
Superintendent of Education for the island province of Mas- 
bete in Southern Luzon, writing to a friend in the United 
States, says : 

"When I went over to Masbete the game was not known to 
the Filipinos, but after I had explained its possibilities they 
took to it with great enthusiasm. Before long we had many 
students who were able to play as well as the average American 
youth. Soon they began to organize teams in the various 
towns in the provinces, and now we have a regular Base Ball 
season in Masbete. In the capital of the province we have one 
team that was only scored against in one inning in three 
games. 

"As for fans, the Filipinos have the Americans backed off 
the boards. It is nothing for the spectators to swarm upon 
the diamond to express their appreciation of some brilliant 
play. At one game 5,000 persons were on the field congratu- 
lating a player, and it was nearly an hour before the game 
could be again started. Everybody in town turns out for the 
games and there is a spirit of rivalry that reminds one of the 
league games in the United States. 

"An American umpire would have an easy time of it in 
Luzon, for the players never treat the arbiter of the game to 
the criticism and sarcasm that he receives in America. The 
umpire's decisions are always received without kicking, and the 



26 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

official is accorded a respect that would seem impossible to the 
men who decide the games in the United States." 

Mr. Moore has spent the last six years in the islands. He 
is well known in athletics in this country, having been a 
record man and coach at the University of Indiana. 

□ □ □ 

THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT 

The magnates of organized Base Ball should bear in mind 
the fact that the experience of the past in professional club 
history has proved conclusively that there are two systems 
connected with the professional business, without which the 
government of the fraternity would be powerless. They are 
the National Agreement and the Reserve Rule. Both are 
necessary to the very life of the business, but especially is the 
National Agreement, which is the basis of the whole profes- 
sional Base Ball structure. 

Before it was established, a condition of things prevailed 
which, if continued another year, would have given the death 
blow to professional Base Ball ; inasmuch as pool gambling, 
contract-breaking and '•revolving" were existing abuses in the 
arena up to the time jf the enactment of this self-same 
National Agreement. Even with that safety compact at com- 
mand, the placing of the business on the plane of a permanent 
institution will be impossible, until the plan of having but one 
great governing power of the whole fraternity is established. 

It should be plainly understood that the National Agreement. 
carried out to the true intent of its originators, is a compact 
which makes it imperative on the part of the government to 
so legislate under the laws of the Agreement, and in their 
make-up as to insure the thorough identification of the best 
interests of all of the existing leagues. 

□ □ □ 

WHAT PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL OWES TO 

THE NEWSPAPERS 

The influence of the daily press on sports is very great ; 
and it has an important bearing on the question of the con- 
servation of the moral forces in public life. The influence of 
the press, in promoting a healthy growth of manly sports and 
pastimes, has never been more potent or influential than in the 
case of its valuable support of our National game of Base 
Ball. Most assuredly, without the aid and countenance given 
by the press to professional Base Ball, that minority class of 
the fraternity could never have secured the degree of popu- 
larity it at present commands. Nor could it have got rid of 
the evils and abuses which prevailed in its early history with- 
out the assistance of the press. 

□ □ □ 

A MANAGER'S VIEWS ON BASE BALL "FANS" 

Manager Patsy Donovan of the Brooklyn club has the right 
idea of that peculiar individual known as the Base Ball "fan," 
or fanatic, on the subject of the national game. In comment- 
ing on the general character of "Fans," he says : 

"Base Ball fans are just the same strange, peculiar, and 
unreasonable and inconsistent beings that they were twenty 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 27 

years ago. Rules are changed, new plays are adopted, old 
plays are laid aside, umpire baiting is now unknown, but half 
or two-thirds of the 'fans' — just as did the 'fans' twenty years 
ago — cheer at the wrong time, give blame where praise is due, 
and maintain a partisanship that would be admirable were it 
not so blind. 

"Now, nine out of ten people who call themselves 'fans' will 
insist that they like a slugging game. Do they? The only 
slugging the 'fans' like is tbe kind the home club is doing. 
Then take the position of the home 'fans' toward the two 
pitchers. 

"If the home twirler strikes out the last man in the game 
with the bases full, he pitched wonderful ball. «If the visiting 
pitcher strikes out the last home batter with the bases full, 
the batter 'couldn't hit a balloon.' And there's one thing that 
lots of 'fans' never seem able to understand, and that is that 
a ball that goes up in the air — no matter how far it is batted 
out — is not half as hard to catch as one that comes to you 
low. 

"The fans will get up and yell and cheer and howl for an 
outfielder who goes running back to the fence and takes a 
high drive over his shoulder — not a difficult catch at all — but 
ihey seldom give a hand to the same man when he comes 
dashing in and bends down while going at full tilt to take the 
ball at his shoe laces. And yet that is one of the hardest 
plays known to the profession and one of the most risky. But * 
the thing that puzzles a ball player most of all is that he 
should be criticised for an error. He knows he deserves a 
call for shirking a ball or for a stupid play or for failure to 
run out a hit, or anything like that, but think of roasting a 
man when he has honestly tried to make a play and failed." 

□ □ □ 

A PLAN FOR ORGANIZING A PROFESSIONAL 

CLUB 

Looking over one of our old scrapbooks we found a clipping 
from a copy of the New York Sporting 1 Times of the decade of 
the eighties, which was edited by the late O. P. Caylor, and 
published by Mr. James E. Sullivan, the President of the 
American Sports Publishing Company. The article follows : 

THE CINCINNATI PLAN. 

"A gentleman of Toledo writes to the Sporting- Times as 
follows : 

"Will you kindly publish in the Sporting Times the plan on which 
the Cincinnati Association club was originally started, in 1881 I 
believe. The writer read it in the Sporting Times a year or so ago, but 
has forgotten the exact details." 

Editor Caylor, in his printed reply to the query, wrote the 
appended article : 

"The plan was very simple yet extremely successful, and 
was the invention of the present editor of Sporting Times. It 
consisted of 200 guarantee subscribers — every one being a 
citizen of such financial standing that the note could be col- 
lected at law. 

"Each guarantor, in consideration of the issuing to him of a 
transferable season ticket to the grounds, gave to the club his 
promissory note for $25, payable to the order of the president 



28 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

of the club on November 1, of that year, without interest. The 
note, however, provided that it should not be payable if on 
that date the books of the club would show that the club had 
sustained no financial loss from the business of the season, 
and in the event there was a loss, then the note should be 
assessed or made payable, for only that portion which was as 
to the full value as the club's loss was to $5,000. There was 
no loss that year, but a profit of $12,500, and every note was 
surrendered on November 1, without one dollar being paid on 
any of them. Thus the 200 guarantors had free admission 
that season. For the next year the club could have had 1,000 
guarantors without canvassing for them. They had a reserve 
fund, and would not accept similar conditions. Had the club 
lost $5,000 or more, the notes would have been the same as 
$5,000 cash, while each guarantor would have paid about 36 
cents admission to the grand stand for each game. Had tbe 
loss been $2,000, each guarantor would have paid $10, or 
about 15 cents for each game. 

"The club found these guarantors a great benefit, for every 
one of the four hundred was interested in the club's financial 
success and was a committee of one to see that the attendance 
was good on each game. 

"The plan is the best that can be devised to start a Base 
Ball club. It is fair and equitable, and it amounts to just so 
much cash. The officers of the Cincinnati club, all financially 
•responsible men, endorsed these 200 notes, and a broker for a 
very small per cent, discounted them. Before they fell due (a 
few days before) they were taken up by the club and returned 
to the various makers. 

"We should like to see Toledo and other cities try the Cin- 
cinnati plan." 

They evidently did so, and hence the successful Toledo 
American Association club of to-day. 

Let the minor league clubs of the existing period try the 
"old Cincinnati plan" in question this year of 1908.- 

D □ □ 

THE IMPROVEMENT IN PITCHING 

A gratifying fact in connection with the existing condition 
of improved methods of play in Base Ball was the high quality 
of the pitching in 1907. Of course, this latter improvement 
has only been shown by the minority class of pitchers ; but the 
increase of experts in the art of masterly work in the pitcher's 
box, has been a feature in the late campaigns, and especially so 
by the leaders in pitching in the ranks of the two major leagues 
of organized Base Ball. 

In regard to this noteworthy improvement in the pitching it 
has come to be generally recognized that the possession of 
great speed in delivery is not alone sufficient to insui'e suc- 
cess, for without thorough command of the ball in pitching 
mere speed is worse than useless. The intelligent class of 
pitchers, who excel in strategy in the box, were successful not 
only in deceiving the eye of the batsman in judging the speed 
of the delivery, and as to the ball being sent in fast or 
slow, but also in puzzling his judgment in regard to the direc- 
tion the ball is sent to him, as well as to its being sent in 
higher or lower than he wants it. Then, too, there is the 
strong point of a pitcher being prompt to take sudden advantage 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 29 

of the batsmen being temporarily "out of form" for effective 
batting; to which may be added that other point of strategic 
skill in pitching — tempting the batsmen to hit high balls for 
outfield catches. All of these features of strategic pitching 
insure a degree of success in the box unknown to the pitcher 
who relies solely on intimidating speed, technically known as 
"cyclone" pitching, which is wild, swift delivery of the ball 
without command of it. All of the improved methods in 
delivery were pitching features of the best work of the occu- 
pants of the box in 1907 in the big leagues in question. 

Just here we want to state that the essentials for effective 
strategic skill in pitching may be briefly summed up as follows : 

First — The power of fully commanding the ball in delivery, 
so as to insure the ball's being pitched over the plate and 
within the legal range, just as the pitcher's knowledge of the 
strong and weak points of the opposing batsmen may suggest. 
Especially is this command of the ball essential in the working 
of the "curves" of his delivery, for without complete control 
of the ball in using the "curves" they are largely wasted, and 
result in more bases on balls than strike-outs or of chances for 
outs off the bat. 

(And, by the way, it has to be stated that the essential of , 
"command of the ball" in pitching was exhibited by more 
pitchers of the first division teams of the major leagues the 
past season than ever before recorded.) 

Second — The possession of speed in delivery, which is of 
great effect when judiciously used and aided by thorough 
command of the ball, but very costly without the required 
control. 

Third — The use of the various curves known to the expert 
class of pitchers. But these curves, like the element of speed, 
equally need command of the ball to make them effective, 
otherwise they do not trouble any batsmen, save, the stupid 
"slugging" class, whose forte is chance hits for "homers," and 
those who indulge in the regular "fungo" hitting style. 

Fourth — Control of temper, which in a Base Ball pitcher is 
as essential to success as it is to a billiard expert, and in that 
game no quick-tempered player can possibly succeed. 

(The want of control over a hot, quick temper, is never 
more strikingly exhibited than it is when a pitcher angrily 
disputes an umpire's decision on "called balls" and "strikes," 
or when he indulges in fault finding with his infield support. 
Both of these acts of folly are only committed by pitchers who 
lack the brain power to excel in their positions.) 

Fifth — The absolute necessity of avoiding the folly — in fact, 
the downright stupidity — of "kicking" against the umpire's 
decisions. Nothing possible can be gained by it, while a great 
deal is lost. All such decisions are fixtures and cannot be 
reversed, as they are, at the worst, but errors of judgment, and 
no such error on the part of the umpire can legally be disputed. 
Besides which the folly of such "kicking" is shown in the fact 
that disputing decisions of the kind implies either dishonesty 
or misjudgment on the part of the umpire, and naturally forces 
him to deprive the offending pitcher of the benefit of the doubt 
he would otherwise have profited by. 

Sixth — The necessary endurance to stand the pressure of a 
long and fatiguing contest. 

Seventh — The nerve and pluck to discharge the onerous 
duties of the position, under the trying circumstances of either 
poor field support of his pitching, or of. a brilliant rally at the 
bat in the face of his best work in the box. 



30 SFALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

THE WORK OF CLUB PRESIDENTS AND 
DIRECTORS 

Presidents and directors of professional Base Ball clubs 
should be an exceptional class of business men by themselves, 
especially as regards the methods of running their respective 
clubs, just as the professional business in itself is exceptional 
in its system of working and management. In ordinary busi- 
ness affairs the governing rule of action is "business is business, 
you know," and the only consideration, as regards its practical 
working, is to remove from the management every phase of 
mere sentiment and to bring to bear in its control that spirit 
of selfish commercialism which governs every business man 
who enters the great race for the Almighty Dollar, which was 
so characteristic of American business men of half a century 
ago, and which in these present days is the basis of all the 
financial evils which afflict business men in the country at 
large. In other words, a president or director of a professional 
Base Ball club should allow a certain amount of sentiment to 
govern his method of running his club, as the charter members 
of the old National League did during the decades of the 
seventies and eighties. The latter thought more of building up 
the game and of making it deservedly popular than they did of 
the dividends on the investment of their capital. 

A writer on the game recently said, in commenting on senti- 
ment in professional Base Ball : 

"For a professional sport it has everything in this country 
beaten across the board in the quality of sentiment ; and don't 
forget that sentiment will go a. long way to induce a man to 
try to recall his younger years and forget his age." 

While exercising a liberal degree of sentiment in club man- 
agement, presidents of professional clubs should especially avoid 
indulging in that great mistake known as "Official Interference." 
that is. interfering with the important work of regular team 
manager, an act of business folly costly to every club in which 
it is allowed. 

When a club engages the services of a team manager it 
should place in his hands the power not only to discipline the 
players, but also that of selecting them, and also that , of dis- 
missing them when they fail to obey his command or rules. 
If this power is not granted to him, or if his directions are 
ignored, discipline is out of the question, and the manager is 
thereby deprived of the opportunity to fully display his innate 
abilitv to manage his team up to the point of pennant- 
winning success. 

□ D □ 

THE COLLEGE SEASON IN THE EAST 

The question of superiority among the college Base Ball 
teams of the Eastern states for the season of 1907 is one which 
has never been settled to the entire satisfaction of the 'varsity 
nines and their adherents, despite the fact that it has been a 
subject of discussion for some months. Because of the absence 
of any governing body or league in this branch of sport several 
of the leading teams of this section did not meet on the diamond 
and attempts to estimate their respective strength by means of 
comparative scores results in "confusion worse confounded.*' 
The season was remarkable for some high class play by Prince- 
ton, Cornell. Brown, Holy Cross, Lafayette and several other 
college nines, and the caliber of some few of the players suf- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 31 

ficient to bring offers from the major league clubs naming fancy 
figures for the services of the collegians in question. 

While all of the players did not measure up to the standard 
set by the teams in the big leagues, many performed in a 
manner which would warrant their entrance into minor leagues 
had they so desired. In several cases during the early season 
college nines defeated professional combinations of excellent 
caliber. Despite these performances it is an exceedingly hard 
matter to select any one of the leading quartette as the best 
college team in the East for the year. Among close followers 
of the sport it is generally conceded that the honor lay between 
Princeton, Cornell and Brown. Taking the season as a whole, 
regardless of any special series, the Brown team won sixteen 
out of eighteen games, lost one and tied the other, a thirteen- 
inning struggle with Yale. The Providence collegians, however, 
did not meet either Princeton or Cornell. They defeated Am- 
herst twice and Pennsylvania, Harvard and Yale each once in 
their big games and a forfeited contest with Dartmouth is also 
down among the list of victories. 

Cornell was second in percentage, winning twenty out of 
twenty-seven games played. The Ithaca team defeated the 
Naval Academy, Yale, Lafayette. Virginia, Amherst, Fordham 
and a number of other teams ; broke even with the Syracuse 
professionals, Columbia and Harvard in two two-game series, 
and lost to Penn State, North Carolina and two other colleges, 
while on the Southern trip. Princeton, next to Pennsylvania, 
played the longest schedule of the year among the Eastern nines. 
Out of thirty-one contests the Tigers captured twenty-two. 
Yale, Harvard, Pennsylvania and Holy Cross all lost two games 
to the speedy Princetonians. Georgetown and Syracuse Univer- 
sity broke even in a similar series. The team also won single 
games from Columbia, Dartmouth, Newark professionals, Penn 
State and several minor institution teams, while games were 
lost to Fordham, Lafayette, Wesleyan, Virginia and Mercers- 
burg Academy. During the season, however, Princeton did not 
play either Brown or Cornell, so no actual comparison can be 
made with either of those teams. 

Holy Cross, with a record of sixteen victories out of twentv- 
four games played, held a high place in the season's record. 
The Worcester team figured in several long-drawn out contests, 
extra inning games being played with Princeton, Harvard and 
Fordham. One of the largest scores of the year in college 
Base Ball in the East was also made by Holy Cross in a game 
against Tufts, when 25 runs were scored against 3 by their 
opponents. Fordham broke even in a two-game series with the 
team, while Dartmouth, Columbia, Williams, Yale, Syracuse, 
Georgetown and other teams were defeated. Harvard and 
Princeton each won two games from the Worcester nine, while 
Seton Hall, Villa Nova and Vermont all won one game each. 

Lafayette also performed well on the diamond, winning 
nineteen games, losing eight and tieing two out of a twenty- 
nine-game schedule. Dartmouth, Pennsylvania, Columbia, Car- 
lisle Indians, the Naval Academy, Wesleyan and Princeton all 
lost to Lafayette. Against this record there were defeats bv 
Yale, Virginia, Cornell, Brown and Penn State. In a four-game 
series with Lehigh each team won two contests and the Mili- 
tary Academy and North Carolina both tied in games with 
Lafayette. 

The Naval Academy team won sixteen out of twenty-five 
games. The Armys Dartmouth, Lafayette, Yale and Cornell 
each won single contests and Harvard took two out of tbree 



32 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDIDE. 

games. Syracuse, Pennsylvania, Georgia and Dickinson figured 
among the teams defeated by the Middies. 

The victory of Harvard in a three-game series with Yale 
completed a fairly successful season for the Crimson, in which 
thirteen out of twenty-two games were won. Princeton, Cornell, 
Brown, Bowdoin and Dartmouth administered defeats, while 
Holy Cross, Amherst, Army and Maine were among the van- 
quished. Williams and Amherst broke better than even on the 
season's play, as did Yale and Pennsylvania. The Quakers had 
the longest schedule of the spring, playing thirty-three games, 
seventeen of which were won and sixteen lost. Yale captured 
fifteen out of twenty-eight games and tied in another. The 
Elis' victories included games from Amherst, Navy. Syracuse, 
Dartmouth, Lafayette and Columbia. Pennsylvania captured 
contests from Georgetown, Trinity, Army, Yale, Carlisle Indians 
and others. The West Pointers and Columbia both fell below 
the .500 per cent mark. The Military Academy team played 
fifteen games, winning seven, losing seven and tieing one. 
Columbia won five out of twenty-one games, lost fifteen and 
tied one. 

The following records show the games played, with the 
results and percentage, among the leading teams of the East : 

College. Games. Won. Lost. Tied. P.C. 

Brown 18 16 1 1 .888 

Cornell 27 20 7 .740 

Princeton 31 22 9 .709 

Holy Cross 24 16 8 .666 

Lafayette 29 19 8 2 .655 

Navy ...25 16 7 2 .640 

Williams 20 12 7 1 .600 

Harvard 22 13 9 .590 

Amherst 19 11 8 .579 

Yale 28 15 12 1 .535 

Penn 33 17 16 .513 

Army 15 7 7 1 .466 

Columbia 21 5 15 1 .238 

□ □ □ 

COLLEGE BASE BALL IN THE WEST 

Although the colleges of the Middle West turned out their 
usual crop of good ball players last spting, the season was 
somewhat of a disappointment on account of the inability to 
determine the champion team. Michigan was out of the "Big 
Nine" circle and for that reason there was no satisfactory way 
for any club to win general recognition as the "Champions of 
the West." a ] ai 

The Ann Arbor aggregation undoubtedly was a strong, well- 
balanced team, as its 0-to-0 tie in thirteen innings with 
Williams College gave evidence, and its participation with 
Illinois. Chicago and the other western teams would have 
added a great amount of interest to the campaign. 

Despite the absence of the Wolverines, there were many 
encouraging signs of healthy activity in quarters where 
College Base Ball had laid dormant for a season or two. Wis- 
consin came to the front with a capable team, which, while 
being far from championship caliber, made a good record : Drake 
University revived the sport and Minnesota made the best 
record it ever held in Base Ball. The Gophers won a decisive 
series from the University of Chicago and also surprised the 
strong Notre Dame team. 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 33 

Chicago had the biggest schedule and the Maroon nine was 
in the thick of the fight from March 16, when it opened the 
season by defeating a team of professionals, 3 to 2, until 
Director Stagg suddenly disbanded the team May 31 after a 
most unusual occurren^. In a game with Minnesota on that 
date, Coach Dickinson used ten men, vainly trying to stall 
off defeat. Mefford, a good fielder, played part of the game 
in the middle field, but when his turn to bat came Stehling. 
was sent to hit for him. The unworthy trick shocked the 
faculty and Professor Stagg, who was present at only an 
inning or two of the game. 

Dickinson was dismissed with a severe reprimand by the 
faculty and the team not allowed to finish its season. For a 
time it seemed that the players, who had worked hard to make 
the team, would not be awarded their "C's", but the faculty 
relented, realizing that the players should not be made to 
suffer on account of the disgraceful mistake of a coach. 

The high standard always set by Illinois in Base Ball was 
again lived up to. Although the Illini lost the invaluable 
services of George Huff in mid season, when Huff went to 
Boston to take the management of the American League team 
of that city, they held together well and pulled out without 
losing a series. In fa<*t, Illinois would be called the champions 
if a choice had to be made. The best trick turned by the 
State University team was to take four straight from Chicago 
and defeat the Williams College team — rated quite high in the 
East — an a stirring 3 to 2 contest. Notre Dame took the 
measure of Illinois early in the season, but later the Illini 
proved their superiority over Notre Dame in a hot 1 to 
affair. 

Notre Dame was satisfied with its glory in winning the 
undisputed championship of Indiana. Always a host on the 
diamond, the Notre Dame players were lords in their own 
State and often invaded other territory with success, as note 
their 5 to 4 victory over the University of Michigan at Ann 
Arbor. But Minnesota proved able to hold her own with the 
crafty Notre Dame team. 

Northwestern was most erratic. Coach Cunningham, the old 
league pitcher, had the purple team going fairly well in the 
early season, when a victory over Wisconsin was scored, but the 
nine went to pieces later. 

Hugh Nicol's Purdue team gave a good account of itself 
and of particular interest were the games in the Missouri 
valley, with Washington University and Missouri as the con- 
quering teams. 

Beloit had a fairly good team and derived much satisfaction 
in defeating its old enemy, Knox. But Knox had a successful 
season at that, winning from Missouri and Nebraska. 




Mr. A. G. Mills 
Mr. N. E. Young 



Sen. Morgan G. Bulkeley 

Mr. A. G. Spalding 
Mr. A. J. Reach 

Mr. Geo. Wright 

MEMBERS OF THE SPECIAL BASE BALL COMMISSION. AND 

MR. A. G. SPALDING. WHOSE CONTENTION AS TO 

THE ORIGIN OF BASE BALL WAS UPHELD 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 35 

The Origin of Base Ball 

By James E. Sullivan, 
Secretary Special Base Ball Commission. 

In the Guide of 1905 there appeared an article from Mr. 
A. G. Spalding, taking issue with Mr. Henry Chadwick, as to 
the origin of Base Ball. 

Mr. Chadwick has contended for many years that the present 
American game of Base Ball derived its origin from, and was a 
direct descendant of the old English schoolboy game of "Round- 
ers," "while Mr. Spalding contends that Base Ball is distinc- 
tively American, in origin as well as development, and has no 
connection whatever with "Rounders" or any other foreign 
game. 

As these well-known Base Ball authorities could not reach 
an agreement between themselves on this question, it was good- 
naturedly decided by the contending forces to refer the whole 
matter to a Special Base Ball Commission for full consideration 
and decision. The following gentlemen, well-known men in the 
Base Ball world, accepted positions on this Commission, viz. : 
Mr. A. G. Mills of New York, an enthusiastic ball player 
before and during the Civil War, and the third president 
of the National League. 
Hon. Arthur P. Gorman (since deceased), ex-United States 

Senator from Maryland. 
Hon. Morgan G. Bjlkeley, ex-Governor, and now United 
States Senator from Connecticut, and the first president 
of the National League. 
Mr. N. E. Young of Washington, D. C, a veteran ball player, 
and the first Secretary and afterward the fourth Presi- 
dent of the National League. 
Mr. Alfred J. Reach of Philadelphia, and 
Mr. George Wright, of Boston, both well-known business men 
and two of the most famous ball players in their day. 
Mr. James E. Sullivan of New York, president of the 
Amateur Athletic Union, accepted the position of Secre- 
tary of this Special Commission. 
This controversy as to the origin of Base Ball, and the ap- 
pointment of a commission of such high standing, aroused con- 
siderable public 'interest, especially among the old-timers of the 
game. The Secretary was deluged with communications from 
different parts of the country, all having a more or less bearing 
on this question. For the past three years the Secretary has 
conducted an extensive correspondence in collecting data and 
following up various clues, suggested by this correspondence, 
that would aid the Commission in arriving at a decision as to 
the origin of the game. Having collected all the data and 
evidence it was possible to obtain, the Secretary compiled the 
whole matter together, and at the close of 1907 laid it all 
before the Special Base Ball Commission for its consideration 
and decision. The members of the Commission have spent 



36 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

several months in going over the mass of evidence collected, 
which has finally resulted in a unanimous decision by the 
Commission that Base Ball is of American origin, and has no 
traceable connection whatever with "Rounders," or any other 
-foreign game. 

The Secretary has recently received notice of this final 
decision, just in time to promulgate it for the first time in this 
issue of the Guide. Space in the Guide will nut permit the 
publication of all the data and evidence that was collected and 
submitted to the Commission, but it is the intention of the 
publishers of Spalding's Athletic Library to add to that series 
a special book on the "Origin of Base Ball," which will contain 
the whole matter in detail. In this issue of the Guide, in addi- 
tion to the full decision of the Commission, there will appear 
the letters, or "briefs," that were addressed to the Commission 
by Mr. Henry Chadwick in support of his contention, and also 
by Mr. A. G. Spalding and Mr. John M. Ward, who fought on 
the American side of this "Origin" controversy. 

The thanks of the Base Ball public are due the members of 
the Special Commission for the time and thought they have 
given to this subject, and their decision should forever set at 
rest the question as to the Origin of Base Ball. 

MR. HENRY CHADWICK'S ARGUMENTS IN SUP- 
PORT OF HIS "ROUNDER " THEORY 

Brooklyn, N. Y., August 1, 1907. 
To Messrs. A. G. Mills, Morgan G. Bulkeley, N. E. Young, 

Alfred J. Reach and George Wright. 
Gentlemen : 

In relation to the existing controversy between Mr. A. G. 
Spalding and myself as to the origin of the established Ameri- 
can game of Base Ball, I shall be "brief and to the point" in 
my discussion of the question at issue between us ; and, in pre- 
senting my argument, I shall not occupy even an hour of your 
valuable time, inasmuch as the facts I present for your im- 
partial consideration are simply incontrovertible. 

In the first, the basic principle involved in the point at 
issue is the use of a ball, a bat, and of bases, in the playing 
of a game of ball ; and, secondly, the date of the period when 
this self-same basic principle was first carried into practical 
effect on the field of play. 

Now I claim, on behalf of my English clients, that the estab- 
lished American national game of Base Ball had for its origin 
the old English school-boy game of "Rounders," and that this 
latter game existed in England as far back as two centuries 
ago ; and, in fact, it is a question at issue in England as to 
whether "Rounders" did not antedate the time-honored game of 
Cricket itself. Suffice it to say, however, that the fact that 
"Rounders' was played by two opposing sides of contestants, on 
a special field of play, in which a ball was pitched or tossed to 
an opposing batsman, who endeavored to strike the ball out into 
the field, far enough to admit of his safely running the round 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 37 

of the bases, so as to enable him to score a run, to count in the 
game — the side scoring the most runs winning the game — 
fully identifies the similarity of the two games. This, in fact, 
was the basic principle of the old English game of "Roundel's," 
and it is, to this day, the basic principle of the American na- 
tional game of Base Ball. N 

As to the various methods of playing the two games, and the 
difference in their respective details of play, that matter in no 
way affects the question of the origin of the American game of 
Base Ball. 

In regard to the point, made by the opposing counsel, In 
which he refers to the game of ball played in "Colonial" days, 
I claim that the Canadian national game of "Lacrosse," a game 
played by the aborigines of North America, and the old English 
game of Cricket, played in New York as far back as 1751, 
were the only games of ball known to our Colonial ancestry 
in the old revolutionary period he refers to. So his argument 
in that regard falls to the ground "as dead as a door nail," as 
the saying is. 

On this statement of incontrovertible facts I present my 
clients' case to your final judgment, feeling confident that your 
decision will be in my favor. 

Very respectfully yours, 

Henry Chadwick, 

Counsel for the Defence. 

MR. A. G. SPALDING CONTENDS THAT BASE 
BALL IS OF AMERICAN ORIGIN 

Point Loma, Cal., July 28, 1907. 
to the srecial base ball commission. 
Gentlemen : 

I claim that the game of Base Ball is entirely of American 
origin, and has no relation to or connection with any game of 
any other country, except in so far as all games of ball have a 
certain similarity and family relationship. 

While it is to be regretted that the beginning of Base Ball 
is more or less shrouded in mystery, I believe ample evidence 
has been collected that will convince the most skeptical that 
Base Ball is entirely of American origin, and had its birth and 
evolution in the United States. The game is so thoroughly in 
accord with our national characteristics and temperament that 
this fact in itself tends to confirm my opinion that it is of 
purely American origin, and no other game or country has any 
right to claim its parentage. 

During my Base Ball trip around the world in 1888-89, in 
company with the Chicago and Ail-American Teams, we were 
frequently reminded of the resemblance between Base Ball and 
some local game in nearly every country we visited. Invariably, 
upon investigation, we failed to see the resemblance, and our 
request for a printed book of rules of such alleged games 
•brought forth the stereotyped reply that there were no such 
printed r'"\es. 



38 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Whenever a Base Ball exhibition was given before an English 
audience, whether in New Zealand, Australia, Ceylon, Egypt 
or England, it was not infrequent to hear an expression some- 
thing like this : "Why, this American game of Base Ball is 
nothing more than our old English game of 'Rounders' that we 
used to play with the girls when we were boys, you know !" 
Some of our American Base Ball party were inclined to resent 
these sneering comments, so when we arrived in England, filled 
with a desire to witness a game of Rounders, we boldly issued 
a public challenge to play a game of Rounders with any "Round- 
ers" club in England, they, in return, to play us a game of 
Base Ball. This ' challenge brought an acceptance from the 
Champion Rounders Club of England, and the game took place 
at Liverpool early in 1889. Books of the playing rules of both 
games, as then played, were exchanged between the English and 
American teams, but a careful study of these books of rules 
revealed very little similarity between the two games. In fact, 
about the only point of similarity seemed to be in the smaller 
size of the "Rounders" playing field, which was square in 
shape, the four corners of which were about 50 or 60 feet apart, 
marked by four small sticks about 3 feet high, with a tiny flag 
on the top ; whereas the Base Ball field is diamond-shaped 
with flat bases at each corner and 90 feet apart. 

Eleven men compose a "Rounders" team, and two innings 
constitute a game, it being necessary to put out the eleven bat- 
ting side to complete an innings ; all of which indicates that 
either Rounders was an offshoot from Cricket, or possibly 
Cricket had its origin in Rounders, which is very much more 
plausible, and certainly more likely, than that Base Ball orig- 
inated from Rounders. The miniature one-handed bat used in 
Rounders is of the same general flat shape as a cricket bat, 
but much smaller — another indication of the relationship be- 
tween Cricket and Rounders. The Rounders ball is a small and 
a rather soft affair, about the size of a golf ball, whereas the 
Base Ball and Cricket ball are about the same size and weight, 
though differently constructed. Another similarity between 
Cricket and Rounders is the peculiar manner of scoring runs 
in the latter game, which provides that a run be counted as 
the runner (or, as we would call it in Base Ball, the base 
runner) touches each post ; thus a complete circuit around the 
four posts would count as four runs. 

In thus comparing Cricket with Rounders, it must not be 
understood that I am claiming that Cricket originated from 
Rounders, but simply to bring out and emphasize the fact that 
Cricket resembles Rounders more than Base Ball does, but 
any comparison with Rounders only tends to belittle both 
games. 

For your information I might add that the one innings 
Liverpool Rounders match between our American Base Ball 
team and England's Champion Rounders Club resulted in favor 
of the Englishmen by a score of 11 to 8. In the subsequent 
Base Ball match the English Rounders players failed to hit a 
ball or make a run in their first innings while the American 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 39 

Base Ball players made 35 runs with no one out and their first 
innings was never finished. 

I am aware that quite a general impression exists in the 
public mind that Base Ball had its origin in the English 
schoolboy game of Rounders, which has been occasioned largely, 
if not entirely, by the very able Base Ball writings of my 
esteemed and venerable friend, Mr. Henry Chadwick, who for 
the past forty years has continued to make the assertion that 
Base Ball had its origin in "Rounders," without as yet pro- 
ducing any satisfactory evidence to sustain his theory. Mr. 
Chadwick has done so much for Base Ball, especially in its 
early struggling days, that I regret the necessity of disagreeing 
with him on any Base Ball subject, but my American birth 
and love of the game would not permit me to let his absurd 
"Rounders" • theory pass unchallenged. If Mr. Chadwick had 
been born in this country, and not in England, he might be as 
totally ignorant of Rounders as the rest of us, but it so hap- 
pened that before he came to this country, when he was about 
ten years of age, he had seen or possibly played in a game 
of Rounders, but I do not recall that he claims to have ever 
seen or played a game of Rounders since his arrival in America, 
nor have I ever seen or heard of his producing any convincing 
proof in support of his contention. 

The oft-repeated assertion that Base Ball did derive its origin 
from the English schoolboy game of Rounders may possibly 
convince some that it is a fact, but I won't be convinced of it 
until more satisfactory evidence has been produced, and your 
Honorable Commission has rendered a decision to that effect. 

A careful search has failed to find a copy of any printed 
"Rounders" rules published previous to 1845, when the Knicker- 
bocker Base Ball Rules first made their appearance. Any mod- 
ern rules of Rounders should not be accepted as evidence, for 
it is well known that friends of that game have in recent 
years appropriated bodily many of the Base Ball rules, and, 
in fact, a noticeable effort has been made to make Rounders as 
much like Base Ball as possible in everything except in name. 
There is no doubt but that the present-day game of "Rounders" 
has derived much of its modern origin from Base Ball, and I 
am as equally positive that our Base Ball of 1845 derived 
none of its origin from the ancient game of Rounders. What- 
ever similarity may be found between ancient Rounders and 
early Base Ball does not in itself constitute evidence that the 
latter game derived its origin from the former, and therefore 
should be treated simply as a coincidence and not as an estab- 
lished fact. The fact that not even one scrap of evidence 
has been produced showing that the game of Rounders was 
ever played in the United States, or that it was even known by 
name, clearly substantiates my position in declaring that Base 
Ball was not derived from Rounders, but is of American origin. 

While the evidence that has been collected and that will be 
submitted to the Commission is not as complete and definite 
as I should like to have it, yet under the circumstances and 
at this late date it is the best and only evidence obtainable, 



40 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

but I believe it is amply sufficient to warrant tbe Commission 
in deciding that Base Ball is of American origin and in no way 
connected with Rounders or any game of any other country. 
The tea episode in Boston Harbor, and our later fracas with 
England in 1812, had not been sufficiently forgotten in 1840 
for anyone to be deluded into the idea that our national preju- 
dices would permit us to look with favor, much less adopt any 
sport or game of an English flavor. 

Having, in my opinion, by the evidence submitted to your 
Honorable Commission, established the fact that Base Ball was 
■of purely American origin, it now becomes necessary, if possible, 
to determine just how it did come about. 

My rather exhaustive research and study of the subject leads 
me to the conclusion that Base Ball derived its origin from the 
old colonial game of "One Old Cat," which was played by three 
boys — a thrower, a catcher and a batsman — the batsman after 
striking the ball running to a goal about thirty feet distant, and 
by returning to his batting position counted one tally. "Two 
Old Cat" was played by four boys — two batsmen and two 
throwers — each alternating as catchers, and a "tally" was made 
by the batsman hitting the ball and exchanging places with 
the batsman at the opposite goal. "Three Old Cat" was played 
by six boys — three batsmen and three throwers — each alternat- 
ing as catchers, and "tallies" were made same as in "Two Old 
Cat." "Four Old Cat" was played by eight boys— four bats- 
men and four throwers — each alternating as catchers, and 
^'tallies" were scored same as in "Two Old Cat." "Four Old 
Cat" was played on a square-shaped field, each side of which 
was about 40 feet long. All the batsmen were forced to run to 
the next corner of this square, or "goals," as they were called, 
whenever any one of the batsmen struck the ball, but if the ball 
was caught on the fly or first bound, or any one of the four 
batsmen was hit by a thrown ball between goals, that runner 
was out, and his place was taken by the fielding flayer who 
put him out. These "Old Cat" games correspond to the present 
day so-called "Scrub Games" of Base Ball, and were changed 
from one, two, three and four "Old Cat" to take in additional 
boys as they arrived on the field. 

At some time in the remote past, to accommodate a greater 
number of players, and to change the individual players of the 
"Old Cat" games into competing teams, probably some ingenious 
American boy figured it out that by placing one thrower in the 
center of the "Four Old Cat" square field and having one 
catcher, with the players divided into sides, this desired 
result would be accomplished. This style of game produced 
what has become generally known as "Town Ball," which was 
played in this country for many years before Base Ball ap- 
peared, and in fact was played up to and for several years 
after Base Ball was established by the Knickerbocker Club in 
1845. "Town Ball" derived its name from the fact that it was 
generally played at "Town Meetings." Mr. H. H. Waldo, of 
Rockford, 111., one of the pioneers of the West and one of the 
early promoters of Base Ball, said : "I came West in 1846, and 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 41 

found 'Town Ball' a popular game at all town meetings, and I 
have no doubt it acquired its name from this fact. The number 
of players on a side was unlimited, and it was the custom of 
the losing side to buy the gingerbread and cider. I have always; 
regarded the game of Base Ball as now played as a modification 
of 'Town Ball.' I never heard of Rounders. We had too much 
national pride in those days to adopt anything that was English 
in our sporting life." 

"Town Ball" differed somewhat in different localities as to 
the method of playing the game, but the playing field was in- 
variably laid out in the shape of a square (not a diamond, as. 
is the Base Ball field), with the four corners or goals about 
60 feet apart. The goals were numbered first, second, third and 
fourth goals. The batsman's position was located half-way 
between first and fourth goal, distant 30 feet from each goal. 
The catcher was stationed back of the batsman and outside 
the square, and the thrower was placed in the center of the 
square field. A circuit of the four goals counted one "tally" 
or run. A batsman could select any thrown ball to strike at, 
but if he missed the ball and the catcher caught it he was out. 
If a batted ball was caught on the fly or first bound the bats- 
man was out. If hit by a thrown ball while running between 
goals the runner was out. Three out, all out ; when the fielding 
side took their innings at the bat. Foul balls being unknown, 
the more skilled batsman would deflect the ball back of him, 
which was considered one of the scientific features of "Towr 
Ball." 

In the absence of any printed rules it was necessary befori 
the game commenced to decide upon the number of "tallies' 1 
that would constitute a game, and the side that made that 
number of tallies first won the game. The designated number 
of such tallies varied from 21 to 100. The score was kept 
by making a notch on each side of a flat stick. In the absence 
of any printed placing rules governing "Town Ball" it was 
natural that the game would vary considerably in different 
localities, but the most usual mode of playing the game was a*s 
outlined above. The same game with different names existed 
in different parts of the country. In certain parts of New 
England it was known by the name of "Round Ball," but I 
have been unable to And any evidence where it was ever called 
"Rounders." In Massachusetts in the early fifties this "Town 
Ball" game was changed in name to "Base Ball," and in those 
early days it was referred to as the "Massachusetts game of 
Base Ball," in contradistinction to the "New York game of 
Base Ball," the latter being the present game of Base Ball, 
while the so-called Massachusetts game of Base Ball was simply 
the game of "Town Ball" or "Round Ball," with some slight 
modifications. In the early sixties the so-called game of Massa- 
chusetts Base Ball, like Town Ball, died a natural death, and 
the so-called New York game, or present game of Base Ball,, 
has become thoroughly nationalized, and at present is the only 
game of "Base Ball" now played anywhere in the world. 

I would call the special attention of the Commission to the' 



42 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

letters received from Mr. Abner Graves, at present a mining 
engineer of Denver, Colo., who claims that the present game of 
Base Ball was designed and named by Abner Doubleday, of 
Cooperstown, N. Y., during the Harrison Presidential campaign 
of 1839, which antedates the organization of the old Knicker- 
bocker Base Ball Club of New York City by six years, when 
the first printed rules were promulgated. It also antedates by 
three years the first authentic account of games of Base Ball 
being played in a desultory sort of way by the young business 
men of New York City in 1842. While it has generally been 
conceded that New York City was the birthplace of Base Ball 
In 1842, this account of Mr. Graves tends to locate its birth at 
Cooperstown, N. Y., in 1839, and General Abner Doubleday its 
designer and christener. 

In this connection it is of interest to know that this Abner 
Doubleday was a graduate of West Point in 1842, and after- 
ward became famous in the Civil War as the man who sighted 
the first gun fired from Fort Sumter, April 12, 1861, which 
opened the War of the Rebellion between the North and South. 
He afterward became a Major General in the United States 
Army and retired from service in 1873, and died January 26, 
1893. 

Mr. Abner Graves was a boy playmate and fellow pupil of 
Abner Doubleday at Green's Select School in Cooperstown, 
N. Y., in 1839. Mr. Graves, who is still living, says that he 
was present when Doubleday first outlined with a stick in the 
dirt the present diamond-shaped Base Ball field, indicating the 
location of the players in the field, and afterward saw him 
make a diagram of the field on paper, with a crude pencil 
memorandum of the rules for his new game, which he named 
"Base Ball." As Mr. Graves was one of the youths that took 
part in this new game under Doubleday's direction his interest- 
ing and positive account of this incident is certainly entitled 
to serious consideration. 

Personally, I confess that I am very much impressed with 
thfc straightforward, positive and apparently accurate manner 
in which Mr. Graves writes his narrative, and the circum- 
stantial evidence with which he surrounds it, and I am very 
strongly inclined to the belief that Cooperstown, N. Y., is the 
birthplace of the present American game of Base Ball, and that 
Major General Abner Doubleday was the originator of the 
game. It certainly appeals to an American's pride to have had 
the great national game of Base Ball created and named by a 
Major General in the United States Army, and to have that 
same game played as a camp diversion by the soldiers of the 
■Civil War, who, at the conclusion of the war, disseminated 
Base Ball throughout the length and breadth of the United 
States, and thus gave to the game its national character. The 
United States Army has certainly played a very important 
part in the early development of Base Ball, and in recent years 
the United States Navy has become the emissary that is plant- 
ing the seeds of the game in every foreign land, which must 
result in making the American national game of Base Ball the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASK BALL GUIDE. 43 

universal field sport of the world. The intrinsic merits of the 
game itself can be depended upon to overcome all prejudice and 
opposition that may show itself. 

Enclosed herewith you will find a very interesting letter bear- 
ing on this -subject from Mr. John M. Ward, a celebrated player 
in his time, and now a prominent lawyer in New York City. 
Mr. Ward has made an extended research and study into the 
origin of the game, and has come to the same conclusion that 
I have, viz., that Base Ball is of American origin and has no 
possible connection with the English game of "Rounders" or 
any other foreign game. 

You will also find attached hereto (see page 282) a copy of the 
original Base Ball Playing Rules, formulated and published by 
the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club, September 23, 1845. In 
connection with these original Base Ball rules you will find a 
comparison I have drawn between these original Knickerbocker 
rules and the present playing rules of the game of 1907, which 
show practically no change in the underlying principles of 
the rules of the game from its inception to the present time. 

A careful comparison and analysis of the original Knicker- 
bocker Base Ball rules of 1845 with the rules or description 
of the so-called English game of "Rounders" will show the 
total dissimilarity of the two games, and should convince the 
most skeptical that there is absolutely no resemblance between 
the two games, and consequently it is impossible that one of 
these games should trace its' origin to the other. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. G. Spalding. 

MR. JOHN M. WARD'S OPINION AS TO THE 
ORIGIN OF BASE BALL 

Law Offices of John M. Ward, 
277 Broadway. 

New York, June 19, 1907. 
A. G. Spalding, Point Loma, Cal. 
My Dear Albert : 

I have carefully read over the letters and manuscripts you 
sent me bearing upon the question of the origin of Base Ball, 
and I am very much in sympathy with your effort to obtain 
some exact information upon that question. I fear, however, 
that your efforts must, in the nature of the case, meet with 
failure, though your investigations may result in throwing 
some side lights upon the inquiry- 

The game of Base Ball had its origin in this country so 
.many vears ago that the living witnesses have long since 
passed off the green sward and the circumstances surrounding 
its inception were undoubtedly such that no written records or 
memoranda of any kind were ever made. Base Ball was orig- 
inally a boy's game. We know this much, at least, from the 
testimony of the men who first took it up and formulated its 
rules for the purpose of making it a manly pastime. When, 



44 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

• 
in about the year 1842, or earlier, Dr. D. L. Adams, Alexander 
J. Cartwright, Colonel James Lee, Duncan F. Curry, E. R. 
Dupignac, William F. Ladd and other prominent business and 
professional men of New York City, seeking some medium for 
outdoor exercise, turned to the boy's game of Base Ball, there 
was not a code of rules nor any written records of the game, 
and their only guide to the method of playing was their own 
recollection of the game as they themselves, when boys, had 
played it and the rules of the game then in existence, which 
had come down, like folklore, from generation to generation of 
boys. Indeed it was not until several years later, upon the 
organization of the Knickerbocker Ball Club in 1845, that the 
rules of the game were first put in writing. Some years later,' 
twenty to be exact, I had occasion to look this matter up and 
■was fortunately able to talk personally with several of the 
original members of the Knickerbocker club, then still living. 
Mr. William F. Ladd was at that time a jeweler in Wall Street, 
a fine, handsome old gentleman, eighty-four years of age, with 
an" intellect as clear as a jewel. He told me many interesting 
incidents about those early days of the game. One of these 
-was that Col. James Lee, who was, at the time of the organiza- 
tion of the Knickerbocker Ball Club, about sixty years of age, 
was one of the moving spirits in the organization of that club. 
That Col. Lee had told him that he, Col. Lee, had played Base 
Ball as a boy ; that it was upon the recollection of Col. Lee 
and other men of mature years among that little coterie of 
health-seeking enthusiasts, that the rules were formulated. 
Another interesting tale told me by Mr. Ladd was that the 
reason they chose the game of Base Ball instead of — and in 
fact in opposition to — cricket was because they regarded Base 
Ball as a purely American game ; and it appears that there was 
at that time some considerable prejudice against adopting any 
game of foreign invention. 

In the infancy of sport in this country New York, Phila- 
delphia and Boston were the three principal centers and an 
examination of the earliest records in each one of these sections 
will disclose the same old popular game of Cat Ball as played 
among the boys. The rules of Cat Ball, as some of your cor- 
respondents point out, were exceedingly simple, such as any 
crowd of boys of ordinary intelligence, possessing a ball and bat. 
might easily evolve. From Cat Ball to the Knickerbocker 
game of Base Ball is only a step, though the game may have 
been passed through several intermediate stages. The old game 
of "Scrub" lies between Cat Ball and Base Ball, though whether 
it preceded or followed the game of Base Ball in point of time 
no man can now say. 

The Knickerbocker game of Base Ball was itself a very sim- 
ple game requiring no great inventive genius, and one of the 
secrets of the immense popularity of the game and its quick 
spread through the country was its very simplicity. It is 
true that the modern book of rules is a formidable looking 
document, but upon analysis it will be found to consist mainly 
of explanations, expositions and refinements of the original 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 45 

simple code. The simplicity of the central idea of the game of 
Base Ball makes it adaptable to the changing disposition of the 
times ; and so it has gone along still holding its original place 
in our affections and increasing the number of its votaries 
year by year with the country's growth. 

Those who have sought to attribute its origin to the English 
game of "Rounders" were persons who became acquainted with 
Base Ball years after its inception as a sport for adults, and 
they have ignored entirely so much of the early history of the 
game as we have been able to find. But most important of all 
it seems to me they overlook the great dissimilarity between 
the original central and controlling ideas of the two games. 
The great feature of Rounders, that from which it derives its 
name, is "the rounder" itself, meaning that whenever one of 
the "in" side makes a complete continuous circuit of the bases, 
or, as we would call it in Base Ball, a "home run," he thereby 
reinstates the entire side ; and it then becomes necessary to 
begin all over again to retry each one of the side at bat, until 
all of them have been put out, such being one of the rules of 
that game. Not one of these detractors of the American game 
has ever shown or claimed that any such rule ever had a place 
in the game of Base Ball ; yet it is not only fair but reasonable 
to suppose that, if Base Ball were a descendant of the English 
game of Rounders, there would be some place somewhere in 
Base Ball of this distinctive feature of the other game. As I 
have said before, however, all exact information upon the 
origin of Base Ball must, in the very nature of things, be 
unobtainable. Boys do not make records of the rules of their 
boyish games and we have never had in this country the "Year 
Books" or a "Badminton Library" to do the work for us. 
America has no "Stonehenge" and therefore we are handicapped 
in any discussion of this nature by the entire absence of con- 
temporary data. But from what investigations I have made 
and from such information as I have been able to get from 
one source and another, and from the innate probabilities, I 
have never had any doubt myself but that Base Ball was a. 
purely American game. 

Yours very truly, 

John M. Ward. 

FINAL DECISION OF THE SPECIAL BASE BALL 
COMMISSION 

New York, December 30, 1907. 
Mr. James E. Sullivan, Secretary, Special Base Ball Commis- 
sion, 21 Warren St., New York City. 
Dear Sullivan : 

On my earliest opportunity, after my recent return from 
Europe, I read — and read with much interest — the considerable* 
mass of testimony bearing on the origin of Base Ball whichi 
you had sent to my office address during my absence. I cannot 
say that I find myself in accord with those who urge tbe> 



46 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

American origin of the game as against its English origin as 
contended for by Mr. Chadwick, on "patriotic ground." In my 
opinion we owe much to our Anglo-Saxon kinsmen for their ex- 
ample which we have too tardily followed in fostering healthful 
field sports generally, and if the fact could be established by 
evidence that our national game, "Base Ball," was devised in 
England, I do not think that it would be any the less admir- 
able nor welcome on that account. As a matter of fact, the 
game of ball which I have always regarded as the distinctive 
English game, i.e., cricket, was brought to this country and 
had a respectable following here, which it has since maintained, 
long before any game of ball resembling our national game 
was played anywhere! Indeed, the earliest field sport that I 
remember was a game of cricket, played on an open field near 
Jamaica, L. I., where I was then attending school. Then, and 
ever since, I have heard cricket spoken of as the essentially 
English game, and, until my perusal of this testimony, my own 
belief had been that our game of Base Ball, substantially as 
played to-day, originated with the Knickerbocker club of New 
York, and it was frequently referred to as the "New York 
Ball Game." 

While "Father" Chadwick and I have not always agreed 
(I recall that he at first regarded as revolutionary the "Full 
Team Reserve Rule" and the alliance between professional Base 
Ball associations, both of which I devised in 1883, and I later 
modeled after the latter the Alliance feature of the A.A.U. re- 
organization), yet I always have had respect for his opinions 
and admiration for his inflexible honesty of purpose ; and I have 
endeavored to give full weight to his contention that Base Ball 
is of English origin. It does seem to me, however, that, in the 
last analysis, his contention is based chiefly upon the fact that, 
substantially, the same kind of implements are employed in the 
game of Base Ball as in the English game of "Rounders" to 
which he refers ; for if the mere tossing or handling of some 
kind of ball, or striking it with some kind of a stick, could 
be accepted as the origin of our game, then "Father" Chadwick 
would certainly have to go far back of Anglo-Saxon civiliza- 
tion — beyond Rome, beyond Greece, at least to the palmy days 
of the Chaldean Empire ! Nor does it seem to me that he can 
any more successfully maintain the argument because of the 
employment, by the English schoolboy of the past, of the im- 
plements or materials of the game. 

Surely there can be no question of the fact that Edison, 
Frank Sprague and other pioneers in the electrical field were 
the inventors of useful devices and processes whereby electricity 
was harnessed for the use of man, although they did not invent 
electricity, nor do they, nor does anybody, know to-day what 
electricity is ! As I understand it, the invention or the origina- 
tion of anything practical or useful, whether it be in the 
domain of mechanics or field sports, is the creation of the 
device or the process from pre-existing materials or elements ; 
and, in this sense, I do not, myself, see how there can be any 
question that the game of Base Ball originated in the United 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 47 

States and not in England — where it certainly had never been 
played, in however crude a form, and was strange and un- 
familiar when an American ball team first played it there. 

As I have stated, my belief had been that our "National 
Game of Base Ball" originated with the Knickerbocker club, 
organized in New York in 1845, and which club published cer- 
tain elementary rules in that year ; but, in the interesting and 
pertinent testimony for which we are indebted to Mr. A. G. 
Spalding, appears a circumstantial statement by a reputable 
gentleman, according to which the first known diagram of the 
diamond, indicating positions for the players, was drawn by 
Abner Doubleday in Cooperstown, N. Y., in 1839. Abner 
Doubleday subsequently graduated from West Point and entered 
the regular army, where, as Captain of Artillery, he sighted 
the first gun fired on the Union side (at Fort Sumter) in the 
Civil War. Later still, as Major General, he was in command 
of the Union army at the close of the first day's fight in the 
battle of Gettysburg, and he died full of honors at Mendham, 
N. J., in 1893. It happened that he and I were members of 
the same veteran military organization — the crack Grand 
Army Post (Lafayette), and the duty devolved upon me, as 
Commander of that organization, to have charge of his 
obsequies, and to command 'the veteran military escort which 
served as guard of honor when his body lay in state, January 
30, 1893, in the New York City Hall, prior to his interment in 
Arlington. 

In the days when Abner Doubleday attended school in 
Cooperstown, it was a common thing for two dozen or more of 
school boys to join in a game of ball. Doubtless, as in my 
later experience, collisions between players in attempting to 
catch the batted ball were frequent, and injury due to this 
cause, or to the practice of putting out the runner by hitting 
him with the ball, often occurred. 

I can well understand how the orderly mind of the embryo 
West Pointer would devise a scheme for limiting the contestants 
on each side and allotting them to field positions, each with a 
certain amount of territory ; also substituting the existing 
method of putting out the base runner for the old one of 
"plugging" him with the ball. 

True, it appears from the statement that Doubleday pro- 
vided for eleven men on a side instead of nine, stationing 
the two extra men between first and second, and second and 
third bases, but this is a minor detail, and, 'ideed, I have 
played, and doubtless other old players have, repeatedly with 
eleven on a side, placed almost identically in the manner indi- 
cated by Doubleday's diagram, although it is true that we so 
played after the number on each side had been fixed at nine, 
simply to admit to the game an additional number of those 
who wished to take part in it. 

I am also much interested in the statement made by Mr. 
Curry, of the pioneer Knickerbocker club, and confirmed by 
Mr. Tassie, of the famous old Atlantic club of Brooklyn, that 
a diagram, showing the ball field laid out substantially as it is 



48 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

to-day, was brought to the field one afternoon by a Mr. Wads- 
worth. Mr. Curry says "the plan caused a great deal of talk, 
but, finally, we agreed to try it." While he is not quoted as 
adding that they did both try and adopt it, it is apparent 
that such was the fact ; as, from that day to this, the scheme 
of the game described by Mr. Curry has been continued with 
only slight variations in detail. It should be bome in mind that 
Mr. Curry was the first president of the old Knickerbocker 
club, and participated in drafting the first published rules of 
the game. 

It is possible that a connection more or less direct can 
be traced between the diagram drawn by Doubleday in 1839 
and that presented to the Knickerbocker club by Wadsworth 
in 1845, or thereabouts, and I wrote several days ago for 
certain data bearing on this point, but as it has not yet come 
to hand I have decided to delay no longer sending in the kind 
of paper your letter calls for. promising to furnish you the 
indicated data when I obtain it, whatever it may be. 
My deductions from the testimony submitted are : 

First: That "Base Ball" had its origin in the United States. 

Second: That the first scheme for playing it, according to the best 
evidence obtainable to date, was devised by Abner Doubleday at 
Cooperstown, N. Y., in 1839. 

Yours very truly, 



^i^m^i 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 49 

We, the undersigned members of the Special Base Ball Com- 
mission, unanimously agree with the decision as expressed and 
outlined in Mr. A. G. Mills' letter of December 30. 




7-v 



OZWl, 





Senator Bulkeley, after affixing his signature, appended the 
following statement: 

"I personally remember as a boy in East Haddam, Conn., 
before 1846, playing the game of One and Two Old Cat, and 
remember with great distinctness the early struggles in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., between the two rival clubs, the Atlantics and 
Excelsiors, and later the Stars, with Creighton as pitcher. 
This was some ten to fifteen years before the National organi- 
zation. I was present, representing the Hartford club, at 
the formation of what is now the National League at the 
Grand Central Hotel, Broadway, New York City, about 1875 
or 1876, and was its first President, with Nick Young, Sec- 
retary. M. G. Bulkeley." 




AUGUST HERRMANN 
H. C. PULLIAM Chairman B> B . JOHNSON 

/ John E. Bruce, Secretary 

THE NATIONAL COMMISSION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 53 

Philadelphia Athletics being right on the heels of the Tigers 
practically from the time the last series of the season between 
Mack's men and Jennings' team was decided in its reduced state 
at the city of Brotherly Love. Those grand twirlers, "Wild 
Bill" Donovan, Ed Siever, Ed Killian and George Mullin, had 
been worked like clockwork and were no doubt in need of a 
restful period, although their loyalty to their team and league 
found them insisting upon plunging into the gruelling battles 
of a world's series with all the fire and vigor of youngsters. 
Chance's grand staff of twirlers, on the other hand, practically 
had been under "double wraps" for a long portion of their 
league race — some insisted that after the first two encounters 
between the Cubs and New York Giants, the National League 
die was cast so far as the rivalry of these supposedly strongest 
teams in the league was concerned. 

Orval Overall, whose work extending over the latter part of the 
season of 1906 and the first two months of the season of 1907, 
gained for him the praise of the most conservative of critics, ap- 
peared to be strong enough to hold the best teams at bay. 
Sou'paw Pfiester, erratic at times and really pitching bad ball 
until within a few weeks of the close of the season, had steadied 
into a twirling machine that Manager Chance could depend 
upon. Then there was Ed Reulbach, in possession of that 
requisite — control — which when much in evidence with the tall 
young giant makes him invincible, and Mordecai Brown, the 
three-fingered miner, a distinct pitching wonder of two seasons. 
That old "bear feeling" that was in evidence in 1906, preceding 
the World's Championship, due to Brown's lame arm, in the 
fall of 1907 had little terror for Chance. He resolved early 
to call upon his reserve. Carl Lundgren, rather than permit 
Brown to offer himself as a sacrifice, if his arm was not 
"right." Furthermore, the Cub leader had learned a great 
lesson in his handling of the team for the previous try at the 
world's flag and never permitted anything like a letdown in 
the Chicago forces, even when the National League race had 
become a certainty. He sent his team against the tried and 
true twirlers of Detroit — 'against the hard hitters of the Jen- 
nings camp, including the American League's premier batter, 
Tyrus Cobb, with the confidence of a leader who knew the 
efficiency of every unit of his organization — knew that if vic- 
tory failed to come to his club it would be nothing short of 
"Kismet" that would give him two successive defeats for the 
world's greatest diamond honors. 

While the preliminaries, with all their interesting weight of 
details, were- being threshed out and the teams were preparing 
for the opening struggle in Chicago on October 8, men who 
long had followed Base Ball regretted the diminution in fierce 
interest. It was held that the inter-league post-season 
struggle could not be so absorbing when played by teams repre- 
senting a more or less enthusiastic Base Ball city like Detroit 
and a big whirling metropolis like Chicago, that had been 
accustomed to the best thrills in Base Ball, as if all Chicago 
were divided into two partisan camps. And while the attend- 
ance for the five games did not aggregate the total for the 
games played between the Cubs and Sox the preceding year, 
and the receipts were several thousands of dollars less, it was 
shown that Chicago contributed characteristically to both the 
gate and the exchequer of not only the National Commission, 
the club owners and players' pool, but to the tide of enthusiasm 
that diminished onlv when it became apparent that the Chicago 
team had its rival organization outclassed. There always will 
be a feeling of disappointment that Detroit did not turn out 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 65 

the throngs that were expected at Bennett Park in the two 
games that were contested in the Michigan city, but charitable 
critics will ever bear in mind that the "heart of Michigan" 
had not throbbed with its accustomed vigor after a tie and 
two successive defeats of the Tigers in Chicago, and that the 
weather man turned on the Labrador brand of wind that con- 
tained some slight flecks of snow for the final game. Opulent, 
liberal Chicago had contributed 59,392 paid admissions for 
three games ; Detroit could muster only 18,676 admissions that 
were paid for, for its two games. Elaborate preparations had 
been made at Detroit by Owner Yawkey, in the short time at 
his disposal, to augment the accommodations of his ball park. 
Every critic who thought he read the throbbings of the public 
pulse in Detroit, said thousands of additional bleacher seats 
would be required there. But at no time did the Detroit club 
tax its accommodations. 

President Murphy of the Chicago organization had time to 
approach the problem of taking care of a throng at the West 
Side Park and he went at the task with a personal whirl that 
was pardonable. Extra circus seating arrangements in the 
ampitheater w rt re installed until the management figured it 
could take care of 28,000 seated patrons. In order to guard 
against possible catastrophe, Mr. Murphy had the extra seating 
accommodations installed under the surveillance of the city 
building department, and was assured by the engineers that a 
locomotive could be driven over his stands without causing 
collapse. 

But the throng of the first day — 24,377 — filled every nook. 
Police arrangements were admirable and disorder did not reign 
even when it seemed that Chicago had won the game and the 
throngs broke into the field, as is the custom. There was a 
chill in the air that did not reach the official scorers, who 
reported to the National Commission that the air was "warm" 
for all of the Chicago games. On the second day 21,901 paid 
admissions were noted, and on the final day in Chicago, the 
attendance fell to 13,114, which was larger than Detroit's 
high water mark of 11,306 for the fourth game. Detroit fell 
to 7,370 for the fifth and last game. 

It was without a discordant note from any critic that the 
teams entered into the conflict on the basis of the division of 
the players' receipts, 60 per cent, to the winner and 40 per 
cent, to the loser. This revision of the former rules governing 
World's Championship Series, made at the Chicago meeting of 
the Commission, met with the approval that it deserved. Two 
great teams, it was urged, had a right to . compensation indi- 
cating their respective merits. Fortunately the contingency of 
a tie in the series, coming up for discussion at the eleventh 
hour among the Commission triumvirate, was settled by the 
providential proviso making a tie the same as a game post- 
poned by rain. This ruling also settled, without disturbing 
harmonious relations, the place of contest for the third game. 
It likewise determined that the players shared in five games 
instead of the regulation four games. 

Detroit had a manager whose indomitable fighting spirit, 
conceived long ago in Louisville, developed in Baltimore and 
rounded into intensity by his first year of activities as a man- 
ager in the major league. But Jennings' grit, hard work and 
energy, that had helped to win the pennant for Detroit, worked 
differently when confined to the bench or the coacher's box in 
the World's Series. His rival was in the game — on the field, 
except in the final contest — where personal leadership qualities 
and actual initiative checkmated the perfection of mechanical 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 61 

skill that invariably was displayed by the rival Tigers. In the 
thickest of the fray, until a pitched ball turned one of his 
fingers into a first-class imitation of a dill pickle, the "Peerless 
Leader" kept the victory fever at the highest point in his 
team. The Detroit spirit seemed to diminish, until it might be 
said that it lodged solely in the sportsman breast of the Tiger 
leader. Better than victory for Chicago, in the minds of 
many, was the manly grace of the defeated men. They con- 
ceded that the victors outplayed them, outgeneraled them — had 
the "charge" on them, as the foot ball man would say, and 
made thousands of friends by tneir manliness. 

That idol of Detroit, Pitcher Donovan, twice depended upon 
for a Wolverine victory, publicly rebuked narrow, partisan 
Detroit "whiners" after the series, with the statement that the 
ball the Cubs played would have beaten the best game the 
Tigers ever played. "It was not a question of condition or 
luck," said Donovan ; "we were outplayed all the time." 

Analyzed from the managers' point of view, Chicago and 
Detroit put up two distinctly different kinds of ball. It may 
have been that Jennings cast his all on his own plan of cam- 
paign, although given advice frequently during the series by 
thousands. If so, he lost because of a devotion to his own 
ideas. The Chicago plan of battle was to get a man on the 
bases and then push him around if it took every trick known 
to the modern game that was legitimate, to get' him over the 
counting house plate. The sacrifice was first in General 
Chance's repertory. If that was not practicable, the stolen 
base and the hit-and-run strategy were to be used. It was said 
that Jennings went back to the old Oriole system, from which 
the Chicago style was developed. The sacrifice hit was rele- 
gated to the past — think of only three bunts laid down by the 
Tigers in five games ! — and the tactics were not changed. 
Defeat seemed imminent to Jennings, and it could not have 
been worse had he tried the sacrifice oftener. It may have 
been that the Tiger general, with a knowledge of the Cub 
pitchers far beyond that of his men, considered it impossible 
to win games with one or two runs, and ordered Detroit to 
bat, slug, worry, whiz out the ball, to get runs, runs, runs. 
The way that Detroit batted in the needed runs when it was 
whittling the American League race to a fine point, may have 
deceived Jennings. 

The total receipts of the series were $101,728 for a total 
paid admission of 78,086. The plavers' share was $54,933.39. 
The Cubs' share was $32,960.03, and the Tigers' share was 
$21,973.35. Club owners drew down $36,622.26 from the pool, 
while the National Commission had its treasury swelled bv 
$10,172.85. J 

In accordance with his agreement with his men, President 
Murphy drew his check for $12,039.97. the difference between 
the sum paid to the Cubs and the $45,000 mark that the 
executive of the Chicagos had set for his men for their profits. 
In pledging them that the series would be worth $45,000 to 
them for their melon, Mr. Murphy assured the victors the 
record-breaking spoils for a world's or anv other series. 

President Yawkey added a gift of $15,000 to his team's 
share of the proceeds, giving the Tigers $36,973.35 to divide 
as they had elected to make the division, which gave each 
Tiger $1,850. The Cubs put $2,250 each to their individual 
accounts in the banks. Ti-ainer "Jack" McCormick and Secre- 
tary Charles G. Williams each received a half of a regular 
share, while Catcher Olis, a recruit, was substantially remem- 
bered in the division. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDK. 

The first game was played at Chica _ on Tiu-.s- 
pi dot day > October 8, and was called at the end of 

^aLjc- twelve innings, on account of darkness, with the 

GAME score 3 to 3, and thousands of partisan fans cer- 
tain that Umpire O'Day, by his desire to be too 
strict, had deprived Chicago of victory. "Wild Bill" Donovan 
and Orval Overall, the two twirlers depended upon in the 
initial contest, pitched grand ball. It was no fault of Overall 
that Reulbach replaced the Californian in the tenth and failed 
to Win, even though he had the Tigers eating out of his hand. 

Jones, the first man up, was passed. The throng of more 
than 25,000 enthusiasts alternately groaned and shrieked. It 
looked bad for Overall ; but a force at second and Slagle's 
spectacular catch of Crawford's long fly, steadied the game. 
Catcher Kling showed the first startling "workout" of his 
salary wing when Schaefer tried to steal, but this only held 
off the coming of the "Terrible Ty" Cobb for the second inning. 
Sheckard got a single off Donovan after Slagle had flied to 
Jones. There was the irony of Base Ball fortune. Twenty-one 
times at bat in the World's Series of 1906 was Sheckard, and 
he could not get a hit. The first time up he poked a bingle 
to left — a hit that would have been more precious than ten 
hits against Detroit had it been made in the battle with the 
White Sox. Chance struck out. 

Sheckard stole second and continued to third on Catcher 
Schmidt's poor throw. Donovan's fine stop of Steinfeldt's liner 
wound up that inning. 

The crowd was eager for Cobb. Detroit rooters pleaded with 
him to pole out a homer. Overall used a quick-breaking curve 
to tbe inside and Cobb hit to Chance. This seemed to set the 
die. It was not until the fourth inning that the ice was 
broken, Chicago getting a lone tally, on Chance's base on balls, 
Steinfeldt's neat sacrifice, Rossman to Schaefer, and Kling's 
single to left, Kling perishing at second, Crawford to Schmidt 
to Schaefer. Evers singled and stole second, but Schulte 
struck out. This one run seemed big with Overall and Donovan 
working the way they were, but there were fireworks to turn 
loose in the eighth. Detroit got three runs in this fatal round 
and apparently had the opening game tucked away. But two 
runs made by Chicago in the ninth brought the drawn battle. 

After Donovan had perished, Overall to Chance, in the 
eighth, Jones singled through Evers and took second on a 
clean steal. Schaefer was saved by Tinker's fumble and stole 
second, Jones squatting on the third corner. Crawford waa 
there with his bat and, hitting through the open space between 
Chance and Evers, scored Jones and Schaefer, and put the 
Tigers in the lead. On Schulte's attack of the "rattles" and 
wild throw to the plate, Crawford went to third. 

Overall then got into the game of "rattles." Cobb hit to. the 
big pitcher, who had Crawford cut off at the plate. Overall 
essayed a throw to Kling instead of running down his man 
and the Tiger got back in safety to third, Cobb meanwhile 
racing to second. Rossman's fly to deep center scored Craw- 
ford, Cobb taking third. Captain Coughlin struck out. 

Detroit accomplished nothing in the ninth and victory seemed 
to be the portion of the Tigers, but Captain Chance singled 
viciously to right and Steinfeldt was passed. Kling's effort to 
sacrifice resulted in a little pop to Rossman. Coughlin fum- 
bled Evers' sharply hit grounder, filling the bases. Again it 
was up to Schulte, but he perished, Rossman to Donovan, 
although Chance came in on the little mite of help. "Del" 
Howard batted for Tinker and struck out, but Schmidt missed 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



61 



the third strike — one of the "Kismet" features that seemed 
marvelous in a World's Series, for it yielded results. Stein- 
feldt scored, Evers going to third. Howard stole second. Then 
came the daring of Evers that nearly won the game. With 
Moran, a right-handed batter, up — Moran was batting for 
Overall — Evers tried to steal home, but was called out. Moran 
had only two strikes called on him. This ended the sub- 
catcher's appearance in the World's Series. It also ended the 
inning. 

Settling down for extra innings in the gathering gloom, the 
teams continued desperate play. In the tenth Slagle came 
near furnishing some decisive fireworks. With one out, he 
caromed a single off Donovan's mitt, stole second, and after 
Sheckard had fanned, stole third. Chance walked and stole 
second. On a little passed ball Slagle tried to score, and was 
called out on account of Steinfeldt's interference with Schmidt's 
part in the play. The umpire is firm in declaring that his 
decision was just ; Steinfeldt clings to the statement that 
Slagle had scored before he shook his bat. There was nothing 
doing with either Donovan or Reulbach after that, darkness 
and the umpires ending the opening battle without a decision. 
Following is the score : 



FIRST GAME (AT CHICAGO), OCTOBER 8. 



Detroit. 



AB.R.H.P.A.E. 



Jones. I. f. ... 
Schaefer. 2b. . 
Crawford, c. f. 

Cobb, r. f 

Rossman, lb. 



13 3 
117 
13 1 

9 



1 
4 



Coughlin, 3b 5 1 

Schmidt, c 

O'Leary, s. s. . 
Donovan, p. ... 



2 1! 

3 



Totals 



.45 3 9 33 17 3 



Chicago. 



AB.R.H.P.A.E. 



Slagle. c. f. .. 
Sheckard. 1. f. 
Chance, lb. ... 
Steinfeldt, 3b. 

Kling, c 

Evers. 2b., s. s 
Schulte, r. f. . 
Tinker, s. s. 
Zimmerman, 2b 

Overall, p 3 

Reulbach, p 2 

* Howard 1 

f Moran 



2 2 

12 

1 15 

12 2 

7 4 

3 2 

2 

3 6 
1 
3 






Totals 41 3 10 36 18 5 



Detroit 
Chicago 



0—3 
0—3 



* Batted for Tinker in ninth inning. 

t Moran batted for Overall in ninth inning, but side was retired 
before Moran' s time at bat was completed. 

Hits— Off Overall: 9 in nine innings; off Reulbach: in three 
innings. Sacrifice hits— O'Leary; Steinfeldt. Evers. Stolen bases- 
Jones 2. Schaefer, Rossman; Slagle ?., Sheckard. Chance. Steinfeldt, 
Evers, Howard. Struck out— By Overall: Coughlin 2, O'Leary, Dono- 
van 2; by Reulbach: Crawford, Donovan: by Donovan: Slagle 2, Chance 
2, Kling. Schulte, Tinker 3, Howard, Overall, Zimmerman. Bases on 
balls— Off Overall: Jones, Rossman; off Donovan: Chance 2, Steinfeldt, 
Kling. Double plays — Evers- Tinker; Schaefer-Rossman. Left on 
bases— Detroit 8, Chicago 8. Hit by pitcher— Sheckard. First on 
errors— Chicago 1. Detroit 3. Missed third strike— Schmidt 1. Wild 
throws— Kling, Schulte, Evers; Schmidt 2. Fumbles— Tinker 1. Evers 
1, Coughlin 1. Umpires— O'Day and Sheridan. Scorers— Richter and 
Flanner. Time— 2.40. Attendance— 24,377. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 63 

The Cubs won the second game, played at Chi- 
SECOND cago, Wednesday, October 9, by a score of 3 to 1, 

^Aiuicr Sou'paw Jack Pfiester and George Mullin being the 

Li A Mb. opposing twirlers. Hoping to strengthen his back- 
stopping position, Jennings relied upon Catcher 
Payne, but Mullin lost control in the second inning, when the 
Tigers had a lead of one tally, forcing in a run and tieing up 
matters, where they remained until the fourth inning, when 
stolen bases and timely hitting netted two runs that were "all 
the candy" for the Cubs. Pfiester's wonderful control, giving 
only one pass, and his command of the most varied assort- 
ment of wide ones and tantalizing outs, that cut the farthest 
corners of the plate, made the Chicago victory look easy. In 
reality, the effective pitching would not have availed had not 
the Chicagos displayed the bewildering dash on bases that took 
the Tiger spirit by the throat as it were. 

Pfiester was lucky to escape trouble in the opening inning. 
Jones singled to left and Schaefer hit too hot for Chance to 
handle. Pfiester then tried his "hoodoo snake" on Crawford 
and had the hard hitter tied in a knot. Cobb hit to Tinker 
and perished in a lightning double with Schaefer, Chance 
winding up the play. 

Chicago tried out Mullin and found him hard, although 
Slagle was walked, stole second and went to third on Payne's 
throw that hit Mullin on the ear. Sheckard popped to Schaefer, 
and Coughlin working that ancient and decrepit trick of the 
"hidden ball" got "Rabbit" Slagle as he stepped off the third 
sack. What the sleep of Slagle cost was shown the next 
moment when Chance singled over second and stole second. 
Steinfeldt struck out. 

With "do or die" marked on their faces the Tigers assailed 
Pfiester in the second. Jennings brought out his cries of 
"E-e-yah" and tore up a great area of turf in his excited 
coaching gyrations. Rossman tore off a terrific three-bagger 
through left center and Payne put out a Texas Leaguer over 
Shortstopville, Sheckard just missing a marvelous catch on a 
grand run and dive. Rossman scored and the Tiger rooters 
took added cheer. O'Leary fouled to Steinfeldt and Payne 
stole second. Mullin flied to Slagle. 

To get back that run was Chicago's hope in the next half, 
and Kling opened well with a single to left. Evers' grounder 
to O'Leary was stopped in grand style, but the throw to 
Schaefer was just too late to force Kling. Schulte's slash was 
a hit too hot for Mullin, and the bases were filled. Tinker 
worried Mullin into giving him a pass, forcing in Kling with 
the run that tied up the score. Slagle and Sheckard were 
easy outs. 

Tinker made up for his fumble on Jones in the third with 
a fine play, getting Davy on Schaefer's hot one. The next 
moment he received one of Kling's rifle shot throws that 
caused Schaefer to perish, while Kling, taking Crawford's foul, 
wound up the inning. 

There was plenty of action in the Chicago half, but no run 
was scored. Chance was passed, "Steiny" was hit in the ribs, 
and Kling's line drive to center was captured by Crawford, who 
sneaked in for just such an emergency, doubling Chance off 
second on what nearly everybody thought would be a scoring 
feat for the leader. Evers singled to right, Steinfeldt going to 
third. "Trojan Johnny" then stole second and it looked 
ominous for Mullin, but Schulte struck out. 

In the next inning Cobb singled and Rossman put a fly 
safely into Schulte's territory, only to find that the Chicago 



Chance scoring; Payne catchir.g; O'Day, Umpire. 

Managers Chance and Jennings in conference before a game. 

WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES— AT CHICAGO. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GLIDE. 



65 



strong thrower forced Cobb at second. Coughlin and Payne 
perished by the pop-up route. 

Chicago clinched the game in the Cub half of the fourth. 
Tinker singled off Mullin's poor shins and Pfiester sacrificed 
him a station. Tinker stole third and Slagle's single, too hot 
for O'Leary, scored the Cub shortstop. Slagle stole second, 
coming home on Sheckard's two-bagger to right. Sheckard 
tried Payne's arm and was thrown out. 

Then Chance popped an easy one to Rossman, and the last 
run of the game was marked up for Chicago, when this inning 
was registered on the score board. 

Pfiester was almost invincible after that. O'Learv got a hit 
in the fifth, but there was nothing doing. Rossman singled in 
the sixth after two were out and Jones beat out a slow one 
to Evers in the eighth, and although Cobb took his base after 
being hit, Kling and Pfiester proved the Tiger killers. In the 
ninth Rossman singled, but a double play killed the Tiger 
chances, who did not resort to the bunt. Coughlin's line fly to 
Tinker caused the trouble, which was deepened when Payne 
struck out. 

Mullin pitched grand ball during these later innings, Slagle 
being the only Cub to punish him for a hit. The score : 

SECOND GAME (AT CHICAGO), OCTOBER 9. 



Detroit. 

ab.r.h.p.a.e. 



Jones, 1. f 4 

Schaefer, 2b 4 

Crawford, c. f 4 

Cobb, r. f 3 

Rossman, lb 4 



Coughlin, 3b 4 



Fayne. c. . 
O'Leary, s. 
Mullin, p. 



2 1 
1 2 

1 

1 

3 12 

2 

1 5 
1 
1 



32 1 9 24 15 1 



Chicago. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E 

Slagle. c. f. .. 
Sheckard, 1. f.. 
Chance, lb. ... 
Steinfeldt, 3b. 
Kling 



. 3 
. 3 



3 



4 1 

Evers. 2b 4 

Schulte, r. f 4 

Tinker, s. s 2 1 

Pfiester, p 2 









Totals 



.28 3 9 27 10 1 



Detroit 

Chicago 



0—1 
*— 3 



Sacrifice hits— Sheckard, Pfiester. Stolen bases— Payne; Slagle 2, 
Chance, Evers, Tinker. Two-base hit— Sheckard. Three-base hit— 
Rossman. Bases on balls— Off Pfiester: O'Learv; off Mullin, Slagle, 
Chance, Tinker. Hit by pitcher— By Mullin: Steinfeldt; bv Pfiester: 
Cobb. Passed ball— Kling 1. Struck out— By Mullin: Steinfeldt, 
Magle, Pfiester, Schulte. Kline: by Pfiester: Crawford, Coughlin, 
Mullin. Left on bases— Detroit 5. Chicago 7. Double plays— Tinker, 
Chance 2: Crawford-O'Leary. First on errors— Detroit 1. Fumble— 
Tinker. Wild throw— Payne. Umpires— Sheridan and O'Day. Scorers 
— Richter and Flanner. Time— 2.15. Attendance— 21,901. 

(^^^^ 

This contest, at Chicago, Thursday, October 10, 

THIRD P rove d to be the final victory of the Cubs on their 

rA .._ home grounds and was the easiest victory of the 

(jAMc. series. Ed Siever, who was pitted against Ed 

Reulbach. pitching poor ball — -below his season's 

standard — Sou'paw Killian relieving him when the Cubs had 

had four innings of glorious picking and had a lead of four 

runs. Killian, although he had a lame arm just before the 

series opened, seemed to possess the requisites to hold the 

winning Cubs, who made only one run off him Besides, he 




Hugh Jennings with his dove of peace. 

Chance blocking Schaefer in an attempt 
to slide to first on a bunted ball. 
Portion of crowd at Detroit. 
SCENES AT WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 67 

started things in the sixth, getting a hit which later was 
coined into the only run the Tigers gleaned that day. 

Reulbach was too good. He struck out Cobb in the second 
the others being easy outs. Chicago got its run in the same 
inning after "Steiny" had slashed one down the left foul line 
for two bags and was sacrificed to third by Kling. Evers got 
a tennis slash on a low one for two bags down the right foul 
line, scoring Steinfeldt. Schulte and Tinker were easily out. 
The knell of Siever was sounded in the third. After 
"Steiny's" terrible smash to Jones was caught, Kling and 
Evers singled to right, Kling making third, whence he was 
pushed home by Schulte, who singled to center. Crawford's 
foxy throw to the infield fooled Evers, who was run down by 
the infielders and Siever, and eliminated from the danger list. 
Tinker hit for three bases on a terrific smash that Jones could 
only get his finger tips on, Schulte scoring, while Reulbach's 
neat single scored Tinker. Slagle popped to Coughlin. 

Chicago made it another in the fifth, Chance getting a two- 
bagger after Sheckard was out, and scoring on Steinfeldt's hot 
one over second. Kling flied to Crawford, and Evers' certain 
three-bagger to right was cut to two bases by the ground rules. 
Schulte was "buffaloed" by Killian and popped to Coughlin. 

The lone tally of the Tigers came in the sixth, Killian 
picking out a wide one for a single to left. Jones worked 
Reulbach for a base, but Schaefer, hitting to "Steiny," was 
doubled with Jones by the lightning work of the infield, Killian 
racing to third. Crawford unexpectedly slashed a slow one to 
Tinker, beating it out and scoring Killian. Cobb's single to 
left put Crawford on third, but Rossman's fly to Slagle killed 
further scoring. 

With the game safe beyond doubt, Reulbach never wavered, 
trying to make it one-two-three. But in the ninth, after Ross- 
man singled, Slagle just missing a difficult catch, he jerked 
one over for Coughlin, who hit hard to Tinker, forcing 
Rossman. Schmidt and O'Leary were easv and the Cubs had a 
lead of two games won to nothing for Detroit. The score : 

THIRD GAME (AT CHICAGO), OCTOBER 10. 



Detroit. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 

Jones, 1. f 3 2 1 

Schaefer, 2b 4 1 4 

Crawford, c. f 4 1 3 1 

Cobb, r. f 4 1 1 

Rossman, lb 4 2 9 

Coughlin, 3b 3 4 1 

Schmidt, c 3 1 2 

O'Leary, s. s 4 3 3 

Siever, p 1 o 1 

Killian, p 2 1 1 

Totals 32 1 6 24 11 1 



Chicago. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 

Slagle, c. f 4 3 

Sheckard, 1. f 4 1 4 

Chance, lb 4 1 1 12 1 

Steinfeldt, 3b 3 1 2 2 0- 

Kling, c 3 1 1 2 

Evers, 2b 4 3 3 2 1 

Schulte, r. f 4 110 

Tinker, s. s 4 1 2 7 

Reulbach, p 3 1 1 2 



Totals : 33 5 10 27 14 1 



Detroit 1 0—1 

Chicago 1 3 1 *— S 

Hits— Off Siever: 7 in four innings; off Killian: 3 in four innings. 
Sacrifice hits-Khng. Bases on balls-Off Reulbach: Jones, Coughlin, 
Schmidt; off Killian: Steinfeldt. Two-base hits— Sheckard, Chance, 
Evers 2 Steinfeldt. Struck out— By Reulbach: Cobb, O'Leary; by 
,7 e J : P a Sle; by Killian: Sheckard. Double plays— Tinker, unas- 
sisted; Steinfelt-Evers-Chance. Left on bases— Detroit 7, Chicago 6. 
Muffed fly— Jones. Wild throw— Evers. Umpires— O'Day and Sheridan. 
Scorers— Richter and Flanner. Time— 1.35. Attendance— 13,114. 




1, Keinoacn; z, Tinker; 3, Slagel; 4, steinfeldt: 5. Sohulte: 6. Brown. 

L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, O. 
A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 69 

The teams now journeyed to Detroit for the 

FOURTH fourtn contest, on Friday, October 11, which 
X flMtr proved to be a repetition of the opener, so far as 
La A ML. the pitchers were concerned, Donovan trving his 
luck again for the Tigers, while Overall, not to be 
denied his victory, stood on the mound for Chicago before a 
throng of 12,000 hostile partisans and many rooters from 
Chicago. The victory was delayed for a few minutes, Detroit 
getting a lead in the fourth, which netted Jennings' men a 
run. But in the next Donovan was punished, although the 
rain, traces of snow and cold winds off Lake Huron bade fair 
to make the contest a futile one for both teams. After that 
the last vestige of Tiger spirit seemed dissipated and when 
Chicago piled up three more in the seventh the world's bunting 
appeared to be flapping hard on a Chicago pole. Detroit used 
two sacrifices in this game to Chicago's four, and Detroit 
really out-hit the Cubs, only the latter made their safe ones, 
no matter how weak, count for runs that helped earn the 
pennant. Donovan struck out such good hitters as Kling — ■ 
twice — Steinfeldt and Evers, but he hit Chance on the finger, 
giving the Peerless Leader some pain to occupy his time with. 
Subsequently, after an X-ray examination, Chance had the dis- 
location repaired and for weeks was unable to use the injured 
member, which was swollen abnormally. 

Detroit's one run was due to Cobb's triple, after two were 
gone in the fourth, and Rossman's single. Coughlin, who had 
three of the six Detroit hits off Overall, put one in center 
field, and Overall passed Schmidt, the original backstop, who 
was put in to redeem his throwing of the first day and to try 
for a hit that did not come in the third game. But Overall 
fanned O'Leary, and that was the only real look-in Detroit 
had in this game. 

Evers began the cold and clammy fifth by beating out a hit 
to O'Leary, the wonderful little shortstop making two errors in 
this game, which took the edge off the marvelous fielding he 
had shown in the preceding games. With Schulte at the bat, 
the half-rain-half-snow fell, until after fifteen minutes' play, 
Schulte got a base on balls. Tinker sacrificed, advancing both 
Chicago runners, and Overall's single scored Evers, Schulte 
taking third, whence he scored on Slagle's fly to Jones. 

The rest of the scoring made the rooters from Michigan very 
sore. Schulte beat out a bunt and on Tinker's attempt to 
sacrifice, Donovan threw too high to O'Leary, and both men 
were safe. Overall advanced both on his sacrifice, and Slagle's 
grounder to O'Leary was hurled too wild to the plate, Schulte 
scoring. Sheckard bunted safely, Tinker crossing the pan. 
Chance forced Tinker and then working the steal stunt for a 
run down was put out, but Slagle scored before Schaefer put 
the ball on Chance. Chicago put another run over in the ninth 
for good measure, Tinker walking after Schulte had flied to 
Jones and going to second on Overall's neat sacrifice. Tinker 
scored on a short pop fly that Slagle put just back of short. 

Temporarily the Detroits had a few trembling hopes in the 
final inning. Cobb flied to "Steiny," but Rossman put one out 
between Sheckard and Slagle and Coughlin was safe at first. 
Then Steinfeldt fumbled his grounder. Overall took Schmidt's 
measure for the strike-out stunt and O'Leary popped to Stein- 
feldt. The score : 



f 



~* 



*4 










4 ? .d 



t 

c 




s^ 




1, Pfeister; 2, Kling; 3, Lundgren; 4, Moran; 5, Overall; 6, Sheckard. 

L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, O. 
A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 71 

FOURTH GAME (AT DETROIT), OCTOBER 11, 



Chicago. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 

Slagle, c. f 5 1 1 2 

Sheckard, 1. f 5 2 1 



Detroit. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 

Jones, 1. f 2 3 

Schaefer, 2b 3 2 3 



Chance, lb. 3 Oil I Crawford, e. f 4 2 

Steinfeldt, 3b 4 2 3 2 0; Cobb, r. f. 4 1 1 4 



Kling, c 4 6 

Evers, 2b 4 1 2 

Schulte, r. f 3 2 1 2 1 

Tinker, s. s. 1 2 2 3 1 

Overall, p. 2 1 3 

Totals 31 6 7 27 11 1 



Rossman, lb 4 1 9 

Coughlin, 3b 4 3 1 1 

Schmidt, c 3 3 4 

O'Leary, s. s. .... 4 3 2 2 

Donovan, p 3 1 

Totals 31 1 5 27 11 2 



Chicago 2 3 1—6 

Detroit 1 0—1 

Three-base hit— Cobb. Sacrifice hits— Tinker 2, Overall 2; Jones, 
Schaefer. Stolen bases— Slagle, Chance. Bases on balls— Schulte, 
Tinker; Jones, Schmidt. Double play— Tinker, unassisted. Struck out— 
Schaefer 2, Crawford, Coughlin, Schmidt, O'Leary; Steinfeldt, Kling 
2, Evers. Hit by pitcher— Chance. Left on bases— Chicago 4, Detroit 
7. Wild throws— O'Leary 2. Muffed fly ball— Slagle. Fumble— Tinker. 
First on errors— Chicago 1, Detroit 2. Umpires— Sheridan and O'Day. 
Scorers— Richter and Flanner. Time— 1.45. Attendance— 11,306. 

The deciding game was played at Detroit, Satur- 
FIFTH dav > October 12, with Mordecai Brown, the premier 
LVT ' " twirler of the National League and master of the 
GAM E National League swatters, selected to twirl for the 
Cubs before the smallest crowd that ever had wit- 
nessed a great struggle between two good teams in such a 
series. He had warmed up for two days, and when he felt 
that his arm was all right, gave Manager Chance the nod of 
the head that the latter was expecting. Mullin, in an effort 
to snatch at least one contest from the Cubs, went on the 
slab for Detroit. He pitched almost as good ball as did 
"Brownie" on the face of the score, but did not have the 
perfect support, and besides was "Kismeted" by the Cubs, who 
seemed destined to wind up the series and give the lie to the 
captious critics who had spread the story that Chicago would 
lose so as to make a Sunday game in Chicago a possibility. 

The Cubs went at Mullin from the jump, that big fellow 
failing to find the plate, and Slagle walked. Sheckard, who 
did not try to sacrifice, flew out, and Del Howard, playing 
first for Chance, struck out. Slagle stole second, and on 
"Steiny's" single to center, scored. Kling flew to Cobb, and 
that one run looked as big as a St. Clair steamer. 

Detroit could do nothing with Brown in its half. Then 
Chicago added its other run, and that wound up the tallying 
in the contest. Rossman dropped Coughlin's throw, and Evers 
was safe. Schulte tried to sacrifice, but Archer, the third 
backstop of Jennings' team, got the pop-up. Tinker singled to 
left, and then gave the shivering fans something to talk of 
with a fine double steal. 

Mullin was disconcerted and walked Brown, filling the bases. 
On Slagle's out, Schaefer to Rossman, Evers scored. Sheckard 
flew to Cobb and the inning was ended. Coughlin singled in. 




1, Evers; 2, Howard; 3, Hofman. 
A TRIO OP WORLD'S CHAMPIONS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



73 



the Detroit half, but that was the sum total of Mordecai's 
troubles. 

Steinfeldt got a three^bagger in the third, but was out at 
the plate on Kling's grounder, hurled with precision by O'Leary. 

It seemed that Brown toyed with the Tigers thereafter ; he 
struck out Cobb in the fourth, and Crawford was held at third 
when Rossman singled, preventing a score. 

Feeling that the World's Championship was in their grasp, 
the Cubs performed brilliantly, even daringly, in the fifth. 
. Sheckard was nipped at first by one of the greatest throws 
Coughlin ever made, making the second out. Howard singled 
to right, and with the hit-and-run signal given, Steinfeldt con- 
nected for his single, but Jones threw Howard out at third, 
where Coughlin was waiting for him. 

In the sixth, after Crawford was out, Cobb made another bid 
for Detroit cheers, singling to right and advancing to second 
when Schulte failed to get the ball in time for a clean throw. 
Kling had his eye on the speedy Georgian, however, and when 
Cobb cut for third the backstop threw him out to Steinfeldt. 
Rossman flied to deep center. 

In the seventh, Coughlin again got a single and stole second, 
but Archer and O'Leary were out by the fanning process and 
a grounder to Tinker, respectively. Mullin flied to Evers. It 
was one-two-three for both sides in the eighth. Schulte singled 
in the ninth, when two were gone, and stole second. Tinker 
walked, Brown's grounder to Coughlin was fumbled, and the 
bases were filled. Slagle yielded to Mullin's persuasion, and 
struck out. 

The last chance of the Tigers for the World's bunting was 
futile. The mightv Cobb struck out. Rossman, refusing to say 
die, singled, and Payne ran for him. Coughlin put a fly into 
Schulte's hands, and Schmidt, batting for Archer, popped to 
Tinker. The score : 



FIFTH GAME (AT DETROIT), OCTOBER 1! 



Chicago. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 



Slagle, c. f 

Sheckard, I. f 



Howard, lb 4 



Steinfeldt, 3b. 

Kling, c 

Evers, 2b. ... 
Schulte, r. f. 
Tinker, s. s. 
Brown, p. — 



1 3 

1 

1 10 







1 



1 
6 
1 



Totals 34 



Detroit. 



AB.R.H.P.A.E. 
.30111 



Jones, 1. f. . 

Schaefer, 2b 4 1 

Crawford, c. f. 

Cobb, r. f 

Rossman, lb. . 
Coughlin, 3b. .. 

Archer, c 

O'Leary, s. s. 

Mullin, p 

♦Schmidt 

t Payne 



1 4 

2 13 
2 1 
4 
3 






Totals 



.34 7 27 17 2 



Chicago 1 

Detroit 



0—2 
0—0 



* Batted for Archer in the ninth. 

t Payne ran for Rossman in the ninth. 

Two-base hits— Crawford, Cobb. Three-base hit— Steinfeldt. Struck 
out— By Mullin: Howard. Slagle; by Brown: Cobb 2, Archer, O'Leary. 
Bases *on balls— Off Mullin: Slagle, Tinker, Brown; off Brown: Jones. 
Stolen bases— Slagle, Evers, Schulte, Tinker; Jones, Rossman, Coughlin. 
Left on bases— Chicago 8, Detroit 7. Umpires— O'Day and Sheridan. 
Scorers— Richter and Flanner. Time 1.50. Attendance— 7,370. 




