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Full text of "Specimen florae Americae Septentrionalis Cryptogamicae; sistens: Muscos hepaticos huc usque in Am. Sept. observatos. Or: Specimen of a systematic arrangement and description of the cryptogamous plants of North America; comprising a diagnostic description of all the hepatic mosses hitherto observed in North America; with ampler descriptions of a number of new species"

FLORAE AMERICAE SEPTENTRIONALIS 
( RYPTOGAMICAE; 



MUSCOS HEPATICOS 

Hue usque in Am. Sept. observatos. 

v or: 

SPECIMEN OF A SYSTEMATIC ARRANGEMENT AND 
DESCRIPTION OF THE 

OF NORTH-AMERICA : 

COaiPBISIIfQ A DIAGNOSTIC DESCRIPTION OF ALL THE 

HEPATIC MOSSES 

Hitherto observed in North-America ; with ampler descriptions of a 
number of new species. 

» - 
BY LEWIS D. DE SCHWEINIZ, D. P. 



RALEIGH: 

rKINTED BY J. GALES. 

1821. 



I 



PREFACE. 



THE AUTHOR of this little Work has, for a number of years, 
made the study of the Cryptogamous Plants of America the assiduous 
object of his leisure hours. He has succeeded in collecting a very 
considerable number in every division of these interesting, but gene- 
rally minute plants, almost exclusively from the vicinity of his resi- 
dence 5 but has not hitherto, with a very few exceptions, been able to 
elicit from other friends of the science any considerable number of 
contributions. This is entirely owing, as he feels assured, to the 
circumstance, that, excepting the late Dr. Muhlenberg, no American 
Botanist appears to have devoted much of his attention to this branch 
of the Science : while the want of a Systematic Synopsis of what has 
hitherto been observed and published, proves a great impediment and 
discouragement in taking it up, as a variety of expensive works must 
he procured, in order even to make the attempt. Conceiving it might 
facilitate the execution of a plan he has for some time entertained, of 
at length effecting the publication of a systematic arrangement of the 
Cryptogamous Plants of North- America, in the manner of Pursh's 
Flora of the Phanerogamous ones, he lias determined to give to the 
public the present sheet, as a specimen of such a Work ; and has 
selected the smallest among its divisions for the purpose, in order, at 
the same time, to render this specimen useful, by its comprising a 
whole order or class of Cryptogamous Plants. 

His intention chiefly is, thereby to make known his Plan, and to 
solicit all those who feel an interest in the success thereof, to furnish 
him with specimens of every kind from their respective vicinities. 
Such is the number of plants of this description, which he has indivi- 
dually met with, in his confined situation, that there can be no doubt 
of a much greater number still unobserved, in the immense extent of 
our country, and its variety of climates. Although true of every 
class of Cryptogamous vegetation, this is peculiarly the case with 
respect to the Fungi, which have been a particular object of the Au- 
thor's attention. The number of these, already observed by him, in 
the western part of North-Carolina, approaches very near 1600 spe- 
cies, comprising more than 400 species not before known. Next 
to the Fungi, the Lichens appear numerous, and least known ; as he 
has determined a good number not heretofore described at all, and a 
very considerable number not before observed in America. The 
Mosses, both frondose and hepatic, seem to have been a little more 
attended to ; but, notwithstanding, there is every reason to believe, 
that our northern and southern mountains, and probably our southern 
swamps, still contain a great number of non-descripts. Before even 



;i Prodromus of an American Cryptogamous Flora can be attempted, 
it will therefore be nercessary to ascertain from the different regions 
of our continent, what are the treasures it contains — and the Author 
most earnestly and respectfully requests to be favoured with informa- 
tion and specimens from every quarter, in order to effect that object. 
A considerable collection of European specimens, determined by the 
hest German Cryptogamists, an adequate collection of Books on most 
of tin 1 (lasses, and a pretty intimate acquaintance, especially with 
the Fungi of Europe, together with excellent instruments, have 
greatly assisted him in the exertions he has hitherto made — and he 
flatters himself, that those botanical friends, who have applied to him 
for communication of specimens, have been in some degree satisfied, 
by what he has been enabled to send them. The present work is 
destined to call the attention of Botanists to the subject; and if this 
should be effected, the Author will, with pleasure, from a conciousness 
of its unavoidable imperfections, consign it to oblivion. He has, 
however, been fortunate enough, to obtain specimens of almost every 
single hepatic moss hitherto noticed as indigenous to America, and to 
augment the number considerahly, so that he entertains a hope, that 
the present sheet may prove useful, as far as it goes, in the determi- 
nation of this class of Cryptogamous vegetables. 

It only remains for him to state, that the Musci Hepatici are ar- 
ranged according to Dr. F. Weber s Historia Muscorum Hepaticorum, 
Kiel 1815 ; that he has carefully compared them with European spe- 
cimens, of which his collection contains the greater part ; and that 
he has not ventured to establish a new species, unless absolutely con- 
vinced of its specific difference. The explanation of the signs and 
abbreviations made use of, will enable the Botanist to judge, what 
degree of confidence is due to the Author's determinations. 

Besides the Work of Dr. Weber just cited, reference has been had 
throughout to Dr. Schwagcrichcn's Prodrom. Hist. Muse. Hepatic ; 
to Michaux Flora Am. Borealis ; to Dr. Muhlenberg's Catalogue: 
to the Catalogue of New-York Plants, published by Dr. Torry ; and, 
in some instances, to Dr. Roth's Flora Germanica. the descriptions 
of the latter being particularly ample. Unfortunately, the Author 
has not been able to procure Hooker's Monography of the Jungerma- 
nias ; nor English Botany of Sowerby : so that he was under the 
necessity of contenting himself with Weber's citations from these. 

Ardently hoping that his attempt will be acceptable to American 
Botanists, notwithstanding its manifest imperfections; and that it 
may prove the means of doing them away in a future more compre- 
hensive work, by eliciting the necessary corrections and information. 
the Author respectfully subscribes himself, 

LEWIS D. DE SCHWEINITZ. 

Salem, Stokes County, North -Carolina. 







EXPLANATION OF MARKS, $c. 



v. r. Signifies that American specimens have been examined by 
the Author in a fresh state. 

r. s. That they have been examined in a dry state, or only revi- 
vified. 

Coll. Europ. That the American specimens have been compared 
with European ones. 

* An aster icus signifies that the species has not before been ob- 
served in America. 

f That the species is exclusively American. 

\ That the species has been named by the Author as a new one. 

§ Before the number of the species, signifies that it is found about 
Salem. 



6 



ESSENTIAL CHARACTERS 

OF 

THE GEXEBA OF MUSCI IIEPATIC1. 



1. Juxgermaxxia. Theca quadrivalvis, nuda, setae nnposita. 
Semixum elateres lineares. 

2. Marchaxtia. Thecae membranaceac, apice dethiscentes, 
rcconditae in receptaculo comiuii pedunculato. Semixum elateres 
eapillares. 

3. Targioxia. Theca subunivalvis. Calyx bivalvis. Semi- 
vim elateres nulli. 

4. Spiiaerocarpus. Theca globosa. Calyx inagnus univalvis, 
apice perforatus. 

5. Axthoceros. Theca bivalvis linearis. Semixum elaterer 
rompressi. Calyx vaginalis. 

6. Blasia. Theca univalvis. Semixum elateres nulli. Thec* 
tubo extrorsum coronata apice biante. 

". Riccia. Theca frondi immersa, univalvis. 



