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Full text of "Mineral land classification : aggregate materials in the Bakersfield production-consumption region"

UBRARV UNIVERSE Or CALIFORNIA DAVIS 



PHYSICAI ! 
LIBRARY 

UC DAVIS 






MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION: 

AGGREGATE MATERIALS 

IN THE BAKERSFIELD 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION 

1988 



CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SPECIAL REPORT 1 47 




1933 



ESOURCES AGENCY 

RDON K. VAN VLECK 
:TARY FOR RESOURCES 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN 
GOVERNOR 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

RANDALL M. WARD 
DIRECTOR 




DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

BRIAN E. TUCKER 
ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST 



SPECIAL REPORT 147 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION: 

AGGREGATE MATERIALS 

IN THE BAKERSFIELD 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION 



1988 



By 
Judy Wiedenheft Cole 



Under the Direction of 
David J. Beeby, W. Ray Seiple, and Brian E. Tucker 



California Department of Conservation 

DIVISION of MINES and GEOLOGY 

1416 Ninth Street, Room 1341 

Sacramento, California 95814 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of California, Davis Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/specialreport147cali 



FOREWORD 



Special Report 147, "Mineral Land Classification: Aggregate Materials in the Bakersfield 
Production-Consumption Region," is part of the continuing analysis of aggregate resources 
in California to be developed by the California Department of Conservation, Division of 
Mines and Geology under authority of the Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975 
(SMARA). This classification is provided to the State Mining and Geology Board for transmit- 
tal to the local governments that regulate land use in this region, and for consideration of 
areas, if any, to be designated as regionally significant. SMARA was enacted by the State 
Legislature to assure mineral resource conservation and adequate mined land reclamation. 

The Mining and Geology Board adopted guidelines in June 1978 to be employed by 
the Division in its mineral resource classification. This report was prepared in conformance 
with those directives. The undertaking is of great importance in economic geology because 
it deals with very specific mineral conservation issues in areas of intensive competing land 
use. 



Ill 



PREFACE 



Reserve tonnage data presented in this report was accurate as of January 1985. 
In 1987 a preprint version of the report was circulated to lead agencies and made avail- 
able to the public. Changes in reserves resulting from either the premature closure of mines 
active in 1985, or the permitting of new mines since that time, may have impacted fore- 
casted depletion dates for the production-consumption region studied. However, the 
material presented and the fundamental conclusions of the report remain valid and useful. 



David J. Beeby 

Urban SMARA Program Manager 



Edited by Alison J. Kenward 
Graphic design by Peggy Walker 

Typeface is Times Roman and Futura, 
produced by Ad Type Graphics, Inc. 

Printing and binding by 
Office of State Printing 



CONTENTS 

Page 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY xi 

INTRODUCTION 1 

Overview of Classification 2 

Brief Overview of Designation 2 

Lead Agency Response to Classification 2 

Overview of Aggregate Uses 3 

DETERMINATION OF THE BAKERSFIELD PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION 4 

Transportation Rates 4 

ESTABLISHMENT OF MINERAL RESOURCE ZONES 4 

Areas Classified MRZ-1 5 

Areas Classified MRZ-2 5 

Areas Classified MRZ-3 6 

Areas Classified MRZ-4 7 

EVALUATION OF PCC-GRADE AGGREGATE IN THE BAKERSFIELD P-C REGION 9 

Concepts Used in Identifying Available Aggregate Resource Areas 9 

Sectors 9 

Calculation of Available Resources 9 

Reserves and Resources 9 

Factors Considered in Calculations 9 

Resource Sector Descriptions 10 

Sector A — James Road Resource Area 10 

Sectors B and C — Kern River Floodplain and Alluvial Fan Resource Area 11 

Sector D — Cottonwood Creek Floodplain and Terraces 12 

Sectors E and F — Alluvial Fan of San Emigdio Creek 12 

Sector G — Wheeler Ridge Resource Area 13 

Sector H — Alluvial Fan of Pastoria Creek 14 

Sector I and J — The Upper (J) and Lower (I) Portions of Caliente Wash 14 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACTIVE MINES PRODUCING OTHER MINERAL COMMODITIES 18 

ESTIMATED 50-YEAR CONSUMPTION OF AGGREGATES 19 

Basis of 50-Year Forecasts 19 

Correlations between Aggregate Production and Consumption 19 

Projected Population and Per Capita Consumption through the Year 2034 21 

Factors Affecting Per Capita Consumption Rates 21 

Comparison of the 50-Year Aggregate Demand with Current Reserves 21 

ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF AGGREGATE 23 

Potential Sources within 15 Miles of Bakersfield 23 

Potential Sources of Aggregate Located Greater than 15 Miles from Bakersfield 24 

Potential Sand Sources 24 

Potential Crushed Rock Aggregate 24 

Potential Sources of PCC-Grade Aggregate Imported from Active Mines Outside the P-C Region 25 

CONCLUSIONS 26 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 26 

REFERENCES 26 

APPENDIX 27 

Interim Criteria for Sectorization of MRZ-2 Areas for Aggregate 27 



VII 



FIGURES 

Page 

Figure 1 . General location map of the Bakersfield Production-Consumption Region 1 

Figure 2. Minimum transport rates for aggregate in the Bakersfield area 5 

Figure 3. Index to the U.S. Geological Survey 7.5 minute quadrangles covering the Bakersfield 

P-C Region 6 

Figure 4. Index to geological maps used to classify land in the Bakersfield P-C Region 7 

Figure 5. Generalized columnar section of the eastern and southeastern margin of the 

San Joaquin Valley 8 

Figure 6. Population and aggregate consumption (3-year averages) far the Bakersfield P-C Region 

for years 1960-1984 20 

Figure 7. Annual per capita consumption of aggregate in the Bakersfield P-C Region (1960-1984) 21 

Figure 8. Projected population in the Bakersfield P-C Region 21 

Figure 9. Generalized columnar section of the southern margin of the San Joaquin Valley 

(San Emigdio Mountains) 25 



TABLES 



Table 1 . Lead agencies located within the Bakersfield P-C Region 4 

Table 2. Minimum rates for transport of aggregate in the Bakersfield area when charges are 

based on time 4 

Table 3. Resources in Sector A, the James Road deposit 10 

Table 4. Resources in Sector B, the Kern River floodplain 12 

Table 5. Resources in Sector C, the Kern River alluvial fan 12 

Table 6. Resources in Sector D, Cottonwood Creek 13 

Table 7. Resources in Sector E, the upper San Emigdio Creek alluvial fan 13 

Table 8. Resources in Sector F, the lower San Emigdio Creek alluvial fan 13 

Table 9. Resources in Sector G, Wheeler Ridge 14 

Table 1 0. Resources in Sector H, Pastoria Creek alluvial fan 14 

Table 1 1 . Resources in Sector I, the lower portion of Caliente Wash 15 

Table 1 2. Resources in Sector J, the upper portion of Caliente Wash 15 

Table 1 3. Summary by subsector of nonpermitted resources and factors used in calculating resource 

totals in Sectors A through J 16 

Table 1 4. Summary of resources, reserves, and acreage by sector in the Bakersfield P-C Region 18 

Table 1 5. Summary of mine sites where commodities other than PCC-grade 

aggregate are extracted 19 



VIII 



TABLES (Continued) 

Table 16. Population, aggregate consumption, and per capita consumption in the 

Bakersfield P-C Region during the period 1960-1984 20 

Table 1 7. Projected aggregate consumption through the year 2034 for the 

Bakersfield P-C Region 22 

Table 1 8. Percentage of total aggregate consumption used for Portland cement concrete 

aggregate in the Bakersfield P-C Region during the period 1960-1984 22 

Table 1 9. Summary of PCC-grade aggregate resources and 50-year demand: 

Bakersfield P-C Region 23 



PLATES 



Plate 1 . Bakersfield P-C Region map, showing the P-C region and urbanizing boundaries and resource 

extraction sites 
Plate 2. Mineral land classification of aggregate resources in the Bakersfield P-C Region 
Plate 2a. Mineral land classification of aggregate resources in the Bakersfield P-C Region (detail) 
Plate 3. Generalized geology of the Bakersfield P-C Region 



Mineral Land Classification Maps 



Plate 4. Oildale Quadrangle Plate 12. 

Plate 5. Oil Center Quadrangle Plate 1 3. 

Plate 6. Rio Bravo Ranch Quadrangle Plate 1 4. 

Plate 7. Gosford Quadrangle Plate 1 5. 

Plate 8. Edison Quadrangle Plate 1 6. 

Plate 9. Bena Quadrangle Plate 1 7. 

Plate 1 0. Oiler Peak Quadrangle Plate 1 8. 

Plate 1 1 . Connor SW Quadrangle Plate 1 9. 



Eagle Rest Peak Quadrangle 
Mettler Quadrangle 
Grapevine Quadrangle 
Pastoria Creek Quadrangle 
Arvin Quadrangle 
Bear Mountain Quadrangle 
Taft Quadrangle 
Maricopa Quadrangle 



Resource Sector Maps 

Plate 20. Oildale Quadrangle Plate 26. 

Plate 21. Oil Center Quadrangle Plate 27. 

Plate 22. Rio Bravo Ranch Quadrangle Plate 28. 

Plate 23. Gosford Quadrangle Plate 29. 

Plate 24. Edison Quadrangle Plate 30. 

Plate 25. Bena Quadrangle Plate 31. 



Oiler Peak Quadrangle 
Connor SW Quadrangle 
Eagle Rest Peak Quadrangle 
Mettler Quadrangle 
Grapevine Quadrangle 
Pastoria Creek Quadrangle 



Cross Sections 

Plate 32. Sections A-A', B-B" and D-D" 
Plate 33. Sections C-C", E-E' and F-F' 



IX 



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 



The Bakersfield Production-Consumption (P-C) Region, as defined in this report, covers 
1,806 square miles and includes the large urbanizing portions of western Kern County in the 
southern end of the San Joaquin Valley. Although substantial portions of this area are agri- 
cultural, urbanization in the vicinity of Bakersfield is occurring at a rapid pace. 

In any urban development, it is important that land-use decisions be made with full rec- 
ognition of the natural resources of the area. Mineral resources, including aggregate, are 
limited within a given region. The object of this report is to convey information concerning 
the aggregate resources of the Bakersfield P-C Region and the expected needs of the region 
for such resources in the next 50 years. For many years, the Bakersfield area has been 
fortunate to have adequate quantities of relatively low-cost aggregate materials locally 
available. However, as more areas become urbanized, suitable sand and gravel deposits 
are being lost through urban development and are being diminished yearly by mining. 

This report presents a classification of the land in the Bakersfield P-C Region by Mineral 
Resource Zones (MRZ) based on guidelines adopted by the California State Mining and 
Geology Board (the Board). This classification project will assist the Board in the event 
the Board contemplates designation of lands containing regionally significant aggregate 
resources pursuant to the Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975 (SMARA). 

The California Department of Conservation's Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) 
has classified the Bakersfield P-C Region according to the presence or absence of significant 
sand, gravel, or stone deposits that are suitable as sources of Portland cement concrete 
(PCC)-grade aggregate. If a deposit contained more than $5 million worth (in 1978 dollars) 
of suitable material and could be extracted and marketed profitably under present technol- 
ogic conditions, or those which could be estimated to exist in the foreseeable future, the 
deposit was classified MRZ-2. 

Active mines producing other mineral commodities were encountered during the course 
of this aggregate study. If those mines met minimum threshold values established by the 
SMGB, their deposits were classified MRZ-2, even though the entire region has not been 
uniformly classified for commodities other than PCC-grade aggregate. 

The land classification within the Bakersfield P-C Region is presented in the form of 
Mineral Resource Zones on 16 U.S. Geological Survey topographic quadrangle maps that 
accompany this report (Plates 4-19) and one small-scale map of the whole P-C region (Plate 
2). Mineral Resource Zones for PCC-grade aggregate were established on the basis of a 
sand, gravel, and stone resource appraisal which included a study of pertinent geologic 
reports and maps, field investigation of outcrops and active and inactive pits, and an analysis 
of water-well logs and drill records. Seven major areas were determined to contain signifi- 
cant PCC-grade aggregate deposits and were classified MRZ-2. Cumulatively, these MRZ-2 
areas cover 53 square miles (3 percent of the total classified area). Sites of active mining for 
mineral commodities other than PCC-grade aggregate were also classified MRZ-2 for their 
specific use, six such sites are documented in this report. In addition, there are large areas 
that contain aggregate resources, but the significance of these resources could not be 
evaluated from available data; these areas were classified MRZ-3. 

In order to organize the volume calculations of the aggregate resources, the State 
Geologist has developed the concept of "sectors" to identify those MRZ-2 areas that have 
not been urbanized. The geometrical configuration and the geologic continuity of the de- 
posit in each sector are fairly uniform, so the tonnage of aggregate present can be calcu- 
lated with some reliability. Thus, sector boundaries are established between that part of a 
natural deposit formed on a fan and that part within the confines of an adjacent modern 
stream channel and its floodplain. The sector concept is used for the convenience of array- 
ing resource information and is intended to convey accurate information regarding the 
locations and approximate tonnage of resources found in nonurbanized areas. 

In the Bakersfield P-C Region, the seven major MRZ-2 areas were divided into 10 sec- 
tors which were further subdivided into 54 smaller areas referred to as subsectors. Existing 
land uses within the sectors are compatible with mining. Together the 54 subsectors cover 
almost 31 square miles (2 percent of the total classified area) and contain a total of nearly 
5.3 billion tons of aggregate. The sectors are described in this report and are shown on 
Plates 20-31. The identification of resource sectors has been done to inform lead agencies 
and others of aggregate resources that could be made available for mining by virtue of the 
present, generally undeveloped status of the land. The sectorization of any specific area is 
not an advocacy of mining in that area. 



XI 



Reserves are aggregate materials that a sand and gravel company owns or controls 
and for which it has a valid mining permit; resources are the total amount of available ag- 
gregate within an area, including any reserves. The estimated aggregate resources within 
the 10 sectors amount to nearly 5.3 billion tons; of this, 212.4 million tons are identified as 
reserves available for mining at the end of 1984. These reserves cover only two square 
miles, which is 0.1 percent of the total classified area. The resources are located in three 
fairly distinct areas. Over 85 percent lie along the southern margin of the San Joaquin 
Valley in alluvial fan deposits. The remaining resources are split between the Caliente Wash 
and a group of deposits close to Bakersfield. The latter include: the floodplains of Kern River 
and of Cottonwood Creek; a portion of the alluvial fan built by the Kern River; and, a small 
alluvial fan near James Road and State Highway 65. 

The total projected aggregate consumption through the year 2034 is estimated to be 
201 million tons of which approximately 107 million tons must be of PCC quality. Currently 
permitted reserves exceed the anticipated consumption of all aggregate in the Bakersfield 
P-C Region during the next 50 years. 

To make the aggregate demand projection, production records and population figures 
were correlated for the past 25 years (1960-1984) to obtain an average per capita rate of 
consumption. The derived rate of 7.4 tons per person per year was used along with popula- 
tion projections to make the estimate of total P-C region consumption for the next 50 years. 
Should unforeseen events occur, such as massive urban renewal, disaster reconstruction, or 
major recession, the aggregate demand could change considerably. 

Possible alternative sources of aggregate, in addition to those deposits classified MRZ-2, 
are present within the Bakersfield P-C Region and in adjacent areas. Included in this group 
are Holocene alluvial deposits, Tertiary sedimentary deposits, and areas underlain by crys- 
talline rock that are all classified MRZ-3. Too little is known about the physical and chemical 
qualities of these possible sources to permit even crude resource estimates. 

If additional aggregate was needed in the Bakersfield P-C Region, the most readily 
available source would be the producers in the Kaweah River and near the town of Avenal, 
both in Tulare County. However, utilization of these deposits by Bakersfield would cause sup- 
ply problems in the marketing areas already being served by these mines. 

As with many forecasts of economic activity, the forecasts in this report should not be 
viewed as offering unqualified predictions of how the future will unfold. The forecasts of this 
report are based on assumptions of the accuracy of the basic data and the continuation of 
development trends of the past three decades into the five decades ahead. 

Assuming the correctness of our forecasts for the consumption of aggregate in the 
Bakersfield P-C Region, the following conclusions were reached: 

• The anticipated consumption of aggregate resources in the P-C region through 
the year 2034 is forecast to be 201 million tons, of which approximately 53 per- 
cent or 107 million tons must be of PCC quality. 

• Over 212 million tons of permitted PCC-grade reserves exist in the P-C region, 
all of which are of PCC quality. 

• These 212 million tons of permitted PCC-grade aggregate reserves exceed the 
anticipated consumption of all aggregate during the next 50 years. 

• The expected longevity of the existing reserves is based upon the assumption 
that mining of these reserves will continue to be permitted until the reserves are 
depleted. 

• Nearly 5.3 billion tons of aggregate resources (including reserves) have been 
identified within the Bakersfield P-C Region. 

• All resources and reserves in the Bakersfield P-C Region are contained in 
deposits of sand and gravel. 



xii 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION: 

AGGREGATE MATERIALS 

IN THE BAKERSFIELD 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION 




Figure 1. General location map of the Bakersfield Production-Consumption Region. 



INTRODUCTION 



In the Bakersfield area (Figure 1 and Plate 1), as in any rap- 
idly urbanizing area, it is important that land-use decisions are 
made with full recognition of the natural resources of the area. 
This is especially true when the resource in question is high- 
grade construction aggregate used in Portland cement concrete. 
This type of aggregate is an indispensable building material and 
is costly to transport. The Bakersfield area has been fortunate 
in having adequate quantities of low-cost, high-quality aggregate 
materials locally available. However, the amount of these mate- 
rials available for future development is diminishing as active 
aggregate producers deplete their deposits and land containing 
suitable sand and gravel resources is utilized for urban 
development. 

This report and associated maps document for the Bakersfield 
area: the location of construction aggregate mines and resources 
(through a process called land classification); the tonnage of ag- 
gregate within deposits which meet the specifications for use in 
Portland cement concrete; and the demand for aggregate within 
this area for the next 50 years. This study was carried out as 
specified by the Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975 
(SMARA). The act was passed by the California State Legisla- 
ture in response to the loss of significant mineral resources due 



to urban expansion, the need for information concerning the lo- 
cation and quantity of essential mineral products, and to ensure 
adequate mined land reclamation. SMARA mandates a two- 
phased mineral resource conservation process called classifica- 
tion-designation. The objective of the classification and designa- 
tion process is to ensure, through appropriate lead agency policies 
and procedures, that raw material is available when needed and 
does not become inaccessible as a result of a lack of information 
during land-use decision-making actions. 

SMARA mandated that guidelines for classification and des- 
ignation be developed by the State Mining and Geology Board. 
The Board, subsequent to a reorganization and receipt of the 
results of pilot studies carried out by the Division of Mines and 
Geology (DMG), originally adopted a set of guidelines on June 
30, 1978. Section 1.1. a of the guidelines requires that the State 
Geologist classify specified areas into Mineral Resource Zones 
(MRZ) or Scientific Resource Zones (SZ) as defined in Section 
1.2 of the guidelines. (Classification is the process of identifica- 
tion of lands containing significant mineral deposits based solely 
on geologic factors, and without regard for present land use or 
land ownership.) Although California has a wide range of min- 
eral commodities within its borders, the Board recognizes that 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



construction materials (sand, gravel, and crushed stone) are pro- 
duced regionally, are used in every urban area of the state, and 
require special classification data. Section 1.3 of the guidelines 
requires that classification reports that pertain to deposits of 
construction materials include the following information: 
(1) the location and estimated total quantity of construction 
material that is geologically available for mining; (2) limits of 
the market (production-consumption) region which the potential 
resource would serve; and (3) an estimate of the total quantity 
of material that will be needed to supply the requirements of the 
consumption region for the next 50 years. This information will 
assist the State Mining and Geology Board in determining the 
statewide or regional significance of these types of deposits. A 
copy of the guidelines can be obtained as part of a DMG publi- 
cation entitled Special Publication 51, "California Surface 
Mining and Reclamation Policies and Procedures" (1983). This 
is available free of charge from the Division. 

