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Full text of "Spectrum Green, 1980"

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http://www.archive.org/details/spectrumgreen75ohio 




SPECTRUM GREEN'S 

OHIO 



UNIVERSITY 



ATHENS, OHIO 
45701 

Vol. 75 



OHIO s 





eueht masaani academia gynncs 

9 97 199 

Pff !^frl IT1 (?. T-ifeg tyJe ( )rg-anizations, etc. 

117 219 

Persons 

145 259 



.31 



«• 



Pawprints 



.51 





171 




Ohio University is more than just an 

academic center or a party school, 

its two most conflicting images. 





The fact is, there 

are as many as 10 

different images of 

Ohio University, 

perhaps more. 



Each image alone, though, is a lie. But when 
brought together, the 10 images of Ohio University 
form an illusion of the whole ... of the real school. 




HOMECOMING * ANNIVERSAW PARTY * GRADUATION 



i 



HALLOWEEN: 
MARDI GRAS 
OF THE MIDWEST 



- 
SPRING FESTIVAL: 

A DAY OF MUSIC, 

DANCING AND FUN 






mflGAzinE 



*» 



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Wearing an OU T-shirt, well-known German director 
Wim Wenders attended a 1979 festival workshop. 

Kit Fitzgerald and John Sanborn demonstrated the 
Thompson - CSF Minicam at the 1979 Athens Video 
Festival. 

Robert Blalack and Jamie Shourt, who worked on the 
special effects in Star Wars, participated in a live 
cablecast workshop during the 1979 Athens 
International Film Festival. 

"The Doodlers", a film by Kathy Rose. 






The seventh annual Athens 
International Film Festival held 
April 25 through May 4 at the new 
Athena Theater complex screened 
more than 400 films, ranging from 
two-minute animation shorts to 
two-hour features. 

The festival, partially funded by 
the Ohio Arts Council and the OU 
College of Fine Arts, used "Anima- 
tion: Origins and Progress" as its 



main theme this year. The program 
featured workshops with Disney 
and National Film Board of Canada 
animators, screenings of experi- 
mental animation, and retrospec- 
tive screenings by independent 
animators such as Jules Engel, Paul 
Glabicki, and Al Jarnow. For the first 
time in history, the festival transmit- 
ted the workshops by satellite to 
public television stations across the 



10 




New York cinematographer, Ed 
Lachman, an OU alumni, gave a 
1979 festival workshop 

An animation category entry at 
the festival. 




country, thereby expanding its 
audience to thousands. 

A second festival theme was 
"Genre of War" which examined 
historical developments in the war 
film "All Quiet on the Western 
Front" (1930) to "Apocolypse Now" 
(1979). 

The festival also continued its 
International Film Competition 
which attracted independent 



filmmakers and producers from the 
United States, Canada and Europe 
in the categories of animation, short 
story, experimental, documentary 
and feature. 

Also included in the festival 
was the 1980 Ohio University Film 
Conference on "Film and Culture" 
which focused on the cultural and 
psychological ways spectators view 
films. Panels and screenings inclu- 



ded topics on Early American 
Cinema as a Cultural Force, Film and 
Anthropology and Film and Per- 
ceptual Theory. 

One special feature of the 
festival was its showcase of the 1979 
Whitney Biennial Film Exhibition 
from New York. The exhibition 
included a series of 19 current films 
by top independent filmmakers in 
the United States. 



11 



12 





Although uptown costumes sometimes involved a great 
deal ol time and money, a little lacial paint or hair die 
could turn just as many heads. 



13 








nly in Athens could Jesus Christ 
meet the devil himself in a spirit of 
fun and good times. Only in Athens 
and only on the night of the now 
annual Halloween party, held 
Saturday, October 27. 

Approximately 5000 people 
jammed the uptown area, forcing 
the closing of Court Street between 
Union and State streets. However, 
no official party was planned for 
uptown, because city and university 
officials agreed there would be too 



many problems involved with the 
large crowd it would attract. 

Meanwhile, about 4000 people 
attended the offical university 
party, held in the Convocation 
Center, featuring the Marching 
110. After the band show, the 
crowd dwindled to about 500 and 
was almost evenly split between 
students and parents in town for 
Parent's Weekend. The Convo 
party offered a rock'n'roll band, a 
costume judging contest, a pizza- 



14 




Far Left - Dressing up and pretending to be 
someone else is part ot the fun of Halloween 
at OU. 

Left - As the hours dwindled on, it was not 
uncommon to see gouls recovering from the 
evening. 

Bottom - Watching Court Street from above 
was just as much fun as being on Court Street 
as students forgot their inhibitions for a night. 




eating contest, and food, beer and 
kisses for sale. Big Bird, won the 
costume contest and the runners- 
up included one student whose 
costume was a portable television 
over his head. 

Uptown, the mood was more 
rowdy and less inhibited. And 
confirming everyone's fears, a large 
proportion of uptown partiers were 
from out-of-town. Of 141 people 
arrested that night, only 26 were 
university students. As the evening 



progressed, police overlooked 
open container violations, and the 
smell of marijuana was noticable at 
times. Several of the costumes worn 
uptown were of dubious taste, such 
as the people that went as toilet 
seats. Many were simply strange 
and creative combinations of paint, 
aluminum foil and cardboard. 

The bars were jam-packed. The 
many unlucky ones who could not 
get in had to content themselves 
with parading down Court Street 



and gawking at the decorated 
masses. 

The added hour gained from 
the switch to standard time took its 
toll and by the time the bars closed 
most people had gone home, and 
the streets were again opened to 
traffic. 

Soon, the city crews were out 
in the rainy, early-morning hours, s 
cleaning the mess, thus signalling J 
the end of this year's "Mardi Cras of 5 
the Midwest." I 



15 



Left - At the unusually hot Homecoming, at least 
one band member tainted from the heal. 

Right - The Marching 110 prepared a specia. 
Homecoming show incorporating the Marching 
Alumni. 

Bottom - The Homecoming Parade featured floats, 
like this Stroh's lAE-AtA float, as well as many 
bands including the Marching Alumni. 





Left - The linale at the bonfire was a 
magnificent display of fireworks. 

Bottom - In addition to the Homecoming 
halftime festivities, many watched the 
Bucsh balloon ascend and descend. 



&USCH 



17 



T. 



Left - Steve Grogan and the rest of the 'Cats 
ran all over Kent State University. 

Right - Fireworks over the golf course lit the 
way to an expanded homecoming. 

Far Right - The sparkle in Gary Jones' eye says 
there is more to the band's steps than 
mechanical practice. 




he 175 anniversary and "Ohio's 
first university" were condensed 
into one theme for Homecoming 
1979, which took place on Sep 
tember 28, 29 and 30. 

Although homecoming united 
students and alumni, each group 
had its own activities planned. The 
alumni were invited to the 
homecoming dance at the Baker 
Center Ballroom Friday night and a 
homecoming luncheon Saturday 
afternoon. The dance featured 
reknowned musicians Sammy Kaye, 
a 1932 graduate, and Ernie Mariani, 
of 1943. Music was also provided by 
the Sounds of Rhythm and Brass. 

Activities for the students 
included a pep rally and bonfire, 
followed by fireworks on the golf 
course Friday night. 

The Saturday morning parade 



featured the candidates for Ms. 
Bronze, the Marching 110, the 
alumni band, which played the fight 
song much to the crowd's delight, 
various fraternity, sorority and 
community floats, several area 
marching bands, Girl Scout, Brow- 
nie and Boy Scout troops, Athens 
Mayor Donald Barrett, and several 
distinguished alumni, including 
Kaye, Mariani and Wilfred Kon- 
neker. 

The Arnold Air Society, spon- 
sored by Your Father's Mustache 
and Kerr Distributors, entered the 
winning float. Zeta Tau Alpha won 
the campus-wide banner contest. 

A crowd of 17,571 watched the 
Bobcat football team destroy Kent 
State, 43-13. The offense continued 
to be led by junior running back 
Tony Carifa, who rushed for 133 



yards in 19 carries and sophomore 
quarterback Sammy Shon, who 
passed for 165. Cornerback Joe 
Callan picked off his sixth pass of 
the season to continue to lead the 
nation in interceptions, and his 
team's defense. 

That night, the Pop Concert 
Committee and ACRN presented a 
concert in the Convocation Center 
featuring Styx. Over 11,500 people 
attended the 90 minute concert, 
which featured such songs as 
"Lady," "The Grand Illusion," and 
"Renegade," as well as songs from 
their just-released album "Corner- 
stone." Drummer John Panozzo 
electrified the crowd on "Ren- 
egade" with a five-minute solo, and 
guitarist Tommy Shaw had the 
audience on its feet after his solo on 
"Crystal Ball." After the encore, 



18 




"Miss America," the masses headed 
uptown to jam-pack the bars. 

Homecoming also kicked off 
the Black Student Cultural Pro- 
gramming Board's annual cultural 
drive. Several scholarships were 
funded by the Black Homecoming 
Queen Fund Drive. The candidate 
who raised the most money, Kim 
Roper, of Cincinnati, was crowned 
Ms. Bronze at the dance. Roper was 
a freshman sponsored by the 
Omega Psi Phi fraternity. 

The Alumni were invited back 
for homecoming by a joint effort of 
the Student Alumni Board and the 
Center Program Board. Because of | 
the school's 175th aniversity drive, I 
more activities were presented I 
than in previous years. 




19 



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s 




Top - Singing was not the only attraction, as 
mimers Balanese dancers, and Karate 
Club were enjoyed by the audience. 

Bottom - Cameo brought the crowd to its 
leet with some funky music. 

Right - With thoughts of school coming to 
a close, many students got together with 
friends to sun-bathe and have a good time. 



SPRING FEST 

It was the perfect setting for a 
celebration. There was spring 
sunshine, music, dancing, and a 
raffle. There were still two weeks 
before finals, and midterms were 
mostly in the past. There was beer 
— and lots of it. And there was a 
crowd — over 9,000 students and 
visitors. 

Celebrants were treated to the 
sounds of Cameo, Jay Ferguson and 
McCuffey Lane, a local country 
rock band; as well as Balanese 
dancing; an exhibition of the 
martial arts by the Karate Club and 
a performance by the O. J. Ande- 



20 




rson Mime Troupe. Ian Matthews 
was also scheduled to perform, but 
apparently Matthews just decided 
not to make the trip. The crowd did 
not seem to mind since the other 
three bands supplied several hours 
of music. Students and visitors also 
entertained themselves by flying 
kites, playing backgammon under 
the sun, visiting several booths set 
up by campus organizations, 
mingling, and most of all tossing 
frisbees. 

The Spring Celebration, held 
May 19 at the Mill Street field, was 
the result of eight months of 
planning by the Spring Celebration 



Committee, a branch of the Stu- 
dent Activities Commission chaired 
by Jim Holt and Tony Pierfelice. The 
festival was termed a success in the 
sense of the heavy turnout, in spite 
of a disappointing raffle ticket sale 
sponsored by the celebration 
committee. Only 1,000 one-dollar 
tickets were sold, according to 
Andy Colfield, a committee mem- 
ber. Various student activities and 
organizations raised another 8,000, 
and the committee also received 
support from area merchants. 

Pierfelice pointed out that if 
there had been more student 
response to the raffle, bigger-name 



bands could have been booked. 
"Everyone was screaming for 
national entertainment," he said, 
"but they wouldn't support us. We 
got good entertainment, but it was 
stuff that a lot of people hadn't 
heard of." 

Colfield also expressed his 
disappointment in the student 
response. "They (the students) take 
it for granted there will always be a 
Spring Festival," he said. "They go 
to all the trouble of inviting friends s 
from out of town, but they don't 1 
take time to spend one lousy dollar « 
for a raffle ticket." 3 



21 




22 




Left - "Shake Down 
Cruise" is one ol the 
hits the Jay Ferguson 
band rocked the crowd 
with. 

Right - Meeting people, 
sharing experiences, 
and having a good time 
were all part of the day's 
activities. 

Bottom - Not everyone 
enjoyed Spring Festival 
was in the crowd. Some 
listened on the bank of 
the Hocking. 

Far Right - The long 
enjoyable day wearied 
some while others 
could continue all night. 



23 



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Assistant to the Vice President 
Ted Kohan waited for the 9 p.m. 
opening of the 175th Anniversary 
Party. While adjusting the chairs 
surrounding the floor he probably 
wondered whether the free subs 
and cake would satisfy the crowd. 
Perhaps no one will come anyway, 
and then what would happen to the 
food? 

Meanwhile, security took their 
positions at the exits of the floor 
area, ready to deal with any 
violence that might occur. It was, 
after all, the weekend before finals, 
which had been plagued with riots 



virtually every spring since 1969. 
However, it was hoped that the 
party would help stop these 
uptown disturbances, although 
prior attempts by the university to 
stop them, such as the Spring 
Festival, hadn't had much success. 
On the other side of campus, 
Michelle Stronz, Mark Henry and 
other members of the Committee 
On Peaceful Existance were waiting 
anxiously. COPE had been blitzing 
the campus for weeks, with adver- 
tising and personal talks, trying to 
raise student awareness of the 
disturbances. COPE hoped that if 



24 



Left - Earlier fears (hat a $3 
cover charge would keep 
students away were 
realized. Less than 1000 
attended what had been 
billed as "the world's 
largest birthday party." 

Right - Police played a 
hard line against rioters. 

Bottom - COPE'S slide 
shows and talks im- 
pressed students, but 
many still went uptown to 
"watch". 




the students understood what the 
trouble was really like, they would 
not participate. 

Back in the Convocation Cen- 
ter, two sides of the floor were 
flanked with a row of tables which 
each boasted an abundance of 
Fritos and potato chips. The front 
was the stage with musical instru- 
ments and stacks of speakers 
demanding the basketball back- 
boards make way. On one side, a 
booth was selling beer and mixed 
drink tickets, the only things not 
covered in the three dollar admis- 
sion fee. The other side foamed 



with beer and mixed drinks. 

A small crowd entered at 9 p.m. 
The total attendence was about 
500, much fewer than the 2000 
hoped for. 

Two bands, The Seeds of 
Fulfillment and Brass Tracks provi- 
ded music for dancing most of the 
evening. Comedian Jimmie Walker 
of CBS' "Good Times" finished the 
entertainment at 1 a.m., in time for 
an ample amount of submarine 
sandwiches and a huge anniversary 
cake. 

But uptown, it happened again. 
By 3:30 a.m., a crowd of people had 



taken over Court Street and the 
police came out in full riot gear. 
Firing knee-knockers and waving 
billie clubs, the police pushed the 
crowd off Court Street and down 
Jefferson Hill. There were some 
arrests, but the crowd and the 
disturbances were much smaller 
than in the previous years. Most 
people had, apparently, stayed 
away. Although any anxieties about 
poor attendance at the party were s 
fulfilled, the party and the efforts of | 
COPE helped control the annual f 
disturbance. I 



25 



en 




The first day of school means 
the hassle and pain of packing and 
unpacking. Moving in involves 
unpacking junk, arranging furniture 
and simply putting the room in 
order. Boxes are scattered and 
eventually the once bleak and 
barren space becomes alive. 

But for some, no university 
housing was available when they 
arrived. Robert Hynes, Director of 



Resident Service and Auxilaries, 
explained that there were more 
students than anticipated. 

Capacity accomodations for 
students totaled about 6,400, but 
6,600 were assigned housing. So 
James and Wilson Halls, both closed 
to residents last year, reopened. 

The university filled requests 
for housing from about 100 Hock- 
ing Technical College students. 



26 







Left - It seems to take lorever to unpack, 
but it is satisfying once finished. 

Right - Moving in is both exciting and 
fearful as thoughts of meeting new people, 
making new friends, and attending 
different classes go through minds of 
students like Will Parks. 

Bottom Right - Finding just the right place 
for everything is hard in a small dorm room. 




These students moved into Wilson 
Hall while OU students shuffled 
over to James Hall. 

Hynes said there were no 
accomodations for James and 
Wilson residents in the Boyd Hall 
dining facility, so these students ate 
in another dining hall. Shortly after 
fall quarter began, a new system 
was designed to take care of this 
problem. 



In addition to service prob- 
lems, the maintence staff had to be 
re-adjusted. 

Fortunately, OU fared better in 
residence housing than many other 
campuses in Ohio. OU has not had 
to house their students in libraries, 
lounges and in unused classrooms. 




27 




GRADUATION 

This is what its all about. Four 
years, more or less, at school comes 
to a climax with graduation, and 
more than one student has strug- 
gled through a senior year with only 
one thought: getting that sheeps- 
kin. 

During commencement exer- 
cises on June 9, 1979, 2,130 degrees 
were presented, including Honora- 
ry Degrees to Lillian Carter, the 
president's mother, and Oliver 
Ocasek, Ohio senator. Dr. John 
Baker, former OU president, gave 



the Commencement Address. 

Associate Degrees were given 
to 234, Bachelor's Degrees to 1,509, 
Bachelor's Degrees in the Honors 
Tutorial College to 30, Master 
Degrees to 326, and Doctors 
Degrees to 27. 

Outstanding undergraduate 
student leaders honored were 
Dwight Ferguson, Diane Heemsath, 
Russell Irvine, Jeffrey Richardson, 
Bernice Seman and 73 other 
undergraduates. 

The president of OU, Charles 
Ping, was the presiding officer. 



28 




Greetings were given by Ronna 
Rubin, senior class president; 
Jasmer Narag, graduate student 
council president; and John Jones, 
Alumni Board of Directors presi- 
dent. 

The processional, March of the 
Priests from "Athalia," and the 
recessional, Coronation March 
from "The Prophet," were played c 
by the Ohio University Symphony | 
Orchestra conducted by Harold c 
Robison. I 



Left - President Ping and Miss Lillian 
couldn't have appeared happier as 
she received her honorary degree 
from Ohio University. 

Top - Over 3000 persons were 
waiting for their degrees as Dr. 
Baker gave the commencement 
address. 

Bottom - The mood was only 
partially solemn among the 
graduates as their caps glittered 
with tassels and halos. 




29 








BIG BOY 



21 W. Union 593-7701 




KERR DISTRIBUTING CO., INC. 
ATHENS, OHIO 



Family brewers for more than 200 years. 



30 



A day at the game 

Splashing away worries 

Could this be Athens? 




Ohio University's Recreation Magazine 



31 



Left - The excitement the band generates 
in the crowd can be credited in part to 
the excitement displayed by individuals 
like Rollie Harper. 

Bottom - But football is the main 
attraction, and players like Steven Doe 
can take a moment to chat with young 
fans. 




J\ day at the game 

From the Marching 110 to flasks, 
students know how to enjoy a game 



32 




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Students, football fanatics and those out for a good 
time are inseparable at an OU football game. A valid ID 
is the pass and enthusiasm is the only pre-requisite to 
enjoying a Saturday afternoon at the stadium where hot 
dogs, popcorn and alcohol abound. 

Despite the "45 cents, I'll take all the nickles you got'' 
soda, the celebration is basically a BYOB affair. And 
many students do bring their own to mix or drink straight. 
From wineskins and hidden flasks, spirits drain into 
students increasing the rowdiness and enthusiasm. 

By half time, the crowd is ready. It's the moment 
many have been awaiting. The OU Marching 110 
assembles on the field to play such unorthodox songs as 
"Dancin' Fool" by Frank Zappa. When the Doobie 



Brothers' "Long Train Running" is announced, cheers 
come from the stands and a Long Train Running card 
section flashes its message from the top of the students' 
bleachers. The band makes its transformation from 
marching to dancing band while fans applaud every dip, 
whirl and kick. 

After half time, the exodus of students who came 
mostly to see the band attests to its popularity. However 
popular, band members are never very successful when, 
with perspiration still fresh on their faces, they attempt 
to sell their album. 

Now that the stands are emptier, the Bobcat's job is 
harder. His tail bounces from cheek to cheek as he pads 

Continued on page 36. 



33 



Far Right • Discussing strategy, the Bobcat 
and Bobkitten plan their next crowd- 
pleasing antics. 

Center - A cup of coke and an exciting 
game — or audience — can make anyone 
forget the rain and cold. 

Top - Rain is not discouraging for some who 
enjoy a day at the game. 

Bottom - Halttime wears vigorous Band 
Director Ronald Socciarelli out after 
another dynamic band performance. 




34 



Q 



ame 




35 




Continued from page 33. 

around in front of the stands trying to maintain 
enthusiasm. The Bobkitten parades along beside him in 
her oversized head and short skirt. 

The cheerleaders featuring men, now, jump up and 



36 



Far Lett - As Coach 
Robert Kappes looks at 
the clock informing him 
there are two seconds 
left, he hugs a player at 
the Miami game. 




down, clap and yell their support for the team and 
entertain the audience by somersaulting and diving onto 
thick pads. Athletic males hold the diminutive girls in 
impossible poses. They keep their pep until the final 
ten-second countdown when the crowd pushes to 



squeeze through the gates. 

Sometimes fans leave with sunburned cheeks and 
sometimes with rain-soaked hair. Long after sunburns 
fade, hair dries and the score is forgotten, students will 
remember a typical day at the game. 



37 




§plashi ng away w orries 

Strouds Run provides 
a getaway from student pressures 



38 




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Left - Strouds Run has a lot to offer, but the 
beach seems to be the most popular spot 
for some. 

Top - Indian Summer allows students to 
enjoy the scenery longer, whether studying 
or playing. 

Bottom - Mary Jones and Mel Stock enjoy 
a quiet afternoon in the beautiful hills of 
Athens County at Strouds. 



They come by the hundreds, by car, by motorcycle, 
by bicycle and even by foot along County Road 20 past 
farmhouses and abandoned fields. They come on a day 
when the sun is out and the temperatures reach the 70s 
in early spring or Indian Summer. They come to escape 
chemistry and calculus, if only for a few hours before 
returning to the real world. 

Strouds Run State Park offers this escape for 
students, with 2,606 acres of trails, picnic areas, 
campgrounds and a beach on Dow Lake, all in the 
wooded hills of Southeastern Ohio. 

On hot days the beach is usually packed with 



sunbathers and swi 
through the air with 
sound of splashing w; 
the lake in search 
leaf-covered trails br 
nick music and cars I 
winding over ridges 
sometimes offering ,i 
people prefer a null 
gnnd loud and gin 
relaxation, and most 



mmers. Music and frisbees float 

the smell of suntan lotion and the 

iter. Row boats and canoes scatter on 

ol hidden coves and inlets. The 

ing hikers away from the sounds of 

the sound of swaying trees, while 

down hollows and over creeks, 

glimpse of surrounding hills. Other » 

iw picnic under shade trees with g 

id friends. Most students want » 

> 

gel it, whatever their tastes. 3 



39 




Qauld this be Athens? 



Fashion at Ohio University 
What it could be 



40 




Fashion is something you read about in magazines. 
There's no such thing in Athens. Comfort, not vogue, 
dictates dressing here. And no matter how long the media 
rejoices over "the preppy look" or "the disco clothes", 
they'll never make the bigtime here. 

We dress like we're in the country — probably 



because we are. There are a lot of old worn jeans seen 
about town and a lot of boots. And if you happen to be 
uptown on a weekend sometime, you'll see more than 
one cowboy-hatted fellow leaning against the bar. But 
that is not to say we're "into" western wear. 

Actually, we're not into any particular style. Take a 



41 



From business to ca- 
sual to dressy, the fa- 
shions across America 
are looking sophisticat- 
ed. But here in Athens. 
fashion as such does 
not really exist. Sophis- 
ticated or comfortable, 
students wear whatever 
pleases them. 




stroll down college street sometime. You'll see more 
'Gators than you can count, along with a healthy supply 
of buttondowns, crew necks and topsiders. 

We also maintain our status in a league of 
name-droppers. We wear Calvin Klein on our back 
pockets, Pierre Cardin on our sleeves and Brooks 



Brothers on our backs. In the spring, the entire campus 
must surely be posing for a T-shirt ad, what with a 
different logo on every shirt. 

And never let it be said that we, here at OU are not 
good sports, for though we may not always win, we 
always look as though we should. We wear baggy grey 



42 




sweats, green and white shorts, and the sneakers Mom 
got us j ust before sending us off to school. If you look real 
hard, you might just see someone in a letterman's jacket. 
For the most part, we don't have a certain look. OU 
is too diversified to adopt, let alone maintain, any one 
style of dress, any behavior or any attitude for long. 



Here in Athens, we tend to wear what is 
comfortable, what is casual and whatever happens to be $ 
left in the bottom of the drawer the day before we do our | 
laundry. Because, for the most part, that's what fashion 1 
is at Ohio University. 



43 



Right — During winter months, students take to 

the "indoor track", the hallway around the 

Convo. 

Bottom — Over-use has led to a deterioration of 

the condition of O.U.'s six racquetball courts. 





T&cpin' active 

Students make the best of old or 
crowded facilities to get their kicks 



44 




College students are an active breed. Despite 17 
hours of classes, all the studying that accompanies that, 
and a social life, students here find time to hit the streets. 

Literally. The university has a two and a half mile 
jogging track along the banks of the Hocking River and 
joggers are seldom chased off the track in Pendan 
Stadium, but most running enthusiasts prefer to run in 
the streets. In the fall and spring runners plod along 
Stewart and North McKinley streets for the scenic East 
or South Green routes, or head for a refreshing romp in 
the hills via Route 56, toward Lake Hope, Route 20, 
towards Stroud's Run, or Route 24, towards nowhere in 
particular. 

When students want the thrill of competition, they 



head for Grover Center. And they head early too, that is 
if they expect to get a court. Grover's six basketball 
courts, six handball courts, two weight rooms and two 
gymnasiums are in constant demand. The competition to 
get a court is sometimes just as demanding as competition 
on the court. 

"There's just not enough,"said Andy Golfield, an 
avid racquetball player. "There's just six courts for the 
students plus 25,000 townspeople. It's become a very 
popular sport, and a lot of townspeople play, too." 

Fortunately, intramurals help organize court usage 
for those persons who are serious players. During the 
winter when indoor sports become most popular, 
intramural racquetball, handball, basketball and 



45 




ftetive 



broomball swing into full gear. 

Broomball, a non-skaters' hockey, takes place in 
aging Bird Arena. When Bird is not being used by the 
hockey team, for intramurals or for classes, it brings in 
a host of pleasure skaters during late fall and winter. 

If Bird Arena is aging, the natatorium is close to 
death. Built in 1949, the 25-yard swimming pool houses 
both swimming and diving teams, college and university 
classes and open swimming by staying open 18 hours a 
day. None-the-less dozens of die-hard swimmers brave 
cramped and inadequate locker rooms and a crowded 
pool to get in a few laps every day. In the fall, intramural 
water-polo also is held in the pool. 

Outdoors, in the spring and fall, the intramural fields 



46 




Right — "Grover-ball" it 

known to produce intense 

games. 

Bottom — Racketball's 

popularity has increased 

beyond the facilities' 

capacity. 



on the West Green and the recreation fields behind the 
South Green and McCraken Hall come alive with 
football, soccer, Softball, baseball, frisbee and the 
numerous other outdoor sports. 

Basketball lovers find time and space to play year 
round. Outdoor courts by the South Green and behind 
McCraken Hall are in constant demand when the 
weather is warm and the six courts in Grover Center are 
in constant use regardless of the weather. The pick-up 
games at Grover Center are legendary, and legend has 
it that some of the finest players in the Mid-American 
Conference participate here and not at the Convo. 

Sixteen tennis courts behind Grover Center are 
usually packed when there's no snow on them. More 



tennis courts are located behind the art building, and 
although tennis enthusiasts complain that they are in 
terrible shape, they still use them continuously. 

For those students that have an addiction to less 
physical sports, the Baker Center Game Room is a haven. 
In fact, 400-500 students engage in several activities at 
Baker on a typical weekday, and this number soars 
toward 650 on weekends, according to Glen Hashman, 
manager of operations. 

Thirteen pool tables take much of this load, but 
bowling is another sport at Baker Center that can cure 
anyone's studying blues. Unfortunately, physical 
education classes, team practicing and intramurals 
occupy the eight lanes most of the day. This leaves 6 p.m. 



47 



Right and Far Right — Bob 
Rothman lines up a shot in the 
Baker Center Game Room, and 
takes another as Dave Carr and 
Juli Lucas look on. 
Below — Students keep the 
Baker Center bowling lanes 
rolling. 




ffcMve 



to 9:30 p.m. as the only time available to enjoy a few 
games. 

In addition to billiards and bowling, the game room 
offers foosball and air hockey. But fanatics of the games 
may get frustrated as only one table of each game is 
available. 

Pool and ping-pong tables can also be found in the 
basements of many dorms for study breaks and 
relaxation. 

Regardless of what he likes to do, a student at Ohio 
University can usually find a place to do it, if he can find 
the time. 



48 




49 



We do it all for you 




McDonald's 



399 Richland Avenue 
2 Blocks South of the Convo 



4 Locations To Serve You: 

23 S. Court St. 

329 Richland Ave. 

Corner of Stimson and Palmer 

Albany, Ohio 



a 



HOCKING VALLEY BANK 

Athens only home-owned service bank 




225 PARK AVENUE SOUTH 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 10003 



50 




Smash d 1 

A Swooping succetes p. 87 

Smiles brighten tip season p. 60 

The man who 

upstaged the ba 







'omen's sports: 
fecoming first clasj 

p-92. . ; 



51 



■»% 



J* 



The man who upstaged the band 



Coming from an assistant 
coaching job at the University of 
Virginia, first-year head coach Brian 
Burke guided the football team to a 
6-5 record, the Bobcats first winning 
season in three years. For Burke, 
this was his first job as head coach 
of a college football team. 

Burke's first team of the season 
was a tough one, against Big-Ten 
foe Minnesota. Though the Bobcats 
controlled the game for three 



quarters, the Gophers scored two 
quick fourth-quarter touchdowns to 
win, 24-10. 

"After the game I felt that there 
wasn't any question that we could 
play with Minnesota," Burke said. 
"With better execution, we might 
have won. I felt that we could play 
with any team in the MAC." 

Despite Burke's optimism, the 
team had its ups and downs in the 
MAC. The Toledo and Central 



Michigan games were examples of 
downs. Referring back to the Toledo 
game, Burke said, "It was an 
extremely frustrating game for both 
the coaches and the players. We just 
didn't play well. We are capable of 
playing so well and didn't, yet we still 
were in the game." 

The Bobcats pleased Burke in 
some games, though. He felt that 
the offense played well in beating 
Bowling Green while racking up 48 




Brian Burke brought out a team that returned respectable play to Peden 



52 




points, and the defense performed 
well against Miami, allowing the 
Redskins just seven points. 

Burke's one goal is a Mid- 
American Conference champion- 
ship, he said. But Burke's future at 
Ohio University was questioned 
after the season when it was 
speculated that he might move on to 
another school. 

"I'm on a one year contract," he 
said later. "It works both ways. In s 
this business, you don't plan much S 
further than one year ahead." m 

Bill Kelly III 




Burke watches play with wide receiver Faron Volkmer. 



Ohio University's 43-year old head coach. 



53 




Tony Carifa hoped and dodged to 700 yards rushing to lead the MAC'S third best rushing offense. 



54 



Something new: a winning season 



A new coach, a winning season 
and a respectable showing in the 
Mid-American Conference were 
new experiences to many members 
of the footb team. Under the 
direction of first-year head coach 
Brian Burke, the Bobcats finished 
6-5 overall and 4-4 in the MAC. 

The Bobcats faced some tough 
opponents during the season. The 
University of Minnesota handed the 
Bobcats their first loss in the season 
opener, in a hard-fought game that 
was closer than the 24-10 score 
indicated. 

After several years, the Bobcats 

Chip Gamerlsfelder 



finally had their revenge in Oxford, 
as 19,674 looked on. In a defensive 
battle, perennial rival Miami was 
beaten by the foot of kicker Steve 
Green, who kicked three field goals 
in the 9-7 win. 

Burke expressed his views on 
how well the offensive and defensive 
units performed. "I was pleased 
overall with both sides," he said. "In 
games nine, ten and eleven, 
(Cincinnati, Bowling Green and 
Northern Illinois) we put a lot of 
points on the board. That pleased 
me because in mi-season we ran 
into the tougher defenses. Towards 




The Miami game had its tips and downs, but the Cats won, 9-7. 



the end of the year we were getting 
better," he said. "Defensively, we 
were pretty spotty: good against 
Miami, bad against Toledo. Toward 
the end of the year, against Bowling 
Green, we shut them down. It was 
mainly a difference in attitude," 
Burke said. 

One of the bright spots for the 
Bobcats this year was sophomore 
quarterback Sammy Shon. "I was 
very pleased with his development," 
Burke said. "I look back to our 
spring game and Steve Green put 
the only points on the board." 
Under the field leadership of Shon, 
the Bobcats ended up third in the 
all -MAC in total rushing. 

Green was another individual 
bright spot. The third and last 
brother in the Green family to kick 
for the Bobcats will be difficult to 
replace, said Burke. "We'll be 
recruiting two people to fill Steve 
Green's shoes. He handled all our 
kicking game. On a trip it helped so 
we could bring another player who 
might be needed elsewhere." 

The team had several other 
outstanding performers. Joe Callan 
anchored the seventh-best passing 
defense in the country by leading 
the nation with nine interceptions. 
Running back Tony Carifa led the 
team in rushing with 700 yards and 
receptions with 45. Kevin Babcock 
was close behind with 687 yards 
rushing, despite playing three 
games with a broken rib. Tedd 
Lucas led a very balanced defensive 
unit with 77 tackles. 

Five players made first-team 
all-MAC: Babcock, Callan, Mark 
Geisler. Green and Steve Groves. 
Geisler, a tight end, was also 
awarded the NCAA post-graduate 
academic scholarship in academics 
and athletic eligibility. Brian Burke 
gave what he felt was the biggest 
honor for the team: "We finished 
fourth and we were picked eighth." 



55 




The 57" Sammy Shon was oversized and, occasionally overwhelmed but the Big-10 style defense . 



Chip Gamertslelder 



56 




but he still managed to keep the Bobcats in the game until the fourth quarter. 



57 






^fa/The race for varsity status 



As the year began drawing to a 
close, at least four club sports at 
Ohio University still held hope for 
becoming the 12th men's varsity 
sport. In order for Ohio University to 
reiain its NCAA division 1-A status. 
Athletic Director Harold McElhaney 
has to pick a 12th varsity sport by 
June 1, 1980. By the spring, four 
sports were still in the running: 
volleyball, rifle team, lacrosse and 
hockey. 

It seems odd that the immense- 
ly popular hockey team would be in 
competition with, say, a virtually 
unknown team like rifle, but accord- 
ing to McElhaney. popularity is only 
a small aspect of the consideration. 
Cost, availability of nearby competi- 
tion, a coach and a facility and 
student interest all play roles in his 
decision. 

It appeared that rifle team had 
the inside track. The major stum- 
bling block for the rifle team was 
overcome when it was learned that 



the NCAA would sanction the sport. 
"We've already got a rifle range and 
a coach available," McElhaney said. 
"And there are a lot of schools with 
a rifle program." 

Hockey proved to be both 
successful and popular again during 
the 1980 season, but it is an 
expensive program, and after the 
resignation of John Menzies in 
March, the team is without a coach. 
A major brawl that broke out in a 
game with Cincinnati also hurt the 
team's chances. 

