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Full text of "Sponsor"



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SPONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADI 




ISERS USE 






~Tw O 



* 



agencies, advertisers and broadcasters 

are now using 





-the only up-to-date industry-accepted source of radio and 
tv station coverage data for efficient time buying and selling 



CALL . . .WIRE ... OR WRITE TODAY for immediate 
delivery of the NCS '61 facts you need ... on any or all 
stations, radio or tv, in any or all 50 states. 

CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS— 360 N. Michigan Ave., FRanklin 2-3810 
NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK-575 Lexington Ave., MUrray Hill 8-1020 
MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIA-70 Willow Road, DAvenport 1-7700 
HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIFORNIA-1680 N. Vine St., HOIIywood 6-4391 




Nielsen Coverage Service 

a service of A. C. Nielsen Company 
2101 Howard Street, Chicago 45, Illinois • HOIIycourt 5-4400 



WHAT THE HAIR 
TINT FRACAS 
MEANS TO TV 

Major marketing fight 
could lead to billings 
hike as leaders push 
some new ad strategies 

Page 25 



Radio proved 
its impact for 
supermarkets 

Page 28 

Ian stations 
satisfy FCC 
regulations? 

Page 30 



■ 

I 



Commercials 
programs no, 
says MR firm 

Page 36 




ON P 




•As of September 1961 



"next to KGNO-tv 
• this is the surest wa 
• ^M to get audience re: 




San Antonio's 



Channel 12 



The BEST response in San Antonio comes from the BIGGEST television audience! 

ARB's June '61 report on 6:00 P.M. to Midnight (Mon. thru Fri.) shows 

KONO-TV, ABC, with 44.7 . . . while others trail with 29.8 and 25.9 

Get the "Inside Story" on San Antonio Television 

Represented by the Katz Agency 









]|]®\5!/o(iiii)®^aiD8o§te2" d f 



Just as important as one's 2nd shoe is 
Michigan's 2nd TV market ... that rich 
industrial outstate area made up of 
LANSING-FLINT- JACKSON and 20 
populous cities . . . 3,000,000 potential 
customers . . . 684,200 TV homes (ARB 
March '60) . . . served exclusively by 
WJIM-TV for 10 years. 



WJIM-TV 



BASIC 



Strategically located to exclusively serve LANSING . . FLINT. . . JACKSON 
Covering the nation's 37th market. Represented by Blair TV. WJIM Radio by MASLA 




THE VOICE OF LONG ISLAND' 



known 
by the 
companies 
we keep! 



FOOD STORE SALES* 
$813,854,000 

SOME "BLUE CHIP" 

ADVERTISERS 

USING WHLI 

TO REACH BIG, RICH 

LONG ISLAND MARKET 

A&P 

Bohack 

Fischer Baking 
General Foods 
Hills Supermarket 
Horn & Hardart 
Krauss Meats 
Standard Brands 
Stvift & Co. 
. . . and almost every 
major national food 
manufacturer, 
processor and distributor 

5TH IN TOTAL 

FOOD STORES SALES 

IN THE UNITED STATES 

•Nassau-Suffolk, (Sales Management 1961) 



Over 400 ttp advertisers 
chose WHLI ll 1960-1961. 
Will you be ei the 
"preferred" list in 1961-1962? 

r , 10,000 WATTS 



WHLI 



HIMPSTIA D 

LONG ISLAND , N. Y. 



AM 1100 
FM 98.3 



t& voice 



far*! UHlMA 



Represented by GUI Perna j 



j / <>/. IS, No. 40 • 2 OCTOBER 1961 

SPONSOR 

TMl WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RAOIO ADVERTISERS USB 



ARTICLES 

The hair tint fracas — what it means to tv 
25 Hair tint struggle in the cosmetic field will result in revenue spurt for 
the television medium as leaders launch new marketing and ad strategies 

Buffalo study on radio for supermarkets 

28 Point-of-purchase study of Bells-IGA shoppers shows that radio can move 
specific items. Radio-featured specials purchased hy 49% who heard 

How can stations satisfy the FCC? 

30 With proposed new FCC rules requiring a mountain of station paper- 
work on logs, WJIM stations in-titute new program reporting plan 

Reach, McClinton solve novelty spots riddle 

32 The whimsical, multi-ending spot series for Martini & Rossi raised an un- 
usual media problem which was solved with a hike in sales in New York 

P.r. is radio rx, says Mogul 

34 Mogul Williams & Saylor president says radio suffers from lack of self- 
promotion. He suggests buying other media to dramatize its potential 



Commercials si, programs no 

36 Viewer interest in tv commercials rise, while the shows arouse L 

enthusiasm, according to study by Ins.iiute of Motivational Research 



ess 



NEWS: Sponsor-Week 7, Sponsor-Scope 19, Spot Buys 44, Washington 
Week 55, Film Scope 56, Sponsor Hears 58. Sponsor-Week Wrap-Up 60, 
Tv and Radio Newsmakers 68 

DEPARTMENTS: Sponsor Backstage 12. 555 5th 16, Compara- 
graph 38, Sponsor Asks 40, Seller's Viewpoint 69. Sponsor Speaks 70 Ten- 
Seconds Spots 70 



Officers: editor and publisher, Norman R. Glenn; executive vice presi- 
dent, Bernard Piatt; vice president and assistant publisher, Arnold Alpert; 
secretary-treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMillin; news editor, Ben Bodec; 
managing editor, Alfred J. Jaffe; senior editor, Jo Ranson; midwest editor, 
Given Smart; assistant news editor, Heyward Ehrlich; associate editors. Jack 
Lindrup, Ben Seff, Ruth Schlanger, Lauren Liboiv; columnist, Joe Csida; art 
editor, Maury Kurtz; production editor, Phyllis Trieb; editorial research, Carol 
Ferster. 

Advertising: assistant sales manager, Willard Dougherty; southern man- 
ager. Herbert M. Martin, Jr.; midwest manager, Paul Blair; western manager. 
George G. Dietrich, Jr.; sales service/production, Shirley S. Allison, John 
f tenner. 

Circulation: Jack Rayman. Maria DeNarvaez; reader service, Gail Ruben- 
stein. 

Administrative: office manager, Fred Levine; George Becker, Michael 
C.mrro. Svd Guttmnn. Irene Sulzbach, Geraldine Daych, Jo Ganci, Manuela 
Santal/a, Mary Kandyba. 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications Inc. 



sponsor PURl (CATIONS INC combing with TV Executive Editorial. Circulation. »n«t 
Advertising Offices: 555 5th New York 17, MUrray Hill 7-8080. Chicago Office: 612 
N. Michigan Av. (11), 664-1166. Birmingham Offke: 3617 8th Ave. So., FAirfax 
h¥i z 1 L0i An * eles Office 6087 Sunset Blvd. 1 28 * . Hollywood 4-8089 Printing Office: 
3110 Elm Av., Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada $9 a year. Other 
countries $11 a year. Single copies 40«. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd class 
postage paid at Baltimore Md 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 






* * 



*• w. 




1 



UA 



M 



uUUD NEIGHBORS? Recent events have raised serious doubts about our 
position throughout Latin America, as often the struggle for men's minds has flared 
into violence. To report the status of this ideological battle to the people of Chicago, 
WBBM-TV sent newsman Frank Reynolds and a camera crew on a fifteen-day tour of 
South America. The result was an eye-opening two-part documentary, "the other 
Americans," seen in prime evening time, detailing the extent to which communism 
is exploiting economic problems of some of our Latin neighbors . . . far-reaching, 
venturesome, topical television at the local level. People who value their time find 
more worth watching on WBBM-TV. Which is why time is so valuable on Television 2, 
the number one station in Chicago for 75 consecutive Nielsen reports. WRBM -TV 

CBS OWNED • TELEVISION 2. CHICAGO 




there is nothing harder to stop than a trend 



Or some interesting illumination shed by 
Nielsen on the new season. 

Here we go again. Into fall again— with 
more television tubes aglow again. 

Glowing, already, with the premiere of a 
bright new season, with the excitement of 
such already-premiered new entries as ABC- 
TV's Follow the Sun, and such other, new net- 
work shows as The Defenders, Car 5k, Where 
are You?, International Showtime and the Du 
Pont Show of the Week ... as well as with the 
return of established favorites with first run 
showings. 

And glowing already, the first Nielsen 
Report* shows, with a prophetically strong 
ABC glow. In homes where they can watch 



all 3 networks, the glowing went : 

ABC — largest audience per average minute. 
ABC— most half-hour firsts (24 to Net Y's 16, 
Net Z's 11). ABC- 3 out of the top 5 shows: 
(Flintstones, 77 Sunset Strip, Real McCoys). 

Sure, one rating doesn't say a season. But 
ratings that evolve from the pattern set so 
consistently last season say plenty. 

They say the trend keeps trending. And 
that's the kind of a trend there's nothing 
harder to stop than. 

ABC Television 

♦Source: Nielsen 24 Market TV Report, week ending Sept. 17, 
1961. Average audience, Mon. thru Sat. 7:30-11 PM; Sun., 
6:30-11 PM. 




Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



2 October 1961 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



GAIL SMITH BOMBSHELL 

General Motors ad chief frankly tells Detroit SRA what 
GM thinks about spot tv and radio as media 



(Detroit): Gail Smith, director of 
advertising and market research for 
General Motors Corporation, made 
a series of frank and provocative re- 
marks about spot tv and spot radio 
in the course of his address to the 
new Detroit chapter of the Station 
Representatives Association last 
Monday. 

Discussing basic media and sup- 
plemental media in strategy plan- 
ning of automotive advertising he 
characterized spot tv and radio as 
supplemental media. "Let me has- 
ten to add," 
he remarked, 
"that we prob- 
ably invest 
more in your 
fields than 
many adver- 
tisers who use 
them as basic 
Gail Smith media." 

Comparing media, he stated: 
"Magazines and newspapers give us 
the opportunity to establish imagine 
in style and appearance. 

"Television," he continued, "pro- 
vides the benefits of practically giv- 
ing the viewer a demonstration 
ride." 

Then he asked, "What's the prob- 
lem with spot tv in the overall 
philosophy?" He cited two problems 
inhibiting greater use of spot tv: 
the need to reach men, practical in 
tv only at night, and the need for 
long commercials to present GM's 




advertising story. 

"Spot tv, at night in prime time," 
stated Smith, "just cannot provide, 
across the board, selling opportuni- 
ties of 60 seconds or longer. Believe 
me there are many choice spot peri- 
ods between top ranking network 
shows that we would love to have, 
but we can't justify the expenditure 
on a national basis, at the expense 
of basic effort, for a campaign of 
IDs or even 20 second spots." 

Discussing radio, in which GM 
corporately was a top spot adver- 
tiser during the 1961 model year, 
Smith said: "Radio does not have 
the advantage of the printed medi- 
um in illustrating style and appear- 
ance. 

"It does not have the advantage 
of television in actual action dem- 
onstration. 

"But," added Smith, "it is virtually 
impossible and actually illegal in 
some states to read a publication 
or watch television while you are 
driving a car. And there, to us, is 
where radio fits into our scheme. 
It can serve as an attention-getting, 
or reminding, or thought starting de- 
vice, to register our message about 
the very type or product or its com- 
ponent parts which you are in and 
are operating at the moment of the 
commercial." 

Smith felt greater use of radio 
was justified in the future "if the 
radio industry, and you gentlemen 
(Continued on page 8, col. 2) 



P&G tells FCC of 
'Program Policy' 

Among the most important 
developments of the current 
FCC hearings in New York 
with tv sponsors was P&G's 
reading of its 21-point "Pro- 
gram Buying Policy." \mong 
the particulars mentioned h\ 
general advertising manager Al- 
bert N. Halverstatt were these: 
business men, in tv dramas, 
may not be treated a^ "cold 
or '"ruthless"; no offense 
should be given to any organ- 
ized minority group: the Civil 
War must be treated with spe- 
cial care; prices charged by 
supermarkets and laundromats 
may not be compared with 
those of independents; the world 
(Continued on page 10. col. 2i 



L&M's $250,000 FOR 
91 EVENTS ON KTTV 

(Los Angeles:) L&M brands will 
sponsor 91 events on KTTV, Los An- 
geles, over a 60 week period. 

Programing will be at least 250 
hours in extent and will include spe- 
cial events, public affairs, and 
sports. Estimated cost is $250,000. 

Purchase was arranged through 
Norm Varney of JWT in New York 
and is for Chesterfield and L&M 
cigarettes. 

It is the first time that a major 
national advertiser has undertaken 
local sponsorships of this kind of 
such range and duration. 

The purchase was announced by 
Robert W. Breckner, v.p. and general 
(Continued on page 10, col. 3) 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



SP0NS0R-WEEK/2 October 1961 



HERMAN LAND TO WBC 
CREATIVE SERVICES 

Herman Land has been appointed 
director of creative services for the 
Westinghouse Broadcasting Com- 
pany. 

The newly created post has been 
set up to coordinate the advertising 
and promotion department and the 
publicity department. 

Land comes to WBC from Corin- 
thian Broadcasting, where he was 
director of public relations and spe- 
cial events. 

The two managers of the present 
departments will retain their pres- 
ent functions, 
Dave Par- 
tridge in ad- 
vertising and 
a successor 
to Mike Sant- 
angelo, who 
was moved 
into a pro- 
Herman Land graming post 
at WBC last week, in publicity. 




BROADCASTER WHEELER 
upped to Detroit News 

It's quite unusual for a broadcast- 
er to move upstairs into the upper 
echelons of his own parent com- 
pany. 

Yet that's exactly what's happened 
in the case of Edwin K. Wheeler, 
just named general manager of the 
Detroit News, parent of the WWJ 
stations. 

Wheeler had been general mana- 
ger of those stations since 1952. 



October's many meetings 

Among the many trade meetings 
to be held in October are these: the 
NAB 9 October in Dallas at the 
Adolphus, 13 October in St. Louis 
at the Jefferson (the AMST meets in 
St. Louis on the 12th), 18 October 
in Salt Lake City at the Utah, and 
20 October in San Francisco at the 
Sheraton Plaza. 



8 



(Continued from page 7, col. 2) 
in particular, gave more time and 
effort to constructive thought as to 
how radio as a medium can further 
assist us, rather than hacking away 
at each other and belittling the 
real strength of your entire indus- 
try." 

The circulation claim gets "a little 
silly at times, and quite frankly has 
created a certain amount of distrust 
both with the public and with the 
advertiser," stated Smith. 

In closing, Smith made three con- 
structive suggestions. 

"I believe this Association could 
and should take the lead in adopt- 
ing a code designed to discredit 
questionable bases for circulation 
claims." 

In the area of research, he said, 
"we believe that more qualitative, 
not additional quantitative, work 
has to be conducted in the area of 
audience research." 

Finally, Smith suggested "some 
organization such as this Associa- 
tion should consider streamlining 
the mechanics of spot radio and 
television buying on a national 
basis. We believe we are working 
with a cumbersome and antiquated 
system. The paper work and time 
consumed sometimes costs more 
than the campaign is worth." 



Christal Politz findings 
on radio revealed 

Uniform habits on radio use were 
discovered by Henry I. Christal in a 
special Politz study covering five 
widely separated radio stations 
which it represents. 

The study, details of which were 
published today, covers WGY, Al- 
bany-Schenectady-Troy, WBEN, Buf- 
falo; WJR, Detroit; WTIC, Hartford; 
and WTMJ, Milwaukee. 

Sets ownership figures showed 
little variation from place to place. 
Households with at least one radio 
in working order were 98 to 99 per- 
cent; for two radios, 60 to 67 per 
cent, and over two, 26 to 32 per cent. 



NEW PRESIDENT, SALES 
AND PROGRAMS V.P.s 
NAMED AT ABC RADIO 

Robert R. Pauley has been elected 
president of ABC Radio, it was an- 
nounced by Simon B. Siegel, execu- 
tive v.p. of AB-PT. 

James E. Duffy has also been 
elected v.p. in charge of sales and 
William T. Rafael has been elected 
v.p. in charge of programing for ABC 
radio. 

Pauley joined ABC Radio in Octo- 
ber 1957 as an 
account exec- 
utive. He was 
named east- 
ern sales 
manager in 
March 1959 
and became 
v.p. in charge 
of the net- Robert R. Pauley 
work last year. He was previously 
an account executive with CBS Ra- 
dio, Benton & Bowles, NBC Radio, 
and WOR, New York. He lives in- 
New Canaan, Conn., and is a gradu-, 
ate of the Harvard Business School. 




NBC TV News sells 
10th regular show 

NBC TV has an order from 
Bristol-Myers ( Y&R I for what 
would he. if it can clear suffi- 
cient station*, its tenth regular 
and fully sponsored news show 
of the season. 

Program would he week.lv at 
6-6:15 p.m. on Saturday, start- 
ing in October. 

XBC's five other weekh news 
shows fall sponsored) are 
those of Huntlev. Brinklev. 
McGee, plus Update and 1-2-3 
Go. a total of six counting the 
new 6 p.m. Saturday buy. 

The four daily news shows 
are "Today" I now under the 
news department), plus news 
strips at 12:55 p.m.. 4:55 p.m.. 
and 6:45 p.m. 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 19f 



-J..-,...; ~. i i_ 



■ j ; i_ 
















i .1 i i i .. . . i i i — :c ; 



' ' 



This looks contagious. 



A rash of increased viewing for 
ABC-TV programs has broken out in 
New York, Chicago, Detroit, Los 
Angeles, San Francisco. 

The stations involved are, respectively, 

WABC-TV, WBKB, WXYZ-TV, KABC-TV, 

and KGOTV...the 5 Owned and Operated 

ABC -TV stations. 

Following the network pattern, four of these 

stations are now first in their markets . . . and 

WABC-TV, a strong second, is closing the 

gap for first place in N. Y. 

How much audience has been gained— and 

at whose expense-ran be quickly charted 

as follows: 



Gain or loss in share of network audience* 

ART TV NETY NETZ 
sSfti statl0n station 


New York 
(WABC-TV) 


+ 16% 


O /o 


-11% 


Chicago 
(WBKB) 


+ 13% 


- 


-14% 


Detroit 
(WXYZ-TV) 


+ 8% 


-6% 


- 3% 


Los Angeles 
(KABC-TV) 


+ 15% 


-3% 


-12% 


San Francisco 
(KGO-TV) 


+14% 


-2% 


-14% 



•Source: ARB March-April 1961, Sun. -Sat., 7.30-11 
PM (N.Y.T.) as against same period for 1960. Network 
Programs. 

With scarcely more effort (like phoning one of 
the 5 ABC-TV National Station Sales offices 
below) you can get the info needed to plan 
your smartest ad strategy in these great TV 
markets. 

ABC-TV National 
Station Sales, Inc. 

New York, New York, SUsquehanna 7-5000 
Chicago, Illinois, ANdover 3-0800 
Detroit, Michigan, WOodward 1-0255 
Hollywood, California, NOrmandy 3-331 
San Francisco, California. UNderhill 3-0077 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



SP0NS0R-WEEK/2 October 1961 



BOOZ, ALLEN ADVISE 
ON NEW PRODUCTS 

"New products are the road to 
business success." 

"The cemeteries of failure are 
filled with companies that have de- 
cided their present line is good 
enough." 

These two statements were made 
by Edmund Ladendorff Jr. of Booz, 
Allen & Hamilton, speaking before 
the fourth annual convention of the 
Pet Food Institute in Chicago. 

His conclusions were based on a 
study of 150 companies, including 
informaiton from 5,000 executives 
and 500 client assignments relating 
to new products. 

Ladendorff expected that 75% of 
the national sales growth in the next 
three years would come from new 
products and brands. 

"New products are a major con- 
tributor to company growth, a pri- 
mary influence on profit perform- 
ance, and a key factor in business 
planning," he stated. 

Yet, he pointed out, only 2% of 
all new product ideas succeed, and 
even after testing 50% fail. But the 
further a product gets along the line 
from inception to delivery, the bet- 
ter its chance of working. 

Further along products tend to be 
pre-empted by other products or 
else they degentate into profitless 
price competition. 



Oil & auto making record 
use of tv sports, news 

Gasoline and auto advertisers are 
making record use of sports, news 
and weather shows to attract male 
tv viewers, reports TvB. 

In the automotive field this fall, 
Chrysler Corporation will sponsor 
the World Series plus the Rose Bowl 
and Blue-Gray games on NBC TV, 
Ford will sponsor NFL games on 
CBS TV and NFL championship 
contests on NBC TV, Buick has the 
Orange Bowl game on ABC TV, and 
UMS has eight bowl games. 



(FCC cont. from page 7, col. 3) 

situation must be accepted in dra- 
mas that deal with it, and the "hor- 
ror" of war is to be minimized. 

Peter G. Peterson, president of 
Bell & Howell, told of its hands-off 
policy and how its controversial pro- 
grams seemed to have even greater 
tv impact than conventional fare. 

Chrysler found action-adventure 
shows the wrong climate for its tv 
commercials. Jersey Standard used 
tv to "make friends" in New York 
and Washington. These were among 
the statements made in the first day 
of the current FCC hearings. 

In its two-market use of shows 
Jersey Standard avoided censorship. 
But DuPont, Chrysler, and Pruden- 
tial did check their network shows. 

Trade observers have noted that 
the timing of the FCC hearings is 
somewhat tardy. Sponsorship was 
at one time dominant, but at pres- 
ent only 15 network shows are spon- 
sor-controlled. 

Other companies whose repre- 
sentatives will testify during these 
hearings on tv sponsorship are from 
American Tobacco, B&W, Scott Pa- 
per, S. C. Johnson, Alberto-Culver, 
L&M, GM, Alcoa, Armstrong, Revlon, 
Lever Bros., Ford, General Mills, 
Bristol-Myers, Allstate, GE, Texaco, 
AHP, Philip Morris, National Biscuit, 
R. J. Reynolds, Sterling Drug, GF, 
P. Lorillard, U. S. Steel, Colgate- 
Palmolive, J. B. Williams, Westing- 
house, AT&T, Best Foods, Warner- 
Lambert, National Dairy, and Rals- 
ton-Purina. 



XEROX' FIRST TV 
IS CBS REPORTS 

First tv buy for Xerox Cor- 
poration is half sponsorship of 
a series of eight CBS Reports 
starting 9 October. 

Campaign is on behalf of its 
office duplicating equipment. 

Agency is Pappert. Koenig. 
and Lois. Inc. 




(L&M cont. from page 7, col. 3) 

manager of KTTV. 

Besides planned events scheduled 
i n advance, 
the deal in- 
cludes cover- 
age of fast- 
breaking spe- 
cial events, 
plus station- 
produced doc- 
umentaries. 

Lawrence W. Robert Breckner 
Bruff, L&M v.p. in New York, com- 
mented, "We believe that this 
unique and 
varied year- 
round pro- 
gram is de- 
signed ideally 
to appeal to 
the sports- 
minded, com- 
munity con- 
Lawrence Bruff scious resi- 
dents of the vital Southern Cali- 
fornia area." 

Added Breckner: it is now possible 
for KTTV to provide "the largest, 
most varied and most comprehen- 
sive local special events and public 
affairs coverage in television his- 
tory." 

He continued, "Television reaches 
its greatest heights when it assumes 
the role of the on-the-scene reporter 
of great events, both predictable and 
unexpected." 




New group acquires control 
of John E. Pearson rep 

A controlling interest in the John 
E. Pearson Company has been ac- 
quired by a group whose principal 
members are Joseph Savilli, Ralph 
W. Neil, Arnold Hartley, and Edward 
B. Connolly. 

Pearson is a national radio/tv rep 
specializing in Negro stations. 

Savilli becomes managing direc- 
tor and Pearson himself becomes a 
consultant. Ray Henze will manage 
the office in New York, Bob Flanigan 
in Chicago, Jon Farmer in Atlanta. 



10 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 60 




The March, 1961, Frei 
survey again proves tl !J- 

TV is Fresno's favorite 1 
tion. 

KMJ-TV has more qu.i 
hour wins Monday through Fri- 
day . . . from sign-on to sign-off 
. . . than the other two Fresno 
stations combined. This is true 
both for the Metro Area and for 
total homes. 

And KMJ-TV's movies have 
unusual audience appeal. The 
afternoon movies Monday 
through Friday were tops in 
every quarter hour rating from 
3:00 to 5:00 p.m. The Sunday 
Cinema Special from 4:00 to 
7:00 p.m. had a 21.5 rating com- 
pared with ratings of 10.4 and 
9.7 by the other two local sta- 
tions. 
*March 1961 ARB, Fresno 




TV . . . first TV Station 

i the Billion-Dollar 

Valley 
of the Bees 




GO FIRST CLASS 



w 



i+h ktvwjotv 



FRESN O 



C/XL-I FORM I A 



McClATCHY broadcasting company 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



11 



1020' 

above 

average 

terrain 






NEW 

TALLER 






SERVING 
THE QUINT CITIES 

DAVENPORT 
BETTENDORF IOW ' 

ROCK ISLAND 
MOUNE ILL 

EAST MOUNE 






( 



WOC-TV Channel 6 

D. D. Palmer, President 

Raymond E. Guth, General Manager 

Pax Shaffer, Sales Manager 

Exclusive National Representatives 
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



12 



■c? 




by Joe Csuia 

■ Sponsor 
I backstage 

Joe E.'s pastel-colored world 

A> far a> I know none of the critics liked the 
first "Open End" show on its new outlet. 
WNEW-TV. (It had. of course, previously had 
a lonsj run on \V\T\-TV.) Jack Gould, in the 
New York Times, dismissed it as "vacuous bab- 
ble,' and the one reporter-critic on the panel. 
Vlarva Mamies, wanted to know why Frank 
Sinatra and the Clan rated a two hour discus- 
sion on a television station in prime time in the nation's number 
one market. 1 loved it for one reason above all others. It marked 
one of the few television appearances of a comic, who to me, is 
unique, purely one of a kind, and the likes of which we will never 
see again. I'm talking, of course, about Joe E. Lewis. Normally, 
in order to catch Joe E., it is necessary to get yourself pushed around 
at the Copacabana in New York, the Chez Paree in Chicago, or any 
one of a dozen other cafes. 

I agreed with Miss Mannes, one of our brighter and most articu- 
late ladv writers, that Sinatra and his scout troop, are made over 
much more than their individual or collective talents warrant, and I 
have a wholesome respect for their talents. I also, however, agreed 
with Jackie Gleason that from the standpoint of showmanship, 
glamour, color and the other ingredients which enable a performer 
to make regular and large deposits in his favorite bank, Sinatra and 
his little band were being very smart and would be idiots to fore- 
sake a formula which has proved so successful. Especially since it 
affords them at the same time full opportunity to play all the games 
so dear to their juvenile hearts. The very fact that David Susskind's 
first show on his new outlet was to be devoted wholly to a discussion 
of the naughty descendants of the original Rat Pack from Holmby 
Hills \sas ample testimony to that. 

Susskind : foolish, pompous 

Of the entire group (in addition to Lewis. Gleason and Miss 
Mannes, there were Ernie Kovacs, Toots Shor, Lenore Lemmon and 
Richard Gehman) only Joe E., floating sleepy-eyed in his lovely, 
private pastel-colored world, struck exactly the note warranted by the 
topic and the foolishlv pompous conduct of Susskind. 

Recoming more gently debonair and wobblingly dignified with 
each sip of his beverage, Lewis put the stuffy moderator in his place 
early in the proceedings. 

"Now, Joe Lewis," ordered Susskind, "you tell us about Sinatra. 
He played you in a picture about the story of your life. . . ." 

Lewis turned to face Susskind, lifted his eyebrows and his glass. 

"Joe E.! Lewis," he said, and drank to his renowned middle 
initial. Then he proceeded to tell the group and the audience about 
Sinatra. 

{Please turn to page 14) 






SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



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* Albert Dimes 



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brings the Tetley Tea sales message to millions of listeners. 
Through Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, Tetley Tea matches advertis- 
ing effort to sales potential market by market . . . with no waste 
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Interested?. . . Your HR man will show you all the facts. Call him 
today. 

The Tetley Tea Taster 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



13 




THE CAT 

is still available in your 
market . . . you owe it to the 
children in your audience 
to give this world-famous 




cartoon character equal 
time in the interest of pure 
entertainment. 




Unquestionabl y today's best 
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14 



Sponsor backstage (Continued from page 12) 



"'I go out with him quite a bit." he said, "and he's dull. He never 
does anything. . . . When he was making the picture, playing me. 
there was a scene where he was standing at the bar. and he had to 
refuse a drink. They had to call in a stunt man to play that scene. 
. . But lies all right, really. He drinks about a quart a da\ 
now. and he better be careful because that's how I started. . . ." 
About this clan business, so what, we had a clan in mv dav. too. 
There was Clara Kimball Young. . . ." 

At one point Miss Mannes got off a scathing and lengthv de- 
nunciation of Sinatra. 

"I don't know," said Joe E. gently, when she ran out of gas, "I 
don't care what you say, I don't like Sinatra that much." 

He revealed, a little later on. that he was planning to organize a 
new Clan of his own. "I'm gonna have President Kennedv. and 
Mickey Mantle, and Judge Marovitz in Chicago. . . ." 

Mention of his old friend. Judge Marovitz, reminded Joe E. of 
the distinguished Judge's great philosophies. 

"Judge Marovitz," he reflected, gazing thoughtfully into his cup, 
"who said: 'It's not so bad if you let money slip through vour 
fingers. Its not even so bad if you let love, or friendship slip 
through your fingers, but if you let vour fingers slip through vour 
fingers . . ." he shook his head sadly, "then vou're in trouble." 

Kovacs' quips 

By the time Susskind recovered from this philosophical gem, 
Ernie Kovacs had moved in. 

''You show me," said Ernie, "a cowboy who rides sidesaddle, 
and I'll show you a gay ranchero." 

For some reason Susskind and all the panelists stared at Joe E., 
who was in turn staring fondly at something immediately in front 
of his eyes, visible to no-one but himself. You would have wagered 
he had not even heard Kovacs. But by some mildly miraculous, 
pixie magic sense he became aware that he was being called upon 
bv his companions. Again he lifted his eyebrows and his tumbler. 

"Show me," he said, "a Czechoslovakian who is an expert forger, 
and 111 show you a bad check." 

He toasted the Czechoslovakian forger to whom he had referred, 
and all the other Czechoslovakian forgers in the world, wherever 
thev might be. He didn't say that, but you knew that was what 
he was doing. 

Susskind pressed Joe E. (and he was careful, after the initial rep- 
rimand, to use the E) to tell about his work in radio. 

"Oh. veah," said Lewis. "I had a radio show. They took a 
Hooperating one time and they found out that 75% of the people 
in the studio weren't listening." 

With that remark Joe E. dismissed his career in broadcasting. I 
know the suggestion has no chance of being adopted, but I do wish 
somebody would put Lewis on television with a show of his own. 
Just Joe E. and one or more people per show for him to talk with. 
It wouldn't matter who the people were. If Susskind couldn't still 
his elfin, other world warmth and humor nobody possibly could. 

It would make a great four a.m. to dawn show. Joe E. could 
come over right after he does his last show at whatever club he's 
working. And it would be a natural for a sponsor like Coca Cola 
or the American Dairy Association. ^ 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 




all 6 ABC owned radio stations sparked a big community action drive for automobile safety) 



The key to safety is community action. And words spark 
action. The words came from people like the officer in 
charge of the Golden Gate Bridge; President of the 
National Safety Council; Indianapolis 500 winner; Presi- 
dent of the American Medical Association. These and 
other interesting people participated in another ABC 
owned radio station community action campaign. They 
have helped fight polio; promote physical fitness, city 
cleanliness, automobile seat belts. This time the point was 
driven home for street and highway safety. Over three 



thousand specially created announcements were broad- 
cast by the ABC owned radio stations in six of the nation's 
largest cities: New York, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Los 
Angeles, and San Francisco. Once again, the ABC owned 
radio stations are proving we can produce the kind of radio 
that generates community action — and listener respect. 

jj ABC OWNED RADIO STATIONS 

WABC NEW YORK WLS CHICAGO KGO SAN FRANCISCO 
KQV PITTSBURGH WXYZ DETROIT KABC LOS ANGELES 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



15 





can \ou direct me to the proper place 
to obtain a copy of the Ketchum. 
MacLeod ^ Grove pamphlet? 

\\ . rheodore Pierson 
Pierson, Ball & Dowd 
Washington, D. C. 

• U you tin a copy of the pamphlet write 

Ketd i. MacLeod & Grori 155 B 11 SL. 

V, V 17, :i- we f,. t \t already Informed Mr. IUerson. 



Pleased with us 

I lull was some stoi j you can ied 
"ii us in your Issue of 21 August, 
and we are all enormouslj pleased I" 
- onsoh update l>\ a number of 
years it* first Lestoil media report. 
Vs ) "in m titer put it most a< cu 
i atel) there've been a l"i of changes 
in tin waj I estoil buys time. We are 
quite proud of Len Tarcher at the 
ageni j Foi ha\ ing put media on a 
"precision-built" basis. 

Charles McCarthy and I aren't ex- 
actl) the sharpest of Irishmen, so on 
behalf of 1m. th of us. our apologies 
I" your man for having burdened 
him with so much material. He is to 
be all the more commended for hav- 
ing seen the wheat for the chaff. 



( 'in thanks for a factual and well- 
balanced repoi I. 

Daniel E. rlogan, Jr. 

president 

Lestoil Products, Inc. 

Holyoke, Mass. 



Happy to help 

Just a note to tell von bow much I 
appreciated the articles and editori- 
al- you have been doing on the issue 
of government program control. 
which may be somewhat immodest 
inasmuch as in one of them you gave 
quite extensive coverage to the re- 
marks that I made at Northwestern. 
In connection with your article on 
page 68 of the 11 September issue, 




WAVE -TV gives you 
28.8/o more SMOKERS 

—and they puff lite) ally 28.8 c /c more 
cigarettes, cigars and pipe tobaccos! 




That's because WAVE-TV has 28.8% more 
viewers, from sign-on to sign-ofT, in any 
average week. Source: N.S.I.. July, 1961. 

CHANNEL 3 • MAXIMUM POWER 
NBC 

LOUISVILLE 

THE KATZ AGENCY, National Representatives 



Lending a helping hand 

\» the following Etorj concerns a 
vast majority of the general popula- 
tion of tin- southwest, reflecting their 
generosity, human kindness and will- 
ingness to help their fellowman in a 
manner embracing the true spirit of 
our free democratic way of life, 1>\ 
their -riving $185,000 worth of 
food, clothing, bedding and $3,948 
in cash in seventy-two hours, we feel 
\oui readers will be interoted. 

Trigg-\ aughn radio and tv sta- 
tions WROD, El Paso and KOSA. 
Odessa. Texas were among the first 
to come to the aid of hurricane rav- 
aged residents of the Texas Gulf 
Coast \rea. On arrival of word that 
thousands were homeless, needed 
food and clothing, the two operations 
immediately began appeals to listen- 
ers and viewers to contribute what 
the) could for hurricane relief. Our 
stations received contributions from 
F.I Paso. Hatch. Silver City. Las 
Cruces, Alamagordo, Hobbs, Fort 
Stockton. Eunice, Jal and many other 
Texas and New Mexico towns. To 
date, with contributions still arriv- 
ing. KR01) radio and tv. and K.OS \ 
radio and tv. have dispatched nine 
huge trailer truckloads of canned 
foods, clothing, and bedding, with a 
conservative estimate of cash value at 
S185.000. In addition, residents of 
Odessa, Fl Paso and surrounding 
areas generousl) contributed a total 
of $3,948 in cash for aiding the vic- 
tims of Hurricane Carla. The size of 
contributions ranged from children 
with a can ol food to companies with 
a hundred cases of canned fods . . . 
and from $.10 to $100 cash. 

Numerous civic and fraternal or- 
ganizations in various towns and 
cities in both New Mexico and Texas. 
aided in the picking up of contribu- 
tions from people unable to bring 
donation"- to the stations. 
Jim Sugg:- 

promotional director 
Trigg Vaughn Stations 
Odessa. Tex. 



sI'onsoi; 



2 OCTOBER 1%1 



Says Leonard Patricelli: 

Vice President, Programs, WTIC -TV, Hartford, Connecticut 




"We bought Seven Arts' 

Vol. II because 

you've got to have 



for PRIM 



"Warner's 'Films of the 50V have name value 

and story line, two of the main points I 

weigh when I compare the quality of feature films. 

We couldn't afford less than the best for 

^FTER DINNER MOVIES, 7 to 9 Monday nights." 



Leonard Patricelli 




Warner's films of the 50's, 
Money makers of the 60's 




SEVEN ARTS 

ASSOCIATED 

CORP. 



A SUBSIDIARY OF SEVEN ARTS PRODUCTIONS, LTD. 

Motion Pictures - "Gigot", starring Jackie Gleason. completed shooting 

in Paris . . . Csne Kelly directing . . . 

Theatre - "Gone with the Wind" in preparation... 

Television - Distribution of films for T.V., Warner's "Films of the 50's". . . 

Literary Properties - "Romancero" by Jacques Oeval . . . 

Real Estate — The Riviera of the Caribbean, Grand Bahama, in construction . . . 



NEW YORK: 270 Park Avenue YUkon 6 1717 

CHICAGO: 8922 D N. La Crosse. Skokie, III. ORchard 4 5105 
DALLAS: 5641 Charlestown Drive ADams 9 2855 

L.A.: 232 So. Reeves Drive GRanite 6-1564-STate 8 8276 

For list of TV stations programming Warner Bros "Films of 
the 50's" see Third Cover SRDS (Spot TV Rates and Data) 



r^ 



cornered 




fc**-"!^ 



WPIX-11 has a "corner" on the kiddy market. During the late afternoon and early evening 
hours when children dominate TV viewing, wpix-11 dominates all competition seven 
days a week. Every year the biggest new children's show is fed into the most fabulous 
back-to-back lineup of children's shows in television. This year it's dick tracy. No other 
station comes close in delivering the tremendous New York children's market of more 
than three million youngsters. 

NEW YORK'S PRESTIGE INDEPENDENT 




: 



Interpretation and commentary 
on most significant tv /radio 
and marketing news of the week 




SPONSOR -SCOPE 



2 OCTOBER 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



You may think them a bunch of Cassandras but there are agencymen who be- 
lieve that a prime threat facing tv as a loyal medium is the spread of the practice 
of bartering time for the sponsor's merchandise on a grand scale. 

The practice, according to these warning-pointers, is rapidly making headway on two 
fronts: 

1 ) The entrepreneur who goes to national advertisers and offers to take in place of cash 
an equivalent amount of their manufactured product at wholesale value for partici- 
pations in a well-known entertainment property placed on stations in a stated number of major 
markets. 

2) Stations, particularly around Christmas time, accepting merchandise in lieu of money, 
figure that they can use this stuff as gifts to customers and prospects. 

The question raised by the alarmed agency people: how can we expect our client to pay 
cash for his tv spot advertising when he sees his competitors are able to get the same sta- 
tions by putting up so much of his product? 

Noted one accountman: "If a competitor of one of our clients should consummate a 
huge barter-time deal he's now working on, we can look forward to $2 million in tv spot 
billings going out the window next year." 



The two outstanding gambits of the past week in national spot tv had to do with 
availability calls on two Christmas promotions: Remington electric shaver (Y&R) 
and Shulton toiletries (Wesley). 

Shulton will be using over 100 markets and Remington will be using 60 markets, each for 
four weeks. 

Other spot tv activity: Tide (B&B); Mobiloil (Bates); Calumet Baking (FC&B), 
13 weeks; Lever's Breeze (SSC&B), day and fringe minutes, six weeks, 22 October start; 
Kayser Hosiery (Daniel & Charles), prime I.D's, day and fringe minutes, two flights, first 
one 14 October; Duffy-Mott apple juice (B&B), night minutes, six weeks, October 22; 
Raleigh (KM&J). 

Apparently, if he'll pay the right premium and not concentrate on major mar- 
kets, an advertiser can get himself a nice batch of nighttime 40-second tv spots: 
Y&R has found this out in setting up the current campaign for Gulf Oil. 

In the Gulf quest Y&R was rather surprised by the number of 40-second breaks it was 
able to get for Gulf and the choice periods involved. The average price paid for the 40's: 
150% of the 20-second rate. 

Another account at Y&R interested in 40's : Johnson & Johnson. 

P.S.: Colgate (Bates) is interested in the 30-second spot as a possible franchise tool. 
In any event, the agency last week put out a call for 30-second availabilities. 

A mission that incurred much notice among Madison Avenue's tv gentry: Wil- 
liam Paley and president Frank Stanton spending a week in Hollywood sizing up 
the programing plans and ideas among suppliers of every rank and persuasion for 
the 1962-63 season. 

It was this listening to everybody that particularly caught the fancy of the interested 

agency people. 

Also, it was the first time that the two had repaired tandem on a long-range objective of 
this sort. One anticipated outcome: a significant change in tang and class of the CBS 
TV program lineup for next season. 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The big topic of palaver among Madison Avenueites last week was the Arbitron 
scored by the initial feature of NBC TV's Saturday Night at the Movies against CBS 
TV's Gunsmoke and Have Gun Will Travel. 

The figures: Movies got a two-hour average of 24.3. Against Gunsmoke it ran 26.5 to 
18.4 and against Have Gun, 24.4 to 16.4. Movies' peak rating (10:30-11) was 27.4. 

Admen are now speculating at the implications of all this in terms of programing. Will 
the other networks start contemplating features in their future? 

(See SPONSOR HEARS, page 56, on possible impact on CBS TV scheduling.) 



Burnett last week brought into sharper focus a procedure that's been growing 
in spot radio : asking reps whether they've been authorized by their stations to clear 
schedules from national advertisers at local rates. 

The query was in connection with a Schlitz campaign. 

Burnett explained that it preferred not to bypass the Chicago reps if the same end — the 
local rate — could be achieved. 

Many of the reps approached by Burnett disclosed in a check by SPONSOR-SCOPE that, 
while they agreed it was bad policy to grant the local rate to national distribtuors, it was 
difficult for them to resist the trend among reps to take, when authorized, such commis- 
sionable business at local rates. 

As these reps put it, what makes it still harder to resist is the profession from agencies 
that they don't like the local-rating any better than the reps but that they are duty-bound 
to their clients to obtain the same rate available to a local or regional competitor. 



Coffee brand packagers in the New York area are bracing themselves for the 
expected invasion of Folger some time after the first of the year. 

As happened in the Folger invasion of Chicago and other markets in recent years, air 
media can count on being substantial beneficiaries. 

In the coffee price war that ensued in Chicago, Folger took off on a blitz that involved 
radio/tv saturation, deals to grocery chains, swamping of the mails with money-saving cou- 
pons, skywriting, and the forcing of at least one national brand off the supermarket shelves. 

At least the two leaders in the electric shaver field — Remington and Norelco— 
have completed their tv plans for the battle of the Christmas trade. 

The scope of their tv operations : 

Remington (Y&R) : 24 commercial minutes on Gunsmoke, plus a total of 22 spots each 
in 60 markets over four weeks. Estimated home impressions: 680,000,000. 

Norelco (LaRoche) : 12 minute participations in ABC TV nighttime shows, plus 
weekend blitzes in 110 markets over eight weeks. Estimated home impressions: 770,000,000. 

As for Schick (NC&K), its Christmas push plans are still indefinite. It's bought a cou- 
ple of nighttime network participations and will get a few more minutes in Revlon properties. 
Meantime it's dickering for a block of barter time, which, according to reports, will involve 
an exchange of merchandise — that is, razors for time. 

The spread of the tv network spot carrier has made the brand advertiser more 
conscious than ever of the relative values he gets out of this type of participation as 
against the use of selective spot tv. 

In any event, it's this kind of analysis that Nielsen reports clients are putting more and 
more emphasis on in their brand research assignments. 

A highlight of the probing often sought: the best home prospects in terms of costs 
that spot can reach as compared to network participation shows. 

20 SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The relative quiet that exists around tv network sales departments won't be of 
long duration. Come the November ratings the boys will be out beating the bushes. 

The reason: many of the advertisers — because of the heavy ratio of scatter plans, both 
night and day — aren't actually committed beyond Christmas. 

It's certainly not like the old lays — say, before the emergence of ABC TV as a full-fledged 
contender — when the vast majority of network advertisers were frozen in there for a full 
52-weeks and a network salesman could spend the winter in untroubled pensiveness. 

Those last-minute buys on the Untouchables and Hawaiian Eye — both in the 
upper rating brackets — that you'll be reading about are due to overspending of 
the budget for the fourth quarter. 

Concerned in the selloffs are Brylcreem (FCB) in Untouchables and Carter Products 
(Bates) in Hawaiian Eye. 

Another sudden vacancy that's come up in Untouchables: J. B. Williams' minute par- 
ticipation. This is to get away from a product conflict with Miles Laboratories. 

Somewhat conspicuous by their absence on this season's tv network nighttime 
roster are the shirt manufacturers. 

To name three: Van Heusen, Cluett Peabody and Manhattan. 

They're not a complete loss to tv. Van Heusen has elected to use spot for its Christmas 
promotion. 

The tv networks are still picking up nighttime trade from last minute buyers, 
with all of it minute participations of an oddment nature. 

Buyers include: Texaco (B&B), two minutes each on National Velvet, Bullwinkle and 
Tales of Wells Fargo, to promote a special kid toy; Jergens (C&W), two minutes each on 
Ben Casey, Adventures in Paradise and Roaring 20's; Shulton (Wesley), two minutes each on 
Checkmate, Cain's 100, Eyewitness, and the Investigators; Norelco (LaRoche), 12 minutes 
in Bus Stop, Paradise, Hawaiian Eye, Ben Casey, the Corrupters and Roaring 20's. 

Incidentally, all three accounts are also using selective spot tv. In the case of Shulton 
it'll be a four-week schedule in over 100 markets at the rate of five to 10 spots a week, 
with 27 November the starting date. 

In 1960 over 75% of national-regional spot billings wound up in the top 50 
markets. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE's processing of FCC figures in 10-market batches shows: 

NUMBER OF MARKETS TOTAL SPOT TV EXPENDITURES PERCENTAGE 

First 10 $197,802,000 43% 

First 20 258,955,000 56% 

First 30 302,129,000 66% 

First 40 327,865,000 72% 

First 50 345,834,000 76% 

Alcoa's (F&S&R) debut in daytime network tv with its wrap means an addi- 
tional 25 quarter-hours to the sponsored daytime total for the final 1961 quarter. 

The budget split: two-thirds for CBS TV and a third for ABC TV. 

Sports-oriented ABC TV has no intentions of putting the Wide World of Sports 
into mothballs. It can use the audience and, above all, the added revenue. 

The plan is to re-install the strongly flavored international series in a late Sunday or 
Saturday afternoon period after the first of the year. 

SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 21 





SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Sellers of spot air media, after hearing Gail Smith's frank talk last week, came 
to the realization that they've still got a tough task in convincing the automotive 
manufacturers of the values of spot. 

Smith, who is now director of advertising and market research at General Motors, expati- 
ated on his conceptions of the assets and limitations of spot before the Detroit chapter of 
the Stations Representatives Association. 

(For a detailed report of Smith's remarks see SPONSOR-WEEK, page 7.) 






American Motors (Geyer, MM&B) is using ABC as its radio arm for the intro- 
duction of the 1962 line, with spot as the tv anchor. 

Network Package, which starts 3 October, embraces co-sponsorship of the weekend news 
(21 broadcasts). Contract is for 26 weeks. 

Standard Brands' Walter E. Armstrong, speaking before the Pet Food Insti- 
tute's annual meeting in Chicago last week, ticked off a set of comparisons to pro- 
ject the dimensions of the dog food field, which is spending at the rate of $30 mil- 
lion a year for tv. 

The nub of his comparisons: 

• Dog food dollar volume in grocery stores has grown at a rate half again as fast as 
margarines and equal to that of cold cereals. 

• More money is spent annually on dog food in groceries alone than is spent on such 
important products as prepared baking mixes, canned baby food, tea, toilet soap, and pack- 
age desserts. 

From Armstrong's view the pet food business has just about scratched the surface, 
since only a third of it is commercially prepared. 



Sellers of spot radio should find some comfort from this: Bates has ordered 
from Nielsen its radio coverage survey, tagged NCS '61. 

Apparently, Bates is looking forward to pouring more of its clients' largess into radio. 

Another interesting sidelight as far as the Nielsen services are concerned: P&G has 
odered Nielsen's local tv rating services in six markets, even though this advertiser's 
top agencies are oriented on that score to ARB. 

According to Nielsen, the new coverage surveys have been sold to 350 radio stations 
and 150 tv stations. 



SPONSOR-SCOPE's midwest staff took a look into the latest avenues of the cos- 
metic business and found that eye makeup and hair products have easily become 
its biggest fast-developing items. 

The keys to this fantastic growth of recent years: 

• Women now change the color of their hair and eye makeup as often as they used to 
change their lipsticks. 

• Home permanents seen to be on the wane, since modern hair styling does not re- 
quire them as much as the styles that have lost vogue, with the result that color has become 
the raging fashion note. 

Incidentally, about 50% of the mass market products in the cosmetic business (sham- 
poos, sprays and hair dressings) are now sold through food chains and supermarkets. 
(For an in-depth study on the hair tint field see article on page 25.) 



For other news coverage in this issue: see Sponsor-Week, page 7; Sponsor 
Week Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 55; sponsor Hears, page 58; Tv and Ra- 
dio Newsmakers, page 68; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

22 SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



CBS 

TELEVISION 

STATIONS 

NATIONAL 

SALES 



r YOUR SERVICE ! Service is the watchword of CBS Television Stations 
National Sales (formerly CBS Television Spot Sales), now the national sales organ- 
ization for the five CBS Owned television stations ly. 

These five major-market stations are being sold now by the full-strength 

staff of ilists in six regional offices ... backstopped by the same array 

of experienced research, promotion and sales service people. What results is a 
finely-tuned force with the knowledge and the time to be an "extra arm" 

to advertisers and agencies seeking top efficiency from their television dollars. 

An unbeatable combination— the sales impact you get from the CBS Owned 
station^ I bs-TV New York, wbbm licago, knxt Los Angeles, wcau -TV 

Philadelphia and kmox-tv St. Louis) plus the service-in you get from CBS 

Television Stations National Sales (v jffices I or Chicago, Los 

Angeles, Detroit, San Franci ta). 



i 







GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN 

HAYDN R. EVANS. General Manager • Represented by H-R Television, Inc. 



24 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



^ SPONSOR 

2 OCTOBER 1961 



'6tf/$67,610 



HAIR COLOR SALES ZOOM 

The field of hair preparations is 

a booming one. This is especially 

true in case of hair coloring 

materials. Rinses, tints and dyes 

sold to tune of $67,610,000 in '60 



^/$46,000 



Hair tint fracas— 
What it means to tv 



Hair tint struggle in cosmetic field will result 
in revenue spurt for the television medium as 
leaders launch new marketing, ad strategies 

f\ mere decade ago only actresses and damsels of pliable virtue 
dyed their hair. 

Today hair coloring is as fashionable and respectable as joining 
j the Book of the Month Club or shopping in a discount house. 

American women now spend in the region of $60,000,000 annually 
on home application hair coloring kits. Five years ago an insignificant 
5% of the beauty parlor business came from hair coloring. Today 
professional beauticians derive a glittering $60,000,000 from hair 
coloring alone every year. 

Obviously, the market for hair coloring preparations is enormous. 
Companies, large and small, interested in new ventures and expansion, 
are casting lecherous eyes at this lucrative and highly colorful industry. 



'58/$37,300 



'57/$32,370 
'56/$28,170 



TT/$24,500 



^/$14,720 

'53/$l 3,740 

7J/$1 2,480 

'All figures in tha 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



25 



Leading hair coloring 
product execs plan 
big television drives 




LEONARD LAVIN (above) pres. of Al- 
berto-Culver, believes in using both 
day and nighttime tv to promote hair 
coloring. Two generations of Clairol 
'savvy' (I to r): Richard Gelb, pres.; 
Bruce Gelb, v.p.; Lawrence Gelb, ch. 
of board, also stress big promotions 




Moreover, it spells vast sums of 
monev to the broadcast industry. 
Makers of hair coloring preparations 
are profoundly convinced that the 
broadcast medium is one of the most 
luminous roads to use in reaching the 
American women, a Sponsor editor 
was told last week. 

"It is the biggest thing to hit the 
cosmetic industry in a long time," 
Stephen Mayham, executive vice 
president of the Toilet Goods Associa- 
tion said recently. "The sales curve 
is climbing steadily. It looks as though 
hair tints eventually will be used as 
commonly as lipstick." 

The art of coloring hair is a 
venerable one. Ancient Greeks and 
Romans bleached their locks. The 
Babylonian and Assyrian noblemen 
and their female companions went 
in for considerable tinting and bleach- 
ing. Near perfection in hair coloring 
was reached by Venetian patricians 
who simply adored blonde locks. They 
brewed a fragrant concoction of lupin 
flowers with saltpeter, saffron and 
madder and then added a sprinkling 
of sour wine with spermaceti and a 
dash of lime and silver salts. Or a 
Renaissance wren bent on having 
"golden-thread hair" might have 
blended alum with black sulpher and 
honey. Today, for a dollar or two. 
she gets an infinitely snazzier job 
with the contents of an attractive 
bottle picked up at the local apothe- 
cary shop. Or she may be one out of 
ten women who have their hair color 
treatments done once a week at the 
beauty parlor or one out of four, 
who have it done once or twice a 
month at the beauty shop. 

The Toilet Goods Association esti- 
mates the volume of sales on hair pre- 
parations alone now 7 is considerably 
above a billion dollar annually in the 
United States. 

A recent Breck questionnaire re- 
veals almost two out of five women 
have tried a hair coloring treatment at 
least once in the past and three out of 
ten had had hair coloring treatments 
during the past year. It was found 
that young and middle aged women 
were more likely to try hair coloring 
than older women. Another significant 
finding: the higher the woman's in- 
come, the more likelv it is that she 



tried hair coloring. 

In reporting the highlights of the 
Breck survey, the American Hair- 
dresser, outstanding trade journal, 
noted that "of these women who have 
tried hair coloring, more than half 
have tried temporary color; one out 
of three permanent color; three out 
of ten, semi-permanent color; one out 
of four, color shampoo, and almost 
one out of five, bleach. Use of tem- 
porary color increased sharply by 
age, dropped as income rose, and in- 
creased with amount of gray in hair. 
Permanent color was more widely 
used by young women; semi-perma- 
nent, by the young and middle aged, 
and bleach, overwhelmingly by 
younger women." 

Brown shades were preferred by 
32% of the women who went in for 
hair coloring treatment; 25% favored 
blonde, and 13% chose red. 11% of 
the women selected gray and white. 
Black was chosen by 6%. 

Practically a new comer in the hair 
care sphere but playing no insignifi- 
cant role in the market is Alberto- 
Culver. The firm is a great believer in 
the use of television to promote its 
numerous products. Among the pro- 
ducts it manufacturers: Tresemme 
Oil Bleach which lightens and condi- 
tions in various colors; Tresemme 
Dye Solvent, Alberto VO-5 and a flock 
of other beauty preparations. Alberto 
VO-5 is one of the largest selling 
women's hair conditioners. Its mak- 
ers say it is the onlv major hair con- 
ditioner without any water in it and 
is a blend of five oils with lanolin as 
the biggest derivative. 

In the short span of six years the 
company, under the presidency of 
Leonard H. Lavin, has been propelled 
to one of the foremost positions in 
the cosmetics and toiletries industry. 
The firm promotes Tresemme on both 
day and nighttime programs using a 
high fashion theme. Lavin looks at 
the hair-coloring renaissance "as the 
age of enlightenment in which they 
have come to realize that hair color- 
ing now is safe, easy, and economical, 
and can be a real beauty asset." Back 
in 1955 the extent of its television 
commitments added up to three week- 
ly spot announcements. It is currently 
buying participations and partial 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



sponsorships on all three webs in 
addition to a heavy spot schedule in 
30 top markets. In 1960, its network 
tv expenditure amounted to $8,822.- 
038. It spent $1,242,160 in spot tv 
last year. More than $1,000,000 was 
spent on its hair coloring product 
alone over network tv, according to 
the Television Bureau of Advertising. 
For the first six months of this 
year the firms spent nearly one-half 
million dollars promoting hair color- 
ing on tv and approximately $20,000 
in spot tv. 

Helene Curtis Industries. Inc., 
headquartered in Chicago, and one of 
the major advertisers in television, 
uses the broadcast medium primarily 
to promote its Product Division 
brands which include Spray Net, Gay 
Top hair dressing. Shampoo Plus Egg, 
etc. Another Helene Curtis division. 
The Beauty Salon Division, is one of 
the major suppliers of professional 
supplies for beauty shops. Products 
include permanent waves, shampoos 
and hair preparations, including hair 



color products. Color Essense. Curtis" 
line of permanent tints, is presentl\ 
being introduced in major markets. 
Included are 15 different shades in 
creme toners, and 18 shades in creme 
color shampoos. Helene Curtis also 
makes Woman of the World tempo- 
rary color rinses in eight colors 
(Vienna Auburn, Roman Beauty. 
English Pewter, Parisian Brunette, 
Scandinavian Blonde, Flanders Flax- 
en, Alpine Mist. Colleen Red I . The 
two Curtis hair color products are 
sold only to beauty salons. The com- 
pany told sponsor it has no plans 
for television advertising of its salon 
color products. 

Speaking of the hair coloring out- 
look in the United States, Arthur 
Caplin, director of marketing for the 
beauty salon division of Helene Curtis 
Industries, told sponsor : "In the 
complicated world we live in today, 
the psychological impact on women 
of increasing age is heightened by the 
emphasis placed on the role of youth. 
This is reflected in a burgeoning 



market demand for liaii coloring 
products which aid in maintaining 
youth. Recent improvements have 
made the maintenance of hair color 
so easy that today no woman must 
look prematurely old because of grav 
hair." Helene Curtis spent about 
$10,000 in -pot television on Wonder 
Rinse last \ear. 

Largely responsihle for changing 
the moral attitudes towards hair col- 
oring in America was Tintair 
launched in the earlv 50's. Once a 
powerful leader in the field, it ran 
into difficulties with Federal regula- 
tory agencies. Both its chemical con- 
tent and advertising methods were 
questioned. Today it is staging a 
vigorous comeback with an ad budget 
of some $800,000 for this year, twice 
the sum it spent last year. Its agency 
is Kastor, Hilton, Chesley, Clifford & 
Atherton. 

A. Mitchell Finlay, president of 
Bymart-Tintair, told sponsor, that 
his firm plans to increase its expendi- 
l Please turn to pope 46 I 



Hair tint sponsors like all kinds of shows in promoting hair color 



Helene Curtis buys quarter hour Alberto-Culver Co. Is buying 
participations in soap operas into action-adventure dramas 



Revlon has decided upon the 
special for its many products 






'As the World Turns' (CBS TV) 

SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



Target: The Corruptors' (ABC TV) 



'Bob Hope Special' (NBC TV) 



27 



BUFFALO STUDY SHOWS RADIO 



^ Bruskin research on Bells-IGA shoppers in Buffalo 
proves radio's ahility to sell specific food items 

* In radio only since 1 Jan., $30,000,000 food chain 
finds 20% of shoppers bought radio featured specials 



\+ onclusive evidence of radio's 
ahility to move specific supermarket 
items was turned up in a recent study 
conducted by R. H. Bruskin Associ- 
ates of shoppers in food shops in the 
Buffalo area. 

Personal interviews outside 10 
Bells-fGA supermarkets with shop- 
pers who had just completed actual 
purchases of canned goods, baked 



goods, meat and produce showed 
that over two-fifths of Bells custom- 
ers were aware of Bells' radio com- 
mericals, that two-thirds of these 
could recall some part of the mes- 
sages, and that half of those exposed 
to Bells-IGA radio advertising sub- 
sequently had purchased radio-adver- 
tised specials. 

Bells-IGA, third largest supermar- 



ket group in the Buffalo area, oper- 
ates 28 stores with a total yearly vol- 
ume of $30,000,000. 

Until last January, their advertis- 
ing, like many other supers had been 
traditionally in newspapers. 

Radio schedules, beginning the 
first of the year were given 15% of 
the total yearly ad budget of $270,- 
000 (5% was set aside for tv). 
Three radio stations, WKBW, WEBR, 
WBNY received the bulk of the radio 
appropriation with schedules of ap- 
proximately 60 30-second spots per 
week. (Minutes were used in the 
WEBR Trafficopter morning pro- 
gram.) 

Radio copy has been occasionally 
institutional, but mainly features spe- 




28 SUPERMARKETS IN BUFFALO AREA, figured in Bells-ISA radio drive. Here, Karl Manhardt, A.e. Ellis Advertising, Robert Abels, 
exec. v.p. Bells-IGA, Jim Arcara, s.m. WKBW, and Norm Schoenig adv. man. Bells-ISA discuss plans for Bruskin radio research project 



28 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



POWER FOR SUPERMARKETS 



cial items: schedules have been 
heavied up for openings and special 
events. 

Despite the relative newness of 
Bells-IGA radio announcements the 
Bruskin firm, which has done a num- 
ber of RAB studies, found heartening 
evidence of radio's sales vitality. 

A total of 511 women outside 
Bells-IGA supermarkets who had pur- 
chased one or more items of meat, 
produce, canned or baked goods were 
interviewed, often within a few sec- 
onds of leaving the check-out coun- 
ter. 

89% reported they had seen or 
heard some form of Bells-IGA adver- 
tising, and as might be expected, 
most first mentioned newspapers. 

However, when asked "Have you 
heard any radio commercials for 
Bells-IGA' Supermarkets?" 40.9% 
said they had and proved their fa- 
miliarity by mentioning specific groc- 
ery items or copy points. 

Of those aware of the supermar- 
kets' radio spots, 38.3% mentioned 
items on sale, and an additional 
10.5% mentioned specials of the day. 
week or weekend. 

Particularly significant to radio 
and advertising men were the ques- 
tions linking radio awareness to actu- 
al purchasing. Newspapers which 
have long contended that "radio is 
just good for institutional advertis- 
ing" will find their arguments refuted 
by the Bruskin figures. 

49.8% of the shoppers who were 
aware of Bells-IGA radio commer- 
cials reported that they had pur- 
chased Bells-IGA radio-featured spe- 
cials. 

Among the radio-featured specials 
most mentioned as having been pur- 
chased were bacon, 23.1%; eggs. 
19.2%; sugar, 18.3%; meat (any 
mention), 9.6 %; coffee, 7.7%; cook- 
ing oil or shortening, 6.7% ; chicken. 
5.8%: butter. 4.8%; vegetables. 
3.8%. 

Equally interesting were the facts 
uncovered by Bruskin Associates on 
radio listening during the day of in- 
terviewing. 

42.3% of the Bells-IGA shoppers 
had listened to radio that day. Their 




ELL5 




CONDUCTED outside 13 Bells-IGA stores, the Buffalo study surveyed only the women who 
had actually purchased canned goods, baked goods, meat or produce at the supermarkets 



Highlights of the Bells-IGA study 

l a 40.9% of shoppers had heard Bells-IGA commercials though 
announcements had been on the air only seven months. 

2. 49.8% of those who had heard Bells-IGA radio announcements 
had purchased radio-featured specials. 



3. 


RddiO- featured specials most often purchased : 


BACON 23.1% 


EGGS 19.8% 


SUGAR 18.3% 


MEAT (any mention) 9.6% 


COFFEE 7.7% 



4. TWO-fifthS of women had heard the radio on the day of 
the interview. 

5. 54% of those who had heard the radio that day. did so within 
an hour before shopping. 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



29 



Radio vs. Sunday newspaper ad 

In the Buffalo study women uere asked if they had seen the Bells-IGA 
Sunday ad and had purchased items featured. 

Saw the ad 198 

Purchased featured items 74 

By contrast, here are similar results for radio. 

Had heard commercials 209 

Purchased featured items 104 

Bells-IGA currently spends 80 ( < of its S270.000 ad budget in news- 
papers. 15', in radio. 5% in tv. 






Wk WM 



■■■■■ ■■ ■ ..: ^ is mi^l 









mean average for listening was 1.6 
hours, broken down as follows: 

15 minutes or less 11.1 S 

Over 15 minutes-30 min. 23.1 
Over 30 minutes-1 hour 19.9 

Over 1 hour-2 hours 16.2 

Over 2 hours-3 hours 11.1 

Over 3 hours-4 hours 7.4 

Over 4 hours 9.8 

Lnreported 1.3 

Asked "Where was it that you last 
heard the radio. " shoppers answered. 

Last listened at home 63.4' < 

Last listened in the car 34.7 

Last listened some other 

place 1.9 

The sample of 511 women obviously 
represented substantial shoppers. Re- 
porting on what thev had just 
bought — 

57.5% had purchased tanned 

goods 
68.1% had purchased baked goods 
78.3% had purchased meats 
69.3% had purchased produce 
Commenting on the surve\ . R. H. 
Bruskin Associates notes as a prime 
conclusion. "Radio is an effective me- 
dium in conveving Bells advertising 
message." 

James Arcara. sales manager for 
\\ KBK which commissioned the 
study, believes that the following 
points are of extreme significance to 
other radio advertisers and broad- 
casters : 

The studv was exclusively amonu 



30 



female adult supermarket shoppers, 
and conducted at the point of pur- 
chase, rather than in the home. Both 
points, says Arcara. make the Brus- 
kin research more valuable than 
other, more general radio studies. 

Of the Bells-IGA shoppers inter- 
viewed. 97.1% were married and 
72% were in the 27 to 50 vear age 
class "the female subgroup that con- 
trols the family purse strings." 

The impact of Bells-IGA radio is 
particularly significant in as much as 
the chain gives 80% of its advertis 
ing funds to newspapers (two metro 
politan dailies and 12 communitv 
papers) and its radio schedules had 
been running for only seven months 
at the time of the studv. 

Agencies with food and supermar- 
ket accounts will be particularly in- 
terested in the Bells-IGA ad strategy 
and the test results, inasmuch as the 
emphasis on specific specials runs 
counter to the way certain other super- 
markets have used radio. 

Sponsor i 31 July 1961 1 while 
noting that "Supermarkets represent 
a super chance for radio.'" reported 
that such chains as Safewav and 
Daitch Shopwell use radio primarilv 
for institutional-tvpe copv. 

The Bells-IGA experience bears out 
what many radio men have long con- 
tended, that the medium can be as 
effective as any other in promoting 
specific retail items. ^ 



HOW CAN 

^ New Commission proce- 
dure for logging, program re- 
ports may cost S10-1 5,000 

^ Michigan station devises 
plan for check of program 
types vs. license promise 

l^iew FCC rules and regulations 
which may have a far reaching effect 
on the structure and programing of 
both tv and radio have broadcasters 
in a shock and confusion as the 
1961-62 season gets under wav. 

In an industry already over- 
whelmed with paperwork, the pro- 
posed FCC requirements on station 
logging and on reports of program- 
broadcast will, it is believed bv com- 
petent observers, cost each of the 
more than 5.000 broadcast stations 
in the country an additional §10.000 
to $15,000 per year for clerical and 
other help. 

\^Tiether such voluminous record- 
keeping will, in the long run. do 
much to raise program standards in 
either radio or tv is very debatable. 
But as long as the Minow-headed 
Commission seems bent on creating 
its own type of paper work snow- 
storm Washington attorneys who 
represent broadcast stations are ad- 
vising their clients 1 1 "make sure 
your own house is in order." and 2i 
"Don't let yourself be a guinea or a 
test case." 

Heart of the problem is of course 
the question as to whether a stations 
programing actuallv coincides with 
promises made in its license applica- 
tion. On the surface this might seem 
easv to determine but the verv frag- 
mentation and flexibility of broad- 
casting often makes detailed break- 
downs laborious. 

Broadcasters and agencies and ad- 
vertisers doing business with radio 
tv stations will be interested in the 
svstem recently instituted at WJIM- 
I TV, Radio and FM i Lansing. Mich 
by Harold F. Gross, president, 
i Please turn to page 53 i 






SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



STATIONS SATISFY THE FCC? 



WJIM STATIONS KEEP WEEKLY % RECORDS 



In Lansing, Michigan, stations WJIM-TV, 
WJIM-Radio, and WJIM-FM have instituted 
a new system of weekly "Program Type Sum- 



maries" for seeing that programs broadcast 
follow the percentages for each program type, 
as represented in WJIM license applications. 




SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



REACH, McCLINTON MEDIAMEN 



^ Martini & Rossi whimsical, multi-ending spot series 
raises media problem; solution sparks N.Y. sales hike 

^ Two-station, vertieal plan provides main thrust for 
drive designed to expose viewer to variety of spots 



wV lun the wits of Reach. VlcClin- 
ton's creative staff came up with a 
series of four 20-second tv commer- 
cials, all presenting the same whimsi- 
cal situation, hut each with a differ- 
ent ending, the agency's media de- 
partment had some investigating to 
do. 

It was readily determined that fre- 
quency was the prime goal for these 
commercials, assemhled on behalf of 
Martini & Rossi imported vermouth. 
The importance of reach was not 
overlooked of course, but it was felt 
that for best results viewers ought to 
see all. or nearly all, of the commer- 
cials in the series. To see just one 
would not convey the ingenuity of 
the several endings. The more end- 
ings each viewer saw, the more his 
interest would be aroused, and the 
more likely he would be to pass his 
viewing experience on by word of 
mouth. So runs the explanation of 
Reach, McClinton v. p. -media director 
Philip C. Kennev. 

\ll of the commercials depict a 
scene in the cabin of a "rocking ship'" 
and feature a Martini & Rossi crate, 
out of which reaches a human hand 
i w ith bottle and glass i . and a port- 
hole. In the course of each commer- 
cial, the hand emerges from the open 
half of the crate top and places a glass 
and a Martini & Rossi bottle on the 
closed half. While the crate continues 
to rock along with the ship, the hand 
pours vermouth out of the bottle into 
the glass. 

Bottle and glass are turned loose 
and slide back and forth with the 
rocking, first to the nearby porthole, 
then into the other side of the crate. 
The four endings consist of the hand's 
attempts, with cliff-hanger suspense, 
to save bottle and glass from falling 



out the porthole or off the other side. 
In one it succeeds in salvaging both 
slipping, sliding items, while in the 
others either bottle or glass disap- 
pears out the porthole or off the 
crate's other side. 

While the Reach, McClinton media 
brains agreed that frequency (with 
proper reach) was the way to give 



these Martini & Rossi mystery -comedy 
announcements the appropriate send- 
off, it remained to determine the best 
way to achieve this within the budget- 
ary allotment for the New York 
metropolitan area where the cam- 
paign had its maiden voyage. At the 
early planning stages, these ap- 
proaches were examined: 

• Concentrate on the three net- 
work stations, on the rationale that 
high ratings are necessary to accom- 
plish duplication 

• Schedule spots adjacent to like 
program types 

• Schedule announcements prior to 
and after the same program 

• Schedule spots, at intervals, on 



Martini & Rossi "owned" late afternoon 





MAIN STRATEGY for airing humor- 
ous, multi-ending vermouth spots 
consisted of vertical, two-station con- 
centration, assumed to hit the bulk 
of N. Y.'s Sunday viewers. Prime 
architect of this plan for the offbeat 
creative concept is Philip C. Kenney, 
v.p.-media dir. of Reach, McClinton 



MRTINkROSSI 

— — »OCK>Ct Cf AN.*-- '* 

, VINO "\rjf ;■ 




5S" PM—* ■' 




UNINIiROSS 

HictarH 



-»OC*XT o* 




32 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



SOLVE NOVELTY SPOTS RIDDLE 



the same night of the week 

• Schedule spots within the same 
program (such as The Jack Paar 
Show or a feature film I 

Reps of the seven New York tv 
stations were called in for a screen- 
ing of the commercials and were 
asked what they had to offer by way 
of response to this off-beat challenge. 
When all of the bids were in, the 
agency found three likely plans: 

1) A vertical plan with four Sun- 
day afternoon announcements at 30- 
minute intervals 

2) A scattering of four prime 20- 
second spots 

3) A horizontal plan of three spots 
adjacent to the same newscast. 



Research determined that Plan 2 
would produce the greatest exposure 
with greatest frequency, but its cost 
came approximately to four times 
that of Plan 1. Also against plan 2, 
it was computed to produce only 50% 
more total audience and 40% more 
frequency than Plan 1. The third 
plan (early evening news adjacency, 
Mon.. Wed. and Fri.) was about the 
same in cost as Plan 1, but would 
produce only 50 ''/, of the male audi- 
ence, important for M&R's objectives, 
that would be delivered by the Sun- 
day afternoon schedule. 

Based on these findings, M&R 
bought seven Sunday afternoon spots 
divided between WCBS-TV and 




Sunday tv in N.Y. as backdrop for spots 

SUNDAY 



4:30 PM 


WCBS-TV 


WNBC-TV 


PRO-FOOTBALL 
WRAP-UP NEWS 


OPEN MIND 


5:00 PM 


M&R SPOT 


M&R SPOT 




AMATEUR HOUR 


CELEBRITY GOLF 


5:30 PM 


M&R SPOT 


M&R SPOT 




G.E. COLLEGE BOWL 


HUNTLEY-BRINKLEY 


6:00 PM 


M&R SPOT 


M&R SPOT 




OH THOSE BELLS 


20TH CENTURY 


6:30 PM 


M&R SPOT 


M&R SPOT 


7:00 PM 


MEET THE PRESS 


PEOPLE ARE FUNNY 






SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



WNBC-TV. From October. I960, 
through March, 1901, the commer- 
cial series was aired on both stations 
at 5 p.m., WCBS-TV at 5:30 p.m., 
both stations at 6 and 6:30. 

As Kenney puts it, "We owned 
those two hours!" In spelling out 
the advantages accruing to M&R for 
such proprietorship, Kenney asserts 
that most Sunday afternoon tv view- 
ers in New York are tuned to these 
two stations. Further, he finds a higfi 
concentration of upper income fami- 
lies in the audience, which group is 
a prime target for this premium 
priced import. 

While this was the main thrust of 
the humor spot series campaign, the 
vermouth advertiser bought addition- 
al exposure for it with a slot in the 
middle and immediately after The 
Roaring 20's on WABC-TV Saturday 
nights, and in the Late Shoiu on 
WCBS-TV Tuesday nights. 

In addition, straight-sell I.D.'s were 
aired nightly on WNTA-TV's Play 
of the Week, which caters to upper 
income families, and three nights a 
week on the same station's Picture of 
the Week. Other reminder copy 
I.D.'s ran on the three outlets. 

The upshot of all this was sales in- 
creases in New York approximately 
three times as great as the rise reg- 
istered for M&R over the rest of the 
country. While M&R had national 
magazine ads going for it in every 
market, only New York had the bene- 
fit of a tv campaign. According to 
Kenney, the New York area, which 
constitutes somewhat over 10% of the 
country's population was responsible 
for some 30 r y of the sales increase 
notched during this period by M&R. 

The New York tv drive was bought 
for about $12,000 per week. Of this. 
6095 went to the 20-second spot ser- 
ies, 40% to the I.D.'s. 

Based on the success of this Y Y. 
approach, the same type of campaign 
was mounted in Chicago last spring. 
Three stations were utilized in this 
initial Chicago push, and for the fall 
campaign they will add a fourth. ^ 



33 




■***, 



MOGUL Wlliams & Saylor president, Emil Mogul, shown in his Madison Ave. office, began his career as a radio time salesman 30 years ago 

P.R. IS RADIO Rx, SAYS MOGUL 

^ Agency head says radio suffers from lack of self-promotion and suggests radio 
people set up a "kitty" to advertise the medium's potential via other ad media 



u 



'ndoubtedly the biggest perplexity 
in the industry today centers around 
the stickler: why does radio which 
has racked up outstanding — and 
countless — performance records, con- 
tinue to lag in terms of sales per- 
formance? And all along Madison 
Ave. theories run rampant. 

There are those who blame it all 



on a lack of "creativity" in selling 
the medium. And then there are 
others who say radio has been out- 
ranked by the glamour of tv. And 
so it goes. 

Emil Mogul, president of Mogul 
Williams & Saylor, a 50-client Goth- 
am agency, doesn't go along with this 
kind of thinkimr. He feels the medi- 



um's allure has turned tepid from a 
lack of public relations. 

The cure for radio's sagging sales 
blues, according to the volatile agen- 
cy executive, lies in a concerted, all- 
out effort to tout the medium's po- 
tential through the help of other 
media and on a year-round basis. 

Mogul suggests that station heads 



34 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



— and reps too — get together to com- 
bine funds and forces and emulate 
others in self-promotion in putting 
other media to work for them. 

"Why not," says Mogul, "do what 
the magazines do, for instance, who 
buy large newspaper ads to tell their 
story? Radio could sell itself through 
large dramatic ads in the papers, in 
the trade press and on net tv, too." 

Mogul, whose rise to his present 
niche — the top rung of a large and 
prosperous ad agency — rivals the 
meatiest Horatio Alger saga, has 
strong feeling about radio. And no 
inhibitions about speaking his mind 
on the subject. 

"Radio," he says, "as a medium, 
is doing a satisfactory selling job. 
Better than others. Even print. But," 
he shrugs, "unless it's properly pro- 
moted, radio is short changing itself 
shamefully." 

Mogul's plan for promoting the 
medium to the prestige status level it 
deserves — and needs — requires co- 
operation, and money. The funds, he 
says, could easily be acquired if sta- 
tions would contribute a small per- 
centage of their billings to accumu- 
late a "kitty" for this specific pur- 
pose. 

\nd it would only take a fraction 
— a mere pittance, says Mogul. Ap- 
proximately 1/10 of one percent of 
a station's total billings would do 
the trick. For illustration, Mogul 
points out that in 1960 spot radio 
did a volume business of $680 mil- 
lion. One-tenth of one percent of that 
amount, he savs, would provide a 
husky total of $680,000. Enough to 
finance the advertising campaign — a 
campaign which "would give the me- 
dium the impact it needs," Mogul 
says, adding "the impact of the mes- 
sage would set up a responsive wave 
in the brain. Like frosting on a 
cake!" 

This amount could be bolstered 
by the rep people, asserts the 
agency man, also via this same small 
percentage figure. Based on the rep 
income last year of $150 million, 
it would bring in an additional 
$150,000. 

This self-promotion plan for radio 
was not sired by Mogul on an im- 
pulse. It was born of long and due 
consideration, and through love for 
the medium. And fostered from the 



viewpoint of a radio station man. 
Mogul began his career as a radio 
time salesman some 30 years ago. 

Currently, Mogul and his agency 
have substantial interests in radio 
stations in Birmingham. Atlanta and 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

This isn't the first time Mogul 
has sounded off on the advisability 
of the plan. He's talked about it at 
meetings and to various groups. 
There have been items printed about 
it also and Mogul has been heart- 
ened by the interest it has sparked 
among station people and reps who 
write him enthusiastically endorsing 
the idea. 

Mogul who thinks the RAB and 
SRA should be involved in the set- 



Emil Mogul, president 

of Mogul Williams & 

Saylor, prescribes 

remedy for radio ills 



up put the idea to the RAB gj 
not so very long ago. "They weren't 
too keen about it," says Mogul, dis- 
cernably baffled. 

Mogul is quick to defend the RAB 
despite their apparent lack of zeal for 
the proposal. He says, "they do a 
fine job in backing up radio with 
research and success stories." 

Mogul, whose deep insight into the 
business of advertising leaves him 
impatient with the selling approaches 
labeled hard sell-soft sell ("they're 
just cliches," he says I. thinks the 
proposed public relations job for ra- 
dio will serve as a double function. 

Aside from promoting the medium 
on a year-round basis to potential 
(Please turn to page 53 I 




"RADIO has to shake off its lethargy and promote itself. Why not do what 
the magazines do, for instance, and buy space in newspapers and the trade 
press and promote the medium via dramatic impact. Net tv would also help." 



"STATION people should combine forces with rep people to subsidize the 
self promotion of radio through a special 'kitty.' The 'kitty' would be ac- 
quired through the contribution of a mere fraction of the total radio billings." 



"RADIO as a medium, is doing a satisfactory selling job. Better than others. 
Even print. But unless it's properly promoted, radio is short-changing itself 
shamefully. It needs an all-out public relations job to sell its potential." 



SPOiNSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



35 



COMMERCIAL SI, PROGRAM NO 



^ Viewer interest in tv commercials rises, while shows 
arouse less enthusiasm, says motivational research firm 

^ All economic groups show liking for commercials 
that hring entertainment and/or genuine information 



I v stations concerned about their 
image should pay more attention to 
the commercials they run. 

That's one of the conclusions that 
ma\ he drawn from a number of re- 
cent studies bv the Institute of Moti- 
vational Research, including one com- 
missioned by KRON-TV, San Fran- 
cisco. Some of that nine-month proj- 
ect's voluminous findings were made 
public at New York presentations 



arranged 1>\ the station's repre- 
sentative Peters, Griffin, Woodward. 

As related by IMR president Dr. 
Ernest Dichter ". . . While a num- 
ber of tv programs are watched 
with less interest than previously, 
many commercials are regarded with 
greater interest and a more positive 
response." 

Elaborating on this ''radical 
change'' in viewer attitude. Dr. Dich- 



ter stated, "People don't hate adver- 
tising; they just want better adver- 
tising. They respect ingenuity, and 
are insulted when producers of com- 
mercials don't take the trouble to 
please them. They're increasingly 
sophisticated, and that includes the 
lower income group." 

The IMR depth interviews, in 
which respondents are encouraged to 
sound off at length on their feelings 
toward tv in general, and the projec- 
tive tests geared to particular stations, 
programs, and commercials, revealed 
the following attitudes toward com- 
mercials. 

They like: 

• Good humor 

• Entertainment value 

• Genuine information 




RELEASE of station Image study by Institute of Motivational Research on behalf of KRON-TV, San Francisco, takes place in New York. At 
center is IMR pres. Ernest Dichter, flanked by Lloyd Griffin, v.p.-dir. of tv Peters, Griffin, Woodward (I), Harold See, gen. mgr., KRON-TV 



36 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 




Viewer psyches explored to find 
how they feel about television 

They want programs and commercials that give 
them lessons in living, help them adjust to their 
everyday problems. They have great expectations 
of seeing their wishes fulfilled by tv, based on the 
medium's performance in its early days. Of late 
they've felt let down by the programing. It seems 
that they're paying more attention to the commer- 
cials, reacting in a positive fashion to those com- 
mercials which shoiv ingenuity, entertain or in- 
form them. So found the IMR researchers. 



• Real-life people and situations, 
making possible high degree of self- 
identification 

• Commercials that blend in with 
program material 

• Silent commercials, or those with 
a minimum of verbalization 

They don't like: 

• Program interruption by com- 
mercials 

• Intrusion of their privacy by 
commercials that depict parts of the 
body and their functions 

• Authoritative, hard sell pitches 
insisting that they buy. 

The quality level of commercials, 
therefore, is one important element 
in construction of a tv station's 
image. Another key component of 
course is the programing. In fact 
the IMR study indicates that a two- 
way street exists here, i.e. that the 
positive image a station can gain 
through strong programing carries 
over to the commercials it delivers. 
In other words, given identical com- 
mercials on two stations, the one 
aired by a quality-programed sta- 
tion will have greater impact than 
that carried by a weaker sister. 

In general the latest IMR study 
indicates middle class preference for 
variety and personality programs. 
The upper class leans toward serious 
drama, documentaries, and other edu- 
cational and cultural fare. The lower 
class likes westerns, but not to the 



extent that might be expected. Middle 
and lower classes show a surprising 
interest in news and documentary 
programing and the greatest objec- 
tion to violence is encountered among 
lower-class viewers. 

It's the feeling at IMR, therefore, 
that tv producers under-rate the audi- 
ence. As Dichter sees it, the "quality 
level" is more important than pro- 
gram types. Whatever the program 
type, it must appeal to audiences 
whose "taste level" has risen as a 
result of years of viewing. He draws 
a parallel with Class A feature films 
of 10 years ago, many of which ap- 
pear laughable now. 

In assessing the import of investi- 
gating station images, Dr. Dichter 
asserted. "It can bring ratings into 
proper perspective." He allows that, 
"It is useful to know how many peo- 
ple are watching television. It is also 
useful to know how many and what 
kinds of people are watching particu- 
lar programs." But, Dichter insists, 
"To sell effectively, the advertiser 
must reach interested, satisfied peo- 
ple." 

The IMR chief considers the crux 
of a station's impact to be the degree 
to which it satisfies its viewers' needs. 
His theory is that people come to tv 
for lessons in living, ways of adjust- 
ing to their surroundings. For in- 
stance, when they're watching seem- 
ingly escapist comedy, such as Jack 



Benny joking about his income tax, 
they may be getting help in terms of 
adjusting to their own tax problems. 
They may feel things aren't so bad 
if Benny can have some fun with the 
subject. 

Among the more direct methods 
applied by IMR in developing station 
image conclusions is a "projected at 
titude test." This consists of some 30 
hypothetical statements by viewers 
about stations. They are presented 
to respondents who are asked to spe- 
cify which stations is most likely and 
least likely to be the one to which 
each statement refers. The score for 
each station represents the mean 
number of responses for that station. 

For instance, in determining which 
station in a particular market the 
viewers believe is "most likely to have 
the best quality programs and per- 
sonalities," response to the following 
statements is weighed: 1) This is 
tops for news-casting and news com- 
mentators; 2) Of all the tv stations I 
know, this has the best children's 
programs; 3) When ! wanl to watch 
serious drama I always look to see 
what that station has for the evening: 
4) My son is very much interested in 
science. It's hard to tear him away 
from that station; 5) For lively, light 
and relaxing programs there is noth- 
ing like that channel: 6) This chan- 
nel has more of the kind of programs 
that make an impression on me. ^ 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



37 



25 SEPT. - 22 OCT. N IGHTTI 






SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



No net service 



Twentieth 
Century 

Prudential 

IB MrCl 

or i- 



Meet The Pres 
co-op 

II. «.50i 



ABC News 
luii- 



No net service 



No net service 



ABC News 

• USt 



No net service 



No net servki 



ABC Ne- 
i-it 



Maverick 

(9/24) 

Kaiser (Y&Ri 

Ideal Toys 



Mr. Ed 

pan 

Studebaker 

Dow Chem. 

C $37.0O<] 



No net Servici 



No net service 



D. Edwards 

News 

Amr- dome 

I Rat** I 

a. J. Reynolds 

(Eety) 
N-L *».5»*»* 



No net service 



Huntley- 
Brinkley Rep. 

R, J. Reynolds 

(Eety) 
N-L M.SOO" 



No net service 



D. Edwards 

Newt 

Am Home 

alt Goodyear 

(Bale*) 

N-L *».5«*t1 



Huntter- 

Briokiey Rep 

N-L $«.5*>t< 



No net i>. 



(Grey) Peter 

Paul (D-F-S) 

Maytag (Burnett 

Brlllo (JWT) 

Keystone (Bres 

nick) Schick 
w $82.0O( 



Lassie 

Cao>pbell Soup 
(BBDO) 

*-r tsr.eoo 



1, 2, 3— Co! 

st 10/8 

Quaker Oats 

Beech-Nut 

Texaco (CAW) 

Beech -Nut 

$15.00( 



Expedition 

Ralston Purina 

(GBAB) 

$18,000 



No net tenriee 



No net service 



D. Edwards 
News 

Amer Home 
(ree>eat feed) 



Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texaco 

(retwt toad i 



Focus on 
America 



0. Edwards 

News 
Am Home 
alt Goodyear 
(repeat feed) 



Hunrtey- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Trxaeo 

(repeat feed) 



No net 



Follow the Sur 
Kaiser (YAR) 

LAM (JWT) 
Dr $90.<XK 



Dennis The 

Menace 

Kelloggi Burnett) 

Beat Food* 

(GB&B) 

B«-F $31,000 



Walt Disney's 

Wonderful 
World of Co 

Kodak (JWT) 
RCA (JWT) 
$98,00' 



lo 



Chevenne 

(7:30-8:30) 

W-F 1*7. OOC 

Mobil Oil 

(Ted Bates) 

Mead Johnson 

iKAE) 



To Tell The 

Truth: 

Am. Home iBatee) 

B.J. Reynold* 

(E*ty) 

BeF $21,000 



No net service 



Bugs Bunny 
G. PM« (R*B) 

(10/10) 
Mars (N.LAB) 
C $37,000 



Marshal Dillon 

Co-op 
W 



Laramie 

<7:S« «-30) 
R. J. Reynolds 

Beech -Nat 
Union Carbide 

(Eety) % 
PPG (Maxon) 
A (1 fio«T4rnl... 



The St 

Allen SI 
9/28/- 

P..;.;-- 1 

Con. 

Calsoo (1 



Ed Sullivan 

(8 9) 
Colgate (Bate*) 
alt Kodak (JWTi 
V-L $85,800 



Walt Disney's 

Wonderful 

World of Colo 



Cheyenne 
Pftn <R*B) 

Amer. Tobacco 
(BBDO) 



Pete and Cladvs 

Polaroid (DDB 

Menley A James 

iFCB) 

Carnation 

(EWRRl 
Sc-F $37,000 



National Velvel 
Gen. Mills 

Bulova (SSCAB) 
Beech-Nut 



Bachelor 
Father 

Amer. Tob. 

(Gumbinner) 
Armour (FCAB) 
Dr 



Dick Van Dyke 

PAG 
C J- . M 



iD. P. Brother) 
Block Drag 

(Grey) Plllsborj 
C-Mi Ludeni 

(Mathes) Bulcri 
(BSCB) 

w 



Maybe 

(PAM) 6 
Maytag (E 

Mattel 

Brillo (. 

C 



Lawman 

J Kryooldi 

(Eety I 

Whitehall 

(Bate*) 

-F $54.00! 



Ed Sullivan 



Car 54, 

Where Are You? 

PAG (Burnett) 

$46,001 



Rifleman 

(10/2) 

PAG 

W $55, OIK 



Window on 

Main St. 

Scott A Toni 

I JWT) 
Dr. $59,000 



Price Is Right 

P. LoriUard 

(LAN 

Amer. Home 
Product* 

(Bates) $22.-00 



Calvin b the 

Colonel 

(10/3) 

Lever 

Whitehall 

Bates) 

A 



Dobie Cillis 

Plllahury 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Philip Morrti 

I Burnett i 

Se-F $37,000 



Alfred 
Hitchcock 

Lincoln-Mercury 

(K&Ei 
My-F $65, 



Top 

Bristol - 

Ke»-. 



Bus Stop 

(10/1) 
Singer (Y&R) 
Alberto-Culver 



C. E. Theatre 

Geo Eleetrlr 

(BBDO) 

Dr F $51 OOC 



Bonanza 
Chevrolet (C-E 



Surfside Six 

(10/2) 

Brown A Wmsr 

(Bates) Armou 

CFCAB) Pontiat 



Danny Thomas 

G.F. (BAB) 
C $48,500 



87th Precinct 
st I/8S 

Lincolti ' 

KAE< Warner 
Lambert (LAF) 
Sunbeam FCaB I 

LAM (D-F-S- 

Latex (Bates' 



The New Breed 

Miles 

Mead Johnson 
K&E i Scott 
JWT Brown A 
Winsn Ba-.es 



Ichabod & Me 
Socony Mobil 
Quaker Oats 

$42,000 



The Dick 

Powell Show 

Reynolds Metals 

Co. (LAN - 2 

Hertz (MCK) 

Am Tob (S8CB) 

Pillsbury (CM) 



Hawaiian 
(9S»-10 

Americax 
Mr-l 



(Compton) 
Mobil Oil (Bates 
Broun A Wmsi 

(JWT) 
Dr $90,00( 



Jack Benny 
Levei (SSCAl: 

Sute Farm 

(NLAB) 

AN-F $8-9.000 



Bonanza 



(MacJA) Brilla 
UWTi Union 

Carbide (Esty) 
Noxzema (SSCB) 
Speidel t.Mc-E) 
A $98,000 



Andy Criffith 
Hen. Fds. (Tt*B) 
Sc-F $47,500 



Helene Curtis 
(Mc-E) 
My »- 

Beechnut 



Mobil Oil 

$102,000 



Red Skelton 

Sinclair 
S. C. Johnson 
$58,000 



Bulova --■ 
Max Factor 
K*E. Helene 
Curtis (Mc-E) 
Beech -Nut 
(TAR 
A 



Hawaiiac 
Larlllard 
Whiul 
(Ted B| 



Adventures in 
Paradise 

(10/1) 

Miles (Wade) 

Brunswick 

(Mc-E) Gen. 

Cigar (TAR) 



Candid Camera 

Lever (JWT) 

Bristol-Myers 

(TAB) 

AuP-L $34,00(1 



Dupont Show 

of the Week 

Dupont (BBDO) 

$75, OOC 



Ben Casey 

(10/2) 
Dow (MacJA) 
Amer. Chicle 
(Bates) Bristol- 
Myers (OBAM) 
Mobil (Bates) 
War-Lam (Bates) 



Hennesey 
Lorlllard il-ANl 
O. Fd* (TA-Ri 
Sc $12,000 



Thriller 
Amer. Tobacco 

(SSCAB) 

Sterling (DFS) 

Corning (Ayer) 

Latex (Bates) 

Pillsbury 

(C-Mitliur,'. 



Alcoa Premiere 

Alma 1"5R 
D.'-F JPO.OOO 



Carry Moore 
Jen Mr 

D. P. Brother) 
S. C. Johnson 



Cains 100 

Lorillard 

Sunbeam 

Latex (Bites i 

Btoek [Grej 



Naked 
(1« -' 
laataTjen 

My-F 



Polaroid Armou: 
Union Carbide 
Moblloil Key- 
stone Camera 
Block Drug 
(SSCB) 
A $99.00 



What's My Line 
Kellogg 
All -State 
(Burnett) 

Q-L $32000 



Dupont Show 
of the Week 



Block Drug 
(SSI 

Con. Cigar 

iEWRAR 

Wynn Oil 

EWRAR) 

Dr $94,200 



I've Cot a 

Secret 

G.F. <Ba.B 

Polaroid (DDB) 

Hertz. Schultz. 

MAJ 
Q $27,000 



Colgate (Bates > 

Union Carbide 

Block (Grey j 

Max Factor 

KA.E 

My 



Alcoa Premiere 



Carry Moore 
R. J. Remolds 

$120,000 



Cains 100 
W-F 



Naked 
Brt».-\ 
Brn ft ' 
ieeehaa 

Br: I 



# bpvctala. 

The only regularly scheduled programs not listed are: Jack Paar, NBC 
TV. 11:15 n.m.-l a.m. Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship- Sun- 
day \rict Special. CBS TV. Sunday. 11-11:15 p.m. Specials for this 
period are: NBC TV: J. F. K. Reports i no price). 9/28. 7:30-8:30 p.m. 
Lincoln Mercury (K&E); Theater '62, The Spiral Staircase. 10 4 10-11 
p.m , WeMin-jhou-p (IfcC-E), $150,000; Purex Special Kor Women 



10 19. 3-4 p.m.. Purex i Weiss): Hallmark Hall of Fame. 'Macbeth" 
repeat, 10 20. 8:30-10:30 p.m.. Hallmark (FCB). ABC TV: World 
Series Special, 10 3. 10:30-11 p.m.. Union Carbide Esrv . $400,000: 
Accent On Youth. 10/25, 10-11 p.m., Times ( Warwick-Legler). $125,000. 
CBS TV: Carnegie Hall Salutes. Jack Benny. 9/27. 10-11 p.rc., 
Sara Lee and Motorola, $300,000. Prices do not include sustaining, 



38 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



_ 



:OMPARAGRAPH 



EDNESDAY 

K CBS NBC 



* et 



service 



i Edwards 
News 

ome iBitu) 
rter (Bates) 
$».500tt 



■k 



let service 



'■ Edwards 
News 
n«r Horn* 
It Carter 
peat fMd) 



5' 

. Alvin Show 
■ 1 Fds (B&B) 

I len. Toy 

$43,000 

I 



r Knows 
1 Best 

$34,000 
I Hard Scott 
i ual Omaha 



Checkmate 

1:30 9:3111 
. lobil Oil 
y it James 
Colgate 



-- 



No net service 



Huntlev- 
Brmkley Rep. 

1 el««u n a v\ t 
N-L $*.500tt 



Huntley- 
Brinkley Rep. 

I emeu 
(repeat teed) 



Wagon Train 

(7:30-8:30) 
W-F $88.00C 



Wagon Train 
B. J Reynold! 

(Eityl 

Natl Btse. 

• Mr Pi 

Ford (JWT) 



loev Bishop 

P&G (B&B) 

Amer. Tohacco 

(SSCB) $48,000 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC News 
nut 



No net service 



No net service 



Ozzie & Harriet 

(9/28) 

Mead Johnston 

(K&E) 

Mobil Oil 

(Ted Bates) 

Peter Paul 

(D-F-S) 



Donna Reed 

Campbell 

(BBDO) 

alt 

Johnson ft J 

(TftR) 

8c-F $40,000 



The Real 

McCoys 

PftG (Comptoa) 

Sc-F $41,000 



No net service 



Mo net service 



D. Edwards 
News 

alt Goodyear 

(Burnett) 

N-L $&.500tt 



Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texaeo tC«tW) 

N-L $6.50©tt 



No net service 



D. Edwards 
News 

alt Goodyear 
(repeat feed) 



Frontier Circus 

Part 
DuPont Vlek 
Sc $78,000 



The Outlaws 

BAW. Plllabun 

(CMlthtim: 

Union Carbide 

(Esty) 
Lincoln - M eroury 

(K&E) 
W-F $88,000 



Frontier Circus 



The Outlaws 

Block (Grey) 
Bulova (SSCB) 

Ludens 

B-Nut I lf» Seven 

Colgate 

Int. Latex 



Bob Cummings 
Show 

Kellogg 

Brown & Wms. 

O $44,000 



Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texaco 

(repeat feed) 



Or. Kildare 

St 9/28 

Singer (Y&K) 

L&M (D-F-S) 

$87,000 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



ABC Newt 

aust 



No net service 



No net servici 



No net service 



D. Edwards 

News 

Parliament 

(BAB) 

alt Amer. Home 

(Batea) 
N-L $».50Ott 



No net service 



D. Edwards 

Newt 

Parliament 

alt Amer. Home 

(repeat feed) 



Straightaway 

(10/6) 
Auto Lite 
(BBDO) 

$28.<HX 



The Hathaway: 

(10/6) 

Ralston (Guild 

Mobil Oil 

Polaroid 

Mars 

$46,00< 



Rawhide 

Van Camp 

Gen. Fds 

(B&B) 

Bristol-Myers 

Philip Morris 

Nat. Biscuit 

W $84,000 



Rawhide 
Drackett (Y&B) 
Colgate (L&N) 
W-F $84,000 



Flintstones 
Miles i Wade) 

alt 
B. J. Reynolds 

(Eety) 
CC-F $44.0(H 



Route 66 

(8:30-9:30) 

Chevrolet (C-E) 

Sterling (DPS) 

Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 

A-F $85,000 



No net service 



Huntley- 
Brinkley Rep. 

lelacu tCAW) 
N-L $6.500tt 



No net service 



Huntley- 

Brinkley Rep. 

Texacu 

(repeat feed) 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



NCAA Football 

Games 

'in progress) 

American Oil 

(D'Arcy) 

Sun Oil (Eety) 

Frltoa 



(EWB&R) 

Gillette (Maxon) 

Humble Oil 

(Mc-E) 

R. .1. Reynolds 

(Esty) 



Matty's Funda) 
Funnies 

(10/7) 
Mattel (C/R) 



International 

Showtime 

7-Up (JWT) 

Sandura (H&O) 

(M-E Prod. Dlv. 

of Mc-E) 



The Roaring 20'i 

Mead Johnson 

Block Drue 

Dalton 

Armour 
A $93.0<K 



No net service 



No net servici 



No net service 



Perry Mason 

(7:30-8 30i 

Collate I Batea) 

Parliament 

<BftB> 

My F $81.0(X 



Bulavo (SSC&B) 

Warner-Lambert 

(CL&F) 

Beechnut 

(Y&R) 



Robert Taylor ■> 

Detectives 
Colgate (Bates) 

Sunbeam 

B&W (K, M. J) 

Warner-Lambert 



The Roaring 
Mobil Oil 

(Ted Bates) 
Peter Paul 
Gen. Cigar 



Leave It To 
Beaver 

Ralston (Gardner 

GB&B) 

Polaroid 

(DD&B) 

Mars (L&B) 

Sc-F $45,000 



Perry Mason 
Sterling (DP*) 
Drarket (TftR) 
Mnnrea <RaR) 

Philip Morris 



The Defenders 
Brown * Wmst 

(Bates) 
Klmberly Clark 



No net service 



No net service 



No net service 



Tales of 
Wells Fargo 

Amer. Tobacco 

(SSC&B) 

Warner-Lambert 

(L&F) 



Beechnut I Y&R) 
Lincoln- Mercury 

(K&E) 
A 



Tall Man 

St 9/9 

It. J. Reynold 

BeeehnnC (Y&R) 

Norwich Pharm. 

Amer. Motors 

$39, OCX 



|?( Bey Ion 

|r Esquire 
ischulton 
| L&M 
I $88,000 



Kraft 

Mystery 

Theatre 

Kraft (JWT) 

$18,000 

Perry Como's 

Kraft Music 

Hall 



My Three Sons 
Chevrolet (C-E) 
Sc-F $49,500 



The 
Investigators 

Vick 

Dow 

Best Foods 



Sterling 
Warner-I.ambert 

(L-F) 

Colgate (Bates) 

My $87,000 



77 Sunset Strip 

(9-10) 
Am. Chicle 

(Bates i 
My-F $85.00< 



Route 66 



PPG (Maxon) 
Union Carbide 

Max Factor 

Latex (Bates) 

Plllsbury (C-M) 

Block (Grey) 

$86,000 



Lawrence Welk 

(9-10) 

J. B. Williams 

Union Carbide 

Polaroid 

Mu $45,000 



(FC&B) 
Lever (OB&M) 
My $102. onr 



Saturday Night 

at the Movie! 

8t 9/23 

Lanolin Plus 

Chemstrand 

Helene Curtl: 

J. B. William 



n >. C. Coes 
• College 
Fdl (B&B) 
S18.000 



St 10/4 

$125,000 

Kraft 
Mystery 
Theatre 



Margie 10/12 

Procter & Gamble 

Beech am 

Miles (Wade) 

Armour 

Whitehall (Bates) 

Culver 

$46,000 



Pond's Polaroid 
Mobiloil Corning 

Glass Shu'ton 
A $91,000 



Hazel 
St 9/28 
Ford (JWT) 
$43,000 



77 Sunset Strir, 

R I Reynolds 

Whitehall 

Brylcreem 

A $102,001 



Father of the 
Bride 

Gen. Mills 
Campbell Soup 
Dr $46,000 



Bell lelephone 

Hour 

St 9/25 alt with 

Dinah Shore 

Show 
I N" W Ayer) 
$150,000 
9:30-10:30 



Lawrence Welk 



Have Cun. Wil 

Travel 
Whall (Batei) 
alt Lever UWTi 
W-F $40.0(K 



. Steel Hr 

wk« 10 11) 

U. S. Steel 
(BBDO) 

$80,000 



The Bob New- 
hart Show 

St 10/11 

Sealtest % 

IN. W. Ayer) 

Beechnut (Y&R) 

$65,000 



Untouchables 

(vTiU-hsii 'festes) 

Block Drug 

(Grey) 

Corn Prod (L&N) 



CBS Reports 

(in. 11) 

Bristol -Myert 

(Y&R) 

Mobiloil 

Smith. Kline, 

French 



ing Along with 

Mitch 

Reynolds 

Ballentine 



Target: The 

Corruotors 

(9/29) 

Lorillard (L&N) 

Lever 

Alberto-Culver 

DuPont (Ayer) 



Twilight Zone 
L&M (McCann) 
Colgate (McC) 
Part 
Mobil Ponds 
A-F $39,000 



Dinah Shore 

Show 

Bt 10/16 

Amer. Dairy 

\ 
B&B Green 
Stamps (SSCB) 
$160,000 



Fight-Week 

Gillette (Maxon) 

Sp-L $45.00C 

Con. Cigar 

(EWR&R) 



Cunsmoke 

10-11 p.m. 

Remington Kan 

(Y&R) 

Gen. Foods 



:le Theatre 
wka 10-11) 
trmitreng 
(BBDO) 

$80,000 



David Brink- 
ley's Journal 

St 10/11 
Douglas Fir Ply- 
wood Assoc. 
PPG 
M $20,000 



Untouchables 

Miles 

Armour (FC&B) 

Beecham (K&E) 

Alberto Culver 

(Compton) 

$98,000 



CBS Reports 

Lever 

Polaroid 

AT&T 

D $50,000 



Buick Colgate 

Safeway 

My $70,000 



Union Carbide 
Speidel Mc-M") 
4 $94,001 



Eyewitness 

Amer. Cyanamid 
Liggett & Myers 
D $25,000 



Frank McCee's 

Here and Now 

St 9/29 

Gulf Oil Corp 

(Y&R I 

J2.").00( 



Make That 

Spare 

Brunswick 

Brn. & Wmsn 

(Bates) 

(Mc-E) 

$15.0<X 



(B&B) 
S. C. Johnson 

(B&B) 
WA $88.00 



(l'ark>on) 

Union Carbld 

(Esty) 

Polaroid 

(DD&B) 

Union Cirbtil 

(Esty) 



R. J. Reynolds 

Thomas Leemin 

(BUT) 

Sunbeam 

r. c. B) 

Noxzema (SSCB 



Maybelline 

(Post & Morr 

Block (Grey) 

Latex (Rates 

Bulova 

Beechnu- 



participating or co-op programs. Costs refer to average show costs in- 
cluding talent and production. They are gross (include 15% agency com- 
mission). They do not include commercials or time charges. Program types 
are indicated as follows (A) Adventure, (An) Anthology. (Au) Audience 
Participation, (C) Comcdv, (D) Documentary. (Dr) Drama, (F) Film, 



(I) Interview. (J) Juvenile. ^L) Live. (M) Misc.. (Mu) Music 
Mystery. (N) News, <Q) Quiz-Panel. (8c) Situation Comedy, 
Sports, (V) Variety, (W) Western. tNo charge for repeats. L. pr- 
date means last date on air. S means strating date for new show or 
sponsor in time slot. JPrice not available. 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



39 



SPONSOR ASKS: 

HOW CAN AGENCIES AVOID OVER- 
SPENDING FOR FILM COMMERCIALS? 

j PART l) 



Those answering this week's 
question are: 

• Rollo W. Hunter, Erwin 

Wasey, KuthraufT & Ryan. New York 

• Cordon Webber, Benton & 
Bowles. New \ ork 

• Harry B. Stoddart, Kenyon & 
Eckhardt. New York 

• John B. Simpson, Foote, Cone 
\ Beldinjr. New ^ ork 



Rollo W. Hunter, ».p. and director of 

tv/radio. Erwin Wasey, Ruthrauff & Ryan, 

Inc., \ew York 

Nothing beats meticulous advance 
planning as a governor on the outflow 
of dollars. Foresight is the agency 
producers most money-saving attri- 
bute. Beware of the Hairbreadth 
Harry who secretly enjoys shooting 
dav crises and the atmosphere of des- 
peration which too often pervades. 

Agency and client should cooperate 
to plan commercials far ahead and in 
series as large as possible. This, of 
course, reduces the unit cost of each 
and offers perspective for sensible 
utilization of common footage. Cash 
conservation starts earlv. 




Ill 



Plan jar ahead; 
produce in 
series; bring 
producer in 
early: avoid 
elaborate sets 



I he production house serves the 
agency better and more economically 
if brought in before storyboards are 
locked up tight with the client. This 
helps to clean up such disaster areas 
as the overlong, unproducible board 
which eats up camera time in extem- 
porary patching while the crew stands 
around. 

It's also possible to save money by 
spending it. The cut-rate job with the 
"backyard" or "garage" variety of 



producer doesn't effect the saving 
which prompts its use. More likely 
it will cost more in the long run — in 
dollars, quality and headaches. Stick- 
ing to reputable firms helps insure 
against unrealistic bidding and ex- 
pensive reshooting. 

Money dribbles away into elabo- 
rate sets of which only a fraction 
will be seen in the close-ups intended 
for use. If you want to shoot the top 
of an electric range, don't let the 
producer build a housing develop- 
ment as a "cover" shot. Similarly, if 
you know that your announcer track 
will fill a whole minute, don't let an 
arranger orchestrate for fifty violins 
to be heard only as the faintest back- 
ground. 

Some items for the thriftv produc- 
er's check list: careful casting (Will 
her hair really be long enough by 
shooting day? Will his pot belly show 
in the scene with his jacket off?) : 
dry rehearsals, walk-through of ac- 
tion ahead of filming; set construc- 
tion finished and checked so cameras 
can roll at an unfashionable hour of 
the morning: color corrected pack- 
ages pre-tested for lighting and 
enough on hand to minimize trauma; 
in commercials with children, dogs or 
food, spares ready to take over. 

One of the best ways to avoid over- 
spending is to avoid getting a repu- 
tation for never knowing what you 
want. When that word gets around, 
production bids come in padded in 
self defense to cover your costly be- 
fuddlement. 

Cordon Webber, V.p. and director of 

broadcast commercial production , Benton & 

Bowles, Inc., New York 

Here is some overheard dialogue 
in the battle to keep commercial film 
costs down: 
Account Executive: We've got to 

get on the air in two weeks. 
Commercial Producer: But — but — 
Account Executive: That means an 

answer print by next Friday. Okay? 




Rule No. 1: Avoid "panic produc- 
tion." Plan ahead. It's cheaper and 
faster to do it ri<rht the first time. 



Video 
1. Open on girl walking across St. 
Mark's Square in Venice followed 
by a croud of pigeons. On cue a 
pigeon alights on her outstretched 
hand. Zoom in to cue of pigeon. 

Audio 
1. Pigeon: (on cue) Coo! 
Rule No. 2: Discourage "Gone 



Keep commer- 
cial's concept 
simple: shoot 
storyboard first, 
then get creative 



With the Wind" copyrighting. Keep 
concepts relevant, simple. 

* --• *• 

Client: Lets produce just one and 

see how it looks. 
Rule No. 3: Produce in pools when 
possible. Piecemeal production can 
up a brand's unit cost. 

* * * 

Commercial Producer: Your guess 
is as good as mine what the hell it 
means. I only saw the storyboard 
this morning myself. 
Rule No. 4: Note to copywriter: 
Don't keep the producer in the dark. 
Talk to him. Early and often. He de- 
serves to know what he is going to 
be hung for before the noose is tied. 
If he's brought into the act early 
enough, maybe he can save both your 
necks. And some production costs, 
too. 

-::• -::- * 

Commercial Producer: The story- 
board says "girl in surf." 

Account Executive (looking out 
window at snowplow on Madison 
l Please turn to page 42 ) 



40 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



NOW DOES IT SAY SUCCESS TO YOU? You're looking at the new symbol of the most success- 
ful spot radio plan in advertising history. Why most successful? Because it has never failed to 
the sales goals of its users * Through the Blair Group Plan you can reach over 80% of the nation's 
buying power with one order, one affidavit, one invoice. You can focus on any segment of the mass 
market- with local personalities delivering your product message. There's nothing like the Blair Group 
Plan anywhere. We've tried to visualize its uniqueness in this new symbol.The spiral signifies the nation- 
wide group of radio stations working together to generate increased selling power for the advertiser- 
power dramatized by the upward thrust of the arrow. See how the Blair Group Plan can strengthen 
the local impact of your marketing strategy. Get the convincing evidence from your nearby office of 
John Blair & Company.*For example, Ac'cent, Beech-Nut Coffee, Columbia Pictures, Cut- 
Rite Wax Paper, Dash Dog Food, Dodge Trucks, duPont Zerex, Dormeyer Appliances, 
Flako Mixes, Ipana, Keds, Marlboro, Mennen, M-G-M, Parker Brothers Games, 
Parker Pens, Philip Morris, Purolator, Tanfastic Lotion, Tea Council of the U.S.A. 



BLAIR GROUP PLAN 




New York PL 2-0400 ■ Chicago SU 7-2300 • Boston KE 6-1472 'Philadelphia LO 8-0290 ,. Detroit .^ 1-6030 -Atlanta 875-7567 
Si Louis GA 1-5262 • Dallas Rl 1-4228 • Los Angeles DU 7-1333 • San Franc.sco DO 2-3188 Seattle MA d ww 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



41 



SPONSOR ASKS: 

ntinued from paze 10) 

i venue'* That mean* Florida. I 

Jamaica. \\ hen do 
leave? 
Rule V " \\oid the w inter jun- 
ket t>> far-off Bonny isles. Whenever 
— ible. plan and Bhool in »vin \>ith 

the seasons. 

* • • 

I WRITER: I think the gill should 
have her shoe* on. 

Commercial Producer: I see her 

\%ith one shoe off and one shoe on. 
Director: Okay, well shoot it both 
ways, then the right way. Bare- 
footed. 
Rule No. ' V id shooting it seven 
ways for Sunday. Careful preproduc- 
tion planning in which common agree- 
ment is reached on all aspects oi the 
job can cut costly overtime. 

• • • 

Client: But it's not like the story- 
board. 

Rule No. 7: Shoot the stor\ board. 
then get creative. This usuallv means 
sbooting it two ways, but can save 
costly reshooting. 

i Rule No. T seems inconsistent 
with Rule No. 6. It is. This leads us 



to the eighth and final rule: I 
Rule No. 8: Don't let rules stand 
in the wav of producing the best 
darned commercial possible. The 
cheapest commercial in the world 
costs too much if it doesn't do the 
job. A commercial that does the job 
hardlv ever costs too much. 



Harry B. Sroddart, manager of tr/radio 
commercial production, Kenyon & Ech- 
hardt, Inc., -Yew I 

Hire smart people! It's not smart 
to be thrifty when you employ second 
hand writers, pedestrian producers 
and apprentice artists. The good 
ones can pay the excess fare in one 
major production job. 

Build a three-man team! It takes 
three to tangle with the complexities 
of a tv commercial. Writer. Visual- 
izer. Producer. Guys who can work, 
live and think together. Nothing 
beats creative chemistrv for setting 
hot ideas on fire. 

Spend client dollars like your own! 
Under-the-table deals are still plagu- 
ing the industry. Get your bidding 
■ lit in the open. Invite at least three 
qualified production houses to a joint 
briefing session. Have sealed bids 



"America looks to the South 
for economic growth, and 
the Jackson TV 
market area 
leads that 
growth." 

Past President. 

U.S. Chamber of Commerce 




BOYD CAMPBELL 



Pres.. Mississippi 
School Supply 



WJTV 



Serving the Jackson, Miss., Television Market 




submitted on the agency's bid form 
to be opened in the presence of all 
concerned. 

Pre-plan! Get with the problems 
early. Hold pre-production meetings 
well in advance. Make a shooting 
storyboard or better yet an animatic 
test. Nine out of 10 production 
problems would never happen if the 
job were properly planned. 

Get the client in the act! Manv of 
the loud noises in screening rooms 



Build a writer- 
visualizer- 
producer team ; 
pick your loca- 
tion: uatch 
residuals 



are justified. \^ hen a client sees 
nothing till the answer print, he's en- 
titled to yell. And one good loud 
yell can knock the hell out of a 
budget. 

Allow more time! The greatest 
waste in tv today is the insane "Beat- 
The-Clock" pace to meet impossible 
air dates. Double, triple and penalty 
time can blow a budget a mile high. 

Shoot in packages! Buv your com- 
mercials wholesale. Shoot three, six. 
nine at a crack and save a bundle. 

Watch those residuals! The time 
to guard against a SAG in your 
budget is before shootins. A single 
spot can cost over $5,000 for 13 
weeks just for residuals. 

Pick your location >.' You can't 
beat the production facibties and 
skilled personnel in New l ork and 
L. A., but you can beat the high 
prices by going on location for some 
commercials ! 

One uord of teaming! There are 
many sensible wavs to cut produc- 
tion costs — true! Just be sure you 
don't end up with a cut-rate drug- 
store commercial. If you weaken a 
million dollar idea, or cheapen a bil- 
lion dollar product to save a few dol- 
lars, you should see an expensive 
head doctor. 



John B. Simpson, ■ P- and national di 

rector of broadcast, Foote, Cone & Belding, 

\ew York 

There are several obvious ingredi- 
ents that prevent excessive costs in 

ease turn to page 66^ 



42 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 




Look at all two! 



one ever bought o goose ond lived happily ever 
r. Or a car or a bar of soap or anything! It pays 
,:ompare constantly, keep abreast, shop around, 
rs ago, a great advertisement appeared with this 
e headline, almost. They were referring to three 
^mobiles. 

ve are talking about two ways to sell your product 
television. Film and Videotape*— both changing 
I growing techniques. In fact. Videotape has pro- 
ved so rapidly in the last few months that you are 
;ing the boat if you're not looking into what it can 
,or your product every time you plan a commercial. 

Videotape Productions of 



The place to see the vast difference between Video- 
tape and film is not in the agency projection room 
where a few executives see it. It's on the home TV 
screen where 100,000,000 consumers are sold. This 
is where the picture and sound superiority of Video- 
tape over film really pays off. This is where the impor- 
tant new editing techniques, the unlimited effects and 
illusions now possible on Videotape really show up 
and sound off. Because Videotape and only Videotape 



is electronically compatible with the television system. 

Videotape is faster. Less costly. Surer . You see 

exactly what you're getting as you get it. You don't 

New York, Inc. • 101 West 67th Street, New York 



tie up a top creative agency team for weeks when 
you assign them to a commercial. They come to 
Videotape Center, walk out with the job done, ex- 
actly as visualized. 

This brings us to our great new Videotape Center. 
It is equipped with three superb studios, every newest 
technological improvement, the creative staff in 
Videotape today and world-wide mobile facilities. 
Tape offers you more than film, but don't just take our 
word for it. Go to any network, any television s) 
better still, come to Videotape Cert 'ook at all 

two— side by side on pipeline to the hc"-e sceen. 

TR 3-5800 



* 



SPONSOR 

IS ON 
THE MOVE 



SEE THE 
INSIDE BACK COVER 



Satwnal and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Lever Brothers, New York, will open a spot campaign for its 
Breeze. This will have its start 22 Octoher and will run through 
2 Decemher. Time segments will be day and early and late night 
minutes. There will be some 40 to 50 markets involved. Agencv : 
SSC&B. New York. Buyer: Chuck Woodruff. 

Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, has expanded its campaign forCrisco 
with an addition of 20 markets. Time segment: night minutes. 
Agency: Compton, New York. Buyer: Joel Segal. Another campaign 
will begin in October for Crisco oil. This will use dav minutes and 
will continue through the P&G year. This will go into some 30 to 
40 markets. Agency: Compton. New York. Buyer: Len Werner. 
The Remington-Rand division of Sperry Rand Corp.. Bridgeport. 
Conn., is coming up with a substantial campaign for its electric 
shaver. This will start 26 November and have a four week flight. 
Time segment: prime breaks. It will go into 60 markets at a 
frequency of 22 spots per week. Agencv: Y&R. New ^ ork. Buyer: 
Don Proctor. 