This Work contains. 
3 species of Juxgermaxxia, 



6 


a 


of Marchaxtia, 


1 


a 


of Targioxia, 


1 


a 


Of SrilAEROCARPUS, 


5 


(6 


of Anthoceros, 


1 


a 


of Blasia, 


4 


\i 


of Riccia, 



pedes of Hepatics. of whom 



* 30, 


i s> 


i 9 


* h 




t 3 


* I, 


t»» 


t 1 


* h 






* 2, 


*2. 


t E 


* 1, 






* 1, 


ih 




• 37, 


to, 


t 15 



• 



The great number of species of Junzermannias, ivul render a conspectus 
of the subdivisions useful for the purposes of examination. Then- 
arc divided into, 



JUNGERMANNIAE : 

I. CAULESCENTES 

f Stipulatae : 

a. triplicitcr : 

b. simpliciter: 

* Foliis auriculatis : 

** Foliis non-auriculatis : 
J. Integris : 

1. Stipulis bifidis v. bilobis: 

2. Stipes integris. 
B. Divisis: 

1. Emarginato-bidentatis. 

2. Tri-quadridenticulatis : 

3. Stipulis bipartitis (no Am. species.) 

\JSTon~ Stipulatae: 

a. Foliis auriculatis : 

b. Foliis non-auriculatis : 

* Integris : 

Jl. Integerrimis : 
B. Dentatis : 
** Divisis: 

d. Bilobis bifidisve: 

1. Integerrimis: 

2. Margine dentatis serratis : 

B. Inaequaliter tridentalis vel apice, tri- 
quadri-vel quinque lidis. 

0. ACAUL&S. 



W( SCI UKIWTICI 



I. J1 NGERMAXXIA (Kupp) LltlU. 
I. CAULEgCENTES : 
\ STIPUULTAE : 

a. Stipuws oiidim; triplici: 

1. 1. CAUJLE PROCUMBENTE BIPINNATO. FoLIIS DIS- Platyj 
T1CHIS, IMIiUK ATls, si BllOTl'MMS, OBTUSIS, VIPU- Llfl « 
LIS l.NTKCKKIIl.MIS TERNIS. V. V. Coll. Europ. ScJiWg, 
i). 13. Weber, p. 15. N. lurk Cat. p. B4. JIuhl. Cat. 
u. 20. Mx. p. 279. 

Common on the bark of living trees, especially Carpi- 
oqp, in bottoms. 

; 2. I. CAULE PROCUMBENTE, BI-VEL TEIPINNATOj ¥o-J J lat !: 
His IMBRICATIS, FORNICATIS, SUBROTUNDO-Q.UADBA- *o«. 
TIS. StIPULIS TERMS, SUBAEQUAXIBrS, INTEUEKRI- 

iiis. v. v. * '■ Aii Lichenastrom Dill. p. 495, ap. 

AVcb. p. 118. 

The distinguishing- characteristics of this species are so 
constant, that I can entertain no doubt of its specific dif- 
ference from the former. It is larger in all its parts, and 
of a yellowish green color, tinged with brown ; almost 
always found on rocks; the branches are very often tri- 
pinnate, almost at right angles, and not so much inclined 
to curl upwards ; towards the ends, they arc always iu- 
crassate and fornicate. The Leaves almost quadrate, 
with their margins inllexed in a dry state. The ternate 
STTPTTLAE are nearly equal and obliquely imbricate, con 
cave when dry. with the margins bent in. The C alv\ is 
large, somewhat bullate, trifid, the Iaeiniac ovate entire, 
or with few teeth. The SETA nfuch longer than in the 
former. 

This is frequent here, and has been sent to me besides 
from New- York by Dr. Torrey. 

V s ) 3. I. CAUIJB DIFILSO, RAHOSO, SIMPUCITEE I'lWATO. Ih 
PIKlfIS LAXI8, PoLiia won IMBRICATI8, 3UBDI8TANTJ- Nobis. 
BUS, ALTERXAHTIBT7S, STUM Lis MINUTI8, ROTUND IS, 
[HTEGRIS, DISTANTIBU8. V. V. * | 

Although this handsome species is something allied to 
Pqrbxla, it cannot be confounded with i*. It is of a re 



10 



Ml M 1 HLPATK'I, 



markably thin texture, often three incHi mreadrng 

its mostly simply pirate bran* lies diffusely, occurring near 
the roots of trees, that are often under water and mi vrei 
rocks, in (louse tufts. The uATEs are unc;' imbricate, 
often a little distant, and generally alternate, obliquely 
ovate, (resembling in shape an car,) undulated slightly in 
the margin, and, when dry, much inflected. The stipu- 
lae are small, roundish, the middle one much larger than 
the two lateral ones ; obliquely arranged, and so distant, 
that the naked caulis appears between the pairs or threes. 
Calyx distichous, imbricate, stipitate, compressedly cylin 
drical. 

The' color is generally a dark green. 

§4. I. CAILE FLTITANTE, IRREGL'LARITER RAMOS* TIN 
NATO. FoiIIS SUBIMBRICATIS, M UUSCULIS, OVALIBUS 

obtusis. Stipulis integerrimis. v. r. f coll. Spe- 
cial, a Dr. Sckwagerichen, Weber, p. 17. Schwg. p. 32. 
Porclla pinna ta 9 Muhl. Cat. n. 2. 

Common here, particularly in the ripples of brooks, 
floating. The color of the broad leaves is a blackish blue : 
they are thin and flat. Dv. Torrey has sent me speci- 
mens, although it is not in New-York catalogue. 

The calyx and seta are said by Dickson to be as in the 
former ones. No botanist, except he and Dillenius, has 
however seen them. With us it is always sterile. 



Tamariscifc' 

Ha. 

Schmidt] 



b. Stipulis ordine simplici. 

# FOLIIS INFERXE ATJRICULATIS. 

§ 5. I. CATJLE REPENTE PINNATO. FoLIIS DISTI4 

OBTUSIS IXTEGERRIMIS $ AURICULIS FORNICATIS ', STI- 
PULIS MINUTIS INTEGERRIMIS BIFIDIS, CALTX TRI- 
GONES, TRIFIDUS PAPIXLOSUS. V. v. Coll. Europ. Weber. 

p. 20. Schwg. p. 14. Dilatata of many, for in*. 

Hooker, Fasc. I. t. 5. Muhl. Cat. n. .16. New-ftirl 

Cat. n. 7. 

On trees and rocks, often of a dark brown purple. 

N. B. Between this and the next, there exists an almosi 
inexplicable confusion among authors. A great numbei 
call them vice versa. I have adopted Weber's distill 
tions. 



MUSCI HEPATIlL li 

I. « U IT', IMPLr.Di: KEPENTK, si'BPi \ \ ;'iO. FoLIIS Dilates 
BI8TICHI8, OBTVUSf IftTBGBIB, AlKH l l,\i: l.ono AL- Wthtr 
TKBO CLVVITO, ALTEKO MI.MMO AUT NTLLO. STIIT- 
LI8 MAJOBIBU8, Hli'llll*. tBBRATlB, PKU-ERTIM (\ 
LICIHIS. CALYX TRIGOBI -\ TKIF1DUS, LAKVIS. X\ V. 

('■!'. i.urop. Weker, pu CI. ScJiwg, p. 14. Tumarisci 

of many, for instance Hooker Fasc. 1. t. 6. •MuhL Cat. 

n. 15?* N. York Cat n. 10? 

More common on trees. A \ht handsome elegantly 
green variety ocean in large tufts, on rocks. Micfaaux 
Tamarisi':. p. 279. The color varies much; often almost 
black. 

§7. I. CAULIBUS BEPENTIBUS, FILIFORMIBCS, VAGE Strpglhfciia. 
PIKMATI8, BREVIUSCULIS. FOLIIS IMBRICATIS, AU- Dick " 
BJCULATIS, LOBIS INAKQUALIBUS ; SUPERIORIBUS MA- 
JORIBUS, BASI SUBTU5 VEXTRICOSIS : I NT ERIORIBUS 
:IINUTIS. STIPULIS HOTUNDATIS, ACUTE ET PRO- 

funde bifidis. v. v. Coll. Europ. * Dick?* Fasc. IV. 
p. 19. Hooker, Fasc. XI. t. 52. Weber, p. 121. 