"It didn't help any," McElhaney 
said of the brawl. "I don't mean that 
to be the kiss of death. But if hockey 
became our 12th sport, an incident 
like that could be the death of the 
team." 

Volleyball and lacrosse have 
also maintained successful pro- 
grams during recent years. While at 
Allegheny College in Pennsylvania, 
McElhaney was instrumental in 
bringing varsity status to the 



lacrosse team there. But he insists 
that this will not affect his decision 
here. Both lacrosse and volleyball 
already have facilities and all the 
equipment they need. 

A number of other club sports 
had early hopes of attaining varsity 
status, but one-by-one they 
dropped out. Water polo, gymnas- 
tics, judo, bowling and fencing were 
all mentioned early, but were 
eliminated. 

Boxing and rugby, two other 
popular sports at Ohio University, 
were never considered because 
neither sport is sanctioned by the 
NCAA. 

"I think boxing is a good sport 
and I would like to see it sanction- 
ed," McElhaney said. "But right now 
it's out of the question ." 

Boxing has been out of the 
running from the beginning, and 
soon three more sports will be, also. 




The lacrosse team hat come a long way recently, but la thia enough? 



58 




Hockey's violent nature both added to its popularity and hurt its chances to become varsity. 

* MKM 




Lacrosse is also violent — when compared to rifle or volleyball —but doesn't pull as many punches as hockey. 



59 



%•• 



% 



¥ 



Smiles 

brightens 

season 



In the past OU has had anything 
but a winning soccer team. As 1979 
rolled around, it looked as if the 
soccer team would repeat history 
and continue the tradition of losing. 

On September 27, after respec- 
tive 4-0 and 2-1 losses to Evansville 
and Denison, Coach Earl Draper 
was fired. He ignored Athletic 
Director Harold McElhaney's order 
to establish tighter control of his 
team, which was notorious for, 
among other things, leaving beer 
cans and cigarette butts on the 
team bus. After a tripped emer- 
gency hatch was blown open, 
Draper received the ultimatum to 
resign or be fired. He chose not to 
resign. 

According to Jay Mariotti, 
former Post sports editor. Draper 
had the reputation of being the most 
controversial coach at OU. 

Assistant coach Andy Smiles 
took over and smiles are what he 
brought to both soccer fans and 
players. Dedicated to winning. 
Smiles helped to transform the 
losing soccer players into champs. 
Overcoming their original setbacks, 
a winning record became a reality. 
The highlights included a 3-2 upset 
of Ohio State and a 2-0 victory over 
Miami. 

Key players for the season were I 
leading scorer Reda Babaria and j 
freshman Deighton Charlemagne. : 




Deighton Charlemagne helped head the Cats toward a successful second half-season. 



60 




Andy Smiles stepped in as coach and won. 



61 



J»% 



VJB 



m 



& 



Injuries 

bring 

Bobcats 

down 

"We never could work with one 
strong lineup," said Gwen Hoover, 
second-year women's volleyball 
coach, referring to the numerous 
injuries that hampered the 11-23 
Bobcats all season. Injuries indeed 
proved to be the main contributing 
factor to the squad's below .500 
performance, most notably with the 
early loss of co-captain Barb 
Haefner to an ankle injury. 

Setters Sue Roth and co- 
captain Judy Mahan were two of the 
most consistent players on the 
team, according to Hoover. They 
picked up some of the slack after 
Haefner's injury and provided 
leadership. 

Hoover noted that the team's 
best wins were against Ashland 
College (15-10, 15-12) and Marshall 
University (15-6, 15-9). This trian- 
gular match was one of only four 
matches played at home this year 
with the 11 remaining matches on 
the road. 

Perhaps the highest point of an 
otherwise dismal season was the 
development of freshmen Donna 
Knutson and Mary Rine. The duo 
became starters toward the sea- 
son's end and has Hoover looking ; 
forward to the future. "They'll play a 5 
very important part next season," * 
she concluded. » 




Beth Bell spikes one in practice. 



62 



??£ 



•I 






# 



Underdogs capture state crowri\fe 



Trust in other teammates 
helped OU Women's Field Hockey 
team capture the state champion- 
ship in November for the 1979 
season. 

"People trusted other people," 
said Coach Kim Brown. "We could 
do more offensively as the season 
progressed." 

In regular season play, the team 
was 3-7-3, with wins over Ball State 
University, Muskingum and Ohio 
Wesleyan. Having the worst record 
of any team entered in the state 
competition, OU went on to defeat 
Bowling Green, top-seeded Ohio 



State University and Miami Univer- 
sity, with a 2-1 victory, to win its first 
state championship. 

"Things finally worked when 
they should," Brown said "Each 
person on the team contributed to 
the success." 

The field hockey team lost, 
however, in regional competition 
with defeats to Purdue and South- 
ern Illinois at Mt. Pleasant, Mi- 
chigan. 

"We should have had a better 
season," said Brown. "We had 
possession of the field. We should 



have won those other season 
games." 

Two players who helped the 
team succeed were Joan Weber and 
Captain Rhonda Rowlins. Brown 
called Weber the best goalkeeper in 
the state. 

Rawlins, former Bermuda re- 
presentative to the world field 
hockey championship, played in 
international competition. "She 
could handle stress. It's nice to have 
a member who has had experience 
with stress," said Brown. 




Mary Hinders and the other Bobcats went into the state tournament as decisive underdogs, but won anyway. 



63 



it 



A 



Co-ed again 



This is the first year OU has had 
male cheerleaders that are "this 
good" according to Mark Gable, 
one of six on the squad. They and 
their female counterparts root for 
the Bobcats during football and 
basketball seasons. 

The cheerleaders' job is to 
psyche up the crowd and the 
players. An all-girl squad is some- 
what limited in what it can do — 



having men adds more variety to the 
show. 

"The guys are the ones who do 
most of the gymnastics, lifting and 
messing around in front of the 
crowd," said Gable. "Face it, guys 
are big hams when given the 
chance." 

The sports administration, 
which sponsors the cheerleaders, 
wanted to get men on the squad to 



bring in more of a crowd and 
therefore more money, plus add 
more spirit to team sports. 

The men get teased for being 
cheerleaders, but most people in 
the stands like them and admire 
their stunts. 

"I went out as a joke, "explained 
Gable. "But then I saw how much 
work it really was; it wasn't much of 
a joke then." 




Mike Meyers is one of the men who was added to the cheerleaders this 
year. 

64 



Joy Martin at a basketball game. 




* 



Youth bring hope 



Cross country has come a long way . 



It was a young cross country 
team that upset Ohio State and ran 
off to a 50-26 season. 

The team, led by a former high 
school ail-American freshman Paul 
Knott, hustled to its best finish in the 
Mid-American Conference since 
1971, sixth place. Knott ran a solid 
20th in that meet. 

The highlight of the season, 
though, came September 29 when 
the Bobcats beat the Buckeyes 
21-39 in a dual meet. It was the first 
time ever, according to Coach Larry 
Clinton, that OU had beaten Ohio 
State. 

The team also featured two 



other freshman, Jeff Blind and Mark^ 
Mutter; two sophomores, Bill 
Tomoff and Wes Hudson, as well as 
junior Steve Zronek and senior 
Gerry Pence. 

"We're headed in the right 
direction," said Clinton. "Next year 
we'll have the strongest nucleus I've 
ever had. We'll look extremely 
strong, with a possibility of challeng- 
ing for the MAC championship." 

Though not a challenger, the 
1979 team was still strong. In the 
Ohio Intercollegiate Championship, 
the Bobcats finished an impressive 
eighth out of 36 schools, and were 
paced by Hutter's 20th place finish. 




through eight bitter years of mediocrity and frustration 



and is only now arriving. 



65 




Rugby's fierce play has attracted large crowds on the South Green field. 



66 




Ruggers 
fall to 
2 - 6 



The fall season was the rugby 
team's worst showing since their 
arrival at Ohio University in 1972. 
"Our 1979 season could be labeled 
what coaches refer to as a rebuild- 
ing season," said Rugby Club 
adviser Peter Griffiths. The club 
finished the season with a 2-6 
record, far short of spring season 
when the team claimed the MAC 
crown. 

Only four lettermen returned to 
lead the team and of eight 
scheduled games, only one was 
played on OU turf. 

The major setback involved a 
ruling from a new club-sport 
committee set up this fall. The 
committee ruled that in order for a 
player to compete, he must carry at 
least seven hours per quarter. 

Even without an impressive 
overall record, the fall season had 
its highlights. The first win was over 
Wright State and the second victory 
came after an impressive bout with 
a highly-touted Cleveland West Side 
Club. 

Individual standouts on the club 
were co-captains Scott Kleman and 
Brian Bradford. Kleman was cited 
for his experienced play in the 
trenches, in the tight-head prop 
position, comparable to an offen- 
sive guard in football. 

The club's roster boasts 40-50 
players. Optimism is high as the club | 
swings into the 1980 spring season, ™ 
featuring six home games. S 



To most students rugby appeared to be unorganized mahem. 



67 



*•* 



A 



* 



jSxA dog of a year 



Everyone predicted a dismal 
season for the young, inexperienced 
Bobcats, but few were pessimistic 
enough to forecast a first-ever 
last-place finish in the Mid- 
American Conference and an 8-18 
record. 

But it turned out to be a s^ason 
that started wrong, with four players 
leaving the team for various reasons 
before the half-way point. The team 
staggered to a 3-13 record before 
head-coach Dale Bandy, under 
pressure from the media and much 
of the student population, an- 
nounced his resignation, effective 
after the season. 

At this point, the 'Cats woke up 
and won half of their remaining 10 
games, salvaging their 12th con- 
secutive winning record (7-6) in the 
Convocation Center. Led by so- 
phomore guard Kirk Lehman, who 
averaged nearly 20 points a game in 
closing weeks and 17.6 for the 
season, the team pulled off one- 
point victories over Ball State, 
Central Michigan and Eastern 
Michigan, and beat Kent State by 10 
and Western Michigan by six in the 
stretch drive. 

But it was not enough as the 
team still finished 5-11 in confer- 
ence play and did not qualify for the 
conference championship tour- 
nament. The first half of the season 
was brutal to the Bobcats. Their 
losses included a 50-83 scorching at 
the hands of Central Michigan, and 
a 50-72 drubbing at home to 
Bowling Green, the Cat's worst loss 
ever in the Convo. 

Lehman and his back-court 
partner, Spindle Graves, led the 
Bobcats in virtually all offensive 
categories, displaying the team's 
lack of depth. The 6'1" Graves led 
the team in rebounding, despite a 
5.3 average, assists and steals, and 
was second on the squad in scoring 
with a 12.1 average. Lehman also 
led the team in field goals, free- 
throw percentage and minutes 
played. Junior John Patterson, who 
was platooned at center with senior 
Doug Graves, led the team in 
field-goal percentage and blocked 
shots, but finished tied with Doug 
Graves for fifth on the team in 
rebounding, at just 2.8 per game. 

Ironically, the team's defense 
was greatly improved over that of 
the 1978-79 team, and allowed just 
73.3 points per game. Spindle 
Graves was the cornerstone of this 



defense, but aggressive play by 
forwards Jim Zalenka and Bill 
Littlefield, and guard Tim Woodson 
also helped slow the pace. Un- 
fortunately, even at a slow pace, the 
Bobcats could not keep up. They 
were held to under 60 points five 
times. 

Before the season, Bandy said 
"Our strength lies in team depth and 
not individual stars. There's no 



doubt in my mind that we will be a 
physically stronger team and be 
quicker defensively, but we will be 
inexperienced." Because of the 
inexperience, and because the 
team's depth did not show through, 
causing Lehman and Spindle 
Graves to take the role of stars, the 
Bobcats suffered through their 
worst season since 1948-49, and 
their worst MAC finish ever. 




Jim Zalenka pulls down a rebound in the 'Call 62-75 loss to Toledo. 



68 




Sophomore forward Andre Adams came on strong toward season's end to finish second on the team in rebounding. 



69 




Spindle Graves' crafty ball handling helped upset Central Michigan in the Convo, 67-66. 



P J Azzollna 



70 




Bill Littlelield and Jim Zalenka found it nearly impossible to penetrate the defense of the nationally-ranked "other guys". 

Delusions of grandeur 



Ohio University vs. Ohio State: 
the names would suggest a rivalry 
despite the fact that they play in 
different conferences. 

But, it didn't take long to 
pinpoint the difference between the 
MAC and the Big Ten. A 27-point 
score (78-51) was the big difference 
when the Bobcats took on the 
number three ranked team in the 
nation, December 1, 1979 at St. 



John Arena in Columbus, home of 
the Ohio State Buckeyes. 

As over 13,000 spectators 
watched the official season opener, 
OU fans were given some hope in 
the first half as the Bobcats rallied to 
tie the score at 25 and were only two 
points down at the half. 

It had taken six and a half 
minutes for Jim Zalenka to score the 
first of his 15 team-high points for 



the Bobcats. 

But the second half was a 
different story. Led by Clark 
Kellogg, Herbie Williams, and Kelvin 
Ramsey, the Buckeyes began rolling 
away from the Bobcats never 
allowing OU to catch up again. 

Coach Bandy of the Bobcats 
said that the fulfillment of potential 
was the key to the game's success. 



71 



vtft 



tK/ Fights of the champions 



The boxing team came out a 
winner in the Fights of the Cham- 
pions held at the Convocation 
Center February 24, but somehow 
Coach Maung Gyi couldn't have 
been completely happy. 

Sure, OU boxers decidedly beat 
the top-ranked squad in the 
country, West Chester State, by 
winning six of eight bouts. And yes, 
OU took one of two decisions in the 
feature fights with Air Force 
Academy pugalists. But the main 
attraction, a fight featuring the 



team's most popular boxer, L.B. 
Towns, was cancelled three days 
before the tournament. Attendance 
at the fights then fell short of 
expectations, with a crowd of little 
over 2,000, and the team did not 
raise enough money to send all the 
boxers to the national champion- 
ships, to be held in Colorado 
Springs. 

Yet, those fans that came saw 
plenty of action. OU's John Beckwell 
lost a split decision to open things 
up, but Leon Butler scored an 



impressive decision over West 
Chester State's Dave Graham to 
turn the tide. Veteran Tony Lake 
battled back in the third round of his 
fight to defeat a heavier John Pendel 
of West Chester State, and the Ohio 
romp was on. 

OU had come into the tour- 
nament ranked fourth nationally by 
the National Collegiate Boxing 
Association, despite beginning the 
year with just two returning boxers, 
Lake and Towns. 




P J A220lina 



Tony Lake took a few blows early, but came on strong in the third round to beat John Pendel. February 24. 
72 




During the summer, Maung Gyi turned down several offers to coach boxing at other schools and soccer at Ohio University, and returned as 
the wizard of O.U. boxing. 



73 



*»% 



& 



& 



"With just one girl graduating, 
we had high hopes for a much better 
season.'' said Coach Gwen Hoover 
about the 1979-80 women's basket- 
ball season. With seven returning 
letter winners, the coach had reason 
to believe that this season would be 
a good one. But, at the end of the 
year, their record was 9-11. 

Inconsistency and poor mental 
attitude were the weaknesses of the 
team, according to Hoover. "The 
girls would make a mistake and 
dwell on it instead of wiping it out of 
their minds and going on with the 
game," said Hoover. 

A larger and tougher varsity 
schedule may also have contributed 
to their losing season. One of the 
most challenging games was 
against University of Dayton, ranked 
number one in the state. Dayton 
defeated OU by 21 points. OU's 
biggest win was against Ashland 
when they won 103-57. 

Leading scorer's were senior 
co-captain Diane Biber with 9.9 
points per game and junior Judy 
Uher with 8.8 points per game. Uher 
was one of the most valuable 
players on the team according to 
Hoover. "She has a good mental 
attitude, a never quitting one," 
Hoover said. 



Experience doesn't 
pay off for women 




Forward Johnnie Henderson loses her battle tor a rebound 



Alan Crabtree Courtesy University Publications 







Spikers 
top 
their 
division 



The men's volleyball club 
topped off a successful season by 
competing in the Mid-American 
Conference and Midwest Intercol- 
legiate Volleyball Association 
(MIVA) Tournaments. 

Led by player-coach Rafael 
Chirinos and club president Michael 
Holden, the team played matches 
tournament style. This means that 
the matches, played on weekends, 
are round-robin and then participat- 
ing teams are seeded for regular 
tournament play. Holden said that 
all of this leads up to the season's 
final tournament, the MIVA. 

Although many individuals 
stood out this year, Holden said, 
"Volleyball is a team sport, not an 
individual sport. You have to love it 
and you have to learn to divide your 
time between classes and being 
gone on weekends." 

Some of the consistent players 
included setter Dave Butt, also the 
tournament organizer, and four- 
year veteran Tony Tawil. the club's 
main power hitter. Randy Oates, 
John Thorndyke and Holden round 
out the 15 player squad. 

OU's division included teams 
from Ohio Wesleyan, Miami, Ober- 
lin, Kenyon and Marietta. 



Player-coach Rafael Chirinos sets the ball. 



75 



JM 



to 



Something 
cheer about 




Coach John Menziea resigned after the aeaaon. 




Rich Barle prepares tor defensing a shot on goal. 



Craig DeSalnlck 



76 




A brawl with Cincinnati caused a game to be cancelled. 




In a lackluster OU sports 
program the ice hockey club stood 
out as a refreshing exception. When 
the Midwest College Hockey League 
tournament ended the season OU 
was champion for the second 
consecutive year after defeating 
Denison 7-2. It also had a fine 
regular season record of 11-5-1. 
The club gave OU's frustrated fans 
something to cheer about. 

And cheer they did. OU hockey 
commanded a large following of 
spirited, boisterous and fiercely 
loyal fans. In the Cincinnati game 
fans threw beer on the Bird Arena 
ice after a fight broke out that the 
officials couldn't or wouldn't break 
up. "It's best to forget about that 
incident,'' OU Coach John Menzies 
said. "It was not the fan's fault, it 
was a result of poor officiating." 

Why is there such a large 
hockey following? "Hockey is a 
great spectator sport," Menzies 
explained. "It's exciting. And 
besides," he grinned, "we're a 
winner." 

The club's schedule was far 
from easy. They played a Dayton 
team that beat them twice, and 
tough Denison and Purdue teams. 
To Menzies, the high point of the 
season was the exciting come- 
from-behind 7-6 win over Purdue 
that kept the fans on the edge of 
their seats to the end. 

Standout players this season 
included Kurt Antkiewicz, captain 
Craig McAlister, Darryl Roberts, 
Greg Craddick, Bob Joyce, Rich 
Barle and MCHL tournament most 
valuable player, Steve Betsko. 

With the team's good record 
and obvious fan support, many 
believe hockey should become OU's 
12th varsity sport. But Menzies is 
not optimistic. "Don't hold your 
breath," he said. "It probably won't 
be." 

But it probably won't matter 
much to Menzies. He announced 
that this would be his last season as 
coach. He compiled a 30-15 record 
during his three-year stint, high- 
lighted by a 16-game winning streak 
at Bird Arena. Menzies summed up § 
the three years saying, "I've made »j 
some mistakes, but we've accom- % 
plished a lot." o 



Starting goalie Chuck Wilson was brilliant in the MCHL playoffs. 



77 



m 



Houska's surprising grapplers 



In its best showing in three 
years, the OU wrestling team 
finished second in the Mid- 
American Conference tournament, 
held in Muncie, Indiana. A strong 
Kent State team captured its 
second straight MAC champion- 
ship, finishing 17 points ahead of the 
Bobcats, with 71 1/2. 

Ohio was again expected to not 
do well, yet six Bobcats placed in 
the tournament. Lorant Ipacs, the 
number one seed at 177 lbs., placed 
first in the MAC by pinning Bob Stag 
of Kent State. Heavyweight Greg 
Byrne and Bill Potts of the 167 lb. 
class both placed third, while Andy 
Slayman, at 150, finished fourth. 
One hundred thirty-four lb. wrestler, 
Andy Lokie, lost a close 



match (13-11) to place second, as 
did Rich Roehner, in the 142 lb. 
class. 

Ohio had a very trying season 
on its way to the MAC champion- 
ships. For many dual meets the 
Bobcats had to forfeit several 
weight classes and could find no 
one to fill them. This contributed to 
the grapplers losing four dual meets 
by one point each. One of these was 
to 17th-ranked Michigan, 24-23. 

The lack of depth hurt the 
Bobcats all season. Coach Harry 
Houska, in a call to a recruiter, 
indicated just how desperate the 
situation was: "Don't tell me about 
juniors, I want to hear about seniors. 
We need help immediately," he 
said. 



Injuries also subtracted from 
their performance; as many as four 
wrestlers were out at one time, 
leaving the lower weight classes all 
but barren. 

The Bobcats participated in a 
wide variety of tournaments and 
matches during the season. They 
began with the Southern Open, in 
which they finished ahead of Kent 
State, 681/2-68. The team took sixth 
place in the prestigious Lock 
Haven-Matt Town USA Tourna- 
ment. In an early show of strength at 
the Ohio Collegiate Invitational at 
Ohio State, the team placed fourth 
out of 18 teams, despite having only 
seven of 10 weight classes filled. 
This exemplified how strong Hous- 
ka's team was, even without depth. 





79 



Torn, Broken or Strained: 

Down but not out 



When an athlete goes down 
with an injury, fans often think of it 
as a statistic, a loss, at best a 
handicap to the team: Babcock is 
out; Zalenka is injured; Hardy is hurt 
— the team won't be as strong. 

But to the athlete, an injury 
often means personal frustration, 
fear, and usually a great deal of 
physical pain. 

Sophomore tennis player Pa- 
trice Risaliti developed cinovitis, an 
inflammation of the rotator shoulder 
cuff during the summer of 1979. "I 
was depressed," she said. "I was 
afraid I wasn't going to play tennis. 
I wouldn't lift my arm; I couldn't put 
my hand in my back pocket. I 
couldn't even run because of the 
movement." 

Fortunately, OU has a strong 
therapy and trainer program, run by 
head trainer Skip Vosler, but is 
administrated by student trainers. 
"It's really first class," said Mike 
Echstenkamper, who missed sever- 
al baseball games in the spring to a 
pulled hamstring. "I was treated 
super. They really spoil you." 

Risaliti agreed. "The trainers 
are great," she said. "I was so close 
to the trainers; they make your 
program so smooth. I guess we 
wouldn't have anything if it weren't 
for them." 

Vosler gives much of the credit 
for the program's success to the 
athletes. "It's very easy to work with 
athletes because athletes want to 
get well," he said. Improved athlete 
conditioning has cut down on the 
severity of injuries, said Vosler, but 
doesn't stop them from occurring. 
"You can't control them," said Mark 
Geisler, who missed much of his 



freshman and sophomore years on 
the football team because of a groin 
pull. "If you think about injuries and 
try not to get them, that's when you 



get them. The best way to prevent 
them is to be in good physical 
shape, but if you just happen to be 
hit right . . ." 




Injured athletes receive conditioning, therapy and treatment from student trainers like Mary 
O'Carroll. 



80 




The pain of injuries is often compounded by fear and frustration when it's severe enough to sideline an athlete. 



81 




Sluggers splash into second 




For Gary Grips and the reat ol the team, an MAC championahip waa in eight, but painfully out of reach. 



82 



Despite their .500 or worse 
finish for the third season in a row, 
the baseball team wound up second 
in the MAC behind Miami University. 

Ohio's record was 20-20 overall 
and 8-4 in conference play. 




Priessman's .378 average kept France 
smiling through lunch. 



Coach Jerry France said of his 
seventh season, "The biggest 
surprise was how we started out on 
the spring trip." The team was 2-11 
in early spring play, against such 
powerful teams as North Carolina, 
Duke and Wake Forest, which went 
to the NCAA playoffs. 

"The other surprise," conti- 
nued France, "was all the rain. It 
hurt our third and fourth starting 
pitchers, who were never really in 
the groove." 

The team was rained out of so 
many games in league play, that 
there was some doubt as to whether 
it would be able to play enough 
games to win the MAC. 

But the season was full of 
exciting, close games. In fact, the 
extra-inning, 4-1 loss to Bowling 
Green constituted the largest losing 
margin of the season. Many of the 
games lost down south on the 
spring trip were by one run. 



"It was an exciting year, very 
close," reflected France. "So many 
close games hurt us." 

Individually, pitcher John Bur- 
den wound up with a 8-1 record, 
while Larry Nicholson had a 7-4 
season. Mike Echstenkamper led 
the hitters, batting .424, and Kevin 
Priessman had a .378 year. 

"Our speed was really good," 
France said. Shortstop Lyle Govert 
set an O.U. stolen base record with 
39; Dave Spriggs and Echstenkam- 
per also had good years. 

The team had four players 
drafted by the pros. Echstenkam- 
per, a center fielder who was on the 
Coaches' All-American second 
team, signed with the New York 
Yankees. Third baseman Scott 
Kuvinka, a Sporting News All- 
American, signed with the Pittsburg 
Pirates, as did Burden and Nicho- 
lson. 




Cheering in rare good weather are Doug Stackhouse, Si Johnson, Jeff England, Brian Kerns, Glenn Pawloaki and Tom Vitale. 



83 



J»% 



p 



Golfers swing 

into 

MAC title 



It proved to be an exciting yet 
controversial season for the Golf 
team. Led by steady sophomore Jeff 
Mawhorr, who averaged 76 strokes 
a game, and senior Jeff Johnson, 
the Bobcats squeezed past Ball 
State to capture their 17th Mid- 
American Conference Champion- 
ship. 

However, in an unprecedented 
move, the District IV Collegiate Golf 
Selection Committee opted to 
exclude the MAC championship 
squad from the NCAA tournament. 

Junior Lowell Dencer, who 
finished third at the MAC champion- 
ship stated his disappointment. 
"Speaking for everyone, I think it 
has dampened our spirits. What 
good does it do us now playing in 
the MAC?" 

Individually, Kermit Blosser was 
voted the 1979 Mid-American 
Conference coach of the year, and 
Mawhorr was darned to the all- 
conference team. 




O.U.'t only MAC champ* war* Jerry Mawhorr, Jeff Johnson, Dencer, Jeff Mawhorr, Bob 
Spark* and Scoff Bibbee. 




Lowell Dencer and the MAC champ* were all amilea until the word came: no NCAA bid. 



84 




The ultimate sport ^ 
sails through 
impressive season 



Carey Amthor watches the disk float into reach 
in a game of grace, speed and skill. 



In only their second year of 
existence, the Ohio University 
Ultimate Frisbee Team registered an 
impressive record, as well as, 
generating enthusiasm that made 
the club a success. 

The season started off on a sour 
note, but the Bobcats pulled 
together to win several straight. They 
qualified for the Regional U.S. 
Championship by winning the 



Northern Ohio Sectional Champion- 
ship, and finishing with an 17-4 
record. 

Co-captains T. J. Kazamek and 
Mike Wittwer pulled the team 
together by working hard to find 
competition. Other key players were 
Doug Gleichauf, who led the team in 
scoring and Dave Weiss, the play- 
maker and leader in assists. Kerr 
Distributing sponsored the team. 




Doug Gliechauf dropped this one, but the team was up all season, until it went to Wisconsin for the U.S. regionals. 



85 



Jt% 



« 



® 



k 



Experienced 
team shows 
consistency 

First year coach Kim Brown led 
an experienced Softball team to an 
11-5 regular season record. 

The team consisted mostly of 
players from the previous year's 
team and the experience showed in 
the team's consistency throughout 
the regular season. 

At the state tournament, how- 
ever, bad luck in the form of rain and 
poorly scheduled games contribut- 
ed to the team's fifth place finish. 
After beating Bowling Green in the 
first game, the team dropped two 
straight, losing to Muskingum and 
the eventual state champion. Ohio 
State. Ohio had beaten both of 
these teams during the regular 
season. 

The key players to Ohio's 
strong regular season showing 
included shortstop Vicki Smith, 
pitcher Tracey Judd. center-fielder 
Sue Harness, and catcher Jane 
Hess. 




only to be disgusted a* the call went lor the Thundering Herd. 



86 







A 

swooping 

success 



Last spring, the O.U. women's 
lacrosse team finished the season 
with an impressive 10-1 record, 
suffering its only loss to a non- 
collegiate team, the Cuyahoga Club. 

The 'Cats began their winning 
season with a revenge victory over 
Ball State. 

Even though Sherril Quinn and 
Valeria Conkey made te Midwest All 
Star team, and Sandi Reimers made 
the second team. Coach Catherine 
Brown said, "I would have a hard 
time identifying any stars. They were 
the most cooperative team I've ever 
worked with." 

She attributed the teamwork to 
eight seniors who have worked 
together for years and also have the 
ability to work well with freshmen. 
Brown added, "Lacrosse is one of 
the most exciting games around and 
it's building a very strong tradition 
at Ohio University." 



££■ M* ftu^ - 


. 








^8 


^ ■ A / v^ 


^^^^v 


'^^_ 


T 






m- \ 


* 



Fighting through two opponents, Sheila Kolenc shows the team's key determination. 



Cookie Wright found it's easy to laugh it you're 
winning. 

87 



A* 



« 



A year for individuals 



MEN'S TRACK 

The men's track team once 
again boasted several individual 
stars but no depth as the team 
finished a disappointing fifth in the 
Mid-American Conference last year. 

Forty of the team's 63 points 
scored in the MAC championship 
were scored by two members: Jesse 
Young and Jerry Hatfield. Young 
won the 200 and 400 meter runs, 
setting an MAC record in the 400. 
Hatfield won the long and triple 
jumps, setting an MAC record in the 
triple jump. They both qualified for 
the NCAA championships. 

Coach Larry Clinton blamed the 
team's lack of depth on the fact that 
three key team members were lost 
spring quarter due to academic 
ineligibility. 





Oecatheiete Keith Fritz misses a jump. Charlie Dempwolf pushes for that little extra that never came to the team as a whole. 



88 




Women's track 
caught short in 
third varsity season. 



Shot-putter Linda Bench lets it fly. 



The women's track team had 
m trouble getting people out for the 
I team, and as a result, struggled 
3 through the season with only 11 
sj members. 

> "It was a good season for 

g individuals," said Cheryl Brown, 
I however, who specialized in long 
g distance running events. "For as 
| many people as we had on the team, 
1 we did a decent job." 

Indeed, individuals broke 17 of 
the school records in 1979, though 



it was only the team's third year of 
existence. 

The team was led by three-year 
veteran Karen Bleigh, who 
specialized in the pentathlon but 
also competed in a number of other 
events, including relays. 

Brown felt this was one of the 
teams key weaknesses. "The small 
team made us double up a lot," she 
said. "If people were in less events. I 
they could have concentrated on t 
one event." £ 




Kim Preston's high-jumping ability proved to be a positive aspect during the '79 season. 



89 



%& 



Netters hobble into fourth 



Junior Mike Riedmayer cap- 
tured the Mid-American Conference 
championship in third singles play to 
highlight the men's tennis season. 

Overall, the team finished with a 
19-15 record, and a fourth-place 
MAC standing. 

"I thought we'd have a better 
season, but injuries cost us 
matches," coach Dave Stephenson 
said. "We had a strong league to 



compete against; several teams 
were nationally ranked. We also had 
some inconsistent play in doubles." 
His starters included team 
captain Jim Oppenlander at number 
one; Tony Torlina. second; Ried- 
mayer, third; Jim Asher, fourth; Peter 
Scarff, fifth; and Stephen Gunder- 
son, sixth. Pete Petrusky and Gary 
Hribar completed the roster. 




Jim Oppenlander captained the squad, but hit teammate Mike Riedmayer won Oil's first singles championship since 1973. 



90 




Women's 
tennis 
a smash 



The women's tennis team 
ended their 1979 season with an 
impressive 11-2 record, finishing 
3rd in the state. 

The greatest strength of the 
squad was consistency in a singles 
play. Junior Karen Cook from 
Columbus played in the number one 
position, compiling an 11-2 record. 

Senior Lynn Bozentka, the 
second singles player, ended the 
season at 8-3, while Sue Regan 
finished with an 1 1-2 record at third 
singles. 

Ann Kopf was number four; her 
individual record was 12-1. Barb 
Haefner, Lori Koenig, and Kathy 
Nickels rounded out the top seven. 

The Cats competed in cold, 
snowy weather every weekend in 
April. Miami and West Virginia 
handed the team its only losses, 
with Miami beating them again in 
the semi-finals of the state tour- 
nament. 



Lynn Bozentka solidified the number-two position with an 8-3 mark. 



91 



**% 



s* 



$ 



Becoming first class 



Women's athletics at Ohio 
University have come a long way 
since 1973 when Catherine Brown 
was head coach for nine different 
varsity sports. 

Today, OU has a head coach for 
almost every sport, plus some have 
assistants. Scholarships are now 
commonplace in the field of 
women's athletics, and Ohio Univer- 
sity has increased its distribution of 
instate scholarships. The athletic 
budget for women has also been 
increased over the years, hitting its 
peak in 1979-80. 

Many women's sports at OU 
receive equal or better treatment 
than some men's sports on campus. 
The men's soccer field must be 
relocated to make room for new 
fields for the women's field hockey, 
lacrosse, and softball fields. The 
intramural football and soccer fields 
will be moved to make room for the 
women's facilities. 

The fact still remains that Ohio 
University is not in compliance with 
Title IX, equal funding. Title IX set its 
deadline for compliance in 1978, but 
many colleges and universities, 
including OU. have not yet met its 
requirements. Those requirements 
include equal funding for men's and 
women's sports, which should be 
distributed through the programs in 
ways beneficial to them. 

But because OU is not in 
compliance with Title IX requir- 
ements, many disadvantages have 
hovered over the women. Even 
though assistant coaches are now a 
part of women's athletics at Ohio, 
not one of them receives a paycheck 
for his or her time spent helping the 
team. 

The women's budget has been 



increased, but equipment and 
facilities are still rather poor. Many 
female athletes must share cleated 
shoes for various sports and some 
uniforms are used for more than one 
sport. 

But the university maintains it is 
working toward compliance with 



Title IX. It has formed a title IX 
Committee to work out the prob- 
lems and grievances associated 
with Title IX. But more than a year 
after its inception, the Title IX 
Committee has done little but make 
a name for itself. 




Alan Crabtree courtesy university Publications 



92 




Whether they're experiencing the agony of defeat or the thrill 
of victory, women athletes usually experience it alone — 
without fans. 



