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Full text of "Sprague's journal of Maine history"

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kman and the Moose River Region 




SPEOIAL EDITION 



/ / vy 






Maine Register 

You cannot afford to be with- 


COME TO 

Dow & Boyle's 


out this accurate information in 


FOR YOUR 


your office. It contains a vast 


STYLISH UP-TO-DATE 


amomit of statistical matter cover- 


CLOTHING 


ing every State interest, profession- 
al, commercial or political. 
Postpaid, $2.00. 


Adler's Collegian, Kirschbaum 

Clothes, Hercules Suits for Boys 

Ed. V. Price Tailoring Line 


G. M. DoNHAM, Publisher 


Gent's Furnishings 


390 Congress Street 


DON'T FORGET 


PORTLAND, - MAINE 


Dow & Boyle, Dover, Me. 


WINDSOR HOTEL 


LABOR SAVING 

Office Devices 


BANGOR, MAINE 


Filing Cabinets 




Card Index Systems 


EUROPEAN PLAN 


Loose Leaf Books 




Lithographing and Printing 


Rooms, Si. 00 up. Each Person 


Blank Books to Order 


Cafe Never Closed 


Duplicating Machines 
Send today for Circulars 


F. W. DURGIN, Prop. 


Loring, Short & Harmon 

Monument Sq. PORTLAND, ME. 


S. G. SANFORD & SON 


Card Index Cabinets 


Livery and Sales Stable 


Letter Filing Cabinets 


Stylish Rigs, Horses, Carriages, 


and Supplies for the same. 


Sleighs, Harness and Robes 
LARGEST, REPOSITORY 


TYPEWRITER 


IN EASTERN MAINE 


AND 


Teams To and From all Trains 


OFFICE SUPPLIES 


Summer Street, near M. C. R. R. Station 




FOXCROFT, MAINE 


C. 0. BARROWS CO. 


Phone 92-2 


Portland, Maine 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Index to Advertisers 

ABBOT VILLAGE. 



PAGE 

Buxton's Rheumatic Cure Co. xiv 
AUGUSTA. 

Central ]\Iaine Power Co xxii 

Hotel North xxiv 

IMaine State Bookbinding Co. xxii 
BAXGOR. 

Manhattan Cafe v 

J. P. Basis Publishing Co vi 

Bangor House v 

Leslie E. Jones. . . .Inside front cover 
John T. Clark & Co. Inside front cover 

B. & A. R. R. Co. .Inside front cover 

R. B. Dunning & Co iv 

F. W. Durgin Inside back cover 

Simon Cohen xxv 

DEXTER. 

C. H. Wyman xvi 

DOVER-FOXCROFT. 
Blethen Bros iv 

Dover. 
F. D. Barrows vi 

Foxcroft. 
Edward E. Whitney & Co.. vi 

Foxcroft. 
E. C. McKechnie xv 

Foxcroft. 
Hughes & Son vi 

Foxcroft. 
Dr. M. Estelle Lancaster ... xii 

Foxcroft. 
Piscataquis Savings Bank.... 

Inside front cover 

Dover. 
Kineo Trust Co Back cover 

Dover. 
Dow & Boyle Inside back cover 

Dover. 
S. G. Sanford & Son 

Inside back cover 

Foxcroft. 
Fred W. Palmer. .Inside front cover 

Dover. 
Sprague's Journal of ]\Iaine 

History xi, xxvi 

Dover. 
E. C. Smith xxiii 

Foxcroft. 
W. L. Sampson xxiv 

Foxcroft. 
Harford's Point Realty Co. .viii, ix, x 

Dover. 



Union Square Pharmacy . . . 
Foxcroft. 

Foxcroft Academy 

Foxcroft. 

GREEXVILLE. 

I. A. Harris 

GREEXVILLE JCT. 

Moosehead Clothing Co 

Arthur A. Crafts 

H. X. Bartley 

GUILFORD. 

C. S. Bennett 

J. K. Edes & Sons 

C. AI. Hilton 

H. Hudson & Son Back 

W. L. Hammond Granite & 

Marble Co 

V. H. Ellis Inside front 

Guilford Trust Co 

Straw & Martin 

HALLOWELL. 

Worster Bros 

JACKMAN. 
Dennystown Company 

E. A. Piper 

F. A. Dion 

O. S. Patterson 

D. Hancox 

Fred Pierce 

W. S. ^loore 

Albert Loubier 

D. C. Pierce 

C. H. Alills 

W. F. Jude 

Harry Stilhvell 

J. A. Bulmer 

J. S. Williams 

L. R. Moore, Jr 

Tames Sands 

Fred Henderson 

Harry A. Young 

E. A. Henderson 

JACKMAN STATIOX 

X'ehon W. Bartley 

A. G. Crawford 

Joseph J. Xichols 

Medie Rancout 

Arthur Rodrique 

W, L. Anderson 

Arthur Cathcart 

Thomas Vintinner 



PAGE 

xxiv 



xni 

53 
iv 

xiii 

ii 

iv 

cover 

xxi 

cover 
xxv 
xxiv 



XXVI 

xxi 

xii 

xviii 

xviii 

xviii 

xviii 

xix 

xiii 

xiii 

xiii 

xix 

xix 

xiii 

xiii 

xix 

xvii 

xvii 

xxi 

xxvii 
xiii 

xii 
xvii 

xii 
xiii 

xii 
xiv 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Index to Advertisers — Continued 



PAGE 

Edlord Founiier xxvii 

T. A. Murtha xxvii 

George Blais xii 

Henry P. McKenney iii 

KIXEO. 

Ricker Hotel Co 80 

MADISOX. 

Henry C. Prince xvi 

Harry S. Dyer xiv 

F. C. Clark Co xiv 

MONSON. 

W. H. Eldridge xii 

Portland-Monson Slate Co... 

Back cover 

PORTLAND. 
Wm. W. Roberts Co 

Inside front cover 

Smith & Sale ....Inside front cover 
Portland-Monson Slate Co... 

Back cover 

Forest City Trust Co Back cover 

G. M. Donham Inside back cover 

Loring, Short & Harmon . . . 

In-side back cover 



PAGE 



C .0. Barrows & Co 

Inside back cover 

A. J. Huston xi, xxiii, xxiv 

Fidelity Trust Co xxiii 

Crocker Photo & Engraving 

Co xxiii 

Shaw Business College xxv 

West End Hotel xxii 

H. J. Burrowes Co xxii 

U. S. Trust Co xxii 

Falmouth Hotel xxii 

Royal Remedy Co xxiv 

SKOVVHEGAN. 

Steward & Marston xv 

John C. Grifjfin xv 

Cullen & Wolfe xv 

Independent Reporter xvi 

The Fiiist National Bank . . . xvi 

Charles Folsom-Jones 53 

WATERVILLE. 

Sen'inel Publishing Co xxviii 

WILLIMANTIC . 

W. L. Earley xx 



A WOMAN'S WAY 

T IS NATURAL FOR A 
WOMAN to wait until she 
wants anything before she buys 
and then she wants it immedi- 
ately. If she fails to find the 
article, she goes to the store 
that has the goods. This is an important factor 
which we have studied since 1856, and it gives 
the stranger confidence to call at our store 
first, where she may find an up-to-date line of 
Dry and Fancy Goods and Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and prices that are reasonable. 
Mail Orders Receive Careful Attention. 




J. K. EDES & SONS 



GUILFORD, 



MAINE 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY iii 



Lake Parlin House 
and Camps 




In the Heart of the Great Maine Woods. 
On the Shores of Beautiful Lake Parlin. 
One of the Most Attractive and Commodious Summer 

Resorts in Northern Maine. 
On the Canada Road accessible by Automobiles and 

Thirteen miles from Jackman Station on C. P. R. 

Henry P. McKenney, Proprietor 

JACKMAN STATION, - - - - MAINE 

We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



iv SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

Established 1835 



>m-m3ucm>im4 



n n n nn m 




PISCATAQUIS EXCHANGE 

GREENVILLE JUNCTION, MAINE 
H. N. Bartiey, Proprietor 

At the foot of Moosehead Lake, the largest inland lake in New 
England, and the gateway to the best fishing and hunting region 
in the country. 

This Hotel is new and elegant, bath rooms, cold and hot water, 
and all of its equipments and appointments modern and up-to-date. 

$2.50--$3.00 PER DAY 



R. B. Dunning 
&Co. 

Seedsmen 

Dealers in 
Garden, Field and 

Grass Seeds 
Agricultural Imple- 
ments 
Dairy Supplies 
Poultry Supplies 
Woodenware 
Fertilizers, Lime 

Cement, Pumps 

Pipe, Pipe Fittings 

Etc. 

BANGOR, MAINE 

Send for Catalogue 



Blethen House 

Blethen Bros. Props. 
Dover, ^ ^ ^ Maine 

OARAGE 

Carriages To and From All Trains 



The Braeburn, 



C. M. HILTON 

PROPRIETOR 



Guilforci, /Waine 

One of the Best Equipped Hotels in Eastern Maine. 
Hot and Cold Water and Bath Rooms on Every Floor 

It is on the Automobile Map of Maine 

We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



\ 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



pansor House 

Sends its hearty greetings to the 
enterprising and puhhc spirited 
citizens and progressive business 
men of Jacl^man, 



= iWantjattan Cafe = 

QDfjc Hcabing Ecsitaurant anli Cafe in iHaitie 
Automobile Parties Stop at the 

iWani)attan 



Special Dinners for Parties 
Ladies' Dining Room up stairs 

J. H. RUSSELL, Prop. 

198-200 Exchange St., BANGOR, MAINE 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 
2 



/ 



vi SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

THE BANGOR COMMERCIAL 

MAINE'S BEST PAPER 

Trial subscription to Daily, $1.00 for three months 
Weekly, three months, for 25 cts. one year, $1.00 
The Commercial (Daily and Weekly) offers advertisers, the most powerful ad- 
vertising influence that can be brought to bear on Maine trade 

J. P. Bass Publishing Co., ''"^""'^"^"^bangor, maine 



INSURE 

Against Fire and Lightning 

WITH 

Edward E. Wliitney k Co. 

Opera House Block 

FOXCROFT, MAINE 

Wc arc General Insurance Agents 



HUGHES & SON 

Piano£i anb 

^laper ^ianog 

STRICTLY HIGH GRADE 

Hughes & Son Mlg. Co. 