American Home Products, New York, will begin a campaign for 
its Dristan on 8 October. This will use fringe and prime late night 
minutes for time. It will have a 52-week run in over 40 markets. 
Agency: T4^. New \ ork. Buyer: Don Douglas. 
Colgate-Palmolive Company, New York, will enter a promotion for 
its Rapid Shave. This will begin 15 October and will have a six 
week flight. Time segment: minutes and breaks. Naturally, thi- 
campaign seeks a male audience. It will go into about 40 to 50 
markets. Agency: Bates. New York. Buyer: Eileen Greer. 
General Foods, \^ hite Plains. N. \ .. will run a test promotion for 
new product. Open Pit Barbecue Sauce. This will use only one mar 
ket. that being Atlanta and it will run over there for 25 weeks. Th 
start is set for 8 October. Time segments: Day minutes on Wedne- 
dav. Thursday, and Friday only. Agency: OBM. New York. Buyer 
Pete Berla. 

Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, has another promotion coming uj 
this time for its Downy. This will begin in October and go throug: 
the P&G vear. Time segments: day and night minutes. It will ente 
some 40 to 50 markets. Agency: Gray. New York. Buyer: Irene Le\^ 
Kayser-Roth Hosiery Company, New York, will begin a promotio 
in October. This will have two starts: 14 October through 20 Octobe 
and 28 October through 3 N ovember. Time segments : day and earl 
and late evening minutes, also prime I.D.'s. It will involve 20 to 3 
markets. 

General Foods, Wliite Plains. N. Y.. has another promotion planne 
for its La France. This will start 15 October and will have a flig 
of six weeks. Time segment: day minutes. There will be about 
markets in this one. Agency : Y&R. New York. Buyer: Lou Fox. 



,: 



14 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 196 




_ ■■■•■•■■■■■■■•■••■■■■ 

■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■•■•■■■■■_ 
■ ■■••■•■■■■■■■•■■•■■■■a 

■ ■••■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■•■~ 
_ _■■■■■■■•■■•■■■>■•■■■■■ 

• ■•■■•■••■■•■■■•■•■■■•■■•■■•■■■•■■■•■oaa 
«■•■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•••■•■■••■■■■■•■ 

■ ■•■••■■•■■■■■•■••■•■••■•■■•■■•■■■•■*•■• 
■ ■■■■■■•■■■■■•■■■■■■•■■•■■■■■■•■•■■■■■•a 

■ ■••■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■••••••■■■•■■■•■■■■■a 

• •■•■■•■■■••■■■•■■••■■■■•■■••■■■■■••■•■■■ 

■ •••■■•■■■■•■■■■•■■■■■■••■■•■•••■■■■*■■■ 

• ■••■•■■•■■■■■■•■■■■■■■•■■■•■■■>■■•■■•■■ 

• ■■■■■■•■■■■■■■•■■■■•■■■■■■■•■■■■■■••■■a 
- - - - - - -■■■••••••■■••■••■■■■• 




Compact, close, crowded . . . Providence, 

the "Must Buy" market . . . where fresh sales impact springs 
from the coverage dominance of WJAR-TV. Programmed to 
penetrate, WJAR-TV reaches more homes, more people, 
in the most compact, close, crowded market in the country 
with a showmanship that translates advertising into sales 
for coverage conscious sponsors. 

NBC • ABC 



ARB 1960 TV Homes 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



WiSMM-TW =n^ 



& Co. Inc. 



45 



SPONSOR 

IS ON 
THE MOVE 



SEE THE 
INSIDE BACK COVER 



HAIR TINTS 

[Continued from page 27 i 

tures in television. It previously 
spent most of its money in magazine 
space. 

"The competition in the hair color- 
ing field will get a lot hotter.'" Finlay 
said. "Some big companies came into 
the field but made no impact on con- 
sumers. Hair coloring is a tough 
product to formulate. It's a narcotic 
(that's a dirty word) but that's what 
hair coloring is. Having once pur- 
chased the product, it is like giving 
a needle to the woman. She must go 
back to the use of the product time 
and again." 

When Tintair first appeared on the 
market, its backers, greater believers 
in the demonstration possibilities of 
video, purchased a flock of shows, 
notablv the Somerset Maugham Thea- 
ter over CBS TV. and also bought 
into such programs as the Frank 
Sinatra show. Jack Carter program 
and Cavalcade of Bands. It spent 
several million dollars promoting 
Tintair via the broadcasting medium. 
But. as indicated previously. Tintair 
ran into calumny and governmental 
obstacles. Professional hairdressers 
spread a base story that the product 
would turn madam's hair green 
which, of course, was a canard. But 
Tintair made hair coloring fashion- 
able and. indeed, respectable. Finlav 
is a great believer in the use of tv to 
promote his product and indicate to 
sponsor that Tintair was planning a 
spot campaign (one-minute spots) in 
major markets including New York. 
Los Angeles, Detroit. Boston, Phila- 
delphia, etc. starting the middle of 
this month. 

"Television can't be surpassed for 
the demonstration of hair coloring.'" 
Finlay declared. "In our TV com- 
mercials we never miss an opportun- 
itv to spell out Tintair's simplicity 
and ease of application. Of course, 
we take abuse from the beauty parlor 
operators because we sell only to the 
consumer, but we'll lick that problem 
before long. Also there are still 
pockets of resistance in this land 
insofar as haircoloring is concerned. 
But it is a minor factor, to be sure." 
Color television, in Finlav's oninion. 
will be a superb blessing for the man- 
ufacturer and sponsor of hair color- 
ing. "Selling color with color is 
most effective." he exclaimed. It is 



simply terrific. Color television will 
be hard to beat in the promotion of 
such products." Finlay estimated 
that Tintair's total expenditures 
since its first appearance on televi- 
sion adds up to approximately 
S7.000,000. Among its current pro- 
ducts are Beauty Set Color Rinse and 
Tintair Creme Color Shampoo. 

Clairol is undoubtedly the number 
one hair coloring product in the land 
— a product made famous by Law- 
rence Gelb, now chairman of the 
board of Clairol Inc. This hair color- 
ing manufacturer is indeed the fab- 
ulous story of the Gelb family despite 
the cheerful fact that it is presently 
a wholly owned subsidiary of the 
Bristol-Myers Corp. which purchased 
it two years ago for the tidy sum of 
822,500,000. Clairol may have been 
sold to a large organization, but its 
key execs are still the Gelbs. Clairol 
sells to both the professional beauti- 
cians and to the consumer. The Gelbs 
introduced Lady Clairol Hair Color 
Bath in 1950 and it was the spark that 
set off a marketing explosion. Later 
came Lady Clairol Whipped Creme 
Hair Lightener, Miss Clairol Creme 
Formula. Salon Formula Creme 
Toner, Come Alive Gray. Blue Light- 
ening Powder Bleach and Pure White 
Creme Developer. 

Like its parent company. Clairol is 
a great believer in Tv advertising. 
Bristol-Myers sales jumped more 
than ll r ; to S146.716.000 last year 
(seventh consecutive yearly increase I . 
In its annual report, B-M observed: 
'Major factors in producing this re- 
sult were the growth of the Clairol 
business . . ." In this instance B-M 
purchased a company with sales fig- 
ured at an annual rate of approxi- 
mately SI 5.000.000. Jack Shor, mer- 
chandising and public relation direc- 
tor of Clairol. told sponsor last week 
that the hair coloring business was a 
phenomenon and that the sales and 
advertising battles for the consumer"? 
dollars haven't really" begun. It is, 
without doubt, a skyrocketing, nay. 
jet-propelled industry that has barely 
scratched the surface, according to 
Shor. 

Television, in Shor's opinion help- 
ed considerably to break down the 
resistance of women toward hair 
coloring. No longer can a cartoonist 
draw a cartoon, as he did in 1932, 
depicting an outraged husband with 



46 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 




A man can do a lot of 

thinking while waiting" 
foi- the moving van 



J\T THE SHD 0? gEPrSMBHl, THE 136 VEC>PLE WBO ARE 
YoUtfG- &RUHCAM JN CHICAGO MOVED TROM. 333 WORTH 
MI^HIG-W AVBNUBTb ONE EAST WACKER PRrvT 
THESE -AflE THB THOUGHTS THAT WENT THROUGH ONE MAN JS 
MIVD WHILE WALTLAJG- FOR THB MOVERS TO COMB- 

JaPi m advertising and I believe in It 

1 believe vi advertising as a worthwhile 
career, but jnore importantly as a ibrce 
for good m a free economy. 

2 know of no more significant 
opportunity than telling an honest 
public about an honest product. 

1 believe m words and I believe in 
pictures, not So much m the way 
-fyey can he put together to arrest 
the eye and ear, but jn the way 
they get ideas out of the package 
into the buying mind. 

1 respect the arithmetic of the Census, 
but in so domgy I try to listen -to the 
heartbeat of the people. 

The size of the market impresses 
me, hut ]t is the feel of it 1 trust. 

SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



When it comes to publications, Ido not 
question the number of people they 
reach gs closely as J do the way they 
talk to them; and it isn't the power 
of rV that stirs me as much as the 
purpose to which it can aspire. 

I believe that in the act of advertising 
you move from principle , not merely 
policy. You see]< to lead and to build, 
and you accept the risk, and if you 
fail, you dare the risk again. 

Or you are neither leading 
nor building. 

It is difficult to believe hke this, 
because It is more popular to hedge 
the bet than to make the book. 

It is safer to repeat a platitude 
than to Suppose a philosophy. 

It is easier to arrest attention tha_n 
to earn your welcome. 

Imagination Can be dangerous. 
But lack of it is fatal. 

Figures comfort business minds and 
formulas promise refuge . But in 
neither do J repose my fall belief 
because 7 am of the people. 

Of, not above them, and most decidedly 
for them. And when J have kept 
faith -with my job , I am with them . 

Advertising is my business, and ■ 
this is why I believe in it. 



FRESHEN UP ON YOUR FALL PROGRAMMING 

Now Available! 

ONE 

MINUTE 

RADIO 

FEATURES! 

Individual Series 
STARRINC 

OLEG CASSINI 

Fashion Commentary 

HY GARDNER 

Show Biz Round-up 

VINCENT LOPEZ 

Numerology and Predictions 

HENRY MORGAN 

Comedy 

• 

For Complete Details and Sample Tapes 

Write or Phone 

CHUCK PRAGER 

Radio Syndications Inc. 

441 West End Ave. 
New York 24, N. Y. 

Phone: TRafalgar 7-8402 



We'd like to be 

the cream in 

Doug II mum's Coffee 

Dear Doug: \our copywriters at 
Charles W. Hoyt insist that since 
your client's coffee is better black, 
it's better every way. 
The logic is crushing. 

So is our logic at WHIH. We 
maintain that if you want to talk 
up coffee in the Tidewater, you'd 
best tell your story over a radio 
station that people really listen to. 

WHIH. for example . . . where 
the news is hot. the music cool and 
the public service programming 
grown-up and important. 

Granted, we're the newest station 
down here, hence temporarily em- 
barrassed for case histories as long 
as your arm. But we're also the 
freshest station. And after all. Mr. 
Humm. isn't that the name of the 
game? Would you have your coffee 
or your commercials (or your 
media I any other way? 

WHIH 

FORMERLY WLOW 

TIDEWATER, VIRGINIA 

AN ELLIOT STATION 
Representatives: Avery-Knodel 



club in his hand, rushing into a 
beauty parlor and exclaiming: "I 
want to see the man who made my 
wife a red-head!"" Shor said that most 
hair coloring makers have learned 
bo* to make hair look good on black 
and white television. "It was a 
struggle at first but we are breaking 
through,"' he said. "Television reaches 
the women most effectively. In addi- 
tion to buying spots in all major 
markets and partial sponsorship of tv 
programs as well as some radio. 
Clairol indicated it was planning the 
purchase of several specials — notablv 
two on NBC. One of the specials 
would deal with high societv in Amer- 
ican. The title of the special is "Storv 
of a Debutante." The other special 
is "The ^ anishing 400." Foote. Cone 
& Belding. the Clairol Agencv. pur- 
chased the two programs for a re- 
ported sum of $340,000. including 
time and talent. No exact dates have 
been set for the presentation of these 
two NBC TV specials. Thev will be 
produced by Bill Wilson. More than 
> 1.500.000 was spent last year on net- 
work and spot tv. In the first six 
months of '61. it spent more than 
si. 200.000. 

Statistics show one out of everv 
three women colors her hair todav — 
and this illuminating factor has con- 
vinced the Clairol executives not to 
broaden their base and enter other 
branches of the cosmetic business. 
Said Larry Gelb. in discussing the 
future of Clairol: "Color profession- 
ally opens doors so wide to a business 
so fabulous, that no companv need go 
afield to find business potentials. 
\^ ere right here — and here in color 
— is where we're going to stay." 

Perhaps more than others. Clairol 
touts color day and night in all its 
dealings. It stages color clinics 
throughout the country. Every woman 
is a likely prospect for a color job. 
according to Clairol. in the salon if 
not in the home, but the emphasis is 
on the beauty salon. Its consumer 
copy is to the effect that "Clairol 
believes onlv her hairdresser knows 
fo 



r sure 



. today haircoloring has 
become the one single service most 
in demand in beauty salons . . . 
Clairol will never cease in its efforts 
to help keep America's beauticians 
the best trained, the best equipped, 
the most respected, and most pros- 
perous in the world. 

Another recent and powerful entry 



into the hair coloring field is Revlon. 
It introduced Color-Up, a hair con- 
ditioner and color rinse last fall. 
Rivals in the field expect Revlon will 
prove a heavy competitor, as it has 
been in other branches of the cos- 
metic business. Revlon is also a deep 
believer in the use of television to 
promote its products. Revlon entered 
the hair coloring products field in 
1959 by purchasing the Bressard 
Hair Products Corp. Revlon. in the 
promotion of all of its products on 
television, spent approximated $6.- 
500,000 in each of the past three 
years. In 1960. its network television 
appropriation added up to $4,219,- 
000. In spot tv last vear it spent 
$2,359,000. 

Also strong in the field is Helena 
Rubinstein who has made consider- 
able impact with her Color Lift Hair 
Rinse which, according to the manu- 
facturer, "is the first and only color 
rinse guaranteed to last through five 
shampoos." It is supposed to condi- 
tion as it colors, blends in grav, cov- 
ers up the faded look in between tint- 
ings and adds an aura of color to 
natural shades of hair. Spot televi- 
sion gets most of the Helena Rubin- 
stein business via Ogilvv. Benson & 
Mather. 

Nor can the student of hair color- 
ing overlook the prominence of Roux 
among the leaders in permanent col- 
oring on the retail level. Other lead- 
ers in the temporary coloring mar- 
ket include Nestle i manufactured bv 
Xestle-LeMuir Co. I and Noreen 
i made bv Beautv Products. Ltd., 
Denver^ . 

Favorites in the permanent color 
field, according to professional beau- 
ticians, are Clairol. Roux and LOr- 
eal. Zotos. Tiz and Clairol are the 
leaders, in that order, for temporarv 
colors in the beautv shops. 

Surprisingly, a goodly number of 
men use hair coloring for economic 
reasons, according to industry ex- 
perts. When hair begins to grav and 
it is difficult to land a job, that's the 
time to tint the hair, it is reported. 
But exact figures on how many men 
color their hair are difficult to obtain. 

Said one large hair coloring manu- 
facturer. "Don't worry, were not 
quite ready to sponsor the \5 orld 
Series or the Fight of the \5 eek on 
television. The market among men 
for permanent or temporary tints 
isn't staggering — not yet. But hope 
does spring eternal!' ^ 



48 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



How 



help 





advertising 



Objectionable 



In TV, radio and print 

Through the Interchange of Opinion on Objectionable Advertising, every 
advertising man and woman can help reduce still further the small percentage 
of advertising which is harmful to advertising as a whole. 



What Is The Problem? 

From time to time, elements which are considered 
offensive and objectionable tend to creep into advertise- 
ments or commercials. 

Cumulatively, these elements irritate people against 
advertising, impair their confidence in advertising as 
a whole and weaken the effectiveness of all advertising. 
When advertising is "false" or "misleading," it is con- 
trary to law. Such advertising is dealt with by govern- 
ment regulatory bodies and by the Better Business 
Bureaus. 

But some advertising which is not illegal may be con- 
sidered objectionable on the grounds of taste and 
opinion. 




1 1 


% 


» 












/zr- 








^rF 








X 





What Can Be Done About It? 

One of the important industry efforts to discourage 
all objectionable aspects of advertising is the Copy 
Code shown in this folder. 

The Copy Code is jointly sponsored by the American 
Association of Advertising Agencies (A.A.A.A.) and 
the Association of National Advertisers (A.N.A.), en- 
dorsed also by the Advertising Federation of America 
and by some of the media associations. 
There is also a continuing program to deal with specific 
criticisms of advertising deemed to be in bad taste or 
otherwise harmful to advertising as a whole. 
This is the INTERCHANGE OF OPINION ON OB- 
JECTIONABLE ADVERTISING, operated by the 
A.N. A. - A.A.A.A. Committee for Improvement of Ad- 
vertising Content. 

The plan is described in this folder. You are invited 
to participate. 




: 



What Does The Interchange Cover? 

The Interchange of Opinion is set up to deal with ar 
national or regional agency-placed advertising co 
sidered harmful or potentially harmful to all adverti 
ing. For example: 

Bad taste, 

Suggestiveness, 

Statements offensive to public decency, 

Visual trickery, 

Weasel wording, 

Improper disparagement of other products 01 
industries, 

Derogation of advertising. 
The Interchange deals essentially with questions 
taste and opinion. It does not deal with the factu 
validity of claims as such, since the Committee dc 
not have access to the facts. Hence, it does not attem 
to duplicate the work of government regulatory bodij 
or the Better Business Bureaus in this area. 



h 







How Does The Interchange Work? 

Through the Interchange, advertisers and agencies rri 
make criticisms at any time, have the criticisms eval 
ated by a panel of advertiser and agency leaders ai, 
if the panel considers the advertising objectionarl 
have their opinions registered with the advertiser a 
the placing agency. 



ere Is How It Works : 

1. Report your criticism of any objectionable advertising to 
the designated person in your organization — the official 
A.N. A. Member Representative, in the case of advertiser com- 
panies; the appointed "coordinator" or A.A.A.A. Official 
Contact, in the case of agencies. 

2. Criticisms by advertisers or agencies are sent to the Secre- 
tary of the A.N. A. -A.A.A.A. Committee, c/o 420 Lexington 
Avenue, New York 17. 

3. Those in the scope of the Interchange are sent without 
identification to the ten advertiser people and ten agency 
people who make up the A.N. A.- A.A.A.A. Committee. 

4. Each member of the Committee is asked whether he con- 
siders any element in the advertisement to be objectionable; 
if so, what and why, and whether it is regarded as "serious." 

5. If a majority of the Committee considers the advertising 
objectionable, the criticism and the Committee's votes and 
comments are sent concurrently to the advertiser and to 
the placing agency of record. 

6. If a majority of the Committee regards the advertising as 
"seriously" objectionable, the advertiser and placing agency 
are asked to take corrective action. If within thirty days 
the advertiser and agency do not answer, or answer unsatis- 
factorily, the Committee will so notify the Boards of 
Directors of the A.N.A. and A.A.A.A. 

'he Committee vote is not reported to the complainant, since the 

!ommittee works in confidence with the advertiser and placing 

gency. 

'he Interchange is not censorship. It is helpful criticism and must 

sly on voluntary self-regulation. But it has helped to bring about 

i: considerable number of improvements in advertising, many in 

Campaigns having wide exposure. 




Vhat Can You Do? 

/ooking out for objectionable features in advertising is a job for 

ach of us in advertising. 

through the Interchange of Opinion, you as an individual can help. 
If you see or hear what you consider an objectionable com- 
mercial on television or radio, note the advertiser, the net- 
work or station, the date and time — enough to describe 
them accurately. 

If you see an objectionable ad in print, tear it out or make 
a note of it. 

Watch for objectionable advertisements on outdoor posters, 
carcards, and in other forms of advertising too, and make 
enough notes to describe them accurately. 
Give your criticism to the person in your organization who 
has been appointed to forward complaints to the A.N.A. - 
A.A.A.A. Committee. 
- an advertiser or a placing agency — receive a communication 

rom the Committee, please consider it carefully. It may express a 
/aluable point of view. 

/our cooperation will help raise confidence in and acceptability of 
ndvertising still further in the minds of the public. 

fou strengthen your own advertising when you help to reduce 

•bjectionable advertising which is harmful to advertising as a whole. 



fou 



COPY CODE 



The following copy practices are 
disapproved in a code jointly 
adopted by the American Asso- 
ciation of Advertising Agencies 
and the Association of National 
Advertisers, and also by the Ad- 
vertising Federation of America : 



a. False statements or mislead- 
ing exaggerations. 



b. Indirect misrepresentation of 
a product, or service, through 
distortion of details, or of their 
true perspective, either editor- 
ially or pictorially. 



c. Statements or suggestions of- 
fensive to public decency. 



d. Statements which tend to un- 
dermine an industry by attribut- 
ing to its products, generally, 
faults and weaknesses true only 
of a few. 



e. Price claims that are mislead- 
ing. 



f. Pseudoscientific advertising, 
including claims insufficiently 
supported by accepted author- 
ity, or that distort the true mean- 
ing or practicable application of 
a statement made by professional 
or scientific authority. 



g. Testimonials which do not re- 
flect the real choice of a compe- 
tent witness. 



The A.N. A— A. A. A. A. Committee for 
Improvement of Advertising Content 

Association of 

National Advertisers, Inc. 

American Association of 
Advertising Agencies, Inc. 

Address: 

420 Lexington Avenue, 

New York 17, N. Y. 




. 




Each lists all 
the previous 
by the FCC 



HOW TO SATISFY FCC 

(Continued from page 30) 

To insure that schedules on the 
three outlets are paralleling program 
plans outlined in the WJIM license 
applications, weekly program type 
summaries (see cut) are prepared 
from the daily logs, 
programs broadcast 
week, broken down 
"Type definitions" (i.e. religious, in- 
structive, public affairs, agriculture, 
etc.) and provides the percentage of 
total operating time devoted to each 
tvpe. Printed in the right hand cor- 
ner of the form are WJIM's per- 
centages for each type as provided to 
the FCC in its license application. 

Each Monday morning these Pro- 
gram Type Summaries are placed on 
President Gross' desk. A quick look 
at the two sets of percentage figures 
provides him with a continuing run- 
ning record of each station's opera- 
tions. 

In addition, a monthly summary 
of program types is drawn up detail- 
ing the same type of information. 
Interestingly enough the WJIM stand- 
ards differ for each of its three out- 
lets. Par for news, for example, at 
WJIM-Radio is 14.7%, for WJIM- 
FM is 13.4% and for WJIM-TV is 
5.9%. (Incidentally, in the WJIM 
breakdowns, all programs other than 
in the six specified categories are en- 
tertainment.) 

Broadcasters, and others who have 
seen the WJIM program type report 
declare it a remarkably simple and 
effective way of keeping track of sta- 
tion programing. 

In the proposed new FCC regula- 
tions, applicants for license renewals 
are required to report to the Com- 
mission on two different samples of 
programing — 1 ) a "Composite Week" 
and 2) an "Applicant's Selected 
Week." 

The "Composite Week" consists of 
the record of seven different specific 
days designated by the Commission 
from the previous year's operation. 

The "applicant's selected week" 
covers seven different ways, chosen 
by the station as typical of its pro- 
graming pattern (but not including 
dates in the "Composite week. ) 

All in all, the amount of detailed 
information will be flowing into FCC 
headquarters in the next few years 
staggers the imagination. And how 
much of it, broadcasters are asking. 
is really worth all the trouble? ^ 



MOGUL 

(Continued from page 35) 

clients it would serve as a means of 
educating a lot of people in the busi- 
ness. 

There are too many existing cases 
where account people don't know- 
enough about radio. Moreover, this 
general lack of knowledge about the 
medium's potential also exists among 
advertisers, says Mogul. Mogul feels 
sure that the proposed plan would be 
applauded by the majority of agen- 
cies which have worked — like Mogul, 
Williams & Saylor — in the interest of 
radio. "There are some," states Mo- 
gul, "who have worked hard to fur- 
ther the medium along. BBDO," he 
adds, "is a good example." 

Blunt-speaking Mogul who is 
known along the Avenue as some- 
thing of a maverick was born in 
New York City during the summer 
of 1900. His alert brown eyes and 
firm-jawed countenance belie his 
calendar years. 

Even while seated on the couch in 
his quietly dignified office, Mogul 
exudes unharnessed energy. With 
gestures adding credence to his com- 
ments, Mogul told a sponsor editor 
of his belief in radio's potential. And 
in the feasibility of his proposed 
plan. 

Mogul made it to his present posi- 
tion by way of the obstacle course. 



He was out earning 



a living at age 



13 when most boys are concerned 
only with bartering bubble gum 
cards. He was errand boy and ship- 
ping clerk in a clothing factory. At 
the same time he joined the ranks of 
the subway scholar brigade, getting 
in a few licks of law school learning 
at night. 

In 1934, after a two-year stint as 
a salesman for a New Jersey radio 
station. Mogul — with two associates — 
set up a small advertising agency that 
specialized in radio. Three years later, 
he formed a partnership with Alvin 
Austin and Raymond Spector to set- 
up a general agency which they called 
Austin Spector Co. 

On January 13, 1940 (apparently 
thumbing his nose at the not-so-lucky 
number 13) Mogul formed Emil Mo- 
gul Co. That first year he had exactly 
three accounts — a retail shoe chain, 
a clothing store and a mens clothing 
manufacturer, and a total billing of 
less than $200,000. (Two of the origi- 
nal accounts are still with him, by the 
way). 



By 1949, Emil Mogul Co. 
reaching up to a billings tab of < I 
to $1.5 million. On January I 
with 19 clients and SI 1 million in 
hillings. Mogul merged with Lewin 
\\ illiams 61 Saylor. 

Mogul who is justifiably proud thai 
his agency has won a number of 
awards for art, copy and tv commer- 
cials, takes a dim view (and doesn't 
mind saying sol of triple and quad- 
ruple spotting and over-commercial- 
ization. 

He also has some strong words to 
say about time bartering deals which 
are currently being practiced by a 
number of radio and television sta- 
tions across the country. 

Mogul is leery of the bartering 
practice as it generally involves a lot 
of unnecessary paper work, and more 
important, often results in a failure 
to deliver the schedule contracted for. 
But. it isn't the extra work that dis- 
turbs him as much as the fact that 
the advertiser and his agency lose 
control of expenditures in a specific 
market. 

Mogul doesn't take issue with local 
barter or trade-out deals. This ex- 
change of merchandise for time is 
legitimate, he says, providing the lo- 
cal merchant uses the time to pro- 
mote his own business. The evil in 
barter arrangement happens when a 
chunk of time is traded by a hungrv 
station to a barter agency at a ratio 
of four to one, for something the 
station needs (it could be anything 
from a new 7 transmitter to office fur- 
niture) and the barter agency is then 
free to sell this time to anyone at 
considerably lower than card rate. 
The general practice is about 10',' 
off the card rate, he says. 

This type of deal sounds and looks 
good on paper, Mogul says, but when 
it's put to the test, the deal invariably 
falls apart at the seams, he contends. 
"Moreover" he adds, "the station 
which barters the time in this fash- 
ion will all too often treat the barter 
'partner' like a stepchild." 

What Mogul means is this: sched- 
ules are subject to pre-emption and 
rescheduling is done in non-desirable 
time area. Not until the monthly 
affidavit and statement arrives is this 
situation fully realized and then it is 
too late to correct the damage. 

"I stronglv urge the FCC and FTC 
to take a good, hard look at the prac- 
tice as it currently exist-." ! ■ 
emphatically. ^ 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



53 




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54 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



.. 







What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



2 OCTOBER 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Officials of the FCC are in a conciliatory mood as they prepare for the 6 Oc- 
tober meeting with broadcasters brought in by NAB to complain about proposed 
new application forms and logging requirements. 

They and the Commissioners will give careful consideration to all complaints, and will 
simplify where they think it can be done without sacrificing the obtaining of the information 
they want and broadcasters really don't want to give; that is, about programing. 

The Commissioners and staff will not listen during this particular meeting to accusations 
of censorship or to any arguments going to the heart of the question involving 
FCC power to call for the information it wants. They will show every willingness to 
work with the industry on engineering forms which will do the job the FCC wants done with- 
out putting a burden of excessive paper work on broadcasters. 



A. Everette Maclntyre has formally been sworn in for a seven-year term as a 
member of the Federal Trade Commission. 

He replaces Robert T. Secrest, and is the second New Frontiersman on the 5-man FTC. 
Chairman Paul Rand Dixon is the other. 

Dixon and Maclntyre both came from Congressional committees. Both were specialists 
on antitrust problems. Their work in Congress indicates they are pretty much alike in their 
thinking, and it appears Maclntyre will strengthen Dixon's hand on the FTC. 

Despite all the publicity about toughened regulatory attitudes at the FCC, therefore, it 
appears the real toughening will be at FTC. Both Dixon and Maclntyre have made it clear 
that antitrust backgrounds notwithstanding, they will work for tighter reins on advertis- 
ing. Both have expressed special interest in broadcast advertising. 

In Maclntyre's background are 25 years as an attorney with the FTC, then a switch to the 
House Small Business Committee. He has conducted probes of the Federal regulatory agen- 
cies, on one of which he now sits as a member. Point of his probes was whether these agencies 
have been negligent in policing their respective fields. And, if so, whether this negligence has 
harmed small business. 

Within his field of interest in these investigations was television advertising. This was true 
both from the point of interest of truthfulness, and whether false and misleading commercials 
by large advertisers could put small business out of business, and also whether large national 
advertisers are permitted an unfair advantage through domination of the airwaves. 

It appears that both Dixon and Maclntyre will be pushing for a step-up in radio/tv 
monitoring, as well as in a general step-up in the field of false advertising. The FTC, in 
short, looks much tougher right now. 



The first session of the 87th Congress appeared to do little about radio and 
television. 

The only major legislation passed were the FCC and FTC reorganizations and the bill 
legalizing league-wide tv contracts, such as the CBS contract with the National Football League 
which had been disallowed by Federal Judge Grim under the NFL consent decree. 

{Please turn to page 57) 



?ONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1%1 



55 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



2 OCTOBER 1961 The syndicators are entering a new documentary vogue. 

copyright i96i Aside from the companies that have gone out of new product distribution, there are very 

sponsor few syndicators left who haven't handled something related to documentaries lately. 

publications inc. Reasons for the vogue are two-fold: a heightened interest in news, news features, and 

factual or informational shows, and the economics of documentaries. 

What's more exciting lately than the headlines, ask some syndicators; no action-adventure 
fiction, they say, can beat today's news. 

Then again, for distributors who don't want to invest SI million or more to produce an 
adventure, documentaries can be had relatively cheaply, some for apparently hardly more 
than the cost of reshuffling stock news footage. 

This is important in a market where shows may have to take the station-by-station route 
and where an expensive show without regional backing could have its troubles. 

This week, for instance, Cinema- Vue entered a co-production deal with Pathe News to 
produce 25 biographical half hours, called They Made History. Sales will be han- 
dled by Joseph Smith in New York and Frank Smith in California. 



Ziv-UA feels that its King of Diamonds is well on its way to becoming another 
Highway Patrol. 

The new series also stars Broderick Crawford and has a hefty advance sale: 185 markets 
reported before telecast started. (Highway Patrol never passed more than 210 markets at 
once.) 

The new series is being supported by many medium and small sized regionals, including 
Jax, Piels, Schmidt, Kroger, Safeway, Fels, and International Harvester. 

At the same time Ziv-UA is building up Ripcord as another Sea Hunt, adding yet one more 
twist to action-adventure programing. (For latest sales details, see FILM WRAP-UP, p. 66.) 



Station sales of The Beachcomber in the last few weeks bring the Filmaster se- 
ries up to 117 markets reported. 

Quite a few of its recent sales come from station groups adding on extra markets: Stor- 
er's WITI-TV, Milwaukee, and Corinthian's KOTV, Tulsa, fall into this category. 

Other station groups making initial buys are Friendly's WSTV, Steubenville, and WBOY- 
TV, Clarksburg, plus Southwest States' KOSA-TV, Odessa, and KVII-TV, Amarillo. 

Other stations bringing recent sales to ten are KTTV, Los Angeles; WAVE-TV, Louis- 
ville; WJAC-TV, Johnstown, and WRDW-TV, Augusta. 



One dilemma of the distributors who did filming in color some seasons ago is 
when, if at all, to try to re-relrease series for effective colorcast. 

A touchy problem could be this: some of the backlog filmed in color has gone through 
extended re-run in black-and-white and it's hard to foretell whether their re-release in tint | 
would be received with sufficient viewer and advertiser interest. 

56 SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



I 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Official Films has reported a pre-tax profit of $0.4 million for the fiscal year 
ended in June compared to a $1.3 million loss the previous year. 

That's $237,000 profit after taxes, compared to $691,000 loss before. 
Distribution commissions and gross profit from sales went up $778,650 to reach $1.2 
million. 

President Seymour Reed attributed the turnabout to streamlining which reduced over- 
head costs plus a new sales organization and very salable new product. 

Incidentally, Howard B. Koerner, in charge of product acquisition for Official, was 
awarded his v.p. stripes this week. 

He now has a $1 million fund for new product or co-production of both fiction- 
al and informational series — "as long as they are entertaining." 

That's Volume III of the Warners group that Seven Arts will bring out in Jan- 
uary (not 11 as mentioned here last week). 

Volume II is already in 49 stations thanks to these four latest sales: WISH-TV, Indian- 
apolis; WSLS-TV, Roanoke; KXTV, Sacramento, and WCTV, Tallahassee. 

Elsewhere in feature films this week KBTV, Denver, picked up 40 Lopert and UA fea- 
tures from UAA, all in color. 

Elliott Abrams has been elected syndication sales v.p. of Sterling Tv. 

A pioneer in the syndication field, Abrams has been with Sterling for ten years, being 
previously midwest and then general sales manager. 

Banner Films has added renewals for three of its shows 

They are: Night Court to KTLA, Los Angeles; WNEW-TV, New York, and KOVR, Stock- 
ton; also I Search for Adventure to WPIX, New York, and Bold Journey to KOMO-TV, Seat- 
tle, and KHQ-TV, Spokane. 

(For new sales on these plus Tarzan features, see FILM WRAP-UP, p. 66.) 



WASHINGTON WEEK 

(Continued from page 55) 

Actually Congress was quite active, and will remain so through the adjournment period. 
Major feature, as has been true of most recent Congresses, were investigations rather than 
specific new laws. By and large, in the past few years the probes have shaken the broad- 
casting and ad industries, while important new laws affecting these industries have been few. 

The Dodd Senate Judiciarv juvenile delinquency subcommittee hearings came after the 
Minow "vast wasteland" charges, and they hurt. These hearings are set to resume soon. 

Once again, the proposal to regulate networks will be in the spotlight, when the 
Senate Commerce communications subcommittee begins hearings on that subject. This series 
will also be during the adjournment period. 

There is an outside possibility of new hearings by the Senate Watchdog subcom- 
mittee of alleged political unfairness by broadcasters. 

In any event, there will be some action in this direction, since there is a strong possibility 
of attempts to loosen Sec. 315 a bit more during the next (pre-election) session of Congress. 

Counted either in number of hearing days or in number of new bills enacted, the Congres- 
sional session didn't appear to be any great shakes. But judging the session by the num- 
bers can be misleading. 

However, there is a very definite likelihood that the final session of the 87th Congress will 
be even more significant. And many of the seeds might be planted during the adjourn- 
ment period. 

SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 57 



A round-up of trade talk, 

trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



2 OCTOBER 1961 

Cawlfht IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Matty Fox. of C&C renown, is reported to be the man behind the scene in the 
maneuver by Dunnan & Jeffrey to spot the Hans Christian Andersen Story on sta- 
tions in 60 major markets. 

The D&J proposition, in essence: (a) the two-hour film would be telecast four times dur- 
ing the Thanksgiving weekend; (b) 13 participating advertisers would be delivered as 
part of the package; (c) the station, in turn, would be paid on a block basis — the hourly 
cardrate; (d) D&J would be recognized as the agency of record for each participating adver- 
tiser. 

Moot point posed by some of the stations approached : could this arrangement be in- 
terpreted as a case of time brokering? 



The movement to get the networks out of the TvB may blow up into so much 
smoke if the issue materializes at the Detroit TvB board meeting in November. 

Two of the networks have insinuated that they're prepared to pull out their o&o's. 
which in terms of membership dues, plus the $10,000 tab each network antes up, adds up to 
around $130,000. 

One possible way around the promotional crisis : setting up of a separate spot division. 



Watch for more piggyback commercials than ever on the tv networks this 
season. 

They serve at least this useful purpose: siphoning off most of the budget accorded 
the smaller brands on the advertiser's roster. 

In the spot tv sector the piggyback commercial is still an item of very limited accept- 
ance. Hence, their spread on the network participation carrier. 



CBS TV shouldn't be surprised if the sponsors of Gunsmoke try to pressure it 
into moving the show up to 8:30 p.m. in the event Saturday Night at the Movies 
(NBC TV) proves too formidable. 

The argument they'll advance: the Defenders will do just as well in the 10-11 period, 
and the network will be protecting a much more valuable property. 

What Gunsmoke may run into is strong opposition from the Defenders group and on this 
specific score: 10:30-11 time belongs to the affiliates and a lot of them probably won't be 
agreeable to clearing for the new tenant. 



Talk about agencymen moonlighting, a number of small agencies are finding it 
beneficial to the creative end of their tv interests. 

It's got quite common for high-priced commercial writers to do such chores on their own 
time, and it makes a good selling point to clients by the smaller agencies. 



Another of the JWT account maharajahs gearing down for retirement within 
the next year or so is Kenneth Hincks and among his plans for that day is this one : 

Fulfilling a lifetime ambition to mound enough credits for a master's degree at the 
I niversity of Virginia. 

Meanwhile he's bought himself a house in Charlottesville. 



58 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 





REACH 




MORE 




FARMERS 




IN THE 




TEXAS 




HOT SPOT 




In the Beaumont- 




Port Arthur-Orange 




market more than 




300,000 people live in 




rural agricultural 




communities. Average 




effective buying 




income for the market 




is over $6,500 




per family. 




You reach them and 




a total of 750,000 




prosperous Texans 




and Louisianans 




in this agricultural, 




petroleum, petro- 




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Spot only through 




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l 











SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



BEAUMONT • PORT ARTHUR • ORANGE 

59 






SPONSOR 
WEEK 

WRAP-UP 



WINNING FOURSOME— Winners of the two-day "Media Masters Invitational Tournament" 
at the Seaview County Club, Atlantic City. The tournament was sponsored by WBTV, Charlotte, 
N. C. Competing in the Media Masters were forty agency and ad execs. The winners shown are 
(l-r) Bob McGredy, TvAR; Pete McLean, DCSS; Jim Thompson, kneeling, B&B; Gary Wilson, OBM 





Advertisers 

An FTC examiner last week 
rapped Carter Product's knuckles 
for using a substance other than 
shaving cream in a tv commer- 
cial. 

The product was Rise and the ex- 
aminer pooh-poohed the advertiser's 
argument that it used the foreign 
substance because of technical photo- 
graphic problems. 

He said that advertisers should be 
granted reasonable latitude in matters 
of product makeup but there's a limit 
to which such reasonableness applies. 

Keystone Camera Company, Bos- 
ton, (Bresnick), will make its 
first entry into network tv with 
an expanded budget for its fall- 
through-Christmas campaign. 

The company will be a participat- 
ing sponsor on Maverick, Adventures 
In Paradise, American Football 
League Games, The Tall Man, and 
Thriller. The promotion will use. via 
networks, 125 major markets. 

Keystone's record budget for this 




POLICE HELICOPTER PATROL for traffic 
in nation's capital is in effect. WMAL broad- 
casts on-scene reports. Discussing patrol are, 
-J l-r) James G. Ray, Sr., pres., Wash.-Balti- 
more Helicopter Airways; Fred S. Houwinlc, 
gen. mgr., Evening Star Bdcstg. Co.;, Police 
Sgt. Clinton Humphries; pilot Ray Chaisson 



SNOW MOUNTAIN in Miami Shopping Cen- 
ter was built from 7,900 pounds of shaved ice by 
WFUN. Listeners were invited to guess when it 
would melt. Winner received $790 (station's fre- 
quency) in merchandise. Native kids hurled their 
first snowballs at WFUN personality Kay O'Shay 



60 




period amounts to $1 million. 

Campaigns : 

• Introduction of the 1962 Dodge 
lines includes a two-week tv spot 
campaign. The saturation effort will 
use some 265 stations in 97 key 
Dodge markets and will be carried 
on eight and 10-second I.D.'s. 

• Bristol-Myers will use tv to 
promote its new Excedrin, an extra- 
strength pain reliever. 

• S&W Fine Foods is stepping 
up its fall advertising campaign with 
expanded spot saturation on tv. It's 
using 20's and 60's in a group of 
western and eastern markets. 

• National Distillers will run sat- 
uration spot radio promotion for its 
Cinzano (Fletcher. RC&H) scheduled 
to start this week. The campaign will 
be open in California with about four 
stations and in New York with some 
six stations. It will use minutes and 
20's on the five-minute Chevalier 
shows. 

• Borden Foods is introducing a 
new product, Instant Litemilk. 
(D-F-S), a low fat dry milk, with a 



spot tv campaign in introductory mar- 
kets. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Ronal 

I. Gow to advertising and sales pro- 
motion manager for Whirlpool's com- 
mercial laundry and drycleaninji 
equipment division . . . Morris D. 
Dettman, advertising manager of 
Minneapolis - Honeywell's Electronic 
Data Processing division, Boston, will 
assume the additional duties of ad- 
vertising manager for the company's 
Precision Meter division, Manchester, 
N. H. . . . Bruce Crawford to ad- 
vertising manager of Chesebrough- 
Pond's Properties and Toiletries di- 
vision . . . Samuel C. Johnson and 
John J. Louis, Jr., to board of di- 
rectors at Johnson's Wax . . . Tad 
Jeffery to advertising and merchan- 
dising manager at General Foods. 

Acquisition: Pet Milk will acquire 
the R. E. Funsten Company, proces- 
sor of pecan nuts. After approval by 
the boards of directors of both firms, 
the terms of the contract was an- 
nounced. Pet Milk will take the as- 



sets and business of Fun 

change for 136,72.'! ol Pel 
stock. 



Agencies 



The Hollywood Advertising Chin 
has begun its second world-wide 
search for radio and tv commer- 
cials. 

This second annual contest has to 
do with commercials produced any 
place in the world and broadcasl al 
least once between 1 December 1960 
to i December 1961. 

Agency appointments: Dr. Sals- 

bury's Laboratories, Charles City, la., 
($.5 million plus) manufacturer of 
poultry medicines and feed additives, 
to Aubrey, Finlay, Marley & 
Hodgson, Chicago, from the Biddle 
Co. . . . Electronic Industries Asso- 
ciation to Henry J. Kaufman As- 
sociates, Washington, D. C, for a 
public relations program for the asso- 
ciation's parts division . . . Interna- 
tional House of Pancakes restaurants 



NEW DISNEY SERIES, 'The Wonderful World of Color,' is being heralded by one of the largest advertisements ever devised for a tv show. 
Alternate sponsor, Eastman Kodak, is devoting its giant Colorama (16 by 60 toot transparency, on east balcony of Grand Central Terminal, New 
York) to the ad. On display from 18 September through 9 October, it features a family watching Disney and newest character Ludwig von Drake 



Kodak 





FLAG-RAISING CEREMONY marked second 
year of KMOX in Hampton Ave. studios in St. 
Louis. (L-r) Rex Davis, KMOX news dir.; Mari- 
jona Macijaukiene, Lithuania, guest of honor; her 
daughter, Mrs. Bataitis; Robert Hyland, gen. mgr., 
KMOX; back row, John Bataitis and daughters 

EVER POPULAR— Deputy Dawg of WALB-TV 
met his fans when he spent two days at 
Midtown Shopping Center in Albany, Ga. 




61 



and pancake mixes t<> Wade . . . 
KMSP-TV, Minneapolis, to Knox 
Reeves, same <it\ . . . Northeastern 
Fiberglass, Schenectady, to Storm 
Advertising, St. Louis . . . Pet Dairy 
Products, a division of Pet Milk in 
John-nn City, Tenn., to Henderson 
Advertising. Greenville, S. C. . . . 
K\l\. Sacramento. Cal.. to Allen, 
d«- St. Maurice & Spitz Advertis- 
ing, San Francisco. . . . Stanley Tools 
division of the Stanlex Work-. New 
Britain, Conn., to Hugh II. Graham 
& Associates, Framington, Conn. . . . 
Venezuelan International Airlines to 
Monroe F. Dreher. 

\ Hi li.it ion : The Feeley Advertis- 
ing Agency. Vu "i ork. and LaRue, 
Cleveland, Inc., Detroit, have an- 
nounced an affiliation for the branch 
office. The combined billings of the 
two agencies will exceed S3. 5 million 
for 1961. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Sid 

Tamber to tv/radio producer at 
EWR&R . . . Robert Wilkins to su- 
pervisor of marketing and research 
and Carole Wilstein to senior mar- 
keting and research analyst, both at 
Post and Morr. Chicago . . . Rov 
Rutkoff to account executive for 
Stern. Walters & Simmons, Chicago 
. . . Norman Feuer to assistant me- 
dia services supervisor at DCS&S . . . 
John F. Lendzian to manager of 
marketing research at Meldrum and 
Fewsmith, Cleveland . . . Frank A. 
Sherer to executive v. p. of Inter- 
public Incorporated . . . Bill Lynn 
to radio/tv supervisor at Y&R from 
program director and supervisor at 
ABC TV. Hollywood . . . James R. 
Cronin to radio/tv director at Lilien- 
feld. Chicago . . . Richard L. 
Thompson to account executive at 
Clinton E. Frank. Inc. . . . Judson 
H. Irish, a v. p. of FC&B. has been 
appointed cop} director of the agen- 
cy's New \ ork office . . . Wallace A. 
Ross, director of the American TV 
Commercials Festival and film indus- 
try consultant has been retained in 
an advisory capacity by U. S. Tele- 
Service Corp.. a commercials monitor- 
ing service. 

New quarters: The Garland 

Agency in Phoenix, Ariz., has estab- 
lished a branch in Los Angeles. Ray 
Barnett has been named v. p. and gen- 
eral manager. 



Stations on the Move 

TOTAL STATIONS ON THE AIR 

I as of 1 September 1961 i 
AM: 3,618 
FM : 907 
TV: 547 

BOUGHT/SOLD/APPROVED 
Sold: WAKY, Louisville. Ky.. to a 
group headed by Frederick Gregg, 
Jr.. and John R. Ozier from the Mc- 
Lendon Corporation I Gordon B. and 
Barton R. ) . Price: $1,350,000. Brok- 
ered b\: Blackburn & Companv. 
Washington. D. C WEZL, Rich- 
mond, Va.. to the Eastern States Ra- 
dio Corporation from WEZL. Inc., 
Ben Strouse, president. Price: $175.- 
000. Brokered by: Blackburn & Com- 
pany. Washington, D. C WCSR, 

Hillsdale. Mich., to Fahey Flynn from 
Ruth Keister and Russell Holcomb. 
Price: $105,000. Brokered by: Hamil- 
ton-Landis & Associates, Washington, 
D. C. Approved: The FTC has ap- 
proved the sale of WNEL, Caguas, 
Puerto Rico, to the Atlantic Broad- 
casting Corporation. 

Associations 

During the past few weeks a 
series of important events took 
place at the National Association 
of Broadcasters. 

Highlights of these actions were: 

• LeRoy Collins announced a re- 
alignment of the NAB executive staff 
in line with the action of the summer 
NAB board meeting. The plan in- 
cludes two positions: Robert D. 
Swezey will be code authority director 
and Vincent T. Wasilewski. formerly 
v.p. for government affairs, will be the 
new executive v.p. 

• The NAB asked the FCC to sus- 
pend temporarily the issuance of con- 
struction permits for fm facilities that 
would conflict with mileage separa- 
tions in the FCC's proposed revision 
of fm broadcast rules. 

• The advisory committee met at 
NAB headquarters and made plans 
for the program form and logging 
hearing to be conducted by the FCC 
on 6 October. 

• A special committee of the NAB 
formally opened a study this week 
into the feasibility of establishing a 
coordinated research program for 
both radio and tv and an NAB re- 
search center. 



The Colorado Broadcasters As- 
sociation has elected Mason 
Dixon, general manager of 
KFTM, Fort Morgan, as presi- 
dent. 

Dixon succeeds Clayton Brace who 
resigned to accept a position as resi- 
dent operations manager of Time-Life 
operations in Beirut, Lebanon. 

TV Stations 

American tv viewing levels sur- 
passed the levels reached in 1960 
seven out of eight times in the 
first eight months of 1961, it was 
reported last week by TvB. 

All-time monthly highs were set in 
three of the eight months, and for 
three successive months — June, July 
and August — records were reached or 
tied, Nielsen data shows. 

TvB also reported that associa- 
tions are making a greatly in- 
creased use of tv both for selling 
ideas and products. 

In the first half of 1961, 41 asso- 
ciations used tv with gross time bill- 
ings of 88,448,041. 

Ideas at work: 

• KABC, Los Angeles, took 300 
members of the press, agency people, 
and clients to the races. In a special 
train, decorated with photos and 
posters for the station's coming sea- 
son, the party took off for a day at 
the Del Mar races. 

• KGUN-TV, Tucson, has gone 
after the local Indian population by- 
signing a real Navajo Indian to as- 
sist with one of the station's kid 
shows. 

• WTTG-TV, Washington, D. C. 
will debut its program entitled The 
Important Xight. The new program- 
ing concept will take the shape of 
four continuous hours of provocative 
discussion at prime time. The sched- 
ule calls for 7:00-11:00 p.m. every 
Sunday night starting 1 October. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

Michael R. Santangelo to program- 
ing department as assistant to the 
v.p. at Westinghouse Broadcasting . . . 
David Bader to national sales man- 
ager at Intercontinental Television 
. . . William R. Preston elected to 
the presidency of the Richmond Tele- 
vision Corporation in Riehmond. Va. 



62 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 




EXCITING ACTORS in 
absorbing motion pictures 
provide the finest TV enter- 
tainment. 

Cary Grant is only one of 
Hollywood's biggest stars 
appearing daily over Chan- 
nel 9. 

Whether your spots are tail- 
ored for daytime, early or 
late evening viewing, 
CKLW-TV can place them 
within the shows whose 
stars are attracting hun- 
dreds of thousands of 
viewers in the Detroit and 
Windsor area. 

For prime time spots at 
reasonable rates powerful 
325,000 WATT CHANNEL 
9 is your answer in the 
nation's fifth market. 



15 



▼ ▼ 



WINDSOR, SERVING THE 
WINDSOR AND DETROIT AREA 



ESSEX BROADCASTERS, INC. 
GUARDIAN BLDG., DETROIT 




Jm- 



AN RKO GENERAL STATION 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



63 



. . . John DeMarco t<> station man- 
ager at KGMB, Honolulu . . . Sheri- 
dan I). Rcid to supervisor of pro- 
graming and sales at the Hawaiian 
Broadcasting System Ltd. . . . Hugh 
l)«'l Regno to director of business 
affairs at WNBQ and WMAQ, Chi- 
cag Wilson C. Wearn to gen- 
eral manager of WFBC-TV, Green- 
ville, S. C, and Rohert Q. Glass to 
general sales manager of the same sta- 
tion. 

Sport sales: Standard Oil of Cali- 
fornia will sponsor one-third of the 
radio and tv broadcasts of San Fran- 
cisco Giants Baseball games starting 
in 1962. 

Happy birthday: WSTV, Steu- 
benville, 0., celebrated the second 
birthday of Tel-All, the news and pub- 
lic information program on the sta- 
tion's daytime schedule. 

Radio Stations 

A new ti i- in. Radioprofit Re- 
search, has been formed to pro- 
vide programing, management 
services, and sales promotion to 
radio stations throughout the 
United States. 

"Chip" Atkins, head of the Texas 
group of radio and advertising men 
who created the organization, tells of 
a Shangri-la radio staff of top-notch 
people who will provide a full-time 
service which any station can afford. 

The current trend toward fea- 
turettes in radio programing is 
being taken advantage of partic- 
ularly in one area : the syndicated 
minute feature. 

Among those specializing in this 
minute field is Chuck Prager Radio 
Syndications, Inc. 

WBNX, New York, has announced 
that it will go completely Span- 
ish, Monday through Friday, 
from 10:30 a.m. to midnight. 

Jose de la Vega has been made 
consultant for the evening program. 
He was director for 11 years of 
Spanish programing at WWRL, 
Woodside, N. Y. 

The American Machine and 
Foundry Company will make pos- 
sible international broadcasting 
of all the sessions of the United 



Nations' 16th General Assembly. 

The company will sponsor the 
broadcasts on station WRUL, the 
Worldwide Broadcasting's interna- 
tional shortwave set-up. 

The formation of Trojan Produc- 
tions, Chicago, was announced 
this past week. 

The firm will be active in the pro- 
duction and syndication of radio pro- 
grams. 

Ted Weber, president of the new 
firm, said that his company will seek 
to translate the finest in newspaper 
features to broadcasting, aiming both 
at entertainment and informing the 
listener. 

Ideas at work: 

• WITH, Baltimore, will air 54 
to 108 announcements per week to 
introduce the public to the 1962 line 
of automobiles. The announcements 
will be of some 45 seconds in dura- 
tion and new car dealers will have 
the opportunity to tie into the public 
service campaign with adjacencies. 

• WJPS, Evansville, Ind., sealed 
its leading d.j., Dave Wood, into a 
fallout shelter for the first live dem- 
onstration in the State of Indiana. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: John 
Hummer to sales staff at KFRC, San 
Francisco, as an account executive 
. . . Howard Saunders to account 
executive at WWRL, New York, from 
Bob Dore Associates . . . Reid Leath 
to account executive at WWOK, Char- 
lotte. N. C. . . . Charles B. Jordan, 
Jr., to regional account executive at 
KBOX. Dallas, from KLIF. Dallas . . . 
John E. Surrick to national sales 
manager at WPEN, Philadelphia, 
from development manager, same sta- 
tion . . . Claude Frazier to station 
manager, WTMA, Charleston, S. C, 
from v.p. and general manager at 
WAGA, Atlanta . . . C. B. Rogers 
to commercial manager at WIST. 
Charlotte, N. C. . . . Ed Denton to 
account executive at WNBQ. Chicago 
. . . Michael E. O'Laughlin to ac- 
i (Hint executive at WMAQ, Chicago 
. . . Larry Saunders to local sales 
manager at WTAR, Norfolk. Va. . . . 

Offbeat sales: Electronics Insti- 
tute of Technology has signed with 
WXYZ, Detroit, to sponsor a 13- 
week series of "Space" documen- 
taries. 



Nostalgia: WJBK, Detroit, starting 
Monday, 25 September, will broad- 
cast programs heard on that station 
15 years ago. Newsman Norm Len- 
hardt is doing the research and broad- 



New quarters: W J JD-AM-FM, Chi- 
cago, will split its office forces and 
broadcast facilities to two separate 
locations. 



Networks 



Radio sales: The Miller Brewing 
Company is now sponsoring news 
commentator Alex Driers Drive Time 
newscasts over the ABC Radio net- 
work. 

Tv sales: Beech-Nut and Texaco 
have joined Quaker Oats as sponsors 
of NBC TV's 1, 2, 3 — Go series 
. . . M. J. Holloway & Co., as its in- 
itial venture into network tv, will 
sponsor Magic Ranch on ABC TV 
. . . Olin Mathieson Chemical will be 
one of two corporate supporters of 
the new Continental Classroom 
course on the structure and function 
of American government, being of- 
fered this fall by NBC TV. 

Kudos: The Electronics Institute of 
Technology in Detroit has presented 
the Institute's Communications Award 
to James G. Riddell, executive v.p. in 
charge of Western operations for the 
American Broadcasting Co.; the re- 
cipient of the Institute's Science 
Award was William P. Lear, board 
chairman of Lear, Inc., Grand Rapids. 

Representatives 

The Clark Brown Company 
southern regional rep firm head- 
quartered in Dallas, has an- 
nounced a reshuffling of its staff. 

The moves include Richard M. 
W alker, v.p. and manager of the j 
firm's Atlanta office, to executive v.p. 
and Harry H. Harkins, also in the ] 
Atlanta office, has been elected secre- I 
tary and will ser\e on the board of 
directors. 

Clarke R. Brown, president, has I 
also announced the reorganization of I 
the company's mid South territory. I 
Jack Hetherington, whose residence I 
office covers Missouri, will include 1 



Memphis. 



64 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



Rep appointments : WDAU-TV 

and WGBI, Scranton, Pa., to A. A. 
McDermott for advertising sales in 
Canada . . . WLEE, and WXEX-TV, 

Richmond, Va., and WITH, Balti- 
more, return to the Clarke Brown 
Company for representation in the 
South . . . WDRC, Hartford, Conn., 
to John Blair & Company as national 
representative. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Bruce 
Houston to Gill-Perna, Inc., as an ac- 
count executive from timebuyer at the 
Meyerhoff agency in Chicago . . . 
John H. Wrath to Chicago manager 
of the Paul H. Raymer Company from 
the presidency of Headley-Reed . . . 
Mike Keating to the L. A. office of 
CBS Radio Spot Sales . . . Thomas 
R. Winters to the Detroit radio sales 
staff of the Katz agency from account 
executive at WWJ, Detroit. 

Film 



Telesynd, set up by Wrather to 
handle Lone Ranger re-runs, has 
named three new men, all under 
manager Hardie Frieberg. 

Richard Buch, formerly of ABC 
Films and Screen Gems, will handle 
the midwest out of Chicago; Owen 
Duffy, once with Guild Films, takes 
over the West Coast zone from Los 
Angeles, and Frank Spiegelman, ex- 
ITC, covers the Northeast from Buf- 
falo. 

George Green Associates, a pub- 
lic relations firm with its own in- 
tegral film operation, will con- 
struct new film studios in Oak- 
land, N. J. 

The new studios, which will replace 
the New York studios, will include 
outside locations, editing and sound 
recording facilities and prop and 
scenery construction. 

New offices: WCD will open West 
coast offices and facilities under the 
supervision of Bob Carlisle, Jr. 

Commercials: Music Makers, Inc.. 
has completed two tv spots for DDB 
in behalf of Columbian Coffee. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Allan 
Roberts has been appointed eastern 
division sales manager for the Allied 
Artists Television Corporation. 



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65 



Sales : Household Finance i NL&B i 

has boughl the Everglades series t<> 
debut on KRCA, I.. A. . . . HV-UA'a 
Ripcord begins it- run this week >\ i t li 
the addition of five market-: \\ VBG, 
Greenwood, Miss. ; WGAL, Lancaster; 
Wl \l . Eau Claire, Wis.; \\ ICD, 
Danville; and WBTW, Florence, 
5. C. . . . Banner Films has had re- 
cent sales for these features: for 
Sight (.nun I .>. /..• \\\\\. Milwau- 
kee; KARD , WiJ.ita: WRBL, Colum- 

l»u>: W'TTG. Washington: KOVR, 
Stockton; For / Search For Adven- 
ture: KPLR, St. Louis; KPHO, 
Phoenix: KENS, San Antonio; 
KTVR, Denver; KREM, Spokane; 
KOTA, Rapid City: KIVA, Yuma; 
For Bold Journey: KENS, San An- 
tonio; KVOA, Tucson; WNEM, Bay 
City; WMBD, Peoria; WHAS, Louis- 
ville; KTBS Shrevesport; KIMA, Ya- 
kima; KATU. Portland: KLIX. Twin 
Falls; WTTV, Indianapolis KHOL, 
Holdrege; For Tarzan Features: 
WOW, Omaha; WSAV, Savannah; 
WTMJ. Milwaukee; KLZ, Denver; 
W WE. Louisville; KBMT, Beau- 
mont: WRYA. Richmond; WHIO, 
Dayton: KYTV, Springfield; KDAL, 
Du'luth : WTYD. Durham. 

Public Service 

Public service in action: 

• W ITH, Baltimore, in coopera- 
tion with National, Marvland and 
Baltimore Civil Defense is conducting 
a radiation-fallout shelter demonstra- 
tion. Personality Buddy McGregor 
will enter a shelter at Mondawmin 
Shopping Center where he will live 
under simulated emergency condi- 
tions for an indefinite period of time. 

• WLW -T. Cincinnati, has pre- 
sented to the Cincinnati and Hamil- 
ton Count) Public Library Films and 
Recording Center. 26 15-minute Date- 
line: I . N. programs which have been 
telecast in the past two years on 
WLW-T and WCET. The films have 
been produced by the I nited Nations 
under the sponsorship of the L . S. 
Broadcasters Committee for the U. N. 
and are now available to the general 
public through the library. 

• WKRC-TV, Cincinnati, will 
telecast the controversial 12-minute 
movie Operation Abolition. 

• WTRL, Bradenton, Fla., has 
\m irked for one month with the local 
• nil defense in a preparedness and 



personal survival campaign, called 
"Project Prepare." 

• WWCO, Waterbury, Com... is 
donating a tape recording of Presi- 
dent Kennedy's I nited Nations ad- 
dress to the W aterhun School and 
Librar\ systems. 

• The Florida Association of 
Broadcasters has established a $500 
scholarship to be awarded to a third- 
year student at the I Diversity of Flor- 
ida. Florida State L Diversity or the 
L Diversity of Miami to "assist him 
to complete his education in broad- 
casting. 

Herbert E. Evans, president of 
Peoples Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion, Columbus, Ohio, will be 
guest speaker at the YMCA of 
Greater New York Annual Din- 
ner. 

Evans, who is the president of the 
National Council of YMCA's, also 
served on the official board of sev- 
eral educational institutions. 

Other industry leaders who will be 
active this year at the YMCA include 
Charles H. Brower, president of 
BBDO, who will head the general ad- 
vertising and publicity for the board 
of directors division on the YMCA's" 
1962 finance campaign. 

Esther and Carla: WTAR (AM- 
TY), Norfolk, Va., gave continual 
coverage to the oncoming hurricane 
Esther. The station provided reports 
through both its outlets and helped 
coordinate a CBS news team sent 
from Washington . . . WNAC, Bos- 
ton, kept New England listeners in- 
formed all dav Thursdav on the prog- 
ress of Esther . . . WNBC (AM-FM- 
TV), New \ork. inaugurated its 
"Community Service Alert" and kept 
New York Metropolitan residents 
posted on every move made by Esther, 
including 28 live tv reports . . . 
WFAA-TV, Dallas, took its self-func- 
tioning mobile cruiser into the heart 
of the area hit bv hurricane Carla . . . 
KFJZ. Fort Worth. Texas, manned a 
hurricane watch for 60 hours as Carla 
readied to strike that state .... At 
W BZ, Boston, a full contingent of 
nine newsmen were on around the 
clock dutv to report on Esther in the 
New England area . . . WISTA. New- 
ark. N. J., got a record listener re- 
sponse as it offered special hurricane 
maps enabling them to follow the 
progress of Esther. ^ 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 42 I 

the successful production of a tv 
commercial, but none can be effective 
without the thoroughly professional 
experience of the agency producer. 

\\ orking closelx with the copy and 
art people, the producer should first 
evaluate the creative details for care- 
ful pre-production planning. He 
knows that any change or delay in 
the schedule will prove costly, but 
that the schedule should be sufficient- 
ly flexible for the introduction of sig- 
nificant improvements. 

Among the first concerns in pre- 
production cost estimate is the evalu- 
ation of the ingredients of the com- 
mercial. Experience determines 
whether an outdoor scene, for exam- 
ple, can be satisfactorily simulated in 
a studio (with considerable savings 
in production costs). But even a 
cost-conscious producer shouldn't 



Based on the 
copy and art 
work, it's essen- 
tial first to 
evaluate crea- 
tive ingredients 



dismiss creative quality if location 
shooting would enhance the commer- 
cial's message. 

Whether the commercial is pro- 
duced in a studio or on location, elab- 
orate sets, production gimmicks, ex- 
cessive talent fees and transportation 
expenses are onlv worth their con- 
tribution toward achieving the end 
result. Will the costly minute details 
of a set design be visible on the home 
tv screen? Are certain technical 
gimmicks necessarv to dramatize the 
selling message? Is it important to 
have four characters, or will two or 
three be just as effective? These are 
just a few examples of the type of 
pre-production questions that should 
be resolved as further insurance 
against over-spending. 

Finally, be wise in the selection of 
a film studio. Their facilities and 
the talent of their personnel should 
provide the technical assistance that 
enables the agency producer to get 
the maximum dollar value on the 
screen in the production of commer- 
cials of outstanding quality. ^ 




66 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



very 
important 
persons 

will meet 
on the 

Xjjj^jidewa lks\ 

of New Tork\ 
during the..\ 




BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION 



^&k^b^% CONVENTION 






I 



NEW YORK,N.Y. 



"!\, 
fc 



:££' 



u m. 



*t 



i». 



Z • B P A • JOIN B P A • • JOIN B P A • JOIN B P A • JOIN B P A • JOIN B P A • 



BROADCASTERS 1 PROMOTION ASSOCIATION 

Send todavT % R °' Box 9736, Cleveland 40 - ° hi ° 

Please rush me more information about BPA 
Name 



Company, 

Address _ 
City 



St 



ate. 



n • v d a Nior • v d a Nior • v a a siior • v d a Niorw 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 



STORY 




WTRF-TV K£J 



WATCHing! This was over- 
heard: "Watching TV I dis- 
covered that the cigaret I've 
been smoking doesn't even 
have it in the middle." 
WATCH wtrf-tv 
WATCH it! Cy Ackermann said 
it! . . "Not only is the cost of living higher 
— some of it isn't fit to drink!" 
WATCH Wheeling 
WATCH out! A landlubber went to the East 
coast for skindiving outfitted with the newest 
and best gear: rubber suit, depth gauge, 
flippers, waterproof watch, sling gun, Aqua- 
Lung, mask, etc. etc. — even a blackboard 
and special chalk for underwater communica- 
tion with other divers. After twenty minutes 
of discovering in the strange and wonderful 
underwater world, he looked up and saw a 
swimmer clad in nothing but bathing trunks. 
Puzzled, then infuriated, the diver pulled 
out his blackboard and wrote: "What gives' 
Spent $450 for special gear. You here with 
nothing?" Whereupon the other man took the 
chalk and scrawled rapidly: "Stupid, I'm 
drowning!" 

WATCH Seven 
WATCH 'em! If you don't think peanuts are 
fattening, just look at some of the elephants 
who love eating them. 

WATCH wtrf-tv 
WATCHA say? Seen the Grand Canyon? It's 
gorges! . . . 

WATCH Wheeling 
WATCHful! If you want to say something in 
the average American home today you have 
to go through channels. 

WATCH Seven 
WATCHing channel seven is a habit with the 
folks around here and our rep, George P. 
Hollingbery will be glad to give you details 
to prove it. Pull in the Wheel ing-Steubenvi lie 
TV audience from WTRF-TV in Wheeling. 



CHANNEL 
SEVEN 



WHEELING, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



SPONSOR 

IS ON 
THE MOVE 



SEE THE 
INSIDE BACK COVER 





:Z :*;;-. :i]"o 



:. . :.:.:.. :....:. ;■;■ ^3 



James O. Luce has been made director at 

the Detroit office of J. Walter Thompson. 

In his new capacity he will handle all the 

Detroit office business in addition to the 

Ford account, which is 90 r '< of the total. 

Luce, with JWT for 17 years, started as 

an assistant buyer on all agency accounts 

and then became a head timebuyer. His 

next position was associate media director 

working on Ford and then he moved up to supervisor of the Ford 

and Champion Sparkplug accounts. In his new post he will shuttle 

between New York and Chicago. 

Rosa B. Evans has been appointed general 
manager of WOKY. Milwaukee. She is 
a v.p. of the parent Bartell Company which 
owns and operates in addition to WOKY, 
stations in New York, San Francisco, and 
San Diego. Merger of Bartell radio sta- 
tions with Macfadden Publications and 
Process Lithographers was recently voted 
by the respective board of directors. Mrs. 
Evans has been an active and integral part of the company since 
its inception in 1947. 

Roy Whisnand, recently resigned v.p. of 
Plough Broadcasting Company and general 
manager of WCOP, Boston, for the past ten 
vears moves to the presidency of his own 
companv. Whizzer Enterprises. The com- 
pany will be active in the purchase and 
management of radio and tv stations and 
in the creation, packaging and marketing 
of radio and tv sales and audience building 
ideas. Whisnand is the chairman of the Massachusetts State In- 
dustry Advisory Committee and is a past president of the New 
England Broadcasting Executives Club. 

Michael R. Santangelo has joined the 
programing department of Westinghouse 
Broadcasting Company as assistant to the 
v.p. Director of public relations and spec- 
ial events for WBC, New York, since 1957. 
Meanwhile, he has served the programing 
department on a contributory basis. San- 
tangelo formerly served Robert Gray As- 
Miciates, Motion Pictures for Television, 

and Kelly-Nason Advertising. In 1959 he was the program cha 
for RTES. 






irman 



(>S 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTORF.R 106] 




frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Of utmost importance among the services radio performs for its audiences is 
reporting the news. Here is a vivid, colorful, downright literary account of 
the radio newsman's activities, created by Richard W. Davis, president- gen- 
eral manager of WELI, New Haven. Mr. Davis wrote it in response to the 
Connecticut Broadcasting Association's request for material for its new pub- 
lication, The Voice. In the words of Association president Sy Byrnes {WADS, 
Ansonia), "It turned out to be such a fine piece of work we felt it deserved a 
wider audience.'" Due to space limitations, some portions were deleted. 




The familiar-fcVoice 



I he swirling snows of a winter morning in New Eng- 
land. Dark of night remains. The people sleep on, their 
heads buried in the warm comfort of pillows and quilts as 
the nippy below zero breezes waft insultingly through the 
open windows. The quiet of night is broken by an occa- 
sional lumbering tractor-trailer rig on the highway or the 
crunching of police patrol car tires on snow-laden city 
streets. And the heavy snow continues. 

A figures fights his way through the mounting drifts. 
While the town and city are oblivious to time, the seconds 
tick by for him because his rendezvous is with time — he is 
a morning radio newsman. 

Alarm clocks start to ring — clock radios come to life.. 
Bedroom blankets stir ever so slightly and long shadows 
are cast by the dial lights. 

The familiar voice is on the air, long before daybreak. 
It is there without fail just as sure as these words are in 
black and white; reporting the news, telling the people 
what happened while they slept, what the weather is doing 
before they chance to look out the window. 

What type of person is this radio newsman who is the 
voice always there, taken for granted at the flip of a radio 
knob? What kind of life does he live, this voice who min- 
isters to the people — weekdays, Sundays, holidays — and 
who gets a half day's work done before the average person 
has had a chance to think about that first cup of coffee? 

He enjoys the things you enjoy — family, home, the 
backyard barbecue, the lawn. His life is more regimented 
but in a topsy-turvy fashion. When others are at play, he 
may be at work and vice versa. While others are awake 
he may be sleeping. Occasionally he is able to snatch 
precious hours to live as others do. Sometimes he tries too 
soon. Five-day week, holidays off — not for him. 

The job of our familiar radio voice doesn't end with 



just "reading the news." Let us take a look into the typi- 
cal radio newsroom, unadorned by frills of television stage 
settings. This is the scene — ■ 

A man in shirt sleeves, perhaps unshaven (time for that 
later), is pouring through the overnight copy from the 
wire service. He may have a telephone headset on, making 
dozens of calls to the local and area town protective serv- 
ices to determine what happened in your town overnight. 
On stormy days there are more incoming calls than out- 
going. He is taking down the school cancellations on the 
unlisted wire from area superintendents and is also an- 
swering the familiar query phoned in on the listed num- 
ber, "Is there any school today in . . .?" from the listener 
whose "radio broke down" or who refuses to bother to 
tune in, read newspapers or keep informed about anything. 

And the eve of our early bird friend jumps back and 
forth from the clock: Western Union Naval Observatory 
Time, set to the Master Clock in Washington, set to the 
Earth's rotation, following the stars. 

No assembly line this. No calling in at the last minute 
to say "I'm sick." No one can step in and "cover" on a 
moment's notice. The radio man may be running a fever 
that would keep beings of lesser stamina under wraps. He 
may be sick to the stomach, moody, fed up. But he has to 
be there because the well being of countless families de- 
pends on it. Hit the microphone switch, smile slightly, lift 
the voice, be alert, sound authoritative, be persuasive. 

The radio man enjoys one distinct advantage over the 
print media. He reports the new s while it is happening or 
within minutes of its occurrence. He knows that people 
tune to him to find out about that local tragedy or the 
status of the summit conference. He also knows that his 
listeners will read the newspaper for "all the details." In 
a sense he helps to sell newspapers. ^ 



SPONSOR 



2 OCTOBER 1961 



69 



SPONSOR 



SPONSOR Moves to 555 5th Ave. 

This week, SPONSOR is operating out of our handsome new 
quarters at 555 5th Avenue, New York 17. 

To say that our staff is happy is putting it mildly. Our 
offices in the new American Oil Building on the corner of 
l(>th and 5th. have central air conditioning, engineered acous- 
tic-, maximum window space, and provide us with 6400 
square feet to move around in I 50 f ( more than our previous 
location). 

We've built a coffee room, a conference room, a library, 
and even a special office for out-of-town visitors. We hope 
you'll come to see us soon. Just one word of warning. The 
entrances to some of these Fifth Avenue addresses are some- 
times confusing. Ours is just around the corner — on 46th St. 

We believe that these vastly improved working conditions 
will help us give you an even better sponsor. We also like 
to feel that they represent another advance in the growing 
importance of the broadcast trade press. 

So make a note of it now. Address sponsor at 555 5th 
Avenue. Our telephone number is Murray Hill 7-8080. And 
we're looking forward to welcoming you soon. 

Courageous public service 

The outstanding job done by a number of East Coast radio 
and tv stations in covering Hurricane Carla and the less dan- 
gerous but ominous Hurricane Esther, deserves more than 
ordinary notice. 

Here was public service "over and beyond the call of 
duty." Literally scores of broadcast people risked their lives 
in order to provide prompt warnings, and full scale on-the- 
spot coverage of the two hurricanes. 

As a result of their unselfish, and voluntary efforts the 
death toll among members of the general public was reduced 
to a minimum, and rescue and salvage work, and the care of 
thousands of displaced people (over 500,000 on the Gulf 
Coast alone during Carla) was carried forward with a maxi- 
mum of efficiency. 

Our hats are off to all the radio and tv men who partici- 
pated in this magnificent effort. ^ 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Chivalry is back: Jay Ward Pro- 
ductions sent out formal invitations 
to "the world premiere" of The Bull- 
winkle Show on NBC, Sunday eve- 
ning. September 24, 1961. It read, 
"The producers have made arrange- 
ments with The National Broadcast- 
ing Company to have this gala pre- 
miere piped into your own home for 
your convenience. Refreshments im- 
mediately following the show at your 
friendly neighborhood tavern. Ward 
spared no expense to get this show 
off the ground! 

Ir pays to advertise: A recent New 
Yorker cartoon finds a doctor seated 
at his desk, turning a quizzical face 
toward his patient who is seated 
across from him, relating his prob- 
lem in the following manner: "Doc- 
tor, I'm suffering from pains of 
headache, neuritis, and neuralgia. I 
wonder if you could recommend 
something with not just one but a 
combination of medically proven ac- 
tive ingredients in easy-to-take tablet 
form." For this he nent to medical 
school! 

Noble savages: Publisher Street & 
Smith received a memo from its pub- 
lication empire owner, Conde-Nast, 
stating that the former's staffers were 
to be provided with free Asiatic Flu 
shots. The memo went on to insist 
that the vaccine be administered be- 
fore Street & Smith makes the 
planned October move from its pres- 
ent quarters at Madison & 57th to 
the Greybar Bldg. at Lexington & 
43rd, site of Conde-Nast headquar- 
ters. Can't have the home office 
blighted with epidemics from the 
provinces! 



On the Bell & Howell Close-Up, 

"Walk in my Shows."" i ABC TV) 
which depicted what it means to be 
a negro in the L.S.. comedian Dick 
Gregory, who is a member of that 
race, observed, "I wouldn't mind pay- 
ing my income tax if I knew it were 
going to a friendly country." This is 
the same guy who recently spoofed 
the push button age by saying hell f 
carry a tv set next time he goes to 
war, and after firing a rocket, will 
turn on Huntley and Brinkley to find 
out what he hit. 



70 



SPONSOR • 2 OCTOBER 1961 




Our new address is 555 Fifth Avenue! 

It's a beautiful new building whose entrance is 
on 46th Street going towards Madison. 
Don't ask us why. 

We've got 50% more space than before; 6,400 sq. ft. 
to be exact. It has central air-conditioning and 
engineered acoustics as well. It's all been designed 
to suit our specifications. 

Our new location even includes a special private 
office for out of town visitors. You are 
cordially invited to drop in and use it 
anytime you're in town. 



SPONSOR 



NEW ADDRESS: 555 Fifth Ave. N. Y. 17. 
NEW PHONE: Mu 7-8080 



PERSPECTIVE 
ON 



.*<■' - 




Possibly. Advertising men, networks, sta- 
tions, and — most significant — important advertisers 
have been quick to recognize "The Man From Oliver 
Street," first show in the series, as an important new 
approach to documentaries, "...excellent..."; 
"...superb..."; "...outstanding production..."; 
". . . high caliber television . . ."; ". . . consider it a coup 
d'etat to have exclusive . . ."; "... outstanding work . . ."; 
". . . proud to show them in prime time . . .". 

"PERSPECTIVE ON GREATNESS" is indeed an unique 
series. Each of the 26 hour-long specials features a 
great name of our time. Al Smith, Lindbergh, MacArthur, 
the Windsors, and so on. Here is unrehearsed drama of 

real life actual on-the-scene exclusive footage from 

the incomparable Hearst Metrotone film libraries, bril- 
liantly edited and augmented. 



fa 



ru 



\£)\i) 




FILMS INC. • SUITE 3200 
THE CHRYSLER BUILDING 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. MU 7-0870 



A HEARST METROTONE PRODUCTION 

26 GREAT NEW HOUR-LONG DOCUMENTARIES 



PONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV A 



II 



• 



0CT 1861 

NBC OENQtw. USRAftf 



JYING RADIO TIME IN MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL? 






lAT'S NEXT 
FOR RADIO 
RESEARCH? 

Solid studies of the 

key listening group-. 
if agency researchers 

have anything to -;i\ 

Page 25 



Metromedia 
soars with 
John Kluge 

Page 28 

Television's 

fearsome 

foursome 

Page 32 

Radio talks 
'hip' for 
U. S. Rubber 

Page 35 



Sing 2nd place for over 4 years in average J^ hour share of audience (6:30 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. Monday thru Friday) 4 countv Metro Area 
[en Station Index. 






' 



69%* of the 740,000 TV homes in 
the 68 counties of the Minneapolis- 
Saint Paul market area are "daily 
subscribers" to WCCO-Television. 

'(Daily Circulation. ARB 1960 Coverage Study) 




sssEWi 



Ul 



This totals more visual and 
audible impact than is possible 
with any "single sense" medium. 




WEBSTER: 

*basic ( bas' tk ) , adj. 1 . of or per- 
taining to the base or essence; 
fundamental; as a basic fact. 



MORE than the dominant television station in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul Market: 
Actually the medium to buy FIRST OF ALL! For complete proof write WCCO- 
Television or national representatives, Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



L 



local program in the 

interest of youth " 



■ 





OUIS 



Progress is the 
keynote in the entire 
St. Louis metropolitan 
area, the area with 
the new spirit, where n. 
than one billion dollars 
is being spent for 
expansion and major 
improvements. Progress 
is the keynote, too, at KTVI, 
the only television station 
in the United States to 
receive the American 
Legion's coveted Golden 
Mike Award for its staff 
produced documentary 
series, "Expedition! 
"St. Louis", acclaimed 
"America's best local 
program in the interest 
of youth." 

And remember, KTVI 
Channel 2 Is still 
your lowest cost 



per thousand 
In St. Louis. m 



Represented 
nationally by , 




CHANNEL _ 

ST. LOUTS 



I 



i 



Made 
the Scene 

and you truly "belonged 
there" because you discov- 
ered" the MOST UNUSUAL 
Christmas gift-giving idea for 
customers, employees and 
friends EVER SEEN! 

• *•• 

. . . and your customers be- 
gan to "phone the scene" just 
to say "THANK YOU" for 
your unique and wonderful 
remembrance and thereby 
open the door to ADDI- 
TIONAL SALES! Even your 
employees and friends 
showed their appreciation in 
the many small ways ONLY 
YOU would understand. 

• ••• 

If you buy gifts (between 
$7.50 and $100.00 each) 
you'll surely want to see this 
unusually practical, sensa- 
tionally simple and refresh- 
ingly different way of saying 
"THANK YOU" to the peo- 
ple who are IMPORTANT 
TO YOU AND YOUR 
COMPANY. 

mm fob mm wmmn.A * I 



I I I I I I 



Automated Gift Plan. Inc.. 
80 ParK Avenue. New Yor* 16, N. Y. 

Please send further information 

Como^r ____. 

»«*H1 

Ot» 

»n 



it |;XX j' cf •t'tt 



I I I I I I I P 



© Vol. 15, No. 41 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation, and 
Advertising Offices: 555 5th New York 17, Murray Hill 7-8080. Chicago Office: 612 
N. Michigan Av. (11), 664-1166. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Ave. So., FAirfax 
2-6528. Los Angeles Office 6087 Sunset Blvd. (28). Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 
3110 Elm Av., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada $9 • year. Other 
countries SU a year. Single copies 40e. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd class 
oostage paid at Baltimore. Md. 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



SPONSOR 

TMl wcekly MAGAZINE TV/ftAOlO ADVERTISERS USB 



ARTICLES 

Radio research: what next? 

25 Agency researches call for broad studies of radio listening habits ! 
with demographic breakdown, more on audience composition by station 

Metromedia soars with John Kluge 

28 Kansas City purchases are among the latest acquisitions in John Kluge's 
constantly expanding operations in key cities around the United States 

C-P-M data shows tv edge in circulation cost battle 

30 Television circulation, cost and cost-per-1,000 estimates are compared 
with magazines and newspapers over the past five years in new study 

Is this tv's most daring foursome? 

32 Four gentlemen from the advertising and broadcasting fields have car- 
ried on an historic golf game in the environs of Westchester County 

Radio talks 'hip' for Keds 

35 U. S. Rubber tries out radio disk jockey fun-sell for its canvas shoes 
for six-weeks in 25 major markets and makes dent in teenage market 

Want a station? Get the %$* out of town! 

37 There are a number of "studio-transmitter" stations in the U. S. deftly 
tucked away in obscure spots. Is this a deliberate plot by somebody? 

NEWS: Sponsor- Week 7, Sponsor-Scope 19, Spot Buys 42, Washington 
Week 55, Film Scope 56, Sponsor Hears 58, Sponsor-Week Wrap-Up 60, 
Tv and Radio Newsmakers 68 

DEPARTMENTS: Commercial Commentary 12,555 5th 13, Spon- 
sor Asks 38, Television Results 46, Seller's Viewpoint 69, Sponsor Speaks 70, 
Ten-Seconds Spots 70 



Officers: editor and publisher, Norman R. Glenn; executive vice presi- 
dent, Bernard Piatt; vice president and assistant publisher, Arnold Alpert; 
secretary-treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMillin; news editor, Ben Bodec; 
managing editor, Alfred J. Jaffe; senior editor, Jo Ranson; midwest editor, 
Given Smart; assistant news editor, Heyward Ehrlich; associate editors. Jack 
Lindrup, Ben Seff, Ruth Schlanger, Lauren Libow; columnist, Joe Csida; art 
editor, Maury Kurtz; production editor, Phyllis Trieb; editorial research, Carol 
Ferster; reader service, Gail Rubenstein. 

Advertising: assistant sales manager, Willard Dougherty; southern man- 
ager, Herbert M. Martin, Jr.; midwest manager, Paul Blair; western manager, 
George G. Dietrich, Jr.; sales service/production, John Henner. 

Circulation: circulation manager, Jack Rayman. John J. Kelly, Lydia 
Martinez. 

Administrative: office manager, Fred Letine; George Becker, Michael 
Crocco, Svd Guttman. Irene Sulzbach, Geraldine Daych, Jo Ganci, Manuela 
Santalla, Mary Kandyba. 




Pi LSE qualitative study of 

SAN DIEGO RADIO 



PHGD&B, PfflO,§@ ©ffl/aOMflWI 
mm ®\? SAN DIEGO RADIO, 

HOOT" 



D 



o o o o o o 



KFMB reaches more different adults daily 
than any other station. 

KFMB's audience listens more attentively, 

has more travel cards, credit cards and charge accounts. 

KFMB is the adults' first choice for news 
and for fuller details of bulletins and flashes. 



fT\ KFMB would be chosen if San Diego adults 
^J , could have only one station. 

KFMB reaches both men and women equally, 
all income groups, all educational levels. 

Ask your Petry man for the full brochure which shows 
why this great station moves more merchandise. 



KFMB RADIO Q SAN DIEGO 



WROC-FM, WROC-TV, Rochester, N.Y. • KERO-TV, Bakersfield, Calif. ^«i.» 

WGR-FM, WGR-AM, WGR-TV, Buffalo, N.Y. • KFMB-AM, KFMB-FM, (£dwJwy^VCi~) 

KFMB-TV, San Diego, Calif. • WNEP-TV, Scranton-WilkesBarre, Penn. \^lS^S^ 
WDAF-TV, WDAF-AM, Kansas City, Mo. 



The Original Station Rtpmtnlatin 



TRANSCONTINENT TELEVISION CORR • 380 MADISON AVE., N.Y. 17 



'SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 




Dr. Ernest F. W. Alexanderson made communications history in 1917, when he designee 
a 200-KW high frequency alternator that produces continuous oscillations. As a result 
sound waves carry better, tune more sharply, and world-wide telegraphy is possible 

UIGRL < UJCniFm • UIGHL-TU have pioneered 

in the development of mass communications. Established in 1922, 1944, and 
1949, respectively, these stations have been and are dedicated to serving 
all listeners in the cities and communities throughout their coverage areas. 





WGAL-TV 

CAclkhM £ 



Lancaster, Pa. 

NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 



Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 
6 SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961] 




Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



9 October 1961 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



NO KIDDIE POOL FOR TV 

Networks won't pool children's time as ABC TV goes it 
alone; Kenndy, Murrow meet tv heads on export image 



Meetings by the three television 
networks to attempt to pool six after- 
noon time periods for a children's 
show of high quality came to an 
abrupt end this week when ABC TV 
announced it would undertake such 
a project alone. 

The assignment of developing the 
new ABC TV program for 1962-63 was 
given to Jules Power, who was also 
named director of children's pro- 
grams. (His previously developed 
show, Discovery, was dropped by 
ABC TV recently as a possible after- 
noon entry due to insufficient sta- 
tion clearances. The clearance 
problem is still serious; several sta- 
tions have already taken editorial 
positions against FCC-inspired chil- 
dren's programing.) 

NBC TV announced that it had 
been ready to enter a 3-network pool, 
subject to Justice Department ap- 
proval. It now has other children's 
programs in development and recent- 
ly began two weekly shows of this 
type, Update and 1-2-3 Go. 

CBS TV announced further 3-net- 
work meetings were pointless in 
view of ABC TV's decision to go it 
alone. It has Captain Kangaroo 
daily and other shows. 

In addition CBS TV dramatically 
switched its Sunday afternoon con- 
cert series to prime time. A series 
of seven concerts in all are affected. 

Four Young People's Concerts, 
sponsored by Shell, and two Phil- 



harmonic concerts, intended for 
adults and sponsored by Ford, will 
be seen in 7:30-8:30 p.m. prime time 
periods to be announced. 

In addition, a third 90-minute Ford 
concert will be scheduled in prime 
time as a special. 

Just at the moment that all these 
network moves, in response to sug- 
gestions on children's programing by 
FCC chairman Minow, were com- 
pleted, the government began to take 
active interest at a higher level in 
an even more important matter: the 
image of U. S. television abroad. 

President Kennedy was to meet at 
(Continued on page 10, col. 2) 



NBC TV's week: $4.7 
million night and day 

In the last week of September 
NBC TV wrote $2.5 million worth of 
nighttime fourth quarter business, 
topping it off with $1.2 million addi- 
tional for daytime. 

The nighttime deals consist prin- 
cipally of minutes sold to four ad- 
vertisers: Metrecal, Johnson & John- 
son, Block Drug, and Mogen David. 

This brings NBC TV's fourth quar- 
ter to the 99% sold out point, up 2% 
from the previous week. 

In daytime, Bristol-Myers bought 
into the 4:55 p.m. news strip. Also, 
31 quarter hours were purchased by 
U. S. Borax, Alberto Culver, Mogen 
David, and American Luggage Works. 



Altes Beer starts 40" 
buying on WWJ-TV 

National Brewing (W. B. Doner) is 
the first advertiser to buy 40 second 
spots on WWJ-TV, Detroit. 

The announcements are for Altes 
Beer and 12 a week will run for 26 
weeks. 

The station priced the announce- 
ments "realistically" at about 30% 
higher than 20-second announce- 
ments. 



Central billings issue 
coming into focus 

Some $8.3 million of station 
monthly receivables are now more 
than 60 days past due. It costs 
major agencies over $0.5 million a 
year to process spot buys. These two 
estimates were made by CMB (Cen- 
tral Media Bureau), which is trying 
to interest agencies in a central 
billings procedure. 

CNB uses C-E-l-R electronic com- 
puters. 

Two other companies also courting 
the agencies in an attempt to set up 
central billings are SRDS and Bank 
of America. 



Lorillard's York is longest 
non-filter of them all 

P. Lorillard will market an extra- 
long cigarette, York, through its 
agency, Lennen & Newell. 

Cigarette is 90 mm; king-size is 
85 mm. York won't have a filter. 

Initial distribution starts soon in 
New York and Chicago after tests in 
Milwaukee and Rochester, N. Y. 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



SPONSOR-WEEK 9 October 1961 



CIGARETS AMONG TOP 
JULY NET TV BRAND 

Seven of the 15 leading network 
tv brands in July 1961 were ciga- 
rettes, reports TvB from LNA-BAR 
figures. 

The seven brands and their July 
1961 gross time billings (in thou- 
sands) were Winston, $779; Camel, 
$767; Kent, $725; Spring, $542; Sa- 
lem, $500; Viceroy. $480, and Pall 
Mall, $438. 

During the same month the top 
brand was Crest tooth paste, $978,- 
000, and the top advertiser was 
P&G, $5.1 million. 

Since the start of 1961 food and 
food products were the leading net- 
work classification, with billings of 
$79.2 million, up 21.2% over a com- 
parable period in 1960. Second cate- 
gory, toiletries and toilet goods, was 
up 9.3% to $70.9 million. 



Lloyd Griffin elected 
president-tv of PG&W 

Lloyd Griffin has been elected to 
the newly created post of president- 
television of Peters. Griffin, Wood- 
ward, Inc. 
The announcement was made by 
H. Preston 
Peters, presi- 
dent of PGW 
and its chief 
executive of- 
ficer. 

Griffin 
joined PGW 

in Chicago in 
Lloyd Griffin 1945 a ft er a 

wartime career with the OWL He 
was elected a v.p. in 1946, and a di- 
rector the following year. 

Lloyd Griffin became a partner in 
1949 and was transferred to the New 
York headquarters in 1951. 
tive committee. 

Before the war he was with several 
radio stations and for seven years 
was with Knox-Reeves Advertising in 
Minneapolis. 




Herald Tribune buys 
WCBS-TV news shows 

Although the New York Daily- 
News own* W PIX. it's fairly 
unusual for New York n» - 
papers to do too much with lo- 
cal stations be\ ond their stand- 
ing promotion exchanges. 

Hence the move of the New 
York Herald Tribune 1 Pappert. 
Koenig & Lois) to buy four 
news shows a week on WCBS- 
TV comes as a tactical surprise. 

The newspaper will sponsor 
the Late News twice a week on 
a rotating basis and has a 10 
minute segment of Morning 
Report Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days. 

The Trib will videotape it? 
following day's front page at 
10:30 p.m. for its late evening 
commercials. 

At PK&L the new executive 
on the Tribune account is Paul 
Keye. ex-OBM: new media su- 
pervisor, from B&B. is Bernard 
Schlossman. 



FCC tells tall tower story 

There are over 100 tv towers over 
1,000 feet now in operation, notes 
the FCC. 

To be exact, there are 101, the 
tallest of which is that of KFFS-TV 
at Cape Girardeau, Mo., 1,676 feet 
tall. 

But that will take second place 
shortly to a 1,749 foot tower at Co- 
lumbus, Ga.. to be shared by WRBL- 
TV and WTVM. 

Only 11 of the 101 towers above 
1,000 feet in the U. S. are over 1,500 
feet tall. 

Construction permits have been 
granted for 13 more and are pend- 
ing for 19 others in the 1,000-feet 
category. 

Although transmission range of tv 
increases with a taller tower, so 
does the air navigation problem, so 
that a proposed high antenna must 
be approved by the FAA as well as 
the FCC. 



RITTENBERG APPOINTED 
NBC FILMS PRESIDENT 

Morris Rittenberg has been ap- 
pointed president of NBC Films. 

The company is a division of NBC 
Enterprises, of which Alfred R. 
Stern is v.p. in charge. NBC Films 
syndicates programs within the U. S. 

Rittenberg came to NBC in 1953 
from the U. S. Department of Labor 
as manager of financial planning for 
the tv network. He became sales 
development manager in 1956 and 
manager of special program sales 
in 1957. 




Matthews named media 
exec. v.p. at Burnett 

In a reshuffle of Leo Burnett's 
management setup, effective 1 Octo- 
ber, Leonard S. Matthews was made 
executive v.p. for broadcasting, 
media, and administration. 

He'll have primary management 
responsibility for both the media 
and broad- 
casting de- 
partments, 
the latter in 
both business 
and program- 
ing. His ad- 
ministrative 
duties will 
also include Leonard Matthews 
research, marketing, and client serv- 
ice. 

Matthews has been with Burnett 
for 14 years. He has served in the 
media, research, marketing, broad- 
casting, and client services depart- 
ments. 

At the same time it was an- 
nounced that these other changes 
in management were made: Richard 
N. Heath, chairman of the executive 
committee in Chicago, will withdraw 
from active participation in agency 
affairs at the end of the year. Philip 
H. Schaff Jr. becomes chairman of 
the finance committee. Draper Dan- 
iels becomes chairman of the execu- 
tive committee. 



8 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



I 




It should be no secret that we believe in UHF 
television. We have repeatedly pointed out that 
we can offer a good service to those who must 
depend on us for local service. Local adver- 
tisers in our principal market area spent over 
half a million dollars last year on this station 
and national advertisers spent a similar 
amount. This, however, is only one criterion, 
unfortunately it is the one by which so much 
is judged in this mercenary field. 

In the matter of service, that which is true 
and devoted is also very expensive to deliver, 
but we do it as noted by the FCC on August 2, 
1960 when it said that we have "shown a record 
of exemplary public service programming in 
generously providing its facilities for the ad- 
vancement of the civic, cultural, charitable, 
educational, and religious needs of the Spring- 
field area." 

Those broadcasters who believe in preserva- 
tion of monopolies, those who believe that a 
license from the FCC is only desirable when it 
happens to also be a license to steal, those 



a statement of 

WWLP & WRLP 

SPRINGFIELD — MASS. — GREENFIELD 

(Television in Western New England) 



by William L Putnam 



sanctimonious characters who only know how 
to shoot fish in a barrel; those people should 
be known for what they are. 

It is easy to convince and influence people 
when you have vast economic leverage to work 
with and it is easy to draw ridiculous circles on 
maps (the broadcaster's favorite indoor occu- 
pation) but the truth should be known for itself 
and we hope it becomes increasingly clear that 
television service can never be equated with 
coverage; that genuine advertising value cannot 
be determined from a series of magic numbers 
and that the very ideals of America are in- 
volved in current proposals made by the Fed- 
eral Communications Commission. 

We would call these matters to the attention 
of all those in this business in order that some 
of the inflated and ridiculous claims advanced 
repeated by those who oppose a fair and com- 
petitive system of television allocation can be 
examined in their true light. 

Represented nationally by HOLLINCBERY 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



SPONSOR -WEEK 9 October 1961 



MB 

WHAT MEDIAMEN THINK 
IN TWIN CITIES 

What media buyers and media 
salesmen think of each other is the 
subject of an AAAA report issued 
by its Twin City Council. 

On the matter of who influences 
buying most, there's variation be- 
tween the media. Says the AAAA 
report: "Reps of all print media ex- 
cept newspapers vote the adver- 
tiser's advertising department as 
having the most influence. News- 
papers put account people at the 
top of the list. Radio and television 
give the top spot to media people." 

One outcome of the study was a 
list of 13 constructive suggestions. 

In recommendation form, they 
were essentially as follows: Media 
representatives should find out buy- 
ers' preferences on appointments 
for calls. Sales calls periods with- 
out appointments were not well 
suited in the Twin Cities area. Sales 
presentation material is well re- 
ceived but room for improvement is 
seen. Media representatives should 
leave condensed versions of long 
sales presentations after making 
such pitches. 

Strictly comparative presentations 
should be avoided since both sales- 
men and buyers dislike them. Sales- 
men should try to check the timing 
of their pitches more often. Buyers 
should provide more information 
about client objectives — a practice 
which they already state they favor. 

Buyers might well be more recep- 
tive to suggestions about media 
and scheduling. Salesmen should 
determine individual preferences of 
buyers for extended sales pitches 
in response to their requests for 
more information. Relations with 
salesmen might be improved if buy- 
ers explained why they reject media 
presentations. Salesmen should con- 
sider before offering rebuttal to a 
rejected offering. Representatives 
of other media might profit by a 
study of sales techniques of repre- 
sentatives of trade papers. 



Bristol-Myers on 
$0.4 mil. news kick 

Bristol-M\ ers is off on a 
news-buying splurge. It just 
spent an estimated $400,000 on 
NBC TV for the fourth quarter 
of 1961. 

Products are Bufferin (Y&Rl 
and Ban (OBM.I. The pro- 
grams it purchased are for six 
days of the week: the 4:55 p.m. 
news Monday through Friday 
and the 6-6:15 p.m. news on 
Saturdays. 



Battle over discretionary $ 

In the battle for the consumer's 
discretionary dollar the scope of 
competition has widened deeply in 
recent years, says Norman Cash, 
TvB president. 

"Today," said Cash, "a new defini- 
tion of competitor is in order." It is 
anyone "who seeks to divert custo- 
mer dollars to his product or serv- 
ice." 

An appliance dealer, Cash gave as 
an example, a competitor "is not 
only another appliance dealer or dis- 
count store; it is also the book sales- 
man who goes from door to door, the 
paper boy or travel agent." 

To respond to this selling revolu- 
tion, Cash urged aggressive selling 
through better advertising and more 
advertising." 



(Nets cont. from page 7, col. 2) 

a luncheon late last week with Ed- 
ward R. Murrow, USIA director, and 
the three network heads, Leonard 
Goldenson of ABC TV, William S. 
Paley of CBS TV, and Robert W. Sar- 
noff of NBC TV. 

The export of programs that stress 
crime and violence is believed to be 
troubling the administration greatly. 

Programs seen on U. S. networks 
are distributed abroad by the net- 
works or sales representatives. 

Apart from the question of the con- 
tent and quality of such programs 



PRO FIRM TO REP 
SMALLER STATIONS 

A new station representative com- 
pany has been formed to serve the 
needs of medium and smaller sized 
markets. It is Prestige Representa- 
tion Organization (PRO), president 
and founder of which is Sam Brown- 
stein. 

Brownstein is former national 
sales manager of Broadcast Time 
Sales. His new company in two 
months of op- 
eration has 
been appoint- 
ed national 
representative 
for 15 sta- 
tions. 

The stations 
are: WMOU, 
Berlin, N. H. ; Sam Brownstein 
WHMS, Charleston; WKTC, Char- 
lotte; WCVI, Connellsville, Pa.: 
WKEN, Dover, Del.; WQMN, Duluth- 
Superior; KRHD, Duncan, Okla.: 
WSAC, Ft. Knox; WKIN, Kingsport, 
Tenn.; WBRB, Mt. Clemens, Mich.; 
WMCR, Oneida, N. Y. ; KKAR, Po- 
mona; WPAZ, Pottstown, Pa.; 
WMMM, Westport, Conn., and WPEG, 
Winston-Salem. 

PRO will specialize in stations in 
markets below the top 50. 




(Cont. from previous col.) 
and the information and impres- 
sions about the U. S. which they 
convey, there is also the matter of 
sheer quantity. Exports of tv film 
programs have drastically increased 
this year, partly through the easing 
of certain quotas. 

CBS Films, for instance, this week 
reported increased Far Eastern ex- 
ports CBS TV series by 130% in Ja- 
pan, 300% in the Philippines, and 
650% in Hong Kong, all of April to 
September 1961 over the same 
months last year. 

NBC International recently made 
similar announcements of stepped 
up exports in various countries. 



10 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 60 




1^ because 
oledo is 
F) different from 
hiladelphia . . . 




and because people are different in different markets . . . Storer programming is different! We put together a 
flexible format to fit the needs of each community . . . making it local in every respect. Result? Both 
WSPD-TV* and WSPD-RADIOt rate first in Toledo . . . WIBG dominates Philadelphia in all surveys! 
. . . Further evidence that Storer quality-controlled, local programming is liked, watched and listened to. 
Storer representatives have up-to-the-minute availabilities. Important Stations in Important Markets. 

* Nielsen— June 1961 

1 Pulse— July-August 1961 



LOS ANGELES 
KGBS 


PHILADELPHIA 

WIBG 


CLEVELAND 

WJW 


WHEELING 

WWVA 


TOLEDO 

WSPD 


DETROIT 
WJBK 


STORER 

BRQADC4STIXG COM PA XT 


MIAMI 

WGBS 


MILWAUKEE 

WITI-TV 

• 


CLEVELAND 

VVJW-TV 


ATLANTA 

WAGA-TV 


TOLEDO 

WSPD-TV 


DETROIT 

WJBK-TV 




a jump 
ahead in the Phoenix area 



Latest Pulse* figures show 

KRIZ #1 

Sunday thru' Saturday with more 
first-place quarter hours than any 
other station. 

KRIZ— 305 
X — 71 
Y — 58 
L — 20 

• According to the July, 1961 Pulse Report. 

KRIZ 




call robert e. eastman & co. f inc. 



by John E. McMilUn 






Commercial 
commentary 




O.K., but what do we suggest? 

Ever since that monster RTES rally at the 
Roosevelt a couple of weeks ago when 1100 in- 
dustry sardines were shoehorned into an 300- 
capacity ballroom to hear FCC Chairman Minow 
lambaste the tv Children's Hour, a great many 
of us who openly and bitterly oppose the New 
Frontier approach to radio/tv problems have 
found ourselves on a spot. 

Mr. Minow did well at the Roosevelt. He is obviously a bright 
guy, a sincere guy, and in many ways a nice guy. And, in attack- 
ing the juvenile delinquencies of tv kid shows he picked a cause as 
sure-fire as Home, Mother, the Flag and the \o<t Fare. 

More and more since the RTES get-together, I've been confronted 
by truculent friends (especially from outside the business) who in- 
sist that I stand and deliver. 

"O.K.,'' they say jeeringly, "so you don't agree with Minow. But 
what do you propose as an alternative?" 

"You tell us you'd like to see better tv programs. But what posi- 
tive, practical plan do you have to offer?" 

"You insist piously that tv can and should be improved. But what 
in the name of hell are you really doing about it?" 

Reluctantly, I must admit that this is a fair indictment. 

Not only an indictment of me, but of all of us in the industry who 
have reacted to Minowism only by hugging our principles to our 
hot little breasts, like the Spartan boy hugging the wolf. 

We haven't yet come up with anything better than the FCC Chair- 
man's proposals. And I think it is time we did so. 

Not his cause but ours 

Don't misunderstand me, however. I'm not suggesting that we try 
to please Mr. Minow, or knuckle under to his demands. 

Any industry plan which is born out of a fear of government 
pressure, government censorship, or government insolence is not 
only cheap, but cowardly. In the long run it is more destructive of 
freedom than open and outright rebellion. 

No, our problem is to figure out how to advance our own cause, 
not Mr. Minow's, our own principles, not his. 

I think we can make a start on this by re-examining some of the 
fundamentals in which most, if not all, of us believe. 

They bear, of course, the old, old familiar names — free speech, 
free press, private enterprise, the dignity of man, and the infinite 
varieties and capacities of individuals. 

Our faith, our traditional American faith anyhow, is rooted in the 
conviction that a society based on these principles is more creative 
and more productive than any other. 

Our current dilemma about tv programs arises out of a nagging 
{Please turn to page 67) * 



12 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 




th 



i 



555 5^ 



Minowtonous 

In the 11 September issue of spon- 
sor, the "Commercial Commen- 
tary" article (page 12) entitled "The 
Case Against Minow" contains a sub- 
heading (on page 42) : "Minowism 
and Minowtiae" . . . you could have 
even called it: 

"Minowism, Minowtiae, Minow- 
tonous." 

R. Erbe 

Madison Avenue 
N.Y.C. 
* * * 

Wish you could have been with us at 
the 26 August meeting of the Arkan- 
sas Broadcasters Association. One of 
the best state meetings I have at- 
tended. 

Ted Rand, manager of KDRS, 
Paragould, came up with this line in 
his talk: "You could expect a man 
named Minow to take a dim view of 
bait advertising." Maybe you've used 
it, but I thought it worthy of one of 
your "10-Second Spots." Anyway, by 
passing his line along I am express- 
ing my approval of that column and 
the remainder of SPONSOR. 

W. Judd Wyatt 
director of advertising 
MY A Insurance Co. 
Columbia, Mo. 

Riding a Dead Horse 

I hate to ride a dead horse, but you 
may recall a letter from Mr. Mc- 
Guiness, vice president, Farm Group 
Supervisor, last December pointing 
out the error in listing McCann- 
Erickson as the agency handling In- 
ternational Harvester Company's 
Farm Equipment radio. This came 
about because the campaign was se- 
lected as one of the top campaigns 
in 1960. 

Now I find that your 1961 edition 
of "Radio Basics" contains the same 
erroneous information! 

I was also fascinated by the 21 Au- 
gust issue and the story on the 225 
Fall broadcast campaigns taken from 
[Please turn to page 17) 




SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



13 



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there are stereo generators, a full choice of FM 
transmitters and antennas. This is a complete 
package of "matched" equipments — all designed 
! to work together in a stereo system, and all built 
to the same high quality RCA standards. 

Stations already equipped with a post-war 
model RCA FM Transmitter can begin stereo pro- 
gramming at once — merely by adding the stereo 
generator — plus the necessary audio equipment. 



Designed by forward thinking RCA engineers this 
stereo generator was the only equipment avail- 
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proved and is now "on the air" at a number of 
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three minutes from the cash register 

Approved Outdoor Advertising strives to be located on 
arteries that lead to the store. 
Approved Outdoor Advertising would be approved neither by 
business nor the public if it violated both sound business 
judgment and good taste by appearing helter-skelter on the 
nation's rural highways. 

For the Standardized outdoor medium -which is the only 
kind represented and promoted by OAl-is sold and bought 
as a marketing tool to reach prospects one-two-three min- 
utes from the cash register. 

Because our Approved Outdoor posters and painted bulletins 
give the last visual picture of the product before the pros- 
pect enters either the store, the tavern or the dealership, 
we must stay on arteries leading to business. 



This makes sense to us because it makes sense to adver- 
tisers. Particularly to marketing managers and others con- 
cerned with the rising costs of distribution. 

Particularly to marketers who know that in this do-it-yourself 
age no one recommends a brand in the store; since fewer 
than one-third of supermarket shoppers make buying plans 
at home, the sale must be started en route . 

Guiding the hand to the shelf or the car to the pump is one 
of the key purposes of advertising. For this call to action 
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16 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



555 5TH 

(Continued from page 13) 
the study made by Boiling Company. 
On page 42, our client's schedule is 
referred to. It is correct only to the 
extent of these words, "Programs de- 
sirable during farm times." We have 
never bought 20's and only buy min- 
utes in emergency. As far as the mar- 
ket and budget information goes, I 
wish I knew as much, since no de- 
cision has been made as yet. 

Aside from the above, I found 
"Radio Basics" most interesting, and 
continue to find enjoyable features 
in SPONSOR. 

Dixon Harper 
radio-tv director 
Aubrey, Finlay, Marley 

& Hodgson, Inc. 
Chicago 



Debating our success story 
The effective use of radio in South- 
ern California for the Lincoln- 
Mercury dealers is a fine success 
story for intelligent advertising and 
a good medium. 

But — I'd like to debate a point in 
the sponsor article. 

Radio, as an over-all industry, is 
doing an increasingly good job of 
reaching people (up 11% in three 
years), and there are many stations 
with varied programing to appeal to 
, a wide range of tastes. 

However, it's not the case that all 
radio is background programs. Many 
stations throughout the country treat 
radio as an alert foreground medium 
of information and entertainment. 

From their many local and net- 
work news and analysis programs 
they have expanded to feature local 
personalities who talk interestingly 
on many subjects. 

These stations are doing a signifi- 
cant communications job — and con- 
sequently they offer their advertisers 
a major bonus in attentive listening 
— much more than "background 
awareness." 

It is not measurable statistically — 
any more than the editorial differ- 
ences between Life and Newsweek 
can be evaluated on a slide rule. 

But our stations know this is an 
important difference, and they invest 
heavily each year to produce this 
kind of better programing. 

Maurie Webster 
v.p. and gen. mgr. 
CBS Radio Spot Sales 
N. Y. C. 




sponsor 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



17 




The Unstoppables, 




followed by The 

Untouchables, 



took 5 out of 
the top 10. 

Continuing its new-season 
trend, ABC-TV trended into 
the top ten with My Three Sons, 
The Real McCoys, 77 Sunset 
Strip, The Flintstones and The 
Untouchables. (The first 3 
named made it in the top 5.) 

This happy record, as recorded 
by Nielsen,* has the added 
virtue of being scored where 
the program popularity race is 
roughest. Namely, those 
competitive markets where 
viewers can view all 3 network 
offerings. And viewed as herein 
reported. 

ABC Television 

*Source: Nielsen 24 Market TV Report, 
- ending Sept. 24, 1961. Average 
Audience, Mon. thru Sat. 7:30-11 PM; 
Sun., 6:30-11 PM 



18 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 196- 




J 



9 OCTOBER 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Interpretation mad commentary 
on most significant tv/ radio 
and marketing news of the week 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



If there's to be any ticking off of somewhat unusual advertiser invasions of 
nighttime network tv this season, these three would have to be included: 

1) The heavy scatter of minute participations by Meade-Johnson (K&E) in behalf 
of Metrecal after that dip in the medium via the Winston Churchill series. It's spending 
at the rate of $3.5 million. 

2) Mobil's (Bates) blitzing off its new copy platform with some 60 minute partici- 
pations on CBS TV and ABC TV for the fourth quarter. 

3) Gillette (Maxon) departing from its whilom preoccupation with sports to sell its 
shaving line on multi-sponsored entertainment programs. 




What with all the problems generated by the 40-second chainbreak, some of the 
tv reps are expressing the hope that media planners can refrain from devising 
schedule combinations which would only aggravate the confusion. 

Like, for instance, the type of availability call put out last week by JWT in behalf of 
Standard Brands' Tender Leaf Tea. 

The plan involved : running a schedule of 20-second announcements for two weeks, 
converting to 10-second spots the succeeding two weeks and then returning to the 
20-second segment for an additional two weeks. 

Report these reps: their stations are telling them that a revolving plan such as this can 
only cause them a loss of revenue during the 10-second cycle. The stations are ask- 
ing: where are we going to sell the open 10 seconds for just two weeks? 



The rather significant development of the week in spot tv was Eastman Ko- 
dak's (JWT) resort to the medium on a substantial scale for the Christmas buy- 
ing season. 

The plan as it now stands: a minimum of four weeks in at least 25 markets and 
weekly schedules of eight prime 20's and six fringe minutes. 

Reps who in recent years have been trying to bring Kodak into the spot tv orbit are 
hoping that the stations will be able to do a good clearance job, which might prove 
fruitful in the event a survey were undertaken to measure the level of Christmas 
camera sales in the spot markets vs. non-spot markets. 

Other national spot tv activity: Lionel Science Sets (Grey), four weeks, pre-Christ- 
mas, 20's and minutes; Dow's Handy Wrap (NCK), testing prime 20's and minutes, nine 
a week, minimum of 10 weeks; Pertussin (Compton), day minutes, 13 weeks; Lovera 
Cigars (Compton), 7 weeks, pre-Christmas, day minutes; Alberto-Culver (Compton), re- 
newing top 30 markets. 

Brown & Williamson (Bates) will be beefing up its less weighty total home- 
impression markets— that is, via network— with spot buys in tv weather reports and 
sports. 

Contracts will be for 13 weeks. 

Word coming to the tv networks out of the Chrysler corporate setup is that 
consideration is being given company tv plans for 1962. 

The immediate interest, according to this information, is in lining up some specials. 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



19 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



In its current buying of spot tv for Crisco Compton has introduced some- 
thing different along the lines of procedure. 

The new twist: instead of buying everything for each of two geographical groups, it 
bought night minutes for group A and day minutes for group B, and then it went 
back and bought day minutes for group A and night minutes for group B. 

All this happened withn a space of a week-10 days. 

Taking the period of January through June as a base, afternoon tv viewing 
continues on the uptrend, whereas the nighttime tune-in quotient keeps going the 
other way. 

Here's a comparison of the average tune-in the first six months of the past four years, 
as measured by Nielsen: 

period 1961 1960 1959 1958 

Noon to 5 pan. 23.5% 22.1% 20.1% 22.1% 

7 p.m. to 11 p.m. 57.1% 57.8% 58.2% 57.0% 

Disney has dissolved its practice of buying its needs for individual releases 
through local agencies and reposed in LaRoche the responsibility for spot tv buy- 
ing throughout the country. 

The consolidation, on the tv side, is worth about $2 million a year in billings to 
LaRoche. 

An average Disney release involves schedules in about 200 markets. 

Incidentally, Disney is offering stations 3 ^4 -minute musical clips from Babes in 
Toy land, a forthcoming release, which may be scheduled as a strip and sold for local 
sponsorship. 

This may not be symptomatic of all tv rep firms but the sales head of a ma- 
jor station group informed SPONSOR-SCOPE last week that agencies outside of 
New York have been concentrating their buying on the minutes to the gross neg- 
lect of the 20's. 

He cited, as an outstanding case in point, Chicago, which, he said, has been giv- 
ing sparse consideration to 20's — the ratio between minutes and that unit being at least 
50% off for 20's as compared to last year. 

The group sales chief said that a similar disregard for 20's also prevailed in such 
buying centers as Minneapolis, St. Louis and Los Angeles. And this, he added, when 
stations had twice as many to selL 

Tv stations that have posted 30-second segments on their ratecards may have, 
in the long run, posed something of a problem for themselves. 

Where these stations had in mind for the 30's was the nighttime chainbreaks, but it 
now turns out that agencies here and there see such units as kind of useful in other 
areas of the stations' schedule— bike fringe and late features and syndication 
shows. 

The latest case in point is the call put out for that sort of placement by Dancer-Fitz- 
Gerald-Sample in behalf of General Mills cereals. 



20 



So that big batch of spot that Compton had ordered in the name of Duncan 
Hines Premium Cake Mix were for another P&G product, namely, Crisco Oil. 

Reps and stations (about 15 tv markets are concerned) were surprised by the switch 
of products after the orders were confirmed — 20 to 30 spots a week, starting 15 
October, but Compton, which services both products, told SPONSOR-SCOPE there 
wasn't anything unusual about the procedure. 

In other words, nobody was hiding nothing for nobody, not even Crisco's competition. 

SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 




SPONSOR-SCOPE co**u*d 



Now that the General Motors strike is settled, the agency for several of the di- 
visions are finecombing the nighttime schedules of the tv networks in search of 
immediate availabilities. 

The lines that are quite scanty in tv weight of the introductory stretch are Buick, Olds- 
mobile and Pontiac. (See 25 September SPONSOR-SCOPE, page 20.) 

Whether there's enough worthwhile for them among the network leftovers is quite prob- 
lematical, and it may all turn out to spot's advantage. 

Another ambitious and expensive programing idea of ABC TV has gone aglim- 
mering: it's the Thanksgiving Day special, which was to run 5:30 to 11 p.m. 

The proposition: a combination of name entertainment and patriotic features, 
with $700,000 net going for talent and a tag of $600,000 for time and preemptions. 

Like a similar idea the network had pitched for the Fourth of July, there were no 
takers. The reaction of some agencymen : maybe the time isn't ripe for offbeat venture 
of such magnitude. 

For an insight into how the package goods advertisers rack up in tv SPON- 
SOR-SCOPE asked TvB to compile for it a list of that category with $4 million or 
better in gross network plus spot billings for the first six months of 1961. 

The following roster, with program and commercial costs not included, was the result: 



ADVERTISER 

Procter & Gamble 

Lever Bros. 

American Home 

Colgate 

General Foods 

General Mills 

Bristol-Myers 

R. J. Reynolds 

Lorillard 

Brown & Williamson 

Miles Laboratories 



JAN.-JUNE 1961 

$53,656,120 

24,522,730 

21,520,691 

19,011,327 

17,932,325 

11,702,207 

10,975,247 

10,611,104 

9,811,327 

9,669,463 

9,639,274 



ADVERTISER 

Philip Morris 

Kellogg 

S. C. Johnson 

National Biscuit 

American Tobacco 

Warner-Lambert 

Liggett & Myers 

Pillsbury 

Campbell Soup 

Standard Brands 

Carter Products 



JAN.-JUNE 1961 
$7,896,872 
7,545,668 
7,183,474 
6,984,291 
6,874,458 
6,642,867 
6,600,867 
4,744,569 
4,727,987 
4,470,440 
4,258,795 



Sources: TvB-LNA; TvB-Rorabaugh. 

P.S. : With programing costs included it's a pretty good bet that General Foods would 
rank at least third on the above list. 