1, Cobb; 2, Coughlin; 3, Donovan; 4, Crawford; 5, Schaefer; 6, Mullin. 

L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, O. 
A GROUP OF DETROIT PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



75 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 
The official averages of the World's Series, compiled by 
Messrs. Richter and Flanner, and accepted by the National 
Commission for the archives of the organization, are as follows : 

THE COMPOSITE SCORE. 
Following is a composite score of the five games played, thus 
arranged to show at a glance the total work in every depart- 
ment : 

CHICAGO. 

G. AB. R. BH. SH. SB. PO. A. E. 

Slagle, center field 5 22 3606 13 01 

Sheckard, left field 5 21 0511 10 00 

Howard, first base 1 50101 10 10 

Chance, first base 4 14 3303 44 10 

Steinfeldt, third base 5 17 2811 10 70 

Kling, catcher 5 19 2 4 1 25 9 1 

Evers, second base 5 20 2713 9 12 3 

Schulte, right field 5 20 3 5 1 6 2 2 

Tinker, shortstop 5 13 4 2 2 2 15 23 3 

•Overall, pitcher 2 5 1 2 6 

Pfiester, pitcher 1 2 1 

Reulbach, pitcher 1 5 1 1 2 

Brown, pitcher 1 3 1 1 

Zimmerman, second base i 10000 010 

Totals 167 19 43 9 18 144 65 10 



DETROIT. 
G. AB. 



Jones, left field 5 

Schaefer, second base 5 

Crawford, center field 5 

Cobb, right field 5 

Rossman, first base 5 

Coughlin, third base 5 

Schmidt, catcher 3 

Payne, catcher 1 

Archer, catcher 1 

O'Leary, shortstop 5 

Donovan, pitcher 2 

Mullin, pitcher 2 

Siever, pitcher i 

Killian, pitcher i 



R. BH. SH. SB. PO. 



Totals 173 6 36 3 7 138 71 

Moran batted once for Overall, but did not complete time at bat. 



Chicago 
Detroit 



0—19 
0—6 



Left on bases— Chicago 33, Detroit 34. 

First on errors — Chicago 4, Detroit 6. 

Two-base hits— Sheckard 2, Chance 1, Evers 2, Steinfeldt 1, Craw- 
ford 1; total 7. 

Three-base hits— Steinfeldt 1, Cobb 1, Rossman 1; total 3. 

Hits— Off Siever: 7 in four innings, and Killian 3 in four innings 
of game of October 10. 

Double plays— Evers-Tinker; Tinker-Chance; Steinfeldt-Evers-Chance; 
Tinker, unassisted; total for Chicago 4. Schaefer-Rossman; Crawford- 
O'Leary; total for Detroit 2. 

Struck out by Chicago pitchers— By Overall: Coughlin 2, O'Leary 2, 
Donovan 2, Schaefer 2, Crawford 1, Schmidt 1, total 10; by Brown: 








IIP '£:■■' 







*n* 



1, Schmidt; 2, Eubanks; 3, Wiggs; 4, D. Jones. 

L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, 0. 
A GROUP OF DETROIT PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



77 



Evers 1, Steinfeldt 1, 
Overall 1, Howard 1, 



Cobb 2, Archer 1, Scbaefer 1, total 4; by Pfiester: Crawford 1, Cough- 
lln 1, Mullin 1, total 3; by Reulbach: Crawford 1, Donovan 1, Cobb 1, 
O'Leary 1, total 4; grand total 21. 

Struck out by Detroit pitchers — By Donovan: 
Kling 3, Slagle 2, Chance 2, Schulte 1, Tinker 

Zimmerman 1, total 16; by Mullin: .Howard 1, Slagle 2, Steinfeldt l r 
Slagle 1, Pfiester 1, Schulte 1, Kling 1, total 8; by Siever: Slagle l r 
total 1; by Killian: Sheckard 1, total 1; grand total 26. 

Bases on balls — By Reulbach 3, by Pfiester 1, by Brown 1, by Overall 
1, by Mullin 5, by Donovan 5, by Killian 1; total 20. 

Passed ball — Kling 1. 

Missed third strike— Schmidt 1. 

Muffed fly ball— Jones 1, Slagle 1. 

Wild throws— By Kling 1, Evers 1, Schmidt 2, Tinker 1, Payne 1, 
O'Leary 2. 

Muffed thrown ball— Rossman 1. 

Fumbles— Tinker 3, Coughlin 2. Evers 1, Schulte 1. 

Hit .by pitcher — By Donovan: Chance, Sheckard, Steinfeldt; by 
Pfiester: Cobb; by Mullin: Steinfeldt. 

Officials — Umpires: O'Day, of the National League, and Sheridan, of 
the American League. Scorers— Richter and Flanner. 

Average time of game — 1.55. 

Average attendance— 15,614. 

Weather — Warm in Chicago, cold in Detroit. 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING AVERAGES. 

Following are the official batting averages of all players par- 
ticipating in the World's Championship Series. They show 
conclusively that the leading batsmen of the Detroits could not 
hit up to form against the Chicago Nationals' pitchers and that 
to this is principally due the defeat of the Detroit Americans 
in the series : 





CHICAGO 












DETROIT 












A. 






s 


S. 


Bat. 






A. 






s. s. 


Bat. 


Player. 


G 


B. 


R. 


H. 


11. 


B. 


P.C. 


Player. 


G 


B. 


R 


TI. 


H. B. 


P.C. 


Steinfeldt, 


5 


17 


2 


S 


1 


1 


.470 


Killian, 


I 


2 


1 


1 





.505 


Evers, 


5 


20 


2 


7 


1 


3 


.350 


Rossman, 


5 


20 


1 


S 


2 


.400 


Slagle, 


5 


22 


3 


6 





6 


.273 


Jones, 


5 


17 


1 


6 


1 3 


.353 


Schulte, 


5 


20 


3 


5 





1 


.250 


Payne, 


1 


4 





1 





.250 


Sheckard, 


5 


21 





5 


1 


1 


.238 


Coughlin, 


5 


20 





5 


1 


.250 


Chance, 


4 


14 


3 


3 





3 


.214 


Crawford, 


5 


21 


1 


5 





.23S 


Kling, 


5 


19 


2 


4 


1 





.210 


Cobb, 


5 


20 


1 


4 





.200 


Howard, 


1 


5 





1 





1 


.200 


Schmidt, 


3 


12 





2 





.166 


Overall, 


2 


5 





1 


2 





.200 


Schaefer, 


5 


21 


1 


3 


1 1 


.143 


Reulbach, 


1 


5 





1 








.200 


O'Leary, 


5 


IS 





1 


1 


.030 


Tinker, 


5 


13 


4 


2 


2 


2 


.154 


Donovan, 


2 


8 











.000 


Zimmerman 


i 


1 














.000 


Mullin, 


2 


6 











.000 


Pfiester, 


l 


2 








1 





.000 


Siever, 


i 


1 











.000 


Brown, 


l 


3 














.000 


Archer, 


1 


3 











.000 


Moran went 


to 


bat 


for 





verall 


in the first 


ga 


me 


and 


side 


was 



retired before he completed his time at bat, hence Moran does not 
figure in the averages. 

TEAM BATTING AVERAGE. 
Chicago Nationals .257; Detroit Americans .208. 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
The fielding averages show the teams to have been on almost 
even terms in this department. Following are the individual 
and team figures : 

CATCHERS. 

Player. G. PO. A. PB. E. PC. I Player. G. PO. A. PB. E. PC. 

Archer, 14 10 1.000 Schmidt, 3 16 9 2 .926 

Kling, 5 25 9 1 1 .971 ) Payne, 1 5 1 '0 1 .875 




1, Wagner; 2, Leever; 3, Clark; 4, Phillippe; 5, Leach; 6, Willis. 
A GROUP OF PITTSBURG PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



7S 



PITCHERS. 



Player. G. PO. A. E. 

Overall, 2 6 

Reulbach, 112 

Donovan, 2 3 4 

Mullin, 2 14 



PC. 

1.000 
1.000 
1.000 



Player. 
Brown, 
Siever, 
Pfiester, 



1.000 | Killian, 



G. PO. A. 

Ill 
h 1 
10 

J 



E. PC. 

1.000 

1.000 

.000 

.000 



FIRST BASEMEN. 

Player. G. PO. A. 

Chance 4 44 1 

Howard 1 10 1 

Rossman *. 5 52 4 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

Player. G. PO. A. 

Schaefer 5 12 21 

Zimmerman \ 1 

Evers 4| 9 12 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

Player. G. PO. A. 

Steinfeldt 5 10 7 

Conghlin 5 9 5 

SHORTSTOPS. 

Player. G. PO. A. 

O'Leary ' 5 9 18 

Tinker 5 15 23 

OUTFIELDERS. 



E. PC. 

1.000 

1.000 

1 .982 



PC. 

1.000 
1.000 

.875 

PC. 

1.000 

.875 



Player. 
Sheckard, 
Crawford, 
Cobb, 



G. PO. A. E. 

5 10 

5 7 2 

5 9 



PC. 

1.000 
1.000 
1.000 



Player. 
Slagle, 
Jones, 
Schulte, 



l. E. PC. 

8 2 .931 

3 3 .927 

G. PO. A. E. PC. 

5 13 1 .929 

5 10 2 1 .923 

5 6 2 2 .800 



TEAM FIELDING AVERAGE. 

Detroit Americans .955; Chicago Nationals .954. 

THE PITCHING AVERAGES. 

The pitching averages for the series show no overshadowing 
performance for any one pitcher as was the case in the two 
preceding World's Championship Series. The Detroit club used 
all of such of its pitchers as were in condition ; while the 
Chicago club held back only two. using four pitchers with 
equal success. Following are the figures : 



Pitchers 
Overall — 
Pfiester .... 
Reulbach . . 



Brown 1 

Donovan 

Mullin 

Siever 

Killian 



BB. HPB. SO. WP. 



10 



PC. 

1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
Reulbach relieved Overall after the 
ninth inning with the score tied and pitched three innings without 
altering the result. Killian relieved Siever in the fifth inning of the 
game of October 10, which is charged as a defeat for Siever. In the 
remaining games each club worked but one pitcher. 

Note. — Summaries of previous World's Championship con- 
tests, since the initial one in 1884, will be found in Spalding's 
Official Base Ball Record, for sale everywhere, price 10 
cents. 



In the first game. October 




1, Phelps; 2, Leifield; 3, Sbeehan; 4, . AbOaticcmu; b, JNeaiuii; t>, 
Gibson, 

A GROUP OF PITTSBURG PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 81 

How We Won the World's 
Championship 

The triumph of the Chicago 
By Cubs for the World's Champion- 

rHARI F^ W MIIRPUV sni P in 1907 can always be 
£-5 \\ x- , pointed to as one of tbe impor- 

Pres. Chicago Nationals tant proofs of the absolute hon- 
esty of the greatest out-of-door 
sports — Professional Base Ball. The Cubs won four games in 
succession, by the hardest kind of Base Ball, and sacrificed the 
big gate receipts on Sunday, October 13, in order to show to 
the world that these contests are fought strictly upon their 
merits, victory going to the team which excels upon the field 
of diamond battle. It is naturally a great victory for Manager 
Chance and his players and we all feel highly elated over our 
triumph. Of course, I am very much prejudiced in favor of 
our club, but I desire to go on record as expressing the belief 
that the Chicago Cubs of 1907 constitute the best Base Ball 
team that was ever put together. Manager Chance is a leader 
whom I regard as peerless, and he has the good will of the 
most loyal and capable bunch of players I know of. The 
personnel of our team is one to which we can point with a 
great deal o* oride, as it contains a number of college grad- 
uates and many men who would shine in other walks of life 
besides Base Ball. We have felt for a long time that the team 
had more Base Ball acumen than any similar team and we feel 
that our victory was due as much to this fact as to the 
mechanical strength of the players. It is a pleasure to know 
that the series was conducted without any unseemly instance 
that would mar the game. Both clubs played clean Base Ball. 
The umpiring was good, and the spectators from both cities, 
Chicago and Detroit, were fair in their attitude toward the 
competing athletes. 



It is putting it mildly to say 

gy that I was delighted with the 

p-ramk I rUAKirP wonderful victory of the Chicago 

rriMiNrv u unMiNOt National League Champions over 

Manager Detroit in the World's Series. 

Many friends have wired and 

written me that we saved the old 'National League the hardest 

blow since the open warfare hit it hard. Be that as it may, 

there never was a minute after we actually got into action 

against the Detroits that I doubted a Cub victory. The team 

was in fighting trim and confident. Last fall we wound up the 

season's fight in rather a desultory manner, and relaxed to our 

cost. But this time we knew just what was cut out for us 

and the men kept keyed up to the World's Series. Our pitchers 

came around all right for the big fight days before the opening 

game ; with Detroit picked as our rival team, I laid out my 

programme to pitch Overall in the opener and Pfiester in the 




1, Titus; 2, Bransfield; 3, Gleason; 4, Sparks; 5, Thomas; 6, Pittenger. 
A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA NATIONALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 83 

second game. We«were in fine condition. Overall had shown 
that he was the man to begin the fray, and whether the public 
knew it or not, Pfiester satisfied me that he was in his best 
form. ' 

If I had heeded the critics who always know better than 
the manager how to run a ball club, I would have been afraid 
to put in Pfiester. By the same token, I would have been the 
worst manager in the land if Pfiester had failed to land his 
game. I did not manage the Cubs any better this year than I 
did last, but we came into our own and Chance is called a 
good manager. 

It was satisfying to me to see the air of confidence the 
Chicagos possessed when they got on bases. We played better 
ball than Detroit, had a better balanced team, and did not 
depart one inch from the line of action laid out on the" bench. 
Our study of our rivals strengthened rather than weakened our 
faith in our own worK. 

It is a mistake to say that when I found that we could run 
the bases with success I ordered the Cubs to desist from 
pilfering and to rely upon our bats and the natural and smooth 
working of the machine to take victories. The men did not 
try to steal bags when they found it was not necessary. The 
Cubs met every condition as it appeared, with the kind of ball 
that wins. 

The science displayed in the opening game was not good. 
Both sides played a bit ragged as if the strain was too 
great. But the last three games were about as good an exhi- 
bition of Base Ball as any critic could wish. 

I did not fear the trip to Detroit. It is well known that 
we play better ball away from home and in a strain than we 
do at home. As for getting rattled at Detroit rooting and 
Manager Jennings' shouts, I wish to say that I never heard 
five words that the Detroit manager said, so engrossed was I 
with the game. The other boys were just like myself in that 
respect. The umpiring was marvelously well done, and by men 
who know every angle of the game. 



Excuse me, but I feel so good 

By that I cannot help saying that 

MORDECAI BROWN rm the happiest pitcher- in the 

d* u U business. Last year I felt down- 

ritchei* hearted over being the principal 

cause of the Chicago club not 

getting the world's pennant that I deserved. This time I feel 

so grateful to Chance for giving me the chance to pitch the 

final game that I never will be able to express myself. Never 

more confident of victory in my life, I almost made a hit in 

my three times at bat. Jennings had great success in his own 

league, but I guess he will have to take off his hat to Chance 

as a manager. Detroit did not seem to have more than a faint 

chance to win from the moment Chicago began to put men on 

bases and touch up the opposing pitchers. 



*07/<yvCZe<l<u^ £$^trz~*^tsis 




H 




■■^MP^ : y--- f 



: 







i ' ^' 



.^ im 





1 M 



1, Dooin; 2, Corridon; 3, Sparks; 4, Magee; 5, Grant; 6, Courtney; 
7, Doolin; S, Knabe. 

A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA NATIONALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 85 

d After the two base hits in the 

Rf first inning I knew by some over- 

JACK PFI ESTER powering sense that I could not 

Pitcher explain that I would be successful 

in pitching against the Tigers. I 
wish to say that my satisfaction over having helped the team 
to the World's Championship is only exceeded by my admira- 
tion for Manager Chance in daring to pitch me in the second 
game. Two months before that, or even less than that, I was 
pitching bad ball. But he groomed me for the big fight, and 
I promised him the best in my shop when he notified me I 
would have to pitch. My arm felt fine and I had no trouble 
in getting it over, trusting to Chance's order to keep it on the 
the outside for the right-handed hitters. Schaefer got it on me, 
but that made me more careful. Crawford looked sheepish 
biting after three wide curves. All the Cubs needed was 
Chance's nod of approval and encouragement. I doubt if any 
team could have stopped us in that series. 




4 tnV 



By 



Aside from the Chicago victory 
A and the kind way that the rivals 

ORVAL OVERALL treated us, my chief satisfaction 
Pitcher is a selfish one — that I had the 

honor of pitching in two games. 
My own lack of thought, doubtless, cost me a good chance to 
win the tie game. But I was surprised that the star pitchers 
of the American League were hit as opportunely as they were. 
I expected a harder time with the Tigers, although it seemed to 
me that we were playing such a well-balanced and efficient game 
that no team could keep us from the world's honors. 



^^i^n^ 



p There were moments when I 

i-r%iai a j « r- . • ■ n * ^ u was using the wide ones and cut- 
EDW. M. REULBACH ting the corners that I almost 
Pitcher became discouraged over not get- 

ting rid of batsmen in that game 
that I pitched. But every time I felt myself feeling that way 
I would get some encouraging remark from Manager Chance. 
He said several times, "Be careful, Ed ; steady, now ; the boys 
have it on this team and you will win your game." It is my 
candid opinion that Detroit was outgeneraled almost at every 
point, and that Chicago would have beaten any rival team in 
the World's Series. Personally, I am glad that I had no bad 
inning, that I made no error and that I came through it with 
a batting average of .200, although I only made one hit. We 
earned the championship and got it, and that's a lot to be 




1, Wiltse; 2, Ames; 3, Devlin; 4, Browne; 5, Seymour; 6, Donlin; 
7, Strang. 

A GROUP OF NEW YORK NATIONALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 87 

d Scarcely once during a game did 

.**...... 7*r .*. mM a Chicago pitcher shake his head 

JOHN G. KLING when I made a signal. That 

Catcher proved to be a source of consid- 

erable satisfaction to me, for it 
indicated that the time I had put in studying the characteristics 
of the opposing batters was not wasted by any means. It also 
indicated the confidence one Chicago player had for another's 
judgment. 

Detroit did not prove as meteoric on the bases as we were 
led to believe ; the pitchers did not seem to have it on Chicago, 
Our friends bade us look out for the twirlers ; I think Chicago 
won because it went at the Tigers just as businesslike as it did 
after New York when the two National League teams were 
squaring off for the season's battle for the flag. Also I think 
that the Chicago victory will put an end to the criticism that 
we had nothing to beat in the National League. 



jU-&^^J 



b My own part in the World's 

^__~~._ 7- . . ^.... nr -t Series was that of a willing under- 
GEORGE E. HOWARD study for one of the greatest and 
First Baseman best ball players in the world. 

From my place on the bench, 
where I was most of the time, it looked to me as if Chicago 
won on a greater amount of well-balanced work, better general- 
ship and superior timely batting. It amused me in Detroit to 
have Cobb believe what I told him in a josh — that I did the 
fighting for the Cubs — that I was carried for that one purpose. 
The look of innocence that came over his face when I said that 
made me like this fellow. Even if he had hit harder against 
our pitchers, I don't think Detroit could have beaten Cnicago. 



\lucr, G. '&iZ-^Ar~aA^<4. 



By 



What's the use of boasting? We 
were the better team, and I think 
JOHN J. tVtna the Detroit and other American 

Second Baseman League experts admitted that 

pretty generally. Personally, I 
could not do much toward the victory, although some of the 
critics were kind enough to say that I did. The Chicago team 
was so well balanced and had demonstrated its value in such 
an easy manner in its own league that the calamity howlers 
frightened some when they made dire predictions about how we 
would go to pieces against the star pitchers of Detroit. 

I think that Detroit did not play up to the teachings of 
Jennings, that it lost heart when the catcher could not peg 
the Chicago base-runners, and was demoralized when it did not 




A GEODP OF NEW YORK NATIONALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 89 

: a o t u^ r ug 1 S e s r „ S „ n a,1 as °lr w ^ & i 1 ,™ 5 !W L*? «• th. serie, 

(/ C^O— w«^ 




€^=^5) 



By . :t ^oked as if Jennings had 

HA Th Y H S J E,NFELDT *** %*?*&*% •& l° 

Third Baseman shine, when Kling's fine pegging 

■st victory I never had anv i°VX, llyely ' After our 
>ta of people cam to me iL SV the ultimate result. 
t you Cubs are going tTwTn thi^/?* t0 .^troit and said, 
possible. It iJSSVs if Chicago "SH 7t md " up as soon 
ery way." v^mcago had it on our boys in 

fASnt inSIld'Toi 11 JS^eS^K, Ba8e Bal1 have * ■«» 
ited. Detroit was looking for *n^ lther ° n Shiated or corn- 
did not come and? fS&SmorpiS 80 -* Ump ' i think - but 
Pless before the premier dSSp', %* + P lcture 9 f the Cubs 
I. not materialize. SAk rmi T fLi°L tIle Am «ican League 
lice batting average and Ann fc-t£r k very ^ proud over getting 
irtesy. vei *se, ana thank the Detroit pitchers for their 




6^s5> 



B y form ag nf ne fh t0 . Play U P to the 

OSEPH B TINKER S in^the^hic^s aTiftaSS! 
Shortstop but none more than I was Still 

had felt out the great Drfnnv^n ti ? d Up that first S ame> 

t think there was a Cub nlavJ, IS a T ay S. ne ^ ame * 
iings had in his pitching -department ' h V« ared * * n / th ™S 
on to believe that our caimSw nn «, W k certainI y bad 
y to produce results and wpfprp .^5- bases was more 




4'o^?T° n kiu£S ffer5 3 ' Bowerman ; 4 > Dahlen; 5, Beaumont; 6, 
A GROUP OF BOSTON NATIONALS. 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



91 

With the exception of right 
field, all the positions on the 
Chicago team, were well taken 
care of in this series, and the 
better team won. I was far from 

K3£ht* JXri ho " WU1K ' - hu ! - there , were s P° ts that seemed 
ongnt, and so I have no misgivmgs about spending my share 
of the winnings for a great piece of horse flesh. It was a 
£ le w r £ f01 ; T t0 ^ bame sickness and get into the series. Only 
a few days before the games were started I thought I was going 

ri-SSnAttSTi the b ? nch - But Chance said I was all 
uglit, and he would take a chance on me. Those two assists 

up^gaZ me ^ helP6d mG t0 f ° rget the two "rroiTchfrged 



By 

FRANK SCHULTE 

Right Fielder 

pleased with my own work, 



-^U-yrr OU^JiX^ 



By 

JAMES F. SLAGLE 

Center Fielder 



(5=^=5) 

All we heard in St. Louis be- 
fore returning home to get ready 
for the World's Series was, "Look 
out for Cobb." The people made 

guess that this helped to preplre^every'man'on ^^nffor 
Se P ?o S arfse?° ntingenCy that the Det?oit hea ^ battel might 
It fell to me to be the first man up, and all the team helned 
S%h°P^iv 0Ve T r ^ ^^ attack of nervousness .That go : SSt 
of the way, I felt no different than if we were meetin" anv 
team m the regular course of events. It uas eaS than I 
had expected on the bases— there was that lack of Det?oir 

to f f hVh^PP^h^ 611 l6d i-° ^ elieve Jenningfhad^de^oped 
to a mgh degree, that soon dissipated our fear of the Ti<*er<? 

AnS?? ma r ny saw T the g am es and thousands of partisans of the 
American League have admitted that we outplayed and out 

baTpUyVto say? 01 ' Champions > so ther * remffilitSffoT'a 




£*& 




-^ 



By i Everybody was on his tiptoea 

JAMES T SHECKARO for a hard series - After the first 
|pf FiaiJ I a ,T no P e of the Chicago out- 

Left Fielder fielders feared Cobb much, and 

helDed iw nil tn ni«v »h«f t confidence in the Chicago pitchers 
7% i ii S a11 to play what I firmly believe was a better article 
of ball than Detroit showed. While Chicago has been credited 
E. lth l n " nu sual amount of brilliancy in base work I think 
ffiS ^ejeadwork of the Cubs, as a rule", snowed better than 
that of their rivals. Personally, none should feel better over 
the victory than yours truly, for in twenty-two times at bat I 

fit v7a d r', fl WnnS' whe - reas T in twenty-onetimes atX in the 
last j ears Worlds Series I was not lucky enough to get a hit! 



ysfevtij /&4U*dLzA+{ 




1, Weimer, Cincinnati; 2, Scanlon, Brooklyn; 3, Maloney, Brooklyn. 
4, Pastorious, Brooklyn; 5, Huggins, Cincinnati. 

A GROUP OF CINCINNATI AND BROOKLYN PLAYERS.t 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 93 

B v The seri es was a grand one for 

H7iMMrDMniu Chicago. I'm glad that I was 

.ZIMMERMAN witli the World's Champions when 

Substitute they got their victories. My own 

part in the victory was nothing — 
simply had a time at bat and got one assist. I would say 
more if I had succeeded in getting a poke into the field for a 
bingle or had scored a run by an outfield fly. 




o v The Chicago victory in the 

r* r» \a/ii 1 iamc World's Series, I firmly believe, 

O. vj. WlLLIAMb was fought in the sleeping cars 

Secretary on the last trip of the team away 

from home. Chance and his men 
brought up every possible contingency that would arise if 
Detroit was met and threshed out the possibilities of the game. 
The real battle was simply the execution of the tactics that the 
Peerless Leader outlined and descanted upon in his daily con- 
ferences with his men. That's why Chicago outgeneraled 
Detroit. 



&.&&f^ 



r v Condition told in the World's 

irkUM c KA~r*r\BKAir*v Series. Chance said all of his 

JuniN r. ivicouniviiurv me n were in good physical trim 

Trainer for the fight, with the exception 

of Hofman and Brown. As to the 

former, time was needed to make him right. In Brown's case, 

only a little care was required. He was right two days before 

he pitched, and told me that he would be ready to pitch his 

head off if Chance called on him. Detroit may have been in: 

good physical condition, but a few of the team were drawn fine 

by worry and their hard pennant race. 




*+~* ST*- 'fii J6c 



cri^px^jQ^ 




1, Jordan, Brooklyn; 2, Ganzel, Cincinnati; 3, Marshall, St. Louis; 
4, McLean, Cincinnati; 5, Gilbert, St. Louis; 6, Lumley, Brooklyn. 
A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 95 

Opinions of Leading Authorities 

By I guess the "best" team won, 

AUGUST HERRMANN a11 1-i S nt - Before it began, I 
AUUU&I Mt MM MA IN IN talked tc the players and ex _ 

ki i.- Resident _ pressed the hope that the "best 

National Commission team" would win. Even Detroit 
fans are convinced that the better team won. The fairness of 
the battle all the way and the remarkably good and effective 
umpiring made for the best interests in Base Ball. I take this 
method of congratulating Messrs. O'Day and Sheridan for their 
admirable handling of the umpires' work. Chance and his boys 
played fine ball, showed great generalship and played fair, and 
they deserve all the fruits of such a splendid victory. It is 
especially gratifying to all lovers of clean sport that the series 
was wound up as it was, for there were a lot of "Know It Alls" 
who said that the Cubs would lose on Saturday at Detroit so 
that a 30,000 crowd could be taken care of at Chicago on 
Sunday. The shortness and the effectiveness of this World's 
Series should silence the captious critics for good. 



VJwL ^ lMA^~^y 



p It has been my conviction for 

ljaddx/ « Bin . .... two seasons that Manager Chance 
MARRY C PULLIAM has developed the most perfect 
Pres. National League Base Ball team that has ever rep- 
resented a club. I thought that 
Detroit was outplayed in the games that I saw. Reports received 
by wire from the Detroit contests indicated that the same 
superiority displayed by the Chicagos on their home grounds, 
was continued in the Michigan city. It's a great victory for 
Chance, Chicago and the National League. 

Long after all the players are dead and followers of the game 
have forgotten that I ever existed, the memory of that Saturday 
victory in Detroit will live. It was a grand thing for pro- 
fessional Base Ball that the Cubs won that game, for the gen- 
eral thought was that the chances for a $30,000 gate at Chicago 
the following day might prove an inducement to the players; 
to plan to have another game. The players proved that Base 
Ball was a clean sport and I'm much pleased. 



■Aw^O-*— *^-» 





A GROCP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 97 

R There seems to be little left for 

b E» iaumcam Detroit and her supporters to do 

B. B. JOHNSON but to gracefully acknowledge de- 

Pres. American League feat and pay a tribute to the win- 
ner, for taking four straight 
games is a wonderful thing in a World's Series. Chicago .won 
mainly on the wonderful work of John Kling. He was in a 
class by himself behind the bat. In no other position did the 
Cubs show up any better than the Tigers. Kling really was the 
pivot around which revolved the whole series. He is a wonder- 
ful backstop and a grand thrower. Detroit did not hit up to 
their standard, the batters failing to measure the Cub twirlers, 
but the pitching against them was no better than the Detroits 
had been facing all season. 




_ Detroit failed. That is quite 

By enough to say. However, I might 

WILLIAM YAWKEY add that my boys were not there 

p. PQ Dpfpoit Ampriran«5 in theiv accustomed style of ef- 
r*res. uetroit Americans fectiye play amJ defeat was our 

portion, just as it should be when a team is outplayed. The 
Chicago team won absolutely on its merits. Chicago played a 
strong, even gait, got a good break in the luck, and taking it 
all around, played the better ball. The opening game showed 
me that the clubs were evenly matched, and I guess many others 
were surprised that the Cubs should take four straight. You 
never can tell in Base Ball. Had we won the first game we 
might have got them on the run. But they were on the run 
only when on the bases. 

Detroit failed to bring out its 

By brand of Base Ball — the glorious 

HUGH A. JENNINGS kind that they all played to land 

minx n a +i.Ai+ A^o.^^ne the pennant in our league — and 

Mgr. Detroit Americans we n ^ ver had a look in w ^ th those 

Cubs. If it were possible to play another series immediately, 
the result might be a complete vindication for the Tigers. 
Although we practically got as many hits as our rivals, we 
simply could not get them when they counted. There always 
is a lucky angle in Base Ball, and that is where luck failed us. 
Detroit won the American League pennant by hitting the ball 
when we needed hits, and I was as much surprised as any one 
that we could not get the timely hits against the Chicago 
pitchers. If anyone were to ask me did we hit as well, I should 
say "yes," but there is no doubt the Chicago hits were more 
timely. Our fielding was satisfactory to me, but I freely admit 
that the Chicagos were our masters on the bases. Other than 
this I have nothing to say. No excuses need be made. We 
failed to deliver the goods, and lost a glorious opportunity to be 
World's Champions. 



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3, Henley; 2, Bendei 

A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA ATHLETICS 



Byrnes: 4. Coonibs: 5. Plank. 

L. VauOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, 0. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 99 

As one of the umpires in the 

By World's Series, I appreciate deeply 

HENRY O'DAY the congratulations of the players 

(j mnip(S National Leaoue and the National Commission. We 
umpire National League assured the men that we were 

there to look after the best interests in Base Ball, that we 
would not make a mistake intentionally, and would strive to 
be absolutely fair. The game was cleanly played both in 
Chicago and Detroit, and the better team won. 



It was a positive pleasure not 

By only to officiate in the big series, 

"JACK" SHERIDAN but to be where every little detail 

U moire American Leaoue ot inside P la y could be grasped. 
umpire American League Im pleased that I had no more 

close decisions than came my way. The men all seemed sat- 
isfied with the umpiring, and it is nice to have them feel that 
way. 

One remarkable thing about the Chicago champions is that 
Chance seems to have his team so well balanced that he has 
no player who seems to shine out better than another. That 
makes team work of a high order, and it was that, and timely 
hitting and good base running, together with Kling's master- 
ful handling of his position, that earned the victory for 
Chicago. 




^ 







1, Coaklev; 2, Knteht; 3. Spvbnld: 4. Hnrtzell; 5, Collins; 6, Davis; 
7, Oldring; 8, Murphy; 9, Dygert; 10, Lord. 

L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, 0. 

A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA ATHLETICS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



101 



Records of Champions 

A Brief Description of the Men who Earned the World's Pennant 
for the Chicago National League Club 

(5^=5) 




FRANK L. CHANCE, MANAGER AND CAPTAIN 

Modestly Manager Chance says he is a 
good manager because his team won the 
World's Pennant. "Had I lost the second 
battle for that flag," says the big fellow, 
' 'I would have had to retire to the Sierra 
Madre mountains to escape hearing the 
anvil chorus." But the Base Ball world 
has grown to understand Chance as not 
only one of the best of managers but the 
most valuable ball player on any team. 
His success with his men in the World's 
Series, to put it tersely, was the victory 
of brains on the field over brains on the 
bench. Born in Fresno, Cal., September 
19, 1877, of Scotch parents, Chance may be 
considered a likely factor in active Base 
Ball for a number of years. He is six feet 
tall, weighs 192 pounds, and by the pur- 
chase of a costly home in Chicago and the 
acquiring of ten shares of stock in the 
World's Champion club, may be called a 
Chicagoan. 

Chance was "discovered" by "Big Bill" 
Lange in 1898, when Lange was the popu- 
lar idol of the Chicago outfield. After an 
experience of two seasons, 1894-5, as a 
backstop for the Washington University team, Chance drifted into pro- 
fessional Base Ball with the Pacific Coast teams. Manager Anson signed 
the California recruit as a catcher, but it was not until 1903 that he was 
induced to try his fortune at the initial sack. Nothing has occurred since 
then to stop the rise of Frank Chance. 

Given an opportunity to show his managerial capacities. Chance soon 
set a standard for handling men. His executive qualities were tried out 
and, combining with his tact in steadying the men in trying moments, 
the power to get the limit out of them, he took his place in the ranks of 
the best managers. 

Perhaps as the leader of the Champion Cubs of 1906, when the team 
set a world's record in winning 116 games in the National League, only 
to fail in landing the World's Championship, Chance gained his widest 
renown, until the season of 1907 found him again leading the Chicagos 
irresistibly toward the National League flag. His victory over the teams 
in his own league and the subsequent crushing of Detroit put the finish- 
ing touches on the "peans of praise" that have echoed and re-echoed in 
two hemispheres. 

JOHN KLING, CATCHER 

"In a class by himself" seems to be the general classification of "Noisy 
Johnny" Kling. The greatest catcher in any league, the highest salaried 
backstop and the idol of the Chicago fans, Kling is given credit by most 



Frank L. Chance. 




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1, Tannehill; 2, Altrock; 3, Fielder Jones; 4, McFarland; 5, Welday. 

L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, 0. 
A GROUP OF CHICAGO AMERICANS. 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



107 




Mordecai Brown. 



Three-Eye League. In 1902 he 
was with Omaha, and in 1903 he 
went to the St. Louis Nationals. 
The famous trade of pitcher 
Jack Taylor and catcher John 
O'Neill to St. Louis, resulted in 
"Miner" Brown coming to Mur- 
phy's team. Brown is married 
and makes his home in Terre 
Haute. 

JOHN A. PFIESTER, 
PITCHER 

Pitcher John A. Pfiester was 
a "recruit" with the Cubs last 
year — to-day he is one of the 
mainstays. It fell to Pfiester to 
work in the second game of the 
World's Series and he has 
thanked Manager Chance a score 
of times for disregarding the 
critics who thought he was too 
erratic to do the trick. "The 
Omaha Kid," as the Cubs call 
him, was born in Cincinnati in 
1878, is 5 feet lVA inches tall 
and weighs 176 pounds. 



When John McGraw was managing the Baltimore team he had his 
eye on this tall Sou'paw as a "comer," and after signing him, permitted 
him to float back to the minors, where he played with Columbus, 
Spokane and San Francisco, for 
two seasons. Pittsburg just es- 
caped having a winning twirler 
in Pfiester, keeping him two 
months in 1903 and letting him 
go to Omaha, where he soon 
showed his prowess and became 
the leading twirler. Chicago got 
him from Omaha and gave him 
a severe try-out in the opening 
home game last year. As a win- 
ning pitcher against the New 
York Nationals, Pfiester earned 
the sobriquet "Jack the Giant 
Killer." He is married and makes 
his home in Cincinnati. 

GEORGE E.HOWARD, 
UTILITY 

Regarded as Manager Chance's 
understudy for first base, "Del" 
Howard also is considered the 
best utility man in the business, 
except Arthur Hofman. "Del" 
is twenty-seven years old and 
has had a checkered career in 
fast company. Born in Sheldon, 
111., he began professional play 
with Kansas City in 1898, and 
then went to St. Joe and Mat- 
toon. In 1903 he went to Chicago, 




John A. Pfiester. 




1, Lajoie; 2, Flick; 3. W. Hiuchman; 4. Berger; 5. Bernhard. 

L. YanOeyen. Photos, Cleveland. 0. 
A GROUP OF CLEVELAND PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



109 




George E. Howard. 



was released to Omaha and then 
went to Pittsburg. In 1905 Howard 
joined the Boston Nationals, where 
he remained until June, 1907, when 
owner Dovey was induced by 
President Murphy to trade him 
for Sweeney and Randall. Howard 
got his sobriquet "Del" because 
of the way he faced the pitchers 
when at bat. He has played the out- 
field, and at first base for Manager 
Chance, and has had the good for- 
tune to field well and bat hard. 

JOHN J. EVERS, 
SECOND BASEMAN 

tt Conservative critics regard 
"Johnnie" Evers as the peer o:: 
any second baseman that ever 
wore the glove. Always energetic 
and playing the game so hard that 
he keeps himself thin, Evers easily 
is the brightest fielding light in 
any contest the Chicagos engage 
in. He shone with an added light 
in the recent World's Series in 
every department of play. His 
throw to first is inimitable and he 
is so daring on the bases that his 
rivals call him a wizard. 
He lives in Troy, N. Y., where he was born in 1883, and is the president 
of the "John J. Evers Association." Picking up his knowledge of the 
firame on Troy lots, Evers joined the Troy team in 1902 as an outfielder. 
James A. Hart learned of him, and brought him to Chicago, where he 
was a sub for several months. The injury to Lowe gave Evers a chance 
at second. How well he has taken care of that position the records 
plainly show. He played in every game last season and helped in a 
considerable man- 
ner to win every 
one of the 116 
contests that the 
Chicagos cap- 
tured. He is un- 
married and is the 
Idol of Troy. 

JOSEPH B. 

TINKER, 
SHORTSTOP 

"Joe" Tinker is 
twenty-seven 
years of age. At 
the beginning of 
the 1907 season he 
had to undergo an 
operation for ap- 
pendicitis, and 
calamity howlers 
said the chances 
of the Cubs were 




John J. Evers. 



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L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, O. 
A GROUP OF CLEVELAND PLAYERS. 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



113 



FRANK M. SCHULTE, 
RIGHT FIELDER 

With a cannon-ball throw in 
from right field, the ability to 
appear to loaf and yet have more 
speed than the flashy outfielders, 
"Schlitz" is one of the most de- 
ceiving major league ball players 
in the business. He seems to be 
always "at rest," but he gained 
the sobriquet of "The Eye of the 
National League" last year by 
his success in picking out hard 
pitchers and slugging them. He 
is one of the most graceful players 
at bat and speedy enough on the 
bases to worry any twirler or back- 
stop. 

Frank was ill and seemed out of 
the World's Series up to within a 
few days of play, but got in and 
did good work. 

Schulte is a native of Coshocton, 
N. Y., and lives at Lestershire, in 
the Empire State. When only six- 
teen he played semi-professional 
base ball and was one of the best 
throwers in his company. He went 
to Syracuse in 1902, whence he was 
brought to Chicago. 

Schulte is twenty-five years of 
age and is unmarried. In 1904, 





Frank M. Schulte. 



when signed by Chicago, he was 
hailed as one of the major league 
finds. 



James F. Slagle. 



JAMES F. SLAGLE, 
CENTER FIELDER 

"The Rabbit" makes his home in 
Worth ville, Pa., where he was born 
in 1874, and he is regarded as one of 
the best little players in any league. 
He began professional ball in Omaha, 
twelve years ago, and in 1896 was 
with Houston in the Texas League. 
The Boston Nationals got him that 
fall, and in 1897 the Grand Rapids 
team borrowed Slagle. After going 
to Kansas City he showed up so 
well as a fielder and trusty leading- 
off man in the batting list that 
Pittsburg bought him. Washington 
and Philadelphia gave the little 
daring base-runner trials in succes- 
sive seasons, and he then went to 
his old fields in Boston, where he 
remained until Chicago signed him 
in 1902 to play center field. Slagle 
is married and is reputed to be one 
of the thriftiest major league stara 
in the business. 




1. Griffith: 2, Rickey: 3, Stahl; 4, Keeler: 5, Keefe; 6, Elberfeld. 
' , L. VanOeyen. Photos, Cleveland, O. 

A GROUP OF NEW YORK AMERICANS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GriDE. 



115 



JAMES T. SHECKARD, 
LEFT FIELDER 

"Jimmy" Sheckard, who takes 
care of the Chicago left field, had 
so many fine things said about him 
when President Murphy bought 
him from the Brooklyn club a year 
ago for four players and a large 
sum of money, that the reaction 
set in with the former captain of 
the Trolley Dodgers, and he had 
the distinction of facing the Sox 
pitchers in the World's Series of 
1906 twenty-one times without get- 
ting a hit. In the recent World's 
Series he cracked out a hit the 
first time up and performed some 
fielding stunts that gained back 
all his friends. 

Sheckard comes of Pennsylvania 
Dutch ancestry, and was born on 
a farm, in 1879. He began pro- 
fessional ball in 1898, and that 
fall was drafted from Brockton to 
Brooklyn. He went to Baltimore, 
but the management sent him 
back to Brooklyn after one season. 
Chicago wanted him for several 
seasons, Chance being particu- 
larly eager to get him for left 
field. Finally after New York had 
bid high, President Murphy threw 
In pitcher Briggs, third baseman James .Casey and outfielders Jack 
McCarthy and Billy Maloney, and got him. 




James T. Sheckard. 




KSSSeSflSHMBJSB 

A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



11? 




The National League Campaign 

By Jack Btdbr, Cincinnati 

It is customary to say at the 
close of each Base Ball season 
that it was the most eminently 
prosperous ever enjoyed by the 
league, and the greatest year for 
Base Ball in every way. And 
this usual remark is not indulged 
in flippantly or over-enthusiasti- 
cally, for so great is the general 
interest in the national sport of 
America that the game more 
than keeps pace with the gen- 
eral progress of these great 
United States. Base Ball, the 
one universally popular sport 
which is maintained in absolute 
freedom from contaminating in 
fluences and associations, grows 
in favor as the country advances 
in wealth, prosperity and intel- 
ligence. Played in the free and 
open air, bringing into action 
every nerve, muscle and tissue 
of brain and body, indulged in 
by groups of lithe and energetic 
athletes, who must combine in- 
dividual skill with intelligent 
concerted action, the game of 
Base Ball is a real delight to 
both participants and spectators. 
The pitcher who, by the equal exercise of his brain cells and 
his good right arm, outwits, befools and mows down the eager 
batsmen ; the sturdy catcher, studying his opponents' methods 
as a great general observes the policies of the enemy ; the 
nimble infielder, with his sudden start, his bewildering speed, 
his keen judgment of the rifle shot that is coming his way, 
and his accurate arm ; the gardener, off with the ring of the 
bat, gauging the distance of the ball against the blue, and 
relentlessly marking down the spot where it must fall ; the 
batsman, employing every ounce of skill and courage in his 
make-up in his bold effort to outwit the writhing pitcher ; 
what athletes experience greater joys than these? 

The great hold of Base Ball rests upon two facts : the one, 
that its constantly varied evolutions furnish great joy to the 
multitudinous spectator ; the other, that professionalism does 
not deprive the athlete himself of his pleasure in the game. 
On the basis of these two truths the great national sport has 
reached its present popularity. Free from taint of any kind 
and appealing to the warm blood and the love of honest and 
clean competition in the heart of every good citizen, the game 
has become the greatest outdoor amusement of the world. No 
wonder, then, that each year is truly hailed as the greatest ever 
in the history of the game. 

The thirty-second season of continuous active existence for 
the National League proved no exception to the rule. In many 
respects it was the most successful ever experienced by the 
parent organization. There have been many closer and more 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDID3. 119 

exciting pennant races, but none in which interest was more 
evenly maintained throughout the season, or in which those 
'clubs which admittedly never had a real chance for the highest 
honors were so well supported by the public. This is the very 
best indication possible of the enormous popularity of Base Ball 
purely as a sport, as a daily exhibition of the refined skill of 
teams of trained men. When thirteen thousand people will 
gather on a chilly autumn day to witness the performance of 
two clubs, neither of which has the slightest chance to change 
its position in the race, and one of which — the home team — has 
been hopelessly outclassed and doomed to a humble position 
for weeks, it is a sign of the healthful influence of Base Ball. 

And such a crowd was present at the league park in Cin- 
cinnati on October 6. the last day of the season of 1907, to 
observe the concluding battle between the Cincinnatis and the 
Pittsburgs. The home team was in sixth place, yet the multi- 
tude, ever loyal, turned out to see the final contest of the year 
and cheered almost as lustily over the "Reds" victory as if 
upon it had depended a place of honor in the league struggle. 
This is an illustration of the kind of support that was given 
to every team in the National League during the season of 
1907.. The majority of thoughtful "fans" in every city except 
New York early conceded the year's championship pennant to 
Chicago, but this admission did not detract from popular 
interest in the scramble for favorable positions in the race. 
Every team in the league was so well supported by its friends 
and admirers at home that financial success was universal. 
Furthermore, the fact that each club closed the season with a 
favorable balance means that the great game was so generally 
appreciated by the public that even the teams which were 
early recognized as hopeless losers attracted gratifying support. 

In point of actual paid attendance, no year was ever more 
prosperous, and a pleasing feature was that the patronage was 
never so evenly distributed. The Chicago public, satiated with 
Base Ball honors, possessing two league and one world's cham- 
pionship, took it for granted that the Cubs were going to win 
their fight with ease in the National, and did not turn out in 
such numbers as in the preceding year, when they were cheer- 
ing Chance's men on to the first West Side pennant in twenty 
years. But the slight decrease in patronage in Chicago was 
more than counterbalanced by larger attendance in other 
cities, so that a more even balance was struck throughout the 
league. 

The Chicago Cubs, put on their mettle by their defeat for 
the World's Championship in the fall of 1906, set out on the 
campaign in 1907 determined to prove themselves capable of 
earning the highest honors of the Base Ball world. And nobly 
did thev work their way through to the desired goal. Chance's 
great team was the master of all opposition from the beginning 
of the season, until it closed with a glorious and unprecedented 
victory in the World's Championship series with the Detroit 
Tigers, who were beaten in four straight games after tieing the 
first contest of the series. The story of that series, the cul- 
mination of the season of 1907, is not to be told here. Suffice 
it to sav that its result furnished no surprise to those who had 
closely followed the wonderful work of the Cubs in their Na- 
tional League campaign. 

Chastened bv the downfall of their confident hopes in 1906, 
the Chicago Nationals attacked their 1907 problem in a truly 
scientific manner. Led by a master of every detail of the 
national game, himself one of the greatest players who ever 




>, Corridon: 3. Courtney: 4, Bransfield; 5, 
D'oota; 6,' Dooilnf'T Reason; 8 Grant; 9 ^acklitsch: 10 Magee; 11, 
Pittenger; 12, Richie; 13, Sparks; 14, ThomM^ Tituj^^ ^^ 

PHILADELPHIA TEAM— NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 121 

trod the base-paths, the Cubs made every post in the league 
race a winning one. Manager Chance commanded a team 
whose final perfect victory was in no detail the result of luck, 
chance, or the fortunes of the game. The Cubs were at all 
times absolute masters. 

The team experienced accidents and injuries enough to have 
seriously interfered with the prospects of an organization less 
strongly fortified in every department, or less expert in every 
branch of team play. Manager Chance himself was out of the 
game nearly one-third of the time. Frank* Schulte, the sluggish 
but speedy right fielder, took part in less than one hundred 
games. Joe Tinker was laid up during the early season by the 
effects of an operation for appendicitis and played in only four 
more games than Chance. In August Mordecai Brown, the 
great three-fingered wizard of the box and the pitching main- 
stay of the team, strained a muscle in his hurling arm and 
was useless for the balance of the season. But Chance had 
foreseen and prepared for all such emergencies. In Arthur 
Hofman he had provided a utility man capable of taking the 
place of any fielder on the team and playing nearly, or quite 
as well, as the regular occupant of the position. Hofman 
ranged from right field to shortstop and thence into his 
manager's shoes at the first corner, and there was no per- 
ceptible weakening at any place where he appeared. This 
mere substitute, theoretically supposed only to fill in occas- 
ionally, played in all but twenty championship games and to 
a certain extent he was the most important man in the squad, 
for he inspired equal confidence with the regular player no 
matter where he played. The presence of Hofman prevented 
the injuries to several of the Cub's stars from having a 
deleterious effect on the work of the club. Team work was 
not broken up and the great machine rolled calmly and 
courageously along, crushing all competitors. 

The overwhelming success of the Cubs in the league race 
was due to a large number of important factors, most notable 
of which were : The intelligent guidance of Manager Chance, 
the great strength of the pitching corps and the perfect 
harmony which reigned among the members of the team. 

Chance showed himself to be a truly "peerless leader," as 
the Chicago cohorts delight to call him. With only a brief 
managerial experience behind him he was quick to grasp the 
potential possibilities of his important position. He gave 
careful thought and serious study to the duties of his office, 
and he has the personal magnetism and the strength of charac- 
ter to make the carrying out of his ideas a pleasure to the 
players under his control. Chance is himself a great ball 
player, easily the best first baseman in the National League, 
a hard and consistent batter and a fast and fearless base run- 
ner. His example on the field was in itself an inspiration to 
his men. His single-minded desire to win was in evidence 
every moment of every game, from the first call of "Play ball" 
to the last hoarse howl, "Yer out." Never did he falter, never 
did he cease to buoy up the spirits of his men by his own 
contagious energy. Chance showed excellent judgment in the 
handling of his team, never overlooking a point either in 
offense or defense that would aid in landing victory. His 
use of his pitchers was particularly intelligent, and he secured 
the very best results from a staff which appeared to be rather 
erratic at the outset of the season. In fact, the grand work 
of the Cub pitchers was a notable feature of the team's play. 

The pitching staff did not look remarkably powerful at the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 123 

getaway. Brown was an acknowledged star, and it was 
upon his coolness, courage and resourcefulness that the hopes 
of the supporters of the Cubs were based. The rest of the 
Chance stable of twirlers were reckoned as of fair ability, but 
nothing of a startling nature was expected from them. Overall 
had been unsuccessful at Cincinnati, Reulbach was effective at 
times, but extremely wild and unreliable ; Lundgren's best work 
was limited to the cold weather of early spring and late fall ; 
Jack Pfiester, -like most "southpaws," was labeled as more or 
less uncertain, while "Chick" Fraser and Jack Taylor were 
counted as verging on the has-been class. The staff furnished 
a great surprise to the public by developing unusual strength. 
Reulbach. Brown and Overall, in the order named, were the 
three leading pitchers of the league, and not a single Chicago 
twirler broke into double figures in the lost column. Overall, 
with twenty-three victories to his credit, was second only to 
Christy Mathewson in the number of games won, and he lost 
less than any man in the league who pitched as often as 
he did. 

Much of the credit for the superlative showing of the Chicago 
twirlers was due to Manager Chance, who seldom let a man 
.stay in the box too long when he was proving ineffective and 
who always had a substitute warmed up and ready to jump 
into the game at an instant's notice. The most possible use 
was made of Reulbach's skill, and the erratic fellow was 
allowed to lose only four games, being yanked out invariably 
at the first sign of weakness. 

The third most important feature of the champions' play 
was the perfect team work which resulted from the complete 
harmony among the players. The Cubs are a high-class 
aggregation of citizens, on and off the field, professionally and 
otherwise. Of keen intelligence, the players were sharp enough 
to realize that no individual records would earn for them so 
much fame and money as the winning of the world's champion- 
ship, and they set sail for that goal, with mutual good- 
feeling, and a collective ambition to make themselves famous 
as a team, rather than as lone stars in the Base Ball firma- 
ment. There was no wrangling, no backbiting, no jealousy, 
among the champions. Each man aimed to fit himself to fill 
the groove marked out for him in Manager Chance's plan of 
team work, and to fill it just as well as he could for the 
good of the team. Hence a great and ' smoothly-working ma- 
chine, capable of smothering all competitors in its dust and yet 
advancing with so little jarring and jolting that its speed 
was pleasingly artistic without being sublimely terrifying. 

In every city excepting New York a second straight cham- 
pionship was conceded to the Cubs before the season opened. 
Gotham, though its team had been relegated to second place 
in 1906. had faith in the recuperative powers of the great 
Mathewson, the aggressiveness of Manager McGraw and Roger 
Bresnahan, the hard-hitting of Cy Seymour and the skillful 
infielding of Arthur Devlin. New York "rooters" also believed 
that the Cubs would show a loss of nerve on account of theii 
defeat by the White Sox in the World's Series of 1906, which 
Chance's men had been supremely over-confident of winning 
But elsewhere around the league circuit the race was gener- 
ally looked upon as a cinch for the Cubs, and this view proved 
to be the correct one. It is certain proof of the great and 
unfailing popularity of the parent organization of Base Ball 
that the fact that the Cubs were almost universally admitted 
to be the class of tbe league did not interfere with the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 125 

attendance in any city except Chicago itself, and that the 
contest for favorable positions in the race aroused wide interest 
throughout the season. 

The story of the National League race of 1907 must largely 
be a review of the steady, cool and triumphant procession of 
the Cubs to the goal of highest honor. The Chicago team got 
a better start than it did in the preceding year. The team 
was taken to West Baden early in March for a preliminary 
purifying of athletic blood, rendered sluggish by the winter's 
idleness. Then South to New Orleans and other cities, where 
good weather predominated and the club rounded into splen- 
did condition. By the time the start to the northward was 
made every man on the team was in rare good shape. So care- 
fully had the training rules been observed that the unusually 
severe weather conditions which prevailed during the first part 
of the championship season did not set the players back to any 
appreciable degree, and the team, except for several injuries to 
players, was in championship form right from the start and 
remained so to the finish. 

The Cubs opened the regular league season on their own 
grounds on Thursday, April 11, in freezing weather, with the 
St. Louis Cardinals as their opponents. The champions won 
easily by a score of 6 to 1, and repeated three days later on 
Sunday, the Friday and Saturday games having been post- 
poned on account of the winter weather prevalent in Chicago 
at the time. Then the champions journeyed to Pittsbux-g, 
where they won the first game of their series with the Pirates, 
making three straight victories. The next day, April 18, the 
champions suffered their first defeat, being beaten by Pitts- 
burg 1 to 0. This was Mordecai Brown's first game, and he 
lost through no fault of his own, pitching shut-out ball 
throughout. 

Pittsburg's one run was scored on the muff of an easy fly 
to center by Jimmy Slagle, a play which caused a good deal 
of critical comment. Slagle, of course backed strongly by 
Chance and all the other Cubs, put in a strenuous claim that 
he had actually caught the ball, and that it fell out of his 
hand as he was about to return it to the diamond. Umpire 
O'Day ruled otherwise, however, declaring it was a pure and 
simple muff, and his decision stood. The error cost the Cubs 
the lead in the race, enabling Cincinnati to move up into a 
tie with them for first place, a lofty position which the Reds 
were able to maintain for only twenty-four hours. While 
Brown lost his first game, it was a long, long time before he 
again passed under the wire second in a championship contest. 
He did not suffer his second defeat of the season until July 
27, having won fifteen games in the meantime, so that with 
the season more than half over he had the remarkable record 
of having won fifteen games and lost one, a winning average 
of .938. 

The Cubs lost only one more game during the month of 
April, Cincinnati defeating them by the overwhelming score 
of 12 to 2 on the 24th. The champions were therefore never 
lower than first place or a tie for first place during the first 
three weeks of the season. The first of May found them with 
thirteen victories and two defeats, for a percentage of .867, 
and leading the league, with the Giants one full game behind 
them. This was a far better showing than the champions had 
made for the same period- in the preceding year, when they won 
ten games and lost six and were in third place, both New York 
and Pittsburg being ahead of them. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 127 

The month of May witnessed a terrific battle between the 
Cubs and the Giants, and the championship was practically 
settled during this period of a few days over four weeks. 
The Giants had secured nearly as good a start as their West- 
em opponents, and they made it a neck-and-neck struggle in 
the hope of getting the nerve of the Chicagos. Manager 
McGraw and his cohorts felt that once in the lead they could 
not be overtaken but would sail on uninterruptedly to a repeti- 
tion of the glories of 1905. In this hope they were doomed 
to disappointment. Three times during May the Giants were 
in sole possession of first place and they were tied for the 
temporary honor as often, but they could not maintain the 
cruel clip set for them by Chance's men and soon dropped 
back. The Cubs were a full game ahead on the evening of 
the first of May, rain preventing their game at Cincinnati 
that afternoon, while the Giants, by defeating Boston, moved 
up to within a game of the champions. 

On May 2 the Reds defeated the Cubs, while the Giants 
administered another trimming to the Beaneaters, and so 
passed into a tie for first place with the Cubs. Then ensued 
a bitter race which, had it occurred during the final month 
of the season instead of the second, would have aroused the 
Base Ball world to a pitch of frenzy. New York took a lead 
of half a game on May 3 by defeating Brooklyn 1 to 0, the 
Cubs' game with Pittsburg being postponed on account of 
rain. Both teams won their games the next day, New York 
still retaining the lead. The Cubs beat the Pirates on the 
5th of May, the Giants resting, and again the two teams were 
tied for the highest place. 

New York forged to the front on May 7, and that team held 
the undisputed lead for nearly two weeks. On May 11, the 
Giants were a full game to the good and that was as far as 
they could advance their relative advantage. The Cubs were in 
foreign territory now, having begun their first invasion of the 
Eastern cities on the 8th of May. This was the accepted 
time for McGraw's men to increase their lead and gain a 
decisive advantage. Urged on by the hosts of Metropolitan 
"rooters," the Giants were setting a tremendous pace on their 
own grounds. From April 25 to May 19, inclusive, a period 
of almost four weeks, they did not experience a single defeat, 
winning seventeen straight games without a break. On May 
19, which was Sunday and therefore a day of rest for all the 
National League teams, as the Western clubs were playing in 
the East at the time, the table of club standings showed that 
New York had won twenty-four games and lost only three, for 
a percentage of .889. Chicago was exactly one full game in 
the rear, having won twenty-three games and lost four for a 
percentage of .852. The Pittsburg team was in third place, 
but almost out of sight, being three hundred points behind 
Chicago. On Monday, May 20. the tail-end Cardinals broke 
New York's long winning streak, defeating the Giants by a 
score of 6 to 4. but the Cubs missed this excellent oppor- 
tunity to overtake the leaders by losing to Boston on the 
same day. 

On the following day began the first series of the season 
between the Giants and the Cubs, and the Polo Grounds 
groaned with the mass of eager humanity assembled there to 
witness the strife of the two leaders. While it was too early 
irr the season for this to be a truly crucial series, the close- 
ness of the race up to this time and the fact that the leader- 
ship for the present depended upon the outcome of these games 




7 n^flA B ^ an ^ ao r t ' J*> Bra^: 4, Bridwell; 5, Brown; 6, Burke: 
P*efl£? e i ; Q %£S* er1 7i 9 ™ Howard: 10, Lindaman'; 11, Needham; 12 
rrener, 13, Ritchey 14, Tenney; 15, Young. 

Photos by Horner, Boston. 
BOSTON TEAM— NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 129 

created intense interest and enthusiasm. Large crowds, limited 
only by the capacity of the grounds, turned out each day. 
The Cubs were equal to the occasion and more than held 
their own in the enemy's bailiwick, winning two out of three 
sames, the first and the last, and leaving New York for the 
West tied with the Giants for the lead. On May 24, while 
the Cubs were on the road to Cincinnati, New York was beaten 
by Boston and surrendered the lead to Chicago by a narrow 
margin of half a game. 

On May 26 the Cubs dropped back into a tie again through 
losing a Sunday game to the Reds while the Giants were 
resting. On May 27 the Reds repeated the dose and the 
Giants, whose scheduled game with Boston was prevented by 
rain, were forced once more into the top position without 
having to labor for the honor. The next day Chicago resumed 
the lead by beating Cincinnati while New York was losing 
to Philadelphia. But an off day for the Cubs and a victory 
for the Giants on May 29 resulted in another tie. This was 
the last day on which any club disputed honors with the 
champions. Decoration Day, May 30, saw Chicago step into 
first place for the last time, as the club never relinquished 
the position again. On that great holiday the Cubs won both 
the morning and afternoon games from the Pirates of Pitts- 
burg, while the Giants succeeded only in breaking even in 
their two contests with the Quakers. On June 1 the standing 
of the three leading clubs was as follows : 

Won. Lost. PC. 

Chicago 29 9 .763 

New York 28 11 .718 

Philadelphia 21 15 .583 

The Cubs had been tested by fire and not found wanting. 
They had the pennant won. During all this time the team had 
been crippled by the absence of either Tinker or Schulte, both 
of whom were out of the game a great deal, but Artie Hofman 
had shown himself to be a remarkably efficient substitute for 
either infield or outfield duty and the club kept going away. The 
Giants, wearied by the terrific pace of the first six .weeks 
of the season, slumped badly in June. Early in the month the 
Eastern clubs journeyed West for the first time and the trip 
proved a disastrous one for McGraw's men, who opened their 
Western series in the home of the enemy on the West Side 
of Chicago and lost all of the three games that were played. 

It was evident to all impartial observers at this time that 
the former world's champions had played out their string 
and the Cubs were universally hailed as two-time winners. 
On this initial Western trip the Giants won only five games out 
of thirteen, and did not capture a victory in either Chicago or 
Pittsburg. Before the middle of June the Gothamites were 
six and one-half games, or one hundred points in the percentage 
table, behind the flying Cubs, and the race was as good as 
over. Philadelphia and Pittsburg during June had a strenuous 
struggle for third position, but both teams were so far in the 
rear of the Cubs that they could no longer be considered as 
vital factors in the pennant struggle. On July 1, the third 
mile-stone in the race, Chicago had won forty-eight and lost 
sixteen for a percentage of .750. New York was more than 100 
points behind with .627, and ' Pittsburg, which had finally 
wrested third place from Philadelphia, was 60 points further 
in the rear. At this period Cincinnati had a good hold on 




1, MeCloskey, Mgr.; 2. Barry: 3, Beebe; 4. Bennett; 5, Burnett; 
6. Byrne; 7. Fromme; 8. Holly; 9. Hostetter; 10. Karger: 11, Konet- 
chy; 12, Lush; 13, Marshall; 14, McGlynn; 15. Murray: 16. Noonan. 
» Horner, Photos, Boston. 

ST. LOUIS TEAM— NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 131 

fifth place, but Brooklyn, after a wretched start at the begin- 
ning of the season, was coining fast, and already loomed up 
as the prospective leader of the second division. 

The morning of the Fourth of July saw an elaborate cere- 
mony on the West Side grounds in Chicago, where the National 
League championship banner was flung to the breezes for the 
first time. The members of the National Commission — Garry 
Herrmann, Harry C. Pulliam and Ban B. Johnson — were pres- 
ent, and Chairman Herrmann made a brief but interesting 
speech. The champion Cubs, escorted by the Cincinnati Reds, 
who were their opponents for the day, paraded the field to the 
stirring music of a brass band, and the populace burst into 
rousing cheers when the huge pennant was unfurled. The 
Cubs refused to allow the great day to be marred by anything 
so unpleasant as a defeat, winning two games from Cincinnati 
in easy style. After this event the champions let down a bit 
for a short time, winning only five of their next nine games, 
an unusually low percentage. They soon regained their stride, 
however, and on August 1 had a percentage of .739, and were 
eleven and a half games ahead of the Pirates, who had ad- 
vanced into second place, a game in front of the withering 
Giants. 

By this time the promise of the Brooklyns had been ful- 
filled, and the Superbas were in fifth place, with Boston sixth, 
Cincinnati seventh and St. Louis, of course, last, a position 
which the Cardinals had graced almost from the beginning of 
the race. 

By che middle of August the Cubs were fourteen full games 
in the lead, and there was absolutely no further interest in the 
race for the pennant, though the attendance at all points held 
up renaarkably well. August witnessed a fierce struggle for 
second honors between Pittsburg and New York. These two 
old and bitter rivals clashed alongside of each other on nearly 
even terms during the entire month, until on September 1, 
the Giants were holding second place by no more than two 
points. 

During September, with the finish in sight, and no further 
honors to be gained until the bell should ring for the world's 
series with the champions of the American League, the Cubs 
slowed down perceptibly. Not until the 22d of the month did 
they register their one-hundredth victory, just thirteen days 
later than in 1906, when they reached the century mark on 
September 9. On September 23 the Cubs, by defeating Phila- 
delphia 4 to 1, clinched the pennant for 1907. They could 
have lost every game from that time until the wind-up of the 
season, two weeks later, without fear of being deprived of 
first honors. This was just four days later than they had 
cinched the flag in 1906, their winning date that season being 
September 19. 

The Cubs closed the season on October 6 with a percentage 
of .704. having won 107 games and lost 45, beating every record 
ever made for number of victories in a season except their own 
of the previous year, when they won 116 games and finished 
with an average of .763. 

The league race, although somewhat in the nature of a 
walkover for the Cubs, was closer than that of the preceding 
season, and a higher class of ball was played on the average. 
After their interesting struggle with the Giants during the 
month of May, Chance's men were never in the slightest 
danger of being overhauled, and went on their winning way in 
calm and peaceful confidence. Still they had many a hard 




1. MeAleer; 2, Hartzell; 3, T. Jones; 4, Niles: 5. O'Connor; 6, 

Stephens. L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, O. 

A GROUP OPI ST. LOUIS AMERICA^ 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 133 

battle to fight, especially with Pittsburg and Philadelphia. 
One sure sign of the superiority of the champions in the more 
scientific details of play was the large percentage of their 
victories which were achieved by one run. Large and one- 
sided scores were very infrequent in the National League last 
year. Especially did the Cubs overwhelm their opponents on 
very few occasions. The team won most of its victories, not 
so much by main strength as by a quick grasp of every critical 
situation ; the closest possible attention to every detail, not 
only by Manager Chance in his capacity of field leader, but 
also by every man on the team; the quick shifting of tbe 
defense to meet each new emergency, the intelligent handling 
of a staff of clever pitchers and the speed and nerve of the 
runners on the bases. 

The Cubs ranked only third in team batting, both Pittsburg 
and New York finishing with higher averages. They made less 
three-base hits than any other team in the league, and Phila- 
delphia was the only club which pounded out less home runs 
than the champions. But John Kling, prince of all modern 
catchers, and a very fast infield and outfield helped the pitchers 
to put up a defense which was not to be battered down very 
often. The Cubs seldom needed many runs to win and their 
inside work was so carefully planned, so thoroughly studied 
and so accurately executed that they were able to secure the 
necessary quota of tallies in many more than two-thirds of 
their contests. Their base running was eminently praise- 
worthy. The team was fast, and the players showed superb 
judgment in making their way around the circuit. And so, 
combining brain work with physical excellence, the Chicago 
team had a comparatively simple march to the championship 
of the National League, and an equally easy victory in the 
series for world's honors which crowned the Base Ball year. 

There were few surprises in the race. The Cubs were 
acknowledged winners almost from the start and the other 
teams ran fairly true to form. Pittsburg was never lower 
than fourth place, and finally finished second, after shaking 
off first Philadelphia and then New York. The Pirates, with 
only an average pitching staff, and with several shifts in the 
line-up, were kept well up in the race by the steadily brilliant 
work of Manager Fred Clarke, Hans Wagner, the champion 
batsman of the league for the fifth time in his career, and 
Tommy Leach, who was sent from third base to center field, 
where he developed as much skill as an outfielder as he had 
shown for years as a guardian of the third corner. These 
three men were the mainstay of the Pittsburg club, which was 
rather mediocre in the other positions, but strong enough to 
remain a steady occupant of the first division. With a stronger 
pitching corps, the Pirates might have made an interesting 
struggle for first honors, as they led all the teams of the 
league in batting and base running. 

The downfall of the New York Giants was a severe -blow to 
the "fans" of the metropolis, but not a surprise to close 
students of the game elsewhere. The team had very little 
young blood, being composed almost entirely of time-tried 
veterans. Every man in the regular line-up with the excep- 
tion of Arthur Devlin at third base had seen many years of 
service. Slowing up was bound to come to such an aggrega- 
tion, and it arrived to a marked extent in 1907. Moreover, 
Mathewson, who regained in a large measure his form of 1905, 
was the only one of the Giant pitchers who twirled consistent 
ball throughout the season. Matty did brilliant work, and 




1, Grimshaw; 2, 
6, Criger. 



Winters; 3. 



Peterson: 4. Hayden: 5, Cy Young; 
L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, 0. 



A GROUP OF BOSTON AMERICANS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 135 

most of his defeats were by close scores, and due to lack of 
batting, as well as slow base running behind him. Manager 
McGraw had a very hard time filling the position at second 
base left vacant by the release of Billy Gilbert. Tom Cor- 
coran, the famous shortstop of the Cincinnati Reds for the 
ten previous years, was tried out at second early in the 
season, but did not meet McGraw's requirements. Strang 
played a few games in the position, and finally Larry Doyle, 
a youngster from a minor league «in the West, was secured. 
Doyle finished the season at second and showed considerable 
promise, but the position was always a weak one. 

The work of the Giants' infield was further embarrassed 
by an injury to first baseman Dan McGann, who was out of 
the game nearly half the season as 1 a result of being hit on 
the arm by a pitched ball. Injuries to catcher Bresnahan and 
right fielder George Browne also handicapped the Giants. 
Starting off at a marvelous pace the New York team ran 
neck-and-neck with the Cubs for the first seven weeks of the 
season and was the only club in the league which ever led the 
champions for so much as a single day at any stage of the 
campaign. The first clash between the two clubs, however, 
showed pretty clearly that the Westerners were the masters 
of the Giants in speed as well as in the pitching department, 
and subsequent events proved that they also had the staying 
powers. 

From the first of June the New Yorks slowly but steadily 
retrograded. As is apt to be the case with a team which 
had won a world's championship and then began to go back, 
certain small jealousies arose among the players. The last 
Western trip of the Giants late in September was disastrous. 
Only four games were won out of thirteen played and the 
climax was capped when Philadelphia closed the season with 
three straight victories over the once proud champions and 
ousted the Giants from third place. New York lost its last 
seven games and wound up in fourth place, the lowest position 
occupied by a Gotham team in five years. 

A marked feature of the season's work was the improved 
spirit shown by the Philadelphia team under the energetic 
management of Billy Murray, who went to the Quaker City 
after many years of successful work as a player and manager 
in the Class A leagues. Murray disproved the theory held by 
some that a man who has never been a great major league 
ball player cannot show much strength as a major league 
manager. The Phillies worked hard for him, played good ball 
all the season, and advanced from fourth to third place. The 
Quakers were a thorn in the side of the champion Cubs, from 
whom they won more games than any other club in the league 
except Pittsburg, and most of their defeats by Chance's crew 
came only after hard-fought struggles. There was a new spirit 
of hustle in the play of the team, which ran a good race in 
spite of severe handicaps on account of injuries. The battery 
work was not effective enough to land the club as close to the 
top as the merits of its play in some other departments would 
warrant. 

Charley Dooin, one of the best catchers in the league when 
he is right, had somewhat of an off year, due largely to anxiety 
caused by illness in his family. Frank Sparks was the only 
consistent winner among the pitchers and his work was re- 
markably strong, as he won twenty-two out of thirty games 
and ranked fourth among all the pitchers of the league,- and 
ahead of any twirler except the three Chicago experts, Reul- 



^m 








1, Mgr. Cantillon; 2, Ganley; b, Shannon; 4, Tompkins; 5, Block; u, 

Tony Smith; 7, Blankenship. L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, O. 

A GROUP OF WASHINGTON PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 137 

bach, Brown and Overall. Grant, the young third baseman 
from Harvard, was injured early in the season, as was Kid 
Gleason, the veteran second baseman. These misfortunes broke 
up the team play of the infield in many contests. Grant, after 
getting back into the game in mid-season, showed great prom- 
ise of becoming a valuable player. The accident to Gleason, 
which occurred in May, hurt the team's play for a time, but 
resulted in the development of a rising young star in the 
person of Otto Knabe, who filled the gap at second so ably 
that Manager Murray kept him in that position for the balance 
of the season. 

The Philadelphia outfield, consisting of the great Sherwood 
Magee, the veteran Roy Thomas, and the hard-hitting Titus, per- 
formed acceptably and with more ginger and enthusiasm than 
ever before. The Quakers were always in the first division, 
but spent most of the time in fourth place, until the very 
last week, when they wound up in style by winning their last 
seven games, four from Pittsburg and three from New York, 
a succession of victories which enabled them to overtake and 
pass the Giants and finish in the third position, only twenty- 
five points behind the Pirates. The work of the Quakers was 
so consistent that manv good judges believe that they will do 
even better in 1908, and may even give the world's champions 
a hard battle for the pennant. 

The four second division clubs, Brooklyn, Cincinnati, Boston 
and St. Louis, were outclassed from the start and never were 
for a moment considered as prominent factors in the race. 
Brooklyn got about as discouraging a start as ever befell a club 
in the National League. The team had a satisfactory training 
trip and was in many quarters considered to be a first division 
probability, if not a certainty. But it dropped sixteen out of 
its first seventeen games, and never was able fully to recover 
from this early shock. The Superbas lost their first four 
games, then broke the ice bv a victory over the Giants to the 
tune of 3 to 0. This lone* shut out failed to turn the tide, 
and the team proceeded to drop the next twelve games straight, 
not winning again until May 11, when it managed to defeat 
the champions at Washington Park by the smallest possible 
score. With the season a month old Patsy Donovan's brigade 
had a percentage of .059, and hope for a first division berth 
had vanished. From that time on, however, the Superbas 
played very fair ball, and their march upward was slow but 
steady. They soon passed the struggling Cardinals, who set- 
tled comfortably into the cellar for the balance of the trip. 
Cincinnati and Boston put up a fight with the laudable intention 
of holding the Brooklyns back in seventh place, but Donovan's 
men were not to be denied and they reached the top of the 
second division during July and never relinquished their place, 
though Cincinnati pressed them hard right at the wind-up and 
might have passed them in another day or two. 

The Cincinnati Reds presented a revised line-up, notable 
for the absence of such famous veterans as Joe Kelley, Tom 
Corcoran and Cy Seymour, who had been with the club for 
years, but were eliminated by Manager Ned Hanlon in his 
search for young blood. The finish of the team in sixth place 
was not a great disappointment, for the simple reason that 
no one had expected anything higher than fifth at the best. 
The team displayed two fine catchers in Schlei and McLean, 
and sprung a sensational young outfielder in the person of 
Mike Mitchell, a recruit from the champion Portland club of 
the Pacific Coast League. The pitching staff, however, was not 




J, Knoll; 2, Jacobson; '6, Hughes; 4, Townsend; 5, Patten; 6, C. 

Jones. L. VanOeyen, Photos, Cleveland, O. 

A GROUP OF WASHINGTON PLAYERS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 139 

strong enough to carry a green team, whose work was not yet 
polished or scientific. 

The Reds got a good start by winning their first three out 
of four games, and they were tied with the Cubs for first place 
at the end of the first week of the season. Then class began 
to tell and the team dropped steadily downward, occupying 
every position in the race except eighth within the next two 
months. On the first of August the Reds were in seventh 
place, just behind Boston, but a very disastrous Western trip 
by the Beaneaters during that month gave the Cincinnati out- 
fit a chance to pass them, which was accepted. The work 
of the team showed some improvement as the season waned, 
and the Reds finally finished with a slightly better percentage 
than in 1906, and only eight points behind their closest rivals, 
the Brooklyns. 

The Bostons were prominent only in the early stages of 
the race. The team was weak behind the bat, a fact which 
prevented its staff of young pitchers from showing as bril- 
liantly as might have been expected, and it was none too fast 
in the field. The only club from which Boston was able to win 
the season's series was the Brooklyn team. The Beaneaters 
were in sixth place on August 1, but on the following day, 
while in the midst of their second Western trip, they began 
a series of losses which finally amounted to fifteen straight 
defeats before it was checked. Cincinnati started Tenney's 
men on their downward path by taking five straight games 
from them, the Cardinals continued the onslaught, winning nine 
straight, and then Pittsburg annexed one before the Bean- 
eaters managed to break the hoodoo. This disastrous series 
of defeats settled the Tenney tribe in seventh place, and there 
they finished. 

The Cardinals of St. Louis were always in last place from 
the time that Brooklyn began to forge its way upward in the 
middle of May. Manager McCloskey was disappointed in the 
work of some of his players and was forced to make so many 
shifts that effective team work was out of the question. The 
team found only one easy mark and that was the Boston club, 
from which it won sixteen games out of the season's series of 
twenty-two. It was not able to win more than eight from 
any other club. The Pittsburg series was particularly dis- 
astrous to the St. Louis men. who won only two games from 
the Pirates during the entire season. One pitcher, the left- 
hander Eddie Karger ; a young third baseman, Bobby Byrne, 
and a new first baseman named Konetchy, who was secured 
from a minor league late in the season, were the stars of 
the team. 

Notwithstanding the fact that Brooklyn, Cincinnati, Boston 
and St. Louis were never seriously in the race, the patronage 
in all four cities was very encouraging throughout the season 
and every club was a financial, if not an artistic, winner. 

The season was not notable for remarkable or extraordinary 
features. There were no excessively long-drawn-out champion- 
ship contests, fifteen innings being the limit for a game. 
There were two of that length, Cincinnati defeating St. Louis 
7 to 5 on the morning of Decoration Dav, and Cincinnati 
playing a fifteen-inning tie with Brooklyn, score 4 to 4, on 
June 6. There were two no-hit games pitched, Pfeffer of 
Boston finding the Cincinnati Reds as his victim on May 8, 
and Maddox of Pittsburg turning the trick at the expense of 
Brooklyn on September 21. There were two . forfeited games, 
one by New York to Philadelphia on the opening day of the? 




1. Ban B. Johnson, President American League (Photo Copyright, 1905, 
by Checkering Co., Boston); 2, Frank J. Farrell, President New York 
(Photo Copyright, 1904, by Geo. R. Lawrence Co., Chicago); 3, Benjamin 
Shibe. President Athletics; 4, J. F. Kilfoyl, President Cleveland; 5, 
John I Taylor, President Boston; 6. Chas. A. Comiskey, President 
Chicago; 7. R. L. Hedges, President St. Louis (Photo Copyright, 1905, 
by J. C. Strauss, St. Louis). 

A GROUP OF AMERICAN LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 141 

season, caused by the crowd at the Polo Grounds swarming 
over the field, there being insufficient police protection, and the 
other by Chicago to St. Louis on the closing day of the 
season. 

Owing to the firm support given the umpires of the league 
by President Harry C. Pulliam, the year passed without a 
single serious case of rowdyism on the field in any champion- 
ship game. In this respect the administration of President 
Pulliam has been of the greatest benefit to Base Ball, to pure 
sport in the National League, and, by example, in all other 
Base Ball associations throughout the country. At the annual 
meeting of the league, which was held at the Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel in New York City in December, President Pulliam was 
re-elected for the season of 1908 by a vote of 7 to 1, the 
New York club alone voting against him, and his salary was 
raised $2,000. Secretary John A. Heydler, a very competent 
official, was also re-elected. 

During this meeting President Charles W. Murphy of the 
World's Champion Cubs, gave an elaborate banquet to the 
club owners, league officials, ball players and newspaper men 
in honor of the victory of his team. A pleasing and unusual 
feature was the presentation to Hans Wagner of the Pittsburg 
club, champion batter of the league, of a handsome and costly 
silver loving cup, the gift of the league in recognition of his 
great playing during the past ten years. This was the first 
time in the history of Base Ball that an individual player has 
been so honored by his league. 

With the season of 1907 came to a close the thirty-second 
year of the continuous existence of the National League. For 
one-third of a century the league has been at the head of the 
great national game, constantly enlarging its field, improving 
its methods and working for the best interests of club owner, 
ball player and interested spectator alike. The prospect is for 
many more years of continued and increasing usefulness for 
the parent organization and fountain head of a business which 
now extends to every village and hamlet in the country, fur- 
nishing healthful sport to the young man and a delightful 
and recreative spectacle for all our citizens. 

Long life and prosperity for the National League of Pro- 
fessional Base Ball Clubs. 

The official averages of the National League for 1907 will 
be found elsewhere in the Guide ; for page number, see 
"Contents." 



r 





SPALDING'S! OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 143 

American League Season of 1907 

By Irving E. Sanborn, Chicago 

The American League's season of 
1907 was a record breaker even for 
that vigorous young organization 
and its remarkable career, studded 
with brilliant and sensational suc- 
cesses. There is no question but 
that the campaign was the most 
noteworthy, financially, in the 
league's history. Artistically it was 
a wonder in the intense interest it 
created throughout the country be- 
cause of its spectacular race for the 
championship in which four of the 
eight clubs were counted as likely 
pennant winners right down near 
to the finish. 

From the playing standpoint 

alone last season does not stand out 

so preeminently over previous years 

as it does in the monetary rewards 

enjoyed by the club owners and 

players, for salaries never were 

higher as a rule, yet the club owners 

never received greater returns on 

their investments than during the 

Ban B. Johnson year 1907. It has been stated 

President American League officially that no club m the Amer- 

Convrteht 1905 hv lcan Lea S ue s career ever played to 

Ohiol^r^ vn lwni, m°re people or more money in 

Cmckermg Co., Boston. Qne se £ so £ than did the Chicago 

White Stockings last year, with the prestige of the title of 
World's Champions added to that which they always have 
maintained. With the Cleveland club as an opponent, the 
White Stockings also drew the largest attendance for a single 
game in the league's history, and that only three weeks before 
the finish of the race, when interest naturally begins to wane 
in any but the closest of battles. 

The Philadelphia club, which was a probable pennant winner 
for a few days longer than Chicago was, drew nearly as many 
people in the aggregate during the season as did the White 
Stockings, but on account of the difference in admission prices 
prevailing in the two cities the margin of actual receipts was 
largely in favor of the Chicago club. 

The victory of Detroit in the pennant race, with its incon- 
trovertible proof of the absolute honesty of the great American 
pastime and its addition of a new name, Hugh Jennings, to 
the already long roster of successful managers to whom the 
American League has offered the opportunity to become world 
famous, was only slightlv dimmed by the poor showing made 
by the Tigers in the World's Championship Series with the 
Chicago National League club. 

In that respect alone last season was not more brilliant and 
successful than all which have preceded it. It was surpassed 
in its artistic results by the season of 1903, when the Boston 
Americans won the world's honors from Pittsburg, and by the 
season of 1906, when Chicago's White Stockings, by beating the 
present Chicago holders of the title, won back for the American 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 145 

League the honors which had been lost to New York by the 
Athletics in 1905. But in no other respects can the seasons 
of 1903 and 1906 compare with that which closed last October. 

In 1903 the league's pennant race itself was something of a 
walkover for the Boston club and did not equal in interest 
any of the four years which have succeeded it. In 1906 all 
previous records were wiped out in every department of the 
game, but these, in turn, were eclipsed last season in every 
respect save the surrender of the World's Championship, by the 
apparently regular swinging of the pendulum of Fate, which so 
far has shown not the slightest partiality to either of the 
major leagues in the awarding of the ultimate honors of the 
year. 

The wonderful growth of the public's interest in Base Ball 
during the last half decade has attracted many hundreds of 
thousands of people to the game to whom its history previous 
to the last four or five years is unknown, or at best hazy. 
Previous to that they were interested in Base Ball only in a 
general or spasmodic way, with none of the intenser personal 
feeling which prompts a close following of the career of the 
club or league in which individual loyalty is centered. To 
these recently made devotees of the great sport it may be of 
interest to learn briefly of the remarkable career of the Amer- 
ican League, which in less than a decade rose from a minor 
organization, whose circuit was restricted to a single section of 
the country, to a major league powerful enough to command its 
full share of the public's patronage and attention, and to 
divide equally, in the last five years, the claims to supremacy 
in playing strength. 

Only ten years ago the prophet who had predicted such a 
phenomenal growth would have been ridiculed, even outside 
"his own country," and the only two men then connected with 
the game of Base Ball who even dreamed of such results were 
B. B. Johnson and C. A. Comiskey, probably the only two men 
capable of accomplishing the miracle which the American 
League's career represents. 

The circuit of what now is the American League ten years 
ago — in 1898 — was bounded by Buffalo on the east and Kansas 
City on the west. It did not include a single city of the first 
twelve in the country in the matter of population. It was not 
even American League in name then, its title being Western 
League. The eight clubs were located in Buffalo, Columbus. 
Detroit, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, St. Paul, Minneapolis and 
Kansas City. Of these cities Detroit, now next to the smallest 
in the circuit, was the largest of the eight. 

With that foundation on which to build the leading spirits 
of the coming American League raised the present structure in 
less than five years. In reality the period of expansion was 
confined to three years, for it was not until 1900 that the then 
Western League became the American League in name. At 
that time a club was located in Chicago and the Cleveland 
franchise vacated by the National League in reducing its cir- 
cuit from twelve to eight clubs, was taken up. C. A. Comiskey's 
St. Paul franchise was transferred to Chicago and the Columbus 
franchise to Cleveland. 

With this beginning the American League declared its inde- 
pendence of the National Agreement and in 1901 precipitated a 
war for players and territory which could only have ended in 
disaster but for the bold conception of expanding immediately 
to a major league circuit. This was accomplished by locating 
clubs in Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore and Washington in 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 147 

1901. That necessitated dropping Buffalo, Kansas City, Minne- 
apolis and Indianapolis from the circuit of 1900. 

The year 1902 saw this expansion process continued by 
transferring the Milwaukee club to St. Louis and before the 
season of 1903 was opened the Baltimore franchise was trans- 
ferred to New York City, and the recent minor league had 
secured a foothold in the five leading cities of the country, 
which foothold was assured it by the declaration of peace m 
the winter of 1902-03 and the birth of the present National 
Agreement under which the two major leagues have since pros- 
pered in a constantly increasing spirit of harmony and friend- 
liness. 

No less remarkable than this territorial and material expan- 
sion has been that of the financial resources behind the several 
clubs, brought about by interesting men of capital in the 
nation's greatest pastime in place of some of greater practical 
knowledge of the game but of smaller resources, who were 
backers of the teams a decade ago; A simple comparison of 
the owners of the league's clubs ten years ago with those who 
control their destinies to-day will Illustrate the point. The men 
interested in the eight Western League cities in 1898 were: 
Buffalo, James P. Franklin; Columbus, T. J. Loftus ; Indian- 
apolis, W. H. Watkins : Detroit, George Vanderbeck; Milwaukee, 
M. R. Killilea, Fred Gross and Connie Mack; St. Paul, C. A. 
Comiskey ; Minneapolis, Clarence Saulpaugh ; Kansas t'ity, 
James II. Manning. 

In passing it may be recalled that the former owners of two 
of these clubs have since died — Messrs. Franklin and Killilea. 
The majority of these men were graduates from the diamond 
itself and those who were not possessed a practical insight 
into the game which enabled them to handle the affairs of 
their clubs personally. The manager was little more than a 
field captain in those days. 

The club owners of the American League of 1908 are : Chi- 
cago, C. A. Comiskey ; St. Louis. K. L. Hedges: Cleveland, J. 
II. Kilfoyl and C. W. Somers : Detroit. W. If. Yawkey; Phila- 
delphia, Benjamin F. Shibe and Connie Mack; Washington, T. 
C. Noyes ; New York, Frank J. Farrell : Boston, John I. Taylor. 
With the single exception of the Washington club these men 
own or control practically all of their club's stock. Of the 
practical Base Ball men. graduated from the ranks of the 
players, only Messrs. Comiskey and Mack remain from the roster 
of ten years ago. In place of the other six are men who have 
made their capital in other business and have become lnt< 
in the sport not alone for the money there was to be made out 
of it but through love of the game itself, increased by civic 
pride which prompted the desire to give their communities great 
Base Ball teams. 

And both of the two graduate players who are still in the 
list have become wealthy and influential in their cities through 
the prosperity of the game, enhanced by their own marked and 
notable ability to keep their clubs always prominent in the 
annual struggles for the pennant. In the quantity of capital 
and resources behind its eight clubs, therefore, the American 
League has increased its material strength quite as much as it 
has that of its circuit and of its teams. 

The struggle for the 1907 pennant in this organization takes 
its place in history alongside of and in direct line with those 
of the three previous seasons. None the less remarkable than 
these in its closeness, the 1907 battle excelled in some respects 
those of other years. In four of the eight cities the contest 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 149 

for the bunting was of vital interest tor practically the entire 
six months' campaign. In two of the other four cities there 
was a chance for the pennant for a considerable part of the 
season, and in the other two cities, which belonged in the 
hopeless class, the addition of new managers to the teams 
served to stimulate new hopes and enthusiasm. 

Only in Chicago did the campaign produce the bitterest brand 
of disappointment, and it already has been stated that Chicago 
stuck to its club through disaster in record breaking fashion. 
For the White Stockings for many weeks of the pennant race 
held out the brightest of promises of repeating their 1906 
victory and thereby giving Chicago, for the second time in 
succession, the unique honor of owning both representatives in 
the World's Series to battle for the highest title in the sporting 
world. And only by a series of ills and accidents, greater than 
any club which finished in the first division ever struggled with 
before, were the White Stockings deprived of their honors. 

Taking the lead early in the race Chicago's then World's 
Champions held to it consistently and tenaciously until nearly 
four of the six months' race was run. But in that time they 
were challenged desperately by three different contenders. 
Detroit, Cleveland and Philadelphia in turn repeatedly assaulted 
the White Stockings' lead, never lengthened to more than a 
few games at best, until finally the representatives of Detroit, 
always keeping within striking distance, went into the lead, 
just as the strain of a crippled team was being felt most 
severely by Chicago, and began that memorable and wonderful 
finish fight with the Philadelphia Athletics. 

Never before has the sport loving portion of a nation been, 
worked up to so high a pitch as during the closing weeks of 
that battle. Probably never will it happen again. 

When the three western contenders for the pennant began 
their last invasion of the east, with only one eastern club to 
do battle with them for tbe championship, each of the four 
clubs was conceded a good chance for the honors. The race 
was so close that it was merely a matter of which of the four 
could make the most desperate finish and secure the best of 
the luck of the game. Philadelphia and Detroit were allowed 
to have the inside chances, but a little slip or let down by 
either of them meant a quick retreat below Chicago and 
Cleveland. 

Two weeks before the finish of the race the results of the 
games played had landed the Tigers and Athletics in a dead- 
locked tie for the lead. The Athletics' opponents at that 
crucial time were the White Stockings, who were only a game 
behind first place, although ranking third. One more victory 
for Chicago would have dropped Philadelphia to third place, 
but the Athletics braced strenuously and, by the almost super- 
human pitching of Plank and Dygert, shut out the White 
Stockings for two successive days, winning the last two games 
of their series by extremely low scores. Mack's men had to do 
it to keep even with Detroit, which won the entire series with 
the Boston club. 

That brought Detroit and Philadelphia together for their 
final series of the season actually tied for the lead, with four 
games to be played with each other, and only ten days of the 
season left. At the same time both Chicago and Cleveland 
were counted strong contenders for the championship. If the 
two leaders had cut each other's throats in those four games 
at Philadelphia, either the White Stockings or Cleveland easily 
could have slipped into the lead while playing weaker oppo- 
nents. 




1, O'Connor; 2, Stevens; 3, Frisk; 4. Farris: 5. Powell: 6, Jones; 7, 
Ryan; 8, Hartzell; 9, Pickering; 10. Butler: 11. Yeager; 12, Del<- 
banty; 13, Crlss; 14, Glade; 15. Wallace: 18. Pelty; 17, Comptm.: 
18, Morgan; 19, Jacobsen; 20. HemDhill: 21. Howell; 22, Niles; 23, 
Stone: 24, James McAleer, Mgr. 

Copyright, 1907, by H. F. Peck, Akron, 0. 
ST. LOUIS TEAM— AMERICAN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 151 

How Detroit won the first game of that critical series — and 
the only one of the four ever decided— is a matter of warm 
memory among the fans of the country, not only those of 
American League leanings, but of all creeds and classes, who 
felt certain that series was to determine the choice of the team 
which was to dispute the world's title with the Chicago Na- 
tionals, already sure of their own pennant. 

It always will be believed by the students of the game that 
the Weather Bureau cut a large figure in the finish of the 
American League's pennant race by the negative method. As 
events proved, Detroit had to win only one of the four 
games it had to play with the Athletics in order to secure the 
pennant. That was' the first game and Detroit won it. The 
second game of the series was prevented by rain with no 
chance to play it off, because, the Philadelphia management had 
arranged to double up the postponed game on the final day of 
the series. 

But the double-header never came off. Instead the Tigers 
and Athletics played that memorable seventeen inning draw, 
full of sensational happenings, and marred by some bickerings 
which, however, were overlooked in consideration of the terrific 
strain of the occasion and the tremendous stakes for which 
they were competing, with the knowledge that the result of 
that one day's battles probably would determine the ownership 
Of the pennant and incidentally the right to share in the 
World's Series receipts. 

That afternoon's work alone deserves a paragraph of its own. 
Starting early in the hope of working off two games the two 
rivals battled until the lamps in the streets outside the 
grounds were burning before they were separated and dismissed 
by the umpires, with the score tied at 9 to 9. Every person 
who could get within seeing distance of that game watched it 
and every one else interested in Base Ball followed it as 
eagerly as possible by telegraphic and press reports. "Wild 
Bill" Donovan pitched the entire seventeen innings, although 
batted for fourteen hits in the first seven innings. The Ath- 
letics used Dygert, Waddell and Plank on the slab. At the end 
of six innings the Athletics had a lead of 7 to 1, ordinarily 
an unbeatable margin. But by scoring four runs in the seventh 
inning the Tigers closed up much of the gap, although the 
Athletics came back with one run in their half of the seventh. 
Detroit scored one more run in their eighth, making the count 
8 to 6 when the ninth started. A single and a home run off 
Waddell tied up the score and Plank was called upon to finish 
the terrific struggle for Philadelphia. Each team scored one 
run in the eleventh inning, but neither of them was able to 
get a man across the plate and break the tie in the remaining 
six innings before it was too dark to continue. 

Detroit, therefore, left Philadelphia on that Monday night- 
with the slender margin of one game which it had gained on 
the Friday previous and with three games of the series with 
the Athletics never to be decided. 