FOXCROFT, MAINE 



P R I N T I N C^ 

We print School Papers, Class Programs and Invitations, School Sta- 
tionery, Wedding Cards and Announcements, Office Stationery, Ball Pro- 
grams, Window Cards and Posters, Booklets, Pamphlets, Business and 
Calling Cards. 

Fine Half-Tone and Color Printing. We aim for the better class of 
printing. Let us do your work. We work to please our patrons. 

FRED D. BARROWS 

SUMMER STREET, Telephone 145-5 FOXCROFT, MAINE 

Mail or Telephone Orders receive immediate attention. Our time is yours 



We kave positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



CONTENTS 53 



Squaw flftountain ITnn 

Moosehead Lake's New Hotel 

AUTO ROAD GARAQE 



Best Place in Northern Maine for you Auto Trip Dinner 

Long Distance Telephone Telegraph Service. Two Mails Daily 

Equipped with modern furnishings throughout; 

steam heat ; electric lights ; baths ; spring water 

In the Heart of Fishing and Hunting Region, and within two miles of 

the Bangor & Aroostook and Canadian Pacific R. R. 

Stations at Greenville Junction 

ARTHUR A. CRAFTS, Proprietor 
HORACE W. NEWENHAM, Manager 

Greenville function, - flDaine 

YEARS THE INSURANCE MAN 
OF SOMERSET COUNTY 

Never a Failure— Never a Lawsuit 
Wliat iViore Do You Want? 

Charles Folsom-Jones 

SKOWHEGAN 




CONTENTS 

Jackman and the Moose River Region 55 

Jackman's Live Business Men 73 

The Catholic Church and Its Schools 74 

Abram Newton 75 

Correspondence 17 

Maine Local Histories So 



54 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 





Lumber Mills of the Jackman Lumber Co. 
Jackman, Maine. 



Sprague's Journal of Maine History 

Vol. Ill JULY, 1915 No. 2 

Jackman and the Moose River 
Region 

By the Editor. 

On the northwesterly side of the State of Maine, in a north- 
easterly direction from the Rangeley Lakes, up in a vast wilder- 
ness among the mountains of Canada and back of the boundary 
range of mountains, (') may be found the sources of Moose River 
which flows in an easterly direction and empties into Moosehead 
Lake. Near its mouth at this lake is the pretty village of Rock- 
wood, at the terminus of the iMaine Central Railroad. 

The valley up and down this river, its streams, ponds, lakes, 
hills, meadows, sporting camps, farms and villages, with the moun- 
tainous grandeur in the distance, altogether constitute one of the 
real beauty spots in the wilderness country of Maine It possesses 
a charm peculiar to itself, incomparable with any other ; a unique- 
ness that is pronounced and instantly impresses the stranger wlio 
visits that region. He knows it, feels it, and at once becomes a 
part of it, and is obsessed with a spirit of its varied beauty. Its 
nearness to forests and wild life, its culture, its churches, its 



C) The boundary range of mountains are about fifteen miles^ westerly 
from Jackman and Moose River plantations, and are a section of the boun- 
dary line between Maine and Canada, and divide the waters which on the 
westerly side flow into the St. Lawrence, from those on the easterly side 
which flow into the State of Maine. They are a part of the "highlands" 
mentioned in the Treaty of 1783 and this word highlands was the storm 
center of the North Eastern Boundary Controversy between the English 
and American Governments for more than a half century and which was 
so serious at one time that a war between the two governments was barely 
averted. 

The Americans construed the word highlands as meaning any ridge of 
land that divided the waters whether actually high hills and mountains or 
otherwise. The English contention was that its proper definition was a 
high and mountainous region like the "highlands" of Scotland. The dispute 
raged and was acute until it was finally settled by the Webster-Ashburton 
Treaty in 1842. 

(See Collections of the Piscataquis Historical Society, Vol. i, pp. 216-441.) 



56 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

schools and its industrial activities so strongly blended with and 
unseparated from the primeval, enraptures him. 

The river is about 60 miles long and is notable for one rather 
curious feature, which is, that it is a continuation of ponds and 
lakes hut which are really only enlargements of the one river. 

The early settlers, the explorers, the lumbermen, guides, hunters 
and map makers, have all given these enlargements of Moose River 
district names and seemed to treat them as separate sheets of water. 

You have Attean Pond' and the Wood ponds. Long Pond and 
Brassua Lake, but after all they are only enlarged parts of this 
unique river. 

When the first voyagers arrived on the coast of Maine in the 
early days of the seventeenth century, they explored routes for 
a highway from this coast to Quebec in Canada. For more than 
two centuries it was a dream of the Colonists of New England 
which was never realized until the present road from the Kenne- 
bec to Quebec was opened to the public. This road was first sur- 
veyed and laid out by virtue of a resolve passed by the Legislature 
of Massachusetts, June 12, 1817. The Legislature of Maine did 
not act upon this matter until the session of 1826 when it passed 
a resolve authorizing the Governor and Council to appoint an 
agent for "the purpose of opening or causing to be cleared and 
made passable, the road called the Kennebec road, north of the 
million acre,^ in the county of Somerset." 

The session of 1827 passed a "Resolve relative to the State 
Road north of the Bingham Purchase." This resolve authorized 
the Governor and Council to appoint one or more agents "to 
examine the road from the north line of the Bingham Purchase, 
in the county of Somerset to the line of this State." It also pro- 
vided that these agents should cause to be made so much of said 
road, as passes over land belonging to this State, and one-half of 
so much of said road as passes over land belonging to this State 
and Massachusetts jointly, safe and convenient for travellers, with 
their horses, carts, sleighs and carriages. It also provided for the 
sale of a township six miles square of the state lands the proceeds 
of which should be used for this purpose. 

C) Also known as Lake Attean. 

C) The Kennebec Bingham Purchase was formerly known locally as 
the "Million Acres." 



JACKMAN AND THE MOOSE RIVER REGION 57 

On January 25, 1827, George Evans* made a report to the Legis- 
lature relative to this road in which it is stated that the object 
to which the favorable attention of the Legislature is solicited, has 
for a long period been regarded worthy of public patronage by 
the government of Massachusetts and this State. The following 
are excerpts from same : 

By virtue of a resolve passed by the Legislature of Massachusetts, in June, 
1817, the commissioners, for the sale and settlement of the public lands, 
caused a road to be surveyed during the same year, from the north line of 
the Bingham Purchase, in the county of Somerset, to the boundary line 
between this state, and Canada, in a direction toward the city of Quebec. 
The sum of five thousand dollars appropriated by the same resolve, was soon 
after expended under the direction of the commissioners, in opening the 
road which had been thus surveyed. Little more, however, was accomplished 
at that time, than cutting down the trees and smaller growth and the erec- 
tion of a substantial bridge at Moose River 

the road yet remaining unfinished, and although it has 

been occasionally used by drovers, who have found a favorable market in 
the British Provinces for horses and cattle, it is wholly impassable for 
carriages ; and the benefits anticipated from its establishment, have been 
but in small degree realized. 

In 1828 a resolve was passed authorizing further exploration of 
unfinished parts of the road. 

In 1830 the Legislature passed the following: 

Resolved, That the sum of four thousand and one hundred dollars, in 
addition to the unexpended balance of last year, be, and hereby is appro- 
priated for the purpose of making and completing, in a manner, convenient 
for carriages to pass thereon, that part of the Canada road so called, which 
is now unfinished, the same being about nine miles on the route examined 
and reported by Messrs. Redington, Sewall and Smith, situated in this 
State between the Canada line and the north line of the Bingham Purchase. 
The same resolve also appointed Charles Miller, of Waldoborough, and John 
C. Glidden, of Freedom, agents to perform this work. 

February 25, 1831, Francis O. J. Smith,^ chairman of a special 
legislative committee to wdiom was referred the resolve in favor 
of Miller and Glidden made an exhaustive report reciting a history 
of the road, of the alterations that had been made in it and of the 
relations and obligations of Massachusetts relative to it. 

C) Honorable George Evans of Gardiner, Maine, afterwards (1841- 
1847) U. S. Senator from the State of Maine. 

Honorable Francis. O. J. Smith of Portland, Maine, a prominent 
public man of that time. He was a lawyer, politician and journalist and 
Member of Congress three terms (1833-1839.) 



58 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

In 1832 Jarius S. Keith, chairman of a special committee made 
a report to the Senate regarding matters in dispute about the road, 
a considerable portion of which was in reference to changing its 
course so that it would run west of Bald Mountain. In this report 
it was stated that Quebec had already become an important market 

for the sale of Maine cattle, horses and sheep that 1,394 

beef cattle, 249 horses, 956 sheep, and 14 tons of fresh fish, passed 
over that road for the Quebec market, between the first day of 
January and the 31st day of December, 183 1. This information 
was obtained from the Custom House officer stationed on this road. 
The following is one of the reports of the agents appointed to 
open this road made to the Governor and Council in 1830, and ex- 
plains the situation at that time so clearly and concisely that we 
copy it in full : 

REPORT. 

To the Governor and Council of the State of Maine: 

The undersigned, Agents appointed on the first day of March, A. D. 1828, 
under the Resolve passed the 24th of January, of the same year, entitled, 
"Resolve relating to the State road north of the Bingham purchase ;" other- 
wise called the Canada road, to make or cause to be made under their 
personal superintendence the road aforesaid, now submit their accounts 
for settlement, W\t\\ the following report of their doings and the present 
situation of the road. 

Under the authority of the Resolve aforesaid, the Agents selected the 
Township No. i, 2d Range North of the Bingham purchase, containing 
18,284 acres, and the same was sold on the day of July, 1828, by the 

Land Agent, on credit, at thirty cents per acre, amounting to $5,485.20, of 
which sum $5,coo was appropriated by the Resolve, for making the road, 
together with $4,187.60, the proceeds of the sale of the township granted by 
Massachusetts, total amount of the appropriation $9,187.60, exclusive of 
interest, which has amounted to $291.11 on the sale of the land appropri- 
ated by Maine, and $318.65 on that granted by Massachusetts. 