Common among mosses on wet rocks — very elegantly, 
but irregularly pinnate, brittle, and of a beautiful green 
color. I have not found it in fructification. 

B. FOLIIS NO* AUR1CULATIS. 

A. Integris: 

1. STIPULIS BIFIDIS VEL BILOB1S. 

I. CAULE AESCENDENTE, SUBRAMOSO. FoLIIS etT - rdlfunrn 
BROTUNDIS, INTEGERRIMIS OBTUSIS STIPULIS OBTUSIS, Ehrhar 
BIFIDIS, LACIMIS ACUTIS, EVANIDIS. V. V. Coll. EtL- 

,). * Jf'cber. p. 28. Seine g. p. 16. 

In wet sphagrous places, creeping about,* sometimes 
floating in the water. 

My Salem specimens have been pronounced to belong 
:o this species by several excellent European botanists; 
and agree perfectly with European specimens received 
from Dr. S pre n gel : but the stipules are so indistinct, that 
{ should otherwise have hesitated, and conceived this to 
belong to another subdivision of the genus. 

.'. I. EOI.IIS IZIBRICATIS, STJBROTUNDIS, INTECERRI- Trichoma*** 
; STIPULIS SUBROTUNDIS BILOBIS, LOBIS OBTU- I> 

. r. s. fr. Pennsylvania. Coll. Europ. Jl'cber. p. 28. 
Schrwgr. p. 16. Mulil. Cut. n. 6. 

On moist earth in woods. I have not yet found this 
species here n+ Salem. It keeps close to the earth. 



12 



Ml Ml llEPATICI. 



Transversa- 



Swarz. 



t'lyptuta. 
Nobis. 



Uidentuta, 
Linn. 



Trilobata. 

Web. 



:J SiTPULIS INTEGRIS. 
V) 10. 1, CAULE Rlll'l'.NTE, SUBRAMOSO. FoLIIS IMBRt- 
<A IIS, OBIIQUE OVATIS, OBTUSIS, BASI SUBTUS COM- 
PLICATI8. STIPULIS RENIFORMI-SUBROTUNDIS, MAR- 
pINE inflexis, ivi lgerrim is. v. r. * f WebCT, p. 
34. Heine g. p. 16. &wart%. Fl. Ind. occid. p. 144. 
Not Uncommon here, on tlie perpendicular walls of rocks — 
rarer on trees. It is distinguished by a yellow color, feu 
branches, often none, and its peculiar habit, of always grow- 
ing transversely. The surculi arc from half an inch to 
two inches long*, closely addressed. 

§11. I, CAULE REPENTE SUBPINNATO, MULTIS IMPLEX- 
IS. FOLIIS IMBRICATIS, FORNICATIS, (iTA UT SUR- 
CULI SEMICYLINDRACEI EVADUNl) DISTICHIS, OBLI- 
QUE OVATIS, ROTUNDATIS, BASI SUBTUS COMPLICA- 
TIS. Stipulis ORBICULATIS, MEDIO AFFIXIS QUASI 
SCUTATIS. T. V. * ^ 

A very distinct species, growing downwards on trees 
and rocks among and over other Jungermanniae in consi- 
derable tufts. Color whitish yellow. The orbicular and 
scutate stipulae distinguish it immediately. The single 
surculi are not often more than half an inch long, but the 
tufts frequently as large as the palm of the hand. The 
fructification lateral. The stipules are elegantly imbricate 
in one series. 

B. Divisis. 

1. Emarginato — bidentatis. 

§ 12. I, CAULE UECUMBENTE, APICE ADSCENDENTE SUB- 
RAMOSO. FOLIIS BIDENTATIS, DENTIBUS ACUMINA- 
TA. Stipulis ovatis quadrifidis. v. v. Coll. Eu- 
rop. Weber, p. 40. Schwg. p. 18. JIuhl. Cat. n. 8. 
Dr. Torrey sent it from New- York. Creeping on the 

earth frequently, at the root of trees, and rarely in tufts. 

2. tri-quadridenticulatis. 

13. I, Foliis oblique ovatis, retusis, APICE INAB- 
qualiter tridentatis, caeterum ixtegerr1mis. 
Stipulis bi-quadrifidis. Flagella ex axillis 
stipularum. r. s. Cull. Ev.rop. from Pennsylvania 
and Canada. Weber, p. 42. Schwg, p. 19. /. radi- 
cans pi. Jlnlil. Cat. radicans, n. 11. 
The Pennsylvania!! and Canadian specimens of this, 

agreeing in every respect with the European, prove thai 



Ill >i !1 DEPATI4 1 i 

ies is really distinct. That grows in our 
. hut the trilobata appears attached to a more 
northern climate. 

{ 14. I. CAULE PROCUMBENTE-REPENTE, MULTIS A GG RE- Tridenticul*- 

GATI8. 1' MPLANATO DISTICHIS, MAJUSCU- ta. 

T.lS, APICE TRIDENTICULATI8, BUBO V A LI BUS. Sril'U- M,r,uu,r 

LIS LATIS, ROTl'NDIS, CIRCUMCIRCA DINTICULATlS. 

Ki.\(;i.i.i. v r,\ vxillis. v. v. f Michauv.p. 278. JV*. 

lorli Cat. n. 5, llcber. p. 12& Seine?, p. 20. 

Not ancommon here in bogs, and sent me by Dr. Tor- 
El grows in large sods — has a yellow color, is much 
more branching and shorter than the former, but is chiefly 
io he distinguished by the stipules. 

A variety, dark brown color, and almost always dich- 
otomous, and of much smaller growth, I have found on 
trees. 

15. I. FoLIIS REMOTIUS8ULIS, 3UBQUADRATI9, SUBAEqUALI- Jl e p!ans. 

ran TRiquADRiFiDis apicb; stipulis foliis siMiLiBus,Linn. 
HL'ADiuiiius. H,bt>r. p. 44. Schwg. p. 20. 

Both authors state, that they possess this species from 
Carolina. I have not yet met with it, although it is so 
distinct that it cannot he mistaken. 

The caulis is pinnate. 

16. I. IlEPENS, CAPILLARIS. FoLIIS SETACEOBIPARTITIS, St'rtnuiroid^ 
SETIS ABTICULAT1S. CALYCIS DENTIUUS SETU LIFERIS. V. S. Micli:vi\, 

| from New-York. W'cbcr.p. 128. Mchauac. p. 27S. 

Dr. Torrey sent it to me sub. nom. I. nodi folia. The 

leaves are triangular, and many cleft iHto setaceous laci- 
niae. bent inwards, and these handsomely articulate. The 
Calyx is very conspicuous. There is some ailiinity to 1. 

roMENTKLl.A. 

17. I. REPENS, RAMOSPSSIMA, FOLIIS IUFIDIS, FIMBRIATQ- J jaem £ 9m . 
LACIXIOSIS ; CALYCIBUS LATEUAI.IBUS, OBI.ONGIS, GLABEL- MicJuilX. 

lis. Seta bbeti. v. s. t Jlicliau.v. g. 27 ( .). Weber, p. 
128. Schwg. p. 21. 

I have specimens sent by Doctor Torrey from Cedar 
Swamp, N. Durham, and others found in Canada bv Rev. 
C. F. Denke. 

Both these last species arc certainly stipulate; the sti- 
pules much like the leaves. 

I. CAULS BREOTO, BIPXNVATO, RAMI3 Al'ICE FORNICATIS, p~ . . 
RASSATIS. FOLIIS TRIFIDIS ; STIPULIS IUFIDIS, LOHGIS- Lin n & Web 

if. cii.imis. v. s. from Labrador, ('nil. Rump. * — 
'.'i'. p. 2!, n 44, 



u 



MUS< I HLI'ATILI 



Ciliarvs. 
Linn. 



Tornentella. 
Ehrhart. 



.Paucijiora. 
Dicks. 



Complanata. 
Linn. 



V it lev lose:. 
Linn. 