93 



**% 



« 







Men's Tennis19-15 




Ohio 


2 


Virginia Tech 


7 


Ohio 


8 


Belmont Abbey 


1 


Ohio 


9 


Western Carolina 





Ohio 


4 


Presbyterian 


5 


Ohio 





Furman 


9 


Ohio 





Georgia 


9 


Ohio 


3 


Davidson 


6 


Ohio 


5 


North Carolina at Charlotte 


4 


Ohio 


3 


Appalachian State 


5 


Ohio 


9 


Dayton 





Ohio 


1 


Miami 


8 


Ohio 


9 


Morris Harvey 





Ohio 


9 


Ohio Wesleyan 





Ohio 


9 


Toledo 





Ohio 


8 


Central Michigan 


1 


Ohio 


8 


Eastern Michigan 


1 


Ohio 


1 


Kentucky 


8 


Ohio 


4 


Western Michigan 


5 


Ohio 


9 


Illinois at Chicago 





Ohio 


9 


West Virginia 





Ohio 


4 


Bowling Green 


5 


Ohio 


3 


Mercyhurst 


6 


Ohio 


8 


Wayne State 


1 


Ohio 


4 


Ohio State 


5 


Ohio 


7 


Cincinnati 


2 


Ohio 


8 


Wright State 


1 


Ohio 


7 


Morehead State 


2 


Ohio 


3 


Ball State 


6 


Ohio 


9 


Northern Illinois 





Ohio 


8 


Kent State 


1 





Women's Basketball 10-12 




Ohio 


62 


Ball State 


76 


Ohio 


76 


Marshall 


82 


Ohio 


77 


Western Michigan 


51 


Ohio 


80 


Sienna Heights 


77 


Ohio 


70 


West Virginia 


79 


Ohio 


81 


Rio Grande 


65 


Ohio 


60 


Cleveland State 


52 


Ohio 


43 


Kent State 


64 


Ohio 


50 


Eastern Kentucky 


73 


Ohio 


66 


Bowling Green 


55 


Ohio 


72 


Cedarville 


66 


Ohio 


71 


Wright State 


66 


Ohio 


62 


Dayton 


83 


Ohio 


58 


Cincinnati 


73 


Ohio 


46 


Miami 


83 


Ohio 


103 


Ashland 


57 


Ohio 


67 


Toledo 


55 


Ohio 


65 


Charleston 


80 


Ohio 


70 


Akron 


81 


Ohio 


54 


Youngstown 


81 


Ohio 


70 


Toledo 


50 


Ohio 


51 


Ohio State 


81 







Football 6-5 




Ohio 


10 


Minnesota 


24 


Ohio 


20 


Eastern Michigan 


7 


Ohio 


35 


Marshall 





Ohio 


43 


Kent State 


13 


Ohio 





Central Michigan 


26 


Ohio 


9 


Miami 


7 


Ohio 


13 


Toledo 


21 


Ohio 


6 


Western Michigan 


20 


Ohio 


27 


Cincinnati 


7 


Ohio 


48 


Bowling Green 


21 


Ohio 


27 


Northern Illinois 


28 




94 







Women's Tennis 11-2 




Ohio 


5 


Kent State 


4 


Ohio 


1 


Miami 


8 


Ohio 


Vs. 


Eastern Michigan snowed out 




Ohio 


9 


Marietta 





Ohio 


6 


Bowling Green 


3 


Ohio 


7 


Morehead State 


2 


Ohio 


9 


Capital 





Ohio 


4 


West Virginia 


5 


Ohio 


7 


Cincinnati 


2 


Ohio 


9 


Denison 





Ohio 


7 


Oberlin 


2 


Ohio 


9 


Kenyon 





Ohio 


7 


Ohio Wesleyan 


2 


Ohio 


vs. 


Wittenberg rained out 




Ohio 


9 


Wright State 










Baseball 20-20 




Ohio 


30 


Furman 





Ohio 


1 


South Carolina 


14 


Ohio 


6 


South Carolina 


10 


Ohio 


3 


Duke 


4 


Ohio 


2 


Duke 


12 


Ohio 


6 


North Carolina 


7 


Ohio 


4 


Campbell College 


2 


Ohio 


2 


Campbell College 


3 


Ohio 


8 


North Carolina 


9 


Ohio 


3 


North Carolina State 


5 


Ohio 


4 


North Carolina State 


5 


Ohio 


5 


Wake Forest 


8 


Ohio 


1 


Wake Forest 


4 


Ohio 


6 


Morris Harvey 





Ohio 


7 


Ohio State 


2 


Ohio 


8 


Ohio State 





Ohio 


6 


Ashland 


2 


Ohio 


15 


Ashland 


12 


Ohio 


6 


West Virginia 





Ohio 


2 


West Virginia 


3 


Ohio 


3 


Wright State 


2 


Ohio 


4 


Wright State 


1 


Ohio 


7 


Kent State 


5 


Ohio 


4 


Kent State 


1 


Ohio 


6 


Marshall 


8 


Ohio 


1 


Bowling Green 


4 


Ohio 


4 


Bowling Green 


3 


Ohio 





Cleveland State 


3 


Ohio 


3 


Cleveland State 


2 


Ohio 





Ball State 


4 


Ohio 


3 


Ball State 


4 


Ohio 


4 


Miami 


3 


Ohio 


2 


Miami 


1 


i Ohio 


4 


Central Michigan 


3 


Ohio 


5 


Central Michigan 


6 


Ohio 


8 


Eastern Michigan 


5 


Ohio 


2 


Eastern Michigan 


4 




Golt 

Iron Duke Intercollegiate Golf Classic 11th 

Ohio vs. Duke, North Carolina, and North Carolina State 2nd 

Marshall Invitational 12th 

Kepler Invitational 11th 

Northern Intercollegiate Golf Tourney 8th 

Blosser Invitational 3rd 

MAC Invitational 3rd 

Falcon Invitational 7th 

Spartan Invitational 14th 

MAC Championship 1st 







Men's Swimming 3-11 




Ohio 


44 


John Hopkins 


64 


Ohio 


48 


Ohio State 


65 


Ohio 


49 


Kent State 


64 


Ohio 


43 


Kentucky 


69 


Ohio 


52 


Cleveland State 


61 


Ohio 


61 


Ball State 


52 


Ohio 


46 


Miami 


67 


Ohio 


49 


Marshall 


64 


Ohio 


79 


Denison 


32 


Ohio 




Ashland forfeit 




Ohio 


50 


Central Michigan 


63 


Ohio 


43 


Eastern Michigan 


70 


Ohio 


31 


Bowling Green 


82 


Ohio 


51 


Toledo 


62 







Men's Basketball 8-18 




Ohio 


51 


Ohio State 


78 


Ohio 


64 


St. Bonaventure 


77 


Ohio 


87 


Canisius 


82 


Ohio 


69 


Western Michigan 


78 


Ohio 


61 


Marshall 


76 


Ohio 


69 


West Virginia 


61 


Ohio 


68 


Youngstown State 


72 


Ohio 


76 


Connecticut 


95 


Ohio 


49 


California State at Fullerton 


71 


Ohio 


50 


Central Michigan 


83 


Ohio 


76 


Cleveland State 


75 


Ohio 


62 


Toledo 


69 


Ohio 


50 


Bowling Green 


72 


Ohio 


65 


Eastern Michigan 


67 


Ohio 


65 


Northern Illinois 


69 


Ohio 


76 


Kent State 


85 


Ohio 


75 


Ball State 


74 


Ohio 


62 


Virginia Tech 


78 


Ohio 


67 


Kent State 


57 


Ohio 


67 


Miami 


71 


Ohio 


62 


Toledo 


75 


Ohio 


67 


Central Michigan 


66 


Ohio 


56 


Western Michigan 


50 


Ohio 


82 


Bowling Green 


91 


Ohio 


61 


Eastern Michigan 


60 


Ohio 


55 


Northern Illinois 


74 



95 



Next winter, vacation down south where the sun never sets 

Antarctica. 



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Health & 
Human Services 




The Home-economics Department and its students made the jump from the College of Education. 



The College of Health and Human Services 
was born this fall amidst much controversy over 
whether or not it was even needed. All the schools 
presently in it already existed under different 
colleges. The Center for Human Development, the 
School of Hearing and Speech Sciences, and the 
School of Health. Physical Education and 
Recreation compose the college now, and the 
School of Nursing will be officially added July 
1980. 

The dean. Dr. Hilda Richards is the first black 
person to become dean of a college other than 
Afro-American Studies at OU. She is also the only 
woman dean here. 



The Ohio University Affiliated Center for 
Human Development provides services to the 
community, does research and is a training ground 
for students in dealing with people who have 
developmental disabilities or are mentally or 
physically handicapped. 

There are five satellite-centers serving 17 
Southeastern Ohio counties. Coordinator for 
Community Relations. Judy Ball said. "It is 
important to look at the total person and to avoid 
fragmentation. The emphasis is that they are 
people first; people who happen to have problems, 
and can function better than most feel they can." 

Last year over 250 students experienced more 



98 




Jim Marhuhk participates in a Health and Human Services experiment. 



than a day's time and 32 spent from 300 to 500 
hours in the program. Athens Day Living Center 
is part of the program which helps the 
handicapped with constructive activities. 

The School of Hearing and Speech Sciences is 
clinically oriented. It is a training program for 
people going into school or clinical therapy. The 
master and Ph.D programs feature pathology and 
audiology studies outside the public school. 

The School of Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation has programs in health services, 
environmental health science and recreation 
studies. The school operates the physical education 
activity program which allows students to choose 



activities ranging from scuba diving to yoga to 
belly dancing. The school is also responsible for 
intramural and club sports. 

The School of Home Economics offers 18 
different bachelor degrees. The programs deal 
with basic human needs and interpersonal 
relationships. Problems of human welfare such as 
nutrition and health are just two subjects dealt 
with in several specialized areas. The School of 
Nursing offers bachelor programs for nurses and 
also provides an educational base for graduate 
study leading to careers as clinicians, teachers, 
administrators or researchers. 



99 



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OS 



'5b 




During registration, the basketball floor is covered with carpeting, which in turn, is covered with students. 

Pre-college. academic advising, closed classes 
and add-drop slips. What do these have in common? 
They are all a part of the registration procedures 
that take place at OU. 

While registration for some may be a relatively 
smooth, orderly procedure, for others it is enough to 
cause migraine headaches. 

Closed classes seem to be the primary problem 
involved in registration, and many underclassmen 
become experts in juggling schedules. Academic 
advisers assigned to students attempt to eliminate 
proposed schedules for accuracy in call numbers, 
required courses and credits. 

Filling out the schedule and turning it in to 
Chubb Hall is a minor step, for missing the payment 
deadline results in no classes, no housing and no meal 
plan. 

Consequently, students in such a predicament 
find themselves having to register all over 
again — through lines for housing in Chubb and 
classes at the Convo. Despite setbacks and % 
repeatedly being told, "I'm sorry, but you're in the« 
wrong line." all manage to survive registration. 2 




100 



A tront row seat tor registration, like Joe Hammond's, still 
may not get you an opening in that class you want. 



Alden library teaming with life on a Friday 
night? No lines at the bars uptown? Where is the 
student population of Ohio University? 

This scene is familiar on campus as the 
quarters change from fall into winter into spring, 
and finals week descends upon the student 
enrollment at OU. 

Everyone's social life screeches to a halt in 
mid-swing as studying becomes an integral part of 
students' lives during the five days composing 
finals week; from the inexperienced freshmen to 
the time-hardened seniors and graduate 
assistants. 

As finals week begins to take its toll and 24 



Hour Quiet Hours become imposed in many of the 
dorms on campus, whispered comments including, 
"I should have dropped zoology at the beginning of 
the quarter!". "I'm going to flunk out." and "Oh, 
no ... " 

Extended library hours, both at Alden and the 
Green libraries, enable students to cram in peace 
and quiet, as they all strive toward the common 
goal of making the grade. 

Students burn the midnight oil and make their 
way, bleary eyed from too many all-nighters, 
coffee, and No-Doz. to their exams, only to emerge 
depressed, jubilant, or uncertain from each two 
hour final. 




During the last week of the quarter, virtually everyone dedicates themselves to their books, either individually, 
or in groups, like Barb Williamson, Carol Mix, Lana Gaskalla and Andrea Thatcher. 



P 



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Arts & Sciences 



The College of Arts and Sciences is composed 
of 19 departments in Humanities, Social Sciences 
and Natural Sciences. Assistant Dean of Student 
Affairs William Jones said that the college is the 
academic cornerstone of the university because it 
offers courses that most students need. 

"Taking a liberal arts program helps free the 
mind from prejudices and hatred, giving one a 
better perception of the world, recognizing 
accomplishments and relative strengths, striving 
to make the world a better place to live." he added. 

Jones explained that two-year technical 
programs focus on a career first, where the 
students are trained but remain basically 
uneducated. The liberal arts curriculums place the 



first value on education and the second on a career. 

There are 28 programs and more are being 
developed with curriculums that gear toward 
specialized jobs by mixing classes together 
effectively. Many prepare students for graduate 
study. 

Despite all the criticism of liberal arts 
programs, the college did a survey of 70 American 
businesses and found that they still do hire liberal 
arts majors. When asked if a liberal arts program 
coupled with a formal business minor would be a 
good curriculum, the positive response was 
overwhelming. That program started in 1976 and 
has been very successful. 




Arts and Sciences covers a range of disciplines varying Irom Chemistry (above) to English to provide a liberal education. 



102 




Students try out film strip projector in the College of Education's media center, located in McCracken Hall. 

The College of Education came out of last 
year's turmoil with a new dean, a new look and 
plans for revamping much of the curriculum, but 
may be more stable than it has been in a long while. 

Last year, controversy stripped the college of 
its dean. Sam Goldman, and a new college stripped 
it of the schools of health, physical education and 
recreation and home economics, as well as $77,000 
in funds. 

But in July, Dr. Allen Myers took over as dean 
and soon announced that the college was back on 
pretty solid ground. Under the Ohio Teacher 
Redesign Program, however, the college has 
continued to change. 

"I'm especially fortunate to be here at a time 
when there's so much positive ferment going on 
about developing quality programs for the 



teaching profession." Myers said in an interview 
last fall. 

The new programs include an Educational 
Media Program and a Guidance and Counseling 
Program. Plans are underway for a program for 
the talented and gifted, and an expansion of the 
Multicultural and Bilingual Education Program. 
In addition, the Department of Economic 
Education has been moved from the College of 
Business Administration to the College of 
Education. 

Other possible developments include estab- 
lishing a Career and Life Planning Center and 2 
re-establishing the old Center for Educational | 
Research and Service, which was eliminated in 3 
1974. S 

Education 



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Osteopathic Medicine 




Barb Girz is one of 148 students of Osteopathic Medicine at Ohio University. 



The rapidly-growing College of Osteopathic 
Medicine, bloomed in the spring as it graduated 21 
doctors of Osteopathic Medicine, the first in Ohio 
history. 

These doctors will serve one-year internships 
in various osteopathic and military hospitals 
before opening up their own practices as family 
physicians. 

"The college was created by the Ohio General 
Assembly in 1975 to educate family physicians to 
work in medically underserved parts of the state." 
said the college's dean. Frank Myers. D.O. "It is 
our mission to train osteopathic physicians who 
will choose to become and remain specialists in 
family practice in those areas without adequate 
numbers or physicians." 

In order to prepare students for practicing in 
rural areas, the school plans to open as many as 4 
health-care clinics in rural parts of southeastern 
Ohio. One such clinic was opened in Nelsonville in 
September, and the two physicians saw nearly 400 
patients in the first two months, with students 
providing back-up work. Another clinic was 



scheduled to open in Coolville in late spring. 

Meanwhile, the college received $175,000 for 
the year to conduct research in geriatrics and to 
integrate the problems of aging into its 
curriculum. The college also obtained an $85,000 
"ultra sound machine" which uses sound instead of 
x-rays to safely produce images of an unborn child 
so that its progress and condition can be 
determined before birth. 

The campus itself has also grown. The $7.5 
million renovation of Irvine Hall as the college's 
second building was nearly complete, and much of 
the building was opened as offices and classrooms. 
Parks Hall was also added, unofficially, to the 
college and may soon be taken over completely to 
house the Medical Service Clinics now located in 
the basement of Grosvenor Hall. 

In the winter it was announced that the 
incoming class would be increased from 48 to 72 „ 
students, and the college was well on its way to a | 
projected capacity of about 500 students, in Ohio's n 
first and only college of osteopathic medicine. & 



104 



IT 







f 




i 




Studying medicine can take its toll on anyone. 



105 






Since February. 1969. Alden Library has been 
the place to go to study or do research. More than 
a decade later, Alden is still "the place" but it has 
other uses. 

Junior Cindy Parker comments. "People 
definitely go to the library to socialize, especially 
during finals week, it's packed, so it's easy to meet 
someone." Karen Zando, senior, agrees socializing 
is common. "I don't go often because I see too many 
old friends and don't get any work done." 

The library is also used to pass time between 



classes so a student doesn't have to walk back to 
his or her dorm room. The library's snack room 
supplies food to keep one going from class to class. 
Alden has stockpiles of current newspapers from 
everyone's hometown (well, almost), and 
magazines. 

"I go to sleep sometimes — it's quiet," says 
senior Purnee Murdock. 

For some students, using the library is a 
requirement. Freshmen trainees, for example, 
must study weeknights for two hours. Some 




The 3,200 study seat! in Alden are at handy lor sleeping aa Ihey are lor studying. 



106 



fraternities and sororities require pledges to go to 
Alden for study tables weekly. 

The Student Development Center is utilized 
by students who want to brush up or need help on 
a particular subject. Movies shown in classes can 
be viewed there. 

The library has many meeting rooms that can 
be used by different groups. Some classes are 
taught, and cultural activities such as poetry 
readings or music recitals go on. 

And then, there are the 78 full-time employees 



who go to Alden to earn a living, and a large 
number of work-study and part-time students are 

employed there. - 

The next time you are bored and wondering S 

where to go or what to do try Alden Library. £ 

Besides helping you suceed in the classroom, you'll £ 

be sure to see someone doing something, even if it s 

is just snoozing. ° 




Ann Wheaton searches through a lew of the more than one million volumes in Alden library. 




Students often need information on where to find information — the library subscribes to over 5,100 periodicals. 



107 



«4H 

o 



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Business 
Administration 



This year the College of Business Administra- 
tion expanded its curriculum by opening the 
decade with a new major area of study and student 
organization to go with it. 

The new field of study, called personnel and 
industrial relations, is designed to prepare 
students for careers in personnel working with and 
for unions and companies in mediating relations. 
The American Society of Personnel Administration 
elected the first officers in 1979-80. 

"This new area gives them (the students) 
more options in career choices — a more specific 
area of concentration," said Dr. John Stinson, 
acting dean of the college and management 
department chairman. 



Along with these new concepts of study, there 
are also the old standbys. The three sequences 
within the Business College — Accounting and 
Quantitative Methods, Administrative Sciences, 
and Management — provide students with career 
possibilities in finance, general business, 
management, marketing. production man- 
agement, business pre-law and the perennial 
favorite, quantitative methods, which deals with 
data processing and statistics. 

The College of Business Administration is also 
selecting an outstanding faculty person to fill an 
endowed chair in the banking department. New 
faces and changes seem to be the order of the 
decade. 




108 



The Business Administration College sponsors an annual Career Day in which students listen to professionals lecture 
on their respective fields. 




More and more women, like Vicki Laferty, are entering the College of Engineering and Technology. 



The very nature of the field of engineering 
and technology demands change, and because of 
this, the College of Engineering and Technology 
tries to install in its students the desire to 
continue learning and to keep up with the 
constant changes in the field. 

"They have to realize that their learning is 
not good forever; it has to be continually 
updated," Dean Richard Mayer said. 

In addition, the college is trying to get 
students practical experience before gradua- 
tion. One way of doing this is the cooperative 
education program that it is getting involved in. 
Under this program, students work away from 
school in their field for three quarters during 
their junior or senior year, and turn their college 



education into a five year experience. 

But this program, and the college's 
increasing enrollment have put an extra burden 
on the faculty. The addition of new positions 
funded by the university and two endowed chairs 
funded by the $7.5 million gift of the late Paul 
Stocker has eased the situation, but Mayer said 
that new faculty members are still needed. 

The college is sponsoring research in 
several areas of coal mining, airplane safety, 
solar energy and traffic safety. Mayer believes 
that these projects and other research will soon 
draw national recognition. 

"With the Stocker funding and the new 
(proposed) building," Mayer said, "The decade 
of the eighties will be great for the college." 



Engineering & 
Technology 



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109 



O 




The ROTC classroom is often lound outdoors, sometimes in tight places. 



110 




Air Force cadet, Patric Jolly, in uniform. 



"Hut. two three, four!" The mocking goes on 
behind their backs, sometimes directly to their faces, 
but they don't let it bother them; they can't. There 
was a time when students in the Air Force and Army 
ROTC commanded respect. But since Vietnam, 
popular sentiment has turned from the military, and 
students participating in ROTC undeservingly catch 
the flack. 

"You get a few people that say 'warmonger' and 
things, but you have to brush that off." Bruce 
Rienstra, a student in Army ROTC said. "You have 
to remember they don't know what they're talking 
about." 

Many of the ROTC classes such as map reading 
and orienteering are opened to all students, with no 
obligations. In this class a student must find his way 
out of an unfamiliar woods with just a map and a 
compass. 

"We pride ourselves that we don't force anyone 
into the program." said Maj. Eric Jungkind. "If they 
want to be here, we're glad. But if they don't, we 
don't force anyone into the program." 

Students can participate in ROTC during their 
freshman and sophomore years with no obligation. 
Those who continue can receive $100 per month 
while participating and graduate with a commitment 
to serve in the Army or Air Force, the national guard 
or the reserves for up to six years. 

In spite of their military lifestyles, ROTC 
students remain students. "ROTC people know how 
to have a good time and party and everything," said 
Barbara Stewart, of Army ROTC. 

Rienstra agreed. "It's a job most people don't 
understand." 




Army cadet, Barbara Stewart, in fatigues. 



111 



cm 

O 



o 



Fine Arts 



Though only one of nine colleges at OU, the 
College of Fine Arts supplies much of the culture 
for Athens. Besides concentrating on developing 
serious artists, musicians, dancers and actors, the 
college provides students of every major with a 
creative outlet. 

Each year about 400 undergraduates and 70 
graduate students take classes in painting, 
ceramics, glass, fibers, sculpture and any of the 
other twelve areas of study. The school boasts one 
of the oldest and finest photography programs in 
the country. It offers the community a Visiting 
Lecture Series of nationally-known artists as well 
as a look at student work in many gallery exhibits 
across campus. 

The School of Music emphasizes private 
instruction and small classes for students who pass 
the initial audition. Their main goal is to train 
professional musicians. However, the majority of 
graduates go into teaching. Several musical 
organizations give students the opportunity to 
perform as well as exposing the entire community 
to everything from opera to jazz. 

Even though admission to the School of Dance 
is only through audition, all students can enjoy the 
activities that go on in Putnam Hall. Guest faculty 
and visiting artists perform numerous concerts 
throughout the year. And. students go on from 
choreographing local productions to dancing in 
regional and national dance companies. 

Theater majors work on two different stages 
toward their goal of becoming professional actors. 
During the summer the school produces shows at 
local Ohio Valley Summer Theaters as well as the 
Monomoy Theater in Massachusetts. Currently 
plans are in the making for a touring project so - 
that students can perform their best work across ! 
the U.S. J 




Art classes are among the most popular in the university. 



112 




Communications students have the opportunity to participate in the production of radio and television shows, as 
well as several campus publications. 



Imagine being a senior in high school again 
and wishing to further a career in communica- 
tions. You apply at Ohio University, you are 
accepted, and now you must choose which field 
of communication you would like to pursue: OU 
offers journalism, interpersonal communication, 
visual communication and radio-television. 

If you decide on journalism, you have chosen 
to become one of approximately 800 students 
also wanting a career in that field. You associate 
yourself with one of five sequences leading to a 
journalism degree: advertising, magazine 
journalism, news writing and editing, public 
relations or radio-TV news. 

Perhaps you would like to study inter- 



personal communication, better known as InCo. 
The InCo major concentrates on one of three 
sequences: organizational communication, 
general speech, or general communication. One 
major aspect of the school of communication is 
the forensics program, which is a nationally- 
recognized debate team. 

One of the nation's best-known college 
broadcast stations, WOUB, is the main element 
of the school of radio-TV. If you have 
broadcasting or production ambitions, then you 
would probably choose one of the three s 
sequences: professional broadcast production, 5 
professional broadcast administration, or « 
comprehensive study in radio-TV. Z 



Communication 



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3 

H 

o 
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n 



The Honors Tutorial College expanded to 
include 21 fields of study for the gifted student to 
choose from. The college, which is the only one in 
the United States that offers degrees through a 
tutorial system, sets a student up in a one-on-one 
situation with a faculty member to design and 
administer an independant study program. 

In order to graduate, students must satisfy 
departmental requirements which generally 
consist of passing a set of comprehensive 
examinations and showing competency in required 
fields of study. It is possible for students to 
graduate in two or three years, and more than 90 
percent of the college's graduates go on to 
graduate or professional schools. 

This year several students have also started 



a tutoring program for gifted children in the 
Federal Hocking School District, and plans are 
underway to expand this to other local school 
districts. 

"We've had some people who've gotten a 
tremendous amount out of the program," said Dr. 
Peter Griffiths, a chemistry tutor. "But some 
struggle from the word go. It's demanding; not 
everyone can learn in the tutorial program." 

It also is demanding of the professors 
involved. "We have to be awake," said Dr. John 
Mitchell, of botany. "We have to be aware of the 
fact that they are better than the average student. 
They do their own research, so we have to keep on § 
top of things. When they come up with their own * 
ideas, we have to be prepared to defend ours." 8 




Students in Honors Tutorial College take advanced courses. Joe Foresthotter speaks to Dr. Margaret Cohn about them. 



114 




One of the key purposes of University College is to help familiarize students with a variety of study fields, as Betty 
Hallow is doing with Robert Tucker. 



This year marks the tenth anniversary of 
two programs originated in the University 
College. 

The Bachelor of General Studies program, 
begun in the fall of 1969. allows students to 
create their own areas of study in accordance 
with individual interests and talents. 

"The program is for people who know what 
they want to study, but in an area we don't have 
a major in," said Dr. Don Flourney, Dean of the 
University College. 

The program was only the second of its kind 
in the nation and recent graduates have received 
degrees in specialized areas such as aviation 
management and electronic music. 

The University Professor's program, is 



described by Flourney as still a "good and strong 
program." 

Each year, on the basis of campus-wide 
nominations and committee approval, anywhere 
from one to ten professors are cited for 
outstanding undergraduate teaching. 

"The program is one of my favorites because 
it is student initiated and student run," said 
Flourney. 

As for innovations, a course entitled 
University Experience was added to the college's 
curriculum this year. The course, geared toward 
entering freshmen, emphasizes solutions to 
problems that might interfere with a new 
student's success in college. Topics include study 
skills and career exploration. 



a 

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CD 

CO 



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CD 
CD 



115 



( ongratulations and 

Best Wishes . . . 

Class of 1980 




Athens Finest 
Department Store 



"Always Searching for Ways 
to Serve You Better" 




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COLLEGE RINGS 

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116 









jf ' "£;,. 



,/ 





Easing 1 Minds 
Hazardous Parking* 
Gleam, Glimmer & Shin* 
Crossing* Athens Streets 



-=■=* 



. 




ome 



Adjusting to a small dorm room 
that doesn't have all the comforts of 
home may not sound ideal, but living 
in a dorm offers a great deal more to 
make up for it. 

There are problems, though. For 
many freshmen it is the first time on 
their own and they have to learn to 
cope with laundry, studies, money and 
increased freedom. Freshmen men 
are notorious for this. "It gets a little 
crazy." said Crawford Hall freshman 
Marty Hancock. "People have had 
hockey games in the corridors, and 
busted beer bottles against the wall." 
Freshmen women's problems usually 
center around roommates. They tend 
to request roommate changes 
frequently. 

All dorm residents do face 
similar problems. Probably the most 
common complaint is noise. While 
some are trying to study or sleep, 
others are playing their stereos or 
having parties. 

Many dorm residents would like 
to cook in their rooms as an 
alternative to cafeteria food. Re- 
sidents in James Hall had a special 



Right — Popcorn poppers, being used here 
by Becky Jarren and Malek Abou-Manaour, 
and illegal appliances like hot plates 
abound in the dorms. 

Far Right — Ceiling art, though against the 
rules, posters and what-nots bring a little 
life to the concrete and plaster. 



problem with not being able to use the 
overcrowded Boyd cafeteria during 
peak hours. 

Having to share a bathroom, 
television and lounge with others 
poses difficulties for dorm residents. 
"You're living in a community," said 
Len Wagner, an RA in Dougan House. 
"You must accept things you're not 
used to, just like in a family. This has 
positive and negative aspects." 

The positive aspects of dorm life 
are too often ignored by many people. 
"Living in a dorm has really helped 



me grow," sophomore Russ Grycza 
said. "I've met a lot of friends I never 
would have had the chance to meet 
outside the dorms. Also for many it is 
a chance to get away from home and 
really make it on your own, without 
the restraints and help of parents. It's 
a make or break situation." 

The activities planned and 
unplanned are some of the best parts 
of dorm life. Many times they are 
unplanned. "A lot of times we'll get 
three or four girls together in a room 
and we'll talk about anything under 




118 







D/?ACW/K> 



BEIBIU 



119 



the sun," said Cristine Armstrong, a 
freshman in Boyd. Late nights 
playing cards and eating pizza with 
friends are common. 

Weekend parties with beer, pizza 
and music are always popular. Many 
times they are built around themes 
such as beach or slumber parties. 

The Boyd Hall resident assis- 
tants sponsored an unusual surprise 
party. They wrote home to all the 
residents' parents asking them to 
send their daughter a gift addressed 
to the students' RA. On Valentine's 
Day they held a party for the whole 
dorm and surprised the residents with 
their parents' gifts. 

In their junior year many 
students decide to move out of the 
dorms. Most of these students 
remember with some happiness their 
experience of living in a dorm. For » 
many, like Wagner, "nothing else I 
captures the spirit of living in a° 
dorm." * 



A phone call it on* way for Penny Kalz lo 
escape concrete walla. 




120 




It Really Works! 



Newcomers who are required to live in the dorms may 
be glad to know that there are special counselors trained to 
help them with any problems. These are the students and 
administrators involved in the Residence Life system. 

Resident Assistants tend to become good friends with 
most of the students in their floor sections, according to 
Laurie Merriman. an RA in Johnson Hall. Merriman said 
that this situation is helped by the way OU's Residence Life 
system is set up — one RA to every 25 freshmen and one to 
every 35 upperclassmen. 

"These ratios differ from those of larger universities 
where it would be harder to establish lasting friendships." 
Merriman said. "OU's size is just right for that sort of thing, 
as well as in the sense of being an RA, too." 

Residence Life sponsors many acitvities for the dorms, 
j ranging from workshops and informational presentations to 
i lounge movies and parties. 

• "Meeting the needs of the students within limit is the 

" most important aspect of Residence Life," Merriman said. 

Left — Beth Ghiloni goes through the "Cookie Machine" in the East 
Green R As last fling before fall work begins. Below-Paperwork is just 
as much a part of being an RA as counseling. 




121 



on'tvi mlk/ilone 



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Do you ever get a nervous "I 
think someone's watching me'" feeling 
while walking alone at night? 

The university escort service is 
there to help, offering protection for 
women or anyone for that matter, who 
doesn't wish to walk alone at night. 

"A lot of girls are a little touchy 
about being out (at night)" commen- 
ted Robert Guinn. director of 
security. 

Guinn feels there are particular 
areas of campus where it is not wise 
for women to be walking alone, citing 
the area south of Bird Arena as one 
example. 

He believes the use of an escort 
service is a prudent idea. 

"There are some (assaults), so it 
does serve the purpose," he said. "If 
it only prevents one assault, then it 
makes my job easier." 

The service is under the direction 
of the Student Senate, with Associate 
Dean of Students Joel Rudy acting as 
adviser. 

Chief coordinator of the service, 
senate member Lisa Lightfoot, 
resigned her position this year, and a 
successor has yet to be named. 

The service is available to any 
student who feels the need, and as 
Guinn adds. "It's a good service even 
if it offers nothing more than peace of 
mind." 





Armed with a radio and a flashlight, an escort team stands ready. Certain areas ot campus admittedly pose a risk late at night. 



122 




Pauline has found that when she puts a little extra shine on things, students are grateful. 



pleam . /^limmer&ohine 



The housekeeper grabbed the 
student, pressed a card into his hand 
and planted a kiss on his cheek. 
"Happy birthday, Jeff," she said. 

For the residents of Gamerts- 
felder Hall, and for Pauline Pauley, 
the housekeeper for half of Gam's 
second, third and fourth floors, the 
scene was not unusual. Pauley is one 
of a number of housekeepers working 
in the dorms who manages to make 



her job more than just cleaning floors, 
lounges and bathrooms. And when the 
relationship between housekeepers 
and students becomes more than just 
professional, everyone seems to 
benefit. 

"These kids are just like my 
own," Pauley said. "They come to me 
every now and then and I help them 
any way I can. I think it's better if you 
try to do little things for them that 



you maybe could pass up. I like to keep 
it nice and clean for them, because 
they keep it that way." 

And the students often return 
the favors. She received several cards 
and two boxes of candy for Valentine's 
Day and usually gets flowers from 
students on her birthday. 

"I've never seen a student I 
didn't like," Pauley said. "They grow 
on you." 



123 




Betsy William* it often the only woman in the weightroom, but that doesn't bother her. 



otrengthT^ordlnrhings 



She looks out of place, sitting 
there pumping weights and sweating 
like all the guys in their half-T-shirts 
and shorts. Never mind that Betsy 
Williams only has one arm, she's a 
woman. 

But she's a woman who believes in 
herself; and she believes that physical 
fitness has given her the confidence 
she needs to maintain her lifestyle. 

"I feel like I'm more here," 
Williams said. "I feel more confident, 
like I can do things that I wouldn't do 
before." 

"Most girls won't work out 
because they don't want to get big and 
muscular. There's no way I can get 
big. I don't have the hormones." 



Williams said. "You can get thin by 
not eating and still be flabby. The 
women in the fashion magazines all 
work out." 

But Williams does not lift weights 
to be in a fashion magazine. She feels 
the confidence she gets from it helps 
her relax, read and paint. And she 
insists that she couldn't really have 
fun without being strong. When she's 
not at Grover or painting — she's a 
painting major — she likes to 
backpack, swim, ride horses, travel or 
do yoga. In the spring she's going to 
take up belly dancing and get a 
bicycle. Strength, she said, makes all 
of these more enjoyable. 

"It's a natural thing for humans 



to put a lot of tension into their bodies. 
If you get strong, just spend that 
three hours a week working out, you 
can get rid of those tensions," she 
said. "After working out, and after 
the sauna, it's better than a fifth of 
whiskey; you just feel so relaxed." 

Having only one arm has always 
made it difficult for Williams to 
strengthen the left side of her body, 
but it doesn't stop her. In fact, in a 
way she feels it has helped her. She 
feels that one reason women don't 
come to the weight room is the looks 
they get from men. 

"It's kind of intimidating. I guess 
I'm used to being stared at; it doesn't 
bother me," she said. 



124 



Since she began working out, Williams has found strength for 
everything in her lite. She started her program at the coaxing ot her 




125 




j^¥%4 J m P^ 



A naked lightbulb on the ceiling 
spreads its glare to reveal bare 
cinder-block walls to a frightened 
freshman. The seed of disenchant- 
ment is planted. Through the 
following two years it is nurtured by 
a growing hatred of cafeteria food, 
rebellion against dormitory regula- 
tions, disgust with noise, impatience 
with the quarrels of fellow residents 
("they're all so immature"), despair 
of help from maintenance and a long 



list of hassles with Chubb Hall. When 
the time comes to choose a home for 
junior year, the tree of discontent is 
sturdy enough to climb and tall 
enough to see all of Athens. 

Sophomores, many nervous about 
opposition from parents at this 
independent move, begin inquiring 
about possibilities for apartments and 
houses early. The offices at Lakeview 
and College Inn begin to handle a flow 
of questions, landlords answer their 



phones and recite time and again 
their list of properties and prices. 
Small groups convene to discuss who 
will live with whom and where they 
can afford to live. 