Unless it's a P&G or General Foods, the sponsor of a new nighttime half-hour 
show has still to put up a battle for clearance in the key two-station markets. 

Advertisers in such cases have had to content lately with two things: (1) the crowding 
out of smaller units by one-hour programs and (2) the reluctance of stations to 
clear for an untested show, figuring that he can do just as well in rating and even net 
more money with a syndicated series. 

Among the new series that's had an uphill battle is Ford's Hazel (NBC TV), which 
has yet to get scheduling in such important markets as Syracuse and Birmingham. 

The latest sales promotion wrinkle that ABC TV is exploiting: it's got the big- 
gest percentage of heavy viewing homes at night in terms of hours. 

This claim is based on an entire January 1961 week, 7:30 to 11 p.m., as shown by the 
NTI for that period: 

NETWORK HEAVY VIEWING HOMES LIGHT VIEWING HOMES 

ABC TV 37.2% 33.6% 

CBS TV 30.9% 31.6% 

NBC TV 30.2% 32.7% 

As interpreted by ABC TV: the percentage in the heavy column confirms the network's 
oft-repeated thesis that it dominates in the young households and the big cities. 



NONVIEWING HOMES 
29.2% 

37.5% 
37.1% 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



21 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Using as a base the present rate of business, SPONSOR-SCOPE is herewith 
taking a stab at estimating what advertising's dollar contribution for tv will be 
for 1961, as compared to the previous year. 

The breakdown as SPONSOR-SCOPE has it figured: 
item 1961 I960 

Network Time $500,000,000 $470,000,000 

Network Programing 350,000,000 320,000,000 

ISational-Regional Spot 480,000,000 460,000,000 

Local time 240,000,000 215,000,000 

Non-network programing 130,000,000 120,000,000 

Commercials 50,000,000 45,000,000 

Total $1,750,000,000 $1,630,000,000 

Jim Luce's assignment as media director of JWT's Detroit office won't make 
much difference in what had been his function as media coordinator of the Ford 
account. 

He'll go on doing the coordinating but more of his time will be spent in Detroit. 
The Ford account represents 90% of the Detroit office's billings. 

The role of the special sales rep, one working on a fee basis for miscellane- 
ous stations, has been resurrected for tv. 

Jack Hardingham, who was a senior v.p. and general manager of Headley- 
Reed, has set himself up as a special rep. His function, as was that of the special rep in the 
earlier radio days: dig up business opportunities among advertisers and agencies 
and work closely with the station's regular reps. 

In tv heretofore this sort of role has been filled by men working on salaries for 
group-owned stations. 

On Hardingham's list at present are WBRE-TV, Wilkes-Barre, WYOK-TV, Merid- 
ian, Miss., and KFVS, Cape Ciradeau, Mo. 

Bates is complaining to some of the radio rep firms that it's again encoun- 
tering in no small fashion an old station delinquency : failing to submit affidavits 
of performance so that the bills can be paid. 

This agency among others thought that this situation was licked a few years back when 
agency comptrollers and a group of radio stations got together on a system that 
would resolve the problem of affidavit roadblocks. 

The billings percentage margin between network tv and spot tv seems to be 
getting closer year by year, if you base your comparison on the FCC figures. 

Here's a five-year recapitulation of time revenue figures for national-regional spot vs. 
network, as reported to the Government bureau: 

YEAR NATIONAL-REGIONAL SPOT NETWORK 

1956 $281,200,000 $367,700,000 

1957 296,400,000 394,200,000 

1958 345,200,000 424,500,000 

1959 424,200,000 445,800,000 

1960 459,200,000 471,600,000 

P.S.: The breakdown of the FCC's 1960 billings report showed these percentages as to 
source: network, 41%; spot 40%; local, 19%. 



For other news coverage in this issue: see Sponsor-Week, page 7; Sponsor 
Week Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 55; sponsor Hears, page 58; Tv and Ra 
dio Newsmakers, page 68; and Film-Scope, page 56. 



22 SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1 



.1 



^t^_ 



*<**** 




Minutes Matter to Time Buyers 

A fresh young college graduate, eager to find a job as a time buyer, 
wangled a five o'clock interview with the Media Director of an 
advertising agency. 

Rumor had it that the M.D. was a punctilious person who went by 
the book.* To insure a favorable impression of his own punctilious 
habits, the youth wanted to arrive on the spot precisely at the 
appointed hour. 

If he averaged 15 miles an hour he would arrive an hour too soon. 
If he averaged 10 miles an hour he would arrive an hour too late. 

See if you can figure out what speed he should average, and the 
distance he had to go. Send us the correct answers and we'll send you 
one of our unique new prizes. It may be round or it may be rectangu- 
lar. Either way, we guarantee it's a gift worthy of your mathematical 
talents if you can solve this puzzle. 

*ABB, to be exact, which shows that'WMAL-TV has the largest share of the 
Washington, D. C, market from 6 P.M. to Midnight, all week. (June '61) 

wmal-tv 

Washington, D. C. 
An Evening Star Station, represented by H-R Television, Inc. 

liated with WMAL and WMAL-FM, Washington, D. C; WSVA-TV and WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va. 

PONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 23 






PRIZE PACKAGES . . . open now 
for more Detroit Sales 

Looking for top-rated minutes in crackerjack movies? 
Then take a look at Channel 2's Fall lineup! The cream 
of the movie packages . . . top stars in the big pictures 
. . . John Wayne in 'The High and the Mighty" and 
"Island In the Sky", Ray Milland in "Sealed Verdict", 
Bob Hope in "My Favorite Brunette", Robert Mitchum 
in "Track of the Cat", plus scores of other audience 
builders. Hit 'em where they're looking! WJBK-TV 
movie spots SELL! 





WARNER BROS. 
"7 ARTS" 



,1 20th CENTURY FOX 
"SUNSET" 



RKO 




MINUTE SPOTS AVAILABLE IN: 

MORNING SHOW EARLY SHOW 

9-10 a.m., Mon. thru Fri. 5-6:30 p.m., Mon. thru Sat. 

NIGHTWATCH THEATER 
11:25 p.m. to sign off, Mon. -Sun. 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY SHOWCASE 
Starting at 1 :00 p.m. 



WJBK-TV 

A STORER STATION 

CHANNEL 2 CBS DETROIT 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE: STORER TELEVISION SALES, INC. 
24 SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 19<» 



^ SPONSOR 

9 OCTOBER 1961 



Two viewpoints on the current status of radio research: 





UYER needs more data on groups in station's audi- 
mce, by demographic data, and by amount of lis- 
bning, says D&C media research head Martin Herbst 



QUALITATIVE data have been added to syndicated and 
individual station research, and more can be expected, 
says Daniel H. Denenholtz, Katz research chief 



I 



[Radio research: what next? 

kgency researchers call for broad studies of radio listening habits, 
vith demographic breakdown, more on audience make-up by station 



i) 



j ndustry interest in research is on 
ie rise, and the radio side, with its 
>ecial problems, is coming in for a 
Dodly share of the discussion. 
Heightened concern with research 
ems. among other sources, from the 
ongressionally-inspired Madow Re- 
:>rt on the subject of broadcast rat- 
igs and construction of a commit- 
e, headed by Westinghouse Broad- 
isting president Donald H. McGan- 



non, to evaluate suggestions that 

NAB get into the research business. 

Those not satisfied with the state 

of radio research point to changes in 

1) The way the medium is bought 
(in batches now as opposed to by- 
the-program in bygone days I . and 

2) Where listening takes place i ever- 
greater addition of out-of-home lis- 
tening has been added). Also receiv- 
ing considerable cogitation are the 



ONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



relatively low-per-broadcast ratings 
prevalent in the multi-station radio 
station field, and the resulting prob- 
lem of relatively large statistical er- 
rors. Larger samples are put forth as 
a possible solution to this, but many 
feel it's unrealistic in terms of the 
added costs. 

There's no question that radio re- 
search can be improved. Disagree- 
ment comes in as to what improve- 



25 



menta would be meaningful enough 
ti> warrant adding to research bills 
Mat ions feel are plenty high already. 
Among those who cite a need for ex- 
tensive overhaul of radio research is 
Martin Herbst. media research direc- 
tor at Donahue & Coe. who has a 
two-fold project in mind. 

For radio in general. Herbst feels, 
an overall study is needed of media 
habits by groups, comparing time 
spent listening to radio with time de- 
voted to other media. The studv 
should relate demographic informa- 
tion, income, buying habits, etc.. of 
each group investigated to radio lis- 
tenership. 

"Radio has developed into a very 
specialized medium." he relates. "It 
is bought in terms of stations, not 
programs, and stations are selected 
on the basis of groups to which they 
appeal, such as Negroes, teen-agers. 
fin listeners, etc. Yet very little re- 
search targets down to these special 
groups. 

"Take teen-agers for instance. 
They're hard to reach with adver- 
tising, but we think radios the way 
to do it. They probably spend more 
time with radio than with all other 
media combined. Generalizations 
are not enough for the leaders of 
industry today, however. To sell them 
on the medium, facts and figures are 
needed. Admittedly a study of teen- 
agers, which would have to be na- 
tional, would run into monev. but it's 





WARD DORRELL, research chief at Blair, 
cites importance of individual station-spon- 
sored investigations into their audieice pofila 



ROBERT COEN, McCann-Erickson media 
research head, voices basic need for master 
study of where radio listening takes place 



that kind of material that's needed to 
help the medium grow," states Herbst. 

The second phase of the Herbst 
proposal applies to day-to-day buy- 
ing. He feels indvidual station data 
should go beyond audience size to 
breakdown bv amount of time de- 
voted to listening, and demographic 
information according to the extent 
of listenership. In other words, he'd 
like to be able to tell which station 
in a market has among its frequent 
listeners, for example, the largest 
number of middle-aged, middle in- 
come, male, automobile owners. 

"This way. you'd have a real pro- 
file of the station instead of such 
subjective descriptions as 'Top 40 
or 'Good Music' now available." 
Herbst summarizes. '"A demographic 
breakdown by station is very impor- 
tant in justifying the local radio buy. 
Now all you get is relative competi- 
tive standing in the market, which 
can change every couple of months. 
This is all right in tv because there 
vou have a frame of reference, the 
program, about which you know the 
audience profile. In radio, the sta- 
tion is the frame of reference." 

Robert Coen, media research di- 
rector at McCann-Erickson. thinks 
the first step toward improving radio 
research ought to be "a big, master 
studv of where radio listening takes 
place." According to Coen. while 
there is some out-of-home data, it is 
not fullv varified in terms of latest 



developments in radio listening, such 
as changes brought on by the spread 
of transistor sets. "\^ ithout this basic 
knowledge of what the radio universe 
looks like, we're handicapped in using 
the ratings we do have," he savs. 

By way of elaborating on how the 
called-for study would help, Coen 
cites a hypothetical station program- 
ing to teen-agers and receiving a low- 
rating. "If we learn that teen-agers 
do, say, 95 % of their listening out of 
home, we can consider that in evalu- 
ating the station for a particular 
client." 

As for where stations might get the I 
money for the large undertaking he | 
favors, Coen thinks substituting 
broader time periods for the current- 
ly prevalent quarter-hour ratings 
could shake loose some funds. Any- 
where from an hour to three hours, 
depending on demands of the pro- 
gram schedule should prove adequate 
for rating periods, and this would 
same money on the sampling. 

Donahue & Coe's Herbst grants 
that broad time period ratings a 
cheaper, tend to eliminate fluctuation, 
and supply bigger unduplicated audi- 
ence than quarter-hour figures. He 
maintains, however, that a switch 
from quarter hour to broad time 
period ratings would not fulfill thet" 
need to change from per broadcast tol 
station measurement in keeping with-j 
change in the way radio is bought! I 
nowadays. In other words, he feels ' 
broad time period ratings are merely, . 
a refinement of quarter hour measure- 
ment, and does not go to the basa 
question of station audience compo- 
sition. 

Daniel H. Denenholtz, v.p. 
charge of research and promotion at 
The Katz Agency takes the stand that' 
radio research, by and large, is keep 
ing pace with developments in the 
radio business. He feels that the 
syndicated services have made sig- 
nificant forward strides in reporting 
audience characteristics and cumula- 
tive ratings, and that individual sta 
tions more and more are commissk>r - 
ing studies of their own audience 
profile and public image. 

Denenholtz expects a free flow 
additions to this tvpe of qualitative 
research as time goes on, but caution 
that it is no substitute for the trad: 



I 



26 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1%] 



:ional quarter-hour ratings which re- 
main vital. It still is necessary to 
know audience at time scheduled, 
and the quarter-hour ratings com- 
prise the components for figuring 
average over any given time span, he 
■ r elates. As Denenholtz sees it, pro- 
graming is not parallel enough for 
broad time period figures to cover 
'avery situation — i.e. you can't work 
adequately with ratings for, say, 7-9 
i.m. if your buy is for 6:30-8:30 a.m. 
But with every quarer-hour covered, 
you can compute the average for any 
:ime span. 




Politz-Christal study delves into refinements of listening 

WEEKLY CUMULATIVE AUDIENCE OF RADIO WITHIN SPECIFIED TIME PERIODS 



One area in which Denenholtz sees 
a need for investigation, though he 
realizes it presents expensive difficul- 
ties, is measurement of unduplicated 
audience reached by different com- 
binations of stations. 

Indicative of new developments 
possible in radio research is a re- 
search study by the Alfred Politz firm 
released last week which purports to 
rise above several of the drawbacks 
sometimes ascribed to existent radio 
data. Conducted on behalf of five 
stations represented by Henry I. 
Christal, the study lays claim to these 



advantages: 

• Universe studied relates to sta- 
tion s comprehensive coverage area, 
rather than being limited to a city or 
metropolitan area 

• Individuals, rather than house- 
holds, were studied. Each interviewee 
reported only for himself 

• Samplings encompassed over 
1,000 interviews per area 

• Reports cumulative listening in 
broad time periods 

• Combined techniques — personal 
interview, qualitative diary, and au- 
dimeter figures. ^ 



Detroit 
% 



Hartford 
% 



Milwaukee 
% 



Schnectady 
% 



Buffalo 
% 



Total population 15 and over 



97 



98 



97 



97 



97 



- 



i-7 AM 



38 



44 



49 



38 



39 



L 



9 AM 



74 



82 



80 



78 



76 



i- 12 Noon 



79 



83 



82 



83 



84 



; 



2-3 PM 



81 



84 



82 



82 



85 



-6 PM 



78 



82 



75 



79 



82 



8 PM 



67 



73 



57 



71 



69 



1-10 PM 



47 



49 



43 



47 



48 



' 


JO -12 Mid. 


36 


34 


30 


34 


41 


' 


I2-5 AM 


12 


13 


12 


11 


15 


: 
I 

I.. 

j : 

if 


i 

TYPES OF MUSIC PREFERRED FOR RADIO LISTENING 


Concert music 


40 


47 


39 


40 


39 


ll 


'opular music with full orchestration 


64 


69 


62 


61 


51 


il 

li 
-I 


'opular music with small orchestration 


61 


67 


54 


55 


55 


■ 
Rock and roll 


37 


33 


28 


29 


27 


i'i 


Don't listen to music 


46 


54 


53 


39 


37 




Other 


10 


5 


8 


6 


13 


I' 


Folk music 


7 


5 


6 


8 


5 






<X 


(SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 










27 







JOHN W. KLUGE, as president and chairman of the board of Metromedia, Inc., formerly Metropolitan Broadcasting Corp., has rcclod up a.-.ofhen 



METROMEDIA SOARS WITH JOHN 



Kansas City purchases are the latest acquisitions in Kluge's constantly expanding; 



| he remarkable "buy" and "build" 
philosophy that marks John W. 
Kluge's every move was again set in 
motion recently when the FCC re- 
cently approved his purchase of radio 
station KMBC and television station 
KMBC-TV, Kansas City, Mo. Kluge's 
company. Metromedia, paid $8,350,- 
000 for both outlets, long regarded 
as choice pieces of propertv in broad- 
cast row. 

Impressive, indeed, was the fact 
that Kluge acquired the Kansas City 
outlet> without any out-of-pocket ex- 
penditures. Much of the money for 
the purchase came from insurance 



companies — savvy operators always — 
who in this instance were convinced 
that Kluge's judgment was sound and 
mature. 

Investors in Metromedia, Inc., 
which changed its name from Metro- 
politan Broadcasting Corp.. last 
spring, vigorously applauded Kluge 
when he relayed the vitamin-packed 
intelligence that gross revenues 
zoomed over two-and-one-half times 
to a dazzling 842.598,179 in 1960. 
from $16,543,422 in 1959. 

Some industry leaders say last vear 
was Metromedia's historic year. 
Others insist that every dav since 



Kluge first entered the broadcasting 
sphere nearlv a decade and a hal 
ago has been memorable. 

His present operations are far an< 
distant cry from the day he and ; 
partner purchased WGAY Radio 
Silver Spring. Md. That was back ii 
1946. He made his entry in metro 
politan New 1 ork radio six yeaifc 
later when acquired control of Metr< 
politan Broadcasting which now ojjl 
erates WNEW and WNEW-TV. 

Since then his choice acquisition 
have included WTTG. Washington 
KOVR, Sacramento; WTVH, PeoriaJ 
WTVP. Decatur: WIP. Philadelphia 



28 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 19(t 




ilk li 



year of financial growth & physical expansion 



KLUGE 



, operations in key cities 



WHK, Cleveland, and KMBC-AM- 
TV, Kansas City. Last year also was 
significant in the history of the com- 
pany. It acquired Foster and Kleiser, 
the nation's second largest outdoor 
advertising company with headquar- 
ters on the West Coast. 

There is however a particular trace 
of pride when Kluge tells acquaint- 
ances and friends of Metromedia's 
acquisition of WRUL Radio, the re- 
markable shortwave station which 
serves Latin America. Africa and 
Europe. 

Kluge said recently: "We, in media, 
have a deep-seated responsibility. We 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



assume things like the Schweitzer 
taping not because of the FCC but 
because there has to be a sense of 
citizenship in communications. We're 
taking a loss on the WRUL opera- 
tion but it is terribly exciting to 
think that on any one day we can 
reach two-thirds of the world with 
our broadcasts." 

What FCC Commissioner Minow 
has been saying about the broad- 
casters of America, strikes a respon- 
sive chord with Kluge. "I'm quite in 
accord with him, "Kluge told 
sponsor. "And I'm not saying this 
for the FCC's benefit. There is a lot 
to be said for the FCC's point of 
view. I don't think it is bad for an 
industry to get shaken up a bit. I 
quite agree with Minow. If you give 
a nation candy all the time, it may 
very well end up with more than 
cavities in its teeth." 

It is Kluge's belief that both the 
nation and the broadcasters have to 
aspire to the finer things as well as to 
a variety of things. Furthermore, 
Kluge doesn't quarrel with Minow 
as regards the state of children's pro- 
graming on the air. 

As one listens to Kluge's aware- 
ness of the power of broadcasting, 



one feels thai Metromedia's rol 
broadcasting ia onl) jusl comn i 
ing. It is a safe bet thai he will have 
the blessing of bis alert board <>( 
directors in the pursuit of more trie- 
vision properties and more radio 
stations. 

"I'm going to staj in broadcasting 
a long time," he remarked last week. 
"A good radio station is like a coun- 
try doctor — he weaves himself into 
the whole structure of the com- 
munity." 

He's a firm advocate of the usi 
of research. He said recently that 
the marketing of goods is an ob- 
stacle course for companies. "We are 
a part of that course."" he said. "We 
should know more about ourselves 
than anybody else, and we can do 
that through research. Then we can 
help the people who are running the 
course." 

Kluge's office in the WNEW-TV 
studios reflects the tastes of a man 
with considerable insight and un- 
derstanding of both the fine arts and 
the folklore of the "organization 
man." It is a large and relaxing room 
with soft lighting and a number of 
paintings on the walls including a 
(Please turn to page 48) 



Broadcast properties of Metromedia 



TELEVISION STATIONS 



STATION 
WNEW-TV 

WTTG 

KOVR* .... 



WTVH* 

WTVP* 

KMBC-TV* 



LOCATION 

.New York 

..Washington 

..Sacramento- 
Stockton, Calif. . 

..Peoria, III 

..Decatur, III 

..Kansas City, Mo. 



YEAR 
ACQUIRED 

1959 

1959 



19S0 

.1960 
.1960 
.1951 



RADIO STATIONS 



WNEW (AM-FM) New York, N. Y. . 

WIP (AM-FM) Philadelphia, Pa. 

WHK (AM-FM) Cleveland, 

KMBC Kansas City, Mo 



.1957 
.1960 
.1958 
.1961 



INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING 


WRUL Scituate, Mass 


1960 


'Affiliated with ABC TV (others independent) 



20 



Television circulation, cost and cost-per-1,000 estimates as 



/ 
/ 
/ 

/ / 



,+46% 



ss 



-' 



■*&> 



Y 



.+25% 



cost 



100 



W # A COST— PER— THOUSAND ^.< 




'55 '56 '57 '58 *59 

1955 Index = 100. Costs are Urns and apaao aaty. 

TV NETWORK 



-14 c 



•60 '55 



"••.-A 



'56 



'57 '58 '59 '60 

TV SPOT 



C-P-M DATA SHOWS TV EDGE 



Trend since 1955: tv circulation has continued to outdistance cost; 



Oay you're an advertiser. In 1950 (when televi- 
sion was scarcely out of the crib) you bought a 
weekly hour variety show on a major network. You 
laid down $20,000 for time. Based on network 
production factors for that year you paid an addi- 
tional $28,400 for talent and production, or a total 
of $48,400 to reach the potential of four million 
television homes. 

It's 1955. The baby not only is out of the crib, 
he's bouncing all over the place. That weekly va- 
riety show is now costing you $60,000 in time and 
$45,000 in talent and production, a total of $105,- 
000 to reach a potential of 30,200,000 homes. 

1960. Baby's a big boy now. That prime time 

30 



hour is costing you $100,000 in time and $67,000 
in talent and production, a $167,000 total to reach 
45,200,000 homes. 

Your cost has increased 245% since 1950, 59% 
since 1955. But your circulation has increased 
more than 1,000% since 1950 and 50% sincei 
1955. Your cost-per-1,000, therefore, has declinedl 
more than 40% since 1950 and 14% since 1955.) 

This hypothetical case points up some of the! 
silent factors inherent in the first of the sponsor! 
graphs shown above. With 1955 (the year general-! 
ly preferred by the industry's major research! 
houses) representing an index of 100, the foun 
graphs trace a five-year history of network andj 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961J 



compared with magazines, newspapers over past five years 




+457c 



+22° 

-I- 19% 




*55 



'56 



'57 



'58 



'59 



'60 



'55 



'56 



'57 



'58 



'59 



'60 



MAGAZINES 



NEWSPAPERS 



IN CIRCULATION COST BATTLE 



Dpot television (cost-per-1,000 circulation) as com- 
ared with magazines and newspapers. Latest 

K>st-per- 1,000 estimates of other major media, 
nee 1955, show a 17% increase in spot radio 
idaytime), a 1.3% decline in network radio and 
Tl r c increase in outdoor advertising. 
Reflected notably in the television graphs is the 
iveling-off process of tv since 1955, especially in 
pot. In a TvB study issued in 1959, spot televi- 
sion showed a 40 r f decline in cost-per-1,000 over 
lie past decade. Its decline over the latter half of 
le decade, however, is only .4%. Equally reveal- 
lg is the role talent and production prices play in 
ieeping network tv's cost-per-1,000 low. Where 



'ONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



network time costs have increased meteorically 
as a result of television's rapid circulation growth, 
less astronomical rises in talent and production 
charges have served to amortize total program 
costs. 

It should be noted that estimates in this report 
reflect only a media comparison relationship be- 
tween cost and circulation over a five-year period, 
not the definitive picture of relative costs among 
media. ^ 

(Sources for the sponsor graphs and estimates: 
Television Bureau of Advertising, McCann-Erick- 
son, Printer's Ink, Bureau of Advertising — ANPA, 
A. C. Nielsen Co.) 

31 



IS THIS TV'S MOST 
DARING FOURSOME? 

^ Four gentlemen from advertising and broadcasting 
have carried on historic golf game in Westchester 

^ Messrs. Tom McAvity, 'Joe' Culligan, Dick Pinkham 
and Ken Bilby continue an old and endearing friendship 



his is the only foursome J 
know that during a match can create 
a program, sell it. schedule it. and 
have it cancelled before they return 
to the clubhouse!"' 

This trace of elfish humor sprang 
from the lips of Michael Dann (vice 
president. CBS TV network pro- 
gram.-. New York) in describing the 
deft and merry goings-on of four 
certain individuals engaged in golfing 
at the Apawamis Club in Rye, N. Y. 

The four gentlemen are Thomas A. 
McAvit\. vice president, programing, 
in the radio tv department. J. Walter 
Thompson Co.; Matthew J. I "Joe") 
Culligan. a general corporate execu- 
ti\e and a director of McCann- 




KEN BILBY, v.p., Public Affairs, RCA, and 
Pinkham go cabin cruising together with their 
families when they are not on the golf course 



Erickson, Inc., in charge of the ad- 
vance projects division; Richard 
A. R. Pinkham, senior vice president 
in charge of broadcast operations and 
member of the board of directors of 
Ted Bates & Co., Inc., and Kenneth 
W. Bilby, vice president, public af- 
fairs, Radio Corporation of America. 

The quartet met at NBC a number 
of years ago. Since then each one 
has gone into similar or other as- 
signments at different establishments. 
But the admiration for each other 
continues, and the human decencies 
they practiced on each other at 30 
Rockefeller Plaza have been carried 
on unceasingly. 

The fearsome four have been find- 
ing surcease from daily problems in 
broadcasting, advertising and other 
communication-producing migraines 
by playing golf. It has been an un- 
ending and almost historic golf game 
filled with the spirit of good will 
and unfailing good humor toward 
each other. 

Once there was a small but cele- 
brated Thanatopsis Poker and In- 
side Straight Club in New York. It 
consisted of luminaries such as 
Franklin P. Adams, George S. Kauf- 
man, Marc Connelly, Heywood Broun 
and Harpo Marx. These boys played 
poker and fashioned bright discourse. 
The McAvity-Culligan-Pinkham-Bilby 
quartet appears to be of the same 
milieu but infinitely more inclined 
toward the healthv outdoors and 
the niblick. More over, there isn't a 
noodnick in the lot according to 
others in the communications dodge. 

McAvity, who has a reputation 
among his peers as one of the savviest 
practitioners in the field of program- 
ing and program development, re- 
laxes with golf, fishing and sailing. 




MATTHEW J. ('JOE') CULLIGAN, gener 
al corporate exec, McCann-Ericltson, says 
there are no concessions on golf course 



He speaks of his golfing companion 
as one of the most "congenial" he 
has ever met. "It is a day in the 
country" for him when he meets the 
boys on the greens. In his opinion. 
Bilby is the steadiest player of the 
lot. His own putting, McAvity de- 
scribes as "weak." 

How has McAvity fared in the small 
bets with the boys on the golf links? 
"I don't think I have lost anv money 
over the years," he said. But it ap- 
pears that one of the foursome, 
Culligan, has been giving him an 
arduous time. Culligan not so long 
ago gave him a $20 check, the result 



of a golfing wager. 



McAvity gave it 



to his wife. She took it to the bank. 
The bank refused it because Culligan 
had failed to indicate his bank 
branch. Moreover, who was "Matthew j 
Daly," the bank demanded to know, 
Culligan's signature, according to col 
leagues, is as difficult to decipher as 
the ancient language of Hindustan 

When a sponsor editor saw Mc 
Avity last week, the latter was carry 
ing another Culligan check. It con- 
tained a wrong date plus two differ 
ent sets of figures. "If you're collect- 
ing a golfing wager from Culligan 
you had better get in cash," McAvity 
said wryly. 

McAvitv is, as a rule, a spring, fal 
and winter golfing member of th( 
foursome. During summer months 
golfing with the others slacks off. 
and McAvity engages in other sporti 
and relaxations. He said that on occi 



32 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 19C 



sion, during the winter season, the 
boys drive up to New Haven, play 
some golf in the morning and see the 
Yale football games in the afternoon. 
Their wives frequently join them at 
!the gridiron spectacles in the Yale 
Bowl. 

Turning to industry problems, the 
J. Walter Thompson executive said he 
thought network programing this 
\ear was better than last year but 
the need for network creativity, net- 
work inventiveness was greater than 
ever. 

Sales are one of the biggest prob- 
lems confronting the networks, he 
noted. "It is the result of the third 
network being firmly entrenched on 
the scene," he said. "Todav all the 
networks have availabilities. But the 
tragedy is that the networks are 
imitating each other, instead of being 
more inventive." 

McAvity did not think that the 
FCC was curbing the freedom of 
broadcasters and he thought FCC 
Chairman Minow had a point 
when the latter criticized the net- 
works for the low 7 character of chil- 
dren's programing. "There's too 
much trash in the children's field," 
McAvity said. "Tf better programing 
is done for the children now, they 
will appreciate better programing as 
adults." 

How do the boys shape up as golf 
players? Culligan has a 13 handicap, 
Bilhy. 11: while McAvity has an 8, 



■i THOMAS McAVITY, v.p., programing, 
! radio-tv dept., J. Walter Thompson, looks 
upon golfing date as a day in the country 



I 




and Pinkham, is highest with 15. 

"This is a competitive business," 
said Culligan," filled with stories of 
bitterness, but the four of us. despite 
the competitive pressures, ha\e 
carried on an honorable kind of 
competition. It was always this way 
with us." 

Culligan said there were no con- 
cessions of any kind in their golf 
playing. "You've got to sink ever) 
putt and gamesmanship prevails at 
all times," he said. "We take a lot 
of ribbing from each other from 
hole to hole. For a two dollar bet, 
anything goes that is legal." 

Messrs. Culligan. Bilby, McAvity 
and Pinkham engage in a running 
satirical bit on status symbols during 
their encounters on the links. Pink- 
ham, upon returning from a Euro- 
pean holiday, would be asked, in 
solemn-like fashion, how are things 
on the Riviera or Biarritz? Both 
Bilby and Culligan are the possessors 
of swimming pools. After a rugged 
golf game, each will pull a status 
symbol line: "I think I'll go home 
and take a swim." Culligan, in an 
attempt to top it, might say: "I think 
III go home and put on my air con- 
ditioner." Pinkham, unable to brag 
of a swimming pool, will say: "I'll 
go on my boat." Culligan said he was 
waiting for the day when one of the 
group would end a golf game with 
this crack: "I think I'll go home to 
my swimming pool, my air condi- 
tioner and my boat." 

Pinkham said he was being pres- 
sured bv Mrs. Pinkham to build a 
swimming pool. "But I'm a twice a 
\ ear swimmer." he observed, "I go in 
twice a year and each time for 30- 
second dips. Swimming, to me, is a 
bore." 

The Culligan family resides in the 
western sector of Rve. The Pinkham 
familv also lives in Rye. near the 
Sound. The Bilby clan resides in the 
Orienta Point area of Mamaroneck. 
McAvity and his family are Man- 
hattanites. 

Culligan said there was also al- 
ways a wide divergence of opinion 
expressed on the golf links. The boys 
discuss broad industry matters, in- 
ternational affairs and the state of 
contemporary literature. The four 
men are constant readers, with em- 
phasis on non-fiction, but once in a 




RICHARD PINKHAM, Senior v.p. in charge 
of radio-tv, Ted Bates, says all wives in group 
are bright. No dud in the lot, he declares 



while they'll approach a novel in 
order to keep abreast of literal") 
trends. 

It is not uncommon for others on 
the links to overhear these four 
golfers arguing the relative merits of 
the best sellers of the week. It is 
conceded bv main in the industry 
that this quartet is about as well read 
a group as one is apt to find any- 
where on the broadcast band or in 
the purlieu of Madison Avenue. The 
gamut of their discussion is indeed 
wide — anything from the theological 
and secular aspects of Reinhold 
Niebuhr to the uncorseted goings-on 
in Henrv Miller's Tropic of Cancer 
Pausing at the fourth hole, recently, 
the boys agreed simultaneousK that 
Tropic of Cancer was "trash." \n- 
other piece of current best-selling 
fiction, namely The Carpetbaggers 
by Harold Robbins, was quick!) 
dubbed "interesting trash." 

The quartet was unstinting in its 
acclaim of William Shirer's massive 
and important book. The Rise and 
Tall of the Thin! Reich. The) were 
unanimous in their praise of 
Shirer's great reporting of the prim 
Nazi saga. Culligan recalled last 
week that the Shirer book was the 
cause of his losing a wager to Bilb\ . 



What 'outsiders' think of potent quartet 

'This is the only foursome I know that during a match can create a program, 
sell it, schedule it, and have it cancelled before they return to the club 
house.' 

Michael Dann, v.p., CBS TV network programs, New York 

The fastest moving quartet on the links as well as in the conference rooms. 
I know them well and admire them greatly.' 

Sydney H. Eiges, v.p., public information, NBC 



Culligan argued certain points. Bilby 
said he was mistaken. Culligan 
wagered $100 he was right. Bilby 
proved him wrong after they went 
over the Shirer tome. After a golf 
match, the boys will usually have a 
drink. Culligan will reach for a 
ginger beer; McAvity, who is a 
switcher will order most anything; 
Pinkham will reach for a rum collins 
and Bilby may some time try a gin 
and tonic. 

A highspot of their regular games 
is the golf dice bit they engage in 
at the 19th hole. "It is like a nar- 
cotic," said one of the foursome last 
week. "You can't stop it, once you've 
begun. And the loser pays for the 
drinks." 

The four are profound family men 
with an enoromous love and respect 
for their wives and children. The 
Bilbys have four children. The Cul- 
ligans have four children. The Pink- 
hams have four children. The Mc- 
Avitys have two children. All told 
14 children. Also a close bond exists 
between the wives and at various time 
during the theatrical season, couples 
will go to the Broadway theatre. "We 
would rather see a bad play than a 
good movie," Culligan observed. 
During summer months, the four- 
some and their wives will take in 
the local strawhat circuit productions 
in which many of their friends and 
acquaintances are appearing. 

Culligan, one of the most penetrat- 
ing professional minds in the busi- 
ness, was asked what he regarded as 
some of the major problems con- 
fronting networks. Among the prob- 



lems he cited these: The independ- 
ence of affiliates which leads to some 
clearance problems; the threat of 
government interference as well as 
ownership of problems, and pay-tv, 
with the loss of sports and some mo- 
tion picture attractions. He also cited 
the failure of two networks to move 
decisively toward color tv. Culligan 
insisted that radio should take ad- 
vantage of its new acceptance by 
raising rates, increasing the range 
and quality of newscasts, increasing 
volume of analysis and commentary, 
and re-introducing a type of radio 
spectacular which would fully cover 
the latest in world shaking develop- 
ments. 

Culligan wants the return of some 
famous comics to radio. He would 
like to see Groucho Marx, Bob Hope, 
Jack Benny and George Burns in new 
formats on radio. He isn't satisfied 
with the news and special events job 
on radio. "It is doing an adequate 
job, but it can certainly do better," 
he said. As for pay-tv, "it is farther 
away than its proponents believe." 
He doesn't think the FCC and Minow, 
in particular, are curbing the free- 
dom of broadcasters. "All one has 
to do is to read the complete text of 
Minow's speeches to recognize that 
he personally oppose control and is 
primarily recommending self-im- 
provement." 

Nor is the character of children's 
programs on a satisfactory level, ac- 
cording to Culligan. "It is the one 
area in which adequacy is not 
enough," he said. "Even after bad 
programs are eliminated, we should 



continue to work toward making me- 
diocre programs worthwhile." 

Pinkham has been a member of 
Apawamis since before Pearl Harbor 
and was responsible for getting Mc- 
Avity and Bilby into the club. Cul- 
ligan was already a member of 
Apawamis. 

"We never talk hard business on 
the golf course," Pinkham said last 
week. "We tell the latest jokes." 

In Pinkham's opinion, McAvity 
has the hardest time sinking putts 
over four inches. Pinkham describes 
Bilby as the most serious player of 
the quartet — a player filled with grim 
determination and the "possessor of 
the worst swing." However, Bilby is 
incredibly accurate when he gets in 
close, Pinkham conceded. 

Culligan's behaviour on the greens 
was described by Pinkham in this 
fashion: "He has the best practice 
swing in the club, but unfortunately 
he doesn't use it to hit the ball. 
Culligan never loses his temper. 
That's an incredible accomplishment, 
you know, for an Irishman. Also. 
Culligan is a surprisingly accurate 
putter for a man with an eye patch.'" 

Pinkham recalls that the caddy- 
master first told him about Culligan 
many vears ago. "What's he look 
like? "Pinkham asked. "Oh," re- 
plied, the caddymaster," he has no I 
special characteristics." As an after- 
thought, he added: "Oh, yes, he has 
an eye patch!" Pinkham, in addition 
to golfing, is keen on skiing, sailing 
and travel. Pinkham's wife is an out- 
standing athlete. She was All-Ameri- 
can in field hockey and lacrosse. She 
was also runner-up in tennis singles 
and champion in doubles at her ten- 
nis club. 

Said Pinkham, with unbridled en- 
thusiasm: "All the wives in our group 
are bright. There isn't a dud in the 
bunch!" 

Pinkham, asked if the thought the 
FCC and Minow were curbing broad- 
casters' freedom, replied: "No, only 
by moral suasion, which is just and! 
proper." 

Pinkham, a great believer in 
presentation of visual news at the| 
breakfast table, observed that on 
of the most depressing facts of toda 
was that 90% of American news 
papers were so bad. " "It is too ba 
(Please turn to page 50) 



34 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



RADIO TALKS 'HIP' FOR KEDS 



^ U. S. Rubber tries out radio disk jockey fun-sell 
for its canvas shoes and makes dent in teenage market 

^ Reports from dealers in Cincinnati and Fort Worth 
relate 15% sales increase to six-week radio campaign 



#\pparently there's no such thing 
as hard sell-soft sell when it comes to 
cracking a teenage market. What it 
takes is a "hip" kind of lingo known 
as fun-sell, a lingo dear to the hearts 



of the not-children-nor-adult group of 
citizenry. And most effective when 
dispensed by that teenage idol, the 
popular local radio disk jockey. 
This was the thinking tried out by 



U. S. Rubber and their agency 
Fletcher Richards, Calkins & Holder) 
this summer when the compam Bel 
out to spark teenager interest in theii 
canvas shoe product, Keds. 

The campaign which involved mul- 
tiple radio stations in the top 25 
markets, proved most successful and 
according to talk around the trade, 
it's quite possible that U. S. Rubber 
will try out this approach in other 
markets next year. 

Although all the sales reports are 
not in. comments like this one from 



Here is how one station promoted Keds in a five-hour stunt 



•S SHOES 



US KEDS 

COKE PARTY 



,'/i am :■///</ 




IN 
PERSON 



AT 1pm 

FREE COKES-PRIZES 




' 



HE CENTER ATTRACTION of the event was WLS (Chicago) disk jockey Dick Biondi who served as host of giant Coke party held at shopping 
laia. Photo left shows window display cards exhibited by Keds dealers. At right is the R&S store which dispensed free Coca Colas to the crowd 





FHE PULLING POWER OF the local disk jockey is evidenced here (right) with this shot of a small portion of the huge crowds which turned I out 

rival by helicopter (left) which earlier had dropped tagged-for-pnzes small styro-foam balls 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



35 



Radio buying is teamwork for U. S. Rubber ad men and agency 




HEAD OF KEDS ad staff is A. J. Hocking, 
advertising and sales promotion manager, 
footwear, general products div. U. S. Rubber 




J. R. McMENAMIN, assistant advertising 
and sales promotion manager, footwear and 
general products division, U. S. Rubber Co. 




SY FRCLICK, FRC&H v.p. radio tv direc- 
tor, who master-minded Keds tv and radio 
commercials is known as Mr. Keds in agency 



Howard Turner, sales manager for 
U. S. Keds in Cincinnati, ''one of the 
largest department stores in Cincin- 
nati enjoyed a 10' < to l.Vr increase 
in Keds sales which they relate direct- 
ly to the Keds radio commercials," 
and this from Stan Wilson, v.p. of 
KFJZ, Fort Worth, "a large suburban 
outlet in Fort Worth indicated that a 
14v< increase in Keds sales could be 
attributed to nothing else beside the 
radio advertising, recommended that 
it be continued — and believes that its 
back-to-school business on Keds will 
double last year's figures." 

Although U. S. Rubber began mar- 
keting the first of its Keds line back 
in the Cay '90's (they were called 
Peds then) this was the first all-out 
effort to win over the teenage market. 
via radio. Footwear News reports 
that for the first half of 1961 imports 
of fabric-upper shoes with rubber 
soles increased 9.49? in pairage and 
2.4' i in volume business. The aver- 
age price of this merchandise fell 
from last year's $1 a pair to 94 cents 
during the first half of this year. 

I . S. Rubber's product has a sales 
price range beginning al $3.95. 

This first local radio campaign to 
Bell K«'ils to teens in their own idiom 
and on their own favorite disk jockey 
shows began 17 July. It was a six- 
week saturation hu\. From 24 to 34 
spots a week were used on l»o or 



three top radio stations with a strong 
teenage audience. The stations were 
provided with four recorded commer- 
cials, prepared by the FRC&H crea- 
tive group, each 50-seconds long giv- 
ing the deejay a minimum of 10 sec- 
onds to endorse and sell Keds in his 
own words. To guide the disk jock- 
eys, a special Keds fact sheet was 
supplied. 

How does a big and staid company 
like I . S. Rubber put across a teen- 
type message? It's not as simple as it 
might sound, says Sy Frolick. FRC&H 



v.p. tv and radio director who foi 
years has master-minded the Keds t^ 
commercials and the recent radio mes 
sages. The problem: should thev at 
tempt a "cute" approach and risk 
wasting the effort on the pseudo 
sophisticated group? Or should the; 
approach be straight telling and 
chance losing the audience befon 
the message goes over the airwaves? 
Jingles? Well, sa\s Frolick, "you'rei 
bound to lose something in the maze 
of music and jingles." 

The solution, then, according to 




CAMPAIGN STRATEGY for Keds recent teenage radio buy in 25 markets was handled by 
FRC&H team (l-r) Fletcher D. Richards, Jr. a.e.; Sylvia Harris, acct. supvr.; timebuyer J. Kelly 



36 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 






■■ > 



1 



Frolick, was simply a matter of win- 
ning the confidence of the teenagers 
by talking their language and by 
giving them something to participate 
in. 

The results of the combined brain 
work of Frolick: Robert Nugent, writ- 
er-producer; Bill Vance; and art di- 
rector Vic Miranda were four record- 
ed light and breezy messages, devot- 
ing almost the entire minute to teen 
talk news. The first told a general. 
blue label Keds story : the second put 
the spotlight on Keds basketball shoes 
for boys; the third highlighted both 
needle-toes and pastel colors in Keds 
for girls; the fourth reminded both 
bovs and girls to get a new pair of 
Keds for back to school. All the com- 
mercials carried the 1961 campaign 
theme — "Get That Great Keds Feel- 
ing. 

The heart of each commercial was 
a "Teen BulleTeen," a piece of 
"news"' or a "tip" for teenagers, with 
zany sound effects. 

Here's a sample Teen BulleTeen: 
"They are building a new padded 
ceiling in the gym at the Wilbur 
Grunt Memorial High in California, 
because the ball team switched to 
Keds and thev keep banging their 
heads. Keds make you jump higher." 

The Teen BulleTeens were designed 
by FRC&H and produced by Nor- 
wood Productions, N.Y.C.. with more 
than fun in mind, it worked as ex- 
pected. Youngsters caught on to the 
BulleTeen idea, started repeating 
them to each other and eventuallv 
made up their own. It led to a 
variety of Teen BulleTeen promotions 
for local dealers. 

Merchandising and promotion 
played a very important part in the 
campaign. Although this was not a 
stipulation for a station buy, most of 
the stations however did come through 
with mailers, contests and other gim- 
micks — all involving the leader of the 
campaign, the local disk jockey. 

In Chicago, for example, radio sta- 
tion WLS disk jockey Dick Biondi 
was the pivot for a five-hour long 
promotion which included five major 
| events, (see photos page 35). Mail- 
ing pieces spotlighting the top disk 
jockeys in the Chicago stations were 
sent out to Keds dealers listing mar- 
(Please turn to page 51) 



WANT A STATION? GET 
THE %$* OUT OF TOWN! 



The story you are about to read 
never happened. It was written by 
Jean Rockwell, gal account executive 
at Parker Advertising, Inc., Saginaw, 
Mich., after she returned, pale and 
shaken, from visits to a radio and a 
television studio the other day. Both 
outlets are what might be called 
"studio-transm itter" operations — and 
though the audience to these outlets 
have no trouble finding them, on the 
dial. Miss Rockwell discovered that 
finding the studio was another matter 
altogether. 



wmar T. Fleegle is employed by 
the FCC. His sole job is to okay 
radio and tv studio locations. With- 
out the dedicated work of such men 
as Omar T. Fleegle. tv and radio as 
we know it today would not exist. 

Let us listen to a conversation be- 
tween Fleegle and Charlie Lumpden. 
prospective station owner: 

Charlie: I have found it, Mr. Flee- 
gle — a fine location! It's so far from 
town, no one knows where it is. Now 
will you stamp my license? 

Fleegle: That is good, Lumpden — 
but vou can do better. Come back to- 
morrow. 

i Next day I 

Charlie: Mr. Fleegle! Guess what? 
I have found a spot that is so far 
from town that no one knows where 
it is — and we can locate the studio 
750 yards from the road behind a 
grove of trees! Now t will you stamp 
my license? 

Fleegle: You have done well. 
Charles — but you can do better. 

(Next day) 

Charlie: Not only is the spot so 
far from town that nobodv knows 
where it is and we can locate our 
studio 750 vards from the road be- 
hind a grove of trees — but I have 
just found out that the road itself is 
unpaved — dusty and bumpy in the 
summer and downright impassable in 
the winter. Now will you stamp my 
license? 

Fleegle: You have done an excel- 
lent job, Charlie — but there is just 



one more thing you must do. 

I Next day I 

Charlie: I have taken care of 
everything, Mr. Fleegle. I have found 
a location so far from town that no 
one knows where it is. We have built 
our studio 750 yards from an un- 
paved, impassable road behind a 
grove of trees — and here is the last 
thing . . . our letterhead has the 
wrong address! Now r will vou stamp 
my license? 

Fleegle: Charlie my boy. vou have 
proved yourself. Here is your license. 
Those #S<T?* agency people will 
never be able to find vou! ^ 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 




SPONSOR ASKS: 

HOW CAN AGENCIES AVOID OVER- 
SPENDING FOR FILM COMMERCIALS? 

(PART 2) 



Those replying to this week's 
question are: 

• Rex Cox, "-arra. Inc.. New "l ork 

• James S. Troy, The Troy-Beau- 

monl ( •.. Men ^ <>rk 

• Robert Bergmann, Filmex Inc.. 
New ^ ork 

Rex Cox, director of creative services, 
Sarra. Inc.. New York 

Hie sponsor or client, advertising 
agency, and film producer, all share 
in the responsibility of trying to save 
monej wherever possible, or express- 
ing it another way . . . "why waste 
money?" Lets look at some instances 
of where money is wasted, or better 
yd where waste can be avoided. 

From the film producers view- 
point, of course, the perfect solution 
would be for the agency and pro- 
ducer to get together earlv in the 
creative stages of the commercial be- 
fore the idea is presented or "sold" 
to the client. 

This does not mean that the film 
producer knows all the answers, but 
from the standpoint of production 
problems he might be able to suggest 
a better economical film approach or 



Costly changes 
avoided if 
everyone con- 




cerned ap- 
proved script 
before produc- 



tion 



technique. There are manv cases 
where the script or storyboard has 

already been sold to the client, and 
when the film producer suggests a 
more effective or economical way he 
i- told. "Oh. we can't change that, 
the client has already approved it." 
"Haste make> \\a>t<*" is not a 
bromide — but a truism. Too often 
production of a film commercial is 
started before ample planning time 
is given, which invariably results in 



expensive changes during shooting: 
running into costlv overtime, or even 
added days for reshooting. 

\nother important point is to be 
sure that everyone who should have 
^een and approved the script before 
production is started has done so. 
be it sponsor or agency personnel: 
and including the producer and di- 
rector, if possible. This would mean 
that all concerned are in agreement 
on how the film should be produced 
when they go on the stage or into a 
recording session. It is indeed frus- 
trating to sit in on a screening of a 
work print and have someone you 
have never seen before, nor who has 
ever attended a meeting or present at 
the shooting, suggest changes. Sug- 
gestions for changes at this stage of 
production naturally are very- costly. 
Of course, changes will always crop 
up during the shooting of any film, 
but these should be held to a mini- 
mum, not be changes of a major 
nature that sometimes makes it seem 
as if the script was "being written on 
the stage. 

There are many more specific 
wastes we could speak of. such as 
over building sets when the script 
only calls for an extreme close up: 
poor preparation, or more to the 
point, late preparation of color cor- 
rected labels or packages, which in- 
variably means delav in shooting. 
Often there is an actual problem in 
obtaining the clients product before 
shooting starts. \^ hen sufficient time 
has not been given for pre-production 
planning or getting approval of the 
script from all concerned, there is 
the other common practice of "Well 
. . . lets shoot it tyvo or three differ- 
ent ways and well make up our mind 
after we see the dailies." This think- 
ing even works into the cutting room, 
and sometimes results in the actual 
editing of the spot two different 
ways because a decision could not 
be reached before shooting started. 

There is also a great waste of 



money in the re-doing of opticals. 
There is an increasing practice of 
going to opticals too soon in order 
to meet an "impossible air date" or 
a "sales meeting" that we just found 
out about. Many times spots go into 
opticals with the full knowledge that 
they will have to be re-opticalled as 
soon as some bit of animation is 
corrected, new mattes are made, or 
better fine grains or high contrast 
prints are obtained. All of this be- 
cause ample production time yvas not 
planned in the beginning. 

As I look back over the above, it 
makes me think that if I'd onlv had 
more time for preparation all could 
have been stated in one simple sen- 
tence: "If vou want to save money in 
producing tv film commercials, 
take time for pre-production planning 
and don't shoot the film until the 
script is right, and all of the client's 
products and props are ready." 

James S. Troy, exec vice president. The 
Troy-Beaumont Company. Inc., Seic 

I believe the best answer lies in 
film companies which utilize the fee 
system — the principle which yvas so 
thoroughly publicized as a result of 
its adoption in the ad agency field by 
Ogilvy. Benson & Mather — but has 
actually has been in use by numerous 
agencies for a number of years. 

As a company which utilizes this 
svstem. we are familiar yvith its ad- 
vantages — and some disadvantages. 



Considerable 
savings in using 
a fee system in 
which agency if 
billed net costs 



But I think it affords the best pro- 
tection for agencies who are right] v 
zealous in economizing for their cli- 
ents. 




38 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



SPORTS 




Candlestick Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, opened April 12, 1960. 
Constructed at a total cost of over $15,000,000, the stadium is municipally 
owned. It seats 42,500 people. Photo by Moulin Studios 



...San Francisco's KTVU 
offers unequalled sports 
coverage in the Bay Area. 
Intense viewer interest is 
indicated by the tune-in 
San Francisco 
Giants — Los Angeles 
Dodgers baseball games: 
an80%shareof audience!* 
San Francisco 49'er foot- 
ball, college basketball, 
wrestling, track, hockey, 
tennis ... if it's sports . . . 
if it's live, San Francisco 
expects to see it on 
KTVU. These popular 
major sports events offer 
high impact for success- 
ful sales campaigns. For 
information on the latest 
sports availabilities, call 
H-R Television or KTVU. 

The Nation's LEADING 
Independent TV Station 



KTl 





CHANNEL 



SAN FRANCISCO • OAKLAND 



(SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



39 



IN 

CHARLESTON 
-HUNTINGTON 

THERE'S NO NEWS 
LIKE 

WSAZ TELEVISION 

NEWS 



♦*♦♦*♦♦*♦«>♦♦ <£> ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Because there's no other 
station that takes such 
an interest in the news 



\\ - ^-TELEVISION is the only tele- 
vision station in the market with "two- 
city" news coverage . . . maintaining 
a full-time news staff in hoth Charles- 
ton and Huntington. 

V And this is a news staff: nine re- 
porters and writers who deliver their 
own news on the air; eight photog- 
raphers who get every important story 
on film as it happens; 27 area cor- 
respondents who furnish on-the-spot 
reports from every corner of the region. 

♦ Match this top-flight personnel 
with the very latest technical facilities, 
add two wire services, combine into 
daily news programs originating si- 
multaneously in Charleston-Hunting- 
ton studios . . . and you get an idea of 
why WSAZ-TELEVISION's regional 
news is another unparalleled PLUS in 
tlii- station's tremendous arsenal of 
audience appeal. 

♦ News dominance, coverage dom- 
inance, ratings dominance ... all go 
together to make WS AZ-TELEVISION 
the easiest media choice you'll ever 
make, in any market. Don"t you wish 
all your decisions were this easy? 



TELEVISION 

CHANNEL 3 CHARLESTON - HUNTINGTON 

DIVISION THE GOODWILL STATION*. INC. 

C. Tom Garten, Vice Prudent and Ceneral Manager 

Represented by The Koti Agency 



It i- necessary for a company 
which uses a fee system to expend 
sufficient time and energ\ to provide 
a wealth of accurate information on 
budgets and possible solutions to a 
project. However, man\ times this 
preliminary effort is more than com- 
pensated for b\ speeding the produc- 
tion time, eliminating errors, and pro- 
viding the results expected l>\ the 
client. 

I nder the fee system, the agencj 
is charged one flat fee for a specific 
project. All costs are billed net — 
without a commission or markup. 
If in production it is obvious that 
an increase in budget would provide 
additional advantages well worth 
considering — for example, the com- 
mercial is ideally suited to color in- 
stead of black and white — then a 
conference is held with the client. At 
this meeting the suggestion is made, 
and the agency makes a decision with 
the full realization that such recom- 
mendations are not based on a desire 
for increased billing. Too frequentlv 
agencies view such suggestions as 
a smoke screen in which to burv over- 
budget costs. 

There are frankly some difficulties 
in switching to a fee system. Crea- 
tive people frequently see more un- 
usual or original solutions to a 
project (at greater cost), and some 
suppliers find it hard to believe (at 
first) that you are really serious 
about your budget ceiling. 

I feel that agencies or clients who 
are exposed to the fee system receive 
a number of advantages. They have 
a clear understanding of what they 
will get for their investment and have 
the facts on what the various costs 
are because estimates are broken 
down. The system eliminates "over- 
budget embarrassment"' and utilizes 
the "open book" system, under which 
the client is free to study costs if 
he wishes. It also enables realistic 
budgets to be set for most commer- 
cials without need for sizeable re- 
serve or contingency fund. 

I believe the system provides for 
a closer working relationship with 
the agency. It can promote the "ideal 
situation'" of a production group be- 
coming an extension of the agency's 
own department. Furthermore, a 
reasonable share of responsibility is 
assumed by the agency, since he is 
fully informed of all project con- 
cepts, techniques and limitations 
throughout production. Also there is 



a much greater opportunity for pro- 
duction group to capture the agency's 
style and feeling. 

The fee system hits home to the 
producer that the money being in- 
vested is the client's monev. and there 
is a limit to the expenditure available 
in all areas of production. The sys- 
tem offers a challenge to companies 
which utilize, and it saves clients' 
mone\ . 

Robert Bergmann, pres., Filmex Inc. 

\ri( ) orl. :: chairman of the public Tela 
dons committee of Film Producers Assoc 

Overspending begins for an agencv 
when an idea or concept for a com 
mercial does not depend on a master 
visual to convey the sales message. 
T_ nless there is shown, dynamicallv. 
the reason for the purchase of the 
product or service — unless the pic- 
ture carries the promise that will be 



By assigning 
work without a 
bid system to 
producers in 
a ho they can 
have confidence 



fulfilled from a sale, the commercial 
is not taking advantage of its tele- 
vision exposures and its investment 
in production. Too often, the com- 
mercial depends on the audio (re- 
flecting its dependence on the radio 
form) — on a catch phrase, a care- 
fully summed-up advertising premise, 
which is better served in a print 
medium. Too often unstimulating 
and non-emotional package or prod- 
uct shots are employed in and out 
of sequence, denying the commercial 
its own form and opportunity to 
make a full statement. Too often a 
viewer is treated to nothing more 
exciting than an announcer's lips in 
motion, medium shot, while holding 
a product in hand. 

Overspending begins when the 
commercial is not understood as the 
effort of two complete teams work- 
ing together; the agency "s and the 
film producer's, with the consequence 
that information, vital to the produc- 
tion, is not passed in a most direct 
and complete manner to all con- 
cerned. When information dribbles 
to the set on production day, as often 
(Please turn to page 48) 




40 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 






WB EN-TV 
SPOTLIGHTS YOUR P .DUCT 
IIM A $3.5 BILLION MARKET 

Your product is in the Western New York spotlight when you spot your sales 
effort on WBEN-TV. 

WBEN-TV, with its high tower and maximum power, delivers a 15-county area 
in Western New York and Northeastern Pennsylvania, plus a bonus audience 
of over 2,000,000 people living on the Canadian Niagara Peninsula. 

And you get more than coverage. You get impact! For Channel 4 — Buffalo, 
is the television pioneer of the area — with 13 years of audience loyalty to its 
credit, over a decade of leadership in audience preference. 

Don't hide your product story under a bushel. Spotlight it in the clear, bright 
picture of WBEN-TV. See how your TV dollars count for more on Channel 4. 



Get the (acts from Harrington, Righter & Parsons, 
National Representatives 

WBEN-TV 

The Buffalo Evening News Station 




SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



41 



WTOK-TV 

MERIDIAN, 
MISSISSIPPI 




A MOST 



EFFICIENT 



MEDIA BUY 

'MISSALAND — thirty-six counties in 
Mississippi and Alabama covered by 
only one television station— WTOK-TV. 
Facts prove that WTOK-TV offers adver- 
tisers one of the nation's most efficient 
media buys. Before completing your 
next market list, take a close look at 
MISSALAND and WTOK-TV. Here's why: 

• 159,400 Television Homes 

• $530,093,000 Retail Sales 

• $796,636,000 Effective Buying 
Income 



Copr. 1961, Sales Man- 
agement Survey of Buying 
Power, further reproduc- 
tion is forbidden 



WTOK-TV 



MERIDIAN, 
MISSISSIPPI 




CHMNEL11 



CBS PRIMARY AFFILIATE 
NBC • ABC 

ssusr 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



TV BUYS 

Lionel Corp., New York, will open a campaign for its trains and 
science sets. The train schedule is set to begin 3 November and will 
have a flight of six weeks; the science set schedule will start 3 No- 
vember and continue for three weeks. Time segments: minutes and 
breaks. Both schedules will go into 40 to 50 markets. Agency: 
Grey, New York. Buyer: Herb Gandel. 

Lever Bros. Corp., New York, will run a spot promotion for its 
Lipton tea. The campaign is scheduled to start 15 October and it will 
have a five or six week flight depending upon the market. Time seg- 
ments: day and night minutes and prime I.D.'s. Agency: SSC&B, 
New York. Buyer: Dan Ross. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York, has a campaign planned for its 
Fab. It will begin 22 October and will have a 10-week flight. There 
will be some 20 to 30 markets involved. Time segments: night min- 
utes. Agency: Ted Bates, New York. Buyer: Jack Flynn. 

The Welch Crape Juice Company, Inc., Westfield, N. Y., will 
open a campaign for its jellied sauce which will start 8 November 
and run through two weeks. Time segments: day and night minutes 
and breaks. It will involve some 20 markets. Agency: Manoff, New 
York. Buyer: Len Ziegel. 

American Home Products Corp., New York, will run two promo- 
tions, the first is a test campaign for a new product, Chef Boy-Ar-Dee 
frozen pizza pies, and the second for Chef Boy-Ar-Dee meat ball 
stew. The pizza campaign will begin 9 October and will have a four- 
week flight. The Meat Ball stew campaign has started 2 October 
and has a scheduled 11-week flight in seven markets. Agency: Y&R, 
New York. Buyer: Ricky Sonnen. 

Chesebrough- Pond's, New York, will promote its Pertussin start- 
ing 9 November. It will have a 10 to 15 week flight in some 40 to 50 
markets. Time segments: day minutes. Agency: Compton, New York. 
Buyer: Genevieve Schubert. 

Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich., will run a campaign for its 
Handy Wrap. The promotion is to begin 9 October, and it will have 
a flight of 10 to 20 weeks depending upon the markets entered. 
There will be some 30 to 40 markets in this promotion. Time seg- 
ments: fringe and day minutes and prime 20's. Agency: NCK, New 
York. Buyer: Sheldon Bodin. 

El Producto Cigar Co., Inc., New York, will open a campaign for 
its Lovera cigars sometime in November. The promotion is sched- 
uled for a seven-week flight. Time segments: minutes and 20's. It 
will enter 20 to 30 markets. Agency: Compton, New York. Buyer: 
Bob Stone. 



42 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



IF THERE 




IF THERE 




• If each trade paper stood on its own . . . 

• If your judgment of each was based solely 
on your personal observations . . . 

• If your decision to buy space in one or the 

other was determined by your reasoning alone . . . 

YOU'D PROBABLY MAKE THE BEST ADVERTISING DECISIONS POSSIBLE. 

Why are we so sure of this? 
Because knowledgeable executives in any industry know, almost 
instinctively, the true calibre of the trade books in their field and the 
particular job which each does best. 
No single book is all things to all readers. In broadcast advertising 
SPONSOR is the acknowledged leader in one 
specialized phase of the field. 
It is tailored for national and regional buyers of time and 
programs, for advertisers and agencies who use radio and television. 
That's our basic reason for being. 



PAPER SALESMEN 



Because it's our basic reason for 
being, ice deliver to advertisers in 

SPO\SOR more readers where there are more dollars. 
Its the one compelling reason 
for using SPO.XSOR for your own ad- 
vertising. You hardly need a trade 
paper salesman to tell you that. 
You can see it for yourself 
every time you j>ict> up SPONSOR! 



SPONSOR 

New address: 555 Fifth Avenue, New York 17 
New phone: Mu 7-8080 




Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaigns 



TV RESULTS 



SUPER MARKETS 

SPONSOR: Food Town IGENCY: Wendt Advertising 

Capsule case history: Food Town Super Markets had a 
-.lit- on Pepsi-Cola, and the sale went oxer well using \YTOL- 
I A . Toledo. Two weeks later. Food Town ran the same sale. 
same price, and their sales went up 90' < over the first sale. 
Food Town sponsored a haskethall game telecast from the 
Toledo University field house over the station, on which they 
announced this second sale. Then Food Town sponsored a 
set ond basketball game on WTOL-TY. this one played in 
Bowling Green, and sales went up another 36%. F. C. 
Kuehrde. radio tv director of \v endt added. "Our potato 
chip sale was e\en more surprising. We had a 678. W < in- 
crease over a previous sale at the same price. Sales on half- 
gallons of ice cream were fabulous. I have no idea how the 
store* were able to keep frozen the many thousands of gal- 
lon- -old. Manv new shoppers told dealers the\ were now 
shopping with Food Town in appreciation of their sponsor- 
ing the names, and WTOL-TY drew almost 10.000 fan letters." 



WTOL-TY. Toledo, Ohio 



MOVIES 

SPONSOR: West Virginia Theatrical Enterprise-. Inc. 
Capsule case history: The bromide about the feud between 
television and cinema is being disproved in Wheeling. W. Va.. 
where WTRF-TY and W. Ya. Theatrical Enterprises. Inc.. 
which operate six theatres in Wheeling, have found that 
they can work together for the benefit of both. John Os- 
borne, district manager of the Enterprise Theatre, went into 
tv because of the coverage that he could get from one ad- 
\erti>ing media, whereas in the past it took several medias 
to receive the same results. Osborne uses 60- and 20-second 
film trailers provided by the distributors. Close attention is 
L-i\en to the placing of the trailer, in order to reach the best 
market for each mo\ie. He has a standard weekly schedule 
which he increases for certain films. Osborne has reported 
hi- success and the way he use- t\ to the film companies. 
service he is convinced that tv is one of the ways for theatres 
to build up their audiences again, and he savs. "We have 
our big box office record with WTRF-TY to prove this." 
WTRF-TY. Wheeling. W. Va. \nnouncements 

46 



SPORTING EQUIPMENT 

SPONSOR: E. J. Smith and Sons AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: E. J. Smith, and Sons, a distributor 
of golfing equipment in Charlotte. N. C, offered, in a one- 
time promotion, miniature motorized racing vehicles called 
"Go-Cars." To sell these expensive "toys." which range 
from $99 to $299 each, the store turned to television. The 
management purchased one spot on Bill Snyder's sport show, 
featured nightly on WSOC-TY. Charlotte, N. C. at 6:25 p.m., 
as a start. But the success of that single spot cost the station 
future billing on that particular promotion. According to 
sales manager Cary Sellers of E. J. Smith, the single WSOC- 
I \ r ommercial was all that was needed to completely sell 
out the complete stock of nearly 60 cars worth $8,000. 
"'That's a lot of merchandise and, let's face it, outstanding 
results," Sellers said. "The results of "Go-Car" promotion 
by far exceeded our expectations. The persuasive power of 
television, and specifically WSOC-TV, completely sold us. 
You can be sure we'll turn to television for our advertising." 



Programs WSOC-TY, Charlotte. N. C. 



Announcements 



TRAILER HOMES 

SPONSOR: Beloit Trailer Sales & Park AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: One of the leading lines of trailers 
carried bv the Beloit Trailer Sales & Park in Beloit, Wise, 
is the Richardson Homes line. Although the company has 
advertised all its lines on WREX-TV, Rockford, 111., for four 
years, and sponsored two years of San Francisco Beat, the 
highest sales ever reached in competition with other Richard- 
son dealers placed it number four position in the country . 
However, during a one month period, Beloit concentrated its 
advertising strictly on Richardson, on the show. "As a re- 
sult," says Bill Korst, sales manager of Beloit, "we wound 
up number one in the country." But the sales manager re- 
ported that one month's results are not the whole story. 
''Every week we have people in from over one hundred miles 
away as a result of our WREX-TY campaign, with fully 10% 
of our sales made to station listeners in the Chicago metro- 
politan area, as well as many who drive in from Dubuque. 
Iowa, where they receive the Rockford station by cable. 

WREX-TV, Rockford, III. Program 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 




,v aU fame 

fJ now a-vfulapie 
at uou* market. 



:/ I //> u <i>"> 



-./ 'j» 



a,,,//,., (,■>?""■<•■•• 



m 4utS7dSA~*- %" "'"■' 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



47 




THE 

LEADER* 

IN 

THE 

SYRACUSE 

MARKET 



WSYR-TY 



DELIVERS 42%* 

MORE HOMES THAN 

ITS COMPETITOR 



*ARB MARKET REPORT 
MARCH, 1961 




Get the Full Story from % 

HARRINGTON, RIGHTER 
& PARSONS 



SPONSOR ASKS 

[Continued from page 40) 

happens, time, thought and action 
have heen forever lost and over- 
spending has set in like a virus. De- 
cision-makers, chary about costs, 
must state their expectations for the 
i ommercial at the proper stage and 
encourage all concerned with execut- 
ing the directions (on both teams) 
to visualize the results. The film pro- 
ducer, because it is his livelihood. 
regularly exercises his "visual mus- 
cles." Coupled with his experience, 
that "seeing eve"' can be valuable, 
and if used early enough, can pre- 
vent overspending. 

Overspending begins when rush be- 
gins. Granted a concept is sound 
and granted that communication has 
been complete, when a commercial 
does not have enough time in plan- 
ning, in preproduction. in production 
and completion, it is much as in the 
preparation and cooking of food, 
without waiting for the oven to finish 
the cycle: it lacks an identity, it 
can't possibly reflect quality and 
sound construction. The complete 
failure for videotape to satisfv stems 
from a belief that speed can be 
equated to efficiency and economy. 
When products are rushed from a 
laboratory and there are only as- 
sumptions that thev will perform 
for the camera without complete ex- 
perimentation, overspending sets in. 

Overspending begins with casting 
\\ ithout the director present to verify 
that besides an agreeable voice, bodv 
and face, the talent can act. move and 
coordinate as demanded for the com- 
mercial at issue. Overspending begins 
when the agency and client decision- 
makers aren't consulted in the casting 
prior to shooting, and wish they had 
been when rushes are screened. 

Agencies, as thev learn more about 
the relation of film production costs 
to qualitv. can be sure about assign- 
ing productions to established, fine 
producers without a bid system, and 
in the long run can avoid overspend- 
ing. ^ 




KLUGE 

(Continued from page 29 I 

comfortable Utrillo and some fresh 
abstract watercolors as yet unframed 
and propped on one of the shelves of 
a book case. The water colors were 
the gifts of a grateful audience at 
Millikin University in Decatur. 111.. 



who had heard him deliver an ab- 
sorbing address on the role business 
and industry should play in fostering 
of the arts. 

The presence of these modern wa- 
ter colors — so far removed from the 
realistic — reveal the progressive taste 
of the occupant of this office. Kluge 
is not only au courant in his art, but 
also considerably savvy in the ways 
of business and the enormous power 
that mass media wield in a tension- 
ridden globe. The office also contains 
a small bronze head of Dr. Albert 
Schweitzer. Alsatian philosopher, 
medical missionary, theologian and 
Bach scholar and one of Kluge's few 
human idols. The book shelves con- 
tain such varied titles as Boris Paster- 
nak's heroic-sized novel of post-revo- 
lutionary Russia. Dr. Zhivago, Lewis 
Mumford's Art and Technics, Com- 
munications in a Modern World, con- 
sisting of the British Association 
Granada Lectures, and the latest 
Brooklyn Real Estate Year Book. 

Kluge, an unflagging worker who 
thinks nothing of spending 80 hours 
a week in his various operations 
across the countrv. has a pertinent 
sentiment bv the late American Car- 



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48 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 









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REPRESENTED BY HENRY I. CHRISTAL COMPANY 



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NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1,520.100 Drug Sales $ 40,355,000 

Households 423,600 Automotive Sales $ 299,539,000 

Consumer Spendable Income General Merchandise $ 148,789,000 

$1,761,169,000 Total Retail Sales $1,286,255,000 
Food Sales $ 300,486,000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 71.7% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to March, 1961 ARB we average 71.7% share of audience from 
9 a.m. to midnight, 7 days a week in Monroe metropolitan trade area. 



KNOE-TV 

Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 



CBS • ABC 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 



I he <>nl\ <omiiiini.il TV station licensed to 

Monroe 

Photo: The southern plant at Armstrong Tire and Rubber Company, Mississippi; aha the first 
rubber plant to be located in Mississippi under Governor White's /ilnn to balance Agriculture 
with industry. 




The day Dad gives Jimmy his first shaving gear is a big one for both of them. 
The father in the background is one of the nation's adults, who receive and 
control 98% of the U. S. income.* In the WBT 48-county basic area, adults 
receive and control most of the $2,690,786,000 worth of spending money** 
. . . and WBT radio has the largest number of adult listeners. Clearly, the 
radio station to use for more sales is the one that reaches more adults . . . 
WBT RADIO CHARLOTTE. Represented nationally by CBS Radio Spot Sales. 

Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 

*U.S Dept o' Commerce "Soring 1961. Area Pulse and Sales Management's Survey ot Buying Power, 196<~> 



dinal James Gibbons housed in a 
simple frame. It greets him every 
day with these words: "The higher 
men climb, the longer their working 
day. And any young man with a 
streak of idleness in him may better 
make up his mind at the beginning 
that mediocrity will be his lot. With- 
out immense, sustained effort he will 
not climb high, and even though for- 
tune or chance were to lift him high, 
he would not stay there. For to keep 
at the top is harder, almost, than to 
get there. There are no office hours 
for leaders." 

Kluge is that rara avis of the 20th 
Century, the happy amalgam of pa- 
tron-of-the-arts and sound business 
expansionist in the media universe. 

Kluge's staffers regard him as an 
extraordinarily humane being with 
a vast affection for mankind. 

The shoe shine man does not kneel 
in front of Kluge. Kluge refuses to 
have anyone kneel at his feet. Shoes 
are sent out to be polished. 

Said a hard-shelled public relations 
man who works for him: "His advice 
to me is simple: 'Never let the pub- 
licity exceed the performance!' I 
think he is the most gentle man I 
ever met." ^ 



QUARTET 

(Continued from page 34) 

that television hasn't picked up that 
slack," he said. 

Original and arresting in his think- 
ing, is the unanimous view of those 
who have heard Pinkham on the cur- 
rent state of broadcasting. Television 
is headed upward, he said recently, 
"not because it is the greatest means 
of communicating ideas since the in- 
vention of movable type, which it is, 
but because it is free, it amuses and 
it sells merchandise. In other words, 
even if it is done badly, its future 
is bright." Pinkham said this appears 
to be the worse moment in tv's young 
existence. "I am grateful to some- 
body who recently said that television 
is very voung to be going through its 
Minow-pause," he smiled. "Minow 
may have performed a very valuable 
function with his 'vast wastelands' 
speech for all of its exaggeration. It 
may well be a turning point for tv 
programing because it has shocked 
a lot of people awake to the dangers 
of putting so many of their program 
eggs into the Hollywood basket." 

Bilby, who worked with the trio 



50 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



when they were employed at NBC, 
has unbounded admiration for their 
talents, their daily conduct of living. 
The Bilbys see a good deal of the 
other families. In fact, the Bilbys and 
the Pinkhams own a cabin cruiser 
jointly in Rye. Mrs. Bilby's avoca- 
tion is song writing. "There are no 
deep business discussions when we 
get together," Bilby said. "We just 
have a great deal of fun. Our fami- 
lies love to meet and we go on vaca- 
tions together." Last week, Bilby took 
time out to comment in particular 
on Pinkham's behavior on the links; 
"Pinkham swings like Ichabod 
Crane," he cracked. "He's a Class B 
golfer, so he has a little inferiority 
complex when he plays with us." 

What do other industry figures 
think of the quartet Here is a typical 
observation: "The fastest moving 
quartet on the links as well as in the 
conference rooms. I know them all 
and admire them greatly." — Sydney 
H. Eiges, vice president, Public In- 
formation, NBC. 

In the dizzying vortex of com- 
munications, the feeling is prevalent 
that this fulgent quartet's harmony 
rating is loftier than any figures Niel- 
sen could conjure up. ^ 



KEDS 

(Continued from page 37) 

keting facts, i.e. teenagers buy 8 pairs 
of shoes a year; 78.4% of teenage 
girls own seven pairs of sneakers; 
59.3% of teenage girls listen to ra- 
dio every day; and 67.7% of teenage 
bovs listen to the radio every day. 

Similar promotions were carried 
out by other stations bought for Keds. 

Over the years the word Keds has 
become a part of the American vo- 
cabulary. No longer just a child's 
play shoe or adult tennis shoe, today's 
Keds are styled for virtually every- 
body. There are needle toes and 
square toes, brushed nylon and nylon 
cord fabrics ad a myriad of colors. 
Then there are casual shoe styles for 
men, not to mention special Keds for 
basketball, track and boating. 

Most of Keds advertising over the 
years has been placed by the Fletcher 
Richards agency (now Fletcher Rich- 
ards, Calkins & Holden) who have 
been the agency for U. S. Rubber 
since 1929. Originally the principal 
medium for Keds advertising was 
magazines and ads featuring the mod- 
ern-day line of Keds still appear im- 



IN ROCHESTER,N.V. 
EVERYBODY listens to 



I 



II MEATH 6-9 :30 A.M. 




BASIC CBS 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



51 



portantl) in leading magazines. Short- 
l\ aftei \\ orld W ar II. however, I S 
Rubbei r« Dgnized the possibilities 
for dramatization of active wear of 
Keds ovei television. Today, a large 
share of Keds' advertising monej is 
going into broadcasting. The Btorj 
of the partnership and growth of 
Keds and television is an exciting 
one. 

It begins back in 1946, even before 
television was a commercial reality. 
Earl) thai year, Dumont Television 
offered I . S. Rubber a half-hour of 
prime time "for free so their sales- 



men could point to a big compan) 
using the infant medium. The half- 
hum each Tuesdaj nighl was filled 
with old Encyclopedia Brittanica films 
and telecast live commercials from the 
old \\ anamaker Store in New York 
In the fall of 1946, a 30-minute 
time period on Friday night at 8 p.m. 
on NBC TV was bought for U. S. 
Rubber featuring Lou Little in a pro- 
gram called Television Quarterback. 
At the end of the football season, the 
time period was retained and the 
show was changed to Campus Hoop- 
la. 



(The same superior adult 
programming in every impor- 
tant market of the nation ^ 
. . . reaching the influential 
Quality Third FM audience! 

THE NATION FOR SALE 

on HERITAGE FM 

Write for Heritage Consumer Profiles 
numbers 4 and 5 ^B showing why the 
Heritage Stations audience is superior, in 
terms of PROFESSIONALS . . . EXECU- 
TIVES and PROPRIETORS. 




HERITAGE REPRESENTATIVES 

New York: 15 West 44th Street ■ Chigago: 8 South Michigan Avenue ■ Los 
Angeles: 2917 Temple ■ Detroit: 1761 First National Bank Bldg. ■ Boston: 234 
Clarendon • Atlanta: 805 Peachtree ■ St. Louis: Box 6155 ■ San Francisco: 625 
Market ■ Seattle: 610 Lloyd Bldg. ■ Minneapolis: 1138 Northwestern Bank Bldg. 



Since that time. U. S. Keds has 
been represented on tv. When NBC 
hooked up its four-city network, U. S. 
Keds went big time with Campus 
Hoopla, and the year following, spon- 
sorship included such diverse net 
shows as Lucky Pap, Dave Garro- 
way's Today, NBC's Color Spread 
Sunday Spectaculars, NCAA Foot- 
ball, Navy Log as well as hundreds 
of the most popular local tv moppet 
shows in almost 200 cities. 

For the past five years, the agency's 
animated Kedso the Clown has been 
U. S. Keds' star salesman — assisted 
of course by the live local personal- 
ities in each market. 

And Kedso comes alive locally in 
some areas. On numerous occasions 
L .S. Rubber's own Keds salesmen 
i with the help of Kedso the Clown 
costumes and tailor-made size 32 
Keds i dress up as Kedso the Clow n 
and make highly publicized store ap 
pearances to build up traffic for their 
dealers. Needless to sav, the kids love 
it and so do the dealers. 

This year, an early Kedso com- 
mercial was one of 25 of more than 
1300 entrants voted into the Hall of 
Fame by the Annual American Com- 
mercial Festival judges. Last years 
Kedsoland was also an award winner 
at the festival. 

Each is a moppet sing-a-long and 
was created by FRC&Hs tv depart- 
ment (Sy Frolick, Bill Vance, story- 
boarded by tv art director Vic Mir- 
anda i and animated by Paul Fennell 
Productions. 

When the agency began buying 
spot tv for U.S. Keds — back in 1953 
— minutes and chain breaks were 
bought within or adjacent to kid 
shows in 22 cities. Over the years 
additional cities have been added. 
The list of cities has expanded in 
this 8-year period to over 160. 

It is entirelv possible that Keds" 
radio buys will eventually develop to 
rival the proportions of the tv ad 
program. J. R. McMenamin, assistant 
advertising and promotion manager, 
footwear and general products divi 
sion, U.S. Rubber, sizes it up likt 
this: "Our participation in teenage! 
radio this year has been most success 
ful. Not only does it afford us at 
opportunity to effectively reach th< 
teenage market, it also offers ou 
sales organization an opportunity t 
execute many promotions on tht 
dealer level." 1 



52 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 196 



very 
important 
persons 

will meet 
on the 

I of New Tork\ 
during the...] 




BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION 



Ji annual 
'^^^y, convention 



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SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



53 




billion 







ction 



NORTH CAROLINA'S 

GRADE A WORLD 

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54 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 







What s happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



9 OCTOBER 1961 

Owlfht 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The Radio-Television News Directors annual meeting drew much attention from 
Washington official circles: pronouncements and attitudes of the news directors 
could have had considerably more influence than similar activities on the part of 
station management. 

However, RTNDA, according to some observers, seemed to be suffering from a split per- 
sonality, and the impact was lost. On the one hand, there seemed to be reasonably unani- 
mous agreement that government intrusion into programing could lead to censorship even 
of the news. On the other hand, there were numerous attacks on the accomplishments 
and even the ethics of the industry, or at least that "small minority." 

It seemed to depend on which meeting you attended or which committee report you hap- 
pened to read. Nor were there any ringing declarations in favor of repeal of Sec. 315 or in 
favor of equal access to inspire Washington action. 

The whisper ran to the effect that FCC chairman Newton Minow would use his appear- 
ance to spring a major policy declaration. Also to the effect that the newsmen would tear 
into his pro-regulatory attitude in the question-answer period scheduled to follow the Minow 
talk. Neither was realized. 

Minow was friendly, even expansive. He suggested only that absence of news programs in 
prime tv time should be corrected. He, himself, decried censorship. He was much in favor of 
editorializing, though most news directors present had registered surprising opposition, and 
he suggested that stations which disagree with him editorialize against him. 

The feeling after it was all over was that the self-criticism went far to cancel out 
pleas for freedom from government dictation, and vice versa. Also that the total re- 
sult would neither hurt nor help broadcasting on the Washington scene. 



Commerce Secretary Hodges met with his advertising advisory committee, and 
offered government money to underwrite a publication about ad industry self-regu- 
latory achievements: this was, however, no sign of a softening of New Frontier 
attitudes toward ad regulation. 

The storm signs are still up. 

The publication will give information on what individual advertisers are doing to create 
and live up to standards set for themselves, what they are doing along the same lines in 
groups. It will also describe trade codes and practices in the industry. And it will be ad 
association representatives, plus representatives of such allied groups as NAB, who will be 
responsible for content. This would seem to be a giant step by a New Frontier cabinet 
officer. 

Unfortunately, however, the Department of Commerce has nothing to do with regulation 
of advertising. The Federal Trade Commission, which does have a good deal to do 
with it, still plans to toughen up its processes. 

What it all amounts to is a pat on the back from Hodges, even while FTC chairman Paul 
Rand Dixon and associates continue to aim a heavy boot a few feet lower down on the ad in- 
dustry anatomy. 

The FCC recently proposed a major tv shift to the uhf channels: it was the 
second time such a proposal was made, the first time under then-chairman George 
C. McConnaughey, and now for the second time it appears that long delay, if not 
an outright backdown, is in the cards. 

(Please turn to page 57) 



5PONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



55 



Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



9 OCTOBER 1961 

Ct»yri|ht IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



FILM-SCOPE 



The pendulum has swung away from syndication on a lot of regional spending. 

For about two years Luckies and other cigarettes were heavy syndication users, but that 
vogue is now over and many station regional tobacco contracts are running out. 

To compound matters, network shows, sports, and local live shows have also siphoned 
off quite a bit of auto, beer, and gas regional syndication money. Studebaker graduated from 
national spot to network and Ballantine is among the beer advertisers to go network. 

Another angle of the low ebb of regionals is the low interest of syndicators in keeping up 
an ample supply of film product. Many distributors — such as CBS Films, MCA, and NBC 
Films — have washed their hands of first-run programing for the moment. 

In five industries a roll call of regional advertisers who've exited first-run syndi- 
cation lately would look like this: 

LAST SHOW AND MARKETS 

Lock-Up (Ziv-UA) 53 
Dangerous Robin (Ziv-UA) 32 
Mr. Ed (national spot) 110 
Shotgun Slade (MCA) 32 
Coronado 9 (MCA) 56 
Jim Backus (NBC Films) 67 
Blue Angels (NBC Films) 68 





ADVERTISER 


Tobacco : 


American Tobacco (BBDO) 




Brown & Williamson (Bates) 


Auto: 


Studebaker (D'Arcy) 


Beer: 


Ballantine (Esty) 




Falstaff (D-F-S) 




Carling (B&B) 


Gas: 


Conoco (B&B) 


Food: 


Blue Plate (Fitzgerald) 






Brothers Brannagan (CBS Films) 35 






56 



Screen Gems has finished its first group of Canadian-made tapes for tv syndi- 
cation in Canada: By Pierre Berton, a five-minute series. 

Possibility of distributing this or other Canadian product eventually within the United 
States is definitely not being ruled out. 



Household Finance is sponsoring Ziv-UA's Everglades on two NBC TV o&o's. 

It purchased the series on KRCA, Los Angeles; previously it bought it on WNBC-TV. 
New York. In another sale People's Natural Gas (KM&G) bought it on WJAC. Johnstown, 
bringing the show's sales total to 61 markets. (For other sales, see FILM WRAP-UP, p. 65.1 



Ted Bates has entered into an unusual annual guarantee arrangement with five 
tv commercials producers. 

The five producers are: Filmways, Transfilm-Caravel, Sarra, VPI, and MPO. 

The guarantees are in the form of minimum annual percentages but do not pro- 
hibit Bates from using other producers. 

Robert Margulies. v. p. of commercial broadcast production, said the step was taken as a 
way of insuring "the highest consistent production quality and developing a closer spirit of 
cooperation and communication." 

Trade observers see in the move a force to stabilize prices — preventing price-cut- 
ting on some jobs and "making it up" on others. 

SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 




FILM-SCOPE continued 



The latest vogue among the commercials producers, it seems, is to get into 
production of motion picture features. 

Van Praag is the latest to make such a move; it has options on a film to be made in 1962. 
Filmways already has a feature film in production in Hollywood. 

Videotape Productions of New York reports that it did 95 commercials in Sep- 
tember, its biggest month to date and 40% ahead of last year. 

Advertisers and agencies involved were Armstrong (BBDO), Chemical Bank (B&B), Gen- 
eral Tire (D'Arcy), Falstaff (D-F-S), Gerber (D'Arcy), J&J (Y&R), Mutual of Omaha (Boz- 
ell & Jacobs), Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Parkson), Remington Rand (Y&R), Universal Appliances 
(Parkson), and U. S. Steel (BBDO). 

Schwerin has arrived at some conclusions about the effects of repetition in tv 
advertising. 

Strong commercials are helped by it but weak ones are hurt. 

It's the new campaign that benefits most by repetition but after a time continued 
exposures deliver fewer and fewer results. 

Schwerin researchers suspected that off-beat, soft sell and humorous commercials bene- 
fited most from repetition. 



WASHINGTON WEEK 

(Continued from page 55) 

Talk in Congress at adjournment time was of the wisdom of waiting for the results of 
the New York City uhf experiment. Talk at the FCC at the moment is that such a delay 
might be the better part of valor. Chairman Minow continues to stress the need for steps to 
activate the little-used channels. But his statements appear to be losing conviction, at 
least for the immediate future. 

The drop-in plan at the moment appears to have a much brighter future. This is the 
idea, very like a proposal made by ABC TV, under which new vhf channel assignments 
would be placed in major markets currently having less than 3 at distances shorter than those 
now permitted under FCC rules. 

There is also plenty of opposition to the drop-in idea. However, nothing like the line- 
up of furious Congressmen whose constituents would lose vhf tv under the de- 
intermixture proposals. 

It begins to appear quite likely that the FCC will authorize new tv stations in most, if 
not all, of the eight top-100 markets in which such drop-ins are proposed. 

Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the House Commerce Committee 
and its now-defunct Legislative Oversight subcommittee, wants the world to know 
that the breathing spell given the broadcasting industry this year will not last. 

Harris, in an adjournment statement of committee accomplishments, pointed out that 
new laws had been passed following his sensational hearings, and that the FCC regulatory 
attitude has changed. He indicated the session now ended was a period for pausing to "take 
stock." Next year, he threatened, things would move again. 

Harris specifically mentioned probes of the FCC's proposals for deintermixture in tv and 
the breaking down of the clear channels in radio. He promised committee consideration of 
ways to end "trafficking" in station licenses, and of the old controversial question of 
whether networks should be regulated. Also on the list was more poking into the field 
of ratings. 



'.-- 



PONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 57 




A round-up of trade taik, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



9 OCTOBER 1961 

C«wr1fht ini 

SPONMR 

PUBLIOATI0M« INC. 



The cognocenti along Madison and Michigan Avenues think Draper Daniels, 
creative boss at Burnett, didn't do much to veil his competitive target with one 
remark in particular last week before the Magazine Promotion Group. 

The jibe: "There's a shabby minority that turns out the advertising that makes the 
rest of us in the business uncomfortable when we see or hear it. I wish I could feel 
that these people work as they do because they don't know better. Unfortunately, some 
of them write books that boast it is bright to be boorish and profitable to stretch the 
truth as far as the law will allow." 



« 



ABC TV sales says not to take seriously the report that it is taking anoth 
look at doing something network-wise with the post 11 :15-p.m. span vs. Jack Paar, 

The report: it would be a 75-minute affair headed up by Dick Clark. 



Marvin E. Coyle. one-time general manager of the Chevrolet division, wb 
died last week, will be remembered by oldtimers in the trade for precipitous ' - 
ing of Jack Benny in 1934. 

When Coyle took over the post he let it be known he had no use for comedians an 
ordered that a musical program be substituted. Isham Jones' orchestra, and Tito 
Guizar, were slipped in. Rubinoff took over the following season. 

As for Benny, it was the start of his extended career for Jell-O. 



ind 



Have you ever heard of the game of politicking for real estate that take* 
place among timebuyers in the giant agencies? 

It has to do with the status that accrues from just where the buyem's desk i 
located in the rows of desks that abound outside the headbuyer's partitioned office. 

The buyer whose desk is located adjacent to the office is deemed having a 
political edge over the buyer located alongside a pillar in the bullpen. 



58 



Though the third biggest spender among the package goods advertisers (see 
SPONSOR-SCOPE), American Home Products' Bill LaPorte is said to be still operat- 
ing in his buying from the networks along the lines of an old formula. 

The formula affects untested nighttime programs and it runs something like this: pay 
but a token charge for the program for the first month or two and then when 
the show shows signs of going places escalate the price accordingly. 

To wit, let the network share in the gamble, but be happy to pay the full tariff 
when the ratings are riding high. 



The other networks are chortling over the spot that NBC TV found itself in 
as the result of a protest by American Tobacco against the designation of the 
alternate week of the Dick Powell show as the Reynolds Metals Hour. 

The gist of the gripe: You take Bonanza away from us, move and convert Wells Fargo 
to an hour and now you attach the name of a co-sponsor to an hour in which we 
participate. 

SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 196 ll 



FLIRT 
WITH A 

WICKED 
WOMAN 




It could be disastrous (and almost was to 
WFAA's Wes Wise and Jack Renfro). "Carla" 
was her name, and the courtship lasted a full 
week. As Texas' worst hurricane in 60 years bore 
down on the coast, WFAA's two-man team drove 
from city to city for their date — determined to 
rendezvous in the very "eye" of the storm. All 
during this period they reported back to WFAA 
listeners ... 42 reports in all. Many have called 



it the "greatest" reporting job of the year for a 
station hundreds of miles from the scene. 

Another example of top reporting through elec- 
tronic journalism from "Southwest Central" — the 
spot on the dial ivhere more of a highly news-con- 
scious audience reside every day. It's just the 
spot for your message, and your PETRYMAX can 
effectively slot that schedule for you. 



WFAA-820 

RADIO f^B DALLAS 




r». or ,*.•«, StofM ff'»r*w 



at (3&MhiA(4iCca£wnA(3efafai« dalla 

WFAA • AM • FM • TV — THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



|>NSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



59 



SPONSOR 
WEEK 

WRAP-UP 



DICK TRACY, comic strip detective, is making his debut over WGN-TV, Chicago, this sea- 
son. Looking over a still from the filmed cartoon during a promotion luncheon were (-r) Ray 
Rayner, host for the program; Ben Berentson, WGN-TV station manager; Chester Gould, crea- 
tor of the Dick Tracy comic strip, and Henry Saperstein, president of Televison Personalities 




Advertisers 




BEAT MAN — Bob Denver, alias Maynard Krebs of 'Dobie Gillis,' thrilled patients in the 
children's wards of the New Orleans' Charity Hospital when he visited them during personal 
appearance tour. He was also chief draw at 'the Day at the Beach' sponsored by WWL-TV 




Campbell Soup. (BBDO). will 

formulate and package special 
and exclusive products for the 
food service industry, complete- 
ly different in appearance and 
taste from products available on 
retail shelves. 

The new policy, contrary to the 
past practice of institutional products 
being an extension of the company's 
retail line, is part of a reorganization 
and expansion of the institutional 
division. 

Along with the policy change, 
Campbell has introduced a new line 
of Insti-Pack soups and new 8-ounce 
servings of beef stew and chicken 
stew — none of which are available at 
retail. 

Tv and radio will be used to pro- 
mote the innovation. 

Campaigns: 

• The National Federation of 
Coffee Growers of Colombia will 
return to tv this fall with minute 
spots, some in color, using Juan Yah 



PROGRAMING MEETINGS were held for 
WBAL-TV, Baltimore, to familiarize staff with 
the total operation and plans of sales pro- 
motion and programing. Brent O. Gurrh, 
v.p. and gen. mgr. handed out fact folders 



PICKING WINNERS in 'Million Dc 
Movie' drawing were (l-r) Mickey Di Mella 
BBDO; Don Porter, BBDO; Dick Dunne, nat" 
sales mgr., WHCT, Hartford, Conn. Prizes 
offered were jet trips: London and Bermuda 




SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 




dez, the typical Colombian coffee 
grower. The promotion will have a 
13-week flight in 10 major U.S. and 
Canadian markets. 

• General Electric, (N. W. 
Ayer.) , will use spot tv to open a pro- 
motion for its new automatic tooth- 
brush. The product will be introduced 

n Chicago, six New England states, 
ind California. The promotion will 
je built of 18 minute spots each week 

n a six-week flight. 

• Contadina Foods, California, 
C&W), will open a spot promotion 
or its Contadina tomato paste with 
>oth radio and tv. Comedy radio 
lommercials will run from 75 to 175 
imes per week in over 30 markets 
or a two month period. Coinciding 
nth this will be a joint campaign 
vith Kraft Foods to promote the 
omato paste and Kraft spaghetti 
inner. 

• Roman Products Corpora- 
ion. I Smith /Greenland) , will break 
;ith a promotion for its frozen Italian 
specialties in New York, Philadelphia 
nd Boston markets. The campaign 
ill use both radio and tv with kid 

'hows on tv and a saturation radio 



schedule of 10U spots per week on 
three stations. 

• Ideal Toy Corp., (Grey), has 
commissioned Santa Claus' deputies 
to visit children's tv personalities in 
24 major markets to familiarize the 
tv stars with the company's 1961 toy 
line which will soon be featured on 
their shows. 



Offbeat note: General Electric, 

BBDO, is planning a series of half- 
page tune-in ads in TV Guide to call 
attention to commercials on its show, 
The General Electric Theater. The 
first insert promotes a three-minute 
video tape message entitled Tv Traf- 
fic Cop. It demonstrates how a num- 
ber of small tv cameras developed by 
the company aids highwav traffic con- 
trol in Detroit. 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Jo- 
seph J. Tomlinson to assistant ad- 
vertising director of Allied Chemical 
Corporation from advertising man- 
ager of the companv's General Chem- 
ical division. 



Agencies 



Agency appointments: Monroe 
Chemical, Quincy, 111. to the John 
W. Shaw agency, Chicago . . . Ham- 
ilton Humidity, Chicago, to Stern, 
Walters & Simmons, Chicago . . . 
National Carbon Eveready, S.A., and 
Union Carbide de Mexico, two affili- 
ated companies in Mexico, to K & E 
de Mexico . . . WABC, New York, 
to Daniel & Charles . . . The Amer- 
ican Molasses Company to Kastor, 
HCC&A for its industrial division 
from Asher, Roston, & Kremer . . . 
Sun Valley Manufacturing, Boston, 
to Storm Advertising, St. Louis . . . 
South Jersey Gas Companv. Atlantic 
City, N. J., to EWR&R. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

Mitchell Streicker to v.p. in charge 
of marketing, research and media at 
Post & Morr, Chicago . . . Bill Adler 
to account supervisor at Smith/ 
Greenland from K&E . . . William 
D. Laurie, Jr., manager of the De- 
troit office of JWT has been elected 
an executive v.p. . . . Dick Berger 
to account executive for Smith/ 




NEW SUNDAY program was introduced over 
WTTG-TV, 'Important Night in Washington.' 
Unveiling program plans to exec committee 
members of the Washington (D. C.) Convention 
and Visitor's Bureau is Donn Colee, v.p., gen. 
mgr., WTTG-TV (r). John W. Kluge, pres.. 
Metromedia, Inc.; Edward R. Carr, chrm., Wash- 
ington Convention and Visitor's Bureau; Mark 
Evans, v.p., Metromedia, attended meeting 



KEK TO THE TRACK — The Del Mar 
|:e track, that is. KABC-TV, Los Angeles, 
\A five lounge cars on a special train to 
jivey staff members Marilyn Maxwell, star 

new 'Bus Stop' series, and Elton H. 
i]le, v.p., gen. mgr. KABC-TV, were wel- 

ned aboard by hostess Marilyn Hawks 



lONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 





* MATURE, ESTABLISHED 
PERSONALITIES * AWARD 
WINNING NEWS * EX- 
CLUSIVE HELICOPTER 
TRAFFIC REPORTS * 
FIGHTING EDITORIALS * 
ADULT MUSIC * 



WPE 

PHILADELPHIA 

THE STATION OF THE STARS 
CALL GILL-PERNA. INC. 



II on- Ted Bates 

helps build strong 

sales two ways 

Yi e still can't reel uff those 12 ways 
that Ted Bates' favorite bread 
builds strong bodies. But we surely 
know tht- two ways Ted Bate? helps 
build strung sales for this product. 

Fir^t. b> finding the right selling 
idea and kicking with it. 

ad. by choosing media that hit 
people right in the- breadbasket. 
W ICE radio in Providence is a good 
example. 

V> ICE i- "the food station" in this 
market. Tops. Number one. Lengths 
ahead id the also-rans. 

:le listen hard to WICE. be- 
- W ICE has something to say 
— and says it. WICE gives Provi- 
dence the kind of public service 
.ramming every city needs, and 
tht- citizenry eats it up. 
The wily ones at Ted Bates are 
capitalizing on thi>. Are you? 



PROVIDENCE 

AN ELLIOT STATION 
Representatives: Avery-Knodel 



Greenland from Daniel & Charles . . . 
Harry Yosburg to the newly cre- 
ated tv post of v.p. and marketing 
- director at Lambert and 
Feasley and Fred L. Ryner to v.p. 
and director of research at the same 
agency . . . Muriel Haynes to tv 
consultant at Armstrong-Warden Ltd.. 
London . . . Jack L. Mathews t 
account supervisor at Clinton E. 
Frank. Chicago . . . H. W. Shepard 
to v.p. and account supervisor: 
Robert E. Immen and Harry 
Croswell to account executives, all 
at Edward H. Weiss. Chicago . . . 
Robert Ballin. v.p. at SSC&B. to 
head the agency's Hollywood office. 
. . . Edmund Burke to v.p. and 
management supervisor in charge of 
the FAM. Schaefer account at BBDO. 

New directors : Herbert G. Drake. 

senior v.p. and account group head: 
C. James Fleming. Jr.. also v.p. 
and account group head, and John 
Metcali. ioint managing director of 
Hobson. Bates & Partners Ltd.. Lon- 
don, have been elected members of 
he board of directors at Ted Bates 
. . . Gilbert P. Goetz to account ex- 
ecutive at Leo Burnett Company from 
account executive at KlauA an Pieter- 
som-Dunlop. Milwaukee . . . Harold 
Peter Mazza to account executive at 
Mogul W\S from account executive 
on the Buick and Renault accounts at 
Kudner. 



Foreign affiliations: Doyle Dane 
Bernbach. New York, will be part- 
ners with von Holzschuher & Bauer. 
KG. Dusseldorf. in the formation of 
a new West German advertising 
agencv to be known as Doyle Dane 
Bernbach. GmbH. 

Stations on the Move 

TOTAL STATIONS ON THE AIR 

ias of 1 September 1961 ) 
AM: 3.618 
FM: 907 
TY: 547 

BOUGHT/ SOLD/ APPROYED 
Sold : KPIG. Cedar Rapids. Iowa. 
to the Black Hawk Broadcasting Com- 
panv. Waterloo. Iowa, subject to ap- 
proval of the FCC . . . WTMT. 
Louisville. Kv.. to CBM. Inc. Price: 
- 75,000. Brokered by: Paul H. 
Chapman Co.. Inc.. Atlanta . . . 
KBIF. San Francisco, to Norwood J. 
Patterson from Ethan Bernstein. 
Price: $250,000 plus. 



Tv Stations 



TvB reported last week that 
June 1961 set a record for I". S. 
tv home viewing v*ith the aver- 
age set at four hours and 29 
minute-. 

This broke the record of : 
hours and 24 minutes set in 1957. j 
In July 1961. the average home 
viewed four hours and 10 minut - 
tie the 1958 total and in August 1961 | 
viewing per home per day was four j 
hours and 12 minutes, topping the] 
four hours and 10 minute avr _ 
set in 1959. 

February 1961 was also a re 
when the average tv home viewed six 
hours and eisht minutes. 

WCBS-TY. New York, has signedi 
the New York Herald Tribune 
as a twice weekly sponsor of th< 
station's Late News and Mornin< 
Report. 

Commercials on the Late Nev 
frequentlv will display the early eci 
rion of the following mornings news 
paper. The commercials will hi 
videotaped shortly before air thu 
and the first printer"* proof o: 
front page will be rushed from t)> 
paper to the tv studio to be incorp< 
rated into the commercial describiri 
the headline stories and their si 
nificance. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE 
George R. Jeneson to v.p. and mic 
western manager for the new Nj 
tional Sales division of RKO Gei 
eral . . . Pat Flaherty, news dir 
tor emeritus of KPRC-TY. B - 
has taken on the additional duties 
audience relations director . . . Jac 
F. A. Flynn to national sales ai 
business manager at WPIX-T\ . R< 
York . . . Joan Walker to tv edb 
of Cue magazine from Newswefl 
radio tv editor . . . Philip Wat^ 
man to local and regional sales ma 
ager at KTUL-TY. Tulsa . . . Ja« 
O'Mara to director of the 
division at TvB from v.p. in char 
of promotion, merchandising and l 
search at KTTY. LA. . . . E. Jon J 
Graff, president and general rra 
ager of WNTA-AM-FM. New. i 
N. J., will be in addition gen J 
manager of WNTA-TV, Newark- 
Ideas at w ork : 

• W nC-TY. Pittsburgh, will J 
radio to help promote its new fl 



62 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1 1 



programing by purchasing time on 
a 16-station radio network to carry 
the full season of the Pittsburgh foot- 
ball games. 

Anniversary: Top Ten Dance 
Party, the live teenage tv series syn- 
dicated by Victor & Richards, is 
starting its seventh year, making it 
the longest running adult live series. 
The show started on WHBQ-TV, 
Memphis, in 1955 with the Coca-Cola 
'Bottling of Memphis as co-sponsor. 
The Bottler is still with the program 
but now sponsors the entire hour and 
a half weekly show. 

Radio Stations 

Sheldon Van Dolen has been 
named general manager of New 
York City's radio station WBFM. 

Van Dolen, who is the former rep- 
resentative of Blair, ABC, and Mc- 
Cann-Erickson, will take part in ex- 
pansion plans for WBFM which will 
amount to redesigning its entire pro- 



RAB predicts 1962 can be the 
biggest year ever for the auto 
industry, but urges a continuity 
in a selling program that uses 
radio's advantages. 

In a presentation sent out last week 
and designed to tell the "Why Radio" 
*tory for automotives. these are a few 
bf the points made: 

• Among the 42.6 million auto 
radios now in use, are to be found the 
greatest percentage of potential custo- 
mers who drive an older car which 
is giving trouble. 

• Nine out of 10 families in the 
•uburbs are car owners and radio 
reaches 78"^ more suburban families 
ban newspapers. 

The meeting of the National 
Spanish Language Network in 
Phoenix resulted in a program 
of research and promotion of 
Spanish language markets and 
stations to regional and national 
advertisers. 

Representatives of 14 Spanish lan- 
guage radio stations, broadcasting to 
l million Spanish-speaking citizens, 
•vere present at the meeting. 

Elected as officers of the network 
: or one year were: John K. Redfield, 
-'eneral manager of KIFN, Phoenix, 
Resident: Gustavo Moran, XEGM, 
Tijuana, 1st v.p.; Peter Trowbridge, 



KEVT, Tucson, 2nd v.p.; and Rich- 
ard Ryan, KLOK, San Jose, secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

Offbeat sale: WXYZ, Detroit, sold 
the Electronic Institute of Technology 
a series of 13 space documentaries via 
the Werner-Sawyer agency. 

Ideas at work: 

• WCAU, Philadelphia, gifted 
buyers with a pocket dictionary 
dressed in a wrapper stating that the 
station is first in total homes — 15.8% 
greater on total week basis than the 
next station. 

• WHAP, Hopewell, Va., is giv- 
ing away a shell home 15 October. To 
date over 10,000 people have with the 
20 participating sponsors. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 
James F. Mullen to account execu- 
tive at WQSR, Syracuse, N. Y. . . . 
Bill Gorman to sales executive at 
KGO, San Francisco . . . Claude H. 
Frazier to station manager at WTMA, 
Charleston, S. C. . . . William J. 
McNicol, Jr., to assistant sales man- 
ager at WOR, New York, from sales 
staffer at the same station . . . Philip 
O'Farrell to sales manager at 
WMCK, Pittsburgh, from WFBR. 
Baltimore . . . Jack Barton to ac- 
count executive at KING, Seattle. 

Kudos : WIL, St. Louis, was entered 
in the Congressional Record 30 Aug- 
ust, as having sponsored a summer 
job placement experiment in St. 
Louis for high delinquency areas. 
The success of the work has helped 
bring about Federal legislation for a 
law to help prevent and control 
delinquency. 

Happy birthday: WABC, New 

York, celebrated its 40th birthday as 
Mayor Wagner declared the week of 
30 September "WABC Week" in New 
York City. WABC became New York's 
first radio station on 30 September 

1921 when as WJZ, in a makeshift 
studio with hanging rugs for sound- 
proofing, the station went on the air 
. . . WOAI, San Antonio, Texas, cele- 
brated its 29th birthday by broad- 
casting vignettes of the years from 

1922 to 1961. The music played dur- 
ing the day of celebration, 25 Septem- 
ber, was selected from the songs that 
were popular during the years remi- 
nisced about. 





SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 




BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION . 

% P. O. Box 9736. Cleveland 40. On.o 1 



Send today! 

Please rush me more information about BPA 



Name 
Company. 
Address 
City 



State. 



STATEMENT REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF 
AUGUST 24. 1912, AS AMENDED BY THE 
ACTS OF MARCH 3, 1933, AND JULY 2. 1946 
(Title 39. United States Code, Section 233) 
SHOWING THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, 
AND CIRCULATION OF 

SPONSOR, published weekly at Baltimore, Mary- 
land for October 1, 1961. 

1. The names and addresses of the publisher, 
editor, managing editor and business managers 
are: 

Publisher and Editor: Norman R. Glenn, Mama- 
roneck, New York. 

Exec. Vice President: Bernard Piatt, Rye. New York. 
Executive Editor: John E. McMillin, New York. 
N V 

2. The owner is: SPONSOR Publications Inc.. 
New York. New York. 

Stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more 
of the total amount of stock: 

Norman R. Glenn, Mamaroneck. N. Y. ; Elaine C. 
Glenn. Mamaroneck. N. Y. ; Ben Strouse, Balti- 
more, Md. ; Ruth K. Strouse. Baltimore, Md. ; 
William O'Neil, Cleveland. Ohio; Henry J. Kauf- 
man, Washington, D. C ; J. Bloom, New York, 
N. Y. ; Pauline H. Poppele, New York. N. Y. ; 
Judge M. S. Kronheim. Washington, D. C. ; Nor- 
man Reed, Washington, I>. c. : Adele Lebowitz. 
Washington. I> ('. : J P. Williams, Dayton, Ohio; 
Jerome Saks. Washington, D. C. ; Catherine E. 
Koste, Hawthorne. N. Y. ; William B. Wolf. Wash- 
ington. D. C. ; Bernard Piatt, Rye, N. Y. ; Arnold 
Appert, New York, N. Y. 

3. The known bondholders, mortgagees, and 
other security holders owning or holding 1 percent 
or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or 
other securities are: NONE. 

4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases where 
the stockholder or security holder appears upon 
the books of the company as trustee or in any 
other fiduciary relation, the name of the person 
ot corporation for whom such trustee is acting; 
also the statements in the two paragraphs show 
the affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the 
circumstances and conditions under which stock- 
holders and security holders who do not appear 
upon the books of the company as trustees, hold 
stock and securities in a capacity other than that 
of a bona fled owner. 

5. The avcrago number of copies of each Issue 
Of this publication sold or distributed, through the 
malls or otherwise, to paid subscribers during the 
12 months preceding the date shown above was: 
9358. (Tills information Is required from dally, 
weekly, semlweckly, and triweekly newspapers only.) 

Bernard Piatt 

Exec. Vice President 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27th day 

uf September, 1961. 

SEAL: Qeraldlne J. Daych 

(My commission expires March 30, 1963.) 



Happy forecasting: E. B. Ride- 
out, meteorologist at WEEI, the 
CBS o&o in Boston, was honored at 
a special luncheon for his 37th year 
at the station. 

Social note: WTAR, Norfolk, Va., 
played host to ad agency representa- 
tives as part of the celebration for the 
station's 38th birthday and for the 
addition of WTAR-FM. 

¥m 

WBUR-FM, Boston, has revived 
the audience request program 
with a show entitled Classical 
Jukebox. 

The non-profit station, owned and 
operated by Boston University, had 
uncovered the new audience which 
came, to large extent, from larger and 
richer commercial fm stations. 

Listeners were asked to make their 
request by phone rather than write 
so that the station knew who was 
listening and at what time. A catalog 
listing all classical music in the 
WBUR library is sent out for the ask- 
ing. 

Networks 

National Arbitron recorded the 
top ten evening tv programs for 
the week of 24 September and 
gave top honors to nine pre- 
mieres. 

The leader for the first top ten sur- 
vey of the season was Sing Along 
With Mitch with a rating of 27.9. 

A list of what's pleasing to the na- 
tionwide tv audience looks like this: 
Sing Along With Mitch ...... 27.9 

Bonanza 27.2 

Hazel 25.7 

Wagon Train 25.4 

Perry Mason 25.4 

Joey Bishop 24.8 

Gunsmoke 24.6 

Dick Powell _ 24.4 

Real McCoys - 24.3 

Garry Moore 24.0 

Red Skelton .. .. 23.9 

ABC TV's daytime audience is up 
19% over a year ago and Nielsen 
reports the average program rat- 
ing is 17% higher than last year. 

On 1 September 1960, the net- 
work's average audience rating was 
4.2 and average homes per minute 



The Nigerian Broadcasting Cor- 
poration announced the appoint- 
ment of Pan American Broadcast- 



amounted to 1,907,000, whereas one 
year later the rating is up to 4.9 and 
the average homes per minute is 2,- 
275,000. 

For the same period, American 
Bandstand was up 500,000 homes. 

Ideas at wok: 

• ABC Radio celebrated the first j 
year of Flair by sending around to 
agency media people birthday cakes 
which contained as an added surprise 
an attractively decorated transistor 
radio set. 

• ABC TV station promotion man- 
agers have received a helping hand 
from Dot Records in exploiting the 
new Margie series which premieres 
12 October. Dot has extracted the 
song Margie from their album and 
re-recorded it on a 45 rpm for the ex- 
clusive use of ABC promotion. 

Specials : As part of its first venture 
into tv since 1953, Motorola will 
sponsor the two-hour dramatization 
of Graham Greene's The Power and 
The Glory starring Laurence Olivier, 
and the Bing Crosby Christmas show. 

Tv sales: The daily news program 
for young America entitled Ameri- 
can Newsstand, has been selected by 
Lehn & Fink Products. The company 
will use the ABC TV show for its 
Stri-Dex Medicated Pads, a skin care 
product for teen-agers. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Jo- 
sept J. DiBuono has joined NBC 
Telesales, a division of NBC, as pro- 
ducer-salesman from tv producer at 
BBDO . . . Walter M. Stein to mar- 
keting and research director at ABC 
TV National Station Sales from di- 
rector of research and sales develop- 
ment at WCBS-TV, New York. 

New affiliates: KSIX, Corpus 
Christi, Texas, a former affiliate of 
CBS Radio, has resumed its affilia- 
tion with the network as of 1 Octo- 
ber .. . WOBT, Rhinelander, Wis., 
has affiliated with NBC Radio which 
bring to 192 the number of stations 
in the NBC Radio Network. 

Representatives 



64 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



. 



ing Company, international ra- 
dio/tv reps, as its North Ameri- 
can commercial sales represen- 
tative. 

Radio Nigeria Network consists of 
17 standard wave stations supple- 
mented by four short wave transmit- 
ters to deliver complete nationwide 
coverage. The stations are located in 
Lagos, Ibadan, Enugu, Kaduna, Kano 
and in 12 other major cities. 

The number of radio homes in Ni- 
geria as of January 1961 had reached 
a record total of 373,000. 

Rep appointments : WQSR, a new 

station on the air 2 October as an 
ABC affiliate in Syracuse, N. Y., to 
Weed Radio Corp. as its national 
sales rep . . . Maine Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, consisting of WSCH, Portland; 
WRDO, Augusta, and WLBZ, Ban- 
gor, to Nona Kirby Company as 
New England rep . . . Foster Broad- 
casting Company to John E. Pear- 
son Company as national sales rep 
for all four Foster southern Califor- 
nia stations — KPRO, Riverside; 
KREO, Palm Springs; KROP, Braw- 
lay; and KYOR, Blythe. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Don 
Dalton and Bruce Houston to the 

Chicago office of Gill-Perna, Inc. . . . 
The Adam Young Companies an- 
nounce the following personnel addi- 
tions: John Fenwick to Young TV, 
New York, as Rog Sheldon's replace- 
ment; Lee Red field to Philadelphia. 
Baltimore, and D. C. for radio; Dell 
Simpson to manage San Francisco 
radio; John Walker to manage 
Young-TV, St. Louis; John Brew to 
New York radio staff; George Yo- 
nan to Chicago radio sales staff, and 
Millard Ewing to the L.A. office 
for radio and tv. 

Film 



! 



Hank Saperstein has claimed for 
the UPA-TPA Mister Magoo se- 
ries the highest national rating 
of any syndicated cartoon library 
during the second quarter of 
1961. 

Unlike other titled cartoons for tv, 
Mister Magoo was sold as a five-min- 
ute library, not a half-hour series, al- 
though most of the 131 stations have 
programed the 131 episodes as a half- 
hour. 



ARB ratings between March and 
June include these: 

MARKET RATING 

Baton Rouge 25 

Boise _ 24 

Chicago 16 

Dallas-Ft. Worth 9 

Evansville 23 

Nashville 11 

Rockford 19 

Saginaw 14 

San Francisco 13 

Washington, D. C. . 20 

Wilkes-Barre . 17 

Bonded Tv Film Service has been 
appointed exclusive Midwest rep- 
resentative for Meridian Films 
Limited of Toronto. 

This will make available Meridian's 
videoprint tape-to-film transfers to 
the broadcast industry within this 
area. 

Promotion: ABC Films has ar- 
ranged personal appearance dates at 
KRNT-TV, Des Moines; WTVN-TV, 
Columbus; WDSU-T,V New Orleans, 
for Dr. Joyce Brothers, whose syndi- 
cated series Consult Dr. Brothers is 
currently running in those cities . . . 
ZrV-UA will promote its Ripcord 
with a sky-diver who will leap into 
the stadium at each home game of 
the Ohio State University football 
team . 

Sales: CBS Films' December 
Bride lists some recent sales: WJBK- 
TV, Detroit; WJXT, Jacksonville: 
WKYT-TV, Lexington, Ky. ; K00L- 
TV, Phoenix; WSPA-TV, Spartan- 
burg, S. C; WJIM-TV, Lansing; 
KRLD-TV, Dallas; WALB-TV, Al- 
bany; WTVJ, Miami, and WBRC-TV r 
Birmingham, Ala. . . . Among new 
signers for ZI V-UA's Everglades are : 
WLEX, Lexington; KREX-TV, Grand 
Junction, Colo.; WICD, Danville, 111.; 
WCMS-TV, Charleston; WBTW, Flor- 
ence, S. C; KNOX-TV, Grand Forks, 
N. D.; and KCND, Pembina, N. D. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Nor- 
man Katz to v.p. in charge of for- 
eign operations at Seven Arts Indus- 
tries . . . Henry S. White to pro- 
gram v.p. at Filmex from v.p. and 
general manager at WNTA-TV, New- 
ark . . . Alton Whitehouse to east- 
ern division sales manager at ITC 
from district manager at ITC's east- 
ern division . . . William Dozier, 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 




\.p. in charge <»f West coast activities 
for Screen Gems, will head a task 
force to advise and consult with the 
Advertising Council in the area of 
motion picture industry relations. 

Public Service 

The Susquehanna Broadcasting 
Company is promoting the United 
Fund through a large mailing of 
a Mow n-ii |> news-gram. 

In addition to much on-the-air sup- 
port by the company's three stations, 
WARM, Scranton; WHLO, Akron, 
and WSBA, York, the mailing goes to 
business and industrial leaders in 
their respective markets. 

Public service in action: 

• WPIX-TV, New York, will lend 
a helping hand to the New York may- 
orality campaign when the station 
gives a full hour to the two candi- 
dates, Mayor Wagner and Louis Lef- 
kowitz, for a debate along with news- 
man John Tillman who will serve as 
moderator. 

• WJJC, Pittsburgh, will present 
an hour-long documentary on the re- 
birth of the downtown Pittsburgh 
area. Several of the personalities re- 
sponsible for the work will participate 
in the feature which will present one 
of the most complete transformations 
in urban history. 

• W'LCY, Tampa, Fla., has creat- 
ed a public service project called 
"Operation Helping Hand." The sta- 
tion's personalities have actually 
adopted a village in Honduras, Cen- 
tral America. The population is 250 
and so poor that a hand plow and a 
handful of seeds would raise their 
living standards by 50 r /r. The vil- 
lage is Limpira. 

• KLUS, Longview, Texas, re- 
cently became the first radio station 



in the country to broadcast an actual 
recovery mission of the United States 
Air Force. 

• KAKC, Tulsa, Okla., with the 
aid of Mayor Jim Maxwell presented 
achievement plaques to two of the 
more than 800 young people at the 
climax of the city-wide Youth Fit- 
ness Day ceremonies held in Tulsa. 

• WJXT-TV, Jacksonville, Fla., 
revived a Bands for Bonds ala World 
War II for the sale of United States 
Savings Bonds in a recent telecast. 