Overview of Classification 

The DMG is responsible under SMARA for carrying out the 
classification phase of the classification-designation process. To 
properly fulfill the Mining and Geology Board's guidelines for 
classification, a process has been developed by the DMG which 
entails seven distinct but interrelated steps. These seven steps are 
described below. 

1 . Determination of Production-Consumption (P-C) Region 
Boundaries. The boundaries of the P-C region are drawn 
along the limits of the marketing area of the active aggre- 
gate operations supplying the urban center under study. The 
Bakersfield area was chosen for study because it is an urban 
center anticipated by the State Office of Planning and Re- 
search to experience expansion. The marketing area of the 
production sites supplying Bakersfield was determined by 
interviews of aggregate operators and analysis of the trans- 
port rates set by the Public Utilities Commission. 

2. Establishment of Mineral Resource Zones (MRZ). All 
lands within the P-C region are assigned Mineral Resource 
Zone classifications (MRZ-1, MRZ-2, MRZ-3, or MRZ-4) 
based upon a geologic appraisal of the PCC-grade aggregate 
resource potential of the land. This appraisal includes study 
of pertinent geologic reports and maps, field investigation 
and sampling at outcrops and at active and inactive pits and 
quarries, and analysis of water-well logs and drill records. 

3. Identification of Available Aggregate Deposits as Sectors. 
Lands containing significant deposits of PCC-grade sand 
and gravel (areas classified MRZ-2 in step 2) are evaluated 
to determine whether or not current uses of these lands pre- 
clude possible future mining. Areas currently permitted for 
mining and areas found to have land uses compatible with 
possible future mining are considered available for mining. 
Sectors which identify available land are delineated and 
described in detail. Criteria for sectorization of MRZ-2 areas, 
established by the Board, are given in the Appendix. 

4. Calculation of Resource Tonnages within Sectors. Inves- 
tigation and analysis of on-site conditions, measurement of 
the areal extent of deposits, drill-hole information, waste- 
material percentages, and deposit densities are used to 
calculate total tonnages of PCC-grade aggregate reserves 
(deposits in land owned or controlled by an aggregate producer 
and permitted for mining by local government at the end of 
1984) and resources (all deposits of PCC quality including 

the reserves) within each sector. Calculations reflect condi- 
tions of the deposits at the end of 1984. 

5. Forecast of 50-Year Needs and the Life Expectancy of 
Current Reserves. The total tonnage of aggregate needed to 



satisfy demand in the Bakersfield P-C Region over the next 
50 years is estimated based on a comparison of the proj- 
ected population over that period with the average annual 
per capita rate of aggregate consumption from 1960-1984. 
Even though all identified reserves are of PCC quality, other 
aggregate commodities are routinely produced and marketed 
from them. The projected life expectancy of the reserves is 
based on the assumption that this practice will continue. 

6. Identification of Alternative Resources . Alternative 
sources of aggregate to meet the forecasted 50- year demand 
are identified and briefly considered. 

7. Other Commodities. Active mines, where commodities 
other than PCC-grade aggregate are produced, are located 
and classified MRZ-2 if they meet a minimum threshold 
value set by the State Mining and Geology Board. Resources 
at the site are not quantified beyond confirming this mini- 
mum value. This classification is just of individual sites 
where commercial extraction of a mineral resource is oc- 
curring. It is not a classification of the entire P-C region for 
this resource. 

The Mineral Land Classification of the Bakersfield 
Production-Consumption Region was initiated in 1984 by 
the State Geologist. Included in the project area is most of 
the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County. Portland 
cement concrete-grade aggregate resources of the area were 
selected for initial classification. Deposits suitable for PCC- 
grade aggregate were classified, and the volume of avail- 
able material within them quantified. All other known 
mines within the P-C region were classified MRZ-2 for 
their particular product but were not quantified beyond the 
establishment of threshold value. 

Each PCC-grade aggregate deposit was evaluated sepa- 
rately, and then considered as part of a single production- 
consumption region established on the basis of existing 
aggregate consumption patterns. Only four of the seven major 
aggregate deposits in the Bakersfield P-C Region are cur- 
rently utilized to serve the market area's needs. 

Brief Overview of Designation 

The present report is concerned with the classification phase 
of the two-step process mandated by SMARA. The designation 
phase follows receipt and approval of this classification report 
by the State Mining and Geology Board and is the formal recog- 
nition by the Board of areas containing mineral deposits of 
regional or statewide significance that should be considered for 
protection from land uses incompatible with mineral extraction. 
Recognition is achieved by the adoption of regulations which 
designate certain deposits to be of prime importance in meeting 
the future needs of the region or the state. Designation is based 
upon the DMG report and consultation with lead agencies and 
other interested parties. Procedures for the designation of lands 
containing significant mineral deposits are specified in Section 
II. 2 of the State Mining and Geology Board's Guidelines for 
Classification and Designation of Mineral Lands. 

Lead Agency Response to Classification 

The State Mining and Geology Board upon receipt of the 
classification information from the State Geologist transmits the 
classification report to the appropriate lead agencies and makes 
it available to other interested parties. Upon receipt of the classi- 
fication report, each lead agency must within 12 months develop 
and adopt mineral resource management policies to be incorpo- 
rated in its general plan. These policies will: 



1988 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, BAKERSFIELD 



1. Recognize the mineral classification information, in- 
cluding the classification maps, transmitted to it by the 
Board. 

2. Emphasize the conservation and development of identi- 
fied mineral deposits. 

Overview of Aggregate Uses 

Sand, gravel, and crushed stone are "construction materials." 
These commodities, collectively referred to as aggregate, pro- 
vide bulk and strength to Portland cement concrete, asphaltic 
concrete, and plaster or stucco. Aggregate is also used as road 
base, subbase, railroad ballast, and fill. Aggregate normally 
provides from 80 to 100 percent of the material volume in the 
above uses. 

Aggregate material is essential to the needs of a modern soci- 
ety. It is a resource of great importance to the economy of any 
metropolitan area. 

During 1984, almost 3 million tons of aggregate, an amount 
worth, on the average, about $13 million, were mined from the 
deposits which supply aggregate to the Bakersfield P-C Region. 
Nearly 95 percent of this amount was consumed within the P-C 
region. Approximately 51 percent of the aggregate produced 
from 1960 to 1982 was used as Portland cement concrete (PCC) 
aggregate (U.S. Bureau of Mines statistics; 1982 is the last year 
a breakdown of production by use is available from the Bureau). 
Enormous tonnages of high-quality PCC-grade aggregate are used 
in concrete highways, dams, canals, airport runways, bridge 
abutments, foundations, buildings, and general construction. 

In this aggregate resource classification study, special empha- 
sis is given to aggregate that meets the specifications used in 
making Portland cement concrete. The material specifications 
for PCC-grade aggregate are more restrictive than the specifica- 
tions for aggregate for other applications. The restrictiveness of 
these specifications makes deposits acceptable for use as PCC 
aggregate the scarcest and most valuable of aggregate resources. 
This also means that aggregate produced from such deposits can 
be, and commonly is, used in other applications than concrete. 
Because of its versatility, its value, its importance in construc- 
tion, and its relative scarcity, PCC-grade aggregate deposits are 
of the most concern when planning for the future availability of 
aggregate commodities. 

In past years, the population in the Bakersfield area has been 
served by high-quality, relatively low-cost aggregate deposits 
within the southern San Joaquin Valley. However, the high- 
quality deposits are being depleted, and some of the potential 
sources are becoming inaccessible as urbanization encroaches on 
lands once used solely for mining, petroleum production, and 
agriculture. 

Rarely, even from the highest-grade deposits, is in-place 
aggregate material physically or chemically suited for every type 
of aggregate use. Every potential deposit must be tested to deter- 
mine how much of its material can meet specifications for a 
particular use and what processing is required. Specifications for 
various uses of aggregate material have been established by sev- 
eral agencies, such as the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, and the California Department of 



Transportation (Caltrans) to ensure that aggregate is satisfactory 
for specific uses. These agencies and other major consumers ol 
concrete, test aggregate for acceptance by standard test proce- 
dures outlined by such organizations as the American Society 
lor Testing Materials and the American Association of State 
Highway Officials. 

Most aggregate specifications have been established to ensure 
the manufacture of strong, durable materials capable of with- 
standing the physical and chemical effects of weather and use. 
For example, specifications for Portland cement concrete and 
concrete products prohibit or limit the use of rock materials con- 
taining mineral substances, such as gypsum, zeolites, pyrite, 
opal, chalcedony, chert, siliceous shale, volcanic glass, and 
some high-silica volcanic rocks. Gypsum shortens the setting 
time of Portland cement; pyrite dissociates to yield sulfuric acid 
and an iron oxide stain; and other substances contain silica in a 
form that reacts with alkali substances in the cement, resulting 
in cracks and "pop-outs." 

Specifications also call for precise particle-size distributions 
for the various uses of aggregate. Aggregate is commonly classi- 
fied into two general sizes: coarse aggregate and fine aggregate. 
Coarse aggregate is rock retained on a 3/8" or a #4 U.S. sieve. 
Fine aggregate passes a 3/8" sieve and is retained on a #200 U.S. 
sieve (a sieve with 200 weaves per inch). For some uses, such as 
asphalt paving, particle shape is specified. Caltrans' Standard 
Specifications (1981) require that at least 25 percent by weight 
of coarse aggregate (1/4 inch to 3/4 inch diameter) used as Class 
2 aggregate base material be crushed particles. Furthermore, 
aggregate material used with bituminous binder to form sealing 
coats on road surfaces shall consist of at least 90 percent by 
weight of crushed particles. Crushed stone is preferable to natu- 
ral gravel in asphaltic concrete because asphalt adheres better to 
broken surfaces than to rounded surfaces, and the interlocking 
of angular particles strengthens the asphaltic concrete and road 
base. 

The preferred use of one aggregate material over another in 
construction practices depends not only on specification stan- 
dards, but also on economic considerations. Alluvial gravel is 
preferred to crushed stone for Portland cement concrete aggre- 
gate because the rounded particles of alluvial sand and gravel 
result in a mix that is easier to work than a mix composed of 
angular fragments. The workability of a mix consisting of Port- 
land cement with crushed stone aggregate can be improved by 
adding more sand, and water, however, additional cement 
must then be added to the mix to maintain concrete durability 
standards. At the present time, the additional cement amounts to 
about a quarter of a 94 pound sack per cubic yard of concrete at 
an additional cost of over $1 .00 per yard of mix. Although more 
care is required in pouring and placing a mix containing crushed 
stone, Portland cement concrete made with this aggregate is as 
satisfactory as that made with alluvial sand and gravel of com- 
parable rock quality. 

In the Bakersfield area, PCC aggregate sells in bulk for about 
$5.50 per ton at the plant site (in 1986). However, this selling 
price reflects only part of the cost to the consumer. Transport 
cost is a significant part of the final delivery price. In areas that 
lack nearby aggregate sources, the delivery charges alone may 
be greater than the sale price of the material at the plant site. 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



DETERMINATION OF THE BAKERSFIELD 
PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION 



The City of Bakersfield and surrounding urban portions of 
Kern County were targeted by the State Office of Planning and 
Research (OPR) as an area experiencing significant urban 
expansion (OPR, 1975), and the State Mining and Geology Board 
scheduled it for a SMARA aggregate classification study by the 
Division of Mines and Geology. The boundaries of such a study 
area (referred to below as the Production-Consumption Region) 
must be delineated to include the urbanizing area targeted by the 
OPR* and the aggregate production districts serving the target 
area. Furthermore, it should include most of the population 
which consumes aggregate mined from the production district 
serving the target area, even if this population is located outside 
the target area. The region is considered closed when at least 95 
percent of the production district's output is locally consumed. 

A study of the Bakersfield sand and gravel producers showed 
that most of the PCC-grade material used in this area is being 
extracted from the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley. 
Three of the deposits which are currently being mined are lo- 
cated 30 miles south of the modified OPR urbanizing boundary, 
but their production is transported north to the greater Bakers- 
field market. These southern mines are therefore an integral part 
of the Bakersfield aggregate picture and are included within the 
P-C region. Consumption of this material, though concentrated 
in Bakersfield, occurs within the entire valley portion of Kern 
County. The Production-Consumption region was delineated 

* The boundary of the area targeted by the OPR was modified for this study because the 
current urban area and the plans of lead ogencies exceed the area the OPR projected 
for urbanizing by 1990. This modification was accomplished by using general plan land- 
use maps obtained from the City of Bakersfield and Kern County and by observations 
of current land-use patterns in the field. 



TABLE I. Lead agencies (counties and incorporated city govern- 
ments) located within the Bakersfield P-C Region. 



AGENCIES 



COUNTIES 
Kern* + f 



CITIES 
Bakersfield + f 
Arvin 
Delano 
Maricopa 
McFarland 
Shaffer 
Taft 
Wasco 



* Agencies with active operations within their boundaries. 
+ Agencies that have land classified MRZ-2 within their jurisdiction, 
t Lead agencies containing sectors 



(Plate 1) to encompass: 1) the Bakersfield/Oildale/Rosedale 
metropolitan area; 2) outlying towns like Arvin and Shafter and 
those rural areas between these towns and Bakersfield which 
are anticipated to urbanize within the 50-year forecast period; 
3) rural areas and towns such as Taft and Delano not anticipated 
to become urban but which consume aggregate from the south- 
ern San Joaquin Valley production area; and 4) the production 
districts delineated in this study. The P-C region boundary, 
when not precisely following the modified OPR or resource 
area boundary, was placed along the most suitable census tract 
boundary to allow use of existing census and other population 
data for forecasting. Lead agencies with jurisdiction within the 
P-C region are shown on Table 1 . 

Transportation Rates 

Because aggregate is a low- value, high bulk-weight commod- 
ity, a major part of its cost to the consumer is for transportation. 
In fact, transportation costs are the principal constraint defining 
the marketing area for a specific production district. 

All aggregate marketed in the Bakersfield P-C Region is 
transported by truck. Minimum rates for independent aggregate 
truckers are set by the California Public Utilities Commission 
(PUC). Rates for the Central Valley are published in "Minimum 
Rate Tariff 7-A," sections 1 through 3 and supplement 24. 
Charges are calculated based on either an hourly rate or a distance 
rate. If the hourly rate is used, the carrier and debtor must enter 
into a written agreement prior to transport. 

Figure 2 and Table 2 illustrate how the PUC rates increase 
with distance as specified in Minimum Rate Tariff 7-A. For 
example, hauling aggregate from Pastoria Creek to downtown 
Bakersfield (approximately 30 miles), results in an additional 
transport cost of two dollars per ton over what it costs to trans- 
port from James Road or Cottonwood Creek, which are only 
about 10 miles from downtown Bakersfield. 

TABLE 2. Minimum rates for transport of aggregate in the Bakers- 
field Area when charges are based on time (includes time elapsed 
during transport, loading and unloading, and stand-by time). 



Typical 

tons per 

load 



# of axles 
per unit of 
equipment 



• Hourly 

rates 

($) 



$/hr/ton 



10 
15 
24 
26 



2 
3 

4 

5 + 



40.00 
45.00 
48.00 
50.50 



'Current as of July 9, 1984; rotes are higher for work done on holidays and weekends. 



ESTABLISHMENT OF 
MINERAL RESOURCE ZONES 



The DMG has classified land in the Bakersfield P-C Region 
according to the presence or absence of significant PCC-grade 
aggregate deposits. The land classification is presented in the 
form of Mineral Resource Zones, or MRZ. Directions for the 
identification of Mineral Resource Zones are set forth in DMG's 
Special Publication 51 in the section entitled "Guidelines for 
Classification and Designation of Mineral Lands" (Division 
of Mines and Geology, 1983). 



The guidelines for establishing the Mineral Resource Zones 
are as follows: 

MRZ- 1 Areas where adequate information indicates that no 
significant mineral deposits are present, or where 
it is judged that little likelihood exists for their 
presence. This zone shall be applied where well- 
developed lines of reasoning, based upon economic- 
geologic principles and adequate data, demonstrate 



1 988 



MINIKAI. LAND CLASSIFICATION, BAKERSFI1 I D 



$10 



CO 

< 

-I 
-1 

o 

Q 



$6 



$4 



$2 




Figure 2 . Minimum transport rates for aggregate in the Bakersfield area when charges are based on mileage (includes 
November, 1984 increase in surcharge); rates are higher for holidays and weekends and if equipment other than "a 
tractor with bottom dump doubles in train" are required at the destination. 



10 



20 



30 40 

TRANSPORT MILES 



50 



60 



70 



80 



that the likelihood for occurrence of significant 
mineral deposits is nil or slight. 
MRZ-2 Areas where adequate" information indicates that 

significant mineral deposits are present, or where it 
is judged that a high likelihood for their presence 
exists. This zone shall be applied to known mineral 
deposits or where well-developed lines of reason- 
ing, based upon economic-geologic principles and 
adequate data, demonstrate that the likelihood for 
occurrence of significant mineral deposits is high. 
MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits, the significance 

of which cannot be evaluated from available data. 
MRZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate for 

assignment to any other Mineral Resource Zone. 
Mineral Resource Zones in the Bakersfield P- 1 " 1 Region are 
presented on a Mineral Land Classification map (Plate 2) and on 
sixteen 1:48,000 reductions of U.S. Geological Survey IVj- 
minute quadrangles (Plates 4-19) that cover in detail those areas 
classified MRZ-2. Figure 3 shows the topographic quadrangles 
that cover the Bakersfield area. 

Mineral Resource Zones within the Bakersfield P-C Region 
were established on the basis of an aggregate appraisal that in- 
cluded the following tasks for assessing the quantity, quality, 
and extent of the aggregate deposits: 

1 . Examination and compilation of relevant geologic maps, 
aerial photos, geologic literature, aggregate industry 
data (some of which is proprietary), and aggregate engi- 
neering test data. The geologic maps used in classifica- 
tion of the Bakersfield P-C Region are indicated on 
Figure 4. 

2. Interviews with aggregate operators, company geolo- 
gists, and consultants. 

3. Compilation and analysis of subsurface well-log data 
and drilling records. 

4. Field observations at outcrops and active and depleted 
aggregate quarries. 



Areas Classified MRZ-1 

Areas classified MRZ-1 were judged on the basis of available 
data to have little likelihood of containing significant deposits of 
PCC-grade aggregate. Deposits that have excessive amounts of 
clay, silt, organic matter, absorptive rock, alkali-reactive rock, 
platy rock, or soft rock are unsuitable for use in PCC aggregate; 
areas containing such deposits are classified MRZ-1. 

The areas in the Bakersfield P-C Region that are classified 
MRZ-1 (see Plate 2) are underlain by material judged to contain 
too much clay or silt for use as aggregate in concrete. These 
include fine-grained deposits in lakes and former lakes in the 
southern San Joaquin Valley and a sedimentary formation 
known as the Round Mountain Silt (Figure 5) which crops out 
within the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Bartow, 
1984). The locations of the lake deposits were determined from 
water-well logs and a compilation of maps by Smith (1964), 
and Wood and Dale (1964). Additionally, areas depleted of 
aggregate or buried by landfills are also classified MRZ-1. 

Areas Classified MRZ-2 

Several areas within the Bakersfield P-C Region are classified 
MRZ-2 (see Plate 2). These are areas for which data indicate 
that there is a high likelihood that significant deposits of PCC- 
grade aggregate exist. 

SMARA guidelines set forth two requirements to be used to 
determine if land should be classified MRZ-2: 

1 . The deposit must be composed of material that is suita- 
ble as a marketable commodity. 

2. The deposit must meet threshold value. The projected 
value (gross selling price) of the deposit, based on the 
value of the first marketable product, must be at least 
$8,500,000 (which is equal to 5 million 1978 dollars). 