The options are diverse. Both 
small-time and big-time landlords 
offer a variety of apartments and 
houses all over Athens County. Some 
students look for the country setting 
among the hills and content them- 
selves with having to drive into town 



126 





Left — With an understanding landlord, 
place* can be personalized. 



Above — You take the good with the bad 
when you move out: your own cooking, but 
your own dishes. 

Bottom — An apartment can have all the 
comforts ot home 



127 




each day to attend classes. The home 
in the country gives them quiet and 
isolation, but removes them from the 
conveniences of being near school and 
uptown. Others look into apartments 
located above the Eatery, the 
Junction or some other establishment 
to maximize convenience, but lose all 
sense of quiet and isolation. The 
spectrum between these two extremes 
is complete. A house in the Old West 
End or down Lancaster Street 
provides some quiet yet is still within 
walking distance of the campus. 
Apartments in the College Inn or 
Lakeview put a student on top of 
things, but provide not much more 
privacy than dorms. The Mill Street 
apartment complex nestles itself back 
along the Hocking River, only a few 
blocks from campus. 

So the hunt begins. Middle-class 
noses turn at the sight of peeling 



The freedom ol your own 

paint and stained furniture. Eyes 
accustomed to mother's tasteful 
interior decorating try to envision 
slip-covers and area rugs making a 
home out of a bleak rectangle. Ears 
listen intently for the scurrying of 
cockroaches when the door opens. 

Pencils tap, calculators flash and 
minds work as students determine the 
limits of their budgets. Summer jobs, 
frugality and generous parents are 
hopefully considered. Someone in the 
group backs out, those remaining 
search frantically for a replacement. 
Contracts are signed: deposits made 
and the ordeal has ended. 

That is until fall, when the fun 
really begins. The items everyone 
promised to bring fail to show up. The 
landlord removed the refrigerator 
without replacing it. GTE didn't hook 
up the telephone as scheduled. Garage 
sales in Athens become more popular 



kitchen — when it's clean — can be nice. 

than theaters, and used furniture 
stores do a booming business. 
Employees at Kroger's and Super 
Duper marvel at the variety of 
purchases made and the amount of 
discussion each decision requires. 
Shoppers marvel at the way the 
budget fails to cover expenses — 
already. 

Sooner or later, though, things 
become settled. Not exactly as 
planned, but livable. The meals aren't 
as good as expected, but they beat the 
dorm food. Neighbors are still noisy, 
but it's more bearable somehow. 
Housemates bicker at 21 just as room 
mates did at 18, but the topics are 
much more substantial, of course. 
Landlords aren't any better than OU 
maintenance, but there were warn- 
ings about that. It's a longer walk to 
class, but it's a pleasanter place to 
return to. 



128 



TTazardous parkin g 




Ever wished you'd just left the old 
Chevy at home? 

Any student with a car on campus 
can probably tell you about the 
irritations involved. 

With an estimated 3,000 vehicles 
registered to OU students, one of the 
major gripes is simply finding some- 
place to park. 

"Garage space is a problem. There 
aren't nearly enough spaces to accom- 
modate the dorm residents who have 
cars." reports Robert Guinn, OU 
Security Director. 

Those bolder students who choose 
to leave their cars in unauthorized 
areas can tell you that the University is 
not the least bit hesitant to have 
vehicles towed away. 

Towing fees range from $15 to $20 
depending on which towing service nabs 
your car. 

An employee of Ace High Towing 
Service puts it best, "We'll tow away 
anything. We'll take a police cruiser if 
they tell us to." 

Getting tickets for violations is 
another hazard. Guinn estimates 30,000 
citations are given out each year on 
campus. Fines range from $3 to $10, 
depending on the violation. If you 
haven't already, chances are that | 
someday you'll find one or more of those » 
little yellow slips neatly tucked under j 

a 

your wiper blade. 2 



It seems as if almost anywhere is the wrong 
place to park, and could bring trouble. 



129 



Left Roller 

skaters, skate- 

boarders, and 
bicyclists cross 
Athens streets 
along with walkers. 

Bottom - Streets of 
Athens contain 
more pedestrians 
than cars at times. 

Far left - Waiting 
for the sign to 
change seems like 
an eternity when 
you are late for a 
class. 




thensctreets 



^rossm gA tnensQ 



Surely everyone has heard the 
phrase "stop, look and listen" before. 
But it seems that when students get to 
Ohio University they forget this 
advice. Despite the crosswalks with 
don't walk neon signs, they go their 
own way. 

Students cross streets where they 
please, and the cars yield not only at 
intersections, but at any given point, 
particulary uptown. 



Is this an offense in Athens? "Of 
course." reported a police spokesman. 
"Jaywalking is an offense in any city, 
except maybe in very small hick 
towns." 

But do police ticket offenders? 
Fortunately, no. According to Athens ' 
police, it depends upon the police 
officer, but observation would tell you 
that no one seems to care. i 



130 




plasma 
Tntopold 



SERA - TEC 

Money is the main reason 
students sell their plasma to Sera-Tec 
Biologies, an FDA licensed chain 
located primarily in college towns. 
"Everybody needs money all the 
time," said one student. 

Of the 1.000 donors per month at 
Sera-Tec, about 90% of them are 
students, according to the manager, 
Bruce Hecht. Their plasma is sold to 
pharmaceutical companies for fur- 
ther manufacturing and packaging. 

Most students come regularly at 
first. Participation, however, drops 



off from the maximum of twice a week 
to just when students need money — 
maybe twice a month. 

"A wide variety of students come 
to Sera-Tec," said Hecht. There is no 
special type of student who gives 
plasma. "It's mostly males, but the 
ratio can be 50-50." he said. No 
student is refused if he can pass the 
various physical and blood tests given 
by the Sera-Tec lab personnel." 

Courteous, friendly and helpful 
describes the atmosphere at Sera-Tec 
for most students. "The staff are just 



real people. They just joke around like 
everyone else," said a student. 

Strict rules and regulations must 
be followed though. "This is not a 
free-lance operation," said Hecht. "I 
don't think most students realize that 
we are licenced and inspected by the 
FDA." 

Whether money is the motive or 
not, students using Sera-Tec as a form 
of survival at O.U. in turn help other 3 
people survive through the benefits of u 
their plasma. w 




Lisa Garnet and Don Wright choose to give 
blood as a source of income. 



131 



EasugM 



inds 




132 



Are you ill at ease with other 
people and do you find it hard to talk 
about things? Do you feel your mind is 
a complete blank and you never know 
what to do? Are you undecided about 
a major? Do you panic during exams? 

These and similar questions 
bother most students during their 
college years and often can't be 
answered without some guidance. 

The Counseling and Psychologi- 
cal Services Center located on the 
third floor of Hudson Health Center 
offer career, educational, personal 
counseling, and an occupational 
library for graduate and undergra- 
duate students seeking some answers. 

Most students are afraid of 
confronting psychological "Houdinis" 
with their problems, minor or 
complex. 



"They have wrong ideas about 
mental health," explains Dr. Jan 
Gill-Wigal, one of nine psychologists 
on the staff. "Admitting something is 
wrong or saying 'I have a problem' is 
not accepted among people. Everyone 
wants to be considered normal." 

Most counseling is done for 
problems everyone has at one time or 
another, such as stress, depression, 
unsatisfactory relationships, and 
sexual concerns. Sometimes these 
problems occur together and can lead 
to other problems. 

While most students come for 
"personal adjustment counseling," 
these problems can be inter-related 
with educational or career problems, 
such as failing grades, poor study 
habits, and lack of motivation to 
study. Some students may want 



guidance in choosing a major or a 
future occupation. 

The center offers counseling on a 
one-to-one basis and group therapy 
sessions. These bring together 10-12 
students who are unassertive or too 
aggressive with others in group 
situations. This helps them to 
overcome fears and feel more 
comfortable. 

Although counseling doesn't help 
everyone, the staff members believe 
most students leave a session or series 
of sessions feeling better about 
themselves and are able to come with 
school and personal problems. 

"There is enrichment and 
problem-solving in the counseling," 
says Gill-Wigal, "and it's exciting to 
watch people look at themselves." 





Far left - Graduate trainees like Erik Stone 
can help ease the troubled minds of many 
fellow students. 

Lett - Students come to the center for a 
wide variety of reasons. 

Right - Dr. Michael Haneb is one of several 
doctors for helping the emotionally 
disturbed. 



133 




134 



t Tnitedpampusi \/ rinistrv 



Blacks, feminists, gays and 
coalitions against world hunger or the 
military draft. No, this is not a list of 
activists from the sixties, but 
programs currently working for 
social change at United Campus 
Ministry. 

"There are misconceptions about 
the UCM is and what it does," says the 
Rev. Jan Griesinger. a member of the 
staff which includes the Rev. Wayland 
Melton and Carol Kuhre. "Students 
hear about gay people or feminists 
meeting here a lot, so they tend to 
identify UCM with only those groups. 
But UCM has programs that include 
all people and all ideas." 



There is also a misunderstanding 
about the role of the church since 
Christianity is usually identified with 
having good personal morals and 
attending church every Sunday. 

But Christianity is also a religion 
of faith and political involvement," 
says Griesinger. "It has to do with the 
status quo and why society deals with 
people the way it does." 

UMC feels it is their role to get 
involved in political and social issues 
as advocates for people who are 
discriminated against or abused, 
sexually, racially or politically. To 
deal with such cases, they use a 
continuous three-step process to 



establish the cause of a problem, study 
it, and effect a change. 

Recent changes have been made 
involving women's study courses at 
Ohio University, a Black Student 
union and a Gay People's Alliance. An 
awareness of the hunger problem in 
Cambodia and South America has 
been fostered by the Coalition Against 
World Hunger. People for Peace are 
calling for nuclear disarmament and 
opposing the return of the draft. £ 

"The people who are a part of the 3 
problem are the ones that will solve 2 
it." Griesinger said. 




Left - Michelle Ajamian and William Miller 
of UCM discuss contemporary women's 
problems. 

Right - Members of the Women's Collective 
protest such issues as racism, sexism, and 
the blaming of the rape victim instead of 
the rapist. 



135 



/^hrist/^omesT ^o /^ampus 



Each day. Ohio University 
students eagerly scan the classifieds 
in THE POST, looking for a ride 
upstate, a personal message, or maybe 
a place to live. And then they come 
across two lines: "Bring Jesus into 
your life come to our fellowship this 
Friday night." There are similar 
messages scattered all over the page. 

At the bottom of each ad is the 
name of a Christian organization, one 
of 16 with over 400 members among 
them — as large as a minority group 
on campus — yet no one seems to hear 
of these "Born Again Christian" 
students. 

This latest renewal of interest in 
the student Christian movement has 
been growing steadily since the 
mid-seventies when there were only a 
few groups active. Yet these students, 
their groups, their religion, and even 
the phenomenon itself are still 
misunderstood by most people. 

They are part of a new genera- 
tion of students emerging after the 
anti-war era, a generation more 
concerned about their grades in 
response to economic recessions and 
the poor job market for many 
graduates. While most students were 
concentrating on finding careers, 
these students looked to more 
traditional values such as religion. 

"Today, young people are going 
to college and the core ethical 
questions, such as the nature of our 
reality, of good versus evil, and of 
justice, have never been more 
pronounced," explains the Rev. E. 
Frances Morgan, pastor of the Good 
Shepard Episcopal Church. 

Part of their attraction comes by 
fulfilling some basic needs that are 
locked in their lives, says Barb 
Walker, a student leader in River of 
Life Ministries, one of the largest 
fellowship groups. Some of these needs 



are safety, self-esteem, a sense of 
belonging, and a chance for personal 
growth. 

The groups themselves are 
different from one another in 
character as they are different from 
the traditional church. Each group 
has its own personality that attracts 
different individuals to its own 
particular style. Some groups, such as 
the River of Life or the Christian 
Student Fellowship meet once a week 
to pray, sing hymns, and study 
scripture from the Bible. Others like 
Campus Crusade for Christ or 
Inter-Varsity that believe in more 
intensive study of the Bible and 



evangelical work, belong to nation- 
wide organizations involved with 
fund-raising and national confer- 
ences. 

The Christian students believe 
they are finding many of their 
questions and needs answered 
through fellowship. They have 
experienced an attitude change, they 
say, an attitude change which gives 
them the motivation to deal with the 
same problems which had earlier 
confused them. 

"We are growing from the center 
outward." says a member of the 
Christian Student Fellowship. "We're 
sure of ourselves now, and we can use 




136 



the Bible to cite why." 

"The biggest question Christian 
students still ask however," says Dr. 
Rebecca Propst. an OU psychology 
professor and adviser to River of Life, 
"is, 'How are we to be different from 
the rest of the world?' As the students 
learn more about the social aspects of 
their faith, they will become more 
politically concerned." 



River of Life Ministries Friday Night 
Fellowship is one of the largest Christian 
fellowships on campus. 
Members often express intense spiritual 
experiences, as does Craig Gambreo. 





137 




Above - Born again Christians seem to have the 
glow of God's love on their faces, as do Keith 
Wasserman and Susie Ribble. 
Right - The people who attend Friday Night 
Fellowship develop a bond and closeness that 
is lasting. 




138 




139 



Trhei yorkin giY/raniilues 



Whether it be making pizzas, 
delivering them, working in the 
cafeterias or creating the advertising 
for university activities, many job 
opportunities are available on and off 
campus. 

The Office of Student Employ- 
ment and Financial Aid serves as a 
referral for employment. All potential 
job openings are posted regularly and 
remain posted for at least three days 
in the office located on the ground 
floor of Chubb Hall. 

Work-Study programs are an 
intregal part of student employment. 
Work-Study tries to correlate a 
student's major and current job 
openings. 

Kathy Romanin, a freshman 
journalism major here, is employed by 
the Work-Study program in the 
Graphics Department. "We work on 
the graphics and advertising of 
promoting different activities that 
occur on campus and in the city of 
Athens,*' Romanin said. "I have some 
experience in art, and the Work- 
Study program tries to assign 
students to departments which make 
the best of their talents." 

Available jobs include office work 
in various college departments. Such 
jobs develop clerical skills and allow 
students to grasp vital experience in 
their prospective field. Or, a student 



may work at Baker Center, the library 
or campus cafeterias. 

Of course all majors can't be 
correlated with each job, but the jobs 
still help. Mary Klaus, a sophomore in 
electrical engineering said, "Student 
Employment is really good at getting 
you a job if you really need one. They 
offer you a variety of jobs." She 
continued, "It's much more conven- 
ient working on campus, mainly 
because it is closer and it is nice to 
work with fellow OU students. It's 
another opportunity to meet people. 
They'll put me anywhere from serving 
on the line to working in the dish 
room. It's pretty enjoyable, the 
relations you build with the older, 
permanent workers." 

Most students have to renew 



their job every quarter, similar to a 
job bid. The student presently holding 
the job has first priority, while past 
performance is considered. 

Minimum wage is the standard 
pay for on-campus work, although a 
department may pay a student more. 

Off-campus work boasts an 
abundant array of jobs. Jobs such as 
deliverymen, bouncers, cashiers and 
stock boys are some types available. 

The Office Of Student Employ- 
ment only monitors on-campus 
employment, but it does encourage 
off -campus employers to hire students 
part-time. 

As far as the occupation outlook 
once a student leaves OU, the Office of 
Career Planning and Placement 
offers guidance and advice. 




Work study and university jobs may put a studant to work at the Learning Resources Center 
or the Frontier Room. 



140 




141 



Whether working lor The Frontier Room (left), the 
Baker Center Information Desk, like Jim Griffith 
(center), a caleteria (right), or a telephone 
switchboard, like Vicki Pitcock, a great many 
students lind ways to make a lew bucks alter classes. 




Ouane W Fletcher 




142 




143 



Congratulations 
Class of 1980 



LOGANS 
UNIVERSITY 
BOOKSTORE 

Masonic Bldg 
593-5547 



e* 1 



i3 



]\^ 



Super D up er 



Hours Daily 8 'til 10, 
Sunday 9:30 'til 7:30 

Stimpson Ave. 

592 3772 

Hours Daily 8 'til 10, Sun 9:30 'til 7:30 



ANGELO'S PIZZA 



H01 , 





Fast, Free, Hot Delivery 

Open Daily at 1 1 a.m. 

12 W Union St. 

593-7796 



Congratulations 
From 



CARPENTER 
HARDWARE 



32 South Court Street 
Athens, Ohio 



144 




I 



m 



E 



B3MDboe/a\ nssGtfS&M}® 



i-< 



'■■:'. 




Several of the bars draw a pretty good day-time crowd, especially for Happy Hour. 



OU is not a party school; OU is 
THE party school, according to 
many T-shirts and bumper 
stickers. 

It is no secret that OU has 
been labelled by students and 
others as a top-rate party school. 
This reputation seems to have 
taken root in the sixties when the 
anti-war movement was in full 
force. OU became notorious for 
active demonstrations and invol- 
vement which still continues in a 
near-annual spring riot. The sixties 
was also a time when the new 
morality movement, characterized 



by drugs, sex, and rock'n'roll 
became the focus of many cam- 
puses. Ohio University was cer- 
tainly no exception. Then in the 
early seventies, PLAYBOY 
magazine declared Ohio Universi- 
ty the top party school in the 
country. Earlier this year, NUT- 
SHELL magazine added to the 
reputation by listing Ohio Univer- 
sity's Halloween celebration as 
one of the top ten collegiate 
parties in the country. 

But is the reputation de- 
served? Certainly few schools 
OU's size have as many bars near 





L~ 



Carry outs, like Fast Eddies, Suttons or the Blue Ruin 
do a brisk business in Athens. 




The Phase On* always seems to draw a larga crowd. 



Continued from page 146. 
campus. The counts vary, but 
there are at least 27 bars in Athens, 
most ol which are located in the 
uptown area. 

And certainly Ohio University 
has its share of parties. Although 
Halloween is the most celebrated 
event, there are many other 
unusual parties. Among these 
have been a Hurricane David party, 
the Rev. Jimmy Jones party, a 
Three-Mile Island party, a wake 
party honoring the death of a 
spider which lived in the College 
Inn for a quarter. There are parties 
celebrating the beginning of a new 
quarter, the end of midterms and 



of course, the end of finals and the 
quarter. But most often, no reason 
is needed for parties; they could 
happen anytime or anywhere on or 
off campus. 

But perhaps the real key to the 
reputation is the uptown area. Bars 
open in the morning for those who 
drink their orange juice with a little 
twist, stay open in the afternoon 
for students to relax in between 
classes, and drive into the night to 
help one sleep more comfortably 
in preparing for a rough class 
schedule the next day. 

And the weekends begin on 

Thursday night. Whether the bars 

Continued to page 150. 




At popular at tha bart ara tha tub thopt. 

Continued from page 148. 
are featuring bluegrass music like 
the Frontier Room, jazz like 
Bojangles, a touch of bizarre, like 
Swanky's, or straight ahead 
rock'n'roll, like the Junction, it'll be 
packed Thursday, Friday, and 
Saturday nights. Regardless of the 
weather, some bars will be 
jammed to overflowing with lines 
going into the street and parties 
going well into the night . . . 



A "tub-human" attembly lina, where Athens 

But perhaps Ohio University is 
like any other school. Since the 
image exists, students like to 
exploit it. Some like the feeling of 
telling friends at home they attend 
a party school, but most never 
forget they're here for a degree. In 
spite of the overtness of the | 
partying, it still appears to be a £ 
minor force in a student's life, and ! 
an optional one at that. 1 




Cat's Dan bartandar Tom Hicks sarvas with a smile. 






In on* ol the last of the big act*, Billy Joal rocked the Convocation Cantor in the apring. 




Foreigner drew just 6,800 people, well below Ihe 9,600 capacity proposed later lor the Convo. 



The concert season in Athens 
began in big fashion with four 
big-name rock and roil bands 
coming to the Convocation Center 
in the fall. But financial losses and 
a re-arranging of seating in the 
Convo caused the Pop Concert 
Committee to change its style in 
the winter, and smaller acts began 
coming to town. 

Styx performed the first and 
most widely attended concert of 
the season. The band combined 
such old favorites as "Come Sail 
Away", "Renegade", and their 
encore number "Miss America" 
with several songs from their 
latest album, Cornerstone. Their 
dazzling light show plus individual 
performances by John Panozzo on 
drums and Tommy Shaw on guitar 



highlighted this homecoming 
weekend attraction. 

Four weeks later, another 
Convo Concert featured Kansas. A 
lackluster performance by the 
band was made worse by their 
inability to use their laser light 
show. Jimmy Matthews, director of 
environmental health and safety 
for the university, prohibited the 
laser show because of previous 
accidents caused by such equip- 
ment and Kansas' late request for 
a mandatory inspection of their 
lasers. 

"Dust in the Wind" and "Point 
of Know Return" drew the greatest 
audience response; yet, compared 
to the performance of their 
warm-up act, The Michael Stanley 
Band, Kansas and their crowd 



appeared lifeless. The Cleveland- 
based band really made the night 
worthwhile for the 6,441 who 
attended. 

Just fourteen days separated 
that show and the appearance of 
Foreigner. In some ways, it was a 
repeat of the Kansas concert. 

The superstar band with three 
successful albums on the market 
drew high expectations, but their 
performance proved to be 
mediocre. Although only 6,800 
came, Foreigner fans flowed with 
the frenzied guitar solos of Mick 
Jones and the vocals of Lou 
Gramm through "Cold as Ice", 
"Feels like the First Time" and 
"Headknockers". 

In the winter, O.U. students 
got a taste of sounds other than 




The Jeff Lorber Fusion, sponsored by the Center Program Board, provided a refreshing blend of jazz - rock. 



rock W roll. A jazz-rock band, the 
Jeff Lorber Fusion, sizzled the 
Baker Center Ballroom in early 
January, and a funk band, the 
Bar-Kays shook Memorial Auditor- 
ium. 

Soon after the Bar-Kays, a 
lesser-known rock 'n' roll band, Off 
Broadway, played before a disap- 
pointingly small crowd in the 
Baker Center Ballroom. 

Part of the reason that smaller 
bands were brought to town in the 
winter was financial. But a major 
change in concert seating policy 
threw things into confusion for 
most of the quarter, forcing the 
PCC, the Center Program Board, 
and the Black Cultural Program- 
ming Board to book smaller acts. 

In an effort to better the safety 



and control crowd problems, Carol 
Harter, vice president and dean of 
students, sought a concert policy 
that would limit seating in the 
Convo to approximately 9,600, 
Also, the proposal recommended 
a limit of 2,300 on tickets to be sold 
at outlets beyond a 50-mile radius, 
and an increase in security and 
parking personnel. 

PCC chairman Mark Litton 
voiced his disapproval over the 
new plan. 

"I personally feel the proposal 
is a mistake. It may not completely 
shut off all concerts here, but it will 
decrease the amount of top acts 
that the committee would want to 
bring here," he said. "The concert 
situation here does not look too 
bright." 



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The Bar-Kays war* on* of several smaller act* that began coming to Ohio University in the winter. 





The theater department opened the tall with Lanlord Wilton's The Mound Builders. 



"We're in the process of 
building so many things," said 
Robert Winters, director of the 
School of Theater. "We're provid- 
ing something for the entire state, 
particularly for southeastern 
Ohio." 

Though the productions are 
funded solely by the box office 
income, the theater still manages 
to put on three major plays each 
quarter. Besides that, the depart- 
ment has expanded its touring, 
begun last year, to two quarters 
instead of one. 

"It's hard to place one play 
above the others," Winters said. "I 
think it's a success that we get on 
as many productions as we do. 
That so many get the opportunity 
to act, direct, design or crew is 
fantastic." 



Winters cited one quarter 
when 260 students got to act in or 
crew a production. That exper- 
ience contributes to the success of 
the school this year in placing 18 
students in internships to pres- 
tigious acting companies across 
the country and in finding jobs 
when they graduate. 

"We had pretty good atten- 
dance this year," Winter said. "But 
we aren't doing well enough. We 
need to work harder to make 
contact with students at Ohio 
University who don't have any 
tradition or training in the arts. 
They get to the movies and the 
bars but I'd like to see them go to 
dance concerts and films as well 
as all this. It's no good to say they 
ought to know better." 

In an attempt to expose more 



Debra Krause and An- 
drew Potter starred in 
the autumn production 
ot Don Giovanni. 




students to theater, the school 
brought two pieces from the 
comedy festival into the dorms. 

"There is an interest there," 
Winters said. "I saw seven or eight 
students grow into a crowd of 30 or 
40 — just from people stopping in 
and staying." 

"If more people came, more 
poeple would keep coming," said 
actor Ken Bright. "Live theater is a 
tremendous experience. There's 
nothing like it." 

The touring group, Stage III, 
spreads theater throughout the 
state. The self-contained company 
performs and sponsors workshops 
for high schools, community 
colleges, universities and 
community groups from Toledo to 
Ironton. 

Only third-year, third-quarter 
graduate students tour with Stage 



III. Most members are older and 
have had professional internships 
with acting companies. That 
brings a certain maturity to the 
groups. They follow a rigorous 
schedule that includes produc- 
tions or workshops, morning, 
afternoon and evening. 

In advance, they learn what 
the schools need and then deliver. 
"Otherwise, you've superimposed 
art on the school's curriculum," 
explained Kenneth Frisch, Stage 
III resource coordinator. "We want 
it to be a different kind of 
experience." 

Stage III exemplifies the 
principle of the whole theater 
department — learn by doing. | 
"How can you find out about I 
touring unless you tour?" Frisch - ; , 
asked. a 




Alan Heer and Roy William Cox starred in Stage Ill's production of Macbeth. 




With the Athena Theater tripling, mora firat-run movies can be seen in Athena. 




The movies finally came to 
Athens, and offered students brief 
escapes into the worlds of fantasy, 
comedy, or mystery. We remem- 
bered Bergman and Bogart on that 
foggy runway in Morocco, 
travelled to Fellini's decadent 
Rome, and followed Keaton and 
Allen into the future, the past, 
Czarist Russia and several Man- 
hattan restaurants. 

This year was one of the best 
for movie-goers, bringing an 
abundance of fine films from the 
Athens Film Society, MIA, and the 
Frontier Room at inexpensive 



prices all during the week. 

The Athens Film Society, 
funded partly by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, featured 
both Classic American and foreign 
films on weekends, in Seigfred 
Auditorium. 

Among the best of the 60 films 
they showed during the year were 
"The Godfather", "Lost Horizon", 
"The Man Who Fell to Earth", 
which was based on the book by 
O.U. English professor Walter 
Tevis and starred David Bowie, 
"Days of Heaven", and Fellini's "La 
Dolce Vita" and "Satyricon." AFS 



Although Memorial Auditorium stopped 
showing movies because ol poor projectors 
and lack of attendance, Seigfred Auditor- 
ium still shows films. 

also featured films by great 
odirectors such as Hitchcock, 
Bergman and Bunuel and actors 
like Chaplin and Garbo. 

However, their biggest 
success came not with major stars 
or Oscar-winning films but with 
pornography. "Emmanuelle II" and 
"The Opening of Misty Beethoven" 
were so popular, in fact, that all 
four showings for each movie were 
sold out and students were still 
being turned away. 

MIA, funded by the Student 
Activities Commission, offered a 
different choice of recent movies 




on Thursday nights in Memorial 
Auditorium. Among them were 
"The Goodbye Girl", "Marathon 
Man", Woody Allen's "Love and 
Death" and "Deliverance". 

But after losses on eight films, 
the MIA decided to stop program- 
ming for winter and spring 
quarters. The reasons, they said, 
were poor attendance due to film 
competition on campus, no pub- 
licity, outdated movie projectors 
and a lack of funds. 

The Frontier Room continued 
to draw large crowds in their 
fourth year of showing free films 





on Tuesday nights. Although 
seating was limited and the screen 
could not be seen by some, the bar 
was usually packed at each film. 
Cheap beer and free popcorn 
helped. 

Among the many good films 
they featured were "Rocky", "One 
Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," 
"Cassablanca". At least seven 
Woody Allen films were shown in 
Athens during the year, and the 
Frontier Room supplied three of 
'jthem: "Sleeper", "Bananas", and 
"Annie Hall". The Frontier Room 
also brought two Peter Sellers' 
Inspector Clouseau films: "The 
Pink Panther" and "A Shot in the 
Dark". 



Meanwhile, students still 
flocked uptown to see flicks at the 
Varsity and renovated Athena 
theaters. The Athena divided its 
seating area up and split into three 
theaters. Though the $3 and $3.50 
tickets were expensive compared 
to those of the campus film 
groups, the uptown theater's had 
no problem bringing students in 
with films like "The Electric 
Horseman", "Star Trek: The 
Motion Picture", "Kramer vs. 
Kramer", "The Muppet Movie", 
"The Jerk", and other first-run 



movies. 



M 



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33S 





The K-Tels bring a new wave of rock W roll to the Frontier Room. 



Athens is fertile ground for 
musical talent, and each season a 
new crop of bands springs up. 

The variety of sound is end- 
less — new wave, country rock, 
acoustic, electric jazz fusion — the 
list goes on. 

Patrons pack Swanky's and 
the Frontier Room weekly to hear 
such groups as Hot Cakes, Cold- 
fish, Close Enough for Jazz, Tang- 
ent and Contraband. 

Frontier Room manager Terry 
Hogan pointed out that Athens 



offers a good environment for a 
young group to get started, but is 
inadequate if a band aspires to the 
big time. 

"It all depends on the profes- 
sional goals of a particular group," 
he said. "If they want to break into 
music full time and want to go 
national, no, it's not a good place." 

Hogan cited the fact that few 
Athens bars are large enough to 
handle live entertainment. 

Many local bands, such as 
Khaki Sweatband, Tangent and 



the K-Tels comprise primarily OU 
students. 

"We do our best to work with | 
students," Hogan said, but added | 
quickly that few student groups £ 
are good enough for weekend I 
appearances. 

According to Hogan, student 
bands come and go frequently, 
perhaps breaking up after only a 
few months. But as one group dies, 
another forms to take its place. 






Sally Shiftier and Ray Nowak spotlight their talents lor student enjoyment. 



IRlllliBEIllsH 




Nick Prokas, "Mr. SourHaki," caters to the late - night crowd. 



For the serious connoisseur of 
late night munching, uptown 
Athens is unparalleled. 

As the masses stumble from 
the various Court Street watering 
holes they find a myriad of friendly 
establishments where they can 
contentedly stuff their faces. 

For those inclined to the usual 
fare of subs and pizza, Angelo's 
Hole in the Wall, The Eatery, Pizza 
House and Souflaki's are some of 
the more popular spots. 

A few will welcome nocturnal 



gluttons as late as 4:00 a.m. 

Those with tastes a bit more 
ethnic can find acceptable cuisine 
at such places as Casa Que Pasa, 
Dolen's, Hop Sing's or Chiccalini's 
Pasta Palace. 

Athens after dark is a fertile 
market for the enterprising res- 
tauranteur, and provides a wide 
range of selection for those who 
genuinely love to eat. 

Whatever mixture of foods and 
atmosphere that best fits your 
liking, you can find it here. 




A relaxed and homey atmosphere greets patrons ot Mom's 
Coffeehouse. 





Students have their choice when it comes to pizza; the Pizza House 
is just one ot many. 



Whether it's a sandwich or a cookie, CJ's is the place to go. 







The action may be alow but competition geta fierce in dormitory backgammon tournamenta. 



In conforming with Ohio 
University's reputation as a party 
school, most students seem 
magnetically drawn uptown on 
weekend nights to drink and 
socialize in crowded bars, or have 
parties in dorms or apartments. 

But not everyone fits into this 
mold. Of those that do, most get 
tired of the uptown crowds at 
some time or other. There are also 
weekends when some don't have 
the money, especially toward the 
end of the quarters. 

There are a wide range of 
activities for times like these. 
While the- vast majority of people 
are gone, some choose to do the 
more mundane chores of everyday 
life. "I always do my laundry on 
Friday nights," one girl said. "It's 



the only time there isn't a line for 
the washers." Writing letters, 
typing overdue reports, and other 
business can best be caught up on 
when school work is not pressing. 

"It's not exciting, but it's 
practical," shrugged one junior. 
Some people even study on the 
weekends. "The library is so quiet 
on Friday and Saturday night," one 
junior said. "That's when I get 
most of my work done." 

If noise from the party next 
door doesn't bother you, the 
weekend is a good time to catch 
up on sleep. "When I get back from 
classes on Friday, I'm too tired to 
party," a freshman admitted. "I 
usually go to bed by 11:00." 

Contrary to popular belief, it is 
possible to have a good time 



without going to parties or bars. 
Many people order pizza or subs 
and have a few friends over to play f 
monopoly or backgammon. | 
Especially popular in dorms are | 
late night gossip sessions which 3 
may cover every subject from 
school to sex. Die-hard television 
addicts, in front of the set even on 
Friday or Saturday nights, are 
joined by those looking for a good 
movie. 

If you're really bored on Friday 
night, you can always alphabetize W 
your records, water plants, or V 
clean your room. For a severe case |> 
of the stuck-in-Athens blues, one i 
junior suggests "I get out a map 
and find all the other places but 
Athens I'd rather be." 







Department Store 



Best Wishes to the 
Class of 1980 

17 North Court St. 
Athens, Ohio 45701 

Phone: 593-6855 



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Within Walking Distance of College Gate 

Open Daily 9 a.m. — 9 p.m. 
22 W. Union St., Athens, Ohio 



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Beers and Wine 



Ice and Snacks Available 



Mon.-Sat. 11:30 a.m. -2:30 a.m. 
15 W. Union Street 




SPACIOUS GUEST ROOMS 
AND SUITES 

Each With Color TV 




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Cocktail Lounge Open 

11am 2 30 a m , except Sun 



THE OHIO 
UNIVERSITY INN 

593 6661. Rts 33 and 50 



170 




171 




AJuki 



On most weeknights, Memor- 
ial Auditorium remains dark and 
empty, with only a few students 
sitting and talking on the front 
steps. But on the evenings that the 
Ohio University Artist Series 
performs, Memorial Auditorium is 
ablaze with lights as students 
dressed in jeans and couples in 
tuxedos and evening gowns enter 
the doors to watch that night's 
entertainment. 

The OU Artist Series opened 
the season with "Eubie!" on Oct. 7. 
The Musical, a revue of composer 
Eubie Blake's hits from the '20's, 
played to a near-capacity crowd. 
The performers sang, danced and 
acted out such numbers as "Daddy" 



and "If You've Never Been Vamped 
by a Brownskin, You've Never Been 
Vamped At All." Only some 
technical problems with the sound 
prevented the audience from 
enjoying the show completely. 

On October 18, performers of 
the Moscow Pops including the 
Nakrasov Russian Folk Orchestra, 
along with members of the Bolshovi 
Opera and the Kiev Ballet, played 
folk songs and waltzes, such as the 
"Danube Waltz" and "Hey, Merry 
Ladies". One of the performers, 
Vladislav Piavko, threw kisses to the 
audience and singled out special 
women to sing to. A fire alarm that 
went off during the performance 
disturbed the audience but not the 




World-renowned pianist, 
Ruth Laredo, performed at 
Memorial Auditorium, 
November 1. 



a 



&■ 




performers as they played on and 
received a standing ovation. 