A remarkable coincidence, even for that sensational pennant 
struggle, was the fact that on the same date the Tigers and 
Athletics were having their bulldog battle in Philadelphia, the 
White Stocking played a fourteen inning draw with Boston, the 
score being 3 to ?». This result, or lack of result, prevented 
Chicago's gaining on the two anchored leaders and wiped out a 
big slice of the chance the White Stockings still had retained 
for the pennant. 

There were only six playing days left on the schedule after 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 158 

this pair of drawn battles, and in that time Detroit and Phila- 
delphia each had seven more games to play, and the Tigers 
had to spend one of those days in travel. The games of 
October 1 produced no change in the situation. Detroit won 
from Washington, while Philadelphia defeated Cleveland. Not 
until this defeat for Cleveland, with only five days of the 
schedule left, were Lajoie's men actually put out of the run- 
ning for the bunting, although they then were fourth in the 
race. 

On the morning of the fifth day from the last Philadelphia 
could pass Detroit by winning again if the Tigers should lose, 
but the outcome of that day's games was heart-breaking for 
the admirers of the Athletics. For Detroit slugged out two 
victories over Washington that afternoon and Cleveland de- 
feated the Athletics, giving the Tigers a fairly strong hold 
compared to their extremely tenuous grip on first place. On 
that date, too, the White Stockings finally were declared out of 
the race, with only four days of the season left. In order to be 
counted out even that far from the finish the Chicagoans had 
had to follow up their tie in Boston by dropping two straight 
games to New York, otherwise there would have been three 
possible pennant winners almost up to the closing day. 

The games of Thursday, October 3, produced no change in 
the situation except to remove one possible defeat from De- 
troit's path, for on that day both the Tigers and Athletics 
won their games, from Washington and Cleveland respectively. 

Washington practically cinched the pennant for the Mich- 
iganders on Friday, October 4, by defeating Philadelphia in 
ten innings while the Tigers were on the road to St. Louis. 
Previous to that setback the chances were not overwhelmingly 
against the Athletics because they had three games to play 
with Washington, while Detroit was due for three games 
against St. Louis, and the Browns had been making a sur- 
prising brace, winning more games than any other team in the 
league during its final swing around the eastern circuit. 

When the Tigers landed in St. Louis on the morning of 
October 5, they had to win only one game in three to put 
themselves out of all possible reach, and that they proceeded 
to do that afternoon, cinching the pennant only twenty-four 
hours before the wire was reached and on the final day of the 
season for the eastern clubs, which could not play on Sunday. 
Only once in modem times has that finish been beaten in the 
matter of tightness and that was when the New York High- 
landers and Boston Americans decided the pennant in Boston's 
favor on the last day of the season. But in that year there 
was no such tight fit throughout the whole first division as 
last fall, when the fourth club was not counted out until 
there were only five days left, and the third club in the race 
was not finally disposed of until there were only four more 
dates in the schedule. 

This was the spectacular finish which kept the Base Ball 
patrons of the world on tiptoe with eager expectation and excite- 
ment for weeks until its outcome was known beyond question. 
The press never devoted a greater amount of space to any sport 
than it was fairly compelled to give Base Ball last season by 
the constantly increasing interest in the outcome of that battle 
and its decision of the contender for the World's Championship. 

Great foot ball games between leading universities, cham- 
pionship battles between the big men of the prize ring, and 
classic stakes and handicaps on the running turf have com- 
manded mc lentarily greater newspaper space and fixed the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 155 

attention of a greater part of the sporting public than did the 
Base Ball season of 1907, or even the World's Series itself, 
perhaps. But these great events of the gridiron, the ring and 
the track occupy undivided attention for only a day or two 
each, while Base Ball interest is sustained and cumulative for 
weeks and months of each year. 

While the season of 1907 was unquestionablv the most pros- 
perous for all leagues great and small, taken as a whole, in 
the history of the game, the coming campaign of 1908 will 
determine the real strength of Base Ball as a national pas- 
time. By another fall it will be known whether Base Ball has 
prospered so immensely in the last few years merely because 
the nation has been intensely prosperous, or whether the game 
itself by its own inherent worth has made much of its own 
well being. 

If Base Ball in the face of the depression in the business 
world, resulting from the financial crisis which immediately 
followed the close of last season, can make even a fairly good 
showing this coming year in comparison with its record of the 
last half decade, it will be established firmlv as a fact that 
the American public loves Base Ball for itself and will sup- 
port it for itself and not as a means of dispensing pleasureable 
whatever surplus coin that public may possess. 

The continued stability and prosperity of Base Ball meana 
much to the nation, aside from its pleasure-loving aspect. 
There is no sport which has a greater moral value to the 
masses and hence to the country, exerting as it does for six 
months of the year a strong influence to draw young men and 
boys — yes, and women, too — away from temptations of various 
kinds, to be found in the saloons and the many kinds of 
gambling. It gives young America a clean, wholesome and 
attractive means of working off its surplus exuberance of 
spirits, feeds the growing demand for thrills and excitement 
normal to the healthy mind and body of youth. It takes men 
and women out into the fresh, open air, compels them to 
expand their lungs and absorb through them new vitality. And 
down to the youngest toddler of the American family it leads 
to the open lots and tempts to healthy and beneficial exercis 
with a minimum of the risk of injury. 

Withal Base Ball inspires admiration for brains and skill of 
a high degree in a contest where nerve, quick perception and 
steadiness conspire with alertness, pluck and daring — and a 
considerable element cf luck — to make the outcome so uncer- 
tain, between two well balanced and well directed teams, that 
a single slip of the spikes may determine victory and defeat. 

The official averages of the American League for 1907 will 
be found elsewhere in the Guide ; for page number, see 
"Contents." 




P. T. POWERS. 

President National Association of 

Professional Base Ball Leagues. 



J. H. FARRELL. 

Secretary National Association of 

Professional Base Ball Leagues. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE CALL GUIDE. 157 

The National Association of Profes- 
sional Base Ball Leagues 

Considering the handicaps of a very late spring and cool 
summer, the National Association of Professional Base Ball 
Leagues had a very successful season in 1907. The failures 
were only a very few, which demonstrates not only the popu- 
larity of the game, but the efficacy of the safeguards placed 
about it by the organization of the National Association, with 
the National Commission as the supreme Court of Appeal, 
seeing that fair play and strict justice is dealt to club owners 
and players alike. 

Following is the purport of the sixth annual report of Sec- 
retary J. H. Farrell : 

"I have the honor to submit herewith the sixth annual report 
of the Secretary's office, covering the transactions for the year 
1907. 

"It is with a great degree of pleasure and pardonable pride 
that we report the year just past as the most successful ever 
enjoyed by the National Association in several respects. 

"The Association has grown stronger and larger in member- 
ship and has furnished employment to more players than ever 
before. 

"A total of thirty-six leagues, embracing 244 cities, qualified 
for membership in the National Association in 1907. 

"In transacting business with 244 cities identified with the 
National Association, 4,300 players, and in gathering evidence 
in the several disputed cases, together with other correspond- 
ence, 13,440 letters were handled by this office. Eleven hundred 
and seventy-eight telegrams were received and 1.047 transmitted. 
Four thousand four hundred players' contracts were promul- 
gated 1 . Two hundred and eighty-four players were suspended 
temporarily, and 887 players were released during the playing 
season. 

"Eight thousand seven hundred Official Bulletins were mailed 
from this office. 

"Six hundred and seven players were released by purchase 
from one club member of the National Association to another. 
One hundred and seventy-nine players were selected by draft ; 
117 by the major leagues and sixty-two by Class A leagues 
(at this writing, October 22, the Class A drafting season hav- 
ing been open but one week). One hundred and fifty-seven 
thousand three hundred dollars have been received in this 
office and paid out for the selection by draft, and exercise of 
optional agreements for players ; $60,800 for optional agree- 
ment players, and $96,500 for drafted players. 

"This amount, together with the amount passing for the 
release by purchase outright of players by National Associa- 
tion clubs, aggregates $265,300. 

"Two hundred and eighty-five decisions were rendered in 
disputed cases, which with 58 cases on hand show a total of 
343 cases passed upon during the past year." 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 159 

American Association 

By H. A. Miller, Columbus, Ohio. 

J The sixth annual Base Ball cam- 

^ paign of the American Association in 

jL 1907 ended in September in one of the 

q closest finishes seen since 1902, when 

PI Indianapolis nosed out Louisville on 

tl the last day of the season. Columbus 

/ won her third successive pennant, but 

f not until Toledo was beaten out for 

\ the honor on the final day of the race. 

1 Columbus closed on Sunday in a double- 

;& header with Louisville, winning the 

^^ first game and cinching the flag. This- 
A victory was necessary, otherwise had 
■ Toledo won both games from Indianap- 
olis, the flag would have been lost. 
^^^ Toledo and Columbus fought it out 

Joseph D. O'Brien the last half of the schedule in desper- 
President a te fashion. On July 7 the Toledo 

American Association club jumped into first place and stayed 
there until September 1, with Columbus 
challenging most of the time. On that day Toledo was met 
at Neil Park with but three points separating the position of 
the "Mud Hens" and the champions. Columbus won both 
games and took the lead before 20,531 persons, the largest 
crowd that ever saw a game of ball in this association. From 
that time on until the finish the battle was a veritable see-saw. 
The race was the best the A. A. has enjoyed since its incep- 
tion. In 1902 it was as close at the finish, but in 1907 it 
was a see-saw affair for the entire last month. No club ever 
landed a flag against greater odds than did Columbus. Almost 
from the beginning her outfield became crippled and shifts 
were necessary nearly the whole season. Jackson broke a bonf* 
in his ankle the first Sunday of the season. Reilly, who re- 
placed him, broke a finger later on. Gessler. the hard-hittin-' 
outfielder, was out of the game a month due to a cut wrist. 
So the troubles accumulated around Manager Clymer's head, 
but through splendid team work and intelligent ball these odds 
were met and the third pennant was taken out of the very 
embers of a dying hope. 

The season witnessed two consistent second-division teams 
come to the fore and make a good fight. Toledo, which pulled 
up to fourth place a year ago, came strong and was "there or 
thereabouts" all summer. Kansas City pulled up, too. and at 
one time led the league. Minneapolis as usual went to the 
front with a dash during the latter part of May and the first 
week in June. The Millers could not maintain their good 
home work on the road, however, and were forced to be con- 
tent to finish third. The season opened auspiciously for In- 
dianapolis. The Hoosiers won consistently, not losing a game 
the first week of the race. Columbus went along and took 
the lead on April 23. On May 17 Kansas City, by winning 
regularly, stepped into first place, the champions slipping 
down by reason of rather poor pitching. On May 20 Columbus 
regained the lead again only to yield it on May 23 to Kansas 
City. Columbus, three days later, advanced to the top once 
more. Minneapolis had been making her big spurt, though, on 
her home ground and on May 28 the Millers went to the fore. 







tCi •<* *?' *•£ 

<§► m*. A & & & n 



1, Barbeau; a, Pokorney; 3, Gillen; 4, West; 5, Lattimore; 6. Chech; 
7, Reagan; 8, Land; 9, Armbruster; 10, Eells; 11, Win. Armour, Mgr.; 
12, Williams; 13, Abbott; 14, Sutthoff; 15, Smoot; 16, Clarke, Mascot; 
17, Josh Clarke; 18, Wm. Clarke; 19, Perring. Turner, Photo. 

TOLEDO TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 




1, O'Neil; 2, John Freeman; 3, Thomas; 4, Edmondson; 5, James Free- 
man; 6, Jerry Freeman; 7, Mertes; 8, Greminger; 9, Kilroy; 10, M. 
Cantillon, Mgr.; 11, Dundon; 12, O. Graham; 13, Buelow; 14, Oyler; 
15, Perrine; 16, P. Graham. Copyright, 1907, by Luxton. 

MINNEAPOLIS TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 161 

They enjoyed the honors of the top rung until June 6, when 
they went down and out for good, never again getting above 
second place. Columbus held the top position just one month 
or until July 7, when Toledo went to the fore and became the 
hot contender for the flag to the end. 

The career of the Toledo club was fitful the first half of the 
season. Armour's team got a bad start and on June 1 was in 
seventh place. During that month and early in July its great- 
est spurt was accomplished. A long series at home of thirty- 
five games helped the Toledoans to get a commanding position. 
The team rose from seventh place on June 1 to second place 
June 16 by almost a successive series of victories. They won 
right along until July 7, when Columbus, faltering slightly, 
gave over the lead to the Lake Erie rivals. Then the fight to 
the finish started. Columbus showed her real class and gave 
an exhibition of battling against odds which has rarely been 
equaled in Base Ball. On August 7 the champions were 
fifty-four points behind Toledo and only in second place by a 
narrow margin, clubs below crowding strongly. The team 
had a slump in batting and the pitching staff, outside of Upp T 
was doing badly. During these days St. Paul came to Neil 
Park and gave the champions a beating such as no Columbus 
club ever received, scoring over 20 runs on Clymer's team. 
That was the turning point. All the bad Base Ball oozed out 
of the team and it struck a winning stride. The team started 
west and had almost unparalleled success. Pitcher Charley 
Hall of Cincinnati was added to the staff and Tom McCreery 
went to the outfield, both helping much toward the winning 
of the pennant. Hall on September 1 pitched the game 
that put the champions back to the top. On September 2 
Clymer's men had won twenty-seven out of the last thirty-two 
games played and pulled to the front against the greatest odds. 
To Manager Clymer's acumen and the grand work of the Co- 
lumbus infield can the most credit be given : Friel, Hulswitt. 
Wrigley and Kihm, playing together for their third season. 
held up the outfield in hitting and fielding so intelligentlv that 
they had much to do with pulling many games out of the fire 
It was a great bunch, none of its members hitting below .285 
with the exception of Wrigley, who made this up by his ability 
to hit when they were needed. 

St. Paul was the weak member of the association. It finished 
last, with Milwaukee seventh and Indianapolis sixth. The 
Brewers at one time made a gallant stand during the middle 
of the season, but poor management kept them from working 
effectively. 

George Upp was the pitching sensation of the association in 
games won. Charley Chech of Toledo was a close second. 
Puttmann and Goodwin were the most worked pitchers. L. 
Durham of Louisville accomplished the unusual feat of win- 
ning two full games on two successive days. 

Jake Beckley of Kansas Citv was the leading batsman with 
John Freeman of Minneapolis virtually second. Freeman made 
a remarkable record in point of home runs, having nearlv twice 
as many as any other player in the association. 

President O'Brien's report showed that every club made 
monev with the possible excention of St. Paul. Columbus and 
Toledo drew esnecially well, the fisrht between these two teams 
being witnessed bv unusual crowds. The umpiring was the 
most effective in the history of the association. 

There were no objectionable scenes on the field during the 
summer, thanks to President O'Brien's effective corps of offi- 





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1, Krantz; 2, McBride; 3, Hill; 4, Case; 5, Huelsman; 6, Lindsay; 7, 

Jas. Burke, Mgr.; 8, Sullivan; 9, Crutcher; 10, Krueger; 11, Leahy; 

12, Swann. Baker Art Gallery, Photc. 

KANSAS CITY TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Peitz; 2, Putman; 3, Thomas Chivingtou, Vice-President; 4, Dur- 
ham: 5, Hughes: 6, Sullivan; 7, Brashear; 8. Dick Cooley, Mgr.; 
9, Quinlan; 10, J. Durham; 11, Woodruff; 12, Stanley; 13, Stovall. 

Baker Art Gallery, Photo. 
LOLMSVILLE TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



163 



cials and his policy for clean sport. There will be no change 
in ownership in 1908 and no change in circuit. Louisville, 
St. Paul and Milwaukee, as well as Kansas City, have new 
managers for this year. Monte Cross will lead the "Blues," 
succeeding Jimmy Burke. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting rnd Fielding in the American Association in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Bash 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



Columbus . . 

Toledo 

Minneapolis 
Kansas City 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON 
Won. Lost. P.C. 

90 64 .584 

88 66 .571 



7S 



Won. Lost. P.O. 

Louisville 77 77 .500 

Indianapolis 73 81 .473 

Milwaukee 72 84 .460 

St. Paul 59 95 .385 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
Diehl, Toledo, 
Beekley, K. City, 
McCarthy, K. City, 



G. AB. R. H.PC. 

22 84 14 34 .393 

100 378 65 138 .365 

49 177 23 60 .339 



Jno. Freeman, Minn., 142 528 
Hall, Columbus. 
Gessler, Columbus 
Neal, Louisville, 
Armbruster, Tol., 
Josh Clarke, Tol., 
Roth, Milwaukee, 
Flood, St. Paul, 



177 .335 

17 42 5 14 .333 

135 470 84 153 .325 

35 129 14 42 .325 

133 500 88 161 .322 

154 557 94 179 .321 

88 334 51 107 .320 Pokorney, Toledo 

70 264 40 84 .318 Connors, Milw.. 



Name and Club. G. AB. R. H.PC. 

Carr, Indianapolis, 137 521 64 164 .315 

Smoot, Toledo, 141 541 84 169 .312 

McCreery, Columbus 37 132 24 41 .311 

Stovall, Louisville, 99 417 57 128 .307 

Perring, Toledo, 135 499 78 150 .301 

Jer. Freeman, Minn. ,153 484 64 175 % 

Huelsman, K. City, 149 566 91 168 .297 

Hulswitt, Columbus 159 631 90 187 .295 

Barbeau, Toledo, 125 458 93 135 .205 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PCI Name and Club. 

137 1348 147 14 .990 Wm. Clarke, Tol., 

158 1725 72 19 .9S9lBeckley, K. City, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
152 333 460 19 .976|Perrine, Minn., 
69 207 197 16 .96llDundon, Minn., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
15 16 46 3 .953|Greminger, Minn., 

155 207 322 31 . 944 1 Perring, Toledo, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

156 331 493 56 .934|Ovler. Minneapolis, 
Hulswitt, Columbus 159 334 544 68 .928lMcBride, K. City, 

OUTFIELDERS. 
McCann, Milwaukee, 36 66 2 1 .985|Geier, St. P. -Mil., 
Seigle, Indianapolis, 116 228 19 5 .980|Armbruster, Toledo, 

PITCHERS. 

West. Toledo, 31 4 46 lOOOICromley, Indian., 

Chenault, Indian., 18 6 23 1000|Townsend, Col., 

CATCHERS. 
G. PO. A. E.PB.PC.I Name and Club. C 
87 426 117 8 14 .985 Pietz, Louis., S 

Linvingst'e, Ind., 112 528 136 12 8 .9S2|Blue, Columbus, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G.BB.SO.W.L.PC.I Name and Club. 
41 70 142 27 10 .730 Manske, Minn., 
39 67 134 25 11 .694|lvilroy, Minn., 



Name and Club, 
Carr, Indianapolis, 
Kihm, Columbus, 



Wrigley, Columbus, 
Flood, St. Paul, 



C. Williams. St. P. -Tl. 
Hopke, Indian., 



Quinlan, Louisville, 



Name and Club. 
Abbott. Toledo. 



Name and Club. 
Upp, Columbus, 
Chech, Toledo, 



84 309 50 91 .294 
90 364 62 106 .291 



G. PO. A. E.PC. 

152 1556 107 21 .987 
100 1118 52 18 .985 



18 49 50 4 .961 
121 340 338 27 .960 



147 181 283 32 .935 
135 172 266 31 .933 



133 326 399 61 .922 
151 337 531 76 .919 



30 48 3 1 .9.S0 
133 185 30 6 .972 



18 19 
26 8 



1000 

1 .986 



G. PO. A. E.PB.PC. 

85 334 87 10 11 .976 
99 453 107 16 10 .972 

G.BB.SO.W.L.PC. 

25 78 67 12 6 .667 
35 68 105 19 10 .655 




1, Carr, Mgr.-Capt. ; 2, Briggs; 3, biagie; 4, Williams; 5, buLumers; 
6, Cook; 7, Howley: 8, Livingston; 9. Eubanks; 10. Linc"say; 11, 
Coulter; 12, Siegle; 13, Hopke; 14, Kellum. 

INDTANAPOT.TR TE AM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Connors; 2, Schneiberg; 3, Dougherty; 4, Beville; 5, Clark; 6, Mc- 

Chesney; 7, Green; 8, Roth; 9, Wilson; 10. McCann; 11. McCormick; 

12, Robinson. Baker Art Gallery, Photo. 

MILWAUKEE TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Essick; 2, Tiemeye:-; 3, Frisk; 4, Criss; 5, Koehler; 6, LeRoy; 7, 
Laughlin; 8, Sugden; 9, Dunleavy ; 10. Ed. Ashenback, Mgr. ; 11, 
Ray M<ehan. Bus. Mgr.; 12, Nordyke; 13. Flood; 14, Farris; 15, 
Geicr; 16, Minnihan. Baker Art Gallery, Photo. 

ST. PAUL TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 165 

Connecticut League 

By William E. Smith, Bridgeport, Coxsr. 

Despite the unfavorable weather conditions which prevailed 
in the first month and made things unpleasant for players and 
spectators, the Connecticut League eventually found the season 
of 1907 very prosperous. The tight little circuit showed 
improvement not only in the financial department but in the 
standard of playing. In former years there have been a large 
number of diamond stars sent out from the Connecticut ranks 
and the 1907 crop was fully up to the standard. 

The Holyoke team, under the leadership of that sterling 
veteran. Tommy Dowd, captured the pennant by a comfortable 



Wj%. Mb..,-- 




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i, Whitley; 2, Dolan; 3, Masse; 4, Dowd, Mgr. ; o, Baker; 6, Lepine; 
7, Hoffman; 8, P. H. Prindiville, President; 9. Fred Winkler, Secre- 
tary; 10, Matvern; 11, Grubb; 12, Thackera; 13, Hodge; 14, Burke; 
15, Thackera, Mascot; 16, Boucher; 17, Ahearn. 

HOLYOKE TEAM— CHAMPIONS CONNECTICUT LEAGUE. 

margin. Holyoke did not have a wonderful aggregation, but 
it was an evenly balanced team, strong in team work and all 
the little details of inside play. 

Waterbury started in whirlwind fashion, but dissension in 
the ranks caused a slump in mid-season which proved dis- 
astrous. Springfield, though strong in individual stars, was an 
in-and-outer. Norwich was a weak batting team, but with several 
good pitchers and a good captain— Gus Soffel. The Hartford 
club was another disappointment. The Senators started well, 
but found the pace too hot and eventually dropped out of the 
first division. The Bridgeport, New Haven and New London 
clubs were all weak and fell by the wayside early. 




BBHi 



1, Hogarty; 2, Shincel; 3, Bronkie; 4, AlcAndrews, Capt.; 5, Ryan; 
6, O'Rourke; 7, Ward; 8, Rogers; 9, Farley; 10, Lachauce; U, 
Durand, Mgr.; 12, Swander; 13, Nichols. 

WATERBDRY TRAM— CONNECTICUT LEAGUE. 




1 Rising; 2, Connor; 3, Stankard; 4, Yale; 5, Miller; 6, Luby; 7, 
Hess; 8, Bannon; 9, Burns; 10, Prank O'Neil, Mgr.; 11, McLaugh- 
lin; 12, O'Connor; 13, Curtis: 14. Waite. 

SPRINGFIELD TEAM— CONNECTICUT LEAGUE. 




l, Cote; 2, Duff; 3, Bridges; 4, Tuckey; 5, Golden; 6, Accorsini; 7, 
Perkins; 8, Duffy; 9, Halligan; 10, Soffel, Capt.: 11 Plank: 12, Pastor. 

Laighton Bros., Photo. 
NORWICH TEAM— CONNECTICUT LEAGUE. 



SFALDI>*i> d OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



167 



The umpire question — that bone of contention in so many 
leagues — was better in the Connecticut circuit than at any time 
since its organization. Much of the credit is due to President 
W. J. Tracy, who handled the question ably. He insisted that 
the umpires should be sustained by the managers, and the result 
was that there were fewer disturbances and less umpire baiting 
by the players. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Connecticut State League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. 




Won. Lost. PC. 


Club. 




Won. Lost. 


PC. 


Holyoke 




.. 83 


42 .664 
47 .621 
49 .595 
51 .582 


Hartf or'l 




.. 66 




55 
75 
80 
93 


.546 


Waterbury 

Springfield 

Norwich 




.. 77 
.. 72 
.. 71 


Bridgeport 




.. 48 


.390 


New Haven ... 




.. 4' 


.355 


New London . . 




.. 31 


.250 






INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 












Name and Club. 


G. 


AB. R. 


BH. PC. Name and Club. 


G. 


AB. 


R. 


BH. 


PC. 


Burke, Hoi., 
West. N. H., 
Ladd, Bridge., 
Rising, Spring., 
Collison, N. L., 
Hayward, N. H., 
O'Rourke, Br., 


22 
27 
125 
121 
16 
110 
125 


77 11 
72 10 
493 60 
476 71 
54 8 
424 26 
488 98 


29 .?77 Hoffman, Hoi., 
25 .347 Luby, Spring., 

168 .341 Beaumont, Br., 

153. .321 McCabe, N. L., 
17 .315 Yale, Spring., 

131 .309 Stankard, Spr., 

148 .303! 


116 
78 

110 
64 
91 

111 


462 
257 
413 
243 
379 
427 


97 
37 
43 
35 
71 
71 


139 

77 
124 

73 
112 
127 


.301 
.300 
.300 
.300 
.295 
.293 






INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 


















FIRST BASEMEN. 












Name and Club. 


G. 


PO. A. 


E. PC! Name and Club. 


G. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


PC. 


Massey, Hoi., 
Lachance, Wat., 


123 1459 59 
125 1329 57 


15 .990|Yale, Spr., 

18 .9S7IBunyan, N. H., 


91 986 
109 1051 


42 
83 


18 
27 


.983 
.977 


Burns, Spr., 
Fitzp'k, NH.-W. 


56 
127 


SECOND BASEMEN. 

130 166 15 .952|Betcher, N. H., 
358 302 38 .946lO'Rourke, N. L., 


22 
83 


38 48 
309 226 


5 
34 


.945 
.942 


Connor, Spr., 
Grubb, Hoi., 


18 
121 


THIRD BASEMEN. 
31 20 1 .981|Hayward, N. H., 
133 310 35 .927lNoyes, Hart., 


65 
121 


68 125 

141 252 


17 
35 


.920 
.919 


Boucher, Hoi., 
Burns, Spr., 


124 
51 


231 427 

112 164 


SHORTSTOPS. 

62 .9141 Sherwood, N. H., 

30 .902lKeenan, Sp.-N.H. 


56 
90 


123 182 
166 229 


35 
47 


.900 
.894 


Dowd, Hoi., 
Burke, Hoi., 


32 
22 


41 4 
40 2 


OUTFIELDERS. 

1 .978! Rising, Spr., 
1 .977 Sawyer, Br., 


121 

85 


216 
135 


20 

10 


5 


.971 
.967 


Mueller, Hart., 
Brown, N. H., 


11 
19 


7 24 

8 60 


PITCHERS. 

1.000 Dolan, Hoi., 

1 .985Luyster, Hart., 


29 
10 


10 
3 


LIT 

33 


3 
1 


.977 
.973 


Connor, Spr., 
Shincel, Wat., 


30 
115 


156 33 

501 119 


CATCHERS. 
1 .995 O'Connor, Spr., 
14 .978 Jope, N. H., 


73 
98 


409 
472 


16 


11 
14 


.978 

.977 


Name and Club. 


PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
W.L.BH.BB.SO.PC.I Name and Club. 


w. 


L.BH.BB.SO.PC. 


Farley, Wat., 
Whitley, Hoi., 


24 
16 


7 234 72 183 .774 
6 153 44 98 .7251 


Plank, Norwich, 
Mattern, Hoi., 


26 10 23£ 
16 7 14E 


66 138 
50 81 


.722- 
.696 

















1 


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m 


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i, ivicivean; 2, Muldo.vney; 3, Collins; 4, Dickey; 5, C-rn; 6, Hall- 
man; 7, Hammond; 8, Clark; 9, La Jeune; 10, C. H. Varnell, Pres. ; 
11, Hendricks, Mgr. ; j2, Chambers: 13. Osteen: 14. Kelly; 15, Fre- 
mer; 16, Donahue. Stanton, Photo. 

SPRINGFIELD (0.) TEAM— CHAMPIONS CENTRAL LEAGUE. 





#5p' - 


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4* : 


W s 


19P 


8 f| : 


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1, Maggert; 2, Hulbert; 3. Wessel; 4, Spahr; 5, Core; 6, Eastley; 

7. Robertson; 8, Price. Mgr.; 9, Scott; 10, G. Miller; 11, L. Miller; 

12, Philbin; 13, Span^ler; 14, Friel: 15. Venable. Griffin, Photo. 

WHEELING TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 169 

Central League 

By H. A. Schitelle, South Bend, Int>. 

Carrying on a very close and inter- 
esting race for the greater part of the 
season, but turning into the stretch in 
better condition and spirit than any 
other club in the league, the Springfield 
club won the pennant of the Central 
League for the season of 1907 by a 
fair margin. Wheeling, Canton, Evans- 
ville, Davton, Terre Haute, Grand Rapids 
and South Bend finished in the order 
named. 

During the first half of the season the 
clubs were so well bunched that the posi- 
tions of the clubs were changing ' con- 
stantly in the percentage column. Every 
club in the league, with the exception of 
F. R. Carson South Bend, was at the head of the per- 

President centage column at one time or another 

Central League during that period, and it was not until 

the latter part of August that the Spring- 
field club gained a commanding lead, and leaving Wheeling practi- 
cally in possession of second place. 

However, Canton, Evansville. Dayton and Terre Haute carried 
on a merry fight for the other two first division berths and the 
result was not known until the final series was entered into. 
Being badly riddled as the result of drafts and sales nearly all 
of the clubs were obliged to do considerable recruiting, with the 
exception of Wheeling and Springfield, whose club rosters were quite 
intact from the previous season. 

Heavy batters, good pitchers and fine team work instilled into 
the team by its manager. Jack Hendricks, was responsible for the 
victory of the Springfield club. The players were game to the 
core and many games were won when the team was apparently 
hopelessly behind in their early stages. But at that the team was 
handicapped, as they were not properly supported at home as the 
club managers lost considerable money, and at the close of the 
season transferred its franchise to Fort Wayne. 

Wheeling, who finished second, had a well-balanced team of 
veterans. They were better fielders than the champions, good hit- 
ters and had a fine corps of pitchers. 

Manager Bade Mvers did very well at Canton. Myers has the 
distinction of having his team carry off the fielding honors each 
vear, and 1907 proved no exception. 

Evansville gathered an entire new team at the beginning of the 
season, and Punch Knoll was successful in securing a good club. 
Davton was one of the greatest disappointments of the y< 
Although conceded to have the best pitching staff in the league 
and a fair club behind them, Terre Haute was unable to keep 
head above the .500 mark when the curtain rung. 
Grand Rapids shared disappointment with Dayton. 
South Bend undertook to develop nearly a whole team of in- 
experienced men into formidable contenders. Angus Grant had 
been successful in that line in the past but the class of Base Ball 
plaved in the Central League had progressed too rapidly to con- 
tinue the practice, and this was not discovered until too late. 
The season proved a successful one for the league. The able 
manner in which it is conducted by its president, F. R. Carson 



1, Bade Myers, Mgr. ; 2, Foy; 3, John Myers; 4, Fink; 5, Holmes; 6. 
Lindsay; 7, Brittsen; 8, Kusel: 9, Marquard; 10, Carroll; 11, John- 
son; 12, Goudy; 13, Texter; 14, Cooper; 15, Reriden; 16, Cooley; 17, 
McGrew. 

* CANTON TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 




1, Pearson; 2, JNorcum; 3, Damman; 4, Beulow; 5. H. W. Stahlhefer. 
Pres. : 6, Kahl; 7, Jaeger; 8, Dunn; 9, Donahue; 10, Blake; 11, Sager: 
12, C. Knoll. Mgr.; 13, Crowder; 14, Pollard; 15, Ferrias. 
EVANSVILLE TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE 




1, Grogan; 2, Evans; 3, McKean; 4, Bere; 5, Hale; 6, Bailey; 7. 
Munson: 8. Molloy; 9, Johns; 10, Yingling; 11, Amsley; 12, Wilson; 
13, Walker; 14, Bescher; 15, Richardson. 

DAYTON TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



171 



of South Bend is responsible for the standing and prestige the 
organization has gained in the very short time of its existence. 
While there were some contentions, disputes, protests, etc., there 
were far less than that of any minor league in the country. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Central League in 1907, according to the 
official records, are given herewith. The complete official records 
are published in Spalding's Official Bash Ball Record, for sale 
to? all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



Springfield 
Wheeling 
Canton ... 
Evansville 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Won. Lost. 
..86 49 
..77 57 
..69 64 



P.C. 

.628 
.575 
.519 
.500 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Dayton 66 71 .482 

Terre Haute 65 72 .474 

Grand Rapids 60 77 .438 

South Bend 53 86 .381 



Name and Club. 
Osteen, Springfield 
Cameron, Terre H., 
Kelly, South B., 
Holycross, South B. 



Name and Club. 
Myers, Canton, 
Ganzel, Gr. Rap. 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G. AB. R. H. PCI Name and Club. 



128 510 80 170 

106 408 38 126 

46 150 12 46 

45 167 17 51 



Donahue, Spring., 
Fremer, Springfield 
McKean, Daytoo-S., 
Donahue, Evans., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC. I Name and Club. 

131 1375 75 11 .992 Dickey, Spring.. 

35 329 19 3 .99l|Freese, Terre H., 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 

124 434 66 127 .295 

115 404 79 119 .294 

108 422 45 124 .294 

100 379 50 111 .293 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

117 1090 94 13 .989 
10 80 v 6 1 .988 



Koudebush. Wheel., 
McCombs, Wheel., 


30 74 66 4 .972|McGrew. Canton, 
113 297 274 22 .962|Kahl, Evansville, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 


137 372 387 34 
106 420 293 33 


.956 


Kelley, Springfield, 
Francis, Gr. Rap., 


39 31 68 4 .960|Walker, Dayton, 
98 123 205 17 .95l|Goodman, Terre H., 

SHORTSTOPS. 


106 162 218 24 
81 127 134 20 


.942 

.92S 


Kipp, Gr. Rapids, " 
Lindsay, Canton, 


27 38 63 7 .935|Crowder. Evans., 
133 283 415 49 .934|Bush, South Bend, 

OUTFIELDERS. 


95 18S 275 34 

121 240 365 52 


.931 


Coffey, So. Bend, 
Knoll, Evans., 


67 101 11 1000|Priee, Wheeling, 
61154 21 2'. 988|Bescher, Dayton, 


129 213 20 3 
72 135 10 2 


.986 



Corns. Springfield, 
Robertson, Wheel., 



PITCHERS. 

32 17 92 1 .991)Miller. Wheel., 27 15 71 2 

25 15 81 1 .990|Breitenstein,S.-E.-D., 16 5 61 2 .971 



CATCHERS. 

Name and Club. G. PO. A. E.PB.PC.I Name and Club. G. PO. A. E.PB.PC. 

Kittridge.Davton, 18 111 21 2 .985 Knoll, Evansville, 58 285 74 7 3 .981 

Cross, So.B.-T.H., 27 103 29 2 .985|Yantz. Gr. Rap., 18 79 26 2 2 .981 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

Name and Club. G. W. L.Tie.PC.l Name and Club. G. W. L. Tie. PC. 
Hammond, Spring., 28 16 3 1 .842|Muldowney, Spring, 25 18 5 1 .783 



Kennedy, Dayton, 



10 



I Robertson, Wheel. 



1 .773 




1, Cameron; 2, Moore; 3, Miner: 4. Brosius: 5. Scott: 6, Glidewell; 



7, Frees; 8, Huber; 9. Robison; 10, DeHaven; 11, Hadley; 12, 
Wheeler; 13, Goodman; 14, Douthett. 

TERRB HAUTE TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 



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1, Ganzel; 2, Warner; 3, E. W. Bliss, Mgr.; 4, Miller; 5, Chappell; 6, 
Geyer; 7, Moran; 8, Francis; 9, P. E. Arnold, Pres. ; 10, Backof; 11, 
Groeschow; 12, Holmquist; 13, Noblett. 

GRAND RAPIDS TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 











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1, Lindsay; 2, Valenti; 3, Tieman; 4, Hay worth; 5, Ferrias; 6, 
Cross; 7, Cruikshank; 8, Bush: 9, Williams; 10, Siner; 11, Holycross; 
12, Keener; 13, Moloney: 14, Coffee; 15, Johnson; 16, Grant, Mgr. 
SOUTH BEND TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 173 

Cotton States League 

By Feank P. Cashmax, Yicksburg, Miss. 

— ^g^ On September 18, 1907, the sixth 

^Uk i Wk successive season of the Cotton States 

^■'..ii; ~ League came to an end and the Mobile, 

fl ' I Ala., club, for the second time in two 

i»> years, won the pennant. For weeks 

■B the final result had been forecasted, 

W^ F\ for early in the race Mobile went in 

W^ WjjKF the lead, and though the club held top 

place by a margin that at times was 

bv no means safe, yet the team took 

A. J nothing in the nature of a disastrous 

Mmi&*w*8&f£ slump, and the Alabamians played a 

^djiffik u |^^^ fast and snappy game at all stages and 

Hk JmjM HSfc finished in prime condition. 

tt^in| From a financial standpoint the sea- 

BBifli I son was not a success, though from 

A r Prowtifb every other view the 1907 season fur- 

PrPsidVnt nished splendid amusement. Until a few 

Totton States T PatniP weeks prior to the close of the race, 

Cotton btates League fiye of ^ the teams were well bunched 

and were within reaching distance of top place. Columbus, 
alone, was destined to make a bad finish, as the latest entry 
into the league made a poor start and the club remained con- 
stantly in the cellar position. 

A comparison of the averages of the past year with former 
figures shows a considerable decline in batting in 1907. Guy 
Sample, manager of the Meridian team, attributed this falling 
off in hitting to the general mixture of seasoned players into 
the ranks of all clubs. According to Sample, the infielders and 
outfielders were stationed to such advantage that they were 
able to gobble up balls that would have counted for hits had 
the youngsters played without constant coaching that the older 
men proffered. 

The pitching staffs of the different teams, too, contained 
some good men. and twirlers who were due to go in a game 
and get a drubbing were altogether exceptional. 

As yet the Cotton States circuit for 1908 has not been deter 
mined on. In December Mobile withdrew from the Cotton 
States League in order to take over the Shreveport franchise 
in the Southern League. Mobile did not bid good-bye to thp 
smaller league before a great deal of wrangling was indulged in. 
The Cotton States magnates were agreed in the belief that the 
Mobile territory was a valuable asset and refused to permit 
this withdrawal unless Mobile paid the regulation draft price 
of $2,500. Mobile attempted to induce the Southern League to 
pay this draft money, but the effort resulted in failure. 

Mobile threatened to put in an independent club rather than 
pav the money and the Cotton Staters declared that unless 
Mobile came to terms the Mobile franchise would be sold to 
other persons or that the league magnates would combine and 
put a team in that city to be operated and owned by the other 
clubs. A satisfactory ending resulted, however, Mobile finally 
agreeing to pay $2,500. 

Mobile's successor has not been determined on at this writing, 
Hattiesburg, Miss., Monroe, La., and Selma, Ala., are applicants 
for the vacant place. Other cites are also clamoring for admit- 
tance, and the proposition to enlarge the circuit from six to 
eight clubs is being entertained. 




1, Fritz; 2, McCay, Mgr.; 3, C. Z. Collson, Sec; 4, Kemmer; 5, 
Tucker; 6, Fitzsimmons, Umpire; 7, Breyette; 8, Thornton; 9, Hoff- 
man; 10, Gear; 11, Boyd; 12, Nolly; 13, O'Brien; 14, Ray, 

MOBILE TEAM— CHAMPIONS COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 



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1, Plass; 2, Toner; 3. Taaffe; 4, Bishop; 5, Krebs; t>, iteumonu; /, 

Cavanaugh; 8, Goodwin: 9, Mannaueh; 10, Blackburn; 11. Meyers; 

12, Yount. Long, Photo. 

VICKSBURG TEAM— COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 



SPALDINGS OFFICIAL BASE BALL. GUIDE. 175 

At the league meeting at Gulfport, Miss., held in December, 
D. S. Compton of Vicksburg, Miss., who had served the league 
as president for two years, tendered his resignation. Strong 
efforts were made to induce Mr. Compton to remain at the head 
of league affairs, for his administration was high-toned, honest 
and business-like. Mr. Compton insisted, however, that he was 
unable to devote further time to the affairs of the office, and 
A. C. Crowder, of Jackson, Miss., was chosen for the position. 
T. D. Tatum, of Gulfport, Miss., was elected vice-president. 
A committee was appointed at the meeting to draft new by-laws 
and a constitution for the league. 

A number of peculiar plays came up for decision which gave 
the umpires some worries. In Mobile one game won by the 
home team from Vicksburg was ordered thrown out, due to the 
fact that the official Spalding ball was not used. In Meridian 
one umpire got much lambasting because he lost count of the 
outs in one inning and allowed four to be made, and thinking 
to even up, permitted but two in the next round. This game, 
too. was thrown out on account of the ruling. The liability of 
base-runners in case of pop-flies to the infield was also dis- 
cussed at length. Players were allowed to leave the sacks at 
their own peril. 

In winning the pennant for Mobile, Manager Bernie McCay 
was given much credit. ' When the club started off most of the 
managers around the circuit predicted that the team would not 
finish one, two, three. And yet McCay took this bunch, changed 
but two positions, nevertheless won the pennant and kept to 
the fore all during the fight. Manager George B'a.kl* -n kept 
Vicksburg well in the running, and he believes that h»: 
have won the pennant had the team secured an even break of 
luck. Jackson made a bad start, due more than anything else 
to poor management, but after Roy Montgomery took hold of 
the team, the club forged to the front. Guy Sample declares 
he has enough of handling youngsters and wants to get out 
of the managerial yoke for awhile. He declares that when a 
manager has to make a team out of the whole cloth at the 
start of each season, it is a most difficult proposition to count 
with any certainty on what may be accomplished. But for a 
run of ill-luck and crippled players, however, he believes 
Meridian's showing in the race last year would have been 
better. Columbus started out by losing the first three straight 
games and never got out of last place. The team that started 
the season, while it contained some weak spots, also included 
some fast men in the bunch. 

Vicksburg had several good men who were taken by higher 
clubs. Redmond, second sacker, who played a star game, will 
be given a trial by Memphis. Taafe, an outfielder, was re- 
turned to Memphis and traded to Jacksonville. Catcher Krebs 
is slated for a trial with Little Rock and first baseman Myers 
was sold to Birmingham. Of the Mobile bunch Thornton, Nolly. 
McCay and Breyette were secured by Montgomery. It is not 
likely, however, that Montgomery will keep them all. Bruner 
and Ray, pitchers, are slated for a trial in New Orleans. 

New Orleans will also draw on the Gulfport team for new 
material, having secured Ryan. Riley and Holland. Lively and 
Graffius were secured by Shreveport. DeVore, the fleet out- 
fielder and hard-hitter of the Meridian club, will go to the New 
York Americans. Schulz, Meridian's big pitcher, is Memphis' 
property. 

Huber of Columbus, a brilliant shortstop at times, will go 
to the Chicago Americans. Kunkle belongs to the Little Rock 



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1, Claire; 2, Petit; 3, Miller; 4, Christman; 5, Ison; 6, Blackburn; 
7, Saillard; 8, McDivitt; 9, Robinson; 10, Montgomery; 11, Taylor. 
JACKSON TEAM— COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 




xi. J. Gilks, Mgr.; 2, Stickney; 3, Ryan; 4, Jrebs; 5, Laird; 6, 
Rieley; 7, Lively; 8, Holland; 9, Goodwin; 10, Bryant; 11. Ison; 
12, Murch; 13, Manush. Martin, Photo. 

GULFPORT TEAM— COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 




1, Billiard; 2, Taaffe; 3. Anurews; -k. Sample, Mgr.; 5, Dunning; 6, 
Sehultz; 7. Price; 8, Pylant; 9, Durmeyer; 10, Roth, Capt. ; 11. Til- 
ford; 12, DeVore. Long, Photo. 
MERIDIAN TEAM— COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 177 

team. When Birmingham gave Jackson Montgomery during the 
middle of the season this was done on the understanding that 
Birmingham would have the pick of the Jackson club at the end 
of the year and choose one man. Pitcher Robinson was selected 
and will go to the Southern leaguers. 

In games won and lost Nolly led all the pitchers in the 
league last year with a percentage of .766, having worked 
in a total of 34 games, winning 23, losing 7 and tieing 4. 
Blackburn of Vicksburg, who took his turn regularly in the box, 
save a short time in the early part of the season when he 
essayed to cover first, finished second in the pitchers' race with 
a percentage of .678. Christman of Jackson was virtually third 
with .666 and pitched more games than either of the leaders, 
Blackburn having worked in 28 and Christman 39. 

Ryan of Gulfport faced more opposing batters than any of 
the other slabmen, with 1,556 to his credit. Opposing batsmen 
also secured more hits off Ryan than any other pitcher, getting 
335 during the season. Ryan also distinguished himself by 
getting more strikeouts to his credit than any other pitcher, 




1, Marshall; 2, Huder; 3, Adamina; 4, ttarlow; o, Kunkel; 6, Maausn, 
7, Stewart, Mgr.; 8, Cox; 9, May; 10, Wheeler. 

COLUMBUS TEAM— COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 

earning 220. His closest competitor in this respect was Bil- 
liard of Meridian with 214. Wheeler of Columbus issued the 
most passes during the year's play, with 113 to his credit. 
Yount of Meridian and Vicksburg was a close second with 111. 
No other twirler issued as many as 100. Yount lead with 18 
wild pitches and Wheeler, consistently, was second with 13. 
Ryan of Gulfport hit the most batters, 31. Ryan and Wheeler 
had 125 runs apiece made from their pitching, these pitchers 
leading in this line. 

Batters who hit .300 were few and far between. No man 
who played the whole season reached the coveted mark. Ex- 
cepting those players who participated in only a couple of 
games, Collins, who later jumped the Columbus club and who 
is to be tried by Memphis in 1908, lead with .367 per cent. 
Montgomery of Jackson, however, played almost three times 
as many games as Collins, 94, and came second with .340. No 
other man has a right to a place above the .300 dead line save 
Campbell of Columbus, who batted at .313, and Gear of Mobile, 
who finished with .309. Campbell played 42 games and Gear 



178 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



36. Of the men who played the entire year, Woodie Thornton 
of Mobile lead with a stick average of .282. Records of the 
men in their individual positions were not kept, and the work 
of the players, though made in different places, was bunched. 
Comparisons, therefore, are difficult. 

In 1908 the Cotton States League will enter its seventh suc- 
cessive year of existence. In 1902 Natchez won the pennant. 
The result of the races of other years was as follows : 1903, 
Baton Rouge ; 1904, Pine Bluff ; 1905, Greenville ; 1906 and 
1907, Mobile. Vicksburg is the only city now in the league 
which was a member of the original circuit. The outlook for a 
successful year of Base Ball in 1908 is good. 

An interesting decision affecting Base Ball players was handed 
down in 1907 by Special Judge Theodore Birchett of Vicksburg, 
who sitting in a garnishment suit brought against Pitcher 
Charles Bishop, ruled that a ball player was a laborer and not 
a professional man. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Cotton States League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records arc published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Played. Won. Lost. 

Mobile 134 82 52 

Vicksburg 134 77 57 

Jackson 133 71 62 



PC. 

.612 
.575 
.533 



Club. Played._Won. Lost. 

Gulf port 135" 68 67 

Meridian 138 66 72 

Columbus 138 42 96 



.Vaine and Club. 
Collins, Columbus, 
Montgomery, Jack., 



Name and Club. 
Sump, Jackson, 
Gilks, Gulfport, 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G.AB.R.BH.PC.| Name and Club. 
33 120 14 40 .367 ( Campbell, Columbus, 
94 344 46 87 -340iGear, Mobile, 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

28 284 16 7 .977 
134 1235 77 41 .970 



Name and Club. 
Fritz, Mobile, 



G.AB.R.BH 

42 147 8 41 
36 136 11 36 



G. PO. A. E. 

20 327 63 17 



PC. 

.504 
.478 
.304 

PC. 



PC. 

.958 



Jones, Columbus, 

THIRD BASEMEN 
Kean, Jax.-Gfpt., 



Preston, Vbg.-Col., 
Kinlocb, Columbus, 



Casey, Columbus, 
Billiard, Meridian, 



Wills, Vicksburg, 
Downing, Meridian, 



SECOND BASEMEN. 

19 86 61 12 .924 Stark, Columbus, 15 2S 32 7 
SHORTSTOPS. 

136 203 47 .878lDurmeyer,Meridian, 145 318 405 79 
OUTFIELDERS. 

13 6 .9671 Price. Col.-Mdn., 37 65 3 4 

2 1 .95SlStickney, Gulfport, 78 72 10 5 

PITCHERS. 

50 2 .9691 Gill, Columbus, 11 13 33 2 

64 4 .967|Miller, Jackson, 23 10 45 3 

CATCHERS. 

24 2 .9Sl|Fisher, B., Vicksb'g, 32 161 43 12 .944 



73 162 
15 21 

% 

21 14 

37 55 



,944 
,942 



,958 
.948 



18 77 
100 894 182 27 .9761 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
, — Opponents — v 

Name and Club. R. AB. H. SO. BB. WE. HB. W. L. TC. 

Nolly, Mobile 72 1128 228 129 56 3 5 23 7 .766 

Blackburn, Vicksburg 64 935 222 86 48 2 12 19 9 .678 

Ashton, Vicksburg 29 433 90 36 20 1 4 8 4 .666 

Christman, Jackson 90 1257 266 167 75 3 7 23 12 .657 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 179> 

Interstate League 

Br W. R. Smith, Fhanklut, Pa. 

The Interstate League, comprising the- 
cities of Bradford, Erie, Franklin, Kane,. 
Oil City, Du Bois and Punxsutawney, in 
Pennsylvania, and Olean, N. Y., opened 
its season of 1907 on May 15. Owing 
to the extremely bad weather the first 
couple of months, the attendance was- 
small in all the cities, and the weather 
was so cold that it was hard for any 
of the players to get "warmed up." 
As a consequence, on July 15 both Kane 
and Olean gave up the ghost. A meet- 
ing of the directors of the other clubs 
was at once held, and it was decided to 
continue the season with six clubs. 
This arrangement continued until the 
F. Baumeister first week in August when, at a meet- 

President ing in Bradford, both DuBois and 

Interstate League Punxsutawney pulled out, the latter hav- 
ing disbanded a couple of days previous, 
which was the cause of the meeting. This meeting lasted until 
late at night, when the four remaining clubs — Bradford, Erie, 
Franklin and Oil City — decided to brave the storm and play out 
the season, a new schedule being arranged. When the first 
two clubs quit, DuBois was leading the league, and it "was 
agreed that she should be awarded the pennant for the first 
half of the season and was to play a series of games with the 
winner of the second season for the championship. This second 
season lasted but two weeks, Bradford being at the head, and 
a third season was started. When the year closed in September 
Franklin was in the lead by a narrow margin, with Bradford 
second, Erie third and Oil City fourth. As DuBois was no 
more in the league, it has not as yet been decided just who were 
the champions. 

Taken all through, the players did excellent work, some men 
high up in Base Ball who were scouting in this section during 
the latter part of the season being responsible for the expression 
that the Interstate was playing much faster ball than either the 
O. and P. or the P. O. M. Quite a number of players were 
sold to major leagues. Curtis of Bradford went to the Giants, 
while Grandy, the big Erie pitcher, was sold to the St. Louis 
Nationals. Eddie Early, the star outfielder who played in 
Franklin, was sold to New York, while the same club disposed 
of McCarthy, the leading batter of the league, and Dwyer, the 
premier first baseman, to Toledo. Sykes and Parsons of Oil 
City go to Columbus, and a number of other players were 
drafted. 

Remarkable work was done by some of the players. It is 
seldom that a catcher is very high in the batting list, but 
Harry Curtis of Bradford was such a sure hitter that every 
pitcher in the league had nervous prostration when he came to 
bat, his record in thirty-six games being .337. McCarthy, who 
was on the utility list for Franklin the fore part of the season, 
was finally given a show and proved his usefulness by winning 
many a game for his club with the bat. He was one of the 
surest men in the league, in seventy-one games batting at .314. 
Another man who kept the pitchers and fielders on the jump 



i 2 3 



10 



5 6 7 8 




... ( 



I, Davey; 2. Hazelton; 3, Foster, Mgr. ; 4, Bussey; 5, Feeney; 6, C. 
Hoover; 7, Zollers; 8, Bedell, Trainer; 9 Kirwan; 10, F. Hoover; 

II, Smith; 12, Schroeder; 13, Harrel 

BRADFORD TEAM—' INTERSTATE LEAGUE. 




1, Crane; 2, Buck; 3, O'Hare, Cant.; 4. Nevenoara; 5. Businsky; 6, 

Cole; 7, Sp.rgent; 8, Dunn; 9, Cosma; 30, Burton; 11, Newnham; 12, 

Cavanaugli; 13, Daly; 14, McDonnell. Hoyt, Photo. 

ERIE TEAM— INTERSTATE LEAGUE. 




1, Jewell; 2, Parsons; 3, Hughes: 4, Doubles; 5, Jarrett; t>, Jutzi; 
7, Willoughby; 8, Sykes; 9, Rexford, Mgr.; 10, Callopy, Capt.; ll t 
Harper; 12, Shields; 13, Colligan; 14, Clougher; 15, Conroy. 
OIL CITY TEAM— INTERSTATE LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



181 



was Sykes of Oil City. This young man made a record that 
will probably never be equaled in Base Ball. On August 22, 
in a game against Bradford, with Davey pitching for the latter 
club, he was seven times at bat and hit safely each time, two 
of the hits being three-baggers. He did his best work in the 
latter part of the season, gaining just 50 points in his batting 
average in the last twenty-four games, closing the season with 
an average of .302 in ninety-seven games. 

Parsons of Oil City and Hughes of Franklin closed the season 
with the same pitching average, but the former worked in eight 
more games, which really gives him the best record. 

To show there were some fast men in the league it is but 
necessary to take note of the fact that the four clubs that 
finished the year had 606 stolen bases to their credit, Zoller of 
Bradford and Cole of Erie being about in the same class. 

The averages of the leaders in Batting and Fielding in the Inter- 
state League in 1907, according to the official records, are given 
herewith. The complete official records are published in Spalding's 
Official Base Ball Recokd, for sale by all newsdealers, price 
10 cents. 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 

Name and Club. 



Name and Club. 
Weimer, DuBois, 
Curtis, Bradford, 
Clyde, Oil City, 
McCarthy, Franklin, 
Callopy, Oil City, 
Hoover, F., Brad., 
Foster, Bradford, 



Name and Club. 
Dwyer, Franklin, 
Sykes, Oil City, 



Larkin, DuBois, 
Feeney, Bradford, 



Allen, Olean, 
Grant, DuBois, 



Savage, Oil City, 
Flynn, Oil City, 



Terrell, Bradford, 
Smith, Kane, 

McCreight, Fran.,' 
Hughes, Franklin, 

Martell, DuBois, 
Curtis, Bradford, 

Name and Club. 
Parsons, Oil City, 
Hughes, Franklin, 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 

60 225 34 76 .338 

36 101 22 34 .337 

23 67 8 22 .328 

71 245 37 77 .314 

41 145 9 45 .310 

87 340 47 105 .309 

70 250 29 77 .308 



Lawrence, Olean, 
Sykes, Oil City, 
Daubert, Kane, 
Welsh, Olean, 
Earley. Franklin, 
Martell, DuBois, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

82 807 39 10 .989 
97 704 53 19 .975 



Name and Club. 
Crane, Erie, 
Campbell, Punx'y, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
46 345 22 12 .9681 Barrett, Kane, 
94 619 49 25 .9641 Schmaltz, Franklin, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
15 39 36 3 .962[Hoffman, Erie, 
39 28 61 5 .947|Snowden, DuBois, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

32 59 66 7 .947|Colligan, Oil City, 
56 80 125 12 .945| Jewell, Oil City, 

OUTFIELDERS. 

15 42 17 1 .985|Meehan, Punx'y, 
41 15 219 40 .98l|Earley, Franklin. 

PITCHERS. 

43 38 65 2 .9811 Cotter, Bradford, 
26 78 40 3 .975|Yoedt, Punx'y, 

CATCHERS. 
49 278 42 5 .985|Clougher, Oil City, 
36 149 25 3 . 983 1 Bailey, Punx'y, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G. W. L. PC] Name and Club. 
27 15 5 .750 McDonald, Erie, 
12 9 3 .750lClyde, DuBois.-Oil C. 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 

31 109 15 33 .303 

97 358 54 108 .302 

42 157 18 47 .299 

10 "7 3 8 .296 

53 2U4 22 K0 .294 

49 185 24 54 ..y. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

81 430 39 15 .972 
3S 310 32 12 .966. 



15 28 16 "5 .957 
73 316 163 23 .954 



45 66 104 11 .939 
60 144 150 24 .925 



71 143 163 20 .939 
94 174 103 23 .923 



47 68 5 2 .973 
53 91 10 3 .971 



16 78 40 3 .978 
34 30 110 6 .972 



26 183 19 4 
52 194 88 9 



G. W. L. PC. 

14 9 4 .692 
24 14 7 .667 




1, Joe Kelley, Mgr. and Capt.; 2, J. J. McCaffrey, Pres.; 3, Thoney; 
4. Hesterfer; 5, Rudolph; 6, Applegate: 7, Mitchell; 8, Frick; 9, 
Hurley; 10, Welch; 11, Flynn; 12, Wotell; 13, Moffltt; 14, Crooks; 
15. Carrigan; 16, Phyle; 17, McGinley; 18, Weidensaul; 19, Schalfly. 
' F. Lyonde, Photo 

TORONTO TEAM CHAMPIONS EASTERN LEAGUE. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE 181 

Eastern League 

Bt J. P. Fitzgerald, Toronto 

Few even of the veriest dyed-in-the- 
wool fans would have staked their Base 
Ball reputations by predicting, in the 
spring of 1907 that Toronto Would win 
the Eastern League pennant. All hoped 
for a first division team, and on form 
it looked as though even that was a 
long reach. It was not a championship 
team on paper; it looked only fair by 
comparison with the other seven on the 
circuit, but they came through the sea- 
son with flving colors, and showed the 
level, even gait that marks the pennant- 
annexing style. 

Former Manager Ed Barrow had 

signed almost the entire team before he 

.,,. t . r -, handed over the reins to Joe Kelley. 

Pr^iHrnt He had in his long career as .manager 

Eastern League wel1 learned the truth of the saying 

eastern League thftt n takeg money to get mon ey. and 

had gathered together, a team regardless of expense. When he 
i I conttol thor> wer- ~aps to fill, but the 

foundation was tbere, and Joe Kelley ably looked after tL? 
superstructure and the furnishings. 

Left without a manager in the middle of the winter. Presi- 
dent McCaffery made haste to get the best, and he certainly 
made a home run with the bases full when he alighted on Sir 
Joseph languishing in Cincinnati. He was a high-priced man, 
but he proved cheap in the end, so much so, that the club 
handed him a purse of $1,000 in gold as a good-will offering 
at the close of the season. 

Perhaps never before in any league, and certainly not in the 
Eastern, did the winning of a pennant redound more to the 
credit of any one man than did the annexing of the honors 
by Toronto to Joe Kelley last season. His own playing was 
good, and he did everything but catch, but it was only a 
shadow to the way he developed his men. He drilled some of 
them from raw recruits to first-class players ; drew out all the 
latent ability of others that had been lying dormant and going 
to seed, so that they became stars ; exhorted here and hurled 
his biting sarcasms there ; dealt out even-handed justice, sparing 
none in his barbed scoldings, and overlooking none in his 
praises. 

The result was that the whole team played as one man, all 
feeling the same pride in the winning of games as though the 
team were their own. There was never a jarring element after 
things got running nicely, and every player on the team felt 
and understood that he was being helped to make good by the 
popular manager. His men worshipped him, and he in his turn 
never failed, in private or in public, to hand out praise where 
it was deserved. 

Joe Kelley won the pennant for Toronto, and every player 
and every fan realized it every day and in every game. He 
had brought his long experience with him. and drilled his fair 
material only into one whole that worked like a piece of well- 
oiled machinery, and if they failed it was on the mechanical 
side rather than on inside ball. 




pll; 4, Murray; 5, Vowinkle; 



i — Million- 2 Kisinsrer; 3, McCoim^H; 4, Murray; o. vowuinie, u, 
Nattr"f 7 Green" 8, Schirm; C. Grob; 10, Hill; 11, Gettman; 
i- White- 13, Cleary 14, Smith; 15. Ryan; 16. Tozer; 17 L. 
^..a!^' Af.; H. C. Weasner, Photos, Buffalo, N. Y. 



McAllister, Mgr. 

BUFFALO TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 



V MeLouuell; i" Peterson; a, imanu. 4. ^^j'^^^iJ 
Mack- 7, Donovan; 8, Cronin; 9, Harris; 10. Barry, 11, AbsteiD 
12 Stevens; 13, Lord; 14, Crawford: 15, Phelan; 16 Hugh Duffy Mgr. 
■"' oieveilB ' - 10 ' H c \yeasner, Photos, Buffalo, N. Y. 

PROVIDENCE TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



186 



Starting out with Bob Wood as his only catcher: a non- 
descript and untried lot of pitchers, with one or two exer- 
tions ; himself at first; Tim Flood at second ; Frick moved 
down from third to short, and showing weakness in hi? new 
& a ^ ; n Ph £ le , at „ , third: Thone y and WeidensSul, utility! and 

Of e iL W fci w b ^ en ° nly fair V* - vear bef01 ' e ' in the outflSK 
«r2£ n e 0t ' ^ 00 , d ' a couple of Pitchers, Frick, Thoney and 
Wottell, were all that was left of the 11)06 team 

Brooklyn turned over Catcher Henley, and one day earlv In 
May, Catcher Bill Carrigan drifted in from Boston unheralded 
and unexpected. Indeed, with Wood and Henley in uniform i? 
was a problem what to do with the Holv Cross man but thev 

KR25 1 an , d , le ^ - W °° d g0 / And that W became easily the 
cleverest and brainiest catcher in the league, working faithfully 

SSjftfilS o°f P t^ e cTouSs d Wtting likG a *» ! ' Gnish ^ 

.?/ r f the ba ^ on th t nose to al1 fields > was forced to first 
?hfL because . Connor . had been unable to take up his work 

Then Tn n ni ^ s PV ained a £ kle acquired in spring practice. 

Ihen Jack Fi yn n J0me d the team for a week's trial, but he 
did so well that they couldn't think of replacing him, and that 
gave Kelley a chance to go to the field. ' 

ini S th * y$ar before, a good man, developed under Kelley 
into easily the fastest man in the li -,> at nitter ** 

Kfi d c e h- ,? e b0Cam ^ the star of tne <*»*>4 but on August 12 
his shoulder was thrown out, and was used no more. Weiden 
sail .was shifted around, and by chance Crooks drilled in and 

fn le TnS e P? a f C6 ^ ter -, H ° ey had been sent on from I 
S n i"" e > but Pjayed only a. few games, his arm giving out. 
wottell was put back in right and did well 

These troubles piled upon one another, and only luck inter 
vened at times to prevent a bad slump. At one stage Thoney 
M?i le L a 2? Carr !? an - th e three hitters of the team-were an 
Kit!* A'dTtViTa' ha n b d it Stm the ** m kept Up ite winn ^ 

JWMxs sssr& wSM^t^ 

&I UtIity 0r ,7 as 0I \ tbe in J' ured list m ost of the season! 
Hesterfer began like a whirlwind, but sickness took it out of 
viSrnn Wa « r l tbe Cl0S< V Rudolph, a youngster, finished like a 
veteran, and is a valuable boy now. Moffltt and \DDleeate 
were erratic, and Jacobson proved a frost. It was decided ? 
Pennant V itch ™S staff that ever won an Eastern League 

But behind them there was Hitting as regular as clockwork 
£" £f"-? y ' Tboney ' . Cai I igan and Weldensaulf and it wm £« 
?? S„ aS e ,t: + was C ^' tain : batting that was liable to break out 
a im f. ny S £ 0t on * he scoring card; clouting that was always 
timely, oftener than not in clusters and in bunches ? 

1 hey were not a great team, but they were a winning one 
and their victories came in that most acceptable of all fo?ms— 
batting streaks extending all along the line. They were ably 

n^hr an h S av £ a11 tb f Base Bal1 tuat was in them and thJ 
public had the most enjoyable season in years. And thev 
turned out to see them as they deserved, close to 175 000 
people viewing the seventy home games, netting the club a 
clear profit of some $20,000. 

RnTHL Stand ^ ng T° f ,^ be cluhs an , d tn £ averages of the leaders In 
Batting and Fielding in the Eastern League in 1907, 




1, Mahling; 2, Engle; 3, Shea; 4, McCafferty; 5, Pardee; 6, Kritchell; 
7, Stanage; 8, McCarthy; 9, Mullen; 10, Cockmaji; 11, Zacher; 12, 
Labelle; 13, McDonald; 14, Sharpe; 15, Carrick; 1G, Jones; 17, 
W. W Uuinham, Mgr. H. C. Weasner, Photos, Buffalo, N. Y. 

NEWARK TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Merritt; 2, Fitzgerald: 3. Whiting: 4. Sherman: fi. Wormwood; 
6. Curtis: 7, Clement; 8, Keister; 9. Hanford: 10, Halligan; 11, 
Butler: 12, Pfanmiller; 13, Vandergrift: 14, McCann; 15, Foxen; 
1G, Woods; 17, Lake; 18, Moore; 19, J. Bean, Mgr. 

JERSEY CITY TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 18y 

according to the official records, are given herpwith tu^ 
R?^l r ? COrds , a ^ e P«W»hed in SpaldixS's Official B^sTr^? 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents! 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Won. 

Toronto 83 

Buffalo 73 

Providence 72 

Newark 67 



Lost. P.C 
51 .619 
59 .553 
63 .533 
66 .504 



Name and Club. 
Wood, Toronto, 
Connor, Toronto, 
Hoey, Toronto, 
Thoney, Toronto, 
Byers, Baltimore, 
Kelley, Toronto, 
McConnell, Prov., 
Butler, Jersey City, 
Carrigan, Toronto, 



Name and Club. 
Sharpe, Newark, 
Clancy, Rochester, 

Smith, Buffalo, 
Woods, J. City, 

Lennox, Rochester, 
Cockman, Newark, 

James, Baltimore, 
Nattress, Buffalo, 



Duffy, Providence, 
Brocket, Mont., 

Weidensaul, Tor., 
Schrim, Buffalo, 



Murray, Buffalo, 
Flanagan, Roch., 

Mitchell, Toronto, 
Vowinkle, Buffalo, 

Butler, -J. City, 
Fitzgerald, J. City, 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING 



Won. 

Jersey City 67 

Baltimore 68 

Rochester " 59 

Montreal ...'.' 45 



Lost. P.C. 
66 .604 
69 .495 

76 .43T 
85 .351 



G. AB.R. H.PC. 

11 30 5 11 .367 

14 34 6 12 .353 

15 48 9 16 .333 
102 413 93 136 .329 

70 221 30 72 .326 
91 314 32 101 .322 
129 494 79 158 .320 
24 78 9 25 .320 
86 291 46 93 .319 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. PO. A. E. PC. I Name and Club. 
122 1421 81 16 .9R9lKellev, Toronto 



Name and Club. 
Barger, Mon.-Roch., 
McDonald, Newark, 
Flanagan, Roch., 
Duffy, Providence, 
Hearne, Baltimore, 
Hambacher, Bait., 
Chadbourne, Prov., 
McConnell, Buffalo, 
Higgins, Rochester, 



G. AB.R. H.PC. 

20 47 6 15 .319 

11 32 4 10 .313 

131 482 66 147 .305 

35 73 9 22 .301 

97 290 34 87 .300 

17 54 8 16 .296 

128 464 70 138 .294 

133 503 57 147 .293 

40 106 9 31 .292 



PO. 
342 



A. E. PC. 

?« 5 .987 



44 40 3 .956 
93 186 13 .956 



59 17 .9S7|McConnell, Buffalo, 132 1384 46 21 ill 
SECOND BASEMEN. 
128 263 360 14 .978|Moran, Rochester, 
19 37 62 3 .97l|Schlafly, Toronto, 
THIRD BASEMEN. 
136 201 283 29 .943|Morgan, Montreal 
125 152 318 29 .942|Burrell, Baltimore, 

SHORTSTOPS. 
34 60 10S 8 .955|Moran, Rochester 
134 331 389 53 .944|schlafly, Toronto, 

CENTER FIELDERS. 
17 38 10 lOOOi Weidensaul, Tor., 
26 59 4 1 .984|Crooks, Tor., 

LEFT FIELDERS. 
22 46 5 1 .981 [Clement, J. City, 
20 46 11 .979|Hayden, Rochester, 
RIGHT FIELDERS. 
1 156 15 5 .972|Handford. Jersey C. 



118 177 278 29 .940 
140 184 321 35 .935 



77 149 246 26 .938 
26 59 72 9 .936 



77 167 
21 51 



133 215 
77 132 



12 



3 .983 
1 .981 



96 154 



24 130 
17 68 



9 7 .959|Wotell, Toronto, 
PITCHERS. 
42 10001 Moffitt. Toronto, 
75 1 .98SJ Rudolph, Toronto, 

CATCHERS. 
23 2 .987|Shea, Newark, 



137 205 
121 164 



17 10 
20 10 



Name and Club. 
McQuillan, Prov. 
McGinley, Tor., 



68 23 2 .978] Ryan, Buffalo) 
PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

Name and Club. 
Tozer. Buffalo, 



50 192 68 6 
81 333 130 11 



. 9B7 

.948 



.977 

.975 



r-Opp , 

W. L. H. BB.SO.PC. 

19 7 197 58 105 .731 
22 10 225 51 111 .6S8 



Moffitt. Tor 



^-Opp.-^ 

W. L. H. BB.SO.PC. 

21 10 209 55 64 .677 
11 6 IIS 48 70 .647 




1, Hearne; 2, Byers; 3, O'Hara; 4, McCloskey; 5, Kelley; 6, Beach; 
7, Burrell; 8, Rapp; 9, Hall; 10, Hunter; 11, Hardy; 12, Adkins; 
13, Toren; 14, Burchell; 15, Demniitt; 16, J. Dunn, Mgr. 
BALTIMORE TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 



:*- C**"i ffl* \L- 






%l, 2 jp ,f ^Jr i 


;t ifi !■ 




yf$' f ' I 






k. .5H^^\ 


1£7r\?7 


x: 



1, Lenox; 2, McLean; 3, Henley; 4, Flanigan; 5, Hayden: 6, Clancy; 
7, Barger; 8, Walter; 9, Doran; 10, Pappalau; 11, Sundheim; 12, 
Higgins; 13, Loudenslager; 14, Malay; 15, Bannon; 16, Bannister; 
17, Moran; 18, A. C. iiuckenberger, Mgr. 

ROCHESTER TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Keefe; 2, Clark; 3, Shean; 4, Brockett; ^, Corcoran; 6, O'Hara; 

7, Stanley; 8, Hughes; 9. Brown; 10, Needham; 11, Joyce; 12, 
Madigan; 13, Waters; 14, Herbst; 15, J. Morgan, Mgr. 

MONTREAL TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. c 



SPALDIJiS'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 189 

Iowa State League 

By John - A. Hall 

^■IP.'W Greater strides than was ever before 

£ a known in the history of the Iowa State 

M League were made by that organization 

jP *%£) 4m. during the season of 1907 when the 

■ mm league jumped to the front among Class 

s* j^mm D leagues in a manner greatly to the 

*0 9mw credit of the various cities in the cir- 

Eb ^m cuit, and also greatly to the credit of 

A .^0 President M. E. Justice, who succeeded 

^dmmmh^Sfm. L - s - Beckham upon the death of the 

^AM -^^^ latter in mid-season. The affairs of the 

dm\ m^^^m%%mk league were taken up and continued by 

|^S I the new president with never a break 
I or a hitch, and the league continued to 
rm HO prosper in a remarkable manner. 

■■■■■■■1 Financially the clubs finished th© 
M. E. Justice season in much better condition than in 

President previous years, almost all of the teams 

Iowa State League in the league breaking better than even. 
Marshalltown was the only city in the 
circuit which was a failure, and the franchise in that city 
was taken up by the league on account of the attendance 
having fallen below the required number of 20,000 admissions. 
Not only did the league advance in attendance and in finan- 
cial ways, but in playing ability as well, and the league was 
considered by competent critics to be the equal of the Three- 
Eye and many other leagues in higher classes than that in 
which the Iowa League is classified. The two Illinois cities, 
Jacksonville and Quincy, developed into two of the besc 
drawing cities in the circuit, and proved to be valuable acquisi- 
tions to the league. The grade of ball played in the league 
was well illustrated by the large number of players from the 
Iowa League, who were sold or drafted to clubs in faster 
company. On the whole, the season was a most successful and 
prosperous one, and the league was never in better condition 
than at the close of last season. 

The work of M. E. Justice as president was recognized at 
this meeting by the league in his selection by a unanimous 
vote to succeed himself in the office of executive of the league. 
One notable feature of the Iowa League of last season was 
the harmony and unity with which the various clubs were 
controlled, good managers being the rule, and the best work 
was thus brought out of the players. Manager Boyle of 
Waterloo was successful in winning the pennant by a narrow 
margin from Burlington, the closeness of the race being well 
illustrated by the fact that the pennant was not won until the 
last series of the season, in which Waterloo met Burlington on 
the home grounds at Waterloo, where three straight victories 
for Waterloo put Burlington out of the running. Manager 
Egan of Burlington was the most successful in disposing of 
his players at good figures to clubs in higher class leagues. 
Schroeder and Green were sold to the Chicago White Sox, 
House to St. Louis Nationals, and Daley to the Cincinnati 
Nationals. Snapper Kennedy of the Marshalltown team seemed 
to have the lead for hard luck, and the fact that his team 
was not higher in the standing is largely due to hard luck 



1 


A .■■ 


? . 


% 


t 


"# 2 


If fa 


1" 


9- f <5 


f 


r .„f - 8 




.7 1 


//f 


r 


si 


! /3 f 



I, Cruikshank; 2, Clark; 3, Hollenbeck; 4, Lizette; 5, Gasper; 6, 
Swalm; 7, Magee; 8, White; 9, Pennington; 10, S. L. Vale, Pies.; 

II, F. Boyle, Mgr. ; 12, H. Junge, Sec; 13, Skour; 14, Curtiss; 15, 
Wilkes; 16, Harmon. Tritz, Photo. 

WATERLOO TEAM— CHAMPIONS IOWA LEAGUE. 




1, Slapnicka; 2, House; 3, Egan, Mgr.; 4, Towne; 5, Grogan; 6, 
Schroeder; 7, Kennedy; 8, Rose; 9, Green; 10, Donovan; 11, Brugge- 
jban: 12, Daly; 13, Burg; 14, McMillen. 

BURLINGTON TEAM— IOWA LEAGUE. 




1, Iiuemiller; 2, Sehaff; 3, Scott; 4, Fuller, Umpire; 5, Moody; 
Coatcs; 7, Patterson, Mgr.; 8, Cramer; 9, Fleming; 10, Fisher; 11, 
Mattiek; 12, Steele; 13, Baker; 14, Richmond, Mascot: 15, Kensel; 
16, Mitze. Photo by Scoles. 

OSKALOOSA TEAM— IOWA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



191 



and the fact that the people at home were not supporting the 
team as they should. 

Almost all through the season the race for the various 
leading positions was close, only a few points separating the 
leading teams the greater part of the time, and this fact 
tended to make the season the successful one it was in regards 
to attendance. The Waterloo team made a great race, being 
near the bottom about the middle of the season and then 
gradually climbing until first place was landed. In a post- 
season series between the Wisconsin League and the Iowa 
League, Waterloo and Freeport each won two games, the re- 
maining three games of the series being prevented by rain. 
The teams seemed to be very closely matched. In a post- 
season series between the Rock Island team, winners of the 
pennant in the Three-Eye League, and the Burlington team, 
runner-up in the Iowa League, it was demonstrated that there 
was but little to choose from between the two aggregations. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Iowa League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. 
Waterloo, 
Burlington, 
Oskaloosa, 
Marshalltown, 



G. 

124 
129 
125 
120 



PC. 

.637 
.605 
.560 
.517 



Club. 
Jacksonville, 
Quincy, 
Ottumwa, 
Keokuk, 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G.AB.R. H. PC! Name and Club. 

15 57 14 21 .368 House, Burlington. 
66 293 52 102 ,348|Blausser, Marsh., 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. PO. A. E. PCI Name and Club. 
96 1004 46 11 .990 Rudd, Quincy, 
16 161 9 2 .988lBirmingham, Keo., 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
51 111 103 9 .960|Magee, Bur.-Wat., 
86 241 236 22 .956lYeager, Keokuk, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
27 39 58 5 .951|Donovan, Bur., 
59 87 129 14 .939|Bagnall, Waterloo, 
SHORTSTOPS. 

16 39 44 6 .933(Harris, Marsh., 
119 228 325 48 .920[Dalton, Quincy, 

OUTFIELDERS. 

Slapnicka, Bur.-Mar. 24 34 lOOOlSchaefer, Marsh., 

Disch, Marshalltown, 17 25 3 1000jLinderbeck, Quincy, 

CATCHERS. 

Name and Club. G.PO. A. E.PB.PCI Name and Club. G. PO. A. E.PB.PC 

Mitze, Oskaloosa, 77 389 99 6 11 .988 Bruggeman, Bur. 123 694 142 17 24 .980 

71 407 78 6 6 .988|Moody, Oskaloosa. 46 247 62 7 6 .978 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

W. L. SO. PC FPCI Name and Club. W. L. SO. PC. FPC. 

9 2 46 .818 .983 Green, Burlington, 28 11 162 .718 .961 

13 3 109 .813 .945lHollenbeck, Wat., 22 9 157 .710 .972 



Name and Club. 
Uhland, Quincy, 
Kaphan, Waterloo, 



Name and Club. 
Corbett, Ottumwa, 
Bauer, Ottumwa, 

Middleton, Marsh., 
Grogan, Burlington, 

Benson, Oskaloosa, 
Pennington, Wat., 

Misse, Marshalltown, 
Wilkes, Waterloo, 



Lizzette, Wat., 



G. W. 

124 63 

127 61 

128 39 


L. 

61 
66 
74 

89 


PC. 

.508 
.480 
.408 
.305 


G.AB.R. H. 

129 513 91 158 
18 60 7 18 


.308 
.300 


G. PO. 

123 1222 
59 673 


A. E. PC. 

85 19 .986 
36 15 .979 


87 168 239 19 
118 290 330 33 


.955 
.950 


114 182 226 27 
46 86 103 13 


.938 
.936 


95 176 255 40 
121 239 325 54 


.915 
.913 


17 12 
68 150 


1000 
12 2 .988 



Name and Club. 
Steele, Oskaloosa, 
Schroeder, Bur., 




1, Copeland; 2, Moran; 3, Berte; 4, Akers; 5, Craig; 6, Patrick; 7, 
Hughes; 8, Belt, Mgr. ; 9, Roland; 10, McCarthy; 11, Pratt; 12, 
Hayden, Mascot; 13, Hagel. 

JACKSONVILLE TEAM— IOWA LEAGUE. 




1, Walsh; 2, Dang; 3, McGuire; 4, Dalton; 5, Johnson; 6, Linder- 
beck; 7. Jamison; 8, Mason; 9, Plummer; 10, Farrell; 11, Rudd, 
Capt.; 12, Hofer, Mgr.; 13, Keyes; 14, Bennett; 15, Rause. 
QUINCY TEAM— IOWA LEAGUE. 



w^4j| 


L' % "'^WR 


i njM' : ^ 




1 ^r ' <m*)te&ZA< , *\ 




HI 

-- 




mm i ~ 


M3 







1, Fleming: 2. Colbert; 3, Sedgwick: 4. Coykendall. 5. Bradley; 6, 
Wiegardt: 7, Bauer; 8, Everett; 9, Hippert; 10, Corbett, Mgr.; 11, 
Finney; 12, Puttman. 

OTTUMWA TEAM— IOWA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 




Northern Copper Country League 

By C. L. Hoche, Lake Linden, Mich. 

The commencement of the second sea- 
son of the Northern-Copper Country 
League found four teams comprising 
the circuit, Winnipeg and Duluth in 
the west, Calumet and Houghton in the 
Copper Country- 

Grand Forks and Lake Linden, hav- 
ing found the proposition of financing 
a team burdensome, had dropped out. 
Many admirers of the game predicted 
that such a league could not exist, 
owing to the long jump from the Cop- 
per Country to Winnipeg, Canada, with 
Duluth the only break in the jump, 
causing road expenses which would 
Dr. Percy R. Glass prove too big a burden financially for 
President the different teams to carry. In addi- 

Northern Copper tion, the public would not enthuse 

Country Leegue over a pennant race with only four 

teams as contenders, where there had 
formerly been eight and six teams in the race. They were 
not verv wrong in their predictions, as only the energetic work 
and influence of President Dr. Percy Glass, kept the league 
intact until the close of season. He is certainly entitled to 
great credit for the able manner in which he conducted the 
league in the face of so many obstacles and adverse condi- 
tions. 

While the league was not a financial success, high-grade ball 
was played, which is evidenced by the number of players who 
have been sold to and drafted by the bigger leagues — Sundheim 
of Houghton to New York Nationals, Miller to Chicago Ameri- 
cans, Brookins to Indianapolis, Kurke and Thompson to South 
Bend, Sawyer of Winnipeg to Washington, Piper and Zeider 
to San Francisco, Bushelman to Toledo, Cummings of Duluth 
to Atlanta, McCormick to Little Rock, Newcomb of Calumet to 
South Bend, and with deals on for the sale of other players. 
It is hoped that with the addition of possibly four teams to 
the circuit, that the season of 1908 will prove to be a financial 
as well as an artistic success. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Won. Lost. PCI Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Winnepeg 74 24 .755 Houghton 48 57 .457 

Duluth 48 55 .466lCalumet 35 67 .343 

WINNIPEG. Field?g Bat . g 

Name and Position. G. AB. R. BH. SH. SB. PO. A. E. PC. PC. 

Zeider, third base 98 363 75 114 8 59 162 248 30 .932 .314 

Cox, right field 96 384 57 117 11 33 240 12 13 .924 .304 

Piper, center field 89 365 61 107 6 44 186 9 8 .960 .293 

Henderson, left field 38 146 28 42 8 13 133 20 13 .921 .287 

Crisp, catcher 94 339 38 96 11 36 487 136 28 .942 .283 

King, second base 97 368 47 79 11 29 228 326 39 .934 .271 

Terry, pitcher 50 164 21 39 5 9 36 77 5 .958 .237 

O'Neill, first base 13 49 5 10 1 131 2 6 .957 .204 

Luderus, first base 57 213 28 45 26 10 651 13 16 .977 .211 

Giencke, pitcher-fielder... 50 151 11 29 12 5 23 69 5 .948 .192 

Sensenbach, shortstop 94 339 43 79 30 22 163 239 50 .912 .168 

Bushelman, pitcher 26 81 5 12 5 3 8 70 3 .963 .148 

Sawyer, pitcher 28 79 6 9 2 3 14 98 5 .957 .113 






' %*^r 



1, Sensenbach; 2, Henderson; 3, Bushelman; 4, Sawyer; 5, Cox; 
6, Crisp: 7. Herr, -Mgr. ; 8, Lamb, Bus. Mgr. ; 9, A. H. Pulford, Pres.; 
10, J. McDonald, Sec.-Treas.; 11, Zeider; 12, Terry; 13. King; 14, 
Piper; 15, Giencke. Bryant's Studio, Photo. 

WINNIPEG TEAM— CHAMPIONS NORTHERN COPPER COUNTRY 
LEAGUE. 




1, McMory; 2, laylor; 3, Wallace; 4, Kaiser; 5, Sincock; 6, Lewis; 

7, Siner: 8, Egan; 9, Ryan; 10, Dolan; 11, Newcomb; 12, Trewdway. 

CALUMET TEAM— NORTHERN COPPER COUNTRY LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



19!> 



Name and Position. 



DULUTH. 
G. AB. R. BH. SH. SB. PO. A. 



McCormiek, right field... 102 379 

C'unimings, pitcher-fielder 57 194 

Anderson, center field 9 37 

Haney, pitcher-fielder 58 180 

Munroe, left field 103 383 

Helding, catcher 75 256 

Livingston, second base.. 89 362 

Sommers, center field — 78 252 

Leighty, shortstop 103 394 

Traeey, first base 103 391 

Goldsmith, center field.... 29 112 

Williams, third base 67 239 

Krick, pitcher 38 112 

Roy, left field 17 50 

Smith, catcher 53 175 



51 116 
29 54 



10 145 19 

3 48 127 
2 21 4 

7 48 89 

18 186 20 

19 292 79 

8 224 212 
25 146 79 

11 180 339 
25 1157 53 

6 41 4 

12 93 161 

4 18 104 
25 3 

5 249 82 



Name and Position. 

Kurke, catcher 23 86 

Solbroa, first base 96 363 

Brookins, third base 48 199 

Thompson, shortstop 23 97 

Taylor, second base 42 126 

Meyers, right field 100 387 

Olsen, left field 97 372 

Langhlin. center field 87 287 

Mutter, first base 16 63 

Sundheim, third base 57 228 

Brand, second base 40 143 

Speiser, second base 18 52 

Bitting, shortstop 25 95 

Miller, pitcher-fielder 55 159 

Kaiser, pitcher-fielder 48 144 

Stewart, catcher 40 147 

Rogers, pitcher-fielder 51 167 

Egan, pitcher-fielder 52 177 



HOUGHTON. 
G. AB. R. BH. SH. SB. PO. 



11 33 

48 112 

27 61 

15 28 

14 36 

61 106 

58 99 



51 



5 115 30 

22 904 66 

13 71 86 

10 38 63 

7 99 127 

17 106 9 

30 149 21 

IS 829 74 



90 97 

30 42 

35 74 

30 116 

45 69 

220 51 

20 103 

30 102 



Name and Position. 

Rogues, shortstop 47 

Corriagan, right field 50 

Kaiser, second base 15 59 

Siner, left field 44 156 

Neweomb, pitcher-fielder. 83 301 

Dolan, first base 71 273 

Wallace, second base 71 282 

Taylor, third base 87 335 

Sincock, pitcher-fielder... 23 85 

Lewis, center field 53 200 

Ryan, pitcher-fielder 73 272 

Oriet, shortstop 59 220 

McMory, catcher 62 204 

Schroder, pitcher 13 42 

Trewdway, pitcher-fielder 28 76 

McLaughlin, left field.... 31 109 

Coopman, pitcher 16 45 



CALUMET. 
G. AB. R. BH. SH. SB. PO. 



A. 

29 



4S 



9 236 118 

8 410 40 

8 184 221 

15 124 158 

27 51 

14 129 12 

11 172 61 

27 116 166 

6 270 100 



57 



14 59 



Name and Club. 
Terry, Winnepeg, 
Sawyer, Winnepeg, 
Giencke, Winnepeg, 
Bushelman, Winn., 
Cummings. Dul., 
Rodgers, Hough., 
Krick, Duluth, 
Koopman, Calumet, 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



Field'g 

E. PC. 

15 .916 

20 .897 

1.000 

11 .926 

15 .932 
16 
42 



.959 
.912 



Bafg 
PC. 
.306 
.278 
.270 
.250 
.245 
.234 



.971 
.918 
.910 



.848 
.985 



Field'g 
E. PC. 



.214 
.214 
.200 
.160 
.160 
.137 

Bafg 
PC. 
.384 
.308 



.887 .306 
.910 .288 
.900 .285 
.885 .273 
.876 .266 
.935 .261 
.973 .253 
.898 .25© 
.917 .223 
.948 .'11 
.858 .200 
.913 .195 
.884 .166 
.163 
.148 
.10? 

Bafg 
PC. 
.381 
.308 



.971 
.854 
.904 



Field'g 
. PC. 

.870 
1.000 



.900 
.944 
.936 
.904 
.895 
.897 
.954 
.947 



.927 
.946 
.915 



G. W 



PC. 

.842 
.739 
.692 
.682 
.606 
.559 
.536 
.455 



Name and Club. G. 
Sincock, Calumet, 15 
Neweomb, Calumet, 28 
Kaiser, Houghton, 
Miller, Houghton, 
Haney, Duluth. 
Treadway, Dul.-Cal., 19 
Eagan, Houghton, 19 



31 



25 



.241 
.235 



.213 
.209 
.205 
.203 
.171 
.146 



PC. 

.400 
.393 
.387 
.375 
.360 
.211 
.211 




1, Cook; 2, Murphy; 3, O'Leary; 4, Eng; 5, Dowers; 6, Berger; 7, 
Lundin; 8, Scott; 9, Howard; 10. Lakaff: 11. Neal: 12, Wanner; 
13, Himes; 14, Tighe, Mgr. ; 15, Swalm; 16, Wilson; 37, Vandine. 
ROCK ISLAND TEAM— CHAMPIONS I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




1, Bittrolff; 2. Moore, Capt. ; 3, Reed, Mgr.; 4. Prout; 5, Wagner; 6, 
Hoffman; 7, Lelivelt; 8, Tennant; 9, Bomar: 10. Purtell; 11, Berry; 
12, Deever; 13, Persons; 14, Lone: 15. Powell: 16. Jeffries; 17, 
Schreiber. 

DECATUR TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASH BALL GUIDE. 197 

Indiana-Ulinois-Iowa League 

By E. E. Buffum, Rock: Island, III,. 

With a new town in the circuit, 
every team save Cedar Rapids under a 
new management and with a schedule 
lengthened from 126 to 140 games, the 
Three-Eye League in the season of 1907 
furnished the fastest Base Ball and the 
most spectacular pennant race since its 
organization, and made the best finan- 
cial showing. After the first month had 
passed it became apparent that the 
honors lay between Rock Island, Peoria, 
Decatur and Springfield, and these four 
teams kept in the first division, alter- 
nating in the leadership for more than 
three months, with the issue in doubt up 
Edward Holland to the very last series. To capture the 
President bunting Rock Island was forced to win 

1. 1. 1. League nineteen out of the last twenty-one 

games played, being enabled by doing so 
to nose Decatur out and finish with a percentage of .652, the 
highest any Three-Eye champions ever attained. 

The league in general was more prosperous than ever before. 
Peoria, Springfield and Rock Island finished with a small surplus, 
while Decatur and Cedar Rapids lost nothing and Bloomington and 
Clinton were not burdensome to their backers. The Dubuque asso- 
ciation was the only one that was in distress at any stage, condi- 
tions in that city necessitating a reorganization in the latter part 
of the season and eventually leading to the only controversy of an.' 
moment to mar the harmony that otherwise prevailed. 

President E. M. Holland of the Three-Eye called a meeting of 
the directors at Peoria, August 13, and a resolution was adopted 
authorizing the executive to declare the Dubuque franchise for- 
feited unless satisfactory assurance was given that the league's 
dues would be paid and the team maintained till the close of the 
pennant race. September 1, while Dubuque was playing at Rock 
Island, President Holland, on the ground that the terms of the 
resolution had not been complied with, directed Secretary Herbert 
Miller to take possession of the team in behalf of the league. Sec- 
retary Rowland of the Dubuque association, who was in personal 
charge of the aggregation, however, resisted and eventually secured 
temporary injunctions in the State courts at Dubuque and Rock 
Island, effectively blocking further attempts to transfer the franchise 
till the close of the season. Even then the Dubuque association was 
not disposed to relinquish its rights, and while preparing to con- 
tinue the fight in the courts began strengthening the team for 
another year. 

The league will start the season of 1908 with a new alignment 
practically all around. Nearly every team has suffered the loss 
of some of its strongest players through sale or draft. Noteworthy 
among the sales was that of Lawrence Doyle, the Springfield third 
baseman, to the New York Giants, the purchase price being $4,500, 
the highest ever paid for a Three-Eye player. Pittsburg secured 
iSwancina, Peoria's first baseman ; the Chicago White Sox, Purtell, 
Decatur's third baseman ; the St. Louis Nationals, Shaw, Cedar 
Rapids' outfielder ; Cincinnati, Egan, Peoria's third baseman ; New 
Tork Americans, Crandall and Pfyle, respectively pitcher and out- 
fielder of Cedar Rapids ; New York Giants, Ludwig, catcher of 
Springfield, and Washington, Beecher, pitcher, also of Springfield. 







J*. Jl 3 


1 


Vt^ 2 


4 


i 




j 5 .rj 7 


&-% * ■*A 


*HL^* *t i * 


^gft'H -. """f^EL 


J^*; 


tS %&*;•■ •' c/^ILj,- 




'2 > »3 ^ 

1 iilrf' i iiA A 


i HH 


• • • ... 

'■■■■■-• 



1, Ludwig; 2, Salisbury; 3, Hughes; 4, Beecher; 5, Scharnweber, 

Mgr. ; 6, Doyle; 7, Novaeek; 8, Moore; 9, Campbell; 10, Smith; 11, 
Euby, 12, Thornton; 13, Fox. 

SPRINGFIELD TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




1, Wilder; 2, Nelson; 3, Davidson: 4. Moore: 5. Thiery; 6, Eastman; 

7, Egan; 8, Kane; 9, Wolf; 10. Raymond: 11. Eriekson: 2, Swacina; 

13, DoLnelly; 14, Bewer. Convrieht. 1907. by R. C. Gibson. 

PEORIA TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 199 

Other players who went to faster company were catcher Starke, of 
Dubuque, to Little Rock ; pitcher Bomar of Decatur, to Des Moines ; 
first baseman Cameron of Springfield, sold to Terre Haute and later 
to Indianapolis ; infielder Vogel of Clinton, to Memphis ; outfielder 
Davidson of Peoria, to Indianapolis ; catcher O'Leary of Rock 
Island, to Memphis ; pitchers Schreiber of Decatur and Thorson and 
Koestner of Bloomington, to Indianapolis, and outfielder Oakes of 
Cedar Rapids, to Los Angeles. 

The strength of the league's pitching staff is evidenced by the 
low batting averages, Wilson of Rock Island, himself a pitcher, 
being the only player credited with a mark of .300 or better. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in Batting 
and Fielding in the Indiana-Illinois-Iowa League in 1907, according to 
the official records, are given herewith. The complete official records 
are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball Record, for sale 
by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 
Club. Won. Lost. P.C.i Club. AB. R. H. SH. SB. PC. 

Rock Island 86 46 .652 Cedar Rapids 72 61 .541 

Decatur 80 47 .630 Clinton 53 78 .405 

Springfield 81 50 .618 Bloomington 51 79 .392 

Peoria 77 52 .597 Dubuque 22 109 .168 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. PCI Name and Club. G. AB. R. H.PC. 

Wilson, Rock Island, 31 105 9 33 .314 Doyle, Springfield, 66 K9 H 78 .290- 

Swancina, Peoria, 123 504 67 147 .2921 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC.i Name and Club. G. PO. A. F. IC. 

