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He- 
107 



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Google 



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STATE OI^ NEW YORK 



Department of Labor 



BULLETIN 



19J4 



"A 
Nos. 57-68 






8.6-l5-JftnO (2(«136) Digitized by LjOOglC 



ALBANY 

J. B. LYON COMPANY. PRINTERS 

1915 



Note. — ^Beginning with 1914 the former quarterly bulletin was superseded by the 
present series of separate bulletins on particular subjects. As each bulletin stands 
by itself, a volume arrangement is not followed in this series, but this title-page and 
list of bulletins is furnished for those desiring to bind the bulletins by years. 



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BULLETINS OF 1914 

No. 57 Idleness of Organized Wage Earners on September 30, 1913 

" 58 Idleness of Organized Wage Earners in 1913 

•* 59 Digest of the New York Workmen's Compensation Law 

** 59 (Revised) The Workmen's Compensation Law 

'• 60 Statistics of Trade Unions in 1913 

" 61 Idleness of Organized Wage Earners in the First Half of 1914 

" 62 New York Labor Laws of 1914 

•• 63 Directory of Trade Unions, 1914 

" 64 Changes in Union Wages and Hours in 1913 

" 65 Union Rates of Wages and Hours in 1913 

'* 66 Strikes and Lockouts in 1912 and 1913 

" 67 International Trade Union Statistics 

" 68 Statistics of Industrial Accidents in 1912 and 1913 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 

300333 



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y,i^i-- STATE OF NEW YORK 



Z'^-y-Jv-Jx ^i^CZZe_J 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 

A 

BULLETIN 



Issued Under the Direction of 

JAMES M. LYNCH 

Commissioner of Labor 



Whole No. sr 
Series on Unemployment No. i 



CONTENTS 

1dle:ness or Organized Wage: Earners 
ON September 30. 1913 



Prepared by 
THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS AND INFORMATION 

Digitized by VjOOQ l-C 



Digitized by 



Google 



New York Labor Bulletin 

PablUh«d hj th« State Department of Labor. 

Whole No. 57 Albany January, 19 14 



IDLENESS AMONG ORGANIZED WAGE EARNERS ON 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1913. 

Beturns as to idleness received by the State Department of 
Labor from practically all trade unions in the state, representing 
over 600,000 wage earners, show a large increase in the proportion 
of members idle on the last working day in September of this 
year as compared with last In fact, the percentage of idle mem- 
bers on September 30 was higher this year than in any other year 
since 1896 with the single exception of 1908. Following are the 
comparative figures for 17 years. 

iDtnncss or Mbmbibs or Labor UmoNB at tbb Ein> or SarrmfBUi. 

Memben THiBBor xdlb — 

induded » • % 

Yeas in reports Number Per cent 

1897 108.454 23.230 13.8 

1808 171,067 22.486 18.1 

1800 201.904 9.500 4.7 

1000 237.166 31.460 13.8 

1001 268.635 18,617 6.9 

1002 321,082 18,381 5.7 

1003 383,971 34.370 9.0 

1004 385.740 37,380 9.7 

1005 376.391 18.430 4.9 

1006 876 , 355 2 1 , 573 5.7 

1007 404.814 42.556 10.5 

1006 358.756 80,576 22.5 

1009 ! 359,787 86,968 10.8 

1010 462.466 63,106 13.6 

1011 467.825 50,390 10.8 

1012 491.178 34.829 7.1 

1018 627,094 101.149 16.1 

When the causes of the idleness reported are examined, it 
appears very clearly that the greater idleness this year as com- 
pared with last was due to a lessened demand for labor. Thus 92 
per cent of the idleness at the end of September this year was 
attribtuted to " lack of work " as compared with but 71 per ceat 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2 Nbw York Labob BuLLBxiifr. 

for the same date in 1912. At the same time, idleness due to 
labor disputes, which constitute the next most important variable 
cause of idleness after lack of work with respect to idleness on a 
particular day, was almost a negligible factor this year, causing 
less than 2 per cent of the total idleness as compared with 17 
per cent due to that element last year. Comparative figures as to 
causes for seven years are as follows. 

Cavsbs or iDLBNsaB or MaMBsiia or Labob Unions at End or Sbptbmbbb, 1907-1913. 

NTTMBBB Or MBMBBB0 XDLB rOB BACH CAUSI 

Causb 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 

Laokofwork 29.301 71,532 27.225 39,307 39.959 24,798 93,495 

Uok of materiBl 1,752 2.043 2.517 2.450 680 279 667 

Weather 569 500 894 163 493 237 493 

Labor duputee 6.916 2.288 2.867 17,646 5,699 6,057 1.855 

DiMbiUty 3.442 3.082 3,000 3.216 3.336 8.199 4,321 

Other oauMS 343 466 175 181 128 93 24S 

Cause not itated 233 665 290 143 95 166 70 

Total 42.556 80,576 36.968 63,106 60,390 34.829 101.149 

rBBCBNTAGB Or IDLBNCSS DXTB TO BACH CAUSB 

Causb 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 

Laokofwork 68.9 88.8 73.6 62.3 79.3 71.1 92.4 

Lack of material 4.1 2.6 6.8 8.9 1.8 0.8 0.7 

Weather 1.3 0.6 2.4 0.2 1.0 0.7 0.5 

Labor disputes 16.3 2.8 7.8 28.0 11.3 17.4 1.8 

DisabiUty 8.1 3.8 8.1 5.1 6.6 9.2 4.3 

Other causes 0.8 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 

Cause not stated 0.5 0.8 0.8 0.2 0.2 0.5 0.1 

Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 lOO.O 

The returns represent not far from 300 different trades or 
branches of trades. Combined along industry lines these trades 
fall into thirteen groups. Comparison of the percentages of idle- 
ness this year and last in these individual groups shows that 
in all but three the proportion of idleness on September 30 was 
higher this year, and only one of the three with a lower percentage 
(printing) is among the larger groups. But the amount of in- 
crease varies greatly in different groups. In several it is com- 
paratively unimportant, and these include the transportation and 
metal trades, two of the four leading groups of organized trades. 
In two, however, the increase is very heavy, and since these two, 
building and clothing, are the two largest groups in point of union 
membership, their increases are practically the controlling element 
in the large increase shown by the percentage for all trades corn- 
Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idlsxesb of Obganizsb Wagx Easnsbb. 8 

bined. In the building trades the percentage of union members 
idle at the end of September was 18 per cent this year as com- 
pared with 7 per cent last year, and in the clothing group the 
percentage was nearly 25 this year as against 7 last year. Com- 
parative figures for individual groups of trades for a number of 
years are given in the following table, which is followed by a 
second showing comparative figures for causes of idleness. The 
latter brings out again the fact shown above by combined figures 
for all trades, that the increase in idleness this year was due to 
greater idleness for lack of employment rather than to other 
elements. 

iDLBifus or Mbmbbrs or Labob Oboanxiatioks at thb End or Sbptsmbbb, bt IirDuaTBnM. 

PBBCBNTAOB 

Number,'' * s 

IifDUVTBT 1913 1913 1912 1911 1910 1909 1908 1907 1900 

1. Buflding. stone working, etc.. 24.832 18.8 6.8 15.9 20.8 13.6 33.6 13.7 6.8 

2. Trwuportetion 8.413 9.6 8.9 6.6 8.2 7.8 14.8 6.6 3.0 

3. Clotliins and textiles 66,956 24.8 7.3 9.7 18.4 16.0 30.4 19.0 11.8 

4. Metals, machinery, etc 2.460 6.7 6.3 20.2 8.7 8.2 24.4 8.0 8.3 

6. Printing, binding, etc 1.388 4.7 9.8 6.0 6.3 6.3 12.7 8.1 12.6 

6. Wood working, etc 1.812 12.4 7.6 14.3 8.6 10.6 21.1 9.8 4.9 

7. Food and tiquon 1,328 7.6 7.1 8.5 10.4 9.3 10.9 6.7 6.4 

8. Theaten and music 58 1.5 5.4 1.6 12.0 10.6 11.6 11.2 12.0 

9. Tobacco 376 4.5 5.9 10.7 6.8 8.7 14.2 3.8 7.1 

10. Restaurants, trade, etc 2.626 9.5 6.9 7.6 4.9 5.3 10.7 4.1 8.6 

11. Pubiio employment 596 3.4 0.2 0.9 0.6 3.2 6.2 10.0 2.6 

12. Stationary engine tending... 604 4.3 1.8 8.6 2.1 2.2 7.4 2.1 1.3 

13. Miscellaneous 812 8.6 8.3 10.9 8.1 14.7 37.8 6.4 3.0 

Total 101.149 16.1 7.1 10.8 13.6 10.3 22.6 10.6 6.7 



Causbs or Idunbss or Mbmbbbs or Labob Unions at thb End or Sbptbmbbb, bt Inovstbibs. 

TTNaHPLOTMBNT* LABOB DZSPUTBS DISABILITT 



Industbt 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1911 


1912 


1913 


Building, stone work- 




















iii«.etc 


16.380 


7,420 


22.640 


2,357 


33 


190 


1.067 


1.263 


1.911 


Transportation 


3.101 


2,111 


7.481 


474 


4.613 


39 


^83 


473 


821 




10.638 


9.072 


55,056 


458 


236 


762 


149 


190 


132 


Metals, machinery, eta 


3,989 


1.034 


1,730 


2.232 


354 


203 


403 


394 


420 


Printing, binding, etc.. 


1.039 


1.680 


984 




816 


48 


364 


362 


353 


Wood working, etc . . . 


1,495 


657 


1,366 


74 


67 


351 


120 


110 


96 


Food and liquors 


1,361 


1.139 


1,185 




8 




160 


88 


143 


Theaters and music. . . 


68 


199 


67 




8 




3 




1 


Tobacco 


601 


201 


134 


82 


24 


3 


283 


228 


234 


Restaurants, trade, etc. 


606 


1.424 


2.482 






10 


100 


48 


130 




104 


17 


683 








49 


12 


11 


Stationary engine tend- 




















ing 


861 


163 


462 






20 


114 


18 


32 


fiiiscellaneous 


889 


197 


506 


22 


8 


229 


61 


23 


37 



Total 41.132 25.314 94.656 6,699 6.067 1.866 8.336 3,199 4.321 



■• Inclusive of lack of work, lack of material, and weather. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



4 New Yokk Labos Bulletin. 

In a table below are given comparative figures for this year 
and last not only for trade groups but for a number of sub- 
divisions of certain groups. It will be seen that all three of the 
divisions of the building group shared in the large increase in 
that gro.up as a whole. In the clothing group, however, it is 
conspicuously in the garment trades that the increase for the group 
is found, with only one other subdivision — hats, caps and 
furs — showing anything like so heavy an increase. 

Figures for localities are not yet compiled, but when it is 
pointed out that two-thirds of the state's union members in the 
building industry, and over 90 per cent of the members in the 
clothing trades, are in New York City, it will be seen that the 
conspicuous increase this year in idleness of organized wage 
earners at the end of September, largely due to the returns for 
those two industries alone, are especially significant for the 
metropolis. As a matter of fact, three-fourths of the members re- 
ported idle at the end of September this year were in New York 
City, the trades reporting the greatest amount of idleness there 
being bricklayers (3,686), bricklayers' laborers (4,711), car- 
penters (3,082) and more than 500 members in each of six other 
building trades. In the clothing trades, nearly all of this idle- 
ness was concentrated in New York City, the trades reporting 
the greatest amount of idleness there being basters (5,010), cloak 
and SiUit makers (6,100), clothing cutters and trimmers (1,500), 
clothing pressors (2,915), coat, pants^ and vest makers (13,655), 
jacket makers (2,605), skirt makers (1,920), tailors (1,305) and 
waist, dress and wrapper makers (12,040). 



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Idleness op Organized Wage Eaenbbs. 



IDLENESS OF MEMBEBS OF LABOR UNIONS AT THE END OF SEPTEMBER, BT TBADE 

GBOUPS 

1913 1912 



iNDuaTBiBS OB Oboups Or Traoxs 

1. Bnfldlnf, Stone Workfaig, Etc 

Stone working 

Building and paving trades , 

Building and street labor 

2. Traaaportatloii , 

Rauways , 

Navigation , 

Teaming and cab driving 

Frdght handling 

Telegraphs 

5. CtotUng and Teztflet 

Garments 

Shirts, ooUars and laundry 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves 

Textiles 

4. Metels, Maddneffy and SUpbnlldiBg 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 

6. Printing, BIndiBg, Ete 

6. Wood Working and Fomltore 

7. Food and LIqaon 

Food products 

Beverages 

8. Tlieaten and Mosic 

9. Toi>aoeo 

10. Berta nr a nte , Triide, Etc 

Hotels and restaurants 

Barbering 

Retail trade 

11. Public Employment 

12. Stationary Engine TendUng 

13. MiBcellaneooB 

Paper and paper goods 

Leather and leather goods 

Glass and glassware. . . .' 

Cement, clay and plaster products . . . . 

Other distinct trades 

Mixed employment 

Total 



Members 
included 


Per 
cent 
idle 


Members 
included 


Per 
cent 
idle 


1S6.028 

5,600 

105,976 

24,452 


18. S 

16.8 
16.0 
28.2 


128,474 

5.985 
97.385 
25.104 


6.8 

4.2 

8.3 
1.8 


88,289 

32.718 

27,274 

19.599 

6,048 

2,650 


9.5 

2.6 
16.9 
11.6 
10.6 

1.1 


80,439 

27,917 

29.839 

15,453 

4.846 

2.384 


8.9 
2.1 
17.9 
7.2 
1.8 
0.1 


225. 7S9 

185.831 

12,439 

15,550 

3,632 

8.287 


24.8 
27.2 
11.8 
20.2 
11.5 
5.1 


129.707 

104.453 

2.683 

15.066 

3.325 

4,180 


7.8 
7.6 
9.6 
4.5 
14.5 
4.1 


36,637 

30,102 
4,886 
1,649 


6.7 

6.2 

7.9 

12.2 


28.484 

24.207 

2.854 

1.423 


6.S 

5.9 
4.1 
17.8 


29,827 


4.7 


29,084 


9.8 


14.629 


12.4 


11,059 


7.6 


17,471 
9.116 
8,355 


7.6 

10.1 
4.9 


17,476 

8.956 
8.520 


7.1 
9.4 
4.7 


S.9S2 


1.5 


S.849 


6.4 


8.S61 


4.6 


8.6S9 


5.9 


27,682 

19,374 

6,638 

1.670 


9.6 

12.7 
1.3 
4.6 


21,315 

18,100 
2,141 
1,074 


6.9 

7.8 
3.0 
0.5 


17.497 


3.4 


14,895 


0.2 


11.694 


4.3 


10.474 


1.8 


9.398 

3,556 
1,165 
1,537 

464 
2.381 

295 


8.6 
10.7 
3.7 
13.7 
9.7 
4.9 
5.4 


7.283 

2.483 
695 

1,634 
157 

2.244 
70 


3.8 

0.4 
3.6 
10.1 
1.9 
1.6 
0.0 


627.094 


16.1 


491.178 


7.1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



New Yokk Labob Bxtllhtin. 

musness among obqanized wags 



Indttbtribs or Groups of Tradrs 



Number 

not 
reporting 



Number 

re- 
porting 



Total 

number 

idle 



1. Bonding, Stone Working, Etc 

Stone working 

Building and paving trades 

Building and street labor 

2. Tnuiaportatlon 

Railways 

Navi^tion 

Teaming and oab driving 

Freight nandling 

Telegraphs 

S. Clothing and TeztUei 

Garments 

Shirts, collars and laundry 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves 

Textiles 

4. Metals, Machinery and Shlpbolldhig. . . 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 

5. Printing, Bfadlng, Etc 

•. Wood Working and Fomltiire 

7. Food and LIqaors 

Food products 

Beverages 

S. Theaters and Mnslc 

9. Tobacco 

10. Restaurants, Thide, Etc 

Hotels and restaurants 

Barbering 

Retail trade 

11. Public Employment 

12. Statloaary Engine Tending 

18. Miscellaneoas 

Paper and paper goods 

Leather and leather goods 

Glass and glassware 

Cement, clay and plaster products 

Other distinct trades 

Mixed employment 

Total 



2.710 

437 

2,181 

92 

5,70« 

2.868 
446 
487 
243 

1.662 

789 

117 
4 

47 
637 

84 

816 

760 
13 
42 

908 

188 

624 

86 
438 

22,066 

1,800 

1.028 

120 

841 

62 

807 

01 

102 

41 
6 

48 

15 
1 

51 



180,028 

5,600 

105,976 

24.452 

88.289 

32.718 

27.274 

19.599 

6,048 

2.650 

225.789 

185.831 

12.439 

15.550 

3.632 

8,287 

80,087 

30.102 
4,886 
1.649 

29.827 

14.029 

17.471 

9.116 
8.355 

8.962 

8.851 

27.082 

19.374 
6,638 
1.670 

17.497 

11,694 

9.898 

3,556 
1,165 
1.537 

464 
2,381 

295 



24.882 

941 

16,997 

6,894 

8.418 

859 
4.606 
2,275 

043 
30 

65, 950 

60.51^ 

1.462 

3,140 

419 

420 

2.460 

1,862 
387 
201 

1,888 

1,812 

1,828 

920 

408 

68 

876 

2.02S 

2,466 

83 

76 

69S 



812 

382 
43 

210 
45 

116 
16 



88.164 



027.094 



101,149 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WOR] 



Il>X.KIT£8S OF ObGANIZEI) WaOB EASmBBS. 
AT THK END OP SEPTEMBER, 191t 



idle 



NxjiKBU Idu on Acoomrr or> 



J^tush: of 



Lack of 
material 



The 
weather 



Labor 
diBputee 



Dia- 
abUity 



Other 



CauM 
noteUied 



18. S 

16.8 
18. O 
28.2 

9.5 

2.6 

16. f» 

11.6 

10.6 

1.1 

24.8 
27.2 
11.8 
20.2 
11.5 
5.1 

6.7 

6.2 

7.9 

12.2 

4.7 

12.4 

7.6 

lO.l 

4.9 

1.6 

4.5 

9.6 

12.7 

1.3 

4.6 

8.'4 

4.8 

8.6 
10.7 
3.7 
13.7 
9.7 
4.9 
5.4 



21,894 

829 

14.679 

6.488 



242 
4.494 
2.098 

665 

8 



4 
404 
160 



178 



168 
10 



74 



ItO 



10 



34 

40 



4 

15 
20 



49.901 
1.40D 
3,058 



265 



1. 
1. 



821 
124 



1. 

I.ISO 

858 
272 

67 



2.482 

2.: 



sa 



16.1 



262 

24 

7 
94 
25 
96 
16 



28 
55 

"56 



762 
664 



37 

21 

150 



173 
30 



48 
Ul 



3 

18 

io 



1.811 

67 

1.607 

237 

821 

562 
74 

122 

58 

5 

182 

60 

2 

45 

16 

9 

488 

346 
10 
64 



148 

62 
81 



284 

188 

67 
44 

10 



93.496 



246 

167 



73 



228 

165 
35 



11 

82 

87 

16 

1 



a 

8 



46 

41 

4 
1 

88 

45 



48 

45 



IS 

10 



14 

8 



81 

52 
26 
13 



46 

6 



84 



667 



488 



1,855 



4,821 



248 



78 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I.Olf 

^7 



\f'- 



^■^^ (STATE Or/NEW YORR^^JS? 
DEPARTMENT OF LABOa.,, 

BULLETIN 



-J. 



Issuea Uiiaer the Direction of 

JAKES M. LYNCH 

QMnmissioner ot Lat)or 



Wbok Ifo. 58 
Series on Unefflployment No. 3 



IDI.ENESS or Organized Wace Hasners 

IN 1913 



Prepared by 
THB BURMU OF STATISTICS AND INFORMATION 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Previous Publications, Concerning: Uaemployment 

Statistics of Uneniploynient have been published from 1897 to date. All 
sucli statistics have been bated on returns from trade unions. For the years 
1S97 and IS9S, these were published only in the annual reports of the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics. Froin 1899 to 1913 summary figures were published 
quarterly in the Bulletin of that Bureau, wiich after 1000 became the Bulletin 
of the Department of Labor, with detailed annual figures in the annual reports 
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Beginning with 1913 statistics, or other 
information, concerning unemployment^ will be published only in Bulletins 
in a series on Unemployment, of which the present is the second number. 

From 1896 to 1905 a State Employment Bureau was maintained in New 
York City. The annual reports of this Bureau were publislied in the annual 
reports of the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the years 1896 to 1900, and in 
the anniial reports of the Commissioner of Labor for 1901 to 190o. Concern- 
ing the abolition of that Bureau, see page 14 of the report of the Commis- 
sioner of Labor for 1005. 

Of the publications above referred to, files of which may be found in many 
public libraries, the Department can now supply only the following: 

Quarierly Bulletins: 1899, Xo. 2; 1902, Ko. 15; 1905, No. 26; 1007, Nos. 
34, 35; 1908, Nos. 36, 37, 38, 39; 1910, No. 45; 1911, Nos. 47, 48, 49; 1012, 
Kos. 50, 51, 62, 53; 1913, Nos. 54, 56, 

Annual Reports of Bureau of Labor Statistics: 1900, 1901-4, 1906-7, 
1909-12. 

Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Labor: lOOl-S, 

Bulletins in Series on Unemployment: No. 1 (whole No. 57) ; No. 2 
(whole No. 58). 



ALBANY 

J. B. LYON COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1914 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNEMPLOYMENT OF ORGANIZED WAGE EARNERS 

[This chart Is based on monthly returns from representative trade unions and 
shows the course of the percentage of members reported idle at the end ofi each 
month for causes other than disputes or disability, which is practically equivalent 
to unemployment, or idleness due to the condition of trade.] 



Cm 


Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May 


Jun. Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct 


Nov. Dec 


41 








40 








39 






/ 


38 






1 


37 








36 






1 


35 






1 


34 






1 


33 






1 


32 






1 


31 






1 


30 






1 


29 






1 


28 






1 


27 






1 


26 






1 


25 


- 




1 


24 




i 


f 


23 




/ 


1 


22 


n\ ^^ 


/ 


1 


21 


\S ^^^^^g^^^^ 


>^^ / 


11 


20 


\ "^ m. / y 


^^^w / 


1 1 
It 
1 § 


19 


\ § \ f 


^^"•v. / 


18 


\ \ Z-^ ^ / 


\ ^^V X 


1 J 


17 


\ V-*-V''^\ ^ / 


\ ^V ^ 


h 


16 


\ / \ ^ / 


\ ^V. ^ 


u 


15 




\ ^^ 


It 


14 




\ 


It 


13 
12 
11 




^^^^- \ -y 


1 1 
1^1 


10 




^M '''^/ 




9 




V - - " " " / 




8 




\ / 




7 




\ / 




6 
5 
4 
3 
2 


1913 






1912 




1 


1904-12 







12] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



New York Labor Bulletin 



Pabllflhed 1»7 tli« Stete Department of lAbor. 



^ Whole No. 58 Albany February, 191 4 



f 



IDLENESS AMONG ORGANIZED WAGE EARNERS IN 1913 

SumiDLAry 

The returns received by the State Department of Labor from 
labor organizations, which are reviewed in this Bulletin, indicate — 

That idleness was more extensive in 1913 than in 1912; 

That the increase in idleness was due chiefly to a lessened demand 
for labor; 

That in the first half of the year unemployment (idleness due to 
the condition of trade) was not, for the six months as a whole, 
markedly different from that in 1912, but after March was con- 
siderably higher than the average for recent years; 

That in the second half of the year unemployment was not only 
greater than in 1912, but was greater than in any other recent year 
except 1908 and very nearly equaled that year; 

That up to the last two months of the year the increase over 
former years in unemployment remained practically constant but 
that in each of the last two months the increase grew larger; 

That at the close of the year, unemployment, especially in New 

York city, had reached a point in excess of that shown in any of 

the last nine years. 

Analysis 

Returns as to idleness on the last working day of each month in 1913 

received from a selected list of representative labor organizations,* 

* In comxMling the list of representative unions, the aim has been to preserve, as far as possible, 
the same proportionate representation of diflfereni industries and industrial centers, particularly 
the former, in the selected fproup as appears in the membership of all trade unions in the state. 
Of the 237 unions reporting m the latter part of the year 97 were in New York City, 37 in Buffalo, 
20 in Albany, 16 in Rochester, 11 in Ssrracuse, and 56 were in 31 other localities. The following 
table compares, by industries, the distribution of members who were reported as to idleness, in 
the selected croups and in all unions at the end of September, 1913: 

Percentage 
of total 

PBRCENTAaB OF TOTAL gTOUp 

NUMBER or MEiiBBRB IN EACH GROUP member- 

' * ^ ' s ship in 

Repre- Repre- repre- 

AU sentetive All sentative sentative 

Indubtbt unions unions unions unions unions 

1. Building, stone working, etc 136.028 33.466 21 .7 21 .4 24.6 

2. Transportation 88,289 23,221 14.1 14.8 26.3 

3. Clothing and textUes 225.739 60,910 36.0 38.9 27.0 

4. Metals, machinery and shipbuilding. 36.637 8,898 5.8 5.7 24.3 

5. Printing, binding, etc 29,827 7,537 4.8 4.8 25.3 

6. Wood working and furniture 14,629 3.194 2.3 2.0 21.8 

7. Food and liquors 17,471 4,297 2.8 2.7 24.6 

8. Theaters and music 3,952 1.209 0.6 0.8 30.6 

9. Tobacco 8,351 2,488 1.3 1.6 29.8 

10. Restaurants, trade, ete 27,682 3,207 4.4 2.1 11.6 

11. Public employment 17,497 3,634 2.8 2.3 20.8 

12. Stationary engine tending 11,594 2,477 1.9 1.6 21.4 

13. Miscellaneous 9,398 2,094 1.5 1.3 22.3 

Total 027,094 156,632 100.0 100.0 2^.0 

ptizecf 5y^ 
[3] 



4 Xew York Labor Bulletin. 

are summarized in the following table together with similar figures 
for previous years. 

TABLE 1. — Percentaqe op Idle Wage Earners in Representative Trade Unions at 

End op Each Month. 

YEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

1902 20.9 18.7 17.3 15.3 14.0 14.5 15.6 7.1 6.3 11.2 14.3 22.2 

1903 20.5 17.8 17.6 17.3 20.2 23.1 17.8 15.4 9.4 11.7 16.4 23.1 

1904 26.8 21.6 27.1 17.0 16.9 13.7 14.8 13.7 12.0 10.8 11.1 19.6 

1905 22.5 19.4 19.2 11.8 8.3 9.1 8.0 7.2 5.9 5.6 6.1 11.1 

1900 15.0 16.3 11.6 7.3 7.0 6.3 7.6 5.8 6.3 6.9 7.6 15.4 

1907 21,5 20.1 18.3 10.1 10.5 8.1 8.5 12.1 12.3 18.5 22.0 32.7 

1908 36.9 37.5 37.5 33.9 32.2 30.2 26.8 24.6 24.6 23.1 21.5 28.0 

1909 29.3 26.5 23.0 20.3 17.1 17.4 13.9 11.9 14.5 13.7 13.3 20.6 

1910 24.5 22.4 22.6 16.0 14.5 15.4 19.4 22.3 12.5 15.0 17.5 27.3 

1911 26.7 24.8 26.6 21.3 27.2 22.9 15.5 11.7 11.2 11.6 20.0 34.2 

1912 25.8 17.6 18.8 13.3 20.1 22.8 21.1 9.1 5.9 7.4 15.3 30.1 

1913 38.2 33.4 21.8 21.7 22.9 22.2 20.8 19.6 16.2 19.3 27.8 40.0 

Mean, 1902-13. 25.6 22.9 21.7 17.1 17.5 17.1 15.8 13.4 11.4 12.9 16.1 25.4 



A study of the table reveals that, with the exception of two months 
(June and July), the percentage of idleness was greater at the end 
of every month than on the corresponding dates in 1912. The 
lessened idleness in the two excepted months was nominal only 
(less than one point in each). The mean percentage of idleness 
for the first six months of 1913 was seven points higher than for the 
first six months of 1912; for the second half of 1913 the mean per- 
centage was nine points higher than for the corresponding period 
of 1912; and for the entire year 1913 the mean percentage was eight 
points higher than for the year 1912 (25.3 as against 17.3). The 
mean percentage for 1913 was higher than for any year since these 
records have been kept (beginning in 1902) except 1908. 

By reference to Table 2, it will be seen that the mean percentage 
of idleness in these representative unions in 1913 was greater in ten 
of the thirteen industrial groups and less in three of the groups than 
in 1912. Among the industries reporting increases were the three 
largest ones which, combined, included more than three-fourths of 
the total membership of the representative unions reporting as to 
idleness. In one of these industries — transportation — the in- 
crease was slight (less than two points). In the building industry, 
the second largest as to numbers reporting, the increase was four 
points, while in clothing and textiles, with almost double the number 
reporting in the building industry, the increase was twelve points. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idlet^ess of Oruanizkd Wage Eaf^ners in 1913. 5 

The other changes were minora both in amount (only one increase 
as much as three points) and in significance because of the relatively 
small numbers reporting. 

TABLE 2. — Mean Montblt PERCCiirrAGB or loLENBas in Reprbsbnt ative Tbadb I'monh, 

BT Iin>rBTRI£f». 

MDrsTBT 1913 1912 1911 1910 1909 1906 1907 1906 

1. Building. Btone working, etc 25.2 21.2 30.7 24.1 26.7 42.3 25.0 10.1 

2. Tranaponation 9.4 7.5 19.9 14.0 23.8 31.0 16.6 12 5 

3. dotfaing and textiles 40.9 28.8 22.8 34.1 18.8 34.3 16.4 H.5 

4. Metals, maeiunery, etc 10.5 11,4 24.0 7.7 13.7 29.0 10.4 5.4 

5. Printing, binding, etc 7.1 5.7 5.2 5.0 9.4 18.7 11.9 16.4 

6. Wood working and furniture 21.7 17.8 19.4 10.5 13.3 33.2 17.9 11.6 

7. Food and UquofB 10.3 9.9 8.5 12.8 9.6 11. 7.4 7.1 

8. Tbeaten and music 13.1 15.7 18.7 13.4 4.9 16.1 6.6 7.H 

9. Tobacco 10.0 7.7 12.8 11.1 12.4 15.4 11.0 4.9 

10. RMtauranta, trade, etc 6.0 5.3 5.3 .>.4 6.6 11.1 6.5 5 

11. PoUic emplQjnment 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.2 1.1 1.4 2.4 

12. Stationary engine tending 2.1 1.9 1.8 1.4 1.6 3.1 1.8 1.9 

13. Miaeellaneous 9.5 7.1 13.1 14.5 14.4 22.0 4.6 2.8 

Total 25.3 17.3 21.1 19.1 18.5 29.7 16.2 9.3 



The year 1913 is compared with 1912 in the two preceding 
tables with reference to idleness due to all causes. These causes 
are specified under three headings in Table 3 which follows. 

TABLE 3. — PKBCBifTAOBa or loLExsaa iif Rbpbbsentative rNioMs at En© or E.\ch Mosth 

FOR Spbcifubd Causbs. 













Labor Disputes. 












Mean 




























for 


TEAR 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


\Uy 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


yr- 


1904... 


. 2.5 


1.6 


6.6 


3.1 


3.9 


1.7 


5.1 


5.0 


4.8 


3.8 


2.8 


2.0 


3.rt 


1905... 


3.1 


2.9 


3.4 


2.4 


1.4 


1.3 


0.6 


0.7 


0.5 


0.7 


0.8 


0.8 


l.t5 


1906... 


1.8 


1.6 


1.4 


1.1 


1.8 


2.0 


1.9 


0.8 


0.8 


1.2 


1.1 


0.7 


1.4 


1907... 


0.7 


1.0 


1.4 


0.4 


1.5 


0.7 


1.9 


3.1 


1.4 


1.0 


0.6 


0.6 


1.2 


1906... 


0.4 


0.3 


0.3 


0.3 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


1.1 


0.3 


0.4 


0.1 


0.8 


0.4 


1909... 


1.4 


0.5 


0.5 


3.7 


3.0 


2.9 


2.6 


2.5 


2.3 


2.8 


2.6 


1.6 


2.2 


1910. . . . 


6.4 


5.5 


3.9 


2.0 


1.4 


2.3 


10.1 


13.7 


3.1 


0.6 


1.4 


0.6 


4.2 


1911.... 


0.6 


0.6 


0.5 


0.3 


1.8 


3.8 


1.4 


1.1 


1.2 


0.5 


1.2 


1.1 


1.2 


1912.... 


0.2 


0.2 


0.1 


0.2 


0.6 


0.6 


1.1 


1.7 


0.1 


0.2 


0.1 


5.8 


0.9 


1913 


19.8 


19.1 


0.1 


0.5 


0.4 


0.4 


0.1 


0.3 


0.1 


0.1 


0.8 


0.1 


3.5 












Disalnlitu. 














1904..,. 


1.3 


1.3 


1.6 


1.2 


1.1 


1.2 


1.1 


1.0 


0.9 


1.1 


1.3 


1.4 


1.2 


1905.... 


1.4 


1.2 


1.2 


1.2 


1.0 




1.1 


1.1 


1.0 


1.3 


1.2 


1.2 


1.2 


1906.... 


1.4 


1.3 


1.3 


1.2 


1.1 




1.0 


1.0 


1.3 


1.2 


1.2 


1.4 


1.2 


1907. . . . 


1.8 


0.7 


1.4 


1.2 


1.3 




1.2 


1.3 


1.2 


1.3 


1.5 


1.5 


1.4 


1908. . . . 


1.4 


1.3 


1.3 


1.4 


1.4 




1.4 


1.3 


1.4 


1.4 


1.4 


1.4 


1.4 


1909. . . . 


1.5 


1.4 


1.3 


1.5 


1.4 




1.3 


1.2 


1.1 


1.3 


1.2 


1.4 


1.3 


1910 


1.6 


1.4 


1.3 


1.4 


1.3 




1.2 


1.2 


1.0 


1.1 


1.1 


1.1 


1.3 


I9I1 


1.3 


1.4 


1.0 


1.5 


1.4 




1.0 


1.1 


1.0 


1.2 


1.2 


1.1 


1.2 


1912 


1.3 


1.3 


1.3 


1.2 


l.l 




1.0 


1.0 


0.9 


1.2 


1.1 


1.1 


1.2 


1913. . . . 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


0.8 


0.8 


0.9 


1.0 


1.1 


1.1 


1.1 


l.O 


1.0 


1.0 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



J 



New York Labor Bulletin. 













Table 3 — C 


tmlinuB 


d. 


















* Unemployment {Principally Lack of Work). 








Mean 
for 


TEAR 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1904.... 


22.0 


18.8 


18.9 


12.7 


10.9 


10.8 


8.6 


7.7 


6.3 


6.4 


7.1 


15.4 


12.1 


1905.... 


18.0 


15.3 


14.6 


8.2 


5.9 


6.7 


6.3 


5.4 


4.4 


3,6 


4.0 


9.2 


8.5 


1906.... 


11.8 


12.4 


8.9 


5.0 


4.1 


3.2 


4.7 


4.0 


4.3 


4.6 


5.3 


13.3 


6.8 


1907.... 


19.0 


.17.4 


15.5 


8.5 


7.7 


6.2 


5.4 


7.7 


9.6 


16.1 


20.0 


30.5 


13.6 


1908.... 


35.1 


35.9 


35.9 


32.2 


30.6 


28.6 


25.2 


22.2 


23.0 


21.3 


20.0 


25.9 


28.0 


1909.... 


26.4 


24.6 


21.2 


15.1 


12.7 


13.1 


10.0 


8.2 


11.0 


9.6 


9.5 


17.7 


14.9 


1910.... 


16.5 


15.5 


17.4 


12.6 


11.8 


11.7 


8.1 


7.5 


8.4 


13.4 


15.0 


25.6 


13.6 


1911.... 


24.9 


22.9 


24.1 


19.6 


24.0 


17.7 


13.1 


9.5 


8.9 


9.8 


17.6 


31.9 


18.7 


1912.... 


24.4 


16.1 


17.4 


11.9 


18.5 


21.0 


19.0 


6.3 


4.9 


6.0 


14.1 


23.1 


15.2 


1913.... 


17.6 


13.2 


20.7 


20.4 


21.7 


20.9 


19.7 


18.2 


15.0 


18.1 


26.1 


38. S 


20.9 



The idleness due to disability in 1913 remained at the usual figure. 
In no year has the idleness reported as due to this cause been less 
than one per cent or as much as two per cent. The mean idleness 
for the year 1913 caused by disputes was 3.5 per cent as compared 
with 0.9 per cent in 1912. Inspection of the table, however, reveals 
that, with the exception of three months — January, February and 
December — dispute idleness in the other nine months was practi- 
cally the same as in 1912, being less in five, the same in two and 
greater in two, the difference, however, being small in each case. 
The increased dispute idleness occurred chiefly in January and 
February and was due to the extensive strike among the garment 
workers in New York City which lasted from December 30, 1912, 
until March 12, 1913. As a result of this strike taken in connection 
with the great weight which garment workers have in these returns 
(their membership reporting in January and February constituted 
34 per cent of the total membership reporting in all representative 
unions), the dispute idleness percentage for the entire representative 
union membership reached an unprecedented figure (19.8 in January 
and 19.1 in February). The decreased dispute idleness reported 
in December was likewise a result of the same garment workers' 
strike, which, as noted above, began on December 30, 1912, and on 
account of which a large number were reported idle at the close of 
that month, whereas none were reported idle at the end of Decem- 
ber, 1913, for that reason. 

After idleness due to disability and to labor disputes has been 
eliminated the remaining idleness reflects the demand for labor 
since the dominant influences in such idleness are the general or 
seasonal business conditions. Table 3 indicates that the mean 
percentage of idleness for the year due to the condition of trade was 
20.9 as against 15.2 for 1912, an increase of nearly six points. This 

♦ Due to lack of work, lack of material, the weather, etc. f - i 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness of Oboanized Wage Eabnbbs in 1913. 7 

increased idleness as compared with 1912 was chiefly in the second 
half of the year. The mean idleness for the first six months of 1913 
was only slightly (0.9 per cent) greater than for the corresponding 
period of 1912, whereas, for the latter half of 1913, the percentage 
was nearly double that in 1912 (22.7 as against 12.2). With un- 
employment for the last six months of 1913 as a whole thus clearly 
shown to have been far greater than in 1912, the question arises 
as to whether during those six months the unfavorable conditions 
were growing worse or not. In other words, was the labor market 
not only less favorable in general, but was it becoming increasingly 
so, in the last half of 1913. Upon this point the course of the per- 
centages from month to month from July to December in 1913 do 
not throw light because, as this is the period of transition from sum- 
mer to winter, there is normally a rising percentage up to the end 
of the year due to the effect of seasonal employment in many trades, 
particularly those connected with building and transportation. 
But a comparison of the diflferences between 1913 and other years 
from month to month is significant on the question. It will be 
seen in Table 3 above that the diflferences between 1913 and 1912 
as to unemplojinent (idleness not due to disputes or disability) 
remain almost exactly constant from August to December except 
for a larger diflference in December. A better comparison for the 
present purpose is one between 1913 and the mean percentages 
for 1904 to 1912, the latter representing as they do the average 
course of the percentages from month to month. Following is such 
a comparison. 

Pbbcentagbs or Uncmplotment at End or Month. 

July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Deo. 

Year. 1013 19.7 18.2 16.0 18.1 26.1 38.8 

Mean. 1904-1912 11.2 8.7 9.0 10.1 12.6 21.4 

Differences 8.6 9.5 6.0 8.0 13.6 17.4 



It here appears that from July to October unemployment, though 
(luite steadily higher, did not increase any more rapidly in 1913 
than the average for earlier years, but in the last two months the 
rise was greater and was increasingly so. In other words, the indi- 
cation of these returns is that the situation as to uiiemplojrment 
in 1913 as compared with previous years, while considerably less 
favorable before, grew increasingly worse in the last two months 
of the year. 

The foregoing general results as to unemployment are set forth 
graphically in the chart at the beginning of this Bulletin. . 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8 New York Labor Bulletin. 

In Table 4, the idleness reported for all causes at the end of each 
month in 1913 and in previous years is given by industries. 

TABLE 4. — PsBOBNTAOE OF Meicbers or Reprksbntatitb Tbadb Unions UNB>fPzx>TBD at 
THE End of Each Month, bt Industries. 

I. Building, SUne Wirking, Etc. 

TEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec « 

1904 38.3 31.2 42.6 12.8 9.3 11.9 12.9 19.8 15.2 12.6 17.1 32.9 

1905 41.5 32.6 31.8 18.8 12.8 12.7 5.6 4.5 2.5 5.2 7.5 8.4 

1906 14.3 16.4 9.4 6.7 7.6 6.4 10.8 6.9 6.4 7.3 10.2 19.2 

1907 40.4 36.1 32.5 17.7 14.9 10.7 11.4 18.5 18.1 25.1 32.5 42.1 

1908 55.6 56.3 53.6 42.2 38.3 36.3 39.5 35.5 34.3 35.2 36.7 44.3 

1909 52.3 46.2 34.7 29.0 23.5 21.5 17.8 13.8 16.7 16.5 18.5 29.7 

1910 38.9 37.0 33.6 20.3 17.9 19.6 15.6 13.7 18.9 19.5 23.5 30.4 

1911 36.8 44.5 47.7 34.1 31.5 29.6 20.9 20.9 18.0 21.8 26.6 35.5 

1912 43.3 40.0 38.2 19.9 20.4 15.6 10.2 11.8 1C.2 12.3 12.6 19.9 

1913 27.7 29.1 27.9 19.6 17.7 21.9 22.5 20.9 20.3 24.3 28.5 41.4 



11, Tratupcrtation . 

1904 40.6 37.7 42.1 33.2 35.3 7.7 8.6 8.8 9.2 6.5 6.2 28.8 

1905 30.8 26.4 25.5 13.7 6.3 6.6 7.7 6.8 4.2 3.2 3.7 29.2 

1906 32.6 29.8 23.6 4.2 4.3 5.9 4.3 3.3 4.6 4.3 4.5 29.1 

1907 28.2 26.5 25.3 5.1 9.2 6.3 4.0 17.8 13.0 13.1 11.7 38.5 

1908 40.7 38.3 40.6 37.2 36.1 32.4 26.4 25.4 22.2 21.5 13.7 37.8 

1909 36.7 31.5 34.2 22.1 20.0 20.3 19.5 18.5 18.0 17.4 16.6 30.2 

1910 30.5 30.0 30.3 8.1 5.4 ' 5.9 5.8 5.9 5.7 6.7 8.4 24.9 

1911 32.5 31.9 31.4 26.8 22.9 17.6 7.5 10.2 10x4 5.8 10.4 31.0 

1912 9.3 10.9 9.3 8.8 7.5 7.4 6.9 9.3 4.7 4.0 4.7 7.2 

1913 13.8 12.3 11.0 7.4 7.2 7.9 6.7 7.5 6.9 7.2 9,6 14.8 



///. Clothing and TextiUt. 

1904 30.0 20.5 28.3 39.4 35.7 38.4 37.1 19.1 18.9 16.3 14.1 14.4 

1905 15.2 12.8 16.3 11.3 7.3 10.2 11.1 9.6 11.9 10.8 8.5 7.3 

1906 8.1 12.5 10.2 9.4 10.4 5.3 5.2 3.5 8.0 9.4 8.4 11.5 

1907 5.4 9.2 6.5 8.2 10.8 8.2 15.4 7.1 10.7 35.5 36.4 43.6 

1908 44.1 43.9 46.8 49.6 48.6 45.2 22.8' 19.0 29.2 24.1 21.4 16.6 

1909 11.8 14.6 16.4 27.2 20.3 23.1 13.0 13.7 23.8 23.7 17.0 21.4 

1910 29.3 19.9 32.2 36.0 32.6 30.7 51.0 57.8 15.7 26.1 29.4 47.9 

1911 35.1 21.4 19.0 17.5 38.7 27.4 15.2 3.0 3.8 4.5 28.5 59.4 

1912 34.8 7.4 14.6 13.3 38.0 52.1 52.9 8.0 2.0 6.4 35.4 80.2 

1913 68.3 56.6 30.1 35.1 39.6 35.7 33.2 30.8 23.4 27.6 45.1 65.0 



IV. Metalst Machinery and Shipbuilding. 

^904 13.7 13.8 13.0 13.3 16.1 14.7 13.2 10.0 8.0 9.5 8.8 8.8 

1905 9.4 7.9 6.2 4.1 4.6 4.2 5.0 4.7 4.5 3.4 4.1 3.8 

1906 7.1 5.1 5.4 4.5 4.7 4.8 3.5 4.0 2.8 8.8 7.5 6.2 

1907 5.5 5.6 3.7 4.5 4.9 4.4 5.4 7.4 12.0 16.0 24.7 30.9 

1908 30.1 35.0 32.4 37.4 35.3 31.9 29.9 23.9 26.5 22.8 21.7 20.9 

1909 25.7 24.8 17.9 15.3 14.5 13.2 14.3 8.9 8.7 5.9 7.1 8.5 

1910 9.8 9.1 6.4 6.0 5.7 6.1 C.l 6.9 8.2 9.1 9.2 9.7 

1911 10.5 12.9 18.8 16.8 32.7 33.9 31.0 20.2 28.0 26.8 25.4 24.4 

1912 17.0 15.6 12.3 14.6 13.4 12.8 8.5 8.3 8.3 8.4 7.5 10.2 

1913 7.6 9.1 6.8 6.7 11.7 9.1 8 3 10.0 9.0 9.5 21.4 16.2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idt^knesh of OmiANizED Wage Earners in 1913. 9 

Tablb 4 — Contintt^. 
V. Printing, Binding, Etc 

■iEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Au«. Sept. Oct. Nov. De«. 

1904 15.0 11.0 10.0 10 4 11.3 12.4 10.8 9.9 8.5 9.8 9.8 9.4 

1906 7.3 7.3 7.2 8.6 8.6 13.8 9.3 9.2 11.3 10.8 13.0 12.1 

1906 10.6 18.9 18.1 17.0 16.9 16.3 15.8 15.7 15.5 15.8 14.4 13.2 

1907 12.9 12.8 13 I 11.5 11.6 11.5 11.5 10.3 12.1 12.3 11.7 11. 1 

1908 21.2 21.7 21.8 21.7 22.3 21.6 19.6 17.5 145 13.9 13.6 15.0 

1909 11.0 12.1 10.9 11.6 9.9 12.6 6.4 7.4 8.1 6.8 7.1 9.2 

1910 5.9 7.2 6.6 7.8 6.8 6.4 3.1 3.3 2.8 2.8 3.4 4.0 

1911 4.6 4.8 4.0 8.5 6.7 4.6 3.3 3.8 4.0 5.6 6.0 6.1 

1912 4.3 4.1 7.8 5.1 5.2 6.5 9.3 5.9 6.7 5.1 5.1 3.3 

1913 6.3 6.4 8 7 6.3 6.5 6.1 4.4 7.4 4.8 10.9 7.4 9.4 

VI. Wood Working and Furniture. 

1904 37.0 33.7 34 4 27.0 26.3 28.7 36.8 27.6 25.2 19.3 18.5 26.2 

1905 24.8 33.0 34.1 21.1 14.7 9.3 12.1 12.5 12.6 3.9 4.0 3.3 

1906 14.5 13.2 13.2 15.3 11.9 10.8 13.5 10.9 9.0 7.5 6.9 12.9 

1907 19.7 15.4 16. K 18.4 20.2 17.0 10.9 11.4 9.3 23.3 38.9 27.9 

1908 39.3 46.1 41.7 38.8 37.5 36.7 25.9 36.3 27.9 22.6 28.1 22.1 

1909 20.3 19.5 15.1 15.3 13.3 13.9 12.8 9.7 13.5 8.0 7.2 10.6 

1910 14.0 14.6 10. H 11.4 11.8 6.7 7.1 8.0 8.4 7.2 8.8 17.1 

1911 23.2 22.1 23.6 21.4 18.3 19.6 13.5 17.5 19.1 16.4 17.8 20.1 

1912 26.1 26.1 23.6 21.6 18.3 19.3 16.1 12.6 11.3 8.5 10.1 19.6 

1913 26.8 28.9 26. 2 23.5 18.6 16.1 14.4 18.0 18.8 20.1 23.9 24.7 

17/. Food and Liquor*. 

1901 6.3 7.2 6 7.2 7.1 5.8 5.9 7.4 8.2 16.9 10.6 10.9 

1905 9.3 9.7 8.4 7.7 6.6 5.8 5.2 6.0 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.8 

1906 7.4 6.9 6.0 16.9 7.5 5.2 5.6 5.5 7.2 6.1 5.5 5.6 

1907 8.2 8.7 7.4 5.2 5.4 5.6 5.3 6.6 8.3 9.1 9.0 10.1 

1908' 11.4 10.6 11.7 10.8 11.0 10.8 10.0 10.4 11.5 11.9 11.6 10.6 

1909 11-5 11.7 10.9 10.7 9.3 9.4 7.0 7.4 8.2 8.6 10.2 9.9 

1910 9.8 9,9 9.2 11.0 21.0 23.5 21.9 10.3 10.7 7.9 8.7 9.1 

1911 10.7 9.0 10.4 9.2 8.4 6.9 8.1 7.0 8.8 7.6 7.8 8.2 

1912 10.5 9.8 10.2 9,5 11.3 10.7 10.2 9.8 9.7 9.6 8.6 8.7 

1913 9.0 8.7 9.5 10.6 11.3 9.0 11.1 12.4 9.5 11.0 10.8 11.4 

Viri. ThoaUrt and Music. 

1901 9.9 9.2 11.3 13.1 12.5 15.6 17.4 15.0 13.6 13.3 12.7 12.4 

1905 12.4 13.1 12,2 8.6 10.6 15.8 24.7 21.1 11.6 4.9 4.9 4.9 

1906 7.6 4.9 6.1 4.8 5.2 4.8 24.8 10.7 4.2 7.3 6.8 6.8 

1907.! 3.0 3.0 7.1 10.8 11.3 15.3 7.0 4.0 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.4 

1908 ^^ 4 8 5^ 10.0 40.9 43.2 26.1 22.0 13.4 9.6 6.5 6.5 

1909 5.0 0.0 0.0 3.4 0.2 29.4 11.0 0.3 8.7 0.2 0.2 0.4 

1910 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 11.7 30.3 41.3 39.7 36.0 0.2 0.2 0.8 

1911 0.3 0.2 3.9 48.8 46.2 52.5 45.9 11.4 0.2 6.5 4.5 4.4 

1912 0.3 0.4 0.5 13.9 40.6 66.9 45.0 19.5 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 

1913 0.5 0.0 0.7 16.9 16.9 66.6 54.2 0.3 0.0 0.3 0.8 0.0 

IX. Tohaeeo. 

1904 5.6 7.7 7.9 10.5 7.4 8.7 10.2 4.1 4.7 3.4 2.8 9.8 

1906 6.0 6.0 6.6 8.4 5.2 3.6 8.3 7.8 2.9 3.2 2.3 10.9 

1906 4.7 8.8 6.9 4.8 3.7 3.3 5.1 3.1 7.2 2.7 2.4 6.2 

1907 5.4 5.7 4.3 4.9 10.7 8.5 6.5 4.4 4.9 3.4 17.7 55.0 

1908 12.9 16.4 14.7 18.3 12.9 9.1 14.6 13.3 14.5 15.2 13.0 80.8 

1909 14.0 14.2 17.1 16.1 17.7 16.9 8.0 9.0 7.1 4.4 3.5 20.6 

1910 13.0 12.0 13.6 21.7 22.4 22.6 3.8 3.7 6.6 3.2 8.1 7.9 

1911 6.1 9.3 7.2 10.6 9.3 15.5 11.0 9.4 9.2 8.1 7.7 50.2 

1912 15.6 10.8 9.9 13.3 11.3 9.2 6.1 4.2 3.5 2.8 2.9 3.3 

1913 8.0 6.2 10.0 5.1 5.2 3.8 5.0 4.8 3.3 5.0 3.8 59.4 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



10 New York Labor Bulletin. 

Tajblb 4 — Connuied. 
X. Re»taurant9, Trade, Etc. 

TEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. .April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

1904 9.6 9.9 8.0 7.7 5.1 3.1 16.1 4.3 9.1 4.6 6.8 5.4 

1906 7.7 9.5 8.5 4.1 3.6 3.8 4.9 5.6 6.7 13.0 7.3 11.3 

1906 8.1 8.8 5.5 5.1 3.9 3.6 2.6 1.7 7.1 4.9 4.4 3.9 

1907 3.4 6.0 4.2 6.7 4.9 3.1 5.8 3.1 4.6 11.6 10.4 15.2 

1908 8.6 9.4 17.3 12.6 10.6 11.6 14.5 11.4 10.6 8.1 9.3 9.6 

1909 9.2 8.3 7.8 7.2 6.1 5.3 4.5 4.8 5.6 6.0 6.6 7.2 

1910 6.1 6.8 3.5 5.8 4.7 4.6 8.3 4.0 5.0 4.8 4.8 6.3 

1911 4.4 4.9 5.8 3.6 3.3 2.8 3.9 3.6 10.7 6.2 6.8 7.5 

1912 7.5 7.1 9.0 6.8 4.3 4.5 4.8 4.3 2.3 4.7 4.4 4.2 

1913 5.7 5.3 3.6 4.9 4.6 5.2 5.4 6.1 8.3 7.0 7.5 8.8 



XI. Public EmpUnment. 

1904 11.5 11.9 6.9 6.8 7.3 8.2 8.1 9.0 9.3 6.0 6.1 5.0 

1905 6.1 4.9 7.4 7.0 6.9 8.3 4.8 4.7 4.7 2.4 2.0 2.6 

1906 4.7 4.1 2.5 3.3 2.4 1.8 1.9 2.2 1.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 

1907 2.6 2.1 1.7 1.4 1.7 0.7 0.7 0.9 2.3 0.8 0.6 8 

1908 1.6 1.1 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.1 1.1 0.8 1.0 

1909 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.1 1.3 1.1 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.2 0.8 1.3 

1910 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.4 

1911 a.O 1.2 1.3 1.0 1.5 1.0 0.7 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.4 0.9 

1912 1.4 2.5 1.2 1.5 1.2 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.0 1.1 1.0 0.6 

1913 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.9 1.0 0.3 1.0 0.8 1.3 



XII. SUUumary Engine Tending, 

1904 3.5 3.2 3.5 2.4 3.3 4.6 5.1 3.9 3.1 2.8 1.9 IS 

1905 1.6 1.6 1.1 2.8 2.8 3.1 2.7 2.7 3.0 2.4 2.7 3.9 

1906 2.2 1.8 1.6 2.5 2.0 1.7 0.8 2.1 2.4 1.9 1.9 0.7 

1907 1.3 1.8 1.5 2.6 1.0 1.3 1.4 1.3 1.3 1.7 2.9 3.2 

1908 3.4 3.3 3.4 3.2 2.5 3.1 2.4 2.9 3.9 2.9 3.3 2.8 

1909 2.5 2.2 1.7 1.6 1.8 1.7 1.3 1.0 1.7 1.5 0.9 1.0 

1910 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.3 1.1 0.9 1.0 1.7 2.0 2.8 2.1 

1911 2.0 1.8 2.0 1.5 1.7 1.3 1.6 2.0 2.4 1.4 1.7 1.6 

1912 1.9 2.7 2.6 2.2 2.0 1.9 1.2 1.5 1.6 1.4 1.3 2.2 

1913 1.9 1.8 2.3 1.6 1.6 1.3 1.5 2.1 2.3 3.0 3.0 2.3 



XIII. Miscellaneous. 

1904 10.2 3.9 5.2 3.3 3.0 2.9 14.8 3.6 3.0 4.9 3.9 4.5 

1905 4.5 6.7 7.2 3.8 3.5 5.0 1.2 2.2 2.8 3.3 3.0 3.1 

1906 3.9 3.0 2.6 2.6 2.2 2.0 1.6 3.1 2.1 3.2 3.9 3.0 

1907 3.5 6.8 3.2 2.6 2.8 4.2 1.9 4.7 3.4 6.6 6.7 10.6 

1906 11.0 17.4 26.9 27.1 16.3 25.6 20.6 42.0 36.3 21.0 10.1 10.2 

1909 8.7 10.5 7.9 4.2 7.1 7.3 30.4 19.4 22.0 19.6 18.0 18.0 

1910 17.4 17.7 32.5 34.7 4.1 7.0 20.6 18.0 3.7 4.8 6.1 7.9 

1911 16.6 14.0 20.1 12.2 11.5 12.0 34.6 27.3 2.3 1.6 2.6 3.3 

1912 3.8 4.0 12.1 5.5 6.7 6.8 18.0 19.2 1.2 3.1 3.6 2.7 

1913 12.3 5.8 6.1 13.1 7.8 4.4 11.5 9.0 4.4 11.9 10.8 17.2 



In connection with a preceding table it was noted that the major 
part of the increased idleness was concentrated in two industries — 
building and clothing. Table 4 shows that a decrease in idleness was 
reported in the building industry in the first five months, but begin. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness of Organized Wage Earners in 1913. 11 

ning with June and in each month thereafter there was a marked 
increase of idleness. This increase, which was felt in each of the 
three subdivisions of that industry and more than two-thirds of 
which was in New York City, was due to a lessened demand for 
labor. 

In clothing and textiles, which industry, as already noted, had 
the greatest weight in these returns both because of the high per- 
centage of idleness and its large membership, the mean idleness 
for all causes from January to June was 44.2 as against 26.7 per cent 
in 1912, an increase of 17.5 points. In the second half of the year, 
the mean idleness for all causes was 37.5 per cent as against 30.8 
per cent in 1912, an increase of nearly seven points. The garment 
workers' strike, already mentioned, was responsible for the larger 
part of the idleness in the months of January and February, although 
a considerable number were idle at the end of January on account 
of lack of work. Disputes as a cause of idleness practically dis- 
appeared after February, but idleness because of a lessened demand 
for labor continued relatively high throughout the year, nearly all 
of it being in New York City. 

In Table 5 below is a comparison of the percentages of idleness 
in representative unions in New York City as compared with the 
State as a whole. It will be seen that in 1913, as usually in other 
years, the percentages of idleness were higher in New York City at 
the end of both June and December. It is noticeable, however, 
that at the close of December in 1913 the difference was greater 
than ever before. 

TABLE 5. — PeiicEKTAaB of Idlbttkss in RsPBBftEXTATivK r?«ios» IN THC Statk and in 

New Yobk Citt. 

END OF — 



JT7NB DECEMBKR 



New York New York New York New York 
Year City 

1901 10 

1905 "1 

1906 



6.8 



1907. 



10.0 



1908 ^^ 

'/. 25.2 



1909 1®-^ 

1910 19'^ 

1911 

»X2 II 

1913 ^^ 



State 


City 


Statp 


13.7 


17.8 


19.6 


D.l 


6.7 


11. 1 


0.3 


12.8 


15.4 


8.1 


34.2 


32.7 


30.2 


27.7 


28.0 


17.4 


18.0 


20.6 


15.4 


29.6 


27.3 


22.9 


36.7 


34.2 


22.8 


35.7 


30.1 


22.2 


46.4 


40.0 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



12 



Xew York Labor Bulletin. 



In Table 6 may be seen further summary figures for New York 
City, comparing 1913 with previous years. The dominance of un- 
employment in the causes of idleness is conspicuous in 1913. 



TABLE 6. — iDLESEfts is Heprbsbntativb Nbw York Cmr Unions. 



Year 

1904 

1905 

X906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 



IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF — 





Members 
reportinic 


THEREOF IDLE 


Labor 
disputes 


Dis- 
ability ] 


Unem- 
ploymeDlt 


)ns 


Number Per cent 






End of June 










* 


66.629 


11,250 


16.9 


1.349 


* 


• 


85 


64,294 


7.149 


11.1 


1.005 


756 


5.383 


87 


61.946 


4.186 


6.8 


1.315 


508 


2,273 


80 


64.117 


6.421 


10.0 


567 


781 


6.073 


92 


62.498 


20.804 


33.3 


129 


808 


19.867 


92 


60.589 


11,495 


19.0 


253 


775 


10.467 


89 


68,811 


13.342 


19.4 


1.510 


928 


10.904 


88 


92,284 


23.213 


25.2 


3.940 


1.199 


18.074 


92 


88,993 


24,287 


27.3 


428 


1.110 


22.749 


98 


125,506 


33.288 


26.5 


7 


893 


32.388 




E 








86 


66,185 


11.770 


17.8 


2.564 


897 


8.309 


89 


62,940 


4,226 


6.7 


673 


701 


2,852 


90 


62,213 


7,938 


12.8 


654 


841 


6.443 


92 


66,120 


22.627 


34.2 


592 


1.053 


20.982 


92 


59.847 


16.585 


27.7 


661 


813 


16,111 


90 


62.736 


11.862 


18.0 


1,391 


799 


9.672 


89 


89.609 


26.526 


29.6 


258 


778 


25,490 


87 


86,351 


31.699 


36.7 


826 


883 


29.990 


92 


89.805 


32.056 


35.7 


6.575 


786 


24.695 


97 


120,591 


55.976 


46.4 


160 


947 


54.869 


— 




— 






■ ■ '- — 





In the foregoing returns from 236 or 237 representative unions 
only are considered. The monthly reports are restricted to a limited 
number because of the expense and other practical difficulties con- 
nected with securing such returns as often as once a month. But 
in addition to these monthly reports, returns as to idleness on the 
last day of March and of September from practically all labor 
organizations in the State were secured. Summaries of these are 
given in the following Tables 7, 8 and 9. 

t Due to lack of work, lack of material and the weather (principally lack of work) . 
♦ Not reported. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness of Organized Wage Earners in 1913. 13 



TABLE 7. — Idlbnbm of Mbmbsbs of All Labob Oboanxsations. 

BND or MABCH BNX> OF 



Members 
induded ^ 

Ybab in reports 

1897 142.570 

1808 179,965 

1809 173.616 

1900 221,717 

1901 228,327 

1902 270,856 

1903 347,492 

1904 382,344 

1906 363.166 

1906 377,283 

1907 404,028 

1908 387,460 

1900 363,036 

1910 380.601 

1911 476,890 

1912 468,070 

1913 678.796 





n>LB — 


Members 


TBBBBOr ; 


IDLB — 


Number 


Per cent 


in reports 


Number 


Per cent 


43.664 


30.6 


168.464 


23.230 


13.8 


37.867 


21.0 


171.067 


22.485 


13.1 


31.761 


18.3 


201,904 


9.690 


4.7 


44.336 


20.0 


237,166 


31.460 


13.3 


42.244 


18.5 


268.636 


18,617 


6.9 


36.710 


13.6 


321.082 


18.381 


5.7 


41.941 


12.1 


383.971 


34.370 


9.0 


103.996 


27.2 


386.740 


37.380 


9.7 


64,916 


15.1 


376.391 


18,430 


4.9 


37,237 


9.9 


376.365 


21.573 


5.7 


77,270 


19.1 


404.814 


42.556 


10.5 


138.131 


36.7 


358.766 


80.576 


22.5 


74,643 


21.1 


360.787 


36.968 


10.3 


62.861 


16.1 


462.466 


63.106 


13.6 


96,608 


20.3 


467.825 


50,390 


10.8 


80,733 


19.6 


491,178 


34,829 


7.1 


01.962 


15.9 


627.094 


101,149 


16.1 



TABLE 8. — Idlbnbss or Membbbb or All Labob Oboantcationb. bt Industbies. 

AT BVD or MABCH AT END Or BBFTBIIBBB 



Num- PBBCXNTAOB Num- rXBCBMTAOB 

b€r, / • » ber, ^ — — — • * 

INDURST 1913 1913 1912 1911 1913 1913 1912 1911 

1. Building, stone working, etc 37.863 28.9 37.6 39.2 24,832 18.3 6.8 15.9 

2. Truisportation 9,268 11.3 11.9 14.9 8.413 9.5 8.9 5.5 

3. Qothing and textiles 38.696 17.3 16.5 17.8 55.956 24.8 7.3 9.7 

4. Metals, mnchinery, etc 2,317 7.6 13.4 17.2 2.450 6.7 6.3 20.2 

6. Printing, binding, etc 2.203 7.5 8.6 4.9 1.388 4.7 9.8 5.0 

6. Wood working, etc 1,720 14.8 17.8 17.6 1.812 12.4 7.6 14.3 

7. Food and liquocB 1.280 7.6 10.9 8.2 1.328 7.6 7.1 8.5 

8. Theaters and musio 285 6.8 4.3 0.9 58 1.5 5.4 1.6 

9. Tobacco 1.052 12.6 11.7 11.6 376 4.5 5.9 10.7 

10. Restaurants, trade, etc 442 4.6 9.1 7.2 2.626 9.6 6.9 7.6 

11. Public employment 683 4.2 1.7 1.9 695 3.4 0.2 0.9 

12. Stotionary engine tending 613 4.6 7.7 6.6 504 4.3 1.8 8.5 

13. Miscellaneous... i 1,176 14.1 14.6 14.5 812 8.6 3.3 10.9 

Total 97.498 16.7 19.6 20.3 101.149 16.1 7.1 10.8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



14 New York Labob Bulletin. 

TABLE 9. — Causes op Idlkkxss in All Labob OBOAinEATioNs. 

NTTMBKB PEBCBMTAGB 

Causb 1910 1911 1912 1913 1910 1911 1912 1913 

A. End 0/ March 

Lack of work 42.010 79.866 71.813 78.196 66.8 82.7 80.0 80.2 

Lack of material 2.667 548 476 1,364 4.2 0.6 0.5 1.4 

Weather 7.329 8.544 8.834 5.799 11.7 8.8 9.8 6.0 

Labor diBputee 6.864 3.289 4.197 7.025 10.9 3.4 4.7 7.2 

DisabiUty 3.838 3.752 4.086 4.328 6.1 3.9 4.6 4.4 

Other cauaee 56 450 133 651 0.1 0.4 0.2 0.7 

Cau9e not stated 87 159 179 135 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.1 

Total 62.851 96.608 89.718 97.498 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 

B. End of September 

Lack of work 39.307 39.959 24.798 93.495 62.3 79.3 71.1 92.4 

Lsck of material 2.450 680 279 667 3.9 1.3 0.8 0.7 

Weather 163 493 237 493 0.2 1.0 0.7 0.5 

Labor disputes 17.646 5,699 6.057 1.855 28.0 11.3 17.4 1.8 

DisabiUty 3.216 3.336 3.199 4,321 5.1 6.6 9.2 4.3 

Other causes 181 128 93 248 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 

Cause not stated 143 95 166 70 0.2 0.2 0.5 0.1 

Total 63.106 50.390 34.829 101.149 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 

Comparing these with the returns from representative xmions it 
appears that, at the end of March, idleness due to the condition of 
trade in the representative unions was three points higher than at 
the corresponding date in 1912, whereas such idleness was three 
points lower in the returns from all unions. It is probable, however, 
that the returns from all unions more accurately represented the 
real situation than those from representative unions. As was 
pointed out in the Bulletin for September, 1913, the increased idle- 
ness reported in the representative unions at the end of March was 
due almost entirely to the clothing group, a decrease in idleness 
having been reported in eight of the industries and small increases 
in the others. The exceptional idleness in the clothing group, 
mainly in two large unions in New York City, one of cloak and suit 
makers and one of fur workers, with the doubling of its membership 
since 1912, which gave that industry greater weight in the returns, 
was sufficient to outweigh the decreased idleness in other industries. 
The returns from the representative unions and from all unions as 
to idleness due to the condition of trade at the end of September 
agree, the idleness in each case being 15 per cent and the increase 
over September, 1912, being 10 per cent in each case. 



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APPENDIX— STATISTICAL TABLES. 

MorUhly Retiamsfrom Representatwe Unions, 

I. Number and membership of unions reporting. 
II. Number of members idle. 
III. Percentage of members idle. 

rv. Principal causes of idleness at end of each month (January to June). 
y. Principal causes of idleness at end of each month (July to December). 
VI. All specified causes of idleness (March and June). 
VII. All specified causes of idleness (September and December). 
VTII. Idleness in New York City at end of June. 

IX. Idleness in New York City at end of December. 

Relumafrom AU Unions. 

X. Idleness at end of March, by industries. 
XI. Idleness at end of September, by industries. 

XII. Idleness at end of March and of September, by industries and trades. 

[15] 



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16 New York Labor Bulletin. 

table i.— number and membership ofjreprbsentative trade unions 



iNDUSTRIEa OR GROUPS OF TraDES 



Un- 
ionfl 



Jan. 



Feb. 



NUMBBB 



March 



1. Bofldintf, Stone WorUnf, Etc 

Stone working 

Building and paving trades 

m y Building and street labor 

2. Transportation 

Railways 

■ Navii^ation 

Teaming and oab driving 

^ Freight handling 

^^_^ Telegraphs 

arOothing and Teztfles 

Garments 

■ Shirts, collars and laundry 

Hats, caps and furs 

ifi Boots, shoes and gloves 

^ Textiles 

4. Metals, Machinery and ShlpbaUdlng 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 

5. Printing, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood Working and Furniture 

7. Food and Liquors 

Food products 

Beverages 

8. Theaters and Music 

9. Tobacco 

10. Restaurants, Trade. Etc 

Hotels and restaurants 

Barbering 

Retail trade 

11. Public Emirioyment 

12. Stationary Engine Tending 

13. Miscellaneous 

Paper and paper goods 

Leather and leather goods 

Glass and glassware 

Other distinct trades 

Mixed employment 

Total 



5« 

29 
8 

10 
7 
2 

*S0 

tl3 
. 1 

•'I 

25 

I 22 
2 

1 

7 

14 

9 
5 

• 2 

5 

§11 

8 
2 

7 

4 

10 

3 
3 
2 

1 
1 



••286 



SS,085 

780 

30,137 

2.168 



8.06S 

7,384 

329 

L350 

L7,S85 

,S,005 

[4,294 
1,797 
2.497 

1.189 

2,S48 

S,058 

2.439 

419 

200 

I 

S.428 

2.600 

ll.»54 

fe540 

i. 595 

460 

300 

59 



156.686 



SS.116 

865 

30,080 

2.170 



20,697 


20,511 


7,100 


7,118 


5.820 


5.845 


4.232 


4.200 


2.025 


1,998 


1,420 


1.350 


64.724 


66.884 


53.329 


53.938 


20 


20 


8.898 


8,889 


1.073 


1.148 


1.404 


1.399 



7.987 

7,352 

235 

350 

7,870 

8,088 

1,880 
2,486 

1,171 

2.848 

8.028 

2,411 
417 
200 

8.868 

2,498 

1.946 

531 
612 
450 
300 
53 



156,065 



84,016 

959 

30.887 

2.170 

21,979 
7,328 
5.930 
5,433 
1,938 
1,350 

66,284 

54,720 

20 

8,970 

1.118 

1,406 

8.122 

7.439 

333 

350 

7.409 

8.081 

4.814 

1.831 
2,483 

1.170 

2.861 

2.974 

2,355 
419 
200 

8,694 

2.617 

1,969 

532 
622 
463 
300 
52 



169,740 



(a) Includes only those members who were reported as to idlene 
• Twenty-nine unions from July to December, inclusive, 
t Twelve unions from July to Ueoember, inclusive. 
t Six unions from July to December, inclusive. 



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Appendix. 17 

MAKING MONTHLY RETURNS ON IDLENESS AT THE END OF EACH MONTH IN 1913 
OP BfaifBEB8(a) At End of — 



April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


33,280 

790 

30.290 

2.200 


33,160 

675 

30.300 

2,185 


33,555 

686 

30.455 

2.415 


33.383 

803 

30,863 

1.717 


33.446 

765 

30.924 

1,757 


33.466 

714 

31.084 

1.668 


33,694 

736 

31,447 

1,512 


33,635 

745 

31.363 

1.527 


33.768 

690 

31,696 

1,472 


22,173 

7.316 
6.023 
5.495 
1,982 
1.358 


23,465 

7,314 
6.297 
6.494 
2.002 
1.358 


24,640 
7,417 
6.512 
7,311 
2.037 
1.363 


22.933 
7.379 
6,886 
6.423 
1.895 
1.350 


22.781 

7.429 
5,674 
6,481 
1.900 
1.297 


23.221 

7.457 
6.761 
6.811 
1,896 
1,297 


23,164 

7.437 
6,961 
6.494 
1.970 
1.302 


23,312 

7.497 
6,149 
6.447 
1,920 
1.299 


23,306 

7.623 
6.997 
6.406 
1,976 
1.304 


66.692 

55.306 

20 

8.840 

1.124 

1.402 


65.681 

54.096 

20 

8.845 

1.233 

1,487 


65.401 

53.893 

20 

8.838 

1,245 

1.405 


60.906 

48.770 

21 

9.493 

1.252 

1.369 


61,252 

48.950 

21 

0.481 

1.416 

1.386 


60,910 

49.136 

20 

9,479 

1,056 

1.220 


61,006 

49.092 

20 

9.478 

1.042 

1,374 


60.970 

48,026 

20 

9,488 

1.112 

1,424 


60.996 

49,172 

20 

9,491 

1 , 122 

1,191 


8.055 

7.369 

336 

350 


8,951 

8,255 
346 
350 


9.347 

8.651 
346 
360 


9,246 

8,560 
346 
360 


9.236 

8,543 

343 

360 


8.898 

8,182 
366 
350 


8,512 

7,816 
346 
360 


8,708 

8,004 
354 
350 


8,692 

7.951 
391 
350 


7,415 


7.896 


7.316 


7.454 


7.491 


7.537 


7,632 


7.694 


7,612 


3.009 


3.068 


3.081 


3.070 


3.087 


3.194 


3,185 


3.160 


3.189 


4.365 

1.836 
2.529 


4.408 

1,866 
2.542 


4,425 
1,876 
2.550 


4.283 

1.761 
2.472 


4,253 
1.773 
2.480 


4,297 

1,773 
2.524 


4,336 

1.838 
2.498 


4,322 

1,821 
2.601 


4,325 

1,832 
2,493 


1.208 


1.207 


1,207 


1.212 


1,216 


1.209 


1.214 


1,219 


1.228 


2.372 


2.408 


2.408 


2.441 


2,469 


2,488 


2.485 


2.526 


2.491 


3.029 

2.420 

417 

192 


3.047 

2.415 
439 
103 


3,113 

2.464 
474 
175 


3.182 

2,424 

441 

317 


3,218 

2.423 
465 
330 


3,207 

2.396 
473 
338 


3.219 

2.418 
488 
313 


3.282 

2,458 
494 
330 


3.326 

2,512 

482 

332 


3.354 


3,378 


3,433 


3.595 


3.640 


3,634 


3.610 


3.641 


3,683 


2,510 


2.624 


2.640 


2,464 


2.418 


2,477 


2,402 


2,364 


2,381 


2.002 

565 
638 
446 
303 
50 


2.018 

565 
639 
440 
312 
62 


1.989 

545 
641 
436 
317 
50 


2.033 

535 
681 
440 
321 
56 


2,062 
560 
675 
439 
320 
68 


2.094 

666 
686 
464 
321 
68 


2,009 

543 
644 
437 
320 
65 


2,003 

653 
638 
439 
320 
63 


2,023 

55X 
639 
439 
337 
55 


159,464 


160,706 


162.455 


156.161 


166.669 


166.632 


156.468 


156,735 


156,910 



§ Twdve umons from July to December, incIufliTre. 
IT Two unioiu froilk July to December, inclusive. 
** Two hundred and thirty-eeven unions from July to December, inclusive. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



18 



New York Labob Bulletin. 
table n.— number of members of representative 



Inddstbieb or Gboupb or Trades 



Jan. 



Feb. 



March 



Boilding, Stone Woridnf. Etc. . . 

Stone working 

Building and paTing trades. 
Building and street labor. . . 



2. TmnsportaUoii 

Railwaj^ 

Navii^tion 

Teaming and cab driving. 

Freight handling 

Telegraphs 



3. QoOiiiig and TeztOes 

Garments . . '. 

Shirts, collars and laundry. 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoos and gloves . . . . 
Textiles 



4. MeUlfl, Machinery and Shipbailding . 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 



5. Printing, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood Working and Fnmltnre. . 



7. Food and Uqaors . . 

Food products . 
Beverages 



8. Theaters and Mask. 

». Tobacco 

10. 



ResUnrantSp Trade, Etc. . . . 

Hotels and restaurants. 

Barbering 

Retail trade 



II. Public Employment 

2. Stationary Engine Tending. 
IS. MlsceiUneoos. 



Paper and paper goods 

I^eather and leather goods. 

Glass and glassware 

Other distinct trades 

Mixed employment 



»,487 
576 

8,414 
498 

2.84S 

300 

1.273 

645 

625 



9.«S0 

626 

8.319 

685 

2.516 

265 

1,161 

490 

600 



44,200 

36.440 



7,667 

14 



611 

528 
33 
50 

469 

806 

S87 

284 
103 

6 

189 



174 

136 
25 
13 



47 

241 

2 

201 

30 

5 

3 



36,999 

29.500 



7,262 

77 

160 

719 

656 
13 
50 

47S 

878 

882 

273 
109 



Total. 



69.452 



145 

159 

125 
15 
19 

5 

46 

113 

4 
53 
39 
15 

2 

62.065 



9,480 
641 

8,359 
480 

2,408 

262 

1,045 

629 

472 



19,960 

13,758 

7 

5.984 

210 

1 

562 

482 
20 
50 

642 



408 

308 
100 

8 

236 

107 

89 
18 



57 

121 

5 
61 
46 

9 



34.790 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 

TRADE UNIONS IDLE AT THE END OF BACH MONTH IN IMS 



19 



April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Got. 


Nov. 


Deo. 


6,521 


5,856 


7,666 


7.518 


6.975 


6,791 


8.189 


9.584 


13,982 


295 


393 


398 


461 


408 


396 


392 


394 


540 


5,806 


5.270 


6.413 


6.694 


6.305 


6.048 


7,392 


8.786 


12.767 


420 


190 


552 


363 


262 


347 


405 


404 


675 


1,«S1 


1.686 


1,989 


1.548 


1.707 


1.607 


1.666 


2.245 


6.457 


260 


276 


267 


279 


285 


227 


327 


307 


304 


396 


425 


319 


211 


173 


215 


205 


406 


1.094 


687 


749 


1.036 


770 


893 


860 


854 


1,107 


1,302 


288 


236 


317 


275 


348 


277 


275 


415 


751 








8 
20.261 


8 
18,875 


19 
14.266 


5 
16.852 


10 
27.521 


6 


28. 4M 


25,990 


26.659 


89.668 


18,601 


21,744 


19,972 


15.137 


12.172 


12,230 

1 
1,829 


14.301 


25,126 


32.712 
3 


iiaw 


*"4;i9i 


■■■*3;337 


'*"4;966 


"'e^osi 


"*2;468 


"^isos 


6.793 


19 


19 


12 


27 


92 


103 


38 


60 


117 


424 


36 


38 


117 


580 


73 


45 


27 


43 


642 


1,051 


851 


768 


922 


801 


808 


1.866 


1,408 


480 


989 


782 


095 


859 


722 


728 


1.804 


1.339 


12 


12 


19 


23 


13 


29 


30 


12 


19 


50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


469 


483 


444 


626 


553 


861 


865 


559 


714 


708 


570 


496 


441 


555 


602 


640 


754 


787 


462 


4H 


398 


470 


529 


410 


477 


447 


491 


348 


331 


278 


336 


346 


262 


330 


309 


345 


114 


165 


120 


134 


183 


148 


147 


138 


146 


204 


204 
125 


804 

92 


657 
121 


4 
119 




4 
124 


4 
95 




122 


81 


1,479 


148 


187 


161 


172 


195 


265 


224 


246 


292 


127 


126 


147 


145 


156 


234 


191 


197 


242 


14 


9 


13 


11 


14 


25 


31 


34 


32 


7 


2 


1 


16 


25 


6 


2 


15 


18 


4 


6 


5 


64 


88 


10 


65 


29 


48 


40 


41 


64 


68 


50 


57 


72 


71 


65 


266 


157 


68 


264 


185 


96 


269 


217 


647 


125 


60 

58 


10 
50 


3 
56 


21 
28 


3 
43 


3 
184 




2 


94 


ieo 


267 


38 


29 


22 


165 


124 


34 


38 


3 


54 


6 


10 


6 


10 


12 


13 


12 
2 


24 
















64,554 


66,799 


66.064 


82.556 


80,707 


25.614 


60.165 


46.668 


62,728 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 New York Laboe Bulletin. 

table m.— pebcentage of members of representative 



Industries ob Groups of Trades 



Jan. 



Feb. 



March 



1. BnUdintf, Stone Wiirklnc, Etc 

Stone working 

Building and paving trades 

Building and street labor 

2. Transportation 

Railways 

Navi^tion 

Teaming and cab driving 

Freight nandling 

Telegraphs 

5. Qothlng and TextUes 

Garments 

Shirts, collars and laundry 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves 

Textiles 

4. Metals, Machinery and ShlpbaUdlng 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 

6. Printing, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood Working and Fumitiire 

7. Food and Uqaors 

Food products 

Beverages 

8. Theaters and Music 

9. Tobacco 

10. Restenrants, Trade. Etc 

Hotels and restaurants 

Barbering 

Retail trade 

11. Public Employment 

12. Stationary Engine Tending 

IS. Mlseeilaneons 

Paper and paper goods 

Leather and leather goods 

Glass and glassware 

Other distinct trades 

Mixed employment 

Total 



27.7 
73,7 
27.9 
23.0 

IS. 8 

4.2 
21.9 
16.2 
30.9 

0.0 

68. S 

68.3 
0.0 

86.1 
1.3 
6.3 

7.6 
7.2 
10.0 
14.3 

6.3 

26.8 

SO 

15.8 
4.1 

0.6 

8.0 

S.7 
5.6 
6.0 
6.5 

• 0.1 

1.9 

12. S 
0.4 

33.8 
6.5 
1.7 
5.1 



29 

72.4 
27.7 
31.6 

12. S 

3.7 
19.9 
11.7 
30.0 

0.0 

66.6 

64.7 
0.0 

81.7 
6.7 

11.4 

9.1 

8.9 

5.5 

14.3 

6.4 

28.9 

8.7 
14.5 
4.4 

0.0 

6.2 

6.S 

5.2 
3.6 
9.5 

0.1 

1.8 

6.8 

0.8 
8.7 
8.7 
5.0 
3.8 



27.9 

66.8 
27.1 
22.1 

11.0 

3.6 
17.6 
11.6 
24.4 

0.0 

SO.l 

25.1 
35.0 
66.7 
18.8 
0.1 

6.8 

6.5 

6.0 

14.3 

8.7 

26.2 

9.6 

16.8 
4.0 

0.7 

10.0 

S.6 

3.8 
4.3 
0.0 

0.1 

2.S 

6.1 

0.9 
9.8 
9.9 
3.0 
0.0 



S8.2 



SS.4 



21.8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 
trade unions idle at the end of each month in 191s 



21 



April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


19.6 


17.7 


21.9 


22.6 


20.9 


20.3 


24. a 


28.6 


41.4 


37.3 


58.2 


58.1 


57.4 


53.3 


55.5 


53. a 


52.9 


78.3 


1Q.2 


17.4 


21.1 


21.7 


20.4 


19.6 


23. S 


28.0 


40.4 


19.1 


8.7 


22.9 


21.1 


14.9 


20.8 


20.8 


26.5 


45.9 


7.4 


7.2 


7.9 


6.7 


7.6 


6.9 


7.2 


9.6 


14.8 


3.6 


3.8 


3.6 


3.8 


3.8 


3.0 


4.4 


4.1 


4.0 


6.6 


6.7 


4.9 


3.6 


3.0 


3.7 


3.4 


6.6 


18.2 


12.6 


11.5 


14.2 


12.0 


13.8 


12.8 


13.2 


17.2 


20.3 


14.5 


11.8 


15.5 


14.5 


18.3 


14.6 


14.0 


21.6 


38.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.6 


0.6 


1.5 


0.4 


0.8 


0.5 


S6.1 


30.6 


35. 7 


33. 2 


30.8 


23.4 


27.6 


46.1 


66.0 


33.8 


40.2 


37.1 


31.0 


24.9 


24.9 


29.1 


51.4 


66.5 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


5.0 


0.0 


0.0 


15.0 


48.7 


47.4 


37.8 


52.1 


63.6 


19.3 


26.0 


24.3 


71.6 


1.7 


1.5 


1.0 


2.2 


0.7 


9.8 


3.6 


5.4 


10.4 


30.2 


2.4 


2.7 


8,6 


4.2 


6.0 


3.3 


1.9 


3.6 


6.7 


11.7 


9.1 


8.3 


10.0 


9.0 


9.6 


21.4 


16.2 


6.5 


12.0 


9.0 


8.1 


10.1 


8.8 


9.3 


22.5 


16.8 


3.6 


3.5 


5.5 


6.6 


3.8 


7.9 


8.7 


3.4 


4.9 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


6.S 


6.6 


6.1 


4.4 


7.4 


4.8 


10.9 


7.4 


9.4 


2S.6 


18.6 


16.1 


14.4 


18.0 


18.8 


20.1 


2S.9 


24.7 


10.6 


11.3 


9.0 


11.1 


12.4 


9.6 


11.0 


10. S 


11.4 


19.0 


17.7 


14.8 


19.1 


19.5 


14.8 


18.0 


17.0 


18.8 


4.5 


6.5 


4.7 


5.4 


7.4 


5.9 


5.9 


6.5 


5.9 


16. » 


16.0 


66.6 


64.2 


0.3 


0.0 


OS 


0.3 


0.0 


6.1 


6.2 


S.8 


6.0 


4.8 


S3 


6.0 


S.8 


69.4 


4.6 


4.6 


6.2 


6.4 


6.1 


8.3 


7.0 


7.6 


8.8 


5.2 


5.2 


6.0 


6.0 


6.4 


9.8 


7.9 


8.0 


9.6 


3.4 


2.1 


2.7 


2.5 


3.0 


5.3 


6.4 


6.9 


6.6 


3.6 


1.0 


0.6 


5.0 


7.6 


1.8 


0.6 


4.6 


5.4 


0.1 


0.2 


0.1 


0.9 


1.0 


0.3 


1.0 


0.8 


1.3 


1.6 


1.6 


1.3 


1.6 


2.1 


2.3 


3.0 


3.0 


2.S 


13.1 


7.8 


4.4 


11.6 


9.0 


4.4 


11.9 


10.8 


17.2 


22.1 


10.6 


1.8 


0.6 


3.8 


0.5 


0.6 


0.0 


0.4 


14.7 


9.1 


7.8 


8.2 


4.1 


6.3 


28.6 


26.5 


41.8 


8.6 


6.6 


5.0 


37.5 


28.2 


7.5 


8.7 


6.8 


12.3 


2.0 


3.2 


1.9 


3.1 


3.8 


4.0 


3.8 


4.7 


7.1 


O.Oj 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


3.1 


6.7 


0.0 


3..7J 


22.0 


22.2 


20.8 


19.6 


16.2 


19.3 


27.8 


40.0 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Ow) 



Kkw York Lahor Bui.lktin. 



TABLE IV.— PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF IDLENESS AMONG MEMBERS OF 



Ikdubtbies or Groups of Trades 






Labor Disputes 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


Ir f^fldlnf. HUm^ WatMiic. Rt^ 


84 


75 


201 


«. 


889 


6 


Stono working 




BuildiPf and navins trades 


34 


75 


201 


256 
25 

2 


244 
95 

14 


5 


Building and tfti'net labor ........ 






5 


10 




274 


Railwayp 




Navigation 




10 




....... ..... 




Teaming anid cab diiving 






2 


14 


274 


Freight handling 


5 








Telegraphs 













S. QoOiiiig and Textfles 


90,650 

30,650 


29,500 

29,500 




420 


IS 


6 


Garments 




Rhirtfli collars and laundry 




' 






Hats, caps and furs 














Roots, Rhoes and glovp-s 








15 
405 

51 

51 


13 


o 


Textiles 










Iron and steel 


17 

17 


224 

224 


9 
9 


812 

312 


812 

312 


Otrh^r m«t-ftlB 




»hipKiiilHins 














1 










e. Wood Working and Famltnre 


41 


13 






9 

9 

9 




7. Food and Uqnora 




2 

2 




Food products 


1 






Beverages 


1 






8. Theaters and Music 














9, Tobacoo 


8 
13 










8 


10. Restaurants, Trade, Etc 


>. 




6 

5 


5 

5 




Hotels and restaurants 




Barbering 








Retail trade, .,..., r r ^ ,. t , 


13 


15 








_ 












12. Stationary Engine Tending 






3 


8 


10 


5 










Paper and paper goods 












Leather and leather goods 








8 






Glass and glassware 












Other distinct trades 














Aiixed employment 




























Total 


80,768 


29.887 


218 


769 


711 


609 







* Due to lack of work, lack o i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appknpix. 
representative trade unions, january to june, 1»i3 



23 







DlSABIUTT 










Unemployment* 






Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


6S2 


709 


667 


4S4 


383 


651 


8.921 


8.846 


8,612 


5,806 


5.1S1 


6,807 


14 


16 


17 


7 




3 


561 


610 


624 


288 


393 


395 


617 


603 


650 


427 


383 


548 


7.863 


7,551 


7,508 


5,123 


4,643 


5.860 


1 












497 
2.511 


685 
2.242 


480 
2,159 


395 
1.408 


95 
1,397 


552 


S27 


264 


249 


221 


276 


288 


1.877 


224 


230 


177 


193 


214 


203 


76 


35 


85 


67 


62 


64 


39 


17 


35 


8 


11 


23 


1.234 


1.134 


1,010 


388 


414 


296 


39 


13 


28 


10 


9 


22 


606 


477 


601 


675 


726 


740 


25 


4 


9 


10 


*1 


40 


595 


596 


463 


278 


195 


277 


46 


30 


SO 


29 


42 


51 


IS, 604 


7.469 


19.9S0 


22,991 


25,9S5 


2S.S03 


12 




15 

1 
4 


15 


21 


16 


5.778 




13,743 

6 

5,980 


18,676 


21,723 


19,956 


21 


21 


6 


10 


20 


7,636 


7,241 


4,300 


4,181 


3.317 


6 


9 


9 

1 


4 
4 


6 
5 


7 
8 


8 
82 


68 
160 


201 








7 


15 


31 


30 


154 


ISO 


165 


1S9 


1S5 


120 


440 


S66 


S78 


352 


604 


419 


119 


102 


135 


105 


103 


80 


392 


330 


338 


324 


674 


381 


10 


3 


5 


9 


7 


6 


23 


10 


15 


3 


5 


13 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


222 


226 


226 


22S 


208 


194 


2S7 


247 


417 


246 


275 


250 


41 


57 


48 


67 


37 


47 


723 


808 


758 


651 


624 


449 


66 


77 


7S 


76 


80 


8S 


321 


305 


3S5 


384 


407 


315 


15 


18 


24 


14 


13 


18 


269 


255 


284 


332 


309 


260 


51 


59 


49 


62 


67 


65 


52 


50 


51 


52 


98 


55 


4 




6 


4 


4 


4 


2 




3 


200 


200 


800 


46 


68 


60 


76 


78 


6S 


1S5 


87 


176 


46 


47 


SI 


40 


4S 


22 


S7 


S5 


65 


121 


101 


85 


106 


97 


96 


19 


28 


9 


25 


24 


53 


117 


97 


80 


97 


97 


94 


21 


11 


13 


10 


9 


11 


4 


4 


5 


4 




2 




4 
S 

8 


2 
IS 


2 
4 
11 


2 
6 


1 
6 
3 








5 






3 




40 


2 
S8 


3 
41 






7 


29 


26 


26 


9 


11 


10 


6 


7 


11 


232 


102 


111 


249 


150 


77 


2 


4 

1 


5 

1 






10 

1 








125 
85 


60 
67 






1 


1 


201 


52 


(K) 


49 








3 
2 


2 
4 




30 

1 


39 
11 


46 
5 


35 
4 


27 
6 


22 


4 


4 


4 


6 


3 


2 




























: 














1,497 


1,616 


1,669 


1.S17 


1.295 


1,475 


27,187 


20,612 


33.008 


32,468 


34.793 


33,960 



material, the weather, etc. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



L>i 



Xew York Labok Bulletin. 
table v.— principal causes of idleness among members 



iNDUaTRIBS OR GSOUPS OF TRADES 






Labor Disptttes 






July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1 . RnHdintf . Stoi»p Wwkinff. Etr 


16 


810 


17 




• 
lOi 8 


Stone working ,,..,,,., 


1 


Building and paving tradna 


16 


319 


17 




lOl 8 


Building and strec^t laboi* 




2 TransDortadon 


50 


26 


16 




12 


40 


RailwayB 




Navigation 














50 26 


15 




12 


40 


Freight nandJing 




Telegraphs 












3 ClotUnc and TextUes 


1 
4 2 


2 


20 


10 




Garments 




Shirts, collars and laundry ,....,... 












Hats* caps and furs 












Boots, sfioes and sloves 


4 


2 


2 


20 






Textiles 


10 

1.096 

1.096 




Tron &ncl steel 


102 

102 


138 

138 


58 

.58 


9 

9 


7 
7 


Other metals 




Shipbuilding , , r - ,-,-..,.. 














5. Printing, Binding, Etc 




2 










6. Wood Working and Fomiture 













7. Food and Liquors 










3 

1 
2 


1 


Food products 








1 


Beverages 










8. Theaters and Mnaie 












9. Tobacco 
















20 

20 


10 

10 






16 

16 


5 


Hotels and restaurants 






5 


Barbering 








Retail trade 






























10 


1 
23 


2 

36 


168 


3 
100 


1 


1 3. MificollanAKMiii 


100 


Pap^r and paper good-f . , 






Leather ancl leather goods 




23 


35 


158 


100 


ioo 


Glass and glassware 






(Hher distinct trades 














Mixed employment 




























Total 


202 


621 


129 


187 


1,250 


162 







* Due to lack of work, lack of 



> 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 
of bepbesentative trade unions. july to decembeb. 1913 







Disability 










Uneuployment* 






July. 


Aug. 


Hcpi. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


581 


072 


738 


087 


590 


000 


0,921 


5.984 


0.030 


7.502 


8,984 


13.308 


14 


10 


6 




1 


14 


447 


308 


300 


392 


30.3 


52<; 


565 


6C1 


731 


687 


588 


050 


6.113 


5.325 


5.300 


6,705 


8,188 


12,100 


2 


1 


1 





1 


2 


361 


261 


346 


405 


403 


673 


297 


345 


334 


328 


362 


289 


1,190 


1.330 


1.258 


1,338 


1.881 


3.128 


219 


207 


180 


223 


195 


174 


60 


7« 


47 


KM 


112 


VM) 


14 


44 


37 


11 


12 


31 


107 


120 


178 


104 


304 


1 .(M'>:{ 


30 


50 


75 


89 


140 


78 


690 


817 


770 


7(i.=> 


O.'j.'i 


1,1M 


34 


44 


42 


5 


5 


6 


241 


304 


235 


270 


410 


745 














8 
20.187 


8 
18.830 


10 
14,210 


5 
16.790 


10 
27,407 


6 


40 


48 


24 


SO 


44 


87 


39.031 


6 


8 


10 

1 
4 


3 


7 


8 

1 
9 


16,131 


12.164 


12.220 


14.298 


25.119 


32,704 
2 


14 


19 


26 


25 


4.936 


6.012 


1,825 


2.442 


2.283 


6.784 


3 


2 


6 


3 


5 


8 


20 


88 


95 


15 


55 


109 


17 


14 


3 


4 


7 


11 


100 


566 


70 


41 


10 


32 


151 


154 


144 


128 


127 


171 


515 


030 


599 


071 


048 


1.230 


118 


125 


117 


99 


98 


141 


475 


596 


547 


620 


610 


1.191 


8 


4 


2 


4 


4 


5 


15 





27 


26 


8 


14 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


221 


230 


210 


202 


200 


190 


105 


315 


161 


033 


869 


618 


SO 


20 


52 


34 


ss 


42 


405 


529 


560 


006 


721 


745 


107 


107 


63 


90 


92 


97 


303 


422 


367 


387 


352 


393 


26 


37 


35 


24 


25 


30 


310 


300 


227 


306 


283 


305 


81 


70 


18 


66 


67 


58 


53 


113 


130 


81 


60 


88 


4 


4 
54 


54 


4 
04 


4 
37 


87 


053 

09 












52 


05 


27 


00 


58 


1.442 


54 


35 


51 


80 


38 


27 


98 


150 


214 


188 


192 


200 


40 


23 


29 


23 


20 


14 


85 


123 


205 


168 


161 


223 


11 


9 


17 


11 


11 


9 




5 


8 


20 


23 


23 


3 


3 


5 


2 


7 


4 


13 


22 


1 




8 


14 


34 


38 



10 

8 


35 

7 


29 

7 


48 
5 














5 


23 


43 


47 


05 


01 


49 


9 


3 


7 


11 


5 


5 


225 


159 


61 


70 


112 


242 


3 


3 


3 

1 


3 


i 


2 

I 


54 


18 
5 










2 


7 


26 


68 


166 








2 
4 






165 
6 


124 
12 


34 
10 


36 
8 


11 


54 


4 




3 


4 


2 


22 








2 














3 


















' 




1,591 


1,723 


1.085 


1,002 


1,558 


1.020 


80,700 


28.403 


23.600 


28.310 


40,830 


60.946 



material, the weather, etc. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



26 New York Labor Bulletin. 

table vi.— all speahed causes of idleness of members of 





March 


Inouhtrieh or Groups ok Trades 


Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 

of 

loatcrial 


The 
weather 


I^bor 
dis- 
putes 


Dis- 
ability 


1. Building. Stone WorUng. Etc. . . . 

Stone workinff 


7,788 
620 

6.633 
480 

1.003 

59 
373 
641 

30 


213 


662 


201 


667 

17 


Building and paving trades. . 
Building and slroct labor 

2 Tremiportation 


213 


002 


201 


650 




1.180 




249 

177 

35 

28 

9 


Railways 










637 

60 

433 




Teaming and cab driving .... 

1«Vniffhtlin.ndHnff 
















a Cloihlnc and Teztllea 


19,980 

13,743 
6 








80 

15 

1 
4 
9 

1 

165 










Shirts, collars and laundry. . . 








5,980 









Boots, snoes and gloves 

Textiles 


201 














4. Metals, Machinery and Sliip- 
building 


347 

314 

8 

25 

417 

768 

885 

284 
51 




16 

16 


9 


Iron and steel ... 




9 135 


Olher metals 






5 
25 

225 

48 

78 

24 
49 

5 

60 

22 

9 
13 


Shiobuildinic 









5 Printintf Bindlnc. Etc 








6. Wood Worldng and Farnitare . . . 































8 TheAtAra and Miiale 








9 Tobacco 


176 

85 








10. Restaarants, Trade. Etc 

























DAtiA.il tnuin 






" ' 1 








3 




2 
18 

10 

5 

1 


12. StaUonary Engine Tending 


41 
111 






8 




1 

1 


' 


Leather and leather goods. . . 


GO 




46 
5 




Other distinct trades 




4 








Total 


80.936! 213 1.811 2131 1.669 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 27 

rbprbsentatite tbade unions at the end of mabch and june, 1913 





JcNa 


Other 
causes 


Total 

number 

idle 


Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 

of 

material 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Dis- 
abiUty 


Other 
causes 


Total 
idle 


4 

4 


9,480 

641 

8.350 

480 

2.408 

262 

1.045 

620 

472 


0.781 

305 

5.834 

552 

1,358 

40 
296 
740 
277 


13 


6 


6 


561 

3 

548 


8 


7.303 

308 




13 


6 


5 


8 


6,413 
552 




20 






274 


288 

203 
23 
22 
40 


24 
24 


1.989 


26 






267 










310 








274 




1,036 










317 
















19.900 

13.768 

7 

5.084 

210 

1 

552 

482 
20 
50 

042 

800 

408 

308 
100 

8 

2S0 

107 

80 
18 


23.303 
10.056 






5 


51 

16 




23,359 










19,072 
















3.317 








20 
7 
8 

120 

89 

6 

25 

194 

47 

83 

18 
65 

4 

53 

05 

53 
11 

1 

5 
3 

11 

10 

1 




3.337 








5 




12 




30 

419 

381 
13 
25 

240 

449 

315 

260 
66 

800 

31 

70 

74 
2 








38 


15 






312 

312 




851 


8 








782 


7 









10 












50 










4 


444 










490 












398 












278 












120 


3 










804 








8 




92 






20 

20 




101 










147 










13 












1 




5 

67 

121 

5 
61 
46 

9 












6 




20 

77 






5 




34 










88 












10 




49 

22 

6 










50 












22 














6 


































48 


34.790 


33.870 


18 


25 


009 


1.475 


"I 


30,034 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 New York Labob Bulletin. ' 

table .vn.— all specified causes op idleness of mebibeb8 of hepre- 





SerTEHBEB 


iNDUBTRIBB OB GROUPB OF TrADBS 


Lark 

of 
work 


Lack 

of 

material 


The 
weather 


l^bor 
dis- 
putes 


DiJH 

abiUty 


1. BuUding, Stone Working. Etc. . . . 

Htone vrorking 


5,048 

3eG 

5.212 
346 

1.202 

46 

174 

739 

235 

8 

14,210 

12.220 


7C 


12 


11 


' 738 


Building and leaving trades. . 
Building and street labor. . . . 




7t 


"ii 


17 


731 
1 


2. Transportatioa 




44 


16 


334 

180 

I 37 

' 75 

42 


Railways 




Navigation 




4 

40 




Toanung and cab driving 

Freight nandling 




15 




Telegraphs ... .7 








3. aothing and TextUes 






2 


24 


Garments 






10 


flhirta, fioIlAFB and laundry. . . 








1 


Hats, caps and furs .'. . . 


1.825 
95 
70 

609 

517 
27 
25 

151 

660 

367 
227 
130 








4 


Boots, shoes and gloves 






2 


6 


Textiles 








3 


4. MeUis. Maehinery and Ship- 






68 


Iron and 8t<»<»l 






58l 117 


Other metals 








2 
25 


Shipbuilding 








5. Printing. Binding. Etc 








210 


6. Wood Woridng and Furniture . . . 








62 










66 






• 




35 










18 


8. Theaters and Music 










0. Tobacco 


27 

214 

205 
8 
1 








64 


10. Bestaurants. Trade, Etc 








61 


Hotels and restaurants 








29 


Barbering 








17 


Retail t'ad* --.,,,-.-,-... 








5 


11. Pnblk EmploTmAfii , 








10 




47 
51 






2 


8 








86i 7 


Paper and paper goods 






1 


3 

1 


Leather and leather goods. . . 


7 
34 
10 






351 


Glass and glassware 








Other distinct trades 






1 


3 


Alixed employment 






















Total 


23.320 


76 


66 


120 


1.685 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AppENmx. 



29 



SENTATIVE TRADE UNIONS AT THE END OF 8EPTEMBEB AND DECEMBEB. 1918 



December 



Other 
causea 


ToUl 

number 

idle 


Lock 

of 

work 


Lack 

of 

Diaierial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dis- 
pute. 


Dia- 

abtUly 


tHher 
rauiwa 


Total 

number 

idlo 




6,701 

396 
6,048 


12,988! 64 


289; 8 


666 

14 

650 

2 

289 
174 
31 

1 


17 


13.982 




526 
11.789 




540 




64 


239, 8 


17 


12,767 




347! 623 

1.607 8,035 

227 102 
216 998 
869' 1,184 
277 1 74R 


60 
65 




675 


12 

1 




40 


28 

28 


3.457 






304 




65 




1.004 









40 




1.302 




I 




751 


11 


19 

14.236 
12.230 


6 

39,531 

32.704 








6 




J 


'I 

1 

1 

11 

171 

141 

5 
25 

196 

:; 

30 

58 


100 


39.668 






1 


32,712 










3 




1.829| 6.784 
1031 25 
73 16 

i 

801, 1.022 

7221 985 
29 12 




1 




6,793 






1 


84 
16 

208 

206 
2 


117 











43 


30 






7 


1.408 


30 






7 


1.339 








19 




50 25 
361 '^I'S 




1 


50 






i 


3 


714 




602 

410 

262 
148 


745 

358 

305 
63 








787 




. 




1 
1 


35 


491 








345 








35 


146 














81 

265 
234 

10 
57 
93 

4i 

34 
13 


1.442 

260 

223 

23 

14 








37 

27 
14 
9 
4 

48 

6 

5 

2 

1 






1,479 








5 

5 




292 

242 
32 












18 
48 




242 






1 
100 




55 










347 

2 




166 
54 






100 




267 
24 




22 









2 




42 


26.314 


60.137 


64 


354 


,« 


1.620 


391 


62.728 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



30 



New York Labok Bulletin. 



TABLE Vm.— IDLENESS IN REPRESENTATIVE TRADE UNIONS IN NEW YORK CITY 
AT THE END OF JUNE, 1913 



Industries ob Gboups of Trades 



Bnfldiiig, Stone Workii«p Etc. . 

8tono workiog 

Building and pavins trades . 
Building and street labor . . . 



2. Transportatkm 

Railways 

Navigation 

Teaming and cab driving . 

Freight Dandling 

Telegraphs 



Clothing and Textiles 

Garments 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves. 



Metals, Maeiiinenr and ShipboUding. 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 



6. Printing, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood Working and Fumitore . 



Food and Lienors . 

Food products. . 
Beverages 



Theaters and Music. 
ToImcco 



8. 

9. 

10. 

11. Public EmploTment 

12. Stationary Engine Tending. 
13. 



Reetanrants, Trade, Etc. . . 

Hotels and restaurants . 
Retail trade 



Leather and leather goods . 

Glass and glassware 

Other distinct tradea 



Un- 
ions 



Total. 



29 



26 

2 



IS 

10 
2 

1 

IS 

10 
2 
1 

2 

5 

7 
5 
2 

1 

2 

3 
2 

1 

2 

2 

6 
3 
2 

1 



98 



Mem- 
bersf 



24,306 

600 

21.403 

2.305 

11.380 

677 
4.763 
3.800 
1,060 
1.080 

62,285 

53,085 

8,675 

525 

4.974 

4.278 
346 
350 

6,904 

2.939 

3.293 
1.463 
1.830 

1.051 

1.539 

1.119 

944 

175 

2.626 
1.755 

1,394 

&I1 
436 
317 



Num- 
ber 
idle 



6.286 

393 

5.341 

552 

971 

17 
179 
580 
195 



23.301 

19.970 

3.326 

5 

402 

333 
19 
50 

428 

489 

367 

252 
115 



Per 
cent 
idle 



125.666 33.288 

I 



Idle on Account op — 



Labor 
dia. 
putes 



25.9 

65.5 
25.0 
23.9 

8.5 

2.5 

3.8 

15.3 

18.4 

0.0 

37.4 

37.6 

38.3 

1.0 

8.1 

7.8 

5.5 

14.3 

6.2 

16.6 

11.1 

17.2 
6.3 

76.1 

4.2 

7.0 

8.2 
0.6 

0.0 

1.3 

5.6 

7.8 
5.0 
1.9 



26.6 



Disa- 
bility 



Unem- 
ploy- 
ment* 



10 



30 

14 

11 

5 

72 

41 

6 

25 

194 

44 

73 

13 
60 



6.920 



4.978 
552 



944 



179 
580 
185 



23.271 

19.956 
3.315 



323 

285 
13 
25 

234 

445 

294 

239 

55 



46 32 

45. 32 

1 



1 22 

1 77 

1 49 

22 

••I 6 



893, 32.388 



* Due to lack of work, lack of material, the weather, etc. 

t Includes only those memben.who were reported iw to idleness. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



31 



TABLE IX.— IDLENESS IN REPRESENTATIVE TRADE UNIONS IN NEW YORK CITY 
AT THE END OF DECEMBER, 191S 



Indubtbies OB Groups or Tbadks 



1. BaOdinf, Stone Working, Etc 

Stone working 

Building and paving trades 

Building and street labor 

2. Tranaportatlini 

Railways 

Navii^tion 

Teanung and cab driving 

Freight nandling. 

Telegraphs 

3. aotUng and TeztOeo 

Garments 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves 

4. MeUda, Machinery and Shipbuilding 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 

5. Printing, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood Worldng and Forniture 

7. Food and Liqiiors 

Food products 

Beverages 

8. Tiieatera and Miuic 

9. ToImmco 

10. Restaurants, Trade, Etc 

Hotels azid restaurants 

Retail trade 

11. Public Employment 

12. Statfonary Engbie Tending 

13. Mlseellaaeoas 

Leather and leather goods 

Glass and glassware 

Other distinct trades 

Total 



Un- 
ions 



29 

1 

26 

2 

13 

3 
3 
3 
3 

1 

12 


2 
1 

13 

10 
2 

1 

2 

5 

7 
5 
2 

1 



Mem- 
borst 



24,462 

600 

22,492 

1,370 

10,414 

650 
4.490 
3,280 

976 
1,019 

58.079 

48,327 

9,302 

450 

4,761 

4,020 

391 

350 

7,072 

3,065 

3,177 

1,426 
1,751 

1,050 

l.i 

1.122 

925 
197 

2.700 

1,629 

1,415 

639 
439 
337 



97 120,591 



Num- 
ber 
idle 



Per 
cent 
idle 



11,267 

480 

10.179 

608 

1,306 

30 

139 

885 

245 

6 

39,275 

32.642 

6,627 

6 

536 

467 
19 
50 

695 

781 

442 

312 
130 



1,225 

33 

19 
14 

37 

35 

345 

267 
54 
24 



55,976 



46.1 

80.0 
45.3 
44.4 

12.5 

4 

3.1 
27.0 
25.1 

0.6 

67.6 
67.6 
71.2 

1 

11.3 

11.6 
4.9 
14.3 

9.8 

26.5 

13.9 

21.9 
7.4 

0.0 

74.5 

2.9 

2.1 
7.1 

1.4 

2.1 

24.4 

41.8 
12.3 
7.1 



Idus on Account of— 



Labor 
dis- 
putes 



46.4 



Disa- 
bility 



100 

100 



160 



388 

12 
376 



21 

8 
7 
6 

95 

65 

5 

25 

194 

39 

90 

35 
55 



947 



Unem- 
ploy- 
ment* 



10.871 

468 

9.795 

608 

1.208 

6 

121 

830 

245 

6 

39,254 

32,634 
6,620 



434 

395 
14 
25 

501 

742 

352 

277 
75 



1,213 

22 

8 
14 



30 

242 

166 
54 
22 



54,869 



* Due to lack of work, lack of material, the weather, etc. 

t Includes only those members who were reported as to idleness. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



32 



New York Labor Bulletin. 

table x.— idleness among obganized 



JNDU81-flI£M OR GrouPB OK TnADCS 



Number 

not 
rcjiorling 



NumJxjr 

ro- 
portiDg 



ToUl 

number 

idle 



1. BuUdiag» Stone WorUngp Etc. . . 

iStone workioj; 

Building and paving trades. 
Building and street labor. . . 



Transportation 

Railways 

Navigation 

Teaming and cab driving. 

Freight nandling 

Tdflsraphs 



Clothing and Toxtflea 

Garments 

Shirts, collars and laundry. 

Hats, caos and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves . . . , 
Textiles 



4. MeUls, Machinery and Sldpbiiilding . 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 



5. Printing, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood Worlcing and Famiture. 



Food and Uqnora . . 

Food products . 
Beverages 



8. 

9. 

10. 



Theaters and Music. 
Tobacco 



Bestaurents, Trade, Etc 

Hotels and restaurants. 

Barbering 

Retail trade 



11. PnbUc Employment 

12. Stationary Engine Tending. 



18. Miscdianeoiw 

Paper and paper goods 

Leather and leather goods. 
Glass and glassware . 



Cement, clay and plaster products. 

Other distinct trades 

Mixed employment 



Total. 



2.710 

437 

2.181 
02 

5,706 

2.868 
446 
487 
243; 

1.662 

789 

• 117 

4 

47 

637 

84 

815 

760 
13, 

42 

903; 

133j 

524 

86 

438 

22,655 

1.866 

1,023 

120 

841 

62 

807 

61 

162 

41 

6 

48 

15 

1 
51 



136.028 

5.600 
105.976 
24,452 

88.280 
32.718 
27.274 
10,500 
6.048 
2.650 

225,730 

185,831 

12,439 

15,550 

3,632 

8,287 

36.637 

30,102 

4.886 

1,649 

29,827 

14,629 

17,471 
9.116 
8,355 

3,052 

8.351 

27.682 

19.374 

6,638 

1,670 

17,407 

11,694 

0,898 
3.556 
1,165 
1.537 

464 
2.381 

205 



24.832 

941 

16.997 

6,894 

8,413 

850 

4.6U6 

2,275 

643 

30 

56.056 

50,515 

1.462 

3,140 

410 

420 

2.450 

1.862 
387 
201 

1.388 

1.812 

1,328 
920 
408 

58 

376 

2,625 

2,466 

83 

76 

596 

504 

812 

382 
43 

210 
45 

116 
16 

101.140 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



WAGE WORKBBS 



Appendix. 
at thb bnd op sbptbmbehp 1913 



33 



Per 
cent 
idle 


NUMBBB IdLB on ACCOUNT OP 


Lack Of 
work 


Laekof 
material 


The 

weather 


Labor 
diaputes 


Dui- 
ability 


Other 
oauaes 


Cauie 
not stated 


18.3 

16.8 


21.894 

829 

14,579 

6,480 

7.397 

242 

4.494 

2.098 

555 

8 

55.066 

49.901 

1.460 

3.058 

382 

255 

1.728 

1.283 
321 
124 

984 

1,342 

1,130 

858 
272 

67 

128 

2,482 

2.398 

28 

56 

583 
462 

7 
94 
25 
96 
16 


568 

4 
404 
160 

10 


178 


190 


1.911 

67 

1.607 

237 

821 
562 

74 
122 

58 
5 

132 

60 
2 

45 

• 16 

9 

420 

346 
10 
64 

363 

96 

143 

62 
81 

1 

234 

130 

67 
44 
19 

11 

32 

37 
16 
1 
9 
3 
8 


46 

41 
4 

59 

45 


45 


16.0 
28.2 


168 
10 

74 


190 


45 


9.5 

2.6 


39 


13 

10 


16.9 




34 
40 


4 
15 
20 




11!G 








10.6 


10 






1 1 




14 
6 


3 


24.8 






762 

554 




27.2 








11.8 










20.2 






37 
21 
150 

203 

173 
30 






11 5 










5.1 






6 

91 

52 
26 

13 

3 




6.7 


2 
2 




6 


6.2 




6 


7.9 






12 2 








4.7 






48 
361 




12 4 


23 
65 






7 6 








10.1 










4.9 


55 










1.6 










4.6 
9.5 


6 


1 


3 

10 


1 
2 


4 
1 


12.7 






1 


1.3 






10 


1 
1 




4.6 








8.4 








1 


4.3 






20 

229 

165 
35 






8 6 


4 

4 


240 

167 


40 

6 




10.7 




3 7 




13.7 




73 


34 




9.7 




17 
12 




4 9 










6.4 
























16.1 


M,4i6 


667 


4« 


1,866 


4.321 


248 


70 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



u 



New Vojjx J^^abou Buj.lktin. 

table xi.— idleness among obganized wage 



Industries or Groups of Trades 



Number 

not 
reporting 



Number I Total 
re- I number 
porting I idle 



1. Baildingp Stone Working, Etc 

Stone working 

Building and paving trades 

Building and street labor 

2. Transportation 

Bailways 

Navigation 

Teaming and cab driving 

Freight handling 

Telegraphs 

8. Clotlilng and TeztOea 

Garments 

Shirts, collars and laundry 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves .1 

Textiles 

4. Metals, Machinery and Shlpbnildlnc 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 

5. Printing, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood WorUng and Faraitnre 

7. Food and Liquors 

Food products 

Beverages 

8. Tlieaters and Music 

9. Tobacco 

10. Restanrants, Trade, Etc 

Hotels and restaurants 

Barbering 

Retail trade 

11. Public Employment 

12. Stationary Engine Tending 

18. Miflcellaneoas 

Paper and paper goods 

Leather and leather goods 

Glass and glassware 

Cement and clay products 

Other distinct trades 

Mixed employment 

Total 



2.928 

376 

2,216 

331 

7,408 

2.829 

878 

535 

1.631 

1,535 

0,166 

8,580 

1 

152 

375 

48 

1,920 

1,777 

127 

25 

849 

68 

427 

312 
115 

21.886 

1,741 

18.548 

12,761 

777 

10 

412 

88 

92 

G 

2 

80 

1 
2 
1 



I 
180,889 

5,890, 

100,246| 

24,753 

81.9171 

28.845 

29.339, 

16.789 

4,439' 

2,606 

228,712' 

189,014! 

11,1721 

14,4971 

3.717, 

6.312 

I 

80.5831 

26.0741 
3.0921 
1,417| 

29.424 

11,644| 

16,779' 

8.431' 
8,348, 

4,982' 

8.87l| 

9.605 

6,520 
2,050 
1,035 

16,846 

11,050 

8.344 
3,357 

957 
1,8281 

159 
1,727 

310 



60.022 



588.596 



87.868 
1.802 

30.102 
5.959 

9.268 

1.271 

4,836 

2,203 

952 

6 

88,696 

29,202 

970 

6,605 

520 

1,399 

2,817 

1.843 
267 
207 

2.208 

1,720 

1.280 

903 
377 

286 

1.052 

442 

369 

61 

12 

688 

518 

1.176 

709 
64 



116 
3 



97,498 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Al'PKNMX. 
WORKERS AT THE END OF MARCH, 1913 



Per 
cent 
idle 






NuiiBXB Idlk on Account of — 






Lack of 
work 


Lack of 
stock 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dinputes 


Di»- 
abiUty 


Other 
cauMfl 


Cause 
not stated 


28.9 

30.6 
30.0 
24.1 


30.441 

1.459 

23.230 

5,752 

6,869 

476 
3,073 
2.068 

253 


888 

2 

852 

34 


1.420 

134 

1,200 

86 

2.378 


3.374 

122 

3.252 


1.698 
75 

1,536 
87 

783 

559 

97 

75 

46 



170 

63 
16 
60 
18 
13 

549 

480 
18 
61 

394 

127 

203 

96 
107 

6 

239 

68 

38 

29 

1 

9 

50 

32 

13 

4 
3 
3 
9 


16 

6 
10 


26 

4 
22 


11. S 


175 

176 


42 

41 

1 


21 


4.4 




21 


16.5 




1.665 

60 

653 




13.1 








21.4 










0.2 










17.3 


34.601 

27,730 

40 

6.181 

483 

67 

1,059 
774 

129 
156 

1.793 

1,638 

1.061 

799 
262 

236 

569 

360 

330 

19 

11 

171 

427 

181 
2 

60 
60 


428 

400 




3.092 

509 

914 

364 

5 

1.300 

173 

109 
64 


506 

500 




15.4 






8.7 






45.6 










14.0 


14 
14 

12 

7 
5 








26.3 




5 

12 
12 




7.6 

7.1 
8.6 


489 

445 

44 


23 

16 


14.6 






7.5 






11 
13 

1 

1 


3 

7 

2 

1 

1 




14.8 
7.6 


7 

3 


26 


10 


10.7 






4.5 


3 






5.8 






43 


12.6 
4.6 


3 


199 
10 


43 
3 


1 

1 
1 


8 


5.7 






3.0 




10 


3 




1.2 








4.2 




503 
21 

753 

653 








4.6 


3 
20 


12 

128 

23 






14.1 


62 

18 




21.1 




6.7 






15.4 




100 


75 


44 




1.9 






6.7 


56 
3 


20 




30 






0.9 






' 
















16.7 


78,196 


1,364 


5,799 


7.025 


4..«, 


651 


135 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Sii 



New York Labob Bulletin. 



TABLE 3aL— CAUSES OF IDLENESS IN 













Idleness at the 


End or 


IXDUBTRT AND TrADE 


Sex 


NDMBSR IDLB ON ACCOUNT OF — 


• 


Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
of ma- 
terial 


The 
weather 


lAbor 
dis- 
putes 


Disa- 
bility 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


I. BUILDING, STONE WORKING, ETC. 
(a) Stone Workii«. 


^T 


376 
20 
67 

100 

50 

10 

30 

3 

100 




5 




1 






BlufistoDA cuttani' heloen 












Granite cutters ... 




14 






6 




Machine stone workers, rubbers and helpers. 




1 
85 
















Marble cutters* helpers 












Marble polishers, rubbers and sawyers 

Paving block cut*er« 








13 

1 








75 


122 






Aciilntors and carvers, - 1 . - 






Btone bankers . 














Htone oiittiers . . . . r 


703 


2 


40 




24 




4 








Total 


M 


1.459 


2 


134 


122 


76 


6 


4 






(b) Bofldlnc and PavliK Trades. 


M 
















RricklftviTH and masons • . . . 






3.940 

450 

5,626 

440 

5 

39 

429 

270 


42 
25 
160 


546 
100 
115 




"287 




3 


Caisson and foundation workers 




Camenters and joiners 


74 


599 
5 


5 


18 






Derrickmen and ricsers 


200 










r)ny<gftm«n, ^team shovel men, Ate 












Electrical workers 


4 




75 


47 






Elevator constructors. 






Glasiers 














TTouse shorers and movers. 


300 

365 

2 

371 








7 
145 






Housesmiths and bridgemen ..,.,..,, 


105 


10 








Insulators, heat and frost 






Lathers 




4 


2 

3.051 

23 

20 


3 

8 

152 

5 

nl 

59 
38 

8 
29 
14 

6 






Millwrights . . 








4,766 

68 

218 

983 

1,406 
450 

"969 

30 

400 

600 

515 

68 

400 

56 

65 


12 

"263 
4 
50 
28 
5 
10 
4 


202 

5 

194 

4 






Paper hancers 






Pavers ana rammermen .................. 






Plasterers 






Rock drillers, tool sharpeners, etc 


2 


1 


Roofers, slate aiid tile .'...... 






Sheet metal workers 


26 


7 






Ktair builders 








3 




Steam fitters' helpers 
















3 






Stone setters 












Tar, felt and waterproof workers 














Tile layers and marble mosaic workers 








1 
5 






Tile layers* and marble mosaic workers' 
helpers 












Tuck pointers 






























Total 


M 


23,230 


852 


1.200 


3,252 


1,536 


10 


22 






(c) BvOdlac and Street Labor. 

An>ha]t workers 


M 


141 
3.311 

620 
1,120 

550 
10 














BrioklayerB*, masons' and plasterers* laborers 






34 


86 




71 
14 






Cement workers 






Excavators and tunnel workers 












General building and street laborers 














Plumbers' laborers 








2 




















Total 


M 


5.752 


34 


86 




87 












Total — Group I 


M 


30.441 


888 


1.420 


3.374 


1,698 


16 


26 




=s 


== 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



37 



EACH INDUSTRY AND TBADE, 1913 











iDUBNXflS 


AT THB 


End of 


Sbptbhbbb 






Total 


Num- 
ber re- 
poriinc 


Per 
cent 
idle 


NUXBIIB IDLS ON ACOOUKT OF — 


Total 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 

cent 
idle 


num- 
ber 
idle 


LflMdc 

of 
work 


Lack 
of mar 

terial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Disa- 

biUty 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
Btoted 


382 


538 
20 
088 
615 
880 
400 
628 
251 


71.0 

100.0 

8.8 

16.4 
0.7 
2.5 
6.8 

80.1 

51.0 
0.0 

57.3 


72 








2 






74 


465 
30 

1.040 
40O 
864 
301 
669 
413 
140 
10 

1,088 


15.9 


20 












0.0 


87 


64 
85 
37 








14 






78 
85 
02 
12 
57 
18 
80 
5 
440 


7.5 


101 












17.3 


85 


4 






io 

12 

7 
2 


41 




10.6 


10 






3.1 


43 


50 

16 

80 

5 

420 












8.5 


201 












4.4 


100; 106 












57.1 


24 














50 


773' 1,350 








20 






40.4 
















1.8021 5,890 


30.6 


820 


4 






67 


41 




041 


5,600 


16.8 










I 
1 60 


0.0 
36.8 
67.6 
22.3 
67.0 
38.3 
4.2 
0.3 
30.0 


10 

4.200 

385 

3.488 

12 

153 

154 

560 

401 














10 

4.430 

385 

4,504 

18 

173 

155 

606 

401 


65 

13,472 

811 

30,360 

670 

470 

821 

6.431 

878 

62 

450 

3.470 

301 

1,250 

352 

22,732 

423 

640 

4.107 

6,657 

1,317 

105 

4,346 

133 

1,771 

1.000 

1.207 

249 

784 

656 

600 
20 


15.4 


4,8271 13.121 


11 






211 




8 


32.9 


575 


850 
20.647 
664 
535 
025 
5.080 
874 






47.5 


6,507 
445 


221 


57 


05 


636 
6 

20 
1 

28 


1 


6 


14.8 
2.7 


205 












36.8 


39 












18.9 


555 






8 




1 


9.4 


270 






45.7 
















0.0 


307 


500 
3,200 

380 
1,217 

205 
17,670 

410 

574 
4,443 
5,516 
2,820 

107 
3,856 

146 
1.764 
1.000 
1.412 

273 

676 

645 

642 
17 


61.4 
10.5 

0.5 
31.1 

3.4 
46.3 
10.0 
72.0 
20.3 
27.1 
10.8 
33.6 
26.2 
50.7 
23.4 
60.0 
36.7 
24.0 
50.2 

8.8 

0.3 
0.0 


100 
587 
2 
100 
4 
515 

74 

62 
682 
537 
200 

20 
678 

30 
200 
500 
761 

50 














100 
682 
2 
102 

024 

77 

60 

1,028 

591 

272 

20 
720 

60 
208 
500 
770 

60 
6 

16 


22.2 


025 


18 






75 




2 


19.6 


2 






0.5 


378 








2 






16.3 


10 


5 
50 










2.6 


8.183 
78 


111 


87 


150 

3 

7 

276 

53 

45 


2 




4.1 
18.2 


413 












10.8 


1.304 


45 








25 

1 
2 


24.5 


1.405 






10.4 


558 


25 






20.7 


36 






19.0 


1,010 








50 
10 
8 


1 




16.8 


74 


20 






45.1 


413 










11.7 


600 












60.0 


518 










10 

6 

1 






59.4 


68 












24.1 


400 












0.8 


57 


15 












2.4 


60 












0.0 




















0.0 




















30,103 


100.246 


30.0 


14,570 


404 


168; 100 


1,607 


4 


45 


16,007 


105,976 


16.0 


141 


704 

17.761 

1,852 

2.367 

2.000 

60 


20.0 
10.7 
34.2 
47.3 
27.5 
17.4 


53 

4.768 

120 

1,375 

160 

10 


8 
152 










61 

5.004 

121 

1,503 

185 

20 


653 

16,196 

1.812 

2.877 

2,850 

64 


9.3 


3,502 




84 






30.9 


634 




1 




6.7 


1,120 






128 
25 


52.2 


550 










6.5 


12 




10 








31.3 


t ! 


1 










5,950 


24.753 


24.1 


6,486 


160 


lOl 


237 


1 




6.894 


24,452 


28.2 


37,863 

■■■-■■ 


130.880 


28.0 


21.804 


568 


178 100 


1,011 


46 


45 


24,832 


136.028 


18.8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



38 



New York Labok Bulletin. 



Table XH.— CftosM of IdlencsB in EMh 





Sex 








iDLBNEflB AT THE 


End or 


Industbt and Trads 




NUMBER IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF — 




Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
of ma- 
terial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dis- 

putOB 


Disa- 
bUity 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


n. TRANSPORTATION. 
(a) RaOwaja. 


« 

a 

F 

M 

« 

• 

a 
• 
a 
a 
■ 

M 

F 










5 
9 
1 








6 






40 


4 

1 
























Conductors 










41 

76 

81 

4 


15 
5 
9 


12 


Emrinflerfl loeomotivA 


48 
141 








7 


Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Motormen, guards, etc. (electric trains) 






























Street railwiiv emnloveea 


2 
71 






135 


83 
27 






RwitnhTTiAn 






















Trainmen, road and yard 


207 








232 


7 


2 


Total 


475 






175 


559 


41 


21 


























(b) NavigaUon. 
Boatmen 


¥ 


300 

700 

61 

1,000 

12 

1.000 








20 










250 

320 

80 

63 

952 








EnicineerB marine 






1 








54 

15 
8 




Mfuit.flni and nilotji 






Seamen 






Total 


M 


3,073 




1,665 




97 


1 








(c) Teaming and Cab Driving. 

Cab and coach drivers and chauffeurs 


M 

a 
a 

M 


104 








13 
















Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs 


1.964 




60 




62 










Total 


2,068 




60 




75 















(d) Freight Handling. 

Coal heavers 


^^ 


39 








12 


' 




Freight and baggagemen 


















340 

70 

243 












214 






31 






Lumber handlers 






Scow trimmers 








3 




















ToUl 


M 


253 




653 




46 












(e) Telegraph. 

TeleffranhGni cominerGi&l 


M 
F 
M 
F 










3 




















Telegraphers, railroad 










3 




































Total 


M 

F 


1 






6 








1 
























Total — Group II 


M 

F 


5,869| 


2,378 


175 


783 


42 


21 














r- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



39 



iBdwCry and Tnde, 191S — Contlnaed 



^Iabcb 








iDLENsae 


AT THK 


End of 










rrotai 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 
cent 
idle 


NUMBXB IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF — 


Total 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 
cent 
idle 


num- 
ber 
idle 


Lack 

of 
work 


TAck 
of ma- 
terial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Diaa- 
biUty 


Other 
cauaes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


5 


71 

679 

531 

3 

2.612 

4,274 

5,472 

200 


7.0 
8.7 
0.4 
0.0 
2.7 
3.2 
4.2 
2.0 


















71 

1,075 

849 

12 

2,678 

4,347 

6,649 

209 

38 

6,638 

1,326 

176 

9,751 


0.0 


59 


10 








1 


4 




15 


1.4 


2 








0.0 




















0.0 


68 










62 

65 

86 

5 


8 

1 
6 


8 
2 


68 

110 

145 

6 

1 

162 

94 

1 


2.6 


136 


44 

51 








2.5 


231 









2.6 


4 








2.4 




1 
33 
76 













•2.6 


220 


4,171 

1.255 

100 

9,677 


6.3 
7.8 
0.0 
4.7 








129 

18 

1 

205 






2.4 


98 












7.1 














0.6 


448 


27 








26 




258 


2.6 










1 




1,271 


28,842 
3 


4.4 

0.0 


242 








562 


46 


10 


859 


32,706 
12 


2.6 










0.0 






















320 


795 
5.550 
3,214 
12,250 
1,530 
6,000 


40.3 
17.1 
11.9 
9.3 
5.9 
32.7 


45 
320 
37 
4.050 
12 
30 














45 
360 
80 
4.070 
31 
30 


335 
6,190 
3.333 
12.854 
1,492 
4,070 


13.4 


950 








30 

5 

20 

19 






6.7 


382 




34 


4 






2.4 


1,134 






31.7 


90 






2.1 


1,960 












0.7 


















4.836 


29,339 


16.5 


4,494 




34 


4 


74 






4.606 


27.274 


16.9 










117 


3,337 


3.5 


302 

10 

1,786 






5 






307 


2,498 

146 

16,966 


12.3 












10 


6.9 


2,086 


13,462 


16.5 




40 


15 


117 






1,958 


11.6 










2,203 


16.789 


13.1 


2,098 




40 


15 


122 






2.275 


19,599 


11.6 










51 


419 
29 
673 
2.602 
416 
300 


12.2 
0.0 
50.5 
12.1 
58.4 
1.0 








20 








20 


356 
112 
695 
4,172 
413 
300 


5.6 
















0.0 


340 










20 
28 
10 






20 

593 

10 


2.9 


315 


555 


10 










14.2 


243 










2.4 


3 














0.0 






















952 


4.439 


21.4 


555 


10 




20 


58 






643 


6,048 


10.6 










3 


879 

223 

1.377 

26 


0.8 
0.0 
0.2 
0.0 


6 
2 










10 
3 


! ,6 

5 

3 11 


808 

217 

1.599 

26 


2.0 












l.A 


3 








5 


07 
















0.0 























6 


2,266 


0.3 

0.0 


6 
2 








6 


13 

1 


3 


27 

5 


2,407 
243 


1.1 










1.2 














9,268 


81,666 
262 


11.3 
0.0 


7,395 
■ 2 


10 


74 


39 


821 


68 

1 


13 


8,410 
3 


88,034 
266 


9.6 
1.2 









== 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



40 



New York Labor Bulletin. 











•Mifo Xn.— CauM of IdlenMs 


In Bach 




Sex 


Idlbmssb at trb Exn> of 


Indubtbt and Tbadb 


NUMBKB IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF — 


Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
of ma- 
terial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Disa- 
biUty 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


UI. CLOTHING AND TEXTILES. 
(•) Garments. 


M 

F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 

H 

F 
M 

m 
m 

F 
M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

• 

F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 


















6 














Bftften 
































202 

to 




























din flortora 
































4,000 
12,044 
S,499 




















45 

6 

65 


4 
















Cloth examinara, spongers and helpers 






5 
13 
11 






2,365 
62 












400 




200 














80 

IS 

700 






4 


11 

1 
























350 
160 













































40 
100 
$0 


















7 
IS 












1 










1 






2 








3 






Snilor suit makers . 


























Skirt makers 


2,640 
20 

to 

15 
5 
























































Tailors 






iso 
to 


8 
S 





































































2 




















Total 


M 

F 


22.158 
5,57« 


400 




471 
38 


52 


350 

160 














(b) Shirts. CoUara and Laandry. 


M 

F 
M 

F 

M 

« 

F 
M 

F 






















1 








34 






120 

S80 

14 

200 

too 
















Rhirl; mittATB 














RKif^ m&kAra 








2 


























10 

1 








6 
























Tntal 


M 

F 


34 






334 

S8& 


13 
S 




























Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



41 



luduaby mad Tnde, 1913 — Coatfaiaed. 



Marcb 










Idubnxw 


AT TRX End of SamicBSR 






Total 


Num- 
ber re- 
portins 


Per 
cent 
idle 


MUMBBB XDLI ON ACCOXTMT OF — 


Total 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 
cent 
idle 


num- 
ber 


LmIc 

Of 

work 


Lack 
of ma- 
terial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dia- 
putes 


Dim- 
biUty 


Other 
cauees 


Cauae 

not 
stated 




7 

14,000 

4,000 

920 

119 


0.0 

14.7 

0.0 

0.0 

22.0 

i5.5 


















3 

88 

10,350 

8,000 

974 

98 

425 

100 

9.060 

38.133 

7,687 

360 

5,263 

14.248 

5 

26,373 

5,505 

6,861 

8,708 

3,000 

800 

270 

700 

800 

411 

869 

TJQ 

800 

5,447 

'•'^ 

60 
3,463 

'\i 

18 

8.076 

84.886 


0.0 


s 























5.010 

1.000 

96 

8 














5,010 

1,000 

101 

5 


48.4 






* 










60.0 


202 








5 






10.4 


to 












8.8 
















0.0 
























0.0 


4,000 


9,000 
35.560 

7,186 
367 

4.939 
18.433 


44.4 

34.0 

«:{ 

48.1 
3.6 



















0.0 


12,093 


4.827 
1,559 
100 
1.622 
3.239 








::::::: ::::::: 




4,827 
1,555 
100 
1.628 
3,240 


12.7 


8,604 














18.9 


70 














27.8 


2.378 








6 

1 






30.9 


663 












22.7 














0.0 


95 


31,025 

6,880 

6,732 

8,868 

2,800 

700 

249 

700 

800 

326 

1,080 

600 

«00 

6.350 

^5 

16 

10 

7.470 

80,980 


0.3 
0.8 
15.6 
19.1 
0.0 
0.0 
16.1 
15.3 

0.7 
0.0 
0.0 
40.0 
^.0 
20.0 
55.0 
10.2 

g:i 

0.0 
0.0 

o.i 


9.969 

8,888 

1,840 

786 

500 

150 

3 






15 


16 
5 






10.000 

8,881 

1,840 

766 

500 

160 

4 


37.9 


1.050 










^i 












460 














55.5 
















16.7 
















18.8 


40 








1 






1.5 


107 












0.0 


55 


















0.0 










5 
5 


2 
4 
3 






7 

6 

311 

80 

1.362 

668 


1.7 


7 












0.7 




308 

80 

1,362 

555 










40.4 














40.0 
25.0 


2.540 














1,700 














55.5 


20 














0.0 


10 


















0.0 


173 


1,140 
150 






7 


11 






i.i58 
171 


33.4 


86 






g 






88.8 
















0.0 




















0.0 




2.960 
9,080 






400 
186 








3.360 

9,809 


41.6 


$ 






4 






87.1 














23,431 


141.290 
^7.7*4 


16.6 
15.1 


32.976 
15.555 






427 

157 


46 
16 






33,448 
17,067 


134.349 
61,488 


24.9 


6,771 










55.5 
















10 
1,728 

. 603 
717 
500 

8,780 


0.0 
10.0 

9.0 
75.5 

4.0 
33.5 
57.P 

2.0 

0.1 


















10 

1.620 
601 
240 

1.206 
818 


0.0 


8 


















0.0 


155 


182 
78 








1 






183 
75 


11.3 


8S0 












16.8 


14 














0.0 


202 


150 

50 














160 
60 


12.4 


too 














8.1 


10 
















7 


1,000 








1 






1,001 


8,080 


18.6 
















381 


3.191 
7,981 


11.9 
7.4 


332 
1,155 








1 
1 






333 
1,189 


3.076 
9,888 


10.8 


689 












18.1 

















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



42 



New York Labor Bulletin. 



Table XIL— Canate of Idteoeaa in Each 





Sex 


iDLBNCSa AT THB EnD Or 


I^roUSTRT AND TraDB 


XUUBBR IDLB ON ACCOUNT OF — 




Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
of ma- 
terial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Disar 
biUty 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


IIL CLOTHING AND TEXTILES — Cone. 
(c) Hata. Cave and Para. 


M 

« 

F 
M 
P 
M 

m 
u 

F 
M 
F 
M 
F 


33 
105 

50 
4,550 
1,000 








32 








1 


4 
















_ , 






































Hatfiniahers 

Hat makers 


430 
33 








11 


























A>fi1HnAm7 «r/\r1rAlHi 






































360 




































Trtfal 


M 

F 

M 
F 
M 
F 
M 


5,151 
l.OSO 


1 


364 


57 




























(d) Boota, Shoea and GloTee. 