Ruth Laredo, a pianist, played 
pieces by Ravel and Chopin for a 
very sparse audience on Nov. 1. 
"The Flight of the Bumblebee" by 
Rimski-Korsakov-Rachmaninoff 
received the most enthusiastic 
response from the audience. The 
OU Symphony Orchestra ac- 
companied Laredo for the second 
half of the show. 

A fly, a monkey and a rabbit 
were all depicted November 9 by a 
mime group, Mummenshcanz, 
featuring Mark Olsen, Claudia 
Weiss and Mark Thompson. Based 
in part upon the ancient Swiss 
theater tradition of "The Masks", 



the group derives its name from the 
German "mummen" meaning 
game and "schanz" meaning 
chance. The packed audience, 
including many children, laughed 
and clapped as performers used 
rolls of toilet paper, clay and yarn to 
portray emotions. During intermis- 
sion the group mingled with the 
audience, to the delight of the 
children. 

Also appearing during the 
Artist Series were the Sam Rivers 
Orchestra, Patrice McBride and 
)ean-Peirre Bonnefous, the Osaka 
Philharmonic, and the Don Redlick 
Dance Company. 



173 




The Moscow Pops came to Memorial Auditorium in the midst ot rising Russo-American tensions and a rash of Russian defections by artists. 



174 



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175 




i 



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There was no shortage of 
outside ideas flowing into Athens, 
as the Kennedy Lecture Series, the 
Student Lecture Series and various 
other campus organizations 
brought in a dozen major speakers 
during the fall and winter. 

Perhaps the best-known 
speaker was Ralph Nader who, on 
January 15, called for students to 
become effective citizens. His 
speech stressed consumer activism 
as it covered a wide range of topics, 
ranging from college and education 
reform — "I'm proposing a differ- 
ent theme for education, that of 
civic training," he said — to the 
contamination of drinking water — 
"Chemical waste studies prove it's 
in every state, not just at Love 
Canal," he said. 

A similar call for action was 



made by Barry Commoner, who 
spoke February 29. Commoner, 
who is running for president under 
a newly formed Citizen's Party, 
stressed the importance of chang- 
ing America from a country that is 
controlled by government and 
corporations to one that is con- 
trolled by citizens. 

Activist-Comedian Dick 
Gregory also called for students to 
wake up and become involved, in 
his February 3 speech, as did civil 
rights activist William Kunstler, two 
weeks later. "I understand that on 
Halloween and the last weekend in 
spring you go mad," Kunstler said. 
"I suggest this year you give that 
some political direction; convert it 
into an anti-registration rally — not 
a riot, but a dignified protest." 

Kunstler was one of a number 



of speakers that the Kennedy 
Lecture Series co-sponsored with 
various departments and schools at 
Ohio University. 

Other speakers included film 
composer Jerry Fielding; Anthony 
Bouza, a former deputy chief of the 
New York police department; Lyle 
Denniston, a Supreme Court 
reporter for the Washington Star; 
Randall Robinson, head of Trans- 
Africa, a black lobbying organiza- 
tion; John Stockwell, an ex-CIA 
agent and the author of a CIA 
expose, Inside the CIA; James H. 
Street, an authority of the world 
food problem and Latin American 
economics; Melinda Liu, the 
newly-appointed bureau chief of 
Peking for Newsweek; and Robert 
Madden, a photographer for 
National Geographic. 




176 




Far Left — Jamas Street 
warned that the United 
States must aide Latin 
America in developing 
food production, and 
soon. 

Left — Melinda Liu dis- 
cussed the new U.S. rela- 
tions with China and her 
responsibilities as a corre- 
spondent in Peking. 



177 




Far Right — Barry Commoner made his first speech as a presidential 
candidate February 29, in Memorial Auditorium. 

Right — Robert Madden discussed his adventures as a photographer 
with National Geographic. 

Above — Ralph Nader lashed out at Congressman Clarence Miller, 
President Jimmy Carter, college admissions tests, and — as usual — 
big business. 



178 




179 





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The Hillel Foundation on Mill 
Street is the center for Jewish 
activities in Athens. There, students 
can socialize with culturally similar 
peers. 

"If a student wants any type of 
thing to happen here, it can," said 
Marty Cohen, chairperson of the 
student board. "All that's involved 
is a little initiative." 

The Hillel Student Advisory 
Board, meets three times per 
quarter to plan group activities, 
such as the Fat Sandwich Coffee 
House, or lox and bagels brunches. 



Other activities include discussions 
ranging from the Jewish Views of 
Jesus, to nuclear energy, Biblical 
literature or Israel. 

The social activities attract 
many non-Jewish people. "It's 
overtly Jewish, "Rabbi Rieser said, 
"but that doesn't mean it's just for 
Jews. Anything we do is open to 
anybody." 

Last spring, the Hillel House 
"adopted" a Soviet Jewish family, 
Vladimir and Karmella Raiz. They 
keep in contact and hope that their 
concern will safeguard the family 



from abuse. 

Discrimination does not end at 
the Russian border, though. A 
Sukka, or shelter commemorating 
the holiday of Sukkot and Soviet 
Jews, was erected by Hillel 
members on the College Green, 
but it was knocked down and slit 
with a knife. Earlier, a Hillel banner 
was burned at the College Gate. s 

For an organization that offers f 
so much to so many such vandalism £ 
seems unfortunate indeed. o 



180 




Left - Understanding is part 
of what Hillel is all about. 

| Right - Sharing the Jewish 
5 experience with children is 
- : just one aspect of Hillel's 
■'■ activities. 



181 




Many black students coming to Athens experience a cultural 
shock. But organizations like the Center tor Afro-American 
Affairs have overcome barriers like the university's refusal 
to recognize Martin Luther King Day as a holiday, to keep 
U Irom being totally dry of black culture. 





182 




6- 




Athens is extremely limited in 
the area of providing satisfactory 
evening recreation and entertain- 
ment for the black students who 
attend Ohio University. 

A majority of the black student 
population coming from large city 
or suburban areas confront a 
cultural shock in Athens. 

Uptown Athens comes fully 
equipped with 15 bars, three pizza 
places, two movie houses, numer- 
ous other eating areas and several 
arcades to occupy an individual's 
time on a Friday or Saturday 
evening. Of course if one isn't 
turned on by slugging down beers 
'til 2 a.m., eating pizzas and subs, 
wasting quarter after quarter to 
bruise your hips on a pinball 
machine or just can't afford $7.00 to 
take your lady to the movies, then 
uptown Athens turns into a real 
drag. 



Most of the black students just 
don't get into listening to the Frog 
Whompers croon and whoop at 
Mr. Bojangles or the Frontier 
Room. The long lines for the Cat's 
Den and The Phase I just aren't 
worth it to listen to average rock or 
pop pour from the jukebox. 

Occasionally a few black 
students will make it uptown to 
Mug and Margarita's for a drink or 
two amidst the closest thing to a 
disco atmosphere. Or they'll spend 
a Wednesday afternoon at happy 
hours at Swanky's or the evening 
there on soul night. 

Blacks create for themselves an 
atmosphere which they are more 
familiar with and therefore can 
relate to better. Ohio University's 
black student population finds 
deejayed dances at Lindley Student 
Center more like their idea of a well 
spent evening. These dances are 



usually given by the black Greek 
organizations and students are 
charged 50 cents to dance and to 
enjoy all the latest soulful, discoand 
jazz recordings. 

Every now and then a Creek 
organization will give a ball. They 
are often held at the Armory. On 
the nights when there are no 
dances, there are other affairs such 
as lectures at Memorial Auditor- 
ium, variety shows and movies at 
Morton Hall which occupy blacks 
on campus. 

No, the majority of the black 
students don't head uptown on 
Friday and Saturday nights but 
instead keep a low profile at 
Lindley. Black students seem to 
include more dancing and singing § 
and less alcohol in their notion of * 
partying. I 



183 




WOUmiii U, A 



Many University students take 
advantage of the cultural folklore 
experiences in this area. Whether 
it's listening to a favorite bluegrass 
band pickin' to its heart's content, 
or a walk around the trails at 
Strouds Run State Park, many 
students can see and experience 
the culture and beauty of the 
region. 

Students can also learn more 
about this area in the classroom. 
Sociology of Appalachia, Politics of 
Appalachia, Geography of Appala- 
chia and. during the 1980 Winter 
Quarter, A Media Survey of Athens 
County all provide insight into the 




people and lifestyles in Appalachia. 

Although there is still interest 
in courses on Appalachia, Associate 
Professor of Sociology Bruce Kuhre 
said that it isn't as popular as it was 
four or five years ago. Kuhre, who 
taught Sociology of Appalachia for 
eight years and co-edited the 
textbook used in the course, said 
past students took a "romantic" 
approach to Appalachia and the 
rural areas. Some thought that 
country living would be easier but 
they later became disgruntled. 

"Today, students are much 
more concerned with being able to 
compete with others in the job 



market," he said. "It (Sociology of 
Appalachia course) doesn't have 
the romantic attachment it did four 
or five years ago. Students who are 
taking it now are more realistic." 

Kuhre is working with 
sociology associate professors 
Bruce Ergood and Cirard Krebs to 
establish a certification in Appala- 
chian Studies curriculum. Although 
nothing is specific, Kuhre said the 
interested student would have a 
regular major and also study 
courses dealing with Appalachia 
before receiving the certificate. 



184 



Far Left - The life of Athens County farmers often reflects 

characteristics associated with Appalachia, including 

self-sufficiency. 

Right - A less complicated lifestyle, one that involves 

producing your own food, is not necessarily an easier one. 

Bottom — The hills allow plenty of space for children to play. 




185 



To an Appalachian 
farm family, dogs are 
often less pets and 
more work animals. 




186 




John Schmieding: "What keeps us together is a common goal of wanting a community in the country." 

GrftlK^ rflU M OKMj 9t All W iH MilKA UHlrlJi j/ 



Looking into the hills of Athens 
county a student can be tempted to 
think, "forget the rat race, I'm going 
to get lost in those hills and settle 
down!" 

Some people do. The Sun- 
flower farm, located about three 
miles from Amesville, is a commune 
of such people, but probably not 
your typical commune. "Most 
communities are formed around 
one ideology," said resident John 
Schmieding. "The most striking 
thing about this community is its 
diversity." 

The Sunflower "community" 
began about four years ago when 
100 acres was bought for the 



purpose of establishing a commu- 
nity arrangement. Currently, there 
are 75 acre plots taken and the 
community will stop growing when 
it adds three more homesteaders. 
The remaining 22 acres belongs to 
everyone who lives on the farm. 

Most people think of com- 
mune residents as ones who strive 
for total self-sufficiency from 
society. At the Sunflower farm 
that's not necessarily the case. 
"Self-sufficiency is not a goal," said 
Schmieding. However, several 
residents don't have conventional 
electricity in their homes. Instead, 
some run their houses off of 
batteries. 



Community members hold 
periodic meetings to discuss their 
business and arrange work 
schedules to get things done 
around the farm. All proposals are 
settled through consensus rather 
than a majority vote. For example, if 
one member disagrees with a 
proposal, a compromise is attempt- 
ed. 

Garry Penswick said the 
community living concept at the 
Sunflower farm works well because 
everyone has his own plot of land 
where they can do what they want 
"It's like one big neighborhood," 
he said. 



Long hours of practice are 
not work, but pleasure for 
Marcia Hall. 




To say someone is a fine 
violinist bespeaks one thing above 
all — dedication. For Marcia Hall, 
playing her violin 50 hours a week 
in addition to attending classes is 
not at all unusual. That is in addition 
to attending classes in conducting, 
music history and completing 
bothersome general requirements. 

But for Hall, practice is not a 
chore, it's a delight. "Oh, sure, 
there are frustrations and moments 




when I want to put it away and not 
even think about music," she says, 
"But more often than not I am 
carried away by the music and the 
technique — the time just flies." 

Hall, a very active musician, 
played first-chair violin while acting 
as concert mistress in the O.U. 
Symphony for the opera "Don 
Giovanni," and has performed 
frequently with the Springfield 
Symphony Orchestra and the 



Huntington Chamber Orchestra. 
Despite these impressive begin- 
nings, Hall's primary objective is not 
to perform in front of tuxedoed 
men and fur-wrapped women in 
great concert halls. "People look 
down on lesser-known groups, but 
if I enjoyed playing with them and 
felt that I was accomplishing 
something musically by being 
there, I'd prefer it to a stuffy 
position in Cleveland or Boston." 



188 




Jazz One's improvisational 
skills grow out of dedication as 
much as talent. 




It seems as if everywhere the 
Jazz Ensembles played, there was 
always a large and enthusiastic 
crowd to accompany them. 

Jazz Ensembles One and Two 
and now newly-formed Jazz Three 
perform. Although not many 
numbers from the so-called "Big 
Band Era" are played, a jazz 
enthusiast could acknowledge the 
fact that much of modern jazz still 
contains a bit of that old brassy 
style. 



"It's easier to relate to the 
audience with modern jazz," said 
Ernie Bastin, associate professor of 
brass instruments and director of 
Jazz One. "And there is just so 
much material to be covered, so we 
don't do the old stuff." 

Jazz Three was formed this year 
in order to give students more 
contact with jazz, Bastin said, and 
also because the students who are 
music education majors will have to 
teach jazz some day. 



"Being in the jazz ensembles is 
the only way they can practice 
jazz," Bastin said. 

Jazz One contains more ad- 
vanced players; however, as Bastin 
said, Jazz Two has vastly improved 
since last year. Jazz Three is 
definitely on its way up, and who 
knows, maybe within the next few 
years, OU will have a Jazz Four that 
it can be as proud of as it is of One, 
Two, and Three. 



189 



One of Ohio University's more 
promising painters is Charles 
Bensman. 




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Qjdm ty tk Hik c| Mm 



The landscape, the small town, 
the comfortable community all 
come together to make Athens the 
perfect setting for a painter. Or at 
least for Charles Bensman, a senior 
in the School of Art. 

"I loved the landscape around 
Athens and Ohio University had a 
good reputation for art," Bensman 
said. "OU is the only help I've 
gotten as far as painting goes. I've 
had my ups and downs but kept 
trying." 



Bensman paints mostly lands- 
capes; his style, as he describes it, is 
"naturalistic, realism." His paintings 
reflect his fondness for Athens 
scenery. 

"I've only gotten as far as I have 
within the last year," he said. "For 
three years I stumbled around, 
making mistakes. But the faculty is 
excellent at OU. And I have to be 
sharp enough to catch my mistakes 
and refine my painting." 

With a lot of luck Bensman 



hopes to become an independent 
painter after graduate school. 
Gallery showings throughout the 
state would make Bensman known. 
If a certain gallery liked his work 
and style, he could begin painting 
exclusively for that gallery. 

Independent painting is not 
the only alternative open to 
Bensman. "I would like to be a 
painting instructor," said Bensman. | 
"My professors think I could go 8 
into illustrations." I 



190 




Experimentation and 
being unconventional 
are hallmarks of 
Charles Couasnon's 
sculpture. 




vmim 



9n Scoifag 



To Charles Couasnon, sculpt- 
ing is the expression of his in- 
dividual pursuit of the spirtual side 
of life. 

"I'm moving my work towards 
individualism," said Couasnon. "I 
want everyone to look towards 
themselves for their spiritual 
comfort rather than to mass 
organizations for religion." 

Couasnon, a senior in art, is a 
transfer student to OU. The 
facilities for sculpting and the 
instructors brought Couasnon to 
Athens. "I needed a change, 



wanted to make a move. I came 
here to visit and liked what was 
going on," he said. 

The change in environment 
improved his work, Couasnon 
admitted. His sculpting lately has 
been with steel although he feels 
the need to experiment with a 
variety of materials to be comfort- 
able. 

Manipulative materials such as 
stone and clay are also a part of 
Couasnon's work. Icons, images and 
spiritual symbols direct his sculpt- 
ing today. 



"I think icons are a locking part 
of the social structure," he said. But 
for Couasnon, they become a way 
to express his thoughts of in- 
dividuality and religion. 

After graduation, Couasnon 
plans to continue sculpting and 
hopes to become financially suc- 
cessful one day. Teaching is also a 
possibility in the near future. But 
whether teaching students or 
working as a sculptor, he will be 
expressing himself through his 
work. 



191 



Singing is rewarding 
(or Tayek, but it is not 
his prime concern. 




Mmd mMMSit 



A vocal musician such as Jack 
Tayek has the added frustration of 
knowing that his "instrument" is 
internal. A pianist can aspire to play 
a Steinway grand, a violinist can 
yearn for a Stradivarius, but a 
vocalist must rely on his vocal 
chords and physical technique. 

"There's a certain benefit to 
that, though," explains Tayek. "A 
voice is yours and no one else has 
made it for you. What you are 



working with is very personal." 

Practice, of course, makes that 
ability more than just a pastime. It 
can be frustrating. "I feel that 
practice should always be difficult, 
Tayek says. "If I'm doing it correct- 
ly, I must be working and striving to 
perfect myself. That's often not 
easy, but it can be rewarding." 

Tayek, who played the role of 
Leporello in the opera "Don 
Giovanni" fall quarter, readily 



admits that opera is not his great 
goal in music. "I'm an educator first, 
and I want to have broad musical 
interests. I enjoy playing in Trom- 
bone Choir. My voice is not a 
hobby, but it's not my prime 
concern. I want to teach people 
how to sing, and I want to use my 
voice to help others learn to use = 
theirs." I 



192 




One of the finest dancers at 
Ohio University, Terri Kraft 
believes her talent to be 
God-given. 



At in fitdttwt 



Terri Kraft, a senior in the 
School of Dance, has immediate 
plans of going home to Seattle to be 
with her father. 

But as far as her career goes, 
Kraft said, "I'm not sure. A lot of 
options are open, in New York or 
other eastern states. I'd like to be 
on the west coast to be near my 
family and my friends." She 
continued, "I committed my life to 
Christ two and a half years ago, and 



since I've met the Lord, I'm sure He 
will direct me in the way I should 
go. He's got a place for me." 

She came to Ohio University 
because she met one of the 
professors, Gladys Bailin, while still 
in High School in Canada at a 
workshop. Kraft said that she has 
come to appreciate this area over 
time, but still loves the mountains 
and the ocean. She said she feels as 
long as one has peace within 



oneself, anywhere can be pretty 
exciting. 

"I think I've been given a gift in 
dance, and have been blessed with 
coordination," Kraft said. "There 
isn't room to think you've made it 
because there's always someone 
better. It's a tough field, so 
self-oriented and self-centered. 
The abilities I have don't come from 
me and I'm thankful for my health." 



193 



At just 26, Connie Ray was 
chosen for the cherished 
role of Martha in "Who's 
Afraid of Virginia Woolf?". 




Connie Ray has been involved 
in theater since she was nine years 
old when she won a state competi- 
tion with her brother in North 
Carolina. 

She come to OU because of its 
good reputation, good teachers 
and internship program. The 
internship program is very impor- 
tant because it allows an actor to 
make important contacts. 

"I want to do it more than 



anything else in the world and it's so 
iffy," Ray said. "There are so many 
out there who are just as good as 
you are — it's just who you know." 

The second year graduate 
student has already learned a lot at 
OU. "Here you're emersed in it 
(acting) from 11-5 every day. It's 
very intensive." Ray added, "You 
may not know for a couple years 
just how much you've learned." 

One thing she learned from 



her role as Martha, in "Who's Afraid 
of Virginia Woolf?" winter quarter 
is that "People don't want to see 
you play it safe. It's boring to see 
someone do what you could do." 
In her role as Martha, one of 
the roles that she says every actress 
wants to play, Ray wore no padding 
and had to "scream like a banshee. 
But, it's okay for you to do it, 'cause 
you're not you," she explained. 



194 




Ken Bright would even- 
tually like to move into 
television and later direct- 
ing. 



"Live theater is a tremendous 
experience," said Ken Bright, a 
graduate student in theater. "If 
more people came, more people 
would keep coming. There's just 
not anything like it." 

Bright himself fell in love with 
theater after getting involved with a 
production of "The Diary of Ann 
Frank". He said" 'Been doing it ever 
since and 'been paying someone 
ever since to be able to keep doing 
it." 

Except for a stint in the Air 



Force and an internship with the 
Cincinnati Playhouse, he has been 
acting at OU. Bright graduated from 
OU and returned here to do his 
graduate work because of training 
— from voice to movement — and 
because of the scale and number of 
performances. 

"I've grown light years as an 
actor with Peter Sander," Bright 
said, citing his current professor's 
relaxed and natural atmosphere. 

Bright taught introductory 
classes to non-majors as well as 



played Dr. Wangel in the winter 
production of "The Lady from the 
Sea". 

Although he admires other 
actors, he copies no one. "You're 
just cheating yourself out of all the 
discoveries you can make. Each 
person brings something different 
to each role," Bright explained. 
"You have to make it real for 
yourself in order to make it real for 
others." 



195 



Philip Terman edits Sphere 
magazine, the center of a tight 
circle of O.U. writers. 





It is like the time in a dream 
When we are sitting between two 

mirrors, 
Our shadows stretched out long 

on the floor. 
We are in a room much like the 

one 

We are in now. 

Ya slowly whisper a poem 

into my ear, your breath 

entering 
my head like fire that spreads 

flame. 

Philip 5. Terman 



Mil foul 



Philip Terman is a creative 
writing major who came to Ohio 
University four years ago from 
South Euclid, a suburb of Cleveland, 
because of the nice scenery. 

"This atmosphere seems to 
breed artists, and poets are not the 
least among them," Terman said. 
"Certain poets here are very serious 
about their work, sort of like a life 
and death situation. They've 
formed a tight circle where every- 
one helps each other out." 

Terman would like to be 
remembered in the Norton Anth- 
ology someday. Shorter range goals 



6 



include graduate school and writing 
a book of poetry. 

Why poetry? "Poetry ex- 
presses the primal music rhythm of 
an individual's nature as manifested 
in collective consciousness. Poetry 
is music," said Terman. "Everybody 
speaks music everyday in their 
conversations. What a poem should 
do is direct itself towards the 
essence of music." 

Currently, Terman is editor of c 

5 

poetry for SPHERE, an outlet for ■ 
artists to have their work published »■ 
in magazine form. g 



196 




For Skip Gans, there's a whole 
world of the uncommon, wait- 
ing to be captured. 




George Cans, a graduating 
senior in photo art from Ramsey, 
N.J., is an individual with an eye for 
the uncommon. 

"I like to photograph the 
peculiar, things that are different, 
out of the ordinary, the unique." 

Gans, known as Skip to most, 
reports that he didn't become 
seriously interested in photography 
before coming to OU. 



"It happened by accident, I 
guess. I just kind of stumbled into 
it," he said. 

"I came with a naive attitude. I 
didn't know anything about it. I just 
kind of got into the system and 
determined for myself what I 
wanted to do — and that's make 
art." 

For Gans, "making art" often 
requires discarding conventional 



formats. He does not always use 
35mm film, but instead utilizes 
"anything that suits the image." 

Gans believes photo art is 
difficult area to study in academic 
terms, but feels there are some c 
excellent faculty members in the | 
department. He plans to do % 
graduate work in art history. 



197 



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It is a well-known fact that no one passing 
the College Gate carries any money. 




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"Buy this! Sign that! Take one 
of these! Would you like to 
contribute?" 

No event or cultural group or 
political-activist club or organiza- 
tion would be recognized by 
students if its supporters didn't 
push their wares at the College 
Gate. 

During the fall and spring the 
gate is flooded with people trying 
to sell anything from T-shirts to 
raffle tickets; publicize anything 
from boxing matches to pantamime 
shows; push petitions for anything 
from getting political candidates on 
the ballot to getting student 



representation by state-wide 
organizations; express views on 
anything from nuclear energy to 
the spring riot; and collect money 
for anything from the American 
Cancer Society to unorthodox 
religious groups. 

Actually, only two organiza- 
tions are permitted to work the 
College Gate at a time. The 
organizations have to be sanctioned 
by the Student Life Programs office 
or some academic department and 
must get permission from that 
office in advance to be out there. 

Regardless of which or how 
many organizations are working the 



gate, they have to hustle to get 
students' attention. Being bom- 
barded by promotions everytime 
they walk onto the College Green, 
students quickly build up a resis- 
tance to the activities. They 
become deaf to the shouts, blind to 
the banners, broke to the pleas, and 
more than often, annoyed. Many 
simply walk around the gate. 

But the T-shirt sellers, pamplet 
passers and petition pushers press 
on, often in the rain, often in 
frustration, but usually in the name 
of a cause. 



198 



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Financial difficulties, a new 
location, new equipment, and the 
coverage of several special events 
dominated THE POST'S first year in 
Baker Center. 

■The story of THE POST this 
year is money or the lack thereof," 
says Gary Marshall, editor of 
EXTRA, THE POST'S weekly 
magazine supplement. To make up 
a 510,000 deficit. Posties took to the 
streets for "Dollar Day," selling the 
last issue of fall quarter for one 
dollar and raising $1900. Marshall 
blames the loss of national advertis- 



ing revenue for the troubled 
financial situation. However, editor 
Jim Frantz says the deficit is 
decreasing. 

Despite the tight money situa- 
tion, THE POST pulled off several 
stories that Frantz and managing 
editor Teri Krimm think are among 
the best stories of the year. 
University editor Alan Adler agrees, 
saying, "This is what sets THE POST 
apart from other college papers. We 
go where the news is." This year 
Post staff members covered the 
pope in Washington D.C., Jimmy 



Carter in Steubenville, Jane Fonda 
in Dayton, and a large march in 
Greensboro, N.C. 

Local stories included coverage 
of a train derailment in Millfield and 
a shooting incident involving City 
Prosecuter James Halleran. 

The Halleran case put THE 
POST in the news when staff writer 
Peg Loftus was charged with 
contempt of court for refusing to 
answer questions at Halleran's 
indictment hearing. Loftus. crime 
and police reporter, had attended 
the party where Halleran had shot 



University editor Alan Adler and Richard Fletcher of the graphics department are two Posties used to long hours. 




200 



TTTT 



JL 





five bullets in the ceiling of ATHENS 
NEWS. She answered the questions 
when ordered by the judge at her 
own hearing. She said, "It made me 
take what I was doing seriously. I 
didn't want to make a bad decision 
for other reporters. I think I did the 
right thing." 

The move from Pilcher House 
has made the staff more profession- 
al, according to Krimm, but long- 
time Posties like Marshall regret the 
passing of the former wild lifestyle. 
"THE POST doesn't raise hell," he 
complains. "We're not outrageous 
anymore." 

But Adler thinks the move to 
conservatism was necessary. 
"We've changed with the campus," 
he says. "OU is not as much of a 
party school as it used to be. If we 
didn't change, we wouldn't be 
representing the students." 

Overall, THE POST is seen as a 
learning ground, the closest thing to 
professional experience on a daily 
paper. But the same dailiness that 
makes THE POST'S reputation, is 
also responsible for its mistakes, 
says Frantz, explaining that the hard 
work and long hours sap the energy 
and stamina of the staff. 



Post editor, Jim Frantz 




201 



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The Institute of Visual 
Communication is a program that 
combines the School of Art and the 
School of Journalism allowing 
students to earn a bachelor or 
science in journalism or a bachelor 
of fine arts degree in visual 
communication. 

The program was run exper- 
imentally for two years and officially 
started in September 1978. Chuck 
Scott, director, said, "It's been 
successful. The program utilizes 
resources of two colleges." He 
continued, "It gives students in 
journalism a better background in 
art and art students a better 



Chuck Scott churns out award-winning 
photographers year after year. 




background in journalism. It's a far 
better arrangement then before. As 
far as we know its the only program 
run this way." 

The Institute sponsors a News- 
photo Conference for word-oriented 
newspaper editors annually. 

Scott said photojournalism is 
usually not taken seriously, but it 
is taken serious at O.U. 



Scott said that it's very impor- 
tant to be trained in all aspects of 
journalism. Editors will no longer 
tolerate photographers who can't 
write. "It's not enough to be a 
photographer or a reporter. One 
should understand the whole 
gambit, graphics, writing, and 
photography," Scott said. 



The number ol would-be photo-journalists has skyrocketed. 





Lru 



When THE POST and the 
Spectrum GREEN moved out of 
Pilcher House last summer, most 
people thought it was the end of an 
era. And good riddance, they said. 
The building was generally thought 
to be the ugliest, most run-down 
structure on campus. The two 
publications had been there since 
just 1974, but when they moved on 



to Baker Center, they left a house 
whose walls were (where they were 
still standing) plastered with graffiti 
("Historic!" claimed THE POST'S 
former editor Chris Celek), ceilings 
were falling in, furniture was torn, 
burned, broken and stolen, and 
trash, old newspapers and year- 
books were, well, everywhere. It 
looked as if a party had been carried 



One of O.U.'s greatest slums — er . 



landmarks — Pilcher House 




on there continuously for six years. 

But somehow, people knew the 
building was something more than 
an eyesore. In the fall the university 
announced it would not tear the 
house down and put in a parking lot, 
as it had originally planned. The 
house had once been a nice place 
— nice enough to house the offices 
of the College of Communication. It 
is the only known example of 
Italianate architecture in Athens. 
And it had been there since 1880. 
when the Pilchers (or was it the 
Sloans? or maybe the O'Blenneses? 
or the Perkins? No one's quite sure) 
had it built to order. 

So the university, which had 
owned it since about 1968. decided 
to have the place declared a 
national historic site. Then the 
university advertised to lease the 
house for 15 years to anyone willing 
to restore it to its original condition. 

But that includes tearing down 
the back half of the building, which 
was added about fifty years ago, 
and cleaning all the historic graffiti 
off the walls. 

Pilcher house is staying, but 
somehow, it will never be the same. 

Goodbye. 

A fitting goodbye. 







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203 



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Gladys Jelks and other students produce Athens only television station, WOUB 




"Gold prices skyrocket." 
Student newscaster Kent Kahn of 
WOUB-TVs NEWSWATCH reports 
the days events for Athens and 
vicinity gaining the valuable exper- 
ience needed to become top-rate in 
the future. 

Telecommunications director 
Joseph Welling describes the 
system of operations at WOUB-TV 
and radio AM-FM as "staff- 
supervised and student-operated." 



WOUB participates in a press conference 
with Ralph Nader. 




204 



Students are involved in all facets of 
radio and television, ranging from 
broadcasting to behind-the-scenes 
production. They can also be 
involved in a work-study program 
consisting of mostly clerical workers 
who are paid for their efforts. 

For those who want to "ham it 
up" and stay loose, radio broad- 
casting provides students with an 
alternative to being in front of a 
nerve wracking camera. "Deejay- 
ing" on radio AM-FM involves 
knowing how to run the equipment 
as well as developing a radio 



personality. Tests are required for 
the student to prove his or her 
abilities. 

The people who work behind 
the scenes in production deal 
mostly with the pressure-packed 
situation of getting the news, 
commercials and announcements 
on the air. They have to know how 
much time is allotted for each 
commercial and must cue in the 
announcer so there are no embar- 
rassing silences between spots. 
They are also responsible for 
putting several local programs on 



the air, such as "Music from the 
Valley." a program featuring 
bluegrass. 

WOUB-TV provides Southeas- 
tern Ohio with not only education 
programs, but also with an OU- 
oriented news program. NEWS- 
WATCH. Students turn into anchor- 
persons and residents come face- 
to-face with possible future heirs to 
Walter Cronkite's job. But for now, 
instead of saying, "And that's the 
way it is . . .", OU's rookies content 
themselves with, "And that's a look 
at NEWSWATCH." 



WOUB-FM is broadcast to most ol southeastern Ohio and features students like Rick Rogala. 




Duane W Fletcher 



205 



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Disaster strikes Millfield in the form of a toxic chemical pouring from ruptured tanks, causing an evacuation of the Athens County town . 




206 



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In 1979-80, OU students were 
brought out of their isolation in the 
hills and were retied to the realities 
of world news. Major international 
crises came home to Americans 
during the year, and seemed to have 
an effect on everything else that 
happened. In November a group of 
militant Iranian students stormed 
the U.S. embassy in Tehran, and a 
month later the Soviet Union 
invaded the neighboring country of 
Afghanistan. 

From that moment, war seemed 
to be a very real possibility here, just 
61/2 years since the American 
people put the horrors of the 
Vietnam War to bed. American 



sentiment on war split, but nearly 
everyone seemed unified in their 
horror and anger over what Iran and 
Russia were doing. Four months 
later, 50 Americans were still being 
held hostage in Tehran, and stories 
of Russian atrocities were still 
filtering out of Afghanistan. 

So in his State-of-the-Union 
Address in January, President 
Carter announced that he was 
calling for a re-instatement of draft 
registration, and the university 
community was stunned into cons- 
ciousness. 

And the cries became political. 
It was an election year, and before 
November, 1979, Carter trailed 



Edward Kennedy by a wide margin. 
Carter's firm stand against the 
Iranian captors and Russia pushed 
him well into the lead in polls, and 
helped him win early primaries. Part 
of his hard stand against the 
Russians included a call for the 
United States to boycott the 
Summer Olympics, to be held in 
Moscow. 

Ironically, it was the Winter 
Olympics, held in Lake Placid, New 
York, that gave Americans a breath 
of relief and a charge of patriotic 
pride. The U.S. hockey team went 
into the Olympics inexperienced, 
untested, unseeded and with no 
hope of getting past the Finnish, 



Corporal William Gallegos, an American hostage in Iran, talks with newsmen at the American Embassy. 




207 



Swedish or Czech teams. Absolutely 
no one gave the scrappy Americans, 
led by Jim Craig and Mark Johnson 
a chance to beat the Russians. 
When they did, Lake Placid was 
pandimonium and the rest of the 
country had found the heroes it 
needed. It was almost anticlimactic 
when the team beat Finland for the 
gold medal, two days later. Mean- 
while, Eric Heiden became another 
winter hero, as he won five gold 
medals, cleaning up in all the 
speed-skating events. 

When the winter games came to 
an end, we were pushed back into 
politics, as the race for the pre- 
sidency continued. For the Repub- 
licans, the elusive Ronald Reagan 
managed to stay in front of a wide 
field that included George Bush, 
John Anderson, John Connally and 
Howard Baker. 

All of this happened so quickly 
that we had almost forgotten all 
about Pope John Paul ll's magical 
trip across the United States. His 
stops in Boston, New York, Chicago, 
Des Moines and Washington 
brought good will and captured 
hearts of Catholics and non- 



Catholics alike. We had also nearly 
forgotten the tragedies that were 
taking place in the South Pacific. 
Thousands of Vietnam boat people 
wandered aimlessly, looking for a 
home, while, nearby, thousands of 
Cambodians starved to death. 

The economy was one thing we 
could not forget. Fueled by a gas 
shortage in the summer, gasoline 
prices soared from 85 cents to $1.15 
a gallon. The call for new energy 
sources went out to many, but, 
unfortunately, was heard by few. 
And in January, inflation had 
reached a rate of 18 percent 
annually. 

Still, we were not completely 
down. The year in sports offered an 
exciting World Series and an 
exciting Super Bowl, both won by 
Pittsburgh. Aging Willie Stargell led 
the Pirates to a come-from-behind 
seven-game victory over the Bal- 
timore Orioles in October. Then, in 
January, Terry Bradshaw and the 
Steelers, heavily favored against the ? 
Los Angeles Rams, had to come| 
from behind twice before they finally s 
won, 31-19. " 



Americans could take a lesson from Mr. Bill who survived crisis after crisis during the year. 