Areas classified MRZ-2 contain aggregate resources that 
are either proven PCC-grade or likely to be of PCC grade. Much 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



of the aggregate in the MRZ-2 areas has not been identified as 
PCC-grade through formal engineering tests. Aggregate deposits 
in untested, unproven areas identified MRZ-2 are believed to 
contain PCC-grade aggregate for either of the following reasons: 

• The aggregate in unproven areas is similar in age and lithol- 
ogy and was deposited under geologic conditions similar to 
that in areas containing proven PCC-grade aggregate. 

• The unproven deposit is a lateral extension of an alluvial for- 
mation from which PCC-grade aggregate has been produced. 
Areas classified MRZ-2 in the Bakersfield P-C Region are 

underlain by Quaternary alluvial fan and floodplain deposits. 
These include a small alluvial fan near James Road and State 
Route 65, alluvial fans along Pastoria and San Emigdio creeks, 
floodplains of the Kern River, Cottonwood Creek, and Caliente 
Wash; and an uplifted fan deposit at Wheeler Ridge. The geo- 
graphic extent of the MRZ-2 classifications for most of these 
areas was primarily based on well-log information (Wheeler 
Ridge is an exception) which indicates lateral changes in the 
size-gradation of the deposit. The descriptions of each resource 
area provide a more detailed discussion. 



Areas Classified MRZ-3 

Areas classified MRZ-3 are those containing aggregate 
deposits, the significance of which cannot be evaluated from 
available data. 

Lithified sedimentary or crystalline rock types are often in- 
cluded in this category. Positive indications in the geologic litera- 
ture and petrologic field examination that show a rock unit to 
contain abundant, hard, durable material without excessive 
amounts of deleterious materials are necessary for a rock unit to 
be considered a suitable candidate for an MRZ-3 classification. 
Additional information regarding the quality of material in these 
areas could either upgrade the classification to MRZ-2 or down- 
grade the classification to MRZ-1 . Formations and rock types 
located within the Bakersfield P-C Region that are classified 
MRZ-3 include the metamorphic and plutonic rocks of the Sierra 
Nevada Mountains and the sedimentary and volcanic units 
which crop out in the Sierra Nevada foothills (shown on Figure 
5), except the Round Mountain Silt. 

Alluvial deposits can also be classified MRZ-3. In the San 
Joaquin Valley, a large part of the unconsolidated alluvial sedi- 
ments are classified MRZ-3. Though much of these sediments 
were deposited under similar conditions and derived from the 



Figure 3. Index of the U.S. Geological Survey 7.5-minute quadrangles 
covering the Bakersfield P-C Region. Each quadrangle containing land 
classified MRZ-2 can be found as a plate in this report. Numbers on the 
index refer to these plate numbers. The numbers in the upper left corner 
indicate the plate number for the mineral land classification map of that 
quadrangle; the numbers in the lower right corner indicate the plate num- 
ber for the resource sector map of that quadrangle. The dashed line is the 
boundary of the modified OPR boundary. 




1988 



MINHRAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, BAK1KSI 111 1) 



same source rocks as those classified MRZ-2 they cannot be 
included in this zone because 1) they are older and have under- 
gone more weathering, or 2) it cannot be proven that they consist 
of the proper size gradations. However, an exploration and test- 
ing program might locate areas of acceptable PCC-grade mate- 
rial within these sediments, especially in the sand-size fractions. 

Land on which mining once occurred and on which the 
resources have not been depleted may be classified MRZ-3. This 
occurs when the remaining quantity of aggregate cannot be 
shown to meet the minimum threshold value stipulated by the 



Board. If a mined area is completely depleted of resource, it is 
classified MRZ-1. 



Areas Classified MRZ-4 

Areas classified MRZ-4 are those areas for which available 
information is lacking or incomplete for assignment into the 
other MRZ categories. No areas were classified MRZ-4 in the 
Bakersfield P-C Region. 



Additional geologic references used 
for lithographic descriptions: 

Addicott, 1970 

Bartow and McDougall, 1984 

Bartow and Pittman, 1983 

Nilsen, Dibblee and Addicott. 1973 

Ross, 1980 



Smith. 1964 

Bartow, 1984 

Diblee and Nilsen, 1973 

Wood and Dale. 1964 

See reference for complete source name. 




Figure 4. Index to geologic maps used to classify land in the Bakersfield P-C Region. 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



Holocene 

and 
Pleistocene 



Pliocene 




< 




Miocene 



Oligocene 



♦ Chanac/Santa 
Margarita Formations 



*Olcese Sand 




* Walker 



* Basement 



Younger 
alluvium 




* Crops out 

within P-C Region 



Chanac/Santa 

Margarita 

Formations 



Fruitvale 
Shale 



Bena 
Gravel 



Round Mountain 
Silt 

Olcese Sand 



Freeman Silt/ 
Jewett Sand 

llmon Basalt 



Deposited in stream channels, fans and basins. 



— Similar environments to above. Differentiated 
into 3 units based on soil development and 
geomorphology. 

— Poorly sorted fluvial sandstone and conglomerate 
with interbeds of silt-stone and mudstone. 

— "nonmarine and marine facies of the same deposi- 
tional sequence" (Bartow & McDougall). C/ianac: 
Coarse-grained, pebbly, arkosic sandstone, clayey 
sandstone & sandy claystone, non-fossiliferous. Sta. 
Marg . fossiliferous, fine to coarse-grained & peb- 
bly sandstone. 

— Marine micaceous, silty shale. 



• Alluvial fan facies: poorly sorted pebble & cobble 
conglomerate, arkosic sandstone and interbeds of 
sandy silt-stone or mudstone. Paralic facies: heter- 
ogenous sequence of siltstone, claystone & shale 
sometimes with coarse-grained sandstone. 

■ Marine sequence of siltstone, diatomaceous shale, 
claystone and silty sandstone. 

■ Upper & lower portions: marine fine to coarse- 
grained sandstone with siltstone interbeds. Middle 
unit: nonmarine coarse-grained and pebbly 
sandstone. 



Vedder Sand 
Walker 



Bealeville 
Fanglomerate 

Basement 



• Marine micaceous siltstone, claystone and fine- 
grained concretionary sandstone. 

Medium to coarsely crystalline basalt; vesicular at 
top & bottom contacts. 



Marine fine to coarse-grained sandstone with 
siltstone interbeds. 

Nonmarine, medium to coarse-grained kaolinitic 
sandstone, claystone and conglomerate. 

Unsorted rubble of granitic boulders and conglom- 
erate within mudstone or clayey sandstone matrix. 

Pre-upper Cretaceous biotite tonalite, hornblende- 
biotite tonalite, diorite, gabbro, hornblende or 
biotite gneiss, felsic gneiss & mica schist. 



(after: Bartow, 1984 and Bartow & McDougall, 1984) 



Portions classified 
as MRZ-2 



Figure 5. Generalized columnar section of the eastern and southeastern margin of the San Joaquin Valley (foothills of the Sierra Nevada 
and Tehachapi mountains). 



1988 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION. BAK.LRSIILLI) 



EVALUATION OF PCC-GRADE AGGREGATE IN THE 
BAKERSFIELD P-C REGION 



An assessment of aggregate resources in the Bakersfield P-C 
Region is presented in this section of the report. The assessment 
was conducted on the basis of a quantitative evaluation of avail- 
able, economically mineable, aggregate resources classified 
MRZ-2. 

Concepts Used in Identifying Available 
Aggregate Resource Areas 

The State Geologist is responsible for calculating aggregate 
resources in those areas classified MRZ-2. Recognizing that 
there are lands within MRZ-2 areas that have already been ur- 
banized and that therefore have a limited opportunity for min- 
eral resource conservation and extraction, the State Geologist 
has limited the calculation of aggregate resource tonnages to 
nonurbanized portions of areas classified MRZ-2 for PCC-grade 
aggregate. 

For purposes of classification, incompatible uses are urbanized 
lands containing high-cost improvements, such as high-density 
residential developments, intensive industrial developments, 
commercial developments, and major public facilities (see 
Appendix, Interim Criteria for Sectorization of MRZ-2 Areas for 
Aggregate). Compatible uses are nonurbanized land comprised 
of very low density residential land (approximately one unit or 
less per ten acres), recreational land that does not have high-cost 
improvements, agricultural land, silvicultural land, grazing 
land, and open space. 

For this report, the determination of which MRZ-2 land is 
nonurbanized was based upon conditions of the land at the time 
of the field study (December 1984 through October 1985). The 
use of the land was determined by the author after consultations 
with lead agencies, reference to aerial photographs, photo-revised 
topographic maps, and field reconnaissance. 



SECTORS 

Sectors are areas that have been classified MRZ-2 for PCC- 
grade aggregate and that are deemed to be available for mining 
based upon the criteria for availability provided by the State 
Mining and Geology Board. Furthermore, within each sector, 
the geometrical configuration of the deposit is sufficiently regu- 
lar to permit reliable calculation of the tonnage of the mineral 
resource present. Thus, sector boundaries would be established 
between that part of a natural deposit formed on a fan and that 
part within the confines of an adjacent modern stream channel 
and its floodplain. The sectors are often divided into subsectors 
to exclude major pipelines, transmission lines, canals, roads, resi- 
dential, industrial, and commercial developments. These sectors 
and subsectors have been employed to focus the attention of land 
planners and local governments on just those areas that remain 
accessible for mineral extraction. Mineral land classification by 
itself, which is done without regard for current land use, does 
very little to put into perspective the resource base that is avail- 
able to meet the future needs of a region. The State Geologist 
calculates the available resources of each sector and identifies 
the amount of remaining resources that have been permitted for 
mining. A more specific term for these permitted resources is 
reserves. The resources present in other (non-sectorized) MRZ-2 
aggregate deposits are not calculated because they are regarded 
as unavailable. 



The calculated reserves and resources within the sectors of 
a region are compared with the State Geologist's forecast of the 
50-year needs of that region. The comparison of regional needs 
with the available reserves and resources provides the opportu- 
nity to focus attention on the mineral resource issues confront- 
ing the region: viz., the need to plan carefully for the use of any 
lands containing mineral resources and the need to consider per- 
mitting additional mining operations in the region as currently 
mined deposits are depleted. 

Each sector meets or exceeds the Board's threshold value, 
and each sector may be considered for designation as an area of 
regional or statewide significance by the State Mining and Geol- 
ogy Board pursuant to Section 2790 of SMARA. Areas that have 
not been sectorized by the State Geologist are not considered for 
designation by the Board. 

Although the classification by the State Geologist and the 
designation by the Board are actions explicitly provided for by 
SMARA, and although the results of such actions yield reports 
that must be acted upon by affected local governments, the sec- 
torization and sector maps do not in and of themselves carry with 
them specific obligations imposed on local governments by 
SMARA. The maps and resource base calculations, however, do 
contain the essential facts that are needed to focus the attention 
of planners on the mineral availability problems and the alterna- 
tive solutions to meet the mineral resource needs of the region. 
Without the sector maps and the accompanying calculations, the 
primary objectives of SMARA could not be achieved. 

Because the Board's criteria for sectorization focus on the 
apparent suitability of the land for mining and do not take into 
account commitments that may have been made which restrict 
the accessibility of some of the sectors for mining, it is possible 
that the available resource base as calculated by the State Geolo- 
gist may be overestimated and the problems confronting local 
government may be understated. Considering these possibilities, 
it becomes important for local governments to carefully review 
the sectors and the associated estimates of resources to ensure 
that previously unrevealed problems are not overlooked and that 
planning decisions are made using a correct perspective on 
available resources. 

Calculation of Available Resources 

RESERVES AND RESOURCES 

In this report, reserves are estimates of tonnages of PCC- 
grade aggregate that have been determined to be acceptable for 
commercial use, that exist within properties owned or leased 
by aggregate producing companies, and for which permits have 
been granted to allow mining and processing of the material. 
Resources include reserves as well as all similar potentially 
usable PCC-grade aggregate materials that may be mined in the 
future, but for which no permit allowing mining has been 
granted, or for which marketability has not been established. 

FACTORS CONSIDERED IN CALCULATIONS 

The resource estimates given here are limited to those PCC- 
grade aggregate resources present in resource sectors, which, as 
explained in the previous section, are the nonurbanized portions 
of the resource areas classified MRZ-2. The resource sectors 
defined in this study are shown on the maps (Plates 20-31) that 



10 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



accompany this report. Deposits where mineral resources other 
than PCC-grade aggregate are currently mined have also been 
classified, but not quantified beyond the establishment of thresh- 
old value. They have, therefore, not been sectorized since their 
regional significance has not been confirmed. 

Each sector is identified by a capital letter and represents a 
resource area or a portion of a resource area which appears to 
have a fairly consistent geometrical configuration. The sectors 
are subdivided with Arabic numbers to exclude the location of 
existing freeways, residential and commercial developments, 
canals, bridges, dams, major powerlines and major pipelines. 
These criteria allow for more realistic calculation of resource 
tonnages. 

The following factors were used to determine the areal extent 
and tonnage of PCC-grade aggregate resources within the 
sectors: 

1 . Sector resource tonnage estimates were based on mea- 
surements taken from base maps that have a scale of 
1:24,000. 

2. Even in proven PCC-grade aggregate deposits, a small 
percentage of the aggregate cannot be used in concrete 
and is referred to in this study as "waste." Waste in- 
cludes pit-run and production waste, both of which may 
be utilized in non-PCC uses, primarily fill. Known 
waste percentages were extrapolated to deposits in un- 
tested sector areas from proven, nearby PCC-grade de- 
posits, from observations of the material in stream cuts, 
and from geologically similar deposits encountered in 
other studies. 

3. Thicknesses of PCC-grade deposits were determined 
through use of water-well log data and information pro- 
vided by persons who have knowledge concerning ag- 
gregate deposits and exploration in this region. 

4. Typical setbacks from utility and rail lines, urban devel- 
opments, and roads, as stipulated in lead agency mining 
ordinances, were used in determining the areal limits of 
subsectors that border areas not available for mining. 

Resource Sector Descriptions 

The total area of the resource sectors in the Bakersfield P-C 
Region is 31 square miles, of which slightly less than 2 square 
miles are currently permitted for mining. The aggregate re- 
sources in these sectors consist of Quaternary alluvial deposits. 
The estimated total of PCC-grade aggregate resources in these 
sectors is nearly 5.3 billion tons. As of January 1985, 212.4 
million tons of these resources were permitted for mining and 
therefore qualified as reserves. No unusual specialty products 
are sold from any of these deposits; nor is any secondary gold 
recovery known to be occurring, although gold was reportedly 
recovered from deposits once mined in the Kern River and its 
terraces (Goldman and Klein, 1961). 



The resource sectors are described below. 
SECTOR A - JAMES ROAD RESOURCE AREA 

Resource Sector A is located north of Bakersfield on a small 
Quaternary alluvial fan composed of reworked sediments de- 
rived from older alluvial fan deposits and the Kern River Forma- 
tion. It is identified as the James Road deposit on Plate 1 and is 
shown in more detail on Plates 4 and 20. 

Kern Rock Company (now owned by Koppers Corporation) 
has had an active extraction site in Subsector A-l since Decem- 
ber 1975. The company is mining a sand and gravel layer with 
an average thickness of 20 feet and an average overburden of 9 
feet. The overburden is stockpiled during mining and replaced 
during reclamation. 

The lithologic composition of the coarse clasts in Sector A is 
the most heterogenous of any deposit observed in the Bakersfield 
P-C Region. There appear to be about an equal amount of the 
following: coarse-grained silicic plutonic rocks (i.e., tonalite, 
granite, etc.), medium- to fine-grained plutonics of intermediate 
composition (i.e., diorite), fine-grained isotropic metamorphic 
rocks, and volcanic rocks (both metamorphosed and nonmeta- 
morphosed). The remainder of the coarse clasts are composed of 
quartzite, gneiss, decomposed granite, and micaceous schist and 
phyllite, each constituting less than five percent of the total. 
Most of the siliceous plutonic rocks are not biotite-rich as is the 
case at the other active aggregate mines in this P-C region. The 
volcanics are of several types including tuffs, welded tuffs, 
volcanic breccias, and scoriaceous porphyritic and flow rocks. 
Maximum clast diameter is 9 inches, with an estimated median 
of about 3 inches. The cobbles are rounded and spherical- to 
disk-shaped. The sand-sized fraction consists of subrounded to 
rounded quartz grains, biotite flakes, and rounded opaque min- 
eral grains. Caliche was observed cementing a 1-foot-thick layer 
of gravels approximately 5 feet below the ground surface, appar- 
ently thinning in one observable direction and cut out by a 
sand-filled channel in another. 

This deposit provides good quality aggregate suitable for 
PCC. The weathering of the plutonic rocks sometimes lessens 
the strength of individual clasts and increases the percentage of 
waste, but doesn't degrade the product below Caltrans specifica- 
tions for PCC-grade aggregate. 

Resource volumes for the two subsectors in Sector A are shown 
in Table 3. Total resource tonnage in Sector A is 15,100,000 
tons. Factors used in calculating these tonnages include: a slope 
of 1 to 1*; in-place density of 1.5 tons per cubic yard; 20 percent 
waste; a resource thickness of 21 feet; and 100-foot setbacks 
from each side of State Highway 65 and the powerline. The den- 
sity, thickness, and waste factors were obtained from Kern Rock 
Company. 



*A pit wall slope of 1 to 1 was assumed in the calculation of nonper 
sectors. 



lifted resources in all 



TABLE 3. 
density - 


Resources (tons) 
■ 1.5 tons/cubic yo 


in Sector A the James Road deposit. Factors: waste = 
rd; overburden = 9 feet; depth = 30 feet. 


20%; 




SECTOR 




AREA 
(acres) 




NONPERMITTED 
RESOURCE 


RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 




ACRES 

UNDER 

PERMIT + 


A-l 
A-2 

TOTAL 

* * Proprietary inforr 
i Does not include 


136 
292 


total 
rvtthir 


3,500,000 
11,600,000 


"Kern Rock 

Company 



fied MRZ-1 and are not part 


of the sector. 


42 


42 


428 

nation. See Table 14 for 
<nown depleted areas 


15,100,000 

volume of reserves. 

permitted area; these areas are class 



1988 



MINHKAL LAND CLASSIFICATION. BAKFRSI IFLD 



M 



Although there are many inactive pits located east-southeast 
of the Kern Rock Company pit (Plate 1), the MRZ-2 classit'iea 
tion was not extended beyond the small fan from which Kern 
Rock produces. Rather, the area surrounding this fan was classi- 
fied MRZ-3 because the depositional history of these sediments 
is more complex, resulting in less consistent lithologies and more 
variable physical properties within the sediments. Several ages 
of alluvium plus the Kern River Formation are mapped here 
(Bartow, 1984). All are older than the area contained within 
Sector A and well log information is sketchy. Most of the inac- 
tive pits are depleted. Extensive geologic mapping, probably 
coupled with drilling and laboratory testing, would be necessary 
to identify possible MRZ-2 areas within these fan deposits. 



SECTORS B AND C — KERN RIVER FLOODPLAIN AND ALLUVIAL 
FAN RESOURCE AREA 

A portion of Recent alluvium deposited by the Kern River has 
been classified MRZ-2 (Plates 4 through 7). Only that portion 
roughly between Coffee Road and the Rio Bravo Ranch stables 
fulfills the requirements for MRZ-2 classification. Upstream, 
the deposit is predominantly boulders which are too oversized 
to be handled economically. Downstream, the sediments are pre- 
dominantly fine-grained and available water-well logs indicate 
that gravel no longer occurs in economic concentrations in the 
subsurface. The proper gradation of the sand fraction required 
for PCC-grade aggregate may still be present downstream from 
the area classified MRZ-2, but this could not be proven with the 
information available — the water-well logs. 