473 


2 




5 


14 














8 
2 


12 


































































"Pq^jJ 


M 

F 


481 
2 


14 




5 


18 


























(e) TeztDee. . 
CaUco and plush engravers, printers, etc . . . 


M 

« 

m 

F 
M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

« 

F 

M 

a 
« 
m 

F 
M 


1 








2 
























\2 











. . . . 
2 





























30 


10 






5 


5 














































3 


4 






3 



































17 








1 
































snoaay worKers 

nillr vrnrlrAra 


12 
2 




i,288 i 




















::::::: ::::;:. .:.:.:|. :.;... 



























1 








































Total 


M 


65 


14 




1.300 


13 


5 






















Total GrouD III 


M 

F 


27,889 
6,612 


428 




2,474 

618 


153 
17 


355 

160 










== 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix, 



43 



ladiwfry and Trade, 1913 ~ Contiiiaed 



Mabcb 
















Total 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 
cent 
idle 


NUMBER IDLS ON ACCOUNT Or — 


Total 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porUns 


Per 

cent 
idle 


num- 
ber 
idle 


Laok 

of 
work 


LmsIc 
te^ 


The ^ 


Disfr- 
biUty 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


34 


300 

1,622 

S60 

7,442 

1,600 

18 

617 

233 

660 


1 11.3 

8.7 

8.9 

61.2 

66.7 

0.0 

71.0 

18.9 

0.4 


20 

195 

68 

1,770 

300 






2 
20 

9 


1 
16 






?3 


305 

1.553 

316 

7,847 

1,800 

41 

720 

240 

610 

325 

67 

1,577 

120 


7 5 


141 










231 


14 9 


31 










300 


2t.4 
22 7 


4,563 






4 






1,000 










16.7 



















438 


25 
20 








11 
7 






36 
27 


5 


44 












11 3 


2 






































19 

1,736 

100 


0.0 

20.9 

0.0 





















362 


620 

40 








6 






626 

40 


39.7 














33 3 


















5,572 


11,968 
£,629 


46.2 
40.8 


2,650 

408 






31 
6 


45 






2,726 
414 


12.608 
2,942 


21 6 


1,0S8 










14 1 


















494 


2,736 
133 
565 

64 
190 

29 


18.1 
0.0 
3.7 
S.l 
1.6 
0.0 


372 






13 


14 


• 




399 


2,903 

103 
148 

20 
380 

78 


13 7 












0.0 


21 










2 






2 


1 4 


t 

















3 


10 






8 








is 


4 7 














0.0 
















1 




518 


3.401 
226 


14.8 
0.9 


382 






21 


16 






419 


3,431 
201 


12.2 


2 











0.0 




















3 


64 
200 
293 
721 


4.7 
0.0 
4.1 
0.3 
0.0 
69.4 


6 
20 
50 








1 






7 
20 
50 


108 

200 

285 

992 

960 

140 

20 

3 

It 

79 

1,547 

2,000 

127 

110 

296 

814 

209 

210 

120 

31 

24 


6 5 















10.0 


12 















17.2 


2 








4 






4 


0.4 



















50 


65 
10 










5 




70 
10 


50.0 












50 




4 
13 
72 
66 


0.0 
0,0 
13.9 
0.0 
















0.0 























10 


















0.0 




32 

70 
2 














32 

70 
4 


2.1 
















3.6 


18 


117 

107 

300 

1,531 

3 

200 

125 

51 

27 


15.4 
0.0 
0.0 
85.0 
66.7 
0.0 
0.0 
2.0 
0.0 










1 


1 




3.1 










0.0 




















0.0 


1 301 








90 
60 


3 






93 

60 


11.4 


t 












28.7 





































0.0 


X 































1 




0.0 






















1 397 


3,923 
1,589 


35.6 
0.1 


175 
80 






90 
60 


9 


6 


1 280! 5.O62I 


5.5 


g 






1 


140\ 3,226\ 


4.5 










1 


31.299 
7,Sd7 


163,863 
69,849 


19.1 

12.4 


36,515 
t8,64i 






569 
193 


116 
16 


6 ' 37.206 158.5261 


23.5 








18,760 ft7.S13\ 


27.9 




■ ■ s 




1 




=--^=rzL=l 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 



Xew York Labor Bulletin. 

Table Xn.— CauM of IdleiMH In Euh 





Sex 




• 


iDLBNXaS AT TBR En1> OT 




MUMBKR IDLS ON ACCOUNT OF — 


Ikoustbt akd Tradh 


Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
of ma- 
terial 


The 
weathe^r 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Disa- 
biUty 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stoted 


IV. METALS, MACHINEBY AND SHIP- 
BUILDING. 

(•) Iron and Steel. 

BlllAk-Tt^HIl" 


M 

P 
M 

« 

m 
* 
■ 

F 

M 

« 
• 

m 
« 

F 
M 

• 

m 


23 
74 
92 
53 








10 
38 
23 
12 
5 




2 












Boilermaken ana iron shipbuilders 

Ooremakers 






15 


4 










CnuM^m^n ................. t 












Cutting die and cutter makers, t - - - 














Drop forcers 










2 

51 

S 






Electrical annars''-'** makers 


43 
























Enamelers 














helpers 


20 




127 


66 


4 






Oas TPeter makers . . 






H^nfi^Ars'nHhf and helpers 














Ffor*A null makers 










1 




















Horseshoers . . .. 


64 

203 

3 

136 








3 
104 

2 
187 

5 
24 






Iron molders and core makers .........«-- 




236 


10 


1 


6 


Iron moiders' aoDrentioes 




MoAkinifltji 


7 


17 


io 


7 


8 


Machinists' apprentices and helpers 

Pattern makers r , 




49 
12 




65 


9 






Saw and tool makers 


































Sheet metal workers 
















fltove mounters . . . r » i 










3 
3 






Wire workers and bed spring makers 


2 






















Total 


M 

F 


774 


7 


445 


109 


477 
S 


12 


16 





















(b) Me«ida, Other Thaa Iron and Steel. 


M 

« 

m 
m 
m 
« 
« 
m 

• 

F 

M 

« 

• 










2 






Beer pump makers 


8 
20 




















2 






Brass molders and core makers ......... t - 




12 










Cable workers 


15 
3 
5 


















24 
40 








Chasers . 












Clock and watch makers 












CoppAFfmiths ..... T r 


3 

1 
10 








4 




7 


Gold pen makers 










Jewelrv workers. 








1 
1 
8 




















25 

4 

35 




32 












Silver workers 


5 












Survical instrument makers ... r 




























Total 


M 

F 


129 


5 


44 


64 


17 

1 




7 




















Sail makers 


M 


15 
100 








1 






Shin and machinerv riffvem . . . 












•Ship painters 








8 

5 

37 






Shin nliimbern and steam fitters 


2 
39 












Shinwriffhts. loiners and calkers ,.,.,,,,,,- 












flnRr MMm {imrririt mAlrAra 




























Total 


M 


156 








51 


















Total — Group IV 


M 

J' 


1.059 


12 


489 


178 


645 

4 


12 


28 








■"'■'~ 


..^_i.. 


" ■■■ 4 


■■■■ ' ■■ 


"" 


"' ' ■■ 


' 


^^u,^_^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



IndiKstry and Trade, 1913 — Contlnaed. 



>URra 










Idlbnxss at the 


End of 


September 








j 1 


Per 

cent 
idle 


NUMBER IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF — 


Totol 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 




Total 1 
num- 
ber 
idle 

1 


Num- : 
ber re- 
porting 


Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
of mA- 
terial 


The 
weather 


dis- 
putes 


Disa- 
bility 1 


^•^' 1 8tat«i 

1 


Per 
cent 
idle 


1 
35 


i 

881 
679 
1,215 
549 
SKI 


4.0 

16.5 

11.0 

11.8 

1.8 

0.0 

1.4 

4.3 

2.7 


28 

91 

210 

30 








J 


1 


36 

118 

325 

34 

6 

1 

10 

7 


925 
665 

1,220 

668 

348 

71 

168 

2.851 

*^ 

989 
46 
35 


3 


112 








27' 


1 


17.7 


134 
60 


^'. 


60 

1 


23] 

t 

1 


30 


26.6 
6.0 


5 


. 




14 


79 




::::::i::":':' 






1 4 


2 


140 

2.192 

111 


7 
3 


1 




1 


6.0 


94 


1 




1 


2 


^ 




1 




1 


0.0 




:■■■■ ::""i 




1 1 







210! 1-070 


20.2 

0.0 
0.0 
4.5 
0.0 
7.2 

10.2 
5.3 
3.9 
0.7 
8.9 

23.1 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
2.8 
8.6 


91 
25 


1 




\ 






92 
25 


9.3 




50 

49 

22 

7 

931 










54 3 








1 




0.0 


i 


■■■ 1 '■' 




j 










: L/_ _ 




1 






1 


67 


51 
340 


1 




3 
142 






54 
541 

2 
343 

4 
237 


892 

5,330 

85 

12,411 

483 

1,670 

53 

270 

1 

203 

110 

58 


6.1 


5^30 5,480 


1 


41 

1 
43 


18 




10.2 


51 94 


1 
195 




2.4 


372 


9,531 

681 

1.661 

52 

67 

1 

87 

106 

58 




95 

4 
24 


4 


6 


2 8 


•> 


i 


0.8 


147 


209 


i 


4 






14.1 


12 


t 

















' 






1 


0.4 














0.0 






1 


23 


::;:::: :::::;: 




23 
3 

1 


11.3 


3 


2 




1 
1 






2.7 


5 










1.7 

















1.S40 
9 


25.955 
119 


7.1 
«.5 


1.283 


2j 


173 


346 


52 


6 


1,862 


29,487 
616 


6.3 
0.0 






1 















74 

126 

210 

87 

25 

353 

129 

60 

226 

115 

76 

4S 

1.124 

IJW) 


2.7 
6.3 
10.5 
13.8 
60.0 
7.6 
34.9 
0.0 
6.2 
0.9 
14.5 

i.B 

5.8 
2.7 
14.3 
0.0 




1 




1 






46 
122 
536 
101 


0.0 


*i 


4 
50 
22 








4 
51 
22 


3.3 


22 


1 


1 






0.5 


12 


1 






21 8 


15 


i 


1 ■" " 






27 


10 


1 i 


1 




10 
27 
26 
24 


400 
130 
306 
230 
114 
171 
13 

1.278 
150 

1,276 
13 


2.5 


45 




25 


2 






20.8 








26 




8.5 


14 


22 






2 


10 4 


1 


1 









0.0 


n 


3 


; 




1 




3 


1.8 


/ 


i . 




! 




0.0 


65 


65 

5 

150 


..::::l::":::. 


5 


5 






65 

5 

160 


5.1 


4 








3 3 


4ai 280 












11.8 




12 












0.0 






■_■ — 1 1 












266 


3,047 
4S 


8.7 

2.2 


321 


1- — - 
1 


30 


10 


26 




387 


4,873 
IS 


7.9 


1 


t 




0.0 




















16 


102 
230 
248 

79 
733 

25 


15.7 
43.5 
3.2 
8.9 
10.4 
0.0 


25 


i 




2 






27 


107 
300 
262 
251 
706 
23 


25.2 


100 


1 








0.0 


8 




1 




7 
13 
40 

2 






7 
77 
88 

2 


2.7 


7 


53 
46 


: :.l 




11 
2 




30.7 


76 






12.5 








8.7 
















207 


1.417 


14.6 


124 


: 




64 


13 


6 


201 


1,640 


12.2 










2.318 

4 


30,419 
164 


7.6 


1,728 


2 




203 


420 


91 


6 


2,450 


36,000 
028 


6.8 
0.0 




-==- 


==r 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



46 



Xew York Labor Bulletin. 



TaUe'Xn.— Causes of ] 



I in Each 





J>CX 








Idleness at the 


End op 


Industry and Trade 


Lack 

of 
work 


NUMBER IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF 






I.«ack 1 rr\,^ 


puS^s ! ^^i'ity 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
suited 


V. Printing. Binding. Etc. 

Bookbindcra 


M 
F 
M 
F 
M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

* 

M 

m 
m 

F 
M 
F 
M 

m 
» 


3S» 

60 

77 


1 


3 12 












Compositors 


1 


3 234 

18 


2 


2 








Electrotypers and 8tereot\'pers 




! 11 




Hint tip printers * 


1 




1 




LithosraDhers 


27 

1 


1 




6' 




Maik?r ";:::::::::::..::..:::::::: 








1 










1 


Music engravers 


" 










NewBuaocr and mail deliverers 






1 .50 






Newspaper writers 


7 


1 




i.. 








1 




1 






Paper handlers 






1 







Photo-engravers 


19 

1 

4 

138 


1 




16 




Photo-gelatine workers 










Plate engravers and printers 












Pressmen 


... 
1 




35 
















Pressmen's assistants and press feeders 


343 






; 9 















Sales book makers 


1 




:.: : ' ^i : 




Wall paper machine printers and color 
mixers 


1 




4 


1 




Wall paper print cutters 


1 








1 










Total — Group V 


M 
F 


1,715 

7S 






Ill 376 

1 18 


3 


2 




.. . 

















VI. WOODWORKING AND FURNITURE. 

Basket makers 


M 

F 
M 

m 
• 

m 
a 
« 
m 

F 
M 

• 








1 

1 






Box makers and sawyers 


4 






' 2 






Broom makers 




.. !". 




1 






Brush makers 


20 

10 

60 
41 
42 






4 


















Cabinet makers 






45 






Carpet fitters and layers 












Carriage, wagon and automobile workers . . . 






::;:::t s 








7 


i 


13 ,10 
25 

7 






Machine wood workers 


320 i 


6 




Piano and organ workers 


102 






Reed workers 






1 








201; 


2.5 


1 17 


1 








Vamishers and polisher? 


16 

87 






; 2 






Wood carvers 






7 




2 












Total — Group VI 


M 

F 


1,528 7! 


26| 13. 127 


7 


2 




10 








.. . 


===== 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



47 



IndMtry aad Tkvde, 191» ~ Cwifaiii 



Mabch 



iDLKffXaS AT TKB EnO OF SSPTBHBBR 



Total 


Nam- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 
cent 
ulle 




NVMBBB IDLX ON ACOOUHT OF — 


ToUl 


Num- 
ber re- 
portiiic 


1 Per 

cent 

1 idli* 


nuBk- 
ber 
idle 


Leek 

of 
work 


LMk 

ofm»- 
terUl 


Tlie 


Lftbor 
patM 


Di«ir Other 
bilHy 1 cauMfl 


; num- 

Dot "'*® 

sUted 


403 

SO 

631 


3,834 

i\sao 

9.746 

M70 

1,208 

22 

1.473 

488 

IS 

34 

1.314 

no 

M 
112 

247 
3,641 

65 

187 
251 


10.5 
S.l 

e.ft 

17.0 
7.3 
O.O 
2.2 
0.2 
O.O 
O.O 
3.8 
7.3 
O.O 
O.O 
2.4 
2.4 
l.O 

14. 

"i6l6 
O.O 
3.1 

2.7 
O.O 


345 

S 

198 

70 










5 

221 

iS 

10 




351 


3.980 

i,m 

9,770 
i83 

1.230 
25 

1.498 
520 

n 
3:» 

1,317 
54 

120 

1.550 

5H 

284 

3.373 

1 

3.342 

87 

70 

220 
275 


8 8 










8 


V S 








1 


420 

3S 


4 3 








It 7 










80 


6 5 


4 
35 










• 4 


16 


'"*33 

1 








9 




44 


2 9 
















:.;...! 












0.0 




. 1.. 








j 


0.0 


• « 


1 






20 





20 


1 5 















1 












0.0 


i 

36 

1 

4 

493 


e 

20 

1 

7 
43 








2 
17 


1 ^ 


6.7 






48 


1 :: 85 


5.5 








1.7 












7 


2 5 








36 

5 


2 


:::::::' si 

.,'... 220 


2.3 


"2i5 









0.0 
6.6 


352 












0.0 


• 










4 




4 


5 7 


2 


17 










17 


7 7 


5 








5 




5 


1.8 




















27.480 
1,944 


7.7 


061 






48 


335 
18 


3 


1,347 

4t 


27,939 

1,888 


4.8 


2,107 


B3 






2.3 


96 


'_'''"' 















saz 

316 

18 

177 

£7 

310 

736 
2.557 
l,4lO 

'i;276 

186 
339 


^-2 

1.9 

O.O 

13.6 

29.8 
19.4 

3-f 
9.8 

13.8 

7.7 

"i9:i 

O.O 

9.7 

28.3 


I 







1 




■ 


400 

382 

28 

232 

50 

3.144 
305 

2,498 
735 

2,942 
752 
130 

1,823 

6 

679 

543 


0.3 




18 










............. ^. 


4.7 


6 


. . 














0.0 




30 








2 




32 


13.8 


24 














0.0 


10 


MO 








31 




fl21 


19.8 


680 








1 


0.0 


00 


22 

49 

421 

111 

12 

19 








1 

2 

28 

7 


1 23 


0.9 


49 




* 




1 51 


6.9 


72 


23 






472 


16.0 


382 






1 118 


15.7 


109 








' 12 


9.2 








66 


10 


1 119 


6.5 


24A 






1 


0.0 




7 
63 






250 

11 




; ; ' 257 


3.8 


18 






14 


! 88 


16.2 


9C 














11.610 


14.7 


1.842 


....f 




351 


96 


1,812 


14,593 


12.4 


1.710 
10 


1 1 


0.0 




== 

















' 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



48 



Xew York Labor Bulletin. 

TiMe Xn.~ Cmiws of Idlen 





Sex 

1 








Idleness at the 


End or 


Industby and Trade 


KUMBER IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF 




Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
of mar 
terial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Diaa- 

biUiy 


1 
Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


Vn. FOOD AND UQUORS. 

Bakers and confectioners 


M 


612 
161 






1 


64 
30 


1 


e 


Butchers and meat cutters 








Flour and cereal workers 












Poultry^ egg and butter hapdlerfl. - t r 


36 














Sugar refinery workers 














Yeast and distillery workers 










2 




















Total 


M 


799 






1 


96 


1 


6 










(b) BcTcrages. 
Brewery employees 


M 


67 
125 

8 


3 






61 
33 


1 


4 


Brewery employees (drivers and bottlers) . . 








Brewery employees (engineers and firemen).. 












Grains workers 














Maltsters 


47 
15 








6 
7 






Mineral water bottlers and drivers 
























Total 


M 


262 


3 






107 


1 


4 










Total — Group VII 


M 


1,061 


3 




1 


203 


2 


10 






Vra. THEATERS AND MUSIC. 

Bill posters 


M 

P 
M 


19 

10 
161 


1 
i 




1 






Calcium light and moving picture machine 
operators 


1 








Mufricians , .,,... 


1 




5 




40 








s 


Stage employees 


46 
























Total — Group VIII 


M 

P 


236 








6 




40 










3 
















VL TOBACCO. 

Cigar makers 


M 

P 
M 
P 
M 
P 
M 
P 


407 

103 

32 


3 199 


32 

10 

1 


158 
65 


1 


1 






Cigar packers 






7 




' 




Cicarette makers 




1 




3 


















Tobacco workers 


7 

10 
















1. !.;;;; 






1 




1 




Total — GrouD IX 


M 

P 


446 
113 


3 


199 


33 

10 


174 

65 


1 


8 








== 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



49 



aad Trade. 19U — GoBtlmMd. 



Mabch 










Idlbnxu 


AT THE En© of 


3EPTBMBEB 






Total 

Dum- 

b«r 

idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 
cent 
idle 


NUUBBB IDLB OH ACCOUNT OF — 


Total 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 
cent 
idle 


Lack 
of 


Lack 
of ma- 
terial 


The 

weather 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Disa- 
biUty 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


681 


4.880 

2.558 

12 

406 

450 

125 


14.0 
7.1 
0.0 
8.9 
0.0 
1.6 


683 

1201 

10 

45 








46 
13 


1 

1 


729 

133 

10 

45 


5,016 

3,029 

151 

824 


14.5 


181 










4.4 










.1 


6.6 


36 










■*:::. .1 


5 5 


















2 


:::::: :::::: 






3 


1 


3 


96 


3.1 










1 




903 


8.431 


10.7 


858 








62 


1 


920 


9,116 


10 1 














136 


3.823 

3.720 

216 

30 

388 

171 


3.6 
4.2 
3.7 
0.0 
13.7 
12.9 


86 
141 

4 


55 






27 
46 




168 

187 

4 


3,803 

3,779 

221 

30 

273 

249 


4.4 


158 






1 


4 9 


8 










1.8 













1 . ... 




0.0 


53 


21 
. 20 






:: ■"':::: 


1 


21 
28 


7 7 


22 








8 


1 


11 2 
* * 










1 ■ " ' 




377 


8.348 


4.5 


272 


55 






81 


1 


408 


8,355 


4 9 












1.280 


16,779 


7.6 


' 1,130 


55 






143 


....i 


1.328 


17,471 


7.6 












20 


322 

1.169 

1.724 

67 

1,650 


6-2 

0.9 
11.9 

ii 


1 

1 

3 

14 
31 








1 


1 

i 


4 

14 
1 ^^ 


419 

1,128 

773 

78 

1,554 


1 


10 










1 2 


206 






:::::::i::.:::: 


! 


4.0 


5 








1 





46 


9 






:::::::i::::::: 


:;;....i 


1 » 


6 








1 






282 


4.865 
67 


5.8 
4.6 


57 








' 


! 


1 «« 


3,874 

78 


1 5 


3 








1 


0.0 




1 






1 


1 1 




801 


5.940 

1,637 

489 

n^ 

31 
77 
81 


t 

1 

13.0 
10.9 

: 10.8 

OM 

2.7 

' O.O 

9.1 

12.S 


95 
23 
10 


5 


1 


1 
1 

3i 143 


1 


i 
1 


1 

! 248 

, 100 
1 23 


5,868 

1,696 

478 

£ 

113 

31 

82 

81 


4.2 


178 




77 
9 


1 


6 9 


53 








1 4 


4 8 










! 1 


0.0 


3 










4 

1 


1 


1 J 


3 5 












:::::::i::::::: 


3.t 


7 


1 








1 .... 





10 












.:....!.. ....i::::::: 

















1 1 




864 
188 


6.618 
1,763 


i 13.1 

1 10.1 

(= 


105 


5 


1 


3 


156 

78 


1 


4 


! 275 

1 101 


6.541 
1,810 


4.2 
6 6 








=== 


===: 










Digitized by VjOOQIC 



50 



New York Labob Bulletin. 



Table XIL— CauM of IdleiMM In Emch 







IDLBNB88 AT THX EnD OF 




Sex 


NUMIiaB IDLE ON ACCOUNT Of — 


Indcstrt and Tbade 


LMk 

of 
work 


Lack 
of ma- 
terial 


The 
weather 


Labor 
dia- 
putes 


Disa- 
bility 


Other 
caxues 


Cause 

not 
stated 


X. RESTAURANTS, TRADE, ETC. 


M \ 177 
3 








25 


1 




(I^ooks 












F 
M 

M 

F 
































































Waiters 


M 


150 








13 




















Total 


M 330 








38 


1 






F 


























(b) B«rberlng. 


M 


19 




10 


al « 












(c) RetaU Trade. 


M 
F 
M 

F 


































11 








1 


































? 


11 








1 


























1 






Total — GrouD X 


M 
F 


360 




10 


3| 68 


1 






















XI. PUBUC EMPLOYMENT. 


M 

■ 

m 
m 
■ 

F 
M 

m 
m 
» 
m 






3 


2 








2 






.: 










■ i 










500 


■ 1 ' 










1 














' 














. . . J . . . 














1 














i 














1 














;1 ; 












. 


1 






\fa/*Kinia«a 














Navy yard clerkB and draughtsmen 




















i 








M 

* 















Pavers, rammcrmen and asphalt workers. . . 


22 












































1 








m 

F 

« 

M 

M 

m 

• 
m 









1 














1 


















Railway mail clerks 


i 














"1 : 












i:; ;..r::... 






Tcamst4?r8 








1 






1 


1 




147 




•:':"i :::::: 


7 


1 • 








1 


M 

F 


_m|...... 


jOsI 1 9 

1 ' 


I 


XII. STATIONARY ENGINE TENDING. 


1 
1 


TL1 


344' ^ 


21 ."i 4-, 






83 






71 5 


1 


Total — Group XII 








1 


M 


427- ^ 


21 !*>' rji 


1 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



51 



Industry t 



1 Trade, 1913 — Contlaned. 



Mabch 


IDLENK88 AT THK EmD OF SePTEMBEB 




Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 

cent 
idle 


KVIIBEB IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF — 


Total Num- 
num- ber re- 

ber porting 

idle , 




Total 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Lack 

of 
work 


loLck rpK^ I.Abor 

o'™a- wither ^^ 
terial ;*®***^*^^ putee 

1 1 


Dba- 
biUty 


Other 
cauBes 


Cause 

not 
stated 


Per 
cent 
idle 


203 
3 


4.088 
399 

/ 
175 


5.0 
0.8 
0.0 
0.0 


178 
6 


1 

j 


33 

o 




1 212 4.147 


5.1 






8 383 


2.1 


; 






0.0 






1 1 






171 


0.0 




2,000 


, 1 1 


* 




2,000 12,308 
1 300 


16.2 


I 




1 






0.0 


163 


1,857 


8.8 


214 


1 r '■' 


32 






246| 2,004 


11.9 


■ • 1 








369 


6,519 

1 


6.7 
0.0 


2,398 


1 


67 




1 


2,466| 19,073 
1 301 


12 9 


..!l!;i!.!. ...'..!.... 


0.0 




.... 


: 1 






61 


2.050 


... 


28 


10 


44 


l' 1 83 0,638 


13 








34 

66 

806 

129 


0.0 
0.0 
1.5 
0.0 










1 88 


0.0 






. 








! 100 


0.0 


12 


1 


1 


10 
9 


1 


64 1.231 


5.2 


1 1 ^ 




12 251 


4.8 














12 


810 
195 


1.4 

0.0 


1 




10 


»; 


04 1.319 
ii| 351 


4.9 


1 


3. A 






1 * ' ' ' 




442 


9.409 
196 


4.7 
0.0 


2,479 
3 


j 10 


12l| 2| 1 

^; 1 


2.013' 27,030 

12 652 


97 


1 1 


1.8 




5 


332 
12 


1.5 
16.7 


50 


1 


10 







66 300 
in 


21.6 


o 










0.0 










321 


0.0 


500 


1.650 
75 
335 
55 
44 
61 


30.3 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


400 


, ' 1 






400 2.104 
173 


19.0 




1 , 






0.0 






1 i 






; 225 


0.0 






1 1 1 


.. .. 




1 50 


0.0 






1 I 






56 


0.0 







! I 




i 54? 


0.0 






1 i 




102 


0.0 




228 

5,193 

95 

142 


0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 




....:;i ■ 




1 250 


0.0 










j 5,253 


0.0 






1 1 ' 




1 94 


0.0 






1 1 




1 ' 142 


0.0 






1 1 




109 


0.0 




75 

52 

4,873 

7/ 

125 

417 

2 

1,000 

141 


6.6 

42.3 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 




' ' 


1 : 92 


0.0 


22 




'"":'::i ;■■ i::::::: 


1 40 


0.0 






:.':"i ! .:.... 




I ; 4,4S8 


0.0 




. . 


1 ' 




1 1 or, 


0.0 






::;:::i:::::::::::::: 






' ' 124 


0.0 






1 






! 232 


0.0 








i 






1 j 2 


0.0 









i 







1 i,3oe 














; os'f 


0.0 




3 






1 




3 275 

ttS 


1,1 




1 


1 




0.0 






j 1 


i ::::::: 


1 2; 254 
1 43 


0.8 












0.0 


154 


571 


27.0 


i24 


1 . ! 







124 580 


21.2 




i 








rtb3 


15,212 
1.1S4 


4.5 
0.0 


583 


1 1 


11 


1; 595 15.990 
! ' 1.501 


3.7 




1 . 1 


0.0 














41H 


7,327 
3,723 


5.7 
2.6 


331 


1 ' 3 


29 
3 






363 7,K14 
141 3,780 


4.6 


'♦5 


121 


...... ^ 







3.7 




1 1 








513 


11.050 


4.6 


452 


1 20 


32 






504 11,594 


4.3 






•■= 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



62 



Xew Yokk Labok Bulletin. 











Table Xn.— Canses of IdlencM In Each 




Sex 








Idlekesi 


AT THE Exn> OF 


Industry and Trade 


NUMBER IDLE ON ACCOUNT OF 


Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
of mar 
terial 


The 

weather 


Labor 
dis- 
putes 


Disa- 
bility 


Other 
causes 


Cause 

not 
stat^ 


XUl. MISCELLANEOUS. 

(a) Paper and Paper Goods. 

Paper bag ana box makers 


M 

F 
M 

F 
















1 




,2 






Paper and pulp wwkem 


2 




653 


23 


18 



















Total 


M 

F 


2 




653 


23 


12 

i 


18 


















(b) Leather and Leather Goods. 

WAltfing mftkAr^ 


M 

« 

F 
M 






3 

1 






HnnM^f^ makers , 


5 
50 

5 










Pocket book and purse makers 




















1 




Trunk and bag workers 








• 






• 








Total 


M 

F 


55 

J 








4 































(c) Glaaa and Glaaaware. 

Decorative glass workers 


M 


25 
25 








1 




Flint glass cutters and workers 






45 


2 


=* 




Glass Ibevolers, polishers, etc 








Glass bottle blowers. . . .' 


10 




100 


30 


1 


42 








Total 


M 


60 




100 


75 


3 


44 








Rnnk rfiftkp™ 


M 


1 




1 




Plaster board and block makers 










Potters 






... 
1 
2 






Terra cotta workers 


1 


















ToUl 


M 


1 




3 












_ 




(e) Other Distinct Trades. 

Button makers 


M 

F 

« 

M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

■ 


1 




1 














Celluloid novelty workers 


, 




4 

4 






Diamond cutters and polishers 


5 






















Fishermen 










Ice house workers 






' 




Janitors, porters and elevatormen 


11 












\Iiner8, iron 






30 


1 




Photograph workers 


1 






Spooking pipe makers 












1 1 










1 








Watchmen 












Wool pullers 


40 


20 






1 














ToUl 


M 

F 


5C 


....^t 


30 


5 

























(n Mlsed Bmplosmient. 
\Iixed employment 


M 

F 


2 

i 












1 










1 






Total — GrouD XIII 


M 

F 

F 


175 
Q 


20 


753 




128 


27 

6 


62f 



















Grand Total 


6,810 


l,3Gl 


5,790 


6,397 
6i8 


4,219 
109 


501 

150 


132 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



53 



Indnatry and Tnd», 1913 — Condaded. 



March 










Idlsncsb 


AT THK End or Sbptbhber 






Total 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 


Per 

cent 
idle 


MUMBSB IDLB ON ACCOUNT Of — 


ToUl 
num- 
ber 
idle 


Num- 
ber re- 
porting 




Lack 

of 
work 


Lack 
aimar 
terial 


The 

weather 


Labor 
difl. 
putes 


Disar 
biUty 


Other 
oauaea 


CauM 

not 
stated 


Per 
cent 
idle 




3 

2 

3,352 


0.0 
60.0 
21.1 










1 






1 


178 

lOi 

3.272 

4 


6 


/ 

















708 


24 


4 


167 


165 


15 


6 




381 


11.6 


























708 


3.355 

B 


21.1 
60.0 


24 


4 


167 


165 


16 


6 




382 


3,450 
106 


11.1 
























3 


300 
85 

390 
6ft 

120 


1.0 
7.1 
12.8 
8.1 
0.0 


















247 
68 

175 
26 

(Win 





6 


7 








1 






8 


11 8 


50 















6 


1 . 



















1 




35 








35 


5 4 




I 














59 


895 
6t 


6.6 
8.1 


7 






35 


1 






43 


1.140 

25 


3 8 


s 



































25 


286 
A22 


8.7 

9.0 

0.0 

25.9 


10 
26 














10 
27 


280 

637 

34 

586 


3 6 


74 








1 






4 2 


14 















183 706 


58 




73 




8 


34 




173 


29.5 


282 1,828 


15.4 


94 




73 




9 


34 




210 


1.537J 13.7 


1 




















220 
95 
100 









25 






17 


2 

1 






44 

1 


46.3 


1 94 


1.1 
3.1 










1 


2 65 














49 06 






















3 159 


1.9' 25 






17 


3 






45 


464 


9 7 
















1 
430 


0.0 
0.0 

A A 


20 






12 


5 






37 


768 
2o 
28 

320 

1 

44 

85 

249 


4 8 


1 «0 













4 


90 





















9 


299! 3.5 

/i 0.0 

57i 


10 






3 




13 


4 1 








1 

















1 1 







[ 




2 
4 








1 


2 
4 


2 4 


11 


261 
30 


4.2 
100.0 








j 


1 6 


30 








:::::::i::::::: 








1 






, ::. 




30 

400 

80 

19R 





















1 1 









80' 0.0 
1001 0.0 
131! 0.0 
228 26.8 


20 
40 










1 


20 
40 


25 












... I 


32 






. 






1 


^1 




61 












1 




226 











. 












111 


1.616 


7.3 

1.9 


56 
40 






12 


8 






76 
40 


2.202 
179 


8.6 


A 











22 3 


-», 
















2 


288 0.7 
B8 S.6 


16 












16 


263 
32 


6.1 


/ 



































1.165 
// 


8.041 
303 


14.5 222 
3.6 40 


4I 240 
J 


229j 37 


40j 


772 

40 


9,056 
nA9 


8.5 
11 7 










1 






89.789 
7,709 


517.900 
66,696 


17.3 74.863 
1J.7 18,6Sg 
1 


6671 493 


1.662 
193 


4.200 
Igl 


247 

1 


70| 82.202 552,691 
I 18,947 74,403 


14.9 
26.6 






1 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



•A^ 



STATE or) NEW YORH 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 



BULLETIN 



tssti^ Under tlic Ulrcctlon of 

jAwts M. tYncn 

Commls&limcr of Lat>or 



Whale m 59 
Scries flix WorRmcn's Insurance No. i 



Digest or tmx New Yop.n "WoRHMtN's 
Compensation Law 



r'rtparc4 tj 
THE BimBAU OF STATISTICS AffD IKFOItMAriOM 

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Previous Publications Concerning Workmen's Insurance. 

Workmen's Compensation or Employers' Liability. 

The Compensation of Accidental Injuries to Workmen. Part II of the 
Annual Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics for 1899 (008 pp.). General 
review of laws and experience in all countries. 

Legislation Concerning Employers' Liability (7 pp.). Bulletin No. 9 (1901). 

Status of Employers' Liability in the United States and Europe (7 pp.). 
Bulletin No. 28 (1906). 

The British Act for the Compensation of Accidents of Employment (22 pp.). 
Bulletin No. 33 (1007). 

Employers* Liability and Accident Insurance Laws A'broad (25 pp.). Bul- 
letin No. 34 ( 1907 ) . 

Employers' Liability or Workmen's Compensation? (14 pp.). Bulletin No. 
39 (1908). 

The Constitutionality of a Workmen's Compeiiaation for Accidents Law, 
by P. T. Sherman (11 pp.). Bulletin No. 40 (1909). 

What a Re-public may do for its \Vorkin;,'men Tlirough Accident Insurance, 
by Dr. Lee K. Frankcl (11 pp.). Bulletin No. 40. Refers to Swiss experience. 

Compulsory Workmen's Compensation Act [1910] Unconstitutional (24 pp.). 
Bulletin No. 46 (1911). Contains Court of Appeals decision in Ivea v. So. 
Buffalo Ry. Co., 201 N. Y. 271. 

The Employers' Liability Act of 1910 (9 pp.). Bulletin No. 46 (19UJ 
Summary of act and note on operation of voluntary compensation feat'" 

Notes and reviews of current cases concerning employers' liability in I 
York courts were a regular feature of the quarterly Bulletin from N< 
(1899) to No. 50 (1913). ] 

Unemployment Insurance. 

i 

Unemployment Insurance in Denmark, by Dr. Lee K. Frankcl (5 rt 

Bulletin No. 40 (1909). _ | 

1 

Trade Union Benefits. * } 

Old Age Pensions for Union Printers (10 pp.). Bulletin No. 39 (I0O8J 

Benefits Paid by International Organizations Affiliated with the Amer^ 

Federation of Labor. Statistics fur different years in Bulletin No. 24 (19| 

and in the SeptemlK-r Bulletins of each year from 1906 to 1913 inclusive, j 



Of the publications above referred to, files of which may be found in n^ 
public libraries, the Department can now supply only the following: J 

(JuartcrJy BuUeiina: 1902, No. 16; 1905, No. 26; 1907, Nos. 34, 35; 1^ 
Nos. 80, 37, 38, 39; 1910, No. 4."); 1011, Nos. 47, 48, 49; 1912, Nos. 50, 'j 
52, 53; 1913, Nos. 54, 50. ^ 






ALBANY 
J. B. LYON COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1914 ^ U 

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New York Labor Bulletin 



PnblUhed by the State Deptttment of Labor. 



Whole No. 59 ALBANY March, 1914 

DIGEST OF THE IMPORTANT PROVISIONS OF THE 
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION LAW.* 



APPLICATION OF THE LAW. 
Employineiits Covered. 
The new law applies to approximately four hundred and fifty 
''hazardous employments/' covering nearly all of the hazardous 
industries. These employments are classified in article 2 of the 
Compensation Law and an alphabetical list of them is appended to 
this bulletin. Specifically excluded from the operation of this law 
are those in agriculture, domestic service, and employments not 
conducted by the employer for pecimiary gain. 

Accidents Covered. 
Every employer in any of the hazardous employments named in 
the list appended to this bulletin must pay or provide for compen- 
sation for the disability or death of his employee resulting from an 
accidental personal injury sustained by the employee arising out of 
and in the course of his employment, without regard to fault as a 
cause of such injury, except where the injury is occasioned by the 
wilful intention of the injured employee to bring about the injury 
or death of himself or of another, or where the injury results solely 
from the intoxication of the injured employee while on duty. In 
these two exceptions neither the injured employee nor his depend- 
ents may receive compensation under this law. The burden of 
proof in disputes as to these excepted cases rests upon the employer. 

AMOUNT OF COMPENSATION PAYABLE. 
Medical Care. 
The employer shall promptly provide for an injured employee 
such medical, surgical or other attendance or treatment, nurse and 
hospital service, medicines, crutches and apparatus as may be 
required or be requested by the employee, during sixty days after 
the injury. 

* The nreaent Workmen's Compensation Law was first passed at the extraordinary seflsaon of 
the LegUuatuze in December of 1913 and was signed by the Governor on the 16th of that month. 
The aet was paawd under an amendment of the Constitution which was approved by the people 
in the general election in November but did not come into force until Januar^r 1. 1914. As passed 
in December the act was not to take effect until January 1, but the question was raised as to 
whether the act could legally be passed prior to that date. In view of this question the act of 
December waa signed by the Governor a second Ume on January 8, and finally was reintroduced 
in the regular session, passed again and approved by the Governor on March 16. No amend- 
ment was made in repassage except the addition of a requirement that not more than three 
membsrs of the Comimsiion shaU belong to the same political party. ( ^ r^r^t-i\r> 

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Nbw Yobx Labob Bullbtik 



Waiting Period. 
Except for the medical care above mentioned, no compensation 
shall be allowed for the first fourteen days of disability. 

Scliedtile of Disability. 
Compensation shall be based upon average weekly wages, such 
average to be determined by methods prescribed in the law. The 
disabilities for which compensation is payable are classified as 
follows: 

1. Total Permanent Diaability. Entitles 
the injured employee to 66) per cent of his 
average weekly wages during the continu- 
ance of such total disability. In the absence 
of conclusive proof to the contrary, the loss 
of both hands, both arms, both feet, both 
legs, both eyes, or any two thereof shall 
constitute permanent total disability. All 
other cases shall be decided in accordance 
with the facts. 

2. Temporary Total Disability. Entitles 
the injured employee to 66) per cent of his 
average weekly wages during the continu- 
ance of such disability, except that the total 
compensation paid shall not exceed $3,500. 

3. Permanent Partial Disability. Entitles 
the injured employee to 66) per cent of his 
average weekly wages for periods named as 
follows: 



For lo08 of Weeks 

Thumb 60 

First finger 46 

Second finger 30 

Third finger 25 

Fourth finger 15 

Great toe 38 

Any other toe 16 

For the loss of the first phalange of a 
thumb, finger, or toe the compensation 
shall be one-half of the amount above speci- 
fied for the loss of such thiunb, finger, or 
toe. The loss of more than one phalange 
shall be considered as the loss of the entire 
thiunb, finger, or toe. 

* Except that if wacee are under $5 per week, compenaation ahall be full 

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Lower limit of weekly com- 



peoaatioD, $6;^ 
916 per week. 



upper limit, 



"google 



Pbovisions of the Workmen's Compensation Law 8 



For loM of 

Hand 

Ann 

Foot 

Leg 

Eye 



Weeks 

. 244 
312 



288 
128 



Lowor limit of weekly oom- 
peoMtioa, $5; * upper limit, 
|20 per week. 



Lower limit of weekly com- 
latioa, $6 ^ 
per week. 



' pensatioii, $6; * upper limit, 
$15 per W4 * 



Perman^mt loss of use of any of the above-mentioned members 
shall be considered as equivalent to the loss of such member. 

Amputation between the elbow and the wrist shall be considered 
as equivalent to the loss of a hand; at or above the elbow, to the 
loss of an arm; between the knee and the ankle, to the loss of a foot; 
and at or above the knee, to the loss of a leg. 

In all other cases classified in this group 
the compensation shall be 66} per cent of 
the difference between the average weekly 
wages of the injured employee and his wage- 
earning capacity thereafter, payable during 
the continuance of such disability. 

4. Temporary Partial Disability. Entitles 
the injured employee to 66} per cent of the 
difference between his average weekly wages 
and his wage-earning capacity thereafter 
during the continuance of such disability, 
except that the total compensation shall 
not exceed $3,500. 

Death Benefits. 

If the injiuy causes death the compensation shall be known as a 
death benefit and shall be payable as follows: 

1. Reasonable funeral expenses, not exceeding $100. 

2. To a surviving wife (or dependent husband) 30 per cent of the 
average weekly wages of the deceased during widowhood (or depend- 
ent widowerhood), with two years' compensation in one sum upon 
remarriage. In addition, to each surviving child of the deceased 
imder the age of 18 years, 10 per cent of the average weekly wages 
until such child reaches the age of 18; except that the total amount 
payable shall not exceed 66} per cent of such wages. 

3. To each surviving child of the deceased under the age of 18 
years, in case there be no surviving wife (or dependent husband), 
15 per cent, of the average weekly wages of the deceased until such 
child reaches the age of 18; except that the total amount payable 
shall not exceed 66} per cent, of such wages. 

*£xoept thai if wacee are under $5 per week, compeneation shall be full waces.^ j 

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4 New York Labob Bult^etin 

4. To each dependent grandchild or brother or sister of the 
deceased under the age of 18 years, 15 per cent of the average weekly 
wages of the deceased until such dependent grandchild or brother 
or sister reaches the age of 18; and to each dependent parent or 
grandparent of the deceased 15 per cent of the average weekly 
wages of the deceased during dependency. Except that in no case 
shall the total amount payable under this subdivision exceed the 
difference between 66f per cent of such wages and the amount 
payable to surviving wife (or dependent husband) and to surviving 
child or children. 

The upper limit of wages to be used as the basis for death benefits 
shall be $100 per month. 

Aliens. 
Compensation payable to aliens not residents (or about to become 
non-residents) of the United States or Canada shall be the same in 
amount as that payable to residents; except that the Workmen's 
Compensation Commission may in its discretion, or upon the applica- 
tion of the insurance carrier shall, settle such claims in one sum at 
one-half their commuted value. 

INSURANCE. 

Each employer shall secure compensation to his employees in 
one of th0 following ways: 

1. By insuring in the State fund. The Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Commission is authorized to offer to employers accident insur- 
ance based upon the hazards of the employments in each group 
named in the appendix to this bulletin. For the purpose of making 
premiiun rates on such insurance as equitable as possible, the Com- 
mission is empowered to adopt a system of schedule rating formed 
in such a manner as to take accoimt of the peculiar hazard of each 
individual risk. 

2. By insuring the payment of such compensation with any stock 
corporation or mutual association authorized to transact the busi- 
ness of workmen's compensation insurance in this State. In this 
case the employer must file with the Workmen's Compensation 
Commission the name of such insurance corporation or mutual 
association, together with a copy of the insurance policy. 

Every insurance policy written by a stock company or by a mutual 
association must give specific recognition to the right of the Com- 
mission to enforce the liability of the insurance carrier to pay the 
compensation provided in the policy. Every such policy shall pro- 



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Provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Law 5 

vide that notice or knowledge of an injury on the part of the em- 
ployer shall be deemed notice or knowledge on the part of the insur- 
ance carrier; that the jurisdiction of the employer shall be the juris- 
diction of the insurance carrier; and that the stock company or 
mutual association shall be bound by and subject to all orders, 
findings, decisions, or awards rendered against the employer for 
the payment of compensation. The insolvency of an employer shall 
not release the insurance carrier from the payment of compensa- 
tion; this fact shall be stipulated in the insurance policy. Finally, 
every such insurance policy shall be void unless it covers liabiUty 
for the payment of the compensation provided for by this law. 

For the purpose of encouraging the formation of mutual associa- 
tions, the Insurance Law was recently amended by adding an article 
entitled " Mutual Employers' LiabiUty and Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Corporations." (This amendment is reprinted at the end of 
this bulletin.) This amendment provides that any thirteen or more 
persons may form such a corporation by fiUng with the Super- 
intendent of Insurance a certificate signed by each of them. Such 
certificate must state the intention of the incorporators and must 
be accompanied by a copy of the proposed charter. 

As soon as forty employers employing not less than twenty-five 
hundred workmen have agreed to take insurance in such a corpora- 
tion and the Superintendent of Insurance has issued a license grant- 
ing the right to issue poUcies, the corporation may transact business. 
No further poUcies may be issued if at any time the membership 
falls below forty employers, or the workmen covered falls below 
twenty-five hundred. 

Each member of such a mutual association is entitled to one vote 
at its meetings, and to one additional vote for every five hundred 
employees or major fraction thereof covered by his insurance policy, 
the total number of votes being limited to twenty for one policy- 
holder. 

The board of directors of each such mutual association is required 
to make rules for the prevention of accidents. Members must 
permit inspections, and their policies are subject to cancellation 
after ten days' notice if they fail to provide the safety appliances 
required by the board of directors. 

3. By furnishing to the Compensation Commission satisfactory 
proof of his financial ability to pay compensation for himself. In 
such case, the Commission may require the deposit of securities 
to guarantee the payment of compensation. 



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6 Xew York Labob Bulletin 

Release from Liability. 

An employer who iasures in the State fund is released from all 
liability for compensation to his injured employees. He shall not 
otherwise be relieved from such liability except by the payment 
of compensation by himself or by his insurance carrier. 

Failure to Secure Compensation. 

If an employer fails to secure compensation in one of the three 
ways above mentioned he shall be liable to a penalty for every- 
day during which such failure continues of one dollar for every 
employee. 

Furthermore, an employer who does not secure the payment of 
compensation in one of the three ways above described is subject 
to court action brought by an injured emploj^ee or his dependents, 
either for compensation under this act or for damages under the 
common law or the Employers' Liability Law; and in such an action 
the defendant may not plead as a defense that the injury was caused 
by the negligence of a fellow servant, that the employee assumed 
the risks of his emplojinent, or that the injury was due to the con- 
tributory negligence of the employee. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

The administration of this law is vested in a Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Commission of five members to be appointed by the Governor. 

Notice of Injury. 

Notice of an injury for which compensation is payable must be 
given in writing to the employer and to the Commission within ten 
days after the injury; and in case of death resulting from such injury, 
within thirty days after death. This notice shall contain the name 
and address of the emploj'ee; shall state in ordinary language the 
time, place, nature, and cause of the injury; and shall be signed by 
the injured employee or by a person on his behalf, or in case of 
death by a dependent or a person on his behalf. The failure to 
give such notice may be excused by the Commission either on the 
ground that for some sufficient reason notice could not have been 
given or on the ground that the State fund, insurance company, 
or employer, as the case may be, has not been prejudiced thereby; 
otherwise, the failure to give such notice shall constitute a bar to 
any claim for compens$ition. 

Determination of Claims. 
It shall be the duty of the Commission to determine the validity 
of claims for compensation and to fix awards. For this purpose 

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Provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Law 7 

hearings may be held before a commissioner or a deputy-commis- 
sioner. A claim for compensation may be presented to the Com- 
mission after the expiration of fourteen- days of disability and must 
be presented within one year after the injury; or if the accident 
causes the death of the employee, his dependents may claim com- 
pensation at any time after his death and must present such claim 
within one year. 

Payment of Compensation. 
All payments of compensation shall be paid to the Commission 
by the State fund, the stock company, the mutual association, or 
the employer, as the case may be, and by the Commission to the 
injured employee or his dependents. Such payments shall be made 
periodically, in accordance with the method of payment of wages 
to the injured employee at the time of his injury or death. The 
Commission may change this method of payment as to any par- 
ticular group. The Conamission may also commute future periodical 
payments to one or more lump sum payments, provided the same 
shall be in the interest of justice. 

Medical Examination. 
An injured employee claiming or entitled to compensation shall, 
if requested by the Commission, submit to medical examination 
at such times and at a place reasonably convenient for him, as 
may be provided by the Commission. If the employee or the insur- 
ance carrier so desires he may have a physician or physicians of 
his own selection to be paid by him present to participate in such 
examination. Refusal to submit to such examination suspends the 
right to compensation for the period of such refusal. 

Modification of Award. 
Upon its own motion or upon the application of any interested 
party, on the ground of a change in conditions, the Commission 
may review any award and in its judgment make any changes sub- 
ject to the limitations of the law. No such review shall affect any 
payments already made. 

Assignments; Exemptions. 
Claims for compensation may not be assigned and shall be exempt 
from all claims of creditors and from levy, execution and attach- 
ment or other remedy for recovery or collection of a debt; such 
exemption may not be waived. Compensation and benefits shall 
be paid only to employees or to their dependents. ^^.^.^^^^^(^QQgl^ 



8 New York Labor Bulletin 

Claims. 
Claims for legal services in connection with any demand for 
compensation and claims for medical services rendered or supplies 
furnished shall not be enforceable unless approved by the Commis- 
sion. If so approved such claims shall become a lien upon the com- 
pensation awarded, to be paid therefrom in the manner fixed by 
the Commission. 

Liens. 

The right of compensation shall have the same preference against 
the assets of the employer as has a claim for impaid wages. 

Subrogation. 
If a workman is injured or killed through the negligence of another 
not in the same employ, such injured workman, or in case of death 
his dependents, shall elect whether to take compensation under this 
law or to pursue his remedy against the person, causing his injury. 
If he elect to take compensation under this law the cause of action 
against such other person shall be assigned to the insurance carrier. 
If he elect to pursue action against such other, the insurance carrier 
shall contribute only the deficiency, if any, between the amount 
of the recovery against such other person and the compensation 
provided or estimated by this law for such injury. 

ASSOCIATIONS FOR ACCIDENT PREVENTION. 

In addition to providing compensation, it is the purpose of this 
law to promote prevention of accidents. This work will be aided 
greatly by precautions enforced and inspections made by the insur- 
ance carrier, especially if systems of schedule rating prevail. To 
fiuiiher insure the minimizing of the number and seriousness of 
industrial accidents this law provides for associations for accident 
prevention as follows: 

The employers in any of the groups of hazardous employments 
named in the appendix to this bulletin may, with the approval of 
the Conunission, form an association for accident prevention and 
may make rules for that purpose. If the Conunission finds that 
such an association sufficiently represents the employers in such 
group, it may approve such rules, and when so approved and approved 
by the Industrial Board of the Department of Labor, they shall 
be binding upon all employers in such group. If such an associa- 
tion appoint an inspector or expert for accident prevention the 
Conunission may at its discretion provide in whole or in part for 
the payment of the remuneration and expenses of such inapeqtor 

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Provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Law 9 

or expert. Such an association may make recommendations to the 
Commission concerning the determination of premiums for classes 
of hazards and for individual risks within such group. 

SUGGESTIONS TO EMPLOYERS. 

Provision for Compensation. 

All employers in any of the hazardous employments named in 

the appendix to this bulletin must provide for compensation to 

all employees entitled to indemnity for injury- according to the 

provisions of this law. 

Insurance. 
In order to guarantee the payment of such compensation each 
employer must satisfy the Commission of his ability to settle all 
claims for compensation due his employees or else he must insure 
either in the State fund, or with some stock company or mutual 
association authorized to conduct accident insurance in this State. 
If he insures in the State fund he is relieved from all liability for 
indemnity for injury to his workmen; otherwise he is still liable 
for payment of compensation if his insurance carrier fails to pay 
the full amount of compensation provided in the law. 

Posting of Notice. 
He must post and maintain in a conspicuous place or places in 
and about his place of business typewritten or printed notices stating 
the fact that he has complied with the rules and regulations pre- 
scribed by the Commission and that he has secured the payment 
of compensation to his employees and their dependents in accord- 
ance with the provisions of the Compensation Law. 

Failure to Insure. 
If he fails to secure insurance for compensation he is liable to a 
fine of $1 per day for each employee and he may be sued for com- 
pensation or for damages by the injured employee or by his depend- 
ents in case of death. In such a suit the defendant is deprived of 
the common-law defenses of fellow-servant negligence, contributory 
negligence, and assumption of risk. 

Medical Care. 
The employer must provide medical care and attention for his 
injured employees for a period of sixty days after the injury if neces- 
sary. If the employer fail to make such provision, the injured 
employee may do so at the expense of the employer. , ^ . 

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10 New York Labor Bulletin 

Enforcement of Payment. 
If an employer or his insurance carrier fail to pay compensation* 
or an instalment thereof, within ten days after the same is due, the 
amount of such payment shall constitute a liquidated claim for 
damages against such employer or his insurance carrier, which, 
with an added penalty of 50 per cent, may be recovered in an action 
to be instituted by the Commission. 

Deposit of Future Payments. 

If the present value of all future payments of compensation for 
an injury be computable, the Commission may, at its discretion, 
commute such future payments to one lump sum payment to be 
paid into the State fund by the insurance carrier. 

Benefits Not to Affect Compensation. 
No benefits, savings, or insurance of the injured employee, inde- 
pendent of the provisions of this law, shall be considered in deter- 
mining the compensation or benefits to be paid under this law. 

Agreements For Contributions Void. 
No agreement by an employee to pay any portion of the premium 
paid by his employer for the purpose of insuring compensation as 
provided in this law shall be valid. Any employer who deducts for 
such purpose from the wages of any employee entitled to the benefits 
provided in this law shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. 

Waiver Agreements Void. 

No agreement by an emploj'-ee to waive his right to compensation 
shall be valid. 

Report of Injuries. 

Every employer shall keep a record of all injuries, fatal or other- 
wise, received by his employees in the course of their emplo>Tnent. 
Within ten days after the occurrence of an accident resulting in a 
personal injury to an employee a report thereof shall be made in 
writing by the employer to the Commission. Such report shall 
state the name and nature of the business of the employer, the 
location of his establishment or place of work, the name, address 
and occupation of the injured employee, the time, nature and cause 
of the injury' and such other information as may be required by the 
Commission. An employer who refuses or neglects to make such a 
report shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of not 
more than $500. 

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Provisioxs of the Workmen's Compensation Law 11 

St'GGESTIONS TO EMPLOYEES. 
Payment of Compensation. 
All employees in any of the hazardous employments named in 
the appendix to this bulletin are entitled to compensation for injuries 
received while at work unless such injuries be caused by the wilful 
intent of the injured workman to injure himself or another or by the 
intoxication of the injured employee while on duty. 

Medical Care. 
An injured employee is entitled to receive from his employer 
medical care and attention for a period of sixty days after the injury 
if necessary. The employee must first request the employer to 
furnish the same, and if the latter fail to make such provision the 
former may do so at the latter's expense; provided the expenditure 
be approved by the Compensation Conunission. 

Amount of Compensation. 
The injured employee is entitled to receive the amount of com- 
pensation already described in this bulletin according to the extent 
of his injury. This includes compensation to the injured workman 
or burial expenses and death benefits to his dependents in case of 
his death resulting from injurJ^ 

Dependents. 
. Those entitled to death benefits in case of the death of an employee 
due to an accident while on dutj' are surviving wife (or dependent 
husband), children under 18 years of age, dependent grandchildren, 
brothers or sisters under 18 years of age, and dependent parents 
and grandparents. 

Benefits. 
No benefits, savings, or insurance of the injured employee, inde- 
pendent of the provisions of this law, shall be considered in deter- 
mining the compensation or benefits to be paid under this law. 

Contributions. 
An employee may not agree to defray any part of the expenses of 
compensation paid by his employer. No employee shall suffer a 
deduction from wages for this purpose. 

Waiver. 
No employee may waive his right to compensation. 

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12 Xew York Labor Bulletix 

Assisnments. 

No employee may agree to assign his right of compensation to 
another. 

Exemptions. 

All claims for compensation shall be exempt from levy, execution 
and attachment or other remedy for the recovery or collection of 
a debt; such exemption may not be waived. Compensation and 
benefits may be paid only to an injured employee or to his dependents. 

Liens. 

The right of compensation shall have the same preference against 
the assets of the employer as has a claim for unpaid wages. 

Notice of Injury. 
Within ten days after an injury and within thirty days after death 
resulting from an injury, notice of such injuiy must be sent in writing 
to the employer of the injured workman and to the Workmen's 
Compensation Commission. Failure to give such notice may prevent 
the payment of compensation for the injury. 

Presentation of Claims. 
A claim for compensation may be presented any time after four- 
teen days of disability and must be presented within one year after 
such injury; or, if the accident results in the death of the employee, 
his dependents may claim compensation at any time after his death 
and must present such claim within one year. 



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APPENDIX. 



<]) Finding list of hazardous employments covered by the Compensation Law. 
(2) Text of law authorizing employers* mutual insurance associations. 



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FINDING LIST OF HAZARDOUS EMPLOYMENTS COVERED BY THE 
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION LAW. 



Group 
Employment. in f 2 of 

Abattoirs 

Acids, corrosive, manufacture of 

Acids, non-corrosive, znanufacture of 
Adding machines, manufactiire of . . . 
Agricintural implements, manufac- 
ture of 

Alcohc^, manufacture of 

Ammonia, manufacture of 

Ammimition, manufacture of 

Anchors, manufacture of 

Artificial ice, manufacture of 

Artificial stone, manufacture of 

Asphalt, manufacture of 

Asphalted paper, manufacture of . . . 
Automobiles, manufacture of 

Baby carriages, toy, manufacture of. 

Bags, cloth, mani^acture of 

Bags, paper, manufacture of 

Bakeries 

Baskets, manufacture of 

Beds, metal, manufacture of 

Bed springs, manufacture of 

Belting, manufacture of 

Bicycles, manufacture of 

Biscuits, manufacture of 

Blankets, manufacture of 

Bleaching 

Boats, small, manufacture of 

Boilers, installation and covering of. . 

Boilers, manufacture of 

Bolts, manufacture of 

Book-binding 

Booming 

Boots, manufacture of 

Boxes, cardboard, manufacture of . . . 
Boxes, wooden and corrugated paper, 

manufacture of 

Breweries 

Brick, manufacture of 

Brick-laying 

Bridge construction, steel 

Bridges, construction, repair, and 

demolition of 

Brooms, manufacture of 

Brushes, manufacture of 

Buildings, construction, repair and 

demolition of 

Building construction, steel 

Buttons, manufacture of 



Cables, underground, 

repair of 

Cables, manufacture of. 
Caisson, construction . . . 



laying and 



No. Group No. 

Law. Employment. in § 2 of Law^ 

30 Calcium carbide, manufacture of 19 

25 Cameras, photographic, manufacture 

28 of 23 

23 Candles, manufacture of 28 

Canning or preparation of fruit, vege- 

24 tables, fish or food stuffs 33 

27 Canoes, manufacture of 16 

25 Canvas, manufacture of 37 

25 Cape, manufacture of 38 

21 Cardboard boxes, manufacture of . . . 40 

25 Cargoes, loading or unloading of 10 

42 Carpentry, structural 42 

19 Carpet sweepers, manufacture of . . . 17 

26 Carpets, manufacture of 37 

24 Carriage mountings, manufacture of . 23 

Carriages, manufacture of 24 

24 Carriages, toy baby, manufacture of 24 

37 Car shops, railway, operation, con- 

40 struction and repair of 3 

34 Car shops, other 4 

17 Cars, operation of, otherwise than on 

23 tracks 41 

16 Cash regist-ers, manufacture of 23 

32 Castings, manufacture of 21 

23 Castings, small, manufacture of ... . 23 

34 Cattle foods, manufacture of 29 

37 Celluloid, manufacture of 25 

39 Cement, manufactiu« of 19 

16 Cereals, manufacture of 29 

42 Charcoal, manufacture of 25 

2 1 Chemical preparations, non-corrosive, 

23 manufacture of 28 

40 Chemicals, manufacture of 28 

14 Chemicals, dangerous, manufacture 

32 of 25 

40 Cheese boxes, manufacture of 17 

Cigarettes, manufacture of 35 

17 Cigars, manufacture of 35 

27 Clay pits 19 

19 Cleaning 39 

42 Cloth, manufacture of 37 

42 Clothing, men's or women's, manu- 
facture of 38 

42 Coal, cargoes of 10 

36 Coffins, manufacture of 16 

36 Collars, manufacture of 38 

Color, manufacture of 26 

42 Compressed air, work under 13 

42 Concrete blocks, manufacture of 42 

23 Concrete work 42 

Condiments, manufacture of 34 

Confectionerj', manufacture of 34 

13 Cordage, manufacture of 36 

21 Corrosive acids or salts, manufacture 

11 of 25 



[HI 



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Pkoyisioxs of the Workmen's Compensation Law 15 



Group Xo. 
Employment. in | 2 of Law. 

Corsets, nuwufacture of 38 

Crackers, manufacture of 34 

Cutlery, manufacture of 23 



Dwif erous chemicals, manufactuj^ of 

Decorating. 

Dining car employees 

DistiDeries '. 

Door factories 

Door screens, manufacture of 

Dredging 

Drugs, manufacture of 

Dyeing 

I^es, manufacture of 

Dynamos, const ruction, installation, 
or operation of 

Electric fixtures, manufacture of 

Eleetric light lines, construction, in- 
stallation or operation of 

Electric power lines, construction, 
installation or operation of 

Electric railways, operation, con- 
struction and repair of 

Electrotyping 

Bevators, installation of 

levators, grain, operation of 

Embossing 

s, installation of 

s, heavy, manufacture of ... . 
, propdled by steam , gas, etc . , 
operation of 

En^es, stationary, operation of . . . 

Engines, traction, manufacture of . . . 

Excavation 

Excelsior, manufacture of 

Explosives, manufacture of 

£q»e8s car employees 

Extracts, manufacture of 



Fabrics, manufacture of 37 

Felt, manufacture of 37 

Fertilizers, manufacture of 28 

Fibre, manufacture of 36 

Fire escapes, installation of 42 

Rre-proofing, manufacture of 19 

Fiflix, canning or preparation of 33 

Fixtures, manufacture of sanitary, 

water, gas or electric 23 

Flax mills 37 

Food stuffs, canning or preparation of 33 

Forgings, manufacture of 21 

Forgings, small, manufacture of ... . 23 

Fovmdries, iron, steel, or metal 21 

Frqght. cargoes of, handling of 10 

FWt, canning or preparation of 33 

FWnaoes, manufacture of 21 

Furniture, manufacture of 10 

Fdjs, manufacture of ' 3S 

Garbage disposal plants 2S 

Gas fixtures, manufacture of *23 



25 
42 
1 
27 
17 
17 
11 
28 j 
39 * 
28 I 
I 
12 I 

'23 

12 

12 

1 
40 
42 
29 
40 
42 
21 

41 
22 
24 
13 
14 
25 
1 
28 



^ , Group No. 

EmploymeDt. in f 2 of Law. 

Gas, manufacture of 25 

Gasoline, manufacture of 25 

Glass, manufacture of 20 

Glass products, manufacture of 20 

Glassware, manufacture of 20 

Gloves, manufacture of 32 

C lue, manufacture or preparation of . 30 

Grain, cargoes of, handling of 10 

Grain elevators, operation of 29 

Gravel pits 19 

Gun powder, manufacture ojf 25 

Hardware, manufacture of 23 

Harness, manufacture of 32 

Hats, manufacture of 38 

Headings, manufacture of 14 

Heating engineering 42 

Hemp products, manufacture of 36 

HorBcs.operation of vehicles drawn by 41 

Hose, rubber, manufacture of 32 

Hosier}', manufacture of 37 

Ice, artificial, manufacture of 25 

Implements, agricultural, manufac- 
ture of 24 

Incline railways, operation, construc- 
tion and repair of 1 

Ink, printing, manufacture of 26 

Instruments, manufacture of 23 

Interior woodwork, manufacture of . . 16 

Iron foundries 21 

Iron, manufacture of 21 

Japans, manufacture of 26 

Kilns, lime 19 

Knitting manufactories 37 

Lath mills 14 

Laundries, power 39 

Leather goods and products, manu- 
facture of 32 

Lime kilns 19 

Liquors, spirituous or malt, manu- 
facture of 27 

Lithographing 40 

Locomotives, manufacture of 21 

Logging 14 

Longshore work 10 

Lumber, cargoes of, handling of . . . . 10 

Lumbering 14 

Machine shops, railway, operation, 

construction and repair 3 

Machine shops, other 4 

Machinery, manufacture of 21 

Machinery', heav>', installation of . . . 42 

Machines, light, manufacture of ... . 23 

Malt liquors, manufacture of 27 

Manila products, manufacture of . . . 36 

Marble works 42 

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16 



New York Labor Bulletin 



Group No. 
'Employment. in § 2 of Law. 

Mattresses, manufacture of 16 

Meat products, manufacture or prep- 
aration of 30 

Meats, manufacture or preparation 

of 30 

Medicines, manufacture of 28 

Merchandise, cargoes of, handling of 10 

Metal, structural, manufacture of . . . 21 

Metal beds, manufacture of 23 

Metal foundries 21 

Metal toys, manufacture of 23 

Metal wares, manufacture of 23 

Metals, preparation of 18 

Milling 29 

Mineral water, manufacture of 27 

Minerals, preparation of IS 

Mining 18 

Motor trucks, manufacture of 24 

Mouldings, manufacture of 17 

Mules, operation of veh icles d rawn by 4 1 

Nails, manufacture of 23 

Oil, manufacture of 26 

Ore, cargoes of, handling of 10 

Ores, reduction of 18 

Organs, manufacture of 16 

Packing houses 30 

Paint, manufacture of 26 

Painting 42 

Paper boxes, corrugated, manufac- 
ture of 17 

Paper, manufacture of 40 

Paper, tarred, pitched or asphalted, 

manufacture of 26 

Paper mOls 15 

Parlor car employees 1 

Paving 13 

Paving blocks, manufacture of 19 

Paving material, manufacture of 19 

Perfumes, manufacture of 28 

Petroleum, manufacture of 25 

Petroleum prod ucts, manufacture of . 25 
Pharmaceutical preparations, manu- 
facture of 28 

Photo-engraving 40 

Photographic cameras and supplies, 

manufacture of 23 

Piano actions, manufacture of 16 

Pianos, manufacture of 16 

Pickle factories 33 

Pile driving 11 

Pipes, installation and covering of . . . 42 
Pipes, laying and repair of, under- 
ground 13 

Pipes, manufacture of 21 

Pitched paper, manufacture of 26 

Pits, sand, shale, clay or gravel 19 

Planing mills 17 



Group No. 
Employment. in § 2 of Law. 

Plastering 42 

Plumbing 42 

Porcelain, manufacture of 20 

Potterj', manufacture of 20 

Powder, gun, manufacture of 25 

Power plants, railway, operation, 

construction and repair of 3 

Power plants, other 4 

Power transmission lines, construc- 
tion, installation or operation of . . 12 

Printers' rollers, manufacture of 26 

Printing 40 

Printing ink, manufacture of 26 

Pulp mills 15 

Quarries 19 

Rafting 14 

Rails, manufacture of 21 

Railway car shops, machine shops, 
steam and power plants, operation, 

construction and repair 3 

Railway's, operation, construction 
and repair of, whether operated by 
8t«am, electric or other motive 
power, including street railways 

and incline railways 1, 2 

Rattan ware, manufacture of 16 

Reduction of ores 18 

Refineries, sugar 33 

Renovating 42 

River-driving 14 

Robes, mam^acture of 38 

Rollers, when propelled by steam, 

gas, etc., operation of 41 

Rolling mills 21 

Roofing 42 

Ropes, manufacture of 36 

Rubber goods, manufacture of 32 

Rubber shoes, manufacture of 32 

Saddlery, manufacture of 32 

Safes, manufacture of 21 

Salts, corrosive, manufacture of ... . 25 

Sand pits 19 

Sanitary engineering 42 

Sanitar>' fixtures, manufacture of . . . 23 

Sash and door factories 17 

Saw mills 14 

Screens, manufacture of 23 

Screens, window and door, manu- 
facture of 17 

Sewer construction 13 

Shades, window, manufacture of 17 

Shaft sinking 13 

Shafting, manufacture of 21 

Shale pits 19 

Sheet metal, manufacture of 21 

Sheet metal products, manufacture of 23 

Sheet metal work 42 

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Pbovisions of the Workmen's Compeksatiox Law 17 



Group No. 
Employment. in | 2 of Law. 

Shingie huUb 14 

Shipbuilding, construction and repair 
in a 8hip>yard or daewhere (cf, 

vesselB) 9 

Shirts, manufacture of 38 

Shoddy, nianufacture of 37 

Shoe blacking or polish, manufacture 

of 28 

Shoes, manufacture of 32 

peeping car employees 1 

~ 8, manufacture of 24 

8, toy, manufacture of 24 

18 

Soaps, manufacture of 28 

Soda waters, manufacture of 27 

Spinning manufactories 37 

Spices, manufacture of 34 

^uituous liquors, manufacture of . . 27 

Spokes, manufacture of 14 

Stationary engines and boilers, oper- 
ation and repair of 22 

Stationery, manufacture of 40 

Staves, manufacture of 14 

Steam and power plants, operation, 

construction and repair of 3, 4 

Steam raUways, operation, construc- 
tion and repair of 1 

Steel building and bridge construc- 
tion 42 

Steel foundries 21 

Steel, structiiral, manufacture of 21 

Stereotyping 40 

Stone cutting or dressing 42 

Stone, artificial, manufacture of . . . . 42 

StoneHsetting 42 

Storage 29 

Storage, place, longshore work in . . . 10 

Stoves, manufacture of 21 

Street raOways, operation, construc- 
tion and repair of 1 

Structural carpentry 42 

Structural steel, manufacture of 21 

Subaqueous construction 11 

Subway construction 13 

Sugar refineries 33 

Tanneries 31 

Tar, manufacture of 26 

Tarred paper, manufacture of 26 

Telegraph lines and wires, operation, 

construction and repair of 6, 7 

Telephone lines and wires, operation, 

construction and repair of 5, 7 

Terra-cotta, manufacture of 19 

TextUes, manufacture of 37 

Thread, manufacture of 37 

Threshing machines, manufacture of . 24 



Group No. 

Employment. in | 2 of Law. 

Tile, manufacture of 19 

Tile-Iaying 42 

Tires, rubber, manufacture of 32 

Tobacco, manufacture of 35 

Tobacco products, manufacture of . . 35 

Toilet preparations, manufacture of. 28 

Tools, manufacture of 23 

Toy wagons, sleighs or baby car- 
riages, manufacture of 24 

Toys, manufacture of metal 23 

Toys, manufacture of wooden 17 

Traction engines, manufacture of . . . 24 

Trucks, operation of 41 

Trunks, manufacture of 32 

Tubing, manufacture of 21 

Tubing, rubber, manufacture of ... . 32 

Tunneling 13 

Turpentine, manufactiu^ of 26 

Typewriters, manufacture of 23 

UmbrellaSy manufacture of 32 

Upholstering 16 

Utensils, manufacture of 23 

Valises, manufacture of 32 

Vanush, manufacture of 26 

Vegetables, canning or preparation of 33 

Vehicles, manufacture of 24 

Vehicles, operation of 41 

Veneer, manufacture of 14 

Vessels, operation and repair of 8 

Wagons, manufacture of 24 

Wagons, toy, manufacture of 24 

Wagons, operation of 41 

Wall-paper, manufacture of 40 

Wareikouse, longshore work in 10 

Warehousing 29 

Water fixtures, manufacture of 23 

Waters, manufacture of soda 27 

Weaving manufactories 37 

Well digging 13 

White wear, manufacture of 38 

Wicker ware, manufacture of 16 

Window screens, manufacture of 17 

Window shades, manufacture of 17 

Wine, manufacture of 27 

Wire goods, manufacture of 23 

Wires, underground, laying and 

repair 13 

Wires, manufacture of 21 

Wooden boxes, manufacture of 17 

Wooden toys, articles and wares, 

manufacture of . . . . 17 

Woodwork, interior, manufacture of . 16 

Yam, manufacture of 37 



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18 Kew York Labor Bulletin 



LAW AUTHORIZING MUTUAL EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY AND WORKMEN'S 
COMPENSATION CORPORATIONS. 

Insurance Law, Chapter 28 op the Consoudated Laws(-\s Amended bt 

L. 1913, Ch. 832). 

ARTICLE 5-A. 

Mutual Employers' Liability and "Workmen's Compensation CoRPORATiONa. 

Section ISo. Incorporation. 

186. Completion of organisation. 

187. Directors and officers. 

188. Meetings. 

189. Assessments. 

190. Dividends. 

191. Reserves; suspension; cancellation and reinstatement of certificate. 

192. Reports to and examinations by superintendent. 

193. Prevention of accidents. 

194. Authorization of foreign mutual insurance corporations. 

§ 185. Incorporation. Thirteen or more persons may become a corporation for 
the purpose of insuring on the mutual plan against loss or damage resulting from 
accident to or injury suffered by an employee or other person and for which the person 
insured is liable, or the liability of the employer to pay compensation to his employees, 
or the compensation of employees under any workmen's compensation law, or against 
loss or damage caused by a truck, wagon or other vehicle propelled by steam, gas, 
gasoline, electric, mechanical or other power or drawn by horses or mules, used ia 
trade or manufacture and owned by any such person to the property of another for 
which loss or damage the person insured is liable, by making and filing in the office 
of the superintendent of insurance a certificate to be signed by each of them, stating 
their intention to form a corporation for the purpose named, and setting forth a copy 
of the charter which they propose to adopt, which shall state the name of the pro- 
posed corporation, the place where it is to be located, the mode and manner in which 
its corporate powers are to be exercised, the number of directors, the manner of 
electing its directors and officers, the time of such elections, the manner of filling 
vacancies, the names and post office addresses of the directors who will serve until 
the first annual meeting of such corporation, and such further particulars as may 
be necessary to explain and make manifest the objects and purposes of the corpora- 
tion. Such certificate shall be proved or acknowledged and recorded in a book kept 
for that purpose by the superintendent of insurance and a certified copy thereof shall 
be delivered to the persons executing the same. 

§ 186. Completion of organization. Upon receipt of a certified copy of the certifi- 
cate of incorporation from the superintendent of insurance, the persons signing such 
certificate may open books to receive applications for membership therein. No such 
corporation shall transact any business of insurance unless and until at least forty 
employers employing not less than twenty-five hundrod employees have become 
members of such corporation and applied for and agreed to take insurance therein, 
covering the liability of such employers to their employees for accidents to or injuries 
suffered by such employee nor until the facts specified in this section have been 

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Provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Law 19 

certified under oath by at least three of the persons signing the original certificate, 
to the superintendent of insurance, and the superintendent of insurance has issued a 
license to such corporation authorizing such corporation to begin writing the insurance 
specified in this article. The superintendent of insurance must be satisfied that the 
membership list of the corporation is genuine, and that every member thereof will 
take the policies as agreed by him within thirty days of the granting of the license 
to the corporation by the superintendent of insurance to issue policies. If at any time 
the number of members falls below forty or the number of employees who are employed 
by the members of the corporation falls below twenty-five hundred, no further poticies 
shall be issued by the corporation until other employers have made bona fide applica- 
tions for insurance therein, who, together with the existing members, amount to not 
less than forty employers who employ not less than twenty-five hundred employees, 
and in the event that such applications for insurance shall not be obtained within a 
reasonable time, to be fixed by the superintendent of insurance, such superintendent 
may take the proceedings against such corporation under section sLxty-three of this 
chapter to the same effect as if clause h of subdivision one of such section was specifi- 
cally applicable to corporations organized under this article. 

The members of the corporation shall be policyholders therein, and when any mem- 
ber ceases to be a policyholder he shall cease, at the same time, to be a member of 
the corporation. A corporation, partnership, association or joint stock company 
may become a member of such insurance corporation and may authorize another 
person to represent it in such insurance corporation, and such representative shall 
have all the rights of any individual member. Any person acting as employer in 
the capacity of a trustee may insure in such corporation and as such trustee may 
assume the liabilities and be entitled to the rights of a member, but shall not be 
personally liable upon such contract of insurance. 

Such corporation may borrow money or assume liability in a sum sufficient to defray 
the reasonable expenses of its organization. 

§ 187. Directors and officers. Any such corporation shall have not less than thir- 
teen directors, and such officers as shall be provided in the certificate of incorporation 
or by the by-laws made by the members. The directors shall be elected annually 
by the votes of the members. All except two of the directors of the corporation 
elected after the organization of the corporation is completed and it is authorized to 
begin to issue insurance policies shall be members of the corporation. AH the officers 
except the secretary, assistant secretary and the actuary must be members of the 
board of directors. 

§ 188. Meetings; basis of right to vote. At all meetings of the members of the 
corporation each member shall have one vote and one additional vote for every five 
hundred employees or major fraction thereof, covered by the policy held by such 
member in the corporation, provided that no member shall have more than twenty 
votes. The number of votes of a member shall be determined by the average number 
of employees at work and covered by said member's policy in the corporation during 
the last six months from a date not less than ten days immediately prior to the date 
of any such meeting. Before any member shall be permitted to cast more than one 
vote at any meeting of members he shall file with the secretary an affidavit showing 
the average number of employees at work during the preceding six months covered 
by the employer's policy of insurance. 

i 189. Assessments. The corporation may in its by-laws and policies fix the 
contingent mutual liability of the members for the payment of losses and expenses 
not provided for by its cash funds; but such contingent liability of a member shall 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 New York Labor Bulletin 

not be less than an amount equal to and in addition to the cash premium written 
in the policy. If the corporation is not possessed of cash funds above its unearned 
premium sufficient for the payment of incurred losses and expenses, it shall make an 
assessment for the amount needed to pay such losses and expenses upon the members 
liable to assessment therefor, in proportion to their several liability. Every member 
shall be liable to pay and shall pay his proportionate part of any assessment which 
may be laid by the corporation in accordance with law and his contract, on account 
of iQsses and expenses incurred while he was a member, if he is notified of such assess- 
ment within one year after the expiration of his policy. All assessments shall be 
based upon present values of all future payments, and all proposed premium assess- 
ments shall be filed in the insurance department and shall not take effect until approved 
by the superintendent of insurance, after such investigation as he may deem necessary. 
AH funds of the corporation and the contingent liability of the members thereof shall 
be available for the pa3rment of any claim against the corporation. 

§ 190. Dividends. The board of directors may, from time to time, fix and deter- 
mine the amount to be paid as a dividend upon policies expiring during each year 
after retaining sufficient sums to pay all the compensation and other policy obliga- 
tions which may be payable on account of the injuries sustained and expenses incurred. 
Any such corporation may hold cash assets in excess of its liabilities, but such excess 
shall be limited to one hundred per centum of its reserves for losses and expenses 
incurred, and may be used from time to time in payment of losses, dividends and 
expenses. 

§ 191. Reserves; suspension; cancellation and reinstatement of certificate. Such 
corporation shall be required to maintain the same reserves for the protection of 
policyholders and employees who may have a right of action directly against such 
corporation as are required to be maintained by stock insurance corporations in 
relation to the same class of insurance, except that reserves for liability for insurance 
of compensation under the workmen's compensation law shall be the same reserves 
as provided by the workmen's compensation commission for the state insurance 
fund pursuant to such chapter, and the superintendent of insurance may suspend or 
cancel the certificate issued by him authorizing said corporation to transact such 
insurance business at any time when in the judgment of the superintendent of insur- 
ance the reserves of said corporation are insufficient to insure and secure the payment 
of its policy obligations, and the superintendent of insurance may reinstate or renew 
said certificate whenever by assessment or otherwise said reserves have been increased 
to a sum sufficient in the judgment of the superintendent of insurance to insure and 
secure the payment of the policy obligations of such corporation. 

§ 192. Reports to and examinations by superintendent of insurance. Every 
such corporation shall make reports to the superintendent of insurance at the same 
times and in the same manner as are required from stock insurance companies trans- 
acting the same kind of business, and the superintendent of insurance may examine 
into the affairs of such corporation at any time, either personally or by any duly 
authorized examiner appointed by him, and the superintendent of insurance must 
make such an examination into the affairs of said corporation at least once in every 
two years. 

§ 193. Prevention of accidents. The board of directors shall make and enforce 
reasonable rules and regulations not in conflict with the laws of the state for the pre- 
vention of accidents to the employees on the premises of members, and for this pur- 
pose the inspectors of the corporation shall have free access to all such premises during 
regular working hours. The policy of any member neglecting to provide suitable 

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Peovisions of the Wobkmbn^s Compensation Law 21 

safety appliances as provided by law or as required by the board of directors may be 
canceled and terminated by the board of directors after giving to such member notice 
of cancellation ten days prior to its becoming effective. 

§ 194. Authorization of foreign mutual insurance corporations. After January 
first, nineteen hundred and seventeen, the superintendent of insurance may, in his 
discretion, issue a certificate of authority to a mutual corporation organised under 
the laws of another state to do such insurance in this state; provided that, in no event, 
shall authority be given to any such mutual corp<Niition to do other kinds of businees 
than those specified in this article. Such corporation shall be required to maintain 
the same reserves for the protection of members and emj^oyees as are required for 
domestic corporations authorised to transact the same kind of insurance. 



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^^f UNIV. OF MICHJOAN^B 

DEPARTMENT OF LA^jPR^^yi^ H 

BULLETIN 1 

lss!t€4 Oader tiie DlrccHoii of ^^H 
GoiEMlssloner of Ubor ^^H 

Whole m. 60 ^^M 
Series ofi La^r Orf tmliatlon m. i ^^H 


f 


Statistics or Tradi; Unions 

IN 1913 




L 


TBI hVMEkV OF STATCnCS 4W0 mPOEMATIOK 

■ Digitized by Google 





FrcTloas Publicatloas CancemiJit Labar Orcanlztttoii 

S(ati$iic9. ^ taiil mvmhujthip In the Si^ttt (for 1S94 

AJ»d Iyw5) T^k -.„ , .- i in tlie annttflJ report of iUn Biirciiu at 

I^or 8t4iii9ttcii for 1S9&. Annual 6tivttatlc« )i&vg bf^eti publkhe^d regOLiarly 

om 1807 to dut^. For the reftrg 1807 and ISOS theie were publisbed 
Illy in tb<3 annual rcporta of tbe Bijr(?iiii of I^lwr Statistics. From IStfU 
to 1013 summary figiirva were ; tin of tliai Biireau 

ti|iiarterty in ISDO and H>UU| t y) whieb a(ter lOlW 

becaoii? th« Biilktln of tlie Depart mecit of labor, with detailed aimiml 
%urei in the anTtiial rt^ porta of the Bureau of Labor Statist let, 

A cotupilatbn of international ^tati^ica of trade unions h&s b^eit pub- 
lihed from 11>01 to date, e^t^^cpt in 1902 ant! 1909, in the D " nt Bui* 
etins for Dpctmber of 1001, >liircli of lf»05 nn^ IdOO und Sej ot?»cr 

y<*arB* 

Other Publicafioth^. Iiifonnatvon toraewbat fragnnctitary or general iu 
liaj-act^r cotjoernhig labor organisation !a to t)e found in the report* of th« 
Itureau of Labor Stat&tiUcfi for lg&5 (^'hapter on Labor Organliations), 1889 
t*ectJon on Union Rates of Wages and Hours of Lfibof, IS83-T) and 1804 
(GrowUi of Organised Labor an^ its Aa*njirig Benefits h 

More specialized material U to be found lu ihn following; 

Laws and Court pfTisioris as to Lnhor Combi nation (16 pp.)» Bepriut 
from VoL 17 of the Report of the V. S. Industrial Coinmit»9ion, in AuQual 
Report of the New York Bureau of Mpdiation iiud Arbitration, 1902^ p* 204* 

The Open 'Shop Discusfiion (37 ppj. Annual Report of tbe CommiBsioner 
of Labor, I»04, p. 228. • - 

Union Initiation Fees and I>u<»s {65 pp*K Annual Export of Bureau ol 
Lfthof StHtiflticaj li>07, p|>. Ixv and 877. 

Oistoiy of Typograpiiiml Union No, 6 (pp. ^ + 717h P«rt I of Annual 
Heport of Buieau of Jjfibor Stfttistic^ for 11>1L 

Kew York laws eoncerniiig lji^K>r organ uatioti have been re^ilarly included 
in tbe annual com {illation of labor tawe puhlbhed tn tbo Annual Report of 
tbe Comtnlflsioneir of Labor* New York eourt deelgiona bearing on the eab- 
ject bavc bcNsn regularly included ju Bulletin snmmariea of fill dceiaioni 
concernini? labor* Tlie U, S. Supreme Ckmrt deciBion iii tbe Hatters' Boycott 
Gase, and that eourt'a ilecieiou on the nnti diserimtm^twn dauie of the 
Erdman Law of 1S98, both in 1908, were reprinted in Bulletins Nos, 30 and 
38, respectively, of thcfc year» 

Of the publications nbove referred to, fili?a of whieh may be found In many 
|>ubllc librarleB, the Department ean now mpply only the following i 

Quartfriff mdletim: 1899, No. 2j 11)02, Ho. 15; 1005, Ko, 2B] If 07, Nob. 
34, H;lj 1008, Not. 30. 37, 3B, 30; lf>10, No* 4S; 1911, Noa. 47i 48, 49; inZt 
JNoa. Gl, 52, 53; 10 LI, No. 56. 

Annual Report of thft Comini^Moncr of Laht/r: 1004, 

Annual litpartM of Burcitu. of Lahor SUtiMke: 1805, 1M7, 1911, t012. 

A n n u it 1 U* p o t f \j f B u rt'u u of \fi?tl tot i f> n itud A r b i f ra t\on : 1 002, 



ALBANV 
J, B, LtON a>MPANV, raiNTEBS 



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by Google 



New York Labor Bulletin 

PablUh€d hj fh* Btofta D«parlm«al of X^bor. 



Whole No. 60 



Albany 



April, 1914 



LABOR ORGANIZATIONS IN 19x3. 

On September 30, 1913, there were in New York State 2,643 labor 
organizations with 665,248 members. Both in number of organiza- 
tions and in membership all previous records were surpassed. The 
total number of new organizations formed during the year was 
313, but 109 organizations disbanded and 30 amalgamated with 
other organizations, making the total lapses 139 and a net increase 
of 174 in the number of new organizations; the largest increase in 
any year smce 1903. From October, 1912, to April, 1913, there 
were 134 new organizations with 73 lapses and from April to October, 
1913, there were 179 new organizations with 66 lapses. 

The membership increase was unprecedented. In the first half 
of the year, the increase — 116,946 — was greater than that for 
any other entire year. In the second half of the year, there was a 
further increase of 21,630 making the total increase for the year 
138,576, or 26.3 per cent. The average number of members per 
imion was 219 as against 213 in 1912. 

TABLE 1.— NmcBBB and Mnmbbbchip or Unions in Nnw Yobk Statn, 180i-1913.t 

INOMUBB (+) OR 
OBOANIXATIONB nMBBBSBIP DBCBBASB ( — ) 

Niim- In- Mem- 

TBAB BNDBD — ber enBM Men Women Total ben Per oent 

1894. JiOyl 860 149,700 7,488 167,197 

1895. Jnlyl 927 67 170,129 10,102 180,231 28.034+ 14.7 + 

1806. Oct.81 962 85 170.296 9.986— 6.5— 

1807. Sept. 80 1,009 47 162.090 6,764 168,454 1,842— 1.1— 

1898. Sept. 80 1,087 78 168,662 7,605 171.067 2,613+ 1.6 + 

1899. Sept. 80 1,320 283 200.932 8,088 209,020 87,953+ 22.2 + 

1900. Sept. 30 1.635 315 233,553 11,828 245.381 36,361+ 17.4 + 

1901. Sept. 80 1,871 236 261.523 14.618 276.141 30,760+ 12.6 + 

1902. Sept. 80 2.229 868 313.592 15.609 329,101 52,960+ 19.2 + 

1903. Sept. 80 2.583 364 380,845 14.753 396.698 66.497+ 20.2 + 

1904. Sept. 30 2.604 •79 378.859 12,817 391,676 3,922— 1.0— 

1905. Sept. 30 2,402 ^102 870,971 12,265 883.236 8.440— 2.2— 

1906. Sept. 30 2,420 18 886,869 11,625 898,494 15,258+ 4.0 + 

1907. Sept. 30 2,497 77 422.561 14,231 436,792 38,298+ 9.6 + 

1908. Sept. 80 2.444 •53 361.761 10.698 372.459 64,388— 14.7— 

1909. Sept.80 3,368 *76 860,819 12,410 372,729 270+ 0.1 + 

1910. Sept. 30 2,457 89 463,801 28,123 481,924 109.195+ 29.3 + 

1911. Sept. 30 2,498 41 468.912 36,402 504,314 22.890+ 4.6+ 

1912. Sept. 30 2.460 *29 489.502 87.170 626.672 22.358+ 4.4 + 

1918. Sept. 30 2.643 174 686.726 78.622 665.248 138.576+ 26.3 + 

•Decraeee. 

t In 1888 there were 826 labor organisations in New York, but not all of them reported their 
membendiip to the Buraau. The 580 anions that made such reports had 118.628 members; assum- 
inc that the remainina 246 union)! averaged the same number of memben. the aggregate member- 
Sp of all unions in 1^ would have been 160.000. or about 12,000 more than in 1894, when industry 
was in the midst of an unusually severe depression. 

ni Digitized by CjOOgle 



2 New York Labob Bulletin. 

Cities and Villages. 
In the table following, the distribution of unions and of member- 
ship as between New York City and the remainder of the State is 
given. New York City had 29 per cent of the organizations and 74 
per cent of the membership. Of the increase in membership during 
the year, the metropolis had 82 per cent. The average membership 
per union was 647 in New York City and 92 elsewhere in the State. 
The number of localities in the State having at least one labor 
organization was 219 as against 214 in 1912. 



TABLE 2. — NuMBBB akd Mbmbsbsbxp or Ukionb in Nbw Yobk Cnr and thb Rsmaindbb 

or THB Stats, 1808-1918. 

ORGANXSATIONB f MBMBBBBBXP ZNCRBABB IN MBMBBBSHXP IN — 



Remain- Remain- 

TBAB BNDBD New York der of New York der of 

BBPT. 30 — City State City State 

1808 440 647 125,429 46,638 

1899 477 843 141.687 67,333 

1000 602 1,133 164.604 90,877 

1901 616 1.366 174,022 102,119 

1902 679 1,660 198,066 131.046 

1903 663 1.930 244.212 161.386 

1904 670 1.834 264.719 136.967 

1906 667 1.736 261,277 131.969 

1906 678 1.742 260.006 138.486 

1907 712 1.786 286.180 160.612 

1908 704 1.740 289.638 132.921 

1909 690 1.669 243,167 129,672 

1910 722 1.736 337.609 144,416 

1911 736 1,762 367,071 147,243 

1912 693 1.776 377.709 148.963 

1913 760 1.883 491.793 173.466 



Remain- 
New York der of 
City Stati> 



16.268 
12.817 
19.618 
24.033 
46.167 
10.607 
*3.442 
8.781 
26,172 

*46,642 

3,619 

94,362 

19,662 

20,638 

114,084 



'21.695 
23.644 
11.242 
28,927 
20.340 

*14,429 

*4,998 

6.627 

12.126 

♦17,691 

•3.849 

14.843 

2.828 

1.720 

24,492 



Total 
State 

37.953 
36.361 
30.760 
52.960 
66,497 
*3,922 
'•'8,440 
16.268 
38,298 

*64,333 
270 

109,196 
22,390 
22.368 

138.676 



•Deoreaae. 

t The number of dties and villages with at least one labor organisation in September from 1898 
to 1913 was as follows: 

1808 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 
87 106 132 140 162 196 187 186 188 200 196 195 196 201 214 219 



The number of localities in the State having 1,000 or more union 
members on September 30, 1913, was thirty-three, an increase of two 
as compared with 1912. During the year, four localities (Amsterdam, 
Ilion, Ogdensburg and Port Chester) entered the list and two (Coming 
and Geneva) dropped out of it. In twenty-seven of these localities, 
there were increases in membership and in six there were decreases. 
Nearly 96 per cent of the total union membership of the State were 
in these thirty-three localities. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Labob Oboanizations in 1913. 



UNIONS AT BNV OP — lISMBBBflBIP AT XN1> OP — 1912-1913, ID — 



TABLE 8. — NuMBNR and Mbmbbbbbip op Unions in Localitus wim 1,000 on Mobs Mbmbbbb 
WITH Gains ob Lossss in 1913. 

mCBBASB OB 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
16. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 



24. 
25. 

26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 



Sept.. 
1912 

New York aty 608 

Buffalo 166 

Boeherter 87 

Schenectady 63 

Byrwenam 86 

Albany 84 

Utica 56 

Troy 46 

Yonken 86 

Elnrira 37 

Newburgh 33 

Binchamton 35 

Niagara FallB 30 

Auburn 32 

Watertown 21 

Poughkeepflie 22 

Middletown 28 

Jamestown 21 

OneonU 16 

NewBocheUe 19 

Meohanicrille 17 

Kingston 24 

mon 3 

Cohoes 20 

Dunkirk 26 

Port Jervis 16 

Homell 20 

GfensFalls 17 

White Plains 14 

Port Chester 17 

Ogdenaburg 17 

Oswego 10 

Amsterdam 17 



Mar.. 
1913 
712 
164 
94 
66 
91 
84 
67 
48 
36 
39 
32 
36 
30 
82 
26 
23 
27 
22 
17 
20 
17 
24 
4 
20 
26 
18 
21 
18 
13 
17 
19 
21 
16 



Sept.. 
1913 
760 
180 
104 
66 
89 
83 
68 
49 
34 
39 
32 
36 
30 
33 
24 
23 
27 
26 
17 
21 
19 
24 
5 
20 
27 
19 
20 
18 
14 
17 
20 
21 
18 



Sept.. 
1012 
377,709 
28.260 
16.064 
7.307 
9,981 
8.969 
6.384 
4.637 
6.902 
2.906 
2,638 
2.244 
1,976 
1.663 
1.213 
1.380 
1.663 
1.304 
1.180 
1.298 
1,027 
1.223 

166 
1.762 
1,760 
1.164 
1,208 
1,007 
1.068 

927 

727 
1.161 

936 



Mar.. 

1913 

481,102 

28.388 

24.261 

8.661 

10,791 

9,073 

7,167 

4.678 

6,714 

2,936 

2.465 

2.443 

2,176 

1,722 

1,860 

1,430 

1.637 

1,272 

1,299 

1,833 

1.011 

1.246 

1.389 

1,481 

1.862 

1.260 

1.236 

1.166 

1.071 

986 

843 

1.094 



Sept.. 

1013 Unions Members 

401,793 67 114.064 

38,784 16 10,684 

20.829 17 4.776 

10.866 12 8.668 

10.668 3 tn 

9.033 n 64 

7.647 3 1.263 

4.823 3 286 

4.607 ^2 •1.886 

3.060 2 174 

2.544 *1 6 

2,427 1 183 

2,160 194 

1.868 1 196 

1.684 3 471 

1.667 1 177 

1,662 ♦! ♦! 

1.637 6 233 

1,432 2 262 

1.418 2 120 

1,378 2 861 

1.368 130 

1.342 2 1,176 

1.337 •425 

1,201 2 H60 

1.243 3 79 

1,191 •n 

1.182 1 175 

1,147 79 

1,068 161 

1.065 3 858 
1,083 2 ♦78 

1.066 1 131 



•Deetease. 



The relative rank of the first and second class cities of the State 
as to union membership appears in Table 4. During the year, 
Schenectady by reason of a large increase in membership (49 per 
cent), moved up from sixth to fourth place, passing Syracuse and 
Albany. Yonkers, by reason of a decline of 23 per cent simultane- 
ously with an increase of 6 per cent in Troy, dropped to the last 
place. These nine cities, it will be noted, contained 65 per cent 
of the population and 90 per cent of the union membership of the 
State. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



4 New York Labor Bulletin. 

TABLE 4. — Pbbckntagb or Tbads Unionists in thb Statb at ths Eni> or Sxftkmbbb 
Bblonqino to Oboakuationb in FtBST AND Sboond Class CrriBS and in tbb Rbuaindbr 
or THB Statb. 

Pop- 
ulation. 
i/>CALiTT 1808 1007 1008 1000 1010 1011 1012 1013 1010 

New York 73.3 65.5 64.3 66.2 70.0 70.8 71.7 73.0 52.3 

Buffalo 5.2 7.6 7.7 7.5 6.1 6.0 6.4 5.8 4.6 

Rochester 2.6 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.4 

Schenectady 0.6 1.7 1.3 1.4 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.6 0.8 

Syracuse 3.7 2.0 2.2 2.3 1.8 1.0 1.0 1.6 1.6 

Albany 2.0 2.0 2.1 2.1 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.4 1.1 

Utica 1.3 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.8 

Troy 1.3 1.1 1.4 1.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.8 

Yonkers 0.6 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 0.7 0.0 

Total (0 cities) 00.5 85.1 84.4 86.2 87.3 87.0 88.3 00.0 66.3 

Remainder of State 0.6 14.0 15.6 14.8 12.7 12.1 11.7 10.0 34.7 

Total State 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 

Industries and Trades. 

The changes in the number and the membership of labor organiza- 
tions by industries during the year are summarized in Table 5. 
Every industry save one (tobacco, which remained stationary) 
gained in number of organizations. In the building industry, the 
gains were distributed, the largest being that of 10 organizations 
in the building and paving trades. Of the total increase of 35 in 
transportation, 10 were in railways, 10 in freight handling and 8 in 
teaming and cab driving. In clothing and textiles, there was an 
increase of 15 organizations in the garment trades, 12 in the boot, 
shoe and glove trades and 5 in the textile trades. In the metals- 
machinery industry, there were 12 new organizations in the iron 
and steel trades and 6 in trades other than in iron and steel. Of 
the 23 new organizations in the miscellaneous group, 10 were of 
up-State paper and paper goods workers. 

In membership every industry gained. In the building industry, 
the gain was confined to the building and paving trades, there having 
been slight losses in the other two sub-divisions of that industry. 
Of the total gain in the building industry, 77 per cent was in New York 
City, chiefly among painters and decorators. Rochester reported 
the next largest gain, 13 per cent of the total, the chief item being 
800 general building and street laborers. In transportation, there 
was a gain of nearly 8,000 members, Buffalo reporting 87 per cent 
of the total, equally divided between railways and teaming. In 
New York City, there was a loss of nearly 2,000 members, chiefly 
in the navigation trades. The clothing-textiles industry reported 
70 per cent of the total gain in all industries. Of the clothing- 
textiles increase, 98 per cent was in New York City and 82 per cent 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



'19 



Labob Obganizationb in 1913. 



was in the garment trades in New York CSty. The membership 
of the textile trades doubled and of the shirt, collar and cuff trades 
tripled, the increase in each case being practically confined to New 
York CSty. The increase in the restaurant, trade, etc., group was 
due chiefly to the strike among the Brooklyn barbers in May, 1913, 
which led to the formation of a new union with 4,500 members. 

TABLE 5. — iNCBBAno ob Dbcbbasb of Unions and Mbmbbbs in 1913. bt Indubtbibs. 

INCBBABB (4-) OB DBCBBABB ( — ) 

Sept., Sept., 

1912. to March to 1912, to 

Sept., Mareh, Sept., March, Sept., Sept.. 

DTDUBTBT 1912 1913 1918 1913 1913 1913 

A. Number of OrganiMtttiont 

1. Bonding, stone working, etc. 706 713 722 7+ 9+ 16 + 

2. Transportation 359 365 394 6+ 29+ 36 + 

3. Clothingand textiles 187 200 221 13+ 21+ 34 + 

4. Metals, machinery, eto 246 251 264 5+ 13+ 18 + 

5. Printing, binding, etc 126 127 129 1+ 2+ 3 + 

6. Wood working and furmtore 70 75 80 5+ 5+ 10 + 

7. Food and liQUOTi 115 115 120 5+ 5 + 

8. Theaters and music 78 82 88 4+ 6+ 10 + 

9. Tobacco 65 65 65 

10. Beslattrants. trade, etc.... 132 133 139 1+ 6+ 7 + 

11. PubUe employment 250 251 257 1+ 6+ 7 + 

12. Stationary engine tending. . 62 67 68 5+ 1+ 6 + 

13. Miscellaneotis 73 86 96 13+ 10+ 23 + 

Total 2,469 2,530 2.643 61+ 113+ 174 + 

B. Number of Membern 

1. Bmlding, stone working, etc. 130,006 133.812 138.738 3,806+ 4.926+ 8.732 + 

2. Transportation 86.120 89,325 93.995 3.205+ 4.670+ 7.875 + 

3. Clothing and textiles 130,206 232.868 226.528 102,662+ 6.840— 96,322 + 

4. Metals, machinery, etc 28.962 32,512 37,452 3.550+ 4.940+ 8.490 + 

5. Printing, binding, etc 29,977 30.273 30.730 296+ 457+ 753 + 

6. Wood working and furniture 11,602 11.712 14.762 110+ 3,050+ 3,160 + 

7. Food and Uquors 17,752 17.206 17,995 546— 789 + 243 + 

8. Theaters and music 25.997 26,318 26,607 321+ 289+ 610 + 

9. Tobacco 10.200 10,112 10.217 88— 105+ 17 + 

10. Restaurants, trade, etc 22.099 23.153 28,705 1.054+ 5.552+ 6.606 + 

11. PttbUc employment 15.696 16,758 18.304 1.062+ 1.546+ 2.608 + 

12. Stationary engine tending. . 10,538 11,133 11.655 505+ 522+ 1.117 + 

13. Miscellaneous 7.517 8.436 9.560 919+ 1.124+ 2,043 + 

Total 526.672 643,618 665.248 116.946+ 21,630+138,576 + 



The union membership of each of the industries for a period of 
years, dating back to and including 1894, is given in the following 
table. The growth of organization in the clothing industry is the 
most striking feature of the table. On September 30, 1912, this 
industry for the first time took the leading position as to union 
membership in the State, exceeding by 200 that of the building 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



6 



I^Bw York Labob Bui^lxtin. 



industry. On September 30, 1913, its membership was nearly 
88,000 in excess of the building industry, and included one-third 
of the total imion membership in the entire State. Ninety-five per 
cent of its membership was in New Ybrk City. 



TABLE 6. — NuMBBB or Union Mbmbbrs in Each lumwntr, ISM to 1913.* 

Ill 



II 



Building, 

stone 

working, Tran»- 

TBAR etc. portation 

1804 49,131 18,773 

1895 53,683 19,134 

1890 56,363 23,469 

1897 53,303 23.933 

1898 59,676 19,065 

1899 70.031 25,981 

1900 79,705 32,979 

1901 84,732 37,923 

1902 90,817 42,824 

1903 110,173 63,791 

1904 119,597 72,257 

1905 133,698 62,871 

1906 147.393 61.540 

1907 150.082 72,771 

1908 120,010 68,000 

1909 113.331 62,375 

1910 120,588 69,060 

1911 129,954 79,309 

1912 130,006 86,120 

1913 138,738 93,995 



Clothing 

and 
teztUee 



IV V 

Metals, 
machinery, Printing, 



VI 

Wood 

working 



VU 




VIII 

Theaters 
and 

TEAS music 

1894 5,688 

1895 7,327 

1896 7.306 

1897 6,920 

1898 9,346 

1899 9,518 

1900 9,608 

1901 11,688 

1902 11,588 

1903 11,674 

1904 13,614 

1905 13,224 

1906 13,439 

1907 16,236 

1908 16.955 

1909 18,528 

1910 20,479 

1911 26,791 

1912 25.997 

1913 26.607 



IX X 

Restau- 
rants, 
Tobacco trade, etc. 



8,722 

9,089 

9,799 

9,097 

8,889 

8,886 

12,349 

10,210 

11.049 

12,435 

12,354 

12,115 

11,888 

11,888 

11.523 

10,531 

10.289 

10,480 

10,200 

10,217 



1,771 

2,133 

3,058 

2.084 

3.228 

4,584 

6.543 

8.182 

10.747 

14.828 

15.255 

12.784 

10,327 

12,104 

10,636 

0,822 

9,064 

10.024 

22,009 

28.705 



XI 
Public 
employ- 
ment 
1.964 
1,964 
993 
1,667 
1,880 
3,797 
7,148 
8.142 
9.160 
9.753 
9.538 
9,346 
9,419 
10.711 
15,097 
16,157 
17,534 
16,660 
15,696 
18,804 



XII 
Stationary 



tending 

975 

1,105 

1,239 

2,948 

3,738 

5,204 

5,666 

7,566 

8,111 

11,166 

12,702 

12,037 

12,650 

14,574 

11.984 

11,946 

12,277 

11,637 

10.538 

11,656 



XIII 

Miscel- 
laneous 
1.134 
1,862 
1.483 
1,322 
1,153 
3,039 
4,188 
5,336 

13,705 

15,979 
9.785 
7,618 
7.813 

10.249 
7,887 
6.843 

10,413 
8,950 
7.617 
9,560 



Total 

167.197 

180,231 

170,296 

168.454 

171.067 

209.020 

245.381 

276,141 

329,101 

395.598 

391,676 

383,236 

398,494 

436,792 

372,460 

372,720 

481.024 

504.314 

526,672 

665,248 



* The figures for industries in earlier years in this table do not always agree with those in the 
annual reports for those years owing to changes made to correspond to the revised classification of 
trades now used by the Bureau. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Labob Obganizations in 1913. 7 

In September, 1913, there were 292 distinct trades or branches 
of trade, each of which had at least one labor organization as com- 
pared with 279 such trades a year ago. In 65 trades there was a 
miion membership of 2,000 or more as compared with 60 such trades 
a year ago. Eight trades — basters, knitters, underwear makers, 
electrical apparatus makers, carriage, wagon and automobile work- 
ers, laundry workers, dock builders, and shirt paakers — appear 
in this list which were not included in 1912; and three trades — 
rock drillers and tool sharpeners, steam fitters and helpers, and 
boiler makers — which were included in the list a year ago do not 
appear in the 1913 list. 

The union membership increased in 54 of these trades, decreased 
in 10 and remained stationary in the organization of actors and 
chorus singers. Coat, pants and vest makers, reporting a gain of 
31,000 members, moved up from twentieth to second place in the 
list; waist, dress and wrapper makers, with a gain of 23,000, moved 
up from sixteenth to third place, and basters, entering the list in 
1913 with a gain of 10,000, took thirteenth place. There were 
decreases of as much as 2,000 members in two trades only — hod 
carriers and skirt makers. 

In number of organizations, 30 trades, in this list increased, 8 
trades decreased, and 27 trades remained unchanged. The largest 
organizations were 11 organizations of boot and shoe workers, 10 
of coat, pants and vest makers, 8 of paper and pulp workers and 7 
of longshoremen. The largest decrease was of 5 organizations of 
electrical workers. 

TABLE 7. — NuiiBBR aicd MsiiBeRSHiP of Unions in Tradss Having 2,000 or Mobs Mbm- 

BBBS (SbPTEMBBB), 1804 AND 1011-1913. 

unions msubers 

TRADB8 *1894 1911 1912 1913 •1894 1911 1912 1013 

aottk and suit makers 3 9 9 7 10,380 38,907 43,235 45,772 

Coat, pants and vest makera(a) . . 12 23 22 32 7.323 8,461 7.360 38.493 

Waist, drew and wrapper makers 5 4 4 11,416 9,750 32,900 

Carpenters and jouners 86 204 203 206 9.021 31,848 30.641 31.212 

Paintera and decorators 25 97 96 99 4,458 15.693 14,552 23,357 

Truck and wagon drivers and 

chauffeurs 1 43 38 45 47 13,708 12.631 17.215 

Hod carriers 27 53 47 51 6.742 18,059 18.275 16.274 

Hotel employeesCO 11 10 17 20 1.014 1,874 14,201 15.278 

Clothing presaers 4 10 9 8 1,085 10,946 11.336 14.250 

Bricklayers and masons 47 66 67 70 7.738 12,735 13,103 13.604 

Firemen, marine 13 4 4 tt526 7.702 12,734 12,854 

Machinists 17 58 58 62 1,180 9.582 7.914 12,513 

Basters 1112 1.240 1.200 1,226 12.350 

Musicians 17 52 51 53 4.584 11.612 11.813 12.171 

Aetofs and chorus nngers 2 5 5 6 393 12,425 11,000 11,000 

* July 1. (a) Includes knee pants makers. (e) Includes only cooks and waiters previous 
to 1912. ft moludes marine water tenders and oilers. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



New Yoek Labob Bulletin. 



TABLE 7. — NuMBBB and Msmbbbship ov Unionb zm Tbadbb Hayimo 2,000 or Mobs Mbm- 
BBB8 (Sbptbubbb), 1894 AifD 1911-1913 — eonduded. 

UNXOMS 



TBADBB 

Compodtora 

Trainmen 

Fur workers 

Jacket makers 

Cigar makers 

Cloak and suit cutters 

Brewery employeesCb) 

Underwear makers 

Engineers, stationary 

Skirt makers 

Barbers 

Street railway employees 

Electrical workers(d) 

Firemen, looomotive 

Plumbers and gas fitters 

Letter carriers 

Iron molders 

Bookbinders 

Cooks and stewards, marine 

Clothing cutters and trimmers. . . . 

Engineers, locomotive 

Bakers and confectioners 

Poet-office clerks 

Sheet metal workers 

TelegraphersCs) 

Longshoremen 

Tailors 

Plasterers 

Bartenders 

Seamen 

Firemen, stationary 

Pressmen 

Knitters 

Boot and shoe workers 

Housesmiths and bridgemen 

Electrical apparatus makers 

Press feeders 

Engineera, marine 

Paper and pulp workers 

Cabinet makers 

Butchers 

Machine wood workers 

Excavators and tunnel workers. . . 

Laborers (general building) 

Conductors, railway 

Cabmen and coach drivers and 

chauffeurs 

Carriage, wagon and automobile 

workers 

Laundry workers 

Dock builders 

Shirt makers 



*1894 


1911 


1912 


1913 


*1894 


1911 


1912 


1913 


27 


47 


47 


47 


7.068 


10,195 


10.553 


10.772 


29 


49 


60 


50 


1,521 


9,733 


9.812 


10.440 


3 


6 


5 


4 


565 


2,359 


10,192 


9,650 


8 


6 


6 


6 


2.676 


7.025 


6.416 


9,564 


47 


61 


60 


60 


8.198 


9.549 


9.293 


9,372 


t7 


1 


1 


1 


t3.454 


5.000 


6.300 


9,060 


24 


48 


48 


48 


3.153 


8,501 


8,511 


8,542 




2 


2 


2 




332 


732 


8,020 


10 


65 


50 


54 


939 


7.768 


6,811 


7,873 




1 


1 


1 




9.000 


10,000 


7.781 


7 


53 


53 


56 


207 


2.883 


2,851 


7.479 


1 


15 


18 


22 


2.500 


2,997 


4.036 


6,778 


2 


40 


41 


36 


666 


5,919 


6.360 


6,490 


31 


49 


x49 


49 


2.439 


5,700 


6.024 


6,368 


tn 


56 


55 


55 


t3.895 


5.236 


5.672 


5,689 


2 


98 


112 


112 


1.183 


5,187 


5.495 


6.670 


30 


43 


41 


40 


3.158 


5,208 


5.656 


6.577 


11 


13 


13 


13 


1.208 


5,297 


6.401 


5.519 


.... 


3 


2 


2 




4,564 


5.600 


5.390 


t7 


8 


7 


8 


ir3.454 


3,239 


8.199 


5.268 


34 


45 


44 


44 


3.241 


5.131 


5.036 


5.092 


19 


35 


34 


35 


1.864 


5,305 


5,001 


5.061 




80 


93 


93 




4,735 


4.911 


4.681 


8 


34 


36 


35 


1,854 


8,561 


4.446 


4.429 




16 


14 


17 




4,101 


4.515 


4.312 


.... 


15 


13 


20 




2.938 


2,923 


4.267 


10 


21 


21 


21 


1,929 


2,614 


2.383 


4.236 


4 


11 


11 


11 


2.703 


4,290 


4.181 


4.229 


5 


35 


38 


39 


363 


3.639 


3,954 


4,216 


1 


3 


3 


3 


6,000 


8.900 


6.000 


4,070 


1 


13 


12 


14 


36 


3.809 


3.727 


3,782 


vr 


13 


16 


16 


n.493 


3.284 


3.450 


3.602 


1 


2 


1 


2 


30 


175 


100 


3,663 


12 


15 


15 


26 


1.775 


2.649 


8.029 


3,541 


4 


9 


9 


11 


450 


3.116 


2.944 


8,481 




9 


10 


16 




1.744 


1.717 


3.465 


** 


7 


8 


8 


•• 


8,322 


3.394 


3.463 


1 


11 


11 


12 


50 


3,477 


3.456 


3,458 




22 


34 


42 




1.815 


2,548 


8,317 


1 


3 


4 


6 


1,120 


2,028 


2,220 


3.147 


4 


24 


24 


25 


823 


3,054 


2,948 


3.070 


4 


16 


15 


16 


321 


2,780 


2.800 


2.986 




7 


3 


3 




3,674 


2,380 


2,877 




4 


3 


2 




8.176 


2,126 


2,850 


18 


28 


28 


28 


1.302 


2,922 


2,861 


2.837 


4 


11 


10 


15 


779 


2.937 


2,939 


2.726 


1 


10 


9 


10 


237 


2.133 


1,599 


2.507 


4 


8 


8 


7 


218 


1.271 


1,804 


2.125 


1 


2 


2 


2 


74 


424 


740 


2.104 


4 


1 


2 


2 


869 


200 


470 


2.024 



t Includes luions oomposed exclusively of steamfittera and helpers. t Includes 
^ Includes dothing cutters and trimmers, and wrapper, shirt and waist cutten. 
pressmen. (b) All branches, including grain workers and maltaters. 

(d) Includes cable splicers and linemen. (e) Includes both commercial and railroad 

telegraphers. 



•July 1. 
press feeders. 
••Included in pressmen. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Labob Organizations in 1913. 9 

Organized Working Women. 
The increase of men in the organized trades of the State was 20 
per cent and of women 111 per cent. This more than doubling of 
the number of the union membership of women increased the pro- 
portion which "organized women bear to the total number of organized 
workers in the State from 7.0 to 11.8 per cent. The increase of 
women was locahzed industrially in clothing and textiles (98 per 
cent of the total) and geographically in New York City (96 per cent 
of the total). The number of organizations composed of women 
exclusively increased from 16 to 24 during the year. There were 
5 unions of electrical apparatus makers with a membership of 614, 
consisting of women only, formed in Schenectady. The two follow- 
ing tables summarize the changes in organizations and membership 
of women imionists. 



TABLE 8. — Pbopobtkon of Women to All Tbadb UNioNiarre. 

Per- Pcr- 

TSAR oentage tsar oentace 

^SM 4.8 1905 3.2 

1806 5.6 1906 2.9 

1807 3.4 1907 8.3 

1808 4.4 1908 2.9 

1809 4.0 1900 3.3 

1900 4.8 1910 5.8 

1901 6.3 1911 7.0 

1902 4.7 1912 7.0 

1903 3,7 1913 11.8 

1904 3.3 =«=ar. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



10 



New Yobk Labob Bulletin. 



TABLE 0.— NuMBSB or Womsk nr Labob UmoHS xx Each Ikdustbt. 

Per- 



centage 
of entire 



IncreBoe 
or de- 



Sept., 
1912 



March, 
1913 



Sept., 
1913 



1912- 
1913 



Buildinc. stone working, etc. 
Transportation 

Bailwayt 

Teamino and cab driving . . 

Tekgraphs 

Clothing and textiles 

OarmenU 

Shirts, eoUart and laundry. 

Hatt, capa and furt 

Boots, shoes and gUnes. . . . 

TexHUs 

Metals, machinery and ship- 
building 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Printing, binding, etc 

Wood working and furniture 

Food and liquors 

Theaters and music 

Tobacco 

Restaurants, trade, etc 

Hotels and restaurants 

Retail trade 

Public employment 

Stationary engine tending . . 
Miscellaneous 

Paper and paper goods . . . 

Leather and leather goods. . 

Other distinct trades 

Mixed employment 



305 

SOS 

27,055 

£$,369 

1,001 

^,470 

164 

1,061 

155 
128 

S7 
1,941 

40 

3.359 

2.322 

671 

476 

196 

1,131 



281 
5 

S78 

61,103 

48,941 

7,98B 

S,6B9 

26$ 

1,589 

164 
119 

45 
1.960 

34 



270 
IS 

$67 

67.409 

61,61$ 

9,S63 

$,94$ 

367 

5, $$6 

635 
62$ 

13 
1.891 

36 



3.368 3.395 

2.263 2,390 

794 653 

699 301 

196 36$ 

1,135 1.501 



35— 

11 + 

46— 
40.354 + 

$9,143-\- 

8,56$ ■{- 

47$ ■¥ 

$13-k- 

$,164-¥ 

480 4- 

494-^ 

14— 

50— 



36 + 

68 + 

18— 

174— 

166 + 

370 + 



nxioira 

or WOUBN 
BXCLUaiVBLT 

bership sept., 1913 

who&re'^ ' 

women Number Number 
Sept.. of of mem- 

1913 unions bers 
0.0 
0.3 
*0.0 



191 

60 
141 



$ 

6$ 

$11 

$8 



342 
106 

$6 
179 

S$ 



151 + 

106 + 

$6— 

38 + 

3$ + 



Total 37,170 71.405 78,522 41,352 



6.0 
29.8 
«7,7 
76.$ 
18.9 

8.8 
38.6 

1.7 
$.0 
0.3 
6.2 
0.2 
0.0 
12.8 
23.4 
2.3 
1.6 
$0.3 
8.2 
0.0 
3.6 
$.9 
$.1 
7.6 
9.7 

11.8 



16 



9 

8 1 
$ 8 

6 



997 
03$ 
0$0 
937 
8 



614 
614 



1,250 



1 1 

1 



24 13,241 



352 



$8 



* Less than 0.05 per cent. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



APPENDIX. 

Summary Tables. 

A. UnioiiB and membership in New York State (March and September). 

B. Unions and membership in New York City (March and September). 

C. Unions and membership, by industries, 1894-1913. 

D. Unions and memberdup in each city, 1894-1913. 

Detailed Tables. 

I. Unions and membership, March and September, by industries, trades and 

localities. 
II. Unions and membership, March and September: 

(a) By counties, towns and trades. 

(b) Recapitulation by counties and towns. 

til] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



12 



New Yobk Labor Bulletin. 



TABLE A.— NIJMBEB AND MEMBEBSHIP OF LABOB ORGANIZATIONS IN NEW TOBK 

state; 191S 



Industrim OB Groups or 
Tradm. 



Unionb at 
End of — 



Mch. Sept. 



NUMBCB 07 MbMBBBS AT EnD OF — 



March 



Men Worn. Total 



Sbptbmbbb 



Men Worn. Total 



BuDdbig, Stone Woridnc, Etc, 

Stone working 

Buildinsand pavinc trades 
Buildinc and street Tabor 



2. Transportation 

Railways 

Navii^tion 

Teaming and cab driving. 

Frwight^ >^ ftn<fling 

Telegraphs 



S. aothlng and Textiles 

Garments 

Shirts* collars and laundry. 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves. . . 
Textiles 



4. Metals. Machinery and Shlp- 

battding 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 



5. Printing, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood Woridng and Fnmltare 



7. Food and Llqnors. 

Food produots. . 
Beverages 



8. Theaters and Music . 

9. Tobacco 



10. Bestanimnts, Trade, Etc. . . 

Hotels and restaurants. 

Barbering 

Retail trade 



11. PnbUc Employment 

12. Statfonary Engine Tending . 
IS. Mlseellaneoins . 



Paper and paper goods . . 
Leather and leather goods 

Glass and sLassware 

Cement, clay and plaster 

products , 

Other distinct trades . . . 
Mixed employment 



Total. 



71S 

42 



M6 

242 
26 
56 
26 
15 

200 

100 
14 
27 
24 
35 



251 

206 

36 



127 

76 

116 

63 
52 

82 

65 

ISS 

58 
54 
21 

261 

67 

86 

30 

5 

23 

3 
12 
4 

2.630 



722 

44 

615 
63 

S94 

250 
30 
61 
36 
17 

221 

112 
13 
28 
30 
38 



264 

217 

38 



129 

80 

120 

67 
53 

88 

65 

139 

59 
56 
24 

267 

68 

96 

44 

6 

21 

5 

14 

6 

2.643 



ISS. 812 

6.266 

102,462 

25.084 

89.044 

31.671 

30.217 

17.324 

6,070 

3,762 

171,765 

148,653 
3.191 
12.120 
3,830 
3,971 



281 

3 



278 

61,10S 

48,941 

7,982 

2,529 

262 

l.S 



ISS. 812 

6.266 
102.462 
25.084 

89.S25 

31,674 

30,217 

17,324 

6,070 

4,040 

2S2.868 

197.594 

11,173 

14,649 

4,092 

5,360 



1S8,7S8 

6,037 
108.157 
24.544 

9S.726 
35,573 
27,720 
20,086 
6.291 
4,055 

159,119 

134,436 

3,080 

12,655 

3,802 

5,146 



270 

13 



267 



1S8,7S8 

6,037 

108,167 

24.544 

9S,995 

35,686 

27,720 

20.086 

6,291 

4,312 



67.409 226,528 



51,512 

9,363 

2,942 

367 

3,225 



S2.S48 

27,732 

3,174 

1,442 

28. SIS 

11.678 

17,206 

8.743 
8.463 

22,950 

7,849 

22,S69 

18,682 

2,827 

850 

16,623 

11. ISS 

8, ISS 

3,361 

897 

1,908 

160 

1,518 

289 

672,213 



164 

119 
45 



S4 



S,S68 
2,263 

794 

599 



195 
1,1S6 



SOS 

2 
62 



211 

28 



71.406 



S2,512 

27,851 
3,219 
1,442 

S0.27S 

11,712 

17.206 

8,743 
8.463 

26,318 

10.112 

2S.15S 

19.281 
2.827 
1.045 

16,768 

11, ISS 

8,436 

3.363 

959 

1.908 

160 

1.729 

317 

643.618 



S6.817 

30,240 

4,886 

1,691 

28,839 

14,726 

17,995 

9,202 
8,793 

28.212 

7,827 

28.052 

19.193 
7.479 
1.380 

16.803 

11,655 

9,218 
3,491 
1,146 
1.585 

479 

2,203 

314 

686,726 



635 

622 
13 



1.891 
36 



S,S95 
2,S»0 

65S 

301 



362 
1.601 



342 

106 
25 



179 



78,522 



185,948 
12,443 
15,597 
4,160 
8,371 



37,452 

30,862 

4,899 

1,691 

30,730 

14,762 

17,995 

9,202 
8.793 

26,607 

10,217 

28,706 

19.494 
7,479 
1,732 

18.304 

11,666 

9.660 

3.597 
1.171 
1.585 

479 

2,382 

346 

665,248 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbndiz. 



13 



TABLE B.— NUMBEB AND MEMBEBSHIP OF LABOB OBGANIZATIONS IN NEW TOBK 

CITY, 191S 



iNDUBTBiaS OB GROUPS OF 

Tkadxs 



Unions at 
End of — 



Mch. Sept. 



NUICBBB OF MBMBBBS AT EnD OF — 



March 



Men Worn. Total 



Sbptbicbbb 



Men Worn. Total 



_, Stone Worktnc. Etc 

Stone' working 

Building and paving trades. 
Building and street labor. . 



TraBsportation 

Railways.. . 
Navigation 



Teaming and cab driving . 

Freight handling 

Telegraphs 



CloCUBg aad Textiles 

Garments 

Shirts, coUara and laundry. 

Hats, caps and furs 

Boots, shoes and gloves . . . 
Textiles 



4. Metals, MacUnery and Ship- 



Iron and steel. 
OUier metals. . 
Shipbuilding . . 



5. PriBdBg, Binding, Etc 

6. Wood WorklBg and FaiBitare 



7. Food and Uqaors . 

Food products . . 



8. ThsatMB and Moaie . 

9. Tobaeeo 



10. Bestaonuits, Trade, Etc. . 

Hotels and restaurants . 

Barbering 

Retail trade 



11. PvbUe EmploymeBt 

12. Statfonary EngtBO Teadlng . 
IS. 



Paper and paper goods | 

Leather and leather goods . 

Glass and glassware | 

Cement, clay and plaster 

products. 

Other distinct trades ■ 

Mixed employment , 

Total 



197 

11 
156 
30 

77 

29 

7 

25 

12 

4 

102 

55 

8 

21 

11 

7 



74 

49 

17 

8 

40 
U 

S9 

30 
9 

15 

16 

25 

15 
3 
7 

43 

25 

24 

1 



712 



198 

13 
157 



82 

29 

7 
24 
18 

4 

116 

63 

7 

22 

15 

9 



41 
41 

42 

32 
10 

15 

15 

SO 

18 
3 
9 

45 

25 

SI 

2 
6 
8 

2 
9 

4 



87.619 

5.008 
63.582 
18.929 

61,924 

5.080 

27.374 

13,568 

3.042 

2,860 

169.175 

141,018 

2,953 

11.782 

1.^ 

1,613 



.87S 

,175 
,270 
,428 

,616 

,662 

.671 
,419 
,252 

,589 

420 

861 

982 
414 
465 

S77 

189 

767 

31 
897 
209 

65 
319 
236 



760 416,582 



263 



263 

56.539 

45.984 

7,934 

2.468 

160 

3 



87,519 

5,008 
63.582 
18,929 

62, 187 

5,080 
27.374 
13.568 
3,042 
3,123 



90.949 

4,867 
68,436 
17,646 

48,674 

5,176 

24.421 

12,435 

3,612 

2,930 



242 



216,714 150,426 

187,002ll30.671 



1,770 
27 



S.028 
2.047 

665 

599 



211 

"62 



121 
28 



10,887 

14.250 

1,959 

1,616 



12,873 

9,175 
2,270 
1,428 

25,385 

8,589 

11.671 

6,419 
6,252 

20,617 

6.467 

16.526 

15,581 
414 
531 

11,397 

8,189 

3.968 

31 

959 

1,209 

05 

1,440 

264 



2.856 

12.313 

2,214 

2,472 



242 

63,872 

49,318 

9,311 

2,842 

172 

2,229 



64,570 



16,018 

9,478 
3,849 
1,691 

24.043 

10.255 

12,457 

6,971 
5.486 

17,607 

4,387 

21,111 

15,456 

4,745 

910 

12,072 

8,465 

4,723 

209 

1,146 

1,031 

150 

1.999 

179 



1,670 
30 



3.027 
2.129 

409 

301 



108 
19 



I 



481,102 420,087 



308 

100 
25 



151 
32 



90.949 

4,867 
68.436 
17,646 

48,816 
5,176 
24,421 
12.435 
3,612 
3,172 

214.298 

179,889 

12,167 

15,155 

2,386 

4,701 



15,018 

9,478 
3,849 
1.691 

25.713 

10.285 

12.467 

6,971 
5,486 

20,634 

6.616 

21,520 

15,757 
4,745 
1,018 

12,091 

8,465 

6,031 

309 
1,171 
1.031 

159 

2,150 

211 



71.706 



491.793 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



14 New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 

table c— number and membbbship of labob unions, bt gboup8 of tradbs, 

1894-1918 « 
GROUP I.— BUILDING, STONE WORKING, ETC. 



Ykab 


Stons Worksrs 


Buiu>Dro 

MSCRANICS 


Laborbbs 


Total 


Unions 


Memben 


Urions 


Members 


Unions 


Memben 


Unions 


Memben 


1894 

1806 

1806 

1807 

1808 

1800 

1000 

1001 

1002 

1003 

1004 

1006 

1006 

1007 

1008 

1000 

1010 

1011 

1012 

1018 


20 
27 
32 
28 
34 
30 
40 
34 
39 
44 
43 
46 
50 
60 
43 
44 
43 
43 
43 
44 


5,093 
4.941 
5.330 
6.156 
4.722 
4,873 
4.937 
6.103 
6.154 
6.559 
7.284 
8,455 
8.644 
8,342 
6.816 
6.011 
5.420 
5.865 
6.078 
6.037 


229 
233 
232 
239 
268 
294 
381 
430 
512 
. 568 
575 
584 
613 
635 
628 
603 
594 
600 
605 
615 


37,261 
41.192 
43,116 
41,285 
45.301 
51.035 
61.278 
63,678 
72,658 
79.654 
78,246 
89.049 
98.952 

101.190 
88.233 
86.646 
92.084 
96.808 
98.803 

108.157 


28 
29 
29 
28 
32 
39 
46 
44 
49 
61 
58 
57 
• 63 
65 
63 
56 
61 
70 
58 
63 


6.777 

7.550 

7,917 

6.862 

9.653 

14.123 

13.490 

15.051 

12.105 

23.960 

34.067 

36.194 

39.797 

40.550 

24.961 

20.674 

23,084 

27,281 

25,125 

24,644 


283 
280 
293 
296 
324 
372 
467 
508 
600 
673 
676 
687 
726 
750 
734 
703 
698 
713 
706 
722 


49,131 

53,683 

56.363 

53.303 

50.676 

70.031 

70.705 

84.732 

00,817 

110,173 

110,607 

133,608 

147,303 

160,082 

120,010 

113,331 

120.688 

120,054 

130,006 

188,738 



GROUP II.— TRANSPORTATION. 



Ybab 


Railway 

ElCPLOTBBSt 


Natiqation 


Tbambtbbs 


TOTALt 


Unions 


Memben 


Unions 




Unions 


Memben 


Unions 




1804 

1806 

1806 

1807 

1808 

1800 

1000 

1001 

1002 

1003 

1004 

1005 

1006 

1007 

1008 

1000 

1010 

1011 

1012 

1013 


113 
117 
120 
134 
134 
142 
153 
164 
181 
210 
239 
231 
223 
245 
264 
269 
267 
262 
264 
267 


11,003 
9,968 
10,365 
13,145 
14,137 
14,660 
17,544 
21,367 
19,883 
27.778 
30,830 
28,101 
28,717 
32,009 
30.608 
30.087 
83.122 
34.230 
36.042 
30.808 


4 

4 

4 

4 

2 

4 



10 

13 

18 

22 

25 

26 

27 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

30 


5.744 

6.003 

6.458 

1.520 

877 

1.231 

3.482 

5.760 

11,861 

16,186 

10,871 

12,620 

12,077 

14.030 

13.673 

13.421 

16.570 

22.005 

30.347 

27.720 


5 
5 

8 
15 
25 
36 
55 
62 
83 
68 
59 
53 
63 
61 
47 
45 
50 
53 

ei 


826 

1.073 

4.026 

2.100 

2.330 

3.377 

4.300 

4.631 

5.135 

12.741 

15,460 

16.525 

14.131 

18.203 

16.745 

12.520 

13,120 

16,010 

16.800 

20.086 


123 
127 
148 
154 
158 
188 
222 
261 
201 
356 
375 
354 
343 
376 
381 
365 
872 
370 
350 
304 


18.773 
10.134 
23,460 
23,033 
10,065 
25.081 
32,070 
37,023 
42,824 
63,701 
72,257 
62,871 
61,540 
72,771 
68.000 
62,376 
60.060 
70.300 
86.120 
03.006 



* Returns are for July 1 in 1804 and 1806. for Ootober 31 in 1806 and for September 30 in 
other years. t Includes telegraphere. both railway and commercial. } Includes freight 

handlen also. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



15 



TaUki C— Nvmbcr and 



Meaib«nM» «r Ubw UbImw, by Giwips af 

GROUP III.— CLOTHING AND TEXTILES. 



Tndm, 18t4-ltl< — omL 



Ybab 


Gabuxnt 

WOBXKBB 


Hat and Cap 
Maksbs and Fub 

WOBUBS 


Shoe axd Glotb 

WOBKXBS 


Total* 




UniooB 


Members 


UnioDB 


Members 


UnioDB 




Unions 


Members 


1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 


46 
61 
59 
55 
56 
58 
61 
74 
90 
85 
88 
83 
86 
92 
85 

S2 
99 

103 

97 

112 


30.514 
41.231 
22.750 
25.667 
19.884 
23.498 
21,339 
34,010 
33.509 
28.792 
26.079 
24.064 
22.952 
29.962 
19.826 
34.164 
107.027 
102.592 
104.569 
185.948 


15 
16 
14 
13 
15 
14 
12 
13 
15 
17 
20 
20 
20 
27 
23 
23 
27 
27 
25 
28 


2.964 
3.682 
2.287 
2.336 
1.697 
1.746 
1.583 
1.936 
3.319 
3.818 
3.899 
3.983 
4.015 
8.290 
4.417 
3.760 
5.794 
6.733 
15.085 
16,597 


13 
16 
12 
10 
15 
13 
16 
21 
34 
38 
33 
17 
19 
16 
17 
15 
17 
18 
18 
30 


1.860 
2.255 
2.029 
2.189 
2.700 
2.156 
2.118 
2.599 
5.403 
5.105 
4.133 
3.352 
3.612 
3.570 
3.936 
3.325 
3.175 
2.952 
3.642 
4.169 


93 
115 
104 

94 
103 
104 
123 
149 
176 
181 
168 
150 
167 
183 
170 
173 
187 
196 
187 
221 


39.162 
51.921 
30.093 
32.147 
26»444 
29,644 
28.783 
41,843 
46.954 
40.981 
36.090 
34.406 
35.259 
47.438 
31.409 
44.537 
119,911 
117.228 
130.206 
226.528 



GROUP IV.— METALS, MACHINERY AND SHIPBUILDING. 





WOBKBBS 


Mbtal Wobkbbs 


Shipbuildbbb 


Total 


Ybab 


















Unions 


Members 


Unions 


Members 


Unions 


Members 


Unions 


Members 


1894 


75 


6,414 


8 


598 


10 


1.297 


93 


8,309 


1895 


81 


7.347 


11 


846 


10 


1.135 


102 


9,328 


1806 


89 


8.506 


10 


1.322 


11 


1,505 


110 


11.833 


1897 


94 


7,577 


15 


963 


11 


1,584 


120 


10.124 


1808 


97 


9.029 


19 


1,207 


11 


1.385 


127 


11,621 


1809 


130 


13.892 


29 


2.378 


10 


1,509 


169 


17,779 


1900 


179 


20.115 


34 


2.467 


14 


1.571 


227 


24,153 


190ir 


205 


21.662 


32 


2.174 


15 


1,780 


252 


25.616 


1902 


251 


32.156 


38 


3,940 


14 


2.105 


303 


38.201 


1903 


289 


39.180 


54 


6,359 


17 


2,691 


360 


48,230 


1904 


264 


30.529 


43 


4.151 


16 


2.291 


323 


36.971 


1905 


243 


28.010 


40 


3.947 


16 


2,206 


299 


34.163 


1906 


238 


29,735 


41 


4,239 


13 


1,962 


292 


35.936 


1907 


250 


31,776 


43 


4.267 


11 


2.031 


301 


38.074 


1908 


229 


24.401 


35 


2.781 


9 


1.648 


273 


28.830 


1909 


210 


23.628 


34 


2.414 


9 


1,503 


253 


27.645 


1910...... 


224 


31.264 


36 


3.706 


9 


1.653 


369 


36,623 


1911 


226 


29,537 


32 


.3.032 


9 


1.468 


267 


34,037 


1912 


205 


24.664 


32 


2.862 


9 


1,436 


246 


28,962 


1913 


217 


30.862 


38 


4.899 


9 


1,691 


264 


37.452 



* Includes also textile workers, laundry workers and shirt and oollar makers. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



16 

Table C—Nu 



New Yobk Labob Bulletin. 



I MembenUp of l^bor Unlona, by Grovfs of 

GROUP v.— PRINTING, BINDING. ETC. 



Tndea, 1894-1913 — oonft. 



Y.AB 


Unions 


MUMBBRS 


Male 


Female 


Total 


1894 


52 
58 
59 
68 
70 
80 
92 
100 
110 
117 
119 
124 
119 
115 
114 
113 
117 
122 
126 
129 


10,912 
11.744 


147 
254 


11.069 


1895 


11.998 


1896 


♦13,948 


1897 


12.933 
14.596 
15,456 
16.387 
17,155 
20,268 
22,876 
24,289 
24.975 
25,399 
24.673 
24,082 
24.180 
25,060 
27,124 
28.036 
28.839 


480 

494 

695 

758 

906 

902 

1,039 

1.059 

1.217 

1,341 

1.475 

1.099 

1.195 

1,829 

1,914 

1,941 

1.891 


13.413 


1808 


15.090 


1809 


16.061 


1900 


17.146 


1901 


18,061 


1902 


21,170 


1903 


23,916 


1904 


25,348 


1906 


26.192 


1906 


26,740 


1907 


26,148 


1908 


26,181 


1909 


25,375 


1910 


26,889 


1911 


29.038 


1912 


29.977 


1913 


30.730 







GROUP VI.— WOOD WORKING AND FURNITURE. 



YaAR 


Unions 


MUCBSBS 




Male 


Female 


Total 


1894 


28 
28 
29 
28 
32 
41 
59 
69 
74 
87 
89 
91 
93 
88 
85 
75 
68 
72 
70 
80 


6.156 
4.457 


13 
20 


6.169 

4.477 

♦4.069 

8.975 

4.468 

6.671 

8.037 

8.113 

12.247 

16.916 

12.771 

11 179 


1806 


1806 


1897 


3,972 
4.468 
6,571 
8,037 
8,091 
12,218 
16,868 
12,725 
11.134 
12.494 
12.115 
10,149 
9,343 
10.197 
11.915 
11,562 
14.726 


3 


1898 


1899 




1900 




1901 


22 

29 
48 
46 
45 
83 
45 
45 
26 
25 
24 
40 
36 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1906 


1906 


12,677 
12.160 


1907 


1908 


10.194 
9,369 
10,222 
11.939 
11 602 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


14.762 





♦ Sex not diBtinguished in 1896. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



lUito C— NvadMr nd 



Appendix. 