Weber uuitcs this species with the following j l>ut 1 
think they are manifest]/ distinct. The jmlcherrima is 
much larger and broader leaved, of a shining chesnut 
brown, and erect. My American specimens arc from La* 
brador. On the earth. 

19. I. CAULE SUBFINNATO, DEOUMBENTE, RAMIS A T'l KN UATIS : 
STIPULIS ET FOLI1S FISSIS, LONGIVSCULK CILIATI8. V. S. 

Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 48. Schwg.n.45. Jluhl. Cat 
n. 18. pulchcrrima. seed, specim. 

I have American specimens from Pennsylvania and from 
Canada. Here I have not met with it. 

Much smaller and lighter colored than the former. On 
rotten logs. 

§ 20. I, CAULE ADSCENDENTE, BIPrNNATO : SUPEA TOMENTOSCH 
FOLIIS AND STIPULIS qUADRIPARTITIS, LONGISSIME CILIATIS, 

albescentibus. v. v. Coll. Weber, p. 49. Schwgr, m. 2t. 
Mx. p. 279. Jlfuhl. Cat. n. IT. Tumj Cat. n. 11. 

A large and distinct species found creeping among 
Sphagnum, sometimes in tufts. 

21. T. CAULE REPENNE RAM OS O. FoLIIS ET STIPULIS SILIILi- 
BUS E RECTO PATEHTlBUSj AD BASIN USQUE TRIPARTITA 

laciniis aduncis. v. s. from Lab: ad or. * Weber, p. 47. 
Dicks. Fasc. I. and 5. f. 9. 

The color resembles pulchcrrima; but it is very small. 
Good fructifer. specimens from Labrador. 

+ Non STirUXATAE. 

a. Foliis auriculatis. 

§22. I. CAULE REPENTE RAMOSO ; FoLIIS SUBROTUNDIS, IN • 
TEGERRIMIS, AURICULA SUEOVATA, PLAN1USCULA. V. V, 

Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 58. Sclrwg. p. 22. Muhl. Cat 
n.14. JV*. Fork Cat.n. 8. 

Very common on the smooth bark of Fagus and other 
trees. Very rarely on rocks. 

b. Foliis non auriculatis. 
* Integris. 

A. Integerrimis, 

§2:3. T. caule nudo (s. absque radiculis) adscendem- 

FOLIIS D1STANTIBUS, SUBVERTICAL1BUS, ccnvexiusculis, 

SUBROTundis, laete viridibus. v. v. Coll. Europ. W e- 
ber, p. Schwg. p. 25 Jlx. p. 2.77. Jluhl. Cat. n. I. 

Torre y v nt it to me from New-York. 
Distinguished by its light green color and naked cauli-. 
>Jot nnmmmrm on rot'on lot's — often amotiS" I. .shatauts. 



BfDSCl HEP AT I ( 1. 15 

>RSO it A i 101 '.HUM- Pulyanlkoc. 

SUB&01 i \- I. inn. 
DIS, PALLIOIS; CALYCE H KK V 1 R V. Bl I .M1D1ATO. I*. V. 

Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 61, ScMvg. p. 25. MuhL Cat 
n. 3. tni it to inc. 

Common here on moist ground and among Sphagnum. 
Often very lull of fructifications. 

. . REPE1 rEj DOUSO RADICULOSO J F0LII3 wnRl' Lanceolate 

cat . , 6UBCONVEXIS, o VAlo- SUBROTUN- Linn 

;• v. Cull, Eur . If'cber, p. (r2. Sc!:w£. p. 25. 
Muhl. Cut. a. r. 

Common on rocks and on earth in woods. It is often 
reddis deed most of this subdivision. 

6 I. C.VULi: REPENTE RADICULCSO J FOLIIS SUBIMBRICATIS, ScatotU 

hiverticalibus, coxvexis, suukotuxdis, antrorsum Schmidel. 
sitbconnivwntibds. v. v. Coll. Europ* Jl'eber, p. 63. 
Schwgr. p. 24. Muhl. Cat. n. 4. 

On old logs, especially pine ; very handsomely twisted — 
often mixed with viticulosa. It occurs both light green 
and purplish. 

27. I. CALM. REPENTE, DORSO RADICULOSO J FOLIIS IMBRI- Sphagr. 
OATIS, SUBVERTir AMBUS. OONOAVIS SUBROTUNDIS, ANTR0R- Dicks 

M LONMvr..\Tii!Ls. v. v. Coll. Europ. * ll'ebev, p. 64. 
Scktog.p. 24. Dicks, t. \.f. 10. 

As common here, among Sphagnum and on moist earth, 
as in Europe. It has likewise been sent to me by Dr. 
Torn v. 

§28. I. PUSILLA REPENTE ABLE ; FOL1 IS ORBICUJ.ATIS, IXTE- Orbicularis 
CERRIMIS; DUPLIC1 SERIE VERTICALITER ASSURGENTZBUS. Micluux. 

V, v. f Jlicfiaux. p. 277. 

The plant I take for the orbicularis of Mx. is common 
here on dry hill sides ; with remarkably long cauline setae. 
The specimens communicated to me by Dr. Torrcy, as the 
orbicularis of Mx. clearly belonged to the dilatata. 
Mine is generally red. 

B. Dentatis. 

§ 29. I. FOLIIS SUBIMBRICATIS, SEMI VERTIC ALIBI'S, OBLiqUIS, JUpleMda 
OVATIS, ROTUNDATIS, DENTICULATIS. V. V. Coll. Europ. * Linn. 

Weber, p. 65. Schwgr. p. 25. 

My plant is generally smaller than the European speci- 
mens ; but otherwise exactly the same. It is frequently 
found here, among rocks in declivities, on the ground. 



*6 



mi >n iu;i' itici. 



B. Divisis. 



A. FoEIIS EMARGINATIS, B1XOBIS 
1. INTEGERB.1MIS : 



L Bl .11) lew. 



Ehrhart. 



§30. I. CAULE KItl'.CTO, SUBRAMOSO; FOLIIS APPROXIMATE 
PATEKTIDIVERGENTIBUS, OBCORDATISi OBTUSE FMAIKilNATI > 
\NGULIS OBTUSIS. V. V. Cull. Europ. * WebtT) p. 73. 

Schwg* p. 27. 

Occurs ralhcr rarely on shaded shelving rocks with us, 

where they arc very moist. 



Funckii. 
Web. and 
#oJir. 



Inflate. 
Huds. 



Curvi folia. 
Dicks: 



Michauxit 
Weber. 



Bicarrii-. 
Mueller, 



§ 31. I. FOLIIS SUBIMBRICATIS, PATENTJBUS, SUBHORIZONTAL- 
IBUS, EMARGINATIS, AKGULIS OBTUSIUSCULIS. CAULE AD- 

scendentEj suBSiMPLici. v. v. Cull. Europ. * Weber, p. 
74. Schw. p. 27. 

.Not uncommon on arid lichenose spots in the woods: 

generally of a deep red color. 

§ 32. I. CAULE PROCUMBENTE, SUBSIMPLICI ; FOLIIS REMO- 
TIUSCULIS, PATEXTIDIVERGENTIBUS, SUBHORIZOVTALIBUS, 
CONCAV1S, ACUTE EMARGINATIS, ANGULIS A CUTIS. V. V. 

Coll. Europ. * Weber, p. 75. Schwg. p. 29. Bicrenata 

plur. 

Occurs in similar places with the former. 

33 I. FOLIIS SUBIMBRICATIS, ERECTIUSCULIS, BIFIDIS, LA- 
CINIIS ATTENUATIS, IXCURVIS. CAULE PROCUMBENTE RA- 

moso. v. v. Cull. Europ. * Weber, p. 76. Schwg, p. 28. 
I found this very distinct species on rotten pine logs on 
Newhope, Orange county. 