The reasons which influenced the agents to advise to sell on credit 
were, that the land would probably bring a higher price, and the season 
was too far advanced to comknience work that summer. The road through 
the north part of the Bingham purchase, about forty miles, was extremely 
bad, and supplies for the workmen could not be transported at that season 
without great expense. Moose river Bridge only, was repaired in the 
autumn of 1828, and the following winter was agreed upon for transporting 
tools and provisions on to the ground, to be in readiness to commence 
work the last spring. 

The Agents decided in favor of making a good carriage road, and the 
Agent of the Bingham heirs pledged himself to us, that he would make 
the roati over the Bingham land, as good as that made by the State, let 
us make it as well as we would. It is obviously for the interest of the 



JACKMAN AND THE MOOSE RIVER REGION 59 



State to make a good road over the public land, if by so doing a like good 
road for the additional distance of forty miles, can be obtained. During 
the two last years the Agent for the Bingham heirs has done much to 
improve the road over their lands, and the undersigned have full confidence 
that he v^^ill redeem his pledge. Travellers report that the inhabitants on 
the Canada side of the line are anxious for the completion of the road, and 
that from sixty to seventy men were employed to make the same, in that 
Province the last summer. 

The tools and part of the provisions necessary for the work were pur- 
chased ; principally in Hallowell and Augusta early last winter ; corn and 
grain was procured in Xorridgewock; and the whole transported to the 
vicinity of the road by sleding last winter. The unusual deep snows in- 
creased the expense of transportation and rendered it extremely difficult 
to forward the articles to their place of destination. 

A few hands were employed in the month of May to build camps and 
make the necessary preparation, and from the beginning of June until the 
last of September the average number of men who laboured on the road 
was about sixty, with eight pairs of oxen. 

The Agents had to encounter many difficulties and suffer many incon- 
veniences. The most part of the provisions and tools were transported over 
one hundred miles by land. Hay and provender from ten to one hundred 
miles. Iron and iron work for repairing tools and shoes for oxen was 
an expensive bill. Fifteen miles of the road is made of sufficient width 
for one carriage to pass another, and well turnpiked, except about half a 
mile, which was postponed on account of the rains ; and the trees cut and 
cleared away so that the path may not be hereafter obstructed by windfalls. 
The ledges were removed or lowered by burning wood upon them instead 
of blasting with powder : in places where the rocks could not be moved, 
they were burnt and levelled with sledges and then covered with earth. 

Nine miles remain to be opened, and when made, the whole distance of 
twenty-four miles from the north line of the Bingham purchase to the 
Canada line, will be more level than the present post road from Augusta 
to Bangor. Part of the land over which the road passes is suitable for 
cultivation, and part is very rocky and barren. 

The Agents are fully satisfied of the importance of the road to this 
State, by the number of travellers who pass through it, even before it is 
opened, and they have information in which full confidence may be placed, 
that numerous travellers from the South in the summer season are desirous 
of passing through Maine, on their way to or from Quebec. 

When the work was suspended, the oxen purchased in the spring were 
sold, and notes for the same, payable to the Treasurer of the State with 
interest, are now in the hands of the agents. The average expense to 
the State for the use of a pair of oxen nearly four months, has been about 
$20, and would have been less had not the price of stock been unusually low 
in autumn, compared with prices in spring, when the oxen were purchased. 

The provisions and tools remaining on hand are well secured for use 
next spring. An inventory thereof is herewith submitted. All bills are 
paid, and to effect this the Agents were obliged to hire money, while that 
appropriated to make the road was lying in the Treasury of the State. 

3 



6o SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



The whole amount expended on the road is $9,373.81 including interest on 
money borrowed of the Vassalborough Bank. 

There is nine miles of road to make, and there remains of the appro- 
priation unexpended, 

including interest, $437 36 

Articles sold belonging to the State 81 00 

Proceeds of the sale of Oxen 429 IQ 

Supplies and tools on hand 383 49 

Total $1,331 04 

The State of Maine is obliged by the terms of agreement with Massa- 
chusetts to complete the road by the first day of November next, or forfeir 
the amount of the sale of the land granted by that Commonwealth, and the 
undersigned are of opinion that a further appropriation of $4,500 will be 
necessary to meet the expense, and they are further of opinion, that the 
expense of making the road has been increasd by the appointment of three 
agents instead of one. 

Which is respectfully submitted, 

JOFX WHITNEY, 
SAMUEL REDINGTON, Agents. 

JOSEPH JOHNSON, 
February 17, 1830. 

It is difficult to fix the precise date when the entire length of 
this road was opened or made passable to the public for the use 
of teams, carriages and vehicles of all kinds. It must have been 
somewhere from 1837 to 1840. From the time ]Massachusetts 
made the first beginning towards it (1817) as we have seen, it 
must have been about twenty years in developing into a passable 
and travelled road. It is not strange that the building of such a 
highway passing through fertile lands suitable for settlers even 
though it was situated far into the most northern portion of Maine, 
should attract the hardy pioneer and adventurer seeking a new 
region for home building. In about two years from the time when 
the Massachusetts Legislature passed the resolve above referred 
to the first settler made his appearance on the line of the Canada 
road, in what is now known as Moose River plantation and had 
become quite a substantial farmer some years before the road itself 
was a reality. This plantation is situated 76 miles north of Skow- 
hegan and 15 miles south of the Canada line. 

The following relating to the early history of Moose River 
Plantation, which Plantation formerly embraced what is now Jack- 
man and Denny stown plantations, was furnished the Journal by 
Mrs. Grace N. Sterling: 



JACKMAN AND THE MOOSE RIVER REGION 



6i 




"The first settlers of Moose River, Maine, were Captain Samuel 
Holden and his wife. Jane Famsworth Holden of Groton, Massa- 
chusetts. Captain Holden started from Anson. Maine, for Moose 

River, Maine, on 
March 4th, 1819. 
They made the 
journey from 
the forks of the 
Kennebec River 
(now known as 
The Forks) to 
Moose River on 
snow - shoes, as 
the snow was 
deep in the 
woods at this 

Log Hauling in the Maine Woods in 1815 ^mie of year. 

Captain Holden 
built a log cabin, covered it with bark and here they made their 
home in the midst of the wilderness. There was not an inhabitant 
for miles around and had it not been for the abundance of fish in 
the river and the game in the surrounding forests, they could not 
have lived ; but 
this together 
with the small 
amounts re- 
ceived from 
travelers that 
were passing 
back and forth 
from Canada, as 
shown by the ac- 
count books of 
Mr. Holden, en- 
abled them to 
obtain a living 
the first, sec- 
ond and third years. After this time they were enabled to 
raise small crops and before long (1822) the Captain had a plenty. 
Before his death there was quite a settlement formed around him. 
Captain Samuel Holden was the fourth child of Jahei and Rachel 




Log Hauling in the Maine Woods, 1915 



62 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Farnsworth Holden of Groton, Massachusetts. Jahez Holden was 
born May 12th, 1735, and married Rachel Farnsworth who was 
born Jan. 29th, 1738. They were married on the nth day of June, 
when she was twenty-three years of age. To this union six chil- 
dren were born, and when the youngest, who were twins, were 
born Jahez Holden enlisted and fought in the Revolutionary War. 
The following story was told to the writer by Mr. Jonas Colby as 
he heard it from his grandfather: 'At the battle of Bunker Hill, 
an entrenchment was dug breast high to protect them from the 
British. The British came in at the end and the Yankees ran be- 
cause they were out of ammunition. Jahez Holden had his musket 
loaded with nine buck shots, he was looking at the British instead 
of his own men, he fired and this is what he said 'if powder and 
ball ever killed human beings it must have killed some there ' 
Mr. Holden was wounded in the side, the ball grazed the skin, and 
he had his arm broken, but still carried the gun. This is the 
record found in Groton during the Revolution, 'Massachusetts 
Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution', Vol. 8, pp. 
33-100: 'Jahez Holden, Groton, Captain ist Company 6th Mid- 
dlesex County Regiment of Massachusetts Alilitia, list of officers 
commissioned April 24. 1776, also Captain 6th Company. Return 
dated Groton, Dec. 5, 1776, made by Brigadier General Oliver 
Precot, of officers appointed to command men drafted from Mid- 
dlesex County Militia into a regiment to be commanded by Colonel 
Samuel Thatcher and ordered to march to Fairfield. Connecticut, 
on or before Dec. 16, 1776. Company drafted from the 6th Mid- 
dlesex County regiment and made up of men from Groton, Pep- 
perell, Townsend and Ashley, Massachusetts.' Captain Jahez 
Holden died June 2nd, 1807 and his wife Rachel Holden moved to 
Moose River with her son. Captain Samuel Holden, where she 
died Jan. 26th, 1829, at the advanced age of 91 years. She is 
buried in the Holden cemetery at Moose River, Maine. Captain 
Samuel Holden's family consisted of eleven children all of these 
being born at Anson, Maine, with the exception of two daughters 
and one son who were born in Groton, Massachusetts." 

Mrs. Lucinda Holden Campbell of Jackman has in her posses- 
sion the following letter : 

'Moose River, Maine, June 5th, 1820. 
Dear Sister & Brother : 

I take this opportunity to write to you and to let you know of 
our health, which is very good at present, through Almighty good- 



JACKMAN AND THE MOOSE RIVER REGION 63 



ness, and while He is lifting up with one hand Pie is pulling down 
with the other. We moved to Moose River last March Fifty- 
three miles from any inhabitant and lived very comfortably till 
the 1st day of May, when our house took fire and was consumed 
with all its contents and left us destitute of provisions or anything 
else. I lost all my bedding and am obliged to lie on the ground 
in a very poor camp. Now if you have any feeling of charity for a 
distressed sister I wish you to send me something, you and the 
rest of my aunts and cousins, if they feel sympathy. Please to 
send me some salt if nothing else, send it to John Eveleth of Au- 
gusta, and send me a letter directed to Moose River to be left at 
Anson P. O. Tlie fire burnt up ten acres of winter rye. Our 
loss is about $1,000. I have worked out doors thirty-six days, not 
having anything to do. This from your distressed sister and 

brother. 

JANE HOLDEN." 

Address on letter 

To Amos Otis, 

Barnstable 

Postage 18 1-2.' 