The Kern River deposits have been divided into sectors based 
on resource depth. Sector B incorporates the non-parkland portion 
of the Kern River floodplain from the Rio Bravo Ranch Head- 
quarters to the vicinity of Manor Street. It is further divided 
into five subsectors containing 69, 100,000 tons of PCC-grade 
aggregate resource. Sector C consists of available deposits in the 
Kern River alluvial fan from Manor Street to Coffee Road. It is 
further divided into 20 subsectors which contain 127,800,000 
tons of resources. 

The lithologic composition of the Kern River floodplain and 
alluvial fan deposits has been analyzed by Goldman and Klein 
(1961). Fifty percent of the gravels consist of medium-grained, 
silicic plutonic rocks (Alaskite, aplite, and hornblende-biotite 
granodiorite). Metavolcanic rocks (mainly rhyolitic to dacitic), 
quartzite, and micaceous schists and gneisses compose the re- 
mainder of the gravels. The sand is angular and composed of 
granitic rock fragments, quartz, feldspar, and biotite. Excessive 
amounts of the latter are deleterious to PCC but can be removed 
during processing by the normal washing done to remove silt 
(Goldman and Klein, 1961). 

Mining of aggregate for PCC has occurred from the Kern 
River floodplain probably since 1915, though at present there 
are no active mines on the floodplain. Prior to 1960, a large op- 
eration by Kern Rock Company was located at the base of China 
Grade Loop. It is now inactive and a portion of the former site 
is used as a track for off-road bikes, etc. Because the quantity of 
remaining gravel in this particular area is unknown, it has been 
classified MRZ-3 (Plate 5). The Griffith Construction Company 
extracted concrete aggregate from a smaller pit on the opposite 
side of the river near the bend in the Beardsley Canal. Mining at 
this site began in 1946 and continued into the early 1960s. Sev- 
eral upstream workings were also reported (Goldman and Klein, 
1961). These include two small sites which operated prior to 1956 
and are now reclaimed to residential use; the first is in Section 2 
of T.29S., R.28E., (Hartman-Fox Co.); and the second in Section 
4 of T.29S., R.29E. (C and H Materials Co.). 



River Rock Company scalped gravel-rich layers from Kern River 
terrace deposits in Sections 35 and 36, T.28S., R.28E. The only 
current mining along the river is a dragline operation near the 
site of Gordon's Ferry. Webster Sand Company produces plaster 
sand here, harvesting only the amount replenished each year. 
(The Kern River now carries only fine sand because it is 
dammed at Lake Isabella.) 

Unfortunately, records from these past operations are not 
available. This required the DMG to estimate the density, waste, 
and depth factors used to calculate resource tonnage in Sectors 
B and C. A density typical of young (less than a few hundred 
thousand years old) stream-bed deposits — 1.5 tons per cubic 
yard — was used. A 15 percent waste factor was used for these 
sectors based on the type and age of the deposit, the amount of 
clay and silt (as observed in the field), and the rock types con- 
tained in the deposit. An overburden thickness of 2 feet, based 
on field observation, was used to account for soil development 
and any overlying fine sand. 

Water-well logs were used to determine resource depth. The 
thickness of sand and gravel seems to increase after the river 
leaves its entrenched course and flows into the more open allu- 
vial fan. Thus, a depth of 40 feet was established for Sector B 
(Plates 20 through 22); and a depth of 60 feet was established for 
Sector C (Plates 20 and 23). The overburden thickness in both 
sectors was observed to be 2 feet. Whereas Sector B consists of 
at least 50 percent gravel, water- well logs for Sector C indicate 
that sand-sized particles predominate over gravel in that sector. 
This is especially true toward the distal portion of the area 
classified MRZ-2. It is estimated that the average sand to gravel 
ratio for Sector C might range between 80:20 to 60:40. 

A 100-foot setback from canals, freeways, roads, powerlines, 
and buried pipelines was used in the resource calculations, based 
on typical use-permit conditions in Kern County. A setback of 
100 feet, centered on the railroad track, was also used for rail- 
ways. Land downstream from the main canal weirs was left un- 
sectorized to provide protection from erosion and undercutting. 
It is felt that the river itself can be directed to one side of its 
current channel and aggregate removed from the remainder of 
the area. Thus, the entire river bed was sectorized. The pipe- 
lines shown crossing the river on the Oil Center and Oildale 
quadrangles (Plates 20 and 21) are petroleum company lines. 
Because they can usually be redirected (oral communication, 
Bob Jones, Kern Rock Company), the land they cover was 
sectorized . 

Some MRZ-2 areas within the Kern River have so many ac- 
tive pumping units and pipelines that mining is currently incom- 
patible. Such areas were not sectorized. Other MRZ-2 areas also 
contain oil wells, but they are not so closely spaced that mining 
cannot occur around them (portions of Subsectors B-2 through 
B-5, C-8 through C-13 and C-17). The distinction was based on 
field observations of oil well density on a sector-by-sector basis 
for all potential sectors within oil fields. In order to more accu- 
rately predict the resources in these subsectors, the resource ton- 
nage was reduced by 15 percent (see Tables 4 and 5). This was 
done to accommodate the existing oil wells and a hypothetical 
cylinder circumscribed by a 100-foot setback from each well. 
Should the wells be properly abandoned, these resources could 
become available for mining. The planimetered acreage for 
these subsectors was not similarly reduced because maintaining 
an accurate accounting of area contained in each subsector is 
important for the comparison and analysis carried out by the 
Mining and Geology Board if they designate this region. Delet- 
ing each active well from the subsectors was not done because 
verifying the status of each well shown on the quadrangle and 
locating each new active well not shown on the quadrangle would 
be time consuming and inaccurate at the scale of these maps. 



12 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



The resource tonnage for Sectors B and C are shown below 
on Tables 4 and 5. There are no PCC-grade aggregate reserves in 
these sectors. 

SECTOR D — COTTONWOOD CREEK FLOODPLAIN 
AND TERRACES 



were determined using the same reasoning (see page 1 1 ). A set- 
back of 100 feet from the power line. Highway 178 and Breck- 
enridge Highway was used. Resources in these subsectors are 
shown in Table 6 and total 26,300,000 tons. There are no PCC- 
grade aggregate reserves in this sector. 



Portions of the f loodplain and terraces of Cottonwood Creek 
have been sectorized (Subsectors D-l through D-4, Plate 22). 
Cottonwood Creek is the only major tributary to the Kern River 
after the river leaves the mountains. The creek joins the Kern 
River approximately 2 miles downstream from the mouth of 
Kern Canyon and forms a gentle alluvial fan at its confluence 
with the Kern River. Cottonwood Creek contains sand and gravel 
in a 50/50 ratio and is classified MRZ-2. However the distal por- 
tion of the fan contains excessive oversized boulders brought in 
from the more energetic Kern River and is, therefore, classified 
MRZ-3 (see Plate 6). 

Lithologic composition of the Cottonwood Creek deposits is 
similar to those in the Kern River floodplain (Goldman and 
Klein, 1961). However, metavolcanic rocks and quartzite each 
compose 30 to 40 percent of the gravel-sized sediments and the 
silicic plutonic rocks only about 15 to 20 percent. The metavol- 
canics are hard, dense and fine-grained. Some have an andesitic 
composition, which is often reactive with cement, but Goldman 
and Klein (1961) state that the amount of meta-andesite is insig- 
nificant. Caliche and opaline coatings occur but are not exces- 
sive. Therefore, a good quality, equant-shaped, non-reactive 
aggregate product can be produced from this deposit. 

Kern Rock Company and Phoenix Construction were active in 
the creek until the 1970s, although at present there are no active 
operations there. Kern Rock Company developed pits in terraces 
above the current floodplain and installed a rock plant south of 
Highway 178. Three of these pits are depleted; one has been 
completely reclaimed. All of these areas are classified MRZ-1. 
Phoenix Construction maintained a small operation, which is 
now nearly indiscernable, farther upstream in Section 19. The 
creek appears to quickly replenish itself. Both producers sold 
PCC-grade aggregate mined from the creek. 

Based on information from Kern Rock Company, coupled 
with on-site field investigations and water-well log analysis, the 
average resource depth in Cottonwood Creek is 35 feet. A 
2- foot-thick soil profile has developed in the floodplain, so this 
overburden thickness was used in resource calculations. Waste 
and density factors are the same in Cottonwood Creek as in the 
Kern River — 15 percent and 1 .5 tons per cubic yard — and 



TABLE 4. Resources (tons) in Sector B, the Kern River floodplain. 
Factors: waste = 15%; density = 1.5 tons/ 'cubic yard; 
overburden = 2 feet; depth = 40 feet. 



TABLE 5. Resources (tons) in Sector C, the Kern River alluvial fan. 
Factors: waste = 15%; density = 1.5 tons/cubic yard; overburden 
= 2 feet; depth = 60 feet. 



SECTOR 


AREA 
(acres) 


NONPERMITTED 
RESOURCE 


RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 


ACRES 
UNDER 
PERMIT 


B-1 
B-2 
B-3 
B-4 
B-5 


287 
289 
23 
105 
327 


21,900,000 

18,400,000* 

1,400,000* 

6,600,000* 

20,800,000* 








"o 









TOTAL 


1031 


69,100,000 














ACRES 




AREA 


NONPERMITTED 


RESERVES/ 


UNDER 


SECTOR 


(acres) 


RESOURCES 


OPERATOR 


PERMIT 


C-l 


43 


4,500,000 








C-2 


13 


1,200,000 








C-3 


20 


2,000,000 








C-4 


16 


1,600,000 








C-5 


93 


10,500,000 








C-6 


43 


4,600,000 








C-7 


209 


23,800,000 








C-8 


104 


9,800,000* 








C-9 


52 


4,800,000* 








C-10 


26 


2,200,000 








C-l 1 


69 


6,100,000* 








C-12 


27 


2,300,000* 








C-13 


27 


2,300,000* 








C-14 


15 


1,400,000 








C-15 


30 


3,100,000 








C-16 


54 


5,700,000 








C-17 


32 


2,700,000* 








C-18 


78 


8,400,000 








C-19 


17 


1,700,000 








C-20 


247 


29,100,000 









TOTAL 


1,215 


127,800,000 






•The resource tonnage for these subsectors was reduced by 15% to accommodate oil 
wells within their boundaries. The planimetered acreage of these subsectors was nof 
reduced, as explained in the text. 



*The resource tonnage for these subsectors was reduced by 15% to accommodate oil 
wells within their boundaries. The planimetered acreage of these subsectors was nof 
reduced as explained in the text. 



SECTORS E AND F — ALLUVIAL FAN OF SAN EMIGDIO CREEK 

Sectors E and F contain more than 75 percent of the total 
resources for the Bakersfield P-C Region, yet are located more 
than 30 miles southwest of downtown Bakersfield on the Recent 
alluvial fan of San Emigdio Creek (Plates 1 1 and 12, 27 and 28). 
The durability and consistency of rock in this deposit apparently 
offset the disadvantage of the long transport distance to the mar- 
ket area. The fan has been mined since the 1930s (Hartman 
Concrete Materials Company), and a lease in Subsectors E-l and 
E-2 is currently operated by Bakersfield Ready Mix (BRM — a 
subsidiary of Cal-Mat, Inc., since 1986). 

Approximately 60 to 70 percent of the coarse clasts in the 
BRM pit consist of biotite-rich and silica-rich plutonic rocks of 
varying crystal size. The biotite in these rocks is usually dissem- 
inated throughout the clast rather than concentrated in bands or 
splotches and is rarely foliated. Coarse-grained granitics without 
mafic minerals, and quartzite (probably not metaquartzite) con- 
stitute approximately 10 percent of the clasts. Epidote is often 
observed in clasts of granite and quartzite. Amphibolite, rounded 
cobbles of fine- to medium-grained, well-lithified sandstone and 
porphyritic volcanics are also numerous, each making up ap- 
proximately 5 percent of the coarse clasts. Marble comprises 
less than 5 percent. Very few metamorphic rocks, other than the 
marble and amphibolite, were observed. The sand is composed 
of angular to subangular quartz rock fragments and 5 percent or 
less biotite, and constitutes 40 percent or less of the deposit. 
Though medium- to coarse-grained granitic rocks soften and 
disintegrate more quickly than other rock types, their presence 



1 1 >SS 



MINFRALLANDCLASSII K ANON. BAKERSFIELD 



I ! 



TABLE 6. Resources (tons) in Sector D, Cottonwood Creek. Factors: 
waste = 15%; density = 1.5 tons/cubic yard; overburden - 2 feet; 
depth = 35 feet. 



SECTOR 


AREA 
(acres) 


NONPERMITTED 
RESOURCE 


RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 


ACRES 
UNDER 
PERMIT 


D-l 
D 2 
D 3 
D-4 


147 

20 

114 

136 


9,400,000 
1,200,000 
7,200,000 
8,500,000 














o 





TOTAL 


417 


26,300,000 






in this deposit has not adversely affected the product. The clasts 
are hard and produce a hard, nonreactive aggregate. The lack of 
disintegration may be due to the young age of the deposit (i.e., 
there has not been time for weathering to occur) and/or the 
amount of free silica in the granitics. The biotite in the sand is 
washed out during normal processing. The relatively high per- 
centage of waste (25 percent) is due to this biotite and to silt in 
the fine fraction, as well as oversized cobbles and boulders. 

Resource calculations for the San Emigdio alluvial fan are 
based on field observations, water- well logs, and BRM informa- 
tion. Company test-holes and mining have proven suitable aggre- 
gate exists to a depth of 200 feet in Sector E. Water- well logs 
indicate sand and gravel continues below 200 feet throughout 
Sector E, but 200 feet was used as the depth in resource calcula- 
tions because suitability below this depth is unknown. Company 
records indicate that the current groundwater level is 550 feet 
below the surface. Well logs in Sector F indicate a decrease in 
the thickness of the upper gravel-rich layers, as the alluvial fan 
deposits grade into basin and Kern Lake deposits. The resource 
depth in this sector was estimated to be 100 feet. Well logs north 
of Sector F indicate that the gravel zones continue to thin and 
grade into sand layers. This sand may be suitable and coarse 
enough for PCC-grade aggregate, but this cannot be proven with 
the available information — water-well logs. The land north of 
Sector F is therefore classified MRZ-3. The in-place density of 
the San Emigdio deposit is estimated to be 1 .75 tons per cubic 
yard. This is based on the relatively high gravel/cobble to sand 
ratio of the deposit, 60:40 to 70:30. It is also based on the fact 
that it is an alluvial fan, which tends to be more compacted than 
stream channel deposits. An overburden of 5 feet was used in 
resource calculations for Sectors E and F, based on observations 
of the BRM pit and water-well logs. 

A setback of 100 feet from the power line (per BRM's Condi- 
tional Use Permit), the California Aqueduct, and major gas/oil 



TABLE 7. Resources (tons) in Sector E, the upper Son Emigdio 
Creek alluvial fan. Factors: waste = 25%; density = 1.75 tons/ 
cubic yard; overburden = 5 feet; depth = 200 feet. 



SECTOR 


AREA 
(acres) 


NONPERMITTED 
RESOURCE 


RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 


ACRES 
UNDER 
PERMIT+ 


El 
E-2 
E-3 
E-4 
E-5 


4,551 
3,972 

583 
1,474 

884 


1,675,200,000 

1,430,800,000 

193,100,000 

560,500,000 

325,100,000 

4,184,700,000 


"Bakersfield Ready Mix 
•Bakersfield Ready Mix 







• 


335 
379 






TOTAL 


11,464 


714 



pipelines was used in resource calculations. A setback of 100 
feet measured from the north and south edges of Highway 166 
was also allotted. San Emigdio Creek and a drain ditch were in- 
cluded in the sector as they can be channeled and temporarily 
redirected. 

There are 4,185,000,000 tons of resource in subsectors E-l 
through E-5 (Table 7) and 81,900,000 tons in subsectors F-l and 
F-2 (Table 8). 

SECTOR G — WHEELER RIDGE RESOURCE AREA 

Resource Sector G is located about 25 miles directly south 
of Bakersfield (see Plates 13, 14, 29 and 30) and contains 
62,600,000 tons of nonpermitted resources. Kern Rock Compa- 
ny's Wheeler Ridge plant (now owned by Koppers Corporation) 
has been active here since 1956. Accessibility to Interstate 5 and 
State Highways 99 and 166, plus ease of excavation, offset the 
disadvantage of the long transport distance. Kern Rock Company 
is mining an uplifted ridge of Tulare Formation (Pleistocene 
sands and gravels)(Figure 9) and older Quaternary alluvium 
(Dibblee and Nilsen, 1973). The Tulare Formation extends the 
entire length of the San Emigdio Mountains and into the Elk 
Hills. Only the small portion of it shown on Plates 13 and 14 
was classified MRZ-2 because the gravel in canyons west of 
Kern Rock Company's Wheeler Ridge site was observed to be 
softer and more weathered than rocks in the company's pit. 



TABLE 8. Resources (tons) in Sector F, the lower San Emigdio Creek 
alluvial fan. Factors: waste = 25%; density = 1.75 tons/ cubic yard; 
overburden = 5 feet; depth = 100 feet. 



SECTOR 


AREA 
(acres) 


NONPERMITTED 
RESOURCES 


RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 


ACRES 
UNDER 
PERMIT 


F-l 
F-2 


158 
296 


28,900,000 
53,000,000 












TOTAL 


454 


81,900,000 






* Proprietary information. See Table 14 for toto! volume of reserves. 
+ Does not include known depleted areos within permitted area; these areas are 
classified MRZ-1 and are not pari of the sector. 



The younger intermingling alluvial fans of Grapevine, Salt, 
and Tecuya creeks, which surround Wheeler Ridge, were not 
classified MRZ-2 because deleterious and weak rock types were 
observed in them. These rock types include shale, chert, and 
biotite schist, which are normally deleterious to PCC-grade ag- 
gregate — all derived from rocks found within the Tehachapi 
and San Emigdio mountains. Because the sediments now uplifted 
in Wheeler Ridge must also have had the same source area, one 
would expect to find these rock types in the Wheeler Ridge de- 
posit. However, they were not observed during inspection of the 
Kern Rock's Wheeler Ridge pit, and if present, have not been a 
problem in Kern Rock's product. Rock types in the deposit in- 
clude: biotite-rich silicic plutonic rocks, many with the biotite 
concentrated in clots; quartz-biotite pegmatite and leucogranite; 
granite; amphibolite; marble, and metaquartzite. Micaceous and 
amphibole-rich phyllite and schist, and dark, hard microcrystal- 
line rocks of presumed metamorphic origin were also observed. 
Some cobbles have a diameter of 1 foot but most are between 3 
and 6 inches. The coarse clasts are subangular to subrounded 
and discoidal to spherical in shape. The sand-sized fraction is 
composed of clear and milky quartz, rock fragments consisting 
of quartz and mafic minerals, and biotite flakes. The sand 
grains are also subangular to subrounded and spherical. Sand 
and silt compose 45 to 65 percent of the deposit. 



14 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



The waste factor for this plant is relatively high, 30 percent. 
Most of this is due to interbedded clay, but some of it is due to 
partial disintegration and softening of some of the plutonic rocks 
due to weathering, and to splintering of the phyllite and schist. 
These are removed through normal sizing, washing, and crush- 
ing, so that serviceable PCC-grade aggregate is produced. 

Most of the factors used in calculating the resources in Sector 
G were derived from Kern Rock Company information coupled 
with water-well logs and observations in the field. They are 
shown on Table 9. The company has no data on in-place density; 
however, their plant manager estimated the density at 1 .5 tons 
per cubic yard. This seems light for an older deposit such as the 
Tulare Formation, but the interbedded fines (clay and silt) which 
exist in this deposit and cannot be avoided during mining would 
cause the in-place density to be less. Overburden varies from 5 
to 25 feet, but averages 10 feet. An average resource thickness 
of 100 feet was used in these calculations based on the following 
information. Kern Rock Company will be mining the ridge to 
a 900-foot elevation which, at the highest part of its lease, con- 
verts to a mined thickness of 350 feet. However, the ridge eleva- 
tion drops quickly from the high point, and the average mining 
depth is from 100 to 150 feet. No water-well logs were available 
to substantiate the total depth of resource in the Tulare Formation. 
Logs in the older alluvium indicate that resource depth varies 
from 80 to 120 feet. 