Meaib«nM» «r Lab«r Uafenm hy Gwfmm ^ 

GROUP VII.— POOD AND LIQUORa 



17 
1894-19U — ooat 



Ybab 


BAKHULBirrcHBBa, 
Etc. 


BBBwnnr 
Emvlotbbb 


Total 




Uniona 


MembeTB 


Unions 


Mwnben 


Unions 


M6ino6n 


1894 


23 

27 
32 
31 
33 
42 
51 
57 
66 
94 
86 
77 
67 
63 
59 
67 
67 
64 
62 
67 


2,187 
2.799 
2.842 
2.548 
2.686 
3;643 
4.506 
3,878 
5.337 
9.315 
8,782 
6.826 
6.358 
6.918 
7.026 
8.517 
10.448 
9.490 
9.032 
9.202 


24 
26 

36 
43 
49 
58 
59 
57 
66 
59 
56 
53 
56 
56 
52 
52 
53 
53 


3.153 
3,411 
4.311 
4.073 
3.883 
4,392 
4.482 
4.851 
7.191 
6.442 
6,612 
6,777 
7.155 
7.439 
7.727 
7.853 
8.127 
8.750 
8.720 
8.793 


47 

53 

61 

63 

69 

85 

100 

115 

125 

151 

142 

136 

123 

116 

115 

123 

119 

116 

115 

120 


5.340 
6,210 


1895 


1806 


7,153 


1897 


6,621 


1898 


6.469 


1899 


7.986 


1900 


8,987 


1901 


8.729 


1902 


12.528 


1903 


15,757 


1904 


15.394 


1905 


13.603 


1906 


13.513 


1907 


14.357 


1908 


14,753 


1909 


16.370 


1910 


18.575 


1911 


18,240 


1912 


17,752 


1913 


17,995 







GROUP VIII.— THEATERS AND MUSIC. 



Ybab 


Unions 


Mbmbbbb 


Male 


Female 


Total 


1894 


26 
27 
28 
27 
29 
29 
32 
38 
44 
51 
55 
59 
60 
64 
67 
75 
75 
77 
78 
88 


5.663 
6.846 


126 
481 


5.688 


1895 


7,327 


1806 


*7,806 


1807 


6.683 
9.033 
9.088 
9.221 
11.179 
10.345 
11.130 
12,282 
12,492 
12.617 
14,846 
15,584 
17,144 
18.993 
23.286 
22.638 
28.212 


887 
313 
430 
477 
509 

1,243 
644 

1.332 

lii 

1.390 
1.371 
1.384 
1.486 
3,505 
3.359 
3.396 


6,920 


1808 


9,346 


1809 


9.518 


1900 


9.698 


1901 


11,688 


1902 


11.588 


1908 


11,674 


1904 


13.614 


1906 


13.224 


1906 


13.439 


1907 


16.236 


1906 


16,955 


1909 


18.528 


1910 


20,479 


1911 


26,791 


1912 


26,997 


1913 


26,607 







*Sex not distinguished in 1896. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



18 New Yobk Labob BuLiiBTnr. 

lUito C— NwBbcr and MembcnUp of Lab«r UirfoM, bj Gfwps «r Tn4M, lM4-ltU — OMrt. 

GROUP IX.— TOBACCO. 



Ybab 


Uniona 




Male 


Female 


Total 


1804 


53 
54 
54 
55 
54 
55 
56 
57 
61 
67 
67 
66 
65 
66 
66 
65 
64 
67 
65 
65 


6.780 
7.011 


1.033 
2.078 


8.722 


1806 


O.OSO 


1806 


•0.700 
007 


1807 


6,007 
6.445 
7,022 
8,442 
7,721 
8,565 
0,457 
0.402 
0.386 
0.450 
0.280 
0.146 
8,387 
8.320 
8.130 
7.878 
7.827 


2.100 
2.444 
1.864 
3.007 
2.480 
2.484 
2.078 
2.052 
2.720 
2,420 
2,608 
2,377 
2.144 
1.060 
2.350 
2,322 
2.300 


1808 


8.880 


1800 


8.886 


1000 


12,340 


1001 


10.210 


1002 


11.040 


1003 


12.435 


1004 


12.354 


1005 


12,115 


1906 


11,888 


1007 


11,888 


1008 


11.523 


1000 


10,531 


1010 


10,280 


1011 


10,480 


1012 


10,200 


1013 


10,217 







GROUP X.— RESTAURANTS. TRADE. ETC. 



Ybab 


HOTBL AND 
RBflTAUBANT 

Emplotxbb 


Babbbrs 


Cubbkb and 
Salbsmbm 


Total 




UnioDB 


Members 


Unions 


Members 


Unions 


Members 


Unions 


Members 


1804 

1805 

1806 

1807 

1808 

1800 

1000 

1001 

1002 

1003 

1004 

1005 

1006 

IIS;::::: 

1000 

1010 

1011 

1012 

1013 


16 
16 
14 
14 
15 
17 
25 
42 
30 
65 
50 
52 
50 
53 
54 
52 
44 
45 
56 
60 


1.377 
1,351 
1.412 
1.453 
1.404 
1.746 
2.600 
3.658 
4.033 
8.470 
10.042 
7.578 
5.303 
6.116 
6.370 
5.607 
5.365 
5.513 
18.155 
10,404 


7 
10 
12 
18 
21 
10 
23 
33 
42 
40 
52 
53 
53 
56 
52 
52 
52 
53 
53 
66 


207 

273 

621 

767 

800 

1,033 

1,387 

1.788 

1,037 

2.430 

2,401 

2,477 

2.424 

3.568 

2.638 

2.601 

2.624 

2.883 

2.851 

7.470 


4 
7 
13 
13 
17 
10 
28 
33 
65 
63 
47 
35 
37 
38 
28 
26 
24 
26 
24 
24 


187 
500 
1.025 
764 
1.015 
1.806 
2.457 
2,736 
4,777 
3.010 
2.722 
2.720 
2.510 
2.420 
1.628 
1,614 
1,075 
1.628 
1.003 
1,732 


27 

33 

30 

45 

53 

55 

76 

108 

146 

177 

158 

140 

140 

147 

134 

130 

120 

124 

132 

130 


1.771 

2.133 

3.058 

2.084 

3.228 

4.584 

6.543 

8.182 

10.747 

14.828 

15.255 

12.784 

10.327 

12.104 

10.636 

0.822 

0.064 

10.024 

22.000 

28.705 



* Sex not distinguished in 1806. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Afpxnbiz. 



19 



Tabto C— Nuibcr and 



» «r JUbar UbImm, by GfwpB «r Tmde*, 1M4-19U — CMrt . 

GROUP XI.— PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT. 



Ybab 


Uniozis 


MxBfBBita 


Male 


Female 


Total 


1894 


6 

6 

4 

4 

8 

41 

58 

81 

105 

111 

117 

111 

112 

118 

148 

149 

224 

230 

250 

257 


1.064 
1.064 




1.064 


1805 




1.064 


1806 




ioes 


1807 


1.667 
1.880 
3.707 
7,143 
8.132 
9,142 
9.596 
9.407 
9,234 
9.305 
10.649 
16.010 
16.038 
16.669 
15.706 
14.565 
16.803 




1.667 


1808 




1.880 


1800 




3.707 


1000 


5 

10 

18 

157 

131 

112 

114 

62 

87 

119 

965 

964 

1.131 

1,501 


7,148 


1001 


8.142 


1002 


0.160 


1003 


9.753 


1004 


9.638 


1005 


9.346 


1006 


9,419 


1007 


10,711 


1006 


15.007 


1009 


16.167 


1010 


17.534 


1011 


16.660 


1012 


15.606 


1913 


18.304 







GROUP XII.— STATIONARY ENGINE TENDING. 



Ybab 


Unioiui 




MaMBBRS 




Male 


Female 


Total 


1804 


1! 

12 
35 
•40 
56 
50 
64 
82 
95 
97 
85 
75 
74 
69 
69 
66 
68 
62 
68 


975 
1.105 
1.239 
2.948 
3,738 
5.204 
5.666 
7.566 
8.111 
11.166 
12.702 
12.037 
12.650 
14.574 
11.984 
11.946 
12.277 
11.637 
10.538 
11.655 




975 


1806 




1,105 


1806 




1.230 


1807 




2.948 


1808 




3.738 


1800 




5.204 


1000 





5,666 


1001 




7.566 
8,111 
11.166 
12,702 
12,037 
12,650 
14.574 
11.984 


1002 




1003 . . . 




1004 




1005 




1006 




1007 




1006 




1009 




11.946 


1010 




12,277 


1011 




11.637 


1012 




10.538 


1013 




11.665 









^ Sex not diBtinsaiihed in 1806. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 



New Yobk Labob Bullbtin. 



IWrte C— Nunber and MMDb«nbip of Lab«r UbImm, by Gvoops «r Twdaa, 1894-ltl< — 

oottcluded 

GROUP XIII.— MISCELLANEOUS. 



Ybab 


Pjlpbr Worxxbs 


Glass Workshs 


Total* 


Uniona 


Members 


Unions 


Members 


Unions 


Members 


1894 






16 
16 


911 

1.330 


20 

24 

21 

21 

20 

45 

65 

69 

112 

157 

118 

100 

105 

96 

88 

75 

78 

67 

73 

96 


1.134 


1896 






1.862 


1896 






12 i;042 
14' 818 
12 758 


1.483 


1897 






1,322 


1898 







1,153 


1899 


4 
10 
16 
27 
48 
34 
36 
35 
35 
34 
21 
24 
26 
34 
44 




251 
490 
929 
2,154 
4,634 
3.195 
3.240 
2,827 
3.674 
2.775 
1,550 
2,279 
3,140 
2,548 
3,597 


21 
21 
15 
20 
26 
25 
21 
20 


1,108 
1,027 
694 
1.722 
2,529 
1.688 
1.085 
1.163 


3,039 


1900 


4,188 


1901 


5,336 


1902 


13,706 
16.979 


1903 


1904 


9,785 
7,618 


1905 


1906 


7.813 
10.249 


1907 


18 1,213 
17 1,131 

19 1.755 
211 2.524 
18i 1.582 

20 1.643 

21 1.585 


1908 


7.887 
6.843 
10.413 


1909 


1910 


1911 


8,969 


1912 


7,517 


1913 


9,660 











* Inoludes leather workers, oement, clay and plaster workers, and aU other trades not elsewhere 
specified as weU as unions of mixed trades. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



21 



TABLE D.— NUMBEB AND 



MBMBBBSHIP OF LABOB UNIONS IN BACH CITT. 

Mbmbbbb 



ClTT 



Albany. 



AliaTBBDAM. 



AUBUBN. 



BlNGHAMTOM. 



BUITALO . 



* Deoranber 31 for 1807; September 30 for subeequeiit yean. 



Number of^ — 
fear* uniooB 


Men 


Women 


Total 


1807 


43 


3.699 


22 


3.621 


1808 


44 


3.314 


24 


3.338 


1890 


60 


4.309 


68 


4.367 


1900 


68 


6.884 


26 


6.000 


1001 


73 


6.767 


82 


6.840 


1002 


80 


7.948 


60 


8.008 


1903 


84 


8.808 


66 


8.873 


1004 


83 


8.162 


57 


8,210 


1906 


80 


7.756 


65 


7.821 


1906 


81 


7.649 


06 


7.746 


1907 


83 


8,518 


101 


8.610 


1908 


85 


7.900 


00 


7.000 


1909 


77 


7.630 


50 


7.680 


1910 


81 


8.026 


88 


8.114 


1911 


83 


8.363 


107 


8,470 


1912 


84 


8.867 


112 


8.060 


1913 


83 


8.878 


165 


0,033 


1807 


3 


66 




66 


1808 


5 


183 




183 


1800 


11 


380 




380 


1000 


23 


1.067 




1,067 


1001 


24 


1.002 


io 


1.012 


1002 


25 


1.108 


21 


1.120 


1003 


26 


1.132 


18 


1,150 


1904 


19 


760 


5 


756 


1905 


16 


604 


4 


608 


1906 


20 


1.027 


17 


1.044 


1907 


22 


1.106 


5 


1.201 


1908 


19 


069 


3 


062 


1909 


16 


864 


4 


868 


1910 


17 


050 


6 


065 


1911 


17 


008 


6 


014 


1912 


17 


034 


1 


036 


1913 


18 


1.063 


3 


1,066 


1807 


17 


706 


2 


707 


1808 


16 


862 


2 


854 


1800 


19 


1,054 




1,054 


1000 


24 


1.206 


3 


1.200 


1001 


27 


1.375 


2 


1.377 


1002 


36 


2,003 


6 


2,000 


1003 


36 


1.000 


30 


2,020 


1004 


34 


1.755 


41 


1,706 


1006 


33 


1.526 


42 


1,567 


1006 


32 


1.480 


31 


1,611 


1907 


32 


1.612 


34 


i;646 


1908 


31 


1.480 


36 


1,626 


1900 


30 


1.361 


37 


1,388 


1010 


31 


1.404 


33 


1.437 


1011 


31 


1.426 


33 


1.458 


1012 


32 


1.636 


27 


1,663 


1013 


33 


1.825 


33 


1,868 


1897 


11 


736 




736 


1898 


15 


804 


17 


821 


1809 


39 


2.146 


107 


2,252 


1000 


37 


1.701 


37 


1,828 


1001 


36 


1,775 


71 


1,846 


1002 


32 


1.560 


110 


1,670 


1003 


33 


1,700 


120 


1.820 


1004 


33 


1.858 


147 


2,006 


1005 


34 


1,087 


176 


2.163 


1906 


37 


2.080 


178 


2,258 


1907 


42 


2.201 


174 


2,465 


1908 


40 


2,025 


147 


2,172 


1909 


36 


1.786 


114 


1,000 


1910 


37 


1.071 


62 


2.033 


1911 


36 


1,087 


144 


2,131 


1912 


36 


2,124 


120 


2.244 


1913 


36 


2,266 


161 


2.427 


1807 


83 


8.687 


21 


8,708 


1808 


80 


8,840 


14 


8,863 


1809 


117 


16,665 


20 


16.604 


1900 


166 


26.448 


164 


26.612 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



22 



Nbw Yotlk Labor Bulletin. 



TsMe D.<-Nwibcr mad Memb«nM» • 



Crrr 
Buffalo — Conduded. 



COHOBS. 



COBNINQ . 



COBTLAXV. 



Dunkirk. 



r Ubur UbI 


teM In EMh CUj, 1897-1913 —c 


midMied 






Mkmbbbs 




'NTitmhAr n§ . 








Ymt* unions 


Men 


woniAn 


Total 


1901 


159 


26.380 


308 


26.683 


1902 


166 


26.096 


376 


26.472 


1903 


174 


32.047 


761 


82.806 


1904 


183 


32.616 


1,009 


33.626 


1905 


178 


27.586 


916 


28.501 


1906 


174 


28.764 


836 


29.590 


1907 


181 


31,891 


824 


32.715 


1906 


176 


28,218 


596 


28.814 


1909 


168 


27.019 


763 


27.772 


1910 


166 


27.917 


1.299 


29.216 


1911 


163 


29.207 


1.147 


30,364 


1912 


165 


26,780 


1.470 


28.250 


1913 


180 


36,876 


1.908 


38.784 


1897 


6 


407 




407 


1898 


13 


768 


698 


1.466 


1899 


12 


833 


748 


1.281 


1900 


13 


806 


607 


1,418 


1901 


16 


675 


524 


1,199 


1902 


10 


642 


160 


692 


1903 


U 


674 


160 


724 


1904 


14 


758 




768 


1906 


12 


587 




587 


1906 


11 


670 




670 


1907 


17 


1,267 


i6 


1,282 


1908 


17 


947 


16 


963 


1909 


15 


998 


13 


1,011 


1910 


16 


1.118 


6 


1,123 


1911 


19 


1.186 


15 


1,201 


1912 


20 


1.472 


290 


1,762 


1913 


20 


1.277 


60 


1.337 


1807 


5 


322 




322 


1898 


4 


274 




274 


1899 


5 


305 




306 


1900 


8 


461 




461 


1901 


16 


968 




968 


1902 


18 


1,016 




1.015 


1903 


26 


1.244 


ii 


1,255 


1904 


20 


1.093 


3 


1.096 


1905 


18 


1.120 


2 


1.122 


1906 


16 


1.072 


2 


1.074 


1907 


19 


1.236 


11 


1.247 


1906 


18 


1.205 


3 


1.208 


1909 


17 


1.114 


3 


1,117 


1910 


18 


1.140 


3 


1.143 


1911 


18 


1.039 


9 


1,048 


1912 


17 


1.005 


10 


1,105 


1913 


15 


968 


10 


978 


1897 


4 


60 


2 


61 


1898 


4 


65 




65 


1899 


5 


72 




72 


1900 


6 


85 


i 


86 


1901 


6 


92 


2 


94 


1902 


6 


148 


1 


149 


1903 


8 


285 


1 


286 


1904 


11 


299 


18 


317 


1905 


12 


280 


16 


296 


1906 


13 


288 


21 


809 


1907 


11 


246 


18 


264 


1906 


11 


214 


14 


228 


1909 


12 


254 


14 


268 


1910 


12 


282 


11 


293 


1911 


11 


277 


14 


291 


1912 


11 


271 


20 


291 


1913 


12 


267 


21 


288 


1897 


2 


31 




31 


1898 


2 


76 




76 


1899 


4 


172 




172 


1900 


17 


720 


5 


726 


1901 


18 


959 


4 


963 


1902 


21 


841 


4 


845 


1903 


26 


1.294 


7 


1,301 



* December 31 for 1897; September 30 for subeequent years. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Tkbto D.— 



Crrr 
DuNXiBX — Concluded . . 



Appbndiz. 






23 


ifUkor UbIm 


M IB B 


Mh Ottr. 1897-1913 — o 


,,tf.rt 








MXMBBBB 












Ymt* uDioni 


Men 


Women 


Total 


1904 


24 


931 


3 


934 


1905 


21 


685 


5 


690 


1906 


17 


686 


6 


692 


1907 


21 


1,223 


8 


1.281 


1908 


21 


776 


10 


786 


1909 


21 


906 


7 


915 


1910 


24 


2.492 


8 


2.500 


1911 


27 


1,862 


14 


1,866 


1912 


25 


1.743 


17 


1.760 


1913 


27 


1.274 


17 


1.291 


1897 


20 


1.048 


4 


1.047 


1808 


18 


1.075 


2 


1,077 


1899 


20 


1.136 


2 


1,137 


1900 


25 


1.509 


4 


1.513 


1901 


30 


2,003 


9 


2.012 


1902 


38 


2.685 


37 


2.722 


1903 


36 


2.261 


116 


2.377 


1904 


39 


2.289 


86 


2.375 


1905 


39 


2.330 


80 


2.410 


1906 


38 


2.496 


92 


2.588 


1907 


45 


2.959 


97 


8.056 


1908 


41 


2.648 


28 


2.676 


1909 


38 


2.551 


29 


2.580 


1910 


38 


2,852 


10 


2.862 


1911 


38 


2.860 


13 


2,873 


1912 


37 


2.889 


17 


2.906 


1913 


39 


3.072 


8 


3.080 



Fulton. 



Gknsva. 



1897 

1898 

1899 i 30 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 30 

1900 1 37 37 

1901 4 143 143 

1902 7 176 176 

1903 10 200 30 230 

1904 8 77 77 

1905 6 75 75 

1906 5 70 70 

1907 7 147 147 

1908 6 125 125 

1909 5 133 133 

1910 6 99 99 

1911 8 144 2 146 

1912 8 190 190 

1913 11 369 369 

1897 6 278 278 

1898 10 323 6 329 
1890 10 321 1 322 

1900 13 546 1 547 

1901 18 762 1 763 

1902 24 859 15 874 

1903 27 800 20 910 

1904 25 866 11 877 

1905 24 823 8 831 

1906 25 996 5 1,001 

1907 24 1,016 4 1.020 

1908 24 972 3 975 

1909 23 824 3 827 

1910 25 803 4 897 

1911 25 971 3 974 

1912 25 1.011 3 1,014 

1913 23 942 3 945 



QLBire Falls 1897 

1898 
1809 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1007 
1908 

* December 31 for 1897; September 30 for mibeequent yeare. 



4 


93 


1 


94 


3 


83 .. 




83 


5 


241 .. 




241 


7 


326 .. 




326 


12 


607 


2 


609 


33 


2,612 


472 


2.984 


29 


1.541 


225 


1.766 


23 


1.119 


17 


1^136 


23 


1.016 


9 


1.025 


22 


987 


7 


994 


20 


1.038 


10 


1.048 


18 


972 


10 


982 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24 



Nsw YosK Labob Bullbtin. 





nM» «r Lftbor 


UbImmIb B 


Mh Otr. 1897-1913 " 


-eMttoaed 




]Jm«mK«. ^ 




Mmons 




Cirr 


Yew* 


uniona 


Men 


Wamen 


Total 


Gum Falls — Condyd^ 


1909 


15 


927 


10 


937 




1910 


17 


861 


11 


872 




1911 


16 


944 


12 


956 




1912 


17 


990 


17 


1.007 




1913 


18 


1.165 


17 


1.182 


Glovbbstills 


Ig97 


2 
2 


275 
519 




275 




1898 


519 




1899 


5 


550 


ie 


566 




1900 


8 


858 


11 


869 




1901 


17 


1.277 


323 


1.600 




1902 


28 


2.565 


458 


3.023 




1903 


30 


2.526 


540 


3.066 




1904 


23 


1.125 


330 


1.455 




1905 


13 


402 


8 


410 




1906 


13 


386 


8 


394 




1907 


12 


390 


5 


395 




1908 


12 


420 


4 


424 




1909 


12 


553 


3 


556 




1910 


13 


601 


3 


694 




1911 


12 


501 


2 


503 




1912 


11 


776 


10 


786 




1913 


13 


594 


25 


619 


HOBNBLL 


1897 


6 
6 


616 

718 




616 




1898 


718 




1899 


7 


719 




719 




1900 


20 


1.895 


272 


1.667 




1901 


21 


1.054 


82 


1.066 




1902 


16 


956 


3 


959 




1903 


20 


1.177 


2 


1.179 




1904 


20 


1.210 


3 


1.213 




1905 


19 


1.184 


80 


1.214 




1906 


22 


1.275 


19 


1.294 




1907 


23 


1.336 


14 


1.360 




1906 


23 


1.414 




1.414 




1909 


21 


1.214 


9 


1.223 




1910 


19 


1.180 


7 


1,187 




1911 


20 


1.189 


14 


1.203 




1912 


20 


1.198 


10 


1.208 




1913 


20 


1.183 


8 


1.191 


tlUDSON 


1897 


2 
3 


53 
115 




53 




1898 


115 




1899 


3 


76 




76 




1900 


4 


98 




08 




1901 


7 


136 




136 




1902 





265 




265 




1903 


10 


302 




802 




1904 


10 


240 




240 




1905 


9 


208 




208 




1906 


9 


200 




200 




1907 


6 


206 




206 




1908 


6 


in 




177 




1909 


6 


170 




170 




1910 


7 


185 




185 




1911 


8 


198 




198 




1912 


7 


167 




167 




1913 


7 


165 




165 


Ithaca 


1897 


13 
12 


347 
291 


20 

17 


367 




1898 


308 




1899 


12 


358 


15 


373 




1900 


13 


327 


16 


343 




1901 


14 


499 


16 


515 




1902 


15 


624 


31 


655 




1903 


17 


793 


19 


812 




1904 


17 


762 


28 


790 




1905 


16 


866 


46 


912 




1906 


15 


647 


36 


683 




1907 


15 


635 


42 


677 




1908 


15 


592 


34 


626 




1909 


14 


584 


28 


612 




1910 


14 


663 


28 


691 




1911 


15 


705 


34 


739 




1912 


15 


658 


23 


681 




1913 


14 


740 


21 


761 



* Deoember 31 for 1897; Septambw 30 for rob teqiaent yean. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



25 



Crrr 



jAMnrrowN. 



Johnstown . 



KiNOflTON. 



LikCKAWANNAt. 



LiTTLB Falls. 



r Lsbor UbIsiu Ib bwh GItjr, IM 7-ltlS — 


-coatlMMd 








Mnmbbbs 




y.««>.v.A» ^« 








Yew* 


unions 


Men 


Women 


ToUl 


1807 


4 


05 




05 


1808 


4 


77 




77 


1890 


7 


150 




150 


1900 


16 


806 


106 


012 


1001 


35 


1.533 


05 


1.628 


1002 


37 


1,450 


87 


1.537 


1003 


43 


1.550 


02 


1.642 


1004 


27 


014 


36 


050 


1005 


22 


760 


18 


787 


1006 


20 


005 


17 


712 


1007 


20 


777 


7 


784 


1006 


10 


787 


15 


802 


1009 


21 


1.081 




1.081 


1010 


20 


1.636 


18 


1.654 


1011 


21 


1.853 


26 


1.870 


1012 


21 


1.271 


83 


1.304 


1013 


26 


1.400 


38 


1.537 


1807 











1808 






1800 










1000 


1 


7 




7 


1001 


8 


8 


111 


lie 


1002 


13 


812 


150 


071 


1003 


13 


882 


176 


1.058 


1004 


10 


874 


10 


808 


10O5 


4 


01 




91 


1006 


4 


74 




74 


1007 


4 


88 




88 


1006 


3 


66 




66 


1000 


3 


77 




77 


1010 


4 


87 




87 


1011 


5 


08 




08 


1012 


4 


04 




04 


1018 


5 


120 




120 


1807 


7 


227 




227 


1898 


6 


100 




100 


1800 


6 


160 




160 


1000 


8 


247 




247 


1001 


8 


221 




221 


1002 


10 


827 


2 


320 


1003 


23 


800 


1 


801 


1004 


24 


077 


2 


070 


10O5 


26 


1.022 


1 


1,023 


1006 


25 


080 


5 


004 


1007 


23 


1.071 


7 


1.078 


1008 


22 


1.004 


7 


1,101 


1000 


23 


1.140 


6 


1.155 


1010 


23 


1.211 


5 


1.216 


1011 


25 


1.283 


5 


1 288 


1012 


24 


1,217 


6 


1.223 


1013 


24 


1,345 


8 


1.353 


1807 










1808 










1800 










1000 











1001 











1002 










1003 










1004 


1 


50 




50 


1005 










1006 










1007 


1 


68 




68 


1006 


2 


114 




114 


1009 


2 


107 




107 


1010 


2 


145 




145 


1011 


2 


115 




115 


1012 


2 


115 




115 


1013 


2 


155 




155 


1897 


3 


47 




47 


1898 


3 


56 




56 


1899 


3 


54 




54 


1900 


13 


513 


16 


520 



* December 31 for 1807; September 30 for lubsequent years. 



t Formerly West Seneca. 
Digitized by VjOOQIC 



26 



Nbw York Labob Bulletin. 



Tabto D.— NvadMr and 



Cut 
Ltttlb Falu — Concluded , 



LOCXPORT. 



MiDOUBTOWN . 



Mount Vwcmon. 



Nbwbi 



UlMT 


UbImm Ib BMk Ottr. 1897-19U- 


•eoBtiaMd 








Membbm 




]kT*.«»W«» <«# _ 








IfX* 


umons 


Men 


Women 


Total 


1901 


20 


657 


27 


084 


1902 


19 


501 


46 


637 


1903 


17 


514 


11 


525 


1904 


16 


480 


20 


600 


1905 


14 


389 


8 


307 


1906 


13 


465 




465 


1907 


12 


389 




389 


1906 


10 


264 




264 


1909 


10 


222 




222 


1910 


11 


286 




286 


1911 


13 


314 


4 


318 


1912 


12 


319 


3 


322 


1913 


14 


360 


17 


377 


1807 


12 


257 


60 


326 


1898 


12 


291 


38 


329 


1809 


22 


1.148 


34 


1,182 


1900 


32 


1,432 


82 


1.514 


1901 


87 


1,290 


93 


1.383 


1902 


34 


1.230 


38 


1.268 


1903 


29 


1,144 


41 


1.185 


1904 


27 


992 


24 


1.016 


1906 


25 


816 


24 


840 


1906 


23 


771 




771 


1907 


20 


678 


86 


174 


1908 


20 


649 


11 


660 


1900 


19 


597 


2 


509 


1910 


21 


640 


17 


657 


1911 


21 


716 


8 


723 


1912 


21 


721 


1 


722 


1913 


20 


721 


11 


732 


1897 


4 


277 




277 


1898 


4 


273 




273 


1809 


6 


296 




296 


1900 


9 


463 




463 


1901 


12 


891 




801 


1902 


20 


885 




885 


1903 


28 


1.332 


37 


1.369 


1904 


27 


1.178 


17 


1.195 


1905 


22 


1.153 


2 


1.155 


1906 


22 


1.146 


5 


1,151 


1907 


25 


1,210 


4 


1,214 


1908 


25 


1.257 


7 


1.264 


1909 


25 


1.345 


5 


1,350 


1910 


25 


1.342 


5 


1,347 


1911 


28 


1,536 


3 


1,589 


1912 


28 


1.551 


2 


1.663 


1913 


27 


1.550 


2 


1.552 


1897 


4 


231 




231 


1898 


6 


236 




236 


1800 


6 


390 




390 


1900 


9 


488 




488 


1901 


10 


545 




645 


1002 


12 


745 




745 


1903 


14 


792 


2 


794 


1904 


12 


667 


2 


669 


1906 


13 


718 




718 


1906 


13 


861 




861 


1907 


15 


982 




982 


1908 


14 


807 




807 


1900 


16 


863 




863 


1910 


15 


1.007 




1.007 


1911 


15 


887 


i 


888 


1912 


15 


809 


1 


000 


1913 


15 


974 


1 


075 


1807 


13 


765 


757 


1.522 


1898 


21 


1,027 


731 


1,758 


1899 


20 


975 


687 


1.662 


1900 


22 


1.107 


679 


1.786 


1901 


21 


1,161 


730 


1.801 


1002 


21 


1,261 


656 


1,917 


1903 


25 


1,651 


700 


2.351 


1904 


33 


1.005 


796 


2.791 



* December 81 for 1807; September 30 (or subsequent years. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbkdiz. 



27 



Tihto D^Nmbw ud 



«r JUbar UbImm im BmIi Cttr. 18t7-ttU — orallna«4 



City 


Year* 


uniomi . 


Men 


Women 


Total 


Nbwbuiiob — Concluded 


1905 


31 


1.934 


862 


2.796 




1906 


33 


1,940 


866 


2.806 




1907 


30 


1.868 


839 


2.702 




1908 


37 


2.077 


817 


2.894 




1909 


35 


1.911 


914 


2.825 




1910 


36 


1,916 


864 


2.779 




1911 


33 


1.797 


779 


2.576 




1912 


33 


1.806 


732 


2.688 




1913 


32 


1.837 


707 


2.644 


Nbw Rocbxllb 


1897 


6 


173 




173 




1808 


6 


182 




182 




1899 


6 


210 




210 




1900 


8 


394 




394 




1901 


9 


400 




409 




1902 


11 


560 




560 




1903 


14 


609 




609 




1904 


12 


584 


i 


585 




1906 


13 


856 


2 


858 




1906 


13 


1.150 


2 


1.152 




1907 


14 


1.310 


4 


1.314 




1908 


14 


891 


3 


804 




1900 


17 


1.890 


2 


1.392 




1910 


19 


1.512 


2 


1.514 




1911 


19 


1.464 


1 


1.465 




1912 


19 


1.298 




1.298 




1913 


21 


1,418 




1.418 


Kbw Yohx Citt 


1897 


432 


128.012 
120.617 


5.476 
4,812 


133.488 
126,429 




1898 


440 




1899 


477 


136,584 


5.103 


141.687 




1900 


502 


146.433 


8.071 


154,504 




1901 


515 


163.604 


10.418 


174,022 




1902 


579 


188,286 


9,769 


198,055 




1903 


653 


235.885 


8.327 


244.212 




1904 


670 


247.021 


7,698 


254,719 




1905 


667 


244,663 


6.614 


251,277 




1906 


678 


253.065 


6.943 


260,008 




1907 


712 


276.565 


9.625 


286,180 




1906 


704 


232.403 


7.135 


239.538 




1909 


699 


234,436 


8.721 


243.157 




1910 


722 


313.515 


23.994 


337.509 




1911 


736 


325.786 


81.285 


357,071 




1912 


693 


345.911 


31,798 


377.709 




1913 


760 


420,087 


71.706 


491,793 


Niaoara Falu 


1897 


6 
5 


200 
151 




200 




1898 


151 




1899 


6 


600 




600 




1900 


29 


1.380 


i92 


1.572 




1901 


38 


2,227 


156 


2.433 




1902 


44 


2.567 


199 


2,766 




1903 


46 


2.536 


255 


2,791 




1904 


40 


1,977 


125 


2.102 




1905 


39 


2.005 


126 


2.131 




1906 


35 


1,669 


108 


1,777 




1907 


31 


1.673 


5 


1.678 




1906 


29 


1.638 


3 


1,641 




1909 


28 


1.403 


7 


1,410 




1910 


29 


1.657 




1,657 




1911 


34 


1.884 


68 


1,952 




1912 


80 


1.961 


14 


1,975 




1913 


30 


2,153 


16 


2,169 


NOBTH Toif AWA2n>A 


1897 










(Sm also Tonawanda.) 


1808 







1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 



1 
3 
6 
6 
6 
13 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 



6 
151 
270 
340 
348 
984 
442 
426 
324 
255 



34 



* December 31 for 1897; September 30 for suboequent yeara. 



6 
151 
270 
340 
348 
1.018 
442 
426 
324 
255 
234 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 



New Yobk Labob Bullstin. 





- c*Btiaa«d 






Mbmbbbs 




>T......Wi>. ^t ^ 








City Year* 


-lUUAUVr Ul ' 


Men 


Women 


Totol 


NoBTB ToNA WANDA — CondwUd 1910 


5 


264 




264 


1011 


5 


436 




436 


1912 


5 


451 




451 


1913 


6 


718 




718 


OODBNSBURO • 1897 


2 
1 


42 
30 




42 


1898 


30 


1899 


2 


94 




94 


1900 


2 


92 




92 


1901 


6 


665 




665 


1902 


10 


708 




708 


1903 


26 


1,394 


22 


1.416 


1904 


25 


1,318 




1.318 


1905 


24 


1,840 




1.840 


1906 


25 


1,387 




1.387 


1907 


26 


1,538 




1.538 


1906 


25 


1.384 




1.884 


1909 


27 


1.447 




1.447 


1910 


25 


1.402 




1.402 


1911 


21 


1.091 




1.091 


1912 


17 


727 




727 


1913 


20 


1.068 


i7 


1,085 


OUDAN 1897 


6 
6 


148 
156 




148 


1898 


156 


1899 


8 


215 




215 


1900 


20 


550 


7 


566 


1901 


22 


630 


12 


642 


1902 


26 


778 


9 


787 


1903 


28 


935 


12 


947 


1904 


32 


1.238 


5 


1,243 


1905 


28 


1.119 


18 


1.137 


1906 


26 


1.001 


11 


1.012 


1907 


26 


1.087 


14 


1.101 


1908 


25 


1.173 


17 


1.190 


1909 


21 


980 


13 


993 


1910 


19 


908 


13 


921 


1911 


20 


875 


16 


801 


1912 


19 


840 


11 


851 


1913 


19 


942 


6 


948 


OifXiDA 1897 


4 
3 


151 
122 




151 


1898 


122 


1899 


3 


196 




195 


1900 


3 


199 




199 


1901 


4 


269 




269 


1902 


9 


341 


5 


846 


1903 


15 


492 


4 


496 


1904 


16 


475 


4 


479 


1905 


13 


439 


5 


444 


1906 


13 


446 


8 


449 


1907 


12 


434 


2 


436 


1908 


12 


452 


1 


453 


1909 


12 


412 


3 


415 


1910 


12 


435 


6 


441 


1911 


13 


491 


7 


498 


1912 


13 


607 


7 


514 


1913 


16 


591 


7 


598 


Onsonta 1897 


8 


485 


6 


491 


1898 


11 


496 


5 


501 


1899 


10 


489 


6 


495 


1900 


11 


548 


8 


556 


1901 


13 


560 


9 


569 


1902 


13 


588 


8 


596 


1903 


13 


641 


10 


651 


1904 


17 


794 


6 


800 


1905 


17 


910 


6 


916 


1906 


18 


896 


6 


902 


1907 


16 


920 


5 


925 


1908 


15 


1,000 


5 


1,005 


1909 


14 


946 


5 


951 


1910 


18 


1.222 


4 


1.226 


1911 


18 


1,122 


3 


1.125 


1912 


15 


1,177 


3 


1.180 


1913 


17 


1.426 


6 


1,432 



* December 31 for 1897; September 30 for subsequent years. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



29 



CWT 



Obwboo. 



Plattsbubo . 



POBT JbRTIB. 



POUOHKBBPSXB . 



RaXSSBLABB. 



* Deoember 31 for 1897; September 30 for sabaequent years. 



r Labor UnUas in EMh aty, 18t7-ltl3 - 


-oontiBaed 






Mbmbbbs 




{)T.iM«t%^. ^* 








Year* 


UDions 


Men 


Women 


Total 


1897 


8 


261 




261 


1898 


5 


212 




212 


1899 


9 


400 




400 


1900 


10 


639 




639 


1901 


24 


1,243 




1.243 


1902 


30 


1.919 


5 


1,924 


1903 


33 


1.935 




1,935 


1904 


33 


1.526 




1.526 


1905 


29 


1.292 


2 


1.294 


1906 


24 


1.056 




1.056 


1907 


19 


985 




985 


1908 


19 


1.121 




1,121 


1909 


18 


996 




996 


1910 


17 


1.003 




1.003 


1911 


20 


1,173 


i 


1.174 


1912 


19 


1.160 


1 


1,161 


1913 


21 


1.082 


1 


1.083 


1897 


3 


50 




50 


1898 


4 


76 




76 


1899 


3 


48 




48 


1900 


4 


65 




65 


1901 


4 


73 




73 


1902 


5 


82 




82 


1908 


4 


72 


i 


73 


1904 


4 


74 




74 


1905 


12 


391 




391 


1906 


10 


360 




360 


1907 


13 


589 




589 


1906 


15 


486 




486 


1909 


11 


394 




394 


1910 


11 


571 




571 


1911 


10 


378 




378 


1912 


10 


356 




356 


1913 


13 


494 




494 


1897 


5 


777 




777 


1898 


5 


806 




806 


1899 


6 


892 




892 


1900 


6 


926 




926 


1901 


8 


1.032 


40 


1.072 


1902 


12 


1.173 


63 


1.236 


1903 


21 


1.858 


59 


1.917 


1904 


22 


1,842 


49 


1.891 


1906 


21 


1.599 


82 


1.681 


1906 


19 


1.343 


67 


1,410 


1907 


21 


1.382 


62 


1,444 


1906 


20 


1.234 


62 


1.296 


1909 


19 


1.230 


66 


1.296 


1910 


19 


1,213 


56 


1.269 


1911 


17 


1,261 


35 


1.296 


1912 


16 


1,127 


37 


1.164 


1913 


19 


1.208 


35 


1.243 


1897 


11 


527 


15 


542 


1898 


14 


542 


4 


546 


1899 


14 


469 




469 


1900 


13 


469 


2 


471 


1901 


14 


634 




634 


1902 


23 


1.383 




1.383 


1903 


27 


1.466 




1.466 


1904 


24 


1.023 


i 


1,024 


1905 


22 


965 


1 


966 


1906 


24 


1.075 


1 


1,076 


1907 


27 


1.309 


2 


1.311 


1906 


24 


1.213 


2 


1.215 


1909 


24 


1.180 


3 


1.183 


1910 


24 


1.313 


3 


1.316 


1911 


24 


1.392 


7 


1.399 


1912 


22 


1.375 


5 


1.380 


1913 


23 


1.549 


8 


1,557 


1897 




208 




208 


1898 




226 




226 


1899 




240 




240 


1900 




275 




275 


1901 




367 




367 


1902 




386 




886 


1903 




491 




491 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



30 



New York Labob Bulletin. 



ClTT 

Rbnssbla.br — Concluded . 



RoClkBSTKR. 



ROIIB. 



SCHBNBCTADr. 



Stracusb . 



rUbmr 


UbImb Ib Back atj, lSt7-19U - 








MXMBBBS 




fl,,w^U^m ^ _ 








Vesr* 


unioBS 


Men 


Women 


Totiil 


1904 




473 




473 


1905 




444 




444 


1906 




454 




454 


1907 




503 




603 


1908 




611 




611 


1909 




667 




667 


1910 




507 




697 


1911 




798 




793 


1912 




812 




812 


1913 




896 




805 


1897 




4.144 


73 


4,217 


1808 




4.475 


48 


4,523 


1809 




7.308 


13 


7.321 


1900 




7.429 


HI 


7.540 


1901 


85 


8.999 


284 


9,283 


1902 


93 


11,096 


371 


11.467 


1903 


108 


12.598 


567 


13.165 


1904 


98 


11.696 


659 


12.265 


1905 


89 


13.630 


401 


13.931 


1906 


87 


18.972 


322 


14.294 


1907 


84 


15.128 


268 


16.396 


1908 


77 


12.630 


324 


12.864 


1909 


76 


12.650 


348 


12.898 


1910 


79 


14.180 


81 


14.261 


1911 


77 


15.019 


69 


15.078 


1912 


87 


15.764 


300 


16,054 


1913 


104 


20.002 


827 


20,829 


1807 


6 


98 




98 


1808 


6 


110 




110 


1899 


6 


90 




90 


1900 


7 . 


123 




123 


1901 


11 


238 




238 


1902 


16 


475 


3 


478 


1903 


20 


616 




616 


1904 


18 


638 


i 


699 


1905 


16 


446 




445 


1906 


14 


405 


i 


406 


1907 


13 


501 


1 


502 


1908 


12 


470 


2 


472 


1909 


11 


463 


2 


466 


1910 


13 


484 


2 


486 


1911 


14 


547 


1 


548 


1912 


15 


674 


3 


577 


1913 


14 


575 


3 


578 


1897 


18 


654 


16 


670 


1808 


19 


944 


21 


965 


1899 


26 


1.744 


36 


1.780 


1900 


28 


2.086 


19 


2.105 


1901 


30 


2.426 


16 


2.441 


1902 


69 


8.231 


626 


8.866 


1903 


80 


9.849 


319 


10,168 


1904 


60 


6.283 


19 


6.302 


1905 


63 


5.663 


31 


5.604 


1906 


68 


7.840 


10 


7.850 


1907 


62 


7.247 


236 


7.483 


1908 


42 


4.880 


7 


4.806 


1909 


44 


5.032 


47 


6,079 


1910 


56 


8.392 


189 


8.661 


1911 


66 


7.374 


139 


7.613 


1912 


53 


7,084 


223 


7.307 


1913 


66 


10.142 


723 


10.866 


1897 


61 


. 4,472 


41 


4.513 


1898 


66 


5.483 


811 


6.294 


1899 


76 


6.115 


667 


6.772 


1900 


77 


5,647 


792 


6,439 


1901 


78 


6.746 


720 


6.466 


1902 


78 


6.843 


679 


6.622 


1908 


81 


7,148 


740 


7,888 


1904 


80 


7.288 


703 


7.991 


1906 


78 


7.267 


833 


8,100 


1906 


80 


7,527 


823 


8,846 


1907 


86 


8,075 


809 


8,884 


1908 


82 


7,663 


678 


8.241 



* Deoember 31 for 1897; September 30 for subsequent years. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix, 



31 



TtMt D.— Namber and MaotlMnhip of Labor Uaionfl la BMh 



ClTT 

SraACCSB — ConehuUd 



Number of 

Year* mdons 

1909 84 

1910 82 

1911 81 

1912 86 

1913 89 



dtf, 1897-191S 

Membbrb 



— coatiaaed 



TONA WANDA 

(See also North TonawaDda.) 



TaoT. 



UncA . 



Watkbtowm. 



1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1906 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1918 

1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 

1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1906 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 

1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1903 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 



1 

1 

1 

2 

12 

14 

18 

12 

13 

9 

8 

5 

5 

5 

4 

5 

5 

26 
26 
37 
38 
52 
45 
53 
56 
55 
52 
49 
49 
50 
47 
47 
46 
49 

23 
29 
33 
39 
44 
47 
53 
53 
52 
49 
50 
48 
48 
49 
53 
55 



13 
12 
15 
27 
22 
27 
26 
22 
21 
21 
21 
17 
17 
20 
21 
21 
24 



Men 
7,752 
8.122 
8.931 
9,386 
10,099 



402 

470 

952 

2,283 

1,226 

1.521 

1,405 

1,153 

1.068 

1.162 

1.256 

1.058 

761 

939 

1,166 

1,208 

1,678 



Women 

667 
711 
601 
505 
559 



15 

14 

6 

77 

355 

325 

921 66 

362 

322 47 

207 50 

164 

129 

121 

120 

116 

HI 

146 

2,109 21 

2,297 

2,799 18 

3,250 121 

4.355 79 

3.895 16 

5.047 77 

5,199 56 

4,988 1,066 

5,074 48 

4,779 45 

5,118 24 

4.468 20 

4.510 11 

4.412 27 

4.512 25 

4,801 22 



1.903 
2,118 
2,538 
3,367 
3,318 
3,855 
4.051 
4.037 
3.914 
3.978 
4,112 
3,742 
3,660 
4,376 
5.300 
6,034 
6,963 



350 

235 

229 

195 

197 

158 

200 

226 

66 

74 

57 

68 

62 

350 

784 

11 
10 
11 
20 
13 
13 
11 
13 
13 
11 
1 



Total 

8.409 
8.833 
9.532 
9.981 
10,658 

15 
14 
6 
77 
355 
325 
987 
362 
369 
257 
164 
129 
121 
120 
116 
111 
146 

2.130 
2.297 
2,797 
3,371 
4.434 
3,911 
5.124 
5.255 
6,054 
5,122 
4,824 
5,142 
4,488 
4.521 
4,439 
4.537 
4,823 

1,903 
2,186 
2,888 
3.602 
3,547 
4,050 
4,248 
4,195 
4,114 
4,204 
4,178 
3.816 
3,717 
4,444 
5,362 
6.384 
7,647 

413 

480 
963 
2.303 
1.230 
1.534 
1.416 
1,166 
1.081 
1,173 
1,257 
1,058 
762 
940 
1,167 
1.213 
1,684 



* December 31 for 1897; September 30 for lubaequent yean. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



32 Nbw Yoke Labob Bullbtin. 

1U>le D.— NambOT and ! 



CiTT 

WATaBYLnr 



YOKKBBS. 



r ubOT 


UaliMi !■ 1 


BMhaty, 


1887-ltlS- 
Mnianns 


•eoiichiM 










Yewf* 


anlona 


Men 


Women 


Total 


1807 




77 




77 


1808 




86 




86 


1800 




60 




60 


1000 




70 




70 


1001 




180 




130 


1002 




117 




117 


1008 




163 




168 


1004 




165 




156 


1006 




126 




126 


1006 




117 


::::;::.^ 


117 


1007 




06 


06 


1008 




76 




76 


1000 




71 




71 


1010 




217 




217 


1011 




165 




166 


1012 




172 




172 


1013 




272 




272 


1807 


15 


807 




807 


1808 


17 


816 




816 


1800 


18 


083 




033 


1000 


21 


1.085 




1.065 


1001 


18 


1,007 




1.007 


1002 


24 


1.643 




1.643 


1008 


28 


2.027 


2 


2.080 


1004 


24 


1,868 




1.868 


1005 


24 


1,077 




1.081 


1006 


24 


2.208 




2.211 


1007 


26 


3,614 




8.618 


1008 


31 


8.366 




8.360 


1000 


31 


8.840 




8.848 


1010 


33 


6.060 




6.062 


1011 


34 


6.311 




6.812 


1012 


36 


6.088 




6,002 


1018 


34 


4.603 




4,607 



^Deoeniber 31 for 1807; September 30 for subsequent yearv. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



83 



TABLE I.-'NUMBBB AND MEMBBBSHIF OF LABOB OBOANnATIONS, BT INDU8TBIB8, 
TBADE8 AND LOCAUTIBS, 191S 





Unxoks at 


NtTMBSB OF MXMBBU AT TBS EVD OF — 


InDUSTBT, TMADB AMD 


ElCI> OF — 


MABCB. 1913 


•Bpnmu. 1913 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. Total 



I. BmLDINGp STONE WOBEING, ETC. 



(a) Stew WorUag. 

BliMstooe Cuttan: 

N«w York. BiooUyn 

Norwich 

^ifffrtifff, 


1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


240 

280 

15 

18 




240 

280 
15 
18 


1 

200' 

240 

15' 

16! 


200 

340 

15 

16 






Total 


4 


4 


553 




553 


*71| 


471 






Bluertone Cuttora' Helpers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


20 




20 


»| 


30 


Granite Cutters: 

Albany 


1 
1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


230 
25 
51 
15 



600 

14 

19 

5 

3 
11 

9 




230 

25 

51 

15 

9 

600 

14 

19 

5 

3 


^ 

25' 

??::::::: 

121 

700' 

171 

is' 

lo; 

3 

12 


150 


Bata^ 


25 


Buffalo 


69 


TTifhlpfwl Kttlh 


17 


Kingston 


12 


New York, ManhattMi 


700 
17 


T^i^kskill , . , , 


18 




10 


Praie KlrMipin* , , 


3 


Rodmrtn-'. . . 


12 




8 




8 


' 




Total 


12 


12 


991 





991 


1.041 




1,041 






Machine Stone Workers. Rubbers 
and Helpers: 
New York, Manhattan 


2 


2 


615 




615 


600 




500 


Marble Cutters, Carvers and 
Setters: 
Buffalo 


1 
1 


1 
2 


65 
1,150 





65 
1.150 


20 
1,235 




20 




1,235 








Total 


2 


3 


1.216 




1.215 


1.255 




1 255 






Msible Cutters' Helpers: 

New York. Manhattan 


I 


1 


400 




400 


391 




391 


Maifale Poliahers. Rubbers and 
oawrers: 
New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


628 




628 


671 




671 


Paving Block Cutters: 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


100 
15 
22 
75 
27 





100 
15 
22 
76 
27 


lool 


100 


Hofley....T:...: 

HiUberton 


15 
32 
80 
28 
150 
15 




15 
32 
80 
28 


New York. Manhattan 


150 


Rochester 


' i 


13 




13 


15 






Total 


5 


7 


252 




252 


420 




420 






Mptois and Carvers: 


1 


1 


200 




200 


160 




160 


Stase Bankers: 

Albany 


1 


1 


24 

1 




24 


10 




10 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



34 



New York Labob Bulletin. 



Table I.— Nombcr and Menbecshlp of Labor OrgudsalloM, by Induatrieo, Thideo and Loealitiea* 

Itlt — COBtlBllod 





Unions at 


NUMBBB OF MSIIBBRS AT THB EnD OP — 


Ikdubtbt, Tbadb and 
localitt 


End of — 


MABCH, 1913 


BEPTBICBER, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


1 
Wom.l Total 



L BUILDING, STONE WORKING, ETC.— 



(a) Stone Working — eondnded. 



Stone Cutters: 

Albion 

Buffalo 

Gouvemeur 

Jamestown 

New York, Manhattan. 

Niagara Falls 

Rochester 

Schenectady 

Syracuse 

Utica 

Yonkers 



Total 

Total — Stone Working. 



(b) Bnfldlng and Paving Tradea. 

Blasting Foremen: 

New York, Manhattan . . 



Bricklayers and Masons: 

Albany 

Albion 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Batavia 

Binghamton 

Brockport 

Buffalo 

r!a.nftnHti.i£ri^ii 

Cohoes 

Coining 

Cortland 

Elmira 

FishkiU-on-Hudson 

Fulton 

Geneva 

Glens Falls 

Gloversville 

Herkimer 

Highland FaUs 

Hornell 

Hudson 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Kingston 

Little Falls 

Lockport 

Malone 

Mechanicville 

Middletown 

Mount Morris 

Mount Vernon 

New Rochelle 

New York, Bronx 

New York, Brooklyn . . . 
New York, Manhattan. 

New York, Queens 

New Yoik, Richmond . . 
Newburgh 



11 



42 



11 



44 



58 

84 

7 

10 

875 
19 
91 

133 
41 
10 
40 



1.368 



6.266 



60 



250 
15 

106 
35 
24 
88 
15 

612 
10 
31 
38 
19 
70 
18 
25 
38 
98 



38 

28 

16 

29 

73 

48 

30 

21 

40 

12 

19 

48 

16 

168 

181 

1.926 

2.195 

2.650 

625 

94 

74 



58 

84 

7 

10 

875 
19 
91 

133 
41 
10 
40 



60 

114 

13 

7 

600 

36 

90 

97 

43 

8 

30 



1.368 1,098 



6,266, 6,037 



60 



65 



250 
15j 

106 
35 
24 
88 
15 

612 
10 
31 
381 
19i 
701 
18l 
25| 
38' 
98. 



381 

28: 

16! 

29 

73 

48 

39 

21 

40 

12 

19 

48l 

16 

168 

181 

1,926 

2,195 

2,650 

625 

94 

74 



270 
13 
98 
44 
19 
85 
15 

612 
6 
34 
41 
21 
88 
15 
30 
45 
96 
36 
40 
26 
20 
281 
951 
57 
43' 
20! 
44 

1^ 

32! 

521 

13 

200| 

182 

1,962 

2.176 

2.589 

650 

94 

78 



60 

114 

13 

7 

600 

36 

90 

97 

43 

8 

30 



1.098 



6.037 



65 



270 

13 

98 

44 

19 

85 

15 

612 

6 

34 

41 

21 

88 

15 

30 

45 

96 

36 

40 

26 

20 

28 

95 

57 

43 

20 

44 

14 

32 

52 

13 

200 

182 

1.962 

2.176 

2.589 

650 

94 

78 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



85 



TfehtoL— N« 



loTLibOT 
1913 — 



bj iMdmriea, Trmdm mmi l«c«lld«i. 



IXVUflTBT, TMADB AXD 
LOCAUTT 



Unions at 
End of — 



Meh. Sept. 



NUMBBB OF MbMBBBS AT TRB EnD OF — 



IIABCH, 1913 I SBFTBMBBB, 1913 



Men Worn. ToUl Men Worn. Total 



L BUILDING, STONB WOSKINGp KTC.— 



ft) 



Brieklayera and Maeooe — concTd. 

Niagara FaUs 

North Tonawanda. 

Norwich 

Nyack 

Ocdendbiirs 

Oneida.'..!!!!!!]!.' 

Owonta 

Oenninc 

Oeweso 

PeeluBU 

Penn Van 

PlaUeborg 

Port Chester 

Port Jervis 

Pa 
Ro 
Roane. 

aaranar Lake. 
Saratogas 

Sloatsbarg .' 

Syneuim 

Tanytown. .. 

Troy 

Ctica 

Watertown. . . 
White Plains. 
Yookers 

Total 

Caisson and Foundation Workers: 
New York, Manhattan. 

Ciipenteiv and Joiners: 

Addison 

Albany 

AlUon 

Aasterdam 

Anbom 

Aosable Forks 

Babylon 

BaklwinsviUe.... !.!.!! 

Ballston Spa. 

Batavia 

^"g hft Tw tiTn 

Broekport 

Buffalo.. 

fj«»>f^ T M^ lig*l* 

Central Valley!!!!!!!!! 

Chatham 

a>yton 

Clinton 

Cohoes 

Corintb-Paimer! ! ! 

Coming 

Cornwall 

Cordand 

Dopew-Lanesster .'.' .' . 







150 
21 
29 
40' 
33: 
87i 
331 
32| 
55, 
53! 
35| 

lol 

38: 

218 

17 

142 

813 

50 

26 

14 

57 

241 

60 

216 

160 

194 

230 

50 

124 

237 




150. 

21 
29i 
40 
33 

III 

32' 

^' 

38 

218 

17 

142 

813 

.W 

26 

14 

57 

241 

60 

216 

160 

194 

230 

50 

124 

237 


156 
25 
27 
50 
37 
92 
39 
35 
55 
51 
38 
11 
41 

21K 
19 

167 

849 

tl 

18 

66 
258 

58 
227 
165 
195 
236 

60 
130 
237 


'!!!*! 


156 

25 

27 

50 

37 

92 

39 

35 

55 

51 

38 

11 

41 

218 

19 

167 

849 

40 

21 

18 

66 

258 

58 

227 

165 

195 

236 

60 

130 

287 


69 


70 


13.306 




13.306 


13.604 




13.604 


1 


1 


800 




! 

890| 1.025 




1.025 






8 

478 

21 

222 

221 

15 

13 

34 

40 

85 

260 

12 

2.000 

30 


!!!!:! 


8 

478 

21 

222 

221 

15 

13 

M 

40 

85 

260 

12 

2.000 

30 


9 

531 

29 

240 

209 

15 

10 

34 

32 

67 

279 




9 

531 

29 

240 

209 

15 

10 

34 

32 

67 

279 


1,970 
20 
11 
22 
24 
85 
81 
48 
92 
30 

1 tt 









1 1,970 
20 
11 


24 
24 
29 
80 
60 
80 
27 
46 
13 




24 
24 
29 
80 
50 
80 
27 
46 
13 


22 

24 
35 
81 
48 
92 
30 
46 
U 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



36 

Table 1.-1 



New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 



• 


Unions a.t 


NuMBKB or Mbmbsbs at tbm Ens or — 


Industbt. Trai>b ak© 

LOCAUTT 


End of — 




SBPTUCBKB. 1013 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



L BUILDING, STONB WOBKINGp BTC.— c 



(b) 



Carpenters and Joiners— ^;on<'d. 

Dobbs Ferry 

DolceviUe 

Dunldrk 

East Syracuse 

EUenvflle 

Elmira 

Endicott 

Fishkill-on-Hudson 

Fort Edward 

Freeport 

Fulton 

Geneva 

Glen Cove 

Glens Falls 

Glovemville 

Great Neck 

Hastings-upon-Hudson 

Hempstead. 

Herkimer 

Holley 

Hoosiek Falls 

Horoell 

Hudson 

Hudson Falls 

Huntington 

Uion 

Irvington 

Islip 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Johnstown 

Kingston 

LakePlaotd 

Lindenhurst 

Littie Falls 

Liverpool 

Lockport 

Lynbrook 

Malone 

Mamaroneck 

Mechanicville 

Medina 

Middletown 

Millbrook 

Millerton 

Mount Kisoo 

Mount Morris 

Mount Vernon 

New Rochelle 

New York, Bronx 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

New York, Queens 

New York, Richmond 

Newburgh 

Niagara Falls 

North Tonawanda 

Norwich 

Nyack 

Ogdensburg 

oCan 



32 




32 


30 




30 


59 




59 


19 




19 


215 







215 


26 




26 


56 




56 


34 




34 


45 




45 


74 




74 


104 




104 


385 




385 


190 




190 


102 




102 


163 




163 


40 




40 


75 




76 


108 




108 


13 




. 13 


10 




10 


49 




49 


44 




44 


56 




66 


122 




122 


56 




66 


51 




51 


125 




125 


141 




141 


267 




267 


70 




70 


170 




170 


75 




75 


44 




44 


54 




54 


140 




140 


56 




56 


53 




53 


21 




21 


56 




55 


193 




193 


38 




38 


20 




20 


99 




99 


14 




14 


295 




295 


390 




390 


1,482 




1.482 


4,470 




4,470 


6,347 




6.347 


1,282 




1,282 


513 




513 


210 




210 


450 




450 


126 




126 


98 




98 


98 




98 


95 




95 


58 




58 



30 

30 

46 

22 

22 

238 

20 

55 

30 

55 

62 

90 

411 

194 

109 

160 

42 

96 

108 

14 

10 

63 

50 

54 

90 

60 

46 

129 

149 

280 

70 

187 

78 

44 

66 

26 

143 

25 

54 

21 

64 

37 

198 

38 

20 

102 

16 

287 

360 

1,507 

4.439 

6,321 

1,213 

5051 

224l 

450 

156 

771 

91> 

118' 

77| 



30 

30 

46 

22 

22 

238 

20 

55 

30 

55 

62 

90 

411 

194 

109 

160 

42 

96 

108 

14 

10 

63 

50 

54 

90 

60 

46 

129 

149 

280 

70 

187 

78 

44 

65 

26 

143 

25 

54 

21 

64 

37 

198 

38 

20 

102 

16 

287 

360 

1,507 

4.439 

6,321 

1,213 

505 

224 

450 

156 

77 

91 

118 

77 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appxkdiz. 



87 



TaM« L— Hwmhmr nd M« 





UltlOlfS AT 
EVB OF — 


NuMBU OF Mkmb— at tbb Enb of — 


InnrvTBTf Tbapv akp 


MASOH. If 13 




1913 


LOCALRT 


amrrr 








MdLJsnii. 


Mmi 


Worn. 


Total 


Mm 


Worn. 


Totel 



LBUILDIlfG 

Onoida r 


,moi 


IB WO 


BKDta, 

78 
12 

125 

178 
60 

114 
10 
90 
76 

168 
78 
62 


■TC— 


78 
13 

125 

178 
60 

114 
10 
90 
76 

168 
78 
62 
85 

260 
14 


ad 

78 
46 

125 

182 
60 

150 
10 
81 
80 

319 
60 
60 

101 

270 

11 

16 

1.034 

42 

180 
51 
40 
68 
60 

157 
86 

534 
28 
14 
20 
93 
40 
30 
43 


;;;;;; 


78 


OneontA 


46 


Hvfiikipc 


125 


Osircso 


182 


IStehocne 


60 


TMokfll 


160 


Pterry 


10 


Ptettebnn 


81 


PleMMKt«^ 


80 


Port Cheater 


219 


PortJeffenon 


60 




60 


Port WMfaington 


V 1 

1' 1 


85 

260, 

14' 


101 


P5nehW*frfM> 


270 


Ridifield Sorinn 




3 
1 


11 


SiTfiSSd 






16 


RochMier 




1,065 
25 
160 




1.065 
25 

160 
60 
40 
46 
70 

129 
82 

485 
27 
14 
22 
99 
48 
20 


1.034 


Rockwell SprincB 


42 


Rome 


180 


Rye 


60 

40| 

46 

70, 


51 




40 




68 


ftiTKnae TiAke. . 


60 


StoBtocs Springs 


129 
82 

485 
27 
14 




157 




86 


flrnfnoctidr 


534 


flg^jg^-, "SjU 


28 


flQTcr flDnan 


14 


Rkanefttelni, . ... 


22'::;::; 


20 


aoeieburg 


99 
48 
20 




93 




40 


Soknj 


1 1 


30 


flonthampton 




1 


43 






19 

66 

1.095 

128 
41 

387 
6 

650 
26 
27 
10 




19 

66 

1,095 

128 
41 

387 
6 

650 
26 
27 
10 

335 




iSS!??!*!:::::::::::::: 


1 i 


66 

1.102 

114 

40 

402 

8 

687 

28 
103 

10 
336 

43 
581 


...... 


66 


S^raeiMe 


3 


3 

1 
1 
2 


1,102 




114 




40 


Trcnr 


402 


•nSdi 


i; 1 


8 


utica ' ; ; ; 


r 1 

i! 1 


687 


Warwick.... 


28 


Watertova 


103 


WeOmlle. ... 


10 


White Plaini 


1 1 335 


336 


WUtesboro. 


2 


l! 40 
2' 644 


40 


43 


Yonkeri 




644 


581 


Total 


204 


206 


30.705 




30.795 


31.212 




31.212 


CemeatMaeoM: 

Atdmm. . 






16 
39 
16 
560 
7 
38 




16 
39 
16 
560 
7 
33 


14 
60 
24 
550 
8 
35 




14 


Buffalo 


50 


Gewra 

NewYoricallBoroaEha.... 
P<^i(bkwir«if 


24 
550 

8 


oyneiBttB 


35 


Total 


6 


6 


671 




671 


681 




681 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



38 



New York Labob Buui-btin. 



Table I.— Nombcr and MMtb«raUp of Labor OrfaniaUloM, by IndwIilM, Tradoa and LocaUttaa, 





191S — eontlBnod 














Unions at 
End of — 


NUMBBR OF MXMBBBS AT THB EnD OF — 


Iin>n8TRT, Trade aicd 
LocALmr 


MARCH, 1013 


aXPTRllBBR, 1013 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



I. BUILDING, STONB WORKINQ, ETC.— 



(b) Bnfldfaic and Pavinc Tnde»- 
contfnned. 

Derrickmen and Rlgsera: 

AlhfMiy 


1 

1 


1 
1 


35 
500 




35 
500 


20 
450 




20 


NewYork, Manhattan 


450 


Total 


2 


2 


535 




535 


470 




470 






Dredgemen, Steam Shovelmen, 
Etc.: 
Bxiffalo 


2 

1 
1 


3 

1 
1 


106 
775 

48 




106 

775 

48 


400 

350 

65 




400 


New York. Manhattan 

Rochester 


350 
65 






Total 


4 


6 


020 




020 


824 




824 






Electrical Workers: 

Albany 


3 


3 

I 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

i 

i 

1 
1 

4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

i 

3 
2 
3 

1 
1 


207 




207 


206 
26 
10 
43 

680 
67 
30 
70 




206 


Amsterdam 


26 


Auburn 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 


io 

46 
545 
23 
30 
83 

40 

16 

45 

3,526 

20 

25 

24 

457 

32 

16 

72 

250 

143 

144 

76 

120 




10 

46 

545 

23 

30 

83 

12 

53 

7 

40 

16 

45 

3,526 

20 

25 

24 

457 

32 

16 

72 

250 

143 

144 

76 

120 


10 


Binffhsmton 


43 


Buffalo 


680 


Dunkirk 


67 


Flmirt^ 


30 


Glens Falls 


70 


Homell 




Jamestown 


46 




46 


Kingston 




Lockport 


45 
16 
55 
3.603 
20 
25 
20 
470 
34 




45 


MidcUetown 


16 


New York, Bronx 


55 


New York, Manhattan 

Newark 


3.603 
20 


Newburgh 


25 


Oswego 


20 


Rochester 


470 


Rome 


34 






Schenectady 


117 
250 
228 
164 
85 
180 




117 


Syracuse 


250 


Troy 


228 


Utica 


164 


Watertown 


85 


Yonkers 


180 






Total 


37 


36 


6.022 




6,022 


6,400 




6.400 






Elevator Constructors: 

Albany 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


23 

30 

800 

21 




23 

30 

800 

21 


20 

36 

800 

23 




20 


Bu£Falo 


36 


New York, Manhattan 

Rochester 


800 
23 






Total 


4 


4 


874 




874 


870 




870 






Glasiers: 

Bu£Falo 




1 








62 




62 














New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


500 




500 


450 




450 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbndiz. 



89 



TUtoL— NambemdMembcraklp«rUbM>Orgutntli»M by IndaMitom ThidM and LmhOIIm. 

19U — c 





Unions at 


NUMBBB OV MbMBKBS 4T TBC EnD OF — 


IxDUSTRT, Trade and 

loCAUTT 


End of — 


IIABCH. 1913 


■■miiBSR, 1913 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



I. BUILDING. STONE WOBKDtG, CTC.— 
andParlag 



(b) 



Hooaenniths and Bridgemen: 

Albany 

Buffalo 

New York, Brooklyn . . . . 
Nev York. Manhattan. . 

Niaoara Falls 

Roeheaier 

Syraciue 

Utica 

Total 

Inenlaton. Heat and Frost: 

Buffalo 

New York, Manhattan. . 

Rochester 

Syracuse 

Total 

Lathers: 

Albany 

BinfEhamton 

Buffalo 

Jamestown 

New RocheUe 

New York, Brooklyn .... 
New York, Manhattan . . 

Rochester 

a^rracuse 

Tarrytown 

Utica 

White Plains .".'.'! !!!.!.! 
Yonkexs 

Total 

MillwTi^ts: 

BumOo 

Deferiet 

Glen Park 

New York. Brooklsm. . . . 
Niagara Falls 

Total 

Painterc and Decorators: 

Albany 

AmBterdam 

Auburn 

Batavia 

Bayihore 

Binghamton 

Buffak) 

Cohoes 

Corinthr-Paimer. .!..!!.. 

CoRdag 

Cortland 

gpbbi Ferry 

Elmirs 

FiahkiU-on-kwIsoa 

FulioD 

Geneva 

Glen Cove 



1 
1 

1 

3 
1 

1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 


160 

200 

525 

2.047 

99 

100 

60 

IS 





160 

200 

525 

2,047 

99 

100 

60 

18 


150 
90 

530 

2,421 

94 

116 
60 
20 




150 
90 

530 

2.421 

94 

116 
60 
20 


10 


11 


3.200 


! 3.209 


3,481' 


3.481 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


25 

350 
9 
6 




25 

350 

9 

6 


J 

350 

"i:::::: 


25 
350 

16 






4 


3 


390 




390 


39li 


391 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


7 

12 

73 

10 

25 

247 

670 

54 

41 

5 

24 

19 

35 




7 

12 

73 

10 

25 

247 

670 

54 

41 

5 

24 

19 

35 


J 

II:::::: 

10 

20 

275 

700 

50 

35 

6 

33 

27i 

30, 


25 

16 

51 

10 

20 

275 

700 

50 

35 

6 

33 

27 

30 


14 


14 


1.222 




1,222 


1.278; 


1,278 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


81 
27 
33 
104 
67 




81 
27 
33 
104 
57 


iJ 

23; 

34' 

130 

65, 


100 
23 

34 

130 

65 


' 6 


5 


302 




302 


352; 


352 




1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


200 
45 

125 
36 
36 
50 

625 
48 
8 
45 
24 
34 

116 
24 
26 
55 
98 


...... 


200 
45 

125 
36 
36 
50 

625 
48 
8 
45 
24 
34 

U6 
24 
26 
65 
98 


50 

136 

41 

49 

47 

554 

52 

6 

47 

25 

23 

'}§ 

97 


...... 




165 
50 

136 
41 
49 
47 

554 
52 
8 
47 
25 
23 

110 
19 
29 
60 
97 



Digitized by CjOOQIC 



40 



New York Labor Bulletin. 



Table L— Nnmbcr and Memb«raUp of Labor Organlsatioiis, by IndoattlM. Tradoa and Localltiaa, 

191 S — eontliiiied 





Unxonb at 




IlfSVflTBY, TbAPB and 
LOCALITT 


End of — 


MARCir, 1913 


SBPTBMBXB, 1913 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


L BUILDING 
^coBtliiiied. 

GleDB Falls 


, STOl 


^ WO 

1 1 
11 


RKINGp 

52 

26 

23 

32 

26 

13 

24 

8 

106 

226 


ETC.— 


52 

26 

23 

32 

26 

13 

24 

8 

106 

226 




ed 

50 
27 




50 


Gloveraville 


27 


HenuMtead . . 




HoomckFaUa 


33 
22 

16 

'1 

115 

225 

25 

82 

22 

8 

49 

22 

31 

27 

41 

52 

25 

105 

122 

581 

4,020 

12,617 

367 

100 

81 

138 

40 

42 

49 

33 

80 

22 

36 

22 

116 

10 

132 

459 

38 

22 


•••••• 


33 


Homell 


22 


Hudson 


16 


Irvinffton ...,,,-.-,-.-- r - - 


13 


lalip 


8 


Ithaca 


115 


Jamestown. . , . . ^ . t . , . r r r t - 


225 


Johnstown 


26 


Kingston. .......... 




30 
21 
8 
50 
25 
28 
25 
53 




30 
21 
8 
60 
25 
28 
25 
53 


32 


Lake Placid 


22 


Liberty 


8 


Lockport 


49 


Malone 


22 


Mamaron^^ftk 


31 


MechanicviUe 


27 


Middletown 


41 


Mineola 


52 


Mount Kisco 


11 
1 


2i 
84 

156 

590 
1,825 
9,927 

371 
90 
72 

118 
25 
31 
37 
26 
77 
28 
30 
22 

109 
12 
27 

106 

465 
36 
2A 





21 
84 

156 

590 
1,825 
9,927 

371 
90 
72 

118 
25 
31 
37 
26 
77 
28 
30 
22 

109 
12 
27 

106 

465 
36 
28 


25 


Mount Vernon , , , 


105 


New Rochelle 


122 


New York, Bronx 


581 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

New York. Queens 


4,020 

12.617 

367 


New York, Richmond 

Newburgh 


100 
81 


Niagara Falls 


138 


Nyack 


40 


Olean 


42 


Oneida 


49 


Ossining 


33 


Oswego 


80 


PeekSdll 


22 


Plattsburg 


36 


Pleasantimle 


22 


Port Chester 


116 


Port Jefferson 


10 


Port Jervis 


25 


Poughkeepaie 

Rochester 

Rome 

Raranac T>>ake , , 


132 

459 

38 

22 


Saratoga Springs 


1 118 


118< 107 


107 


Schene'ctacTy 




140 
43 

524 
65 


140 1481 


148 


Suffern 


43 

524 

55 


52, 

486 


52 




486 


Tanytown 


52 

46 

235 

154 

8 

9 

73 

18 




52 


Tonawanda 


46 


Troy 




220 

152 

10 

8 

58 

16 

14 

99 

260 




220 

152 

10 

8 

58 

16 

14 

99 

260 


235 


Utica 


154 


Warsaw 


8 


Waterford. . . ." 


9 


Watertown 


73 


Watervliet 


18 


Westbury 




White Plaiwi 


102 
255 


102 


Yonkc"» . . - 


266 






Total 


98 


99 


18,301 


18.301 


23,857 




23,367 






• 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbkdix 



41 



TaU* I.--N« 



, by IndMtriM, ThidM aad 





Uniovs at 


NUMBSB OF MwfBEBS AT TKB ExD OF — 


Imdustbt, Tbadb amv 
LocAurr 


Ekd of — 


MASCH. 1913 


UPTBiaKB. 1918 




M«b. 


Sept 


Mim 


Worn. 


ToUl 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



L BUIUMNG, STONB WOBKING, RC.- 



(b)PiJMtog and Paving Tradee 

Paper Hancsra: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 


73 
168 
142 

44 




73 
168 
142 

44 


78 
198 
141 

46 




78 
198 
141 

46 


New York, Manhattan 

Rochipffter 


Utica 




Total 


4 


4 


427| 


427 


463 




463 




Buffalo 


1 
2 
3 
5 


1 
2 
3 
5 

1 
1 


60 

91 

135 

270 


.. 


60 

91 

135 

270 


60 
95 
130 
310 
22 
35 




60 
95 
130 
310 
22 
35 


New York, Bronx 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

New York, Qoeena 




1 


25 





25 




Total 


12 


13 


581 




581 


652 




652 




PiMterera: 

T^nchamton. . . ... . . . , 


1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 


14 

170 

14 

11 

091 

3.196 

198 

41 

99 

16 





14 

170 
14 
11 

691 
3.196 

198 
47 
99 
16 


17 
156 

17 

14 

607 

3,047 

206 

48 
101 

16 




17 

156 

17 

14 

607 

3,047 

206 

,Sf 

16 


n^f^lo 


Jamestown 


Lockport 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

New York. QtMeena 


Nipcan Ffilh 




Watertown 




Total 


11 


11 


4.450 





4.450 


4.229 




4.229 




Flambers, Gaa and Steam Fitters 
and Helpers: 
Albany 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 


102 
30 
42 
14 
33 

285 
28 
11 
12 
10 
35 
7 
23 




102 
30 
42 
14 
33 

285 
28 
11 
12 
10 
35 
7 
23 


109 
27 
42 
11 
90 
290 
28 

9 
12 
10 
34 

7 
23 
21 
14 
21 

9 
27 
26 
24 
14 
28 
12 


:::::: 


109 
27 




Anbam 


42 

11 
90 


BatavU 


^TPChamton. . , 


Buffalo 


290 

28 

g 


Cohoes 


Corinth-Palmer 


OrrrAng, . , 


12 


THr-HHt 


10 




34 


Fulton 


7 


Geneva 


23 


GleuFalls 


21 


Qkjversville 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


25 
24 
8 
29 
23 
32 
17 
25 




25 
24 
8 
29 
23 
32 
17 
25 


14 


n^lrim^ 


21 


Homell 


9 


Ithaca 


27 




26 


fn«i0rton. 


24 




14 


LoefaMffT.. ' .. 


28 


M^r.:;::: ::::::::: 


12 


Middtetown 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


17 
39 
17 
20 
1,000 




17 
39 
17 
20 
1.000 


18' - 


18 


Mount Vernon 


55 
19 




55 


New Rocfaelle 


19 


New York, Bronx 




New York. Brooklyn 


"946 





946 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



42 



New York Labob Bulletin. 



Table L — Nninbor and MemberaUp of Labor Orgsaniatloiia, hj Indostrlea, Trades and Leeallttee 

1^13 — coBtinned 





Unions at 


NUMBBB 0» MBllBERtf AT THB EnD OF — 


Indubtrt, Tradb and 
localitt 


End of — 


UABCH, 1913 


BBPTBIIBBB, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



I. BUILDING. STONE WORKING, ETC.— 



(b) BoildlBtf and PavlBg Trades- 
continued. 

Plumbers. Gas and Steam Fitters 

New York. Manhattan 

New York, Queens 


5 


5 


1,896 

170 
42 
63 
24 
10 
22 
7 
14 
24 
6 
17 
30 
10 
67 

450 
38 
18 
85 
19 

225 
54 
91 

100 
12 
60 
98 




1,896 
170 
42 
63 
24 
10 
22 

il 

24 
6 
17 
30 
10 
67 

450 
38 
18 
85 
19 

225 
54 
91 

100 
12 
60 
98 


1,862 

280 

42 

51 

26 

9 
23 

8 
14 
17 




1.862 
280 


New York, Richmond 

Newburgh 


42 
51 


Niagara Falls 


26 


Nywsk 


9 


Olean 


23 


Oneida 


8 


0<Mfining 


14 


Oswego 


17 


PeekScill 




Plattsburg 


22 
35 
10 
76 

452 
38 
20 

120 
15 

225 
37 

103 

120 

6 

50 

102 


:::::: 


22 


Port Chester 


35 


Port Jervis 


10 


PniiirhlcnAniiie 


76 


Rochester 


452 


Rome 


38 




20 


Schenectady 


120 


Suff ern 


15 


Syracuse ..... t r ... r ..... . 


225 


T'arry town 


37 


Troy 


103 


Utica 


120 


Watertown 


6 


White Plains 


60 


Yonkers 


102 






Total 


55 


55 


5.650 




6,550 


5,689 




5.689 






Rock Drillers, Tool Sharpeners. 
Etc.: 
Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


120 
1,600 
1,200 




120 
1,603 
1,200 


122 

1,100 

135 




122 


New York, Manhattan 

Yonkers 


1.100 
136 






Total 


3 


3 


2,820 




2.820 


1.367 




1,367 






Roofers, Slate and Tile: 

Buffalo 


1 

1 


1 
1 


30 
77 




30 
77 


25 

80 




25 


New York. Manhattan 


80 


Total 


2 


2 


107 




107 


105 




105 






Sheet MeUl Workers: 

Albany 






67 
20 
32 
20 
265 
20 
49 
13 
12 
31 
37 
15 
23 





67 
20 
32 
20 
265 
20 
49 
13 
12 
31 
37 
16 
23 


64 
22 
31 
19 
325 
20 
58 




64 


Amsterdam 


22 


Auburn 


31 


Bingham ton 


19 


Buffalo 


325 


Dunkirk 


20 


Elmira 


58 


Fulton 


151 

13 

31 

38 

15 

29 ...'... 


15 


Geneva , 


13 




31 


Jamestown 


38 


Little Falls 


15 


Middletown 


29 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Tfehtol.— Ni 



Appxitbiz. 48 

fgaiiliBHwM, by lad— tri— , Trtidat — d I.»f Mtlw. 
19U — 



IVDURBT, TbADS AND 

LoGALtrr 



Ukions at 
Ekd of — 



Mdi. Sept. 



NVMBSB OF MbOTEM AT THB EmD OF - 



MAmCH. 1913 



Men Worn. ToUl 



upnioBB* 1913 



Men Worn. ToUl 



L BIHLDING 
») PidMtog and FeTJi^ TredM 

M<nxnt Vernon 


2 


«B WO 

2 


BEING. 

17 
14 
2.399 
45 
30 
31 
23 
16 
8 
27 
16 
36 
220 
21 
33 
145 
26 
48 
54 
32 
55 


ETC.- 


17 
14 
2.399 
45 
30 
31 
23 
16 
8 
27 
16 
36 

220 
21 
33 

145 
26 
48 
54 
32 
55 


•d 

20 
14 
2.800 
45 
30 
30 




20 


NewRochelle 

New York, ManhaUaa 

New York. QoeeDa 


14 

2.800 

45 


New York. Richmond 


30 
30 


NkfamFatb 


26 

17 

9 


26 


OodenflnirF . . . . 


17 


^ST!?. ;::;::;;:::::: 


9 


Oawem 


3H 
16 
36 

248 
18 
36 

145 
22 
44 
60 
35 




38 


PortCbiBflter 


16 


PooKhkeepaie 


36 




248 


Rome 


18 




36 


^ynunme ' .... 


145 


iWrytown 


22 


Troy 


44 


Utica 


60 


White Plains 


35 


V5»k«» 


60 


60 












ToUl 


35 


35 


3.900 




3,900 


4.429 




4,429 






Stair BuikieTs: 

New York. ManhaUan 


1 


1 


ue! 


146 


133 




133 


Steam and Hot Water Fitters: 
Albany 


1 
1 
I 
1 
I 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

i 

1 

1 


54 

110 

40 

11 

1,400 

121 
36 




54 
110 

40 

11 

1.400 

121 

36 


54 
104 
26 




54 


Buffalo 


104 


Mount Vernon 


26 


NewRochelle 




New York, Manhattan 

Sefaenectady 


1.400 
124 
63 





1,400 
124 


VflnkfTV 


63 









Total 


7 


6 


1,772 




1.772 


1.771 




1,771 




* 




Steam Fitters' Helpers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


1,000, 


1.000 


1.000 





1.000 


Stone MaKms: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


275 

225| 

837 

90; 


275 

225 

837 

90 


171 

215 

838 

90 




171 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 


215 

838 

90 






Total 


4 


4 


1,427| 


1.427 


1.314 




1 314 








Stone Setters: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


273 


273 


255 




255 


Tar. FeH and Waterproof Work- 
Rodiester 


1 


1 
1 


676! 

! 


676 


756 
28 




756 
28 














Total 


1 


2 


676 




676 


784 




784 





















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 



New York Labor Bulletin. 



Takto L— NomlMr and MMtbOToUp of Labcr OrfurfnltaM, by InduMM, TndM I 





Unions at 




Industbt, Tbadb AJn> 
LocALmr 


End of — 


MARCH, 1913 


BBPTXlfBES, 1013 




Meh. 


Sept. 


M«n 


Wom.i Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



I. BU1LDINO, 8TONB WORKING, ETC.— eoBttnaad 



(b) Bnlldliic and Pavinc Trades — 
eondiided. 

Tile Layers and Marble Mosaic 
Workers: 



Albany. 
Buffalo. 
New York, Manhattan . 

Rochester 

Syracuse 



Total. 



Tile Liters and Marble Mosaic 
Workers' Helpers: 

Buffalo 

New York, Manhattan . . . 



Total. 

Tuck Pointers: 
Buffalo . . . 
Rochester . 



Total. 



Total — Building and 
Trades 



Pavinc 



(c) BnUdiiig and Street Labor. 

Asphalt Workers: 

New York, Manhattan 



Bricklayers, Masons and Plaster- 
ers' Laborers: 

Albany 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Binghamton 

Buffalo 

Centrallslip 

Geneva 

Kingston 

Mamaroneck 

Middletown 

Mount Vernon 

New RocheUe 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan . . . 

New York, Queens 

New York, Richmond .... 

Newburgh 

Oneida 

Oswego 

Plattsburg 

Port Chester 

Rochester 

Rome 

Saranac Lake 

Schenectady 



609 



16 
46 
520 
45 
20 



647 



53 
591 



644 



615{102,462 



704 



195 



52 

32 

320 



35 

30 

17 

45 

105 

103 

2.297 

12' 12,010 

73 

11 

46 

75 



60 
45 

170 
70 
40 

418 



16 
46 
520] 
45 
20 



18 
35 
536 
55 
20 



647 



664 



53 
591 



644 



102,462 



53 
608 



661 



30 



108.157 



704 



660 



195 



62 

32 

520 



35 

30 

17 

45 

105 

103 

2,297 

12,010 

73 

11 

46 

75 



60 
45 

170 
70 
40 

418 



210 
57 
32 
35 

370 
10 
28 
27 
20 
40 

126 
95 
,035 
.000 
70 
10 
61 
80 
15 

108 
61 

178 
20 



18 

35 

536 

55 



664 



53 
608 



661 



7 
23 



30 



108,167 



660 



210 
57 
32 
35 

370 
10 
28 
27 
20 
40 

126 
95 
2.036 
11.000 
70 
10 
61 
80 
15 

108 
61 

178 
20 



Digitized by CjOOQIC * 



Apfbitdiz. 



46 



TaUt L— Noikw nd »f««b«n 


lilt — « 


Z^ 


■M.kf 




m^Tn^mndh 


t 




Uhiom* at 


NuMBBB or Mbmbbm at nu Evd of ^ 


LocALtrr 


MASCH. 1918 


flvmsBB. 1918 




Heh. 


Btpt. 


Mmi 


Worn. 


Total 


Han 


Worn. 


Total 



L BdUNNO, 8TONB WOSKINO* BTC^ 



(e) liiniln ori 8tMa* Labw-^ 

OMIUHUUU 

an* Laboran-^omdiHlei. 
flyracuiw 


3 

1 
2 

1 
1 


i 

8 

1 
2 

1 
1 


730 
2ft 
450 
125 
300 




780 
23ft 
4fi0 
12ft 
300 


560 

1^ 
150 
800 





560 




2ft 


Utioa 


168 


WUtoPlaiiM 


IftO 


Yonkora 


300 






Total 


52 


51 


18.079 




18.079 


16.274 




16.274 






Ceownt Woiken: 

Jamntown ■ ■ • 




1 
1 








12 
1.800 




12 




1 


1.864 




1.864 


1.800 


Total 


1 


2 


1.864 




1.864 


1.812 




1,812 








EieaTaton and Tunnel Workeia: 

Naw York. Manhattan 

Yonken 


2 

1 


2 

1 


1.900 
467 




1.900 
467 


2.000 
877 




2,000 
877 






Total 


8 


8 


2.367 




2.367 


2,877 




2,877 






G«nral Boiklus and Street 
Laboren: 




1 

1 








50 
2.800 




50 




1 


2.000 




2,000 


2.800 






Total 


1 


2 


2.000 




2.000 


2.850 




2.850 






^*°"'^ Yoik. Bn^klyn 


1 


1 


70 




70 


71 




71 


Total Bnikling and Stioet Ubor 


62 


63 


25.084 




25.084 


24.544 




24.544 


Total — Group I 


713 


722 


133.812 


• •• ' " 


133.812 


138.738 




138.738 







n. TRANSPORTATION. 



(a) Raliwaja. 

Cw and LoeomotaTe Paintera: 

Albany 

Mkklletown . 




1 
1 


58 

17 


1 
1 

58 
1 17 


56 

»». 


56 
19 






Total 




2 


75 


75 


75' 


75 






Car laiipMton. Rapairen, Etc.: 




1 
2 


8 
186 





8 

285 

112 

50 

68 

27 

84 

98 

37 

38 

196 

15 




8 


Buffalo 




1H6 


285 




112 


Etmira 




2i 
68 
33 
85 
80 
24 
33 
100 




21 
68 
33 
85 
80 
24 
33 
100 


60 




68 


Mkldtetown 


27 


Nev York. Bronx 


84 


New York. Manhattan 

Nev York Oueena 


98 
37 


vlormiSr.^^::. 


38 


ODMnto 

Phttrtwinr 


196 
15 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



46 



Nbw York Labob Bulletin. 



ItlS — eoBllBued 




Unions at 
End o» — 


NXTM BBB or MSMBBBS AT THB EnD OV 


hmvvm, Tradb and 

LOCALITT 


MABCB. 1013 


SBPTSMBKB, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



n. TRANSPORTATION — 



(a) Raflways — omlinued. 

Car Inspecton. Rcpairei*, Etc. — 
Rotterdam Junction 

RniiMMi Point 


1 




22 




22 


21 
25 
35 
22 
18 


i 

; 21 

25 












35 


Troy • 


1 


21 




21 


i 22 


WhitiihAll 




1 18 














Total 


13 


18 


681 




681 


1,139 


i 1.139 






Clerks, Railway: 

Albany 


1 




80 




80 


66 

310 

70 

41 

112 

141 

30 

9 

58 

17 

8 


1 

66 


Buffalo 


9 319 


x^Avbroolc 




70 

40 

103 

141 

18 

9 

66 

17 

8 


3 

...... 


70 

43 

103 

141 

18 

9 

66 

17 

8 


1 70 




4 45 


New York Bronx .,,-,-.,.- 


112 


New York, Brooklyn 

Port Chester 


141 

30 




9 


Rotterdam Junction 

Troy 


68 

17 


Wa.tii>rtown 


8 






Total 


10 


11 


542 


3 


545 


861 


13 874 






Conductors: 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




169 

56 

323 




169 
66 

323 
82 

135 

190 

117 
25 

116 
82 
45 

208 

182 
61 
34 
54 
44 

101 
47 

152 


169 
56 

313 
81 

135 

207 

114 
26 

116 
86 
52 

209 

179 
69 
34 
66 
48 

101 
46 

143 
55 

153 
70 


160 




1 66 


Bi%tlo 


1 313 




82| 


1 81 


F'fuit Rvr&GUse 


135 
190 
117 
25 
116 
82 
45 
208 
182 
61 
34 
54 
44 
101 
47 
152 
55 


:::;;; 


1 136 




207 


Ilomeil 


114 




26 




116 


Middletown 





86 


New Rochelle 


62 


New York, Manhattan 

Kip«r York OiMfpns 


1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 

I 1 

II 1 
11 1 

i; 1 
i< 1 
11 1 
ll 1 
1, 1 
11 1 
ll 1 
1 1 


209 
179 


New York, Richmond 


:::::;! §S 




; 66 




48 


Oneonta 


; 101 




46 


Port jervis 


143 




; 55 


65 


Rochester 


158: 158 


153 




70 

1441 

105' 

58i 

^i 


70 
144 
105 
58 
34 


70 




142 


142 


I tifta 


105 
50 
33 


106 


W^atertown 


50 


Whitehall 


33 






Total 


28| 28 


2.847 


2.847 


2.837 





3.837 






Engineers, Locomotive: 

Albany 


1 1 

2 2 

71 7 
l' 1 

i; 1 

2, 2 


182 
82 

962 

173 
86 

218 


!.!..'. 


182 

82 

962 

173 


177 




177 


Binahamton 


83 

954 

173 

90 

216! 


83 


Buffalo 


964 


Comins r 


173 




; 86 

! 218 


90 


Elmira 


216 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



47 



Ihbto L— Nwnbw ud M«mbmk|p or I^Ubw Organlnrtloii^ Iv iBdnrtriaa. T^^ 

ItlS — « 





Unions at 


NUMBBX OF MbMBMBS AT TBB EnD OF — 


Industrt, Trads JlSD 

Lo«ALITT 


End of — 


UARca, 1913 


BBPTBICBBB. 1913 




Meh. 


Sopt> 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



IL TSANSPORTATION — 



(a) BaOwaya — coDtlnaed. 

Enpnoera, LooomotivoB — eond^d. 

Homell 

Mechanicville 

Middletown 

New York, Bronx 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Queens 

New York, Richmond 

Norwich 

Ogdensburg 

Clean 

Oneonta 

Oswego 

Port JerviB 

Rensselaer 

Rochester 

Salamanca 

Schenectady 

&rracuse 

Troy 

Utica 

Watertown 

White Plains 

WhitehaU 



Total. 



Firemen and Engineers, Loco- 
motive: 

Albany 

Auburn 

Avon 

Binghamton 

Buffalo. 

Ck)ming 

East Syracuse 

Elmlra 

Green Island 

Homell 

Kingston 

Lackawanna 

Malone 

Maybrook 

Mechanicville 

Middletown 

New York, Bronx 

New York, Queens 

New York, Richmond .... 

Niagara Falls 

Norwich 

Olean 

Oneonta 

Oswego 

Plattsbur^ 

Port Jervis 

Rensselaer 

Rochester 

Salamanca 

Saratoga Springs 

Schenectady 

Syracuse 

Utica ; 



44 



44 



209 
114 
142 
476 
33 



36 

63 

166 

117 

201 

183 

305 

67 

83 

240 

87 

160 

136 

105 

80 



6,076 



450 

80 

49 

65 

1,256 

138 

129 

282 

68 

276 

83 

63 

30 

42 

100 

110 

640 

210 

64 

64 

83 

86 

166 

88 

68 

302 

237 

240 

74 

30 

46 

232 

226 



209 

114 

142 

476 

33 

266 

66 

39 

36: 

63l 

166 

117 

201 

183' 

305 

671 

831 

2401 

87 1 

160: 

136; 

106 

801 



469 

80 

49 

65 

1,256| 

138 

1291 

282 

68 

275 

83 

63 

30 

42 

100 

110 

540 

210 

64 

64 

83 

85 

166 

88 

68 

302 

237 

240 

74 

30 

45 

232 

225 



200 

120 

141 

485 

34 

263 

66 

39 

40 

50 

171 

105 

218 

198 

306 

68 

83 

267 

86 

140 

137 

103 

80 



6.076| 6,092 



466 

85 

60 

65 

1,417 

134 

124 

286 

67 

260 

80 

74 

35 

36 

100 

110 

509 

219 

56 

70 

83 

92 

181 

90 

60 

280 

248 

245 

73 

30 

45 

244 

226 



200 

120 

141 

486 

34 

263 

66 

39 

40 

60 

171 

106 

218 

198 

306 

68 

83 

267 

85 

140 

137 

103 

80 



5,092 



466 

86 

50 

65 

1,417 

134 

124 

286 

67 

260 

80 

74 

35 

36 

100 

110 

509 

219 

65 

70 

83 

92 

181 

90 

60 

280 

248 

246 

73 

30 

45 

244 

226 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



48 



New York Labob Bulletin. 



Table I.— Number and M«mbenblp of Labor Orfudnttmis, by IndMrtrfM. 





Unions at 




IMDUBTBT, TRAOB AND 

LocALirr 


End of — 


MASCB. 1913 


SBPTSiaBB, 1913 




Moh. 


Sept. 


Men IWom. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



n. TRANSPOBTATION— oenllnaed 



Firemen and EngineerB, Looo- 
Warwick 


1 
1 
1 


1 


44 

153 
56 




44 

153 
56 


45 

151 
65 




45 


Watertown 


151 


Whitehall 


65 






Total 


49 


49 


6,215 




6,215 


6,368 




6,368 




Motormenj Guards, Etc. (Electric 

New York. Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 


2 
2 


2 
2 


211 
220 




211 
220 


211 
216 




211 
216 


Total 


4 


4 


431 




431 


427 




427 






Signal Maintainers: 

New Rochelle 




1 








88 




38 














Street Railway Employees: 

AllMmy 




1 

2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


506 
135 




506 
135 


552 




552 


Bingham top ,,..-,- r 




Bufnilo 


2.360 

71 

15 

120 

43 

34 

200 

13 

66 

92 

57 

957 

28 

452 

500 

560 

409 

26 

224 




36 


Pupkirlr 




40 

16 

118 

45 

29 

200 

12 

59 

86 

30 

960 

23 

430 

525 

542 

300 

20 

230 




40 

16 

118 

46 

29 

200 

12 

59 

86 

30 

960 

23 

430 

525 

542 

300 

20 

230 


71 


Elmira 


15 


Glens Falls 


120 


Ithaca 


43 


Middietown 


34 


New Rochelle 


200 


New York, Brooklyn 

Newburgh 


12 

66 


Port Chester 


92 


RenstKflaer . . r - . r . , , r r - . . . . 


57 


Roohoeter 


957 


Saratoga Springs 


28 


Schen^tacfy 


452 


Syracuse 


500 


Xroy 


560 


Utioa 


409 


Waterloo 


26 


Yonkers ,,,.,--,,, 


224 






Total 


21 


22 


4.306 




4,306 


6,778 




6,778 




Switchmen: 

Binghamton 




2 
1 


39 
927 
47 
34 
78 

7 
48 
13 

8 
16 
14 
10 
16 

6 




39 

927 
47 
34 
78 

7 
48 
13 

8 
16 
14 
10 
16 

6 


42 

988 
44 
33 
81 

3 
56 
11 

6 
16 
12 
13 
27 
11 




42 


Buffalo 


988 


Elmira. . .". 


44 


Homell 


33 


Tiackawanna 


81 


T^ons r , 


3 


Maw York. Bronx. . 


56 


Niagara Falls 


11 


Port Jervis 


6 




16 


Salamanca 


12 


Shortsville 


13 


Syracuse 


27 


Xftica 


11 






Total 


20 


20 


1.263 




1,263 


1.843 




1,343 






Trackmen, Railway: 

Mechanicville 


1 


1 


100 




100 


175 





175 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



49 



TUftle I.— N«mbw and M«nbwdd» 



of Labor OrgantetlmH, hf I iid— falw, TkadM i 
ItlS- 





Unions at 


NUKBSB or MuCBUtS AT TBI EnD OF — 


iMDVwm, Tbjldb and 


End of — 


MABCB. 1918 


BBPTBUBBR. 1918 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



n. TRANBPOBTATION.— 



(a) BaihnweoBdvded. 

Trainmen, Road and Yard: 

A bany 


2 
2 


2 
1 


415 

79 

250 

1,148 

250 

300 

650 

90 

308 

144 

42 

96 

160 

297 

333 

94 

828 

629 

167 

50 

153 

135 

65 

150 

225 

130 

54 

306 

92 

65 

307 

396 

69 

49 

163 

74 

127 

441 

120 

371 

47 

62 

164 

140 




415 

79 

250 

1,148 

250 

300 

550 

90 

308 

144 

42 

96 

160 

297 

333 

94 

828 

629 

167 

50 


432 

80 

251 

1.201 

269 

310 

550 

89 

310 

148 

36 

96 

164 

302 

351 

98 

829 

680 

173 

51 

140 

137 

76 

136 

250 

132 

61 

318 

91 

69 

337 

402 

70 

44 

170 

74 

131 

455 

120 

380 

47 

72 

168 

140 




432 


Anbnm 


80 




251 


Bunalo 


1 201 


Coming. . , r r . 


269 


East Sjnraouae 


310 




650 


Fishkill-on-Hudson 


89 


Homell 


310 


Kinaston 


148 


Lyons . r 


36 


Maybrook 


96 




164 


Mlddletown 


302 


New York, Bronx 


351 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

New York, Queens 


98 
829 
680 


New York, Richmond 

Newburgh 


173 
51 


Nisciira FalW. , . , 


140 


Norwich 


..'.'.'.'.\ 13.^ 


187 






65 

150 

225 

130 

54 

306 

92 

65 

307 

396 

69 

49 

163 

74 

127 

441 

120 

371 

47 

62 

164 

140 


76 


^fuTT!^.'.:;:::::::::::: 


136 


Oneonta 


260 


Oswego 


132 


Plattsburg 


61 


Port Jervis 


318 


PoujchkeeDsie 


91 


]R4^v<mA 


69 


ll^^n<n^la«r 


337 




402 


Rotterdam Junction 

Rouses Point 


70 
44 


f^alamanca . ....... 


170 


Raratoga Spring* 


74 




131 


Syracuse 


455 


t^T.:::.::.::.:::::::: 


120 


Utica 


.. . ' 380 


Walton 


1 47 


Warwick 


:::.:i 72 


Watertown 


i 168 


Whit4^hall . 


! 140 






Total 


50 


50 


10.135 




10,135 


10.440 


I 10,440 






Total — Railways 


242 


250 


31,671 


3 


31.674 


35,573 


13| 35,586 






(b) NavigatloB. 

Boatmen: 

New York, Manhattan 

Whitehall 


1 
1 


1 


795 
200 




795 
200 


335 




335 












Total 


2 


1 


995| 


995 


336 




336 






Cooks and Stewards, Marine: 
Buffalo 


1 
1 


1 
1 


250 


250 


390 
5.000 




390 


New York, Manhattan 


5,300" 1 5.300 


5,000 


Total 


2 


2| ft-S.'M)' 


5,550 


5,390 




5.390 






• 








Digitized by VjOOQIC 



50 



New Yoke Labob Bulletin. 







Unions at 
End o» — 


NUUBBX or MKMBXR0 AT TBK EmD OV — 


Invubtrt. Tradb and 

L0CAX«ITY 




8BPTBlfBXR» 1013 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



0. TBANSPOBTATION.— 



EncineeTB, Marine: 

Albany 


1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


74 
30 
412 
22 
18 
93 
2,702 
40 
19 
40 




74 
30 
412 
22 
18 
93 
2,7C2 
40 
19 
40 


76 
30 
394 
26 
20 
84 
2,702 
39 
19 
42 
26 




76 


Alexandria Bav 


30 


Buffalo - 


394 


Clayton 


26 


"Dunkirk r , . , 


20 


Kingston 


84 


New York. Manhattan 

OtrrlnnnKiinr 


2,702 
39 


Osweso 


19 


Tonawanda 


42 


Whitehall 


1 


26 












Total 


11 


12 


3.450 




3,450 


3,458 




3,458 






Firemen, Marine: 

Buffalo 


2 
1 

1 


2 
1 

1 


484 

12,100 

66 




484 

12,100 

66 


714 

12,000 

140 




714 


New York, Manhattan 

Oflrdenflbtinr 


12,000 
140 






Total 


4 


4 


12.650 




12,660 


12,854 




12,864 




Masters and PUots: 
Albany 


1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


82 




82 


82 
20 
15 
43 
53 
164 
1.200 
36 




82 


Buffalo 


20 


Clayton 


1 


13 




13 


15 


Oreennort . ... 


43 


ICintratAn 










53 


New York, Brook.yn 

New York, Manhattan 

Port Jefferson 


1 


162 
1.326 




152 
1,326 


164 

1,200 

36 














Total 


4 


8 


1,572 




1,572 


1,613 




1,613 






Seamen: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


800 

5.000 

200 




800 

6,000 

200 


800 

3.020 

250 




900 


New York. Manhattan 

North Tonawanda . , , 


3.020 
250 






Total 


3 


3 


6,000 




6,000 


4,070 




4,070 






Total — Navigation 


26 


30 


30,217 




30.217 


27.720 




27,720 


(c) Teaming and Cab DriTlng. 

Cab and Coach Drivers and 
Chauffe\irs: 
Albany 


2 

1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 


2 

1 
3 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
2 


131 
35 

174 

823 

2,100 

24 

17 

75 

125 




131 
35 

174 

823 

2,100 

24 

17 

75 

126 


167 

40 

460 

600 

1,200 

24 

15 

100 

130 





167 


Binshamton 


40 


Buffalo , 


450 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 


600 

1,200 

24 


Saratoffa SnrinKS. ...... t r - - 


15 


Syracuse 


100 


Troy 


130 








Total 


14 


15 


3.504| 


3,604 


2,726 




2,726 






Garage Workers: 

Now York Manhattan . . . 




1 








146 




145 






1 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Affhtbcl 



61 



IttteL— Moibvi 





Itll— < 


MrtiMMd 


I 










Umionb at 
End or — 


NUMBKB OF MKMUm AT TU EnD OV — 


IXDUSTBT, TmADB AND 
LOCAUTT 


MABCN. 1913 


BBPnUCBBB. 1918 




Meh. 


Sept. 


M«n 


Worn. 


ToUl 


I 
Men Worn. 

I 


ToUl 



n. TBAMSPOBTATION.— c 



(c) TmaOag and Cmb IhMag—\ 

Tn<k and Wagon Driven and 
Cbanffeun: 

Albany 


4 
4 
1 
1 
3 
18 
1 
1 
1 
3 


16 


680 




680 

219 

112 

75 

313 

10.332 

55 

32 

15 


602 

257 

2.892 

80 

348 

10,142 

52 

52 

15 

535 

1C4 

148 

450 

1.198 

350 




602 

OK9 


Aaburn 


219 




Buffalo 


112t 

75 


' 2,892 

1 Q/k 


Genera 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York. ManhaUan 


313 

10.332 

55 

32 

15 

206 






...... 


348 

10.142 

52 

52 

15 

535 

104 

148 

450 

1.198 

OKA 


OsdeaebuK 


Oinrego 






i 




1 
2 
1 
1 


95 




95 
436 
900 

350 


T^oy 


436 




Utiea 


900 
350 




YookflTB , 






Total 


42 


45 


13.820 




13,820 


17 215 


1 1 Y A1 e 






Total— Teaminc and Cab Drivins 


56 


61 


17.324 




17.324 


20.0861 1 20.086 


(d) FMf hC HandUnc 

Coal Heaven: 

Buffalo 


1 
2 


1 
2 


10 
410 




10 
410 


10 
350 




10 
350 


New York. Manhattan 


Total 


3 


3 


420 




420 


3fI0 


1 OOA 










Fraight and BacsagBmen: 

Mechanicvnia 




1 
1 
1 








25' 

58! 

29j 


25 

58 
29 


Rotterdam Junction 











Troy 


1 


29 




29 




Total 


1 


3 


29 




29 


112 


112 




OramHandlen: 

Buffalo 


2 


2 
1 


608 




608 


609! 

17: 


699 
17 


f%4mibi]Tx 












Total 


2 


8 


608 




608 


716J 


716 




Boffalo 


3 
3 
6 

1 
1 


3 
6 
9 

1 
1 


1,090 
107 

2.225 
30 
80 




1.000 
107 

2.225 
30 
80 


1.195' 

50r 

2.461 

30 

80 


1.195 
501 

2.461 
30 
80 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 


oSS?!™!'. .:;:........ 




Total 


14 


20 


4.132 




4.132 


4.267 




4,267 






Umber Handlen: 

Buffalo. 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
2 
1 

1 


108 

100 

240 

25 

18 


i; 


108 

100 

240 

25 

IS 


116 




116 

100 

265 

25 

30 


North tonawaiida 

Ocdenebnrc 


1(K) '.'.'.'.'.'. 
265 

25 

30 


ToBftwfindA . 


Troy 




Total 


5 


6 


491 




491 


535' 


536 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



52 



New Yore: Labob Bulletin. 



1W»to I.-- Nufibw and 



orubw 

ItlS — 





Unions at 


NUMBKB OF MSMBBBB AT TBB EnD OF 


Iin>u0TBT, TBadb and 

LOCALITT 


End of — 


MABCH. 1013 


■BPTBMBSB, 1913 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



n. 1 

(d) n«lglit BudUng — ceacl*d. 

Scow Trimmera: 

New York, Manhattan 


ntANSl 

1 


PORTA 

1 


noN.- 

300 


-coedu 


lied 

300 


300 




300 


Total — Freight Handling 


26 


36 


6,070 




6,070 


6.291 




6,291 


(e) Telegraphe. 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 


25 

865 

7 

2 


"222 

i 


26 

1,087 

7 

3 


25 

812 

8 

2 


■ ' *2i6 

i 


26 


NewYork, Manhattiui 


1.028 
8 


Utioa 


3 






Total 


4 


4 


890 


223 


1.122 


847 


217 


1.064 






Telegraphere. Raihroad: 


1 
1 


1 

1 
1 

I 
I 

1 
1 
1 


281 
40 


2 


283 
40 


281 
42 
34 
53 
33 

274 

104 
1,784 

334 
69 

200 


2 

i 

"is 

11 
3 
8 


283 


Blasdell 


42 


Chatham 


34 


Elmira . ,,,,..... ^ , 


1 


44 


1 


45 


53 


Franklinville 


33 


Kingffton - 


2 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 


218 

46 

1,661 

334 
64 

175 


'""36 

11 

3 

8 


218 

46 

1,691 

346 
67 

183 


275 


New Roehelle 


104 


New York, Manhattan 

New York, Queens 


1.799 
345 


Rochester 


72 




108 






Total 


11 


13 


2,863 


55 


2.918 


3,208 


40 


3.248 






Total — Telegraphs 


15 


17 


3.762 


278 


4.040 


4,055 


267 


4,312 






Total — Group II 


365 


394 


89,044 


281 


89.325 


93,725 


270 


93.996 







m. CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 



Badge, Banner and Regalia Mak- 
New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


7 


34 


41 


3 


32 


35 


Basters: 

New York. Manhattan 

Roohester 


1 


1 

1 


14.000 


4,000 


18,000 


10,000 
350 


2.000 


12,000 
360 














Total 


1 2 


14,000 


4.000 


18,000 


10.350 


2.000 


12.360 






Buttonhole Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 

Syracuse 


3 3 

1| 1 


920 


55 
64 


975 
64 


974 


36 
60 


1.010 
60 








Total 


4; 4 


920 


119 


1.039 


974 


96 


1.070 






Clip Sorters: 

New York, Manhattan 




1 
1 








400 
25 


100 


600 


Rochester 










26 












Total 




2 


1 




425 


100 


526 






1 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Apfxndix. 



■MeL— Nh 






Unzojcs at 


NuvBBa or Muains at tu Ein> or — 


ISDOSTBT. TkaOB AND 
LOCAUTT 


Em OF — 


MABCB. 1913 


nrrmMMMR, 1913 




Moh. 


Smfit. 


Man 


Worn. 


Total 


Man 


Worn. 


Total 



DL CLOTHING AND TEXTIU8 - 



Clottk And Suit Catten: 

New York. ManhatUD 


1 


1 


9.020 




9.020 


9.060 




9.060 


Cloak and Suit Maken: 

Albany 


1 
1 

1 
4 

1 
1 


i 

1 

4 
1 


26 
95 
2.000 
33.400 
32 
26 


6 

45 

1.000 

6,072 

12 

2 


32 

140 

3,000 

39,472 

44 

28 


! 




Buffalo 


115 

1.3C0 

36.700 

20 


50 

500 

7.075 

12 


165 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 


1.800 

43.775 

32 


Troy 












Total 


9 


7 


35.579 


7,137 


42,716 


38.135 


7,637 


45,772 






aotk Examinera. Spongers and 
Helpers: 
New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


367i 


367 


»» 




360 


aothinc Cutters and Trimmers: 


1 
1 
2 
1 


1 

1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 


32 
1.000 
3.700 

42 


' 


32 
l.COO 
3.700 

42 


32 
1.160 
3.700 
43 
160 
114 
79 







32 


New York, Brooklyn 


1.150 

3.700 

43 


Rochester 


150 


Syracuse 


1 
1 


115 
55 




115 
55 


114 


uSaT:::::::::::::::::: 


79 






Total 


7 


8 


4.944 




4,944 


5.268 




5,268 






Clothing Preesers: 

Bdlalo 


1 
2 
4 

1 


1 
2 
4 
1 


44 

575 

17.700 

120 




44 

575 

17.700 

120 


46 

846 

13.232 

124 


2 




46 


New York. Brooklyn 

Syracuse 


846 

13.234 

124 






Total 


8 


8 


18.439 




18.439 


14,248 


2 


14.250 






Coat. Pants and Vest Makers: 
Albany 


1 
2 
1 
5 

7 

1 
5 

1 
1 


1 
2 

1 
7 
9 
4 

5 

1 
1 


30 

71 

4 

4.566 

26.125 

6.000 

179 

35 

15 


14 

40 

6 

605 

4.545 

1,200 

370 

35 

45 


44 

111 

10 

5,171 

30.670 

7.200 

549 

70 

60 


35 

76 

4 

4.265 

20.180 

1.587 

190 

35 

13 


10 
44 

5 

1.070 

6.172 

540 

386 

35 

46 


45 


Buffalo 


120 


Jamestown 


9 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 


5.335 

26.352 

2.127 


Syracuse 


576 


ij2cr!^::. ::..:::::::.::. 


70 


Warrenabuig 


59 






Total 


34 


31 


37.025 


6.860 


48.885 


26.385 


8.308 


34.693 






Jsdut Makers: 

New York. Brooklyn 

New Yorit. Manhattan 


3 
3 


3 

3 


2.160 
4.672 


563 
1,800 


2.713 
6.372 


2.061 
4.800 


603 
2,100 


2.664 
6,900 


Total 


6 


6 


6.732 


2.353 


9.085 


6.861 


2.703 


9,564 






Knee Puta Makers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


2.800 


700 


3.600 


3.000 


800 


3.800 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 



New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 



Table I. — Niunb«r and MembenUp of Labor Orsanintloiui, by Indutrleo, Trades and LocaUtleo, 

19ia — < 





Unions at 


NUMBXR OF MkUBBRS AT TH» EnD OF — 


Ikdustrt, Trads and 
localitt 


End of — 


MARCH. 1913 


UPTSlfBBR, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



m. CLOTHING AND TEXTILES — coBtbiaod 



Neckwear Cutters: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


2 


265 




255 


285 




285 


Neckwear Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


700 


800 


1.500 


700 


800 


1,500 


Overall Makers: 

Buffalo 


1 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 


1 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 


""iw 

96 
6 

4 
30 


45 
75 

621 
38 
91 

150 


45 
265 
717 
44 
95 
180 


"■'266 

177 

4 

4 

30 


49 
70 

526 
80 
94 

120 


49 


New York, Manhattan 

Newburgh 


270 
703 


Port Jervis 


34 


Schenectady 


98 


Wappingers Falls 


150 






Total 


8 


8 


326 


1.020 


1,346 


415 


889 


1.304 






Sailor Suit Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


600 


200 


800 


770 


200 


970 


Skirt Makers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


6.350 


4,250 


10,600 


6,447 


2,334 


7,781 


Stuffed Toy Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


100 


40 


140 


150 


60 


200 


TaUors: 

Albany 


1 
1 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


50 

33 

184 

11 

20 

40 

28 

1.150 

1,275 

24 

5 

32 

8 

15 

63 

65 


2 

10 

114 

8 
4 
3 

15 
310 

15 
4 

2 

4 

3 

4 


52 

43 

298 

19 

24 

43 

43 

1,460 

1,290 

28 

5 

34 

12 

15 

66 

69 


132 

35 

135 

10 

21 

38 

28 

1,600 

1.300 

22 

5 

23 

11 

20 

63 

69 


20 

12 

117 

8 

3 

2 

10 

425 

112 

4 

i 

3 

3 

4 


152 


Binghamton ».».». 


47 


Budfifdo 


252 


Cortland 


18 


Dunkirk 


24 


Eimira 


40 


Ithaca 


38 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

Niagara Falls 


2,025 

1,412 

26 


Poughkeepsie 


5 


Rochester 


24 


Salamanca. 


14 


Schenectady 


20 


Syracuse 


66 


Troy 


73 






Total 


19 


21 


3,003 


498 


3,501 


3.512 


724 


4,236 






Theatrical Costumers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


16 


10 


26 


13 


12 


25 


Waist, Dress and Wrapper Mak- 
ers: 

New York, all Boroughs 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 


1 
2 

1 


{ 

2 


150 

320 

7.000 


2,130 

790 

18,000 


2,280 

1.110 

25.000 


75 

400 

7.600 


2.300 

125 

22,400 


2,375 

525 

30,000 


Total 


4 


4 


7,470 


20.920 


28.390 


8,075 


24.825 


32,900 






Total — Garments 


100 


112 


148.653 


48.941 


197,594 


134.436 


51,512 


185,948 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



56 



Tible L— Number uid Memberahlp of hOtm OrculntlaM, hj Indiulriea. 

Itia — oontinaed 





Unions at 


NUICBBB or MUfBSIW JLT THE EnD OF — 


IwDuaTBT, Tbadb akd 

LOCALTTT 


End of — 


MABCB. 1013 


Sbptsmbkb. 1913 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men jWom. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



m. CLOTHINQ A.ND TEXTILBS — eontlaned 



(b) Shirts, CoUan and Laundry. 

CoUar Makers: 

Albany 


1 


1 


10 


20 


30 


10 


24 


84 






Laundry Workers: 

Glena Falls 


1 

1 
4 
1 
1 


1 
1 
3 

1 
1 


150 

15 

1,500 

58 
5 




■"6i7 
8 


150 

15 

2,017 

68 

13 


141 

12 

1,410 

56 

6 


"493 
8 


141 


Middletown 


12 


New York. Manhattan 

Poughkeepsie 


1,903 
56 


Troy 


13 






Total 


8 


7 


1,728 


525 


2,263 


1,624 


601 


2,125 






Shirt Cutters: 

New York» Manhattan 


1 


1 


350 




350 


240 




240 


Shirt Makers: 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 


1 
1 


1 
1 


3 
600 


17 
700 


20 
1,300 


6 
1,200 


18 
800 


24 
2,000 


Total 


2 


2 


603 


717 


1,320 


1,206 


818 


2,024 






Underwear Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 

PeekskiU 


1 
1 


1 
1 


500 


6,700 
20 


7,200 
20 




8,000 
20 


8.000 
20 






Total 


2 


2 


600 


6,720 


7,220 





8,020 


8.020 






Total — Shirto. CoUars and Laun- 
dry 


14 


13 


3,191 


7.982 


11.173 


3,080 


9.363 


12,443 




(c) Hats. Caps and Fnrs. 

aoth Hat and Cap Cutters: 
New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


300 




300 


305 




305 


Qoth Hat and Cap Makers: 

Albany 


1 
1 
6 

1 


1 

1 
6 
1 


14 

120 

1.475 

14 


1 

30 

319 


15 

160 

1,794 

14 


18 

90 
1.428 

18 


■""26 
325 


18 


Now York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

Utica 


110 

1,753 

18 






Total 


9 


9 


1,623 


350 


1,973 


1.554 


345 


1,899 






Pur Workers: 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 


2 
2 


2 
2 


615 
6,827 


iisoo 


615 
8,327 


825 
7,025 


i.'soo 


825 
8,825 


Total 


4 


4 


7,442 


1.500 


8,942 


7.850 


1.800 


9,650 






Hat and Cap Sweatband Cutters: 
New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


18 




18 


41 





41 


Hat Finishers: 

Matteawan 


1 
2 

1 


1 
2 

1 


42 
690 
126 




42 
690 
1261 


44 

689 
120 




44 


New York, Brooklyn 

Newburgh 


689 
120 






Total 


4 


4 


758 




758 


753 




753 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



56 



New Yoek Labob Bulletin. 



Tabto L— ^Nmbcr and 



or IinbOT Orculatfcmfl, bj lodutriefl, TndM mi4 LooOIIIm, 
19ia — < 



Iin>u0iiKT, Tbadb and 

LoCALtTT 



UmONS AT 

End of — 



Mch. Sept. 



NUMBBB OV MbICBBBS AT THB EnD OV — 



1913 



SEPmCBBB, 1913 



I I 

Man Worn. Total Men Wom.l Total 



m. CLOTHING AND TEXTILES — contianed 



(e) Hata^Capa and Fan— eoad*d. 

Hat Makers: 

New York. Brooklyn 

Newburgh 


^ 


1 
1 


100 
142 




100 
142 


100 
142 




100 
142 






Total 


2| 2 


242 




242 


242 




242 






Hat Trimmers: 




1 
1 




500 
60 


500 
60 





510 
100 


510 
100 






Total 


2, 2 




560 


560 




610 


610 






Millinery Workers: 

New York. Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 




1 

1 




19 


19 


■ ' 325 


17 
50 


17 
375 














Total 




2 




19 


19 


325 


67 


392 






Straw Hat Makers: 


3 


3 


1,737 


100 


1,837 


1.585 


120 


1.705 


Total ■— Hats, Caps and Fun. . . . 


27 


28 


12.120 


2.529 


14.649 


12,655 


2,942 


15.597 


(d) Boots, Shoes and GlOTes. 

Boot and Shoe Workers: 

Buffalo 


2 

1 
3 
6 
6 
2 


2 

1 
6 
8 
8 
2 


55 

7 

925 

476 

1,494 

115 


1 

■ "95 

1 
72 


56 

7 

1.020 

477 

1,566 

115 


52 

7 

1,227 

607 

1,219 

160 


1 

"ioo 

2 
166 


53 


Homell 


7 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 


1.327 
609 

1 385 


Syracuse 


160 






Total 


20 


26 


3.072 


169 


3.241 


3.272 


269 


3 541 






Glove Workers: 


1 
1 


1 


350 
218 


30 
34 


380 
252 


150 


20 


170 














Total 


2 


1 


568 


64 


632 


150 


20 


170 






Suspender Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 

Syracuse 


1 
1 


2 

1 


190 


20 
9 


210 
9 


380 


70 
8 


450 

8 






Total 


2 


3 


190 


29 


219 


380 


78 


458 






Total — BooU, Shoes and Gloves. 


24 


30 


3,830 


262 


4,092 


3,802 


367 


4,109 


(e) TeztUea. 

Calico and Plush Engravers, 
Printers. Etc.: 
Gamerville 


2 

1 


2 

1 
1 

1 


27 
19 


i 

1 

1 27 

1 19 


43 
18 
24 
24 




43 


Newburgh 


18 


Wappingers Falls 


24 


West Haverstraw 


1 


19 


1 »« 


24 






Total 


4 


5 


65 


i « 


109 




109 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appenbiz. 



67 



Tkdtto L— Nmber mmd M«mbcnU» 



or LidiOT OrcurfntloBa, by iMtaMlifM, TkBdM uid LmiOMmp 
ItlS- 



iNpusrar, Tbaj>b akd 
LocAurr 



Unioms at 
End of — 



Meh. Sept. 



NuMBBB or Mbmbxbs at TBI End of - 



1913 



Mon Worn. I Total 



1918 



Men Worn. Total 



m. CLOTHING AND TEXTILES — eimtla«ed 



Card««: 

Cohoee 


1 


1 


200 




200 


200 




200 






Carpet Workera: 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


200 
81 
27 




200 
81 
27 


204 
81 
27 





204 


Newburgh 


81 


Rifton 


27 






Total 


3 


3 


308 




308 


312 




312 






Cotton Qooda Worken: 

Cohoea 


3 

1 
1 


3 

1 
1 


184 
400 
IfiO 


151 
500 
095 


335 
900 
845 


112 
600 
3C0 


60 
800 
600 


172 


New York MiUa. 


90 


Utica 


900 






Total 


5 


5 


734 


1.346 


2.080 


1.012 


960 


1,972 






Embioideiera, Machine: 

New York. Bronx 




1 
1 








40 
100 


'"'26 


40 




1 


80 




80 


120 


Total 


1 


2 


80 




80 


140 


20 


160 






Hoaiery and Neckwear Maken: 
Little Falls 


1 


1 


4 


13 


17 


3 


12 


15 






Knit Goods Cutters and Boarders: 
Cohoee 


2 


2 


80 




80 


83 




83 






Knitters: 

Cohoes 


1 


1 
1 


66 




66 


63 
1,500 


'2^666 


63 


New York all Boroushs . . . 


3,500 














Total 


1 


2 


66 




,66 


1.563 


2.000 


3,563 






Lace Curtain Makers: 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


15 

23 

70 

9 




15 
23 
70 


15 

23 
78 
13 




15 


Kinffrton.. 


23 


New York, Bronx 


78 


Newburgh 


13 






Total 


4 


4 


117 




117 


129 




129 






Loom Fixers: 

Cohoes 


1 
1 


1 

1 


47 
60 




47 
60 


50 
60 




50 


Utica 


60 






Total 


2 


2 


107 




107 


110 




110 






Shoddy Workers: 

Cohoes 


1 


1 


300 


i 

300 


296 




296 






Silk Workers: 

Amsterdan 


1 
3 
2 


1 
3 

1 
1 


71 

175 

1.288 


71 

3 178 
1,288 


72 
164 
450 
150 


9 

160 
50 


72 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

New York, Queens 


163 
600 
200 








i 




Total 


6 


6 


1.534 


3' 1.637 


826 


209 


1.035 




1 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



58 



New York Labor Bulletin. 



T^ble I.— Number and Menbershlp of Labor Organlnaoiia, bj IndnstriM, Trades aad Localitfea, 

191S — eontiniied 





Unions at 


NuMBEB OF Members at the End of — 


LOCALITT 


End of — 


MABCH. 1913 


Septsmbeb, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



m. CLOTHING AND TEXTILES — concluded 



(e) TextUes — oondnded. 

Cohoes 


1 

1 




125 
75 




125 
76 


135 
75 




135 


Little FalW 


75 






Total 


2 




200 




200 


210 




210 






Spinners, Mule: 

Utica 


1 




125 




125 


120 




120 






Woolen Workers: 

Waterloo 


1 




51 


27 


78 


33 


24 


57 






Total — Textiles 


35 


38 


3.971 


1.389 


5.360 


5,146 


3.225 


8.371 






Total — Group III 


200 


221 


171,765 


61.103 232.868 


159,119 


67.409 


226.528 






=^= 





lY. METALS, MACHINERY AND SHIPBUILDING 



(a) Iron and Steel. 

Blacksmiths: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 




158 
60 
67 




168 
60 
67 


166 
60 
84 
18 
9 
36 

347 
35 
77 

115 




166 


Dunkirk 


60 




84 


Jamestown 


18 


Mechanicville 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


9 
49 

323 
34 
74 

110 




9 
49 

323 
34 
74 

110 


9 


Middletown 


36 


New York, Manhattan 

Niagara Falls 


347 
35 


Oneonta 


77 


Schenectady 


115 






Total 


9 


10 


884 




884 


947 




947 






Buffalo . 


1 
1 

1 
1 


i 

2 

1 


65 

84 

480 

50 




65 

84 

480 

50 








Dunkirk ........... r . r ., r . 


72 

548 

46 




72 


New York, Manhattan 

Schenectady 


548 
45 






Total 


4 


4 


679 




679 


665 




665 






BoUer Makers and Iron Ship- 
builders: 
Albany 


1 
I 


-} 


241 

130 

65 

9 

41 

55 

8 

569 

102 

40 

13 

24 

42 

20 




...... 


241 

130 

65 

9 

41 

55 

8 

569 

102 

40 

13 

24 

42 

20 


228 




228 


Buffalo 


280 

18 

9 

41 

62j 

12 

466 

75 

18 

151 

31 

41 

44 


280 


Dunkirk 


18 


Geneva 


9 


Mechanicville 


41 


Middletown 


62 


New York, Bronx 


12 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York. ManhatUn 

New York. Richmond 

Norwich 


466 
75 
18 
15 


Oneonta 


31 


Osweff o 


41 


Rochester 


44 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



69 



TUftle L— NuBber and MamlMnldp 



of Labor OrgiBtotk»ii», hj InduiilM, Tndm i 
191S- 





UmONB AT 


NUMBBB aw MBMBBRfl AT TBS £kD OV -- 


Ikdustbt, Tbadb and 
localitt 


End of — 




ABPTSMBKB, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


ToUl 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



IV. METALS, MACHINEBT AND SHIPBUILDING — oontfaaed 



(a) Iron and Steel — eratfamed. 

Boiler Makers and Iron 8hip- 
buildare-^eoaciudtti. 
Salamanca .... 




1 
1 
1 

1 








16 
20 
55 
26 




16 


^racuae 


1 

1 
1 


22 
55 
28 




22 
65 
28 


20 


I'roy 


55 


Utica 


26 






Total 


19 


21 


1,464 




1,464 


1,467 




1,457 






Core Makers: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


200 




200 
130 

22 
160 

46 


242 
100 

23 
170 

50 




242 


Depew-Lancaster 


130 


100 


New York. Manhattan 

Schenectady 


22 

160 

45 




23 
170 


Troy 


50 






Total 


5 


5 


667 




667 


685 




686 






Cranemen: 

nnnWrV 


1 
2 


1 
3 


46 
235 




46 
235 


60 
298 




50 


Schenectady 


298 






Total 


3 


4 


281 




281 


348 




348 






Cutting Die and Cutter Makers: 
New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


82 




82 


78 




78 


I^rop Forgers: 

New York. Brooklyn 

Schenectady 


1 


1 
1 


140 




140 


135 
34 




135 
34 














Total 


1 


2 


140 




140 


169 




169 






Electrical Apparatus Makers: 
New York, Manhattan 


1 
9 


1 
16 


54 
2,138 


"iii 


54 
2.249 


40 
2.811 


' ■ *6i4 


40 
3.425 






Total 


10 


16 


2.192 


111 


2.303 


2,851 


614 


3,466 






Enamelers: 

Little Falls 




1 








27 




27 














Foundry and Machine Shop La- 
borers and Helpers: 
Dunkirk 


1 
2 

1 
2 

1 
1 


2 

2 


65 
395 

45 
416 
127 

23 




65 
395 

45 
415 
127 

23 








New York. Brooklyn 

Rochester 


473 




473 


Schenectady 


388 




388 


Troy 


1281 


128 


Watertown 
















Total 


8 




1.070 




1.070 


989 




989 






Gas Meter Makers: 

Albany ..,.,.,.. 


1 




60 




50 


60 




60 






Hammersmiths and Helpers: 

Dunkirk 


1 




49 




49 


35 




35 






Horse Nail Makers: 

KeeeevUle 


1 




23 


7 


30 


23 


7 


30 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 



New York Labor Bullbtin. 



Table I.— Number end MemberaUp ef Leber OrfMibeileiie, bf Imfautriea, 

191S — 



Tradee end LoeelMee, 





Unions at 


NUMBBB or MXMBXBS AT TBX EkO OV — 


Insubtrt, Tbadb akd 
localitt 


End or — 


MABCH, 1913 


SBPTBMBBR, 1913 




Moh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



lY. MBTALS, MACHINEHT AND SHIPBUILDING — 



HoTBeshoen: 

Albany , . . , 






30 

13 

86 

6 

13 

14 

240 

400 




80 

13 

85 

6 

13 

14 

240 

400 


30 
11 
84 
8 
13 
17 




30 


Auburn 


11 


Buffalo . . ... , r - - - r 


84 


Cortland 


8 


Mount Vernon . , , . r . . , . r r - - 


13 


New Roohelle 


17 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 


200 

400 

10 

86 

37 

20 

17 

25 


200 

400 

10 


Rochester 




34 
39 
20 
17 
28 




34 
39 
20 
17 
28 


36 


Syraouae 


37 


ifroy 


20 


Utica 


17 


Yonkers 


26 






Total 


13 


14 


939 




939 


»»l 


908 






Iron Molders and Core Makers: 
Albany 


2 
1 


2 


182 

110 

48 

32 

8 

794 

20 

185 

132 

60 

65 

145 

4 

30 

30 

17 

13 

771 

160 

75 

23 

13 

172 

115 

95 

511 

20 

465 

92 

450 

325 

300 


'.''.'.". 


182 

110 

48 

32 

8 

794 

20 

185 

132 

60 

65 

145 

4 

30 

30 

17 

13 

771 

150 

75 

23 

13 

172 

115 

95 

611 

20 

465 

92 

450 

325 

300 

112 

70 


222 




222 


Auburn . 


104 

22 

32| 

lO' - 


104 


Ballston Spa 


22 


Batavia .'. 


82 




10 


Buffalo 


703 

6 

232 

100 

64 

48 

145 

4 

30 

30 

24 

12 

758 

185 

81 

23 

39 

170 

125 

95 

494 

34 

465 

88 

396 

343 

288 

135 

70 




703 


Coming 


6 


Depew~Lancasteir . ■ , , - r . - - . 


232 


T^unkirk ,...,. 


100 


Rlmira , - - , , 


64 


Frankfort 


48 


Geneva 


145 


Hoosick Falls 


4 


Homell 


30 


Hudson Falls 


30 


Lockport 


24 


Midcfietown 


12 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 


768 

185 

81 


Niagara Falls 


23 


Clean 


39 


Peekakill 


170 


Port Chester 


126 


Poughkeepsie 


95 


Ro^ester 


494 


Baratoga iSpring^ 


34 




465 


Seneca Falls 


88 


Syracuse 


396 


ojrin^uoo 


343 


Utica .' 


288 


Watertown 


112, 

70| 


135 


Yonkers 


70 






Total 


41 


40 


6,634| 


5,634 


5,577 




5.577 






Iron Molders' Apprentices: 

Buffalo 




1 


97 




97 


94 




94 












Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appsndiz. 



61 





IMS — « 


MBNiHiM, »y laAistrits. Tw4m mi4 I if HHm. 




Unions at 
End or — 


NUMBSB OF MSMBKBS AT THB En1> OF — 


IVDUSTRT, TXASB AMD 
LOCAUTT 


MABCH, 1013 


uPTBifBn. 1013 




Meh. 1 8«pi. 


Mm Worn. 


Total 


Men WomJ Total 



IV. MBTALS. MACHINKBT AND SmPBUlLNNG — « 



(a) ITM tad Stool — cMliHwd. 

M«ehio»U: 

Albaay . . 


1 I 

1 li 68 68 

1 li 226 226 

I 1 132 ia2 


1 
54 


64 

300 
02 

o fun 


Auburn 


300 

02 

2.040 

15 

12 

340 

152 

260 

7 

1.000 

11 




Binghamton 


Bulfftlo 


3 3i 613 

11 li 15 
1 11 12 
1. 11 375 


h\R 


Ctnintb-Palmer 


.::::: 


15 

12 

375 

150 

170 



1.200 

10 

50 

118 

50 


::::::: *' i6 

to 


Corninc 


Diipirirk 




840 

162 

260 

7 

1.000 

11 

63 

123 


Elmin 


1 I 


150 


Gram laUad 






170 


Homell 



1,200 




Ilion 




Loekport 


10 ! ; ! ! : ; 
50 

118 

50 




63:::::: 

123 




New York, Bronx 


} 






New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

New York, Queens 


8 
14 


8. 1.235 
141 2.736 

1 12 

2 64 
1 125 


' 1.235 

' 2.735 

12 

64 

j 125 


1,2.12 

3,040 

17 

60 

70 

180 

78 

102 

24 

20 

3 

800 

34 

1,407 

7 

460 

63 

100 

65 

175 




:::::: 


1.262 

3,040 

17 

60 

70 

180 

78 

102 

24 

20 

3 

800 

34 

1.407 

7 

450 

63 

100 

65 


New York. Richmond 

Nisgais Falto 


North Tonawanidls 


2 




Norwich 




71 


' Ti 


Ooaonta 


1361.:..:. 136 

36 »t 


Onreco 


Pearl River 


15' 


15 

5 

1.000 

in 


Port Chester 


5 

1.000 

10 

1.008 

7 

476 

67 

86 




Rochester 






1 1.008 

1 7 

1 475 

67 

SA 


Seneca Falls 


Bjrracuse 


Trov 


uSL:::::::::;:::::::::: 


Watertown 


400> Atv\ 


Yonkers r 


175 


175 




*ia 


Total 


62 


62 


10.830 


! 10.830 


12.613 




12.613 




Helpers: 
Buffalo. 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


' xo 




10 
00 
20 

20C 
62 

800 








Green IsUnd 

Oneonta 


it 00 

1 20 

2 200 

1, 52' 

1 300 


86; 

3ll 

276 

32! 

RA 


86 

32 

68 


Ronhestm' 












Total 


6 


6| 681 




681 


483 




483 




Ptttem Makers: 

iUbany 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


25 
g 





26 



260 

1.035 

67 

260 

68 


27 

11 

arm 







27 

8^ 
006 

64 


Auburn 


Buffalo 


2B0' 


New York. Manhattan 

Roehester 


1,036 

67 

260 

68 





006 

60 

256 

^\ 




STawsr^:::*.::'.!!!ii!!! 






Total 


7 


7 


1.704 




1,704 


1 72^' 


1.723 











Digitized by VjOOQIC 



62 



New York Labor Bulletin. 



Table 1.— Number and Memberahip of Labor OrganliatioiM, hj InduCriea, Trades and Loealitlea, 

1918 — continued 





Unions at 


NUMBXR OF MbMBBBS AT THE EnD Or — 


Indubtbt, Trax>b and 

LOCAUTT 


End or — 


MABCH, 1918 


BSPCTMBEB, 1913 




Moh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



IV. METALS, MACmNERT AND SHIPBUILDING — continaed 



Rolling Mills and Steel Works 
Employees: 
Lockport 


1 
1 


1 
1 


33 
19 




33 

19 


33 
20 




33 


Pougnkeepsie 


20 






Total 


2 


2 


52 




52 


53 




53 






Saw and Tool Makers: 

Canastota 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


6 
20 
42 


1 


7 
20 
42 


6 

22 

42 

200 


1 
...... 


7 


New York, Manhattan 

Port Jervis 


22 
42 


Schenectady 


200 














Total 


3 


4 


68 


1 


69 


270 


1 


271 






Sheet Metal Workers: 

Jamestown 




1 
1 
1 








130 
50 
43 




130 




1 
1 


60 

39, 


50 
39 


50 


Syracuse 


43 






Total 


2 


3 


89 


89 


223 




223 






Stove Mounters: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


J 

16 

271 

26 


15 
16 
27 
26 
25 


15 
20 
23 
26 
30 




15 


Geneva 


20 


Port Chester 


23 


Rochester 


26 


Troy 


25 




30 






Total 


5 


5 


109 




109 


114 




114 






Wire Workers and Bed Spring 
Makers: 
New York. Brooklyn 


1 


1 


58 




58 


58 




58 


Total — Iron and Steel 


206 

1 


217 

1 


27,732 
75 


119 


27,851 

■-& = 

75 


30.240 
46 


622 


30.862 
46 


(b) Metals Other Than Iron and 
Steel. 

Automobile Lamp Makers: 

New York. Manhattan 


Beer Pump Makers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


126 




126 


122 




122 


Brass Molders and Core Makers: 

New York. Manhattan 

Troy 


1 
1 


1 
1 


70 
17 




70 
17 


84 
17 




84 
17 






Total 


2 


2 


87 




87 


101 





101 






Brass and Copper Workers: 

New York. Manhattan 


2 


2 


210 




210 


636 




536 


Cable Workers: 


1 




25 




25 
















Chandelier Filers and Makers: 
New York. Manhattan 


2 


2 


353 




353 


400 




400 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



68 



Table L— Nunber mad 



MembcraUp of Labor Organisatlona, by ladnatriM, Tradea i 
191S — contiaaad 





Unions at 


NnifBBB or Mbmbbrs at tbb End or — 


Imdubtbt, Tradb akd 

LOCALTTT 


End or — 


MABCH, 1913 


Sbptbhbkb, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Totol 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



lY. METALS, MACHINERY AND SHIPBUILDING — eentinned 



(b) MeCala Otber Tbaa Iron and 
StMd — eonclnded. 