O'Leary, R. Island, 18 198 3 2 .990 Swancina, Peoria, 123 1402 5 r * 19 .9S7 

Crockett, Clinton, 131 1412 74 20 .9S7|Tighe, R. Island, 49 524 26 8 .986 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
Wanner, R. Island, 128 391 391 27 .966!French, Clinton, 69 213 180 17 .959 

Genins, Dubuque, 67 196 198 16 .96l|Egan, Peoria, 124 357 395 34 .957 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
Bewer. Peoria, 128 162 264 31 .932Vandine, R. Island, 133 168 291 40 .920 

Herbert, Bl.-Spr., 117 189 246 37 .922,Purtell, Decatur, 129 199 222 37 .919 

SHORTSTOPS. 
Raymond, Peoria, 120 235 420 51 .928IBerger, R. Island, 116 269 403 54 .926 
Scharnweber, Spr., 127 262 374 50 .927|Cook, Rock Island, 18 25 50 6 .926 

OUTFIELDERS. 
Bomar, Decatur, 21 24 10 1000! Ruby, Springfield, 130 237 19 4 .985 

Connors, Bloom., 104 192 11 2 .990 Davis, C. Rapids, 129 251 11 5 .9S1 

PITCHERS. 
Scott, Rock Island, 18 4 43 1000|Persons, Decatur, 11 1 30 1000 
Roach, Peoria, 12 1 20 1000'Ovvens, C. R.-Spr., 41 22 123 3 .980 

CATCHERS. 

Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PB. PC.iName and Club. G. PO. A. E. PB. PC. 

Simon, C. R., 109 522 154 7 4 .99o'Erickson, Peo., 65 336 42 8 11 .979- 

Smith, Clinton, 57 283 64 5 4 .986Berry, Decatur, 48 262 51 7 3 .978 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

,— Opponents— >, 
W. L. AB. H. R. HB. BB. SO. PC. 

Campbell, Springfield 10 3 450 97 48 6 47 51 .769 

Eastman, Peoria 17 6 759 165 62 43 93 .739 

Beecher, Springfield 28 10 1180 229 54 15 34 137 .737 

Scott, Rock Island 13 5 539 108 36 2 25 38 .722 



f » V' 

L__: ;»>.-is._ 


■ m f r 



1. Riggs; 2, Fleet; 3, Lemon; 4, Baker; 5, Vogel; 6, Harrod; 7, 

Stauffer, Mgr. ; 8, Crockett; 9, Smith; 10, French; 11, Curtis; 12, 

Ohland. Paulin, Photo. 

CLINTON TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




1, Donovan, Mgr.; 2, Brown; 3, Beck; 4, Keostner; 5, Tharson; 6, 
Syfort; 7, Connors; 8, Herbert; 9, Humes; 10, Dang; 11, Seisson; 12, 
.Snyder; 13, Wilson; 14, Weinan; 15, Philips; 16, Lavelle. 

Williams, Photo. 
BLOOMINGTON TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 201 

Ohio and Pennsylvania League 

By playing a sensational article of ball 
during the final month of the season, the 
Youngstown team, with Sam Wright, a 
veteran newspaper man, as manager, won 
a third pennant in the Ohio and Pennsyl- 
vania League. The "Champs," as they are 
called by reason of their oft-repeated trick 
in winning the flag, got away in good style- 
when the season opened but struck the 
toboggan not long afterward, and until the 
finish were operating upon a sliding scale 
in the first division. 

Bob Berryhill's Newark club, after fight- 
ing its way to the top by virtue of a 
lengthy string of consecutive victories dur- 
ing July, held that position during the 
Chas. H. Morton greater part of the remaining time. But 

_,. President the team's final northern trip was a dis- 

Ohio and Penn. League astrous one. On Labor Day the leaders 
played their first engagement on the trip, 
losing both games of a double-header at Mansfield. On Friday, 
September 6, the Akron team slipped into first position, Berryhill's 
outfit dropping two games at Youngstown. The Akron players 
were enjoying an off day, but nevertheless afforded an opportunity to 
top the seven other clubs — something never oefore accomplished by an 
Akron team in the history of O. & P. ball. 

The finish was exciting. After the Newark club had returned 
from its last trip, the race for the pennant resolved itself into c 
fight between Akron and Youngstown in the northern end of the 
circuit, and between Newark and the other three western towns on 
the opposite end. The Akron and Youngstown teams, always bitter 
rivals, had a majority of their games yet to play, and indications 
were that while they were splitting them up, Berryhill's team would 
find the western clubs easy picking and would win the rag. But 
the Newark bunch didn't encounter the expected cinch in the western 
clubs, while Youngstown managed to secure a better than even 
break with Akron and to defeat practically all of the other teams 
with whom they were scheduled. Only thirteen points separated the 
three leading clubs at the finish, and they were almost as close 
together all through the last month of the season. Akron won their 
series with every club in the league excepting Newark, with whom 
they tied, each club winning ten games. Youngstown won their 
series with every club excepting Akron. This series resulted ten to 
eight games in favor of Akron. Newark won every series excepting 

to Akron and Youngstown. . _ 

The league realized a large sum from players drafted and sold. 
More than a score were taken, and most of these were seized by 
major league clubs. 

President Charles H. Morton's guiding influence was strongly felt 
during the troublesome periods which are bound to occur in any 
organization. Mr. Morton's third year as president of the league 
witnessed an even greater growth and prosperity among the clubs. 
Because of an increased expense to the various clubs, few of them 
made a financial success out of the 1907 season, and it is likely that 
one or two changes will be made in the circuit before the bell taps 
for the opening of another season. 



J UTC|w i^pi. 


k ^i^k jT3^^^^^^^^^^ 


L' If -4- fi« 









1, B. Thomas; 2, Compton; 3, Redman; 4, Wright, Mgr.; 5, Mock; 
6, Nallin; 7, Starr; 8, Smith: 9. Breen: 10. Blount; 11, Hilley; 12, 
Ostdiek; 13, W. Thomas; 14, Ohl; 15, McAleese; 16. Glassburner; 17, 
Servatius; 18, Schettler. Sabine, Photo. 

YOUNGSTOWN TEAM— CHAMPIONS OHIO AND PENNSYLVANIA 
LEAGUE. 




1, Wrattan; 2, Pearee; 3, Asher; 4, Stoup; 5, Gygli; 6, Link; 7, 

Smith; 8, Winters; 9, Berryhill, Mgr.; 10, Maincette; 11. Havel; 

12, Locke; 13, Murray; 14, Abbott; 15, Schweitzer; 16, Dougherty; 17, Snyder. 

NEWARK TEAM— OHIO AND PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE. 




1, Armstrong; 2, Mattuy; 3. Schwartz: 4. East: 5. Kelley. Trainer; 

6. Goode: 7, Breckenridge; 8, Strood; 9, Broderick; 10, Callahan: 11, 

Ehman; 12. Caffyn; 13, King: 14. Lalonge. Peck, Photo. 

AKRON TEAM— OHIO AND PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



203 



The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Ohio and Pennsylvania League in 
1907, according to the official records, are given herewith. 
The complete official records are published in Spalding's 
Official Base Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, 
price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Won. Lost. P.C.I Won. 

86 52 .623 New Castle 64 

86 53 .619 Sharon 55 

53 .610 Mansfield 55 

62 .537|Marion 48 



Youngstown 86 

Newark 86 

Akron 83 

Lancaster 72 



Lost. P.C 
74 .46S 
84 .396 
84 .396 
87 .356 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
Tate, Marion, 
Roach, Sharon, 
Elston, Lancaster, 
Mcllveen, Akron, 
Blake, Marion, 
Drake, Mansfield, 



G.AB.R. H. PC. 

50 197 21 65 .330 

18 79 4 26 .329 
115 418 59 133 .318 

19 84 16 26 .310 
58 240 27 73 .304 

139 545 76 164 



Name and Club. 
Schwartz, Akron, 
Servatious, Lan.-Yg 
Pearce, Newark, 
Justus, Lancaster, 
Burwell, Sharon, 
Blough. Marion, 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PCI Name and Club. 

131 1465 47 12 .992 Dithridge, Marion, 

30 338 27 3 .992|Daubert, Marion, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

16 35 48 3 .965[Breen, Youngs., 
57 155 140 11 .964) Nugent, New Cas., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

96 141 199 16 .955[McClint'k, Yg.-Nk. 
89 126 145 14 .95l|Raftis, Lancaster, 

SHORTSTOPS. 
138 290 439 35 .954ID. Davis, N.-A.-N.C. 

31 74 91 9 .948|Green, N. C.-Shar., 

LEFT FIELDERS. 
Kelley, New Castle, 23 53 3 1000|Woodruff, N. Cas., 
L. Locke, Lancaster, 73 122 5 3 .977lSpeas, Mansfield, 

CENTER FIELDERS. 
Drake, Mansfield, 139 352 23 4 .989|Schweitzer, New., 
Heller, Lancaster, 62 139 8 2 .987|Eichelb'r, Ak.-Lan., 

RIGHT FIELDERS. 
16 19 1 lOOOlMathay, Shar.-Ak., 
80 101 3 1 .990|Abbott, Newark, 

PITCHERS. 

32 19 68 1 .989(Limric, N. C.-Shar., 
31 10 80 1 .9S9]Lucas, Marion, 

CATCHERS. 

30 137 51 1 .995|Ortlieb, Akron, 
78 432 93 5 .99l|Luskey, Marion, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G. W. L. PCI Name and Club. 
35 25 10 .714 mowers. New Castle, 
23 16- 7 .696| B. Thomas, Youngs., 



Name and Club. 
Schwartz, Akron, 
Bannon, Youngs., 

Lucas, Marion, 
Pinkney, New Cas. 



Hagen, New Castle, 
Wrattan, Newark, 



Starr, Youngs., 
Wrattan, Newark, 



Reynolds, Mans., 
Lawrence, Yng.-Mn. 



Yarnell, Mansfield, 
Schettler, Youngs., 



Murphy. N. C.-Ak. 
Fox, Lancaster, 



Name and Club. 
Asher, Newark, 
Breckenridge, Akron, 



G.AB.R. H. 


PC. 


135 508 68 151 
. 66 256 41 76 
89 249 31 74 
47 159 10 47 
18 51 9 15 
24 82 8 24 


.297 
.297 
.297 
.295 
.295 
.293 


G. PO. A. E. 

30 280 29 3 
71 709 40 8 


PC 

.999 
.989> 


138 4" 
20 50 52 * 


.963- 
.962 


60 58 111 10 

51 u, 


.944 


93 179 276 29 
26 39 69 7 


.940- 
.939 


67 126 7 3 
115 266 26 8 


.974 
.973 


114 244 25 7 
58 128 9 4 


.975 
.972 


111 149 13 4 
95 163 11 4 


.988 
.978 


27 10 59 1 
19 7 66 1 


.9S6 
.986 


30 112 34 2 
109 507 147 10 


.986 
.985 


G. W- L. 

29 20 9 
41 28 13 


PC 

.690 
.683 



*&.' 9k £&* : M 


BP 


^J^-^m 




w^-^w^^M 


B ' % 


'^5^!gM^-"'%jl 


^w^ 



I, Doherty; 2, Frock; 3, Bradley; 4, Sline; 5, Langin; 6, Templin; 
7, Litchi; 8, O'Donnell, Bus. Mgr.; 9, Burkett, Mgr.; 10, Knotts; 

II, Coffin; 12, Dam; 13, Reynolds; 14, McCune; 15, Russell: 16, 
iBushey. Oliver, Photo. 

WORCESTER TEAM— CHAMPIONS NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 




1, Connaughton, Capt.; 2, Williams: 3, Lovell; 4, Leonard, Mgr.; 
5. Daum; 6. Essler; 7, Scully; 8, Killian; 9, Burke; 10, Abbott; 11, 
Guiheen; 12. Moore; 13, Fitzmaurice; 14, Ball; 15, Spencer; 16, 
Steele; 17, Adler; 18, Ort; 19, Tansey. 

LYNN TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 205 

New England League 

Bt President T. H. M/cretane 

Once more the little old New England 
League greets the Base Ball world 
through the Spalding Guide. 

Like this Guide, the New England 
League is a pioneer in the field, and 
growing "bigger, better and busier" as: 
the years roll on. 

Last spring, eight evenly matched 
teams started in the race, and all fin- 
ished strong, with the Worcester club 
taking the championship, for the second 
time, under the clever handling of Jesse 
Burkett. 

The Worcester victory was clean cut,. 

the management sticking close to the 

t w iw.iDv.xn, salary limit, while the Lawrence club, 

pJS^ who were last in the race, ignored the 

New England Leatrue saIai 'y limit ' to find that the club was 
Mew England League ba(Jly handled> and a change of officers 

necessary. Every game scheduled was 
played, and the same clubs are in line for this season, with 
several cities anxious to get a franchise in this organization. 

In point of skill the players of this league reached the 
highest point known to the league, and it would take very 
little to make the weakest team a match for the strongest. 
It was a case of getting the work out of the boys, as young- 
sters must have a capable leader. 

This league was not exempt from the trouble that creeps 
into every minor league in the country, i. e., a lack of strict 
business methods. Managers were often responsible for un- 
necessary trouble, poisoning the minds of the club owners 
against the umpires. The umpire question is still the biggest 
handicap to the game ; next to the salary limit in importance, 
and both propositions beyond the control of any one man or 
officer in any league. 

Perhaps the New England has stuck as close to the salary 
limit as any minor league organization in the land, and this no- 
doubt has considerable to do with the great strength of this won- 
derful little Base Ball organization, for it must be remembered 
the New England alone prospers without Sunday Base Ball. 

The importance of having ball parks located as near as 
possible to the business section of the different cities was 
plainly shown at Lowell and Brockton last year. The year 
before Lowell went to the bad, as the ball park was located 
well out from the city, all benefits going to the trolley line. 
A new park was built close to the center of the city, and 
from a losing proposition, Lowell became one of the best minor 
league towns in the country. 

The Manchester franchise was taken to Brockton, where a 
fine park a few minutes from the center of the city was used, 
and the venture was a paying one. There is no question about 
the necessity of ball parks being located where the business 
man can reach there in ten or fifteen minutes. The day for 
playing for the benefit of street railroads has passed in Base 
Ball, as they always insist on building the parks several miles 
out, forcing the fan to spend ten cents for two rides. 




a, Flanagan, Aigr. ; z, Donovan; a, J. O'Toole; 4, McGovern; 5, Cross; 

•6, Reardon; 7, M. O'Toole; 8, Kane; 9, Murch; 10, Cutting; 11, 

Csittorson; 12, Hickman; 13, McCormick; 14, Mitchell. Vibert, Photo. 

BROCKTON TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 




1. niuiert; 2, luisiier; a, Connolly; 4. Aiafartlin; 5, Keady; 6, 
McCaLe; 7, Madden; S, Hamilton; 9, Clohecy, Pres.; 10, Billet; 11, 
Uniac; 12, O'Day; 13, Perkins; 14, Barton; 15, Boardman. 

HAVERHILL TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. , 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



207 



And what a great army of wonderful ball players this sec- 
tional league has sent forth to electrify the delighted fans in 
the big cities. Just now the great Middle West is the home 
of the coming great players, mostly on account of Sunday ball, 
and writing of Base Ball on the Sabbath, I only wish we 
could see the law-makers break away from their old traditions 
and allow at least the amateurs to play ball on Sundays. It 
makes better citizens, and a healthier family condition. Clean, 
open athletics seven days in the week, is none too much, as it 
makes Romans of the weakest aspirant. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the New England League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Bash 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Clubs. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Worcester 76 36 .67£ 

Lynn 61 49 .55E 

Brockton 59 51 .536 

Haverhill 55 55 



.501! 



Clubs. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Fall River 56 56 .500 

Lowell 48 60 .444 

New Bedford 48 62 .43G 

Lawrence 40 74 .351 



Name and Club. 
Burkett, Worcester. 
Hamilton. Haverhill 
Russell, Worcester, 



Name and Club. 
McDonald, N. B . -Law. 
Ort, Lynn, 



Burns, Lowell, 
Connors, Fall River, 



Boardman, Haver. 
Harris, Lowell, 



Shannon. Lowell, 
Litschi, Worcester, 



INDIVIDUAL 
G.AB.R.BH.PC. 

52 195 23 66 .338 
91 324 50 108 .333 
63 242 29 76 .314 



BATTING. 

Name and Club. 
Keady, Haverhill, 
Mullaney, N. Bed., 
Madden, Lynn, 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. PO. A. E. PC.) Name and Club. 
, 36 365 25 2 .995 Pulsifer, Haverhill, 
31 328 19 2 .994|Brennan, Law.-L.-H. 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

114 287 333 21 .967|Connaughton, Lynn, 
37 74 122 7 .966|Baiton, Haverhill, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

42 45 94 6 .959|Lovell, Lynn, 
22 25 43 5 .932|Dooin, Haverhill, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

106 211 337 50 .9161 Mitchell, Brockton, 
95 197 272 44 .914|Moorehead, New B., 



G.AB.R.BH.PC, 

57 213 ?,0 64 .300 
103 370 SI 10 .297 
37 128 11 38 .297 



Devine, Haver. -Law., 46 82 
Hamilton, Haverhill, 91 161 



OUTFIELDERS. 

4 1 .989|Barclay. Lynn, 
6 2 .988 1 Reynolds, Worces. 



PITCHERS. 

34 23 115 1 .993|Abbott. Lowell-Lynn, 27 
31 20 92 1 .991|Sline, Worcester, 



G. PO. A. E. 


PC 


77 822 54 11 
15 145 6 2 


.988 
.Ml 


106 340 334 26 

90 288 228 26 


.963 
.952 


103 129 237 34 
19 26 36 6 


.916 
.912 


111 157 348 52 
102 236 284 54 


.907 
.90C 


43 73 4 1 
112 143 9 4 


.987 

.974 


27 5 120 3 
31 10 102 3 


.977 

.973 



E. Steele. Lynn, 
Moore, Lynn, 

CATCHERS. 
Damn, Lynn, - 62 260 58 7 .984|McGovern, Brock., 57 330 90 10 .97f 

Duggan, N. B.-Low., 59 291 74 7 .981|Toomey, Fall River, 31 170 40 7 .977 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



Name and Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Wormwood. Worcester, 10 3 .769 
Sline, Worcester, 23 8 .742 



Name and Club. 
Keady, Haverhill, 
E. Steele, Lynn, 



Won. Lost. PC. 
11 5 .688 
24 11 .681 



flfH&^ig 






12 '5 fff /5 






iyt- ^ y 


JSp£- ; 1 1 9 



1, O'Connor; 2, McCormack; 3, Follansbee; 4, Thornhill; 5, Kussman; 
0. Roiss; 7, Webb; 8, Burke; 9. Mt-ssenaer: 10. Tetreault; 11, Giant; 
12, Gilroy; 13, Guiheen; 14, Waters; 15, Jerger; 16, Higgins. 
FALL RIVER TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 




1, Winn; 2, Kenniston; 3, Cameron; 4, Taylor; 5, Connelly; 
O'Niel; 7, Burns; 8, Abbott; 9, McCarty; 10, McTalhon; 11, Pickett; 
12, Barrett; 13, Sullivan, Sec; 14, Dam; 15, Lucia; 16, Doherty; 
17, Shannon, Capt.; 18, Wilder; 19, Burrill. 

LOWELL TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 




1, Kehoe; 2, Mullaney; 3. Duggan; 4, Coveney, Capt. & Mgr. ; 5, 
Kiernan; 6, Klobedanz; 7, Danzig: 8. Drohan; 9, Valdois; 10, McDon- 
ald; 12, Austin; 13. Norris; 14, Robinson. Vibbert, Photo. 
NEW BEDFORD TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 209 

Southern Michigan Association 

By President Joseph S. Jackson" 

In the second season of its history, 
^flB|t. that of 1907, the South Michigan 

^HP^Jk League achieved a record alike credit- 

Mr jk able to the men who, as club owners in 

F^ *0*WB tne organization, have been working for 

fr I the success of the Association, and to 

JV the fans of the circuit who have sup- 

} ^"^m ported it and have shown their appre- 

A J/ ciation of the class of Base Ball pro- 

^fflffl^HL vided. Up to 1906, when this associa- 

^BM PhH^^. tion was organized, no league in Michi- 
^^ gan had succeeded in weathering a 
k ^k complete season, and the success of the 

South Michigan in going through two 
W I years and thus establishing itself as a 

„ T permanent institution is cause of self- 

Joseph S. Jackson congratulation to its directors. 
c ., President A An eight-club league took the field at 

Southern Michigan Assn. tne start of the 1907 season. The 
league had begun operations in 1906 
with five clubs, Mount Clemens, Kalamazoo, Tecumseh, Battle 
Creek and Jackson. Late in that season Saginaw was taken 
in, the territory becoming available through the collapse 
of the Inter-State League. At the circuit meeting in the 
fall it was decided not to continue in Saginaw. The cir- 
cuit was advanced to one of eight clubs by awarding fran- 
chises to Bay City, Flint and Lansing. With a single - 
tion, Jackson, these cities completed the season, giving the 
League a record of losing but one club in two years. 

The 1907 race was an excellent one, and the pennant was 
won by the Tecumseh club after a hard battle with Kalamazoo, 
the contender. Battle Creek was coming fast at the finish, 
and Mount Clemens made one great trip, but was too far 
behind the leader at the time to threaten. Bay City started 
well, but fell away toward the close. Lansing and Flint got 
poor starts and were unable to get out of the second division. 
The winning of the pennant by Tecumseh is interesting in view 
of the fact that that city has less than twenty per cent of the 
population of the next smallest town in the league. 

Though the records seem to indicate that the batting was 
extremely light, there were some good batsmen in the league. 
But it was especially strong in pitchers, no less than half a 
dozen of these being drafted. . The pitching strength, with the 
fact that some of the scorers were very severe on the fielders, 
accounts partly for the batting figures shown. Single run 
victories and overtime contests were numerous. The league 
attracted attention of the scouts, though it was in Class D, 
and five men were taken by the majors, as follows : Merkle 
of Tecumseh, New York Nationals ; Maire of Kalamazoo, Boston 
Americans ; Gough and Chiesman, Mount Clemens, Detroit 
Americans ; Teal, Tecumseh, taken by the Athletics, but draft 
disallowed because of irregularity. In addition, Classes A and 
B took a number of players. 

For 1908 but one change in the circuit is made. Jackson 
returns, making up the eight clubs, a new and stronger asso- 
ciation backing the team. The Mount Clemens franchise is 
transferred to Saginaw. 




1, J. H. Smith, Treas.; 2, Fletcher; 3, Railing; 4, Merkle; 5, Wag- 
ner; 6, Doty; 7, H. Temple, Sec; 8, Somerlot; 9, Preston; 10, R. A. 
Heesen, Pres.; 11, Teal; 12, Slear, Capt.; 13, Wolf; 14, Bradley; 
15, Hodges, Mascot; 16, Mitchel; 17, Hillinger. 
TECUMSEH TEAM— CHAMPIONS SOUTHERN MICHIGAN LEAGUE. 




1, Thos. P. Moore, Pres.; 2, Jake Weickgenant, Treas.; 3, Geo. 
Black, Sec. & Bus. Mgr. ; 4, Stieger; 5, Cross; 6. Deneau; 7, Gid- 
dings; 8, Felrath; 9, Landry; 10, Stewart; 11, Reardon; 12, Free- 
land; 13, McCain; 14, Henderson; 15, Hessberger. Schett, Photo. 
BATTLE CREEK TEAM— SOUTHERN MICHIGAN LEAGUE. 



1 #- 1 




1 7 ** zm 


'M»*MiMl 


i ifcr^T^HT/ 


M 


*%« 




lof 


"V, 

t 


12 ti 



1, Dillon; 2, Baenziger, Sec; 3, Harris; 4, (iough; 5, Thomas, Mgr.; 
6, Cadman; 7. Eherts; 8, Ragan; 9, Wenger; 10, Daringer; 11, 
Burkart; 12, Neuschafer. ' 

MT. CLEMENS TEAM— SOUTHERN ' MICHIGAN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL EASE BALL GUIDE. 



211 



# It is believed that the South Michigan has the most compact 
eight-city circuit in organized ball. There are six jumps 
Of less than forty-two miles each. From the extreme north- 
eastern town. Bay City, to the extreme southwestern stand, 
Kalamazoo, the trip by rail can be made inside one hundred 
and fifty miles 

Joe S. Jackson of the Detroit Free Press, connected w T ith the 
league since its organization, was elected to serve his thii*d 
term as president at the annual meeting. James A. Reynolds, 
sporting editor of the Jackson Citizen-Press, was elected' secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Southern Michigan League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Bash 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Tecumseh 69 42 .622 

Kalamazoo 62 47 .569 

Battle Creek 63 49 .563 

Mt. Clemens 51 51 .500 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Bay City 46 47 .495 

Lansing 46 57 .44? 

Flint 42 64 .396 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
Chiesman, Mt. C, 
Landry, Bat. Cr., 



Name and Club. 
Webster, Kal., 
Ganzel, Mt. C, 



Tlbald, Flint, 
Bell, Kalamazoo, 



Wltham, Jackson, 
Andrews, Kal., 



L. Thomas, Lan., 
Henderson, Bt. Cr., 



Hessberber, Bt. Cr. 
Blake, Kalamazoo, 



Kench, Lansing, 
Steiger, Bat. Creek, 



Ryan, Kalamazoo, 
Reardon, Bat. Cr., 



Name and Club. 
Steiger, Bat. Cr., 
Teal, Tecumseh, 



G. AB.R. H.PC. 

17 48 7 15 .313 
108 401 60 120 .297 



Name and Club. 
Cocash, Flint, 



G. AB.R. H.PC. 

88 322 26 94 .292 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E.PC. 

109 1220 28 22 .983 
54 535 32 12 .979 



Name and Club. 
Thomas, Mt. C, 
Deneau, Bat. Creek, 



G 


PO. A. E. PC. 


111 


736 136 31 .97? 


105 


900 129 24 .977 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
56 117 131 10 .961|Dillon, Mt. C. 

112 276 345 26 .959|Morrissey, Lansing, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

21 29 32 3 .979|Bradley. Tecumseh, 

113 130 159 18 .94l|Ragan, Mt. C, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

34 65 81 8 .948|Leifheit. Lansing, 
108 184 333 33 .940 (Hamilton, Flint, 

OUTFIELDERS. 

5 .9S2|Weirick, Bay City, 

5 .978|Taylor, Kalamazoo, 

PITCHERS. 
lOOOIParent, Bay City, 

6 .982 1 Method, Kal., 

CATCHERS. 

6 .987|Walsh, Kalamazoo, 
6 .982lCadman, Mt. C, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
W. L.BB.SO.PC.I Name and Club. 
17 4 29 135 .810 Railing. Tecumseh, 
21 5 49 137 .SOslGough, Mt. C, 



L08 256 
L07 171 


19 

10 


17 6 21 
46 214 108 


77 389 
52 280 


65 
55 



95 276 224 27 .94& 
91 283 234 35 .930 



81 268 93 27 .930 
103 145 196 28 .922 



83 43 62 7 .938. 
68 113 202 22 .935 



SS 114 19 6 .965 
92 135 39 5 .961 



38 46 95 '6 .979> 
44 9 110 3 .976- 



97 493 135 12 .! 
26 126 24 3 .! 



W. L.BB.SO.PC. 

21 8 74 175 .724 



253 .714* 




1, Atkins; 2, Haley; 3, Parent; 4, Bensiey; 5, Weirick; 6, Blair; 7, 
McNutt; 8, Taylor, Mgr.; 9, Barney; 10, Pinnance; 11, Newcomb; 
12, Bradley. 

BAY CITY TEAM— SOUTHERN MICHIGAN LEAGUE. 




I, Todd; 2, Pierce; 3, Ellsworth, Sec; 4, Kearney; 5, Hughey; 6, 
Mauch; 7, Lawrence; 8, Thomas; 9, Morrisev Mgr.; 10, McDermitt; 

II, Burns; 12, Agler. 

LANSING TEAM— SOUTHERN MICHIGAN LEAGUE. 




1, Krapp; 2, Cocash; 3, Hogan; 4, Kelly; 5, Pinnance; 6, Barney; 
7, Bouckart; 8, Hamilton; 9, Craven; 10, Woodburn; 11, Priestaff; 
12, Smith; 13, Taber. 

FLINT TEAM-SOUTHERN MICHIGAN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 213 

Tri-State League 

Bt C. M. Kellet, Altoona, Pa. 

The Tri-State League operated during 
the season of 1907 under the embrac- 
ing wing of organized Base Ball, and 
the experiment was far from unsatis- 
factory. After the strenuous times of 
the outlaw days of 1905 and 1906 the 
calm of last season was most agreeable 
to the magnates. They knew when they 
retired at night that they would have 
a ball club in the morning, and they 
had the satisfaction of knowing, also, 
that they would not be everlastingly at 
the mercy of mercenary ball players; 
who compelled them, under the old sys- 
tem, to stand and deliver on the 
slightest pretext. 

The contest lacked many of the sen- 
sational features of preceding seasons, 
yet in some particulars it was 
ficiently close to maintain interest until 
far in the season. Williamsport, with a team comnosed almos# 
exclusively of major league players, forged ahead' toward the 
close of the season, after it seemed almost a foregone conclusion 
that Harrisburg was down on the cards as pennant winner. 
The uncertainty that preceded the conclusion of negotiations! 
between the Tri-State and the National Association made it 
impossible fdr several of the clubs to get in position for the 
fray. When peace was assured some difficulty was experienced 
in securing desirable players, and for this reason some of the 
best towns were left with second-division clubs. 

The defection of York, which won the championship in 1907, 
made a change of circuit imperative, and the Tri-State made a 
satisfactory transfer to Reading, which gives promise of be- 
coming one of the soundest towns in the circuit. 




Chas. F. Carpenter 

President 

Tri-State League 




1, Sallee; 2, Wolverton; 3, Manning; 4, Porter; 5, Delehanty; (>» 
Whalen; 7, Burde; 8, Stansberry; 9. Vickers; 10, O'Hara; 11, Hen- 
nessy; 12, Charles; 13, Blair. 

WILLIAMSPORT TEAM— CHAMPIONS TRI-STATE LEAGUE. 



if f^ 



WW 



pi ^ 



dkH %J* **fc , * %# ^0 



'-» 



« v . t 



J, Schriver; 2, Calhoun; 3, Leary; 4, George Heckert, Mgr. ; 5, 

Campbell; 6, Doscher; 7, Selbach; 8, Zimmerman; 9, Foster; 10, 

Pounds; 11, Patt-ee; 12, Brennan; 13, Smith; 14, O'Neil; 15, Martin. 

HARRISBURG TEAM— TRI-STATE LEAGUE. 




1, Rhodes; 2, Hafford; 3, Poole; 4, Martell; 5, Moser; 6. Hartman; 
7, Gilbert; 8, Moran; 9, Crist; 10. Barton: 11. Cannell: 12, Strobel; 
13, Flournoy; 14, Carney; 15, Magoon; 16, Larkin. 

TRENTON TEAM— TRI-STATE LEAGUE. 




Mjy_jj_ jy ntj Jill 



1, Scott; 2, Johnson; 3, Killefin; 4. Wiltse; 5. Cooney; 6, 
7, Raymer, Mgr.; 8. Poole: 9, Chapnelle; 10, Speer; 11, Ku 
12, Daly; 13, Brouthers; 14, Conn. California Photo Co., Ltd. 
JOHNSTOWN TEAM— TRI-STATE LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE). 



211 



The Tri-State has profited by the experience of last season 
and has adopted a lower salary limit — $3,000 per month. It is 
felt that this sum will be large enough to maintain first-clasa 
minor league clubs and at the same time lessen the chances of 
distressing losses that have been sustained in the past. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Tri-State League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Bash 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Williamsport 86 38 .694 

Harrisburg 79 47 .627 

Lancaster 73 53 .579 

Trenton 70 54 .565 



Club. Won. Lost. PO. 

Altoona 61 61 .500 

Johnstown 46 77 .374 

Wilmington to 43 79 .851 

Reading 38 87 .304 



Name and Club. 
Delehanty, Wmspt., 
O'Hara, Lan.-Wspt., 
Wolverton, Wmspt., 
O'Neill, Harris., 
Killifer, Johns., 
Burde, Wmspt., 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



G.AB.R. H. PC. 

108 380 65 135 .355 
56 205 34 72 .351 
85 294 47 103 .350 
125 469 77 143 .305 
108 380 55 116 .305 
90 323 56 96 .297 



Name and Club. 
Clay, York-Read., 
C. Foster, Lan., 
Deininger, Altoona , 
McCabe, Lan., 
Scott, Johns. -Lan.. 



G.AB.R. H. PO. 

128 47) 69 140 .29« 
124 443 77 130 293 
113 413 44 121 .2*i 
19 58 7 17 .2*3 
64 186 30 54 .290 



Name and Club. 
Cassiday, Wilgn., 
Deal, Lancaster, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

102 1021 65 8 .993 
118 1072 88 14 .989 



Name and Club. 
Calhoun, Harris., 
Whitney, Wmspt., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

135 105 20 .988 
127 1270 63 23 .983 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
Gleason, Wmspt., 21 57 44 2 .981[XIagoon, Trenton, '21 52 56 3 .973 

Farrell, Altoona, 100 277 282 13 .979|Arndt, Wilgn., 79 179 207 11 .972 



Magoon, Trenton, 
Zimmerman, Harris. 



Gleason, Wmspt., 
Barton, Trenton, 



Beard, York-Rdg. 
Myers, York-Rdg. 



Ross, Tren.-York, 
J Smith, Harris., 



Name and Club, 
oallee. Wmspt., 
Burke, Lan., 



THIRD BASEMEN. 
15 14 33 2 .959|Odell, Lancaster, 
127 174 278 25 .948| Schwartz, Altoona, 

SHORTSTOPS. 
51 114 167 17 .9431 Newton. Lancaster, 
17 28 36 4 .9411 Ward, Altoona, 

OUTFIELDERS. 
36 74 12 .. 1000|Moran, Trenton, 
17 18 4 .. lOOOILelivelt, Reading, 

CATCHERS. 
26 96 33 .. 1000 [ Koepmann, Johns., 
63 225 49 4 .986|Grady, Wilmgn., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
Field'g Pitch'g 



PC. W.L. PC 

32 .948 22 5 .815 
23 .947 15 5 .750 



Name and Club. 
Vickers, Wmspt., 
Campbell, Harris., 



121 147 192 
115 138 219 



.944 
.943 



127 251 357 43 .934 
114 230 335 40 .934 



1 .989 
1 .982 



84 426 121 10 .983 
53 252 94 7 .980 



Field'g Pitch'g 

G. PC. W. L. PC. 

33 .909 25 9 .735 

34 .966 21 8 .724 




1, Betts; a, Heeu; 3, Hannafan; 4, Dohertv. Mgr. ; 5. Ingerton 
Millerick; 7, Fox; 8, Wood; 9, Magie; 10, Galaski; 11, Coekill; 12, 
Raidy; 13, Warner, Sec; 14, Winchester, Pres. ; 15, Butler, Vice- 
Pres. ; 16, McNamara; 37, Fairbanks. Obenaus Co., Photo. 

ALBANY TEAM— CHAMPIONS NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE. 



y ' ? >v 


\ 


Zjj 




5 - ii*/i 7 ^ 








t Jk 





1, Yancey; 2, Rudinski; 3, Graham; 4, Zeimer; 5, McDougall; 6, 

Garrity; 7, Schultz; 8, Schrall: 9. Beckendorf; 10. McArdle: 11, 

H. D. Ramsey, Mgr. ; 12, Clark; 13, Shortell; 14, Polchow; 15, Duffy. 

SCRANTON TEAM— NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE. 





SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 217 

New York State League 

By Edward E. Auker, Albant 

When the gong sounded on September 
22 last, thus ending the season of 1907 
in the New York State League, one of 
the most successful years the organi-' 
zation of which John H. Farrell is 
president was closed, with Albany as 
champions. Through the earnest efforts 
of Manager Mike Doherty and the able 
and ever willing co-operation of the 
Albany Base Ball Association, of which 
Charles M. Winchester, Jr., is presi- 
dent, the capital of the Empire State was 
able to land the flag. The interest 
taken in the race by fans, players, 
managers and owners of the eight 
t tt t?at?wittt teams in this compact and thriving or- 

p' «;^„f ganization was never equalled. 

New York Leae-ue The race for the P er ' ,s Ir i 

in ew York League doubt untn the flnish> It d-veloped 

into one of the most brillicit; and stub- 
bornly contested battles on the diamond that had ever been 
seen. The Senators finished the season just 13 points ahead 
of Scranton, the pennant winners of the previous year. A 
slump at any stage of the last two weeks of the season meant 
second division honors for any of the four teams in the first 
division. 

The race promised to be a hippodrome for the first two 
months of the season, Utica taking the lead on the first day 
and holding it until replaced by Scranton on August 1st. 
Albany was considered by many as a dark horse. Tbe team 
at times displayed excellent form, but when it developed a 
slump, particularly on the road, it dropped with such rapidity 
that it was thought at one time it could not land in the first 
division. 

By consistent work, Scranton managed to pull off a long 
string of victories and held the lead, which it captured from 
Utica, until September 2, when the Miners were displaced by 
the Senators. Then followed an interesting struggle, with 
four teams having an almost equal chance, Albany, Scranton, 
Utica and Troy. 

The pennant was practically conceded to Albany on Septem- 
ber 15, when Albany outplayed the A. J. & G. combination 
and Scranton was outclassed by Syracuse. Although the Law- 
makers were scheduled to line up against Utica the following 
week, which team was a contender for the pennant, it was 
agreed that only through a strong reversal in form, could the 
honors be taken from the Senators. The team although under 
a heavy strain, showed its true caliber in the last week of 
the race and finished under the wire in first place. 

Albany, the pennant winners, figured in the largest number 
of extra-inning games. The greatest game of the season, and 
for that matter since the organization of the league, was 
plaved at Utica on September 11th between Albany and Utica. 
The two teams battled for fifteen innings without a score. 
Albany finally got to Pitcher Heffernan's curves and pounded 
out four runs in the first half of the sixteenth inning. Pitcher 




1, Shaw; 2, Heffernan; 3, Schlitzer; 4, Rutherford; 5, Carroll; 6, 
Gleason; 7, Coughlin; 8, Kerr; 9, Flater; 10, Swayne: 11, Steelman; 
12, Kane; IS, Kennedy, Capt.; 14, Wilson; 15. C. Dooley, Mgr. 
UTIOA TEAM— NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE. 




1, Aloeaer; *, Uuuovan; 3, weeden; % Mason; &, fswoinistead; tt, 

Conroy; 7, Gillespie; 8, Good; 9, Cargo; 10, McSurdy; 11, Stewart. 

TROY TEAM— NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



219 



Fairbanks, who a few weeks before was released by Utica, 
held down his old team-mates without a semblance of a hit 
for twelve consecutive innings. But two hits were made off 
Fairbanks in the sixteen innings. 

Scranton and Troy battled for nineteen innings at Troy on 
June 25th. This was the longest game of the season. Troy 
won by a score of 3 to 2. 

On Augast 28th Troy and Binghamton played an eighteen 
inning game at Troy, the home team winning by a score of 
4 to 3. Ramsay and McSurdy were the opposing pitchers. 

The other long contests were: 

Sixteen innings — Albany vs. Scranton, May 13. Won by 
Albany, 4 to 3. 

Fifteen innings — Albany vs. Binghamton, July 14. Won by 
Binghamton, 3 to 2. 

Fourteen innings — Albany vs. Utica, August 2. Won by 
Albany, 4 to 3. 

Thirteen innings — Utica vs. A.-J.-G., June 1. Won by 1 
3 to 2. Albany vs. Syracuse, September 7. Called by dark- 
ness with the score a tie, 3 to 3. 




1, Killingsworth; 2, Zimmerman; 3, Doran; 4, Robertson; 5, Lezotte, 
Mgr. ; 6, Ziegler; 7. Swift; 8, Hollingsworth, Capt. : 9, J. Monks, 
Sec; 10, A. J. Lynch, Pres.; 11, Hiestand; 12, Eley; 13, Hunter; 14, 
Carr; 15, Graney; 16, McGinley; 17, Toman; 18, McGee; 19, Pogarty. 
WILKES-BARRE TEAM— NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE. 



The players developed were : 

Albany — Fairbanks and Raidy to Columbus and Fox to Mem- 
phis by draft. Detroit purchased First Baseman Kockill. 

Scranton — Third Baseman McArdle drafted by Oakland, Cal., 
and Pitcher Garrity by Cleveland. 

Utica — Pitchers Flater and Schlitzer to Philadelphia Amer- 
icans, Kerr to Baltimore, Kane to Pittsburg, Swayne to St. 
Louis Americans. With the exception of Schlitzer, who was 
sold, the others were drafted. 

Troy — McSurdy to Rochester, Hardy to Oakland. Moeller to 
Pittsburg, DeGroff to New York Americans. Moeller was the 
only player sold. 

Wilkes-Barre — Second Baseman Zimmerman and First Base- 
man Robertson were sold to Chicago by draft, Graney to 
Cleveland, Swift to Memphis, Hunter to Brooklyn. 




1, Miller; 2, Trainor; 3, Schultz; 4. Zinssar: 5. Crisham, Capt. ; 6, 

Fifield; 7, Castle; 8, Cranston; 9, Aubrev; 10, Griffin, Mgr. ; 11, 

Rafter; 12, Carr; 13, Hellmund; 14, Carter. Horgan, Photo 

SYRACUSE TEAM— NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE. 



? | | I 



I, Welch; 2, Murray; 3, Wagner; 4, Hinehman; 5, Bowen; 6, Walsh; 
7, Parkin; 8, Van Zandt; 9. Bierhalter. Trainer: 10. Drury, Mgr.; 

II, Hammond, Pres.; 12, Roach; 13, McAllister; 14, Marcan; 15, 
Manning; 16, Sullivan; 17, Bruce. Newing, Photo. 

BINGHAMTON TEAM— NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE. 




1, McCarty; 2, Hafford; 3, McCormack; 4, Bowen; 5, Earl, Mgr.; 

6, Childs; 7, Collins; 8, Barry; 9, Leard; 10, Weeks; 11. Stroh; 12, 

Cooney. Rich, Photo. 

AMSTERDAM-JOIINSTOWN-GLOVERSVILLE TEAM, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Binghamton — Pitchers Parkins and Wagner to Philadelphia 
Nationals by draft. 

Syracuse — Pitcher Carter to Philadelphia Americans and 
Second Baseman Cranston to Memphis. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the New York State League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Bash 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Won. Lost. P.C. 
Albany 79 50 .612 



Scranton 81 54 .600 

Utica 78 54 .591 

Troy 75 56 .573 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Wilkesbarre 69 

Syracuse 61 

Binghamton 51 

A.-J.-G 39 



Won. Lost. P.C. 
66 .511 
75 .448 
83 .376 
95 .291 



Name and Club. G. AB.R. H. PC. 

Moeller, Troy, 77 306 55 102 .333 

Hollingsw'th.Wilke. 123 366 39 110 .327 
Goode, Albany, 111 409 62 129 .315 

Zimmerman, Wilkes., 98 397 65 125 .314 



DeGroff, Troy, 
Crisham, Syracuse, 



Name and Club. 
Kockill, Albany, 
Robertson, Wilkes. 



O'Brien, Troy, 
Childs, A.-J.-G. 



Carr. Syracuse, 
Ingerton, Albany, 



Zeimer, Scranton, 
Peartree, Wilkes., 



Fox. Albany, 
Eagan, Troy, 



Garry, Bing., 

Eley, Wilkes-Barre, 



Fogarty, Wilkes., 
Schrall, Scranton, 



Parkins, Bing., 
Donnelly, Troy, 



Millerick, Albany, 
Roach, Bing., 



135 481 71 151 .311 

136 402 42 126 .315 



Name and Club. 
Betts, Albany, 
Hunter, Wilkes., 
Kerr, Utiea, 
Kockill, Albany, 
Schrall, Scranton, 



G. AB.R. H. PC. 

133 487 51 149 .306 
36 93 9 28 .301 
32 78 4 23 .293 
132 489 60 143 .292 
132 474 61 138 .in 



126 417 304 30 
131 388 279 29 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC. f Name and Club. 

132 1160 131 7 .994 Crisham, Syracuse, 

110 1083 86 12 .989|McGamwell, Bing., 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
56 138 137 11 .961[Dohertv, Albany, 
128 337 289 25 .96ljKennedy, Utica. 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
123 146 279 18 .959[Donovan, Troy, 
132 203 274 33 .935JMcArdle, Scranton, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

113 231 359 18 .9701 Aubrey, Syracuse, 
17 19 38 3 .950]Cargo, Troy, 

LEFT FIELDERS. 

114 171 11 4 .978 Magee, Wilkes-Barre, 85 152 

115 257 10 9 .967jGraham, Scranton, 

CENTER FIELDERS. 

3 lOOOfDufify, Scranton, 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

136 1456 108 16 .989 
110 1094 58 



131 205 309 38 .93i 
125 176 240 32 .928 



50 98 
131 248 



44 5 .982|Riggs, Syracuse, 
RIGHT FIELDERS. 



130 299 37 
132 161 12 



7 .979[Donovan. Bing., 
4 ,977j\ r an Zandt, Bing., 



PITCHERS. 

48 19 106 lOOOISchlitzer, Utica, 
39 15 90 2 .98l|Carter, Syra., 

CATCHERS. 

95 479 164 9 .9S6|McNamara, Albany, 
89 421 102 10 .9SllRafter, Syracuse, 



131 274 427 42 
134 314 395 47 


943 
.937 


85 152 
131 268 


15 7 

24 


.959 
.957 


116 238 
21 35 


25 7 
2 1 


.974 
.373 


63 79 

117 286 


4 2 
20 10 


.976 
.968 


40 11 125 3 
34 26 99 3 


.978 
.976 


55 291 
62 304 


61 7 
73 7 


.980 
.980 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 223 

Pacific Coast League 

Bt Hahht B. Smith, San Francisco, Cal. 

In view of conditions that existed at the end of the 1906 
season, together with complications that arose both in the 
Northwest and in California, the past year has been a most 
remarkable one in the annals of Pacific Coast League Base Ball. 
Every club of the four that now comprise the league made 
money, in spite of extraordinary difficulties with which they 
had to contend, and it was proved conclusively not only that 
the men behind the enterprise are healthy sportsmen, but that 
the people will give them support. 

Base Ball fans will remember that the Pacific Coast League 
finished the year 1906 on three legs. The San Francisco grounds- 
had been completely destroyed by the fire. Los Angeles was in 
a tangled condition. Fresno was anything but self-supporting, 
and Seattle indifferent. The condition was enough to shake the 
hearts of the strongest men. Then came the deflection of the 
Seattle club. Russ Hall, to whom the franchise had been 
awarded, joined forces with the Pacific Northwest League and 
strenuous efforts were made to carry Judge W. W. McCredie 
and the Portland club into that organization. To the credit 
of Judge McCredie, who has stood once and for all with the 
Coast League, that plan failed. 

Even with his support, affairs were discouraging. The clubs 
that were left had all they could do to support and finance 
their own projects, without putting in a new club in Seattle. 
That territory was finally abandoned, for to have financed a 
team would have been folly, and Fresno was reluctantly dropped, 
as there was no city that could take the place of the Wasning- 
ton metropolis. Nor did this end the troubles of the magnates. 
Oakland and San Francisco were without grounds and money 
had to be raised. In San Francisco, with F. M. Ish and J. Cal 
Ewing, the president of the league, at the helm, and with Ed 
M. Walter, president of the Oakland association, hard at work 
results were had. As a result, San Francisco has a $100,000 
plant, the finest park west of the Rocky Mountains, while the 
Oakland club's location is more central than ever before. 

There were minor difficulties, such as street car strikes, to 
interfere with the prosperity of the game, but the fans have 
turned out in large numbers. At Oakland the attendance has 
been beyond all expectation, while Los Angeles supported its 
pennant-winning team in proper shape. Judge McCredie of 
Portland made more money with a tail-end club than he did 
the year previous, when he won the pennant, and the San 
Francisco people have had no reason to complain. 

From the standpoint of class the playing was of a high 
order, as is best evidenced by the men who were drafted from 
the various clubs by the major leagues. President Ewing gave 
a business administration and the playing on the field was ex- 
ceptionally well marked by the absence of rowdyism. This was 
largely due to the backing given the umpires, who had strict 
orders to enforce discipline. 

Although Los Angeles led most of the way in the pennant 
race, and finally won by a safe margin, the fight for honors, 
was close from start to finish. Unfortunately, the Portland 
team was attended by more than its usual share of hard luck 
and trailed along in the rear. San Francisco and Oakland, 
however, were contenders, and not until the season was almost 
finished could the winner be definitely picked. A six-team league 




1, Spencer; 2, Melchoir; 3, Willis; 4, Hildebrand; 5, Haggard; 0, 
Zeider; 7, Streib; 8, Wheeler; 9, Jones; 10, Henley; 11, Piper; 12, 
Mohler; 13, Williams; 14, Irwin; 15, Esola. 

SAN FRANCISCO TEAM— PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE. 




1, Eagan; 2, Bliss; 3, Carnes; 4, Wright; 5, E. N. Walter, Pres. 
Heitmuller; 7, Van Haltren, Capt. ; 8, Hogan; 9, Dashwood; 10, Wm. 
Gemmell, Sec; 11, Smith; 12, Bigbie; 13, Haley; 14, Goodwin; 15, 
Cates; 16, Devereaux. Dorsaz & Butler, Photo. 

OAKLAND TEAM— PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE. 




1, Byrne; 2, Kaferty; 3, Pernoll; 4, McCreedie; 5, Johnson; 6, Groom; 
7, Casey; 8, Mott; 9, Kinsella; 10, Kennedy; 11, Donahue; 12, Hart- 
man; 13, Bassey. Graham, Photo. 
PORTLAND TEAM— PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



229 



would unquestionably add variety, but tbe difficulty is to find 
cities of sufficient strength. Los Angeles is anxious for con- 
tinuous ball and is willing to furnish a fifth city. Doubtless, 
in another year, such an arrangement can be perfected, but 
for the present it is the consensus that four strong clubs are 
better than six, with two that might have to be carried. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Pacific Coast League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Clubs. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Los Angeles 115 74 .60? 

San Francisco 104 99 .51E 



Clubs. Won. Lost. P.C, 

Oakland 97 101 .48» 

Portland 72 114 .388 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 


G. AB. R.BH.PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. AB. R.BH.PC. 


Eagan, Oakland, 
Melchoir, San F., 
Dillon, Los A., 
Cravath.Los A., 


194 708 96 237 .335 
66 220 42 67 .305 

181 631 88 192 .304 

182 614 106 186 .303 


Moriarity, San F., 
McCredie, Port., 
Raftery, Portland, 
Hogan, Oakland, 


66 239 31 72 .301 
169 606 73 183 .300 

41 159 23 47 .295 
87 269 33 78 .290 




INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 






FIRST BASEMEN. 




Name and Club. 


G. PO. A. E. PC. 1 Name and Club. 


G. PO. A. E. PC. 


Dillon, Los A., 
Bigbee, Oakland, 


181 1889 128 25. 988 Williams, San F., 
197 2166 144 45 .98llAtherton, Portland, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 


173 1863 91 38 981 
53 538 35 16 .973 


Mohler, San F., 
Casey, Portland, 


108 315 336 25 .964|Bernard, Los A., 
175 407 470 25 .963|Haley, Oakland, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 


94 225 251 27 .946 
201 515 500 66 .D39 


Irwin, San F., 
Devereaux, Oak., 


163 229 297 23 .9581 Smith, Los A., 
191 225 429 33 .952|Brashear, Los A., 

SHORTSTOPS. 

38 9^ 112 10 .954[Eagan, Oakland, 
173 311 581 59 .938|johnson, Portland, 


118 161 294 30 .938 
65 77 149 19 922. 


Zeider, San F., 
Delmas, Los A., , 


194 327 627 67 .9341 
*1 61 130 14 .932 




\ OUTFIELDERS. 




Bernard, Los A., 
Cravath, Los A., 


47 92 3 2 .979[Heitmuller, Oak., 
173 287 41 9 .9731 Melchoir, San F., 

f PITCHERS. 


199 304 42 11 .969) 
66 108 10 4 .967 


Schimpff, Portlanc 
Jones, San F., 


, 16 14 39 1000 1 Wright, Oakland, 
56 11 139 3 .980lHenley, San F., 

CATCHERS. 


54 32 152 5 .973 
56 21 118 5 .965 


Name and Club. 


G. PO.A. E. PB.PC.I Name and Club. G 


PO.A. E. PB.PC. 


Donahue, Port., 
Moore, Port., 


89 440 165 10 11 .984 Street, San F., 154 676 220 29 12 .969- 
65 253 97 9 14 .975|Eager, Los A., 83 333 77 13 8 .96* 




PITCHERS' RECORDS. 




Name and Club. 


W. L. SO.BB.PC. 


Name and Club. 


W. L. SO.BB.PC, 


Gray, Los A., 
Hosp, Los A., 


32 14 216 155 .696 
12 7 56 96 .632 


Henley, San F., 
Burns, Los A., 


24 15 197 103 .616 
23 16 144 S2 .590 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



22Y 




ILL _ . / -I 

L. A. G. Shoafp 

President 

Eastern Illinois League 

run for their money. 



Eastern Illinois League 

By G. L. Price 

Having weathered its first stormy year 
of existence and having proved itself 
to be one of the fastest leagues of its 
class, despite its youth, the Eastern 
Illinois is preparing to enter upon the 
second season with bright prospects. 
The league had its birth at Pana, and 
its godfather was Joe Adams, "Old 
Wagon Tongue," as he is known all 
over Illinois. Six clubs took franchises, 
Pana, Taylorville, Shelbyville, Cen- 
tralia, Mattoon and Charleston, and the 
season opened with much formality. 

To all except Mattoon it was the 
first taste of league ball, and all liked 
the flavor except Centralia. The latter 
after dragging along for a few weeks 
relinquished its franchise to Paris, 
which with its fast, independent 
bunch, gave its older brethren a great 
Pana took the lead at the beginning of 
the season and kept it until other clubs became alarmed. Then 
Charleston, swollen far beyond the salary limit of $600 with 
high salaried men, took the bit in its teeth, crowded Pana out 
of first place and set to work to cinch the pennant. 

Charleston and Mattoon for three-quarters of a century have 
been rivals. When Mattoon "fans" saw Charleston in the lead 
all of this rivalry and old-time jealousy revived. The "fans" 
turned out royally, and the result was that the season closed 
with the pennant firm in Mattoon's grasp. 

It was fitting that the city which had given to the Base Ball 
world "Bobby" Wicker, "Dummy" Taylor, "Pug" Bennett, 
"Larry" Doyle and a half score of other fast men and had 
put its trade mark upon Frank Chance should win the first 
flag in the new league, and Mattoon enters its second season 
with a determination to hang onto the coveted bunting. 

The league which became famous during 1907 for its extra 
inning games and its great strike-out records produced many 
pitchers who are yet to be heard from. Loomis of Charleston 
will play the coming season with Terre Haute in the Central 
League, Laudermilk, the elongated slab artist who made the 
"champs" the terrors of all batters last season and who pos- 
sesses a record of seventeen strike-outs in one game, will return 
to Decatur in the Three-I League. Cleon Webb, the collegian, 
who completed Mattoon's pitching staff, will go to the O.-P. 
Johnny Barkwell. one of Charleston's star performers, has been 
sold by Decatur to Columbus, O. Ketter, Taylorville's catching- 
managerial phenom, goes to the Central League. "Big Chief" 
Williams, the hard-hitting Indian, whose batting won him a 
pale-face bride while with Mattoon last season, will manage a 
team in the O.-P., and he will take with him Pitcher Walters 
and Fielder Bartley of Charleston. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. 

Mattoon 74 

Charleston 71 

Paris 44 



Won. Lost. PC. 
44 .627 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Taylorville 58 58 .600 

Shelbyville 51 68 .42* 



Pana 50 



.421 




1, Paskert; 2, Winters; 3, Ford; 4, McKenzie; 5, Zellar; 6, Castle- 
ton; 7, Spade; 8, Becker; 9, Fox; 10, Castro; 11, Jordan, Capt.; 12, 
W. Smith, Mgr.; 13, S. Smith; 14, Sweeney; 15, Dyer. 

Copyright, 1907, by Will F. Nelson, Atlanta. 
ATLANTA TEAM— CHAMPIONS SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Watson; 2, Carey; 3, Schulze; 4. Hurlburt: 5. Bells; 6. Owens; 
7, Rathford; 8, Neighbors; 9, Thiel; 10, Babb: 11. Loncks: 12. Suggs; 
13, Stocksdal; 14, Plass;; 15, Hemline; 16, Ritchards; 17, Carte" 
MEMPHIS TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 229 

Southern Association 

Bt Walteh Taylor, Atlanta, Ga. 

£ Beyond any doubt the season of 

1907 was the most prosperous that the 
Southern Association has ever seen. It 
is perhaps considered the proper thing 
to say that each season was better 
than those that preceded it when speak- 
ing of any league, for it is not na- 
tural to acknowledge failure, but in 
this instance it may be said that the 
Southern never saw so much prosperity 
as was poured into its lap from the 
cornucopia of plenty during the season 
of 1907. 
There were disappointments, to be 
sure, for there were eight clubs con- 
W M Kavanaugh tending at the start for only one pon- 

p^rt nant, and seven managers saw their 

Q/w,«,£«f a ™»5o««« hopes that found full bloom in the 
Southern Association gpring wither ag the geason advanced . 

The race for the honor of first place 
was between Atlanta and Memphis, and the first mentioned 
took away the prize. It was a finish, though, that disturbed 
the nerves of the most blase and the race was not over until 
the last game had been played between the two contend" 

The winning of the pennant by Atlanta brings to that city 
the first flag that it has seen in twenty-five years, and the 
population was wild with joy when it was seen that the 
bunting was to be theirs. 

At the start of the season it looked as though Nashville 
was going to take a prominent place in the race. John Dobbs, 
of major league experience, was engaged as manager and 
took charge' of affairs with a vim and energy that would Ik. e 
counted for more had his team not been beset by bad luck, 
which put many of the players out of the game for days and 
some for the entire season. 

Charley Babb began his second year as manager of the 
Memphis club with a determination to take the pennant or 
make a fight that would keep the man who did get it very 
busy. Babb failed to win the flag, but he did not give Billy 
Smith, manager of the Atlanta forces, any time for recrea- 
tion. Babb had an excellent club and he handled its affairs 
like a veteran. He received the best support from his men 
and there was no complaint that could be made by even the 
most ardent adherent of the Memphis organization. 

Smith, like Babb, began the second year of his service as 
manager in the Southern Association. The previous year he 
suffered from injuries to his men and lost a number of games 
by the closest possible scores. Smith, however, turned to 
valuable profit the experience of his first summer in the 
association, and worked energetically all the winter preparing 
for the fight that he predicted would come with the new 
year. He gathered about him a set of players who entered 
into the spirit of the game at all times and worked with all 
of their energy and skill to aid in winning the pennant. It 
was this loyalty to their manager that brought about the 
desired results. Smith, with a srenerous spirit, told his men 
if they won he would divide $500 among them. They won, 




1, McCarty; 2, Eyler; 3, Hess: 4. Orr: 5. Hart: 6, Page; 7, 

Buchanan; 8, Gilbert; 9, Kunkle; 10, Rockenfield; 11, Douglass; 12, 

Bowcock; 13, Miller. Nelson, Photo. 

LITTLE ROCK TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Wilhelm; 2, Walters; 3, Lister; 4, Smith; 5, Vaughn; 6, Ragan; 
7, Meek; 8, Gardner; 9, Clark; 10. Alcock; 11, Montgomery; 12, 
Mitze; 13, Garvan; 14, Turner; 15, Rhoettinger; 16, Molesworth. 

BIRMINGHAM TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. * 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 231 

and true to his promise, he came forward with the money. 
They refused to accept a penny, contending that the pleasure of 
winning was enough for them. 

Before coming to Atlanta Smith won two pennants for 
Macon, Ga., in the South Atlantic League. Tiie owners of 
the Atlanta franchise have given him a contract for two 
more years at an increased salary. 

The spirit of improvement that pervaded the entire league 
was found in most healthy condition at Little Rock, where 
the club owners brought back to them their former manager, 
Mike Finn, who on a previous occasion had landed them in 
second place. Finn was not so fortunate as to do that in 
1907, but he displayed a managerial ability that gave the 
City of Roses not only a good club, but one that made money 
for its owners and pleased the Base Ball public all over the 
circuit, winning praise from every official of the league. 

Montgomery had an excellent team with men on it who 
attracted attention from major league managers, but the start 
was not a good one. John Marlarky, who handled the team, 
worked hard to get a higher place than seventh, which was 
just one above Nashville, but without success. 

There was an interesting race between New Orleans and 
Little Rock for third place and the club from the Crescent 
City was victorious. Charley Frank, who is called the "Fox 
of the Southern Association," did not give up his fight for 
high honors until the very last of the season. He was con- 
stantly on the watch for players who would add strength . 
his club, and brought Lave Cross on to play third base 
shortly after he got his freedom from major league company. 
The club would have been a dangerous contender for first 
place had the outfield been a little stronger. 

Birmingham, the pennant winner the year before, had ups 
and downs enough to try the soul of any manager. Harry 
Vaughn proved his staying qualities by holding up his head 
all the season and fighting against stronger odds than his; 
team could overcome. Vaughn tried to get men to fill in the 
gaps that arose during the summer, but found it a hard thing 
to do at the time he needed them the most. 

Following Birmingham came Shreveport, La., which had a 
new manager in Tom Fischer, who for two years had been 
the best pitcher with the club. Fischer was the youngest 
manager in the association, both in years and point of service, 
but he did well despite the fact that he finished sixth. 

The most important happening in the association during 
the year was the announcement that Shreveport was to sell 
its franchise to Mobile, Ala., whose club won the Cotton 
States League pennant in 1907. For several years Mobile has 
been anxious for a Southern Association berth and had made 
a number of offers for the franchise of Shreveport. Finally 
a trade was made and the season of 1908 will see a new 
town in the circuit and one that, it is fully believed, will be 
able to make an excellent showing. Mobile is a growing and 

Prosperous city with the laudable ambition burning in the 
earts of its people to win a Southern pennant. 
The prosperity of the Southern Association during 1907 was 
due to two things. The better business conditions generally 
and the excellent management of President W. M. Kavanaugh, 
whose good judgment and knowledge of Base Ball affairs 
enabled him to steer the organization clear of all breakers. 
The prominence of President Kavanaugh in the world of Base 
Ball has done much to keep the association in the splendid 




1, Warrender; 2, Graham; 3, Massing; 4, Fisher, Mgr. ; 5, King; 

6, Beeker; 7, Graffius; 8, Gaskell; 9, Carr; 10, Hickman; 11, Clarke; 

12, Lewee; 13, Rapn: 14. Daley. Nelson, Photo. 

SHREVEPORT TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 





W- 9fcg&Wr 



wr&sWLl J£J* & ra 




'JS^J 



Mt t f 



i.*r 



1, Henline; 2, Nye; 3, Perry; 4, Hausen; 5, Houtz; 6, Ball; 7, Sea- 
bough; 8, Malarkey; 9, Gear; 10, Weems; 11, Walsh; 12, Maxwell 
13, Baxter. 

MONTGOMERY TRAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Wiseman; 2, Carr; 3, Morse; 4, Sorrell; 5, Schopp; 6, Hardy; 7, 

Wells; 8, McElveen; 9, Lister; 10, E. Duggan; 11, Nichols; 12, Dobbs. 

NASHVILLE TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUILE. 



condition that has marked its progress year after year since 
his election as its chief executive. He was re-elected at the 
annual meeting in December that was held in Atlanta, and 
the association unanimously voted to hold its next meeting in 
Little Rock, his home, as a compliment to him. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Southern Association in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 





Won. Lost. P.C. 




Won. Lost. P.C. 


Atlanta 


.... 78 54 .591 


Birmingham 


.... 61 71 


.474 


Memphis 

New Orleans ...... 


.... 74 57 .565 
....68 66 .507 


Shreveport 

Montgomery 

Nashville 


...62 70 
...62 71 
...59 78 


.470 
.460 


Little Rock 


.... 66 66 .500 


.431 




INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 






Name and Club. 


^G.AB.R.BH.PC. 


Name and Club. 


G.AB.R.BH.PC. 


Meek, Birmingham, 
Fisher, Shreveport, 
Hardy, Nashville, 
Atz, New Orleans, 
Ball, Montgomery, 


120 441 50 150 .340 
64 205 21 64 .312 
92 285 33 89 .312 
140 507 73 158 .311 
128 488 59 147 .301 


Stockdale, Memphis, 
S. Smith, Atlanta, 
Spade, Atlanta, 
Seabaugh, Mont., 
Woods, Little Rock, 


35 104 12 31 
108 402 39 118 
44 142 17 42 
78 265 14 77 
74 255 26 75 


.298 
.297 
.295 
.294 
.290 




INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 








FIRST BASEMEN. 






Name and Club. 


G. PO. A. E.PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. PO. A. E. PC. 


Cary, Memphis, 
Sabrie, New Or., 


138 1352 114 14 .990 
130 1463 62 17 .988 


Lister, Birm.-Nsh., 
Fox, Atlanta, 


124 1198 92 30 
139 1305 100 24 


.984 
.983 




SECOND BASEMEN. 






Lewee, Shreveport, 
Jordan, Atlanta, 


135 399 358 15 .980|Gatins, New Or., 
127 386 359 25 .967| Walters, Birm., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 


136 332 407 25 
142 332 435 31 


.967 
.961 


Cross, New Orleans, 
Hess, Little Rock, 


137 211 293 36 .933jBrouthers, New Or., 
SHORTSTOPS. 


136 203 274 36 
16 23 43 5 


.920 
.920 


Benson, Shreveport, 
Atz, New Orleans, 


59 114 180 26 .950iDeMontreville,Birm. 
139 280 426 45 .940jBabb, Memphis, 

OUTFIELDERS. 


107 190 346 35 
130 343 398 53 


.938. 
.933 


Gear, Montgomery, 
Neighbors, Memphis 


44 71 11 1 .988|Winters, Atlanta, 
137 301 22 4 .987|Thiel, Memphis, 

CATCHERS. 


133 225 11 3 
30 69 7 1 


.987 

.985 


Stark, Little Rock, 
Woods, Little Rock, 


17 80 16 1 .989|Owens, Memphis, 
72 307 96 5 ^Latimer, Nash.-Bm. 

PITCHERS. 


45 196 50 3 
54 202 58 4 


.987 
.984 


Fisher, Shreve., 
Suggs, Memphis, 


28 15 52 1 .985|Bills, Memphis, 
35 29 99 2 .984J Shields, Memphis, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 


36 51 122 3 
12 13 37 1 


.982- 
.980 


Name and Club. 


G. W. L. T. PC. | Name and Club. 


G. W. L. T. PC. 


Shields, Memphis, 
Castleton, Atlanta, 


11 8 3 1 .725 
25 17 8 4 .6S0 


Manuel, New Or., 
Keith, Little Rock, 


31 20 11 
22 14 8 


.645 
.636 



f 

1 

5 

■ri /] T i 


3 *£ifc 1 


Hi i 


6 ^r 7 '<> > d 



1, McLaughlin; 2, Collins, Mgr. ; 3, Field, Pies.; 4, Marshall; 5, 
Emery; 6, Haley; 7, Joubert; 8, Decker; 9, Horn; 10, Kenney; 11, 
Jackson; 12, Finn; 13, Badger. 

LAKE CHARLES TEAM— GULF COAST LEAGUE. 



p k.n 


1 ' fs^«i - w 2 £* -'''"■8' 3 ~V 


HHSSHE;!! 



1, Kuhn; 2, Brimbitt; 3, J. Kirkman; 4, Grey; 5, Gregory; 6, 
Aston; 7, Guiterez; 8, Taylor; 9, Jones, Capt. ; 10, Riggin; 11, 
Quetterre; 12, Brazel; 13, Carroll; 14, Frickey; 15, Dix. 
MONROE TEAM— GULF COAST LEAGUE. 



y. 






1, Latham; 2, Duplaine; 3, Monyhan: 4. McDonald; 5, Fisher; 6, 
Hutchcroft; 7, Kevins; 8, Paulig; 9, W halon; 10, Vitier; 11, Ford; 
12, Richardson; 13, Mason. 

GRANGE TEAM— GULF COAST LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 235 

Gulf Coast League 

By Johit Marshall, Lake Charles, La. 

The first season of the Gulf Coast League was not a success 
from a financial standpoint, but lor good, clean Base Ball' 
nothing better could be hoped. 

The six clubs that started the season were there at the 
finish, not so wealthy, but game to the core. 

Too much cannot be said of P. O. Moss, one of the ablest 
business men in Southern Louisiana, who, though he had his 
own extensive business to look after, spent time and money in 
the interest of the league, in his official duties as president. 

The directors were F. B. Field, Lake Charles; J. C. Carbo, 
Alexandria ; R. Koonz, Monroe ; J. W. Link, Orange ; J. R. 
Parkerson, Lafayette, and John Lewis, Opelousas, all able 
business men, working hand in hand for the life of the league. 

As the season advanced the poor players were weeded out, 
better men taking their places. The last half of the season 
saw the clubs putting up an article of ball that any Class B 
organization might be proud of. 

The strong Alexandria club started out at such a pace that 
two or three of the clubs could not hang on and by the first 
of July threatened to give up unless something was done. A 
meeting of the directors was called, and they decided to cut 
the season in half, all clubs starting with a clean slate after 
July 4th, the winners of the halves to play seven games for 
the championship. The clubs finished the first half as fol- 
lows: Alexandria, La., Lake Charles, La., Opelousas, La., 
Lafayette, La., Monroe, La., and Orange, Texas. The second) 
half found Lake Charles, Orange and Monroe in a neck-and- 
neck finish, Lake Charles finally winning out, and later won 
the pennant by beating Alexandria, four out of five. 

The efforts of Lake Charles' worthy manager, D. W. Collins, 
had at last realized results, as he was the only manager that 
kept his team intact, having made less changes than any 
other team in the league. He is to be congratulated, as he 
has won two pennants in the last three years, and finished 
second in the other race. One thing in his favor, his players 
were all well behaved, and this helped them land the flag, as 
they worked in perfect harmony and team work was their 
point. 

The Alexandria club fared well in selling players. Short- 
stop White was disposed of in the middle of the season to 
ban Antonio and Catcher Braun at the end of the season to 
Austin, Texas. There were quite a few other good ones in the 
league that were overlooked. The all-star club of the league 
would be : Catchers, Braun and Collins ; pitchers, Weeks. 
Booles, Frikie and Knight ; first base, Hoffman ; second base, 
Badger; shortstop, Relf ; third base, Addington ; left field,. 
Emery; center field, Carrol or McLaughlin; right field, Horn. 
The coming season will very likely see Beaumont Texas, and? 
Baton Rouge in this league. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in. 
Batting and Fielding in the Gulf Coast League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 

glete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base* 
all Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUrDB. 



CLUB STANDING 



FIRST HALF OF SEASON. 

Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Alexandria 41 17 .707 

Lake Charles 33 26 .559 

Opelousas 50 28 .526 

Lafayette 27 29 .482 

Monroe 22 33 .400 

Orange 18 38 .325 



SECOND HALF OF SEASON. 

Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Lake Charles 41 20 .673 

Monroe 41 22 .651 

Orange 43 24 .642 

Alexandria 23 33 .411 

Lafayette 21 35 .375 

Opelousas 18 39 .350 



Name and Club. 
Jones, Monroe, 
Braun, Alexandria, 
Blanchfield, Op.-L.C. 
Horn, Lake Charles, 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



G. AB.R. H.PC. 

49 184 33 66 .359 
99 360 43 125 .348 
34 125 23 43 .344 
86 329 40 105 .319 



Name and Club. 
Blanchett, Opel., 
Olire, L.C.-Mon.-Al., 
Bessey, Mon. Laf., 



G. AB.R. H.PC. 

103 381 49 117 .307 
72 254 31 77 .303 
17 67 6 20 .299 



Name and Club. 
Hubbard, Lafayette, 
Hoffman, Alexandria, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. Ch. E. PCI Name and Club. G. Ch. E. PC. 

23 251 1 .996 Jackson, Lake Chas., 37 421 10 .976 
110 1188 25 .979|McDonald, Orange, 17 165 4 .97« 



Page, Alexandria, 
Hubbard, Lafayette, 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
28 156 8 .949|Jones, Monroe, 45 244 12 .947 

50 249 13 .948] Badger, Lake Chas., 83 477 26 .945 



Addington, Monroe, 
Badger, Lake Chas., 



THIRD BASEMEN. 
79 311 10 .968|Dobard, Orange-Laf., 16 69 6 .913 
34 148 10 .932l011re, L.C.-Mon.-Alex., 30 137 14 .898 



White, Alexandria, 
Relf, Lafayette, 



SHORTSTOPS. 

77 406 33 .919 1 Reagan, Monroe, 78 401 44 .890 

106 636 63 .900| Marshall, Lake Chas., Ill 601 67 .889 



OUTFIELDERS. 
Hubbard, Lafayette, 25 52 10001 Weeks, Alexandria, 17 15 1000 
Ford, Orange 24 22 1000|Dix, Monroe, 15 18 1000 



Kinney, Opel.-0.-L.-C, 
Frickie, Monroe, 



PITCHERS. 

20 88 1 .989 1 Finn, Lake Chas., 18 88 2 .977 

28 92 2 .978 1 Weeks, Alexandria, 26 111 3 .973 



Braun, Alexandria, 
Edmunds, Opelousas, 



CATCHERS. 

91 650 9 .9S6(Kitchens, Or.-AIex., 
24 121 



I McDonald, Orange, 



15 113 2 .982 
58 405 9 .978 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



Name. 
Welch, 
Kinney, 



Won. 


Lost. PC. 


FieWg 
PC. 


Name. 


5 

7 


6 .454 
10 .412 


1.000 
.989 


Frickie, 
Finn, 



Field'g 
Won. Lost. PC PC. 



.978 
.977 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



23? 



Western League 

By Sa^dx Gbiswold, Omaha 

No season in the quarter of a century 
of the great American game in this belt 
of the country has approached in ar- 
tistic or financial success that of 1907 
in the Western League. No higher 
grade of ability and finish was ever 
attained by the performers than that 
which has been exemplified by a ma- 
jority of the teams of this ambitious 
and deserving circuit. No greater re- 
ward ever poured into the cash boxes 
of the club owners, whose sagacity and 
enterprise have made possible such re- 
sults. Nor has the Western League 
alone profited by all this unprecedented 
prosperity, which reflects that of all the 
environing country. Independent, State 
and city leagues never were more 
numerous than this year, and wherever 
conducted on sound principles have 
prospered as never before. In the Western the pennant race 
was of exceptional brilliance, and interest held all of the local 




N. L. O'Neill 

President 
Western League 




1, Lebrand; 2, Austin; 3, Gonding; 4. Hall; 5, Autrey; 6, Thompson; 
7. Welch; 8, Grahame: 9. Dolan: 10. King; 11. Reagan; 12, Saunders; 
13, W. A. Rourke, Pres. & Mgr. ; 14, McNeely; 15, Belden; 16, 
Francks, Capt.; 17, Pete, Mascot. 

OMAHA TEAM— CHAMPIONS WESTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Lauterborn; 2, Olmsted; 3, Kinnelley; 4, Zalusky; 5, Wheeler, 
Capt. & Mgr.; 6, Cassidy; 7, McDonough; 8, McHale; 9, Doll; 10, 
White; 11, Johnson; 12, Bohannon; 13, R. Adams; 14, C. Adams; 15, 
Murphy. Schlueter, Photo. 

DENVER TEAM— WESTERN LEAGUE. 




1,, Bader; 2, McGilvray; 3, Jackson; 4, Hatch; 5, Elwert; 6, Derby; 
7, Cruise; 8, Drill, Mgr.; 9, MacGregor; 10, Ryan; 11, Fitzgerald; 
12, Corhan; 13, Smith; 14, Belden. 

PUEBLO TEAM— WESTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 23! 

territory spellbound from gong to gong, and in several of the 
minor organizations out here, races almost equally thrilling 
were fought out. There were but precious few incidents to 
mar the reputation of the great sport, which seems to be 
constantly gaining a stronger hold on the public's affections. 
President O'Neill was vigilant and untiring in his efforts to 
make commendable Base Ball history ; the umpire staff, with 
the great Jack Haskell as chief, competent, staunch and 
popular ; the magnates, for the most part in. harmonious accord 
with each other, and the public enthusiastic, approbatory and 
prodigal in its liberality everywhere, how could there have been 
any other result? Base Ball in the West is surely far nearer 
perfection than ever before, and it seems destined to reach that 
coveted stage. Let the club owners join hands and hearts in 
a whole-souled effort to keep the game on the up-grade until 
it is elevated to the unchangeable position aimed at, and it is 
sure of the unqualified admiration and unswerving allegiance of 
every worthy citizen of America. 

But the Western League battle. So far as Omaha was con- 
cerned, it was heroically fought, and her success was anything 
but startling. To be sure, Buck Francks started with a team 
composed mostly .of raw material, but so ably had it been 
selected that this grand Base Ball disciplinarian soon had it 
tinged with gilt. Although Omaha beat Ducky Holmes' doughty 
Lincoln team out by a narrow margin, she really had by far 
the better team. Had it not been for Omaha's last trip 
west, when for some unaccountable reason, she won but a 
single game, she would have quit miles ahead of her nearest 
competitor. With big Gus Thompson. Donald Ragan, War 
Sanders, Clyde Hall and Harrisburg McNeeley on the hill, 
Omaha had every other twirling corps on the circuit skinned 
a block. These men, with the old war horse, Joe Dolan, on 
first ; the sensational George Graham, a brand new one, on 
second ; Francks at short, Jimmy Austin at third, and Chick 
Autrey, Harry Welch and Bill Belden in the field, made an 
aggregation calculated to give any team in the country a run 
for their money. Lincoln was also strong and dangerous at 
all times, but Des Moines, even had her team been kept intact, 
could have accomplished little more than she did. Denver 
looked good at the commencement, but lack of intelligent hand- 
ling and internal dissension disintegrated the structure and It 
played the season out way below its proper grade. Frank 
Selee's Pueblos were the nondescript of the league, while Sioux 
City was the real weakling. The Puebs stacked up in high 
class style one day, and the next revived memories of the sand 
lots. In the stick alone their strength seemed to lie. With 
Sioux City it was purely a lack of nerve. The genial Mr. 
Duncan had a lot of good men who fell way short of their 
real capabilities. 

But the season. There wasn't a club in the circuit but what 
came out on the right side of the ledger, and that, too, despite 
the disastrous weather all through May and June. Omaha 
made a barrel of money, with Lincoln, Des Moines, Denver. 
Sioux City and Pueblo following in order. Omaha turned out 
one 12,000 crowd, and averaged 5,000 for every Sunday. The 
closing games drew better than ever before in the history of 
the game. 

While the big leagues have relieved the Western League of 
many cf its best players, the scouts overlooked much good 
timber, and there is plenty left to give us another season of 
high class ball in 1908. Of the sales made, Pueblo and Des 



240 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDH. 



Moines lead. Pueblo disposed of McGilvray, Elwert, Cooke, 
Ryan and Melchoir, and Des Moines of Shipke, Gehring Clark 
and Wilson ; Omaha sold Autrey and Ragan ; Lincoln, Cicotte. 
Sioux City was the only club that did not make a sale. There 
is much talk of an eight club circuit for 1908, but this expan- 
sion just now looks exceedingly doubtful. With the cities in 
contemplation — St. Joseph and Kansas City, Kansas — the move 
could only result disastrously. It would be better to let well 
enough alone. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Western League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Games. Won. Lost. PC. 


Club. Games. Won. Lost. 


PC. 


Omaha, 147 84 63 .571 


Denver, 


143 68 75 


.475 


Lincoln, 142 79 63 .556 


Pueblo, 


139 65 74 


.467 


Des Moines, 139 76 63 .547 


Sioux City, 


148 56 92 


.378 




INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 






Name and Club. 


G. AB. R. H. PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. AB. R. H. 


PC. 


Gehring, D. Moines, 


39 118 17 48 .406 


Cassiday, Denver, 


137 4S5 88 149 


.307 


Bader, Pueblo, 


62 231 47 80 .346 


Drill, Pueblo, 


66 181 20 54 


.298 


Slattery, S. C, 


39 141 14 46 .320 


Fenlon, Lincoln, 


138 516 72 154 


.298 


Hart, S. C, 


115 405 52 131 .323 


Nance, S. C, 


70 252 39 75 


.297 


Wilson, D. Moines, 


50 192 33 62 .323 


Weed, S. C, 


150 585 89 172 


.294 


Hogriever, Des M., 


143 496 80 158 .319 


Bressler, S. C, 


29 92 8 27 


.293 


White, Denver, 


123 438 48 139 .317 


Wheeler, Denver, 


148 584 72 170 


.291 


Welch, Omaha, 


151 514 70 160 .311 


Autrey, Omaha, 


151 561 82 163 


.290 


McGilvray, Pueblo, 


146 564 94 174 .308 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 






Name and Club. 


G. PO. A. E. PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. PO. \.E. 


rc. 


Lebrand, Omaha, 


18 166 14 1 .994 


Hart, Sioux City, 


Ill 1085 80 17 


.985 


White, Denver, 


123 1205 38 15 .988 


Dexter, Des M., 


108 1131 61 19 


.984 




SECOND BASEMEN. 






Fox, Lincoln, 


149 385 475 32 . 964 1 Andreass, Des M. 


137 351 432 40 


.951 


Bader, Pueblo, 


62 141 154 14 .955 


Graham, Omaha, 


146 368 407 45 


.945 



Austin, Omaha, 
Sheehan, D., S. C. 



Granville, Sioux C. 
Gagnier, Lincoln, 



Vandergrift, Denver, 22 35 
Corkhill, Des Moines, 76 111 



Bressler, Sioux City, 
Hatch, Pueblo, 



Shannon, Des M., 
Sullivan, Lincoln, 



THIRD BASEMEN. 
151 216 479 36 .951|Reddick, Den. -Lin. 
92 188 191 21 .947|Hogriever, Des M., 

SHORTSTOPS. 
138 278 419 49 .934[Francks, Omaha, 
145 376 456 59 .9341 Wheeler, Denver, 



OUTFIELDERS. 

lOOOIBelden, Den.-Pueb. 
9 2 .984] Hogriever, Des M., 

PITCHERS. 
36 1000|Saunders, Omaha, 
72 1 .988) Cicotte, Lincoln, 



27 143 40 3 

90 418 118 10 



CATCHERS. 

3 .984IZinran, Lincoln, 
981|Gonding, Omaha, 



48 46 83 S .942 
65 77 141 14 .939 



138 275 406 50 .932 
33 86 105 15 .927 



53 94 4 2 .980 
68 69 12 2 .976 



34 14 139 3 .981 
39 10 120 4 .970 



75 246 86 7 .979 
114 569 131 15 .979 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



241 



Western Canada League 

By President B. L. Robinson" 

/^GBfe. During the years of 1905 and 1906 
/. ( R^ great interest was taken in semi-pro- 
I m mm fessional Base Ball, which was intro- 
^IM dueed into Western Canada. In the 
L^ ^^jf wBf spring of 1907 there budded forth the 
5& Western Canada League, commonly 
■ stvled the "Twilight League," owing to 
V * W tne fact tnat during the entire season 
\*%r~ the games were played after 6 o'clock 
i*^ mw\. i n * ue evening. This league was com- 
^^my^J^^^m^ posed of the following towns: Edmon- 
^^A|^lfl^^ ton, Calgary. Medicine Hat and Leth- 
Hl Mr^ I bridge, and while the promoters of the 
Wmi ] /^r1|& I h-ague mot with very little eneourage- 
^JAfl I ment from the general public, we are 
BffiNH I proud to say that we came through the 
Fred Johnston entire season without making a soli- 
Secretary tar y change in any one of our teams 
Western Canada League and without any one of the tear, s 
Yyeaueiii^ududijcdeuc losing any amount of money to speak 
of. The standing of the teams was such as to keep people up 
to fever heat during the whole season, each of the teams of 




1, Hamilton; 2, Zurlage; o, Benny, Mgr. ; 4, Works; 5, Perry; 6, 
McClain; 7, West; 8, Donnelly; 9, flollis; 10, Westcott; 11, W. 
Cousins, Pres.; 12, Jas. Fleming. Vice-Pres. ; 13, W. J. McLean, Sec- 
Treas. ; 14, S. Fleming, Mascot. 

MEDICINE HAT TEAM— CHAMPIONS WESTERN CANADA 
LEAGUE. 



142 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



the league having led some time during the season, until 
about the middle of August, when the Medicine Hat team 
forged ahead, closely followed by Edmonton. The excitement 
between those two teams was intense, each leading the league 
three times during one week. 

The Western Canada League has apparently brought out 
and developed some very promising players, the most notable 
among these being C. Ford of the Edmonton team, who has 
been purchased by the Philadelphia Americans. Several others 
are almost ready for big league companies, and, in fact, are 
now good enough to play in almost Class B ball, particularly 
pitchers Works and Barnstead. Works is one of the fastest 
and yet a most eccentric pitcher, while Barnstead allowed less hits 
per game than any other twirler. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Western Canada League in . 1f )07, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Played. Won. Lost. PC. 

Medicine Hat 90 58 32 .644 

Edmonton 85 50 35 .588 



Club. Played. Won. Lost. PC. 

Lethbridge 82 37 45 .451 

Calgary 



85 



26 59 



.306 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
Works, Med. Hat., 
O'Dea, Lethbridge, 
Blexrud, Edmonton, 
Gouche, Calgary, 



Name and Club. 
Rodgers, Calgary, 
O'Dea, Lethbridge, 



Wessler, Edmonton, 
Hamilton, Med. Hat, 



Moyne, Edmonton, 
Boylan, M. H.-Leth. 



Harper, Edmonton, 
White, Edmonton, 



Russell. Calgary, 
Nagle, Edmonton, 



Gouehe, Calgary, 
Ford, Edmonton, 



G. AB. 


R.H. 


PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. AB. 


R.H. 


PC. 


59 173 
78 280 
67 244 
24 59 


30 59 
53 95 

38 82 
4 19 


.341 
.339 
.336 

.322 


Hamilton, Med. Hat, 
Lussi, Edmonton, 
Chandler, Calgary, 
West, Med. Hat, 


87 295 
93 275 

88 317 
66 214 


72 94 
51 83 
43 94 
45 63 


.319 
.302 
.296 
.294 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G.PO. A. E. PC. 

44 419 22 14 .969 
78 764 33 26 .968 



Name and Club. 
Lussi, Edmonton, 
O'Donnell, Cal. M.H., 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
93 216 195 27 .937|Machin, Lethbridge, 
87 199 137 28 .923|Rodosey, Calgary, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
18 12 23 2 .946|Harris, MedicineHat, 
25 56 42 7 .9331 Baker, Edmonton, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

76 127 185 25 .926|0'Brien, Lethbridge, 
36 59 35 9 .913| Perry, Med. Hat, 

OUTFIELDERS. 
87 152 29 5 .973! Foster, Lethbridge, 
21 33 2 1 .972|Taylor, Calgary, 

CATCHERS. 

24 112 28 3 .979|Rogers, Lethbridge, 



526 124 16 .976| Benny, Med. Hat, 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

92 710 47 28 .964 
79 468 20 20 .961 



85 199 210 34 .923 
58 106 107 19 .918 



20 37 31 5 .931 
84 114 74 15 .926 



39 59 104 24 .878 
87 184 174 62 .852 



84 148 16 6 .965 
34 62 7 3 .959 



71 338 63 12 .971 
87 509 134 22 .967 



Name and Club. 
Works, Med. Hat, 
Hollis, Med. Hat, 



PITCHERS' 
W. L. T.BB.SO.PC. 



RECORDS. 
Name and Club. 



26 11 3 129 217 .703,Crist, Edmonton, 
21 9 1 75 173 .700 Blexrud, Edmon., 



W. L. T.BB.SO.PC. 

19 9 4 64 136 .678 
10 5 2 91 38 .666 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Virginia League 



243 



The Virginia League closed the most 
successful, and, at the same time, most 
remarkable season in its history, on 
September 18. Norfolk, under the 
management of Bob Pender, won the 
pennant, after a hard fight, with a per- 
centage of .583. Danville was second 
and Lynchburg third. Portsmouth fin- 
ished last, with a percentage of .374, 
and was the only club in the league 
that failed to win as many games as it 
lost. 

Although the salary limit of last sea- 
son exceeded that of the season before, 
every club in the circuit made money. 
Richmond and Portsmouth had the best 
attendance and the moguls of those 
two cities profited more than any of 
the others, but Norfolk was also one of 
t> , ^ ,. tne Dl S money makers, with Danville 

Roanoke and . Lynchburg following in about the order named ! ' 
Like all minor leagues in 1907, the Virginia League had 
few good hitters The fielding was fast and the pitchfng of 
a high class. Many extra-inning contests went on record 
Fewer players went from the Virginia League to the majors 




Jake Wells 

President 

Virginia League 




JackS"* 2 B°? ; p 3l . M » h , : 4 ' HaaS; 5 ' Manion;'e, Ruhland; 7, 
12 «&• i« •nS„i Pe,1 i d f r, » M r- : 9 ' E dwards : 1°. Fox; 11, Jordan 
1A feeitz; 13, Dingle; 14, Bertram; 15, Cumming. 

NORFOLK TEAM— CHAMPIONS VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




I, Kice Gwynn, Pres. ; 2, Fisher; 3, Doyle; 4, Reggy; 5, Khinehart; 
6, McKevitt, Mgr.; 7, Wrenn; 8, Tydeman; 9, Walker; 10, Henn; 

II, Ryan; 12, Flowers; 13, Hicks; 14, Lavender; 15, Powell: 16, 
Walsh. Cole, Photo. 

DANVILLE TEAM— VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




I, Kline; 2, Evans; 3, J. J. Grim, Pros. & Mgr.; 4, Hooker; 5, 
Anthony; 6, Wynne; 7, Kirkpatrick; 8, Oakley: 9, Stewart; 10, Holt; 

II, Bowen; 12, Murray; 13, Cummings. Faris & Murphy, Photo. 

LYNCHBURG TEAM— VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




1, Salve; 2, Cowan; 3, Titinan; 4. Gettig; 5. Revelle; 6, Carroll; 
7, Cassidy; 8, Reeve, Mgr.; 9, Heffron; 10, Walsh; 11, Hobbs; 12, 
Wallace; 13, Warren; 14, Long; 15. Siebrie; 16, Stackpole. 
RICHMOND TEAM— VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



24S 



last season that ever before, but this, it is believed, was due 
to the fact that so few hit above .250. Arthur Evans, the 
Lynchburg catcher, and Martin Walsh, the big Danville 
pitcher, were bought by the Chicago Nationals. Walsh is a 
brother of Ed Walsh of the White Sox. 

Bill Otey, Norfolk's star twirler, was sold to Pittsburg be- 
fore the season closed. Manion , Norfolk's shortstop, and Salve, 
one of Richmond's pitchers, were drafted by Class A clubs. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Virginia League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



Norfolk 67 

Danville 67 

Lynchburg .... 65 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Won. Lost. P.C.I Won. Lost. 



.583i Richmond * 
.536; Roanoke . . 
.512 1 Portsmouth 



P.C. 

.500 
.500 
.374 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. PCI Name and Club. 
Fisher, Danville, 49 177 23 59 .333 Vail. Rich.-Port., 

Bentley. Lynchburg, 59 179 26 56 .313 McMahon, N.-Port., 
Brodie, Roanoke, 72 238 26 74 .31l|Loucks, Dan. -Nor., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



Name and Club. 
Haas, Lchb.-Nor., 
Shaffer, 



Rhoades, Lchb., 
Doyle, Danville, 



Rhinehart. Danv. 
Fishman, Lchb., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 
Ill 1174 44 13 .9S9 
57 629 17 8 .988 



Name and Club. 
McKevitt, Danv., 
Raley, Roanoke, 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 

20 49 5 15 .306 
34 118 11 36 .305 

21 56 5 17 .304 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
24 69 64 4 .971(Siebrie, Rich., 
131 317 377 26 .964lHessler, Roanoke, 



400 25 5 
986 46 16 



92 178 235 16 
21 39 59 4 



.963 
.961 



THIRD BASEMEN. 

40 78 99 4 .97S|Ruhland, Norfolk, 109 132 242 17 .957 

41 49 87 16 .958lEustace, Roanoke, 108 129 217 25 .933 



Moss, Portsmouth, 102 
Manion, Norfolk, 100 



McKevitt. Danv., 59 
Curtis, Roanoke, 27 



Carter. L.-R.-P., 27 

Heisman, Roanoke, 12 



Edwards, Dan.-N., 101 
Ryan, Danville, 99 



SHORTSTOPS. 

220 291 31 .944) Fisher. Danville, 
204 334 35 .939|McMabon, Roan., 

OUTFIELDERS. 

7 1.000 [ SeiU. Norfolk, 
l.OOolBrodie, Roanoke, 



49 75 138 14 .938 
81 194 243 31 .934 



34 

PITCHERS. 
9 21 l.OOOIFox, Norfolk 
8 25 l.OOOlBertrand, Norfolk, 25 

CATCHERS. 

539 79 11 .9831 Cote, Roanoke, 
529 136 12 .982|Cowan, Richmond, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



123 

72 


180 
130 


20 
S 


1 
1 


.995 
.993 


26 
25 


9 

10 


5S 
36 


1 

1 


.985 
.979 


53 
53 


308 
258 


7S 
5S 


8 

7 


.980 
.978 



, Opp. , H. B. W. T. Shut- 

Name and Club. G. AB. H. R. B. B. SO. P. G. outs. W. L. PC. 

Bertrand. Norfolk 13 403 80 29 12 41 47 1 2 3 9 2 .818 

Walker, Danville 22 685 133 52 16 54 102 2 1 3 15 6 .714 

Otey, Norfolk 35 1149 214 86 19 83 197 3 3 10 22 10 .688 

Ham, Danville .10 331 80 40 6 29 26 2 1 6 3 .667 







I, Annis; 2, McAlear; 3, Kelly; 4, Hetling; 5, Nichols; 6, Becker; 
7, Holland, Capt. ; 8, Breese, Pres. and Mer. : 9. SDeer; 10, Young; 

II, Clark; 12, Dick; 13, Bayless; 14, Milan; 15, Weaver. 
WICHITA TEAM— CHAMPIONS WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Wilson; 2, Fleharty; 3, Zink; 4, Casey; 5, Tonneman; 6, Size- 
more; 7, Lewis; 8, Andrews, Mgr.; 9, P. H. Hostutler, Pres.; 10, 
Barber; 11, Mclnnis; 12, Noyes; 13, Johnson; 14, Pettigrew; 15, 
Wood. 