§ 34. I. SURCULIS ERECTIU5CULIS : FOLIIS BIFIDIS APPROXIMA- 
TIS, SUBIMBRICATIS, PATENTIDIVERGEXTIBUS, INTEGERS I- 
MIS, ACUTE EMARGINATIS, AXGULIS ACUTIS. FrUCTIFICA- 
TIO TERMINALIS. CALYX TUBULOSUS, APICE PLIGATUS. — 

v. v. f Michaux. varia, p. 278. ^e Weber, p. 76. 

I have some doubts concerning the identity of this spe- 
cies; as mine by no means resembles the bicornts, (See 
Weber's remark,) but a good deal the asplemoides. It 
occurs on shady moist rocks along mountain brooks. 

§35. I. CAULE REPENTE, SUBRAMOSO : FOLIIS, REMOTI9, PA- 
TENTIBUS, BEMIVERTICALIBUS, COXCAVIS, EMARGIlf ATO-BI- 
DEHTATI8, DENTIBU8 ACUMIXATIS, ACUTISSIMIS, CONXI\ 

tibus. v v. Cull. Europ. * Weber, p. 77. Sckwg, p. 27. 
\ very good species, not uncommon here with the re^t. 



MU8C1 nr.pvTiri. 17 

. 1. ( U T.E PLEXU080, BUBRAMOSOj REPENTEJ TOLlls Jhcnspidala. 
MOT l >. PATE N 1 l-l) I \ ERG B \ T I B is, SEM I -V1-KT1C ALI- Linn. 
BUS, FLANIUSCU1I8, kCUTE BMARGINATO-BIDEHTATISJ 

DENT1E1 s DITER6BNTIBU8. V. V. Coll Europ. * U\- 

ber, p. i r :?- p- ~>j- MuhL Cat. Sphacrocephala, 

•. 3 cud n. 9. 

bent from New-York by Dr. Toney. Common here, 
and easily distinguished by its diverging teeth. 

\\ 37. I. is REPENTIBUS, RAMOSI8 SIMPLICITER CornOv 

I'lNWTIs: FOLIIS OVATIS EMA UG 1 NATO-EI FIDIS ; DEN- Dicks. 
TIBUS u UTI8 CONNITENTIBUS. V. V. Scd. lion. Coll, 

Europ. Weber, p. 135. Dicks, fasc. IV. t. 11. /. 15. 

Muhl. Cat. n. 10. 

A small, but distinct, species — not uncommon here. 

^38. I. CAULE BttEVI, DECFMI5EME, DORSO RADICULOSO. Ehrhavticmc 
FoLIIS IMRRICATIS, SURPATENTIRL S, COXCAVIS, OR- Weber. 
TISE EMARGIXATIS, AN GILTS ACFTIUSCULIS. V. T. 

Sed. nun. Cull. Europ. * JJ'cber, p. 81. Ehrh. blcuspi- 

data. 

Though I am not acquainted with the Swedish plant 
described by Weber, his description suits perfectly this 
distinct species of our vicinity. 

2. Margins dentatis, serratis. 
vei crenllatis. 

§ 39. I. CATTLE ERECTO SIMPLICI. FoLIIS SUHROTUX- Undtdata 
DIS, ORTUSIS, SUBDENTICTJLATIS, UXDLLATIS, LORIsLinn 
ORTUSIS, AXTICO MIXORE CONCAVO, FOSTICO COXVEXO. 

v. v. Coll. Europ. * Weber, p. 84. Schwg. p. 23. 
Not uncommon in bogs ; and distinguishable from the 
next chiefly by the leaves not being so strongly citiate. 

§ 40. I. CARLE ERECTO, SURRAMOSO. FoLIIS LOHIS SUR- J\' em oix> M 

KoTlxniS DENTATO CH.IATIS. V. V. Coll. Europ. Linn. 

(I <btr, /). 85. Hcltwg. p. 23. MuhL Cat. n. 13. A\ 

York Cat. n. 9. 

A common and large species, of a whitish green color ; 
immediately distinguishable by the ciliate leaves. A va- 
riety, almost white, and still more ciliate, occurs, with 
i\ sessile fructifications, which possibly may be speci- 
fically distinct. 

§41. I. LE>IPTNATTS FOLIIS, IN C VILE ERECTIUSCLLO, /?„, 
BRAMOSO. LoBIS FOLIORI \I STTBOl v'I'ls, Vi\ A( III s, Linn. 
DEBTTICU1.AT18. v. r. Coll. Mmrop, Jf'eber. p. 84. 

Dilun. tab. 71./. 19. 



L8 



MVi ( i ftllPATICl 



Umhrosa. 
Schrader. 



Albicans. 
Linn. 



Pusilla. 
Linn. 



Quinqucdcn.' 

'ala. 

Linn. 



This and the next (together with I. compact*, not yet 

found by me) are very nearly allied, but Weber has well 
distinguished them. They are mostly reddish. The resup. 
is the largest of them, and not unfrequent here on the 
earth in arid spots — leaves obtuse. 

§48. I. FOUI loiiis srnovATis, veins vel acuminula- 
tis serratis. r. v. * Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 85. 
Hooker, Tab. 6.f. 24. 

In similar spots, with acute leaves. 

§ 43. I. CAULE ERECTO, SUBDIVISO. LoBIS EOLII OB- 
LOXGIS, ACUT1LS( I LIS, NERVO INSTRUCTIS, APICE 

serratis. v. v. Coll. Europ. * Weber, p. 80. Scjnvg. 
p. 23. 

A very distinct species, growing in considerable tufts, 
of a whitish yellow color, on the earth, or at the foot of 
trees and stumps. 

B. Inaequaliter tridentatis vel apice tri quad- 

RI-QTINQIEEIDIS. 
§ 44. I. PUSILLA REPENS. FoLIlS SUBQUADRATIS, PLI- 
CATIS, MARG1NE ANTICO OBTUSO, CRENATIS, CETERUM 

integerrimis. v. v. Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 87. 
Schwg. p. 29. MM. Cat. n. 19. JV*. York Cat. n. 4. 
Very distinct — a light green. The surculi short, but 
broad. On loamy ground. 

§45. I. CAULE ERECTIUSCULO, DORSO RADICULOSO : EO 
LIIS PLICATIS, QUADRATIS IMMO QUERCIFORMIBUS, 
APICE DENTIBUS ACUTIS INTEGERRIMIS 3 VEL 5 DEN- 

tatis. v. r. Coll. Europ. * Weber, p. 88. Schwgr. 

p. 29. 

The leaves of this species are often confluent, and much 
like oak leaves. It occurs among Sphagnum not rarely, 
and I possess some uncommonly handsome specimens from 
Labrador, which cleaved closely to a parcel of Lichens 
from thence. 



eta. 

SchmideJ. 



§ 46. I. CAULE REPENTE : FoLIIS CONCAVIS, INAEQUALI- 
TER TEIDEXTATIS, DENTIBUS ACUTIUSCULIS, INTE 

gerrimis. v. r. * Weber, p. 87. Schwg. p. 29. — 
Hooker Ease. V. t. 19. Roth. EL Germ. III. p. 379. 

GLOBULIIEIJA. 

I have not seen the European species, but meet with one 
here in moist woods, on the ground, which agrees well. 






(1 nr.lWTICI. i9 

. I. CAl "I ►SO, BIMPLICIU8CUL0 : FOI.i 

IN U.CU Al.li i R IKIIIUIS, LACINIIS DORSO CANALICU- Schl 

lav is, de] Weber, p. 89. Schw. p. 

19. tinker Fasc. ill. t. 10, 

A very distinct spa ics on our moist rocks ; and pretty 
large. 1 have not seen the European species. 

$48. I. caul:: erecto, flexuoso, subsimplici : fo- /. 

LIIS INFERIORIBUS MINORIBU8 INTEGERRIMIS, BlTPE- Hool 

RIORIBUS SUBQUADR A II B, I NO ALTLROVL DEWTE 
SP.-RSO. SPIMFORMI. T. V. * U't'bl'r, p. 140. Jlookt I 

Fate, Mil. I. 50. 