TABLE 9. Resources (tons) in Sector G, Wheeler Ridge. Factors: 
waste = 30%; density = 1.5 tons/cubic yard; overburden = 
10 feet; depth = 100 feet. 



SECTOR 



AREA 
(acres) 



NONPERMITTED" 
RESOURCE 



RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 



ACRES 
UNDER 
PERMIT + 



G-l 



928 



62,600,000 



* Kern Rock Company 



416 



Proprietary information. See Table 14 for total reserves. 

The resource tonnage for this sector was reduced by 10 percent to accommodate oil 

wells contained within its boundaries. The planimetered acreage of the sector was 

not reduced, as explained in the text. 

Does not include known depleted areos within permitted area; these areas are 

classified as MRZ-1 and are not part of the sector. 



Although Sector G is not divided by roads, aqueducts, or other 
developed land, it is bordered by Interstate 5 and State Highway 
99. A setback of 100 feet was left adjacent to these two major 
highways. The oil wells scattered within Sector G will not pre- 
vent mining. However, up to 10 percent of the resource in Sector 
G is located within hypothetical cylinders outlined by 100-foot 
setbacks around each well. Therefore, 10 percent was subtracted 
from the nonpermitted resources total which was calculated 
based on the planimeter measurement of Sector G. The acreage, 
as shown on Table 9, was not reduced, as explained on page 1 1 . 
The groundwater level is 625 feet below ground surface in Kern 
Rock Company wells, so groundwater will not be an impedi- 
ment to mining. 

SECTOR H — ALLUVIAL FAN OF PASTORIA CREEK 

This area consists of a Recent alluvial fan built by Pastoria 
Creek (Plates 15 and 31), on which Oildale Ready Mix has been 
operating a portable rock plant and producing aggregate of PCC- 
grade since 1982. Adjacent to their 40-acre lease are old borrow 
pits which were aggregate sources for the California Aqueduct. 
Presumably, knowledge of this good quality material led Oildale 
Ready Mix to this fairly isolated location (more than 30 miles 
south of Bakersfield). The deposit contains 99.9 million tons 
of resources. 



The Pastoria Creek deposit consists of subangular-to-sub- 
rounded, oval- to disk-shaped boulders, cobbles, and gravel with 
a maximum diameter of several feet. Most of the coarse clasts 
have a diameter between 4 and 9 inches. The major lithologic 
type is a biotite-rich, coarse- to medium-grained crystalline rock 
which is of plutonic or high-grade metamorphic origin. Many of 
these clasts are compositionally banded. In others the biotite is 
concentrated in clots. Clasts rich in amphibole are also present 
— sometimes qualifying for the term hornblendite (or amphibo- 
lite if metamorphic). Cross-cutting veins of quartz and potassium 
feldspar are common. Other rock types include coarse-grained 
granite, quartzite, marble, and weathered biotite schist (less 
than 2 percent). One clast of meta-conglomerate was observed. 
Other than the weathered schist, all the clasts observed were 
very hard and would produce durable aggregate. The sand-sized 
fraction consists of angular rock fragments and quartz. 

The resources present in Sector H are shown on Table 10. 
The resource calculation factors are based on Oildale Ready Mix 
Company's Conditional Use Permit and field observations. No 
water-well logs are available for this sector. A waste factor of 10 
percent was established during an inspection of the pit. The den- 
sity of 1 .75 tons per cubic yard was estimated by extrapolation 
from similar deposits. The resource depth of 60 feet was based 
on field observations and on previous mining which has reached 
a depth of 30 to 35 feet. Remaining resource thickness in the 
28-acre aqueduct borrow pit which is part of Sector H-5 was 
estimated by DMG at 25 feet. 

The outline of the area classified MRZ-2 was based on the 
topographic extent of the Pastoria Creek alluvial fan as observed 
on the quadrangle map. 



TABLE 10. Resources (tons) in Sector H, Pastoria Creek alluvial fan. 
Factors: waste = 10%; density = 1.75 tons/cubic yard; overburden 
= feet; depth = 60 feet, and 25 feet for part of H-5. 



SECTOR 


AREA 
(acres) 


NONPERMITTED 
RESOURCE 


RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 


ACRES 
UNDER 
PERMIT 


H-l 
H-2 
H-3 
H-4 
H-5 


39 
64 
38 

111 
497 


5,000,000 

9,000,000 

5,100,000 

1 5,600,000 

65,200,000 






'Oildale Ready Mix Co. 






40 


TOTAL 


749 


99,900,000 


• 


40 



* Proprietary information See Table 14 for combined reserve tonnage. 



SECTORS I AND J — THE UPPER (J) AND LOWER PORTIONS 
(I) OF CALIENTE WASH 

Resource Sectors I and J are shown on Plates 24 through 26. 
Edison Sand Company mined sand from Sector I until flooding 
in 1982 forced them to discontinue excavation, invalidating their 
vested right to mine. The sand produced from Sector I was used 
in ready mix concrete and gunite. Ten to 20 percent of the 
deposit consisted of gravel (personal communication with Jerry 
Malouf, owner of Edison Sand Company), which was usually 
concentrated in layers. More than 10 years ago, Griffith Con- 
struction Company mined sand and gravel from the upper por- 
tion of the wash (Sector J) for use in Freeway 58 (the area they 
excavated has been naturally replenished). This information and 
indications in the water-well logs of a significant thickness of 
sand and gravel, led to the MRZ-2 classification of Caliente 



I')SS 



MINHRAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, BAKLRSFIFLD 



15 



Wash. Sector I contains 385,900,000 tons of resources, and 
Sector J contains 14,800,000 tons 

Caliente Wash was split into two disconnected sectors for two 
reasons. First, downstream from the town of Caliente the creek 
narrows and the stream bed changes from alluvium to Walker 
Formation and Bena Gravel. This intervening area has been 
classified MRZ-3. Second, the lower portion below the narrows 
consists of sand and a small percentage of gravel, whereas the 
upper portion is 30 to 40 percent gravel. It is interesting to note 
that a significant amount of gravel does not exist downstream 
from the narrows where it would be expected. This may be due 
to the fact that just above the narrows the surrounding hills 
change from predominantly hard crystalline rocks to softer sedi- 
mentary sandstone, siltstone, and conglomerate. Perhaps these 
formations contribute so much sand that it swamps the coarser 
clasts from upstream. 

The MRZ-2 classification of Sector J does not extend farther 
upstream Caliente Wash due to narrowing and thinning of the 
deposit (Plate 10). The MRZ-2 classification of Sector I does 
not extend farther downstream due to a fining of the sand seen 
on the surface and a lack of gravel being noted in water-well 
logs (Plate 8). 

No gravel-sized clasts could be found at ground surface in 
Sector I. The sand was observed to be a pebbly, well-graded 
arkosic sand. Quartz and rock fragments are subangular to 
subrounded. Biotite occurs as flakes or books. The gravel and 
cobbles in Sector J predominantly consist of medium- to coarse- 
grained biotite-rich silicic plutonic rocks, fine- to medium- 
grained diorite and some aplite. The percentage of these plutonic 
rock clasts varies from 40 to 60 percent of the deposit. Clasts of 
volcanic breccia also constitute a significant portion of the de- 
posit, as well as metaquartzite and quartz. Fine-grained meta- 



sediments, metavolcanics, meta-graywacke, welded tuff, marble 
and mica schist were also observed. Near Caliente in Sector J, 
the maximum clast size is 1 foot with most clasts between 1 Vi 
and 3 inches. At the north end of Sector J, boulders several feet 
in diameter are present with many 18-inch clasts. The sand in 
Sector J is similar to the arkosic sand in Sector I (i.e., it con- 
tains quartz, biotite, rock fragments, and opaque minerals). The 
grains are angular to subangular. 

Sectors I and J contain 15 percent waste. This was estimated 
based on field observations of percent fines, the types of rocks 
in Sector J, and the amount of biotite in Sector [. The remaining 
factors used in resource calculations are different in each sector. 
Density in Sector I, which is composed of 80 to 100 percent sand- 
sized particles, is estimated to be 1 .2 tons per cubic yard. DMG 
has found this to be typical of loose, quartz-rich sand without 
gravel-sized clasts. Density in Sector J is estimated to be 1.5 
tons per cubic yard which is typical of young, noncompacted, 
alluvial sand and gravel. Water-well logs for the lower portion of 
the wash (Sector I) indicate that sand and gravel extend to at 
least 100 feet below ground surface, so this depth was used in 
resource calculations. (Current groundwater level in this portion 
of Caliente Wash is unknown, but it was between 100 and 200 
feet in December 1958 [Wood and Dale, 1964]). Water-well logs 
for the upper portion of Caliente Wash (Sector J) show the de- 
posit to be thinner, ranging from 25 to 45 feet, with 30 feet rep- 
resenting the average. Soil has developed in Subsector 1-6 and 
the lower portion of Subsector 1-5. Subsector 1-1 and most of 1-2 
have grass or phreatophytes growing in the nonactive portions of 
the wash. An overburden thickness of 2 feet was used through- 
out Sector I to account for these surface conditions. No overbur- 
den is present in Sector J. 

The resources present in Sectors I and J are given in Tables 
1 1 and 12. No PCC-grade aggregate reserves exist within these 
sectors. 



TABLE 11. Resources (tons) in Sector I, the lower portion of Caliente 
Wash. Factors: waste = 15%; density =1.2 tons/cubic yard; 
overburden = 2 feet; depth = 100 feet. 



SECTOR 



l-l 

1-2 
1-3 
1-4 
1-5 
1-6 



AREA 
(acres) 



NONPERMITTED 
RESOURCE 



RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 



TOTAL 



177 


25,200,000 


8 


800,000 


20 


2,500,000 


372 


52,400,000 


1,361 


210,400,000 


611 


94,600,000 


2,549 


385,900,000 



ACRES 
UNDER 
PERMIT 



TABLE 12. Resources (tons) in Sector J, the upper portion of 
Caliente Wash. Factors: waste = 15%; density = 1.5 tons/cubic 
yard; overburden = feet; depth = 30 feet. 



SECTOR 



AREA 
(acres) 



NONPERMITTED 
RESOURCE 



RESERVES/ 
OPERATOR 



J-i 
J-2 
J-3 
J-4 



TOTAL 



149 


8,600,000 


31 


1,800,000 


61 


3,600,000 


15 


800,000 


256 


14,800,000 



ACRES 
UNDER 
PERMIT 



16 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



TABLE 13 


Summary 


by subsector of nonpermitted resources and factors used 


n calculating resource totals in Sectors A 


through J (See end 


of table on page 17 for footnotes). 


























CORRECTION 










MINEABLE 




%OF 

USEABLE 

AGGREGATE 




DENSITY 
(tons/acre- 
foot) 


FOR 1:1 


RESOURCE 


SECTOR 


AREA IN 
ACRES* 


X 


AGGREGATE 

THICKNESS* 

(feet) 


X 


X 


SIDESLOPES 
(rounded 
to 10,000 


TONNAGE 

(rounded to 

100,000 tons) 


















tons) 




A - James Road (al 


luvial fan) 














A-l 


94 


X 


21 


X 


80 


X 


2420 


340,000 


3,500,000 


A-2 


292 


X 


21 


X 


80 


X 


2420 


280,000 


11,600,000 


TOTAL 


386 
















15,100,000 


B-Kern River floodplain 














B-l 


287 


X 


38 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


570,000 


21,900,000 


B-2 


289 


X 


38 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


4,150,000# 


1 8,400,000 


B-3 


23 


X 


38 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


350,000# 


1 ,400,000 


B-4 


105 


X 


38 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


1,560,000# 


6,600,000 


B-5 


327 


X 


38 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


4,500,000# 


20,800,000 


TOTAL 


1,031 
















69,100,000 


C-Kern River alluvial fan 














C-l 


43 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


680,000 


4,500,000 


C-2 


13 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


340,000 


1,200,000 


C-3 


20 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


430,000 


2,000,000 


C-4 


16 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


270,000 


1,600,000 


C-5 


93 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


650,000 


10,500,000 


C-6 


43 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


580,000 


4,600,000 


C-7 


209 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


1,170,000 


23,800,000 


C-8 


104 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


2,580,000# 


9,800,000 


C-9 


52 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


1,420,000# 


4,800,000 


C-10 


26 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


850,000# 


2,200,000 


C-l 1 


69 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


2,100,000# 


6,100,000 


C-12 


27 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


930,000# 


2,300,000 


C-13 


27 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


880,000# 


2,300,000 


C-l 4 


15 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


370,000 


1,400,000 


C-l 5 


30 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


520,000 


3,100,000 


C-16 


54 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


780,000 


5,700,000 


C-17 


32 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


1,090,000# 


2,700,000 


C-18 


78 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


900,000 


8,400,000 


C-19 


17 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


370,000 


1,700,000 


C-20 


247 


X 


58 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


340,000 


29,100,000 


TOTAL 


1215 
















127,800,000 


D — Cottonwood Creek floodph 


ain 












D-l 


147 


X 


33 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


530,000 


9,400,000 


D-2 


20 


X 


33 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


140,000 


1,200,000 


D-3 


114 


X 


33 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


490,000 


7,200,000 


D-4 


136 


X 


33 


X 


85 


X 


2420 


680,000 


8,500,000 


TOTAL 


417 
















26,300,000 


E — Upper San 


Emit 


gdio Creek alluvial fan 










E-l 


4,216 


X 


195 


X 


75 


X 


2823 


- 65,470,000 = 


1,675,200,000 


E-2 


3,593 


X 


195 


X 


75 


X 


2823 


- 52,650,000 - 


1,430,800,000 


E-3 


583 


X 


195 


X 


75 


X 


2823 


- 46,640,000 = 


193,100,000 


E-4 


1,474 


X 


195 


X 


75 


X 


2823 


- 48,030,000 


560,500,000 


E-5 


884 


X 


195 


X 


75 


X 


2823 


- 39,860,000 = 


325,100,000 


TOTAL 


10,750 
















4,184,700,000 





IWX 



MINI KA1 LAND CLASSIFICATION, bakersfield 



17 



TABLE 13 (Continued) 



SECTOR 



AREA IN 
ACRES 



MINEABLE 

AGGREGATE 

THICKNESS* 

(feet) 



%OF 


DENSITY 


USEABLE x 


(tons/acre 


AGGREGATE 


foot) 



CORRECTION 

FOR 1:1 

SIDESLOPES 

(rounded 

to 10,000 

tons) 



RESOURCE 

TONNAGE 

(rounded to 

100,000 tons) 



F — Lower San Emigdio Creek alluvial fan 



F-l 
F-2 



158 
296 



95 
95 



75 
75 



2823 
2823 



2,900,000 
6,510,000 



H — Pastoria Creek alluvial fan 



H-l 
H-2 
H-3 
H-4 
H-5 



39 
64 
38 

111 
457 



60 
60 
60 
60 
60 



90 
90 

90 
90 
90 



2823 
2823 
2823 
2823 
2823 



980,000 

790,000 

730,000 

1,320,000 

4,470,000° 



28,900,000 
53,000,000 



TOTAL 454 














81,900,000 


G — Wheeler Ridge 

G-l 512 x 


90 


X 


70 


X 


2420 


- 15,500,000# 


62,600,000 



5,000,000 

9,000,000 

5,100,000 

1 5,600,000 

65,200,000 



TOTAL 709 



99,900,000 



— Lower Caliente Wash 



1-1 


177 


X 


98 


X 


85 


1-2 


8 


X 


98 


X 


85 


1-3 


20 


X 


98 


X 


85 


1-4 


372 


X 


98 


X 


85 


1-5 


1,361 


X 


98 


X 


85 


1-6 


611 


X 


98 


X 


85 



1936 
1936 
1936 
1936 
1936 
1936 



3,300,000 
450,000 
730,000 
7,590,000 
9,100,000 
3,890,000 



25,200,000 

800,000 

2,500,000 

52,400,000 

210,400,000 

94,600,000 



TOTAL 2,549 



385,900,000 



J — Upper Caliente Wash 

J-l 
J-2 
J-3 
J-4 



49 


X 


30 


X 


85 


31 


X 


30 


X 


85 


61 


X 


30 


X 


85 


15 


X 


30 


X 


85 



2420 
2420 
2420 
2420 



540,000 

90,000 

1 90,000 

1 20,000 



8,600,000 

1,800,000 

3,600,000 

800,000 



TOTAL 256 



1 4,800,000 



TOTAL NONPERMITTED AREA IN SECTORS A 
THROUGH J = 18,279 acres or 28.6 square 
miles 



TOTAL PCC-GRADE AGGREGATE RESOURCES 
(NONPERMITTED) IN SECTORS A THROUGH J 
5,068,100,000 tons 



+ Does not include acres permitted for mining and therefore may not match acreage given in column 1 on Tobies 3 through 12- The acreage shown here can be 
verified by subtracting column 5 from column 2 on Tables 3 through 12. 

* Mineable aggregate thickness = resource depth minus overburden. 

# Also includes correction to account for reduction in resource tonnage in those subsectors containing oil wells (see pages 1 1 and 14 for explanation). 
Also includes correction to account for resources already mined from currently nonpermitted borrow pit. 



The formula used to calculate aggregate tonnage follows: 



TOTAL 

SECTOR 

TONNAGE 



# ACRES 



MINEABLE 

AGGREGATE 

THICKNESS 

(feet) 



PERCENTAGE 
OF USEABLE 
AGGREGATE 



•DENSITY 
IN TONS PER 
ACRE FOOT 



CORRECTION 

FOR 1:1 
SIDESLOPES 



• IN-PLACE AGGREGATE DENSITY; SECTORS A-D, G, J = 2420 TONS/ ACRE-FOOT 

* IN-PLACE AGGREGATE DENSITY; SECTORS E, F, & H = 2823 TONS/ACRE-FOOT 
•IN-PLACE AGGREGATE DENSITY; SECTOR I = 1936 TONS/ACRE-FOOT 



18 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



TABLE 14. Summary of resources, reserves and acreage by sector in the Bakersfield P-C Region. 



SECTOR 


RESOURCE 
AREA 


TOTAL 
ACRES 
IN SECTOR 


PERMITTED 

ACRES 

IN SECTOR" 


PCC-GRADE 

RESERVES 

(tons) 


NONPERMITTED 

RESOURCES 

(tons) 


A 


James Road 


428 


42 


• 


15,100,000 


B 

C 


Kern River 
Subtotal 


1,031 
1,215 

2,246 














69,100,000 
1 27,800,000 

196,900,000 


D 


Cottonwood 
Creek 


417 








26,300,000 



San Emigdio 
Creek 



Caliente Wash 



Subtotal 



11,464 
454 



714 




2,549 
256 



2,805 



TOTAL SECTOR AREA 
= 19,491 acres or 
30.5 square miles 



PERMITTED AREA 
= 1,212 acres or 
1.9 square miles 



TOTAL RESERVES 
= 212,400,000 tons 



TOTAL RESOURCES 
= 5,280,500,000 tons 
(Reserves + all Non- 
permitted Resources) 



4,184,700,000 
81,900,000 





Subtotal 


11,918 


714 


• 


4,266,600,000 


G 


Wheeler Ridge 


928 


416 


• 


62,600,000 


H 


Pastoria Creek 


749 


40 


• 


99,900,000 



385,900,000 
14,800,000 

400,700,000 



"Proprietary 
** Does not include land which has been classified MRZ-1 due to depletion, but which is still part of property covered by a valid use permit. 