• WIL, St. Louis, has an official 
school closing service. Each school 
in the area has a special code num- 
ber which identifies the caller at time 
of school closing due to inclement 
weather or other reasons. Calls are 
made to the station's staff for imme- 
diate use on the air. 

• WSAC, Ft. Knox, Ky., in a re- 
versal of normal programing opera- 
tions, gave an entire day, 29 Septem- 
ber, to patriotic music and Civil De- 
fense promotions. 

• WKMH, Detroit, ran a back-to- 
school contest to help reduce the 
school drop-out problem. The entries 
had to complete the phrase, I want to 
go back to school because . . . and 
the ten winners received transistor 
radios and wrist watches. 

• Some Pittsburgh tv and radio 
stations were virtually given away 
for one day last week when the Pitts- 
burgh Radio and Television Club 
selected 16 member agencies of the 
United Fund of Allegheny County by 
way of a blind drawing at a luncheon 
meeting of the Club under the super- 
vision of Mark W. Cresap, campaign 
chairman of the 1961 United Fund 
Drive. Each winning agency will be 
free to take over its respective sta- 
tion on 18 October and will supply 
background information on its activi- 
ties for use on the air throughout 
the day. 



Q 

A, 



Can a TV film distributor use 
BONDED's facilities in other 
cities? 



Yes, BONDED has offices in 
New York, Chicago, Los An- 
geles and Toronto. This pro- 
vides better control and re- 
duces shipping costs. 



BONDED 

TVFI3LM 




CHICAGO 
LOS ANGELES 
TORONTO 



A Division of 

NOVO INDUSTRIAL CORP. 



Kudos: KABC, L.A., was honored 
at the 17th annual Fleet Safety Award 
Banquet of the Los Angeles Chapter 
of the National Safety Council. The 
station received its award for devel- 
oping a system permitting the broad- 
cast of an hourly box-score of traffic 
accidents on holiday weekends . . . 
WBBM, Chicago, was the recipient 
of the award for "best reporting of 
community problems" from the Ra- 
dio-Tv News Directors Association at 
their Washington, D. C, meeting . . . 
WNBQ, Chicago, has been cited by 
the United States Treasury Depart- 
ment for "an outstanding contribu- 
tion to the successful administration 
of Federal tax laws. Harold R. All, 
Chicago District Director of the In- 
ternal Revenue Service, presented the 
certificate to Lloyd E. Yoder, NBC 
v.p. and general manager of WNBQ- 
WMAQ. 

Trade Dates 

The American Association of Ad- 
vertising Agencies will hold its 
1961 Central Region Annual 
Meeting 12 and 13 October at 
the Ambassador West Hotel in 
Chicago. 

Meeting theme: Improving the ef- 
fectiveness of our end product: ad- 
vertising. 

Among the key speakers will be 
John E. McMillin, executive editor of 
SPONSOR, who will speak on "I Worry 
About You Creative Guys." 

The NAB fall conferences began 
9 October and will be followed 
by seven more conferences in as 
many cities. 

The many subjects to be covered 
include reports on government and 
public relations, member services, ra- 
dio and tv Code activities, etc. 

The dates of future meetings and 
their locations are: 13 October, St. 
Louis; 18 October, Salt Lake City: 
20 October, San Francisco; 10 No- 
vember, Boston; 13 November, Pitts- 
burgh; 15 November, Minneapolis; 
and 20 November. Jacksonville. 

Other trade dates: The Nebraska 
Broadcasters Association will meet 
in Grand Island, Neb., 20 and 21 No- 
vember . . . New York State Broad- 
casters Association will hold their 
1962 Legislative Dinner in Albany. 
N. Y., 6 March. ^ 



66 



SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



I 



Commercial commentary (Com. from p. 12) 



suspicion that the system itself is not being as productive of real 
excellence as it could and should be. 

Our challenge, then, is to devise some plan which will unlock 
more of the tremendous creative energies we know are inherent in 
private enterprise, and in free individuals, and use them in the 
service of tv. 

Does this sound like an overstatement of the obvious? 

If it does, consider this fact. Not one of our critics (Mr. Minow 
included) really operates on this basis. 

Instead, they view with noisy alarm the stretches of tv wasteland 
and immediately begin to suggest plans to police, censor, and con- 
trol the system with legislation and regulation, with mountains of 
bureaucratic paperwork, with pressures, threats, sneers and jeers, 
and with making certain, as Mr. Minow said fiercely at the Roosevelt, 
that broadcasters "damn well live up to their promises." 

All of which is a negative, repressive approach to the problem. 
Our own approach must be quite different. Our own plan, when we 
find it, must be directed to opening up new avenues of creativity, 
new Avellsprings of talent and ideas. 

TVs Forgotten Man 

Such a plan will not be easy to come by. It involves much more 
than glib formulas — like the Doerffer Plan, the Collins proposal for 
"Blue Ribbon" programs, the Minow suggestion for three-network 
children's-hour collusion blessed by the Justice Department. 

It can only come from deep digging and hard thinking about the 
roots of our difficulties, and it cannot be based on the mistaken no- 
tion that either law T or government are in themselves potent creative 
forces. (Both Mr. Minow and Governor Collins frequently fall into 
this error.) 

Actually, I am certain, any effective industry plan must be built 
around an understanding of the individuals who make up the broad- 
casting business, and a knowledge of how they can be inspired, 
honored and set free to create, produce, and present more imagina- 
tive, meaningful products. 

Up to now, practically all tv program criticism has been guilty of 
the fallacy so brilliantly delineated by sociologist William Graham 
Sumner in his historic definition of the Forgotten Man. 

Said Sumner, "When A wants B to do something for C — B is the 
Forgotten Man." In all the hullabaloo about what tv owes to the pub- 
lic, about the industry's "responsibility to the people," the broad- 
caster has been the Forgotten Man. Yet it is only through him that 
real improvements can come. 

How can we set about devising a true "broadcaster's plan" for the 
progressive improvement of tv programing in years to come? 

Obviously leadership is necessary. And obviously, leadership can 
come from only one of two places, the networks or the NAB. 

If Governor Collins has managed to acquire, in 10 months, the 
intimate knowledge of broadcasters and creative broadcast problems 
necessary for such a project — then bless him. Let him get to work 
on it. 

But if, as I suspect, a more sophisticated approach is needed, 
then this is an open plea to Messrs. Sarnoff and Stanton to organize 
an all industry meeting to consider the problem and formulate a plan. 

Our cause, believe it or not, is better than Mr. Minow's. But for 
Pete's sake, let's get off the dime and do something about it. ^ 

SPONSOR • 9 OCTOBER 1961 






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Sam Rahall Manager 

ALLENTOWN, PENNA. 

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BECKLEY, WEST VIRGINIA 

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John flanzhitff, Manager 

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 

— "Our New Baby" 

Jack Faulkner, Manager 



RAHALL RADIO GROUP— Represented by 
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I 






James E. Duffy has been elected v.p. in 
charge of sales for ABC Radio Network. He 
has been national director of sales for ABC 
Radio since April of last year. Previously 
he was the director of sales for ABC 
Radio's central division. Duffy joined the 
American Broadcasting Company 12 years 
ago. In May of 1952 he was promoted to 
director of advertising and promotion for 

the central division. From 1955 to 1957 he was an account executive 

for ABC Television, also in the central division. 

Howard B. Koerner has been elected v.p. 
of Official Films, according to an announce- 
ment by Seymour Reed, president. Koerner, r 3 
previously executive in charge of product 
acquisition for the television film distribut- 
ing company, will be responsible for this 
area of activity. He graduated from Har- 
vard Law School in 1951 and was associ- 
ated with the law offices of New York State 
Controller Arthur Levitt and then to corporate private practice and 
contract negotiations for various companies. He became associated 
with Official Films in January 1960. 

Sterling Beeson has joined the sales execu- 
tive staff of The Pulse, Inc. His former 
presidency at Headley-Reed Company, New 
'" ' York, culminated 19 years work as sales- 

^ ^F a man, sales manager, v.p. and general man- 

^^ "^^t ager. Subsequently Beeson became an in- 

^L^K>J|&£ i: vestor in and general manager of \^ R\ M. 

W^ Mffl./ Rochester. After bringing sales from an 

initial $1,500 to 817,000 per week, the 
station was sold at a substantial profit. Earlier in his career he was 
at WXYZ, Detroit, and WTOL, Toledo, and made his debut in the 
rep business with Joseph Hershy McGilvra in 1939. 

Larry Saunders has been named local sales 
manager of WTAR, Norfolk, Va., after 

serving since 1959 as an account executive. 

He joined the WTAR staff as a summer an- 
nouncer in 1955. After graduating from the 
University of North Carolina in 1957, he 
joined the station's news department where 

he received a Virginia Associated Press a V » 

Award for special events coverage. In 

1960, the Norfolk-Portsmouth Sales Executive Club presented Saund 
ers with a "Sammy" award for outstanding sales success. 





68 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



V 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Headaches brought forth by voluminous paper work in sales and traffic are 
on the way out, according to Phillip W . Wenig, president of SRDS-Data, 
Inc.. and Broadcast Billing Co., both subsidiaries of Standard Rate and Data 
Service. He points to cure by electronic computers and data processing ma- 
chines, to some extent available immediately, the rest follow in the not too 
distant future. Prior to joining SRDS, Mr. Wenig held research and data 
processing positions in both government and advertising, and a faculty posi- 
tion at the U. of III., where he received graduate and undergraduate degrees. 




Automation conies to radio and tv operations 



19 he age of automation is descending on tv and radio 
operations with the speed of a runaway locomotive. It is 
only a few hours until dawn of a tomorrow when the vast 
amounts of clerical work involved in sales and traffic will 
'be done instead — and at a fraction of present time and 
cost — by electronic computers and data processing ma- 
chines. 

To have made that statement only five years ago would 
have seemed like crystal-ballgazing. Today, the machinery 
is out of the laboratory, the methods have been developed, 
and many of the specific services are immediately available. 

It will be profitable for the station executive to know 
about them before — like the runaway locomotive— they 
•threaten to run over him. Let's take a brief look at some 
of them. 

1. Centralized billing services. It has been a long-time 
station executive's dream to get complicated spot billing 
.procedures off his back. Machines are now ready and 
^waiting to do the job. Here's how they work: 

Agencies and advertisers feed the machines placement 
3rders with complete specifications. The machines process 
hese orders electronically and mail them out to the sta- 
:ions. The stations, in turn, feed the same machines con- 
firmation of fulfillment. The machines then compute cost 
with all relevant discounts and mail out the bills. 

As a very valuable by-product, make-goods can be han- 
Ued within a few days instead of the weeks (and attendant 
leadaches) now required. 

2. Availabilities. Machine processing will give the sta- 
ion rep a vastly more important role, while at the same 
ime providing a happy sedative for the pains of the local 
-alesman. It will be the station rep who feeds the machines 
lata for all his clients, so that availabilities for all of them 



are up-to-the-minute. Local sales departments will be able 
to check their availabilities accurately, and within mo- 
ments, by a phone call to the rep. 

I would like to emphasize that the electronic solution to 
the old problem of virtually independent selling by local 
sales and the rep must involve control of availabilities by 
the rep. All of his numerous clients can be handled on 
one computer. One computer for the use of single station 
— or even four or five stations — simply is not economical- 
ly feasible. 

3. Generation of reports. As of this moment, all infor- 
mation on station rates, coverage, and audience composi- 
tion is being translated into machine language. This will 
mean that every potential buyer will have available the 
fame information on every station. The "quantitative 
quest" will be over. 

And that will make the role of the salesman — and the 
rep's salesman — more important than ever. He will have 
to be truly creative. He will have to inaugurate local re- 
search projects which will determine cost per thousand of 
exposure to executives over $10,000, or housewives, or dog 
owners, to be integrated by machines with nationally-avail- 
able information. Even more, he will have to make his 
sales pitches on the intangibles of his station operation — 
the character and atmosphere of both the station and its 
audience. 

Without question, electronics eventually will take over 
many more areas of operations than spot billing, avail- 
abilities, and reports. Those three, however, are immedi- 
ately in front of us, as we at Data, Inc., and Broadcast 
Billing have good reason to know from the years of work 
and thought we have spent perfecting the methods and 
operating the machines that have made them possible. ^ 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



69 



SPONSOR 




This we fight for— 1961 

Last week, in the process of moving to our new quarters 
at 555 Fifth \\enue. we took down from the walls of our old 
oflnv-. several framed topics of an editorial which appeared 
in sponsor in February 1953. 

Titled 'This we Fight For" it listed 15 industry objectives 
to which SPONSOR eight years ago pledged its aggressive 
support. 

Some of these objective? have been accomplished over the 
years. In 1953. for instance, we were fighting for the e-tab- 
lishment of a TvB, and for an RAB (then BAB) with a mil- 
lion dollar budget. Both have since been realized. 

Other of our 1953 "This We Fight Fors" seem almost 
naive today. (We dreamed then of a "foolproof rating system, 
possibly a low cost electronic system, based on a adequate 
sample and capable of fast returns.") 

Still other of sponsor's objectives remain as knotty prob- 
lems in 1961, as they were eight years ago — the elimination 
of unnecessary paper work in buying radio and tv spot, the 
need for more program experimentation, the need to "con- 
vince advertisers that radio has a place in the American Home 
which neither television or any other medium can usurp." 

But what impressess us most about our 1953 editorial is 
that as a statement of trade paper policy and conviction, it is 
still completely up-to-date. 

We wrote better than we knew! 

We said then "In our opinion the proper role of a trade 
paper is not only to inform, but to lead the way. SPONSOR has 
been built on this concept, and unusual growth is in good 
measure due to the needs it has seen, the causes it has 
espoused. 

"The true test of a trade paper editor is his ability to focus 
on key necessities within the industry he serves, the soundness 
with which he ananlyses an industry problem, the way in 
which he licks it." 

sponsor in 1961 stands squarely behind these sentiments. 
This is our credo. thi> i> the way in which we intend to operate 
in all the years ahead. 

Each week you will find in our editorial pages many ex- 
amples of the thing- we believe in. the improvements we fight 
for. They form, in effect, the spirit and guts of sponsor. ^ 



70 






lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Method actors, please note: This 
is the off-beat means that ABC v.p. 
for news. James Hagerty chose to 
help his staffers perfect their art: 
"To ALL ABC REPORTERS. Sub- 
ject Air Work: ''Speak the speech, I 
pray you. as I pronounced it to you, 
trippingly on the tongue: but if you 
mouth it. as many of your plavers 
do, I had as lief the towncrier spoke 
my lines. Nor do not saw the air too 
much with your hand, thus, but use 
all gently: for in the very torrent, 
tempest, and. as I may say, the whirl- 
wind of passion, you must acquire 
and beget a temperance that mav 
give it something. 0, it offends me 
to the soul to hear a robustious peri- 
wig-pated fellow tear a passion to tat- 
ters, to very rags, to split the ears of 
the groundlings."' And the tag line 
read: Courtesy: Hamlet, who has had 
a rather long run. 

In the public eye: Vice President 
Lyndon B. Johnson dashed into 
Washington's Statler - Hilton hotel 
and asked a woman in the lobby if 
she knew in which room the luncheon 
for \^ ashington Post columnist 
George Dixon was taking place. She 
replied that her husband also was 
supposed to attend the luncheon 
I honoring Dixon on publication of 
his new book about life in D. C.) , but 
she didn't know its location. Before 
Johnson could move on and get more 
helpful directions, the woman asked 
him what he does for a living. 
'T'm Vice President." the tall Texan 
answered. "Oh," she said, "Of 
what?" 

New alphabet game: Add to your 
collection of Madison Avenue lan- 
guage "the AABBJ stamp of ap- 
proval'" on unreasonable client re- 
quests, particularly among radio/tv 
reps. lit stands for Approved 
Against Better Business Judgment.) 

Candored Camera: Filling in for 
Jack Paar one night recently. Sam 
Levenson tossed a carton of Kent 
Cigarettes into guest Margaret Tru- 
man Daniel's hands and asked her to 
do the commercial lead-in. Margaret, 
who's inherited some candor from a 
close relative, tossed it back with a 
curt : "/ don't smoke, so you hold it." 



SPONSOR 



9 OCTOBER 1961 




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10th ANNUAL 
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A 42-page >e<tion of 
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Know-how is the 
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the Negro market 

Page 9 

The stations: 
community roots 
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Page 13 



Negro basics: 
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Page 16 






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Represented by: 



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J ONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



the only 

station in 

New York 

Programming 

100% 

to the 

Great 

Negro 

Community* 






'Mon. thru Fri. 



WLIB 




IN AUDIENCE 

22 out of a possible 28 half- 
hour firsts. Tied for first in 
two more. Negro Pulse: July- 
Aug. '61 

IN COMMUNITY SERVICE 

More Community Service pro- 
grams than any other Negro 
Station 

IN NEWS PROGRAMMING 

One of the largest Negro 
news staffs in America 

IN NAT'L ADVERTISING 

Consistently more national 
advertisers than any other 
Negro Station in N. Y. 



WLIB 



Hotel Theresa - 125th St. 
and Seventh Ave. - N. Y. C. 




11 



13 



15 



16 



22 



31 



34 



I .,, IS, V„ 41 m 9 OCTOBER 1961 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MACAZINE TVRADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



The Negro radio outlook 

Tea year- ha\e brought the Negro population into a growth stag^ 
wlin-f dynamic- haM- the force of an explosion, the impact of a bom) 

Know-how is key to selling Negro 

Major agencie- are recommending their clients take a serious look 
at tin- Negro market, and the specialized media that -ene i 

Market has boomed in past decade 

Soaring population is also setting new records in growth of income, 
education and spending: new patterns traced across the nation 

Stations' community roots are spreading 

Quantity and quality of Negro-appeal broadcasting reflects new con- 
munity life: stations put appeal and zest into public-service concept 

NRA: straining to profile audience 

Organization of Negro-appeal broadcasters weather- its first formatnc 
years, spells out possible developments for a responsible future 

Negro market basics 

Six pages of the latest statistical information on population growt:: 
spending power, listening habits and vital planning informatici 

Profiles of Negro stations 

sponsor's national questionnaire draws detailed replies from mor 
than 200 stations: essential facts on programing and ad sen ice 

Major Negro advertisers 

National and big regional ad\ertiser^ drawn from station replies, ar 
impressive checklist of Negro radio's national ten-year success stoi 

Negro programing log 

Breakdown of weekly programing hours reveals substantial rise 
stations which devote significant time to Negro-appeal programin 



Officers: editor and publisher, .\urman R. Glenn; executive rice pre^ 
dent. Bernard Piatt; rice president and a— istant publisher. Arnold Alpe^ 
secretary -treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMillin; news editor. Ben Bodtl 
managing editor, Alfred J. Jafte: Negro supplement editor, Daiid Wise.\ 
senior editor. Jo Ranson; midwest editor. Guen Smart: assistant news edit: 
Heynard Ehrlich: associate editors. Jack Lindrup, Ben Self. Ruth Schlangl 
Lauren Liboic; columnist, Joe Csida: art editor, Maury Kurtz: product:! 
editor. Phyllis Trieb: editorial research. Carole Ferster: reader service. 6^ 
Rubenstein. 

Advertising: assistant sales manager. Willard Dougherty : southern m^ 
ager. Herbert M. Martin, Jr.: midwest manager. Paul Blair: western ma 
George G. Dietrich. Jr.: sales service production. Shirley S. Allison, /t 
Henner. 

Circulation: circulation manager. Jack Rayman: John J. Kelly. Lj 
Martinez. 

Administrative: office manager. Fred Levine: George Becker. 
Croco. Syd Guttman, Irene Sulzbach. Geraldine Da\ch. Jo Ganci. Man 
Santalla. Mary Kandxba. 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



1961 SPONSOR Publications 






SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive Editorial Circulation 
Advertising Offices: 555 5th New York 17, MUrray Hill 7-8080. Chicago Office: 
N. Michigan Av. 1111, 644-1166. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Ave. So.. FAi 
2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. « 28 ' . Hollywood 4-8089. Printing O'j 
3110 Elm Av . Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada S9 a year, 
countries Sll a year. Single copies 40c. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd 
postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 111 




"■•^s^"* 



# SELLING FORCE 
IN NEGRO MARKET* 

This is the extraordinary lineup we've worked toward since WHAT pioneered Negro 
broadcasting back in 1944. Seven of the Nation's most experienced and genuinely 
talented Negro radio people. (Robbin Robinson was minding the store when this 
picture was taken). Each with an incredible hold over his and her share of the 
nearly 700,000* Negroes within WHAT'S new 1,000 watt non-directional, 
"platinum ring". 

HOOPER GIVES THEM A SOLID LEAD OVER THE SECOND NEGRO STATION FROM 
7 AM TO 6 PM MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, EVERY MONTH (except March) DURING 
1961, RIGHT UP THRU AUGUST. SUNDAYS FROM 10 AM TO 6 PM. 

We're proud they've leaped dramatically ahead in ratings, but prouder still of their 
superb selling record for clients. Nothing can sell 26.4% * of Philadelphia quite 
as effectively! 





lOOO WATTS ; # Non : Directional 

Represented by John E. Pearson Co. 



I960 U. S. CENSUS 



GUARANTEEING A SINGLE EQUITABLE RATE TO ALL ADVERTISERS! 



I SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



«w^ 



Sell the Negro in these Six Big Markets . . . 
with ROUNSAVILLE RADIO 

buy one or all — discounts with two or more! 

WCIN— CINCINNATI. 5000 watts. Reaches 

172,530 Negroes, who spend $195,163,250 

annually. 

WLOU— LOUISVILLE. 5000 watts. Reaches 

118,950 Negroes, who spend $106,866,220 

annually. 

WVOL— NASHVILLE. 5000 watts. Reaches 

123,930 Negroes, who spend $99,320,000 

annually. 

WYLD— NEW ORLEANS. 1000 watts. Reaches 

294,990 Negroes, who spend $258,902,500 

annually. 

WTMP— TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG. 5000 watt. 

Reaches 108,600 Negroes, who spend 

$89,652,500 annually. 

KRZY— DALLAS-FT. WORTH. 500 watts. 
Reaches 208,712 Negroes who spend 80% of 
income on consumer goods. 

FIRST U. S. NEGRO-PROGRAMMED CHAIN 

FIRST IN RATING IN 6 BIG MARKETS 



O N S , 

Ft) 

^^^ R A t 


5 


jFtJ 

1 o ^^^k 



*824,000,000 

Market that must 

be spoken to 

if you are to sell it! 



This Market is the Negro reached 

only by ROUNSAVILLE RADIO 
in Six Important Markets 



Facts prove Rounsaville Radio is the media that reaches 
and sells the Negro consumer in these rich markets. 
All Rounsaville Radio stations are rated FIRST by 
Pulse and Hooper — and 95 f ^ of the Negroes listen to 
radio, prefer Negro radio. Rounsaville Radio programs 
exclusively to them, features Negro talent and 
personalities — speaks directly to them with warmth and 
believability. Negroes spend 80 c ^ of income on 
consumer goods. A proper part of your advertising 
budget must go to Rounsaville Radio or you miss this 
important buying group. Call or write today for the full 
Rounsaville Radio story. Ask about our merchandising 
plan to back your schedules. Represented nationally 
by John E. Pearson, in the Southeast by Dora-Clayton. 
ROBERT W. ROUNSAVILLE, Owner-President 



ROUNSAVILLE 

RADIO STATIONS I 



3220 PEACHTREE RD., N. E. • ATLANTA 5, GEORGIA 

HAROLD F. WALKER 

V. P. A Nat'l Sales Mgr. 

DORA-CLAYTON 

Southeastern Rep. 



ROBERT W. ROUNSAVILLE 

Owner-President 

JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 

Nat'l Rep. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 196 






SPONSOR'S lOth ANNUAL 
NEGRO RADIO ISSUE 



THE 



NEGRO 
RADIO 

OUTLOOK 



I his year marks the 10th edition of sponsor's 
annual Negro radio issue. And coincidental!)-, 
1961 brings release of the first figures from the 
decennial census. What's been happening in the 
decade, and what promise does the future hold? 

sponsor's pioneering survey of the market was 
headlined "The forgotten 15 million." Today, there 
are almost 19 million Negroes in the United States. 
an increase of 25% in a period when the white 
population has risen by only 18%. This is the 
most significant fact in the picture of the Negro 
market, to which this issue is devoted. The dimen- 
sions of this immense bloc are spelled out national- 
ly and regionally in subsequent pages devoted to 
The Markets. 

If the physical growth in this ten years has been 
astonishing, no less important has been the change 
in advertisers' attitude. An editorial which referred 
to Negroes today as "forgotten" just wouldn't make 
sense. A major agency today can advise its clients 
that they are "confronted with a growing, dynamic 
Negro market" — and there is no need to qualify 
the statement, sponsor's own nationwide survey of 

i SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



Negro-appeal stations reveals that major adver- 
tisers are relying more and more on the medium 
which is pre-eminently suited, not only to reaching, 
but to convincing the market. Current thinking of 
advertising strategists is highlighted in the section 
devoted to Advertisers and Agencies. 

Ten years of progress have brought deep changes 
in the format and approach of the Negro-appeal 
stations. Confronted with an audience which more 
and more is enjoying the good life; which is be- 
coming dramatically urbanized, and which is sink- 
ing its roots into new communities, broadcasters 
have responded with a diversity of new service 
programs which mirror the life of the Negro com- 
munitv. Details are spelled out in The Stations. 

"Service" does not begin and end with program- 
ing. Many stations have become active project 
leaders; a positive force to whom their audience 
looks and in whom they trust. The story is told in 
this 10th anniversary issue: it is perhaps the most 
meaningful aspect of the past decade's change. 
It is certainly the best augury for the future. ^ 



CO 



More than 

1,000,000 Negro 

listeners in 

3 states. 



* 



Important 

personalities at each 

station add to 

sales results. 



CJ> 



CD 



3 Speidel stations 

located to reach the 

cream of the Negro 

audience. 



C_D 
kCJ> 



Programming 

exclusively to Negroes 

assures listener 

loyalty. 



These notes from the Golden Horn Stations 

tell the story of Speidel's dominance in the South Carolina 

Negro Market. Ideal locations, tremendous audience, 

proper programming and 

great sales personalities 

are behind the solid successes 

these stations chalk up 

for advertisers in every field. 



Ask Bob Dore or Dora-Clayton 

for complete information 

and 2 and 3 station discount rates 




GOLDEN HORN STATIONS 

SPEIDEL 

BROADCASTING CORPORATION 




czg h dzn Emm 



5000 W 1470 KC 1000 W 730 KC 

COLUMBIA, S. C CHARLESTON, S. C. 



250 W 540 KC 
FLORENCE, S. C. 



* flash ! just added, WSOK 



Savannah, Georgia 



Advertisers and agencies 



KNOW-HOW IS KEY TO 
SELLING NEGRO TODAY 



Experience, careful planning can trigger dynamic sales results, clients find 



^%dvertisers and their agencies 
find themselves confronted today 
with a growing, dynamic Negro mar- 
ket." 

This could be a quote from station 
promotion. Instead — and significant- 
ly — it's taken direct from a report 
by one of the nation's biggest agen- 
cies. 

Benton & Bowles' media analysis 
division used the quote to summar- 
ize its findings this year, after a 
long hard look at the facts. B&B 
continued : 

"There are numerous 'success 
stories' by companies that have ap- 



proached this market judiciously 
using well thought out advertising 
and promotional techniques." 

And taking first place in the strat- 
egy would be Negro radio. To quote 
the agency again: "Twenty years ago 
there were three Negro oriented ra- 
dio stations . . . now there are 150 
stations that devote 10 or more hours 
per week to Negro programing . . . 
This tremendous growth in Negro 
radio is the most dramatic develop- 
ment in Negro media in the past two 
decades." 

But though the market is admitted- 
ly booming, it's one which has its 



own set of ground rules and one that 
requires more than the usual amount 
of advertising delicacy and market- 
ing know-how. 

These are problems which have 
been given a good deal of thought 
by many agency strategists. In the 
front rank is Sam B. Vitt, v.p. and 
media director of DCS&S. In a re- 
port prepared especially for sponsor, 
Vitt analyzes the inherent problems: 

"Most marketing and advertising 
men would be impressed if you told 
them you knew where a market ex- 
isted whose annual purchasing power 
was in excess of that of all Canada. 




Merchandising is bonus for advertisers 



WASHINGTON, D. C. is site of one of 
nation's most modern new station. WOOK's 
building houses six studios and offices 

WAMO dj Bill Powell and tennis star Althea 
Gibson in typical supermarket promotion; 
here for Ward's Tip Top Bread, Pittsburgh 




QUAKER OATS COMPANY was part- 
sponsor of WBEE's Chicago Talent Hunt, 
which attracted a record 1,530 entries 



75,000 AUNT JEMIMA packages were sold 
in the metro New York area during the third 
Gospel Contest run by station WWRL 





Or in excess ol thai ol most other 

nations of the world, f«»r that matter. 

"Bui as impressive as that ma\ 

sound, that is in fact the current 
estimated financial dimension of the 
Negro market in the I . S. toda] 
120 billions annually. 

" \nd the further projection is that 
the uruv> national product of the 19 
million Negroes this \<ar will total 
something around M2 billions — over 
;*,*, of the estimated total US. GNP. 

"This, of course, is not surprising 
to some, \stute marketing and ad- 
vertising men ha\e long heen aware 
of the value of this marketing area 
and have heen assiduously giving it 
some of their best endeavors. Others 
mav have been thinking about it. per- 
haps, but not doing too much to as- 
sure themselves a share of it. 

Some marketing highlights: 

Where are sales made in the Negro 
market? Some of the most detailed 
research has been done by the food 
industrv. According to I SDA. Ne- 
groes spend up to \2 l 'c more in su- 
permarkets and other retail food out- 
lets on a per capita basis than do 
comparable-income white families. 

What does a company do when it 
learns that Negroes are prime cus- 
tomers for its product? Here. Gen- 
eral Baking's experience is instruc- 
tive. 

According to A. Waldron Stone. 



TOP MERCHANDISING AWARD in Pet 

Milk's first national Gospel Singing Contest 
was presented to KNOK, Fort Worth 



GB's advertising manager, it \>a- dis- 
covered that not only did Negroes 

l>u\ more bread per capita, but they 
preferred a sweeter loaf. Today. GB 
markets a sweeter loaf, known as 
"Hone\ -Sweet. trapped in clear 
cellophane, it is -old onl\ in Negro 
areas. Sales of *"Hone\ ->weet have 
proved the move to \>c a good one. 
Stone report?. 

Kxtending the invitation to Negro 
consumers can take manv forms. 
Negro-oriented media can carry di- 
rect appeals, which can be bolstered 
at the point-of-sale. Some companies 
use Negroes as home economists and 
demonstrators, and coordinate pro- 
motions with club groups, home serv- 
ice shows, and retail outlets. 

Use of Negro celebrities, both in 
testimonials, and as representatives, 
has grown. Ward Baking employs 
world tennis champion Althea Gib- 
son as a community relations repre- 
sentative. 

Pet Milk maintains an active pro- 
gram in the Negro community. For 
14 vears the companv has used the 
famed Fultz Quads in advertising and 
personal appearances. The companv 
also sponsors a weeklv radio pro- 
gram of spiritual and gospel music 
on some 61 radio stations beamed to 
the Negro market. 

Another dairy outfit. Carnation, 
conducts successful "Healthv Babv 





KDIA, San Francisco, has tied itself to audi- 
ence with extensive personal-service broad- 
casting; taps resulting enthusiasm for sales 

TEENAGERS pack around Mobile Show 
aired by WJMO, Cleveland. Talent program 
goes wherever needed, is sales tool also 





KEY BOOSTER of the Negro market, Sam 
B. Vitt, is vice president and media director 
of Doher+y, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield. N.Y. 

Contests." aimed solely at the Negro 
market. 

S altest ice cream 'National Dairy 
Products I has a policy of not 
using people in advertisements or on 
point-of-purchase material. Com- 
pany is now modifying this policy to 
make it more productive in the Ne- 
gro market. 

I se of Negro-appeal p-o-p piece- 
has jumped at a rapid rate. There 
seems to be an "eagerness of retail- 
ers to use p-o-p material to create a 
friendly atmosphere." according to 
one observer. 

i Please turn to page 26' 



S£ Mention AMI, 




FISCHER BAKING used WNJR s merchan- 
dising facilities, in Newark, N. J. cam- 
paign utilizing extensive on-air promotion 

IN-STORE supermarket promotions are effec- 
tive tool of KCOH, Houston. Dj's actually 

work in markets for five to six hours daily 




The Market 



PAST DECADE SAW 
THE MARKET ZOOM 




MARKET BOOM has benefited Negro-appeal stations all over, according to Sidney J. Wolfe, (r), president; George Wharton, res. dir., KBS 



It has benefited from spectacular growth of population, wealth and education 



he Negro market today may be 
le fasting-growing market segment 
f the U. S. economy. 

In every area that's capable of 
iea sure men t — numbers, income, 
ducation, spending — the Negro 
rowth-rate has shown a vast im- 
rovement in the past 10 years. 

The proof is solid. On the na- 
onal level, the 1960 census is giving 
egro marketers an unimpeachable 

gument. 

At the regional level, broadcasters 

e converting the census figures in- 

what they hope will be hard-hitting 

les promotion. 



Let's take a look at the broad pic- 
ture first: — 

In 1949, Negro disposable income 
was around $10 billion. Twelve years 
later the estimate is $22 billion. 

In 1950, the nonwhite population 
was about 16 million people. It's now 
well over 20 million; Negro growth 
rate accelerated 25.4% compared 
with an increase of only 17.5% for 
the white population. 

Last year's census reveals not only 
growth, but change. For the first 
time, the figures show more than half 
of the nation's Negroes living outside 
the southeastern states. And also 



•ONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



for the first time, the state with the 
largest number of Negroes — New 
York — is located outside the South. 

Facts like these lend themselves 
readily to glib talk about a "popu- 
lation explosion." Truth is less dra- 
matic but more meaningful: 

Changes in the Negro market are 
deep-rooted and discernible over 
many years. They have followed a 
predictable pattern. What's new in 
the 60's is a steep rise in the 
growth-curve: the market is ap- 
proaching a critical mass which can 
give it explosive significance for ad- 
vertisers. Examples: — 



11 



Station activities reflect Negro's fuller life 





NASHVILLE AUDITORIUM Is packed to 
capacity for Gold Cup tournament sponsored 
by WVOL as benefit for blind children 

"JUNE BRIDE" contest on WLOU, Louis- 
ville had tab partially picked up by furni- 
ture store aiming at Negro home owners 



> jjjfML- ■ ■ ' ■ ^S fcafc^- - ^m^ 



WITH RISING PROSPERITY, Negro com- 
munity is giving more time to leisure activi- 
ties. Here is Elks parade in New York 




SVV *M FREE 





**&- 



ADULT NEGRO participation in the world 
of sports is increasing. Meantime, WNOO 
makes sure that children also get into swim 





EBULLIENT personalities reflect the soar- 
ing state of Negro radio and Negro markets. 
WJMO's John Slade is Cleveland d.j. 




WAMO's general manager Leonard Walk 
finds Negro interests extend beyond met- 
ropolitan boundary of Pittsburgh 

URBAN LEAGUE is playing important role 
as Negroes shift to cities. New Orleans mem- 
bership drive is helped by station WYLD 



• Movement of Negroes to large 
cities can be traced back to the turn 
of the century. But within the last 
10 years the movement has become a 
stampede; Negro population in 21 
central cities increased by 50 per 
cent. 

• Non-white enrollment in col- 
leges and professional schools has 
been a fact of life since the early 
1900's — but since 1950, it has rock- 
eted 86.4 /f . (The Negro market now 
includes more college graduates than 
does the whole of Great Britain.) 

• Negro family income has risen 
steadily since the late 30's — steadily, 
that is, until the 50's and 60's, when 
the curve soared upward 58/f in 10 
years. 

(Percentages don't tell the full 
story, of course. In absolute terms 
the Negro remains poorer, worse- 
educated and more vulnerable to eco- 
nomic storms than the white section 
of the community. But in many 
areas the gap narrows to a marginal 
difference: for example, individual 
Negro income may be lower than 
white, but disposable family income 
can well be higher.) 

Is the Negro market solidly based? 
Spectacular growth does not neces- 
sarily spring from a firm foundation, 
nor buttress itself as it grows. Yet 
the improved status of the Negro 
appears to have a horizontal as well 
as a vertical spread. 

It's been said that Negroes, with 
$20 billion to spend after taxes, are j 
a richer market than the entire Do- j 
minion of Canada. This is a good 
flip generalization; advertisers should 
find more meaning in the prosaic re- 
ports of the Commerce Dept. on 
"condition and plumbing for housing 
units,'' which reveal an "appreciable 
decline in the number of dilapidated 
units occupied by nonwhites." 

Translated, Negroes are investing 
their new wealth into better homes- 
and becoming new customers for 
household durables. Between 1950 
and 1960. the number of Negroes in 
"sound" homes has doubled. About 
two-thirds of Negro homeowners now 
possess sound units, containing all 
plumbing, compared with one-third 
in 1950. and the proportion of sound 
rental homes has risen similarly, 
from one-fourth to one-half. 

The sense of these national figures 
{Please turn to page 33 I 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 196 L 



The Stations 



THEIR COMMUNITY 
ROOTS ARE SPREADING 



More stations give more time to Negro affairs; build deep loyalty 



Jy any objective measure, Negro- 
appeal radio is booming. Iheres a 
great deal more programing: promo- 
tion is reaching new levels in both 
quality and quantity, and the stations 
are being welded more and more 
securely into their communities by 
; public-service broadcasting which 
touches the daily life of the listener. 
According to sponsor's survey, 
there now are more than 600 stations 
which carrv a significant amount of 
Negro-appeal programing. That's an 
increase of at least 100% since the 
first sponsor survey, in 1949. 

And not only the number of sta- 
tions, but the volume of special pro- 
graming has also increased. As evi- 
dence: Keystone's Negro Network, 
a rural and small town group reports 
that a typical station carries 42 
L quarter-hours of programing designed 
jespeciallv for Negro audiences each 
week. 

There's been "at least a 15 f r ri;e 
in the number of Negro-appeal radio 
program hours and a 30% gain in the 
number of Negro-appeal stations in 
the last decade," according to Key- 
stone's research director, George 
Wharton. Keystones figures are not 
atypical. More than 200 stations 
which supplied information to spon- 
sor left no doubt that the amount of 
^programing has been beefed-up: sta- 
tion profiles contained in this issue 
reveal growth in all categories, from 
Ithe 100' r -stations downward. 



Equally important, if less measur- 
able, is the loyalty which this pro- 
graming arouses. Reason is that 
Negro-appeal stations are tieing them- 
selves increasingly into the life of 
their communities, under a forceful 
public-service approach. 

The ingredients of the format in- 
clude anything from lost-and-found 
notices, to leadership of community 
projects. A good example of the 
grassroots appeal is found in Mem- 
phis, where WDIA has built an 
audience estimated at over l 1 /^ mil- 
lion Negroes. 

Bert Ferguson, co-founder of the 
station in 1947. says this was the 
logical result of a program of mutual 
trust and cooperation. WDIA has 
played a leading community role, in 
everything from forming Little 
Leagues baseball teams to sponsoring 
a school for crippled children. 

The station sponsors two revues 
each year — the Starlight in summer 
and the Goodwill in winter. All pro- 
ceeds go to Negro charities. 

In 1961, there was a $10,000 
scholarship fund to help bright Negro 
students to make it to college. 

Fund-raising is undoubtedly one of 
the most effective tools which stations 
have discovered, in securing audience 
identification. Take the case of 
Rounsaville's WON, which inaugu- 
rated its Goodwill Spectacular in 
Cincinnati a couple of years ago. As 
the result of the 1959 and 1960 Spec- 




KDIA, San Francisco, covered both I960 
conventions; on election night had five re- 
porters in field with instant returns 

Community's mirror 

COSTA RICAN broadcaster Carlos Cor- 
doba was brought to KNOK, Fort Worth, 
during State Department tour and exchange 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 




taculars, about $20,000 has been 
placed in the Goodwill Fund, adminis- 
tered by civic leaders. 

The rising educational level of the 
Negro audience is leading to a 
healthy increase in news and discus- 
sion programs. Because of interest in 
the civil-rights proposals, the 1960 
party conventions were a "must" for 
stations like KDIA, San Francisco 
which miiI two men to the Demo- 
cratic rally in Los Angeles, and sta- 
tion manager Walter Conway to the 
Republican floor in Chicago. 

WLIB, New York, also was at the 
conventions with members of a news 
staff which reputedly is the largest of 
any Negro-appeal station. The phi- 
losophy behind this, according to 
general manager Harry Novik, is that 
"the community itself should have the 



right to be heard and all its worth- 
while projects supported." 

It's common practice, for example, 
for WLIB staff broadcasters to tele- 
phone anywhere in America for ex- 
clusive interviews with Negro or white 
leaders on important issues as they 
arise. It covers every major Negro 
convention with its own men; every 
WLIB newscast has something of 
interest to the Negro community. 

Some of its community service 
programs have been on for years. 
Others are created as the need arises. 
Last year WLIB allocated 55 quarter- 
hours to various Negro groups to dis- 
cuss the specific problems that face 
these groups today. Many of its serv- 
ice programs are carried by Negro 
stations all over the country. 

Similar attention to public infor- 



mation on matters of Negro interest 
is shown by stations such as WHAT, 
which broadcast the entire proceed- 
ings of this year's NAACP conven- 
tion in Philadelphia. 

WHAT also sent to Washington on 
the "Freedom Train 1961" two of 
their top news analysts, who inter- 
viewed Roy Wilkens, executive secre- 
tary of NAACP, Clarence Mitchell, 
civil rights attorney and also director 
of the Washington NAACP, Senator 
Joseph Clark of Pennsylvania and 
many other dignitaries. 

For its complete convention cover- 
age the station received official com- 
mendation and citations. WHAT also 
sponsored the Negro golf tournament, 
during the convention. Extensive on- 
air promotion made the tournament 
(Please turn to page 38) 



I $ I i I % '■■ i i 




LITTLE LEAGUE TEAM sponsored by WLIB, N. Y., seen with YMCA official Leo Swanston. 
Many stations support similar activities. WLIB also builds audience identification with 
series of public-service broadcasts in which adult leaders discuss Negro community problems 



■ - fK 



,fe * v 



Public service broadcasting touches life at many and varied levels; 



NEGRO GOLF tournament sponsored by 
WHAT raised $1103 for NAACP, in con- 
junction with Philadelphia conference 




CINCINNATI'S independent Negro station, 
WCIN, has identified itself with the audience' 
at personal level; can muster full housesj 



WDIA, Memphis, has collected thousands of 
dollars for Negro charities from Starlight 
Revue, held in city each summer 



CAVE-IN at Philadelphia destroyed four 
homes, killed three. Jo Rainey, WDAS news 
director, collected $300 for relief 






The broadcasters 



FRANCIS M. FITZGERALD, first president 
and chairman of board of Negro Radio As- 
sociation, has guided NRA successfully 
'through its important formative year 



NRA: IT'S STRAINING TO 
PROFILE ITS AUDIENCE 

^ Current task is providing reliable market data 
for in-depth presentation to advertisers; NRA will 
woo admen with facts from new research 



NRA has growing list 
off member stations 

KAOK, Lake Charles, La. 

KDIA, San Francisco, Calif. 

KNOK, Fort Worth, Texas 

KOKA, Shreveport, La. 

KOKY, Little Rock, Ark. 

KSAN, San Francisco, Cal. 

KRZY, Dallas, Texas 

KYOK, Houston, Texas 

WAAA, Winston Salem, N. C. 

WAMO, Pittsburgh, Penna. 

WAOK, Atlanta, Ga. 

irVBOK, New Orleans, La. 

WCIN, Cincinnati, Ohio 

WDIA, Memphis, Tenn. 

WEBB, Baltimore, Md. 

WENN, Birmingham, Ala. 

WGIV, Charlotte, N. C. 

WGOK, Mobile, Ala. 

WHAT, Philadelphia, Penna. 

WJLD, Birmingham, Ala. 

WLIB, New York, N. Y. 

WLOK, Memphis, Tenn. 

WLOU, Louisville, Ky. 

WOIC, Columbia, S. C. 

WOKJ, Jackson, Miss. 

WOPA, Chicago, III. (Oak Park) 

WPAL, Charleston, S. C. 

WRMA, Montgomery, Ala. 

WSRC, Durham, N. C. 
1 WTMP, Tampa, Fla. 

WUST, Washington, D. C. 

WVOL, Nashville, Tenn. 
| WXOK, Baton Rouge, La. 

WYLD, New Orleans, La. 

WYNN, Florence, S. C. 



\Jnly a year ago, a group of for- 
ward-looking Negro-appeal station 
owners met in Washington and 
formed the national Negro Radio 
Association. Francis M. Fitzgerald 
was elected president and chairman 
of the Board. Egmont Sonderling, 
Robert Rounsaville, Norwood Patter- 
son, Stanley Ray, Harry Novik, and 
Joseph Speidel were elected to the 
board. In Chicago in October, 1960, 
the board elected Rounsaville as vice 
president; John McLendon as secre- 
tary; and Samuel Feldman as treas- 
urer. 

At the Chicago meeting, decisions 
were reached about needs of the asso- 
ciation, and plans were made to take 
action on filling the many voids in 
research and market information. The 
ultimate goal of a New York office 
and a permanent executive represent- 
ative to make representations of 
Negro-appeal radio was adopted. It 
was agreed, however, that fully- 
authenticated research material must 
first be obtained. The S. J. Tesauro 
Data Processing Company was select- 
ed to give the association basic 
market data and in-depth character- 
istics of the Negro Market, both on 
a national and local level. At a Spring 
meeting in New York, D. Parke Gib- 
son, author of Confidential Report of 
the Negro Market was retained to 
get certain phases of public relations, 
membership, and trade news under- 
way. It was again agreed by the board 
that research would be needed before 
any further plans could crystalize. At 



PONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



this meeting other matters such as 
presentation plans and methods were 
discussed. Several names were sub- 
mitted by Board members who could 
be considered as executive represent- 
ative prospects. Now, just what has 
happened to strengthen the position 
of NRA during its first year? 

First, research is definitely under- 
way. It has been slow in coming, but, 
most important of all it is coming. 
The Census Bureau has experienced 
considerable delays due to the stag- 
gering information which the 1960 
Census covered. Tesauro's Data 
Processing machines are laboring day 
and night getting this material to- 
gether. "We have been delayed much 
past what we had originally antici- 
pated," says Fitzgerald, "but the 
wait will be well-worth it. The re- 
search we are getting, when finalized 
and put into our big presentation, 
will really turn some corporate eyes 
toward the use of Negro-appeal radio. 
In fact, I expect some advertisers are 
going to ask their agency people why 
they haven't been using Negro-appeal 
radio already." 

The NRA has been sending out two 
editions of the Bronze Mike, an indus- 
try letter. One edition is for "member 
stations only," and the other is in- 
tended for client and agency con- 
sumption. The Bronze Mike is the 
trade-mark of NRA and will be tied 
in directly with creating an industry 
image. 

A slide-presentation is being readied 
i Plrase turn to page 25) 



15 



Market Basics 



I960 CENSUS ANALYSIS OF THE NEGRO POPULATION 



NEGRO POPULATION 



Standard metropolitan 
statistical area 



Total 
Population 



Both 
Sexes 



Percent 

of Total 

Population 



Male 



Female 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 
New York 
Outside central city 



10.695 633 

7.781.984 
2.912.649 



1.277.625 

1.087.931 

139.694 



11.5 

14.0 

4.8 



560,327 

498.167 

62.070 



667.385 

589,76* 

77,62' 



CHICAGO, ILL. 
Chicago 
Outside central city 



6.220.913 
3.550.404 
2.670.509 



890.154 

812.637 

77,517 



14.3 

22.9 

2.9 



427,106 

387,718 

39,388 



463.04. 

424.91? 

38.12 



LOS ANGELES-LONG BEACH, CAL. 6.742.695 

Los Angeles 2.479.015 

Long Beach 344.168 

Outside central cities 3.919,514 



464.717 

334.916 

9.531 

120.270 



6.9 

13.5 

2.8 

3.1 



224.373 

160,118 

5.039 

59,216 



240.3^. 
174.79J 
4.49: 
61.05- m 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
Philadelphia 
Outside central city 



4.342.897 
2.002.512 
2.340.385 



671.304 
529.240 
142.064 



15.5 

26.4 

6.1 



320.985 

250.256 

70.639 



350.40 

278.98 

71.42 



DETROIT. MICHIGAN 
Detroit 
Outside central city 



3.762.360 
1.670.144 
2.092.216 



558.870 

482 223 

76,647 



14.9 

28.9 

3.7 



270.711 

232.829 

37.882 



288,15 

249.3911 
38.7 



BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 
Baltimore 
Outside central city 



1.727.023 
939.024 
788.099 



378.575 

326.589 

51.986 



21.9 

34.8 

6.6 



184.739 
157,130 

27.609 



193.83 

169,43 

24.3 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 
Houston 
Outside central city 



1.243.158 
938.219 
304.939 



246.351 

215.037 

31.314 



19.8 
22.9 
10.3 



118.797 

103.471 

15.326 



CLEVELAND. OHIO 
Cleveland 
Outside central city 



1.796.595 
876.050 
920.545 



257.273 

250.818 

6.455 



14.3 

28.6 

0.7 



123.994 

120.873 

3.121 



WASHINGTON. D. C. MD.-VA. 
Washington 
Outside central city 



2.001.897 

763.956 

1.237.941 



487.183 

411,737 

75,446 



24.3 

53.9 

6.1 



235.416 

196.257 

39,159 



ST. LOUIS. MO.-ILL. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Outside central city 



2.060.103 


294.873 


14.3 


138.222 


156,6 


750.026 


214.377 


28.6 


100.159 


114,2 


1.310.077 


80.496 


6.1 


38.063 


32/1 



MILWAUKEE. WIS. 
Milwaukee 
Outside central city 


1.194.290 
741.324 
452.966 


63.170 

62.458 

712 


5.3 
8.4 
0.2 


31.013 

30.547 

466 


32.: 

31,9 

2 


SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND, CAL. 
San Francisco 
Oakland 
Outside central cities 


2.783.359 
740.316 
367.548 

1.675.495 


238.754 
74.383 
83.618 
80.753 


8.6 
10.0 
22.8 

4.8 


117,259 

36.209 
40.331 
40,719 


121,4 

38. "J 
43,3 

40.) 


Bamg of Cttmu li*».0 

16 






SPONSOR NEGRO 


ISSUE • 9 


OCTOBER 19(1 



NTRAL AND SUBURBAN DISTRICTS OF 25 METRO AREAS 



Standard metropolitan 
statistical area 



Total 
Population 



NEGRO POPULATION 

Percent 
Both of Total 

Sexes Population 



Male 



Female 



OSTON, MASS. 
Boston 
Outside central city 



2,589,301 

697,197 

1,892,104 



77,781 
63,165 
14,616 



3.0 
9.1 
0.8 



37,188 

30,081 

7,107 



40,593 

33,084 

7,509 



ALLAS, TEXAS 
Dallas 
Outside central city 



1,083,601 
679,684 
403,917 



155,488 

129,242 

26,246 



14.3 

19.0 

6.5 



74,838 
61,911 
12,927 



80,650 
67,331 
13,319 



EW ORLEANS, LA. 
New Orleans 
Outside central city 



868,480 
627,525 
240,955 



267,478 

233,514 

33,964 



30.8 
37.2 
14.1 



126,747 

110,096 

16,651 



140,731 

123,418 

17,313 



1TTSBURGH, PA. 
Pittsburgh 
Outside central city 



2,405,435 

604,332 

1,801,103 



161,499 

100,692 

60,807 



6.7 

16.7 

3.4 



78,611 
48,670 
29,941 



82,888 
52,022 
30,866 



AN ANTONIO, TEXAS 
San Antonio 
Outside central city 



- 



687,151 

587,718 

99,433 



45,314 

41,605 

3,709 



6.6 
7.1 
3.7 



22,190 

19,415 

2,775 



23,124 

22,190 

934 



AN DIEGO, CALIF. 
San Diego 
Outside central city 



1,033,011 
573,224 
459,787 



39,397 

34,435 

4,962 



3.8 
6.0 
1.1 



21,081 

17,904 

3,177 



18,316 

16,531 

1,785 



EATTLE, WASH. 
Seattle 
Outside central city 



1,107,213 
557,087 
550,126 



28,261 

26,901 

1,360 



2.6 
4.8 
0.2 



14,227 

13,464 

763 



14,034 

13,437 

597 



JFFALO, N. Y. 
Buffalo 
Outside central city 



1,306,957 
532,759 
774,198 



82,910 
70,904 
12,006 



6.3 

13.3 

1.6 



40,706 

34,575 

6,131 



42,204 

36,329 

5,875 



NCINNATI, OHIO-KY. 
Cincinnati 
Outside central city 



NNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Minneapolis 
St. Paul 
Outside central cities 



1,071,624 
502.550 
569,074 



128,121 

108,754 

19,367 



12.0 

21.6 

3.4 



1,482.030 
482,872 
313,411 
685,747 



20,702 

11,785 

8,240 

677 



1.4 
2.4 
2.6 

0.1 



60,532 

51,264 

9,268 



10,288 

5,792 

4,070 

426 



67,589 
57,490 
10,099 



1 

EMPHIS, TENN. 

< Memphis 

J Outside central city 


627,019 
497.524 
129,495 


227,445 

184.320 

43,125 


36.3 
37.0 
33.3 


107,426 
86,287 
21,139 


120.019 
98,033 
21,986 


INVER, COLORADO 
Denver 
Outside central city 


929,383 
493,887 
435,495 


31,548 

31,066 

482 


3.4 
6.3 
0.1 


15,399 

15,145 

254 


16,149 

15.921 

226 


LANTA, GEORGIA 
1 Atlanta 
] Outside central city 


1,017,188 
487,455 
529,733 


231,474 

186,464 

45,010 


22.8 

38.3 

8.5 


107,789 
86,248 
21,541 


123,685 

100,216 

23,469 



10,414 

5,993 

4,170 

251 



POIVSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



17 



Market Basics 



!"v" 






i;;:;r:'iiiiiiiiiiii![!iii;;ii!;iiui!ii;;iiiiiiiii!! 

NEGRO POPULATION BY STATES— 1950-1960 

NEGRO POPULATION 



"SEC Tota 



State 


-'.'.- i'. '. " 


UNITED STATES 




ALABAMA 


5 266 1W 


ARIZONA 


i ::: if: 


ARKANSAS 


:.~36.2~: 


CALIFORNIA 


if ■•".■:- 


COLORADO 


: ~ff 7-~ 


CONNECTICUT 


2.535.234 


DELAWARE 


•1-5 Iff 


DIST. OF COLUMBIA 


■£5 =5: 


FLORIDA 


- 551 :ff 


GEORGIA 


3 .-3.115 


IDAHO 


:f" Iff 


ILLINOIS 


10.081.158 


INDIANA 


- f f Z -r5 


IOWA 


:."■ ff 


KANSAS 


: :~; f.: 


KENTUCKY 


f ::-s iff 


LOUISIANA 


3 257.022 


MAINE 


ffffff 


MARYLAND 


f Iff fff 


MASSACHUSETTS 


f 1-5 f"f 


MICHIGAN 


" iff 15- 


MINNESOTA 


5.-13.55- 


MISSISSIPPI 


f 1": 1-1 


MISSOURI 


-.319.S13 


MONTANA 


5"-."57 


NEBRASKA 


1.-111.330 


NEVADA 


fff I": 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


" - --. 


NEW JERSEY 


6.066,782 


NEW MEXICO 


r: ; 


NEW YORK 


:c. 5 — .- 


NORTH CAROLINA 


- ::f 15: 


NORTH DAKOTA 


r;_ --: 


OHIO 


5 "."5 35" 


OKLAHOMA 


_ ;_; _*- 


OREGON 


-. c;.ri 


PENNSYLVANIA 


.- .-.r.^rr 


RHODE ISLAND 


C " - ^ c ^ 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


2.3S2 55- 


SOUTH DAKOTA 




TENNESSEE 


f ff" fff 


TEXAS 


r r r: 


UTAH 


890.627 


VERMONT 


fff ffl 


VIRGINIA 


" C-^ i j. ; 


WASHINGTON 


: 535:1- 


WEST VIRGINIA 


1 55f -11 


WISCONSIN 


3.951.777 


WYOMING 


fff :ff 



Bmi :■', Obm M i 



: - e;;e 



m 



1960 


1950 


or Decrease 


15.5~1.S31 


5,044.937 


-25.-1 | 


... — . 


c* « ^ * " 


- 5.1 I 


4.3,40.3 


5: 5~- 


- 5".: 


f:f "5" 


-_r.r;r 


; : I 


:ff ffl 


-r_ . . 


- 51.2 I 


f : f ff 


20,177 


- 55.2 


If" 1-5 


55.-i"2 


1-f 5 I 


60.688 


-5 355 


-t- 39L2 | 


•ill. 737 


:s: 5f3 


— -5.5 | 


55f 15: 


535 1:1 


— -5.9 § 


1 Iff fff 


1.jc2. r2 


- 5.5 


1.502 


1 151 


— --.. = 


1 i3".-r: 


:-: ri. 


- il.z 1 


355 2"5 


-1 ~ * 


- 5-1.5 | 


35. 35- 


i5.r-_ 


- 2S.5 | 


51 --: 


- N, 


- 25.3 | 


515 7-7 


_. . r_. 




1 ff.-:. - 


555. ~:5 


- 1"5 I 


3.31S 







31: -If 


553 5": 




111 5-2 


"3.1"! 


- 52.9 | 


" 1 " ffl 


-■13 255 


— c_ _ | 


22,263 




fff ■ 


915,743 


7Si.-7~ 


- "-2 I 


555.555 


^r ..:: 


— 31.5 I 


1.-15" 


.._;_ 


- 15.1 | 


55:55 


19.23- 


- 52.1 | 


If 3-5 


•1.555 




1.555 


"fl 


-1515 | 


51-.S"5 


:.: rrr 


— 51.5 


1 7 n^^ 


5.-135 


-1C2.9 I 


;.-. .:.. 


515 151 




- ■ z - - 


1.5-1". 553 




— . 


55" 




"35.55" 


:._- . _ 


- 55.2 | 


" * x _ 


--r.:>.3 


+ 52 I 


13 133 


:i.r:5 


— 57.3 i 


555. "5f 


- - v ^S -* 


— 33.5 1 


» . , 


15.55.3 


- 31.9 1 


K w , w 


55: . 


- :.9 1 


1.11- 


727 


— r5._ 


-^ * - 


- ; " c.3 


— 13.5 


1 1 ft7 1 0^\ 


- -i"*.^ 


— 21.5 


-1 — *• 


: ~29 


- 52.2 I 


519 


t t "> 


- 3.2 i 


515 555 


- _, __ 


— r 


— v * *• 


35 551 


- 55.5 1 


V w ^ *. 


11- ff " 


- „._ J 


"- :--i 


» 


-If--. 5 1 


2.183 


: 55" 


- 1- f | 


i 


;;iiiii iiii 




;;!.iii!iniii- 



18 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



Market Basics 

EARNING POWER OF NEGRO FAMILIES AND INDIVIDUALS 

Negro annual income over 10 years 



Year 



. of Census, 1960. 



Families 



White 



Nonwhite 



Unrelated individuals 
White Nonwhite 



1960 


$5,835 


$3,233 


$1,860 


$1,064 




1959 


5,643 


2,917 


1,663 


1,075 




1958 


5,300 


2,711 


1,592 


1,080 




1957 


5,166 


2,764 


1,592 


1,013 




1956 


4,993 


2,628 


1,466 


1,087 




1955 


4,605 


2,549 


1,402 


935 




1954 


4,339 


2,410 


1,317 


875 




1953 


4,392 


2,461 


1,473 


1,161 




1952 


4,114 


2,338 


1,519 


1,051 




J1951 


3,859 


2,032 


1,258 


929 




11950 


3,445 


1,869 


1,115 


817 





legion 



Average annual income of Negro men 

Male 



White 



Nonwhite 



Nonwhite as 

per cent of 

white 



Jortheast 



$4,466 



$3,199 



71.6 



^orth Central 



4,327 



3,385 



78.2 



>outh 



3,406 



1,133 



33.3 



/est 



- 



4,693 



3,244 



69.1 



Source: Current Population Reports, Consumer Income, Series P-60, No. 35. Jan. 1961. Bureau of the Census. 0. S. Department of Commerce, table 31. (1959 figures.) 



1 














1 
1 
















Marital status of Neg 


ro 


workers 












Malt 


1 




Female 






White 




Nonwhite 


White 




Nonwhite 


j'otal 


78.5% 




74.3% 


34.1% 




41.2% 


tingle 


55.6 




55.0 


45.5 




33.6 


larried 


89.0 




87.9 


29.6 




40.8 


Vidowed, divorced, separated 


57.5 




67.7 


38.6 




47.2 



Hirce: "Marital and Family Characteristics of Workers, March I960," Monthly Labor Review, April 1961, United Stat*§ Department of Labor, table C. 
PONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



19 



Market Basics 



NEGRO STATIONS' SHARE OF NEGRO AUDIENCE 



Market 



Average weekday share 
Negro radio 



of Negro audience 

General radio 



New Orleans 


60.9% 


[2 stations) 


40.1% 


8 stations) 


San Francisco/Oakland 


45.0% 


2 stations) 


46.0% 


[9 stations) 


Dallas 


36.0% 


2 stations) 


41.5% 


4 stations) 


Columbus, Ga. 


51.0% 


!1 station) 


47.5% 


A stations) 


Baltimore 


57.0% 


2 stations) 


36.0% 


7 stations) 


Miami 


53.0% 


[1 station) 


42.0% 


[9 stations) 


Baton Rouge 


56.0% 


1 station) 


44.0% 


(6 stations) 


Chattanooga 


49.0% 


[1 station) 


49.0% 


[5 stations) 


Mobile 


64.7% 


(2 stations) 


35.1% 


5 stations) 


Memphis 


61.7% 1 


2 stations) 


33.3% 1 


5 stations) 


Houston 


64.1% ( 


2 stations) 


34.7% ( 


6 stations) 


Washington, D. C. 


56.3% 


2 stations) 


40.9% 


[7 stations) 


Philadelphia 


55.0% 


2 stations) 


38.0% 


[6 stations) 


Cleveland 


57.0% 


2 stations) 


41.0% 


[6 stations) 


Los Angeles 


36.7% 


1 station) 


52.5% 


10 stations) 


Detroit 


47.3% 


[2 stations) 


48.6% 


(7 stations) 


Birmingham 


53.0% 


3 stations) 


39.0% 


r 6 stations) 


St. Louis 


60.0% 


2 stations) 


41.0% 


3 stations) 


Beaumont-Port Arthur 


46.0% 


1 station) 


53.0% 


7 stations) 


Bernard Howard, from most recently available Pulse and Hooper metro area reports. 



Listening and viewing habits of Negro women 

Did you listen to radio yesterday? Did you watch tv yesterday? 



Yes 



63.8% 



No 



36.2% 



Yes 



62.4% 



No 



35.8% 



When did you listen to the radio yesterday? 

Times 



Number 



Per Cent 



Morning 



38 



38.0 



Afternoon 



19 



19.0 



Evening 7 


















7.0 


Morning & afternoon 14 


















14.0 


Morning & evening 3 


















3.0 


Morning, afternoon, evening 18 


















18.0 


Afternoon, evening 1 


















1.0 


100 


















100.0 


Source: "Pilot surrey of the Xegro market," Brick Muller Associates, Memphis, 1961. Sample used 
contain about 50 percent of the Xegro women 21 years and over. Method was personal Interview. 

20 


was 


a random cluster of the 
SPONSOR NEGRO 


14 census tract areas of Memphis whl 
ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 196 



Market Basics 



KEYSTONE'S STATIONS COVER 53% OF NEGROES 



The Keystone Broadcasting System's Negro net- 
work — the largest such group in the country — in- 
cludes 360 affiliated radio stations programing 
directly to the Negroes in their community. Their 
signals cover 53 ( \ of the total U. S. Negro popu- 

Coverage areas with more than 50 

ALABAMA 

Call Letters City Percent 



0. 



lation — mainly concentrated in rural areas — and 
they average 42 quarter-hours of Negro-appeal pro- 
graming weekly. Stations comprising the Negro 
network are located in 23 States; the concentration 
of Negroes is illustrated by this table. 

Negro population 



WXAL 


Demopolis 


68.2% 


WULA 


Eufala 


56.4 


WJAM 


Marion 


68.3 


WHBB 


Selma 


54.9 


WJDB 


Thomasville 


54.2 


ARKANSAS 


KFFA 


Helena 


60.2 


GEORGIA 


WDEC 


Americus 


52.4 


WBBK 


Blakely 


51.2 


WFDR 


Manchester 


54.9 


WSYL 


Sylvania 


58.3 


WKLE 


Washington 


52.4 


WBRO 


Waynesboro 


57.2 


WBMK 


West Point 


55.6 


LOUISIANA 


KLPL 


Lake Providence 


50.9 


KDBC 


Mansfield 


54.6 


KTLD 


Tallulah 


64.8 


MISSISSIPPI 


WGLC 


Centreville 


62.0 



Keystone Broadcasting System, 1961 from most recent Nielsen coverage data. 



Call Letters 


City 


Percent 


WROX 


Clarksdale 


67.0 


WCLD 


Cleveland 


62.5 


WMDC 


Hazlehurst 


52.0 


WDLT 


Indianola 


60.8 


WXTN 


Lexington 


71.9 


WMBC 


Macon 


56.4 


WMIS 


Natchez 


54.2 


WQBC 


Vicksburg 


60.4 


WAZF 


Yazoo City 


66.9 


NORTH CAROLINA 


WCNF 


Weldon 


57.2 




SOUTH CAROLINA 




WBAW 


Barnwell 


50.3 


WACA 


Camden 


52.6 


WBHC 


Hampton 


57.5 


WDKD 


Kingstree 


66.4 


WYMB 


Manning 


51.8 


WALD 


Walterboro 


51.1 


VIRGINIA 


WEVA 


Emporia 


55.1 


WYSR 


Franklin 


57.6 


WLES 


Lawrenceville 


52.9 



Negro population of U. S. by regions— ten-year comparison 



I 



Number 



April I960 

Percent 
distribution 



Number 



April 1950 

Percent 
distribution 



Increase from 
1950-1960 

Number Percent 



Total 

New England 

Mideast 

\ Great Lakes 

Plains 

Southeast 2 

Southwest 

Rocky Mountain ... 
Far West 1 



United States 1 



18,860 

243 
3,776 
2,885 

561 

8,981 

1,401 

49 

964 



100.0 
1.3 

20.0 
15.3 

3.0 
47.6 

7.4 
.3 

5.1 



15,042 

143 
2,586 
1,804 

424 

8,392 

1,157 

28 

509 



100.0 

1.0 
17.2 
12.0 

2.8 
55.8 

7.7 
.2 

3.4 



3,818 

100 

1,190 

1,081 

137 

588 

243 

22 

456 



excluding Alaska and Hawaii. The 1960 Negro population for these two States was 12.000. 

'irginia. West Virginia, Kentucky. Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina. Georgia, Florida, Alabama. Mississippi. Louisiana, and Arkansas. 

•urce: Xegro population of the United States nears 19 million, CB 61-11, Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of Commerce, March 1961. 



25.4 

70.3 
46.0 
59.9 
32.3 
7.0 
21.0 
77.7 
89.5 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



21 



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SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 






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'SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



23 



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24 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



NRA 

(Continued from page 15) 

for showings to advertisers and agen- 
cies. The basic presentation plan has 
been formulated. Its completion 
awaits the research being done. This 
project will not be delayed much past 
the research deadline in that market 
and other material can easily and 
quickly be dropped into the format. 

Special studies have been completed 
and are readv as guideposts to ulti- 
mate goals. They will be held back 
until the overall presentation can be 
made. "These studies have given 
NRA a new and keener insight into 
what agencies and advertisers need 
in evaluating and using more Negro- 
appeal radio." Fitzgerald stated. 
"It is amazing how much correspon- 
dence has been received from the top 
advertisers and agencies who want 
to know more about Negro-appeal 
radio. We have not let one inquiry 
go unanswered and we pledged them 
the ultimate in information that can 
guide them in the use of Negro-appeal 
radio," Fitzgerald continued. 

"Looking back over the past year," 
Fitzgerald said, "I guess I would 
at first agree with those who say 'you 
haven't done anything;' but then, 
after a little closer look, I would have 
to disagree completely." "I would 
examine,"' Fitzgerald continued, 
"mv thirty years in Broadcasting, 
and agree that to even get a compara- 
tive hand-full of radio people together 
on a project of this kind would seem 
impossible. To gain a few and lose 
a few and still have an active associa- 
tion of members at the end of the 
hardest year, the first, is a tribute to 
the station owners who belong to 
NRA." "It shows that they are good 
operators who concern themselves 
with contributing something big and 
successful to the industry." 

NRA still needs members to reach 
all of its new objectives. "I am 
certain," said Fitzgerald, "if Negro- 
appeal station owners would but ex- 
amine their conscience a very little 
bit, they would join up with NRA. 
After all, what is good for Negro- 
appeal radio is good for them, and 
creating new and better national 
business is one of the prime objectives 
of NRA." ^ 




'loM-'N' 

Joe Howard 



SENATOR' 'FRaNT'C 

Bristoe Bryant Ernie Durham 



These 3 Dee Jays contribute mightily to make 
the number one Negro station in the 
Detroit area. 



WJLB 



WJLB 



LEADS IN NEGRO 
APPEAL PROGRAMMING 



• 88-1/2 weekly broadcast hours beamed at 
an approximate 600,000 audience with an an- 
nual aggregate income of $700,000,000 makes 
a "must buy" for Negro directed 
advertising. 



FOR 21 YEARS 



and particularly in the last 
decade, has 

racked up sales for the knowing advertiser who 
wants to capitalize on the rich potential Negro 
market. 

Let the 3 Disc-A-Teers — 'Senator' Bryant, 'Joltin' Joe 
and 'Frantic' Ernie plus WJLB's other superb talent do 
the telling and the selling to a huge audience that 

because they LOOK UP 




SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



25 



NOW! 
WWRL 



(1600 ON THE DIAL) 



GOES 
NEGRO 







HOURS 
PER 

DAY 



*The only New York Station reaching 
the huge Negro Audience around the 
clock — 24 hours a day. 

WWRL • N.Y. 77 • DE 5-1600 

26 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 

(Continued from page 10) 

Help is needed for the retailers in 
expanding \egr<> neighborhoods. As 
Negroes extend their residential 
boundaries, quite often other resi- 
dents begin moving out. 

Neither the small retailer, who has 
invested hundreds of dollars, nor the 
chain store, which bas invested thou- 
sands, can always afford to move. 
Rather, they must stay and "sell" the 
new customers. Most retailers are 
grateful for any preselling assistance 
they can get. This help, which can 
take many forms, should include ad- 
vertising in Negro media, p-o-p ma- 
terial, and the personal contact of- 
fered by Negro sales and good will 
representative*. 

If you want a share of this market, 
you can probably get it. Sam Vitt's 
recommendations : 

"Design your marketing strategy 
to include the Negro market as a 
separate marketing plan. Here's 
where "separate but equal" is Con- 
stitutionally right and to your ad- 
vantage. 

"Determine that special consider- 
ations will be employed in executing 
your Negro marketing strategy. In 
your advertising, use Negro media, 
use Negro models, etc. 

"Decide that your advertising 
budget for the Negro market will be 
sufficient for coverage, continuity, 
and frequency. And stick with it." 

The very size of the Negro market 
alone makes it one which most man- 
agements will not choose to ignore. 
But beyond that, so many facts have 
been uncovered during recent years 
highlighting the enormous potential 
value of the Negro market that, if 
they are properly marshalled and 
presented, it is almost inconceivable 
managements would not welcome a 
marketing strategy design which in- 
cluded cultivation of the Negro mar- 
ket. Here are a few of the important 
facts : 

1. It is not very widely known 
that the annual purchasing power of 
the Negro Market was greater than 
that of all Canada. 

2. The Negro is a "younger" pop- 
ulation. Their median age is around 
twenty-four years as against thirty- 
one years for white. Thus, they tend 
to be among that group of heavy 
consumers which for most products 
make the best potential customers in 



the view of marketers. 

3. Negroes devote a higher pro- 
portion of their budget to personal 
care than do white people. Addition- 
ally their purchasing power is ex- 
pended at a faster rate than is that 
of the whites during a comparable 
period of time. 

For example, using again the per- 
sonal care area, the average annual 
expenditure per Negro household far 
exceeds that of the white household 
in every income category except the 
very highest and the very lowest. 
Interestingly, the average Negro fam- 
ily with a $5,000 income maintains 
a standard of living comparable to 
that of a white family with an annual 
income of $8,000. 

There are many, many more of 
these facts easily available. One 
other, though, would seem to merit 
particular attention, in the opinion 
of DCS&S's Vitt. 

The percentage of Negroes to the 
total U.S. population has been, and 
is, expanding. In 1940, Negroes ac- 
counted for an estimated 9% of the 
U. S. population. Today, that per- 
centage has increased to an estimated 
12%. Additionally, as more and 
more Negroes move into urban areas 
— and it is estimated that 40% -45% 
of all Negroes are now living in the 
top 35-40 U.S. markets — opportunity 
for more efficient utilization of Negro 
labor increases with a resultant high- 
er wage earnings for that group. 
What this means, of course, is that 
the advertiser who cultivates the 
Negro market can establish a fran- 
chise in an expanding market, which 
traditionally spends at a faster rate 
than the white market, and one 
which is now increasingly in a better 
position to spend even more. 

An important step in how to win 
Negroes and influence sales is criti- 
cally important. Almost every socio- 
logical, psychological, and marketing 
study undertaken on the market has 
uncovered what now seems to be a 
formula of the needs of the Negro 
population. 

This can be summed up in these 
words: Recognition. Identification. 
Invitation. 

The Negro needs to have recogni- 
tion as a person. The very fact that 
an advertiser will undertake a spe- 
cial campaign against the Negro 
market is interpreted as a form of 
recognition to the Negro. And that 
advertiser immediately stands to gain 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



an important competitive edge over 
the advertiser who has not taken this 
step. 

Identification is equally important. 
Can the Negro identify with your 
product? Can the Negro identify 
with the ad that promises "lovelier, 
whiter hands with ABC soap?" Be- 
cause of the Negro's history of sup- 
pression his need to be "invited" to 
try the product appears to be a 
strong one indeed. True, he may 
use it without invitation, but this 
power of a special invitation to him, 
alone, can be considerable, and for 
many advertisers has clearly been 
demonstrated in sales increases worth 



crowing about. 



For these reasons, determining that 
special considerations will be em- 
ployed in executing your Negro mar- 
ket strategy can be extremely valu- 
able. The degree to which special 
consideration is given will not infre- 
quently have a direct corollary effect 
upon sales. There are many, many 
ways in which these special consid- 
erations may be implemented. Here 
are a few of Vitt's pointers: 

1. Use the same copy and the 
same layout if you like, but when- 
ever possible, use Negro models for 
those ads appearing in Negro media. 

2. When using Negro broadcast 
media, use the station Negro person- 
alis. Usually he has established him- 
self in the market and can lend you 

(the values of his own believability 
I and acceptance as well as lending 
I you many valuable merchandising 
.attributes through appearance with 
the trade and as a public personality 
within the market. Companies rim- 
ming the range from Hamilton Watch 
■ and Pepsi-Cola to American Tobacco 
| Company and Helene Curtis have 
found these areas significant enough 
to receive their continuing attention. 
But whatever the special consid- 
eration, "Identification" should be 
the key word, according to Vitt. 

Now for the next point. The third 
step may be at one and the same 
time the easiest and most difficult of 
the methods used in winning Ne- 
groes and influencing sales. 

It may be the easiest because the 
concepts of coverage, continuity, and 
frequency are basic concepts which 
very few advertising and marketing 
men would have difficulty with in 
terms of acceptance from their man- 
agements. The difficulty may per- 
s stem from the fact that since 



the effort involves a budget consid- 
eration it can be considered to take 
away from the advertiser's general 
media efforts. "And don't we reach 
them with our general media, any- 
way i 

Vitt replies: 

"Well, the answer, as he is prob- 
ably well aware, is, yes, you do 
reach them with the general media. 
But you reach them with that all- 
important nuance missing. You aren't 
giving them a special invitation. And 
you aren't giving yourself that added 
effectiveness you get from special 



Negro direct media. Thus, logical as 
the question may be, careful evalua- 
tion shows it to have some of the 
logic of that other man's question 
who asked of Edison, "But can't we 
already see by candlelight, anyway, 
Tom?" 

"The essence, of course, is that if 
the decision is made to seek the Ne- 
gro market — then seek it whole- 
heartedly, and seek it with adequate 
funds. No question about it. You'll 
get your money back." 

The budget designated for the mar- 
ket will play a significantly larger 



WGES 



Established in 1924 

There are only 10 cities in the United States with a total population greater 
than the Negro population of Chicagoland. 

This is a big market with big buying power in a concentrated area. 

The Negro population of Chicagoland area is now more than 1,000,000. 

The buying power of this responsive segment is more than 3 a billion dollars. 

WCES is the only full time 5000-watt Chicago station devoting a major 
portion of its time to broadcasts directed to the Negro Market. 

WCES broadcasts more programs to the Negro Chicagoland area than 
any other Chicago station. 

It takes WCES to reach the Chicagoland Negro Market! 

You can reach the Negro audience without WCES but don't make the 
mistake of trying if economy and resulting sales are important. 

The Seven Negro personalities who broadcast your advertising message 
are experienced air salesmen. 

Each personality has his distinct method of showmanship in pro- 
gramming and a salesman's presentation of advertising copy. 

There is no question that the best way to reach the Chicagoland Negro 
Market is WCES. 

WGES COVERS ALL OF CHICAGOLAND 
SOUTH— WEST AND NORTH! 



WGES 



First choice to sell the Chicagoland Negro Market! 

5000 Watts 

Chicago 12, Illinois 



2708 W. Washington Blvd. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



27 




SIGNPOST OF A 

$20 BILLION 

MARKET 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



The national Negro Radio 
Association has fast become 
the fountainhead of infor- 
mation on the twenty-bil- 
lion dollar Negro Market. In 
years to come, NRA will 
give the advertising industry 
even better tools with which 
to mine this ever-increasing 
multi-billion dollar market. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



By the end of this year, 
NRA plans to release its 
first study of the Negro 
Market. It will be the most 
comprehensive fact book 
ever assembled on a special 
market. It will be the re- 
sult of exhaustive research 
and thorough examination 
based on unimpeachable 
sources of material. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



No advertiser or agency can 
be without the facts on the 
Negro Market and how it 
can be best and most effi- 
ciently influenced on a daily 
basis by Negro-Appeal Ra- 
dio. Cet a request in early 
for your copy. The address 
is P. O. Box 10063 Char- 
lotte 1, N. C. 



role in influencing the choice of me- 
dia for the campaign. With the ex- 
panding market there has been a cor- 
responding expansion of Negro me- 
dia. Generally, white media will have 
counterparts in Negro media. The 
exception to this has been in the area 
of television though there are now 
some indications that even here a Ne- 
gro counterpart medium mav be de- 
veloping. 

Primarily, however, national adver- 
tisers appear to seek the Negro mar- 
ket through radio. The frequency 
and efficiency are important benefits 
permitted by radio but often the 
stimuli comes from two other con- 
siderations: 

1. The educational level of the 
Negro population is at an appreciablv 
lower level than is that of the white 
population. Thus the potential of the 
printed media is relatively at a some- 
what more restricted level. 

2. Data to date on Negro tele- 
vision ownership and viewing pat- 
terns tends to indicate that here. too, 
the potential is not as broad as it is 
via radio. 

The conclusions drawn from these 
facts indicate that in general radio 
offers a greater potential for reach- 
ing the Negro market effectively. 

"Someone in the broadcast repre- 
sentative business said, "When com- 
plete integration becomes a realitv in 
this country there'll be no need for 
Negro radio stations." Someone else 
has said (in the Harvard Business 
Review) concerning a consumer mar- 
ket study that "This material sug- 
gests that the differences in consump- 
tion patterns will diminish as social 
and economic discrimination is alle- 
viated.'' Vitt observes: — 

"If these men are oracles then in 
future generations advertising and 
marketing men will no longer find 
themselves so concerned with a Ne- 
gro market. It is probably realistic 
to anticipate, however, that those 
advertisers who develop this market 
today will find that tomorrow' (when 
this market no longer exists in its 
present form) their advertising dol- 
lars will be that much more valuable 
against the total general market. 
And very often it is the slight plus 
that makes all the difference. . . ." 

Vitt's thinking is typical of the ap- 
proach which more and more is guid- 
ing major advertisers toward the Ne- 
gro market. Another expert in this 
field is D. Parke Gibson, a Negro 



who heads a market consultancy serv- 
ice in New York. Here's his advice 
to agencies: 

"We would recommend that the ad- 
vertising agency be called in and 
briefed on management's thinking as 
relates to the Negro market. The 
company should explain what it 
would like to do and ask the agency's 
recommendation. 

"Rarely does an advertising agency 
volunteer information on the Negro 
market, since some believe to do so 
would be misinterpreted bv the cli- 
ent. It must be said, however, that 
some agencies are alert to the poten- 
tial and trends of the market and 
constantly recommend its develop- 
ment. 

"A Negro market presentation bv 
one of the large advertising agencies, 
as part of a general presentation, has 
contributed to an agency's acquisi- 
tion of several major advertisers. 

"A coordinated sales program from 
the field sales director to division 
managers should be included in sales 
materials for key markets. It is also 
recommended that the Negro mar- 
ket be included as part of sales train- 
ing meetings, as also the growing 
Puerto Rican market, and possibly 
other ethnic groups. 

"A pilot project might include sev- 
eral Southern, Northern, and West- 
ern cities, to determine the soundest 
strategy, before launching a nation- 
al campaign. Where dual cities are 
used in each region, one campaign 
could be part of the general pro- 
gram, and the other could be a spe- 
cially-tailored program so that the 
results of both could be determined 
and compared." 

Parke Gibson's analysis gains even 
more point when the role of the Ne- 
gro homemaker is considered. 

The American Negro woman is 
doing two things in the Negro mar- 
ket; she is rocking the cradle of its 
booming population (the Negro pop- 
ulation is growing at a 50^ faster 
rate than the rest of the population) : 
and. she is having a lot to say about 
how the dollar is to be spent. In 
Americas Negro community. 17% 
of all the households are headed by 
women, as compared to the 8% for 
whites. 

Unfortunately, in plotting the ap- 
proach to the Negro market, the 
advertiser has in the past been ham- 
pered by lack of reliable and detailed 
information. Benton & Bowles media 



28 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



analysis division reports '"the great 
majority of privately undertaken re- 
search is not national in scope . . . 
the reasonableness and utility of 
some of these data is open to ques- 
tion.'' 

The question of survey methods is 
considered bv Frank Dusenbury. of 
KJET. Beaumont. Tex. Says Dusen- 
bury : — 

"A major problem . . . and one 
which has greatly affected the amount 
of national business placed on Ne- 
gro programing stations ... is that 
"general " audience surveys do not 
give a true picture of the Xegro sta- 
tions' share of audience. There are 
several reasons why this is true. 

"1) Survey agencies do not. to m\ 
knowledge, hire Negro interviewers 
when conducting surveys. At least, 
thev don't in this area. It is my con- 
tention that Negro interviewers 
should be used in direct proportion 
to the Negro percentage of popula- 
tion in the area surveyed. Natural 
prejudice, particularly in the South, 
could very possibly influence the con- 
tent of a survey conducted strictly by 
white interviewers. There is also 
reason to believe that, in many cases, 



KGFJ 

LOS ANGELES 

IS 

SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA'S 

ONLY ALL-NEGRO 

APPEAL STATION 

IN 

THE NATION'S 

THIRD LARGEST 
NEGRO MARKET 

WITH 

FROM 31 TO 52% 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

(LA. Negro Market Pulse 
March-April 1961) 

Represented by 

BERNARD HOWARD & CO. 



a Negro being interviewed b\ a white 
person will tend to the answers that 
he or she believes the white person 
wants to hear . . . and these may not 
necessarily be true answers. 

"2 1 White persons interviewed 
I again particularlv in the South I 
have a normal antipathy toward re- 
vealing that they have been listening 
to a Negro station. This would be 
particularly true in a personal inter- 
view type of survey and would have 
an adverse effect on the stations" 
share of audience reported in the 
survey. 

"3) The Negro community does 
not have the proportionate share of 
telephones enjoyed by the white com- 
munity. This factor is greatly dis- 
advantageous to Negro stations since 
the percentage of Negro homes called 
will not be in direct proportion to the 
Negro share of total population. 

"4) There is good reason to believe 
that white female interviewers em- 
ployed in making a "'personal call' 
type of survey do not go into Negro 
neighborhoods and query Negro fam- 
ilies regarding their radio listening 
habits. Most such calls are made af- 
ter working hours and. understand- 
ably, white women interviewers could 
not be expected to venture into Ne- 
gro neighborhoods after dark. This 
again results in a "less than actual ' 
number of listeners being reported 
for the Negro station. 

"Of course, special surveys are con- 
ducted strictly within the Negro com- 
munity and probably give a fairly 
accurate report of the share of Negro 
listeners a station has. However, 
this type of special survey does not 
accurately report the share of "white 
or "total"' audience a Negro station 
may have . . . and the station there- 
fore suffers from a national business 
standpoint when the agency time- 
buver gets down to his slide rule 
calculations based on cost-per-1.000 
and ratings. 

"I believe that most Negro pro- 
gramed stations would show up far 
better in general audience surveys if 
corrections were made in survey tak- 
ing methods that would result in a 
true reporting of actual listenership 
to Negro stations. 

"Certainly, purchases by agency 
timebuyers based on strictly "share 
of audience" figures generally result 
in the omission of Negro programed 
stations. I realize, of course, that 



WOOK 



is more than 
radio! It is the 
most effective 
medium for 
selling one of 
America's larg- 
est and richest 

NEGRO 
MARKETS: 

The 600,000 high-income 
consumers in 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



The proof? In an 18-station market, 
WOOK Radio rates among the top 
two stations in total audience in 36 
time segments . . . according to 
Pulse Jan. -Feb. 1961. 



WOOK 

RADIO 

5321 FIRST PLACE N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 
TUckerman 2-2500 

A Division of United Broadcasting Co. 

Represented nationally by: 

NEW YORK: UBC Sales, 420 Madison Ave. 

Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 

ATLANTA: Dora-Clayton Agency, Inc. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



29 



share of audience is but one of the 
bases of a timebuyer's decision. On 
the other hand, it's been my experi- 
ence that the bulk of a national busi- 
ness placed in a market will go to the 
high rated stations in that area. 

"L nfortunately . . . the most lis- 
tened to stations in a good many 
markets may very well be the Negro 
programed stations that show up 
poorly on the survey charts due to 
the basically incorrect statistics com- 
piled by rating firms using an over- 
simplified approach to a most com- 
plex situation. If this is the case . . . 
and I believe it is . . . then it's cost- 
ing the operators of Negro pro- 
gramed radio stations a lot of mon- 
ey," concludes Frank Dusenbury. 

Advertisers and agencies have also 
to consider the "masking" effect of 
some audience -measurement tech- 
niques. According to Leonard Walk, 
general manager of WAMO, Pitts- 
burgh, the true dimensions of the 
market are often obscured. His 
thinking: — 

"Negro market radio stations are 
being "short-changed" by 1960 Ne- 
gro census statistics. This is due to 



the arbitrary grouping of only cer- 
tain "home counties" into the "metro 
area" and not including other near- 
by counties which have sizeable Ne- 
gro populations. These nearby coun- 
ties may not provide many listeners 
for the general market radio stations 
in the home city, but contain very 
loyal listeners for the Negro station." 

Since most timebuys are based on 
"metro area" statistics for each given 
market, the Negro station does not 
receive credit for its listeners in 
nearby counties outside the definition 
of the "metro area." 

Why do the Negro stations attract 
listeners outside the metro area when 
the general market stations do not? 
Because the outside towns and cities 
have "home" stations of their own 
which provide programing similar to 
the big city stations but with strong- 
er signals. However, the "outside" 
towns and cities seldom have Negro 
stations. Therefore, Negro listeners 
in these areas tolerate the poorer re- 
ception of the distant Negro station 
in order to receive the programing 
which is not available locally. Few 
general programing listeners will 



Capital Buys in 


the Capital Cities 


WADK 


WRMA 


Atlanta, Ga. 
America's 
Most Powerful 
24 Hour Full Time 
Negro Station 

You're really selling 
your product in Atlanta 
when you tap WAOK's 
vast Negro audience. 
Check Pulse or Hooper. 
WAOK is Atlanta's 
greatest salesman to the 
Negro buyer. 


Montgomery, Ala. 
Survey After Survev 
Proves WRMA 
To Be Montgomery's 
No. 1 Radio Buy!! 

Sales rocket in Central 
Alabama when WRMA 
promotes the product. 
Montgomery's must buy, 
WRMA is no. 1 in rat- 
ings. In Montgomery 
WRMA is the station 
that sends your message 
Home! 


WAOK 


WRMA 


Atlanta, Ga. 

Represented by 
Daren F. McGavren Co., Inc. 


Montgomery, Ala. 

Represented by 
Everett-McKinney, Inc. 


5% Discount C 


)n Combination 


Now Under WA( 


)K Management: 


WTHB ££ 

AUGUSTA, GA. Repres< 


a's only full 

►rogrammed station 

jnted by John E. Pearson Co. 



carefully "fine tune" their radio to 
bring in a distant station. However, 
Negro listeners in "outside" areas 
will go to great lengths to be able to 
hear Negro programed stations 50 
or 60 miles away, including installa- 
tion of antennas and the purchase of 
more powerful radios. 

This fact has been demonstrated 
very often in Dusenbury's experience 
with WAMO in Pittsburgh and has 
also been pointed out by Negro sta- 
tion operators in other cities. The 
Pittsburgh standard metropolitan 
area includes four counties (Alle- 
gheny, Butler, Washington, West- 
moreland). However, there are a 
number of heavily industrialized 
cities and towns outside this area 
that have very heavy Negro popula- 
tions but no Negro station. Cities 
such as Wheeling and Weirton, W. 
Va., Steubenville, 0. and Uniontown, 
BroAvnsville. Indiana and Johnstown, 
all in Pennsylvania all outside the 
Pittsburgh metro area definition but 
inside the WAMO signal area and 
all have sizeable Negro populations, 
said Dusenburv. 

An analysis of the effective cover- 
age area of WAMO based on regular 
mail response, showed that the Ne- 
gro population outside the metro 
area totaled fully 50% of the Negro 
population inside the area. Studies 
of other markets indicate a similar 
situation. The Cleveland standard 
metro area includes only Cuyahoga 
and Lake Counties, yet Pat Tusch- 
man. president of Negro programed 
WABQ reports that the station has a 
regular listening audience in Lorain, 
Summitt and Stark Counties which 
add some 75,000 Negroes to the 
Cleveland station's ECA. Buffalo, 
New York's standard metro area 
does not include the sizeable Negro 
population in Rochester and Erie 
which are covered by Buffalo's Negro 
station. These situations in northern 
cities are duplicated in the south 
where large Negro farm populations 
outside the metro area add greatly to 
the ECA (effective coverage area) of 
the Negro station. Examples are 
Baton Rouge with a metro Negro 
population of 73,158 and an ECA of 
over 430,000. Meridian, Miss., with 
a metro Negro population of 23,492 
and an ECA population of over 
320,000 and Houston, Tex., with a 
metro Negro population of 249,875; 
ECA over 540,000 ^ 



30 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



NEGRO RADIO'S CLIENTS 

This list of national and regional advertisers who used Negro-appeal radio dur- 
ing this past year is a partial roster of names taken from station questionnaires 



Admiration Coffee 

Alka Seltzer 

American Bakeries 

American Finance Corp. 

American Oil Co. 

American Tobacco Co. 

American Wine 

Anheuser 

Arrid 

Armour 

Artra Skin Cream 

Atlas Sewing Machine 

Aunt Jemima 



Ballantine Beer 
Bayer 

B. P. Goodrich 
Beauty Glow 
Birdseye Foods 
Borden's Dairy Products 
Breast-O-Chicken Tuna 
Bristol-Myers 



WANT RADIO 

is a solid 

FIRST IN 

NEGRO 

AUDIENCE 

in the important 
Negro market of 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Use WANT leadership if you want 
results from the 38% of the 
Richmond population which is non- 
white. 

WANT 

513 E. Main Street, Richmond, Va. 
Milton 3-8368 

A Division of United Broadcasting Co. 

Represented nationally by: 

NEW YORK: Bob Wittig, 420 Madison Ave. 

ATLANTA: Dora-Clayton Agency, Inc. 



Budweiser 
Buhler Mills 
Buick 



Cadillac 

Camel Cigarettes 

Canada Dry Beverages 

Carling's Beer 

Carnation 

Carolina Rice 

Chesebrough-Ponds 

Chevrolet 

Clabber Girl Baking Powder 

Coca-Cola 

Comet Cleanser 

Continental Baking 

Creomulsion 



D 

D-Con 

Denman Tires 
Domino Sugar 



Easy Monday Starch 

Eno 

Esso 

Ex-Lax 

F 

Falstaff Beer 
Feen-A-Mint 
Ford 

G 

Gallo Wine 
General Foods 
Gillette Razor Co. 
Gloss 8 

Goodyear Tires 
Guinness Stout 

H 

Haas-Davis 
Hadacol 
Hamm's Beer 
Hill Bros. Coffee 
Holsum Bread 
Hormel Meats 



now... 




TIMES 

MORE 

POWERFUL 

■ 

Birmingham's Only 
Full time 100% Negro 
Programmed Station 
Established 1942 

WJLD 



BIRMINGHAM 
ALABAMA 

Full duplication on 

WJLN-FM 



I 



Independent Life & Accident Ins. 
Interstate Bakeries 
Italian Swiss Colony Wine 



Represented nationally by 
BERNARD HOWARD 



*I000 Watts daytime— 250 Watts night 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



31 



The only San Francisco 

Bay Area 

Negro station with 

SIX 
APPEAL 



69% of the Negro population of the 
San Francisco Bay Area live in five 
counties outside San Francisco. KDIA is 
the only Bay Area Negro station reach- 
ing this entire six county market and 
in some important Negro population 
areas is the only Negro radio station 
available. 



Metropolitan 6 County Negro Pulse 
May, 1961 



6:30 AM-12 Noon 
KDIA 21 

Negro Sta. B 19 
H. U. R. 29.8 



12Noon-6PM 
26 
18 
26.2 



These figures reflect a lead for one sta- 
tion in a smaller area and KD'.A domi- 
nance in the majority area. 

• • • 

LOOK! COMPARE KDIA WITH ALL 
STATIONS IN THE MOST COM- 
PLETE NEGRO SURVEY EVER MADE 
IN THE BAY AREA.* 

1,000 Negro adults in Richmond, Cali- 
fornia, were surveyed by a Negro church 
with the assistance of a university re- 
searcher in the most complete Negro 
survey ever made in the Bay Area. 
Though primarily a sociological study, 
answers to a radio station tune-in ques- 
tion revealed this: 



KDIA 
60% 

Details on request 



ALL OTHERS 
40% 



• • • 



Get the Negro market you pay for. 
Buy— 



KDIA 

Sonderling Station 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Represented by Bernard Howard 



Kelly's Canned Foods 
King Dollar Stores 
Kroger 



Lady Lennox Hair Dye 

Lever Bros. 

Liggett & Myers 

Lipton Tea 

P. Lorillard 

Lucky Strike 

Lydia Pinkham 

M 

Manischewitz Wine 
Maxwell House 
Millbrook Bread 
Miller Hi-Life Beer 
Monticello Drugs 
Mum Deodorant 

N 



Nadinola Cream 
National Biscuit Co. 
National Standard Life Ins. 



Omega Flour 

Oscar Mayer Meat Products 

P 

Pabst Brewing 
Pall Mall cigarettes 
Pepsi-Cola 
Pet Milk 
Pharmaco 

Q 

Quaker Oats 



Rheingold Beer 

R. J. Reynolds 

Robin Hood Flour 

Roma Wine 

Royal Crown Cola 

Royal Crown Hair Dressing 

Ruppert Beer 

S 

Schaeffer Beer 
Schlitz Beer 
Scott's Emulsion 
Sealtest Foods 
Sears Roebuck 
Sessions Cooking Oil 
Seven-Up 
Shell gas & oil 
Silvercup bread 



Singer Sewing Machine 
Standard Brands 
Sunoco 



Tareyton cigarettes 
Texaco 
Tidewater Oil 
Tip Top bread 

U 



Union Oil 

U. S. Royal Tires 

V 

Valiant 

Vaseline petroleum jelly 

W 



Ward Baking Co. 
White Rose 
Winston cigarettes 
Wonder bread 
Wrigley gum 



Charles Young Products 
Yukon's Best flour 




FOR 

HOUSTON'S 

NEGRO 

MARKET 



KCOH 



Established acceptance 
Due to 

• Advertisers' Results 

• Merchandising 

• Community Service 

(Merit*! F«ctt) 
400,000 N*gre P*P- '« J' I— <M 

S4.400 I— ■ p+t hesnkli — '41. 

Sourct: Or. H. A. Bullock. Head of Research, 
Ttus Southern University. 

Author: Pathways to the Houston Negro Market. 



KCOH HOUSTON 



The First all Negro 

Station in Texas 

RepreMotexl by John P«rwn Co. 



32 



SPONSOR NEGRO IS-LE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



MARKETS 

(Continued from page 13) 

is echoed at the personal level of the 
businessman. Michael Teicholz. 
president of Donbar Development 
Corporation, located in the New York 
area and who is one of the largest 
builders and developers selling pri- 
marilv to the Negro market, says: 

"When I began building private 
homes for Negro families, most were 
in the SI 2,000 range. Now my big- 
gest sellers are eight-room two-bath 
split-levels selling for $21,000 or 
more." 

Higher incomes and better homes 
are partially a function of movement 
to the cities. In 1900. only 23% of 
the nonwhites lived in cities com- 
pared with 43% of the white popula- 
tion. By 1950 the ratio was nearly 
equal, at 62:64 and in 1960 the pro- 
portion of the nonwhite population 
living in urban areas exceeded the 
white urban population. 72% and 
70% respective!) . 

Negro population in the 21 central 
cities increased bv two million, or 
50%, in the last decade. At the 
same time, the white population in 
these cities declined by one million. 
Consequently, negroes represented 
19% of the central city population in 
1960 compared with 13% 10 years 
before. 

SPONSOR surveys across the nation 
reveal this is a typical phenomenon. 
From Chicago's WGES, for example, 
it's reported that the city has lost 
more than a quarter-million white in- 
habitants since 1940, and has gained 
over a half-million Negro residents. 
A study this year by WBEE pin- 
points the change: out of 75 Chicago 
city neighborhoods, 20 account for 
93.2% of the nonwhite population. 

Cleveland's 250,000 Negroes main- 
tain a community, within the city, 
that's clearly mapped by WJMO, in a 
survey conducted by the Davis & 
White Agency. The pronounced ur- 
ban character of Cleveland's Negro 
population is reflected in shopping 
habits: 84% of their clothing is 
bought in downtown stores, rather 
than suburban shopping centers; 
83% of home furnishing sets and 
81% of appliances. 

"Greater Kansas" included 134.000 
Negroes in 1959, according to KPRS. 
yet 110,000 of these were concen- 



trated within Kansas City, Mo., and 
Kansas City, Kansas. The Negro was 
then spending $30 million annually 
on food and $20 million on clothing 
in the K. C. area — which was ap- 
parently enough for Philadelphia's 
Steele Research to soberly conclude 
"The Negro has become a factor in 
the Great Mid-western market." 

The "island" effect also shows up 
clearly in St. Louis, where Negro 
population has grown from 18 to 
29% in the past decade. In the West 
End area 70% of residents are Ne- 
groes, compared with only 2% in 
1950, and according to KATZ, 90^5 
of the group lives in 30 specific areas 
where the white population is less 
than 50%. 

In general terms, if Negro city 
groups tend to be physically cohesive 
this leads to a market "package" 
which specialized radio stations can 
deliver with almost no wastage. But 
one of the plus-factors of Negro-ap- 
peal programing is the active desire 
on the part of the listener, which can 
mean that a Negro-appeal station will 
enjoy a sizeable audience bevond the 
metropolitan area. 

Another point to be remembered 
is that the urban "island" is a tran- 
sitional stage for the Negro, and there 
are already some markets where this 
is no longer true. 

A case in point is Flint, Michigan, 
where the Negro population rose from 
14,000 in 1950 to over 38.000 in 
1961. More than 8,000 of these are 
emploved in various General Motors' 
plants, with an income and job se- 
curitv which lifts this Negro com- 
munity above the average. 

The result — according to WAMM 
— is that over 65% of the Flint adult 
Negroes either own or are buying 
homes, and that there has been a 
substantial move to suburban areas. 
The group now spends over $34 mil- 
lion annuallv: much of it in three 
suburban shopping centers. 

In the Midwest as a whole, increase 
of Negro population has been largely 
the result of migration. In 1910, the 
eleven States of the old Confederacy 
claimed 81% of Negroes: today, the 
same States have only 52%. Between 
1940 and 1950, 80% of Chicago's 
increase came from immigration, but 
the following decade the movement 
lost steam, and for the first time, nat- 
ural increase became the major fac- 
tor in Negro population growth. 
{Please turn to page 37) 



YOUR 
KEY 




TO THE 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

NEGRO 
MARKET 

WSID 



Highest rated station 100% Negro 
programming in the Baltimore 
Market. Hooper Survey April-May, 
May-June, June-July, July-August, 
August-September '61. 

Also look at the Baltimore Negro 
Pulse Aug. '61 WSID share: 
7 a.m. to 12 noon — 28% 
12 noon to 6 p.m. — 34% 

1000 Watt clear channel station 
in the heart of an expanding 
Negro Market (343% increase... 
1950-1960) 

Baltimore's pioneer Negro station 
. . . ever ready to aid your product 
sales through WSID PLUS MER- 
CHANDISING. 

WSID 

ONE OH! ONE 
ON EVERYONE'S RADIO 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



33 



BIG 
BEAT 
RADIO 



— Now in 
St. Louis,, too I 



Big Beat Radio made WOBS 
tops in Jacksonville. Now 
it's taking St. Louis by storm. 
Take advantage of this pow- 
erful selling force in both 
markets. 



WOBS 

Jacksonville 
Fla. 



WBBR 

E. St. Louis 
III. 



Jack Masla & Co., Inc. 
St. Louis 



Gill-Perna, Inc. 
Nat. Rep. 



Dora-Clayton 
Southern Rep. 



NEGRO STATION PROGRAMING 



This listing of Negro-appeal stations is a partial selection from over 200 
questionnaires turned into sponsor. Within each block (i.e. 100% pro- 
graming) the stations are arranged by state and city. A minimum of 10% 
of weekly programing is adopted as qualification for a Negro-appeal station. 



100% Negro-appeal 
programing 



CITY 

Birmingham . 
Birmingham 


CALL LETTERS 

ALABAMA 

- - WENN 

W]TT) 


Huntsville 


WF.T1P 


Mobile 


WGOK 


Montgomery 


.... WRMA 


Tuscaloosa . 


... .... WTUG 


Little Rock 


ARKANSAS 

KOKY 


Los Angeles 


CALIFORNIA 

KGF1 


San Francisco KSHN 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington .WOOK 


Washington 


. ... ... WUST 


Orlando ... 


FLORIDA 

WOKR 


Pensacola 


WROP 


Tampa 

Atlanta 


WTMP 

GEORGIA 

WAOK 


Atlanta 


WERD 


Columbus 


WCLS 


Columbus - . 


... . WOKS 


Macon 


.. .. WIBB 


Savannah ... 


WSOK 


Harvey 


ILLINOIS 

WREE 


Louisville 


KENTUCKY 

WLOU 


Baton Rouge 
New Orleans 


LOUISIANA 

WXOK 


WROK 


New Orleans 
Shreveport 


WYLD 

_. KANR 


Shreveport _ 


KOKA 



CITY CALL LETTERS 

MARYLAND 

Annapolis WANN 

Baltimore ...WERR 

Baltimore WSID 



MICHIGAN 

Detroit (Inkster) _ 



MISSISSIPPI 

Greenville 

Jackson 

Meridian 



MISSOURI 



Kansas City 
St. Louis _ 
St. Louis _ 



Newark 



NEW JERSEY 



WCER 

-.WESY 
-WOK] 
-..WQIC 

--KPRS 
-JKATZ 
.JKXLW 

-WNJR 



NEW YORK 



Buffalo 
New York 



Pending 
WWRL 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Durham WSRC 

OHIO 

Cincinnati WCIN 

Cleveland WARQ 

Cleveland WJMO 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburgh _. 



~WDAS 
..WHAT 
WAMO 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



Charleston 

Orangeburg 



TENNESSEE 



Chattanooga 

Jackson 

Memphis 

Nashville _ 



TEXAS 



Beaumont 

Dallas-Ft. Worth 
Dallas Ft Worth 

Houston 

Tyler 



WPAL 
WDIX 

WNOO 

-WJAK 

-WDIA 

WVOL 



KJET 

KRZY 



...KNOK 

-KCOH 

— KZEY 



3<L 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



CITY 


CALL LETTERS 




VIRGINIA 


Norfolk .... 


WRAP 


Richmond 


.. WANT 



50-74% Negro-appeal 
programing 



75-99% Negro-appeal 
programing 



CITY CALL 


LETTERS 


CALIFORNIA 




Oakland . 


JCDIA 


GEORGIA 




Augusta 


WAUG 


NEW JERSEY 




Newark 


-WHBI 


NEW YORK 




New York .... . 


..WLIB 


NORTH CAROLINA 




Charlotte 


WGIV 





"BIG BILL" HILL 

No. 1 ivith 

300,000 Negroes 

on Chicago's West Side 



• • • • 



PERVIS SPANN 

Chicago's 

Result-Producing 

Negro Night Show 

Midnight to 4 a.m. 

• • • • 

NOW 

Solid coverage of 

1,000,000 Negroes 

in Chicagoland 

with increased power 

1KW 

WOPA 

Oak Park-Chicago 



CITY 


CALL LETTERS 




ARKANSAS 


Arkadelphia _ 


— ..... KVRC 



Waycross 
Chicago .. 



CEORCIA 
ILLINOIS 



WAYX 



WGES 



MICHIGAN 



Detroit 
Flint 



WJLB 

.____ WAMM 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Neck WYAI 



25-49% Negro-appeal 
programing 



CITY 

Butler 


CALL 

ALABAMA 


LETTERS 
WPRN 


Jacksonville 


FLORIDA 


WRHC 


Marianna 

Brunswick 
Columbus 


GEORGIA 


...WTYS 

WMOG 
„WDAK 


Gainsville 




-WGGA 


Chicago 


ILLINOIS 


WAAF 


Oak Park 
Indianapolis 
Muskegon .... 




WOPA 


INDIANA 


.WGEE 


MICHIGAN 


WMUS 


Clarksdale _ 
New York .. 


MISSISSIPPI 


WROX 


NEW YORK 


WADO 


NORTH CAROLINA 

Sanford 


..WEYE 


Claremore 
Clarksville 
Franklin 


OKLAHOMA 


XWPR 


TEXAS 


JCCAR 


VIRGINIA 


^.WYSR 



in key city 
CLEVELAND: 

Only WJMO 
programs 
top Negro 
talent . . . 
backed with 
consistent and 
heavy 

promotion to 
deliver your 
message to 
230,000 Negroes 
at Cleveland's 

LOWEST COST 
PER LISTENER 

• • • 

WJMO 

RADIO 

Cleveland, Ohio 

/ Division of United Broadcasting Co. 

Represented nationally by: 

NEW YORK: UBC Sales, 420 Madison Ave. 

Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 

ATLANTA: Dora-Clayton Agency, Inc. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 



35 




BROADCASTING 

with 100% 
Quality Negro 
Programming! 

MOTIVATING 

a prestige- 
conscious 
audience 
TO BUY! 

MERCHANT-ISING 

to "bridge 
the gap" 
between 
advertiser 
and retailer! 




5,000 WATTS 
BALTIMORE 

Samuel E. Feldman 
Exec. Vice-President & Cen. Mgr. 

Represented by 

BERNARD HOWARD & CO., INC. 

20 E. 46th St., N.Y.C. OXford 7-3750 



10-24% Negro-appeal 
programing 



CITY 



CALL LETTERS 



CITY CALL 

ALABAMA 

Auburn 

Dothan 


LETTERS 

WAl D 

WOOF 


Eufaula 

Florence 


WULA 
WJOl 


Florence 


WOWL 


Foley __ 

Marion 

ARKANSAS 

Hot Springs 


WHEP 
WJAM 

KBLO 


Pine Bluff 

FLORIDA 

Ocala 

Pahokee .... 


KOTN 

WMOP 
. WRIM 


Quincy 


WCNH 


West Palm Beach 


W1RK 


GEORGIA 
Baxley 


WHAB 


Madison 


WYTH 


Statesboro 

Valdosta 

INDIANA 

Gary __ 


WWNS 
WGOV 

WWCA 


LOUISIANA 

Lake Charles 

Ville Platte 


-KAOK 
... KVP1 


MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

MICHIGAN 

Flint 


WITH 
WTRX 


MISSISSIPPI 

Belzeni 


WELZ 


Cleveland 


WCLD 


Columbus 


.WCBl 


Greenville 

Houston 


WGVM 
WCPC 


Pascagoula-Moss Point 


WPMP 


Starkville 


WSSO 


West Point 


.WROB 


Yazoo City 


WAIF 


NEW MEXICO 

Hobbs 


KWEW 


NORTH CAROLINA 

Burlington 


WBBB 


Elizabeth City 

Fayetteville 


WCNC 
..WFNC 


Greensboro 


. WGBG 


Henderson 

Kinston 


WHVH 
...WELS 


Lumberton 


WAGR 



Raleigh ..WSHE 

Reidsville WREV 

Rocky Mount WCEC 

Shelby WAD A 

Whiteville WENC 

Wilson WGTM 

Wilson WVOT 

OHIO 

Columbus WVKO 

OKLAHOMA 

Muskogee .. KMUS 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Anderson WANS 

Bennettsville __ WBSC 

Greenville WESC 

Mullins WJAY 

Orangeburg WTND 

Sumter WSSC 



TENNESSEE 



Clarksville 
Nashville .. 



WJZM 
WLAC 



TEXAS 

El Campo KULP 

Galveston KGBC 

Houston-Pasadena KLVL 

Longview KLUE 

Marshall KMHT 

Taylor KTAE 

VIRGINIA 

Gloucester WDDY 

Hopewell WHAP 

Lynchburg WBRG 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee WMIL 



Less than 10% 

Negro-appeal 

programing 



CITY CALL LETTERS 

FLORIDA 

Delray Beach WDBF 

Fort Pierce WARN 

GEORGIA 

Americus W DEC 

Thomasville _ WKTG 

Waycross W ACL 

ILLINOIS 

La Grange ...... WTAQ 

MICHIGAN 

Philadelphia WHOC 

Picayune .... WRJW 

Tupelo WELO 



36 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



THE MARKET 

(Continued from page 33 I 

On the Eastern coast, however, it 
seems that migration is continuing 
apace. Philadelphia's white popula- 
tion decreased 15 r r since 1950, yet 
the Negro group increased 40%. Ac- 
cording to WHAT, in a recent com- 
pilation which drew on accepted au- 
thorities, Philadelphia's metro Negro 
count now is 675,017, making the 
city the third largest Negro market 
in the U. S. 

Philadelphia provides a good case 
history of what is happening to the 
Negro in the Sixties. WHAT, quot- 
ing an Evening Bulletin survey, claims 
that 32% of Negro wage earners now 
earn between $4,000 and $8,000. 
They're abundant in expensive per- 
sonal possessions: 45.9% own or are 
buying homes; 70% own or are buy- 
ing a car; 91%, a tv set; 11%, a 
home air conditioner unit: 12.3% 
have department-store charge ac- 
counts, excluding time-payment and 
lay-away plans. 

The manner in which income is 
spent is also fairly typical of the na- 
tion's burgeoning Negro middle-class. 
About $507 million dollars is spent 
annuallv by the group, of which food 
and beverages account for 33.4% ; 
housing, 28.6% : clothing, 13.8% ; 
recreation, 5.4% ; medical 



care, 
and to- 



3.2% ; personal care, 3.0^ 
bacco, 1.9%. 

In Baltimore, traditionally a South- 
ern city, the wave of Northern pros- 
perity also is welling up. WEBB re- 
ports that of 380,000 Negroes with- 
in the metro area, 34% earned up- 
ward of $4,000. Older employment 
patterns are also changing; though 
41% of the Negro labor force is oc- 
cupied in heavy industrial and light 
manufacturing, there now are 23.000 
people, or 12%, in commercial and 
civil services, and 16.000 or 3%, in 
professional occupations. 

The most highlv-developed Negro 
market in the U. S. is found in Wash- 
ington D. C, which leads the nation 
with a 53.9% Negro population. Sta- 
tion WUST quotes the fact that 25% 
of all Federal employment in the city 
is held by Negroes, and that 48% 
of the Negro wagearners make more 
than $5,000. 

It's also no accident that Washing- 
ton is the scene of one of the most 
detailed Negro market studies yet 
made, undertaken by Pulse in 1960 
for WOOK. The profile is one of 



economic and physical stabil it \ : 
though Washington has a transient 
population, two out of three Negro 
family heads have lived there 15 
years or more; 20% have checking 
accounts and 40% have charge ac- 
counts. 

The high level of Federal employ- 
ment, plus the fact that one in five 
Negroes is a "white collar" worker 
suggests (according to Pulse) that 
the market is economically good. In 
the composite of all employed house- 
hold members, 60% earn between 
$50 and $80 weekly, which is also 
an indication that the Negro market 
is on a good economic plane. 

The WOOK study documents that 
in the nation's capital, as elsewhere, 
the Negro is extremely brand con- 
scious. Of total toilet-soap sales, 
40% are to Ivory, with Lux next 
but well behind, at 15%. Colgate 
dentifrice earned a whopping 57% 
response in Pulse questioning, with 
Gleem leading the rest with 14%. 

The effect is marked in most prod- 
ucts; coffee (Wilkens and Maxwell 
House) ; soft drink (Coca Cola and 
Pepsi Cola) ; beer, (Ballentine and 
Budweiser) ; cigarettes, (Camel and 
Pall Mall, among men, and Pall Mall 
and Salem among housewives) ; Tide 
and Fab in the packaged detergents, 
and Bufferin in the headache reme- 
dies. 

Pulse's summary of its Washington 
survey was that "results lend strong 
support to the acceptance of the Ne- 
gro market as a good one for the ad- 
vertiser . . . earning power is good, 
and there is strong evidence that 
purchasing power exists and is ap- 
plied." 

Evidence of a more positive nature 
is found in New York, whose metro 
area now represents the largest Ne- 
gro market in the U. S. 

From 1950 to 1961 the Negro 
population of New York City rose 
65.7%. to 1.243.000. Across the 
Hudson in New Jersey, the change 
has been even more dramatic: from 
1950 to 1958 the Newark Negro pop- 
ulation jumped from 68.316 to 141.- 
914, an 100% increase which was the 
largest of any city in the country. 

The combined New York-New 
Jersey Negro group now totals 
1.687,221, and as Len Mirelson, gen- 
eral manager WNJR, Newark, points 
out, this group is equivalent to the 
fifth largest city in the U. S. 

With a healthier economy. New 




NOW 1000 WATTS 
Programming to 
Pittsburgh's 250,000 
Population Negro Market 

SIR WALTER 
RALEIGH 




BILL 
POWELL 



4/&^k PORKY 

ICHEDWICK 






SUNNY 
JIM 





CHARLES 
GORDON 

News Director 




ALEXANDER 
MARTIN 



NOW 1000 WATTS 
ON 860 KC 



WAMO 

PITTSBURGH 

100% Negro Programming 

.BERNARD HOWARD. 
NATL. REP. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



37 



York's ^ roup also is tending 

to be less cohesive. Manhattan has 
traditionally absorbed most of the 
in-migrants, l>ut these now are buying 
homes and settling in other suburbs. 
Studies made b) W W KL show that 
Manhattan's Negro population in- 
creased bj onlj 5.795 in the past 
decade i mnpared xsith 79% for 
Brooklyn and 1!!7' ', for Queens. 
Yi-sau. Suffolk. Westchester and 
Rockland counties have increased by 
amounts ranging from 55 to 155%. 
and since the latter areas are highlv- 
rated real estate this development is 
an indication of rising wealth. 

Harry Novik, general manager of 
WLIB. points to the "enormous 
growth of new housing, with manv 
luxury apartments renting from $35 
to $50 per room." The face of Har- 
lem proper, says Mr. Novik, has un- 
dergone enormous changes in the 
past five years. 

In upstate New York. Buffalo pro- 
vides another skyrocketing example. 

Between 1950 and 1960 the city of 
Buffalo lost 47.397 population. Dur- 
ing this same period, there was a 
Negro population gain of 34,305. 
\^ hile the white population was drop- 
ping by 17.6%. the \egro population 
was growing by a whopping 143%. 

And it's the same dynamic storv 
out on the West Coast. Part of this 
growth has been thoroughly docu- 
mented by Far West Surveys, in a 
comprehensive San Francisco report 
forKSAN. Highlights:— 

There has been an increase in the 
total population in the San Francisco- 
Oakland metropolitan area of 542.952 
people, an increase of 24.2% be- 
tween 1950 and 1960. 

Negro population has increased at 
a higher percentage rate than the 
total population. The Negro prob- 
ably will continue to increase at a 
higher percentage than the total pop- 
ulation. 

The Negro has not been integrated 
to a very great extent into the total 
population insofar as housing ac- 
commodations are concerned. With 
only a few exceptions, the increase in 
Negro population is reflected by very 
sharp increases of Negroes in the 
same census tracts in 1960 as in 
1950. It appears that the Negro pop- 
ulation extends into areas adjoining 
those areas in which the population 
had been highly concentrated. 

In Nevada, the Las Vegas station 
KENO demonstrated that money 



isn't only found on the tables. Of 
its 16,500 Negro population. KENO 
found 57% owning their homes, of 
win mi i'A'i have made major re- 
pairs or remodelling since buying: 

owning washing machines. .' 
tv. 10% dryers and \~'r freezers. 