This is :i very distinct species. The teeth very small. 
The plant itself by no moans so. Rare. 

II. AcAULES. 

§49. I. SUBACAULIS, FRONDE SU RDICIIOTOM A, PLANA )&/iW1 , rt 
NERVOSA, MARGINF INTEGRA VII. P INN ATIFIDO-SINU- Swi 
ATA, INTEGERKLMA GLABRA. V. V. * \ H'cIjlT, p. 89. 

Swarz. Fl. Iml. occid. p. 145. 

A very large species — often found among Sphagnum in 
our bogs in bodies together. The fructification break* 
forth from the nerve on the middle of the irons — with a 
calyx very much laciniated. I ha\e never found the seta 
protruded as yet. 

N. B. This must not be confounded with Dickson's 
mm ata : a variety of miltifida to which it bears no 
resemblance. 

5 50. I. FRONDE OBOVATA, I.OBATA, SUBEXIRVI, I.OBIS £.,-,,; 
SINUATIS, MARGINE UNLULATIS, SUPLRNE FRUC.TI-I 

fera. v. r. Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 90. Schwg. p. 
52. MuhU Cat. n. £1. A*. York Cat. n. 1. 

A well known plant. The seta sometimes grows two 
or three inches long. Common on the hanks of woody 
brooks. 

'3 51. I. FRONDE OBOVATA, LOEATA, ENERVI, GLABRA,^,. 
CARNOSA, LOBIS SINUATIS: INFERNE FRUCTIFERA. — j; 

v. v. Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 93. Schwg. p. 31. MM* 

Cat. n. 22. .V. Fork Cat. n. 2. 

I never found it in fructification. It is not common 
here, but occurs anionic Sphagnum, i pecially in the water. 
All the specimens I have found are smaller than the <• 
mon European ones. 



20 



ML SCI HEPATIC I. 



Multifida. 
Linn. 



Pahnatn 

Hedwig 



Bipmnata. 
I i.z. 



Furcata 
Linn. 



Pubescent 
Sehrank. 



Nobis. 



§ 52. I. FRONDE REPENTE, BIPINN ATIFID A EXLRVI, LA* 
CIMIS ANGU8TIS, APICE LATIORIBUS. V. V. Coll. Eu- 

rop. * Weber, p. 94. Schwg.'p. 31. 

Dr. Torrey sent specimens from Cedar Swamp. 

Very common here among leaves in springs, especially 
the' variety sinlata Dickson, which sometimes grows 
very huge and beautifully multifid. It is of a brittle sub- 
stance, and fine blue green. 

§ 53. I. FRONDE BREVI, SUBADSCENDENTE, DIG1TATO 

palm ata, eneiivi. v. v. ColL Europ. Weber, ??. 95. 

Schwg. p. 30. MM. Cat. 24. 

Occurs on rotten wood in very moist places, or that is 
often inundated. The irons at most three lines long ; but 
a large patch is often together. Very dark green. 

§ 54. I. FRONDE PROCUMBENTE, BIPINNATA, ENERVI, 
LACINIIS VERSUS APICEM ATTENUATES. T. V. * f 

Weber, p. 95. Schwg. p. 30. Swarz. p. 145. 
A small, but neat species, perfectly agreeing with 
Swartz. Among mosses on shelving shaded rocks. 

§ 55. I. FRONDE LINEAR!, DECUMBLNTE, RAMOSA, EX- 
TREMITATIBUS FURCATIS, NERVOSA, MARGINE IN- 
FERNE ET DORSO NERVI PUBESCENTE, LUTEO VIRIDI. 

v. v. Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 97. Schwg. p. 31. Mx. 

p. 280. Muhl. Cat. n. 22. JV. York Cat. n. 3. 

A very common moss on the sides of rocks and stones, 
varying in color and pubescence of the margin, sometimes 
almost smooth. 

§ 56. I. FRONDE LINEARI, RAMOSA. EXTREMITATIBUS FURCATIS, 
NERVOSA. TOTA BUPERFICIE UTRINQUE PUBESCENTE. V. l\ 

Coll. Europ. * Weber, p. 99. Schwg. p. 31. 

This is found rarely with us, on mountains, and differs 
by being altogether strongly pubescent : it is always of a 
very yellow color. 

§ 57. I. FRONDE LINEARI ANGUSTISSIMA, RAMOSA, EXTREMI- 
TAT1BUS NON FURCATIS SED SUBBIFID1S, LACINIIS ATTENUA- 
TE, SUBENERVI. MARGINE FRONDIS LOBIS SPATHULATIS, 
CLAVATIS ET DIFFORMIBUS, INTERDUM STOLONIFORMIBUS, 
INTERMIXTIS CILIIS. ORNATO V V. * \ 

A new species, forming dense tufts along rocks and 
earth, from which it is easily separated. Though allied 
to the two former, it is manifestly distinct by the curious 
margin of the very narrow and tender frons. 



MT7SC1 HEPATIC*. 2i 

The. fructification has not hitherto been observed by me. 
It is smaller, and of a more delicate construction than the 
rest. The color green of yellow — no pubescence except 
the interspersed (iliac of the margin. 

58. I. FRONDE SIMPLH I LATA* NON LOBATA, OBLONG A, SUB Oblonga. 
ACUMINATA: MAHG1NE UNDULATO ALT VERSLS NERYUM CRAS- Nobis. 
SUM, PLICATO, CET1.RUM INTEGERRIMO. A PICK INTKRDUM 
IN LONGUM I ::ODUCTUM V. V. * \ 

This highly remarkable moss comes nearest I. si.vuata, 
but is so different in many respects, that I cannot omit it 
new spe< i( ^. although it has been but imperfectly ob- 
served. 1 accidental!} drew a patch of it out of the water 
and mud of a pond near Little River, Cumberland county, 
with CJtriculariae. 

The Irons is about one-eighth of an inch in breadth. 

Remark. Most of the Jungermanniae arc in fructifica- 
tion in advanced spring: many are so already in winter. 
V number are very rarely found in fructification, especial- 
ly of the last division, and, generally, those which grow 
in water. Such individuals of these as are left dry, are 
the most likely to fructify. 

2. MARCH AXTIA. Linn. 

Remark. The specific differences of the Marchantiae 
are mostly taken from the form and manner of the female 
parts of fructification, and of the common receptacle. But 
the frons appears to me, in many instances, to deserve 
equal attention. 

1. If. RECEPTACULO FEMINEO RADIATO, MASCULO PEDUVCU-p^Q^ 
LATO PELTATO. FrONDIBUS CONGESTIS. LOBAT18, NERVOSIS Linn. 

et venulis DECussATis oRNATis v. s. Coll. Eiwop. We- 
ber, p. 101. Schwg. p. S2. Roth. Fl. G. 4 IT. 420. Muhl. 
Cat. p. 100. fi 2. JV. Turk ' at n. 1. Mx. p. "177 

My American specimens are from Pennsylvania, not 
having found it here as yet. It cannot be confounded with 
any other species, on account of the remarkable radii and 
very long peduncle of the female receptacle. The nerv of 
the frons is generally brown. 

2. If. RECEPTACULO FEMINEO H EMISPH AERICO. - 

CRO, MARGINE HIRSUTO: MASCUI.UM SESSILE. S UH RO TUN- Swart/ 
Dl ~: INUM FroNTI. LUITSSIM M SIM- 

PLICi AC I \ I I D1CHOTOMA. M\ ". l\ 

* f Wtber, p. 103. fitoorte. FL Jnd. oedd. p. 1879. 

This is by far the largest and most elegant Hepatic I 
:i ; and agrees so well with Swartz's descrip 



MUSCI HEPATJC1 



Conica. 
Linn. 