CLASSIFICATION OF ACTIVE MINES PRODUCING 
OTHER MINERAL COMMODITIES 



The entire P-C region has been classified for PCC-grade ag- 
gregate. Additionally, during this work, sites of active produc- 
tion of other commodities were encountered. It was decided that 
deposits which contain active mining operations, regardless of 
the type of mineral commodity being produced, would also be 
classified MRZ-2. However, the resources and reserves at these 
sites have not been quantified beyond the confirmation that the 
deposit meets the minimum threshold value established by the 
State Mining and Geology Board for that particular commodity. 
The reader should be aware that this classification of individual 
mine sites is not to be construed as a classification of the entire 
region for these commodities — but solely a classification of 
particular sites where commercial extraction of a mineral re- 
source is occurring. Because no attempt has been made to deter- 
mine the regional significance of these individual operations, 
they have not been sectorized as candidates for designation by 
the Board. 

In the Bakersfield P-C Region there are six sites where non- 
PCC-grade aggregates are mined (see Table 15). Four exist on 
the eastern side of the region and include: a wind-blown ridge 
of sand (Plate 8) where Edison Sand Company and Kern County 
Department of Public Works are extracting mortar sand, plaster 
sand, roadbase, fill, and nursery sand; a site on the Kern River 
where Webster Sand Company (Plate 5) draglines plaster sand 
(this location is already classified MRZ-2 due to the presence of 
PCC-grade aggregate); and Granite Construction's base and as- 



phaltic-concrete sand pits between James Road and State High- 
way 65 (Plate 4) and on Sycamore Creek alluvial fan (Plates 16 
and 17). The fifth and sixth sites exist on the western side of 
the P-C region and are mined by Bob Morton Construction and 
General Production Service, Incorporated. The Bob Morton 
Construction site is adjacent to Elk Hills Road, west of Valley 
Acres in the Tulare Formation (Plate 18). Aggregate for road 
base, riprap, and fill is mined here. The General Production 
Service, Inc. site is located just south of Taft on the west side 
of State Highway 33. It is a source of roadbase and subbase 
(Plates 18 and 19). 

Very little processing is done of the aggregates obtained from 
these mines. Bob Morton Construction Company does screen 
their mined material and Granite Construction Company washes, 
crushes, and screens the material from both of their sites. 
The alluvium at Granite Construction's Sycamore Creek plant in 
T.31S. is interesting because it is derived from a single source 
— the hornblende-biotite tonalite of Bear Valley Springs (Ross, 
1980). Ninety percent of the coarse clasts consist of coarse- and 
medium-grained silicic plutonic rocks often foliated and rich in 
biotite with a lesser amount of hornblende. Quartzite and peg- 
matite clasts constitute the remainder. The sand-sized grains 
consist of quartz and up to 30 percent biotite. It is this large 
quantity of loose biotite and the foliated biotite of the gravel that 
have kept the deposit from meeting specifications more stringent 
than for concrete curbing and asphalt. It lessens the strength of 



I'lSS 



MINLRAL LAND CLASSIFICATION. BAkLRSHLLD 



I') 



both the sand- and gravel-sized fractions and weathers quickly, 
softening the gravel clasts. However, the plant has produced 
good quality asphalt aggregate since the 1960s. 

The western part of the P-C region appears to contain a wide- 
spread source of fill, roadbase and subbase within the Tulare 
Formation and alluvium derived from this formation. Where ob- 
served in borrow pits and road cuts, these units consist of a silty, 
gravelly sand. The sand is subrounded to rounded and predomi- 
nantly composed of quartz with a few rock fragments and opaque 
minerals. The gravel component composes from 10 to 30 per- 
cent of the deposit, ranging from 1/2 inch to 2 inches in size. Up 
to 70 percent of the gravel is hard, porcelaneous shale and chert, 
both of which would be deleterious to PCC. The shale, as well, 
would be too soft for use in asphaltic paving aggregate. The rest 



of the gravel is composed of hard, fairly unweathered plutonic 
and metamorphic rocks. The Atlantic Richfield Company 
(ARCO) intermittently obtains fill and road surfacing material 
for its own use from a small borrow pit south of Derby Acres 
and east of Highway 33, which is below the State Mining and 
Geology Board threshold value so is not shown on the plates. 
The Bob Morton Construction Company and General Production 
Service, Inc., as noted previously, continue to obtain various 
types of construction aggregate from their 30- to 50-foot deep 
pits in the Tulare Formation. 

No other mineral extraction sites besides the aggregate mines 
previously discussed were found within the Bakersfield P-C 
Region. 



ESTIMATED 50-YEAR CONSUMPTION 
OF AGGREGATES 



Basis of 50-year Forecasts 

The State Mining and Geology Board, as specified in its 
"Guidelines for Classification and Designation of Mineral Lands" 
(Part II of Division of Mines and Geology Special Publication 
51), required that mineral land classification reports for regions 
containing construction materials classified MRZ-2 include "an 
estimate of the total quantity of each such construction material 
that will be needed to supply the requirements of both the 
county and the marketing region in which it occurs for the next 
50 years. The marketing region is defined as the area within 
which such material is usually mined and marketed. The amount 
of each construction material mineral resource needed for the 
next 50 years shall be projected using past consumption rates ad- 
justed for anticipated changes in market conditions and mining 
technology." In the guidelines, the Board also specifies that 
these estimates be reviewed periodically (every 10 years or less). 

Fifty-year forecasts of PCC-grade aggregate needs in the 
Bakersfield P-C Region were made on the basis of reported ag- 
gregate-production records during the years 1960-1984. For the 
purposes of this study, P-C region boundaries were defined to 
ensure that nearly all PCC-grade aggregate produced in the 
Bakersfield area will be consumed in the study area* Imports 
of PCC-aggregate from outside the study area are insignificant. 



More than 95 percent of all aggregate produced in the Bakersfield P-C 
Region is consumed within the P-C region boundaries. 



Correlations Between Aggregate Production and 
Consumption 

Past studies of aggregate marketing regions in California have 
shown that there is a strong correlation between the amount of 
aggregate produced and the population in a given aggregate pro- 
duction-consumption region (Anderson, et al., 1979). On this 
basis, aggregate production and population figures in the Bakers- 
field P-C Region were correlated for the years 1960 through 
1984 (Table 16). Correlations between the annual aggregate pro- 
duction records and the population statistics were used to obtain 
per capita consumption rates of aggregate in the study area. The 
historical aggregate production data in the study area was ob- 
tained from mining records of the U.S. Department of the Inte- 
rior, Bureau of Mines (1960 to 1982 and 1984) and from the 
aggregate companies (1983 and 1984). The Bureau of Mines 
records are compiled from responses to voluntary questionnaires 
that are sent annually to known mining operators. Each pro- 
ducer is requested to divulge the production from each of his 
producing properties for the preceding year. It is important to 
note that the degree of accuracy of these statistics depends en- 
tirely on the producer's response. Historical population data for 
the Bakersfield area were taken from census data obtained from 
Kern County (1981). 

The average per capita consumption rate in the Bakersfield 
P-C Region is 7.4 tons of aggregate per year over the period 
from 1960 to 1984 (see Table 16). Due to the erratic variations 



TABLE 75. Summary of mine sites where commodities other than PCC-Grade 


aggregate are extracted. 










LOCATION 










(Section/ Township 




COMPANY 




PRODUCT 


/Range) 


PLATES 


Edison Sand Company 




Masonry nursery & fill sand 


17, 30S/30E 


land 8 


Kern County Public Works 




sand for base & fill 


30, 30S/30E 


land 8 


Webster Sand Company 




plaster sand 


9, 29S/28E 


1 and 5 


Granite Construction 




fill & asphalt sand 


21, 28S/27E 


1 and 4 


Granite Construction 




asphalt aggregate 


27, 28, 33 & 34 
31S/30E 


1,16 and 17 


Bob Morton Construction 




roadbase, riprap & fill 


25, 31S/23E 


1 and 18 


General Production Service, 


Inc. 


roadbase & subbase 


19, 32S/24E 


1,18 and 19 



20 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



TABLE 16. 


Population, aggregate consumption (tons) and per capita consumption (tons) in the 


Bakersfield P-C Region 


during the 


period 1960-1984. 












3-Year 


Annual 








'Aggregate 


Average of 


Per Capita 


Year 


Population 


Consumption 


Consumption 


Consumption 


1960 


241,600 


1,530,000 






1961 


244,000 


1,544,000 


1,555,000 


6.35 


1962 


246,400 


1,592,000 


1,491,000 


6.05 


1963 


248,900 


1,337,000 


1,422,000 


5.71 


1964 


251,300 


1,337,000 


1,481,000 


5.89 


1965 


253,700 


1,769,000 


1,645,000 


6.48 


1966 


256,100 


1,829,000 


1,864,000 


7.28 


1967 


258,500 


1,994,000 


2,317,000 


8.96 


1968 


260,900 


3,128,000 


2,743,000 


10.51 


1969 


263,000 


3,160,000 


3,051,000 


11.60 


1970 


265,700 


2,865,000 


2,582,000 


9.72 


1971 


271,300 


1,720,000 


1,974,000 


7.28 


1972 


276,800 


1,338,000 


1,489,000 


5.40 


1973 


282,300 


1,409,000 


1,650,000 


5.84 


1974 


287,800 


2,204,000 


1,830,000 


6.36 


1975 


293,400 


1,876,000 


2,146,000 


7.31 


1976 


298,900 


2,357,000 


2,011,000 


6.73 


1977 


304,400 


1,799,000 


2,015,000 


6.61 


1978 


310,000 


1,889,000 


1,900,000 


6.13 


1979 


315,500 


2,012,000 


2,003,000 


6.35 


1980 


321,000 


2,109,000 


2,064,000 


6.43 


1981 


331,300 


2,070,000 


2,175,000 


6.56 


1982 


341,500 


2,346,000 


2,269,000 


6.64 


1983 


351,800 


2,392,000 


2,567,000 


7.30 


1984 


362,000 


2,963,000 






The averc 


ge per capita consumption for 1961-1984 is 7.4 tons 


Calculations may not replicate exactly due to rounding. 


* Rounded to nearest 1000 tons 










2£ 
b c 

< CO 

11 

a. — 



300 




















































200 








100 






















































1960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 1972 1974 1976 1978 1980 1982 

Figure 6. Population and aggregate consumption (3-year averages) for the Bakersfield PC Region for years 1960-1984 



1984 



1 >N,X 



MINHRALLANIM I ASSII IC'ATION. BAkhkSHI.U ) 



21 



co 



12 



10 















































































Average 


Per Capita Consi 


imption - 


7.4 tons 



























































1? 



10 



1960 



1962 



1964 



1966 



1968 



1970 



1972 



1974 



1976 



1978 



1980 



1982 



1984 



Figure 7. Annual per capita consumption of aggregate in the Bakersfield P-C Region for the years 1967-1984 (based on 3-year averages of 
total annual consumption within the PC region). 




1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 

Figure 8. Projected population (50 years from date of study) in the Bakersfield P-C Region. 



2025 



2030 



2035 



22 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



TABLE 17. Projected aggregate consumption through the 


year 2034 for the Bakersfield P-C 


Region. 




Five-year per capita consumption = 37.0 tons/ person 
One-year per capita consumption = 7.4 tons/ person 












AGGREGATE 




AGGEGATE" 


YEARS 


•AVERAGE 
POPULATION 


CONSUMPTION 
ALL AGGREGATE 




CONSUMPTION 
PCC AGGREGATE 




(millions) 


(million tons) 




(million tons) 


1985-1989 


.389 


14.4 




7.7 


1990-1994 


.428 


15.8 




8.4 


1995-1999 


.464 


17.2 




9.2 


2000-2004 


.497 


18.4 




9.8 


2005-2009 


.530 


19.6 




10.4 


2010-2014 


.562 


20.8 




11.1 


2015-2019 


.595 


22.0 




11.7 


2020-2024 


.628 


23.2 




12.3 


2025-2029 


.660 


24.4 




13.0 


2030-2034 
TOTAL 


.693 


25.6 




13.6 


201.4 


107.2 


* Population projections fo 

** Population projections fo 

This estimate is based on 


- the years 1985-2020 were obtained from the California Department of Finance Report 83-P-3. 

■ the years 2021-2034 were linearly projected from data in Report 83-P-3. 

he fact that approximately 53 percent of the aggregate consumed from 1960 to 1982 was PCC quality 


see Table 18). 



TABLE 18. 


Percentage of total aggregate consumption 


used for Portland cemer 


if concrete (PCC) aggregate in the Bak- 


ersfield P-C Region during the period 1960-1982. 












PERCENT OF 




TOTAL AGGREGATE 


PCC AGGREGATE 


TOTAL AGGREGATE 




CONSUMED 


CONSUMED 


CONSUMPTION USED 


YEAR 


(tons) 


(tons) 


AS PCC AGGREGATE 


1960 


1,530,000 


623,000 


40.7 


1961 


1,544,000 


783,000 


50.7 


1962 


1,592,000 


676,000 


42.5 


1963 


1,337,000 


250,000 


18.7 


1964 


1,337,000 


646,000 


48.3 


1965 


1,769,000 


1,017,000 


57.5 


1966 


1,829,000 


739,000 


40.4 


1967 


1,994,000 


729,000 


36.6 


1968 


3,128,000 


1,887,000 


60.3 


1969 


3,160,000 


2,115,000 


67.0 


1970 


2,865,000 


1,962,000 


68.5 


1971 


1,720,000 


855,000 


49.7 


1972 


1,338,000 


793,000 


59.2 


1973 


1,409,000 


635,000 


45.1 


1974 


2,204,000 


801,000 


36.4 


1975 


1,876,000 


868,000 


46.1 


1976 


2,357,000 


1,369,000 


58.1 


1977 


1,799,000 


1,028,000 


57.1 


1978 


1,889,000 


1,185,000 


62.8 


1979 


2,012,000 


1,252,000 


62.2 


1980 


2,109,000 


1,167,000 


55.3 


1981 


2,070,000 


NOT AVAILABLE 


? 


1982 


2,346,000 


1,561,000 


66.5 


1983 


2,392,000 


NOT AVAILABLE 


? 


1984 


2,963,000 


NOT AVAILABLE 


? 


Average 


percentage of total aggregate consumption used as PCC-aggregate = 


53.2%. Percentage calculations may 


not replicate precisely due to rounding. 







1 988 



MINHRAL LAND CLASSIFICATION. BAKLRS1ILLD 



23 



TABLE 19. Summary of PCC-grade aggregate resources and 
50-year demand: Bakersfield P-C Region. 



• Permitted Reserves 

• Nonpermitted Resources 

• 50- Year Demand 



= 212,400,000 tons 
= 5,088,800,000 tons 
= 201 ,400,000 tons 



in aggregate production from year to year (see Figure 6), a three- 
year moving average of the annual aggregate production was 
used in conjunction with population statistics (for purposes of 
curve smoothing) to compute the per capita consumption rates 
for the P-C region (Figure 7). The moderately high consumption 
rates in the Bakersfield area are characteristic of aggregate 
marketing regions in which the overall population density is 
relatively low and the rate of urban development is high. A 
moderately high consumption rate probably will be maintained 
within the Bakersfield P-C Region until the onset of urban matu- 
rity, then it will decrease and eventually drop to a general main- 
tenance level. Urban maturity is the point in the development of 
an area at which construction materials are used primarily to 
maintain what has already been developed, rather than to 
provide for further development. 

Projected Population and Per Capita 
Consumption through the Year 2034 

A simple analysis of the historical aggregate production and 
population statistics was conducted to calculate an historic per 
capita consumption rate for the Bakersfield P-C Region. This 
rate was applied to the projected population growth in the region 
anticipated through the year 2034 in order to calculate the 50- 
year aggregate demand for the P-C region. Population projec- 
tions for the years 1980 to 2020 (Figure 8) were obtained from 
the California Department of Finance (1983). This data was ex- 
trapolated by DMG for the study area on a straight line basis 
through the year 2034 to provide the 50-year population projec- 
tion as specified under the SMARA guidelines. The results of 
these calculations (Table 17) reveal that an estimated 201 mil- 
lion tons of all types of aggregate will be needed to satisfy the 
projected future demand for this construction material in the 



Bakersfield P-C Region through the year 2034. Of this total, 
107 million tons must be of PCC-grade (see Table 18). 

Factors Affecting Per Capita 
Consumption Rates 

The wide variations from year to year in the per capita con- 
sumption rate (Figure 7) (5.40 to 1 1 .60 tons) are probably re- 
flections of changes in urban growth rates with time and the 
construction of major facilities (for example, the California 
Aqueduct and Interstate 5). In part, these variations also result 
from incompleteness and inaccuracies in the production records 
supplied to the U.S. Bureau of Mines. Certainly the economic 
climate is a powerful variable that influences the annual per 
capita consumption rates for aggregate. Very high interest rates, 
for example, such as existed in California during the 1980 to 
1982 period, tend to lower the amount of new construction in 
an area and consequently lower the demand for aggregate. 

At some point in the future, the average annual per capita 
consumption rate of 7.4 tons for the Bakersfield P-C Region will 
probably decrease with the onset of urban maturity and then stab- 
ilize at a lower rate. However, should unforeseen events occur, 
such as massive urban renewal or disaster reconstruction, the 
per capita consumption rate could increase radically. 

Comparison of the 50-Year Aggregate 
Demand with Current Reserves 

The total PCC-grade aggregate reserves for the Bakersfield 
P-C Region were calculated to be 212.4 million tons as of Janu- 
ary 1985 (see Table 14). At the average rate of past aggregate 
consumption in the region (7.4 tons per person annually), these 
reserves are theoretically sufficient to supply the P-C region 
beyond the 50-year forecast, probably to the year 2037. 

According to U.S. Bureau of Mines aggregate production sta- 
tistics for the years 1960 to 1982, roughly 53 percent of the total 
aggregate consumed in the study region was used in PCC. This 
means that 107 million tons of aggregate will be required for 
use in PCC within the next 50 years (53 percent of the total 50 
year demand). If the 212.4 million ton reserve of PCC-grade ag- 
gregate was used exclusviely for PCC, the supply would proba- 
bly last 32 years beyond 2034. 



ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF AGGREGATE 



Most of the P-C region has been classified MRZ-3. The por- 
tions of the MRZ-3 areas which are most likely to contain sand 
and gravel suitable for use in PCC are highlighted in the follow- 
ing paragraphs. 

Potential Sources Within 
15 Miles of Bakersfield 

Along the Kern River (Plates 5 and 6), there are terrace de- 
posits which are remnants of a floodplain developed by the river 
prior to its most recent change in base level. These terraces, 
higher than the Recent floodplain, exhibit a rolling surface due 
to dissection. They are most conspicuous on the north side of 
the river along Round Mountain Road and on both sides of the 
river between Rancheria Road and Hart Park. Several inactive 
aggregate mines are located in the terraces. The most easily ob- 
served is found along Round Mountain Road within Section 35 



T.28S., R.28E., where selective mining and scalping of gravel 
lenses has occurred. Selective mining is probably required here 
because the gravel layers are intermittent and seem fairly clayey 
(probably due to post- depositional weathering). Another poten- 
tial limitation on the usefulness of these deposits is that in some 
areas they may be just a veneer covering Tertiary formations 
(this is suggested by the outcrop pattern as mapped by Bartow, 
1984). For these reasons the terraces were not classified MRZ-2. 
However, with proper care and exploration, economic extraction 
might be undertaken. 

The Kern River Formation (Figure 5), which is of latest Mio- 
cene to Pleistocene (?) age, has also been exploited for sand and 
gravel. This predominantly coarse-grained and friable formation 
was deposited in fluvial and alluvial fan environments within or 
adjacent to the Kern River. It crops out in a 50-mile long belt 
from Caliente Creek to the vicinity of Terra Bella (Bartow and 
Pittman, 1983), as shown on Plate 3. It is thickest at its western 
edge where it is up to 1,600 feet thick (Bartow and Pittman, 1983). 