A common threat brings students together 




208 



an anti-draft rally reminiscent of the 60s. 




209 



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Bill Kelley III takes a break from his work in the photo lab of the ATHENS MESSENGER. 




210 



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OTHMTOMME 



Probably the best known 
publication on campus is THE 
POST, but there are many types of 
media that students have the 
opportunity to become involved 
with. 

One is ATHENS MAGA- 
ZINE, which is a lab magazine, one 
of two self-supporting university 
magazines in the country. The class 
is required for all magazine jour- 
nalism majors, but is open to all 
journalism students. It is published 
quarterly. Editor of the spring issue, 
Tim Smith, said, "ATHENS MAGA- 
ZINE deals with southeastern Ohio 



in some way. The stories are wide 
open; there are political, environ- 
mental and historical pieces. In 
some quarters there have been more 
town-related articles and in others 
quarters more student-related 
articles." Smith said that winter 
quarter was the first that students 
were graded for their work. 

A weekly newspaper, ATHENS 
NEWS is totally self-supporting 
employing four full-time and about 
ten part-time people, five of which 
are students. "We try to print things 
that aren't covered in other media, 
exciting news that readers can't find 



anywhere else," Editor-Publisher 
Bruce Mitchell said. "We are an 
advocacy-oriented newspaper, 
meaning we don't believe there is 
such a thing as total objectivity." 

Another newspaper on campus 
is AFRO-AMERICAN AFFAIRS. The 
all-student staff puts the paper out 
monthly, but due to technical 
difficulties did not publish an issue 
fall quarter. AFRO-AMERICAN 
AFFAIRS is on a rotary budget of the 
Center Afro-American Studies and 
receives funds from the allocations, 
commission of the Student Life 
Office. According to Candace 



Rusty Smith and Dave Johnson graduated from OU to become program directors of WATH-WXTO. 




211 



Roseman, editor, "We print straight 
news in the university and in Ohio. 
We try to print national and 
international news that affects black 
students in the Athens community." 
The green radio stations are 
affiliated with ACRN and area 
Residence Life Programs. They are 
not interconnected, but are closed 
systems only broadcasting to the 
dorms on their green. 



An undergraduate creative arts 
publication, SPHERE MAGAZINE 
publishes short fiction, poetry and 
graphic art. Students compose the 
staff. SPHERE MAGAZINE is pub- 
lished annually, coming out spring 
quarter. 

SPECTRUM GREEN is OU's 
yearbook. The yearbook is self- 
supporting and the staff consists of 
students. "We try to combine the 



best of magazine makeup and 
design with the needs and require- 
ments of a modern college year- 
book," editor Scott Powers said. "A 
lot of people comment that they've 
never seen a yearbook like ours — 
we take that as flattery. The Ohio 
University yearbook is considered 
one of the most dynamic in the 
country." 



Greg Smestad shoots the cover of Athena Magazine, while Chris Hartman holds a reflector board. 




212 




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A professor of English, Daniel 
Keyes is the author of several short 
stories, three novels, and is current- 
ly working on his fourth. Keyes' first 
major short story, "Flowers for 
Algernon" was widely acclaimed 
and when he rewrote it into his first 
novel in 1966, it won the Nebula 
Award for Best Novel. 

FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON 
deals with a neurological exper- 
iment performed on a retarded man 
and the results and effects of that 
experiment. The story was later 
made into a screenplay entitled 
CHARLY. Cliff Robertson won an 
Oscar for Best Actor in 1969 
portraying Charly. 

Keyes' second novel, THE 
TOUCH, released in 1968, deals 
with the trauma in a nuclear plant 
accident. His third novel has been 
accepted by his publisher and is 
scheduled for release in the fall of 
1980. 

Last summer, CHARLY was 
made into a musical drama by David 
Rodgers, with music score written 
by Charles Strauss, who also wrote 
the music to several popular 
musicals, including ANNIE and 
GOLDEN BOY. The musical opened 
in Canada in December, 1978 to 
standing ovations and rave reviews. 

There is now a producer 
working to get backers to bring 
CHARLY to Broadway. And ABC 
has shown an interest in doing a T.V. 
special. 

In his 13th year as a faculty 
member of the English Department, 
Keyes is on leave so that he can 
devote full time to his current 
project, the biography of Billy 
Milligan, who is said to have ten 
personalities. Milligan had read 
FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON and 
specifically asked that Keyes write 
his biography. Keyes has done 



research in multiple personalities 
while attending Brooklyn College. 

Keyes, in commenting on the 
fact that his writing deals in 
psychological matters, said, "Every 
writer finds his or her area to work. 
I've found that I'm most fascinated 



with the human mind." 

He added that he does plan to 
go into other things. Whatever these 
other things happen to be, Keyes 
has had an impact on both readers 
of his books and students in his 
classes. 



Success is billowing upward for English professor Daniel Keyes. 




213 



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PH 



Hodding Carter III and David 
Brinkley headlined the World 
Communication Conference enti- 
tled "Communication in the 21st 
Century,'' held April 27th through 
May 4th. 

Carter, assistant secretary of 
state for public affairs, opened the 
conference with a keynote address 
entitled "International Communica- 
tions: Rights and Responsibilities" 
on Friday, April 27 in Memorial 
Auditorium. 

Carter said the United States 
press and government are the best 
in the world, but not good enough. 
He said the inverted pyramid is an 
unrealistic style to use in today's 
active news world. Carter added 
that the news media are inaccurate 
in international coverage and the 



media do not cover enough interna- 
tional news. 

Brinkley, anchorman for the 
"NBC Nightly News,'' refuted 
Carter's charges on international 
coverage in a Kennedy Lecture on 
Sunday evening, April 29 at Memor- 
ial Auditorium. Brinkley said that 
Americans are interested in local 
news first, national news second 
and international news last. He said 
that the lack of time and interest 
keep international coverage at a 
minimum. But Brinkley added that 
he thinks important international 
events are covered well and stories 
such as the Iranian Revolution were 
perhaps overly covered. He pointed 
out that time is a problem because 
local affiliates do not want to give 
the networks extra time to cover 



more news. 

Brinkley answered questions 
ranging from what he does on the 
job to whether he would replace 
Johnny Carson on the "Tonight 
Show." He assured the audience he 
would not be replacing Carson and 
had not even heard the rumor. 

The School of Journalism held 
its annual banquet on May 3 in 
Nelson Commons. Robert Gilka, 
director of photography for NA- 
TIONAL GEOGRAPHIC spoke 
about the importance of great 
events, rather than stories. 

Gilka and Paul Miller, director 
of Gannett Company, received Carr 
Van Anda awards, the highest 
award given by the School of 
Journalism. Gilka began his career 
in Zanesville. Ohio and is responsi- 



Communication Week opened with a lecture by former CBS newsman Daniel Schorr. 




214 




ble for NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC's 
internship program for photojour- 
nalism students. Miller who was 
president of Associated Press, 
received an Honor Award for 
"distinguished service in jour- 
nalism." Stanley Swinton if famous 
for his coverage of international 



events, particularly worldwide 
revolutions and wars. 

Colleen Dishon, editor of the 
Tempo section of THE CHICAGO 
TRIBUNE, was also honored at the 
banquet. Dishon, whose career also 
began in Zanesville, and has taken 
her to the COLUMBUS DISPATCH, 



The Black Communication Caucus met at Alden Library as one aspect of Communication 
Week. 




THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL and 
the CHICAGO DAILY NEWS, is 
noted for transforming the Tempo 
section from a normal women's 
section to a magazine section. 

Panel discussions were held 
throughout the week in Alden 
Library. A panel on "World Adver- 
tising and Public Relations: Patterns 
of International Practices" brought 
such distinguished persons as 
Harold Burson, chairman of Burson- 
Marsteller and Danial da Cruz, vice 
president of Doremus and Company 
to the campus. They talked about 
progress and strategy of overseas 
advertising and public advertising 
and public relations. 

Keith Fuller, president of 
Associated Press and Gerald Long, 
director of Reuters Ltd., were 
members on freedom of information 
and the Third World. 



David Brinkley amused the audience with 
his insight and knowledge ol the media. 




215 




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ALL-NIGHT ACRN 

There may still have been as 
many as 60 people out there 
listening to him on ACRN radio 
when it got to be 4 a.m., but there 
was really no way for him to know. 
So Dave Dolinsky would just keep 
cueing up records and talking to his 
invisible audience every Tuesday 



morning from 2 to 7. 

But for those persons with 
cable radio who were staying up all 
night studying or partying, Dolinski 
and the other all-night ACRN D.J.s 
were a constant source of music. 
And that there was another voice 
out there, another person trying to, 
and succeeding at, staying awake. 



For Kolinski, his weekly all- 
nighter meant having to drink up to 
a quart of mattee tea and orange 
juice during the night. It meant 
having to disrupt his Mondays and 
Tuesdays to prepare for and recover 
from his radio shift. And it meant 
missing his Tuesday morning class 
as often as not. 



Dave Dolinski continues to cue records into the night, not sure just how many continue to listen. 




216 



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But the late-night shift gave 
Dolinski and the others an op- 
portunity to play music that they 
might not have been able to play 
during the day. After all there is 
nothing conventional about being 
up at 4 a.m., whether studying, 
partying or playing records on a 
Tuesday morning. , 



Up late studying, Sue Palm listens to 
late-night ACRN. 



Top - Known by listeners as "Crazy Dave," he said he got a lot of calls in one night telling 
him to quit playing "Cleveland music" and get back to Athens-type rock'n'roll. 




1 








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217 




A special thanks to Logan's 
for providing the womenswear 
and to Baron's for supplying a suit 
and tie. Also to Century House for 
providing the beautiful scenery. 



Congrats, Bobcats! 




Sincerely yours, v**?*- /M\Ufi,£tr 

Sam DiLiberto, Ad Director 



Freshman 

Sophomore 

Junior 



Senior 

Alumnus 



For the rest of your 
life-Ohio University 
will never be far from 
your thoughts. 




The Ohio University Alumni Association 
297 I inclli \ Hall 
Athens. Ohio 4570 1 



218 



ORGANIZATIONS, ETC. 



VOL 75 



ISSUE 1 




219 




Organizational 

Communications 

Association 

"Organizational Commun- 
ications Association's basic 
function is to provide organiza- 
tional communications majors 
with a better understanding of 
their major and to help them 
find jobs. This social and 
educational organization spon- 
sors speakers and has a peer 
advising committee to help 
communications majors sched- 
ule for classes." 

Bowling Club 

"This year we placed first 
in a tournament with all the 
universities in Ohio that have 
bowling clubs. Scott Ackerson 
won a trophy in this tour- 
nament by averaging 222. We 
also finished second to Ohio 
State in a tourney with all the 
southeastern Ohio schools. Our 
year concluded with a singles' 
tournament in Columbus." 

Center 

Program 

Board 

"Center Program Board is 
the student organization that 
plans and sponsors many of the 
extracurricular activities. 
Some are Homecoming, Hal- 
loween weekend, Spring Fes- 
tival, and Frontier Room bands 
and movies." 



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Front - Maresea Elmore - Blackwell, Aaron Risen, Sheryl Frisbey, Julie Looser, P. 
Di Marco. Second - Buck Buczak, Nikki Deas, chairperson, Marcy Rose, Marka 
McMullin, Robin Mafrgass, Jerry Poncar, Carmen Renalty. 




Front - Dewey VanHoose, Scott Ackerson, Jim Angert, Chris Adams. Back - Don 
Lindstrom, president, Thom Vance, Dan Cramer, Mike Taylor, Bob Wiemers. 




Front - Jeff Anderson, Annette Silver, Tony Pierfelice, Julie Loeser, Kathy Fisher, 
Lorna Jones, Connie Justi. Back Marc Hattenbach, Ed Potnick, Stephanie Haas, 
Julie Damschroder, Francie Coghill, president. Jack Edelman, Rick Collins. 



220 




Front - Dennis Devoe, Fred Schwartz, Kate Berlin, Orlando Jackson. Rich McDonie. 
Back - Bruce Rienstra, Ken Roll, Jim Halterman, president. 



Pershing 

Rifles 

Club 

"Pershing Rifles Club is a 
military organization that does 
things for the community. 
We're still small since we just 
started last year, so we're 
trying to build ourselves. At one 
time, the club was strictly for 
people in the army, but now 
those in the other services and 
even civilians may join." 




Front - Barbara Fox, president, Julie Bastian, Kristie Seipel, Carol Arment. Laurie 
Fairlie, Cheryl Lai, Kathy Elliot. Back - Alice Wurst. Lisa Yearick, Debbie 
Rudroicki, Barb Scott, Gloria Coble, Jan Bickelhaupt, Linda Pritts. 



Music Therapy 

"Music therapy uses music 
as a tool to reach other people. 
The Music Therapy Club spon- 
sors Music Therapy Awareness 
Week which starts and ends 
with a workshop on main- 
streaming which is the first 
step in getting special children 
in public education by teaching 
them music. We sponsor activi- 
ties that involve special people 
in the community." 




Cheerleaders 



"Male cheerleaders add a 
lot to the squad. The crowd 
appreciates the extra stunts we 
can perform. We make it look 
easy, but there's a lot of work 
behind what we do. The work is 
worth it though, psyching up 
the crowd and hamming it up 
— we love it." See the story on 
page 64. 



Front - Ginny Heiland, Tim Gilts. Bottom - Rex Ballinger, Steve Johnson, Mike 
Meyers, Chuck Howe, Mark Gable, Top - Karen Williams, LeAnna Mapes, Joy 
Martin, captain, Susie Abdella, Patty Sleppy. 



221 




Black Student 
Culture Program 

Board 

"Black Student Cultural 
Program Board have been 
serving the minority communi- 
ty for five years. Since its 
existence in the Athens area, 
minorities have been treated to 
an array of Black culture. This 
year, the B.S.C.P.B. sponsored 
Black Homecoming and Sibling 
Weekend concert with the 
Bar-Kays." 




Front — Shawn Williams, Michelle Munn, Ricky Granger. Back — Anthony Charles. Andre 
Rudolph, Dana Booker, Micheal Turner, William Kent, president. 



Ad Club 

"The Advertising club 
puts together an ad campaign 
annually which includes media, 
creative, marketing and sales 
promotion. This year, the 
corporate sponsor of American 
Advertising Federation is 
Nabisco snack foods. The 
campaign slogan is 'Fun at first 
sight, love at first bite."' 




Front — Ann Gazzerro. Sally Hart. Marta Altberg. David Brooks, Al Stamm, Jack Edelman. Mark 
Potteiger. Second — Thomas Peters, advisor, Patti Frankhouser, Cathy Schultz, Doris Enemann, 
Eugene Tallarico, Tom Cook, Bob Claster, Karla Finger, Tim Guesman, Charles Borghese, Scott 
Skeabeck. Mary Jo Cacciacarro. Back — Rich Slavin, Mark Palmer, Charles Griggs, Julia Priog, 
Brenda King, Dan Nather, Jeff Lawson. Jeff Davidson. 



222 




Black 
Computer 
Science Assembly 

"The Black Computer 
Science Assembly was founded in 
1978 to help minority students in 
computer science and work 
toward increasing the percen- 
tage of graduates in the field. In 
addition to offering a tutoring 
service, we sponsor tours, lec- 
tures and workshops." 



Front — Kit Gregtak, Regenia Williams, Melinda L. Sherbs, Lone MacDonald, president. Back — 
Kathleen Connolly, Andrea Delmage, Lynn McFadden, Margaret McCarthy, Edie Parsons, Susan 
Crabtree. 




Campus 
Girl Scouts 

"The Campus Girl Scouts 
help younger girl scouts in the 
community by maintaining the 
girls' knowledge of scouting and 
teaching crafts and skills. We 
help the girls sell cookies, take 
them backpacking, and serve as 
leaders for various groups in the 
area." 



Front — Sharon K. Reece, Leslie R. Adkins, Gail McDavid, Carol Funderburk. Back - 
Paul Miller, Lynn Cole, Valarie Parker, Thomas N. Tans. 



Reggie Amory. 



223 




American 

Society of 

Interior Design 

"The American Society of 
Interior Design basically 
provides programs and activi- 
ties for students interested in 
the field of interior design that 
are educational and that 
provide social interaction with 
members at all levels. We are a 
professional organization that 
sponsors lectures and seminars 
and has fund raising projects." 



Fashion 
Associates 

"Fashion Associates ex- 
plore the business and mer- 
chandising aspects of fashion, 
but keep busy throughout the 
year with make-up demonstra- 
tions bringing in merchants to 
discuss their merchandising 
techniques and contemporary 
fashions." 




Front — Marsha Ellinger, Beth Heeb, president. Marcia Drenten, Judy Matthews, advisor. Second 
— Kim Tozer, Kim Hutchinson. Sandy Hart, Lisa Sanders, Lynn Hall, Joyce Spires, Evelyn Pana, 
Michael Reese. Back — Beth Arnold, George McKinniss, Doreen Polivchak, Anita Schoener, Kim 
Simmons, Diane Moeller, Kim Trautman, Marie Parkanzky. 




Front — Barbara Craig, Ruth Ruslander, Nancy Harre. president. Back — Jane Schwoeterman, 
Michele Kahn, Jenny Bitters, Mary Pat Illig, Erin Hill, Ellen Goldsberry, advisor. 



224 




Front — Steve Rausch, Michele Temple, Mark McCain, Greg Pfouts. Laura Gongos, Darah 
Fraembs, Rise Sanders, Middle — Carol Morman, Joan McDonnell, Lisa Lopez, Lynne Ann 
Machowsky, Joanne O'Toole, Pamela Favoh, Rhonda Hopp, Back — Jennifer Sheehan, Hugh 
Culbertson, academic advisor, Janet Glass, Barry Hackman, Evan Meyer, Melanie McMillan, Scott 
Scruta. 



PRSSA 



"Public Relations Student 
Society of America (PRSSA) 
operates as a P.R. agency and 
has handled accounts for local 
businesses, student organiza- 
tions and athletic clubs if they 
needed promotion. We also 
handled several national ac- 
counts. Some of our members 
attended a national PR confer- 
ence in St. Louis in November. 
This provided for us contact 
with professionals." 




Front — Jan Turner. Toni Heldman. Jennifer Davis, advisor. Donna Garpiulo. Elizabeth Hosroan, 
Brenda L. Dodrill, president. Back — Sissy Hamilton, Kelly Stotz, Wendy Babos, Stacie Edwards, 
Gwyn Morris, Julie Fries. Dawn Spalding, Monica Maron, Lisa Gribble. 



Women's 

Panhellenic 

Association 

"The Women's Panhellenic 
Association is the governing 
council of sororities. We organ- 
ize and set regulations for all 
rushing procedures and Greek 
Week. We promote inter- 
sorority activities, such as the 
Dancercize class during winter 
quarter. We plan to participate 
in Earth Day as a social science 
program." 



225 




Black Student 

Communication 

Caucus 

"With the upsurge of 
Afro-American student inter- 
est and participation in the 
area of cummunication, a 
pressing need for increased 
interaction among students 
formed. The aim of the Black 
Student Communication 
Caucus is to fulfill these and 
other needs. Formed in 1973 to 
cope with academic problems, it 
now includes both curricular 
and extra-curricular pro- 
grams." 

Student 
Senate 

"In February, the Student 
Senate lost its fight to ratify a 
constitution and faced dissolu- 
tion, in spite of the efforts and 
accomplishments of its various 
commissions and services." See 
related story, page 256 




Front — Kathy F. Nicholson, Sherrie Hauser. Donna Cotton, Michelle Munn, Middle — Cynthia 
Baker, Branden G. Smith, Julia Dixon. Marc V. Smith. Back — Michael Price, Melvin Williams, 
president, Brew Woods, Tim Roberts. Not present — Wendy Baines, Bruce Dunn, Evette McGee, G. 
Jolts 




Seated — Jeff Withem. Mary Deniro, Kevin Williams, president, Middle Row — Louise Gillota, 
Linda Smith, Charla J. Ping, Carla Mattmiller. Helen Eckley, Marsha Huber. Lana McAllister, 
Kathy Core, Brett Rypma, Cindy LaFollette. David Holt, Dawn Spalding. Ardis Edmonuson, Toni 
Heldman. Greg Moore, Jerry Steirhoff. Tonia Shindledecker, and Steve Ellis. Back — Susan 
MacDowell, Bill Boston, Bob Armstrong, John Saragusa, Nancy Ellis, Bob Fott. Kelly Jay Walker, 
Bob Powell and Purnee Murdock. 



226 




Front — Michael E. Fletcher, Julie C. Loeser, Aaron P. Riser, Carmen A. Renaldy. Back 
Wayne E. Diller, Jack D. Randle, Peter W. Elam, Phred G. Di Marco. 




Front — Debbie Cielec. Theresa Croll, Nick Robetts, Laura Thorpe, Martha Reinhart, Sue McKinney. 
Back — G.A. Westenbarger, advisor, Jeff Kramer, Susan Samples, Brad Neihart. Joanne Fedyna. 
Tim Cagle, James Y. Tong (friend). 



Organizational 

Communication 

Committee 

for Understanding 

and Recognition 

"Organizational Commun- 
ication Committee for Under- 
standing and Recognition (OC- 
CUR) enhances organizational 
communication majors. We con- 
tact different organizations and 
businesses informing them about 
the major. OCCUR was estab- 
lished last year and the goal is to 
increase requests for organiza- 
tional communication majors. It 
is not a familiar degree, so we're 
bringing it out." 

Chemistry Club 

"The Chemistry Club con- 
sists of students from various 
fields of chemistry to computer 
science. Club activities include 
guest speakers, field trips, 
chemistry magic shows, and 
parties. An enriching learning 
experience is combined with a 
relaxed and fun atmosphere that 
also provides a good chance for 
faculty and students to ap- 
preciate each other in and out of 
the classroom." 



227 




Spectrum 
Green 

"Spectrum GREEN spe- 
cializes in tracking down 
sources, pictures or stories 
hours before deadlines, hiding 
on rooftops, getting caught 
hiding on rooftops, pulling 
all-nighters, pulling hair out, 
turning hair gray, pacifying 
bill collectors and printing 
companies, pacifying our sales 
manager, maintaining peace on 
the staff at 4 a.m., fighting at 
4:30, and somehow publishing a 
college yearbook." 



Student 

Alumni 

Board 



"The Student Alumni 
Board serves as a liaison 
between students and alumni. 
It desires to enhance the lives of 
those on campus, hoping to 
encourage graduates to be 
active alumni. A variety of 
programs are sponsored by the 
group including Extern, Senior 
Showcase and Green Carpet 
Days." 




Front - Karen Hannah, Sue Herr, Ed Dale, Laura Martinez, Betsy Webb, Diane McOill. Back - Carol 
Faulkner, Scott Powers, editor, Jeff Orabmeier, Mark Rightmire. Karen Nelson, Sam Diliberto, 
Duane Fletcher, Lisa Oriffis. 




Front - Lisa Casey, president, Maureen Brannan, Leeanna Smith. Second - Karla 
Finger, Sue Squance, Mary Talbott. Patti Oahris, Kid Podolski. Third - Todd 
Elmers, Barry Adams, advisor, Cindy Penson. Alison Stahl. Patty Maclnnia, James 
Jones. Fourth - Tom Shepherd, Shelly Simmons, Chris Rybak, Shelia Gardner. Cathy 
Barrett, advisor, Ralph Phillips. Back - Rick Rogala, Kevin Kelly. 



228 




Front - Mark Hagun, Brenda Vorpe, Mark Litten, chairman, Claudia Goldsberry. Second - Mark 
McCain, Joe McKinley, Steve Abbott, Cathy Evan, Jeff Anderson, Jon Schreiber, Back - Bob Linger, 
Unknown Electrician. 



Pop 

Concert 

Committee 

"The Pop Concert Commit- 
tee brought in Styx, Kansas, 
The Michael Stanley Band and 
Foreigner, but the new seating 
policy at the Convo made it 
hard to plan other concerts 
later in the year. We also 
co-sponsored the Bar-Kays with 
the Black Student Cultural 
Programming Board." See 
story on pages 152-156. 




Front - Joyce Spires. Linda Tackett, president, Kathy Kimpel. Back 
Karen Cristina, Taundre Van Pelt, Doreen Polivchak. 



Joan Ward, Pat Patterson, 



American 
Home Economics 
Association 

"The American Home 
Economics Association is a 
professional organization for 
students in Home Ec and 
related careers. The programs 
are centered around the differ- 
ent fields of Home Ec. This past 
year, our projects have fea- 
tured Historical Restoration, 
Consumer Protection Agency, 
Creative Cooking, and Career 
and Family Planning. Service 
projects have included a bake 
sale for My Sister's Place, and 
painting chairs for the day care 
center." 



229 




You'd think that a broadway 
production was about to take place. 
Just walk into one of the eight campus 
sorority houses a week before fall 
classes begin. Inside you will find skit 
rehearsals, song practices and an 
over-abundance of decorations, name 
tags and refreshments, all for the 
coming week of fall rush. 

Panhellenic Preview is the first 
contact the OU girls have with the 
Greek system. Panhel members go 
from green to green with a slide 
presentation of OU Greeks explaining 
sorority and fraternity life. 

The week of rush begins with the 
Panhellenic Association organizing 
the hundreds of girls into small 
groups. A rush counselor escorts each 
group to the sorority houses. Open 
House is the first of the five-day 
parties that allows rushees to casually 
meet the girls from each house. 

The following days are filled with 
excitement as sororities set their 
theme parties and perform skits and 
dances demonstrating what their 
sorority means to them. After three 
days of parties, the rushees all meet 
again and fill out bid cards for the 
houses they choose to join. Meanwhile 
the sororities also make lists of girls 
they would like as sisters. Panhel then 
matches the cards from the rushee 
lists from the sororities. 

Fraternity rushing follows the 
sorority rush a week later without the 
formal structure set up for sororities. 
Rules are set up by the Fraternity 
Council (IFC) but the individual 
fraternities organize their own 
system of rush. Open House is 
publicized in THE POST, and large 
banners are displayed over the 
houses. 

A relaxed atmosphere that 
includes alcoholic beverages and 



Greek Rush. 




En masse, the Chi Omega* greet their new pledges. 



230 



A New Beginning 




Lasting friendship and love is symbolized by a "welcome" 
hug. 

231 




other refreshments is the standard 
procedure. Fraternities do devise 
theme parties for each of the five 
nights of rush. When a house feels 
comfortable with a certain individual 
they ask him to pledge. 

Black Greeks pledge new 
members in a very individual and 
selective procedure. They organize 
their own time of rush which usually 
is not during a specific week. When 
they need new members they set up a 
reserved room in Baker Center and 
send out flyers to the men and women 
on campus. There the fraternity or 
sorority meets the rushees in a very 
relaxed but serious atmosphere. From 
this time on it is up to the sorority or 
fraternity to decide who they would 1 
like to meet again and maybe pledge | 
into their organization. g 




In a circle of sisterhood, Chi Omegas initiate their new pledges. 




Rush counselors pull together final ideas before rushees enter. 



232 



Phi Kappa Tau 

"The Phi Kappa Taus 
raised $1300 for the sixth 
annual Muscular Dystrophy 
dance Marathon in early 
February. We are the only 
fraternity to still have a house 
mother and are in the process of 
changing our rush program to 
stress academics." 




Front — Rick Harrison, Dave Rogers. 8teve Latham. Steve Doerr, Gennee. Johnny Clutter. Back 
— Matt Driscoll. Dale Miller. Jeff Jones. Feyzi Serim. Keith Tracy, Bill Moyer. Rick Schraitle and 
John Morris 



Lambda Chi 
Alpha 

"Lambda Chi Alpha parti- 
cipated in all the Greek sports 
and reached the finals of the 
broomball competition. Our 
little sises organized a mock 
New Year's Eve party and we 
ran a Bible study session on 
Tuesday nights." 




Front — Dan Tambellini. Byron Carley. Mark Arnold. Rich McDonie, Scott Schultz. Second — 
Andy Haack. Dave Teuscher. Doug Keown, Andy Press. Kevin Callihan. Third — Dave Cross, Carl 
Crook. Scott Johnson, Greg Wargo. Mike DeWitt. Tim Nabors. Jeff Gross, Tim Fellows. Back — 
Bruce Froning. Andy Park. George Gale. Chad Sproul. Mike Harper. Tim Brown. Toni Cook, Scott 
Sieverstein. 



234 




Front — Shelley Groll, Lori Bringard, Annette Dwyer, Jane Dvorak, Kathy Milgate. Carol Sams. 
Second — Lisa Miller, Lisa Gribble, Marianna Scholz, Melinda Tryon, Shelley Bateman, Debbie 
Sigman. Third — Mrs. Willis. Elizabeth Jones, Debra Sandbrink, Teresa Munro. Cindy Eames. 
Susie Saltsman. Back — Jennifer Long, Jane McAllister, Laura Logan, Barb Krupar. Carol 
Arment, Julie Priog, Cathie Brown, Ellen Baxter. 




Phi Mu 



"Phi Mu sorority is the only 
sorority on campus that has a 
Charter Development Program. 
Our philanthropy is doing social 
service projects for Project Hope. 
We won the presidential scho- 
larship for highest GPA among 
sororities fall quarter. We helped 
the Phi Kappa Taus sponsor the 
dance marathon for muscular 
dystrophy." 



Delta 
Sigma Theta 

"Delta Sigma Theta is a 
public service sorority. The 
sorority activities are based on a 
five point program of educational 
opportunity, economic develop- 
ment, urban and housing deve- 
lopment and mental health. The 
members participated annually 
in a Trick-or-Treat for sickle-cell 
and in the spring the Jabberwak. 



Front — Jackie Carslile. Madrid Watson. Sharon Parker. Kim Johnson. Mara Rose. Second - - Kim 
Springer, Michelle Munn. Elisa Smith. Desiree Langston, Linda Hampson. Back Donna Harris. 
Mary Bradley, Lorna Jones. Linda Hamby. Linda Hopson. Sherrie Houser. 



235 



Circle K 



"Circle K is a community 
organization affiliated with the 
Kiwanis Club. We've designat- 
ed this year 'The Year of the 
Child' and are trying to help 
children that are abused, lonely 
or are in crisis. In doing so, 
we've worked closely with 
Beacon Elementary School and 
the the new community recrea- 
tion center." 




Student 

Personnel 

Association 



"Student Personnel As- 
sociation formed in December, 
1979, and presently has 20 
members. Guest speakers often 
attend the bi-monthly meet- 
ings. Trips to various busin- 
esses in Parkersburg and 
Gallipolis have been taken so 
members can relate their course 
work to the actual personnel 
function." 



Front - Sue Totten. Cheri Reighard Mary Ann Gallo, Tonya Schindledecker, 

Laura Greiner. Sande Blandford, Durise Fritschle. Second - Betty Ehlers. JoAnn 
Fedyna. Mindy Sauerman, Laura Morgan. Rod Bennett, John Escolas, Greg Hickey, 
Ed Dale. Ruth Shook, Tern Gahn. Back - Jim Newman, Rich Schmedel, Howard 

Moss, Stephanie Lowe, Linda Shank Matt Timmons, Bridget George, 

president, Terri Lasher, Rick Taylor, Frank Fugate. 




Front - Annette Silver, Timothy Thompson. Back - Carol Johnson, Leonard Wolff, 
Julie Loeser, president, Jeffrey Coteman. 



Parachute 
Club 

"The Sports Parachute 
Club provided ground training 
for nearly 40 students and 
provided an opportunity for 
some members to take jumps 
before bad weather brought an 
end to fall season. In the winter 
we lost access to our plane, and 
began to search for a new plane 
and pilot for the spring sea- 
son. 




Front - Debbie Dworkin, Betty Ehers, Jodi Alexander. Dwayne Williams, president, 
Robin Maggass, Steve Kress. Back - Jay Dilla Hunt. Brian McDiarmio. Dave 
Mundy. Jon Jackson, Joan Sommer. 



236 




Front - Eric Johnson, president, John Maher. Randall Burkey, Keith Atkins, Scott 
Brown, Mark Smarelli. Back - Albraham Ifalagbo, Susan Kohn. Kristina Rozman. 
Erin Luise Stager. Janet Bickelhaupt, Kathryn Cushinpham. Robin Wechter, 
Warren Drescher, Gabriel Ag-inde. 



Way 

Campus 

Outreach 

"The Way Campus Ou- 
treach is dedicated to making 
the truth of God's Word and the 
greatness of Jesus Christ 
available to everyone at Ohio 
University. The purpose is that 
people may learn for them- 
selves through Biblical teach- 
ing and fellowship, and how to 
live the more abundant life 
promised in the Bible." 




Front - Jack Tayek, Bob Gibson, president, John Hogan. Mike Carpenter. Second 
- Ken Andrews, advisor, Joe Koker, Daryl Kunesh, Dave Parker, Doug Parker, Art 
Leach. Back - Jerry Wood, Randy O'Keefe, Dave Harmon, John Tracy, Frank 
Hillyard. Jeff Skaggs. 



Phi Mu Alpha 
Sinfonia 

"Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, 
Professional Music Fraternity, 
provides leadership and guid- 
ance to its members through 
selection of worthwhile projects 
and many other chapter func- 
tions. Our goals are to create 
and maintain a higher standard 
of music in America, provide 
services in music within the 
community, and create brothe- 
rhood among men in music." 




Senior 

Class 

Council 



Front - Mark Hattenbach, . . . ,Kati Free, Stacy Edwards. Back - Cathy Barrett, 
Tim Keable, Donna Weinberg, Rich Slavin, president. 



"The Senior Class Council 
sponsored a raffle and a movie 
at Athena theater to raise 
money for the senior class gift, 
benches for the College Green. 



237 




Sigma Chi 

"The Delta Pi chapter of 
Sigma Chi currently has 46 
active members and a very 
supportive group of alumni. 
Over the past several years, we 
have been especially successful 
in stimulating and developing 
cooperation between student 
organizations. Our annual 
service project, Siglympics 
Week, netted over $2000 for 
the American Cancer Society 
last year." 




Front - Phil Geiger, Doug Hartman. Boog Powell, president. Second - Bozo Flinn, Toad White. Crank 
Scott. Mike Muck. Gimp Farrell, Mike Gael. Bird Weinland, Chris Easton. Back - Dave Shwartz, 
Dave Johns, Twig Blackburn. Tom Philps, Tom Daviea, Mork Lamontia, Art Berg, Rick Rosenthal, 
Buzz Delano, Todd Westfall. Bob Koegie. 



Alpha 

Delta 

Pi 



"Alpha Delta Pi has been 
active all quarter taking 19 
girls through formal Rush and 
seven informally. We have 
teams competing in water-polo 
and volleyball. One of our 
philanthropic projects was 
volunteering for the Athens 
Bloodmobile. We will be wor- 
king on Daffodil Day in the 
spring for the American Cancer 
Society." 