"This house which is referred to in this letter was built on the 
farm now owned by Richard Holden. The old cellar can yet be 
seen. After this was burned the second camp was built, where 
Willie Pierce lives today. After this camp had served its purpose 
and Captain Samuel prospered he built a frame house which is 
still standing and is occupied by W. J. Murtha. After Captain 
Samuel Holden opened the way several other families moved in 
and settled around, one of them being Asa Churchill, who built 
a house on the farm now owned in Jackman village by A. Guay. 
Some parts of the ,old house still exist, in different places in town. 
The second house in Jackman plantation was built by Milmtus 
Holden on what is now known as the Colby farm. 

'The town of Jackman derived its name from Jim Jackman of 
Solon, Maine, who cleared and settled on what is known as the 
'Old Jackman Field' 10 miles south of Moose River bridge. The 
date is unknown.. 

"Captain Samuel Holden was a very religious man. as he was 
always ready to entertain any preacher that might come into the 
town, and early records show that different preachers of several 
different denominations came occasionally to hold services and 



64 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



from an early date a Sunday School was conducted in the homes 
and schoolhouse, dating back to 1847." 

"The Free Will Baptist Church was organized in 1875 in the 
Union Church at Moose River, fourteen members formed the 
organization. In 1855 Captain Holden in the absence of a minister 
officiated at the funerals. In i8go the Free Will Baptist Church 
united with the Congregationalists and the IMoose River Congrega- 
tional Church of Jackman was organized. In 1912 a very com- 
fortable little parsonage was built. The present Pastor is the 
Rev. R. E. Jones." 

On Tuesday, May 24, 1892, this new and attractive church edi- 
fice (Congregational) was dedicated to the service of religious 

work in accord- 
'S^.. 'iHnHHHH ance with the 

ritual of that de- 
nomination. The 
invocation was 
by the Reverend 
Andrew L. 
Chase of Fox- 
:roft, Mai n e, 
and Prayer by 
Reverend Salem 
D. Towne. The 
dedicatory ser- 
mon was deliv- 
ered by the Rev- 
erend Charles Davison of Greenville. Then followed the dedica- 
tion of the House of Worship as above mentioned; the prayer of 
Dedication was by Reverend J. E. Adams D. D., and the benedic- 
tion by Reverend Charles Davison. 

This church has ever since then been in a very prosperous con- 
dition and has done good work along the lines for which it was 
established. 



.JLim. f 




' 4m '\mn ' d^ " ' 


% f, 


HHE3™Sl^^T3js^%^* *'*'*^^^ 




^^^^^^H^ Lr''^*^^ 



The Moose River Bridge 



NOTES FROM THE FIRST RECORD BOOK 
OF THE PLANTATION OF MOOSE RIVER. 
FROM 1852 TO 1859. 
TO CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON, ESQ. 
Pursuant to a written application signed by you and four other 
inhabitants of townships No. four Range one and No. four Range 



JACKMAN AND THE MOOSE RIVER REGION 65 

two and Sandy Bay Township (so called) north of the Bingham 
Kennebec purchase in the county of Somerset, Demon- 
strated Moose River Plantation. 

You are hereby required in the name of the State of Maine to 
notify and warn the Electors of the said Moose River plantation 
comprising the aforesaid Townships qualified according to the 
Constitution of this state or of the United States, to assemble at 
the dwelling house of Christopher Thomas in said Plantation on 
Saturday the sixteenth day of October inst. at one of Clock in the 
afternoon for the purpose of transacting the following business to 
wit: 

First to Choose a plantation Clerk and three assessors Given 
under my hand this first day of October in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and fifty two. 

SULLIVAN LOUTHROP 

One of the County 

Commissioners for 

Somerset County. 
Pursuant to the within warrant, I have notified the within 
named inhabitants to meete at the within place and time by post- 
ing up notices in two different places in said plantation as by Law 
required. 

CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON. 
Moose River, Oct. 16, 1852. 
Pursuant to the foregoing warrant the inhabitants assembled 
at the foregoing place and organized by Choosing Samuel Wey- 
mouth Moderator, Otis Holden Clerk and Otis Holden, Molentus 
Holden and Josiah F. Whitney assessors. 
Copy attest 

OTIS HOLDEN, 

Plantation Clerk. 
Art. first, chose Samuel Weymouth Moderator. 
Art 2d, chose Otis Holden Clerk. 

Art. 3, chose Otis Holden, Malintus Holden, Josiah Whitney 
Assessors sd Plantation. 

4th, voted to hold the next meeting at Christopher Thompson's. 

OTIS HOLDEN. 

Plantation Clerk. 
Personally appeared before me Samuel Weymouth and took the 
oath as moderator within and for the Plantation of IMoose River 
this sixteenth day of October, 1852. 

CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON, Justice of the Peace. 



66 SPRAGJE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Personally appeared Otis Holden before me and took the oath 
as Clerk of the Moose 'River Plantation this sixteenth day of Octo- 
ber, 1852. 

CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON, Justice of the Peace. 
Personally appeared Otis Holden, Malintus Holden and Josiah 
F. Whitney and took the oath as assessors with and for the Plan- 
tation of Moose River this sixteenth day of October, 1852. 

CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON, Justice of the Peace. 
Copy Attest 

OTIS HOLDEN, 

Plantation Clerk. 

The next plantation meeting was held April 2, 1853, when the 
same officers were again elected. 

It was voted "that Moose River plantation shall compose one 
school district" and 'Christopher Thompson was elected School 
Agent. No money was raised for any purpose. 

At the September election in 1852 the whole number of votes 
cast was twenty-two. 

The annual plantation meeting in 1854 was held at the dwelling 
house of Otis Holden on the thirteenth day of April. Otis Holden, 
Melintus Holden and Benjamin Holden were elected assessors at 
this meeting. 

In 1855 Otis Holden, Philander M. Colby and Melintus Holden 
were elected assessors, and Philander M. Colby was elected school 
agent. 

At the same meeting held on the twelfth day of March an 
agreement by certain of the inhabitants was entered into to erect 
a schoolhouse by su'bscriptioii "to remain the property of such in- 
habitants as shall pay a part of the cost of said house if said house 
should be sold or disposed of for the purpose of building a bigger 
one or any other purpose the sum sold for to be invested in another 
schoolhouse or paid back to such persons as paid in a part for 
building said house." 

The subscribers were : 

Otis Holden $25.00 

P. M. Colby 15.00 

Z. Bumpus 10.00 

Samuel Holden, Jr I5-0O 

Galon Newton 25.00 

Benjamin Holden 12.00 



JACKMAN AND THE MOOSE RIVER REGION 67 

M. Holden 20.00 

Josiah F. Whitney 1500 

F. G. Pressey 10.00 

Patrick McKenna 10.00 

Richard Harris 5.50 

In 1856 William H, Durgin was elected Clerk. The meeting was 
held that year at the "tavern House" of Otis Holden. 
The list of voters recorded in 1859 is as follows: 

Austin Holden Elisha Hilton 

Philander M. Colby Jason Hilton 

Zeppenian Bumpus Jonah Hilton 

Roibert J. Campbell Sherwin Hilton 

Caleb ]\Iorton Jacob F. Newton 

Peter Kinney H. H. Colby 

Seth Moore Alexander Sands 

Elisha C. Moore Edward Sands 

Llewellyn Moore Spencer Colby 

Ephraim Aloore Franklin G. Pressey 

Galon Newton Otis Holden 

Horatio Newton William Ray, Jr. 

Otis Newton . Jonas Colby 

John Keliher Melintus Holden, Jr. 

The building of the Canada road soon begun to attract the 
pioneer always in search of a new country to subdue and in a few 
years after Captain Holden had invaded this wilderness, others 
settled along the line of the road, and about the year 1830, settlers 
were clearing lands and opening farms in that part of Moose 
River plantation that is now the thriving village of Jackman. 
Among these were Seth Moore, Patrick McKennay who emigrated 
from the north of Ireland when about 17 years of age, to the city 
of Quebec and in 1830 or 1831 settled here; Cyrus Whitney, 
Michiel Redmund, David Roache, and James Jackman for whom 
the settlement was named. 

Both Moose River and Jackman although each have more in- 
habitants than many Maine towns, are yet legally plantations, 
having since their first organization by the County Commissioners 
each been reorganized under the statutes of Maine relating to 



68 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

plantations "having not less than two hundred inhabitants.'" In 
these plantations are villages originally located along the Canada 
road and so closely connected that a stranger does not perceive 
the line of division. The Canada road is now and probably always 
will remain the main street of these twin villages, although now 
one sees pretty little cross streets being laid out and some fine 
dwellings being erected. 

Prior to the opening of the railroad, which is a part of the main 
line running from Halifax to the Pacific coast, Jackman was an 
isolated place which in those days, until the opening of the rail- 
road, seemed destined to remain so for a long period of time. 

And right here we quote an interesting letter recently received 
from Honorable Sylvester J. Walton an emiment Maine lawyer and 
public man of note having represented Somerset County in both 
branches of the Legislature and the Executive Council of Maine. 
For a quarter of a century and more Mr. Walton has annually, 
and often semi-annually, visited this charming region while on 
fishing and hunting trips, for he is a true lover of the woods and 
woods and lake sports. 

"Skowhegan, Me., June i6, 1915. 
"Editor of S Prague's Journal of Maine History- 

"I understand you have in view the writing a short history of 
Jackman, Moose River and Dennystown. The same will certainly 
be interesting, not only to the people who were buried in the vast 
wilderness in the western part of Somerset county until the advent 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway some twenty-five years ago. Be- 
fore that time the nearest settlement of any size was at Bingham 
fifty miles away. No physicians nearer than 55 miles although 
often needed. No lawyers nearer than 55 miles, not needed, for the 
inhabitants for lack of attorneys and courts resorted to self de- 
fense, the first great law of nature. 

*T remember the first time I was at Jackman I attended the 
first morning of my arrival a wedding, a wedding supper and four 
fights and when I attempted to separate the combatants in the 

(*) Revised Statutes of INIaine 1903, Sec. 114, p. 89. Township 4, Range 
I, was first iccorporated as Jackmantown plantation, July 9th, 1859, and 
reorganized February 17, 1894, under the name of Jackman. It was the 
design of the writer to make record herein of the organization of Jackman 
similar to that which appears on these pages regarding Moose River 
plantation. Mr. Melvin E. Holden, the clerk of the latter plantation is a 
careful custodian of the early records and is preserving them properly. 
The Jackman clerk however was unable to produce his records and they 
were presumably lost. 