It's often assumed that gains such 
as these have been made at the ex- 
pense of all southern states. But it's 
not necessarily so. Both Texas and 
Florida recorded major Negro pop- 
ulation gains within the census peri- 
od: when KZEY took a look at its 
own East Texas area it found 25.1 
were Negroes, and State as a whole 
gained more than 200.000 Negroes, 
giving it the second-largest Negro 
population in the country. Rising 
prosperity is shown by a $78 million 
consumption in the Tyler-Longview 
area alone, from 37.000 Negro homes. 

Though the South has been the 
pool from which other areas have 
drawn, its own Negro birthrate is 
sufficient to ensure its place as a ma- 
jor Negro bloc for many generations. 
In cities served by the OK stations 
— New Orleans. Houston, Memphis. 
Mobile, Baton Rouge and Lake 
Charles — the 1960 Negro birthrate 
ranges from 27% to 54% of the 
total, and the highest concentrations 
of Negro population are to be found 
in some of the rural areas. 

Buying power is rising, and with 
it a brand-consciousness which can 
be surprising. In West Virginia, for 
example. WSTV quotes 1960 Sales 
Management data for its area, with 
a Qualitv Index ranging from 78 to 
114: WERD. Atlanta, records a 
household disposable income of near- 
lv $7,000: from the Mississippi- Ar- 
kansas-Louisiana delta, WESY helps 
guide the spending of $689 million 
disposable dollars. 

Many Southern stations can fur- 
nish evidence not only of higher Ne- 
gro income, but also of the quality- 
appeal of their markets. In Houston, 
KCOH has note of 30 Negro sub- 
divisions with homes costing from 
$8,500 to $25,000: says president 
Robert Meeker, "there is more evi- 
dence of the Negro patronizing the 
best stores downtown."' 

Or again, in Virginia. WRAP finds 
that "the Negro population in Tide- 
water is rich and getting richer, and 
without Negro consumption 44% of 
the market is lost." 

It was a Southern newspaper, the 
J ir pinion -Pilot, which this year 



pointed out "The Negroes' influence 
on the market is far greater than 
their relative buying power ... he 
will insist on getting the brand he 
want- 

Which neatlv expresses the qualitv 
factor of the Negro market. And the 
total importance of this enormous 
segment of population was summar- 
ized by the New York Herald Tri- 
bune: — "Negro breadwinners have 
more than doubled their average 
weekly income since 1950 while their 
white counterparts have seen onlv a 
60% increase. 

"The gross national product of the 
18,900,000 Negroes in the United 
States will total more than $42 mil- 
lion this year. Nobodv is going to 
sesresate that much monev." ^ 



STATIONS 

'Continued from page 15) 

an outstanding success: a check for 
$1103 was presented to NAACP. 

Whether appealing for help for 
accident victims, fas does WD AS in 
Philadelphia), or promoting road 
safety (WEBB, Baltimore), or assist- 
ing rehabilitation of juvenile delin- 
quents (WJMO, Cleveland). Negro 
radio is strongly on the positive. 

But sometimes a station can — and 
does — illumine the negative aspect, to 
correct an abuse of common concern. 
Case in point was the series of inter- 
views conducted bv Leon Lewis, news 
director of WWRL, which resulted in 
a crackdown on employment agencies 
bv the Bureau of Licenses of New 
York Citv. 

Lewis interviewed four girls who 
were brought to New York Citv by 
employment agencies on promises of 
lodging, meal security and return 
transportation. None of the promises 
were kept and the distraught girls 
were offered positions at salaries be- 
low the standard for local applicants. 

The interviews were turned over 
to the NAACP for presentation to the 
District Attorney's office. The result 
was that on July 26th License Com- 
missioner Bernard J. O'Connell sus- 
pended five employment agencies for 
practices highlighted by the informa- 
tion provided by WWRL. 

Although public-service and com- 
munity affairs are perhaps the fastest- 
moving development in Negro pro- 
graming, backbone of the industry 
remains music — and music of a par- 
ticular type. 



38 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



WHAT, for example, devotes 36 
hours weekly to spiritual and gospel 
programs. Says general manager 
Dolly Banks: "In our experience, this 
is the only programing in Negro radio 
today that can attract a 100% adult 
buying audience." 

Keystone's analysis shows: — 

• 318 radio stations carry 20 hours 
per week or less. 

• 36 stations broadcast between 21 
and 40 such hours weekly. 

• 6 air between 41 and 100 hours 
each week. 

• 1 affiliate broadcast more than 
100 hours weekly. 

Most Negro-appeal broadcasters lay 
stress on programs featuring popular 
Negro bands and singers; rhythm and 
blues mood music; race music, Ne- 
gro folk songs and melodies. 

Properly directed, it produces a 
widespread effect: in Houston, KCOH 
swept 5 out of 6 categories in a city- 
wide poll conducted by the Negro 
Informer newspaper ; in Bennettsville, 
S. C, WBSC's request-style Night- 
hawk Show gains estimated 90% of 
the Negro audience. . . . 

The taste of the Negro audience, 
however, is not as strictly limited as 
is sometimes thought. This fact was 
borne out in the experience of Gerry 
Grainger, program director of 
WWCA, Gary, Ind. Reports Grainger : 
"A Pulse was taken in our area 
in September, 1959, strictly with the 
Negro audience. Then, as now, we 
carried about 10 hours weekly of 
what we had considered strictly 
Negro appeal. When the Pulse came 
in. we were amazed to find that our 
"good music" segments were also as 
well received in a strict Negro survey, 
as were the programs beamed to the 
Negro household. 

"I dislike hearing people say, 'My 
market is different.' I don't think 
Gary is. We feel that what we have 
discovered about Negro listening 
j habits would hold true in any North- 
ern Negro market, if proper surveys 
and inquiries were made. Possibly it 
is time we all had a look behind the 
old concept of 'Negro programing." 

Supporting evidence for this view 
is provided by WJDX, Jackson, Miss., 
which unlike WOKJ, is not a spe- 
cifically Negro-appeal station. Man- 
ager Fred Beard explains the anomaly 
thus: — 

"About 40% of our rural audience 
is made up of Negroes. We have a 



Negro preacher on on Sunday morn- 
ing. It's programmed with the idea in 
mind that white people will be listen- 
ing to it as much as Negroes will. 
"We feel that Negroes are as vitally 
interested in news as anyone else and 
as a result, we feel that we have a 
large Negro audience listening to our 
local news as well as our NBC news. 
We have a number of excellent relig- 
ious programs such as Back to the 
Bible for which we have a large Negro 
audience. We have proof of this in 
our mail from Negroes." 

But this must be considered a 
minority view. An overwhelming 
number of successful Negro-appeal 
stations have demonstrated that a 
loyal following is built by attention 
to strong Negro personalities and 
pinpointed programing. 

It's almost standard to build pro- 
graming around the disc jockey. Djs 
often acquire distinctive pseudonyms 
. . . like KSAN's "Rockin' Lucky," 
WDIA's Theo "Bless My Bones" 
Wade, WAMO's "Sunny Jim," 
WIBB's Ray "Satellite Papa" Brown, 
or WHAT's "Bonnie Prince" Charlie 
Geter. Occasionally a jockey — like 
"Prince Omar" of KOKA, Shreve- 
port — adds colorful attire to match 
his radio personality. When he makes 
public appearances for the station, 
"Prince Omar" is resplendent in a 
red, Turkish-type fez, with a brilliant, 
cloth-of-gold-lined cape draped non- 
chalantly over his tropical suit. 

Of the Negro radio disc jockey, 
John McLendon of the McLendon- 
Ebony group says: "Rather than 
sound very distinctly Negro, we find 
it very important to inject a great 
deal of promotion, production speed, 
and sound as good in pronunciation 
as the better programmed white 
stations. 

"It is extremely important in the 
changing South to bear in mind that 
since integration is a very slow proc- 
ess there is a great self consciousness 
among the Southern Negroes — even 
to the point where he has become 
conscious of radio quality." 

"The Negro in the South today," 
he continues, "does not wish to be 
associated with radio which is any- 
way degrading to his race; he tends 
greatly to shy away from the hooting 
and hollering personalities that ori- 
ginally made Negro radio programs 
famous. McLendon applies this policy 
to stations KLIF, Dallas; KILT, 



'SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



9 OCTOBER 1961 



Houston; KTSA, San Antonio; 
KEEL, Shreveport; WARY. Louis- 
ville; WYFL, Buffalo; and KABL, 
San Francisco. 

About the Negro radio personality, 
Leonard Walk, general manager of 
WAMO, only station programing to 
Pittsburgh's 250,000 population, high 
income Negro market, says: ' : We find 
that the Negro disc jockey personality 
pulls the largest and most loyal fol- 
lowing. We use a music formula that 
mixes rhythm and blues, gospel, popu- 
lar (Nat King Cole variety), jazz and 
spiritual music in a carefully planned 
proportion." 

This blend has brought success to 
hundreds of Negro-appeal stations. 
Can this success continue? 

Point at issue is whether, as inte- 
gration accelerates, the Negro be- 
comes more or less conscious of his 
racial identity. Some observers have 
suggested that the end of the process 
must be the disappearance of special 
programing. 

SPONSOR put this question to a num- 
ber of stations, who in turn carried 
spot surveys. A typical return came 
from Ranny Daly, general manager 
of WAAA, North Carolina:— 

"We had five of our Negro person- 
alities make a quick check of ten 
Negroes each in eight different in- 
come groups and job categories. 

"Of the 50 questioned 43 said they 
wanted more Negro news and four did 
not care, three said it did not make 
any difference to them. All 50 
questioned said they listened to 
WAAA at least five times as much as 
they did any other station. 

"This station now programs 12 
newscasts per day of a strictly local 
nature; w r e receive an average of 30 
contributed news items per day." 

From San Francisco, KSAN's J. 
Walter Carroll summarized his find- 
ings in a statement that epitomises 
the entire industry: — 

"Negro-appeal radio is more im- 
portant to the Negro today, because 
it provides a direct and powerful 
mirror in which the Negro can hear 
and see his ambitions, achievements 
and desires. 

"It will continue to be important 
as a means of orientation to the 
Negro, seeking to become urbanized, 
as he tries to make adjustment to the 
urban life. Negro radio is vitally 
necessary during the process of assi- 
milation." ^ 



39 



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9 OCTOBER 1961 



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12 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 9 OCTOBER 1961 




IMPACT... 



a wonderful word to explain the power that WDAS exerts on the 700,000 Negroes that form 
America's third largest Negro Community • When WDAS is your Philadelphia Negro Radio Buy, 
you are assured of reaching More of your Market because WDAS is the Negro Rating Leader and 
has been for the past ten years • Too, More National Quality Advertisers use WDAS because of 
their proven IMPACT • Delivered Merchandising • Top Negro Personalities on the Air . . Jocko, 
Georgie Woods, Sir Lancelot, John Bandy, Kae Williams, Hal Jackson, Joseph Rainey • Plus the 
WDAS Community Service Group Concept. Let 5,000 Watts of Power deliver your Selling Message 

• In short, in Philadelphia, for IMPACT on the Negro Market, you must use WDAS 

Upon request, we will gladly send you the complete WDAS Story together with a list of Blue-Chip 

accounts that constantly use our station and a personal copy of our Total Market Study of Negro 

Philadelphia 




Represented Nationally by 

BERNARD HOWARD COMPANY 



NEW YORK / SAN FRANCISCO / ATLANTA / CHICAGO / LOS ANGELES 



HERB SCHORR, National Sales Manager 
WDAS, Belmont & Edgely Road, Phila. 31, Penna. 




POSITION IN THE RICH ! 
SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAI 

NEGRO MARKET. 




^ Con.an Survey shows 
KSRN with 49.2% --* 
share or the rich S£ 
Oaklond Negro market. 



• • 



Pulse shows 



24.3% 



1961 



Conlon ogoin shows 
KSRN leading the woy 
ith 42.8%- 



W" 



• • 



Far West Surveys s 



hows 





LEADERS LAUD KSAN ^J^ARAFTER Yf 
COMMUNITY PARTICIPATIONS 



KSAN 



WRITE 

1111 MARKETS! 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

FOR YOUR FREE COPY 

OF THE 

LATEST NEGRO POPULATION STUDY 

BEFORE YOU BUDGET FOR 

THE S.F.-OAKLAND BAY AREA. 

Or Contact: 

Bob Dore, N.Y.. Chicago 
Dora Clayton, Atlanta 




if CRN *h a 39.9% overage m> J§ w um 

KSRN w.th a Sandeberg/Gates, LA. 



USE HISTORY FOR YOUR YARD STICK- NOT HEARSAY. 
E KSAN FOR COVERAGE OF THE RICH BAY AREA NEGRO MARI 



16 OCTOBER 
40< a copy • S8 






SPONSOR 




'4£f£±. 



ON^GREATNESS 

"^ - ~~^ 1 C 1961 




NEW WAVE 7 

■ ^ ™ w w w in w Hb ■ Possibly. Advertising men, networks, stations, 
and — most significant — important advertisers have been quick to recognize "The 
Man From Oliver Street," first show in the series, as an important new approach to 
[documentaries, "...excellent..."; "...superb..."; "...outstanding production..."; 
". . . high caliber television . . ."; ". . . consider it a coup d'etat to have exclusive . . ."; 
"... outstanding work . . ."; "... proud to show them in prime time " 

"PERSPECTIVE ON GREATNESS" is indeed an unique series. Each of the 26 hour- 
long specials features a great name of our time. Al Smith, Lindbergh, MacArthur, the 
Windsors, and so on. Here is unrehearsed drama of real life... actual on-the-scene 

^exclusive footage from the incomparable Hearst Metrotone film libraries, brilliantly 

ledited and augmented. 



6 GREAT NEW HOUR-LONG 
OCUMENTARIES 

HEARST METROTONE 

PRODUCTION 




FILMS INC. • SUITE 3200 
THE CHRYSLER BUILDING 
NEW YORK 17. N. Y. MU 7-0870 



NEW FACTS 
PIERCE SPOTS 
PAPER JUNGLE 



Firm in the central 
billings sweepstakes 
airs study on agencj 
costs for spot buying 

Page 25 



Night radio: 
it's attracting 
new interest 

Page 28 

Tv helps Cott 
put the kibosh 
on store deals 

Page 30 

'You agency 
guys would 
love my job' 

Page 32 



DIGEST ON PAGE 



It looks different 
It is different 



Television 
Station 

Audiences 



October 23 — 

November W 

1961 



Average 



Week 





This fall; 
N0r1 "» "° «.S. tv 3tat lo „ 




Nielsen 



Station Index 



Now, more than ever... 

a complete source of 

actionable 
facts* 



on television 
station audiences 






^4^ meaning facts on which you 
can take decisive action with confi- 
dence . . . significant facts . . . based 
on many measurement refinements 
. . . including newly defined Areas, 
and expanded samples. 

Whether you are a time buyer or 
time seller, here is the tv audience 
information you need . . . station by 
station and season to season ... as 
accurate as today's advanced tech- 
niques and machines can make them. 
Whether a single market, a group of 
markets, or the nation as a whole, it 
will pay you to use the accepted 
standard of audience measurement . . . 

Nielsen Station Index 

NSI is a Registered Service Mark of the A. C. Nielsen Company 



a service of A. C. Nielsen Company 

2101 Howard Street, Chicago 4-5, Illinois 

HOI I y court 5-4400 



FOR ALL THE FACTS 

CALL . . . WIRE ... OR WRITE 

CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS 

360 N. Michigan Ave., FRanklin 2-3810 

NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK 

575 Lexington Ave., MUrray Hill 8-1020 

MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIA 

70 Willow Road, DAvenport 1-7700 

HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIFORNIA 

1680 N. Vine, HOIIywood 6-4391 



NOW 
a dynamic 



new 



FORCE 

in Atlanta 




Overwhelming choice of local TV advertisers! 



waga«tvE] 



YOUR CAMPAIGN BELONGS ON 
THE IMPORTANT STATION IN 
ATLANTA A STORER ^^STATION • 

THE dynamic NEW FORCE represented by Storer Television Sales 

IN ATLANTA TELEVISION ! ! ! 

SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



ALL 

® ® ® 



are on 



WDBOTV 



in 



CENTRAL FLORIDA 

ARB reports 



WDBOJV 

DELIVERS 



35.4 
65.4 



%more homes 
thansta."B" 

% more homes 
thansta.C' 



from 9 am to midnight 

in CENTRAL FLORIDA'S 

BILLION DOLLAR MARKET! 



NIELSEN reports 



HOMES REACHED 



STA. 


MON. 


-FRI. 


SUN. 


■ SAT. 


12-3PM 


3-6PM 


6-9PM 


9-Mid. 




(00) 


(00) 


(00) 


(00) 


WDBO 


304 


306 


546 


446 


4 6" 


166 


148 


389 


271 


•c 


61 


193 


295 


243 



WDBOTV 

CH. 6 CBS ORLANDO 

BLAIR tVA has more FACTS ! 
♦ March, 1961 Reports 










© Vol. 15, No. 42 • 16 OCTOBER 1961 

SPONSOR 

THI WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



ARTICLES 

New facts pierce paper jungle 

25 Survey of agency-rep-station paper headaches by Central Media Bureau 
reveals additional cost to agencies can be as high as $500,000 a year 

Night radio: far from dead 

28 Creative programing, discussion shows and emphasis on local news is 
attracting nighttime radio buys on radio stations around the country 

Tv helps Cott put kibosh on 'deals' 

30 Bottler switches from year-round, print-promoted price deals to twin 
flights of quality-oriented spot tv; first phases hikes sales by 20% 

Managing a radio station — more fun than agency work? 

32 "You agency guys would love my job," says Paul Marion of Charlotte. 
No. 1 in a new series contrasting a radio man's with an adman's life 

Savvy video commercials 

35 New York's top film commercial producers scan their recent assign- 
ments and come up with a number of savvy agency film commercial gems 

'Diggin' like sourdoughs' 

37 'Gold rush' promotion by South Dakota station group attracts 175,000 
over one weekend as climax to Dakota Territory Centennial observance 

NEWS: Sponsor- Week 7, Sponsor-Scope 19, Spot Buys 42, Washington 
Week 55, Film Scope 56. Sponsor Hears 58, Sponsor-Week Wrap-Up 60. 
Tv and Radio Newsmakers 71 

DEPARTMENTS: Sponsor Backstage 15, 555 5th 16, Sponsor 
Asks 38, Radio Results 44, Seller's Viewpoint 72, Sponsor Speaks 74, 
Ten-Second Spots 74 



Officers: editor and publisher, Norman R. Glenn; executive vice presi- 
dent, Bernard Piatt; vice president and assistant publisher, Arnold A/pert: 
secretary-treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMUlin; news editor, Ben Bodec; 
managing editor. Alfred J. Jaffe; senior editor. Jo Ranson; midwest editor. 
Given Smart; assistant news editor, Hey ward Ehrlich: associate editors. Jack 
Lindrup, Ben Seff, Ruth Schlanger, Lauren Libow; columnist, Joe Csida; art 
editor, Maury Kurtz; production editor, Phyllis Trieb; editorial research, Carol 
Ferster; reader service, Gail Rubenstein. 

Advertising: a«=i«tant sales manager. Willard Dougherty; southern man | 
ager. Herbert M. Martin, Jr.; midwest manager, Paul Blair; western manager 
George G. Dietrich, Jr.; sales service/production, John Henner. 

Circulation: circulation manager, Jack Rayman, John J. Kelly, Lydia 
Martinez. 

Administrative: office manager, Fred Levine: George Becker. Michael 
Crocco. Svd Guttrnan. Irene Sulzbach. Geraldine Daych, Jo Ganci. Manuela 
Santalla, Mary Kandyba. 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications lac 



SPONSOR PUBUCATIONS INC. combined with TV Executive Editor!*! Circulation, and 
Advertising Offices: 555 5th New York 17, MUrray Hill 7-8080. Chicago Office: 612 
N. Michigan Av. (11), 664-1166. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Ave. So., FAirfax 
2-6528 Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. (28). Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office 
3110 Elm Av.. Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada S9 • year. Othtr 
countries $11 a year. Single copies 40c. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd class 
postage paid at Baltimore. Md. 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 






Why WLOS-TV bought Seven Arts' Volumes I & II 




Theodore A. Bland 

Vice President and General Manager 

WLOS-TV, Ashevifle. Greenville. Spartanbu 




Warner's films of the 50's... 
Money makers of the 60's 




SEVEN ARTS 

ASSOCIATED 

CORP. 



A SUBSIDIARY OF SEVEN ARTS PRODUCTIONS. LTD. 

Motion Pictures- Gigot. starring Jackie Gleason, completed shooting 

in Paris . . . Gene KeHy directing . . . 

Theatre -"Gone with the Wind" in preparation... 

Television -Distribution of films for T.V., Warner's "Films of the 50V... 

Literary Properties-' Romancero" by Jacques Deval... 

Real Estate-The Riviera of the Carribbean, Grand Bahama, in construction... 



NEW YORK: 270 Park Avenue YUkon 61717 

CHICAGO: 8922-D N. La Crosse, Skokie, III. ORchard 4-5105 
DALLAS: 5641 Charlestown Drive ADams 9-2855 

L.A.: 232 So. Reeves Drive GRanite 6-1564-STate 8-8276 

For list of TV stations programming Warner Bros. "Films of 
the 50's" see Third Cover SRDS (Spot TV Rates and Data) 



By Any Yardstick 



THE BIG ON 



Takes the Measure 




ARB 
PULSE 

NIELSEN 

TRENDEX 



WKRG-1V 

CHANNEL 5 MOBILE, ALA. 

Call Avery-Knodel, Representative, 
or C. P. Persons, Jr., General Manager 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 




Latest tv and 
radio developments ot 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



16 October 1961 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



SPOT MERRY-GO-ROUND? 

Fairfax Cone proposes networks rotate all tv spots 
except specials to solve tv programing 'disgrace' 



Television advertisers should be 
rotated like magazine advertisers 
through all shows except specials — 
according to a proposal made this 
week by Fairfax M. Cone. 

This highly controversial proposal 
was made in Chicago before the 
Broadcast Advertising Club. Cone is 
chairman of the executive commit- 
tee of Foote, Cone & Belding. 

The spot-rotation innovation was 
proposed as the solution to how to 
provide different programing service 
simultaneously, and to prevent all 
advertisers from seeking the same 
type of show at the same time. 

Informal reaction of network offi- 
cials was to dub the proposal "ideal- 
istic" and "unrealistic." For it to 
work all advertisers would have to 
relinquish their preferred positions 
within certain shows. 

Cone's proposal, regarded as tv's 
first reply to FCC Chairman Minow's 
"vast wasteland" description would, 
Cone said, "balance the weekly fare 
'between regular and special enter- 
tainment features and regular and 
special features in fields of contro- 
versy and ideas — even in the arts." 

Speaking frankly on a variety of 
subjects,' Cone called "Bus Stop" on 
tv "the nastiest, ugliest show" he 
has ever seen in the medium. 

He complained of advertisers pur- 
suing "the numbers," buying the 
audience he wants and serving no 
other. 



Instead of suggesting more chan- 
nels, he proposed that the networks 
cease their pursuit of the same 
mass of viewers hour after hour. 
"Television, unhappily," he re- 
marked, "seems to be aimed pri- 
marily at the people whose tastes 
can't be changed and whose sights 
can't be raised." 

He cited studies to show that even 
"if you are getting the bulk of the 
gum-chewers and the lip-movers and 
the bulk of the no-opinion holders" 
an advertiser would reach no more 
than "a third of the great body of 
sensible and sensitive Americans," 
this being a bad business practice. 

Accusing television of reaching 
only "the majority of viewers" but 
not "the majority of the public," he 
suggested the solution was massive 
spot rotation since, in effect, tv or 
almost all of it would sooner or 
later be spot television anyway. 



TvAR's PER-FAMILY 
ANNUAL SPOT FIGURES 

Figures on a per-family basis for 
spot tv in various markets based on 
1960, the latest year of FCC data for 
three-station markets, have been 
made up by TvAR for its own use. 

Average per-family tv spot invest- 
ment is bigger in biggest markets, 
$9.67 in the top ten, declining uni- 
formly to $5.41 in markets out of the 
top 40. 

(Continued on page 8, col. 2) 



Magazines on radio 
spending spree 

More magazines are using 
network radio than ever before 
and they're also using it more 
heavily when they do go in. 

To take a sample, just at CBS 
Radio in the past year, the fol- 
lowing national magazines have 
been in: Saturday Evening 
Post, Ladies' Home Journal, 
Life, Look, Time, McCall's Red- 
book, Reader's Digest, and Bet- 
ter Homes and Gardens. 

There's also a local boom of 
newspapers in many major mar- 
kets. 

Keep in mind these are cash 
deals and have nothing to do 
with promotion exchanges run- 
ning between air and print. 



GRAHAM CRUSADE'S 89 
MARKETS FOR HOURS 

(Chicago): Smaller tv markets 
across the country have been getting 
a substantial boost from the Billy 
Graham Crusade (Waiter F. Bennett). 

In 89 markets Graham has bought 
eight consecutive nights for full 
hours for videotapes of the crusade 
in Philadelphia this September., 

Revenue involved is substantial 
since one-time hour rate is being 
paid in almost every case. The stig- 
ma to paid religion has vanished, 
apparently, since the agency re- 
ported that station tape facilities, 
not program approval were their 
only difficulty. But they've now 
made kinescopes to solve this. 



i 

! 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



SPONSOR- WEEK 16 October 1961 



PLOTNIK TO KING 

AS CREATIVE DIRECTOR 

Gene Plotnik has joined King 
Features Syndicate as director of 
creative services for the tv division. 
He was director of public rela- 
tions for Screen Gems for the past 
four years and 
before that 
tv editor of 
The Billboard. 
Plotnik will 
be responsi- 
ble for exploi- 
tation of Pop- 
W ^k eye and other 

Gene Plotnik King Features 

tv properties. This will include sales 
promotion and merchandising. 

He will report to Al Brodax, King's 
tv director, and will work with him 
in developing newsworthy and ex- 
ploitable new tv programs. 




NBC Films has $2 mil. 
all time record quarter 

NBC Films reports a record quar- 
ter of $2 million for the period end- 
ing 1 October, announced its new 
president, Morris Rittenberg. 

What's remarkable is that all of 
this volume is through re-run syndi- 
cation sales of two off-network 
shows, Best of Groucho and The 
Deputy, and a regional sale of 
R.C.M.P. to McCulloch Company for 
its chain-saws. 

National sales manager of NBC 
Films since its re-shaping this sum- 
mer is William P. Breen. 



Penfield's tv check 

for commercials 

(San Francisco): Penfield & Asso- 
ciates has developed a "Tv Spot 
Check" service to test and compare 
commercials. 

The test can be done before or 
after they are on the air. An unusual 
feature is that segments of a com- 
mercial or common components can 
be tested before the entire com- 
mercial is produced. 



TvAR's spot figures 

(Continued from page 7, col. 2) 

Biggest market was Chicago where 
$12.76 per family was spent in tv 
spot. 

Here are spot billings per tv fam- 
ily ranked in descending groups: 

Over $12: New York, Chicago. 

Over $10: Los Angeles, Buffalo, 
Houston, Denver. 

Over $9: Philadelphia, Boston, St. 
Louis, Washington, Baltimore, Kan- 
sas City, Milwaukee, Seattle-Tacoma, 
Miami, Columbus, 0., Portland, Ore., 
Sacramento-Stockton, Tampa. 

Over $8: Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, 
New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Ro- 
chester, N. Y., Spokane, Phoenix, 
Honolulu, Hartford-New Haven-New 
Britain-Waterbury. 

Over $7: San Francisco, Cleveland, 
Minneapolis- St. Paul, Dallas -Ft. 
Worth, Atlanta, Albany-Schenectady- 
Troy, Omaha, San Antonio, Fresno, 
Indianapolis - Bloomington, Des 
Moines-Ames. 

Over $6: Memphis, Norfolk, Tulsa, 
Wichita-Hutchinson, El Paso, 

Over $5: Nashville, Scranton- 
Wilkes-Barre, Salt Lake City, Knox- 
ville, Peoria, Youngstown, Amarillo, 
Las Vegas, Harrisburg- Lancaster, 
Portland, Me., Bay City-Flint-Sagi- 
naw, Mobile-Pensacola. 

Over $4: Cedar Rapids, Richmond, 
Little Rock, Madison, Orlando, Ft. 
Wayne, Chattanooga, Bakersfield, 
South Bend, Albuquerque, Tucson, 
Colorado Springs, Charleston-Hunt- 
ington, Springfield - Decatur -etc., 
Harrisburg, lll.-etc, Roanoke. 

Over $3: Greenville, Altoona-Johns- 
town, Austin-Rochester. 

Over $2: Evansville - Henderson, 
Green Bay-Marinette. 

Detroit was not included because 
FCC data does not include CKYW-TV. 

Averages, besides top ten and 
below-40, given above, are: markets 
11-20, $8.93; 21-30, $8.16; 31-40, $6.92. 
Markets of two or more tv areas, 
such as Hartford-New Haven, are 
included in dollar brackets above 
but not in calculated averages. 



NORTON NAMED AMPEX 
LATIN MANAGER 

Ampex International has appoint- 
ed Charles E. Norton as regional 
marketing manager for Latin Amer- 
ica. 

Norton will handle magnetic re- 
corders, tape 
and other 
Ampex de- 
vices in the 
rapidly grow- 
ing Latin 
American 
market. 

He was for- 
merly video Charles E. Norton 
products marketing manager of Am- 
pex International in Redwood City. 
Before that Norton was southern 
area manager for RCA equipment. 




August net tv up 
15% to $58 mil. 

August 1961 network tv gross time 
billings were up 14.8% over that 
month last year, reports TvB. 

The month's billings were $58,- 
403,914, compared to $50,867,085 in 
1960. 

Both ABC TV and NBC TV regis- 
tered large gains for August, 27.4% 
and 24.5%, respectively. 

Network figures individually were 
ABC TV, $14,484,650; CBS TV, $21,- 
446,651, and NBC TV, $22,472,613. 

During August parts of the day for 
all networks together were as fol- 
lows: daytime up 20.8% to $18.5 
million, nighttime up 12.3% to $39.9 
million; daily up 23.5% to $16.5 mil- 
lion, and weekend up 2.1% to $2.0 
million. 



Zerex into radio for 
automotive audience 

DtiPont Zerex (BBDO) has gone 
into network radio on weekends to 
reach car drivers on behalf of the 
anti-freeze product. 

News and sports bought by Zerex 
on CBS Radio and ABC Radio are 
worth an estimated $75,000 so far. 



8 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 






Miss M'Goo? 



On the principle that every American 
girl should have a chance to enter a 
beauty contest, M'Goo's— a beatnik 
hangout on Hollywood Boulevard— en- 
tered its own contestant, Miss M'Goo. 
for the title of Miss Los Angeles. 

Southern California, of course, is 
where things are always happening. 
Sometimes funny or off-beat things, but 
more often serious matters— new prob- 
lems to solve, new needs to satisfy, new 
conditions to cope with— all part of this 
market's explosive growth. And to keep 
up with the constantly changing scene, 
Southern Californians keep tuning in 
knx kaleidoscope, with Bob Ferris. 



Every day knx kaleidoscope fo- 
cuses on a different story and presents it 
in depth, with on-the-scene excitement. 
It's the inside story ... as told by the 
people who are living it . . . and the 
man on the street who is affected by it. 
One day it's the Miss M'Goo contest . . . 
another day the narcotics problem, the 
black market baby racket, or L. A.'s 
own battle of Bunker Hill against slums. 
Whatever is up in Southern California, 
Bob Ferris is there. And every day, 
Monday through Friday from 6:30 to 
7:00 pm, thousands of listeners are 
there, too. No wonder more people lis- 
ten to knx, more often, than to any 



other station in Los Angeles. 

Such exciting coverage of the local 
scene is typical of the idea radio you 
find on all seven CBS Owned Radio Sta- 
tions. One reason why they command 
more attention than any other group of 
stations in America. No matter how you 
measure it — total homes reached each 
week, families reached in metropolitan 
areas, households reached in metropol- 
itan county areas — the CBS Owned 
Radio Stations reach more people than 
any other group of stations.* And more 
people who are tuned in fo listen. 

The CBS Owned Radio Stations 



KNX Los Angeles WCBS New York WCAU Philadelphia WBBM Chicago WEEI Boston KMOX St. Louis KCBS San Francisco 

Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



AGEMENT, 1961 



SPONSOR- WEEK 16 October 1961 



TvB's STATUS REPORT 
FOR 1961 FIRST HALF 

Viewing levels and advertising ex- 
penditures for tv both advanced in 
the first half of 1961, notes a TvB 
status report on the state of the 
industry. 

Average audiences increased 4.8% 
to 13,882,000 homes in the average 
minute. At night the increase was 
3.1%, to 21,058,000 homes. 

Total gross time billings for both 
network and spot advanced 3.7% 
over 1960, to reach $675,796,000 from 
January to June, 1961. 

The average U. S. tv home spent 
slightly more time watching tv in the 
first half of 1961, five hours and 22 
minutes, or three minutes more than 
in 1960. 

Tv viewing was up most heavily in 
morning, 9.3%, and afternoon, 6.8%. 
The average audience of network 
nighttime shows was up 5.1% in 
homes. But week-end network day- 
time shows fell, 4.2%. 

Network costs-per-thousand rose 
by 3.0% to $2.73. Evening shows' 
CPM rose 1.0% to $3.98 and day- 
time shows' CPM went up 5.8% to 
$2.01. 

Both the percentage of homes and 
the number of homes using tv dur- 
ing average minutes has been in- 
creasing gradually, according to 
Nielsen figures. The total day went 
up from 29.2% back in 1959 to 29.3% 
in 1960 and then to 29.6% in 1961. 
Comparable figures for morning are 
13.1%, 13.2%, and 13.9%; for after- 
noon, 23.8%, 24.2%, and 24.9%; and 
for evening, 45.3%, 45.2%, and 44.9%. 

Average tv usage for the nation 
has fluctuated between 5:15 and 
5:22 since 1957. In 1961 to June the 
individual regions ranked as fol- 
lows: East Central, 5:52; Northeast, 
5:24; Pacific, 5:14; West Central, 5:12, 
a-d South, 5:11. This reflects, since 
1950, a large rise for the East Cen- 
tral and Pacific, and a decline for 
the West Central. 



Broadcast news pact 
for time and RKO 

Time, Inc. and KKO General 
lia\e entered a cooperative 
agreement for ''Time Life 
Broadcast News." 

Involved are all the RKO 
General stations plus newsmen 
of lime, Life, Fortune, and 
Sports Illustrated. 

The initial purpose of the 
agreement is to supply news for 
radio on tape. 

Supplj of five segments of 
five minutes each weekly begins 
in November and will expand. 



AAAA reports on what 
thought leaders say 

Thought leaders' criticism of ad- 
vertising stems from objections to 
particular ads but might be altered 
if they had more information. 

These were among the findings of 
the AAAA study conducted by the 
Group Attitudes division of Hill and 
Knowlton. Some 180 college, re- 
ligious, business, editorial, and gov- 
ernment people or leaders were in- 
terviewed. 

In brief, here's what the AAAA 
found: 

Nine out of 10 regard advertising 
as productive but may question its 
"side effects." 

Religious leaders doubt that ad- 
vertising fulfills its social obliga- 
tions and feel that irresponsible ad- 
vertising makes business morally 
suspect. 

"Advertising is a cultural depres- 
sant, tending to destroy individual- 
ism," think sociologists. Economists 
criticize non-informative or brand 
competition advertising. 

Thought leaders agree advertising 
influences people to buy unneces- 
sary things. 

Despite objections, about 80% 
would adjust their views if facts 
and arguments so convinced them. 



JOSEPH IS MS-FB 
MEDIA CHIEF, V.P. 

Julius Joseph Jr. has been named 
vice president and director of media 
for Maxwell Sackheim - Franklin 
Bruck, Inc. 

He has been in the media field for 
more than 25 years and was formerly 
account executive and media super- 
visor at KHC&A. 



News directors angered 
at N. Y. radio limits 
to Mayoralty debates 

Local stations are running into 
difficulties in debates like the Ken- 
nedy-Nixon ones of last year. 

In New York incumbent Mayor 
Wagner had a debate with Republi- 
can nominee Lefkowitz. 

Trouble began when tv debate on 
WPIX was offered to radio for simul- 
cast only. WOR and WNYC carried 
it but WNEW refused because it was 
denied news editorial judgment on 
excerpts and delayed broadcast. 

Political figures involved, not the 
broadcasters, made the limitation 
that left several news directors in 
New York hopping mad. There was 
no such limit on the Presidential 
debates. 

After the telecast radio stations 
WMCA and WNEW began rebroad- 
casting excerpts anyway, defying the 
ban. WMCA asserts the material 
was public domain legally one hour 
after telecast. How it obtained the 
tapes is not known. 



AMST facts to Congress 
on deintermixture 

(St. Louis): The AMST held a strat- 
egy meeting this week to formulate 
a reply to FCC proposals of deinter- 
mixtures in markets beyond the 
eight already designated. 

Jack Harris of KPRC-TV, Houston, 
association president since its 
founding in 1956, revealed that perti- 
nent facts were being collected for 
transmission to Congress. 



10 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 60 



^* 



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Avoid audienceanemiaitus* 

Trust Taft AND ABC to deliver the 



largest audiences in four great markets. # 



<*<=>q$ 



Cincinnati 

WKRG 
TV 

am 
fm 



Columbus Birmingham Lexington * 



WTVN 
TV 

am 
fm 



WBRC 
TV 

am 
fm 



WKYT 
TV 




Nervous twitch caused by consistently low audience count. 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



* r«o* 



s 



11 



Bowling is now 

the no. 3 sporl 
in TV today 







"CHAMPIONSHIP 
BOWLING" 

# Now going into its 
8th straight year 

#26 brand new 
one-hour shows 

% Feature bowling's 
top stars 

Fred Wolf, bowling's 
No. 1 sportscaster 



Produced in cooperation with 
AMF PINSPOTTERS, INC. 




tremendous ratings, even against footbal 
major league baseball, and feature filmi 



12 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 




and 

'Championship 
Bowling" is the 
10. 1 bowling show 

MEMO TO AGENCIES: 

Don't worry about time slots and market availabilities . . . we 
have the choice ones already blocked out for you . . . just call us. 
50% or 25% sponsorship available in markets coast-to-coast. 



UJa^SckuiuaH^u "* 



c. 

75 East Wacker Drive/Chicago 1, Illinois 
Phone: FRanklin 2-4392 

SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 1^ 



IT'S THOSE LITTLE "EXTRAS" THAT HELP BUILD THE 



QUALITY TOUCH 




Quality reporting is more than just 
game statistics. WFAA-TV's award win- 
ning Sports Director Wes Wise gets the 
human interest aspects, the "whys and 
wherefores," the real meat behind im- 
portant sports developments which has 
won for him a large and loyal sports 
audience. With two pro teams and those 
Southwest Conference powerhouses in 



the Dallas area, that "sports beat" in- 
evitably shows up on WFAA-TV! 

But whether it's a sports audience, 
women's, children or combined, you'll 
find this same quality touch prevalent in 
all facets of WFAA-TV's operation. Why 
not call your PETRYMAN for good 
avails during the popular fall season? 



WFAA-TV 

channel 8 Q 



P**l a I C« .. inc.] Tkt Original Station Reymtntati 




iCOfcOHA (3&kt&i ■ 



DALLAS 



14 



DALLAS MORNING NEWS 

SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 




by Joe Csida 






Sponsor 



.'■> 




'I like Newton Minow' 

Last Ma\. in Washington. I thought my per- 
sonal relationship with Newton N. Minow, Chair- 
man of the Federal Communications Commis- 
sion was off to a pleasant and promising start. I 
have always been and am most interested in 
meeting and developing the warmest possible 
association with bright, earnest people, working 
for what I i in my simple-minded way) consider 
the good. Newton Minow struck me as that type of a person when 
he did the VIPers the honor of turning up as our guest on the eve 
of the NAB convention. And the next day after he made his "waste- 
land" speech I still felt that way about him. 

I did a '"backstage" on his speech, in which I said I was quite im- 
pressed with him and the talk. I criticized him only on the grounds 
that possibly he should have been a mite more mindful of the pub- 
lic relations damage he was doing the broadcasters and the tele- 
vision industry by making the kind of speech he made. I felt this 
was particularly true, since he obviously hadn't had the opportu- 
nity as of that date to find out how the majority of the men who run 
the nations networks and stations would react to his ideas. And I 
considered it unduly harsh of him to kick them in the teeth in pub- 
lic as hard as he did in that speech before getting to know them, 
their intent, and their motives better. 

Mr. Minow wrote me a nice personal note, which I didn't use in 
the column and don't intend using now, since it was ] personal. And 
I didn't see or hear from him again till Friday (22 September! 
when he made his children's program talk before the largest crowd 
a Radio & Television Executives' Society luncheon had ever at- 
tracted. On that occasion. I went into the little room set aside for 
the Chairman and the other dignitaries who were to be his com- 
panions on the dais. Making all allowances for the fact that Mr. 
Minow was being as harrassed as the Guest of Honor usually is at 
functions of that type, I still felt that he greeted me somewhat more 
coldly than I expected. 

Confusing the McMillin and Csida columns 

Later, when he had completed his talk, I think I possibly may have 
run into the reason for his frigid response to my greeting. I ran 
into a couple of fellow VIPers, Morrie Novik and Joe Ream, in the 
Roosevelt halls after the talk, and I made some highly complimentary 
remarks about the Chairman's talk. Both Morrie and Joe took the 
attitude that I was drastically revising my opinion of Mr. Minow 
and his notions. They were under the impression that I had written 
several columns chastising the Chairman and expressing caustic dis- 
agreement with his views, his style and his general comportment. 
It was only after the most careful questioning that I discovered 
(Please turn to page 53) 



I 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



rr who knows 
better than 
my salesmen 
how our spot 
schedule on 
WSUN pays off?" 




THIS IS HOW C. J. STOLL. MOBILE HOME 
DEALER IN ST. PETERSBURG. FLORIDA. 
AND PAST PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL 
MOBILE HOME DEALERS ASSOCIATION, 
FEELS ABOUT WSUN RADIO. 



"Whenever we prepare a budget for 
advertising my salesmen always re- 
mind me of the important results 
delivered to us by WSUN radio 
and insist that a good portion of our 
advertising dollars be spent on this 
station. I ask you, who knows bet- 
ter than my salesmen how our spot 
schedule on WSUN pays off?" This 
is how most local advertisers feel 
about the Suncoast's greatest cover- 
age radio station. It will pay off for 
you, too! 



Ratings vary from survey to survey; 
the true yardstick is SALES! Dollar 
for dollar by any survey, your best 
Tampa - St. Petersburg buv 

WSUN radio 62 

Tampa -St. Petersburg 

Natl. Rep: VENARD, RINTOUl & McCONNELL 
S.E. Rep.- JAMES S. AYERS 



15 





Minow upheld 

I appreciate John McMillin's column 
on Roy Collins in your 28 August 
edition (which I'm reading at home 
with my private home subscription). 

When the Governor was one of 
the final two candidates for the NAB 
presidency, he made this comment : 
"You must realize that by nature I'm 
an advocate, and I'll never work at 
any job where I can't be such." 

He further made the point that he 
would never advocate anything that 
was against his principles but stated 
that he felt the broadcast industry 
and a heavy majority of its members 
individually would learn that his 
principles and theirs were akin. 

He has a hard job, but he has what 
it takes to do the job. He needs 



a friendly press (which doesn't mean 
he should be above industry criti- 
cism). In view of his newness on 
the job, the broadcast press should 
have been friendlier and more en- 
couraging. In his eagerness to get 
going. I think he made a few mis- 
takes, but this will happen to anyone. 
As I said above, I appreciate your 
article — and I find few points of even 
minor disagreement. 

Merrill Lindsay 
vice president 
WSOY 
Decatur, III. 

We even get 'down-under' 

SPONSOR reallv gets around . . . even 

"Down-Under." 

In Julv, WWJ-Radio ran an ad 




WAVE -TV viewers have 
28.8% more TEETH 

—and keep 'em sparkling with 28.8% 
more tooth paste, powders and brushes! 



That's because WAVE-TV has 28.8% more 
viewers, from sign-on to sign-off, in any 
average week. Source: N.S.I., July, 1961. 

CHANNEL 3 • MAXIMUM POWER 
NBC 

LOUISVILLE 

THE KATZ AGENCY, National Representatives 




concerning the station's "The Total 
Story" brochure. Today's mail 
brought a letter from Radio 2 HD 
Newcastle. N.S.W., Australia, men- 
tioning sponsor and requesting a 
copy of the brochure. 

Previously, we had received simi- 
lar requests from Adelaide. Honolulu, 
and many markets in the U. S. A. 
Nice going. 

A. Glenn Kyker 
promotion manager 
WW J Stations 
Detroit, Mich. 

Repeating a boo-boo 

I suggest you reprint (I am enclosing 
a copy of it) your boo-boo in your 
next issue. How do you justifv tell- 
ing one how to divide his time when 
you can't even add it! 

W. J. Lewis 
sales director 
W-TEN 
Albany, .V. Y. 

• The "boo-boo" referred to was in 18 September. 
"Sponsor- Week." It ran — "BTS also prepared a break- 
down of how a salesman should spend his best 25 hours 
jf the week. 9 a.m. to noon and 2 to 5 p.m. daily." We 
picked up the farts from a BTS release, and thought 
that BTS might have allowed for coffee-breaks and 
thereby lost a little time. 

Proper designation 

I have just received my copy of "Tv 
Basics" and I am disturbed to find, 
you have listed WLUK-TY in 
Marinette. 

For a magazine that is normally 
the first with information, it is sur- 
prising that WLUK is listed as Mar- 
inette as well as Green Bay when we 
have had the Green Bay designation 
for a period in excess of two years. 
Trust we can look forward to a 
revision. 

Raymond W. Grandle 
general manager 
WLUK-TV 
Green Bay, Wise. 

• SPONSOR published the designation as submitted 
to us. WLrK-TV was listed as Green-Bay-Marinette. 

* * * 

On page 58 of your "Tv Basics" 
supplement of SPONSOR (11 Septem- 
ber 1961) you list the winners of the 
1961 American Tv Commercials 
Festival in 30 product categories. Un- 
der the category "Gift Items" you 
list the title of the commercial "Take 
a Picture.' the advertiser Eastman 
Kodak Company, and the product 
"Scott rail brands)." The product 
is Kodak cameras and film. 

J. G. Scott 

assistant television, manager 

Eastman Kodak Co. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



16 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



Cosmography Broug, t 



w: 



f E live, we have it on reliable authority 1 , on 
one planet of one star of some two billion 
in our (that's the editorial our) galaxy. These 
stars are billions of miles from each other. There 
are some billion similar galaxies which are quadril- 
lions of miles apart. Between is space, probably 
empty. 

Our earth is about 1/2,000,000,000,000,000,000 
of the works. 



£> 



°% 



'o 



~& 






That seems to be a suitably self-effacing framework 
for our next observation. 

Only one station in television markets of three sta- 
tions or more, U.S.A., Planet Earth, Our Star, Our 
Galaxy, surveyed by an equally reliable authority 2 , 
had more than 50% of BOTH total homes and 
metro share. That station was WMT-TV, Cedar 
Rapids-Waterloo, CBS Television for Eastern Iowa, 
represented by The Katz Agency, Inc., affiliated 
with WMT Radio, K-WMT, Fort Dodge; WEBC, 
Duluth. How do you express that as a fraction of 
1/2,000,000,000,000,000,000: 



'Hubble Atlas of Calaxii - 
2 ARB, Jure '6 I . 




16 OCTOBER 1961 



17 



\ 



\, 



local 



\ 



«NMHpnp 



WPIX-ll services New Yorkers by delivering local news and special events with consistent fijfo 
excellence and dependability-as attested to by our six Sylvania Awards, two Emmy 
Awards, the Headliner Award and the DuPont Award. Over the years wpix-11 has been 
the only New York Independent to provide live television news on a regular basis as part 
of its service to the community. One more important reason why wpix is New York's 
prestige independent. Where are your 60 second commercials tonight? m 



N 



W YORK'S PRESTIGE INDEPENDENT 





16 OCTOBER 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Interpretation and commentary 

on most significant tv/ radio 

and marketing news of the week 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



This is a special report on the images that the buyers and sellers of spot radio 
have of each other these days. 

What especially actuated SPONSOR-SCOPE into making this inquiry : radio stations 
have lately in swelling numbers been asking their reps: what's been happening to 
new national spot business? 

The basic implication of that query may be construed as this: (1) fall business hasn't 
come up to expectations; (2) can the reason point to underlying problems that spot 
radio ought to take to heart immediately and see what can be done about them. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE's crosssection of inquiry took in media directors, timebuyers 
and reps and broadcasters and here, reduced to essence, is what they had to say : 

MEDIA DIRECTORS : The time seems to have come for spot radio to take a complete 
inventory in how it should be presented and sold. The lack of market information 
and knowledge of their stations' characteristics in audience and general comport is appalling 
among many rep salesmen. It is their business to keep uptodate on all the vital areas that 
will make you sit up and notice the medium. 

TIMEBUYERS: What makes it often hard to buy radio is that a goodly number of 
stations change their formats so often and so fast that we can't tell what we're buy- 
ing. Some of them go on shuttling from Top 40 to general appeal and back again with little 
understanding of what this can mean at the buying end. It confuses our conceptions of 
what a station sounds like and unless we know what a station sounds like, we and 
the advertiser don't know what kind of audience we're getting. 

REPS : Most of the people on the creative level in agencies are tv-oriented. They're 
loath to find out what radio today can do to sell goods. They don't know how to write for 
radio, and they don't want to know, since tv gives them a more flamboyant showcase for 
their talent — and helps win awards, which, you would think, they consider more important 
than selling. And at the media level, the majority of timebuyers care for nothing but 
numbers. Quality is of minor concern to them. All they seek is quantity. 

STATIONMEN: Echo the above sentiments and are quite disturbed by the buyers' lip- 
service to, if not total lack of, interest in qualitative factors. They're bitter about this: 
they toil and spend on public service, aiming to build station personality and image, but 
the national advertiser and his agency keep playing the numbers game. Overlooked 
is the station's impressive record as a prime mover of goods and services in its locality. 






National spot radio buying took a moderate turn for the better last week. 

Radio buys out of New York included: Bayer Aspirin (DFS), 13 weeks; Pall Mall 
(SSC&B) ; U. S. Tobacco's Model brand (Donahue & Coe), 60 markets, multiple stations per 
market, three flights; Chapstick (Gumbinner), 50 markets, 10 to 30 spots a week, 13 weeks. 

Chicago radio action included: Florists Telegraph Delivery (KM&J), 400 markets, 
week preceding Thanksgiving; there'll be another schedule for Christmas. 

Here are insights into spot tv strategy being mulled by midwest accounts. 

PARKER PEN (Burnett) : Will use about 65 major markets for a pre-Christmas cam- 
paign, with 75 rating points per week for both day and night minutes the criteria. 

GILLETTE LABS (North) : Aiming in some markets— the list is now over 80— for 225 
rating points a week in behalf of Thoroxin tablets and Duramid 12, a long-acting deconges- 
tant. In Indianapolis, where Duramid's been heavily tested, the goal's 400 points. 

CHUN KING (BBDO Minneapolis) : Revamping second and third flight strategy; in- 
stead of fringe minutes, it's to be strictly prime time. 



• 16 OCTOBER 1961 



19 



■1 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The buying pare in national spot tv was about as sturdy last week as any single 
week since the fall spree started. 

One of the buys that reflected a particular omen: General Mills' Cheerios (D-F-S) found 
so few stations interested in selling 30-second (station-break) segments that the en- 
tire new schedule of 13 weeks was switched to minutes. 

Other spot tv activity out of New York: Custom Farms (JWT), 20's, I.D.'s, four 
weeks, starting 21 October; Gravy Train (B&B), 20's and late minutes, three weeks; Scott 
Paper (JWT), in markets where network clearances are not obtainable, 10 weeks; Mrs. Fil- 
bert's margarine (Y&R), six weeks. 30 October; Colgate's Congestaid (L&N), three flights, the 
first starting 12 November; P&G's Liquid Prell (Grey), night minutes in about 30 markets; 
Schick (NC&K), nine weeks, in three flights. 

Chit of the midwest : Dow Chemical (MacManus. J&A), Christmas promotion for Ben- 
Mont gift products, two flights: S. C. Johnson's Glade CB&B). 



It may be a little too early to come to conclusions on how the new nighttime 
network tv season's shaping up, but from comment gathered by SPONSOR-SCOPE 
among New York agency tv department executives the preliminary picture has some 
discernible shadows of things to come. 

Without attempting to pinpoint prospective winners, these observations lean to these ex- 
pectations and broad generalizations: 

NETWORK POSITIONS: NBC TV has so far come up stronger that in recent years 
with its newcomers and bids not only to make it a closer three-horse race than ever but to press 
its competitors hard for first place on most nights of the week and average minute tune-in 
across the seven-night board. 

WESTERNS: There's still plenty of power in a couple of the holdovers, Wagon Train 
and Bonanza, and a pretty good bet in the elongated Wells Fargo. Little strength elsewhere. 

SITUATION COMEDIES: NBC TV seems to have come up with two or three clicks 
and two of the CBS TV holdovers should continue to hit the mark: otherwise, and that includes 
the new cartooners, the outlook is not so hunkv-dory. 

CRIME-SUSPENSE: Only one among the newcomers that seems to suggest it is going 
places is the Dick Powell opus; however, this type, like adventure shows, takes a little longer to 
get rolling; hence, there may be some surprises. Holdovers are showing vulnerability. 

ADVENTURE ANTHOLOGIES : They're picking Dr. Kildare, especially on quality. 

LIVE COMEDY: No sensations are anticipated. 

Note of caution: Remember there were a number of bad guesses last fall. 



NBC TV affiliates are being permitted by the network to sell — at coop rates, of 
course — a scattering of nighttime minutes. 

The opportunities: four minutes a week in the 7:30-8:30 span; two minutes in Meet 
the Press; markets left open by Sealtest in connection with the Bob Newhart show; all spot! 
in Saturday Night at the Movies when the film runs after 11 p.m. 



P&G has yet to make a decision on whether to expand the marketing of its new 
label on cooking oil, namely, Puritan. 

Like Crisco oil, Puritan has been undergoing area tests, but the difference is this: the new 
Crisco version is already being promoted by an expanding spot tv campaign. 



20 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 196 ill 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Credit Bates as the agency participating in a record number of nighttime shows 
on the tv networks this season: the tally is 42 program series. 

By night of the week the participations in shows stacks up as following: Sunday, 4; 
Monday, 8; Tuesday, 4; Wednesday, 3; Thursday, 9; Friday, 7; Saturday, 7. 

Not included are the Doug Edwards newsstrip, Jack Paar and Sunday News Special 
(CBS). 

There must be big money in the weight-control urge: Metrecal (K&E) has 
obligated itself for an additional $400,000 in night and daytime minute participa- 
tions, with this bundle going to NBC TV. 

At the start of the season, Metrecal, a Mead Johnson product, had committed itself about 
$1.5-million worth of the same thing at ABC TV. 

AH three tv networks are in there furiously bidding for R. T. French's ( JWT) 
daytime budget, which for 1962 will run around $1.5 million. 

About $200,000 of this comes from the Bird Care division (Foley). 

For the networks it's quite a cut from what it was for 1961. The cause: French is going 
to do more print next year, whereas this year the policy was 90% tv and the leavings for 
print 

Provision has also been made in the French budget for a substantial showing in spot. 

ABC TV has changed is conception of how its business review undertaking 
should be sold, admitting it had too tough a row to hoe by spotting it as a half -hour 
Sundays. 

The revised thinking: five-minute segments after the 11 p.m. news. It'll be tagged 
the Business Day. 

Perhaps the strangest paradox at the moment in air media is this: day tv 
audiences keep growing, but the networks are not only pricing their daytime inven- 
tory in the other direction but searching for ways to keep as much net from this as 
possible. 

Witness NBC TV's request of affiliates that they forego compensation from the sever- 
al half -hour strips which the network offers as bonus shows; that is, an advertiser 
gets a quarter -hour of them free for every four quarter-hours he buys. 

The move has broad implications for all the networks. What NBC, in effect, is saying 
to affiliates : if we don't collect on a segment of our time, you don't either. 

(See 9 October SPONSOR-SCOPE, page 20. for Nielsen evidence of daytime tv's average 
audience upward trend.) 

If you should be confused over the various types of scatter plans as practiced in 
daytime network tv, a few definitions are in order. 

And here they are: 

SINGLE SHOW SCATTER PLAN: You buy three minutes and you're entitled to 
spot them on the same program series on three different days. 

MULTIPLE SHOW SCATTER PLAN: You buy as many minutes as you wish and 
scatter them on as many shows as your batch of minutes allows. 

ROTATION SCATTER PLAN: You buy a minute on a program and the network is 
privileged to change the position of your commercial from day to day and week to 
week. 

• 16 OCTOBER 1961 21 







SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



ABC TV seems bent on lending an air of exclusivity to the daytime Ernie Ford 
half hour strip, which makes its bow 2 April 1962. 

It's limiting the strip's sponsorship to six (across the weekday board) advertisers. 

What it was asking for Ford last week : $17,500 a week for five five-minute segments a 
week, which figures out to S3, 500 per commercial minute. Contracts would be for a 
minimum of 26 weeks, which adds up to $455,000 for each of the proposed six advertisers. 

P.S. : Ford will do one out of every three commercials. 

The trend of the Hollywood film makers toward putting the bulk of their ad- 
vertising largess into tv continues. Columbia Pictures (K&E) has taken $3 million 
out of print for use in network and spot tv. 

Disney, which is now in over 200 tv markets on a picture-by-picture basis, made a similar 
switch lately and is spending for spot tv at the rate of $2 million a year. 

Columbia, incidentally, got its big awakening about the effectiveness of spot tv when it 
used 15 markets at an expenditure of $150,000 for the plugging of Guns of Navarone. 

Interesting marketing sidelight: about 70% of box-office revenue derives from the 
16-to-28 age bracket, which offers a pretty sharp clue for tv audience pinpointing. Columbia 
appears to be reaching for the other 30% via news on ABC TV. 

Chicago reps last week thought it a little too grim on the part of the Kitchens 
of Sara Lee (Hill, RM&S) to say it wouldn't buy any spots in or adjacent to gun- 
slinging westerns or crime shows. 

Says Sara Lee: we're trying to build a quality image for our products and so we're 
taking a firm stand against having them identified with violence. 

As time goes on the networks will find it tougher to dispose of alternate half- 
hour shows as such to the No. Two advertiser. 

The reason is sheer economics: a minute in an alternate half hour costs 20% of the hour 
rate, whereas a minute in an hour show with multiple sponsors costs 16-2/3% of the hourly 
rate. ^ 

About a year ago the automotive giants were wondering whether the compacts 
ought to be assigned to individual agencies for maximum efficiency. 

The interim has proved this strategy entirely unnecessary. 
What has happened: agencies with several lines of the same company's output 
have staffed up a separate creative group for the compacts. 

Ollie Treyz thinks the agencies can play an important role in the development 
of network-controlled programing. 

So he told a working panel on network-agency relationship at the 4A's Central Region 
meeting in Chicago last week. 

The ABC TV President said that the network was already deep in the throes of putting 
together its program structure for 1962-63 and that now was the time when the ideas are 
^till in the amorphous stage — for agency people to get in there with appraisals and sugges 
tions. Not when the schedule has already been firmed up. 

Treyz ticked off as cases where there had been such preliminary brain -nobbing: My Threi 
Sons, The Donna Reed Show, Hawaiian Eve, 77 Sunset Strip, Naked City. 

On one point Treyz left no doubt: ABC TV would go on maintaining control over thi 
programs planning and building function : it's call was for suggestions and ideas. 



For other news coverage In this Issue: see Sponsor-Week, page 7; Sponso 

Week Wrap-Up, page 60; Washineton Week, page 55; sponsor Hears, page 58; Tv and Rs 
dio Newsmakers, page 71; and Film-Scope, page 56. 



22 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 




HEART OP SOU 



ROLINA 



'he 257,961 people who make WIS-television's home market the state's larg- 
t metropolitan area (and a close second in the two Carolinas after a 
.1% increase in the 1960 Census) give Channel 10 their major time and 
,tention, not to say devotion. This adds up to a 78.5 share of audience, 
jys ARB (March 1960). And throughout South Carolina, WIS-television's 
]26-foot tower, tallest in the South, delivers more of the state, more effectively 
an any other station. In short, South Carolina's major selling force is 



" 



VI S television 



V J_k^» liClCVlidlUXl NBC/ABC-Columbia, South Carolina 

Charles A. Batson, Managing Director 

station of THE BROADCASTING COMPANY OF THE SOUTH 

G. Richard Shafto, Executive Vice President 
3-television. Channel 10, Columbia, S.C. • WIS Radio, 560, Columbia, S.C. • WSFA-TV, Channel 12, Montgomery, Ala. / All represented by Peters. Griffin. Woodward, Inc. 



BCS 

T 




* ' Mil 



Naked City 




The Donna Reed Show The Real McCoys 





My Three Sons 



The Flintstones 



How do you top 10 
winners like these? 




Ben Casey 




MTj 



SurfSide Six 



The Untouchables 



Here's how: 



To follow in the footlights of ten of 
ABC-TV's top programs (each of them in 
first place in their time periods*) we've got 
a bevy of stars and future headliners wait- 
ing in the wings. 

Will they measure up to our big ones? 
It won't be easy. But we think the new- 
comers (and the established favorites soon 
to start their new 1961-62 series) show 
the kind of style that will make it. 

To see how well they do, keep your eye 
on ABC-TV. Which is just what the audi- 
ence is doing. 

ABC Television 

♦Source: Nielsen 24 Market TV Report, Average Audience, 
week ending October 1, 1961, 7:30-11 PM, Mon.-Sat.; 6:30- 
11 PM, Sun. 






SPONSOR 

16 OCTOBER 1961 



IEW FACTS PIERCE 
POT PAPER JUNGLE 

VI B survey of agency-rep-station 
iper problems shows cost to agen- 
es can be as high as $500,000 a year 



i new size-and-shape map of the long-standing paper 

le through which spot radio /tv admen and broadcasters 

!st regularly chop their way is causing a stir this week. 

! in the form of a three-way, agency-rep-station study of 

It "systems" completed recently by Central Media Bu- 

tu, which now offers a clearing-house method via C-E-I-R, 

. of standardizing and automating what General Motors' 

1 Smith recently called the "cumbersome and anti- 

ted" mechanics of spot buying. These are some of the 

s which have come to light in the CMB checkup: 

More than three-fourths of top air media agencies 

tiel spot data as "agency of record" for one or more 

nts, or handle the extra job of assembling final records 

pot buys for an agency of record. 

Nearly one out of three stations (29%) told CMB 




PAPERWORK STUDY by Central Media 
Bureau highlights need for the centrali- 
zation of spot radio/tv billing, payment, 
rate policing via electronic computor 
technology, believes CMB's 37-year-old 
pres. Kenneth Schonberg. 



Once an adman's pipedream, "centralized" billing for spot 





BROADCAST BILLING CO. 
TV FIRST— BBC will concentrate on tv (later radio) with 
system designed around existing spot forms. Chrm. 
Laury Botthof (seated), George W. Schiele, sales v.p. 
(I) and Richard I. Golden, operations v.p. (r) 



BROADCAST CLEARING HOUSE 
RADIO FIRST— BCH has made alliance with Bank o 
America to handle spot data processing and payments 
BCH's John Palmer, pres. (I) and Lee Mehlig con 
centrate on radio spot, later, adding tv data 



that spot paperwork is increased 
"substantially" by the growth of 
multi-agency spot accounts. 

• A large agency estimates that it 
spends about 865.000 each year in 
timebuyer, clerical and other salaries 
just to clear up discrepancies be- 
tween spot orders and spot billing, 
primarily due to changes in earned 
radio/tv spot rates. 

• This problem isn't unique to 
agencies. Stations estimate that they 
spend four executive and nine clerical 
man-hours each month clearing and 
adjusting discrepancies on outstand- 
ing billing. 

• The price of paperwork delays 
can be measured in terms of spot 
dollars that have become clogged in 
payment channels. Projecting station 
estimates of percentages of current 
billing that is outstanding, CMB esti- 
mates that at least $4 million in spot 
radio t\ revenue is "past due" each 
month by 90 days or more, and over 
18 million is behind payment by 60 
• lavs or more. 

• Errors, which must be resolved 
later, can creep all too easily into the 
present paper-heavy systems of spot 
buying. It takes no less than eight 
documents to process a spot buy in 



26 



tv: contract, time order, estimate, 
client invoice, station invoice, affi- 
davit of performance, station vouch- 
er, adjusted invoice to client. 

• Station reps are also on perma- 
nent safari through the paper jungle, 
usually at a cost of extra salaries and 
delays in payment. Special depart- 
ments for handling data on discount 
rates earned by multi-product ac- 
counts have been set up by seven out 
of every 10 reps responding to CMB, 
with an average of four people (and 
as many as 10, in 20% of cases) as- 
signed to such paperwork. 

• Agencies are fully aware that 
the paperwork problem must be 
solved and often indicate just how it 
might be done. "Although stations 
and reps do not agree, there should 
be some way to combine the biggest 
sources of paperwork into one con- 
tinuity-availability sheet, confirma- 
tion and order or contract," the me- 
dia director of one of Madison Ave.'s 
largest agencies told CMB. Another 
media executive, whose Park Ave. 
agency is in the "top 20" in broad- 
cast billing, suggested that stations 
and reps could cut back on paperwork 
by "adhering more closely to con- 
firmed orders and improving their 






procedures to provide us with moii 
accurate information more quickly.' 

That familiar plea, for greater aq 
curacy r and speed, is really the storr 
center of the hurricane of papej 
which has long bedeviled spot media 
As agency overhead has inched steaC 
ily upward to put a neat prof 
squeeze on the handling of spot a« 
counts, there's been a greater outc 
for faster and better communicatio 
between buyer and seller in spot 

Modern data-processing techno 
gy, spurred in many cases by 
increasing complexity of defer 
needs and weapons systems, has on 
recently caught up to the proble 
This, in turn, has created a n 
vision of "automated" agency pr 
tices in which admen and rep exei 
tives can spend more time on 
creative and marketing aspects 
spot radio /tv and less on its boi 
keeping headaches. 

It will be none too soon, the exe 
tives of the new firms now propos 
new systems of centralized billi 
freely admit. "Spot radio tv is 
ting so complex, so hard to buy, tl 
it is making it increasingly diffk 
for advertisers and agencies to der 
maximum efficiency from spot bi 



t 






SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER Vi 



I 



is being proposed by trio of new concerns 




CENTRAL MEDIA BUREAU 
:V & RADIO — CMB has answer to agency-rep-station paperwork prob- 
lems, using sophisticated computer facilities of C-E-l-R, Inc. CMB's principals 
re William J. Sloboda, exec. v.p. (left), Lois Hirst, v.p., and Kenneth Schon- 
erg, pres. (standing). Here, they map new "economic maximum" formula 



;:ts," said Kenneth C. Schonberg, 
esident of Central Media Bureau. 
The lack of prompt information on 

•(issed spots can cause real head- 



aches, and agencies often find them- 
selves suddenly involved with make- 
goods on a flight of spot announce- 
ments which is already over," said 



George W. Schiele, sales v.p. of the 
SRDS-sunported Broadcast Billing 
Co. "Agencies have admitted to us 
that the media bills they usually pay 
first are those that are 'authoritative,' 
and what they usually mean by that 
is billing from print media, not spot," 
said Lee Mehlig, exec. vp. of Broad- 
cast Clearing House and himself a 
former broadcaster with first-hand 
experience of spot payment slow 
downs. 

Just what are the new billing firms 
offering? 

There are some significant similari- 
ties — and differences. 

Central Media Bureau, just-an- 
nounced arrival on the central-clear- 
ance front, feels that the paperwork 
problems falls "into two main cate- 
gories." As CMB sees it, they are: 
(a) the huge variety of paper forms 
with which stations and agencies have 
to contend, and (b) the "highly com- 
plex rate discount structure" that has 
grown out of the competitive nature 
of spot broadcasting. 

The solution to the problem, CMB 
believes, lies in the simplification and 
standardization of spot forms, the 
centralization of records of discounts 
earned by spot advertisers, and the 
establishment of a central point to 
(Please turn to page 46) 



lighlights of Central Media Bureau study of spot "systems" 



L Timebuyers spend 75% of work week chopping path 
v ough "paperwork jungle," CMB survey reveals. 



i 



Buyer function 



% of total 
time spent 



Reducable via 
automation? 



lecting Availabilities 


39% 


No 


:uring Plans, Discounts 


12% 


Yes 


sting Alternate Schedules 


21% 


Yes 


ition Confirmations 


8% 


. No 


1 1 
^paring Client Estimates 


5% 


Yes 


ling Discrepancies 


13% 


Yes 


/ising Client Estimates 

If - 


2% 


Yes 


1 


1 pNSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 





2. $8.8 million in spot tv billings (or 16% of the average 
billing on U.S. tv stations) is 60 days "past due" in any 
average month because of delays in clearing, adjusting 
invoices at agencies. 

3. 60% of spot agencies say it takes from one to 3 
weeks between confirmation of a spot buy and notifica- 
tion to other agencies of new earned discounts when 
multi-product client is involved. 

4. 50% of reps say it takes more than one day, and 
up to a week, to receive written confirmation from 
agencies of an oral sale in spot radio/tv. 

5 b $500,000 in salaries is spent annually by one large 
agency just to handle spot paperwork. 



27 



NIGHT RADIO: FAR FROM DEAD 



^ Creative pro^ramm*:. discussion snows, per>onalitie*. and empha*i* on local new* 
are attracting advertiser* to nighttime radio on station* all around the countrv 





I 



ATTRACTING NIGHTTIME SPONSORSHIP are these programs: KLZ's (Denver) Denver 
at Night (left above). Murray Kaufman whose records show is heard on WINS, N.Y.C. 
weekday nights from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Also KMPC (L.A.) nighttime current events program, 
Nightside. part of the schedule bought by local Pepsi-Cola dealers last month 




t's been said many time* — in the 
trade — that for a medium which was 
declared deader than a door nail ten 
years ago. radio sure _ and. 

And of course, everyone knows all 
about its daytime activities. How. for 
instance, radio goes along with die 
housewife while she waxes the floor, 
or whips up a batch of Pablum. And 
that it"s right there — somewhere in the 
potpourri of shaving equipment — in 
the bathroom when the man of the 
house does awav with his morning 
fringe of whiskers ' FCC head Mi- 
now included: he said as much ir 
his talk to the CBS Radio group ir 
New ^ ork City, last month i . The*. 
there are all the outdoor places radk 
manages to get around to. places 
where its not possible to tote a tv set. 

Recently, however, and with 
little hoopla, the "corpse" is begin- 
ning to show signs of becomii - 
nocturnal gadabout i in local areas,] 
anywav. I 

Radio stations in a number of mar- 
kets around the country, ar- 
ing to rep shop talk, experiencir.. 
creased sales activitv in nighttime 
segments. Although most of the 
ness is from local advertisers, indica- 
tions point to the fact that national! 
accounts are eyeing night radio wit] 
more than cursory interest. 

In other words — and to borro"*] 
these words from Robert E. Eastr 
national sales manager. Josep:. 
Cuff — more advertisers are begir 
to "see the light insofar as nighttim 
radio is concerned." Inquires 
"Can R. J. Reynolds. Pall Mall. Fo:< 
dealers. Schlitz. Mercury dealers 
Vaseline. Kent. Cover Girl. He 1 
mann's Mayonnaise. Texaco. Falsta3 
Beech-Nut. etc.. be wrong "This, 
he declares, "is just a partial . - 
prominent national advertisers wh 
have seen the light. 

He adds "perhaps this awakeni i\ 
on the part of national advertise l 
was brought about to some de<r:- 






?PON?OR • 16 OCTOBER 19^! 



the fabulous success enjoyed by many 
local advertisers who have found that 
the addition of nighttime rings the 
cash register. 

For example: Costello Kunze Ford 
in St. Louis grew from insignificance 
to the leading Ford dealer in metro- 
politan St. Louis through the use of 
24 hour saturation on WIL." Says 
Cuff, "it must be more than sheer co- 
incidence that a year or so after Cos- 
tello Kunze had registered their tre- 
mendous sales gains, Texaco bought 
a schedule, including heavy use of 
nighttime, on the same radio station." 
Many top agencies and key adver- 
tisers, says Eastman's national sales 
manager, have come to appreciate the 
[fact that not only does the inclusion 
of nighttime commercials expand 
overall reach and penetration, but 
that the audience gained thereby can 
he had for an extremely low cost. 

"The local successes, the list of 

,.users, RAB, NSI, Pulse, etc. combine 

Ljto offer proof positive that nighttime 

radio is a tangible sales stimulant," 

he declares. 

The Katz Agency also discloses that 

whey have experienced increases in 

lighttime sales. Slight, perhaps, but 

levertheless an increase. According 

o Katz' v.p. and radio sales manager, 

VI. S. Kellner, this increase has been 

felt mostly by stations which have 

reatively programed for nighttime 

adio. 

"When stations offer an unique 
omething-to-sell, nighttime radio can, 
md is being sold," he says. As an ex- 
mple he points to KLZ, Denver 
khose Denver At Night, a program 
package featuring personalities, lots 
f news ( with emphasis on local 
■Jews) had attracted heavy sponsor- 
hip. 
In New York City, WINS, the 
I >atz repped station, is also experi- 
rncing outstanding success with 
ighttime sponsors. Station manager 
I ed Steele credits the surge in busi- 
| ,ess (since January) to "strong per- 
Ipnalities and creative selling." Says 
l.jteele, "Murray Kaufman, from 7- 
|.|0:30 p.m., Barry Farber with WINS 
Yfpen Mike from 10:30 to 11 p.m., 
Ijnd Jack Lazare with the all-night 
I lows, are the strong personalities 
I jiat have brought the nighttime rat- 
ings on WINS to figures better than 
j ]ie daytime ratings of some other 



NCS '61 on nighttime 'bandwagon 1 



radio stations in New York." Accord- 
ing to the August Pulse ratings, the 
average quarter-hour rating of the 
7-11 p.m. segment is a strong 2.3. 
This is the highest rating for that 
time segment among all New York 
radio stations, the nearest competi- 
tor having a 1.9. 

Many sponsors, says Steele, buy 
only nighttime schedules. Among 
them: St. George Pool, Paul Sar- 
gent, Ltd., R and G Clothing, Tie 
City, Male Travel Agency, Al Nor- 
man's Mens Shop, Cover Girl Cos- 
metics, Propa P. H. Heavy place- 
ment on nighttime are bought by 
Budweiser, Schaefer Beer, Champale, 
Barney's Aqueduct, Tom McAn, 
Castro Convertibles, Beacon Wax, 
Coca Cola, National Shoes and Con- 
tadina Foods. 

Says Kellner," the potential of 
nighttime radio hasn't been realized — 
the audience doesn't disappear when 
the sun sets, and everybody doesn't 
switch over to television." He adds, 
"we've been successful in selling 
nighttime as part of the overall con- 
cept of the additional reach radio can 
add to schedules in other media. This 
is especially true in the case of sta- 
tions offering Total Audience Plans, 
where advertisers can buy a combi- 
nation of day and night at attractive 
rates." 

NBC Spot Radio Sales also reports 
success with its Total Audience Plans. 



H-R'S RADIO RESEARCH 

Manager, Mary Ann Richard- 
son, says, "NCS 1961 figures 
that H-R has received to 
date show that Nielsen has 
jumped on the nighttime 
radio bandwagon. Nighttime 
circulation in many markets 
is running very close to day- 
time circulation figures." 



Says its director, Fred Lyons "since 
the beginning of the year, we've ex- 
perienced a definite rise in the num- 
ber of advertisers purchasing what we 
may refer to as Total Audience Plans 
— that is, schedules that more or less 
encompass the entire broadcast day." 

Lyons cites two of "many logical 
reasons for this approach to spot 
radio buying." 1 ) "There is reason 
to believe that there is relatively little 
duplication of audience between day- 
time and nighttime listeners — even on 
one station. Many nighttime listeners 
are, for one reason or another, simply 
not available to radio (as well as 
other media) during the daytime 
hours. And, as a whole, nighttime lis- 
teners can usually be purchased more 
economically because of the extremely 
advantageous nighttime rates." 

2) "The continuing extension of re- 
tail hours well into the night has 
added increased impact to nighttime 
radio advertising. All across the coun- 
try a steadily mounting number of 
shopping centers, supermarkets, su- 
burban retail outlets of all tvpes, as 
well as downtown department stores, 
are keeping their doors open until 
nine or ten o'clock at night. This af- 
fords the nighttime radio advertiser 
a golden opportunity to get across the 
'last word' to prospective customers 
and do it within an hour of the time 
the actual purchase is made." 
(Please turn to page 48) 



iPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



29 




PRESIDENTS on hand for pre-season meeting, where sales force learned of the new tv plans, 
are John J. Cott, Cott Beverage Corp., (I), and S. Robert Freede of Riedl & Freede 



TV HELPS COTT PUT 
KIBOSH ON 'DEALS' 

^ Bottler switches from year-round, print-promoted 
price deals to twin flights of quality-oriented spot tv 

^ Nine-station, five-state lineup comprises 13-week, 
spring-summer phase; responsible for 20% sales jump 



ft hen last spring came in like a 
lion, the Cott Beverage Corp. of New 
Ha\en. Conn., had a qualm or two 
about its new "no deal" philosophy. 

The regional soft drink producer 
previousK had relied heavily on 
newspaper-promoted price reduction 
offers. But then, while competitors 
were attempting to huck the incle- 
ment spring weather with price deals. 
( "tt was trying nut a new program 
of spot tv and no deals. Cott stuck 
to its t\ ^uns through the spring and 
-ummer peak soft drink selling sea- 
son, and when the smoke had cleared, 
found it- sales were 20 r r ahead of 
tin- same period last \ear. 

The move to tv had its inception 
when Cott awarded its advertising 
account to Riedl ii Freede. Inc.. head- 



quartered in Clifton. N. J. As related 
by agencv v. p. Daniel A. \^ hitnev. 
Cott account supervisor, here's why 
tv got the nod: 

• Reach 

• Frequencv 

• Prestige value transferred to 
the product by the medium, in the 
eyes of both the trade and the con- 
sumer 

• Ability to present product dra- 
maticallv 

• Broad audience composition. 
with bonus of teen-agers and children 

• Relatively low cost-per-1.000 
Cott was out to build a quality and 

excitement image for its products. 
The price reduction deals that had 
occupied nearly all of the company's 
advertising energies in the past were 



dropped (except for off-season for- 
. because considered detrimental 
to the sought after quality image. 

This approach was carried over to 
Cott's newly-introduced cherry cola, 
despite the fact that industry tradi- 
tion calls for price inducements for 
new products, and sales of the chern 
cola nevertheless have reached the 
volume of Cott's best-selling fruit 
flavored drink, orange. 

Riedl & Freede developed three 
60-second commercials, one each for 
fruit flavors, mixers, and the new 
cherry cola, with 20- and 10-second 
versions of each. For them the agen- 
cv constructed a 13-week, nine-station 
campaign embracing southern New 
England. New York. Pennsylvania, 
and Ohio. 

In nearly all cases the stations pur- 
chased were network affiliates and. 
keeping within the approximately 
1 4.^0.000 earmarked for the drive. 
Cott sought top-rated, prime evening 
time network program adjacencies. 

Cott's main thrust in New York 
was delivered bv \^ ABC-TA which 
for the full 13 weeks aired 21 spots 
per week, mostly 20's and 60's. with 
a few 10's. WCBS-TV also broad- 
cast 21 Cott spots per week for 13 
weeks, but there the emphasis was 
on 10's. For six weeks. \^ NEVI -T\ 
aired 19 Cott spots a week, minute:- 
and I.D.'s. 

The bottler's Connecticut buv con- 
sisted of WNHC-TV, New Haven, 
which carried 19 spots a week, mosth 
20's and 60's with a few 10's. for the! 
entire 13 weeks. Also on the full 13- 
week program was \^ HNB-T\ . New 
Britain, which aired 16 per week. 
60's and 10's. And in Springfield .! 



Cott's streamlined 




EXCITEMENT is injected into the Cott K 
spots with opening scenes of running, biltt 



30 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



Mass., the Cott message was delivered 
by WWLP (TV), 10 times per week, 
in the form of 60's and 20's, with an 
occasional I.D. 

Cott stretched its tv dollar over the 
campaign's full length in Pennsyl- 
vania by taking a week's hiatus every 
week or two within its schedules on 
WTAE-TV, Pittsburgh, and WFBG- 
TV, Altoona. The former aired 11 
spots a week, mostly minutes, and 
the latter eight per week, mostly min- 
utes, both during seven staggered 
weeks. In nearby Ohio, the Cott 
message was carried by WKBN-TV, 
Youngstown, 10 times per week, 
mostly minutes, for the entire 13 
weeks. 

The new Cott media strategy calls 
for heavy concentration in the peak 
selling seasons, spring-summer and 
the year-end holidays. In the past, 
the bottler's newspaper-promoted 
price reduction deals were at their 
heaviest in peak selling seasons, but 
there was more exposure in the off- 
periods. 

"We feel the reach and impact of 
our spring-summer tv campaign has 
built a sales momentum that will 
carry through the fall when we're off 
the air, more than making up for 
any advertising we might have run 
during that period under the old 
system," states Whitney. This mo- 
mentum will get a giant boost Thanks- 
giving through New Year's thanks to 
spot tv outlays equal to or greater 
than the spring-summer push, with 
commercials playing up the Cott 
mixers (ginger ale, club soda, Half 
and Half grapefruit and lemon), in 
conjunction with the year-end im- 
bibing season. 



While Cott looks for universality in 
audience composition, the housewife 
looms as the prime target. Most of 
Cott's business involves the quart bot- 
tles, which are considered family- 
size, so the housewife's importance is 
uppermost. On the other hand, Cott 
is endeavoring to branch out more 
and more into the smaller bottle field, 
so the company welcomes the younger 
element in the tv audience. 

Children are featured in the com- 
mercials for new cherry cola and the 
fruit flavors, for somewhat different 
reasons. They order a lot of cherry 
cola drinks at soda fountains, so are 
expected to take to the bottled ver- 
sion. As for fruit flavors, the chil- 
dren's presence in the commercial is 
calculated to boost the feeling, preva- 
lent among average housewives that 
fruit flavored beverages are healthful 
for their children. 

As for the commercial devoted to 
mixers (ginger ale, club soda, Half 
and Half grapefruit and lemon, etc.), 
it opens with adults doing the cha 
cha. Mixers of course call for a more 
sophisticated scene. 

The motif of the Cott commercials 
is action, and plenty of it — to lend an 
air of excitement and fun to the prod- 
ucts. Thirty scene changes per min- 
ute are par for the course. The open- 
ing 15 seconds in each minute spot is 
devoted to action backed by upbeat 
music, with narration held off until 
product shots are introduced subse- 
quently. Scene changes are done in 
time to the music, as are phrases and 
individual words of voice-over copy. 
Dominant in the music is the unique 
sound of chromatic drums. 

The music is scored differently for 



each of the three commercials. Rock 
and roll provides the background for 
the commercial introducing the new 
cherry cola, expected to have special 
appeal to the young folks. A modern 
popular music score accompanies the 
fruit flavor spot, while for the mixers 
the rhythm is cha cha. 

Scenes during the opening 15 sec- 
onds of all three commercials depict 
the bottom half of people in action. 
For cherry cola, the spot opens with 
kids' legs pedaling bicycles moving 
fast. They wheel into a driveway, 
jump off of their bikes, race across 
the lawn into the door of a house, and 
tramp into the rumpus room, where 
they sit on the floor around a coffee 
table. 

Then comes shots of cherry cola 
on a tray in the foreground, and the 
voice-over narration begins. There 
are various scenes of product pour- 
ing, and a soda fountain scene during 
which the announcer states that 
cherry cola, long a soda fountain 
favorite, now is in bottles. 

The fruit flavor beverage commer- 
cial opens with the feet and legs of a 
youngster running in time to the 
music, up to a Ninth Ave. type fruit 
stand. His hand reaches out and 
touches an orange. Out comes the 
storekeeper, hands on hips, survey- 
ing the child defiantly. When the 
child accidently causes an orange to 
roll down the carefully arranged 
mountain of fruit, he looks gingerly 
at the fuming merchant and takes 
off as fast as legs can carry him. Only 
then does the narration begin, with 
video devoted to pourings of the 
product and shots of large quantities 
of fruit rolling along. ^ 



tv commercials contrast with old print-promoted price deals 






riding, and dancing accompanied by upbeat musical baclcgound. Narration is withheld until after the brisk opening, coming in with the product 
shots (r). Kids appear in the fruit flavor and cherry cola spots, while adults doing the cha cha serve as opener for more sophisticated mixer plugs 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



31 



IS MANAGING A RADIO STATION 



NO. 1 IN A 

NEW SPONSOR 

SERIES 

; (see Sponsor Speaks page 74) 






^ "You agency guys would love my job," says Paul 
Marion of Charlotte, in detailing his experiences 

^ Compare your own life on Madison or Michigan 
Avenues with this account of local radio operations 



by PAUL. MARION 

Mgr., WBT, Charlotte 

lanaging a radio station is much 
like riding a spirited and cantanker- 
ous horse; you never quite know 
where you'll wind up but you're 
pretty sure to have an interesting and 
challenging ride. 

The other day when I arrived at the 
office, my secretary told me there were 
three people waiting to see me. One 
was a pretty, young, blonde married 
woman, otherwise unidentified, the 
second was a well known Charlotte 
artist, the third an FBI agent. 

Having, by "nature and calling," a 
tremendous respect for agencies of the 
United States government, having a 
pretty, young blonde married to me, 
and knowing the artist well enough to 
have him wait a few minutes, I told 



my secretary to batten down the 
hatches and bring the FBI agent first. 
The agent, whom I had never met, 
was so exceptionally gentle, cordial 
and, at first, so uninformative, that I 
was soon frantically searching my 
conscience for my unpunished crime. 
Mercifully, I eventually gathered that 
he wanted us to broadcast a descrip- 
tion of Public Enemy Number 3 who 
was suspected of being in our cover- 
age area. The artist had a magnificent, 
scheme for painting twelve original 
oils of local historical subjects for us 
to use on a calendar. The price was 
completely out of our reach but he 
talked so interestingly of local history 
that it was many minutes before I re- 
membered I had a third visitor. 

Mrs. Young Blonde finally came in 
and she had Mrs. Young Brunette 



with her. They — just the two of them 
— were, apparently, launching the first 
local campaign for funds to combat 
cystic fibrosis. I knew cystic fibrosis 
was a disease — not a flower — but that 
was about all I knew. As my pretty 
visitor talked so professionally of the 
little known disease, how it attacks 
mainly children, how it has been con- 
sidered almost inevitably fatal, how 
many children have died from it part- 
ially because of improper diagnosis, 
and of the dire need of more research, 
I asked her whether she was a nurse. 
No, just an interested parent. Were 
there many children with the disease 
in Charlotte? "Not very many so 
diagnosed," she said. And then she 
added, quietly and completely without 
any appeal for sympathy, "I have 
only two children with cystic fibrosis 



"An endless variety of assignments and chores," says Marion 





^^0^m 




**• 




*^^A 




PUBLIC SPEAKING. "I get more invitations 
to address local groups than I can possibly 
fill." Here at a Community Pride luncheon 



CHECKING SCRIPTS. The station manager 
is the last word on controversial program 
points. Marion spends hours in the tape room 




MEETING VIPS (all of them who come to 
Charlotte). Here Marion converses through 
an interpreter with a German broadcaster 



32 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



MORE FUN THAN AGENCY WORK? 




"CONTACTS? MORE CONTACTS THAN I KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH!" says Marion. "People visit me and call me at all hours of 
the day or night to register complaints or sometimes to praise the station. I've been called at I A.M. to hear a complaint about the lyrics ot 
a song. Once I almost had to leave town to shake a caller who insisted that we were broadcasting 'waves' that gave her unbearable pains!" 



but she," nodding toward her com- 
panion, "has four." I was shamed and 
touched by such unassuming bravery 
but the experience was not unique in 
my business life. 

To be sure, receiving three such 
callers back to back is unusual, even 
for a radio station manager, but for 
variety of contacts within a commu- 
nity, few jobs can rival mine. 

Many years ago I enjoyed a hu- 
morous little book entitled How To 
Run A Bassoon Factory. A great 
many people don't know what a bas- 
soon is and care less. I can imagine 
telling a group of strangers that I 
manufacture bassoons or bibcocks or 
bevel gears, and having a vast silence 
fall upon the assemblage. This 
NEVER happens when I say I man- 



age a radio station. People react to 
radio. They praise radio or they 
criticize it; they listen regularly or 
they "never listen anymore;" they 
think radio is getting better, or they 
think it is beyond help. But they are 
almost never speechless when the sub- 
ject comes up. Of course, radio is 
not the only vocation the mere men- 
tion of which stirs up spirited discus- 
sion. But surely one of the great 
satisfactions of managing a radio sta- 
tion is that no matter where you are 
or who you meet, you immediately 
have certain common ground with 
even complete strangers. 

In contrast with the thousands of 
people who work day after day in a 
proscribed routine and never have 
any contact with the people who con- 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



surae the products they produce or 
help produce, the radio station man- 
ager sometimes gets more of those 
contacts than he really feels he can 
use. People visit me and call me at all 
hours of the day and night to register 
complaints or sometimes to praise the 
station. I have been called at 1 a.m. 
to hear a complaint about the lyrics 
of a song or an announcers gram- 
matical error. Several years ago I 
almost had to leave town to shake a 
caller who insisted that we were 
broadcasting "waves" that gave her 
unbearable pain every time she lis- 
tened. She didn't explain why she 
continued to tune in. One house- 
holder nearly ran me crazy because 
her telephone number was just one 
digit off from that of WBT and phone 



33 




PHONEY TELEGRAM? Marion nearly threw 

this wire from President Eisenhower into the 

wastebasliet, thinking it was a gag by the 

station staff. (See text for the full story) 




WOMAN OF THE YEAR. Presentations of 
awards are another perpetual chore for a busy 
station manager. Here's Marion giving Woman 
of the Year honors to Dr. Elizabeth Corkey 



calls for one of our programs were 
running HER crazy. But the crank 
calls ar«> more than offset by the calls 
and visits from listeners who have 
good things to sa\ or, better still, 
ideas of how the station can better 
aerve the community. 

W hoever undertakes to do a job in 
Charlotte — civic, cultural, education- 
al or charitable — seems to appear 
sooner or later, generally sooner, in 
my office. The results of some of 
these \ tsita are routine; others are far- 
reaching. 

One fall day. six years ago, a young 
lady who worked as a secretary for a 
local oil company asked me for an 
appointment She wanted publicity 
for a performance of Handel'- "Mes- 
siali 1>\ a Music Club chorus in a 
local church. She explained that a 



freewill offering taken at this per- 
formance was the principal way in 
which the club raised money for 
music scholarships. 

At the time of her call, Charlotte 
was patting itself on the back on the 
completion of a beautiful new civic 
auditorium, seating 2,500 people. As 
we talked that day, we both thought 
of how wonderful it would be if 
"Messiah" could be given each Christ- 
mas season and, perhaps someday, fill 
the auditorium. Two days later, our 
company took over the sponsorship 
of "Messiah" and underwrote the 
rental fee for the new auditorium. 

On December 4 last year, the date 
of the annual performance, I arrived 
at the auditorium a half hour ahead 
of time. \S hen I finally found a park- 
ing space and started toward the audi- 
torium, I met streams of people 
coming away. My first thought was 
that the performance had been can- 
celed; I found instead that every seat 
in the auditorium was full a half- 
hour before the performance, as manv 
were standing as the firemen would 
allow and hundreds were being turned 
away. Here was the satisfaction of 
seeing a good idea grow great. Our 
company has helped the music club 
to realize an ambition and made pos- 
sible the collection of almost $6,000 
in scholarship funds. But the end was 
not yet. Now a second musical event 
has been added through our partner- 
ship with the music club — a spring 
performance of Haydn's "The Crea- 
tion," which promises to be as popu- 
lar with the community and as profit- 
able to the music scholarship fund as 
"Messiah." 

If a radio station is a magnet that 
draws local visitors with interesting 
personalities and ideas, its attraction 
seems to be even stronger for the out- 
of-town great and near-great. We 
have entertained at the station such 
widely diverse figures as Jack Demp- 
sej and Ira Pettina, Betsy Palmer and 
Ivy Baker Priest, Ann Jeffreys and 
Gene Autry. Phil Rizzuto and Joan 
Bennett, Leon Uris and Adlai Steven- 
son. We have originated broadcasts 
for Lowell Thomas. Walter Cronkite. 
Ed Murrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
General Bela Kiraly, hero of the 
Hungarian underground, and Dwight 
D. Eisenhower. While contacts with 
each of these were stimulating, one of 



It was a message of 
signed Dwight D. 



mj favorite memories stems from an 
experience with the last-named gen- 
tleman. 

In 1957 we celebrated the 35th an- 
niversary of WBT. As radio stations 
will, we let the word get around to 
network stars and leading citizens 
that, if they insisted on congratulat- 
ing us on our anniversary, we would 
not be adverse to broadcasting their 
good wishes. The customary congrat- 
ulations rolled in and we collected a 
goodly representation. On the day be- 
fore the celebration began, a message 
came in that made all the others pale 
by comparison. 

As I walked into my office that 
morning I saw a yellow envelope un- 
opened on top of my mail stack. As 
I opened it I saw it was from the 
White House, 
congratulations 
Eisenhower. 

Now our radio staff is a fairly in- 
formal brotherhood and the clever 
con is far from unknown among us. 
I had perpetrated one or two myself. 
I still remembered the gleam in the 
eve of our publicity man who received 
a highly exciting but inaccurate tele- 
type from Za Za Gabor about visiting 
the station the next morning. Mem- 
ory brought back also the plight of 
our merchandising girl who constant- 
ly misspelled Procter and Gamble — 
until she received one morning a tele- 
type from the president of P&G can- 
celling all advertising on our station 
until she learned to spell. 

What then, I thought when I saw 
the yellow envelope, could be more 
natural than that mv ever-loving staff 
had cooked up a telegram from the 
president and were even then wait- 
ing to enjoy my gullibility. On the 
other hand, if it was genuine, what 
a topper it would be for our anni- 
versary celebrations! I stood smack 
in the middle of a dilemma. 

There was nobody I could consult. 
\nv member of my staff might have 
sent the telegram. There A\as only 
one solution — to call the WTiite House. 
Our operator nearlv swallowed the 
switchboard when I put in the call but 
in a remarkably short time I had the 
White House on the phone and soon 
I was talking to Press Secretary Hag- 
erty. I identified myself and asked 
whether the president had sent us a 
(Please turn to page 50) 



;i 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



Humor and skill come to the front in recent crop of commercials 




WT PRODUCERS pick 'savvy-made' commercials. Top row (I to r) Nestea (MPO) Mc-E, Jim Manilla, producer; Scott Tissue (EUE) Robert La- 
^hance, producer. Below (I to r) 6-12 Mosquito (CBS Animations) Mathes, Frank Huber producer; Piels (EUE) Y&R, Bill Muyskins, producer 




AVVY VIDEO COMMERCIALS 



Top film commercial producers scan their recent 
issignments and pick a number of savvy agency gems 

Viewers' interest in new crop of film commercials 
Js being wetted with considerable humor and freshness 



Advertising agencies, undeniably, 
Ire moving toward a level of com- 
mercial film making that borders on 
ae original and frequently brilliant. 
Tiere is also ample proof that the 
ecent batch of commercials on the 
ideo lanes were infused with con- 
iderable suavity, subtle humor, so- 
histication and soft sell. 
Film commercial makers — the men 



dio know agencies best- 



-were re- 



cently asked by a sponsor editor to 
express themselves about savvy agen- 
cy television commercial experts. 
Who, in their educated opinion, were 
doing outstandingly in the creation of 
commercials? Who were some of 
the agencies with sparkling creativ- 
ity, the agencies with mastery of the 
difficult art of the television commer- 
cial? 

A number of New York film com- 



PONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



mercial producers, unhesitatingly, 
singled out J. Walter Thompson as 
one of the foremost agencies respon- 
sible for the advancement of the 
commercial. 

Also avoiding the trite and imita- 
tive, in the opinion of film produc- 
ers, were such agencies as BBDO, 
Maxon, J. M. Mathes, Ogilvy, Benson 
& Mather, McCann-Erickson, D'Arcy, 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, Benton & Bowles, 
Norman Craig & Kummel, Doyle 
Dane Bernbach, Campbell - Ewald, 
Young & Rubicam, Reach McClinton, 
Papert, Koenig, Lois, Grey, SSC&B 
and several Canadian agencies. 

But, above all, the trend was to- 
ward selling products with fun and 
a dash of frolic. Said Lincoln Dia- 
mant, vice-president, Daniel & 



35 







Here are agencies regarded as shining in commercial making 



Major New 1 ork film producers take a look at the 
product in their shops and come up with this list of 
American and Canadian advertising agencies which 



have the latest savvy and know-how in getting thd 
commercial rolling from the story boards to ultimatJ 
projection on the television screens of Americ: 



Bailor & Tripp 



BBUO 



Benton & Bowles 



Campbell-En aid 



B'Arcy 



Boyle Bane Bornbaeh 



Kenyon & Eekhardt 



Ogilvy, Benson & Mather 



MacLaren Advertising Ltd Papert, Koenig, Lois 



McCann-Eriekson 



Mann-Ellis 



J. M. Mathes 



Maxon 



Norman, Craig & Knmniel 



Beaeh McClinton 



Spitzer, Mills & Bates 
J. Walter Thompson 
Young & Bubicam 



Charles: "Madison Avenue has dis- 
covered that wit can actually strength- 
en commercial memorability and 
boost product sales. Products and 
services traditionally considered in- 
appropriate for a witty tv selling ap- 
proach are yielding to the injection 
of a little good humor into their tv 
spots." 

Diamont noted that gifted agency 
people have joined equally talented 
film producers to reveal how humor- 
ous commercials are turning a for- 
merly provoked television audience 
into a relaxed army of commercial 
aficionados. 

More and more ad agencies are 
veering toward the smart, the new 
and the different in film commercials, 
according to Samuel Magdoff, secre- 
tary-treasurer of Elektra Film Pro- 
ductions, a small organization but 
widelv recognized for its arresting 
and prize-winning results. Like other 
industry figures, Magdoff sees a trend 
on the part of the agencies toward 
brighter, more humorous commer- 
cials, especially when they lend them- 
selves to the medium. Agencies, in 
Magdoff's opinion, are currently look- 
ing for what he termed "the clean 
and well-designed commercial." 

"This isn't art for art's sake," he 
said. 'It is just designing better com- 
mercials to sell more products. And 



36 



I'm pleased to see that agencies are 
leaning toward the humorous, toward 
the lighter approach in their copy." 

Magdoff, along with his associ- 
ates, implores agencies not to come 
to film commercial producers with 
"every scene pinned down." "We 
could do a great deal more for them 
if their story boards weren't tightly 
locked up when they arrive at our 
door." And he continued, "We hope 
most agencies will learn to see us 
earlier. Discussions, beforehand, 
will prove rewarding for all con- 
cerned and the end result — the com- 
mercial — will be infinitely better." 

Among the "prideful" commercials 
of recent origin made by Elektra and 
singled out by Magdoff for inclu- 
sion in the sponsor list are these: 
Brillo, 60-second, live action-anima- 
tion, black and white (J. Walter 
Thompson) with a new graphic tech- 
nique and novel use of titles; Puss'n 
Boots, 20-second, animation, black 
and white (Spitzer, Mills & Bates) 
filled with gay and gentle humor; 
£550 Imperial, 60-second, animation, 
black and white (MacLaren Advertis- 
ing Ltd.) which Magdoff describes 
as "graphic onomatopoeia"; General 
Electric Blender, 60-second, live ac- 
tion, black and white (Maxon) 
which contains "some of the most 
beautiful food shots! — shot to a 



rhythm and beat"; Chesterfield, 6( 
second, graphics and live action blaq 
and white (J. Walter Thompsoni 
"extraordinarily smart graphics < 
cigarettes and packages with effectiv 
closeups" and Chevron Gas, 60-se 
ond, black and white (BBD&O) wit] 
"exquisite understatement of tl 
sponsor's product." 

CBS Animations, a comparative 
new department of CBS Films In( 
with Tom Judge as general sal 
manager, has been doing a boomii 
business in various types of comme 
cials but the emphasis he notes a 
pears to be on copy with fresh hum< 
and a remarkable air of modernit 
It is Judge's boast that his orgai 
zation "can do better work faste 
than rival organizations in the cit 
He said the need for originality, st\ 
and quality in the creation of coi 
mercials was one of the main reasoi 
for the establishment of CBS Ai 
mations. 

"What our customers want to bu 
I feel, is a superior creative cont 
bution and the management of pi 
duction," Judge said. "It isn't fil 
or tape, or live action, or animatio 
or art, or design, or scenery, or sta 
ing that our customer buys. It 
rather in the case of television coi 
mercials, the most effective way 
communicating an idea or a conce 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 19( 



;> his potential customer through the 
jedium of television. Our business 
; to contribute to and manage the 

n< effective and motivating translation 
Uf the idea, emotion and/or concept 
nto a medium, permitting it to be 
^d and subsequently fed at will 
lto the television svstem. We can 
jnction in this direction effectively 
nly if we concern ourselves with the 
eeds and the desires of our cus- 
)mers and only if we concern our- 

- 2lves with what he is buving rather 
lan what we are selling." 

Among the notable commercials of 
ecent vintage made under the aegis 
f CBS Animations in Judge's opin- 
M) are the following: 6-12 Mosquito. 
0-second. animation i J. M. Mathes) 
we like this one because it gives a 
losquito a personality": Olxmpia 
'ypeuriter. 60-second. live and ani- 
lation (Mann-Ellis) "the superb 
lose-up photography showing the 
nusual capabilities of this ma- 
hine": Good Luck Margarine, 10- 
?cond. stop motion I Ogilvv. Benson 
Mather 1 , ""this combines stop mo- 
on with a third dimensional aspect 
tiat gives an unusual effect": Good 
nd Plenty Candy. 60-second. anima- 
l Bauer & Tripp), the light and 

•springy line technique makes this one 
tand out. in Judge's evaluation. It"s 

tjlone in a sing-along fashion to that 
oungsters can learn to sing the words 
f the commercial: Friend's Beans, 
0-second. animation (J. B. Mathes) 

. an excellent example of the use of 
ie 10-second spot to best advan- 
age" and Fifth Avenue Candy. 30- 
nd. animation l J. M. Mathes 1. 
rovides an entertaining situation 
lat is also eye-catching." 

\gencies are indeed reaching new 
ighs in creativity of commercials, 
ccording to Bill Susman. vice presi- 
ent of MPO Videotronics Inc. He 

i aid it was clearly evident that filmed 
•' commercials were constantly im- 

i? roving in production values. More- 
ver. viewer sophistication was in- 
reasins. he noted. Quality, in Sus- 
lan s opinion, did not necessarily 
lean elaborateness, although an elab- 
rate commercial "may be of high 
uality." 

■k "And not simplicity, either, for 

\ iere are plenty of simple commer- 
ials that look as if they have been 
lade by and for simpletons." Sus- 
I Please turn to page 51) 



DIGGIN' LIKE SOURDOUGHS' 



¥ ou uns re probably too voung 
to remember, but they wuz a kinda 
excitin' gold rush back in the old 
Dakota Territory days. Didn't find 
too much gold but had a lot of fun 
diggin". 

Now, these Dakotans are still great 
diggers and if you happened to sashay 
"round Manchester (it's in what most 
folks now call South Dakota ) a coupla 
weeks ago you'da seen a passle of 
Dakotans shovelin' as if they wuz 
sourdoughs struck it rich. 'Course, 
there's no gold there, not even pyrite. 
but it seems that some radio and 
teevee fellers buried about thirtee-five 
thousan" dollars in prizes. 

Cordin" to some folks these radio 
and teevee fellers work for somebody 
called KELO-LAND (it's a name va 
hear a lot about 'round these parts I . 
It's one of these new-fangled broad- 
castin' companies [Editor s note: the 
old prospector is talking about KELO- 
AM-TY. Sioux Falls: KDLO-TV. 
Florence, and KPLO-TV Reliance, all 
South Dakota i and there's a fella 
names a" Joe Floyd seems to have a 
lot to do with it. Ya kin tell he's im- 
portant cuz he's usually got a ceegar 
and he wears big plack specs. 

I guess I shoulda ex-plained that 



right now were celebratin' the cen- 
ten-neeal l that means a hunnert 
years) of the startin' of the old Da- 
kota Territory and they got a come- 
mishun and all like that. 

\^ ell. these radio and teevee fel- 
lers put on what they call a big pro- 
moshun during the summer 'n' long 
about the end of August — it was the 
last weekend — there wuz big doin's 
'round Manchester. 

You wouldn' believe it but this week- 
end doin's — they called it gold rush — 
got more folks to come than a barn 
raisin". Dunn' two days they wuz a 
hunnert seventy five thousan' folks 
there. On Sunday alone they wuz a 
hunnert "n" eight thousan'. 

The diggin' I was tellin' ya about 
they's the folks that won gold shovels 
in a contest. They wuz a thousan four 
hunnert thirtee nine of 'em. An' on 
Sunday they lined up jes' like soljers 
on leetle plots and went at it with a 
hoot and a holler. 

They wuz other doin's, too. I jes' 
nearly fell over with dee-light when 
Larry Welk began squeezin' that ay- 
cordeen. An' then two cowpokes from 
that Ran hide teevee show an' that 
Huck Houn' and 1 ogi Bear the leetle 
'uns like, t was really sump'n. ^ 



'GOLD RUSH' promotion of KELO-LAND stations attracted 175,000 persons during weekend 
climaxing Dakota Territory Centennial observance. Below some of the 1,439 who dug for prizes 



PONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 




SPONSOR ASKS: 

HOW CAN AGENCIES AVOID'OVER- 

SPENDING FOR FILM COMMERCIALS? 

(PART 3) 



Those replying to this week's 
question are: 

• Marvin Rothenberg, MPO Yid- 
eotronics, Inc.. New \ork 

• Louis Cavrell, President, Char- 
ter Oak Tele Pictures. Inc.. New York 

• Tom Dunphy, W C D. Inc.. New- 
York 



Marvin Rothenberg, vice president 

and producer-director. MPO Videotronics, 

Inc.. \eu York 

Strangely, one of the techniques 
used by most agencies in the attempt 
to keep from overspending on com- 
mercial production, frequently results 
in higher costs, and may result in a 



Producer can 
help agency- 
keep costs 
doun when 
brought in at 
early stages 



commercial which does not realize 
its full selling potential. This is the 
practice of competitive bidding based 
on completed storyboards. 

In theory, at least, a commercial 
which is pinned down in storvboard 
form to the last optical effect, exact 
to a degree that enables each of the 
production companies to bid on the 
same thing, helps the agencv receive 
accurate bids. These bids are com- 
parable, and from them the agency 
can select the lowest price. But this 
theory — and practice — brings in the 
producer too late for him to perform 
a most important aspect of his serv- 
ice to the agencv and client. Most 




quality production houses have vast 
experience in commercial production. 
The producer — and frequently, the di- 
rector who will be in charge of the 
actual filming — can offer important 
cost-saving advice if he is called in 
at the outset of the commercial devel- 
opment. And it will be much easier 
for the agency to avail themselves of 
this advice, if it comes to them before 
the commercial has been approved by 
the agency's client and has thereto- 
fore become frozen. 

Follow the process for producing 
tv spots for a moment, and see hoAV 
early consultation Avith the producer 
can save money. The agency's crea- 
tive staff comes up with a great con- 
cept for a commercial. This same 
concept can be projected in a variety 
of ways, and at highly varying costs. 
Were not talking about distorting the 
creative concept or reduction of qual- 
ity now — the worst way to reduce 
costs is to reduce quality. The shod- 
dily-produced commercial is the worst 
kind of overspending — regardless of 
cost, poor quality cannot produce the 
kind of results the client expects from 
the monev he spends on time charges. 
Whatever has been spent, no matter 
how little, is overspent. 

Assuming good quality, then, most 
ideas can lend themselves to varying 
treatments, and variations in produc- 
tion technique within each of those 
treatments — all at different cost lev- 
els. Top notch agency producers 
know this, and when working closely 
with the other agency creative peo- 
ple, will guide the development of the 
commercial with an eye on cost. But 
one member of the tv commercial 
creative team is still missing— the pro- 
duction company. He can make sig- 



nificant contributions to the develop- 
ment and projection of the idea — he 
is a professional film maker — and can 
instantly tell whether or not a par- 
ticular effect or technique is over- 
costly in relation to its impact on the 
audience. 

Such close participation will also 
enable the production company to 
better schedule the commercial from 
concept to completion. The film busi- 
ness is highly unionized : overtime for 
the rush to get the spot on the air is 
extremely costly. Thus, better sched- 
uling all through the creation and ap- 
provals of the commercial — with the 
air date constantly in mind — can get 
the commercials in front of the 
cameras sooner, with less overtime, 
and lower costs. 

Bidding has its place. But remem- 
ber that it is not always the least ex- 
pensive procedure for commercial 
production. Better commercials, at 
lower costs, can more frequently be 
produced by early selection of the 
producer, and his creative participa- 
tion right from the start. 



Louis Cavrell, president. Charter Oak 
Tele Pictures Inc.. \eu York 

An advertising agency can avoid 
over-spending for tv-spots by avoid- 
ing certain conditions that will un- 
doubtedly lead to higher costs than 
necessary. 

A tv-agency should entrust the 
critical decisions to a person or per- 
sons who are qualified by experience 
to make economically wise commit- 
ments. 

I say economically w ise. because all 
economies are not necessarily wise. 
For instance the selection of a film 



38 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 





On outdoor boards, in newspapers— even in the 
i —as well as on television, Chicago has been decked out with thousands of smiling 9s during 
te past eight weeks. This was the biggest teaser campaign ever to hit a metropolitan area— a 
blockbusting, news-making campaign to introduce WGN-Television's exciting new fall program- 
to viewers on Channel 9. This was a campaign promoting greater audiences for 

More outstanding features . . . 

more music, more drama, more spe- 
cial events and service programming 
—"Great Music from Chicago," "The 
Play of the Week," "Bozo's Circus," 
"Ripcord," "King of Diamonds," 
"Dick Tracy," "Your Right to Say It." 
Exclusive year-around sports 
. . . introducing this season the Satur- 
day Sports Spectacular featuring 
away-from-home hockey games of 
last season's hockey champions, the 



est movies at 10:15 P.M.-pre- 
senting the 111 post-1950 film fea- 

Ies from the celebrated Seven Arts 
d MGM packages. 
>re newscasts . . . Snappy, exclu- 
e "Newsbreak," nine times daily — 
10 and 11 a.m. and at 1,2,3, 7,8, 
d 9 p.m., supplemented by com- 
ite and comprehensive news cover- 
age at 7:45 and 11:45 a.m. -5:45 
plus "10th Hour News" at 10 
. and the "Midnight Roundup." 

>re than 1,000 9s via skywriting 




Chicago Blackhawks, and Chicago's 
new professional basketball team, the 
Chicago Packers . . . every Saturday 
night starting October 14. 
For availabilities, contact: WGN- 
TV, 2501 Bradley Place, Chicago 18, 
Illinois. Phone: LAkeview 8-2311. 
WGN-TV, 220 E. 42nd Street, New 
York, N. Y. Phone: MUrrayhill 2-7545. 
Represented by Edward Petry & Co. 



friend 



afc 



because you "found" the 
MOST UNUSUAL Christ- 
mas gift-giving idea for cus- 
tomers, employees and 
friends EVER SEEN! 
• • • • 

Yes, you were "really in 
action." Your customers even 
called to say "THANK 
YOU" for your unique and 
wonderful remembrance and 
thereby opened the door to 
ADDITIONAL SALES! 
Your employees and friends 
too, showed their apprecia- 
tion in the many small ways 
ONLY YOU would under- 

*"* *••• 
If you buy gifts (between 
$7.50 and $100.00 each) 
you'll surely want to see this 
unusually practical, sensa- 
tionally simple and refresh- 
ingly different way of saying 
"THANK YOU" to the peo- 
ple who are IMPORTANT 
TO YOU AND YOUR 
COMPANY. 

wfiu fot moh mmum . I ": I 



i i i 



Mil l 



Automated Gift Plan, Inc . 
80 Park Avenue. New York 16. N. Y. 

BP- ••* 

1 tiit '.<■' 



I 



'• 



I X v '.i »»|i, 



I I F 



m 



company solely because their bid is 
low er than someone else's is not m 
saril) \si»»\ unless this company also 
i~ able to deliver the experience and 
control that is required in such mat- 

- 

Storyboard should be complete and 
reflect all the production problems of 
the film, so that the film producer can 
realistically bid on the job and pro- 
\ ide the agencv with such vital infor- 
mations concerning schedules for 
casting, studio rentals, studio-crew, 
animation-requirements, etc.. — and 
finally provide the agency with a rea- 
-onable date for deliverv for final ac- 
ceptable answer print. 

Some agencies have been known to 
purchase large amounts of expensive 
airtime without assurance that they 
will have the films available, this 
usuallv results in extraordinary pres- 
sure to meet these airdates. which gen- 



Responsibility 
for all phases 
of production 
should be 
determined 
from beginning 



erally also results in unnecessary ad- 
ditional costs for overtime charges 
and sometimes also for avoidable 
mistakes. 

The responsibility in all phases of 
the film production should be thor- 
oughlv understood as to whom this re- 
sponsibility belongs. 

If the producer does not under- 
stand that he is responsible for props, 
it is likely that on the day of shooting 
expensive delays, in which the crew, 
studio, and agency-people sit around 
waiting for a "chair." will be un- 
avoidable. 

Advanced planning in form of com- 
prehensive discussions between film 
companv and agencv can resolve such 
problems as special permits in ap- 
proval of locations, approval of stock- 
shots, etc. 

Without this carefully planned and 
worked out schedule a considerable 
increase in costs is almost a cer- 
taint\ . 





Tom Dunphy, exec, lice president, 
W ( D, Inc., .Veit York 

Overspending a tv commercial 
budget is usually the result of two 
related factors. In the first instance, 
the commercial film producer fails 
to spell out what he really intends to 
deliver when he submits his specific 



By the agency 
spelling out to 
the producer 
uhat he is 
expected to 
deliver 



dollar bid. Then, when well into 
production, the agency producer 
finds the bid doesn't cover all the 
elements to complete the commercial 
as he envisioned it ... a standup 
award-winner. He accordingly makes 
one or two little changes, which he 
feels his continguency should cover 
but invariably doesn't. 

Is either offender dishonest or 
overzealous? No! The remedy is 
simply although a little time-consum- 
ing. 

Most commercial film producers 
would welcome a preproduction meet- 
ing before being awarded a contract 
to discuss the production as that 
producer would handle it, at which 
time he can also predict fairly ac- 
curately how much his method would 
cost. There is one requirement: that 
such production meetings be not just 
"brain-picking" sesions, or awk- 
ward gatherings at which his com- 
petition is in attendance. In other 
words, the final one or two producers 
in a bidding competition would be 
given a private opportunity to ex- 
plain their bids . . . thereby pinning 
the price down — and, of course, im- 
pressing the agency with exactly how- 
much creativity they will be getting 
for their money. Then, if, during the 
course of production, the agency pro- 
ducer decides to make changes, he 
will know the responsibility for up- 
ping the budget is his, and I suggest 
he find out then and there how much 
money is involved. The chances are 
be will stay within his budget." ^ 



40 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 




Bruce Morrow 
10 PM-12 Mid. 



Scoct Muni 
7:15-10 PM 



Sam Holman 
11 AMI PM 



Herb Oscar Anderson 
610 AM 



Fred Hall 
10 AM-6 PM Sun. 



Time flies. So does WABC. And so do the delighted listeners to the 
Swingin' Seven from 77. Fly with us to our Fortieth Birthday 
Party. Special features. Special events. Extra Special prizes and 
surprises. All day. All month. And, of course, First Person News, 
Your Kind of Music. All the time on the new sound of new york. 




RADIO CHANNEL J J 



on your sound dial 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



41 






WPTF 

Raleigh-Durham 



» 



>o, 



to. 



has TWICE 

as many 
adult listeners 

1 Jll/iiS any other station in 
the nation's 28th radio market. 

Source: 32- county area PULSE: 



WPTF 


55.1% 


Station B 


24.1 


Station C 


5.2 


Station D 


9.2 


Station E 


6.4 


^NATION'S \ 


i va ' ^-\ 


28th RADIO ] 




MARKET $C 

b. NIELSEN n2 4 / . 


-^jj^ 



■V 



50,000 WATTS 680 KC 

NBC /WMi'ofe lor Pa/er'gh Durhom 

and Fos'e'i North Corolina 

R H. Mason, General Manager 

Gus Youngsteadf, Sales Manager 

PHIRS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 

National Repreientoltvei 

WPTF 32-County Area Pulse Aud. Comp., May. 1960 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



RADIO BUYS 

U. S. Tobacco, New York, has a schedule involving 40 to 50 mar- 
kets for its Model pipe tobacco. This promotion will have three 
flights: 30 October for three weeks; 6 December through 12 Decem- 
ber, and 18 December through 22 December. The time segments will 
be minutes and I.D.'s. There will be two stations used per market. 
Agency: Donahue & Coe, New York. Buyer: Phil Brooks. 

Morton Manufacturing Corp., Lynchburg, Va., will open its an- 
nual promotion for Chap Stick and Chap Stick hand cream. The 
campaign will enter the top 50 markets and will begin the end of 
October. Time segments will be minutes at a frequency of 10 to 30 
spots per week. Agency: Gumbiner. Buyer: Anita Wasserman. 

TV BUYS 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York, has two flights planned for its 
Congestaid. The first flight will begin 12 November and will con- 
tinue for five weeks. This will be followed by a second five-week 
flight starting 7 January. The total number of markets involved in 
this promotion will be about 40, in major areas. Time segments: night 
fringe minutes. Agency: L&N, New York. Buyer: Jim Alexander. 

Schick Inc., New York, will soon open a spot campaign for its 
Schick electric shaver. The entire schedule calls for nine weeks, but 
this will be divided into three flights. The first flight is to start 22 
October and run for four weeks with late night and early fringe 
minutes; the second flight will begin 12 November and go on for six 
weeks with four prime breaks per week. The third flight is an intensi- 
fication of the two previous flights, building onto both the minutes 
and breaks and to continue through the Christmas holiday. Some 
50 to 60 markets are planned for this promotion. Agency: Norman, 
C&K, New York. Buyer: Jack Mais. 

Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich., will go into some 30 to 40 
markets in a promotion for its Ben-Mont gift products. This cam- 
paign will also have two flights: the first starting 27 November and 
the second starting 11 December, both for one week. Time segments: 
day and night minutes. The schedule calls for 20 to 30 markets. 
Agency: MacManus, J&A. Buyer: Jerry Latsky. 

S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc., Racine, Wis., will begin a campaign 
6 November for its Glade. This promotion will have a six week flight 
in about 30 markets. Time segments: early and late fringe minutes. 
Agency : B&B, New York. Buyer : Stan Kreisler. 

Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, will promote two products: Liquid 
Prell starting 15 October through the P&G year using night minutes 
in about 30 markets. Agency: B&B New York. Buyer: Barry Alley. 
The second promotion is for Downey in more than 20 markets with 
day and night minutes. The Downey schedule starts 13 November 
through the P&G year. Agency: Grey, New York. Buyer: Irene Levy. 



42 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



who "approves" approved outdoor advertising 




Everybody! 

Because in Approved Outdoor Advertising 
there is continued adherence to the highest 
standards of good taste and to the require- 
ments of marketers who insist their message 
be close to where the sale is made. 

That's why Approved Outdoor locations are 
primarily in commercially-zoned areas — 
where marketers can effectively use this low- 
cost medium to drive down today's rising 
distribution costs. 

This is the only kind of Outdoor recommended 
and sold nationally or regionally by OAI. the 
national sales organization — the kind lo- 
cated so close to the cash register that it can 
be the last product-purchase message before 
the prospect enters the store, tavern or 
dealership. 

Approved Outdoor Advertising plant opera- 
tors (represented by OAI) learned long ago 
that marketers and agencies seek locations 
in or close to the central marketplace and 
the surrounding shopping areas— not on 
those parts of the great highways where 
little or no business is done. 

Note: Roadside signs of non-standard size or 
construction— and signs identifying places 



of business— are not a part of the Approved 
Outdoor Advertising medium. OAI sells only 
standardized 24-sheet and 30-sheet posters 
—painted bulletins with or without dramatic 
embellishments— and spectaculars specially 
constructed to meet special needs. 

If you are alarmed at rising media costs and 
skyrocketing distribution percentages, we 
suggest you critically study the recent in- 
dustry-wide research program delineating 
markets including reach and frequency of 
households with the lowest exposu re-per- 
dollar rate in all advert ising. 

We suggest you take a good look at some 
case histories that will show an excellent 
share of market increase where Approved 
Outdoor was the only variable. An Approved 
Outdoor representative can be at your desk 
as early as tomorrow morning. Give us a ring. 
He'll have thefacts why agencies recommend 
this vital medium to marketers who have to 
sell every day, all day. 

APPROVED OUTDOOR is the smart money 
answer to today's tough marketing situa- 
tions and is represented nationally only by 

Outdoor Advertising Incorporated 

360 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York. MU 2-2800 




Offices in: Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, St. Louis, San Francisco, Seattle 
SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



43 



Capsule case histories of successm 
local and regional radio campaign 



RADIO RESULTS 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

SPONSOR: Struck & Irwin Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: To sum up in the word of the gen- 
eral manager of the Struck & Irwin Co., Madison, Wise., 
"We are sold out." This, in a few words, tells the successful 
Bales Btorj <>f their hlacktop paving advertising campaign 
on WKOW Radio. Madison. The company bought the five- 
rninute 7:45 a.m. Jack Davis Weather Show, for three days 
a week, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, starting 3 April 
ami ending 2 ( ) September. The campaign offers Struck & 
Irwin's blacktop paving of driveways service. Now, even 
though the campaign was recently completed, the company 
is unable to accept more contracts because of the amount 
of business their radio advertising has brought them. Struck 
& Irwin's general manager also had this to say about adver- 
tising on WKOW: "With only a nominal expenditure on 
this station, our blacktop division volume will be in excess 
of $200,000. An excellent return for the dollar spent." The 
approximate cost of the campaign on the show was $1,000. 
WKOW, Madison, Wisconsin Program 



MUSIC STORES 

SPONSOR: Music Box AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Music Box, with its two loca- 
tions, one in Langley Park, Maryland, and one in Washing- 
ton, D. C, has advertised exclusively on WMAL, Wash- 
ington's, Felix Grant Show for the past seven years. This 
show, which features good jazz, is on the air from 8 p.m. to 
midnight, Monday through Friday. The Music Box has 
scheduled 12 one-minute announcements per week. Two 
years ago the Music Box started featuring an Album-of-the- 
\\ eek, and at this time the store manager kept 30 of the 
featured albums in stock for potential buyers. Now, two 
years later, the Music Box must have at least 75 to 100 
albums on hand before an on-the-air offer can be made, due 
to the interest and response of the WMAL listeners. The 
manager of the Music Box says, "My association with the 
Felix Grant Show has been magnificent, and for my part the 
jazz show is the best buy in town." This evening show has 
effectively and continually reached potential new customers. 

\\ MM . Washington, D. C. Announcements 



CLOTHING 

SPONSOR: Robert Hall Clothes AGENCY rArkwrignt Advertis 
Capsule case history: Robert Hall Clothes recently 
ceived the largest and most successful response it has ei 
had for a radio write-in promotion. Robert Hall boughl 
schedule on WCBS using the Jack Sterling Show (6:( 
10:00 a.m.) to promote a special contest. Sterling awardejl 
a Robert Hall wardrobe to a listener and his entire fami 
whose postcard was selected from those sent in. Within fi 
days, and after only a handful of 30-second announcemen 
had been broadcast, 23,278 cards were received. Robei 
Hall Clothes, which has concentrated a large part of i 
advertising budget on radio over the years, was impress 
by Sterling's results. Jerry Bess, exec. v.p. at Arkwrig 
Adv., said: "We are most enthusiastic about the show, a 
we look forward to a continued campaign for the accou 
using both straight commercials and contest promotio 
Sterling, with his tremendous personal magnetism, has tl 
ability to not only reach people, but sell products as well 

WCBS, New York Announcement 



BANK 

SPONSOR : North Carolina National Savings Bank AGENCY : Dire 
Capsule case history: When the North Carolina Nation 
Savings Bank, Winston-Salem, decided to go into radl 
advertising for the first time they turned the problem d 
setting up a campaign over to the sales staff of WSJS, Win^ 
ton-Salem. WSJS set up a special news bulletin packa; 
an unscheduled number of straight one-minute news bul 
tins to be used whenever the WSJS staff felt material t 
newsworthy enough. Up to the Minute News, as the b 
letins are called, has done a tremendous job for the bai 
According to Frank O'Sheen, bank vice president. Up 
the Minute News was our very best radio buy. The neul 
bulletin campaign on WSJS has been a great help in estab 
lishing our identity as well as being a perfect springboarj 
for the telling of, and selling of, specific services." In addH 
tion, O'Sheen said,the WSJS news presentation has prcf 
vided a number of favorable side effects in addition tl 
getting the bank's specific public story across to customer^ 
WSJS, Winston Salem, N. C. Announcement 



44 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 




What fdmOUS COmmUniCatOr Said What? The letters above-TASBEM-do not stand 
for "Take A Shower Bath Each Month." But as used by their originator, they do refer to taking the populace 
-to the "cleaner's". Part of his success was achieved by rule of Thumb; part as a powerful proponent of the 
jScandinavian nightingale. Who was he— and what did he say? You'll find the answer below. 

On the subject of famous communicators, the letters WWDC have long spelled radio leadership in the rich, 
ever-expanding Washington, D.C. 5-county metropolitan area. Leadership in listeners— in programming— in 
personalities— in dollars-and-cents results to advertisers. Let us communicate your sales message. 




WWPC 



Washington 



. . . the station that keeps people in mind 

Member of the Blair Group Plan . . . represented nationally by John Blair & Co. 
And in growing Jacksonville, Fla., it's WWDC-owned WMBR 

..ajnuiw AJ3A3 UJog jajpns V s,3J3qj.,,-wnujeg seauiqj 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



45 



PORT OI 

PITTSBURGH 









LX 



H?l 



and see 

how to get more 
sales tonnage 
in the port of 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

According to the U. S. Army 
Engineers, the Port of Pitts- 
burgh handled 6,872,194 tons 
lastyear.ThegreaterPittsburgh 
marketing area is even bigger 
when it comes to sales ton- 
nage. Last year retail sales to- 
taled $2,883,162,000. How to tap 
that market? Buy WTAE. Need 
proof? Just look at the record. 
In the past year, 46 major local 
Pittsburgh advertisers have 
switched to WTAE. They know 
the market. They demand sales. 
You can get more sales for 
your clients' money on WTAE, 
too. See your KATZ represent- 
ative for the story of the over- 
whelming local and national 
trend to WTAE in Pittsburgh. 



BASIC ABC IN PITTSBURGH 



CHANNEL 



PAPER JUNGLE 

(Continued from page 27) 

clear billing discrepancies between 
stations and agency. 

CMB, which will demonstrate its 
service on fully-programed electronic 
computers in about three months and 
will be in active operation in six. has 
worked out a system (using the fa- 
cilities of C-E-I-R, Inc., which has a 
staff of over 350 and does 88 million 
annually in data processing business) 
which includes these highlights: 

1. Automatic "control" of dis- 
counts and efficiency evaluation (i.e., 
is the schedule being bought at the 
most advantageous rate?) of radio/ 
tv spot buys. 

2. Standardized CMB invoices to 
agencies, replacing "hundreds of sta- 
tion billing forms now used." 

3. Single voucher checks for pay- 
ment to stations, again replacing a 
multiplicity of present agency forms. 

4. Clearance of discrepancies (be- 
tween what was ordered and what 
was actually on the air). 

5. Same-day transmission of 
earned-rate information to agencies, 
speeding up present reporting chan- 
nels by as much as several weeks. 
And CMB will provide agencies with 
estimates and prompt costing of al- 
ternate media plans. 

Broadcast Billing Co., subsidiary 
of long-established Standard Rate & 
Data Service, views the problem 
principally as one in which "tv sta- 
tions and advertising agencies waste 
thousands of man-hours and dollars 
duplicating each other's efforts." The 
result, according to BBC, is "a cli- 
mate of misunderstanding between 
buyer and seller, and a needless limit- 
ation on the attractiveness of spot 
broadcasting as advertising media." 

Although two of the three new 
billing firms (CMB and Broadcast 
Clearing House) intend to use stand- 
ardized forms, BBC won't, apart from 
internal processing. BBC's latest 
presentation puts it this way : "Broad- 
cast Billing Co. recognizes that each 
client has form requirements and 
internal procedures peculiar to his 
own circumstances; the service com- 
pany must tailor itself to the existing 
standards and paperwork." 

One of the key elements in its spot 
tv service, according to BBC, will be 
in the area of reconciliation of rec- 
ords, putting "the control of expendi- 
tures on a daily basis and insuring 
an improved cash flow." Reports of 



discrepancies "indicating failure to 
perform authorized announcements 
i will be) sent to the station and the 
representative daily to facilitate im- 
mediate renegotiation of these spots 
w ith advertisers." 

BBC will also operate in the area 
of estimates. "For its client agencies, 
BBC is prepared to formulate the 
monthly expenditure estimates by ac- 
count in a format and on dates as 
indicated by advertiser requirements." 
And, in the agency-of-record area, 
BBC plans to maintain "daily 'status 
boards' reflecting the total activity 
in year-to-date for multi-agency ad- 
vertisers." 

Broadcast Clearing House, which 
plans to start its service on a radio- 
now, tv-later formula, feels the paper- 
work problem is particularly acute 
in spot radio because "there's little 
standardization of forms and proce- 
dures," and agencies face a headache- 
producing mountain of bills, checks 
and affidavits for each individual sta- 
tion. Additionallv. there are the 
problems of correcting discrepancies, 
endless correspondence, lack of safe- 
guards and schedule-policing, and 
station reluctance to conform to a 
variety of agency procedures in bill- 
ing and paying. 

By using its own standardized 
forms and processing them at Bank 
of America's data center in San 
Francisco, BCH hopes to accelerate 
payment to the 25th of the month 
following the broadcast of spot radio 
schedules. This, BCH's Mehlig be- 
lieves, will be a big improvement 
over the present situation. "The 
usual time lag on station payment in 
spot radio is 60-150 days." 

Centralized billing procedures are 
in operation right now in some ad- 
vertising areas. Outdoor advertising, 
for example, is billed through central 
channels, and an organization was 
recently set up to handle weekly 
newspapers on a similar basis. The 
Katz Agency for some time now has 
centralized its own spot billings (and 
has taken its commissions faster as 
a result) , and Peters, Griffin, Wood- 
ward in 1957 launched a punch 
compiled system of computing and 
reporting station availabilities elec- 
tronically. 

Will the new plans to centralize 
spot radio/tv billing meet industry 
support from advertising agencies, 
reps and various industry organiza- 
tions? There's considerable indica- 



46 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



• 

■ 






I 







Take TAE and see 

how to get more sales tonnage in the port of 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 



m.V 



tfTas 




I 



BASIC ABC IN PITTSBURGH 

THE KATZ AGENCY, inc 

National Representatives 



ti.m that tin- entire >p«>t industry, 
\w\u\ ol it- paper load, i- generally 
in supporl <>f the concept 

\ t\ pica! summation of the a«enc\- 
|t'\fl problem can be found in the 
\M.rd> of John Ennis, v. p. and media 
dirt-t tor of Fletcher I). Richards, who 
stated: *'l baven'l am accurate idea 
of how mucn it costs na in media 
billing, paying and estimating a spot 
campaign but I do know a goodly 
amount of man-hour* is devoted to 
these functions." ^ 

THIS WE FIGHT FOR : 

Tit o years ago, sponsor's 1 

| Standard Spot Practices Com- I 

mil tee developed a standardized jj 

form to ease manual billing jj 

paperwork in spot radio /tv. \ 

\ Backed by the Agency Finan- J 

rial Management Group, this j 

form uas later adopted by over jj 

j 200 stations. On many occas- jj 

I sions and in many stories, j 

| sponsor has advocated the cen- g 

tralization. standardization and W 

\ simplification of the "paper g 
jungle" in spot media. 



NIGHT RADIO 

[Continued from page 29) 

"Increasingly good" is the word 
out of CBS Radio Spot Sales, in re- 
gard to nighttime sales. Reports Mau- 
rie Webster, v. p. and general manager 
of the rep firm "Life Magazine just 
purchased a series of nighttime news- 
casts on several of our stations, to 
reach more and different customers 
for their publication." He adds, "and 
Cinzano Vermouth is buying night- 
time radio announcements." Their 
reason: "the atmosphere is best for 
extolling the virtues of their fine wine 
at a time when listeners are likely to 
be most interested in it." 

"Fresh and attention-compelling 
programing," says Webster, is respon- 
sible for much of the advertiser at- 
traction. "Features like KXX's ( L.A. I 
Kaleidoscope, a nightly half-hour doc- 
umentary on Southern California. Or 
KMOX's i St. Louis I Sports Open 
Line with local sports authorities and 
audience phone-in guestions. Or 
KCBS' l San Francisco) Viewpoint 
where listeners call in with their 
opinions on the problem of the eve- 
ning." Webster also calls attention 
to WCBS in New York Citv which 



i i 



Look South for new economic 
strength. . . look at the Jackson 

TV market area 
for solid growth 
and a sound 
future." 

Served, 1954-1957, as 
Head of Largest World-wide 
Masonic Organization 
(Royal Arch Masons) 

TOM Q. ELLIS 

Clerk, Supreme Court 
of Mississippi 




WLBTho 



Hingbery 




Serving the Jackson, Miss., Television Area 



has been scoring heavily with night- I 
time sponsorship of its news and I 
sports sho\\ -. 

Wl Radio Sales' W. H. Losee told 
sponsor that Pepsi-Cola purchased a I 
45-minute portion of KMPC's i Los I 
Angeles i nighttime schedule last i 
month. The purchase, not a parent 
company buy. is a daily, six-days a 
week. 52-week schedule. It involves 
the 9:30 to 11 p.m. segment. 

H-R v.p. James M. Alspaugh who 
says ""its a rule of thumb among 
H-R salesmen to pitch nighttime 
availabilities as part of most every 
saturation campaign" points to the j 
success of WMAL. Washington, and ! 
K\^ K. St. Louis in nighttime spon- 
sorship. 

Alspaugh says "we know that there 
is a large important segment of ra- 
dio listeners that can onlv be reached 
at night therefore each advertiser 
should take advantage of this for 
maximum selling of his product." 

H-R"s radio research manager, 
Marv Ann Richardson backs this up 
with this nighttime listening date. 
In New Haven. WELFs nighttime cir- 
culation in their home countv is 61% 
as great as their daytime circula- 
tion: KGB. San Diego, nighttime cir- 
culation 65% of their davtime circu- 
lation: WJAX. Jacksonville, Fla. 
nighttime circulation. 74% of its 
davtime circulation. 

G. W illiam Boiling, president, ra- 
dio division. The Boiling Co. cites 
KRNO. San Bernardino. Calif., 
WBRY. Waterbury. Conn., and 
KTRX. \^ ichita Falls. Texas, as ex- 
periencing increases in nishttime 
sales. Bob Holczer. general man- 
ager of WBRY says the station is 
"sold out even night of the week." 
The Waterbury Savinss Bank, savs 
Holczer. buys an evenins music caval- 
cade from 8:30 to 11 p.m. every 
night of the week. 

According to Boiling. KTRN's 
revenue, "from 9 to 10 p.m. is as 
great as it is from 4 to 5 p.m. or 9 
to 10 a.m." 

Ben H. Holmes, v.p. in charge of 
Petrv"s radio division lists the fol- 
lowing advertisers currently on Petry- 
repped stations: A. J. Sirris & Co.; 
Canada Dry Beverages: Encore Ciga- 
rettes: Esso Standard Oil: Foods 
Plus: General Motors Acceptance 
Corp.: General Motors-Fisher Body: 
Kiplinger Magazine: Minute Rub 
I Bristol-Myers i Minute Maid Orange 
Juice: Model Tobacco: Monroe Auto 



\i\ 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 




E3 




q 



CZ3 





* 



R 



■esearch is the key word which links the objectives of the leading 
audience measurement service and the world's largest independent 
data processing firm. 

To ARB clients, this alliance of objectives and resources promises 
an expansion of research services to meet every television audience 
measurement need of the '60's . . . and beyond. 




AMERICAN RESEARCH BUREAU 

DIVISION OF C-E-l-R INC. 

Washington • New York • Chicago • Los Angeles 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



49 



Equip.; .Mum: Noxzema Cover Girl; 
Owens "i achl Qub; Profit Research; 
Raeford Worsted.; Remington Arm-: 
Reynolds robacco; Sail) Hansen 
netics; Shulton Bronze Tan: 
Texaco; Twentieth Centur) Fox; 
Tyrex; Universal Pictures; and 
\\ elch's Vpple S Grape Drink. 

The] use nighttime radio, Bays 
Holmes, "to reach a particular kind 
of person." Vccording to Holmes 
u he's tli«- fellow (58' i of nighttime 
listener? are men) who cant be 
reached by broadcast means during 
working hour- (except during the 
\\ ..rid Series or an Astronaut shot i : 
who doesn't drive to the office fat 
least one-third of all men don't and 
therefore are unreachable during 
traffic hours) ; who has more money 
to Bpend (nighttime listeners earn 
more than those who don't listen I : 
and who watches t\ lessl much more 
tv disenchantment among nighttime 
radio listeners than among non-lis- 
teners I . 

Texaco, which had tried out an 
all night show I midnight to 6 a.m.) 
on KQV. Pittsburgh, recently re- 
newed for another 13 weeks. Accord- 
ing to Tom Doolev. Eastern sales 



manager, Adam Young. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. station WSJS 
reports increased advertiser interest 
in its Night Beat format which 
covers man-in-the-street interview- 
shows, teen-age activities, music and 
other community events. ^ 



Will mi <•<•<» ss spot! 

J. Walter Thompson? 

\\ e hope bo. ^ ou ht. J. \\ alter has 
been running automobile commer- 
cials on WICE. our sister station in 
Providence. We hope these com- 
mercial- have been so successful 
that the agency is now spoiling to 
schedule them on WHIH, our brand 
new Station here in the Tidewater. 
\- "the new kid in town", perhaps 
we shouldn't act so cocky and brash. 
Nonetheless, our new format with 
it- -lam bang interest in local 
affairs is making converts lickety- 
split. We want you agency people 
to know about this. 

we naturally hope -uecess 
in Providence has whetted J. 
Walter's appetite for more of the 
same in the Tidewater. Wouldn't 
you like to get in on this good 
thing, too? 

WHIH 

FORMERLY WLOW 
TIDEWATER, VIRGINIA 

AN ELLIOT STATION 
Representatives: Avery-Knodel 



RADIO MAN 

(Continued from page 34) 

telegram. "Yes, certainly," Hagerty 
remembered. I almost failed to get 
up the nerve to ask the next question. 
Could we use it for publicity? Hag- 
erty said, "Surely, no objection at 
all." I thanked him and hung up. 
Within the next few 7 minutes the whole 
station knew about it and within the 
next few days the whole eastern sea- 
board heard about it. Nobody will 
ever know how 1 close I came to decid- 
ing it was a fake and throwing it in 
the waste basket. 

A radio station manager's job keeps 
him close to the news, gives him a 
feeling of being in on great events 
and helping to keep millions in- 
formed. More interesting still, he fre- 
quently supplements his knowledge of 
news on the air by contacts with news 
on the hoof. Since WBT represents 
the great American area radio station, 
as a New York station represents the 
metropolitan type, we are frequently 
a first port of call for foreign radio 
officials visiting the united States un- 
der sponsorship of the State Depart- 
ment. Industry representatives from 
ihe United Arab Republic. Saudi 
Arabia, the Philippines, Japan, and 
West Germany have visited our sta- 
tion in the past few years. In each in- 
stance they have contributed to our 
understanding of the world. In addi- 
tion they have given us some merrv 
moments. 

Two years ago we had as our guest 
for three days, Dr. Hans Bau:ch. Di- 
rector of the West German Radio and 
Television Network. We were w arned 
in advance that Dr. Bausch spoke no 
English and would be accompanied 
by an interpreter. Dr. Bausch and 
his interpreter arrived and I entered 
into a new experience in communi- 
cations. I spoke to the interpreter, 
the interpreter spoke to Dr. Bausch. 
Dr. Bausch replied to the interpreter 
and the interpreter replied to me. 
Pretty soon I was so numbed by this 
quadruple conversational technique 
that I couldn't think of anything to 
say. 



There was to be a small luncheon 
for Dr. Bausch the next day and it 
seemed imperative to me that we 
should have someone else at the table 
who could speak German other than 
the interpreter, someone who could li 
tell Dr. Bausch about Charlotte and nt 
the Carolinas in his own tongue. 
\\ here to find someone? Charlotte is jr 
cosmopolitan as southern cities go but 111 
you don't hear fluent German on lp 
e\er\ street corner. The Chamber of 
Commerce was no help. The library 
had German books but no bodies. In 
desperation. I turned to the telephone 
directory. If I could find a Von some- 
thing or a something-haus, I could 
track down mv man. No Vons. No 
hauses. Then it jumped at me from 
among the V. "Dr. Reiner G. Stoll." 
obviously German and well educated. I( 
The "G" probably stood for "Ger- 
hardt." 

I had never heard his name but I jj, 
called him. His English was lightly |{ 
accented. He was suave, cordial, com- 
pletely understanding. He would be 
glad to have lunch. The next day he 
appeared promptly at the private din- 
ing room in the City Club. I intro- 
duced myself, introduced him to the 
interpreter and the interpreter intro- 
duced him to Dr. Bausch. Peace. 
The German language flowed like the 
Rhine past Die Lorelei while the rest 
of us smiled benignly and conversed 
quietly in American. We knew we 
had been successful but had no idea 
how complete our triumph was until 
we later found that our visiting Ger- 
man and our Charlotte German had 
grown up in the same section of 
Stuttgart. Yet one surprise was left 
for us. 

As we left the club I decided upon 
an experiment. I had studied a little 
German in college and had been 
yearning to trv it out on the good 
doctor. So I asked him a question in 
German. I have forgotten what I 
asked, probably something like "How 
many fingers have you on your right 
hand?" To my amazement he an- 
swered in very good English and from 
that moment on he talked with us ex- 
clusively in English. His self con- 
sciousness about his English appar- 
ently left him completely when he 
heard my German. 

Interesting as such experiences are, 
they are no more satisfying than the 
dav-to-dav job of satisfying our audi- 
ence and our advertisers. Serving the 
public is such a vast concept that it 



50 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



becomes vague. The public contains 
minorities and majorities, segments, 
sections and cliques; and it ultimate- 
' ly reduces to individuals. 

One of the obvious and appealing 
minorities in any radio audience is 
the audience for classical music, 
classical drama, and discussion pro- 
grams. Four years ago we did some- 
thing that I am sure made our com- 
petitors think we had rocks in our 
head: we started a Monday through 
Friday, 8-9 p.m. show made up ex- 
clusively of this type of program ma- 
terial. It's still on the air and has ac- 
tually become a little commercial. 

We broadcast the swearing-in of 
new lawyers (they didn't call us, we 
called them), make an annual award 
to the outstanding clubwoman of 
Charlotte, produce and broadcast 
carefully scripted one-hour programs 
on the religious denominations in our 
section, and give an annual award of 
$1000 to the most progressive small 
town in our "Community Pride Con- 
test/' Yet I believe the most satisfy- 
ing achievement of all is to serve an 
individual — one person, one listener. 

It is surprising that an individual 



will feel so close to a station that he 
will confidently request a personal 
service. Let me assure you from per- 
sonal experience that our listeners 
will. Any week we may receive calls 
asking us to help find a strayed cat or 
a lost dog, to locate a relative, to pub- 
licize a neighborhood benefit party. 
We always try. In mid-winter last 
year. I received a frantic call from a 
distraught mother. Her seriously ill 
child was asking continuously for a 
slice of watermelon. Watermelon in 
January! It seemed ridiculous, but 
we broadcast the appeal. Result: One 
slice of watermelon delivered to the 
home the same afternoon. 

Sometimes I wish that when we are 
sending out bills to agencies for com- 
mercial services, we could attach an 
additional bill which would say, "For 
extra goodwill from locating one 
slice of watermelon in January- — no 
charge." It might give them a better 
understanding of the extra services 
radio provides. The list is endless. 
I hope it will continue to prove end- 
less because as radio serves it will 
prosper. And I like riding this can- 
tankerous horse. ^ 



SAVVY VIDEO 

(Continued from page 37) 

man cracked. "Quality in commer- 
cial production comes from creative 
integrity, conscientious effort, and 
something Hollywood calls 'produc- 
tion values' — a blending of experi- 
ence, realism and talent." 

Sets, lighting, photography, direc- 
tion, editing — these are the contribu- 
tions that the film producer ma^es to 
the commercial the agency has writ- 
ten and conceived, Susman told spon- 
sor. Start with a well-written, sound- 
ly conceived story board, and turn it 
over to an experienced, creative pro- 
ducer with the talent and the experi- 
ence to realistically interpret the 
original concept, and the finished 
product, according to Susman, should 
spell quality. 

Obviously, there are numerous ex- 
amples of high quality commercials 
made by MPO Videotronics. Of the 
arsenal of outstanding achievements, 
Susman selected four as examples of 
excellent creative work on the part of 
ad agencies. Here are Susman's ex- 
amples, chosen at random, he ex- 
I Please turn to page 70) 




AVERAGE QUARTER-HOUR HOMES REACHED SUMMARY 
MONDAY through FRIDAY 

WFLA-TV STA.'A" STA.'B" 

SIGN-ON TO NOON 27,400 17,800 2,400 

NOON TO 6 P. M. 28,400 25,900 7,600 

6 P. M. TO MIDNIGHT 66,600 65,800 22,000 



Again, ARB proves that, on 
Mondav through Friday — 
when most people watch tele- 
vision — WFLA-TV reaches 
more homes from sign-on to 
midnight than any other sta- 
tion in West Coast Florida ! 

'Monday through Friday, ARB, June 1961 




8 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES, BLAIR-TV 



\*rfla-t%/ GO 



TAMPA - ST 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



51 



Jr 60plC 5 a practical 
man about Madison 
Avenue once remarked, 
"watch TV programs, 
not organizations!' 

We have no basic quarrel with the quotation, 
but before it gets into Bartlett we'd like to 
make a point or two: 

Corinthian, an organization of stations in sev- 
eral markets, believes that its group set-up 
provides impetus for the kind of local pro- 
gramming that ties communities to stations. 
Indeed, people watch programs. Well-advised 
sponsors watch ownership. 

Responsibility in Broadcasting 




52 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 













KOTV 

Tulsa 

KHOU-TV 

Houston 

KXTV 

Sacramento 

WANE-TV 

Fort Wayne 

WISH-TV 

Indianapolis 

WANE-AM 
Fort Wayne 

WISH-AM 
Indianapolis 



lepresented by H-R 



, 



Sponsor backstage ' Con//«ueJ from page 15) 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



they had been reading sponsor editor John McMillin's pieces on 
Minow and attributing John's sentiments to me. 

Now I admire John as a writer and editor, but that does not mean 
that I necessarily agree with him on every issue. On the question of 
Newton Minow. I am just about in total disagreement with John 
insofar as his written opinions about the FCC head express his 
full views. Happily, I have no need to curry favor with either John 
or Newton Minow. My column does not necessarily reflect sponsor's 
editorial position. It represents nothing more nor less than my own 
opinions and observations, and I am happy to say that in more than 
five years of turning out these pieces neither Editor McMillin nor 
publisher Norman Glenn have ever killed a column because mv 
opinion ran contrary to their's. 

All of this, of course, is a long introduction to the simple state- 
ment that I was highly impressed with Newton Minow and the 
great potential good he can do broadcasting in the long run in May, 
and now after hearing his dissertation on the Children's Hour before 
the RTES I am even more highly impressed. While Minow did sav 
that he was retracting not one single word of his May chastisement, 
I felt that the tone of his speech on 22 February was far friendlier, 
far more constructive, far more calculated to prove to the broad- 
casters that he was trying to help them do the best possible job. 

Friendlier, more constructive 

He still said that the Commission "will refuse to let the crv of 
censorship smokescreen our mutual efforts to improve broadcasting." 
And, even while telling the broadcasters that their judgment, based 
on a constant awareness of their responsibilities, must determine 
the course of programing, he warned "I assure vou that we intend to 
take your responsibilities as seriously as we take our own." Re- 
peatedly, he stressed that he and the FCC want nothing to do with 
programing, that this is purely the business of the broadcasters. 
And he even took a firm position as broadcasting's champion in 
an area where it has often been accused and attacked. 

He said: "I don't accept the proposition advanced by some that 
tv itself causes juvenile delinquency. Eut shouldn't tv be a major 
cause of juvenile development? I am skeptical about the charge that 
the sex and violence on tv cause teenage immorality. But doesn't tv 
have the duty to contribute heavily to teenage responsibility?" 

I think most serious broadcasters would feel pleased that Minow 
has not climbed the popular bandwagon of blaming tv for every 
youthful misguided, unfortunate who makes a headline. 

As for the Chairman's proposal on children's shows. I believe it 
has tremendous merit. I believe that if I were a network president 
I would reject Minow's suggestion of alternating a prime hour with 
my two competitors. If it were at all feasible, and I had the faith I 
would like to have in my program people. I would come up with a 
children's show for the full five day strip on my own. And I would 
strain every effort to see that it was a better, more educational, con- 
structive, inspiring and ves. entertaining show than either of nrj 
competitors could produce. And if it turned out quite a great show, 
and one or both of my competitors did even better, even then I 
wouldn't feel too badlv. I would be thinking of the possible good it 
could be doing mv kids, and other 69.999.998 children to who 
Minow was referring. ^ 



53 




niii\i'h'i jl ' ILU wi^^w' M!;l!l ' 



BUT... WKZO-TV Can Light Your 

Sales Success In Kalamazoo -Grand Rapids! 








NSI SURVEY- 


—GRAND 


RAPIDS-KALAMAZOG 


AREA 




February 20-March 19, 1961 






STATION TOTALS 




Homes Delivered 


Per Cent of Total 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


WKZO-TV 


STATION B 


Mon. thru Fri. 












9 a.m. -Noon 


48,400 


34,000 


58.7 


41.3 




Noon-3 p.m. 


65,900 


53,800 


55.0 


45.0 




3 p.m. -6 p.m. 


56,400 


71,900 


43.9 


56.1 




Sun. thru Sat. 












6p.m.-9p.m. 


155,600 


96,800 


61.7 


38.3 




9 p.m. -Midnight 


138,200 


66,200 


67.6 


32.4 



WKZO-TV's 1000-foot tower can be your guide to 
greater sales activity in the rapidly growing Kalamazoo- 
Grand Rapids area. 

Your commercials on WKZO-TV will reach an average 
of 80% more homes than on Station B, Sunday through 
Saturday, 6 p.m.-Midnight (NSI— Feb. 20-March 19, 
1961). You'll be building for the future in a good 
market, too. Both Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids are 
among the 55 fastest-growing markets in America. 

And if you want all the rest of outstate Michigan worth 
having, add WWTV, Cadillac-Traverse City, to your 
WKZO-TV schedule. 



Sources: Sales Management Survey of Buying Potter and Television Magazine. 
%The earliest U.S. lighthouse was first lit September 14, 1716 on Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor. 




WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WWTV — CADILLAC-TRAVERSE CITY 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 



WKZ0TV 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • lOOO' TOWER 

Studios in Both Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids 

For Greater Western Michigan 

Aver/Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 




What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



16 OCTOBER 1961 

Copyright I Ml 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The Supreme Court has refused to review the FCC-Appeals Court action taking 
Miami channel 10 away from Public Service Television, National Airlines subsidiary: 
The grounds were alleged improper approaches to former FCC commissioner 
Richard A. Mack. 

The case can have only one more step to go, and if it is taken it will be little more than a 
formality. Public Service can ask the Supreme Court to reconsider its own action, but the 
highest court turns down such requests in an extremely routine manner. 

This is the first FCC license cancellation in a generation, and the Supreme Court 
refusal to hear arguments must have an ominous sound for other "influence" cases 
which may follow. Eventually, it appears likely, there will be license cancellations for other 
reasons. Court disposition of the Miami channel 10 case, though it appears to strengthen the 
FCC regulatory hand, will not point the way toward treatment of cases involving, for 
instance, charges that programing did not live up to promises made. 

In fact, the decision in this case isn't even a precedent. Mere refusal to hear a case 
doesn't mean the Supreme Court has passed on merits or legal matters involved. It does no 
more than permit a lower court decision to stand. However, the same Appeals Court which 
ruled that Miami channel 10 should be taken from Public Service and given to L. B. Wilson, 
following an FCC finding to that effect, will hear future "influence cases.*' 



The FCC is in the courts on pay-tv, and this time in the Appeals Court : this case 
will also eventually go to the Supreme Court, whichever side wins. 

Theatre owners are appealing FCC approval of RKO's Hartford on-the-air pay-tv experi- 
ment. They claimed FCC had no power to make a grant, since it would be a major 
change in the concept of broadcasting. That the projected rentals to be charged for 
decoders would violate the FCC's own dictate that subscribers should not be required 
to buy decoders. That the test will give the FCC no useful information as to whether pay-tv 
will work, 

RKO and the FCC denied these charges, point by point. They said nothing in the law 
prevents the Commission from aiding in development of new uses for the broadcast 
spectrum. Other arguments were answered with a statement to the effect that these were 
matters the FCC was set up to decide. 






The Food and Drug Administration-American Medical Association jointly 
sponsored National Congress on Medical Quackery heard some harsh words about 
radio and tv programs featuring "'nutritional misinformation." 

Dr. Frederick J. Stare, nutrition chairman of the Harvard School of Public Health, called 
on FCC chairman Newton Minow to yank the licenses of stations which "permit nutritional mis- 
information to be poured out to an unsuspecting public." He said he knew of at least 60 radio 
stations who permit individuals to "purr their melodious incantations of nutritional 
nonsense." 

Dr. Stare described at length serious illnesses which would go untreated if listeners and 
viewers accepted what they heard at face value, plus the great amount of useless foods and 
vitamins they would buy. He offered to give Minow a list of offending broadcasters, and added 

(Please turn to page 57 ) 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



55 



i 






Significant news, trends in 

• Film • Syndication 

• Tape • Commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



16 OCTOBER 1961 

Copyright IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



There are flashes of light on the syndication horizon which portend the dawn 
of a syndication upturn after the first of the year. 

Insiders hear of renewed activity for production of first-run half -hour syndicated 
shows by companies devoid of new product today. 

First off, MGM-TV might well bring its Zero-One, a co-production with BBC, into 
syndication as its maiden entry should it fail to land a network deal. 

Then there's talk that ABC Films will have a new show of some type other than action- 
adventure. 

Also, CBS Films is understood to be readying distribution plans for an adventure 
series for early 1961. 

Neither MCA, NBC Films, nor NTA, has plans now for new syndication product, but ITC, 
Screen Gems, and Ziv-UA (alphabetically) are now in first-run distribution, or never left it 

Even for those houses that are now primarily re-run shops, some occasional first-run 
product is helpful to brighten up the Line. 



There seems to be a Wolper documentary in almost every salesman's portfolio 
these days. 

Actually Wolper is just continuing his Biography series of 39 half-hours for Official Films, 
with which he's had continuing dealings, while at the same time bringing out his The Story of 
for Ziv-UA. 



ABC Films has 15 Canadian markets sold for ABC TV's Ben Casey. 

Colgate-Palmolive, Ltd. and Ford Motor of Canada are sharing eight markets, and 
stations in seven additional cities bought the rest. 



Ziv-UA finds ample justification for its simultaneous release of three first-run 
series in the fact that they are now sold in five-sixths of the top 50 markets. 

The three shows, Everglades, Ripcord, and King of Diamonds, achieved this sales 
coverage by small regionals and station sales, for the most part. 



Add these to your list of feature film sales : 

• MCA's pre-1948 Paramounts to nine more stations, KFVS-TV, Girardeau; WMUR-TV, 
Manchester; KGNS-TV, Laredo; KVOA-TV, Tucson; WHBF-TV, Rock Island; WSBT, South 
Bend; WCCB-TV, Montgomery; KSYD-TV, Wichita Falls, and WBTW, Florence. 

• Seven Arts' Volume I and II of post-1950 Warners to W-TEN, Albany; KHOU-TV 
Houston; Temple, Tulsa; KOLD-TV, Tucson; WDAU-TV, Scranton, and KGHL-TV, Billings 



As an auxiliary to its $8 million a year tv commercials and industrials businei 
MPO has branched off into the equipment field. 

Its first device is an 18-pound 8 mm sound projector that can run up to 15 minutes anc 
repeat. Intended for salesmen, it's called Videotronic 8. 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 19611 9 

I 




FILM-SCOPE continued 



Fred Niles expects his newly opened New York branch to top $1 million in 
volume the first year and then to add on $1 million more each year for the next five 
years. 

His current volume from Chicago and Hollywood is around S3 million, 60% of it in 
commercials and 10% in tv programs. 

Niles is optimistic about interchanging talent among his three studios as needed — 

instead of picking up free lance people for each job. 

Besides his commercials and industrials, Niles has a tv film series and a feature film to be 
made late in 1961 and released early next year. 



WASHINGTON WEEK 

(Continued from page 55) 

that such stations aside from losing their licenses might well be indicted for practic- 
ing medicine without licenses. 



The deadline for filing arguments for and against network option time came 
and went : filings were by the same few interests, and followed the same lines these 
interests have pursued through the years. 

Network claimed the practice is "reasonably necessary" to conduct their business, a 
factor which makes restraints of trade legal under the anti-trust laws. They questioned a move 
by the FCC to reconsider a decision made only last year, preserving option time by a 
4-3 vote, merely because Minow's vote now substitutes for that of King. 

Station reps and KTTV agreed that networks can operate successfully without option 
time. KTTV said that in addition to banning option time, FCC should be vigilant in guarding 
against substitute means of accomplishing same end. It specifically cited CBS plan. Station 
said if any station devotes more than 75 percent of its air time to a single program supplier, 
that should be considered evidence that an illegal arrangement is in effect. 

The networks said they are in competition with other national ad media, and if they are 
unable to guarantee station clearances the advertisers will choose a competitor. 
Justice Department didn't file. It declared, during the last administration, that option time is a 
"per se" violation of antitrust laws. 

Oral argument is slated for 3 November on the proposal to ban option time on the 
grounds that it is against public interest, rather than on antitrust grounds. Justice may 
not testify in view of elimination of the antitrust law angle. It "advised" the FCC in last year's 
proceedings leading up to a cut of a half hour, but retention of the practice. 



NAB's group of 15 small station-large station, radio-tv broadcasters appeared to 
have made little impression on the FCC at a meeting with respect to proposed new 
application forms and logging requirements. 

FCC general counsel Kenneth Cox seemed quite agreeable to changes to make reporting 
easier. Minow and other commissioners agreed they didn't want to force broadcasters to hire 
extra people just to make out forms. But, aside from Hyde, the Commissioners appeared 
•et on getting the information. Craven will likely vote with Hyde, but he expressed 
puzzlement over why broadcasters were now asking for changes on forms worked 
out in cooperation with an NAB committee. Commissioners Cross and Bartley were 
absent, but broadcasters can gain little comfort from that 



• 16 OCTOBER 1961 



57 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



16 OCTOBER 1961 

OmrrllM 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



SPONSOR HEARS 






To tv reps Friday has come to have a special significance: its the day that Comp. 
ton calls 'em up to cancel some P&G schedule. 

It usually happens around 3 p.m. If anything, it fixes the rep up for a jolly weekend 
mood. 



Looks like a major Madison Avenue agency is stuck with the $75,000 bill for 
the pilot of a series for which it couldn't get time on any of the tv networks. 

The client sees the investment as strictly the agency's responsibility. 
One way the size of the gamble may be reduced: sale of the film to Revue or some- 
one else for a summer replacement anthology. 

BBDO is reported to be on the verge of adopting another innovation for its 
media department : a second vice-president. 

The said-to-be recipient: Mike Donovan, the department's tv stalwart and quite in- 
fluential in the planning stages with at least two of the agency's topflight accounts. 



Cases where network radio properties, besides Amos 'n' Andy and Pepsodent, 
changed the course of a product or company: 

Wayne King and Lady Esther: from the occupancy of a small Wacker Drive (Chicago) 
loft, the makers of the face cream in quick time were rolling in hefty national sales. 

Jack Benny and Jell-O : an old product which the comedian made a must on grocery 
shelves and lifted to No. 1 among non-prepared desserts. 

Bing Crosby (Music Hall) and Kraft: virtually drove out of existence regional and 
local cheese distributors and converted processed cheese into a household acceptance. 

Fibber McGee & Molly and S. C. Johnson: The team can be credited with starting 
this company up the spiral to the bigtime among household cleansers. 

Ma Perkins and Oxydol: The serial not only boosted the brand to tops in packaged 
soaps but changed P&G's entire thinking re advertising and merchandising. 

An upper-rank agency is beginning to suspect that it's been taken in by the 
promises it got from an account it acquired a few months ago. 

The account, a substantial spender hi tv, turned over several new products to the 
agency with assurances it would be getting several million dollars to get them rolling in 
the medium. 

Says the account manager, now the company hasn't any money to spare for new 
product promotion and he doesn't know when it will be forthcoming. 

Leonard Goldenson and Ollie Treyz apparently are on a long range goodwill 
gathering plan. Two midwest advertisers reported to their New York agency that 
these two ABC TV chieftains had called on them with a preface which ran to this 
effect : 

They were merely on a getting-acquainted tour, with the other intent being to let 
advertisers in on the network's general philosophy of service in programing and to 
the client. 

Also, that Goldenson hopes to cover the leading 100 advertisers with these visits. 

SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 




Buns look bunnier! 



On Videotape* the tantalizing flavor 
of a hot biscuit, the sparkle of a soft 
shampoo- product appeal -comes into 
the home as it never can on film. 
You're invited to come to Videotape 
Centerto seewhylThis iswhere 
the most appealing commercials 
on television are being created. 
Videotape Productions of New York Inc. 
101 West 67 Street, New York-TR 3-5800 



•TM AMPEX CORP. 




SPONSOR 
WEEK mM *" m 



Advertisers 



Menly & James (FC&B), a sub- 
sidiary of Smith, Kline & French, 
will be cutting loose with a 13- 



week spot tv campaign in 60 mar- 
kets, with the schedules calling 
for from 12 announcements a 
day both day and nighttime. 

The product: Contac, a new de- 
la\ed aclion cold remedy. 



Contac also on CBS TV for a flock 
of minute participations in enter- 
tainment series and news specials. 

Texaco bought the all night show, 
Dial-A-Score, on KQV, Pitts- 
burgh, in a 50-50 deal with local 
dealers in order to encourage 
them to stay open all night. 

Originally a 13-week order, the buy 
was renewed for another 13 weeks 
last month. The show, as it gives 
away ball scores via the telephone, 
can be used to document from trunk 
line meters that people are awake and 
listening. 




COMRADERIE— Gathered at the meeting of the Detroit Chapter 
of Station Representatives Association were (l-r) Robert Britton, v. p. 
dir. media & research, MacManus, John & Adams; Gail Smith dir. 
of adv. & mkt. research, G.M. Corp.; Sheldon Mover, v. p., D. P. 
Brother; Carl Uren, asst, adv. mgr., Chevrolet Motor Div.; Harold 
Savage, media super. Chevrolet Motor Div.; Cerl Georgi, Jr., v.p. 
C-E; Charles Fritz, v.p. John Blair Co., pres. SRA Detroit Chapter 



EVERY am radio station in Michigan was purchased by Dick Fred- 
erick Ad Agy. to promote last month's State Fair. Thanking Freder- 
ick (seated) for purchase were (l-r) Wendell Parmelle, Brdcst. Time 
Sales; Arthur Underwood, Jr., Katz Agy; Dan Bowen, Gill-Perna; 
Larry Gentile, Boiling; Stuart Mackie, Avery-Knodel; Charles Sitta, 
Michigan Spot Sales; Chris Gentile, Larry Gentile Assoc; James 
Brown, Venard, Rintoul & McConnell; Bernard Pearse, Pearse Sales 





DEDICATORY telecast for KTAL, Shreveport, La., as an NBC affili- 
ate had chairman of the board of NBC Robert W. Sarnoff as prin- 
cipal speaker. Station covers areas of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas 



TWENTIETH anniversary party for both sponsor Burger Brewing 
Co. and sportscaster Waite Hoyt (at mike) with WKRC, Cincinnati. 
Ken Church (2nd I) sr. v.p. of Taft Brdcstg. Co. presented plaque 











60 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



Mars, Inc., and president James 
R. Fleming were the recipients 
of a plaque from the National 
Confectioners Association in rec- 
ognition of the firm's contribu- 
tion of an elaborate tv commer- 
cial to the entire candy industry. 

The commercial, to be sponsored 
by Mars on a nationwide tv network 
19 October, is a promotion for all 
candy and it's woven into the format 
of a one-minute musical comedy 
number. 

After the network showing, the in- 
stitutional commercial will be avail- 
able to any candy firm, free of charge 



through the NCA for local tv shows. 

Campaigns: 

• Shulton (Wesley Associates) 
will co-sponsor network tv programs 
and back them up with a separate 
spot tv saturation campaign in more 
than 80 markets. These efforts are 
the company's plans for the coming 
Christmas season. 

• Campbell Soup Company, 
(Leo Burnett), is introducing a new 
line of deep dish frozen meat pies 
under the trade name of Swanson. A 
"Free Pie Offer" promotion will open 



the item with saturation spot tv in 
selected markets. 



Agencies 



■ 



DX Sunray Oil, a heavy user of 
farm spot, has named Gardner to 
handle the firm's product and 
corporate advertising as of 1 Jan- 
uary. 

The account will be serviced from 
Gardner's St. Louis office with John 
H. Leach, v. p., serving as an ac- 
count supervisor and J. R. McCollom 
as account executive. 




BREAKING UP— With obvious pleasure, 
Ted Mack axed up the old Video Tape Cen- 
ter in New York City prior to moving to new 
quarters. Looking on with approval is John 
Lanigan, v. p., gen. mgr. Video Tape Prdns. 



PRACTICE BOMB carries WIP, Philadel- 
phia message to dozens of national time- 
buyers. Benjamin Leighton (r), Campbell- 
Mithun, Inc., Minneapolis received missive 
from Harvey Glascock, v. p., gen. mgr. WIP 




NEW SHOW— John W. Kluge (I) pres. 
and board chrm., Metromedia and Edward 
Carr, chm., Washington Convention and 
visitors Bureau look at poster for new Mark 
Evans show WTTG-TV, Weshington, D. C. 





PROCLAMATION for WABC (New York) 
week in honor of station's fortieth anniver- 
sary was given to v. p. gen. mgr. WABC 
Harold Neal, Jr. by Mayor Robert Wagner. 
Presentation was made at City Hall 



SOFTBALL champs— 1961 St. Louis Media 
League champs are shown with coach Al 
Meyer (ctr. r), H. W. Chesley, Jr., pres. 
D'Arcy Adv. Co. holding trophy. D'Arcy 
defeated KMOX (St. Louis, Mo.) radio 8 to 




SHELTERED LIFE— Entering shelter as part 
of WHB, Kansas City, Mo. Civil Defense 
promotion are Chuck Boyles (c) WHB 
'Night Beat' moderator; Herbert Dolgoff, 
gen. counsel, Storz Brdcstg.; George Arm- 
strong, v.p., gen. mgr. WHB and Storz Bdcstg.; 
Don Loughnane, operation mgr., WHB 




61 



The account ua- formerl) held b\ 
I'.itt^-W oodburj . k..in~;i- City. 

\-ciit\ appointments: [be Flami- 

naire Co. <>f France, Brittanj origi- 
nators jihI manufacturers of the bu- 
tane lighter, to North Advertising 
. . . Monsanto Chemical's plastic 
division to Tatham-Laird. Chicago. 
from NL&B . . . The Bubble Up Cor- 
poration. Peoria. 111., to Cambell- 
Mithun . . . Dwinell-Wright's White 
House premium qualit) coffee to Cole 
Fischer & Rogow . . . Bristol-Myers 
de Mexico for its Ipana tooth paste 



and Bromo-Quinina to Kenyon & 
Erkhardt . . . \ rapes Corp.. Red- 
wood city, Cal., manufacturer of mag- 
netic recording devices, to C&W, in 
a move to consolidate all advertising 
h ith one agenc. . . . Durkee-Mower. 
Lynn, Ma—., to Manoff . . . Federal 
Bake Shops, Davenport, Iowa, to 
Ir\ing J. Rosenhloom & Associ- 
ates. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

Stanley Burger to media depart- 
ment of Kudner. from senior buyer at 
DDB . . . Gerald J. Weipert and 




TULSA'S 







PUBLIC SERVICE 

PROGRAMMING 

From on-the-spot coverage of the Confer- 
ence On Peaceful Uses Of Space, to AVi 
hours a week of education and information 
programs (more than the other Tulsa sta- 
tions combined), KVOO-TV offers the finest 
public service programs in Eastern Okla- 
homa. Further proof that Channel 2 is 
Tulsa's finest station! 




Represented by 

(EdwardYpetry *Y Co -. ,nc ) 

The Original Statiun Representative 



KVOOTV 



Charles Sutherland to the creative 
staff of Comstock & Company. Buffalo 
. . . Ferrill T. Rohinson to media 
group supervisor at Gardner . . . 
James E. Shriner to assistant ac- 
count executive at Howard H. Monk 
& Associates. Rockford. 111. 

Agency mergers: Speer Advertis- 
ing Agency, L.A., and Mays & 
Company have merged under the 
name of Speer & Mays, Inc. The 
two organizations have complemen- 
tary backgrounds, Speer primarily in 
the industrial and Mays primarily in 
the consumer field . . . The Griswold- 
Eshleman Company, Cleveland, 
will merge with Stoetzel & Assoc. 

Stations on the IViove 

The Sunpapers of Baltimore 
took over operation of stations 
WBOC (AM) and WBOC-TV, 
Salisbury, Md. 

E. K. Jett, v.p. and director of tv 
for the A. S. Abell Company which 
publishes the Baltimore papers and 
operates station W MAR-TV in that 
city, made the announcement of the 
purchase which includes the Penin- 
sula Community Television Company, 
an antenna service subscribed to by 
3,000 homes. 

Operation of the Salisbury facili- 
ties will continue with largelv the 
same personnel as before. 

TOTAL STATIONS OIV THE AIR 

fas of 1 October 1961) 
AM: 3.635 
FM:921 
TV: 555 

BOUGHT/SOLD APPROVED 
Sold: KTIX, Seattle, to Chem-Air 
Inc.. and will involve changing the 
call letters to KETO for both the 
am and fm facilities. The price: 
$247,500. Brokered by: Edwin Torn- 
berg & Companv. New York . . . 
KFOX-AM-FM, L.A, to California 
Broadcasting Co.. Inc., from Bing 
Crosby Enterprises. The price : $1,000,- 
000. Brokered by: Blackburn & Com- 
panv. Washington. D. C. . . . On 
air: KGIN-TV, G r a n d Island, 
Neb., began broadcasting 1 Octo- 
ber .. . WNNJ-AM-FM, New- 
ton. N. J., began broadcasting on the 
fm dial as of 4 October. 
An hours increase: WBAL-FM, 
Baltimore, is now broadcasting 48 



62 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



hours per week from 7:25 am to mid- 
night. 

Call letter change: Radio station 
WEEP, Pittsburgh, Pa., changed its 
call letters on 2 October to WYRE. 

Associations 

LeRoy Collins, speaking at the 
NAB Fall Conference in Dallas 
last Monday, said that the NAB 
is now on better terms with gov- 
ernment representatives in all 
branches of the federal govern- 
ment than ever before. 

These were some of the highlights 
emphasized in his recent speech: 

• Collins does not believe that the 
FCC intends to try to coerce broad- 
casters anywhere at any time to put 
on the air specific programs or spe- 
cific categories of programs because 
it may approve or desire such. 

• He stood firm on the proposi- 
tion that a responsible broadcaster 
has the right and responsibility to 
determine and control what he pro- 
grams. 

• Broadcasters, when Minow gave 
his "vast wasteland" speech, wanted 
him to declare war, but Collins said, 
"I would not do so, because, in the 
first place, there was justification for 
much of his criticism." 

• The NAB president went on to 
say that whether broadcasters like it 
or not, Minow became in the public 
mind the "white knight" — the people's 
champion for improvement in tv pro- 
graming, which is the broadcasters 
proper role. 

New Jersey Broadcasters' Associa- 
tion, at its fall conference just 
concluded in Atlantic City, elected 
Glenn C. Jackson, v.p. and gener- 
al manager of WTTM, Trenton, 
N. J., as its president for 1961- 
62. 

Fred Wood, president and general 
manager of WMVB, Millville, was 
elected v.p. 

Georgia Broadcasters will con- 
duct an annual competition for 
four prestige awards to be given 
annually at their summer con- 
vention. 

The four award categories are: 

1) Broadcaster-Citizen of the Year 

— to be given to the GAB member 

who, in addition to being a good 

broadcaster, achieves notable recog- 




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16 OCTOBER 1961 



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D. D. Palmer, President 

Raymond E. Guth, General Manager 

Pox Shaffer, Sales Manager 

Exclusive National Representatives 
Peter*, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



nitioa for his community service. 

2) GAB Station of the Year— to 
the radio or tv station deemed out- 
standing in all respects for the year. 

3) Radio-TV Promotion of the 
Year — an award for the best and most 
successful promotion, sales campaign 
or public relations effort by a GAB 
member. 

h Georgian of the Year — a pres- 
tige award to be given to a citizen of 
Georgia not a broadcaster, for out- 
standing achievement during the year. 

The Radio and Television Execu- 
tives Society, at its first meeting 
this week in New York, drew up 
a three-point watchdog plan on 
pending bills. 

These will form the basic function 
for RTES' legislative committee and 
they amount to: 

1 I Careful watch and monitoring 
of state and federal legislation con- 
cerning radio and tv and to keep 
members informed thereof. 

2 1 After analysing the pending 
legislation the committee will urge 
RTES members to take firm stands 
on issues that affect the industry. 

3 I The committee will function as 
a positive arm of the organization, 
even to suggesting new and amended 
legislation. 

Tv Stations 

TvB will give 18 awards this week 
for its tv research plans compe- 
tition at a luncheon in the Wal- 
dorf-Astoria Hotel, New York. 

The competition, announced last 
fall, was devised to enlist the partici- 
pation of people on all basic fields 
of activity in producing exceptional 
research plans for any problem re- 
lating to tv and human behavior. 

Taft Broadcasting Company has 
inaugurated a concept of report- 
ing news for children. 

At Taft stations in Cincinnati and 
Columbus, Ohio, and Birmingham. 
Ala., and Lexington, Ky., the coinci- 
dentally introduced Young People s 
World with a format follows a basic- 
pattern with five minutes in early 
morning and/or evening time with an 
established children's personality pre- 
senting the news, accenting at least 
one important timely subject each 
day. 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

Murray Gross to director of adver- 
tising for Metromedia, Inc.. from 
TvB . . . Bob Zak to assistant pro- 
motion manager at WJBK-TY, De- 
troit . . . Dudley W. Faust to ac- 
count executive at WPIX-TV, New 
York, from CBS . . . Gary B. Smart 
to account executive at WAVY-TV, 
Norfolk, Ya., from director of radio 
and tv continuity at the same station 

Ideas at work: 

• WJRT, Flint, Mich., used closed 
circuit tv at the Saginaw Fair for a 
fall preview of WJRT and ABC pro- 
graming, and distributed a station- 
produced card game plus a four page 
tabloid newspaper promoting fall fea- 
ture films. Some 40,000 games and 
"Telemovie Digests" were distributed 
during the event. 

• WFGA-TV, Jacksonville. Fla.. 
had over 1,000 entries when the sta- 
tion staged a Yogi Bear birthday- 
party on its Popeye Playhouse. A 
40 pound cake was donated bv a local 
restaurant to Hope Haven Hospital 
for Children, some of the bear's most 
avid fans. 

Financial report : Wometco En- 
terprises declared a 10^v stock divi- 
dend in addition to the regular cash 
dividend payable 15 Januarv 1962 
to stockholders as of record 2 Janu- 
ary 1962. The regular quarterlv cash 
dividend of 17%# on the Class A 
stock and 6 1 -jC on the Class B stock 
was declared payable 15 December 
1961 to stockholders of record as of 
1 December 1961. 

Sports sales: Hills Bros, coffee 

(N. W. Aver l has purchased one- 
quarter sponsorship of NFL pro-foot- 
ball games to be telecast over KPIX. 
San Francisco, this fall . . . Duquense 
Brewing Company, Pittsburgh, will 
sponsor 15 games of the American 
Hockev League to be telecast over 
KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh. 

Real estate deal: WTIC-AM-FM. 

Hartford, Conn., has bought the 
Broadcast House as its new home. It 
was purchased by the Travelers 
Broadcasting Service Corp.. for a 
price of $2,045,000. 

Sport sales: Chevrolet Dealers of 
Southern California will be a ma- 
jor sponsor of the 12 remaining Los 



64 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



Angeles Lakers games to be telecast 
on KHJ-TV, Hollywood. 

Radio Stations 

Agency guests at Detroit's WWJ 
radio's cocktail party presenta- 
tion in New York had a chance 
to participate at the event: a 
novel version of bingo. 

This was the way it happened — at 
the Stork Club: Significant facts from 
the pitch had been printed on lap 
size boards in bingo style, and mem- 
bers of the audience placed disks 
bearing the WWJ call-letters on each 
"good business" fact which their 
board contained. The winner of each 
"good business" game was presented 
with a gift from the J. L. Hudson de- 
partment store in Detroit. 

The theme of the presentation : busi- 
ness is good and here's how it got 
that way. It told about the station's 
broad programing appeal. 

The idea of underground emer- 
gency broadcasting facilities 
seems to be gaining momentum 
around the country. 

Both WYDE. Birmingham. Ala.. 
and WEAM. Washington, D. C. are 
already in the building stage of a 
radio station completely underground. 
The structures will include trans- 
mitter, tower, power generator and 
microwave relav equipment. 

V 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Roch 
Demers to general manager at 
CJMS. Montreal . . . James G. 
Babb. Jr., to sales manager at WBT, 
Charlotte. N. C. . . . Steve Brown 
to v. p. of both KOIL. Omaha, and 
KISN, Portland, Ore. . . . Steve 
Shepard to executive v.p. and a 
member of the board of directors of 
KOIL. Omaha . . . David W. Salis- 
bury to general manager of WROK. 
Rockford. 111. . . . Grady Berry to 
WQXI. Atlanta, as an account execu- 
tive . . . Jeanne Caskey to promo- 
tion and public relations director at 
WONE. Dayton. 0. 
to v.p. of Rand Broadcasting 



Frank Craig 



Ideas at work: 

• KCBS, San Francisco, and local 
newspapers are running a joint $12.- 
000 football pool contest and are 
drawing double the number of entries 
pulled by a similar contest which the 




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SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



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65 



STORY 



WTRF-TV ^>a k rd 




•WATCH, 
man!" 



WATCHcry! Fallout . . . fall- 
remember when the 
ng you had to do about 
and make up; or 
new bra or girdle; or 
proceed independently' 



WATCH wtrf-tv 
WATCHmg Cleopatra go by! Caesar: "Gee, 
that Cleo is some number!" Antony: "Man, 
you can say that again, I've checked and it 
adds up to XXXVI, XXII, XXX. 

WATCH Wheeling 
WATCHful Walter was walking in the woods 
and saw a grasshopper sitting on a log Walter 
said, "Little Grasshopper, ao you realize how 
famous you are? They've even named a drink 
after you!" The grasshopper's eye widened as 
he replied, "They've named a drink for me?" 
Then he became skeptical: "Naa, who'd call 
a drink Melvin?" 

WATCH Seven 
WATCH 'em run! Now we know why Russia's 
runners make a good showing in the Olympic 
games During their training, real bullets are 
used in the starting guns! 

WATCH wtrf-tv 

WATCH your attitude! Bob Ferguson says he 
overheard this one:"Recessions don't bother 
me, I was a failure during the boom!" 

WATCH Wheeling 

WATCH that line! Football season . . . when 
you watch numbers on sweaters instead of 
in them. You know, football, the game where 
it takes a spectator four quarters to finish a 
fifth! 

WATCH Seven 
WATCH it! Seven is the big seller in this 
section of the country. The W,.e£iing-iieuben- 
ville Industrial Ohio Valley is rich country 
for advertisers and WTRF-TV does the big job 
from Wheeling. Ask George P. Hollingoery. 



CHANNEL 
SEVEN 



WHEELING, 
WEST VIRGINIA 



STEVENS PT. 
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MARINETTE j 
OCONTOi 



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MANISTEE 



MANITOWOC 



FOND DU LAC 



WEST BENDl 



THE 



LAND OF 
MILK& 



i 




newspapers ran last year by them- 
selves. 

• WCAO, Baltimore, brought the 
local citizenry 75.000 strong out for 
ping-pong balls which the station 
dropped from the air — over 50,000 
of them and numbered so that the 
catchers could enter contests for 
$5,000 worth in prizes. 

. WABC. Vu York, invited all 
its listeners for the station's 40th 
birthday party at Freedomland, a lo- 
cal amusement park. A birthday 
card will be the official ticket of ad- 
mission and each rerson presenting 
a card at the gate will be admitted 
free. Regular admission price for 
adults is SI. 95. 

• KNUZ, Houston, in a promo- 
tion for the fifth anniversary of the 
Gulfgate Shopping City, helped sell, 
via its dj's, 20,000 gold fish at two 
for five cents. 

• WKTC, Charlotte, N. C. has 
given a dj a vacation in a fallout 
shelter for one week. 

New quarters : The Gordon Group 

continues to be headquartered in San 
Francisco at 2655 Hyde Street. The 
suite office is available to visitors by 
night. 

WSTC-AM-FM, Stamford, Conn. 
is taking the FCC Chairman's re- 
cent suggestion and has sched- 
uled a weekly program for the 
younger set to be called World 
News For Children. 

The timelv report of national and 
international events is prepared for 
the eight to 14-year-old group and 
will go on the air Saturdays at 9 a.m. 
following the station's local and ABC 
world news. 

School super Joseph Franchina has 
suggested that the program be the 
subject of current events for Monday 
morning classes. 

Storer Broadcasting, on the day 
following the Broadcasters Pro- 
motion Association in New York, 
will have a get-together with its 
promotion men. 

It's set for 9 November and it will 
be a rare occasion for the 12 plus 
people from across the country to 
look things over. 

Since sports has rolled on to be- 
ing such a big business, one can 
look back to 40 years ago this 



month when the first play-by-play 
account of a baseball game was 
aired. 

It happened at KDKA, Pittsburgh, 
in 1921 when the station covered the 
World Series between the Yankees 
and the Giants. KDKA had just gone 
on the air the previous November. 



WCRB-AM-FM, Boston, demon- 
strated its new stereo-fm multi- 
plex to a gathering of advertising 
and media people. 

The speciallv prepared show fea- 
tured monitored off-the-air stereo-fm 
programs and a "live" action demon- 
stration of the station's role in bring- 
ing regular stereo broadcasts to New 
England in 1954. 

The Greater Delaware Valley 
1961 High Fidelity Music Show 
will open 29 October at the Ben 
Franklin Hotel in Philadelphia. 

It will be based on the theme of 
multiplex broadcasting and reception. 



Networks 



Mutual affiliates, via their advi- 
sory committee, has suggested to 
the FCC that it probe the eco- 
nomic abilities of communities 
to support broadcast activities as 
one way to offset bad program- 
ing practices. 

The recommendation was contained 
in an eight-point report voluntarily 
presented to the FCC as a result of 
a survey conducted among all MBS 
affiliates since last March. 

CBS TV's Morning Minute Plan 
is enjoying an SRO status with a 
total of 28 different advertisers 
participating. 

The plan, which started in Febru- 
arv of this year, opens the Network's 
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, EDT, Mon- 
dav through Friday period to low 
cost, rotating, minute-participation 
sponsorship. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

John J. Kelly to account executive 
at CBS Radio Network Sales Depart- 
ment from director of client relation 
for tv Spot Sales at CBS . . . G. 
Thaine Engle, manager of broad- 
cast promotion at NBC, was re- 



66 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



elected this week to the board of 
directors of Just One Break. Inc. For 
the past decade he has helped secure 
air time for public service announce- 
ments encouraging the employment 
of the phvsicallv handicapped. 

Sports sales: Mennen, Sunbeam 
and Anheuser-Busch will sponsor 
the 1961-62 pro basketball broadcasts 
on NBC T\ . During the coming 
season, 23 pro basketball games will 
be televised. 

Specials: \ves Montand, in a pro- 
gram recreating hits of past broad- 
way shows, has been signed for a 
Timex special on ABC TV, 26 No- 
vember from 10:00 to 11 :00 p.m. 

New affiliates: KGA, Spokane, 

Wash., has joined the CBS Radio 
network as its primary affiliate, re- 
placing KXLY . . . KSIX, Corpus 
Christi. Texas, has resumed its affili- 
ation with CBS Radio. 

Kudos: Leonard H. Goldenson, 

President of American Broadcasting- 
Paramount Theaters, will be given the 
B'nai B"rith President's medal for 
humanitarianism at a dinner in his 
honor 14 November at the Waldorf. 

Representatives 



Representation in the U.S. main- 
land for Puerto Rico's first Eng- 
lish-language radio network was 
announced by Intercontinental 
Services, Ltd.. New York. 

The Quality Broadcasting Network 
—stations WKYN, San Juan. WFQM, 
San Juan, and WORA-FM, Mayaguez 
—is affiliated with MBS. 

Rep appointments : WRAW, Read- 
ing, Pa.: WFLI, Chattanooga, Tenn.; 
WKGN, Knoxville. Tenn.; WABY, 
Albany. N. Y. : WSLI, Jackson, Miss., 

all to Radio-TV Reps, Inc YND, 

Managua. Nicaragua, to Pan Ameri- 
can Broadcasting Company. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

Lee A. Lahey to the board of direc- 
tors at Robert E. Eastman . . . Thom- 
as A. Dooley to eastern sales man- 
ager of Adam Young from account 
executive at the same firm . . . James 
W. Svehla. Jr.. to Chicago radio 
sales staff of Edward Petrv. 




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rated station in Albany-Schenectady-Troy at approximately the same 
cost per 1,000. SKYLINE delivers 92,300* nighttime homes every 
quarter-hour Sunday through Saturday. Non-competitive coverage. 
One contract — one billing — one clearance. Over 254,480 undupli- 
cated sets in 5 key markets. Interconnected with CBS-TV and ABC-TV. 



IDAHO - 



KID-TV Idaho Falls 
KLIX-TV !w,n Falls 



MONTANA - KXLF-TV Butte 

KFBB-TV Great Falls 
KOOK-TV Billings 

TV NETWORK 

P.O. Box 2191 Idaho Falls, Idaho 



^T\ 




.,;-&fc^-^r. '<^. y.'x.^tf ^C>^- -ARB average Match. 1961 

Call Mel Wright, phone JAckson 3-4567 - TWX No. I F 1 65 
or your nearest Hollingbery office or Art Moore in the Northwest 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



67 



What they see on 

WJAC-TV 



Film 




THEY BUY! 




When you advertise your product on 
WJAC-TV, you can be sure people 
see it ... . and they'll buy it, too! Both 
ARB and Nielsen show WJAC-TV to be 
the number one station in the Johns- 
town-Altoona market, but statistics 
don't buy products .... people do! 
WJAC-TV clients know that WJAC-TV 
gets action, turning viewers into 
buyers. If you're after people . . . pur- 
chasing people . . . pick WJAC-TV! 

For Complete Details, Contact: 

HARRINGTON, RIGHTER 
AND PARSONS, INC. 

New York Boston ChKogo Detroit 
Atlanta Los Angeles Son Francisco 




M«'tro-Coldw\ n-Mayer Television 
in connection with the episode 
Holiday Weekend of the studio's 
new Dr. kildare series, has joined 
up with the National Safety Coun- 
cil to push a national safety cam- 
paign. 

I he episode, which deals with holi- 
day traffic fatalities, will be aired on 
NEC 16 November week before the 
Thanksgiving holiday. 

The Hollywood Advertising Club 
will sponsor the second annual 
International Broadcasting 
Awards formal banquet, 13 Feb- 
ruary. 

Over 40 IBA trophies will be pre- 
sented to the world-wide winners in 
25 categories of tv commercials and 
15 classes of radio commercials. 

Screen Gems' first tv show to be 
taped outside of the U. S. went 
into production in Toronto last 
week. 

"By Pierre Berton" series is a five- 
minute show of personal commentary 
to be aired daily. Twenty segments 
were taped last week and syndicated 
throughout Canada. 

PEOPLE OX THE MOVE: 

Crawford W. Hawkins, Jr., to pro- 
ject supervisor at On Film Inc. . . . 
Gerry Corwin to midwestern sales 
director at TEC . . . Robert E. 
Dressier to director of radio, tv and 
film activities for public relations 
department of Field Enterprises Edu- 
cational Corp. . . . Leonard Feld- 
man elected to the board of directors 
of Sterling Television. 

Sales: Warner Bros. Films of the 
50's have been sold during the past 
week in the following markets: 
KHOU-TV, Houston: KOTV. Tulsa: 
W-TEN. Albany; KOLD-TV, Tucson; 
WDAU-TV, Scrantom and KGHL- 
TV. Billings, Mont. 

Public Service 

Public service in action: 

• KTTV, L.A., and 33 other West 
Coast tv stations are pre-empting 
three hours of prime time programing 
to give viewers complete coverage of 
the "Hollywood's Answer To Com- 



munism" rally at the Hollywood 
BowL It's a follow-up of KTTVs 
public sen ice teleca-t- of southern 
California anti-communist school at 
the sports arena several weeks ago. 

• WSIX-AM-FM-TV. Nashville, 
Tenn., secured the exclusive telecast 
beeper story on the I*. AAV. -Ford ne- 
gotiations story. The station had the 
report on the air almost a full hour 
before the major news wire services 
had the stor\ . 

• WCBS, New York, will feature 
a Monday-through-Fridav show. 3:15 
to 9:00 p.m.. which will give listeners 
a chance to air their views on current 
issues. 

• KORL. Honolulu, has opened a 
new field of communications bv es- 
tablishing a system of notifying phy- 
sicians when they are needed at local 
hospitals. 

Kudos: WHKAM-FM. Cleveland, 
received the United States Air Force 
1961 Public Service Award. This 
came as a result of the station's ef- 
forts in distributing a complete re- 
cording of Americas first space-man's 
ride to civic institutions throughout 
the Cleveland area. ^ 



FRESHEN UP ON YOUR FALL PROGRAMMING. 

Premiere in your market with these 
brand new . . . 

1- MINUTE 

RADIO 
FEATURES! 

Individual Series 
STARRING 

OLEG CASSINI 

Fashion Commentary 

HY GARDNER 

Show Biz Round-up 

HENRY MORGAN 

Comedy 

• 

For Complete Details and Sample Taptt 

Write or Phone 

Chuck Prager Radio 

Syndications Inc. 

441 West End Ave. 

New York 24, N. Y. 

Phone: TRafalgar 7-8402 



68 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



JOIN B P A. 



i 




very 
important 
persons 

will meet 
on the 

sidewalks] 

of New York\ 
during the,..] 




■H 



BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION 




flll^Iln ANNUAL 



®^>C^ CONVENTION 



mm 


IS?fc 




\d\fiA/6mi 




EiSfeV' 



ssnsfpsiai 



NEV^ YOFtKl,2Sr.Y. 



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2 • B P A • JOIN B P A • • JOIN B P A« JOIN B P A • JOIN B P A • JOIN B P A • 



BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION 

jSend today! % R °- Box 9736 < Cleveland 40 - Okio 

^| Please rush me more information about BPA 

Name 

Company 

Address 

City State 



" • v d a Nior • v d a Nior • v <i a Nior • v a a Niorw 



SPONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 



69 




BILL COSTELLO 



Current assignment-the Kennedy 
Family. That's Bill Costello originating 
from the White House with accurate, 
concise, authoritative newscasts on 
Mutual. He brings to you 30 years of 
news reporting-plus quality news 
beats that only an on-the-scene re- 
porter can deliver. Want Washington? 
Bill Costello is there for Mutual Radio. 
♦ Remember: Mutual wraps up 66% of 
its radio audience in the A and B mar- 
kets-where the buying is biggest. Buy 
Mutual Radio-and you've got it covered 
at the point of sale. 





A Service to Independent Stations 
Subsidiary of Minnesota Mining 
& Manufacturing Company ^fYl 



SAVVY VIDEO 

{Continued from page 51) 

plained: 

United Brewers, 90-second, live ac- 
tion (J. Walter Thompson). Here is 
a simple, but effective agency idea — 
"who says beer is a man's bever- 
age?" and visualization — an actress 
receiving and rejecting gifts from 
hands reaching in from off-screen, 
got the extra ingredient of a creative 
performance. Hands were choreo- 
graphed by Lee Sherman, Broadway 
choreographer. Viewers may not be 
conscious of why, but the commer- 
cial moves, attracts, is memorable, 
according to Susman; Nested, 60- 
second, live action ( McCann Erick- 
son), Paul Petroff, MPO art direc- 
tor, in Susman's judgment, did a 
brilliant job of developing the sets in 
these lush commercials. Yet the ele- 
gance or the set design didn't destroy 
the realism the agency wanted. Al- 
though the set was of Hollywood cali- 
ber, its cost was remarkably low and 
well within a commercial budget, 
Susman pointed out; Budweiser, 60- 
second, live action (D'Arcy). Sus- 
man said that Bob Johnson, the 
agency producer - director, worked 
closely with Zoli Vidor, MPO direc- 
tor of photography. Together they 
created a tour de force in lighting 
and the finished commercial showed 
the results of using top flight talent; 
Eastman Kodak, 60-second, live ac- 
tion (J. Walter Thompson). Here 
Matt Harlib, agency producer, asked 
Marvin Rothenberg, MPO director, 
and Susman to meet with him, dis- 
cuss the agency's concepts and make 
any suggestions they thought would 
help improve the commercials — be- 
fore thev were tied down on finished 
presentation boards. They made a 
number of suggestions that were in- 
corporated in the boards." 

Gone is the dav of the simple com- 
mercial. Fred Raphael, general man- 
ager and vice president of Filmways. 
a major producer of tv commercials, 
told SPONSOR. The table top commer- 
cial is almost a thing of the past, in 
Raphael's opinion. "As agency peo- 
ple became aware of the techniques 
available to them in film production, 
it enlarged their creative visual think- 
ing." Raphael declared. 

Raphael chose the following five 
high-quality commercials made re- 
centlv at Filmways: Eastman Kodak, 
two minutes, live action, color (J. 
Walter Thompson). This is a Christ- 



mas theme with Santa Claus. The win- 
ter theme was done in New 1 ork in 
the middle of August with a set built 
atop of the studio roof; Metrecal, 60- 
second, live action (Kenyon & Eck- 
hardt i . This one comes across with 
such realism that it shocks the view- 
er, Raphael said: Prell, 60-second, 
live action (Benton & Bowles). Hair 
photography here is sensational, ex- 
citing; Eord, 60-second, (J. Walter 
Thompson) ; Willy Jeep, 60-second, 
color ( Norman, Craig & Kummel I . 
This stresses the power and mobility 
of vehicles with remarkable effective- 
ness, he said. 

Both Alfred L. Mendelsohn, gen- 
eral sales, and Michael Elliot, one of 
the executive producers, of EUE Di- 
vision of Screen Gems, agreed with 
their colleagues that humor in tele- 
vision commercials has increased. 

Saluting agency producers for their 
creative talents, both Elliot and Men- 
delsohn picked these six as among 
recent notables: Five Day Deodorant, 
60-second, black and white, live ac- 
tion (Dovle Dane Bernbach i . EUE 
execs describe it as a commercial 
"with a fresh, clean look*'; City 
Chewy, 2 1 o minutes, color, live ac- 
tion I Campbell-Ewald) . "Here's a 
warm, natural representation of the 
need of a city family to get away for 
a respite in the country. The casting 
of the family and the humanness of 
their reaction, makes this commer- 
cial real and compelling"; Piels. 60- 
second, black and white, live action 
(Young and Rubicam). "Excitingly 
photographed, filled with surprises 
and quick visual changes, L nusual 
beer and bottle shots coupled with 
different faces expressing varied emo- 
tional reactions': Praise Soap, 60- 
second. black a^d white, live action 
I Reach. McClinton) . "A unique situ- 
ation in which a pirl, supposedly un- 
real, engaees in th° darins exploits 
of a wood nvmph. It i* done in good 
taste and with an ethereal beautv 
throughout"; Allerest, 60-second, 
black and white I'Papert, Koenig, 
Lois). "As with Dillv Beans, which 
we also made, this is a humorous 
and sophisticated presentation of a 
new product. It delivers a serious 
message with a big laugh": Scott Tis- 
sue, 60-second. black and white, live 
action (J. Walter Thompson). This 
gave us an opportunity to paint a 
delicate and soft visual portrait of 
gentleness and sweetness through a 
little girl's innocence." ^ 



70 



«rONSOR • 16 OCTOBER 1961 








th f 



Jack F. A. Flynn has been appointed na- 
tional sales and business manager of the 
WPIX-TV, New York, sales department. 
A veteran of broadcasting, he was formerly 
account executive on sales staff of WPIX- 
TV and served in this area for the last eight 
years. Flynn has been with the station since 
1951. He has held executive posts in pro- 
graming, production, and operations. Prior 
radio and tv staff of WGN, Chicago, and 




c 




to this he served on 

was graduated from the University of Missouri. 

Jack O'Mara has been named director of 
the western division of the Television Bu- 
reau of Advertising. He is presently v.p. 
in charge of promotion, merchandising and 
research at KTTV, L.A., and has received 
numerous national and local awards in 
these fields. His 23 year broadcasting ca- 
reer began at KVOE, now KWIZ, Santa 
Ana, Calif., and includes affiliations with 
ABC, CBS and Hooper. Mara earned his B.A. and 
in journalism at the University of Missouri. 



Pat Flaherty, news director emeritus of 
KPRC radio and tv, Houston, has assumed 
the additional duties of audience relations 
director. He will travel extensively through- 
out the stations' coverage area, maintain- 
ing a constant contact with individuals and 
groups in KPRC's audience. He began his 
career in 1921 as one of Texas' radio pio- 
neers. During World War II he was an 

NBC correspondent in New Guinea and the Philippines and made 

the first broadcast of the re-capture of Manila. 

George R. Jensen has been named v.p 
and midwestern manager for the new Na- 
tional Sales division of RKO General, it 
was announced bv Donald J. Quinn. direc- 
tor of National Sales, RKO General. Prior 
to his present appointment, he was v.p. and 
midwest sales manager for WOR-AM-FM, 
New York. Jensen has been with the com- 
pany for ten years. Previously, he was 
associated with the Crosley Broadcasting Company. He will make 
his headquarters in Chicago. 





IN 

PORTLAND 

OREGON 



they eye it 




and Buy it 




ON 

KOI N tv 



KOIN-TV is Portland's resultjul sta- 
tion because it reaches 7 of every 10 
homes in a rich 33 county area, with 
highest ratings (see latest Nielsen). 

>Sr Represented Nationally by 
HARRINGTON, RIGHTER & PARSONS, INC. 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



71 



frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



Recently. J. Glen Taylor, president and general manager WAVY-TV, Norfolk, 
Va., took part in a three-station promotion in Norfolk. The results surprised 
him greatlv. led him to revise his opinions on the attitude of agency people, 
and made him come up with the idea that selling methods should be changed. 
As Taylor puts it, ". . . one of the factors that helped us in getting the reaction 
we received was the simplicity of . . . approach. . . . We stuck mainly to facts. 
. . . In our particular work and association with these people (timebuyers 
we have found an exceptionally gratifying response to our market stories." 




New selling methods needed 



^^ome of the startling remarks I keep hearing from 
various sources from time to time concern references to 
agency time buyers as skeptical or cynical. In our par- 
ticular work and association with these people, we have 
found an exceptionally gratifying response to our market 
stories. 

One definition of "salesmanship," I believe, is the 
ability to persuade the other person to believe as you 
believe. If one's material is good and the presentation 
well-planned, it has been my experience that interest, 
belief, acceptance and in many cases, gratitude for ex- 
planations and enlightenment are the results more often 
than not. 

I think some of the most striking examples of this type 
of reaction by agency people has been seen in recent 
months during a series of market promotions the three 
stations in Norfolk, Va. (WAVY-TV, WTAR-TV and 
WVEC-TV) and their individual sales representatives have 
presented to agency time buyers, research and media ex- 
perts and personnel of national advertising market and 
media groups. 

Since the inception of our three-way market promotion, 
we have found that many of the people mentioned above, 
rather than treating our presentation with skepticism 
and/or cynicism, have displayed completely opposite emo- 
tions to our film presentation. The reactions, to underplay 
the results, have ranged from mildly enthusiastic to out- 
right and \<><iferous approval on the part of these partici- 
pants. 

Whether or not the reason was because our film ran 
only fifteen minutes and encompassed the entire range of 
what we were trying to point out to the agency people, or 
whether the fact that three stations were telling the same 
story and not individual stories of their accomplishments 
is hard to >a\. When time buyers, in writing, tell us that 



"this was the most illuminating market story I have ever 
seen," or write that "I have never before realized how 
rapidly the Norfolk area was expanding," or "in fifteen 
minutes you have changed my whole concept of that par- 
ticular market" or that "this short, entertaining but com- 
plete story of your market's potential was educational and 
enlightening. I never before realized the closeness of the 
areas in that market," . . . then perhaps it is time for a 
re-evaluation of our attempts to reach time buyers. 

Perhaps we have found the key to reaching the people 
who I know are snowed in continually by the magnitude 
of their jobs. At least we know that we have received 
attention never before achieved in our long experience of 
contacting agency people. 

I think one of the factors that helped us the most in 
getting the reaction we received was the simplicity of our 
three-station market approach. We did not present glowing 
reports featuring such superlatives as Greatest, Best, etc. 

We stuck mainly to facts about our market. Facts that 
could be easily checked, but by the same taken could have 
been easily overlooked in individual presentations. We 
brought out the most important facts about the market from 
the standpoint of the agencv time buyer. That it was a 
closely integrated market . . . the geographical location of 
the cities comprising the market, Norfolk-Portsmouth, 
Hampton, Newport-News, were within a few miles of each 
other. That the military in Norfolk, rather than being just 
Navy, encompasses 37 different branches of the Armed 
Forces and that rather than being a weakness was actually 
a $200 million bonus for advertisers. 

We don't know how our unique market promotion will 
work out from the standpoint of increased sales dollars in 
the market, but we have received a degree of interest and 
attention from agency people and advertisers, far above 
an\ we have experienced on an individual basis. ^ 



72 



si'onsoi; 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



ii 



Charlotte's WSOC-TV. 



■ ■ 



an important advertising entity in 
its area"- Bren Baldwin. K&E 




WSOC-TV's modern facilities serve an area of nearly 3 million people 
with the Carolinas' finest programming. A continuing promotion and 
publicity program builds audience bonuses for both station and adver- 
tiser. In addition, WSOC-TV gives vigorous merchandising support that 
expands product distribution and multiplies sales. Schedule WSOC-TV. 
It is one of the great area stations of the nation. 



WSiC-TV 

CHARLOTTE 9-NBC and ABC. Represented by H-R 



WSOC and WSOC-TV are associated with WSB and WSB-TV, Atlanta, WHIO and WHIO-TV, Dayton 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 



73 



SPONSOR 




The Life of a Radio Man 

In thi> issue (page 32) we're beginning a series of articles 
which will appear in sponsor from time to time on the "Life 
of a Radio Station Manager." 

Our purpose with this series is to acquaint our agency and 
advertiser readers with what, we believe, has become one of 
the most fascinating and absorbing occupations in American 
life today. 

And it is largely an untold story. No great novels or plays 
have ever been written about radio station men, comparable 
to those written about newspaper editors, lawyers, and doctors. 

The glitter and glamor of network tv personalities com- 
mand most printed space devoted to broadcasting. 

But in terms of real drama, variety of experience, and 
closeness to people and community life, we doubt if there is 
any profession in the country which equals local radio man- 
agement. 

And, as Paul Marion points out, an awful lot of agency 
men and ad managers would love a station manager's job. 

Vigorous objections by Corinthian 

The vigorously worded document in which Corinthian 
Broadcasting recently expressed its objections to the FCC's 
proposed program logging forms, makes exciting, challeng- 
ing reading. 

Ordinarily few individual broadcasters care to register 
blunt and open criticism of Commission activities, though 
state and local broadcast associations sometimes do. 

Corinthian, however, has not hesitated to state its opposi- 
tion in the strongest possible terms "The proposed program 
form is objectionable in its overall implications and it is ob- 
jectionable in certain of its specific questions." 

"Corinthian believes that the Commission cannot, as a mat- 
ter of law, and should not, as a matter of policy, control the 
quality and diversity of programing." 

sponsor recommends to every one interested in the health 
and welfare of the broadcast industry, a careful study of the 
Corinthian arguments. 

And we particularly want to congratulate Wrede Peters- 
meyer and members of Corinthian management for taking a 
courageous, forceful stand on fundamental principles. ^ 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Putting on the dog: Klavan and 
Finch have gone high hat. The 
WNEW, New York, morning per- 
sonalities recently chastised their 
outfit's traffic department i K&F in- 
sist their reports on \. Y. traffic 
originate in the station's traffic de- 
partment! for copy that read: "Traf- 
fic on the approaches to the George 
Washington Bridge is proceeding at 
a snail's pace." Insisted Klavan, or 
was it Finch. "Next time instead of 
snail say escargot. 

Attention, tired execs: Leonard 
Key, producer of the forthcoming 
Broadwav musical. ''The Night They 
Raided Minsky's," is scouring the 
Madison Ave. and Wall St. areas 
these davs, but his foray? have noth- 
ing to do with advertising or stocks 
and bonds. Kev seeks gentlemen with 
bald heads, red faces, fat necks, and 
pendulous jowls, in junction with his 
show, based on the hevday of bur- 
lesque. The "tired businessman" 
types ( which abound on the two 
streets. Kev claims I . are desired to 
occupv an entire row at each per- 
formance of the musical, therebv 
lending authenticity, nostalgia, and 
flavor. 

Free medical care: The ABC News 
team has high hopes of getting 
through the coming winter minus 
bouts with the common cold. When 
they had their proboscises featured 
in full-page newspaper ads under the 
heading of "25 noses for news." The 
Schering Corp. (Coriciden cold tab- 
lets, nose drops, etc. ) , sent packages 
of its products to each of them. 

Another non-first: Groucho Marx 
takes issue with G.E.'s announcement 
that he'll play his first serious role, 
that of an attorney. "Some of my 
best comedy tries." quips Marx 
"turned out to be serious roles." 

New gun in town: Hudi O'Brian, 
veteran rider of the tv Purple Sage 
(Wvatt Earp was his handle • , now 
is pursuing a Broadwav legit stage 
career. One of his comments about 
life among the big citv slickers: 
"Those horses sure look funny with 
policemen on 'em." 



74 



SPONSOR 



16 OCTOBER 1961 







Go First Class with KMJ-TV — 
and with first class ratings as con- 
firmed by the new Fresno ARB 
survey of July, 1961. 

KMJ-TV has more quarter hour 
wins throughout the week . . . 
from sign-on to sign-off . . . than 
any other Fresno station. This is 
true both for the Metro Area and 
for total homes. And KMJ-TV 
leads consistently in the number 
of adult viewers. 

KMJ-TV movies lead the field. 
The afternoon movies Monday 
through Friday are the top rated 
daytime movies with an average 
rating of 15.0. The Sunday Cinema 
Special from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. has 
a 22.0 and the Friday night Fabu- 
lous Films has a 17.0 rating. 

♦July 1961 ARB, Fresno. 




S^KMJ-TV . . . first TV Station 



the Billion-Dollar 

Valley 

of the Bees 



GO FIRST CLASS 



wi 



+h KMJ-TV 



FRE9N O 



CAL-I RORIM l/X 



McCLATCHY BROADCASTING COMPANY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



rKMJ-TV ~T\ 



BUFFALO 



GO ACTIVE WITH 




CHANNEL 2 

Your Peer)- representative (or in Canada, Andy McDermott) has a whole bag full of neat sales tricks that will help you sell 
the Western New York and Southern Ontario market through Channel 2. Let them show you how WGR-TV's leadership 
in sports, movies, and local programming keeps viewers glued to 2. To sell Buffalo ... get active with WGR-TV. 



WGR-TV CHANNEL 2 NBC BUFFALO. N.Y. A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 

WROC-FM, WROC-TV, Rochester, N. Y. • KERO-TV. Bakersfield, Ca 



H WGR-AM, WGR-FM, WGR-TV, Buffalo, N.Y. • KFMB-AM, KFMB-FM 

C KFMB-TV, San Diego, Calif. • WNEP-TV, Scranton-Wilkes-Barre. Penn. , 

WDAFTV, WDAFAM. Kansas City, Mo. 
TRANSCONTINENT TELEVISION CORP. • 380 MADISON AVE., N.Y. 17 



\UmwilP<mn «Ye»- xcj 




23 OCTOBER 19&1 
40< a copy • SS a yaar 



SPONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO) 




ADVERTISERS 



■ 



IN THE LAND OF THE BIG CHEESE 

WEAU-TV 92%! 

(EVEN WHEN THE FISH ARE BITINC . . .) 



IT'S 



k 



'■% 



'%; * 




/ 



THE AGENCY 
MEDIA DEPT. 
IN 1966 

Mediamen view their 
future in such areas 
as research, status, 
and automation impact 

Page 25 



How spot radio 
works for 
8 big clients 

Page 28 

1956-1961— 

wha' happened 
in radio/tv? 

Page 30 



WEAU-TV 

EAU CLAIRE, WISC. 

Reaching ¥4 million people and 2 million cows 
with the best of ABC, NBC and CBS 



Network tv 
studies tag 
customers 

Page 34 








r LRR; 




What's first with Hoosiers 
. . . is first with WFBM-TV 



3rd Annua/ Antique Auto Tour— This Hoo- 
sier love for old motor cars just comes naturally. 
Indiana happens to be the birthplace of today's 
automobile. That's why WFBM-TV included 
Kokomo and honored the "Haynes" on its first 
tour. So successful were preceding tours thatthis 



year's caravan included 125 cars and extended 
nearly three miles. Each year it has been more fun 
for those who went— and even more exciting to 
goggle-eyed thousands in cities around Indian- 
apolis who watched it. These Mid-Indiana viewers 
prefer WFBM-TV, too. Ask your KATZ man! 



Represented Nationally by The KATZ Agency 



C 



c 




A TIME-LIFE STATION 




FAMOUS IN 
PHILADELPHIA 



FOR 



EXCLUSIVE 

n 



LL U 

Traffic Reports 
INTERESTING 

VIGNETTES 

2 5 DAILY 




ELODIC 

MUSIC 

AWARD WINNING 

m 





FRI 3 V 





I 





IN RADIO 

ITS THE SALES CLIMATE 

THAT COUNTS 

Represented Nationally By GIL-PERNA 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



/ERWHELMINGLY 

THE LEADER IN THE 
SYRACUSE MARKET 

WSYR-TV 

DELIVERS 42%* 

MORE HOMES THAN 

ITS COMPETITOR 




C.i ik. r.ll S,~, I... HARRINCTON. RIGHTCR k f ARSONS 

HE'S NOT HANDSOME 
HE'S NOT A SMOOTHIE 
but . . . 
HE'S THE MOST 

AUTHORITATIVE 
HAP GLAUDI 
SPORTS 

At last, the New Orleans tele- 
\ision market has a sports 
editor who knows the facts and 
presents them. HAP GLAUDI 
fills this need more than 12 
times per week! 
For that hig PLUS in New 
Orleans . . . huv HAP 
GLAUDI SPORTS! 

Represented nationally by Katz 

WWl-TV 

©NEW ORLEANS 



© Vol. 15, No. 43 



23 OCTOBER 1961 




SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE Tv/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



ARTICLES 

Media departments — 1966 
25 Maximum of planning, minimum of paperwork, assumption of program- 
ing function, elevation of stature envisioned for media five years hence 

How radio works for 8 big clients 

28 Some of the nation's largest advertisers are betting on spot radio. 
Reps point to auto makers, and execs probe radio problems 

1956-1961— wha' happened? 

30 Here is a look at some of the major industry happenings, people in the 
news, which sponsor has reported since it went weekly five years ago 

Net tv studies tag customers 

34 More web audience data are helping clients target customers with more 
precision. Pulse syndicated service is most comprehensive in this area 

Dreikorn's homey radio sell 

36 New England baker, fed up with noisy advertising claims, beefs up on 
regional radio spots and proves the quiet, homespun pitch sells bread 



NEWS: Sponsor- Week 7, Sponsor-Scope 19, Spot Buys 50, Washington 
Week 55, Film Scope 56, Sponsor Hears 58, Sponsor-Week Wrap-Up 60. 
Tv and Radio Newsmakers 72 



DEPARTMENTS: Commercial Commentary 12, 555 5th 14, 

Sponsor Asks 40, Timebuyer's Corner 39, Seller's Viewpoint 73, Sponsor 
Speaks 74, Ten-Second Spots 74 



Officers: editor and publisher, Norman R. Glenn; executive vice presi- 
dent, Bernard Piatt; vice president and assistant publisher, Arnold Alpert; 
secretary-treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMUlin; news editor, Ben Bodec; 
managing editor, Alfred J. Jaffe; senior editor, Jo Ranson; midwest editor, 
Gwen Smart; assistant news editor, Hey ward Ehrlich; associate editors, Jack 
Lindrup, Ben Seff, Ruth Schlanger, Lauren Libow; columnist, Jee Csida; art 
editor, Maury Kurtz; production editor, Phyllis Trieb; editorial research, Carol 
Ferster; reader service, Gail Rubenstein. 

Advertising: assistant sales manager, Willard Doughertys southern man- 
ager, Herbert M. Martin, Jr.; midwest manager, Paul Blair; western manager, 
George G. Dietrich, Jr.; sales service/production, Lee Mertz. 

Circulation: circulation manager, Jack Rayman, John J. Kelly, Lydia 
Martinez. 

Administrative: office manager, Fred Levine; George Becker, Michael 
Crocco, Syd Guttman, Irene Sulzbach, Geraldine Daych, Jo Ganci, Manuela 
Santalla, Mary Kandyba. 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation, and 
Advertising Offices: 555 5th New York 17, MUrray Hill 7-8080. Chicago Office: 612 
N. Michigan Av. (11), 664-1166. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Ave. So., FAirfax 
2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. (28), Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Offica: 
3110 Elm Av., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: U. S. S8 a year. Canada $9 a year. Other 
countries $11 a year. Single copies 40<. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd clan 
postage paid at Baltimore. Md. 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 




Now Herb 

gets the "Oscar"! 




WHO Radio Farm Director Herb 
Plambeck (right) receives first broad- 
cast-industry "Oscar in Agriculture" 
award from Thomas H. Roberts, 
Sr., President, DeKalb Agricultural 
Association, for "outstanding serv- 
ice, to American agriculture." 



WHO 

for Iowa PLUS ! 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watn 

NBC Affiliate 



WHO Radio is part of 
Central Broadcasting Company, 
which also owns and operates 

WHO-TV, Des Moines; 
WOC and WOC-TV, Davenport 



Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 
National Representatives 




"WHO's Herb Plambeck Wins Second 
Major 1961 Farm Service Award-"Oscar 
in Agriculture". For the second time this year, 
WHO is proud to announce that Farm Director 
Herb Plambeck has received another of America's 
top farm service awards. And again, the award is 
from an organization that sponsors one of Herb's 
farm programs! 

This time it is the first annual "Oscars in Agri- 
culture" award for the one broadcast personality 
judged to be most helpful to the farming industry. 
The award will be presented annually by the DeKalb 
Agricultural Association, Inc., through a panel of 
independent agricultural experts. 

Earlier in the year Herb received the coveted 
American Feed Manufacturers Association "Animal 
Agricultural Award" for outstanding service to live- 
stock and poultry farmers. Now both these top 
awards are added to the tremendous string of 45 
other state, national, and international citations 
Herb has received in the past 25 years. 

Herb Plambeck is known as "Mr. Agriculture" 
throughout the large WHO coverage area — Amer- 
ica's 14th largest radio market. He and his expert 
WHO staff are on the air sixty times per week with 
farm programs. 

Ask your PGW Colonel for availabilities. 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 




UICRL • UICBL-Fm • UUGM.-TV have pioneered 

in the development of mass communications. Established in 1922, 1944, and 
1949, respectively, these stations have been and are dedicated to serving 
all listeners in the cities and communities throughout their coverage areas. 





WGAL-TV 



Lancaster, Pa. 

NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 






Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 
6 SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 




Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busy readers 



n 



23 October 1961 



SPONSOR-WEEK 



FOOD JUST EATS UP TV 

Three separate '61 studies of food brokers and super- 
market men show 68, 78, 97% prefer tv as ad medium 



In three separate studies, all cur- 
rent and conducted during 1961, the 
overwhelming preference of food 
brokers and supermarket people is 
for tv as the medium they regarded 
as doing the most effective job. 

One study was done by TvB. A 
second was done by an advertising 
agency for a soap giant and a na- 
tional food that has asked that its 
name not be mentioned. The third 
study was done by CBS TV. 

In all three studies more than 
two-thirds of trade people selected 
tv as the medium they prefer to 
have working for them. 

The TvB study was prepared to 
urge a national canner who had 
dropped out to return to tv. 

Fifty-three food brokers in 33 
states were interviewed. They were 
asked which medium they consid- 
ered most effective in selling retail 
trade — especially supermarkets. 

Thirty-eight named tv exclusively, 
four named newspapers exclusively 
and one named radio exclusively. 
Seven favored newspapers combined 
with tv and three didn't respond. 

Of those answering 76% preferred 
tv exclusively, 14% newspapers com- 
bined with tv, 8% newspapers only, 
and 2% radio only. 

A second study was done in the 
midwest to see what media food 
brokers felt would be the "most 
helpful in getting grocery retailers 
to support new product introduc- 



tions." Thirty-three brokers were 
interviewed for 30 to 45 minutes. 

Thirty-two of the 33 named tv as 
the "most helpful" selling medium 
and one named newspapers. 

The third study (see SPONSOR- 
SCOPE, 25 September, p. 21) con- 
ducted by CBS TV among 2,800 su- 
permarket managers was on house- 
wife appeal and managers were 
asked to select among daytime tv, 
newspapers, women's service maga- 
zines, radio, Sunday supplements, 
and billboards. 

They were asked which media they 
thought helped national advertisers 
most and, also, how they would di- 
vide a $1 million budget among the 
six media. 

On effectiveness the media were 
voted as follows-, tv 68%, news- 
papers 22%, magazines 4%, radio 
4%, supplements 4%, and billboards 
1%. 

Media allocations were voted to 
be divided as follows: tv 44%, news- 
papers 24%, radio 14%, magazines 
10%, supplements 5%, and bill- 
boards 3%. 



ABC Int'l into Manila 

ABC International has signed a 
programing, engineering, and sales 
agreement with a new station in 
Manila, the Philippines. 

The station, DZBB-TV, (Republic 
Broadcasting) starts shortly. 



Animation comeback 
for Laurel & Hardy, 
Marx Bros, on tv 

Great Hollywood comedy 
teams of the past are being re- 
vived for tv by means of ani- 
mated cartoons. 

NBC TV is first to announce 
a specific show of this type. 
Laurel and Hardy, a half-hour 
prime time series set for 1962- 
63. The voices will be simu- 
lated. Hardy died in 1957. 

Laurel and Hardy is to be 
produced by Larry Harmon and 
released through Jayark. 

Screen Gems is working on 
a series to turn the Marx 
Brothers into an animated 
series filmed from dolls with 
simulated voices. Chico Marx 
died earlier this month. 



SYLVANIA'S 4 RADIO NETS 
FOR RECORD FLASH DRIVE 

Network radio is being used in 
what's probably the heaviest adver- 
tising campaign ever launched for 
photographic flashbulbs. 

Sylvania is using NBC, CBS, Mu- 
tual, and ABC. On 1,000 network 
stations, more than 600 spots are 
expected to produce 1 billion con- 
sumer impressions. 

William A. Cummings, ad manager 
said the advertising campaign is the 
largest one ever staged by his com- 
pany and is probably the biggest 
ever in the flashbulb industry. 

Programs to be used include Mu- 
tual News, NBC News on the Hour, 
CBS News, and Don McNeil on ABC. 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



SP0NS0R-WEEK/23 October 1961 



KELLIHER IS WNEW 
MIDWEST MANAGER 

Although Metromedia has not set 
up a rep firm for itself at this time, 
it has bolstered its midwest sales 
staff for WNEW Radio, New York, 
through the appointment of Richard 
J. Kelliher as mid-west sales man- 
ager. 

Kelliher was national sales man- 
ager in New York for RKO General 
stations KHJ, Los Angeles, and 
KRFC, San Francisco. 

From 1954 
to 1960 he was 
a manager in 
the San Fran- 
cisco, Chica- 
go, and New 
York offices of 
Adam Young 
radio and tv 
Richard J. Kelliher representa- 
tives. 

He has been in radio sales since 
1948. He attended the University of 
Chicago and the University of Mich- 
igan and was in the Marine Corps 
during World War II. 




PGW 'cost yardstick' 
for tv spot up-dated 

PGW has brought up-to-date its 
"cost yardstick" — an estimating de- 
vice — covering 84 markets for ap- 
proximately 91% of all U. S. tv 
homes. 

Five rate categories are incorpo- 
rated: nighttime half hours and 
twenties, five day and five fringe 
night minutes, and a 10/12 plan. 

Another feature is the month-by- 
month temperature table of 80 mar- 
kets so seasonal advertisers can 
readily assign start dates. 

The PGW "cost yardstick" con- 
tains market-by-market data. Perti- 
nent figures are added to obtain 
estimates for particular spot tv cam- 
paigns. 

Rates given are selected as 
follows: 



8 



Five day participation rates are 
based on 260 time frequency dis- 
count or on 5 or 6 Plan rates. Fringe 
night minutes are for before 6:30 
p.m. or after 11 p.m. Eastern time. 
Nighttime twenties are prime time 
breaks — the most expensive rates 
for this type. Half-hours are be- 
tween 7-11 p.m. but not in the high- 
est rate prime time classification. 



BALABAN ON ROBERTSON 
ON CANADIAN PAY-TV 

Barney Balaban, Paramount Pic- 
tures president, has replied to 
charges made by Norman S. Robert- 
son as a parting blast when he re- 
signed from the board of Famous 
Players Canadian Corporation. 

Paramount owns 51% of Famous 
Players which ran a Telemeter pay 
test in Toronto. 

Balaban referred to the Etobicoke 
operation and a research and de- 
velopment one very fruitful in pro- 
ducing basic information — one that 
shouldn't be judged by straight 
profit and loss. 

Balaban made his views known in 
a letter to John J. Fitzgibbons Sr., 
Famous Players president. 

He denied Robertson's allegation 
that the pay-tv experiment lost 
$11,000 a week. Balaban said the 
loss weekly was $3,500 without 
counting depreciation and $7,500 in- 
cluding such amortization. He point- 
ed out that back in 1950 the tv in- 
dustry lost $25 million, and asserted 
that pay-tv losses will go even high- 
er in its experimental phases. 

Balaban also denied Robertson's 
charge that Paramount dominated 
the affairs of Famous Players. 



Helbros' Xmas spot effort 

Helbros Watch (S. Jay Reiner) will 
make its heaviest use of radio/tv 
this Christmas with 10-second spots 
in 40 radio stations. 

Purpose of the spots is to back 
up a magazine campaign handled 
by E. A. Korchnoy, Ltd. 



ESTY STOWELL NAMED 
OBM PRESIDENT 

Esty Stowell has been elected 
president of Ogilvy, Benson & 
Mather, announced former president 
David Ogilvy, who will become chair- 
man. 



Stowell joined 




Esty Stowell 



the agency five 
years ago as 
executive v.p. 
Before that he 
was at Ben- 
ton & Bowles 
from 1934 to 
19 5 6 — 22 
years. He 
started as an 
apprentice 



and rose to the post of executive 
vice president. 

Stowell's appointment has been 
expected for some time. It has been 
known that Ogilvy wanted to relieve 
himself of some management 
chores. 



Broadcast spot costs 
$30 million to do 

It costs broadcasting $30 million 
a year to buy, sell, and process radio 
and tv spot, according to a study 
made by Arthur Young and the Bank 
of America and Broadcast Clearing 
House. Young is BCH's accounting 
firm. 

BCH estimates that under its 
automated system "substantial per- 
centages — more than 50 per cent in 
most cases" could be saved by agen- 
cies, representatives, and stations. 

For the following four items, it is 
estimated the three groups— agen- 
cies, representatives, and stations — 
would effect the following savings, 
respectively: Operational and pro- 
cedural steps, 33.3%, 51.5%, and 
57.2%; Comparison and check 
points, 66.6%, 66.6% and 66.6%; 
Internal handling time, 62.1%, 
70.4%, and 29.1%; Material, space, 
and equipment costs, 58.5%, 27.5%, 
and 41.3%. 

SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 




a statement of 

WWLP & WRLP 

SPRINGFIELD — MASS. — GREENFIELD 

(Television in Western New England) 



by William L Putnam 



We hear rumblings of unhappiness among 
broadcasters regarding the strong talk and ac- 
tions of the FCC under the new leadership of 
Newton Minow. We also hear noises to the 
effect that maybe even Governor Collins has 
been too critical of our industry. 

We have no sympathy with the ramblers. 
It is our opinion that the broadcasting industry 
needs very strong and enlightened leadership. 
We need leaders with a little bit more sense 
of the future and our responsibilities to the 
nation than many of our intra-industry politi- 
cians have exhibited in the past. We believe 
that Governor Collins is this sort of person. 



However, if we cannot raise our standards 
and overall integrity by the Governor's prod- 
ding from within, then Newton Minow is just 
the guy we ought to have breathing on us in 
the interests of the public. We find ourselves 
feeling continually grateful that his term has 
seven years yet to run. Our industry needs 
strong men, and it looks like we have got them. 

We are not sure that what is momentarily 
good for the broadcasters is good for the public 
we serve. But we are firmly convinced that 
what is bad for the public hurts us even more. 

Represented nationally by H0LLING6ERY 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



SP0NS0R-WEEK/23 October 1961 



BAXTER OF STORER 
ON 'RESPONSIBILITY' 

"Responsibility is the key to suc- 
cessful radio programing," stated 
Storer Broadcasting Company radio 
v.p. Lionel F. Baxter at the Alabama 
Broadcasters Association's annual 
fall meeting. 
"It matters little whether the for- 
mat is music 
and news, top 
forty, beauti- 
ful music or 
all talk," 
stated Baxter. 
"It must be a 
responsible 
approach and 
Lionel F. Baxter one deter- 
mined by management, not talent." 
It is management's responsibility 
to determine what communities 
need as well as want and then to 
program accordingly, he asserted. 

He pointed out how depth studies 
led to reprograming of WIBG, Phila- 
delphia as a modern music station 
and WGBS, Miami as a "Sound of 
Music with News in Depth" station. 




NBC TV, WCBS-TV telling 
rating success stories 

NBC TV is pointing with glee to 
the Nielsen NMA ratings for average 
audience for the three weeks 24 
September-8 October. 

Network 7:30-11 p.m. ratings ran 
between 17.0 and 19.5 for the three 
weeks and were 10 to 14% over CBS 
and 13 to 28% over ABC. In quarter- 
hour averages NBC says it was en- 
tirely in first or second place, never 
third. 

WCBS-TV meanwhile is needling 
NBC's statement about averages by 
pointing out that the CBS flagship 
station had all ten of the top ten 
New York shows in the 8-14 October 
Arbitron. Eight were network shows, 
but in first and fourth place were 
its local Late News and Weather for 
Saturday, 32.6 and Wednesday, 24.3. 



Here we go again 

First known network casualty 
of the season is Roaring Twen- 
ties on ABC TV which will exit 
at the end of December. 

Its replacements will be 
^ ours For a Song, a quiz with 
Bert Parks, and Room For One 
More, situation comedy. 

The Park s show is also to be 
a daytime strip. 



TvB ANNOUNCES WINNERS 

OF RESEARCH COMPETITION 

The winners of TvB's first compe- 
tition for exceptional plans in tv re- 
search have been announced. 

There are 18 awards in all. A 
prize of $4,000 plus $250 honorarium 
was awarded for study in tv's role in 
shaping adolescent behavior. Au- 
thors are Dr. Arthur J. Brobeck of 
Yale and Mrs. Dorothy B. Jones of 
Los Angeles. 

A prize of $1,500 in addition to 
the honorarium went to Drs. Karl 
U. Smith of Wisconsin and Wimmiam 
M. Smith of Dartmouth for a study 
of scientific television methods ap- 
plied to analysis of perceptual feed- 
back in behavior. 

Other research plans for which 
awards were made include: Televised 
Communications and Income Tax 
Compliance, Rational vs. Emotional 
Communications, The Effects of Ag- 
gressive Content in Tv Programs 
upon the Aggressive Behavior of the 
Audience, Prominenene and Audi- 
ence Structure, Television in Induc- 
ing Action, Repetition in Commu- 
nication, 'Individualizing' Televised 
Instruction, Personality and Televi- 
sion Advertising Messages. Taste 
Development, Family Structures and 
Viewing, The Logic of Politics, The 
Principle of Television Orientation, 
and Physician Education. 

The competition was conducted 
by a group of social scientists 
headed by Dr. Mark A. May. 



CRUTCHFIELD, RUPP 
ELEVATED AT ARB 

Two changes in station sales as- 
signments at ARB were announced 
this week by Roger Cooper, manager 
of station services. 

J. Ralph Crutchfield has been 

named station 1 

sales super- 
visor to co- 
ordinate local 
ma rket re- 




ports to sta- 
tions. He'll 
handle sales 
and client 
services to J. Ralph Crutchfield 
the 375 tv station subscribers to 
local ARB services. 

Jim Rupp has been named mar- 
keting director of station services 

i — = for all station 

activity other 
than the local 
market report. 
These include 
telephone co- 
incidentals, tv 
nationals, spe- 
cial surveys, 
coverage 
studies, special tabulations and the 
new station management analysis 
report. 

Crutchfield was formerly assistant 
sales manager and Rupp was south- 
ern regional sales manager. 




Jim Rupp 



Narva, Keenan named in 
L&N media appointments 

Two appointments in the media 
department of Lennen & Newell this 
week were the naming of Martin 
Narva as associate media director 
and of Michael E. Keenan as assist- 
ant media director. 

Keenan joined L&N from FC&B. 
where he has been a media buyer 
for the past 18 months. Previously 
he bought print at Compton. 

Narva joined L&N as a trainee in 
1955 and has been an assistant 
media director since 1959. 



10 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 60 





i 




X2 





? 




BALANCED PROGRAMMING 

Agency X had a client who was a specialist. He specialized in a one- 
syllable word — NO! Hoping to increase his vocabulary, the agency invited 
him to a party. However, he hovered near the bar and fiddled with the 
bar equipment — in silence. 

An adroit agency man, believing that actions speak louder than words, 
joined the fiddling. After a bit the agency genius pointed out that certain 
pieces exactly balanced others, as shown in the first three sketches. He 
asked the client to calculate the number of Martini glasses it would take 
to balance the julep cup. All Martini glasses being full except the one 
shown, the client was obliged to think. 

Send us the answer* and win an exciting new prize. It may be round 
or rectangular, thick or thin, solid or liquid. 

*// mathematics isn't your cup of tea, we suggest you demonstrate your 
capacity to achieve the necessary balance to the H-R man at your neigh- 
borhood bar. 

Source material Dover Publications, Inc. 

wmal-tv 

Washington, D. C. 

An Evening Star Broadcasting Company Station, represented by H-R Television, Inc. 

(Affiliated with WMAL and WMAL-FM, Washington, D. C; WSVA-TV and WSVA, Harrisonburg, Va, 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



11 



Bob Kelly, are 
you listeuiuy? 



Bei ause Hob Kelly is so highly 
respected as a time buyer at Lennen 
& Newell, we're proud to claim him 
.1- one of our biggesl boosters. Bob is 
original!) a Providence boy, and makes 
a point to keep up to date on the old 
home town. 

And in Providence, how times have 
changed! \\ ICE sure has grown-ups 

talking with its nice balance of music 
and new-, spiked with a healthy shot 
of public service programming — the 
honest to goodnos kind that really 
does serve the public. 

If you know Bob Kelly, please give 
him a ring and pass along this new 
information. We're as proud of Provi- 
dence as Bob is — and we want to 
make sure he's up to date on what's 
been happening here at the live-wire 
station. 



PROVIDENCE 

AN ELLIOT STATION 
Representatives: Avery-Knodel 



SELL THRU QUALITY RADIO 



USE A 

"JOE" RAHALL 
STATION 




WLCY- 
WKAP- 
WWNR- 
WNAR- 
WQTY- 



N. )oe Rahall 



TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 

— First in Hooper and Pulse 
Sam Rahall Manager 

ALLENTOWN, PENNA. 

— First in Hooper and Pulse 
"Oggie** Davies, Manager 

BECKLEY, WEST VIRGINIA 

— First in Hooper and Pulse 
Tony Gonzales, Manager 

NORRISTOWN, PENNA. 

— First in Hooper 

John Banxhoff, Manager 

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 

-"Oar New Baby" 
Jack Faulkner, Manager 



RAHALL RADIO GROUP— Represented by 
ADAM YOUNG 






by John E. McMillin 



Commercial 
commentary 




Notes on the Creativity Kick 

During the last 12 months I've attended the 
fall meeting of the Association of National Ad- 
vertisers at Hot Springs, the winter meeting of 
the Advertising Federation of America in Wash- 
ington, the spring meeting of the American As- 
sociation of Advertising Agencies at White Sul- 
phur Springs, and 10 days ago, the 4A's Cen- 
tral Region Meeting in Chicago. 

Such a peripatetic schedule leaves one a little limp and dazed 
with no very clear recollection of specific speeches, panels, and 
presentations at any of these industry conclaves. 

However, a few vivid impressions do remain. And since I am 
leaving next week for Virginia to begin the whole cycle again, it 
may be worth while to try to report here what I've gathered during 
the past year. 

Based on talks and discussions at the ANA, 4As, and AFA, I'd 
say that two sizeable subjects have almost completely dominated 
agency and advertiser thinking in this period. 

They are, 1) the image of the advertising business and how to 
improve it, 2) creativity and how to stimulate it. 

Of the two, the image-building problem has provoked the more 
specific though varied activities. The 4As have been deep in a Hill 
& Knowlton project, involving a research study among "thought 
leaders" and "opinion makers." The AFA has been putting together 
a massive "Advertising Recognition" program. The ANA has hired 
a new public relations v.p., Bill Heimlich, and will announce several 
important new projects shortly, and such industry consultants as 
Harry MacMahon have been preparing some very meaty pro-adver- 
tising presentations. 

But creativity, that shadowy goddess before whose shrine increas- 
ing numbers of admen have been burning increasinglv large pot- 
fuls of incense, remains a somewhat mysterious subject. 

Despite all I've heard, I still think that advertising's current 
"creativity kick" is operating on a pretty confused basis. 

For God, for country, for creativity 

Why it is that an industry which, as recently as 1956, seemed 
hell-bent on embracing the "Modern Marketing Concept," on be- 
coming scientific and research-minded as all getout, has done this 
sudden flip-flop in favor of God, country, and creativity? 

What is the meaning of all the pro-creative oratory you hear at 
advertising meetings? How sincere is it? How realistic? 

Perhaps the most obvious explanation of the industry's pre- 
occupation with creativity is that it is just another fad in a busi- 
ness that has a built-in weakness for faddish enthusiasms. 

"One year it's motivational research, the next it's corporate im- 
( Please turn to page 45) 



12 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 




the good guy always wins! t *# 

' — \ I 1 1 ' 




6 P.M. WEEK DAYS 



Exactly the better-type feature you'd 
expect WWJ-TV to come up with 
for fall and winter spot advertising ! 

Praised in Washington as a "good" 
successful action-adventure series, 
and boasting a fast track record, 
"Wyatt Earp" is first run off 
network— slotted across the board for 
maximum exposure to WWJ-TV's 
big family-hour audience. 

Ride with the good guy and win 
important sales gains in the brawny 
Detroit-Southeastern Michigan 
market. Your PGW Colonel has 
complete details. Phone him today ! 