Chaeers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


129 




129 


132 




132 


aock and Watch Makers: 

New York. Brooklyn 

Naw York ManhaH-An . . 


1 


I 

1 


60 




60 


150 
160 




160 
160 














Total 


1 


2 


60 




60 


310 




310 








CopperBmiths: 

Elmira , 


1 

1 


1 
1 


15 
211 


15 

211 


14 
216 




14 


New York, Manhattan 


216 


Total 


2 


2 


226 




226 


230 




230 






Gold Pen Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


115 




115 


114 




114 


Jewelry Workers: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 


110 
44 
32 


" "45 


110 
44 

77 


122 
30 
20 


■■'is 


122 


New York, Manhattan 

Rochester 


30 
33 






Total 


3 


3 


186 


45 


231 


172 


13 


185 






Metal Polishers. BufiFers and 
Platers: 
Albany 


1 




25 




25 


23 

13 

75 

13 

37 

10 

160 

60 

30 

270 

150 

171 

72 

80 

30 

44 

46 




23 


Binahaniton 


13 


Buiialo 


1 
1 
1 

1 


50 
14 
45 
11 




50 
14 
45 
11 


75 


Dunkirk 


13 


Elmira 


37 


Geneva 


10 


Ilion 


160 


Jamestown 


1 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


58 

32 

312 

122 

172 

85 

81 

34 

40 

58 




58 

32 

312 

122 

172 

85 

81 

34 

40 

58 


60 


Little Falls.- 


30 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

Rochester 


270 
150 
171 


Schenectady 


72 


Syracuse 


80 


Troy 


30 


Utica 


44 


Watertown 


46 






ToUl 


16 


17 


1,139 




1.139 


1,284 




1,284 






Metal Spinners: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


150 




150 


150 




160 


Silyer Workers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


2 


280 




280 


1,276 




1.276 


Surgical Instrument Makers: 
New York, Brooklyn 


1 


1 


13 




13 


13 




13 


Total — Metals Other Than Iron 
and Stef 1 


_36 


38 


3,174 


45 


3.219 


4.886 


13 


4.899 




a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 



Xew Yobk Labor Bulletin. 



Table I.— Nnmber and MamberaUp «r Lsbw OrgBnintioiis, by ladiMtriM, Trade* mad LMdMes, 

IMS -^ oontliiMd 





Union at 




Industbt, Tmadb and 

LOCAUTT 


End of — 




■BPTBICBER, 1013 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



IV. METALS. MAGHINEBT AND SHIPBUILDING — 



SailnuJcen: 

New York. Brooklyn 


1 


1 


102 




102 


109 




109 


Ship and Machinery Riggers: 
New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


230 




230 


300 




300 


Ship Painters: 

New York, Brooklyn 


1 


1 


253 




253 


268 




268 


Ship Plumbers and Steam Fitters: 
New York. Brooklyn 


1 


2 


81 




81 


266 




255 


Shipwrights, Joiners and Calkers: 

New York. Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

Tonawanda 


2 

1 
1 


2 

1 


420 

317 

14 




420 

317 

14 


425 
309 




425 
309 










Total 


4 


3 


761 




761 


734 




734 






Spar and Derrick Makers: 

New York, Brooklyn 


1 


1 


25 




26 


26 




25 




9 


g 


1.442 




1.442 


1,691 




1,691 






Total— Group IV 


251 


264 


32,348 


164 


32,612 


36,817 


636 


37.452 







V. PRINTING, BINDING, ETC. 



Bookbinders: 

Albany 


1 

1 
9 

1 
1 


1 
1 
9 

1 
1 


130 

75 

3,637 

19 

12 


" ■ '45 
1,6.54 


130 

120 

5.191 

19 

12 


130 

76 

3,781 

19 

15 


1 

46 

1,451 


131 


Buffalo 


122 


New York. Manhattan 

Rochester 


5.232 
19 


Utica 


....;: 


15 






Total 


13 


13 


3.873 


i.sgg 


5.472 


41021 


1,498 


5.519 




Compositors: 

Albany ......' 






463 
27 
15 
26 

114 

601 
20 
10 
68 
29 
32 
35 
62 
26 
40 
25 
28 
17 
7.069 

540 
48 
67 


8 

'"i7 

.5 

3 

5 

6 

7 

■ ' "262 

i 

I 


461 
27 
32 
26 

119 

504 
20 
15 
68 
35 
32 
42 
52 
25 
40 
25 
28 
17 
7.271 

540 
49 
68 


452 
26 
21 
26 

110 

522 
19 
11 
71 
30 
32 
35 
52 
25 
39 
22 
18 
14 
7.094 

657 
49 
59 


12 

""24 

' "ii 
3 

6 

8 

6 

"266 

i 


464 


Amsterdam , 


26 


Auburn 


45 


Batavia 


26 




121 


Bu^alo 


525 


Cohoea 


19 


Dunkirk 


16 


Elmira, ........-.,..,.-.- 


71 


Glens Falls 


33 


Gloversville 


32 


Ithaca 


41 


Jamestown 


52 


Kingston 


25 


Lookport. 


39 


Middletown 


22 


Mount Vernon 


18 


New Rochelle 


14 


New York, all Boroughs .... 

New York, Manhattan 

Newbursh 


7,294 

557 

50 


Niagara^alls 


59 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbndix. 



65 



TaUe L— NanlMr and MemlMraUp 



•r Labor OrSMlHUioM. bf IndMlriM, TimdM aad LoealMe*. 
191S — c 





Unions at 


NuMBBR or Mbmbus at thb End or — 


iNDoaraT, Tb&db and 

LOCAUTT 


En© or — 


MARCB, 1913 


SBPTBMBBR, 1913 




Moll. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



Y. PRINTING, BINIMNG* ETC.— contiBaed 



fforwioh 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


20 
27 
18 
36 
15 
43 

220 
18 
20 
64 

276 
30 

152 

152 

13 

9 

23 

46 


1 

5 

2 

2 
6 

2 

i 

2 


21 
27 
18 
36 
15 
43 

225 
18 
22 
66 

280 
30 

154 

152 
13 
10 
23 
48 


22 
26 
21 
33 
13 
44 

225 
18 
20 
66 

275 
29 

157 

160 
12 
10 
25 
46 


1 

i 

5 

2 

2 
5 

2 

i 

2 


23 


Olean 


26 


Oneida 


21 


Oneonta , , r , 


33 


Peekakill 


14 


Poughkeepeie 


44 


RouMtter 


230 


Rome 


18 


Smratoga Sprinss 


22 




68 


Syracwie. 


280 


Tsny^wx 


20 


Trov 


150 


utS^::::::::::::::. :...:. 


160 


Watertown 


12 


Waverly 


11 


White rlaina 


26 


Yonkers 


48 






Total 


47 


47 


10.412 


276 


10.687 


10.486 


286 


10.772 




Eleotro^ypen and Stereotsrpers: 
Albany 


1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


68 
16 
60 

7 

1.010 

24 

17 

15 

9 




53 
15 
60 

7 

1.020 

24 

17 

16 

9 


50 
16 
60 

7 

1,065 

21 

14 

15 

9 




50 


Binchaniton 


16 


Bu^Uo 


60 


Khnira r 


1 7 


Niacara Falls 


1,055 
21 


Rrnhmter 


14 




IS 


tftica 


9 






Total 


11 


11 


1.220 




1.220 


1.247 




1,247 




Hat Tip Printen: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


26 




26 


25 




26 


Lithocraphen: 

Buffalo 


1 

4 
1 


1 

4 
2 


77 

1.363 

49 




77 

1.363 

49 


76 

1,378 

60 




76 


New York, Manhattan 


1.378 
60 






Total 


6 


7 


1.489 




1.489 


1,514 




1,514 






Mailers: 

Albany , , . r 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 


11 
471 

7 


■'*i2 


11 

483 

7 


12 

602 

6 


""ii 


12 


NeiTJork, Manhattan 

Utica 


519 
G 






Total 


3 


3 


489 


12 


501 


520 


17 


537 






Musle EnsraTers: 

NewYork. Manhattan 


1 


1 


34 




34 


36 




35 


New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


1.347 




1.347 


1.360 




1.360 


Newspaper Writers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


110 


2 


112 


64 


2 


56 


Paper Handlers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


112 




112 


120 




120 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



66 



New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 



Table I. — Number and Membenlilp of Leber Orf nhaltona, by Indnetilee, Trades and LecalMee 















Unions at 
End of — 


NUMBBB OF MeMBBRB AT THE EnD OF — 


Indubtrt, Thadb and 
Locality 


MARCH, 1913 


BBPTEMBER, 1013 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn J Total 

1 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



V. PRINTING, BINDING, ETC.— cottdnded 



Photo-Engravers : 

Albany 


1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


25 
90 
1,324 
27 
14 
8 




25 
90 
1,324 
27 
14 
8 


24 
92 
1,402 
29 
13 
8 




24 


Buffalo 


92 


New York, Manhattan 

Rochester 


1,402 
20 


Syracuse, 


13 


tf tica 


8 






Total 


6 


6 


1.488 




1,488 


1,568 





1,568 






Photo-GelatiDe Workers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


41 




41 


68 




58 


Plate Ensravers and Printers: 
Albany 


1 
3 


1 
4 


12 
238 




12 
238 


12 
285 


■ 


12 




285 


Total 


4 


5 


250 




250 


297 




297 






Pressmen: 

Albany 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


136 

28 

197 

13 

94 

12 

2.916 

70 

72 

49 

37 

5 

19 


i 


135 

29 

197 

18 

14 

12 

2,916 

70 

72 

49 

37 

5 

19 


135 
28 

207 
12 
14 
19 
2,916 
75 
86 
47 
41 
4 
17 


i 


136 


Binghamton 


29 


Buffalo 


207 


Elmira 


12 


Jamestown 


14 


Lockport 


19 


New York, Manhattan 

Niagara Falls 


2.916 
75 


Roel^ester 


86 


Syracuse 


47 


Utica 


41 


Watertown 


4 


Yonkers 


17 






Total 


16 


16 


3,567 


1 


3,568 


3,601 


1 


3,602 






Pressmen's Assistants and Press 
Feeders: 
Albany 


1 
2 
3 

1 
1 


1 
2 
3 
1 
1 


12 

179 

3,033 

52 

76 


45 
25 

i 


57 

204 

3,033 

53 

76 


12 

177 

3.065 

56 

66 


45 
30 

2 

10 


57 


Buffalo 


207 


New York, Manhattan 

Rochester 


8,065 
58 


Syracuse 


76 






Total 


8 


8 


3,352 


71 


3,423 


3,376 


87 


8.463 






Sales Book Makers: 

Niagara Falls 


1 


1 


65 




65 


70 




70 






Wall Paper Machine Printers and 
Color Mixers: 
Buffalo 


1 
1 
2 


1 
1 
2 


15 

68 

104 




15 
68 
104 


34 

74 

114 




34 


Hudson Falls 


74 


New York, Manhattan 


114 


Total 


4 


4 


187 




187 


222 




222 






Wall Paper Print Cutters: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 


1 
1 


21 
230 




21 
230 


23 
252 




23 


New York, Manhattan 


252 


Total 


2 


2 


251 




251 


275 




275 






Total — Group V 


127 


129 


28,313 


1,960 


30.273 


28.839 


1.891 


30,730 




r, ■■ ■ = 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



67 



TOIc 1.— Nuibcr aMi McBbcnMp of Labw OrgBnintioiis, ky 

19U — 





1 

' Unions at 

1 End or — 


NuifBBR or 


Mbmbsm at thk End 


or — 


iKoraTBT, Trade and 
LocALmr 


MABCH. 1913 


■BPTBMBSS, 1913 




, Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



VI. WOOD WORKING AND niKNlTUSB 



BMket Mmken: 

LiTorpool 


1 
1 


1 
1 


187 
320 




187 
320 


190 
270 




190 


New York, Mmnhattan 


270 


Total 


2 


2 


507 




607 


460 




460 






Box Makers and Sawyen: 

KinssUm 


1 
1 


1 
1 


10 
300 




16 
300 


22 

360 




22 


New York. Manhattan 


360 


Total 


2 


2 


316 




316 


382 




382 






Broom Makers: 

Amaterdam .,....---,,- r - - - 




1 








5 
5 
18 




5 


New York. Manhattan 










5 


" 


1 


18 




18 


18 






Total 


1 


3 


18 




18 


28 




28 






Brmh Makers: 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 


1 
1 


1 
1 


90 

87 


27 


117 
87 


145 
87 


30 


175 

87 


Total 


2 


2 


177 


27 


204 


232 


30 


262 






CabiDet Makers: 

New York. Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

Oneida 


1 
3 


1 
4 

1 


400 
1.881 




400 
1.881 


470 

2.662 

15 




470 

2,662 

15 














Total 


4 


6 


2.281 




2.281 


3.147 




3.147 






Carpet Printers and Layers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


310 




310 


305 




3a5 


Curisfe, Wacon and AutomobUe 
Workers: 
Albany 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 


1 
1 

i 

1 

t 

1 


79 

650 

36 

31 

205 

401 

48 

51 




79 

650 

36 

31 

205 

401 

48 

51 


80 
1.600 




80 


Buffalo 


1 600 


OoMeskill . . 




Elmin 


33 

225 

460 

48 

61 


...... 


33 


New York, Brooklyn 

Kvnunia^ 


226 

460 

48 


?ss^ 


61 






Total 


U 


10 


1.501 




1,501 


2.507 




2 607 






Coopers: 

Albany 


1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 


1 
1 

i 

1 

4 
1 
2 

1 
1 


35 
14 
14 
26 
82 
434 

9 
83 
46 

8 




35 
14 
14 
26 
82 
434 

9 
83 
45 

8 


35 
13 




35 


Buffalo 


13 


GIbds Falls 




Loeknort t 


30 

86 
413 

10 
104 

43 
7 




30 


NewYork. Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

P^ekakiU 


86 

413 

10 


Roehester 


104 


HvTa«|iaA 


43 


itica 


7 


Total 


14 


13 


760 




760 


741 




741 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 



Nbw Yoek Labor Bulletin. 



Tabtol.— NwDber ud MembOTriiip oTLftbw 



by IndiMlilM. ThidM aad hoeaMmm, 





UWIOMB AT 


NuMBm or Mbmbxbs at tbb Emd or — 


InDVSTHT, TmADK AND 
LOCAUTT 


Ehb or — 


MABCH, 1913 


BBPTBMBBB, 1013 


' 


Mob. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



VI. WOOD WORKING AND FURNITURE- 



Albany 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


28 
170 
21ft 




28 
170 
215 


29 
170 
202 

29 
150 

40 
497 
365 
396 


'.'.'.'.'.'. 


29 


Batavia 


170 


Buffalo 


202 


PunVi'V 


29 


Elmira 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


144 

40 

492 

378 

391 

24 

82 

430 

84 

21 

42 

42 




144 

40 

492 

378 

391 

24 

82 

430 

84 

21 

42 

42 


150 


Middleport 


40 


New York, Bronx 


497 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

Ogdensburg 


365 
396 


P«DP Yan 


93 
708 
175 
18 
32 
82 




...... 


93 


Itooheeter 


708 




175 


Sidney 


18 


Troy 


32 


Utica 


82 






Total 


15 


16 


2.583 




2.583 


2,986 




2,986 




i 




Piano and Organ Workers: 

New York, Bronx 


1 

1 
5 


1 
1 
6 


95 

17 

1.298 




95 

17 

1.298 


73 

17 

663 





73 


New York, Brooklyn 


17 
663 


Total 


7 


7 


1.410 




1.410 


753 




763 






Reed Workers: 

New York. Brooklyn 




1 








130 




130 














Makers: 
Jamestown 


1 
1 
4 
1 
2 


1 
1 
5 

1 
1 


60 
43 
1.085 
63 
35 


7 


60 
43 
1,065 
63 
32 


78 
44 
1.628 
65 
11 


6 


78 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

Roohetter 


44 

1.628 
65 


Syraotise 


17 






Total 


9 


9 


1.276 


7 


1.283 


1.826 


6 


1,832 




Vamiahers and Polishers: 

Buffalo 


1 


1 
1 
1 


126 




126 


128 

500 

51 




128 


New York. Manhattan 


500 


Rochester 


i 


60 




60 


51 






Total 


3 


3 


186 




186 


679 




670 






Wood Carvers: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 




8 

39 

214 

79 

23 




8 

39 

214 

79 

23 


7 

41 

413 

60 

20 




7 


New York, Brooklyn 

Rooheeter 


41 

413 

60 


Syracuse 


20 






Total 


6 


5 


368 




363 


550 




550 






Total — Group VI 


7ft 


80 


11.678 


34 


11.712 


14.726 


36 


14.762 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



6» 





Umom AT 


Numn OF Mbmbm 


It AT Tl 


■ Snp ov — 




Bud or — 


MABCB. 1918 


-r»-.l.U 




Mflh. 


Stpft. 


Mm 


Worn. 


Tona 


»«- 


WOB. 


Tona 



▼n. FOOD AND UQ1K>B8 



AlbttBT 


2 
10 


IC 


42 
28 

226 
16 
18 
21 
10 

468 

912 

2,674 

47 

7 

16 

166 
41 

100 
30 
41 
76 




42 
28 

226 
16 
18 
21 
10 

461 

913 

2.644 

47 

7 

16 

166 
41 

100 
30 
41 
76 


44 

80 

889 

12 

12 

19 

12 

682 

976 

2.626 

46 

8 

16 

200 

88 

100 

82 

42 

86 




44 


AobWH r r 


80 


Buffalo 


289 


Fhnin., . . 


13 


Qiaos PkUi 


13 


So!!wSSb..! ::;::::.:.. 


19 


Middtetown 


12 


N«v ToA. BniBX 


682 


N«w York, BnxtUyn 


976 

2.626 

46 


fSjJSJiJ^;: •■; 


8 


Ptalnkill 


16 




200 




88 


SSSoS^ 


100 


5?SyVV^ . 


88 


uSL:;::::::;::::::::::; 


42 


Yimk«r* 


86 






ToUl 


U 


86 


4.028 




4.988 


6.061 




6,061 






BvtehfiKs and Meat Cutton: 
Albanv . . . . , 


* 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


70 
61 
88 

40 
20 
28 

476 

1.472 

80 

26 

78 

164 
40 

102 
86 




70 
61 
88 

40 
20 
28 

476 

1.472 

80 

26 

78 

164 
40 

102 
86 


60 

61 

208 

42 

21 

28 

482 

1.630 
94 
36 
74 
161 
40 
94 
90 




60 


^bS.. ..;::.::.:::::::: 


61 


Buffalo 


208 


Klinim 


42 


OflWTft 


21 


Xiofftoii? . 


23 


Now Yoik« BrooUyn 

RoflheatT. 


482 

1.620 

94 


Bomo 


26 




74 


SwSoS^ 


161 


i?Sr?7;........:.....::.. 


40 


VHm 


94 


YonkflTf 


90 






Total 


24 


26 


2.827 




2,887 


8.070 




3.070 






Floor and Cmal Worker*: 

i^iffalQ 




2 

1 








138 

18 




138 


New York. BrooUyn 


1 


12 




12 


13 


Total 


1 


8 


12 




12 


161 




151 






Poultry, Efga and Butter 


1 


3 


406 




406 


834 




824 


9agu BefiMry Workers: 

Yookan 


1 




460 




460 
















YeMt and Diatillery Wakaia: 
Fnk^n 


1 


1 


125 




136 


96 




96 






Total — Food Ptodoeta 


68 


67 


8.743 




8.743 


9.202 


^ 


9.203 



Digitized by VjOOQiC 



70 



Nbw York Labob Biti.lbtin. 



Table I.~ Number aad Membership of Leber Orgeniatloiia, by iBdnstrleB, Tredes end Leodltles, 

1918 — continued 





Unions at 




Inoitstrt, Tradb and 
localitt 


End o» — 


masch. 1913 


Sbftbmbbr, 1913 




Moh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Wom. 


Total 



Vn. FOOD AND LIQUORS — centinaed 



(b) Bererages. 
Browerv Employees: 


2 


2 

2 

1 


145 
37 
28 
46 

256 
16 




145 
37 
28 
46 

256 
15 


156 


156 


Amsterdam 


40 
28 
48 
264 
17 
28 
33 
32 


!!!!".! 


40 


Auburn 


28 


Binshamton 


48 


Btttfalo 


264 




17 




28 


Dunkirk 


2 

1 


27 

27 

21 

23 

48 

26 

75 

13 

17 

514 

1.774 

47 

14 

30 

14 

15 

240 

106 

164 

150 


:::::: 


27 

27 

21 

23 

48 

26 

75 

13 

17 

514 

1,774 

47 

14 

30 

14 

15 

240 

106 

164 

150 


33 


Elmira 


32 


Fort Eidward 


20 

22 

45 

32 

75' 

13, 

17 


20 


Homell 


22 


Hudson 


45 


Jamestown 


32 


Kit\mt^on 


75 


LooEport 


13 


Middletown 


17 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

NiiMiara Falls , . r 


506 
1,860 




506 
1.850 


OKoensbuTK 


14 

?! 

17 
240 
110 
160 
158 




14 


ofom .T!^ ..::..:::!!::! . 


38 


Port JerviB 


14 


Pouchkeepflie . 


17 


Roohester 


240 


Syracuse 


110 


I'roy 


160 


Utica 


158 






Total 


29 


29 


3.872 




3.872 


3.977 




3,977 






Brewery Employees (Drivers and 
Albany." " 


1 
2 
2 
2 

1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
2 
2 
2 


56 

476 

1.112 

1,720 

11 

165 

70 

121 

37 


•••••• 


56 

476 

1.112 

1.720 

11 

165 

70 

121 

37 


57 

544 

1,172 

1.770 

13 

168 

72 

126 

86 




57 


Buffalo 


544 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

Niagara Falls 


1,172 

1,770 

13 


Rochester 


168 




72 


Syracuse 


126 


Troy 


36 






Total 


12 


12 


3.768 




3.768 


3,958 




3,958 






Brewery Employees (Ensineers 
and Firemen): 
Albany 


1 
1 


1 
1 


82 




82 
134 


82 
140 




82 


Buffalo 


134j 


140 




1 




Total 


2 


2 


216 


216 


222' 


222 






Grains Workers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


30 




30 


30 


30 


Malsters: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


213I 

131 


213 
131 
23 
37 


207 

89 

23 

36. 


207 


Geneva 


89 


Oswego 


23 
37 




23 


Syracuse 


36 






Total 


4 


4 


404 


1 404 


1 355 


365 






1 


1 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



71 



Table I.— Namber and MeBibenUpaf Labor Orfanlsatiaaa, by ladaatetoa, Tradca i 

1913 — coatfaaed 





Ukionb at 


NUMBBB OF MBMBBRa AT TBB EnB OF 


LOCALITT 


End or — 


MARCH. 1913 


■■PTBioiaB, 1913 




Moh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



Vn. FOOD AND UQUORS - 



Mineral Water BotUera and 
Driven: 
Albimy 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 
1 


43 

13 

102 

16 




43 

13 

102 

16 


40 

38 

158 

15 




40 


Buffalo 


38 


New York, Manhattan 


158 
16 






Total 


4 


5 


173 




173 


251 




261 






Total — Bevera^efl 


52 


53 


8.463 




8.463 


8.793 




8,793 






Total — Group VII 


115 


120 


17.206 


r.-i 


17.206 


17.995 




17,996 



Vm. THEATERS AND MUSIC 



Actors and Chorus Singers: 

New York, Manhattan 


5 


6 


8.000 


3.000 


11. COO 


8.000 


3.000 


11,000 


Bill Posters: 

Albany 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


30 

30 

65 

200 




30 

30 

65 

200 


34 

34 

152 

200 




34 


Buffalo 


34 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 


162 
200 


Total 


4 


4 


325 




325 


420 




420 






Caldum Lisht and Moving Pic- 
ture Machine Operators: 
Buffalo 


1 
2 

1 


1 
2 


90 

1.031 

39 




90 

1.031 

39 


65 
993 
39 
23 
11 




66 


New York, Manhattan 

Rochester 


993 
39 


Trov 


28 


uSSi ::::::.:::: 


1 


ii 




11 


11 






Total 


5 




1.171 




1,171 


1,131 




1,131 






Musicians: 

Albany 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




207 
70 
66 

115 

430 
48 
35 
51 
80 

127 
32 
48 
35 
68 
92 
51 
41 

104 
58 

132 
76 
43 
73 
68 


3 
6 

8 

15 

7 

5 

15 

10 

8 

3 

4 

1 

■"is 

6 
3 

10 

23 
2 

18 
6 
4 

11 
4 


210 
76 
74 

130 

437 
53 
50 
61 
88 

130 
36 
49 
36 
81 
97 
54 
61 

127 
60 

150 
80 
47 
84 
72 


207 
80 
73 

109 

435 
53 
30 
60 
99 

164 
32 
54 
34 
72 

102 
53 
30 

100 
70 

120 
76 
66 
73 
74 


6 

3 

8 

16 

10 

4 

10 

11 

8 

4 

3 

2 

""is 

6 
4 
8 

16 

8 

. 30 

6 

5 

11 
3 


212 


AnMterdarn - 


83 


Auburn 


81 




126 


Bu&lo 


446 


C/AnandaiffUA 


67 


Coming 


40 


r^rri\f^^'\ 


61 


rhinkirV . r , r 


107 


Elmirftr . . , . - . ^ . . , . , 


168 


Fairport 


36 


FiffhKill-op-HudMm 


66 


Geneva 


34 


Glens Palls 


86 


Gloversville 


107 


Hoosiek Falls 


67 


Homell 


88 


IKon 


116 


Ithaca 


73 


Jamestown ...........*.... 


160 


Kingston .,...,.. r . - 


82 


TiiSlJ Fftlla. 


61 




84 


i^^imi. 


77 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 



Nbw Yokk Labor Bui*i*btin. 



1U>ie I.— Nombw and MMnbmrirfp of Lsbw OigMdntfona, by ladulriM, Trades sad LomIUIm* 





IMS— 4 


Mdioed 


I 












Unions at 
End of — 


NxncBaB of Mnmbbbs at tbm End of — 


ImDUSTBT, TXADB JkKD 
LOCAUTT 


MABCK, 1913 


SBFTaiiBaB, 1013 




Moh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



YUL THEATERS AND MUSIC— oendnded 



Medina 




2 

1 


64 

42 

550 

6,474 

38 

65 

125 

30 

19 

65 

35 

40 

51 

68 

20 

210 

550 

60 

14 

135 

292 

195 

183 

28 

61 

108 


7 

3 

25 
2 
2 
5 

i 

10 
5 
5 
2 
5 
6 
5 

40 
4 
2 

!§ 
5 

33 
3 

i 


71 

42 

553 

6.499 

40 

67 

130 

30 

20 

75 

40 

45 

53 

73 

25 

215 

500 

64 

16 

140 

302 

200 

216 

31 

61 

109 


68 

36 

600 

6.362 

38 

64 

128 

35 

82 

60 

30 

35 

49 

71 

15 

207 

527 

57 

15 

144 

298 

196 

183 

29 

94 

107 


10 

2 

25 
2 

1 
6 

"ii 

6 
6 
5 
2 
6 
5 
5 

48 
3 
2 
6 

11 
5 

33 
1 

2 


78 


New Roohelle 


36 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

Newark 


602 

6,387 

40 


Newburgh r , 


65 


Niagara JFaUs 


134 




35 


Osdenshurff 


99 


SSS^^.. .::::::.:.:::: 


65 


Oneida 


36 


Ossining 


40 


Pw^k<ikill 


51 


Port Chester 


76 




20 




212 


^^S|S2S?^ 


575 


Rome 


60 


Balamanca r r . r 


17 




150 


^^n^Qse 


309 


TVoy 


201 


utii.. ::::::::. .::.:.:... 


216 


Walden 


30 


White Plainii r . i 


94 


Yonkers 


103 






Total 


52 


53 


11,671 


368 


12,039 


11,776 


395 


12,171 






Stage Employees: 

Albany t 






35 
19 
27 
73 
16 





35 
19 
27 
73 
16 


35 
23 
25 
73 
16 
18 
33 
24 
16 
30 
250 
1,050 
40 
9 

64 
36 
68 
38 
28 




35 


AtU>um 


23 


Binghamton ...... 


25 


Buffalo 


73 


Cortland 


' 16 


TWmkirk 


18 


Q^nera , . , . , 




33 




33 


33 




24 






15 

27 

234 

1,035 

40 




15 

27 

234 

1,035 

40 


16 


Lookport 


30 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

Newbui^Eh - r 


250 

1,060 

40 


Oneida 


9 


Port Jervis 










g 






66 
37 
60 
39 
27 


...... 


66 
37 
60 
39 
27 


64 




36 


Syraottss 


68 


Xroy •' • 


38 


Utioa 


28 






Total 


16 


20 


1.783 




1.783 


1,885 




1,885 






Total — Group VIII 


82 


88 


22.950 


3.368 


26.318 


23.212 


3,395 


26.607 





DL TOBAOOD 



Cigar Makers: ; 

Albany i 1 

Amsterdam 1 

Auburn | 1 

Batavia 1 

Binghamton I 



1 


246 


10 


256 


258 


10 


I 


48 




48 


50 




1 


47 


1 


48 


50 


1 


1 


33 




33 


34 




2 


225 


87 


312 


205 


i2i 



268 
5U 
51 
34 

326 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



Table L— Nnmbcr uid MemberaUp 



«r Labw OrgMiintfoM. bj IndmaMm, 
191S 



Trades Mid LoMlitiM. 





Unionb at 


NuMBxm or Msmbsbs at ths End of — 


Industbt, Tbaob and 
localitt 


End of — 


MABCH. 1013 


8BPTB1CBBB, 1013 




Moh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



n. TOBACCO— eoBdaded 



Clgnrmalcen — concluded. 

Buffalo 

Coming 

Cortlsnd 

Coxaackie 

Dunkirk 

Elmira 

Fulton 

Geneva 

Glens Falls 

Gloveraville 

Hornell 

Hudson 

Ithaca 

Jamestown. 

New York, Brooklyn . . . 
New York. Manhattan . 

Niagara Falls 

Norwich 

Ogdendt>urg 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Owego 

Psekakill 

Plattsburg 

Poughkeepsie 

Rochester 

Rome 

SalazDanca 

Saratoga Springs 

Saugerties 

Schenectady 

Syracuse 

.Troy 

Utica 

Watertown 

Waverly 

Total 

Cigar Packers: 

Binghamton 

New York, Brook^ . . . 
New York, Manhattan . 
Syraeuse 

Total 

Cigarette Makers: 

New York, Manhattan . 

Tobacoo Workers: 

Albany 

New York. Manhattan. 

Newburgh 

Rochester 

Syracuse 

Utica 

Total 

Total -- Group IX 







447 

22 

26 

6 

24 

. 54 
24 
87 
31 
30 
22 
15 
52 
13 
28 
22 
50 

776 

3,018 

17 

27 

30 

200 
02 
40 
51 
32 
70 

217 
55 
26 
27 
22 
57 

310 

200 

114 
37 
17 


1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

3 

2 



i 

' '42 
1,050 

1 
5 

6 

i 

8 

2 

5 

14 
3 

i 

1 


448 
23 
27 
6 
24 
55 
24 
00 
31 
30 
22 
15 
54 
13 
28 
23 
50 

818 

4.068 

18 

32 

30 

200 
07 
40 
51 
32 
71 

225 
55 
26 
20 
22 
62 

324 

302 

114 
38 
18 


444 

18 

26 

5 

25 

55 

24 

88 

32 

30 

26 

15 

52 

13 

28 

20 

63 

747 

3.023 

18 

25 

30 

218 

00 

33 

51 

30 

72 

212 

57 

21 

30 

24 

63 

317 

300 

114 

34 

17 


2 

2 

1 

i 

3 

2 

■ "42 

2.032 

2 

6 

6 

i 

10 

2 

7 

20 
3 

2 


446 
18 
28 
6 
25 
56 
24 
01 
32 
30 
26 
16 
54 
13 
28 
20 
63 

780 

5,055 

20 

31 

30 

218 
06 
33 
51 
30 
73 

222 
57 
21 
32 
24 
70 

337 

303 

114 
36 
17 


50 


50 


7,112 


2,147 


0,250 


7.006 


2,276 


0.372 


1 

1 
2 

1 


1 
1 
2 

1 


33 

40 

450 

15 


2 
2 


35 

40 

450 

17 


34 

40 

430 

14 


2 


34 

40 

430 

16 


5 


5 


547 


4 


551 


536 


2 


538 


3 


3 


112 


31 


143 


113 


31 


144 


1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 


30 
15 

4 

5 

6 

18 


20 
24 

7 

17 
13 


50 
30 
4 
12 
23 
31 


30 

16 

3 

5 

5 

23 


20 

24 

2 

7 
14 
14 


50 
40 
5 
12 
10 
37 


7 


7 


78 


81 


150 


82 


81 


163 


65 


65 


7,840 


2.263 


10.112 


7,827 


2.300 


10,217 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



74 



New York Labor Bulletin. 



Table 1.— Nmnbar «Bd McmbcnJilp of Labor Org«ni«m<in», by UOmatgim, Twd— — d LpctIM— 

191S — c 





Unions at 
End or — 


Number or Members at tsb End op — 


Industry, Trade and 

IjOCaLITY 


MARCH, 1913 


SEPTEMBER, 1913 




Mob. Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


ToUl 


Men 


Worn. Total 



X. RESTAURANTS, TRADE, ETC. 



Bartenders: 

Albany 


1 




270 
50 
31 
107 
448 
55 
26 
18 
46 
24 

66 

19 

30 

225 

560 

610 

23 

30 

34 

45 

40 

40 

26 

37 

52 

335 

17 

115 

31 

285 





270 

50 

31 

107 

448 

55 

26 

18 

46 

24 

28 

40 

65 

19 

30 

225 

560 

610 

23 

30 

34 

45 

40 

40 

26 

37 

52 

335 

17 

115 

81 

285 


185 

40 

30 

123 

400 

53 

27 

17 

55 

37 

28 

40 

87 

22 

30 

211 

550 

662 

21 

39 

33 

47 

42 

42 

28 

33 

60 

388 




185 


Auburn 


40 


Batavia 


30 


Binghamton 


123 


Bu&lo 


40O 


Coboea 


53 


Cortland 


27 


niinlrirV 


17 


Elmira 


55 


Fulton 


37 


Geneva 


1 28 


IthlMMft 


1 40 




:.::::i 87 


Mount V^mon 


22 


New Rocbelle 




30 


New York, Bronx 


211 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

Newark 


550 
662 

21 




39 


Norwich 


33 


Olean 


47 


OneontA .... . . . ... 


42 


Oaweso 


42 


PMlnSrill . , 


28 


Port Chester 


33 


PniighkMpmA 


60 


Rochester 


388 








100 
36 

283 
45 

280 


'..'/..'. 


100 


Sfln^MJS Falls 


36 




283 


I'roy 


45 


Utica 




215 
10 

103 
77 


'•['''' 


215 
10 

103 
77 


230 


Waterloo 




Watertown 


iie 

76 




116 


Yonkers 


76 






Total 


39 


39 


4,167 




4.167 


4,216 




4,216 






Cooks: 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

Rochester 


1 
2 

1 
1 




41 

352 

12 

26 


i 


41 

353 

12 

26 


43 
354 


i 


43 
355 


Syracuse. 


27 




27 






Total 


5 




431 


1 


432 


424 


1 


425 






C<x>ks and Waiters: 

Schenectady 


1 

1 
1 




50 
50 
75 




50 
50 
75 


42 




42 






Utica 


129 




129 






Tptal 


3 


2 


175 




175 


171 




171 






Hotel Employees: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


12,029 


598 


12,627 


12.308 


300 


12,608 


Waiters: 

Albany 


1 

1 


1 
1 

1 
1 


112 
250 




112 
250 


58 
300 

31 
350 




58 


Buffalo 


300 


Jamestown 


31 


New York, Brooklyn 


i 


320 




320 


350 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix, 



75 



T able I.— NuBber and MembcnUp 



off Labor OrganfantloM, by Indwtries, TndM aad 
191S — eontintted 





Unions at 
End of — 


NuMBBB or 


MbMBKBB AT THB EnD 


OF — 


Induhtrt, Trade and 
Locality 


MARCH. 1913 


SEPTBimBB, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



X. RESTAURANTS, TRADE, ETC^ eoBtliiiied 
(a) Hotels and Restanraato- 



Wa iters — concluded. 

New York, Manhattan 

Rochester 

Syracuse 

\ onkers 

Total 

Total — Hotels and Restaurants. 

(b) Barberinf . 



Barbers: 

Albany 

Amsterdam. . . 

Auburn 

Batavia 

Binghamton. . 

Buffalo 

Ck>hoes 

Coming 

Cortland 

Dunkirk 

Elmira 

Fulton 

Geneva 

Gloversville . . 
Gouvemeur . . 
Hoosick Falls. 

Homell 

Ithaca 

Jamestown. . . 
Johnstown ... 



Little Falls 

Lockport 

Malone 

MechanicviUe 

Middletown 

Mount Vernon 

New Rochelle 

Now York, Brooklyn . . . 
New York* Manhattan . 
New York, Richmond . . 

Newburgh 

Niagara Falls 

Norwich 

Ogdensburg 

Olean 

Oneida 

Oneonta 



Plattsburg 

Port Chester 

Port Jervis 

Poughkeepeie 

Rochester 

Rome 

Saratoga Springs. 

SchenectacW 

Seneca Falb 



10 



58 



13 



59 



845 
223 



32 



1,880 



18.682 



130 
27 
42 
21 
93 

520 
41 
28 
12 
32 
72 
24 
21 
21 
12 
11 
17 
31 
73 
14 
30 
18 
31 
18 
8 
21 



16 

90 

320 

4 



17 
10 
40 
15 
24 
33 
19 
20 
13 
32 

172 
21 
18 

103 
15 



599 



845 
223 



32 



1.880 



19,281 



130 
27 
42 
21 
93 

520 
41 
28 
12 
32 
72 
24 
21 
21 
12 
11 
17 
31 
73 
14 
30 
18 
31 
18 
8 
21 



16 

90 

320 

4 

39 



17 
10 
40 
15 
24 
33 
19 
20 
13 
32 

172 
21 
18 

103 
15 



978 

235 

92 

30 



2.074 



19,193 



301 



128 




128 


31 




31 


43 




43 


20 




20 


99 




99 


609 




609 


42 




42 


31 




31 


13 




13 


31 




31 


68 




68 


24 




24 


18 




18 


17 




17 


10 




10 


10 




10 


19 




19 


32 




32 


80 




80 


10 




10 


27 




27 


20 




20 


35 




35 


17 




17 


9 




9 


26 




26 


19 




19 


23 




23 


4.585 




4.585 


160 




160 


41 




41 


25 




25 


17 




17 


17 




17 


42 




42 


10 




16 


25 




26 


3G 




36 


19 




19 


21 




21 


12 




12 


49 




49 


284 




284 


28 




28 


20 




20 


112 




112 


13 




13 



978 

235 

92 

30 



2.074 



19.494 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 



New York Labor Bulletin. 



TkMe L— Nwnber tmd MemberaMp of Labor Orguibatioiiii, bj Indulriec. Tndos and LoodMes 



















TJnxonb at 
End of — 


NUMBMB or MSMBBBa AT THB EnD OF — 


Induvtbt, Trads and 

IX)CALITT 


MABCH, 1913 


■BPTBMBBB, 1918 




Moh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


ToUl 



X. RESTAURANTS. TRADE, ETC.— eondvded 



Barbers — etmdudtd. 






172 
10 
96 
76 
26 
12 
17 
30 




172 
10 
96 
75 
26 
12 
17 
30 


163 
11 
97 

102 
40 
15 
18 




163 


Ti4ond«roca 


11 


Troy 


97 


Utioa 


102 


Watertown t 

Watervliet 


40 
15 


Waverly 


18 


Yonkers 












Total — Barbering 


54 


56 


2.827 




2,827 


7.479 




7,479 






(c) Retail Trade. 

Bookkeepers, Stenographers. Etc. : 
NeWYork. Manhattan 


1 


1 


34 


66 


100 


98 


100 


198 


Clerks and Salesmen: 

Albany 


2 


1 

1 
4 
1 

1 
1 

2 

6 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


91 

13 

64 

8 

7 

10 

16 

83 

348 

73 

4 

7 

18 

14 

60 


4 

"■'72 
3 

9 
30 


95 

18 

64 

8 

7 

10 

16 

88 

348 

145 

7 

7 

29 

23 

90 


93 

12 

168 

8 

7 

10 


4 

"iio 


97 




12 


Buffalo 


278 


Cohoee 


8 


Homell 


7 


TJttlft Fi^Uf , . , 


10 


Mount Vernon 




New York. Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

Newburgh 


78 
734 

70 
5 
7 
9 

21 

60 


8 

76 
3 

""io 

19 
22 


78 
742 
146 


Niagara Falls 


8 


onSa.™ ::::::::.:::! 


7 


Pmkffkill . 


19 


Baratoca SDrinfff* 


40 


Syracuse 


82 






Total 


20 


23 


816 


129 


945 


1.282 


252 


1.534 






Total — Retail Trade 


21 


24 


8fiO 


195 


1.045 


1.380 


352 


1.782 




133 


139 


22. 8M 


794 


28,153 


28.052 


653 


28.705 







XI. PUBUC EMPLOYMENT 



Arsenal Employees: 

Tona Island 


1 
2 
1 


2 

1 


78 

180 

65 




78 
189 
65 








Watervliet 


280 
76 




230 


West Point 


76 






ToUl 


4 


3 


332 




332 


306 




306 






Carpenters: 

Otisville 


1 


1 


12 




12 


11 




11 






Customs Employees: 

New York. Manhattan 




2 








321 




821 














Dock Builders: 


2 


2 


1.650 




1.650 


2.104 




2.104 


Electrical Workers: 

New York. Brooklyn 


1 


1 


75 




75 


178 




178 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbhdiz. 



17 



lUle I.— N«Bb«r m4 If Mib«l 






mm.bfl 

I 




■bTkiidM 


MidLi 


•*^ 




UlflOKS AT 

En OF — 


NUMBBB OF MmBBM AT m EnD OF — 


IndUVTBT. TBADB AMD 
LOCALRT 


MABCH. 1918 




IMBU 


1918 






BCeb. 


8^^. 


Men 


Worn. 


Totel 


Mm 


Worn. 


Total 



XL PUBUC BMPLOTIISKT — 



FSnoiOD, Oilvi And Wator 
Tondm: 
New York« Brooklyn. ...... 

New York, Mnnhaitaa 


1 

1 


1 
1 


200 

186 




200 
186 


100 
126 




100 
126 


Total 


2 


2 


885 




386 


226 




226 






Highwey Foiwnen*. 

New York« Manhattan 


1 


1 


66 




66 


60 




60 


Hospital Exnployeee: 


1 


1 


44 


61 


105 


66 


82 


188 


• . • • 




Iminigratioo Servioe Emidoyeee: 
New York. Manhattan 




1 








162 




162 














Inapeeton of CoDatruotion: 

New York, Bxonz 




1 

1 

1 

. 1 


80 
58 
68 
22 




80 
68 
68 
22 


75 
66 
74 
36 




75 


New Y ork, Brooklyn 

New York, Bdanhattan 

New York, Qoeena 


66 
74 
86 






Total 




4 


228 




228 


260 




260 






Letter Carriers: 

Albany 




1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


75 
3 
11 
25 
3 
8 
3 

2 

6 
3 


...... 


75 

3 

11 

25 

3 

8 

3 

30 

4 

329 

6 

3 

3 

4 

12 

13 

15 

5 

2 

11 

4 

2 

29 

3 

4 

6 

7 

6 

10 

11 

16 

3 

4 

3 

3 

6 

12 

6 


81 

4 

15 

81 

4 

10 

4 

41 

4 

360 

6 

3 

3 

4 

14 

14 

14 

6 

3 

11 

5 

2 

35 

3 

4 

8 

7 

7 

10 

13 

16 

4 

6 

7 

4 

5 

10 

5 




81 


Albion 


4 


Armtfvrdam.. 


15 


Auburn - 


31 


BaUrtonSpa 


4 


Batavia 


10 


Bath 


4 


Rjnghl^mtnn 


41 


Broelcport 


4 


Buffalo 


360 




6 




a 


Canton 


3:::::: 


8 


OatHkili . , 


4 
12 
13 




4 


Cohoea 


14 


Comins 


14 


Cmtlaml . , 


16 


14 


PnnimlW 


5 

2 

11 

4 

2 

20 

3 

4 

6 

7 

6 

10 

11 

16 

3 

4 

3 

3 

5 

12 

6 





5 


Dapoaat 


3 


Di^^kirk 


11 


Kaat Aurora. 


5 


EUenville 


2 


Ebnira 


36 


Fishkin-on-Hudaon 


8 


Fort Plain 


4 


Fradonsa 


8 


Freeport 


7 


Fulton 


7 


(Vmevft . ... . , , . 


10 


Glena Falls 


18 




16 


Goshen 


4 


Gouvemeur ... 


5 


Hcmpetead 


7 




4 


liooaick Falls 


5 


Uornell 


10 


Hudwn 


5 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



78 



New York Labor Bui^letin. 



Table I.— Number and Membenddp of Labor OrcaBisatloBS, by IndvaCrics, Trades and Localities, 

1913 — eoBtlnaed 





Unions at 
End of — 


NuifBKR or Membxbs at thb End 


or — 


Industry, Tbadb and 
LocALrrr 


MARCH. 1913 


SBPTBICBBR, 1913 




Mcb. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn.: Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



XI. PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT — eontiiitted 



Letter Carriers — continued. 

Hudson Falls 

lUon 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Johnstown 



Kinfston. 
Jj6 Roy . . 



I^ Roy . 
Little Falls. 

Looki)ort 

LowviUe 

Lyons 

Malone 

Mamaroneck 

Mechanicville 

Medina 

Mlddletown 

Mount Vernon 

New Rochelle 

New York, Brooklyn . . . 
New York, Manhattan . 

New York, Queens 

New York, Richmond . . 

Newark 

Newburgh 

Niagara Falls 

North .Tonawandia 

Northport 

Nyack 

Ogdensburg 

Olean 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Oswego 

Owego 

Patchogue 

PeeksWU 

Penn Yan 

Plattsburg 

Port Chester 

Port Jervis 

Potsdam 

Poughkeepsie 

Rochester 

Rockville Center 

Rome 

Salamanca 

Saranac Lake 

Saratoga Springs 

Saugerties 

Schenectady 

Seneca FaUs 

Silver Creek 

Syracuse 

Tarrytown 

Tonawanda 

Troy 

Utica 

Walton 

Watertown 

WatervUet 

Watkins 

Waverly 

jllsville 



WelU 



7 
6 

19 

31 
9 

13 
5 
9 

16 
3 
4 
8 
3 
2 
5 
9 

22 

15 

1.040 

2,552 

151 

58 
5 

19 

32 
7 
4 
5 
8 

12 
6 
9 

15 
5 
5 

11 
3 
6 

12 
7 
5 

23 

175 

9 

10 
4 
7 

11 
3 

53 
7 
2 
119 
7 
2 

46 

53 
4 

26 
9 
3 
6 
4 





7 
6 

19 

31 
9 

13 
5 
9 

16 
3 
4 
8 
3 
2 
5 
9 

22 

16 

1,040 

2.552 

151 

58 
5 

19 

32 
7 
4 
5 
8 

12 
6 
9 

15 
5 

if 

3 

6) 

12 
7 
5 

23 

175 

9 

10 
4i 
7, 

11! 

119 

7 

2 

45 

53 

4 

26; 

i 



5 
6 

16 

32 
9 

12 
3 
9 

16 
3 
4 
7 
3 
2 
4 
9 

22 

18 

1.040 

2,676 

168 

59 
6 

22 

31 
7 
4 
7 
8 

12 
6 
9 

15 
5 
4 

11 
4 
7 

12 
7 
6 

23 

176 

7 

11 
4 
7 

11 
3 

58 
6 
2 
113 
9 
6 

51 

53 
4 

26 
9 
3 
6 
4 



6 

15 

32 
9 

12 
3 
9 

16 
3 
4 
7 
3 
2 
4 
9 

22 

18 

.040 

,575 

168 

69 
6 

22 

31 
7 
4 
7 
8 

12 
6 
9 

15 
5 
4 

11 
4 
7 

12 
7 
6 

23 

178 

7 

11 
4 
7 

11 
3 

58 
6 
2 
113 
9 
6 

51 

53 
4 

20 
9 
3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



79 



Table I.-- Namber and MemberaMp of Labor OrgaaliatioBap by Indvatrlefl, Tradca and LocaHUeo, 

1913 — c 





Unions at 


NUMBBR OF.MsUBBBa AT^THB EnD OF — 


iNDUBTBr, TraDB AND 
LOCALITT 


End ow — 


MABCH. 1913 


SBPTBMBBB, 1913 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



XI. PUBUC EMPLOTMENT — cimanBed 



Weatfield 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


3 
15 
73 




3 
15 
73 


3 
15 
74 




3 


WMte Plains 


15 


Yonken 


74 






Total 


112 


112 


5,543 




5.543 


5.670 




5,670 




Machiniste: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


95 




95 


94 




94 


Navy Yard Gierke and Draughts- 
N^S^'ork. Brooklyn 


1 


1 


142 




142 


142 




142 


Navy Yard DrUlers: 

New York, Brooklyn 




1 








109 




109 














New York, Manhattan 


1 


1 


75 




76 


92 




92 


Pavers, Ranunermen and Asphalt 
Wookers: 
New York, Bronx 


1 
1 


i 


7 
45 




7 
45 








New York. Manhattan 


40 




40 


Total 


2 


1 


52 




52 


40 




40 






Poet Office Clerks: 

Albany 




1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


64 
3 
6 

18 
2 
3 

30 
3 
242 
3 
5 
4 
1 
2 
5 
5 
8 

11 
4 
4 
6 

20 
3 
3 
9 
9 

11 
2 
3 
5 
4 
6 


i 

4 



2 

1 

i 

1 

i 

i 


64 
3 
6 

18 
3 
3 

30 
3 
246 
3 
5 
4 
3 
3 
5 
5 
8 

11 
5 
5 
6 

21 
3 
3 
9 

10 

11 
2 
3 
5 
4 
6 


64 
4 
8 

20 
2 
3 

32 
3 
247 
4 
5 
4 
1 
2 
7 
6 
8 

11 
5 
4 
6 

21 
3 
3 
9 
8 
9 
3 
4 
6 
4 
6 


i 

3 

2 

1 

i 

1 

i 

i 


64 


Albion 


4 


Anu(terdam 


g 


Auburn 


20 


BaUston Spa 


3 


Bath 


3 


Bingbamton r . , , r 


32 


Broickport 


3 


Buffalo 


250 


Cannjoharie 


4 


Oanandaigiia 


5 


CaniMitota , , 


4 


Canton 


3 


Catdrill 


3 


Cohoee 


7 




6 


Coming , 


g 


Cortland 


11 


DansviUe 


5 


Dnnkirk , , r ^ 


5 




Q 


Elmira 


22 


FIshkill-on-Hadvop 


3 


Fredonia 


3 


Qeneva 


g 


Olens FbUs 


9 


Gloversville 


9 


Gouvemeur 


3 


Hempstead 


4 


"Rt^i^jn^ 


5 


Homell 


4 


hS£S5:::;;;:;::::::::;;: 


6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 



New Yobk Labob Bulletin, 



Table I.— Nunber and Meiiibenhip of Labor OtgfudmOonM, bj Indnslviea, Trades and LocaUttea, 

191S — ooBttaaed 





Unions at 


»^ 


InDUBTST, TBADK AMD 

LocAurr 


End of — 


MAKCH, 1913 


BKirrauBSB, 1013 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. ToUl 



XI. PUBUC EMPLOYMENT — centimied 



Post Office Clerks — concluded. 

Hudson Falls 

Irvington 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Johnstown 

Kingston 

Le Roy 

Little Falls 

Lockport 

Lyons 

Malone 

Medina 

Middletown 

Mount Vernon 

New Rochelle 

New York, Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan . . . 

New York, Queens 

New York, Richmond 

Newark 

Newburah 

Niagara Falls 

Norwich 

Nyack 

Ogdensburg 

Oiean 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Ossining 

Oswego 

Owego 

Palmyra 

Patchogue 

PeekStfll 

Penn Yan 

Plattsburg 

Port Chester 

Port Jervis.^ 

Poughkeepsie „. . 

Rochester 

Rookville Center 

Rome 

Salamanca 

Saranao Lake 

Saratoga Springs 

Saugerties 

Schenectady 

Syracuse 

Tarry town 

Troy 

Utica 

Walton 

Watertown 

Watkins 

Waverly 

White Plains 

Yonkers 



ToUl. 



Post Office Laborers: 

New York, ManhattaD . 



93 



4 
2 
7 

14 
6 

16 
4 
8 

11 
1 
4 
4 
8 

13 

11 

504 

3.193 

59 

23 
9 

16 

16 
4 
5 
6 
6 
3 
5 
4 

10 
3 
3 
6 
5 
6 
4 
6 
6 

22 

101 

4 

11 
2 
3 
7 
3 

38 

82 
7 

35 



4.914 



72 



4 

2 

7 

17 

6 

17 

4 

8 

11 

8 

4 

4 

10 

14 

11 

511 

3.193 

70 

25 

9 

18 

10 

6 

5 

6 

7 

4 

5 

4 

11 

3 

6 
5 
5 
4 
7 
6 

22 

103 

5 

11 
4 
5 
9 
3 

40 

82 
7 

36 

36 
3 

16 
3 
4 
5 

25 



4.986 



12.'3 



2 
8 

14 
6 

16 
4 
8 

10 
1 
4 
5 
9 

15 

11 

466 

2,845 

71 

24 
9 

15 

16 
4 
4 
6 
7 
3 
5 
5 

11 
3 
3 
6 
9 
5 
4 
7 
6 

21 

130 

4 

11 
3 
3 
7 
3 

38 

90 
6 

34 

39 
2 

13 
3 
4 
9 

25 



4.616 



124 



65 



3 

2 

8 

17 

6 

17 

4 

8 

10 

3 

4 

5 

11 

16 

11 

473 

2.850 

78 

24 

9 

16 

17 

5 

4 

6 

8 

4 

5 

5 

12 

3 

3 

6 

9 

5 

4 

8 

6 

23 

132 

4 

11 

5 

5 

9 

3 

38 

90 

6 

34 

40 

3 

17 

3 

4 

12 

25 



4.681 



124 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



81 



Table I.-- Niamlm aad MembMAlp of LakOT OrgurinlioiM* bj iBdnatrles, Tn 

191S — eontfnaed 





Unions at 




Industry. Tbade and 

LOCAUTT 


End of — 


IIABCH. 1913 


sarTSUBBB, 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


XI. PUl 

Public School Janitora: 

Albany 


BUC E 

1 


MPLO^ 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


ITMENT 

23 


— eonc 

2 


ladMl 

25 


23 
11 
17 
52 
11 
210 
13 
4 
36 
22 
31 
23 
21 


2 


26 


Auburn 


11 


Binchainton 










17 


Buffalo. ... ... 


1 
1 

1 


68 

11 

194 




58 

11 

194 


62 


Mount Vernon 

New York, Manhattan 

New Rochelle 


11 

210 

13 


Oneida 










4 


Rochester 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


36 
22 
28 
24 
21 




36 
22 
28 
24 
21 


36 


Schenectady 


22 


Syracuse 


31 


Utica 


28 


Ynnk^fil r - 




21 






Total 


9 


13 


417 


2 


419 


474 


2 


476 






Public School Teachers: 

Buffalo 


1 


1 




1.000 


1.000 




1,352 


1,362 




Railwav MaU Qerka: 

Albany 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


58 
185 

68 
150 

52 




58 
185 

68 
150 

62 


53 
186 

61 
200 

60 




63 


Buffalo 


186 




61 


Syracuse 


200 


"^eedsport 


60 






Total 


6 


5 


613 




613 


560 




660 






Stationary Engineers: 

New York, Brooklyn 


1 


1 


300 




300 


275 




276 


Street Sweepers: 

New York, Manhattan 


3 


1 


145 




145 


70 




70 


Teamsters: 

Buffalo 




1 








260 




260 














War Department Employees: 

New York, Manhattan 




1 








43 




43 














Water Works Employees: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 
1 
2 


1 

1 
1 
2 


100 

80 

246 

145 




100 

80 

246 

145 


100 
100 
240 
146 




100 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan 

Yonkers 


100 
240 
146 






Total 


6 


5 


671 




571 


686 




686 






Total — Group XI 


261 


257 


15.623 


1.136 


16,758 


16,803 


1,501 


18,304 











XII. STATIONARY ENGINE TENDING. 



Engineers, Stationary: 

Albany 

Auburn 

Bingham ton 

Buifalo 

Fort Edward 

Geneva 

Glens Falls 

Gouvemeur 

Kingston 



213 




213 


38 




38 


29 




29 


543 




543 


41 




41 


11 




11 


7 




7 


30 




30 



268 




268 


38 




38 


27 




27 


633 




633 


14 




14 


41 


...... 


41 


11 




11 


29 




29 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82 



New York Labor Buli^etin. 



TaUe I.— Number and Memberahip of Labor OrganfanUlons. by Indiistries, Trades and LMaUttea, 





1»18 — 


eonanaed 










Unions at 
End of — 


Number of Members at the End of — 


Industry, Trade and 

LOCALXTT 


MARCH. 1913 


SEPTEMBER. 1913 




Mch. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn.': Total 

: 



Xn. STATIONARY ENGINE TENDING — 



Engineers, Stationary — concVd. 
Little Falls 


1 

1 
1 
1 
7 
14 
1 
1 

I 

1 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
14 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


11 

31 

33 

48 

1,225 

4,014 

20 

82 

51 

146 

25 

412 

165 

27 

30 

32 

9 

68 

65 


! u 

31 

33 

48 

1.226 

4,014 

20 

; 82 

51 

146 

25 

1 412 

! 165 

27 

30 

32 

1 9 

1 68 

65 


8 
34 
35 
46 




8 


Middletown 

Mount Vernon 


34 
35 


Mew York. Bronx 


46 


New York. Brooklyn 

New York, Manhattan 

New York, Queens 


1,091. 

4,425 

21 


1.091 

4.425 

21 


New York. Richmond 

Newburgh 

Niagara Falls 

Poughkeepsie 

Rochester 

Syracuse 

Tonawanda 


82 

54 

152 

28 

432 

173 

27 

30 

24 

10 

68 

72 




...... 

:;:::: 


82 

54 
152 

28 
432 
173 

27 


Troy 


30 


Utica 


24 


Warsaw 


10 


White Plains 


68 




72 






Total 


53 


54 


7.406 


1 7.406 


7.873 




7.873 






Firemen. Stationary: 

Ballston ^)a 






20 

411 

65 

6 

38 


' 20 

411 

65 

6 

38 


18 

440 

64 

7 

37 

38 

19 

2,800 





18 


Buff aln 


440 


Corinth-Palmer 


64 


Elmira 


7 


Fort Eklward 


37 


Fulton 


:i8 


Glens Falls 


"' i 


17 

2.800 

15 

25 

150 

72 

9 

75 

24 


17 


19 


New York, Manhattan 

Oswego 




2,800 

15 

25 

150 

72 

9 


2,800 


Piercefield 


25 
151 
72 
9 
72 
30 




25 


Rochester 


151 


Syracuse 


72 


T^conderoga 


9 


Watertown 


75 

24 


72 


Yonkers 


30 










Total 


14 


14 


3,727 




3,727 


3,782 




3,782 






Total — Group XI I 


67 


08 


11,133 





11,133 


11.665 




11,656 



Xm. MISCEtLANBOUS 



(a) Paper and Paper Goods. 

Paper Bag and Box Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 


• 


1 
1 








175 
3 


I 
100 275 


Rochester 


1 


3 


2 


5 


2 5 










Total 


1 


2 


3 


2 


5 


178 


102 


280 






Paper and Pulp Workers: 

Black River 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 


29 
44 
60 
30 
18 
373 
191 




29 
44 
50 
30 
18 
373 
191 


29 
60 
39 
20 
402 
202 
27 
32 




42 


Brownville 


29 


Cadyville 


50 


Carthage ........ 


39 


Chateaugay .......... r ,.. r 


20 


Corinth-Palmar , . 


402 


Deferiet 


202 


Emerwille 


27 


Felu'l^IiUs 


1 


32 




32 


32 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Afperdix. 



83 



Table L— Nunber mmI Menriwnl 


ttpoTLabOTOrfiBlailim 
1913 — eontinaed 




aadUellCk.. 




Unions at 
End of — 


Number of Mbmbbbs at the End of — 


Induhtiit, Traok and 

LOCAUTT 


MABCH, 1013 


seftbmbbb, 1913 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 



Xm. MISCBLLANEOUS — eontlBtted 



(a) Paper aad Paper Goods — 
coadnded. 

Paper and Pulp Warken-^ond^d. 
Fort Eklward 


2 

1 

. 3 

1 


2 

1 
3 
2 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 


386 
60 

262 
36 




385 
60 

262 
36 


342 
96 

276 
53 
10 

237 
16 
60 
34 

130 
34 
16 

143 
16 

307 
46 
20 

152 

157 
70 

258 


4 


346 


Fulton 


96 


Gleos Falls 


276 




53 


Harriflville 


10 


Hudson Falls 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
I 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 


239 
31 
60 
31 

130 
34 
20 

291 
24 

399 
60 
23 
93 

146 
70 

207 




239 
31 
60 
31 

130 
34 
20 

281 
24 

399 
60 
23 
93 

146 
70 

207 


237 


Lyons Falls 


16 




60 


New York. Brook.yn 

Niagara Falls. 


34 
130 


Norfolk 


34 


Norwood 


16 


Picroefield 


143 


Potsdam 


16 


Pyrites 


307 


Ravmondville 


46 


Saugerties 


20 


Thomson .---,.. 


162 


Ticonderoga 


157 


Trov 


70 


Watertown 


258 






Total.. 


38 


42 


3,358 




3.368 


3,313 


4 


3,317 






Total — Paper and Paper Goods. 


39 


44 


3.361 


2 


3.363 


3,491 


106 


3,597 


BelUng Makers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


300 




300 


260 




250 


Harness Makers: 

New York, Manhattan 


2 


2 


87 




87 


71 




71 


Pocket Book and Purse Makers: 
New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


390 


62 


462 


175 


26 


200 


Trunk and Bag Workers: 

New York, Manhattan 


1 


2 


120 




120 


660 




660 


Total — Leather and Leather 
Goods 


5 


6 


897 


62 


959 


1.146 


25 


1.171 






(c) Glaaa and Glassware. 

Decorative Glass Workers: 

New York. Manhattan 

Rochester 


1 
1 


1 

1 


266 
22 




266 
22 


260 
20 




260 
20 






ToUl 


2 


2 


287 




287 


280 





280 






Flint Glass Cutters and Workers: 
Coming ,.....,,, 


1 
1 
3 
1 
1 


i 

3 

1 
1 


110 
36 

696 
15 
14 




no 

35 

096 

16 

14 








Elmira 


26 

58C 
16 

ao 


'..'..'.. 


26 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Queens 


680 
16 


Port Jervis 


20 






Total 


7 


6 


87Q 




870 


640 




640 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



84 



New Yoek Labob Bulletin. 



TiAie L— Nomlm Mid MemlMnUp •€ Labor OrgwdiirtlM^ b7 Iiidas^^ 

1913 — < 





Unions a.t 
End of — 


NuMBBB or. 


^Mbmbbbs at tod End or — 


Indubtbt, Tbadb Ain> 

LOCALITT 


MABCH, 1913 


SvnMBiB, 1913 




Meh. 


Sept. 


Men 


Wcwn. 


Total 


Men 


Wom. 


Total 


xm. 

(e) GIam mad CSlMMwwe — 
eoBcMsd. 

OlMB Bevelera, Polifltea, Etc.: 
Buffalo 


Misa 

1 


1 


SOUS — 

14 


eoBtIm 


led 

14 


34 




84 






GlMB Bottle Blowers: 

Alden 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 




3 
32 
52 
40 
26 
72 
43 
117 




3 
32 
52 
40 
26 
72 
43 
117 








Binghaxnton 


34 
47 
36 
24 
49 
45 
40 
75 
51 
85 
60 
76 




34 


Cayde 


47 




36 


Geneva 


24 


Hambuis 


49 


Liockport 


45 


New York, Brooklyn 

New York. Manhattan . . . 


40 
76 


New York, Queens 


1 
1 
1 
1 


116 
112 
42 
82 




116 
112 
42 
82 


61 


Olean .'.7 


85 


Poughkeeime 


60 


RocEeeter 


75 






Total 


13 


12 


737 




737 


631 




631 






Total — Gla« and Glassware. . . . 


23 


21 


1,908 




1.908 


1.585 




1,686 


(d) Cement, Clay and Plaster 
Pradncts. 

Briok Makers: 


1 








220 




220 














Plaster Board and Block Makers: 
New York, Manhattan 





1 








110 




110 














Potters: 

Buffalo 


1 
1 


1 
1 


84 
11 




84 
11 


90 
10 




90 


Solvay 


10 






Total 


2 


2 


95 




95 


100 




100 






Terra Cotta Workers: 

New York, Queens 


1 


1 


65 




65 


49 




49 






Total — Cement. Clay and Plas- 
ter Products 


3 


5 


160 




160 


479 




479 






(e) Other Distinct Trades. 

Button Makers: 

New York. Manhattan 

Roohester 


1 


•2 

1 


430 


20 


450 


708 
60 


25 


733 
60 














Total 


1 


3 


430 


20 


450 


768 


25 


793 






Celluloid Novelty Workers: 


1 


1 
1' 


90 


90j 




28 


28 








Diamond Cutters and Polishers: 
New York, Brooklyn 


1 


l' 
'1 


299 


1 


1 
300| 


J . 


321 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



85 



Tkble L— Nwnbcr and MembenUp of Labor OrgaiiisaCloiis, by Indufltriea. TndM aad LoodUies, 













Union a.t 
End of — 


NUMBBB OF MbIIBUS AT THB EnD OF ~ 


INDU8TBT, TBADE ANX> 
LOCALITT 


MABCB. 1913 


SBPTSMBSB. 1913 




Meh. 1 Sept. 


Men 


Worn. 


Total 


Men Worn. Total 



Xm. MISCELLANEOUS — eondttded 



(e) Other Dtatlnct T^adea — 

Fiflhermen: 

nqpfrirV 


1 
1 


1 


48 
9 




48 
9 


44 




44 


Weatfield 












Total 


2 


1 


57 




57 


44 




44 






loe Houae Worken: 

New York. Brooklvn 




1 








85 




85 














Janitors, Porters and Elevator- 
men: 
Buffalo 


1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


52 

160 

60 




52 
150 
60 


60 

150 

40 




60 




160 
40 






Total 


3 


3 


262 




262 


250 




260 






Miners. Iron: 

Mineville 


1 




30 




30 
















Photograph Workers: 

New York, Manhattan 




1 








30 




80 














Smoking Pipe Makers: 

New York. Manhattan 




1 








400 




400 














Umbrella Makers: 

New York, Manhi^ttan 


1 


1 


80 


100 


180 


80 


125 


205 


Watchmen: 

New York. Manhattan . . . 


1 




131 




131 
















WoolPuUers: 

New York. Manhattan 


1 


1 


229 




229 


226 




226 


Total — Other Distinct Trades . . 


12 


14 

1 
3 

1 
1 


1.518 


211 


1.729 


2,203 


179 


2.882 


Buffalo 




07 

139 

40 

68 


■ "32 


67 


New York. Manhattan 


3 


236 


28 


264 


171 


New York, Queens 


40 


Utica 


I 


53 




53 


68 






Total — Mixed Employment 


4 


6 


289 


28 


317 


314 


32 


346 


Total — Group XIII . . . 


86 


96 


8,133 


303 


8,436 


9,218 


342 


9,560 


Grand Total 


2.530 


2.643 


572,213 


71,405 


643,618 


580,726 


78,522 


665.248 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



86 New York Labob Bulletin. 

table n.— unions and membership by locautiiss and trades, 191s 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



County, Town and Tradb 



Sex 



Marcs 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



Septbmbbb i 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



Vll-a 
X-b 
X-a 

VIII 
IV-m] 
V 

Vll-b 
Vll-b 
Vll-b 
I-b 
U- 
VII-j 
II- 
Il-a 
I-b 
VI 
IX 



ALBANY COUNTY. 

AUmiu. 

Bakers and confectioners 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Bill posters 

Boiler makers and iron shipbuilders. 
Bookbinders 



Brewery employees 

Brewery employees (drivers and bottlers) . . . 
Brewery emplovees (engineers and firemen) . 
Bricklayers and maa 



M 



Il-a 
X-c 

Ill-a 

III-c 

Ill-a 

Ill-b 



Il-a 
VI 

I-b 

I-b 

V 

I-b 
Il-a 
Il-b 
XII 
Il-a 
IV-a 

I-a 
IV-a 

I-b 
IV-a 

I-b 
XI 
VI 
IV-o 
V 

Il-b 
IV-b 
Vll-b 
VIII 

I-b 
IV-a 
V 
V 
I-b 
XI 
V 
V 



Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers- 
Butchers and meat cutters 

Cab and coach drivers and chauffeurs 

Car and locomotive painters 

Car[>enters and joiners 

Carriage, wagon and automobile workers . . . . 
Cigar makers 

Clerks, railway 

Clerks and safeamen 

Cloak and suit makers 

Cloth hat and cap makers 

Coat, pants and vest makers 

Collar makers 



Compositors . 



Conductors 

Coopon 

Derrickmen and riggers 

Electrical workers 

Electrotypers and steraotypers ...... 

Elevator oonstructcvs 

Engineers, locomotive 

Engineers, marine 

Engineers, stationary 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive. . 

Gas meter makers 

Granite cutters 

Horseshoers 

Housesmiths and bridgemen 

Iron molders and core makers 

Lathers 

letter carriers 

Machine woodworkers 

Machinists 

Mailers 

Masters and pilots 

Metal poliAhers, buffers and platers. . 
Mineral water bottlers and drivers. . , 
Musicians 



Painters and decorators 

Pattern makers 

Photo-engravers 

Plate engravers and painters 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 

Post office clerks 

Pressmen 

Pressmen's assistants and press feeders 



M 



42 
130 
270 

30 
241 
130 



145 
.56 
82 

250 

195 
70 

131 
58 

478 
79 

246 

10 

80 

91 

4 

26 

6 

14 

/ 

30 

H 

10 

go 

453 
8 

169 
35 
35 

207 
53 
23 

182 
74 

213 

4. 
50 

230 
30 

160 

182 
7 
75 
28 
68 
11 
82 
25 
43 

2(y7 
3 

200 
25 
25 
12 

102 
64 

135 
12 
45 



128 

185 
34 

228 

130 
/ 

156 
57 
82 

270 

210 
50 

167 
56 

531 
80 

258 

10 

65 

93 

4 



18 



35 
10 
10 
i4 

452 
if 

160 
35 
20 

206 
50 
20 

177 
76 

268 

456 
50 

150 
30 

150 

222 
25 
81 
29 
54 
12 
82 
23 
40 

207 
S 

165 
27 
24 
12 

109 
G4 

135 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



87 







and Trades. I91S — 


eoBtfnaed 


In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 


County, Town and Tradb 


Sex 


March 31 


Septsmbkb 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


XI 


Publi<^ flchfwl janitAra 


M 

F 

M 

« 
■ 

• 
■ 

M 

m 
P 

M 

a 

F 
M 

• 

• 


1 


23 
g 

58 

67 

35 

54 

24 

506 

50 

f 

25 

281 

$ 

16 

30 

SO 

415 

680 

112 


1 


23 


XI 


Railway mail olerkif. , 


2 
53 


I-b 


8hMt mAtAl WArlTAni (hMiMips) 


64 


VIII 




35 


I-b 


Steam and hot water fitters 


54 


I-a 


s^iMji bank^ra. . . , , , . . , , . . . 


10 


Il-a 


Street railway employees 


552 


Ill-a 


Tailors 


132 


Il-e 


TelegnHpheni, oommercial 


SO 
25 


Il-e 


Telegrapheni railroad 


281 


I-b 


Til<i layen^ and marble mosaic workers . 


9 
18 


IX 


Tobacco workers 


30 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and yard 


SO 
432 


II-c 
X-a 


Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs 

Waiters 


592 
58 




Total 






M 

F 


84 


8,936 
137 


83 


8,878 




Coboea. 

Barbers 


166 


X-b 


M 

c 
m 
• 
m 
* 
m 
m 

F 

M 

• 

« 

m 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

2 

1 
1 
I 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


41 

65 

31 

200 

80 

8 

20 

184 

161 

80 

66 

12 

47 

48 

28 

5 

300 

125 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


42 


X-a 




53 


I-b 




34 


Ill-e 


Carders 


20Q 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


81 


X-c 


Ci^flw and saleanien 


8 


V 


Compoaitors 


19 


IIlH» 


Cotton goods wiMrkers 


112 


Ill-e 


Knit goods cutters and boarders 


60 
83 


Ill-e 


TTnit^r. , . . , 


63 


XI 


Letter carriers 


14 


Ill-e 


Loom fixers 


50 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


52 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Poet office clerks 


28 

7 


Ill-e 


Shoddy workers 


296 


Ill-e 


RpinnAni, ji^.k . . , 


135 




Total 






M 

F 


20 


1.330 
161 


20 


1,277 




Graen Island. 

Blacksmiths 


60 


IV-a 


M 

m 
m 
m 


1 
1 
1 
1 


67 

58 

170 

90 


1 
1 
1 
1 


' 84 


Il-fl 


Firemen and engineers, locomotive 


57 


IV-ft 


Machinists 


269 


IV-a 


Machinists' apprentices and helpers 


86 




Total 






M 


4 


385 


4 


496 




Bavena. 

Trainmen, roail and yard 




Il-a 


M 


1 


65 


1 


69 




Watenrllet. 




XI 


m 
m 
m 
m 


2 

1 
1 
1 


189 
12 
9 
16 


2 

1 
1 
1 


230 


X-b 


Barbers ...'...' 


15 


XI 


Letter carriers 


9 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


18 




Total 






M 


5 


226 


5 


272 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



88 New York Labor Buli^btin. 

Table n.— Unloiis and Memberahip by LocaUtfes and TradM, 191S — eontinned 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



County, Town and Trade 



'8ex 



March 31 



I Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 



SSPTEMBBR 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



I-b 
XI 



X-b 
X-a 

Vll-b 

F *-c 
II-c 
I-b 

IX 

IX 



Il-a 
I-b 
V 

Il-a 
XII 

n_ 

Xlll-e 

rv-a 

I-b 
XI 
IV-a 
IV-b 
VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
I-b 

XI 
I-b 
VIII 
Il-a 
Il-a 

in-a 

Il-a 



XI 
I-b 



:i-e 



ALLBGANY COUNTT. 

WellsTille. 

Carpenters and jmners 

Letter oarriers 

ToUl 



BROOME COUNTY. 



Barbers. . 

Bartenders 

Brewery employees 

Brioklayers and masons 

Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Cab and ooikoh drivers and ohauffeurs 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cisar makers 

Cigar packers 

Composators 

Conductors. 

Electrical workers 

Electrotypers and stereotypers 

Engineers, locomotive 

Engineers, stationary 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Glass bottle blowers 

Iron molders and core makers 

Lathers 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 

Metal polishers, buffers and platers 

Musicians 

Psinten and decorators 

Plasterers 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 

Post office clerks 

PTossiuen 

Public school janitors 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Stage employees 

Street rauway employees 

Switchmen 

Tailors 

Trainmen, road and yard 

Total 

Letter 

Carpenters and joiners 

CATTABAUOUS COUNTY. 

FkBakllnvllle. 

Telegraphers, railroad 



M 



M 



M 



14 



107 
46 
88 
32 
35 
260 
225 
87 
33 

114 
6 
56 
46 
15 
82 
29 
65 
32 
8 
12 
39 

132 



116 
16 
50 
14 
33 
30 
28 

i 



20 
27 

135 
39 
33 
10 

250 



35 



2.323 

ISO 



26 



10 

4 



14 



99 
123 
48 
85 
35 
40 
279 
205 

iff 

34 



110 
11 
56 
43 
16 
83 
27 
65 
34 
10 
16 
41 
92 
13 

109 
16 
47 
17 
90 
32 
28 
1 
17 
19 
25 



42 
35 

IS 
251 



36 



2,266 
161 



33 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 

Table D.— UnionB and M«mbenhl» bj LmsIMm and Trade*, 191S — 



89 



duBtry 



CouMTT, Town and Tbaob 



Sex 



MabcbSI 



Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
ber of 



SapTSiaaBao 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 



X-b 
X-a 
Vll-b 
I-b 
I-b 

V 

Il-a 
Il-a 
II. 
XIII-c 
I-a 
IV-a 
XI 
VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
XI 

I-b 
Il-a 



X-a 

IV-a 
I-b 
I-b 
IX 
Il-a 
I-b 
Il-a 
Il-a 
XI 
IV-a 
VIII 



CATTARAUGUS COUNTY 

Oleaa. 

Barbera 

Bartenders 

Brewery emploveee 

Bricklayers ana masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Compoators 

Conauctors 

Engineers, locMnotive 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive. 

Glass bottle blowers 

Granite cutters 

Iron molders and core makers 

Letter carriers 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 
Post office clerks 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Trainmen, road and ysrd 

Total 

Bartenders 

Boiler makers and iron shipbuildors. 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers 

Conductors 

Electrical workers 

Engineers, locomotive 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive. 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 

Musicians 

Post office clerks 

Switchmen 

Tailors 

Telsgraphers, railroad 

Trainmen, road and yard 

Total 



CAYUGA COUNTY. 



M 



F 
M 



P 
M 



M 



19 



XI 



Il-a 
III-« 



Il-e 
Il-a 



Vll-a Bakers and confectioners , 

X-b Barbers 

X-a Bartenders 

Vll-b Brewery emplovees 

I-b Bricklayers and masons 

I-c Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers . 
Vll-a Butchers and meat cutters , 

I-b Carpenters and joiners 

I4> Cement masons 

IX Cigar makers 



M ! 
P 



16 



M 



40 
45 
30 
87 
58 
27 
44 
63 
85 
112 
14 
13 
12 
65 
10 
31 
22 
6 

i 

8 
150 



912 
11 



17 



26 
46 
26 
70 
16 
67 
74 
4 
10 
14 

2 
M 

14 
8 
4 

175 
8 

163 



732 

le 



28 
42 
50 
28 
85 
52 
51 
221 
16 
47 



19 



15 



42 

47 

38 

92 

77 

26 

48 

50 

92 

85 

17 

39 

12 

60 

6 

42 

23 

7 

/ 

9 

136 



942 
6 



16 
21 
68 
21 
70 



68 

73 

4 

34 

15 

t 

3 

f 

12 

11 

5 

200 

8 

170 



786 
15 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 New York Labob Bulletin. 

Tabte U.— UnloiM and Membenddp by LocatttiM and TradM, 1913 ~ continued 



In- 
diwtry 
num- 
ber 


CouNTT, Town and Tbadh 


Sex 


March 31 


SEPTBSIBBn 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 

uniona 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


V 


CAYUGA GOUNTT — eoadnded. 

AnDnm ~~' eondndad* 
Compomtom ..... ....................... 


M 

P 
M 

u 
m 
m 
m 
a 
« 
m 

F 
M 

m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 




16 
17 
10 
38 
80 
13 

110 
25 

226 

66 

8 

126 

9 

42 

18 


2 
6 


21 


I-b 


Electrical workers . 


\t 


XII 


Kngineort, stationary 


38 


Il-a 




86 


IV-a 


Horseshoers 


11 


IV-a 


Iron molders and core makers 


104 


XI 


Letter carriers 


31 


IV-a 




300 


VIII 


Musadans 


73 


I-b 


Paintflrs and decorators 


8 
1.36 


IV-a 


Pattern makers 


11 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks 


42 
20 


XI 


Public school janitors 


11 


I-b 






32 

19 

79 

219 


♦ 31 


VIII 


Stage employees 


23 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and yard 


80 


II-c 


Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs 

Total 


257 




M 
P 


32 


1.696 

te 


33 


1,825 




W^eeoaport* 
Railway mail carriers 


SS 


XI 


M 


1 


62 


1 


50 




CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY. 

Dunkirk. 

Barbers 




X-b 


M 

m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
a 
« 
m 

P 

M 

m 
« 

« 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 

P 

M 

a 
P 

M 

m 
m 
m 
P 




32 
18 
60 
84 
66 
27 
60 
24 
10 
5 
46 
23 
18 
48 
65 
49 
132 
11 




31 


X-a 


Bartftndfrrs . 


17 


IV-a 


Blacksmiths 


60 


IV-a 


Blai^ksmiths' htilpvn 


72 


IV-a 


Boiler makers ancl iron riiipbuilders 


18 


Vll-b 


Brewery emplcnrees 


33 


I-b 




46 


IX 


Cigar makers . . '. 


25 


V 


Compositors 


11 


IV-a 


Cranem<*n 


5 

50 


I-b 


Electrical workers . . 


67 


Il-b 


Eng?n*wrs, marine 


20 


Xlll-e 


FIsLennen 


44 


IV-a 






ivia 




35 


IV-a 


Iron molders and core makers 


100 


XI 


Letter carriers 


11 


VI 


Machine woodworkers 


29 


IV-a 


Machinists 




375 

14 

80 

8 

10 

4 

/ 

20 


349 


IV-b 


Mfttal poHshnrs, bufff^rs and platers 


13 


VIII 


Musicians ' 


09 


I-b 
XI 


Post office clerks 


8 
10 

4 


I-b 


Sheet metal workers (building) 


20 


VIII 


Stage employees 


18 


Il-a 


Street railway employees 




40 
20 

4 


71 


Ill-a 


Tailors 


21 




Total 


S 




M 

P 


26 


1.334 
18 


27 


1,274 






17 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 

Table n.— Ualoiis and Memberaliip by LocalttlM and Trades, 1913 — coaUnned 



91 



In- 


CouifTT, Town and Trade 


Sex 


MabchSI 


SBirrEMBUi 30 


dustry 


Num- 

ber 

of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 

uniona 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


XI 


Fradenla. 

Letter carriera 


M 

m 


1 
1 


6 
3 


1 

1 


g 


XI 


Poet office olerka 


3 




Total 






M 


2 


9 


2 


11 




Jameetown. 

Barbers 




X-b 


M 

m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 

F 
M 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

F 
M 

m 
m 
a 

F 
M 

a 
« 
m 
a 
■ 
a 




73 
65 




80 


X-a 


Bartenders 


87 


IV-a 


ni(vekmnithn 


18 


Vll-b 




i 

1 


28 

48 

267 


32 


I-b 


nnAic]ayer9 ana nuMK>D9 , - . , 


57 


I-b 


ClUTMnters and ioiners .... 


280 


I-c 


Cement workers 


12 


IX 


^ga' makers 




13 

4 

e 

52 
53 
10 
31 
58 

132 
18 

228 
14 
23 
14 
S 
14 
37 


13 


Ill-a 


Coat, pants and vest makers 


4 


V 


Compositors 


6 
52 


I-b 


Electrical workers 


46 


I-b 


Lathers 


10 


XI 


I>cttf»r carriera . . . . ... . 


32 


IV-b 


Metal polishers, buffers and platers 


60 


VIII 


Mmnciana ... ..... 


120 


I-b 


Painters and decorators . . . . , . . 


SO 
225 


I-b 


Plasterars 


17 


I-b 
XI 


Phimbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Poet office clerks 


26 
14 


V 


Prwwmen 


S 
14 


I-b 


Sheet metal workers (building) 


38 


IV-a 


Sheet metal workers (shop) 


130 


VIII 


Atage employees .... . . . 




15 
10 
60 


16 


I-a 


Stone cutters 


7 


VI 


Uphc^aterers and mattress makers 


78 


X-a 


H^aiters 


31 




Total 










M 

F 


22 


1,245 

M7 


26 


1,499 




Silver Creek. 

Letter carriers 


98 


XI 


M 


1 


2 


1 


2 




Weatfleld. 

Fishermen 




XIII-c 


M 

a 


1 
1 


9 
3 






XI 


Letter carriers 


1 


3 




Total 






M 


2 


12 


1 


3 




CHEMUNG COUNTY. 
Elmlra. 




VI I-a 


M 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

F 
M 

a 
a 




15 
72 
46 
27 
70 
40 
21 

215 

31 

45 

1 

68 

190 
15 




12 


X-b 


Barbers 


68 


X-a 


Bartenders , . 


55 


Vll-b 


Brewery employees 


32 


I-b 


Bricklayers and masons 


88 


Vll-a 


Butchers and meat cutters 


42 


Il-a 




50 


I-b 


Carpenters and jomers 


238 


VI 
IX 


Carriage, wagon and automobile workers 

Cigar makers 


33 
55 


V 


Compoaitors 


1 
71 


Il-a 


Conouctors 


207 


IV-b 


Coppersmiths 


14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



92 New Yobk Labor Bulletin. 

Table U.— Ualoni and MambMaUp by Loealitiaa and Tradaa, ItlS — coatfiiiied 



In- 
dustry 
numr 

bar 



CouMTT, Town and Tbapb 



Sex 



MabcbSI 



Nam- 
bar 
of 



Num- 
borof 



bare 



SSPTBllBBBaO 



Noift- 
bor 
of 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



CHBMUNG COUNTY ^eoadadad. 



I-b 
V 

Il-a 
Il-a 

XII 

XIII-c 

rv-a 

XI 
VI 
IV-a 
IV-b 
VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
XI 

V 
I-b 
Il-a 
ll-a 
Ill-a 



Eleottioal workers 

Electrotsrpers and stereotypers 

Engineers, looomotiTe 

Firemen sjod engmeeis, looomotive. . 

Firemen, stationary 

Flint gUss cutters and workers 

Iron molders and core makeca 

Letter carriers 

Machine wood workers 

Machinists 

Metal polishers, buffers and platers. 
MuBicians 



M 



Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 
Post office clerks 



Pressmen 

Sheet metal workers (building) . 

Street railway employees 

Switchmen 

Tailors 



Il-e 
Il-a 



X-b 
X-a 

I-a 
IV-a 

I-b 
Il-a 

I-b 
IX 



Telegraphers, railroad. . . . 
Tndnmen, road and yard. 



Total. 



CHENANGO COUNTY. 



Barbers 

Bartendan 

BhMBlaBa eutters 

Boiler maksrs and iron shipbuilders. 

BrfflUayera and masons 

Car inQ>ectors, repairers, ecc 

Carpenters and jomers 

Cigar makers 



Compositors . 



Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 

rv-a 

VIII 
XI 

Il-a 



Conductors 

Engineers, locomotiYe 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive. 

Machinists 

Miisifiiana 

Post office clerks 



Trainmen, road and yard. 



M 



Total. 



CLINTON COUNTY. 

Cadyrnie. 

Paper and pulp workers 



Xlll-a 



MerrlsoBTOle. 
Xlll-a Pi4>er and pulp workers 



30 

7 

218 

282 

6 

36 

60 

29 

144 

ISO 

45 

127 

3 

116 

35 

20 

i 

13 
49 
16 
47 
40 

S 
44 

/ 
550 



39 



2,927 
9 



17 
34 
15 
13 
29 
33 
98 
27 

6 
20 

/ 
34 
39 
83 
71 
30 

4 

g 
135 



16 



50 



60 



30 

7 

216 

285 

7 

25 

64 

35 

160 

162 

37 

164 

n^ 

34 
21 

i 

12 
68 
16 
44 
38 
t 
. 53 



660 



16 



8,072 

8 



17 
33 
16 
15 
27 
38 
77 
26 

e 

22 

1 
34 



78 
35 

4 

/ 

137 



679 
8 



60 



60 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



93 



TUile n.— Ualoiw and Memberahip by LocaHtiM and Trades, 191S — contlniMd 



Maxch 31 



SaPTBMBBB 30 




PlaMaburf. 

X-b Baiben 

I-b'Bricklayen and i 

I-o.BricUayen. nuwons and plasterera' laborers. . 

Il-alCar inapectorB, ref^auers, etc 

I-b Carpenters and joiners 

IX jC^gar makers 

Il-a! Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

IV-aiHoTseeboms 

XI Hotter carriers 

I-bjPuntera and decorators 

I-b 'Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpen. . 

XI 'Poet office clerks 

Il-a Trainmen, road and yard 



1 


90 


1 


32 


1 


58 



t 



Total. 



Benaes Point. 

Il-a Car inspectors, repairers, etc 

lI-olTrainmen, road and yard 



Total. 



COLUMBU COUNTY. 



I-b'Caipenters and joiners. 
II-ejTelegrapbers, railroad. . 



I 



Total. 



Vll-b 
I-b 
I-b 

IX 

XI 
I-b 

XI 



Hudaon. 

Brewery emplcwees 

Bricklayers ana maoons , 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers 

Letter carriers 

Painters and decorators 

Post office clerks 



Total. 



CORTLAND COUNTY. 

I Cortland. , 

X-b:Barbers 

X-o| Bartenders 

I-b Bricklayers and masons 

I-b Cari>enters and joiners 

IX Cigar makers 



IV-a Horseshoers 

XI Letter carriers . 
VIII Musicians 



I-b 
XI 
VIII 
Ill-a 



Painters and decorators . 

Poet office clerks 

Stage employees 

Tailors 



Total. 



M 



M 



1, 6 

li 30 

1, 17 

1 4 

1 54 



11 



12 



408 



49 



49 



24 



24 



160 



19 



13 



12 



19 
41 
108 
15 
81 
30 
60 
10 

7 
36 
22 

4 
61 



494 



25 
44 



69 



22 
34 



56 



45 
28 
50 
15 

5 
16 

6 



165 



13 
27 
21 
46 
26 

8 
14 
50 
11 
25 
11 
16 
10 

267 
SI 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



94 



New Yobk Labor Bulletin. 



Table H.— Uvloiui and Membwdap by LowJHIeii and TVadea, 1913 — eontfauied 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



VI 



Machine woodworkers. 

WaltaiL 



XI 
XI 



Il-a 



I-b 
I-b 
XI 
VIII 

I-b 
XI 
Il-a 



III-c 



I-b 



I-b 



letter carriers . . . 
Poet office clerks . 



Trainmen, road and yard. 
Total 



DUTCHESS COUNTY. 

F1flhkiU-on-Hudson. 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Letter carriers 

Musicians 



Painters and decorators . . 

Post office clerks 

Trainmen, road and yard. 



X-b 
X-a 

Vll-b 

I-b 

I-b 

I-b 

IX 

Il-a 
V 
XII 
XIII-c 
I-a 
IV-a 
Ill-b 
XI 
VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
XI 

IV-a 

I-b 

Ill-a 

Il-a 



CouNTT, Town AKn Tradk 



DELAWARE COUNTY. 



Total. 



Hat finishers. 



Matteawan. 



Carpenters and joiners 

MttlertoB. 

Carpenters and joiners 



Ponghkeepele. 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Brewery en4>loyees 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cement masons 

Cigar makers 



Clerks, railway 

Compositors 

Engineers, stationary 

Glass bottle blowers 

Granite cutters 

Iron molders and core makers. 

Laundry woricers 

Letter carriers 

Musicians 



Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 
Post office clerks 



Rolling mills and steel works employees . 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Tailors ; • • v ■ * \ 

Trammen, road and yard 



Total. 



Sex 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



Mabch 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



21 



242 



42 



38 



20 



32 

52 

15 

142 

260 

7 
70 

/ 

9 
43 
25 
42 

3 

96 

58 

23 

210 

6 
106 
67 
22 



19 



1.433 



SSPTEMBBR 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 



23 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



18 



4 
2 

/ 
47 



5;) 

1 



15 
55 

3 
54 

2 
10 

3 



238 



38 



20 



49 

60 

17 

167 

270 

8 
72 

/ 

9 
44 
28 
60 

3 

05 

56 

23 

207 

6 

132 

76 

21 

t 
20 
36 

5 
91 

1,549 
8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ApPENDI>t. 



95 



TsUe n.— Unioiui and MemberaUp by Localfttes and Tradea, 191S — conUimed 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



County, Town and Tradb 



Sex 



March 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 



SsPTXliBBB 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



DUTCHESS COUNTY — condaded. 

Wapplngera Falla. 

Ill-e Calico and plush engravers, printers, etc 

Ill-a Overall workers 

Total 



ERIE COUNTY. 

Alden. 

XIII-c Glass bottle blowers 

Biaadell. 

Il-e Telegraphers, railroad 

Buffalo. 

Vll-a Bakers and confectioners 

X-b Barbers 

X-a Bu*tenders 

VIII Bill posters 

IV-a Blacksmiths 

IV-a Blacksmiths' helpers 

IV-a Boiler makers and iron shipbuilders 

V Bookbinders 

Ill-d Boot and shoe workers 

Vll-b Brewery employees 

Vll-b Brewery employees (drivers and bottlers) 

Vll-b Brewery emplcnrees (engineers and firemen) 

I-b Bricklayers and masons 

I-c Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Vll-a Butchers and meat cutters 

II-c Cab and coach drivers and chauffeurs 

VIII Calcium light and moving pictuie machine opera- 
tors 

Il-a Car inspectors, repairers, etc 

I-b Carpenters and jomers 

VI Carriage, wagon and automobile workers 

I-b Cement masons 

IX Cigar makers 

Il-a Clerks, railway 

X-c Clerks and salesmen 

lll-a Cloak and suit makers 

Ill-a Clothing cutters and trimmers 

Ill-a Clothing presaers 

Il-d Coal heavers 

Ill-a Coat, pants and vest makers 

Compositors 

Il-a Conductors 

Il-b Cooks and stewards, marine 

VI Coopers 

IV-a Core makers 

I-b Dredgemen, steam shovelmen, etc 

I-b Electrical workers 

V Electrotypers and stereotypers 

I-b Elevator constructors 

Il-e Engineers, locomotive 

Il-b EngineerSt marine 

XII Engineers, stationary 



M 



M 



M 



30 
160 



30 

160 



40 



520 

448 

30 

158 

05 

130 

75 

46 

55 

1 

256 

476 

134 

612 

520 

88 

174 

90 

186 

2.000 

650 

39 

447 

/ 



64 



95 

45 

32 

44 

10 

71 

40 

601 

5 

323 

250 

14 

200 

106 

545 

60 

30 

962 

412 

543 



24 

30 

itO 



54 
/«0 



42 



609 

400 

34 

166 



280 
76 

1 
264 
544 
140 
612 
370 
203 
450 

65 

285 

1,970 

1.600 

50 

444 

2 

310 

9 

168 

110 

115 

60 

32 

46 

10 

76 



ai? 

390 

13 

242 

409 

680 

60 

36 

954 

394 

633 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



96 New York Labor Bulletin. 

Tkble n.— Ualons and MembenUp by LocalltiM and TndM, 1913 — continued 





County, Town and Trade 


Sex 


MABCB31 


Sbptbiibbr 30 


In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
berof 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Nimi- 
berof 
mem- 
bers 


Il-a 


EBIE COUNTY — eoaUnned. 


M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

F 
M 
F 
M 

m 
m 
m 
• 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 

F 
M 

« 
• 


8 
2 
1 


1,256 
484 
411 


8 
2 

1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

i 

1 

3 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
3 


1,417 


Il-b 


Firemen, marine t , 


714 


XII 


Firemen^ Btationarv 


440 


VII-« 


IHniir miiA tftf^mul wnrlrAra 


138 


XIII-c 


Olam bovelem. DoIiaherB. etc r . . . 


1 


14 


34 


I-b 


Qlaiiers ! '. 


62 


Il-d 


Orein handlers 


2 

1 
1 
1 

i 

1 

3 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 


098 
51 
85 
44 
61 

200 
25 

794 
97 
52 

110 
73 

329 

77 

1,690 

108 

215 

513 
10 

213 
65 


699 


I-a 


Granite eutterii 


69 


IV-a 


Horaeahoers 


84 


XI 


Hnaoital emoloyeea 


5<i 


I-b 




8g 
90 


I-b 


Inmilatora. heat and frMt - , . . 


25 


IV-a 


Iron moldera and core makers 


703 


IV-a 


Iron molders' aoDrentioes 


94 


Xlll-e 




60 


IV-b 


Jewelrv workers 


122 


I-b 


Lathen 


^1 


XI 


JjotttT carriers 


360 


V 


Lithoffraohers 


76 


n-d 




1,195 


Il-d 


TiUjifi^Ar handlers 


116 


VI 


Machine woodworkers 


202 


IV-a 


MfV^hiniiitJi 


2,040 


IV-a 






Vll-b 


Maltsters. 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

4 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

2 
2 

i 

i 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
7 
3 

i 

1 
1 


207 


I-a 


Marble cutters, carvers and setters 


20 


I I-b 


Masters and pilots 


20 


IV-b 




i 

1 
1 


50 
81 
13 


75 


I-b 


Millwrwhta 7 


100 


Vll-b 


Mineitu water bottlers und drivers 


38 


Xlll-f 


Mixed employment 


67 


VIII 


Muffi^Pf , , , . 


1 
i 

4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

2 
2 

i 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


430 

7 

525 

73 

250 

60 

90 

170 

285 

242 

197 
179 

25 

58 

1,000 

185 

120 

.30 
800 
265 

73 
110 

84 
275 

15 


435 


Ill-a 


Overall workers , , ,,,,., 


10 
49 


I-b 


Painters and deconitors - - , 


554 


I-b 


Paper hangers 


78 


IV-a 


Pattern makers 


300 


I-b 


Pavers and rammermen 


60 


V 


Photo-engravers 


92 


I-b 


Plasterers 


156 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office cleiiES 


290 
247 


Xlll-d 


Potters 


5 
90 


V 




207 


V 


Pmoimen'fl munstantfl and nress feede*^. ......... 


177 


XI 


Public school lanitom 


SO 
52 


X 




1,562 


X 


Rail^in^y mail clerks 


186 


I-b 


Rook dirillers, to<^ sharpeners, et-c 


122 


I-b 


Roofers, slate and tile. T 


25 


Il-b 


Seamen 


800 


I-b 


Sheet metal workers Cbuildina) 


325 


VIII 


Stage employees 


73 


I-b 


Steam anVl Hot water fitters 


104 


'I-a 


Stone cutters 


114 


I-b 


Stone masons 


171 


IV-a 




15 


I I-a 


Street railway emolovees . . 


2,360 


Il-a 


Switchmen 


7 
3 


927 
18^ 
lU 


988 


Ill-a 


Tailors ] 


135 


XI 


Teamsters 


117 
260 


I-b 
I-b 


Tile layers and marble mosaic workers 


i 
1 


46 
53 


35 
53 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



97 







In- 


COUlfTT, TOWK AK© TbASB 


Sex 


MabchSI 


Sbptbmbbb 30 


dutry 

num- 

bar 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Il-a 


EBIE COUNTY -^eoDdnded. 

B«ff«l« — eoadiided. 

TnHnin«ii| r<Md uid yard 


M 
* 
M 

r 


2 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


1,148 

112 

8 

126 

260 

16 

21 

100 


2 

4 


1,201 

2.892 

7 

128 

300 

34 

23 

100 

7 


II-c 
I-b 


Track ukd wagon dnven and chauffeurs 

Tuck pointers 


VI 


Vamiahers and poUahflrs 


X-B 


Waiten 


V 
V 


Wall i>aper machine printers and color mixers 

Wall paper print cutters . . 


XI 


Water works employ ws 


VI 


Wood carrers , . ' . T . . . .......... . . 




Total 




164 


26.997 
1,391 


180 


36,876 
1,908 




Depew-Laaowter. 

Car inspectors, re^axxers, etc 


Il-a 


M 

■ 

m 
m 
m 


1 


1 

1 

1 

1 


112 
11 

100 
36 

232 


I-b 


Carpenters and j<nners ..... 


1 
1 

1 


13 
130 

40 
186 


rv-a 


Core makers . . . ' 


Xlll-e 


Glass bottle blowers 


IV-« 


Iron mdUiers and core makers 




Total 




M 


4 


868 


5 


491 




Ea^ AuPOfik 

Letter carriers 


XI 


M 

m 


1 
1 


4 

6 


1 
1 


5 
6 


XI 


Poet office derkfl 




Total 




M 


2 


10 


2 


11 




Hamburg. 

Glass bottle blowers 


XIII-c 


M 


1 


72 


1 


49 




^ Lackawaaaa., 

Firsmen and engineers, locomotive 


II-B 


M 


1 
1 


63 

78 


1 
1 


74 

81 


Il-a 


R«ifti^hTiM«n . . , . 




Total 




M 


2 


141 


2 


166 




Tonawaada. 

Knginc^ni, marine 


Il-b 


M 


1 
1 

1 
1 


40 

27 

2 

26 


1 
1 

1 
1 


42 

% 

25 
46 


XII 


Engineers, stationary 


XI 


Letter carriers ,' 


Il-d 


Lumber handlers 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


rv-c 


Shipwrights, joiners and calkers 


1 


14 




Total 


M 


5 


108 


5l 146 




ESSEX COUNTY. 
Aoaable Forks. 


I-b 


M 


1 


15 


•1 






KeeMTflle. 


1 AU 


IV-a 


M 

F 


1 


23 

7 


1 


23 

7 




lAkePiadd. 

CarpentCTS and joiners 


I-b 


M 

m 


1 
1 


75 
21 


1 
1 


78 
22 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 




Total 




M 


2 


96 


2i 100 




Miae^e. 

Miners, iron 


Xlll-e 


M 


1 


30 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



98 Xew Yobk Labob Bulletin. 

Tabto n.— UnioiM and Me»b«nU» hj LocalltiM Mid TrmdM, 191S — coatiniMd 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 


COUMTT, TOWK AMD TraOE 


Sex 


March 31 


Septbmbxr 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


X-b 


ESSEX COUNTY — eondiided. 

Tteonderoga. 

Barbers 


M 

m 
m 
m 


1 
1 
1 
2 


10 

41 



146 


1 
1 
1 
2 


11 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


40 


XI 




9 


Xlll-a 


Vt^ptT and pulp workers 


167 




Total 






M 


5 


206 


5 


217 




FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Chateaagay. 

Paper and pulp workers 




Xlll-a 


M 


1 


18 


1 


20 




Malone. 

Barbers 




X-b 


M 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


18 
12 
53 
30 

8 
25 

4 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


17 


I-b 


Bricklayers and masons 


14 


I-b 




54 


Il-a 


Firemen and engineers, locomotive 


35 


XI 




7 


I-b 


Painten and decoraton 


22 


XI 




4 




Total 






M 


7 


150 


7 


163 




ffaranaf Lake. 

Bricklayers and masons 




I-b 


M 

F 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


14 
40 
70 

7 

28 

3 

i 


1 


18 


I-c 


Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


i 
1 

1 
1 


60 


XI 


Letter carriers . .' 


7 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


22 


XI 


Post office clerks 


3 




Total 


f 




M 

P 


6 


162 


5 


110 




FULTON COUNTY. 

Bakers and oonfeetioners 


f 


Vll-a 


M 

• 

• 
a 
• 
m 

F 
M 

• 
F 
M 

■ 


1 

1 


21 
21 


1 


19 


X-b 


Barbers 


17 


I-b 




36 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


1 

i 

i 

1 

i 

1 
1 


102 
39 
32 

350 
30 
16 
02 
6 
26 
25 
11 


109 


IX 


Cigar makers 


39 


V 


Compositors 


32 


Ill-d 


Glove workers 


150 


XI 


Letter carriers 


go 

16 


VIII 


Miminii^nii , , 


102 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


6 
27 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks 


14 
9 


VIII 


Stage employees 


24 




Total 












M 

F 


11 


735 
SS 


13 


594 




Barbers 


26 


x-b 


M 

• 

m 
« 


1 
1 
1 


14 




10 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


70 


XI 
I-b 


Letter carriers 


9 


Painters and deoorators .......,.',. r .... r . - r .. . 


25 


XI 


Post office clerks 


1 


6 


6 




Total 






M 


4 


99 


5 


120 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 99 

TdUalL— UMlouuidM«nlMrakl»br UcalMMmiidTndM. 1»U — eMUfaiamI 



In- 
dustry 
ngm- 


County, Town and Tbade Qt 


ftlABCBSl 


Sbptsiibui 30 


» Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


X-b 


GENESEE GOUNTT. 

BateTliu 

Barben ft 


« 1 
1 1 


21 
31 
24 
85 
33 
26 
25 
32 
8 
170 
36 
14 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


20 


X-» 


Bartenders ' 


30 


I-b 


Rrickleyerv and maeons ' 


19 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners * 


67 


IX 


^^Sgw makers ' 


34 


V 




26 


I-a 


Granite ciittem , ' 


25 


IV-a 


Iron moMlers and core makers ' 


32 


XI 


Letter carriers . . . . ...... ^ . * .. ^ ...... . . ' 


10 


VI 


Machine wood workers ' 


170 


I-b 


Painters and decorators * 


41 


I-b 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 


11 




Total ft 


1 12 


505 


12 


485 








XI 


LeBojr. 

Letter earrien ... ft 


1 1 


5 

4 


1 
1 


4 


XI 


Post office clerks ' 


3 










Total ft 


1 2 





2 


7 








XI 


GEEENE COUNTY. 

CataUU. 

Letter caniers . . . . . ft 


1 1 
• 1 
r 




1 
1 


4 


XI 


Post office dorks ' 


2 




1 


/ 




Total ft 


1 2 

r 




2 


6 




1 


1 


IX 


Couadda. 

Cigar maker* r , r r ft 


i 1 

I 1 


30 


1 


5 




HEBKIMEB COUNTY. 

Dolgeville. 

Camenters and ioiners ft 


/ 


I-b 


1 


30 








IV-n 


Frankfort. 

Iron molderff and core makeni ft 


1 1 


65 


1 


48 








I-b 


Heridmer. 

Bricklayers and maeona ft 


I 1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


38 

108 

3 

24 

5 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


40 


I-b 


Caroenters and ioiners ' 


108 


XI 


LetSrcKTiS .T^^ .::::::::::::::::::::::: • 


4 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 

Post office clerics * 


21 
5 










Total ft 


f 5 


178 


5 


178 








I-b 


nian. 

Caroenters and ioiners A 


I 1 

1 
1 


56 

6 

1.200 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


60 


XI 


Letter carriers ' 


6 


IV-a 


Machiniatfl * 


1.000 


rv-b 




160 


VIII 


ftiumHniif ' 


1 


104 
MS 


100 






16 




ToUl ft 


f 4 


1,366 
B3 


5 


1,326 






16 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



100 New York Labob Bulletin. 

Table n.— Unions nad Memberahlp by LocnUtlM and TrndM, 1913 — eoattamed 



In- 
dustry 
num- 

b«r 


COUMTT, Town AKD TbADB 


8ez 


MabchSI 


SBPTncBUi80 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 

pinions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 








X-b 


Uttte Falls. 

Harbors . . . 


M 

■ 

« 
« 

m 
u 

F 
M 

• 

m 
P 

M 

« 

« 




18 
21 
54 
10 




* 

20 


I-b 


BricklayfirB and masons t ■, 


20 


I-b 


Oarpwnt*'" ■.nH ioinors , ......---rr---- 


65 


X-c 


Clerkfl and salflsmon 


10 


IV-a 


FinamAl^m , , ^ . ■, r - 1 


27 


XII 


Enffinnem. stationary ,,.....,... 




11 
4 

IS 

9 

32 

43 

4 

17 

8 

15 

75 


8 


III-« 


Mofdftrv find nAflkw**' makftrs r . . 


3 


XI 


Lettor oarrifiTS • 


18 
9 


IV-b 


Mfttal noUshers. baff«r9 and Dlat«ni , 


30 


VIII 


M MiriHani r ' 


66 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks r r ., r - - - 


6 

14 

8 


I-b 


RhiMfc Tnetjil workers n>uildinc^ 


15 


Ill-e 




75 




Total 






M 

F 


13 


317 

17 


14 


360 




JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Alenndila Bay. 

Knginee*Ti, marine . . . .' 


17 


Il-b 


M 

a 


1 

1 


30 
15 


1 
1 


80 


I-a 


Pavinic blook cutters 


15 




Total 






M 


2 


45 


2 


45 




Black Rlrer. 

Paner and duId workers t ,,,.,. r 




XIII-« 


M 


1 


29 


2 


42 




"PanMp and duId wfffkers 




Xlll-a 


M 


1 


44 


1 


29 




Carthage. 

Pan«F unA miln WOrkeTS. , . , t r - r 




Xlll-a 


M 


1 


80 


1 


89 




Clayton. 

CamenterB and joiners 




I-b 


M 

• 

m 


1 
1 
1 


24 
22 
13 


1 

1 
1 


24 


Il-b 




26 


Il-b 


Kf Anteni and nilots 


15 




Total 






M 


3 


59 


3 


65 




Deferlet. 

Millwriflhta 




I-b 


M 

m 


1 
2 


27 
191 


1 
2 


23 


Xlll-a 


Paner and duId workers 


202 




Total 






M 


8 


218 


3 


225 




Felts MDIo. 

ParkAT and ntiln WOrkeTS ................ t 




Xlll-a 


M 


1 


82 


1 


83 




Glen Park. 

Millwrights 




I-b 


M 


1 


33 


1 


34 


X-b 


WatertowB. 
Barbers 


M 

m 
m 
• 
m 

F 
M 

■ 
• 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

i 
1 
1 
1 


26 
103 
50 
27 
37 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


40 


x2 




116 


I-b 


T%i>i<*1rlavai« anH maanna ...... ,.,,rrt, t-- 


60 


I-b 


Oamenteni and ioiners - 


103 


IX 


rriffAT makers 


34 




fTlnrkfi railwav .... 


f 


Il-a 


8 
13 
58 


1 
1 
1 


8 


V 


C?f>fnT>osi torn .t.t....r^-T-i 


12 


Il-a 


Conduetors 


50 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appxndiz. 

Tsbto n.— UbIbm and UwtohmnU^ br LawHH— ami Tndaa. IMS — c 



101 



ait, 

num- 
ber 


Couimr. Town aito Tsadb S 


MabcbSI 


SanaiiBBBao 


sx Num- 
ber 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


of 


Num- 
ber of 

"bST 


I-b 


Electrical worken r , r ? 


A I 
1 « 

■ 1 

■ 1 

I 1 

A i 


76 

136 

163 

76 

23 

112 

26 

400 

68 

68 

207 

16 

12 

12 

i 

164 




86 


II-* 




187 


II-* 




151 


XII 


Fiiameiit etatioiiaiy 


72 


IV-* 


Iroo molden and oofe maken 




IV-a 




135 


XI 


Letter eairiers. 


26 


IV-* 


Ma^kintft#. , . , , 


65 


IV-b 


Metal noliahert. bufTeni and olatera 


46 


I-b 




78 


Xlll-a 


P^>er and pulp worken 


268 


I-b 


Plaeteren. 7. . T 


16 


x^-* 


Poet office clerks * 


6 
18 


V 


Preamen I 


i 


II-* 


Trainmen, road and yard 


168 










Total I 


A 26 

f 


1.865 
6 


24 


1,678 
9 








I-ft 


EIN08 COUNTY. 

New York CHr. Broeklni BoraiKh. 

Building, 8ton4 WorHng, Etc, 
Blueetone cutters B 


A 1 
I 2 
; 17 

; 3 


240 

2,195 

2,297 

4,470 

525 

247 

1(M 

1,825 

135 

691 

1.000 

70 

226 


1 
2 

17 


200 


I-b 


Bricklayers and masons 


2.176 


I-« 
I-b 




2,036 
4,439 


I-b 


Housesmiths and bridaemen 


630 


I-b 


Latben 


275 


I-b 


MUlwrighftif 


130 


I-b 


Painters and decorators ' 


4,020 


I-b 


Pavers and rammermen 


130 


I-b 


Plasterers 


607 


I-b 
I-« 


Plumbers, cas and steam fitters and helpers 

Plumbers^ laborers 


946 
71 


I-b 


Stone masons 


216 










Total—BuiMing, Stone Workinc. Etc I 


A 43 


14.024 


43 


16.774 


n-c 


Cab and coach drivers and chauffeurs 1\ 


A 2 

: 

3 
' 1 
2 
1 
1 
• 3 


823 

141 

33 

107 

152 

211 

12 

94 

313 


2 

1 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 


600 


Il-a 


Clerks, railway ' 


141 


Il-a 


Encineers, locomotive ' 


34 


I -d 




501 


I -b 


Masters and pilots. . . . . , ' 


164 


II-* 


Motormen, guards, etc. (electric trains) . . - , ... ' 


211 


I -a 


Street raUway employees ' 


12 


I -* 




98 


II-€ 




348 










Total— TransDortation ^ 


A 16 


1,886 


18 


2.109 








ni-d 


CloUiino and T4xUU8. 
Boot and shoe workers A 


A 3 
f 

A 1 

? 

A '" 1 

f .... 

i ' I 
2 
5 

r 


926 

96 

2,000 

1,000 

120 

SO 

1,000 

676 
4.666 

906 


5 

i 

i 

i 

2 

7 


1,227 


ni-* 


1 

Clnak and niit makers 1^ 


100 
1,300 


III-c 


1 

Cloth hat and can makers IV 


600 
90 


m-* 




to 

1.150 


m-* 


dirthini prassera ' 


846 


III-* 


Coat, nants and vest makers. * 


4.266 






1,070 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



102 New Yobk Labor Bulletin. 

TkUe n.— UnloM ami MmnbenM^ bj LMaHtlM ami TndM. ItlS — c 



In- 
ductry 

ber 



County, Tows axb TAad* 



Box 



MaBPH 3t 1 PFFTFMBtn 30 



Nil 



uniona 



Num- 
ber of 
inftm- 



Num- 
b*r 
of 



Num- 
bvrof 



bers 



KINGS COUNTY— contliiDed. 

N*w York atjt Brooklsm Borou|h — ^nnUnoad. 

Cioihing and TtiHit* — concluded. 
in-Oi|Fur workers . ..,. ^. ......... .^ ............. . 

tll-Ci Hat f UTDuhera 

Ill-c Hut mAkflTw.,,.,. , ,.,.. 

1 11-4 Jacket coAken .., .^. .................. ^. . 



I 



I II-c I Millinery wofken^ 
Itl-b Shirt maken 



Itl-elSilk Wi>Tka», 



Ill-a 
III 



Tailon 

Waiat, drsM and wrappeT nukeri . 



IV-» 
IV-b 

IV-» 



M 



^ M 

Total — Clottunc and Textilfa F 



Afef^p \fncMnetv and .^kipbuihiing. 

BoUsr mRken and iron shipbuildera, 

Clock and watch makers . . 

Dfop forgcfh ^ 

Foundry and machine shop laboxeis imd biilpfln. . i 

1 V-ft HoTi>eeilir>en 

IV-a Irnn molden and Core mokera - . ■ 

IV-a MaehiiiijiN .,..,.., 

IV-bJMeUl. [voli«beni« buffern and pJaters. * . . 

IV-o l^ail makers ...,.,,.,, .._.,. 

IV-c Ship painters , . , 

lV*e Ship plumbent and nt^am fjit^rs ., ^ ........... . 

IV-c Bhipwriehtf!. ioiners and C;alker«. . - .. 

IV-c ^par and derrjrk makers - .,^.' 

rV-b Surreal Intirument makei«. I 

1 V-a Wire workere nud hed npnng makers ............ | 



M 



Tolal— MetalA. Machinery and StvipbuUdiiig . ' M 



VII-a^Bakcre and QonfpclioaerB, ,,,. 4^. .,♦..... . 

X-b Barber* . ...,..,, 

yi-ik Bartenders .... ^ .,.,, ^ ^ ............ ^. . 

VlII jBill posters... ,., 

Vll-b Hrpwery employees ... 

Vll-b Brevpry employ e«i Ediivera and botyera). 
V! I Brush makerfl . . . , , . . . 



I 



Vll^l Butchers and m^t cultera. ............ 

VI iCabinet mak^^rs ,,,.._...,. 

"I Carnajce. wa^on and automobile workerft . 
IX ^gar itiiakcrfi ...,..,..,...,, 



IX Cigar packoriH .......,.,..-.,- 

X*<*ir'lprks and salesmen , . 

X-B Cookii , , , 

VI jCuopefB ., 

XllT-c Diamond cuHpts and poUshtsm 



XT 
XII 
XI 
XI 

XIII^! 

XJII^ 

xnu 

XI 



■).. 



Ele^lrkal work*™ (public empJoyi 

KngiDeert^ stAiiunary . . , 

Eneinwn, slatloiuny (public employees) . . 

Firemen, oilers and water tenders (public em- 
ployees) ... 1 ►....,.., 

Fbnb glaiMi culterji and workers. ................ 

Flour and ecroal workers . , , . 

Olaas bottle blowers * * 

Ice house workers 

Inspoctorn of eoiiirtruetion . . , , ............... 



M 



M 



M 



M 



615 

100 

2,lfl0 

19 

3 

17 

17a 

1,150 

320 

7SQ 



30 



H.2«g 



eo 

140 

305 

240 

771 

1,235 

312 

102 

253 

SI 

420 

25 

13 



27 



4,674 



912 

00 
560 

65 

bl\ 

1.112 

f 7 , . . 
475 
400 
2fl5 
776 

49' 
83 
41 
S2 

2gn 

I 

75 

l,22S 

300 



200 
12 

iir 



m 



34 



2Q 



S2« 

100 

2,061 

9Q$ 

17 

6 

ti 

154 

U 

i.aoo 

4M6 
400 



14.613 
t>W7 



46a 
150 
135 

473 

2O0 

75i 

1,252 

270 

109 

26S 

255 

425 

25 

13 

58 



4.S57 



975 

4h585 

550 

152 

506 

1,172 

145 

SO 

483 

470 

225 

747 

43 

49 

78 

43 

86 

320 

I 

173 

1,001 

275 

100 
530 
13 
40 
85 
66 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



tU^to n^^UniMM and 



Appsndix. 103 

M«mb«nU» Vj Loodtttoa and TndM, 19U — MBllN«d 





CouNTT, Town and Tbasb 


Sex 


Mabch 31 


Septkmbbr 30 


.In- 
(luiiry 
num- 
ber 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of . 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mmn- 
bers 


XI 


New York aty, BraoUyn BoroBgh eeacNded. 

MUcdlaneou* — concluded. 
Letter cerriere 


M 

« 
F 
M 

a 
« 
m 
m 

F 
M 

u 
m 
m 
m 
m 


1 
1 
1 

i 


1,040 

378 

650 

5 

142 




1.040 


VI 


Machine woodworker* 


365 


VIII 


Musicians 


600 


XI 


Nftw vnrd nlArlra a.nH dmUffhtflnien 


142 


XI 




109 


Xlll-a 
VI 


Paper and pulp workers 


1 
1 
1 


81 

17 

504 

7 


34 


Ptftno find orviiQ workers . . . . . . 1 1 . - r - r - . - r - r - . - 


17 


XI 


Post office clerks .............. 


466 


VI 


Heed workers 


7 
130 


VIII 


RtscA emnlovees 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


234 
43 

820 
80 
39 


250 


VI 




44 


X-a 


Waiters 


350 


XI 




100 


VI 


Wood oaryers 


41 




Total — Miscellaneous 




. 


M 

F 


54 


11.814 
80 


57 


16,696 




Total — New York City, Brooklyn Borough 

LEWIS COUNTY. 

Harrlavllle. 
Paner and duId workers 


82 




M 

F 


leo 


46.007 
S,60t 


181 


54.049 
9,969 


Xlll-a 


M 






1 


10 




Lewrllle. 

Letter carriers 








XI 


M 


1 


3 


1 


3 




Lyons FMIa. 

Paner and duId workers 




Xlll-a 


M 


1 


31 


1 


15 




UVING8TON COUNTY. 

Aron. 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 




Il-a 


M 


1 


40 


1 


50 




DanarUle. 




XI 


M 

• 

F 




5 

4 
/ 


1 

! 


5 


XI 


Poet office clerks 


5 




Total 


/ 




M 

F 







1 


2 


10 




Mount Merrla. 

Bricklayers and masons 


1 


I-b 


M 

u 




16 
14 


1 
1 


13 


I-b 


Onmenters and ioiners 


16 




Total 






M 


2 


30 


2 


29 




MADISON COUNTY. 

ranattfttai 

Letter carriers 




XI 


M 

« 
F 


1 
1 
1 


3 

4 
6 
1 


1 
1 
1 


3 


XI 


Post office clerks 


4 


IV-a 




6 




Total 


/ 




M 

F 


3 


13 

/ 


3 


13 






1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



104 Nbw Yobk Labob Bulletin. 

Tkble n.— Unions and Membership by Localltfes and Tndes, 1913 — eentf nned 



In- 
dustry 
1 num- 
ber 


CouNTT, Town and Tsadb 


Sex 


March 31 


SXPTBMBUlSO 


Num- 
ber 
of 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 








VII-o 


Oneida. 

Bakers and oonfectioners 


M 

■ 

« 
« 
■ 

m 
« 
m 
m 

F 
M 

■ 
• 

P 
M 

m 


1 
1 
1 
1 


7 
15 


1 

1 


8 


X-b 


Barbers 


16 


I-b 


Rricklayern and masons 


33' 1 


39 


I-c 
VI 


Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Cabinet makers 


76 


1 
1 

1 


80 
15 


I-b 


Carpenters and joinera 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

1 
1 


78 


78 


IX 


Cigar makers ... . 


209 1 

7 1 

18 1 

6! 1 


218 


X-c 


Clerks and saleiimen 


7 


V 


Compositors 


21 


XI 


Letter carriers 


6 


VIII 


Muncians 


35 
6 

87 
7 
3 
1 


1 

i 

1 
1 

i 

1 


80 


I-b 


Paintera and decorators 


e 

49 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Poet office clerkfl 


8 
3 


XI 


Public school janitors 


1 

4 


VIII 


Stage employees. 






9 




Total 










M 

F 


13 


530 


16 


591 




MONBOE COUNTY. 

Breckport. 

Bricklayers and masons 


7 


I-b 


M 

* 

m 
m 


1 
1 

1 
1 


15 


1 


15 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


'I 






XI 


Letter carriers 


1 


4 


XI 


Post office clerks 


31 1 


3 




Total 






M 


4 


34; 3 


22 




Falrport. 




VIII 


M 

F 


1 


32! I 

4 


32 




Bakers and confectioners 


5 


Vll-a 


M 

• 

« 

m 
m 

F 

m 
m 
m 
m 

« 

F 
M 
F 
M 

M 

m 

F 
M 

F 


1 
1 
1 


156i 1 
172^ 2 
335 1 


200 


X-b 


Barbers 


284 


X-a 


Bartenders 


388 


Ill-a 


Basters 




1 
1 


350 


IV-a 


Boiler makers afid iron shipbuilders 


1 
1 
6 

i 

} 

2 

1 


20 


44 


V 


Bookbinders T 


19, i 
1.494 8 

7£ 

240 1 

ie5 1 

813 1 

170 2 

89i 1 


19 


Ill-d 


Boot and shoe workers 


1,219 


VI I-b 


Brewery employees 


tee 

240 


Vll-b 
1-b 


Brewery employees (drivers and bottlers) 

Bricklayers and masons 


168 
849 


I-c 
Vll-a 


Butchers and meat cutters 


178 
94 


Xlll-e 


Button makers 




1 

1 


60 


VIII 


Calcium light and moving picture machine operar 
tors 


1 
3 

1 
1 


39 


39 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


1,065: 3 

&0 1 

217 1 


1,034 


Xlll-e 


Celluloid novelty workers 


B8 


IX 


Cignr makers 


212 


Ill-a 


Clip sorters 


8 
1 


i 

1 


10 
25 


III-a< 


Clothing cutters and trimmers 






150 


III-a< 
V < 


Coat, pants and vest makers 


1 
2 


6,000 

220 
6 


4 
2 


1,587 


Compositors 


'^. 




6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 

Tabto n.— Unioaa mad MMibenhlR by LocidlllM ud TradM, 19U — 



105 



In- 
dustry 



CouMTT, Town akd Tbadb 



Sex 



Mjxch 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



bwn 



SxpTBiiBn 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



bera 



MONROE COUNTY— eoMiaded. 



Il-a Conductors. 



Bocheeter — eendnaed. 



X-e 

VI 
XIII-c 
I-b 
I-b 
V 
I-b 
Il-a 
XII 

Il-a 
XII 

IV-» 

XIII-c 

I-a 

IV-a 

I-b 

I-b 

IV-» 

IV-b 

I-c 
I-b 
XI 
V 
VI 
IV-ft 
IV-» 
IV-b 
VIII 

I4> 
XIII-« 

I-b 
IV-a 

I-b 

I-a 

V 

I-b 
XI 

V 
V 

XI 
XI 
I-b 
VIII 
I-a 
IV-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 
Ill-a 

I-b 
Il-e 

I-b 
IX 



Cooks 

Coopers 

Decorative glass workers 

Dredgemen, steam shorehnen, etc 

Electrical workers 

Electrotypers and stereotypers 

Elevator constructors 

Engineers, locomotive 

Engineers, stationary 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Firemen, stationary 

Foundry and machine shop laborers and helpers. 

Glass bottle blowers 

Granite cutters 

Horseshoers 

Housesmitbs and bridgemen 

Insulators, heat and frost 

Iron molders and core makers 

Jewelry workers 



M 



Laborers, general building and street. 

Lathers , 

Letter carriers , 

Lithographers 

Machme woodworkers 

Maohioista 

Machinists* apprentices aiul helpers. . 
Metal polishers, buffers and platers. . , 
Musicians 



Painters and decorators 

Paper bag and box makers 

Paper hangers 

Pattern makers 

Pavers and rammermen 

Paving block cutters 

Photo-engravers 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 
Post office clerks 



Pressmen 

Pressmen's assistants and press feeders. 



Public school janitors 

Railway mail clerks 

Sheet metal workers (building) . 

Stage employees 

Stone cutters 

Stove mounters 

Street railway employees 

Switchmen 

Tailors 



Tar felt and waterproof workers. 
Telegraphers, railroad 



Tile layers and marble mosaic workers . 
Tobacco workers 



Il-a 
II-c 

VI 



Trainmen, road and yard 

Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs . 

Tuck pcHnters 

Upholsterers and nuttress makers 



168 
12 
83 
22 
48 

457 
17 
21 

305 

412 

240 

150 
45 
82 
11 
34 

100 
Q 

611 

32 

4S 

2.000 

54 

175 
49 

430 
1,000 

300 

172 

650 
40 

465 
3 
i 

142 
57 
25 
13 
27 

450 

101 
S 
72 
52 
1 
36 
68 

220 
66 
91 
26 

960 

16 

32 

2 



64 

5 

45 

5 

7 

396 

206 

28 

63 



163 



104 

20 

66 

470 

14 

23 

306 

432 

246 

161 



76 
12 
36 

116 
16 

494 

20 

IS 

2,800 

50 

178 
60 

708 

800 
58 

171 

627 
48 

459 
3 
M 

141 
69 
36 
16 
29 

452 

130 

f 

86 

56 

36 
61 

248 
64 
90 
26 

957 

16 

23 

1 

28 

69 

5 

65 

5 

7 

402 

635 
28 
66 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



106 New Yoek Labob Bulletin. 

TW»to n.— Unfou Mid Menbenhlp by LocallllM mad Trades. IflS — emitlMwd 



In- 

duBtry 

num- 

ber 


CouMTT, Town and Tradb 


Bt 


March 31 


Sbpteiibbb 30 


** Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


VI 


VfuiuHhera and poluihen 


1 


1 1 

' 1 

1 


60 

223 

79 


1 
1 
1 


51 


X-a 


Waiters 


235 


VI 




69 




Total 






1 


i Q4 
r 


22.784 
1.477 


104 


20.002 




SpAncwports 
Carpenters and joiners. 


8B7 


I-b 


^ 


1 1 


19 








MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

Amsterdam. 

Barbers 




' ' 


X-b 


i 


1 1 
1 
1 


27 
37 
106 


1 


31 


Vll-b 


Brewery emplovees 


40 


I-b 


Bricklayers ana masons 


98 


I-<5 


Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Broom makers 


57 


VI 






5 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


1 
' 1 

1 
' 1 

1 
■ 


222 
200 

48 
13 
27 


240 


Ill-e 


Carpet workers 


204 


IX 


Cigar makers 


50 


X-c 


Cl^rVn ftT^d ^esmen 


12 


V 


Compositors 


26 


I-b 


Electiioal workers. 


26 


XI 


Letter carriers 


1 
' 1 

7 

1 1 
1 
1 
1 

' 1 


11 
70 

6 
45 
30 

6 
20 
71 


15 


VIII 


Miinnians . 


80 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


5 
50 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post ofiioe clerks 


27 
8 


'I-b 


Sheet metal workers (building) 


22 


Ill-e 


Silk workers 


72 




Total 






» 
1 


1 16 

7 


933 
6 


18 



1.063 




CansJohsrle. 

Post office clerks 


5 


XI 


A 


1 1 


3 


1 


4 




Fort Plain. 

Letter carriers 




XI 


A 


1 1 


4 


1 


4 




, St. JohnsTllle. 

Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


A 


i 1 


40 


1 


40 




NASSAU COUNTY. 

Freeport. 

Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


» 


1 1 
1 


45 

7 


1 

1 


55 


XI 


Letter carriers 


7 




Total 






» 


i 2 


52 


2 


62 




Glen Core. 

Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


y 


1 1 

1 


385 
08 


1 
1 


411 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


97 




Total 






» 


i 2 


483 


2 


508 




Great Neck. 
Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


A 


1 1 


163 


1 


160 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Afpbitdix. 



107 





Id- 
dustry 


County, Town and Trade - 8< 


March 31 


Srptriibkr 30 


« Num. 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


I-b 


Cftipentera and jotnon Il 


A 1 
1 
1 
1 


75 
3 

23 
3 


1 
1 


96 


XI 


Lfltier oftrriors . T . . * 4 . * . * ^ . * ., 4 44 . x .... 


7 


I-b 






XI 


Poftt office derkfl 


1 


4 










Totftl » 


« 4 


104 


3 


107 








I-b 


Ljnbfoek. 

Cftrpenten and joinen A 


1 1 


56 


1 


26 








I4> 


Mlneeku 

Painten ftnd deooratora A 


4 




1 


52 












I-b 


Pert WaOiBflen. 

Caxpentora and joinen 1^ 


I 1 


8., 


1 


101 








XI 


BeckrOle Center. 

Letter cftrriera A 


d 1 
' 1 

r 


9 

4 
1 


1 
1 


7 


XI 


Poet office clerks ... 


4 




1 












Total Ik 


i 2 

r 


13 

1 


2 


11 




J 










I-b 


Weetbnry. 

Painter* and decoratora . . > 


1 1 


14 








NEW YORK COUNTY. 

New Yerk OHj, Manhattan and Brenz Borovglia. 

Build%Hg» StoM Working, Etc. 
Asphalt workers » 




• • . 


I-« 


; 33 


704 

60 

280 

20 

4.576 

12.010 

890 

7,829 
560 

1.864 
500 
775 

3.571 
8C0 

1,900 
600 
500 

2.047 
350 
670 
615 

1.150 
400 
628 
10,517 
168 
361 


4 
1 
1 

I 

12 

1 
33 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
13 

i 

1 
3 
1 
1 


660 


I-b 




65 


..-ft 


Bluestone cutters 


240 


I-a 


Bluestone cutters* helners 


30 


I-b 


RricklftyMr^ ^nt\ Tnftsons 


4,551 


I-c 
I-b 


Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 


11,000 
1,025 


-b 


Carpenters and joiners ' 


7.828 


-b 


Cement masons 


550 


I-o 


Cement workers ' 


1,800 


-b 


Derrickmen and rigsers ' 


450 


-b 


Dredgemettt steam skovelmen, etc 


350 


-b 


Electrical workers, ^ . ' 


3,658 


-b 


Elevator constructors 


800 


,-c 




2,000 


. -a 


Granite cutters » ' 


700 


-b 


House shorers and movers ' 


450 


-b 


Housesmiths and bridgemen ' 


2,421 


-b 


Insulators, heat and frost ' 


350 


. -b 


Lathers • 


700 


-a 
-ft 


Marble cutters* carvers and setters ' 


500 
1,235 


-ft 


Marble cutters' helpers ' 


391 


-a 


Marble polishers, rubbers and sawyers ' 


671 


-b 


Painters^ and decoratora ' 


13,198 


-b 


Paper hangers * 


198 


-b 




405 


.-ft 


Paving block cutters ' 


150 


-b 


Plarteipers .... 4 * 




3,196 

1,916 

1.500 

77 


3,047 


-b 
-b 


Rock drillers, tool sharpeners, etc ' 


1.86:} 
1,100 


I-b 


Roofers, slate and tile-.T ' 


80 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



108 Nkw Yobk Labor Bulletin. 

Table D.— UiiImm and MenbenUp by LocaUtiM and Trades, If IS ~ centfaned 



In- 


CovKTT, Town and Tbadb 8< 


MaschSI 


Sbptbhbbb 30 


dustry 
num- 
ber 


" Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
berof 

"bS' 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


I-a 


coBdaaed. 

BuHdino, Stone Working, Etc.— concluded. 
Sculptors and carvers A 


1 1 

I ^ 

2 
3 


200 

2.399 

146 

1.400 

1,000 

875 

837 

273 

676 

520 

591 


1 
2 

2 
3 


150 


I-b 




2,800 
133 


I-b 


8tiur builders .... , . * 


I-b 


Steam and hot water fitters ' 


1,400 


I-b 


Steam fitters' helpers ' 


1 000 


I-a 


Stone cutters . . . T ' 


600 


I-b 


Stone masons ' 


838 


I-b 


Stone setters ' 


255 


I-b 


Tar, felt and waterproof workers ' 


756 


I-b 


Tile layers and maA>Ie mosaic workers ' 


536 


I-b 


Tile layers and marble mosaic workers' helpers.. . . ' 


608 




Total — BuUdins. Stone Working, Etc & 


1 125 


69,951 


125 


71,641 


Il-b 


TroiM-portation. 
Boatmen ^ . . Ik 


1 1 

2 

2 

1 

2 

' 1 

• 1 

2 

' 1 

' 2 

1 1 


795 

2,100 

165 

103 

410 

208 

5,300 

475 

2,702 

540 

12,100 


1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
9 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

3 

16 


335 


II-o 




1,200 


Il-a 


Car insDecton. reoairers. etc. ' 


182 


Il-a 


rile'ks, railway a . ' 


112 


Il-d 


Coal heavers.'. ' 


350 


Il-fl 


Conductors ' 


209 


Il-b 


Cooks and ttt^^wards. marine . . ' 


5,000 
485 


Il-a 


Engineers, locomotive ' 


Il-b 


Rngineemi marine . . , . . ... • 


2,702 


Il-a 


Firemen and engineers, locomotive ' 


509 


Il-b 


foremen, marine * 


12,000 
145 


II-c 


Garage workers ' 


Il-d 


T^ngifhoremen ..... . . ' 


' 6 
' 1 
2 
1 
' 1 
1 
1 

f 2 


2,225 

1.325 

220 

300 

5,000 

48 

865 

ggs 

1 AA1 


2.461 


Il-b 


Masters and pilots ' 


1,200 


Il-a 


Motormen, guards, etc. (electric triedns) * 


216 


Il-d 


Sfiow trimmers. ' 


300 


Il-b 


Seamen • 


3,020 


Il-a 


Switchmen ' 


56 


Il-e 


Telegrapheni, nnrnmercial ' 


812 


Il-e 


Telegraphers, railroad li 


tie 

1,784 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and ^ard i 


' 30 

f 3 1 ifll 


16 
1,180 


II-c 


Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs ' 


18 


10,332 


10,142 




Totfd — TrMisportation A 


i 52 


48,035 
t6i 


54 


44,400 






tsi 


Ill-a 


Clothing and TexlilM. 
Radge, banner and regalia makers .............. N 


1 1 

[ i 

t 6 

[ 3 


7 

14.000 
4,000 

«e 

920 
66 


1 

i 

8 

3 

i 


3 


Ill-a 


Basters i 


SB 
10,000 


Ill-d 


Boot and shoe workers f* 


t.ooo 

607 


Ill-a 


Buttonhole makers "S 


974 


Ill-a 


Clip sorters i 


38 
400 




Cloak and suit outters ti 






100 


Ill-a 


f 1 

4 

« i 

' 1 
i 6 

1 ■■■'2 
4 

r 


9.020 

33.400 

e,07t 

367 

300 

1,475 

S19 

8,700 

17,700 


1 

4 

i 

1 

6 

2 

4 


9,060 


Ill-a 


Cloak and suit makers ' 


36,700 


Ill-a 




7,075 
360 


III-o 


Cloth hat and cap 'cutters '. ' 


305 


III-c 


Cloth hat and cap msJcers Ik 


1,428 


Ill-a 


Qothlng cutters and trimmers ik 


S»6 
3,700 


Ill-a 


Clothing pressers ....... ... ' 


18,282 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appxin>iz. 

TUile n.— Unioas ud MembenUp hj LooUitlM 



10» 



andTradM^lfU — 



In- 
dmtry 
mim- 

b«r 


COUWTT, TOWH Aim TSAOX S 


«z 


MascbSI 


SBPTBMBBBaO 


Num- 
ber 
of 

nninim 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bars 


be?" 
of 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 








Ill-ft 


N«w Yark CUj. Manhatten and BcoBZ Boravgha — 
eonllBiied. 

Cldhing and TgxHUa — continued. 
Coat, nantii and vest makers . . , . t . I 


yi 


• 7 

i 


26.125 


9 
2 


20,180 

e,l7» 

140 


Ill-e 






Pur workers I 


to 


Ill-e 


2 

i 

i 

1 

3 

i 


6,827 

1,600 

218 

M 

600 
4,672 
1,800 
2.800 

700 


2 


7,025 
1,800 


Ill-d 


Glove workers 1 




Hat and can sweatband cutters 7 






III-c 


i 

/ 
3 

i 

i 


41 


III-c 


Hat trimmers i 


610 


Ill-a 


Jacket makers 1 


4.800 


Ill-a 


Kiym p%nts makers 1 


t,ioo 

3.000 

800 

1 600 


ni-« 


Knitt««ra. . . \ 




T*aflf^ ^iirtain makers 1 






t,000 


ni<« 


1 

4 


70 

1.500 

617 


1 

3 

i 


78 


Ill-b 


lAundry workers ,.,.,,,. ^ . 