HUTCHINSON TEAM— WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



24T 



Western Association 

By Phesident D. M. Shivelt 

The Western Association will in- 
augurate its seventh annual pennant 
race this year about May 1. Its pros- 
pects have never appeared brighter ; in 
fact, it is doubtful whether there has 
ever been such an auspicious outlook. 
The Western Association has long out- 
lived the stage of experimentality and 
has become a fixture. No change will 
be made in its circuit this season as all 
clubs have shown their desire to re- 
main another year. 

Some of the magnates were disposed 
to cut loose Leavenworth or Springfield 
and admit Enid. Then there was talk 
also of dropping both the above-named 
towns and annexing Coffeyville and In- 
dependence, but the majority thought 
this inadvisable, at least for this year, 
and so this plan was abandoned. 
Although last season was perhaps the poorest, financially 
speaking, and, from the standpoint of equalized playing strength, 
that the Western has ever had, more men were sold and drafted 
than in any previous year. This shows that the class of play- 
ers was by no means inferior. Wichita made a joke of the 
pennant race, getting away (in race-track parlance) to a flying 
start and never being headed. The Jobbers finished many 
points ahead of their next competitors, the Oklahoma Mets. 
Hutchinson was a comparatively easy third, with Topeka taking 
fourth eased up. 

There will be a bunch of veteran stars sprinkled through 
the Western Association clubs the coming season. Frank 
Isbell, of the famous World Champion White Sox of 1906, 
will lead the champion Wichita bunch, while the veteran 




Dr. D. M. Shively 

President 
Western Association 




X, Hurlburt; 2, Halla: 3, Envin; 4, Runkel; 5, Davis;- 6, Jones; 7, 
Arnold; 8, Olson; 9, Abbott; 10, Bunton; 11, Regan; 12, Wooley. 

Strawn Photo Co. 
TOPEKA TEAM— WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Owens, Mascot; 2, Oleson; 3, Flemming; 4, Gill; 5, Rohn; 6, 

Tillman; 7, Underhill; 8, Armstrong, Mgr. ; 9, Harrington; 10, Persh; 

ll.Welsch; 12, George; 13, Root; 14, Bankhead. Stigleman, Photo. 

JOPLIN TEAM— WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 



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1, Wright, Capt.; 2, Mayor Moore, Pres. ; 3, Shaner; 4, Burns; 5, 

tPainter; 6, Milton, Mgr.; 7. Meredith; 8 Galliene: 9. Lofton; 10, 
Cheek; 11, Nee; 12, Olson; 13, Price. 

WEBB CITY TEAM— WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 



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1, A. Rohr, Pres.; 2, Cobb; 3, Ashley; 4, Selby; 5. Gilbert; 6, Price; 
7, Quiesser; 8, Hollingsworth; 9, Middleton; 10, Shumeyer, Mgr.; 11, 
Turner; 12, Vaughn; 13, Fisher. 

LEAVENWORTH TEAM— WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 249 

Bostonian, Dick Cooley, has purchased the Topeka club, and 
will again handle that team. Both Isbell and Cooley will play 
with their clubs as well as manage, and they will both be 
drawing cards around the circuit. The lesser celebrities will 
be Jack McConnell, a former Western League, Central League 
and Three-Eye League manager, who will this year manage the 
Oklahoma City club. 

Jay Andrews, who played third for Buffalo in American 
League days, will again handle the managerial reins at Hutch- 
inson, and Dud Risley, who has played ball from coast to 
coast, will swing back into this circuit to don managerial and 
playing spangles at Springfield. 

Larry Milton, of many minor league years' experience and 
one major league trial, will again manage Webb City. He is 
now owner of that club and expects to give all others a run 
for the championship honors. 

Johnny Fillman, who three years ago managed the Joplin 
club with fair success, will once more blossom as a leader and 
try to give Joplin the championship distinction. 

Leavenworth will probably have Lewis Armstrong, who for 
the last two seasons has managed Joplin. 

The Western Association magnates expect this year to rigidly 
enforce their salary limit, which has been fixed at $1,500. 
With a strict observance of this limit every club should make 
money. 

The club owners have apparently fully awakened to the 
advantage of living up to the above limit. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Western Association in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Wichita 98 35 .737 

Oklahoma City 86 54 .614 

Hutchinson 77 59 .566 

Topeka 75 65 .536 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Joplin 71 64 .526 

Webb City 65 70 .4S1 

Springfield 46 92 .333 

Leavenworth 29 108 .212 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
C. McFarland, O. C. 
Becker. Wichita, 
Love, Okla. City, 
Davis, Topeka, 
Seabaugh, Spring., 
Holland, Wichita, 



G.AB.R. H. PC. 

27 89 11 28 .314 

97 377 40 117 .310 

42 152 26 47 .309 

123 474 75 146 .308 

25 82 10 25 .30S 

130 483 51 148 .307 



Wright, Webb City, 44 153 13 47 



Name and Club. 
Milan, Wichita, 
Root, Joplin, 
Bayless, Wichita, 
Weaver, Wichita, 
Landreth. Topeka, 
Zink, Hutchinson, 



G.AB.R. H. PC. 

114 428 86 130 .304 

46 133 14 40 .301 

128 485 75 144 .297 

119 436 38 122 .294 

38 143 20 42 .294 

122 454 46 133 .291 



Name and Club. 
Abbott, Topeka, 
Halla, Topeka, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC. | Name and Club. 

119 1582 54 12 .993 Rohn, Joplin, 

17 216 18 2 .992 Milton, W. City, 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

119 1176 60 17 .987 
34 261 16 5 .982 



E. Olson. Topeka, 
Burns, W. City, 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
139 327 423 16 0-9iKelley. Wichita. 
45 72 49 3 .976J lonnomanu, T.-H. 



134 336 317 33 .963 
19 108 18 6 .955 




I, McFarlane; 2, Jackson; 3, Murphy; 4, Snodgrass; 5, Andrews 
6, Gates: 7, Haught; 8, Carlisle; 9, Powell; 10, Mack. Capt. & Mgr. 

II, Cowan; 12, Evans; 13, Keller; 14. Connors; 15, Pres. Haymond 
FAIRMONT TEAM— CHAMPIONS WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

LEAGUE. 





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1, Crabb; 2, Bails; 3, Roeper; 4, Washer; 5, Ralston; 6, Welty, 
Capt.; 7, Slevin; 8, Miller; 9, Farmer; 10, Humphries; 11, White. 
SCOTTDALE TEAM— WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE. 



i*/. . r^i ■ 


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1, Galuraith; 2, Mctfreety; 3, isniith, Mgr. 
McTighe; 6, Hollister; 7. Clark: 8. Gribben 
Ganser; 11, Simpson; 12, Lower. 

CLARKSBURG TEAM— WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE. 



4, Welch, Pres.; b, 
9 Weckenhofer; 10, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



251 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING.— (Continued. ) 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PCI Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. 

Welter, Springfield, 51 36 76 5 .958 Pendry, O. City, 136 154 291 29 .939 

Noyes, Hutch., 30 52 65 5 .958L\ndrews, Hutch., 110 114 248 26 .933 

SHORTSTOPS. 



Runkle, Topeka, 
Smith, Springfield, 


16 
49 


21 48 4 .945|Nee. Spr.-W. C, 
81 152 18 .929| White, 0. City, 

OUTFIELDERS. 


37 110 93 17 
125 230 369 55 


.923 
.916 


Noyes, Hutchinson, 
Halla, Topeka, 


36 
37 


58 3 lOOOIMerideth. W. City, 
34 4 lOOOlBoles, Topeka, 

PITCHERS. 


29 71 10 1 
19 60 11 1 


.987 
.986 


Burns, W. City, 
McClintock, O.C., 


28 
14 


13 59 lOOOlHorton, Hutch., 
2 49 1 .988| Halla, Topeka, 


19 5 37 1 
33 9 115 4 


.977 
.969 



CATCHERS. 
Name and Club. G. PO. A. E.PB.PC.f Name and Club. 
Seabaugh. Spr.. 25 126 26 3 1 .98llErwin, Topeka, 
Weaver, Wichita 119 799 145 19 4 .OSOiCheek, W. City, 



G. PO. A. E.PB.PC. 

48 206 45 6 3 ..980 
129 619 147 20 9 .975 



Name and Club. 
Young. Wichita. 
McFarland, O.C., 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



L. BB. SO.PC. 
4 56 179 .879 
4 9 137 .846 



Name and Club. 
Hofer. O. City, 
Fleharty, Hutch., 



W. L. BB. SO.pC. 

9 2 26 31 .SIS 
28 10 117 215 .739 



Western Pennsylvania League 

The Fairmont team showed itself to be the best of the con- 
tenders for the championship of the Western Pennsylvania League 
during 1907, beating Butler out in the first part of the season by 
more than 120 points, and in the second half topped Scottdale by 
72 points. Owing to the disbandment of the Piedmont team the 
season suddenly closed on July 14, but with Beaver Falls and 
Piedmont out, the league, with a great deal of enthusiasm, decided 
to continue and reorganized with six clubs. The special feature 
of the championship struggle was the contest for second place, 
Butler beating Scottdale out by 12 points in the first campaign, 
while Scottdale finished second in the final tussle by a small 
margin. Bad weather overtook the contesting teams at important 
points of the race, making the season in the main not so successful 
as anticipated. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF FIRST HALF OF SEASON. 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Fairmont 42 21 .667 

Butler 35 29 .546 

Beaver Falls 31 27 .534 

Connellsville 32 32 .500 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Greensburg 29 29 .500 

Clarksburg 31 32 .492 

Scottdale 23 30 .454 

Piedmont 16 41 .280 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Won. Lost. P.C. 



Fairmont 22 

Scottdale 22 

Butler 19 



11 


.667 


15 


.595 


15 


.559 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Greensburg 13 15 .464 

Clarksburg 15 20 .429 

Connellsville 12 24 .333 




1, Mcllveen; 2, R. F. Sinclair, Dir. ; 3, Roy; 4, Murphy, Capt.; 5, 
Miller; 6, MacHale; 7, McCabe: 8. Curtis Laughlin, Pres. ; 9, Tam- 
sett; 10, Dessau; 11, J. P. Stetler, Mgr.; 12, Ortleib; 13, Connors; 
14, Boyle; 15, Pleiss; 16, Murray; 17, Lloyd; 18, Godwin. 

STEUBENVILLE TEAM— CHAMPIONS P. O. M. LEAGUE. 




1, Dennis; 2, Wales; 3, Swartling; 4, Marty Hogan, Mgr.; 5, Albert; 
6, Shriver; 7, Dieters; 8, Watt; 9, Walker; 10, Clark Fulkison, Sec. 
and Bus. Mgr.; 11, Davis; 12, Skillman; 13, Montgomery. 

ZANESVILLE TEAM— P. O. M. LEAGUE. 




1, Frill; 2, Rarey; 3, Conroy; 4, Farabaugh; 5, Fleming, Capt.; 6, 
Ball; 7, Wetzel; 8, Bippus, Mgr.; 9, Sweeney; 10, Price; 11, Pear- 
tree; 12, Boyle; 13, Kenworthy; 14, Wilhelm. 

EAST LIVERPOOL TEAM— P. 0. M. LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



253 



Pennsylvania-Ohio-Maryland League 

A new champion in Steubenville was the result of quite a 
vigorous and interesting campaign among the clubs of the Penn- 
sylvania-Ohio-Maryland League circuit during the campaign ot 
1907. Uniontown, the old champion, was fortunate to finish in 
second place, as its team was hard pushed by both Zanesville and 
East Liverpool. It was not until these three clubs met for the 
last games of the season that Uniontown was enabled to land in 
second place, with Zanesville only four points behind, and East 
Liverpool a close fourth. The balance of the clubs were not 
dangerous at any time of the race, and this affected the attend- 
ances considerably. The weather, too, operated against the clubs 
financially, although the leaders reported they had a balance on 
the right side of the books. 

The standing of the clubs in the Pennsylvania-Ohio-Maryland 
League for 1907 is appended. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Clubs. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Steubenville 69 33 .676 

Uniontown 64 43 .598 

Zanesville 63 43 .594 

East Liverpool 62 45 .579 



Clubs. 



Won. Lost. P.C. 
..45 57 .441 



Washington 

Charleroi 45 63 

McKeesport 38 68 .358 

Braddock 37 71 .343 



.417 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 


G. AB. R. H. PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. AB. R. H. 


PC. 


Schriver, Zans., 
R. Miller, McK., 
Corcoran, Untwn, 
Lord, E. Liv., 
Walker, Zanes., 
James, Wash., 


101 259 36 87 .335 
32 100 19 33 .330 
34 122 15 40 .328 
31 112 17 36 .321 
18 60 6 19 .317 
97 339 48 106 .313 


Hartman, McK., 
Mcllveen, Steub., 
Blake, E. Liv.. 
Rudolph. Untwn, 
Maitland, Steub.. 


91 350 59 107 
58 218 16 66 
17 63 6 19 
107 330 40 98 
39 117 14 34 


.305 
.303 
.302 

.297 
.290 






INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 






Name and Club. 


G. 


PO. A. E. PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. PO. A. E. 


PC. 


Conroy, E. Liv., 
Murphy, Steub., 


93 1040 60 9 .992 
76 815 69 15 .991 


Davis. Uniontown, 
Kellar, Uniont'wn, 


85 983 31 12 
27 260 13 6 


.988 
.981 


McCloskey. Untwn 
Lord, E. Liv., 


58 
31 


SECOND BASEMEN. 
118 145 10 .963 Smith, Untwn- Was 
53 72 6 .954 | Peartree, E. Liv., 


78 162 197 18 
18 80 116 10 


.953 
.951 


Wetzell, E. Liv., 
Godwin, Steub., 


THIRD BASEMEN. 
96 116 261 8 .977 1 Broderick, Steub., 
28 39 54 5 .958 | Kruger, Steub., 


16 12 41 3 
25 25 51 3 


.951 
.951 


Corcoran, Untwn. 
Jackson, Charleroi 


34 
52 


SHORTSTOPS. 
69 104 6 .966 1 McCloskey, Untwn 
84 85 20 .945 | Price, Was.-E. L., 


50 77 136 13 
60 126 154 19 


.942 
.936 


McCracken. Wash. 
Mcllveen, Steub., 


22 
58 


OUTFIELDERS. 

60 4 1000 I Morgan, McKees., 
92 6 1 .999 ) Kellar, Untwn, 


107 279 37 6 
80 146 28 3 


.984 
.983 


McHale, Was.-Stn. 
Witherup, Untwn, 


, 21 
16 


PITCHERS. 
10 66 1000 1 Pearson, Untwn. 
2 44 1000 | Reeder,E.L.-McK., 


35 17 82 1 
21 5 48 1 


.990 
.9S1 


Sweeney, E. Liv., 
Bailey, Untwn, 


CATC 
43 211 28 2 .992 
23 120 35 3 .981 


HERS. 

Schmidt, Brad., 
Lawrence, Zanes., 


23 115 17 3 
26 115 24 3 


.980 
.979 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



255 



Oklahoma-Arkansas-Kansas League 

By Das M. Cars 

J^ At the annual spring meeting of the 

y Kansas State League in 1907 the name 

l£ of the organization was changed to 

R O. A. K., or Oklahoma, Arkansas and 

ir Kansas League. Fred McDaniel, who 

P had served the Kansas State as presi- 

y dent without remuneration, was elected 

as president of the organization, and 
^^^fe. served throughout the year, giving 
l9y much of his time to the affairs of the 
league and doing a great deal toward 
making the season a successful one, al- 
though again he served without salary. 
Hi Dan M. Carr, a Bartlesville, Okla. r 
newspaper man, was appointed by him 
acting secretary of the league, and also 
gave his time and services to the 
league and President McDaniel gratis. 
Bartlesville, McAlester, Muskogee and Tulsa in Oklahoma ; Fort 
Smith in Arkansas, and Independence, Coffeyville and Parsons 
in Kansas began the,, season and stayed until June 1, when the 
excessive rain in Kansas made it necessary for Parsons to quit. 
As McAlester had failed to support its team for the same 
reason it was dropped and the league made into a «ux -club body. 
The standing of the teams at that time was as follows : 



Fred McDaniel 
Pres. O. A. K. League 



Won. Lost. 

Bartlesville 19 7 

Independence 17 

O.ftVvville 16 

McAlester 11 



S 



14 



PC. 
.731 



.640 
.440 



Won. Lost. PC. 

Muskogee 11 14 .440 

Tulsa 11 16 .407 

Parsons 9 17 .346 

Fort Smith 8 17 .320 



On August 16, the inability of 'Fort Smith to play Sunday 
games necessitated the withdrawal of that club from the 
league, and a meeting was called, at which Tulsa agreed to 
withdraw for a consideration and with the understanding that 
it would be allowed to play this season. It was thereupon 
■decided that the pennant for the seas n should be awarded to 
the Bartlesville club and a new season started, with the under- 
standing that the winner was to play for the championship of 
the league with Bartlesville in the event that that club should 
not again be returned a winner. At the cIosj of that season the 
standing of the teams was as follows : 



Won. Lost. PC. 

Bartlesville 60 38 .612 

Independence ... 52 41 .559 

Coffeyville 49 41 .544 



Won. Lost. PC. 
. 51 45 .531 



Muskogee . . , 

Fort Smith 43 48 

Tulsa 37 59 



.473 

.385 



From August 16 until the season closed on September 16, 
the fight between the four clubs was a good one, the battle 
finally settling down between the Coffeyville and Bartlesville 
clubs, and only being settled in the next to the last series of the 
season at Bartlesville. The final standing : 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Bartlesville 24 13 .649 

Coffeyville 22 16 .579 



Won. Lost. P.C. 



Independence 16 23 

Muskogee 14 26 



.419 
.350 




1, Devlin; 2, Scott; 3, Darrah; 4, Disch; 5, Fiske; 6, Barlow; 7, 
Stark; 8, Schoonhoven, Mgr. ; 9. Evans; 10, Ives; 11, Warhop; 12, 
Ireland. Copyright, 1907, by J. Sanderson. 

IFREEPORT TEAM— CHAMPIONS WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS STATE 
LEAGUE. 





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1, Miller; 2, Chase; 3, Nagle; 4, Lang; 5, Gradv: 6, Hille; 7, McAuley; 
8, Pierce; 9, Furgeson, Mgr.; 10, Fox; 11, Kroz. 

WAUSAU TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



257 



Wisconsin-Illinois State League 

After a campaign of unusual brilliancy, which was fought out 
by Freeport, Wausau, La Crosse and Eau Claire, the team from 
Freeport, 111., won the right to be styled the champions of the 
Wisconsin-Illinois League. It was just such another finish as that 
between Freeport and La Crosse in the fall of 1906, when the 
Badgers nosed out the men from Illinois, only the result in 1907 
was reversed, Freeport landing at the top, with Wausau second, 
La Crosse third, and Eau Claire fourth. With the exception of 
Fond du Lac, the second division clubs had quite a contest amon 
themselves, Oshkosh heading the list. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in Batting 
and Fielding in the Wisconsin-Illinois State League in 1907, according 
to the official records, are given herewith. The complete official records 
are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball Record, for sale by 
all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 
Won. Lost. P.C. 
Freeport 79 41 .658 



Wausau 76 

La Crosse 67 

Eau Claire 62 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Oshkosh 59 65 .47S 

43 .639 Madison 52 66 .441 

50 .573 Green Bay 48 73 .39& 

56 .525 Fond da Lac 34 82 .293 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
Konetchy, La C, 
Disch, Freeport, 



Name and Club. 
Barlow. Freeport, 
Konetchy, La C, 



Boyle, Green Bay. 
Duchien, L. C.-Osh., 



McAuley, Wausau, 
Bond, La Crosse, 

Wallace. Green Bay, 
Fiske, Freeport, 



Corrigan. G. Bay, 
Bailey, Eau Claire, 



Minhan, G. Bay, 
Darrah, Freeport, 



Pierce; Wausau, 
Cross, F. du Lac, 



G. AB.R. H. PC. 

39 145 27 52 .358 
75 268 33 83 .309 



Name and Club. 
Whitmore, Madison, 
E. Smith, Madison, 



G. AB.R. H.PC. 

106 406 60 119 .293 
18 4S 6 14 .291 



Name and Club. 
Miller, Wausau, 
Minhan, G. Bay, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. PO. A. E. PC. I Name and Club. 
97 958 46 14 .986 Hotten. Eau Claire, 
39 421 14 8 .98l|Eide, Freeport, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
73 189 179 22 .9461 Fox, Wausau. 
97 166 131 27 .945|Caldwell, Oshkosh, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
122 247 356 25 .96010'Leary, Eau Claire 
109 168 217 31 .925|Sullivan, Oshkosh, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

15 36 49 5 .9441 Walters, G.B.-Fon., 
121 238 310 44 . 925 1 Cook, Madison, 
OUTFIELDERS. 
40 36 3 10001 Todd, Wausau, 
92 164 12 2 .9881 Fleming, F. du Lac, 

PITCHERS. 

18 6 29 1 .972|Theobold, Madison, 
33 21 100 4 .968|Warhop, Freeport, 

CATCHERS. 

44 296 56 3 .991|Stark. Freeport, 
20 79 18 1 .989IE. Smith, Madison, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
Opp 

Name and Club 
Disch, Freeport, 
Warhop, Freeport 



G.PO. 

67 671 
21 205 



A. E.PC. 
34 17 .976- 
11 6 .973 



102 152 269 29 .935 
79 151 181 23 .935 



92 121 191 26 
115 143 251 35 



102 223 244 41 
86 234 227 42 



23 35 

70 12 



22 90 
62 105 



.923 
.918 



.919 
.916 



.965 
.965 



123 817 147 12 
54 297 79 5 



.PS7 
.9SS 



W. L.H.BB.SO.PC. 

14 2 100 42 85 .875 
6 1 63 25 32 .857 



,-Opp.^ 
W. L.H.BB.SO.PC. 

5 1 52 13 22 .833 
30 6 170 81 338 .833 





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1, Baillies; 2, Hastings; 3, Flynn; 4, Carney; 5, Lucheen; 6. Killian; 
7, Cermak; 8, Hawley, Mgr.; 9, Becker; 10, Moore; 11, Bond; 12, 
Cahill. 

LA CROSSE TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Smith; 2, Malone; 3, Bailey; 4, Hotten; 5, Furchner; 6, Eberly 
7, Hooper; 8, Steele; 9, Lippert; 10, Lynch, Mgr.; 11, Gleeson; 12 
Watson; 13, Stang; 14* Mascot; 15, O'Leary. 

EAU CLAIRE TEAM— W'SCONSIN-ILLTNOIS LEAGUE. 



timWt -*" ~ Jfll 


:. v % .,<*.■ 


a*"-"-- 




K w 


..c.^O.Ot. ? 


r ■ 


. / . J 



1, Converse; 2, Safford; 3, Lewis; 4, White; 5, Reitz; 6, Sullivan; 
7, Danforth, Pres. ; 8, Bubsir, Mgr.; 9. Sage; 10, Bourgeois; 11, 
Johnson; 12, Warren; 13, Dolan; 14, Caldwell. 

OSHKOSH TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Rogers; 2, Whitmore; 3, Cook; 4, F. Smith: 5. Theobold: 6, Mil- 
ler; 7, Vorpagel; 8, Liese; 9, Grimes; 10. E. Smith; 11, Lange; 12, 
Cassiboin, Mgr.; 13, Shaw; 14, Sehaub. Ford, Photo. 

MADISON TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Miller; 2, Dolan; 3, Liese; 4, Parish; 5, O'Laughlin; 6. Stremmel; 
7, Taylor; 8, Ott; 9, Corrigan, Mgr.; 10. Wallace; 11, Charles; 12, 
Boyle; 13, Kernan. 

GREEN BAY TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Crangle; 2, Karnell; 3, Reinig, Pres. ; 4, Hatch; 5, Dahner, Sec; 
<J, Cross; 7, Gardner; 8, O'Hara; 9, Carney; 10, Letcher, Mgr.; 11, 
Cwin; 12, Koons; 13, Zook; 14, Mascot; 15, Walters. 

FON DU LAC TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Evers; 2, Wilkinson; 3, White; 4, Foster; 5, Raferty; 6, Meaney; 
7, Raymond; 8, Mullin; 9, Johnson, Capt. ; 10, Reisenger; 11, Griffin; 
12, Scnippy; 13, Matthews, Mgr.; 14, Paige. Bahr, Photo. 

CHARLESTON TEAM— CHAMPIONS SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE.. 




1, Savidge; 2, Evans; 3, Mascot; 4, Schan; 5, Violat; 6, Sitton; 7, 

Chandler; 8, Russell; 9, Mullaney, Mgr.; 10, Bierkotte; 11, Lee; 12,-. 

Thiel; 13, Roth; 14, McMillan; 15, Lewis; 16, Markley. 1 

JACKSONVILLE TEAM— SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 




1, Houston; 2, Rowan; 3, Stowers; 4, Clark; 5, Wohlleben; 6, Stin- 

eon; 7. Russell; 8, Lipe, Mgr.; 9. Robinson; 10, Rhoten; 11, Lafitte; 

^2, Pepe; 13, Murdock; 14, Harley. Milner, Photo., 

MACON TEAM— SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 261 

South Atlantic League 

While the Charleston team, under the leadership of Wilson 
Mathews, won the fourth annual championship of the South 
Atlantic League, which ended on September 4, 1907, by a 
comfortable margin, the competition as a whole was well 
fought, especially between the three leading clubs — Charleston, 
Jacksonville and Macon. The result was in the nature of a 
surprise for the Macon team, last year's champions, which 
was confident of retaining the flag but could do no better than 
to finish third, Jacksonville getting second. There were 
twenty-two tied games recorded, but only one was played off. 
Fifteen games were stopped by rain, but ten of these were 
subsequently decided. 

Notwithstanding the bad weather encountered during the 
season. President Charles W. Boyer of the league is the 
authority for the statement that the entire six clubs came out 
of the conflict with a financial balance on the right side, and 
the league will start off in the 1908 campaign in a healthy 
condition. 

The champion Charlestons acquired further distinction dur- 
ing the season of 1907 by having the leading batsmen of the 
league in outfielder Charles Raftery, whose average of .301 
in one hundred and twenty games placed him as the only 
.300 batter in a field of ninety-five who participated in fifteen 
games or over. Wagnon of the Augusta and Columbia teams 
stands second to Raftery, with an average of .294 for thirty- 
one games, while Stinson of the ex-champion Macons finished 
third with .292 in one hundred and ten games. Raftery also 
proved himself to be the champion base stealer of the league, 
having eighty to his credit, while outfielder Mull in of the 
same club has seventy-two and Howai'd of Savannah fifty-one. 
Third baseman Lipe of the Macon club, whose batting average 
was only .195. carried off the honors in sacrifice hitting, 
having accomplished such a feat forty-eight times. His nearest 
competitor is Bierman of the Augusta club. 

In the fielding department Jacksonville has two leaders in 
Mullaney at first base and McMillan at shortstop. Macon has 
the best fielding pitcher in Harley and the leading catcher in 
Hamish. Crozier of Augusta leads the outfielders, and Bo- 
hannon of the same club outranks all second basemen. Tibald 
of Columbia is placed at the head of third basemen after play- 
ing in thirty-eight games, but Lewis of .Jacksonville played in 
one hundred and eight games and is only twenty-three points 
behind Tibald. Charleston also is credited with the leading 
pitchers in Raymond and Paige, the former losing only eleven 
games in fifty-one, and Paige only six in twenty-one. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the South Atlantic League in 1907, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The com- 
plete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

Charleston 75 46 .620 

Jacksonville 68 51 .871 

Macon 68 54 .567 



• Won. Lost. P.C. 

Ausrusta 59 61 .492 

Savannah 56 63 .471 

Columbia 36 87 .293 




1, Armstrong; 2, Comingor; 3, Dexter; 4, Bender; 5, Reinhardt; 6, 
Piatt; 7, Evers; 8, Kustus; 9, Bohannon; 10, Maloney; 11, Holmes; 
12, Wagnon; 13, Connelly; 14, McKernan; 15, Thomas; 16, Ransick, 
Mgr.; 17, Bierman; 18, Brahic. 

AUGUSTA TEAM— SOUTH/ ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 




1, Keiber; 2, Morris; 3, Bayne; 4, Stafford; 5. Deaver, Mgr.; 6, 
Hoff; 7, Logan; 8, Quigley; 9, Kahlkoff; 10, Swann; 11, King; 12, 
Howard. 

SAVANNAH TEAM— SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 




1, Lally; 2, Burt; 3, Walters; 4, Ransick, Mgr.; 5, Tribble; 6, 

Veibohm; 7, Kanzler; 8, Fox; 9, Lohr; 10, Wagnon; 11, Schwenk; 

12, McMahon; 13, Shea. Bahr, Photo. 

COLUMBIA TEAM— SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



263 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 


G. AB. R.BH.PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. AB. 


R.BH.PC. 


Raftery, Chas., 
Wagnon, Aug. -Col. 


120 425 69 128 .301 
31 102 5 30 .294 


Stinson, Mac, 


110 401 


45 117 


.292 




INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 










FIRST BASEMEN. 








Name and Club. 


G. PO. A. E. PC. | Name and Club. 


G.PO 


A. E. 


PC. 


Mullaney, Jax., 
Soutb, Col., 


66 748 43 7 .991 Wohleben, Mac, 
18 202 7 2 .990J Stafford, Sav., 


128 1302 52 19 
126 1288 86 22 


.987 
.986 




SECOND BASEMEN. 








Bohannon, Aug., 
Logan, Sav., 


49 135 116 16 .977|Bill Evans, Jax., 
117 386 298 24 .966|Lally, Col., 


84 217 178 16 
127 368 208 28 


.961 
.960 




THIRD BASEMEN. 








Tibald, Col., 
Bierkotte, Jax., 


38 48 90 5 .965[Le\yis, Jax., 
23 27 61 4 .956|Busch, Aug., 


108 134 254 24 
102 144 239 21 


.942 
.942 




SHORTSTOPS. 








McMillan, Jax., 
Pepe, Mac, 


53 96 186 20 . 934 1 Morris, Sav., 
125 287 418 52 .93l|Hallman, Col., 


115 210 381 46 
28 54 79 11 


.928 
.924 




OUTFIELDERS. 








Harnish, Mac, 
Connors, Sav., 


15 15 1000[Crozier, Aug., 
15 12 10 lOOOjMeany, Chas., 

PITCHERS. 


100 178 
125 124 


12 2 
14 2 


.995 
.986 


Harley, Mac, 
Hoff, Sav., 


37 18 109 2 .984|Savidge, Jax., 
15 8 51 2 . 967 1 Holmes, Aug., 

CATCHERS. 


40 22 
43 14 


S7 4 
113 6 


.964 
.955 


Harnish, Mac, 
Robinson, Mac, 


44 253 47 1 .996IH. Smith, Col., 
73 398 93 3 .994|Reisinger, Chas., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 


66 408 
76 454 


75 7 
97 8 


.986 
.986 


Name and Club. 


G. W. L. T. PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. W. 


L. T. 


PC. 


Raymond, Chas., 
Paige, Chas., 


51 35 11 5 .761 
21 15 6 .714 


Lee, Jax., 
Holmes, Aug., 


32 20 
37 22 


11 1 
14 1 


.645 
.629 



North Texas League 

Only four clubs participated in the championship of the ' North 
Texas League, which was divided into two periods. Only the 
first period was completed, the league not being a paying venture. 
Corsicana finished in the lead with a percentage of .778. Paris 
was second, .642 ; Greenville, third, .548 ; Terrill, fourth, .375. 
Welch of the Greenville club led the batsmen of the league with a 
percentage of .338. The following players developed as leaders in 
their respective positions : Coyle, Corsicana, first base ; Reed, Corsi- 
cana, second base ; Yohe, Greenville, third base ; Bell, Terrell, 
catcher ; Ray, Paris, pitcher ; Thompson, Paris, shortstop ; Sheffield, 
Paris, left field ; Poindexter, Corsicana, center field ; Cowan, Paris, 
right field. 







i % '* '- £ S * 



j«^f &>/. = . *£^ • .*?•■ 






i 



1, Mahon; 2, Brinker; 3, Boettiger; 4, Campbell; 5, Higginbotham; 
6, Fitzgerald; 7, Tonnesen; 8, Stankel; 9, Householder; 10, Van 
Buren; 11, Brown; 12, Streib; 13, Anderson, Capt. ; 14, Hickey. 
ABERDEEN TEAM— CHAMPIONS NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 




* 



■jf ;•« 

r___ : . 4iiii ...Aii. : 



1, Shaw; 2, Marshall; 3, Nelson; 4, Kellackey; 5, Deller; 6, Butler; 

7, Martinke; 8, Shea; 9, C. Shreeder, Mgr.; 10, Lynch, Capt.; 11, 

Stoval; 12, Briseno; 13, Engle. Avery, Photo. 

TACOMA TEAM— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 




I, Arbogast; 2, Rush; 3, Hickey; 4, Welsh; 5, Bruyette; 6, Dug- 
dale, Pres.; 7, Shaffer, Capt.; 8, Howell; 9, Ross; 10, Quigley; 

II, Stanley; 12, Kieite; 13, Dudley; 14, Allen; 15, Coy; 16 Meyers; 
1Z»* Paddock. Webster & Stevens, Photo. 

SEATTLE TEAM— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 265- 

Northwestern League 

By J. Newton Colteh, Spokane, "Wash:. 

With the recovery of Seattle, one of 
the original cities of the Northwestern 
League circuit, the 1907 season of the 
league was perhaps the brightest this 
section of the country has ever known. 
Every club finished with a handsome 
net profit. There was not a sign of 
financial distress manifested at any 
time. The class of Base Ball was justi- 
fied by the attendance. Neither Seattle, 
Tacoma, nor Spokane ever saw such 
crowds, even in the old war days, as 
filled their respective parks during the- 
exciting contests of the year. 

The circuit of the league was simi- 
lar to that before the California in- 
W. H. Lucas vasion, with the exception of Portland, 

President which stuck to the Pacific Coast League. 

Northwestern League Tacoma, after quitting the Coast League- 
in 1905, entered the Northwestern n> 
1906, and Seattle followed this season, Russ Hall and J. P. 
Agnew voluntarily turning over the Seattle franchise to D. E. 
Dugdale, Seattle's popular leader of the old days. Hall took 
over the Butte franchise with a handsome bonus for his with- 
drawal from Seattle, which left the Coast League without 
backing in the city. The Coast League was not able to put 
monev into Seattle and abandoned the territory. 

Seattle proved to be a veritable gold mine for Dugdale, just 
as it did a few years ago. The attendance was such that 
every visiting club made more than its expenses on every trip, 
so it must be understood that Dugdale was well remunerated! 
for his efforts to give the coast city a winner. 

The Aberdeen club won the pennant because it was the best 
balanced team, was fortunate in keeping its men in condition 
for the greater part of the race, did not have to experiment 
with new material, had a wonderful pitching staff, and was well 
managed by Bob Brown, who kept the team members working' 
in well nigh perfect harmony. There were old heads working 
with brilliant youngsters and the result was a logical one. 

Tacoma, under the management of Mike Lynch, played a 
wonderful, fast, inside game. 

Manager Dugdale did wonders with his patched up Seattle 
team. Not until the middle of the season did the lineup ever 
look the same two davs in succession. 

Russ Hall also had to build up an entirely new team with 
only two or three players left over from the year before. He 
had a fast", aggressive bunch of youngsters who are capable of 
a brilliant defensive game. 

The Spokane team was a great disappointment to local 
"fans" who supported it loyally to the finish. At times it 
showed flashes of brilliancy, but lost many games by a run. 

Vancouver was a good ball town and deserved a better team* 
than that which was given it in the first few weeks by Parke 
Wilson. He underestimated the strength of the league and his 
bunch was compjetely outclassed at the start. 

Thirteen Northwestern League players were either drafted* 
or purchased by leagues of higher class. Burnett of Tacoma 




1, Meyers; 2, Cartwright, Capt.; 3, Hall, Mgr.; 4, Samuels: 5, 
Rossvelt; 6, Garvin; 7, Stiss; 8, Hoon; 9, Irby; 10, Wilkins; 11, 
Donovan; 12, Smith; 13, Bell; 14, Adams. 

Copyright, 1907, by W. S. Hawes. 
BUTTE TEAM— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE 







1, McKeene; 2, Ripley; 3, Altman; 4, Suess: 5, Carney; 6, Gray; 7, 
Swindells; 8, Jensen; 9, James; 10, Swain; 11, Erickson; 12, Wright; 
13, Claflin; 14, Rowan; 15, Quinn; 16, Killalay. 

SPOKANE TEAM— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 




1, iStripp; 2, Boyle; 3. Clynes; 4. Hyatt; 5, Hall; 6, Reniker; 7, 
Doyle; 8, Croll; 9, Downie; 10, Dunn; 11, Duker, Bus. Mgr.; 12, 
Hurley, Mgr. 

VANCOUVER TEAM— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



267 



and Bell of Butte were sold during the season to major league 
clubs, the former to St. Louis for $2,250 and the latter to 
New York for $2,000. Myers of Seattle was drafted by the 
Boston Americans, and Myers, the Indian catcher of Butte, 
was drafted by the Chicago Americans, but in the former case 
a sale to St. Paul made previously held good and the Seattle 
outfielder will go with the American Association team. Pitts- 
burg also put in a draft for Shaw, but he reverted to St. 
Paul by reason of prior sale. 

The following were drafted by Class A clubs: Nelson, 
Shreveport ; Deller, Oakland ; Altman, Oakland ; Jensen, Port- 
land ; Tonneson, St. Paul. Pitcher Higginbotham, the leading 
Northwestern twirler, was recalled by tne St. Louis Nationals. 

Rowdyism was handled with a firm hand by President W. 
H. Lucas. The determined stand of the league's executive 
was in keeping with his long record, in that it naturally made 
him enemies while entrenching his position in the minds of 
those who stand for clean Base Ball. 

The standing of the clubs in the Northwestern League in 1907 
and the leaders in Batting and Fielding are appended. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 
Club. Won. Lost. PC.i Club. Won. Lost 



70 



73 
76 
106 



PC. 

.490 
.472 
.243 



Aberdeen 85 51 .625 Butte 

Tacoma 90 59 .604 Spokane 68 

Seattle 83 65 .56ll Vancouver 34 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 

G. AB. R. H. PC. Name and Club. 

19 68 14 25 .368 Meyer, Seattle, 

127 499 64 173 .347 Croll, Vancouver, 

59 246 36 80 .326 Hyatt, Vanco'er, 

119 475 89 152 .320 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC.I Name and Club. 

135 1346 71 15 .990 Kellackey. Se.-Ta. 

140 1485 78 24 .985 1 Burnett, Tacoma, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
18 40 48 3 .967 Anderson, Aber., 
15 36 43 4 .952 Stis, Sea.-Butte, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
38 51 100 9 .944 McIntyre,Van.-Ta., 20 22 34 5 .918 



Name and Club. 
Frisk, Seattle, 
Householder, Ab., 
Burnett, Ta., 
Bell, Butte, 



Name and Club. 
Streib, Aberdeen, 
Cartwright, Butte, 

Engel, Tacoma, 
McKune, Spokane, 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 

134 484 85 151 .312 
110 438 58 134 .306 
115 457 43 137 .300 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

139 1460 69 23 .985 
49 541 28 10 .983 



134 326 373 39 .947 
123 339 396 50 .936 



Graham. Butte, 
Fitzgerald, Aber. 



Briseno, Tacoma, 
Harper, Se.-Van. 



Frisk, Seattle, 
Stovall, Tacoma, 



Dunn, Van.-Sp., 
Garvin, Butte, 



Boettiger, Aber., 
Altman, Spokane, 



Name and Club. 
Brinker, Aber. 



119 123 206 29 .919 E. Hickey, Se., 

SHORTSTOPS. 
148 317 47S 67 .922iBruyette, Bu.-Se., 

22 72 70 13 .916 Brown, Aberdeen, 

OUTFIELDERS. 
19 37 2 1000|Lynch. Tacoma, 

23 26 4 1000 Croll, Vancouver, 

PITCHERS. 
27 11 65 1 .9S7 Claflin, Ta.-Se.-Sp. 
36 9 99 5 .956lDeher, Tacoma, 

CATCHERS. 

57 415 85 10 .9S0i Brown, Aberdeen, 

27 170 25 4 .980lSpencer, Van.-Ab., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

W. L. BB.SO.PC.j Name and Club. 

15 6 62 120 .714! Deller, Tacoma, 



113 134 252 



.915 



Higginbotham Ab., 29 12 100 295 .7071 Welch, Seattle, 



62 135 203 32 .914 
104 213 253 43 .912 



144 341 31 11 .971 
34 66 2 .971 



33 15 94 5 .956 
44 10 95 5 .955 



17 108 25 3 .978 
99 428 133 14 .976 



W. L. BB.SO.PC. 

27 15 65 162 .643 
9 5 37 58 .643 



268 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Texas League 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Played. Won. Lost. PC.f Club. Played. Won. Lost. PC. 

Austin 140 88 52 .629|Fort Worth 139 61 78 .439 

Dallas 139 84 55 .604 Galveston 140 59 81 .422 

;San Antonio .... 140 82 58 .586|Waco 140 53 87 .378 

Houston 139 79 60 .568|Temple 139 52 87 .374 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G.AB.R.BH.SB.PC.| Name and Club. 
22 66 11 22 4 .333| Wheeler, Fort W., 
107 386 55 128 14 .332 Newnam, San A., 
74 276 50 89 16 .322 Gardner. Austin, 
134 437 74 140 12 .320 White, Temple, 



Name and Club. 
McGill, Austin, 
Stovall, San Ant. 
Mclver, Temple, 
Aiken. Houston, 
Speaker, Houston, 118 468 70 147 36 .314 



Name and Club. 
Adams. Austin. 
Salm, Ft. Worth 

'Th'pson, Tern. -Ft. W. 
Pendleton, S. Ant. 

.Nagel, Waco, 
Everhard, S. Ant., 

White. S. Antonio, 
"McCulley, Austin, 

Longley, Tem.-Aus. 
Briskey, Houston, 

Preston. Galveston. 
Leidy, S. Ant., 

-Collins. S. Ant.. 
Cavender, Waco, 

McGill, Austin, 
Gallagos, Ft. Worth, 

Naylor, D.. Ft.W., 
Hunt, Ft. Worth, 

Name and Club. 
McGill, Austin. 
Hester, Houston, 



18 39 



124 262 
128 266 



G.AB.R.BH.SB.PC. 

16 36 4 11 8 .306 
118 440 74 132 43 .300 
139 546 76 160 44 .291 

98 333 32 97 8 .291 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PCI Name and Club. 

140 1328 66 17 .987 Newman, S. An., 

135 1399 123 25 .984|Ozee, Waco, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
24 35 28 2 .973|Bammert, Waco, 
140 316 320 30 ,955|Gardner, Austin, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
52 112 110 9 .962iFirestine, Austin, 
140 211 334 44 .927jLouden, Dallas, 

SHORTSTOPS. 
52 96 142 10 .960'Markley, S. Ant., 
130 250 354 47 .928|Bigbee, Waco, 
RIGHT FIELDERS. 

136 179 15 6 .970|Bradley, Austin, 
3 .96l|Speaker, Houston, 

CENTER FIELDERS. 
51 4 lOOOIReilly. Dal.-Galv., 
302 19 6 .98l|Maloney, Dallas, 
LEFT FIELDERS. 
16 7 .972|Whiteman, Hous., 
42 13 .960|Disch, Galveston, 
PITCHERS, 
22 12 52 1000;ciark, Galveston, 
10 4 24 lOOOiBiersdorfer, Dallas, 

CATCHERS. 
16 96 17 1000fMoore,Wade, Hous., 
32 165 58 4 .982|McMurray, S. Ant., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G. W. L.SO.PC.i Name and Club. 
19 15 4 49 .780|Covington, Houston, 
23 17 6 92 .739,Burnett, Dallas, 



G. 


PO. 


A. E. 


PC. 


118 

30 


1083 
2S3 


47 19 
9 5 


.9S3 
.9S3 


140 
139 


329 387 38 
312 341 27 


.949 
.946 


138 

140 


151 273 36 
258 353 59 


.923 
.912 


68 
138 


141 201 37 
206 286 55 


.902 
.899 


82 
118 


133 
189 


13 6 
29 12 


.960 
.948 


126 
140 


114 
247 


8 14 
22 7 


.979 
.976 


135 
55 


247 
88 


25 14 
10 5 


.951 
.951 


12 
33 


3 
10 


42 1 
98 3 


.978 
.972 


87 
134 


459 114 14 
728 115 23 


.976 
.973 


G 


W. 


L.SO.PC. 


23 16 

28 19 


6 129 

8 116 


.727 
.704 



South Carolina League 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Won. Lost. P.C.I Won. 

fiumter „ 44 23 .651|Spartanburg 

Orangeburg „.., 42 25 



.627|Florence 23 



P.C. 

.514 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Atlantic League 



The season in the "outlaw" Atlantic League ended in a tie between 
Brooklyn and Reading:, until Reading was awarded a forfeited game. 
The club standing and the leaders in Batting and Fielding follow: 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Reading 69 44 

Brooklyn 68 44 

Allentown 64 51 

Newark 59 56 



PC. 

.611 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Elizabeth 56 59 .487 

Pottsville 49 62 .441 

Tamaqua 43 65 .398 

Easton 44 71 .3S3 



Name and Club. 
Palomino, Brook., 
J. Kelly, Easton, 
Sheaser, Allen., 
Brent, Reading, 
Kelly, Brooklyn, 
Reischman, Bkln., 
Ross, Elizabeth, 



Name and Club. 
Smith, Tamaqua, 
Cox, Rd. -Newark, 



Cuddy, Brooklyn, 
Lloyd, Pottsville, 

McLatchie, Read. 

Walsh, Tamaqua, 

Ritter, Reading, 
Miller, Chester, 



O'Neil. Tamaqua, 
Kelly, Brooklyn, 

Whalen. Chester. 
ghaekleton, Eas., 

Lee. Reading, 
Meehan, Chester, 

Biehl. Reading. 
Longstreet, Eliz., 

Ross, Elizabeth, 
Kite, Chester, 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G. AB. R. H. PC. | Name and Club. 
42 164 36 59 .360 Bertwhistle, Read. 
42 162 24 58 .358 Padrone. Brook., 
Brown, Tamaqua, 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 



56 227 41 81 .357 

18 60 16 21 .350 

24 84 24 29 .345 

80 285 51 97 .340 
15 



23 



Hambacher, New. 
Sullivan, Easton, 
Hartman, Read., 



32 108 


21 


35 


.324 


57 212 


38 


70 


.316 


31 117 


15 


37 


.316 


09 430 


92 130 


.302 


43 159 


23 


4S 


.302 


87 281 


2G 


84 


.299 



.337|Boice, Newark, 



20 67 9 20 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC. , Name and Club. 

31 230 11 4 .984 Reischman, Brook. 
101 968 51 21 .980 Murray, Newark, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
71 141 198 14 .960 Gastmeyer, Eliz., 
19 55 63 7 .944 McGeehan, Tarn., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
94 168 182 18 .951|Courtney, Newark, 
33 46 76 8 .938lKnox, Easton, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

56 151 149 26 .920 Wagner, Eliz., 

32 76 82 16 .908 O'Neil, Elizabeth, 

LEFT FIELDERS. 
27 47 4 1000iWood, Easton, 
24 31 21 lOOOlBertwistle, Read., 

CENTER FIELDERS. 
21 26 1000|Rice, Allentown, 
44 94 11 3 .972lTyler, Reading, 

RIGHT FIELDERS. 

57 93 23 1 .991 Miller, Easton, 
18 46 7 1 .981Agnew, Chester, 

PITCHERS. 

44 41 92 6 .985 Speer, Newark, 

43 15 87 12 .982 Johnson, Potts., 

CATCHERS. 

23 142 18 1 .994JLapp, Pottsville, 

24 133 15 3 .980jTherre, Easton, 

<?^§> 

Empire League 



G. PO. 

80 793 
49 452 


A. E. 
31 18 
21 10 


PC. 

.97S 
.977 


26 59 
36 56. 


92 11 

93 12 


.932: 
.925- 


81 90 154 21 
43 102 123 21 


.921 
.915- 


71 125 
30 38 


137 28 
81 14 


.903 
.895- 


20 6 
32 46 


45 1 
3 1 


.9S1 
.980 


59 113 

60 96 


IS 5 
7 5 


.963 
.954 


46 74 

52 499 


5 2 
39 16 


.975 

.971 


24 24 
27 69 


55 2 
52 4 


.975 
.968- 


19 77 
31 236 


15 2 
21 % 


97» 

.974 





Won. 


Lost. 


P.C. 




Won. 


Lost. 


P.C. 


Oswego 


55 


29 


.655 


Fulton 


43 


42 


.506- 


Seneca Falls .. 


56 


32 


.636 


Geneva 


34 


51 


•40O 


Auburn 


44 


39 


.530 


Lyons 


25 


64 


.281 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 271 

Public Schools Athletic League 

Mr. A. G. Spalding's Address at Cleveland, Ohio, September 20, 1907, 

Upon the Occasion of the Presentation of the Spalding Trophy 

to the Public Schools Athletic League of Cleveland. 

It always gives me pleasure to meet a body of American 
youths, for in such a body I invariably find many who are 
deeply interested in Athletic Sports. I assume that the boys 
of Cleveland do not differ from other American boys in their 
love of Athletics, but that I may understand what sort of an 
audience I am addressing, I am going to ask, with the permis- 
sion of your principal, for an expression on the subject. All 
those who are interested in Athletic Sports, who have partici- 
pated in some form of Athletics, and are fond of Athletic Sport 
generally — and Base Ball in particular — please signify it by 
raising your right hands. On the contrary, those that take no 
interest in Athletic Sports will please raise their hands. The 
vote appears to be unanimous. Evidently we are in an Athletic 
atmosphere. Now we understand each other ; we meet on 
common ground, with this difference : you are in the midst 
of, or at the commencement of, your athletic career, while mine 
was passed some thirty or more years ago. 

My present unathletic appearance may make it difficult for 
you to believe that I was ever an athlete, but the early Base 
Ball records will show that I began my career as a professional 
Base Ball pitcher at the age of seventeen, and for ten years 
thereafter participated in the annual contests for the Base Ball 
Championship of the United States, so whatever I may say to 
you to-day will be from personal experience and knowledge of 
the subject. 

Base Ball was the father of Athletic Sports in America. Pre- 
vious to its appearance, about sixty years ago, your grand- 
fathers were too busily engaged in their pioneer work of 
developing this western country to engage in such pastimes, but 
the vote just taken in this school indicates that their grand- 
children have the time and inclination, as well as the facilities, 
to engage in Athletic Sports. 

The origin of Base Ball is somewhat shrouded in mystery. 
Some prominent authorities claim that it sprung from the old 
English schoolboy game of "Rounders," while others claim that 
it was purely of American origin, as it certainly was of Amer- 
ican development. My rather extended research convinces me 
that Base Ball is entirely of American origin ; had no connec- 
tion with "Rounders," or any other foreign game, except insofar 
as there is a sort of family relationship between all games of 
ball. The first authentic record that I have been able to ob- 
tain dates the commencement of Base Ball in America back to 
1839, when a youth of Cooperstown, N. Y. — Abner Doubleday by 
name — first outlined the diamond field with a stick in the dirt, 
explained the game to his boy playmates, and afterwards drew 
up a set of playing rules for this new game, which he named 
"Base Ball." It will interest you to know that this young 
Abner Doubleday graduated from West Point in 1842 and after- 
wards, while stationed at Fort Sumter, was the man who sighted 
the first cannon that opened the Civil War in 1861. He after- 
wards became a Major General in the United States Army and 
died in 1892. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 273 

The next we learn of Base Ball was in 1842, when the younf 
business men of New York City began playing Base Ball as a 
summer recreation on Saturday afternoons. Three years later, 
in 1845, the same coterie of young^ New York business men or- 
ganized the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of New York, the 
first Base Ball club ever organized. This club in the same year 
issued the first printed set of playing rules, which was the 
commencement of organized Base Ball. As this was the only 
Base Ball club in existence at that time, the members divided 
up into first, second, third and fourth' nines, and played match 
games among themselves. Seven years later, in 1852, the second 
club came into existence, known as the Gotham Base Ball Club, 
of New York City. Two years later, in 1854, two more New 
York City clubs were organized and known as the Eagles and 
Empires. This led to exciting matches between these four clubs, 
and brought the game into public notice. 

Between 1855 and 1861 about forty more clubs were or- 
ganized, confined almost entirely to New York City and imme- 
diate vicinity. 

When President Lincoln issued his first call for troops at 
the breaking out of the Civil War in 1861, the New York Base 
Ball players were among the first to respond. They took their 
Base Ball implements with them, and thus introduced their 
favorite game into the army, where it became a popular camp 
diversion. In some unaccountable way this new game of Base 
Ball found its way into the Confederate Army, so that at the 
close of that conflict in 1865 the returning soldiers of both 
armies disseminated Base Ball throughout the nation and gave 
it its national character. 

While Base Ball had its patriotic side, it also served another 
good purpose in 1865 in acting as a sort of vent or safety valve 
to let off the steam and extraordinary excitement that the war 
had occasioned, and the returning veterans of the war probably 
needed something of this kind to bring them down to peaceful 
pursuits. 

From 1866 to 1871 a Base Ball wave spread over the coun- 
try and the game became a furore throughout the nation. Every 
city, town, and village had its Base Ball club, which generated 
such a spirit of rivalry that a sort of veiled professionalism 
crept into the game, although strenuous efforts were made to 
keep the game on an amateur basis. The amateur governing 
body, principally through lack of experience, was utterly unable 
to direct and control the rapidly growing sport, and as a nat- 
ural consequence many abuses crept into the game, which 
threatened its annihilation. 

In 1871 the first National Association of Professional Base 
Ball Players was organized, since which time the game has been 
governed by the professional element. This first professional 
association proved itself utterly unable to eradicate the abuses 
that had been inherited from the previous amateur regime, and 
things went from bad to worse. The gamblers practically con- 
trolled the game. Pool selling existed on many grounds, and 
if they were not actually located on the grounds, they were 
nearby ; so a Base Ball match became a sort of meeting plac« 
for gamblers to ply their trade. Players were frequently accused 
of "throwing" games in the interest of the pool box, and at thf 
close of 1875 Base Ball was in ill repute. 

Fortunately for the game there aopeared at this crisis a very 
remarkable man in the person of William A. Hulbert. the then 
newly-elected President of the Chicago Club. Mr. Hulbert, a 
wonderfully able man, actuated by his love for Base Ball and a 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 275 

keen desire to preserve its integrity, determined to save it from 
the utter demoralization and inevitable ruin that would surely 
result if it remained any longer in the grasp of the gamblerg. 
His first move was to organize the present National League of 
Professional Base Ball Clubs in February, 1876, which, from 
that day to this, has been a very important factor in the gov- 
ernment of the game. 

The city of Cleveland played a very important part in those 
early days, for it was in this city that the National League 
meetings were usually held. I recall the first annual meeting 
of the League in this city in the fall of 1876, when it became 
necessary to expel the strong clubs of New York and Philadel- 
phia — known as the Mutuals and the Athletics — for failing to 
comply with the League requirements ; from that time to this 
it has not been necessary to expel a club member for a similar 
offence. 

One year later, in 1877, in this same city of Cleveland, four 
prominent players were expelled from the League for "throwing" 
games in the interest of themselves and their gambler friends ; 
from that day to this, no professional player has been convicted 
of a similar offence. 

In 1881, ten prominent League players were expelled for ex- 
cessive dissipation, which had a salutary effect, with the far- 
reaching result that no profession is more free from drunkenness 
and dissipation than that of Professional Base Ball. 

It was these bold and drastic actions of the National League 
In those early days, under the guiding hand of Mr. Hulbert 
and those in sympathy with his efforts, that has raised Base 
Ball to its present position of popularity and prosperity. Base 
Ball has become an institution, and plays an important part in 
our civilization, especially among the younger element. 

There is something about Athletic Sports that cannot be ac- 
quired from books. To get the spirit of the thing, one must 
actually engage in the sport itself. The ball player soon learns 
that dissipation of any kind is a certain bar to success, for he 
must have a good clear eye, steady nerve, and a certain self- 
poise and complete control of his temper, to become an expert. 
Cigarette smoking is probably one of the most harmful indul- 
gences for the athlete. 

Base Ball is one of the least dangerous of all field sports. 
It not only develops the physique, but the mental qualities as 
well, for the ball player must be alert, act quickly, and think 
quicker. There is no place on the team for the drone. A 
closely contested game is well calculated to arouse all the 
anger, passion and jealousy in the boy, for he can go from the 
height of glory in victory to the very depths of despair in de- 
feat. There is no midway station ; the score tells the story. 
You win, or you lose. The result of the game can be read in 
the smiling countenances and springy step of the victorious 
team, who leave the field amid the joyous cheers of their 
friends, while the dejected look and lifeless walk of the losing 
team denote the vanquished. But the losing player may be con- 
soled with the thought that the victor of to-day may become 
the vanquished of to-morrow, and he soon learns to brush away 
that dejected feeling, and get ready for the next match. After 
playing several games in which victories and defeats are sure 
to be intermixed, he soon learns not to be ovei elated in victory, 
nor too much cast down in defeat, thus producing that self- 
poise so desirable in boy or man. We live in a strenuous age, 
and the system of education of our youth must be adjusted to 
meet this extraordinary strenuosity. Advanced educators realize 



276 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

that Athletic Sports properly organized and directed are to 
become very important factors in modern education and char- 
acter building. Boys take as naturally to Athletic Sports as 
ducks to water, but unless they are properly guided and to a 
certain extent controlled in their sports, some are liable to 
make sport the main object in life, neglecting their studies and 
other duties. 

I am glad to see that Cleveland, through the- organization 
of its Public Schools Athletic League, has undertaken to provide 
the proper equipment and direct the boys of this city in their 
sports. I learn from its Secretary, Mr. Ehler, that very satis- 
factory progress has been made this first year of the organi- 
zation, and he is confident that with the co-operation of the 
Sschool officials and teachers that as much or more will be 
accomplished for the public school boys and girls of Cleveland, 
as has been accomplished by a similar organization for the 
vouth of New York City. I congratulate the boys of Cleveland 
in having such a Public Schools Athletic League to provide 
suitable conveniences and direct their Athletic Sports. 

When I was informed by Mr. Ehler that a Public Schools 
Athletic League had been organized in Cleveland, and an invi- 
tation was extended to me to supply a suitable Base Ball Tro- 
phy to be competed for annually by the teams representing the 
various public schools of this city, I felt honored by the invi- 
tation, and proceeded to comply. A further invitation from 
Mr. Ehler brings me here to-day for the special purpose of 
presenting this Trophy, which I understand was won by the 
Base Ball team of the Pairmount School. 

It now gives me pleasure to formally present this perpetual 
Base Ball Trophy to the Public Schools Athletic League of 
Cleveland, through its President, the Rev. D. F. Bradley, who 
tells me that he was once the proud pitcher of an Oberlin 
College team back in the seventies. 

May it serve the purpose for which it is donated, and may 
the best team always win it. 



CLEVELAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS CHAMPIONSHIP 

• By G. W. Ehler, 
1 Supervisor of Physical Training, Cleveland Public Schools. 

The first Base Ball tournament of the elementary schools of 
Cleveland, O., was held in the spring of 1907 under the auspices 
of the Public Schools Athletic League. Out of seventy-two 
eligible school teams fifty-seven were represented in the tourna- 
ment, and as an inducement for the boys to do their utmost 
toward securing the leading honors, Mr. A. G. Spalding pre- 
sented to the league a beautiful trophy entitled, "Play Ball." 
This trophy was won by the Fairmount Public School team 
in the final game with the Sackett School team at Edgewater 
Park, the score being 3 to 0, after seven innings 

The tournament opened the eyes of many principals and 
teachers to the true character of many boys whom they had 
judged only from their conduct in the class room. Many boys' 
scholarship was raised to a higher standard, while to all was brought 
an idea of the meaning of loyalty and the realization of an ideal 
of gentlemanliness such as they had never known. 

Summary of the games follows : 

Central District — First Round — Outhwaite won from Dike, 
Sterling won from Wooldridge, Case-Woodland won from 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL OOIDE. 277 

Marion, South Case won from Outhwaite. Semi-final round- 
Sterling won from South Case, Case-Woodland won from May- 
flower. 

Final round — Case- Woodland won from Sterling. 

East District — First Round — Rosedale won from Doan, 
Hough won from Boulton, Fairmount won from Brandon, Wade 
Park won from Dunham, Giddings won from Lincoln, Rice won 
from Woodland. Semi-final round — Fairmount won from Rose- 
dale, Hough won from Wade Park, Rice won from Giddings, 
Hough won from Rice. 

Final round — Fairmount won from Hough. 

Glenville District — First round — Parkwood won from Ala- 
bama, Hodge won from St. Clair, Sowinski won from Stanard, 
Waring won from Rockwell. E. Madison won from Case, Willson 
won from N. Doan. Second round — Hodge won from Parkwood. 
Waring won from Sowinski, E. Madison won from Willson. 
Semi-final round — Waring won from E. Madison. 

Final round — Waring won from Hodge. | 

Lincoln District — 'First round — Downing won from Pearl, 
Sackett won from Walton, Clark won from Scranton. Semi- 
final round — Sackett won from Downing. 

Final round — Sackett won from Clark. 

South District — First round — Woodland Hills won from 
Miles Park, Broadway won from Normal, Huck won from Mt. 
Pleasant, Union won from Fowler, Woodland Hills won from 
Warren. Semi-final round— Broadway won from Huck, Wood- 
land Hills won from Union. 

Final round — Broadway won from Woodland Hills. 

West District — First round — Landon won from Willard, Hulle 
won from Detroit, Waverly won from Gordon, Orchard won from 
Hicks, Landon won from Lawn. Second round — Landon won 
from Waverly, Orchard won from Halle. 

Final round — Landon won from Orchard. 

CITY CHAMPIONSHIP. 

First round — Fairmount won from Case-Woodland, S to 4 ; 
Sackett won from Landon, 6 to 5 ; Broadway won from War- 
ing, 5 to 4. 

Semi-final round — Fairmount won from Broadway, 12 to 7. 

Final round — Fairmount won from Sackett, 3 to 0. 

NEW YORK PUBLIC SCHOOLS CHAMPIONSHIP 

By Henry Chadwick. 

According to the official statement of the secretary of the 
Public Schools Athletic League, the victory of Public School 
No. 10 of Brooklyn for the championship was won over an 
entry of 106 different school teams, which competed for the 
handsome trophy presented by Mr. A. G. Spalding. Public 
School No. 24 won the championship of Manhattan in the 
contest restricted to the borough and defeated Public School 
No. 5 of the Bronx, winner of the Bronx Borough champion- 
ship in the first interborough game. It then played Public 
School No. 58 of Queens, which drew a bye after winning the 
championship of Queens Borough. The Manhattan School then 
played Public School No. 10 of Brooklyn in the final game, 
No. 10 having won the Brooklyn championship, and then de- 
feated No. 14, winner of the Richmond Borough title. 

The concluding game of the series for the Inter-League cham- 
pionship, which took place at the Polo Grounds in Manhattan 



278 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



on June 8, was the most enjoyable — either professional or 
amateur — that I attended during the past season. 



Manhattan. 

Anderson, s. s 

Snyder, c. f 

Fleck, 2b 

Walters, lb 

Schwarz, c 

King, 1. f 

O'Hara, r. f 

McGrath, r. f 

Rose, 3b 

Heller, p 



R.H. O.A.E. 



13 



4 

14 1 

8 

10 



10 

4 3 

3 



2 27 14 



Brooklyn. 
H. Williams, 3b.. 
Gorman, 2b 



R.H. O.A.E. 






Scrup'r, lb 

Woods, c 

Dobin, c. f 



1 


Quigley, p 

Wick, 1. f 

Siersfer, s. s 

B. Williams, r. f 1 



2 1 

4 

1 10 

3 9 

2 3 



2 



2 

2 2 



2 


3 



1 




Totals 2 10 27 10 



0—2 



.00011000 

.00000000 0—0 

Manhattan 3. Chances for catches — By 

Stolen bases— By Brooklyn 3, by Man- 



Totals 

Brooklyn 

Manhattan 

Left on bases — Brooklyn 6 
Brooklyn 6, by Manhattan 3 

hattan 1. Runners forwarded by base hits — By Brooklyn 3, by Man- 
hattan 1. Struck out— By Quigley 3, by Heller 6. Umpire— Al Orth. 
Time of game — 1 hour and 50 minutes. 

There were thirty-six teams entered in the Manhattan con- 
test and these played in districts. The district winners then 
competed and gradually were eliminated until No. 24 of Man- 
hattan was the only school left. In the same way forty-threa 
teams played in Brooklyn, and the games between Brooklyn 
District winners left No. 10 in the lead. Nine teams played 
in the Bronx, leaving No. 5 the victor. Twelve teams played 
in Queens, leaving No. 58 champion, while No. 14 of Richmond 
won over four teams. 

The complete record of all the title winners in the District 
Leagues, borough or interborough, championships follows : 

DISTRICT LEAGUE TOURNAMENT. 



D.A.L. No. 



Manhattan 

2 P.S. No. 

3 " 



Bronx. 

D.A.L. No. 10 

" 23 



P.S. No. 



25 
87 

5 
40 

6 
62 
22 
44 
24 
171 



D.A.L. No. 



Brooklyn. 

1 P.S. No. 

5 " 

11 " 

15 " 

17 " 



" 24 " " 

Queens. 

D.A.L. No. 16 P.S. No. 

" 19 " 

«' 22 " " 

" 20 " 

Richmond. 
D.A.L. No. 4 P.S. No. 



BOROUGH TOURNAMENT WINNERS. 

Manhattan ...Public School No. 24 I Queens Public School No. 58 

Bronx Public School No. 5 Richmond .. .Public School No. 14 

Brooklyn Public School No. 10 | 

CITY TOURNAMENT WINNER. 

Brooklyn Public School No. 10 

The Spalding: Trophy was won in 1905, the year of its presenta- 
tion, by Public School No. 46, Manhattan, and in 1906, by Public 
School No. 10, Brooklyn, the latter now being a "two-time" winner 
of the statuette. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 279 

Notes of the Major Leagues' Season 

Compiled fob The Spalding Guide by E. J. Lanigan or Niw York 

As was the case in 1906 there was a surprising wind-up to 
the season, the Chicago club, champion of the National League, 
winning four straight games against the Detroit team, flag- 
winner of the American League, in the series for the World's 
Championship. Not since 1884, when the first World's Cham- 
pionship series was played between Providence of the National 
League and the Metropolitans of the American Association, has 
the set of contests for the supremacy of the universe resulted 
so decisively in a. team's favor. 

It was the first time a Chicago National League club ever 
'captured the world's series, though three times previously it 
had fought for the honors, namely, 1885, 1886, and 1906. 

Detroit furnished many of the sensations of 1907, having in 
.Manager Jennings, Pitcher Donovan and Outfielder Cobb a "Big 
Three" who caused as much talk as the "Big Four" of twenty 
years ago. 

Pitcher William Donovan played a great part in giving 
Detroit its first major league flag in twenty seasons, he win- 
ning .862 of his games — a pitching record for the American 
League. 

For a time during 1907 it looked as if the Providence club's 
record of twenty consecutive victories would go by the boards, 
the New York Giants during May winning seventeen games in 
succession and then being defeated by opponents whom they 
took too lightly — the St. Louis Cardinals. 

The list of no-hit games was added to in the National League 
by Pfeffer of the Boston club, and Maddox of the Pittsburg 
team, the latter performing this remarkable feat in his second 
game. The unfortunate habit of curtailing games played 
havoc with one pitcher, for Karger of St. Louis, in a seven- 
inning contest against the Bostons, set the Massachusetts men 
down without a hit or run, not a man getting to base. His 
control was perfect and his support flawless. 

There were no no-hit games in the American League, though 
several pitchers got near the glory circle. But always, just 
near the fag end of the contest, a player would rip off the one 
single that prevented the accomplishment of the feat. Twice 
were substituted hitters "The Spoilers," and in another instance 
the lone hit was made by a man who entered the contest to 
relieve an injured comrade. 

No new plays developed during the season, but there was a 
more general use of the "squeeze play," and a perfection in it. 
The play was better executed in the American League than in 
the National, though under Ned Hanlon the Cincinnati team 
worked the "squeeze" nearly as well as the New York Ameri- 
cans, who were the first to incorporate it in their repertory of 
attack. 

For the first time in major league history, the leading bats- 
men of the two big bodies each had the same percentage, 
namely, .350. It was announced at first that Cobb's average 
was .352, but investigation showed an error in computing it, 
and Pittsburgers consequently grew happy. 

In the Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide of 1901 there 
was advocated the compilation of statistics that would show 
the number of runs batted in by players, it being the belief 
that this data would be of much benefit in determining a man's 
worth to his club. The New York Press of Sunday, December 
8, 1907, printed such statistics of the American and National 
League campaigns and thought the subject of such importance 
that an entire page was devoted to it. 



280 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

It was shown how each and every run in the major leagues 
was scored, the "runs batted in" record being believed to reveal 
the true value of a player to his club measured by the ability 
to hit when men were on bases waiting to be sent home. In 
compiling these figures a player received credit for the runs 
he drove in on base hits, on long flies to the outfield, sacrifice 
hits and grounders on which there was no chance to nail a 
runner at the plate. 

These records showed John Wagner of the Pittsburg club and 
Tyrus Cobb of the Detroit team — the Champion batsmen of 
1907 — also to have excelled in batting in runs. The American 
League sticker drove in more tallies than his National League 
rival, the figures being 116 to 91. But Cobb played in eight 
more games than Wagner and had the additional advantage of 
playing in an organization where curtailed games were 
unknown. Both players had good places in the batting order 
from which to drive in runs, for men who bat third, fourth and 
fifth will necessarily receive many chances to drive in tallies/ 
It is the business of the first man to get on and of the second 
man to advance him, the others to bring him in. But no posi- 
tion in the batting order is a poor one if a player has the 
pluck. 

Of the four .300 batsmen of the National League — Wagner, 
Magee, Beaumont, and Leach — Wagner stood first in batting in 
runs, Magee second, Beaumont fifth, and Leach thirty-first. 
The little Pittsburger batted second almost all season and 
enthusiasts* should give him the benefit of this extenuating 
circumstance. Long hitters, like Lumley of Brooklyn, Seymour 
of New York, and Titus of Philadelphia, ranked well up in the 
"runs batted in" re3ord, but it was shown that they did the 
greater part of their stickwork at the expense of weak pitchers. 

The excellence of the team work of the Chicago World's 
Champions was revealed by these figures, Steinfeldt batting in 
69 tallies, Evers 55, Chance 48, Kling 41, Sheckard 39, Schulte 
and Tinker 34 each, Slagle 33, and Hofman 32. They did not 
have a .300 batsman in their ranks, but each and every regular 
was a good pinch hitter and did his share of batting in the 
tallies that won them the National League flag. Other teams 
were not so fortunate in having their batting strength so 
evenly divided. The Bostons had four men who batted in 40 
or more runs (Beaumont being the leader) ; Brooklyn, two 
(Lumley, leader) ; Chicago, four (Steinfeldt, leader) ; Cincin- 
nati, four (Ganzel, leader) ; New York, three (Seymour, 
leader) ; Philadelphia, four (Magee, leader) ; Pittsburg, five 
(Wagner, leader) ; St. Louis, one (Murray). Wagner, Magee, 
Beaumont, and Murray also excelled for their teams in straight 
stickwork. 

The American League averages show nine .300 hitters, these 
men being Cobb, Kay, Orth, Crawford, Stone, Killian, Clymer, 
Flick, and Nicholls. In the "runs batted in" record of the 
players of this league the nine leaders were, in order : Cobb, 
Harry Davis, Seybold, Chase, Crawford, Rossman, Donovan, 
Unglaub, and Anderson, only two of the nine having percentages 
last season above .300. In future years enthusiasts looking at 
Harry Davis's batting record — it was .266 — might imagine the 
Philadelphia captain had an off season, but of what value he 
was to his team is shown by the 91 runs he batted in, rank- 
ing second to Cobb in this respect. Seybold was a .271 hitter 
and he batted in 89 runs, while Kay, though he batted .333 in 
25 games, only drove six runs across the plate for his team. 
Wallace, a man with a batting average of .257, drove in two 
more runs than Stone, whose percentage was .063 higher. 
Wallace also drove more runs across the plate than Lajoie, 
who is a grand hitter, yet too much on the slugger type. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 281 

Murnane Paragraphs 

By Presides! T.H. Muhsase of the New En-glaktd League 

I failed to note any new play during the past season, but the 
improvement in team work was remarkable. Players had prac- 
tically abandoned what was known as slugging and a greater 
effort was made to meet the ball with a much shorter swing, 
in this way cutting down the chances for strikeouts and giv- 
ing the innelders improved opportunity to display their ability 
to the delight of the spectators. 

The change in style has cut down the chances for brilliant 
outfielding. In fact, one hears very little of great catches 
in the outfield these days of more scientific hitting. About 
one chance in five went to the outfield last season and less 
than one chance in five was of a character to call for brilliant 
work. It was much different with the infielders, who averaged 
more than half the work even outside the performances of the 
first baseman. 

The most remarkable improvement that I have noticed in the 
game has been at first base, where a player must now be just 
as good a fielder on ground balls and in throwing as the other 
infield positions. The development of the bunt, hit and run and 
placing of the ball by the batsmen forced the whole infield 
to develop a defence that was surprising. 

The player who fails to hustle, no matter how strong he may 
be individually, is not the proper timber for a winning com- 
bination in the major leagues. There is very little difference 
in the personal merit of the men who go to make up the six- 
teen teams of the two big leagues. As these men are the pick 
of the profession success comes only to the team that has 
gathered in hustlers, men who keep in condition and then go 
onto the ball field to hustle every moment they are in the 
game. There can be no let up even by one member, and no 
shirking if the team hopes to land with the leaders. 

Indifference is a germ that can drift into a combination of 
great ball players, and like a spoiled apple in a barrel soon 
contaminates the whole contents. I would have a team of 
ordinary players who were hustlers rather than a team of 
wonderful players who were indifferent to the final results. 
The winner is a hard loser, but not necessarily a player who 
will be disagreeable. The keen edge of defeat will always 
rankle '*n the breast of a man who thrives on victories, and the 
man who loves to win will hustle from first to last. There- 
fore a team of hustlers can always be found at the top at the 
close of each season. 

Players of a great team must have speed and staying powers ; 
must know the fine points of individual and team work, and 
have the disposition to play hard, aggressive ball at all times. 
Must keep cool under fire and be so constituted that a defeat 
or two will not worry them. A great team must have out- 
fielders who can drive the ball for extra bases, and at least 
five men must be good base runners. The men must be able to 
bunt us well as hit out. 

Base Ball players should attend strictly to business, and 
never show displeasure at the umpire's rulings. "Every thing 
evens up.*' once said a wise Base Ball player, and he was a 
man especially considerate of all umpires. A little encourage- 
ment will help the man out on the field to his best work, while 
continual fault finding will take his mind off of his work and 
the result sought for is lost. 



282 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Origin and Early Evolution of the 
Base Ball Playing Rules 

It will surprise as well as interest all lovers of the game to know 
how very closely the modern game of Base Ball compares with the 
original game as adopted and played by the original Knickerbocker 
Base Ball Club of New York City in 1845. 

Practically no change has been made in the basic principles un- 
derlying the game, since the first playing rules were formulated in 
1845. 

Those changes that have been made were occasioned by the 
necessity of amplifying and making more plain certain rules that 
were somewhat ambiguous, and to provide penalties for their in- 
fraction. 

No change has been made in the dimensions of the playing field; 
no change in the bases, except to slightly increase their size; no 
change in the bat; and very little change in the ball, except to 
gradually reduce its size and weight to its present standard. In 
the early days of the game the ball was extremely lively, which was 
gradually changed to extreme deadness, and then swung back to a 
happy medium, as in the official ball of to-day. There has been 
practically no change in the construction or liveliness of the official 
ball of the game for the past twenty-five years, which would in- 
dicate that the ball has gone through its experimental stages and 
had now become standardized, same as the English cricket ball, 
which has not been changed for over a hundred years. 

The following comparisons show how slightly the game of Base 
Ball in 1845 differed from the present game as played in 1908: 

IN 1845 IN 1908 

The first printed code of Base Ball Play- 
ing Rules was promulgated by the original 
Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of New York 
City, Sept. 23, 1845, and was as follows : 

Rule 1. Members must strictly observe Practically the same, 
the time agreed upon for the commence- (See present Rule 70.) 
ment of the game, and be punctual in their 
attendance. 



Rule 2. Before the commencement of the Practically the same, 

game the President shall appoint an um- ? xce P t *^ at a ^ co If^. 

. , . „ , ,. . , , has been provided to 

pire, who shall keep the game m a book record the game. (See 

provided for that purpose, and note all present Rules 84, 85 

violations of the Rules during the game. an( * 86 ^ 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



IN 1845 

Rule 3. The two Captains shall toss for 
innings; the winner having the choice of 
sending his team first to the bat or to the 
field. 

Rule U. The bases shall be from "home" 
to second base, 42 paces; from first to third 
base, 42 paces equidistant. (In 1854 the fol- 
lowing was added— "and from Home to 
Pitcher not less than 15 paces.") 



IN 1908 

Practically the same. 
(See present Rule 29.) 



Practically the same, 
except that the Pitch- 
er's distance was in- 
creased in 1881 to 50 
feet, and in 1894 it was 
further increased to 
60^ feet to the present 
Pitcher's Plate — in 
reality to 57 feet. (See 
present Rules 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 
13.) 



Rule 5. No stump (or scrub) game shall 
be played on a regular day of a match 
game. 

Rule 6. If a sufficient number of members 
should not be present at the hour named 
for commencing the game, their places may 
be filled by gentlemen not regular members 
of the Club. 

Rule 7. If members appear after the game 
is commenced, they may be chosen in if 
mutually agreed upon. 

Rule 8. The game to consist of 21 counts, 
or aces, but at the conclusion an equal 
number of hands must be played. 



Rule 9. The ball must be pitched and not 
thrown for the bat. 



Rule 10. A ball knocked out the field, or 
outside the range of the first or third base, 
is foul. 

Rule 11. Three balls being struck at and 
missed and the last one caught, is a hand- 
out; if not caught is considered fair, and 
the striker bound to run. 



Practically the same. 



Practically the same. 
(See present Rule 28.) 



Practically the same. 



This Rule was 
changed in 1857 to 
nine innings. (See 
present Rules 22, 23, 
24, 25, 26 and 27.) 

A decided change. 
(The present Rule (31) 
says, "The ball may 
be pitched or thrown 
for the bat." See 
Rules 30, 31, 32, 33, 34.) 

Same. (See present 
Rules 45 and 46, and 
Ground Rule 69.) 

Exactly the same. 
(See present Rule 56.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUID1. 



IN 1845 

Rule 12. If a ball be struck, or tipped, and 
caught either flying or on the first bound, 
it is a hand-out. 



Rule IS. A player running the bases shall 
be out if the ball is in the hands of an 
adversary on the base, or the runner is 
touched with it before he makes his base; 
it being understood, however, that in no 
instance is a ball to be thrown at him. 



IN 1908 

Considerably 
changed. The "Fly* 
game was not fully 
established until 1865, 
and the "foul tip" was 
modified in recent 
years. (See present 
Rules 46 and 49.) 

Same. (See present 
Rules 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 
57 and 58.) 



Rule lb. A player running who shall pre- 
vent an adversary from catching or getting 
the ball before making his base, is a hand- 
out. 



Same. (See present 
Rule 43.) 



Rule 15. Three hand-outs, all out. 



Same. (See present 
Rule 51.) 



Rule 16. Players must take their strike in 
regular turn. 



Same. (See present 
Rules 38, 39, 40, 41, 42.) 



Rule 17. All disputes and differences rela- 
tive to the game, to be decided by the Um- 
pire, from which there is no appeal. 



Same. (See present 
Rules 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 
65, 66. 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 
72, 73, 74, 78, 79, 80, 81, 
82 and 83.) 



Rule 18. No ace or base can be made on a 
foul strike. 



Same. (See present 
Rules 35, 36, 37, 49, 50.) 



Rule 19. A runner cannot be put out in 
making one base, when a balk is made by 
the Pitcher. 



Same. (See present 
Rule 34.) 



Rule 20. But one base allowed when a ball 
bounds out of the field when struck. 



Same. Now covered 
by special Ground 
Rules. (See present 
Rules 48, 75, 76, 77.) 



In 18b8 the following Rule was added : 
Rule 21. The player running to first base 
was out, if the ball was held by an adver- 
sary on that base before the runner reached 
it, but this applies to first base only. 



Same. (See present 
Rule 56.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDIDE. 



In 1854 the following Rules were added : 

Rule 22. Players must make the bases in 
the order of striking, and when a fair ball 
is struck and the striker not put out, the 
first base must be vacated as well as the 
next base or bases if similarly occupied; 
players must be put out, under these cir- 
cumstances, in the same manner as when 
running to first base. 



IN 1908 

Same. (See present 
Rules 52, 53, 54, 55 and 
56.) 



Rule 23. A player shall be out, if at any 
time when off a base he shall be touched 
by the ball in the hands of an adversary. 

Rule 24. If two hands are already out, a 
player running home at the time a ball is 
struck cannot make an ace if the striker is 
caught out or put out at first base. 



Same. (See present 
Rules 52, 53, 54, 55 and 
56.) 



Same. (See present 
Rule 59.) 



Rule 25. Players must take their strike in 
regular rotation ; and after the first innings 
is played the turn commences at the player 
who stands on the list next to the one who 
lost the third hand. 



Same. (See present 
Rules 38 and 39.) 



Rule 26. The ball shall weigh from five 
and a half to six ounces, and measure from 
two and three-quarters to three and one- 
Lalf inches in diameter. 



In 1857 the following Rule was added : 

Rule 27. A game shall consist of nine in- 
nings, and at least five innings must be 
played to constitute a game. 



A slight, but im- 
portant change. The 
weight of the ball has 
been slightly reduced 
from h% to 6 ozs., to 
the present 5 ozs., and 
the size from Wa, to 
3% inches in diameter 
to the present 9 inches 
in circumference. 
(See present Rule 14.) 



Same. (See present 
Rules 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 
and 27.) 



286 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

SPALDING'S 
SIMPLIFIED BASE BALL RULES 

Simplified Base Ball rules have been prepared by Mr. A. G. 
Spalding of New York and Chicago, who is the recognized 
authority on the National Game. They are of great assistance 
to beginners as well as to veterans. Based on the Official 
Playing Rules, as published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide, they state in condensed form all the technicalities that 
must be observed in the sport without the somewhat dry and 
formal wording which is necessarily employed by the rule 
makers to state each fact with great explicitness. 

The Simplified Rules are intended especially for the amateur 
player and spectator. It is frequently the case that both have 
neither the time nor the inclination to study at length the 
reason for motives through the intricacies of the Complete 
Code of Playing Rules. The latter are essential, of course, to 
the professional expert. 

In the Simplified Rules nothing will be found lacking which 
is accessory to the game. Wherever the technical reading of 
a rule is sought the simplified code provides for ready refer- 
ence, which is another point in its favor. 

A division is made of the important departments under 
appropriate headings, with a special notation referring to the 
particular official rule in the Spalding Guide bearing upon 
the point which is under discussion. By this method it will bft 
observed that it is easy to turn from the Simplified Rules 
to the Official Rules whenever the exact law as laid down by 
the authorities of the major leagues is deemed requisite for 
consultation. 



The Ball Ground - 
How to Lay it Out 



Base Ball is played upon a level field, upon which is out- 
lined a square, which is known as the infield or "diamond." 
The term "diamond," in a broader sense, is also frequently 
used in the United States to apply to the entire playing field. 
Literally, however, the "diamond" is the infield proper. 

The infield is bounded by the base-running paths, which 
extend from base to base. The bases are placed at right 
angles to each other, on each corner of the "diamond," at 
intervals of ninety feet beginning from the home plate. Thus, 
first base must be ninety feet from home plate, second base 
ninety feet from first base, third base ninety feet from second 
base and also ninety feet from the home plate, thus completing 
a perfect square. 

The territory which lies behind third base, second base and 
first base, beyond the infield and within the lines defining fair 
ground and also without these lines, is known as the outfield. 
All that portion of the field outside of the base lines that 
extend from home plate to first base and from home plate to 
third base, all territory behind the home plate and all terri- 
tory outside of straight lines reaching from the outside corner 
of third and first bases indefinitely to the outfield is foul 
ground. 

Sometimes it is impossible for boys who desire to play Base 
Ball to obtain a field sufficiently large for the regulation 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASH BALL GUIDE. 287 

diamond, whose dimensions have previously been stated, and 
in such cases an effort should always be made to place the 
bases at equal distances from each other in order that the 
symmetry of the diamond and the correct theory of the game 
may be preserved. Players of younger years may find that a 
smaller diamond adds more enjoyment to their amusement, 
since they are better able to cover the ground in fielding the 
ball in a smaller area and do not become so fatigued by running 
the bases when the latter are stationed at their full legal dis- 
tance from each other. 

The bases, except home plate, are best constructed of canvas 
bags filled with sawdust. Home plate should be of whitened 
rubber, whenever it is possible to obtain it. Some cruder sub- 
stance may be used for bases if nothing else is obtainable, but 
it is best to follow the suggestions given. First, second and 
third bases should be attached to pegs driven in the ground, 
and home plate should be sunk so that its upper surface is on 
a level with the surface of the ground. 

The pitcher's position on a diamond of regulation size is 
located sixty and five-tenths feet from home plate, and on a 
straight line, extending from home plate to the center of second 
base. It, too, should be denoted by a plate of whitened rubber, 
to be sunk until its upper surface is on a level with the surface 
of the field. This plate should be the shape of a parallelo- 
gram twenty-four inches long by six inches wide, with the- 
longer sides of the parallelogram at right angles to home 
plate. 

If a diamond smaller than the regulation size be used, the- 

pitcher's position should be relatively closer to home plate. 

(For detailed description of laying out a "diamond" see 

Rules Nos. 1 to 13, inclusive, of Spalding's Official 

Base Ball Guide.) 

The Ball 

The Spalding Official National League Ball is used in regula- 
tion games, but for players fifteen years of age or younger, the 
Spalding Official "National League Junior" ball, made the 
same as the National League Ball, only slightly smaller ,in 
size, should be used, for it better fits the boy's hand and pre- 
vents straining the arm in throwing. 

(See Rule No. 14 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

The Regulation Bat 

The Bat must always be round and not to exceed 2% inches 
In diameter at the thickest part. Spalding Trade Mark Bats 
are made to suit all ages and physiques, and are strictly in 
accordance with official regulations. 

(See Rule No. 15 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Regulation Gloves and Mitts 

The catcher or first baseman may wear a glove or mitt of 
any size, shape or weight. Every other player is restricted to 
the use of a glove or mitt weighing not over ten ounces and 
measuring not over fourteen inches around the palm. Spalding's 
Trade Marked Gloves and Mitts are regulation weight and size 
and are used by all champion players. 

(See Rule No. 20 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



288 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Players* Uniforms 



Games played by players not clad in a regular uniform are 
called "scrub" games and are not recorded as "match" games. 
Every club should adopt a regular uniform, not only to enable 
the players to play properly and with comfort, but to distin- 
guish one team from the other. 

(See Rule No. 19 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



Players' Benches 



All ball grounds should be provided with two players' benches 
back of and on each side of the home plate. They must be not 
less than twenty-five feet outside of the coachers' lines. The 
coachers may not go within fifteen feet of the base lines. Each 
team should occupy one of these benches exclusively, and their 
bats and accoutrements should be kept near the bench. 

(See Rule No. 21 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Field Rules 

No person shall be allowed upon any part of the playing 
field except the players in uniform, the manager of each side 
(and the latter not when the game is in progress, except that 
he is in uniform) ; the umpire and the officers of the law. No 
manager, captain, or player is supposed to address the specta- 
tors. In a regular League match this is considered a viola- 
tion of the rules. 

(See Rules Nos. 75-77 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 

Soiling and Providing Balls 

No player shall be allowed to soil a new ball prior to put- 
ting it into play. 

In League games the home team provides the ball.. It is 
customary in smaller leagues to expect the home team to do 
the same. The umpire has the custody of the ball when it ia 
not in play, but at the conclusion of tbe game the ball becomes 
the property of the winning team. 

(See Rule No. 14 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Number and Positions of Players 

Two teams make up each contest with nine players on each 
6ide. The fielders are known as the pitcher, the catcher, the 
first baseman, the second baseman, the third baseman, the 
shortstop, the left fielder, the center fielder and the right 
fielder. None of these is required to occupy an exact position 
on the field, except the pitcher, who must stand with his foot 
touching the pitcher's plate when in the act of delivering the 
ball to the batter, and the catcher, who must be within the 
"catcher's space" behind the batter and within t«n feet of 
home plate. Players in uniform must not occupy seats in the 
stands or mingle with the spectators. 

(See Rules Nos. 16, 17 and 18 of Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Guide.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE- 289 



Substitute Players 



It is always advisable to have a sufficient number of sub- 
stitutes in uniform ready to take the field in case any player 
shall become disabled or be disqualified. 

(See Rule No. 28 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Choice of Innings — 
Fitness of Field for Play 

The home team has the choice of innings and determines 
whether the ground is fit for play providing it has rained 
before the beginning of the game. If two clubs from the same 
city are playing, the captain of the team on whose ground the 
game is played has the choice of innings. 

(See Rule No. 29 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



A Regulation Game 



The game begins with the fielders of the team losing the 
choice of innings in their respective positions. The first batter 
of the opposing team is in his "box" at home plate. This 
"box" is a parallelogram, six feet by four, on either side of 
home plate, and six inches back from the furthest corner of 
the plate. 

If it is not possible to outline a "box" it should be remem- 
bered that the batter is never allowed to step over home plate 
to strike at the ball, and that he must not run forward toward 
the pitcher, to exceed three feet from the center of the plate, 
to strike at the ball. 

The umpire may take his position, at his option, either 
behind the pitcher or the catcher. He judges all balls and 
strikes, declares all outs, decides whether the ball is batted 
foul or fair, decides as to the legality of the pitcher's deliv- 
ery, and, in fact, has complete control of the game. His 
decisions must never be questioned, except by the captain of 
either team, and only by the latter when there is a difference 
of opinion as to the correct interpretation of the rules. 

The team at bat is allowed two coaches on the field, one 
opposite first base and the other opposite third base, but they 
must never approach either, base to a distance closer than 
fifteen feet, and must not coach when there are no runners on 
the bases. 

Whenever a player is substituted on a nine he must always 
bat in the order of the man who retires from the game. A 
player may be substituted at any time, but the player whose 
place he takes is no longer eligible to take part in the contest. 

A game is won when the side first at bat scores fewer runs 
in nine innings than the side second at bat. This rule applies 
to games of fewer innings. Thus, whenever the side second 
at bat has scored more runs in half an inning less of play 
than the side first at bat it is the winner of the game, pro- 
vided that the side first at bat has completed five full innings 
as batsmen. A game is also won if the side last at bat scores 
the winning run before the third hand is out. 

In case of a tie game play continues until at the end of 
even innings one side has scored more runs than the other, 
provided that if the side last at bat scores the winning run 



290 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

before the third hand is out the game shall terminate. This 
latter provision applies to a regular nine-inning game. Rul- 
ings relative to drawn games and games that are called because 
of atmospheric disturbances, fire or panic will be found under 
the head of "Umpire's Duties." 

(See Rules Nos. 22-27 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



Pitching Rules 



Before pitching the ball the pitcher must face the batsman 
with both feet squarely on the ground and in front of the 
pitcher's plate. When the ball is delivered the pitcher must 
face the batter and one of his feet must be in contact with 
the pitcher's plate. Not more than one step must be taken in 
the act of delivery. 

Whenever the ball after being pitched and without striking 
the ground goes over any part of home plate between the knee 
and the shoulder of the batsman it must be called a strike, 
whether the batsman strikes at it or not. 

If the pitcher fails to deliver the ball over any part of the 
plate, or if he delivers it over the plate above the shoulder or 
below the knee and the batsman declines to strike at it, it is 
called a ball. 

If the ball touches the ground before it passes home plate 
and is not struck at by the batsman, it is a ball and must be 
called as such by the umpire. If struck at, it is, of course, 
recorded as a strike. 

At the beginning of each inning the pitcher is allowed to 
throw five balls to the catcher or to an infielder for "warming- 
up" practice, the batsman refraining from occupying his posi- 
tion in the "box" at home plate. 

After the batsman steps into his position the pitcher must 
not throw the ball around the infield, except to retire a base 
runner. If he violates this rule and, in the opinion of the 
umpire, is trying to delay the game, the umpire may call a 
ball for every throw thus made. If the pitcher occupies more 
than twenty seconds in delivering the ball to the batter the 
umpire may call a ball for each offense of this nature. 

The pitcher must not make any motion to deliver the ball 
to the batsman and fail to do so, nor must he feint to throw 
to first base when it is occupied by a runner and fail to 
complete the throw. Violation of this rule constitutes a balk 
which gives all runners who are on the bases at the time an 
opportunity to advance a base each without being put out. 

A balk is also declared when the pitcher throws to any 
base to catch a runner without stepping directly toward that 
base in the act ' of making the throw ; when either foot of the 
pitcher is behind the pitcher's plate when he delivers the ball ; 
when he fails to face the batsman in the act of delivering the 
ball ; when neither foot of the pitcher is in contact with the 
pitcher's plate in the act of delivering the ball;" when in the 
opinion of the umpire the pitcher is purposely delaying the 
game ; when he stands in his position and makes any motion 
with any part of his body corresponding to his customary mo- 
tion when pitching and fails immediately to deliver the ball ; 
when he delivers the ball to the catcher when the latter is 
outside of the catcher's box. 

When a pitched ball, at which the batsman has not struck, 
hits the batsman or the umpire before the catcher touches it, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 291 

the umpire must call it a dead ball and no base runner can 
advance. The batsman, however, must be in his position at 
the time that the ball hits him and must make every effort 
to get out of the way of the ball if he fears that it will hit 
him. 

If a batsman makes a foul strike, if a foul hit is not 
caught, if the umpire declares a dead ball, or if a fair hit ball 
touches a base runner, the ball becomes dead and is not in 
play until after it has been returned to the pitcher, standing 
in his position, and the umpire has given the word to resume 
play. No base runners may advance when the ball is not in 
play. 

Whenever a person not engaged in the game touches a batted 
or thrown ball, a block follows. This must at once be an- 
nounced by the umpire, and runners shall be privileged to 
advance bases until the ball is thrown to the pitcher, standing 
in his position. After that they advance at their peril. The 
pitcher may then throw a runner out wherever he sees a 
possibility of doing so. Should a spectator retain possession 
of a blocked ball, or throw it or kick it out of the reach of 
the fielder who is endeavoring to recover it, The umpire must 
call "Time," and hold all runners at such bases as they occu- 
pied when he called "Time" until after he has permitted play 
to resume, with the ball returned to the pitcher standing in 
his position. 