24 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



The most likely area to discover economic deposits of aggregate 
within the Kern River Formation is probably south of the Kern 
River and north of Breckenridge Highway. Elsewhere, sand- 
stone and siltstone interbeds become more significant. 

The Kern River Formation has some of the same shortcomings 
as the terrace deposits discussed previously. Weathering has 
softened the gravels and increased the clay content. Good gravel 
layers, once found, must be selectively mined to be economic 
(personal communication with Robert Jones, Kern Rock Com- 
pany). According to Goldman and Klein (1961), caliche layers 
and opaline or calcareous coatings are sometimes present, and 
"large-scale development requires detailed exploration to avoid 
unsuitable areas." However, mining has occurred from this for- 
mation; some operations having ceased only within the last few 
years. Sites of aggregate extraction from the Kern River Forma- 
tion include: Section 18/19 of T.29S., R.28E. (Oildale Quadran- 
gle—Plate 4); Section 1 of T.29S., R.28E, Sections 6 and 7 of 
T.29S., R29E. (Oil Center Quadrangle — Plate 5); and Sections 
9 and 10 of T.29S., R.29E. (Rio Bravo Quadrangle — Plate 6). 

Alluvial fans consisting of reworked Kern River Formation 
clasts are a third potential resource. An example is the fan mined 
by Kern Rock Company at James Road (Sector A). It was 
formed by an intermittent stream which drains a hilly area un- 
derlain by Kern River Formation. Due to the processes of ero- 
sion and transportation, the weathered rocks are broken up and 
carried away along with silt and clay from the original forma- 
tion. Thus, a cleaner and more concentrated deposit of gravel 
has been formed in the upper (proximal) portions of the fan. 

Unexplored fans similar to the one mined by Kern Rock 
Company at James Road exist between Niles Street and State 
Highway 58 (Oil Center and Lamont Quadrangles) and between 
Breckenridge Road and Highway 58 (Edison Quadrangle — for 
a more detailed geologic map of these areas see Bartow, 1984). 
Available water-well logs and geologic mapping for these quad- 
rangles indicate the need for detailed exploration to identify 
economic deposits. The younger fans are most likely to contain 
suitable aggregate material, but they have developed within and 
on a large blanket of the oldest alluvium mapped in the eastern 
San Joaquin Valley (four stages of alluviation have been differ- 
entiated spanning earliest Pleistocene through Recent time; 
Bartow, 1984). Care would have to be taken in an initial stage of 
exploration to delineate the younger deposits from the older. 

In addition to the Kern River Formation, one other Tertiary 
sedimentary unit — the Bena Gravel (Figure 5) — may provide 
suitable aggregate. It crops out in a long band which continues for 
more than 15 miles south of Bakersfield. The northernmost por- 
tion of this band is inside the P-C region, the rest is outside. This 
coarse-grained Miocene unit has been mapped and described as 
consisting of two facies which, together with a shale unit found 
in the subsurface, form a fan-delta complex. The alluvial fan fa- 
cies was observed in the field as consisting of rounded and hard 
gravel and cobbles in a matrix of sand and some silt. No delete- 
rious rock types were observed in outcrops near Breckenridge 
Highway, but Bartow and McDougall (1984) describe local ac- 
cumulations of laminated claystone and siltstone clasts. Because 
no mining has occurred from this formation, there is a signifi- 
cant need for testing to establish rock quality. The formation 
crops out in a south-southeast trending band of variable width 
from Cottonwood Creek to Highway 58. It then reappears at Co- 
manche Point, trending southeast to past the confluence of Tejon 
and Chanac creeks. A second coarse-grained unit known as the 
"unnamed conglomerate" (Figure 9) is found in small outcrops 
paralleling the front of the foothills from Tunis Creek south to 
Tecuya Creek and appears correlative with the Bena Gravel 
(Dibblee and Nilsen, 1973). At Liveoak Creek (Plate 15) this 
unit was observed to consist of hard cobbles and gravel. How- 



ever, clasts of serpentine were also evident, which may be prob- 
lematic because serpentine tends to be soft and/or brittle, 
exhibiting little rock strength. 

Potential Sources of Aggregate Located Greater 
Than 15 Miles from Bakersfield 

There are two areas at the south end of the San Joaquin Val- 
ley which appear promising for aggregate production, although 
the majority of both these areas are outside the P-C region. The 
first is the Tulare Formation west of the Kern Rock Company 
plant at Wheeler Ridge. The Tulare Formation actually extends 
the whole length of the San Emigdio Mountains and crops out 
again in Elk Hills (see map unit Qpt on Plate 3), but it becomes 
progressively finer-grained in the western portions. From 
Wheeler Ridge to San Emigdio Creek it is described as consist- 
ing predominantly of gravel, with an average thickness of 1 ,000 
feet (Dibblee, 1961). As described on page 13 for Sector G, 25 
to 35 percent of the gravel clasts inspected in stream cuts and 
cuts for oil pads between Kern Rock Company's Wheeler Ridge 
plant and the "wind gap" (see Plate 3) are weathered and soft, 
but perhaps this is just a phenomenon of surface weathering and 
does not extend to any depth. The topography does become 
steeper and more rugged as one moves higher and westward onto 
Wheeler Ridge. Building access roads and digging benches from 
which to mine might be a challenge in this situation. 

The second area of interest at the south end of the valley con- 
sists of the alluvial fans which blanket the mountain fronts from 
Pastoria Creek to Tecuya Creek. The streams which deposited 
these sediments drain fairly large areas of hard crystalline 
rocks, flowing through Tertiary sedimentary formations for the 
last mile(s) before reaching the valley. The hard rocks consist of 
hornblende gneiss, quartzite, biotite schist (metamorphic rocks), 
and granite, granodiorite, diorite and tonalite (plutonic rocks) 
(Ross, 1980). Where rock types such as biotite schist and sedi- 
mentary shale or chert are concentrated, the deposits may not be 
suitable for PCC-grade aggregate. An exploration program, how- 
ever, would probably locate areas within these fans sufficiently 
free of deleterious rock types. 

Potential Sand Sources 

Besides the potential sources of sand and gravel described in 
the previous pages, additional sand resources may be developed 
in the many medium- to coarse-grained Tertiary formations crop- 
ping out adjacent to the San Joaquin Valley margin (see Figure 5 
and 9). Both the San Emigdio Mountains and the Sierra Nevada 
foothills contain these formations, the most promising of which 
include the Walker and the Chanac/Santa Margarita formations. 
Both contain friable, coarse-grained, quartzose sandstone often 
in thick, massive beds. Unfortunately, both units were observed 
to contain interstitial clay and the Chanac Formation was ob- 
served to have clay coatings on the grains. This may not be true 
throughout the formations, but where present this clay would re- 
quire extra washing of the sand. The Santa Margarita Formation 
is being mined for PCC aggregate in Santa Cruz County near 
Felton and Davenport (Stinson, Manson and Plappert, 1983). 
However, there is some question in the geologic literature as to 
whether the rocks mapped as Santa Margarita in eastern Kern 
County are the same as those in the Coast Ranges (Addicott, 
1970). 

Alluvial sand is available in the Quaternary stream and fan 
deposits classified MRZ-3 within the P-C region. The most likely 
places to explore are just downstream of the MRZ-2 areas of 
Kern River, Caliente Wash, and San Emigdio Creek. 



1V88 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION. BAKERSIIELI) 



25 



r 



< 

z 



< 

O 



« 



Holocene 

and 
Pleistocene 



r 



Miocene 




Oligocene 



Eocene 



>- 

O. Of 



♦ Younger alluvium 

* Older alluvium 



* Tulare 
Formation 



Bitterwater Creek 
Shale 



Monterey 
Shale 



Unnamed 
Conglo- 
merate 




Plieto 
Formation 



Forma- 
tion 



San Emigdio 
Formation 



Tejon 
Formation 



Basement 



* Crops out within 
P-C Region 



Portions classified 
as MRZ-2 



Younger 
alluvium 

Older 

alluvium 

Tulare 
Formation 

Bitterwater 
Creek Shale 

Monterey 
Shale 

Unnamed 

Conglom- 
erate 

Temblor 
Formation 

Tecuya 
Formation 



Plieto 
Formation 

San Emigdio 
Formation 



Tejon 
Formation 



Deposited in stream channels, alluvial fans and lakes. 

As above and including landslide debris. 

Nonmarine sand & gravel deposited in alluvial fans; 
slightly consolidated. 

Marine siliceous mudstone. 
— Marine siliceous shale. 



Coarse unsorted granitic detritus in an arkosic matrix. 
Nonmarine. Time-correlative with Bena Gravelf?). 



•Marine sandstone and shale with a basal conglomer- 
atic sandstone. 

• Nonmarine mudstone, siltstone and pebbly conglom- 
erate with middle volcanic unit of basalt, and lesser 
andesite, dacite, agglomerates and tuffs (marine & 
nonmarine). 

• Marine sandstone with middle unit of shale in San 
Emigdio Canyon. 

■Marine medium to coarse-grained sandstone and 
conglomeratic sandstone with middle unit of shale in 
San Emigdio Canyon. 

•Marine sandstones and shales with some interbedded 
conglomerate and shale — divided into 4 members 
based on lithology. 



Basement — Granitic and gneissoid rocks, and Rand schist. 



After Nilsen and Dibblee, 1973 

and Nilsen, Dibblee and Addicott, 1973. 



Figure 9. Generalized columnar section of the southern margin of the San Joaquin Valley (San Emigdio Mountains). 



Potential Crushed Rock Aggregate 

Crushed rock might also be a source of aggregate, even 
though currently permitted reserves of alluvial sand and gravel 
are more than adequate to cover the forecasted 50-year demand 
for the P-C region. The crushed rock could be mixed with the 
alluvial sand which is present with a low percentage of gravel 
in sectors C and I. It might also be used with the potential sand 
sources discussed above. Basement rocks of the Sierra Nevada 
and Tehachapi mountains crop out along the eastern and south- 
ern side of the P-C region, and consist of tonalite, granodiorite, 
granite, gneiss, and metasedimentary rocks (Ross, 1980). Small 
outcrops of basalt are also present in the San Emigdio Mountains 
and in the vicinity of Caliente Creek, which may also be a suit- 
able crushed rock source. 



Potential Sources of PCC-Grade Aggregate 

Imported from Active Mines Outside the 

P-C Region 

PCC-grade aggregate could be obtained for use in the Bakers- 
field P-C Region from active mines outside the P-C region. 
However, the additional transport costs incurred by trucking 
aggregate from these other sites would increase the price of 
construction materials for the Bakersfield consumer beyond a 
competitive level with local supplies. Utilization of these depos- 
its by Bakersfield would cause supply problems in the marketing 
areas already being served by these mines. 

The closest deposits currently being mined are located on the 
Kaweah River (Tulare County 80 miles from Bakersfield) and 
near Avenal which is 85 miles from Bakersfield. This transport 
distance would lead to an increase of about $9.00 per ton in the 
delivered price of aggregate. 



26 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 147 



CONCLUSIONS 



Within the Bakersfield P-C Region, seven resource areas con- 
taining 10 sectors, divided into 54 subsectors, have been identi- 
fied. They contain nearly 5.3 billion tons of aggregate 
resources. 

Based upon available production data and population projec- 
tions, the Bakersfield P-C Region will need 201 million tons of 
aggregate during the next 50 years. Of this projected demand, 



approximately 53 percent (107 million tons) must be suitable for 
Portland cement concrete. At the end of 1984, approximately 
212.4 million tons of aggregate reserves existed within the P-C 
region. This exceeds the projected demand. If a major earth- 
quake were to affect the P-C region and necessitate reconstruc- 
tion, the depletion date of existing reserves could occur sooner. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The Division of Mines and Geology gratefully acknowledges 
the full cooperation of local government agencies, organiza- 
tions, and aggregate producers, all of whom provided informa- 
tion during the course of this study. Special thanks are extended 
to the Kern County Planning Department, City of Bakersfield 
Planning Department, California Public Utilities Commission, 



California Department of Transportation District 6, California 
Department of Water Resources, Bob Jones and Kern Rock 
Company, Jerry Malouf and Edison Sand Company, Bakersfield 
Ready Mix Company, Granite Construction Company, and Don 
Osborn, Cal/Mat. 



REFERENCES 



Addicott, W.O., 1970, Miocene gastropods and biostratigraphy of 
the Kern River area, California: U.S. Geological Survey, 
Professional Paper 642, 174 p. 

Anderson, IP., Loyd, R.C., Kiessling, E.W., Kohler, S.L., and Miller, 
R.V., 1979, Classification of sand and gravel resource areas, 
San Fernando Valley Production-Consumption Region: Califor- 
nia Division of Mines and Geology Special Report 143, Part I and 
II, 79 p. 

Bakersfield (CA) City, 1984, Land use and circulation element: 
Bakersfield Metropolitan Area General Plan. 

Bartow, J.A., 1984, Geologic map and cross-sections of the south- 
east margin of the San Joaquin Valley, California: U.S. Geolog- 
ical Survey, Miscellaneous Investigations Map 1—1946. 

Bartow, J.A. and McDougall, K., 1984, Tertiary stratigraphy of the 
southeast San Joaquin Valley, California, U.S. Geological 
Survey Bulletin 1529-J, 41 p. 

Bartow, J.A. and Piftman, G.M., 1983, The Kern River Formation, 
southeast San Joaquin Valley, California: U.S. Geological 
Survey Bulletin 1529-D, 17 p. 

California Department of Finance, 1983, Population projections 
for California counties 1980-2020, series E-150, Report 83-p-3. 

California Department of Transportation, 1981, Standard specifica- 
tions, p. 40-1 to 90-34. 

California Division of Mines and Geology, 1983, California surface 
mining and reclamation policies and procedures: California 
Division of Mines and Geology Special Publication 51, second 
revision, 38 p. 

California Office of Planning and Research, 1975, Urban expan- 
sion map, State of California, Map 4 of 8, scale 1:500,000. 

California Public Utilities Commission, 1984, Minimum rate tariff 
7-A, Item numbers 290, 330, 340, 370, and supplement 24, 
southern territory. 

Dale, R.H., French, J.J. and Gordon, G.V., 1966, Ground-water 
geology and hydrogeology of the Kern River alluvial-fan area, 
California: U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report, 92 p. 

Dibblee, T.W., 1961, Geologic structure of the San Emigdio Moun- 
tains, Kern County, California: Pacific Section, Society of 
Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists — Society of 
Economic Geophysicists - American Association of Petroleum 
Geologists Spring Fieldtrip Guidebook, 43 p. 

Dibblee, T.W and Nilsen, T.H., 1973, Geologic map of San Emigdio 
and western Tehachapi Mountains, Kern County, California: 
American Association of Petroleum Geologists Fieldtrip 
Guidebook. 



Dupras, D., 1985, Mineral land classification: aggregate materials 
in the Sacramento area: Division of Mines and Geology 
Special Report 156, 103 p. 

Goldman, H.B., 1962, Sand and gravel in Troxel, B.W. and Morton, 
P.K., Mines and Mineral Resources of Kern County, California: 
California Division of Mines and Geology County Report 7, 
p. 274-279. 

Goldman, H.B., 1964, Sand and gravel in California, Part C — 
southern California: California Division of Mines and Geology 
Bulletin 180-C, 58 p. 

Goldman, H.B. and Klein, I.E., 1961, Sand and gravel resources of 
the Kern River near Bakersfield, California: California Division 
of Mines and Geology Special Report 70, 32 p. 

Jennings, C.W. and Strand, R.G., compilers, 1969, Los Angeles 
Sheet geologic map of California: California Division of Mines 
and Geology, scale 1:250,000. 

Kern County, 1981, Population and housing report, (I960, 1970 
and 1980 census results), 31 p. 

Kern County, 1982, Land use, open space and conservation ele- 
ment — metropolitan priority area, west and east halves: Kern 
County General Plan. 

Nilsen, T.H., Dibblee, T.W, and Addicort, W.O., 1973, Lower and 
middle Tertiary stratigraphic units of the San Emigdio and west- 
ern Tehachapi Mountains, California: U.S. Geological Survey 
Bulletin 1372-H, 23 p. 

Ross, D.C., 1980, Reconnaissance geologic map of basement rocks 
of the southernmost Sierra Nevada: U.S. Geological Survey 
Open File Report 80-307, scale 1:250,000. 

Silva, M.A., Burnett, J.L., Rapp, J.S., and Cole, K., 1983, Mines and 
mineral producers active in California: California Division of 
Mines and Geology Special Publication 67, 62 p. 

Smith, A.R., compiler, 1964, Bakersfield sheet, geologic map of 
California: California Division of Mines and Geology, scale 
1:250,000. 

Stinson, M.C., Manson, M.W. and Plappert, J.J., 1983, Mineral land 
classification: aggregate materials in the San Francisco- 
Monterey Bay Area; Classification of aggregate resource 
areas Monterey Bay Production-Consumption Region: 
California Division of Mines and Geology Special Report 146, 
Part IV, 106 p. 

Wood, P.R. and Dale, R.H., 1964, Geologic and ground-water 
features of the Edison-Maricopa area, Kern County, California: 
U.S. Geological Survey Water Supply Paper 1656, 108 p. 



1988 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, BAK1KSI II I I) 



27 



APPENDIX 



Interim Criteria for Sectorization of MRZ-2 
Areas for Aggregate 

The purpose of seetorizing MRZ-2 areas is to provide a semi- 
quantified estimate of construction aggregate resources which 
are likely to be available to satisfy society's needs during the 
next 50 years. This estimate, when compared to DMG projected 
needs for the next half century, provides the context for commu- 
nities to plan for future resource availability in their land-use 
policies. The determination of sectors is intended for the use of 
the State Mining and Geology Board in identifying areas which 
are candidates for designation under SMARA. The development 
of sectors provides a perception of future mineral resource avail- 
ability in the face of future needs and also portrays where these 
available minerals are generally located. This information is dis- 
tributed by the Board to all affected lead agencies to provide 
them with the data necessary to plan for future resource availa- 
bility in their land-use policies. 

All areas within MRZ-2 classifications are sectorized if they 
have current land uses which are similar to those in areas which 
have undergone mineral extraction in the past. Areas within 
MRZ-2 classifications which have generally not been available 
for surface mining in the past for specified social or economic 
reasons are not sectorized. Since such areas are unlikely to be 
used for surface mining during the foreseeable future, their in- 
clusion in estimates of future resource availability would be 
misleading. 

The estimation of future mineral resource availability in sec- 
tors is not a precise analysis, but rather it is the best general esti- 
mate which can be made with the data presently available. Areas 
within and without sectors can be used for mining or other land 
uses at the discretion of local governments charged with respon- 
sibility for making land-use decisions. Establishment of sectors 
in no way infringes on this authority. Rather, it provides a per- 
ception of future mineral resource availabilities in the face of fu- 
ture needs and also portrays where these available minerals are 
generally located. 

The following criteria are used by the DMG in identifying 
mineral resource areas which are available for future use. These 
criteria, in conjunction with the geologic and geometric charac- 
teristics of specific mineral deposits are used in sectorizing 



MRZ-2 areas. Use of these criteria assure that sectors contain 
geologically homogeneous mineral deposits which, based upon 
current land use, will be available for future use. 

The following specific land uses are considered to be gener- 
ally incompatible with mining and have been excluded from sec- 
tored lands. Mineral resource areas containing land uses not 
specifically listed will be considered for sectorization. The cri- 
teria are to be applied only to lands classified MRZ-2. 

There are two general categories of exclusion: I) Economic 
Exclusion, and II) Social Exclusion. 