JACKMAN AND THE MOOSE RIVER REGION 69 

first fight, I was taken by the arm and led away with the admoni- 
tion that I had better keep away and let them fight it out, for if I 
did not, I might get a knock out myself. There were no stores in 
those days nearer than Bingham, except one at Moose River and 
no mills except one saw mill. 

"For thirty years I have never failed to visit that remote settle- 
ment from my home in Skowhegan once or more each year, and I 
have never found a more kind, whole souled people than there. 
Times of course have changed now, with them lawyers, a dozen 
stores of all kinds and two or three physicians and a great influx 
of people from without, Jackman and Moose River have become 
hustling places, yet I doubt if the people live now nearer to nature 
than they did in the old days. 

"Truly yours, 

"S. J. WALTON." 
In 1910 the population of Jackman was 667 and Moose River 251. 
Each has increased since then and it is estimated that Jackman now 
has about 1,200 ihabitants. Dennystown is an adjoining planta- 
tion and Long 
Pond plantation 
is eight miles be- 
low, where is 
located the Kel- 
logg Lumber 
Company, that 
employs about 
75 men in its 
mills and 200 or 
more laborers 
in the woods. 
The Canadian 
, ,, . c ,, Pacific Railway 

r u n s througn 
Jackman where it maintains a depot, freight houses etc. 

Jackman must always be the trading and business center for 
plantations and settlements contiguous to it and along the line of 
the railroad and the Canada road as follows : Dennystown, Long 
Pond, Somerset Junction, Attean, Holeb, Franklin, Skinners Mills, 
Lowelltown, Parlin Pond, where Henry McKenney has a commo- 
dious summer resort and near which is the magnificent summer 
home of Michiel Piel of New York; and on the Canada side are 
Marlow, St. Come and St. George in near proximity. 




70 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



The vast forestry of spruce and other valuable timber surround- 
ing it makes it a lumber center of importance. Much of this lum- 
ber territory is not accessible to river driving without great expense, 
but the problem of getting it to market more profitably was solved 
by Mr. Abram Newton, through whose energetic efforts capitalists 
were induced to make large investments in these lands the result 
of which was the establishment of the Jackman Lumber Company, 
although its mills are situated on the Moose River side of the 
boundary line that divides it from Jackman. This corporation 
was organized in March, 19 14. Its president is Honorable George 
H. Prouty' of Newport, Vermont, who has been Governor of that 
State (1908-1910) and well known as a business man of ability 
throughout New England; its treasurer is F. L. Perry of Boston 
and a member of the Perry and Whitney Company' lumber con- 
cern, and Chester C. Whitney of Boston is its secretary and assis- 
tant treasurer, Abram Newton of Jackman is the General Manager 
of its lumbering property and forestry interests. It has erected 
mills which have a capacity of sawing 125 thousand feet of long 
lumber per day, and from 25 to 30 million feet of lumber annually, 
and will manufacture all kinds of wood and lumber products. It 
is estimated that this corporation owns 200 million feet of standing 
timber besides being a large purchaser of stumpage. A logging 
railroad has been built from the C. P. Railway station in Jackman 
to its mill two miles distant and has already been extended into 
the woods five miles beyond and at the present time has a force of 
laborers extending it eight miles further and ultimately this lum- 
ber railroad will be not less than twenty miles in length. At the 
mills it has a large boarding house and cottages are being built for 
its laborers. It employs about 100 men in the manufacture of 
lumber and when in full swing will furnish employment to from 
five to six hundred men in the woods. 

The New Castle Lumber Company is another Jackman lumber 
concern that begun operations in 1914. It saws seven milion feet 
or more of long lumber annually and has a capacity for sawing 
thirty thousand feet per day and when in operation employs from 
50 to 75 men in the mills. George D. Pastorius of New Castle, 

C) Prouty and Miller of Newport, Vermont, are extensive dealers in, 
and manufacturers' of lumber. 

C) The Perry & Whitney Company of Boston are among the largest 
wholesale dealers in lumber in New England, and are extensive manufac- 
turers of long lumber, spruce dimensions, building frames, etc. 



JACKMAN AND THE MOOSE RIVER REGION 71 

Maine, is its General Manager and Joseph E, Shaw is the superin- 
tendent. 

There is one Post Office at Moose River and two in Jackman, 
one at the village and one at Jackman Station. 

Jackman has four general stores ; two clothing stores ; one fur- 
niture store and undertaker; one millinery establishment; one jew- 
eler ; two drug stores ; one hardware store ; one dealer in harnesses, 
etc. ; two or three markets and the Dennystown Company have two 
large grocery and provision stores, one in each village. There are 
also blacksmiths, barbers, photographers, a taxidermist, a plumber, 
a harness maker ; restaurants ; a cant dog manufacturer ; two hay 
and grain dealers ; garages ; a sporting goods store ; shoemakers, 
and several engaged in the lumbering business. 

It differs from the times that Mr. Walton speaks of for it now 
supports three lawyers ; two deputy sheriffs ; two clergymen and 
two doctors. There are twelve registered guides and five or six 
sporting camps all well filled during the summer season and two 
hotels. Besides the church organizations it has among its fraternal 
orders the Foresters, the ]Macabees, the Modern Woodmen and 
Moose River Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
The latter lodge was instituted June 9, 1915, by Harry Reid, G. M.; 
John E. Bunker, D. G. M. ; Willis E. Parsons, G. W. ; and Wm. W. 
Cutter, G. Sec. Among other members of the Grand Lodge who 
were present were Walter H. Blethen and John F. Sprague of 
Dover and S. L. Berry of Waterville. On the evening of June 10, 
a large nuntber of applicants were received into the new lodge, the 
ritualistic work having been most excellently performed by the 
members of New England Lodge of Greenville." 

This lodge started under the most favorable auspices having Mr. 
O. S. Patterson, the Customs Officer at Jackman, for its first 
Noble Grand supported by an efficient board of officers. 

The Moose River Hotel at Jackman Station, Nelson W. Bartley, 
proprietor, is a commodious and attractive hostelry with all up-to- 
date facilities for the entertainment of guests and is receiving a 
liberal patronage from the traveling public. These villages have 
electric light and water systems. Their public schools are excellent 
and efficient and they are also supporting a public library and Jack- 
man has a good public hall. 



C)The ladies of Jackman and Aloose River are entitled to great credit 
for the superb banquet provided by them on this occasion. 



r^ SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Another enterprise that will in the future prove to be of inestima- 
ble value to the Moose River region is the new State highway 
from Jackman to Rockwood and the Kineo Station on the Maine 
Central railroad on the westerly shore of Moose Head Lake a dis- 
tance of 30 miles, and now under construction by the State High- 
way Commission. 

By the united efforts of many of the citizens, these plantations, 
the M. C. railroad, the Ricker Hotel Company, Somerset County, 
and the State of Maine, this great work has been assured. 

At the last session of the Maine Legislature the state appropriated 
the sum of $22,500.00 and the other interests added to it $23,500.00, 
so that the road will probably be opened to the public within the 
next year. In addition to this the Hollingsiworth and Whitney Com- 
pany dedicated to the state three miles of good road that they had 
already constructed and which is made a part of this road, and 
the Great Northern Paper Company also dedicated two miles of 
road in equally as good condition. These corporations and all of 
the^ owners of lands over which it passes, donated to the state all 
of the land damages which they might have been legally entitled to. 
Along its line is much excellent land now only lying in waste and 
better adapted to farming than timber growing; and undoubtedly 
settlers will locate there in the near future. This is one of the 
most commendable things that the State of Maine has done during' 
the last half century, and we hope that it is but the beginning of a 
wiser and broader state policy; one that will continually aid in the 
development of Maine ; utilize her many latent resources, and do 
something towards inducing her young men and young women to- 
remain at home. 



JACKMAN'S LIVE BUSINESS MEN 



Jackman's Live Business Men 

When an opportunity presents itself to give worthy publicity 
to a town by printer's ink its most enterprising and public spirited 
business men are always alert to aid it and their own individual 
enterprises at the same time by their advertisements. This was the 
case at Jackman when this special issue of the Journal was sug- 
gested to them. Following is a list of those who have been benefited 
by availing themselves of this and we can avouch for their integ- 
rity and square business dealings, and certify that they are THE 
hustling, enterprising, and REAL LIVE WIRES in the business 
affairs of Jackman : 



Nelson W. Bartley, 
Dennystown Company, 

E. A. Piper, 

F. A. Dion, 

O. S. Patterson, 
D. Hancox, 
Fred Pierce, 
W. S. ^loore, 
A. G. Crawford, 
Albert Loubier, 
Joseph J. Nichols, 
Medie Rancout, 

D. C. Pierce, 
Arthur Rodrique, 
W. L. Anderson, 
C. H. Mills. 

W. F. Jude, 
Arthur Cathcart, 
Harr>' Stillwell, 
J. A. Buhner, 
Thomas \"intinner, 
Edlord Fournier, 
J. S. Williams, 
L. R. Moore, 
James Sands, 
T. A. Murtha. 
George Blais. 
Fred Henderson, 
Harry A. Young, 

E. A. Henderson, 
Henry P. McKenney, 



Hotel. 

Groceries, etc. 
Real Estate. 

Druggist and Sporting Goods. 
Insurance. 

Clothing and Dry Goods. 
Jeweler. 

Furniture and Undertaker. 
Day and Night Restaurant. 
Restaurant. 
Jeweler. 
Barber Shop. 
Deputy Sheriff. 
Photographer. 
Lawyer. 
Lawyer. 
Lawyer. 
Autos. 

Harnesses and Picture House. 
Garage. 
General Store. 

Fruit Stand and Picture House. 
Blacksmith and Cant Dogs. 
Restaurant. 

Restaurant and Dealer in Furs. 
Hotel. 

Barber Shop. 
Heald Pond Camps. 
Carpenter and Contractor. 
Wood Pond Camps. 
Lake Parlin Hotel and Camps. 