1.410 


III-C 


Millin^^ry workers .....,,.,.,.-.-,--- J 




Neckwear cutters J 






60 


Ill-a 


1 

1 

2 

i 

i 

1 

2 


255 
700 
800 
190 
76 
600 

too 

350 

600 

700 

1.288 


2 
2 

i 

i 

1 

i 


285 


Ill-a 


Neckwear makers . 


700 


Ill-a 


Overall workers J 


800 
200 


Ill-a 


Aailor "niit makers . . I 


70 
770 


Ill-b 


Shirt cutters J 


too 

240 


Ill-b 


j^kirt makers. . - . - , , . , 


1.200 
800 
460 


Ill-e 


Silk wn'kenp t . . , , r J 




SJnrt makers J 


150 


Ill-a 


i 


3 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

2 


6.350 

4,950 

1,737 

100 

100 

1^ 

MO 

1.275 

16 

16 

10 

500 

6,700 

7.160 

90,180 


1 

3 

i 

2 

2 

i 


5.447 
t,8SA 
1,585 


III-c 


Straw hat makers J 


Ill-a 


Stuffed toy makers ^ 


ito 

150 


Ill-d 


Suspender makers 1^ 


60 
380 


Ill-a 


Tailors H 


70 

1,300 

lit 

13 


Ill-a 


Theatrical costumers. . . . . . ^ 1^ 


Ill-b 


Undef^'«»ar makers ^ 


It 


Ill-a 


Waist, dress and wrapper fn^kftm ^ 


1 

3 


8,000 

7.675 

t4,700 








Total — Clothing and Textiles 1^ 




72 


144.876 
68,117 


81 


135.663 
60,986 






IV-b 


Afatalfl. Machinery and Shipbuilding. 




1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
2 

1 
2 

1 


75 
126 
323 
480 

no 

210 

70 

353 

129 


1 

1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 


46 


V-b 


Beer pump makers * 


122 


rv-a 


Blacksmiths * 


347 


V-a 


Blacksmiths* helpers * 


548 


rv-a 


Boiler makers an'd iron shiDbuilders ' 


87 


V-b 


Brass and copper workers , ' 


536 


rv-b 


ftfi^ifii molders'and core makers * 


84 


rv-b 


Chandelier filers and makers ' 


400 


ivlb 


Chasers * 


132 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



110 New Yobk Labos Buludtin. 

l^fo n.— UbIom ttid Mflmb<nM» by L>ca m iM and TiradMi. lilt- 



Id- 
dufltiy 



CouNTT, Town aiid Tradb 



8«s 



Mabcb 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



bwn 



SBPTBKBaB ao 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 



Num- 
ber of 



NEW YOBK COUNTT 
New Terk City, MBBbBttan sad Bcobx BefevghB — 



IV-b 

IV-R 

IV-» 

rv-a 
rv-b 

IV-a 
IV-a 
IV-b 
IV-a 
IV-a 
IV-b 
IV-b 
IV-a 
IV-a 
IV-c 
IV-c 
IV-b 



MetaU, Maiehinvy and SkipbuUdino — concluded. 

Clock and watch makers 

Coopemnithe 

Core makers 

Cutting die and cutter makers 

Electrical apparatus makers 

Gold pen makers 

Horseshoers 

Iron molders and core makers 

Jewelry workers 

Machinists 

Machinists' apprentices and helpers. 
Metal poUshers, buffers and platers. , 

Metal q;>inners 

Pattern makers 

Saw and tool makers. 



M 



Ship and machinery rioers 

Shipwrights, joiners aira calkers. 
Silver workers 



Total — Metals, Machinery and Shipbuilding 



M 



Bookbinders . 
Compositors. 



PrirUimg, BindinOt Etc. 



VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 
VI 



Electrotypers and steretoypers . 

Hat tip printers 

Lithographers 

Mailers 



Music engravers 

Newspaper and mail deliverers. 
Newspaper writers 



Paper handlers 

Photo-engravers 

Photo-gelatine workers 

Plate engravers and printers 

Pressmen 

Pressmen's assistants and press feeders, 
Wall paper machine printers and color 
Wall paper print cutters 



Total — Printing. Binding, Etc . 



Wood Workino and Pumihtre. 

Basket makers 

Box makers and sawyers 

Broom makers 

Brush miJcers 

Cabinet makers 

Carpet fitters and layers 

Carriage, wagon and automobile workers . 

Coopers • • • • 

Machine woodworkers 

Piano and organ workers 

Upholsterers and mattress makers 

Vamishers and polishers 

Wood carvers 



M 



Total — Wood Working and Furniture. 



M 



16 



211 

22 

82 

64 

116 

400 

160 

44 

2,786 

200 

122 

160! 

1.0361 

20; 

230; 

317 

280 



43 



8,093 



8,637| 

7,«09! 

iO»\ 

1.020 

26 

1,363 

471 

"t 

1.347 

not 

112 

1.324 

41' 

238 
2,916 
3.033 

104 

230 



40 



23.616 
1,770 



320 
300 



87 

1.881 

310 

401 

434 

883 

1.393 

1.086 



28 



214 



7,308 



leo 

216 

23 

78 

40 

114 

400 

186 

30 

3.049 

276 

160 

160 

996 

22 

300 

809 

1,276 



46 



10,076 



3,781 

1,161 

7,661 

SOO 

1.066 

25 

1.378 

502 

17 

35 

1.350 

64 

M 

120 

1.402 

58 

286 

2.916 

3,065 

114 

262 



41 



24,043 
1,670 



270 

360 

5 

87 

2.662 
305 
460 
413 
893 
736 

1,628 
500 
413 



32 8,732 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



TMe n.— UniMM mad Mi 



Appsndix. 

by LMaMlM and TiradMi, IMS- 



Ill 



In- 
diistry 
num- 



CouHTT. Town amd Tbadb 



8n 



Mabch 31 



Num- 

b«r 

of 
unions 



Num- 
bw of 



bws 



Sbptshbsx so 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
b«rof 



Vll-a 
Vll-b 
Vll-b 
Vll-a 
Vll-a 
Vll-b 
Vll-b 



vin 



VIII 
VIII 



VIII 
VIII 



IX 



NEW YORK COUNTY — 

New Yoik City. Manbattan and Bronx Boravtka — 
contianed. 



Food and Liquora. 

Bakers and confectioners 

Brewery employees 

Brewery employees (drivers and bottlers) . 

Batchers and meat cutters 

Egg inqieotors 

Grains workers 

Mineral water bothers and drivers 



M 



Total — Food and Liquors . 



M 



Thmtera and Mune. 
Actors and chorus singers 



Billposters 

Calcium light and moving picture machine op- 
erators 

Musicians 



Stage employees 

Total — Theaters and Musio . 



IX 

IX 



IX 



Cigar makers. 



Cigar packers 

Cigarette makers. 

Tobacco workers . 



Tobacco. 



Total — Tobacco. 



X-b 
X^ 

X-c 

X-c 
X-a 
X-a 

X-a 



XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 



RutauranU, Trade, Etc. 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Bookkeepers, stenographers, etc 



Clerks and salesmen 

Cooks 

Hotel employees 

Waiters 

ToUl — Restaursnts, Trade, Etc. 



M 



Public Employment. 

Customs employees 

Bock builders 

Firemen, oilers and water tenders 

Highway foremen 

Immigration service employees. 

Inspectors of construction 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 

Park gardeners and laborers 

Pavers, rammermen and asphalt workers . 
Post office clerks 



M 



8.142 
1.774 
1.720 
1,472 

406 
30 

102 



28 



8,646 



8.000 

S,000 

200 

1,031 
6,474 

1.035 



12 



16,740 
S,0£6 



3.018 

1,960 

450 

112 

SI 

15 

t4 



11 



3.505 
f,006 



320 

835 

34 

ee 

348 



352 

1 

12.020 

6981 

845 



18 



14,763 
665 



1,650 
135 
55 



148 

2,552 

05 

75 

52 

3.103 



8.057 
1.850 
1,770 
1,620 

824 
30 

158 



31 0,309 



12 



8,000 

S,000 

200 

003 

6.362 

f6 

1.050 



23 



16,605 
S,OU 



3.023 

f.05Jf 

430 

113 

SI 

16 

H 



3.691 

M,087 



160 

873 

08 

100 

734 

8 

354 

1 

12.308 

SOO 

078 



15.505 
409 



321 

2.104 

125 

50 

162 

140 

2.676 

04 

02 

40 

2.845 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 New York Labob Bulletin. 

Tftbto n.— Unions and Membcniilp by LocalHlM and Thidss, If IS — contlnncd 



In- 
dustry 
num- 

ber 



XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 
XI 



XII 
XII 



Xlll-b 
Xlll-e 

XIII-c 
XIII-c 
Xlll-b 
Xlll-e 
Xlll-f 

Xlll-a 

Xlll-e 
Xlll-d 
Xlll-b 

XIII-« 
Xlll-b 
Xlll-e 

Xlll-e 
Xlll-e 



X-b 

Vll-b 

I-b 

I-b 

IX 

V 
VI 
I-b 
XIII-c 
IV-a 
XI 
IV-a 



CouMTT, Town aito Tbadb 



NEW YORK COUNTY — 

New York City» Manhattan and Bronx Boimitfhs - 
concluded. 

PuWtc Emplotfm«ni — concluded. 

Post office Laborers 

Public school janitors 

Street sweepers 

War department employees 

Water works employees 



Total — Public Employment. 



Stationary Engine Tending. 

Engineers, stationary 

Firemen, stationary 



Total — Stationary Engine Tending . 



Belting makers. 
Button makers. 



Mitcdlaneotu. 



Decorative glass workers 

Glass bottle blowers 

Harness makers 

Janitors, porters and eleratormen . 
Mixed employment 



Paper bag and box makers. 



Photograph workers 

Plaster board and block makers . 
Pocket book and purse makers. . 



Smoking pipe makers . . . 
Trunk and bag workers. 
Umbrella makers 



Watchmen... 
Wool pullers. 



Total — Miscellaneous. 



Total — New York City, Manhattan and Bronx 
Boroughs 



NIAGARA COUNTY. 



Lockport. 

Barbers 

Brewery emplovees 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers 



Compomtors 

Coopers 

Electrical workers 

Glass bottle blowers 

Iron molders and core makers. 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 



8n 



M 



M 



Mabcb 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



19 



IG 




Num- 
ber of 



125 
194 
145 



246 



8,665 



4,062 
2,800 



6.862 



300 

430 

BO 

265 



87 
150 
236 

M8 



390 



120 
80 

too 

131 
229 



2.418 
£10 



31 
13 
40 
140 
22 
1 
40 
26 
40 
43 
17 
16 
10 



30 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 



20 



16 



20 



512 



Num- 
ber of 



bers> 



124 

210 

70 

43 

240 



9.244 
6 



4,471 
2.800 



7.271 



250 
708 

£6 
260 

75 

71 
150 
139 

SM 
175 

too 

30 
110 
175 

S6 
400 
650 

80 
1»6 



226 



3,499 
S07 



359.479 
68,669 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Tkbie IL— UnfoM and Membwahip by LocidlllM 



118 



•Bd Tndem, If IS — conllniiMl 



In- 
dustry 



CovMTT, Town Am Tbadb 



8ez 



Mabcb31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



SXPTBHBXXSO 



Num- 
ber 
of 

tmioDS 



Num- 
ber of 



VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
I-b 
XI 
V 

IV-a 
VIII 



VI 



X-b 

IV-a 

Vll-b 

Vll-b 

I-b 

I-b 

IX 

X-c 



V 
XII 
Il-a 
I-b 
IV-a 
XI 
IV-a 
I-b 
VIII 

I-b 

Xlll-a 

I-b 

I-b 

XI 

V 

V 

I-b 

I-a 

Il-a 
Ill-a 

Il-a 



I-b 
I-b 

XI 
Il-d 

IV-a 
Il-b 



NIAGABA COUNTY — 

Lockport — eondvded. 

MumdaiM 

Painters and deooratora 

Plasterers 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers, 

Post ofSce clerks 

Pressmen 

Roiling mills and steel works employees 

Stage employees 

Total 

MIddleport. 

Machine woodworkers 

Niagara lUla. 

Barbers 

Blacksmiths 

Brewery employees 

Brewery employee (drivers and bottlers) . . . 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers 

Clerks and salesmen 

Compositors 

Electrotypers and stereotsrpers 

Engineers, stationary 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Housesmiths and bridgemen 

Iron molders and core makers 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 

Millwrights 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

Paper and pulp workers 

Plasterers 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 
Poet office clerks 

Pressmen 

Sales book makers 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Stone cutters 

Switchmen 

Tailors 

Trainmen, road and yard 

Total 

North Toi 

Bricklayers and masons . 
Carpenters and joiners . . 

Letter carriers 

Lumber handlers 

Machinists 

Seamen 

Total 



20 



if 



40 



34 
47 
11 

ISO 

4S0 

17 

1 

4 

S 

67 

1 

24 

146 
64 
99 
23 
32 

125 
67 

126 
6 

118 

130 
41 
24 
15 
1 
70 
65 
23 
19 
13 
24 
4 

153 



30 



2,160 
16 



M 



21 

126 

7 

100 



200 



M 



454 



20 



78 
11 
49 
14 
28 
10 
19 
33 
30 



721 
11 



40 



26 
36 



18 

166 

460 

18 

t 

6 

5 

60 



21 
162 
70 
04 
23 
31 
70 
65 
128 

e 

138 

130 

48 

26 

16 

1 

75 

70 

26 

36 

11 

22 

4 

140 



30 



2.153 

16 



26 
166 
7 
100 
180 
260 



718 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



114 



New Yoek Labob Bulletin. 



Tkble n.— Unions rad Membenhip by I^nlN l ii n and Tndfls. If It — conCfamed 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



CouNTT, Town aijd Tsadb 



Sex 



Mabch 31 



Numr 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



SXPTBKBXX 90 



Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
bwof 
mem- 
bers 



I-b 
Ill-e 



X-b 
I-b 
I-c 

Vll-a 
I-b 

IX 
V 
I-b 

XI 
VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
XI 
I-b 



Vll-a 
X-b 
X-a 

IV-s 

V 

Vll-b 

I-b 

I-c 

Vll-a 

I-b 

VIII 

VI 
IX 
III-c 
Ill-a 

III-B 

V 

Il-a 

X-a 

VI 

Ill-e 

I-b 
V 

Il-a 

XII 

Il-a 

IV-a 

I-b 

IV-a 

I-b 

XI 



ONEIDA COUNTY. 

CUnton. 

Carpenters tad joiners 



M 



New Yerk MOls. 

Cotton goods workers 



Barbers 

Bricklayers and masons 

Bricklayers, masons and plasterers* laborers. 

Butchers and meat cutters 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigarmakers 

Compositors 

Electrical workers 

Letter carriers 

Musicians , 



M 



Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 

Post oflSce clerks 

Sheet metal workers (building) 



Total. 



14 



Utica. 

Bakers and confectioners 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Boiler makers and iron shipbuilders 

Bookbinders 

Brewery emplovees 

Bricklayers and masons 

Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers. 

Butchers and meat cutters 

Carpenters and joiners . 



M 



Calcium light and moving picture machine op- 
erators 

Carriage, wagon and automobile workers 

Cigar makers 

Cloth hat and cap makers 

Clothing cutters and trimmers 

Coat, pants and Test makers 

Compositors 

Conductors 

Cooks and waiters 

Coopers 

Cotton goods workers 



Electrical workers 

Electrotypers and stereotirpers 

Engineers, locomotive 

Engineers, stationary 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive. 

Horseshoers 

Housesmiths and bridgemen 

Iron molders and core makers 

Lathers 

Letter carriers 

Ill-e Loom fixers 

VI Machine woodworkers 

IV-a Machinists 

V iMailers 



M 



M 



29 



400 

SOO 



21 
60 
70 
25 
160 
65 
18 
32 
10 
60 



607 
4 



41 

75 

215 

28 

12 

160 

230 

450 

102 

650 

11 
51 

114 
14 
65 
35 
36 

152 

105 

75 

8 

150 

ess 

, 144 

9 

160 

32 

225 

17 

18 

300 

24 

53 

60 

42 

86 

7 



14 



35 



600 

SOO 



40 
20 
25 
180 
67 
18 
34 
11 
57 
9 



11 
18 



675 
5 



42 
102 
230 

26 

16 
168 
236 
168 

94 
687 

11 

61 

114 

18 

79 

35 

S6 

160 

105 

129 

7 

300 

600 

164 

• 

140 

24 

225 

17 

20 

288 

33 

63 

60 

82 

100 

6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



TaMsn^Uiri 



Afpjuvdix. 

b7 



115 



L>ca m iMMidTinidw,lfU — c 



In- 
dustry 



CoTTMTT, Town aitd Tbaj>b 



MjlechSI 



Nmn- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
b«rof 



Sbptbubxx 30 



Nom- 



of 
unions 



Num- 
b«rof 



bwn 



IV-b 

Xlll-f 

VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
V 
I-b 
XI 

V 
XI 

I-b 

UI-« 

VIII 

I-a 

Il-a 

Il-a 

Il-e 

IX 

Il-a 
II-c 



ONEIDA COUNTY — 

Utfen — amdadML 

Metal poiishen, buffers and platers. 

Mixed employment 

Musicians 



Painters and decorators 

Paper hancers 

Photo-engravers 

Plumbers, sas and steam fitters and helpers. 
Poet ofSoe clerks 



Pressmen 

Public school janitors 

Sheet metal workers (building) . 

Spinners, mule 

Stage employees 

Stone cutters 

Street railway employees 

Switchmen 

Telegraphers, commercial 



Tobacco workers . 



Trainmen, road and ^ard 
Truck and wagon drivers 



and diauffeurs . 



ToUl. 



I-b 



I-b 



I-b 
Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 



VI 
I-b 



I-b 



I-b 



I-b 
Xlll-a 



Whiteeboio. 

Carpenters and joiners 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 

Baldwfnsvflle. 

Carpenters and joiners 



East STracnse. 

Carpenters and joiners 

Conductors 

Engineers, locomotive 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive. 
Trainmen, road and yard 



Total. 



Uverpool. 

Basket makers 

Carpenters and joined 



Total. 



Rockwell Springs. 

Carpenters and joiners 



Carpenters and joiners. 

Solvsy. 

Carpenters and foiners 

Potters 



Total. 



M 



M 



57 



40 

53 

183 

33 

152 

44 

8 

100 

35 

/ 

37 

24 

54 

125 

27 

10 

300 

6 

2 

/ 

18 

13 

371 

900 



778 



40 



34 



10 
135 



129 
300 



669 



187 



187 



25 



22 



31 



58 



44 

68 

183 

55 

154 

46 

8 

120 

39 

1 

41 

23 

60 

120 

28 

8 

409 

11 

2 

1 

23 

380 
1.198 



6,963 

684 



43 



34 



22 
135 

00 
124 
310 



681 



190 
26 



216 



42 



20 



30 
10 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



116 Nbw York Labor Buuletin. 

TViUe n^~UnloiM and Mcnbenlilp by LoodlliM uid Trades, If U — eonlliued 



In- 
dustry 



Vll-a 

X-b 

X-a 

IV-a 

Ill-d 

Vll-b 

Vll-b 

I-b 

I-c 

VI 

Vll-a 

Ill-a 

II-c 

I-b 

VI 

I-b 
IX 

IX 

X-c 

Ill-a 

Ill-a 
Ill-a 
Ill-a 



Il-a 
X-a 
X-a 

VI 

I-b 

V 

Il-a 
XII 

11^ 
XII 

I-a 
IV-a 

I-b 

I-b 
IV-a 

xin-« 

I-b 

XI 

IV-a 

Vll-b 

IV-b 

Vll-b 

VIII 

I-b 
IV-a 

V 

I-b 

I-b 
XI 

V 

V 

XI 
XI 

I-b 
IV-a 



CouMTT, Town and Tbadb 



ONONDAGA COUNTY -- 



Bakers and confectioners 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Boiler makers and iron shipbuilders 

Boot and shoe workers 

Brewery employees 

Brewery emplovees (drivers and bottlers) . . 

Bricklayers and masons 

Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Broom makers 

Butchers and meat cutters 

Buttonhole makers 

Cab and coach drivers and chauffeurs 

Carpenters and joiners 

Carnage, wagon and automobile workers — 

Cement masons 

CSgar makers 

Cigar packers 

Clerks and salesmen 

Qoak and suit makers 

Clothing cutters and trimmers 

Clothing pressers 

Coat, pants and vest makers 

Compositors 

Conductors 

Cooks 

Cooks and waiters 

Coopers 

Electrical workers 

Electrotypers and stareotypers 

Engineers, locomotive 

Engineers, sUttionary 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Firemen, stationary 

Granite cutters 

Horseshoers 

Housesmiths and bridgemen 

Insulators, heat and frost 

Iron molders and core makers 

Janitors, porters and elevatormen 

Lathers 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 

Malsters • . • 

Metal polishers, buffers and platers 

Mineral water bottlers and drivers 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

Pattern makers 

Photo-engravers 

Plasterers • • • • • • 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 

Post oflBce clerks 

Pressmen • 

Pressmen's asastants and press feeders 

Public school janitors 

Railway mail clerks. 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Sheet metal workers (shop) 



Sex 



M 



M 



M 



March 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



100 

172 

285 

22 

115 

106 

121 

216 

730 

18 

164 

64 

75 

1,095 

48 

33 

310 

U 

15 

£ 

60 

SO 

32 

12 

115 

120 

179 

570 

275 

5 

144 

26 

50 

45 

250 

15 

240 

165 

232 

72 

9 

39 

60 

6 

450 

60 

41 

119 

476 

37 

81 

15 

292 

10 

524 

68 

14 

99 

225 

82 

49 

76 



Sxptbmbbb30 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 



150, 

145 
391 



Num- 
ber of 

ttOTtt- 



100 
163 
283 

20 
160 
110 
126 
227 
560 

18 
161 

60 

100 

1.102 

48 

35 
317 

to 



i 


14 




f 


1 


60 




n 


1 


20 




12 


1 


114 


1 


124 


5 


190 




S86 


1 


275 




6 


1 


142 


1 


27 



43 
250 

15 
267 
173 
244 

72 
8 

37 

60 



396 

40 

35 

113 

450 

36 

80 

15 

298 

11 

486 

64 

13 

101 

225 

90 

47 

66 

10 

31 

200 

145 

43 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 

Tkbie IL— Unioiw and Mmnberalilp by LoeaHtlM 



117 



and Tradss, If IS — cmitinned 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



ConKTT, Town and Tbadb 



Sex 



March 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unionfl 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



Skptbhbbb 90 



Numr 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 



ONONDAGA COUNTY — eonduded. 

STracnse — eondaded. 

VIII Stage employees 

I-ft Stone cutters 

Il-a Street railway employees 

Ill-d Suspender makers 

Il-a Switchmen 

Ill-a Tailors 

Il-e Telegraphers (commercial) 

I-b Tile layers and marble mosaic workers 

IX Tobacco workers 

Il-a Trainmen, road and yard 

II-o Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs . . . 
VI Upholsterers and mattreas makers 

X-a Waiters 

VI Wood 

Total 



M 



60 

41 

525 

9 
16 
63 

5 

7 
20 

6 

17 

441 

95 

25 

7 
Q8 



91 



Vll-b 
I-b 
I-b 
XI 
VIII 

XI 



ONTARIO COUNTY. 
Canandaigna. 



Brewery emplovei 

Bricklayers and masons . 
Carpenters and joiners . . 

Letter carriers 

Musicians 



Post office clerks. 
Total 



M 



114 
6 



X-b 
X-a 

IV^i 
I-b 
I-c 
Vll-a 
I-b 
I-b 
IX 

XII 
XIII-c 
IV-a 
XI 
Vll-b 

rv-b 

VIII 
I-b 
I-b 
XI 
I-b 
VIII 
IV-a 
II-« 



GeneTa. 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Boiler makers and iron shipbuilders 

Bricklayers and masons 

Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers . 

Butchers and meat cutters 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cement masons 

Cigar makers 



M 



Il-a 



Engineers, stationary 

Glass bottle blowers 

Iron molders and core makers , 

Letter carriers , 

Malsters 

Metal polishers, buffers and platers 

Musicians , 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 

Post office clerks 

Sheet metal workers (building) , 

Stage employees 

Stove mounters , 

Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs ... 



M 



Total. 



Switchmen . 



ShorteTllle. 



M 



24 



21 
28 
9 
38 
35 
20 

104 
16 
87 
5 
41 
26 

145 
10 

131 
11 
35 
55 
23 
9 
12 
33 
16 
75 



10 



23 



68 

43 

500 

8 

27 

63 

S 

8 

20 

5 

lA 

455 

148 

11 

e 

92 
20 



10,099 
659 



17 
6 

20 
6 

53 



107 



18 
28 

9 
45 
28 
21 
90 
24 
88 

5 
41 
24 
145 
10 
89 
10 
34 
60 
23 

9 
13 
33 
20 
80 

942 
5 



13 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



118 



New York Labob Bulletin. 



Tubto IL— UnloM ud Memberahlp by I.ora1Htei ud Tndss, If IS — MBtlaved 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



County, Town and Trade 



8ez 



Mabcb 81 



Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



SKFTBHBm 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



I-b 
I-b 
XI 



I-b 
I-a 



Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 



ORANGE COUNTY. 

Central Valler. 

Carpenters and joiners 



Cornwall. 

Carpenters and joiners 



Letter carriers. 



Geahen. 



Brioklayers and 
Granite cutters. 



HIgUand Falls. 



M 



Total. 



M 



Maybrook. 

Clerks, railway 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive . 
Trainmen, road and yard 



M 



Total. 



M 



Vll-a 

X-b 

IV-a 

IV-a 

Vll-b 

I-b 

I-c 

Il-a 

Il-a 

I-b 

IX 

V 

Il-a 
I-b 
Il-a 
XII 
Il-a 
IV-a 
Ill-b 
XI 
IV-a 
I-b 
I-b 
XI 

I-b 
Il-a 
Il-a 



Mlddletowa. 

Bakers and confectioners 

Barbers 

Blacksmiths 

Boiler makers and iron shipbuilders 

Brewery emplovees 

Bricklayers ana masons 

Bricklavers, masons and plasterers* laborers. 

Car and locomotive painters 

Car inspectors, repairers, etc 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers 

Comoositors 

Conductors 

Electrical workers 

Engineers, locomotive 

Engineers, stationary 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Iron molders and core makers 

Laundry workers 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 
Post oflBce clerks 



M 



Sheet metal workers (building) . 

Street railway employees 

Trainmen, road and yard 



27 



15 



48 



208 



10 
21 
49 
55 
17 
48 
45 
17 
33 

193 
59 
25 
82 
16 

142 
31 

110 
13 
15 
9 

118 
53 
17 
8 
B 
23 
29 

297 



Total . 



27 



1.535 
i 



-,,- Newbnrgli. 

Vll-a Bakers and confectioners 

X-b Barbers 

X-a Bartenders 

I-b Bricklayers and masons 

1*0 Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers. 

T*u ^^<^ *^ plush engravers, printers, etc 

ttV Carpenters and joiners 

*n-e Carpet workers. 
X-ccieSsandi 



M 



P 



47 
39 
30 
74 
46 
19 
210 
81 
73 
72 



27 



11 



30 



26 
17 



43 



70 
36 
96 



12 
26 



17 
52 
40 
19 
27 

198 
63 
22 
86 
16 

141 
34 

110 
12 
12 
9 

123 
41 
18 
9 
» 
29 
34 

302 



1,650 



46 
41 
39 
78 
61 
18 
224 
81 
70 
76 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ApFxm>ix. 



119 





In- 
dustry 
Bum- 

b«r 




BX 


MabchSI 


BBPTBMBm 30 


Num. 

ber 

of 

unions 


Num. 
ber of 
mem- 
bws 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


III-« 


Qoihin^ cutters and trimman a 


1 

f 

I 

r 
i 

1 

r 
f 

i 

I 
r 
f 

i 

> 


1 

1 

i 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

i 

1 
1 

i 

1 
1 

1 


42 

48 

. 1 

26 

61 

126 

142 

60 

76 



10 

66 

t 

06 

eti 

72 

63 

16 

i 

31 

40 

69 

4 


1 

1 

i 

2 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

i 

1 
1 

i 

1 
1 
I 


43 


V 


ComDontora ....... ' 


40 


I4> 


Electrical workers ^ 


/ 
26 


XII 


^nginfWTS, statiooary , . . . . ' 


64 


III-c 


Hat f%niffhi»pf ' 


120 


III-o 


Hf^t "i%k«r^ . , , . ' 


142 


III-C 


Hat trimmmip J 


100 


IV-a 


Iron moklers and core makers r . . r . r r ^ 


81 


Ill-e 


T4if€ curtain makers ... * 


13 


XI 


Letter carriers ' 


22 


VIII 


Mu^aans . . , * 


64 


Ill-a 


1 
Overall workers A 


1 
177 


I-b 


Painters and decorators ^ 


BBe 

81 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 

Post office clerks ' 


51 
15 


I-b 


Sheet metal workers G>uikUng) A 


/ 
30 


^^tL 




40 




66 


IX 


Tobacco workers .'..'. * 


3 




Trainmen, road and yard A 


$ 


Il-a 


1 
1 


60 
55 


1 
1 


51 


II-c 


Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs ' 


52 




Total A 


1 
? 


32 


1.697 
768 


32 


1,837 




^ i 


707 


XI 


Otisvllla. 


i 


1 


12 


1 


11 








X-b 


PortJerrla. 

Barbers A 


* 

1 
1 

f 
I 

7 
I 

> 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

i 

1 
1 
1 


13 

14 

17 

62 

152 

201 

302 

14 

7 
20 

6 

6 
S8 
27 
10 

6 
42 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

i 

1 
1 

! 

1 

1 


12 


VI -b 


Brewery employees * 


14 


I-b 


Bricklayers and masons 


19 


-b 


Carpenters and joiners ' 


60 


Il-a 


Conductors 


143 


Il-ft 


Engineers, locomotive ' 


218 


Il-a 


FHi^Tnen and engineers, locomotive r . . . . 


280 


XIII-c 


Flint glass cutt«s and workers ' 


20 


X 


I^tercarriers ... .... ' 


7 


VII 


\f.i«S«i-i^n. , 


15 


Ill-a 


i 
Overall workers A 


6 
4 


I-b 


Painters and decorators A 


SO 
25 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 

Post office clerks * 


10 
6 


IV-a 


Saw and tool makers ' 


42 


VIII 


Stage employees ' 


9 


Il-a 


Switchmen * 


1 


8 
306 


6 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and yard ' 


318 










Total > 


I 


18 


1,207 
A3 


19 



1,208 




/ 


36 


I-b 


Tuxedo. 

Carpenters and joiners A 


1 


1 


6 


1 


8 








VIII 


Walden. 

Musicians A 


1 

? 


1 


28 
5 


1 



29 




J 


/ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



120 



NsW YOBK LaBOB BniXETIN. 





IkMe n.— UbImm tad MvmhtnM^ hf LMalMw and Tradaa, Itll — 




d 


In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 


COUMTT, TOWH AND TbASS ft 


MABCB31 


SBPTBHBBBdO 


" Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 


Num. 
ber 
of 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 










I-b 


Wanrlek. 


A 1 

1 

■ 1 


26 
44 

62 


1 
1 
1 


28 


II a 


Finmif^n and Anann«Mmi. looomotiTe 


45 


Il-a 


Trainman, rond ft»d yard t . . . - 1 - 


72 










Total f> 


d 3 


132 


3 


145 








XI 


WMft Point. 

Arsenal employees • ■ ^ 


IL 1 


65 


1 


76 








I-b 


OBI.RANS COUNTY. 

Albion. 

firiAlrlftvf^'* unH mftAOnfl I 


rl 1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


15 
21 

3 
100 

3 
58 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


13 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


29 


XI 


Letter oarriers 


4 


I-a 


Paving block cutters 


100 


XI 


Post ofiBee clerks t 


4 


I-a 


Stone cutters 


60 










Total » 


A 6 


200 


6 


210 








I-b 


HoDey. 

Camentem and ioiners t . r ^ 


1 
.1 1 
1 


13 
22 


1 
1 


14 


I-a 


Paving block cutters 


32 










Total li 


i 2 


35 


2 


46 








I-a 


Holbertoii. 

Pavinc block cutters Ik 


.1 . 


75 


1 


80 








I-b 


Medina. 


4 




1 

1 

1 



1 
1 
1 


37 


XI 


Letter oarriers ' 


1 Y 

r 

i 1 


5 
64 

2? 


4 


VIII 


Musicians ' 


68 


I-a 


Paving block cutters A 


10 

28 


I-b 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks ' 


12 


XI 


1 Y 


4 


5 










Total A 


i 4 

f 


100 

7 


6 


154 




/ 


10 


X-b 


OSWEGO COUNTY. 

FidtoB. 
Barbers A 


i 1 
1 
1 
1 

; 1 


24 
24 
25 
74 
24 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


24 


X-a 


Bartenders * 


37 


I-b 


Aricktayers and masons r ' 


30 


I-b 


C/amenters and ioiners * 


62 


IX 


Cigar makers • * 


24 


XII 


Firemen, stationary * 


38 


XI 


Letter carriers ' 


i 
1 

' 1 
1 

' 1 




6 
26 
60 

7 
13 


7 


I-b 


Painters and decorators * 


29 


Xlll-a 


Paper and pulp workers ' 


96 


I-b 
I-b 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 

Sheet metju workers ' 


7 
16 










Total h 


1 10 


283 


11 


369 








X-b 


Oswego. 

Barbers » 


i 1 
1 
1 

1 

1 


33 
40 
42 
53 


1 
1 

1 
1 


36 


X-a 


Bartenders ' 


42 


rv-a 


Boiler makers and iron shipbuilders ' 


41 


I-b 


Bricklayers uid masons ' 


51 


I-c 




15 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appxin>iz. 121 

TU>le n.— UdIoiw ud MembenUp by LocalltiM ud TndM. Itll ^ coalfamed 



In- 
dujitry 
num- 
ber 



County, Town an© Trads 



Sex 



Mabcb 81 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



ben 



SXPTKHBSB 80 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber ol 



bers 



OSWEGO COUNTY — 



I-b 
Il-a 

I-b 
Il-a 
Il-b 
Il-a 
XII 
XI 
Il-d 
IV-a 
VII4) 

I-b 

I-b 
XI 

I-b 
Il-a 
II-c 



XI 



X-b 

X-a 

IV-ft 

IV-a 

I-b 

Il-a 

I-b 

IX 

V 

Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 

XI 

IV-a 

IV-a 

XI 
Il-a 



I-b 



Oswego 

Carpentera and joiners 

Conductors 

Electrical workers 

Engineers, locomotive 

Engineers, marine 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Firemen, stationary 

Letter carriers 

Longfllioremen 

Macninists 

Malsters 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gaa and steam fitters and helpers 
Post office clerks 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Trainmen, road and yard 

Truck and wagon dnvers and chauffeurs. . . 

Total 



OTSEGO COUNTY. 

Coopersfown. 

Post office clerks 

Oneonta. 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Blacksmiths , 

Boiler makers and iron shipbuilders. 

Bricklayers and masons 

Car inspectors, repaiiers, etc 

Carpenters and jomers , 

Cigar makers 

Compositors 

Conouctors 

Engineers, locomotive 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive. . 

Letter carriers , 

Machinists , 

Machinists' apprentices and helpers. 

Post office clerks , 

Trainmen, road and yard 

Total 

Blehlleld Springs. 

Carpenters and joiners 



M 



21 



M 



M 



17 



M 



QUEENS COUNTY. 

New York City, Queens Borough. 

I-b Bricklayers and masons 

I-c I Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers. 
Il-a^Car inspectors, repairers, etc 

I-b, Carpenters and jomers 

Il-a'Coxuiuctors 

Il-a' Engineers, locomotive 

XII I Engineers, stationary . 



M 



II-aFuremen and engineers, locomotive. 

"~":i-o)r 



XIII-o) Flint glass cutters and workers. 



10 



178 
47 
24 

117 
10 
88 
15 
15 
80 
36 
23 
77 
24 
10 
1 
27 

130 
15 



1,093 

1 



24 

40 

74 

24 

32 

100 

12 

02 

6 

36 

101 

166 

166 



136 

62 

5 

225 



1,294 
6 



14 



625 

73 

24 

.282 

182 

266 
20 

210 
15 



21 



17 



10 



182 
46 
20 

105 
19 
90 



15 
80 
24 
23 
80 
17 
11 
1 
38 
132 
16 



1.082 

1 



25 

42 

77 

31 

35 

196 

46 

90 

6 

33 

101 

171 

181 

9 

102 

32 

5 

250 



1,426 



11 



650 

70 

37 

1.213 

179 

263 
21 

219 
15 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



122 



fTsw YoBK Labob BuLLBTIir. 







In- 

duBtry 

nam- 

ber 


County, Town aitd Traob Sc 


March 31 


Sbptsiibbb 30 


" Num- Num- 
ber berof 
of mem- 
unions bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
berof 
mem- 
bers 








XIII-c 


Olam bottle Klow^ni \ 


I 1 116t 
1 22 
4 151 
1 12 




61 


XI 




35 


XI 


I/Att6r oarriore ....ttr---- * 


168 


rv-a 


Machinivtv , - - r * 


17 


Xlll-f 


Miz6(l flniDlovin<^Pt , , , , , * 


40 


I-b 


Painteni and decorators * 


4 37i 


367 


I-b 


PfryAra luid Tamrn«rm«m * 


22 


I-b 


Plastererv , . . . , ' 


2 198 
1 170 
4 59 

^ U 

I 1 . 45 


206 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbora, gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 

Post office clerks * 


280 
71 


I-b 


Sheet metal wdrkers (buildins) N 


7 
45 


Ill-e 


Silk workers ■ 


150 




Telecraohers. railroad Iv 






60 


Il-e 


I i 334 

^ U 

I 1 65 
1 629 


334 


Xlll-d 


Terra cotta workers ... IV 


11 
49 


II-B 


Trainmen, road and yard r * 


680 










Total K 


f 40 4.869 
^ g2 


43 


5.192 




BENSSELAER COUNTY. 

Hooeick Falls. 

Barbera lb 


68 


X-b 


i 1 11 

' 1 10 

• 1 4 

1 6 

1 51 

f 5 

1 1 32 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 


10 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners ' 


10 


IV-« 


IroiT molders and core makers ' 


4 


XI 


Letter caniers ' 


5 


VIII 


Musicians .1 r ' 


53 


I-b 


Painters and deoorators IV 


^ 










Total ft 


1 6 113 
r S 


e 


115 






4 


Il-a 


BensMlaM. 

Conductors Ik 


i 1 55 
2 183 
1 237 
1 80 
1 307 


1 
2 

1 
1 
1 


55 


Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 


Engineenit loconiioti've. ,,,,,... ^ . ^ .. ^ 


198 


Firemen and engineers, locomotive ............. ' 


248 


Street railway employees ^ ' 


57 


Trainmen, road and yard 


337 










Total B 


a 6 812 


6 


895 








Vll-a 


Troy. 

Bakers and confeotioners ft 


1 1 30 

; 1 96 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 1 

1 2 

1 

1 1 

1 

2 

1 
1 
2 

1 

1 i 


32 


X-b 
X-a 

IV-a 

IV-b 

Vll-b 


Barbers 


97 


Bartenders 


45 


Boiler makers and iron shipbuilden ,,,,... 


1 55 

■ 1 17 

2 164 
1 37 

■ 1 194 

1 40 

2 125 


55 


Brass molders and core m^cers 


17 


Brewery emplosrees 


160 


VII4) 
I-b 


Brewery emplmrees (drivers and bottlers) 


36 
195 


Vll-a 


Butchers and meat cutters 


40 


II-c 


Cab and coach drivers and chauffeurs. 


130 


VIH 


Caldum light and moving picture machine op- 
erators. 


23 


II-« 




1 21 

2 387 
" 1 299 

^ S 

A 1 17 

1 26 
^ f 


22 


I-b 




402 


IX 


Cig<^ makeri. ,', 


300 


II-« 


Clerk*, railway. i 


3 
17 


III-* 


Cloak and raii makers 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbitdix. 



128 







mUfaUHN 


1 


In- 




March 31 


SXPTXIfBCB 30 


duirtiy 

nUBBr 

ber 


" Num- 
ber 
of 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
imions 


Num. 
ber of 

mem- 
bers 


V 


CompoflitOTB li 


/I I 

i i 

2 


152 

t 

45 

143 
87 
30 

127 
29 
20 

325 
5 
8 
45 
18 
42 
57 
34 

105 
6 

220 
70 
91 
35 
1 
48 
39 
25 

542 
65 

12^ 
436 


I 


157 


IV-a 




f 

50 


I-b 


Electrical workers 


228 


Il-a 


Fngineem, lo4M>motive ' 


85 


XII 


Kngfp^^rf , stationary ' 


30 


IV-a 
Il-d 


Foundry and nutchine shop laborers and helpers. . ' 


128 
29 


IV-ft 


HOTseshoers 


20 


IV-a 


Iron molders and core makers * 


343 


Ill-b 


Laundry workers ' 


5 


XI 


Letter carriers li 


8 
51 


Il-d 


Lumber handlers ' 


30 


VI 


Machine woodworkers ' 


32 


IV-a 


MnAhiniip^ , , • 


63 


IV-b 


Metal polishers, buffers and platers ' 


30 


VIII 


Mn«Ml^ni| . ' 


196 


I-b 


Pidnters and decorators fk 


5 
235 


Xlll-a 


Paper and pulp workers ' 


70 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 

Post office clerks ' 


103 
34 




Sheet metal workers (building) A 




I-b 


i 

2 


44 


VIII 


Rtage employees. ' 


38 


rv-a 


Stove mounters * 


30 


Il-a 


Street railway emplosrees - ' 


560 


Ill-a 


Tailors. ' 


69 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and yard i 


A 


II-o 


Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs ' 


450 




Total 1^ 


1 48 


4.553 

g6 


49 


4,801 




J 


X-b 


BICHMOND COUNTY. 

Barbers h 




4 
40 
94 
11 
513 
61 
66 
82 
64 
58 
54 
90 
42 
23 

30 
167 






IV-a 


Boiler makers and iron shinbuilders r . ' 




18 


I-b 


Bricklayers and masons ' 


94 


I-c 
-b 


Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers ' 

Carpenters and joiners ' 


10 
505 


I 


Conductors. . . . ' ' 


59 


I -a 


Engineers, locomotive ' 


66 


XII 


Engineers, stationary ' 


82 


Il-a 


Firemen and engineers, locomotive , . . * 


55 


XI 


Letter carriers ' 


59 


IV-a 


M^hiniata • 


50 


I-b 


Psinters and decorators ' 


100 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 

Post offioe clerks ' 


42 
24 




Sheet metal workers (buikling) ^ 




I-b 




30 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and yard 


173 










Total ... A 


i 25 

1 2 


1,399 
g 


24 


1 367 




BOCKLAND COUNTY. "" 

Gamenrffle. 

Calico and plush engravers, printers, etc li 






— _— 


_^^— _ 


Ill-e 


27 


2 


43 


XI 


lonaldaiid. 

Arsenal employees li 


« 1 


78 








i — 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



124 Nbw York Labob Bulletin. 

TaUe n.— Unioiw and MembenUp br LocalltiM and Trmdea, Itll — coatisiied 



In- 
dustary 

"bSr" 


CouMTT, Town and Trads 


Sex 


MabcbSI 


Sbptbmbbr 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


I-b 


Nyack. 


M 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


40 
98 

5 
25 
10 

5 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


50 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


91 


XI 


Letter carriers 


7 


I-b 


PaiptAn and de<M>rators 


40 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks 


9 
4 




Total 






M 


6 


183 


6 


201 




Pearl BiTer. 

Ma<^>iinfiiti| 




IV-ft 


M 


1 


15 


1 


20 




Bricklayers and masons 




I-b 


M 

m 


1 

1 


60 
99 


1 
1 


58 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


93 




Total 






M 


2 


168 


2 


151 




Snffern. 

Caroenters and Joiners ...».- 




I-b 


M 

m 
m 


1 
1 

1 


66 
43 
19 


1 

1 
1 


66 


I-b 


Painters and decorf^tovs t , - - , , . , ^ - r r 


52 


I-b 


Total 


15 




M 


3 


128 


3 


133 




West HaTerstraw. 

Calico and plush engravers, printers, etc 

ST. LAWBENCE COUNTY. 

Canton. 

Letter carriers 




Ill-e 


M 


1 


19 


1 


24 


XI 


M 

a 

F 


1 
1 


3 

1 


1 

1 


3 


XI 


Post office clerks 


1 




Total 


2 




M 

F 


2 


4 
g 


2 


4 




EmerTTllle. 

Paper and pulp workers 


g 


Xlll-a 


M 






1 


27 




Barbers 








X-b 


M 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


12 
7 

16 
4 

36 
2 
7 


1 


10 


XII 


RngiriAAm, stationary 




Ill-e 


Lace ourtain makers 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


15 


XI 


Letter carriers 


5 


Xlll-a 


Paper and pxilp workers , 


53 


XI 


Poet office clerks 


8 


I-a 


Stone cutters 


13 




Total 






M 


7 


83 


7 


99 




Norfolk. 

Paper and pulp workers 




Xlll-a 


M 


1 


34 


1 


34 




Norwood. 

Paper and pulp workers 




Xlll-a 


M 


1 


20 


1 


15 




Ogdensbiirc. 

Barbers 




X-b 


M 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


10 
14 
33 
24 
95 
30 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


17 


Vll-b 




14 


I-b 


Bricklayers ana masons 


37 


II-c 


Cab and coach drivers and chauffeurs 


24 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


118 


IX 


Cigar makers 


30 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbkduc. 125 

Tftble n.— Untoas ud MenlMnUp by LocaUtlM ud TtadM, Itll — cmitintted 



In- 
dustry 

nnm- 

ber 


COVNTT. TOWK AND TrADK SeX 


March 31 


SspmiBBR 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 








Il-a 
Il-a 


Conductors » 

KoffUMora. locomotaw r 


IL 

1 
1 

f 

i 
1 

1 




54 
36 
40 
66 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 


56 
40 


Il-b 


Kng|f)4«erf , nuinne . , 


39 


Il-b 
Il-d 


Firamen, Tr><MiTi^ * 

Grain handlers ' 


140 
17 


IX 


Letter carriers * 




8 

30 

240 

24 

10 

1 

6 

16 

65 

32 


8 


Il-d 


T^ngffhoremen ,..,,,. 


30 


Il-d 


T.vmH'v handlers ' 


265 


VI 


Machine woodworkers ' 




VIII 


Musicians ' 


1 

i 

1 
1 
1 


82 


XI 


Post office clerks ................ ^ ...... t - - - ^ 


/7 
6 


I-b 


Sheet metal workers (building) ' 


17 


Il-a 


Trmv>mep, rond and srard r . ' 


76 


II-c 


Truck ana wagon drivers and chauffeurs ' 


52 




Total » 


1 
f 


19 


842 

1 


20 


1,068 




/ 


/7 


XII 


Pleneflald. 

Firemen, stationary ^ 


li 


1 
2 


25 
291 


1 
2 


25 


Xlll-a 


Paner and duId workers * 


143 










Total . » 


1 


3 


316 


3 


168 








XI 


Potadam. 

Letter carriers ^ 




1 
1 


5 
24 


1 
1 


5 


Xlll-a 


PfuMr and duId workers. , . . - 


16 










Total li 


d 


2 


29 


2 


21 








Xlll-a 


Pyritoa. 


4, 


2 


399 


2 


307 








Xlll-a 


Paner and duId workers. 1^ 


fl 

1 

1 

7 


1 


60 


1 


45 




SARATOGA COUNTY. 
BallatonSpa. 




I-b 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


40 

20 

48 

3 

2 

1 




32 


XII 


PiranMn. nlfttiotiiirv ....... .r 


18 


IV-ft 


Iron molders and core makers. ..... r 


22 


XI 


Letter carriers * 


4 


XI 


Post office clerks ..... ' 


2 






1 




Total ^ 


1 

f 


5 


113 

1 


5 


78 




I 


t 


I-b 


, Corinth-Palmer. 

CWmAniiini And ioinftra ^ 


i 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


60 
65 
15 
8 
873 
11 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


48 


XII 


Firemen, stationary * 


64 


IV-a 


Maohimsti* . . ' ' 


15 


I-b 


Painter* and decoratom , . . , ' 


8 


XIII-A 


T>firMir mxiA mitn WArlcsrft * 


402 


14) 


Plumbers* gas and steam fitters and helpers ' 


9 




Total » 


1 


7 


522 


7 


546 








X-b 


Mechanleimto. 

Barbers . Ii 


i 


1 
1 
1 


8 

9 

41 


1 
1 

1 
1 


9 


IV-« 


Blacksmiths 


9 


IV-« 


Boiler makers and iron sbipbuildam 


41 


Xlll-d 


Briokmakers 


220 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



126 New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 

Table IL— Unions and MemberaUp by LacaUtlea and Tradea. 1»1S — caatlBBad 



In- 

duBtry 
num- 
ber 


CouNTT, Town and Tradk 


Sex 


Makch31 


Sbptbmbbb 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bera 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


I-b 


SABATOGA COUNTY — conctaded. 


M 

a 
• 
• 

F 

M 

a 
m 
• 
a 
■ 
a 
a 

F 
M 

a 
a 


1 


10 


• 1 


32 


Il-a 


Car in^ix^ectors. repairerv, etc. r , - - - 


1> 68 


68 


I-b 




1 

1 

i 

1 

1 


55 
40 
5 
116 
114 
100 


64 


Il-a 


Clerkf , 'ailway 


41 


Il-a 


Conductors 


4 
116 


Il-a 


F.ngifiAAf. lofiomotive 


120 


Il-a 


Firemen and ensineere, locomotive 


100 


Il-d 


Freiffht and baasafcemen 


25 


XI 


Letter oarrieri i 


1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

1 
1 


2 
50 
29 
68 

d 

100 
160 


2 


IV-ft 




53 


IV-a 


Mn^-hiniat^' apprentioefi and helperv 


31 


VIII 


Munciana , . - - 


74 


I-b 


PiiintAni uid docorators • . . . r 


S 
27 


Il-a 


Trackmen, railway 


175 


Il-a 


T'rn.inTnnn. road and vard 


164 




Total 






M 

F 


17 


1,004 
7 


19 


1,371 




Saratoga Springa. 

Barbers 


7 


X-b 


M 

F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 

« 

F 
M 

■ 


1 
1 
1 


18 
67 
17 




20 


I-b 


Bricklayers and masons 


66 


II-c 


Cab and coach drivers and chauffeurs. 


15 


Il-a 




35 


I-b 


Can^entem and iomem 


1 
1 

i 

i 

i 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

i 

1 


129 

27 

f 

14 

9 

20 

g 

30 

20 

11 

118 

18 

7 

g 

23 

74 


157 


IX 


Cigar makers 


30 


X-c 


Clerkfl and salesmen , . » , - 


g 
21 


V 


Compositors 


19 
20 


Il-a 


Firemen and ensineers. locomotive t . - ^ - 


g 
30 


IV-a 


Iron molders ana core makers .......... r 


34 


XI 


Letter carriers ... 


11 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


107 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Poet office clerks 


20 
7 


Il-a 


Street railway employees 


g 

28 


Il-a 


Trainmen. rcMul and vard . . . . . . r - t - . . t t - - - 


74 




Total 






M 

F 


15 


583 
IS 


1« 


675 




Waterford. 

PiLintAni and dAcnrAfcom . 


gs 


I-b 


M 


1 


8 


1 


9 




SCHENECTADY COUNTY. 

C*AT infffMctorff. nnurers. oto. ... 




Il-a 


M 

a 
a 
a 


1 
1 


22 
56 


1 
1 
1 
1 


21 


Il-a 


Clerks, rail wav ...,,,.,... 


58 


Il-d 


Fraiirht And VMMV&ffoni6n ... # . - ■ 


58 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and yard r t , - 


1 


60 


70 




Total 






M 


3 


147 


4 


207 








Vll-a 


M 

a 
a 
a 


1 
1 

1 


41 
103 
115 
110 


1 

1 

1 


83 


X-b 


Barbers 


112 


X-a 


Bartenders .... 


100 


IV-a 


Blacksmiths 


115 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appbkbix. 



127 



TtJMm n.— Ualoiui and BieMb«nUf by Localities and Tiadaa. 1»11 — 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



CouNTT, Town akd Trade 



Sex 



MabchSI 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



Skptbmbeb 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY — eondnded. 



Schenectsdy — condnded. 

IV-a Blaoksmiths' helpers 

Vll-b Brewery employees (drivers and bottlers) 

I-b Bricklsyers and masons 

I-c Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers . 

Vll-a Butchers and meat cutters 

I-b Carpenters and joiners 

IX Cigar makers 



Compositors . 



X-a 

IV-a 
IV-a 
IV-a 
IV-a 

I-b 
Il-a 
Il-a 
IV-a 
IV-a 
XI 
VI 
IV-a 
IV-b 
VIII 

Ill-a 

I-b 
IV-a 

I-b 
XI 

XI 

IV-a 
I-b 

IV-a 
VIII 
I-b 
I-a 

Il-a 
Ill-a 

Il-a 

II-o 



Cooks and waiters 

Core makers 

Cranemen 

Drop forgers 

Electrical apparatus makers. 



Electrical workers 

Engineers, locomotive 

Firemen sjid en^neers, locomotive 

Foundry and machine shop laborers and heli>ers. 

Iron molders and core makers 

Letter carriers 

Machine woodworkers 

Machinists 

Metal polishers, buffers and platers 

Musicians 



M 



50 

70 
241 
418 

78 
485 

57 
6 

64 
S 

50 
160 
235 



Overall workers . 



Painters and decorators 

Pattern makers 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 
Post office clerks 



Public school janitors 

Saw and tool makers 

Sheet metal workers Cbuilding) . 

Sheet metal workers (shop) 

Stage employees 

Steam and hot water fitters 

Stone cutters 

Street railway employees 

Tailors. 



Trainmen, road and^ard. 
Truck and wagon dnvers. 



2,138 

111 

72 

83 

45 

415 

465 

53 

84 

1.098 

85 

135 

6 

4 

91 

140 

260 

85 

38 

g 



33 

50 

37 

121 

133 

430 

15 

127 



Total. 



VI 



XI 
XI 



SCHOHARIE COUNTY. 

CobleskiU. 

Carriage, wagon and automobile workers. 



M 



Letter carriers . . . 
Post office clerks . 

Total 



SCHUYLEB COUNTY. 
Watkfaia. 



56 



8.445 

eie 



36 



15 



45 

72 
258 
383 

74 
634 

63 
7 

66 
» 

42 
170 
298 

34 
2,811 

eiA 

117 
83 
45 

388 

465 
58 

175 

1,497 

72 

144 
6 

i 

256 
120 
38 



200 
36 
50 
36 

124 
97 

452 
20 

131 

104 



65 



10.142 
7gS 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



128 New YonK Labor Bulletin. 

' « Tftble IL~ Unions nnd Membership by Locattties and Trsdes, 1»11 — oontfamed 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



CouNTT, Town akd Traok 



Sex 



Mabcb 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



Sbftbmbbb 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



SENECA COUNTY. 



X-b 
X-a 

I-b 
IV-ft 
XI 
IV-s 



X-a 

Il-a 
Ill-e 



Barbers 

Bartenders 

Carpenters and joiners 

Iron molders and core makers, 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 

Total 

Waterioo. 

Bartenders 

Street railway employees 

Woolen workers 

Total 



STEUBEN COUNTY. 



M 



M 



Il-a 
I-b 



XI 
XI 



X-b 
I-b 
I-b 
IX 

Il-a 

II 

Il-a 
XIII-c 

IV-a 
XI 

IV-a 
VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
XI 
Il-a 



X-b 

Ill-d 

Vll-b 

I-b 

I-b 

IX 



Car inspectors, repairers, etc 
Carpenters and jomers 

Total 

Letter carriers .... 

Post office clerks 

Total 

Comlac- 

Barbers 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers , 

Conductors 

Engineers, locomotiye 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Flint glass cutters and workers 

Iron molders and core makers 

Letter carriers 

Machinists 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks 

Trainmen, road and yard 

Total 

Homell. 

Barbers 

Boot and shoe workers 

Brewery emplovees 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers 



M 



M 



M 



179 



16 



28 

38 

80 

22 

1 

82 

173 

138 

110 

20 

13 

12 

35 

15 

45 

12 

8 

250 



16 



1,066 
16 



M 



17 
7 
23 
16 
49 
22' 



15 



13 
36 
28 

88 
6 
7 



178 



26 
33 



59 



17 



31 
41 
92 
18 



81 
173 
134 



6 
14 
12 
30 
10 
47 
12 

8 
269 



968 
10 



19 
7 
22 
20 
63 
26 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix, 



129 



TaUe U.^ Unloro and Membcrriap by Lornlltl— and TrMles, 1913 — continued 



In- 
dustiy 

"beT 


CouxTY, Town and Tkade 


Sex 


March 31 


SCPTXMBER 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 


Ntmn- 
berof 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


X-c 


Clerkis and nalmnen . . 


M 

» 
« 

• 
P 

M 

■ 

« 
» 




7 

117 

12 

209 

275 

:io 

12 

9 

41 

10 

2« 

8 

4 

34 

308 




7 


Il-a 
I-b 


Conductors 

Electrical workers .... 


114 


Il-a 


Kngineers, locomotive 




200 


Il-a 
IV-a 
XI 


Firemen and enipneers, locomotive 

Iron molders and core makers 

Letter carriers 


250 
30 
10 


IV-a 


Machinists 


7 


VIII 


Musicians 


30 


I-b 




8 
22 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, sas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks 


9 

4 


Il-a 


Switchmen 


33 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and yard 


310 




Total 






M 
F 


21 


1,226 
JO 


20 


1,183 




SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Babylon. 

Carpenters and joiners 


8 


I-b 


M 


1 


13 


1 


10 




BaySlMre. 

Painters and decorators 




I-b 


M 


1 


36 


1 


49 




Central lallp. 

Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 




I-c 


M 






1 


10 










Il-b 


M 






1 


43 




Carpenters and joiners 


' 




I-b 


M 


1 


122 


1 


00 




Mip. 

Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


M 

■ 


1 
1 


125 

8 


1 
1 


120 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


8 




Total 






M 


2 


133 


2 


137 




Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


M 


1 


44 


1 


44 




Northport. 

Letter camera 




XI 


M 


1 


4 


1 


4 




Patchofne. 




I-b 


M 

« 
« 


1 
1 
1 


60 
5 
6 


1 
1 
1 


60 


XI 


Letter carriers 


4 


XI 


Post office clerks 


6 




Total 






M 


3 


71 


3 


70 




Port Jeffenon. 

Carpenters and Joiners 




I-b 


M 

m 
m 


1 


78 


1 

1 
1 


60 


Il-b 


Masters and pilots 


36 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


1 


•12 


10 




Total 






M 


2 


00 


3 


106 




BlTerhoad. 

Caroenters and ioinerB . 




I-b 


M 






1 


16 


1 '■ 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



130 Xew Yoek Labob Bulletin. 

TtiMe U.— Unions ud MembenUy by LoodlttM »nd Tmdes, 1913 — eontinaed 



In- 
dustry 



CorMTT, Towx Ajn> Tbade 



Sex 



March 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



SEPTSMBSnaO 



Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
ber of 



bera 



I-b 
I-b 
I-b 

I-b 



IX 

xr 

XI 



X-b 
IX 



XI 
XI 



SUFFOLK COUNTY — 

SsTTille. 

Carpenters and joiners 



SmltliU»WB. 

Carpenters and joiners 



SonChamptoD. 

Carpenters and joiners 



SULUVAN COUNTY. 

Llbertr. 

Painters and decorators 



Cigar makers . . . . 
Letter carriers . . . 
Post office clerks . 



TIOGA COUNTY. 
Owego. 



Total. 



Barbers 

Cigar makers . 

Compositors . . 



Letter carriers . . . 
Post office clerks . 



WaTeriy. 



Total. 



TOMPKINS COUNTY. 



X-b 
X-a 

I-b 
I-b 
IX 



XI 
VIII 

I-b 
I-b 

XI 
I-b 
Il-a 

Ill-a 



Barbers 

Bartenders 

Bricklayers and masons . 
Carpenters and joiners . . 
Cigar makers 



Compositors. 



Letter carriers . 
Musicians 



Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers. 

Post office clerks 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Street railway employees 

TaUors 



Total. 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



14 



82 



48 



31 
40 
73 
141 
52 

2 
35 

7 
19 
58 

f 

106 

29 

7 
31 
45 
28 
15 

695 



14 



86 



40 



43 



18 
17 



10 

1 
6 

4 



55 

1 



40 

95 

149 

52 

f 
35 

e 

15 
70 

S 
115 
27 

8 
31 
43 
28 
10 

~740 
»1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ApFxin)iz. 

Tftble n.— Unions and Membenhlp hj LocaBtfea 



131 



and TndM. 1913 — contimwd 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



I-b 
XI 



X-b 
VI 
Vll-b 
I-b 
I-c 
Vll-a 
,»• I-b 
IX 
V 

Il-a 
I-b 
Il-b 
XII 
Il-a 
I-a 

IIlH» 

XI 
Il-b 
VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
XI 

Il-e 

Il-a 



III-« 



I-a 

IX 

XI 

Xlll-a 

XI 



CouNTT, Town and Traox 



ULSTER COUNTY. 



Carpenters and joiners 

Letter carriers 

Total 

Kingston. 

Barbers 

Box makers and sawyers 

Brewery employees 

Bricklayers and masons 

Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Butchers and meat cutters . . ; 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers 

Compositors 

Conauctors 

Electrical workers 

Engineers, marine 

Engineers, stationary 

Firomen and engineers, locomotive 

Granite cutters 

Lace curtain makers 

Letter carriers 

Masters and pilots 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers, 
Post office clerks 

Telegraphers, railroad 

Trainmen, road and yard 

Total 

Bifton. 

Carpet workers 

Savgerties. 

Bluestone cutters 

Cigar makers 

Letter carriers 

Paper and pulp workers 

Post office clerks 

Total 



WARBEN COUNTY. 

Glens FkOs. 

Vll-a Bakers and confectioners 

I-b Bricklayers and masons 

I-b Carpenters and joiners 

IX Cigar makers 

V Compositors 

VI Coopers 

I-b Electrical workers 

XII Engineers, stationary : 

XII Firemen, stationary 

Ill-b Laundry workers 



Sex 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



MabcbSI 



Num- 
ber 
of 

imions 



24 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



SxpteiibbrSO 



Num- 
ber 
of 

unions 



30 
16 
75 
39 
30 
28 
170 
28 
2o 
23 

7 
93 
30 
83 

9 
23 
13 



75 

6 

30 

32 

16 

1 

218 



144 



27 



13 
98 
190 
31 
29 

e 

14 
83 
11 
17 
150 



24 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



24 



27 
22 
76 
43 
27 
23 
187 
28 
25 
25 



84 
29 
80 
12 
23 
12 
53 
76 



24 
16 

1 
274 

1 
148 



1,345 
8 



27 



16 
24 

3 
20 

8 



66 



12 
96 
194 



70 

11 

19 

141 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



132 New York Labor Bvlletin. 

Ttible n.— Unions and Memberaldp by LocaUtles and Trades. 191S — conUnned 



In- 
duBtry 
num- 
ber 



County, Town and Tradb 



Sex 



Mabcb 31 



Num- 
ber 

uni(HUi 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



SXFTEMBEB 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 



bers 



XI 
VIII 

14) 
Xlll-a 
I-b 
XI 

Il-a 



Ill-a 



Vll-b 
I-b 
XII 
XII 
Xlll-a 



I-b 

IV-a 

XI 

Xlll-a 

XI 

V 



Xlll-a 



Il-b 
Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-a 
Il-b 
Il-a 
Il-a 



XIII-c 



XI 
XI 



WABBEN COUNTY — eonelnded. 

Glens Falls — condaded. 

Letter carriers 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

P^)er and pulp workers 

Plumbers, gas and steamfitters and helpers . . 
Post office clerks 

Street railway employees 

Total 

Warrenalmrg. 

Coat, pants and vest makers 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Fort Edward. 

Brewery emplosrees 

Carpenters and joiners 

Engineers, stationary 

Firemen, stationary 

Paper and pulp workers 

Total 

Hudson Falls. 

Carpenters and joiners 

Iron molders and core makers 

Letter carriers 

Paper and pulp workers 

Post office clerks 

Wall paper iiri«i»hin^ printers and color mixers, 

Total 

ThooisoB. 

Paper and pulp workers 

WUtehall. 

Boatmen 

Car inspectors, repairers, etc 

Conductors 

Engineers, locomotive 

Engineers, marine 

Firemen and engineers, locomotive 

Trainmen, road and yard 

Total 

WAYNE COUNTY. 

ayde. 

Glass bottle blowers 

lorons. 

Letter carriers 

Post office clerks 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



11 
68 
13 
52 
252 



9 

1 
118 



18 1.146 
20 



M 



38 
385 



478 



56 
30 

7 
239 

4 
68 



404 



200 



56 
140 



510 



62 



18 



13 

72 

15 

50 

276 

21 

8 

I 

120 



1,165 
17 



13 

4B 



20 
30 
14 
37 
342 
4 



443 

4 



54 
30 

5 
237 

3 
74 



403 



152 



18 
33 
80 
26 
65 
140 



362 



47 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



133 



Table II. — Unions and Membership bjr Loenllties and Trades, 19 IS — continued 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 


CouNTT, Town and Tradb 


Sex 


Mabch 31 


September 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Il-a 


WAYNE COUNTY — conchided. 

Lyena — coacladed. 

Switchmen 


M 

m 


1 
1 


7 
42 


1 
1 


3 


Il-a 


Trainmen, road and yard 


3d 




Total 






M 

F 


4 


54 


4 


44 




Newark. 
Bartenders 


2 


X-a 


M 

• 

« 

a 

F 
M 


1 
1 
1 
1 

i 


23 

20 

5 

38 

f 

9 


1 
1 
1 
1 

i 


21 


I-b 


Electrical workers 


20 


XI 


Letter carriers 


6 


VIII 


Muflicians 


38 


XI 


Post office clerks 


e 

9 




ToUl 






M 
F 


5 


95 
2 


5 


94 




Palmfrm. 

Poet office clerks 


2 


XI 


M 


1 


3 


I 


3 




WESTCHESTER COUNTY. 

Dobbs Ferry. 

Brewery employees ...» 




Vll-b 


M 

m 
a 






1 
1 
1 


28 


I-b 


Carpenters and joiners 


1 
1 


32 
34 


30 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


23 




Total 






M 


2 


66 


3 


81 




HastlntfB-opon-Hadson. 

Cable workers 




IV-b 


M 

c 


1 
1 


25 
40 






I-b 




1 


42 




Total 






M 


2 


65 


I 


42 




Inrlngton. 

Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


M 

M 

a 


1 
1 

1 


41 

24 

2 


1 
1 
1 


46 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


13 


XI 


Poet office clerks 


2 




Total 






M 


3 


77 


3 


61 




Carpenters and joiners 




I-c 
I-b 


M 

a 
a 
a 


1 

1 
1 
1 


17 

21 

3 

28 


1 
1 
1 
1 


20 
21 


XI 


Letter carriers 


3 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


31 




Total 






M 


4 


69 


4 


75 




Mount KIseo. 

Carpenters and joiners 




I-b 


M 

■ 


1 
1 


99 
21 


1 

1 


102 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


25 




Total 






M 


2 


120 


2 


127 




Meant Vernon. 

Barbers 




X-b 


M 

a 
a 






1 
1 
1 


19 


X-a 


Bartenders 


1 
1 


19 
168 


22 


I-b 




200 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



134 New Tobk Labob Bulletin. 

"mble n.— Unions and Membership by Localities and Trades, 191S — eontfamed 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



I-o 
I-b 

X-c 

V 

xu 

IV-a 

XI 
I-b 
I-b 

XI 

XI 
I-b 
I-b 



X-b 

X-a 
I-b 
I-c 
I-b 

V 

Il-a 
I-c 

rv-a 

I-b 
XI 
VIII 
I-b 
I-b 
XI 
XI 
I-b 
Il-a 
I-b 
Il-a 
Il-e 



I-b 
I-b 
VIII 

I4> 
I-b 
XI 



Vll-a 
X-a 
l-h 
I-b 

IX 
X-c 



CoTTNTT, Town and Tbadb 



WESTCHESTER COUNTT — eentlnved. 

Meant Vernon — oondaded. 

Brioklayerst masons and plasterers' laborers. ... 

Carpenters and joiners 

Clerks and salesmen 

CompontoiB 

Engineers, stationary 

Horseahoers 

Letter carriers 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post o£Bloe clerks 

Public school janitors 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Steam and hot water fitters 

Total 

New BocheUe. 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Bricklayers and masons 

Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers . . . . 

Carpenters and joiners 

Compositors 

Conductors 

General building and street laborers 

Horseshoers 

Lathers 

Letter carriers 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks 

Public school janitors 

Sheet metal workers (building) 

Si gnaJ maintainers 

Steam and hot water fitters 

Street railway employees 

Telegraphers, railroad 

Total 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers, 
Post office clerks 

Total 

Peekskfll. 

Bakers and confectioners 

Bartenders 

Bricklayers and masons 

Carpenters and joiners 

Cigar makers 

Clerks and salesmen 

Compositors 



Sex 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



March 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



15 



20 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



105 
295 
16 
28 
33 
13 
22 
84 
39 
13 
1 

11 
17 
40 



903 

1 



16 

30 

181 

103 

390 

17 

45 



14 
25 
15 
42 
156 
17 
11 



14 



11 

200 

46 



1.333 



55 
125 
40 

5 
26 
14 

4 



264 
6 



16 
26 
35 
114 
51 
18 
11 
15 



SXPTSMBKB 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 



15 



21 



Num- 
ber of 



126 
287 



18 
36 
18 
22 
10& 
55 
15 
i 
11 

20 
26 



974 

1 



23 
30 

182 
96 

260 
14 
52 
60 
17 
20 
18 
36 

122 
19 
11 
13 
14 
38 



200 
104 



1.418 



66 

126 

36 

6 
33 
14 

6 



267 
5 



16 

28 

38 

150 

51 

9 

10 

13 

1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Afpbkbiz. 135 

Tbble n.— Unioiw and Memberahip by LocalHiMi mad Trades, 191 S — cmitiBned 



In- 
diiitiy 
mim- 


County, Town and Trade 


Sex 


Mabch 31 


Sbptbmbsr 90 


Num- 
ber 
of 
imions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


VI 


WESTCHESTEB COUNTY — eontfaiacd. 

Coopers 


M 

M 
* 

F 
M 

M 

m 

F 
M 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

i 

1 
1 
1 
1 




19 

172 

11 

51 

2 
28 

6 

5 

go 

125 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

i 


10 


I-a 


Omnitf^ niif,tjftr« , . , .,,,,. 


18 


IV-a 


I»vn molder^ and core ixiAker? , , 


170 


I-a 


Letter carriere 


ill 
149 


XIII 


Mnipi<*inni| 


I-b 


Painten and decorators - 


22 


I-b 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks 




XI 


1 
1 
1 


9 


Ill-b 


Underwear makers 


iO 


VII-» 


Yeast and distillery workers 


90 




Total 


M 

F 


17 


701 
SS 


16 


680 




PleanmtTlIle. 

Carpenters and joinors 


SS 


I-b 


M 

m 


1 
1 


76 
22 


1 
1 


80 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


22 




Total 






M 


2 


98 


2 


102 




Port ChMter. 

Barbers 




X-b 


M 

m 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

a 

F 
M 

a 

F 
M 

a 
a 




20 

37 

218 

45 

168 

18 

115 

12 

5 

68 

5 

109 

30 

6 

1 

16 

27 

86 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

1 
1 

i 

1 
1 


21 


X-a 


Bartenders .... 


33 


I-b 


BncklayAm ftnd nianons t , 


218 


I-c 
I-b 


Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Carpenters and joiners 


61 
219 


Il-a 


Clenw, railway ...... 


30 


IV-a 


Iron molders and core nudcers 


125 


XI 


Letter carriers 


12 


rv-a 

VIII 

I-b 
I-b 
XI 


Machinists 

Musicians 

Painters and decorators 

Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Post office clerks 


3 
71 

6 
116 
35 

7 


I-b 
IV-a 


Stove mounters 


1 

16 
23 


Il-a 


Street milwftv *>niplovees . 


92 




Total 

Bye. 

Carpenters and joiners 

Tarrytown. 

Bricklayers and masons 

Bricklayers, nuisons and plasterers' laborers 

Carpenters and joiners 

Compositors 

Lathers 

Letter carriers 






M 
F 


17 


980 

e 


17 


1.082 

e 


I-b 


M 


2 


60 


1 


51 


I-b 
I-c 
I-b 
V 
I-b 
XI 


M 

a 
a 




160 

25 

128 

30 

5 

7 

55 

54 

7 

26 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


165 

25 

114 

29 

6 

9 


I-b 




52 


I-b 
XI 


Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

Poet office clerks 


37 
6 


I-b 


Sheet metal workers (building) 


22 




Total 

White Plaine. 

Bricklayers and masons , 






M 


10 


497 


10 


465 


I-b 


M 

M 

a 
a 


1 

1 
1 
1 


124 

125 

335 

23 


1 

i 


130 


IHJ 

I-b 


Bricklayers, masons, and plasterers' laborers 

Carpenters and joiners 


160 
336 


V 


Compositors 


25 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



136 



Xew Yobk Labob Bulletin. 



Table n.— Ui^ 



MdTnd0S,19U — 



In- 
dustry 
num- 
ber 



County, Toww and Trade 



Sex 



Mabch 31 



Num- 
ber 
of 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



SXPTEaiBER 30 



Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 



Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 



WESTCHESTEB COUNTY — cenctaded. 

White FUlos — conctaded. 

Il-a Encineers, locomotive 

XII Engineers, stationary 

I-b Lathers 

XI Letter carriers 

VIII Musicians 

I-b Painters and decorators 

I-b Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

XI Post office clerks 

I-b Sheet metal workers (building) 

Total 

Yonkera. 

Yll-a Bakers and confectioners 

X-b Barbers 

X-a Bartenders 

I-b Bricklayers and masons 

I-c Bricklayers, masons and plasterers' laborers 

Vll-a Butchers and meat cutters 

I-b Carpenters and joiners 

V Compositors 

I-b Electrical workers 

XII Engineers, stationary 

I-c Excavators and tunnel workers 

XII Firemen, stationary 

IV-a Horseshoers 

IV-a Iron molders and core makers 

I-b Lathers 

XI Letter carriers 

IV-a Machinists 

VIII Musicians 

I-b Painters and decorators 

I-b Plumbers, gas and steam fitters and helpers 

XI Poet office clerks 

V Pressmen 

XI Public school janitors 

I-b Rock drillers, tool sharpeners, etc 

I-b Sheet metal workers (building) 

I-b Steam and hot water fitters 

I-a Stone cutters 

I-b Stone masons 

Il-a Street railway employees 

Vll-a Sugar refinery workers 

II-c Truck and wagon drivers and chauffeurs 

X-a Waiters 

XI Water works employees 

Total 



WYOMING COUNTY. 

Perry. 

I-b Carpenters and joiners 

I-a Granite cutters 

Totol 



M 



M 



M 



M 



M 



105 
68 
19 
15 
61 



13 



1,069 



76 

30 

77 

2371 

300. 

85 

644 

46 

120 
65 

467 
24 
28 
70 
35 
73 

175 

108 
/ 

260 
98 
23 

19 

21 

1,200 

55 

36 

40 

90 

230 

450 

350 

32 

145 



5,709 
6 



14 



34 



103 
68 
27 
15 
04 

102 

50 

9 

5 

35 



1,144 
S 



85 



76 

237 

300 

90 

581 

46 

18 

180 

72 

877 

30 

25 

70 

30 

74 

175 

107 

B 

255 

102 

25 



17 
21 

135 
60 
63 
30 
90 

224 



350 
30 
146 



4,603 



10 
10 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 



137 





In- 

dustry 

nun- 

ber 


County, Town and Trade 


Sex 


March 31 


September 30 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 


I-b 


SHTer Springs. 


M 


1 


14 


1 


14 




Warww. 

EngineArn, fft^tioniLry . , , 




XII 


M 

• 


1 

1 


9 
10 


1 
1 


10 


I-b 


Painters and decorators 


8 




ToUl 

YATES COUNTY. 

Penn Yan. 

Brf cklay^c" and madoiuf . ... 






M 


2 


19 


2 


18 


I-b 


M 

m 
m 


1 
1 
1 
1 


10 
3 

82 
5 


1 
1 
1 
1 


11 


XI 


Letter carriers 


4 


VI 


Machine woodworkers 


93 


XI 


Poet office clerks 


5 




Total 






M 


4 


100 


4 


113 





















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



138 New Yoek Laboe Bulletin. 

recapitulation of table h.— unions and mbbfbesship, by locauties. itis 





Sex 


Maboh 31 


Sbptembeb 30 


COUNTT AND ToWN 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


AXJBANT COFNTY 


M 

F 


114 


10,942 
X88 


113 


10,992 
£1S 




Albany 


M 
F 
M 
F 

¥ 
M 


84 
20 

4 

1 
5 

2 


8.936 
157 

1,330 

lot 

385 

65 

226 

14 


83 
20 

4 

1 
5 

2 


8.878 

155 

1,277 


Cohoes 


Green IsUmd 


60 
495 


Rftvena 


69 


Watervliet 


272 


ALZJBOAirr Comrn: 

WoUiivillf* 


14 






Bbooms Countt 


M 

F 


37 


2,351 
IBO 


38 


2.289 




161 


Binchamton 


M 

F 
M 

N 

M 

F 


36 

i 

1 

35 



2,323 

JgO 

2 

26 

1,644 
g? 


36 

i 

1 
35 


2,266 


Deposit 


161 
3, 


Endicott 


20 


Cattarauoxjb County 


1,761 




SI 


Franklioville 


F 
M 

F 






1 
19 

is 

34 


33 


Olean 


19 
i6 

33 


912 
11 

732 
16 

1,748 

ge 


942 




6 
786 


Cayuoa County 


15 
1,875 




55 


Auburn 


M 

F 
M 

M 

F 


32 

i 

53 


1,696 
26 
52 

2,602 

43 


33 

i 

57 


1,825 


Weedsport 


55 
50 


Chautauqua County 


2,789 
55 




niinkirlt 


M 

F 
M 

k 

M 

F 


26 

2 

22 

i 

2 
39 


1,334 

18 

9 

1.245 

£7 
2 
12 

2.927 
9 


27 

2 

26 

i 

1 
39 


1,274 


Fredonia 


17 
11 


Jamestown 


1,499 


Silver Creek 


38 
2 


Westfield 


3 


Chemung County: 

Elmira 


3,072 
8 




Chsnanoo County: 

Norwich 


M 

F 1 


16 


682 

8 


16 


679 
8 


Clinton County 


M 


14 


567 


17 


673 






Cadyville 


M 


1 

1 

11 

1 

8 


50 

60 

408 

49 

184 


1 

1 

13 

2 

9 


50 


Morrisonville , 


60 


Plattsburg 


494 


Rouses Point 


69 


Columbia County 


221 






Chatham 


M ' 


1 
7 


24 
160 


2 

7 


56 


Hudson 


16. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 139 

Recftpitiilatlon of Table IL~ Unioiis and MemlMnUp, by Loodlties, ItlS — eoBtimied 





Sex 


^fABCH31 


Sbptembbb 30 


County and Town 


Num- 
ber of 
uniona 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


COBTLAND CoUNTT: 

CoHUnd 


M 

F 


12 


263 
19 


12 


267 




91 


^KLAWAm COXTNTT 


M 

F 


4 


74 
1 


4 


71 




1 


Ridney 


M 

« 

F 

M 

F 


1 
3 

34 


21 
53 

J 

1,805 
167 


1 
3 

35 


18 


Walton 


68 


DTTTCHBflfl COITNTT . 


i 

1,948 




ISO 


FishkiU-on-Hudaon 


M 

F 

M 

« 

a 

« 

F 
M 

F 

M 

F 


7 

i 

1 

1 
23 

i 

180 


242 

1 

42 

38 

20 

1,433 

6 

30 

160 

27,739 

1,591 


7 

i 

1 

1 

23 

2 

196 


238 


Matteawan 


44 


Millbrook 


38 


Millorton 


20 


Poughkeepflie 


1,649 


Wi^ypipget"! Fallff 


8 
54 


Fxn COITNTY 


190 




1,908 


Alden 


M 

« 

F 
M 

a 

M 

M 

F 


1 

1 

164 

4 

2 

1 
2 
5 

10 


3 

40 

26,997 

1,S91 

368 

10 

72 

141 

108 

370 

7 






Blaadell 


1 
180 

6 

2 

1 
2 
5 

9 


42 


Buffalo . . ,...,. 


36,876 




1,908 
491 


Kafft Aurora ..... 


11 


Hamburg 


49 


I.4M^ka wanna 


155 


Tonawanda 


146 


Embx County 


355 




7 


AuBable Forks 


M 

« 

F 

M 

M 

F 


1 
1 

2 

1 
5 

14 


15 
23 
7 
96 
30 
206 

330 


2 


15 


Keeaeville 


23 


Lake Placid 


7 
100 


Mineville 




Ticonderoga 


5 
13 


217 


Fbanklin County 


288 




» 


Chateaugay 


M 

u 

« 

F 


1 

7 
6 


18 
150 
162 

2 


1 

7 
5 


20 


Malone 


153 


Saranac Lake 


110 




« 


Fulton County 


M 

F 


15 


834 

So 


18 


714 




J85 


Gloveniville 


M 

F 
M 

M 


11 
4 

14 


735 
35 
99 

514 


13 
5 

14 


594 


John«ttown r 


J85 
120 


Gbnkssb County 


492 






Batavia 


M 

M 


12 
2 


505 
9 


12 

2 


485 


LeRoy 


7 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



140 Xew York Labor Bulletin. 

RecftpitaUtlon of Table n.— Unions nad MenilMrahip, by LoeaUtton, 191S — continned 





Sex 


March 31 


Septembek 30 


County and Town 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Num- 
ber of 
imions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


GbEBNK Ck>XJNTY 


M 
F 


3 


11 


3 


11 




2 


pRfjlkiM . 


M 

F 
M 

F 

M 
F 


2 

i 

24 


6 

/ 
5 

1 

1,956 
40 


2 

i 

26 


6 


CoxsEckie 


/ 
5 


Herkimeb County 


/ 
1,942 




33 


DoUevUle . . 


F 
M 
F 

M 
F 


1 
1 
5 

4 

13 


30 

65 

178 

1.366 

23 

317 

17 

2.345 
6 


1 
1 
5 
5 

14 

11 




30 


Frankfort 


48 


Herkimer - 


178 


Ilion 


1.326 


Little Falls 


16 
360 


Jettkkbo's County 


17 
2,189 




6 


Alexandria Bav ... ... 


M 

M 
U 

U 

u 

F 

M 

F 


2 

1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
25 

18« 


45 

29 

44 

30 

59 

218 

32 

33 

1,855 

6 

46.697 
3,502 


2 
2 

1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
24 

181 


45 


Black River 


42 


Brownville 


29 


Carthage 


39 


Clayton 


65 


Deforiet 


225 


Felta Mills 


32 


Glen Park 


34 


Watertown 


1,678 


ExNos County: 

New York City, Brooklyn Borough* 


54,049 
2,969 


Lewis County 


M 


2 


34 


3 


28 






HarrisviUe 


M 

M 

F 

If 

F 
M 

M 

F 






1 
1 
1 

5 


10 


Lowvillc 


1 

1 

5 


3 
31 

88 
/ 


3 


Lyons Falls 


15 


Livingston County 


89 




/ 


Avon 


1 
2 



2 

16 


49 
9 
/ 

30 

543 

7 


1 
2 

2 

19 


50 


Dansville 


10 


Mount Morrw 


1 
29 


Madison County 


604 




8 


Cft-nfUftntA ,,....,. 


M 
F 
M 
F 

M 

F 


3 

is 

100 


13 

/ 

530 

6 

22,869 
1,481 


3 

16 

108 


13 


Oneida 


591 


MoNBOE County 


7 
20.056 




830 


Brockport 


M 

u 

F 
M 
F 
M 


4 

1 

94 

i 


34 
32 

22,784 

1,477 
19 


3 

1 

i64 


22 


Fairoort 


32 


Rochester 


5 
20,002 


Spenoerport 


827 



* See summary of New York City, following New York County 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 







Sex 


MabchSI 


Sbptbmbeb 30 


County and Town 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Num- 
berof 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


MONTOOMBBT CoUNTT 


M 
F 


18 


980 
6 


21 


1.111 




$ 


Arnctenlain 


M 

F 
M 

M 

F 


15 

i 

1 
1 

14 


933 

6 
3 

4 
40 

970 
1 


18 

i 

1 
1 

13 


1.063 


r:iiniuoli»m , 


5 
4 


FnnPWin 


4 


8t. Jnbi^mnlU 


40 


Namau County 


1,026 












Freeport 


M 

F 
M 

M 

F 


2 
2 

1 
4 
1 


52 
483 
163 
104 

56 


2 
2 

1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 


62 


Glen Cove 


508 


Great Neck 


160 


Hempetead 


107 


Lynbrook 


25 


Mineola 


52 


Port WMhiDgton 


1 
2 

i 

712 


85 

13 

1 

14 

416,532 


101 


RoekviUe Center 


11 






WeBtbury 






Niw YoBK County: 

New York City. Maohattan and BroDx Bor- 

oushs (»ee below). 
NewYork City 


760 


420.087 




71,706 


Manhattan and Bronx Boroughs 


M 

F 
M 
F 
M 
F 
M 
F 

M 

F 


478 

ieo 

40 

25 

56 


363.567 

ei,ou 

46.697 

S,602 

4.869 

22 

1,399 

2 

3.334 

27 


512 

isi 

43 

24 


369,479 


Brooklyn Boroui^ 


68,669 
54.049 


Queens Borough 


2,969 
5,192 




68 
1,367 






NiAOARA County 


57 


3,632 




27 


Lockport 


M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

M 

F 


20 

i 

30 

5 

74 


680 

12 

40 

2,160 

16 

454 

7,465 
1,282 


20 

i 

30 

6 

75 


721 


MkUUeport 


11 
40 


Niagara Falls 


2,153 


North TonawAnda 


16 
718 




8,216 




987 


Clinton 


M 

u 

F 
M 

F 
M 

F 
M 

M 

F 


1 
1 

14 

57 

i 

102 


29 
400 
600 
607 

6.389 
778 
40 

11,216 
64S 


1 
1 

14 

58 

i 

101 


35 


New York Mills 


600 


Rome 


SCO 
575 


Utica 


$ 
6,963 


Whiteaboro 


"St 


Onohdaoa County . . . . 


11,132 




669 


Baklwinsville 


M 

M 
M 
M 
« 

F 


1 
5 

1 
1 
1 
2 
91 


34 

660 

187 

25 

22 

31 

10.248 

64S 


1 
5 
2 
1 
1 
2 
89 


34 


Fiaat Byra47nse. 


681 


u^^SSlT.////.:: ,:.:.. .::.., 


216 




42 




20 


Solyay 


40 


Syracuse 


10,099 




669 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



142 New Yoek Laboe Bulletin. 

Recupltiilation of Table IL— UbImm mad Membwahip, by LocalltlM. 19U ~ cMilliwed 





Sex 


Mabch 31 




County and Town 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 




M 

F 


31 


1.104 
8 


30 


1,062 




7 




M 

F 
M 
F 
M 

M 

F 


6 
24 

i 

01 


114 
S 

©80 
S 
10 

4.063 
806 


6 

23 

i 

93 


107 


Geneva 


ni 


ShorteviUe 


S 
18 




5,154 




74S 


Central Valley 


M 

F 
M 

F 

M 

■ 

F 
M 

F 
M 

« 

M 

F 






1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
27 

32 

i 

19 

i 

3 

1 

15 


11 


Cornwall . . .' 


1 
1 
2 
3 
27 

32 

i 

18 

i 

1 

3 

1 

13 


27 

3 

43 

208 

1,535 

e 

1.097 

768 

12 

1,207 

i 

28 

5 

132 

05 

410 
7 


30 


Goahen 


4 


Highland Falls 


43 


Maybrook 


202 


Middletown 


1.550 




1.837 


Otisville 


707 
11 


Port Jervia 


1.208 


Tuxedo. . . . T , . , T r , . r - r T 


SS 
8 


Walden 


29 


Warwick 


145 


West Point 


76 


Oblkans Coutt 


490 




10 


Albion 


M 

« 

m 
m 

F 

M 

F 


6 
2 

1 
4 

31 


200 
35 
75 

100 

7 

1.376 
1 


6 
2 

1 
6 

32 


210 


HoUey 


46 


Hulberton 


80 


Mfldipa. 


154 




10 
1.451 




1 


Fulton 


M 

N 

F 

M 

F 


10 
21 

19 


283 
1,003 

i 

1,313 
6 


11 
21 

19 


869 


Oswego 


1,082 




1 
1,443 




6 


Coooerstown 


M 

« 

F 
M 

M 

F 


1 
17 

i 

40 


5 

1.294 

6 

14 

4.869 


1 
17 

i 

43 


6 


Oneoota 


1,426 


Richfield Springs 


6 
11 


• New York City, Queens Borough* 


5,192 




68 


RawfMKLAint C«Tn»TT 


M 

F 


eo 


5.478 
M8 


61 


5,811 




$6 


HfKWi^^V li'iLll" 


M 

F 

M 

« 

F 


6 

6 

48 


113 

S 

812 

4,553 

S5 


6 

6 

49 


115 


RflWHtftlaer 


f^i 


Troy 


4,801 




it 



* See summary of New York City, following New York County. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Affbitdiz. 



143 







Sex 


MabchSI 


Ssptsmbu 30 


County axd Town 


Num. 
berof 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Richmond Coxtmtt: 

New York City, Richmood Borough* 


M 

F 


25 


1.399 


24 


1,367 








RoCKUiXD CotWTT 


M 


16 


618 


15 


572 








M 

M 


2 
1 
6 

1 
2 
3 

1 

38 




27 

78 
183 

15 
168 
128 

19 

1.787 
S 


2 


43 


Tona Inland 




Nyaek 


6 
1 
2 
3 
1 

40 


201 


Pearl River 


20 


Sloatsborg 


151 


• Sufferp 


133 


West Haverstraw 


24 


St. Lawbence County 


1.788 




19 


CaotOD r t 


M 
F 
M 

« 
« 

m 
a 

F 
M 

M 
« 

M 
F 


2 


4 


2 

i 

7 

1 

1 

20 

3 

2 

2 

1 

48 


4 


Emeryville 


18 

27 


Gouveroeur 


7 

1 

1 

19 

3 

2 
2 
1 

45 


83 
34 
20 

842 
1 

316 
29 

399 
60 

2.230 


99 


Norfolk 


34 


Norwood 


15 


OgdeDsburg 


1.068 




17 
168 


Potsdam 


21 


Pyrites 


307 


Raymondville 


45 


Aakaixmia County 


2,679 




55 


Ballstos Spa 


M 
F 
M 

m 

F 
M 
F 
M 

M 

F 


5 

7 

17 

is 

i 

50 


113 

1 

522 

1.004 

7 

583 

16 

8 

8,692 
M16 


5 

7 

19 

ie 

i 

69 


78 


Corinth-Palmer 


1 
546 


Mfii^hanicville , 


1.371 


Saratosa SoriiuDB 


7 
675 


Waterf Old 


9 




10,349 




7«5 


Rott4n^am JuDotion ,.,,.,,. r ■, , - 


M 
F 

M 


3 
56 

1 


147 
8.445 

eie 

86 


4 
65 


207 


Schen«otady 


10,142 


ScHORAxn County: 

Cobleskill ^ 


7BS 








Watkio« 


M 


2 


6 


2 


6 






Sbnvca County 


M 
F 


9 


260 

i7 


8 


287 




94 


flfffiMa Fftlls 


M 

u 

F 


6 
3 


179 
81 

t7 


6 
2 


178 


Waterloo 


59 




24 



*See summaiy of New York City, following New Yoric County. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



144 



New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 







Sex 


Marob 31 


Sbptbmbsb 30 


County and Town 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Num- 
berof 
unions 


Num- 

berof 

members 


&TEITBBN County 


M 
F 


41 


2.314 
i6 


39 


2.175 




18 


Addiflon 


M 
F 

M 


2 

2 

16 

2i 

14 


16 

6 

1.066 

16 
1.226 

10 

643 


2 

2 

15 

20 

10 


17 


Bath 

Coming 

HoraeU 

Suffolk County 


7 

968 

10 

1.183 

8 

748 


BabyloD 

Bay Shore 

Central lalio 


M 


1 

1 


13 
36 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


10 
49 
10 


GreoDport 






43 


Huntington. 


1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
2 


122 
133 
44 

4 
71 
90 


90 


lelip 


137 


Lindenhurat . 


44 


Northport 


4 


Patohogue 


70 


Port Jefferaon 

Riverhead 


106 
16 


Sayville 


1 
1 


82 
48 


86 


Smithtown 


40 


Southamoton 


43 


Sullivan County: 

Liberty 


1 


8 


8 






TxoQA County 


M 

F 


8 


101 


8 


96 




1 


Owego 


M 

F 

M 

F 


3 
5 

14 


48 

53 

2 

695 
26 


3 
5 

14 


41 


Wavcrly 


55 


Tompkins Couxmr: 

Ithaca 


1 
740 




21 




M 

F 


31 




1,337 
6 


32 


1.462 




8 


Ellenville 


M 

« 

F 
M 

M 

F 


1 
24 

........ 

5 
19 


2 
1,239 

6- 
27 
69 

1.161 
66 


2 
24 

i 

5 

19 


24 


Kingston 


1.345 


Rif ton 


8 
27 


Saugerties 


66 


Wahren County 


1,178 




6$ 


Glens Falls 


M 

F 
M 

F 

M 

F 


18 

i 

18 


1.146 
20 
15 

1.485 


18 

i 

20 


1.165 


Warrensburg 


17 
13 


'W AumtaroM County 


1.860 




4 












Fort Edward 


M 

F 
M 


5 


478 


6 


443 




4 


Hudson Falls 


7 

1 
5 


404 

93 

510 


7 
1 
6 


403 


Thomson 


152 


WhitehaU 


862 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Appendix. 145 

Reeapitnlation of Table n. — Unions and Membership, by Localities, 191S — concluded 





«" 


March 31 


Septehbkk 30 


CODNTT ANU ToWN 


Num- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 
ber of 
members 


Nimi- 
ber of 
unions 


Num- 

borof 

members 


Watnb County 


s 


11 


204 


11 


1S8 




4 


Clyde 


¥ 
? 

M 
F 
M 

M 

F 

ivT 

: 

M 
M 

M 

F 
M 

M 

F 
M 
F 

F 

M 

* 

F 
M 

F 

M 


1 
4 

5 

i 

151 


52 

54 

2 

95 

2 

3 

12.011 

62 


1 

4 

5 

i 

149 


47 


LyoDs 


44 


Newark 


2 
94 


Palmyra. 


2 
3 


Westchester County 


11,181 




o2 


Dobbs Ferry 


2 
2 
3 

4 
2 
15 

20 

6 

i7 

2 

17 

2 

10 
13 

36 

5 


06 

65 

77 

09 

120 

903 

I 

1,333 

264 

5 

701 

33 

98 

980 

S> 

497 
1.009 

£ 
6,709 

5 

48 


3 

1 

\ 

2 
15 

2i 

6 

ie 

2 

17 

i 

10 
14 

34 

5 


81 


H»«tinir*-ui:>on-Hudson , 


42 




61 


MamaroDeck 


75 


Mount Kisco 


127 


^lownt Verr\on ,...........,.,..,,.- 


974 


New Rochelle 


1,418 


Owining 


207 


PiM^k^ill . 


.5 
689 


PleasaDtville 


,i3 
102 


Port Chester 


1.082 


Rye 


6 
51 


TarrytowD 


4r>5 


White Plains 


1,144 


Yonken 


4.603 


Wyoiunq County 


4 
52 






Perry 


M 
M 


2 

\ 

4 


15 
14 
19 

100 


2 
1 
2 

4 


20 


Silver Springs 


14 


Warsaw 


18 


Yates County: 

Penn Yan 


113 






Grand Total 


M 

F 


2,630 


572,213 


2,643 


680,726 




78,022 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 






^STATE OTJ NEW YORK {SX^Xij 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 



BULLETIN 



^'^^ 


. Issued Under the Direction of 


>u 


JAAES M. LYNCH 


.^^*- 


Commissioner of Labor 




Whole Ifo. 61 , 




Series on Unemployment Ifo. 3 



lDLi:N£:ss or Organized Wage Earners' 
IN THE First Half or 1914 



Prepared by 
THB BUREAU OF STATISTICS AND INF0RMATiq|lGoOQle 



Previous Publications Concerning Unemployment 

Statistics of Unemployment haTe been published from 1897 to date. All 
such statistics have been based on returns from trade unions. For the years 
1897 and 1898, these were published only in the annual reports of the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics. From 1899 to 1913 summary figures were published 
quarterly in the Bulletin of that Bureau^ which after 1900 became the Bulletin 
of the Department of Labor, with detailed annual figures in the annual reports 
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Beginning with 1913 statistics, or other 
information, concerning unemployment will be published only in Bulletins 
in a series on Unemployment, of which the present is the third number. 

From 1896 to 1905 a State Employment Bureau was maintained in New 
York City. The annual reports of this Bureau were published in the annual 
reports of the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the years 1896 to 19D0, and in 
the annual reports of the Commissioner of Labor for 1901 to 1905. Concern- 
ing the abolition of that Bureau, see page 14 of the report of the Commis- 
sioner of Labor for 1905. 

Of the publications above referred to, files of which may be found in many 
public libraries, the Department can now supply only the following: 

Quarterly Bulletins: 1899, No. 2; 1902, No. 15} 1907, No. 35; 1908, Nos. 36, 
37, 38; 1910, No. 45; 1911, Nos.-47, 48, 49; 1912, Nos. 50, 51, 52, 5a; 1913,. 
No. 64. 

Annual Reports of Bureau of Labor Statistics: 1900, 1901-4, 1906-7, 
1910, 1912. 

Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Labor: 1902-5. 

Bulletins in Series on Unemployment : No. 1 (whole No. 57) ; No. 3 {whole 
No. 61). 



ALBANY 

J. B. LYON COMPANY. PRINTERS 

1914 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



New York Labor Bulletin 

Pablished by the State Department of lAbor. 

Whole No. 6i Albany October, 19 14 

IDLENESS AMONG ORGANIZED WAGE EARNERS IN THE 
FIRST HALF OF 1914 

This Bulletin summarizes reports from 236 trade unions as to 
idleness on the last working day of each month from January to 
June inclusive. These returns were from 36 different localities 
and represented approximately 100 different trades and 25 per 
cent of the total union membership in the State. A summary 
of these and of similar returns for other years appears in the 
following table. 

TABLE 1. — PcBCBNTAOB OF Idlb Waob Earnbrs in RiipaBSB.vrrArivs TttAOB Umions, 
Januart-Junb, 1914 

END OF — Mean 

* ■ » for six 



TBAB Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June montha 

1902 20.9 18.7 17.3 15.3 14.0 14.5 16.8 

1903 20.5 17.8 17.6 17.3 20.2 23.1 19.4 

1904 25.8 21.6 27.1 17.0 15.9 13.7 20.2 

1906 22.6 19.4 19.2 11.8 8.3 9.1 15.1 

1906 15.0 15.3 11.6 7.3 7.0 6.3 10.4 

1907 21.5 20.1 18.3 10.1 10.5 8.1 14.7 

1908 36.9 37.5 37.5 33.9 32.2 30.2 34.7 

1909 29.3 26.5 23.0 20.3 17.1 17.4 22.3 

1910 24.5 22.4 22.6 16.0 14.5 15.4 19.2 

1911 26.7 24.8 25.6 21.3 27.2 22.9 24.8 

1912 25.8 17.6 18.8 13.3 20.1 22.8 19.7 

1913 38.2 33.4 21.8 21.7 22.9 22.2 26.7 

1914 32.3 30.7 28.3 23.6 22.7 25.5 27.2 



Mean, 1902-1914 26.1 23.6 22.2 17.6 17.9 17.8 20.9 



Inspection of the table reveals that taking the six months period 
as a whole there was small change as compared with the corre- 
sponding period one year ago, the mean percentage of idleness for 
the first six months of 1914 being one-half of one point higher 
(27.2 as compared with 26.7) than the mean for the fibrst six 
months of 1913. The mean idleness for the six months was mid- 
way between the average for the corresponding period in the 
thirteen years 1902-1914 and that for 1908, the latter being the 
year in which the greatest idleness was reported. 

The tptal idleness due to all causes as in the preceding table 
is classifi^ under three separate headings in the following table. 

"'V Digitized by CjOOgle 



2 New York Labob Bulletin 

TABLE 2. — Pbbcbntaob op Meicbbbs of RspRXABNTATiys Tbadb Unions Unbmplotbd at 
End or Month, Januabt-Juns, fob Spbczfibd Causbs 

Labor DUjmtet Mean for 

TBAB Jan. Feb. Mar. April May Juaa month 

1904 2.6 1.5 6.6 3.1 3.9 1.7 3.2 

1906 3.1 2.9 3.4 2.4 1.4 1.3 2.4 

1906 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.1 1.8 2.0 1.6 

1907 0.7 1.0 1.4 0.4 1.6 0.7 1.0 

1908 0.4 0.3 0.3 . 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 

1909 1.4 0.6 0.6 3.7 3.0 2.9 2.0 

1910 6.4 6.6 8.9 2.0 1.4 2.3 3.6 

1911 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 1.8 3.8 1.3 

1912 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.6 0.6 0.3 

1913 19.8 19.1 0.1 0.6 0.4 0.4 6.7 

1914 0.1 0.2 0.7 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.8 



Dtsabtlity 

1904 1.3 1.8 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.3 

1906 1.4 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.2 

1906 1.4 1.3 1.3 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.2 

1907 1.8 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 1.4 

1908 1.4 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 

1909 1.6 1.4 1.3 1.6 1.4 1.4 1.4 

1910 1.6 1.4 1.3 1.4 1.3 1.4 1.4 

1911 1.3 1.4 1.0 1.6 1.4 1.4 1.3 

1912 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.2 1.1 1.3 1.3 

1913 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9 

1914 1.2 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 



* Unemployment {PrincipaUy Lack of Work) 

1904 22.0 18.8 18.9 12.7 10.9 10.8 15.7 

1906 18.0 16.3 14.6 8.2 5.9 6.7 11.6 

1906 11.8 12.4 8.9 6.0 4.1 3.2 7.6 

1907 19.0 17.4 16.6 8.6 7.7 6.2 12.4 

1908 35.1 35.9 36.9 32.2 30.6 28.6 83.1 

1909 26.4 24.6 21.2 16.1 * 12.7 13.1 18.9 

1910 16.6 16.6 17.4 12.6 11.8 11.7 14.3 

1911 24.9 22.9 24.1 19.6 24.0 17.7 22.2 

1912 24.4 16.1 17.4 11.9 18.5 21.0 18.2 

1913 17.6 13.2 20.7 20.4 21.7 20.9 19.1 

1914 31.0 29.3 26.6 22.4 21.4 24.3 26.8 



The idleness caused by labor disputes during the first six monihs 
of 1914 was negligible, which was in marked contrast with the 
same period in 1913, in which year there was an unprecedented 
amount of dispute idleness caused by a strike among the clothing 
workers in New York City in January and February. The dis^ 
ability idleness remained small as usual. With idleness due to 
disputes and disability eliminated, the remaining idleness, classi- 
fied in the table as '^ unemployment^" was due chiefly to lack of 



* Dna to lack of work, lack of material, the weaibar, etc. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness Among Okuanized Wage Eabners 3 

work which aiiordd the best iDdicatioii as to general business con- 
ditions since in comparison of the same months from year to year 
seaaonal conditions tend to remain constant 

Comparison of 1914 with 1913 shows that the unemployment 
idleness was higher in each of the first six months (May excepted) 
of 1914 than in the corresponding months of 1913. In coimec- 
tion with the great excess of unemployment idleness in January 
and February as compared with the same months in 1913, atten- 
tion should be called to the abnormally high percentage of dis- 
pute idleness in those months in 1913 which was lacking in 1914. 
The total idleness reported in January and February, 1913, ex- 
ceeded that reported for those months in 1914, as was shown in 
Table 1. There was the usual steady lessening of idleness from 
month to month until in May the idleness reported was slightly 
less than May, 1913. This was followed, however, by an upturn 
in June. 

Moreover, a comparison of the unemployment idleness in the 
first two quarters of 1914 with the corresponding periods in 1913 
indicates not only the customary lessening of unemployment as 
the season advanced, but also that the second quarter of 1914 com- 
pared much more favorably with the second quarter of 1913 than 
did the first quarter of 1914 with the first quarter of 1913. Thus 
in the first quarter of 1914 the mean percentage of unemployment 
idleness was 11^8 points greater (28.9 as against 17.1) than in 
the first quarter of 1913, while in the second quarter of 1914 the 
mean percentage was only 1.7 points greater (22.7 as against 
21.0) than in the second quarter of 1913. In other words, so far 
as these returns are an indication there was a greater amount of 
unemployment in the first half of 1914 than in the corresponding 
period of 1913, but this difference was sensibly less in the second 
quarter than in the first quarter. 

In the following table, a summary of the idleness due to all 
causes and classified by industries during the first half of 1914 
is given together with similar returns for previous years. As 
already noted, most of the idleness was due to unemployment, 
in which lack of work was the chief factor, since the idleness on 
account of disputes and disability combined did not amount to as 
much as two per cent in either of the six months. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 







Mean for 


May 


June 


6 months 


9.3 


11.9 


24.4 


12.8 


12.7 


25.0 


7.6 


6.4 


10.1 


14.9 


10.7 


25.4 


38.3 


36.3 


47.0 


23.5 


21.5 


34.5 


17.9 


19.6 


27.9 


31.6 


29.6 


37.4 


20.4 


15.6 


29.6 


17.7 


21.9 


24.0 


33.2 


35.5 


42.0 



4 Nbw Yobk Labob Bullbtik 

TABLE 3. — Pbbcxntagb op Msmbbbs or Represkmtativb Tradb Unions Unkkplotsd at 
£in> of Month, Jandabt-Junb, bt Indxtstbixs 

7. BuUdinOf Stone Workino, Bte, 

TXAB Jan. Feb. Mar. April 

1904 38.3 31.2 42.6 12.8 

1905 41.6 32.6 31.8 18.8 

1906 14.3 16.4 9.4 6.7 

1907 40.4 36.1 32.5 17.7 

1908 65.6 56.3 53.6 42.2 

1909 52.3 46.2 34.7 29.0 

1910 38.9 37.0 33.6 20.3 

1911 36.8 44.5 47.7 34.1 

1912 43.3 40.0 38.2 19.9 

1913 27.7 29.1 27.9 19.6 

1914 47.4 60.1 45.3 40.2 



JJ. Trantportation 

1904 40.6 37.7 42.1 33.2 

1905 30.8 26.4 25.5 13.7 

1906 32.6 29.8 23.6 4.2 

1907 28.2 26.6 25.3 5.1 

1908 40.7 38.3 40.6 37.2 

1909 36.7 31.5 34.2 22.1 

1910 80.5 30.0 30.3 8.1 

1911 32.5 31.9 31.4 26.8 

1912 9.3 10.9 9.3 8.8 

1913 13.8 12.3 11.0 7.4 

1914 17.2 13.4 14.8 11.5 



///. Clothing and Textiles 

1904 30.0 20.5 28.3 39.4 

1905 16.2 12.8 16.3 11.3 

1906 8.1 12.5 10.2 9.4 

1907 6.4 9.2 6.5 8.2 

1908 44.1 43.9 46.8 49.6 

1909 11.8 14.6 16.4 27.2 

1910 29.3 19.9 32.2 36.0 

1911 35.1 21.4 19.0 17.5 

1912 34.8 7.4 14.6 13.3 

1913 68.8 56.6 30.1 35.1 

1914 42.4 37.4 33.8 26.2 



JV, Metalt, Madiinery and Shtpbuildino 

1904 13.7 13.8 13.0 13.3 

1905 9.4 7.9 6.2 4.1 

1906 7.1 6.1 5.4 4.5 

1907 6.5 6.6 3.7 4.5 

1908 30.1 36.0 32.4 37.4 

1909 25.7 24.8 17.9 16.3 

1910 9.S 9.1 6.4 6.0 

1911 10.5 12.9 18.8 16.8 

1912 17.0 15.6 12.3 14.6 

1913 7.6 9.1 6.8 6.7 

1914 15.7 18.4 16.2 16.5 



35.3 


7.7 


32.8 


6.3 


6.6 


18.2 


4.3 


6.9 


16.7 


9.2 


6.3 


16.8 


36.1 


32.4 


37.6 


20.0 


20.3 


27.5 


6.4 


5.9 


18.4 


22.9 


17.6 


27.2 


7.5 


7.4 


8.9 


7.2 


7.9 


9.9 


8.6 


12.7 


13.0 



36.7 


38.4 


32.1 


7.3 


10.2 


12.2 


10.4 


5.3 


9.3 


10.8 


8.2 


8.1 


48.6 


45.2 


46.4 


20.3 


23.1 


18.9 


32.6 


30.7 


30.1 


38.7 


27.4 


26.5 


38.0 


52.1 


26.7 


39.6 


35.7 


44.2 


28.3 


31.5 


33.3 



16.1 


14.7 


14.1 


4.6 


4.2 


6.1 


4.7 


4.8 


5.3 


4.9 


4.4 


4.8 


36.3 


31.9 


33.7 


14.5 


13.2 


18.6 


5.7 


6.1 


7.2 


32.7 


33.9 


20.9 


13.4 


12.8 


14.3 


11.7 


9.1 


8.6 


16.0 


13.9 


16.1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness Among Oeganizbd Wage Eabnebs 5 

TABLE 3. — Pebcbmtaob or MsiflBCBfl of RxpRmsNTATiTfl Tbadb Unionb XJnbmplotbo at 
End ov Month, Januabt-Junb, bt iNDun-BiBa — Ccntinutd 

V. Printing^ Binding^ Etc 

TBAB Jan. 

1904 16.0 

1906 7.3 

1906 19.6 

1907 12.9 

1908 21.2 

1909 11.0 

1910 6.9 

1911 : 4.6 

1912 4.3 

1913 6.3 

1914 8.2 













Mean for 


Feb. 


Mar. 


AprU 


May 


June 


6 months 


11.0 


16.0 


10.4 


11.3 


12.4 


12.7 


7.3 


7.2 


8.6 


8.6 


13.8 


8.8 


18.9 


18.1 


17.0 


16.9 


16.3 


17.8 


12.8 


13.1 


11.6 


11.6 


11.6 


12.2 


21.7 


21.8 


21.7 


22.3 


21.6 


21.7 


12.1 


10.9 


11.6 


9.9 


12.6 


11.4 


7.2 


6.6 


7.8 


6.8 


6.4 


6.8 


4.8 


4.6 


8.6 


6.7 


4.6 


6.6 


4.1 


7.8 


6.1 


6.2 


6.6 


6.6 


6.4 


8.7 


6.8 


6.6 


6.1 


6.7 


7.4 


8.6 


10.3 


9.9 


10.1 


9.1 



VT. Wood Working and Furniture 

1904 37.0 

1906 24.8 

1906 14.6 

1907 19.7 

1908 39.3 

1909 20.3 

1910 14.0 

1911 23.2 

1912 26.1 

1913 26.8 

1914 36.2 



VJI. Pood and Liquor9 

1904 6.3 7.2 

1906 9.3 9.7 

1906 7.4 6.9 

1907 8.2 8.7 

1908 11.4 10.6 

1909 11.6 11.7 

1910 9.8 9.9 

1911 10.7 9.0 

1912 10.6 9.8 

1913 9.0 8.7 

1914 10.2 13.1 



VIII, Theatert and Mune 

1904 9.9 

1905 12.4 

1906 7.6 

1907 3.0 

1908 4.6 

1909 6.0 

1910 0.3 

1911 0.3 

1912 0.3 

1913 0.6 

1914 0.0 



33.7 


34.4 


27.0 


26.3 


28.7 


31.2 


83.0 


34.1 


21.1 


14.7 


9.3 


22.8 


13.2 


13.2 


16.3 


11.9 


10.8 


13.2 


16.4 


16.8 


18.4 


20.2 


17.0 


17.9 


46.1 


41.7 


38.8 


37.5 


36.7 


40.0 


19.6 


15.1 


16.3 


13.3 


13.9 


16.2 


14.6 


10.8 


11.4 


11.8 


6.7 


11.6 


22.1 


23.6 


21.4 


18.3 


19.6 


21.4 


26.1 


23.6 


21.6 


18.3 


19.3 


22.6 


28.9 


26.2 


23.5 


18.6 


16.1 


23.4 


41.3 


41.4 


32.5 


28.8 


25.9 


34.2 



6.6 


7.2 


7.1 


5.8 


6.7 


8.4 


7.7 


6.6 


5.8 


7.9 


6.0 


16.9 


7.5 


5.2 


8.8 


7.4 


5.2 


5.4 


5.6 


6.8 


11.7 


10.8 


11.0 


10.8 


11.1 


10.9 


10.7 


9.3 


9.4 


10.6 


9.2 


11.0 


21.0 


23.5 


14.1 


10.4 


9.2 


8.4 


6.9 


9.1 


10.2 


9.5 


11.3 


10.7 


10.3 


9.5 


10.6 


11.3 


9.0 


9.7 


12.0 


10.7 


11.8 


11.4 


11.5 



9.2 


11.3 


13.1 


12.5 


15.6 


. 11.9 


13.1 


12.2 


8.6 


10.5 


15.8 


12.1 


4.9 


6.1 


4.8 


5.2 


4.8 


5.6 


3.0 


7.1 


10.8 


11.3 


15.3 


8.4 


4.8 


5.1 


10.0 


40.9 


43.2 


18.1 


0.0 


0.0 


3.4 


0.2 


29.4 


6.8 


0.3 


0.2 


0.2 


11.7 


30.3 


T.2 


0.2 


3.9 


48.8 


46.2 


52.5 


25.8 


0.4 


0.5 


13.9 


40.6 


66.9 


20.4 


0.0 


0.7 


16.9 


16.9 


66.6 


16.9 


0.0 


0.0 


16.5 


51.3 


53.8 


20.8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



New York Labob Bulletin 

TABLE 3. — Pbbcxmtaob op Mkmbiwm or Rxphxbbmtatitb TRia>B Vmotn Unsvplotbd ax 
Em) OP Month, JANXTABT-nJuNS, bt Industriss — Confe'ntMd 

IX. Tobacco 

TEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. April May 

1904 6.6 7.7 7.9 10.6 

1905 5.6 6.0 6.6 8.4 

1906 4.7 8.8 6.9 4.8 

1907 5.4 6.7 4.3 4.9 

1908 12.9 16.4 14.7 18.3 

1909 14.0 14.2 17.1 16.1 

1910 12.0 12.0 13.6 21.7 

1911 6.1 9.3 7.2 10.6 

1912 15.5 10.8 9.9 13.3 

1913 8.0 6.2 10.0 6.1 

1914 14.2 17.7 15.7 15.6 



1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 







Mean for 


May 


June 


6 months 


7.4 


8.7 


8.0 


5.2 


3.6 


6.9 


3.7 


3.3 


5.4 


10.7 


8.5 


6.6 


12.9 


9.1 


14.1 


17.7 


16.9 


16.0 


22.4 


22.6 


17.4 


9.3 


15.5 


9.7 


11.3 


9.2 


11.7 


5.2 


3.8 


6.4 


12.8 


48.2 


20.7 



X. Besfauroftte, Trade, Etc. 

1904 9.6 9.9 8.0 7.7 

1905 7.7 9.6 8.5 4.1 

1906 8.1 8.8 5.6 5.1 

1907 3.4 6.0 4.2 5.7 

1908 8.6 9.4 17.3 12.6 

1909 9.2 8.3 7.8 7.2 

1910 6.1 6.8 3.5 5.8 

1911 4.4 4.9 5.8 3.6 

1912 7.5 7.1 9.0 6.8 

1913 5.7 5.3 3.6 4.9 

1914 11.7 12.3 11.7 10.5 9.4 12.8 11.4 



XL PtMie EmphymaU 
1904 11.5 11.9 



5.1 


3.1 


7.2 


3.6 


3.8 


6.2 


3.9 


3.6 


5.8 


4.9 


3.1 


4.6 


L0.6 


11.6 


11.7 


6.1 


5.3 


7.3 


4.7 


4,6 


5.3 


3.3 


2.8 


4.1 


4.3 


4.5 


6.5 


4.5 


5.2 


4.9 



1905 6.1 4.9 

1906 4.7 4.1 

1907 2.5 2.1 

1908 1.6 1.1 

1909 1.6 1.5 

1910 1.3 1.4 

1911 2.0 1.2 

1912 1.4 2.5 

1913 0.1 0.1 

1914 2.3 2.1 



6.9 


6.8 


7.3 


8.2 


8.8 


7.4 


7.0 


6.9 


8.3 


6.6 


2.5 


3.3 


2.4 


1.8 


3.1 


1.7 


1.4 


1.7 


0.7 


1.7 


1.4 


1.1 


1.0 


0.7 


1.2 


1.6 


1.1 


1.3 


1.1 


1.4 


1.4 


1.5 


1.1 


1.0 


1.3 


1.3 


1.0 


1.5 


1.0 


1.3 


1.2 


1.5 


1.2 


0.7 


1.4 


0.1 


0.1 


0.2 


0.1 


0.1 


2.3 


1.5 


1.5 


1.5 


1.9 



XII. Stationary Engine Tending 



3.5 


3.2 


3.5 


2.4 


3.3 


4.6 


3.4 


1.6 


1.6 


1.1 


2.8 


2.8 


3.1 


2.2 


2.2 


1.8 


1.6 


2.5 


2.0 


1.7 


2.0 


1.3 


1.8 


1,5 


2.6 


1.0 


1.3 


1.6 


3.4 


3.3 


3.4 


3.2 


2.5 


3.1 


3.2 


2.5 


2.2 


1.7 


1.6 


1.8 


1.7 


1.9 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.3 


1.3 


1.1 


1.1 


2.0 


1.8 


2.0 


1.6 


1.7 


1.3 


1.7 


1.9 


2.7 


2.6 


2.2 


2.0 


1.9 


2.2 


1.9 


1.8 


2.3 


1.6 


1.6 


1.3 


1.8 


1.9 


1.7 


2.3 


2.3 


2.3 


2.7 


2.2 


._— . . 








- . 


t^sssa^= 


= _. — 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness Among Obganized Wage Eabnebs 7 

TABLE 3. — TmRcrnxnAam of MaiiBBBa ov Rbpbukmtatiys Tbaob UmoMB UifniPLOTBO at 
End or Month, Januabt- Jumb, bt iNDirsTRias — Ccndudsd 
XIII, Mi§cettaneoua 

Mean for 

TEAB Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June 6 niontha 

1904 10.2 3.9 6.2 3.3 3.0 2.9 4.8 

1905 4.6 6.7 7.2 3.8 3.6 6.0 6.1 

1906 3.9 3.0 2.6 2.6 2.2 2.0 2.7 

1907 3.6 6.8 3.2 2.6 2.8 4.2 3.7 

1908 11.0 17.4 26.9 27.1 16.3 26.6 20.7 

1909 8.7 10.5 7.9 4.2 7.1 7.3 7.6 

1910 17.4 17.7 82.6 34.7 4.1 7.0 18.9 

1911 16.6 14.0 20.1 12.2 11.5 12.0 14.2 

1912 8.8 4.0 12.1 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.3 

1913 12.3 6.8 6.1 13.1 7.8 4.4 8.3 

1914 17.0 16.7 17.6 12.4 25.9 30.2 20.0 



Inspection of the preceding table reveals that in each of the 
thirteen industrial groups save one the mean percentage of idle- 
ness for the six months exceeded that for the corresponding period 
of 1913. In the building industry, the increase was eighteen 
points and in transportation three points. lu the clothing in- 
dustry, which included nearly double the number reporting as to 
idleness of the next largest industry — building — there was a 
decrease of eleven points. The great increase (14.3 points) in 
the mean percentage of idleness in the tobacco industry was very 
largely due to the high percentage of idleness (48.2) reported 
in that industry in June. This high percentage was caused by 
the annual shutdown, which this year occurred in June, for 
inventory in one large cigar-making establishment Eighty per 
cent of the total idleness reported for June in the tobacco industry 
was thus caused. The increase was shared in by all the groups 
in the building industry. In transportation, while all the groups 
reported some increase of idleness, it was especially marked in 
navigation, teaming and cab driving, and freight handling and 
least of all in railway service. The slight increase (three points) 
of idleness at the end of June as compared with the end of May 
was felt in each of the three leading industries — building, trans- 
portation and clothing — being most marked (four points) in 
transportation, three points in clothing and two points in building. 
In the fourth largest industry reporting (metals-machinery), tlie 
June idleness was two points less than in May. 

A comparison of the idleness at the end of March and the end 
of June in each of the years 1913 and 1914 is less unfavorable 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8 A'Ew YoBK Labok Bulletin 

for June than for March of this year. Of the four leading in- 
dustries which together included more than three-fourths of the 
total number reporting as to idleness, transportation was the only 
one in which the excess of idleness in June, 1914, as compared 
with June, 1913, was greater than the excess of idleness in March, 
1914, as compared with March, 1913. In this industry, the per- 
centage of idleness, which in March, 1914 was 3.8 points greater 
than in March, 1913, was, in June, 1914, 4.8 points greater than 
in June, 1913. In the building industry, however, the percentage 
of idleness in March, 1914, was 17.4 points greater than in March, 
1913, while in June, 1914, the percentage was only 13.6 points 
greater than in June, 1913. In the clothing-textile industry, the 
percentage in March, 1914, was 3.7 points greater than in March, 
1913, while in June, 1914, the percentage of idleness was 4.2 
points less than in June, 1913. In the metals-machinery in- 
dustry, the March, 1914, percentage was 9.4 points greater than 
at the corresponding period of last year, while the June, 1914, 
percentage was only 4.8 points greater than in June, 1913. This 
comparison indicates what was said in connection with a pie- 
ceding table that, while idleness in the first half of 1914 as a 
whole was greater than in the corresponding period of last year, 
this diiference decreased in the second quarter. 

The idleness at the end of June in 'New York City classified 
by causes together with similar returns for previous years is 
summarized in the following table. 

TABLE 4. — Idleness in Rrpresbktativb New York Citt Unions at th« End^of Jukb 

IDUB ON ACCOUNT OF — 
THERSOr IDM * : * s 

Members ^ * * Labor Dis- Unem- 

TBAB Unions reporting Number Per cent diq>utefl ability ploymentf 

1904 ♦ 66,629 11,250 16.9 1,349 ♦ ♦ 

1905 85 64.294 7.149 11.1 1.005 756 5.383 

1906 87 61.946 4.186 6.8 1.315 598 2,273 

1907 89 64.117 6.421 10.0 567 781 5.073 

1908 92 62,498 20,804 33.3 129 808 19.867 

1909 92 60.589 11.495 19.0 253 775 10.467 

1910 89 68.811 13,342 19.4 1,510 928 10.904 

1911 88 92,284 23.213 25.2 3,940 1,190 18,074 

1912 92 88.903 24,287 27.3 428 1,110 22.749 

1013 98 125,566 33.288 26.5 7 893 32.888 

1914 94 114.345 33,515 29.3 282 1.084 82.199 

* Not reported. 

t Doe to lack of work, lack of material, the weather, etc. (principally laok of work). 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness Among Oboanized Wags Eabnebs 9 

The preceding table shows that in New York City the predomi- 
nant cause of idleness was unemployment, as was true throughout 
the State. By comparison with Table 1, it may also be seen that 
the idleness due to all causes was nearly four points greater 
(29.3 as against 25.5) in New York City than in the State as 
a whola 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL TABLES 

Monthly Returns from Representative Unions {January-June, 1914) 

Number and percentage of members idle. 
Principal causes of idleness. 
Idleness in New York City at end of June. 

[11] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



12 



New York Labob Bulletin 

number and percentage of unemployed members of 



Induvtrzxs OB Gboupb of Tbadu 



Un- 
ions 



Mbmbebs Rbfortinq* 



Jan. 



Fob. 



Mar. 



April May , June 



1. BnUding. Stone Working, Bte. . . 

Stone working 

Building and paving trades 
Building and street labor. . . 

2. Transportation 

Railways 

Navii^tion 

Teaming and cab driving. . . 

Freight handling 

Telegraphs 

S. ClotMng and TeztOea 

Garments 

Shirts, ooUars and laundry.. 

Hats, caps and furs , 

Boots, shoes and gloves. . . . 
Textiles 

4. Metals, Machlnerr and SUvUdi 

Iron and steel 

Other metals 

Shipbuilding 

5. Printing, Blading, Ete 

g. Wood Working and Fnmltiin.. . 

7. Food and Liquors 

Food products 

Beverages 

8. Ilieaters and Music 

9. Tobacco 

10. Restaurants, Trade, Etc 

Hotels and restauranta 

Barbering 

Retail trade 

11. Public EmpioTment 

12. Statlonanr Engine Tending 

M. Miacellaneooe 

Paper and paper goods 

Leather and leather goods. . 

Glas.«i and glassware 

Other distmct trades 

Mixed employment 

Total 



60 

2 

t65 

3 

66 

29 
8 
10 

7 



29 
,12 

4 
4 
8 

25 

22 
2 

1 



ss.ggo 

670 

31.405 

1.585 

22.8S6 

7,610 
5.401 
6.356 
2.119 
1.350 

61.S62 

49.405 

22 

9.507 

1.089 

1.339 

8.778 

8,062 

366 

350 

7,704 

8,124 

4,200 

1,769 
2,491 

1.227 

2,591 

8,400 

2,587 
467 
352 

8.684 

2,874 

1,861 

542 
488 
437 
346 
48 



88,553 

670 

31.353 

1,530 

22.900 

7.585 
5.441 
6.400 
2,117 
1.357 

00.824 

49.171 

22 

9.334 

1.086 

1.211 

8.642 

7,926 

366 

350 

7,697 

8,115 



890 

894 
496 

206 

602 

882 

569 
463 
350 

759 

878 

873 

549 
496 
432 
346 
50 



88,580 

670 

31,330 

1,530 

22,978 
7,577 
5.426 
6,488 
2,135 
1,352 

01,870 

49,286 

22 

9,786 

1,051 

1,225 

8,599 

7,i 
366 
350 

7,095 

8.100 



855 

892 
463 

206 

688 

426 

594 
464 
368 

768 

407 

868 

552 
509 
438 
315 
49 



88.769 

725 

31.544 

1,500 

23,023 

7,711 
5.288 
6.576 
2.090 
1,358 

60,182 

48.151 

22 

9.782 

1.035 

1,192 

9,009 

8,353 
366 
350 

7,094 

2,952 

4,409 
1.937 
2,532 

1,211 

2,621 

8,568 

2,503 

726 



4,087 
2,409 



88.883 88.886 

766 818 

31.572 31.022 

1,495 1,495 



I 



28,088 

7.689! 
5.644 
6.354 
1.987, 
1.364 

57.058 

45,026 

21 

9.796 

1.033 

1.177 

8.967 

8,251 

366 

350 

7,667 

2,984 

4,465 

1.940 
2,525 

1,225 

2,590 

8,574 

2,545 

600 



4,078 
2,897 



1,916 


1,944 


524 


549 


593 


601 


434 


430 


311 


310 


54 


54 



t2U 



156,867 156,821 

I 



156,985 



156,970 



158,755 



22,849 
7,772 
5.404 
6.312 
1,996 
1,365 

55.926 

43.886 

16 

9.823 

1,032 

1,160 

8.740 

8.026 
364 
350 

7,011 

8,008 

4,829 

1,791 
2,538 

1,277 

2,007 

8,509 

2,444 
721 
344 

4,102 

2,891 

1,877 
545 

627 

439 

817 

49 



151,621 



* Includes only those members who were reported as to idleness. 

! Fifty-four unions in April, May and June. 
Two hundred and thirty-four unions in April, May and June. 
Eleven unions in April, May and June. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness Among Obganizsd Wage Eabnebs 13 

bbpbebbntative trade unions, january to june, 1914 







NUMBBB IdLH 








PnCBNTAGS IdUI 






Jan. 


Feb. 


Mat. 


April 


May 


June 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


16,968 

540 

14,505 

920 


16,801 

551 

15.327 

923 


16,192 

580 

18,828 

775 


18.669 

417 

12.440 

712 


11.289 

463 

10.101 

675 


11,826 

374 

10,767 

685 


47.4 
80.6 
46.2 
58.0 


60.1 

82.2 
48.9 
60.8 


46.8 

87.9 
44.1 
50.7 


40.2 

57.5 
39.4 
47.5 


88.2 

60.4 
32.0 
45.2 


86.6 

45.7 
34.7 
45.8 


8,918 

368 
1.383 
1.187 

964 
16 


8.076 

390 

1.380 

571 

714 

21 


8.898 
410 

1,305 

757 

910 

16 


2.689 

421 
763 
878 
572 
5 


1,972 

418 
504 
635 
402 
13 


2,910 

433 

749 

1,271 

440 

17 


17.2 

4.8 
25.6 
18.7 
45.5 

1.2 


18.4 

5.1 
25.4 

8.9 
33.7 

1.5 


14.8 
5.4 
24.1 
11.7 
42.6 
1.2 


11.6 

5.5 
14.4 
13.4 
27.4 

0.4 


8.6 

5.4 

8.9 
10.0 
20.2 

1.0 


12.7 

5.6 
13.9 
20.1 
22.0 

1.2 


26.016 

18.413 

3 

7,490 

72 

38 


22.769 

16.150 

4 

6.461 

59 

95 


20,767 

13,634 

6 

7.020 

60 

37 


16.782 

8,407 
4 

7,296 
48 
27 


16.163 

8.093 
1 

7,000 
71 
98 


17,607 

11.812 

5 

5,572 

67 

151 


42.4 

37.3 

13.6 

78.8 

6.6 

2.8 


87.4 

32.8 

18.2 

09.2 

5.4 

7.8 


88.8 

27.7 

27.3 

71.7 

5.7 

3.0 


26.2 
17.5 
18 2 
74.6 
4.6 
2.3 


28.8 

20.0 
4.8 

71.5 
6.9 
8.3 


81.6 

26.9 
31.3 
56.7 
6.5 
12.9 


1.878 

1,235 

93 

50 


1.688 

1,438 

100 

50 


1.892 

1,228 

114 

50 


1,499 

1,337 
112 
50 


1,489 

1,287 

102 

50 


1.219 

1,068 

101 

50 


16.7 
15.3 
25.4 
14.3 


18.4 

18.1 
27.3 
14.3 


16.2 
15.6 
31.1 
14.3 


16.6 

16.0 
30.6 
14.3 


16.0 

15.6 
27.9 
14.3 


18.9 

13.3 
27.7 
14.3 


628 


668 


666 


789 


768 


766 


8.2 


7.4 


8.6 


10.8 


9.9 


10.1 


1,101 


1,287 


1,282 


969 


844 


794 


86.2 


41. S 


41.4 


82.6 


28.8 


26.9 


4S5 

290 
145 


677 
389 
188 


628 

393 
130 


479 

346 
133 


626 

380 
136 


496 

381 
114 


10.2 

16.4 
5.8 


18.1 

20.5 
7.5 


12.0 

20.8 
5.3 


10.7 

17.9 
5.3 


11.8 

20.1 
5.4 


11.4 

21.3 

4.5 








200 
408 


629 
881 


687 
1.267 


0.0 
14.2 


0.0 

17.7 


0.0 
16.7 


16.6 
16.6 


61.3 
12.8 


68.8 


868 


460 


414 


48.2 


400 

326 
53 
21 


415 

359 
38 
18 


401 

338 
40 
23 


876 

332 

26 

18 


886 

297 

31 

8 


448 

273 

21 

154 


11.7 

12.6 

11.3 

6.0 


12.8 

14.0 

8.2 

5.1 


11.7 

13.0 
8.6 
6.3 


10.6 

13.3 
3.6 
5.3 


9.4 

11.7 
4.5 
2.4 


12.8 

11.2 

2.9 

44.8 


88 


78 


87 


63 


62 


60 


2.8 


2.1 


2.8 


1.6 


1.5 


1.6 


46 


40 


66 


66 


64 


66 


1.9 


1.7 


2.8 


2.8 


2.8 


2.7 


816 

2 

119 

64 

130 

1 


812 

10 

167 

67 

63 

5 


827 

. 2 

181 

66 

69 

9 


287 

10 
40 
64 
123 


60S 

9 

201 

75 

215 

3 


667 

105 

113 

245 

95 

9 


17.0 
0.4 
24.4 
14.6 
37.6 
2.1 


16.7 

1.8 
33.7 
15.5 
18.2 
10.0 


17.6 

0.4 
85.6 
15.1 
21.9 
18.4 


12.4 

1.9 

6.7 

14.7 

39.5 

0.0 


26.9 

1.6 
33.4 
17.4 
69.4 

5.6 


80.2 

10.3 
21.4 
55.8 
30.0 
18.4 


60,658 


47.971 


44,488 


87.066 


84.866 


88,701 


82.8 


80.7 


28.8 


28.6 


22.7 


26.6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



14 



New Yobk Labob Bulletin 

pbincipal causes of idleness among 



OP 



TMnTTA'rarKA OR Onnrrpfl OW ^TllAnm 


Labob Dibputbs 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


1. BnUdlnf , Stone Workfnf, Ete 




5 


115 


88 


40 


f 


Btone working 






Building and paving tradea 




5 


115 


38 


40 


Q 


Building and street labor 










16 


110 






s 


lUilwaya 










Navigation 






110 












16 






3 


Froightliandling 












Telegrapha 














S. dothing and Teztfles 


76 
75 


75 
75 


805 
805 








Garments 








Bhirte, collars and laundry 








Hats, caps and furs 














Boots, shoes and gloves 














Textiles 














4. Metals. Maehlnery and ShIplNilidInf 

Iron and steel - . r . , 


87 

4 
33 


87 

4 
83 


69 

29 
30 


89 


30 


63 

33 
30 


41 

17 


Other metab 


24 


fthipbinWi«g 




6. Printing, Binding. Etc 














«. Wood Working and Famitare 




160 






6 

7 

7 


2 


7. F^mmI and Liquors 


1 
1 


2 

2 


S3 

33 




Food products 




Beverages 




8. TlioBtora and Music 














9. Tobaoco 








46 


14 




10 . Bestaurants, Trade, Etc 


20 

20 


80 

30 




190 


Hotels and restaurants 








40 


Barbering 










Retail trade 












150 
















12. Stationanr Engine Tending 
























112 




Paper and paper goods 












Leather and leather goods 














Glass and glassware 














Other distinct trades 










112 




Mixed employment 


























Total 


183 


m 


1.091 


156 


241 


242 







* Due to lack of work, lack of material, the weather, etc. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Idleness Among Obganized Wage Eabnebs 
reprebbntatiyb trade unions. lanuabt to june, 1914 



15 



DUABIUTT 


UimiPLOTiairr * 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


722 


799 


995 


897 


719 


796 


15,243 


16.999 


14.412 


12.724 


19.489 


11.115 


2 


1 


2 


6 


2 


4 


538 


550 


587 


412 


461 


370 


719 


786 


663 


801 


093 


701 


13.786 


14.636 


13.050 


11.601 


9,368 


10.060 


1 


3 




1 


16 




910 


020 


775 


711 


660 


686 


SS7 


839 


369 


299 


271 


294 


3.691 


2,726 


2.929 


2.349 


1.791 


2.948 


194 


222 


219 


201 


186 


106 


174 


168 


191 


220 




237 


23 


10 


7 


16 


la 


4 


1.360 


1.370 


1.188 


748 


491 


746 


135 


67 


66 


24 


32 


28 


1.052 


400 


692 


854 


6oa 


1.240 


6 


47 


68 


60 


40 


36 


960 


667 


842 


622 


362 


404 














16 
26.912 


21 
22.969 


16 
19.924 


5 
16.792 


13 
16,126 


17 


» 


35 


28 


29 


38 


15 


17,692 


8 


7 


8 


4 


10 




18,33C 


16.068 


12.821 


8.403 


8.983 


11.812 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 




2 


4 


3 




4 


8 


17 


12 


7 


16 


9 


7.482 


6.444 


7.008 


7,289 


6.985 


6.563 


7 


9 


4 


6 


8 


6 


65 


50 


56 


43 


63 


62 


3 




2 


3 


4 




35 


96 


86 


24 


94 


151 


lis 


131 


115 


192 


129 


119 


1.228 


1.429 


1.218 


1,368 


1.269 


1.098 


83 


101 


85 


72 


00 


78 


1.148 


1333 


1,114 


1.256 


1.164 


973 


5 


6 


6 


6 


6 


7 


65 


62 


79 


77 


67 


70 


26 


26 


26 


26 


26 


26 


25 


26 


25 


26 


26 


25 


297 


212 


212 


229 


214 


218 


421 


359 


443 


599 


644 


548 


S2 


69 


49 


62 


45 


63 


1.949 


1.991 


1,289 


997 


794 


739 


lOS 


191 


97 


71 


76 


69 


381 


479 


424 


376 


443 


436 


80 


20 


82 


14 


20 


13 


259 


360 


359 


29fl 


362 


368 


73 


72 


66 


67 


66 


46 


72 


116 


65 


76 
299 

282 


81 
929 

247 


68 
687 


•5 


191 


79 


39 


79 


75 


893 


359 


335 


1.182 


8S 


51 


49 


52 


58 


94 


297 


334 


352 


824 


278 


194 


70 


37 


18 


34 


80 


60 


236 


202 


320 


298 


258 


1S3 


11 


8 


8 


11 


11 


10 


42 


3G 


32 


15 


20 


11 


2 


6 
79 


23 
85 


7 
91 


8 
99 


4 
99 


19 

4 


12 

2 


2 


11 

2 






79 


2 




5 


8 


9 


7 


9 


19 


49 


32 


49 


49 


48 


56 


3 


21 


8 


16 


19 


9 


313 


291 


319 


222 


381 


661 


a 


10 


2 


10 


9 

1 














105 






119 

64 

130 


167 
65 
65 


181 
66 
65 


40 
64 
118 


200 

75 

103 


113 




2 
8 






245 




4 


6 




6 


90 


i 


1 


2 






1 




4 


7 




3 


8 










1.818 


1,918 


1,752 


1.777 


1.977 


1.939 


48.792 


46.741 


41,949 


35.123 


32.987 


86.829 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



16 



l^BW YOBK Labob BuiXETIir 



IDLENESS IN REPRESENTATIYX TRADE UNIONS IN NEW YORK CITT AT THE END 

OF JUNE, 1914 




Un- 
ions 


Mem- 
benit 


Num- 
ber 
idle 


Per 
cent 
idle 


Inut OM Account or — 


iNDumiisB OR Groups or Trades 


If 

putes 


Disa- 
bUity 


Unem- 
ploy- 
ment* 


1. BafldlBf, Stone Working. Ete 

StnnA working r ............... , 


28 
26 

18 

11 

18 

10 


28.761 

712 

21.649 

1.400 

9.619 

666 
8.710 
3.090 
1.000 
1.063 

68.128 

43.026 

9,648 

460 

4.711 

3.997 

364 

360 

7.066 

2.928 

8.146 

1.373 
1.772 

1.087 

1,709 

1.181 

926 
206 

8.199 

1.698 

1.288 

627 
439 
817 


10,091 

368 

9,063 

660 

997 

26 

124 

466 

376 
17 

17.127 

11.682 

6.403 

42 

656 

506 
101 
60 

789 

». 