Ciimta. 
Michaux 



tion of the ii ik si ta observed in Jamaica, that 1 cannot 
doubt their identity. Ours grows exclusively in the ca\i- 
ties formed by Shistose rocks along the banks of rivulets, 
v. c. Little Yadkin ; but there to an immense extent, 
covering their sides for many yards. The general breadth 
of the frons is half an inch — the length of a single one two 
or three inches. Its texture is extremely brittle — the co- 
lor a pure dark green. A very strong middle rib runs on 
the under surface, which alone puts forth loots. The 
frons is generally elegantly dichotomous, and lobed, the 
lobes rounded, undulate, and often crenate. The female 
receptacle is on a short peduncle, and extremely hirsute 
below, rather subcorneal, and appears entire. I found it 
not yet perfectly in fructification beginning of November. 



Hemisphaeri- § °' 

ca. 

Linn 



, SUBQUADRANGULATO, CALICIS PROPRII LACINIIS OB- 
Frondibus MINORIBUS CRENATIS SUBTUS ATRORU- 



M. RECEPTACULO FEMINEO SUBHEMISPH AERICO, SUBIX 
TEGRO, 
TUSIS. 
BENTIBUS , SUPRA LAETE VIRIDIBUS. V . V. Coil. £urop. 

Wtber. p. 104. Scliwg. p, 33. Muhl. Cat. n. 1. New 

York Cat. n 2. 

Not uncommon on rocky ground here. 

§ 4. M RECEPTACULO FEMINEO OVATOCONICO, SUB ANGULATC, 
MASCULO SESSILI. FllONDIBUS LONGE REPENTIBUS, VERRU- 
COSIS, sinuatis. v. v. Coll. Europ. ff eber, p. 106. — 
Schwg. p. 34. Jluhl Cat. n. 3. J\ew-Yor/c Cat. n. 3. 

This is the most common here, though very rarely found 
in fructification. It creeps about the banks of springs and 
walls, and on moist stones ; and the frons is generally not 
so complicated as that of polymorpha, nor so brownish. 

§5. M. PUSILLA: . FRONDE MARGINE COLORATO EBOSA-CRE- 
NATO. LOBIS ROTUNDATIS. HeCEPTACULO FEMINEO SUB- 
GLOBOSO, QUINQUELOBO. EX INCISUBIS PROLIXE FILAMEN- 

toso. v. v. f Weber, p. 143. Schwg. p. 33. Mx. p. 

270. JSIahl. Cat. n 5. cruciata? JV\ Fork, n. 4. crucial? 

I apprehend that the cruciata of Muhl. is this species. 
The frons very much resembles that of cruciata. The 
fructification is very beautiful. The peduncle of the fe- 
male about four lines high, the receptacle nearly globular, 
four or five cleft below, with numerous hairs or filaments 
from the divisions. The resemblance to hemisphaerica 
is not very striking. The frons is small, less lobed than 
in cruciata, but more rounded and broader than in the 
next. The lower surface and margin purple. On flat 
rocks. Fr. in summer. 



Ml'x I HEPATIC!. 

. M. PUSILLA ; i: DTOHOTOM 'A, AXGUSTA. TeneUa 

DEMI ft EO OOVOIDBO ! I i'lRANA- Linn 

)-Mr L l lr i do : riMBEIia LIOULATO LIK£AJLIBOS. PfiDUN- 

ui) v r. \ Webfr t p. 143. Scliwg. 
j). $S. Michaux, p. 276. -Vu/tZ. Cut. n. 4. Mew-Fork 

C ;.. 

Aii elegant and distinct moss. The fimbriae are by 
no means, as Schwagerichen presumes, the laciniae of the 
This is only three cleft — the divisions round- 
The fiimbriae, on the contrary, are long linear Ian- 
,u snow white organs, of a very different kind, and 
in great number, flexuosely proceeding from a white mar- 
gin! of the receptacle, and sometimes even from the pedun- 
cle. The dons is very narrow, green, usderneath purple 
and veined, turning up the margin when dry. 

Mctnark* Imperfect specimens of other hepatics prog- 
nosticating some new species have been observed by me. 
Among the rest. Mr. Le Conte found one, probably a very 
distinct Marchantia, in the mountains. It is however nc 
cessary to wait till these are found in fructification before 
they can be determined. 

3. TARGIONIA. (Mich.) Linn. 

CAPSULA SUBCLOBOSA, CALYCI B1VALVI INSIDERS APICE DEHI5- 
CENS, DKX1ATA. UNILOCULARS, POLYSPERMA J^EMINA AF- 

fixa filo toiito. Itoth. FL Germ. III. p 423. 

This generic description of Roth suits exactly the cha- 
i acter of the hepatic below described ; so that it must be 
considered as belonging to the Genus. But it is certainly 
a different species, as the Thallus is so greatly different, 
and from its not agreeing at all with tiie European speci- 
mens of T. hypophylla in my collection. 

Both Weber and Schwaegerichen cite the T. hyfophtl- 
la as found in Carolina. I have not met with it, but al- 
most suspect that they have seen imperfect frondes of 
Marchantia hirsuta, and taken them for the Targionia. 
Weber, p. 108. Schwagerichen, p. 35. I have not adopt- 
ed it as an American species on that account, especially 
as Muhlenberg does not mention it. 

$ 1. T. CAPSULA OBLOXGA OOMPRESSA SUBGLOBOSA, CALYCI Orbicu 
MAGNO BIVALVI 1NSIDENS, DKMLM EJECTA, APICE RlMA Nobis. 
DEHI8CEWTE, UNILOCULARIS, POLYSPERMA. SeMIMA FILO 

torto affixa. Frohs orbicularis LOBATA PLICATA IN 

[TTRUMj BAEPE CONFLUENS, SKD NUN IX 0AE8PTTEM AG- 
GREGATE. V. V. * \ 

A most distinct plant, hitherto found by me only in my 
own bottom garden, in fructification. December and Jatm 



24 



MUSCI nEPATICI. 



Terrestris. 
Mich. 



.Laevis. 
JLinn. 



ary. but in great quantities on the moist earth of the beds. 
It forms orbicular froodes, like the Anthoceros, much 
lobed and crenate in the margin, and plicated towards the 
centre. The caxicbs proceed from the plicae, are large, 
sometimes much crowded, twovalved, and containing a. 
large oblong capsule, yellowish color, which in time falls 
out, and leaves a hollow. The capsule is a little com- 
pressed, and has a rim on the top — probably the opening. 
although 1 have not seen any open — it is filled by small 
globular yellow seeds. The diameter of a single frons is 
often one inch — many are confluent. The color sometimes 
green — generally a dark brown, and only greenish in the 
margin. 

4. SPHAEROCARPUS. (Mich.) 
Calyx magnus glubo o-turbinatus apice perforatus ; 
multis aggregatis in fronde minxjto. capsula in fun- 
do calycis. sewlis 

This very remarkable plant I can hardly doubt is the 
one Dickson describes, Fasc. I. p. 8. But I have not sue- 
ceeded in observing tbe Capsules. I shall, therefore, de- 
scribe my hepatic at length, and continue to observe it. 
It was found in immense quantities on the ground in a 
cornfield in December. 

§ 1. S TERRESTRIS MINIMA. FrONDE VIRIDISSIMA TEXUISSI- 
MA JUNGERMANNIOIDT A RETICULATA, VARIE LOBATA, LOBIS 
ADSCENDENTIBUS ACUMINATO-OVATIS. IJALYCIBUS (STRUC- 
TURA FOL10RUM JuNGERMANNIARUM RETICULATA) GLOBOSE 
TUBBINATIS, centro foramine rotundo arcte IN FRONDI 
AGGREGATIS. ITA UT FRONS VIX CONSPICITUR. MAJUSCULIS 

fseminis pap averts J viridissimis aetate subpurpuras.- 

CENTIBUS APICE. 