7A 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



The Catholic Church and Its 
Schools 

At the Jackman Station Village are St. Anthony's church, the 
Sacred Heart Convent and the St. Anthony Parochial School, the 
result of the zealous and indefatigable labors of its pastor the Rev. 
Joseph F. Forest, P. P., who came here in 1892. Father Forest is 

a native of Can- 
ada and was 
educated in the 
As s u m p t i o n 
College at Mon- 
treal. Prior to 
his coming here 
the Catholics 
had only re- 
ceived occasion- 
al visits from 
Canadian 
priests. In the 
first years his 
pastorate duties 
extended over a very large territory embracing all of northern 
Somerset, Greenville and the entire region to the Canada line. 
The church was built in 1893. The convent, which is a magni- 
ficent granite building of four stories 65 feet on the street and 55 
feet back, was built in 1907. 

The parochial school building of three stories, sixty feet in width 
and seventy-eight feet in length, was completed in 1912 and an 
annex for boys to it in 1914. 

Two hundred and fifty scholars are in regular attendance, some 
of them from many parts of Maine, and one hundred and twenty- 
five of them board at the Convent. 

At the Convent are sixteen sisters presided over by Mother 
Superior Mary Phillippine from the St. Joseph Sisters of Lyons, 
France, who are the teachers in the school. 

In the parish comprising Jackman and the surrounding planta- 
tions and settlements about 175 families are communicants of the 
St. Anthony church. 




Sacred Heart Convent, Jackman, Maine 



ABRAM NEWTON 



75 



Abram Newton 



Abram Newton was born October lo, 1863, at Dennystown Plan- 
tation, and was the eldest son of Horatio and Luretta Newton. His 
early life was passed on the farm, with school privilege of only a 
very few weeks each year, the nearest schoolhonse being about five 
miles away. 

At fourteen years of age he secured his first employment as a 
"swamper" in the lumber woods and for several succeeding win- 
ters followed the different occu- 
pations incident to the logging 
operations, and in the Spring 
and Summer was engaged in 
driving the logs down the dif- 
ferent streams and rivers in 
northern Maine. 

When nineteen years old he 
became foreman in the woods 
and also on the drive. For a 
period of nine years he was a 
foreman, being employed by the 
late Omer Clark and Ed. P. 
Page in that capacity. 

He shortly afterward entered 
into a contract to cut and haul 
logs for Brown & Allen of 
Greenville, Maine, having asso- 
ciated himself as a partner, 
with Henry L. Colby of Jack- 
man, Me. 

For the succeeding period of 




ABRAM XEWTON 

Prominent in the Business Affairs 
of Jackman 



eleven years the ^firm engaged in lumber operating for Lawrence 
Brothers of South Gardiner; the South Gardiner Lumber Co., 
the Hollingsworth & Whitney Co. and others. 

In 1897 Mr. Newton was appointed Deputy Collector of Customs 
under President McKinley and held the position until his resignation 
in 1914. 

In addition to his duties as Customs Collector, he was actively 
engaged as a lumber operator, having several important contracts 
with the Great Northern Paper Company, covering a period of 
several years. 



76 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




Mr. Newton's marked ability 
as a timber estimator has been 
recognized by many important 
timberland owners for several 
years and he has been a member 
of commissions at different 
times whose duty it was to de- 
termine the value and quantities 
of available timber on many 
large tracts, not only in Maine 
but in several of the Southern 
and Middle western states. He 
is now the owner of large inter- 
ests and holdings in both Maine 
and Canadian timber lands. 

He has always had the best 
interests of Jackman at heart 



WEBSTER S. MOORE 

Chairman of the Board of Asses- 
sors of Jackman 

and has been honored many 
times by its citizens who recog- 
nize his ability and sound busi- 
ness judgment. 

In politics he has always been 
a Republican and would doubt- 
les9 have been elected a member 
of the last Legislature from this 
class, but business matters pre* 
vented him from becoming a 
candidate. 

]\Ir. Newton is a member of 
the Board of Trustees of the 
Guilford Trust Company and has 
been such ever since the Green- 
ville branch was established. 

In September of last year he 
entered upon his duties as Gen- 
eral Manager of the woods department for the Jackman Lumber 
Company and occupies that position at the present time. 




DANIEL HANCOX 

Prominent Business Man of Jack- 
man. 



CORRESPONDENCE n 



On September i, 1897, he was married to Jennie M. Colby of 
Jackman. Their daughter, Velzora A. Newton, is a member of the 
senior class of the Maine Central Institute at Pittsfield, Maine. 



Correspondence 

From Honorable William R. Pattangall. 

Honorable William R. Pattangall, Attorney General of the State 
of Maine, heartily endorsers the Journal and contributes valuable 
information regarding the Longfelloiv family: 

Waterville, Maine, June i6th, 191 5. 
Mr. John F. Sprague, 

Dover, Maine. 
Dear Brother Sprague: 

I have been especially interested in your Journal of Maine His- 
tory. I remember saying to you one time when we were talking 
about our own state that the great trouble with Maine was that 
nobody knew anything about the state either from an historical 
or an industrial standpoint. You are certainly doing a great work 
in interesting the people of Maine in its early history. 

I read with especial interest in your May number a sketch of 
Stephen Longfellow written by William Willis, I do not know that 
you are aware of the very close relationship between the Longfellow 
family of Portland and the Longfellow family of Machias. Some 
few facts in that connection may be of interest to you. 

The first of the Longfellow name to come to this country was 
William Longfellow, born in England in 1651, who came to New- 
bury, Massachusetts, in 1674. He had two sons, Stephen and Na- 
than. Stephen in turn had two sons, one of whom bore his name, 
and the other was named for his grandfather, William. William 
lived in Newbury, Massachusetts, and his son, Nathan, was born 
there in 1764, moving to Machias in 1767. Nathan served in the 
Revolutionary War with the rank of lieutenant. He also had a 
second cousin Nathan, a great grandson of the original William 
Longfellow, some three years older than he, who was born in Con- 
wallis, Massachusetts, and who moved to Machias about the time 
of the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. This Nathan had a 
son, Jacob, who married Taphenus, a daughter of Lieutenant Na- 



78 SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

than. My maternal grandfather, Daniel Longfellow, was a son 
of Taphenus and Jacob. 

I have been especially interested in looking up these matters, not 
only from the standpoint of my maternal ancestors, but because I 
also find that Abraham Adams, who was the grandson of Richard 
Pattangall, the first of the name to come to this country and who 
settled in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1640, married Ann Longfellow, 
who was the daughter of the original William Longfellow and Ann 
Sewall, So that I find myself a descendant of William Longfellow 
on both sides of the family. 

Yours very truly, 

W. R. PATTANGALL. 



Honorable Augustine Simmons of North Anson, Maine, writes : 

In my recent article" on Franklin Simmons the word "the" before 
Franklin should read though. In the last paragraph the word 
"free" should read face. 



Sebec Lake, Maine, June 14, 1915. 
To the Editor of S Prague's Journal of Maine History: 

In looking over the May issue of the Journal, I was very much 
interested in the article on workers with the divining rod. 

Royal Day was my grandfather, and I have a very good remem- 
brance of him, and I know he was perfectly sincere in his work of 
discovering water veins below the surface of the ground. I do 
not know his theory or the scientific principle on which he based 
his figures, but I do know that he did not claim any occult power 
when he gave the depth at which water would be found. He used 
an instrument based on scientific principles, from which he made 
his figures. This instrument, I think, was made by my grandfather, 
Royal Day, and as near as I can describe the instrument, it is a 
quarter circle made from a hard wood board mounted on a trypod, 
and has a plumb bob attached to tell when it is level. This quarter 
circle is sub-divided by lines into lesser quarter circles with a scale 
of figures along each line. This instrument is now in my possession, 
and I value it very highly as a relic, and the article in your Journal 
makes this doubly valuable to me, as it puts it in the class of 
historical relics. 

Very truly, 
MRS. B. M. PACKARD. 

C) See Journal No. i, Vol. 3, pp. 27-28-29. 



CORRESPONDENCE 79 

Chicago, June 9, 191 5. 
To the Editor of S Prague's Journal of Maine History: 

I note in May No. that you refer to Whig doggerel of 1840-1, 

and purport to give the "first Hne". Is not this a little in error? 

Some years ago in Western Kansas I met an old pioneer and 

was introduced to him as being from Maine. Oh yes he knew all 

about me and he launched forth : 

"Oh have you heard the news from Maine. 
From Maine all honest and true 
She's gone hell bent for Governor Kent 
For Tippacanoe and Tyler too." 
A little further inquiry proved that it was about all he did know 
of Maine, but he had sung the song during the Campaign. 

Yours truly, 

T. H. SMITH. 



Old Town, Me., July 2, 191 5. 
Editor of Sprague's Journal of Maine History: 

Upon reading Vol. 2 of your valuable publication, "Sprague's 
Journal of Maine History", I find mentioned on page 88, the 
names of Moses Pearson & John East. I have a deed which has been 
handed down (among other papers), conveying land in Falmouth, 
to Edward & John Tyng in 1832. It is signed by Moses Pearson, 
James Winslow & John East, "Proprietors Committee for laying out 
the common land in Falmouth." The certificate on the back is as 
follows : "The within Bounds of land or flats. Recorded in the 
proprietors Book of Records for Falmouth, November 20, 1732, pr. 
Moses Pearson, Proprietor Clerk." 

The above is, probably, of not any direct importance to you, but 
in a general way I thought it might be of interest to learn a little 
more of the persons named in the Journal. 

Yours very truly, 

H. HILLIARD. 



As we have already remarked in these columns it is the most en- 
terprising business men in a town that does the most advertising. 
This is well illustrated in this issue of the Journal. 



8o SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Maine Local Histories 

Mr. A. J. Huston, 92 Exchange Street, Portland, Maine, the 
well known dealer in new and old books, and who makes a specialty 
of all books, pamphlets, etc., relating to the State of Maine, has 
recently issued a valuable little booklet entitled "A Check List of 
Maine Local Histories". 26 pages are devoted to town histories, 
lists of regimental and county histories, general histories of the 
state, county atlases, historical society collections, historical and 
genealogical magazines, ecclesiastical histories, legislative session 
laws, etc. Price 50 cts. 



In Skowhegan, Madison, Dover-Foxcroft, Greenville, Guilford, 
etc., it has been the live wire business men whose names appear 
herein. Take the town of Guilford as an example. There is 
probably not a town in Maine of its size that has more country 
trade come to its merchants ; that has more business center in it 
from miles beyond its borders than that town and they have always 
been among the most liberal advertisers. 