456 

351 
104 

687 

1.180 

247 

97 
160 

58 

44 

468 

113 
245 

95| 


42.5 

61.7 
41.9 

47,1 

10.6 

4.0 

3.3 

14.7 

37.5 

1.6 

82.2 

27.2 

66.0 

9.3 

18.9 

12.6 
27.7 
14.3 

10.5 

26.8 

14.5 

25.5 
6.9 

68.2 

69.0 

21.8 
10.5 
73.2 

1.7 

2.6 

85.8 

21.4 

66.8 
30.0 


6 


486 


9.600 

368 


Building and paving trades 

Building and sj^eetlabor 


6 


486 


8.672 
660 


X. TranflDortatlon 


8 
8 


47 
16 

4 
18 
9 


947 


Railways 


10 


Navigation 


120 


Teanung and caJt driving. 

Fi^ierMr^andling 


4S4 

866 


TelfiffraDhs .... 7 


17 


8. Oolhlng and TeitOes 




10 


17.117 


Garments 


11.682 


Hat*. Caps and furs 


81 

7 
24 

2 


k 

2 

70 

38 

7 
25 

218 

51 

58 

9 
44 


6.396 


Boots, shoes and gloves 


40 


4. Metals, Machineir and SUpbofldlng . 

Iron and steel 


666 

460 


Other metals 


70 


RhiphuM^fing 


25 


6. Printing, Binding, Ete 


526 


6. Wood Working and FomltiiTO 

7. Fk»od and Liquors 


788 

402 


Food products 


342 




60 


8. Theaters and Mosfe 


687 


9. Tobacco 


190 

40 
160 


46 

48 

43 


1.134 


10* Bestanrants, Trade, Etc 


14 




14 


Retail trade 




11. Pablle Employment 


58 
8 
6 




12. Stationary Engine Tending 


86 




448 


Leather and leather goods. ...... 


113 


Glass and glassware 






245 


Other distmot trades 




5 


90 






Total 


94 


114.845 


88,515 


29.8 


m 


1.084 


82.199 







* Due to lack of work, lack of material, the weather, etc. 

t Includes only those members who were reported as to idleness. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1'^ i I 



l\d L ( STATE OrjNEW YOKn {^^C^^^ 
DEPARTMENT OF LABOK 



BULLETIN 



Issued Under the Direction of 

JinES H. LYRCH 

OHnmissUmer of Labor 



Wbole Ifo. 62 
Seriet on Labor Legislation No. l 



New Yo»n Labor Laws 
or 1914 



Prepared by 
TH£ BURBAU OF StATISTICS AND UfFORHATIOIf 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Tbe Labor Laws of 1914 



Chapteb Subject Page 

16 Supervision over insurance rates for workmen's compensation 17 

21 Boys carrying newapapets * . * . . 18 

38 Free transportation of employees and their families by eommon 

carriers.... , 19 

41 Workmen's compensation 21 

00 Convict labor on state or county highways 46 

61 Convict labor on county highways 49 

68 Cohvict labor on state highway in Greene county 50 

110 Factory investigating commission (continuation) 51 

116 . . Free tran^iortation of mail carriers in uniform by eommon carriers. . 52 

170: Workmen's compensation commission (appropriation for) : . . 53 

181 Bureau of employment 63 

182 Fire escapes and stairways in factories 57 

183 Sanitation in mercantile establishments. .....'' 58 

188 Earnings of convicts 61 

316 Workmen's compensation (amendment) 62 

320 Compulsory contributions to benefit or insurance funds by mercantile 

employees 64 

331 Hours of labor of women and minors in mercantile establishments 65 

333 Salary /)f chief mercantile inspector 66 

352 Garnishee law '. — , , . . i 66 

366 Safety from fire and ventilation in factories 68 

388 Dairy employees exempted from one day of rest in seven law 71 

396 Employees in continuous industries with an eight hour day exempted 

from one day of rest in seven law 71 

458 Vacations of park employees in New York City 72 

459 Enforcement of fire prevention laws in New York City 72 

466 Appropriations for Americsui Museum of Safety 74 

475 . . Department of Licenses in New York City 75 

479 Enforcement of compulsory education law in New York City 79 

512 Generating plants of public service corporations not to be deemed 

factories Si 

514 Hours of kbor and days of rest in drug stores 81 

817 (1913) Appropriation for Compensation Commission 82 

832 (1913) Mutual workmen's compensation insurance companies 82 



ALBANY 
B. LYON COMPANY, PRINTERS 



1®^* Digitized by Google 



New York Labor Bulletin 

Published by the State Department of lAbor. 

Whole No. 62 Albany June, 1914 



THE LABOR LAWS OF 1914 
GENERAL REVIEW 

The text of the New York labor laws enacted in 1914, with 
indication of the changes made in existing laws, are reproduced 
in later pages together with a number of other statutes affecting 
labor more or less directly. Of the 29 laws reproduced, 11 are 
additions or amendments to the Labor Law proper, 4 are con- 
cerned with workmen's compensation,* 1 with the Factory Inves- 
tigating Commission, and the remaining 13, while not explicitly 
amending the Labor Law, nevertheless affect labor to an extent 
which is thought sufficient to warrant their inclusion in this list. 

Preceding the text of the laws are to be found the recommenda- 
tions concerning labor which were made by the Governor to the 
Legislature. These recommendations were this year made in 
special messages, the annual message having been confined almost 
exclusively to the subject of State finances. It may be noted, 
however, that in the annual message recc^ition was given to the 
Factory Investigating Commission, whose labors resulted in the 
enactment of a large number of labor laws in 1913 and which are 
referred to as " progressive milestones in industrial legislation." 
Concerning the Workmen's Compensation Law, also, which was 
enacted in 1913 (and re-enacted this year), the message states 
that it occupies " a prominent place in the Nation's progressive 
laws." 

Workmen's Compensation 

By far the most important measure of the year, so far as labor 
is concerned, was the passage of the workmen's compensation act. 
It will be recalled that in 1910 a compulsory compensation law 
applicable to certain hazardous industries only was enacted but 

^n addition, two other laws of 1913. which were passed at the extraordinary 
session too late for inclusion in the June, 1913, Bulletin, are reproduced. One 
of these, chapter SIT, appropriated $150,000 for the Workmen's Compensation 
Commission. The other, chapter 832, authorized the formation by employers of 
mutual Insurance companies. . . , 

fll Digitized by V^OOgle 



2 New York Laboe Bulletin. 

was declared unconstitutional in 1911 'by the Court of Appeals. 
The Legislature in 1912 proposed a constitutional amendment 
which would permit the enactment of a comprehensive compulsory 
compensation law. The same amendment was duly proposed by 
the Legislature of 1913 in accordance with article 14, section 1 
of the State Constitution, which requires an amendment to be 
proposed by two successive Legislatures before submission to pop- 
ular vote. On November 4, 1913, the amendment was adopted 
at the general election of that year. At the extraordinary session 
in 1913 a compensation act to go into effect on January 1, 1914, 
was passed by the Legislature and was approved by the Governor 
on December 16. Doubt arose, however, as to the constitution- 
ality of the act in view of article 14, section 1 of the Constitution, 
which provides that an adopted amendment " shall become a part 
of the Constitution from and after the first day of January next 
after such approval." In view of the doubt the act was again 
approved by the Governor on January 8, 1914. The doubt con- 
tinuing, however, as to the power of the Legislature to pass a 
compensation act prior to January 1, 1914, the law was re-enacted 
in 1914 and approved by the Governor on March 16, thereby 
removing any possible doubt of its constitutionality so far as the 
time of enactment was concerned. The only change made in the 
original statute was the insertion of a provision that not more 
than three of the five members of the compensation commission 
created by the act should belong to the same political party. 

This act marks the culmination of a long campaign in New 
York State. The text of the law (chapter 41, Laws 1914; chap- 
ter 67, Consolidated Laws) is found in later pages, and a detailed 
analysis of the act may be found in Bulletin 59 of the Department. 
It may be noted here, however, that it applies to approximately 
450 employments, classified into 42 groups, covering nearly all 
the hazardous industries, and excludes from its operation agri- 
culture, domestic service and employments not conducted for 
pecuniary gain. Four methods of insurance, one of which must 
be accepted under penalty of a fine and the abrogation of conamon 
law defenses in an action for damages brought by injured em- 
ployees, are open to employers, namely, in the State insurance 
fund, which is to be administered by the Conmiission, in mutual 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



The Labor Laws of 1914. 3 

associations* or in stock companies, whose rates are to be approved 
by the State Insurance Department, or finally by self-insurance 

^ upon satisfying the Commission of their financial ability. 

Q The amount of compensation to be paid in case of injury or 

death varies in accordance with the character of injury, or number 

"^ of dependents (in case of death), but in general is two-thirds of 

' J wages with no compensation for the first two weeks after injury, 

^>o other than immediate medical care. 

3 The administrative provisions of the act went into effect on 

January 1 and the obligation of employers to insure under the 
act goes into effect on July 1. The Commissioners, appointed by 
the Governor, with the consent of the Senate, are as follows: 
Eobert E. Dowling, Chairman; John Mitchell, Thomas Darling- 
ton, Howard T. Mosher, J. Mayhew Wainwright. 

The Commissioner of Labor is an ex-officio member, but has no 
vote on orders, decisions or awards. 

Certain changes were made in the Compensation Law by chapter 
316, Laws of 1914. Two of these affect the penalty to be im- 
posed upon employers who fail to secure compensation for their 
employees in one of the four methods prescribed in the law. By 
one of these changes an employee who is injured in the service 
of such an employer is freed from the necessity of pleading free- 
dom from contributory negligence in an action for damages, and 
by the other such an employer, instead of paying a fine of one 
dollar for each employee for every day during such failure to 
insure, is liable for " an amount equal to the pro rata premium 
which would have been payable for insurance in the State fund 
for such period of non-compliance." 

Another change is as to the compensation to be paid to children 
imder eighteen years of age of employees deceased as a result of 
injuries. If the deceased employee left a surviving wife or de- 
pendent husband the act provided originally that each such child 
was to receive 10 per cent of 'the deceased's wages. The amend- 
ment provides that in case of the subsequent death of such sur- 
viving wife or dependent husband, each child is to receive 15 
per cent of the deceased's wages until the age of eighteen years. 



• See chapter 832, Laws of 1913. 



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4 New York Labos Bulletin. 

thereby placing such children on the same footing as if there had 
been no surviving parent, in which case the act provides the pay- 
ment of 15 per cent. 

Another change was intended to bring State, municipal and 
county employees within the scope of the act, providing, however, 
that any benefit from a pension fund received by the dependents 
of any such deceased employee toward which no contributions had 
been paid by such employee may be applied toward the compwisa- 
tion provided by the law. However, the definition of the word 
" employment " which " includes employment only in a trade, 
business or occupation carried on by the employer for pecuniary 
gain " was not changed by the amendment, and since only a small 
part, if any, of governmental activities are conducted for " pecu- 
niary gain " it would seem doubtful whether such employees are 
really brought within the scope of the act.* 

By chapter 16, Laws of 1914, the State Insurance Department 
was given supervision over the classification of risks and schedule 
of rates of stock companies and mutual associations, but such 
supervision over the State insurance fund was specifically denied 
and was left solely with the Commission, 

Two appropriation bills were enacted for the purposes of the 
Commission. Chapter 817, Laws of 1913, appropriated $50,000 
for expenses and -$100,000 for the establishment of the State 
insurance fund. Chapter 170, Laws of 1914, appropriated 
$350,000 for the expenses of the Commission. 

Bureau of Emplosrment 

The most important amendment of the year to the Labor Law 
proper was the creation within the Department of a Bureau of 
Employment. For a number of years an employment office was 
maintained in New York City, but was discontinued in 1906, on 
account of the smallness of the annual appropriation ($5,000) 
for its maintenance and the resultant unsatisfactory character of 
its work. Since the abolition of that office there has been recur- 

• mi 

♦ An opinion of tlie Attorney-General, dated June 9 and received as this Bulletin 
was pasRiuR throuf^h the press, holds that the amendnrent hrlngs within the scope 
of the act only those state and municipal employees who are en^raged In the haz- 
ardous employments specified in section 2, and even then only when such employ- 
ments are carried on for *' pecuniary gain " by the State or municipalities. 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 5 

rent agitation for the establishment of some agency for handling 
the problem of unemployment. The acute situation as to unem- 
ployment which developed in the latter part of 1913 and the early 
months of 1914 led to the introduction in the Legislature of a 
bill creating a Bureau of Employment. This bill which became 
a law (chapter 181) follows closely the recommendations made 
by the Wainwright Commission in 1910. The bureau is to be in 
charge of a director of peculiar qualifications as tested by a civil 
service examination. OflBces may be established wherever deemed 
necessary. Provision is made for the appointment of advisory 
committees, consisting of employers and employees in connection 
with each office. Special attention is to be given to juvenile labor, 
provision being made for the registration of children between 
fourteen and eighteen years of age while yet in school, and study 
is to be made of their vocational aptitudes. The bill carried no 
specific appropriation for the establishment of the bureau. 

Safety 

Fire Prevention, — The fire hazard in factories was the occa- 
sion of much legislation in 1913. Certain modifications of that 
legislation were made in 1914. Chapter 182 changed the require- 
ments as to means of exit from factories erected prior to October, 
1913. According to the former statute one of the two required 
means of exit from factory buildings might be an outside fire 
escape if, in the opinion of the Industrial Board, safety was not 
thereby endangered. This yearns amendment provides that, in 
factory buildings of five stories or less in height, outside fire 
escapes may be used as one of the means of exit unless the In- 
dustrial Board affirmatively " finds " that adequate protection 
is not thereby furnished in case of fire, the effect of the amend- 
ment being that, whereas formerly the permission of the Indus- 
trial Board had to be secured before an outside fire escape could 
be used on such buildings, such fixe escapes may hereafter be used 
until the Board finds them unsafe. The use of outside fire es- 
capes in buildings over five stories high remains, as formerly, 
contingent upon the approval of the Board. 

Another change made by chapter 182 was as to interior stair- 
ways serving as a required means of exit. Formerly the require- 

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6 New York Labob Bulletin. 

ment was that such stairways in factory buildings more than four 
stories high should be enclosed with fire resisting material. The 
amendment applies this requirement only to buildings more than 
five stories high. The Industrial Board, however, has power to 
require the enclosure of such stairways in buildings of five stories 
or less if safety requires it. 

A third change is that windows leading to fire escapes may be 
provided with frames and sash covered with metal instead of being 
made of metal. 

Chapter 366 modified the requirement that openings in ele- 
vators and hoistways be provided with gates " at least six feet 
high " to gates " of suitable height.'^ Also openings leading to 
outside fire escapes erected on buildings five stories or less high 
which were constructed prior to October, 1913, need not extend 
to the floor level, but are to be governed by the present law appli- 
cable to fire escapes. 

The definition of fire-proof windows was changed so as to 
permit frames and sash covered with metal instead of being made 
of metal. 

The duty of providing proper ventilation and dressing and 
emergency rooms for female employees was placed upon the per- 
son operating the factory instead of upon the owner. Water 
closets may be ventilated by having suitable ducts leading to the 
outer air instead of having windows as formerly required. 

Chapter 459 renders discretionary with, instead of mandatory 
upon, the fire commissioner of New York City the enforcement 
of the fire prevention rules of the Industrial Board, but expressly 
denies to him the power to issue any orders as to the means of 
exit from factories. 

American Museum of Safety, — Chapter 466 authorized the 
Board of Estimate and Apportionment in New York City to 
appropriate annually a sum not exceeding $50,000 for the support 
of the American Museum of Safety, which was incorporated in 
1911, and of which the Commissioner of Labor is a trustee. 

Day of Rest 

The statute enacted in 1913 requiring one day of rest in seven 
for employees in factories and mercantile establishments was modi- 

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The Labob Laws of 1914. 7 

fied by three statutes in 1914. Chapter 388 exempted from the 
operation of the day of rest law employees in cheese factories, 
creameries, dairies, ice cream plants and milk establishments 
generally where not more than seven persons are employed. (.Chap- 
ter 396 similarly empowered the Commissioner of Labor to 
exempt employees engaged in necessarily continuous industries,* 
provided all of the employees in a given establishment have an 
eightrhour day throughout the week. 

Chapter 514 provided that the law should have no application 
to employees in drug stores, but that such employees shall have 
" one afternoon and evening off in each week and in addition 
thereto shall receive one full day off in two consecutive weeks." 

Mercantile Establishments 

Hours of Women and Children, — Four statutes were enacted 
relating primarily to mercantile establishments. Chapter 331 re- 
duced the working hours of children under sixteen years of age 
from nine per day and fifty-four per week to eight per day and 
forty-eight per week throughout the State. The hour later than 
which such children may not work was also changed from seven 
p. M. to six p. M. The discrimination existing against second- 
class cities as to the working hours of females over sixteen was 
removed. Formerly the statute permitted a ten-hour day and 
sixty-hour week, except in second-class cities where a nine-hour 
day and a fifty-four-hour week were required. The amendment 
makes a nine-hour day and a six day and fifty-four-hour week 
applicable throughout the State instead of to second-class cities 
only. Furthermore the hour later than which no female em- 
ployee may work was placed at ten p. m. for all cities, whereas 
formerly such employees in second-class cities were not permitted 
to work later than six p. m. The amendment also permits the 
time for the noon meal to be shortened, provided a written permit 
to that effect is secured from the Commissioner of Labor. 

Sanitation. — The provisions for sanitation in mercantile estab- 
lishments were entirely rewritten and made more comprehensive 
by chapter 183. Six new sections were added dealing with clean- 
liness, drinking water, wash rooms, dressing rooms, water closets 

♦ Under date of April 27. the Attorney-General ruled that " An Industrial or 
manufacturing process necefi^sarily continuous la one which is. conducted ^wenty- 
four hours every day." Tiigitized ByXjOO 



8 New York Labob Bulletin. 

and ventilation respectively. It was made mandatory upon the 
Industrial Board to fix standards of ventilation, temperature and 
humidity and to make rules for their maintenance. 

Miscellaneous. — Chapter 320 prohibits compulsory contribu- 
tions by means of deductions from wages, direct payment or other- 
wise, of employees in mercantile establishments to benefit or in- 
surance funds. Chapter 333 authorizes an increase in the salary 
of the Chief Mercantile Inspector from $3,000 to $4,000. 

Street Trades 
Boys Carrying Newspapers. — Chapter 21 legalized the carry- 
ing of newspapers by boys over twelve years of age " between the 
close of school and six-thirty o'clock in the afternoon " and by 
boys over fourteen years of age " between five-thirty and eight 
o'clock in the morning." 

Factory Investigating Commission — Minimum Wage 
The Factory Investigating Commission, which was appointed 
in 1911 to investigate the conditions of manufacturing in loft 
buildings and otherwise in first and second-class cities, was con- 
tinued by the Legislature in 1912, and its scope extended to in- 
clude all factories in the State. The large mass of labor legisla- 
tion in 1913 was due mainly to the labors and reports of the 
Commission. In 1913 the Commission was again continued with 
the additional duty of investigation as to the advisability of legis- 
lation as to minimum wages in industry. A preliminary report 
upon this latter question was submitted in 1914, and by chapter 
110 of this year's laws the Commission was extended until Feb- 
ruary 15, 1913, with an additional appropriation of $50,000. 

Convict Labor 
Four of this year's laws deal with convict labor. Chapters 60, 
61 and 68 amend the Highway Law and the Prison Law so as to 
permit the wider use of convict labor in the construction and 
repair of State and county roads. Chapter 60 struck out the 
limitation that not more than three hundred of the convicts in each 
State prison may be employed in the repair of highways and also 
the provisions that convicts may not be employed outside of a 
radius of thirty miles from the prison or within the limits of an 

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The Labor Laws of 1914. 9 

incorporated city or village. The expense of maintenance of such 
employees is to be paid from the highway fund. Chapter 61 
authorized county supervisors to employ convict labor ^' in the 
discretion of the superintendent of prisons " upon county roads. 
Chapter 68 authorized the Superintendent of State Prisons to 
furnish convict labor for the construction of the State highway 
in Greene county, the expense of maintenance of such convicts 
to be a charge upon the highway fund. Chapter 188 authorized 
the prison authorities to deduct, on account of misconduct, from 
the compensation allowed to inmates of State prisons and reforma- 
tories for labor performed an amount to be determined by the 
authorities, but not to exceed fifty cents per day. Formerly the 
law required a flat deduction of fifty cents per day. 

In addition to these four laws, the text of which is reproduced 
in later pages, mention may also be made of chapter 214, not re- 
produced, which appropriated $75,000 for the establishment of a 
brick making plant in connection with the State reformatory at 
Elmira, the product to be used in road construction in line with 
the Governor's message of March 23. 

Railroad Employees 

Chapter 38 extends the definitions of the terms *' employees " 
and " families " in the Public Service Commissions Law so as to 
include furloughed and superannuated employees among those to 
whom free transportation may be given by common carriers. 
Chapter 116 authorized common carriers to grant free transporta- 
tion to mail carriers in uniform. 

Miscellaneous 

Garnishee of Wages, — Chapter 352 amended the Garnishee 
Law as to judgments against wages recovered more than ten years 
prior to September 1, 1908, at which time the amended law of 
that year took effect. 

Vacation Periods of Municipal Employees, — Chapter 458 
amended the Greater Xew York charter by exempting employees 
of the Park Department from the restriction that municipal em- 
ployees must have their vacations in the months from June to 
September, inclusive. 



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10 New York Labor Bulletin. 

Licensing of Trades. — Chapter 475 added a new chapter to the 
Greater New York charter and created a Department of Licenses 
which shall have charge of the granting of all licenses which have 
heretofore been in the hands of the Mayor, the Bureau of Licenses, 
the Commissioner of Licenses and other authorities. 

Compvlsory EdktccUion Law. — Chapter 479 authorized the 
Board of Education in New York City to establish a Bureau of 
Compulsory Education, School Census and Child Welfare, among 
the duties of which shall be the enforcement of the Compulsory 
Education Law in connection with the employment of children 
under the Labor Law. 

Definition of Fdctories. — Chapter 512 amended the law by 
excluding from the definition of factories " power houses, gener- 
ating plants, barns, storage houses, sheds and other structures " 
" owned or operated by a public service corporation." Formerly 
such structures were exempt only when " used in connection with 
railroad purposes " and generating plants were not included in 
the exemption. 



RECOMBfENDATIONS CONCERNING LABOR IN MESSAGES OF 
GOVERNOR GLYNN 

Bureau of Employment (Message of March 6) 

Public attention has been forcibly turned to the fact that a large number 
of men are unable to find employment. During the past fall and winter the 
problem of the unemployed has steadily grown more acute. 

For the man who is not sincerely anxious to secure work the public has 
no sympathy. For the man who is anxious to work, but cannot find employ- 
ment, the State has sympathy and a very real concern. 

While I do not believe that the present situation is as serious as some 
would have us believe, I am persuaded that it is serious enough to demand 
our consideration. Whatever the State as a State can do to provide work 
for the unemployed it is morally bound to do. 

The present situation is not new. Unemployment is an evil which is al- 
ways present in a greater or less degree in our industrial system. Where 
there is no work to be done the State can rarely create work. But there 
are many times when although there is work to be done and men anxious to 
do that work, the employer and the man who wants to work cannot get into 
touch with each other. 

This latter situation the State can remedy. 

After consultation with the Commissioner of Labor and a study of em- 
ployment systems which have proved successful abroad, I have caused a bill 
to be prepared which embodies a plan to reduce unemployment to a minimum. 



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The Laboe Laws of 1914. 11 

This bill adds another bureau to the Department of Labor — a Bureau of 
Employment. The bill provides that this bureau shall be under the imme- 
diate charge of director "who shall have recognized executive and mana- 
gerial ability " and " technical and scientific knowledge upon the subject of 
unemployment." 

This director is to be chosen by a civil service examination. He must be 
a man who has had wide experience, and a part of his examination shall be 
to submit a detailed plan of " organization and administration of employ- 
ment ofiices such as are contemplated by this act." 

The Commissioner of Labor is empowered to establish public employment 
offices wherever he deems them necessary, and the purpose of these offices 
shall be to bring together all kinds and classes of workmen in search of em- 
ployment, and employers seeking labor. 

The superintendent of every public employment office is to receive appli- 
cations from those seeking employment and from those seeking employees, 
and must register every application. 

The superintendent must further supply the director of the bureau with 
periodic reports of the employment conditions in his territory. 

An advisory committee, composed of prominent employers and representa- 
tives of labor, will be appointed by the Commissioner of Labor for each 
public employment office. Tlie duty of this advisory committee shall be to 
give the superintendent advice and assistance in connection with the manage- 
ment of his office. 

Provision is made in the bill for strikes, and no applicant for labor shall 
be deprived of the assistance of the employment office because of his refusal 
to work in an establishment where a strike is in progress. Before any appli- 
cant for labor may be sent to such establishment he must be notified of the 
strike. 

Separate departments for men, women and children in the employment 
office are created by the bill. It further provides that all minors between 
the ages of fourteen and eighteen years may register from the schools that 
they attend. 

Under the bill the various public employment offices scattered through the 
State are required to co-operate with one another in order that the employ- 
ment office which has a surplus of work offered may draw additional appli- 
cants for work from employment offices where there is no work obtainable. 

In this way the worker will be put in touch with localities where there 
is a demand for labor, and the employer will have the advantage of a State- 
wide canvass in his search for workers. 

The public employment office is empowered to advertise, wherever necessary, 
for positions or for workers; provided that the expenditure for advertising 
is not more than five per cent of the employment office's total expenditures. 

The Commissioner of Labor is empowered, under this bill, to secure what- 
ever information he may desire from private employment agencies, and the 
service of the public employment agency is to be free to all applicants. 

New York must deal with an ancient problem in a modern way. If, 
through the creation of these public employment offices, the State of New 
York can bring the worker and the employer into closer touch, it will have 
done a necessary duty in reducing the evil of unemployment. 



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12 New York Labor Bulletin. 

One of the purposes of government is to supply its citizens with informa- 
tion necessary to their welfare. There is no information more vital to the 
citizen of the State than knowledge of where he may obtain work to feed 
and clotlie himself and his dependents. 

Workmen's Compensation Insarance (Message of January ai) 

At the recent extra session of the Legislature of 1913 a bill was passed 
which provided that insurance corporations and associations carrying on 
the business of workmen's compensation insurance should file with the Super- 
intendent of Insurance their classifications of risks and premiums, together 
with their basis rates and schedules, and that these should not take effect 
until the Superintendent of Insurance should have approved them as ade- 
quate for the risks to which they applied. 

I felt constrained to veto this bill when it came before me for executive 
consideration, because I felt that the State insurance fund shortly to be 
inaugurated under the provisions of the new Workmen's Compensation Law 
might be regarded as being included among the " associations " over which 
these larger supervisory powers were given to the Superintendent of Insur- 
ance, and it seemed to me undesirable that there should be any conflict of 
authority between the Insurance Department and the new Workmen's Com- 
pensation Commission in respect to this State fund. Except for this feature, 
the bill which I vetoed met with my warm approval, and I so stated in my 
veto memorandum. 

This bill, modified so as to exclude the State fund from its operation be- 
yond any possible question, is about to be introduced at the present session 
of the Legislature, and in my judgment it should, in its present form, be 
immediately passed. I shall certainly give it my approval if it comes be- 
fore me after favorable action by tne Legislature. The reason why the 
passage of such a law is highly desirable at this time is plain. Experience 
has shown that under stress of competition between different insurance 
organisms, inadequate rates are likely to be charged, and that in the end 
this is very apt to result in an inability on the part of the insurers to ful- 
fill their policy obligations. At the present moment, we are about to estab- 
lish in New York a State administered fund to ensure compensation risks 
in competition with privately managed insurance companies and associations. 
If by so doing they could eliminate this competition, it is not unreasonable 
to suppose that some of the stronger stock companies would at the beginning 
be willing to take heavy losses in their compensation business, by cutting 
rates to a point which the State fund could not with safety venture. A 
well established, rich company might carry this practice a considerable dis- 
tance without imperilling its own solvency. It is a possibility which should 
be guarded against. The proper solution, it seems to me, is that the Insur- 
ance Department shall possess power of approval of the rates which shall 
be charged by the stock companies and mutual associations. This is now 
being done in Massachusetts, with excellent results. On the one hand, the 
charging of excessive premiums by the powerful companies acting in combi- 
nation with each other is prevented; on the other hand, the charging of a 
sufficient rate is ensured, so that the insurance will remain safe and depend- 
able. In the case of compensation insurance, the ultimate sufferers from unsafe 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 13 

insurance conditions are the workingmen of the State. I deem it absolutely 
essential in their interest that the insurance protection upon which so many 
of them will rely — that afforded by the stock companies and the employers* 
mutual associations — shall be safeguarded in the manner provided for by 
the bill to which I refer. 

I, therefore, respectively urge your honorable body to give immediate con- 
sideration to the measure which is to be introduced to accomplish this very 
desirable purpose. In its present form it applies, plainly and unmistakably, 
to the compensation insurance rates of the stock companies and mutual 
associations only. It does not apply to the rates which shall be charged by 
the State insurance fund. 

Prison Labor for Construction of Material for State Roads (Message of 

March 23) 

New York is engaged in building 12,000 miles of road which will wear out 
forty years before they are paid for. 

Unless the State makes a radical change in the type of road it builds, it 
will cost from $20,000,000 to $30,000,000 yearly to maintain and rebuild 
New York's highways when the present system is completed. 

This is the real highway problem. 

It costs New York approximately $12,000 to build a mile of macadam 
road which, under present traffic conditions, will not last more than ten 
years. It costs a thousand dollars a year to maintain and resurface these 
macadam roads. And, at the end of ten years when these roads are worn 
out it will cost at least $6,000 a mile to rebuild them. 

One hundred million dollars has been voted for the construction of New 
York's highways. If the roads we build in the future cost as much as those 
we have been building in the past, it will require an additional $30,000,000 
to complete the proposed system. On New York's 12,000 miles of macadam 
roads the annual cost of maintenance will be $12,000,000, the total cost of 
the roads will be $130,000,000 and at the end of ten years from the date of 
completion the State will have little to show for an expenditure of 
$260,000,000. 

In the twenty years thereafter the tax for highways will be at least 
$20,000,000 each year, if our roads are to be kept in proper condition. 

Every year the taxpayers of New York will be compelled to pay $12,000,000 
for maintenance. Every year they will be forced to pay $5,000,000 in interest 
charges on their bonds. Every year they will be compelled to contribute 
$2,500,000 to the Sinking Fund to take up these bonds when they mature. 
And every year they will be required to pay additional millions to rebuild 
part of the roads on which they are lavishing these tremendous sums. 

In other words. New York must either change its road policy or prepare 
to levy a perpetual and yearly road tax of $2 on every man, woman and child 
within its borders. 

When the State planned its highway system it did so without knowledge of 
the motor traffic that these roads would later be asked to withstand. 

Following the lead of Massachusetts it adopted a system of macadam 
roads eminently fitted to light horse traffic but utterly unsuited to the wear 
and tear of the heavy automobile. The result has been that an ever increas- 



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14 New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 

ing motor traffic is pounding the roads of New York apart almost as fast 
as they can be built. What the State has saved in the initial cost of its 
roads is more than lost in the great and increasing cost of maintenance. 

New York's experience has simply been that of adjoining States but upon 
a larger scale. 

New York pays no more than Massachusetts does for the same kind of 
macadam road. New York's macadam roads last as long as roads in Massa- 
chusetts that are subjected to the same degree of traffic. Last year Massa- 
chusetts spent over $800 a mile for repairing and resurfacing and many' 
older roads needed rebuilding at a cost of from $6,000 to $10,000 a mile. 

New Jersey builds its roads at an approximate cost of $10,000 a mile, 
but it is fortunate in the possession of domestic road material which other 
States must import. For repairs and resurfacing New Jersey spends over 
$1,500 a mile. 

I do not believe that when the taxpayers of New York voted $100,000,000 
for a system of good roads, they realized that they would be compelled to 
spend more than $20,000,000 a year to perpetuate these roads. And in fair- 
ness to these taxpayers and to the various governmental activities to which 
the State's money ought to be devoted, those in authority must devise some 
way to reduce the cost of keeping New York's highways in repair. 

Instead of roads that wear, out in ten years. New York must build roads 
that will last from twenty to thirty years. Instead of building highways 
tliat cost $1,000 a year to maintain, New York must construct roads that can 
be maintained at a moderate annual cost. Instead of putting down roads 
that cannot withstand the traffic that passes over them the State must find 
some way to build roads that are fitted for present conditions. 

Two types of road with which this country has had experience answer 
these requirements. One is the concrete road, the other the brick road with 
concrete foundation. 

In the past New York has been slow to adopt concrete or brick roads be- 
cause of their high initial cost. Where a macadam road costs from $10,000 
to $13,000 a mile to build, a concrete road costs from $12,000 to $16,000 a 
mile, and a brick road coflts from $20,000 to $25,000. 

Unfortunately the experience of the modern road builder with concrete 
has been rather limited. Michigan has built concrete roads in one county 
and thus far has obtained very satisfactory results, but these roads have not 
been down long enough to justify any positive conclusion as to their per- 
manence and economy. Brick roads, however, have been laid in hundreds of 
cities and have everywhere demonstrated their durability. Brick roads have 
been down for twenty-five years and have admirably stood the test of the 
hardest kind of traffic. The annual cost of maintaining these brick roads 
has been remarkably low, ranging from practically nothing to from ten to 
fifty dollars per mile. 

Even if New York were compelled to pay $25,000 a mile for brick roads 
it would be economy to build such roads instead of macadam roads in all 
places where the State's highways are subjected to heavy automobile traffic. 

The total expenditures for twenty years on a macadam road amount to 
$36,000. This includes $12,000 for building, $18,000 for maintenance, and 
$6,000 for rebuilding at the end of the first ten years. 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 15 

The total expenditures for twenty years on a vitrified brick road amount 
to $26,000 if we allow a maximum ot $25,000 for building and $&0 a year 
for maintenance. 

On these outside figures the difference in cost for twenty years between the 
macadam and brick roads shows a balance of $10,000 in favor of the brick 
road even if New York pays the market price for brick. 

I believe, however, that by judicious legislative action it is possible for 
New York to build brick roads for a little more than it now costs to build 
macadam roads. 

The greatest item in the construction of brick roads is the cost of the 
vitrified brick. If the State can secure this brick cheaply its road problem 
will be solved. In a brick road costing $25,000 a mile the brick itself costs 
$12,000. 

New York can make its own brick by utilizing the splendid deposits of 
shale which are found in profusion all through the southern half of the State 
and by using prison, labor to turn this natural resource into paving blocks. 

I respectfully suggest to the Legislature that it amend the Prison Law 
so that the State's prisoners may be employed in the manufacture of brick 
for the State's highways. 

The State Geologist informs me that : " New York State has an inex- 
haustible and widely distributed resource in shale which may be made 
the basis of an industry large enough to supply all the local requirements 
in paving material of the best quality. The value of this resource has been 
recognized by private enterprise, and for the last twenty years paving brick 
have been manufactured on an increasingly large scale. The local product 
comes in competition with that made in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan and 
other states, and the test of experience generally appears to justify the 
opinion that the brick made in the New York plants compare favorably 
with the best in the market. Practically the whole of the southern half 
of the State between the meridian of Buffalo and Albany and the Pennsyl- 
vania state line is underlaid by formations that include shale among the 
more important members." 

We have the material for brick highways at hand. We have labor w^aiting 
within our prisons to transform this material into the finished product. 
Seemingly all that is needed is the wisdom to turn these facts to advantage. 

This is not a matter that can be settled off-hand, but the least that faith- 
ful public servants can do is to give it their serious and immediate con- 
sideration. 

At Elmira, where the State Reformatory is located, there are deposits of 
shale particularly fitted for the purpose I suggest. It would be easy to 
make an experiment there to determine beyond any doubt the feasibility and 
economy of using prison labor in the manufacture of paving brick. The 
plant necessary for the manufacture of vitrified brick is comparatively 
simple aifd inexpensive. 

I urge the Legislature to appropriate, at once, enough money to try out 
at Elmira the plan I have outlined. 

Furthermore, I recommend that the Legislature appoint a legislative com- 
mittee to investigate the entire question and to gather data upon which 
the Legislature may act advisedly at its next session. 



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16 New York Labob Bulletin. 

New York would be merely following the enlightened and economical 
system of lister commonwealths if it employs its prisoners to make the 
brick needed for its highways. 

In Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, Utah 
and Wisconsin, prisoners are used in the preparation of road material. 

Many states go further. Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, 
Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Michi- 
gan, Missouri, Montana, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New 
Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, 
Washington and Wyoming employ the prisoners of the state to a greater or 
less extent in the building, repair and maintenance of their roads. 

I am not suggesting that New York employ its convicts in the actual con- 
struction of its highways. To do this would mean an entire change in the 
State's attitude towards prison labor and would bring convicts into positive 
competition with free citizens. 

I firmly believe that the State's roads should be constructed by free 
labor either working under contractors or in the employ of the State itself, 
but I also believe that the State should, so far as practicable, secure the 
material for its highways by the labor of its prisoners. At present the State 
is employing prison labor in the manufacture of supplies for State institu- 
tions and there is equal reason why such labor should be employed to manu- 
facture the bricks for the State's highways. This would be simply applying 
to our highways the system we now apply to State and municipal institutions. 

Those who are qualified to speak, inform me that by securing the vitrified 
brick for New York's roads in this manner brick roads can be constructed at 
a cost of $15,000 a mile. 

On this basis the total cost of a mile of brick road for 20 years would be 
$16,000, including $15,000 for building and twenty years of maintenance at 
$50 a year. The total cost of macadam road for the same period, as I pointed 
out, is $38,000. 

An idea of the importance of the economy I propose may be gained from 
the fact that the total saving in the 7,300 miles of road yet to be constructed 
would amount to $146,000,000 in the twenty years after their completion, 
or more than the total cost of constructing our entire system of highways. 

Surely it is worth while to turn this possible economy into an accomplished 
fact. 

In connection with the construction of permanent highways a careful study 
should also be made of the feasibility of utilizing Medina sandstone blocks 
for road construction. This stone has been used for permanent pavement 
for a great many years. Main street in the city of Rochester, and a number 
of streets in the city of Buffalo and elsewhere have been successfully paved 
for twenty or thirty years with this material. The State in acquiring lands 
in connection with the Barge canal has obtained property from which this 
stone can be procured and cheaply transported where desired. Medina sand- 
stone blocks, I am advised, can be made with convict labor and the use of 
machinery as cheaply as brick and affords as good, if not a better wearing 
surface. 

Our State has been more backward than other states in the attention which 
it has given to the study of road building. The Republic of France main- 
tains a permanent representative at the city of New York to 



study road 

Google 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 17 

conditions in America. Delegations from Belgium, Canada, Japan, and other 
countries have visited our State Highway Department recently to study 
conditions here, and we are justified in asking to have our own State through 
a legislative committee make a careful study of our own road problems. 

I believe there is other important work for a committee such as I suggest. 
I believe it could, without interfering with the provisions of the highway 
referendum, or the constitutional amendment for highways, save the State 
at least fifteen million dollars by a readjustment of designated highways, 
many of which needlessly parallel one another. It should also be able to 
map out a plan, satisfactory to the State and profitable to the towns, for 
the construction and maintenance of bridges in connection with the highways. 

There is sad need of uniformity in this policy. It is unfair to compel 
towns of small financial means to build and maintain expensive bridges used 
by the people of the State at large. We need a new system of highway 
patrol and section supervision similar to the systems of England and France; 
and this a legislative committee should satisfactorily devise. 

Far-seeing, constructive legislation is needed to prevent the squandering 
of millions of dollars of the people's money upon roads which are not needed 
in some instances, and which in all instances will not stand up under the 
present grind of heavy automobile traffic. 

New York should have good roads, but the only way to have good roads 
is to have only roads that New York can afford to maintain. A friend of 
good roads would rather see one road maintained in splendid condition than 
five roads gaping and neglected. 

I shall expect and shall exact results from the Highway Department during 
the coming summer. I shall do whatever I can as Governor to see that the 
State receives the full value of its money in all roads built during my admin- 
istration. But the highway problem cannot be settled in any single admin- 
istration if the general plan is wrong. 

In view of the facts that I have presented for your consideration in this 
message, it must be conceded that our present methods of construction for 
most of our roads are unfitted for existing conditions. 

I ask the Legislature for its support and assistance in securing for New 
York the kind of roads that the State ought to have. 

TEXT OF LABOR LAWS OF 1914 

[Arranged in chronological order of enactment as Indicated by chapter numbers. 
In the case of acts which make changes in existing law, new matter Introduced is 
printed in italic type and old matter omitted is encloBed in brackets. Acts con- 
taining only new matter are in Roman type throughout.] 

Chapter 16. 

An Act to amend the insurance law, in relation to the approval of premium 
rates of corporatione and aasociations transacting the business of work- 
men's compensation insurance. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as foVUyim: 

Section 1. Article one of chapter thirty-three of the laws of nineteen 
hundred and nine, entitled "An act in relation to insurance corporations, 
constituting chapter twenty-eight of the consolidated laws," is her^b; 



18 New York Labor Bulletin. 

by adding at the end thereof a new section, to be section sixty-seven, to 
read as follows: 

§ 67. Approval of premium rates. Every insurance corporation or as- 
sociation, except the state insurance fund as administered by the state 
workmen's compensation commission, authorized to transact business in this 
state, which insures employers against liability for compensation under the 
workmen's compensation law, shall file with the superintendent of insurance 
its classification of risks and premiums relating thereto, and any subsequent 
proposed classification of risks and premiums, together with basis rates and 
schedules, if a system of schedule rating be in use, none of which shall take 
effect until the superintendent of insurance shall have approved the same 
as adequate for the risks to which they respectively apply. The superin- 
tendent of insurance may withdraw his approval of any premium rate or 
schedule made by any insurance corporation or association if, in his judg- 
ment, such premium rate or schedule is inadequate to provide the necessary 
reserves. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved March 4. 

Chapter 21. 

An Act to amend the labor law, in reUtion to the employment of children in 
cairying and distributing newspapers. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
Ho enact as follows: 

Section 1. Chapter thirty -six of the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, 
entitled "An act relating to labor, constituting chapter thirty-one of the con- 
solidated laws," is hereby amended by inserting therein a new section to be 
section one hundred and sixty-one-b, to read as follows: 

§ 161-b. Employment of children in carrying and distributing newspapers. 
Upon obtaining a permit and badge as provided by this section, a male child 
over twelve years of age between the close of school and six-thirty o'clock 
in the afternoon and a male child over fourteen years of age between five- 
thirty and eight o'clock in the morning may be employed to carry and 
distribute newspapers on a newspaper route in a city or village, if no other 
work or employment be required or permitted to be done by any such child 
during that time. The badge or permit required by this section shall be 
issued to such child by the district superintendent or the board of education 
of the city or village and school district where such child resides, or by such 
other officer thereof as may be officially designated by such board for that 
purpose, on the application of the parent, guardian or other person having 
the custody of the child desiring such permit and badge, or in case such 
child has no parent, guardian or custodian then on the application of his 
next friend, being an adult. Such permit and badge shall not be issued 
until the officer issuing the same shall have received, examined, approved and 
placed on file in his office satisfactory proof that such male child is of the 
age prescribed by this section, and shall also have received, examined and 
placed on file the written statement of the principal or chief executive officer 
of the school which the child is attending, stating -that such child is an 
attendant at such school, that he is ot the normal development of a child of 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 19 

his age and physically fit for such employment, and that such principal or 
chief executive officer approves the granting of a permit and badge to such 
child. No such permit or badge shall be valid for any purpose except during 
the period in which such proof and written statement shall remain on file, 
nor shall such permit or badge be authority beyond the period fixed therein 
for its duration. After having received, examined and placed on file such 
papers the officer shall issue to the child a permit and badge. Such permit 
shall state the date and place of birth of the child, the name and address 
of its parent, guardian, custodian or next friend, as the case may be, and 
describe the color of hair and eyes, the height and weight and any distin- 
guishing facial mark of such child, and shall further state that the papers 
required by this section have been duly examined and filed; and that the 
child named in such permit luis appeared before the officer issuing the permit. 
The badge furnished by the officer issuing the permit shall bear on its face 
a number corresponding with the number of the permit, and the name of the 
child. Every such permit, and every such badge on its reverse side, shall 
be signed in the presence of the officer issuing the same by the child in whose 
name it is issued. The badge provided for herein shall be worn conspicuously 
at all times by such child while so working; and all such permits and badges 
shall expire annually on the first day of January. The color of the badge 
shall be changed each year. No child to whom such permit and badge are 
issued shall transfer the same to any other person nor be engaged in any city 
or village in distributing newspapers without having conspicuously upon his 
person such badge, and he shall exhibit the same upon demand at any time 
to any police or attendance officer. 

S 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved March 5. 

Chapter 38. 

An Act to amend the public service commiasioiis law, in relation to free trans- 
portation or reduced rates. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Subdivision two of section thirty-three of chapter four hundred 
and eighty of the laws of nineteen hundred and ten, entitled "An act in 
relation to public service commissions, constituting chapter forty-eight of 
the consolidated laws," is hereby amended to read. as follows: 

2. No common carrier subject to the provisions of this chapter shall, 
directly or indirectly, issue or give any free ticket, free pass or free trans- 
portation for passengers or property between points within this state, except 
to its officers, employees, agents, [pensioners,] surgeons, physicians, attorneys- 
at-law, and their families; to ministers of religion, officers and employees 
of railroad young men's Christian associations, inmates of hospitals, chari- 
table and eleemosynary institutions and persons exclusively engaged in chari- 
table and eleemosynary work ; and to indigent, destitute and homeless persons 
and to such persons when transported by charitable societies or hospit«kls 
and the necessary agents employed in- such transportation; to inmates of the 
national homes or state homes for disabled volunteer soldiers and of sol- 
diers' and sailors' homes, including those about to enter and those returning 



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20 New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 

home after discharge and boards of managers of such homes; to necessary 
caretakers of property in transit; to employees of sleeping-car companies, 
express companies, telegraph and telephone companies doing business along 
the line of the issuing carrier; to railway mail service employees, post- 
office inspectors, customs inspectors and immigration inspectors; to newsboys 
on trains, baggage agents, witnesses attending any legal investigation or 
proceeding in which the common carrier is interested, persons injured in acci- 
dents or wrecks and physicians and nurses attending such persons; to the 
carriage free or at reduced rates of persons or property for the United States, 
state or municipal governments, or of property to or from fairs and exposi- 
tions for exhibit thereat. 

§ 2. Subdivision three of section thirty-three of such chapter, as amended 
by chapter five hundred and forty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
eleven, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

3. Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to prohibit the interchange 
of free or reduced transportation between common carriers of or for their 
officers, agents, employees, attorneys [and] surgeons, and their families, and 
their household and personal effects, nor to prohibit any common carrier from 
carrying passengers or property free, with the object of providing relief in 
cases of general epidemic, pestilence or other calamitous visitation; nor to 
prohibit any common carrier from transporting persons or property as incident 
to or connected with contracts for construction, operation or maintenance, and 
to the extent only that such free transportation is provided for in the 
contract for such work, nor to prevent any common carrier from transporting 
children under five years of age free. Provided further, that nothing in this 
chapter shall prevent the issuance of mileage, excursion, school or family 
commutation, commutation passenger tickets, half fare tickets for the trans- 
portation of children under twelve years of age, or any other form of reduced 
rate passenger tickets, or joint interchnngeabie mileage tickets, with special 
privileges as to the amount of free baggage that may be carried under mileage 
tickets of one thousand miles or more. But before any common carrier sub- 
ject to the provision of this chapter shall issue any such mileage, excursion, 
school or family commutation, commutation, half fare, or any other form 
of reduced rate passenger tickets, or joint interchangeable mileage ticket, 
with special privileges as aforesaid, it shall file with the commission copies of 
the tariffs of rates, fares or charges on which such tickets are to be based, 
together with the specifications of the amount of free baggage permitted 
to be carried under such joint interchangeable mileage ticket, in the same 
manner as common carriers are required to do with regard to other rates 
by this chapter. Nor shall anything in this chapter prevent the issuance of 
passenger transportation in exchange for advertising space in newspapers at 
full rates. 

The term " empJo^ees " as used in subdivisions two and three of this seo- 
tion, when referring to employees of a common carrier, shall include fur- 
loughedy pensioned^ and superannuated employees, persons who have becoms 
disabled or infirm in the service of any stwh common carrier, and the remains 
of a person killed in the employment of a carrier and ex-employees traveling 
for the purpose of entering the service of any such common carrier; amd the 
term "families" as used in such subdivisions shaU include the families of 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 21 

those persons named in this proviso^ also the familes of persons killed, a/nd the 
widows during toidowhood and minor children during minority of persons who 
died, while in the service of such common carrier. 

§ 3. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved March 12. 

Chapter 41. 

An Act to re-enact and amend the workmen's compensatioii law. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate attd Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Chapter eight hundred and sixteen of the laws of nineteen hun- 
dred and thirteen, entitled "An act in relation to assuring compensation for 
injuries or death of certain employees in the course of their employment 
and repealing certain sections of the labor law relating thereto, constituting 
chapter sixty -seven of the consolidated laws," is hereby re-enacted and amended 
to read as follows: 



CHAPTER 67 OF THE CONSOLIDATED LAWS. 
Workmen's Compensation La.w. 

Article 1. Short title, application, definitions. (§§ 1-3). 

2. Compensation. (§§ 10-34). 

3. Security for compensation. (§§ 5(M»4). 

4. State workmen's compensation commission. (§§ 60-76). 

5. State Insurance fund. (§§ 90-105). 

6. Miscellaneous provisions. (§§ 110-119). 

7. Laws repealed; when to take effect. (§§ 130-131). 

ARTICLE 1. 
Short Title; Application; Definitions. 

Section 1. Short title. 

2. Application. 

3. Definitions. 

Section 1. Short title. This chapter shall be known as the "workmen's 
compensation law." 

§ 2. Application. Compensation provided for in this chapter shall be pay- 
able for injuries sustained or death incurred by employees engaged in the 
following hazardous employments: 

Group 1. The operation, including construction and repair, of railways 
operated by steam, electric or other motive power, street railways, and incline 
raiways, but not their construction when constructed by any person other 
than the company which owns or operates the railway, including work of 
express, sleeping, parlor and dining car employees on railway trains. 

Group 2. Construction and operation of railways not included in group one. 

Group 3. The operation, including construction and repair, of car shops, 
machine shops, steam and power plants, and other works for the purposes 



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22 New York Labor Bulletin. 

of any such railway, or used or to be used in connection with it when operated, 
constructed or repaired by the company which owns or operates the railway. 

Group 4. The operation, including, construction and repair, of car shops, 
machine shops, steam and power plants, not included in group three. 

Group 6. The operation, including construction and repair, of telephone 
lines and wires for the purposes of the business of a telephone company, or 
used or to be used in connection with its business, when constructed or 
operated by the company. 

Group 6. The operation, including construction and repair, of telegraph 
lines and wires for the purposes of the business of a telegraph company, 
or used or to be used in connection with its business, when constructed or 
operated by the company. 

Group 7. Construction of telegraph and telephone lines not included in 
groups five and six. 

Group 8. The operation, within or without the state, including repair, of 
vessels other than vessels of other states or countries used in interstate or 
foreign commerce, when operated or repaired by the company. 

Group 9. Shipbuilding, including construction and repair in a ship-yard 
or elsewhere, not included in group eight. 

Group 10. Longshore work, including the loading or unloading of cargoes 
or parts of cargoes of grain, coal, ore, freight, general merchandise, lumber 
or other products or materials, or moving or handling the same on any dock, 
platform or place, or in any warehouse or other place of storage. 

Group 11. Dredging, subaqueous or caisson construction, and pile driving. 

Group 12. Construction, installation or operation of electric light and elec- 
tric power lines, dynamos, or appliances, and power transmission lines. 

Group 13. Paving; sewer and subway construction, work under compressed 
air, excavation, tunneling and shaft sinking, well digging, laying and repair 
of underground pipes, cables and wires, not included in other groups. 

Group 14. Lumbering; logging, river-driving, rafting, booming, saw mills, 
shingle mills, lath mills; manufacture of veneer and of excelsior; manufacture 
of staves, spokes, or headings. 

Group 15. Pulp and paper mills. 

Group 16. Manufacture of furniture, interior woodwork, organs, pianos, 
piano actions, canoes, small boats, coffins, wicker and rattan ware; upholster- 
ing; manufacture of mattresses or bed springs. 

Group 17. Planing mills, sash and door factories, manufacture of wooden 
and corrugated paper boxes, cheese boxes, mouldings, window and door screens, 
window shades, carpet sweepers, wooden toys, articles and wares or baskets. 

Group 18. Mining; reduction of ores and smelting; preparation of metals 
or minerals. 

Group 19. Quarries; sand, shale, clay or gravel pits, lime kilns; manufac- 
ture of brick, tile, terra-cotta, fire-proofing, or paving blocks, manufacture 
of calcium carbide, cement, asphalt or paving material. 

Group 20. Manufacture of glass, glass products, glassware, porcelain or 
pottery. 

Group 21. Iron, steel or metal foundries; rolling mills; manufacture of 
castings, forglngs, heavy engines, locomotives, machinery, safes, anchors. 



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The Laboe Laws of 1914. 28 

cables, rails, shafting, wires, tubing, pipes, sheet metal, boilers, furnaxses, 
stoves, structural steel, iron or metal. 

Group 22. Operation and repair of stationary engines and boilers, not 
included in other groups. 

Group 23. Manufacture of small castings or forgings, metal wares, instru- 
ments, utensils and articles, hardware, nails, wire goods, screens, bolts, metal 
beds, sanitary, water, gas or electric fixtures, light machines, typewriters, 
cash registers, adding machines, carriage mountings, bicycles, metal toys, 
tools, cutlery, instruments, photographic cameras and supplies, sheet metal 
products, buttons. 

Group 24. Manufacture of agricultural implements, threshing machines, 
traction engines, wagons, carriages, sleighs, vehicles, automobiles, motor 
trucks, toy wagons, sleighs or baby carriages. 

Group 25. Manufacture of explosives and dangerous chemicals, corrosive 
acids or salts, ammonia, gasoline, petroleum, petroleum products, celluloid, 
gas, charcoal, artificial ice, gun powder or ammunition. 

Group 26. Manufacture of paint, color, varnish, oil, japans, turpentine, 
printing ink, printers' rollers, tar, tarred, pitched or asphalted paper. 

Group 27. Distilleries, breweries; manufacture of spirituous or malt liquors, 
alcohol, wine, mineral water or soda waters. 

Group 28. Manufacture of drugs and chemicals, not specified in group 
twenty-five, medicines, dyes, extracts, pharmaceutical or toilet preparations, 
soaps, candles, perfumes, non-corrosive acids or chemical preparations, fertil- 
izers, including garbage disposal plants; shoe blacking or polish. 

Group 29. Milling; manufacture of cereals or cattle foods, warehousing; 
storage; operation of grain elevators. 

Group 30. Packing houses, abattoirs, manufacture or preparation of meats 
or meat products or glue. 

Group 31. Tanneries. 

Group 3!2. Manufacture of leather goods and products, belting, saddlery, 
harness, trunks, valises, boots, shoes, gloves, umbrellas, rulbber goods, rubber 
shoes, tubing, tires or hose. 

Group 33. Canning or preparation of fruit, vegetables, fish or food stuffs; 
pickle factories and sugar refineries. 

Group 34. Bakeries, including manufacture of crackers and biscuits, man- 
ufacture of confectionery, spices or condiments. 

(xroup 35. Manufacture of tobacco, cigars, cigarettes or tobacco products. 

Group 36. Manufacture of cordage, ropes, fibre, brooms or brushes; manilla 
or hemp products. 

Group 37. Flax mills; manufacture of textiles or fabrics, spinning, weav- 
ing and knitting manufactories; manufacture of yarn, thread, hosiery, cloth, 
blankets, carpets, canvas, bags, shoddy or felt. 

Group 38. Manufacture of men's or women's clothing, white wear, shirts, 
collars, corsets, hats, caps, furs or robes. 

Group 39. Power laundries; dyeing, cleaning or bleaching. 

Group 40. Printing, photo-engraving, stereotyping, electrotyping, lithograph- 
ing, embossing; manufacture of stationery, paper, cardboard boxes, bags, or 
wall-paper; and book-binding. 

Group 41. The operation, otherwise than on tracks, on streets, highways, 
or elsewhere of cars, trucks, wagons or other vehicles, and rollers and engines. 



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24 New Yoek Labob Bulletin. 

propelled by steam, gas, gasoline, electric, mechanical or other power or 
drawn by horses or mules. 

Group 42. Stone cutting or dressing; marble works; manufacture of arti- 
ficial stone; steel building and bridge construction; installation of elevators, 
fire escapes, boilers, engines or heavy machinery; brick-laying, tile-laying, 
mason work, stone-setting, concrete work, plastering; and nmnufacture of 
concrete blocks; structural carpentry; painting, decorating or renovating; 
sheet metal work; roofing; construction, repair and demolition of buildings 
and bridges; plumbing, sanitary or heating engineering; installation and 
covering of pipes or boilers. 

§ 3. Definitions. As used in this chapter, 1. "Hazardous employment'' 
means a work or occupation described in section two of this chapter. 

2. " Commission " means the state workmen's compensation commission, 
as constituted by this chapter. 

3. " Employer," except when otherwise expressly stated, means a person, 
partnership, association, corporation, and the l^al representatives of a de- 
ceased employer, or the receiver or trustee of a peraon, partnership, asso- 
ciation or corporation, employing workmen in hazardous employments; but 
does not include the state or a municipal corporation or other political sub- 
division thereof. 

4. " Employee " means a person who is engaged in a hazardous employ- 
ment in the service of an employer carrying on or conducting the same upon 
the premises or at the plant, or in the course of his employment away from 
the plant of his employer; and shall not include farm laborers or domestie 
servants. 

6. "Employment" includes employment only in a trade, business ny occu- 
pation carried on by the employer for pecuniary gain. 

6. " Compensation " means the money allowance payable to an employee 
or to his dependents as provided for in this chapter, and includes funeral 
benefits provided therein. 

7. " Injury " and " personal injury " mean only accidental injuries aris- 
ing out of and in the course of employment and such disease or infection as 
may naturally and unavoidably result therefrom. 

8. " Death " when mentioned as a basis for the right to compensation means 
only death resulting from such injury. 

0. " Wages " means the money rate at which the service rendered is recom- 
pensed under the contract of hiring in force at the time of the accident, in- 
cluding the reasonable value of board, rent, housing, lodging or similar ad- 
vantage received from the employer. 

10. " State fund " means the state insurance fund provided for in article 
five of this chapter. 

11. "Child" shall include a posthumous child and a child legally adopted 
prior to the injury of the employee. 

12. " Insurance carrier " shall include the state fund, stock corporations 
or mutual associations with which employers have insured, and employers 
permitted to pay compensation directly under the provisions of subdivision 
three of section fifty. 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 25 

ARTICLE 2. 

Compensation. 
Section 10. Liability for compensation. 

11. Alternative remedy. 

12. Compensation not allowed for first two weeks. 

13. Treatment and care of injured employees. 

14. Weekly waxes basis of compensation. 
16. Schedule in case of disability. 

16. Death benefits. 

17. Aliens. 

18. Notice of injury. 

19. Medical examination. 

20. Determination of claims for compensation. 

21. Presumptions. 

22. Modification of award. 

23. Appeals from the commission. 

24. Costs and fees. 

25. Compensation, how payable. 

26. Enforcement of payment in default. 

27. Depositing future payments. 

28. Limitation of right to compensation. 

29. Subrogation to remedies of employee. 

30. Revenues or benefits from other sources not to affect compensation. 

31. Agreement for contribution by employee void. 

32. Waiver agreements void. 

33. Assignments; exemptions. 

34. Preferences. 

§ 10. Liability for compensation. Every employer subject to the provisions 
of this chapter shall pay or provide as required by this chapter compensa- 
tion according to the schedules of this article for the disability or death of his 
employee resulting from an accidental personal injury sustained by the em- 
ployee arising out of and in the course of his employment, without regard 
to fault as a cause of such injury, except where the injury is occasioned by 
the willful intention of the injured employee to bring about the injury or 
death of himself or of another, or where the injury results solely from the 
intoxication of the injured employee while on duty. Where the injury is 
occasioned by the willful intention of the injured employee to bring about the 
injury or death of himself or of another, or where the injury results solely 
from the intoxication of the injured employee while on duty, neither the in- 
jured employee nor any dependent of such employee shall receive compensation 
under this chapter. 

§ 11. Alternative remedy. The liability prescribed by the last preceding 
section shall be exclusive, except that if an employer fail to secure the pay- 
ment of compensation for his injured employees and their dependents as pro- 
vided in section fifty of this chapter, an injured employee, or his legal repre- 
sentative in case death results from the injury, may, at his option, elect to 
claim compensation under this chapter, or to maintain an action in the courts 
for damages on account of such injury; and in such an action the defendant 

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26 Nbw York Labos Bulletin. 

may not plead as a defense that the injury was caused by the n^ligence of a 
fellow servant or that the employee assumed the risk of his employment, or 
that the injury was due to the contributory negligence of the employee. 

§ 12. Compensation not allowed for first two weeks. No compensation 
shall be allowed for the first fourteen days of disability, except the benefits 
provided for in section thirteen of this chapter. 

§ 13. Treatment and care of injured employees. The employer shall 
promptly provide for an injured employee such medical, surgical or other 
attendance or treatment, nurse and hospital service, medicines, crutches and 
apparatus as may be required or be requested by the employee, during sixty 
days after the injury. If the employer fail to provide the skme, the injured 
employee may do, so at the expense of the employer. The employee shall 
not <be entitled to recover any amount expended by him for such treatment 
or services unless he shall have requested the employer to furnish the same 
and the employer shall have refused or neglected to do so. All fees and other 
charges for such treatment and services shall be subject to regulation by the 
commission as provided in section twenty-four of this chapter, and shall be 
limited to such charges as prevail in the same community for similar treat- 
ment of injured persons of a like standard of living. 

§ 14. Weekly wages basis of compensation. Except as otherwise provided 
in this chapter, the average weekly wages of the injured employee at the 
time of the injury shall be taken as the basis upon which to compute com- 
pensation or death benefits, and shall be determined as follows: 

1. If the injured employee shall have worked in the employment in which 
he was working at the time of the accident, whether for the same employer 
or not, during substantially the whole of the year immediately preceding 
his injury, his average annual earnings shall consist of three hundred times 
the average daily wage or salary which he shall have earned in such em- 
ployment during the days when so employed; 

2. If the injured employee shall not have worked in such employment dur- 
ing substantially the whole of such year, his average annual earnings shall 
consist of three hundred times the average daily wage or salary which an 
employee of the same class working substantially the whole of such immedi- 
ately preceding year in the same or in a similar employment in the same or 
a neighboring place shall have earned in such employment during the days 
when so employed; 

3. If either of the foregoing methods of arriving at the annual average earn- 
ings of an injured employee cannot reasonably and fairly be applied, such 
annual earnings shall be such sum as, having regard to the previous earn- 
ings of the injured employee and of other employees of the same or most 
similar class, working in the same or most siQiilar employment in the same 
or neighboring locality, shall reasonably represent the annual earning capacity 
of the injured employee in the employment in which he was working at the 
time of the accident; 

4. The average weekly wages of an employee shall be one- fifty- second part 
of his average annual earnings; 

5. If it be established that the injured employee was a minor when injured, 
and that under normal conditions his wages would be expected to increase, 
the fact may be considered in arriving at his average weekly wages. 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 27 

§ 15. Schedule in. case of disability. The following schedule of compensa- 
tion is hereby established: 

1. Total permanent disability. In case of total disability adjudged to be 
permanent sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of the average weekly wages 
shall be paid to the employee during the continuance of such total disability. 
Loss of both hands, or both arms, or both feet, or both legs, or both eyes, 
or of any two thereof shall, in the absence of conclusive proof to the con- 
trary, constitute permanent total disability. In all other cases permanent 
total disability shall be determined in accordance with the facts. 

2. Temporary total disability. In case of temporary total disability, sixty- 
six and two-thirds per centum of the average weekly wages shall be paid to 
the employee during the continuance thereof, but not in excess of three 
thousand five hundred dollars, except as otherwise provided in this chapter. 

3. Permanent partial disability. In case of disability partial in character 
but permanent in quality the compensation shall be sixty-six and two-thirds 
per centum of the average weekly wages and shall be paid to the employee 
for the period named in the schedule as follows: 

Thumb. For the loss of a thumb, sixty weeks. 

First finger. For the loss of a first finger, commonly called index finger, 
forty-six weeks. 

Second finger. For the loss of a second finger, thirty weeks. 

Third finger. For the loss of a third finger, twenty-five weeks. 

Fourth finger. For the loss of a fourth finger, commonly called the little 
finger, fifteen weeks. 

Phalange of thumb or finger. The loss of the first phalange of the thumb 
or finger shall be considered to be equal to the loss of one-half of such thumb 
or finger, and compensation shall be one-half of the amount above specified. 
The loss of more than one phalange shall be considered as the loss of the 
entire thumb or finger; provided, however, that in no case shall the amount 
received for more than one finger exceed the amount provided in this schedule 
for the loss of a hand. 

Great toe. For the loss of a great toe, thirty-eight weeks. 

Other toes. For the loss of one of the toes other than the great toe, sixteen 
weeks. 

Phalange of toe. The loss of the first phalange of any toe shall be con- 
sidered to be equal to the loss of one-half of said toe, and the compensation 
shall 'be one-half of the amount specified. The loss of more than one phalange 
shall be considered as the loss of the entire toe. 

Hand. The loss of a hand, two hundred and forty-four weeks. 

Arm. For the loss of an arm, three hundred and twelve weeks. 

Foot. For the loss of a foot, two hundred and five weeks. 

Leg. For th^ loss of a leg, two hundred and eighty-eight weeks. 

Eye. For the loss of an eye, one hundred and twenty-eight weeks. 

Loss of use. Permanent loss of the use of a hand, arm, foot, leg or eye shall 
be considered as the equivalent of the loss of such hand, arm, foot, leg or eye. 

Amputations. Amputation between the elbow and the wrist shall be con- 
sidered as the equivalent of the loss of a hand. Amputation between the 
knee and the ankle shall be considered as the equivalent of the loss of a foot. 
Amputation at or above the elbow shall be considered as the loss of an arm. 
Amputation at or above the knee shall be considered as the loss of the leg. 

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28 New York Labob Bulletin. 

The compensation for the foregoing specific injuries shall be in lieu of all 
other compensation, except the benefits provided in section thirteen of this 
chapter. 

Other cases. In all other cases in this class of disability, tK<! compensation 
shall be sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of the difference between his 
average weekly wages and his wage-earning capacity thereafter in the same 
employment or otherwise, payable during the continuance of such partial 
disability, but subject to reconsideration of the degree of such impairment 
by the commission on its own motion or upon application of any party in 
interest. 

4. Temporary partial disaibility. In case of temporary partial disability, 
except the particular cases mentioned in subdivision three of this section, an 
injured employee shall receive sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of the 
difference between his average weekly wages and his wage earning capacity 
thereafter in the same employment or otherwise during the continuance of 
such partial disability, but not in excess of three thousand five hundred 
dollars, except as otherwise provided in this chapter. 

6. Limitation. The compensation payment under subdivisions one, two and 
four and under subdivision three except in case of the loss of a hand, arm, 
foot, leg or eye, shall not exceed fifteen dollars per week nor be less than live 
dollars per week; the compensation payment under subdivision three in case 
of the loss of a hand, arm, foot, leg or eye, shall not exceed twenty dollars 
per week nor be less than five dollars a week ; provided, however, that if the 
employee's wages at the time of the injury are less than five dollars per week 
he shall receive his full weekly wages. 

6. Previous disability. The fact that an employee has suffered previous 
disability or received compensation therefor shall not preclude him from 
compensation for a later injury nor preclude compensation for death result- 
ing therefrom; but in determining compensation for the later injury or death 
his average weekly wages shall be such sum as will reasonably represent 
his earning capacity at the time of the later injury. 

§ 16. Death benefits. If the injury causes death, the compensation shall 
be known as a death benefit and shall be payable in the amount and to or 
for the benefit of the persons following: 

1. Reasonable funeral expenses, not exceeding one hundred dollars; 

2. If there be a surviving wife (or dependent husband) and no child of 
the deceased under the age of eighteen years, to such wife (or dependent 
hu^and) thirty per centum of the average wages of the deceased during 
widowhood (or dependent widowerhood) .with two years* compensation in 
one sum, upon remarriage; and if there be surviving child or children of the 
deceased under the age of eighteen years, the additional amount of ten per 
centum of such wages for each such child until of the age of eighteen years, 
provided that the total amount payable shall in no case exceed sixty-six and 
two-thirds per centum of such wages. 

3. If there be surviving child or children of the deceased under the age 
of eighteen years, but no surviving wife (or dependent husband) then for the 
support of each such child until of the age of eighteen years, fifteen per 
centum of the wages of the deceased, provided that the aggr^ate shall in 
no case exceed sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of such wages. 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 29 

4. If the amount payable to surviving wife (or dependent hu&band) and 
to children under the age of eighteen years shall be less in the aggregate than 
sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of the average wages of the deceased, 
then for the support of grandchildren or brothers and sisters under the age 
of eighteen years, if dependent upon the deceased at the time of the accident, 
fifteen per centum of such wages for the support of each such person until of 
the age of eighteen years ; and for the support of each parent, or grandparent, 
of the deceased if dependent upon him at the time of the accident, fifteen per 
centum of such wages during such dependency. But in no case shall the 
aggregate amount payable under this subdivision exceed the difference between 
sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of such wages, and the amount payable 
as hereinbefore provided to surviving wife (or dependent husband) or for 
the support of surviving child or children. 

Any excess of wages over one hundred dollars a month shall not be taken 
into account in computing compensation under this section. All questions 
of dependency shall be determined as of the time of the accident. 

§ 17. Aliens. Compensation under this chapter to aliens not residents (or 
about to become nonresidents) of the United States or Canada, shall be the 
same in amount as provided for residents, except that the commission may, 
at its option, or, upon the application of the insurance carrier, shall, com- 
mute all future installments of compensation to be paid to such aliens, by 
paying or causing to be paid to them one-half of the commuted amount of 
such future installments of compensation as determined by the commission. 

§ 18. Notice of injury. Notice of an injury for which compensation is 
payable under this chapter shall be given to the commission and to the em- 
ployer within ten days after disability, and also in case of the death of the 
employee resulting from such injury, within thirty days after such death. 
Such notice may be given by any person claiming to be entitled to compensa- 
tion, or by some one in his behalf. The notice shall be in writing, and con- 
tain the name and address of the employee, and state in ordinary language 
the time, plac6, nature and cause of the injury, and be signed by him or by 
a person on his behalf or, in case of death, by any one or more of his de- 
pendents, or by a person on their behalf. It shall be given to the commission 
by sending it by mail, by registered letter, addressed to the commission at 
its ofiice. It shall be given to the employer by delivering it to him or send- 
ing it by mail, by registered letter, addressed to the employer at his or its 
last known place of residence; provided that, if the employer be a partner- 
ship then such notice may be so given to any one of the partners, and if the 
employer be a corporation, then such notice may be given to any agent or 
officer thereof upon whom legal process may be served, or any agent in charge 
of the business in the place where the injury occurred. The failure to give 
such notice, unless excused by the commission either on the ground that notice 
for some sufficient reason could not have been given, or on the ground that 
the state fund, insurance company, or employer, as the case may be, has not 
been prejudiced thereby, shall be a bar to any claim under this chapter. 

§ 19. Medical examination. An employee injured claiming or entitled to 
compensation under this chapter shall, if requested by the commission, sub- 
mit himself for medical examination at a time, and from time to time, at a 
place reasonably convenient for the employee, and as may be provided by the 
rules of the commission. If the employee or the insurance carrier request he 



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30 New York Labor Bulletin. 

shall be entitled to have a physician or physicians of his own selection to be 
paid by him present to participate in such examination. If an employee 
refuse to submit himself to examination, his right to prosecute any proceed- 
ing under this chapter shall be suspended, and no compensation shall be pay- 
able, for the period of such refusal. 

§ 20. Determination of claims for compensation. At any time after the 
expiration of the first fourteen days of disability on the part of an injured 
employee, or at any time after his death, a claim for compensation may be 
presented to the commission. The commission shall have full power and 
authority to determine all questions in relation to the payment of claims for 
compensation under the provisions ot this chapter. The commission shall 
make or cause to be made such investigation as it deems necessary, and upon 
application of either party, shall order a hearing, and within thirty days 
after a claim for compensation is submitted under this section, or such hear- 
ing closed, shall make or deny an award, determining such claim for compen- 
sation, and tile the same in the office of the commission, together with a state- 
ment of its conclusions of fact and rulings of law. The commission m9y, 
before making an award, require the claimant to appear before an arbitration 
committee appointed by it and consisting of one representative of employees, 
one representative of employers, and either a member of the commission or 
a person specially deputized by the commission to act as chairman, before 
which the evidence in regard to the claim shall be adduced and by which it 
shall be considered and reported upon. Immediately after such filing the com- 
mission shall send to the parties a copy of the decision. Upon a hearing 
pursuant to this section either party may present evidence and be represented 
by counsel. The decision of the commission shall be final as to all questions 
of fact, and, except as provided in section twenty-three, as to all questions of 
law. 

§ 21. Presumptiona In any proceeding for the enforcement of a claim for 
compensation under this chapter, it shall be presumed in the absence of sub- 
stantial evidence to the contrary 

1. That the claim comes within the provisions of this chapter; 

2. That sufficient notice thereof was given; 

3. That the injury was not occasioned by the willful intention of the injured 
employee to bring about the injury or death of himself or of another; 

4. That the injury did not result solely from the intoxication of the injured 
employee while on duty. 

§ 22. Modification of award. Upon its own motion or upon the applica- 
tion of any party in interest, on the ground of a change in conditions, the 
commission may at any time review any award, and, on such review, may 
make an award ending, diminishing or increasing the compensation previously 
awarded, subject to the maximum or minimum provided in this chapter, and 
sliall state its conclusions of fact and rulings of law, and shall immediately 
send to the parties a copy of the award. No such review shall affect such 
award as regards any moneys already paid. 

§ 23. Appeals from the commission. An award or decision of the commis- 
sion shall be final and conclusive upon all questions within its jurisdiction, 
as against the state fund or between the parties, unless within thirty days 
after a copy of such award or decision has been sent to the parties, an appeal 
be taken to the appellate division of the supreme court of the third depart- 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 31 

rn^nt. Iht! commisBion may also, in its discretion, where the claim for com- 
pensation was not made against the state fund, on the application of either 
party, certify to such appellate division of the supreme court, questions of 
law involved in its decision. Such appeals and the questions so certified shall 
be heard in a summary manner and shall have precedence over all other civil 
cases in such court. Ihe commission shall be deemed a party to every such 
appeal, and the attorney-general, without extra compensation, shall repre- 
sent the commission thereon. An appeal may also be taken to the court of 
appeals in all cases where such an appeal would lie from a decision of an 
appellate division, in the same manner and subject to the same limitations 
as is now provided in civil actions. Otherwise such appeals shall be subject 
to the law and practice applicable to appeaU in civil actions. Upon the final 
determination of such an appeal, the commission shall make an award or 
decision in accordance therewith. 

§ 24. Costs and fees. If the coounission or the court before which any pro- 
ceedings for compensation or concerning an award of compensation have been 
brought, under this chapter, determines that such proceedings have not been 
so brought upon reasonable ground, it shall assess the whole cost of the pro- 
ceeding upon the party who has so brought them. Claims for legal services 
in connection with any claim arising under this chapter, and claims for ser- 
vices or treatment rendered or supplies furnished pursuant to section thirteen 
of this chapter, shall not be enforceable unless approved by the commission. 
If BO approved, such claim or claims shall become a lien upon the compensa- 
tion awarded, but shall be paid therefrom only in tlie manner fixed by the 
commission. 

% 25. Compensation, how payable. Compensation under the provisions of 
this chapter shall be payable periodically, in accordance with the method of 
payment of the wages of the employee at the time of his injury or death, and 
shall be so provided for in any award; but the commission may determine 
that all payments or payments as to any particular group may be made 
monthly or at any other period, as it may deem advisable. The commission, 
whenever it shall so deem advisable, may commute such periodical payments 
to one or more lump sum payments, provided the same shall be in the interest 
of justice. If the award requirea payment of compensation otherwise than 
from the state fund all payments as required by the award shall be made 
directly to the commission or to a deputy specially authorized to receive the 
same, and disbursed in accordance with its award to the persons entitled 
thereto. And employers and insurance companies shall for such purpose be 
permitted, or when necesaary to protect the interest of the beneficiary may be 
required, to make deposits to secure the prompt and convenient payment of 
such compensation. 

§ 26. Enforcement of payment in default. If payment of compensation, or 
an installment thereof, due under the terms of an award, be not made within 
ten days after the same is due, by the employer or insurance corporation liable 
therefor, the amount of such payment shall constitute a liquidated claim for 
damages against such employer or insurance corporation, which with an 
added penalty of fifty per centum may be recovered in an action to be insti- 
tuted by the commission in the name of the people of the state. If such 
default be made in the payment of an installment of compensation and the 
whole amount of such compensation be not due, the conunission may, if the 



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32 New York Labor Bulletin. 

present value of such compensation be computable, declare the whole amount 
thereof due, and recover the amount thereof with the added penalty of fifty 
per centum, as provided by this section. Any such action may be compromised 
by the commission or may be prosecuted to final judgment as, in the discretion 
of the commission, may best serve the interests of the persons entitled to 
receive the compensation or the benefits. Compensation recovered under this 
section shall be disbursed by the commission to the persons entitled thereto 
in accordance with the award. A penalty recovered pursuant to this section 
shall be paid into the state treasury, and be applicable to the expeoBes of 
the commission. 

§ 27. Depositing future payments. If an award under this chapter re- 
quires payment of compensation by an employer or an insurance corporation in 
periodical payments, and the nature of the injury makes it possible to com- 
pute the present value of all future payments with due regard for life con- 
tingencies, the commission may, in its discretion, at any time, compute and 
permit or require to be paid into the state fund an amount equal to the 
present value of all unpaid comxxensation for which liability exists, in trust; 
and thereupon such employer or insurance corporation shall be discharged 
from any further liability under such award and payment of the same shall be 
assumed by the state fund. 

§ 28. Limitation of right to compensation. The right to claim compensa- 
tion under this chapter shall be forever barred unless within one year after the 
injury, or if death result therefrom, within one year after such death, a claim 
for compensation thereunder shall be filed with the commission. 

§ 29, Subrogation to remedies of employee. If a workman entitled to com- 
pensation under this chapter be injured or killed by the negligence or wrong 
of another not in the same employ, such injured workman, or in case of 
death, his dependents, shall, before any suit or claim under this chapter, 
elect whether to take compensation under this chapter or to pursue his 
remedy against such other. Such election shall be evidenced in such 
manner as the commission may by rule or regulation pretfcribe. If he 
elect to take compensation under this chapter, the cause of action against 
such other shall be assigned to the state for the benefit of the state insurance 
fund, if compensation be payable therefrom, and otherwise to the person or 
association or corporation liable for the payment of such compensation, and 
if he elect to proceed against such other, the state insurance fund, person 
or association or corporation, as the case may be, shall contribute only the 
deficiency, if any between the amount of the recovery against such other 
person actually collected, and the compensation provided or estimated by 
this chapter for such case. Stich a cause of action assigned to the state 
may be prosecuted or compromised by the commission. A compromise of any 
such cause of action by the workman or his dependents at an amount less 
than the compensation provided for by this chapter shall be made only 
with the written approval of the commission, if the deficiency of compensa- 
tion would be payable from the state insurance fund, and otherwise with the 
written approval of the person, association or corporation liable to pay the 
same. 

§ 30. Revenues or benefits from other sources not to affect compensation. 
No benefits, savings or insurance of the injured employee, independent of 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 33 

the provisions of this chapter, shall be considered in determining the com- 
pensation or beneiits to be paid under this chapter. 

§ 31. Agreement for contribution by employee void. No agreement by an 
employee to pay any portion of the premium paid by his employer to the 
state insurance fund or to contribute to a benefit fund or department main- 
tained by such employer or to the cost of mutual insurance or other insur- 
ance, maintained for or carried for the purpose of providing compensation 
as herein required, shall be valid, and any employer who makes a deduction 
for such purpose from the wages or salary of any employee entitled to the 
beneiits of this chapter shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. 

§ 32. Waiver agreements void. No agreement by an employee to waive 
his right to compensation under this chapter shall be valid. 

§ 33. Assignments; exemptions. Claims for compensation or benefits due 
under this chapter shall not be assigned, released or commuted except as 
provided by this chapter, and shall be exempt from all claims of creditors 
and from levy, execution and attachment or other remedy for recovery or 
collection of a debt, which exemption may not be waived. Compensation and 
benefits shall be paid only to employees or their dependents. 

§ 34. Preferences. Ihe right of compensation granted by this chapter 
shall have the same preference or lien without limit of amount against the 
assets of the employer as is now or hereafter may be allowed by law for a 
claim for unpaid wages for labor. 

ARTICLE 3. 
Security for Compensation. 

Section 50. »Security for payment of compensation. 

51. Posting of notice regarding compensation. 

52. Effect of failure to secure compensation. 

53. Release from all liability. 

54. The insurance contract. 

f 50. Security for payment of compensation. An employer shall secure 
compensation to his employees in one of the following ways: 

1. By insuring and keeping insured the payment of such compensation in 
the state fund, or 

2. By insuring and keeping insured the payment of such compensation 
with any stock corporation or mutual association authorized to transact the 
business of workmen's compensation insurance in this state. If insurance be 
so effected in such a corporation or mutual association the employer shall 
forthwith file with the commission, in form prescribed by it, a notice specify- 
ing the nam? of such insurance corporation or mutual association together 
with a copy of the contract or policy of insurance. 

3. By furnishing satisfactory proof to the commission of his financial 
ability to pay such compensation for himself, in which case the commission 
may, in its discretion, require the deposit with the commission of securities 
of the kind prescribed in section thirteen of the insurance law, in an amount 
to be determined by the commission, to secure his liability to pay the com- 
pensation provided in this chapter. 



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34: Kbw Yobk Labob Bulletin. 

If an employer fail to comply with this Bection, he ahall be liable to a 
penalty for every day during which such failure continues of one dollar for 
every employee, to be recovered in an action brought by the commisaion. 

Ihe commission may, in its discretion, for good cause shown, remit any 
such penalty, provided the employer in default secure compensation as 
provided in this section. 

i &1. Posting of notice regarding compensation. Every employer who has 
complied with section fifty of this chapter shall post and maintain in a con- 
spicuous place or places in and about his place or places of business type- 
written or printed notices in form prescribed by the commission, stating the 
fact that he has complied with all the rules and regulations of the commis- 
sion and that he has secured the payment of compensation to his employees 
and their dependents in accordance with the provisions of this chapter. 

i 62. Effect of failure to secure compensation. Failure to secure the pay- 
ment of compensation shall have the effect of enabling the injured employee 
or his dependents to maintain an action for damages in the courts, as pre- 
scribed by section eleven of this chapter. 

§ 53. Release from all liability. An employer securing the payment of 
compensation by contributing, premiums to the state fund shall thereby become 
relieved from all liability for personal injuries or death sustained by his 
employees, and the persons entitled to compensation under this chapter shall 
have recourse therefor only to the state fund and not to the employer. An 
employer shall not otherwise be relieved from the liability for compensation 
prescribed by this chapter except by the payment thereof by himself or his 
insurance carrier. 

S 54. The insurance contract. I. Right of recourse to the insurance car- 
rier. Every policy of insurance covering the liability of the employer for 
compensation issued by a stock company or by a mutual association author- 
ized to transact workmen's compensation insurance in this state shall contain 
a provision setting forth the right of the commission to enforce in the 
name of the people of the state of New York for the benefit of the person 
entitled to the compensation insured by the policy either by filing a separate 
application or by making the insurance carrier a party to the original appli- 
cation, the liability of the insurance carrier in whole or in part for the pay- 
ment of such compensation; provided, however, that payment in whole or in 
part of such compensation by either the employer or the insurance carrier 
shall to the extent thereof be a bar to the recovery against the other of the 
amount so paid. 

2. Knowledge and jurisdiction of the employer extended to cover the insur- 
ance carrier. Every such policy shall contain a provision that, as between 
the employee and the insurance carrier, the notice to or knowledge of the 
occurrence of the injury on the part of the employer shall be deemed notice 
or knowledge, as the case may be, on the part of the insurance carrier; that 
jurisdiction of the employer shall, for the purpose of this chapter, be juris- 
diction of the insurance carrier and that the insurance carrier shall in all 
things be bound by and subject to the orders, findings, decisions or awards 
rendered against the employer for the payment of compensation under the 
provisions of this chapter. 

3. Insolvency of employer does not release the insurance carrier. Every 
such policy shall contain a provision to the effect that the insolvency or bank- 



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Thb Labob Laws of 1914:. 35 

ruptcy of the employer shall not relieve the insurance carrier from the pay- 
ment of compensation for injuries or death sustained by an employee during 
the life of such policy. 

4. Limitation of indemnity agreements. Every contract or agreement of 
an employer the purpose of which is to indemnify him from loss or damage 
on account of the injury of an employee by accidental means, or on account 
of the negligence of such employer or his officer, agent or servant, shall be 
absolutely void unless it shall also cover liability for the payment of the com- 
pensation provided for by this chapter. 

6. Cancellation of insurance contracts. No contract of insurance issued by 
a stock company or mutual association against liability arising under this 
chapter shall be cancelled within the time limited in such contract for its 
expiration until at least ten days after notice of intention to .cancel such 
contract, on a date specified in such notice, shall be filed in the office of the 
conunission and also served on the employer. Such notice shall be served 
on the employer by delivering it to him or by sending it by mail, by regis- 
tered letter, addressed to the employer at his or its last known place of 
residence; provided that, if the employer be a partnership, then such notice 
may be so given to any one of the partners, and if the employer be a corpora- 
tion, then the notice may be given to any agent or officer of the corporation 
upon whom legal process may be served. 

ARTICO: 4. 
State Workmen's Compensation Commission. 

Section 60. State workmen's compensation commission. 

61. Secretary, deputies and other employees. 

62. Salaries and expenses. 

63. Office. 

64. Sessions of commission. 

65. Powers of individual commissioners and deputy commissioners. 

66. Powers and duties of secretary. 

67. Rules. 

68. Technical rules of evidence or procedure not required. 

69. Issue of subpoena; penalty for failure to obey. 

70. Recalcitrant witnesses punishable as for contempt. 

71. Fees and mileage of witnesses. 

72. Depositions. 

73. Transcript of stenographer's minutes; effect as evidence. 

74. Jurisdiction of commission to be continuing. 

75. Report of commission. 

76. Commission to furnish blank forms. 

i 60. State workmen's compensation commission. A state workmen's com- 
pensation commission is hereby created, consisting of five commissioners, to 
be appointed by the governor, by. and with the advice and consent of the 
senate, one of whom shall be designated by the governor as chairman, not 
more than than three of which shall belong to the same poUtiaaX party. The 
commissioner of labor shall also be an ex officio member of the commission 



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«36 New York Labok Bulletin. 

but »hall not have a vote on ordere, decisions or awards. Appointments may 
be made during the recess of the senate, but shall be subject to confirmation 
by the senate at the next ensuing session of the legislature. The term of 
office of appointive members of the commission shall be five years, except 
that the first members thereof shall be appointed for such terms that the 
term of one member shall expire on January first, nineteen hundred and 
sixteen, and on January first of every succeeding year. Successors shall be 
appointed in like manner for a full term of five years. Vacancies shall be 
filled in like manner by appointment for the unexpired term. Each appointive 
member of the commi-ssion shall before entering upon the duties of his office 
execute an official imdertaking in the sum of fifty thousand dollars to be 
approved by the comptroller and filed in his office. The governor may remove 
any appointive commissioner for inefficiency, neglect of duty or misconduct 
in office, giving him a copy of the charges and an opportunity of being publicly 
heard in person or by counsel, upon not less than ten days' notice. If such 
a commissioner be removed, the governor shall file in the office of the secre- 
tary of state a complete statement of all charges made against him and a 
complete record of his proceedings and his findings thereon. £ach appointive 
commissioner shall devote his entire time to the duties of his office, and shall 
not hold any position of trust or profit, or engage in any occupation or 
business interfering or inconsistent with his duties as such commissioner, or 
serve on or under any committee of a political party. The commission shall 
have an official seal which shall be judicially noticed. 

ft 61. Secretary, deputies and other employcH?s. The commission may ap- 
point one or more deputy commissioners and a secretary to hold office during 
its pleasure. It may also employ, during its pleasure, an actuary, account- 
ants, medical doctors, clerks, stenographers, inspectors and other employees 
as may be needed to carry out the provisions of this chapter. The authority, 
duties and compensation of all subordinates and employees, except as pro- 
vided by this chapter, shall be fixed by the commission. 

§ 62. Salaries and expenses. The chairman of the commission shall receive 
an annual salary of ten thousand dollars, and each other commissioner, an 
annual salary of seven thousand dollars. The secretary shall receive an 
annual salary of five thousand dollars. The commissioners and their subor- 
dinates shall be entitled to their actual and necessary expenses while traveling 
on the business of the commission. The commission may also make the neces- 
sary expenditure to obtain statistical and other information to establish 
. classifications of employments with respect to hazards and risks. The salaries 
and compensation of the subordinates and all other expenses of the commis- 
sion, including the premiums to be paid by the state treasurer for the bond 
to be furnished by him, shall be paid out of tlie state treasury upon vouchers 
signed by at least two commissioners. 

§ 63. Office. The commission shall keep and maintain its principal office 
in the city of Albany, in rooms in the capitol assigned by the trustees of 
public buildings. The office shall be supplied with necessary office furniture, 
supplies, books, maps, stationery, telephone connections and other neces- ' 
sary appliances, at the expense of the state, payable in the same manner as 
other expenses of the commission. 

$ 64. Sessions of commission. The commission shall be in continuous session 
and open for the transaction of business during all business hours of every 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 37 

day excepting Sundays and legal holidays. All sessions shall be open to the 
public and may be adjourned, upon entry thereof in its records, without 
further notice. Whenever convenience of parties will be promoted or delay 
and expense prevented, the commission may hold sessions in cities other than 
the city of Albany. A party may appear before such commission and be heard 
in person or by attorney. Every vote and official act of the commission shall 
be entered of record, and the records shall contain a record of each case 
considered, and the award, decision or order made with respect thereto, and 
all voting shall be by the calling of each commissioner's name by the secre- 
tary and each vote shall be recorded as cast. A majority ot the commission 
shall constitute a quorum. A vacancy shall not impair the right of the 
remaining commissioners to exercise all the powers of the full commission so 
long as a majority remains. 

§ 65. Powers of individual commissioners and deputy commissioners. Any 
investigation, inquiry or hearing which the commission is authorized to hold 
or undertake may be held or taken by or before any commissioner or deputy 
commissioner, and the award, decision or order of a commissioner or deputy 
commissioner, when approved and confirmed by the commission and ordered 
filed in its office, shall be deemed to be the award, decision or order of the com- 
mission. Each commissioner and deputy shall, for the purposes of this chap- 
ter, have power to administer oaths, certify to official acts, take depositions, 
issue subpoenas, compel the attendance of witnesses and the production of 
book«, accounts, papers, records, documents and testimony. The commission 
may authorize any deputy to conduct any such investigation, inquiry or 
hearing, in which case he shall have the power of a commissioner in respect 
thereof. 

§ 66. Powers and duties of secretary. The secretary of the commission 
shall: 

1. Maintain a full and true record of all proceedings of the commission, of 
all documents or papers ordered filed by the commission, of decisions or 
orders made by a commissioner or deputy commissioner, and of all decisions 
or orders made by the commission or approved and confirmed by it, and 
ordered filed, and he shall be responsible to the commission for the safe cus- 
tody and preservation of all such documents at its office; 

2. Have power to administer oaths in all parts of the state, so far as the 
exercise of such power is properly incident to the performance of his duty 
or that of the commission; 

3. Designate, from time to time, with the approval of the commission, one 
of the clerks appointed by the commision to exercise the powers and duties 
of the secretary during his absence; 

4. Under the direction of the commission, have general charge of its office, 
superintend its clerical business, and perform such other duties as the com- 
mission may prescribe. 

I 67. Kules. The commission shall adopt reasonable rules, not inconsistent 
with this chapter, regulating and providing for 

1. The kind and character of notices, and the service thereof, in case of 
accident and injury to employees; 

2. The nature and extent of the proofs and evidence, and the method of 
taking and furnishing the same, to establish the right to compensation; 



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38 Nbw Yobk Labob Bullbtin. 

3. The forms of application for tlrose claiming to be entitled to com- 
pensation; 

4. The method of making investigations, physical examinations and in- 
spections; 

5. The time within which adjudications and awards shall be made; 

6. The conduct of hearings; investigations and inquiries; 

7. The giving of undertakings by all subordinates who are empowered to 
receive and disburse moneys, to be approved by the attorney-general as to 
form and by the comptroller as to sufficiency. 

8. Carrying into effect the provisions of this chapter; 

9. The collection, maintenance and disbursement of the state insurance 
fund ; 

§ 68. Technical rules of evidence or proceidure not required. The commia- 
sion or a commissioner or deputy commissioner in making an investigation 
or inquiry or conducting a hearing shall not be bound by common law or 
statutory rules of evidence or by technical or formal rules of procedure, 
except as provided by this chapter; but may make such investigation or 
inquiry or conduct such hearing in such manner as to ascertain the sub- 
stantial rights of the parties. 

§ 69. Issue of subpoena; penalty for failure to obey. A subpoena shall be 
signed and issued by a commissioner, a deputy commissioner or by the secre- 
tary of the commission and may be served by any person of full age in the 
same manner as a subpoena issued out of a court of record. If a person fail, 
without reasonable cause, to attend in obedience to a subpoena, or to be 
sworn or examined or answer a question or produce a book or paper, or to 
subscribe and swear to his deposition after it has been correctly reduced to 
writing, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. 

§ 70. Recalcitrant witnesses punishable as for contempt. If a person in 
attendance before the commission or a commissioner or deputy commissioner 
refuses, without reasonable cause, to be examined, or to answer a legal and 
pertinent question or to produce a book or paper, when ordered so to do by 
the commission or a commissioner or deputy commissioner, the commission 
may apply to a justice of the supreme court upon proof by affidavit of the 
facts for an order returnable in not less than two nor more than live days 
directing such person to show cause before the justice who made the order, 
or any other justice of the supreme court, why he should not be committed 
to jail. Upon the return of such order the justice shall examine under oath 
such person and give him an opportimity to be heard; and if the justice 
determine that he has refused without reasonable cause or legal excuse to be 
examined or to answer a legal and pertinent question, or to produce a book 
or paper which he was ordered to bring, he may forthwith, by warrant, com- 
mit the offender to jail, there to remain until he submits to do the act 
which he was so required to do or is discharged according to law. 

8 71. Fees and mileage of witnesses. Each witness who appears in obedi- 
ence to a subpoena before the commission or a commissioner or deputy 
commissioner, or person employed by the commission to obtain the required 
information, shall receive for his attendance the fees and mileage provided 
for witnesses in civil cases in the supreme court, which shall be audited and 
paid from the state treasury in the same manner as other expenses of the 



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The Labob Laws of 1914:. 39 

commiBsion. A witness subpoenaed at the instance of a party other than 
the commission, a commissioner, deputy commissioner or person acting under 
the authority of the commission shall be entitled to fees or compensation 
from the state treasury, if the commission certify that his testimony was 
material to the matter investigated, but not otherwise. 

§ 72. Depositions. The commission may cause depositions of witnesses 
residing within or without the state to be taken in the manner prescribed 
by law for like depositions in civil actions in the supreme court. 

§ 73. Transcript of stenographer's minutes; effect as evidence. A tran- 
scribed copy of the testimony, evidence and procedure or of a specific part 
thereof, or of the testimony of a particular witness or of a specific part 
thereof, on any investigation, by a stenographer appointed by the commission, 
being certified by such stenographer to be a true and correct transcript 
thereof and to have been carefully compared by him with his original notes, 
may be received in evidence by the commission with the same effect as if 
such stenographer were present and testified to the facts so certified, and a 
copy of sudh transcript shall be furnished on demand to any party upon 
payment of the fee provided for a transcript of similar minutes in the supreme 
court. 

§ 74. Jurisdiction of commission to be continuing. The power and juris- 
diction of the commission over each case shall be continuing, and it may, from 
time to time, make such modification or change with respect to former findings 
or orders relating thereto, as in its opinion may be just. 

§ 75. Report of commission. Annually on or before the first day of Febru- 
ary, the commission shall make a report to the legislature, which shall include 
a statement of the number of awards made by it and the causes of the acci- 
dents leading to the injuries for which the awards were made, a detailed 
statement of the expenses of the commission, the condition of the state insur- 
ance fund, together with any other matter which the commission deems 
proper to report to the legislature, including any recommendations it may 
desire to make. 

§ 76. Commission to furnish blank forms. The commission shall prepare 
and cause to be distributed so that the same may be readily available blank 
forms of application for compensation, notice to employers, proofs of injury 
or death, of medical or other attendance or treatment, of employment and 
wage earnings, and for such other purposes as may be required. Insured 
employers shall constantly keep on hand a sufficient supply of such blanks. 

ARTICLE 6. 

State Insurance Fund. 

Section 90. Creation of state fund. 

91. State treasurer custodian of fund. 

92. Surplus and reserve. 

93. Investment of surplus or reserve. 

94. Administration expense. 

95. Classification of risks and adjustment of premiums. 

96. Associations for accident prevention. 

97. Requirements in classifying employment and fixing and adjusting 

premium rates. 

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40 New York Labor Bulletin. 

Section 98. Time of payment of premiums. 

99. Action for collection in case of default. 
100. Withdrawal from fund. 
lOL Audit of payrolls. 
10*2. Falsification of payroll. 

103. Wilful misrepresentation. 

104. Inspections. 

105. Disclosures prohibited. 

§ 90. Creation of state fund. There is hereby created a fund to be known 
as " the state insurance fund," for the purpose of insuring employers against 
liability under this chapter and of assuring to the persons entitled thereto 
the compensation provided by this chapter. Such fund shall consist of 
all premiums received and paid into the fund of property and securities 
acquired by and through the use of moneys belonging to the fund and of 
interest earned upon moneys belonging to the fund and deposited or invested 
as herein provided. Such fund shall be administered by the commission 
without liability on the part of the state beyond the amount of such fund. 
Such fund shall be applicable to the payment of losses sustained on account 
of insurance and to the payment of expenses in the manner provided in this 
chapter. 

§ 91. State treasurer custodian of fund. The state treasurer shall be the 
custodian of the state insurance fund; and all disbursements therefrom shall 
be paid by him upon vouchers authorized by the commission and signetl by any 
two members thereof. The state treasurer shall give a separate and additional 
bond in an amount to be fixed by the governor and with sureties approved 
by the state comptroller conditioned for the faithful performance of his duty 
as custodian of the state fund. The state treasurer may deposit any portion 
of the state fund not needed for immediate use, in the manner and subject 
to all the provisions of law respecting the deposit of other state funds by him. 
Interest earned by such portion of the state insurance fund deposited by the 
state treasurer shall be collected by him and placed to the credit of the fund. 

§ 92. Surplus and reserve. Ten per centum of the premiums collected from 
employers insured in the fund shall be set aside by the commission for the 
creation of a surplus until such surplus shall amount to the sum of one 
hundred thousand dollars, and thereafter five per centum of such premiums, 
until such time as in the judgment of the commission such surplus shall be 
sufficiently large to cover the catastrophe hazard. The commission shall also 
set up and maintain a reserve adequate to meet anticipated losses and carry 
all claims and policies to maturity. 

§ 93. Investment of surplus or reserve. The commission may, pursuant to 
a resolution of the commission approved by the comptroller, invest any of the 
surplus or reserve funds belonging to the state insurance fund in the same 
securities and investments authorized for investment by savings banks. All 
such securities or evidences of indebtedness shall be placed in the hands of 
the state treasurer who shall be the custodian thereof. He shall collect the 
principal and interest thereof, when due, and pay the same into the state 
insurance fund. The state treasurer shall pay all vouchers drawn on the 
state insurance fund for the making of such investments when signed by 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 41 

two members of the commission, upon delivery of such securities or evidences 
of indebtedness to him, when there is attached to such vouchers a certified 
copy of the resolution of the commission authorizing the investment. The 
commission may, upon like resolution approved by the comptroller, sell any of 
such securities. 

§ 94. Administration expense. The entire expense of administering the 
state insurance fund shall be paid in the first instance by the state, out of 
moneys appropriated therefor. In the month of January, nineteen hundred 
and eighteen, and annually thereafter in such month, the commission shall 
ascertain the just amount incurred by the commiBsion during the preceding 
calendar year, in the administration of the state insurance fund exclusive 
of the expense for the examination, determination and payment of claims, 
and shall refund such amount to the state treasury. If there be employees 
of the commission other than the commissioners themselves and the secretary 
whose time is devoted partly to the general work of the commission and 
partly to the work of the state insurance fund, and in case there is other 
expense which is incurred jointly on behalf of the general work of the com- 
mission and the state insurance fund, an equitable apportionment of the 
expense shall be made for such purpose and the part thereof which is appli- 
cable to the state insurance fund shall be chargeable thereto. As soon as 
practicable after December thirty-one, nineteen hundred and seventeen, and 
annually thereafter, the commission shall calculate the total administrative 
expense incurred during the preceding calendar year in connection with the 
examination, determination and payment of claims and the percentage which 
this expense bore to the total compensation payments made during that year. 
The percentage so calculated and determined shall be assessed against the 
insurance carriers including the state fund as an addition to the payments 
required from them in the settlement of claims during the year immediately 
following, and the amounts so secured shall be transferred to the state 
treasury to reimburse it for this portion of the expense of administering 
this chapter. 

§ 95. Classification of risks and adjustment of premiums. Employments 
coming under the provisions of this chapter shall be divided for the purposes 
of the state fund, into the groups set forth in section two of this chapter. 
Separate accounts shall be kept of the amounts collected and expended in 
respect to each such group for convenience in determining equitable rates; 
but for the purpose of paying compensation the state fund shall be deemed 
one and indivisible. The commission shall have power to rearrange any of 
the groups set forth in section two by withdrawing any employment embraced 
in it and transferring it wholly or in part to any other group, and from such 
employments to set up new groups at its discretion. The commission shall 
determine the hazards of the different classes composing each group and fix 
the rates of premiums therefor based upon the total payroll and number of 
employees in each of such classes of employment at the lowest possible rate 
consistent with the maintenance of a solvent state insurance fund and the 
creation of a reasonable surplus and reserve; and for such purpose may 
adopt a system of schedule rating in such a manner as to take account of 
the peculiar hazard of each individual risk. 

§ 96. Associations for accident prevention. The employers in any of the 
groups described in section two or established by the commission may with 



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42 New Yobk Labor Bulletin. 

the approval of the commisAlon form themselyes into an association for 
accident prevention, and may make rules for that purpose. If the commission 
is of the opinion that an association so formed sufficiently represents the 
employers in such group, it may approve such rules, and when so approved 
and approved by the industrial board of the labor department they shall be 
binding on all employers in such group. If such an approved association 
appoint an inspector or expert for the purpose of accident prevention, the 
commission may at its discretion provide in whole or in part for the pay- 
ment of the remuneration and expenses of such inspector or expert, such pay- 
ment to be charged in the accounting to such group. Every such approved 
association may make recommendations to the commission concerning the 
fixing of premiums for classes of hazards, and for individual risks within 
such group. 

§ 97. Requirements in classifying employment and fixing and adjusting 
premium rates. The following requirements shall be observed in classifying 
employments and fixing and adjusting premium rates: 

1. The commission shall keep an accurate account of the money paid in 
premiums by each of the several classes of employments or industries, and 
the disbursements on account of injuries and deaths of employees thereof, 
including the setting up of reserves adequate to meet anticipated losses and 
to carry the claims to maturity, and also, on account of the money received 
from each individual employer and the amoimt disbursed from the state in- 
surance fund on account of injuries and death of the employees of such em- 
ployer, including the reserves so set up; 

2. On January first, nineteen hundred and fifteen, and every fifth year 
thereafter, and at such other times as the commission, in its discretion, may 
determine, a readjustment of the rate shall be made for each of the several 
groups of employment or industries and of each hazard class therein, which, 
in the judgment of the commission, shall have developed an average loss ratio, 
in accordance with the experience of the commission in the administration 
of the law as shown by the accounts kept as provided herein; 

3. If any such accounting show an aggregate balance (deemed by the com- 
mission to be safely and properly divisible [devisible] ) remaining to the 
credit of any class of employment or industry, after the amount required 
shall have been credited to the surplus and reserve funds and after the pay- 
ment of all awards for injury or death lawfully chargeable against the same, 
the commission may in its discretion credit to each individual member of 
such group, who shall have been a subscriber to the state insurance fund for 
a period of six months or more prior to the time of such readjustment, and 
whose premium or premiums exceed the amount of the disbursements from 
the fund on account of injuries or death of his employees during such period, 
on the instalment or instalments of premiums next due from him such pro- 
portion of such balance as the amount of his prior paid premiums sustains 
to the whole amount of such premiums paid by the group to which he belongs 
since the last readjustment of rates; 

4. If the amount of premiums collected from any employer at the begin- 
ning of any period of six months is ascertained and calculated by using the 
estimated expenditure of wages for the period of time covered by such pre- 
mium payment as a basis, an adjustment of the amount of such premium 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 48 

shall be made at the end of such six months, and the actual amount of such 
premium shall be determined in accordance with the amount of the actual 
expenditure of wages for such period; and, if such wage expenditure for such 
period is less than the amount on which such estimated premium was col- 
lected, such employer shall be entitled to receive a refund from the state in- 
surance fund of the difference between the amount so paid by him and the 
amount so found to be actually due, or to have the amount of such difference 
credited on succeeding premium payments, at his option; and if such actual 
premium, when so ascertained, exceeds in amount a premium so paid by such 
employer at the beginning of such six months, such employer shall imme- 
diately upon being advised of the true amount of such premium due, forth- 
with pay to the treasurer of the state an amount equal to the difference be- 
tween the amount actually found to be due and the amount paid by him at 
the beginning of such six months' period. 

§ 98. Time of payment of premiums. Except as otherwise provided in this 
chapter, all premiums shall be paid by every employer into the state insur- 
anc fimd on or before July first, nineteen hundred and fourteen, and semi- 
annually thereafter, or at such other time or times as may be prescribed by 
the commission. The commission shall mail a receipt for the same to the 
employer and place the same to the credit of the state insurance fund in the 
custody of the state treasurer. 

§ 99. Action for collection in case of default. If an employer shall default 
in any payment required to be made by him to the state insurance fund, the 
amoimt due from him shall be collected by civil action against him in the 
name of the people of the state of New York, and it shall be the duty of the 
commission on the first Monday of each month after July flrflt nineteen hun- 
dred and fourteen, to certify to the attorney- general of the state the names 
and residences, or places of business, of all employers known to the com- 
mission to be in default for such payment or payments for a longer period 
than five days and the amount due from such employer, and it shall then be 
the duty of the attorney-general forthwith to bring or cause to be brought 
against each such employer a civil action in the proper court for the collec- 
tion of such amount so due, and the same when collected, shall be paid into 
the state insurance fund, and such employer's compliance with the provisions 
of this chapter requiring payments to be mad 3 to the state insurance fund 
shall date from the time of the payment of said money so collected as afore- 
said to the state treasurer for credit to the state insurance fund. 

{ 100. Withdrawal from fund. Any employer may, upon complying with 
subdivision two or three of section fifty of this chapter, withdraw from the 
fund by turning in his insurance contract for cancellation, provided he is not 
in arrears for premiums due the fund and has given to the commission written 
notice of his intention to withdraw with'n thirty days before the expiration 
of the period for which he has elected to insure in the fund; provided that 
in case any employer so withdraws, his liability to assessments shall, not- 
withstanding such withdrawal, continue for one year after the date of such 
withdrawal as against all liabilities for such compensation accruing prior to 
such withdrawal. 

§ 101. Audit of payroll)*. Every employer who is insured in the state 
in€urance fimd shall keep a true and accurate record of the number of his 
employees and the wages paid by him, and shall furnish to the commission, 



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44 New York Labor Bul,letin. 

upon demand, a sworn statement of the same. Such record shall be open 
to inspection at any time and as often as the commission shall require to 
verify the number of employees and the amount of the payroll. 

§ 102. Falsification of payroll. An employer who shall wilfully misrep- 
resent the amount of the payroll upon which the premiums chargeable by 
the state insurance fund is to be based shall be liable to the state in ten 
times the amount of the difference between the premiums paid and the amount 
the employer should have paid liad his payroll been correctly computed; and 
the liability to the state under this section shall be enforced in a civil 
action in the name of the state insurance fund, and any amount so collected 
shall become a part of such fund. 

§ 103. Wilful misrepresentation. Any person who wilfully misrepresents 
any fact in order to obtain insurance in the state insurance fund at less 
than the proper rate for such insurance, or in order to obtain payment out 
of such fund, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. 

§ 104. Inspections. The commission shall have the right to inspect the 
plants and establishments of employers insured in the state insurance fund; 
and the inspectors designated by the commission shall have free access to 
such premises during regular working hours. 

§ 105. Disclosures prohibited. Information acquired by the commission or 
its officers or employees from employers or employees pursuant to this 
chapter shall not be opened to public inspection, and any officer or employee 
of the commission who, without authority of the commission or pursuant to 
its rules or as otherwise required by law shall disclose the same shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor. 

ARTICLE 6. 
Miscellaneous Provisions. 

Section 110. Penalties applicable to expense of commission. 

111. Record and report of injuries by employers. 

112. Information to be furnished by employer. 

113. Inspection of records of employers. 

114. Interstate commerce. 

115. Penalties for false representations. 

116. Limitation of time. 

117. Duties of commissioner of labor. 

118. Unconstitutional provisions. 

119. Actions or causes of action pending. 

§ 110. Penalties applicable to expenses of commission. All penalties 
imposed by this chapter shall be applicable to the expenses of the commission. 
When collected by the commission such penalties shall be paid into the state 
treasury and be thereafter appropriated by the legislature for the purposes 
prescribed by this section. 

§ 111. Record and report of injuries by employers. Every employer 
shall keep a record of all injuries, fatal or otherwise, received by his em- 
ployees in the course of their employment. Within ten days after the 
occurrence of an accident resulting in personal injury a report thereof shall 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 45 

be made in writing by the employer to the commission upon blanks to be 
procured from the commission for that purpose. Such report shall state 
the name and nature of the business of the employer, the location of his 
establishment or place of work, the name, address and occupation of the 
injured employee, the time, nature and cause of the injury and such other 
information as may be required by the commission. An employer who 
refuses or neglects to make a report as required by this section shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of not more than five hundred 
dollars. 

§ 112. Information to be furnished by employer. Every employer shall fur- 
nish the commission, upon request, any information required by it to carry 
out the provisions of this chapter. The commission, a commissioner, deputy 
commissioner, or any person deputized by the commission for that purpose, 
may examine under oath any employer, officer, agent or employee. An 
employer or an employee receiving from the commission a blank with direc- 
tions to file the same shall cause the same to be properly filled out so as 
to answer fully and correctly all questions therein, or if unable to do so, 
shall give good and suflScient reasons for such failure. Answers to such 
CiUestions shall be verified under oath and returned to the commission within 
the period fixed by the commission therefor. 

(f 113. Inspection of records of employers. All books, records and payrolls 
of the employers showing or reflecting in any way upon the amount of wage 
expenditures of such employers shall always be open for inspection by the 
commission or any of its authorized auditors, accountants or inspectors for 
the purpose of ascertaining the correctness of the wage expenditure and 
number of men employed and such other information as may be necessary 
for the uses and purposes of the commission in the administration of this 
chapter. 

S 114. Interstate commerce. The provisions of this chapter shall apply 
to employers and eraplovees engasred in intrastate, and also in interstate or 
foreigrn commerce, for whom a rule of liabilitv or method of compensation 
has been or mav be established by the congress of the United States, only 
to the extent that their mutual connection with intrastate work may and 
shall be clearlv separable and distingniishable from interstate or foreign 
commerce, except that such eraplover and his employees workinsr only in 
this state may, subject to the approval and in the manner provided by the 
commission and so far as not forbidden by any act of congress, accept and 
become bound by the provisions of this chapter in like manner and with the 
same efTect in all respects as provided herein for other employers and their 
employees. 

§ 115. Penalties for false representation. If for the purpose of obtaining 
any benefit or payment under the provisions of this chapter, either for him- 
self or any other person, any person wilfully makes a false statement or 
representation, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. 

§ 116. Limitation of time. No limitation of time provided in this chapter 
shall run as against any person who is mentally incompetent or a minor 
dependent so long as he has no committee, guardian or next friend. 

f 117. Duties of commissioner of labor. The commissioner of labor shall 
render to the commission any proper aid and assistance by the department 

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46 New Yobk Labor Bulletin. 

of labor as in his judgment does not interfere with the proper conduct of 
such department. 

§ 118. Unconstitutional provisions. If any section or provision of this 
chapter be decided by the courts to be unconstitutional or invalid, the same 
shall not affect the validity of the chapter as a whole or any part thereof 
other than the part so decided to be unconstitutional or invalid. 

§ 119. Actions or causes of action pending. This act shall not affect any 
action pending or cause of action existing or which accrued prior to July 
first, nineteen htmdred and fourteen. 

ARTICLE 7. 
Laws Repealed; When to Take Effect. 

Section 130. Laws repealed. 

131. When to take effect. 

§ 130. Laws repealed. Article fourteen-a and sections two hundred and 
fifteen to two hundred and nineteen-g, both inclusive, chapter thirty-six of 
the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, as amended by chapter six hundred 
and seventy-four of the laws of nineteen hundred and ten, are hereby repealed. 

§ 131. When to take effect. This chapter shall take effect immediately 
[January first, nineteen himdred and fourteen], provided that the applica- 
tion of this chapter as between employers and employees and the payment 
of compensation for injuries to employees or their dependents, in case of 
death, shall take effect July first, nineteen hundred and fourteen, but pay- 
ments into the state insurance fund may be made prior to July first, nine- 
teen hundred and fourteen. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately, except as provided in section 
one hundred and thirty-one as re-enacted hereby. 

Approved March 16. 

Chapter 60. 

An Act to amend the highway law and the prison law, in relation to conyict 
labor and the construction of state or county highways by counties and 
towns as contractors. 

The People of the State of New Torhy represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section one hundred and thirty-one of chapter thirty of the laws 
of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act relating to highways, con- 
stituting chapter twenty-five of the consolidated laws," is hereby amended to 
read as follows: 

f 131. Award of contracts to board of supervisors or town board. A board 
of supervisors of a county, or a town board of a town, in which any portion 
of a state or county highway is situated, may present proposals and be 
awarded a contract for the construction or improvement of such highway, 
as provided in this article, for and on behalf of such county or town. If 
such contract be awarded to a board of supervisors or a town board such 
board shall, by resolution, designate some suitable person or persons to carry 
into effect, on behalf of the town, such contract, and transact all business in 
respect thereto as may be necessary. A member of the board of supervisors 

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The Labor Laws op 1914. 47 

or town board at the time such contract was awarded or such designation 
was made, or a person who is a partner of, or a stockholder in the same 
corporation as that of such member, shall not be so designated. A member 
of the board of supervisors or town board at the time such designation was 
made, or a firm, corporation or association of which he is a member or has 
an interest, shall not be directly or indirectly interested in any such contract 
nor shall such member, or such firm, corporation or association furnish 
materials or perform labor or sevices, either directly or indirectly, under or 
in connection with the performance of any of the work required in accordance 
with such contract, nor shall such member, firm or corporation or asso- 
ciation, be paid for materials furnished or services rendered in respect 
to such contract. The clerk of the board of supervisors or the town 
clerk shall transmit a certified copy of the resolution designating the 
person or persons to carry into effect such contract to the commission 
prior to the awarding of a contract to the board of supervisors or town 
board. The person or persons so designated shall, before the contract is exe- 
cuted, give an undertaking to the county or town, with sureties to be ap- 
proved by the commission and the board of supervisors or town board, for an 
amount equal to the amount of the bid presented by the county or town. 
Such undertaking shall be conditioned on the faithful performance of their 
duties in respect to such contract and for the proper accounting, safe-keeping 
and lawful disbursement of all moneys that may come into their hands there- 
under. Such undertaking shall be filed in the office of the county or town 
clerk and a copy thereof shall be transmitted to the commission. The person 
or persons so designated shall thereupon be competent to receive all moneys 
payable under such contract under the provisions of this article, and they shall 
account therefor to the county or town. The board of supervisors or town 
board, after such contract is awarded, shall designate, by resolution, a banking 
corporation or a trust company wherein the moneys received under such 
contract shall be deposited. Such bank or trust company shall, upon the 
request of the board of supervisors or town board, make a statement of the 
monev so deposited. The commission shall, by rules and regulations, pre- 
scribe the manner in which the moneys received under such contract shall be 
expended and the forms of accounts to be kept by the person or persons desig- 
nated as above provided; and where convict labor is used, aa hereinafter pro- 
vided, an account shall he kept of the items incurred daily for maintenance 
of convicts and compensation of other laborers, if any. Reports may be 
required by the conunission from time to time from such person or persons. 
When a contract is entered into under the provisions of this section, the 
hoard undertaking thereby to construct or improve a highway or section 
thereof, may, by resolution, direct the person or persons designated for carry- 
ing out the contract to apply to the superintendent of state prisons for 
convict labor, in the construction of such highway or section thereof. The 
resolution shall specify the maaoimum number of convicts to be applied for, 
for such work. Such desianated person or persons shall make request, in 
ivritinc. to the superintendent of state prisons for convict labor, in con- 
formity to the provisions of such resolution, such reouest to be aocomvanied 
with a copy of such resolution, A copy of such resolution and of such 
request shall also be filed with the commission. The superintendent may 



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48 New York Labor Bulletin. 

detail for lahor^ pursuant to such resolution and request, such number of 
convicts as may he availahle therefor, not exceeding the number applied for. 
Such convicts shall be in the immediate cha/rge and custody of the officers 
and guards detailed by the superintendent of state prisons^ and at all times 
subject to the control of such superintendent, except that the work to be 
done shall be directed by the engineers and foremen of the state highioay 
department. The expense of maintenance of such convicts sh4ill be paid by 
the county or town entering into such contra^ from funds due thereon, to 
such mAinicipality. A county or town may purchase machinery and tools for 
the construction of a highway or section thereof, under any such contract, out 
of moneys to be paid thereon, within the estimates for such items contained 
in the proposals at the time of the letting of the contract, but stich machinery 
and tools shall be the property of the state, and after the completion of th^ 
work shall be subject to disposal or to any lawful use by the commission. 
Moneys realized from selling or renting a/ny such used machinery or tools 
shall be paid into the state treasury to the credit of the highway fund. Any 
such used machinery or tools may be loaned by the commission, if requested, 
for construction of a highway or section thereof, by a county or toion, by 
contract under this section, to be kept in repair a/nd operated at the expense 
of the county or town with moneys payable under the contract. 

If a county or totvn shall construct a highway or section thereof, by con- 
tract as above provided, for a lesser sum tha/n the contract price, as the same 
shall appear from the accounts a/nd reports herein provided for, the county 
or toum, as the case m>ay be, shall be paid only the amount of the actual cost 
of such construction, paid or incurred, and the surplus shall remain in the 
state treasury and continue available for any state or county highway con- 
struction for which the same may have been or shall be appropriated. 

§ 2. Section one hundred and seventy-nine of chapter forty-seven of the 
laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act relating to prisons, 
constituting chapter forty-three of the consolidated laws,*' is hereby amended 
to read as follows: 

§ 179. Employment of convicts on public highways. The superintendent of 
state prisons may employ or cause to be employed!, not to exceed three hun- 
dred of] the convicts confined in [each] the state prison* in the repair of 
state and county highways at any place wnthin the state upon request of the 
state commission of highicays, the constntction or improvement of state or 
county highways constructed or improved by any board of supervisors or 
town board under a contract with such commission of highways, upon request 
CM provided in section one hundred and thirty-one of the highway law, and 
also in the improvement w repair of [the] any other public highway [, 
within a radius of thirty miles from such prison and outside of an incorpo- 
rated city or village]. The expense of maintenance of such convicts while 
employed in repairing a state or county highxoay shall be borne by the state 
and paid by the state commission of highways, in the same manner cw other 
expenses in repairing such highways. 

The agent and warden of each prison may make such rules as he may deem 
necessary for the proper care, custody and control of such prisoners while 
so employed, subject to the approval of the superintendent of state prisons. 

The agent and warden of each prison may designate, subject to the approval 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 49 

of the Buperintendent of state prisong, the highways and portions thereof 
upon which such labor shall be employed; and such portions so designated 
and approved, except portions of a state or county highway, shall be under 
his control during the time such oonstructiony improvements or repairs are 
in progress, and the state highway commission [the state engineer and sur- 
veyor] shall fix the grade and width of the roadway of any such high- 
way Cs], and direct the manner in which the work shall be done. 

A state or county highway herein referred to is a state or county highway 
as defined in the highway law. 

The superintendent of state prisons is hereby authorized to purchase any 
machinery, tools and materials necessary in such employment, except employ- 
ment on a state or county highway, 

I 3. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved March 21. 

Chapter 61. 
An act to amend the highway law, in relation to county roads. 

The People of the State of 'New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Chapter thirty of the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled 
"An act relating to highways, constituting chapter twenty-five of the con- 
solidated laws,'* is hereby amended by adding thereto, after section three 
hundred and twenty, a new section, to be section three hundred and twenty-a, 
to read as follows: 

§ 320-a. County system of roads. The board of supervisors of a county may 
provide for the construction or improvement of a highway or section thereof, 
in one or more towns of the county at the joint expense of the county and 
town or towns, and may prepare a map of a definite system of county roads 
for the county for such improvement. 

The board may by resolution direct the county superintendent to supervise 
the preparation of grade and culvert work of a road, so designated by said 
map for improvement, by the town superintendent of the town in which such 
improvement shall be made, and upon the completion thereof by the town, 
and the county superintendent's certification that the road is so prepared and 
that the town is equipped with sufficient machinery to properly perform the 
work, such machinery to be furnished by the town and used during the roads 
construction, the board- may direct the construction of an improved road 
under the direction of a committee known as the highway officials of the 
county as hereinafter provided. The construction work shall be under the 
charge and supervision of the town superintendent of the town in which the 
work is being done. If for any cause the town superintendent is incapacitated 
or in the opinion of the county superintendent is incompetent to properly 
take charge of the work, some competent person shall be designated by the 
county superintendent by and with the advice and consent of the town board 
and the compensation of the town superintendent or person in charge shall 
be a town charge. 

The employment of convict labor on roads so constructed shall be authorized 
and permitted, in the discretion of the superintendent of state prisons, upon 
the requisition of the county superintendent of highways. 



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50 New York Labob Bulletin. 

The highway officials of the county under this section shall consist of the 
county superintendent, three members of the board, appointed by the chair- 
man. The supervisor of the town in which a road is being improved shall be 
a member of the said committee on all questions involving the work in the 
town of which he is the supervisor. 

Unless the advice and directions of the highway officials shall be followed in 
the prosecution of the work, no liability therefor shall accrue to the county 
for its share of the cost of work. 

The cost of such improvement other than that apportioned to the towns 
shall be a county charge. The amount of the cost of such improvement so 
to be borne by the county shall be levied and collected as a county charge 
and paid in to the county treasurer. The resolution of the board of super- 
visors providing for the construction or improvement of such highway, may 
authorize the county treasurer of the county or the supervisors of the respect- 
ive towns to borrow money on the faith and credit of the county or of such 
towns to pay the portion of the cost of such construction or improvement to 
be borne respectively by the county or such town or towns. Such resolution 
may also provide for the issue and sale of such bonds and shall conform so 
far as may be with the provisions of this chapter, relating to a resolution 
authorizing a town to borrow money for highway purposes. Payments there- 
from shall be made from time to time by the county treasurer upon the certifi- 
cate of the district or county superintendent countersigned by the chairman 
of the highway officials committee. Said orders shall be drawn to the order 
of the supervisor of the respective towns where roads are being constructed 
to be disbursed by them, upon the orders of the town superintendent or person 
designated in his stead, in the same manner as highway disbursements are 
now made and provided for, under the town highway bureau of the highway 
department. 

Such highways, when completed and accepted by the board of supervisors, 
shall be thereafter repaired and maintained at the sole expense of the towns 
in which they are located, unless the board of supervisors shall apportion a 
share of the expense thereof upon the county. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved March 21. 

Chapter 68. 

An Act to amend chapter seven Imndred and eighty-four of the laws of nine- 
teen hundred and thirteen, entitled "An act to amend the highway law, 
in relation to establishing a new state route in the county of Greene, and 
making an appropriation for the construction and improvement thereof,'* 
in relation to the employment of convict labor in such construction and 
improvement. 

The People of the State of New Torkf represented in Senate and Assemhlyf 
do enact as foUowe: 

Section 1. Section two of chapter seven hundred and eighty-four of the 
laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, entitled "An act to amend the high- 
way law, in relation to establishing a new state route in the county of 
Greene, and making an appropriation for the construction and improvement 
thereof," is hereby amended to read as follows: 



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Thb Labob Laws of 1914. 51 

§ 2. The sum of one hundred and ninety thousand dollars ($190,000), or 
so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of any 
m<mey in the treasury, not otherwise appropriated, to be expended, except aa 
herein othenoise provided, in the manner provided for by article six of the 
highway law, for the construction and improvement of state route five-c, as 
established by this act. The state commiseion of JUghioaya may construct 
and improve such route by contract or by the purchase of material and 
securing of labor in the open market, or partly by each method, or wholly 
or partly by forces of the state department of highways. If such construc- 
tion and improvement be made wholly by contract, maps, specifications and 
estimates shall be made, proposals advertised for and the contract awarded 
as provided in article six of the highway law, a/nd if specified parts or items 
only of such construction and improvement be done by contract the provisions 
of such article of the highway law shall govern the making of maps, esti- 
mates and specifications and the awarding of contracts therefor so far as 
they may be made applicable. 8uch commission may, in its discretion, use 
convict labor, as hereinafter provided, in the construction and improvement 
of such route or parts thereof, or vyith respect to certain items of the work. 
The superintendent of state prisons is hereby authorized to furnish available 
convict labor therefor, upon the application of such commission. The expense 
of maintenance of convicts while so employed shall be paid from the moneys 
herein appropriated in the same manner as other expenses of such con- 
struction and improvement. The officers and guards of the prison department 
shall have the charge and custody of such convicts, but the engineers and fore- 
men of the highway department shall direct the work to be done; and nothing 
herein contained shall be construed to authorize the em/ployment of such 
convict labor for a person, firm, association or corporation contracting with 
such commission for the performance of any part or item of such construc- 
tion or improvement. Moneys expended directly for material, labor and cost 
of maintenance of convicts shall be paid out by the state treasurer upon the 
audit and warrant of the comptroller upon vouchers approved by such com- 
mission. 

I 2. This act shall take effect immediately. . • 

Approved March 21. 

Chapter 110. 

An Act to continue the commission created by chapter five hundred and sixty- 
one of the laws of nineteen hundred and eleven, entitled "An act to create 
a commission to investigate the conditions under which manufacture is 
carried on in cities of the first and second class in this state^ and making 
an appropriation therefor/' and making an appropriation therefor. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. The commission created by chapter five hundred and sixty-one 
of the laws of nineteen hundred and eleven, entitled "An act to create a com- 
mission to investigate the conditions under which manufacture is carried on 
in cities of the first and second class in this state, and making an appropria- 
tion therefor," is hereby continued with all the powers conferred by said 
chapter as amended by chapter twenty-one of the laws of nineteen hundred 



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52 New York Laboe Bulletin. 

and twelve, and conferred by chapter one hundred and thirty-seven of the 
laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen. 

§ 2. The said commission shall make a report of its proceedings, together 
with its recommendations, to the legislature on or before the fifteenth day 
of February, nineteen hundred and fifteen. 

§ 3. The sum of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000), or so much thereof as 
may be needed, is hereby appropriated for the actual and necessary expenses 
of the commission in carrying out the provisions of chapter one hundred and 
thirty-seven of the laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, and of this act, 
payable by the treasurer on the warrant of the comptroller on the order of 
the chairman of said commission. 

§ 4. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 3. 

Chapter 116. 

An Act to amend the public service commissions law, in relation to the free 
transportation by common carriers of mail carriers in uniform. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate omd Assembly, 
do enact as folloios: 

Section 1. Subdivision two of section thirty-three of chapter four hundred 
and eighty of the laws of nineteen hundred and ten, entitled "An act in rda- 
tion to public service commissions, constituting chapter forty -eight of the 
consolidated laws," as amended by chapter thirty-eight of the laws of nine- 
teen hundred and fourteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

2. No common carrier subject to the provisions of this chapter shall, 
directly or indirectly, issue or give any free ticket, free pass or free trans* 
portation for passengers or property between points within this state, except 
to its oflScers, employees, agents, surgeons, physicians, attomeys-at-law, and 
their families; to ministers of religion, officers and employees of railroad 
young men's christian associations, inmates of hospitals, charitable and elee- 
mosynary institutions and persons exclusively engaged in charitable and elee- 
mosynary work; and to indigent, destitute and homeless persons and to 
such persons when transported by charitable societies or hospitals, and the 
necessary agents employed in such transportation; to inmates of the national 
homes or state homes for disabled volunteer soldiers and of soldiers* and 
sailors' homes, including those about to enter and those returning home after 
discharge, and boards of managers of such homes; to necessary caretakers of 
property in transit; to employees of sleeping-car companies, express com- 
panies, telegraph and telephone companies doing business along the line of 
the issuing carrier; to railway mail service employees, post-office inspectors, 
mail carriers in uniform, customs inspectors and immigration inspectors; to 
newsboys on trains, baggage agents, witnesses attending any legal investiga- 
tion or proceeding in which the common carrier is interested, persons injured 
in accidents or wrecks and physicians and nurses attending such person; to 
the carriage free or at reduced rates of persons or property for the United 
States, state or municipal governments, or of property to or from fairs and 
expositions for exhibit thereat. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 4. 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 53 

Chapter 170. 

An Act making an appropriation for carrying out the proyisions of the work- 
men's compensation law. 

The People of the State of Neta York, represented in Senate and Aasemhlyy 
do enact cm folUywe: 

Section 1. The sum of .three hundred fifty thousand dollars ($350,000), or 
BO much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of any 
moneys in the state treasury not othffrwise appropriated, for carrying 
out the provisions of chapter eight hundred and sixteen of the laws of 
nineteen hundred and thirteen, to include the following expenditures, hereby 
expressly authorized, in addition to any other expenses necessary for carry- 
ing out the proyisions of such chapter, to wit: salaries, compensation, 
traveling and other actual and necessary expenses of the members of such 
commission, its officers, deputies, counsel, subordinates and employees, and 
expert and other help employed by it; printing, postage, telephones and 
telegrams; establishment, rent, furnishings and equipment of branch offices 
elsewhere than in the city of Albany; rent of additional office room, if 
necessary, in the city of Albany and furnishings and equipment therefor; 
supplies for such commission and its offices. The moneys hereby appro- 
priated shall be paid out by the state treasurer upon the warrant of the 
comptroller upon vouchers signed by at least two of the workmen's com- 
pensation commissioners. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 7. 

Chapter 181. 

An Act to amend the labor law, in relation to the establishment of a bureau 

of employment. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section forty-two of chapter thirty-six of the laws of nineteen 
hundred and nine, entitled "An act relating to labor, constituting chapter 
thirty-one of the consolidated laws," as amended by chapter five hundred 
and fourteen of the laws of nineteen hundred and ten and chapter one hundred 
and forty-five of the laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, is hereby amended 
to read as follows: 

§ 42. Bureaus. The department of labor shall have [four] five bureaus 
as follows: inspection; statistics and information; employment; mediation 
and arbitration and industries and immigration. There shall be such other 
bureaus in the department of labor as the commissioner of labor may deem 
necessary. 

§ 2. Such chapter is hereby amended by inserting therein after article 
five a new article to be article five-a, to read as follows: 



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54: New York Labob Bulletin. 

ARTICLE 5 A, 

BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT, 

Section 66, Director, 

66'a. Public employment offices, 

66-h. Purpose. 

66c Officers, 

66-d, Registration of a/ppUcants, 

66-6, Reports of superintendents. 

66-f. Advisory committees, 

66-g, Notice of strikes or lookouts. 

66'h. Applicants not to he disqualified. 

66'i. Departments. 

66'j. Juveniles, 

66-k. Co-operation of public employment. 

66-1. Advertising. 

66-m. Service to be free. 

66'n, Petidlties. 

66-0. Labor market bulletin. 

66-p. Information for employment agencies, 

I 66. Director. The bureau of employment shall be under the immediate 
charge of a director who shall have recognized executive and manageriai 
ability f technical and scientific knotdedge upon the subject of unemployment 
and administration of public employment offi^ces and recognized capacity to 
direct investigations of unemployment and public and private agencies for 
remedying the same. The civil service eaoitmination for the position of 
director shall be such as to test whether candidates have the altove qualifica- 
tions. As a part of such esoaminatUm each candidate shall be required to 
submit a detailed plan of organisation and administration of employment 
offices such as are contemplated by this article. 

§ 66-a, Public employment offices. The commissioner of labor shall estab- 
lish such public employment offices, and such brcMch offices, as may be neces- 
sary to carry out the purpose of this article. 

§ 66-b. Purpose, The purpose of such offices shall be to bri^g together all 
kinds and classes of workmen in search of employment and employers seeking 
labor, 

% 66-c. Officers. Each office shall be in charge of a superintendent, who shall 
he subject to the supervision and direction of the director. Such other em- 
ployees shall be provided as may be necessary for the proper administration 
of the affairs of the office. 

I 66-d. Registration of applicants. The superintendent of every public 
employment office shall receive applications from those seeking employment 
and from those seeking employees and shall register every applicant on prop- 
erly arranged cards or forms provided by the commissioner of labor, 

§ 66'e. Report of superintendents. Each superintendent shall make to the 
director such periodic reports of applications for labor or employment and 
all other details of the work of each office, and the expenses of maintaining 
the same, as the commissioner of labor may require. 



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Ths Labob Laws of 1914. 55 

§ 66'f. Advisory oomnUttees, The commissioner of labor shall appoint for 
each public employment office an advisory committee, tohose duty it shall be 
to give the superintendent advice and assistance in connection with the man- 
agement of such employment office. The superintendent shall consult from 
time to time with the advisory committee attached to his office. Buch advisory 
committee shall be composed of representative employers and employees with 
chairman who shall be agreed upon by a majority of such employers and of 
such employees. Vacancies^ however caused, shall be filled in the same manner 
as the original appointments. The advisory committees may appoint such sub- 
committees as they may deem advisable. At the request of a majority either 
c/ the employers or of the employees on advieory committees, the voting on 
any particular question shall be so conducted that there shall be an equality 
of voting power between the employers and the employees, notwithstanding 
the absence of any member. Ewcept as above provided, every question shall 
be decided by a majority of the members present and voting on that question. 
The chairman shall have no vote on any question on which the equality of 
voting power has been claimed, 

i 66-g. Notice of strikes or lockouts. An employer, or a representative of 
employers or employees may file at a public employment office a signed state- 
ment with regard to the existence of a strike or lockout affecting their trade. 
Such a statement shall be ewhibited in the employment office, but not until it 
has been communicated to the employers affected, if filed by employees, or 
to the employees affected, if filed by employers. In case of a reply being 
received to such a statement, it shall also be exhibited in the employment 
office. If any employer affected by a statement notifies the public employment 
office of a vacancy or vacancies, the officer in charge shall advise any appli- 
cant for such vacancy or vacancies of the statements that have been made. 
§ 66-h. Applicants not to be disqualified. No person shall suffer any dis- 
qualification or be otherwise prejudiced on account of refusing to accept em- 
ployment found for him through a public employment office, where the ground 
Of refusal is that a strike or lookout exists which affects the toork, or that the 
wages are lower than those current in the trade in that particular district or 
section where the employment is offered. 

I 66-i. Departments. The commissioner of labor may organize in any office 
separate departments with separate entrances for men, women and juveniles; 
these departments may be subdivided into a division for farm laibor and such 
other divisions for different classes of work as may in his judgment be 
required. 

i 66- j. Juveniles. Applicants for employment who are between the ages of 
fourteen and eighteen years shall register upon special forms provided b^ 
the commissioner of labor. Such applicants upon securing their employment 
certificates as required by law, may be permitted to register at a public or 
other recognized school and when forms containing such applications are trans- 
mitted to a public employment office they shall be treated as equivalent to 
personal registration. The superintendent of each public employment office 
shall co-operate with the school principals in endeavoring to secure suitable 
positions for children who are leaving the schools to begin work. To this end 
he shall transmit to the school principals a sufficient number of application 
forms to enable all pupils to register who desire to do so; and swh principals 
shall acquaint the teachers and pupils with the purpose of the public employ- 



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56 New York Labob Bulletin. 

ment office in plticing juveniles. The advisory committees shall appoint special 
committees on juvewile employment ichich shall include employers, workmen, 
and persons possessing experience or knowledge of education, or of other con- 
ditions affecting juveniles. It shall he the duty of these special committees to 
give advice with regard to the management of the public employment offices 
to which they are attached in regard to juvenile applicants for employment. 
Such committees may take steps either by themselves or in co-operation with 
other bodies or persons to give information, advice and assistance to boys and 
girls and their parents with respect to the choice of employment and other 
matters bearing thereon. 