(See Rules Nos. 30-37 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



Batting Rules 



Before the game begins each captain must present the bat- 
ting order of his team to the umpire, who shall submit it to 
the captain of the other side. This batting order is followed 
throughout the game except when a player is substituted for 
another, the substitute batting in the order of the retired 
player. 

Each player of each nine must go to bat in his regular 
order unless a substitute has been authorized to false his 
place. 

After the first inning the first batter in each succeeding 
inning is the player following the man who completed his 
full time at bat in the inning before. For instance, if a 
batter has but one strike in the first inning and the third 
hand be put out while he is at bat, he becomes the first batter 
in the following inning, not having completed his full time at 
bat in the inning previous. In such case, any balls and 
strikes called in the previous inning do not count when he 
resumes his time at bat. 

Players of the side at bat must remain on their seats on the 
players' bench except when called upon to bat, to coach, or to 
act as substitute base runners. 

No player of the side at bat except the batsman is priv- 
ileged to stand in the spaoe behind the catcher, or to cross it 
while the pitcher and Catcher are handling the ball. 

Players sitting on the bench of the side at Dat must get out 
of the way of fielders who approach them while trying to 
field a batted or thrown ball. 

Any legally batted ball that settles on fair ground (the 
infield) between home and first base, or between home and 
third base, or that bounds from fair ground to the outfield 



292 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

inside of first base, or third base, or that touches the person of 
a player or the umpire on fair ground, is a fair hit. 

A fair hit is also any legally batted ball that first falls 
on fair territory beyond first base or third base. 

Any legally batted ball that settles on foul ground is a foul 
hit, except that a ground hit, should it roll from foul to fair 
territory between first and home and third and home, and 
remain there, is a fair hit. 

A ground hit that first strikes fair territory and rolls out- 
side of the foul line between first and home, or third and 
home, is a foul hit. 

Any legally batted ball that falls on foul territory beyond 
first base, or third base, or that touches the person of a player 
or an umpire on foul ground, is a foul hit. 

A foul tip is the continuation of a strike which has merely 
been touched by the bat, shoots directly into the hands of the 
catcher and is held by him. 

A bunt hit is legally tapping the ball slowly within the 
infield by the batsman. If a foul result, which is not legally 
caught, the batsman is charged with a strike, whether it be 
the first, second or third strike. 

Any hit going outside the ground is fair or foul as the 
umpire judges its flight at the point at which it passes beyond 
the limitations of the enclosure in which the contest takes 
place. A legal home run over a wall or a fence can only be 
made when the wall or fence is 235 feet from the home plate. 
This rule is not invariably followed in amateur games. 

If the batsman strikes at a pitched ball and misses it, a 
strike is called. 

If the batsman fails to strike at a pitched ball which passes 
over the plate at the proper height, a strike is called. 

A foul tip caught by the catcher is a strike. 

A foul hit, whether a fly or a ground hit, bounding to any 
part of foul ground, is a strike unless the batter has two 
strikes. After two strikes the batter may foul the ball without 
penalty unless he bunts or is caught out on a foul fly. 

All bunts rolling foul are strikes. If the batsman strikes 
at the ball and misses it, but the ball hits him, it is a strike. 

If the batsman, with either of his feet out of the batsman's 
box, hits the ball in any way it is a foul strike and the bats- 
man is out. 

If a batsman bats out of turn and it is discovered aft^r 
he has completed his time at bat, but before the ball has been 
delivered to. the succeeding batsman, the player who should 
have batted is out, and no runs can be scored, or bases be 
run, on any play made by the wrong batter. This penalty is 
not enforced unless the error has been discovered before the 
ball is delivered by the pitcher to the succeeding batsman. 

If the error is discovered while the wrong batsman is at 
bat, the proper player may take his place, but he must be 
charged with whatever balls and strikes have already been 
recorded against the wrong batsman. Whenever this happens 
the batters continue to follow each other in their regular 
order. 

Should the batsman who is declared out for batting out of 
order be the third hand out, the proper batsman in the next 
inning is the player who would have come to bat had the side 
been retired by ordinary play in the preceding inning. 

The batsman is out if he fails to take his position within 
one minute after the umpire has called for him. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 293 

The batsman is out if a foul fly, other than a foul tip, is 
caught by a fielder, providing the latter does not use his cap, 
his protector, or any illegal contrivance to catch the ball, and 
providing the ball does not strike some object other than a 
fielder before being caught. It has been ruled that when the 
ball lodges in the catcher's protector by accident and he 
secures it before it falls to the ground, the catch is fair. This 
is a very exceptional play. 

The batsman is out on a foul strike. 

The batsman is out whenever he attempts to hinder the 
catcher from fielding or throwing the ball, either by stepping 
outside of the lines of his position or by deliberate obstruc- 
tion. 

The batsman is out when three strikes are called and first 
base is occupied, whether the catcher holds the ball or not, 
except there be two hands out at the time. 

The batsman is out, if, while attempting a third strike, the 
ball touches any part of his person, and base runners are not 
allowed to advance. 

Before two men are out, if the batsman pops up a fly to the 
infield with first and second, or first, second and third bases 
occupied, he is out if the umpire decides that it is an infield 
hit. The umpire shall immediately declare when the ball is 
hit whether it is an infield hit or an outfield hit. It is cus- 
tomary for the umpire to call the batter out in case that he 
decides it an infield hit, so that base runners may be pro- 
tected and not force each other out through the medium of a 
•double play. . 

The batsman is out on a bunt that rolls foul if the attempted 
bunt be made on the third strike. 

The batsman is out if he steps from one batsman's box to 
the other after the pitcher has taken his position. 

(See Rules Nos. 38-51 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



Base Running Rules 



After the batsman makes a fair hit in which he is not put 
out he must touch first, second and third bases, and then the 
home plate in regular succession in order to score a run. 

No base runner may score ahead of the men who precedes 
him in the batting order, if that player is also a base runner. 

The batsman must run to first base immediately after mak- 
ing a fair hit. or when four balls have been called by the 
umpire, or when three strikes have been declared by the umpire. 

If the batsman is hit by a pitched ball, either on his per- 
son or clothing, and the umpire is satisfied that the batsman 
did not purposely get in the way of the ball, and that he 
used due precaution to avoid it, he is entitled to run to first 
base without being put out. 

The batsman is entitled to run to first base without being 
put out if the catcher interferes with him or tries to prevent 
him from striking at the ball. 

The batsman is entitled to first base, without being put 
out. if a fair hit ball hit either the person or clothing of an 
umpire or a base runner who is on fair ground. 

Whenever the umpire sends the batsman to first base after 
four balls have been called, or for beiner hit by a pitched ball, 
or because he has been interfered with by the catcher, all 
: runners on bases immediately ahead of him may advance a 



294 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

base each without being put out. A runner on second or third 
base with first base unoccupied would not be considered a 
runner immediately ahead. 

Any base runner is entitled to advance one base when the 
umpire calls a balk. 

Any base runner is entitled to advance one base when the 
ball, after being delivered by the pitcher, passes the catcher 
and touches the umpire, or any fence or building within ninety 
feet of the home plate. The penalty in regard to touching a 
fence or building is frequently waived by mutual consent where 
the ground area is limited. 

If a fielder obstructs a base runner the latter may go to the 
next base without being put out, providing the fielder did not 
have the ball in his hand with which to touch the runner. 

A base runner may advance a base whenever a fielder stops 
or catches the ball with his cap, glove, or any part of his 
uniform detached from its proper place on his person. 

The base runner shall return to his base without liability 
of being put out when a foul is not legally caught, when a 
ground ball is batted foul, or when the batter makes a foul 
strike. 

On a dead ball the runner shall return to his base without 
liability of being put out, unless it happens to be the fourth 
pitched ball to the batter, in which case, if first, or first and 
second base, or first, second and third bases be occupied, run- 
ners shall advance to the next bases in regular order. If by 
accident the umpire interferes with the catcher's throw, or a 
thrown ball hits the umpire, the runner must return to his 
base and is not to be put out. If a pitched ball is struck at 
by the batsman, but missed, and the ball hits the batsman, 
the runner must return to his base and may not be put out. 
In any of the above cases the runner is not required to 
touch any intervening bases to reach the base to which he is 
legally entitled. 

If after the third strike has been called and missed by 
the catcher the then batsman attempts to hinder the catcher 
from fielding the ball, he is out. 

Any fly ball legally hit by the batsman and legally caught 
on fair or foul ground is out. 

Three strikes are out if the catcher holds the ball. In case 
he drops it, but picks it up, and touches the batsman, or 
throws it to first base, and the first baseman touches the base, 
or the batsman, before the latter can get to first base, the 
batsman is out. 

Should the batsman make a fair hit and in the last half of 
the distance between home plate and first base run more than 
three feet outside of the base line, he is out, except that he 
may run outside of the line to avoid interference with a fielder 
trying to field the ball as batted. This rule is construed rather 
liberally owing to the great speed with which runners go to 
first base. 

Whenever the runner is on the way from first to second base, 
second to third base, or third base to home plate, or in reverse 
order trying to secure the base which he has just left, he 
must keep within three feet of a direct line between bases. 
If he runs out of line to avoid being touched by a fielder, he is 
out. However, if a fielder is on the line trying to field a batted 
ball, the runner may run behind him to avoid interference, and 
shall not be called out for it. 

Interference with a fielder attempting to field a batted ball 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 295 

retires the runner, unless two fielders are after the same hit, 
and the runner collides with the one whom the umpire be- 
lieves to have had the lesser opportunity to field the ball. 

The runner is always out at any time that he may be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless the runner 
is on the base to which he is legally entitled. The ball, how- 
ever, must be held by the fielder after he has touched the 
runner. If the runner deliberately knocks the ball out of the 
fielder's hands, to avoid being put out when not on base, he 
shall be declared out. 

If a runner fails to get back to a base after a foul or fair 
hit fly ball is caught, other than a foul tip, before the ball is 
fielded to that base and legally held, or the runner be touched 
by a fielder with the ball in his hands before he can get back 
to the base last occupied, the runner is out, except that if the 
ball be thrown to the pitcher, and he delivers it to the batter, 
this penalty does not apply. If a base should be torn from its 
fastenings as the runner strikes it, he cannot be put out. 

If a runner is on first base, or runners are on first and 
second bases, or on first, second and third bases, and the ball 
shall be legally batted to fair ground, all base runners are 
forced to run, except in the case of an infield fly (previously 
referred to), or a long fly to the outfield. Runners may be 
put out at any succeeding base if the ball is fielded there and 
properly held, or the runners may be touched out between 
bases in the proper manner. After a foul fly is caught, or 
after a long fly to the outfield is caught, the base runners 
have the privilege of trying for the next base. 

A base runner hit by a legally batted ball in fair territory 
is out. In such case no base shall be run, unless necessitated 
by the batsman becoming a base runner. No run shall be 
scored nor shall any other base runner be put out except the 
one hit by the batted ball, until the umpire puts the ball in 
play. 

A runner who fails to touch each base in regular or reverse 
order, when a fair play is being made, is out if the ball be 
properly held by a fielder on the base that should have been 
touched, or the runner be touched out between bases by the 
ball legally held by a fielder, provided that the ball has not 
been delivered to the batsman in the meantime by the pitcher. 

If a runner fails to return to the base that he occupied 
when "Time" was called after the umpire has announced 
"Play" he is out. provided that the pitcher has not in the 
meantime delivered the ball to the batsman. 

The runner is out if he occupies third base with no one 
out or one out and the batsman interferes with a play that is 
being made at home plate. 

The runner is out if he passes a base runner who is caught 
between two bases. The moment that he passes the preceding 
base runner the umpire shall declare him out. 

When the batter runs to first base he may overrun that base 
if he turns to the right after passing it. If he turns to the 
left he renders himself liable to be touched out before he gets 
back to the base. 

If, before two hands are Out, and third base is occupied, 
the coacher at third base shall attempt to fool a fielder who is 
making or trying to make a play on a batted ball not caught 
on the fly, or on a thrown ball, and thereby draws a throw 
to home plate, the runner on third base must be declared out. 

If one or more members of the team at bat gather around 
a base for which a runner is trying, thereby confusing the 



296 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

fielding side, the runner trying for the base shall be declared 
out. 

If a runner touches home plate before another runner pre- 
ceding him in the batting order, the former loses his right to 
third base. 

(See Rules Nos. 52-57 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



Coaching Rules 



The coachers must confine themselves to legitimate direc- 
tions of the base runners only, and there must never be more 
than two coachers on the field, one near first base and the other 
near third base. 

(See Rule No. 58 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Scoring of Runs 

One run shall be scored every time that a player has made 
the legal circuit of the bases before three men are out, pro- 
vided that a runner who reaches home on or during a play 
in which the third man is forced out, or the third man is put 
out before reaching first base, the runner shall not be entitled 
to score. 

A player who makes a legal hit to fair territory is entitled 
to as many bases as he can advance without being put out. 
If a fielder is unable to get the ball home until the man has 
completed the circuit of the bases, the latter is entitled to a 
home run, provided the fielder has not made a misplay in 
handling the ball. The same rule applies to the making of a 
three-base hit, a two-base hit, or a hit for one base, which is 
also known as a single. 

(See Rule No. 59 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



Ground Rules 



Any special ground rules shall be understood by both team 
captains and the umpire, or umpires, in case there be two 
officials. The captain of the home club establishes the ground 
rules. 

(See Rule No. 69 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



Umpire's Duties 



The umpire has the right to call a draw game, whenever a 
storm interferes, if the score is equal on the last inning played. 
Calling a "draw game" must not be confounded with calling 
"time." 

If the side second at bat is at bat when a storm breaks, 
and the game is subsequently terminated without further play, 
and this side has scored the same number of runs as the other 
Bide, the umpire can call the game a draw without regard to 
the score of the last equal inning. In other words, the game 
is a draw just as it rests. 

Under like conditions if the side second at bat has scored 
more runs than the side first- at bat, it shall be declared the 
winner, all runs for both sides being counted. 

A game can be forfeited by the umpire if a team refuses to 
take the fi<*\d within five minutes after he has called "Play" ; 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 297 

if one side refuses to play after the game has begun ; if, after 
the umpire has suspended play, one side refuses to play after- 
he has again called "Play" ; if one side tries to delay the 
game; if the rules are violated after warning by the umpire; 
if there are not nine players on a team after one has been 
removed by the umpire. The umpire has the right to remove 
players for objecting to decisions or for behaving in an un- 
gentlemanly manner. 

Only by the consent of the captain of an opposing team may 
a base runner have a player of his own side run for him. 

Play may be suspended by the umpire because of rain, and 
if ram falls continuously for thirty minutes the umpire may 
terminate the game. The umpire may call "Time" for any 
valid reason. 



Umpire's Authority 



Under no circumstances shall a captain or plaver dispute 
the accuracy of an umpire's judgment and decision on a play. 
If the captain thinks the umpire has erred in interpretation 
of the rules he may appeal to the umpire, but no other player- 
is privileged to do so. 

(See Rules Nos. 61-62 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 

General Definitions 

"Play" is the order of the umpire to begin the game or to- 
resume it after "Time" has been called. 

"Time" is the order of the umpire to suspend play tem- 
porarily. 

_ "Game" is the announcement of the umpire that the contest 
is terminated. 

"Inning" is the time at bat of one team and is terminated 
when three of that team have been legally put out. 

"Time at Bat" is the duration of a batter's turn against 
the pitcher until Ire becomes a base runner in one of the ways 
prescribed in the previous rules. In scoring a batter is exempt 
from a time at bat if he is given a base on balls, if he makes 
a sacrifice hit, if he is hit by a pitched ball, or if he is inter- 
fered with by the catcher. 

(See Rules Nos. 78-82 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



Scoring Rules 



Each side may have its own scorer and in case of disagree- 
ment the umpire shall decide, or the captain of each team 
may agree upon one scorer for the match. 

(See Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide for the Scoring 
Rules, and see Spalding's Official Score Book for a 
Complete Guide on "How to Score Correctly and 
with Understanding.") 



£98 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDIDB. 

READY REFERENCE INDEX 

To the Official Playing Rules as Pub- 

lished in Spalding's Official 

Base Ball Guide 



The Ball Ground- 
How to Lay it Out 

See Official Rules, Nos. i to 13, inclusive, in Spalding's 
Official Base Ball Guide. 

The Players' Benches 

See Rule 21 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Field Rules 

See Rules 75-77 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

The Official Ball 

See Rule 14 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

The Regulation Bat 

See Rule 15 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Regulation Gloves and Mitts 

See Rule 20 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Players' Uniform 

See Rules 18-19 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Number and Positions of Players 

See Rules 16-17 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 



SPALDING'S OPFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 299 

Substitute Players 

See Rule 28 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Choice of Innings 

and Fitness of Field for Play 

See Rule 29 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

General Definitions 

See Rules 78-83 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guidc> 

i 

A Regulation Game 

See Rules 22-27 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Pitching Rules 

See Rules 3037 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Batting Rules 

See Rules 38-51 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Base Running Rules 

See Rules 52-59 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Umpire's Duties 

See Rules 60-74 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Scoring Rules 

See Rules 84-86 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. SOI 

Official Playing Rules Professional 
Base Ball Clubs 

As adopted at the meeting: of the Joint Playing Rules Committee of the 

National League and the American League, held at National 

League Headquarters, New York City, March 2, 1904. 

Amended February 14, 1906, February 25, 1907, 

and February 27, 1908. 

1908 Amendments : Rule U. sec. U; Rule 85. sec. 5. 

These Rules have also been adopted by 
The National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues. 

The Ball Ground. 

The ball ground must be enclosed. To ob- 

RULE 1. viate the necessity for ground rules, the 

shortest distance from a fence or stand on 

fair territory to the home base should be 235 feet and from 

home base to the grand stand 90 feet. 



To Lay Off the Field. 

To lay off the lines denning the location 
RULE 2. of the several bases, the catcher's and the 
pitcher's position and to establish the boun- 
daries required in playing the game of base ball, proceed as 
follows : 

Diamond or Infield. 

From a point, A, within the grounds, project a straight 
line out into the field, and at a point, B, 154 feet from point 
A, lay off lines B C and B D at right angles to the line 
A B ; then, with B as a center and 63.63945 feet as a radius, 
describe arcs cutting the lines B A at F and B C at G, B D 
at H and B E at I. Draw lines F G, G E, E H, and H F, 
which said lines shall be the containing lines of the Dia- 
mond or Infield. 

The Catcher's Lines. 

With F as a center and 10 feet radius, de- 

RULE 3. scribe an arc cutting line F A at L, and! 

draw lines L M and L O at right angles - 

to F A, and continue same out from F A not less than* 

10 feet 



302 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL QUIDS. 

The Foul Lines. 

From the intersection point, F, continue 
RULE 4. the straight lines F G and F H until they 
intersect the lines L M and L O, and then 
from the points G and H in the opposite direction until 
they reach the boundary lines of the ground, and said lines 
shall be clearly visible from any part of the diamond, and 
no wood or other hard substance shall be used in the con- 
struction of such lines. 

The Players' Lines. 

With F as center and 50 feet radius, 
RULE 5. describe arcs cutting lines F O and F M 
at P and Q; then, with F as center again 
and 75 feet radius, describe arcs cutting F G and F H at 
R and S ; then, from the points P, Q, R and S draw lines 
at right angles to the lines F O, F M, F G and F H, and 
continue the same until they intersect at the points T 
and W. 

The Coachers' Lines. 

With R and S as centers and 15 feet 

RULE 6, radius, describe arcs cutting the lines R W 

and S T at X and Y and from the points 

X and Y draw lines parallel with the lines F H and F G, 

and continue same out to the boundary lines of the ground. 

The Three-Foot Line. 

With F as a center and 45 feet radius, 
RULE 7. describe an arc cutting the line F G at 1, and 
from 1 to the distance of three feet draw a 
line at right angles to F G, and marked point 2 ; then from 
point 2, draw a line parallel with the line F G to a point 
three feet beyond the point G, marked 3 ; then from the 
point 3 draw a line at right angles to line 2, 3, back to 
and intersecting with F G, and from thence back along the 
line G F to point 1. 

The Batsman's Lines. 

On either side of the line A F B de- 
RULE 8. scribe two parallelograms six feet long and 
four feet wide (marked 8 and 9), their 
longest side being parallel with the line A F B, their 
distance apart being six inches added to each end of the 
length of the diagonal of the square within the angle F, 
and the center of their length being on said diagonal. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 80S 

The Pitcher's Plate. 

Section i. With point F as center and 
RULE 9. 60.5 feet as radius, describe an arc cutting 
the line F B at line 4, and draw a line 5, 6, 
passing through point 4 and extending 12 inches on either 
side of line F B ; then with line 5, 6, as a side, describe a 
parallelogram 24 inches by 6 inches, in which shall be lo- 
cated the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 2. The pitcher's plate shall not be more than 15 
inches higher than the base lines or the home plate, which 
shall be level with the surface of the field, and the slope 
from the pitcher's plate to every base line and the home 
plate shall be gradual. 



The Bases. 

Section i. Within the angle F, describe 
RULE 10. a five-sided figure, two of the sides of which 
shall coincide with the lines F G and F H 
to the extent of 12 inches each, thence parallel with the 
line F B 8^2 inches to the points X and Y, a straight line 
between which, 17 inches, will form the front of the home 
base or plate. 

Sec. 2. Within the angles at G, I and H describe 
squares, whose sides are 15 inches in length, two of such 
sides of which squares shall lie along the lines F G and 
G I, G I and I H, I H and H F, which squares shall be 
the location of the first, second and third bases respectively. 



The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's 
RULE 11. Plate at 4 must each be of whitened rubber, 
and so fixed in the ground as to be even 
with its surface. 

The First Base at G, the Second Base 
RULE 12. at E, and the Third Base at H must each 
be a white canvas bag filled with soft ma- 
terial and securely fastened in place at the points specified 
in Rule 10. 

The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 
RULE 13. and 8 must be marked with lime, chalk or 
other white material, easily distinguishable 
from the ground or grass. 



304 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASK BALL GUIDE. 

The Ball. 

Section i. The ball must weigh not less 
RULE 14. than five nor more than five and one-quar- 
ter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not 
less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches 
in circumference. The Spalding National League Ball or 
the Reach American League Ball must be used in all 
games played under these rules. 

Sec. 2. Two regulation balls of the make adopted by 
the league of which the contesting clubs are members, 
shall be delivered by the home club to the umpire at or 
before the hour for the commencement of a championship 
game. If the ball placed in play be batted or thrown out 
of the grounds or into one of the stands for spectators 
or in the judgment of the umpire, become unfit for play 
from any cause, the umpire shall at once deliver the alter- 
nate ball to the pitcher and another legal ball shall be sup- 
plied to him, so that he shall at all times have in his con- 
trol one or more alternate balls. Provided, however, that 
all balls batted or thrown out of the ground or into a stand 
shall when returned, to the field be given into the custody 
of the umpire immediately and become alternate balls and 
so long as he has in his possession two or more alternate 
balls, he shall not call for a new ball to replace one that has 
gone out of play. The alternate balls shall become the ball 
in play in the order in which they were delivered to the 
umpire. 

Sec. 3. Immediately upon the delivery to him of the 
alternate ball by the umpire, the pitcher shall take his posi- 
tion and on the call of "Play," by the umpire, it shall be- 
come the ball in play. Provided, however, that play shall 
not be resumed with the alternate ball when a fair batted 
ball or a ball thrown by a fielder goes out of the ground 
or into a stand for spectators until the base-runners have 
completed the circuit of the bases unless compelled to stop 
at second or third base in compliance with a ground 
rule. 



The Spalding: League Ball has been adopted by the National League 
for the past thirty-one years and is used in all the League contests. It 
has also been adopted by the majority of other professional leagues and 
by practically all the colleges. 

For junior clubs (clubs composed of boys under 16 years of age) we 
secommend them to use the Spalding Boys' League Ball, and that games 
played by junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games the same 
•1 if played with the Official League Ball. 



SPALDING'S 0F1TICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 305 

Discolored or Damaged Balls. 

Sec. 4. In the event of a ball being intentionally dis- 
colored by rubbing it with the soil or otherwise by any 
player, or otherwise damaged by any player, the umpire 
shall, upon appeal by the captain of the opposite side, 
forthwith demand the return of that ball and substitute for 
it another legal ball, as hereinbefore described, and impose 
a fine of $5.00 on the offending player. 

Home Club to Provide Balls. 

Sec. 5. In every game the balls played with shall be 
furnished by the home club, and the last in play shall 
become the property of the winning club. Each ball shall 
be enclosed in a paper box, which must be sealed with 
the seal of the Secretary of the League and bear his certifi- 
cate that he has examined measured and weighed the ball 
contained therein and that it is of the required standard in 
all respects. The seal shall not be broken by the umpire 
except in the presence of the captains of the contesting 
teams after "Play" has been called. 

Reserve Balls on Field. 

Sec. 6. The home club shall have at least a dozen reg- 
ulation balls on the field during each championship game, 
ready for use on the call of the umpire. 

The Bat. 

The bat must be round, not over two and 
RULE 15. three- fourth inches in diameter at the thick- 
est part, nor more than 42 inches in length 
and entirely of hardwood, except that for a distance of 
18 inches from the end, twine may be wound around or 
a granulated substance applied to the handle. 

I Number of Players in a Game. 

The players of each club, actively en- 
RULE 16. gaged in a game at one time, shall be nine 
in number, one of whom shall act as cap- 
tain; and in no case shall more or less than nine men be 
allowed to play on a side in a game. 

Positions of the Players. 

The players may be stationed at any points 
RULE 17. of the field their captain may elect, regard- 
less of their respective positions, except 
that the pitcher, while in the act of delivering the ball to 



306 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

the bat, must take his position as defined in Rules 9 and 
30 ; and the catcher must be within the lines of his position 
as denned in Rule 3 and within 10 feet of home base, when- 
ever the pitcher delivers the ball to the bat. 

Must Not Mingle With Spectators. 

Players in uniform shall not be permit- 
RULE 18. ted to occupy seats in the stands, or to 
mingle with the spectators. 

Uniforms of Players. 

Every club shall adopt two uniforms for , 
^.ULE 19. its players, one to be worn in games at 
home and the other in games abroad, and 
the suits of each of the uniforms of a team shall conform 
in color and style. No player who shall attach anything 
to the sole or heel of his shoe other than the ordinary base 
ball shoe plate, or who shall appear in a uniform not con- 
forming to the suits of the other members of his team, 
shall be permitted to take part in a game. 

Size and Weight of Gloves. 

The catcher or first baseman may wear a 
RULE 20. glove or mitt of any size, shape or weight. 
Every other player is restricted to the use 
of a glove or mitt weighing not over 10 ounces and meas- 
uring not over 14 inches around the palm. 

Players' Benches. 
Section i. Players' benches must be fur- 
RULE 21. nished by the home club and placed upon 
a portion of the ground not less than twen- 
ty-five (25) feet outside of the players' lines. One such 
bench shall be for the exclusive use of the visiting team 
and the other for the exclusive use of the home team. 
Each bench must be covered with a roof and closed at the 
back and each end ; a space, however, not more than six 
(6) inches wide may be left under the roof for ventilation. 
All players and substitutes of the side at bat must be 
seated on their team's bench, except the batsman, base- 
runners and such as are legally assigned to coach base- 
runners. Under no circumstances shall the umpire permit 
any person except the players and substitutes in uniform 
and the manager of the team entitled to its exclusive use 
to be seated on a bench. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDIDB. 30^ 

Penalty for Violation. 

Sec. 2. Whenever the umpire observes a violation 
of the preceding section, he shall immediately order 
such player or players as have disregarded it to be 
seated. If the order be not obeyed within one minute the 
offending player or players shall be fined $5.00 each by the 
umpire. If the order be not then obeyed within one minute^ 
the offending player or players shall be debarred from 
further participation in the game, and shall be obliged to< 
forthwith leave the playing field. 

A Regulation Game. 

Every championship game must be com- 

RULE 22. menced not later than two hours before- 

sunset and shall continue until each team. 

has had nine innings, provided, however, that the game 

shall terminate : 

Section i. If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine 
innings than the other side has scored in eight innings. 

Sec. 2. If the side last at bat in the ninth inning scores 
the winning run before the third man is out. 

Sec. 3. If the game be called by the umpire on account 
of darkness, rain, fire, panic, or for other cause which puts-' 
patrons or players in peril. 

Extra-Inning Games. 

If the score be a tie at the end of nine 
RULE 23. (9) innings for each team, play shall be 
continued until one side has scored more 
runs than the other in an equal number of innings, pro- 
vided, that if the side last at bat score the winning run 
before the third man is out in any inning after the ninth, 
the game shall terminate. 

Drawn Games. 

A drawn game shall be declared by the 
RULE 24. umpire if the score is equal on the last 
even inning played when he terminates 
play in accordance with Rule 22, Section 3, after five or 
more equal innings have been played by each team. But 
if the side that went second to bat is at the bat when the 
game is terminated, and has scored the same number of 
runs as the other side, the umpire, shall declare the game 
drawn without regard to the score of the last equal inning. 



308 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Called Games. 

If the umpire calls a game in accordance 
RULE 25. with Rule 22, Section 3, at any time after five 
innings have been completed, the score 
shall be that of the last equal innings played, except that 
if the side second at bat shall have scored in an unequal 
number of innings, or before the completion of the un- 
finished inning, at least one run more than the side first at 
ibat, the score of the g?me shall be the total number of runs 
each team has made. 



Forfeited Games. 

A forfeited game shall be declared by the 
RULE 26. umpire in favor of the club not in fault, in 
the following cases : 

Section i. If the team of a club fail to appear upon the 
ifield, or being uoon the field, refuse to begin a game for 
which it is scheduled or assigned, within five minutes after 
the umpire has called "Play" at the hour for the beginning 
o* the game, unless such delay in appearing, or in com- 
mencing the game, be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuse to 
continue to play, unless the game has been suspended or 
terminated lay the umpire. 

Sec. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the umpire, 
one side fails to resume playing in one minute after the 
umpire has called "Play." 

Sec. 4. If a team employ tactics palpably designed to 
>delay the game. 

Sec. 5. If, after warning by the umpire, any one of the 
rules of the game be wilfully and persistently violated. 

Sec. 6. If the order for the removal of a player, as 
authorized by Rules 21, 58 and 64, be not obeyed within 
one minute. 

Sec. 7. If, because of the removal of players from the 
game by the umpire, or for any cause, there be less than 
mine players on either team. 

Sec. 8. If, when two games are scheduled to be played 
in one afternoon, the second game be not commenced 
within ten minutes of the time of the completion of the 
•first game. The umpire of the first game shall be the 
timekeeper. 

Sec. 9. In case the umpire declare the game forfeited, 
3ie shall transmit a written report thereof to the president 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE; BALL GUIDE. 30S> 

of the League within twenty-four hours thereafter. How- 
ever, a failure on the part of the umpire to so notify the 
president shall not affect the validity of his award of the 
game by forfeiture. 

No Game. 

"No game" shall be declared by the um- 
RULE 27. pire if he terminates play in accordance with 
Rule 22, Sec. 3, before five innings are com- 
pleted by each team. Provided, however^ that if the club 
second at bat shall have made more runs at the end of 
its fourth inning than the club first at bat has made in five 
completed innings of a game so terminated, the umpire 
shall award the game to the club having made the greater 
number of runs, and it shall count as a legal game in the 
championship record. 

Substitutes. 

Section i. Each side shall be required 
RULE 28. to have present on the field during a cham- 
pionship game a sufficient number of sub- 
stitute players in uniform, conforming to the suits worm 
by their team-mates, to carry out the provisions of this- 
Eode which requires that not less than nine players shall 
occupy the field in any inning of the game. 

Sec. 2. Any such substitute may at any stage of the 
game take the place of a player whose name is in his 
team's batting order, but the player whom he succeeds 
shall not thereafter participate in that game. 

Sec. 3. A base-runner shall not have another player 
whose name appears in the batting order of his team run. 
for him except by the consent of the captain of the other 
team. 

Choice of Innings — Fitness of Field for Play. 

The choice of innings shall be given to 
RULE 29. the captain of the home club, who shall be 
the sole judge of the fitness of the ground 
for beginning a game after a rain ; but, after play has been 
called by the umpire, he alone sha.ll be the judge as to the 
fitness of the ground for resuming play after the game has 
been suspended on account of rain, and when time is so 
called the ground-keeper and sufficient assistants shall be 
under the control of the umpire for the purpose of putting: 
the ground in proper shape for play, under penalty off 
forfeiture of the game by the home team. 



310 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

THE PITCHING RULES. 

Delivery of the Ball to the Bat. 

Preliminary to pitching, the pitcher shall 
(RULE 30. take his position facing the batsman with 
both feet squarely on the ground and in 
front of the pitcher's plate ; and in the act of delivering the 
ball to the bat he must keep one foot in contact with the 
pitcher's plate defined in Rule 9. He shall not raise either 
foot until in the act of delivering the ball to the bat, nor 
•make more than one step in such delivery. 

A Fairly Delivered Ball. 

A fairly delivered ball is a ball pitched 
RULE 31. or thrown to the bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that passes over any portion of the home base, before 
touching the ground, not lower than the batsman's knee, 
nor higher than his shoulder. For every such fairly deliv- 
ered ball the umpire shall call one strike. 

An Unfairly Delivered Ball. 

An unfairly delivered ball is a ball de- 
RULE 32. livered to the bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that does not pass over any portion of the home base 
'between the batsman's shoulder and knees, or that touches 
the ground before passing home base, unless struck at by the 
batsman. For every unfairly delivered ball the umpire 
shall call one ball. 

Delaying the Game. 

Section 1. If, after the batsman be stand- 
RULE 33. ing in his proper position ready to strike at 
a pitched ball, the ball be thrown by the 
pitcher to any player other than the catcher when in 
the catcher's lines and within 10 feet of the home base (ex- 
cept in an attempt to retire a base runner), each ball so 
thrown shall be called a ball. 

Sec. 2. The umpire shall call a ball on the pitcher each 
time he delays the game by failing to deliver the ball to 
the batsman for a longer period than 20 seconds, excepting 
that at the commencement of each inning, or when a pitch- 
er relieves another, the pitcher may occupy one minute in 
•delivering not to exceed five balls to the catcher or an 
unfielder, during which time play shall be suspended. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 311 

Balking. 

A balk shall be: 
RULE 34. Section i. Any motion made by the 

pitcher while in position to deliver the ball 
to the bat without delivering it, or to throw to first base 
when occupied by a base runner without completing the 
throw. 

Sec. 2. Throwing the ball by the pitcher to any base to 
catch the base runner without stepping directly toward 
such base in the act of making such throw. 

Sec. 3. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while either foot is back of the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 4. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while he is not facing the batsman. 

Sec. 5. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by 
the pitcher while not in the position defined by Rule 30. 

Sec. 6. Holding of the ball by the pitcher so long as, in 
the opinion of the umpire, to unnecessarily delay the game. 

Sec. 7. Making any motion to pitch while standing in his 
position without having the ball in his possession. 

Sec. 8. Making any motion of the arm, shoulder, hip or 
body the pitcher habitually makes in his method of delivery, 
without immediately delivering the ball to the bat. 

Sec 9. Delivery of the ball to the bat when the catcher 
is standing outside the lines of the catcher's position as 
defined in Rule 3. 

, If the pitcher shall fail to comply with the requirements 
of any section of this rule, the umpire shall call a "balk." 

Dead Ball. 

A dead ball is a ball delivered to the bat 
RULE 35. by the pitcher, not struck at by the bats- 
man, that touches any part of the bats- 
man's person or clothing while he is standing in his position, 
or that before passing or getting beyond the control of the 
catcher touches any part of the clothing or person of the 
umpire while he is on foul ground. 

Ball Not in Play. 

In case of a foul strike, foul hit ball not 
RULE 36. legally caught, dead ball, or a fair hit ball 
touching a base runner, the ball shall not 
be considered in play until it be held by the pitcher stand- 
ing in his position, and the umpire shall have called 
"Play." 



312 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Block Balls. 

Section i. A block is a batted or thrown 
RULE 37. ball that is touched, stopped or handled by 
a person not engaged in the game. 

Sec. 2. Whenever a block occurs the umpire shall de- 
clare it, and base runners may run the bases without liabil- 
ity to be put out until the ball has been returned to and 
held by the pitcher in his position. 

Sec. 3. If the person not engaged in the game should 
retain possession of a blocked ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the fielders, the umpire shall call 
"Time" and require each base runner to stop at the base 
last touched by him until the ball be returned to the pitcher 
in his position and the umpire shall have called "Play." 

THE BATTING RULES. 
The Batsman's Position. 

Each player of the side at bat shall be- 
RULE 38. come the batsman and must take his posi- 
tion within the batsman's lines (as defined 
in Rule 8) in the order that his name appears in his team's 
batting list. 

The Order of Batting. 

The batting order of each team must be 
RULE 39. delivered before the game by its captain to 
the umpire who shall submit it to the in- 
spection of the captain of the other side. The batting order 
delivered to the umpire must be followed throughout the 
game unless a player be substituted for another, in which 
case the substitute must take the place in the batting order 
of the retired player. 

The First Batsman in an Inning. 

After the first inning the first striker in 
RULE 40, each inning shall be the batsman whose 
name follows that of the last man who 
completed his "time at bat" in the preceding inning. 

Players Belong on Bench. 

When a side goes to the bat its players 
RULE 41. must immediately seat themselves on the 
bench assigned to them as defined in Rule 
21, and remain there until their side is put out, except 
when called to the bat or to act as coachers or substitute 
base runners. 



, SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 313 

Reserved fdl» .Umpire, Catcher and Batsman. 

No player bi xn£ £itfe "at bat," except the 
RULE 42. batsman, shall occupy any portion of the 
space within the catcher's lines as defined 
in Rule 3. The triangular space back of the home base is 
reserved for the exclusive use of the umpire, Catcher and 
batsman, and the umpire must prohibit any player of the 
side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the 
ball is in the hands of the pitcher or catcher, or passing 
between them while standing in their positions. 

Fielder Has Right of Way. 

The players of the side at bat must 
RULE 43. speedily abandon their bench and hasten 
to another part of the field when by remain- 
ing upon or near it they or any of them would interfere 
with a fielder in an attempt to catch or handle a thrown 
or a batted ball. 

THE BATTING RULES. 
A Fair Hit. 

A fair hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 44. settles on fair ground between home and 
first base or between home and third base 
or that is on fair ground when bounding to the outfield 
past first or third base or that first falls on fair territory 
beyond first or third base or that touches the person of 
the umpire or a player, while on fair ground. 

A Foul Hit. 

A foul hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 45. settles on foul territory between home and 
first base or home and third base, or that 
bounds past first or third base on foul territory or that 
falls on foul territory beyond first or third base or touches 
the person of the umpire or a player while on foul ground. 

A Foul Tip. 

A foul tip is a ball batted by the bats- 
RULE 46. man while standing within the lines of his 
position, that goes sharp and direct from 
the bat to the catcher's hands and is legally caught. 



314 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

A Bunt Hit. 

A bunt hit is a legally batted ball, not 

RULE 47. swung at, but met with the bat and tappc 1 

slowly within the infield by the batsman. 

If the attempt to bunt result in a foul not legally caught, sa 

strike shall be called by the umpire. 



Balls Batted Outside the Ground. 

Section i. When a batted ball passes 
RULE 48. outside the ground or into a stand the um- 
pire shall decide it fair or foul according to 
where it disappears from the umpire's view. 

Sec. 2. A fair batted ball that goes over the fence or 
into a stand shall entitle the batsman to a home run unless 
it should pass out of the ground or into a stand at a less 
distance than two hundred and thirty-five (235) feet from 
the home base, in which case the batsman shall be entitled 
to two bases only. The point at which a fence or stand 
is less than 235 feet from the home base shall be plainly 
indicated by a white or black sign or mark for the um- 
pire's guidance. 

Strikes. 

A strike is : 
RULE 49. Section i. A pitched ball struck at by 

the batsman without its touching his bat ; or, 

Sec. 2. A fair ball legally delivered by the pitcher at 
which the batsman does not strike. ( 

Sec. 3. A foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the 
batsman has two strikes. 

Sec. 4. An attempt to bunt which results in a foul not 
legally caught. 

Sec. 5. A pitched ball, at which the batsman strikes but 
misses and which touches any part of his person. 

Sec. 6. A foul tip, held by the catcher, while standing 
within the lines of his position. 



Foul Strike. 

A "Foul Strike" is a ball batted by the 
RULE 50. batsman when either or both of his feet is 
upon the ground outside the lines of the 
batsman's position. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 316 

When Batsman is Out. 

The batsman is out : 
RULE 51. Section i. If he fail to take his position 

at the bat in the order in which his name 
appears on the batting list unless the error be discovered 
and the proper batsman replace him before a time ' 'at bat" is 
recorded, in which case, the balls and strikes called must 
be counted in the time u at bat" of the proper batsman. 
But only the proper batsman shall be declared out, and 
no runs shall be scored or bases run because of any act 
■of the improper batsman. Provided, this rule shall not be 
enforced unless the out be declared before the ball be de- 
livered to the succeeding batsman. Should the batsman 
•declared out under this section be the third hand out and 
his side be thereby put out, the proper batsman in the next 
inning shall be the player who would have come to bat 
had the players been put out by ordinary play in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

Sec. 2. If he fail to take his position within one minute 
after the umpire has called for the batsman. 

Sec. 3. If he make a foul hit other than a foul tip, as de- 
fined in Rule 46, and the ball be momentarily held by a 
fielder before touching the ground ; provided, it be not 
caught in a fielder's cap, protector, pocket or other part 
of his uniform, or strike some object other than a fielder be- 
fore being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he make a foul strike, as defined in Rule 50. 

Sec. 5. If he attempt to hinder the catcher from fielding 
or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of the 
"batsman's position, or in any way obstructing or interfer- 
ing with that player. 

Sec. 6. If, while first base be occupied by a base runner, 
three strikes be called on him by the umpire, unless two 
men are already out. 

Sec. 7. If, while attempting a third strike, the ball touch 
any part of the batsman's person, in which case base run- 
ners occupying bases shall not advance as prescribed in 
Rule 55, Section 5. 

Sec. 8. If, before two hands are out, while first and 
second or first, second and third bases are occupied, he 
hit a fly ball, other than a line drive, that can be handled 
by an infielder. In such case the umpire shall, as soon as 
the ball be hit, declare it an infield or outfield hit. 

Sec. 9. If the third strike be called in accordance with 
Sections 4 or 5 of Rule 49. 



316 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE., 

Sec. io. If he steps from one batsman's box to the other 
after the pitcher has taken his position. 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 
Legal Order of Bases. 

The Base Runner must touch each base 
RULE 52. m legal order, viz., First, Second, Third 
and Home Bases ; and when obliged to re- 
turn while the ball is in play, must retouch the base or 
bases in reverse order. He can only acquire the right to a 
base by touching it, before having been put out, and shall 
then be entitled to hold such base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order, or has been legally forced 
to vacate it for a succeeding base runner. However, no 
base runner shall score a run to count in the game ahead! 
of the base runner preceding him in the batting order, if 
there be such preceding base runner who has not been put 
out in that inning. 

When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 

The batsman becomes a base runner: 
RULE 53. Section i. Instantly after he makes a 

fair hit. 

Sec. 2. Instantly after "Four Balls" have been called by 
the umpire. 

Sec. 3. Instantly after "Three Strikes" have been de- 
clared by the umpire. 

Sec. 4. If, without making any attempt to strike at the 
ball, his person or clothing be hit by a pitched ball unless, 
in the opinion of the umpire, he plainly make no effort 
to get out of the way of the pitched ball. 

Sec. 5. If the catcher interfere with him in or prevent 
him from striking at a pitched ball. 

Sec. 6. If a fair hit ball strike the person or clothing of 
the umpire or a base runner on fair ground. 

Entitled to Bases. 

The base runner shall be entitled, with- 
RULE 54. out liability to be put out, to advance a base 
in the following cases : 
Section i. If, while the batsman, he becomes a base 
runner by reason of "four balls" or for being hit by a 
pitched ball, or for being interfered with by the catcher in 
striking at a pitched ball. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 317 

Sec. 2. If the umpire awards to a succeeding batsman a 
base on four balls, or for being hit by a pitched ball, or 
being interfered with by the catcher in striking at a pitched 
ball and the base runner be thereby forced to vacate the 
base held by him. 

Sec. 3. If the umpire call a "Balk." 

Sec. 4. If a ball delivered by the pitcher pass the catcher 
and touch the umpire or any fence or building within 
ninety (90) feet of the home base. 

Sec. 5. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction of a fielder, unless the latter have the ball in 
his hand ready to touch the base runner. 

Sec. 6. If the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with 
his cap, glove or any part of his uniform, while detached 
from its proper place on his person. 



Returning to Bases. 

The base runner shall return to his base 
RULE 55. without liability to be put out: 

Section i. If the umpire declares any foul 
not legally caught. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declares a foul strike. 

Sec. 3. If the umpire declares a dead ball, unless it be 
also the fourth unfair ball, and he be thereby forced to take 
the next base, as provided in Rule 54, Section 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire inter- 
fere with the catcher in an attempt to throw or the umpire 
be struck by a baU thrown by the catcher or other fielder 
to intercept a base runner. 

Sec. 5. If a pitched ball at which the batsman strikes 
but misses, touch any part of the batsman's person. 

Sec. 6. In any and all of these cases the base runner is 
not required to touch the intervening bases in returning I? 
the base he is legally entitled to. 

When Base Runners are Out. 

The base runner is out : 
RULE 56. Section i. If, after three strikes hav4 

been declared against him while the batsman, 
the third strike ball be not legally caught and he plainly 
attempts to hinder the catcher from fielding the ball. 

Sec. 2. If, having made a fair hit while batsman, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a fielder before touch- 
ing the ground or any object other than a fielder; pro- 



318 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

vided, it be not caught in a fielder's hat, cap, protector, 
pocket or other part of his uniform. 

Sec. 3. If, when the umpire has declared "Three 
Strikes" on him while the batsman, the third strike ball 
be momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground; provided, it be not caught in a fielder's cap, 
protector, pocket or other part of his uniform, or touch 
some object other than a fielder before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a fielder before he shall have 
touched first base. 

Sec. 5. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with 
any part of his person before such base runner touch first 
base. 

Sec. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from 
home base to first base, while the ball is being fielded to 
first base, he run outside the three foot lines, as defined 
in Rule 7, unless he do so to avoid a fielder attempting to 
field a batted ball. 

Sec. 7. If, in running from first to second base, from 
second to third base, or from third to home base, he run 
more than three feet from a direct line between a base 
and the next one in regular or reverse order to avoid be- 
ing touched by a ball in the hands of a fielder. But in case 
a fielder be occupying a base runner's proper path in 
attempting to field a batted ball, then the base runner shall 
run out of direct line to the next base and behind said 
fielder and shall not be declared out for so doing. 

Sec. 8. If he fail to avoid a fielder attempting to field 
a batted bail, in the manner described in Sections 6 and 7 
of this rule, or in any way obstruct a fielder in attempting 
to field a batted ball, or intentionally interfere with a 
thrown ball ; provided, that if two or more fielders attempt 
to field a batted ball, and the base runner come in contact 
with one or more of them, the umpire shall determine 
which fielder is entitled to the benefit of this rule, and 
shall not decide the base runner out for coming in contact 
with a fielder other than the one the umpire determines 
to be entitled to field such batted ball. 

Sec. 9. If at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless some 
part of his person be touching the base he is entitled tc 
occupy; provided, however, that the ball be held by the 
fielder after touching him, unless the base runner delib- 
erately knock it out of his hand. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 31S? 

Sec. io. If, when a fair or foul hit ball (other than a 
foul tip as defined in Rule 46) be legally caught by a 
fielder, such ball be legally held by a fielder on the base 
occupied by the base runner when such ball was batted, 
or the base runner be touched with the ball in the hands- 
of a fielder, before he retouch such base after such fair or 
foul hit ball was so caught; provided, that the base runner 
shall not be out in such case, if, after the ball was legally 
caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the pitcher 
before the fielder hold it on said base, or touch the base 
runner out with it ; but if the base runner, in attempting 
to reach a base, detach it from its fastening before being 
touched or forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

Sec. 11. If, when the batsman becomes a base runner, 
the first base, or the first and second bases, or the first, 
second and third bases be occupied, any base runner so 
occupying a base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, and 
may be put out at the next base in the same manner as in 
running to first base, or by being touched with the ball in 
the hands of a fielder at any time before any base runner 
following him in the batting order be put out, unless the 
umpire should decide the hit of the batsman to be an in- 
field fly. 

Sec. 12. If a fair hit ball strike him before touching 
a fielder, and, in such case, no base shall be run unless 
necessitated by the batsman becoming a base runner, but 
no run shall be scored or any other base runner put out 
until the umpire puts the ball back into play. 

Sec. 13. If, when advancing bases, or forced to return 
to a base, while the ball is in play, he fail to touch the 
intervening base or bases, if any, in the regular or reverse 
order, as the case may be, he may be put out by the ball 
being held by a fielder on any base he failed to touch, or 
by being touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder 
in the same manner as in running to first base ; provided, 
that the base runner shall not be out in such case if the 
ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher before the 
fielder hold it on said base or touch the base runner with it. 

Sec. 14. If, when the umpire call "Play," after the sus- 
pension of a game, he fail to return to and touch the base 
he occupied when "Time" was called before touching the 
next base ; provided, the base runner shall not be out, in 
such case, if the ball be delivered to the bat by the 
pitcher, before the fielder hold it on said base or touch the 
base runner with it. 



320 SPALDING'S 'OFFICIAL, BASH BALL GUIDE. 

Sec. 15. If with one or no one out and a base runner on 
third base, the batsman interferes with a play being made 
at home plate. 

Sec. 16. If he pass a base runner who is caught between 
two bases, he shall be declared out immediately upon pass- 
ing the preceding base runner. 

Overrunning First Base. 

Sec. 17. The base runner in running to first base may 
overrun said base after touching it in passing without in- 
curring liability to be out for being off said base, pro- 
vided he return at once and retouch the base, after which 
he may be put out as at any other base. If, after over- 
running first base, he turn in the direction of or attempt 
to run to second base, before returning to first base, he 
shall forfeit such exemption from liability to be put out. 

Sec. 18. If, before two hands are out and while third 
base is occupied, the coacher stationed near that base shall 
run in the direction of home base on or near the base line 
while a fielder is making or trying to make a play on a 
batted ball not caught on the fly, or on a thrown ball, and 
thereby draws a throw to home base, the base runner en- 
titled to third base shall be declared out by the umpire 
for the coacher's interference with and prevention of the 
legitimate play. 

Sec. 19. If one or more members of the team at bat 
stand or collect at or around a base for which a base 
runner is trying, thereby confusing the fielding side and 
adding to the difficulty of making such play, the base run- 
ner shall be declared out for the interference of his team 
mate or team mates. 

Sec. 20. If he touch home base before a base runner pre- 
ceding him in the batting order, if there be such preceding 
base runner, lose his right to third base. 

When Umpire Shall Declare an Out. 

The umpire shall declare the batsman or 
RULE 57. base runner out, without waiting for an ap- 
peal for such decision, in all cases where 
such player be put out in accordance with any of these 
rules, except Sections 13 and 17 of Rule 56. 

Coaching Rules. 

The coacher shall be restricted to coach- 

HULE 58. ing the base runner only, and shall not 

address remarks except to the base runner, 

and then only in words of assistance and direction in run- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 321 

ning bases. He shall not, by words or signs, incite or try 
to incite the spectators to demonstrations, and shall not 
use language which will in any manner refer to or reflect 
upon a player of the opposite club, the umpire or the spec- 
tators. Not more than two coachers, who must be players 
in the uniform of the team at bat, shall be allowed to oc- 
cupy the space between the players' and the coachers' lines, 
one near first and the other near third base, to coach base 
runners. If there be more than the legal number of coach- 
ers or this rule be violated in any respect the captain of 
the opposite side may call the attention of the umpire to 
the offense, and thereupon the umpire must order the il- 
legal coacher or coachers to the bench, and if his order 
be not obeyed within one minute, the umpire shall assess a, 
fine of $5.00 against each offending player, and upon a 
repetition of the offense, the offending player or players 
shall be debarred from further participation in the game,, 
and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 

The Scoring of Runs. 

One run shall be scored every time a 
RULE 59. base runner, after having legally touched 
the first three bases, shall legally touch the 
home base before three men are put out ; provided, how- 
ever, that if he reach home on or during a play in which* 
the third man be forced out or be put out before reaching 
first base, a run shall not count. A force-out can be made 
only when a base runner legally loses the right to the base 
he occupies and is thereby obliged to advance as the result 
of a fair hit ball not caught on the fly. 

UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 
Power to Enforce Decisions. 

The umpire is the representative of the 
RULE 60. League and as such is authorized and re- 
quired to enforce each section of this code. 
He shall have the power to order a player, captain or man- 
ager to do or omit to do any act which in his judgment is 
necessary to give force and effect to one or all of these 
rules, and to inflict penalties for violations of the rules as 
hereinafter prescribed. 

There shall be no appeal from any de- 

RULE 61. cision of the umpire on the ground that he 

was not correct in his conclusion as to* 

whether a batted ball was fair or foul, a base runner safe 



322 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

or out, a pitched ball a strike or ball, or on any other 
play involving accuracy of judgment, and no decision ren- 
dered by him shall be reversed, except that he be con- 
evinced that it is in violation of one of these rules. The 
captain shall alone have the right to protest against a 
decision and seek its reversal on a claim that it is in con- 
flict with a section of these rules. 

Must Not Question Decisions. 

Under no circumstances shall a captain 
£RULE 62. or player dispute the accuracy of the um- 
pire's judgment and decision on a play. 

Clubs Can Not Change Umpire. 

The umpire can not be changed during a 
'RULE 63. championship game by the consent of the 
contesting clubs unless the official in charge 
of the field be incapacitated from service by injury or ill- 
mess. 

Penalties for Violations of the Rules. 

In all cases of violation of these rules, by 
'RULE 64. either a player or manager, the penalty for 
the first offense shall be a fine by the um- 
pire of $5.00, and, for a second offense, prompt removal 
■of the offender from the game or grounds, followed by 
a period of such suspension from actual service in the club 
as the president of the League may fix. 

Umpire to Report Violations of the Rules. 

The umpire shall within twelve hours 
'RULE 65. after fining or removing a player from the 
game, forward to the president a report of 
the penalty inflicted and the cause therefor. 

Immediately upon being informed by the 
'RULE 66. umpire that a fine has been imposed upon 
any manager, captain or player, the presi- 
dent shall notify the person so fined and also the club of 
which he is a member; and, in the event of the failure of 
the person so fined to pay to the secretary of the League 
the amount of said fine within five days after notice, he 
shall be debarred from participating in any championship 
game or from c itting on a player's bench during the prog- 
s-ess of a championship game until such fine be paid. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 323 

When the offense of the player debarred 
RULE 67. from the game be of a flagrant nature, 
such as the use of obscene language or an 
assault upon a player or umpire, the umpire shall within 
four hours thereafter forward to the president of the 
League full particulars. 

Warning to Captains. 

The umpire shall notify both captains be- 
RULE 68. fore the game, and in the presence of each 
other, that all the playing rules will be 
strictly and impartially enforced, and warn them that fail- 
ure on their part to co-operate in such enforcement will 
result in offenders being fined, and, if necessary to pre- 
serve discipline, debarred from the game. 

On Ground Rules. 

Before the commencement of a game the 
RULE 69. umpire shall see that the rules governing 
all the materials of the game are strictly 
observed. He shall ask the captain of the home club 
whether there are any special ground rules, and if there 
be he shall acquaint himself with them, advise the cap- 
tain of the visiting team of their scope and see that each 
is duly enforced, provided that it does not conflict with 
any of these rules. 

Official Announcements. 

The umpire shall call "Play" at the hour 
RULE 70. appointed for the beginning of a game, an- 
nounce ''Time" at its legal interruption 
and declare "Game" at its legal termination. 

Suspension of Play. 

The umpire shall suspend play for the 
RULE 71. following causes: 

i. If rain fall so heavily as to cause the 
spectators on the open field and open stands to seek shelter, 
in which case he shall note the time of suspension, and 
should rain fall continuously for thirty minutes thereafter 
he shall terminate the game. 

2. In case of an accident which incapacitates him or a 
player from service in the field, or in order to remove 
from the grounds any player or spectator who has violated 



- tPALDlttGr 3fTK7lAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

the rules, or in case of fire, panic or other extraordinary 
circumstances. 

Call of Time. 

In suspending play from any legal cause 
RULE 72. the umpire shall call "Time"; when he calls 
"Time," play shall be suspended until he 
calls "Play" again, and during the interim no player shall 
be put out, base be run or run be scored. "Time" shall 
not be called by the umpire until the ball be held by the 
pitcher while standing in his position. 

Decisions on Balls and Strikes. 

The umpire shall call and count as a 
RULE 73. "ball" any unfair ball delivered by the 
pitcher to the batsman. He shall also call 
and count as a "strike" any fairly delivered ball which 
passes over any portion of the home base, and within the 
batsman's legal range as defined in Rule 31, whether struck 
at or not by the batsman ; or a foul tip which is caught 
by the catcher standing within the lines of his position, 
within 10 feet of the home base ; or which, after being 
struck at and not hit, strike the person of the batsman ; 
or when the ball be bunted foul by the batsman ; or any 
foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the batsman has 
two strikes, provided, however, that a pitched ball shall 
not be called or counted a "ball" or "strike" by the um- 
pire until it has passed the home plate. 

If but one umpire be assigned, his d\ /ties 

RULE 74. and jurisdiction shall extend to all points, 

and he shall be permitted to take his stand 

in any part of the field that in his opinion will best enable 

him to discharge his duties. 

Field Rules. 

No person shall be allowed upon any 
RULE 75. part of the field during the progress of a 
game except the players in uniform, the 
manager of each side, the umpire, such officers of the law 
as may be present in uniform, and such watchmen of the 
home club as ma> be necessary to preserve the peace. 

No manager, captain or player shall ad- 
RULE 76. dress the spectators during a game except 
in reply to a request for information about 
the progress or state of the game. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 325 

riii p 77 r Ever y club sh all furnish sufficient police 
mule, (t, force to preserve order upon its own 
a. c ,, ,, grounds, and in the event of a crowd enter- 
ing the field during the progress of a game, and interfer- 
ing with the play in any manner, the visiting club mav 
refuse to play until the field be cleared. If the field be not 
c eared within 15 minutes thereafter, the visiting club may 
claim and shall be entitled to the game by a score of nine 
been \ "oT ma "er What number of innin SS has 

General Definitions. 

rin cr 70 " P1 ?y" is the order of the umpire to be- 

riUL-t /a. gin t he game or to resume it after its sus- 
pension. 

riii it 70 "Time" is the order of the umpire to sus- 

nuLt ' y « P en d Play. Such suspension must not ex- 
tend beyond the day. 

em e on ."Game" \ s the announcement of the ura- 

kule 80. pire that the game is terminated. 

riii e oi /'An inning" is the term at bat of the 

Mum »i. nine players representing a club in a game 
and is completed when three of such play- 
ers have been legally put out. 

riii p »? *. T A Time T a l Bat " is the term at b at of a 
kule 82. batsman. It begins when he takes his po- 
sition, and continues until he is put out 
or becomes a base runner. But a time at bat shall not be 
charged against a batsman who is awarded first base by the 
umpire for being hit by a pitched ball, or on called balls, or 
when he makes a sacrifice hit, or for interference by the 
catcher. 

Dm c 00 L "Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required 
Kui_t vs. by these rules. 

THE SCORING RULES. 

ouirr oa .To promote uniformity in scoring cham- 

KULE 84. pionship games the following instructions 
are given and suggestions and definitions 
made for the guidance of scorers, and they are required to 
make all scores in accordance therewith. 



326 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

The Batsman's Record. 

Section i. The first item in the tabu- 

RULE 85. lated score, after the player's name and 

position, shall be the number of times he 

has been at bat during the game, but the exceptions made 

in Rule 82 must not be included. 

Sec. 2. In the second column shall be set down the runs, 
if any, made by each player. 

Sec. 3. In the third column shall be placed the first base 
hits, if any, made by each player. 

The Scoring of Base Hits. 

Sec. 4. A base hit shall be scored in the following cases : 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground on or 
within the foul lines and out of the reach of the fielders. 

When a fair-hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by 
a fielder in motion, but such player can not recover himself 
in time to field the ball to first before the striker reaches 
that base or to force out another base runner. 

When the ball be hit with such force to an infielder or 
pitcher that he can not handle it in time to put out the 
batsman or force out a base runner. In a case of doubt 
over this class of hits, a base hit should be scored and 
the fielder exempted from the charge of an error. 

When the ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder that he 
cannot handle it in time to put out the batsman or force 
out a base runner. 

In all cases where a base runner is retired by being hit 
by a batted ball, unless batted by himself, the batsman 
should be credited with a base hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the 
umpire, as defined in Rule 53, Section 6. 

In no case shall a base hit be scored when a base runner 
is forced out by the play. 

Sacrifice Hits. 

Sec. 5. In the fourth column shall be placed the sacri- 
fice hits. 

A sacrifice hit shall be credited to the batsman who 
when no one is out or when but one man is out, advances 
a runner a base by a bunt hit, which results in the batsman 
being put out before reaching first, or would so result if 
it were handled without error. 

(a) A sacrifice hit shall also be credited to a batsman 
who, when no one is out or when but one man is out, hits a 
fly ball that is caught but results i?i a tun being scored. 



SrALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GOIDB. 82? 

Fielding Records. 

Sec. 6. The number of opponents, if any, put out by 
each player shall be set down in the fifth column. Where 
the batsman is given out by the umpire for a foul strike,. 
or fails to bat in proper order, the put-out shall be scored 
to the catcher. In cases of the base runner being declared 
"out" for interference, running out of line, or on an in- 
field fly, the "out" should be credited to the player who 
would have made the play but for the action of the base 
runner or the announcement of the umpire. 

Sec. 7. The number of times, if any, each player assists 
in putting out an opponent shall be set down in the sixth 
column. An assist should be given to each player who- 
handles the ball in aiding in a run out or any other play 
of the kind, except the one who completes it. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play 
in time to put a runner out, even if the player who could 
complete the play fail, through no fault of the assisting, 
player. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player 
who handles or assists in any manner in handling the 
ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the 
player who makes the put-out, or in case of a thrown 
ball, to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and 
in such a way that a put-out results, or would result if 
no error were made by a team-mate. 

Assists should be credited to every player who handles 
the ball in the play which results in a base runner being; 
called "out" for interference or for running out of line. 



Errors. 

Sec. 8. An error shall be given in the seventh column 
for each misplay which prolongs the time at b^t of the 
batsman or allows a base runner to make one or more 
bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out. But a wild pitch, a base on balls, a base awarded to 
a batsman by being struck by a pitched ball, an illegal 
pitch, a balk and a passed ball, each of which is a battery 
and not a fielding error, shall not be included in the seventh, 
column. 

An error shall not be charged against the catcher for a 
wild throw in an attempt to prevent a stolen base, unless 
the base runner advance an extra base because of the error. 

An error shall not be scored against the catcher or an 



328 SPALDTNG'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

infielder who attempts to complete a double play, unless 
the throw be so wild that an additional base be gained. 

In case a base runner advance a base through the failure 
-of a baseman to stop or try to stop a ball accurately thrown 
to his base, he shall be charged with an error and not the 
player who made such throw, provided there were occasion 
for it. If such throw be made to second base the scorer 
shall determine whether the second baseman or shortstop 
shall be charged with an error. 

Stolen Bases. 

Sec. 9. A stolen base shall be credited to the base run- 
ner whenever he advances a base unaided by a base hit, a 
put-out, a fielding or a battery error. 

The Summary. 

The Summary shall contain : 
RULE 86. Section i. The score made in each in- 

ning of the game and the total runs of each 
side in the game. 

Sec. 2. The number of stolen bases, if any, made by 
«ach player. 

Sec. 3. The number of two-base hits, if any, made by 
«ach player. 

Sec. 4. The number of three-base hits, if any, made by 
«ach player. 

Sec. 5. The number <©f liome runs, if any, made by each 
player. 

Sec. 6. The number of double and triple plays, if any, 
made by each side and Hhe names of the players assisting 
in the same. 

Sec. 7. The number of innings each pitcher pitched in. 

Sec. 8. The number of base hits, if any, made off each 
pitcher. 

Sec. 9. The number of times, if any, the pitcher strikes 
out the opposing batsmen. 

Sec. 10. The number of times, if any, the pitcher gives 
bases on balls. 

Sec. 11. The number of wild pitches, if any, charged to 
the pitcher. 

Sec. 12. _ The number of times, if any, the pitcher hits a 
batsman with a pitched ball. 

Sec. 13. The number of passed balls by each catcher. 

Sec. 14. The time of the game. 

Sec. 15. The name of the umpire. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Index to Rules 



TO LAY OFF THE FIELD. Sec. Rule. 

The ground * 

Diamond or infield • *' 

Catcher's lines * 

Foul lines * 

Players' lines 

Coachers' lines £.' 

Three-foot line £. 

Batsman's lines 

Pitcher's plate • 

Slope of infield from pitcher's plate 2 9 1 

The bases 2 J J 

Material of ■ J* 

The home base — shape and size of 1 ly 

Material of . . J* 

Marking the lines — material of !* 

The ball • 3* 

Weight and size 1 

Make to be used 1 

Number to be delivered to umpire 2 - l*' 

To be replaced if rendered unfit for play 2 

Return of those batted or thrown out of ground 2 

Alternate — when to be placed in play 3 

Penalty for intentional discoloring (amended 1908) 4 1* 

Furnished by home club 5_6 1* 

The bat — material and size of 1& 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of players in the game • • 16 

Players' positions 1? 

The pitcher's position 9. 30v 

Must not mingle with spectators -• • • 1& 

Uniforms and shoes 19 

Size and weight of gloves 20 

Players' benches 1 21 

Umpires not to wait for notice from captains 2 21 



THE REGULATION GAME. 

Time of commencing championship games » 

Number of innings 

Termination of game 1-2-3 

Termination of game before completion of fifth inning 

Extra-innings game •■■ 

Drawn game . .»% 

Called game...,*., i ■ -••.-.■ 

Forfeited game..., ■. 

Failure of a club to appear 1 

Refusal of a club to continue play 2 

Failure of a club to resume play 3 

t Resorting to dilatory tactics . .. 4. 



22 
22- 
22: 
2T 
23- 
24 
25^ 
26 
26- 
26 
26 
2.G 



330 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Sec. Rule. 

Wilfully violating rules 5 26 

Disobeying order to remove player. 6 26 

Less than nine players 7 26 

:Second game to begin ten minutes after completion of 

first 8 26 

If field be not cleared in fifteen minutes 77 

When groundkeeper is under umpire's control 29 

Umpire to make written report of forfeiture 9 26 

No game .", 27 

Substitutes 1 28 

May take place of player at any time 2 28 

Base runner — consent of opposing captain necessary... 3 28 

Choice of innings — fitness of field for play 29 

Pitching rules: 

Delivery of the ball to bat 30 

A fairly delivered ball 31 

An unfairly delivered ball 32 

Penalty for delay by throwing to bases 1 33 

Penalty for delay in delivery to batsman 2 33 

Balking: 

Failure to deliver ball after making motion 1 34 

Failure to step toward oase before throwing 2 34 

Delivery of ball while foot ie hack of plate 3 34 

Delivery of ball while not facing batsman 4 34 

Motion to deliver ball While not in position 5 34 

Delaying game by holding ball 6 34 

Motion to pitch without having ball 7 34 

Any habitual motion without delivery of ball to bat.. 8 34 

Delivery of ball while catcher is outside of his lines.. 9 34 

Dead ball — hitting batsman in position or umpire on foul 

ground . 35 

Ball not in play 36 

Block balls: 

Touched or stopped by person not in game 1 37 

Umpire to declare block 2 37 

Base runner* to stop under certain conditions 3 37 



THE BATTING RULES. 

"Batsman's position 38 

Order of batting 39 

First batsman in each inning 40 

Players of side at bat> belong on bench 41 

Not to invade space reserved for umpire, catcher or 

batsman .. 42 

To vacate bench to prevent interference with fielder 43 

A fair hit 44 

A foul hit 45 

A foul tip 46 

A bunt hit 47 

Infield fly— definition of 8 51 

Balls batted outside ground: 

Fair hit over fence or into stand 1 48 

Fair or foul where last seen by umpire 1 48 

Batsman entitled to home run 2 48 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDIDE. 331 

Sec. Rule. 

Strikes: .~ 

Ball struck at by batsman £ *£ 

Fair ball not struck at • * ^ 

Foul hit not caught on fly unless batsman has two 

str ikes 3 4S> 

Attempt to bunt resulting in foul 4 49- 

Missed strike but which touches batsman 5 

Foul tip held by catcBer 6 ^ 

A foul strike dU 



THE BATSMAN IS OUT. 

If he fail to take position in proper turn 1 51 

If he fail to take position within one minute 2 ol 

If he make foul hit other than foul tip and ball is caught. 3 51 

If he make foul strike £ °* 

If he interfere with catcher » ™ 

If with first base occupied, three strikes are called b ox 

If! while attempting third strike, ball touch his person.... 7 

If, before two are out, he hits infield fly 8 

If third strike is called in accordance with Sec. 4 or 5 of 
Rule 49 



If prevented from advancing by fielder's obstruction. 



51 



If he step from cne box to other 1° 5 * 

THE BASE-RDNNING RCLES 

?s • 

e runner prec< 
Batsman becomes base runner: 



Legal order of bases fL 

Not to score before runner preceding °* 



After he makes fair hit * ^ 

After four balls are called * J* 

After three strikes are called A °* 

If he be hit by pitched ball J 2- 

If catcher interfere with him » j£ 

If fair hit strike umpire or base runner 6 as- 
Entitled to bases (without liability to be put out) : 

If umpire call four balls 1 ° 4 " 

If umpire award batsman first base for being hit by 

pitched ball ; 1 ° 4 

If umpire award batsman first base for interference of 

catcher * * 

If umpire award next batsman first base ^ »* 

If umpire call a "balk" «* 54 

If pitched ball pass catcher and hit umpire 



5 54 

6 54 



If fielder stop or catch ball illegally 

Returning to bases (without liability to be put out): 

If umpire declare any foul not legally caught 1 °/^ 

If umpire declare foul strike ~ ^ 

If umpire declare dead ball ^ ^ 

If umpire interfere with catcher or throw 4 o«> 

If pitched ball struck at touches batsman 5 5& 

When not required to touch intervening bases 6 



332 SPALDING^ OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE*. 

Base runners are out: Sec, Rule. 

Attempt te hinder catcher after three strikes 1 56 

Fielder hold fair hit 2 56 

Third strike held by fielder 3 56 

Touched with ball after three strikes 4 56 

Fielder touches first base ahead of runner 5 56 

Running out of three-foot lin^s 6 56 

Running out of line after having reached first 7 56 

Failure to avoid fielder in act of fielding ball 8 56 

Touched by fielder having ball in possession 9 56 

Ball held on base before runner can return 10 56 

Forced to vacate base by succeeding runner 11 56 

Hit by fair ball before touching fielder 12 56 

Failure to touch bases in regular or reverse order 13 56 

Failure to return to base held when "time" was called 14 56 

If batsman interfere with play at home plate 15 56 

Passing preceding base runner 16 56 

Overrunning first base 17 56 

Coacher drawing throw to plate 18 56 

Members of team at bat confusing fielding side 19 56 

Runner touching home before preceding runner 20 56 

Tmpire to declare out without appeal for decision 57 

•Coaching rules 58 

Scoring of runs , 59 

Definition of a "force-out" 59 

THE UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 

Power to enforce decisions 60 

No appeal from decision 61 

-Captain alone has right to appeal on rule construction 61 

Cannot question umpire's accuracy of judgment 62 

Cannot change umpire during progress of game 63 

Penalties for violations 64 

Umpire to report fining or removal of player within 12 

hours 65 

Notification of fines and time of payment 66 

Umpire's report on flagrant cases 67 

Warning to captains 68 

C*ro.ind rules and materials of the game 69 

■Official announcements 70 

Suspension of play 71 

Call of "time" .. 72 

Decisions on balls and strikes '. . . . 73 

Position of umpire on field 74 

FIELD RULES. 

Persons allowed on field other than players and umpire 75 

^Spectators shall not be addressed 76 

Police protection 77 



GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

-"Play" 79 

"Time" 79 

-"Game" 80 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDIDB. 

Sec. Rule. 

"An inning" 81 

"A time at bat" -.. - .. 82. 

"Legal" or "legally" .. 8* 



THE SCORING RULES (Rule 84). 

The batsman's record: 

Times at bat 1 85 

Number of runs 2 85 

First base hits 3 85 

When base hits should be credited 4 85 

Sacrifice bits (amended 1908) 5 85 

The fielding record: 

Number of put outs, and explanation, of 6 85 

Number of assists, and explanation of 7 85 

Errors, and explanation of .. . 8 85 

Exemption from errors 8 85 

Scorer to determine 8 85 

Stolen bases 9 85 

The summary: 

The score of each inning and total runs 1 86. 

The number of stolen bases 2 86' 

The number of two-base hits 3 86- 

The number of three-base hits 4 86 

The number of home runs 5 86; 

The number of double and triple plays 6 86* 

The number of innings each pitcher pitched in 7 86* 

The number of base hits made off each pitcher 8 86 

The number of strike outs 9 86- 

The number of bases on balls 10 86 : 

The number of wild pitches 11 86 

The number of hit batsmen 12 86 

The number of passed balls 13 86> 

The time of the game i.... 14 86> 

The name of the umpire 15 86 



334 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Spalding's Official Base Ball Record 

Commencing with January, 1908, the first number of 
-Spalding's Annual Base Ball Record of 180 pages was issued, 
•containing the official Base Ball statistics and records of leagues, 
•clubs and players, and other interesting statistical matter for 
1907. In addition to this statistical matter for the past year 
the book contains a mass of valuable historical and statistical 
records, conveniently arranged by years, covering Professional 
Base Ball from its inception in 1871 to 1907 — a period of thirty- 
seven years. 

This new annual Record book is, as its name implies, statis- 
tical in nature, profusely illustrated with players in action, and 
is intended to be a comparative Compendium of Professional 
Base Ball from the establishment of the game on a professional 
foasis, in 1871, up to the present time. Technically speaking, the 
''National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs" was not 
organized until 1876, five years after the formation of the 
original Professional Association, known as the "National Asso- 
ciation of Professional' Base Ball Players," but as the latter 
organization was the natural and immediate successor of the 
former, with which it became merged, and as the same coterie 
of club officials and players was connected with both organiza- 
tions, so far as these records are concerned, it has seemed proper 
to treat these two bodies as one continuous governing Profes- 
sional Association from the commencement of organized Pro- 
fessional Base Ball, in 1871, to the present time. When the 
words "National" or "National League" appear in connection 
■with these records, it will be understood as covering both asso- 
ciations, from 1871 to 1907, inclusive. 

We quote from the Record book as follows : 
"Professional Base Ball was formally inaugurated in the 
United States by the organization of the original "National 
Association of Professional Base Ball Players," in New York 
City, March 17, 1871. This first Professional Association was 
succeeded by, or rather merged into, the "National League of 
Professional Base Ball Clubs," at a meeting held in New York 
•City, February 2, 1876, thus making practically one continuous 
Professional Association from 1871 to 1907, inclusive, covering 
& period of thirty-seven years. 

"Under the auspices of these Professional Associations, the 
Base Ball Championship of the United States has been com- 
peted for annually, and practically under the same conditions. 

"Various statistics have been compiled from the official records, 
•containing a List of Officers of the National League, Honorary 
Members of the League, Presidents of League Clubs and the 
Champion Clubs, to whom the title of "Champions of the 
XTnited States" has been officially awarded each year, with a 
list of players of each championship team and their averages. 

"For the purpose of ready comparison of National League 
players' records of one period with another, the players have 
been grouped into five-year periods, showing the highest Fielding 
and Batting records during that period in each playing position. 
"This five-year sjstem of grouping will be known as the 
National "All America" Team for that period. To become 
-eligible for a place on a National "All America" team, a player 
must have played one or more seasons on a National League 
•Championship Team, and must have played at least fifty games 
(pitchers, twenty-five games) in the same position. The player 
ttaving the highest combined Fielding and Batting record for 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



335 



any year in that five-year period will be placed in his proper 
playing position on the National "All America" Team, cover- 
ing that particular five-year period. A similar method will be 
followed in making up the Grand "All America" Team, cover- 
ing Professional Base Ball from its inception in 1871 to date." 
That the readers of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide 
may get a better understanding of the character of this new 
Record book, the following pages have been made up in abbre- 
viated form from the Record, which we think will be of interest 
to the great army of Base Ball players, both past and present, 
as well as the public generally. For full details and explana- 
tions of these abbreviated records and other statistical matter 
the reader is referred to the Spalding Official Base Ball 
Record of 1908. 

WINNERS OF THE NATIONAL BASE BALL CHAM- 
PIONSHIP OF THE UNITED STATES 

For each year from the commencement of Organized Professional Base 
Ball, in 1871, to 1907, inclusive, with the name of Manager of each Club. 



Club. 



Athletics Philadelphia . 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Chicago 

Boston 

Boston 

Providence 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Boston 

Providence 

, Chicago 

1886|Chicago 

1887!Detroit 

New York 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Boston 

Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 

Pittsburg 

Pittsburg 

Pittsburg 

New York 

New York 

Chicago 

Chicago 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 



1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 

mS 

1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 



m 


01 


1 


v a 




. 


Fo 


6 8 




^ 


m 


22 


7 


.759 


39 


8 


.830 


43 


16 


.729 


43 


17 


.717 


71 


8 


.899 


52 


14 


.788 


31 


17 


.646 


41 


19 


.683 


59 


25 


.702 


67 


17 


.798 


56 


28 


.667 


55 


29 


.655 


63 


35 


.643 


84 


28 


.750 


87 


25 


.770 


90 


34 


.726 


79 


45 


.637 


84 


47 


.641 


83 


43 


.659 


86 


43 


.667 


87 


51 


.630 


102 


48 


.680 


86 


43 


.667 


89 


39 


.695 


87 


43 


.669 


90 


39 


.698 


93 


39 


.705 


102 


47 


.685 


101 


47 


.682 


82 


54 


.603 


90 


49 


.647 


103 


36 


.741 


91 


49 


.650 


106 


47 


.693 


105 


48 


.668 


116 


36 


.765 


107 


45 


.704 



Manager 



Hicks Hayhurst. 
Harry Wright. 
Harry Wright. 
Harry Wright. 
Harry Wright. 
A. G. Spalding. 
Harry Wright. 
Harry Wright. 
George Wright. 
A. C. Anson. 
A. C. Anson. 
A. C. Anson. 
John F. Morrill. 
F. C. Bancroft. 
A. C. Anson. 
A. C. Anson. 
W. H. Watkins. 
James Mutrie. 
James Mutrie. 
Wm.McGunnigle. 
F. G. Selee. 
F. G. Selee. 
F. G. Selee. 
Edward Hanlon. 
Edward Hanlon. 
Edward Hanlon. 
F. G. Selee. 
F. G. Selee. 
Edward Hanlon. 
Edward Hanlon. 
Fred Clarke. 
Fred Clarke. 
Fred Clarke. 
John J. McGraw. 
John J. McGraw. 
Frank Chance. 
Frank Chance. 



FROM 
336 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 

"ALL AMERICA" TEAMS. 

Players on National Championship Teams who have played in one 
position in 50 games ( pitchers 25 games ) or over and whose combined 
records of Fielding and Batting ( pitchers' record includes Percentage of 
Victories, Fielding and Batting ) rank the highest in each position cover- 
ing the different five-year periods are entitled to a place on the National 
" All America " Team for that period. 



NATIONAL " ALL AMERICA " TEAM. 

For the first five-year period — 1871 to 1875, inclusive. 



Position 


Name and Club 


u 
a 


EG 

. 0) 

SB 
O 




bo 

fid 

vol 


bo 

M 


I 


Pitcher 

Catcher 


A. G. Spalding, Boston 

Jas. L. White, Boston 

C. A. McVey, Boston 


1875 
1875 
1875 
1873 
1874 
1873 
1875 
1875 
1875 


63 

79 
79 
60 
60 
59 
77 
69 
64 


.899 



.858 
.816 
.968 
.865 
.904 
.940 
.940 
.933 
.904 


.318 
.354 
.358 
.453 
.275 
.422 
.337 
.306 
.284 


2.075 
1.170 
1.326 






1.318 


Third base. .. 


Harry Shaf er, Boston 

Geo. Wright, Boston 


1.179 
1.364 


Left field.... 
Center field . . 
Right field... 


Andy Leonard, Boston 

Jas. O'Rourke, Boston 

Jack Manning,. Boston 

Total average 


1.277 
1.239 

1.188 








.899 


.904 


.336 


1.340 



NATIONAL "ALL AMERICA" TEAM 

For the second five-year period — 1876 to 1880, inclusive. 



Position 



Pitcher 

Catcher 

First base. . . 
Second base. 
Third base. . . 
Shortstop. . . . 
Left field.... 
Center field . . 
Right field... 



Name and Club 



L. Corcoran, Chicago 

Jas. L. White, Chicago. . 
C. A. McVey, Chicago. . . 

Ross Barnes, Chicago 

A. C. Anson, Chicago 

John F. Peters, Chicago . 
Thos. York, Providence. . 

Paul Hines, Chicago 

J. O'Rourke, Providence. 

Total average 









bo 


bo 






^g 

*$ 


SO 




in 

1880 


a 


1* 


ffl 


56 


.798 


.939 


.221 


1876 


74 




.791 


.335 


1876 


55 




.956 


.345 


1876 


66 




.910 


.403 


1876 


66 




.850 


.342 


1876 


66 




.932 


.348 


1879 


80 




.897 


.307 


1876 


64 




.917 


.330 


1879 


54 




.784 


.351 






.798 


.886 


.331 



FROM ----._ 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 
Published Annually in January. 

NATIONAL "ALL-AMERICA" TEAM 

For the third five-year period — 1881 to 1885, inclusive. 



337 



Position 


Name and Club 


u 

|S 


O 


c 
o 

d 

fa 


be 
fa 


bo . 
.So 


£ 


Pitcher 

Catcher 


J. G. Clarkson, Chicago 

Frank S. Flint. Chicago 


1885 
1881 
1881 
1883 
1^83 
1881 
1883 
1884 
1882 


70 
77 
83 
96 
94 
79 
98 
107 
77 


.790 


.803 
.828 
.975 
.923 
.871 
.870 
.936 
.895 
.887 


.215 
.310 

.399 
.330 
.323 
.277 
.278 
.304 
.305 


1.808 
1.138 
1 374 


Second base. . 
Third base... 
Shortstop. .. . 
Left Field . . . 
Center Field. 
Right Field . . 


J. J. Burdock, Boston 

Ezra B. Sutton, Boston 

Thomas Burns, Chicago 

Joseph Hornung, Boston 

Paul Hines, Providence 

M. J. Kelly, Chicago 


1.253 
1.194 
1.147 
1.214 
1.199 
1.192 




Total average 










.790 


.888 


.305 


1.280 



NATIONAL "ALL-AMERICA" TEAM 

For tbe fourth five-year period — 1886 to 1890, inclusive. 



Position 


Name and Club 


s 
£ 


DO 

55 1 

O 


a 
o 

o 
fa 


bo 

£fa 
fa 


bfl . 

.So 

^fa 


I 


Pitcher 

Catcher 

First base . . . 


Charles Getzein, Detroit 

C. W. Bennett Detroit 

A. C. Anson, Chicago 

Fred Dunlap, Detroit 


1887 
1887 
1886 
1887 
1890 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 


43 

50 
121 

64 
126 
123 

58 
118 
127 


.« 


53 


.906 
.905 
.963 
.953 
.932 
.906 
.936 
.903 
.809 


.240 
.363 
.371 
326 


1.829 
1.268 
1.334 
1 279 


Third base... 


G. B. Pinkney, Brooklyn 

J. C. Rowe, Detroit 


.309 1.241 
.363! 1 269 


Left field. . . . 
Center field. . 
Right field... 


H. Richardson, Detroit 

Edward Hanlon, Detroit 

Sam Thompson, Detroit. 

Total average 


.363 
.316 
.406 


1.299 
1.219 
1.315 








683 


.924 


.340 


1.340 



NATIONAL "ALL-AMERICA" TEAM 

For the fifth five-year period— 1891 to 1895, inclusive. 



Position 



Pitcher 

Catcher 

First base. . . 
Second base, 
Third base. . . 

Shortstop 

Left S< d... 
Center field. . 
Right . Id... 



Name and Club 



W. Hoffer, Baltimore 

W. Robinson, Baltimore . . 
D. Brouthers, Baltimore . 

H. Reitz, Baltimore 

J. J. McGraw, Baltimore. 
H. Jennings, Baltimore. . . 

Jos. Kelley, Baltimore 

Hugh Duffy, Boston 

Wm. Keeler, Baltimore... 

Total average 









bd 


bo 






DO 


a rl 






u 

s 


O 


og 

fa£ 


2^ 
^fa 
fa 


3° 

c4q" 


1 


1895 


37 


.784 


.933 


.216 


1.933 


1894 


106 




.914 .348 


1.262 


1894 


123 




.975 


.344 


1.319 


1894 


100 




.966 


.309 


1.272 


1895 


93 




.880 


.374 


1.254 


1895 


131 




943 


.386 


1.329 


1894 


129 




.951 


.391 


1.342 


1893 


131 




.958 


.378 


1.336 


1895 


131 




.957 


.364 


1.378 






.784 


.942 


.349 


1.378 



FROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 

NATIONAL "ALL-AMERICA" TEAM 

For the sixth five-year period— 1896 to 1900, inclusive. 



Position 


Name and Club 


u 


03 






bo 


bo 

3* 


"5 
1 




W Hoffer, Baltimore 


1896 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1897 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1896 


35 
66 
118 
121 
132 
129 
130 
125 
127 


.823 


.878 
.919 
.973 
.953 
.931 
.926 
.955 
.953 
.973 


.301 
.354 
.345 
.314 
.346 
.397 
.370 
.344 
.392 


2 002 


Catcher 

First base... 


W. Robinson, Baltimore 

J. J. Doyle, Baltimore 


1.273 

1.318 
1.267 


Third base. . . 




1.277 


Shortstop 

Left field.... 
Center field. . 
Right field... 


H. Jennings, Baltimore 

Jos. Kelley, Baltimore 

W. R. Hamilton, Boston 

Wm. Keeler, Baltimore 

Total average 


1.323 
1.325 
1.297 
1.365 








.823 


.940 


.352 


1.383 



NATIONAL "ALL-AMERICA" TEAM 

For the seventh five-year period— 1901 to 1905, inclusive. 



Pitcher 

Catcher 

First base . . . 
Second base. . 


C. Mathewson, New York. . . . 

R. Bresnahan, New York 

W. E. Bransfield, Pittsburg . . 

C. C. Ritchey, Pittsburg 

T. Leach, Pittsburg 


1905 
1905 
1902 
1902 
1901 
1903 
1903 
1902 
1902 


40 

87 
100 
114 

90 
111 
101 
131 

59 


.775 
.775 


.970 
.970 
.986 
.961 
.908 
.933 
.962 
.972 
.992 

.962 


.236 
.302 
.308 
.287 
.298 
.355 
.351 
.357 
.329 

.320 


1.981 
1.272 
1.294 
1.248 
1.206 






1.288 


Left field .... 
Center field . . 
Right field . . . 


Fred Clarke, Pittsburg 

C. H. Beaumont, Pittsburg. . . 


1.313 
1.329 
1.321 




Total average 


1.367 



GRAND NATIONAL "ALL-AMERICA" TEAM 

From the commencement of Professional Base Ball, in 1871, to 1907, 
inclusive, covering a period of 37 years. 



Position 


Name and Club 


Year 


Gam's 


P.C. 
Won 


Field- 
ing 
P.C. 


Bat- 
ting 
P.C. 


Total 


Pitcher 

Catcher 

First base . . 
Second base 
Third base. . 
Shortstop . . 
Left field . . 
Center field" 
Right field. . 


A. G. Spalding, Boston . . 

John Kling. Chicago 

A. C. Anson, Chicago . . . 

Ross Barnes, Boston 

H. Steinfeldt, Chicago . . 
H. Jennings, Baltimore . 
Jos. J. Kelley, Baltimore 

Hugh Duffy, Boston 

Wm. Keeler, Baltimore . 
Total Average 


1875 
1906 
1881 
1873 
1906 
1895 
1894 
1893 
1896 


63 
96 
83 
60 
150 
131 
129 
131 
127 


.899 


.858 
.982 
.975 
.865 
.954 
.943 
.951 
.958 
.973 


.318 
.312 
.399 
.453 
.327 
.386 
.391 
.378 
.392 


2.075 
1.294 
1.374 
1.318 
1.281 
1.329 
1.342 
1.336 
1.365 








.899 


.940 


.373 


1.413 



*Wm. Keeler played center field on the Brooklyn team of 1899, and in this, 
position had a record in fielding of .970 and in batting of .376, making a total 
of 1.346, which would entitle him to the center field position on the Grand 
National "All-America" Team, but as he had a higher record as right 
fielder of the Baltimore team of 1896, the center field was given to Hugh 
Duffy of Boston with the next highest record of 1.336. 



FROM 
SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 389- 

Published Annually in January. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING RECORDS 

Showing the batting record of the three leading Batsmen for each year 
from the commencement of Organized Professional Base Ball, in 1871, to 
1907, inclusive, covering a period of thirty-seven years. 





Name 


Position 


Club 




be 

.So 


1871 


Levi Meyerle 

Ross Barnes 

C. A. McVey 

Ross Barnes 

Andy Leonard . . . 
A. G. Spalding... 

Ross Barnes 

Geo. Wright 

Jas. L. White.... 
Wm. McMullin . . . 

C. A. McVey 

West Fisler 

Ross Barnes 

Geo. Wright 

Jas. L.White.... 
Ross Barnes. . ^. . 

John Peters 

C. A. McVey..... 
Jas. L. White .... 

Fred Cassidy 

Jas. O'Rourke 

H. Dalrymple 

Paul Hines 




Phila. Athl.. 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Athletics 

Boston 

Athletics .... 
Boston ...... 

Boston 

Boston 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Boston 

Hartford .... 

Boston 

Milwaukee . . 
Providence . . 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Providence . . 
Providence . . 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Buffalo 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

Providence . . 

Buffalo 

New York . . . 

Chicago 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Chicago 

New York . . . 

Buffalo 

New York . . . 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Detroit 


37 
43 
40 
44 
45 
47 
60 
59 
60 
55 
70 
37 
78 
79 
79 
66 
66 
63 
48 
50 
49 
60 
60 
60 
50 
84 
80 
75 
84 
84 
84 
55 
61 
84 
82 
82 
97 
96 
91 
104 
106 
107 
110 
98 
88 
118 
125 
121 


403 




374 






366 


1872 




404 


Left field 


341 




Pitcher 


338 


1873 




453 




422 






401 


1874 


Left field 


387 




385 






382 


187 s ) 




386 






.357 






.354 


1876 




403 




348 






345 


1877 


First base and right field 
Right field 


.385 
362 


1878 


Left field and center" field 
Left field.... 


.350 
.356 
351 






345 


1879 


A. C. Anson 

Paul Hines 

Jas. O'Rourke. . . . 

Geo. F. Gore 

A. C. Anson 

A. Dalrymple 

A. C. Anson 

M. J. Powell 

J. C. Rowe 

Dan Brouthers... 

A. C. Anson 

Joe Start 




407 






357 


lflfift 


Right field and first base . 


.351 
365 




First base 


.338 




Left field 


.332 


1881 




399 






338 




Shortstop 


.333 


188? 


First base 


.367 




First base 


.362 






328 


1883 


Dan Brouthers . . . 

Roger Connor 

George F. Gore... 
James O'Rourke. . 
EzraB. Sutton... 

M.J.Kelly 

Roger Connor 

Dan Brouthers... 

M. Dorgan 

M. J. Kelly 

A. C. Anson 

Dan Brouthers... 




371 






.361 




Center field 


.334 


1884 


Center field 


.350 




Third base 


.349 


1885 


Catcher and right field. . 


.341 
.371 




First base 


.358 




Left field 


325 


1886 


Catcher and right field. . 


.388 
.371 




First base 


.370 



FROM 
340 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 





Name 


Position 


Club 


is 


be 

P. 


1887 


A. C. Anson 

Dan Brouthers . . . 
C. J. Ferguson... 

A. C. Anson 

J. P. Beckley 

James Ryan 

Dan Brouthers . . . 
John Glasscock. . . 

A. C. Anson 

John Glasscock. . . 
W. R. Hamilton . . 
John Clements. .. 
W. R. Hamilton.. 
A. C. Gumbert . . . 

P. Browning 

Dan Brouthers... 

C. L. Childs 

W. R. Hamilton.. 

Jacob Stenzel 

W. R. Hamilton.. 

Hugh Duffy 

Hugh Duffy 

G. A. Turner 

S. L. Thompson . . 
Jesse Burkett 

E. J. Delehanty.. 

W. Keeler 

Jesse Burkett 

H. Jennings 

E.J. Delehanty.. 
W. Keeler 

F. Clark 




Chicago 

Detroit 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Pittsburg.... 

Chicago 

Boston 

Indianapolis . 

Chicago 

New York . . . 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

Pitts'g&Cin. 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg 

Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia. 

Baltimore 

Cleveland 

Baltimore 

Philadelphia. 
Baltimore . . . 
Louisville . . . 
Baltimore . . . 
Baltimore . . . 
Boston ...... 

Cleveland . . . 
Philadelphia. 

St. Louis 

Baltimore . . . 
Pittsburg . . . 
Philadelphia. 
Brooklyn .... 
St. Louis .... 
Philadelphia. 

Brooklyn 

Pittsburg . . . 
Cincinnati . . . 

Brooklyn 

Pittsburg^ . . . 
Cincinnati. . . 
Pittsburg . . . 
Pittsburg . . . 
Cinn. &N.Y. 
St. Louis . . . 


122 
122 

69 
134 

71 
130 
126 
134 
134 
124 
123 

97 
133 

28 
101 
152 
144 
136 

51 

82 
131 
124 

77 
102 
132 
116 
131 
133 
129 
122 
128 
129 
129 
128 
109 
148 
145 
138 
118 
134 
138 
137 
142 
138 
136 
131 

60 
132 
129 
124 
102 
132 

96 
142 


421 




First base 


419 


1888 


Pitcher 


.412 
343 






342 


1889 


Center field 


.331 
373 






359 






341 


1890 




336 




Left field 


324 






315 


1891 


Left field... 