New Mount Kineo House and Annex 

/Woos^h^ad Lake^, Kineo, IWeiin^ 

In the Centre of the Great Wilderness on a Peninsula Under the 
Shadow of Mount Kineo 

On the east side of the most beautiful lake in New England, forty 
miles long and twenty miles wide, dotted with islands, and with hundreds 
of smaller lakes and streams in easy proximity, in the midst of some of the 
grandest scenery in America, is the 

NEW MOUNT KINEO HOUSE and ANNEX 

recently remodeled and with many improvements added; making it second to none for 
comfort, convenience and recreation. 

It is a Palace in the Maine woods and in the heart of the great game region. 

This region leads all others for trout and salmon. Spring and Summer fishing. 

^ The NEW MOUNT KINEO HOUSE opens June 27, remaining 
open to September 28th. New Annex opens May 16, closes Sept. 28 



WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET, 

containing full description of its attractions for health and pleasure during the Summer 
season. First-class transportation facilities offered during the seasons. 

Ricker Hotel Company, Kineo, Maine, 

C. /\. JUDKIINS, /VXanage.!-. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY vii 




"1^1 

--♦J CO 



Oh ^ 



S".S 



O oj 

(jh_ la 



^"■i S 
"5t3 « 

OOP) 

m'^ — 

9 " a 

o is 
_2 £^ >> 

-.a s fe 

CO t.-« (U 

2*^-d - 

c » p^ 



-^^ 



;«-s 






o o"" 

O H O rt 



Pleasantly situated in the beautiful village 
of Foxcroft, Maine 

We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



vJii SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




Do you want a Cottage on Harford's Point 
on the westerly shore of Moose Head Lake, the 
grandest and most lovely sheet of inland water 
in all of New England, and one of the grandest 
in the world ? 

The above illustration is a view of Harford's 
Point facing Moose Island in a northerly direc- 
tion. For information, address, 

Harford's Point Realty Co. 

Dover, Maine. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY ix 




On the southerly side of the Point is a charm- 
ing little bay or cove and the above represents 
the most southerly portion of its west shore. 

This is known as Deep Cove. 
. Write us for information. 

Harford's Point Realty Co. 

Dover, Maine. 



(See next page) 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




The above shows the continuation of this west 
shore of the same cove in a northerly direction, 
the two pictures giving you a very good idea of 
some of the beauties of Deep Cove. 

Harford's Point is about three miles above 
Greenville Junction and is a beautiful promon- 
tory of land of high eminence above the lake 
level. It is in the midst of splendid trout and 
salmon fishing and is in the heart of Maine's 
best hunting grounds where big game and game 
birds abound. It would be an attractive and 
desirable location for a sportsman's club. 

If it occurs to you that you would like to own 
a summer home on this delightful spot, write 
for further particulars to 

Harford's Point Realty Co. 

Dover, Maine. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY xi 

BOOKS WANTED, FOR SA'LE OR TO EXCHANGE 
(Ads not exceeding three lines inserted for lo cents for each issue and 
5 cents for each additional line.) 



BOOKS FOR SAIjE. 

Bangor, Maine, and its Attractions. Issued by the Board of Trade 
(1906) Illustrated. Paper — 64 pp. $ .50 

Collection of the Maine Historical Society Documentary History 
(Baxter MSS.) Vol. 9, 17, Cloth— 500 pp. • 1.50 

Pioneers of France in the New World. Francis Parkman, (Little 
Brown & Co., ed. 1907) Cloth — 491 pp. i.oo 

Maine's War Upon the Liquor Trafific. Col. Wing. Paper— 89 pp. .50 

Hannibal Hamlin in Commemoration of the 100 Anniversary of his 
Birth, 1909. Paper. Illustrated. .50 

History of Doric Lodge, F. & A. M., Monson, Maine. 1868-1887— 
Paper. .50 

History of Mt. Kineo Lodge, F. & A. M., Guilford, Maine, 1861- 
1901 — ^Abner T. Wade. Cloth and paper board covers. Illustrated — 
115 PP- 1.25 

Report of the Inland Fish & Game Commissioners 1902. Cloth — il- 
lustrated. .35 

Reports of Bureau of Industrial and Labor Statistics 1896-97-99- 
1903-4-6. Cloth Illustrated. .50 

Beginnings of Colonial Maine, (Burrage 1914). Cloth — 412 pp. 3 00 

A Royal Tragedy, (Nat Wilder, Jr., Fireside Pub. Co.) Cloth— 236 
PP- I.oo 

A novel relative to the Indian and Colonial history of Maine and the 
Bar Harbor region. It is a fascinating tale of interest to all interested 
in early history of Maine. 

Collections of the Piscataquis Historical Society, Vol. 1-522 pp. Of 
interest to all students of Maine History and contains much about 
Northeastern Boundary Controversy. 2.0CJ 

Centennial Town of Sangerville 1814-1914, 100 pp. — 'Cloth. Illus- 
trated. Contains all of the proceedings with many pages of early 
important vital statistics. Reprint from Sprague's Journal. i.oo 

Engagement of Enterprise and Boxer near Portland in war of 1812. 
Rev. H. O. Thayer. 15 pp. — Paper covers. Reprint from Sprague's 
Journal. .50 

SECOND HAND BOOKS. 

Josh Billings Farmers Alminax-1870. .50 

The World Almanac 1906-1908. (As good as new) .25 

Biography of Hosea Ballou, by his son M. M. Ballou — 400 pp. (Bos- 
ton 1852) I.oo 

Maine Register 1899-1900. (In perfect condition) i.oo 

Will be sent by mail postpaid for the above prices. Address — SPRAGUE'S 
JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY, DOVER, MAINE. 
BOOKS WANTED. 

Maine Treasurers' Reports, Governors' Messages, Rules and Orders House 
and Senate, State Prison, Bank and Land Agents' Reports from 1820 to 1829. 

A. J. HUSTON, 
92 Exchange St., Porland, Maine. 



xii SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




THE OLD STAND-BY STAND 

The Jackman Drug and Sportman's Goods and Supply Store. 



F A. DION, 



Jackman, Maine 



Arthur Cathcart 

AUTOMOBILES 
TO LET 



Jackman Station, 



Maine 



Arthur Rodrique 

Photographer 

Post Cards and 'Vieivs of Jackman 
and 'Vicinity, 



JACKMAN STATION, 



MAINE 



GET SHAVED AT 

GEORGE BLAIS' 

UP-TO-DATE BARBER SHOP 

'PUy Pool While You Wait. 
Jackman Station, Maine 



^i UTOISTS on their way to Moose- 
^^ head Lake, while passing through 
the picturesque village of Monson, will 
find Gasoline and Auto Supplies 
and Fixtures at the store of 

W. H. ELDRIDGE 

Corner Main and Water Streets 



DR. M. ESTELLE LANCASTER 
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN 

Cor. North amd Summer Sts., FOXCROFT, MAINE 

Hours- 9-12 A. M., 2-5 P. M. 
And by Appointment Telephone 238-3 



Joseph J. Nichols 

Will supply anything you want in the 

Jewelry Line 

Diamonds a Specialty 

Jackman Station, - Maine 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



XllJ 



SPORTSMEN 

Here you will find everything: in the line of 
Clothing, Mackinaw Frocks, Sweaters, Shoes 
Rubber Goods, Moccasins, Etc. Nice Fishing 
Tackle, Rifles, Shot Guns. Revolvers and Am- 
munition. A fine line of moccasin Slippers 
for ladies wear. Daily Papers. Books and Ma- 
gazines. Call and see us, or call us by phone 
No. 7-12. 

Moosehead Clothing Co., Millard Metcalf, Mgr. 
Greenville Junction. Me., opp. B. & A. R. R. Station 



Davis C. Pi 



lerce 



I. A. Harris, DRUGS 

Greenville, Maine 

Edison Phonographs 
and Records 

The— R E :x: Pk L L— Store 

C. S. Bennett 

Dealer in 
Finest Quality of Jewelry 

Watches, Clocks and Silverware 
Jewels and Diamonds 

Guilford, Maine 

L. R. Moore , Jr. 

Quick Lunches 
Confectionery and Fruit 

Jackman, Maine 



Deputy Sheriff 
Jackman, Maine 

All Civil Processes Promptly Served 

Telephone Connection 

C. H. Mills 

Counsellor and 

Attorney at Law 

Jackman, Maine 

W. F. Jude 

Counsellor and 

Attorney at Law 

Jackman, Maine 

W. L. Anderson 

Counsellor and 

Attorney at Law 

Jackman Station, Maine 



General Blacksmithing A. G. Crawford 

and Horse Shoeing Day & Night Restaurant 

Cant Dogs and Cant Dog Hooks Fruit, Confectioney, Ice Cream and 
a Specialty 
J. S. Williams, Jackman, Me. 



Tobaccos 
Jackman Station, Maine 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



xjv SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



Albany, N. Y., April loth, 1915. 
The Buxton Rheumatic Cure Co., 

Abbot Village, Maine 
Gentlemen : — 

It gives me pleasure to send yoii 
this unsolicited testimonial regarding 
Buxton's Rheumatic Cure. For years 
I have been a great sufferer from Ar- 
ticular Rheumatism, to such an ex- 
tent that for almost one year I was 
unable to walk. I was treated by 
many doctors and took the so called 
"Cures" at Carlsbad and Mt. Clem- 
mons but without results. Finally in 
despair I was oersuaded to try Bux- 
ton's Rheumatic Cure. I got relief 
dt once and within two months could 
walk as good as ever. I am glad to 
give you this information in the hope 
it may reach the eyes of some unfor- 
tunate suffering from that awful af- 
fliction called Rheumatism. 

Very truly yours, 

C. H. THOMAS. 
SEND FOR BOOKLET 

Buxton Rheumatic Cure Co. 

ABBOT VILLAGE. 



MAINE 



The Last Word in 

Clothing 

Furnishing Goods 

and Footwear 

Harry S. Dyer 

OUTFITTER 

For Men and Boys 

FOOTWEAR 

For Men, Women & Children 

MADISON, MAINE 



F. C. CLARK COMPANY 

Madison's Popular Ary Goods Store 

EVENTUALLY 

You'll buy your Drv Goods and 
Ready-to-wear Apparel of F. C. 
Clark Co. 

Kot alone because of the high quali- 
ty of our sioods 

Not alone because of the correctness 
of our styles. 