Detroit, Channel 4 • NBC Television Network 

WWJ-TV 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC 

Associate AM-FM Station WWJ 
Owned and Operated by The Detroit News 



L. 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



13 





th 



5Sil 



Congratulations on Negro issue, but . . . 
I want to congratulate you on the 
Negro edition of sponsor, which 
came in this morning. 

Knowing that you are always in- 
terested in making sure that your 
magazine is correct in its copy, I 
would like to call the following to 
your attention: 

1. On page 34 in your list of Ne- 
gro Station Programing, under 
100% Negro Appeal Programing in 
the State of New York, you list 
WWRL. For your information, 
WWRL does not program 100% Ne- 
gro on a 7 day per week basis. The 
station copied the WLIB format in 
broadcasting to the Negro commu- 
nity in New York City only 100% 
on a Monday thru Friday basis. 

2. On page 40 in Negro Station 
Profiles, you again will find that 
your information is incorrect. You 
list WWRL as a 100% Negro opera- 
tion, which they are not. By calling 
the station it can easily be verified 
that their week end programs are de- 
voted to foreign languages. 

I am calling this to your attention 
in just thumbing through the pages 
of the new edition, which I received 
this morning. 

Harry Novik 
general manager 
WLIB 
N. Y. C. 

• WWRL converted to Negro appeal programing 24 
hours a (lay, Monday through Friday (weekends they 
are bi-lingual), but after SPONSOR'S questionnaires 
for the Negro Issue had been returned. WWRL then 
sent a corrected questionnaire. In the ensuing changes, 
the second questionnaire was incorrectly revised. 
SPONSOR is sorry about the mix-up. 



Almost identical approaches 
I noted with considerable interest, 
the article titled "Improved Research 
Ahead For Radio and TV," as pub- 
lished in your 20 August issue, as 
well as your editorial comment un- 
der "Sponsor Speaks," indicating 
that this holds promise of a refresh- 
ing and creative new approach to 
radio measurements. 

While I am certainly in full agree- 

( Please turn to page 42) 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 




FOR THAT "LIVE" LOOK, TAPE IT. . . 

on SCOTCH® BRAND Live -Action Video Tape! 



"Real-life" presence is the new TV look achieved by today's 
commercials using "Scotch" brand Video Tape. Until now, the 
home-viewer's picture has been an ingenious compromise — an 
optical medium shown on an electronic screen. 

Not so with tape! "Scotch" brand Video Tape offers complete 
compatibility of picture source and picture — both electronic — 
with a greatly expanded gray scale for gradual transitions from 
absolute black to absolute white. In addition, tape eliminates 
jitter, provides excellent sound quality and an "unlimited" number 
of special effects. It all adds up to cleaner, crisper originals of 
unsurpassed quality . . . with exceptional Video Tape duplicates 
and kines from master tapes. 

"SCOTCH" is a registered trademark of 3M Company. © 1961. 3M Co. 



Tape has many advantages — for advertiser, agency, producer. 
Playback is immediate, serious goofs can be remedied at once by 
retakes. Special effects are made instantaneously ... no lab work 
and waiting. Costs are competitive, savings gratifying. 

Tape is easy to work with, no mystery . . . talented specialists 
are available to help you. Prove it to yourself! 
Send your next TV storyboard to your local tape 
producer for an estimate that will surprise you 
— at no cost or obligation. 

Write for the new brochure, "The Show is on 
Video Tape" — a case history of six commercial 
tapings. Enclose 25^ to: 3M Co., Box 3500, 
St Paul 6, Minn. 




magnetic Products Division 



3m 

M COFflPANY 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



15 



Bob Rich, Seven Arts Vice President and General Sales 
Manager, after person-to-person talks with seven 
representative station executives, states: 

"No motion pictures ever released to television have gener 
ated as high a commercial return for stations as Warner's 
'Films of the 50's.' 

"In such important markets as Denver, Chicago, Amarillo, 
Dallas, New York, Asheville, N. C. and Minneapolis 'Films 
of the 50's' have clearly demonstrated their overwhelm- 
ing acceptance by local and national advertisers. Here's 
what they reported at mid-September." 






IN DENVER 



KLZ-TVdebuts "THE 10:30 MOVIE," a new Monday 
through Saturday feature film showcase primarily 
scheduled with Warner Bros. "Films of the 50's." 
Says Jack Tipton, Manager and Director of Sales, 

• •Three weeks prior to the premiere, this new 
show was 80% sold out to such blue chip national 
advertisers as Coca-Cola, Avon Products, Wrigley 
Chewing Gum and Vick Chemical in addition to 
such local advertisers as Meadow Gold Dairy, Ford 
Dealers, Dupler's Furriers, Nides Electric Appli- 
ances and the Paradise Pet Shop. By premiere date 
September 8th 'The 10:30 Movie' was 100% sold 



of stations' commercial success 
with Seven Arts'"Films of the 50's' 



IN NEW YORK 

Peter Affe, Station Manager, WNBC-TV says, 

••That the Seven Arts product is accepted by time buyers as 
top quality TV entertainment is attested by the fact that we 
premiered our new Saturday night Movie Four on September 
23rd with all available minutes and 10 second ID's sold out. 





IN DALLAS 

says KTVT's Program Manager, Arno Mueller, 

••Selling is made somewhat easier when you have the best 
feature films to schedule. To wit: our Friday night show, 'Films of 
the 50's,' was sold out before its September 8th premiere. •• 




IN CHICAGO 

Jim O'Rourke, Western Division Sales Manager, WGN-TV, reports: 

• •WGN-TV was 100% sold out a week before its new feature 
strip unveiled 'Films of the 50's' on September 11th, Mondays 
through Fridays at 10:15 P.M. ~ 



ASHEVILLE, GREENVILLE, SPARTANBURG 

Theodore Eiland, WLOS-TV's Vice President 
and General Manager, says: 

• •To develop not only audiences, but dollars you've got to 
deliver top product. When you tell TV buyers you've signed up 
for Seven Arts, they instantly connect the name with the most 
outstanding movies on TV today. Result, we entered Fall with 
a sold out situation.*^ 



IN AMARILLO 

we hear from Charlie Keys, General Manager, KVII-TV, 

• •KVII-TV debuted its weekly presentation of 'Films of the 
50's' on Sunday, September 17th at 10:00 P.M. Two weeks be- 
fore starting time this ABC network affiliate was 75% sold out to 
two local sponsors, Amarillo National Bank and Fedway Depart- 
ment Stores. By starting date KVII was 100% sold out.** 




IN MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL 

says Don Swartz, President and General Manager, KMSP-TV, 

• •Advertisers are quick to sense the strong audience appeal 
of these Seven Arts feature films. Three weeks after buying Vol- 
ume II, we were over 80% sold out on 'Picture of the Week,' which 
we initiated September 8th on Friday evenings at 10:30 P.M.** 




Warner's films of the SO's... 
Money makers of the 60's 



SEVEN ARTS 
ASSOCIATED 
CORP. 



A SUBSIDIARY OF SEVEN ARTS PRODUCTIONS. LTD. 

Motion Pictures -"Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone"... 

Theatre -"Gone with the Wind" in preparation... 

Television — Distribution of films for TV., Warner's "Films of the 50's"... 

Literary Properties— "Disenchanted" by Budd Schulberg... 

Real Estate -The Riviera of the Caribbean. Grand Bahama, in construction... 



NEW YORK: 270 Park Avenue YUkon 61717 

CHICAGO: 8922-D N. La Crosse, Skokie, III. ORchard 4-5105 
DALLAS: 5641 Charlestown Drive ADams 9-2855 

L. A.: 232 So. Reeves Drive GRanite 6-1564-STate 8-8276 

For list of TV stations programming Warner Bros. ' 

the 50's" see Third Cover SRDS (Spot TV Rates and Data*! 




We take our comedy seriously. 



We believe in it, we mean. 

We believe in the kind of good humor 
you find in "Ozzie & Harriet," for instance. 

And we believe in its effectiveness as a 
medium for advertisers. 

The audience that has followed this 
series into its eleventh year gives weight 
to our belief by once again putting it in 
first place in its time period.* 

The audience has also chosen to keep 
their dial on ABC-TV. Three comedies 
that follow"Ozzie & Harriet" on Thursday 



nights are also first in their time periods.* 
They are "My Three Sons," in its second 
season, "Donna Reed," in its third, and 
"The Real McCoys," in its fourth. 

You can't laugh off success like this. So 
if you're serious about selling, get your 
laughs from the comedies on ABC-TV. 

ABC Television 

♦Source : Nielsen 24 Market TV Report, Average Audience, Week 
Ending Oct. 8, 1961 




Interpretation and commentary 

on most significant tv/radio 

and marketing news of the week 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



23 OCTOBER 1961 

Copyright 1961 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



If you as a seller of tv are looking for an inkling on how the business shapes 
up for the first quarter of 1962, you might take note of what the forecasters at 
NBC are telling their cohorts. 

In essence, here's what they're saying: judging from the general outlook of the econ- 
omy, the network's near sellout nighttime situation should carry over into the first part of 
the coming year. 

The big fly in the ointment, however: networking has become so flexible and accommo- 
dating for advertisers that it can have sharp repercussions on network profits. Advertis- 
ers moored to lower-rated shows may want out in quick time from the lower-rated stock and 
lodgement in reasonably good replacements. 

A marked trend of this sort would entail millions of dollars in network program com- 
mitments. 



Lending substance to the likelihood of the first 1962 quarter being even strong- 
er than the last 1961 quarter for tv is the fact that much shopping is going on at 
this point for network availabilities come 1 January. 

Among those looking are Kraft (JWT), Nestle, both of which have staked out more 
tv money for 1962, and Menley & James's Contac (FCB), a new, delayed-action decongestant, 
which recently made its debut in the medium as a customer of both spot and network. 



Ogilvy, Benson & Mather proved the hot agency of the past week in dishing out 
new spot tv business for the last quarter. 

OBM's availability quest was in behalf of Helena Rubinstein, night minutes ; and Lever's 
Vim and Lucky Whip, day minutes mostly. 

Other spot tv action out of New York: DuLuxe Reading toys (Zlow) , minutes in kid 
shows, p re-Christmas ; Block Drug's Polident (Grey), late night minutes; Phillips' Van Heusen 
shirts, night minutes and 20's, pre-Christmas ; Marshmallow Fluff, Old London cheese and 
Ipsey Doodles (Manoff ) , five weeks, in kid shows. 

Out of Chicago: Peter Pan peanut butter (McCann-Erickson) ; Staley's Stay Puff rinse 
(EWRR). 

Wrigley Cum (Meyerhoff ) is going on a minute commercial kick and the Chi- 
cago spot trade's puzzled by the advertiser's sacrifice of tv chain-break franchises 
for this new strategy. 

What Wrigley's whole revamped approach adds up to is this: (1) the minutes are to 
be stripped, wherever possible, with 6-6:30 p.m. the most favored period; (2) some chain- 
break units will be retained, but 70% of the tv spot money will go to minutes. 

As Meyerhoff explains the switch: we've got a new institutional platform — no push- 
ing of any flavor, but the Wrigley name and spear trademark stressed — and we think that min- 
utes best serve the purpose. 

The agency did some looking at 40-second breaks, but the availability calls so far have 
been confirmed to minutes. 

From the seller's viewpoint, the request comes at a somewhat sticky moment — what with 
fringe minutes at night tighter this fall than they've been in years. 

Incidental note for stations: Wrigley's December layoff this year will be two weeks 
instead of four. 




• 23 OCTOBER 1961 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



With this issue SPONSOR-SCOPE completes its fifth year of publication, and 
the fact serves as good an excuse as any to do a quick look-back at some of the 
more or less important events, turning points, milestones or whathaveyou of the 
business. 

If you're of a cynical bent, you might quip — and be pretty accurate — that anyone who's 
been away tbese five years wouldn't know it: the problems are virtually the same, only they've 
taken on different names and situations. 

Be that as it may, a back-panorama would have to include these significant incidents and 
transitions: 

• The emergence of ABC TV as a third network given to breaking precedents. 

• The FCC scandals involving quiz shows and station-grant practices. 

• ABC TV innovating the spot carrier concept for tv networks to the point where 
today an observer may find it difficult to draw the flexibility line between network and selec- 
tive spot. 

• The reduction of the exclusively sponsored nighttime tv program to the point 
where its ratio of all network time is less than 20%. 

• The almost complete disappearance of talk about sponsor identification. 

• Station group ownerships in tv growing by leaps and bounds in strategic dollars to 
the point where most of them have elected to do their own national selling and thereby 
changed in no small measure the complexion of the station representation business. 

• The surge of national spot radio as a competitive advertising tool, even though this 
medium at the moment can stand a little resparking via use concepts and fresh promotional 
fare. 

• The zoom in the popularity of entertainment specials among advertisers, with the bub- 
ble bursting after two or three seasons for two reasons: (1) far fewer takers, (2) regu- 
lar advertisers not liking the idea of two pre-emptions in mid-season. 

R. J. Reynolds and Esty are working presently on spot plans for 1962, and 
one thing looks pretty certain: the account will remain in radio with all its over- 
whelming dominance of the spot medium. 

Pall Mall. Lucky Strike and some of the Lorillard brands make heavy use of the same 
medium, but Reynolds stands out by itself because of its 52-week allegiance and tremendous 
station list. 

And now P&G has definitely taken over the dentifrice brand leadership. 

In round figures the relative market shares of the three on top of the toothpaste roost are: 
Crest, 30%; Colgate, 25%; Gleem, 20%. 

Which brings up the fact that P&G is now No. One in nine different facets of the cleans- 
ing field. The other eight products and their areas: liquid detergent, Ivory; soap bar, 
Ivory; cleanser, Comet; general purpose detergent, Tide: heavy duty cleanser, Mr. 
Clean; automatic washer detergent, Dash; dishwasher detergent, Cascade; shampoos, 
Prell (liquid and concentrate). 



If you think that spot tv schedules in the topmost markets aren't getting tight, 
witness the predicament that Gulden Industries (Compton) found itself in connec- 
tion with its campaign for Liflite batteries. 

As far back as last month stations in nine top markets submitted schedules for a post- 
Thanksgiving Day start, subject to 30-day confirmations. 

But it wasn't until the account decided last week to advance the starting date to 13 No- 
vember and make it a six-week instead of a four-week campaign that it learned that much 
of the earlier designated spots had already been allocated elsewhere. 

Aftermath: Gulden sales executives themselves had to take to the road to talk stations 
into improving the spots that had been substituted. 



20 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



They're probably fighting words, but ABC TV daytime sales chief Ed Bleier 
last week dropped a bit of advice for the spot fraternity. 

Instead of bewailing the loss of accounts to networks, look around for new 
opportunities, as we have, he said. 

Bleier gave this example: the surge of food accounts to daytime network tv the past 
year, with a goodly portion of this money coming from print. 

A rich target for both network spot, said he, are the prepared foods and it's up to 
spot to search them out, big and small, and wean their budgets away from print, as his 
network has been doing in such cases as Campbell Soup-Pepperidge Farm, Golden Grain mac- 
aroni, Minute Maid, Dr. Pepper, Metrecal, Morton's frozen food and Fritos. 

The place to look for new advertisers to tv are the network daytime rosters. 

Here's how they stack up this season: 

ABC TV: Chatham blankets, Union underwear, Smith-Corona typewriters, A. J. Sirus 
school supplies, Golden Grain macaroni, Calgon, Dynel fibers. 

NBC: Deluxe Reading toys, Eldon Industries, General Insurance. 
CBS TV: Father John's medicine, Zerox Corp. 

Could ABC TV have put itself at a disadvantage this season by the late take-off 
of its new nighttime product? 

Some agency people believe that it would have been prudent for that network to have 
terminated the contracts on its older series or re-runs sometime in September, instead of 
carrying them over until October, and thereby preventing the opposition from getting an 
earlier start on the new stuff. 

The ABC TV policy that admen cite as creating this situation: the disinclination to can- 
cel a program when pre-empted but tacking it on instead to the end of the contracted 
schedule. 

For current dilemmas you probably won't find anything as brow-wrinkling as 
the one that NBC TV has with its daytime operation. 

The NBC TV dilemma stems from the fact that the network has a lot of unsold daytime 
inventory. 

And the problem, simply put, is this : how can it lessen the pricing of what it has to offer 
without lowering the quality and cost of its program, and, in the process, probably losing 
No. One position in ratings? 

To soften the ledger situation NBC TV recently asked affiliates to waive compensation on 
programs put on the bonus rack. No definite response is yet at hand. 

What might make a pretty good bet: ABC TV's romance with the 1920's has 
come to an end. 

It all started off with the Untouchables — which proved a goldmine — reached out to the 
Roaring 20's, which is due for early replacement, and embraced Margie, whose future looks in 
question. 

Whitehall's swing-away from ABC TV's Calvin & the Colonel after the first rat- 
ing, according to Bates, was merely due to one of those brand requirement situa- 
tions. 

It seems that on second thought the brandmen involved decided that they ought to have 
their commercials stowed in a show with more adult appeal. To wit, older audiences. 

To make up for its exit as an alternate week customer of Calvin, Whitehall bought an 
equal number of minutes in Ben Casey and a number of other one-hour programs. 

SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 21 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Sundry tv stations are beginning to frown on what they deem to be the abuse 
of a practice thought to be common among agencies servicing the P&G account. 

The practice: circulating in advance information on choice P&G spots that the notify- 
ing agency is about to cancel. 

What disturbs these stations: a notifying agency using the information, not in P&G's 
behalf, which they hold okay, but to strengthen the schedules of another account in the same 
agency. 

Often, say these stations, they have somebody in line waiting for improved positions and 
it's rather difficult to turn down under such circumstances an agency that carries the P&G 
banner. 

Parenthetically, they raised this question: is the practice ethical? 

Robert Eastman, who was identified with the innovation of the group plan idea 
while at Blair, is in process of setting up a similar confederation composed of his 
own 45 stations. 

It will be called the Eastman Network. The ratecard, etc., will be made available to 
prospects this week. 

Major theme of the pitch will be: one bill, one affidavit, attractive discounts. 

In connection with that recent blind buy for Crisco Oil out of Compton, P&G 
has a policy on that type of buying that it tries to adhere to as closely as possible. 

The rule: the brand substituted for such undercover buy must be in the same cate- 
gory so as to avoid any product protections problems for the station. 

In the case of Crisco Oil, the brand cited for availabilities was Duncan Hines. The 
premise here was that both had to do with food. 

The advantage of the blind gambit is obvious: P&G didn't want to take a chance 
on Wesson or some other competitor plunging into the market beforehand with a price pack 
or some other gimmick. 

It will be recalled that Maxwell used the regular coffee ruse for buying in behalf of 
Maxwell instant and Yuban. 

Nielsen has sped up the availability of its tv reports to subscribers on two fronts. 

The 20-market report, which used to take eight days, is now received five days after 
the closing date. In other words, the week ending on a Sunday should be in the hands of a 
subscriber Friday of the same week. 

The national report should be received two weeks after the last reported program, 
whereas the old interim of this pocketpiece used to be three weeks. 

Norelco (LaRoche) was jobbed out of 100 million home impressions in the 2 
October SPONSOR-SCOPE estimate of its tv impact for the Christmas trade. 

The electric shaver was credited with using 110 markets, whereas the actual lineup is 
around 200 markets for the eight-week spot blitz. On that basis the estimate of home 
impressions should be 870 million. 

If you're out Detroit way Friday 17 November and would like to see TvB's hour 
presentation to the automotive industry, arrange to be on hand for the morning 
session. 

The presentation will hit all levels of what tv has and can do for car selling. 
The TvB meeting itself will last three days. 



22 



For other news coverage in this issue: see Sponsor-Week, page 7; Sponsor 
Week Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 55; sponsor Hears, page 58; Tv and Ra- 
dio Newsmakers, page 72; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 





* i 












FARM GAL AT EVENING CHORES 



. . . m the S&W oi 



[Qk and 



■oneyi 



She's getting ready for a "Barn Dance", 1961 version, at her 
Country Club! Seriously, our people enjoy living at its best. And 
our Station reflects that better life with 

1. Channel 2 for those extra counties. 

2. CBS for the best in Public Servrce. 

3. 400,000 TV homes for greener pastures. 



$r tk ^W oj jtt and y^oncy 



GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN 

HAYDN R. EVANS, Genera I Manager • Represented by H-R Television, Inc. 




WAUSAU 

OCONTof"" v-i$ TUHCEON 

f *is rapids t ^tri ' J-fi t ,/. 

W ISCON! 

afpieton 



■ N } -\ 



[SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



23 




POPULATION ! 



The Charlotte TV MARKET is First 
in the Southeast with 651,300 Homes* 



We'd be the first to admit that it stretches the 
imagination to hang a city population of more than 
two-hundred thousand — but hang the city popula- 
tion when counting necks in the entire Charlotte 
Television Market! 

The real kicker is that WBTV delivers 55.3^ more 
TV Homes than Charlotte Station "B"!** 



* Television Magazine — 19t 
ARB 1960 Coverage Study- 
Average Daily Total Homes Delivered 









Wfm 






Compare these SE Markets! 



WBTV 



Charlotte 



Louisville . . . 
New Orleans 



Richmond 



. 651. 300 

. 569. 300 
. 549. 800 
. 423.800 
. 379.400 
. 268. 800 



CHANNEL 3 ^ CHARLOTTE/ jefferson standard broadcasting com pan 

Represented Nationally by Television Advertising Tvy^R 1 Representatives, Inc. 



SPONSOR 

23 OCTOBER 1961 



4 QUESTIONS ON MEDIA DEPARTMENTS 



1. Will they make inroads on programing function? 



2. Will all-media personnel take over completely? 



3. How much will automation affect media research? 



4. What will happen to department's planning function? 



Answers on page 27 




MEDIA DEPARTMENTS 



Maximum of planning, minimum of paperwork, assumption of pro- 
graming function, heightened stature envisioned five years hence 



« 



I oday : s agency mediamen envi- 
sion their departments five years 
hence as virtually free from clerical 
bondage — unleashed to devote them- 
selves to imaginative, creative plan- 
ning, and buying. 

The more sophisticated media de- 
partment of tomorrow may be head- 
ed by men on whom rest not only 
'media responsibilities as we know 
Ithem today, but the agency program- 



ing function ("or, what's left of it," 
said one tight-lipped adman) as well. 
This prediction is based on conjec- 
ture that with network tv sold more 
and more on a participation basis, 
the resulting magazine-like approach 
to tv can't help but push programing 
totally into media's bailiwick. 

It'll be a department with in- 
creased stature in the overall agency- 
set-up, its planning function more 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



closely integrated than ever with the 
marketing function. 

There is widespread agreement 
that more "all media" personnel will 
be needed in tomorrow's department. 
As for whether timebuyers will or 
should take on the all-media stripe. 
however, unanimity is not to be 
found among today's mediamen. 
Some feel that increased complexity 
can be anticipated in the handling 



25 



How automation fits into media picture 




"CONSOLE" of IBM 1401 electronic 
computer shown here is one type of advan- 
ced automatic data processing equipment 
currently being utilized by SRDS Data. Inc.. 
to develop techniques to aid in media selec- 
tion and to reduce burdens of repetitive 
clerical and administrative media depart- 
ment operations. Some of the anticipated 
accomplishments to which this and other 
machines are expected to contribute. 



1. Automate specific media planning and buying functions 

2. Examine more buying alternatives and perform more exhaustive media 
comparisons 

3. Allocate more time for creative media planning by eliminating repetitive 
clerical and administrative operations 

4. Sharply reduce departmental operating costs and at the same time 
dispense with clerical error 

5. Develop new techniques to aid in media selection through modern 
mathematical and computor methods, including linear programing and 
operations research 

6. Provide a means of storing pertinent information in machine language for 
maximum accessibility at any point in time 



of each medium, and will require 
specialization at least at the buyer 
level. 

But all-media or not all-media, the 
timebuyer of tomorrow will be op- 
erating a lot differently than he does 
today. Facts will be pouring out of 
the machines — facts he and his as- 
sistants now spend countless hours 
assembling with the limited powers 
of the human brain. Client and 
agency will have every right, there- 
fore, to expect a lot more imagina- 
tive, incisive decisions than today's 
paperwork-laden buyers can produce. 

This creativity escalation appears 
imminent, provided over-reliance on 
computers does not crop up — a fear 
voiced by one media director. He 
visualizes a danger that the newlv- 
supplied mountains of facts may tend 



to overpower media people, distract- 
ing them from the creative, imagina- 
tive side of the field. 

A few media departments already 
have their feet wet in automation at 
the basic tabulation level. And there 
are instances of somewhat more ad- 
vanced explorations along mechani- 
cal lines. Example: feeding Nielsen 
comparative media audience data, the 
client's sought-after audience compo- 
sition, and the amount of monev 
available into an electronic com- 
puter which coughs up the logical 
media combinations in seconds, in- 
stead of the hours required if it were 
done bv hand. i.e.. bv head. But 
this is just the beginning of more 
and more complex operations ma- 
chines will be expected to perform. 

It's generally agreed that with an 



ever increasing volume of progres- 
sively more sophisticated data on its 
w a\ to aid media departments in per- 
forming their functions more effec- 
tively, more sophisticated analysts 
and researchers will be needed, and 
that segment of the department will 
take on greater stature. The de- 
partment will be depending on them 
to handle the high-powered mate- 
rials. They may be expected to know 
how to program machines for the 
questions the department wants an- 
swered. 

On the other hand, a sharp deple- 
tion in the number of media depart- 
ment clerical personnel is anticipated 
to result from automation. Compton 
media senior v.p. Frank Kemp sees 
this development as necessitating a 
new approach to training depart- 
mental beginners, since the clerical 
unit has served as training ground. 
A more formalized training program 
will be needed. Kemp feels. 

Increased stature is anticipated 
for the paperwork-free media depart- 
ment of 1966. where the planning 
function will have top priority. As 
Frank Gromer. v.p.-media director 
at Foote. Cone & Belding sees media 
planning five vears from now. it will 
be more integrated with other ad 
agency functions. He looks to an even 
closer relationship between media 
and market research, for instance, so 
that media planning will be done in 
full recognition of all marketing 
factors. 

Additionally. Gromer foresees a 
growth in all-media responsibilities, 
in response to a growing need for 
this kind of versatility. Yet both he 
and Kemp feel the media buying spe- 
cialist will remain verv important 
due to increased complexities such as 
addition of new media within the old 
categories i i.e. more stations, maga- 
zines, etc. i . possible introduction of 
new categories i space in paperback 
books is a new one i . and a greater 
proliferation of reference material to 
work with vis a vis each medium. 

Representative of the viewpoint 
that all mediamen need all-media 
know-how is Cunningham & ^ alsh 
media v.p. Edward T. Baczewski. At 
his agency thev believe in starting at 
the lowest decision level to build a 
well-rounded. creative mediaman. 
one eventually readv to rise to the 



; 



26 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



upper echelons of planning. As for 
the handling of the increasingly com- 
plex problems and statistics expect- 
ed to crop up with each medium as 
time goes on, Baczewski feels that 
specialization in the research area 
ought to serve as the solution. 

In elaborating on his concept of 
the creative mediaman, Baczewski 
defines him as one who knows and 
appreciates all the tools (media and 
materials) that he uses. He feels 
that media more and more will be 
considered a marketing service, as 
opposed to a mere analyzer of audi- 
ence data, so that media practition- 
ers will need broader education, 
knowledge, imagination in order to 
act effectivelv. 

"Media and marketing are synony- 



mous," states Baczewski. "An adver- 
tising medium is a market place, a 
distribution method. And with more 
scientific data to be available more 
quickly in the future, with statistical 
relationships determinable by the 
push of a button, there will result a 
hastening of the marketing maturity 
which mediamen should achieve." 

Among the media leaders surveyed 
by sponsor, the opinion that media 
departments of the future will be 
assuming agency programing respon- 
sibilities, should the galloping trend 
toward sale of network programing 
on a participation basis continue, 
was very much in evidence. In the 
words of William E. Matthews, v.p.- 
director, Dept. of Media Relations & 
Planning at Young & Rubicam: "Due 



to the changing situation in network 
tv, agencies are having less and less 
control over the selection, purchase 
and production of programs. The 
network purchase is turning princi- 
pally from sponsorship into participa- 
tions, and it seems the programing 
function in agencies consequently is 
contracting. If this continues, the 
two operations, media and program- 
ing, will merge. A likely first step is 
the Benton & Bowles arrangement 
whereby the media director added 
leadership of the programing depart- 
ment to his responsibilities." 

The ultimate in magazine-like sell- 
ing of network tv was advocated re- 
cently by Fairfax M. Cone, chair- 
man of the executive committee at 
Foote, Cone & Belding (Sponsor- 



-- — — - 






1 



MEDIAMEN REPLY TO 4 QUESTIONS ABOUT THE FUTURE 



DIRECTOR: Will have to be 
A knowledgeable in program- 
ing, which function is likely to 
be entirely assumed by media in 
the near future, based on gallop- 
ing trend in the direction of 
buying and selling network pro- 
graming via a magazine-like, 
participation basis 



1 TIMERUY ER: Unleashed from 
dm most of the paperwork that 
now steals away his time, tomor- 
row's buyer will be called on for 
creative, imaginative planning. 
Some feel his responsibilities will 
embrace all-media; others say 
increased complexity of his duties 
will call for specialization 




tl RESEARCH-ANALYSIS: This 
U section's importance will be 
in the ascendant, with the depart- 
ment depending on it for evalua- 
tion of the mountains of material 
forthcoming from electronic com- 
putors, as well as other improved 
Statistical tools. It may be called 
ion to program the computors 



■ 



PLACING FUNCTION: Great- 

■ er integration with other ad 
agency functions is anticipated 
for this top priority aspect of 
media work. Vis a vis marketing 
research there will be a closer 
working relationship, with media 
planning done in full recognition 
of all marketing factors 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



27 



WEEK, 16 October 1961). He told 
the Broadcast Advertising Club in 
Chicago that tv advertisers should 
be rotated like mazagine advertisers 
through all shows except specials. 
He proposed this as a means of pav- 
ing the way for better balanced pro- 
g raining at all hours, since adver- 
tisers could not seek out the same 
type of show at the same time, as I 
now is the case. 

At present this proposal is looked 
on as "blue sky" by most since it 
presupposes relinquishment by adver- I 
tisers of their preferred positions 
within certain top-rated shows. Should 
it be adopted, however, there would 
be virtually no need for separate de- I 
partments. 

Meanwhile, there's nothing blue 
sky about the advent of electronic 
computors as an integral part of 
media department operation. The 
feeling is unanimous among the panel 
surveyed by sponsor. 

SRDS Data, Inc., has spelled out I 
several areas in which its automated 
systems can be of help. Among these I 
is examination of more buying alter- j 
natives and performance of more j 
exhaustive media comparisons than 
the normal pressures of time permit. 

Development of new techniques to I 
aid in media selection through mod- 
ern mathematical and computor 
methods is another cause for which j 
SRDS Data asserts its usefulness. And 
assistance in provision of a means 
of storing pertinent information in 
machine language for maximum ac- 
cessibility also is offered. 

In addition, the company's Adver- 
tising & Media Service Div. proffers 
assistance in elimination of repetitive 
clerical and administrative opera- 
tions, thereby allowing the agency 
media department more time for 
creative planning. 

In pointing up changes that can be 
expected when automation gets into 
full swing in media departments, 
Kenneth Schonberg, president of the 
automated spot buy clearing house 
Central Media Bureau, states that a 
survey by his company shows 54% 
of timebuyers' time goes to paper- 
work. "A very different timebuyer is 
coming," he says. "Thanks to automa- 
tion, he'll be able to exercise the true 
function of creative strategist." ^ 



HOW RADIO WORKS 
FOR 8 BIG CLIENTS 

^ Reps point to increased campaigns and activity by 
major automotive companies as significant development 

^ Agencies and advertisers sound off on how spot 
radio serves them best and why radio business is slow 



i| hough reps have voiced the view 
for years that makers of autos and 
auto accessories often overlook spot 
radio's impact, these radio sellers are 
touting auto and auto accessory cam- 
paigns this season as among the more 
interesting examples of current tactics 
in the medium. 

Perhaps significantly, three differ- 
ent campaigns out of General Motors 
were among those cited. One of the 
three GM clients is so bent on getting 
mileage out of radio, it has dropped 
outdoor and newspapers in order to 
double its radio schedule. 

Robert H. Teter, vice-president and 
director of radio at PGW, says "One 
interesting pattern which has emerged 
is a budget increase on the part of 
automotive companies. New model 



introductions this year have been ac- 
companied by some of the most potent 
spot radio campaigns in recent years." 

Interestingly, no more than a 
month ago SRA voted to launch a 
cooperative sales venture to combat 
Detroit's habit of dragging its feet in 
spot radio. 

A review of current radio cam- 
paigns indicates that some of radio's 
largest and oldest advertisers are bet- 
ting on spot. Here is a rundown of 
eight clients — what they're doing and 
how they're doing it. 

The client doubling its radio sched- 
ule is GM's Harrison Radiator Divi- 
sion, which makes automotive air- 
conditioning units. This year the 
company eliminated outdoor and used 
newspapers and radio in 63 markets. 



Ad manager steers anti-f reeze battle 



W. W. CARTY, du Pont's adver- 
tising manager in charge of the 
Zerex permanent anti-freeze 
campaign, has been described 
as the "driving force" in this 
year's planning. Zerex is using 
a saturation schedule covering 
950 stations in some 300 mar- 
kets in its target to overtake 
Prestone. The commercials are 
hard-sell, and are scheduled to 
break just prior to the freeze 
periods in each market. 



28 






SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



Winston, Oldsmobile and Zerex tailor spot radio to fit tactics 

"WINSTON tastes good" is too good for the Reynolds people and their agency, 
William Esty, to let go. But not to overdo it and wear the listener out, the company uses 
"waves of saturation" for all its cigaret products, each "wave" lasting about two months. 
Winston's turn again will begin 1 November and go until 1 January. Winston wants people 
to be aware when its commercials begin and stop, but the separate product campaigns 
are not a "campaign" in the usual sense. They're just a part of the over-all plan of 
scheduling and the company has designed for total saturation. 




f0R F ,NE> HA«0« 




OLDSMOBILE wanted added impact to introduce the 
,new 1962 models, and turned to a three-week campaign on 
spot radio to serve the purpose. It involved 55 markets, three- 
four stations per market. An Olds spokesman labeled spot 
radio "as the main endeavor of the year." The company also 
just renewed exclusive sponsorship of CBS radio network Lowell 
Thomas' news. Another use is "token schedules" on spot basis. 



ZEREX, du Pont's permanent anti-freeze, is utilizing radio to the fullest this year 
with its largest ever radio budget. A variety of commercials — jingles with commentary 
and commentary only — are scheduled mostly at the primary driving times, 7-8 a.m. and 
3:30-7 p.m., depending on areas and labor let-out times. "Don't ask for trouble, 
ask for du Pont anti-freeze" is the clinch line. The name, Zerex, is not used in 
this case because studies show du Pont's name gives a "Tiffany feeling, and connotes 
reliable research." The company expects firm results to be known by mid-November. 




most south of the Mason-Dixon line, 
in eight-week flights. As for next 
year, plans are already set to drop 
newspapers and put the money re- 
leased into spot radio, according to 
Jack Walsh, broadcast-media super- 
visor at D. P. Brother & Co., Detroit, 
Harrison's agency. Starting in Janu- 
ary, 98 markets (with three to four 
stations per market) will hear 10 
commercials a week for 10 weeks. 
Last year's spots featured Jaye P. 
Morgan and Roberta Sherwood, but 
1962 talent plans are not yet definite. 
Another Brother client, Oldsmobile, 
used spot radio as added impact to 
introduce the new models and "un- 
doubtedly" will use much more spot 



during next spring's sales push. 

Olds has another spot radio cam- 
paign in tow as a weapon in small 
problem markets, "problem" mean- 
ing where there's a hole in network 
coverage or a weak newspaper. After 
a dealer survey, Olds found that if it 
placed token schedules in small areas 
that the local dealers were more 
prone to tie-in with programs of their 
own. They found local activity amiss 
in areas where the agency or ad- 
vertiser does nothing. 

For the coming anti-freeze battle, 
BBDO has developed the largest radio 
campaign ever for du Pont's Zerex. 

"Du Pont Zerex for cars left out at 
night or in unhealed garages," is the 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



commercial theme aimed to hit driv- 
ers in general, and male buyers in 
particular. Some 950 stations will 
carry the spots for six to eight weeks 
at the beginning of the freeze peri- 
od for each of du Pont's markets. 

The spots are both commentary 
and jingle, rotated during the peak 
driving periods of each area. W. W. 
Carty, ad manager of anti-freezes, ex- 
pects strong indicators of results to 
be in by mid-November or a little 
later. 

Purolator oil filter, a product of 

Purolator Products Inc., Rahway. 

N. J., entered spot radio for the first 

time last spring, and after nine weeks 

l Please turn to pape 39) 



29 



1956-1961— WHA' HAPPENED? 



^ A lot ha* happened in the business during the past 
five years since SPONSOR changed format, went weekly 

^ There was quite a fuss about the 40-sec. breaks, a 
turmoil in oil. triple-spotting and a "vast wasteland" 



I 



t was just five years ago — on the 
27th of October, to he exact — that 
SPONSOB went weekly. For SPONSOR it 
climaxed ten \ears: first as a month- 
ly, and later, biweekly. Ten good years 
of dishing up to those in the trade 
the latest news and developments on 
the radio and tv advertising scene. 

For the occasion, sponsor put on 
fresh makeup and even changed its 



old red and white dress for something 
blue. Under the cover there were in- 
novations also. For one thing the edi- 
torial format had been completely re- 
vamped and sharpened. For another 
a host of new features had been add- 
ed. Among them sponsor-scope, 

SPONSOR HEARS, and WASHINGTON 
WEEK. 

Five years have passed since that 



day when the first weekly issue rolled 
off the press. And good or bad they 
were, to say the least, eventful years. 
Especially in and around the business. 

A number of men (and women 
too) rose to prominence, or otherwise 
made headlines during that half dec- 
ade and the broadcast industrv as a 
whole faced up to a number of crises. 

There was much soul-searching, 
planning, and some new trends and 
while they were happening SPONSOR 
lived w ith all of them : watching close- 
ly and reporting. There were times 
when SPONSOR editorially led the way 
in trying to resolve a particular in- 
dustry problem. 

Back in 1957, for example, sponsor 
went to bat for solutions to the paper 



Remember these stories? They appeared on the dates listed 

15 May, 1961 



W SPOhtSOB 



22 August, 1960 



if 



&o*» 



T\fl«A0\l 



\fl 






30 



- . BCBments 
■ 
i than two 

■ 
D. Houe* ■ - 

■ 

t for an- 

■ 

■ 




are critical of both OfKe Jreyz and the NAB f -. ?°^ 




REAK TRIGGERS ** 



°«Vi 



■ 



*lO* 



•"* 



«*£** 






: ■ 



iv 



*c A s ~"°o 






5 September, 19 




■ 



*°«»- ^°'° **;.. **'■•#, 



c *e. 



*Tl 



ft 



en 



s '*c 






SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



jungle which made spot buying an 
unattractive mess to agencies. An 
article entitled Lei's Cut Spot's Paper 
Maze in the 2 March, 1957 issue ex- 
plored thoroughly the trouble areas 
of spot buying and listed possible 
solutions to the problem. 

The article also gave a round up 
look at what different groups were 
doing to alleviate the situation as well 
as relating comments from agency- 
men on the subject. 

In 1958 when all of Madison Ave. 
was eyeing, with understandable in- 
terest, the revolt against triple spot- 
ting by a number of top agencies, like 
Benton & Bowles who rebelled for its 
two blue chip spot tv clients — P & G 
and General Foods — SPONSOR came 
out with an in-depth story covering 
every facet of the to-do. Entitled 
Triple Spotting Showdown, the story 
(in the 8 March, 1958 issue) brought 



out in the open the strong feelings 
against the three back-to-backs by 
both agency and advertiser. 

Said a P & G agency media direc- 
tor at that time: "spot tv is pretty 
expensive and there may be a revalu- 
ation of the medium soon if adver- 
tisers have to continue to pay top 
prices for commercials whose impact 
is diluted by two others." 

Another major industry story 
which dealt with an attempt to down 
grade tv by Fortune magazine was 
unfolded on the 29 November, 1958 
issue. Entitled "How Fortune tipped 
off the new anti-tv 'party line' " the 
story diluted the severity of the 
Fortune magazine writer's caustic 
comments by offering item by item 
rebuttal to the charges. The sponsor 
story also revealed reasons — financisl 
— why the magazines fight tv in this 
manner. 



A special sponsor series which 
turned the spotlight on radio and its 
little-known potential (and which 
brought a flood of responses from all 
parts of the country) was Radio's Big 
New Burst of Creativity. The series 
which began in the 5 September, 1960 
issue, pointed out that radio can 
build new creativity on 1) community 
service; 2) news; 3) entertainment; 
4) music; and 5) editorializing. 

The story which was solidly based 
on a coast-to-coast survey and through 
talks with hundreds of executives, 
brought to light the many, and sur- 
prising, developments in grass-roots 
radio which are responsible for turn- 
ing radio into America's most crea- 
tive ad medium. 

In the summer of 1960 when the 
$32 billion oil industry was consid- 
erably rattled by marketing up- 
heavals sponsor, presented a factual 



It. 



and dealt with major industry crises, news, and developments 



25 July, 1960 



:5 i« l * " ,Eu 1 



29 November, 1958 



24 January, 1959 



^ SPONSOR 



-2S5i* 



'oh, 






UUM »• « Pl0S1 °* 




SPONSOR'S 
$500,000,000 

PLAN FOR 
SPOT RADIO 



r °*n 



«4n 



^Are 






»e<* 



Off 



zmmm 



*»eiy 



bn ne 



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*nt,-, 



tv 



Party 



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SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



31 



Here are a few of the industry people 




James T. Aubrey, Jr. 

president of CBS TV 

When Louis Cowan unexpectedly tendered 
his resignation as CBS TV head in December, 
1959, Jim Aubrey, then executive v. p. 
moved up to take over this top CBS post 




LeRoy Collins 

president. NAB 

When Florida Governor Collins gave up the 
political whirl to take over as NAB head in 
January this year he had people wondering it 
he could cope with radio tv complexities 

and thoruugh-going report right from 
the core of the situation. Entitled 
Turmoil in Oil. the article which ap- 
peared in the 22 August. 1960 issue, 
brought out these facts: 

• "Within the next two years at 
least two more of the big oil com- 




Norman E. Cash 
president, TvB, Inc. 

It was in October, 1956, that Norman Cash 
was elected president of the Bureau. Under 
his leadership, TvB membership has grown to 
more than 260 with an income past $1 million 




Robert E. Eastman 

president, Robert E. Eastman Co. 

In July 1958, and after a year's hiatus, Bob 
Eastman returned to the station rep field. 
He went back to the business at that time 
with a lineup of eight radio stations 

panics will become major national ad- 
vertisers. 

• '"Network tv. hitherto almost 
useless to them because of their lim- 
ited regional nature, should open up 
as an important ad medium." 

• "As the new generation of mar- 



keting executives takes in a new mar- 
keting era both spot and net tv should 
get a large share of oil and gas ap- 
priations." 

• "Spot radio, already high in fa- 
vor among oil men, should continue 
to build and at the expense of news- 
papers." 

• '"Agencies serving oil accounts 
will be called on for more marketing 
savvy in the r 60"s and there will be 
some agency casualties." 

When ABC TV shook up the in- 
dustry with announcement of the 
proposed 40-second breaks, sponsor 
talked with people in the business 
and rounded up considerable com- 
ments on the subject. The storv — 
40-Second Break Triggers Trouble. 
15 May. 1961 — brought sharp re- 
marks from four agencies which han- 
dle P&G accounts. The spokesmen: 
Y&R's George Gribbin. Grey's A. L. 
Hollender. Compton's Frank Kemp, 
and B&B"s Lee Rich. 

Said Hollender: '"the creativitv of 
the commercial and of the program 
are both hurt by overdoing commer- 
cial time. And the future of the me- 
dium is involved in everv move of 
this sort, that* whv the agencies are 
so dead against the ABC TV move. 
"Commercials." he added, "should be 
good, properly spotted and compati- 
ble with the viewing enjoyment." 

During the mid-summer season of 
1961 when tv people began recogniz- 
ing the potential of public service 
programing, sponsor sized up the 
situation in an article entitled New 
$25 Million Tv Trend. It appeared 
in the 25 July. 1960 issue and re- 
ported, in part, "beginning in Oc- 
tober, the three tv networks will have 
over SOO^ more advertiser-paid-for 
programs of an informational, edu- 
cational, and public service nature 
than ever before in tv history." 

The advertiser investments, in this 
tvpe of network programing, re- 
ported SPONSOR, ranged from $23 to 
$25 million. 

The reasons for the upswing of ad- 
vertiser interest, according to the 
sponsor article: 

• "More creative programing by 
network packagers." 

• "More creative selling by net- 
work sales departments." 

• "More creative buying, especial- 
lv bv top level executives in adver- 



32 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



tiser and agency organizations." 

Back in 1959 — at the beginning of 
the year — SPONSOR ran the first of a 
special series dealing with national 
spot radio. The series sponsor's 
"$500,000,000 Plan for Spot Radio" 
got off to a start on the 24 January, 
1959 issue. It revolved around a 
new long-range business plan for the 
national spot radio industry. 

"sponsor believes" said the arti- 
cle, "that spot radio can and should 
be a half-million dollar industry by 
1963 — even though this would mean 
nearly tripling the advertiser dollars 
spent in the medium in 1958." 

"We are convinced, however," the 
story continues, "that national spot 
radio can never achieve its proper 
stature in the advertising world 
without more sound, clear-headed 
over-all business planning than the 
industry has seen to date." The story 
went on to outline, step-by-step, a 
plan to build spot radio volume to the 
sponsor proposed goal. 

These were just a few of the stories 
centering around eventful doings 
during that five-year span in the in- 
dustry which SPONSOR brought to its 
readers. There were also a host of 
articles about agencies and its peo- 
ple. 

For example, there is the storv on 
Leo Burnett the Chicago ad agencv. 
which appeared in two-part form 
first in the 28 February, 1959 issue. 
Entitled The House That Leo Built 
dealt first with the Burnett character 
— its personality and principles, and 
second, with the Burnett organiza- 
tion itself. The story traced the 
agency's history — from its humble 
beginning on 5 August. 1935 — to its 
impressive, present operation. 

In late summer of this year SPON- 
SOR began a series of articles covering 
the subject: "Have you thought of 
using radio?" The first article under 
the title: "When the budget is ti<dit." 
which appeared in the 21 August is- 
jsue, the spotlight was focused on ad- 
vertisers who have had outstanding 
success with the use of radio on lim- 
!ited budgets. Among them, the 
Mogul, Williams & Savior account, 
Rayco Manufacturing. 

"Rayco," related the article, "uses 
more than 2500, one minute spot an- 
nouncements over 90 stations every 
week, 52 weeks a year." 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



The frequency range, according to 
Leslie L. Dunier, MW&S v.p. in 
charge of radio/tv, is 10 to 40 spots 
a week per station. 

Dunier was quoted like this: "In 
the 70 markets in which Rayco em- 
ploys radio extensively, the sales pat- 



tern has risen substantially over a 
period of years." 

During the past five years a num- 
ber of people have made "noise" in 
and around the trade. For a look at 
a few, see the photos on this and the 
preceding page. ^ 



who've made news in past five years 




Robert E. Kintner 

president, NBC 

Veteran newspaper man Robert Kintner took 
over the presidency of NBC in July, 1958. 
A former president of ABC, Kintner came to 
NBC in 1957 as an executive vice president 




Newton N. Minow 

chairman, FCC 

It was early in May this year when FCC head 
Minow got up before the NAB convention in 
Washington and rocked the industry when 
he exploded his "vast wasteland" charge 




Rosser Reeves 

chairman, Ted Bates & Co. 

Six months ago, the 5 1 -year-old agency 

executive put out a book called 'Reality in 

Advertising' and caused an epidemic of 

raised eyebrows along Madison Avenue 




Robert W. Sarnoff 

board chairman, NBC 

Bob Sarnoff, an eloquent advocate of 
tv's accomplishments in the field of 
entertainment, news and documentary, took 
over as head of NBC in 1956 



33 



TV STUDIES TAG CUSTOMERS 



^ Increasing variety of data on web audiences are 
helping clients target prospects with more precision 

^ Most comprehensive syndicated service in this area 
is that of Pulse, now readying its fifth U. S. survey 



laast week at the New York head- 
quarters of The Pulse, Inc., located 
at the fashionable corner of 57th St. 
and 5th Ave., a crew of technicians 
were busily tooling up to gather what 
has become fashionable research. 

The crew was preparing to launch 
the fifth in a series of marketing 
surveys of network television audi- 
ences. Comprising a vast array of 
detail, these surveys are enabling 
web tv advertisers to target potential 



customers with more precision. Like 
many another research firm, Pulse 
has been undercutting what has long 
been an over-reliance on program 
ratings. 

It's a cliche — and an old one at 
that — to point out that tv advertisers 
want prospects, not audience. 

Yet it's only been fairly recently 
that information to guide the buyer's 
hand in snagging these prospects has 
appeared in any sizeable quantity. 



Facts on Pulse's network tv studies 

WHAT IT MEASURES: Primarily, the Pulse Marketing Survey of Network Tv 
Programs measures the number of families or individuals in all program 
audiences who use various products 

NO. OF PRODUCTS MEASURED: Roughly 40 product usage questions are 
asked in each survey. However, there is some repetition; 75 different prod- 
ucts were covered in the last three reports 

BREADTH OF SURVEY: All network shows are measured for each product 
usage question. Sample is projectible to tv homes of entire U. S. 

SAMPLE AND METHOD: Results are based upon the following number of 
personal, house-to-house interviews: weekday strips, 1,250 interviews; once- 
a-week shows, 1,750 interviews. The method is aided recall over a seven-day 
period with one-seventh of sample interviewed on each day 

FREQUENCY OF SURVEY: Current plan is to put out three surveys a year- 
fall, winter and spring. The next survey will be out in January 

OTHER FACTS: In addition to product usage there are also demographic 
facts about viewers. Data on total viewing individuals using product is sup- 
plemented by figures on viewers per 100 sets; data on total viewing families 
using product is supplemented by percent of viewing families who use product 



Whether this lag has been due to re- 
search services dragging their feet or 
whether the cause is the constant be- 
hind-scenes jockeying between medi- 
um and buyer over who should pay 
for the more exotic audience facts is 
not easy to assay. 

A number of research services have 
begun offering a greater variety of 
"qualitative" information during the 
past few years — much of which has 
aided the buyer in isolating the par- 
ticular audience segment he wants to 
reach. ARB, the Market Research 
Corp. of America, Nielsen, Pulse and 
Trendex are among them. 

Probably the most comprehensive 
syndicated service along these lines 
is Pulse's Marketing Survey of Net- 
work Television Programs. The sur- 
veys were initiated back in 1959. The 
prototype study was conducted dur- 
ing the July 1959-June 1960 period 
and covered only 22 major metro 
areas. Report No. Two was substan- 
tially enlarged to cover the entire 
U.S. and subsequent reports in the 
winter and spring of this year contin- 
ued on that basis. The coming fall 
report will be out in January with 
field work to take place next month. 

The heart of the Pulse Survey is 
the product usage information. For 
example, the second report had about 
50 qualitative characteristics meas- 
ured. More than 30 dealt with prod- 
uct usage, ownership, purchase or 
expenditures. Others dealt with demo- 
graphic and socio-economic ques- 
tions, such as age, sex, occupation, 
education, size of family, etc. 

There is a dizzying amount of ma- 
terial in the Pulse studies. For each 
of the characteristics, Pulse lists every 
network show (except those whose 
audiences are too low to provide reli- 
able rating estimates) — more than 200 
of them. This means an analyst going 
over the material is dealing with 
10,000 separate audience figures. One 
agency research executive said grim- 
ly: "It's almost too comprehensive to 
handle." 

The format of the report is basic- 
ally simple, however. Take, for ex- 
ample, a characteristic such as the 
number of teenage viewers. Under 



34 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



Why you can't buy network television by ratings alone 

J. HOMES REACHED DIFFER IN KEY CHARACTERISTICS 

PROGRAM Total homes Homes with babies 



HOUSE PARTY 


3,363,000 


554,000 




LOVE OF LIFE 


3,326,000 


998,000 




Homes with 5 or more persons 


PERRY MASON 


17,186,000 


3,722,000 




77 SUNSET STRIP 


17,345,000 


6,283,000 




2. PRODUCT OWNERSHIP 

PROGRAM 


OF VIEWERS 

Total homes 


DIFFERS 

Males using electric razor 




MAVERICK 


12,329,000 


5,254,000 




HAWAIIAN EYE 


12,382,000 


4,145,000 




Clothes dryer ownership 


GUESTWARD HO 


5,386,000 


2,297,000 




WITNESS 


5,304,000 


1,086,000 





3. LOWER-RATED SHOWS CAN DELIVER MORE PROSPECTS 

PRnrRAM Tt u Male viewers drinking 

KKUbKAM lotal homes regular coffee 



TO TELL THE TRUTH 


6,811,000 


2,719,000 




TWENTIETH CENTURY 


5,861,000 


3,538,000 




Female viewers who 
purchased lipstick 


TALL MAN 


7,366,000 


2,376,000 




TAB HUNTER 


5,808,000 


2.878.000 




Pulse, 'Marketing Survey of Network Television Programs,' 


November-December 1960 






■■■■■■■■■H 



this heading, there is a listing of all 
network shows in alphabetical order, 
the day and time period the show 
is aired, the network, the number of 
teenage viewers for each show and 
the number of teenage viewers per 
100 sets. Pulse also provides the total 
population for each characteristic 
measured so the analyst can figure 
out what percent of the U. S. total 
he is reaching. 

In measuring individuals, Pulse 
always provides the program viewers 
per 100 sets. In measuring families, 
the number is supplemented by the 



percent of families in the program 
viewing audience to which the charac- 
teristic measured applies. 

In gathering information for these 
studies Pulse was faced right off with 
a obvious economic hurdle. While 
Pulse's own personal interview 
method was an obvious choice be- 
cause of the long questionnaire re- 
quired, Pulse's usual method of 
asking respondents about their view- 
ing habits during the preceding day 
and evening meant the cost of inter- 
viewing would be prohibitive. 

Pulse could have chosen the diary, 



of course, but didn't for a number 
of reasons, one of the more obvious 
being it would mean embracing a 
competitive method. Another reason: 
Pulse dislikes what it considers a 
serious lack of interviewer control 
over conventional diary entries. 

Let's assume (said Pulse's tech- 
nicians) that a sample size of 100 is 
desired for a program audience. If 
this program is viewed by lO^c of 
the population, then 1,000 interviews 
would be required or 7,000 for the 
entire week. 

(Please turn to page 49) 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



35 



RADIO 



Q.B.A. ADVERTISING BUREAU 

A DIVISION OF QUALITY BAKERS OF AMERICA COOPERATIVE. INC. 
120 WEST 42 STREET. NEW YORK 36. NY. • CHickonng 4 8484 

5/2/61 

■ .Til 



air date: 

ordered by: 3FOI H 



member: 
product: 






.... 
[fj: HIGH, 1 - - HCL3 U 

ns good. . bs for QBE 

: Good Living. ..e record of picnic fun 
greer. New England hills and shores. Everywhere 
you enjoy good New England food... traditional 
DHEIKQHN'S ORANGE V.P.'.P 5ISAD with Sunmertin 
...in picnic sandwiches... DREIKORNS HOLLS rralce tl i 
A rbecue. DREIKORNS is sure to be ft . good - 

for three generations the DREIKORNS have always t 
good breads for their New England neighbors... 
SIC: our 

. IKORNS Is good lire ... 's gojod. living... 

Dreikorn's sales pitch appeals to local pride 

DREIKORN RADIO COMMERCIALS (see sample above) deals mainly with rec- 
ipes which evoke New England culinary pride and the beauty of the area's 
changing seasons. The commercial sell, subtly interwoven, emphasizes only 
the "goodness" of the product. The same is carried out in print and in tv 



"_.»..-..'/-_.' »/ifj 



!D /iei£ov?iA 



ALBUM OF 

GOOD LIVING 

IN 

NEW 
ENGLAND 




BACK TO SCHOOL 



F:r~ eeifiafl O ' - i. ^J 

has been famed for its culture and \eh" .". C 

And the New England county fair is synono- ~J 

inous with the best in neighborly good bring. f fif 



DREIKORN'S HOMEY RADIO SELL 

^ New England bread-niaker, fed up with noisy advertising elaims, beefs up 
regional spot radio campaign and proves prestige sales pitch sells more loaves 



^%sk am baker and hell tell you 
there are more wa\ s than one to ped- 
dle a loaf of bread. Some do it -with 
the look-ma-no-holes-in-this-loaf tech- 
nique, while others manage to rack 
up sales with the tenderness test chal- 
lenge. 

Not so Otto E. Dreikorn, president 
of a venerable New England bread- 
maker — Dreikorn's Bakery — and a 
strong advocate of the broadcasting 
media. Dreikorn. whose grandfather 
started the Holyoke, Mass. -based bak- 



ery back in 1888. takes a dim view 
of advertising '"noises and its hv- 
perboles. He prefers, instead, to play 
it straight. He has. he says, a good 
loaf of bread and that's all he wants 
to sav about it — simplv. pleasingly, 
and in good taste. 

This is the method which has 
worked like a charm for the com- 
pany I an early and long time region- 
al user of tv and radio I over the 
years. And it's the method Dreikorn 
will continue to stack his chips on. 



As a matter of fact, early this year, 
and '"fed up to the teeth" with high- 
decibel advertising, Dreikorn insti- 
gated the most extensive ad cam- 
paign I primarily on radio i in the 
company's history to prove that pres- 
tige and quality alone will sell (in 
New England, anyway i . \\ ith the 
campaign still far from the wind-up 
stage, the company has scored a 
10% sales increase, the largest per- 
centage of increase in mam years. 
Because of this success the campaign 



36 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



will be repeated next year, said a 
company spokesman. 

The Dreikorn campaign strategy 
was worked out by the baker's 
"agency," Quality Bakers of Ameri- 
ca Advertising Bureau. Dreikorn is 
one of 135 members of Quality Bak- 
ers of America, the country's leading 
independent wholesale bakers coop- 
erative, which acts as ad advisor and 
executor for its members. The 
franchised trademark of QBA is Sun- 
beam bread, although 25 of its mem- 
bers carry their own brand. Drei- 
korn's is Orange Wrap bread. The 
Dreikorn campaign is under the ac- 
tive supervision of QBA account ex- 
ecutive Ralph Usifer with QBA's ad- 
vertising department head, Robert L. 
Schaus, as overall consultant. 

Fourteen radio stations and two 
tv outlets were bought this year. Al- 
though Dreikorn has had radio and 
tv buys going on a year-round basis 
(with a reduced frequency during 
the last six weeks of the year) 
around the Western Massachusetts 
area at a rate of some 12 spots a 



week, radio buys were beefed up in 
1961 to average out to 25 or 30 spots 
a week, and tv to 25 spots. 

On radio, 30 second adjacencies to 
news and weather were bought with 
90% of the messages slotted during 
the 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. time period on 
weekdays. The theme — "Dreikorn's 
Album of Good Living in New Eng- 
land" — was designed to evoke emo- 
tional pride in the New England way 
of life. Both radio and tv commer- 
cials (the work of QBA's writer/pro- 
ducer Daye Engel) dwell upon the 
area's history, tradition and modern 
life. The commercials are tailored 
to suit the changing seasons and 
much of it is devoted to New Eng- 
land traditional recipes. 

In order to capture as much re- 
gional flavor as possible, the tv com- 
mercials were produced locally at the 
Bay State Film Studios just outside 
of Springfield. Local New England 
talent was used throughout and scen- 
ic clips of New England were freely 
used to illustrate the grandeur of the 
countryside and to catch the homey, 



familiar scenes at fishing wharves, 
local inns, fairs, etc. Only at the 
end does Dreikorn subtly mention 
its "good" bread — "good bread for 
today's living." 

A well-known Boston radio an- 
nouncer, Vernon Williams, provided 
a nostalgic atmosphere (voice-over) 
for the spots and integrated music 
helped set the mood. 

The radio and tv campaign which 
was bolstered by newspaper ads and 
outdoor billboards, cost a SPONSOR- 
estimated $200,000. The radio sta- 
tions used: WSPR, WHYN and 
WMAS, Springfield; WTXL, West 
Springfield ; W D E W, Westfield ; 
WSBS, Great Barrington; WBRK, 
and WBEC, Pittsfield; WMNB, North 
Adams; WHAI, Greenfield; WHMP, 
Northampton; WREB, Holyoke; 
WARE, Ware; and WACE, Chico- 
pee, all Massachusetts. 

The tv stations: WHYN-TV and 
WWLP, both Springfield. The buys 
included minutes, 20's and I.D.'s. 

In keeping with the well-circulated 
I Please turn to jMge 51) 




CONSIDERABLE RESEARCH is involved in digging up data on famous New England dishes and folklore for the Dreikorn campaign. Going 
over advertising ideas are Ralph Usifer, account exec, Quality Bakers Advertising Bureau and Marjorie Weisenburger, QBA's ass't art director 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



37 



CAPITAL TYPES -11 

THE 

MEAD 

WAITER 

Belongs to 

Xot-so-secret Order 

of the Itching Palm. Frightens 

dignitaries and 

tourists alike. Student of 

horses. Carries private black 

list of animals and people 

he has lost money on. 

Lavish only in praise of 

WTOP Radio, the station 

important to people 

in the Greater Washington area. 

WTOP 
RADIO 

Washington, D.C. 

Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 

POST-NEWSWEEK 

STATIONS A DIVISION OF 

THE WASHINGTON POST COMPANY 




8 CLIENTS 

(Continued from page 29) 

of "tremendous success," signed for a 
schedule July through October on 110 
stations in 83 markets in two-week 
flights. 

A J. Walter Thompson spokesman 
said "A great part of Purolator's ad- 
vertising dollar has gone into spot 
radio because we get the most from 
radio — particularly merchandising 
benefits." 

Following through with Reynold's 
established policy of rotating prod- 
uct campaigns, Winston is scheduled 
to go on 1 November through 1 Janu- 
ary. A Reynolds spokesman credited 
the company as one of the first major 
advertisers to return to radio four 
or five years ago. It figured out a 
different way to use radio as a selling 
tool which resulted in developing 
plans for total saturation. 

Rather than sponsoring a once-a- 
week show as in the old days, Rey- 
nolds began buying all stations in all 
markets with concentration on early 
and late news periods. 

The waves of saturation for each 
Reynolds cigaret is calculated not to 
wear out the listener, and make him 
aware when a new cycle begins. 

Bristol Myer's Ipana shifted strate- 
gy this year, dropping tv, and by the 
end of this month, its agency, 
Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, 
hopes to complete ad plans for 1962, 
based on the current radio program. 
Indicators point to more radio. 

Competition with the new fluorides 
coming out has been rough. Ipana 
minute and 30-second commercials 
go into about 300 markets with more 
than 1,100 stations on the schedule. 
This includes all four networks. 

An Ipana man said the reason for 
dropping tv was for "obvious reas- 
ons: radio frequency." 

Another big strategy shift hap- 
pened at Mennen's this year. It di- 
verted most of the spot radio budget 
to the networks to get "a broader 
market base in relation to the cost- 
per-1,000." 

The schedule now is some spot, 
thrown in as promotional support, 
but is primarily network radio which 
Mennen's has on a 52-week basis with 
all four nets (NBC was just signed 
in September). 

"Network is easier to get, in terms 
(Please turn to page 41) 




Media Personalities 

what they are doing 

and saying 



TIMEBUYERS 
CORNER 




SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



Timebuyers' Corner, a new weekly sponsor department, features the 
personalities who make up the agency media business. Buyers and 
media directors alike — what they are doing and what they are saying 
is reported here. The present coverage will be expanded in the next 
few weeks, with a complete run-down on agency media people through- 
out the country. 

NEW YORK: There's an opening at 
D-F-S, created by the departure of Frank 
Moriarty . . . Murray Roffis was made media 
director at NC&K . . . Kudner had to cable 
John Marsich to return from his European 
vacation, because of Fisher Body's earlier- 
than-usual campaign . . . Bob Kelly of L&N 
returned from Milwaukee after setting up 
a test for York cigarettes. 

A typist, applying for a job at K&E's media 
department, said: "I can answer phones. I Murray Roffis of Norman, 

i j r u u i • " ai j r -i Craig & Kummel 

worked tor enough bookies. . . . Al and Gail 

Sessions, who were at Gumbinner, moved to Philadelphia where they 

joined the staff at Werman & Shore . . . Grey Adv. is looking for a 

buyer to replace Judy Meilman. 

Joe Granda is back from his vacation in Nassau . . . Frank 
Dewey at B&B has been busy most of this month working on 
Post's new Oak Flakes campaign . . . Nick Imbornone of SSCB 
was given a party at Sardi's East by his friends. He marries 
WNEW's Dorothy Hayes 28 October . . . Jerry Golden of Doyle 
Dane Bernbach is honeymooning. 

Jerry Sprague of C&W was lunching with a 
friend at a fashionable Third Ave. bistro which 
lists its menu on a large blackboard on the wall. 
His friend left early to keep an appointment, and 
Sprague found he had left his wallet in the office. 

The manager assured Sprague that there was 
nothing to be concerned about, they simply would 
list his name and the amount on the blackboard. 

"That would be embarrassing," Sprague pro- 
tested. "Everyone would see it." 

"Not at all," the manager said, "your coat 
will be hanging over it." 

A messenger was quickly dispatched with the $10.50. 

A top-10 agency is considering a switch to all-media buyers, 
which would mean that a number of media people would be 
given notice . . . The buyers at a cigarette agency refer to the 
client as the Egyptian Curse . . . Joel Davis is now at Ted Bates, 
on the Boyle-Midway div. of American Home Products. 

At Y&R, John Heugel, who was formerly on print for Lipton Tea 
(Please turn to page 41) 



39 




Nick Imbornone of SSCB 



SPONSOR ASKS: 



WHAT MAKES A REP PRESENTATION 

OUTSTANDING TO BUYERS? 




Those replying to this week's 
question are: 

• Joe Cranda, McCann-Erickson, 
New York 

• Ceorge Riedl, Riedl and Freede. 
Inc., Clifton. N. J. 

• Mary Lou Benjamin, Grey Ad- 
vertising. New \ ork 

• Marie V. Coleman, Donahue 
& Coe. N. Y. 



Joe Cranda, timebuyer at McCann- 
Erickson, New York 
So what's outstanding? Coverage 
map. program schedule, rate card 
and a list of availabilities — the uni- 



Documented 
data that's 
presented in 
terms of client's 
product and 
market 



formity is something that bears seri- 
ous consideration. Why are presen- 
tations so much alike? 

Because of the similaritv of pro- 
motional material, it takes a profes- 
sional salesman to make a presenta- 
tion outstanding. My vears of ex- 
perience have taught me that there's 
a great difference between a repre- 
sentative and a salesman. 

Here's an example of an effective 
presentation which was recently given 
me by a professional salesman : 

A group of five radio stations in 
North Carolina recently had a 90 
county survey taken to document su- 
periority over competition. The re- 
sults of the survey showed such com- 
plete dominance that the group of 
five stations, which combined de- 
livers coverage of more than 4,000,- 
000 people, found that they had an 
audience comparable to leading sta- 
tions in the top five markets. 

The promotional material this 
group turned out, coupled with the 
enthusiasm of the representative, lead 
to one of the most outstanding pres- 
entations I've recently witnessed. 



This presenation had all the neces- 
sary ingredients — namely: (1) an 
interesting 'package' idea based upon 
the total market delivered by the 
five stations combined: (2) docu- 
mentation to support audience claims, 
and illustrate exactly what was being 
offered; (3) a merchandising plan 
which promotes both the advertiser 
(building brand awareness), and 
the stations (building a larger audi- 
ence for our commercials). 

Another twist that made this pres- 
entation outstanding was the use of 
a tape playback — which enabled us 
to actually hear what we were buy- 
ing. Taped sales presentations are 
extremely effective, they're nearly as 
good as a personal market visit. 

The above presentation reflects 
teamwork by the station and the 
representative, and both were doing 
their job extremely well. 

Ceorge Riedl, co-owner of Riedl and 
Freede, Inc., Clifton, New Jersey 

We look on each representative as 
a potential partner in planning for 
the particular market which he rep- 
resents. Presumably, the rep knows 
all the important factors about the 
market and how the station he reps 
can influence it. 

Too often the representative adds 
little to what is readilv available 



A good one has 
clearly defined 
coverage, cur- 
rent and year- 
ago ratings 



from SRDS and the rating sen- 
ices. The most important thing that 
any representative can bring to an 
agency is honesty — and, of course, 
knowledge of what he is trving to 
sell. 

The written portion of the rep 
presentation should concentrate on 
the facts rather than the hard-sell 
language ballooning of claims. The 
aural presentation should concen- 




trate on the various ramifications of 
the facts presented in the written 
presentation. To put these on pa- 
per would make an unnecessarilv 
long and involved presentations. The 
written pitch should include: 

1. Size of the market, population, 
income, percentage of major occu- 
pations (executive, white collar, 
heavy industry, etc.). 

2. Station coverage, clearly out- 
lining primary and secondary cover- 
age. 

3. Availabilities on the particular 
station, screened as to applicability 
to the type of product, including cur- 
rent ratings and a year-ago ratings 
with all the avails listed separately. 

4. A clear outline of the station 
image created as a result of its pro- 
graming. 

5. Definitive audience viewing or 
listening patterns, realigning changes 
of ratings in relation to seasons for 
both daytime and nighttime pro- 
graming. 

6. Cumulative audience projec- 
tions within the scheduled period in- 
dicating reach and frequency, etc. 

7. Suggested medi-mix possibili- 
ties for the market wherever applica- 
ble. 

8. Media merchandising services 
(clearly outlined in terms of quan- 
tity of the details) such as: 

a) in-store display plans 

b) letter to the trade 

c) mailings to the trade 

d) calls on the trade 

e) on-the-air tie-in spots, etc. 

9. Any additional information 
such as success stories expressing 
concrete facts regarding products 
similar to those of the advertiser. 

10. A candid expression of the 
pitfalls in the market and as applied 
to the use of the station itself. 

Mary Lou Benjamin, timebuyer at 

Grey Advertising, Inc. New York 
I would say the following: 
A general profile of the market in- 
come levels, population, ethnic break- 
down, vacation habits in resort 
(Please turn to page 51 I 



40 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



8 CLIENTS 

(Continued from page 39) 

of efficiency, when we want it. The 
frequency is simply cheaper." 

Meanwhile, another advertiser, 
Guardian Maintenance Corp., the 
service department of GM dealers. 
has used a 30-week schedule in 65 
markets for three years in a real 
success story. 

Now in a seven-week flight, a com- 
pany spokesman said "radio has done 
a lot. There's a marked increase in 
the volume of service." 

The goal is to indoctrinate listeners 
to take care of their cars, and es- 
pecially by "educated" service dealers 
for GM products. 

The figures are not available, but 
it's obvious radio gets substantial 
portion of Guardian's ad dollars. 

Just how spot radio will fare in 
this fourth quarter won't really be 
known for some weeks. Schedules 
were increased during the spring and 
summer of 1961, and most radio men 
thought the trend would continue. 
Now they don't know, and it's a mat- 
ter of grinding it out. It looked like 
spot radio was really going into full 
gear, but now it seems to be a ques- 
tion of making the grade and shift. 

Last week sponsor-scope reported 
several buys out of New York which 
could be an indication of better days. 

Companies definitely feel the 
strength of an economy on the up- 
swing and of consumers gradually 
ready to untie the purse strings. 

Why isn't spot radio getting its 
share? 

The reps were the most articulate 
and quick to say what they thought 
was holding down spot radio. One 
executive said it is simply the "cost 
of doing spot business compared with 
the efficiency of network deals where 
you've got one purchase, one con- 
tract, volume circulation, in one fell 
swoop." 

He further said he'd heard agency 
men comparing notes on how much 
more spot cost than network radio, 
and it was often up to 25%. 

Another rep said radio was in a 
seemingly bad situation because it 
is unknown which accounts are buy- 
ing at the local level, and how much 
volume they are buying. However, 
another rep dismissed the rate struc- 
ture problem, and bounced it back to 
economics and efficiency. ^ 




TIMEBUYERS 
CORNER 



(Continued from page 39) 



and Remington Rand, has been made tv buyer for Spic & Span. John 
Gailbriath worked on this account previously and has been transferred 
to Y&R's L.A. office where he is a senior buyer on Wessen-Snowdrift. 

There's a secretary to a top media director who is liked by 
reps because of her courtesy and good naturedness. The other 
afternoon the m.d. was at Michael's Pub with some reps and 
remarked: "Mary is the most responsive, cooperative secretary I 
ever had — always laughing and cheerful to everyone who comes 
to the office. Of course, I've never had any one before who 
took scotch and soda breaks." 




At the WWJ and PGW cocktail party given at the Stork Club, (I to r) Lee Vanden- 
Handel of PGW hosts Y&R buyers Ann Jacknowiti, Peter Spengler, Don Foote 

Don Dowd of D-F-S returned from his vacation in Illinois . . . Paul 
Fitzgerald, now at Gumbinner, had a boy ... At Louis & Armand's, a 
buyer announced to this column : "Ted Bates will shortly place a bust of 
Fred Maltz in its lobby — he's the man who first put the cotton in pill 
bottles." . . . Eleanor Accles at C&W has been active the last few 
weeks placing additional November schedules for Jergens lotion. 

The Stork Club has become a popular place for entertaining 
large numbers of media people: the cocktail party which WWJ 
of Detroit and PGW had, and the series of luncheons given by 
The Thorn Radio Group of North Carolina and BTS . . . The 
disagreement between a rep and a media director at a major 
agency has reached major proportions. The old story: the rep 
pitched the client . . . After a number of problems, Bill Brett at 
B&B wrapped-up the Pepto Bismol schedules which start the 
end of the month . . . Jacques Van Sluv Mars left BBDO for 
NC&K. 

Sally Reynolds of L&N, at Pavilion with station men, pointed out the 
good will many stations create at Christmas time with their gifts. Last 
year she received an expensive carving knife from a station she hadn't 
bought in two years. She added: "Not through the mail — through the 
window." ^ 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



41 




WITH MEDIA SELECTION 
BECOMING INCREASINGLY MORE COMPLICATED 

YOUR NO. 1 BUY IS STILL 

KEWB 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE: THE KATZ AGENCY. INC. 

Here's still another slant on the right way to buy San 
Francisco. The top four radio stations are Independents, 
right? Right! (See Pulse or Hooper) . By much? Wow! 

Take KEWB and the other two in the top three. In Pulse,* 
these stations produce 49.8% of the audience, total rated 
time periods, while the three network stations total 18.4%. 
Hooper* says these same three top Indies deliver 52.8%, 
the nets 17.7%. 

No 'whistling in the dark' - just KEWB's consistency . . . 
all year, every year! 

J J 'PULSE, July-Aug, '61 HOOPER, Aug-Sept, '61 

|(*V CROWELL COLLIER BROADCASTING CORPORATION 

A SOUND CITIZEN OF THE BAY AREA 

110 ADVERTISERS SPONSOR COLOR TV 

During the '60-'61 season, 110 major advertisers 
sponsored network Color Television programs. More 
and more sponsors are moving up to Color. What about 
you? Get the full Color picture today from: W. E. Boss, 
Director, Color Television Coordination, RADIO COR- 
PORATION OF AMERICA, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New 
York 20, New York, Tel: CO 5-5900 



555 5TH 

(Continued from page 14) 

ment with the overall necessity for 
improved research, and its real value 
to both the radio station and the 
advertiser. I would call your atten- 
tion to the fact that the idea is not 
exactly new. W-GTO having had a 
very similar study produced in the 
late spring of 1960. 

Actually, the study by William 
Wahl Associates, now an affiliate 
with the George Gallup organization, 
our basic approach was almost iden- 
tical, except that we are an area sta- 
tion, geographicallv located at con- 
siderable distance from two metro- 
politan areas, and interested in more 
closely defining our audience within 
one of them, while the stations in 
question are geographicallv metro- 
politan, seeking to define their over- 
all area audience. 

One study item, of more interest 
to us than other sections of the coun- 
try- was listening habits as related 
to time of residence in the area. 
This was due to the extremelv fast 
growth of the Florida population, 
over the past ten years, because of 
the influx from other states. You 
might be interested in knowing that 
this influx amounted to slightlv bet- 
ter than 166,000 new residents per 
year over the past ten years. 

We particularlv noted that thi$ 
type survey had verv close correla- 
tion with previous mail pull response 
both as to quantitv and quality of 
listenership, while the standard rat- 
ing survey, though providing similar 
correlation at geographical close 
range, was alwavs at wide divergence 
in such a metropolitan area. 

G. Max Kimbrel 

manager 

W-GTO 

Cypress Gardens, Fla. 



I'liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiij 

CORRECTION 

On page 39 of the 10th An- | 
nual Negro Radio issue, Part | 
Two of the 9 October 1961 
SPONSOR, the list of McLendon 
Ebony stations should have 
read: WENN. Birmingham, 
Ala.; KOKY, Little Rock, Ark.; 
KOKA, Shreveport, La., and 
WOKJ, Jackson, Miss. 

illlll!illlll!lllllll!ll!lllllllllll!llllllllllin!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIl Illlll 



42 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



New RCA 
iartridge Tape System 
with "TRIP CUE" 




Here's the cartridge tape system with something new— trip cue! This unique 
feature allows you to record a special trip-cue tone that, during playback, 
can be used to start the next device in an automatic or semi-automatic system, 
with split-second timing. (In TV operations it may be used tc advance slide 
projectors.) 

Delayed broadcast, spot announcement campaigns, production aids, themes, 
station breaks can be handled by the RT-7A with a minimum of effort. Car- 
tridge is selected, placed in a playback unit, forgotton until "Air" time, then 
instantly played at the flick of a button. Cueing and threading are eliminated. 

Check this handsomely-styled equipment against any other for compactness 
and design ... Provides transistor circuitry, low power consumption, simplic- 
ity of operation! It's one more in a growing line of value-packed new prod- 
ucts for radio and television stations from the pioneer in broadcasting. See 
your RCA Broadcast Representative. Or write to RCA Broadcast and Tele- 
vision Equipment, Dept. AD-264, Building 15-5, Camden, N. J. 



The Most Trusted Name in Electronics 

RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 





Typical packaging is this attractive 
four-unit console with single BA-7 
Cartridge Tape Record and Playback 
Amplifier and three Cartridge Tape 
Decks, as illustrated. 

Separate units of this system avail- 
able are the Record and Playback 
Amplifier, and the Cartridge Tape 
Deck. A Cartridge Storage Rack is 
also available. 



s£4l 





v 



99 SQUEEZES . . . 
That's a lot ! But 
just you watch as 
multi-image after 
multi-image 
dissolves . . . 



:r*/^ 



<tf* 




w 



.— 



dissolves . . . 
dissolves . . . 
dissolves . . . 
dissolves . . . 



dissolves to multi- 
image after multi- 
image! Right, it's 
a lot— but easy 
when it's film 
that's in the plot! 




Commercial commentary (Com. from p. 121 



does the 
unusual... 



How to say "99 squeezes" (make 
every last squeeze count). How to 
say "soapy . . . soapier . . . 
soapiest!" How to do it all with 
such zest that the new Brillo Soap 
Pads sing out in the mazes of marts 
everywhere ! 

Answer: Do it in words and pic- 
tures. Put it to music. On film, of 
course! Because film gives you 
commercials, crisp, vivid, exciting 
— the way you want them — 
and when! 

And that's not all ! Film provides 
the optical effects you require for 
sharp, high-polish commercials; in 
addition, assures you the con- 
venience, coverage and penetration 
market saturation requires. 

For more information, write 

Motion Picture Film Department 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Rochester 4, N.Y. 

East Coast Division 

342 Madison Avenue 
New York 17, N.Y. 

Midwest Division 

130 East Randolph Drive 
Chicago 1 , III. 

West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 

or W. J. German, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and distribution of 

Eastman Professional Motion Picture 

Films, Fort Lee, N.J., Chicago, III., 

Hollywood, Calif. 

ADVERTISER: 

Brillo Manufacturing Co., Inc. 
AGENCY: 

J. Walter Thompson Company 
PRODUCER: 

Elektra Film Productions 



ages, the next agency compensation, the next creativity, and prob- 
ably in 1965 we'll all be gaga over satellite ad messages," is the 
way one agency man expresses it. 

Another theory, and one I find highly amusing, is that advertis- 
ing thought goes through regular, rhythmic, cyclical swings like a 
gigantic pendulum — first emphasizing the scientific, then the artistic 
side of the business. 

According to this theory, we're now in the midst of an art-type 
swing, and can look for an equally violent reaction toward statistics. 

A third theory is that the emphasis on creativity represents a re- 
turn to fundamentals, to the real nature of advertising itself. 

But now let me throw in my own two cents worth, and suggest 
still another possibility. I think it is an unmistakable sign of the 
times. 

It strikes me that today, in every strata and facet of our society, 
there has been building up a tremendous emotional hunger for what 
might be called with fair accuracy, "new truth." 

Somehow the old truths — about government, politics, diplomacy, 
education, business, science, the family, the home, life itself and 
even tv programs — don't seem to be enough. We vearn for some- 
thing wholly new, but also wholly true. 

And the emphasis on creativity (which is by no means confined 
to the ad business) merely reflects this new-truth hunger. 

But get it clown to earth 

All of which is a pretty fancy way of saying that I think adver- 
tising's creativity kick is socially understandable and no passing fad. 

But creativity, as I have heard it discussed at the ANA, the AFA, 
and the 4As, needs to be hauled down out of the clouds and given 
an anchor in reality. 

Despite all the rich, ripe, round-bottomed lip service they pay to 
the creative ideal, I think a lot of the boys are kidding themselves. 

Creativity in the abstract has loads of emotional oomph. But 
there has never been a time in the history of the business when so 
many powerful forces were working against the creative spirit. 

For instance, take Rosser Reeves and his Ted Bates operation. 
There has never been as big or as important an anti-creative agency 
as Bates, never as articulate an anti-creative spokesman as Reeves 
in his impressive book Reality in Advertising. 

Or taking the "Marketing Concept" boys who dominate many 
agency managements. For them, overall marketing is everything; 
they aren't buying the importance of the creative man. 

Or take Bingoism (I'm indebted to Draper Daniels for the term) 
the vicious "numbers game"' which is played by both admen and 
media — newspapers, magazines, radio and tv stations and networks 
— and which bastardizes the importance of creativity by shrieking, 
in effect, "It doesn't make a damn bit of difference what you say or 
even how you say it. All that matters is how many people you tell 
it to and how much it costs." 

These and many other more subtle enemies are working strenu- 
ously to destroy the creative concept. And despite all the noble 
speeches, all the high sounding panel and presentations at associa- 
tion meetings, I've seen little evidence that admen are really facing 
such realities. 

Creativity? It's great. But it requires more than just talk. ^ 



45 





l:< 



Ever hear /about the time we gave 



We agree with timebuyers: most pitches for 
television and radio stations are pretty boring. 
After you've heard the results of the latest sensa- 
tional survey for the umpteenth time, you wish 
you could sneak downstairs for a quick icy coldie. 

Well, we don't like to bore our media friends. 
They're our bread and butter. We like to make 
our pitches as painless as possible. That's why we 
gave the king salmon sodium pentothal. 

You see, it started with the idea that we needed 
something different (and painless) for a big pre- 
sentation party in Los Angeles for media people. 
Some wiseacre suggested we hold a salmon derby 
in Hollywood, of all places. Like most ideas that 
jell in Monday morning meetings, this one hadn't 
quite jelled. There was a loud chorus of huzzas 
and nobody gave a second thought as to how the 
heck you get the live fish there. 

Tons of dollars and three weeks later, we had 
five drowsy 25-pound fish lollygagging in the pool 
at the flossy Sportsmen's Lodge. 



About 350 timebuyers, account executives, net- 
work wheels, and assorted Hollywood celebrities 
had the time of their lives trying to land a fight- 
ing king salmon, a couple of which looked about 
as animated as that young lady you see in the 
Nite-All ads. 

How did we get the salmon there? Well, we 
retained Clarence Pautzke, the country's leading 
expert on salmon (he must be — JFK just made 
him U. S. Game Commissioner). Clarence netted 
the salmon at the mouth of the Columbia River, 
rushed them to a waiting Flying Tiger plane, 
dumped the fish into custom-built tanks, and then 
nursemaided them all the way to L. A. 

To keep the salmon quiet, Clarence adminis- 
tered the sodium pentothal. But that's only half 
the story. He had to supply them with oxygen 
on the 1,000-mile flight, too. Pretty narrow line 
between keeping salmon quiet and putting them 
to sleep for good. 

When the plane door sprang open in Los 







the king salmon sodium pentothal? 



Angeles, out bounded Clarence Pautzke, bellowing, 
"I don't want to talk to reporters — where the heck 
are the fresh oxygen tanks?" 

WWW 

We tell this story not to illustrate the wonder- 
ful, wacky world of show business, but rather to 
make another point. The Crown Stations are not 
ordinary stations. We sell differently, just as we do 
things differently in our respective communities. 
Our audiences expect a Crown Station to go all 
the way, to show more ingenuity, to provide more 
entertainment, to dig deeper on news and public 
interest programs, than any other station. That's 
how we expect to win constant viewer and listener 
loyalty. 

The record shows that we have done it. Most 
timebuyers, agency account men, and sales man- 
agers prefer to have their business on a Crown 
Station (all other things being equal). 



And the beauty of it is, of course, that we cover 
the three key markets of the Pacific Northwest — 
Portland, Seattle, and Spokane. Crown Corner, 
U.S.A., is the second largest lump of business in 
the entire West. 

Work out your problems in California, we 
always say, and then come north for the easy 
decision. The Crown Stations. 



THE CR0WN STATIONS 

KGW, AM, TV, Portland 

KING, AM, FM, TV, Seattle 

KREM, AM, FM. TV, Spokane 




If You Lived In West Texas 




STATION 

TV KVII-TV KOSATV 

^MARILLO OUI»A MIDLAND 



You'd look to the Trigg-Vaughn Stations 
for news. TV covers the news fast 
and in depth. Examples . . . 

August 3, 1961 707 Hijack ... on the 
air with live remote at 6:45 A.M. and 
fed the nation till FBI apprehended 
hijackers. 

September 11, 1961 Hurricane Carla . . . 
covered on-the-spot for two days by 
TV News Director. 



September 13, 1961 Within 36 hours of 



"Carla," 



TV 



audience had responded 
with almost $300,000 in non-perishable 
foods and clothing for victims. 

DOMINATES WEST TEXAS 

LEADS IN SERVICE 



TV 



BECAUSE 



TV 



AND ENTERTAINMENT. THE BOLLING 
COMPANY MAN HAS THE FULL STORY. 

BUY [§3 to sell West Texans... 
Get 34% of New Mexico to boot 



KROD-TV 

El Paso 



KVII-TV 

Amarillo 



K0SA-TV 

Odessa / Midland 



3 Quality Stations/3 Quality Markets/1 National Representative 



Jack C. Vaughn 

Chairman of the Board 



Cecil L. Trigg 

President 



George C. Collie 
National Sales Manager 



48 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



NET TV FACTS 

(Continued from page 35) 

Pulse finally settled on a seven-day 
aided recall method. In this decision, 
the Messrs. Sydney and Laurence 
Roslow — head of Pulse and associate 
director, respectively — were bolstered 
bv a studv done in England in which 
data from a seven-day recall showed 
a high correlation with an overnight 
recall. In the actual field work, one- 
seventh of the sample is interviewed 
on each night of the week. Thus, for 
each day of the week, there is always 
one-seventh of the sample talking 
about viewing only one night re- 
moved from the time of the interview. 

In this type of survey, one ques- 
tion begs to be answered. Is there 
enough difference in the characteris- 
tics of network audiences to justify 
the expense of gathering the informa- 
tion? For example, in measuring a 
matter like the percent of women who 
buv lipstick, do program audiences 
differ enough? If. for all network 
shows, the percent of such women 
viewers ranges only slightly, then the 
buyer would do well to look for over- 
all ratines and the rest co hanp. 



Located in the 
exclusive hotel area of 

NEW YORK 






? AIR CONDITIONING 



TELEVISION 

PRIVATE BATH 
IN EACH ROOM 



>.f» Housekeeping 
lents, too 



HOTEL 

PARK CHAMBERS 

Corner 58th St. & Avenue of the Americas 

NEW YORK CITY 19 

In its location, service, atmosphere and 
reasonable rates, it's the ideal hotel- 
home for transient and permanent 
guests. Single $9 to $12. Double $12 
to $16. 2-room suites from $18. Lower 
rates by the week or month. 

Wrife for brochure and map of 

New York's most fascinating places 

to see and things to do. 

James A. Flood. Manager 



Pulse did no definitive study to 
prove its point, but a number of ex- 
amples provided by Pulse indicate the 
differences are significant (see page 
35). Furthermore, a number of blue 
chip companies who would have no 
trouble picking a research study apart 
in a professional manner are sub- 
scribers to one or more of the studies. 
Among them are a top advertiser, 
Colgate-Palmolive: some first-rank 
agencies, William Estv. Fuller & 
Smith & Ross, K&E, McCann-Erick- 
son, SSC&B. Y&R. and a few major 
firms on the selling side of media, 
The Katz Agency, the John Blair Co., 
Westinghouse Broadcasting Corp., 
Curtis Publishing. f? 



' 



An inadvertent typographical trans- 
position in the Negro Radio Issue, 9 
October 1961, page 42. assigned incorrect 
facts to three stations adjacent to each 
other in a listing. The correct facts are: 
WDIA, Memphis— 50 kw; 1070 on the 
dial; a Sonderling station: 14 years on the 
air; 12% years of Negro-appeal program- 
ing; broadcasts 140 hours per week, all 
devoted to Negro-appeal programing; di- 
vides its programing as follows — 48%, d.j.'s, 
39% religious, 8% news, 5% other; esti- 
mates market contains 1,357,000 Negroes; 
estimates annual Negro family income in 
market at $3,316 average, with 69% of 
Negroes living in rural areas, "w LAC, Nash- 
ville — frequency, 1510: network affiliate; 
a Life & Casualty Ins. Co. station; 35 years 
on air; 14 years of Negro-appeal program- 
ing; broadcasts 168 hours per week, 21 r c 
devoted to Negro-appeal programing; has 
increased Negro-appeal programing during 
past year; all Negro-appeal programing is 
via d.j.'s; 21.5% of total business comes 
from Negro-appeal clients: estimates mar- 
ket contains 308,000 Negroes: estimates 
average Negro family income in market is 
$1,755 annually, with 139c of Negroes 
living in rural areas. \^ \ OL, Nashville — 
5 kw; frequency. 1470: independent; a 
Rounsaville station; 10 years on air; 10 
years of Negro-appeal programing; on air 
132 hours per week, all devoted to Negro- 
appeal programing; no change in ratio of 
such programing compared to last year; 
divides its programing as follows— 50 r r 
d.j.'s, 10% other music, 26%; religious, 7% 
news, 5% homemaker, 27c public service: 
all income from Negro-appeal clients; esti- 
mates it covers 120,000 Negro population: 
estimates average annual family income of 
Negroes in area at $3,105, with 28.7% of 
Negroes living in rural areas. 



very 
important 

persons 
■ (* r 

\ will meet 

*\ _ on the 



QjjJLsia'ewa lks\ 

of Xenv 1 ork\ 
S- during the.. 



w$m 



■wiHiiflm 



1 A AfTTTT I n 



JbcC*^ 



CONVENTION 



mm 



Ialdorf 



STOMA 



; £\^ 



^ 



sFr«'<fr 






Z • B P A .JOIN B P A 



"07^^-^ 



ISTENrV YORKMST.Y. 



BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION 
% P. O. Box 9736, Cleveland 40. Ohio 



Send today! 



Please rush me more information about BPA 

Name _ m 

Company 

Address . 

City 



State. 




SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



49 



IN THE MORNING 




WASHINGTON 

DRIVES 

TOWORK 
ONWRC 



Washington drives to work and it 
drives early . . . staggered work- 
ing hours, long distances and 
(gulp!) traffic. WRC is the capital's 
favorite companion during drowsy 
time in the morning. And, don't 
forget, Washington is the nation's 
tenth market. 

FACTS: WRC lands in first place 
for every quarter hour between 
7:00 and 8:30 A.M. (7:30, by the 
way, hits a nice, round 8.0.) 
Source: Pulse, July-August, 1961 
(Mon.-Fri.) 

Whatever you make — and you 
want to make sales — make sure 
WRC gets your message. 



WRC-980 USE 




NBC Radio in Washington 
REPRESENTED BY NBC SPOT SALES 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 




SPOT BUYS 



RADIO BUYS 

Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association, Inc., Detroit. Mich., 
has bought in about 200 markets for a promotion to run the week 
prior to Thanksgiving. There will be other pre-holiday campaigns 
but they will be bought individually. Time segments: minutes. This 
promotion will use two to three stations per market. Agency: Keyes, 
Madden, & Jones, Chicago. Buyer: Virginia Rusett. 

American Tobacco, New York, has bought some 65 spots per 
week in a list of over 107 markets for its Pall Mall. Among the com- 
pany's frequent flights this buy accounts for a two week flight sched- 
uled to start 6 November. Time segments: Minutes. Agency: SSC&B, 
New York. Buyer: Mike Cambridge. 



TV BUYS 

Phillips-Van Heusen Corp., New York, will open a promotion on 
4 November. The time segments to be used for this buy are night 
minutes and prime 20's. The schedule calls for a flight of five or six 
weeks depending upon the market involved. There will be more 
than 40 markets. Agency: Grey, New York. Buyer; Herb Gandel. 

Ceneral Foods, White Plains, N. Y., will begin a promotion 23 
October for its Gravy Train dog food. It will have a three week 
flight in some 50 to 60 markets. Time segments: prime breaks and 
fringe minutes. Agency: B&B, New York. Buyer: Bob Wilson. A 
second campaign scheduled is for Post cereal. There will be a three- 
week flight in more than 25 markets. Starting date is 30 October and 
time segments are fringe and kids minutes. Agency: B&B, New- 
York. Buyer: George Simco. 

Helena Rubenstein, New 7 York, will promote a group of products 
with spot tv starting 23 October. This will use night minutes in over 
30 markets and is set up for a three-week flight. Agency: OBM. 
New York. Buyer: Maxine Cohen. 

Colgate Palmolive, New York, has spot campaigns coming for two 
products. The first is Colgate dental cream with a five week flight 
starting 16 October. There will be some 20 to 30 markets involved. 
Time segments: prime breaks. Agency: Ted Bates. Buyer: Florence 
Simons. The second promotion is for Ajax. The schedule calls for a 
run of 52 weeks starting 6 November. Time segments: fringe and 
prime minutes. Markets: over 40. Agency: Norman C&K, New York. 
Buyer: Al Silverman. 

American Home Products Corp., New York, has scheduled a 13 
week flight for its Sudden Beauty. Time segments will be minutes 
with a teenage audience. Starting date is 1 November. Agency: Ted 
Bates, New York. Buyer: Jack Scanlon. 



50 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



DREIKORN'S HOMEY SELL 

[Continued from page 37) 

theory that New Englanders are a 
special breed of people who do not 
hold with high pressure gimmicks, 
Dreikorn keeps his marketing tac- 
tics on the same lofty plane as his 
commercials. 

No fanfare is made in stores and 
the stations involved in selling the 
Dreikorn staff-of-life do not engage 
in contests or similar attention-get- 
ters. 

Dreikorn's onlv personal contact 
with the consumer is made through 
his affiliation with Welcome Wagon. 
Here, the Welcome Wagon hostess, 
making her rounds of welcoming 
newcomers will give the newcomer 
a loaf of Dreikorn bread and follow 
it up with a card which is redemable 
for another loaf. 

Dreikorn credits air media with 
the gradual growth of his company. 
For a regional bread advertiser with 
only half a state as the market, and, 
moreover, a family-owned indepen- 
dent, battling the big-budget giants 
of the industry on a small budget, 
there is nothing like it he savs. 

Radio especially has helped Drei- 
korn surmount the hurdle of a not- 
so-easy product name. Radio, he 
maintains, has helped his customers 
to walk into a store and unhesitat- 
ingly pronounce, correctly, the name 
Dreikorn (dry-corn). Without this 
aid. who knows, he shrugs; perhaps 
in frustration they would have turned 
to another easier-to-pronounce loaf. 

Quality Bakers' account executive, 
Ralph Usifer, puts it this way: "Over 
the years, there is no question that 
the one advertising medium most re- 
sponsible for the success of this com- 
pany (Dreikorn's) has been radio. 
Aside from the obvious intimate na- 
ture of this medium — reaching the 
housewife in her home on a regular 
and a repetitive basis — there was an- 
other peculiar advantage to Drei- 
korn's; it gave the exact pronuncia- 
tion to a difficult brand name. This 
label registered in the minds of some 
700,000 customers because of the 
constant use of radio over the past 
20 years." 

This feeling is shared by Drei- 
korn's sales manager, James B. Dowd 
who says the medium has "demon- 
strated good selling power and kept 
sales at record level in the face of 
strong competition." ^ 




SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 40) 

areas, inflation of population by 
schools, army bases, and temporary 
installations, in relation to potential 
sales. 

General information applicable to 
station in the market from the stand- 
point of acceptance, programing, 
type of audience, coverage and rat- 



General knowledge of the distri- 



It includes 
market's in- 
come levels, 
population, and 
ethnic break- 
down 



bution and marketing problems of 
the product. 

For examples, in a major market 
buy (Miami) made for one client, 
"must buy" stations, from the point 
of rating surveys used, were top 40 
stations. One rep pointed out the 
segment of the audience, important 
to the client, that was being missed 
by not using his better music sta- 
tion. Because of his knowledgeable 
approach, both to the market and 
the product's consumer appeal, a 
schedule was placed with the station, 
although it was a complete deviation 
from the general buying pattern. 

When the schedules were sent to 
the client, he was delighted with the 
addition of the station, since the rep 
enlisting the cooperation of the sta- 
tion, had the foresight and interest 
to cover him with the same presenta- 
tion. 

Marie V. Coleman, media buyer, 
Donahue & Coe 

Essentially, a rep presentation 
should offer sufficient facts to enable 
the buyer to make an informed de- 
cision concerning media selection 
with greatest savings of time. Good 
presentations consist of two parts: a 
review of basic data about the sta- 
tion and market, and the clear, con- 
cise presentation of specific informa- 
tion to meet a specialized buying 
problem, or to explain a new develop- 
ment that affects the salability of the 
station. 

Basic information : While the basic 
information should be concise, it 
should not be a rehash of material 



IN THE EVENING 




WASHINGTON 

DRIVES 

HOME 

ONWRC 



The latest Pulse report (July- 
August, 1961) (Mon.-Fri.) puts 
WRC in first place (or tied for 
first) in every quarter hour be- 
tween 5:00 and 6:45 P.M. This 
means that during evening driv- 
ing time we reach more listeners 
than any other station. 

Not surprising! WRC's brand of 
unbeatable new coverage, music 
and weather attracts the kind of 
people that make the nation's 
tenth market so responsive. And 
it attracts more of them at the 
key driving hours. 

In the evening, make Washing- 
tonians aware of your brand. 



WRC-980 m 




NBC Radio in Washington 
REPRESENTED BY NBC SPOT SALES 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



51 



V- i /'iilsc Audience Sur- 
shows Baltimore Ne- 
groes prefer THE NEW 
WSID over nearest competi- 
tor >;' ■•' < of the time from 
? A.M. to 7 P.M.. Monday 
through Friday. 



IN 
THE 



THE NEW 

WSID IS 

FIRST 

EXPANDING 

BALTIMORE 

NEGRO 

MARKET 



Highest rated station 100% Negro programming in the 
Baltimore Market. Hooper Survey April-May, May- 
June, June-July, July- August. August -September '61. 
Baltimore's only clear channel station serving the ex- 
panding Baltimore Negro market. 

Baltimore's pioneer Negro station . . . 
ever ready to aid your product sales 
through WSID PLUS MERCHANDIS- 
ING. 

A detailed Pulse Baltimore Negro market study is 
available on request. Call or write C. Carroll Larkin, 
Genera] Manager or U B C Sales, Chicago, 111. — Los 
Angeles — San Francisco — New York. Dora-Clayton, 
Atlanta. 



WSID 



ONE OH! ONE ON EVERYONE'S RADIO 

910 North Charles Street • Baltimore, Maryland 
SA 7-8250 

'Pulse Sffiro Audience Surrey Aug. '61. 



DISNEY: "COLOR TV GREATEST 
INNOVATION IN HOME ENTERTAINMENT" 

With his new TV show, "The Wonderful World of 
Color," Disney, too, makes the big move to Color TV. 
What about you? Get the full Color picture today from: 
W. E. Boss. Director, Color Television Coordination, 
RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA. 30 Rockefeller 
Plaza, New York 20, New York, Tel: CO 5-5900 




readily gleaned from Standard Rate 
or other standard reference sources. 
It should contain sufficient depth in- 
formation to give the buyer a clear 
picture of the station and its market. 
To my mind, the presentation 
should cover the station's effective 
coverage area and the characteristics 
of its audience. I think it has become 
more and more important for the rep 
to provide considerable qualitative in- 



PreserUation 
concisely tells 
how and ivhy 
station will sell 
the product 



formation about the audience, such 
as income levels, ages, and if possible 
buying preferences and predilections. 

Naturally there should be program- 
ming and rating information, with the 
ratings broken down in the most us- 
able form to help shed maximum 
light on the problem at hand. 

Market information should contain 
a definition of the area, its size by- 
population and households: a break- 
down of spendable income and retail 
sales, and an in-depth market analysis 
that should emphasize the unique as- 
pects and idiosyncracies of the market 
in question. 

Specialized information : It is 
difficult to talk about specialized pres- 
entations without resorting to specific 
examples which I recall as being out- 
standing. For example. KM5P-TY. 
Minneapolis, formerly an independ- 
ent, was awarded the ABC affiliation. 
This made the outlet, to all intents 
and purposes, a new station, and all | 
information about the size and char- 
acter of its audience became obsolete. 
KMSP-TVa rep, I recall, issued a 
presentation which graphically and 
clearlv showed what the affiliation 
switch did to the Minneapolis-St. Paul 
market, and enabled buyers to readily 
grasp the new audience picture there. 

Another problem which a rep 
tackled effectively involved a new 
delineation of a television market. 
The station KNTV, San Jose, con- 
siders itself part of an overall market 
including Salinas-Monterey. The sta- 
tion's rep then issued a presentation 
which factually and logically ex- 
plained the reasons why the concept 
was realistic in terms of media buying 
patterns. ^ 



52 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



when you think of Kansas City remember. our 



A. P. 



* 





NOW 2,320,499 STRONG 

From old Westport Landing in 1847 to the hub of a big, bold, booming 
200-mile-wide trade area . . . that's the recorded growth of Kansas City. 



AND NOW. 



16th 
15th 
14th 



13th 

11th 

6th 

3rd 



n Population 

n Manufacturing Employment 

n Number of Airline Operations 

n Retail Sales 

n Bank Deposits 

n Wholesale Sales 

n Bank Clearings 

n Apparel Industry 

n Number of Railroads 

as a Cattle and Calf Market 



2nd in Automobile Assembly 

in Feed Manufacturing 

1st in Rail Receipts of All Livestock 

in Vending Machine Production 

KCMO-Radio— 810 Kc— 50,000 watts, Kansas City's 
most powerful station and KCMO-TV— Channel 5 — 
100,000 watts full power from tall tower television 
...give you all this at low cost-per-thousand. 



W7 r*.. rvi 



®* AREA POTENTIAL 
TV-Radio-FM 

E. K. HARTENBOWER, V. P. and Gen. Mgr., R.W. EVANS, Radio Sta. Mgr.. SID TREMBLE, TV Sta. Mgr. 



\j\ondoj 



Gfy 



Represented Nationally by Katz Agency 



A Meredith Station Affiliated with "Better Homes and Gardens" &. "Successful Farming" Magazines. 




:>i 



OVER HALF BILLION DOLLAR EXPANSION PLANNED IN 
THE MARKET ON THE MOVE - TAMPA- ST. PETERSBURG 



Part of this development is a nine million dollar in- 
vestment in Port Tampa. Here, on a 30-acre site, the 
National Gypsum Company is constructing a gigantic 
plant to provide overnight service of building supplies 
to Florida customers. 

The motivation for many such new developments in 
the progressive Tampa-St. Petersburg area is aptly 
expressed in this statement by Mr. Melvin H. Baker, 
Chairman of the Board of National Gypsum. "We are 
more than ever convinced that the Tampa area is a 
dynamic center of commerce and industry and that 
Florida offers a glowing economic future." 

REMINDER: Progress and Prosperity go 
hand-in-hand. Look to WTVT— the televi- 
sion station on the move— to dominate this 
vitally important market on the move! 



SHARE OF AUDIENCE... 44.4% 

Latest ARB 9:00 AM - Midnight 

CHECK THE 
TOP 50 
SHOWS ! 



ARB 




NIELSEN 


WTVT 


37 


WTVT 45 


Station B. . 


13 


Station B 5 


Station C . 





Station C 



ARB., Tampa-St. Petersburg Metro Area, June 1961, 4 week summary. 
N.S.I. , Tampa-St. Petersburg Metro Area, July, 1961, 4 week coverage. 



STATION ON THE MOVE - 

WTVT 




Channel 
13 



TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG 



The WKY Television System, Inc. WKY-TV/WKY-RADIO' Oklahoma City Represented by the Katz Agency 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



I 




23 OCTOBER 1961 
Otnrliht i96i 

SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



What's happening in V. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



The Federal Trade Commission hasn't been as spectacular with its toughening 
up process as has been the Federal Comm unications Commission : it appears, how- 
ever, that the end result will be the same. 

Latest move over at FTC is appointment by chairman Paul Rand Dixon of career em- 
ployee Cecil G. Miles to a totally new job, "program review officer." Idea is to have some- 
body responsible for getting the biggest enforcement mileage out of available FTC 
manpower. 

Dixon explained. "Because the laws administered by the Federal Trade Commission are 
so broad in concept and provide such wide opportunity for constructive action, the Commis- 
sion continually must choose the fields in which it can best serve the public interest." 

The checking of broadcast advertising is only one part of FTC responsibilities over all 
advertising. Policing of so-called "false and misleading" claims is only a small part of the 
over-all FTC job. But the appointment of a single individual to check the over-all picture 
will undoubtedly lead to a stricter eye on advertising. 

New chairman Dixon and the other commissioners, both new and old, all profess great 
friendliness to advertising as an institution. They say that it is the unprincipled mi- 
nority which must be checked. And they are saying with near unanimity that the FTC 
will be more active in this field than ever. 






Nearly 18 months ago, then-chairman Frederick Ford also appointed an "expe- 
diter" over at the FCC: the new position at that agency had vested in it the same 
responsibility for seeing that Commission work didn't lag. There is no coincidence 
in the fact that the trend went toward tighter regulation. 

In the general furore over the Minow "vast wasteland" speech, and the flow of personal 
publicity which shows no sign of ending, many tend to forget that there are six other com- 
missioners. Forgotten, equally, is the fact that Fred Ford is still on the FCC and is still very 
influential. 

The Ford position on any given matter is almost crucial. Without the backing 
of Ford, Minow would lose out a large part of the time. On matters involving general regu- 
latory philosophy, Minow can count only on the almost invariable backing of Robert Bartley. 
T. A. M. Craven and Rosel Hyde will provide the opposition on most non-unanimous 
votes. 

As things have been going, Robert E. Lee and John Cross have been swing votes. Ford 
has almost always been in the Minow corner, and he has generally managed to carry the two 
uncertain voters with him. If Ford had voted on the other side in several important cases, he 
would have carried at least one of these two votes with him. 

Those who wish to know how far the FCC will go in putting teeth into its regulatory 
processes would actually be better off knowing how Ford stands than inquiring into the Minow 
intentions. Appointment of Minow, in most respects, amounted more to adding a vote to the 
Ford side than substituting a new regulatory philosophy. 

Latest evidence that Ford hasn't changed his mind for political or any other reasons came 
at the NAB conference with the Commissioners on application forms and new logging require- 
ments. Minow was in an extremely conciliatory mood. It was only Ford who spoke out 
against what he believed to be excesses by some broadcasters. It was Ford who started the 
ball rolling with a statement that the FCC must be able to check up on what broadcast- 
ers are doing. 

(Please turn to page 57) 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 




A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



23 OCTOBER 1961 

Cwyrllht IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INO. 



Lanolin Plus is reported to have a couple more company acquisitions in the 
works. 

The pair: Lilly Dache hair and general cosmetics (BBDO) and Beauty Counselors, Inc., 
of Grosse Pointe, Mich. (Gumbinner). The acquisitions would be strictly stock propositions. 
Most recent takeover by Lanolin Plus was Hazel Bishop. 



Y&R chairman Sigurd Larmon took time out recently to assure his agency 
comrades — big and small — that the rumor about his plans to retire in the near fu- 
ture was the sheerest nonsense. 

(Incidentally, nothing within an agency creates as ticklish a problem as a report about 
some upper key figure retiring.) 

Time will tell who got the better part of the bargain on this one. 

The saga has to do with ABC TV's refusal earlier in the year to buy Hazel, preferring 
to throw its lot with Margie. 

P&G indicated an interest in Hazel for the Thursday franchise period it got from 
ABC TV, but ABC TV, it would seem, thought Margie the better property. 

It might be noted that P&G at the moment isn't happy about the choice. 



Don't he surprised if one of the talent offices finds itself the owner of a major 
block of stock in a leading tv film production firm. 

Reports have it that commissions outstanding from the producer are now in the hundreds 
of thousands. 



You might take this as pretty much a rule-of-thumb in agency media opera- 
tions: the number of timebuyers vs. print buyers runs in about the same ratio ae 
tv/radio billings vs. print billings. To cite a couple examples: 

RATES: Tv/radio billings are around 95% of the whole and the buying setup is 188 
for air media and seven for print. 

COMPTON: Tv constitutes 61% of the agency's billings and the buyer ratio is 18 tv 
and 11 print. 



Can you imagine Gimbel's congratulating Macy's for contributing something 
worthwhile in merchandising? 

Your credulity may not stretch that far, but in tv such an exchange of plaudits has actually 
occurred: ABC TV congratulated CBS TV for contributing to the industry its study 
among 2,800 supermarket managers, which made several strong points in favor 
of tv. 

(See 25 September SPONSOR-SCOPE, page 25, for resume of this study.) 



Did you know the only class of employees in the tv networks that rides first 
class on airlines these days on company business are union people? 

Their contracts require it. 

As for the others — from top brass down — it's exclusively coach, as dictated by the treas 
urer's office. 



58 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



^kU, 



NOT EVERY MAN'S A KING in the up-and-coming KSLA-TV area. . .but 
lost of the folks live like it. From their gleaming offices in sparkling new glass-and-steel skyscrapers 
d their smart air-conditioned suburban homes, they live it up . . . and love it! The big majority of them 



x . i, +^ km A-TV for news they believe . . . proqrams thm/ ,-♦ 
:heC K the figures) look to KSLA T^ ^ ^^ atX)ut ^ ^s t^ey stay at h ( 

.Harrington, ^, _^ ^5js^. bL *. TV market 

AsK our rev 



^alfy nch K S [ y A a l h0me t0 ^tc h . 




KSLA-TV SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



'ONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



59 



SPONSOR 
WEEK 



u::;:.:. c? 



Advertisers 



Campbell Soup's institutional 
marketing director, William P. 
MacFarland, told members of the 
Eastern Frosted Foods Associa- 
tion S82. ^,000,000 is spent for 
frozen foods in top 60 markets. 



Speaking at the association's lunch- 
eon in New York last week, he said 
that this accounts for 61 'v of the 
total sales. 

According to MacFarland. this fig- 
ure represents a higher percentage 
of total food business than the quan- 
tity of frozen food bought by food 



service industries. 

Mattel, Inc., Hawthorne, Calif., 
toymaker, has a scheduled bud- 
get of more than S4.5 million to 
support sales during the 1962 
year. 

This represents an increase of over 
30% more than the previous years 
expenditures. 

The budget will include an in- 
creased concentration of spot tv. 

Campaigns: 

• Pez candy (Daniel & Charles I 
will use both live presentation and 
film for a heavy schedule of spot tv. 
The promotion will start this month 



POTOMAC RIVER boating party was held for third year by WMAL (radio and tv), Wash- 
ington, D. C. Outing was aboard SS Mt. Vernon for press to preview station's fall programing 




CHATTING WITH SPONSORS of ABC Evening Report' is ABC v. p. in charge of news, 
special events, and public affairs, James Hagerty (c). The program sponsors are (l-r) Fred- 
erick Stock, v.p. in charge of mktg., E. R. Squibb & Sons; Arthur Stafford, v. p. of msdng., 
Olin Mathieson; George Squibb, dir. of sales, Squibb; J. J. Toohy, v.p. and gen, mgr., Squibb 





UN Gen'l Assembly programs are backed b- 
AMF Intern'l on WRUL, Scituate, Mass 
L-r Don Morrison, mkt. dir., AMF; Ral 
Brent, WRUL pres.; John Hayes, v.p., EWR&F 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



I 



in some 15 markets. 

• Peter Paul has introduced a 
new ten cent candy bar, called Chif- 
fon. The company has planned a 
schedule of almost continuous tv spot 
campaigns and some network pro- 
graming. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 
J. Ferris Brogan has been appointed 
director of advertising and promo- 
tion for the International division of 
Borden Foods Company. He is form- 
erly the assistant marketing manager 
for milk based products at Borden . . . 
H. D. Wakefield to assistant adver- 
tising and merchandising director at 
S. C. Johnson & Co.. Racine. Wis. 



Kudos: Lee H. Bristol, chairman 
of the board. Bristol-Myers Company, 
and chairman of the Advertising 
Council, will receive the first Paul B. 
West Award. The award was estab- 
lished last year by the Association 
of National Advertisers to honor "the 
individual contributing the most to 
advertising and who best personifies 
the goals and standards of Paul B. 
West." 



Agencies 



James S. Bealle, v. p. and tv-radio 
director at Kenyon & Eckhardt, 
has appeared on a tv show en- 
titled The Tv Controversy In 



Other Countries, for the West 
German Tv Network. 

The 45-minute filmed show, also 
including FCC Chairman Newton 
Minow and NAB president LeRoy 
Collins, will be seen in West Germany 
on 11 November and includes some 
K&E tv commercials as examples of 
U.S. creative work. 

Agency appointments: Foremost 
Dairies (3.5 million) to Guild, Bas- 
comb & Bonfigli from BBDO . . . 
Walt Disney's Buena Vista Film Dis- 
tribution Company to C. J. LaRoche 
. . . Emge Packing Company, Indiana, 
to Ruben Advertising, Indianapolis 
. . . Lawrence of London Ltd., to 




HEERING UP patients at N. Y. Memorial Hospital monthly 

>arty were WCBS radio personalities, Martha Wright, Richard 

ayes, and Jack Sterling's pianist Hank Jones in musical revue 




EEING OFF WBAL. Baltimore held first annual golf tournament 

• U. S. Naval Academy golf course. Attending were, l-r, John Yan- 
>ski, chief accountant; Robert Hance, acc't exec, WBAL-TV; Perry 
ndrews, announcer for WBAL; Thomas Carr, v. p., gen. mgr., WBAL 




ANNUAL PRESENTATION, shown for various agencies in N. Y. 
area, is exhibited here by San Francisco Radio Brdcstrs. Assn. at Ted 
Bates. At show were l-r, Norm Chester, media supr.; Homer Odum, 
v. p., gen. mgr. KABL, San Francisco; Tom Watson, brdcst. buyer; Bill 
Kennedy, v. p., assoc. media dir.; Maurie Webster, v. p., gen. mgr., 
CBS Radio Spot Sales; Bob Engelke, v. p., assoc. media dir. 




AT THE RACES — Electric Roadways Sports Car rally in Ideal 
Toy Corp. showrooms attracted N. Y. tv personalities who came to 
see sponsor's new products. Picking winning (?) cars are l-r Fred 
Scott, WNEW-TV; Sonny Fox, WNEW-TV; Jack McCarthy, WPIX 
(TV); Tom Gregory, WNEW-TV; Abe Kent, v. p. mechandising, 
and Mort Schneider, director of television promotion, Ideal Toys 



I PONS 



SOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



61 



I amlii'i & Feasley . . . Lufthansa 
\irlincs has retained D'Arcy . . . Sea- 
board Finance to FC&B, L. A. . . . 
Dutch Masters Cigar Company to 
Paper! Koenig, Lois from EWR&R 
. . . Mackd Develo])ment Company to 
Vllcnger Advertising. Boston . . . 
\IU: Radio West to Albert Frank- 
Guenther Law. 



PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 

F. Thomas Bertsche to account 
executive at MacFarland. Aveyard & 
Co.. Chicago . . . Byron Chandler 
to media manager at Ketchum. Mac- 
Leod & Grove . . . Frank L. Calla- 
han to account executive at EWR&R 
. . . William B. Hyland to account 
executive at Winius-Brandon. St. 
Louis . . . Norman L. Peterzell to 
v. p. on the Colgate Palmolive account 
at L&N . . . Robert W. Wheeler to 
v. p. of 1 \R's Los Angeles office . . . 
Bernice G. Preiseer to director of 
consumer marketing at Ketchum. Mac 
& G . . . James B. Gibson to media 
assistant at N. W. Aver. Chicago . . . 
Walter Cooper to tv-radio depart- 
ment at \. \\ . \\er. New York . . . 
Tyson L. Janney and John W. 
Shepherd to the plans and market- 
ing department of N. W. Ayer, Phila- 
delphia . . . Donald R. Stimble to 
account executive at Leo Burnett. 
Chicago . . . Leo B. Pambrun to 
account executive at Charles Bowes 
Advertising, L.A. . . . Raymond R. 
Morgan to v. p. at the Walker Saussv 
agencv in Hollywood, from FRC&H 
. . . Don Rose to director of public 
relations for Herbert Baker Advertis- 
ing, Chicago . . . Donald W. Me- 
Keehen account executive at the 
Spokane office of the Pacific National 
Advertising agencv . . . Robert J. 
^ yllie to account executive at 
Chimr<r & Cairns. Boston . . . Nor- 



man K. Carrier to chief tv and ra- 
dio time analyst and buyer at Mac- 
Farland. Aveyard & Company. Chi- 
cago. 

Elected v.p.'s: Ronald McCulloch 
and Eugene A. Raven, account su- 
pervisors at FC&B. New York, have 
been elected v.p.'s of the agency. 