Front - Becky Zielasko. Lisa Novak. Second - Mindie Mengeret. Patti Ryder, Jennie Drachenberg, 
Mary Haggerty. Wendy Fildman. Jera Foster. Third - Lisa Luker, Stephannie Jaros. Barbara 
Newhouse, Carolyn Rose, Kathy Kopp, Judy McLindon, Jana Schlucter, Cathy Blaettnar, Molly 
Laughran. Fourth - Denise Connally, Juli Maher, Katby Anderson, president. Becky Layne, Wendy 
Moyer, Debbie Phillips. Helen Eckley, Trudy Stambaugh, Cindy Hoskinson. Dawn Duben. Melissa 
Beard, Debbie Caravetta. Karen Ford. Maria Postallion. Fifth - Nancy Strathers, Diane Thompson, 
Monica Maron, Nancy Katzak, Trissa Whorton. Duffy Dougherty. Kim DeNell. Lucia Whitehead. 
Ellen Butter. Mary Lubelski. Kathy Ruggie. Amy Borgman. Sylvia Ruppe. Back - Chris Joras, 
Kristie Miller. Becca Braune, Jacqui Koch. Linda Kibler. Cindy Fox, Helga Ruppe, Maureen Clancy, 
Julie Rosenbeck. Julie Leser, Sue Zantal. 



238 




Alpha 

Epsilon 

Chi 



"Alpha Epsilon Chi, Broth- 
ers in Christ, is an interdeno- 
minational fraternity which 
works to provide service to 
community organizations such 
as Red Cross, My Sister's 
Place, and local churches. 
Drawing the brotherhood toge- 
ther are fellowship and active 
discussion of what it means to 
be a Christian on a college 
campus and in a confused 
world." 



Front - Rich Ronald, Jeff Nutter, Jeff Burks, Chuck Sherrill, president. Gary Breese, Dale Albright, 
Marc Fultz. Back - Greg Hostetler, Ronald Sanders, Scott Dobransky, Jim Dixon. Ben McClellan, 
Phil Althouse. Jack Tayek, Curt Howard. 




Front 
Smith, 



Andre Rudolph 
William Kent. 



president, Larry Carter. Back - Micbeal Turner, David Murphy, Micheal 



Phi 

Beta 

Sigma 



"Epsilon Omicron chapter 
of Phi Beta Sigma was founded 
on this campus on May 2, 1972 
and since that date we have 
strived to serve the community 
of Athens as well as the 
minority population on campus. 
We have supported such orga- 
nizations as The March of 
Dimes, American Cancer Socie- 
ty and others." 



239 




Everyone had left Ewing Field 
and all that remained was some litter. 
But in the minds of those who sat on 
the grass earlier, there lingered 
hundreds of images of the color, 
sounds and often silliness of J-Prom 
1979. 

Blocks away, costumed char- 
acters, sound men and flat-carriers 
were pulling tape from their mouths 
and shouting the outcome at the 
awards presentation. There was 
reason for celebration. After a year's 
absence, J-Prom had returned to Ohio 
University a success, on May 9-10. 

Many persons on campus doubted 
J-Prom would come back. Only juniors 
and seniors had ever seen the event 
and known how much planning, time 
and rehearsal each 15-minute skit 
required. 

Ric Gale, co-chairman of the 
overall winners, said he felt the 
one-year gap did not hurt his group. 

"It was not a problem. We had 
nothing to base our ideas on, so we had 
to use our own creativity more," he 
said. "I think it helped us a lot." 

Four groups, all combinations of 
Greek units, entered under the theme 
"Behind the Scenes: What if ... " 

The skits featured a variety of 
ideas, from TV stars at a disco to a 
musical version of THE EXORCIST. 
Each group had to write scripts and 
songs, choreograph dance numbers, 
and paint scenery for their ideas. 

"There was definitely competi- 
tion between the groups, but it was 
not the overriding factor." said Linda 
Lee, who played one of the characters 
in the Chi Omega-Lambda Chi Alpha 
skit. 



J-Prom 
strikes again 



"I'd never performed before and 
I really enjoyed it. J-Prom teaches you 
discipline and how to work to a 
common goal," she said. 

"J-Prom is a Greek tradition; 
we're the only ones who keep it going. 
You always say, 'I'm not going to do it 
this year,' but you always end up 
doing it and enjoying it," said Karla 
Finger of the Alpha Ki Delta-Beta 
Theta Pi group. 

Chris Armstrong, Delta Tau 
Delta one of the marshals in charge of 
overseeing each group, said he felt 
that this year's J-Prom was well 
planned. 

"The committee and marshals 
took time to cover all the bases with 
the groups," he said. "It was a good 



experience. I hope it stays around for 
a long time." 

At the awards presentation. Chi 
Omega-Lambda Chi Alpha won the 
best overall skit, best songs, and best 
choreography trophies. Alpha Gamma 
Delta — Delta Tau Delta was second 
overall, with trophies for best scenery 
and banner. Alpha Xi Delta — Beta 
Theta Pi won the award for best 
costumes. The fourth participating 
group was Phi Mu — Theta Chi. 

"J-Prom brought about an 
inter-and intra-house closeness." said 
Gale. "It was a good learning 
experience." 




Who could resist a song? Certainly not Maryanna Shollz as Patsy McFadden belts one out. 



240 




Not everyone was in step, but no one noticed as the Alpha Xis and the Betas helped dance and sing J-Prom back to life. 



241 




Above - Costumes abounded during 
J-Prom 

Top Right - Carol LaBerteaux and Linda 
Czech of Alpha Xi Delta dance to the 
singing of Beta Theta Pi's Paul Garololo. 

Right - Presenting "The Exorcist", explode 
to tempt the subject into a world of junk 
food. 




242 




Left - Roseanne Roseanna Danna transforms Plain 
Jane into a beautiful disco dancer after being 
disgusted with her appearance. 

Right - Ending the long hours of planning and 
practice, Chi Omegas and Lambda Chi's proudly 
take home first place. 



243 




An uninformed observer at Putnam 
Field might have wondered if two 
quarters had passed in the blink of an 
eye, as OU's fraternities and 
sororities participated in the Greek 
Week activities this fall. 
The annual event was moved from 
spring to fall to open the calendars of 
the Greek chapters, usually crowded 
with formals and even busier with the 
return of J-Prom. 
The move created some problems, 
according to co-chairpersons Linda 
York and Tim Hopkins. 
"It was tough to swing Greek Week 
this year." said Hopkins. "The people 
involved were not used to the change, 
and there was not enough time to 
organize properly." 
"It was hard getting places large 
enough to accommodate the events 
because it was held so late in the 
quarter." added York. 
Still, those who participated seemed 
to enjoy the week's activities, which 
included a bed race, chug-off. Gong 
Show and the traditional Greek 
games. 
This year's events marked the first 
time black Greek chapters were 
involved, participating in the Gong 
Show and service projects which 
raised $426.85 for United Appeal. 
A new event was the "Greek God 
and Goddess" Contest, which proved 
to be a cross between a fashion show 
and the $1.98 Beauty Contest. 
"The Greek God thing was fun to 
do. It differed from all the points and 
glory that has been involved with 
events in the past," said Hopkins. 
"We tried to shy away from 
everyone going for each others' 
throats. I hope the competition aspect 
is played down in the future," he 

said. 



Greek Week's 
Race Slows 




The path is quickly cleared as the Sigma Nu fraternity forces the heavy metal kid through 
the race. Participants include (from left to right) Chris Dunford, Dave Diles, John Beckwith 
and Rich Elsea. 




Lambda Chi's Jeff Gross won't let anyone stop him as he and Mark Arnold race for the 
finishing line. 



244 




One of the highlights of Greek Week was the bed 
races. Participants from Sigma Chi include (from left 
to right in back row) Todd White, Doug Hartman, 
Dave Coffindiffer and Mark Juhnke. Riding the bed is 
Jeff Riestenberg. 




Pi Phi, Mary Deneiro and Alpha Xi Delta's Janet Polling, enjoy the full day of events during 
Greek Week. 



245 





Terri Logins, 6'neta Ramsey. Lynn Baker, president, Cheryl Martin. 



"The women of Zeta Phi 
Beta have tried to meet the 
community and the needs of the 
people on a national level 
through various programs such 
as the stork program, Red 
Cross, American Cancer Socie- 
ty, the NAACP and the United 
Negro College Fund." 



Kappa 

Alpha 

Psi 



9i V V 1 



Front - Richard Landcaster. Micheal Holt. Back - Brian Hawkins, Nelson Campbell. 
Douglas James. Dairy] Griffin, president. 



"Kappa Alpha Psi's fun- 
damental purpose is achieve- 
ment. We sponsor a Big 
Brother's program at the 
Athens County Home for 
Battered Children called Guide 
Right. We have a Friend's 
Program where freshmen are 
matched with upperclassmen 
orienting them to college life at 
OU." 

Chi Omega 

"Chi Omega's placed first 
in Greek Week, J-Prom, and 
received scholarship trophies. 
The philanthropic project for 
the quarter was working for the 
escort service under the 
Student Senate.*' 




Front - Marcie Eddy. Beth Hosman, Julie Black. Sue Rosenblum. Aura Thrush, 
Betsy Strong, Cheri Hamilton, 8ue Holland. Second * Traci McBride, Lorri 
VanMeter. Glori Jarvis. Janet Vatter, Cathy Dunbar, Susan Ridge. Third - Le 
Mapes. Colleen Rooney. Diane Kudlinski. Susie Corbett, Lori Lay. Katie Kirchner, 
Robin Maggass. Mary Jo Cacciacarro. Kelly Stotz. Fourth - Michelle Thieme, Suzy 
Popovich, Mandy Eiswerth, Laura Decker. Barb Kirchner. Cindy Penson. Shelly 
Smith, Nancy Brennan. Fifth - Patti Alspaugh. Sue Sligo, Barb King. Cindy Yeager, 
Sheryl Johnson, Beth Barrett, Laura Fieler, Christie Groves, Mary King. Back - 
Jenni Gibson. Diane McGill. Lynn Mihelick. Bethany Garwick, Sue Herr. president, 
Gwyn Morris, Pat Lowe. 



246 




&S.JMM 



Front - Jennifer Leahr, Debora Boddie, Rhonda Freeman. Back - Karen Fowler, 
Sandra Watkins. Linda Penn, president, Yalonda Salter, Shawn Williams. 



Bffllffi 
" f 




Front - Donna Haseley, Ilissa Tuften, David Wiltsie. Second - Lorie MacDonald, 
Cheryl Lubert, Irene Kern, Bia Papadoraoulds, William Wrage. Back - Lena Ek, 
Ramona Ryan, David Berry, president, Gretchen Inboden, Kathy Oppelt. 



Alpha 

Kappa 

Alpha 



"Delta Phi chapter of 
Alpha Kappa Alpha has been 
involved in many community 
activities such as Halloween 
and Easter gatherings for 
children, Putman Day Care 
Center, hypertension aware- 
ness displays and donating 
Christmas gifts to the needy." 



Phi 

Sigma 

Iota 



"Phi Sigma Iota is the 
National Honor Society for 
modern languages with an 
emphasis on community ser- 
vice. It is an organization for 
the advancement of foreign 
languages which participates 
in the Southeastern Ohio 
Language Fair in Athens in 
April. One of the community 
service projects in some of the 
members teach foreign lan- 
guage in elementary school." 




Front - Guy Philips, Nelson Leonard. Second - Domingo Herraiz, Greg Smith, Steve 
Bovard, Brian Beasley, Mike Gilton. Bill Edmiston, president. Back - Mike Stiger, 
Tom Kelly, Kelley Moses. Russ Koler, Rob Wilson, Mitch Swain. Bill Falin. 



Phi 

Delta 

Theta 



"Recolonized in the spring 
of 1979, the Phi Delts have 
progressed rapidly towards a 
goal of being reinstalled as a 
chartered fraternity at Ohio 
University. We plan to finish a 
productive year with communi- 
ty service projects, an active 
social calender, and our formal 
re-installation as a chapter in 
May. For the men of Phi Delta 
Theta, the dream has become a 
reality." 



247 



"Alpha Phi Alpha has an 
annual Feed the Needy project. 
This year we collected approx- 
imately $200. We sponsored 
the tenth annual Ms. Bronze 
pageant and an Afro-American 
smorgasbord buffet." 




Alpha 

Phi 

Alpha 



Delta 

Sigma 
Pi 



"Delta Sigma Pi is a 
national business fraternity 
which has chapters all over the 
country. Members can be any 
business major. We're not just 
limited to accounting or fin- 
ance. Both men and women may 
join." 



Front - Jeffery Scott, Lamar Washington, president. Randy HU1. Back - Marc Early, Anthony 
Robinson, Arnold Dixon, George Coulter, Rufus Mobley III. 




Front - Chuck Ciuni, Dave Cox, Mark Sutter. Sarah Waxier, Dale Dengate. Matt Timmons. Second 
- Kirstin Sheets, Tammy Murphy, Brenda Puleo. Bridget Dorsey, Tari Wyant, Robin Maggass, 
Kammie Sherman, Kristie Miller, Jackie Williams. Jim LaRosa, Darice Fritschle, Howard Kates, 
Sam Cefaratti, president. Back - Christie Groves, Mike Tunner. Frank Barone, Jocelyne Dinopoulos, 
Jack Jakubowski, Bart Griffin. Paul Guyot, Bill Cook, Jamie Admonius, Chris Miller. Lenny Wolff, 
Jim Hoelker. Mike Clary. Pat Kelly. Tim Robertson. 



248 




Persons of 
the World 



Ping & 
Persons 



Dedicated 

Persons 

Volunteer 

Time 




Chinese 

Persons 

Experience 

O.U. 

Student 

Senate 

Battles 

For Its Life 



Handicapped 

Persons Not 

Impaired 

at O.U. 



249 




The Cutler Hall gang: Wayne Kurlinaki, vice president for university relations; Carol Hnrter. vice president and dean of atudenta; Charles Ping, 
president; Eugene Peebles, vice president for operations end Neil Bucklew, provost and vice president for academics. 



250 



-Ping & Persons 



In 1979 it became apparent that Ohio 
University had finally reached stable 
ground financially, and was ready to 
prepare itself for what looked to be a rough 
decade — the 1980s. The university had 
been floundering from crisis to crisis for 
several years, and appeared to be heading 
in no particular direction before Charles 
Ping became president in 1975. 

But plans and programs laid out by 
Ping and his administration for straighten- 
ing things began to bear fruit this year. 

"For the first time in at least eight or 
nine years we haven't faced any budget 
crises in the fall quarter." said James L. 
Brunning. vice-president for planning and 
development. "We had a solid budget this 
year for the first time in a long while." 

How had the university gotten out of 
the hole in the first place? 

"A few years ago the storms beating on 
the university were frightening." Ping said 
in his Convocation Address in September. 
"Unanticipated enrollment decline, an 
inability to meet debt payments and a 
threat of default on bonds, a biennial 
budget that was $6 million out of balance, 
a skepticism about Ohio University in the 
minds of leaders of state government and 
the general public, destructive patterns of 
student life, a gnawing, anxious doubt that 
kept faculty and students from viewing 
with pride the richness of life here at Ohio 
University." 

In the past couple of years progress has 
been made to overcome these problems. 
Much of this progress can be attributed to 
a six-point Education Plan, developed in 
1977, to give the university direction. The 
plan included a commitment to the ideal of 
a university; a commitment to measure the 
growth of the university in terms of quality 
instead of quantity; a commitment to the 
intellectual community; a commitment to 
the international community and develop- 
ing education for interdependence; a 
commitment to life-long learning; and a 
commitment to educational justice. 

Of course, a number of problems still 
exist and are cropping up at the university. 
But now that Ping and the other adminis- 
trators are no longer fighting crises left over 
from the past, they're in a better position to 
tackle these problems, Ping said. 

After just three years at Ohio 
University. Ping almost left in the spring. 
He applied to fill the vacant presidency at 
Michigan State, but after being selected as 
a finalist, withdrew his application. 

"I thought long and hard about it; I 
decided to stay here." Ping said. "We had 
a lot of people who had invested a lot of 
time toward attaining our goals. There 
were a lot of factors, though. I guess it was 
mostly the people." 

It's the diversity of students, among 
other things, that kept Ping here. He's quick 



to note that Ohio University has the highest 
percentage of out-of-state and internation- 
al students of any state university in Ohio. 

"A number of students chose this 
institution deliberately." Ping said. "They 
don't just go here to go to college." 

And. according to Ping, the quality of 
students coming here has improved. 

"As I look at the circulation figures in 
the library, they've had a four-fold 
increase in 10 or 12 years. The use of the 
library reserve shelf also shows a dramatic 
increase." he said. "All of that suggests that 
whatever else students are doing, they're 
not spending all their time partying." 

Not that he is against partying. 
"Alcohol, like any other substance is what 
you do with it — good or bad." he said. 
"Parties are not necessarily bad; I go to 
parties. I like parties." 

Ping's right-hand man in the adminis- 
tration is provost and vice-president for 
academics, Neil Bucklew. Bucklew. who 
came to Ohio University with Ping from 
Central Michigan University, has been 
described as sharing the presidency. He 
was responsible for the planning process 
that helped bring stability to the university, 
and his responsibilities include directing 
the instructional programs. 

Perhaps the most controversial 
administrator during the year was Carol 
Harter. the vice-president and dean of 
students. She was responsible for the 1804 
birthday party in June and the Halloween 
party, both held in the Convocation Center. 
Each of these moves were partly responsi- 
ble for reducing the annual uptown 
disturbances during those nights. She was 
also involved in the new seating regulation 
for Convo concerts, a move intended to 
increase safety and crowd control. Harter 
is responsible for residence halls, student 
organizations and activities, and student 
support services. 

As vice-president for planning and 
development. Brunning's job deals mainly 
with keeping things moving along. 
However, he headed an effort to bring 
about a change in the faculty-adviser 
program and a structural change in the 
university college, to increase advising. 

Wayne Kurlinski, the vice-president 
for university relations, is involved in 
promoting outside understanding and 
support for the university. He led the 
fantastically successful 1804 Fund, which 
concluded in the fall after netting the 
university over $22 million. In addition, he 
deals with alumni, government relations 
and publications. 

Gene Peebles is vice-president of 
operations and his responsibilities cover 
everything from security to facilities 
planning. It was out of his office that the 
findings of the Special Utilization and 
Management Study will be carried out. 



This will include, over the next several 
years, a reduction in buildings and floor 
space at the university. 

But that is yet to come. Now that the 
university has declared itself to be on 
stable ground, Ping and his crew still have 
a hard fight ahead. 

"We have weathered the storm; the „ 
ship is afloat sailing in a strong wind." Ping f 
said. "But the seas ahead are heavy, and we S. 
must be at the tasks of trimming the sails s 
and setting a course." <" 




President Ping points to new directions for 

Ohio University. 251 



Persons o£ the World 



If you ask the question, "Where 
are you from?" at Ohio University, 
never assume you will be given such 
responses as "Cincinnati." or 
"Toledo." There are students here 
who would reply "Ankara," "Cal- 
cutta," or "Izmir." Obviously, they 
do not go home for the weekend. 

Over 1,000 international 
students here in Athens boast an 
array of backgrounds — from China, 
Malaysia and Taiwan; to Pakistan, 
Saudi Arabia and Iran; to Peru, 
Turkey and Nigeria; to Egypt, Libya 
and Norway . . . the list goes on. 

International students reside on 
all greens at OU, though many of 
them choose to live in Shively or 



Perkins halls, which are internation- 
al dorms located on the East Green. 
Some are graduate students, some 
are freshmen. Their majors differ, as 
do their campus activities, opinions 
of American culture and of OU. 

Luis Felipe Valcarcel, is a 
25-year-old graduate student in 
Business Administration from Lima, 
Peru. He was a 1977 graduate from 
the Universidad de Lima. Valcarcel 
had friends from Lima who attended 
OU in 1974 and 1976. He admits he 
came to school with a distorted 
picture of Athens, influenced by his 
friends. 

Lima is all cement according to 
Valcarcel who was overwhelmed by 




the lush hills of southern Ohio. He 
described his first view of OU's 
campus as fascinating. Valcarcel, 
the only Latin American student in 
Shively, became involved in dorm 
government and Tae-Kwon-Do and 
is a member of the OU Latin 
American Association. 

Sedat Gokcen, an electrical 
engineering major from Turkey, 
represents the international students 
on the Student Advisory Board. He 
is a Resident Assistant, formerly in 
Gamertsfelder, currently in Shively, 
and he hopes to become an Assistant 
Resident Director. He chose to study 
outside of Turkey because of the 
internal conflicts in his country, and 
had never been in the U.S. before 
his arrival on campus, which he now 
likes. 

On the other hand, Sudata 
Gupta, a history major from Calcut- 
ta, India, finds OU and Athens 
satisfactory, but observes, that 
"there is no existence outside of the 
campus." 

Gupta, another graduate 
student, found that arriving at OU 
two days before classes began gave 
her little time to adjust to a new city, 
a new culture and a new education 
system. Standing in lines for three 
hours at Chubb Hall did not add to 
her pre-conceived notion of "Amer- 
ican efficiency" either. 

Adjustments were not too 
difficult for her and some differ- 
ences, such as the informal teacher- 
student relations on campus, Gupta 
found extremely fascinating. 

Already fluent in English, 
Gupta had no language problems, 
but that is not the case with many 
foreign students. Many, Gupta says, 
find that life in the United States can 



Though tensions sometimes exist, international students usually find help from American 
students. 



252 




Like any other students, international students find their first priority to be books. 



253 




254 



Moslem international students display a powerlul observance ol Islam. 

be very lonely. Gupta has overcome 
this because of her basic interest in 
people and other cultures. She 
attributes having many American 
friends to being willing to adjust to, 
even if she cannot fully accept, 
value differences. "You can find out 
about people by reading books," 
Gupta says, "But books don't talk 
back to you — people do." 

And while foreign students may 
be thousands of miles from home, 
often they are affected by interna- 
tional crises, as in the case of 
freshman Jahandar Ketabchi, from 
Tehran, Iran. He is a civil engineer- 
ing major and one of three Iranians 
in Shively. 

Ketabchi misses his family, but 
would not want to go back to Iran. 
Due to the turmoil, everything was 
closed, and he was bored. Ketabchi 
does not support the Shah or 



Khomeini, and is not involved with 
protests, but the situation in Iran has 
also created difficulties in financing 
his education. Money goes through a 
great deal of red tape before he 
receives it. 

Ketabchi finds Athens enjoy- 
able and hasn't encountered the 
problems that some Iranians on 
college campuses have as a result of 
American ill-feelings. 

He compared Khomeini to the 
pope, noting that he is qualified to 
run religion, but not politics. 
Ketabchi would wait until the 
turmoil is over before he would go 
back to Iran, but the situation has 
caused him considerable reflection. 
He has mixed feelings about where 
he will eventually live. Right now he % 
has to concentrate on finishing his <B 
freshman year. I 




Facing Mecca thrice-daily in prayer is not stopped by a 5000 mile gap. 



^^■3 





'v.J 




255 



Student Senate 
Battles For Its Li£e 



In 1979-80 Student Senate faced 
its greatest challenge in its four-year 
history with the duty of ratifying a 
new constitution. It took 18 months 
of study before the final document 
was presented to the student body by 
the Constitutional Review Task 
Force. 

A winter quarter campaign was 
highlighted by feverish confronta- 
tions between the Senate and THE 
POST. Although 82 percent of those 
voting approved the constitution, the 
document came within 54 votes 
|17.4' '- ) of receiving the necessary 18 
percent of the student body vote 
needed for ratification. 

"Communication, internal and 
external, remains a problem," said 
Judicial Chairperson Ardis Edmon- 
son. "It was reflected in the 
constitution vote." 

Rejecting the idea of permanent 
reinstatement by the administration, 
the senate chose instead to take a 
revised constitution back to the 
student body for yet another vote. 

"The things we faced this year 
taught us that we can't be all things 
to all people," said senate president 
Kevin Williams, after defeat of the 
document. "The same people that 
say that the Student Senate 
shouldn't exist are the same ones 
asking the members for help in 
solving their problems." 

The Senate met the administra- 
tion head on over issues such as the 
controversial Convo concert policy, 
which limited the use of the Convo 
for future concerts. The Senate also 
protested the lack of input on this 
and other decision-making commit- 
tees and eventually won approval 
for most of its suggested revisions. 

The Senate commissions 
continued to be the backbone of the 
Senate. The Academics Commission 



and a Senate task force appeared 
before the faculty and administra- 
tion with improvement on the 
advising system and produced an 
advisee's bill of rights. The Judicial 
Commission, stripped of its tradi- 
tional input into judicial hearings, 
continued to advise students of the 
judicial process and to investigate 
student grievances year round. 

The Escort Service began full 



operation again in mid-January 
under executive coordinator Lisa 
Lightfoot. Along with 130 other 
volunteers, the Escort Service was 
operating even better than its initial 
year. 

Senate treasurer Dave Halt 
summed up the year by saying, "At 
times it can be a pain in the ass, but 
sometimes you have to take a pain in 
the ass to defend student interests." 




President Kevin Williams survived a lot ol flak, but hit senate might not. 



256 




Communication Director Chrissie Miller and Jim Burke, who ascended to the vice presidency when Kathy Core resigned. 




Internal dissension and criticism for THE POST left surviving senators frowning, even before the constitution-vote. 



257 



A&B 



Abdul Hamid, Lukman A. H. 
Microbiology 
Abdella, Marilyn S. 
Elementary Education 
Adams. Craig A. 
Finance 
Adkins, Jim 
Geology- 
Alexander, Linda S. 
Physical Education 
A'Hearn. Matthew V. 
English 
Altberg. Maria B. 
Radio- Television 
Anderson, Carmen C. 
Advertising and Public Relations 
Anderson. Michael T. 
Secondary Education 
Andonian. Karen L. 
Interior Design 
Andre. Louis C. 
General Communication 
Andrews. Nancy E. 
Sculpture 
Arment, Carol A. 
Fine Arts 
Arnold. Susan M. 
Music Therapy/Music Education 
Ashford. Bernita 
Physical Education 
Auletto, Michael J. 
Radio-Television 
Bachnicki, Donna A. 
Child Development/Community Service 
Badgley. Michael C. 
Marketing 
Bailey. Meggan M. 
Marketing/Advertising 
Baird. Michael ]. 
Finance 
Baines. Wendy F. 
Radio- Television 
Baker, [anis E. 
Baker. Judith A. 
Zoology 
Baker. Kent D. 
Civil Engineering 
Baker, Neal B. 
Radio- Tele vision 
Baker. Stephanie E. 
Psychology 
Balishin. Laura 
Communication 
Ballinger. Rex R. 
Physical Education 
Balog. Tom 
Journalism 
Barijwa. Durojaiye Jamiu 
Political Science 
Bauer. Ellen Marie 
Speech & Hearing Therapy 
Baumann. Meg A. 
Organizational Comm unication 
Beal. Cathy 
Graduate 
Beall, Glenn W. 
Radio-Television 
Beals. Blair R. 
Recreational Management 



258 





Beavers, Debra M. 

Elementary Education 

Bechtel, Steven C. 

Political Science 

Becker. Wendy L. 

Special Education 

Behr, Pitoy 

Social Work/Mental Health 

Bench. Linda S. 

Physical Education 

Benjamin, Bonnie S. 

Forensic Psychology 

Bensman, Charles L. 

Painting 

Berlin. Katherine A. 

Psychology 

Bern-, Peter N. 

Mathematics 

Biber, Diana 

Arts and Sciences 

Bickelhaupt, Janet L. 

Music Therapy 

Black. Julie L." 

Dietetics 

Blair. Christina M. 

Business Education 

Blair, Donald 

Finance 

Blandford. Sandra S. 

Bloom, Brian D 

Public Relations 

Bly. Kimberly A. 

C Irganiza tion a 1 Comm un ica tion 

Bodell. Thomas C. 

Public Relations 

Bongard, David L. 

History 

Boright, Mark A. 

Accounting 

Bowen. Betsy A. 

Comm un ica tion 

Bowen, Brent L. 

Journalism 

Bowser, Kyle D. 

Radio-Television 

Boyd. Regina L. 

Journalism Education 

Boy kin. Renee 

English Literature 

Bradley. Mary L. 

Orga n iza tion a 1 Com m unica tion 

Bradshaw. Alice F. 

Recreation Management and Spanish 

Brannan. Maureen J. 

Education 

Brashear, Amy K. 

Music Education 

Bresnahan, Jim, L. 

Radio-Television 

Bressler. Dawn S. 

Psychology 

Brewin. Barbara A. 

International Studies 

Brown. Christine E. 

Interpersonal Communication 

Brown, Evan S. 

Business Administration 

Brown, Gerald W. 

Theatre 



259 




Wilford joined his uncle and aunt in Athens, U.S.A. 




Zhen Zhoo and Yanyi Chen immediately encountered a great American hassle: college registration. 



260 



Chinese Persons 
Experience OU_ 



Ohio University in very fortun- 
ate to be a part of the Cultural 
Exchange Program implemented by 
Vice President Mondale which 
established a cultural and educa- 
tional exchange between the U.S. 
and China. At the present time, OU 
has 13 students from China. 

fimmy Yan, and Willford and 



Mimi Sheng. enrolled at OU in 
September and were among 200 
privately sponsored students in a 
broad sampling of colleges across 
the country, primarily Ivy League 
and larger state universities. 

After five months of living in 
America, mainly spent in Athens. 
Willford and Mimi feel their biggest 




Wilford Sheng and his wife Mimi in their new Athens home. 



problem has been the language. 

Willford has studied English for 
three years in China and is now in 
the Ohio Program of Intensified 
English. Willford and Mimi have 
spent little time for entertainment in 
their new environment because 
there is too much school work. 

When asked if the couple had 
any preconceptions about Amer- 
icans before coming to the country, 
they replied that they hail always 
pictured Americans dressing very 
formally, wearing suits and ties, but 
Willford comments. "Now I see 
they're wearing anything!" 

About 500 visiting scholars will 
also attend U.S. universities. Ohio 
University now has five visiting 
scholars who are supported by both 
their government and Oil. Most of 
the scholars arc studying mathema- 
tics or engineering and are in their 
late twenties or early thirties. 

Chang Yuan Yin has found in 
his short stay in the U.S. very 
interesting, particularly our celebra- 
tion of Christmas. He spent the day 
at Dean William Dorrill's house 
where he first experienced the taste 
of turkey. Other visiting scholars 
included Zhen-Zhao, Zonglian Fel, 
Hong-Qi Yan and Song-Shi Kang. 

OU now has five Chinese 
students in the graduate school: 
Da-Wei Wang, Yi Chia Tang, Yuan 
Hung |an. Zhou Hao Xuan and Lu 
]iren. Their first impression of 
Americans was that they are very 
friendly. 

So far the cultural exchange 
between our two countries has been 
one-sided but James Y. Tong, a 
university chemistry professor who 
coordinated the Chinese education- 
al program, said that OU wants to 
send students to China. The U.S. I 
government is offering scholarships f 
to graduate students for work in 6 
China. 



261 



c 



Brown. Scott M. 

Management 

Brown, Willie R. 

Political Science 

Brugger, Jean M. 

Radio- Television 

Brugger. Jeffry V. 

Radio- Television 

Bryant. Marc Duane 

Marketing 

Buckhaults. Ray E. 

Management 

Buckley, John P. 

Business 

Buczak. Mark A. 

Organizational Communication 

Buenger, Bob 

Economics 

Buening, John J. 

Electrical Engineering 

Bunge, Gary A. 

Violin 

Burkhart. Kristen K. 

Theraputic Recreation 

Burkhart, Susan G. 

Social Work 

Burkin. Robert F. 

Accounting and Quantitative Methods 

Burns. Jacquelyn A. 

Music Therapv 

Button. Edwin Clark 

General Business 

Cahill. Vincent M. 

Physical Education 

Cahoon. David A. 

Management 

Calabro, Mary Ellen 

Sociology 

Calvert. Edward C. 

Accounting 

Campbell. Mark V. 

Radio- Television 

Cardwell. J. David 

Computer Science 

Carney. Mark R. 

Political Science 

Carovac. Karen R. 

Hearing and Speech 

Carr. Alison L. 

English 

Carr. Leah D. 

Philosophy 

Carroll. Timothy R. 

Education 

Casey. Lisa M. 

General Communication 

Casper. David A. 

Communication 

Castillo. Norma | 

Computer Science 

Cefaratti. Samuel E. 

Accounting 

Chabal. Priscilla M. 

Public Relations 

Chancy, Cris L. 

Hearing and Speech Therapy 

Chapman. Deborah M. 

Graphic Design 

Chapman. Richard A. 

Recreational Management 



262 




PI?? 





Choughari. Salah Ali 

Electrical Engineering 

Chow, Chu-Yuen 

General Business 

Christman, David NL 

Education 

Christner, Laura {. 

Education 

Church, Lisa A. 

Com munica tion 

Ciprian. John P. 

English 

Ciuni, Charles R. 

Accounting 

Clark, Diane D. 

Management 

Clark. John S. 

Business 

Clark, Stephen M. 

Chemical Engineering 

Clark. Terrence H. 

Management 

Claster. Robert A. 

Radio- Television 

Claypool. Caryn Lee 

Special Education 

Clifford. Mark 

Fine Arts 

Clifton. Ralph 

Business 

Cloutier. Dennis M. 

Outdoor Education 

Clouse, Sharon Schuer 

Arts and Sciences 

Cohen, Leslie 

Physical Education 

Cole. Lynn H. 

Arts and Sciences 

Colvin, Cathy L. 

Education 

Connolly, Michael L 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Connors. Mark R. 

Finance 

Corbin. Emilie K. 

General Communication 

Cornelius, Julie A. 

Marketing 

Corvino. Lorraine D. 

Social Work 

Costanzo, Joseph A. 

Accounting 

Crabtree, Susan Elaine 

Special Education 

Craig, Barbara Ann 

Fashion Merchandising 

Creecy. Arnetta P. 

Physhology 

Croes, Susan B 

Accounting 

Crosby. Meg B. 

English 

Cross, Lori [ 

Hearing and Speech 

Crouse, [ill A. 

Arts and Sciences 

Cunnington. Craig T, 

Business 

Cunningham. Robert R. 

Painting 



263 



D 



Dame. Linda M. 

Special Education 

Damschroder. Julie A. 

Accounting 

Darkow, Judith L. 

Psychology and Social Work 

Davis, Cathy J. 

Psychology 

Davis. Deborah Anne 

Organizational Communication 

Davis. Kimberly A. 

Modern Dance 

Davies. Lynn E. 

Com m unica tion 

Dearth. Patsy J. 

Special Education 

Deas. Patricia (Nikki) 

Communication 

Dezoso, Joaquin L. 

Demjan. Patricia Frances 

English and French 

Dempsey. Michael J. 

History 

DeNell. Kim M. 

Elementary Education 

DeNiro. Man,- Margaret 

Public Relations 

DeVoe. Dennis L. 

Business Management 

DeVore. Victoria L. 

Early Child Education 

Dickerson. Richard D 

Civil Engineering 

Diehl, Edward A. 

Recreation Management 

DiGiandomenico, Louis A. 

RTV Administration Management 

Dillahunt. Christine L. 

Nursing 

DiLiberto. Sam Michael 

Advertising 

Dillhoff. Deb L. 

Physical Education 

DiMarco. Phred G. 

Organizational Communication 

Dischinger. David A. 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Dix. Donna L. 

Science Writing 

Dodd, Gary A. 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Donadio, Patrick J. 

RTV Administrative Management 

Draghic, Nan M. 

Child Development and Community Services 

Draper. Quintilla 

Accounting 

Drobina, James J. 

Computer Science 

Duffey, John P. 

Marketing 

Duffie. Laurie A 

Accounting 

DuMaine. Denise C. 