338 




Pitcher 


326 




Left field 


324 


1892 




335 






335 




Left field 


330 


1893 




409 




Left field 


395 






.378 


1894 




.438 






.423 




Right field 


.403 


1895 


Left field 


423 




Left field 


399 




Right field 


.394 


1896 


Left field 


.410 






.397 




Left field 


.394 


1897 


Right field... 


.432 




Left field.... 


.406 




J. Kelley 


Left field 


.389 


1898 


W. Keeler 

W. R. Hamilton.. 

Jesse Burkett 

E. J. Delehanty.. 

Jesse Burkett 

J. J. McGraw. . . . 

J. Wagner 

Elmer H. Flick... 

W. Keeler 

Jesse Burkett 

E.J. Delehanty.. 

W. Keeler 

C. H. Beaumont . . 
J. B. Seymour. . . 

W. Keeler 

J. Wagner 

M. Donlin 

Fred Clarke 

J. Wagner 

M. Donlin 

J. P. Beckley 


Right field 


.379 






.367 




Left field 


.345 


1899 


Left field 


.408 




Left field 


.402 






.390 


1900 


Shortstop and left field. 
Right field 


.380 
.378 






.366 


1901 


Left field 


.382 




Left field 


.357 






.355 


1902 


Center field 


.357 






.349 






.342 


1903 




.355 




Right field 


.351 




Left field 


.351 


1904 




.349 




Right field 


.329 




First base ; 


.325 



FROM 
SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



341 



rt 


Name 


Position 


Club 


11 

is 


Id 

M 


1905 


J. B. Seymour 

J. Wagner 

M. Donlin 

J. Wagner 

H.Steinfeldt 

H. G. LumJey 

J.Wagner 

Sherwood Magee. 
C. H. Beaumont. . 


Left field 


Cincinnati . . . 

Pittsburg 

New York . . . 
Pittsburg . . . 

Chicago 

Brooklyn .... 
Pittsburg . . 
Philadelphia. 
Boston 


149 
147 
150 
140 
151 
131 
142 
139 
149 


.377 






.363 




Right field 


.356 


1906 




339 






.327 




Rightfield 


.324 


1%7 




.350 




Left field 


.328 




Center field 


.322 



NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING RECORD 
SUMMARY 

Showing the batting rank of each batsman, whose average has been 
.400 and over, from the commencement of Organized Professional Base 
Ball, in 1871, to 1907, inclusive, covering a period of thirty-seven years. 



Rank 



Name — Position 



Club 





«H JR 


u 


°B 


9 


O rt 


>H 


£0 


1873 


60 


1894 


124 


1897 


128 


1895 


132 


1894 


77 


1873 


59 


1887 


122 


1887 


122 


1887 


69 


1896 


133 


1893 


51 


1899 


145 


1879 


50 


1897 


129 


1872 


44 


1894 


102 


1876 


66 


1871 


37 


1899 


138 


1873 


60 


1894 


114 



PQ 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh . . . 
Twelfth .... 
Thirteenth. . 
Fourteenth . 
Fifteenth... 
Sixteenth... 
Seventeenth 
Eighteenth . 
Nineteenth . 
Twentieth . . 
Twenty-first 



Ross Barnes, second base 

Hugh Duffy, center field 

William Keeler, right field 

Jesse Burkett, left field 

G. A. Turner, center field 

George Wright, shortstop 

A. C. Anson, first base 

Dan Brouthers, first base 

Charles J. Ferguson, pitcher 

Jesse Burkett, left field 

Jacob Stenzel, center field 

E. J. Delehanty, left field , 

A. C. Anson, first base , 

Fred Clarke, left field 

Ross Barnes, second base 

Samuel L. Thompson, right field 

Ross Barnes, second base 

Levi Meyerle, third base 

Jesse Burkett, left field 

James L. White, catcher 

E. J. Delehanty, left field 



Boston 

Boston 

Baltimore.. . 
Cleveland... 

Phila 

Boston 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Phila 

Cleveland.. . 
Pittsburg. . . 

Phila 

Chicago 

Louisville . . 

Boston 

Phila 

Boston 

Phila 

Cleveland.. . 

Boston 

Phila 



.453 
.438 
.432 
.423 
.423 
.422 
.421 
.419 
.412 
.410 
.409 
.408 
.407 
.406 
.404 
.403 
.403 
.403 
.402 
.401 
.400 



BATTING SUMMARY 

Showing a batting rank of players who have had a batting record of 
.400 and over for more than one year. 



Name 


Club 


. rt 
o V 
£!* 

3 
2 
3 
3 


Records 


0) 






.453 .404 .403 
.421 .407 .... 
.423 .410 .401 
.408 .400 .399 


.420 






.414 




Cleveland 

Philadelphia 


.412 


E. J. Delehanty 


.402 



FROM 
342 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE FIELDING AND BATTING 
RECORDS 

Showing- the fielding and batting rank of players who hold the three highest 

percentages in their respective fielding positions, covering the thirty-seven 

year period from the commencement of organized Professional Base Ball, in 

1871, to 1907, inclusive. 



Name and Club. Year Games PC 

Pitchers' Fielding Record. 

A. Dorner, Boston 1907 36 1.000 

H. Briggs, Chicago. ... 1904 34 1.000 
T. F. Sparks, Phila. ... 1905 34 1.000 

Catchers' Fielding Record. 

F. Bowerman, N. Y.. . . 1907 62 .990 

P. Moran, Boston 1905 78 . 986 

F. Bowerman, N. Y. . . . 1906 67 . 984 
First Basemen's Fielding Record. 

Dan McGann, N. Y. . . . 1906 133 .995 

O.Tebeau, Cleveland.. 1897 91 .994 

Dan McGann, N. Y.... 1907 81 .994 
Second Basemen's Fielding Record. 

J. A. McPhee, Cin'ti.. . 1896 116 .982 

Wm. Hallman, Phila... 1901 89 .977 

C. C. Ritchey, Boston. . 1907 144 .971 
Third Basemen's Fielding Record. 

H. Steinf eld t, Chicago. 1907 151 .967 

Harry Arndt. St. Louis. 1906 65 .965 

Lave Cross, St. L.-Clev . 1899 141 . 957 
Shortstops' Fielding Record. 

T. Corcoran, Cincinnati 1905 151 .952 

Geo. Wright, Boston... 1872 47 .948 

H. C. Long, Boston. . . . 1902 108 .947 
Left Fielders' Fielding Record. 

Fred Clarke, Pittsburg 1907 144 .987 

J. Sheckard, Chicago. . 1906 149 .986 

W. F. Shannon, St. L. . 1905 140 .983 
Center Fielders' Fielding Record. 

Roy Thomas, Phila 1906 142 .986 

W. S. Brodie, Bait 1897 100 .983 

Roy Thomas, Phila.... 1905 147 .983 
Right Fielders' Fielding Record. 

M. Tiernan, N. Y 1898 103 .986 

Otis Clymer. Pittsburg 1905 89 .986 

Wm.Keeler, Brooklyn. 1901 125 .985 



Name and Club. Year Games PC 

Pitchers' Batting Record. 

C. J. Ferguson, Phila. . 1887 69 .412 

A. G. Spalding, Boston 1873 60 .371 

A. C. Gumbert, Chic. . . 1891 28 .326 

Catchers' Batting Record. 

James L. White, Boston 1873 60 .401 

M. J. Kelly, Chicago. . . 1886 118 .388 

C. A. McVey, Boston.. 1874 70 .385 
First Basemen's Batting Record. 

A. C. Anson, Chicago. . 1887 122 .421 

Dan Brouthers, Detroit 1887 122 .419 

A. C. Anson, Chicago. . 1879 50 .407 
Second Basemen's Batting Record. 

Ross Barnes, Boston. . . 1873 60 ,453 

Ross Barnes, Boston ... 1872 44 .404 

Ross Barnes, Boston. . . 1876 66 .403 
Third Basemen's Batting Record. 

LeviMeyerle.Ath.Phil. 1871 37 .403 

J. J. McGraw, Bait. . . . 1899 118 .390 

Lave Cross, Phila 1894 120 .388 

Shortstops' Batting Record. 

George Wright, Boston 1873 59 .422 

Hugh Jennings, Bait. . 1896 129 .397 

J. Wagner. Pittsburg.. 1900 134 .380 
Left Fielders' Batting Record. 

Jesse Burkett, Cleve.. 18S5 132 .423 

Jesse Burkett, Cleve.. 1896 133 .410 

E. J. Delehanty, Phila. 1899 145 .408 
Center Fielders' Batting Record. 

Hugh Duffy. Boston. . . 1894 124 .438 

G.A.Turner, Phila.... 1894 77 .423 

Jacob Stenzel, Pittsb.. 1893 51 .409 
Right Fielders' Batting Record. 

Wm. Keeler, Bait 1897 128 .432 

S. L. Thompson, Phila. 1894 102 .403 

Elmer H. Flick, Phila. . 1900 138 .378 



NATIONAL LEAGUE PITCHING RECORDS 

Showing the rank in percentage of games won of pitchers who have held the 

three highest percentage records, and have pitched in 25 games and over, 

covering the thirty-seven year period from the commencement of organized 

Professional Base Ball in 1871, to 1907, inclusive. 

Name Club Year N ^ y a e me3 

A. G. Spalding Boston 1875 63 

Charles Radbourne Providence 1884 72 

A. G. Spalding Boston 1872 47 



P.C. 

Victories 



FROM 
SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE AVERAGES 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Clubs. 



a s a ,• a .s 8*5,2 

5 K E « w 5 £5 a £ 

Chicago 12 14 16 15 17 17 16 107 

Pittsburg 10 8 12 16 12 13 20 91 

Philadelphia.... 8 14 .. 10 13 13 11 14 83 

New York 6 10 11 .. 12 13 13 17 82 

Brooklyn 5 6 8 10 .. 15 7 14 65 

Cincinnati 6 10 8 9 7 .. 13 14 66 

Boston 5 9 8 9 12 9 6 58 

St. Louis 6 2 7 5 8 8 16 . . 52 

Lost 45 63 64 71 83 87 90 101 604 



343 



& 

.704 
.591 
.666 
.536 
.439 
.431 
.392 
.340 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
Wagner, Pitts., 
Magee, Phila., 
Beaumont, Boston, 
Leach, Pitts., 
McGann, N. Y., 
Seymour, N. Y., 
Chance, Chicago, 
Mitchell, Cin., 
Wolter.Cin.Pt.-St.L. 
Clarke, Pittsburg, 
McLean, Cin., 
Schulte, Chicago, 
Kling, Chicago, 
Lynch, Pitts.-N. Y., 
Paskert, Cin., 
Brain, Boston, 
Hoffman, Boston, 
Devlin, N. Y., 
Osbcrn, Phila., 
Titus, Phila., 
Jordan, Brooklyn, 
Sheehan, Pittsburg, 
Tenney, Boston, 
Schlei, Cincinnati, 
Odwell, Cincinnati, 
Hofman, A., Chi., 
Sheckard, Chicago, 
"Lumley, Brooklyn, 
Steinfeldt, Chicago 
Shannon, N. Y., 
Corcoran, N. Y., 
Scanlan, Brooklyn, 
Smith, H., Pitts., 
Abbaticchio, Pitts. 
Murray, St. Louis, 
Browne, G., N. Y., 
Bates, Boston, 
Bowerman, N. Y., 
Doyle, N. Y., 
Slagle, Chicago, 
Storke, Pittsburg, 
Nealon, Pittsburg, 
Byrne, St. Louis, 
Ritchey, Boston, 



G. AB 

142 515 
139 503 

149 580 



R. H. PC. 

98 180 .350 
75 165 .328 
67 187 .322 



149 547 102 166 



81 262 
126 473 
109 382 

148 558 
17 63 

144 501 
101 374 
92 342 
100 334 
19 39 
16 50 

133 509 
19 86 

143 491 
37 163 

142 523 

143 485 
67 226 

149 554 
72 246 
84 274 

134 470 
142 484 
118 454 
151 542 



17 34 

18 38 
147 496 
131 485 
121 458 
119 447 

90 311 
69 227 
136 489 
102 357 
104 381 
149 559 
144 499 



.JN'.I 



Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. PC. 

Knabe, Phila., 126 444 67 113 .255 

Burch, St. L. -Brook. 84 274 30 70 .255 

Merkle, N. Y., 15 47 12 .255 

Ganzel. Cincinnati, 143 531 61 135 .254 

Howard, Bost.-Ch., 89 335 30 85 .254 

Sweeney, Ch.-Bost., 57 201 25 51 .254 

Lush, Phila. -St. L., 39 122 11 31 .254 

Bresnahan, N. Y., 104 328 57 83 .253 

Mowrey, Cin., 138 448 43 113 .252 

Strang. N. Y., 95 306 56 77 .252 

Konetchy. St. Louis 91 331 34 83 .251 

Evers, Chicago, 151 508 66 127 .250 

Pfeffer, Boston, 19 60 1 15 .250 

Huggins, Cin., 156 561 64 139 .248 

Lewis, Brooklyn, 136 475 52 118 .248 

Barry, St. Louis, 81 294 30 73 .248 

Kane, Cincinnati, 75 262 40 65 .248 

Hostetter, St. L., 118 397 21 98 .247 

Batch, Brooklyn, 106 388 38 96 .247 

Lobert, Cincinnati, 147 537 61 132 .246 

Courtney, Phila., 130 440 42 107 .243 

Thomas, Phila., 121 419 70 102 .243 

Grant, Phila., 74 268 26 65 .243 

Burnett, St. Louis, 59 206 18 49 .238 

O'Hara, St. Louis, 47 173 11 41 .237 

Hummell, Brooklyn, 97 342 41 80 .234 

Alperman, Brook., 138 558 44 130 .233 

47 121 .267 iKrueger, Cin., 96 317 25 74 .233 

52 144 .266 Bransfield, Phila., 92 348 25 81.233 

155 585 104 155 .265 Casey, Brooklyn, 138 527 55 122 .231 

62 226 21 60 .265 Hollv, St. Louis, 150 545 55 125 .229 

2 9 .265Malonev, Brook., 144 502 51115.229 

4 10 .263 Davis, Cincinnati, 70 266 28 61 .229 

63 130 .262Hannifan, N. Y., 49 149 16 34 .228 

46 127 .262jMoran. Chicago, 59 198 8 45 .227 

54 119 .260 Clvmer, Pittsburg, 16 66 8 15 .227 
52 116 .260 Noonan, St. Louis, 70 237 19 53 .224 
31 81 .260 Bennett, St. Louis, 86 324 20 72 .222 
16 59 .260 Hallman, Pitts., 84 302 39 67.222 
71 126 .258 Tinker, Chicago, 113 402 36 89 .221 
24 92 .258 Gibson, Pittsburg, 110 382 28 84 .220 
29 98 .257 McCarthy, Brook., 25 91 4 20 .220 

55 143 .256 Bridwell, Boston, 140 509 49 111 .218 
45 127 .255!McIntyre. Brooklyn, 28 69 6 15 .217 



29 78 
46 139 
58 112 
64 163 

5 18 
97 145 

35 108 .289 

44 98 .287 

44 95 .284 

3 11 .282 

10 14 .280 

60 142 .279 
17 24 .279 

61 136 .277 

22 45 .276 
72 144 .275 
43 133 .274 

23 62 .274 
83 151 .273 
28 67 .272 

24 74 .270 
67 126 .268 
76 129 .267 



FROM 
844 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL. BASE BALL. RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING— (Continued). 
Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. PCI Name and Club. 
" 79 8 17 .215 Corridon, Phila., 



Brown, C, St.L.-Ph. 



Jacklitsch, Phila. 
Overall, Chicago, 
Phelps, Pittsburg, 
Dooin, Phila., 
Randall, Ch.-Bost., 
Beckley, St. Louis, 
Dahlen, N. Y., 
Anderson, Pitts., 
PastoriuS, Brook., 
Doolin, Phila., 
Ritter, Brooklyn, 
Marshall, St. Louis, 
McGlynn, St. Louis, 
Swaeina, Pittsburg, 
Needham, Boston, 
Weimer, Cincinnati, 
Brown, S., Boston, 
Flaherty, Boston, 
Taylor, J., Chicago, 
Shar, N. Y., 
Kelly, St. Louis, 
Mathewson, N. Y., 
Phillippe, Pitts., 
Mason, Cincinnati, 
Fromme, St. Louis, 
Karger, St. Louis, 
Hitt, Cincinnati, 
Burke, Boston, 
McGinnity, N. Y., 
Reulbach, Chicago, 
Ames, N. Y., 



65 202 19 43 .213 Young, Boston, 



94 



.213 Richie, Phila., 



36 113 11 24 .212 Bergen, Brooklyn, 

96 313 18 66 .211 Rucker, Brooklyn, 

94 336 22 71 .211|Ewing, Cincinnati, 

32 115 6 24 .209 Brown, M., Chicago 

143 464 40 96 .207|Leever, Pittsburg, 

121 413 73 85 .206 Stricklett, Brook., 

28 73 6 15 .205 Leifield, Pittsburg, 
145 509 33 104 .204'Gleason, Phila., 

89 271 15 55 .203;Pittenger, Phila., 

83 268 19 54 .202] Willis, Pittsburg, 
25 .2001 Hopkins, St. Louis, 
19 .200 Wiltse, N. Y., 

79 260 19 51 .196 Boultes, Boston, 

29 72 7 14 .194 Dorner, Boston, 
65 208 17 40 .192 Beebe, St. Louis, 

22 .191 Bugler. Brooklyn, 
9 .191 Taylor, L., N. Y., 

24 79 10 15 .190 Lindsman, Boston, 
52 197 12 37 .188 Smith, F., Cin., 
41107 8 20 .187 Lundgren, Chicago, 

35 65 5 12 .185 Bell, Brooklyn, 

25 44 1 8 .182 Pfiester, Chicago, 
23 55 5 10 .182Moren, Philad., 

39 112 9 20 .179 Coakley, Cincinnati, 

21 56 6 10 .179 Fraser, Chicago, 

36 129 6 23 .178 Ferguson, N. Y., 

47 103 6 18 .175 Camnitz, Pittsburg, 

27 63 4 11 .175 Sparks, Phila., 

39 69 5 12 .1741 



45 125 
26 95 



35 115 
18 47 



G. . 


,\B. 


R. 


H. 


PC. 


38 


97 


6 


16 


.165 


40 


80 


2 


13 


.163 


. 25 


43 


3 


7 


.163 


51 138 


2 


22 


.159 


37 


97 


6 


15 


.155 


44 


123 


10 


19 


.154 


35 


85 


6 


13 


.153 


31 


73 


3 


11 


.151 


30 


81 


9 


12 


.148 


40 102 


5 


15 


.147 


35 


126 


11 


IS 


.143 


16 


36 


3 


5 


.139 


39 


103 


3 


14 


.136 


15 


44 


7 


6 


.136 


34 


67 


5 


9 


.134 


29 


68 


2 


9 


.132 


36 


92 


3 


12 


.130 


31 


86 


4 


11 


.128 


29 


79 


6 


10 


.127 


29 


48 


3 


6 


.125 


34 


90 


S 


11 


.122 


IS 


28 


1 


3 


.107 


28 


66 


4 


7 


.106 


35 


S4 


6 


8 


.095 


30 


64 


4 


6 


.094 


37 


74 


4 


6 


.081 


37 


84 


2 


6 


.071 


22 


45 


4 


3 


.067 


15 


18 





1 


.055 


31 


60 


2 


3 


.050 


33 


89 


1 


3 


.034 



Tsvo-base Hits (only those who have made 10 or more are given) — 
Wagner 38, Magee 28, Seymour 25. Steinfeldt 25, Brain 24, Alperman 23, 
Lumley 23, Sheckard 23, Titus 23, Dahlen 20, Ganzel 20, Strang 20, 
Beaumont 19, Casey 19, Chance 19, Leach 19, Doolin 19, Bates 18. Clarke 18, 
Evers 18, Holly 18, Tenney 18, Courtney 17, Mitchell 17, Ritchey 17, 
Devlin 16, Knabe 16, Mowrey 16, Bransfield 15, Jordan 15, Kling 15, Thomas 
15, Abbaticchio 14, Schulte 14, Huggins 12, Hummell 12, Shannon 12, 
G. Browne 11, Byrne 11, A. Hofman 11, Konetehy 11, Lewis 11, Tinker 11, 
Batch 10, Krueger 10, Murray 10, Nealon 10, Randall 10. 

Three-base Hits (only those who have made 10 or more are given) — 
Alperman 16, Ganzel 16, Beaumont 14, Wagner 14, Clarke 13, Bates 12, 
Leach 12, Lobert 12, Mitchell 12, Magee 12, Titus 12, Lumley 11, G. Browne 
10, Maloney 10, Murray 10. 

Home Runs— Brain 10, Lumley 9, Murray 7, Wagner 6, G. Browne 5, 
Beaumont 4, Bresnahan 4, Jordan 4. Leach 4, Magee 4, Strang 4, Gibson 3, 
Hummell 3, Kane 3, Konetehy 3, Mitchell 3, Seymour 3, Titus 3, Abbatic- 
chio 2, Alperman 2, Bates 2, Clarke 2, Courtney 2, Evers 2, Flaherty 2, 
Ganzel 2, Hostetter 2, Karger 2, Marshall 2, Ritchey 2, Schulte 2, Ames 1, 
Anderson 1, M. Brown 1, Chance 1, Davis 1, Devlin 1, Doolin 1, Ewing 1, 
Hannifan 1, Holly 1, A. Hofman 1, Howard 1, Huggins 1, Kling 1, Knabe 
1, Lobert 1, Moran 1, Mowrey 1, Needham 1, Noonan 1, Paskert 1, Reul- 
bach 1, Shannon 1, Shay 1, Sheckard 1, Steinfeldt 1, Storke 1, Thomas 1, 
Tinker 1, Weimer 1. 

Sacrifice Hits (only those who have made 10 or more are given)— 
Knabe 40, Devlin 36, Sheckard 35, Casey 32, Leach 29, Huggins 27, Lobert 
27, Maloney 25, Steinfeldt 25, G. Browne 24, Byrne 24, A. Hofman 24, 
Abbaticchio 22, Batch 22, Mowrev 22. Schulte 20, Holly 19, Lewis 19, 
Lumley 19, Kane 19, Ritchey 18, Tenney 18, Clarke 16, Tinker 16, Barry 15, 
Hummell 15, Jordan 15. Mitchell 15, Thomas 15, Bowerman 14, Evers 14, 
Konetchv 14, Sheehan 14, Wagner 14, Odwell 13. Seymour 13, Beaumont 12, 
Ganzel 12, Krueger 12, Storke 12, Anderson 11, Bates 11, Hallman 11, 



TROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



345 



Titus 11, Bridwell 10, Burch 10, Dahlen 10, Ewing 10, Gibson 10, Gleason 
10, Nealon 10, Shannon 10, Sweeney 10. 

Stolen Bases (only those who have stolen 10 or more are given)— 
Wagner 61, Evers 46, Magee 46, Leach 43, Devlin 38, Clarke 37, Abbatic- 
chio 35, Chance 35, Shannon 33, Sheckard 31, Lobert 30, A. Hofman 29, 
Huggins 28, Slagle 28, Anderson 27, Beaumont 25, Maloney 25, Byrne 21, 
Hallman 21, Strang 21, Seymour 21, Murray 23, Kane 20, Tinker 20, 
Steinfeldt 19, Lumley 18, Doolin 18, Knabe 18, Bridwell 17, Mitchell 17, 
Casey 16, Holly 16, Lewis 16, Bresnahan 15, G. Browne 15, Tenney 15, 
Howard 14, Knoetchy 13, Burch 12, Bates 11, Bowerman 11, Dahlen 11, 
Nealon 11, Thomas 11, Brain 10, Dooin 10, Grant 10, Jordan 10, Krueger 10, 
Mowrey 10, Odwell 10, Sheehan 10. 



Club. G. 

Pittsburg 157 

New York .... 155 

Chicago 155 

Cincinnati 156 

Boston 152 

Philadelphia .. 149 

St. Louis 155 

Brooklyn 153 



Name and Club. 
Hannifan, N. Y., 
Swacina, Pittsburg, 
McGann, N. Y., 
Bowerman, N. Y., 
Chance, Chicago, 
Ganzel, Cincinnati, 
Storke, Pittsburg, 
Hofman, Chicago, 
Tenney, Boston, 



CLUB BATTING. 
AB. R. H. TB. 2BH. 3BH. HE. SH. SB 



4957 634 1261 1607 



78 19 178 264 



4874 
4892 
4966 
5020 
4725 
5008 
4895 



573 1222 
571 1224 



514 
419 
446 



1547 
1521 
1226 1577 
1222 1552 
1113 1441 
1163 1443 
1135 1457 



160 
162 
126 
142 
162 
121 
142 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 

Name and Club. 
Beckley, St. Louis, 
Jordan, Brooklyn, 
Hostetter, St. L., 
Nealon, Pittsburg, 
Bransneld, Phila., 
Courtney, Phila., 
Konetchy, St. Louis, 
Howard, Chicago, 
149 1587 113 19 .989 Merkle, N. Y., 



G. 


PO. 


A. E. 


PC. 


29 


248 


13 1 


.996 


26 


246 


12 1 


.996 


81 


781 


55 5 


.994 


29 


286 


9 2 


.993 


109 


1129 


80 10 


.992 


143 


1346 


84 14 


.990 


23 


181 


11 2 


.990 


18 


204 


4 2 


.S90 



165 
195 
195 
133 
130 
156 
197 



G. PO. A. E. 

13 4 




PC. 



32 303 
143 1417 
27 263 



104 



78 31 .980 
18 6 .979 
68 24 .978 
53 21 .978 
29 10 .978 
922 71 25 .975 
301 16 9 .972 
122 7 7 .949 



426 



iH 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



Gleason, Phila., 
Ritchey, Boston, 
Evers, Chicago, 
Huggins, Cin., 
Knabe, Phila., 
Alperman, Br'klyn, 



26 
144 



72 67 3 .979 
340 460 24 .971 
151 346 500 32 .964 
156 353 443 32 .961 
121 293 336 26 .960 
115 298 378 33 .953 



Abbaticchio, Pitts., 
Hummell, Br'klyn, 
Bennett, St. Louis, 
Corcoran, N. Y., 
Hostetter, St. L., 
Doyle, N. Y., 



147 

44 



320 380 36 .951 
106 129 12 .951 
175 208 25 .939 
108 183 19 .939 
150 233 30 .927 
128 158 26 .917 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



Steinfeldt, Chicago 
Casey, Brooklyn, 
Sheehan, Pittsburg, 
Devlin, N. Y., 
Mowrey, Cin., 
Byrne, St. Louis, 
Brain, Boston, 



151 
138 
57 
140 
127 
148 
130 



161 307 16 
176 274 21 
55 137 12 
174 282 29 
167 214 29 
212 348 49 
191 323 47 



Grant, Phila., 
Courtney, Phila., 
Storke, Pittsburg, 
Leach, Pittsburg, 
Kane, Cincinnati, 
Sweeney, Boston, 



74 106 145 23 .916 

75 90 143 24 .907 
67 75 123 16 .884 
33 45 65 15 .880 
25 20 59 11 .878 
23 36 52 13 .871 



SHORTSTOPS. 



Bridwell, Boston, 
Dahlen, N. Y., 
Lobert, Cin., 
Tinker, Chicago, 
Wagner, Pittsburg, 



140 325 437 47 .942 

143 292 426 45 .941 

142 299 382 43 .941 

113 215 390 39 .939 

138 314 428 49 .938 



Lewis, Brooklyn, 
Doolan, Phila., 
Holly, St. Louis, 
Hofman, Chicago, 
Sweeney, Chi.-Bost. 



145 
147 

42 
18 



277 372 43 .938 
327 463 60 .929 
317 474 62 .927 
81 116 17 .921 
21 44 10 .867 



FROM 
546 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING— (Continued). 
LEFT FIELDERS. 



Name and Club. 
McCarthy, Br'klyn, 
Hummell, Br'klyn, 
Clarke, Pittsburg, 
Magee, Phila., 



Shannon, N. Y., 


155 


282 


18 


Sheckard, Chicago, 


142 


223 


13 


Odwell, Cin., 


76 


172 


6 


Howard, Boston, 


45 


54 


8 


Osborn, Phila., 


26 


C 

52 


UN 
2 


Thomas, Phila., 


121 


274 


15 


Leach, Pittsburg, 


109 


278 


15 


Krueger, Cin., 


70 


131 


8 


Seymour, N. Y., 


126 


300 


8 


Paskert, Cin., 


16 


33 


3 


Kelly, St. Louis, 


16 


34 


2 


Davis, Cin., 


69 


159 


11 


Strang, N. Y., 


28 


55 


9 



G. PO. A. E. PC. | Name and Club. 
25 38 1000 Krueger, Cin., 
21 51 5 1000 Kane, Cin., 
144 298 15 4 .987 Burke, Boston, 
139 297 13 7 .978 Randall, Boston, 

7 .977 Murray, St. Louis, 
6 .975 Batch, Brooklyn, 

5 .973,0'Hara, St. Louis, 

2 .969 Burch, Brooklyn, 

JNTER FIELDERS. 

lOOOiMaloney, Br'klyn, 

6 .980 Hallman, Pittsburg, 
6 .980 [Beaumont, Boston, 

3 .979 Slagle, Chicago, 

8 .975 Hofman, Chicago, 

1 .973 Burnett, St. Louis, 

1 .97* Anderson, Pitts., 
5 .971 Burch, St. L.-Brk., 

2 .970 Hopkins, St. Louis, 



G. PO. 

26 67 

38 81 

32 52 

59 93 

124 225 

81 152 



24 



144 336 

28 48 

149 296 

132 234 

23 63 
59 98 

24 47 
53 93 
15 21 



A. E. 

3 3 
6 4 

2 3 
8 6 
24 18 
8 12 

2 4 



18 12 

4 2 
30 13 
15 10 

5 3 
8 5 
2 4 

11 9 
3 



RIGHT FIELDERS. 



Batch, Brooklyn, 
Bates, Boston, 
O'Hara, St. Louis, 23 
Schulte, Chicago, 91 

Hallman, Pittsburg, 45 
Kelly, St. Louis, 



26 



Mitchell, Cin., 
Anderson, Pitts., 
Barry, St. Louis, 



1000 Lumley, Brooklyn, 
118 169 18 4 .979|Hofman, A., Chi., 

1 .975 Browne, N. Y., 
4 .972 Titus, Phila., 

2 .971 Strang, N. Y., 
2 .965|ciymer, Pittsburg, 

11 .964|Hoffroan. Boston 



118 171 15 



36 3 
130 11 



36 51 



143 256 
91 159 



48 7 3 

146 14 10 

198 21 17 

56 4 5 

24 2 



PC 

.959 
.956 
.947 
.944 
.933 
.930 
.917 
.873 



.967 
.963 
.962 
.$61 
.958 
.955 
.925 
.920 
.875 



.923 
.923 



Randall, Chi.-Bost., 33 57 4 



81 94 11 4 .9631 



Bowerman, N. Y., 62 
Kling, Chicago, 98 

Bresnahan, N. Y., 95 
Jacklitsch, Phila., 58 
Schlei, Cin., 67 

Phelps, Pittsburg, 35 
McLean, Cin., 89 

Moran, Chicago, 59 

Gibson, Pittsburg, 110 

Passed Balls— Kling 2, 
Jacklitsch 4, Butler 5, 
Bresnahan 11, Needham 



CATCHERS. 
320 70 4 .990 Brown, S., Boston, 
499 109 8 .987 Ritter, Brooklyn, 
483 94 8 .986 Bergen, Brooklyn, 
270 97 6 .984 Needham, Boston, 
277 111 8 .980 Dooin, Phila., 
145 38 4 .979 Marshall, St. Louis 
365 110 12 .975 Noonan, St. Louis, 
258 72 9 .973 Butler, Brooklyn, 
499 125 18 .972 Smith, Pittsburg, 
Smith 2, Schlei 3, Phelps 3, Moran 
S. Brown 6, Bowerman 7, McLean 
11, Noonan 11, Marshall 12, Gibson 14 



IS 



267 91 11 . 
391 103 16 . 
175 67 8 . 
281 101 13 . 
436 123 24 . 
374 142 26 . 
369 98 24 . 
106 34 8 . 
46 16 4 . 
3, Bergen 
8, Ritter 
, Dooin 16 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
Record of those who pitched in fifteen *or more games, arranged according 
to percentage of victories: 



Name end Club. G. PO. A. E. FA. HB. BB. 

Ruelbach, Chicago 27 13 53 5 .930 9 64 

Brown, M., Chicago.... 34 20 75 1 .990 6 40 

Overall, Chicago 36 14 76 3 .968 11 69 

Sparks, Philadelphia.... 33 10 50 4 .938 7 51 

Lundgren, Chicago 28 6 56 1 .984 2 92 

Mathewson, New York. 41 16 87 6 .945 2 53 

Willis, Pittsburg 39 17 87 3 .972 7 69 

Pittenger, Philadelphia. 16 4 25 1.000 5 35 

Camnitz, Pittsburg 31 8 46 1 .982 3 59 

Fraser, Chicago 22 7 42 3 .942 3 46 

Taylor, L., New York.. 28 8 45 4 .930 3 46 



Shut-out 
SO. G. W 

5 



L. PC. 



.810 
.769 
.742 
.733 
.720 
.667 
.656 
.643 
.619 
.615 
.611 



FROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



347 



PITCHERS' RECORDS— (Continued). 

Shut-out 

Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. FA. HB. BB. SO. G. W. L. PC 

Leever, Pittsburg 31 4 39 2 .956 8 46 65 5 14 9 .609 

Pfiester, Chicago 30 8 44 7 .881 5 48 90 3 14 9 .609 

Ferguson, New York.... 15 8 12 1 .952 5 20 37 3 2 .600 

Taylor, J., Chicago 18 6 40 1.000 1 33 22 7 5 .583 

Pastorius, Brooklyn 28 7 60 2 .971 6 77 70 4 16 12 .571 

Corridon, Philadelphia.. 37 14 99 9 .926 9 89 131 3 *18 14 .563 

Phillippe, Pittsburg.... 35 8 53 1 .984 5 36 61 1 14 11 .560 

Leifield, Pittsburg 40 18 94 6 .949 12 100 112 6 20 16 .556 

Rucker, Brooklyn 37 5' 73 7 .918 8 80 131 4 15 13 .536 

Wiltse, New York 33 11 59 2 .972 5 48 79 5 13 12 .520 

Coakley, Cincinnati 37 12 58 2 .972 7 79 89 1 17 16 .515 

McGinnity, New York.. 47 18 94 4 .966 15 58 120 3 18 *18 .500 

Richie, Philadelphia.... 25 7 26 2 .943 5 38 40 2 6 6 .500 

Ewing, Cincinnati 41 14 60 3 .961 7 85 147 2 17 19 .472 

Stricklett, Brooklyn 29 17 95 2 .982 8 65 69 4 12 14 .462 

Karger, St. Louis 39 29 96 6 .954 10 65 137 6 *16 19 .457 

Ames, New York 39 11 76 8 .916 10 108 146 1 10 12 .455 

Brown, C, St. L.-Phila. 30 11 60 2 .973 11 101 55 4 10 12 .455 

Flaherty, Boston 27 12 76 9 .907 7 59 34 12 15 .444 

Weimer, Cincinnati 29 21 66 7 .926 23 63 67 3 11 14 .440 

Dorner, Boston 36 17 58 1.000 15 92 85 2 12 16 .429 

Pfeffer, Boston 19 4 38 2 .955 7 61 65 1 6 8 .429 

Scanlan, Brooklyn 17 1 21 3 .880 3 61 59 2 6 8 .429 

Lindaman, Boston 34 12 62 4 .949 15 108 90 2 11 15 .423 

Lush. Phila.-St. L 28 11 53 4 .941 11 63 91 5 10 15 .400 

Lynch, Pitts. -N. Y 19 7 35 1.000 1 52 43 5 8 .385 

Moren, Philadelphia.... 37 3 72 2 .974 9 101 98 3 11 18 .379 

Hitt, Cincinnati 21 3 37 1 .976 12 56 63 2 6 10 .375 

McGlynn, St. Louis 45 22 94 12 .906 4 112 109 3 14 25 .359 

Boultes, Boston 24 15 54 4 .945 8 50 49 5 9 .357 

Bell, Brooklyn 35 4 91 6 .941 6 77 88 3 8 16 .333 

Mclntire, Brooklyn 28 7 56 6 .913 7 79 49 3 7 15 .318 

Young, Boston 40 20 69 3 .967 13 58 86 3 10 23 .303 

Mason, Cincinnati 25 6 44 1 .980 6 55 45 1 5 12 .294 

Fromme, St. Louis 23 9 39 3 .941 4 67 67 2 5 13 .278 

Beehe, St. Louis 31 18 62 5 .941 10 109 141 4 7 19 .269 

Smith, Cincinnati 18 6 25 2 .939 4 24.. 19 2 7 .222 

* Includes one forfeited game. 

No-hit games— Pfeffer of Boston vs. Cincinnati, May 8; Maddox of 
Pittsburg vs. Brooklyn, September 20. 

Wild Pitches— Ames 20, Beebe 15, McGlynn 11, Overall 10, Rucker 10, 
Corridon 8, Dorner 8, Karger 8, Boultes 6, Ferguson 6, Lindaman 6, 
Lush 6, Moren 6, C. Brown 5, Camnitz 5, Fromme 5, Mathewson 5, M. 
Brown 4, Leifield 4, Bell 3, Coakley 3, Fraser 3, McGinnity 3, Phillippe 3, 
Scanlan 3, Stricklett 3, Weimer 3, Wiltse 3, Young 3, Lynch 2, Lund- 
gren 2, Mclntire 2, Pastorius 2, Pfeffer 2, Pfeister 2, Reulbaeh 2, J. 
Taylor 2, L. Taylor 2, Willis 2, Ewing 1, Flaherty 1, Hitt 1, Leever 1, 
Pittenger 1, Richie 1. 

Extra Innings Games— Mathewson 6, McGinnity 6, McGlynn 6, Rucker 5, 
Ames 4, Beebe 4, Bell 4, Boultes 4, Dorner 4, Flaherty 4, Karger 4, 
Overall 4, Stricklett 4, Weimer 4, Pastorius 3, Leever 3, Reulbaeh 3, M. 
Brown 2, Camnitz 2, Coakley 2, Corridon 2, Ewing 2, Lindaman 2, 
Mclnfm- 2, Moren 2, Pfeister 2, Smith 2, Sparks 2, J. Taylor 2, Wiltse 2, 
Young ?, C. Brown 1, Ferguson 1, Fraser 1, Fromme 1, Leifield 1, Lund- 
gren 1, Lush 1, Mason 1, Pfeffer 1, Phillippe 1, Richie 1, Willis 1. 

Tie Games— Ames 2, Bell 2, Boultes 2, Leever 2, Stricklett 2, Coakley 1, 
Dome- 1, Ewing 1, Fraser 1, Lush 1, Mason 1, McGlynn 1, Pfeffer 1, 
Richie 1, Rucker 1, J. Taylor 1, Willis 1. 



FROM 
348 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 

THE AMERICAN LEAGUE 

The records of the "American League of Professional Base 
Ball Clubs" have been compiled from the Record book on the 
same general lines as was adopted in the National League 
records and covers the period from the organization of the 
American League in 1900 to and including 1907. 

The American League having been in existence only eight 
years, its records are necessarily meagre, as compared with the 
National League with its thirty-seven years' existence, but as it 
is the intention of the Record book to add each succeeding year's 
records in both major leagues to this "Base Ball Compendium," 
and make such changes as newly made records may require, 
it is believed these comparative Base Ball records of both major 
leagues will grow in interest with each succeeding year. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS 

For each year from the beginning of the American League, in 1900, to 

1907. inclusive, covering a period of eight years, with the name of the 

manager of each champion club. 



Club 



1900 Chicago 

1901 Chicago 

1902 Athletics, Philadelphia. 

1903 Boston 

1904 Boston : 

1905 Athletics, Philadelphia. 

1906 Chicago 

1907 Detroit 









<u g 


M-g 




fio 


c o 


dg 




O 


^ 


82 


53 


.607 


83 


53 


.610 


83 


53 


.610 


91 


47 


.659 


95 


59 


.617 


92 


56 


.621 


80 


56 


.614 


92 


58 


.613 



Manager 



Charles A. Comiskey 
Clark Griffith 
Connie Mack 
James Collins 
James Collins 
Connie Mack 
Fielder Jones 
Hugh Jennings 



"ALL-AMERICA" TEAM-AMERICAN LEAGUE 

For the first six-year period, 1900 to 1905, inclusive. 
Players on American League Championship teams who have played in 
one position in 50 games (pitchers 25 games) or over and whose combined 
records of Fielding and Batting (pitchers' record includes Percentage 
of Victories, Fielding and Batting) rank the highest in each position 
covering the different five-year periods are entitled to a place on the 
American "All America" teams for that period. 



Position 


Name and Club 


u 

ca 


to 
O 


Og 


60 

id 


■SO 


"c3 
1 


Pitcher 

Catcher 

First base . . . 
Second base. 
Third base... 


Denton Young, Boston 

O. F. Schreckengost, Phila. . . 

Harry Davis, Philadelphia 

D. F. Murphy. Philadelphia. . 
Lave Cross. Philadelphia 


1903 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1902 
1902 
1901 


40 
71 
128 
76 
137 
139 
123 
135 
114 


.757 


.946 
.957 
.983 
.968 
.947 
.934 
.967 
.980 
.966 


.330 
.317 
.308 
.313 
.339 
.304 
.376 
.318 
.332 


2.033 
1.274 
1.291 
1.281 
1.286 
1 238 


Left field.... 


E. Delehanty, Washington . . . 


1.343 
1.298 


Right field... 


R. A. Seybold, Philadelphia. . . 


1.298 



Note. — In order to have the five-year periods in the American League 
correspond with the same periods in the National League, in this first "All- 
America" team of the American League a period of six years was covered, 
but in future "All- America" teams will be made up on the five-year basis. 



FROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



349 



AMERICAN LEAGUE FIELDING AND BATTING 
RECORDS 

Showing the fielding and batting rank of players who hold the three highest 
percentages in their respective fielding positions, covering the eight-year 
period from the beginning of the American League, in 1900, to 1907, inclusive. 



Name and Club. Year Games 

Pitchers' Fielding Record. 
Harry Howell, N. Y... 1903 26 1. 
N.Altrock, Chicago... 1905 40 
G. H. White. Chicago. 1907 47 . 
Catchers' Fielding Record. 
Joe Sugden, St. Louis. 1904 79 
J. O'Connor, St. Louis. 1906 54 
J. O'Connor, New York 1903 64 . 
First Basemen's Fielding Record. 
J. Donohue, Chicago. . 1907 157 . 
Geo. LaChance, Boston 1904 157 . 
Geo. Carey, Wash'gton 1902 120 
Second Basemen's Fielding Record. 
N. Lajoie, Cleveland.. 1905 59 
N. Lajoie, Cleveland . . 1902 87 
N. Lajoie, Cleveland.. 1906 130 
Third Basemen's Fielding Record. 
W. Bradley, Cleveland 1906 82 

Lave Cross, Phila 1903 136 

Jas. Collins, Boston... 1902 105 
Shortstops' Fielding Record. 
T. Turner. Cleveland.. 1906 147 
W. Wallace, St. Louis. 1904 139 
M. Cross, Philadelphia 1907 74 
Left Fielders' Fielding Record. 
P. Dougherty, Chicago 1906 86 . 
Jas. Barrett, Detroit. . 1904 162 . 
Hugh Duffy, Milwa'kee 1901 78 
Center Fielders' Fielding Record. 

H. Bay, Cleveland 1904 132 

Fielder Jones, Chicago 1906 144 
Fielder Jones, Chicago 1903 137 
Right Fielders' Fielding Record. 

E. Hahn, Chicago 1907 156 

Sam Crawford, Detroit. 1905 103 
Wm. Keeler, New York 1906 152 



Name and Club. Year Games 

Pitchers' Batting Record. 
Callahan, Chicago. ... 1901 27 . 

Young, Boston 1903 40 

Mullin, Detroit 1902 33 

Catchers' Batting Record. 

Clarke, Cleveland 1906 54 . 

Schreckengost, Phila. . 1901 75 
Schreckengost, Phila. . 1902 71 
First Basemen's Batting Record. 
Hickman, Cleveland .. . 1902 98 

Freeman, Boston 1907 129 

Anderson, Milwaukee. 1901 125 
Second Basemen's Batting Record. 
Lajoie, Philadelphia... 1901 130 

Lajoie, Cleveland 1904 99 

Lajoie, Cleveland 1902 87 

Third Basemen's Batting Record. 
Bradley, Cleveland .... 1902 136 . 

L. Cross, Phila 1902 137 . 

L. Cross, Phila 1901 100 . 

Shortstops' Batting Record. 

Keister, Baltimore 1901 114 

Elberf eld, New York.. 1906 98 . 

Parent, Boston 1903 139 . 

Left Fielders' Batting Record. 
Delehanty, Washington 1902 110 

Stone, St. Louis 1906 154 . 

Dougherty, Boston .... 1903 339 . 
Center Fielders' Batting Record. 

Crawford, Detroit 1903 137 . 

Jones, Chicago 1901 133 

Crawford, Detroit 1907 144 . 

Right Fielders' Batting Record. 

Cobb, Detroit 1907 150 . 

Buck Freeman. Boston 1901 129 
Keeler. New York 1904 143 



PC 

344 



358 
320 
317 



422 
381 



341 

339 
331 

328 
306 
304 

376 

:m 

332 

332' 
325- 
323 



343 



AMERICAN LEAGUE PITCHING RECORDS 

Showing the rank in percentage of games won of the three leading pitchers 

in the American League, who have pitched in 25 games and over, covering 

the eight-year period from the beginning of the American League, in 1900, to 

1907, inclusive. 

Cub Year %&&" v££.. 

W.Donovan Detroit 1907 29 .862 

Clark Griffith Chicago 1901 31 .774 "• 

JohnChesbro New York 1904 63 .774 



350 



FROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 






AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING RECORDS 

Showing the batting rank of the three leading batsmen for each year, from 
the beginning of the American League, in 1900, to 1907, inclusive, covering a 
period of eight years. 



& Name and Club 




bo 

•So 


& Name and Club 


•gs 


60 

•So 




o rt 


cSPm 


o J3 


Eh 


>H 


'AO 


w 


S* 


'AO 


M 


1900 Sam Dungan, Kan. City 


117 


.337 


1904 N. Lajoie, Cleveland . . . . 


140 


.381 


R. Harley, Detroit 


123 


.32b 


Wm. Keeler, New York. 


143 


.343 


O. Pickering, Cleveland 


140 


.324 


Harry Davis, Phila 


102 


.308 


1901 N. Lajoie, Phila 


131 


.422 


1905 N. Lajoie, Cleveland. . . . 


65 


.328 


J. J. McGraw, Bait.... 


73 


.352 


Elmer Flick, Cleveland . 


131 


.306 


J. Freeman, Boston 


129 


.346 


Wm. Keeler, New York 


149 


.302 


1902 E. Delehanty. Wash'n. 


123 


.376 


1906 Geo. Stone, St. Louis. . . 


154 


.358 


N. Lajoie, Cleveland 


87 


.369 


J. J. Clarke. Cleveland 


57 


.358 


C. Hickman, Cleveland 


130 


.363 


N. Lajoie, Cleveland . . . 


152 


.355 


1903 N. Lajoie, Cleveland. . . 


126 


.355 


1907 Tyrus R. Cobb, Detroit. 


150 


.350 


Sam Crawford, Detroit 


137 


.332 


D.Kay, Wash 


25 


,333 


P. A. Dougherty, Bost. 


130 


.332 


AlOrth, New York.... 


43 


.324 



AMERICAN LEAGUE AVERAGES 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Clubs. 



Detroit 

Philadelphia . . 

Chicago 

Cleveland!' 

New York 

St. Louis 

Boston 

Washington . . 



Lost.. 



o 


O 


z 




9 


11 


13 


14 


12 


14 


9 


14 




10 


12 


16 


11 




15 


12 



14 



58 



Name and Club. 
Cobb, Detroit. 
Kay, Washington, 
Orth, New York, 
Crawford, Detroit, 
Stone, St. Louis, 
Killian, Detroit, 

^Clymer, Wash'ton, 
Flick, Cleveland, 
Nicholls, Phila., 
Lajoie, Cleveland, 
Niles, St. Louis, 

*» Anderson, Wash., 
Chase, New York, 
Oldring, Philadel., 
Mclntyre, Detroit, 
McFarland, Chic'go, 
Congalton, Boston, 
Hartsel, Philadel., 
Collins, Philadel., 

^ Milan, Washington, 



57 64 67 78 83 90 
INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
PC, 



G. AB. R. H 

150 605 97 212 .350 
25 60 8 20 .333 
43 105 11 34 .324 

144 582 102 188 .323 

155 596 77 191 
46 122 
57 206 

147 540 

124 460 
137 509 
120 402 

87 333 

125 498 
117 441 

20 81 

52 138 
133 518 
143 507 
141 523 

48 183 



j Name and Club. 
)ft>eU'hanty, Wash., 
Rossman, Detroit, 
Moriarty, N. Y., 
Lister, Cleveland, 
-..Pickering, St. L., 
16 39 .320TUanley, Wash'ton, 
30 65 .316 Parent, Boston, 
78 166 .302\IIickman, Wash'n, 
75 139 .302 Jones, Detroit, 
53 152 .299 Sehreek. Philadel., 
65 142 .289lSeybold, Philadel., 
33 96 .288iMurphy, Philadel., 
72 143 .287 Elberfeld, N. Y., 
48 126 .286 Hart, Chicago, 



6 23 
11 39 
46 146 
93 142 
51 146 
22 51 



Williams, N. Y., 
Laporte, N. Y., 
Dougherty. Chic, 
Altizer, Wash., 
Clarke, Cleveland, 
Davis, Phila., 



102 599 



O 

.613 
.607 
.576 
.559 
.473 
.454 
.396 
.325 



G. AB 

141 499 

153 571 
126 437 

22 65 
151 576 

154 605 
114 409 

81 221 
126 491 
101 356 

147 564 
124 469 
120 447 

29 70 
139 504 
130 470 

148 533 
147 540 
120 390 

149 582 



R. H. PC. 

52 139 .278 

60 158 .277 
51 121 .277 

5 18 .277 
63 159 .276 
73 167 .276 
51 113 
21 64 

101 134 
30 97 
58 153 
51 127 .271 

61 121 .271 

6 19 .271 

53 136 .270 
56 127 .270 
69 144 .270 
60 145 .269 
44 105 .269 
84 155 .266 



.276 
.273 
.272 
.271 



FROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



351 



Name and Club. 
Donovan, Detroit, 
Jones, Wash., 
Spencer, St. Louis 
Kleinow, N. Y., 
Jones, Chicago, 
Donohue, Chic, 
Hemphill, St. L., 
Schaefer, Detroit, 
Wallace, St. L., 
Warner, Wash.,** 
Hahn, Chicago, 
Unglaub, Boston, 
Hoffman, N. Y. 
Jones, St. Louis, 
Bemis. Cleveland, 
Owen, Chicago, 
Sullivan, Boston, 
Schmidt, Detroit, 
Coughlin, Detroit, 
Isbell, Chicago, 
Barrett, Boston, 
Lowe, Detroit, 
Turner, Cleveland, 
Ferris. Boston, 
O'Leary, Detroit, 
Tannehill, Chic, 
Yeager, St. Louis 
Davio, Chicago, 
Hughes, Wash.,**^ 
Howell, St. Louis, 
Stovall, Cleveland, 
Hartzell, St. Louis, 
Birm'gh'm, Cleve., 
Conroy, N. Y., 
Keeler, N. Y., 
Bender, Phila., 
Nill, Cleveland, -* 
Graham, Wash., 
Welday, Chicago, 
Hinchman, Cleve., 
Kitson, N. Y., . 

Blankenship, Wash* 
Bradley, Cleve., 
Winters. Boston, 
White, Chicago, 
Butler, St. Louis, 
Downs. Detroit, 
Hoey', Boston, 
Mullin, Detroit, 
Young:, Boston. 
H. H'chman, Cleve., 
Knight. Boston, 
Rohe, Chicago, 
-Wagner, Boston, 
Bell. N. Y.. 
Plank, Phila., 
O'Brien, Cleve., 
Chesbro. N. Y., 
Moore, N. Y.. 
Cross., Philadelphia, 
Glade. St. Louis, 
Ball. N. Y., * 

Gehring, Wash., 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING— (Continued). 

Name and Club. G. AB 

Gnimshaw, Boston, 64 181 

Theilman, Cleve., 21 59 

Stephens, St. Louis, 58 173 

Cross, Wash., <*• 41 161 

Shipke, Wash.,*** 64 189 

Smith, Chicago, 42 92 

Tannehill, Boston, 21 51 

Thomas, N. Y., 80 208 

Shaw, Boston, 76 198 
Quillan, Chicago, /M9 151 
Kahoe, Washington, 17 47 

Harris, Boston, 12 21 
Smith, Washington,^ 51 139 

Rhoades, Cleve., 35 92 

Hayden, Wash., ** 62 164 

Powers, Phila., 59 159 

Lord, Philadelphia, 57 170 

Rickey. N. Y., 52 137 

Brackett, N. Y., 10 22 

Criger, Boston, 75 226 

Alt rock, Chicago, 30 72 

Glaze, Boston. 32 61 
Sullivan, Chicago, 112 329 

Bay. Cleveland. 34 95 

Berger, Cleveland, 14 28 

F. Dela'nty, Cleve., 15 52 

Hogg. N. Y., 27 64 

Perrine, Wash.,'*'* 44 146 

Dineen, St. Louis, 29 59' 

Pelty, St. Louis, 36 95 

Coombs, Phila., 24 48 

Payne, Detroit, 53 169 

Walsh, Chicago, 57 154 

Liebhart, Cleve., 38 87 

O'Connor, St. Louis, 25 89 

Pruitt, Boston, 35 51 

Seivers, Detroit, 38 91 
Vickers, Phila.. 
Buelow, St. Louis 



G. AB 


R. 


H. 


PC. 


37 109 


20 


29 


.266 


121 437 


4S 


116 


.265 


71 230 


27 


61 


.265 


90 269 


30 


71 


.264 


154 559 


72 


146 


.261 


157 609 


75 


15S 


.259 


153 603 


66 


156 


.259 


109 372 


45 


96 


.258 


147 538 


56 


13S 


.257 


72 207 


11 


53 


.256 


156 592 


S7 


151 


.255 


139 544 


49 


138 


.255 


136 517 


SI 


131 


.253 


155 549 


53 


137 


.250 


65 172 


12 


43 


.250 


11 16 





4 


.250 


144 551 


73 


135 


.245 


104 349 


32 


85 


.244 


134 519 


80 


126 


.243 


125 486 


60 118 


.243 


106 390 


52 


95 


.243 


17 37 


2 


9 


.243 


142 524 


57 127 


.242 


143 561 


41 


135 


.241 


139 465 


61 


112 


.241 


33 108 


9 


26 


.241 


123 430 


32 104 


.239 


132 486 


59 


111 


.238 


36 80 


6 


19 


.238 


44 114 


12 


27 


.237 


124 466 


38 110 


.236 


60 220 


20 


52 


.236 


136 476 


55 


112 


.235 


140 530 


58 124 


.234 


107 423 


50 


99 


.234 


45 100 


in 


23 


.230 


78 258 


26 


59 


.229 


26 48 


7 


11 


.229 


24 35 


2 


8 


.229 


152 514 


62 117 


.228 


16 31 


3 


7 


.226 


37 102 


4 


23 


.225 


139 498 


48 


111 


.223 


35 94 


6 


21 


.223 


48 90 


12 


20 


.222 


20 59 


4 


13 


.220 


105 374 


2S 


82 


.219 


39 96 


7 


21 


.219 


70 157 


16 


34 


.217 


45 125 


10 


27 


.216 


15 51 


3 


11 


.216 


138 499 


37 107 


214 


144 494 


46 105 


213 


111 385 


29 


82 


213 


17 52 


4 


11 


212 


43 123 


9 


26 


211 


82 270 


15 


58 


208 


29 72 


1 


15 


208 


15 29 


3 


6 


207 


77 248 


37 


51 


206 


24 73 


9 


15 


205 


15 44 


5 


9 


205 


20 44 


7 


9 


205 



Smith, Washington? 
Falkenberg, Wash., 
Block, Washington, 
Doyle. N. Y.. 
Hess, Cleveland, 
Wakefield, Cleve..-- 
Schlafly, Wash.,«^ 
Powell, St. Louis, 
Eubanks, Detroit, 
Dygert, Phila., 
Patten, Wash., 
Wrddell. Phila., 
Archer, Detroit, 
Toss, Cleveland, 
Johnson, Wash., 
Newton, N. Y., 
Oherlin, Wash., 
Patterson, Chicago, 
Armbruster. Bos., 
Bartley, Phila., 
Clarkson. Cle^e., 
Morgan, Boston, 
Keefe, N. Y., 



R. H. PC. 

19 37 .204 
7 12 .203 

15 35 .202 

13 32 .199 

17 37 .196 

11 18 .196 

2 10 .196 

20 40 .192 
10 38 .192 
17 29 .192 



42 114 
14 36 



9 .191 
4 .190 



12 26 .187 

5 17 .185 

14 30 .183 

9 29 .182 

12 31 .182 

16 25 .182 
5 4 .182 

12 41 .181 
7 13 .181 

4 11 .180 
30 59 .179 
14 17 .179 

2 5 .179 

3 9 .173 

5 11 .172 

13 25 .171 

4 10 .169 
4 16 .168 
4 8 .167 

17 28 .166 

7 25 .162 

8 14 .161 



14 .157 
8 .157 
14 .154 

3 .150 

11 .147 

12 .143 
12 .140 

8 .140 
8 .138 

4 .138 

5 .135 



10 10 .135 



12 .132 

1 4 .129 

11 12 .128 

4 11 .126 

4 12 .124 
6 5 .119 
6 13 .114 
1 4 .111 

5 4 .108 



3 .097 
6 .095 
2 .090 



2 4 .073 
2 1 .053 



FROM 
352 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECCXD. 

Published Annually in January. 

Sacrifice Hits (only those who have made 10 or more sacrifice hits 
are given) — Bradley 46, Jones (Chicago) 34, Nicholls 34, Jones (St. 
Louis) 31, Rossman 28, Ganley 27, Seybold 26, Sullivan 26, Keeler 26, 
Isbell 24, Coughlin 23, Altizer 20, Pickering 20, Rohe 19, Hemphill 19, 
Jones (Washington) 17, G. Davis 17, Dougherty 17, Parent 17, Unglaub 17, 
Schaefer 17, O'Leary 16, Turner 16, Hinchman 16, Donohue 15, Collinsi 15, 
Stovall 14, Delehanty 14, Downs 14, Powers 14, Congalton 13, Smith 
(Washington) 13, Flick 13, Murphy 13, Lajoie 13, Cross 13, Cobb 12, 
Liebhart 12, White 12, H. Davis 12, Ferris 12, Stone 11, Jones (Detroit) 
11, Crawford 11, Wagner 11, Hartsel 11, Williams 11, Hoffman 11, Sulli- 
van 10, Criger 10, Schmidt 10, Hahn 10, Chase 10. 

Stolen Bases (only those who have stolen 10 or more bases arc 
given)— Conroy 41, Flick 41, Cobb 40, Ganley 40, Altizer 38, 
Dougherty 33, Chase 32, Jones (Detroit) 30, Hoffman 30, Oldring 29, 
Moriarty 28, Donohue 27, Turner 27, Jones (Washington) 26, Delehanty 
(Washington) 24, Lajoie 24, Jones (St. Louis) 24, Birmingham 23, Stone 23, 
Elberfeld 22, Isbell 22, Schaefer 21, Hartsel 20, H. Davis 20, Rossman 20, 
Bradley 20, Wagner 20, Anderson 19, Niles 19, Crawford 18, Clymer 18, 
Cross 17, Hahn 17, Jones (Chicago) 17, Rohe 16, Wallace 16, Sullivan 16, 
Pickering 15, G. Davis 15, Coughlin 15, Hinchman 15, Williams 14, Hemp- 
hill 14, Unglaub 14, Nicholls 13, Stovall 13. Congalton 13, Parent 12, 
Ferris 11, O'Leary 11, Yeager 11, Murphy 11, Seybold 10, Laporte 10, 
Perrine 10. 

Two-base Hits (only those who have made 10 or more two-base hits 
are given)— H. Davis 37, Crawford 34, Lajoie 32, Collins 29, Cobb 29, 
Seybold 29, Oldring 27, Ferris 26, Rossman 24, Murphy 23, Hartsel 23, 
Chase 23, Delehanty 22, Isbell 22, Unglaub 22, Clarke 21, Hinchman 21, 
Yeager 21, Laporte 20, Turner 20, Parent 20, Bradley 20, Hemphill 20, 
O'Leary 19, Wallace 19, Williams 18, Schreck 18, G. Davis 18, Jones 
(Chicago) 18, Stovall 18, Moriarty 18, Sullivan 17, Dougherty 17, Flick 17, 
Elberfeld 16, Jones (Washington) 16, Donohue 16, Jones (St. Louis) 16, 
Knight 16, Pickering 16, Nicholls 14, Stone 14, Anderson 13, Rohe 13, 
Conroy 12, Congalton 12, Schaefer 12, Downs 12, Spencer 11, Coughlin 11, 
Ganley 11, Niles 11, Barrett 11, Altizer 11, Jones (Detroit) 11, Hickman 11, 
Hahn 10, McFarland 10, Birmingham 10, Sullivan 10, Hoffman 10. 

Three-base hits (only those who have made 10 or more three-base 
hits are given)— Flick 18, Crawford 17, Unglaub 15, Cobb 15, Williams 
13, Stone 13, Laporte 11, Conroy 11, Birmingham 10, Hartzell 10, Jonea 
(Washington) 10, Pickering 10. 

Home Runs— H. Davis 8, Seybold 5, Hoffman 5, Cobb 5, Crawford 4, 
Stone 4, Ferris 4, Hartsel 3, Flick 3, Clarke 3, Conroy 3, Congalton 2, 
Delehanty 2, Knight 2, Rohe 2, Lajoie 2, Niles 2, Chase 2, Murphy 2, 
Williams 2, Howell 2, Altizer 2, Yeager 1, G. Davis 1. Schlafly 1, Walsh 
1. Glaze 1, Coombs 1, Lord 1, Thomas 1, Hogg 1, Orth 1, Spencer 1, 
Donohue 1, Schaefer 1, Unglaub 1, Dougherty 1, Clymer 1, Oldring 1, 
Plank 1, Gehring 1, Shipke 1, Graham 1, Hinchman 1, White 1, Downs 1, 
Young 1, Stovall. 1, Birmingham 1, Hughes 1, Sullivan 1, Barrett 1, 
Ganley 1, Parent 1. 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 

Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. 
Donohue, Chicago, 157 1846 140 12 .994 
Unglaub, Boston. 139 1504 84 22 .9S6 
Altizer, Wash., 50 579 24 10 .984 

Jones, St. Louis, 155 1687 103 31 .983 



Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PO. 

Davis, Phila., 149 1478 103 38 .977 

Moriarity, N. Y., 22 226 7 6 .975 

Lister Cleveland, 22 219 10 6 .974 



Chase, N. Y., 121 1144 77 34 .973 

Grimshaw, Boston, 15 130 7 4 .973 
Hickman, Chicago, 30 283 16 11 .965 



Stovall, Cleveland, 122 1381 68 25 .< 

Anderson, Wash., 61 615 31 11 .J 

Rossman Detroit, 153 1478 62 30 .5 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

Hartzell, St. Louis, 15 36 40 2 .974 Nill, Cleveland, 32 60 84 5 .966 

Lajoie, Cleveland, 128 314 461 25 .969 Murphy, Phila., 122 271 386 24 .965 

Ferris, Boston, 143 424 459 30 .967 Schaefer, Detroit, 74 183 205 10 .961 

Williams, N. Y., 139 357 393 26 .966 Isbell, Chicago, 119 276 384 30 .957 






FROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORI\ 

Published Annually in January. 



353 



Name and Club. 
Niles, St. Louis, 

SPerrine, Wash., 
O'Brien, Wash., 
Delehanty, Wash., 
Yeager, St. Louis, 



Cross, Wash., 
Shipke, Wash., 
Bradley, Cleve., 
Yeager, St. Louis, 
Coughlin, Detroit, 
Tannehill, Chicago, 
Hartzell, St. Louis, 
Knight, Boston, 



Cross, Philadelphia, 
Sehaefer, Detroit, 
Turner, Cleveland, 
Davis, Chicago, 
O'Leary, Detroit, 
Wallace, St. Louis, 
Wagner, Boston, 
Conroy, N. Y., 



Mclntyre, Detroit, 
Hahn, Chicago, 
Altizer, Wash., 
Parent, Boston, 
Sullivan, Boston, 
Oldring, Phila., 
Jones, Chicago, 
Seybold, Phila., 
Congalton, Boston, 
Jones, Detroit,. 
Stone, St. Louis, 
Keeler, N. Y.. 
Bay, Cleveland, 
Hartsel, Phila., 
Jones, Washington, 
Anderson, Wash., 
Barrett, Boston, 
Grimshaw, Boston, 
Crawford, Detroit, 
Cobb. Detroit, 
Nlll, Cleveland, 



Patterson, Chicago, 
Owen, Chicago. 
White, Chicago, 
Walsh, Chicago, 
Hughes, Wash., 
Plank, Phila., 
Howell, St. Louis, 
Joss, Cleveland, 
Tannehill, Boston, 
Coombs, Phila., 
Siever, Detroit, 



FI 


ELD 


INC 




SEC 


OND BASEMEN — 


(Continued). 




G. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. 


PO. 


A. E. 


PC. 


116 


280 


352 34 


.949 


Downs, Detroit, 


80 


149 


207 27 


.930' 


24 


52 


53 


6 


.946 


Schlafly, Wash., 


24 


67 


49 9 


.928 


17 


28 


55 


5 


.943 


Nicholls. Phila., 


28 


41 


69 10 


.917" 


68 


172 


180 


22 


.941 


Rohe, Chicago, 


39 


81 111 19 


.910- 


17 


46 


53 


7 


.934 


H. Hinchman, CI., 


15 


25 


60 9 


.904 




THIRD BASEMEN. 










41 


38 


98 


3 


.978 


O'Brien, Wash., 


40 


49 


95 16 


.900 


63 


57 


127 


11 


.949 


Moria,rity, N. Y., 


91 


115 


160 31 


.899 


139 


164 


278 


29 


.93N 


Rohe, Chicago, 


73 


58 


161 25 


.898 


91 


108 


194 


20 


.938 


Laporte, N. Y., 


64 


65 


115 21 


.896 


133 


163 233 


30 


.930 


Collins, Phila., 


139 


143 257 47 


.895 


31 


21 


82 


10 


.912 


Delehanty, Wash., 


46 


70 


73 18 


.888^ 


38 


49 


74 


12 


.911 


Quillin, Chicago, 


48 


45 io; 


.871 


132 


178 


293 49 


.906 
















SHORTSTOPS. 










74 


169 226 19 


.954 


Nicholls, Phila., 


82 


178 258 33 


.930- 


IS 


30 


.48 


4 


.951 


Elberfeld, N. Y., 


118 


295 400 52 


.930 


141 


258 477 39 


.950 


Smith, Wash., 


51 


99 


141 21 


.930 


132 


223 485 38 


.949 


Altizer, Wash., 


71 


155 


251 32 


.928 


138 


353 448 48 


.94S 


Perrlne, Wash., 


18 


36 


59 7 


.924 


147 


338 517 54 


.941 


Rohe, Chicago, 


29 


38 


94 11 


.92S 


109 


283 387 50 


.931 


Parent, Boston, 


43 


80 155 20 


.922 


3S 


95 


94 14 


.931 


O'Brien, Wash., 


21 


27 


49 9 


.894 






OUTFIELDERS. 










20 


43 


3 


1000 


Hinchman, Cleve., 


148 


231 


18 11 


.958 


156 


182 


24 


2 


.990 


Hemphill, St. L., 


153 


320 


12 15 


.957 


26 


54 





1 


.982 


Flick, Cleveland, 


147 


219 


22 11 


.956 


47 


78 


12 


2 


.978 


Hoffman. N. Y., 


135 


286 


20 15 


.953 


143 


296 


16 


S 


.975 


Conroy, N. Y., 


100 


204 


10 10 


.951 


117 


180 


10 


5 


.974 


Lord, Philadelphia, 


53 


91 


6 5 


.951 


154 


307 


IS 


9 


.973 


Pickering, St. L., 


151 


210 


14 12 


.949 


147 


201 


19 


6 


.973 


Birmingham, Cleve. 


134 


273 


33 17 


.947 


129 


179 


19 


6 


.971 


Dougherty, Chi., 


148 


209 


19 13 


.946 


125 


282 


15 


9 


.971 


Ganley, Wash., 


154 


276 


23 19 


.940 


155 


276 


12 


9 


.970 


Welday, Chicago, 


15 


13 


2 1 


.938 


107 


144 


13 


5 


.969 


Downs, Detroit, 


20 


39 


3 3 


.933 


31 


55 


5 


2 


.968 


Milan, Washington, 


47 


80 


12 7 


.929 


143' 


191 


11 


7 


.967 


Delehanty, Cleve., 


15 


19 


3 2 


.917 


111 


226 


6 


S 


.967 


Laporte, N. Y., 


63 


84 


10 9 


.913 


26 


56 


2 


2 


.967 


Clymer, Wash., 


51 


79 


4 8 


.912 


99 


183 


14 


7 


.966 


Hickman, Chicago, 


21 


25 


4 3 


.906 


23 


27 


1 


1 


.966 


Bell, N. Y., 


17 


35 


4 


.897 


144 


311 


22 12 


.965 


Hoey, Boston, 


21 


24 


4 


.857 


150 


238 


30 11 


.961 


Rickey, N. Y., 


22 


32 


1 6 


.846 


25 


53 


20 


3 


.961 


















PITCHERS. 










19 


5 


36 





1000 


Hogg, New York, 


26 


7 


47 2 


.964 


11 


5 


16 





1000 


Killian, Detroit, 


42 


11 


94 4 


.963 


47 


33 


103 


2 


.986 


Smith, Chicago, 


41 


20 109 5 


.963 


56 


35 


227 


4 


.985 


Leibhart, Cleve., 


38 


9 


92 4 


.962- 


34 


6 


61 


1 


.985 


Mullin, Detroit, 


47 


15 


133 6 


.961 


43 


33 


,88 


2 


.984 


Glaze, Boston, 


32 


8 


40 2 


.960 


42 


42 


125 


3 


.982 


Altrock, Chicago, 


30 


26 


89 5 


.958 


42 


21 


143 


3 


.982 


Gehring, Wash., 


14 


3 


19 1 


.957 


18 


9 


42 


1 


.981 


Rhoades, Cleveland 


35 


13 


83 5 


.950- 


23 


9 


37 


1 


.979 


VIckers, Phila., 


10 


2 


17 1 


.950< 


38 


11 


69 


3 


.964 


Powell, St. Louis, 


32 


2 


69 4 


.947' 



FROM 
354 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING— (Continued). 



Name and Club. 


G. 


PO. 


A. 


E 


PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


PC. 


Smith, Washington 


, 36 


10 


95 


6 


.946 


Newton, N. Y., 


19 


6 


43 


4 


.925 


Donovan, Detroit, 


32 


13 


56 


4 


.945 


Glade, St. Louis, 


24 


3 


45 


4 


.923 


Dineen, St. Louis, 


29 


5 


46 


3 


.944 


Orth, New York, 


37 


9 


95 


9 


.920 


Eubanks, Detroit, 


15 


3 


32 


2 


.944 


Bartiev, Phila., 


15 


9 


14 


2 


.920 


Pelty, St. Louis, 


36 


25 


SI 


7 


.943 


Chesbro, N. Y., 


29 


3 


66 


5 


.919 


Doyle, New York, 


29 


5 


45 


3 


.943 


Berger, Cleveland, 


14 


2 


20 


2 


.917 


Winters, Boston, 


35 


6 


77 


5 


.943 


Keefe, N. Y., 


19 


1 


20 


2 


.913 


Hess, Cleveland, 


17 


6 


26 


2 


.941 


Kitson, N. Y., 


16 


4 


17 


2 


.913 


-Morgan, Boston, 


26 


6 


57 


4 


.940 


Pruitt, Boston, 


35 


7 


64 


7 


.910 


Falkenberg, Wash. 


32 


10 


82 


6 


.939 


Dygert, Phila., 


42 


13 


74 


9 


.906 


Young, Boston, 


44 


5 


S3 


6 


.936 


Johnson, Wash., 


14 


5 


20 


3 


.893 


Bender, Phila., 


33 


14 


57 


5 


.934 


Harris, Boston, 


12 


1 


21 


3 


.880 


M'oore, N. Y., 


15 


1 


27 


2 


.933 


Waddell, Phila., 


43 


16 


67 12 


.874 


iClarkson, Cleveland, 2! 


10 


30 


3 


.930 


Patten, Wash., 


36 


12 


58 


12 


.854 


Thielman, Cleve., 


20 


9 


42 


4 


.927 


Oberlin, Wash., 


11 





26 


5 


.839 


Graham, Wash., 


20 


3 


35 


3 


.927 






















CATCHERS. 












Blankenship, Wash 


. 22 


87 


25 


1 


.991 


Kleinow, N. Y., 


86 


318 


97 14 


.967 


O'Connor, St. L., 


25 


87 


29 


1 


.991 


Stephens, St. L., 


56 


200 


63 


9 


.967 


Schreck, Phila., 


99 


640 


145 12 


.985 


Clarke, Cleveland, 


115 


470 


119 


24 


.961 


Sullivan, Chicago, 


109 


477 


117 10 


.9S3 


Hayden, Wash., 


57 


247 


52 


12 


.961 


Powers, Phila., 


59 


313 


80 


7 


.983 


Spencer, St. L., 


63 


250 


80 15 


.957 


Buelow, St. Louis, 


25 


77 


36 


2 


.983 


Bemis, Cleveland, 


51 


180 


42 


10 


.957 


Payne, Detroit, 


46 


205 


55 


5 


.981 


Hart, Chicago, 


25 


85 


23 


5 


.956 


Criger, Boston, 


74 


288 


109 


9 


.978 


Thomas, N. Y., 


61 


257 


90 17 


.953 


Kahoe, Wash., 


15 


61 


19 


2 


.976 


Block, Wash., 


21 


59 


16 


4 


.949 


Archer, Detroit, 


17 


62 


16 


2 


.975 


Schmidt, Detroit, 


103 


446 


132 


34 


.944 


McFarland, Chicago, 43 


192 


47 


7 


.972 


Armbruster, Chi., 


22 


89 


37 


8 


.940 


Shaw, Boston, 


73 


294 


106 


12 


.971 


Wakefield. Cleve., 


11 


37 


3 


3 


.930 


Warner, Wash., 


64 


271 


64 10 


.971 


Rickey, N. Y., 


11 


56 


11 


9 


.882 






PITCHERS' RECORDS. 












Name and Club. 


W. 


L. TO. 


T. 


PC. 


Name and Club. 


W. 


L. TO. 


T. 


PC. 


Donovan, Detroit, 


25 


4 





1 


.862 


Powell, St. Louis, 


13 


16 


2 





.448 


Joss, Cleveland, 


27 


11 


1 


1 


.711 


Winters, Boston, 


12 


15 


3 





.444 


Dygert, Phila., 


20 


9 


5 





.690 


Morgan, Boston, 


8 


11 


2 





.421 


White, Chicago, 


27 


13 


3 





.675 


Clarkson, Cleve., 


5 


7 




1 


.417 


Bender, Phila., 


16 


8 


2 





.667 


Patten, Wash., 


12 


17 







.414 


Smith, Chicago, 


22 


11 


3 


1 


.667 


Newton, N. Y., 


7 


10 







.412 


Killian, Detroit, 


25 


13 





1 


.658 


Glaze, Boston, 


9 


13 




1 


.409 


Siever, Detroit, 


19 


10 


4 





.655 


Orth, N. Y., 


14 


21 







.400 


Plank, Phila., 


24 


16 





3 


.600 


Altrock, Chicago, 


8 


12 




2 


.400 


Young, Boston, 


22 


15 


2 


2 


.595 


Coombs, Phila., 


6 


9 







.400 


Waddell, Phila., 


19 


13 


7 


1 


.594 


Patterson, Chicago 


4 


6 







.400 


Glade, St. Louis, 


13 


9 


1 





.591 


Eubanks, Detroit, 


2 


3 







.400 


Hogg, N. Y., 


11 


8 


4 





.579 


Owen, Chicago, 


2 


3 




1 


.400 


Thielman, Cleve., 


11 


8 








.579 


Pelty, St. Louis, 


12 


21 




1 


.361 


Walsh, Chicago, 


24 


18 


6 


2 


.571 


Johnson, Wash., 


5 


9 







.357 


Leibhart, Cleve., 


18 


14 


1 


1 


.563 


Hughes, Wash., 


7 


13 







.350 


Rhoades, Cleve., 


15 


14 


2 


1 


.517 


Smith, Wash., 


11 


21 




1 


.344 


Howell, St. Louis, 


16 


15 


3 


1 


.516 


Dineen, St. Louis, 


7 


15 







.318 


Mullin, Detroit, 


20 


20 


2 


1 


.500 


Gehring, Wash., 


3 


7 







.300 


Doyle, N. Y., 


11 


11 


2 


1 


.500 


Moore, N. Y., 


3 


7 







.300 


Hess, Cleveland, 


6 


6 


2 


1 


.500 


Graham, Wash., 


4 


10 







.286 


Keefe, N. Y., 


4 


4 


2 





.500 


Falkenberg, Wash. 


, 5 


18 




1 


.217 


Kitson, N. Y., 


S 


3 


2 


1 


.500 


Pruitt, Boston, 


3 


11 







.214 


Berger, Cleveland, 


3 


3 





2 


.500 


Oberlin, Wash., 


3 


11 







.214 


Vickers, Phila., 


2 


2 


2 





.500 


Bartley, Phila., 





4 


6 


1 


.000 


Chesbro, N. Y., 


9 


10 


6 


1 


.474 


Harris, Boston, 





7 





1 


.000 


Tannehill, Boston, 


6 


7 


2 


1 


.462 















FROM 
SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 355 

Published Annually in January. 

National Association of Professional 
Base Ball Leagues 

CHAMPIONSHIP CLUBS, 1907 



League 



American Association 

Central League 

Connecticut League 

Cotton States League 

Eastern League 

Eastern Illinois League 

Gulf Coast League 

niinois-Indiana-Iowa League . 

Interstate League 

Iowa League 

New England League 

New York State League 

Northern Copper League 

Northwestern League 

Ohio- Pennsylvania League . . . 
Okla.-Ark.-Kans. League 

Pacific Coast League 

Penn.-Ohio-Md. League 

South Atlantic League 

Southern Association 

South Michigan League 

South Carolina League 

Texas League , 

Tri-State League 

Virginia League 

Western Association 

Western League 

Western Penn. League 

Western Canada League 

Wisconsin-Illinois League 



Champion 



Columbus, 

Springfield, O 

Holyoke, Mass 

Mobile, Ala 

Toronto, Ont 

Mattoon, 111 

Lake Charles, La. 
Rock Island. 111... 



Waterloo, Iowa 

Worcester, Mass 

Albany, N. Y 

Winnipeg, Man 

Aberdeen, Wash 

Youngstown, O 

Bartlesville, Okla. . . 

Los Angeles, Cal 

Steubenville, O 

Charleston, S. C 

Atlanta, Ga 

Tecumseh, Mich . . . 

Sumter, S. C 

Austin, Tex 

Williamsport, Pa . . . 

Norfolk, Va 

Wichita, Kans 

Omaha, Neb 

Fairmont, Pa 

Medicine Hat, Can. . 
Freeport. Ill 



Games 


Games 


Won 


Lost 


90 


64 


86 


49 


83 


42 


82 


52 


83 


51 


74 


44 


41 


20 


86 


46 


79 


45 


76 


36 


79 


50 


74 


24 


85 


51 


86 


52 


24 


13 


115 


74 


69 


33 


75 


46 


78 


54 


69 


42 


44 


23 


88 


52 


86 


38 


67 


48 


98 


35 


84 


63 


42 


21 


58 


32 


79 


41 



P.C. 



.612 
.619 
.627 
.672 
.652 

!637 
.679 
.612 
.755 
.625 
.623 
.649 



.620 
.591 
.622 
.651 
.629 
.694 
.583 
.737 
.571 
.667 
.644 
.658 



BATTING AND FIELDING AVERAGES 

Players in the different leagues of the National Association who have 
played in one position in 50 games (pitchers 25 games) or over, and have the 
highest percentage in Batting and Fielding in their respective positions. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



BATTING 


FIELDING 


Position 


Name 


Club 


w 

S 

o 


P.C. 


Position 


Name 


Club 


£ 


P.C. 


Pitcher . . 


Criss 


3t. Paul 


27 


.281 


Pitcher . . 


West 


Toledo.. 


31 


1.000 


Catcher.. 


Roth 


Milw'e. 


88 


.320 


Catcher. . 


Abbott. . . 


Toledo.. 


87 


.985 


lst,base . . 
2d base . . 


Beckley.. 


K. City. 


100 


.365 


1st base. . 


Carr. 


Ind'olis 


137 


.990 


Flood .... 


St. Paul 


69 


.318 


2d base. . . 


Wrigley. . 


Col'bus 


152 


.976 


3d base. . . 


Perring.. 


Toledo.. 


135 


.301 


3d base. . . 


Hopke . . . 


Ind'olis 


155 


.944 


Shortstop 


Hulswitt 


Col'bus 


159 


.296 


Shortstop 


Quinlan.. 


L'sville 


156 


.934 


Fielder. . . 


Gessler . . 


Col'bus 


135 


.325 


Fielder. . . 


Seigle 


Ind'olis 


116 


.980 


Fielder. . . 


Armbru'r 


Toledo.. 


133 


.322 


Fielder. . . 


Armbru'r 


Toledo.. 


133 


.972 


Fielder. . . 


Clarke, J. 


Toledo.. 


154 


.321 


Fielder. . . 


Himes 


Ind'olis 


90 


.966 



FROM 
356 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



CENTRAL LEAGUE 



BATTING 


FIELDING 


Position 


Name 


Club 


09 

I 
u 


d 

Oh' 


Position 


Name 


Club 


to 

a 

o 




Pitcher . . 


Corns 


Sp'field 


32 


.281 


Pitcher . . 


Corns.... 


Sp'field 


32 


991 


Catcher . . 


Clarke . . . 


Sp'field 


92 


.251 


Catcher. . 


Knoll .... 


Ev'ville 


58 


.981 


1st base.. 


Cameron . 


Terre H 


102 


.309 


1st base.. 


Myers 


Canton . 


131 


.992 


2d base. . . 


McKean . 


D.-Sp.. 


108 


.294 


2d base. . . 


McCombs 


Wh'ing 


113 


962 


3d base. . . 


Donohue . 


Sp'field 


72 


.295 


3d base, . . 


Frances. . 


G.Rap's 


98 


951 


Shortstop 


Osteen... 


Sp'field 


112 


.338 


Shortstop 


Lindsay. . 


Canton . 


133 


.934 


Fielder. . . 


Fremer . . 


Sp'field 


68 


.294 


Fielder. . . 


Coffey . . . 


S. Bend 


67 


1 000 


Fielder. . . 


Core 


Wh.-D. 


121 


.276 


Fielder. . . 


Knoll .... 


Ev' ville 


61 


.988 


Fielder. . . 


Hendri'ks 


Sp'field 


66 


.272 


Fielder. . . 


Price 


Wh'ing 


129 


.987 



CONNECTICUT LEAGUE 



Pitcher . . 


Luby 


Sp'field 


27 


.300 


Pitcher . . 


Dolan .... 


Holy'ke 


29 


.977 


Catcher. . 


Beaum'nt 


Br'port 


107 


.300 


Catcher. . 


Shincel . . 


W'bury 


115 


978 


1st base.. 


Yale 


Sp'field 


91 


.295 


1st base . . 


Massey . . 


W'bury 


123 


.990 


2d base. . . 


O'Rourke 


Br'port 


121 


.303 


2d base. . . 


Burns 


Sp'field 


56 


.952 


3d base. . . 


Hayward 


N. Hav. 


65 


.309 


3d base. . . 


Grubb . . . 


Holy'ke 


121 


.927 


Shortstop 


Paster . . . 


N'wich 


120 


.286 


Shortstop 


Boucher . 


Holy'ke 


124 


.914 


Fielder. . . 


Ladd 


Br'port 


125 


.341 


Fielder. . . 


Rising . . . 


Sp'field 


121 


.971 


Fielder. . . 


Rising . . . 


Sp'field 


121 


.321 


Fielder. . . 


Sawyer . . 


Br'port 


85 


.967 


Fielder. . . 


Hoffman . 


Ha'ford 


114 


.301 


Fielder. . . 


Kennedy. 


N. Hav. 


66 


.964 







EASTERN 


LEAGUE 








Pitcher . . 


M'Carthy 


New'rk 


30 


.279 


Pitcher . . 


V owinkle 


Buffalo | 31 


.988 


Catcher. . 


Byers 


Balto . . 


61 


.322 


Catcher . . 


Shea 


New'rk 


50 


.977 


1st base. . 


M'Conn'll 


Buffalo 


132 


.292 


1st base . . 


Sharpe. . . 


New'rk 


122 


.989 


2d base. . . 


M'Conn'll 


Prov . . . 


129 


.320 


2d base. . . 


Smith.... 


Buffalo 


128 


.978 


3d base. . . 


Lord 


Prov... 


134 


.278 


3d base. . . 


Lennox . . 


Roch'er 


136 


.943 


Shortstop 


Beach 


Balto . . 


70 


.258 


Shortstop 


Nattress. 


Buffalo 


134 


.944 


Fielder... 


Thoney . . 


Toronto 


94 


.329 


Fielder. . . 


Weidens'l 


Toronto 


99 


.M2 


Fielder. . . 


Chadbo'e. 


Prov... 


118 


.294 


Fielder. . . 


Zacker... 


New'rk 


128 


.974 


Fielder. . . 


White.... 


Buffalo 


114 


.289 


Fielder. . . 


Murray . . 


Buffalo 


114 


.972 



GULF COAST LEAGUE 



Pitcher . . 


Halley... 


LakeCh 


30 


.224 


Pitcher . . 


Frickie. . . 


Monroe 


28 


.978 


Catcher. . 


Braun . . . 


Alex. .. 


91 


.348 


Catcher . . 


Braun . . . 


Alex... 


91 


.986 


1st base . . 


Blanch 'te 


Opel . . . 


90 


.307 


1st base . . 


Hoffman . 


Alex... 


110 


.979 


2d base. . . 


Badger . . 


LakeCh 


83 


.273 


2d base. . . 


Hubbard. 


Lafay. . 


50 


.948 


3d base. . . 


Adding 'n 


Monroe 


79 


.243 


3d base. . . 


Adding 'n 


Monroe 


79 


.968 


Shortstop 


White. . . . 


Alex . . . 


77 


.248 


Shortstop 


White. . . . I Alex . . . 


77 


.919 


Fielder. . . 


Horn 


LakeCh 


85 


.319 


Fielder. . . 


Carroll...! Monroe 


108 


.984 


Fielder. . . 


Emery . . . 


LakeCh 


93 


.270 


Fielder. . . 


Emery. . . 1 LakeCh 


111 


.970 


Fielder. . . 


Mason . . . 


Orange 


60 


.254 


Fielder. . . 


KetchumlL.C.-Al 


99 


.956 





ILLINOIS- 


INDIANA-IOWA 


LEAGUE 






Pitcher . . 


Wilson . . . 


Rock I.. 


31 


.314 


Pitcher . . 


Owens . . . 


C. Rap . 


41 


.980 


Catcher. . 


Erickson. 


Peoria . 


65 


.263 


Catcher . . 


Simon 


C. Rap . 


10*) 


.990 


1st base.. 


Swancina 


Peoria . 


123 


.292 


1st base. . 


Crockett . 


Clinton 


131 


.987 


2d base. . . 


Vogel 


Clinton 


58 


.276 


2d base. . . 


Wanner. . 


Rock I.. 


128 


.966 


3d base. . . 


Doyle 


Sp'field 


66 


.290 


3d base. . . 


Bewer . . . 


Peoria . 


128 


.932 


Shortstop 


Deringer. 


Peoria . 


59 


.220 


Shortstop 


Raymond 


Peoria . 


120 


.928 


Fielder. . . 


Davidson 


Peoria . 


121 


.284 


Fielder. . . 


Connors. . 


Bloom. . 


104 


.990 


Fielder. . . 


Jeffries . . 


Decat'r 


123 


.271 


Fielder. . . 


Ruby .... 


Sp'field 


130 


.985 


Fielder. . . 


Davis .... 


C. Rap. 


129 


.269 


Fielder. . . 


Davis 


C. Rap. 


129 .981 



FROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 

INTERSTATE LEAGUE 



357 



BATTING 


FIELDING 


Position 


Name 


Club 


CO 


d 


Position 


Name 


Club 




d 








O 
27 


.240 










(X 


Pitcher . . 


Parsons. . 


Oil City 


Pitcher . . 


M'Creig't 


Fr'nkln 


43 


.981 


Catcher. . 


Foster . . . 


Bradf'd 


70 


.308 


Catcher . . 


Bailey . . . 


Punx . . 


5?. 


.969 


1st base . . 


Sykes .... 


Oil City 


97 


.302 


1st base . . 


Dwyer. . . 


Fr'nkln 


8? 


.989 


2d base. . . 


Schmaltz. 


Frank. . 


73 


.248 


2d base. . . 


Feeney. . . 


Bradf.. 


9-1 


.964 


3d base. . . 


Hoover. . . 


Bradf'd 


81 


.309 


3d base. . . 


Snowden. 


DuBois 


60 


.925 


Shortstop 


Jewell . . . 


Oil City 


94 


.278 


Shortstop 


Flynn . . . 


Oil City 


56 


945 


Fielder. . . 


Weimer. . 


DuBois 


60 


.338 


Fielder. . . 


Earley . . . 


Fr'nkln 


R3 


.971 


Fielder. . . 


M'Carthy 


Frank. . 


71 


.314 


Fielder. . . 


O'Hare . . 


Erie. . . . 


91 


.968 


Fielder. . . 


Earley . . . 


Frank. . 


53 


.294 


Fielder. . . 


Spratt . . . 


Bradf'd 


78 


.965 



IOWA LEAGUE 



Pitcher . . 


Harmon. . 


Wat'loo 


27 


.230 


Pitcher . . 


Gasper. . . 


Wat'loo 


27 


983 


Catcher.. 


Mitze 


Oska... 


77 


.246 


Catcher . . 


Mitze 


Oska. . . 


77 


.988 


1st base . . 


Kennedy. 


Burl . . . 


66 


.274 


1st base. . 


Corbett . . 


Ottum . 


96 


,990 


2d base. . . 


Patterson 


Oska... 


76 


.261 


2d base. . . 


Middlet'n 


Marsh '1 


51 


960 


3d base. . . 


Burg 


Marsh '1 


103 


.274 


3d base. . . 


Pen'ing'n 


Wat'loo 


59 


939 


Shortstop 


Kensel . . . 


Oska... 


83 


.268 


Shortstop 


Wilkes . . . 


Wat'loo 


119 


.920 


Fielder. . . 


Kaphan . . 


Wat'loo 


66 


.348 


Fielder. . . 


Linde'bk 


Quincy. 


68 


988 


Fielder. . . 


House 


Burl. .. 


129 


.308 


Fielder. . . 


Curtis 


Wat'loo 


59 


,979 


Fielder. . . 


Plummer. 


Quincy. 


104 


.287 


Fielder. . . 


Bauer 


Ottum . 


69 


.978 







NEW 


ENGLAND LEAGUE 








Pitcher . . 


Abbott. . . 


Low-Ly 


27 


.234 


Pitcher . . 


E. Steele. 


Lynn . . 


34 


993 


Catcher. . 


Knotts . . . 


Worces 


68 


.288 


Catcher . . 


Daum 


Lynn . . 


62 


984 


1st base. . 


Danzig - . . . 


NewB. 


98 


.289 


1st base . . 


Pulsif er. . 


Hav'hil 


77 


988 


2d base. . . 


Kehoe 


NewB. 


59 


.275 


2d base. . . 


Burns 


Lowell . 


114 


967 


3d base. . . 


Wilson... 


Law'ce. 


103 


.282 


3d base. . . 


Lovell 


Lynn . . 


103 


.915 


Shortstop 


Ort 


Lynn. . . 


52 


.259 


Shortstop 


Shannon . 


Lowell . 


106 


,916 


Fielder. . . 


Burkett. . 


Worces 


51 


.338 


Fielder. . . 


Hamilton 


Hav'hil 


91 


.988 


Fielder. . . 


Hamilton 


Haverh 


91 


.333 


Fielder. . . 


Reynolds. 


Worces 


111 


.974 


Fielder. . . 


Russell. . . 


Worces 


63 


.314 


Fielder. . . 


Kane 


Broct n 


101 


.§72 



NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE 



Pitcher . . 
Catcher. . 
1st base.. 
2d base. . . 
3d base. . . 
Shortstop 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 



Hunter . . 


W.Barr 


36 


.301 


McGinley 


W.Barr 


66 


.247 


Crisham.. 


Syr'cus 


136 


.313 


Zimmer'n 


W.Barr 


99 


.314 


Holling'h 


W.Barr 


123 


.327 


Cargo 


Troy . . . 


134 


.280 


Moeller . . 


Troy . . . 


77 


.333 


Goode 


Albany 


111 


.315 


DeGroff. . 


Troy . . . 


135 


.313 



Pitcher . . 


Parkins. . 


Bingh n 


48 


Catcher . . 


Millerick. 


Albany 


95 


1st base . . 


Kockill. . . 


Albany 


132 


2d base. . . 


O'Brien.. 


Troy... 


56 


3d base. . . 


Carr 


Syr 'cus 


123 


Shortstop 


Zeimer.. . 


Scran 'n 


113 


Fielder. . . 


Garry 


Bing'n. 


50 


Fielder. . . 


Eley 


W.Barr 


131 


Fielder. . . 


Fog-arty. . 


W.Barr 


130 



NORTHERN COPPER LEAGUE 


Pitcher . . 


Cumm'gs 


Duluth. 


57 


.278 


Pitcher . . 


B'shelm'n 


Winp'g 


Z6 


.963 


Catcher. . 


Crisp . . . 


Win'pg 


94 


.283 


Catcher . . 


Stewart.. 


Houg'n 


40 


.971 


1st base . . 


Solbroa . . 


Houg'n 


96 


.308 


1st base.. 


Luderus . 


Winp'g 


57 


.977 


2d base. . . 