§ 66-k. Co-operation of public employment offices. The commissioner of 
labor shall arrange for the co-operation of the offices created under this article 
in order to facilitate, when advisable, the transfer of applicants for ioork 
from places where there is an over supply of labor to places where there is a 
demand. To this end he shall cause lists of vacancies furnished to the several 
offices, as herein provided^ to be prepared and shall supply them to newspapers 
and other agencies for disseminating information, in his discretion, and to 
the superintendents of the public employment offices. The superintendent 
shall post these lists in conspicuous places, so that they may be open to public 
inspection. 

§ 66-1. Advertising. The commissioner of labor shall have power to solicit 
business for the public employment offices established under this article by 
advertising in newspapers and in any other way that he may deem expedient, 
and to take any other steps that he may deem necessary to insure the success 
and efficiency of such offices; provided, that the expenditure under this section 
for advertising shall not exceed five per centum of the total expenditure for 
the purposes of this article, 

§ 66-m. Service to be free. No fees direct or indirect shall in any case be 
charged to or receixwd from those seeking the benefits of this article. 

§ 66-n. Penalties. Any superintendent or clerk, subordinate or appointee, 
appointed under this article, who shall accept directly or indirectly any fee, 
compensation or gratuity from any one seeking employment or labor under this 
article, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine 
Of not more than five hundred dollars, or by imprisonment in jail for a term 
not exceeding six months, or both, and shall thereafter be disqualified from 
holding any office or position in such bureau. 

§ 66-0. Labor market bulletin. The bureau of statistics and information of 
the department of labor shall publish a bulletin in which shall be made public 
all possible information uHth regard to the state of the labor market including 
reports of the business of the varioiLS public employment offices. 

§ 66-p. Information for employment agencies. For the purposes specified 
in the foregoing section every employment office or agency, other than those 
established under this article, shall keep a register of applicants for W'Ork and 
applicants for help in sueh form as may be required by the commissioner of 
labor in order to afford the same information as that supplied by state offices. 
Such register shall be subject to inspection by the commissioner of labor and 
information therefrom shall be fumislied to him at such times and in such 
form as he may require. 

i 3. This act Bhall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 7. 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 57 

Chapter 182. 
An Act to amend the labor law, in relation to fire escapes and stairways. 
The People of the State of Neto Yoi'k, represented in Senate and Asaeniblyf 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Subdivisions one and two of section seven ty-nine-b of chapter 
thirty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act re- 
lating to labor, constituting chapter thirty-one of the consolidated laws/' 
as added by chapter four hundred and sixty-one of the laws of nineteen 
hundred and thirteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

§ 7&-b. Requirements for existing buildings. No factory shall be con- 
ducted in any building heretofore erected unless such building shall con- 
form to the following requirements: 

1. Required exits. Every building over two stories in height shall be 
provided on each floor with at least two means of exit or escape from fire, 
remote from each other, one of which on every floor alwve the ground floor 
shall lead to or open on an interior stairway, which [in buildings over 
four stories in height] shall be enclosed as hereinafter provided, or to an 
exterior enclosed fireproof stairway. The other shall lead to such a stair- 
way; or to a horizontal exit; or to an exterior screened stairway; or to 
fire-escofpes on the outside of the building in buildings of fii>c stories or less 
vn height eofcept th-at such fire-escapes shall not he acK-eptcd as required 
means of exit in such buildings or particular classes thereof where the in- 
dustrial board finds that such fire-escapes would not in its opinion furnish 
adequate and safe means of escape for the occupants in case of fire; or 
to outside fire-escapes in luUdings over five stories in height when, in the 
opinion of the industrial board the safety of the occupants of the building 
would not be endangered thereby [,]. [to Are escapes on the outside of the 
building.] No point on any floor of such factory shall be more than one 
hundred feet distant from the entrance to one such means of exit. When- 
ever egress may be had from the root to an adjoining or nearby structure, 
every stairway serving as a required means of exit shall be extended to 
the roof. All such stairways shall extend to the first story and lead to the 
street or to an unobstructed passageway leading to a street or road or to 
an open area affording safe passage to a street or road. 

2. Stairway enclosures. All interior stairways serving as required means 
of exit in buildings more than [four] five stories in height and the land- 
ings, platforms and passageways connected therewith shall be enclosed on 
all sides by partitions of fire-resisting material extending continuously from 
the basement. Where the stairway extends to the top floor of the building 
such partitions shall extend to three feet above the roof. All openings in 
such partitions shall be provided with self-closing doors constructed of fire- 
resisting material except where such openings are in the exterior w^all of 
the building. All such partitions and the doors provided for the openings 
therein shall be constructed in such manner as the industrial board may 
prescribe by its rules and regulations. The industrial, hoard shall have 
power to adopt rules and regu-lortions requiring tJw enclosure of stairways 
serving as required exits in buildings of five stories or less in height or vn 
particular classes of such buildings wherever the bfxird finds that because 
of the conditions existing in such buildings such requirement is necessary 



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58 New York Labob Bulletin. 

to secure the safety of the lives of the occupants thereof in c€tse of fire. 
Whenever in the case of any existing buildings not over six stories in 
height, the industrial board shall find that the requirements of this and 
the last preceding subdivision relating to stairway enclosures can be dis- 
pensed with or modified without endangering the safety of persons employed 
in such buildings, the industrial board shall have power to adopt such rules 
and regulations, as may, in its opinion, meet the conditions existing in such 
buildings, which rules and regulations may make said requirements in- 
applicable or modify the same in such manner as it may find to be adapted 
to securing the safety of persons employed therein. The industrial board 
shall have power to adopt rules and regulations, permitting, under con- 
ditions therein prescribed, as a substitute for the stairway enclosures herein 
required the use of partitions heretofore constructed in such manner and 
of such fire-resisting material as have heretofore been approved by the local 
authorities exercising supervision over the construction and alteration of 
buildings. In such cases, however, every opening in the enclosing partitions 
shall be provided with fire doors. 

I 2. Subdivision five of secticm seventy-nine-b of such chapter is hereby 
amended to read as follows: 

6. The provisions of subdivision four shall not apply where at the time 
this act takes effect there are outside fire-escapes with balconies on each floor 
of the building connected with stairways placed at an angle of not more 
than sixty degrees, provided that such existing outside fire-escapes have or 
shall be provided with the following; 

A stairway leading from the top floor balcony to the roof, except where 
the fire-escapes are erected on the front of the building; a stairway not less 
than twenty-two inches wide from the lowest balcony to a safe landing place 
beneath, which stairway remains down permanently or is arranged to swing 
up and down by counterbalancing weights; a eafe and unobstructed exit 
to the street from the foot of such fire-escapes as provided in subdivision four 
hereof; steps connecting the sill of every opening leading to the fire-escapes 
with the fioor wherever such sill is more than three feet above the floor 
level; and all openings leading to the fire-escapes provided with windows 
having metal frames and sash or frames and sash covered with metal and 
with wired glass where glass is used, or with doors constructed in accord- 
ance with the requirements of subdivision four; and all windows opening 
upon the course of the fire-escape provided with fireproof windows. 

§ 3. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 7. 

Cliapter 183. 

An Act to amend the labor law, in relation to sanitation in mercantile estab- 
lishments. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section one hundred and sixty -eight of chapter thirty-six of 
the laws of nineteen hiindred and nine, entitled "An act relating to labor, 
constituting chapter thirty-one of the consolidated laws," as amended by 
chapter eight hundred and sixty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 59 

eleven and chapter one hundred and forty-five of the laws of nineteen hun- 
dred and thirteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

S 168. [Wash-rooms and water^osets. Suitable and proper wash-rooms 
and water-closets shall be provided in, adjacent to or connected with mercan- 
tile establishments. Such rooms and closets shall be so located and arranged 
as to be easily accessible to the employees of such establishments. 

&uch water-closets shall be properly screened and ventilated, and, at all 
times, kept in a clean condition. The water-closets assigned to the female 
employees of such establishments shall be separate from those assigned to 
the male employees. 

If a mercantile establishment has not provided wash-rooms and water- 
closets, as required by this section, the board or department of health or 
health commissioners of the town, village or city where such establishment 
is situated, unless such establishment is situated in a city of the first or 
second class, in which case the commissioner of labor shall cause to be served 
upon the owner, agent or lessee of the building occupied by such establish- 
ment a written notice of the omission and directing such owner, agent or 
lessee to comply with the provisions of this section respecting such wash-rooms 
and water-closets. 

Such owner shall, within fifteen days after the receipt of such notice, 
cause such wash-rooms and water-closets to be provided.] 

Cleanlines8 of rooms. Every room in Ck m>ercantUe eatabliahment <md the 
floor, toalls, ceilings, windows and every other part thereof and all fiootwres 
therein shaU at ail times he kept vn a clean and sanitary condition. Floors 
shall, at all times, he maintained in a safe coT^dition. Suitahle receptacles 
shall he provided and used for the storage of waste and refuse; such re- 
ceptacles shall he maintained in a sanitary condition, 

§ 2. Such chapter is hereby further amended by adding thereto, after 
section one hundred and sixty-eight, six new sections, to be sections one 
hundred and sixty-eight-a, one hundred and sixty-eight-b, one hundred and 
sixty-eight-c, one hundred and sixty-eight-d, one hundred and sixty-eight-e 
and one hundred and sixty -eight-f, to read, respectively, as follows: 

§ 168-a. Cleanliness of huildings. Every part of a huilding in which a 
mercantile estaltlishment is located and of the premises thereof and the 
yards, courts, passages, areas or alleys connected with or helonging to the 
same, shall he kept free from any accumulation of dirt, filth, ruhhish or 
garhage. The roof, passages, stairs, halls, basements, cellars, privies, water- 
closets, and all other parts of such huilding and the premises thereof shall 
at all times he kept in a clean, sanitary and safe condition. The entire 
huilding and premises shall he well drained and the plunibing, cesspools and 
drains thereof at all times kept in proper repair and in a sanitary condition. 

§ 168-b. Drinking water. In every mercantile esttiblishment there shall 
he provided at all times for the use of employees a sufficient supply of clean 
and pure drinking water. Such water shall he supplied through proper pipe 
connections with water mains through which is conveyed the water used 
for domestic purposes, or from a spring or well or hody of pure wofter. If 
su^ch drinking water he placed in receptacles in the mercantile establishment, 
such receptacles shaU he properly covered to prevent contamination and shall 
he thoroughly cleaned at frequent intervals. 



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60 New York Labor Bulletin. 

§ 168-c. Wash-rooms and washing facilities. In every meroaniile establish- 
ment there shall be provided and maintained for the use of employees ade- 
quate and convenient wash-rooms, or uxishing forcUities, Such washing facili'- 
ties shall consist of sinks or stationary basins provided with ruwning water 
or with tanks holding an adequate supply of clean water and shall be 
separate for ea>ch seas wherever required by the rules of the industrial board. 
Every wash-room shall be provided with adequate m^ans of ventilation and 
heating and artificial illumination, 

§ 168-d. Dressing rooms. In every mercantile establishment where more 
than five wom^sn are em^ployed a sufficient number of dressing rooms con- 
veniently located shall be provided for their use. Each dressing room^ shall 
be properly ventilated by a uyindow or by suitable ducts leading to the outer 
air amd shall be enclosed by partitions or walls. Each dressing room shaU 
be provided with adequate means for artificial illumination, suitable means 
for hanging clothes and a suitable number of seats and shaU be properly^ 
heated and ventilated. Each dressing room shall be separated from any water- 
closet compartment by adequate partitions. Adequate floor spa^e shall be pro- 
vided in dressing rooms in proportion to the number of employees. Where 
more than ten women are employed such dressing room shall have a floor 
space of not less than sixty square feet and shall have at least one u?indow 
opening to the outer air, 

§ 168-e. Water-closets. I, There shall be provided for every mercantile 
establishment a sufficient number of suitable and convenient water-closets. 
All water-closets shall be maintained inside the mercantile establishment 
eojcept where, in the opinion of the commissioner, it is impractioable to 
do so. 

2, There sh^l be separate water-closet compartments or toilet rooms for 
females^ to be used by them exclusively^ and notice to that effect shaU be 
clearly marked at the entrance of such compartments or rooms. The entrance 
to every water-closet shall be effectively screened by a partition or vestibule. 
Where uxiter-closets for males and females are in adjoining conipartments 
or toilet rooms, there shall be partitions of substantial construction betioeen 
the compartments or rooms extending from th^ floor to the ceiling and such 
partitions shall be plostered or metal covered to a sufficient height. When- 
ever any water-closet compartments open directly into the workroom, ex- 
posing the interior^ they shall be screened from, view by a partition or a 
vestibule. The use of curtains for screening purposes is prohibited. 

3, The use of any form of trough water-closet, latrine or school sink u?ithin 
any mercantile establishment is prohibited except such fixtures in existence 
on the first day of October, nineteen hundred and fourteen, having a com- 
mon flushing system and approved by the industrial board in its rules. All 
such trough water-closets, latrines or school sinks shall, before the first day 
of October, nineteen hundred and fifteen, be completely removed and the 
place where they were located properly disinfected under the direction of 
the department, 

4, Every water-closet installed before October first, nineteen hundred and 
fourteen, inside any mercantile establishment shall have a basin of enameled 
iron or earthenware, and shall be flushed from a separate water-supplied 
cistern or through a proper valve connected in such manner as to keep the 
toater supply of the establishment free from, conta^nmation. 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 61 

5. All woodwork enclosing water-olosei fixtures shall be removed from the 
front of the closet (md the gp<ice underneath the seat shall be left open. All 
tcater-closet compartments or toilet rooms constructed before October first, 
nineteen hundred and fourteen^ shall have windotos opening directly to the 
outer air or shall be otherwise properly ventilated to the outer air by 
suitable ducts, and shall be provided with means for artificial illumdnation, 

6. All water-closets y urinals, toater-closet compartments and toilet rooms 
hereafter installed in a mercantile estaltlishment, including those provided 
to replace existing fixtures shall be properly constructed, installed, ventilated, 
lighted and maintained in accordance with such rules as may be adopted 
by the industrial board, 

7. All water-closet compartments and toilet rooms, and the floors, u?alls, 
ceilings and surface thereof, and all fixtures therein, and all water-closets 
and urinals shall at all times be maintained in a clean and sanitary con- 
dition. The floor or other surface beneath and around the closet shall be 
maint<Uned in good order and repair and all the woodwork shall be kept well 
painted with a light colored paint. The enclosure of each compartment and 
toilet room shall be kept free from obscene yyriting or marking. Where the 
water supply to water-closets or urinals is Uaible to freeze, the water-closet 
comp€trtm€nt shall be properly heated so as to prevent freezing, or the supply 
and flush pipes, cisterns and traps and valves shall be effectively covered 
with wool felt or hair felt, or other adequate covering, 

§ 168-f. Ventilation. Every mercantile establishment shall be provided 
with proper and sufficient means of ventilation by natural or m^ohanioal 
means or both, as may be necessary and there shall be maintained therein 
proper and sufficient ventilation and proper degrees of temperature and 
humidity at all times during working hours. The industiHal board shall 
make rules for and fix standards of ventilation, temperature and humidity 
in mercantile establishments. 

§ 3. This act shall take effect October first, nineteen hundred and fourteen. 

Approved April 7. 

Chapter 188. 
An Act to amend the prison law, in relation to the earnings of prisoners. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section one hundred and eighty-five of chapter forty -seven of the 
laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act relating to prisons, con- 
stituting chapter forty-three of the consolidated laws," is hereby amended to 
read as follows: 

§ 185. Earnings of prisoners. Every prisoner confined in the state prisons, 
reformatories and penitentiaries, who shall become entitled to a diminution 
of his term of sentence by good conduct, may, in the discretion of the agent 
and warden, or the superintendent of the reformatory, or superintendent of 
the penitentiary, receive compensation from the earnings of the prison or 
leformatory or penitentiary in which he is confined, such compensation to be 
graded by the agent and warden of the prison for the prisoners therein, and 
the superintendent of the reformatory and penitentiary for the prisoners 
therein, for the time such prisoner may work, but in no case shall the com- 



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62 New Yobk Labob Bulletin. 

pcnsation allowed to such convictB exceed in amount ten per centum of the 
earnings of the prison or reformatory or penitentiary in which they are con- 
fined. The difference in the rate of compensation shall be based both on the 
pecuniary value of the work performed, and also on the willingness, industry 
and good conduct of such prisoner; provided, that whenever any prisoner shall 
forfeit his good time for misconduct or violation of the rules or regulations 
of the prison, reformatory or penitentiary, he shall forfeit out of the compen- 
sation allowed under this section such an amount as may he determined hy 
the agent and loarden, the superintendent of the reformatory, or the super- 
intendent of the penitentiary, not to ewceed fifty cents for each day of good 
time so forfeited; and provided, that prisoners serving life sentences shall 
bt entitled to the benefit of this section when their conduct is such as would 
entitle other prisoners to a diminution of sentence, subject to forfeiture of 
good time for misconduct as herein provided. The agent and warden of each 
prison, or the superintendent of the reformatory or superintendent of the 
penitentiary may institute and maintain a uniform system of fines, to be 
imposed at his discretion, in place of his other penalties and punishments, to 
be deducted from such compensation standing to the credit of any prisoner, 
for misconduct by such prisoner. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Aproved April 7. 

Chapter 316. 
An Act to amend the workmen's compensation law, generally. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate aaid Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Subdivision three of section three of chapter eight hundred and 
sixteen of the laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, entitled "An act in 
relation to assuring compensation for injuries or death of certain employees 
in the course of their employment and repealing certain sections of the labor 
law relating thereto, constituting chapter sixty-seven of the consolidated 
laws," as re-enacted by chapter forty-one of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
fourteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

3. " Employer," except when otherwise expressly stated, means a person, 
partnership, association, corporation, and the legal representatives of a 
deceased employer, or the receiver or trustee of a person, partnership, asso- 
ciation or corporation, employing workmen in hazardous employments [ ; but 
does not include] including the state [or] a/nd a municipal corporation or 
other political subdivision thereof. 

§ 2. Sections eleven, sixteen and thirty of such chapter are hereby amended 
to read, respectively, as follows: 

§ 11. Alternative remedy. The liability prescribed by the last preceding 
section shall be exclusive, except that if an employer fail to secure the pay- 
ment of compensation for his injured employees and their dependents as pro- 
vided in section fifty of this chapter, an injured employee, or his legal repre- 
sentative in case death results from the injury, may, at his option, elect to 
claim compensation under this chapter, or to maintain an action in the 
courts for damages on account of such injury; and in such an action it 
shall not he necessary to plead or prove freedom from cowtrihutory negligence 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 63 

nor may the defendant [may not] plead as a defense that the injury was 
caused by the negligence of a fellow servant [or] nor that the employee as- 
sumed the risk of his employment, [or] nor that the injury was due to the 
contributory negligence of the employee. 

§ 16. Death benefits. If the injury causes* death, the compensation shall be 
known as a death benefit and shall be payable in the amount and to or for 
the benefit of the perscms following: 

1. Reasonable funeral expenses, not exceeding one hundred dollars; 

2. If there be a surviving wife (or dependent husband) and no child of the 
*deaceased under the age of eighteen years, to such wife (or dependent husband) 
thirty per centum of the average wages of the deceased during widowhood 
(or dependent widowerhood) with two years' compensation in one sum, upon 
remarriage; and if there be surviving child or children of the deceased under 
the age of eighteen years, the additional amount of ten per centum of such 
wages for each such child until of the age of eighteen years/ in case of the 
suhsequeni death of siich surviving wife {or dependent husband) any sur- 
viving child of the deceased employee, at the time under eighteen years of age, 
shall have his compensation incretised to fifteen per centum of such wages, 
and the same shall he payable until he shall reach the age of eighteen years; 
provided that the total amount payable shall in no case exceed sixty-six and 
two-thirds per centum of such wages. 

3. If there be surviving child or children of the deceased under the age of 
eighteen years, but no surviving wife (or dependent husband) then for the 
support of each such child until of the age of eighteen years, fifteen per 
centum of the wages of the deceased, provided that the aggregate shall in no 
case exceed sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of such wages. 

4. If the amount payable to surviving wife (or dependent husband) and 
to children under the age of eighteen years shall be less in the aggregate 
than sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of the average wages of the deceased, 
then for the support of grandchildren or brothers and sisters under the age 
of eighteen years, if dependent upon the deceased at the time of the accident, 
fifteen per centum of such wages for the support of each such person until 
of the age of eighteen years; and for the support of each parent, or grand- 
parent, of the deceased if dependent upon him at the time of the accident, 
fifteen per centum of such wages during such dependency. But in no case 
shall the aggregate amount payable under this subdivision exceed the differ- 
ence between sixty-six and two-thirds per centum of such wages, and the 
amount payable as hereinbefore provided to surviving wife (or dependent 
husband) or for the support of surviving child or children. 

Any. excess of wages over one hundred dollars a month shall not be taken 
into account in computing compensation under this section. All questions of 
dependency shall be determined as of the time of the accident. 

§ 30. Revenues or benefits from other sources not to aifect compensation. 
No benefits, savings or insurance of the injured employee, independent of the 
provisions of this chapter, shall be considered in determining the compensation 
or benefits to be paid under this chapter, except that, in case of the death of 
an employee of the state, a municipal corporation or any other political sub- 
division of the state, any benefit payable under a pension system which is 

* So in original. 

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64 New York Labor Bulletin. 

not sustained in whole or in part by the contributions of the employee, may 
he applied toward the payment of the death benefit provided by this chapter. 

I 3. Subdivision three of section fifty of such chapter is hereby amended to 
read as follows: 

3. By furnishing satisfactory proof to the commission of his financial 
ability to pay such compensation for himself, in which case the commission 
may, in its discretion, require the deposit with the commission of securities 
of the kind prescribed in section thirteen of the insurance law, in an amount 
to be determined by the commission, to secure his liability to pay the com- 
pensation provided in this chapter. 

If an employer fail to comply with this section, he shall be liable to a 
penalty [for every day] during which such failure continues of an amount 
equal to the pro rata premium which would have been payable for insurance 
in the state fund for such period of non-compliance [one dollar for every 
employee] to be recovered in an action brought by the commission. 

The commission may, in its discretion, for good cause shown, remit any 
such penalty, provided the employer in default secure compensation as pro- 
vided in this section. 

§ 4. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 14. 

Chapter 320. 

An Act to amend the labor law, in relation to compelling employees of a mer- 
cantile establishment to contribute to a benefit or insurance fund. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Article one* of chapter thirty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred 
and nine, entitled "An act relating to labor, constituting chapter thirty-one of 
the consolidated laws," is hereby amended by adding thereto a new section, 
to be section twenty-four, to read as follows: 

I 24. Contributions to benefit or insurance fund. A corporation engaged 
in the business of operating a mercantile establishment shall not by deduction 
from salary, compensation or wages, by direct payment or otherwise, compel 
any employee in such mercantile establishment to contribute to a benefit or 
insurance fund maintained or managed for the employees of such establish- 
ment by such corporation, or by any other corporation or person; and every 
contract or agreement whereby such contribution is exacted shall be absolutely 
void. A corporation which will violate this section shall be liable to a penalty 
of one hundred dollars, recoverable by the person aggrieved in any court of 
competent jurisdiction. A director, officer or agent of a corporation who com- 
pels any employee to make a contribution in violation of this section, or 
sign any contract or agreement to make such contribution, or imposes or re- 
quires such a contribution as a condition of entering into or continuing in the 
employment of a mercantile establishment, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. 

I 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 14. 

* So in orieinni, but the new section should evidently have been Inserted imme- 
diately following section 22 of article 2. 



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The Laibor Laws 6t 1914. 65 



Chapter 881. 

An Actio amend the labor law, in relation to the hour« of labor of women and 
children in mercantile establishments. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Aaaembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section one hundred and sixty -one of chapter thirty-six of the 
laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled '*An act relating to labor, con- 
stituting chapter thirty-one of the consolidated laws/' as amended by chapter 
three hundred and eighty-seven of the laws of nineteen hundred and ten, 
chapter eight hundred and sixty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
eleven and chapter four hundred and ninety-three of the laws of nineteen 
hundred and thirteen, is hereby further amended to read as follows: 

§ 161. Hours of labor of minors and women; time for meals. 1. No 
child under the age of sixteen years shall be employed, permitted or suffered 
to work in or in connection with any mercantile establishment, business 
office, [or] telegraph office, restaurant, hotel, apartment house, theater or 
other place of amusement, bowling alley, barber shop, shoe-polishing estab- 
lishment, or in the distribution or transmission of merchandise, articles or 
messages, or in the distribution or sale of articles more than six days or 
[fifty-four] forty-eight hours in any one week, or more than [nine] eight 
hours in any one day, or before eight o'clock in the morning or after [seven] 
six o'clock in the evening of any day. The foregoing provision shall not 
apply to any employment prohibited or regulated by section four hundred 
and eighty-five of the penal law. 

2. Na female employee over the age of sixteen years shall be required, 
permitted or suffered to work in or in connection with any mercantile estab- 
lishment [in any second-class city] more than six days or fifty-four hours 
in any one week, [and elsewhere more than sixty hours in any one week;] 
or more than nine hours in any one day [in any second-class city; or else- 
where more tlian ten hours in any one day], unless for the purpose of mak- 
ing a shorter work day of some one day of the week; or before seven o'clock 
in the morning or after [six o'clock in the evening of any day in any second- 
class city, or elsewhere after] ten o'clock in the evening of any day. This 
section does not apply to the employment of persons sixteen years of age 
or upward [on Saturday, provided the total number of hours of labor in 
a week of any such person does not exceed fifty-four hours in any second-class 
city or elsewhere sixty hours, nor to the employment of persons during the 
five days preceding the twenty-fifth day of December in any second-class 
city, or elsewhere] between the eighteenth day of December and the follow- 
ing twenty-fourth day of December, both inclusive. 

S. Not less than forty-five minutes shall be allowed for the noonday meal 
of the employees of any [such] establishment specified in subdivision one 
hereof, unless the commissioner of labor shall permit a shorter time. Such 
permit shall be kept conspicuously posted in the main entrance of the estab- 
lishment, but it ma^ be revoked at any time. Whenever any employee is 
employed or permitted to work after seven o'clock in the evening, such em- 
3 



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66 New York Labor Bukletin. 

ployee shall be allowed at least twenty minutes to obtain lunch or supper 
between five and seven o'clock in the evening. 

f 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 14. 

Chapter 333. 

An Act to amend the labor law, in relation to salary of chief mercantile 

inspector. 

The People of the State of New York, repr^ented in Senate and Aeeemhly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section fifty-eight of chapter thirty-six of the laws of nineteen 
hundred and nine, entitled " An act relating to labor^ constituting chapter 
thirty-one of the consolidated laws," as added by chapter one hundred and 
forty-five of the laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, is hereby amended 
to read as follows: 

§ 68. Division of mercantile inspection. The division of mercantile in- 
spection shall be under the immediate charge of the chief mercantile 
inspector, but subject to the direction and supervision of the commissioner 
of labor. The chief mercantile inspector shall be appointed and be at 
pleasure removed by the commissioner of labor, and shall receive [such] a/n 
annual salary not to exceed [three] four thousand dollars, [as may be 
appropriated therefor.] 

S 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 14. 

Chapter 352. 

An Act to amend section thirteen hundred and ninety-one of the code of civil 
procedure, in relation to exemptions and executions. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section thirteen hundred and ninety-one of the code of civil 
procedure is hereby amended to read as follows: 

§ 1391. In addition to the exemptions, allowed by the last section, neces- 
sary household furniture, working tools and team, professional instruments, 
furniture and library, not exceeding in value two* hundred and fifty dollars, 
together with the necessary food for the team, for ninety days, are exempt 
from levy, and sale by virtue of an execution, when owned by a person, 
being a householder, or having a family for which he provides, except where 
the execution is issued upon a judgment, recovered wholly upon one or more 
demands, either for work performed in the family as a domestic or for the 
purchase money of one or more articles, exempt as prescribed in this or the 
last section. Where a judgment has been recovered and wliere an execution 
issued upon said judgment has been returned wholly or partly unsatisfied, 
and where any wages, debts, earnings, salary, income from trust funds or 
profits are due and owing to the judgment debtor or shall thereafter become 
due and owing to him, to the amount of twelve dollars or more per week, the 
judgment creditor may apply to the court in which said judgment was 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 67 

recovered or the court having jurisdiction of the same without notice to the 
judgment debtor and upon satisfactory proof of such facts by affidavits or 
otherwise, the court, if a court not of record, a judge or justice thereof, 
-must issue, or if a court of record, a judge or justice, must grant an order 
directing that an execution issue against the wages, debts, earnings, salary, 
income from trust funds or profits of said judgment debtor, and on presen- 
tation of such execution by the officer to whom delivered for collection to 
the person or persons from whom such wages, debts, earnings, salary, income 
from trust funds or profits are due and owing, or may thereafter become 
due and owing to the judgment debtor, said execution shall become a lien 
and a continuing levy upon the wages, earnings, debts, salary, income from 
trust funds or profits, due or to become due to said judgment debtor to 
the amount specified tlierein which shall not exceed ten per centum thereof, 
and said levy shall be a continuing levy until said execution and the expenses 
thereof are fully satisfied and paid or until modified as hereinafter provided, 
but only one execution against the wages, debts, earnings, salary, income from 
trust funds or profits of said judgment debtor shall be satisfied at one time 
and where more than one execution has been issued or shall be issued pur- 
suant to the provisions of this section against the same judgment debtor, 
they shall be satisfied in the order of priority in which such executions are 
presented to the person or persons from whom such wages, debts, earnings, 
salary, income from trust funds or profits are due and owing. It shall be 
the duty of any person or corporation, municipal or otherwise, to whom said 
execution shall be presented, and who shall at such time be indebted to the 
judgment debtor named in such execution, or who shall become indebted to 
such judgment debtor in the future, and while said execution shall remain 
a lien upon said indebtedness to pay over to the officer presenting the same, 
such amount of such indebtedness as such execution shall prescribe until said 
execution shall be wholly satisfied and such payment shall be a bar to any 
action therefor by any such judgment debtor. If such person or corporation, 
miuiicipal or otherwise, to whom said execution shall be presented shall fail, 
or refuse to pay over to said officer presenting said execution, the percent- 
age of said indebtedness, he shall be liable to an action therefor by the judg- 
ment creditor named in such execution, and the amount so recovered by such 
judgment creditor shall be applied towards the payment of said execution. 
Either party may apply at any time to the court from which such execution 
shall issue, or to any judge or justice issuing the same, or to the county 
judge of the county, and in any county where there is no county judge, to 
any justice of the city court upon such notice to the other party as such 
court, judge, or justice shall direct for a modification of said execution, and 
upon such hearing the said court, judge or justice may make such modifica- 
tion of said execution as shall be deemed just, and such execution as so 
modified shall continue in full force and effect until fully paid and satisfied, 
or until further modified as herein provided. This section, so far as it 
relates to wages and salary, due and owing or to become due and owing to 
the judgment debtor, shall not apply to judgments recovered more than ten 
years prior to September first, nineteen hundred and eight, nor to judgments 
heretofore or hereafter recovered upon suoh judgments, and any execution 
heretofore issued upon such judgments pursuant to an order heretofore 



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68 New York Labor Bulletin. 

granted under this section shall, when this act takes effect, cease to be a 
lien and continuing levy upon wages and salary thereafter to become due 
and owing to the judgment debtor. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 15. 

Chapter 866. 
An Act to amend the labor law, in reUtion to fire protection and rentilatioiL 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Aseembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Subdivision one of section seventy-nine of chapter thirty-six of 
the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act relating to labor, 
constituting chapter thirty-one of the consolidated laws," as amended by 
chapter two hundred and two of the laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, 
is hereby amended to read as follows: 

§ 79. Elevators and hoistways. 1. Inclosure of shafts. Every hoistway, 
hatchway or wellhole used for carrying passenger or employees, or for 
freight elevators, hoisting or other purpose, shall be protected on all sides 
at each floor including the basement, by substantial vertical inclosures. All 
openings in such inclosures shall be provided with self-closing gates [not 
less than six feet high] of suitable height, or with properly constructed 
sliding doors. In the case of elevators used for carrying passengers or 
employees, such inclosure shall be flush with the hatchway, and shall extend 
from floor to ceiling on every open side of the car, and on every other side 
shall be at least six feet high, and such inclosures shall be free from fixed 
obstructions on every open side of the car. In the case of freight elevators 
the inclosures shall be flush with the hoistway on every open side of the car. 
In place of the inclosures herein required for freight elevators, every hatch- 
way used for freight elevator purposes may be provided with trap doors so 
constructed as to form a substantial floor surface when closed and so 
arranged as to open and close by the action of the car in its passage both 
ascending and descending; provided that in addition to such trap doors, the 
hatchway shall be adequately protected on all sides at all floors, including 
the basement, by a substantial railing or other vertical inclosure at least 
three feet in height. 

§ 2. Subdivisions four and five of section seven ty-nine-b of such chapter, 
as added by chapter four hundred and sixty-one of the laws of nineteen hun- 
dred and thirteen, are hereby amended to read, respectively, as follows: 

4. Fire-escapes. All outside fireescapes shall be constructed of wrought- 
iron or steel and shall be so designed, constructed and erected as to safely 
sustain on all platforms, balconies and stairways a live load of not less 
than ninety pounds per square foot with a factor of safety of four. Wherever 
practicable, a continuous run or straight run stairway shall be used. On 
every floor above the first there shall be balconies or landings embracing one 
or more easily accessible and unobstructed openings at each floor level, con- 
nected with each other and with the ground by means of a stairway con- 
structed as hereinafter provided and well fastened and secured. All open- 
ings leading to outside fire-escapes shall have an unobstructed width of at 
least two feet and an unobstructed height of at least six feet.[, and] Such 



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The Labob Laws of 1914. 69 

openings shall extend to the floor level or within six inches thereof, [andj 
shall be not more than seven inches above the floor of the fire-escape bal- 
cony [.], [Such openings] shall have metal frames or frames covered with 
metal and be provided with doors constructed of fireproof material and with 
wired glass where glass is used, except in cases where fire-escapes are here- 
after erected on buildings constructed prior to October first, nineteen hundred 
and thirteen, of five stories or under in height, in which cases the provisions 
of subdivision five as to the use of steps to connect with the fire-escapes and 
as to the construction of openings leading to fire-escapes shall apply. All 
windows opening upon the course of the fire-escape shall be fireproof win- 
dows. The balconies shall have an unobstructed width of at least four 
feet throughout their length and shall have a landing not less than twenty - 
four inches square at the head of every stairway. There shall be a passage- 
way between the stairway opening and the side of the building at least 
eighteen inches wide throughout except where the stairways reach and leave 
the balconies at the ends or where double run stairways are used. The 
stairway opening of the balconies shall be of a size sufficient to provide clear 
headway and shall be guarded on the long side by an iron railing not less 
than three feet in height. Each balcony shall be surrounded by an iron 
railing not less than three feet in height, thoroughly and properly braced. 
The balconies shall be connected by stairways not less than twenty-two 
inches wide, placed at an incline of not more than forty-five degrees, with 
steps of not less than eight-inch tread and not over eight-inch rise and 
provided with a hand-rail not less than three feet in height. The treads of 
such stairways shall be so constructed as to sustain a live load of four 
hundred pounds per step with a factor of safety of four. There shall be a 
similar stairway from the top floor balcony to the roof, except where the 
fire-escape is erected on the front of the building. A similar stairway shall 
also be provided from the lowest balcony to a safe landing place beneath, 
which stairway shall remain down permanently or be arranged to swing 
up and down automatically by counterbalancing weights. When not erected 
on the front of the building, safe and unobstructed egress shall be provided 
from the foot of the fire-escape by means of an open court or courts or a 
fireproof passageway having an unobstructed width of at least three feet 
throughout leading to the street, or by means of an open area having com- 
munication with the street; such fireproof passageway shall be adequately 
lighted at all times and the lights shall be so arranged as to ensure their 
reliable operation when through accident or other cause the regular factory 
lighting is extinguished. 

5. The provisions of subdivision four shall not apply where at the time 
this act takes effect there are outside fire-escapes with balconies on each 
floor of the building connected with stairways placed at an angle of not more 
than sixty d^rees, provided that such existing outside fire-escapes have or 
shall be provided with the following: 

A stairway leading from the top floor balcony to the roof, except where 
the fire-escapes are erected on the front of the building; a stairway not less 
than twenty-two inches wide from the lowest balcony to a safe landing place 
beneath, which stairway remains down permanently or is arranged to swing 
up and down by counterbalancing weights; a safe and unobstructed exit to 
the street from the foot of such fire-escapes as provided in subdivision four 



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70 New York Labob Bullbtin. 

hereof; steps connecting the sill of every opening leading to the fire-escapes 
with the floor wherever such sill is more than three feet above the floor 
level; and all openings leading to the flre-escapes provided with windows 
having metal frames and sash or frames and sash covered with metal and 
with wired glass where glass is used, or with doors constructed in accordance 
with the requirements of subdivision four; and all windows opening upon 
the course of the flre-escapes provided with flre-proof windows: 

§ 3. Subdivision seven of section seventy-nine- f of such chapter, as added 
by chapter four hundred and sixty-one of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
thirteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

7. Fireproof windows shall be windows constructed of metal frames and 
sash or framss and s<uh covered with metal and provided with wired glass 
and of the automatic, self-closing type. 

§ 4. Subdivision one of section eighty- six of such chi4)ter, as amended by 
chapter one hundred and ninety-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
thirteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

1. [The owner, agent or lessee] The person operating [of] every factory 
shall provide, in each workroom thereof, proper and sufficient means of ven- 
tilation by natural or mechanical means, or both, as may be necessary, and 
shall maintain proper and sufficient ventilation and proper degrees of tem- 
perature and humidity in every workroom thereof at all times during working 
hours. 

§ 5. Subdivision three of section eighty-eight of such chapter, as amended 
by chapter two hundred and twenty-nine of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
ten, chapter three hundred and thirty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred 
and twelve and chapter three hundred and forty of the laws of nineteen 
hundred and thirteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

3. Where females are employed the person operating the factory shall prO' 
vide dressing or emergency rooms [shall be provided] for their use; each 
such room shall have at least one window opening to the outer air and shall 
be enclosed by means of solid partitions or walls. In every factory in which 
more than ten women are employed there shall be provided one or more 
separate dressing rooms in such numbers as required by the rules and regu- 
lations of the industrial board and located in such place or places as required 
by such rules and regulations, having an adequate floor space in proportion 
to the number of employees, to be fixed by the rules and regulations of the 
industrial board, but the floor space of every such dressing room shall in no 
event be less than sixty square feet; each dressing room shall be separated 
from any water closet compartment by adequate partitions and shall be pro- 
vided with adequate means for artiflcial illumination; each dressing room 
shall be provided with suitable means for hanging clothes and with a suit- 
able number of seats. All dressing rooms shall be enclosed by means of 
solid partitions or walls, and shall be constructed, heated, ventilated, lighted 
and maintained in accordance with such rules and regulations as may be 
adopted by the industrial board with reference thereto. 

§ 6. Subdivision four of section eighty-eight-a of such chapter, as added 
by chapter three hundred and forty of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
thirteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

4. Every existing water closet and urinal inside any factory shall have a 
basin of enameled iron or earthenware, and shall be flushed from a separate 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 71 

water-supplied cistern or through a flushometer valve connected in such 
manner as to keep the water supply of the factory free from contamination. 
All woodwork enclosing water closet fixtures sliall be removed from the front 
of the closet and the space underneath the seat shall be left open. The floor 
or other surface beneath and around the closet shall be maintained in good 
order and repair and all the woodwork shall be kept well painted with a 
light color paint. All existing water closet compartments shall have win- 
dows w suitable ducts leading to the outer air and shall be otherwise venti- 
lated in accordance with rules and regulations adopted for that purpose by 
the industrial board. Such compartments shall be provided with means 
for artificial illumination and the enclosure of each, compartment shall be 
kept free from all obscene writing or marking. 

§ 7. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 15. 

Chapter 388. 

An Act to amend the labor law, in relation to employees in daJxiee^ creamexieSi 
milk condensazieSy milk shipping stations, butter and cheese factories^ ice 
cream manufacturing plants and milk bottling plants. 

The People of the State of Neio York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Subdivision two of section eight-a of chapter thirty-six of the 
laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act relating to labor, con- 
stituting chapter thirty-one of the consolidated laws," as added by chapter 
seven hundred and forty of the laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, is 
hereby amended by adding at the end thereof and as a part thereof a new 
subdivision to read as follows: 

(f) Employees in dairies, creameries, milk condensaries, milk powder fac- 
tories, milk sugar factories, milk shipping stations, butter and cheese fac- 
tories, ice cream manufacturing plants and milk bottling plants, where not 
more than seven persons are employed. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 16. 

Chapter 396. 

An Act to amend the labor law, in relation to exempting certain employees 
from the provisions of the law relating to one day of rest in seven 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as folloios: 

Section 1. Subdivision two of section eight-a of chapter thirty-six of the 
laWB of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act relating to labor, con- 
stituting chapter thirty-one of the consolidated laws," as added by chapter 
seven hundred and forty of the laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, is 
hereby amended to read as follows: 

2. This section shall not apply to 
• (a) Janitors; 

(b) Watchmen; 



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72 New York Labob Bulletin. 

(c) Employees whoBe duties include not more than three hours' work on 
Sunday in (1) setting sponges in bakeries; (2) caring for live animals; (3) 
maintaining fires; (4) necessary repairs to boilers or machinery; 

(d) Superintendents or foremen in charge. 

(e) Employees, if the commissioner of labor in his discretion approves, 
engaged in the work of any industrial or manufacturing process necessarily 
continuous, in which no employee is permitted to work more than eight hours 
in any calendar day. 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 
Approved April 16. 

Chapter 458. 

An Act to amend the Greater New York charter, in relation to racations of 
employees in the department of parka. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section fifteen hundred and sixty-seven of the Greater New 
York charter, as re-enaoted by chapter four hundred and sixty-six of the 
Iftws of nineteen hundred and one, and added by chapter five hundred and 
fifty-nine of the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, and amended by chapter 
six hundred and seventy-nine of the laws of nineteen hundred and ten and 
chapter one hundred and twenty -one of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
thirteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

§ 1567. The executive heads of the various departments are authorized 
and empowered to grant to every employee of the city of New York, or of 
any department or bureau thereof, and of the department of education, a 
vacation of not less than two weeks in e€u:h year and for such further period 
of time as the duties, length of service and other qualifications of an em- 
ployee may warrant, at such time as the executive head of the department 
or any officer having supervision over said employee may fix, and for such 
time they shall be allowed the same compensation as if actually employed, 
except that no such vacation shall be granted to per diem employees for 
longer than two weeks and only during the months of June, July, August 
and September. The provision, hotcever^ restricting vacation periods to the 
4nonths of June, July, August and September shall not apply to the depart- 
ment of parks, 

§ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 20. 

Chapter 459. 

An Act to amend the Greater New York charter, in relation to the better pre- 
vention of fires. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do ena>ct as follows: 

Section 1. Sections seven hundred and seventy-four and seven hundred and 
seventy-five of the Greater New York charter, as re-enacted by chapter four 
hundred and sixty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and one, which was 
added thereto by chapter eight hundred and ninety-nine of the laws of nine- 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 73 

teen hundred and eleven, and amended by chapter six hundred and ninety-five 
of the laws of nineteen hundred and thirteen, are hereby further amended 
to read as follows: 

[duties of fire commissioner.] 

S 774. The commissioner [shall] is empowered to enforce all laws and 
ordinances and the rules and regulations of the industrial board of the de- 
partment of labor in respect of 

1. The prevention of fires and danger to and loss of life and property there- 
from; 

2. The storage, sale, transportation or use of combustibles, chemicals and 
explosives. 

3. The installation and maintenance of automatic or other fire alarm 
systems and fire extinguishing equipment; 

4. The means and adequacy of exit, in ckase of fire, in and from all build- 
ings, structures, enclosures, vessels, places and premises in which numbers 
of persons work, live or congregate from time to time for any purpose except 
tenement houses and except factories as defined by the labor law. 

5. The investigation of the cause, circumstances and origin of fires and the 
suppression of arson. 

[POWERS OF THE COMMISSIONER.] 

§ 775. The commissioner is further empowered to 

1. Cause any building, structure, enclosure, vessel, place or premises, or 
any part thereof, or thing therein- or attached thereto, to he examined and 
inspected by any officer or employee of tlie department designated for such 
purpose ; 

2. Order, in writing, the remedying of any condition found to exist in, 
on or al)Out any building, structure, enclosure, vessel, place or premises, 
except tenement houses, [and except factories as defined by the labor law,] 
in violation of any law or ordinance or rulei or regulatuyn of the industrial 
hoard of the department of luhor in respect to fires or to the prevention of 
fires, except the tenement house law; but the commissioner shall muke no 
such order, respecting the means and adequacy of esnt from a factory, a>s 
defined by the labor law; 

3. [Require] Order, in writing, the installation, as prescribed by any law 
or ordinance or by the rules and regulations of the industrial board of the 
department of labor, in any building, structure [or], enclosure, vessel, place 
or premises, of automatic or other fire alarm system or fire extinguishing 
equipment and the maintenance and repair thereof [,]; or the construction, 
as prescribed by any law or ordinance, of adequate and safe means of exit 
from all buildings, structures, enclosures, vessels places and premises, except 
tenement houses and except factories as defined by the labor law; 

4. [Require] Order any building, structure, enclosure, vessel, place or 
premises, which, in the opinion of the commissioner, is inadequately pro- 
tected against fire perils to be vacated, or to be condemned and removed; 

5. Cause any vessel moored to or anchored near any dock or pier in the 
city to be removed to and secured at such place in the harbor as shall be 
designated by the commissioner, provided such vessel shall be on fire or in 
danger of catching fire or is, by reason of its condition or the nature of its 
cargo, a menace to shipping or to property or the water-front of the city; 



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74 New York Labob Bulletin. 

6. [Cause any order of the commissioner or department which is not 
complied with within the time fixed in the order for such compliance to be 
enforced and to take proceedings for the enforcement thereof.] 

The commissioner or any authorized officer or employee of the department 
may enter, at any reasonable hour, any building, structure, enclosure, vessel, 
plaoe or premises, or any part thereof, to make inspections or in furtherance 
of the purpose of any provision of this chapter. 

Orders of the department or of the fire commissioner shall be addressed 
to the owner or owners, lessees or occupants of the building, structure, en- 
closure, vessel, place or premises affected thereby, but it shall not be neces- 
^ sary to designate such owner or owners, lessees or occupants, by name in 
any such order, but the premises shall be designated in the address, so that 
the same may be readily identified. Service of any such order may be made 
by delivery of a copy thereof to the owner or any one of several owners, to 
a lessee or any one of several lessees, or to any persoa of suitable age and 
discretion in charge or apparently in charge of the premises, or if no person 
be found in charge of the premises then by affixing a copy of such order 
prominently upon the premises. 

I 2. The Greater New York charter, as re-enacted by chapter four hun- 
dred and sixty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and one is hereby amended 
by adding thereto a new section numbered seven hundred and seventy-five-a 
thereof to read as follows: 

i 775-a. Fire drills. The fire commissioner^ in cases where provision is not 
otherwise made by law or ordinaaice, is empoioered in his discretion to require 
and compel the regular and) periodical performance of a fire driU, including 
imsfruction and practice in the use of means of eofit, alarm systems and fire 
prevention or extinguishing methods and equipment, in all buildings, struc- 
tures, enclosures, vessels, places and premises where numbera of persons work, 
live or congregate in the city of New York except tenement houses, 

i 3. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 20. 

Chapter 466. 

An Act to amend the Greater New York charter, in relation to authorizing the 
board of efltimate and apportionment to make an annual appropriation for 
the support and maintenance of the American Museum of Safety, and in 
relation to the conduct of such museum. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assemhlif, 
do enact as follows : 

Section 1. The Greater New York charter as re-enacted by chapter four 
hundred and sixty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and one, is hereby 
amended by inserting therein a new section, to be section two hundred and 
forty-four-a thereof, to read as follows: 

APPROPRIATION FOR A^IERTCAX MTTSEUM OF SAFETY. 

i 244-a. The board of estimate and apportionment shall have power in 
its discretion to annually include in its final estimate, such sum as it may 
deem proper, not exceeding fifty thousand dollars, for the keeping, preserva- 
tion and exhibition of safety devices and means and methods of safety and 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 75 

Banitsition in the building or %nj part thereof in the city of New York now 
or hereafter occupied by the American Museum of Safety, upon condition 
that the collection of safety devices and the means and methods of sanitation 
exhibited in said building occupied or to be occupied by the American Mu- 
seum of Safety, shall be kept open and accessible to the public hereafter free 
of all charge throughout tlie year, five days in each week, one of which shall 
be Sunday afternoon, and also for two evenings in each week, within such 
hours and subject to such rules and regulations as may be determined by 
the trustees of said museum ; and also that on the two days in each week 
during which said museum may remain closed to the general public it shall 
be open and accessible to students, schools and societies organised for the 
purpose of promoting means and methods of safety and sanitation within 
such hours and subject to such rules and regulations as may be determined 
by the trustees of said museum; and also that the trustees of said American 
Museum of Safety shall, between the months of October and July in each 
year, publish and distribute among such schools of the state of New York 
as may be designated by the commissioner of education and the commissioner 
of labor, manuals of safety and hygiene and reading lectures on accident pre- 
vention and industrial hygiene for instruction as to the ways and means of 
preventing accidents and as to industrial home and school hygiene. 

I 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 20. 

Chapter 475. 

An Act to amend the Greater New York charter and repealing section three 
hundred and forty-six thereof, in relation to licenses and licensing author- 
ities in the dty of New York. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Aesemhly, 
do enact as folUnos: 

Section 1. The Greater New York charter, as re-enacted by chapter four 
hundred and sixty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and one, is hereby 
amended by adding thereto a new chapter to be known as chapter twelve-a, 
containing new sections, the same to be known as sections six hundred and 
forty and aix hundred and forty -one, to read as follows: 

CHAPTER XII-A. 
Depabtment of Licenses. 

COMiaSBIONEB; DBPimES; EKPLOTEES; BALABIES. 

I 640. There shall be a department of licenses in the city of New York, 
the head of which shall be caUed the commissioner of licenses, who shall 
be appointed by the mayor. His salary shall be seven thousand five hundred 
dollars a year. The main office of the department shall be located in the 
borough of Manhattan and branch ofiices may be located in the other bor- 
oughs of the city. The commissioner of licenses shall appoint two deputies* 
the salaries of said deputies to be fixed in accordance with section fifty-six 
of the charter. Subject to existing laws, the commissioner may appoint 
such employees as may be necessary to perform the duties devolved upon the 



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76 New Yobk Labor Buixbtin, 

department. Officers and employees of any department, board or office of the 
city, except members of the uniformed force of any department, now per- 
forming any of the functions hereby vested in the department of licenses, 
shall be transferred to the said department. 

JUBIBMCnON. 

§ 641. The commissioner of licenses shall have cognizance and control of 
the granting, issuing, transferring, renewing, revoking, suspending and 
canceling: 

1. Of all licenses and permits now issued by the mayor pursuant to the 
code of ordinances of the city. 

2. Of all licenses and permits now issued by the bureau of licenses attached 
to the mayor's office. 

3. Of all licensed issued under the provisions of article eleven of the gen- 
eral business law, so far as it applies to the city of New York. 

4. Of all licenses in relation to theatres and concerts now issued under the 
provisions of sections fourteen hundred and seventy-three, fourteen hundred 
and seventy-four, fourteen hundred and seventy-five and fourteen hundred 
and eighty-three of the Greater New York charter, by the police commissioner. 

5. Of all licenses in relation to dance halls and the appointment of in- 
spectors thereof in pursuance of sections fourteen hundred and ninety and 
fourteen hundred and ninety-four of the Greater New York charter as added 
thereto by chapter five hundred and forty-seven of the laws of nineteen hun- 
dred and ten. 

The commissioner of licenses is hereby vested with all the powers an4 
functions now exercised in relation to licenses by (1) the mayor pursuant 
to the code of ordinances of the city; (2) by the bureau of licenses attached 
to the mayor's office; (3) by the commissioner of licenses appointed by the 
mayor under the provisions of article eleven of the general business law; 
(4) by the police commissioner in rekition to theatres and concerts; (5) 
by the mayor or other licensing authority in relation to public dance halls. 

Except as in this chapter otherwise provided, the previous consent, approval 
or recommendation of any other department, board, body or office of the 
city shall not be necessary to the issuance of a license or permit by the 
commissioner. 

I 2. Section fourteen hundred and seventy4hree of such charter is hereby 
amended to read as follows: 

[POLICE DEPARTMENT GRANTS LICENSE;] LICENSE FOR PUBLIC 
EXHIBITIONS; FEE; PENALTY FOR NEGLECT TO OBTAIN LICENSE. 

i 1473. [The police department] The oommiaHoner of Ucenaes is hereby 
authorized and empowered to grant such license, to continue in force until 
the first day of May next ensuing the granti thereof, on receiving for each 
license so granted, and before the issuing thereof, the sum of five hundred 
dollars; ewcept that in the borough of Richmcnd, the fee for 8uch lioerue 
shaU he one hundred dollars; and every manager or proprietor of any such 
exhibition or performance who shall neglect to take out such license or 
consent, or cause, or allow any such exhibition or performance or any single 
one of them without such license, and every person aiding in such exhibition. 



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The Labob Laws of 1914, 77 

and every owner or lessee of any buiMing, part of a building, garden, grounds, 
concert room or other room or place, who shall lease or let the same for 
the purpose of any such exhibition or performance or assent that the same 
be used for any such purpose, except as permitted by such license, and 
without such license having been previously obtained and then in force if the 
same shall be used for such purpose, shall be subject to a penalty of one hun- 
dred dollars for every such exhibition or performance which penalty shall be 
prosecuted, sued for and recovered in the name of the city of N^ew York, 
and shall be paid to the chamberlain of the city of New York, to be paid 
into the treasury of said city. 

I 3. Section fourteen hundred and seventy-four of such charter is hereby 
amended to read as follows: 

CX>MMUTATION OF LICENSE FEB. 

§ 1474. The said [police department] commissioner of licenses is hereby 
authorized to grant licenses for said exhibitions or performances for any 
term less than one year, and in any case where such license is for a term 
of three montlis or less, the said [police department] commissioner of licenses 
is hereby authorized to commute for a sum less than five hundred dollars, 
but in no case less than two hundred and fifty dollars for a theatre, or one 
hundred and fifty dollars for a circus, concert room, or other building or place 
whatsoever; except that in the borough of Richmond no license shall he 
granted for less than six months and the fee therefor shfUl be fifty dollars. 

I 4. Section fourteen hundred and seventy-five of such charter is hereby 
amended to read as follows: 

FEES TO BE PAID OVER TO GOMPTBOLLEB. 

§ 1475. Upon granting every such license authorized by this title, the said 
[police department] commissioner of licenses shall receive from the person 
to whom the same shall be granted the amount payable for said license, as 
above provided, which amounts as respectively received by [it] him shall 
be paid over to the comptroller of the city of New York to be paid into the 
treasury of said city. 

I 5. Section fourteen hundred and eighty-three of such charter is hereby 
amended to read as follows: 

PBOHlBinON OF SALE OF SPIBITUOUS LIQUOBS AND EMPLOYMENT OF FEMALE 

WAITEBS. 

I 1483. It shall not be lawful to sell or furnish any wine, beer or strong 
or spirituous liquors to any person in the auditorium or lobbies of any place 
of exhibition or performance mentioned in section fourteen hundred and 
seventy-two of this act, or in any apartment connected therewith by any 
door, window or other aperture, except that the [police department] com' 
missioner of licenses may, in [its] his discretion, and subject to such regula- 
tions and restrictions as [it] he may determine, permit the same to be sold 
or furnished while concerts, consisting of vocal or instrumental music only 
are being given in a place duly licensed by [it] him as hereinbefore provided. 
Such permission shall only be operative so long as it sliall be lawful under 
the laws of this state to sell or furnish wine, beer or strong or spirituous 
liquors at such place, and may be revoked at any time by the. [police de- 
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78 New Yobk Labob BuuJBTnr. 

partment] commissioner of licenses. It shall nol be lawful to employ or 
furnish or permit or assent to the employment or attendance of any female 
to wait on or attend in any manner, or furnish refreshments to the audience 
or spectators or any of them, at any of the exhibitions or performances 
mentioned in said section, or at any other place of public amusement in the 
city of New \ork. The provisions of this act shall not be construed to inter- 
fere with the right of any incorporated or other society, organized and main- 
tained for the cultivation of vocal or instrumental music, to exercise and 
practice the same in good faith for themselves only, and not for the observa- 
tion and entertainment of the public; nor shall the use or occupation by 
any such society for the purposes aforesaid of any hall or room connected 
with any place wherein by the laws of this state it is lawful to sell wine, 
beer or strong or spirituous liquors be construed to make isuch place a place 
of public amusement within the provisions of this act. 

I 6. Section fourteen hundred and ninety of such charter, as added by 
chapter five hundred and forty-seven of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
ten, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

PUBUC DANCE HALL; LICENSE OF; BEQUIBEMENTS. 

I 1490. All public dance halls shall be licensed by the [mayor or other 
licensing authority] commissioner of licenses of the city of New York; the 
fee for each such license shall be fifty dollars for each year or fraction thereof. 
All licenses issued on or between the first day of April and the thirtieth day 
of September of any year shall expire on the thirty-first day of March of 
the succeeding year. All licenses issued on or between the first day of 
October and the thirty-first day of March of any year shall expire on the 
thirtieth day of September of the succeeding year. No license shall be 
issued unless the place for which it is issued complies with all laws, ordi- 
nances, rules and the provisions of any building code applicable thereto and 
is a safe and proper place for the purpose for which it shall be used, properly 
ventilated and supplied with sufiScient toilet conveniences. Every licensed 
public dance hall shall post its license at the main entrance to its premises. 

I 7. Section fourteen hundred and ninety-four of such charter, as added 
by chapter five hundred and forty-seven of the laws of nineteen hundred 
and ten, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

[INSPECTORS OF DANCING ACADEMIES.] INSPECTORS OF PUBLIC DANCE 
HALLS; APPOINTMENT OF, 

I 1494. [The mayor or licensing authority] The commissioner of licenses 
of the city of New York may appoint such inspectors and other officials 
necessary to carry out the provisions of sections fourteen hundred and eighty- 
nine, fourteen hundred and ninety, fourteen hundred and ninety-one, fourteen 
hundred and ninety-two and fourteen hundred and ninety-three as may be 
authorized by the board of estimate and apportionment of the city or author- 
ity having the right to appropriate public money. The money paid for 
licenses under this act shall be applied toward the payment of the salaries 
of the inspectors appointed hereunder. Any deficiency and any other expense 
of carrying this act into effect until appropriation can be made therefor shall 
be met by the issue of special revenue bonds of the city. The inspectors to 
be appointed under this section shall be designated as inspectors of public 
dance balls. ^ - . 

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The Labob Laws of 1914. 79 

i 8. This act shall not be deemed to repeal or modify any existing ordi- 
nances, except in so far as and to the extent that the same are inconsistent 
herewith. 

I 9. Section three hundred and forty-six of the Greater New York charter 
and other laws inconsistent herewith or contrary hereto are repealed, so far 
as they are inconsistent or contrary, but nothing in this act shall be deemed 
to change, alter, vary or limit any liability which has accrued under the 
provisions of any statute hereby repealed or to affect any action or proceed- 
ing now pending, growing out of or under any of the provisions of any of 
the acts hereby repealed in whole or in part. 

I 10. This act shall take effect on the first day of June, nineteen hundred 
and fourteen. 

Approved April 20. 

Chapter 479. 

An Act to amend the Greater New York charter, in relation to the enforcement 
of the compulsory education law and to a school census. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Ataemhly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. The Greater New York charter, as re-enacted by chapter four 
hundred and sixty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and one, is hereby 
amended by adding to section ten hundred and sixty-nine, a new subdivision, 
to be known as subdivision eight, to read as follows: 

8. The board of education shall have power to establish a bureau of com- 
pulsory education, school census and child welfare and subject to the pro- 
visions of law and of this act, the said board shall have power to make 
by-laws, rules, regulations and prescribe forms for the proper performance 
of the duties of all persons employed in and under the direction of said 
bureau. On the nomination of the board of superintendents the board of 
education shall have power to appoint a director and an assistant director 
of the said bureau for a term of six years each, and such attendance officers, 
enumerators, clerks and other employees as may be necessary, and to fix their 
salaries within the proper appropriation; to assign a chief attendance 
officer, and one or more attendance officers as supervising attendance officers 
for such periods as may be prescribed in the by-laws of the board of educa- 
tion. No person shall be eligible for the position of director or of assistant 
director of the said bureau who has not one of the following qualifications: 
(a) Graduation from a college or university recognized hy the University of 
the State of New York, together with five years' experience in teaching or 
supervision since graduation, (b) A principal's license for any of the bor- 
oughs of the city of New York obtained as the result of an examination, 
together with ten years' experience in teaching or supervision. The director 
and assistant director shall be participants in the teachers*^ retirement fund 
under section ten hundred and ninety-two of the charter of the city of New 
York and be subject to its provisions. Attendance officers employed under 
the direction of the said bureau shall perform duties in connection with 
the enforcement of the compulsory education law, in the taking of a school 
census, and in connection with the employment of children under the labor 
law, and such other duties, not inconsistent with this act, as the director of 



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80 New Yokk Labob Bulletin. 

the bureau or the board of education may prescribe. It shall be the duty 
of persons in parental relation to any child between the ages of four and 
eighteen years residing in the city of New York to give to the educational 
authorities of the district within which they severally reside, all the informa- 
tion prescribed in section six hundred and fifty of article twenty-four of 
the education law of the state relating to such child, and such other informa- 
tion as may be required. Persons in parental relation who withhold such 
information shall be liable to the penalty prescribed in section six hundred 
and fifty-three of article twenty-four of the education law of the state. It 
shall be the duty of attendance officers, acting as census enumerators, to 
collect the information prescribed in section six hundred and fifty of article 
twenty-four of the education law and such other information as the state 
commissioner of education or the board of education may require. 

The director of the bureau of compulsory education, school census and 
child welfare, herein established, shall, subject to the by-laws of the board 
of education and in its name, enforce the compulsory education law, direct 
attendance officers in their duty, commit and parole truant and delinquent 
children and proceed against those in parental relation in the manner pro- 
vided in section six hundred and thirty -five of chapter one hundred and 
forty of the laws of nineteen hundred and ten as amended, any provision 
of the said law or of section ten hundred and seventy-eight of the charter 
of the city of New York to the contrary notwithstanding. The assistant 
director shall perform such duties in connection with the supervision of the 
school census, or otherwise, as the director, subject to the by-laws of the 
board of education, may prescribe. Under the direction of the board of 
education the city superintendent of schools shall have a general supervision 
of the bureau of compulsory education, school census and child welfare. 

On or about May first, nineteen hundred and fourteen, the board of educa- 
tion shall ascertain the information required by section six hundred and 
fifty of article twenty-four of the education law of the state relating to a 
census of all persons within the city of New York between the ages of four 
and eighteen years of age. Thereafter such census shall be amended from 
day to day by attendance officers, clerks and other employees under the 
supervision of the director, as changes of residence occur among children of 
such city within the ages prescribed in this article, and as other persons 
come within the ages prescribed, and as other persons within such ages shall 
become residents of such city, so that said board of education in its census 
bureau shall always have on file a complete census of the names and residences 
of the children between such ages and of the persons in parental relation 
thereto. 

The expense of carrying out the provisions of this act, except the salaries 
of directors and attendance officers, shall be paid out of the special school 
fund as created by section ten hundred and sixty of the charter of the city 
of New York. 

I 2. This act shall take effect on the first day of May, nineteen hundred 
and fourteen. 

Approved April 20. 



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The Labor Laws of 1914. 81 

Clupter 512. 
An Act to amend the labor law, in relation to definition of factory. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Asaemhlff, 
do enact aa follovx: 

Section 1. The paragraph defining a factory of section two of chapter 
thirty-six of the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act relating 
to lahor, constituting chapter thirty-one of the consolidated laws," as 
amended by chapter five hundred and twenty -nine of the laws of nineteen 
hundred and thirteen, is hereby amended to read as follows: 

Factory; work for a factory. The term "factory", when used in this 
chapter, shall be construed to include any mill, workshop, or other manufac- 
turing or business establishment and all buildings, sheds, structures or other 
places used for or in connection therewith, where one or more persons are 
employed at labor, except power houses, generating plants, barns, storage 
houses, sheds and other structures owned or operated by a public service 
corporation [used in connection with railroad purposes], other than con- 
struction or repair shops, subject to the jurisdiction of the public service 
commission under [article three of] the public service commissions law. 
Work shall be deemed to be done for a factory within the meaning of this 
chapter whenever it is done at any place, upon the work of a factory or upon 
any of the materials entering into the product of the factory, whether under 
contract or arrangement with any person in charge of or connected with such 
factory directly or indirectly through the instrumentality of one or more 
contractors or other third persons. 

I 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 23. 

Chapter 514. 

An Act to amend the public health law, in relation to the practice of pharmacy, 
as to working hours and sleeping apartments in phamuicies and drug 
stores. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Section two hundred and thirty-six of chapter forty-nine of the 
laws of nineteen hundred and nine, entitled "An act in relation to the public 
health, constituting chapter forty-five of the consolidated laws," as amended by 
chapter four hundred and twenty-two of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
ten and chapter six hundred and thirty of the laws of nineteen hundred and 
eleven, is hereby further amended to read as follows: 

§ 236. Working hours and sleeping apartments. No apprentice or em- 
ployee in any pharmacy or drug store shall be required or permitted to 
work more than seventy hours a week. Nothing in this section prohibits 
working six hours overtime any week for the purpose of making a shorter 
succeeding week, provided, however, that the aggregate number of hours 
in any such two wet'ks shall not exceed one hundred and thirty-two hours. 
The hours shall be so arranged that an employee shall be entitled to and 
shall receive at least one afternoon and evening off in each ireek and in addi- 
tion thereto shall receive one full day off in two consecutive weeks. No 

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82 New Yosk Labob Bulletin. 

proprietor of atay pharmacy or drug store eliall require any clerk to sleep in 
any room or apartment in or connected with such store t^at does not comply 
with the sanitary regulations of the local hoard of health. The proviHone 
of this aection aXone regulate working hours and sleeping apartments in 
pharfnaeies or drug stores, 

I 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved April 23. 

Chapter 817 (of 1918). 

An Act making an appropriation for carrying out the objects and purposes of 
the workmen's compensation law. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. The sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($150,000), 
or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury, not otherwise appropriated, for carrying out the 
objects and purposes of an act, entitled "An act in relation to assuring com- 
pensation for injuries or death of certain employees in the course of their 
employment and repealing certain sections of the labor law relating thereto, 
constituting chapter sixty-seven of the consolidated laws," of which fifty 
thousand dollars ($50,000) shall be available for payment of the salaries 
of the state workmen's compensation commission, its officers and employees 
and for the general expenses of the commission, and one hundred thousand 
dollars ($100,000), for the expense of the establishment and administration 
of " The State Insurance Fund." 

{ 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved December 16, 1013. 

Chapter 832 (of 1918). 

An Act to amend the insurance law, in relation to the creation of mutual com- 
panies to insure employers against loss, damage or compensation resulting 
from injuries suffered by employees or other persons for which the person 
insured is liable. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows: 

Section 1. Chapter thirty- three of the laws of nineteen hundred and nine, 
entitled ''An act in relation to insurance corporations, constituting chapter 
twenty-eight of the consolidated laws," is hereby amended by inserting therein 
a new article to be article five-a, to read as follows: 

AUTICLE 6- A, 

Mutual Emploters' Liabilitt and Workmen's Compensatioh 
cobpobations. 

Section 185. Incorporation. 

186. Completion of organization. 

187. Directors and officers. 

188. Meetings. 

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The Labok Laws of 1914. 83 

Section 189. ABsessments. 

190. Dividends. 

191. Reserves; suspension; cancellation and reinstatement of cer- 

tificate. 

192. Reports to and examinations by superintendent. 

193. Prevention of accidents. 

194. Authorization of foreign mutual insurance corporations. 

§ 185. Incorporation. Thirteen or more persons may become a corpora- 
tion for the purpose of insuring on the mutual plan against loss or damage 
resulting from accident to or injury suffered by an employee or other person 
and for which the person insured is liable, or the liability of the employer 
to pay compensation to his employees, or the compensation of employees 
under any workmen's compensation law, or against loss or damage caused 
by a truck, wagon or other vehicle propelled by steam, gas, gasoline, electric, 
mechanical or other power or drawn by horses or mules, used in trade or 
manufacture and owned by any such person to the property of another for 
which loss or damage the person insured is liable, by making and filing in 
the office of the superintendent of insurance a certificate to be signed by 
each of them, stating their intention to form a corporation for the purpose 
named, and setting forth a copy of the charter which they propose to adopt, 
which shall state the name of the proposed corporation, the place where it 
is to be located, the mode and manner in which its corporate powers are to 
be exercised, the number of directors, the manner of electing its directors and 
officers, the time of such elections, the manner of filling vacancies, the names 
and post office addresses of the directors who will serve until the first annual 
meeting of such corporation, and such further particulars as may be neces- 
sary to explain and make manifest the objects and purposes of the corpora- 
tion. Such certificate shall be proved or acknowledged and recorded in a 
book kept for that purpose by the superintendent of insurance and a cer- 
tified copy thereof shall be delivered to the persons executing the same. 

( 186. Completion of organization. Upon receipt of a certified copy of 
the certificate of incorporation from the superintendent of insurance, the 
persons signing such certificate may open books to receive applications for 
membership therein. No such corporation shall transact any business of 
insurance unless and until at least forty employers employing not less than 
twenty-five hundred employees have become members of such corporation and 
applied for and agreed to take insurance therein, covering the liability of 
such employers to their employees for accidents to or injuries suffered by 
such employee nor until the facts specified in this section have been certi- 
fied under oath by at least three of the persons signing the original certifi- 
cate, to the superintendent of insurance, and the superintendent of insurance 
has issued a license to such corporation authorizing such corporation to 
begin writing the insurance specified in this article. The superintendent of 
insurance must be satisfied that the membership list of the corporation is 
genuine, and that every member thereof will take the policies as agreed by 
him within thirty days of the granting of the license to the corporation by 
the superintendent of insurance to issue policies. If at any time the number 
of members falls below forty or the number of employees who are employed 



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84 New York Labob Bulletin. 

by the members of the corporation falls below twenty-five hundred, no further 
policies shall be issued by the corporation until other employers have made 
bona fide applications for insurance therein, who, together with the existing 
members, amount to not less than forty employers who employ not less than 
twenty-five hundred employees, and in the event that such applications for 
insurance shall not be obtained witliin a reasonable time, to be fixed by the 
superintendent of insurance, such superintendent may take the proceedings 
against such corporation under section sixty-three of this chapter to the same 
effect as if clause h of subdivision one of such section was specifically appli- 
cable to corporations organized under this article. 

The members of the corporation shall be policyholders therein, and when 
any member ceases to be a policyholder he shall cease, at the same time, to 
be a member of the corporation. A corporation, partnership, association or 
joint-stock company may become a member of such insurance corporation 
and may authorize another person to represent it in such insurance corpora- 
tion, and such representative shall have all the rights of any individual 
member. Any person acting as employer in the capacity of a trustee may 
insure in such corporation and as such trustee may assume the liabilities 
and be entitled to the rights of a member, but shall not be personally liable 
upon such contract of insurance. 

Such corporation may borrow money or assume liability in a sum sufficient 
to defray the reasonable expenses of its organization. 

§ 187. Directors and officers. Any such corporation shall have not less 
than thirteen directors, and such officers as shall be provided in the certifi- 
cate of incorporation or by the by-laws made by the members. The directors 
shall be elected annually by the votes of the members. All except two of 
the directors of the corporation elected after the organization of the cor- 
poration is completed and it is authorized to begin to issue insurance 
policies shall be members of the corporation. All the officers except the secrc* 
tary, assistant secretary and the actuary must be members of the board of 
directors. 

§ 188. ISIeetings; basis of right to vote. At all meetings of the members 
of the corporation each member shall have one vote and one additional vote 
for every five hundred employees or major fraction thereof, covered by the 
policy held by such member in the corporation, provided that no member 
shall have more than twenty votes. The number of votes of a member shall 
be determined by the average number of employees at work and covered 
by said member's policy in the corporation during the last six months from 
a date not less than ten days immediately prior to the date of any such 
meeting. Before any member shall be permitted to cast more than one vote 
at any meeting of members he shall file with the secretary an affidavit show- 
ing the average number of employees at work during the preceding six months 
covered by the employer's policy of insurance. 

§ 189. Assessments. The corporation may in its by-laws and policies fix 
the contingent mutual liability of the members for the payment of losses and 
expenses not provided for by its cash funds; but such contingent liability of 
a member shall not be less than an amount equal to and in addition to the 
cash premium written in the policy. If the corporation is not possessed of 
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The Labor Laws of 1914. 85 

losses and expenses, it shall make an assessment for the amount needed to 
pay such losses and expenses upon the members liable to assessment therefor, 
in proportion to their several liability. Every member shall be liable to pay 
and shall pay his proportionate part of any assessment which may be laid 
by the corporation in accordance with law and his contract, on account of 
losses and expenses incurred while he was a member, if he is notified of such 
assessment within one year after the expiration of his policy. All assess- 
ments shall be based upon present values of all future payments, and all 
proposed premium assessments shall be filed in the insurance department and 
shall not take effect until approved by the superintendent of insurance, 
after such investigation as he may deem necessary. All funds of the cor- 
poration and the contingent liability of the members thereof shall be avail- 
able for the payment of any claim against the corporation. 

I 190. Dividends. The board of directors may, from time to time, fix and 
determine the amount to be paid as a dividend upon policies expiring during 
each year after retaining sufiicient sums to pay all the compensation and 
other policy obligations which may be payable on account of the injuries 
sustained and expenses incurred. Any such corporation may hold cash 
assets in excess of its liabilities, but such excess shall be limited to one 
hundred per centum of its reserves for losses and expenses incurred, and 
may be used from time to time in payment of losses, dividends and expenses. 

§ 191. Reserves; suspension; cancellation and reinstatement of certificate. 
Such corporation shall be required to maintain the same reserves for the 
protection of policyholders and employees who may have a right of action 
directly against such corporation as are required to be maintained by stock 
insurance corporations in relation to the same class of insurance, except that 
reserves for liability for insurance of compensation under the workmen's com- 
pensation law shall be the same reserves as provided by the workmen's com- 
pensation commission for the state insurance fund pursuant to such chapter, 
and the superintendent of insurance may suspend or cancel the certificate 
issued by him authorizing said corporation to transact such insurance busi- 
ness at any time when in the judgment of the superintendent of insurance 
the reserves of said corporation are insufficient to insure and secure the pay- 
ment of its policy obligations, and the superintendent of insurance may 
reinstate or renew said certificate whenever by assessment or otherwise said 
reserves have been increased to a sum sufiicient in the judgment of the 
superintendent of insurance to insure and secure the payment of the policy 
obligations of such corporation. 

( 192. Reports to and examinations by superintendent of insurance. Every 
such corporation shall make reports to the superintendent of insurance at 
the same times and in the same manner as are required from stock insur- 
ance companies transacting the same kind of business, and the superintendent 
of insurance may examine into the affairs of such corporation at any time, 
either personally or by any duly authorized examiner appointed by him, and 
the superintendent of insurance must make such an examination into the 
affairs of said corporation at least once in every two years. 

§ 193. Prevention of accidents. The board of directors shall make and 
enforce reasonable rules and regulations not in conflict with the laws of 



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86 New York Labor Bulletin. 

the state for the preyention of accidents to the employees on the premises of 
members, and for this purpose the inspectors of the corporation shall have 
free access to all such premises during regular working hours. The policy 
of any member neglecting to provide suitable safety appliances as provided 
by law or as required by the board of directors may be canceled and termi- 
nated by the board of directors after giving to such member notice of can- 
cellation ten days prior to its becoming effective. 

§ 194. Authorization of foreign mutual insurance corporations. After 
January first, nineteen hundred and seventeen, the superintendent of insur- 
ance may, in his discretion, issue a certificate of authority to a mutual 
corporation organized under the laws of another state to do such insurance 
in this state; provided that, in no event, shall authority be given to any such 
mutual corporation to do other kinds of business than those specified in this 
article. Such corporation sliall be required to maintain the same reserves 
for the protection of members and employees as are required for domestic 
corporations authorized to transact the same kind of insurance. 

( 2. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved December 23, 1913. 



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INDEX OF BILLS RELATING TO LABOR IN THE 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION OF 1914. 

[Explanation. — Only the principal purpose and final stage of each bill are In- 
dicated; identical bills tn Senate and Assembly are recorded as one: bills enacted 
Into law are described In italic type ; numbers in parentheses are '^ Printed," the 
others " Introductory,'* numbers. Abbreviations used are : S. or Ben. for Senate, 
A. or Aasm. for Assembly, and Com. for Committee.] 

ADMINISTRATION OF LABOR LAWS. 

To provide that power houses, generating plants, hams, storage houses and 
other structures owned or operated by a public service corporation shall not 
he deemed factories. Mr, Machold, A, 1377 (1648, 1819). Approved April 
23, as Chapter 512. 

To repeal the law giving preference to citizenB of New York State and 
forbidding the employment of unnaturalized aliens on public work. Mr. 
Mackey, A. 1191 (1305). Labor and InduBtriea Com. 

To make permissive instead of mandatory the forfeiture of a contract for 
public work by reason of violation of the eight-hour and prevailing rate of 
wages provisions, and to eliminate the requirement that the Commissioner of 
Labor shall enforce the provision against the employment of aliens and non- 
residents on public work. Mr. Mackey, A. 1190 (1304). Labor and Indus- 
tries Com. 

To provide for court appeals from the orders of the Industrial Board or the 
Commissioner of Labor. Senator Patten, 8. 1309 (1631). Labor and Indus- 
tries Com. 

To provide that notices of hearings on rules or regulations of the Indus- 
trial Board shall be printed at least once not less than ten days prior thereto. 
Senator Patten, S. 1300 (1613). Sen. passed; Aasm. Labor and Industries 
Com. 

To provide civil penalties for violations of the labor law. Senator Patten, 
8. 1102, (1270, 1646) and Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 1342 (1484). Sen. passed; 
Aasm. Labor and Industries Com. 

To authorize an increase in the salary of the chief mercantile inspector 
from three thousand to four thousand dollars. Senator Patten, 8. 1044 
(1189) and Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 1299 (1433). Approved AprU 14, as Chapter 
'333. 

To define the terms " mechanic " and " prevailing rate of wages." Senator 
Coats, S. 992 (1121) and Mr. J. A. Smith, A. 1224 (1343). Not approved by 
the €k>Temor. 

To continue the Factory Investigating Commission until February, 1915 
and appropriating $50,000 for its expenses. Senator Simpson, S. 963 (1112) 
and Mr. Phillips, A. 280 (280). Approved April 3, as Chapter 110. 

To recodify the Labor Law. Senator Patten, S. 972 (1239, 1591) and Mr. 
A. E. Smith, A. 1253 (1456). Sen. Labor and Industries Com.; Assm. Judi- 
ciary Com. 

To authorize magistrates in New York City to try actions for violations of 
the Labor Law, first offense, where the person charged therewith pleads guilty. 
Senator Patten, S. 971 (1101, 1576) and Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 1202 (1316, 
1516, 1681). Not approved by the Gk>vernor. 

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88 New York Labor Bulletin. 

To increase the penalties for violations of the Labor Law. Senator Patten, 
S. 970 (1100, 1563) and Mr. A. £. ^rnith, A. 1203 (1317, 1353). Sen. passed; 
Assm. Judiciary Com. 

To transfer the enforcement of the law for the making of mattresses when 
made of unclean materials from the Commissioner of Labor to the Commis- 
sioner of Health. Senator Patten, S. 1103 (1271) and Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 
1341 (1483). Not approved by the Governor. 

HEALTH AND SAFETY. 
Factories. 

Assembly resolution for an investigation of the existing laws, ordinances 
and regulations as to building and fire prevention. Mr. Ellenbogen, Ways 
and Means Com. 

To require the mayors of all cities except New York to appoint inspectors 
to prescribe rules for the installation of electrical apparatus. Mr. Schwarz, 
A. 10»7 (1183). Electricity, Gas and Water Supply Com. 

To extend the term " laundries '' so as to include hotel and hospital laun- 
dries. Mr. Grimier, A. 876 (043). Labor and Industries Com. 

To make it a misdemeanor to smoke in a mercantile establishment, except 
in cigar stores. Mr. Grimier, A. 858 (005, 1527). Codes Com. 

To make it a misdemeanor to violate the Labor Law as to smoking in fac- 
tories. Mr. Grimier, A. 603 (721). Codes Com. 

To extend the term " bakeries " so as to include kitchens in hotels and 
restaurants. Mr. Sufrin, A. 700 (832). Labor and Industries Com. 

To re-define the term " tenement house " as used in the Tenement House 
Ijaw. Mr. Scheidemann, A. 709 (737). Cities Com. 

To prescribe the construction of semi-fireproof buildings to be used for 
mercantile or manufacturing purposes in second class cities. Mr. G. T. 
Seelye, A. 471 (477, 757). Cities Com. 

To abolish the office of State Fire Marshal. Mr. Hinman, A. 458 (462). 
Sen. Insurance Com. ; Asnm. parsed. 

To authorize the Tenement House Department in New York City to order 
a tenement house vacated when found to be dangerous to life or health by 
reason of lighting and means of fire escape. Mr. Stoddard, A. 286 (286). 
Social Welfare Com. 

To require that tenement houses hereafter erected exceeding four stories ' 
in height be fireproof, and amending the law as to fire escapes in tenement 
houses. Mr. Scheidemann, A. 243 (243). Judiciary Com. 

To cMthorize the hoard of estimate in New York City to appropriate 
$50,000 annudllif for the support of the American Museum of Safety, Mr, 
A, E. Smith, A. 103 (102). Approved April 20, as Chapter 466. 

To provide that owners of tenant-factories shall be responsible for observ- 
ance of the safety and sanitary requirements applicable to such buildings. 
Senator Patten, S. 1301 (1614). Sen. passed; Assm. Labor and Industries 
Com. 

To exempt one story buildings from the requirement that roofs shall be 
covered with incombustible material. Senator Patten, S. 1256 (1500) and 
Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 1480 (1752). Sen. third reading; AsRva, Labor and 
Industries Com. 



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Index of Bills. 89 

To permit inside fireproof stairways and automatic safety devices in lieu 
of outside iron fire escapes. Senator Walters, S. 1246 (1500). Cities Com. 

To amend the Labor Law relative to fire protection and to ventilation 
in factories. Senator Patten, 8. 1224 (1430, 1486, 1679) and Mr. A. E. 
Smith, A. 1477 (1749). Approved April 14, as Clvapter 366. 

To extend the discretion of the Industrial Board as to the enclosure of 
stairways serving as cxitSy and to outside fire escapes, in factory huildvngs. 
Senator Patten, S. 1223 (1420, 1596, 1670) and Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 1478 
(1750). Approved April 7, as Chapter 182. 

To strengthen the pi'ovisions for cleanlvness, sanitation and ventilation in 
mercantile establishments. Senator Patten, 8. 1043 (1188, 1645) and Mr. 
A. E. Smith, A. 1300 (1434, 1780). Approved ApHl 7, as Chapter 183. 

To prohibit the repapering or recalcimining of living or work rooms until 
the old paper or calcimine has been removed and the rooms cleaned. Senator 
Wende, S. 1036 (1168). Com. of the Whole. 

To abolish the municipal explosives commission in ffew York City and to 
transfer its functions to the fire commissioner. Senator Foley, S, 1019 
(1148, 1380, 1673) and Mr. Hoff, A. 1254 (1373). Approved AprU 23, as 
Chapter 495. 

To prohibit smoking in mercantile establishments where' more than ten 
persons are employed. Senator Patten, B. 968 (1098) and Mr. A. £. Smith, 
A. 1204 (1318). Sen. Com. of the Whole; Assm. Labor and Industries Com. 

To render the enforcement of the rules of th<i Industrial Board in regard 
to fire prevention discretionary with, instead of mandatory upon, the fire 
commissioner in Neio York City. Senator Simpson, 8. 583 (630, 1474) and 
Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 859 (906, 1711). Approved April 20, as Chapter 459. 

To exempt Buffalo from the jurisdiction of the State Fire Marshal, except 
as to State buildings therein. Senator Wende, S. 323 (329) and Warhus, 
A. 293 (293). Sen. Insurance Com; Assm. Insurance Com. 

To prohibit the use of unsanitary materials in the manufacture of mat- 
tresses. Senator Walters, S. 304 (310) and Mr. Buecheler, A. 429 (433). 
Sen. Com. of the Wliole; Assm. passed. 

To forbid the sale of wood alcohol or any mixture containing wood alcohol 
unless conspicuously labeled " poison, likely to cause blindness or death." 
Senator Griffin, S. 1067 (1212). Com. of the Wliole. 

To require the installation within one year of automatic safety devices on 
all passenger elevators except those in private residences. Senator Horrick, 
S. 184 (184, 1459). Com. of the Whole. 

Mines and Quarries. 
To require all persons engaged in blasting work, except for agricultural 
purposes, to hold a certificate of fitness from the State Fire Marshal. Senator 
Patten, S. 293 (299) and Mr. McElligott, A. 423 (426). Sen. Insurance 
Com.; Assm. Insurance Com. 

Building Work. 

To require inspection of all swinging scaffolds and their appliances once 
a year by the Commissioner of Labor. Mr. Farrell, A. 115 (114). Labor 
and Industries Com. 



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90 New Yoek Labor Bulx-ethst. 

Bailwayg. 

To require a conductor in addition to the motorman on every street surface 
railroad car. Senator McKnight, S. 988 (1117, 1327) and Mr. Sulliyan, A. 
47 (46, 1172). Sen. Com. of the Whole; Assm. lost. 

To require an additional conductor on the inside and an additional con- 
ductor on the rear platform of every street surface railroad car in New 
York C^ty, when more than ten passengers are standing on the inside and 
three passengers on the rear platform. Mr. Scheidemann, A. 532 (537, 710). 
Bailroads Com. 

To require an extra motorman on every electric subway car or train while 
passing under any river. Senator Boy Ian, S. 010 (1024) and Mr. Ahem, 
A. 1000 (1176). Sen. Railroads Com.; Assm Railroads Com. 

To provide that applicants for positions as motormen, conductors or drivers 
on street surface or electric railroads shall have not less than fifteen days 
instruction on a car previous to regular employment. Senator Healy, S. 
105 (105) and Mr. T. D. Taylor, A. 87 (86). Sen. Railroads Com.; Assm. Rail- 
roads Com. 

To require one year's experience on steam or electric railroads for motor- 
men on electric multiple unit trains. Senator Sanner, S. 300 (306) and 
Mr. McRoberts, A. 276 (276) . Sen. Com. of the Whole; Assm. Railroads Com. 

To eoftend the defitUtions of the tenns "employees" and "families" m 
relation to free tranaportation hy common carriere. Senator Wende, 8, 180 
(180, 035) and Mr. PhUlipa, A. 132 (131, 548, 703). Approved March 12, 
as Chapter 38. 

To authorize the exemption of any railroad from the full crew law if the 
Public Service Commission finds other and difi'erent methods of operation 
to be safe. Mr. Sullivan, A. 62 (61). Railroads Com. ; 

To extend the one day of rest in seven law to all employments except the 
operation of railways and street car lines. Mr. Willard, A. 1434 (1684). 
Labor and Industries Com. 

To extend the one day of rest in seven law to railway and street car 
employees. Mr. Willard, A. 1435 (1685). Labor and Industries Com. 

To require railroad companies to plank highway crossings at grade. Mr. 
Garrison, A. 604 (722). Railroads Com. 

WOMAN AND CHILD LABOR. 

To permit females to work until 10:00 p. m, in mercantile establishments 
in second class cities, and to provide an eight-hour day and forty-eight hour 
week for children under sixteen in mercantile and other Imeiness establish- 
ments. Senator Patten, S. 060 (1090, 1644) and Mr. A, E. Smith, A. 
1205 (1310, 1515; S. 1675). Approved ApHl 14, as Chapter 33L 

To remove the limitation on the hours of women and minors in mercantile 
establishments during the week preceding Easter Sunday. Mr. Horton, A. 
701 (720). Labor and Industries Com. 

To define ** mercantile establishment," and to regulate the hours of women 
and minors and the sanitation therein. Senator Patten S. 1042 (1187) and 
Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 1207 (1431). Sen. Labor and Industries Com.; Assm. 
Labor and Industries Com. 



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Index of Bills. 91 

To provide that women and children employed in mercantile establishmentB 
who begin work not later than 1:00 p. m. and continue work after 7:00 p. m. 
shall have 20 minutes for supper between 5:00 p. m. and 7:00 p. m. Senator 
Patten, S. 1287 (1602). Labor and Industries Com. 

To permit persons more than 16 years of age to work after 6:00 p. m. 
on Friday and Saturday in mercantile establishments in Yonkers. Mr. 
Blakeley, A. 427 (431). Social Welfare Com. 

To provide an eight-hour day and forty-eight hour week for women in 
mercantile establishments. Mr. Henschel, A. 1425 (1651). Labor and 
Industries Com. 

To prohibit the employment of women in or for any factory more than 
eight hours per day or forty-eight hours per week. Mr. Bleecker, A. 1362 
(1533). Labor and Industries Com. 

To abolish the permanent census hoard in New York City and provide that 
the Board of Education shall take the school census in connection toith 
enforcement of the Compulsory Education Law. Senator Simpson, S, 778 
(850) and Mr. Boff, A. 996 (1065, 1680). Approved ApHl 20, as Chapter 
480. 

To authorize the New York City hoard of education to establish a bureau 
of compulsory education^ school census and child welfare. Senator Simpson, 
S, 776 (848) and Mr. Hoff, A. 995 (1064, 1581). Approved April 20, as 
Chapter 479. 

To require the owners or operators of factories, stores and other estab- 
lishments in New York City to exhibit registries of children employed or 
employment certificates of such children to policemen acting under the super- 
vision of the superintendent of schools as truant officers. Mr. Grimier, A. 
843 (890). Cities Com. 

To permit the carrying of newspapers in the afternoon by boys over twelve 
and in the morning by boys over fourteen years of age. Senator Walters, S. 
512 (550) and Mr. Phillips, A, 644 (662, 805). Approved March 5, as 
Chapter 21. 

To license and regulate the employment of children in street trades in 
Saratoga Springs. Senator Whitney, S. 82 (82) and Mr. Seelye, A. 84 (83). 
Sen. Villages Com.; Assm. passed. 

To raise from sixteen years to eighteen years the age of children not 
permitted to attend certain resorts. Senator Thomas, S. 1031 (1163) and 
Mr. S. A. Jones, A. 1123 (1209). Sen. Codes Com.; Assm. Codes Com. 

HOURS OF WORK. 
Hours. 

Concurrent resolution providing for the direct construction by the State 
of canals and highways. Mr. B. E. Moore. Ways and Means Com. 

To provide that the eight-hour and prevailing rate of wages provisions 
shall apply where the state or a municipality is directly or indirectly obligated 
to pay the whole or any part of the contract price. Senator Walters, S. 408 
(428, 1527) and Mr. Buecheler, A. 537 (542). Sen. lost; Assm. Labor and 
Industries Com. 

To provide that forfeiture of contract for violation of the eight-hour law 
be made permissive instead of mandatory. Senator Patten, S. 554 (599) and 
Mr. Mackey, A. 1188 (1302). Sen. Codes Com.; Assm. Codes Com. 

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92 New Yobk Labob Buli^ethst. 

To provide for making up time lost on public work, and to eliminate the 
prevailing rate of wages clause for work done " upon any material to be used 
upon or in connection *' with public work. Senator Patten, S. 555 (600, 1013) . 
Labor and Industry Com. 

To provide that the eight-hour and prevailing rate of wages law shall apply 
to materials furnished for and used upon public work. Mr. Sullivan, A. 374 
(376). Labor and Industries Com. 

To exempt from the eight-hour and prevailing rate of wages provisions 
asphalt work in cities and villages, involving the use of hot asphalt de- 
livered, or in transit, to site of the work within the eight-hour period. 
Senator Blauvelt, S. 959 (1072). Labor and Industries Com. 

To limit the hours of tour workers in paper mills to eight per day and 
forty-eight per week, except in emergencies. Senator Duhamel, S. 707 (760) 
and Mr. Moore, A. 7M (826, 1567). Sen. Labor and Industries Com.; Assm. 
Labor and Industries Com. 

To provide that all paper used by election officials shall have been manu- 
factured in accordance with the eight-hour and prevailing rate of wages laws. 
Mr. McCue, A. 269 (269). Judiciary Com. 

To provide that all paper used in State printing shall have been manu- 
factured in accordance with the eight-hour and prevailing rate of wages laws. 
Mr. McCue, A. 267 (267). Printing Com. 

To exempt from the law requiring one day of rest in seven dairies, cream- 
eries, butter and cheese factories, ice cream plants and milk establishments 
where not more than seven persons are employed. Senator Brown, 8. 850 
(921, 1087, 1308, 1520). Approved April 16, as Chapter 388. 

To exempt from the one day of rest in seven law employees, engaged in 
continuous industrial or manufacturing processes, who have the eight-hour 
day. Senator Thompson, 8. 503 (542, 932, 1382). Approved April 16, a4 
Chapter 396. 

To extend the time which certain classes of employees may work on Sun- 
day from three hours to five hours, and to exempt employees in milk, butter 
and cheese establishments from the one day of rest in seven law. Mr. 
Grant, A. 181 (181, 707, 1239, 1612; S. 1676). Not approved by the 
Governor. 

To exempt employees in salt refineries from the law requiring one day's 
rest in seven. Mr. Knight, A. 483 (488, 1454). Lost. 

To exempt employees in drug stores from the one day of rest in seven law, 
and to provide for such employees one afternoon and one evening off duty 
in each week in addition to one full day off every two weeks. Senator 
Walters, S. 407 (427, 1232) and Mr. Seelye, A. 596 (607, 1403, 1760). 
Approved April 23, as Chapter 514. 

To limit the working hours of employees in grocery or provision stores in 
first class cities to seventy hours per week and eleven per day, except that 
fifteen hours is to be permitted on Saturday. Senator Boylau, S. 2 (2) 
Not approved by the Governor. 

Sunday Work. 

To provide that during prohibited hours on Sunday all entrances to delica- 
tessen stores shall be locked. Mr. Ellenbogen, A. 1436 (1686). Codes Com. 
To permit delicatessen dealers in first class cities to sell, serve and deliver 



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Index of Bills. 98 

cooked and prepared foods at any hour on Sunday. Mr. Sufrin, A. 893 
(968). Codes Com. 

To add vaudeville^ stage entertainments or presentation of pictures, mov- 
ing or stationary, provided an admission fee is chaiged, to the list of pro- 
hibited entertainments on Sunday. Mr. Thorn, A. 292 (292). Codes Com. 

To authorize theatrical performances on Sunday in first class cities, pro- 
vided the entire gross receipts are applied to philanthropic purposes. Senator 
Wende, S. 169 (169) and Mr. Crane, A. 231 (231). Sen. Codes Com.; Assm. 
Codes Com. 

To legalize Sunday labor by those who observe religiously another day of 
tne week as a Sabbath or day of rest. Mr. Sufrin, A. 211 (211). Codes 
Com. 

To provide that an employee whose designated day of rest is Sunday, if 
required to do Sunday work in an emergency, shall receive double pay for 
the three subsequent days in lieu of compensation for such Sunday work. 
Senator Patten, S. 1286 ( 1601 ) . Labor and Industries Com. 

To regulate public traffic on Sunday in cities other than New York City. 
Senator Wheeler, S. 204 (204) and Mr. Phillips, A. 60 (59). Sen. Codes 
Com.; Assm. Codes Com. 

To prohibit the business of boot blacking on Sunday after 3:00 p. m., 
except in hotels and on ferry boats. Senator Boy Ian, S. 95 (95) . Sen. passed; 
Assm. Codes Com. 

Holidays. 

To make Cood Friday a legal holiday. Senator Torborg, S. 64 (64). 
Judiciary Com. 

LEGAL RIGHTS. 
Employers' Liability for Accidents. 

To re-enact the workmen's compensation law and providing that not more 
than three of the commissioners shall he of the same political party. Senator 
Kamsperger, 8, 267 (268; A. 948). Approved March 16, as Chapter 41. 

To appropriate $350,000 for the expenses of the Workmen's Compensation 
Commission, Mr. Macdonald, A, 1502 (1831). Approved April 7, as Chapter 
170. 

To reappropriate $150,000 for the Workmen's Compensation Commission. 
Mr. Macdonald, A. 1499 (1803). Sen. third reading; Assm. passed. 

To extend the jurisdiction of the Workmen's Compensation Act to include 
State, municipal and county employees. Senator Foley, S, 1318 (1651). 
Approved April 14, as Chapter 316. 

To amend the law as to reserves held by employers' liability corporations. 
Senator Wilson, S. 664 (712) and Mr. Gillett, A. 775 (817). Sen. Insurance 
Com. ; Assm. Insurance Com. 

To require that the premium rates of every employers' liability corporation 
or association, except the State insurance fund administered by tJie Work- 
men's Compensation Commission, shall be approved by the Superintendent 
of Insurance. Senator Ramsperger, fif. 97 (97; A. 326) and Mr. A. E. Smith, 
A. 112 (111). Approved March 4, as Chapter 16. 

To amend the code of civil procedure by extending from three years to 
six years the time within which an action may be brought to recover damages 



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94 New Yoek Labob Buluetht. 

for personal injury, resulting from negligence. Senator Blauvelt, 8. 481 
(510) and Mr. Van Name, A. 724 (752). Sen. Codes Com.; Amm. Codes 
Com. 

To provide that a labor organization tohich forms a corporation for the 
purpose of eonstructing and maintaining a temple, a home for indigent 
members or a library shall elect a member of such corporation for a term 
of three years, instead of one year <m at present, Mr. Thorn, A, 317 (318). 
Approved April 23, as Chapter 509. 

To authorize the incorporation of associations having no capital stock 
and not organized for pecuniary profit and having a membership of more 
than one thousand, instead of more than five thousand as at present. Senator 
Thompson, S. 1307 ( 1620) . Judiciary Com. 

To require pawnbrokers to file with the police department information 
which will identify any person who pawns mechanics' tools. Senator Duhamel, 
S. 603 (651) and Mr. McElligott, A. 74 (73, 1273). Sen. Judiciary Com.; 
Assm. passed. 

Wages. 

Concurrent resolution to empower the Legislature to fix, through a com- 
mission, minimum wages for all laborers in New York State. Mr. B. E. 
Moore, A. 562 (573). Judiciary Com. 

To appoint a commission to fix minimum wages for women and minors 
in industry. Mr. Dunlop, A. 1144 (1242). Ways and Means Com. 

To provide for an accounting every six months of all m^oneys collected on 
executions issued against toages, earnings and salary. Senator Whitney, &, 
475. (513) and Mr. Seelye, A. 635, (652). Approved April 15, as Chapter 
347. 

To provide that no assignment of, or power of attorney to collect, earnings, 
given by any municipal employee, unless approved by the head of the 
department, shall prevent payment of such earnings directly to such employee. 
Henator Boylan, 8. 351 (358) and Mr. Matheivson, A. 611 (628). Approved 
April 6, as Chapter 164. 

To regulate the making of loans secured by assignment of wages. Senator 
Malone, S. 213 (213) and Mr. Horton, A. 166 (166). Sen. Judiciary Com.; 
Assm. Banks Com. 

To amend the law as to judgments recovered prior to September I, 1908 
against usages or salaries. Mr. Thorn, A. 801 (843). Approved April 14, 
as Chapter 352. 

To provide for the establishment in first class cities of night courts to 
have jurisdiction of actions brought to recover wages in the sum of fifty 
dollars or less. Mr. Sufrin, A. 110 (109). Not approved by the Governor. 

To prohibit mercantile establishments from compelling employees to con- 
tribute to benefit or insurance funds. Senator White, S. 1244 (1498). Ap- 
proved April 14, as Chapter 320. 

GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES. 

To provide that no reinstatement of dismissed persons shall be made by a 
department head, other than the police and fire commissioners, in New York 
City, when the applicant has been removed more than four years. Mr. Simp- 
son, A. 129e (1430, 1710). Cities Cohl 

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Index ov Bills. 95 

To require the refunding of money from the pension fund to dismissed 
memhers of the police force in New York City, except when the dismissal 
was for the conviction of a crime. Senator Pollock, S. 230 (240) and Mr. 
Hoff, A. 356 (358). Sen. Cities Com.; Assm. Cities Com. 

To require the payment of 4 per cent interest on money refunded from 
the pension fund to dismissed memhers of the police force in New York City. 
Senator Pollock, S. 240 (241) and Mr. Hoff, A. 357 (359). Sen. Cities Com.; 
Assm. Cities Com. 

To provide that the salary of a police matron in New York City shall be 
the same as that of a patrolman with equal length of service. Senator 
Davidson, S. 456 (481) and Mr. Lane, A. 606 (623). Sen. Cities Com.; Assm. 
Cities Com. 

To require the appointment of twenty patrolwomen to the New York City 
police force. Mr. Eisner, A. 226 (22^). Cities Com. 

To extend the benefit of the police pension fund in New York City to other 
employees in the department holding positions in the classified civil service. 
Mr. Sufrin, A. 791 (»33). Cities Com. 

To provide that sergeants and patrolmen in first class cities shall receive 
extra pay for duty in excess of eight hours within any twenty-four consecu- 
tive hours. Mr. Heam, A. 72 (71). Cities Com. 

To provide that firemen and policemen in Neu> York City may not he rein- 
stated by the heads of their departments after having been dismissed upon 
charges, Mr, Hoff, A, 998 (1067). Approved April 20, as Chapter 471. 

To permit the appointment to the uniformed force of the fire department 
in New York City of firemen, marine stokers or pilots who hold United States 
licenses. Mr. Walker, A. 50 (49). Cities Com. 

To except the park department in "Sew York City from the provisions 
restricting vacation periods of employees to the months of June, July, August 
and September, Senator Torborg, S, 1204 (1432). Approved April 20, as 
Chapter 458. 

To provide a pension fund for the street cleaning force in the Borough of 
Queens, New York City. Senator Patten, S. 294 (300) and Mr. Nehrbauer, 
A. 443 (447). Sen. passed; Assm. Cities Com. 

To authorize the board of estimate in New York City to retire on pension 
any municipal officer, clerk or employee totally disabled by accident in the 
performance of his duty, irrespective of the length of service. Senator Her- 
rick, S. 183 (183). Cities Com. 

To forfeit the pension of any person, except the commissioner of deeds, 
in receipt of a pension from New York City who shall hold any position 
under the state or city of New York. Senator Heffeman, S. 727 (788) and 
Mr. McRoberts, A. 830 (877, 1289). Sen. third reading; Assm. passed: 

To provide for a disciplinary board in New York City which shall hear 
complaints against civil service employees. Senator Patten, S. 621 (670) and 
Mr. Crane, A. 842 (889, 1607). Sen. Cities Com.; Assm. lost. 

To extend the eight-hour day and prevailing rate of wacres provisions to 
stationary firemen in state hospitals. Senator Patten, S. 851 (941) and Mr. 
McElligott, A. 907 (972). Not approved by the Governor. 

To provide an eight-hour day for laborers in armories. Senator Malone, 
S. 439 (464) and Mr. Geyer, A. 353 (d55). Sen. Military Affairs Com.; 
Assm. Military Affairs Com* 



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ftft New York Labor Butxetin. 

To abolish twelve-hour shifte and increase the pay of eight-hour firemen in 
state hospitals. Senator Patten, S. 1082 (1250) and Mr. McElligott, A. 707 
(735). Sen. Judiciary Com.; Assm. Ways and Means Com. 

To provide an additional laborer in each armory occupied hy a separate 
division. Senator Herrick, 8, 815 (887) a/nd Mr, Stoddard, A. 1345 (1487). 
Approved April 6, as Chapter 150. 

To amend the law as to armories, including the number and pay of em- 
ployees. Senator Wilson, S. 996 (1125) and Mr. Wheeler, A. 850 (897). 
Sen. Military Affairs Com.; Assm. Military Affairs Com. 

To make temporary provision for additional employees in armories. Senator 
Herrick, 8. 1015 (1144) and Mr. Stoddard, A. 1347 (1489). Approved April 
6, as Chapter 162. 

To provide additional assistant armorers, assistant janitors and laborers in 
iurmories. Senator Uerrick, 8. 1057 (1202). Approved April 6, cm Chapter 
163. 

To amend the law relative to the payment of annuities to retired employees 
of the sUte hospitals for the insane. Mr. Phillips, A. 1005 (1074). Vetoed 
by the Oovernor. 

To create a fund for the payment of pensions to retired employees of state 
prisons and state reformatories. Senator Healy, S. 495 (534) and Mr. Law, 
A. 623 (640). Vetoed by the Governor. 

To increase the salaries of certain employees in state prisons. Senator 
Healy, B. 781 (853). Approved April 7, as Chapter 189. 

To create a retirement fund for the payment of annuities to employees 
of state charitable institutions. Senator Seeley, S. 136 (136) and Mr. Brew- 
ster, A. 153 (152). Vetoed by the Governor. 

To provide a retirement fund foir state employees in the classified civil 
service. Senator Patten, S. 967 (109-7) and Mr. Adler, A. 806 (853). Sen. 
passed; Assm. Judiciary Com. 

To provide a minimum wage of two dollars per day for laborers and 
mechanics on state canals. Senator Wende, S. 1282 (1559) and Mr. Gallup, 
A. 504 (509, 1142, 1664). Not approved by the Governor. 

To require that laborers engaged in construction work for the state, a 
municipal corporation or a commission shall be paid their wages twice a 
month. Mr. Talmage, A. 1231 (1350). Labor and Industries Com. 

To except employees of county tuberculosis hospitals from provision that 
boards of supervisors may determine their salaries. Senator White, 8. 595 
(643, 1312) and Mr. Sullivan, A. 803 (845). Approved April 15, as Chapter 
358. 

To add the Fiscal Supervisor of State Charities to the board which classi- 
fies the employees of charitable and reformatory institutions for the purpose 
of determining wages. Senator Blauvelt, S, 397 (417) and Mr. Macdonald, 
A. 608 (625, 803). Approved April 7, as Chapter 215. 

To permit common carriers to give free transportation to mail carriers in 
uniform. Senator Griffin, 8. 1184 (1404, 1664) and Mr. Grimier, A. 1355 
(1497, 1801). Approved April 4, as Chapter 116. 

To permit the playing of music on Sunday at funeral processions of asso- 
ciations of municipal, state or national employe^. Mr, McGrath, A. 130 
(120, 471). Approved April 14, as Chapter 328. 



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Index ojf Bills. 97 

To provide for the retirement on pension of civil war veterans now in the 
civil service of New York State. Senator Palmer, S. 311 (317) and Mr. 
Quick, A. 460 (464). Sen. third reading; Assm. passed. 

PRISON LABOR. 

To strike out the provision for a houses furniture and provisions, in addi- 
tion to his salary, for the principal keeper at Sing 8ing prison. Senator 
Seeley, 8. 1277 (1546) and Mr. Law, A. 1494 (1790). Approved AprU 7, as 
Chapter 187. 

To provide a house, furniture and provisions in addition to salary for the 
principal keepers at Dannemora, Great Meadow and Clinton prisons. Senator 
Healy, S. 1088 (1256). Sen. passed; Assm. Judiciary Com. 

To deduct from the earnings of prisoners guilty of misconduct, the amount 
to he determined by the prison authorities but not to exceed fifty cents per 
day. Senator Heffernan, 8. 729 (790). Approved April 7, as Chapter 188. 

To provide that prisoners may receive compensation, not exceeding one 
dollar per day, for labor performed in excess of the amount fixed by the 
prison authorities. Senator Healy, S. 415 (435) and Mr. Quick, A. 667 
(678, 1608). Sen. Penal Institutions Com.; Assm. passed. 

To authorize the use of convict labor in th-e coT^struction of a state road 
in Qreene county. Senator Blauvelt, 8. 157 (157) and Mr. Chase, A. 326 
(327). Approved March 21, as Chapter 68. 

To authorize the use of convict labor in the construction of state and 
county highways. Senator Blauvelt, fif. 6 (6, 501). Approved March 21, as 
Chapter 60. 

To authorize the employment of convicts on county roads. Senator Hewitt, 
8. 94 (94, 933) and Mr. Springer, A. 209 (209). Approved March 21, m 
Chapter 61. 

To remove the thirty-mile limitation from prisons within which convicts 
may be employed in the improvement of highways. Mr. Emerson, S. 7 (7). 
Int. Affairs Com. 

To provide that prisoners in jails and other penal institutions, as well as 
those in state prisons, reformatories and penitentiaries, shall be employed 
for the benefit of the state or political divisions thereof. Senator Healy, S. 
416 (436) and Mr. (^uick, A. 568 (579). Sen. Penal Institutions Com.; 
Assm. passed. 

Concurrent resolution to provide for the construction of farm prisons. Mr. 
Mathewson. Ways and Means Cora. 

Assembly resolution for the acquisition by the state of farms and the 
employment of convicts thereon. Mr. Suf rin. Ways and Means Com. 

To establish a brick-making plant in the state reformatory at EUnira. 
Senator Murtaugh, 8. 995 (1124. 1325, 1575) and Mr. Knapp, A. 1265 (1386). 
Approved April 7, as Chapter 214. 

To authorize the superintendent of prisons to establish plants for the 
making, by convict labor, of paving brick for state and county highways. 
Senator Blauvelt, S. 248 (250) . Finance Com. 

To amend the law relative to the sale of prison products. Senator Healy, 
S. 417 (437) and Mr. Quick. A. 566 (577, 1602). Sen. Penal Institutions 
Com.; Assm. passed. 

4 



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98 New Yoek Labor Bulletin. 

INDUSTRIAL EIKJCATION. 

To authorize iKe erection of a vocational high aehod building in Syracuee. 
Senator Walters, 8. 447 (472) a^ Mr, Haighi, A, 584 (695). Approved 
April 11, ae Chapter 299. 

To except from the provisionB prescribing minimum qualifications for 
teachers in primary and grammar schools, teachers in industrial, Tocational 
and trade subjects. Mr. EUenbogen, A. 1467 (1739). Public Education Com. 

REGULATION OF TRADES AND OCCUPATIONS. 

To require every lionised chauffeur to file notice oi a change in his addiess 
with the Secretary of State. Mr. Henachel, A. 1242 (136»). Intenal Affairs 
Com. 

To require the licensing of all automobile operators. Mr. Hopkim, A. 530 
(635). Internal Affairs Com. 

To provide for the licensing of automobile drivers. Senator Foley, S. 1320 
( 1653 ) . Internal Affairs Com. 

To regulate the licensing and hours of labor of chauffeurs. Senator Griffin, 
S. 1139 (1306). Internal Affairs Com. 

To prohibit the issuance of a chauffeur's license to any person under 21 
years of age, and to make it a misdemeanor for an owner to employ an operator 
not licensed as a chauffeur. Mr. Conkling, A 34 (33). Internal Affairs Com. 

To provide for the apprenticeship, examination and licensing of chauffeurs. 
Senator Walters, S. U9S (1418) and Mr. Buecheler, A. 1409 (1«35). Sen. 
Internal Affairs Com.; Assm. Internal Affairs Com. 

To provide for licensing operators and chauffeurs and for the revocation of 
such licenses. Senator McClelland, S. 1205 (1433) and Mr. MtGrath, A. 
1157 (1255, 1448). Sen. Internal Affairs Com.; Assm. Internal Affaire Com. 

To prohibit the issuance of a chauffeur's license to one who has been con- 
victed of a felony and to revoke the license of any chauffeur hereafter con- 
victed of a criminal offense. Mr. Conkling, A. 32 ( 31 ) . Internal Affairs C6m. 

To provide for examining and licensing automobile operators and for the 
revocation of such licenses. Senator Herrick, S. 8M (974, 1247, 1600). In- 
ternal Affairs Com. 

To authorize first class cities to enact ordinances relative to the suspension 
or revocation of licenses of automobile operators. Mr. Conkling, A. 31 (30). 
Internal Affairs Com. 

To require the licensing of barbers. Senator Ramsperger, S. 504 (543) and 
Mt. Quigley, A. 535 (540). Sen. Com. of the Whole; Aasm. Public Health 
Com. 

7*0 create a department of licensee in New York City which ehaXl have 
general cha/rge of the ieewmce of Uceneee. Senator Herrick^ S, 350 (357, 1080) 
and Mr, Stoddard, A. 619 (636, 1285). Approved April 20, ae Chapteer 475. 

To provide that no license as a private detective shall be granted any one 
who has been convicted of a felony. Mr. Thorn, A. 721 (749). Judiciary 
Com. 

To make it a misdemeanor to act as a private detective without a license 
from the State Comptroller; no license to be issued to one who has Iwen con- 
victed of a felony. Senator ^^'hite, S. 260 (262). Finance Com. 

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TwDBx OF Bills. 99 

INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES. 

To require employers advertising for laborers to take the place* of strikers 
to state that strike exists. Mr. Sufrin, A. 134 (133). Codes Com. 

Similar bill by Mr. Kerrigan, A. 781 (823). Codes Com. 

Similar bill by Mr. Sufrin, A. 1337 (1479). Codes Com. 

Similar bill by Senator Boylan, S. 479 (617) and Mr. Karutz, A. 511 (616). 
Sen. Codes Com. ; Assm. Codes Com. 

To strike out the provisions that eivil officers may call out the militia to 
suppress disturbances and that compensation for such services shall be paid 
by the county wherein such disturbances occurred. Mr. Quigley, A. 982 
( 1051 ) . Military Affairs Com. 

To provide that the Qovemor of the state alone may call out the militia to 
suppress disturbances. Mr. Quiglcy, A. 981 (1060). Codes Com. 

To legalize boycotts. Mr. Sullivan, A. 375 (377). Codes Com. 

To make it a misdemeanor for an employer to attempt, secretly or by mis- 
representation, to prevent a former employee from securing employment else- 
where. Senator White, S. 251 (253) and Mr. Sullivan, A. 302 (302). Sen. 
passed ; Assm. Codes Com. 

UNEMPLOYMENT. 

Concurrent resolution for an investigation of employment and employment 
agencies. Mr. Malone. Sen. Finance Com.; Assm. passed. 

To esiahlUk a bureau of employment in the department of labor. Senator 
Fatten, 8. 1065 (1210) and Mr, A. E. Smith, A. 1298 (1432.) Approved ApHl 
7, as Chapter 181. 

Similar bill by Senator Davidson, S. 289 (289), and Mr. Patton, A. 337 
(339). Sen. passed; Assm. lost. 

To create an employment bureau in the office of the Secretary of State to 
secure positions for drivers of automobiles and other vehicles. Senator Wal- 
ters, S. 1197 (1417) and Mr. Buecheler, A. 1410 (1636). Sen. Internal Affairs 
Com.; Assm. Internal Affairs Com. 

IMMIGRANT LABOR. 

Aaeembly resolution in Opposition to the " Burnett Bill " pending in Con- 
gress which provides a literacy test for immigrants, Mr, Sufrin, Adopted 
February 3. 

Senate resolution for the investigation by the Senate Banks Committee of 
private banking. Senator FoUock. Adopted January 7. 

To amend the banking law, including the supervision of private bankers. 
Senator Follock, S, 713 (833, 1353, 1592, 1666; A. 1830) and Mr. Adler, A. 
929 (1114, 1660, 1816). Approved April 16, as Chapter 369. 

To amend the law as to private bankers. Senator Pollock, S. 542 (679, 
1248, 1427, 1552) and Mr. Karutz, A. 1115 (1201, 1659). Sen. passed; Assm. 
Banks Com. 

To transfer supervision over private bankers from the State Comptroller to 
the Superintendent of Banks. Senator Torborg, S. 33 (33) and Mr. KarutK, 
A. 261 (261). Sen. Banks Com.; Assm. Banks Com. 

To place private bankers under the supervision of the banking department. 
Mr. Greenberg, A. 604 (621). Banks Com. 



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100 New York Labob BuLi-BTiir. 

To provide for state Buperyigion of private bankers. Senator Herrick, 
S. 886 (&75, 1469) and Mr. Walker, A. 792 (834, 1502). Sen. Banks Com.; 
Assm. Banks Com. 

To regulate private banking. Mr. Sufrin, A. Ill (110). Banks Com. 

To regulate private bankers. Mr. Walker, A. 1387 (1597) . Banks Com. 

To amend the law as to the supervision of small loan brokers. Mr. Walker, 
A. 793 (835). Judiciary Com. 

To provide for state regulation of the httsinese of making personal loans 
in amounts not exceeding two hundred dollars. Senator Murtaughy 8. 838 
(909, 1350, 1531) and Mr. Knight, A. 1009 (1078, 1549). Approved April 
23, as Chapter 518. 

To provide that the penal provisions in r^^rd to misleading advertisements 
shall not apply to real estate sales conducted by licensed auctioneers in first 
class cities. Senator Griffin, S. 1192 (1412) and Mr. Henschel, A. 1396 (1622). 
Not approved by the (lovemor. 

Identical bill by Mr. Patton, A. 1285 (1419). Codes Com. 

To make transportation companies liable for tickets sold by persons who 
are unauthorized but who hold themselves out publicly as agents. Mr. 
Sufrin, A. 135 (134). Sen. Com. of the Wliole; Assm. passed. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

To prohibit the giving of tips to employees. Mr. Nelson, A. 785 (827). 
Codes Com. 

Similar bill by Mr. Simpson, A. 1161 (1259). Third reading. 

To provide pensions for widowed mothers with dependent children. Senator 
Griffin, S. 1191 (1411) and Mr. McCue, A. 1444 (1694). Sen. Com. of the 
Whole; Assm. passed. 

To provide pensions for destitute mothers who have dependent children. Mr. 
Mr. Bleecker, A. 1363 (1534, 1805). Charitable and Religious Societies Com. 

To require first and second class cities to maintain free lodging houses. 
Senator McClelland, S. 370 (383) and Mr. Baxter, A. 663 (682). Sen. Cities 
Com.; Assm. Social Welfare Com. 

To appoint a committee to investigate the subject of old age pensions in 
New York State. Mr. Wood, A. 525 (530), Ways and Means Com. 

To appoint a commission to investigate the organization and operation in 
other countries of old age pensions ana insurance against unemployment and 
sickness. Mr. Henschel, A. 948 (1017). Ways and Means Com. 

To appoint a commission to investigate the distribution of population, 
housing conditions, cost of farm land, educational facilities, and living con- 
ditions in general in New York State. Mr. Thorn, A. 457 (461). Sen. 
Finance Com. ; Assm. passed. 

Similar bill by Mr. Haight, A. 922 (987). Ways and Means Com. 

To authorize savings banks to retire their employees on pension. Senator 
Pollock, S. 1207 (1435). Sen. passed; Assm. Banks Com. 

To create a state department of foods and markets. Senator Wheeler, 8. 
1128 (1296, 1677, 1622) and Mr. A. E. Smith, A. 1375 (1546, 1815). Approved 
April 8, as Chapter 245. 

To create a department of markets in New York City. Senator Pollock, S. 
1018 (1147, 1654) and Mr. Patton, A. 1251 (1371). Not accepted by the 

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'"^^ 



/state or NEW YORK 
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 

BULLETIN 



Issued Under the DlrecUon ^f 

JAMS U. tYMCH 

COmmissiQiier of Labor 



Wliole no. 6S 
Serlci on Labor Orgautzailoa Wo. 2 



Directory or Tradi: Unions 
1914 



h-cpared bj 
THE ftURBAO OF STATISTICS AND £ffFOItMATlO!f 

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Preyious Publications Conceroins: Labor Organization 

; Statistics, Statistics of unions and membership in the State (for 1894 
and 1895) were first published in the annual report of the Bureau of 
Labor Statistios for 1895. Annual statistics have been' published regularly 
from 1897 to date. For the years 1897 and 1898 these were publish^ 
only in the annual reports of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. From 1890 
to 1913 summary figures were published in the Bulletin of that Bureau 
(quarterly in 1899 and 1900, thereafter semi-annually) which after 1900 
became the Bulletin of the Department of Labor, with detailed annual 
figures in the annual reports of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The publica- 
tion of annual figures in a special Bulletin was begun with 1913. 

A compilation of international statistics of trade unions has been pub- 
lished from 1901 to date, except in 1902 and 1908, in the Department Bul- 
letins for December of 1901, March of 1905 and 1906 and September of other 
years. 

Other Publications. Information somewhat fragmentary or general in 
character concerning labor organization is to be found in the reports of the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics for 1885 (chapter on Labor Organizations), 1888 
(section on Union Rates of Wages and Hours of Labor, 1883-7) and 18U4 
(Growth of Organized Labor and its Accruing Benefits). 

More specialized material is to be found in the following: 

Laws and Oourt Decisions as to Labor Combination (16 pp.). Reprint 
from Vol. 17 of the Report of the U. S. Industrial Commission, in Annual 
Report of the New York Bureau of Mediation and Arbitration, 1002, p. 204. 

The Open-Shop Discussion (37 pp*)- Annual Report of • the Conimissioner 
of Labor, 1904, p. 228. 

Union Initiation Fees and Dues (65 pp.). Annual Report of Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, 1907, pp. Ixv and 877. 

History of Typographical Union No. 6 (pp. xx -f- 717). Part I of Annual 
Report of Bureau of Labor Statistics for 1911. 

New York laws concerning labor organization have been regularly included 
in the annual compilation of labor laws published in the Annual Report of 
the Commissioner of Labor. New York court decisions bearing on the sub- 
ject have been regularly included in Bulletin summaries of all decisions 
concerning labor. The U. S. Supreme Court decision in the Hatters' Boycott 
Case, and that court's decision on the anti-discrimination clause of the 
Erdman Law of 1898, both in 1908, were reprinted in Bulletins Nos. 36 and 
38, respectively, of that year. 

Of the publications above referred to, files of which may be found in man^ 
public libraries, the Department can now supply only the following: 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Labor: 1904. 

Annual Reports of Bureau of Labor Statistics: 1895, 1907, 1911, 1912. 

Annual Report of Bureau of Mediation and Arbitration: 1902. 

Quarterly Bulletins: 1899, No. 2; 1902, No. 15; 1905, No. 26; 1907, Nos. 
34, 35; 1908, Nos. 36, 37, 38, 39; 1910, No. 45; 1911, Nos. 47, 48, 49; 1912, 
Nos. 51, 52, 53; 1913, No. 56. 

Bulletins in Series on Labor Organization: No. 1 (whole No. 60); No. 2 
(whole No. 63). 



ALBANY 

J. B. LYON COMPANY. PRINTERS 

1914 



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New York Labor Bulletin 

PabQshed by the State Department of Leber. 

Whole No. 63 Albany July, 1914 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

From time to time various requests have come to the Depart- 
ment for lists of trade unions. Such requests have come not only 
from unions but others as well. This experience, and consider- 
ation of the important position which labor organizations now 
occupy and their close relation to many other social movements^ 
have suggested the usefulness of such a directory as this.* 

The main portion of the directory presents a list of local unions 
in New York 'State. Nearly all local unions are affiliated, how- 
ever, with national or international organizations, and many have 
affiliation with state or district organizations. Accordingly the 
list of local unions is preceded by lists of such national, state 
or district organizations, resulting in four divisions or parts of 
the directory as follows: 

National and Xntematlonal OrganlzatlonB 

This list includes all national organizations both those repre- 
sented by locals in this state and those not so represented, the 
latter being indicated by a dagger (t)« A majority of the national 
trade unions are affiliated with the one federation of national 
unions, the American Federation of Labor, and these are desig- 
nated by an asterisk (*). Only one official (usually the secretary) 
is given for national unions. 

State and District Organizations 
This list comprises organizations state-wide in extent, or for 
districts larger than a single city or village, except where such 
an organization is credited in general fashion to such a city or 

♦A similar directory Issued for a number of years by the Bureau of Statletlcs 
in Massachusetts is reported to be both popular and useful. 



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2 New York Labor Bulletin 

village " and vicinity " in which case it is listed in the third 
division. For many of the trade councils, therefore, the only dis- 
tinction between the second and third divisions is this purely 
geographical one and any one seeking a full list of such organ- 
izations for any particular trade should consult both divisions. 
In this division the organizations are arranged alphabetically by 
trades or name of organization except for railroad trades which 
are gi'ouped together at the end. 

Local Federations and Trade Oooncils 

This part comprises the central labor bodies representing dif- 
ferent trades, and local trade councils confined to a single city 
or village (or such a single locality "and vicinity"). Trade 
councils for definitely wider districts are listed in the second part. 
The arrangement here is by locality, with organizations listed 
alphabetically under each, except that federations of trades or 
general labor unions are placed at the beginning of the list in 
each locality. 

Local TJ&lonB 

These are arranged alphabetically by counties, cities and vil- 
lages, and by trades. To facilitate finding of cities or villages 
when counties are not known, a county and page index of the for- 
mer is given at the end of the directory. The national affiliation 
of any local union may be identified as follows : Local unions, for 
which only the name of the trade (usually abbreviated) is given, 
are affiliated with the national organization of that trade, as given 
in the list of such national organizations (with appropriate word- 
ing of name of local to indicate affiliation where there is more 
than one national organization in the trade). Locals marked 
"Independent," or whose name contains some local designation 
in addition to the name of the trade, have no national affiliation. 
Local unions composed exclusively of women are so indicated. 

Date of Information 

The list of local imions embraces those in the state on Septem- 
ber 30, 1913, the date of the last complete canvass of unions (by 
correspondence or agents' visits) except that unions known to have 
disbanded since that time are omitted, and names and addresses 



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Intboductory Note 3 

of officers are corrected, so far as possible by correspondence, to 
April 1, 1914, or later. The lists of other organizations secured 
by correspondence are as of June 1, 1914. 

AbbroTlationB 

The following abbreviations are used in the lists: 

For organizations: A. F. of L. for American Federation of 
Labor ; K. of L. for Knights of Labor ; L. A. for Local Assembly. 

For officials: P for President; R S for Eocording Secre- 
tary ; F S for Financial Secretary ; S or Secy, for Secretary ; S 
T or Sec Treas for Secretary Treasurer; GST for Grand 
Secretary Treasurer; P S for President Secretary; G S for 
General Secretary; B A for Business Agent; Ch for Chair- 
man, except for locomotive engineers where Ch is an abbrevia- 
tion for Chief, which is the appellation of the presiding official; 
Ch Cond for Chief Conductor. 

For nddresses:* St. for Street; A v. for Avenue; PI. for 
Place; Ter. for Terrace; Pk. for Park; Ed. for Road; Sq. for 
Square; P. O. Box for Post Office Box. 

Trade Union JoumalB and Labor Papers 

Following the list of labor organizations there is appended a 
list of trade union journals received by the Department, whose 
file of such journals is nearly complete, and of labor papers pub- 
lished in Xew York State. The list of trade union journals is 
arranged alphabetically by trades, except those representing rail- 
road trades which are grouped together at the end. These jour- 
nals are all issued monthly except as otherwise indicated. The 
list of labor papers is arranged alphabetically by the cities in 
which they are published. 



*A11 addresses are for New York State unless otherwise noted. 



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NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 



FEDEBATIONS 

American Federation of Iiabor 

Headquarters: 801 G St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 

Samuel Oompers, P; Frank Morrison, S 

Departments 

Building Trades Department, A. F. of 

L. : William J. Spencer, S, Room 401, 

Ouray Bldg., Washington, D. C. 
Metal Trades Department, A. F. of L.: 

A. J. Berres, S, Room 512, Ouray 

Bldg., WaBliington, D. C. 
Mining Department, A. F. of L. : Ernest 

Mills, S, 605 Railroad Bldg., Denver, 

Colo. 
Railroad Bmployees Department, A. F. 

of L. : John Scott, S, 301 Sawyer Bldg., 

St. LonlB^ Mo. 
Union Label Trades Department, A. F. 

of L. : Thomas F. Tracy, S, Boom 708, 

Onray Bldg., Washington, D, C. 

liABOR UNIONS 

Industrial WoricerB of the World 
(Chicago Branch) 

V. St. John, GST, Room 307, 164 W. 
Washington St.. Chicago, 111. 

Industrial Workers of the World 

(Detroit Branch) 
H. Richter, G S T, P. O. Box 651, 

Detroit, Mich. 

Knights of Iiahor 

I. D. Chamberlain, G S T, 43 B St., 
N. W,, Washington, D. C. 

TRADE UNIONS 

*A8be«tos Workers, International Asso- 
eiatlon of Heat and Frost Insulators 
and 

Thomas J. McNamara, S T. 2510 Slattery 
St., St. Louis, Mo. 

*B?*.kern and Confectioners Internationa] 
Union of America, Jonmeymen 

Charles Ittland, S. 212 Bush Temple of 
Music, 221 Chicago Ar., Chicago, 111. 

•B?irber« International Union of 
XmeHr^i, Journeymen 

Jncob Fischer. S T. 222 E. Michigan St., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

♦Birtenders Internationnl T^easrne of 
America. (9e9> Hofnl nnd RoKtiiirant 
Employees Internntionnl Altlnnce.) 

•Bill PoMtor« and Blllers of America, 
Interna tlonal AlTlnnoe of 

Wflllnm McCarthv. S. 14S2-nO Rpoarlwav 
(Room 800. Fitzgerald Bldg.), New 
York, N. Y. 

♦B1arksmltb« and HeTpers, Inter- Bntrher Workmen of America, Brother- 

nntlonol Brotherhood of bood of 

WUfnm F Kramer. S T. Rooms 1270-.sr) Wlllinm J, Bernreitber, S, 200 E. 45th 

Monon Bldg., Chicago, 111. St., New York. N. Y. 

[4] 



BIsoetone Cutters, Flairgers, Curb and 
Bridge Setters of America* Amalga- 
mated 

Edward Broderlck, S, 418 E. Slst St., 
New York, N. Y. 

*Boiler Makers, Iron Ship Builders and 
Helpers of America, InternaAloiial 
Brotherhood of 

W. J. Gllthorpe, S T, Suite 7-12, Law 
Bldg., Kansas City, Kan. 

Bookbinders of If. A., IntcmationaZ 
Brotherhood of 

James W. Dougherty, S T, 222 E. Michi- 
gan St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Bookbinders, National Brotherhood of 

William H. Kennedy, P, 516 W lOTtU 
St., ^ow York, N. Y. 

*Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

C. L. Baine, S T, 216 Summer St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Boot and Shoe Cutters Assembly of the 
Knights of LAbor, NaUonal 

Bennett M. Jayne, S T, 402 North 42d 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Box Makers and Sawyers of America, 
United Order of 

James Curran, S T, 2023 Throop St., 
Chicago 111. 

^Brewery Workmen of America, Inter* 
national Union of the United 

Louis Kemper, S, Vine St., near Hol- 
llster, Cincinnati, Ohio 

*Brick, Tile and Terra Cotta Workers 

Alliance. International 
William Van Bodegraven, S T, 2341 W. 

12th St., Chicago, 111. 

Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers In- 
ternational Union of America. 

William Dobson, S, Drawer 575. Univer- 
sity Park Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

*Brldice and Structural Iron Workers, 
International Association of 

Harry Jones. S T. 422-424 American 
Central Life Bldg., Indianapolis. Ind. 

*Broom and Whisk Makers Union, In- 
ternational 

William R. Boyer, S T, 851 King PL, 
Chicago, 111. 

♦Brnshmakers Internationnl Union 

Goorpre T. Vltzthnn, S T, 2052 Gates Av., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

f Building Laborers International Pro- 
tective Union of America 

S. P. Johnson, G S, 2.S26 Damon St., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



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National. Okganizations 



TRADE i;>'IONS— ConUnued 

Car Workers, Iniernatioiial Aesociatlon 
of 

G. W. Gibson, H T, Koom 1200, Morton 
Bldg., StSH Ho. Dearborn iSt., Chicago, 
111. 

fCard Jftoom Operatives of America* 
Amalgamated (affiliated wliift Vn. 
Textile Woricere ef Amer.) 

Thomas W. Keleher, S. 215 Coffin Av., 
New Bedford, Mass. 

*tCarmen of America, Brotherhood 

Railway 
E. William Weeks, S T, o07 Hall Bldg., 

Kansas City, Mo. 

♦Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
L Hi ted Brotherhood of 

Frank Duffy, S, Carpenters Bldg., In- 
Uianapolis, Ind. 

Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
i^maljamatrnl Society of 

Thomas Atkinson, ;s, 76 Bible House, 
New York, N. Y. 

•Carrlave^ Wacan and AntomohOe 

Worlcers of North America^ later* 
natioml Union of 

William P. Mavell, S T, 30 Chapln Block, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Carriage* Wagon and Automobile 
Worlcers Union 

John Larkin, R S, 066 Cotumbns Av., 
New York City. 

*Cement Workers, American Brother- 
hood of 

Henry Ullner. S T, Room 705, Clunie 
Bldg., California and Montgomery 
Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

Cliandeller, Brass and Metal Worknrs of 
North America, Brotherhood of 

M. J. Grinthal, S, 393 Second Av., New 
York. N. T. 

Chauffeurs Proteetive Association of 
New York State. 

Roy Lowe, S. care Albany Garage, Al- 
bany, N. Y. 

*Cifrar Makers International Union of 
America. 

George W. Perkins, P, Monon Bldg., 
Chicago, IlL 

*Clerkfl. Brotherhood of Railway 

R. B. Fisher. R T. 307-310 Kansas City 
Life Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

*ClerkM International ProtertlTO Asso- 
cifltlon. Retail 

H. J- Conway, S T. Lock Drawer 248, 
Lafayette, Tnd. 

*C1erka, National Federation of Post 
Office 

ThoraflR P. Flflhertv. R T. 1419 Clifton 
St., N. W.. Washington, D, C. 

Clerks, United National Association oi 
Pout Office 

William F. Gibbons, R, Scranton, Pa. 

•Cloth Hat pnd Cnp 3Iakcrs of North 
America, United 

Max Zuokerman, S, 62 E, 4th St., New 
York. N. T. 



*Conunerolal Telegraphers Union of 
America, The 

Wesley Russell, S T, 922-930 Monon 
Bldg., Chicago, lU. 

•Compressed Air aad Foundation 
Workers Union of the United IMates 
and Canada, International 

Henry Kuhlmauu, S, 238 Ten Eyck St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

•Coopers International Union of North 
America 

WilUam K. Deal, S T, Suite A, Bishop 
Bldg., Kansas aty, Kan. 

Custodians of Public Schools of New 

York State 
Thomas F. Keating, S, 91 Pine St., 

Blnghamton, N. Y. 

•CnttiniT IMe aid Cottar Makers, Inter- 
national Union of 

WiUlam Boudg, 8 T, 727 Manida St.. 
New York, N. Y. 

•IMamond Workers Prateettve Union oc 

America 
Andries Meyer, P, 323 Washington St., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

•Dredge Workers Protective Associa- 
tion, International (See Int. Long- 
shoremen's Assn.) 

Dredgemen, Intemntlonal Brotherhood 
of Steam Shovel and 

T. J. Dolan, GST, Snite 508-510, Fort 
Dearborn Bldg., Cliirago, 111. 

Drop and Machine Forgers, Die Sinkers 
and Trimmer Miriiera, United Aoso- 
dntlon of 

E. F. Rlviter, G S T. 106 Rapelye St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

•Blectrieal Workers, Interaaildonal 
Brotherhood of 

Charles P. Ford, S, Pierlck Bldg., 
Springfield, lU. 

Electrical Workers, Internationa^ 
Brotherhood of 

J. W. Murphy, G S, P. O. Box 42, 



ffn. 



Springfield, 



•Elevator Constructors, International 
Union of 

William Young, S T, 418 Perry Bldg., 
10th and Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Engineers, Amalgamated Soriety of: 
American Council 

William Pelahay, S, 309 Broadway, 
New York City 

Engineers BenHlrial Association of the 
U. S., NaUonal Marine 

Georcre A. Grubb, S, 1040 Dakln St., 
Chicago, 111. 

•Engineers, Tntematlonal Union of 
Steam and Operating 

.Tnmps J. Hflnnahan, S, 6334 Yale Av., 
Chicago, 111. 

•Firrmen, International Brotherhood of 
Stntlonary 

C. I.. Rhnmn, S T, 3615 N. 24th St., 
Omaha. Nob. 



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New York Laboe Bulletin 



TRADE VNION&— Conttnued 

^Fishermen's Assoctation, General (See 
Int. Lioni:shoremen's Ass'n) 

^Foundry Employees, International 
Brotherliood of 

George Bechtold, S T, 200 S. Broadway, 
St. Louis, Mo. 

^fFreigrlit Handlers, Brotherhood of 
Railroad 

George H. Kroeger, S, 816-24 Harrison 
St., Chicago, 111. 

^Fur Workers Union of United States 
and Canada, International 

Samuel Korman, S, 89 E. 10th St., New 
York aty 

^Garment Workers of America, United 

B. A. Larger, P, Rooms 116-122 Bible 
House, New York City 

'Garment Workers Union, International 

Ladies 
John Alexander Dyche, S, 32 Union Sq., 

New York City 

*Glas8 Bottle Blowers of the United 
States and Canada 

William Launer, S, Rooms 930-932 
Witherspoon Bldg., Juniper and Wal- 
nut Sts., Philadelphia. Pa. 

t Glass Snappers National Protect! ¥e As- 
sociation, Window 
L. L. Jacklin, S, Kane, Pa. 

'Glass Workers International Associa- 
tion of America. Amalgamated 

A. J. Scott. S, 118 E. 28th St., New 
York City 

tGlass Workers, National Window 

Charles Bryant S, 419 Electric Bldg.. 
Cleveland, Ohio 

*GlaAS Workers Union, American Flint 

William P. narke, S T, 928-32 Ohio 
Bldg., Toledo, Ohio 

*Glove Workers Union of America, 
International 

Elizabeth Chrlstman, S T, Room 506, 
Bush Temple of Music, Chicago, 111. 