New quarters: Alan M. Shapiro 

agency in Philadelphia has opentd 
new offices at 113 S. 21 Street. 

Mergers: Two St. Louis agencies. 
Ridgeway-Hirsch Company and 
French Inc. have joined forces to 
become Ridgeway, Hirseh & 
French. 

New Agency: A new agency to be 
known as Reynolds & Foster has 

been formed in Boston. It will be 
headed by Robert W. Reynolds and 
Gale P. Foster, v.p. Thev were both 
with the Sutherland-Abbot agencv in 
that citv. 

Stations on the Move 

An agreement has been reached 
between Loew's Theaters, Inc.. 
and the Storer Broadcasting 
Company for the purchase of ra- 
dio station WMGM. New York. 

Arthur M. Tolchin. executive v.p. 
and director of the station, made the 
announcement and noted that further 
details cannot be released until filing 
with the FCC has been completed. 

TOTAL STATIONS ON THE AIR 

(as of 1 October 1961) 
AM: 3.635 
FM: 921 
TY: 555 



COLOR PROGRAMMING 
63% AHEAD OF LAST YEAR! 

This year, there'll be 655 more hours of Color pro- 
gramming than last year. The big move to Color TV is 
on. Get the full Color picture today from: W. E. Boss, 
Director, Color Television Coordination, RADIO COR- 
PORATION OF AMERICA, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New 
York 20, New York, Tel: CO 5-5900 






BOUGHT SOLD APPROVED 
Approval : Atlass Broadcasting Com- 
pany, San Francisco, has received per- 
mission from the FCC for the transfer 
of license of KKHI, San Francisco, 
from the Gordon Broadcasting Com- 
pany. The purchase price for KKHI 
was reported as over $700,000. 
On the air: KICL-TV. San Fran- 
cisco, will begin regular programing 
operations on 1 November. The sta- 
tion will operate on Channel 43 with 
its transmitter on mile-high Eshom 
Point in the Sierras. 

Associations 

The West Virginia Broadcasters 
Association has announced its 
new officers for the forthcoming 
year. 

Mel Burka. WTIP. Charleston, has 
been elected president. A. G. Ferrise. 
\^ MMN. Fairmont, to v.p.: and Don 
Haves. \^ KAZ. Charleston, to secre- 
tarv-treasurer. 

Alvin M. King, senior field rep- 
resentative for the NAB. was 
named to the new post of NAB 
field director. 

The appointment was announced 
by William Carlisle. NAB v.p. for 
station services who supervises the 
field staff. 

TV Stations 

An old feud has flared up again 
between AFTRA and NBC TV- 
Chicago stations — WNBQ and ' 
WMAQ. with the FCC in the 
middle. 

As it did three years ago. AFTRA 
has filed a petition with the FCC 
raising the question of "public inter- 
est" in connection with the stations' 
applications for renewals of license 

The union again wants the Com- 
mission to define its concept of publie 
service in relation to charges lodged 
bv AFTRA. The l-^ic sripe: the sta 
tions don't use enough local talent. 

Sears, Roebuck introduced, last 
week, a new line of color tv seU 
in 100 major cities. 

Under the company's brand name 
of Silvertone. the new color se's uti- 
lize a high fidelity American-made 
picture tube reported to give 50 c < 
brighter picture than previous models. 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 196 



L 






Ideas at work. 

• KDAL-TV, Duluth, Minn., got 
together with the drug companies in 
its area for a campaign to counteract 
the recent negative image of the drug 
industry. 

• KTRK-TV, Houston, has set 
up a bandstand in Herman Park, em- 
ployed the top military band in the 
southwest, and invited the public 
out on weekend afternoons to hear 
them and sing with them from time 
ito time. 

• WABC-TV, New York, v.p. and 
general manager Joseph Stamler has 
been named chairman for the New 
,York radio and tv industry's cam- 
paign for B'nai B'rith youth services. 
'Mortimer Weinbach, ABC v.p. and 
general counsel, was appointed chair- 
"man of the labor relations division 
and Howard W. Cosell, ABC radio 
and tv sports broadcaster was named 
chairman of the sports division of the 
campaign. 

• WLOS-TV, Asheville, N. C, 
bombarded local towns with hundreds 
of balloons carrying a printed mes- 
sage for the premier of Ripcord and 
father fall shows. 

• WLW-I, Indianapolis, chartered 
an Indianapolis city bus, kept it on 

regularly scheduled run and, invited 
he public to ride free. All this was 
for the Kick-off of ABC-TV's Bus 
Stop. 

Kudos: KRCA, L.A., won three 
3olden Mike Awards from the Radio- 
Tv Association of Southern California 
. . WHNB-TV, West Hartford, 
Conn., received the public interest 
award from the National Safety Coun- 
il for the sixth consecutive vear . . . 
WBKB, Chicago, and its fm affili- 
ite, WENR-FM, Chicago, has been 
warded a Citation by the U.S. Air 
. ? orce for their public service contri- 
butions. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 
lack A. Scott to account executive 
it WTVR-TV. Columbus, from radio 
station WTVN, Columbus . . . Je- 
•ome J. Klasman to account execu- 
te at WTOP-TV, Washington, D. C. 
) . . J. Ralph Crutchfield to station 
tales supervisor at ARB . . . Warren 
p. Doremus to director of news and 
mblic affairs at WHEC and WHEC- 
jTV, Rochester, New York . . . Donn 
Shelton to promotion manager at 
|wlTI-TV. Milwaukee . . . Jack 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



Davies to account executive at KING- 
TV, Seattle . . . Robert A. Fishman 

to local sales staff of WTTG-TV, 
Washington, D. C, from commercial 
manager of WAMS, Wilmington, Del. 

Offbeat sales: KNXT, L.A., has 

sold the Harwyn Publishing Company 
(Grant) an extensive schedule of 
spots to promote Art Linkletter's En- 
cylopedia For Children. 

Birthday party: KGUN-TV, Tuc- 
son, celebrated the new tv year with 
a kind of New Year's eve party. Holly- 
wood stars came out to Tucson for 
the two-hour live remote telecast. 

Unveiling note: WOC-TV's new 

tower and transmitter got its dedica- 
tion 5 October with local state and 
national figures attending a recep- 
tion. 

Radio Stations 

The National Spanish Language 
Network has appointed a com- 
mittee to study the rate pattern 
with a view towards possible re- 
vision. 

At present a flat rate covers use 
of the NSLN, but under considera- 
tion are sectional rate patterns for 
accounts needing advertising help 
in certain specified areas. 

Here's something novel in politi- 
cal campaigning: Sponsorship of 
a football game. 

The Republican Town Committee 
of Wallingford, Conn., is picking up 
the tab on the broadcast of a high 
school football game to be broadcast 
by WMMW, Meriden. 

RAB reported last week that its 



prediction of last spring came 
true: For the July-September 
period of this year radio led tv 
in the number of people reached 
and the daily number of people 
exposed. 

In exposure, radio exceeded tv 
at a daily rate of 6.9 million on the 
average. 

The average number of people 
reached for the period was 7.9% 
greater than for the same period in 
1960 when radio led tv for eight 
summer weeks. 

An Under-Sheriff of a jail in Den- 
ver has forbid radio KTLN to be 
heard in the county jail. 

The action was taken, so the station 
feels, so the prisoners could not hear 
the editorial comment and news 
stories about the scandal in the Den- 
ver Police department. 

Ideas at work: 

• WITH, Baltimore, dj and of- 
ficial Baltimore shelternaut, broke the 
national endurance record of 240 
hours and is continuing in the shelter. 

• WDAU, Scranton, ran a spot 
campaign to sell a railroad car. The 
car, a former VIP special Pullman, 
sold for $6,000. 

• Westinghouse Broadcasting 
Company has sent around to the 
trade highlights from its retrospec- 
tive series of 16 half-hour programs 
entitled Memoirs of the Movies. It 
was produced in cooperation with the 
Oral History Research Project of Co- 
lumbia University and was four years 
in the making. 

Kudos: WMCR, Oneida, N.Y., pres- 
ident Dick Mills has had a day in 
Oneida proclaimed in his name. Mills 
is leaving for Berlin where he will 



FULL-LENGTH FEATURE FILMS 
ON COLOR TV 

This season, "Saturday Night at the Movies" will bring to the 
Color Television screen such color film classics as "There's 
No Business Like Show Business" and "Halls of Montezuma." 
No wonder everybody's moving up to Color. What about you? 
Get the full Color picture from: W. E. Boss, Director, Color 
Television Coordination, RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA, 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y., Tel: CO 5-5900 



63 



broadcast direct, covering New York, 
Massachusetts, and Philadelphia . . . 
\\ FBM, Indianapolis, Marthabel 
Geisler was presented a plaque in 
thai ciiv by the American W omen in 
Radio and Television "in honor of 
her 31 years of service to the broad- 
cast industry" . . . WNNJ, Newton, 
Y .1.. general manager Ronald Hick- 
man was reelected president of the 
\rw Jersey Associated Press Radio 
Association at its annual meeting in 
Atlantic Citj ... In a letter to WMCA, 
New ^ ork, the Federation of the 
Handicapped praised the station for 
is outstanding work in securing jobs 
for handicapped workers. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: 
David Green to director of advertis- 
ing and promotion for KMBC. Kan- 
sas City . . . Suzy Simpson to pro- 
motion and merchandising director at 
KFJZ. Ft. Worth. Texas . . . William 
Shcla to sales manager at KA\0. 
Seattle . . . Mike Hauptman to di- 
rector of advertising and promotion 
at \Y ABC, New York from program 
department at the same station . . . 
John F. Crohan to v.p. and general 
i„. r -t WCOP-AM-FM. Boston 



. . . Ray Miller, news director at 
KPRC. Houston, to assistant to the 
manager in charge of news . . . 
Robert O'Brien to administrative 
assistant at KGMS, Sacramento . . . 
Richard B. Wheeler, president and 
general manager at KRIZ. Phoenix, 
announced the resignation of two of 
the station's top executives . . . 
Richard J. Kelliher to mid-west 
manager of WNEW, New York na- 
tional sales . . . E. J. Halm to man- 
ager of WABJ, Adrian. Mich., from 
commercial manager of the same sta- 
tion . . . George Palmer to general 
manager of WSAT-FM, Cincinnati. 

Hapny anniversary: Leon Racu- 
sin, WCFL, Chicago, sales executive, 
celehrated his 20th year with the sta- 
tion last month. 

New affiliation: The QXR Network 

has added four new affiliates during 
the month of October: WTCX-FM. 
Tampa; KPFM, Portland, Ore.; 
KLSN-FM, Seattle, and WDTM-FM, 
Detroit. 

Program notes: Storz Broadcast- 
ing Company has bought a series of 




NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 

Population 1320.100 Drug Sales $ 40,355,000 

Households 423,600 Automotive Sales $ 299,539,000 

( onsumer Spendable Income General Merchandise $ 148,789,000 

MJiil, 1(59,000 Total Retail Sales $1,286,255,000 
Food Sales $ 300,486,000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 71.7% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to March, 1961 ARB we average 71.7% share of audience from 
9 a.m. to midnight, 7 days a week in Monroe metropolitan trade area. 



KNOE-TV 

Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 



CBS • ABC 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 



Tin onl) commercial ! V station licensed to 
Monroe 

Photo /■ ion ni Wohasco Industries, Inc., manufacturers of the finest carpels 

and f Mississippi. 



"featurettes" entitled Teen-Beat and 
produced by Sound Ideas. It consists 
of 25 different tape recorded featur- 
ettes per week. 

Offbeat sale: WAVE, Louisville, 
has sold to General Electric the com- 
plete season of the Louisville Orches- 
tra. The schedule includes nine con- 
certs. 

Daffydil: KOL, Seattle, wants to 
break a world record for the greatest 
number of records played during a 
two week period. The station is giv- 
ing $1300 in prizes away to listeners 
who count the records and send their 
entrv to the station by telegram. 

Call letter change: KQBY, the 

MBS outlet in San Francisco, changed 
call letters 16 October to KKHI. The 
change was effected by the new owner, 
Frank Atlass who bought KQBY from 
the Gordon group. 

Networks 

Jack Paar has signed a new con- 
tract with NBC and will begin a 
weekly series of prime-time pro- 
grams next fall. 

Paar will terminate his participa- 
tion in the present Jack Paar Show on 
30 March 1962. The NBC TV late 
evening program will continue Mon- 
day-through-Friday nights with an- 
other outstanding personality — as 
host. 

New affiliate: A new radio station 
in Syracuse, N. Y., WQSR, which 
began operating this week, has been 
signed as an affiliate of the ABC 
Radio Network. This brings to 385 
the total number of station affiliated 
with ABC. 

Kudos: CBS president, Dr. Frank 
Stanton, was awarded the Cultural 
Leadership Award of the Sterling 
Silversmiths Guild of America in 
ceremonies at the Museum of Con- 
temporary Crafts in New York City. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Daniel 

P. Galogley to manager of station 
clearance at ABC Radio Network 
from account service representative 
at the same network . . . Alfred J. 
Harding to director of sales plan- 
ning at CBS news division from sales 



64 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



nanager for public affairs programs 
it the same network . . . George P. 
'hillips to account executive at ABC 
fV, Chicago sales staff from sales 
presentation and promotion writer at 
VBC. 

Vogram note: ABC TV has sold 
he Wide World of Sports to Gillette 
Maxon) and Liberty Mutual In- 
urance (BBDO) for sponsorship 
iundays (5-6:30), starting 7 Janu- 
ry; NBC TV will next season have a 
.aurel & Hardy cartoon series, in 
olor, with the material suggested by 
le surviving member of the team, 
tan Laurel, and Larry Harmon Pic- 
ures producing. 

Representatives 



I-R Television, Inc., has an- 
lounced an innovation in billing- 
rivoice systems which should re- 
uce the paper work. 

After several months of investiga- 
on by a management consultant 
rm, the conclusion was reached to 
stablish a procedure for one inclu- 
ve sales order, contract, billing 
dger and monthly invoice. 

After one typing of this by H-R, the 

ency or station can reproduce as 
jiany copies as needed. 

The form also carries a statement 
■tifying that broadcasts have been 

ade and logged. 

s a result of a meeting 25 Sep- 
mber, the Radio and Television 

epresentatives Association of 

tlanta announced officers and 
rectors for the coming year. 

I New officers for the association are: 
■esident: Dick Hunter, Holling- 
ry; v. p., Joe Sierer, Petry; secre- 
cy-treasurer: John Hicks, H-R Reps. 
Elected to the board of directors 
re: Frank Rice. "Dutch" Savage, 
and Bill McRae (past 



ck Walker, 
esident) . 



^ 



p appointments : WLBW-TV. 

i new tv station in Miami, to H-R 
;ps . . . Bernard Howard & Co., 

lich represents KGFJ. Hollywood, 
three major markets will also rep 
station in San Francisco . . . 
!GM, San Diego, to National 
me Sales for the East and Midwest 

OPLE ON THE MOVE : Arthur 

3NSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



J. Decoster to account executive at 
ABC TV National Station Sales, Chi- 
cago . . . Bill Keup to AM Radio 
Sales, Chicago, as an account execu- 
tive . . . Paul C. Holter to account 
executive at NBC Radio Spot Sales 
in Chicago, from Avery-Knodel, San 
Francisco . . . Claire R. Horn to 
director of research and planning for 
Daren F. McGavren, New York . . . 
Samuel Hall, Jr. to radio sales 
manager at the St. Louis office of 
Petry . . . David K. Williams to tv 
sales executive and Seymour Gair and 
John R. Lego to radio sales execu- 
tives, all at RKO General . . . Rich- 
ard J. Kelliher to Midwestern man- 
ager WNEW Radio National Sales. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Sam- 
uel Hall, Jr., has been appointed 
radio sales manager for the St. Louis 
office of Petry. For the past 11 years 
he has been an account executive at 
KXOK, St. Louis. 

Film 

D. B. "Skip" Creaser, associated 
with Consolidated Film Indus- 
tries for the past 10 years, has 
purchased IdentiColor Labora- 
tory. 

It will operate out of its new loca- 
tion in Hollywood. The seller was 
the H L Instrument Company of 
Pasadena. 

Kudos : ZIV-UA's Ripcord and Man 
and The Challenge were recipients of 
an "outstanding public service award" 
from the United States Army "for 
presenting the vital and significant 
story of the Department of the Army 
to a major audience of the American 
people. 



Sales: Warner Bros. Films of the 
50's have been scheduled for tele- 
casting in color by: WNBC-TV, New 
York; KQTV, Ft. Dodge, Iowa; 
WISH-TV, Indianapolis; WFLA-TV, 
Tampa; KOTV, Tulsa; WOR-TV, 
New York; KHJ-TV, L. A.; WGN- 
TV, Chicago; WSB-TV, Atlanta; 
KMJ-TV, San Francisco; KPRC-TV, 
Houston; WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee; 
KCRA-TV Sacramento. Calif.; 
WNEM-TV, Saginaw; WWLP, 
Springfield, Mass.; KOGO-TV, San 
Diego, Calif.; KTVU, San Francisco; 
KSLA-TV, Shreveport. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Ernest 
Motyl to sales manager of MGM 
Telestudios from head of the New 
York office of MGM-TV . . . Harold 
D. Tunis to midwest division account 
executive for Seven Arts Associated 
. . . Howard Christensen to v.p. 
of Television Arts & Producers Corp. 
. . . Daniel Wilson to v.p. and ad- 
ministrative head of Jules Power Pro- 
ductions. 

Trade Dates 

The North Carolina Association 
of Broadcasters will hold their 
annual convention 6 and 7 No- 
vember. 

It's set for the Mid-Pines Club in 
Southern Pines. One of the speakers 
during the first session will be Com- 
missioner Bob Bartley. 

0> 
Other trade dates: The Middle 
Atlantic Regional Industrial Ad- 
vertising Conference will be held 
16 November at the Marriott Motor 
Hotel in Philadelphia ... The Ne- 
braska Broadcasters Association. 
20 and 21 November at Grand Island 
. . . New York State Broadcasters 



KRAFT BUYS COLOR TV FOR 
THE FIFTH STRAIGHT YEAR 

Kraft knows from experience that Color commercials 
sell. What Color does for Kraft it could do for your 
product, too. Get the full Color TV story today. W. E. 
Boss, Director, Color Television Coordination, RADIO 
CORPORATION OF AMERICA, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 
New York 20, New York, Tel: CO 5-5900 



65 




AM's Best 5 KW Buy! 

The unique PA circuit in ITA's 
5 kw AM transmitter operates 
with about 90% efficiency. 
Only five tube types used and 
total tube complement is nine. 
Makes maintenance simple 
and economical. Checkthese 
advantages: • Solid State Rec- 
tifiers • Conelrad and Remote 
Control Provisions • Power 
Cutback to 1 kw • Automatic 
Recycling • Free Installation 
Supervision. It's value packed! 
For complete information 
write ITA Dept. BJ-1. 



ITA Electronics Corporation 

BROADCAST DIVISION 
Lansdowne, Pennsylvania 



Association 1962 Legislative Dinner, 
6 March in Albany. 

Equipment 

TV Zoomar has made available 
new remote control lenses called 
the Super Universal Zoomar 
Model B. 

The speed of zoom and focus can 
be controlled at any distance from the 
camera, with an overall zoom range 
of 2^2 to 72 inches. Size of the 
lenses has been reduced but the weight 
remains the same. 

Another feature: it mounts quickly 
and easily on all 3 and 4^ inch 
image orthicon cameras. 

ITA has appointed Westrox as 
exclusive international distribu- 
tor for ITA's complete line of 
broadcast equipment. 

This offers ITA, as R. Paul Corn- 
stock, Jr., ITA v.p. and sales director 
pointed out, complete coverage of 
the worldwide market. 

ITA will exhibit its full line of am 
and fm transmitters at the broad- 
casters convention in Mexico City 
this month. 

A five percent price increase on 
equipment manufactured by 
RCA's broadcast and tv division 
goes into effect 1 November. 

Boost applies to transmitting, stu- 
dio and relay equipment used in tv- 
radio and closed circuit industries. 

Reason given for the hike: in- 
creased engineering and manufactur- 
ing costs "involved in turning out 
the more complex equipment required 
by current high standards of broad- 
casting performance." 

Idea in action : Shure Bros., Evans- 
ton manufacturer of mike and stereo- 



high fidelity components has just 
named the winners of its theatrical 
performers contest. First prize — a 
free recording session at a studio of 
their choice — was won by the Eligi- 
bles, an L.A. vocal quartet. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE : Gerald 
H. Reese, named coordinator of sales 
promotion and public relations for 
Shure Bros.; Chris Bach, manager 
of service and rentals of Caldwell 
Equipment, Toronto. 

Public Service 

Public service in action: 

• WREX-TV, Rockford, 111., took 
a hand in promoting the patriotic 
"Freedom Week" as proclaimed bv 
the City of Rockford. The week, which 
included rallies, civic functions, and 
store tie-ins, had as its purpose the 
contrast of communism with the 
American free enterprise system and 
to realistically assess the problems 
that face our country. 

• WPRO-TV, Providence, R. I., I 
was the assembly place last week for | 
the entire Rhode Island Congressional 
delegation. Both Senators and Con- l 
gressman appeared on a live telecast 
on the general subject of the achieve- 
ments of the 87th Congress. 

• KALL, Salt Lake City, launched 
a high school safe driving contest on 
its Bob Barnett Show as part of an 
extensive drive to train youths in the 
ways of safe driving. Prizes were 
offered for the best slogans sent in by 
Utah's high school populace. 

• WLOF-TV, Orlando, Fla., has 
a daily program called Orbit as a 
public service project for Fire Pre- 
vention Week. Lowell Fenner, per- 
sonality of the show, gave a demon- 
stration of a jump into a rescue net 
for one program. 



Q 

A 



# Can BONDED service my 
transcriptions, slides and 
props? 



BONDED 

TVFI] 



• Yes, this is part of BONDED's 
agency service. 




CHICAGO 
LOS ANGELES 
TORONTO 



A Division of 

NOVO INDUSTRIAL CORP. 



66 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



• WFLA, radio and tv, Tampa, 
Fla., presented, for the third straight 
year, a check for $350 to the State of 
Florida Champion Dairy Judging 
team. This year's winner was sent to 
the national competition in Iowa 
where they finished third. 

• KFRC, San Francisco, is cur- 
rently running its second annual 
United Crusade Slogan Contest on 
behalf of the Crusade's 1961 fund 
drive for the community. Listeners 
are asked to send in what they think 
would be the best slogan for next 
year's United Crusade. 

• Herbert E. Evans, president of 
Peoples Broadcasting Corp., who just 
returned from a world tour, was guest 
speaker at the annual dinner of the 
YMCA of greater New York. In his 
speech he mentioned that he had been 
surprised to see, wherever he traveled, 
so many young people showing an in- 
terest and taking part in matters re- 
lated to the welfare of their country. 
More on air shelter programs: 
WFRV-TV, Green Bay, has had a 
fall-out shelter test program in opera- 
tion entitled Survival '61. The sta- 
tion's studios have been the meeting 
place of the people, representing the 
public in many walks of life, who are 
interested in implementing the test. 

Kudos: WSB, Atlanta, has been 
cited by the American Cancer Society 
in recognition of "outstanding work 
done by the station in the 1961 Edu- 
cation-Funds Crusade" . . . KLZ-TV, 
Denver, was recipient of the Colorado 
Bar Association's first annual Justice 
Award. The award was made for the 
station's "outstanding efforts in bring- 
ing to the attention of the public the 
vital role of the law, the legal pro- 
fession and the courts in American 
Life." . . . The Louisiana and Texas 
Associations of Broadcasters were 
awarded certificates at the respective 
annual meetings by the American Na- 
tional Red Cross for the efforts of the 
stations involved in broadcasting 
safety information prior to and dur- 
ing Carla. 

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: Ken 

Maiden has been appointed public 
affairs and public service director for 
Miami radio station WGBS . . . Jim 
Monroe to director of public affairs 
at KCMO (AM-FM-TV), Kansas 
City. + 




ir jLvXlN Clr I j.Hj • •• 

INTEGRITY 



Thomas Jonathan Jackson, Lt General C.S.A., remains one of 
the most colorful and studied personalities of the War Between 
the States. A brilliant soldier, this famous Virginian broke the 
rules of war to win. His place in history assured by his military 
genius, this man popularly known as "Stonewall" was also a 
man of great principle and integrity. 

We at Shenandoah Life Stations believe devotion to high princi- 
ples to be essential to the success of all phases of our broad- 
casting services. 

wsls - TV 

ROANOKE , VIRGINIA 
AM 61 • FM 99.1 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
AVERY-KNODEL, INC.. 



M 



'THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE EOR INTEGRITY" 



ANOTHER COLOR TV PREMIERE 

The Bullwinkle Show makes its Color debut this sea- 
son. General Mills and Ideal Toys are the sponsors. 
Learn today why more and more shows and sponsors 
are moving up to Color. Contact W. E. Boss, Director, 
Color Television Coordination, RADIO CORPORATION 
OF AMERICA, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, 
New York, Tel: CO 5-5900 



SPONSOR • 23 OCTOBER 1961 



67 



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These handsome pens will win many friends everywhere for your station: 
Your call letters are beautifully sculptured in 3 Dimensions above the 
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THE TWO F 







ADVERTISING 



It's one of the enigmas of the human mind that most men 

who sell advertising do not "buy" their own philosophies. They have another 

face for this occasion. 

Tho there are exceptions, of course, (and we number some of them among 
our clients) the broadcast industry, as a whole, is a perfect case in point. Last year 
it "sold" over $2,200,000,000 worth of radio and tv time. It "bought" an 
estimated 7-million dollars worth of trade paper advertising; an expenditure of 
about one-third of one percent of total sales. It may have matched that 
expenditure for local advertising— bringing the grand total up to 
two-thirds of one percent. 

It advocates the concept that industry should allocate three to five percent 
for promotion but it "buys" about 20% of what it "sells". 

We wonder what would happen to the broadcast industry, itself, if other 
industries used their ratio. Thank Heaven it's not likely. 

But more important— we wonder why more broadcasters do not realize 
that if they can do so well with so little, what an enormous potential there 
actually is out there— and what successes might be achieved if the 
industry "really believed" in advertising and allocated the same budget for 
themselves that they so loudly proclaim for others. 

The stakes are a piece of $10,000,000,000 (ten-billion) more American dollars. 




JAY VICTOR & ASSOCIATES, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 




with the 
BIG CHEESE in Wisconsin 

Not only 3^ million people 
but 2 million cows. 



WEAU-TV 

f EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN 




10 East 52nd St., New York 

* 

LUNCHEON... COCKTAILS . . . DINNER 

At the piano: Jules Kuti, 5 to 11 P.M. 

PLaza 10845 • Closed Sundays 




Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS! 



Island 
ndustry 



John F. Crohan has been named v.p. and 
general manager of WCOP-AM-FM, 
Boston. For the last five years he has 
served as v.p. and station manager at 
WICE, Providence, R. I., and has been as- 
sociated with major Rhode Island radio 
properties for more than ten years. An Air 
Force veteran, he has attended Providence 
area schools. Crohan is an officer of the 

Broadcasters' Association and is chairman of the 

Advisory Committee, Conelrad. 



Robert P. Schroeder has been appointed 
sales manager of KYW-TV, Cleveland. He 
is, at present, sales representative with 
TvAR in Chicago. He replaces Albert 
Krivin who recently became general man- 
ager of KMBC-TV, Kansas City, Mo. 
Schroeder began his broadcasting career 
in 1946 as a salesman for WCAE, Pitts- 
burgh. Five years later he moved to the 
sales department of WDTV, Pittsburgh's first tv station 
as KDKA-TV. In 1951, he joined CBS Network sales. 




now known 




Sheldon Van Dolen has been made gen- 
eral manager of WBFM, the Muzak owned 
New York City FM outlet. He was form- 
erly account executive at Blair Television 
Associates and Weed & Co. Prior to enter- 
ing the representation field, Van Dolen 
was a sales presentation writer for Amer- 
ican Broadcasting Company, and before 
that was an assistant account executive at 
McCann-Erickson Advertising agency. He will supervise the entire 
WBFM operations, including a revision of its program structure. 

S. Campbell Ritchie has been appointed 
president and general manager of CKLW 
radio and tv, the RKO General station in 
Detroit. He has been with the station since ' 
1936 and has served as announcer, vocalist, 
traffic manager, program director and oper- 
ations manager. Ritchie came to the sta- 
tion from CHML, Hamilton, Ontario, 25 
years ago where he was staff announcer. 
During World War II, he wrote, produced, and announced for BBC 
and was a major in the Canadian Army. 




72 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 





H 
t 












• 


V 




f 










^^^ 


c 


^^ 







frank talk to buyers of 
air media facilities 



The seller's viewpoint 



On September 26, 1961, Ward Dorrell research v.p., Blair Co., made a plea 
for qualitative research to the Louisiana Broadcasters' convention. This 
week's viewpoint is an excerpt from that speech in which Dorrell states that 
". . . the best defense against automative buying is qualitative research." 
He contends that radio needs this type of research more than tv, and, also 
it is necessary in order to pin down the evaluation of ratings and keep selec- 
tions error- free. He states: "If we use the right kind of fact getting . . . then 
we have basic, sound sales support that cannot be shaken by ratings . . ." 




U 



The need for qualitative research 



nquestionably, the best defense against automative 
buying is qualitative research and by the term "qualita- 
tive' I mean any sort of measurement of audience charac- 
teristics other than sheer number of bodies. You and I 
know, of course, that ratings are indispensable and in noth- 
ing that I say today do I wish to imply any r derogation 
of their importance. 

^ e all know that two identical cost-per-1,000 program- 
ing efforts can have widely varying sales-effectiveness. Too 
many factors enter the given situation to pin down the 
evaluation on ratings alone — and limited to automated 
ratings, buying selections would be shot full of error. But 
equipped with qualitative information — we can find out 
how to develop a payoff audience. If we use the right 
kind of fact-getting — the qualitative approach — then we 
have a basic, sound sales support that cannot be shaken 
by the ratings-only short-sightedness, or bright hunches 
and precedent, bad habit, and the personal and emotional 
factors that effect the buyer-seller relation. 

Four years ago one of the great stations we represent, 
WHDH in Boston, produced one of the first qualitative 
research studies that I know of. This study was done by 
the Pulse Inc. and attempted to determine the reasons caus- 
ing people to turn on the radio, program preferences, 
awareness of network stations, extent of out-of-home radio 
audience, Boston station preferences and the station image. 

Other qualitative reports for our stations followed in 
rapid succession and to date 36 Blair represented radio 
stations ha\e ordered and utilized similar qualitative re- 
search. 

After the production of a station image report, what 
can we do for an encore? Well, if we have a station image 
in our hands why not produce a station audience image? 
Such a report provides you with specific facts about your 
audience far and beyond the ordinary treatment of how 
many men, women, teen-agers and children. What kind of 
people listen to or watch your station programing? What 
do these listeners or viewers think of vour station and 
what is much more important, are they people who are 



capable of purchasing the product you advertise? Many 
of our stations who have purchased station image reports 
have followed them with audience image reports. A typi- 
cal report of this nature would obtain information about 
such factors as these: 

1. How much money did you (your wife, the lady of the 
house) spend for food and groceries in the past seven 
days? 

2. Did the head of your family (or you — if the head is 
interviewed) take a trip during the last year (exclud- 
ing weekends) ? 

a. Was this a business or vacation trip? 

b. If you took a vacation trip, about how much did 
the entire trip cost (food, travel, hotel, etc.) ? 

3. Some big corporations pride themselves in knowing 
how many Americans own stock in a company. Do you, 
or the head of your family, own stocks or bonds or 
securities in any company? 

4. Do you, or any member of vour family own an auto- 
mobile? 

a. Was it bought new or used? 

b. What year, model? 

5. What kind of work does the head of your family do? 

6. What is the total amount of your entire family income 
per year? That is, the salaries of all the working mem- 
bers and their income such as investment and business 
operations. 

7. What was the last grade in school of the head of the 
family ? 

Armed with this kind of information vou will find your 
prospective buyer, his supervisor, media directors and 
account executives eager to receive it. Broadcasting is way 
behind competititve media in the production of this kind 
of information. 

It has been our experience that our radio stations need 
qualitatiye research to a greater extent than our tv sta- 
tions. However, the time is rapidly approaching particu- 
larly with the threat of automated buying when tv sta- 
tions will find this type of research invaluable. ^ 



SPONSOR 



23 OCTOBER 1961 



SPONSOR 



Still-the Spot Radio Dilemma 

Indications reaching sponsor this week are that spot ra- 
dio's 4th quarter figure will be nothing to cheer about. 

And this at a time when spot tv and network tv are moving 
ahead, when local radio continues its healthy climb, when 
even network radio shows signs of vigor. 

It is a baffling, exasperating phenomenon, and it has been 
for a number of years. 

sponsor has said it so many times we're sick of repeating 
it now — there is absolutely no reason for spot radio's poor 
showing in the national advertising picture — no reason in- 
herent in radio as a medium, at any rate. 

But something obviously is radically wrong — either in the 
way spot radio is sold or not sold or the way in which it is 
bought or not bought. Somewhere there is an answer to the 
problem, a solution to the dilemma. 

We urge increasingly vigorous efforts by station manage- 
ments and by station representatives and by industry asso- 
ciations to root out the causes of Spot Radio's sub-par posi- 
tion and come up with practical anwers. 

Presenting Timebuyers' Corner 

This week, we're proud to present (pages 39 and 41) a 
new sponsor feature which we predict will become one of 
the best-read sections of our book. 

Timebuyers' Corner is designed to provide a kind of "per- 
sonal column" for all those engaged in the actual purchase 
of radio and tv time, the highly influential agency media 
people whose decisions determine the broadcast placement 
of advertising funds. 

Timebuyers' Corner, as you can see, will report on both 
personal and business doings, not only news of engagements, 
weddings, births and other special events, but job changes, 
new account assignments, and human interest stories. 

In charge of Timebuyers' Corner is Associate Editor Jack 
Lindrup, who reports he is hungry for every item of time- 
buyer news you can supply. 

He's particularly anxious for out of New York news, about 
timebuyers in Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis, San Francisco, 
Atlanta, Houston, Los Angeles and every other agency cen- 
ter. Send in an item today! ^ 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Great- impersonation: Who's the 
guy going around impersonating a 
sponsor editor, sounding like come- 
dian Shelley Berman, and pumping 
ad agencies for information on who's 
producing and/or appearing in cer- 
tain tv commercials? If he's not 
Shelley Berman, he ought to call Art 
Poretz at Mogul, Williams & Savior 
right away, because he sounds so 
much like Shelley Berman the agency 
may be able to use him in one spoof- 
type commercial or another. 

And regardless of whether the guy 
is or not Shelley Berman, and does 
or does not work in a Mogul com- 
mercial, he ought to put Poretz out 
of his misery and tell him what's 
going on. Poretz hasn't been the 
same since the Bermanesque voice 
identified itself as Hy Kaplan of 
sponsor magazine and fired ques- 
tions about the tv commercials. Sus- 
picious from the start, Art fended 
off the questions, and finally asked 
if it wasn't Shelley Berman. "Yeah, 
you've got me dead to rights; I'm the 
guy who prances around on the Paar 
show," he replied. 

What's the next disaster?: When 
newsman Lee Tucker, of KPRC-TV, 
Houston, goes on vacation, Texans 
know a disaster will occur. This 
vacation, the first in two years, 
Tucker went to Washington state 
when hurricane Carla hit the Texas 
coast — one of the biggest news stories 
of the year. On previous vacation, 
Tucker was away when a maniac 
bombed Houston's Poe Elementary 
School. The station is thinking of 
offering Tucker's vacation schedule to 
the Civil Defense officials. 

Pair of Jacks: One secretary at an 
ad agency congratulated another on 
getting "The Jackie Look." 

"Oh, you've noticed that I look 
like Jackie Kennedy?" 

"No," said the other. "Like Jackie 
Ghason." 

White House Rock: Speaking 
of Jackie (Mrs. JFK that is), she 
has a decorating problem with those 
famous White House rocking chairs. 
"A rocker is a rocker, and there isn't 
much you can do to make it look like 
am thing else," she laments. 



71 



sponsor 



23 OCTOBER 1961 




To 



because 
oledo is 

F) different from 
hiladelphia. . . 




nd because people are different in different markets . . . Storer programming is difTe 
lexible format to fit the needs of each community . . . making it local in evei 
VSPD-TV* and WSPD-RADIOt rate first in Toledo . . . WIBG dominates Ph 
. . Further evidence that Storer quality-controlled, local programming is liked, 
•torer representatives have up-to-the-minute availabilities. Important Stations 

Ziehen— June 1961 
°uhl— July- August 1961 


rent! We put together a 
•y respect. Result? Both 
iladelphia in all surveys! 
watched and listened to. 
In Important Markets. 


LOS ANGELES 
KGBS 


PHILADELPHIA 
WIBG 


CLEVELAND 
WJW 


WHEELING 
WWVA 


TOLEDO 
WSPD 


DETROIT 

WJBK 


STORER 

BR0ADCJST1SG COMPANY 


MIAMI 
WGBS 


MILWAUKEE 

WITI-TV 


CLEVELAND 

WJW-TV 


ATLANTA 

WAGA-TV 


TOLEDO 

WSPD-TV 


DETROIT 

WJBK-TV 

















"..PERSPECTIVE ON GREATNESS excellent!.." 



"..exceptional prestige series for our client.." 



"Congratulations ! 



" . . superb. . " 



" . .proud to show 



. .a truly yt&.S. 



". .salable 




..high caliber television.." 



WHAT THEY SAY 



"..impressed with concept.. 



them in prime time.." 



PERSPECTIVE ON GREATNESS outstanding!" 



% fresh documentary presentation.." 



commodity wide prospect appeal.. 



"..a coup d'etat to have exclusive.." 



PERSPECTIVE ON GREATNESS 



26 GREAT NEW HOUR-LONG DOCUMENTARIES 



A HEARST METROTONE PRODUCTION 




FILMS INC. • SUITE 3200 
THE CHRYSLER BUILDING 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. MU 7-0870 



3© OCTOBER l««j 
40< a copy • SO m ymmr 



PO 




SOR 



WEEKLY MAGAZINE RADIO/TV ADVERTISERS USE 



°*-*~ 
-»*•-»« 



-# «. 



•r l o> 



WITH 



26 HOUR-LONG 

GREAT 

GREATER 



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IMPACT- BECAUSE 



THE REAL THING IS THE 



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FILMS INC. • SUITE 3200 
THE CHRYSLER BUILDING 
NEW YORK 17. N. Y. MU 7-0870 








1961 REPORT: 
NEW TREND IN 
FARM RADIO/TV 

10th Annual Report by 
sponsor reveals more 
service programing — 
partly Minow- induced 

Page 27 



Station policy 
on 40-second 
breaks a riddle 

Page 32 

Radio and 
print aren't 
copy cats 

Page 34 

Network radio's 
newest sell: 
'money' markets 

Page 36 



DIGEST 











Yes, sir! And our 

campaign is going great 

on KRNT-TV, a most 

unusual station! 



The preferred stations in this "preferred city" are KRNT Radio and TV. 
leaders in ratings, leaders in community service . . . leaders in the billing 
parade. Our share of local television business in this major 3-station 
market has always averaged nearly 80*7 ; our local radio business has 
always been way ahead in a 6-station market. 

Most folks don't realize this about Des Moines — we're 36th in the FCC 
list of markets according to appropriation of national spot TV revenue. 
The same sources prove that Iowa's capital and largest city is a good 
radio market, too. 

You knoii you're right when you buy these most unusual stations. KRNT 
Radio and TV, the stations people believe in and depend upon. And you 
know you're buying at the same low rate as everyone else when you deal 
with these responsible stations. 

Buy "the live ones" — KRNT Radio and TV, Cowles stations ably repre- 
sented by The Katz Agency. 



KRNT 



RADIO AND TV - Des Moines 

An operati and Broadc 




Gtow DBDpollaDDfi k GDq© 2 nd ? 



Just as important as one's 2nd shoe is 
Michigan's 2nd TV market ... that rich 
industrial outstate area made up of 
LANSING-FLINT-JACKSON and 20 
populous cities . . . 3,000,000 potential 
customers . . . 684,200 TV homes (ARB 
March '60) . . . served exclusively by 
WJIM-TV for 10 years. 



WJ I M -TV 



BASIC 




Strategically located to exclusively serve LANSING . . . FLINT. . . JACKSON 
Covering the nation's 37th market. Represented by Blair TV. WJIM Radio by MASLA 



T 




YOU CAN'T SELL 

THE SIOUX FALLS 

MARKET WITH A 

SLIP LIKE THIS! 

And there's no need to let thousands of con- 
sumers slip out of your reach because your 
tv message is out of their sight. Fortunately, 
one television facility has been specifically 
engineered to get you the entire Sioux Falls 
trading area. KELO-LAND TV. Your message, 
originating on KELO tv Sioux Falls, sweeps 
through KELO-LAND'S 103-county spread. It 
never misses a county. And KELO-LAND TV 
never misses a bet to back your message 
with intelligent promotional support! 



CBS • ABC 




\ 



kelQland 

KELO-tv SIOUX FALLS; and interconnected 
KDLO-tv Aberdeen, Huron, Watertown 
KPLO-tv Pierre, Valentine, Chamberlain 

JOE FLOYD, President 

Larry Bcntson, Vice-Pres. • Evans Nord, Cen. Mgr. 

Represented nationally by H-R 

IEEX35J 



Midcontinent Broadcasting Group 
KELO LAND/rv and radio Sioux Falls, S. D.; 
WLOL/am, fm Minneapolis-St. Paul; WKOW/am 
and tv Madison, Wis.; KSO radio Des Moines 




© Vol. 15, \o. II • 30 OCTOBER 1961 

SPONSOR 

THC WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



lOth ANNUALiFARM REPORT 

New trends: farm radio/tv '61 

27 Current analysis reveals a rich opportunity for advertising dollars in farm 
broadcasting markets as tv-radio farm directors beef up news and public 
service programs— Pioneer Hi-Bred Corn feels farm radio's value is based 
on sponsorship of service type programs— Statistics on farming's new face 

ARTICLES 

The 40-second break riddle 

32 Mediamen await distinguishable pattern on pricing, pre-emptibility, and 
length of notice before pre-emption; 30's and 40's off to slow start 

Radio and print aren't copy cats 

34 Real-life situation type talk often used on radio commercial copy to equal 
impact of message related visually in print ad says DDB ace copywriter 

Net radio's newest 'sell' 

36 Latest network presentation from NBC Radio breaks tradition of selling 
blanket coverage, puts stress on ability to reach key 10% of U.S. counties 



NEWS: Sponsor- Week 7. Sponsor-Scope 19, Spot Buys 46, Washington 
Week 59, Film Scope 60, Sponsor Hears 62, Sponsor-Week Wrap-Up 66, 
Tv and Radio Newsmakers 72 



DEPARTMENTS: Sponsor Backstage 14, 555 5th 16, Sponsor 
Asks 45, Timebuyer's Corner 49, Seller's Viewpoint 73, Sponsor Speaks 74, 
Ten-Second Spots 74 



Officers: editor and publisher, Norman R. Glenn; executive vice presi- 
dent, Bernard Piatt; vice president and assistant publisher, Arnold Alpert; 
secretary-treasurer, Elaine Couper Glenn. 

Editorial: executive editor, John E. McMUlin; news editor, Ben Bodec; 
managing editor, Alfred J. Jaffe; senior editor, Jo Ranson; midwest editor,! 
Gwen Smart; assistant news editor, Heyward Ehrlich; associate editors, Jackl 
Lindrup, Ben Seff, Ruth Schlanger, Lauren Libow; columnist, Jee Csida; artl 
editor, Maury Kurtz; production editor, Phyllis Trieb; editorial research, Carol \ 
Ferster; reader service, Gail Rubenstein. 

Advertising: assistant sales manager, Willard Dougherty ; southern man 
ager, Herbert M. Martin, Jr.; midwest manager, Paul Blair; western manager, 
George G. Dietrich, Jr.; sales service/production, Lee Mertz. 

Circulation: circulation manager, Jack Rayman; John J. Kelly, Lydia\ 
Martinez. 

Administrative: office manager, Fred Levine; George Becker, Michael! 
Crocco, Syd Guttman, Irene Sulzbach, Geraldine Daych, Jo Ganci, Manueln\ 
Santalla. 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



© 1961 SPONSOR Publications In I 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, Circulation, in i 
Advertising Offices: 555 5th New York 17, MUrray Hilt 7-8080. Chicago Office: 61J 
N. Michigan Av. (11), 664-1166. Birmingham Office: 3617 8th Ave. So., FAirfc* 
2-6528. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Blvd. (28), Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office] 
3110 Elm Av., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada $9 a year. Other 
countries $11 a year. Single copies 40<. Printed U.S.A. Published weekly. 2nd cla< 
postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 



Suddenly 
you 

Made 

the Scene" 




and you truly "belonged there" because you "discov- 
ered" the MOST UNUSUAL Christmas gift-giving idea 
EVER SEEN! In fact, it was especially suited for 
your valuable business associates, friends and 
even employees. 

...and then everyone began to "phone the scene" just 
to say "THANK YOU" for your unique and wonder- 
ful remembrance and thereby open the door to ADDI- 
TIONAL TRANSACTIONS! 




MAIL THIS COUPON. 

TODAY! 



i/ff FOR MORE IHFORMATIOH 
OUT THIS PRESTIGE 
\fT-GI¥IMG IDEA! 



If YOU buy gifts (between $7.50 and $100.00 each), 
you'll surely want to see this unusually practical, sen- 
sationally simple and refreshingly different way of 
saying "THANK YOU" to the people who are 
IMPORTANT TO YOU AND YOUR COMPANY. 



MAIL TO: W Automated Gift Plan, Inc., 80 Park Avenue, New York 16, N. Y. 

Please send further information about your 1961 Gift Bookard program. 

Name of Company _______________^^___^_ 

Address 




4$* 



Zone State. 



We use appro* 



.Gifts in the $7.50 to $100.00 price range. 




The audience is settling 
(on ABC-TV) 



ABC leads on more nights than 
any other network.* 

The restless dial -twisting from new 
show to new show is over. And the 
dial -twisters are beginning to settle 
down comfortably — in front of ABC- 
tuned sets. 

The first report (after all new shows 
had premiered) shows ABC command- 
ing more nights of the week than any 
other network. 

It also shows ABC's Monday-thru- 
Friday evening audience average to be 
greater than any other network's! 



ABC's new shows are demonstrating 
their audience popularity with Ben 
Casey on Monday, Margie on Thursday 
and Target: The Corruptors on Friday. 
Each of the aforementioned front- 
runners ran first in its time period and 
helped give ABC over-all superiority 
on its night. 

From where we sit, the audience 
would seem to be definitely settling on 

ABC Television 



*Source: Nielsen 24 Market TV Report, week ending Oct. 15, 1961. 
Average Audience, Mon. thru Sat., 7:30-1 1 PM; Sun., 6:30-1 1 PM. 




Latest tv and 
radio developments of 
the week, briefed 
for busv readers 



30 October 1961 



SP 




-WEEK 



ABC's COMMANDO RAID 

ABC TV takes Wagon Train from NBC TV in $10 million 
deal, will strip 189 $10 million re-runs day and night 



ABC TV has revived an old tactic 
in the art of networking: the raid. 

Its prize: NBC TV's Wagon Train. 

Starting in the fall of 1962 the 
hour-long series shifts to ABC TV 
for an estimated price to MCA-Revue 
of $10 million for two years' supply. 
The deal includes an additional $10 
million for re-runs of 189 episodes 
to get three plays each in two years. 

ABC TV will telecast new episodes 
of Wagon Train in prime time, prob- 
ably at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. It is 
understood the re-runs will be 
stripped at after 11 p.m. opposite 
Jack Paar and also in the daytime. 

An oddity of the raid is that NBC 
TV owns a piece of Wagon Train — 
around 15 or 20 per cent — and will 
hence collect $3 or $4 million out of 
the $20 million. 

Veterans can't recall anything like 
this NBC-to-ABC switch since the 
Paley talent raids on NBC back in 
the late 1940's, when Jack Benny, 
Edgar Bergen, and Amos 'n' Andy 
were lured over to CBS Radio on 
tax structures that have revolution- 
ized talent payment ever since. 

More than just a top-rate show 
shifts from NBC TV to ABC TV. If 
the later keeps it in its present time 
slot it stands a good chance of domi- 
nating Wednesdays in 1962-63. 

There's still more involved in the 
deal. Advertisers in Wagon Train 
could easily decide to go along for 
the ride. One of them, Ford (JWT) 



is at present an NBC-only adver- 
tiser. Should, for example, Ford be- 
come an ABC-only advertiser, that 
alone would allow ABC TV program- 
ing v.p. Thomas W. Moore to recoup 
his investment in new episodes. 

With a supply of hour-long re-runs 
including Wagon Train — and also in- 
cluding some Twentieth Century Fox 
re-runs which the ABC o&o's pur- 
chased recently— ABC would have a 
distinct post-11 p.m. identity which 
could sell against both Jack Paar 
and the Late Show. 

ABC TV's strategy could be two- 
fold: it could sell the re-runs as net- 
work spot carriers and also leave 
availabilities for ABC TV National 
Station Sales or stations and repre- 
sentatives to sell as announcements. 



Tv calls $18 mil. 
ASCAP fee unfair 

Tv stations feel they are paying 
more than their share for music li- 
cense rights to ASCAP. 

The All-Industry Music License 
Negotiating Committee points out 
that last year tv stations paid $18 
million while radio, which has eight 
times the number of stations and 
uses more music, paid only $10 mil- 
lion. Tv represented 50% of ASCAP's 
income and radio was 39% more. 

Hamilton Shea of WSVA-TV, Har- 
risonburg, Va., committee chairman, 



in a letter to Stanley Adams, ASCAP 
president, asked for the following 
changes when current contracts ex- 
pire on 31 December 1961: 

That films be licensed at the 
source and that stations pay only 
for local productions or other shows 
not yet licensed. 

That tv rate be reduced in line 
with radio rates. 

That lower blanket license fees be 
established for news and public af- 
fairs shows which use music only 
incidentally. 



FCC awards N. Y. ch. 13 
to educational group 

The FCC has approved the 
sale of WNTA-TV, Newark, to 
Educational Television for the 
Metropolitan Area. Inc. Pro- 
tests and court action bv New 
Jersey's Gov. Robert B. Mevner 
are expected. 

Meyner's complaint is that 
the three networks plus station 
groups Metropolitan and RKO 
General put up $2.5 million in 
violation of anti-trust laws, that 
New Jersey has been deprived 
of its only uhf station, and that 
NTA was making a profit bv 
trafficking in licenses. 

Says the FCC: The Justice 
Department has alreadv been 
consulted, the new station would 
give New Jersev more — not less 
— service, and NTA had an un- 
usual service record and wasn't, 
in accepting ETMA's $6.2 mil- 
lion bid. taking the highest of- 
fer. Last week. too. New York 
got its 8th station: WUHF. (See 
page 1CH 



SI'nNSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 



SPONSOR- WEEK/ 30 October 1961 



SAG SETTLES: 'WILD' 
OR LOCAL RATES FOR 
NETWORK CUT-IN SPOTS 

Negotiations between the broad- 
casting advertising industry, the net- 
work, and SAG over "cut-ins," for 
local announcements in network 
shows have resulted in a solution 
which will relieve the industry of the 
threat of retroactivity and provide 
an opportunity for advertisers to 
pick up availabilities in certain net- 
work shows at lower rates. 

The solution provides for talent 
payment either at "wild spot" or lo- 
cal program commercial rates. In 
no case will network rates be asked 
for cut-ins. 

With a single important excep- 
tion, "wild spot" rates apply to per- 
formers in local spot announce- 
ments sold by the local stations but 
used in network programs on time 
released to the local stations. 

The exception is for local spots 
in programs carrying network com- 
mercials which were broadcast on 
the major portion of the network 
between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. current 
New York time. 

New York time is controlling in 
rate decisions. But a show origi- 
nating in Chicago, for example, at 
7:30 p.m. but not carried in New 
York is counted as an 8:30 p.m. New 
York show if half or more the net- 
work carries it. 

In an hour long show carried in 
New York between 7:30-8:30 p.m. the 
first half is "wild spot" and the sec- 
ond half at local program commer- 
cial rate regardless of when stations 
carry the show. In network shows 
such as Marshall Dillon (network 
Gunsmoke re-runs) in which there 
are no network commercials, the 
payment is always at the "wild spot" 
rate. 

In individual markets where no 
network advertiser has placed an 
order — such as a small market — 
availabilities in network shows re- 
leased to stations are at the "wild 
spot" rate also. 



, ..;_ ii&jz. ...... . ■ -' ... 



These walls do not 
a prison make 

For an example of the broad- 
ening and often off character of 
sponsorship, you can cite a re- 
cent combination on WCSH- 
TV, Portland, Me. 

The case: a bomb shelter 
construction company picked 
up the tab for a film documen- 
tary on the state prison. 



DUAL FIRSTS FOR 
KDKA, PITTSBURGH 

KDKA Radio, Pittsburgh, is the 
first station in the country from two 
points of view. 

Historically, the station is recog- 
nized as the first and thus celebrates 
its 41st anniversary on 2 November. 

And in ratings the station has the 
highest quarter-hour average audi- 
ences, Sunday through Saturday, 6 
a.m. to midnight, according to a 
NSI study for June and August 1961. 

According to Nielsen, KDKA de- 
livers a larger audience of radio in 
its average quarter hour than any 
other radio station in the U. S. 



Lodge, Ward letters to 
CBS affils. sound upbeat 

CBS TV affiliates which carry the 
full network commercial schedule 
will have 9-11% greater billings dur- 
ing the fourth quarter of 1961 than 
in 1960, and station payments will 
increase accordingly. 

So stated affiliate relations and 
engineering v.p. William B. Lodge in 
a letter dated 20 October. The letter 
followed by two days another from 
Carl S. Ward, v.p. and director of 
affiliate relations, on the success of 
CBS' morning plan. 

Ward assured stations that al- 
though individual minutes under the 
plan have been selling for far less 
since February, network station pay- 
ments have risen since March. 



WHOM DO YOU TRUST?] 

The season for a barrage of ratings 
claims and counter-claims among 
the tv networks has arrived. 

ABC TV, in its turn, points out 
that it leads on three nights — Mon- 
day, Thursday, and Friday — accord- 
ing to the Nielsen 24 market report 
for 15 October. 

Average ratings from 7:30-11 p.m. 
provided ABC TV with these night 
lead scores: Monday, 18.7; Thursday, 
21.3, and Friday, 19.6. 

The same ratings source gave CBS 
TV the lead on Tuesday, 19.0, and 
Saturday, 23.7, and NBC TV had 
Wednesday, 20.3, and Sunday, 23.2. 

At the low end — scores under 15.0 
— the same report listed ABC TV 
on Tuesday, 14.0; Saturday, 12.2, and 
Sunday, 12.1; CBS TV on Thursday, 
9.7, and NBC TV on Friday, 13.0. 



Petry's fifth seminar on 
promotion and research 

Petry will hold its fifth annual 
seminar on promotion, research, 
and merchandising on 8 November 
in New York in conjunction with 
the BPA Convention. 

The agenda is based on sugges- 
tions from promotion managers of 
stations represented by Petry. 

Four subjects given about equal 
priority were these: station-repre- 
sentative cooperation, presentations, 
research, and merchandising. A 
fifth subject, trade press advertis- 
ing, was regarded as being of slight- 
ly lower importance this year, and a 
sixth is station activity from the 
FCC's viewpoint. 

The meeting will contain open 
discussion, case histories, and brief 
talks by Petry people on the first 
three topics. 

Bob Hutton and Bill Steese will 
moderate; Myra Wheeler will talk on 
s t a t i o n-representative cooperation, 
Jack Carter will discuss presenta- 
tions, and Bob Schneider will talk 
on research. 

The vote was 3-to-l against trade 
press attendance of the seminar. 



8 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 




More congressmen watch the news most on WRC-TV. Were it the proverbial "little bird" that 
told us, we'd hardly mention it. But the Senators and Representatives themselves were the source! 
35% of Congress responded to a special survey completed in July, 1961.* WRC-TV & NBC came out a 
staggering favorite over other Washington stations . . . with 56% more votes than all other stations 
)ombined! This marked preference went to WRC-TV for its complete news coverage, thorough analysis, 
listinguished commentators and wide -range of news and informational programs. We're pleased — 
nit not surprised. WRC-TV has always aimed at and attracted the adult and knowledgeable 
ludiences in Washington. You can attract them too... on WRC-TV, of course! 1I7T) /I rflf 7 ia s l 



-Walter Gerson & Associates. Inc. 



CHANNEL 4 IN WASHINGTON- NBC OWNED 
REPRESENTED BY NBC SPOT SALES 



•ONSOR • 30 OCTOBER 1961 



SPONSOR- WEEK/ 30 October 1961 



FIVE AD TYPES SPEND 
$50 MIL IN NET TV 

Through August 1961 there were 
five kinds of advertisers that had 
spent $50 million or more on net- 
work tv during the present calendar 
year, according to LNA-BAR reports 
released by TvB. 

Biggest classification was food 
and food products, It had billings 
of $90.3 million, up 21.7% over 1960. 

Soaps, cleansers, and polishes 
were second with $57.4 million, up 
26.1%. Drug and remedies rose 
10.8% to $59.8 million. Toiletries and 
toilet goods were up 9.6% to $82.4 
million. Smoking materials in- 
creased 8.4% to $55.4 million. 

For the month of August alone the 
top tv network brand was Camel, 
$927,768, and the top company was 
P&G, $5.2 million. 

Other classifications of advertisers 
which showed substantial increase 
for January-August 1961 over the pre- 
vious year included these: apparel 
& footwear, building materials, con- 
sumer services, gasoline, jewelry- 
optical goods, and sporting goods- 
toys. 

Substantial drops in the same 
period were shown by automotive, 
beer-wine, horticulture, household 
equipment, household furnishings, 
industrial materials, insurance, pub- 
lishing & media, radio-tv-musical, 
and travel-resorts advertiser cate- 
gories. 



TvB meeting in Detroit- 
signs with BBM, Canada 

TvB's most comprehensive annual 
meeting to date is set for 15-17 No- 
vember at the Statler Hilton in De- 
troit. 

Special speakers will include 
Thomas Adams, C-E, and William 
Lewis, K&E. 

Meanwhile TvB of Canada has 
signed an agreement to use all the 
research services of the Bureau of 
Broadcast Measurement. 



10 



WUHF, channel 31, 
New York's 8th. 

I ltra high frequence tv go 
an important boost last week 
as New York City's WUHF 

eighth channel of the area, he 
gan on the air on channel 31 

At the same moment in Wash 
ington FCC chairman Newton 
Minow called for a lobbying 
campaign to make uhf recep- 
tion standard on new tv set-. 

The FCC is investing S2 mil- 
lion in tests to see how uhf tv 
works in a cit\ with high build- 
ings. New \ ork Cit\ has ap- 
propriated $350,000 for pro- 
graming costs. 

The station, which formallv 
opens 5 November, will present 
service programs for the police 
and fire department, education- 
al, cultural, and other non- 
commercial programing. 



XMAS TV TOY ADS 

TO REACH $14 MILLION 

Pre-Christmas advertising by toy 
companies will be up about 1/3 this 
year and should be around $14 mil- 
lion. 

Remco (Webb Advertising) allo- 
cated $2.3 million for the fourth 
quarter of 1961 compared to $1.5 
million last year — a 50% rise. 

Louis Marx has $2 million ear- 
marked for pre-Christmas ads, a 
300% increase over last year's $0.5 
million. 

Ideal Toy has $2 million for Christ- 
mas advertising, compared to last 
year's $1 million. 



Missouri Broadcasters meet 

The fall meeting of the Missouri 
Broadcasters Association was held 
in Jefferson City at the Governor 
Hotel 27 October this year. 

Prominent speakers addressed 
over 100 radio and tv station people. 
Speakers included state officials 
Governor John Dalton and Attorney 
General Thomas Eagleton. 



DEFENSE DEPARTMENT 
ASKS FCC TO WATCH 
FALL-OUT SHELTER ADS 

(Washington): The Department of 
Defense has asked the Federal Trade 
Commission to keep a close watch 
on advertising of fall-out shelter 
products and services. 

The purpose of the campaign is to 
prevent irresponsible advertising 
from damaging public confidence in 
the reputable manufacturers whose 
cooperation with the Government's 
civil defense plan is needed. 

All media, including radio and tv, 
are being monitored for exaggera- 
tions which would mislead or de- 
fraud. 



Keystone's FMBS resets 
its fm network of 34 

(Chicago): FM Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, a subsidiary of Keystone Broad- 
casting System, has reshaped its 
network of 34 stations. 

The 34 station are located in 26 
leading fm markets. 
National sales manager of FMBS 
is John Harti- 
gan. The com- 
pany is based 
in Chicago. 

Projected 
coverage of 
the network is 
9.3 million, or 
71%. of U. S 
fm homes. 




| 

John Hartigan 



Fels to Manoff 

An account switch of particular 
interest to spot is Fels & Co. soap 
products from Aitkin-Kynett to Rich- 
ard K. Manoff. 

Entire budget runs around $3.5 
million, with 50% of it in spot tv 
The leading brands of the company 
are Naptha Granules and Liquid De- 
tergent. 

Account had been with Aitkin- 
Kynett for five years. 

Reason given for the changes 
differences in marketing philosophy 



More SPONSOR-WEEK continued on page 64 




Take a, second look 

( it's McGregor-Soderstrom, in Duluth ) 



Take a second look at the Duluth-Superior market - 

it's bigger than you think! 

It's the second-biggest market* in both Minnesota and Wisconsin! 

Bigger than Madison or Des Moines! 

Bigger than Austin, Pensacola or South Bend ! 



lOUJuCK^msferlm'-BIGOTCR than you think-and only 



KDAL 



-> 



. delivers it all ! 



KDAL— CBS RADIO-TELEVISION/3— AN AFFILIATE OF WGN, INC.— REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 

'Sales Management population estimates, January 1, 1961. 



54 SPONSOR • 30 OCTOBER 1961 



11 




JTHE PGW 





(DOILOWlEi; 



MTY 



The TV and Radio Stations represented by I*<;\V play an impor- 
tant part in the everyday life of a majority of the nation's homes. 



And the PGW Colonels in our ten offices from coast to coast are 
always ready, willinf? and very able to show you the best ways to 
reach these millions of homes with spot television on these fine 
television stations. Won't you give us a call? 

FOR SPOT TELEVISION 



EAST- 


SOUTHEAST channel primary 






CHANNEL PRIMARY 


WAST 


. Albany S<hene<:U<1y Tr, . 


13 


ABC 


KMBC-TV . 


. Kansas City . 


9 


. ABC 


WW J TV 


. Detroit 




NBC 


WISCTV . 


Madison, Wise 




. CBS 
. CBS 


WPIX 


. Nev*York 




IND 


WCCO TV . 


. Minneapolis St Paul 




WCSC-TV 


. Charleston, S. C 
. Columbia, S. C. 
. Greenville. Ashevllle. 

Spartanburg 
. Jacksonville 
. Miami 
. Montgomery 
. Nashville . 


10 


CBS 
NBC 

ABC 
NBC 
CBS 
NBC ABC 
ABC 


WMBD TV . 
KPLR-TV . 
KARD-TV . 
KFDM TV . 
KRIS-TV . 
WBAPTV . 
KENS-TV . 




31 . 


. CBS 


WISTV . 
WLOSTV 

WFGA-TV 

WTVJ 

WSFATV 

WSIXTV 


. St. Louis 

. Wich,' 
. Beaumont 
. Corpus Ctu > 
. Fort Worth-Dallas 
. San Antonio 




ND 
. NBC 
. CBS 
. NBC 
. NBC 
. CBS 


WDBJTV 


. Roanoke 




CBS 










WSJS-TV 


. Winston-Salem-Greensboro 




NBC 


MOUNTAIN ik/ *l 1 














KBOI-TV 


. Boise 




. . CBS 


MID WE 


ST- SOUTHWEST 






KBTV 


. Denver 




. ABC 


WCIATV 


. Champaign Urbana 


3 


CBS 


KGMB-TV . 


. Honolulu 




. CBS 


WOC-TV 
WHO-TV 


. Davenport-Rock Island 
. Dei Moinas 


6 
13 


NBC 
NBC 


KMAU-KHBC 

KTU 


TV 

. Los Angeles 




ND 


WDSM-TV 


. Duluth Superior 




NBC 


K RON TV . 


. San Francisco 




. NBC 


WDAY-TV 


. Fargo 




NBC 


KIRO-TV . 


. Seattla-Tacoma . . 




. CBS 



PJetkk 




Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1 




IIVC 



N ■ W YORK 

CHIC AOO 



ATLANTA 
■OSTON 



DETROIT 
ST. LOUIS 



•»T. WORTH 
DALLAS 



LOS ANGELES 
SAN FRANCISCO 



NEW 



by Joe Csida 



TOWER 



SERVING 
THE QUINT CITIES 

DAVENPORT 
BETTENDORF '0 WA 

ROCK ISLAND 
MOUNE ILL 

EAST MOUNE 



r 



WOC-TV Channel 6 ^ 

O 0. Polmer, President 

Roymond E. Guth, General Manager 

Pax Shaffer, Soles Manager 

Exclusive National Representative* 
Peterv, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



14 



Sponsor 







No more recordings for radio? 

I believe it is safe to say that more local, re- 
gional, and even national advertisers carry spots 
in music programs on the nation's radio stations 
than in any other single form of programing. 
And consequently the shape those music pro- 
grams take in the years to come, and the broad- 
casters' cost of carrying those programs could 
have a bearing on the continuing effectiveness 
of the sales messages of the thousands of advertisers riding the music 
bandwagon. 

As to shape, we have already witnessed and continue to witness 
every day the struggle between the station in a given market plaving 
the so-called Top 40 hit records of the dav. as opposed to the station 
playing so-called "good music."" In many markets the Top 40 outlet 
has the big rating, but its "good music" rival claims the ratings rep- 
resents vast numbers of unrulv teenage children, mostlv female. Avith 
transistor radios and no buving power. It's own good music audi- 
ence, says this broadcaster, represents a smaller group, but a group 
of prosperous adults. In either case the lure, of course, is music 
programing, mainlv via phonograph records. 

Since the phonograph record industrv did a fairlv healthv $480.- 
000.000 in business last year, it is quite possiblv premature to point 
out that the broadcaster's cost of acquiring these phonograph records 
for programing purposes mav rise quite sharplv — or even that we mav 
eventuallv see the dav when record companies will make serious ef- 
forts to prevent broadcasters from playing phonograph records at all. 

When viewed in the light of the not-so-distant navola hoopla, 
which indicated that some record people were actually willing to 
pay to have their records broadcast, the notion I've just stated mav 
seem preposterous. Even when considered in todav's conditions in 
which record companies still spend literally millions of dollars fur- 
nishing records free or at extremelv low and favorable prices to 
radio stations, and persuading them to play the records, the idea of 
record firms refusing to permit stations to use their product mav 
seem ludicrous. But there are some straws in the record industrv 
wind, and it would not hurt broadcasters, advertisers and agencies 
to take a glance at the waving of these wind-disturbed thistles, how- 
ever gentle at the moment. 

The straws in the wind 

One Straw: The record business, like many another industrv. is 
plagued bv possiblv the most severe case of cut-rating and discount- 
ing in its history. 

Straw Two: Costs in the record industrv. again as in many if not 
all others, are rising and profits shrinking. 

Straw Three: Teenagers and adults alike are increasingly purchas- 
( Please turn to page 56) 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 



GREAT f | m* 
INSTITUTIONS 



— ^ZRr^-f 



I >v ■» 



. . . remembered for 

performance I ^ 



UDOLF BI1STO 
neral Manager 




ETROPOLITAN 



OKLAHOMA CITY 



KWTI/- 



rmtionally toy 




555 5 




Happy despite error 

1 1 was thoughtful of you to alert me 
t<> the 2o September issue of your 
fine magazine prior to my receiving 
it. so I could be ready for the typo 
in the spelling of my name. Had you 
not done so. I would have been ill- 
prepared for the upsurge in my mail. 
I should like to compliment you on 
the evident thorough readership of 
sponsor. It would be unthinking of 
rne if I did not tell you that I've been 
delighted to hear from many old and 
good friends who were galvanized 
into action by the juxtaposition of 
m\ picture and a strange name. And 
I don't know what this will do to 
your BPA statement, but there's at 
least one advertising director of gen- 
eral magazines who is a careful 



reader, one university professor and 
another gentleman who identified 
himself, simply, as "Mack the Knife." 
It was great fun and no harm 
done and we all recognize that an 
error of any kind is certainly a devi- 
ation from the norm! 

R. H. Boulware 

vice president 

Fletcher Richards, Calkins & 

Holden. Inc. 

N. Y. C. 



Delighted 

We are delighted to see the four full 
pages, in your 2 October issue, de- 
voted to the A.N.A.-A.A.A.A. Inter- 
change of Opinion on Objectionable 
Advertising. 




WAVE -TV viewers do 
28.8% more LAUNDRY 

-use 28.8% more soaps, detergents, 
bleaches, bluings and starches! 



I hat's because WAVE-TV has 28.8% more 
viewers, from sign-on to sign-off, in any 
average week. Source: N.S.I. , July, 1961. 

CHANNEL 3 • MAXIMUM POWER 
NBC 

LOUISVILLE 

THE KATZ AGENCY, National Representatives 




16 



This is a great contribution by 
SPONSOR, and the Committee has 
asked me to express their apprecia- 
tion. 

We hope your readers will bear 
the Interchange in mind and let us 
know whenever the\ consider at) ad- 
vertisement or commercial to be in 
bad taste or otherwise objectionable. 
Richard L. Scheidker 
secretary 

ANA-AAAA Comm. 
■\ ew York City 

No agency change 

Just a note to call your attention to 
an error in the item in Sponsor- 
Scope, page 21 of your 11 Septem- 
ber issue. 

The second short item on that page 
mentions a purchase of commercial 
time from CBS TV bv Alcoa Wrap 
and. in parentheses, indicates F&S&R 
as the agency. Ketchum. MacLeod 
& Grave is the agencv for Alcoa Wrap 
and has been for some vears. 

This by no means watered down 
the extreme pleasure that we felt at 
KM&G upon reading Sponsor Speaks 
on page 68 of the same issue. Manv 
thanks. 

H. B. Anderson 

vice president and director 

Ketchum, MacLeod & 

Grove, Inc. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Welcome to 555 5th 

Just a quick note of welcome to our 
happv building. I was delighted to 
read in your 2 October issue tha 
your staff is glad to be here and so 
handsomely esconced. Please let u 
know r if we can ever be of anv spe- 
cial service to you in anv way. As 
good neighbors should. w r e'd like td 
be of any assistance we can if thq 
need arises. 

Charles V. Skoog. Jt 

president 

Hicks & Greist. Inc. 

N. Y. C. 

Kluge 

Your piece on John Kluge was one 
of the finest I've ever read. I believej 
it captured Mr. Kluge — his warmth 
his decency and. most especiallv. his 
principles. 

Phil Cowan 

director of public relatioii 

Metromedia. Inc. 

New York City 

SPONSOR • 30 OCTOBER 19t 



Why WFLA-TV bought 
Seven Arts' Volume II 






Says George Harvey: 

"The first Seven Arts package offered 
fine TV entertainment, but 



George Harvey, Vice President and 
General Manager, WFLA-TV, Tampa, Florida 







1 
i 



"It's a stronger over-all pack- 
age. We bought it to improve 
our Friday Night Movie. It 
takes an exceptional movie product to 
deliver maximum audience in a prime 
time slot against competitive network 
programming. Warner's 'Films of the 
50's' give us the best available prod- 
uct for that kind of exposure." 



Warner's films of the 50's. 
Money makers of the 60's 




SEVEN ARTS 

ASSOCIATED 

CORP. 



A SUBSIDIARY OF SEVEN ARTS PRODUCTIONS. LTD. 

NEW YORK: 270 Park Avenue YUkon 61717 

CHICAGO: 8922-D N. La Crosse, Skokie, III. ORchard 4-5105 
DALLAS: 5641 Charlestown Drive ADams 9 2855 

L.A.: 232 So. Reeves Drive GRanite 6 1564-STate 8-8276 

For list of TV stations programming Warner Bros "Films of 
the 50's" see Third Cover SRDS (Spot TV Rates and Data) 



\ 



local 
delivery 



& 



W 






y .a 



WPIX-ll services New Yorkers by delivering local news and special events with consistent^ 
excellence and dependability-as attested to by our six Sylvania Awards, two Emmy 
Awards, the Headliner Award and the DuPont Award. Over the years wpix-11 has been 
the only New York Independent to provide live television news on a regular basis as part 
of its service to the community. One more important reason why wpix is New York's N| 
prestige independent. Where ore your 60 second commercials tonight? 



NEW YORK'S PR 



TIGE INDEPENDENT 





Interpretation and commentary 

on most significant tv /radio 

and marketing news of the week 




SPONSOR-SCOPE 



30 OCTOBER 1961 

Cwyrlfht IMI 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



With the state of the business in the medium being what it is this fall, spot radio 
is wide open to national advertisers for opportunity buys. 

In many markets the advertiser should be able to name his own schedules and not find it 
difficult to get the merchandising support he requires. 

Reports flowing into SPONSOR-SCOPE suggest that lots of radio station managements, 
troubled by the relative slack in national billings, are giving serious thought to these steps: 

1 ) Asking their reps to conduct an inquiry through the SRA into the reasons for the 
softer market and finding out where the money has gone. 

2) Searching out among national advertisers and agencies the reasons why in a bullish 
advertising period spot radio hasn't been getting its past share. 

3) Station management leaders getting together with the SRA's radio committee to deter- 
mine how the medium can rekindle its status among national advertisers as a potent force 
for selling goods on the local level. 

Radio stations may not find much comfort from this, but their reps, from all reports, are 
in there really battling for what business there is. Buyers say that salesmen are becoming 
bitterly competitive for every bit of business, including switch pitches. 



The TvB thinks that the tv industry has become, in a way, a Cowardly Lion, 
and it's compounding a serum (namely, a special presentation) to overcome a grow- 
ing timidity about raising rates. 

The basic points that this pitch will make: 

• TVs home potential may have about reached saturation level but that's no reason why 
stations or networks should be apologetic about upping rates. Print keeps cutting rates 
for everybody but the advertiser. 

• Tv's cost-per-1,000 is on the rise, but the level is still away below those of magazines 
and newspapers, with tv tossing in the added advantages of sight, sound, and product action 
— plus the medium's incomparable speed and breadth for reaching people. 

• To hold its share of the ad dollar tv must logically increase its revenue and a goodly 
part of that must stem from rate increases. 



FCC chairman Minow will likely snort at this but there's a growing suspicion in 
financial circles that among the next of the commission's gambits will be to regulate 
profits on the grounds that tv stations fall within the purview of a monopoly. 

The argument would run something like this: a tv station is a licensed utility and as such 
may have its profits circumscribed to a reasonable return on its invested capital. 



Here's a toy manufacturer that's hitting as hard with spot tv after Christmas as 
it's now doing prior to the gift-buying holiday. The client: Transogram (Mogul, 

W&S). 

The new campaign that Transogram is embarking on 22 January will run for 20 weeks. 
The spots, of course, will be adjacent to kid shows. They will introduce new toy lines. 

Other new spot tv business: 

Parker Pen (Burnett), seven weeks, starting 5 November, nighttime minutes, plus day- 
time, in some 40 scattered markets; Duncan Hines brownie mix (Gardner, St. Louis), night 
minutes, mid November start, as part of a P&G open end contract. 



30 oc'tober 1961 



19 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Media planners shouldn't let themselves be unduly influenced by the fact their 
tv ti.mebuyers are finding spot schedules pretty tight in the key tv markets. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE last week checked with several station-group sales operations and 
found a low carryover of current commitments into the first 1962 quarter. It averaged 
from 22% to 28%. 

In other words, there'll be plenty of good spot pickings in December. 

Foremost Dairies' switch of its $4 million account back to Guild, Bascom & 
Bonfigli could prove quite beneficial to spot. 

Under BBDO's aegis the account hasn't been anything as active in spot as it used to be. 
and, even though GB&B hasn't formulated media plans for the client, there's a nostalgic un- 
dercurrent at the agency which bodes better for spot. 

It will be recalled that while at GB&B Foremost had this distinguishing characteristic in 
air media: it sponsored lots of local programs. 

Rated as one of the top growth companies in its field, Foremost is on an expansion 
kick in the east. 

Chicago rep salesmen clearly aren't in a cheery mood. 

Business in both tv and radio lately hasn't been on the buzzing side and in looking around 
for a critical theme, they've raised this conundrum: why can't spot have its own promo- 
tional bureaus — each independent of the RAB and the TvB? 

They're also asking what SRA headquarters is doing to stimulate spot business. 

Postscript for these question-tossers : SRA headquarters has been hinting it's got some- 
thing new in the works but can't tell until it's wrapped up. 

Colgate's cashing in an established brand of its own family in connection with 
a new contender to Mr. Clean and Lestoil. 

The name it's attaching to the all-purpose detergent about ready for testing is Ajax. 
That new family member will contain ammonia. 



If you're an accountman and have just got into the finer points of client-agency 
relationships on a nighttime network tv buy, you'll be interested in the three stages 
involved, where the client has his own property. 

They are these: 

STAGE I: You sell him on the idea that it's a real "happy" show and get him to 
make a decision to buy the pilot. 

STAGE II: Out comes the first rating and you use as a frame of reference the average 
for all programs. If your rating meets that level or is over, you're in, but if it's several 
points under the average you're in trouble. 

STAGE III: You wait for the Nielsen local market reports and dig around for data that 
makes your rating look better than it is, like getting homes that are the best kind for 
the product. 



20 



Their relative expenditures in spot tv over the past four years could have much 
to do with the contrasting barrelage trends of the Budweiser and Schlitz breweries. 

Here's the comparison, with the spot dollar figures coming from TvB: 



Budweiser 



Schlitz 



YEAR 


TOTAL BARRELS 


SPOT BILLINGS 


TOTAL BARRELS 


SPOT BILLINGS 


1957 


6,115,000 


$2,237,000 


6,023,000 


$1,753,000 


1958 


6,962,000 


2,076,000 


5,557,000 


1,779,000 


1959 


8,027,000 


2,071,000 


5,860,000 


325,000 


1960 


8,480,000 


2,189,000 


5,640,000 

SPONSOR • 


1,127,000 

30 OCTOBER IS 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



There's no question that NBC TV's doing lots better at night than it did last sea- 
son, but the rating scholars on Madison Avenue have this word of caution : don't 
jump to hasty conclusions until the program sampling is over and the shake- 
down time arrives, namely, the latter half of November. 

It may, they figure, turn out to be a closer race for leadership than it looks right now. In 
any event, they see much NBC TV strength on Sunday, Saturday, and Wednesday, with 
CBS riding merrily through Tuesday night, holding early Saturday night in its grip and bat- 
tling ABC TV for the Monday night tune-in. 

Incidentally, the one big problem of the new season is the cartoon. They're certainly 
not clicking, nor are several of the more expensive situation comedies with real, live people. 



CBS TV is not letting the competition get to prospects first with their line of 
public affairs programing for the 1961-62 season. 

The twin steps being taken by CBS TV: (1) get a line on advertisers who are thinking 
about sponsoring public affairs fare next season; (2) showing them the various lines of such 
programing the network has in mind and letting the prospects select subject matter that 
will fit in with the company image. 

It would seem from Bell & Howell's latest financial statement that sponsor- 
ship can really pay off. 

The company, because of its pursuit of the segregation issue in ABC TV documentaries, 
was threatened with product boycotts in certain southern areas. 

Reported B&H last week: its third-quarter sales and earnings were slightly above last 
year's record levels and earnings themselves were the highest of any quarter in company 
history. 

CBS TV keeps expanding its roster of afternoon strips which carry the double 
cross-plug privilege, the latest being Love of Life (12-12:30 p.m.). 

Previous programs given double cross-plug status were The Millionaire and Password. 

The network's move with a pretty-good-rating soaper caused some eyebrow-lifting 
among agencies. One line of speculation: CBS TV may have in mind applying the dou- 
ble cross-plug concept for all its controlled afternoon fare, providing a flexibility that is not 
far removed from the morning policy of minute participations. 



Ever hear of the 20 Million Club, which the usually staid Nielsen has whimsi- 
cally tagged on as an elite compartment of its audience reports? 

What gives this club a specific relevancy is the fact that the latest Miss America Pageant 
set a new high for that elite assembly. Membership in the club is limited to one-time 



svements in total audience — not 


ratings. 








Here are the top 10 members, t 


o date: 








PROGRAM 


DATE 


MINUTES 


' ( U.S. TV 


TOTAL HOMES 


Miss America Pageant (CBS) 


9/9/61 


150 


54.1 


25.400.000 


Inaugural Ceremonies (NBC) 


1/20/61 


405 


53.5 


25.100,000 


1959 World Series (NBC) 


10/4/59 


175 


54.6 


2 1.300,000 


1959 Academy Awards (NBC) 


4/6/59 


105 


55.0 


24,200,000 


1959 World Series (NBC) 


10/6/59 


165 


54.1 


24,100,000 


1960 Academy Awards (NBC) 


4/4/60 


110 


52.9 


23,900,000 


Ed Sullivan Show (CBS) 


1/6/57 


60 


59.7 


23,500,000 


Cinderella Special (CBS) 


3/31/57 


90 


59.3 


23,300,000 


1959 World Series (NBC) 


10/5/59 


170 


52.0 


23,100,000 


Lucy-Desi Special (CBS) 


11/6/57 


75 


55.9 


23,000,000 



5PONSOR • 30 OCTOBER 1961 21 

jH 

II 



L^ 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Intercollegiate football games in tv apparently have a greater pulling power 
than pro games. 

That's the way, anyway, it turned out last year (September through December). In re- 
sponse to a SPONSOR-SCOPE query on how the two areas of football stacked up with home 
audiences, Nielsen furnished this comparison: 

CLASS AVERAGE SETS IN USE HOMES PER AVERAGE MINUTE 

NCAA games 11.7 5,300,000 

National Football League 9.9 4,500,000 

Note: the figures do not include bowl, playoff or championship games. 

■ 

An interesting sidelight on football audiences is the audience composition that 
prevails Saturday vs. Sunday matinees. 

Note following breakdown from Nielsen, which relates to the fall of 1960: 
The Saturday distribution: 



TIME 


MEN 


WOMEN 


TEENAGE 


CHILDREN 


1-2 p.m. 


24% 


27% 


13% 


36% 


2-3 p.m. 


28% 


29% 


13% 


30% 


3-4 p.m. 


31% 


31% 


13% 


25% 


The Sunday 


variation : 








2-3 p.m. 


36% 


32% 


13% 


19% 


3-4 p.m. 


36% 


31% 


13% 


20% 


4-5 p.m. 


35% 


33% 


11% 


21% 



An outfit in Chicago calling itself the Print Promotion Program is trying to col- 
lect a fund of $750,000 for an all-out competitive battle against broadcast media. 

Targets of the war chest appeal include, besides newspapers and magazines, paper manu- 
facturers, ink makers, printers, unions, and space reps. 

The prospectus the PPP is using sketches, among other things, the dollar growth of the 
combined air media vs. print in relation to all ad dollars. 

Kraft ( JWT) has bestowed that fresh bundle of daytime dollars (about 400,000 
of them) on NBC TV, with the commitment extending from January through June. 

It's the first time for Kraft in daytime tv network in several years. 

Kraft's also been toying with the idea of a second nighttime show. It needs more ex- 
posure for its many product lines and brands, especially among working women. 

TvB has assigned a full-time man — Bill McRae — to keep tv reps informed on 
what it's doing in matters of research and promotion. 

McRae, who'll be New York-based, will also concentrate on trying to help the reps on 
sales problems involving specific data processed or collected by TvB. 

Bill Colvin will be in charge of keeping the station members informed and happy. 

Taking the I October NTI as a source, the total number of advertisers using 
the tv networks at that point added up to 212. 

In terms of the clock, 77 were on nighttime only, 73 in daytime only and 63 used both 
day and night. 

The same source showed a total of 233 advertisers for the like period of 1960. It 
rould be that those in are spending a lot more than they did last year. 



For other news coverage in this issue: see Sponsor-Week, page 7; Sponsor 
Week Wrap-Up, page 64; Washington Week, page 59; sponsor Hears, page 62; Tv and Ra- 
dio Newsmakers, page 72: and Film-Scope, page 60. \§'-\ 



-2 SPONSOR • 30 OCTOBER 1961 

i 



«PII\ 



SERVING 

PANAMA CITY • DOTHAN • TALLAHASSEE 



DOTHAN 



WJHG-TV 




TALLAHASSEE 



NEW FACILITIES AS OF JANUARY 196T 






*1,000 FT. TOWER delivers *NBC PROGRAMMING 

TO 

* 480,700 PEOPLE in * 77,090 TV HOMES 

MAY BE BOUGHT IN COMBINATION WITH WALB-TV, ALBANY, GA. 



A GRAY TELEVISION STATION 










EPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL, INC. • IN THE SOUTH BY JAMES S. AYERS CO. 



flPONSOR • 30 OCTOBER 1961 



23 




**•»" 



The Embassy off Austria 

His Excellency Dr. Wilfried Platzer, 
Ambassador to the United States 
from Austria, and Mme. Platzer and 
their daughter, Sylvia, in the 
large Salon at the Embassy . . . 
another in the WTOP-TV series 
on the Washington diplomatic scene. 



WTOP-T 

WASHINGTON, D 



Represented by TvAR 



STATIONS A DIVISION OF 
THE WASHINGTON POST COMPANY 






Photograph by Fred Maroc 




..« 



•* N 




I 








$*m 




Nfe 



*=£ 



J 



*::- 










FARMING IS VERY 




I. 

if 

f:- 













in FRESNO 

- where Beeline Radio KMJ delivers more for the money 




2() 



Fresno County is the nation's #1 farm income county. How to reach this 
important market? With Beeline Radio KMJ, which delivers more adult 
audience and more total audience than any other station. KMJ leads in 
Fresno's 12-county Pulse Ratings 86'/c of the time. 

Throughout Inland California and Western Nevada, the Beeline sta- 
tions deliver more radio homes than any other combination of stations 
— at the lowest cost per thousand. 

Source: Nielsen Coverage Service Report #2 and 
April 1961, 12-county Pulse. 

McCLATCHY BROADCASTING COMPANY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • PAUL H. RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 





KOH O RENO 

KFBK ° SACRAMfcNTO 

^ \ 

KBEE ° MODESTO 

I \ 

KMJ OfRESNO, 

1 \ 

KERN ° BAKERSFIEID 



SI'ONSOli 




30 OCTOBER 190 



SPONSOR 

30 OCTOBER 1 961 




New trends: farm radio/tv '61 

Farm stations cock an ear to FCC Chairman Minow's urging of more 
public service programs — farms better equipped, incomes move up 




30 OCTOBER 1961 



f his is the year that farm stations have an ear 
cocked to FCC Newton Minow's warnings anent 
better programing and more public service. Farm 
stations that may have tinkered with the notion of 
dropping or curtailing their farm departments 
quickly reconsidered when they saw Minow's index 
finger shaking in their faces, industry figures ob- 
served. Consequently, most farm program chief- 
tains are beefing up their news and special events 
and stepping up their editorializing on the airlanes. 

27 



Farm figures zoomed in past 20 years 



NUMBER OF FARMS 

millions 




FARMING carries on as 
U.S.' biggest job and 
trend toward fewer farms 
which started in 1940, 
when there were 6 million 
farms, was speeded up 
between 1954 and 1959 



AVERAGE FARM ACREAGE 



AGRICULTURISTS note 
that trend to larger units 
of production which 
started with mechanical 
revolution took a big step 
forward between the 
period of 1954 and 1959 



174 






rill 

1940 '45 '50 '55 '60 



FARM INVESTMENT 

billions of doll) 




' Total 

Assets 



Land and 
Buildings 






I I 



■ I 



Farm 
Machinery- 



. I I 

194CT45 '50 '55 '60 

Source: Meredith Publlshlnc Compiny 



FARM equipment invest- 
ment jumped six times 
in last 20 years; land and 
buildings increased in 
value four fold in past 
two decades to a total 
of about $129 billion 



28 



Meanwhile, on the other side of I 
the farm radio/tv coin, the bread-i 
and-butter aspect of facts and figure- 
is acquiring fresh attention as the- 
Federal government winds up its flo^ 
of data from the agricultural censu- 
of 1959. The figures nail down more 
precisely the trends that have becomr 
clearly apparent during the past dec- 
ade — particularly the decline in the 
number of U.S. farms and the fact 
that those remaining are sproutim 
larger and growing succulenth 
richer. 

The fanner today is no more a 
hayseed than the Madison Avenue 
organization man. Today's farmer i ? 
both poet and sound business man. 
He seldom forgets nature essayist 
John Burroughs' remarks: "There is 
virtue in the cow : she is full of good- 
ness: the whole landscape looks out 
of her soft eyes." \or does the farm- 
er ignore those three elements so 
vital to increase the productivity of 
his acreage: mechanization, chemi- 
calization and management. Said a 
shrewd, knowing Chicago advertising 
executive the other day: "The most 
important piece of equipment on a 
modern farm todav is a sharp pen- 
cil." 

With the aid of the pencil, power 
equipment and knowledge gleaned 
from radio-tv, the farmer's lot has 
improved vastly. The 10th annual 
farm report by SPONSOR reveals a 
striking canvas for the Sixties filled 
with high-income farms and fewer 
marginal farms, a record proportion 
of owner operators and more farm 
expenditures. 

In short, it means more "agri- 
business" for the farmer as well as 
advertiser. It adds up to a more than 
I ID billion rural market for consumer 
and agricultural products. Current 
statistics on farming are as cheerful 
as the rooster's crow by the dawn's 
early light. Since 1940. investment 
in farm machinery and equipment 
jumped six times — from S3 billion to 
S18 billion: land and buildings ap- 
preciated from S33 billion to S129 bil- 
lion in two decades: average value 
for each farm zoomed 63 ^c in six 
vears and total assets catapulted from 
|54 billion. 20 vears ago. to a stag- 
gering $204 billion last year. Gross 
income bounced from Sll billion in 
1940 to $38 billion in 1960. 



SPONSOR • 30 OCTOBER 1961 



:■ 



• 



ing their clients more and more with 

- the magnetic news of farmer spend- 
ing for goods and services to grow 
his crops and livestock — somewhere 

- in the verdant region of $26 billion 
yearly. This, in addition to some 

r $15 billion annually for the things 
that urbanites also purchase, such as 

'clothing, food, drugs, furniture and 
appliances including such significant 

- items on the top of the list as radios 
and tv receivers, the latter in color, 
mind you. 

; The number of farms with incomes 

of $5,000 and more vaulted from 

T26.000 in 1940 to an overwhelming 

1,447,000 in 1960. In 1940, a mere 

,; 58.000 farms boasted of incomes over 

* '110,000. Today there are 794,000 

■such farms in existence. Manufac- 

-'• turers of farm equipment also see a 

1 steadily rising sales curve. Since 1954 

there are 9% more field tractors on 

i'7% fewer farms; 6% more grain 

combines on 6% more farms; 15% 

"more corn pickers on 13% more 

•farms; 44% more forage harvesters 

• on 40% more farms and 52% more 

; pick-up balers on 51^ more farms. 

The farmer spends approximately 
$3 billion in new farm tractors and 
a bther motor vehicles, machinerv and 
: equipment every year. The farmer 
spends about $3.5 billion on fuel, 
ubricants and maintenance of ma- 
3 bhinery and motor vehicles each vear. 
Tie spends more than one billion 
yearly on fertilizer and lime. Thanks 
o mechanization and automation, 
>ne hour of farm labor produces four 
.imes as much food and other crops 
ban it did 40 years ago. The De- 
oartment of Agriculture reports that 
-rop production is 58% higher per 
tcre and the output per breeding ani- 
■nal is an overwhelming 81% greater. 
And what about export trade? The 
Oepartment of Agriculture reports 
lhat $4.5 billion in farm products 
Were exported in the fiscal year 1960 
»nd established a new record. 

No longer is the farmer bogged 
lown in frugality when it comes to 
Improving his land and stimulating 
ihe mind of his family. Scooping 
eed to cattle and hogs, according to 
pxperts. will soon be a thing of the 
last. Mechanized feeding and water- 
Jig systems with effortless push-but- 
on gadgets are here today. A large 



TRFD goes afield for working knowledge 

Typical of the present 
day television and radio 
farm director is Gordon 
Roth (r) of KCBS, San 
Francisco, who is seen out 
on the field widening his 
knowledge, in this in- 
stance, sheep raising. 
The TRFD is a thorough 
student of agriculture who 

travels thousands of miles annually in order to keep in constant touch 
with current farm conditions and his loyal audience. Majority of farm 
program directors, on a first-name basis with farmers, get first-hand 
reports on seeds, chemicals and hundreds of other processes the farmers 
use in their business to increase their huge productivity. 




manufacturer of tractors and com- 
bines startled the farming world last 
week when he announced the mar- 
keting of special wafers of com- 
pressed hay for the cows of America 
and Canada. A machine will com- 
press hay into hard wafers 2 inches 
by 2 inches, something the cows will 
undoubtedly moo over, and thus cut 
down the man hours by 25 to 40% 
for every ton of hay harvested. It 
will also cut tractor hours consider- 
ablv. Currently, farmers bale their 
hav. The new machine also means 
less storage space for the hay. 

The Kevstone Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, indubitably, fills a striking posi- 
tion in the American farm broadcast- 
ing svstem with its highly-specialized 
1.100 affiliates serving as an umbrel- 
la for some 83% of the total farms in 
the land. Noel Rhys, executive vice 
president of Keystone Broadcasting 
Svstem. told sponsor last week that 
farm programs have one of the most 
singular followings "for the very 
sound reason that no other national 
media furnishes the local farmer 
wherever he may be with the immedi- 
ate vital statistics he requires in the 
conduct of his business." 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 



Advertising budgets are getting 
bigger, according to Rhys. Year-in 
and year-out sponsors are upping 
their expenditures on farm radio sta- 
tions, he observed. Among Key- 
stone's new advertisers are such pow- 
erful figures in the industry as Mas- 
sey-Ferguson, the world's largest 
makers of tractors and self-propelled 
combines, and Dow Chemical extoll- 
ing its crab grass killer. 

The Keystone stations, according 
to Rhys, are currently carrying some 
16 farm specialtv advertisers. 

Though farm broadcasters are do- 
ing a noble job, it is the opinion of 
some experts in the field, that radio 
communications for farm business- 
men can stand improvement. Donald 
Lerch, Jr., widely known agricultural 
communicator and former director 
of Agriculture for the Columbia 
Broadcasting System, has entered in- 
to negotiations with Kevstone Broad- 
casting System to provide its stations 
with across-the-board five-minute ra- 
dio programs "designed to meet the 
challenge which faces the nation's 
one million commercial farm busi- 
nessmen who are striving to become 
more efficient and more productive. 



29 





RURAL and urban audiences find valuable news on the airlanes. Here 
N. J. Secretary of Agriculture Phillip Alampi, demonstrates cranberry 
production on Governor Robert B. Meyner's weekly program on 
WNTA-TV, Newark. I 50 pound pumpkin was discovered through contest 



FARM DIRECTOR is considered a unique breed in talent circles. 
Here is WSJS Radio-TV (Winston-Salem) farm director Harvey Din- 
kins (I) interviewing W. W. Johnson, assistant county agent for David- 
son County, North Carolina, about important subject of raising pigs 



and to make more money for them- 
selves." 

Keystone is presently seeking ad- 
vertisers for the Lerch series of taped 
programs which, according to present 
plans, should get under way the first 
of next year. The Lerch idea is to 
incorporate two-minute 45-second 
news commentaries about practices 
involving a client's product into each 
program. 

Lerch said his transcribed com- 
mentaries would sell the practice — 
the surrounding commercials would 
sell the product. 

Numerous city radio and television 
stations in an effort to provide pub- 
lic service to all its inhabitants, which 
usually includes a goodly number of 
farmers in outlying areas, provides 
a bucolic touch that is not without 
its educational value. Typical of city 
broadcasters that reach out into the 
hinterlands is WNBC-AM and 
WNBC-TV. The flagship outlet of 
NBC, in the heart of Gotham, is cur- 
rently providing a six-day-a-week 
(5:30 to 6 AM) service to farmers 
over WNBC-AM. Farmers tune to the 
station for their market prices on 
vegetables, fruit, poultry, e<?ss, etc. 

"It's true that in the WNBC-TV 
listening and viewing area, the per- 
centage of farmers is small," Peter 
M. Affe, station manager told spon- 
sor, "but a station broadcasting in 
the interest of the community is 
aware that farmers and farming 
make up an important segment of 



30 



that community, no matter how small 
their number." 

With pride, Affe pointed out that 
there are eight farms with a total of 
71 acres in the Bronx; 14 farms 
utilizing 15 acres in Brooklyn; 232 
farms (7,406 acres) in Nassau; 60 
farms (148 acres) in Queens; 68 
farms (1,152 acres) in Richmond; 
303 farms (25,388 acres) in West- 
chester; 8,347 farms (778,218 acres) 
in New Jersey and 3,282 farms 
(1,321,129 acres) in Connecticut. 
All told, 12,414 farms in the WNBC 
and WNBC-TV area— all within a 
very dry martini's gulp from 30 
Rockefeller Plaza. 

As a public service to the farmers 
in its area, WOR, New York, has 
been airing farm reports on its Sun- 
rise Serenade Monday through Sat- 
urday from 5 to 5:30 a.m. and Sun- 
day, 5:30 to 7 a.m. Reports are 15- 
minutes in length. 

Farm advertisers tailor their mes- 
sages to specific localities. Of the 
advertisers for example, using WSJS, 
Winston-Salem, Brown & Williamson 
Tobacco runs a decidedly fresh com- 
mercial campaign in the area. Di- 



recting 



its advertising to tobacco 



growers in the Piedmont Valley area, 
B&W uses an informational approach 
to farmers telling them of the types 
of tobacco they are looking for, best 
methods to grow the tobacco, infor- 
mation on the tobacco market, etc. 
On the radio side, farm sponsor- 
ship is on the rise with a number of 



advertisers trying the field for the 
first time, WSJS execs said. 

Today radio stations all over the 
country are adjusting their formats 
to allow for longer newscasts, edi- 
torial and greater public service, Bob 
Palmer, media supervisor at Cun- 
ningham & Walsh told SPONSOR. 
Palmer, who for the past seven years 
has been responsible for all media on 
the Agricultural Division of Ameri- 
can Cyanamid Company, said that in 
this new atmosphere, "the radio farm 
director, who for years was consid- 
ered a holdover from the old days, 
is looked upon as the first of a new 
breed of radio personality." 

The resultant importance of the 
Farm Department to the total station 
operation will, in Palmer's judgment, 
provide the RFD with more of the 
tools necessary for his assignment 
such as clerical help (many RFD's 
still must write their own letters), 
mobile units and release from other 
station duties so that he may travel 
his area in search of program ma- 
terial. 

"Farm radio today is better than 
it was seven years ago when I first 
entered the field, Palmer observed. 
"If the current trend continues, the 
next seven years should see farm ra- 
dio come into its own as a priman 
agricultural medium." 

Cyanamid is one of the largest ag- 
ricultural advertisers. Last year. 
Cyanamid began a major radio effort 
described as the "Aureomycin Radio 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 



It! 




NEW farm series of taped commentaries for 

Keystone Broadcasting System stations will 

be launched shortly by Donald Lerch, Jr., 

ji >| Washington agricultural expert and bdcstr. 



^Network" (not actually a network*, 
but rather a group of 40 top farm 
^directors from coast to coast). 

Total advertising of major farm 
agriculture products, not including 
home sprays and insecticides, on tv 
in 1960 was slightly less than in 
J1959, according to TvB figures. Spot 
;|and network billing in 1959 came to 
13,574,871. In 1960 it amounted to 
13,449,914. With the exception of 
ijMassey-Ferguson, most farm agri- 
n Culture advertisers put their money 
n spot tv last year. Massey-Fergu- 
;on allocated $1,667,499 to network 
cv advertising and $50,000 to spot; 
Ford spent $40,437, network, and 
173,000, spot; Consumers Co-Op, 
d&50,300, spot; Ralston Purina, $157,- 
)00, spot; Bercraft Corp., $176,400, 
Jipot; International Harvester, $304,- 
)00, spot; Charles Pfizer, $73,500, 
pot. 

The key to success for anything 
ijrom financing to fertilizers, pesti- 
cides to packaging, sidings to seeds, 
>n farm radio is via the RFD route, 
n the educated opinion of toprung 
executives at the Gardner Advertis- 
$ ng Company. This agency, thor- 
oughly conversant with every aspect 
>f farm broadcasting, is constantly 
e-evaluating the medium. Invariably, 
ts findings reveal that farm radio 
3 an effective medium for its clients. 
Tie rural market is of vital impor- 
ance not only to Gardner's agricul- 
aral clients — which account for 
(Please turn to page 48) 



■ 



Rise in NATRFD members cheers 
farming's professional air group 

Agriculture's indelible link with American consumers (reaching 
more than 100 million rural-urban listeners daily) is the highly- 
regarded National Association of Television and Radio Farm Di- 
rectors. These are the knowledgeable farm broadcasters who per- 
form as liaison between sponsor, his field personnel and distribu- 
tors and, most importantly, his farming customers. 

In 1960 more than 20 new members joined this organization, 
according to George Roesner, farm director of KPRC & KPRC- 
TV, Houston, and president of NATRFD. Roesner also told 
sponsor that to the best of his knowledge no broadcast station has 
discontinued farm broadcasting in that time. (It was not too long 
that the NATRFD had expressed concern about this problem to 
the FCC.) 

"We of the NATRFD constantly learn of new advertisers in the 
farm field who have discovered the great advantage of this type of 
specialized programing," Roesner said. "With today's farmer 
having a higher investment per employee than any other business- 
man, the farmer is vitally interested in keeping up with the latest 
developments and techniques of his business." 

"The farm broadcast listener is a devoted one. He pays atten- 
tion to everything on the program. For this reason not only has 
an impressive list of new advertisers been added to the roster of 
advertisers but the continuing sponsors have strengthened their 
exiting schedules. The farm director's personal approach to his 
programs, his delivery of the sponsor's message, and his built-in 
'believability' make him one of the most influential personalities 
on any station." (Please turn to page 52) 

FARM cartoonist Bill Ferguson shows the dominant role played by the NATRFD members 




For more farm material see page 38 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 



THE 40-SECOND BREAK RIDDLE 



^ Mediamen await distinguishable pattern on pricing, 
pre-emptibility. and length of notice before pre-emption 

^ Introduction of longer chain breaks during peak 
selling season seen as interfering with clarification 



I imebuyers of the world, unite.' 
If you want to buy a 40- or 30-second 
spot in those new 40-second chain 
breaks, you have nothing to lose but 
your marbles. 

In time, no doubt, the seemingly 
endless variety of methods employed 
by stations in selling the newly-length- 
ened breaks will take on a distin- 
guishable pattern, but. . . . 

Take the plight of North Advertis- 
ing media buyer Barbara Swedeen. 
for instance. She's just back, and 
still out of breath, from a nine-sta- 
tion expedition encompassing Chi- 
cago. Detroit, and Cleveland. What 
did she find? "Nine different ways 
of handling the 40-second breaks." 
These variations include price of 
40"s and 30"s in relation to 20s. pre- 
emptibilitv. and length of notice pro- 
vided prior to pre-emption. 

This apparent confusion stems not 
onlv from the noveltv of the 40-sec- 




40-SECOND SPOTS loom as minute sub- 
stitute in prime time, says Pete Dalton, asso- 
ciate media director, Donahue & Coe agency 



32 



ond break, but also from the co-inci- 
dence of its introduction with the 
peak fall spot tv buying season. With 
demand high for placement of the 
traditional 20-second announcements, 
the logical solution from most view- 
points has been to fill the slots with 
20's back to back. Also, it is felt 
there was not enough time between 
announcement that longer breaks 
were coming and their actual intro- 
duction this fall to allow for produc- 
tion of unique-length commercials 
right away. At any rate it is assumed 
that when unfilled slots crop up in 
late fall-early winter, however, both 
seller and buyer of time will pay 
closer attention to the potential of 
30's and 40*s. and a more workable 
arrangement should evolve. 

As for which of the newly-feasible 
spot lengths — 30"s or 40's — is more 
likely to catch on, there's opinion 
favoring each, and for a variety of 
reasons. The 40-second announce- 
ment gets the nod from Donahue & 
Coe associate media director Pete 
Dalton. As he sees it. the 40 is sub- 
stantially longer than the 20. offering 
room for appreciably more copy, if 
needed, in prime time. The 40 con- 
stitutes a substitute for the minute, in 
Dalton's estimation, whereas the 30 
may not be sufficiently longer than 
the 20 from a copy standpoint to 
merit paying much more than the 20 
rate. 

Harry Durando, D&C buyer, adds 
that in determining the worth of a 
40-second spot, cost-per- 1.000 in re- 
lation to the 20 is not a valid tool. 
If the 40 costs nearly twice the 20, 
and the 20's c-p-m is two dollars, the 
40's c-p-m will approach four dollars, 
he grants, but hastens to point out 
that the 40's contribution is on the 
creative side. If the selling message 



needs the extra time, in prime listen- 
ing hours, the 40 pulls its weight, 
states Durando. 

On the other hand, many feel the 
30-second length has the inside tracL 
This viewpoint is to be encountered 
among officials of several leading rep 
firms, and client product managers, 
as well as agency people. 

One agency account man, Conrad 
Roth at North Advertising, notes that 
many network tv advertisers already 
have 30-second commercials on hand 
which they readily can shift to spot, 
whereas production of new length 
commercials may require more time, 
money, and effort than the rewards 
would indicate to be worthwhile. On 
the negative side vis-a-vis 30-second 
spots. Roth notes that they may be 
difficult to place in desirable positions 
if thev cannot pre-empt a 20-second 
commercial. But. if they're available 
where they'll deliver the audience you 
want, and you need the extra 10 sec- 
onds to tell your product story, 
they're a good buy at 150% of the 
20-second rate. Roth feels. 

Among the other factors cited as 
favoring 30's over 40's is the former's 
greater similarity to the accustomed 
20 both as to length and price. Addi- 
tionallv. it is felt that more attention 




CONFUSION that timebuyers no* face 
is spelled out by North Advertising's Bar- 
bara Swedeen. (See box on opposite page) 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 



will be paid to 30's on the rationale 
that availabilities will be easier to 
find since they don't require a totally 
empty break, but rather can fit side 
by side with a 10-second I.D. 

As for advertisers currently on the 
air with 40- or 30-second commer- 
cials in national spot tv, there's but 
a handful, though several are making 
inquiries. Gulf Oil is in several mar- 
kets with 40's via Young & Rubicam. 
An official of that agency relates that 
prime time availabilities weren't too 
tough to assemble in markets below 
the 10 largest. 

Another 40-second spot advertiser 
is a new product of U.S. Tobacco, 
Skis cigarettes, for which Donahue 
& Coe is running a test campaign in 
Cleveland. Because that project hit 
the air 2 October, in the height of the 
spot tv selling season, the first group 
of spots acquired for Skis was some- 
what under par in terms of audience 
delivered, Pete Dalton of D&C points 
out, but he reports steady improve- 
ment in the spots' positions. 

In the D&C media department it is 
felt that 40's are ideal for an intro- 
ductory campaign such as the Cleve- 
land push for Skis cigarettes. Vast 
exposure, such as prime time offers, 
is sought in order to acquaint as 
many people as possible with the new 
product, and the 40 seconds allow 
for the necessarily numerous copy 
points that accompany such an intro- 
duction, Durando explains. 

Also welcome is the heightened op- 
portunity to reach the trade with 
spots placed in prime time, thereby 
building their enthusiasm which, of 
course, is extremely helpful in putting 
over a new product. Before 40's be- 
came available in prime time, says 
Durando, it often was necessary to 
stick with fringe minutes in order to 
have enough time for all of the copy 
points, and this lessened the possibili- 
ties that members of the trade that 
would be called on to sell the prod- 
uct would see the commercials. 

Among the advertisers who report- 
edly have been checking into avail- 
ability of 40's are Kodak, Howard 
Johnson, and Arrestin products of 
Johnson & Johnson. Investigation 
of the 30-second spot possibilities has 
been conducted on behalf of Revlon. 
Anahist, and Colgate-Palmolive, with 
strong liklihood that all three will hit 






Station replies on breaks run gamut 
Q. 



What length copy pre-empts what? 



A. All longer announcements pre-empt a 10 

A. A 20 is pre-emptible by a 40 but not by a 30 



A. A 30 is not pre-emptible 
A> A 10 is not pre-emptible 



A. A plan 10 is pre-emptible by a full-rate 10, a plan or full-rate 
20, plan or full-rate 30's and 40's 

A. A 20 is pre-emptible by longer copy only if the break's other 
20 seconds are open 



Q-in 



"in pre-emptible, how much notice do I get? 



A. Four weeks notice from date of order 
Aa Two weeks notice from date of order 



A> After four telecasts 



Aa After two telecasts 



Aa After one telecast 



Aa Immediately 



Q. 



What are you charging for 30's and 40's? 



A. From 125 to 150% of the 20 for the 30 

A- From 150 to 200% of the 20 for the 40 

Aa Some have incorporated plans into prime time since base rates 
were raised to accommodate 30's and 40's. (Minute used to 
cost same as 20) 



the air with spot 30's before the year 
is out. 

Kenyon & Eckhardt is another 
agencv which has been exploring the 
possible use of 30's and 40's in spot 
tv in the past few months. Thus far 
K&E has not found offerings in the 
new spot lengths attractive. Accord- 
ing to v. p. -associate media director 
Brendan J. Baldwin, "Generally, sta- 
tions are using their better-rated 



time segments to sell two 20-second 
announcements and making available 
for 30- or 40-second commercials 
times around shows drawing smaller 
audiences. 

"Most stations charge 150% of the 
20-second rate for a 30-second com- 
mercial and 200% of the 20-second 
rate for a 40-second commercial. At 
these prices," Baldwin asserts, "if 
one is to purchase anv sizable num- 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 1961 



33 



1 



ber (if markets, it is frequently more 
r< onomical to buy into network shows 
which can produce better audiences 
in the s|M>t markets than would be 
possible if \ uu would purchase 30- or 
40-seeond announcements in the 
-.mie markets. 

"We will continue to look for cre- 
ative applications of this facility," 
says Baldwin in summing up his 
agency's outlook on the subject. 

Getting back to the pandemonium 
encountered by Barbara Swedeen in 
her explorations of the 40-second 
break situation, it has been her prac- 
tice to ask three basic questions. One 
takes in pre-emptibility, which proc- 
ess always has had its confusing as- 
pects, the addition of two new spot 
lengths makes the old arrangement 
look like child's pla\ . 

No sooner had one station told 
her that I.D.'s are pre-emptible by all 
longer announcements, than another 
declared he would protect I.D.'s from 
all comers, i.e. they were not pre- 
emptible. Another stated that a plan 
10 is pre-emptible by a full-rate 10, 
plan and full-rate 20's, and plan or 
full rate 30's and 40's. 

As for 20's she found that they 
may be pre-emptible by a 40 (though 
probably not by a 30) , provided the 
20 to be pre-empted is lodged in a 
40-second break in which the other 
20 seconds are vacant. Some told 
Miss Swedeen that 30's and 40's 
would not be pre-emptible. Yet this 
is not universal since some stations 
have incorporated plans into prime 
time because base rates were raised 
to accommodate insertion of 30's and 
40's. (Previously, the prime time 
minute was priced the same as the 
20 in many instances.) 

Once she determines that a partic- 
ular spot or group of spots is pre- 
emptible, Miss Swedeen, naturally, 
wants to know how much she can 
count on before the pre-emption axe 
falls. Well, they may offer her four 
weeks notice from date of order. Or 
two weeks. Or four telecasts, or two 
telecasts, or one. Occasionally, she 
finds her spots are subject to imme- 
diate pre-emption. 

As for prices. Miss Swedeen has 
encountered 40's ranging from 150 
to 200 r ; of the 20-second rate. She 
has come across 30's priced from 125 
to 150% of the 20's. ^ 



3 1 



RADIO AND PRINT 
AREN'T COPY CATS 

^ Doyle Dane Bernbach ace copywriter tells why radio 
copy differs from print ad in projecting same message 

^ On radio it often takes real-life situation type talk 
to equal impact of message related visually in print ad 




Beside toiling on accounts like Rainier beer 
and Polaroid, DDB copywriter David J. Herz- 
brun also instructs copywriting at N.Y.U. 



w 



hen Mark Twain said it — that 
the spoken English and the written 
English are two different languages 
— he wasn't about to be concerned 
with radio. Or, for that matter, radio 

. copywriters. Nor could he possibly 
foresee that not too many years hence, 
his theory would be daily tested, and 
profoundly respected, by these same 
radio writers. 

One of this clan is Doyle Dane 
Bernbach ace copywriter David J. 
Herzbrun who uses his own work on 
the Rainier beer (a Seattle product 
made by Sicks Rainier Brewing Co.) 
ads (print and its radio counterpart) 
to illustrate here how the written 
word differs from the spoken word in 
selling the same product (see photos 

1 next page). 

"In print' says Herzbrun, "we have 

\ copy, illustration, layout, and typog- 



raphy." "In radio," he adds, "therei 
are different materials: spoken words, 
sounds, music and the personality of: 
human voices." The end products,, 
he points out. will, quite naturally,: 
differ enormously. 

The Rainier beer ad campaign I 
which involved the print and radio i 
ads shown here ran in several North- 
west coastal states (mostly Washing- 
ton) to introduce the company's 
innovation: a cold pack can carrier. 

In print the Rainier Beer sell was 
full-page ads in local newspapers and 
in the Saturday Evening Post re- 
gionally. The radio commercials were 
carried over area radio stations. 

The message which Rainier beer 
sought to project via these ads dealt 
mainly with the convenience of hand- 
ling the carrier case as a means 
explaining the "mystery" of the new 
cold pack process. There seemed, 
said Herzbrun, to be a bit of conjec- 
ture among consumers as to the work- 
ing method of the innovation. 

The approach to telling the same 
enlightenment story, however, is quite 
obviously, totally different. The print 
ad is blunt and the copy matter brief. 
The radio commercial, however, in- 
volves a true-to-life situation, with 
down-to-earth characters, and a 
sprinkling of ordinary-type humor. 

Herzbrun explains it like this: 
"when it comes to the problem of ex- 
plaining the cold pack method, I'dpl 
rather have two people, real-life kind 
of people, talking in ordinary, under- 
standable terms." 

To apply this same technique to 
print, says Herzbrun, would be ex- 
traneous. The picture in the ad tells 
the story, clearhy and concisely. "It 



. 



SPONSOR 



30 OCTOBER 196 L 



would be cluttered and terribly in- 
volved" he says, "and unnecessary." 
David Herzbrun who joined the 
creative staff of Doyle Dane Bern- 
bach about a year-and-a-half ago, has 
since that time, worked mainly on the 
Polaroid account. He came to DDB 
from CBS Radio where he was adver- 
tising director. Earlier in his career 
he was copy chief at Sudler & Hen- 
nessey; senior promotion writer at 

jTime, Inc.; and merchandising direc- 
tor, American Home magazine. 

For the past five years, Herzbrun 
has been instructing adult night stu- 
dents in the art of copywriting at 
X.Y.U. (see Agency Men Go For 

■'Moonlighting' Bit, 25 September, 
1961 sponsor). 

How exactly does a copywriter 
tackle the problems of making the 



same sales pitch in print and radio 
simultaneously ? 

There is no such thing as a "set 
of rules," declares Herzbrun," just 
guides and principles each writer 
makes or adopts for himself." 

"In writing for radio," Herzbrun 
says, "I always try to work visually. 
I imagine a scene, and try to find 
ways to make it come to life, either 
through the use of character voices 
or sound effects or both. These have 
to replace the visual elements avail- 
able in print." 

Apart from these obvious differ- 
ences, says Herzbrun, there is a dif- 
ference in the actual writing tech- 
nique. Words that look fine in com- 
bination when you read them on 
paper often sound confusing or awk- 
ward when thev're said aloud, he 



says. 

One of the main differences, ac- 
cording to the DDB creative writer, is 
sentence structure. Example: printed 
copy often uses an incomplete sen- 
tence or a phrase instead of a full 
sentence. 

In radio, says Herzbrun, this is apt 
to make the copy sound broken and 
spotty. The story has to flow smooth- 
ly and conversationallv to make it 
easily understood as it is read. 

There are other things to consider 
also, according to Herzbrun. He says 
"I have had to learn to avoid paren- 
thetical phrases (I like them in 
written copy) but I have never found 
an announcer who can say a paren- 
thesis." 

"I've also had to learn to write 
i Please turn to page 64) 




It takes two entirely different tacks to 
tell same story in radio and in print 



EORGE: Ethel, don't sit there. 
HEL (RHAPSODIC): Isn't it beautiful here? 
EORGE (FLATLY): Yeh, beautiful. Now get up. 
THEL: What a lovely view! 
5E0RGE: Yeh. Lovely. Now will you please get up? 
ITHEL (STUBBORNLY): Why? I'm comfortable. 

3E0RGE: Well, get uncomfortable. You're sitting on the Rainier Cold Pack. 
•THEL: Why not? It's strong enough. 

3E0RGE (SARCASTICALLY): You're not using your head, Ethel. I bought 
the Rainier in a Cold Pack because I like my beer cold. Now get up 
before you hatch it! 
1THEL (SWEETLY REASONABLE): Don't be silly, George. It's a Cold Pack, 
isn't it? They said it would keep the beer cold for hours. Refrigerate 
it like any 6 pack or 12 pack, they said, and your Rainier Beer stays 
cold up to six hours . . . without ice. 
iEORGE: They didn't say to sit on it for six hours. 
THEL: But it's insulated! 
EORGE (PATIENTLY): Ethel, the insulation is aluminum . . . and it works 

by reflecting the sun's rays and . . . and all that jazz. 
THEL: I don't understand a word you're saying. 
EORGE: Forget it, Ethel, forget it. But you'll have to get up anyway. 
THEL: Why? 

EORGE: Because I'm thirsty. 
THEL: So am I! Let's have a Rainier. 




. 



Both hold 12 cold cans of Rainier. Both will stay 
cold for hours. Which would you rather carry? 



Radio takes different tack in putting 
across same message projected by a 
magazine ad. In the Rainier beer ad, 
for example, in order to depict the 
carrying ease of the can carrier 
{shown above in the print ad by 
comparing old and new beer can 
toting methods) the copy icriter put 
liis radio characters in a picnic set- 
ting. The remainder of