Taylor . . . 


Houg'n 


42 


.285 


2d base. . . 


King 


Winp'g 


97 


.934 


3d base. . . 


Zeider . . . 


Win' pg 


98 


.314 


3d base. . . 


Zeider . . . 


Winp'g 


98 


.932 


Shortstop 


Leighty . . 


Duluth. 


103 


.220 


Shortstop 


Sens'nb'h 


Winp'g 


94 


.912 


Fielder. . . 


M'Corm'k 


Duluth. 


102 


.306 


Fielder. . . 


Piper 


Winp'g 


89 


.960 


Fielder. . . 


Cox 


Win'pg 


96 


.304 


Fielder. . . 


Lewis 


Calu'et. 


53 


.954 


Fielder. . . 


Piper .... 


Win'pg 


89 


.293 


Fielder. . . 


Monroe . . 


Duluth. 


103 


.932 



FROM 
SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 

NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE 



BATTING 


Position 


Name 


Club 


m 

s 


d 








O 


b 


Pitcher . . 


Tonnesen 


Aber'n. 


36 


.252 


Catcher. . 


Boettiger 


Aber'n. 


57 


.286 


1st base. . 


Burnett.. 


Tacoma 


59 


.326 


2d base. . . 


Donovan. 


Butte.. 


138 


.251 


3d base. . . 


Shaw .... 


Tacoma 


150 


.278 


Shortstop 


McKune.. 


Spokan 


139 


.255 


Fielder. . . 


Househl'r 


Aber'n. 


1'27 


.347 


Fielder. . . 


Bell 


Butte.. 


113 


.320 


Fielder. . . 


Meyer 


Seattle. 


134 


.312 



FIELDING 



Position 



Pitcher . . 
Catcher.. 
1st base. . 
2d base. . . 
3d base. . . 
Shortstop 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 



Name 



Dunn 

Boettiger 

Strieb..., 

Stis 

Fitzge'ld 
Briseno . 
Lynch . . 
Househl'r 
Ross 





CO 


Club 


§ 




O 


Spo-Va 


27 


Aber'n. 


57 


Aber'n. 


135 


Sea.-B . 


123 


Aber'n. 


119 


Tacoma 


148 


Tacoma 


144 


Aber'n. 


127 


Seattle. 


107 



OHIO-PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE 



Pitcher . . 


Justus . . . 


Lancas. 


45 


.295 


Pitcher . . 


Yarnell . . 1 Mansfd 


32 


.989 


Catcher. . 


Pearce . . . 


New'rk 


89 


.297 


Catcher.. 


Fox 1 Lanc'er 


78 


.991 


1st base. . 


Schwartz 


Akron . 


131 


.297 


1st base. . 


Schwartz' Akron . 


131 


.992 


2d base. . . 


East 


Akron . 


129 


.285 


2d base. . . 


Pinkney . 


New CI. 


57 


.964 


3d base. . . 


King 


Mansfd 


135 


.273 


3d base. . . 


Hagen . . . 


New CI. 


96 


.955 


Shortstop 


Starr 


Youngs 


138 


.267 


Shortstop 


Starr 


Youngs 


138 


.954 


Fielder. . . 


Tate 


Marion. 


50 


.330 


Fielder. . . 


Lawrence 


Y.&M. 


80 


.990 


Fielder. . . 


Elston . . . 


Lanc'er 


115 


.318 


Fielder. . . 


Drake 


Mansfd 


139 


.989 


Fielder. . . 


Drake 


Mansfd 


139 


.301 


Fielder. . . 


Mathay . . 


Sh.-Ak. 


111 


.988 







PACIFIC 


COAST LEAGUE 








Pitcher . . 


Nagle 


Los An. 


34 


.249 


Pitcher . . 


Jones 


SanFr. 


56 


.980 


Catcher. . 


Street.... 


San Fr. 


154 


.231 


Catcher. . 


Donohue . 


Port'nd 


89 


.984 


1st base. . 


Dillon.... 


Los An. 


181 


.304 


1st base. . 


Dillon... 


Los An. 


181 


.988 


2d base. . . 


Brashear. 


Los An. 


95 


.270 


2d base. . . 


Mohler. . . 


San Fr. 


108 


.964 


3d base. . . 


Smith.... 


Los An. 


118 


.243 


3d base. . . 


Irwin 


SanFr. 


163 


.958 


Shortstop 


Eagan . . . 


Oakla'd 


194 


.335 


Shortstop 


Delmas . . 


Los An. 


173 


.938 


i elder. . . 


Melchoir . 


SanFr. 


66 


.305 


Fielder. . . 


Cravath. . 


Los An. 


173 


.973 


Fielder. . . 


Cravath. . 


Los An. 


173 


.303 


Fielder. . . 


Heitmul'r 


Oakla'd 


199 


.969 


Fielder. . . 


McCredie 


Port'nd 


169 


.300 


Fielder. . . 


Melchoir. 


SanFr. 


66 


.967 



PENNSYLVANIA-OHIC 


-MARYLAND LEAGUE 




Pitcher . . 


Miller.... 


McKes. 


26 


.330 


Pitcher . . 


Pearson. . 


Union.. 


35 


.990 


Catcher. . 


Schriver. 


Zanes . . 


92 


.335 


Catcher. . 


James . . . 


Wash . . 


78 


.975 


1st base. . 


Tarleton . 


Charl . . 


67 


.274 


1st base. . 


Conroy. . . 


E. Liv. . 


93 


.992 


2d base. . . 


Wilbert.. 


McK.B. 


51 


.249 


2d base. . . 


McClos'y. 


Union. . 


58 


.963 


3d base. . . 


Hartman 


McKes. 


72 


.305 


3d base. . . 


Wetzell.. 


E. Liv. . 


96 


.977 


Shortstop 


Ferguson 


Ch-M'K 


76 


.253 


Shortstop 


Jackson. . 


Charl... 


52 


.945 


Fielder. . . 


Mcllveen. 


Steub.. 


58 


.305 


Fielder. . . 


Mcllveen 


Steub.. 


58 


.999 


Fielder.. . 


Rudolph . 


Union.. 


107 


.297 


Fielder. . . 


Morgan . . 


McKes. 


107 


.984 


Fielder. . . 


Morgan. . 


McKes. 


107 


.289 


Fielder. . . 


Kellar... 


Union. . 


80 


.983 



SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE 



Pitcher . . 


Sparks. . . 


Augus . 


34 


.268 


Pitcher . . 


Harley. . . 


Macon.. 


37 .984 


Catcher. . 


Evers 


Charls.. 


59 


.265 


Catcher. . 


Robinson 


Macon.. 


73 


.994 


1st base. . 


Dexter. . . 


Augus . 


114 


.253 


1st base. . 


Mullaney 


Jackv. . 


66 


.991 


2d base. . . 


Logan . . . 


Savan.. 


117 


.254 


2d base. . . 


Logan . . . 


Savan. . 


117 


.966 


3d base. . . 


Griffin . . . 


Charls.. 


65 


.259 1 


3d base. . . 


Lewis.. . . 


Jackv. . 


108 


.942 


Shortstop 


Johnson . 


Charls.. 


93 


.263 


Shortstop 


McMillan 


Jackv'. 


53 


.934. 


Fielder. . . 


Raf tery . 


Charls.. 


120 


.301 


Fielder. . . 


Crozier . . 


Augus. 


100 


.99F 


Fielder. . . 


Stinson . . 


Macon.. 


110 


.292 


Fielder. . . 


Meany . . . 


Charls.. 


125 


.986 


Fielder. . . 


Murdock. 


Macon.. 


125 


.266 


Fielder. . . 


Lohr 


Colum.. 


88 


.988 



PROM 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL, BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 

SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION 



BATTING 



Position 



Pitcher . . 
Catcher. . 
1st base . 
2d base. . . 
3d base. . . 
Shortstop 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 



Name 



Fisher . . . 
Hardy . . . 
Meeks . . . 

Page 

M'Elveen 

Atz 

Paskert.. 
Molesw' h 
Henline . . 



Club 



Shreve. 
Nashv . 
Birmin. 
L.Rock 
Nahsv . 
New Or 
Atlanta 
Birmin. 
Mp-My. 



.312 
.312 
.340 
.268 
.286 
.311 



.278 



FIELDING 



Position 



Pitcher . . 
Catcher. . 
1st base . . 
2d base. . . 
3d base. . . 
Shortstop 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 



Name 



Fisher . . . 
Woods . . . 

Cary 

Lewee . . . 

Cross 

Benson . . 
Neighb'r. 
Winters. . 
Gilbert. . . 



Club 



Shreve. 
L. Rock 
Memph 
Shreve . 
New Or 
Shreve. 
Memph 
Atlanta 
L. Rock 





SOUTH CAROLINA LEAGUE 


Pitcher . . 


Armstr' g 


Gr-Spg 


32 


.217 


Pitcher . . 


Laval 




?7 


935 


Catcher.. 


Buesse.C. 


Orangb 


54 


.323 


Catcher . . 


Buesse.C. 




54 


969 


1st base.. 


Benbow. . 


Spar . . . 


70 


.250 


1st base . . 


Scott 




5*1 


978 


2d base. . . 


M'Kenzie 


Or.-Spa 


70 


.237 


2d base. . . 


Wynne. . . 


Sumptr 


fi? 


961 


3d base. . . 


Reinhar't 


Greenv. 


54 


.289 


3d base. . . 


Cook 


Orangb 


m 


898 


Shortstop 


Lindsay.. 


Sumptr 


68 


.255 


Shortstop 


Lindsay. . 


Sumptr 


68 


.904 


Fielder. . . 


Coles 


Spar . . . 


79 


.286 


Fielder. . . 


Laudy . . . 


Gr. Spr. 


59 


984 


Fielder. . . 


Glaze .... 


Orangb 


64 


.257 


Fielder. . . 


M'Laurin 




66 


953 


Fielder. . . 


Tyderm'n 


Orangb 


66 


.241 


Fielder. . . 


Welsh. . . . 


Sumptr 


51 


.939 



SOUTH 


MICHIGAN LEAGUE 




Pitcher . . 


Steiger. . . 


Bat.C. 


46 


.236 


Pitcher . . 


Steiger. . . 


Bat.C. 


46 


982 


Catcher. . 


Barber... 


Bat.C. 


43 


.226 


Catcher.. 


Ryan 


Kalam . 


77 


987 


1st base. . 


Thomas . . 


Mt. C. 


111 


.288 


1st base . . 


Webster . 


Kalam . 


109 


.983 


2d base. . . 


Morrissey 


Lansi'g 


91 


.281 


2d base. . . 


Tibald.... 


Flint. . . 


"S6 


961 


3d base. . . 


Craven. . . 


Flint. . . 


103 


.269 


3d base. . . 


Andrews. 


Kalam . 


113 


941 


Shortstop 


Darring'r 


Mt. C. 


102 


.283 


Shortstop 


Hender' n 


Bat. C 


108 


.940 


Fielder. . . 


Laudry . . 


Bat. C 


107 


.297 


Fielder. . . 


Hessber'r 


Bat.C. 


108 


.982 


Fielder. . . 


Cocash. . . 


Flint. . . 


88 


.292 


Fielder. . . 


Blake.... 


Kalam . 


107 


.978 


Fielder. . . 


Bensley. . 


BayC. 


97 


.252 


Fielder. . . 


Weinck . . 


BayC. 


88 


.965 



TEXAS LEAGUE 


Pitcher}. . 


Guyn 


Waco . . 


35 


.241 


Pitcher . . 


Biersdf'r. 


Dallas. . 


33 


.972 


Catcher. . 


White.... 


Temple 


70 


.291 


Catcher . . 


Gordon. . . 


Austin. 


10? 


.982 


1st base. . 


Miller.... 


Dallas. . 


91 


.278 


1st base . . 


Adams. . . 


Austin . 


140 


987 


2d base. . . 


Gardner . 


Austin . 


139 


.291 


2d base. . . 


Pendlet'n 


San An. 


88 


.971 


3d base. . . 


Louden . . 


Dallas. . 


99 


.276 


3d base. . . 


Nagel 




W> 


961 


Shortstop 


Markley . 


San An. 


68 


.248 


Shortstop 


Watle. . . . 


San An. 


52 


.960 


Fielder. . . 


Mclver. . . 


Temple 


74 


.322 


Fielder. . . 


Bradley . . 


Austin. 


82 


.960 


Fielder. . . 


Speaker. . 


Hous'n. 


118 


.314 


Fielder. . . 


Pulliam . . 


Ft. Wor 


73 


.960 


Fielder. . . 


Stoval.... 


San An. 


107 


.291 


Fielder. . . 


Wallace.. 


Waco . . 


131 


.953 



TRI-STATE LEAGUE 


Pitcher . . 


Hafford.. 


Tren... 


34 


.267 


Pitcher . . 


Wolfe. . . . 


Wilm . . 


37 


1 00G 


Catcher. . 


Grady. . . . 


Wilm . . 


53 


.276 


Catcher. . 


J.Smith. 


Harris . 


63 


.986 


1st base.. 


Cassidy . . 


Wilm . . 


102 


.275 


1st base . . 


Cassidy . . 


Wilm . . 


102 


.993 


2d base. . . 


Charles . . 


Wmspt 


107 


.280 


2d base. . . 


Farrell... 


Altoona 


100 


.979 


3d base. . . 


Wolv'ton. 


Wmspt 


85 


.350 


3d base. . . 


Zim'er'an 


Harris . 


127 


.948 


Shortstop 


Killifer.. 


Johns. . 


70 


.305 


Shortstop 


Gleason.. 


Wmspt 


51 


.943 


Fielder. . . 


Deleha'ty 


Wmspt 


108 


.355 


Fielder. . . 


McFarl'd. 


Wilm . . 


107 


.977 


Fielder. . . 


O'Hara . . 


La-Wm 


56 


.351 


Fielder. . . 


W.Hart'n 


A1.-J... 


9? 


.973 


Fielder. . . 


O'Neill... 


Harris . 


125 


.305 


Fielder... 


Sebring. . 


Wp.-W. 


75 


.972 



360 



FROM 
SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 







VIRGINIA LEAGUE 










FIELDING 


Position 


Name 


Club 


w 

i 


d 


Position 


Name 


Club 


m 

i 

o 


d 








o 


.274 








fc 




Walsh . . . 


Pt.-Dan 


39 


Pitcher . . 


Carter . . . 


L.-R.-P 


27 


1.000 


Catcher. . 


Bentley . . 


Lynch.. 


56 


.313 


Catcher. . 


Edwards. 


Dan.-N 


101 


.983 




Shaffer . . 


Rich . . . 


57 


.270 


1st base . . 


Haas 


L.-Nor. 


111 


.989 




Siebrie. . . 


Rich... 


92 


.242 


2d base. . . 


Doyle 


Danv . . 


131 


.964 




Eustace. . 


Roan. . . 


108 


.246 


3d base. . . 


Ruhland . 


Norf'lk 


109 


.957 


Shortstop 


Moss 


Ports . . 


102 


.231 


Shortstop 


Moss 


Ports . . 


102 


.944 




Brodie . . . 


Roan. . . 


72 


.311 


Fielder. . . 


McKevitt 


Danv . . 


59 


1.000 




Henn 


Danv . . 


130 


.284 


Fielder. . . 


Seitz 


Norf'lk 


123 


.995 


Fielder. . . 


Sullivan . 


Nor.-Pt 


114 


.270 


Fielder. . . 


Brodie . . . 


Roan. . . 


72 


.993 



WESTERN ASSOCIATION 



Pitcher . . 


Root 


Joplin . 


32 


.301 


Catcher. . 


Weaver . . 


Wichi'a 


119 


.294 


1st base.. 


Holland. . 


Wichi'a 


126 


.307 


2d base. . . 


E. Olson. 


Topeka 


139 


.245 


3d base. . . 


Hetling.. 


Wichi'a 


128 


.279 


Shortstop 


S. Olson . 


Joplin . 


112 


.268 


Fielder. . . 


Becker. . . 


Wichi'a 


93 


.310 


Fielder. . . 


Davis 


Topeka 


123 


.308 


Fielder. . . 


Milan 


Wichi'a 


107 


.304 



Pitcher . . 
Catcher. . 
1st base . . 
2d base. . . 
3d base. . . 
Shortstop 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 
Fielder. . . 



Burns 

Weaver.. 
Abbott. . . 
E. Olson. 
Welter.: 
White.... 
Harri'g'n 
Murray . . 
Pettigr'w 



W. City 


28 


Wichi'a 


119 


Topeka 


119 


Topeka 


139 


Spring. 


51 


O. City 


125 


Joplin . 


125 


Spring. 


134 


Hutch . 


125 



WESTERN LEAGUE 




Gehring. . 


Des Mo. 


39 


.406 


Pitcher . . 


Hatch.... 


Pueblo. 


43 


.988 




Drill 


Pueblo. 


62 


.298 


Catcher . . 


Sullivan. . 


Lincoln 


90 


.981 


1st base. . 


Hart 


SiouxC. 


111 


.323 


1st base.. 


White. . . . 


Denver 


123 


.988 


2d base. . . 


Bader 


Pueblo. 


62 


.346 


2d base. . . 


Fox 


Lincoln 


149 


.964 




Wheeler . 


Denver 


111 


.291 


3d base. . . 


Austin . . . 


Omaha. 


151 


.951 


Shortstop 


Gagnier.. 


Lincoln 


145 


.265 


Shortstop 


Granville 


SiouxC. 


138 


.934 




Wilson . . . 


Des Mo. 


50 


.323 


Fielder. . . 


Corkhill.. 


Des Mo. 


76 


.984 




Hogriev'r 


Des Mo. 


68 


.319 


Fielder. . . 


Belden... 


Den-Pu 


53 


.980 


Fielder. . 


Welch . . . 


Omaha. 


151 


.311 


Fielder. . . 


Hogriev'r 


Des Mo. 


68 


.976 



WESTERN CANADA LEAGUE 


Pitcher . . 


Works . . . 


Med Ha 


40 


.34] 


Pitcher . . 


Works . . . 


Med Ha 


40 


.703 


Catcher. . 


Ford 


Edmon. 


93 


.283 


Catcher . . 


Ford 


Edmon. 


93 


.976 




O'Dea.... 


Leith . . 


78 


.329 


1st base. . 


O'Dea.... 


Leith . . 


78 


.969 


2d base. . . 


Hamilton 


Med Ha 


87 


.319 


2d base. . . 


Wessler. . 


Edmon. 


93 


.937 


3d base. . . 


Chandler. 


Calgary 


88 


.296 


3d base. . . 


Baker. . . . 


Edmon. 


84 


.926 


Shortstop 


McClell'd 


Calgary 


66 


.240 


Shortstop 


Harper . . 


Edmon. 


76 


.926 


Fielder. . . 


West 


Med Ha 


66 


.294 


Fielder. . . 


Russell. . . 


Calgary 


87 


.973 


Fielder. . . 


Nunzie. . . 


Leith . . 


70 


.281 


Fielder. . . 


Foster . . . 


Leith . . 


84 


.965 


Fielder. . . 


Hopkins . 


Ca-M.H 


91 


.264 


Fielder. . . 


Nunzie. . . 


Leith . . 


70 


.945 



WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE 


Pitcher . . 


Stremmel 


G. Bay. 


58 


.240 


Pitcher . . 


Darrah. . . 


Freep't 


33 


.968 


Catcher . . 


Watson . . 


Eau Cla 


96 


.272 


Catcher. . 


Stark .... 


Freep' t 


123 


.987 


1st base . . 


Whitmo'e 


Madis'n 


106 


.293 


1st base. . 


Barlow. . . 


Freep' t 


97 


.986 


2d base. . . 


Fox 


Waus. . 


102 


.248 


2d base. . . 


Boyle .... 


G. Bay. 


73 


.946 


3d base. . . 


Vorpagel 


Madis'n 


117 


.227 


3d base. . . 


McAuley. 


Waus . . 


122 


.960 


Shortstop 


Lynch . . . 


Eau Cla 


115 


.270 


ShortstOD 


Fiske 


Freep' t 


121 


.925 


Fielder. . . 


Disch 


Freep't 


75 


.309 


Fielder. . . 


Bailey . . . 


Eau Cla 


92 


.988 


Fielder. . . 


Litcher . . 


F.duLa 


100 


.286 


Fielder. . . 


Miller.... 


Madis'n 


81 


.975 


Fielder. . . 


Ives 


Freep't 


92 


.277 


Fielder. . . 


Kroy 


Waus.. 


109 


.973 



FROM 
SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL RECORD. 

Published Annually in January. 



ON*(OH 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Container 

of 

a dozen 

Spalding 



What a Base Ball Club Needs 

It is immaterial what position a ball club occupies, be it a National 
League team, a minor leaguer or a lot team, the most important article 
of the game is the ball, and a club should have the best ball made. The 

Spalding Official National 
League Ball— the adopted 
_ ball of the National 
m League for over thirty 
years— is the leader where- 
ever Base Ball is played, 
and is used by nine- tenths 
of the organized leagues 
throughout the world. 

0fficial Ci^K^J»P^JH ml m The price is $L50 each> 

League Balls. Jkj!5£Fli^?p-Tri^" *%MM but when ordered by clubs 

in dozen lots a special club 
price of $15.00 a dozen is 
made. The famous Spald- 
ing line of Base Balls in- 
cludes in addition to the 
Official National League 
Ball fourteen other balls, 
all well made and bearing the 
Spalding trade-mark, as follows : 

The Spalding "Double Seam" 

League Ball. This ball is made 

with the same care and of the same materials as the National League 

Ball, but is double stitched ; warranted to last a full game. Price, $1,50. 

The Spalding "National Association" 
Ball. This is a splendid ball, second 
only to the National League Ball, and 
is warranted to last a full game under 
ordinary conditions. Price, $1.25 each, 
and in dozen lots to clubs, $12.00 per 
dozen. 

The "Semi-Pro" League Ball; regu- 
lation size and weight; a good ball. 
Price, $1.00. 

The "City League" Ball; full size 
and weight; excellent for general prac- 
tice. Each, 75 cents. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros, have always 
made it a point to satisfy the juniors, 
and the only complete line in the 
world for the juniors to use is the 




Spalding line. 

The official ball for the boys is 
the Spalding Official "National 
League Jr." This ball is in every 
respect the same as the Spald- 
ing Official National League 
Ball, except smaller in size. 
All games played with this 
Junior League Ball will 
be recognized as legal. 
Price, $1.00. 

The "National As- 
sociation Jr." is same 
in every way as the 
"National Associa- 
tion," but smaller in 
size; it costs 75 cents. 




Spalding's 
Complete 

line of 
Base Balls. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



The ball that promises to be a popular one among ths 
juniors this year will be the "Public School League." It 
is a well made, junior size ball, with horsehide cover. It is 
one of the best balls for general practice for boys' teams. 
Price, 50 cents. 

The rest of the Spalding line includes the Spalding "Pro- 
fessional," at 50 cents; "King of the Diamond," 25 cents; 
"Lively Bounder," 25 cents; "Junior Professional," 25 cents; 
'[ Boys' Amateur," 10 cents ; " Boys' Favorite," 10 cents, and 
" Rocket, " 5 cents. 

With such a variety to select from, any team can get a 
Spalding ball suitable to its needs, and when a Spalding ball 
is used there is no question of unfairness or irregularity, as 
the SpUding line is uniformly made and universally recognized 
as the standard wherever a game is played. 

THE BAT 

Before starting on a description of the Spalding line of bats, 
the following article from the New York Evening Journal of 
February 1, 1908, by Sam Crane, the old-time player and now 
the Base Ball writer on that publication, will be of interest. 

BY SAM CRANE 

"Before McGraw left for Los 
Angeles he went down to the cel- 
lars of A. G. Spalding & Bros, and 
selected a string of bats that spell 
base hits. Six dozen of them Mc- 
Graw picked out, and they were all 
those seasoned fellows that 'zing' 
whenever the ball is met on the 
trade mark. 

"McGraw, when he selected the 
bats, said to me : ' It is the bats 
that tell the story and make ball 
players. Pitchers may be all right, 
and I guess they are, but give me 
the bat I want— the one that feels 
good to me— and I will make all the 
other fellows extend their grounds. ' 

TAKES PLENTY OP BATS. 
" Well, Murphy takes down with 

him to Marlin Springs all those 

pitcher disturbers, and there is not 

a big stick in the bunch that don't 

call for a .300 average. Even Leon 

Ames has a bat labeled in his name 

that will produce results— so 'tis 

said." 
The Spalding line of bats is a 

most complete one. The leader is 

the Spalding "Gold Medal" Bat. 

Its popularity has been secured by 

its superiority. It is perfect in bal- 
ance and finish and the quality of 

timber the best; made in light or 
dark finish and with plain or taped handle. Price, $1.00 each, Spalding 
Boys' " Gold Medal " plain bat, 50 cents. The Spalding "Record " Bat is 
made from the same models as the Gold Medal bats, but finished in rough 
and ready style, with no polish— simply the plain oil finish. Packed one 




Keeler 
Model 



Tyrus R. Cobb, 
Champion Batsman 
American League. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

dozen in a crate (assorted lengths from 30 to 35 inches and weights from 
36 to 42 ounces). The Record Bat is especially recommended for club use, 
including college and school teams. Price, $1.00 each. 

As usual, Spalding introduces something new this year— " Players' 
Autograph" Bats. This line was established to satisfy the ever-increas- 
i ng demand from players throughout America for bats of the same model 
as used by the leading batsmen, and they are duplicates of the models of 
the well known stars, such as Cobb, Chance, Stone, Keeler, Bresnahan 
and Huggins, and the line has been so selected that it is immaterial what 
size, weight or length bat a player wants he is sure to hit it in one of the 
"Autograph" bats. The cost of the "Autograph" bats, plain oil finish, is 
$1.00 each; special to clubs, $10.00 per dozen. 

The Spalding "Trade-Mark" bats still retain their old-time popularity, 
because they are kept up to the high standard set for them in the early 
days of the game, when they were introduced by A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
i n 1877, and have been recognized for over thirty years as standard by 
players. No. 3-OT is a wagon tongue ash bat, taped handle, 50 cents ; 
No. 3-0, Wagon Tongue ash bat, plain handle, 50 cents; No. OXT, Axletree 
bat, taped handle, 35 cents ; No. OX, Axletree bat, plain handle, 25 cents- 
It is in the Spalding Boys' Bats that A. G. Spalding & Bros, appeal tc 
the youngsters. No. 3X, Junior League bat, plain handle, extra quality 
ash, spotted burning, 25 cents; No. 3-OB, Boys' Wagon Tongue bat, taped 
handle, 25 cents; No. 2XB, Boys' bat, good quality ash, 10 cents. 

The bat and the ball taken care of, we will now consider other necessary 
implements, the inflated body protector, for instance. These come in five 
different styles, ranging in price from $3.00 to $8.00 ; for boys, the 
" Youths'," well made, costs $2.50. 








MASKS 

Spalding's Masks are the best on ac- 
count of their superior workmanship, 
and their long experience as manufac- 
turers. With a poor mask, a catcher 
takes a big risk, when by buying an ar- 
ticle that is made right, he saves him- 
self from possible disfigurement for life. 

There are no less than fourteen different 
styles to select from in the Spalding line, be- 
ginning with the "Sim Protecting" Mask, 
used by prominent leaguers, at $4.00, to the 
Spalding " Special Soldered " Mask, $4.00; 
"Neck Protecting" Mask, $3.50^ "Na- 
tional Association" Mask, $2.50; "Semi- 
Pro League" Mask, black finish, $2.50, 
and the " Regulation League," three dif- 
ferent styles, $2.00 and $1.75 in black 
wire, and $1.50 in bright wire. 

The younger players have five different 
masks to select from. Spalding's "Am- 
ateur," $1.00; "Boys' Amateur," black 
wire, $1.00 ; "Regulation" Mask, 75 cents; 
"Youths' " Mask, 50 cents, and No. " D," 
slightly smaller than the Youths' mask, 
25 cents. 

Spalding now makes a special mask for 
umpires which combines the neck-protect- 
ing arrangement and a special ear pro- 
tection. It costs $5.00, and is the safest 
mask for an umpire to wear. 








SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



All clubs need Bases, Home Plates, Pitchers' Plates, Foul Flags, Uni- 
form Bags— these Spalding's have in various qualities, prices and designs 

Then there are Bat Bags for the club. No. 2, of waterproof canvas, to 
hold twelve bats, at $3.50 ; No. 3, for six bats, $2.00. No. 7 is a special 
club bat bag. of sole leather, made particularly for leagues, colleges and 
clubs; just the thing for clubs that travel on a schedule, $30.00 each. 

There are also individual bat bags. No. 01 is of sole leather and holds 
two bats, it costs $4.00; No. 02. of heavy waterproof canvas, $1.50; No. 03, 
heavy canvas, $1.00. 

Every club needs a Score Book. The Spalding line is as follows : No. 4 
board cover, 30 gaires, $1.00 : No. 5, cloth cover, 60 games, $1.50 ; No 7* 
cloth cover, 160 games, $3.00. Pocket Score Books, 10, 25 and 50 cents each! 

UNIFORMS 

The Spalding line of Uniforms includes 
eight different grades, and is the only 
complete line of uniforms that a ball 
player has to select from. Catering to 
the highest class of ball players, Spald- 
ing is naturally in a position to give an 
amateur team the highest class of goods 
at the lowest prices, and made in a way 
that experienced base ball tailors can 
effect. The highest grade made is the 
No. Uniform, in fifteen different col- 
ors. The blue check, red stripe and 
green stripe present new features for 
uniforms, and are meeting with excel- 
lent favor among different clubs. Price, 
$12.50 each when ordered for team. 

Spalding No. M Uniform, the Minor 
League Uniform, is for a club that de- 
sires a medium price uniform that is sure 
to give them good service. It is with- 
out doubt one of the strongest and most 
durable uniforms at the price and can- 
not be equaled. Team suits, $7.50 each. 
The other grades are : University Uniform, No. 1, same as No. 0, but 
lighter in weight, $10.00 each; Interscholastic Uniform, No. 2, a very pop- 
ular suit, which can usually be worn two seasons, $8.00 each; Club Special 
Uniform, excellent for amateur clubs, No. 3, $5.00 each; Amateur Special 
Uniform, very popular with junior teams. No. 4, $4.00 each ; the Spalding 
Junior Uniform, No. 5, $3.00 each ; the Spalding Youths' Uniform, No. 6, 
in good quality gray material only, $1.00 each. 

A coat is a necessary part of the equipment of a team. Spalding Base 
Ball Coats are made in four grades, and will be furnished in stock 
colors. The Spalding Vest Sweater, No. VG, is very popular with 
ball players. Best quality worsted, heavy weight, pearl buttons, price, 
$6.00 each ; Boys' Jacket Sweater, No. BRC, all wool, in gray only, $2.50 
each ; Spalding Ribbed Coat Sweater, No. CDW, made of very good 
quality worsted, ribbed knit, in gray only, costs $5.00 each. 

The Spalding T Shirt is the most comfortable garment ever designed 
for base ball pitchers, and is especially serviceable during the early spring 
and late fall games ; all wool merino, fleece lined, with roll collar and 
long sleeves, $3.50 each. 

The Spalding measurement blank and a complete lot of samples and 
prices of uniforms will be sent free to any address upon request. To 
save time, write to the nearest Spalding store, a list of which can be 
found on the inside front cover. 











: fa» • 


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IggwgX'wi 





;anK L. Chance. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

What a Base Ball Player Needs 



Twenty-three styles of 
Catchers' Mitts — and every 
one a winner — comprises the 
Spalding line for 1908. Every 
catcher, no matter what pet 
ideas about a mitt he may 
have, will find them embodied 
in some particular style of 
a Spalding Mitt. As Spald- 
ing's have a store in every 
city of the National League 
and American League cir- 
cuits, they are naturally the 
headquarters for Base Ball 
and are continually receiving 
suggestions from all of the 
leading players, who visit the 
stores to get their equipment. 
Space does not permit much 
more than a list of names and 
prices, but no boy should 
fail to send for a copy of the 
Spalding Base Ball Catalogue, 
which contains pictures, 
prices and descriptions of everything new in Base Ball. Write to the 
nearest Spalding store ( see inside front cover for list ) and the cata- 
logue will be sent by return mail, free of charge. 

The very best Catchers' Mitt made is the Spalding No. 9-0 Mitt, called 
the '"Three-and-Out." This is the " last word " in Mitts and is certainly 
a masterpiece. It costs $8.00. The balance of the line, each with 
some particular merit, and the best for the money that can be bought, is 
as follows : 




Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 



Professional " Catchers' Mitt, No. 8-0. 
Scoop " Catchers' Mitt, No. S. 
International " Catchers' Mitt, No. 7-OR. Black 
Perfection " Catchers' Mitt, No. 7-0. 
League Extra" Catchers' Mitt, No. 5-0. 
League Special " Catchers' Mitt, No. 4-0. . 
Decker Patent " Catchers' Mitt, No. OX. . 
Decker Patent " Catchers' Mitt, No. 3-0. Black 
Interstate " Catchers' Mitt, No. 0. 
Decker Patent " Catchers' Mitt. No. OR. Black 
Intercity " Catchers' Mitt, No. OA. 
Semi-Pro " Catchers' Mitt, No. 1R. . . 
Amateur " Catchers' Mitt, No. 1A. 
Back-Stop" Catchers' Mitt, No. 1C. . 
Association " Catchers' Mitt, No. 2R. Black 
Club " Catchers' Mitt, No. 2A. 
Practice " Catchers' Mitt, No. IB. 
Interscholastic " Catchers' Mitt, No. 3R. . 
Public School " Catchers' Mitt, No. 4. 
Boys' Amateur, " Catchers' Mitt, No. 4R. . 
Boys' Favorite " Catchers' Mitt, No. 4B. . 
Boys' Delight " Catchers' Mitt, No. 5. 



$7.00 

10.00 

7.00 

6.00 

5.00 

4.00 

3.E0 

3.50 

3.00 

2.50 

2.50 

2.00 

1.75 

1.50- 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

.75 

.50 

.50 

.35 

.25 



Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 
Spalding 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

BASEMEN'S MITTS 

If you are a first-baseman 
you can be sure that in 
Spalding's very complete line 
of Basemen's Mitts, which 
consists of ten different 
styles, you can secure just 
what you want. The Spald- 
ing Mitts are made in such a 
way that they are practically 
broken in as soon as one is 
put on the hand. That's why 
they are so popular. The 
list follows : 

Spalding "League Special," 

No. AX. t . . $4.00 

Spalding "League Special," 

No. BX. 4< . . $4.00 

Spalding " League Special," 

No. BXR. . . $4.00 

Spalding " League Special," 

No. BXS. . . $4.00 

Basemen's Mitt, No. CO. ... 3.00 

2.50 
. . 2.00 

2.00 
1.50 
1.00 




Professional 

Semi-Pro " Basemen's Mitt, No. CX 
Amateur " Basemen's Mitt, No. CXR. 
Amateur " Basemen's Mitt, No. CXS. 
Double Play " Basemen's Mitt, No. DX 
League Jr." Basemen's Mitt, No. EX. 



MITTS FOR PITCHERS AND FIELDERS 

Made especially for Pitchers, but never- 
theless a very satisfactory style also for 
Basemen— in fact, the nearest approach 
to an all around Mitt that has ever been 
put out is Spalding's " League Extra " 
Pitchers' and Basemen's Mitt, No. IF. 
The face is made of special quality white 
buck, and the balance of Mitt of special 
brown calfskin; correctly padded and 
without hump ; laced all around and at 
thumb ; strap-and- buckle fastening at back. 
It costs $4.00. The balance of the line of 
Spalding Fielders' Mitts is listed as follows : 

Spalding "League Special" Fielders' 
Mitt No. 2F, with molded brown calfskin 
face ; extra full thumb, laced ; leather 
lined and strap-and-buckle fastening at 
back. Each, $3.00. 

Spalding " League Special " Fielders' 
Mitt No. 3F, is made of specially tanned 
black calfskin ; padded with best felt ; 
reinforced and laced at thumb ; leather 
lined; strap-and-buckle fastening at 
back. Each, ( $3. 00. 

Spalding " League Special " Fielders' 
Mitt No. 4F, is made of the very best and 
softest white tanned buckskin : the thumb 
and at wrist is extra well padded ; laced 
at thumb; leather lined ; strap-and-buckle 
fastening at back. Each, $3 .00. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Spalding " Pi ofessional" Fielders' Mitt, No. 5F. . . . $2.00 

Spalding "Stmi-Pro" Fielders' Mitt, No. 6F 1.50 

Spalding "Amateur" Fielders' Mitt, No. 7F 1.00 

Spalding "Amateur" Fielders' Mitt. No. 8F 1.00 

Spalding " Ltague Jr." Fielders' Mitt, No. 9F. This is a very 
popular Boys' Mitt ; made of buck tanned leather, reinforced 

and laced at thumb ; well padded .50 

, Spalding " Be ys' Favorite," No. 10F. It is a Spalding Mitt and 

that tells the story .25 

LEATHER LINED INFIELDERS' GLOVES 

The following line of Spalding Gloves is made with web of leather be- 
tween the thumb and first finger, which can be easily cut out if not re- 
-quired. Each bears the Spalding Trade-Mark to show that they are the 
^genuine article. Twenty-five different styles. 

Spalding " Professional " Infielders' Glove, No. PXL. . . $3.50 

Spalding " Intercollegiate " Infielders' Glove, No. 2X. . . 3.00 

Spalding " League Extra " Infielders' Glove, No. RXL. . . 3.50 

Spalding " Intercity " Infielders' Glove. No. 2XR. . . . 2.50 

Spalding " International " Infielders' Glove, No. 2XS, made of 
finest quality velvet tanned buckskin, very popular with most 

of the prominent players 2.50 

Spalding " Prof essionalJr." Infielders' Glove, No. PBL. . . 2*.50 

The balance of the line of Spalding Gloves is appended : 
Spalding " Professional " Infielders' Glove, No. PX. On lines 

suggested by prominent players ; extra long to protect wrist. 3.00 

Spalding " League Extra " Infielders' Glove, No. RX. Black 

calfskin, general design same as " Professional." 
Spalding " League Special " Infielders' Glove, No. XW. 
Spalding " Semi-Pro " Infielders' Glove, No. 3X. 
Spalding " Professional Jr." Infielders' Glove, No. PB. 
Spalding " Association " Infielders' Glove, No. 4X. 
Spalding "Amateur " Infielders' Glove, No. 3XR. 
Spalding " Club Special " Infielders' Glove, No. XL. . 
Spalding " Champion " Infielders' Glove, No. X. 

Spalding " Practice 
ers' Glove, No. XS. 




3.00 
2.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
Infield- 
$1.25 

Spalding " Interscholastic " 
Infielders' Glove, No. 13. $1.00 
Spalding "Regulation" In- 
fielders' Glove, No. 15. $1 . 00 
Spalding " Regulation " In- 
fielders' Glove, No. 15R. $1 . 00 
Spalding line of Infielders' 
Gloves for Juniors is a line 
that will appeal to the 
youngsters. These Gloves are 
identically the same as our 
high grade line and are made 
in such a way that they will 
last a boy indefinitely, imma- 
terial of how hard he uses 
them or what uee they are 
put to. Spalding goods are 
not for show window pur- 
poses only-— although their 
lines and " style " appeal to 
all players — but for rough 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

usage — and they always " stand up " under it— that's what the Spalding 
Trade-Mark means when placed upon any athletic article. 

The Spalding " Public School " Infielders' Glove, No. 12, is something 
new ; a full size glove, of white velvet tanned leather, padded, 75 cents. 

The Spalding ' League Jr." Infielders' Glove, No. 16R. Men's size, 
black leather, lightly padded, leather lined. Each, 75 cents. 

Spalding " Junior" Infielders' Glove, No. 16. Full size ; made of white 
velvet tanned leather. Each, 50 cents. 

Spalding " Boys' Amateur " Infielders' Glove, No. 14. Youths' profes- 
sional style ; buck tanned white leather, padded, with inside hump and 
leather lined. Each, 50 cents. 

Spalding "Boys' Favorite" Infielders' Glove, No. 19, is made of buck 
tanned white leather, is lightly padded and size suitable for larger 
boys. Each, 25 cents. 

Spalding "Boys' Delight" Infielders' Glove, No. 18. Made of buck 
tanned white leather, padded, and with inside hump. Each, 25 cents. 

SHOES 

When it comes 
t o outfitting a 
club with Shoes 
it is' right 
there that A. G. 
Spalding & Bros, 
are at home. The 
Spalding Shoes 
are acknowledged 
to be the best ex- 
amples of base 
ball footwear in 
America to-day. 
The best kanga- 
roo leather is used for tops, best white oak leather for soles, and the 
finest hand-made steel plates. Spalding Shoes are made in the Spalding 
factory and are "bench made," meaning that the Shoe is really made 
throughout by hand by a shoemaker working at a bench in the good old- 
fashioned way. An ill-fitting shoe is the worst handicap a player can 
have ; it annoys him, makes him slow and afraid to take chances, and in 
the end causes his release. Spalding's carry lasts of the leading players 
and their re-orders from season to season, are a tribute to the worth of 
the Spalding Shoe. 

The Spalding " Highest Quality " Shoe, No. 2-0, is the one that is uni- 
versally used by the best ball players ; it is hand-made throughout, is light 
and serviceable and makes a ball player feel like playing ball. Price, 
$7.00 per pair. 

The Spalding "Sprinting" Base Ball Shoe, No. 30-S, is made of selected 
kangaroo leather and built on the Spalding famous running shoe last, the 
last that has made Spalding's running shoes famous. It is strong but 
light and fits the foot like a glove. The " Sprinting" costs $7.00 per pair. 

The Spalding " Featherweight " Base Ball Shoe, No. FW, is the lightest 
Base Ball Shoe ever made ; it is the shoe that the fast basemen like to 
wear. Owing to the lightness and fineness of its construction it is suit- 
able for the exacting demands of the fastest players, but is not intended 
for general use. j4 $7 .00 per pair. 

The Spalding " Club Special," No, 0, is made of carefully selected satin 
calfskin, and a very substantially constructed shoe in every respect. 
Price, $5.00per pair. 

Spalding ' Amateur Special," No. 35. This is the popular one with the 
amateur players ; it is of good quality calfskin, machine sewed ; has a 
long life and gives good service. It is a comfortable shoe and we specially 
recommend it to amateurs and minor leaguers. Per pair, $3.50. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

The Spalding " Junior " Shoe, No. 37. This is made with the same care 
as our high grade professional shoe, because if there is anything we make 
a special point of, it is pleasing the boys, and they go to Spalding's because 
Spalding satisfies them. The Spalding "Junior" Shoe is made on the 
regular Base Ball Shoe last, and cannot be duplicated for the money in 
any part of the world. Price, $2.50 per pair. 

Managers and captains of Base Ball teams who wish a complete outfit 
should not fail to consult the nearest Spalding store manager. Addresses 
will be found on the inside front cover of this book. There the captain 
and manager can have expert knowledge, which it is possible only for 
A. G. Spalding & Bros, to place at his disposal ; this is worth a great deal 
when a captain or manager wishes to select a suitable team outfit. 



No boy who expects to be a good player can get along without the 
Spalding Athletic Library series on Base Ball. Mr. A. G. Spalding, who 
was the famous pitcher of the Champion Boston team of 1872, 1873, 1874, 
1875, and of the Chicago team of 1876, the first winners of the National 
League pennant, and who took the Chicago and All- America teams around 
the world in 1888-89, which created such a big sensation at that time, still 
retains his interest in the national game and recommends these books 
especially to the boys : 

No. 1 Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 1A Spalding's Official Base Ball Record. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 202 How to Play Base Ball. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 223 How to Bat. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 232 How to Run Bases. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 230 How to Pitch. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 229 How to Catch. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 225 How to Play First Base. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 226 How to Play Second Base. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 227 How to Play Third Base. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 228 How to Play Shortstop. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 224 How to Play the Outfield. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 231 How to Organize a Base Ball Club ; How to Organize 
a Base Ball League ; How to Manage a Base Ball 
Club ; How to Train a Base Ball Team ; How to Cap- 
tain a Base Ball Team ; How to Umpire a Game ; 
Technical Base Ball Terms. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 219 Ready Reckoner of Base Ball Percentages. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 310 Official Handbook of the National League. Price, 10 cents. 

No. 309 Official Minor League Base Ball Guide. Price, 10 cents. 



CAUTION BASE BALL BOYS 

Because of your youth and inexperience, advantage is frequently 
taken of you base ball boys, by the^so called "Just as Good" dealer, who 
tries to palm off on you some of his "Just as Good" Base Ball goods, mads 
especially for him by the "Just as Good " manufacturer, when you call 
for the Spalding goods. You are cautioned not to be deceived by this 
"Just as Good" combination, for when you get onto the field you will 
find these "Just as Good" Balls, Bats, Mitts, etc., will not stand the wear 
and punishment of the genuine Spalding articles. Remember that 
Spalding goods are standard the world over, and are used by all the leading 
clubs and players. These "Just as Good " manufacturers endeavor to 
copy the Spalding styles, adopt the Spalding descriptive matter and Spald- 
ing list prices, and then try to see how very cheap and showy they can 
make the article, so the "Just as Good" dealer can work off these imi- 
tations on the unsuspecting boy. 

Don't be deceived by the attractive 25 to 40 per cent, discount that 
may be offered you, for remember that their printed prices are arranged 
for the special purpose of misleading you and to enable the "Just as 
Good " dealer to offer you this special discount bait. This "discount" 
pill that the "Just as Good " dealer asks you to swallow is sugar coated 
and covered up by various catchy devices, that are well calculated to 
deceive the inexperienced boy, who will better understand these tricks of 
the trade as he grows older. Remember that all Spalding Athletic Goods 
are sold at the established printed prices, and no dealer is permitted to 
sell them at a greater or less price. Special discounts on Spalding Goods 
are unknown. Everybody is treated alike. This policy persistently 
adhered to makes it possible to maintain from year to year the high 
quality of Spalding Athletic Goods, which depend for their sale on Spald- 
ing Quality, backed by the broad Spalding Guarantee, and not on any 
deceiving device like this overworked a nd fraudulent ' ' Discount ' ' scheme 
adopted by all of the " Just as Good " dealers. 

Occasionally one of these "Just as Good" dealers will procure some 
of the Spalding well known red boxes, place them in a showy place on 
his shelves, and when Spalding Goods are called for, will take from these 
Spalding boxes one of the "Just as Good " things, and try to palm it off 
on the boy as a genuine Spalding article. When you go into a store and 
ask for a Spalding article, see to it that the Spalding Trade-Mark is on 
that article, and if the dealer tries to palm off on you something "Just as 
Good." politely bow yourself out and go to another store, where the gen- 
uine Spalding article can be procured. 

In purchasing a genuine Spalding Athletic article, you are protected 
by the broad Spalding Guarantee, which reads as follows : 

We Guarantee to each purchaser of an article bearing the 
Spalding Trade-Mark that such article ivill give satisfaction and 
a reasonable amount of service, when used for the purpose for 
which it was intended and under ordinary conditions and fair 
treatment. 

We Agree to repair or replace free of charge any such article 
which proves defective in material or workmanship : PRO VIDED 
such defective article is returned to us, transportation prepaid, 
during the season in uihich it was purchased, accompanied by 
the name, address and a letter from the user explaining the claim. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 
Beware of the " Just as Good " manufacturer, who makes " pretty " 
Athletic Goods ( as if they were for use as an ornament ) at the expense 
of "quality," in order to deceive the dealer ; and beware of the substi- 
tute-dealer who completes the fraud by offering the " Just as Good " 
article, when Spalding 
Goods are asked for. # ^* 




THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
n Q UALITY 




vTRADE-MARK 

I ACCEPT NO ! 

1 SUBSTITUTE ^ 



SOMETHING NEW IN BASE BALL 

The Spalding 

6BDcr Official Base Ball 
Record= 



r 



y 



=§D 



President PuUiamSays: iStSSSSSStJS 

be possessed by not only every club owner, every protessional ball player, 
but every lover of the game, simply as a complete record of the growth 
of professional base ball in America." 



A PARTIAL LIST OF CONTENTS 

Complete Official Averages of the National, American, and all the Minor 

Leagues. 
World's Championship Records from 1884 to 1907, wi'h Scores of Games and 

List of Players Participating. 
Long Games of 1907. 
National Championship Winners from 1871 to 1907, with Names of Players 

and Their Averages. 
Leading Pitchers from 1871 to 1907, inclusive. 
Leading Fielders from 1871 to 1907, inclusive. 
Leading Batters from 1876 to 1907, inclusive. 
No-Hit Games in the Major Leagues from 1879. 
American League Championship Winners from 1900. 
The Year in Base Ball: A Resume of All the Happenings in the Base Ball 

World from January to December, 1907. 
Complete List of League Clubs from 1876, with Dates of Admission and 

Officers' Names. 
Miscellaneous Records. 

FOR SALE BY ALL NEWS DEALERS 
PRICE lO CENTS 



Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. | London 

in any of the following cities will receive attention j England 



For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston Philadelphia 
Pittsburg Washington 
Baltimore New Orleans 



Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 



Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
MinneapoUs 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING TRADEMARK 



PROTECTS 

THE 
CONSUMER 



prevents 
fraudulent; 

SUBSTITUTION 



TherVondescrip 
Manufacturer- 
says to the#V' 
Dealer : ( #<i 

"Why pay 15 to 2o' 
per cent, more formal 
SpaldingTrade Marked \^ 
Athletic Goods, when I 
dm prepared to furnish 
you "Just as good", articles' 
for so much less price 




.The Substitute 

Dealer says 

|to the Con- 

"We. are just out 
of the Spalding 
article asked for, 
but here is some- 
thing "Just as good" 
at 25j per_cent. less 
price." 



Spalding Cautions the Consumer 

to make proper allowances for these "Just as Good" manufacturers and 
substitute-dealers' statements, but see lo It thai the Spalding Trade-Mark 
Is on, or attached, to each Spalding Athletic article, for without this 
Trade-MarK they are not genuine Spalding Goods. 



We are prompted to issue this Caution to users of Spalding's Athletic Goods, 
for the reason that many defective articles made and sold by these "Just as 
Good" manufacturers and dealers are returned to us as defective and un- 
satisfactory, and which the consumer, who has been thus deceived, has asked 
us to repair or replace under our broad Guarantee, which reads as follows: 



We 

Spald 
It wai 

We 

which 
name 


Guarantee to each purchaser of an article bearing the 
Ing Trade-Mark that such article will give satisfaction and 


i Intended and under ordinary conditions and fair treatment. 
Agree to repair or replace free of charge any such article 
proves defective In material or workmanship : PROVIDED 
defective article Is returned to us, transportation prepaid, 

f the season In which It was purchased, accompanied by the 
address and a letter from the user explaining the claim. 



Beware of the "Just as Good" manufacturer, who makes "appearance" first 
and 'Quality' secondary, in order to deceive the dealer; and beware of the 
substitute-dealer, who completes the fraud by offering the consumer the 
"Just as Good " article whenSpalding's. Goods are asked for. 



THE SPALDING TRADEMARK 



PROTECTS 

THE 
CONSUMER 



PREVENTS . 

FRAUDULENT 

SUBSTITUTION 



THE SPALDINGipS^TRADE-MARK 

GUARANTEES ifeM! ACCEPT NO 
1^ QUALITY VgZSP SUBSTITUTE ^ 



SPALDING 

Official National League Ball 

Is the Standard of the World 

It Is the Original League Ball It is the Official League Ball 

It is the Universally Adopted League Ball 

It is the Best League Ball 

IT HAS BEEN FORMALLY ADOPTED AS THE 

Official Ball ot the National League for over 3 Years 

It has also been adopted as the Official Ball for all Championship Gamesj 
by the following Professional Leagues : 

INTER-STATE LEAGUE for 9 years 
'NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE for 11 year) 
CENTRAL LEAGUE for 5 years 
COTTON STATES LEAGUE for 5 years 
INDIANA, ILLINOIS and IOWA 

LEAGUE for 7 War? 
and by 22 other Professional Leagues that have adopted the Spalding 
Official National League Ball from 1 to 4 years. 

THE SpafoTng Official National League Ball was first adopted by the National League in 1878, and! 
is the only ball that has been used in Championship League Games since that time. In the! 
recent grcst World's Championship Games in Chicago between the Chicago Nationals and the Detroit, 
Americans the Spalding Official National League Ball was used. 

IN addition to the different American adoptions, the Spalding Official National League Ball has beeri 
made the official ball by the governing Base Ball Associations of Mexico, Cuba, Canada, Australia,, 
(South Africa, Great Britain, Philippine Islands, Japan, and, in fact, wherever Base Ball is played. 
The Spalding Official National League Ball has received this universal adoption because of its well 
established reputation for uniformity and high quality, but the special object of such adoptions, fromt 
the players' standpoint, is to secure absolute uniformity in a ball, that will prevent unfair "jockeying" 
with an unknown ball, and make National and International Base Ball contests possible, and at the 
eame time make the records of players of value, and uniform throughout the world, which can only 
be secured by standardizing one well known ball. 



'EASTERN LEAGUE for 20 years 
NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE for 20 yearn 
NORTHERN LEAGUE for 5 years 
WESTERN ASSOCIATION for U years 
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE for 5 years 



The Spalding Official National League Ball 

is used by Yale, Harvard, Princeton and all prominent college teams. The soldiers and sailors in the), 

United States Army and Navy use it exclusively. In fact, the Spalding League 

Ball is in universal use wherever Base Ball is played. 

Crice irt a' while a minor league will experiment for a short time with some other ball, but invariably 

returns to the Spalding Official National League Ball, .which has now become universally recognized; 





The Standard of the World 








Communications addressed to 




Montreal 
Canada 


A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 


London 
England 




For street numbers see inside front cover oi this book. 




New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 


Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 


Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Orleans 


Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 


Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 


San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING, 

GUARANTEES I 

:Lf> QUALITY 



fe||TRADE-IVIARK 

MMjjjj ACCEPT NO 
fe^ SUBSTITUTE *> 




THE SPALDING OFFICIAL NATIONAL LEAGUE BALL 

The Official ball of the game for over 30 years. Adopted by the National 
League in 1878, and the only ball 
used in Championship games 
since. Each ball wrapped in tin- 
foil, packed in a separate box, 
and sealed in accordance with the 
latest League regulations. War- 
ranted to last a full game when 
used under ordinary conditions. 
No. 1. Each, $1.50. 



Official National League Jr. 

Made with horse hide cover, and in every respect 
same as our Official National League Ball No. 1, 
except slightly smaller in size. Especially designed 
for junior clubs (composed of boys under 16 years of 
age i and all games in which this ball is used will 
be recognized as legal games. Warranted to last 
a full game when used under ordinary conditions. 

No. Bl. Each, $1.00. 



Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see Inside front cover of this book. 



London 
England 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Pittsburg 
Baltimore 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Orleans 



Chicago I Cincinnati 

Cleveland Kansas City 

Detroit 1 St. Louis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDINGip^TRAD E-MAR K 

GUARANTEES mWGJ- ACCEPT NO 
\ f> QUALITY %££? SUBSTITUTE ^ 




Spalding Doable Seam League Ball Spalding National Association Ball 



Second only in quality to the Spald- 
ing Official National League Ball. 
Made in exact accordance with the 
Official rules. Best horse hide cover, 
rubber center, wound with all wool 
yarn. Warranted to last afullgame. 
No. NA. Each, $1.25 



Made with same care and of same 
material as the Spalding Official 
National League Ball. The double 
stitch is used, making it doubly 
secure against ripping. Warran- 
ted to last a full game. 
No. O. Each, $1.50 

| No. L3, Semi-Pro League $1.00 
Regulation size and weight and 
superior to any of the various 
imitations of the Spalding Ofa 

cial National League Ball. 
[ No. L4, City League Each, 75c. 
Full size and weight,well made, 
excellent for general practice. 
No. B2, National Association Jr. 
Same as National Association 
No. NA, only slightly smaller. 

Each, 75c. 
| No. B3, Public School League, 50c. 
A well made junior ball; splen- 
did for practice by boys' teams. 
Send for Spalding new complete Catalogue of Base Ball Goods. 
Mailed Free. 





Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to -^___— 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. I London 

in any of the following cities will receive attention | England 
Fir atreet numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Orleans 



Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 



Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING^^TRADE- MARK 

GUARANTEES fee ACCEPT NO I 

lr^ QUALITY ^™# SUBSTITUTE: *^j 



professional 



UnsoftA* 

J/amond 



Xtvelyfiounder 



Sp* 



&£. 



essional 



ZRoys'SiWorite 



J&i-DIN 



\&oysy(mateur\ 



Sf>\ 



&ocAret 



Spalding Professional 

Selected horse hide cover; full size ball. Made of 
carefully selected material and warranted first- 
class quality. Put up in a separate box and sealed. 

No. 2. Each, 50c. 
Spalding King of the Diamond 

This ball is full size, made of good material and 

horse hide cover. Put up in a separate box and 

sealed. 

No. 5. Each, 25c. 
Spalding Lively Bounder 

Horse hide cover. A very lively ball; the inside ia 

all rubber, making it the liveliest ball ever offered 

at the price. Put up in a separate box and sealed. 

No. 10. Each, 25c. 

Spalding Junior Professional 

Slightly under regular size. Horse hide cover and 

is very lively. Carefully made and a perfect boys' 

size ball. Put up in a separate box and sealed. 

No. 7B. Each, 25c. 
Spalding Boys' Favorite Ball 

A good boys' lively ball, boys' size; two-piece 

cover; each ball trade-marked. Packed one dozen 

balls in a box. 

No. 12. Each, 10c. 
Spalding Boys' Amateur Ball 

Nearly regulation size and weight. The best ball 
for the money on the market: each ball trade- 
marked. One dozen balls in a box. 

No. 11. Each, 10c. 
Spalding Rocket Ball 

This is a good bounding ball. Boys' size. The best 

5-cent, two-piece cover ball on the market; one 

dozen balls in a box. 

No. 13. Each,5c. 







communications addressed to 






Montreal 
Canada 


A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 


London 
England 




For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 




New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 


Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 


Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Orleans 


Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 


Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 


San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
— „ QUALITY 



fc§&TR AD E- M ARK 
jWGJ accept no 

K^^W c;ilRQT|TUTE ..*?. 



\JL 



Flayers' 

Autograph 

Bats 




% IPOR THE PAST THIRTY YEAK„ or since our Base Ball 
■ J; i Bat Factory was established, we have turned out special 
f Ji model bats to suit the leading players of the prominent 
i"28fi professional leagues, and our records will show hun- 
TC dreds of different bats made in accordance with the 
ideas of the individual player, many of whom have been 
league record-makers. 

The models that have been adopted have been duplicated 
by us from time to time as they have required additional bats, 
and in hundreds of cases we have been requested to furnish to 
other players duplicate bats that have been made for and used 
by well-known players. 

In order to satisfy the ever-increasing demand from our 
customers for bats of the same models as used by 'eading play- 
ers, we have obtained permission from many of the leading 
batters of the country to include in our line of high-grade bats 
these "Players' Autograph" bats, bearing their signature. 

Space will not permit us to include a description of all the 
various models, but the following models have been selected as 
examples of what we are producing in this special " Players' 
Autograph" Bat Department: 



CfasK**- 



^K*"A. •<? 



z+ 



This is a very large Bat yvitb a fairly 
thick handle Bats supplied will 
not weigh less than 45 nor over 

48 ounces. 



Autograph Model 



This is also a large Bat. almost the 
same length as the Chance Model, 
but with much less wood, especially 
in the handle part of the Bat. Bats 
supplied will not weigh less than 



O Autograph Model 



This is a different shaped Bat than 
either of above, somewhat shorter, 
thick handle and rounded 
Model end - Bats supplied will not weigh 
less than 41 nor ove r 43 ounces. 



ol good bulk, with a 
ick handle. Bats sup- 
ot weigh less than 40 



jrt A short 

(/ (JO Autograph Model 



hort Bat wii 
good bulk 



Qhr&^LM^ 



Autograph Model 



players. The Keeler Model is 
short and has fairly thin handle 
Bats supplied will not weigh less 
than 36 nor over 39 ounces. 



No. PA. Plain oil finish. Price, $1.00 Each. 

■"ARRF^PONnFlVrF Sm. If you wish any P articular model bat, and will describe the bat you require, 
VVIVlYLidrvillSlillVLi r% the length, weight and full description of same, and address any of our 
branch stores, the matter will be taken up, with the hope of furnishing our customers with the exact model 
and style and weight of bat that they require. This will come under our Special Players' Autograph Bat 
Department. This entire department is looked after by the manager of our Professional League Base Ball 
Department, who is familiar with mo<?t of the types of models used by the leading players and to whom will 
be referred any unusual model. As these bats are made to order only, at least two weeks' time may be required. 



Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



London 
England 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston I Philadelphia 
Pittsburg Washington 
Baltimore! New Orleans 



Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 



Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING^^TRADE-MARK 

GUARANTEES lofeiSbl ACCEPT NO 
i^f^^aU ALITY \^%P SUBSTITUTE y \ 



COLD MEDAL 



MUSHROOM 



TRADE MARK 



SPALDING GOLD MEDAL BATS 

No. GM. Plain, white wax finish. . . . Each, 
No. GMT. Taped, white wax finish. 
No. GMP. "Professional," special dark finish. . " 
No. GMB. Boys', plain, white wax finish. . . " 
SPALDING MUSHROOM BATS 

No. M. Plain, special finish Each, 

No. MT. Taped, taped handle. . , . . " 
SPALDING RECORD BATS 

No. SR. Plain oil finish Each, 

SPALDING TRADE MARK RATS 
No. 3-OT. Wagon Tongue, taped, special finish. Each, 
No. 3-0. Wagon Tongue, plain handle. 
No. OXT. "Axletree," tape wound handle. 
No. OX. "Axletree," plain handle. " 

No. 3X. Junior League, plain, spotted burning. 
No. 3-OB. Boys', Wagon Tongue, taped, special finish." 
No. 2XB. Boys', good quality ash, varnished. . 



$1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
.50 

$1.00 
1.00 

$1.00 

$ .50 
.50 
.35 
.25 
.25 
.25 
.10 



For 
complete 
descriptions 
and illus- 
trations of 
SPALDING 
BATS, 
and all 
Accessories 

for 
BASE BALL 

see 

Spalding's 

Base Ball 

Catalogue 

for 1908. 

Mailed free 







Communications addressed to 






Montreal 
Canada 


A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 


London 
England 




For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 




New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 


Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 


Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Orleans 


Chicago 

Geveland 

Detroit 


Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 


San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING /fe-%TR A DE-MARK 

GUARANTEES fejlO ACCEPT NO 
/ > QUALIT Y "%j^& SUBSTITUTE^ 



SPALD ING BASEMEN'S MITTS 





Spalding League Special" No. AX Basemen's Mitt 

JNo. AX. Special professional model. Finest quality 
white tanned buckskin face, back and lining; lacing 
all around and at thumb. . . Each $4 00 

tvt S £v din £ " Lea 9 ue Special" No. BX Basemen's Mitt' 

JNo. UX. b ine selected and specially tanned brown calf- 
skin lace, back and lining; lacing all around. $4.00 
Spalding "League Special" No. BXR Basemen's Mitt 

JNo BXK. Specially selected finest quality black calf- 
skin face, back and lining; lacing all around. $4.00 
Spalding "League Special" No. BXS Basemen's Mitt 

JNo. BAb. bpecial professional model. Finest selected 
brown calfskin face, 'back and lining; lacing all 
around and at thumb. . . . Each $4 00 

tvt ™ s P aIdin 9 "Professional" Basemen's Mitt ' 

No. CO. Very durable olive calfskin face, back and 
lining. Padded and laced all around. Each, $3.00 

tvt ™ Spalding "Semi-Pro" Basemen's Mitt 
Z' i *^ aCe of s *> e ?\ aU y tanned slate-color leather; 
back of firm tanned brown leather; extra well pad- 
ded. Strap-and- buckle fastening. . Each, $2.50 

xr~ rvS 31 ^! 19 "Amateur" Basemen's Mitt (Black) 

No. CXR. Black calfskin face, black leather back and 
lining. Well padded, no hump. . . Each $2 00 
at ™o Spalding "Amateur" Basemen's Mitt 
No CXS. Brown buck leather face, brown tanned lea- 
ther back and lining. Well padded, no hump. $2.00 
xt nv s P a,dina "Double Play" Basemen's Mitt 
No. DX. Men s size. Oak tan specially selected leather, 
laced all around. Very easy fitting. Each, $1.50 
w„ uv Spalding League Jr." Basemen's Mitt 
Q •?V 1 Good J S U ^ ll &. ,v y hite Iea ther, laced all around, 
buitably padded. Will give good service. Each, $1.00 

ACL STYLES MADS IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 




Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



London 
England 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 



Philadelphia I Chicago I Cincinnati 
Washington Cleveland Kansas City 
New Orleans I Detroit I St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6. 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING^^TRADE-MARK 



GUARANTEES 
i|r > QUALITY 



$£il 



ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE ^ \ 










SPALDING FIELDERS' MITTS 

Spalding "League Extra" Pitchers* and Basemen's Mitt 

No. IF. The nearest approach yet made to an all around 
mitt. Face of special quality white buck, balance 
special brown calfskin. Correctly padded; no hump. 
Laced all around and at thumb. . Each, $4.00 
Spalding "League Special" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 2F. Molded brown calfskin face; extra full thumb, 
laced; leather lined .... Each, $3.00 
Spalding "League Special" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 3F. Specially tanned black calfskin; best felt pad- 
ding; laced at thumb; leather lined. Each, $3.00 
Spalding "League Special" Fielders' Mitt 
No 4F. Very best and softest white tanned buckskin; 
thumb and at wrist extra well padded; laced thumb; 

leather lined Each, $3.00 

Spalding "Professional" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 5F. Specially tanned drab leather, well padded 
with fine felt; leather lined, carefully finished, laced 
thumb. Strap-and-buckle fastening at back. $2.00 
Spalding "Semi-Pro" Fielders' Mitt 
No, 6F. Face of white tanned buckskin, brown leather 
back; leather lined; laced thumb. . Each, $1.50 
Spalding "Amateur" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 7F. Good brown cape leather, well padded, leather 
lined; reinforced and laced at the thumb. Strap-and- 
buckle fastening at back. - . . Each, $1.00 
Spalding "Amateur" Fielders Mitt (Black) 
No. 8F. Good quality black tanned leather; well pad- 
ded, leather lined; reinforced and laced at thumb. 
Strap-and-buckle fastening at back. . Each, $1.00 
Spalding "League Jr." Fielders' Mitt 
No. 9F. A very popular boys'mitt; buck tanned leather, 
well padded; reinforced and laced at thumb. 50c. 
Spalding "Boys' Favorite" Mitt 
No. 10F. Special tanned buck, well padded and sub- 
stantially made; laced at thumb. . Each, 25c. 

ALL STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 




Complete 
descriptions 

and prices 
in Spalding's 

Base Ball 

Catalogue. 
Mailed free. 



Montreal 
'Canada 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



London 
England 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Orleans 



Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 



Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6. 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES ' 
r^ QUALITY 



fe^TR AJD E-MARK 

fciO ACCEPT NO 
%^£& ■ SUBSTITUTE <r 





Spalding "Professional" Infielders' Glove 

N . PXL. Best ever made, finest buckskin, 
h avily padded at edges, no heel pad. de- 
sign from prof's ideas, leather lined. $3.50 

Spalding "Intercollegiate" Infielders' Glove 

No. 2X. Selected velvet tanned buckskin, 
finest felt padding leather lined Ea.,$3.00 

Spalding "league Extra" Infielders' Glove 

No-RXL. Absolutely highest quality Black 
calf, material, etc., like PXL. Each, $3.50 

Spalding " Inter-City " Infielders* Glove 

No. 2XR. Prof, style, padded little finger and 
extra large thumb, leather lined. Ea.,$2.50 

Spalding "International" Infielders' Glove 

No.2XS. Best vel. tanned buckskin, popular 
with professionals, leather lined. Ea.,$2.50 

Spalding "Professional Jr." Infielders' Glove 

No. PBL. Best youths' glove. made like PXL. 
professional style, leather lined. Ea.,$2.50 

Spalding "Professional" Infielders' Glove 

No. PX. Finest buckskin, heavily padded 
around edges and into little finger. $3.00 

Spalding "League Extra" Infielders* Glove 

No. RX. Black calfskin, quality and design 
same as PX, highest quality. Each $3.00 

Spalding "League Special" Infielders' Glove 

No.XW. Specially tanned calfskin.best felt, 
no heel pad, extra long to protect wrist. $2 50 

Spalding "Semi-Pro" infielders' Glove 

No. 3X. Good quality oil tanned lea , special 

finish, no heel pad, correctly padded. $2 00 

Spalding "Professional Jr." Infielders' Glove 

No. PB. Youths'. Material,etc.,asPX $2.00 

Spalding "Association" Infielders' Glove 
No, 4X, White buck, no heel pad Ea , $2.00 

Spalding "Amateur" Infielders* Glove 
No.3XR. Black lea extra large thumb. $2.00 

Spalding "Club Special" Infielders' Glove 
No. XL, White buck, no heel pad. Ea ,$1.50 

Spalding "Champion" Infielders' Glove 
No. X. White buck, leather lined. Ea $1 50 

ALL STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 



Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



New York I Boston I Philadelphia 
Buffalo Pittsburg Washington 
Syracuse I Baltimore! New Orleans 



Chicago Cincinnati 

Cleveland Kansas City 

Detroit I St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



<^\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY /7* 



No. 219— Ready Reckoner of 
Base Ball Percentages. 
To supply a demand for a book which 
would show the percentage of clubs 
without recourse to the ardous work of 
figuring:, the publishers have had these 
tables compiled by an expert. Price 
10 cents. 

BASE BALL, AUXILIARIES. 

IVo. 1A — Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Record. 

Something: new in Base Ball. Con- 
tains records of all kinds from the be- 
ginning of the National League and 
official averages of all professional or- 
ganizations for the past season. Illus- 
trated with pictures of leading players 
taken in action. Price 10 cents. 



No. 309— Minor League Base 
Ball Guide. 

The minors' own guide. Contains 
pictures of leading teams, schedules, 
report of annual meeting National 
Association of Professional Base Ball 
Leagues, special articles and official 
rules. Edited by President T. H. Mur- 
nane, of the New England League. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 310— Official Handbook 
of the National League 
of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs. 

Contains the Constitution, By-Laws, 
Official Rules. Averages, and schedule 
of the National League for the current 
year, together with list of club officers 
and reports of the annual meetings of 
the League. Price 10 cents. 



Group II. Foot Ball 

No. 2— Spalding's Official 
Foot Ball Guide. 

Edited by Walter Camp. 

IContains the new rules, 
with diagram of field; All- 
America teams as selected 
by the leading authorities; 
reviews of the game from 
various sections of the 

I country; scores; pictures. 

I Price 10 cents. 





No. 300— How to Play Foot 
Ball. 

Edited by Walter Camp, of Yale. 
Everything that a beginner wants to 
know and many points that an expert 
will be glad to learn. Snapshots of 
leading teams and players in action, 
with comments by Walter Camp. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 2A— Spalding's Official 
Association Soccer Foot 
Ball Guide. 

A complete and up-to- 
date guide to the "'Soccer" 
game in the United States, 
containing instructions for 
playing the game, official 
rules, and interesting 
news from all parts of the 
country. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 2S6— How to Play Soc- 
cer. 

How each position should be played, 
written by the best player in England 
in his respective position, and illus- 
trated with full-page photographs of 
iJlayers in action. Price 10 cents. 

FOOT BALL AUXILIARIES. 
No. 303— Spalding's Official 
Canadian Foot Ball 

Guide. 

Edited by Frank D. Woodworth, 
Secretary-Treasurer Ontario Rugby 
Foot Ball Union. The official book of 
the game in Canada. Price 10 cents. 

Group III. Cricket 

No. 3— Spalding's Official 
Cricke t Guide. 

The most complete year 
book of the game that has 
ever been published in 
America. Reports of 
special matches, official 
rules and pictures of all 
the leading teams. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 277— Cricket; and How 
to Play it. 

By Prince Ranjitsinhji. The game 
descr" I concisely and illustrated with 
full-page pictures posed especially for 
thislbo^k. Price 10 cents. 




X\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY^ 



Group IV. 



Lawn 
Tennis 




No. 4— Spalding's Official 
i%\ 11 Tennis Annual. 

Contents include reports 
of all important tourna- 
ments; official ranking 
from 1885 to date; laws of 
lawn tennis; instructions 
for handicapping; deci- 
sions on doubtful points; 
management of tourna- 
ments; directory of clubs; 
i. yhig out and keeping a court. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 



>o. 157— How to Play L.awn 
Tennis. 

A complete description of lawn ten- 
nis; a lesson for beginners and direc- 
tions telling how to make the most im- 
portant strokes. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 279— Strokes and Science 
of Lawn Tennis. 
By P. A. Vaile, a leading authority 
on the game in Great Britain. Every 
stroke in the game is accurately illus- 
trated and analyzed by the author. 
Price 10 cents. 




Group V. 

No. 5— Spalding's 
>lf Guide. 

Contains records of all 
important tournaments, 
article 3 on the game in 
various sections of the 
country, pictures of prom- 
inent players, official play- 
ing rules and genera' 
items of interest. Price 
10 cents. 



Golf 

Official 




No. 276— How to Play Golf. 

By James Braid and Harry Vardon, 
the world's two greatest players tell 
how they play the game, with numer- 
ous full-page pictures of them taken 
on the links. Price 10 cents. 



Group VI. Hockey 

No. 6— Spalding's Official Ic* 
Hockey Guide. 

The official year book of 
the game. Contains the 
official rules, pictures of 
leading teams and players, 
records, review of the 
season, reports from dif- 
ferent sections of the 
United States and Canada. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 304— How to Play Ice 
Hockey. 

Contains a description of the duties 
of each player. Illustrated. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 154— Field Hockey. 

Prominent in the sports at Vassar, 
Smith, Wellesley, Bryn Maw rand other 
leading colleges. Price 10 cents. 

No. 188 — Lawn Hockey, 
Parlor Hockey, Garden 
Hockey. 

Containing the rules for each game. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 180— Ring Hockey. 

A new game for the gymnasium. 
Exciting as basket ball. Price 10 centf 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY. 
No. 25«— Official Handbook 
of the Ontario Hockey 
Association. 

Contains the official rules of the 
Association, constitution, rules of com- 
petition, list of officers, and pictures of 
leading players. Price 10 cents. 

*ttt Basket 
Group VII. 

No. 7— Spalding's Official 
Basket Ball Guide. 

Edited by George T. 
Hepbron. Contains the 
revised official rules, de- 
cisions on disputed points, 
records of prominent 
teams, reports on the game 
from various parts of the 
country. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 



Ball 




^SPALDING 



ATHLETIC 



LIBRARY//* 



No. 193— How to Play Basket 
Ball. 

By G. T. Hepbron, editor of the 
Official Basket Ball Guide. Illustrated 
with scenes of action. Price 10 cents. 



No. 200— Official Basket Ball 
Guide for Women. 

Edited by Miss Senda Berenson, of 
Smith College. Contains the official 
playing rules and special articles on 
the game by prominent authorities. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 



BASKET BALL. AUXILIABY. 
No. 29J>—< ollegiate Basket 
Ball Handbook. 

The official publication of the Colle- 
giate Basket Ball Association. Con 
tains the official rules, records. All 
America selections, reviews, and pic 
tures. Edited by H. A. Fisher, of 
Columbia. ?rice 10 cents. 

Group Vm. Bowling 

No. 8— Spalding's Official 
Bowling Guide. 

The contents include: 
diagrams of effective de- 
liveries; hints to begin- 
ners: how to score; official 
rules; spares, how they 
are made ; rules for cocked 
hat, quintet, cocked hat 
and feather, battle game, 
etc. Price 10 cents. 

„ _,, Indoor 
Group IX. Base Ball 

No. 9— Spalding's Official In- 
door Base Ball Guide. 

America's national game 
18 now vieing with other 
indoor games as a winter 
pastime. This book con- 
tains the playing rules, 
pictures of leading teams, 
and interesting articles on 
the game b> leading au- 
thorities on the subject. 
Price 10 cents. 



Polo 






Group X. 

No. 10— Spalding's 
Official Boiler 
Polo Guide. 

Edited by J. C. Morse. 
A full description of the 
game; official rules, re- 
cords; pictures of promi- 
nent players. Price 10 cents 

No. 129— Water Polo 

The contents of this boc 
every detail, the individual i 
players, the practice of the 
to throw the ball, with illustrations and 
many valuable hints. Price ■ G c< 

No. 199— Equestrian Polo. 

Compiled by H. L. Fitzpat i Eel 
New York Sun. Illustrated with por- 
traits of leading players, ar> 
most useful information for polo play > 
ers. Price 10 cents. 

_ ^_ MisceUaae- , 
Group XI. ous( 

No. 201 — Lacrosse. 

Every position is thoroughly ex- 
plained in a most simple anv concise 
manner, rendering it the b» manual 
of the game ever publisl L Illus- 
trated with numerous snaps 1 4. im- 
portant plays. Price 10 cen 

No. 297— Official Hr 
U. S. Inter-Collegia t. 
crosse League. 

Contains the constitution, h: -laws, 
playing rules, list of officers and ecords 
of the association. Price 1C 

No. 271— Spalding's 01 
Roane Guide. 

The official publication c 
tional Roque Association ol 
Contains a description of ;i 
and their construction, diagrat-. 
trations, rules and valuable in forma- 
tion. Price 10 cents. 

No. 138— Spalding's Official 
Croquet Guide 

Contains directions for playing, dia - 
grams of important strokes, description 
of grounds, instructions for the begin- 
ner, terms used in the gar and the 
official playing rules. Price 10 cents. 



ottce. 



^gPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY/7 5 



No. 248— Archery. 

A new and up-to-date book on this 
fascinating pastime. The several 
varieties of archery; instructions for 
shooting; how to select implements; 
how to score; and a great deal of inter- 
esting information. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

Mo. 194 — Racquets, Squash- 
Racquets and Court Ten- 
nis. 

How to play each game is thoroughly 
explained, and all the difficult strokes 
shown by special photographs taken 
especially for this book. Contains the 
official rules for each game. Price 10 
cents. 

Xo. 167— Quoits. 

Contains a description of the plays 
used by experts and the official rules. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 170— Push Ball. 

This book contains the official rules 
and a sketch of the game; illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 13— How 
Ball. 



to Play Hani 



By the world's champion, Michael 
Egan. Every play is thoroughly ex- 
plained by text and diagram. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 14 — Curling:. 

A short history of this famous Scot- 
tish pastime, with instructions for 
play, rules of the game, definitions of 
terms and diagrams of different shots. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 207— Bowling on the 
Green; or, Lawn Bowls. 
How to construct a green; how to 
play the game, and the official rules 
of the Scottish Bowling Association. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 189— Children's Games. 

These games are intended for use at 
recesses, and all but the team games 
have been adapted to large classes. 




No. 1SS— Lawn Games. 

Lawn Hockey, Garden Hockey, Hand 
Tennis, Tether Tennis; also Volley 
Ball, Parlor Hockey, Badminton, Bas- 
ket Goal. Price 10 cents. 

Group XII. Athletics 

No. 12— Spalding's Official 
Athletic Almanac. 

Compiled by J. E. Sulli- 
van, President of the Ama- 
teur Athletic Union. The 
only annual publication 
now issued that contains 
a complete list of amateur 
best-on-records; intercol- 
legiate, English, swim- 
ming, interscholastic, Irish, Scotch, 
Swedish, Continental, South African, 
Australasian; numerous photos of in- 
dividual athletes and leading athletic 
teams. Price 10 cents. 

No. 27— College Athletics. 

M. C. Murphy, the well-known ath- 
letic trainer, now with Pennsylvania, 
the author of this book, has written it 
especially for the schoolboy and college 
man, but it is invaluable for the athlete 
who wishes to excel in any branch of 
athletic sport; profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 182— All-Around Ath- 
letics. 

Gives in full the method of scoring 
the All-Around Championship; how to 
train for the All-Around Champion- 
ship. Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 156— Athlete's Guide. 

Full instructions for the beginner, 
telling how to sprint, hurdle, jump and 
throw weights, general hints on train- 
ing; valuable advice to beginners and 
important A. A. U. rules and their ex- 
planations, while the pictures comprise 
many scenes of champions in action. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 273— The Olympic Gaines 
at Athens 

A complete account of the Olympic 
Games of 1906, at Athens, the greatest 
International Athletic Contest ever 



Suitable for children from three to! held. Compiled by J. E. Sullivan, 



eight years, and include a great variety. 
Price 10 cents. 



Special Un'-ted States Commissioner to 
the Olympit Games. Price 10 cents. 



^PALDING^SkTRADE-IVIARK 

UARANTEES TO4lJb| ' ACCEPT NO 

; QUALITY %Z^& SUBSTITUTr *- 



S^— 




sm 







The Spalding Uniform No. 0— Highest Grade Made 

Workmanship and material very highest quality through- 
out. Consisting of Shirt, Pants, Cap, Belt and Stockings. 
The Spalding Uniform No. 0. Complete, $15.00 £f«) CA 
Net price clubs ordering for entire team. Suit, «?■.*•«» V 

The University Uniform No. 1 
Equal to No. Uniform, but slightly lighter. Consist- 
ing of Shirt, Pants. Cap, Belt and Stockings. 
University Uniform No. 1. Complete, $12.50 £fA (|A 
Net price clubs ordering for entire team. Suit, <PIV.V V 

The Interschoiastic Uniform No. 2 
One of our most popular suits, and will give the best of 
satisfaction. Can usually be worn two seasons. Consist- 
ing of Shirt. Pants, Cap, Belt and Stockings. 
Interschoiastic Uniform No. 2. Complete, $10.00 <£C A A 
Net price clubs ordering for entire team. Suit, «PO.W 

The Minor League Uniform No. M 
Well made of very durable material. Consisting of Shirt, 
Pants, Cap, Belt and Stockings. 

Minor League Uniform No. M. Complete, $9.00 £7 CA 
Net price clubs ordering for entire team. Suit, *** * •*' v 

The Club Special Uniform No. 3 
Well finished; a most excellent outfit for amateur clubs. 
Consisting of Shirt, Pants, Cap. Belt and Stockings. 
Club Special Uniform No. 3. Complete, $6.00 CC AA 
Net price clubs ordering for entire team. Suit, ** ,vv 

The Amateur Special Uniform No. 4 
Very popular with the younger base ball players. Con- 
t Shirt Pants, Cap, Belt and Stockings. 

jial Uniform No. 4. Complete, $5.00 <fcH A A 
Net price clubs ordering for entire team. Suit, <P^ V " 

The Spalding Junior Uniform No. 5 
Made expressly for clubs composed of boys and youths. 
Consisting of Shirt, Pants, Cap, Belt and Stockings. 
Spalding Junior Uniform No. 5. Complete, $4.00 £9 A A 
Net price clubs ordering for entire team. Suit, **>*>•"" 
No extra charge for lettering any of above shirts with club name aor fur 
detachable sleeves. Extra charge for all lettering on caps. 

The Spalding Youths' Uniform No. 6 

The Spalding Youths' Uniform No. 6. Very well made 

of good quality Gray material. Consisting of <£| A A 

- Shirt, Pants. Cap, Belt and Stockings. Complete, <P>«VV 

No larger sizes than 30-in. waist an d 34-in. chest furnished in No. 6 un iform. 

Oue felt letter only on shirt. Extra charge for all lettering on caps. 

Send for Spalding's handsome measurement blank and 

complete assortment of samples and prices. 



Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addresBed to 

A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



London 
England 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Orleans 



Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 



Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



notice. 



, THE SPALDING^S^TRADE-IVIi. 

GUARANTEES M^lil ACCEPT NO 
V> QUALITY . %Z^<& SUBSTITUT 




ial 



SPALDI1VG BASE BALL c 

Spalding Highest Quality 

No. 2-0. Hand made throughout 
selected kangaroo leather. Nt 
expense have been spared in mai^. 
shoe not only the very highest ; n quai' " ; 
but perfect in every other detail. Tti^ 
plates are of the finest hand-forged razor 
steel and are firmly riveted to heel and 
sole Per pair, $7.00 

Spalding Sprinting Shoe 

No. 30-S. Made of selected kangaroo leather 
and built on our famous running shoe last. 
This shoe is strongly made, and, while ex- 
tremely light in weight, will be found sub- 
stantial in construction. Hand sewed and 
a'strictly bench made shoe. Per pair, $7.00 

Spalding "Featherweight" Shoe 

The Lightest Base Ball Shoe Ever Made. 
Size ol Shoe— 5 6 7 8 9 
Weight (Ozs.) 17 ti% 18 19 20 

No. FW. Owing to thelightness and fineness 
of its construction, it is suitable for the 
exacting demands of the fastest players, 
and is not intended for general use or for 
the ordinary player. Hand sewed and a 
strictly bench made shoe. Per pair, $7.00 

Spalding Club Special 

No. 0. Carefully selected satin calfskin, ., .a- 
chine sewed; substantially constructed, 
first-class shoe in every particular. Steel 
plates riveted to heel and sole. Pair, $5.00 

Spalding Amateur Special 

No. 35. Made of good quality calfskin, ma- 
chine sewed; a serviceable and durable 
shoe; specially recommended. Plates riv- 
eted to heel and sole. . Per pair, $3.50 

Spalding Junior 

No. 37. A leather shoe, made on regular 
base ball shoe last. Plates riveted to heel 
and sole. An excellent shoe for the money 
but not guaranteed. Per pair. $2.50 



Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. London 

in any of the following cities will receive attention England 



For street numbers see 



de front cover of this book. 



New York I Boston 
Buffalo Pittsburg 
Syracuse 1 Baltimore 



Philadelphia I Chicago 
Washington | Cleveland 
New Orleans Detroit 



Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDJNG^^TRADE- MARK 

GUARANTEES IpSllGl ACCEPT -NO^ 
ra* .QUA LITY W1 AR ^ - StlBSTifiirr ^ 




SPALDING BASE BALL COATS 

No. 0. Double Breasted Coat. Each, $10.50 

To clubs purchasing 9 or more at one time. " $9.50 

No. 1. Double Breasted Coat. Each, $10.00 




$9.00 

Each, $8.50 

" $7.50 

Each, $8.25 

. " $7.50 






"g To clubs purchasing 9 or more at one time. 

;g No. 2. Double Breasted Coat. 
3 To clubs purchasing 9 or more at one time. 
S No. M. Double Breasted Coat. 

§To clubs purchasing 9 or more at one time. 
UMPIRE BLOUSES 

5 No. Quality Flannel $6.00 No. 2 Quality Flannel $4.00 
J No. 1 Quality Flannel 5.00 No. 3 Quality Flannel 3.50 
g SPALDING VEST SWEATER 

•a; No. VG. Best quality worsted, heavy weight, pearl but- 
^ tons. Gray or white only. Special trimmed edging and 
i_9 cuffs in stock colors supplied at no extra charge. $6.00 
H BOYS' JACKET SWEATER 

gQ No. BRC. Boys' Jacket Sweater. All wool, pearl buttons; 
_ . in gray only. Well made and attractive. Each, $2.50 
35 SPALDING RIBBED COAT SWEATER 

^ No. CDW. Good quality worsted, ribbed knit, gray 
85 only. Special trimmed edging and cuffs in stock colors 
4> supplied at no extra charge. Each, $5.00 

6 SPALDING T SHIRT FOR PITCHERS 

g* No. T. Merino, fleece lined, roll collar, long sleeves. $3.50 
1 SPALDING BASE BALL SHIRTS, SEPARATE 
W With name of club. No charge for detachable sleeves. 
vt No.O. '/The Spalding," any style. 
*b No. 1. "University," any style, 
.5 No. 2. "Interscholastic," any style. 
S No. 3. j'Club Special," any style. 
^ No. 4. ''Amateur Special," any style, 
va No. 5. "Junior," any style. 

SPALDING BASE BALL PANTS, 

No. 0. # "The Spalding," any style. 

No. 1. "University," any style. 

No. 2. ^'Interscholastic," any style. 

No. 3. ]|Club Special," any style. 

No. 4. "Amateur Special," padded. 

No. 5. "Junior," padded. 

SPALDING BASE BALL STOCKINGS 

A great variety of colors and styles. 25c. to $1.75 pair. 
SPALDING BASE BALL BELTS 

Leather, worsted and cotton web, all styles. 10c. to $2.00 
SPALDING BASE BALL CAPS 

In six qualities and all styles. 25c. to $1.25 each. 



Each. 


$6.00 


Each, 


5.00 


Each, 


4.00 


Each, 


2.50 


Each, 


2.00 


Each, 


1.50 


SEPARATE 


Pair, 


$6.00 


Pair, 


5.00 


Pair, 


3.75 


Pair, 


2.50 


Pair, 


2.00 


Pair, 


1.50 



Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers eee inside front cover of this book. 



England 



i 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston Philadelphia 
Pittsburg Washington 
Baltimore New Orleans 



Chicago Cincinnati 

Cleveland Kansas City 

Detroit I St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES I 
^ QUALITY 



^TRADE-MARK j 
SBMISuJ accept no 

%^^7 SUBSTITUTE ^y 



SPALDING'S BASE BALL SUNDRIES 



Bandages— Knee, arm,etc.,silk and cotton, 75c. to $5.50 
Bases. No. O— Canvas, filled, quilted. . Set 3, 6.00 

No. 1— Canvas, filled, not quilted. 

No. 2 — Canvas, filled, ordinary quality. 

No. 4— Canvas, unfilled, laced. . . " 
Bat Bags. No, 2— Heavy canvas, for 12 bats. Each, 

No. 3— Same as No. 2, to hold 6 bats. . 

No. Ol— Sole leather, for 2 bats. 

No. 02— Canvas, leather cap at ends. 

No. 03— Canvas, leather cap 1 end. . 

No. 7— Club, sole leather, for 36 bats. 
Batting Cage, Movable— Simple and strong. 
Emblems — Small size, 25c.; medium, 35c; 



5.00 
3.50 
1.00 
3.50 
2.00 
4.00 
" 1.50 
" 1.00 
" 30.00 
" 50.00 
large, .50 



Foul Flags— Bunting, 16 x 24in., 7ft. staff. Each, 1.50 
Glove Softener — Used in place of oil or grease. Box, .10 
Hackey Ankle Supporter, cures sprains, 25c, 50c. 1.00 
Heel Plates. No. 4-0— Razor steel, sharpened. Pair, .50 

No. 2-0 — Hardened steel, sharpened. 

No. 1H— Good steel, sharpened. . 
Home Plates. No. 1— White rubber. . Each, ] 

No. C — Composition, very durable. . j 

Indicators, Umpire. No. O— Celluloid. 
Pitchers' Box Plate. No. 3— White rubber. " 

Pitchers' Toe Plate. No. A— Aluminum. 

No. B— Brass. 

Score Books. No. 1— Pocket size, paper, 7 games. " t 

No. 2— Board, 22 games. 

No. 3— Board, 46 games. ... \\ 

No. 4— Club size, board. 30 gai.ies. 

No. 5— Cloth, 60 games. 

No. 7— Cloth, 160 games. ... 

Score cards. . . . Each, 5c, Doz., 
Scoring Tablet. No. 1— Celluloid. . . Each, 
Toe Plates. No. 3-0— Razor steel, sharpened. || 

No. O— Hardened steel, sharpened. . 

No. 1 — Good steel, sharpened. 

Pitchers', No. A— Aluminum 

Pitchers', No. B— Brass. 
Uniform Bags. No. 2— Fine bag leather. . 

No. 1 — Best heavy canvas, leather bound. 

No. 6— Canvas rcll, leather straps, handle. " 

No. 5— Uniform and bat bag, best canvas. " 

No. 4— Uniform bag, brown canvas. 
For complete descriptions, prices and illustrations of 
all the latest accessories for Base Ball, send for 

Spalding's Base Ball Catalogue. Mailed Free. 








Communications addressed to 






Montreal 
Canada 


A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 


London 
England 




For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 




New York 

Buffalo 
Syracuse 


Boston 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 


Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Orleans 


Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 


Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 


San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING^^TRADE-MARK 

GUARANTEES loB»l. ACCEPT NO 



GUARANTEES 
QUALITY 



ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE ^ \ 



London, Eng., Dec. 5, 1907. 

Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros. 
London, Eng. 



Gentlemen : 



Tj, 



The Boxing 
Gloves, Boots, 

: .veaters and Punching Bags that I have 
1 -;ed in Training for my match with 
Gunner Moir, for the Heavyweight 
Championship of the World, and which I 
nave secured from your firm, are the best 
I have ever used, and I most cheerfully 
i. commend them to anyone following 
my profession. 

From the opinion I have formed of 
these goods I shall use them in my train- 
ing, and in signing articles of agreement 
to box Jack Palmer and Jem Roche, or 
any future contests in which I may take 
I art, will insist that A. G. Spalding & 
Bros.' Gloves be used, this statement to 
be included in and to be one of the articles 
r said agreements. Yours very truly, 





Montreal 
Canada 



Communications addressed to 

A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book. 



England 



New York I Boston I Philadelphia 
Buitalo Pittsburg Washington 
Syracuse I Baltimore! New Orleans 



Chicago I Cincinnati 

Cleveland Kansas City 

Detroit I St. Louis 



San Francisco 

Denver 
Minneapolis 



Prices in effect January 6, 1908. Subject to change without notice. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



Durand-: 

WOODEN LOCKER 
tionable because 
vermin, absorb odors, can be 
easily broken into, and are dan- 
gerous on account of fire. Lockers made 
from wire mesh or expanded metal af- 
ford little security, as they can be easily 
entered with wire cutters. Clothes 
placed in them become covered with dust 
and thelockers themselves presenta poor 
appearance, resembling animal cages. 

Durand-Steel Lockers are made 
of high-grade steel plates, and are fin- 
ished with gloss-black Furnace baked 
Japan (400°) , comparable to that used on 
hospital ware, which will never flake off 
nor require refinishing, as do paints and 
enamels. 

Durand-Steel Lockers are usual- 
ly built with doors perforated full length 
in panel design, with sides and backs 

solid. 

This 





Six Lockers in 
Double Tier 



»j) Three Lockers in S 

P 



pre- 
vents 
clothes 
in one 
locker 
from 

coming in contact with wet gar- 
ments in adjoining lockers, while 
plenty of ventilation is secured by 
having the door perforated its 
entire length, but if the pur- 
chaser prefers we perforate the 
backs also. 

The cost of Durand-Steel Lockers 
is no more than that of first-class 
wooden lockers, and they last as 
long as the building, are sanitary. 
secure, and in addition, are fire- 
proof 

We are handling locker, isa spe- 
cial contract business, and ship- 
ment will in every case be made 
direct from the factory in Chi- 
cago. If you will let us know the 
number of lockers, size, and ar- 
rangement, we shall be glad to 
r-p. take up through correspondency 
e l ler the matter of prices 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 

Send for Complete Catalogue of I Stores in all large cities. 

all Athletic Sports. I See inside cover page of this book. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




005 901 607*6