Theatre 

Dunlap. |. Carl 

Business Management 

[ )ii|)ins, Michael I 

MH robiohgy 

264 




w$m 





EOT 



Dye, |anet M. 

Graphic Design 

Dylewski. Dennis 

Marketing 

Eastman, Jane C. 

Special Education 

Eaton. Ellen S. 

Nutrition and Dietetics 

Eberly. |oseph W. 

Russian and International Studies 

Eddy. Marcie 

Education 

Edmiston. William H. 

Clinical Psychology 

Edwards, Stacie K. 

Organizational Communication 

Ek, Lena M. 

Management 

Elam, Peter W. 

Organizational Communication 

Ellis, Linda S. 

Management 

Elmore. Maresea Lynn 

Organizational Communication 

Elshweikh, Rashid T. 

Radio- Television 

Engel. ]erry 

Business 

Engelson. Susan P. 

General Communication 

Engemann. Doris I. 

Advertising 

Escolas, |ohn W. 

Zoology 

Evans. Charlene L. 

Accounting 

Fairchild. Vanessa L. 

Arts and Sciences 

Fairlie, Laura |. 

Music Therapy 

Faulk, Charles H. 

Industrial Engineering 

Faulkner, Carol S. 

Magazine journalism 

Feasline, Mark E. 

Felice. Marguerite L. 

Psychology 

Fenimore, Nancy ]. 

Honors Tutorial 

Ferris, John E. 

Visual Communication 

Feuer, Joel E. 

Zoology 

Finger. Karla N. 

Advertising 

Fischbach, Michael G. 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Fisher, Kathleen M 

Organizational Communication 

Fitz, Tamara Kay 

Social Work 

Fletcher, Robert A. 

Accounting 

Flournoy. Peter W, 

Accounting 

Fluellen. Evelyn D. 

Marketing 

Foley. Harry D. 

Organizational Communication 



265 



G 



Foreman. Paula |. 
Psychology- 
Vox, Gregor\ W 
Radio- Television 
Free. Kalhryn E 
Organizational Communication 
Freeman. Ronda E. 
Special Education 
Fretti, Benjamin |. 
Chemical Engineering 

Friedman. Amy Dee 

Art Education 

Frisbey. Sheryl A. 

Orga nizational Communication 

Fritchle. Darice D. 

Finance 

Fulk. Teresa L. 

Arts and Sciences 

Fuller. Donna Rene 

A lanagement 

Galerstein. Robert 

Radio-Television 

Gamble. Tom 

Public Relations 

Gannon. Patricia L. 

Journalism 

Ganyard. Linda C. 

Organizational Communication 

Gargiulo, Donna L. 

Social Work and Psychology 

Garrett. Darrell V. 

Political Science 

Gattermeyer, Daniel J. 

Political Science 

Gayhardt, Man- K. 

Special Education 

Geisler. Mark T. 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

George. Bridgette A. 

Accounting 

Gibson. Robert M. 

Music Education 

Gildow. Jacquelyn K. 

Communications Comprehensive 

Gilts. Timothy D. 

Business 

Gingold. Pamela D. 

Accounting 

Glenn. Maureen E. 

Textiles and Clothing 

Gliebe, Carolyn M. 

Education 

Cluck, Kristine A. 

Microbiology 

Gnomblerou Francois 

Engineering Technology 

Goldsberry. Andria R. 

English Education 

Gomwalk, Gloria 

Graduate 

Gongos. Laura |. 

Public Relations 

Gornick. Victoria A. 

Management 

Cough. Gretchen E. 

Child Development and Community Services 

Graham. Rebacca M. 

Early Childhood Education 

Granella Emilio A. 

Chemical Engineering 

266 






r i 




£l 


*}^» 


M >k 




Br ^ 


r w\* 


^^"^ 




H 



Grant, Phyllis |. 

Journalism 

Gravagna. Ross F. 

Journalism 

Gray. Sheilah M. 

Pre-Dentistry 

Greene, Timothy J. 

Finance 

Greissinger, Diane V. 

History 

Griffin. Gregory |. 
Chemical Engineering 
Grimes, B. James 
Ad\ 'ertising/Prom otion 
Grimm, Kitty L. 
Music Education 
Grimshaw. M. Jane 
Theatre 

Groll. Shelley S. 
Special Education 

Gross, George F. (Fritz) 
Graphic Design 
Gross. Nancy }. 
Interior Design 
Grueser. Gina K. 

Guanciale. Gina M. 
Special Education 
Gulas, Gregory M. 
Sports Administration 

Gundling, James P. 

Arts and Sciences 

Haas, Stephanie L. 

Advertising 

Habeaman. Roy A. 

Organizational Communication 

Hagan, Mark C. 

Industrial Technology 

Hahn, Bruce R. 

Chemistry and English 

Hall, Diane A. 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine 
Hall. Lynn E. 
Interior Design 
Hall. Nancy L. 
Hearing and Speech 
Halley. Louella M. 
Business Education 
Halley. Sandra L. 

Halstead. Ted W. 

History and International Studies 

Halter. Daniel R. 

Communication 

Hamby. Linda F. 

Special Education 

Hamman. Sharon E. 

Fine Arts 

Hampton. Dona 

Elementary Education 

Hampston. Linda J. 

Business Management 

Hanes, Kathy S. 

Accounting 

Hardy. Lori J. 

Special Education 

Harris. Barbara J. 

Painting 

Harris. Donna C. 

Organizational Communication 



267 



Harris, Joel P. 

Arts and Sciences 

Harrison, Judy A. 

Communication 

Hart, Patricia A. 

Marketing 

Hart. Sandra K. 

Interior Design 

Hartline. Diana Lee 

Hattenbach. Marc D. 

Public Relations 

Hauser. E. Martin 

Radio- Tele vision 

Hawthorne, Mark T. 

RTV Administration Management 

Heck, Beverly A. 

Special Education 

Heeb, Beth A. 

Interior Design 

Heldman, Toni A. 

Advertising 

Heller. Robert D. 

Communication 

Hepler. Wayne A. 

Radio- Television 

Hereth. Louise B. 

Theatre 

Herman. Penny 

Physical Education 

Hermann, Robert F. 

Radio- Television 

Hershev. Joseph W. 

Health 

Hickey, Gregory G. 

Zoology^ and Pre-Med 

Hibbard, Bonnie S. 

Elementary Education/Early Childhood 

Higinbothom, Gae Lyn 

Spanish 

Hildebrand. Olivia ). 

Marketing 

Hiiliard. Janice R. 

Education 

Hiiliard. Kathy A. 

Radio-Television 

Hillyard, Franklin P. 

Music Education 

Hinson, Steven T. 

Hrschberg, Kerry T. 

Theatre 

Hirschman. Laura F. 

Special Education 

Hixon, Beth E 

Accounting 

Hogan, John T. 

Vocal Music Education 

Hogan. Myra E. 

English Literature 

Hoisington. Roy Lee 

Electrical Engineering 

Holland. Susan E. 

Special Education/Early Childhood 

Holtel, Sandra K. 

Genera! Business 

Holvey. Nancy M. 

University College 

Hoon. Ann E. 

Fine Arts 



268 





I& J 



Hoover. Andrew M. 

Radio- Television 

Hosman, Elizabeth M. 

Interior Design 

Houk. Michelle A. 

Zoology 

Howard. James C. 

Organizational Communication 

Howard. Kim 

Comm un ication 

Howdyshell, Mary C. 

Special Education 

Howe. Charles L. 

University College 

Huffer. Mark E. 

Political Science 

Huffman, James F. 

Fine Arts 

Hulshof. Patricia K. 

Social Work 

Hunley. Dianna L. 

Social Work and Psychology 

Hunting. Mark R. 

General Business 

Hurley. Vicki L. 

Accounting 

Hussain. Imtiaz 

International Studies 

Inman, David I 

Industrial Arts 

Ivine. James A. 

Electrical Engineering 

Isma. Fatima G. 

Radio- Television 

Ittel. Terri L. 

Radio-Television News 

Jackson, Adrienne 

Communication 

Jacobs. Joan 

Special Education 

Jacobs. William E. 

Management 

Jagers. Donald J. 

Studio Arts 

James. Laura Ellen 

Psychology 

Jancsurak, Joe 

Magazine Journalism 

(akobsky. Elizbeth P. 

Journalism 

Jarrett, Frank 

Psychology 

Jellinek. Trade 

Elementary Education 

Jenkins. Pogina S. 

Early Childhood/Elementary Education 

Jimenez. Omar R. 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Johnson. Carol L. 

Management 

Dolinsky. David Louis 

Radio- Television 

Jones. James E. 

Management 

Jones. Jeffrey F. 

Education 

Jones. John Clayton 

Accounting 

Jones, Lorna D. 

Special Education 



269 



Dedicated Persons 
Volunteer Time — 




Helping the menially troubled may require enthusiasm and patience, or sometimes just a warm hug. 



270 




Buses bring 150 volunteers each Monday. 



The Halloween party is always special to both residents and volunteers. 



They were excited. They were 
going to the Athens Mall. Yet all they 
had to spend was one dollar; but to 
some of the residents of the Athens 
Mental Health Center, it was more 
than enough. They also had a special 
group of friends accompanying 
them: students who volunteer their 
Monday nights to work at the Health 
Center. 

The residents always think of 
Monday evening as a special event. 
Some greet the volunteers with 
handshakes, hugs and kisses as the 
students step off the bus. 

Residents attend Monday night 
functions with much enthusiasm. 
During the week, they ask, "When 
are the volunteers coming?" And the 
enthusiasm is contagious. 

"I feel really good when I get off 
the bus," said volunteer Sharon 
Poling. "It makes me feel wanted 
and needed." 

Most volunteers have no com- 
plaints. From the minute they step 
off the bus, they know why they are 
there — to help their friends and 



have fun as well. 

Besides helping around the 
center, the volunteers also plan 
special functions. These functions 
include bus trips to the mall, art 
exhibits and an annual Halloween 
party when both residents and 
volunteers dress up in their wildest 
costumes and dance, bob for apples, 
drink cider and perform skits. 

There is also a resident volun- 
teer program in which students 
participate. One such student. 
Marcy Yaffe, lived at the Mental 
Health Center this past summer. In 
exchange for room and board, Yaffe 
worked fifteen hours a week in 
patient-related activities. Yaffe said 
it was easy to become attached to the 
women she lived with. 

One advantage of the resident 
program is the opportunity residents 
have to observe the volunteer's 
lifestyle, making the chances of 
outside living much greater for the 
resident. 

Yaffe said that it was a good 
experience. She loved the job and 



the people, and said she came to 
think of them as friends and not 
patients. 

That sentiment was echoed by 
Julia Smith, a three-year volunteer 
who started going to the center on 
Monday nights during her freshman 
year and has been a volunteer since. 

Smith loved it so much that she 
changed her major from social 
studies to special education. Some- 
times she missed studying for exams 
so she could go to the center. 

It seems one might become 
depressed after witnessing these 
people's problems, yet none of the 
volunteers seem depressed. Of 
course, some have reservations. "I 
sometimes have doubts about 
whether I want to do this the rest of 
my life," said volunteer Laura 
Stouffer. But she said she always has 
a good feeling when she gets home. 

Smith agreed, "They just want 
someone to listen to them as a friend, 
I would do anything for them," she 
added. 



271 



K 



Josten, Richard J. 

Journalism 

Joy, Susan E. 

Recreation/Outdoor Education 

Justi, Connie J. 

Radio-Television 

Kahn, Michele S. 

Fashion Merchandising/Business 

Kallett. Melissa R. 

Accounting 

Kalman. Howard K. 

Radio-Television 

Kappel. Michael |. 

Industrial Engineering 

Karimian, Kambiz 

Civil Engineering 

Kastovich. Marcia L. 

Business Management/Finance 

Kates, Howard L. 

A ccoun ting/Fin a nee 

Keable. Timothy P. 

Finance 

Keenist, William J. 

Journalism 

Kelch, Jeff A. 

RTV Performance 

Kelch, Jeffrey D. 

Graphic Design 

Kelley, Anita P. 

Art Education 

Kelley, Cynthia D. 

Special Education 

Kelley. Patrick W. 

Business 

Kelley, Sandra M. 

Advertising 

Kenney, Anne M. 

Magazine Journalism 

Kent. William F. 

Political Science 

Kern, Irene 

German 

Ketzak, Nancy J. 

Business Management 

Kiely. [ill S. 

Organizational Communications 

Kimpel, Kathy A. 

Kimura. Takayuki 

Graphic Design 

Kirkendall, Debora L. 

Special Education 

Kisor, Peggy A. 

Graphic Design 

Klett, Lee D. 

Chemistry 

Klock, Steven R". 

RTV Administration Management 

Knapp. Deirdre f. 

Psychology 

Knight, Bradley f. 

Marketing 

Kocak, Christine M. 

Organizational Communication 

Koch. Andrew Frank 

University College 

Koenig. Chris E. 

Industrial Technology 

Kahn, Barbara j. 

Hearing and Speech 



272 




L 




Kolopajlo. Mark A. 

Journalism 

Kopf. Mary Ann 

Social Work 

Kosik. Margie A. 

Antiquities 

Krise, Patricia Lynn 

Fashion Merchandising 

Kucharson, Jill A. 

Interior Design 

Kudrick, Melissa L. 

Magazine Journalism 

Kuhar. Mark S 

English 

Kuhn. Renae 

Art Education 

Kunkle. Connie Leigh 

Radio-Television Performance 

Kurlinski. Elaine T. 

Special Education 

Kushner. Robert G. 

Electrical Engineering 

Kuszmaul. David W. 

Electrical Engineering 

Lafayette. Michelle Marie 

International Studies 

Lancaster. Richard A 

Accounting 

Lang. Stephen A. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Lanker. M. Kathleen 

Geography 

LaRocca. ]ohn P. 

Industrial Engineering 

Laturell. |effrey A. 

Radio-Television 

Layne. Becky L. 

Elementary Education 

Leahr. Jennifer 

Radio-Tele vision 

Lentz. John A. 

Fine Arts 

Levison. Michael S. 

Advertising 

Lewis. Jane L. 

Organizational Communication 

Lewis. Karen R. 

Organizational Communication 

Lewis. Lorrainne Tracye 

Management 

Lewis. Robin 

Elementary Education 

Ley, Julie A. 

Recreational Therapy 

Lindstrom. Don R. 

Arts and Sciences 

Lipply. Barbara L. 

General Business 

Littlefield. William G. 

Pre-med 

Lloyd. Jeff A. 

Chemistry 

Locke. ]ohn A. 

General Business 

Loeser. Julie C. 

Organizational Communication 

Logston. Robert W. 

Electrical Engineering 

Lowe. Stephanie K. 

Elementary Education 



273 



M 



Lucas, Laure] J. 
Marketing 

Lyall. Sandra M. 

Photography 

Lyon. Myra S. 

Advertising 

Macaulay, David R. 

Magazine journalism 

MacDonald. Lorie A. 

History /French 

Maciag. Paul A. 

Fine Arts 

Macioch, Cynthia M. 

University College 

Mackey. David C. 

Physical Education 

Mackin, Terri L. 

Textile Testing 

Maginn. Sharen L. 

Fin a n ce/Ma rketing 

Mahokey. Annette Christine 

Theatre 

Majid. Marinah A. 

Business Management 

Maness. Susan E. 

Organizational Communication 

Marhulik. James 

Physical Education 

Marker. Catherine A. 

Markham. Mark M. 

Psychology/Philosophy /Photography 

Maron, Monica 

Foods in Business and Communication 

Martin, George J. 

Business Management 

Martin, Joy A. 

Physical Education 

Martin. Nancy A. 

Special Education 

Marx. Patricia A. 

Special Education 

Maxey. Cathy A. 

Organizational Communication 

Mayfield. Wayne S. 

Marketing 

McCain. Cynthia L. 

Interior Design 

McCarty. Ned S. 

Physical Education 

McCulloch. Mark W. 

Radio- Television 

McDonald. Rory N. 

Accounting and Management 

McKec. Robert Michael 

Business Management 

McKcnna, Pat M. 

Early Childhood Education 

McKibben. Janet D. 

Fine Arts 

McCaine. Lawrence W. 

Recreation Management 

McNeill. Alice J. 

Biology 

Mechling, Corinne M. 

Mceks. Rhonda J 

Music Education 

Meerc. Man Kathleen 

Elementary Education 



274 




N 




Merkle, Dan 

Business 

Metz, Leslie K. 

Ra dio- Tele \ ision 

Metz, Susan A. 

English and Political Science 

Michael, Barbara Ellen 

Human Development/Mental Health 

Technology 

Midkiff. Vicki L. 

Psychology 

Miller, Christopher K. 

Business 

Miller, Ed D. 

Education 

Miller. John A. 

Management 

Miller. Laura Ann 

Psychology and Chemistry 

Miller, Paul 

Computer Science 

Mitchell, Karen L. 

Dietetics and Community Nutrition 

Mizicko. Edward A. 

Health 

Mohtlman. Dawn M. 

Monroe. |ohn L 

Photography 

Moore. Deborah A. 

Recreational Management 

Morath. Tarn S. 
Graphic Design 
Morgan. Barbara L. 
University College 
Morris. Michael F. 
Political Science 
Mountz. Randi R. 
Radio-Television News 
Mull. Nancy A. 
Finance 

Mullins, Elizabeth A. 
Recreational Management 
Munn. Michelle 
Organizational Communication 
Munro, Terese J. 
General Speech 
Muntean, Bill P. 
Management 
Murdock, William P. 
Economics 

Murphy. Judy A. 
Magazine Journalism 
Muthues. John H. 
General Business 
Myers. Michael L. 
Physical Education 
Naqvi, Sarah Shameem 
Production Design 
Nash. John C. 
Zoology 

Nass. Sabrina 

Community Health Services 

Neal. Tamisine M. 

Health Education 

Neff. Tina Gothard 

Organizational Communication 

Neidert, Julie M. 

Elementary Education 

Nelson. Martha C. 

English 



275 




John Reil, ol Gamertsfelder Hall, plays with his dog, Shadow. 





While not completely blind, Ralph Johnson is 
visually handicapped, but special viewing 
screens help him overcome this. 

"You don't have to be perman- 
ently blind or deaf to make use of 
our handicap services," explains 
Tony Coleman, programs director 
for Affirmative Action. The program 
is designed to assist all handicapped 
students ranging from permanently 
blind or deaf to the temporarily 
impaired. 

Here at Ohio University there 
are three blind students that take 
advantage of the services. One of 
them is David Andrews, house 



276 



Handicapped Persons 
Not Impaired At OU — 




proctor of Delta Tau Delta Fraterni- 
ty. Andrews has been attending 
graduate school at O.U. since fall 
1978 and will be graduating in 
March 1980. He has found his way 
around the O.U. campus very 
successfully. He has been attending 
public schools since the sixth grade. 
Each quarter David plans ahead 
by ordering tape cassettes which are 
a much easier form of studying than 
big and bulky Braille text books. It 
takes time and planning to order the 



tapes because the New York service 
he uses is the only service available 
today. 

But, with the programs being set 
up by Coleman, O.U. will soon be 
taping their own books for the blind 
students, offering a much quicker 
service. Besides setting up a taping 
system, Coleman is also designing a 
Braille Room for Alden Library. The 
room will accomodate Braille 
typewriters, talking books, and 
current magazines. 



Another service that will be 
made available will be a project 
called "Circle of Care". The circle 
will include volunteers from Athens 
and volunteer students that will help 
the handicapped in any way they 
need. 

"Our job is to make any and all 
handicapped students more com- 1 
fortable here at O.U.," says 1 
Coleman. o 



277 



O&P 



Newsad, Rose M. 

Psychology 

Nguyen, Lam Huu 

Computer Science 

Nicholas, Maren M. 

Chemistry 

Nilsen, Kristin A. 

English 

North, Micheal . 

Industrial Technology 

Novak, Lisa Ann 

Radio-Television 

Obando. Julian J. 

Engineering Technology 

Ocheje, James Attah Bello 

History 

O'Hare. Craig R. 

Finance 

Okoniewski, Jay A. 

Business 

Oliver, Jon D. 

Field Biology 

Oloruntoba, Agboola John 

Business Management 

Onyema, Kenneth D. 

Civil Engineering 

Orosz, Gale M. 

Studio Arts/Creative Writing 

Osswald. Scott L. 

Comm un ica tion 

Ostrander. Barbara J. 

Fashion Merchandising 

OToole. Joanne 

Radio-Television 

Paglialunga. Donna M. 

Zoology 

Palm. Pamela S. 

Radio- Television 

Park, Terri L. 

Interior Design 

Parker. Douglas W. 

Fine Arts 

Parker. Ethan A. 

Civil Engineering 

Parker. Thomas S. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Paskievitch, Cheryl L. 

Speech and Hearing Therapy 

Paterson. Douglas S. 

Physical Education 

Patton, Paul N. 

Radio- Television 

Pavic. Mark 

Radio-Television 

Pawloski. Glen E. 

Creative Writing 

Pease. Steven C. 

Communication 

Pelka. Audrey 

Social Work 

Penn. Linda Marie 

Radio- Television 

Perry, Craig D. 

Advertising 

Peters, Michael D. 

Arts and Sciences 

Petroff. Patricia J 

General Speech 

Pettit. Kathryn \ 

Special Education 



278 





QOR 



Philbrick, Wendy S. 

Communica tion 

Phillips, Deborah Marie 

Fashion Merchandising and Promotion 

Phillips. Ralph K. 

Organizational Communication 

Phinick, Susan D. 

Special Education 

Pierce, Thomas L. 

Industrial Technology 

Pierson. Jeffrey S. 

Theatre 

Pinnix, Nicholas E. 

Accounting 

Polen. Holly A, 

Management 

Poling, Barbara K. 

Music Education 

Poling. |anet G. 

Marketing 

Poling. Patricia J. 

Graphic Design 

Polivchak. Doreen K. 

Interior Design 

Post, Craig L. 

Environmental Geography 

Powell. Robert Boog 

Radio-Television Administration 

Powers, Kathryn G. 

Food Service Management 

Pozzuoli, Andre H. 

Finance 

Predmore. Leslie Susan 

Elementary Education 

Price. Michael D. 

Radio- Television 

Pritchard. Shawna L. 

Public Relations 

Prystasz. Kelly ]. 

Education 

Prystasz, Linda M, 

Pyne, Thomas W, 

Marketing 

Quintana. Jose L. 

Electrical Engineering 

Raab. Paul R 

Magazine Journalism 

Ramsey. Darrell M. 

Industrial and Systems Technology' 

Ramsey. R. Bruce 

Radio- Tele vision 

Ransom. Susan L. 

Honors Tutorial 

Rausch, Delene A. 

Physical Education 

Rawn. David E. 

Finance 

Ray. Aurelius F 

Communication 

Redmount. ]oel ]. 

Theatre 

Reiley. Kathleen A. 

Magazine Journalism 

Reindl. Renee R. 

Mental Health 

Renner. Susan M. 

/ournalism 

Rensi. Karen Sue 

General Studies 



279 



s 



Rentz. Larry A. 

Chemistry 

Richtand. Lois G. 

Journalism 

Riedel, Michael L. 

Marketing 

Riffle. Karen A. 

Consumer Services 

Rinaldi. Georgia G. 

Fine Arts 

Robinson. Sandi A. 

Special Education and Elementary Education 

Rockwitt, Jacalyn Leigh 

Theatre 

Roehner. Richard M. 

Chemical Engineering 

Roney. Vicki L. 

Public Relations 

Rose. Marcy 

Organizational Communication 

Rosenbeck. Judy K. 

Chemical Engineering 

Rostek. Michelle M. 

Special Education 

Rowlands, Cindi Ann 

Fashion Merchandising and Marketing 

Rowlands. Thomas J. 

Management 

Rudnicki. Debra K. 

Music Therapy 

Runyan, Catherine W. 

Ruppe. Helga M 

Elementary Education 

Russell. Melissa M. 

Special Education 

Russell. Richard Dale 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Ryan, Mary B. 

Rybka. Daniel M. 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Ryder, Patricia K. 

Public Relations 

Salazar, F. Oswaldo R. 

Education and Physical Education 

Salter. Theresa A. 

Fashion Merchandising 

Sams. Carol S. 

Graphic Design 

Sanders, Rise M. 

Public Relations 

Sanders, Ronald E. 

Electrical Engineering 

Sandusky. Beth R. 

Education 

Satonik, Robert C. 

General Studies 

Schevene. Suzanne 

Management 

Schmermund. Diana L. 

Social Work 

Schmidt, Elizabeth A. 

Schroeder. Christine C. 

Elementary Education 

Schoonover, Cheryl 

Business 

Scott. Barb F. 

Music Therapy 

280 





Scott, Jennifer L. 

Political Science 

Sech. Gail M. 

Marketing 

Seckerson, Brenda A. 

General Speech 

Segal. Marc I . 

Theatre 

Sellers. Katie P. 

Special Education 

Sellmeyer. Gregory 1 W. 

Electrical Engineering 

Semenchuk. Alicia |. 

Recreational Management 

Serim. Feyzi 

Computer Science 

Seslar, Barbara A. 

Business 

Sezemsky. Gaye L. 

Interior Design 

Sheasley. Jeffrey L. 

Magazine Journalism 

Sheerer. Jeffrey A. 

Radio-Television Production 

Sheets. Sherryl A. 

Radio- Television 

Shegog. Loni L. 

Special Education 

Shepherd. Thomas C. 

Accounting 

Sherrill, Charles A. 

Journalism 

Shields, Ival E. 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Shiffler. Sally Ann 

Arts and Sciences 

Shrake, R. Guy 

Zoology 

Shultz. Scott A. 

Radio-Television Management 

Sigman, Deborah Lynn 

Clothing and Textiles 

Silvaroli, Bonnie A. 

Education 

Silver. Annette M. 

General Studies 

Sininger. Daniel C. 

Accounting 

Siragusa, John R. 

General Communication 

Skaggs. Jeffrey 

Music Education 

Slavin. Richard Miles 

Advertising 

Slate. Arlene E. 

Psychology 

Sleeper. Susan L. 

Mathematics 

Slott. Cindy J. 

Smelter. Debra L. 

Psychology 

Smith. Bobbi Jo 

Art Education 

Smith. Charles B. 

Radio-Television Management 

Smith, Cindylu M. 

Environmental Biology 

Smith. Douglas R. 



281 



T 



Smith. Gregory W. 

Visual Communication 

Smith, Marc V. 

Radio-Televison News 

Smith, Shelley J. 

Interior Design 

Smith, Timothy M. 

Magazine Journalism 

Smith, Toni K. 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Snider, Cathy ]. 

Snyder, Timothy R. 

Psychology 

Sobel. Laura B. 

Organizational Communication 

Sook, Perry A. 

Radio- Television 

Spade. Pamela L. 

Applied Music 

Speicher, Melanie S. 

Comm un ica tion 

Spires, Joyce A. 

Interior Design 

Staninovski, Sophia 

Fashion Merchandising and Marketing 

Stoia, Lulah Ann 

Communication 

Stout. Charles B. 

Management 

Strang, Darcy M. 

Public Relations 

Straslicka, Deborah A. 

Special Education 

Strong. Florence E. 

Elementary Education 

Sturgeon, Paul A. 

Management 

Swift, Mark W. 

Zoology 

Tackett. Linda Sue 

Home Economics Education 

Talbott, Mary M. 

Social Studies 

Tang, Thomas Nathaniel 

Computer Science 

Tawil. Tony Emile 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Thayer. Paul M. 

History 

Thomas. )anine A 

General Communicaton 

Thomas, Sandra M 

Interpersonal Communication 

Thompson. Timothy N. 

Management 

Thornburg, Caryn G. 

Ps\'chology 

Tilberg.' Beth A. 

Journalism 

Timmerman, Andy C. 

Political Science 

Timmons. Matthew S. 

Marketing 

Tomko. Susan Ann 

Accounting and Quantitative Methods 

Topole, Holly A 

Recreation Management 

Tracy. John M 

Music Education 



282 




: ?PS1$ 



UBV8W 




Tracy. Larry K. 

Radio-Television 

Turner, Michael E. 

Organizational Communication 

Uehtman. Tad 

Marketing 

Underwood. Katherine D. 

Organizational Communication 

Vaitkus, Teresa E. 

Sculpture 

VanDervort. Sharyn L. 

English 

Van Duzer. William B. 

Marketing 

Van Liew, William P. 

Civil Engineering 

Van Pelt. Taundra S 

Home Economics 

Vaughn. Virginia Lee 

Recreation Management 

Vehr. Christopher ]. 

General Communication 

Veit. Daryl Lynn 

Fashion Merchandising 

Vellios, James |. 

Business 

Vellios. George J. 

Business 

Vercellotti. ]oseph M. 

Civil Engineering 

Vetter. Jerome A. 

Management 

Vita. Julie A. 

Child Development 

Vogelzang, Elizabeth A. 

Journalism 

Volk. Thomas J. 

Botany 

Vollmer. Dianne H 

Education 

Waddell. Cindy L. 

Electrical Engineering 

Wagner. Diane M. 

Political Science 

Wagner. Douglas A. 

Administrative Management 

Wagner. Sheri A. 

Radio- Television 

Wallace. Walter K. 

Engineering Technology 

Walton. Richetta Leah 

Political Science 

Ward. Diane Terry 

Elementary Education 

Warner. Cindy K. 

Wasil. Greg 

Magazine Journalism 

Watkins, Sandra B. 

Public Relations 

Wxler, Sarah L. 

Accounting 

Weaver. Richard T. 

Electrical Engineering 

Weber. Michael G. 

Recreation 

Weinberg. Donna M. 

Organizational Communication 

Wellman. Tim A. 

Electrical Engineering 



283 



Welsch, Amy E 

Fine Arts 

Werley. Michele A. 

International Broadcasting 

West. Robert |. 

English 

Wharton, Richard S. 

Computer Science 

Wherley. Susan 

Radio-Television 

Whitaker. Christopher D 

Journalism 

White, Karen R. 

Microbiology 

White. Susan E. 

Studio Arts 

Wiemers. Robert A. 

Management 

Wightman. Ann 

Political Science 

Wildman, R. Mark 

Outdoor Education 

Wilhelm. Diana C 

Environmental Zoology 

Williams. Diane K. 

Mental Health Technology and Psychology 

Williams. Melvin F. 

Com m un ica lion 

Williams, Valencia J. 

Psychology 

Willis, Julie Ann 

Physical Education 

Wilson. Leslie D 

Accounting 

Wilson, Theresa L 

German and Russian 

Windt. Janet Marie 

Recreation Management 

Winkler. Elizabeth G. 

Political Science 



284 





n ' ^H ; 




X&Y&Z 




m 



^A.i 



y*r * p- 



ytor. ? ** 



Winn, Sterling 

Radio- Television Management 

Wiviott, Gary A. 

Marketing 

Wolf, William Terrance 

Electrical Engineering 

Wolfe. Peggy Sue 

Advertising 

Womack. Theresa A. 

Special Education 

Wood, Joseph T. 

Worthy. Adrienne C. 
Political Science 
Yagel. Katherine E. 
Psychology 
Yanez. Juan 

Yakubisin. Elaine E. 
Theatre 

Yilalys. Jose Miguel 
Geology 

Yocono. Jamie A. 
Furniture Design 
York, Linda I. 
Public Relations 
Zando, Karen A. 
Health Education 
Zantal. Susan L. 
Management 
Zdanowicz. Julie H. 
Photography 
Zielasko, Becky 
Advertising 
Zinermon, Wanda D. 
Zucker. Susan C. 
Radio-Television 
Zuho. William T. 
Management 



Don Goodman 
Com m un ica tion 



Shultz, Catherine 
Advertising 



285 




All these images of 
Ohio University are very 
real. Each of the ten 
views demands its own 
recognition, but they're 
not mutually exclusive. 




286 




In fact, all of these 
views must surely come 
together to form one 
image of Ohio University: 
the image we take with us 
when we leave. 




287 



STAFF 



EDITOR: 

Scott Powers 

GRAPHICS EDITOR: 

Sarah Brothers 

PHOTO EDITOR: 

Lisa Griffis 

COPY EDITORS: 

Carol Faulkner 

Karen Hannah 

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITORS: 

Mark Rightmire 

Patti Fife 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS: 

Laura Martinez 

Diane McGill 

Myra Lyon 

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR: 

Sam DiLiberto 

ACCOUNTANT: 

Sue Herr 

SALES DIRECTOR: 

Andy Goldfield 

ASSISTANT SALES DIRECTOR: 

Nan Nicholson 

GRAPHICS ASSISTANTS: 

Lori Bringard 

Sue Carroll 

Lisa Charney, 

Ann Gazzerro 

Carol Greene 

Mary Metzger 

Karen Nelson 

STAFF WRITERS: 
Jodi Alexander 
Sue Carroll 
Ed Dale 
Jeff Grabmeier 
Steve Kovach 
Dave MacCaulay 
Mark Spearman 
Gretchen Van Tassel 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS: 

Chris Carr 

Duane Fletcher 

Greg Smith 

Betsy Webb 

Bruce Zake 

ADVERTISING ASSISTANTS: 
Jill Deibel 
Steve Hagen 



COVERS 

Photos: 

Book Cover - Lisa Griffis 

9 - Lisa Griffis 

31 - Chris Carr 

51 - Michael Levy 

97 - Lisa Griffis 

117 - Lisa Griffis 

145 - Lisa Griffis 

171- Mike Dubinsky 

191 - Mark Rightmire 

249 - Mark Woytovich 



CONTRIBUTORS 

Contributing Writer* Regina Boyd, Kim Brown, Scott Johnton, Tracey Judd, Lynn Krise, Rolf 
Kuestner, Mark Mills . Lynda Moody, Grog Moore. Richard Neptune, Mark Rauterkua, Mara 
Rote, Lisa Ryan, Charle* Sherrill, Gary Snyder, Danny Wataon 

Contributing Photographora: P.J. Azzolina, Craig OeSatnick, Mike Oubinaky, Gail Fierier, Joe 
Fori i hotter. Chip Gamorlafelder, Joe Hahn, Chris Hartman. Jeff Hinkley, Bob Johnson, John 
Kaplan, Bill Kelly III. Mike Levy, Ron London, Bruce Mikule, Rob Muller, Joe Patronite, Jerry 
Porter, Debra Reingold, Marilyn Shapiro, Julie Sheehan, Greg Smeatad, Laura White, Jim 
Witmer. Mark Woytovich. Lynn W. Meeka 

Adviser*: 
J. W. Click 
Earl Meyer 



THANKS 



Thanks to Mike Soatarich, Joe Wilds. Kelly Ray and the whole Baker 
Center geng for their patience. Thank* to Mike North tor giving u* a 
breek. Thank* to University Publication*, sports Information and 
Athen* New*, and a big thank* to The Po*t, lor helping u* out when 
we were in e bind. Thanka to the Varsity Theater tor setting up our Night 
Lite. And special thank* to Ohio Magazine for allowing u* to use a 
faceimil* of their logo. 



PRINTER & STUDIO 

Volume 75 of the Ohio University Spectrum Green was printed by Walsworth 
Publishing Company, Marceline. Mo. In all, 925 books were printed by the offset 
lithography method. Senior portraits were taken by Delma Studios of New York. 



OHIO 



UNIVERSITY 




* * 



. 



_«, 



4 



- 




13 s 


*p* 





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