In cavitate calycis observavi (tit Weber) aliquid stylis 
muscorum simile — sed capsulam seminibus repletam non 
dum inveni. r. r. # * 

I am inclined to suppose that my plant is in a young 
state, and hope to find the capsule in time. One frons is 
at most one quarter of an inch in diameter. But a great 
man} are contiguous. The Sphaerocarpus is a genus 
very little known as yet in general. 

5. ANTHOCEROS. (Mich.) Linn. 

§ 1 \ FRONDE PLANA CRENATA SINUATA IMPUXCTATA. V. V. 

Coll. Europ, fCebcr,p. 111. Schwg. p. 35. Jlufd. Cat. 
n. 1. 

On moist earth — certainly different from the next, which 
is much larger, and not by any means flat. Common. 



Ml >< I BEPATICI. 

D1BU9 0:1 BIC1 51 I'tui v 

) LOB ATI S, M.\R(,i\ i i KOS : 

Co ; Bi s. r. v. \Vi hi r, p, 111. 

.V '/wnix, />. 

Very common here in the fall, on th< of ditches. 

The Irons often two inches in diameter, and very full of 

fructifications, exceeding an inch in height Frona much 
like I. epiphylla* 

N \ I V, LACIN1 VIA PC S TaGI- J 

nl'lv. Ot is prioribus truncata. v v. C»lt. Europ. Linn. 
Il'tber, p. 112. Schwgr. p. S5. Muhl. Cut. n. 2. 
Occurs frequently on the earth; especial!) on lichen 
ipota in the woods — in gardens. Not half as large as the 

former. 

v 4. A. FrO.VDE RAMOSISSIMA PLANA LODIS MULTIFOHMIBUS iMciniatv. 
LACIXIATA, ALUS LINEAUI OBLONG18, kLIIS LA TIS BO TUN* NoblS. 
DATIS MARGIXE PLICATIS C'RENATIS ET LACIMATIS \ OM- 
XIXO EXF.RVI, MAXIMA. CORNICULJS SPARS1S RAR1S M/ 
IMIS EX VAGIXULA LOMOA BIFIDA, IX MEDIA FRONDE. V. 
' \ 

This large and remarkable species was found by me in 
great abundance in a swampy gravelly spot, occasioned 
by a large spring, forming beautiful green patches more 
than a foot in diameter. The color is a dark green — the 
substance very brittle. The pcricarpium splits twistingly. 
and is upwards of one and a half inches long, with a caly?v 
or vagina one-eighth of an inch high. The surface of the 
irons quite smooth. 

15. A? Fronde juxgermaxnoidea elongata SIMPLIOI, 

NERVO MEDIUM PERCUKRENTE. Fill ICTIFIC ATION E TERMI- nioides. 
XALI. (CLOBOSA VAGINA,) LOKGIUSCULA, IilVALVI, LINEARI.^ 
T. V. * } 

Found among Sphagnum, in hogs, rarely. I am doubt- 
ful whether it belongs to the Genus, from the different , 
habit of the simple Irons. It is small, and, at first sight, 
appears a single shoot of June. quiitqjjefida. From the 
middle rib, on both sides, a thin greenish purple Irons 1 
tends in various shaped lobes, obtusely pointed, so as al- 
most to approach the shape of leaves With plicate loh 
At the end a pericarpium, as long as the frons, perfect! \ 
like that of an Anthoceros, rises perpendicular from a verj 
11 globular vagina. The Irons is undivided, (in one 
instance I found it dichotomous,) and not above half an 
: — upr Hue broad, or two at 'J' 



26 fHUSGI BEEPATlCr. 

BLASIA. (Mich.) Linn. 

1. B. CAPSULA M !>\ FRONDE IMMERSA, OVATO-OBLK 

Unn. \i\ ruBO hi ants', persistence. Frondibus or- 

QLARIBUS, AUT CONGESTIS LAETE. IMMO SPLEXDENTER, 
TIRIDIBUS; VEXOSO-Rll in I.ATIS, DI-VEL TRICHOTOMIS, 

apice capsuliferis. i?. v. * Coll. Europ. JVeber. p 114. 
Schwgr. p 36 Dr. Torrey sent it. Roth. Fl. Germ. III. 

p. 426, 428. 

On exsiccated spots of mill-dams. My specimens agree 
so perfectly with European ones, that I have no doubts. 
When not in full fructification, it may be recognised by 
the black male spots on the under side, A very handsome 
figure of it in Hoffman's Flora Dcutschlands. 2 part. 

7. RICCIA. (Mich.) Linn. 

N. B. The fructifications of this genus arc but little 
understood ; but the species can be readily distinguished 
notwithstanding. 

§ 1. R. TERRESTRIS, FRONDE PUNCTATA. LACINIIS LATIORIB1 S, 

.Linn. v. x. Coll. Europ. Weber, p. 115. Schwgr. p. 37+- 

Muhl. Cal. n. 1. 

Occasionally occurs on clay and earth. 

Lutescens. § 2- R« TERRESTRIS, MAJUSCULA, ORBICULATA AC CONFJ.T EN.-. 

Nobis. Frondibus di-vel triciiotomis apice turgidis, inflexis 

emarginato bifidis. lobis margine liberis, medio 
nervo, superne impresso, inferne convexo, radicu- 
loso : Substantia porosa, constans ex tuberculis in- 
TUS granulis minutis REPLETIS. V V. * \ 

Found in abundance in an exsiccated swamp on the 
ground, forming large yellow patches of two inches in 
diameter. The lower surface puts forth numerous radi- 
cles, besides those on the middle nerv. In Spring. 

3. R. fluitans ; fronde dichotoma, oecordata, radio u- 
Linn. lis serratis. JVeber, p. \17. Schwgr. p. 38. Jluhl.Cut. 

n. 2. JK'ew-York Cat. n. 2. 

I have seen no American specimen. 

4. R. FLUITANS, FRONDE DICHOTOMA, LACINIIS LIN] 

elonoatis. v. s. Coll. Europ. Jfeber, p. 117. Schwg. 
p. 38. Muhl. Cat. 11. 9. 

Sent me from Cherokee Country. Not found here. 



FINIS. 



atam 

in. 



r 



27 



4DDENDA.il 



Sii -ere written, the fallowing additional 

Nations have occurred t<> the author: 

Page 19, n. 51. /. r'ni f *uis. 
This Bpecies lias been found by me this year in elegant 
fructifications, and as large as any European specimens. 
The setae proceed from the lower surface, and are upward 
of an inch long, and very thick. 

Page 21. n. 2. Mdrchantia polymorpha. 

Found here on Muddy Creek in plenty. 

Remark. — Two new species of Marcbantia have been 
dis4 overed by me this year, of which the description how- 
cannot he inserted. 

Page 23. Turgioma. 
I have found the Taugioma hypophylla in an exca- 
vated spring-house, in great perfection and full fructifica- 
tion in February, 1821, so that this species must now be 
inserted. 

§.£. T. CaPSUXA GEOBOsA, CAXTCI BIVALYI UrSIDBJTS, BjpopkyUa 
POLYSPERMY FbONDIBUS 8IMLLIBU8 MARCH 1NTIIS- Li 
MAG.NI>, I.N t AESPITEM COLLECTIS, SUPRA LAETB VI- 
RIDIBU8, VEBBUCIS ALBIDIS MINIMIS ADspEUSIS, 
i HTl s MfiKii -ANTIBUS, VII, LIS RADICUXOSI8 TBBJUX 
UTOIS. Roth. p. 423. Schwg. p. 35. Web. p. 108. 
v. v. Coll. Europ. * 

It grows in large tufts, like the Marchant. hemisphae 

rica, on the excavated rock. 

Page 24. Spiiaeuocakpi>. 
Having continued my observations on this remarkable 
s, I bad the pleasure, in March, 18:21, of finding it 
with complete capsules, perfectly answering the descrip- 
tion. The Capsule is globose, filled with minute seeds, 
at first green, then blackish, at the bottom of the Calyx, 
and about half* a> large. It soon mi 
rably.