I) Economic Exclusion 

Specific excluded land uses: 

1 ) Residential areas 

2) Commercial areas with land improvements (buildings) 

3) Industrial areas (buildings and adjacent needed storage 
and parking facilities) 

4) Major public or private engineering projects: 

a) canals 

b) freeways 

c) bridges 

d) airports and associated developments such as 
parking lots 

e) dams 

f) railroads 

g) major pipelines 

h) major power transmission lines 

II) Social Exclusion 

Specific excluded land uses: 

1) Cemeteries 

2) Geologic Scientific Zones 

3) Public parks, developed historical sites and structures, 
and public recreation areas of all types 

4) Public or private schools, institutions, hospitals, and pris- 
ons, including adjacent grounds and related structures 

5) Military bases and reservations 



87 76205 






> 



m r- 
*3 > 
> CO 

r- <£ 
CO -n 



O 



DO 
> 

rn 

CO 



-p 

h 

rn 

o 

z 



CO 

"D 

Q 

*J 

"O 
O 

— j 

^1 



IN 2^ 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

BRIAN E. TUCKER, ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST 

■5 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA - GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY - GORDON VAN VLECK 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION - RANDALL M. WARD 



SPECIAL REPORT 147 
PLATE 1 




BAKERSFIELD PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION 

showing the P-C Region boundary, Urbanizing boundary 
and Resource Extraction sites 
KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 

by Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 



Urbanizing area (modified 

from O.P.R. I975 to reflect 
' subsequent growth and 
local lead agency plans). 

Location of currently active 
extraction site for 
PCC-grade aggregate. 

3500 

Currently active extraction site 
for mineral resources other than 
PCC-grade aggregate. 

Former extraction site for 
various aggregate commodities. 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

BRIAN E. TUCKER, ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA - GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY - GORDON VAN VLECK 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION - RANDALL M. WARD 






SPECIAL REPORT 147 
PLATE 2 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONES 



PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 

UC DAVIS 



MRZ-1 Areas wherf adequate information indicates 
that no significant mineral deposits are present, 
or where it is judged that little likelyhood exists 
for their presence. 



MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates 
that significant mineral deposits are present, or 
where it is judged that a high likelyhood exists 
for their presence. 



MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits, the 

significance of which cannot be evaluated from 
available data. 

See Plates 4-19 for official classification 
of quadrangles containing MRZ-2. 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION OF AGGREGATE RESOURCES 
IN THE BAKERSFIELD P-C REGION 

KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 

by Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 



..BfiECKENPIOGE j 
J MOL1N7AIN ' 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA - GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

BRIAN E. TUCKER, ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST 







DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

BRIAN E. TUCKER, ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA — GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY- GORDON VAN VLECK 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION -RANDALL M. WARD 



ho. \A1 



1- 



PHYSICAl SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 

UC DAVIS 

SPECIAL REPuki I47 
PLATE 3 



KINGS COUNTY j TULARE CO UNTY 

KERN COUNTY 



•-35°00 




GENERALIZED GEOLOGY 
OF THE BAKERSFIELD P-C REGION 

KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 

by 
Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 

10 MILES 



20 KILOMETERS 



EXPLANATION 

Alluvium * Sedimentarv Rocks 



Qa, Alluvium, stream, 
terrace, dune 
deposits. 



Basement Rocks 



Ql, Lake bed deposits. 
Qls, Landslide deposits. 



Qpt, Tulare Formation — 

Pleistocene fluvial and 
fan deposits of loosely 
consolidated gravel, 
sand, and silt. 

QPk, Kern River Formation-- 
Upper Miocene to 
Pleistocene fluvial sand- 
stone, conglomerate 
and siltstone, loosely 
consolidated. 

T, Eocene through Miocene 
Sandstone, Siltstone, 
conglomerate and shale; 
*also includes small 
outcrops of Miocene 
volcanic rocks. 



Mzb, Undivided plutonic 
rocks--mainly 
Tonalite and Grano- 
diorite and higher 
grade metamorphic 
rocks--mainly 
hornblende and 
biotite gneiss 
(Ross, 1980). 



m, Metasedimentary 
and metavolcanic 
rocks — mainly 
mica schist 
(Ross, 1980). 



LEGEND 

Geologic contact 

Fault (dashed where uncertain, dotted where concealed). 

Thrust Fault (barbs on upper plate, dashed where uncertain, 
dotted where concealed). 

Production-Consumption Region Boundary 



30' 

-4- 



45' 
-r- 



119° 00' 
1 






STATE OF CALIFORNIA -GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 




« 

*. * 



L 

TOPOGRAPHIC BASE MAP BY U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



SAND & GRAVEL 
( MRZ-2 1 



EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 

AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Bo Lindanes established from dam supplied b v the Office or Planmnt 

PfiOOUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNOARY 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 

judged thai little likelihood e.isfs tor their presence 
Areas where adequate information indicates ihai sigrnfi. 
cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is nidged 
that a high likelihood lor their presence exists. 
Arees containing mineral deposits the significance Of 



mailable information is medeq 
V other MRZ zone 

a.planalion ol MRZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4. SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19, 1987 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA -GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 







MRZ-3 






•• • 



L ? 



; 




» 

.... 







EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaoes established from data suppbed by the Olfice ol Planning 
and Hssesrcn with modifications developed liom information sup- 





(see text lor discussion) 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 


SAND & GRAVEL 






MfiZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 


V ^ 




y^ ^s. 


ludged that little likelihood ski Mi tor rheir presence 


/ \ 


MflZ-J Areas where adequate information indicates thai signifi- 


( MRZ-2 ) 


cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is judged 


v y 


MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance Ol 


v *\ 


which cannot be evaluated Irom available date. 




MRZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate for as- 




signment to any other MRZ zone 




See text lor additional explanation ol MRZ Symbols. 



I 

N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19, 1987 



/ 



— • SS c 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-G 



IKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 



RIO BRAVO RAI 



. 



n 




MRZ-3 










MRZ-3 






# 



EXPLANATION 

Oi.ll hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Horn data supplied by the Office of Pfenning 
and Research with modifications developed from information sup- 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
Isee le*l (or discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 


MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates 


V ^ 




S^ \ 




X A 


MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates 


( MR2-2 J 


that a high likelihood for then presence ems 


V y 


MftZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the sign 


V — * 


which cannot be evaluated from available da 




MRZ-4 Areas where available mformelron is >nedeq 




stgnment to any other MRZ zone 




See texi for additional explanation ot MRZ Symbols 



N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOaST JUNE 19. 1987 




EXPLANATION 



_ _ OUTER BOUNDAflr OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
ANO LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries established fiom dafa supplied by the Office of Planning 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates ibai no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits are present. or where it is 
judged that little livelihood exists lot their presence 

MRZ-2 Aieas where adequate information indicates that signifi- 
cant mineral deposits are present, or where il is lodged 
that a high likelihood lor then presence exists 

MftZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance of 
which cannot be evaluated from available data 

signment to any other MRZ *ono 



I 

N 






n of MRZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenhelt Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19. 1987 



^Z § i 




= OF CALIFORNIA -UEORGE OEUKMEJfAN. 



EDISON QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL AEPORT 14) PLATE 



r 



~i 




EXPLANATION 



OU1ER eOUNOARY OF AREAS SUBJECT T( 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries established liom data supplied by ! 
and Research with modiiications developed li 



URBANIZATION 
e Office of Plannim 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 



SAND & GRAVEL 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




ning mineral deposits the signifie 

available information is madeQuat 
any oiher MRZ zone. 

il explanation of MRZ SymbOlB 



! 

N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenhelt Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19. 1987 






£3 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIA 




MRZ-3 



.^. 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Soundaoes established from data supplied by the Office of Planning 
,],■„.] R^v*, : i, ----- 1 1* -■ rr,,, .],!,.- ,11.0ns developed from information sup- 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 



SAND & GRAVEL 



( MRZ-2 J 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 
MRZ-i Areas where adequate information mi 



I 

N 



eral deposits 
gh likelihood I 



information indi 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19, 1967 



5H; 




STATE OF CALIFQRNIA-GEOHGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 



L REPOflT H7 PLATE 10 







EXPLANATION 



9^ E ,",.?P T U i'P A 5 V 0F A " £AS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundanes esiabhsbed Iron, dan iopphed by .he Ollrce ol Plannm, 
Id hi I modifications developed from .nformaiidn sup 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNOARY 



SAND S GRAVEL 




rllNERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



signmeni ro an V older MRZ lone 
l Idr addniorial e-planalion ol MRZ Sym 



I 

N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenhelt Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19. 1987 



i 0= [ 








SAND 8 GRAVEL 
( MRZ-2 1 



EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
ANO LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom data supplied by the Office of Plannin; 
and Research with modilications developed tram infotmalion sup 
plied by local government and other source; 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see ten lot discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits are present, or where it is 
ludged that little likelihood exists for their presence 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate intormation indicates that sigmfi- 



N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19, 1987 



23 
25. 



/^$k\ 



STATE OF CALIFOflNlA-GEOROE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 




CLE REST PEAK 
SPECIAL AEF 



QUADRANGLE jf 

1RTM7 PLATE 12 



; r 



■Ji 



P BY US GEOLOGIC 






SAND & GRAVEL 



EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF ARCAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
ANO LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from data supplied by Ihe Ollice ol Plenmn, 
and Research with modifications developed liom .ntormatior. sup 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




ir MRZ zone 

ation ol MRZ Symbols 



I 

N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenhel! Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19. 1987 



§2 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA -GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from dale supplied by the OMice of Planning 
and Research with modifications developed from information sup- 





(see text lor discussion! 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 


1 


SAND & GRAVEL 


MHZ ■ i Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 


N 


f MRZ-2 J 


ludged that little likelihood emsts lo' their presence 
MRZ-2 Areas whore adequate mlormBtion indicates lhat sigmli- 

that b high likelihood tor their presence exists, 
MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance of 

MRZ-4 Areas where available information il inadequate tor as- 
signment to any other MRZ zone 


1 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 
By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19. 19B7 



See text lor additional e-planatinn o! MHZ Sym 



~3i 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA- GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 







: ^a_: 



EXPLANATION 



Drill ho'e 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF A _ _ 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

is established from daia supplied bv ihe Office ol Planning 



SAND & GRAVEL 



S SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
Uh ANtA CLASSIF' — 

isiablished from dsi 

and Research wiih modifications developed U 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 







N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19, 1987 







STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 



PASTORIA CREEK QUADRANGLE -V 






■J 



EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 

AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom dam supplied by the Olhce of Planning 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 



j*\ ~"*v judged that little likelihood exists lor then presence 

f ^ MR2-2 Arees where adequate inlormalion indicates thai signili- 

[ MRZ-2 J 



MRZ- 
MRZ-4 Ai 



ming mineral deposits ihe significance 
1 be evaluated Irom available data 
available information is inadequate lor , 
ignment 10 any other MRZ /one 



I 

N 



See tent lot additional eiolenanon ol MRZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4. SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOQST JUNE 19. 1987 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNOARY OF AREAS SUBJECT T 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries established Irom date supplied b y the C 
and Resea'Ch with modifications developed Irom 



URBANIZATION 

ol Planning 



SAND & GRAVEL 




PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 
MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates tna 
udged ihat little likelihood exists for then presi 



MRZ-2 



high 



nmg mine 


nformation 
nlormalion 


ndicates (hat sigmti- 
r where it is |udged 

tha significance ol 


available 


s inadequate lor as- 



N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19, 1987 



S3 






BEAR MOUNT 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 




I REPORT 147 PLATE 17 



GRANITE CONSTRUCTION CO 



MR2-2 

(aggregate for asphalt) 



TOPOGRAPHIC BASE MAP BY U S GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 

AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

BourxlBr.es established Irom da la supplied by Ihe Ollice ol Planmni 
and Research vviifi modifications developed Irom information sup 



SAND & GRAVEL 



PfiODUCTIONCONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see lent lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




I 

N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 
Judy Wiedenhett Cole 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19, 19B7 



£2 



eo«i< 



C~S 




- CAUFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 



TAFT QU; I 



' 

1 






n 
i 








; 








'-' 


! ' 








s - 






MRZ-2 

(road base gnd subbase) 

/GENERAL PRODUCTION SERVICES INC. 



I 






EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 

AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries eslabhshed liom dale supplied by (he OINce ol Plannmt 



SAND S GRAVEL 




and Research with modifications developed Irom inlorn 


.«.„ w 




PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNOARY 
(see te.t for discussion) 




| 


MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




f 


MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates <hc 
MRZ-2 Areas where adequate mlormation indicates the 


I no sig- 


N 
| 


"■7 aTgTl'l^ihood lo." .hi," p^esen^e'-Vs ' 




1 


MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the lignifie 
MRZ-4 Areas where available mlormation is madequal 


ance o! 




a lor as- 




See lent to. additional e.ptanat-on ol MRZ Symbols 







MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenhetl Cole 

1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19. 1987 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries esiablished dom data supplied by the Olfice ol Planning 
and Research with modifications developed from information sop- 





(see re 


XI for docuMion) 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 


SAND & GRAVEL 


MRZ-1 


Areas where adequate information indicates the 


A^ 


MRZ-: 


ludgad thai nine likelihood exists lot their prese 


( MRZ-2 ) 


MRZ-3 


thai a high likelihood lor their presence exists 

which cannot be evaluated from available data 
Areas where available mlormaiion is tnedequat 
signment lo any other MRZ zone 




Seete 


1 lor additional explanation ot MRZ Symbols 



I 

N 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Bakerstield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1967 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19, 1987 




SECTOR C-4 
SECTOR C-14 : 
SECTOR CMSj^Vl 



-SECTOR C- 



' l: | I i: 

SECTOR C-1.8 
-^ / ■ ■ \ U 





EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PROOUCTION-CONSUMPTlON REGION BOUNDARY 
ANO OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SU8JECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 
Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenhett Cole 
1987 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



9ha-<a-V - 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19.1987 







STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 



OIL CENTER QUADRANGLE -V 

SPECIAL REPORT 1*7 PLATE 21 ^ 



-i 



" 1 





EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
AND OUTER BOUNOARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19,1987 



£3 

— ■ §5 < 







1 



0> 













y 



^ 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PROfn i!" HON I ONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
6oundar.es established liom dale supplied by the Ollici 
Research wilfl modification:, developed I 






n supplied by Ic 



il gove 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 
Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1967 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

Du^-^JC. — \^c^— 

ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19.1967 



£3 



r:s 








EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries established liom data supplied by the Ollic 
Planning and Research with modifications developed 
mloitnation supplied by 'oeal government and other source 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



ACTING STAR-: r.tOLOLiST ,.' JNf 1'IMH 



CO «r - 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE C 




EDISON QUADRANGLE 



w 



;r 






n 








EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION. CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION ANO LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Bouridaiies established Irom dale supplied by the OHir 
Planning and Research wiili niodilicalions deviflupoi) 
information supplied by local government and other source 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenhelt Cole 
1987 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



5lAfl-t/ \ E K~<L^— 

ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19.1997 



■ S £ 




I OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 





EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTIONCONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenhett Cole 
1987 



PREPAREO IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



£)uj3-<^Jv- - 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19,1987 



5 = 5 





SECTOR J-1 






. ' " 



J 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 
Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



£utf-u_X- - 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19.1987 



£3 

5ii ; 




-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 



CONNER SW QUADRAN 



i 





EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

Bakersfield P-C Region 

By 

Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



9ui3L^— X~ - 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19,1987 



/ 







GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 




NOT IN SECTOR 



SECTOR E-1 










I 






2 o~< 



\- ; 







EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION RKCION BOUNOARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



9uA^_Jy- - 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19,1987 



EG 



co -a: • 

, oe t 

!= CO . 




ETTLER QUADRANGLE 





EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT Of AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries established Itom dais supplied by the t 
Planning and Research with modilicalions develop 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 
Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenhett Cole 
1987 



PREPAREO IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975. ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



£>ia" l -"*-V- - 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19.1987 



















JS GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 








EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION CONSUMPTIC 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY 
UH8ANIZATION AND LIMIT 



N REGION BOUNOARY 
; AREAS SUBJECT TO 
OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

data supplied by the Ollice ot 
h modi lie aliens developed Irom 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 
Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenhefl Cole 
1987 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



3uA-o—-y 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19.19B7 




SECTOR H-1 



F^ 5 j) 











EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



PRODUCTION CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNOARY 
AND OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO 
URBANIZATION AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries established Irom d»ta supplied by the Olhce ol 
Planning and Research wiih mod ideations developed Irom 
information supplied by local government and othef sources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

Bakersfield P-C Region 



Judy Wiedenheft Cole 
1987 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



9uju^_\- - 



ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST JUNE 19.1987 



STATE 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

BRIAN E. TUCKER, ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST 



TN2fr 

OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR CA- 
THIE RESOURCES AGENCY — GORDON K. VAN VLECK ^i ^rj 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATI ON -RANDALL M. WARD, DIRECTOR pig-tc 32 



SPECIAL REPORT 147 
PLATE 32 



PHYSICAL SCIENCES 



A' 



500 - 



300 J 




500 



L 300 



500 



300 




UC DAVIS 



c.gr 



Small Alluvial Fan Southwest 
of James Road - transverse section 



Kern River Alluvial Fan and Floodplain 
transverse section 



/ c 



600'- 
400' - 




F^V-I 


/ 


o 
? 


b° 

o 


/ 


200' - 




_£_2J— -t§= 




* 


gr -1- < -- 

c.gr 


Era 

f.gr/ 















o 1 -1 










f.gr 






600 



400 



200 



u 



EXPLANATION 

Predominantly fine-grained deposits (sandy clay, 
silt or clay). 

Predominantly sand-sized grains (fine-to medium- 
grained or well graded sand; gravel not present). 

Predominantly coarse-grained deposits (gravel, 
sand & gravel or coarse sand). 

bd — Coarse-grained deposits where boulders are also 
described in well logs. 

QTu — Kern River Formation of Upper Miocene 
through Pleistocene age. 

Deposits classified MRZ-2. 



f.gr 

sd 

c.gr 



Kern River Alluvial Fan - longitudinal section 



II 



— Indicates approximate depth and location of water well. 
Wavy cross-arm denotes bottom of well log below depth 
of cross-section. 

Indicates approximate location of lithologic or geologic 
contact; dashed where inferred. 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION OF AGGREGATE RESOURCES IN THE BAKERSFIELD P-C REGION 

GENERALIZED GEOLOGIC CROSS-SECTIONS OF A-A\ B-B" AND D-D" 

by 
Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 



400'-! 



VERTICAL 
EXAGGERATION 
10:1 



2000' 4000 - 



TN 2^ 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

BRIAN E. TUCKER, ACTING STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA- GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR Cb 



THE RESOURCES AGENCY — GORDON K. VAN VLECK 



ho 



147 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION -RANDALL M.WARD, DIRECTOR n\ ate. 3 



SPECIAL REPORT 147 
PLATE 33 



700 -, 




UC DAVIS 



500 " 



100 -> 



■700 



-500 



-300 



u 100 



Kern River Floodplain and Channel 



EXPLANATION 




100 



f.gr 
sd 

c.gr 

bd 



L 100 



400' 



200' 



Alluvial Fan of San Emigdio Creek 



VERTICAL 
EXAGGERATION 
10:1 



2000' 4000' 




Predominantly fine-grained deposits (sandy clay.silt or clay) 

Predominantly sand-sized grains (fine-to medium-grained or 
well graded sand; gravel not present). 

Predominantly coarse-grained deposits (gravel, 
sand & gravel or coarse sand). 

Coarse-grained deposits where boulders are also described 
in well logs. 

Indicates approximate location of lithologic or geologic contact; dashed where inferred. 

Deposits classified MRZ-2. 

Indicates approximate depth and location of water well. Wavy 
cross-arm denotes bottom of well log below depth of cross-section. 



900' 



700 



500' -I 




•- 500 



Alluvial Fan of Grapevine and Tecuya Creeks 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION OF AGGREGATE RESOURCES 
IN THE BAKERSFIELD P-C REGION 

GENERALIZED CROSS-SECTIONS C-C", E-E' AND F-F 

by 
Judy Wiedenheft Cole 

1987 



I 



mw