Government Employees, National 

League of 
George R. Canty, S, Hingham, Afass. 

^Granite Cutters International Associa- 
tion of America, The 

James Duncan, P, Hancock Bldg., 
Qulncy, Mass. 

^fGrinders and Finishers National 
Union, Pocket Knife Blade 

F. A, nidsbnry. S, 508 Brook St., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Hat Finishers Association of the United 
StatcH of America. Wool 

J. J. Flanagan, S T, Araesbury, Mass. 

Hatters of America, Straw, Panama 
and Lndies 

Wnlter Bnkor, 6 S, 43 E. 22d St., New 
York aty 

*Hatters of North America, United 

Martin Lawlor, S T, Room 15. 11 
Waverly PL, New York City 



Hod Carriers and Building r.aborers 
Association of New Jersey 

John McKee, S, 21 Sylvan PI., Mont- 
clair, N. J. 

*Hod Carriers, Buildinir and Common 
Laborers Union of America, Inter- 
national 

A. Perslon, S T, Box 597, Albany, N. Y. 

*Horsetihoers of the United States auu 
Canada, International Union of Jour- 
neymen 

Hubert S. Marshall, S T, Room 005, 
Second National Bank Bldg.. Cincin- 
nati, Ohio 

*Hotel and Restaurant Employees In- 
ternational Alliance and Bartenders 
International League of America 

Jere L. Sullivan, S, Commercial Tribune 
Bldg., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Hotel Workers Union, International 

Frank J. Hina, S T, 72 W. 36th St., New 
York City 

Inspectors Association of Greater New 
York, United 

P. J. McMahon, P, 801 E. Tremont Av., 
New York City 

*Iron, Steel and Tin Workers, Amal- 
gamated Association of 

M. P. Tlghe, S T, House Bldg., Smith- 
field and Water Sts., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Laborers Union Protective Society 

Michael Dooley, P, 238 W. e7th St., New 
York City 

^Lace Operatives of America, The 
Cliartered Society of Amalgamated 

David L. Gould, S, 545 W. Lehigh Av., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Lathers International Union, Wood, 
Wire and Metal 

Ralph V. Brandt, S T, 401 Superior 
Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 

^Laundry Workers International Union 

Harry L. Morrison, S T, Box 11, Station 
1, Troy, N. Y. 

^Leather Workers on Horse Goods, In- 
ternational United Brotherhood of 

J. J. Pfelffer, S T, 504-5 Postal Bldg., 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Letters Carriers, National Association 
of 

M. J. Finnan, S, 945 Pennsylvania Av., 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

^Lithographers International Protective 
and Beneficial Ansociatlon of the 
United States and Canada 

James M. O'Connor. S T, Langdon 
Bldg., 309 Broadway, New York City 

^Lithographic Press Feeders of the 
United States and Canada, Inter- 
national Protective Association of 

Henry C. Kmnz, S T, 200 E. 23d St., 
New York City 

Lithographic Stone and Plate Preparers 
of America. 

Pntrlrk J. Ryan. G P, Cicero, 111. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



National Obganizations 



TRADK UNIONS— €ontli»i6d 

Uthoffitiphio Workmen, Intematloiud 
Union of 

Wm. J. Riehl, S, 14 Alexander Are., 
Youkers, N. Y. 

LooomotiTo SnsinoerSy Brotherhood of 

C. H. Salmon, G S, 1124 3. of L. E. 
Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 

liOcomotlTO Firemen and Kngrlnemon, 
Brotherhood of 

A H. Hawley, GST, Peoria, 111. 

•Itontrshoremen's Assoclntlon, Inter- 
nntlonnl 

John J. Joyce, S T, 702-4 Brisbane 
Bldg., Buffalo. N. Y. 

lA>n8r»horemeB'e ProtectlTe AeooclntloB 

Patrick J. Nash, P, 420 Hudson St., New 
York City 

Loom Fixers Association, National 

Oliver Christian, S, P. O. Box 8, Law- 
rence, Mass. 

*M»rhlne Printers and Color Mixers of 
the United States, NattonnI Associa- 
tion of 

P. B. Lyons, S, 334 Trenton At., Buffalo, 
N. Y. 



*M olders Union of North Amerloa* In- 
ternational 

Victor Kleiber, S, 530 Walnut St, 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Musical and Theatrical Union, Inc., 
American International 

W. Shurtleff, S, Box 135» StaUon B, 
Washington, D. C. 

*Mnslclaas, American Federation of 

Owen Miller, S, 3535 Pine St., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Painters and Paper Hangers Union of 
America, International 

A. Dryaneroff, O S, 143 E. 103d St., 
New York, N. Y. 

^Painters, Decorators and Paper 
Hangers of America, Brotherhood of 

J. C. Skemp, S T, Drawer 90, Lafayette, 
Ind. 

^Paper Makers, International Brother- 
hood of 

J. T. Carey, P, 127 N. Pearl St., Al- 
bany, N. Y. 

•Pattern Makers League of North 
Ameriea 

... ^. . ^ » * *. • « ■ «. James Wilson, P. Rooms 1006-0 Second 

•Machinists, International Assodatiou National Bank bldg.. Ninth and Main 

Ge^o'rge Preston. S T. 908-914 G St., »*'- ^^<^^^^^^^ 

N. W., McGill Bldg., Washington. 
D. C. 



(Idg., f 
Ohio 



•fMalntenance of Way Bmployees, In- 
ternational Brotherhood of 

S. J. Pegg, S, 27 Putnam Av., Detroit, 
Mich. 

*MarbIe Workers, International Asso- 
ciation of 

Stephen C. Hogan. S T, 406 E. 149th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Masters, Matee and Pilots, American 
Association of 

M. D. Tenniswood, S, 306 Vine St., 
Camden, N. J. 

•Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of 
North America, Amalgamated 

Homer D. Call, S, 212 May Ay., Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 

•Metal Polishers, Buffers. Platers, Brass 
and Silver Workers Union of North 
America 

Chnrles R. Ath^rton, 8 T, Nenve Bldg., 
nnciunatl, Ohio 

•Metal Workers International Alliance, 

Amalcamated Sheet 
John F. BrRy, H T, 407 Nelson Bldg., 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Metal Workers, Brotherhood of 

Chnrlps HeydA. Q S T, Booms 41-43 
Bfekmnn Bldg., M Park Row, New 
York, N. Y. 

^Mlne Workers of America, United 

WlllKtm Green. R T, State Life Bldg., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

•♦Miners. Western Federation of 

KrnoRt Mills. S T, 606 Railroad Bldg., 
Denver, Colo. 



•PaTers, Bammermen, Flag Layers, 
Bridge and Stone Curb Setters, Inter- 
national Union of 

Edward I. Hannah, S, 223 E. &9th St., 
New York, N. Y. 

•Paving Cutters Union of the United 
States of America and Canada 

Carl Bergstrom, Lock Box 27, Albion, 

•Photo-Engravers Union of North 
America, International 

Louis A Schwarz, S T, 218-221 Ray< 
mond Bldg., 5609 Germantown Av., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

•Piano, Organ and Musical Instrument 
Workers International Union of 
America 

Charles Dold, P, 1037 Greenwood Ter- 
race, Chicago, 111. 

•Plasterers International Association of 
the United States and Canada, 
Operative 

T. A. Soully, S T, 442 E. Second St., 
Middletown, Ohio 

•Plate Printers Union of North America, 
International Steel and Copper 

Hiarles T. Smith, S. 612 F St., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

•Plumbers, Gas Fitters. Steam Fitters 
and Steam Fitters Helpers of the 
United States and Canada, United 
Association of Journeymen 

Thomas E. Burke, S T, 411-416 Bush 
Temple of Music, Chicago, III. 

Poster Artists Association of Ameriea 

Roy R. Randall. P S, Box 162, Station 
B, Cleveland, Ohio 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



New York Labor Bitlletin 



TRADB UNIONS— €ontliiii6d 

*Potter8» NaUonal Brotherhood of 
Operative 

John T. Wood, S T, Box 6, East Liver- 
pool, Ohio 

•fPowder Mid Hich Bxploelvo Wovfcere 
of America, United 

Ira Sharpnack, S, R. R. No. 3, Colum- 
bus, Kan. 

^Prtnt Cotter* AModatioa of Amecloo* 
National 

Richard H. Scheller, S T, 229 Hancock 
Av., Jersey City, N. J. 

*Printinir Pressmen and Assistants 
Union of North America* International 

Joseph C. Orr, S T, Rogersvllle, Tenu. 

^Pnlp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers 
of the United States and Canada, In- 
ternational Brotherhood of 

John H. Malin, S, Post Office Drawer 
K, Fort Edward, N. Y. 

*Qnarr7- Woricers International Union 
of North America 

Pred W. Suitor, S T, Scamplni Bldg., 
Barre, Vt. 

Railroad Slffaaimen of Ameriea, 
Brotherhood of 

D. R. Daniels, G S T, 28 Newton St., 



lels. G 
, BCass. 



Mansfield 



tRnllroad Station Agents, Order of 
P. H. Phlnney, 8, Honament Beach, 
Kass. 

Railroad StaUon Employees, Brothet*> 
hood of 

Frank HngrheB. 6 S T, 9 Poole St., 
Medford, Mass. 

*Ballroad Telegraphers, The Order of 

L. W. Quick, S. Star Bldg., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of 

A. E. Kinsr, GST, American Trust 
Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 

Railway Conductors of America, Order 
of 

W. J. Maxwell, GST. Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa 

^Railway Employees of America, Amal- 
iramated Association of Street and 
Electric 

W. D. Mahon. P, 001-608 Hodges Block, 
Detroit. Mich. 

Railway Mall Association (Mail Clerks) 

George A. Wood, S, Portsmouth, N. H. 

*Rock Drillers Association, Interna- 
tional (See International Lonff shore- 
men's Association) 

*Roofers, Compooition, Damp and 
Waterproof Workers of the United 
States and Canada. International 
Brotherhood of 

D. J. Ganlcy. S T, 14 N. Oxford St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

HSaw Smiths National Union 

F. E. Klnp«ley. S, 2728 Ashland Av., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



^Seamen's Union of Anseiiea* Interna- 
tional 

Thomas A. Hanson, S, 570 W. Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

M^Hiinfle Wearers, B a n mi ll Workers 
and Woodsmen, International Union 

WllUam H. Reld, S, 306 Maynard Bldg., 
SeatUe, Wash. 

Shoe Workers of Ameriea, United 

M. J. Traeey, S, Rooms 45-40 Proctor 
Bldg., 31 Exchange St., Lynn, Mass. 

•Slate and Tile Roofers Union of 
America, International 

Joseph M. Gavlok, S T, 3013 W. 47tn 
St., Cleveland, Ohio 

•tSlate Workers, American Brotherhood 
of 

Philip Jago, Jr., 6, Pen Argyle, Pa. 

*Splnners Union, International (aJBllated 
with Un. Textile Workers of Amer.) 

Urban Fleming, S^ 18S Lyman St, Hoi- 
yoke, Mass. 

•Stace Employees of the United Statee 
and Canada^ International AlUance of 
Theatrical 

Lee M. Hart, S T, Boom 607, 1547 
Broadway, New Tork, N. Y. 

•tState, City and Town Employees, 
National Federation of 

J. F. Andrews. S, 83 Morgan St., New 
Bedford, Mass. 

Steam Engine Makers Society 

William F. Dawtry, G S. Market Bldg., 
Thomas St., Strudehlll, Manchester, 
England 

Steam, Hot Water and Power Pipe Fit* 
ters and Helpers of America, Inter- 
national Association of 

W. H. Davles, S T, 1413 W. 67th St, 
Chicago, 111. 

Steam Shovelmen, Associated Union of 

Frank E. Landon, P, 116 Laflln Av., 

Waukesha* Wis. 
J. W. Tracy, S T, 335 South Dearborn 

St., Chicago, III. 

*Steel Plate Transferrers Association 
of America, The 

J. T. W. Miller, S, 1024 Park Road, 
N. W.. Washington, D. C. 

*Stereotypers and Blectrotypers Union 
of North America, International 

George W. Williams, S T, Boom 2y, 
Globe Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

tStofrie Makers licague. National 

F. W. Souderman, S T, Wheeling, 
W. Va. 

*Stone Cutters Association of North 
America. Journeymen 

Walter W. Drayer. S T, Central Life 
Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

*Stove Mounters International Union of 
North America 

Frank Grlmflhaw, S T. 1210 Jefferson 
Av. Bast, Detroit, Mich. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



National, Organizations 



TRADE UNIONS— Concluded 

Sweepers, Drivers and Hostlers Union, 
Metropolitan Protective Association of 

G. Mauro, P, 302 B. 110th St., New York, 
N. Y. 

*SwltGlunen's Union of North America 

M. R. Welch, S T, 326 BrUbane Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

^Tailors Industrial Union (Inteni»> 

tlonal) 
E. J. Bralfl, S, Box S67, Bloomington, 

111. 

•Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen and 
Helpers of America, International 
Brotherhood of 

Thomas L. Hughes, S T, 222 B. Michi- 
gan St., Indianapolis Ind. 

•Textile Workers of America, United 

Albert Hlbbert, S T, Box 742, Fall River 
Mass. 

•Tile liayers and Helpers International 
Union, Ceramic, Mosaic and Bncaustlo 

James P. Reynolds, S T, Room 20, Blair 
Bldg., 12 Federal St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

•Tip Printers, International Brother- 
hood of 

T. J, Carolan, S T, 6 Plum St., Newark, 
N. J. 

•Tobacco Workers International Umon 

E. Lewis Evans, S T, Rooms 50-53, 
American National Bank Bldg., Third 
and Main Sts., Louisville, Ky. 

•Travelers Goods and licather Novelty 
Workers International Union of 
America 

Murt Malone, S T, 191 Boyd St., Osh- 
kosh. Wis. 

•Tug Firemen and Linemen's Assoela^ 
tion. (See Int. Lonirshoremen's Assn.) 



•Tugrmen's Protective Assn., Licensed. 
(See Int. Longshoremen's Assn.) 

•Tnnnel and Subway Constructors In- 
ternational Union of North America 

Michael Carraher, S T, 150 E. 125th St., 
New York. N. Y. 



of 



North 



•Typographical Union 
America^ International 

J. W. Hays, S T, Newton Claypool 
Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

•Upholsterers International Union of 
North America 

James N. Hatch, P, 234 First Av., Long 
Island City, N. Y. 

•fWeavers Amalgamated Association of 
the United States of America, Ebistlc 
Goring 

Alfred Haughton, S, 60 Cherry St., 
Brockton, Mass. 

fWeavers, National Federation of Cloth 

James Whitehead, S, Fall River, Mass. 

' •Weavers Protective Association, Amer- 
ican Wire 

B. E. Desmond, S T, 27 Woodland Av., 
Woodhaven, L. I., N. Y. 

•White Rats Actors Union of America 

W. W. Waters. S, 227-31 W. 46th St., 
New York, N. Y. 

•Wood Carvers Association of North 
America, International 

Thomas J. Lodge, S, 10 Carlisle St., 
Roxbury, Mass. 

Wool Sorters and Graders Association 
of the U. 8.. National 

J. J. Whittaker, P, 25 Cornell St., 

Lowell, Mass. 
Geo. H. Brear, S T, 1 Gamble PL, 

Lawrence, Mass. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE AND DISTRICT ORGANIZATIONS 



FEDSBATIONS 

New York Stat« Federation of L«bor 

Daniel Harris, P, 447 E. 81st St, Brook< 

]yn 
Edward A. Bates, S T, 302 Mary St., 

Utlca 

New York State Federation of Labor: 
]>irliilatlve Committee 

Thomas D. Pitzsrerald, Ch, 210 Jay St., 
Albany, N. T. 



TRADK OBGANIZATIONS 

Allied Printing Trades Council (State) 
David Walsh, S, 923 Pulitzer Bldg., 
New York City 

Bakery and Confectionery Workers: 
Capital DIfitrict Joint Board 

J. Dries, S. 79 Third Av., Albany, N. Y. 

Barbers Association of New York State 
E. H. Colmer, S, 192 Genesee St., Utica, 
N. Y. 

Boilermakers: Eastern Seaboard Dis- 
trict 

John J. Dowd, S, 168 Wilkinson At., 
Jersey City, N. J. 

Boilermakers District Council No. 12: 
New York Central System 

Joseph Ernst, S T, 576 Eagle St., Baf- 
falo. N. Y. 

Boilermakers District Council No. S6: 
American I«ocomotive Co. Plants 

P. W. Donahue, P, 436 Deer St., Dun- 
kirk. N. Y. 

J. S. Nicholas, S, 1923 Stuart Av., Rich- 
mond, Va. 

Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers: 
New York State Conference 

Robert Nethercott, S, Ellendale Av., 
Port Chester 

Bnlldlnir Trades Board of Representa- 
tives for Queens, Nassau and Suffolk 
Counties 

Headquarters: 274 Fulton St., Jamaica 
J. J. Fallon, P, 274 Fulton St, Jamaica 
Charles Bums, S, 274 Fulton St., Ja- 
maica 

Bulldlnir Trades Council: Queens, Nas- 
sau and Suffolk Counties 

Charles Cornell, S, 28 Union St., Flush- 
ing, L. I. 

Carpenters and Joiners State Council 

'r*. M. Guerin. P, 290 Second A v., Troy 
Charles Flesler, S, 508 E. 86th St, New 
York City 

Carpenters and Joiners District Coun- 
cils: Greenburff and Mt. Pleasant 

Joseph Nickerson, S, Main St, Dobbs 
Ferry 



Carpenters and Joiners District Coun- 
cil: Mohawk VaUey 

Frank Scanlon, S, 215 Henry St, Herki- 
mer 

Carpenters and Joiners District Coun- 
cil: Niagara County 

J. L. Smith, S, 222 South St, Lock port 

Carpenters and Joiners District Coun- 
cil: North Hempstead 

Charles L. Honemedein, S, Port Wash- 
ington 

Carpenters and Joiners District Coun- 
cil: North Shore 

Eugene G. Banzett, S, Huntington 

CIgarmakers State Blue Iiabel licugue 

W. R. Ferguson, P, P. O. Box 104, 
Oneida 

Electrical Workers: District Council 
(New York and N. E. Penna) 

L. D. Lacy, P, General Delivery, Utica 
I. S. Scott, S T, 10 Park St, Troy 

Electrical Workers (A. F. of L.) : Int. 
Executive Board — First District 

Headquarters: 50 E. 59th St, New York 
City 

Horseshoers State Association: State 
Charter No. S 

Fred J. Kellerer, S, 23 Bennett St, 
Buffalo 

Lathers, Wood, Wire and Metal: 
Bl-Stote District Council (N. Y. and 

N. J.) 
J. T. Taggert, S, Brevoort Hall, 134 E. 
54th St, New York aty 

I^^hers, Wood, Wire and Metol: West- 
chester County District Council 

David McArdle, S, 14 Palisades Av., 
Yonkers 

l.etter Carriers: New Yorii State Assn. 

R. M. Sherman, S, 1205 Hall St. Elmira 

Longshoremen's District Council: At- 
lanUc Coast District 

James E. Tighe, P, 5 Longwharf, St 

John, N. B. 
William F. Dempsey, S, 159 W. 6th St.. 

South Boston, Mass. 

Machinists District I^odge No. S3: 
Central New York 

Thomas H. Rapple, S, 427 Van Voast 
St, Schenectady 

Machinists District Lodge No. 41: Dela- 
ware and Hudson Railway 

William Semple, S T, Green Island 

Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen's 
State Ass<»ciation 

Homer D. Call, S, 214 May Av., Syracuse 

Molders Conference Board: Central New 

York 
L. E. Gerrity, B A, 314 Hnlett St.. 

Schenectady 



[10] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



State and District Organizations 



11 



TRADE ORGANIZATIONS— Contliiaed 

Pftlnters and Decorators Conference for 
Ontario and Wetitern New York 

R. Sparling, S, 1H42 Cleveland Av., 
Niagara !• alls 

Painters and Decorators Trl-Connty 
Board 

Thomas Wright, S, 746 Coney Island 
Ay., Brooklyn 

Painters and Decorators District Coun- 
cil No. 80: Westciieeter Co. 

Arthur J. Bennett, S, 44 Highland Av., 
New Rochelle 

Painters and Decorators District Coun- 
cil No. 25: Albany and Rensselaer 
Counties 

P. J. Guerin, S, 1050 Fifth Av., Troy 

Painters and Decorators District Coun- 
cil No. 28: Queens and Nassau 
Counties 

Headqnarters : 33 Fnlton St., Jamaica, 

L. I. 
Otto WeUold, S, 280 Sixth Av., Astoria, 

L. I. 
W. J. 0*Donnell, B A, 12 George Si., 

Jamaica, L. I. 
Frank Allen, B A, 324 Hulst St., Long 

Island City 

Painters and Decorators District Coun- 
cil No. 40: Hudson River Counties 

John F. Benst, S, R. F. D. No. 1, 

Poughkeepsie. 
L. E. Smith, B A, 167 Morrison St., 

Poughkeepsie. 
J. L. Netmore, B A, 9 Perry St., 

Poughkeepsie * 

Post Ofllce Clerks: New York State 
Branch 

Arthur French, S, Cortland 

Plumbers: New York State Association 

John S, Strachan, S T, 705 Brandy wine 
Av., Schenectady. 

Plumbers: Westchester County licague 

Patrick Byrne, S, 9 Cliff Av., Yonkers 

Plumbers: District Council of New 
York, New Jersey and Connecticut 

Hugh McOowan, S, 422 E. 77th St., New 
York aty 

Sheet Metal Workers (Amal.): Central 
New York District Council 

George Ball. P, 7 Hamilton St., Utlca 
Nell A. McCualg, S T, 500 Robert St., 
Rome 



Railroad Adjustment, Grievance, Legisla- 
tive and Protective Committees 

Locomotivo Engineers: State I«eglslatlve 
Board 

Thomas Milan, Ch, 1025 Lake St., El- 

mira 
George W. Rlghtson, S T, Box 105, 

Ravena 

Locomotive Ifingineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: B. R. A P. Railroad 

R C. Weaver, Ch, 419 DuBois A v., 
DuBois. Pa. 

John M. Breen, S, 56 York St., Roches- 
ter 



Locomotive Bngineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Boston A Albany 
Railroad 

F. J. Otterson, Ch, 49 Prairie Av., Au- 

burndale, Mass. 
J. W. Mead, S, 416 W. Main St., W. 

Springfield, Mass. 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Brooklyn Rapid 
Transit Co. 

John Murnin, .Ch, 2158 Fulton St., 
Brooklyn 

John F. PhilUps, S, 524 54th St.. Brook- 
lyn 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Central New Eng- 
land Railroad 

John Savage, Ch, 148 Mather St., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Everett Sisson, S, 72 Oakland Terrace, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: D. A H. Railroad 

George M. Parker, Ch, 60 Deitz St., 

Oneonta 
John T. Hines, S, 81 James St, Green 

Island 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: D. L. A W. Rail- 
road 

F. J. Stanton, Ch, Clark's Summit, Pa. 
Wilson Martin, S, 1118 W. Onondaga 
St., Syracuse 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Conunittee: Erie Railroad 

H. A. Kelly, Ch, 7 Erie St., Port Jer- 
vls 

W. H. McCannon, S, Box 170, Susque- 
hanna, Pa. 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Lehigh Valley Rail- 
road 

E. J. Smith, Ch, 232 Park St., Pittston, 

Pa. 
A. S.' Headley, S. 319 Communlpaw Av., 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Long Island Rail- 
road 

D. McLaren, Ch, 19 B. 2l8t St., White- 
stone, L. I. 
H. Ash mead, S, Baldwin, L. I 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: N. Y. C. ft H. R. 
Railroad 

M. J. Flannery, Ch, 180 Sumner Place, 

Buffalo 
J. M. Albright, S, 100 Elm St, Utica 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: N. Y., O. * W. Rail- 
road 

H. S. Ryder, Ch, Box 168, Mlddletown 
Stephen Wood, S, Childs, Pa. 

Locomotive Engineers, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Rutland Railroad 

W. E. Sweeney, Ch. 87 Forest St., Rut- 
land. Vt. 

H. D Holden, S. 138 Church St., Rut- 
land. Vt. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



12 



New York Labor Bulletin 



TRADB ORGANIZATIONS— ContlDiied 

Ziec^BMtire Fireman and Bnffinemoii: 
State L«vUtetlTe Board 

T. E. Ryan, Ch, 11 Delaware St., Al- 

bsny 
James F. Geraghty, S, 574 E. 139th St., 

New York City 

liecomotlve Firemen and Enslnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: B. B. ft P. 
Railway 

J. B. Jordan, Ch, 524 Washington Av., 
DuBois, Pa. 

C. H. Keenan, S T, Box 202 E. Sala- 
manca 

I^ocomotiTe Firemen and Bnslnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: Boston ft Al- 
bany Railroad 

B. H. Rhines. Ch, 32 Hill St., W. Spring- 
field, Mass. 

F. W. Cox» S, 34» Columbus Av., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Locomotive Flren&en and Enirlnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: Boston ft 
Maine Railroad 

Z. L. Blake, Ch, 9 Cambridge St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

A. H. Pike, S T. Box B. MechanlcvUle 

LeeomotlTe Firemen aad Baslnanen, 
Joint Protective Board: Brooklyn 
Heights Railroad 

J. Jacobs, Ch, <K)6 Rockaway Av., 
Brooklyn 

Locomotive Firemen and Bni^nemen, 
Joint Proteetlve Board: Buffalo Creek 
Railroad 

G. N. Hofner, Ch, 183 Park View Av., 
Buffalo 

W. J. Kenney, 3 T, 181 O'Connell Ar., 
Buffalo 

Leeomotive Firemen and Eni:inMnen, 
Joint Protective Board: Central New 
England Railroad 

N. 0. Teed. Ch, 46 Marlbora St., Hart- 

ford. Conn. 
P. Hickey, S, 44 Blrdsall St., Wlnsted, 

Conn. 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: D. ft H. Bail- 
way 

Fred Hanlon, Ch, 20 Durand St.. Platts- 

bnrg 
J. T. Hlnes, S, 81 James St, Oreen 

Island 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnicinemen, 
Joint Protective Board: D. L. ft W. 
Railway 

r. p. Hubler, Ch, Box 543, E. Strouds- 

burg. Pa. 
W. S. Decker, S T, 140 N. 13th St, 

Newark 

Loeomotlvo Ffremem and Bncinemen, 
Joint Protective Board: Erie Railroad 

D. B. Robertson. Ch, 135 E. Myrtle Av., 
Yrtunestown, Ohio 

H. P. Hnnvey, S T, 353 Qlenwood Av., 
Buffalo 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: Lehlirh ft 
Hitdson Railroad 

I. I'.lrd, Ch, Warwick 



Locomotive Firemen and Enslnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: Lei&Igh Val- 
ley Railroad 

Leo Jackson, Ch, Main St., Duryea, Pa. 
H. U. Burkhart S T, 415 Commuuipaw 
Av., Jersey City, N. J. 

Locomotive Firemen and Enslnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: Long Island 
Railroad 

W. J. King, Ch, 302 E. 57th St, New 
York City 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginonen, 
Joint Protective Board: Manhattiwi 
Railway 

H. B. Piuney, Ch, 2(«) W. 133d St.. New 

York City 
Theodore Fry, S, 240 W. 122d St, New 

York City 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: N. Y. C. Ball- 
road (East of Buffalo) 

0. D. Hopkins, Ch, G27 W. Manlius St, 
Syracuse 

G. M. Halght S, 1245 Broadway, 
Rensselaer 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: N. Y., N. H. 
ft H. Railway 

H. M. Walker, Ch, 82 Whltefleld St., 

Dorchester, l^fass. 
P. S. Mahler, S, 277 Belgrade Av., Ros- 

lindale, Mass. 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: N. Y., Ont. 
ft W. Railroad 

1. C. Wallace, Ch, 2S1 North St, Middle- 
town 

C. H. Hanley, S, 61 Rexford St, Nor- 
wich 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen. 
Joint Protective Board: New Jersey 
ft New York Railroad 

G. Wallace, Ch. Spring Valley. 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: Oneida Rail- 
road (Electrified) 

Owen Lynch, Ch, 505% Bear St, Syra- 
cuse 

H. R. Hughes. S T, 170 Blandina St, 
Utlca 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen, 
Joint Protective Board: Rutland RiUl- 
road 

G. E. Smalley, Ch, 44 Pine St, Rut- 
land, Vt 

W. E. Tucker, S T, 03 Grove St, Rut- 
land, Vt 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen. 
Joint Protective Board: South Buffalo 
Railway 

M. Doherty, Ch, South Parkside Av., 
Lackawanna 

Locomotive Firemen and Bnglnemen. 
Joint Protective Board: Staten Island 
Railroad 

L. M. Mohr. Ch, 172 Maple Av., Rose- 
bank, S. I. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



State and District Oegaxiz-vtions 



13 



TRADE ORGANIZATIONS— Continued 

IjooomoUve Firemen and Enflnen&en, 
Joint ProtecUve Board: VUter ft 
Delaware Railroad 

Tliomua Jordan, Ch, 50 Meadow St., 
KlAfi^ston 

Railroad Tcainmen: State L.esielsave 
BcMurd 

Johu P. Ogden, Ch, 224 23d St,. Water- 

vllet 
Jobu Fltzffibbons, LeglslatiTe Agent, 5 

Benson Bldg., Albany 

Railroad Tmlamen, General Orievaaee 
Committee: Boston ft Aibaar Railroad 

M. N. Doyle, Ch, 834 Mlllbnry St., 
Worcester, Jlfaes. 

C. F. Barney, S, 380 Broadway, Rensse- 
laer 

Railroad Trainmen, Gencml Orlovaaee 
Committee: Brooklxn Raotcrn District 
Terminal Railroad 

n. J. Edgar, Ch, C2 Presberger St,, So. 

Osone Park 
H. GerkenB, S, 135 Russel St., Brooklyn 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 
Committcie: BnlTalo, Rochester ft 
Pittsburg Railway 

J. J. Foster, Ch, 124 S. Franklin Av., 

Du Bols, Pa. 
F. R. Hewitt, S, 108 Record St., Punxsn- 

tawney. Pa. 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 

Committee: Bush Terminal Railroad 
J. A. Alford, Ch, 135 57th St., Brooklyn 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grleranee 
Committee: Central New England 
Railway 

J. .1. WaU, Ch, 30 Center St., Hartford, 

Conn. 
B. Flaherty, S, 11 Beekman St., Beacon 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievanoe 
Committee: Delaware ft Hudson Rail- 
road 

M. Dognan, Ch, 227 Liberty St., Sche- 

ne<tady 
John Nichols, S, 65 Broad St., Albany 

Railroad Trainmen, General GrioTanee 
Committee: Delaware^ Lackawanna ft 
M'eRtern Railroad 

TT. J. Welsh, Ch, 315 Fabiufl St., Syra- 
cuse- 

K. G. Lynch, S, 30 Fisher St., Washing- 
ton, N. J. 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 
Committee: lErlm Railroad 

T. H. O'Brien. Ch, 3805 Riverside Av., 

Cleveland, Ohio 
George E. Wells, S, 175 Boulevard, 

Clarion, Ohio 

Railroad Trainmen, General GricTanee 
Committee: L^ke Cham plain ft Moriah 
Railroad 

O. Breeyear, Ch. Port Henry 
A. Putnam, S, Port Henry 

Railroad Trainmen, General GrieTance 
Committee: lichigh ft Hudson River 
Railroad 

V. Reiner, Ch, Warwick 
P. O. Ryerson, S, 71 Rose St., Phllilps- 
burg 



RaUroad Trainmen, Geaeral Grievance 
CouMilHee: Lehigh ft New Rnglaud 
Railroad 

R. Garrls, Ch, Box 485, Pen Argyl, Pa. 

R. Gangler, S, Pen Argyl, Pa. 

Railroad Trainmen* General Grievance 
Committee: l.ehlgli Valley Railroad 

C. A. Donnelly. Ch, IOC Pine St., Pltts- 

tou. Pa. 
R. O. Hannon, S, 021 Ontario Av., 

Niagara Falls 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 
Committee: Long Island Railroad 

C. Lehman, Ch, 100 WhitUer Av., 

Jamaica 
T. F. Taylor, S, 108 Union Hall, Ja^ 

maica 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 
Conunittee: N. Y. C. ft H. R. R. R. 

C. M. HoUday, Ch, 100 Coleridge Av., 

Syracuse 
C. B. Johnson, S, 402 Normal Av, Buffalo 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 
Committee: New York, CMeago ft Si. 
lionls Railroad 

E. J. Stiles, Ch, 450 W. Ferry St., 
BaflTalo. 

E. V. Smith, S, 1430 E. 120tb St, Cleve- 
land, Ohio 

Railroad Trntnasen, General Grievance 
Committee: New York Dock Co. 

W. S. Smith, Ch, 938 Herkimer St., 

Brooklyn 
A. Fay, S, 41 Hull St., Brooklyn 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 

Committee: New York, New Haven ft 

Hartford Railroad 
John L. Rowe, Ch, 353 Nlchol St., 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
J. W. Frldcnburg, S, 39 Prout St., New 

Haveu, Conn. 

Railroad Trainmen* General Grierance 
Committee: New York, Ontario ft 
Western Railway 

J. W. Flanagan, Ch, 85 Silver St., Nor- 
wich. 
T. M. Galvln, S, 06 B. 8th St., Oswego 

RiUlroad Trainmen, General Grievance 
Committee: RnUand Railroad 

F. J. Butterfly, Cli, 102 Bellevue Av., 
RuUnnd, VL 

W. J. Ashllne, S, Box 300, Rouses Point 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 
Committee: Staten Iflland Rapid 
Tramiit Co. 

James R. Huff, Ch, 18 Cottage PI., Port 

Richmond 
C. H. Bardes, S, 18 Rosebank PI., Port 

Richmond 

Railroad Trainmen, General Grievance 
Committee: Ulster ft DHaware Rail- 
road 

G. Freer. Ch, 14 Smith Av., Kingston 
J. Rmedcs, S, 40 Elmcndorf St., Kings- 
ton 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: B. 1.. ft R. Railroad 

W. C. Newell, Ch, 10% Burrows St, 

Rooboster 
R. B. Bushmell, S, 13 Erie St., Albion 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



14 



New Yoek Labor Bulletin 



TRABB ORGANIZATIONS— CoBClnded 

Rallwaj Conductors, Goaeral Adjust- 
mont Committee: Central New Sng- 
land Railroad 

D. O'Hearn, Ch, Millerton 

M. E. Klley, S, W. Suffleld, Conn. 

Railway Condnctore, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: D. L. A W. Railroad 

J. T. Downey, Ch, 003 Sunset Av., Utlca 
B. L. Bennett, S, 1006 College Av., 
Elmlra 

Railway Conductors* General Adjust- 
ment Conunlttee: Delaware A Hudson 
Railroad 

J. E. Rhodes. Ch, Box 444, Whitehall 
W. D. Hall, S, R. F. D. No. 2, Water- 
vUet 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Delaware A North- 
ern Railroad 

L. E. Sanford, Ch, Margaretvllle 
H. A. Liddel, S, Margaretville 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Erie Railroad 

U. E. Zimmerman, Ch, 709 Girard At., 
Marlon, Ohio 

J. C. Hullinger, S, d8 Warren St, Hunt- 
ington, Ind. 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Hudson Valley Rail- 
road 

Harry Fort, Ch, Greenwich 

M. J. Spohn, S, Box 250. Stillwater 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: I^ehigh A Hudson 
River Railroad 

Edwin Carroll, Ch, 157 Broad St, 

Phillipsburg 
Lewis Batson, S, Warwick 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Lehigh Valley Rail- 
road 

O. D. France. Ch, 259 Jersey St., Buffalo 
H. S. rennell. S, Lehlghton, Pa. 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Long Island Rail- 
road 

B. L. Purlck, Ch., Port Jefferson Sta- 
tion 

F. J. Miller, S, 7 Candace St., Jamaica 

Ridlway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: N. T. C. ft H. R. 
Railroad 

H. Welch. Ch, 294 Dartmouth St., 
Rochester 

C. A. Martin, S, 120 Merriam Av., Syra- 
cuse 

Railway Conductors. General Adjust- 
ment Committee: N. Y., N. H. ft H. 
Railroad 

C. S. Brigham, P.. 721 Main St, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

C. W. Merrill, S, 29 Evergreen St., Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Railway Conductors, General Adjast- 
ment Committee: N. T.. O. ft W. Rail- 
way 

M. (\ Hoke. Ch.. HR E. 6th St.. Oswego 
F. Vincent, S. 21 Hopper St., Utlca 



Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Oneida Railroad 

George BicAndus, Ch, 101 Jefferson Av., 

Utlca 
John Smith, S, 206 West Av., Utica 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Rutland Railroad 

J. F. Stuart, Ch. 48 Killington Av., 
Rochester 

F. S. Paige, S, 40 Patterson St, Ogdens- 
burg 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Staten Island Rapid 
Transit Company 

W. J. Reeves, Ch, Tottenvllle 
John Nichols, S, 39 Chestnut Av., Rose- 
bank 

Railway Conductors, General Adjust- 
ment Committee: Ulster ft Delaware 
Railroad 

W. H. Hickok, Ch, 70 Elm St., Oneonta 

G. B. Mattice, S, 3 Hickory St, Oneonta 

Street and Electric Railway Bmployecs: 
Joint Legislative Committee 

James E. Murphy, S, 417 Wolf St, 
Syracuse 

Street and Electric Railway Employees: 
New York State Railways Joint Con- 
ference Board 

Frank E. Bullard, S, P. O. Box 103, 
Glens Falls 

Switchmen. Adjustment Board: B. R. ft 
P. Railroad 

E. Murnin, Ch, 777 Clinton St, Buffalo 

Switchmen, Adjustment Board: Buffalo 
Creek Railway 

B. L. Simons, Ch, 549 Swan St., Buffalo 

Switchmen. Adjustment Board: D. L. ft 
W. Railroad 

M. J. Flaherty, Ch, 1017 Browns' Court 
Scranton, Pa. 

Switchmen, Adjustment Board: Erie 
Railroad 

E. G. Myers, Ch., 43 Davey St., Buffalo 

Switchmen, Adjustment Board: L. 8. ft 
M. 8. Railroad 

T. C. Cashen, Gen Ch, 1350 187th St, 

Cleveland, Ohio 
G. C. Roth, Loc Ch. 42 Brewster St, 

Buffalo 

Switchmen, Adustment Board: Lehigh 
Valley Railroad 

J. A. Flynn, Ch, 17 Norman St. Buffalo 

Switchmen, Adjustment Board: New 
York Central Railroad 

Thos. O. Meaney, Ch, 175 May St, 
Buffalo 

Switchmen, Adjustment Board: Penn- 
sylvania Railroad 

W. H Watchorn, Ch, 475 Wlnslow Av., 
Buffalo 

Switchmen, Adjustment Board: South 
Buffalo Railway 

H. T. Turner, Ch, 725 Abbott Roaa. 
Buffalo 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LOCAL FEDERATIONS AND TRADE COUNCILS 



AIAANT 

Central F«denitloB of lAbor 

John J. Dillon, S, 45 Second St. 

Allied Printlngr Trades Council 

Francis E. J. Rich, S, B. F D. No. 1 

Bulldlnff Trades' Council 

Emil E. Miowsky, S, 212 Hamilton St. 

Carpenters and Joiners District Council 

F. C. Ludlum, R S, 562 Washington Av. 

Plambers: District Association of Al- 
bany- and Vicinity 

E. C. Ball. S, 9 Jumel PL, Saratoga 

Springs 
Union LAbel I«eagne 

G. J. Davis. S, 95 First St. 



AMSTERDAM 

Central Liabor Union 

William H. Stanley, S. Box 104 

Textile Council 

John Toon. P, 16 Swan St., rear 
Harry J. Qale, S. 38 Garden St. 



AUBURX 

Central Labor Union 

A. D. Mandy. S, 24 HoUey St. 



BATAYIA 

Central Labor Union 

William McSweeney. S. 

Carpenters and Joiners District Council 

F. C. Miller, S, 512 BlUcott St. 



Building Trades Council 

Robert L. Alger, S, 239 Barton Si 

Carpenters and Joiners District Council 

W. W. VanUne, S, 12 E. Eagle St. 

Machinists District Lodgtf No. IS: Buf- 
falo and Vicinity 

R. W. Hagner, S, 311 Law Exchange, 
Buffalo 

Metal Trades Council 

Adolph Weber, S. 419 Dodge St. 

Molders Conference Board: Buffalo and 
Vicinity 

Joseph Harris. B. A., 212 Law Exchange 
Bldg., Buffalo 

Painters and Decorators District Coun- 
cil. No. 4 

W. O. Roderick. S, 80 Marshall St. 
M. T. Conley, B A. 38 E. Tupper St. 

Union Label League 

Harry Slater. S, 312 Syracuse St. 

United Trades and Labor Council 
John Clark. P, Law Exchange Bldg. 
Frank Zeltz, R S, 255 E. Genesee St. 
Simon P. O'Brien. F S, 293 Hamburg St. 
John Coleman, B A. Law Exchange 
Bldg. 

COHOES 

Central Federation of Labor 

Walter A. McCoy. S, Box 143 

Building Trades- Council 

H. J. Lancaster, S, 229 Remsen St. 

Textile Council 

Patrick Cooey, P. Johnston Av. 
Walter A. McCoy, S, 85 Oneida St. 



BINGHAMTON 

Central Labor Union 

Jeremiah Ryan, S, 77 State St. 

AUled Printing Trades Council 

W. T. Squires, S, P. O. Box 1033 

Building Trades Council 

J. Ryan, S, 77 State St. 

Union Label League 

Jeremiah Ryan, S. 77 State St. 



BUFFALO 

Central Labor Council (A. F. of L.) 
William Heatley, S, 07 Potomac Av. 

Allied Printing Trades Council 

W. J. McLaughlin, S, P. O. Box 502 

Blacksmiths' District Council No. 88 of 
Buffalo 

Frank Beacherer, P. 313 Read St., 

Buffalo 
W. E. Roberts, S, 634 Sixth St., Niagara 

Falls 



CORINTH 

Central Trades and Labor Assembly 
H. E. Selgel, S. Box 106 



CORNING 

Central Associated Trades Council 
E. L. Crego, S, 323 E. 2d St. 



CORTLAND 

Central Trades and Labor Assembly 
Burt M. Mudge, S, 14 Railroad St. 



DEPEW-LANCASTER 

Central Labor Union 

William J. Gerrlnger, S, Box 259 



DUNKIRK 



United Trades and Labor Council 

Henry Flck, S, 227 King St. 



[16] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



16 



!New York Labor Bulletin 



DUNKIRK— Concluded 

BlavksmlthR District Council No. SS: 
Locomotive Smiths and Helpers of 
Dunkirk 

William Phillips, P, 753 Deer St. 
Fred Knope, S, 631 Grant Av. 

Metal Trades Conndl 

J. G. Sause, S, 21 Courtney St. 



' ELMIRA 

Central Trades and Labor Assembly 

William J. Finnegan, S, 114 S. William 
St. 

Building Trades Conndl 

Edward W. Phelps, S, 553 Coburn St 

Carpenters and Joiners District Council 

Charles Albertson, S, 1352 Lake St. 



LITTLE FALLS 

Trades Assembly 

R. T. Seattle, S, CO Jackson St. 



LOCKPORT 

Central Labor Union 
Mortimer W. Clark, S. 



HIDDLBTOWN 

Central Labor Union 

B. F. Judson, S, 145 Prospect Av. 



MT. VERNON 



Central Labor Union 

W. B. Uockett, 8, 51 S. 4th Av. 



FORT EDWARD 

Trades Assembly 

Henry Hussard, S, Box 100 



FULTON 

Bnlldlngr Trades Council 

Jay Fuller, S, 10 W. Fourth St. 



GENEVA 

Federation of Labor 
M. F. Tracy, S, Box 162 



GLENS FALLS 

Central Trades and Labor Assembly 

Charles C. Guy, S. 



GLOVERSVILLS 

Central Labor Union 
William Hale, S, 92 Yale St. 



HUDSON 

Central Labor Union 

Albertus Nooney, P, 539 Prospect St. 



ITHACA 

Central Labor Union 
M, F. Nolan, S, Box 186 



JAMESTOWN 

Central Labor Council 

H. A. Hartman, S. Box 402 

Allied Printlnip Trades Council 

J. S. McCallum, S, 80 Falconer St. 



KINGSTON 

Central Trades and Labor Council 

Michael I. Dunne, S, 59 Staples St. 



LANCASTER (See Depew-Lancaster) 



NEWBURGH 

Central Labor Union 

Miss Emma McCauley, S, 150 Broadway 



NEW ROCHELLE 

Central Labor Union 

Abner J. Kuhn, S, 90 Church St. 



NEW YORK CITY 
Bronx Borough 
Bronx Labor Council 

Headquarters: 2998 Third Av. 
J. Wolf, P, 2IH)8 Third Av. 
Ed. Miller, S, 2998 Third Av. 

BuildlniT Trades Board of Representa- 
tives 

Headquarters: Arthur Bldg., Tremont 

and Third Av. 
John r. Tmhof, P, Arthur Bldg. 
J. P. McGrane, S, Arthur Bldg. 

Brooklyn Borouyk 
Central Labor Union 

Headquarters : 949 Wllloughby Av. 
M. De Young, P, 193 Schaeffer St. 
Otto Nichols, S, 764 Metropolitan Av. 

Knlgbts of Labor District Assembly No. 
220 

Headquarters: 2 Ralph Av. 
John McCarthy, M W, 3249 Fulton St. 
C. Hill, S, 240 Ninth Av. 

Building Trades Board of Delegates 

Headquarters: 137 Court St. 
Wm. P. Kenneally, P. 333 Second Av., 

New York City 
C. Burns, S, 218 Monitor St. 

Combined Assodatlon of Engineers 

Headquarters: 125 So. Elliott PI. 
Jas. O. Westberg, P, 125 So. Elliott Pi. 
Chas. McCuen, S, 295 Tompkins Av. 

Laborers Protective Union General 

Council (L. I.) 
J. Dooley, P. 102 Russell St. 
M. Kane, S, 88(H Fifth Av. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Federations and Trade Councils 



17 



NBW YORK CITY—Brooklyn, concluded 

Palnt«ni and Decorators District Coun- 
cil No. 29 

Headquarters: 67 Myrtle Av. 
Val. Duswalt, S, 67 Myrtle A v. 

A. Pracht, B A, 1451 Gates A v. 
C. Brymer, B A, 81 Hopklus St. 

Woven Label Weavers District Council 

Chas. KitigstoD, K, 71 Woodruff Ay. 

M^»»h»^j»w Borough 

Central Federated Union 

HeadquarterH: 243 E. K4th St. 
T. J. Curtis, P, LIO E. 12oth St. 
Ernest Bohm, S» 210 E. 5th St. 

Industrial Workers of the World: New 
York District Coancil 

Headquarters: 22U5 Third Ay. 
Thomas Flynn, S, 2200 Third Av. 

Labor Council of Greater New York 

Headquarters: 243 E. HUh St. 
Aug. J. Joo8, S, 451 Linden St., Brook- 
lyn 

Tnited Hebrew Trades 

B. Weinstein, S, 151 Clinton St. 

Allied Println«r Trades CounHI 

Headquarters: Pulitser Bldjf. 
Thos. J. (farroll, P. 923 PullUer Bldg. 
Peter J. Brady, S, 923 Pulitzer Bldg. 

Bakery and Confectionery Workers 
Joint Execntiye Board 

Headquarters: 821 E. 73d St 
J. H. Hesse, S, ^41 E. 25th St. 

Bakery and Confectionery Workers: 
Anti-Bread Trust Conference 

Walter Vojyel, S, 59 Fenner Av., Pater- 
son, N. J. 

Boilermakers District Council No. 2 of 
New York 

P. T. Kenneally, P, 9 Magnolia Av., 



'ally, 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Gerald A. Daly, S T, 
Brooklyn 



676 60th St., 
Board (Int. 



Bookbinders Central 
Brotherhood) 

Headquarters: Room 903, 
150 Nassau St 
J. F. Brosnan. P, 150 Nassau St. 
H. Patrie. S, 23 Duane St. 

Brewery Workmen's Joint Council 

Headquarters: 243 E. 84th St. 
Charles Weyell, S, 243 E. 84th St. 

Bricklayers, Bfasons and Plasterers: 
Greater New York Executive Conoi- 
mittee 

Headquarters: N. W. cor. 36th St. 

and Ninth Av. 

Samuel Tom ley, P. 90S Amsterdam Av. 

Thomas Murray, S, 1554 Minford Place 

Bu9in€8$ Agents 
Brooklyn : 
William Dwyer. 194 Butler St.* 
Andrew Streit, 1726 Gates Av. 

Manhattan and Bronx: 

J. J. Donnelly, 1590 E. 10th St,. 
Brooklyn 

Edw. Dunn, 239 E. 84th St. 

John Gill, 1520 Roselle St., West- 
chester 



P. Hopkins, 707 Courtland Av. 
William Chalmers, 243 E. S4th St. 
Louis Mazsola, 413 E. 114th St 

Queens : 
John Bartley, 28 Isabella PL, ABtorU 

Building Trades Council 

Headquarters: Brevoort Hall, 154 
E. 54th St. 
R. n. Tompkins, S, 154 £. 54th St 



Bnlldinc Trades af 

Vicinity: United Boards of Bualmess 
Affents 

Headquarters: Breroort Hall, 154 

E. 54th St.. New York City 

John T. Taggert, P, 320 Highland Av., 

Mt. Vernon 
Boswell D. Tompkins, S, 509 W. 157tb 
St., New York cnty 

Building Trades of New York and Long 
iHland: KxeeutlTe Council of Hie 
United Boards of Business Agonts 

Headquarters: Brevoort Hall, 154 

E. 54th St.. New York City 

John T. Taggert, P, 320 Highland Av., 

Mt. Vernon 
Roswcll D. Tompkins. S, 609 W. 157th 
St., New York City 

Butchers Council of New York (Brothor- 
hood) 

Headquarters: 200 E. 45th St 
John WalBh, P, 200 E. 45th St 
P. McDennott, S. 200 E. 45th St. 

Carpenters and Joiners District Council 

Hondquarters: 142 E. 59th St 
E. L. Welsh, P, 142 E. 69th St 
Oliver Collins, S. 142 E. 69th St 



Business Agents 

Bronx : 
J. T. Donovan, 594 Eagle Av. 
C. Ba usher, 1370 Franklin Av. 
S. O'Brien, 446 E. 179th St 
W. Anderson, 1488 A'yse Av. 

Brooklyn: 
I>. Hancock, 255 Atlantic At. 
W. O'Orady, 255 Atlantic Av. 
G. Schoher, 255 Atlantic Av. 

E. Bradley, 255 Atlantic At. 

Manhattan : 

W. J. Connell. 142 E. 50th St 

F. Nylnnd. 142 E. 59th St. 
J. M<»rri8on, 142 E. 59th St 
J. Rice, 142 E. 59th St. 

Queens : 
J. Quinn, 54 N. 7th St., Whitestonc 
H. Phillips, 399 Boulevard, Rockaway 

Beach 
A. Cuttfl, 15 Oxford Av., Jamaica 
I. W. Stock, 312 8th Av., Long Island 
City 

Richmond : 
James Martin, 6S4 Van Duxer St. 

Stapleton 
A. L. McCallum, 141 Manor Road, 
West New Brighton 

Carriage, Wagon and Automobile 
Workers: Joint Exemtive Board 

John Larkin, S, 988 Columbus Av. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



18 



Xew York Labor Bulletin 



NBW TOBK CITT— BfaahAtten, contiiiued 

Cigmr Makers Joint Adviftory Board 

Headqaarters : 134 Seventh St. 
William Strauss, P, 920 Broadway, 

Brooklyn 
D. Levy, S, »53 Third Av. 

Clear Makers Union Label Leaguo 

Headquarters: 321 E. 73d St. 
J. C. Hilsdorf, P, 246 nrst Av. 
D. Levy, S, 470 E. 172d St. 

Coopers Joint Bxecntive Board 

Headquarters: 243 E. 81th St. 
Albert Streicher, S, 1476 St. Lawrence 
Av. 

Laborers Union Protective Society Gen- 
eral Cooncil 

Headquarters: 229 E. 47th St. 
Michael Dooley, P, 238 W. 67th St. 
Matthew Sullivan, S, 229 E. 47th St. 

Lonssboremen's District Council: New 
York City and Vicinity 

Henry Stover, P, 325 Willow Av., Ho- 

boken, N. J. 
John J. Kuehns, S, 213 Clinton St, Ho- 

boken, N. J. 

Lonssboremen's Union Protective Asso- 
ciation Bxecntive Board 

Headquarters: 420 Hudson St. 
Richard J. Butler, P, Bayside 
Daniel Sullivan, S, 259 Ninth Av. 

Business Agents 

Patrick Clancy, 416 E. 18th St. 
John Nolan, 529 Park Av., Hoboken, 
N. J. 

Macbinists District Lodce No. 10: New 
York City and Vicinity 

Headquarters: 203 E. 56th St. 
James Bell, P, 253 36th St., Brooklyn 
J. B. Wilson, S, Room 602 Morton Bldg., 
110 Nassau St. 

Business Agents 

Michael T. Neyland 
William Brandey 
E. J. Deerinjr 
W. J. Carney 

Headquarters: 116 Nassau St. 

Metal Trades Council 

M. T. Neyland, S, 110 Nassau St. 



Molders Conference Board: New York 
City and Vicinity 

Headquarters: 67 St. Marks PI. 
Henry Frank, P, 76 Hall St., Brooklyn 
Bernard Kelly, S, Morton Bid?., 110 

J. B. Keaiing, B A, Morton Bldg., 110 
Nassau St. 

Pavers and Rammermen's General 
Council 

Headquarters: 223 E. 50th St. 
T, Connaughton, P, 223 E. 50th St. 
Edw. Broderlck, S, 223 E. 50th St. 
J. O'Rourke, T, 223 E. 59th St. 

Painters and Decorators District Coun- 
cil No. 9 

Headquarters: 177 E. 87th St. 
Thomas McMurray. P, 260 W. 135th St. 
J. M. Wilson, S, 753 Tlnton Av. 



Business Agents 

William Young, 179 W. 89th St. 
H. Marks, 1628 Washington Av. 
J. C. Schultz, 409 E. 86th St 
L. Zeve. 1378 Boston Road 
E. C. Freeman, 2634 8th Av. 

Plasterers Council of New York <Opera- 
Uve) 

Headquarters: 210 Fifth St 
J. H. O'KelUy, P, 133 Bright St, Jersey 

aty, N. J. 
J. J. Nilan, S, 192 East End Av. 

Business Agents 

J. J. Dooley, 103 E. 125th St. 
J. P. Leavey, 103 B. 125th St 
J. La Monte, 108 E. 125th St 

Plumbers and Gas Fitters District 
Council of Greater New York 

Headquarters: 243 E. 84th St 
C. Moriarlty, P, 102 Commerce St., 

Newark N J 
J. Gray, § T,' 153 97th St, Brooklyn 

Piano and Organ Workers Joint Board 

Headquarters: 444 Willis Av. 
Charles Dold, P. 1551 Second Av. 
John Walz, S, 29 Wilson Av., Astoria 

Sbeet Metal Workers (Amal.) : District 
Council of Greater New York and 
Vicinity 

J. H. Sleight P, 143 Main St, Nyack 
O. Pask, S, 33 Tichnor Place, Montclair, 
N. J. 

Steam and Operating Bngineers Joint 
ExecntlTe Board 

Headquarters: Temple Bar Bldg., 
Brooklyn 
Thomas Bagley, P, 110 Mercer St 
WUllam M. Gavan, S, 644 Bush wick Av., 
Brooklyn 

Business Agents 

M. Murphy, 154 B. 54th St 

M. A. McConville, 431 E. 13Sth St 

R. A, Walton, 641 E. 149th St 

"\ P. Nolan, 307 W. 54th St 

J. E. Donahue, 307 W. 54th St. 

Joseph Muntefering, 949 Willoughby 

Av., Brooklyn 
C. H. Hall, 125 First Av., New Brighton 

Tailors Joint Board (Un. Brotherhood) 

Headquarters: 142 Second Av. 
Joseph Gold, Ch, 250 Grove St., Brook- 
lyn 
Joseph Schlossberg, S T, 89 Delancey 

St 

Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen and 
Helpers District Council 

Headquarters: 346 Eighth Av. 
^»nrtln I.acey, P, 347 W. 43d St. 
W. O'Neill. S, 142 Sevpnfh St. 
IMwln Gould, T, 888 Third Av. 

Business Agents 

Commission Wagon Drivers: 
H. MrCormick. Washington and Har- 
rison Sts. 
D. Murray, care Utah House, 25th St. 
and Eighth Av. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Fedekations and Trade Councils 



19 



NEW YORK CITY— Manhattan, conelaied 



Excayatlng and Sand Teamsters: 
D. Webster, 229 E. 47tli St. 
Andrew Burnett, 527 W. 133d St. 

Department Store Driyers: 
William O'Brien, 301 W. 25th St. 

Retail Furniture Drivers: 
C. Braunsteiu, 20 Orchard St. 

House Wreckinsr Drivers: 
Henry Berger, 62 Pitt St. 

Chauffeurs and Cab Drivers: 
J. P. Daly. 305 W. 54th St. 

Railway Baggage and Transfer Team- 
sters : 
M. Lacey, 347 W. 43d St. 

Building Material Drivers: 
P. Carroll, 51 E. 134th St. 
F. O'Brien, 450 W. 48th St. 

Theatrical Teamsters: 
M. Lacey, 347 W. 43d St. 

Truck Drivers: 
William O'Neill 
J. Larkln 
J. Brennan 
William Brown 
Headquarters: 147 Seventh St. 

Tunnel and Sabway Constructors Dis- 
trict Council 

Headquarters : 150 B. 125th St. 
Thomas E. O'Brien, P, 511 W. 50th St. 
Michael Carraher, S, 325 Cypress Av.. 
lonkers 

Business Agents 

Thomas J. Curtis, 346 B. 204th St. 
A. Sallimbene, 216 E. 108th St 

Union Isabel Leairue 

Peter J. Brady, S, 300 Pulitzer Bldg. 

Queens Borough 

Building Trades Board of Bepresenta- 
tlves 

Hemlnuarters: 274 Fulton St., Jamaica 
f/..'^- ^laJlon, P, 274 Fulton St., Jamaica 
Chas. Burns, S, 274 Fulton St., Jamaica 

BIchmond Borough 
Central Trades and Labor Council 

Edw. Porter, P, 86th St. and Third Av., 

New York City 
Peter F Markey, S, 3380 Westervelt Av.. 

TompklnsviUe 

Building Trades Board of Bepresenta- 
tives 

Headquarters: 1326 Richmond Road. 

Dongan Hills, N. Y. 
•^cf- ,^'artin, P, 232 Richmond Road. 
Stapleton 

E. J. Gibbons, S, 1326 Richmond Road. 
Dongan Hills, N. Y. 

NIAGABA FALLS 

S™?/*«*"^ Labor Council 

F. M. P«rry, S, 1877 Llnwood Av. 

Allied Prtnting Trades Council 

A. Trowell. S, 1335 Willow Av. 



Building Trades Council 

William J. Hallett, S, 1639 Llnwood Av. 

NOBWICH 

Trades Assembly 

J. J. Dillon, S, 36 Adelaide St 

OODBN8BUBO 

Trades and Labor Council 

D. T. Letham, S, 85 Elizabeth St. 



GLEAN 

Trades and Labor Council 

D. Burley, S. Box 401 



GNBIDA 

Trades Assembly 

P, F. Splckler, S, 2 West St. 

Union Label League 

H. L. Williams, S, 17 William St. 



GNEGNTA 

Trades and Labor Council 

J. Meader, S, Box 302 

OSWEGG 

SJrtJf* ^"^S^ •"* lAbor Assembly 

William H. Carr, S, 210 Syracuse Av. 

Building Trades Council 

B. C. Bough, S, 144 W. Bridge St. 

PEEK8K1LL 

Trades and Labor Assembly 

Peter C. Tompkins, S, 119 Bay St. 

PLATT8BUBO 

Trades and Labor Assembly 

John M. Derby, S, 41 Rugar St. 

PORT CHESTEB 

Carpenters and Joiners District Coon- 
cll: Port Chester and Vldnlty 

Albert A. Gasteiger, S, 523 Bllendale 
Av., Port Chester 



POBT JEBVIB 

Central Labor Union 

Charles B. Dalley, S, 56 Hudson St. 

PGUOHKEEP8IE 

Trades and Labor Council 

Philip C. Klein, S, 732 Main St. 

Union Label League 

Thomas Butler, S, 104 Deliafleld. St. 
Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 



New Yoek Labob Bulletin 



BOCHESTBB 

Ontral Trades and Labor Coanoll 

Ileury Flaherty, S, 223 Brooks At. 

AlUed Printing Trades Council 

W. U. Birmingham, S, 43 Henrietta St. 

Bulldingr Trades Council 

I). Gibson, S, 55 Joslyn Park 

Carpenters and Joiners District Council 

Goorfje 11. Wright, S, 100 Reynolds 

Arcade 

Coopers Joint Executive Board 

G(*oree F. Fisher, S, 17 Lewis St. 

Metal Trades Council 

AV. L. Burke, S, 286 Brown St. 

Painters and Decorators District Coun- 
cil No. 18 

William K, Harrington, S. 20 Fountain 

St. 
John H. Baker, B A, 42 Exchange St. 



BOMB 

- Trades Assembly 
John IL O'Neill, S. 

Building Trades Council 

Neil A. McCuaig, S. 500 Robert St. 



SABANAC LAKE 

Central Labor Union 

John J. Murphy, S, 101 Broadway 



SCHENECTADY 

Trades Assembly 

John Radley, S, 112 S. Ferry St 

Buildinsr Trades Council 

Douglas H. Pratt, S, care Freeman & 
Son, 124 Wall St 

Union Labd Learue 

P. M. Bleser, S, 802 Emmett St 



8TBACU8E 

Central Trades and L«bor Assembly 

Charles A. Yates, S, 305 S. Warren St 

Allied Printlnir Trades Council 

Charles Hemans, S, 206 S. Grouse Av. 

Building Trades Council 

Charles F. Brown, S, 54 Mowry Apart- 
ments 

Carpenters and Joiners District Council 

John Dodd, S, 307 Bishop Av. 



IfMkAnlsts Dlsti«ct Lodye Ma. Ss Sym- 

cuse and Vicinity 
Edwin D. Marcbent, P, B. D. No. 9, 

Auburn 
James G. Forsyth, S, 206 Pond St., 
Syracuse 

Metal Trades CowuU 

C. W. Garlock, S, 306 Cedar St 

Union Label Leagne 

E. F. Carroll, S, 210 Eldorado St 



TBOY 

Central Fcideraiion of L«b«r 

T. F. Flanagan, S, Federation Hall 

Carpenters and Joiners District Conncll 

Junies G. Wilson, S, 75 Albany Av., 
Green Island. 

UTICA 

Trades and Labor Assembly 

Alex. Rosenthal, S, Box 167 

Allied Printing Trades Council 

P. E. Kelley, S, care The Dispatch 

Building Trades Council 

George M. Ball, S, 7 Hamilton St 

Union Label League 

Miss Louisa Stritt, S, 44 St Vincent St 



WALDBN 

Central Labor Union 

Nathaniel Nutt S. 



WATBBTOWN 

Central Trades and Labor Assembly 

Stephen J. English, S, 279 State St 

Allied Printing Trades Council 

C. M. Burnett S, care The Reunion 



WHITB PLAINS 

Central Labor Union 

C. H. Cypher, S, «4 Spring St. 



TONKBB8 

Federation of Labor 

Frank Littlefalr, S, 151 Waverty St 

AlUed Printing Trades Cofuidl 

Harry B. Bennett S, 165 Webster Av. 

Building Trades Council 

H. I. Smith. S, 20 Poplar St 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LOCAL UNIONS 
ALBANY COUNTY 



ATBANT 

Bakers No, 10 

1). Cahlll, P, 81 Livingston Av. 

D. Lavery, R S, 94 Alexander St. 

Bakers No. 8S (Hebrew) 

Max Herman, P, m Heridmer St. 

S. Kaplan, F S, 51 Mulberry St. 

Barbers Na* 106 

Theodore J. Lederer, P, 307 Broadway 

Adam Alheim, Jr., F S, 207 S. Pearl St. 

Bartenders No. 228 

Richard B. Nolan, P, 322 Clinton Av. 
Matthew F. Dug an, R S, 26 Pleasant St. 

BIU Pesters and Blllers No. 21 

Richard F. Mackay, P, Bauds Opera 

House, Troy, N. Y. 
Herman J. Koenig, C S, 57 Morton Av. 

Ballar Makers Na. 197 

James H. Sullivan, P, 55 Lexington Av. 
John J. Leamy, R S, G8 Livingston A v. 

Bookbinders No. 10 

Thomas V. Mullen, Jr., P, 235 Sheridan 

Av. 
Frank Welnhofer, R S, 213 Sherman SL 
John Otto, Stat, i3 Myrtle Av. 

Brewery Workmen No. 15 

Leo Pietorowski, P, 50 Benjamin St. 
Frederick Sorbe, R S, 54 Third Av. 

Brewery Workmen No. M (Beer 

Drivers) 
George Kyle, P, 42 Bradford St. 
J. H. I>e Groat, R S, IS Glen St., 

Rensselaer, N. Y. 

Brewery Workmen No. 139 

Max Franz, P, 206 Myrtle Av. 
Isaac Greystone, R S, Matilda St. 



_ Workman No. ZlA (Engineers 
and Firemen) 
John Daly, P, 151 Second St. 
William M. Watson, R S, 23 Myrtle Av. 

Brewery Workmen No. S76 (Mineral 
Water and Beer Bottlers and Drivers) 
John Harbinger, P, 110 Second Av. 
William Unger, F S, 15 Stephen St. 

Bricklayers No. 

Charles F. Dooley, P, 3 Oak St. 
Thomas V. Kelley, C S, 61 Schuyler St. 

Bridge and Structural Iron Workers 
No. IS 

John J. Carroll, P, 16 Genesee St. 
Bert C. Hall, F S, 147 S. Knox St 

Carpenters No. 117 

D. F. Dawson, P, 374 Central Av. 

F. C. Ludlum, R S, 562 Washington At. 

Carpenters No. 1446 (Machine Wood 

Workers) 
William E. Taafe, P, 278 Orange St. 
John Wagner, F S, 365 Elk St. 



Carriage, Wagon and Automobile 

Workers No. 59 
Henry GeurUe, P, 23 W. Van Vechten 

St. 
Theodore KuUman, R S, 60 Catharine 

St. 

Chauffeurs Protective Association of 

New York State No. 4 
Joseph Flack, P, 32 Osborne St. 
Sidney J. Davis, R S, 300 Sheridan Av. 

Cigar Makers No. 68 

Royal C. Glrvin, P, 58 Second Av. 
John J. Dillon, R S, 45 Second St. 

Clerks No. 083, Post Office 

W. F. Mattlmore, P, 374 Central Av. 

Joseph A. Nestor, R S, 6 Jeannette St. 

Clerks No. S7, Railway 

Henry W. McGurn, Jr., P, 26 Corning 

St.., West Albany, N. Y. 
Hobart L. Bundy, F S, 395 First St. 

Clerks No. 43, Retail 

Maurice T. Kelleher, P, 313 Livingston 

Av. 
Edward Welsh, F S, 73 Myrtle Av. 

Conductors No. S6, Railway 

John E. Gray, P, 1303 Second St., 

Rensselaer, N. Y. 
S. C. Davison, R S, 215 N. Allen St. 

Coopers No. 7 

John Coyle, P, Troy, N. Y. 

Joseph Stoltz, F S, 175 Second Av. 

Custodians of Public Schools 

Frnuk Van Appledoorn, P, 59 Catharine 

St. 
Charles J. Sniffen, R S, 36 Chestnut St. 

Denrlckmea and Blggers No. 14124, A. 
F. of L. 

George Clark, P, 218 Clinton Av. 
John J. Fitzalmmons, F S, 74 N. Lark 

St. 

Rlectrical Workers No. 1S7 (Linemen) 
B. Raflferty, P. 130 Clinton St. 
Michael J. Roe, F S, 221 Clinton Av. 

Electrical W^orkers No. 170 (Inside 

Wlremen) 
Joseph Condon, P, 15 High St. 
H. 0. Roch, R S, 15 High St. 

Blectrical Workers No. 696, A. F. of 

I«. (Inside Wlremen) 
George W. Colony, P, 86 Hudson Av. 
John J. Dowllng, F S, 70 Bradford St. 

Elevator Constructors No. 8S 

Emil Mlowsky, P, 212 Hamilton St. 
Charles Nicholson, R S, 333 Washing- 
ton Av. 

Bngineers No. 46, l.ocomotive 

John T. Greenalch, Ch Cond, 1358 Third 

St., Rensselaer, N. Y. 
Marquis L. Collard, R S, 9 Kent St. 



[21] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



22 



New York Labor Bulletin 



ALBANY COUNTY— Albany, contlnoed 

Engineers So, 63, Marine 

Geo. B. Vau Aieu, k", 552 East St., 

Keuttselaer, N. Y. 
George Laliiil, K «, 768 Broadway 

Engineers No. 106, Steam (Int. Un.) 
l-^dward Murphy. 1^ -ido Mudison Av. 
Thomas McGraw, K S, 33 Morton Av. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 230, Logo- 
motive 

Robert J. Brown, P, 478 West St. 
William C. Gelsel, R S, 416 Clinton Av. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 699, Loco- 
motive 

J. Kochlutke, P, 55 Elizabeth St. 
Wilbur Livingstone, R S, 56 N. Swan 
St. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 708, I<oco- 
motlve 

Edward J. Bruso, P, 232 First St. 
Bernard E. Jordan, R S, 33 N. Lark 
St. 

Garment Workers No. 177, United 

(Pants Makers) 
Jacob Bloom, P, 70 Philip St. 
Joseph Rotenberg, R S, 77 Schuyler St. 

Garment Workers No. 261 (Collar 

Makers) 
Thomas J. Gorman, P, 51 Westerlo St. 
Miss Pearl Matson, R S, 38 Walker St., 

Rensselaer, N. Y. 

Gas Meter Makers 

William Monrlan, P, 253 Sherman St. 
Charles L. Mosher, R S, 229 First St. 

Granite Cutters 

James Gough, P, Pearl St. Hotel, S. 

Pearl St. 
Martin J. Lennon, F S, 46 Second St. 

Hat and Cap Makers No. 85, Cloth 

David Alexander, S, 100 Herkimer St. 

Hod Carriers and Building Laborers 

No. 190 
Michael Gannon, P, 174 Sheridan Av. 
John J. Finn, F S, 101 First St. 

Horseshoers No. 05 

.Tohn Knox. P. 8 Grand St. 
David F. McNierney, R S, 306 Sheridan 
Av. 

Lathers No. 166 

James V. Cottrell, P, 818 Seventh St., 

Rensselaer N. Y. 
Stephen Allen, R S,' 146 Central Av. 

Letter Carriers No. 469 

Frederick D. Hills, P, 39 Benson St. 
John F. Hess, R S, 100 Grand St. 

Machinists No. 426 

John F. Ahem, P, 127 Grand St. 
Frank H. Bigley, F S, 21 Lincoln Av. 

Masters. Mates and Pilots No. 7 

Frank L. De Noyelles, P, 56 Columbia 

St., Rensselaer, N. Y. 
Geo. H. Warner, R S, 1312 Fourth Av., 

Rensselaer, N. Y. 

Meat Cutters and Boteher Workmen 
No. 142 

A. Mieslow, P, 232 Sherman St. 
Alfred A. Fox, F S, 362 Second Av. 



Metal Polishers, Buffers and Platers 

No. 29 
Peter Wenz, R S, 78 Bassett St. 
Jos. Welch, F S, 2 Kirk Alley 

Molders No. 8 (Stove) 

JtrauK Leauy, P, 20 ihacher St. 

Daniel W. O Connor, R S, 67 Second St. 

Molders No. 292 (Architectural and Ma- 

<:iiinery) 
John t\ bkerritt, P, 396 Elk St. 
William Klrklaud, C S, 229 Livingston 

Av. 

Musicians No. 14 

Charles H. Collins, P, 116 State St. 
John A. McGiU, R S, 91 Grand St. 

Painters No. 201 

Charles Eckart, P, 429 First St. 
James H. Dulin, R S, 179 Orange St. 

Painters No. 585 (Car Painters) 
Edward McCann, P, 628 Myrtle Av. 
William H. Kyle, R S, 22 West St. 

Pattern Makers 

Paul Selke, P, 2C7 Second Av. 

John £. Murphy, R S, 1243 Broadway 

Photo-Engravers No. 21 

Walter W. Stein, P, 48 W. Van Vech- 

ten St. 
William G. Boepple, R S, 680 State St. 

Plumbers No. 7 

Patrick Powers, P, 276 Madison Av. 
Charles J. Grace, F S, 136 Grand St. 

Printing Pressmen and Assistants No. 
23 

Wm. Biggs, Jr., P, 193 Sheridan Av. 
John A. Hamilton, R S, 19 Walter St. 

Printing PresKtiien and Assistants No. 

71 (Press Feeders) 
Bernard McLaughlin, P, 130 Dove St. 
Miss Ada Trueworthy, R S, 26 Mohawk 

St. 

Railway Mall Association (Railway 

Mail Clerks) 
Charles W. Burlingame, P, Yoorhees- 

ville, N. Y. 
James H. Marlow, R S, 172 Jay St. 

Bheet Metal Workers No. 83 
William M. O'Brien, P, 18 Sherman St. 
Herman H. De Rouville, P S, 88 
Second St. 

Stage Employees No. 14 

Daniel J. Burns, P, 170 Morton A v. 
James H. Bowen, R S, 69 Ten Broeck 
St. 

Steam Fitters No. 45 

John J. Hanlon, P, 235 S. Swan St. 
William Laut, F S, 51 Howard St. 

Steel and Copper Plate Engravers No. 9 

James C. Nelllgar, P, 327 Clinton Av. 
Frederick W. Mullen, R S, 52 N. Pearl 

St. 

Stereotypers and Electrotypers No. 28 

Robert J. Powers, P, 122 Philip St. 
Leo Livingston, R S, 128 First St. 

Stone Bankers No. 14210. A. F. of L. 

Wilfred Geroux, P, 73 Eagle St. 

Thomas Nicholson, F S, 35 Sheridan 
Av. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Unions 



23 



ALBANY COUNTY— AlbMix, concluded 

Street and Slectric Ballwny Kmployees 
No. 148 

Joseph S. Droogran, P 327 Madison At. 
Maurice J. Whelan, F S, 1 Garden St. 

Tailors No. IM 

Melchoir C. Neubaner, P, 41 Maiden 

Lane 
Joseph Schroeder, P S, 105 Schuyler St 

Team Owners 

Charles A. Soden, P, 303 Third St 
Lester Parker, R S, 2 Park Av. 

Teamsters No. 104 (Livery Employees) 
Augustus Moran, P, 53 Irving A. 
Richard F. Going, F S, 73 Jefferson St 

J^f^^if'f. ^^' *•* (Truck Drivers) 
John McCarthy, P 431 8. Pearl St 
Bernard Marks. F S, 02 Cambridge Av., 
Rensselaer, N. Y. • » 



Teamsters No. SS2 (Coal Handlers) 
Ldward Brennan, P, 78 Trinity PI. 
Charles F. Smith, R S, 38 CUnton St 

^••"ifHf" ^Z*- **• <^ce Handlers) 
frank Van Amberg P 447 S. Pearl St 
George King. P S, 7 First Av. 

Telegraphers No. 151, Railroad (Dela^ 
ware * Hadson B. B. System) 

**"^Klt Bi?d'r N. ^"'"^ *''"*''°"' 

Tile Layers No. 01 

Joseph Burkhard, P 73 Second Av. 
\v.'cf^^rA^ ^ Washington 

Tobacco Workers No. t4 

Edward O. Hess, P, 148 Second Av. 
Edward S. Richards, R S, 213 Second St 

Trainmen No. 8 

Michael J. Sheehan. P, 00 First St. 
Richard J. Doyle, R S, 3©2 S. Pearl St. 

Trainmen No. S7 

H. R. Osborne, P. 2 Manning Square 
James P. McNamara. R S, 8 Riverside 
Av., Rensselaer, N. Y. 

Typographical Union -- MaHem No. 20 

B. W. Van Deusen, P, 793 Albany St. 

Schenectady. N. Y. ^ » 

Henry W. Johnson, P 8, 182A Second 

Av. 

Typographical Union No. 4 

Kugene H. Ferris, P. 158 Eagle St 
George A. Wilkes. F S, 244 Colonle St. 

COHOBB 
Barbers No. 044 

Arthur TherrauU. P, 122 Remsen St. 
Theodore De Groat, F S, 230 Remsen 
St. 

Bartenders No. 909 

Thomas R'^che. P. 

Edward Hill, F S, 120 Ontario St 

Bricklayers No. 8 

i??,H Walsh, P, .TT Johnson Av. 
William A. Stanton, R S, 20 Summit 
St 

Carpenters No. M 

David Fontaine, P, 104 Vllet St. 
Edward Sickles, F S, 30 Factory St. 



Clerks No. 940, Post Ofllce 

Robert B Humo, P, 32 White St. 
Luke Kelly, R S, 47 McElwaln Av. 

Clerks No. 1122, Retail 

Pierre O. Guar, P, 243 Remsen St 
George B. Vail, R S, 241 Saratoga St 

Letter Carriers No. 288 

Robert B. White, P, 58 Heartt Ave. 
John F. Hanton, B S, 10 Seneca St. 

Loom Fixers No. 87 

Reaumel Cuneau, P, 13 Erie St. 
Ailiecl Ellis, l-t S, Vliet St 

Painters No. 71 

Walter Rov Evans, P. 20 Factory St 
Charles Mallory, R S, R. F. D. No. 1 

Plnmbers No. 8M 

John McGann, P, 154 Congress St 
James Mullen, R S, 22 Garner St 

TezUle Workers No. 440 (Jack Spin- 
ners) 
Joseph Johnston, P, 17 Amity St. 
Ellas Schofleld, R S, Box No. 72 

Textile Workers No. 409 (Knit Goods 

Cutters) 
George Lock wood, P, 18 Columbia St 
Fred Smith. F S, 5 Niver St 

S?.^S** Workers No. 590 (Carders) 
William Donahue, P. White St. 
Thomas Jordan, R S, 12 Strong PI. 

^•^***«. Workers No. 552 (Knit Goods 

Boarders) 
John Flood. P, 78 Main St 
Israel F. Shepard, R S, 80 Congress St 

''•St**"*,, Worker* No. 577 (Garnet 

Workers) 
Edward Frasler. P, 49 Factory St 
Walter A. McCoy, R S, 86 Oneida St. 

Textile Workers No. 500 (Weavers) 
Treffley Bourdeau, P, 12 N. Mohawk 

St 
Andrew Grogan, R S, 1 Garner St. 

Textile Workers No. 709 (Knitters) 
Arthur CoUey, P. 112 Railroad St. 
Henry Shannon, R S, 140 Congress St. 

Textile Workers No. 718 (Washers and 

Dyers) 
Patrick Cooey. P, 24 Heartt St. 
Joseph McCarthy, R S, 00 Breslin Av. 

'y^^**^ Workers No. 749 (Slasher 

Joseph Butterworth, P. 01 Manor Av. 
Edward Wells, R S. 20 Broadway 

Typograohlcal Union No. 825 

Frank H. Adams, P, c/o Republican 

Ofllce 
James A. Guire, F S. P. O. Box 290 



GREEN ISLAND 

Bbieksmlths and Helpers No. 72 

WilHnm TTnderdown, P, (^eorsre St 
Martin Crogan, R S, 507 Broadway, 
Watervliet N. Y. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24 



Xew York Labob Bulletin 



ALBANY COUNTY-— Green Island, concluded 

Firemen and KnslncoAen No. S10, Loco- 

motivo 
L. Meyers, P, 3 Clinton St. 
J. F. Ulues, Jr., F S, 81 James St. 



Machinists No. 8e» 

John Thompson, P, 131 Third Av., 

Albany, N. Y. 
William R. Pohl, R S, 222C Sixth Av., 

Troy, N. Y. 

MachinlstB No. 986 (Machinists' Ap- 
prentices and Helpers) 

John Murray, P, 22 Tyler St., Troy, 
N. Y. 

Albert Forget, R S, 148 Hudson At., 
Cohoes, N. Y. 



RAVENA 



Trainmen No. 665 

R. S. Winchell, P 
C. Mullen, R S 



WATEBVLIST 



Barbers No. 229 

William H. Dunn, P, 227 23rd St. 
James McAdams, F S, 401 19th St. 



Dt Employees No. 8 (Ord- 
nance Makers) 
A. L. Welty, P, 1429 Broadway 
John J. Casey, R S, 341 Second St., 
Troy, N. Y. 

Letter Carriers No. 178 

David A. Tomlinson, P, 1315 First Av. 
W. J. Fitzgerald, R S, 715 25th St. 

Machinists No. 166 (Ordnance Makers) 
Roy F. Murphy, P, 315 7th St. 
James H. Qilmore, R S, 505 16th St. 

Painters No. 611 

Andrew J. Mellvaine, P, 115 Second Av. 
Joseph Oathout, R S, 18 First St. 



ALLEGANY COUNTY 



WBLLSVILLB 

Carpenters No. 770 

Arthur J. Dayton. P. 

Giles £. Davis, Belmont, N. Y. 



Letter Carriers No. 679 

Fred J. Boyd, P. 
A. W. Vincent, R S. 



BRONX COUNTY 

See Bronx Borough under New York City 



BROOME COUNTY 



BIXGUAMTON 



Barbers No. 156 

Geo. F. Stack, P, Security Mutual 

Building 
Edward A. Maltby, P S, 55 Court St. 

Bartenders No. 178 

Peter F. Waoks, P, 3 Mnry St. 
Michael T. Foley. R S, 145 Water St. 

Brewery Workmen No. 161 

James Hi<-key. P. 44 Clark St. 
Thomas F. Sheehan, F S, 155 Laurel 
Av. 

Bricklayers No. 42 

William Morny. P, 15 High St. 
William J. Doyle, F S, 30 Walnut St. 

Carpenters No, 281 

Perry Van Duzen, P, Port Dickinson, 

N. Y. 
0. M. Ross, F S. 7 Edwards SL 

Ciirar Makers No. 16 

John J. Sullivan, P, 1ft Winding Way 

John J. Ellis, F S, (KJ Chapin St. 

Clfffir Makers No. 218 

M. J. Costello. P, 17 Duane A v. 

John F. Warden, R S, 11% Pearne St. 

Cigar Makers No. 229 (Cigar Packers) 
Frederick Butler, P, 11 Sherwood Av. 
Charles H. Everett, R S, 134 Front St. 

Clerks No. 177, Post Office. 

Ambrose Ham, P, Post Office 

Harry E. Hennessey, R S, Post Office 



Conductors No. 164 

Wheaton D. Loomis, Ch Cond, 4 Gold 
St. 

F. B. Tewksbvry, F S, 7 Congdon PI. 

Custodians of Public Schools _ 

John F. Westfall, P, 22 ConklinTvT 
Thomas F. Keating, R S, 91 Pine St. 

Klertricnl Workers No. 826 (Inside 
Wire men) 

E. C. Shntt, P, 671^ Pine St. 

William J. Bldwell, F S, Hotel Mc- 
Donald, Lewis St, 

Bngineers No. 311, Locomotive 

P. E. Whalen, Ch. 41 Pine St. 
J. R. Watson, R S, 13 Lyons St. 

Bnglneers No. 709, Locomotive 
John H. Cooper, Ch, 227 Chenango St. 
Charles F. Whitaker, R S, 20% Robin- 
son St. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 227, Lo- 
comotive 

John H. MoMnhon, P, 9 Ely St. 

G. H. Hodge, R S, 25 Andrews Av. 

Glass Bottle Blowers No. 67 

Louis J. Warner, P, 182 Chapin St. 
Thomas O'Brien, R S, 10 Thorpe St. 

Hod Carriers and Bolldlng Laborers 
No. 7 

John Lane, P. 9 Meadow St. 
J. A. Cline, F S, 5 Carhart Av. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Unions 



25 



BROOMS COUNTY— Blnshamton* coMiiidad 



l4itherB No. S7 

F. H. Tiffany. P, 142 Front St. 
Jefemiah Ryan, C 8, 77 State St. 

Letter Carriers No. SSS 

George H. Foote, P, 10 Livingstone St. 
R. 6. Turk, Jr., R S, 6% Cedar St. 

Mtkchiniflts No. 874 

D. E. Robards, P, Endlcctt, N. Y. 

W. D. Eldred, F S. 60 St. John Av. 

Metal PoUflherfl No. 89 

S. J. FitEgltibons, P, 141 Clinton St. 

W. C. Guy, R S, 41 Mozart St. 

MoMoM No. 274 

Albert Rush, C S, 27 Hotchklss St. 

Musicians No. 880 

Henry Hamel, P, 

F. H. Livingston, R S, 36 Lewis St. 

Painters No. 108 

C. L. Ogden, P, 28 CurUs SL 

W. H. Diehl, F S, 14 Columbia Av. 

Plasterers No. Ul, Operative 

A. Barnes, P, Moxart St. 

Charles S. Frey, F S, 16 Charlotte St. 

Plvmbers No. US 

John F. Hurley, P, 11 Centenary St. 
F. Thomburn, F S, 14 Meadow St. 

Printlag Pressmen and Assistants No. 67 

Allen Griggs, P, 187 Oak St. 

W. S. Williams, F S, 26 Division St. 

Sheet Metal Workers No. ZZ 
Charles Houk, P, Myrtle Av. 
C. E. Lent, R S, 25 Arthur St. 



Henry Hamel, P, 94^ Sasquehanna St 
" -^ - '5 Le • ~ 



Stage Employees No. 64 

Carl Winters, P, 24 Doubleday St. 
Bert W. Toaer, F S, P. O. Box 976 

Stereotypers and Eleetrotj'pers No. 90 

(Electrotypcrs) 
Edward P. Cahill, P, 86 Leroy St. 
M. G. DooUttle, R S, 179 Vestal av. 

Switchmen No. 114 

John L. McMahon, P, 42 Grlswold St. 
Geo. Martin, R S, 41 Mendelsohn St. 

Tailors No. 68 

O. Florman, P, 103 Water St. 
A. Benson, F S, 11 Seminary Av. 

Teamsters No. 878 

Charles Shove, P, 11 Centenary St 
O. F. French, R S, 98 Washington St. 



Trainmen No. 86 

John J. Madden, P, 
M. J. Touhey, R S, 



24 Doubleday St 
3 Wales Av. 



TypocravMcal Union No. 888 

John E. Qulnn, P, 225 Oak St. 
Robert Palmer, F S, 16 Judson St. 



DEPOSIT 

Letter Carriers No. 1899 

E. J. Frost, P, Post Office 

Jesse R. Bradtke, F S, Post Office 



ENIHGOTT 

Carpenters No. 1879 
L. B. Hill, P. 

A- C. Waterman, R S, 101 Leroy St, 
Blnghamton, N. Y. 



CATTARAUGUS COUNTY 



FRANKLINVILLB 

Teleigraiphers No. 17, Ballroad (Pennsyl- 
▼fMila R. R. System, Bnffalo Division) 

C. S. Simmons, Local Chairman, Keat- 
ing Summit. Pa. 



OLEAN 

Barbers No. 39 

Thomas F. Cahill, P, 106 W. State St 
H. E. Cunningham, F 6, 172 N. Union 
St. 

Bartenders No. 238 

Michael J. Consldlne, P, New Imperial 

Hotel. 
James Smith, F S, Dunleavy Bros. Cafe 

Brewery Workmen No. 4, Branch No. 8 

Andrew Hoffert P, 121 W. Green St 
Charles Bullmer, R S, 712 W. Henley 
St. 

Bricklayers No. 88 

Hark Hanley, P. East Side 

W. H. Flint, F S, 401 W. Green St 

Can»eatero No. 646 

C. W. Hall, P, 627 Garden Av. 
Charles Petersen, R S, 136 N. 7th St. 

Clerks No. 674, Post Office 

Miss Mary L. Dugan, P, 115 8. 5th St. 

Fred H. Miller, R S, 209 S. 8th St 



Conductors No. 444 

C. E. Pennock, Ch Cond, 815 Washing- 
ton St. 
Peter Welch, R S, 319 N. Union St. 

Eagineeni No. 846, Locomotive 

William H. Rogers, Ch, 607 Sixth St 
Tracy T. Buck, R S, 605 N. First St. 

Firemen and Baginemen No. 898, Loco- 
motive 
Harry S. Meyer, P, 152 N. Seventh St. 
F. C. Sill. R S, 212 Worden Av. 

<;iaflB Bottle Blowers No. 44 

J. A. Smith, P, North Union St 
P. N. Cam. F S, 123 Fulton St 

Granite Cutters 

Charles E. Crandall, P, 31 Center Ft. 

James G. Foley, R S, 717 W. State St 

Letter Carriers No. 208 

John J, Kane. P, 110 N. Fifth Kt 
f^arl B. McElfresh, R S, 1405 Washing- 
ton St. 

Molders No. 98 
P. J. Ryan, P, Laurel Av. 
Stephen M. Cartwrlght F S, 107 Cole- 
man St. 

Municifinff No. 115 

R. E. Wlxson, P, 20 Center St. 

W. N. Casey, R S, 104 S. Second St 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



26 



New York Labob Bullbtin 



CATTABAUGUS COUXTT— OlMO, 

PalBten Xo. 416 

H. K. Freeman, P, 216 S. Union St. 
Harry R. Turner, F S, 427 Fourth Av. 

Plumbers No. 600 

D. E. Sullivan, P, 134 N. Sixth St. 

Frank Ziegler, F S, 115 N. Twelfth St. 

Sheet Metal Workers No. 862 

Frank Story, P, Tompkins St. 
T. J. Duncan, R S, 302 Wayne St. 

Trainmen No. 1S8 

D. I. Fosdick, P, Washington St. 
William H. Welch, R S, 1020 N. Union 

St. 

Typoffraphlcal Union No. 846 

J. B. Whitley, P. 

W. T. Barnard, C S, lOM W. Henley St. 

SALAMANCA 

Boiler Makers No. 506 

A. G. Frey, P, 165 E. State St. 

D. J. Carpenter, R S, 3 Maple St. 

Bricklayers No. 90 

Ernest Beebe, P, 46 Frank St. 

E. H. Johnson, R S, Randolph, N. Y. 

Carpenters No. 1662 

Daniel Sweet, P, East Salamanca, N. Y. 
C. B. Brown, R S, Country Club 

Clear Makers No. S40 

J. R. Lawrence. P, 16 East St. 
John Metzler, R S, 160 W. State St. 



Clerks No. 1068, Post Offlee 

Elmer S. Holt, P. 

Misa Anna C. Wllklns, R S, Post Office 

Condnetors No. 466 

J. J. Ray, Ch Cond, 116 SUte St 
M. Qriffen, R S» 77 William St, Brad- 
ford, Pa. 

Bnylneers No. S64, I«ocomotlTe 

H. W. Monahan, P, 7 Allesany St. 
E. N. Godfrey, R S, 167 E. State St. 

Firemen and Snirlnemen No. 681, lioeo- 
motlve 

W. V. Jones, P, East Salamanca, N. Y. 
S. S. Nelson, F S. East Salamanca, N. Y. 

Letter Carriers No. 1007 

Roy W. Harris, P. 

H. R. Finch, R S, Post Office 

Machinists No. 464 

Ray Sayres, P, State St 

Paul T. Myers, F S, 106 E. State St 

Musicians No. 488 

E. R. Phillips, P, 23 Main St 
Harry B. Craig, R S, 125 Broad St 

Telegraphers No. 48, Railroad (Erie 
R. R. System, New York Division) 

Charles L. Bridge, Genl. S T, Deposit 

Trainmen No. 187 

C. A. Velle, P. 24 Church St. 

F. E. Dill, R S, Blsmark Hotel 



CAYUQA COUNTY 



AUBURN 

Bakers No. 178 

Adolph Pohle, P, 16 Purt At. 
Valentine Barthelman, F S, 19 Chapel St 

Barbers No. 60 

Alonzo Porter, P, State and Genesee Sts. 
Rudolph Roscher, C S, 74 Genesee St 

Bartenders No. 880 

William A. Donnelly, P, 20 State St 
Jerome B. Long, R S, 47 Genesee St 

Brewery Workmen No. 86 (Drirers and 

Bottlers) 
Edmund Glavln, P, 227 State St 
John F. Meissner, R S, 212 Woodlawn 

Av. 

Bricklayers No. 81 

William Hlrons, P, 240 Clark St 
George F. Stone, F S, 77 Lewis St 

Carpenters No. 468 

John S. Jewell, P, 33 Holley St 

Henry B. King, R S, 85 Walnut St 

Cement Workers No. 164 (Cement 

Masons) 
Edward O'Hnra, P, 97 Lansing St 
William C. Caldwell, F S, 24% Gaylord 

St 

Cifrar Makers No. 811 

John Dlffe. P, 16^ E. Genesee St 
Frank Rigby, F S, 28 Chestnut St 



Clerks No. 170, Post Offlee 

Joseph Ibbotson, P, 66 Nelson St 
W. J. Jewhurst R S, Hoops Ay. 



Bleetrlcal Workers No. 804 (A. F. of L.) 

(Inside Wiremen) 
T. H. Mohan, P, 61 Steele St. 
Fred WhiUng, R S, 29 Elizabeth St 



Engineer — Janitors (Public School 

Janitors) 
David Wills, P, 24 Mary St 
B. P. Warne, R S, 59 Capitol St 



Engineers No. 88, Steam (Int Union) 
H. J. Burns, P, 29 Academy St 
J. H. Deyore, R S, 24 Seminary Av. 



Firemen and Bnglnemen No. 807, I^oco- 
motive 

Roger C. Hill, P, 61 Clark St. 
S. D. Kirk, R S, 63 Perrine St 



Hod Carriers and Balldlag Laborers 
No. 117 

Paul Mundt P, Wall St 

Michael Brennan, F S, 9 Francis St. 



Horseshoers No. 57 

F. Alexander, P, 43 Mattie St 
Joseph L. Hickey, R S, 2 Fulton St 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Unions 



27 



CAYUGA COUNTY— Aabarn, coneladed 

Letter Carriers No. 151 

John B. Kelland, P. Post OiBce 
Howard H. Clack, R S, Post Office 

Machinists No. 16S 

Edwin Marchant, P, 56 Qrant Av. 
Ed. W. Beyer, R S, 33^ Walnut St. 

Meat Cotters and Bateher Workmem 
No. S 

George Riohnecker, P, 204 Jeannette St. 
James C. Carroll, F S, 10^ John St 

Molders No. 107 

Leon Shoecraft, P, 77 Standard At. 
W. J. Nugent, C S, 47 Wall St. 

Masiclaas No. 289 

J. M. Beecher, P, 98 N. Dirlsion St. 

A. J. Brown, R S, 55 Frances St. 

Painters No. 118 

Frank E. Mott, P, 10 Alden Av. 
James B. Maynard, F S, 19 Lewis St 

Pattern Makers 

Frank H. Barnes, P, 1 Baker Av. 
John J. Kleintjes, R S, 14 Florence St 

Plumbers No. 187 

George Sewlert, P, 1% Cayuga St 
Charles Spencer, R S, 139 Fulton St 

Sheet Metal Workers No. 427 

John Ker%'an, P, 74 Wall St 

Matthias J. Erhardt, R S, 115 Osborne 

St 



Stage Employees No. 110 

Edward Burns, P, Seymour St 
T. H. Mohan, R S, 61 Steele St. 

Teamsters No. M (Ice Handlers) 

Kipp earner, P, 46 Clark St 

Edward Secor, R S, 14 Washington St 

Teamsters No. 678 (Expressmen — 

Team Owners) 
Henry Owens, P, Fulton St. 
William C. Rhodes, R S, 66 Lake Av. 

Teamsters No. 677 (Team Owners) 
George Halstead, P, 25 Orchard St. 
Charles W. Flanigan, F S, 10 Park Av. 



Teamsters No. 879 

Thomas Keffe, P, 33 Washington St 
William J. Warden, F S, 11 Baker Av. 

Trainmen No. 745 

W. H. Oleason, P, 23 Bradford St, 

Waverly, N. Y. 
C. E. Hearne, F S, 2 Sherwood St 

Typographical Union No. 588 

Charles M. Warren, P, 309 N. Seward 

Av. 
James C. Jacobs, F S, 10 Liberty St 



WEED8PORT 

Assn. (Railway Mall 



Railway 

Clerks) 
F. J. Parsons, P. 
Fred Ewins, R S. 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



DUNKIRK 

Barbers No. 108 

Fred Mehs. P, 54 Ruggles St. 

Oscar A. Burbee, F S, 130 Central Av. 

Bartenders No. 40 

Edward Crlnans, P, Fredonia, N. Y. 
E. W. Walters, R S, 32 Lake St 

Blaeksmlths and Helpers No. 128 

William Phillips, P, Deer St 
Frank Sweet R S, 771 Park A v. 

Blacksmiths and Helpers No. 189 (Ham- 
mersmiths) 
Walter Roberts, P, 415 Central Av. 
Fred Knope, R S, S. Beaver St 

Blaeksmlths and Helpers No. 888 

(Helpers) 
John Lyons, P, 204 Antelope St. 
CJeorge Nagel, R S, 521 Deer St. 

Boiler Makers No. 125 

James G. Sause, F S, 21 Courtney St 

Brewery W^orkmen No. 16, Branch No. 1 

Herman Wolf, P, 204 King St 

Frank Schwenkel, R S, 222 Railroad Av. 

Carpenters No. 466 

Frank R. Oraves, P, Park Av. 
L. H. Clark, R S, 01 Qreen St. 

Carpenters No. 488 (Machine Wood 
Workers Locomotive Shops) 

Benedict Kachermeyer, P, 47 W. 
Doughty St. 

Lynn K. Ooodspeed, R S, 71 E. 6th St 



Carpenters No. 1845 

A. Roesler, P, 31 N. Martin St 
Joseph Dombrowski, F S, 104 E. Front 
St 

Cigar Makers No. 417 

Adolph Kaiser, P, 209 Lion St. 
Frank L. Smith, R S, 17 Oenet St. 

Clerks No. 968, Post Office 

H. J. Link, P, 414 Bass St 

W. K. Ames, F S, 28 W. Fourth St. 

Electrical Workers No. 698 

C. B. Johnson, P, 44 W. 5th St 
C. R. Harris, P S, 57 W. Third St. 

Electrical Workers No. 608 (A. F. of 

L.) (Cranemen) 
Ernest Lavondowski, P, 15 Oenet St. 
Fred T. Karrow, F S, 725 Deer St 

Fishermen No. 887 (Int. Longshoremen's 

Assn.) 
C. S. Gillson, P, W. Second St. 
Charles D. Baker, F S, 117 Plover St. 

Letter Carriers No. ISO 

Edward B. Ames. P. 24 W. 4th St. 
Henry Schilling, R S, 27 E. Talcott St. 

Machinists No. 824 

C. J. Peterson, P, 63 Ruggles St. 
Emil Hagberg, F S, 329 Deer St. 

Molders No. 90 

Henry Frahm, P, 108 Lincoln At. 
T. F. Watson, C S, 510 Park Av. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 



Xew Yobk Labor Bulletin 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNT Y—Dnnklrk, «oncliid«d 



Musicians No. 108 

Harry Weinlug, P, Lion St. 
Henry J. Link, R S, 414 Bass St. 

Plombers No. 186 

F. FelMngrer, P, R. D. No. 10 

C. E. Beard sley, R S, 817 Lion St. 

She«t Metal Workers No. 68 
Hermann Plnmadore, P, 22G Lynx St. 
Peter J. Lugen, R S, 37 E. B>ont St. 

Bftasre bnployees No. 808 

Earl Brooks, P Empire Theater 
John Duryea, R S, 995 Central At. 

Street and Electric Railway Employees 
No. B9Z 

Thomas H. Martin, P, North East, Pa. 
Karl F. Plehl, F S, 298 Seymour St., 
Fredonia, N. Y. 

Tailors No. 255 

George Swartz, P, Fredonia, N. Y. 
William Gibbs, R S, 100 E. Front St. 

Tngaaen No. 874 (Int. I«ongshoremen's 

Assn.) 
W. Murray. P. 
Benjamin Yleau, F S, 150 Light St. 

Typogmpkleal Union No. 677 

Frank G. FelUnger, P, 117 Lion St. 
George E. Dorler, F S, Zebra St. 

FREDONIA 
Clerks No. 488, Post Office 

E. W. Easton, P. 
O. E. Cadwell, R S. 

Letter Carriers No. 720 

Blair F. Simons, P. 

Harvey N. Hill, R S, Post Office 

JAMESTOWN 

Barbers No. 178 

L. L. Bcbweln, P, 002 N. Main St. 

J. C. Markle, F S, 222 Main St. 

Bartenders No. 199 

George Hope, P, 335 Allen St. 
George A. 0*Donnell, R S, 707 W. 8tb 
St. 

Blacksmiths and Helpers Ho. 808 

Carl Eralandson, P, 6 Cross St. 
Axel HegBteadt, R S, 42 Water St. 

Brewery Workmen No. 4, Branch No. 11 

Bert Benson, P, 7 Harrison St. 

F. W. Scott, R S, 7 Harrison St. 

Bricklayers No. 24 

Edward Mahoney, P, E. Buffalo St. 
John A. Fox, R S, 505 Clinton St. 

Carpenters No. 66 

Peter Hammergren, P, 135 Bowen St. 
John M. Kane, F S, P. O. Box No. 102 

Cement Workers No. 206 (Block 

Makers) 
Emil Jacobson, P, 8 Curtis St. 
David Hansen, F S, 4 Curtis St. 

Clear Makers No. 870 

Clarence Swanson, P, 28 Scott St. 
F. C. Fox, F S, 305 Falconer St. 

Clerks No. 165, Post Office 

John E. Carlson, P. 

Ira F. Beal, R S, 131 Buffalo St. 

Electrical Workers No. KMI 

T. L. Stafford. P, Hty Hotel 

S. C. Keller, R S, 834 Washington St. 



Garment Workers No. 229 (Coat, Pants 

and Vest Makers) 
E. J. Bucklaew, P, 870 Washington St. 
MlRS Emma Carlson, R S, 102 Brodhead 

Av. 

Hotel and Restaurant Employee* No. 

271 (Walters) 
J. Hardigau, P, Everett Hotel 
Delbert Sayers, R S, " Kalserhoff '• 

Lathers No. 806 

Frank Beach, P, R. D. No. 75 
Asa L. Phillips, R S, 311 Pine St. 

Letter Carriers No. 1«5 

W. R. Fuller, P, 325 Oossman St. 
C. W. Jackson, R S, 10 Hall Av. 

Metal PoUahers No. 88 

Gust. L. Dean, P, 10 Peterson St. 
O. D. Robertson, F S, R. D. No. 81 

Musicians No. 184 

George E. Chase, P, Celeron, N. T. 
George B. Hinman, F S, Celeron, N. T. 

Painters No. 496 

E. A. Oberlin, P, 205 Lafayette BL 

M. M. Gifford. R S, 34 W. 8fh St. 

Plasters No. 186, Operative 

George Lyona, P, Regent St 
Anton E. Olsen, R S, 27 Maple St 

Plumbers No. ZSZ 

Charles (Jarrtty, P, comer 2nd and 

Washington 6ta. 
Charles Shaffer, R B, 1016 Prendergast 

Av. 

Printing Pressmen and Assistants No. 

104 
Thomas French, P, 12 Fluvana Av. 
J. C. Wilkinson, R S, 46 Haszard St 

Sheet Metal Workers No. 170 (Metal 

Furniture Makers) 
Oscar Johnson, P, 14 WilUams St 
John L. Nelson, R S, 13 Partridge Bt 

Sheet Metal Workers No. 824 (Building) 

H. Wulf, P. 313 Palmer St. 

George N. Crowe, F S, 11 B. 8rd St. 

Stage Employees No. 266 

Frank O. Stafford. P, 400^ Cherry 8t 

B. R. Stafford, F S, 210 K 2nd Bt. 

Stone Cutters 

O. Preston. P, Crane St 

W. E. Downs, F S, 61 River St 

Typographical Union No. 206 

H. H. Stoltz, P, 70 Barrett St 
Louis E. Ruden, F S, 10 Virginia 
Boulevard 

Upholsters No. 38 

A. Elseman, P. 18 Lower St 

Harry Hartmann, C S, 213 Fulton St. 



SILVEB CKTSKK 

Letter Carriers No. 1420 

William H. Myers, P. 

Richmond S. Palmer, R S, Post Office 



WBSTFIELD 

Letter Carriers No. 1294 

Theodore L. Barker. P. 

P. J. WilUnk, C S, Post Office 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Unions 



29 



CHEMUNG COUNTY 



ELMIBA 

Bakers No. 186 

Jos(*pb (JllenKhfeiskl, P, corner Hoffman 
and Qray Sts. 

B. L. Mayo, U S, 214 Orchard St. 

Barben No. 165 

Alex a. Cuthbert, P, Realty Building 
John L. Holley, F S, 122 Penusylvanla 
Av. 

Bartenders No. UOl 

F. J. Sullivan, P, 156 Lakn St. 
Frank McConnell, K S, 156 Lake St. 

Brewery Workmen No. ?0 

Frank Michaike, P, 757^ Harper St. 

Albert H. Gerber, R S, 520Vj Lake St. 

Bricklaarers No. 28 

M. F. Burgess, P, 123 U Homer St 
E. H. Butters, R S, lin La France St. 

Car Workers No. 159 

A. Jenklna, P, 010 W. Church St. 
John Eagleson, R S, 1318 Baldwin St 

Carpenters No. 58? 

Grant Nelson, P, 311 West Av. 

C. P. Rockwell, R S, 663 Columbia St 

Carpenters No. 879 (Machine Wood 

Workers) 
O. G. Thomas, P, 321 Tuttle Av. 
C. W. Hall, R S, 512 Pitch St. 

C'iflrar Makers No. 52 

James Clancy, Jr.. P, 411 Walnnt St. 

E. G. Cuthbert, F S, 208 W. Chemung 
PI. 

Clerks No. 847, Post Ofllce 
Harry Espey, P, 65& Lake St. 
Clark Wilcox, R S, 519 Fitch St 

Conductors No. 9 

Thomas McCarthy, Ch Cond, CCS W. 
Third St. 

F. B. Hewett R S, 310 South Av. 

Cond actors No. 874 

J. H. Noonan, Ch Cond. S70 N. Main St 

B. L. Bennett R S, 345 Irvine Place 

Klectrlral Workers No. 139 

H. C. Bullock, P. 407 W. 5th St. 
M. M. Pollak, F S, 110 High St. 

Enylneers ^o. 41. Locomotive 

.T. S. Loffan. P, 420 JcflTcrHon St. 
B. M. Snyder, R S, 520 Balsam St. 

Knglneers No. 484. Locomotive 
Charles H. Price, P, 1005 Lake St. 
Thomas Feeney, R S, .T30 Irvine PI. 

Firemen and Envlnemen No. 242, Loco- 
motive 

.T. .A PrvIs. P. 1012 OMk St. 

A. L. Smith, R S, 375^^ Thurston St 

Firemen and En«rlnemen No. 463, Loco- 
motive 

in ram L. Koennn, P, 144 E. Choinnng 

St. 
William J. Balles, R S, 321 Baty St. 



Firemen No. 271, Stationary 

W. H. Wagner, P, 1122 College Av. 
C. O. Heller, F S, 404 Pine St 

Glass Workers No. 98, Amer. Flint 

Samuel Shave, P, 550 E. 2d St 
Roy E. Bartholomew, F S, 4000% Col- 
lege Av., Klmira Heights, N. Y. 

Letter Carriers No. 21 

J. J. Powers, P, S. Division St. 
Clarence Lambert R S» Post Office 

Maehlnlsts No. 421 

L. J. Hinman, P, 118 Lormore St. 
William Baruetson, R S, 413 Locust St. 

Meat Cutters and Batcher Workmen 
No. 164 

Thomas Baker, P, 419 N. Main St 

B. R. Shappee, F S, 312 S. Broadway 

Metal Polishers No. 57 

James F. Clark. P, 214 W. 2nd St 
Gustav F. Rohde, F S, 711 Sullivan St 

Holders No. 289 

Fred J. McKalg, P, 508 William St. 

F. F. Merrill, It S, 450 CarroU St 

Masiclans No. 814 

W. H. Bowers, P, 217Mj W. 2nd St. 
Eugene J. Lorimer, F S, 105 De Witt 
Av. 

Painters No. 824 

Edward W. Phelps, P, 563 Coburn St. 
Joseph L. Beach, R S, 663 Beecher St 

Painters No. 528 (Carriage and Sign 

Painters) 
J. C. Cane, P, 316 Baldwin St 
H. A. Ensworth, F S, 809 Laurel St. 

Plumbers No. 206 

Paul Huber, P, 119 W. Honry St. 

It A. Dickson, R S, 822 W. First St. 

Printing PreNbmen and Assistants No. 
187 

Eugene M. Durfey, P, 412 Pleasant St. 
John W. Mann, F S, 402 Pleasant St. 

Sheet Metal Workers No. 70 (Copper- 
smiths) 
,Tohn Mumberger, P, Howard St 
Garfield Latimer, R S, 255 Partridge St. 

Sheet Metal Workers No. 112 

G. Lockwood. P, 505 John St. 

J. H. Griff, R S, 310 Cottage Pi. 

Stereotypers and Electrotypers No. 69 

(Stcrcotypers) 
Maurice Cniiipboll. P. .•^62 W. 3d St. 

C. G. Brown, R S, 808 W. Church St. 

Street and Electric Railway EmploycH'^A 
No. 179 • 

C. P. Rockwell. P. 663 Colnmbia St. 
Charles M. Pratt, R S, 706 N. Elm St. 

Switchmen No. 144 

M. W. Powers, P, 756 S. Main St. 

Wm. Murphy, R S, r.l8 W. 7th St. 

Tailors No. 91 

Gcorgo But'^her, P, corner Grey ond 

Elm Sts. 
Jo.scph Rochrer, P S, 418 W. 2d St. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



30 



New Yoek Laboe Bulletin 



CHEMUNG COUNTY— Blmira, conelvded 

Telegraphers No. 17, Railroad (Pennsyl- 
vania R. R. System, Elmlra Division) 

C. R. Elliott, Local Cbalrman, 640 W. 
Water St. 

Trainmen No. S20 

Cbarles Ferris, P, 511 Mount Zoftr St. 
A. D. Kinner, R S, 1140 Oak St. 



Trainmen No. 41S 

F. L. Hedges, P, 7 Fred St. 

£. S. Wilson, R S, 606% FrankUn St. 



Typographical Union No. IS 

G. B. Morgan, P, c/o "Advertiser" 
£. S. Spalding, F S, 509 W. CUnton St. 



CHENANGO COUNTY 



NORWICH 

Barbers No. SS4 

James J. Daly, P, National Hotel 
Frank E. Lennox, C S, 02 E. Main St. 

Bartenders No. 186 

Tbomas Downey, P, Brunswick Hotel 
William J. McOuigan, F S, Eagle Hotel 
Cafe 

Bluestone Cutters 

Cbarles Mead, P, Columbia St. 
M. J. Byrne, F S, 33 Rexford St. 

Boiler Makers No. S96 

James E. Callaban, P, 1 Columbia St. 
Ricbard J. Condon, F S, 10 Division St. 

Bricklayers No. 76 

Jobn Skaban, P, 37 Pleasant St 
Carlos E. Crandall, F S, R. D. No. 4 

Car Workers No. ZA 

William Boyd, P. 20 Jones At. 
J. J. Dillon, B A, 36 Adelaide St. 

Carpenters No. 810 

Fred Walker, P, Barden Av. 
D. C. Pike, R S, 33 Henry St. 

Cigar Makers No. 126 

W. E. Smltb, P, 25 Sbeldon St. 
Theodore H. Macksey, R S, 41 Rexford 
St. 



Clerks No. 848, Post Ofllce 
James H. Leach, P. 
O. K. Carr, R S. 

Conductors No. 841 

Cbarles T. King, P, Pine Villa 
C. W. Dorman, R S, 47 Front St. 

Engineers No. 560, Locomotive 
R. E. Rowe, P, 120 Adelaide St. 
William Haigbt, R S» 04 Mitchell St. 

Firemen and Bnglncmen No. 216, Loco- 
motive 

Arthur Trask, P, Clinton St. 

Ernest F. Scbraft, R S, 46 Sbeldon St. 

Machinists No. 586 

Jobn Fuller, P, 22 Hickok Av. 
E. E. Richards, R S, 25 Brown Av. 

Musicians No. 806 

L. A. Cevasco, P, Elm St. 

Ira Robb, R S, 48 Blrdsall St. 

Trainmen No. 858 

Tbomas Aston, P, 16 York St. 
Roy D. Bloom, R S, 30 Mitchell St. 

Typographical Union No. 458 

W. E. Miner, P, Piano St. 

J. B. Van Deusen, R S, 65 Henry St, 



CLINTON COUNTY 



CADYVILLE 

Palp Workers No. 16 

Cbarles Hull, P. 

S. A. O'Connell, C S. 



MORRISONVILLE 

Pulp Workers No. 11 

Edward Rock, P. * 
Napoleon La vine, C S. 



PLATTSBURG 

Barbers No. 456 

W. N. Guyette, P, 7 River St.. 

A. J. Dallaire, F S, 70 Margaret St. 

Bricklayers No. 92 

Z. Lucia, P. 

J. C. Ryan, R S, Box No. 332 

Carpenters No. 1042 

F. L. Baker, P, 41 S. Catherine St. 
J. A. Mcllwaine, R S, 56 Riley Av. 

Cigar Makers No. 270 

William Conroy, P, 51 S. Catherine St. 
Fred Prunler, R S, 17 Bailey Av. 



Clerks No. 1126, Post Ofllce 

John G. Grlener, P. 

A. A. Healey, R S. 

Firemen and Bnglnemen No. 180, Loco- 
motive 
M. W. Ingalls, P, 124 Bridge St 
Charles W. Palmer, R S, 88 Pine St. 

Hod Carriers and Building Laborers 
No. 267 

James Judge, P. 

Victor Dyer, R S, 27 S. Beekman St. 

Horseshoers No. 280 

Joseph Wood, P, Miller St 

Cbarles Brockney, R S, 22 S. River St. 

Letter Carriers No. 488 

Weldon E. ValenUne, P, 152 Brinkerboff 

St 
Fred Raby, R S, Post Office 

Painters No. 489 

B. G. Meyers, P, 41 Elm St 

W. H. Lenagben, R S, 95 Cornelia St. 

Plumbers No. 497 

A. O. Martin, P, 141 Broad St 
Frank Lance, R S, 56 Cbamplain St 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Unions 



31 



CUNTON COUNTT— Plaltsbarr, concladcd 

Trainmen No. 640 

W. C. Tedford, P, 27 Hamilton St. 
Noel Lucia, Jr., R S, 11 Champlain St. 



BOUSES POINT 
Trainmen No. 7W, Railway 

F. L. Loughto, P, Box 465 
Z. J. Gebo, F S, Box 480 



COLUMBIA COUNTY 



CHATHAM 

Carpenters No. 1915 

Daniel N. Groves, P. 
Philip Moore, R S. 

Tele^riH^hera No. 157, Railroad (Rat- 
land Ry.) 
£. J. La Pointe, General Chairman 
J. F. Haher, Genl S T, Brandon, Vt. 

HUDSON 

Brewery Workmen No. SI 

Charles Hessenthaler, P, Allen St. 
Burton Malone, F S, 517 Clinton St. 

Bricklayers No. 71 

William Bniger, P, 12 Dodge St. 
Jeremiah Coffey, C S, 31 Union St. 



Carpenters No. 1075 

Harry Hart, P, 253 State St. 

Norman G. Asher, F S, 618 Warren St. 

Cigar Makers No. 186 

G. W. Wurster, P, 444 Carroll St. 
Thomas McGraw, R S, 213 State St. 

Clerks No. 47S, Post Office 

H. Y. Magown, P. 

Thomas H. Cruise, R S, Post Office 

Letter Carriers No. 528 

Henry Buxbury, P, 39 Worth A v. 
Fred J. McDonald, R S, 824 Columbia 
St. 

Painters No. 8t0 

J. H. Johnson, P, 31 Allen St. 
D. W. Miller, R S, 554 State St. 



CORTLAND COUNTY 



COBTLAND 

Barbers No. 276 

Chas. D. Seaman, P, 30 Miller St. 
Edward E. Adams, F S, 8 Groton Ay. 

Bartenders No. 128 

Francis E. Kelley, P, 28 Port Watson 

St. 
W. F. Keman, F S, 12 Brown Av. 

Bricklayers No. 26 

W. E. Leonard, P, Floral Av. 
J. M. Olds, R S, 163 Horner At. 

Carpenters No. 1010 

Richard Dwyer, P, 21 Orchard St. 
John 0*Leary, F S, 187 Tompkins St. 

Cigar Makers No. 116 

Joseph McHale, P. 

F. H. Tucker, R S, P. O. Box 286, 
Homer, N. Y. 

Clerks No. 151, Post Office 

Herbert J. Phelps, P, 108 Clinton Av. 

Anson E. Casterline, R S, 33 Arthur A v. 



Horseshoers No. 211 

Fred Welch, P, 19 Orchard St. 

W. E. Jenkins, R S, 23% N. Main St. 

Letter Carriers No. 211 

George T. Lester, P. 

Frank H. Stanbro, R S, 12 Townley At. 

Musicians No. 528 

Norton N. Adams, P, 3 Floral At. 
H. B. French, R S, 18 Charles St. 

Painters No. 080 

Hiram Winchell, P, 18 Dowd St. 
H. A. Masten, R S, 5 James St. 

Stage Employees No. 272 

Daniel Dalton, P, 9 Brown At. 
Ray W. Fuller, R S, 52 Pomeroy St. 

Tailors No. 886 

John G. Webber, P, 101 Maple At. 
Miss Margaret Gorman, R S, 12 Steven- 
son St. 



DELAWARE COUNTY 



SIDNEY 

Carpenters No. 1466 (Machine Wood 

Workers) 
H. J. Atwell, P. 
^. C. Krueger, R S. 

WALTON 
Clerks No. 1468, Post Office 

Howard D. Salton, P. 
W. L. Gladstone, R S. 



Letter Carriers No. 1841 

W. M. Dolg, P. 

R. L. Manterstock, R S, Post Office 



Trainmen No. 75 

L. B. Twaddell, P. 

J. P. Hawyer, R S, 18 Fancher At. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



32 



New York Labor Bulletin 



DUTCHESS COUNTY 



BEACON 

BrIcklayorN No. 18 

John Shiols, P. 

Clareuce E. Taylor, K S, 57 Kent St. 

Carpi^nters No. 323 

John Atkinson, P, 2 South Elm St. 
Kobort J. Lamoree, It S, 17 Leonard St. 

Clerkfi No. 134S, Post Office 

W. A. Itrundai?e, P. 

John M. Spalffht, K S, Post Office 

Hat Flnlahers No. 1, Wool 

Frank Allyn. P. 

Robert Blackburn, R S, 20 First St. 

Letter Caralers No. It44 

Fred Palno. P. 

Henry A. Annls, R S. Post Office 

3I«alci»ns No. ^>9 

Stylos E. McKee, P. 
A. H. Auschutz, R S. 

Paintem No. 501 

Jnnies Vredenberg, P, Glenham, N. Y. 
II. Macy, R S, 17 South St. 

Trainmen No. 287 

Robert McCarroU. P. 

C. F. Brewster, R S, 50 Beacon St. 



MILLBROOK 

Carpenters No. 1263 

James Clark, P, South Mlllbrook, N. Y. 
John A. Mahar, R S. 



MILLERTON 

Carpenters No. 1876 
Eiiunett Wheeler, P. 
Jost'ph G. Jenneweln, Box 85 



POUG1IKEEP8IE 

Barbers No. 832 

Irwin Howe. P, 19 Academy St. 
P. B. Marten, R S, Nelson House Bar- 
bor Shop 

Bartenders No. 438 

JoHoph C. Fltzpatrlck, P, 425 Main St. 
Fred Theyson, R S, 3 Zlmmer Av. 

Brewery Workmen No. 68 

Frank Roesch, P, Leights Brewery, 

Nowburph, N. Y. 
Charles Germer, R S, 11 Tulip St. 

Brlrklnyers No. 44 

Joseph Purrell. P. 20 Mansion St. 

J. A. McKenna, S, 27 Orchard PI. 

Carpenters No. 203 

Mitchell W. Earl, P, 11 S. Clinton St. 
Cecil H. Van Wagner, F S, 24 Dean PI. 

Cement Workers No. 143 

Joseph Rolser, P, 29 Perry St. 
John Philipson, R S, 265 Main St. 



CigBT Makers No. 74 

Charles H. Hahu, P, 33 S. Bridge St. 
Frank Daubert, R S, 57 S. Bridge St. 

Clerks No. 1314, Post Office 

William Krieger, P. 53 Noxon St. 
Fred A. Monell, R S, 139 N. Clinton St. 

Clerks No. 98, Railway 

Ellsworth F. Haun, P, 28 Gate St. 
Clarence De Lamater, F S, 102 South 
Av. 

Garment Workers No. llff (Laundry 

Workers) 
Henry Hopper, P, Salt Point Road 
Howard J. Parson, R S, 389 Main St 

Glass Bottle Blowers No. 62 

James Groves, P, 27 Orchard PL 
Homer Belanger, F S, 00 Delafleld St. 

Granite Cutters 

Clarence MacKelhony, District Officer, 
48 Franklin St. 

Iron, Steel and Tin Workers No. 5 
James Doran, P, 18 Lafayette St. 
Robert McTaggart, C S, 69 Llvlngstoii 
St. 

Letter Carriers No. 187 

Wilmont C. Graham, P, 44 Carroll St. 
John Haubennestal, R S, 106 Pine St. 

Molders No. SO 

Charles Demask, P, 35 Oifford Av. 
Ira M. Hawks, F S, 66 Taylor Av. 

Musicians No. 288 

George Esser, P, 2 Allen PI. 

Fred J. Gardner, R S, 12 Crannell St. 

Painters No. 156 

C. A. Meyers, P, 315 Main St. 
E. L. Mather, R S, 13 Academy St. 

Plumbers No. 180 

George N. Smith, P. 29 Delano St. 
Philip C. Klein, R S, 36 Fox St. 

Sheet Metal W^orkers No. 283 

William Cook, P, 317 Mansion St. 
John Saudison, R S, 51 Thompson St. 

Tailors No. 18 

Bernard Schneider, P, Bedell Clothing 

Store 
R. Gralrl, R S, 199 Main St. 

Trainmen No. 827 

Frank M. Doran, P, 48 Taylor Av. 
John J. Hlgglns, R S, 7 Bellevue Av. 

Typographical Union No. 315 

Ira V. D. Warren, P. 

Archie F. Ostrander, R S, 31 Rose St 



WAPPINOERS FALLS 

Garment Workers No. 84 (Overall 

Workers) 
Miss Catherine Faydea. P. 
Miss Kathryn T. C. Colgan, R S, Box 

160 

Textile Workers No. 830 (Calico Fold- 
ers) 
n^rt Cnmpbell, P. 
11. C. Townsend, R S. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Unions 



33 



ERIE COUNTY 



Telesrrapherii No. £89, Railroad (Lake 
Shore * Mlchlffa« SeotlierA B#. 
SyBtem, Kaetevn DivUion^ 

6. Ifi. Klpp, Local CUairman 

UGWFALO 
Bakera No. 19 

Louis Spaetb, P, 1298 JeffBrsoii St. 
WilUam Kneller, F S, 1Q<7 Keed St. 

Bakers No. 2» (Polish) 

Jobn Wojciesbowski, P, 1068 Broadway 

A. OlyMczak, R S, 100 Clark St. 

Barhers Ne. Mt 

Peter Schaefbucb, P, 41 B. Deleran At. 

George H. Wahl, IT S, 357 Bsoadway 

Bartenders No. ITS 

i^'rauk Brown, P Sv 8 Sycamore St. 

P. J. McGowan, F S, 12 fiL Bagle St 

BIB Posters- and BUlers No. M 

Martin Connor, P, 382 Prospect At. 
John B. Voll, U S, 38 Bennett St. 

BiacksBiitha and Helpers No. 128 

Frank Beacher, P, 213 Reed St. 
Fred Hermann, B S, 308 N. Ogden St. 

Boiler Makers No. 7 

George F. Moir, P, 116 Gtoodell St 
Fred Goodall, F S, 431 Carlton St. 
Thomas J. King, B A, 1275 Seneca St. 

Bookhinders No. 17 

Walther Matthies, P, 1128 E. Delevan 

Av. 
Albert J. Fox, F S, 206 Locust St. 

Boot and Shoe Workers No. IS 
Peter F. Smith, P, 331 Pratt St. 
Valentine Kuch, F S, 27 Oneida St 

Boot and Shoe Workers No. SOS (Cus- 
tom Repairers) 
August M. Ziesler, P, 242 Clinton St. 
J. J. Brucks, C S, 409 Elm St 

Brewery Workman No. 4 

Herman Koenig, P, 278 Jefferson St. 
Fritz Renz, C S, 568 E North St. 

B te w ci'j Workmen No. 4, Braneh 7 

(Engineers and Firemen) 
Eugene Redleln, P, 65 Camp St. 
Charles Kopp, R S, 311 Best St. 
FriU Renz, B A, 568 E. North St 

Brewery 'Workmen No. 16 (Drivers) 
George Dendinger, P, 56 Herman St. 
Henry Kranlchfeld, C S, 650 E. Utica St. 

Brewery Workmen No. 189 (Malsters) 
Jacob Kllger, P, 292 Reed St. 
Fred Hoppe, B A, 135 Adams St. 

Brewery Workmen No. 194 (DriTers 

and Bottlers) 
Ernest H. Gierman, P, 401 Bristol St. 
William A. Boergers, R S, 35 Jobnson 

St 

Bricklayers No. 86 (Stone Masons) 
Christ Bremer. P. 53 Clay St. 
Gottlieb Scbultz, F S, 419 Koons At. 



BaleUayers Now ^ 

John V. Mackey, P, 55 Como At. 
William Martgolf, C S, 8 Harlow PL 
Louis Carney, B A, 77 Lake View At. 

Bridge and SimctnxBl Iron Wockaas 
No. 6 

Michael J. Meegan, P, 76 Pearl St 
Alfred Wright R S, 24 Desmonds PI. 
George Brown, B A, 144 Abbott &d. 

Car Workers No. 1 

Joseph (^ Sauer, P, 278 Brinkman St 
Otto Marquart R S, 2»0 Goodyear At. 

Car Workers No* S 

W. C. Rolaa, P, 179 Sycamore St 
James Dugj^an, R S* 790 S. Division 3t 

Carpenters, AmaJL Society 

J. L. Simons, P, 35 (ielston St 
Sam Carson, £ S, 261 Babcock St 

Carpenters No. 8 

Adam Schmidt P, 344 Sycamore St 
H. W. KauXmann, B S, 354 Koons Ay. 

Carpenters No. SSS 

A. Boyack, P, 433 Winslow At. 

W. H. Winkelmann, F S, 40 Roetzer 
At. 

Carpentara No. 874 

Richard Sloat P. 362 Military Road 
WllUam AlUson, R S, 280 Carlton St 

Carpenters No. 440 

Herman L. Giellenthein, P, 788 Glen- 
wood Av. 
Thomas Hanover, R S, 19T Eaton St 

Carpenters No. 1345 

B. B. Miller. P, 197 Winona St 
Henry F. Barkhardt R S, 11 Gorham 

St 

Carpenters No. 1377 

Jacob Flsber, P, 2027 Niagara St 
John Schaefer, R S, 45 Riverside At. 

Carpenters No. 1401 (Machine Wood 

Workers) 
Albert Schott P, 454 Spring St 
William Olday, R S, 627 E, Ferry St 

Carpenters No. 1466 (Machine Wood 

Workers) 
William P. Hoffman, P, 41 Wagner PI. 
Joseph C. Klein, R S, 35 Davis St. 

Carpenters No. 1668 

J. J. Yandprberg, P, 431 Connecticut St. 

Henry E. Briscoe, F S, 2S Briscoe Av. 

Carpenters No. 1787 

Andrew Sczymoniek, P, 125,3 Broadway 
Frank Zurek, R S, 41 Beck St. 

Carriage, Waicon and Antomohlle 
Workers No. 4S 

Wm. R. Hayes, P, 319 Hampshire St. 
Wm. P. Mavell, R S, 30 Chapln Block 

Cigar Makers No. 2 

John Hartlda, P, 50 Days Pk. 

Fred Weigel, F S, 271 E. Genesee St. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



34 



Xew York Labor Bulletin 



BBUS COUNTY— Boiralo, conUnncd 

Clerks No. 11, Post Office 

Edward T. O'Connor, P, 291 Maryland 

St. 
Charles M. Shear, R S, City Division, 

P. O. 

Clerks No. 285, Railway 

M. F. Hannon, P. 

John H. Brady, R S, 3(H Fulton St. 

Clerks No. 212, Retail (Clothing) 

D. C. McNeill, P., c/o The Liberty Co., 

35 Seneca St. 
Charles V. Sandstrom, c/o The Liberty 

Co., 35 Seneca St. 

Clerks No. 716, Retail (Furniture) 
Anthony J. Slebold, P, 40 Demond PI. 
M. Emil Kayser, F S, IM Laurel St. 

Clerks No. ISIO, Retail (Shoe) 
J. F. Fllndall, P, 567 Main St. 
William C. Prior, R S, 89 Watson St. 

Coal Handlers No. 110 (Int. Longshore- 
men's Ass'n) 
John Cadigan, P, 29 Vlncennes St. 
Thomas F. Ryan, R. S, 484 Elk St, 

Conductors No. 2 

A. B. Smith, Ch Cond, 561 West Av. 

A. KeaUng, R S, 458 S. Division St. 

Cooks, Marine, of Great Lakes (Int. 
Seamen's Union.) 

William F. Sautter, F S, 55 Main St. 

Coopers No. 98 

W. Dahlheim, P, 64 Adams St. 
Fred O. Pfeil, F S, 223 Madison St. 

Dredffe Workers No. 470 (Int. Long- 
shoremen's Assn.) 

Thomas P. Daley, P. 299 S. Division St. 

Edward M. Gallagher, F S, 20 Lakeview 
Av. 

Dredge Workers No. 887 (Int. Long- 
shoremen's Assn.) (Pile Drivers) 
Joseph Britton, P, 244 Swan St. 
Cornelius Kelleher, F S, 484 Perry St. 

Kleotrical Workers No. 41 (A. F. of L.) 

(Inside Wiremen) 
R. L. Alger, P. 239 Barton St. 
G. C. King, F S, 179 Waverly St. 

Electrical Workers No. 45 (Linemen) 
J. W. Weger, P, 157 Monroe St. 

B. Earl, R S, 7 Purdy St. 

Elevator Constructors No. 14 

Albert Schell. P, 518 Glenwood Av 
Thomas E. Blnnie, R S, 42 Hawley St. 

Elevator Operators 

Paul Tax, P. 816 C^nesee St. 

Edward C. Masterson, F S, 297 Perry St. 

Engineers, Amal. Roc. (Machinists) 
John Cameron, P, 729 West A v. 
James G. Watson, F S, 24 Grant St. 

Engineers No. 15, Loeomotive 

John Oannah, Ch, 340 N. Division St. 
Theodore Williamson, R S, 128 Rich- 
mond Av. 

Engineers No. 828, Loeomotive 

George F. Burns. Ch, 703 Prospect Av. 
Wilfred Petrie, R S, 113 Florida St. 



Engineers No. 882, Loeomotive 

C. A. Hessler, Ch, 14 Teresa PL 

W. F. Hessler, R S, 155 Parkview Av, 

Engineers No. 421, Locomotive 

R. C. Hicks, Ch, 658 Walden Av. 
F. W. Stone, R. S, 1801 Bailey Av. 

Engineers No. 588, Locomotive 

Edwin J. Day, Ch, 217 Gold St. 
J. C. Helseubuttle, R S, 56 Halstead av, 
Sloan, N. Y. 

Engineers No. 644, Locomotive 

William Smith, Ch, 541 N. Division St. 
Frank M. Craven, R S, 1023 Lovejoy St. 

Engineers No. 659, Locomotive 

F. H. Goodenough, Ch, 34 Kamper St. 

F. C. Watklns, F S, 510 S. Division St. 

Engineers No. 1, Marine 

Wm. A. Hayes, P, 765 Main St, 
M. F. Hannon, R S, 10 Exchange St. 

Engineers No. 17, Steam (Int. Union) 

Mark J. Cronln, P, 139 Abbott Rd. 
John A. Springs, F S, 842 Elllcott St. 

Engineers No. 82, Steam (Int. Union) 
John J. Glass, P, 514 E. Eagle St. 
Owen F. Ryan, R S, 756 Washington St. 

Engineers No. 400, Steam (Int. Union) 

(Public School Janitors) 
Henry W. Biden, P, School 26. 
William Feist, R S, School 56, W. Dele- 
van Av. 

Engineers No. 460, Steam (Int. Union) 
A. F. Saunders, P, 310 Seneca St. 
James Self, F S, 492 Plymouth Av. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 12, Loco- 
motive 

William J. Kinney, P, 181 O'Connell Av. 
Oorge N. Hafner, R S, 163 Parkview 
Av. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 85, Loco- 
motive 

W. S. Reese, P, 77 Princeton St. 
E. J. Metzlnger, R S, 312 Grey St. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 101* Loco- 
motive 

H. H. Dockstader, P, 100 Brinkman St. 
Arthur G. Phiel, R S, 102 Domedian Av. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 241, Loco- 
motive 
E. R. Todd, P, 87 Putnam St. 
Thomas Bodkin, R S, 1466 S Park Av. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 276, Loco- 
motive 

S. H. Hasfurter, P. 300 N. Ogden St. 
Philip Koch, R S, 240 Cedar St. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 816, Loco- 
motive 

H. J. Zilch, P, 1804 Bailey Av. 
William M. Halght, R S, 339 Seventh St. 

Firemen and Englnemen No. 472, Loco- 
motive 
Henry C. Kreuger, P, 112 Dovey St. 
Walter Freemyer, R S, 130 Ideal St. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Local Unions 



35 



BBIE COUNTY— Buffalo, continued 

Itremen and Bnirlnemon No. 614, Loco- 
motive 

J. W. Jacobs, P, 123 Sage Av. 
Charles Kaiser, R S, 284 Fillmore Av. 

Firemen, Marine (Int. Seamen's Union) 

Thomas Conway, R S, 71 Main St. 

Firemen No. 11, Stationery 
Richard O'Toale, P, 3399 Main St. 
George C. Purrington, F S, 609 Elm St. 

Firemen No. 444, Tug (Int. Longshore- 
men's Assn.) 
M. W. Ferine, P, 24 Princeton PI. 
Thomas H. Sloan, F S, 497 Masten St. 

Floar and Cereal Mill Bmp. Prot. Assn. 
No. 14,450, A. F. of L. 

C. W. Stralr, P, 138 N. Division St. 
Christian Schuster, R S. 209 Sherman 
St. 

Flour PackerH and Helpers Prot. Union 
No. 14,477, A. F. of L. 

Joseph Freeman, C S, 105 Kilburn St. 
Frank Llnehan, F S. 

Garment Workers No. 18 (Overall 

Workers — Women) 
Miss Emma North meyer, P, 326 Monroe 

St. 
Miss Ella Maerke, R S, 462 Adams St. 

Garment Workers No. 20 (Pressers) 
Stanlslans Czaster, P, 226 Goodyear St. 
Max Gelber, F S, 17 St. Louis Av. 

Garment Workers No. 46 (Clothing 

Cutters) 
J. C. Clark, P. 178 Normal Av. 
Clayton M. King, R S, 732 Elmwood Av. 

Garment Workers No. 119 (Coat Makers) 
Alfred Herrmann, P. 386 Madison St. 
Ralph Mldda, R S, 384 Clinton St. 

Garment Workers No. 147 (Pants Mak- 
ers) 
James Parressl, P, 202 Seventh St. 
Frank Choppa, R S, 118 S. Division St. 

Garment Workers No. 231 (Tailors — 

Women) 
Miss Marian Felix, P, 731 .Jefferson St. 
Miss Elizabeth Rapp, F S, 34 Matthews 

St 

Garment Workers No. 90, Ladles (Tail- 
ors) 

Paul Herrlnsr, P. 423 Elm St. 

Miss Rebecca Gubenko, R S, 97 Adams 
St. 

Glass Workers No. 85 (Revelers, Polish- 
ers, etc.) 
George DeNoon, P. lf»6 Purdy St. 
C. F. Sugent, F S, 307 Spring St. 

Granite Cutters 

A. Hoskln. P. 81 Gallltin Av. 

Frank Bullock, R S. 59 Northland Av. 

Hod Cnrrlers and Building Laborers 

(Polish) 
Alex Partvkn. P. 345 Gibson St. 
Andrew Walczak, R S, 176 Miller Av. 

Hod Carriers and Building Laborers 
No. 104 

Nicholas Mogarvero. P. 

Gulseppi Guglnzza, R S, 180 Erie St. 



Horseshoers No. 23 

Harry Duulop, P, 443 Johnson St. 
James S. Gray, R S. 188 W. Huron St 
Dennis G. Corbett, B A, 289 High St. 

Hospital Employees 

R. S. Geise, P, State Hospital 
Peter Strang, R S, State HosplUl 

Hotel and Restaurant Employees No. 

196 (Walters) 
Thomas Tarrant, P, 420 Main St. 
E. W. Weaver, F S, 420 Main St. 

Industrial Workers No. 5 (Mixed Em- 
ployment) 
Paul Herplng, R S, 423 Elm St. 
Joseph Klopus, F S, 2079 Niagara St. 

Insulators and Asbestos Workers No. 4 

John Coote, P, 58 Cary St. 

John W. Ryan, R S, 400 Michigan St. 

Jewelenr Workers No. 14,494, A. F. of L. 
John Werner, P, 120 Ludington St. 
Carl Kraltz, P S, 87 Bennett St. 

Lathers No. 82 

William Smith, P, 30 Garner Av. 
Fred O. Toale, R S, 528 Sycamore St. 

Letter Carriers No. 8 

Thomas F. Kennedy, P, 118 Demond PI. 
James