Not alone because of the lowness of 
our orices. 

Not alone because of the excellence 
of our store service. 

Not alone because of the importance 
of our Store. 

Satisfactory Guarantee. 

Net because of any of these features 
will you eventually decide to trade 
here, ^^■'t because of the combina- 
tion of them all. You are sure to 
find out that this is THE STORE 
THAT SATISFIES. 

F. G. Clark Company, Madison, Me. 

'The Place of Rare Bargains 



Thomas Vintinner 



DEALER IN 



Dry Goods, Groceries 

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers & Flour 
Jackman Station, Me. 



W 



e have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY xv 

JOHN C. GRIFFIN 

=:^^= Snsurance ^gencp — 



SKOWHEGAN, Maine 



Ben T. Steward Clair R. Marston 

STEWARD & MARSTON 

^eating, plumbing anb ^\)ttt Mttai OTorfecrg 
anb pneumatic l^atcr ^ps!tem«f 

Stores at Skowhegan & Waterville 

CULLEN & WOLFE 

==^ VULCANIZING =^=^= 



Tires and Tubes Repaired All Work Guaranteed 

Distributors of l^iller's Geared-To-The-Road Tires and Veedol Motor Oil 

We pay the express one way on all out of town work 
R. R. Square, SKLOIA/HEGAIN, yV\/\IINE 

HORSKS 

Heavy Worls: Horses Al-ways on Hand. 

Also Carriages and Farn^ Wagons 

A Square Deal witti Every Biayer 

E. C. McKECHNIE 

FOXCROKT, Tel. 208 NIAINE 

We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



xvi SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 

INDEPENDENT-REPORTER 

Three months, 23c. One-half year, 50c. One year, $1.00 

Remit in stamps, coin, currency, check or P. O. Money Order 

Subscribe for yourself or as a gift to your friend. 

10,000 Readers, chiefly in Somerset County 

Office of Publication, Skowhegan, Maine 



THE MADISON BULLETIN 

The only paper in Madison and the only 
one in Western Somerset County. Job 
Printing of every description. Let us 
estimate on your next job. 

Henry C. Prince, Prop., Madison, Maine 



Jfirs^t i^ational panfe 

of ^feotDljesan, ilaine 



ESTABLISHED 1825 



Capital, $150,000.00. Surplus and Profits, $150,000.00 
Interest Allowed 



and everything 
that is musical 



Estey Pianos 

also all kinds of HOUSE FURNISHINGS 
at C. H. WYMAN'S, D^xterU^laine 

,\Ve have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY xvii 

The Heald Pond Camp 

Located nine miles north of Jackman, three miles from the main 
highway. We have just completed a nice Automobile road to 
Camp, and we are now ready to receive Automobile parties. 

Automobile people will find this a nice place to stop over 
when on their way to and from Canada, or a good place to make 
headquarters when around Jackman, as you will find the best 
of Hunting and Fishing and everything is of the best. You 
wi 1 miss something if you do not stop at 



The Heald Pond Camp 

Fred Henderson, Prop. 



JACKMAN, 



MAINE 



New 
Barber 
Shop 

Medie Rancout 

JACKMAN STATION, - MAINE 

Fruit, Confectionery 
and Cigars 

On Sale at Store Connected 



Harry A. Young 

Contractor 

and 

Builder 

Dealer in 

HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS. 
Tinware, Stoves, Crockery, 
Glassware and Builders' 
supp'ies of every de- 
scription. 



Jackman, 



Maine 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



xviii SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



W. S. MOORE DANIEL HANCOX 



Undertaker 

Dealer in 

Furniture 



JACKMAN, 



MAINE 



Dealer in 



Dry Goods 
Fancy Goods 

and 

Furnishings 

Boots and Shoes 



JACKMAN, 



MAINE 



FRED PIERCE "^^'*'''^"^^"'' 

Accident 



Dealer in 



Watches 
Clocks 
Jeivetry ^«^ 
Silverware 

Repairing Neatly Done 



JACKMAN, 



MAINE 



I nsurance 

Office at U. S. Customs 
'Phone 17-2. 



O. S. Patterson 



JACKMAN, 



MAINE 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY xix 



GET YOUR LUNCH 
—at— 

LOUBIER'S 

—the— 

BRAND NEW 
RESTAURANT 

Opposite the Station Post Office. 
JACKMAN, MAINE. 



HarrySTILWELL 

The popular Theatrical man can 
be found at his 

Up-To-Date Harness 
Shop 

except on 
Monday, Wednesday & Saturday 
Evenings, his Moving Picture 
Nights 

—at— 

The Jackman Town 
Hall 



J. A. BULMER 

Gasoline, Oils, Batteries, Tire?. 
Auto Accessories, Etc. 

Repair Work a Specialty 

Long Distance Telephone. 



AN UP-TO-DATE 

Restaurant 

In every respect. 

Tobacco, Choice 

Cigars 
and Confectionery 

Buyer and seller of Raw Furs 
of all kinds. 

JAMES SANDS 

JACKMAN, MAINE. 

VVe have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



JACKMAN, 



MAINE. 



XX SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 




....HOTEL EARLEY.... 

W. L. EARLEY. Prop. 

Fishing and hunting unexcelled. Salmon weighing 3 11)s., bass, 
3 lbs., white perch, i 1-2 lb., are not uncommon. Pure spring 
water. Fresh eggs, butter and cream ; vegetables from our 
own garden. Fishing tackle, sportsmen's supplies, cigars and 
confectionery. Board, $2.00 per day, $10.00 per week. Guides, 
$2.50 per day, board $1.00 per day. Our canoes are 50c per day. 
$2.50 per week. Team or boat will meet all parties on notice. 
Booklet and reference on request. Automobile road direct to 
hotel. 

Willimantic, Maine 



Telephone Connection 



P. O. Guilford, R. F. D. No. 3 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY xxi 



E. A. HENDERSON 

WOOD 

POND 

CAMPS 

One of the most attractive places 
in the Maine Woods for fishermen, 
hunters and summer tourists. You 
will make a great mistake if you do 
not send at once for booklet and full 
particulars regarding this charming 
resort. Address 

E. A. Henderson, 
JACKMAN. MAINE 



Hallowell 
House 

HALLOWELL, ME. 

Worster Brothers, Props. 

Modern Conveniences 
50 Rooms 
Steam Heat 
Cuisine Excellent 
Conv.enient to Trains 
Rates Moderate 

Popular with Auto 
Parties 

Baggage delivered to and from depot 
without expense 



E. A. PIPER W. L Hammond 



Real 
Estate 



Timberland and 

V lllage Lots ' Monuments, Headstones and 



Granite & 
Marble Co, 



Manufacturers and 
Dealers in 



BOUGHT and SOLD 



Cemetery Work 
of all Kinds 



Jackman, Maine Guilford, 



M 



aine 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



xxii SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



50,000 Horse Power 

AVAILABLE FOR INDUSTRIES IN CENTRAL MAINE 

Central Maine Power Co. 

Offices at Augusta, Gardiner, Waterville, Skowhegan, 
Pittsfield and Dexter 



Falmouth Hotel 

J. J. POOLER 

Proprietor 

Portland, Maine 

EUROPEAN & AMERICAN PLAN 

Maine State Bookbind- 
ing Company 



EDITION WORK IS 
OUR SPECIALTY 



327 Water Street 
Augusta, Maine 



If you are not receiving 
interest on your bank ac- 
count communicate with 

United States Trust Co 

Portland, Maine 



Maine Views Historical Scenes 

Advertising Calendars 

H. J. BURROWES Co. 

Portland, Maine 

Lowest Prices and Highest Qualities 

West End Hotel 

Opposite Union Station 

PORTLAND, MAINE 



Remodeled 
Telephones in all Rooms 

Hot and Cold Running Water 

Private Baths 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these page.5 



SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY xxiii 



Magazines 8t Pamphlets FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE 



WANTED 



WILL PAY .fLOO EACH 


FOR 


Bangor Historical Magazine, 




Oct, Nov., 


1883 


Maine Genealogist and Biog- 




rapher, Dec, 


1875 


Dec, 


1876 


Mayflower Descendant, 




Jan., July, 


1903 


Apr., July, Oct., 


1904 


Apr., 


1906 


Old Times at North 




Yarmouth, Oct., 


1877 


July, 


1878 


Poet Lore, Jan., 


1894 


Massachusetts Resolves — 




May, 1815 




Ma , 1820 




Jan., Apr., May, 1821 




Jan., May, 1822. 




Jan., May, 1823. 




Jan., 1824. 




Only the above dates wanted at these 


prices. 




A. J. HUSTON, 




92 Exchange St., Portland 


Maine. 



John Francis Sprague's Books 

Piscataquis Biography, and Frag- 
ments, $1.00 

Sebastian Rale, a Maine trag- 
edy of the 18th Century, $1.00 

The North Eastern Boundary 
Controversy and the Aroostook 
War. $1.25 

Accidental Shooting in the Game 

Season, .25 

Backwoods Sketches, $1.00 

Also Piscataquis Historical So- 
ciety Collections, Vol. I, $2.00 

Any of the above named books will be 
sent postpaid upon receipt of the 
price. 

A. J. HUSTON 



A Complete Set of the Agriculture 
of Maine, 62 Vols. 



Commencin r with the Transactions 
of the Agricultural Societies, 1850-55, 
5 vols ; Reports of the Secretary of the 
Board of Agriculture, 1856-1901, 45 
vols; Reports of the Commissioner of 
Agriculture, 1902-13, 12 vols. 

7 vols, boards and 55 vols, cloth 

A complete set is very hard to obtain 
today — contains much valuable histor- 
ical material. 

Price $45.00, or will exchange for 
books of equal value. 



E. C. SMITH, 



MAINE 




Crocker 

Photo & Engraving 

Company 

92 Exchange St., Portland, Maine -St Exchange St., Portland, Me. 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages 



xxiv SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



This Space 

is reserved for one 
of the best equipped 
up-to-date hotels in 
Maine. When you 
are in Augusta stop 
at the deservedly 
popular 

Hotel North 

CM3 



BOOKS New and Old 

We carry in stock a large 
and varied assortment of 
books, both old and new. 

Catalogues sent on request. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Books Bought. 

A. J. Huston, 

92 Exchange Street 

PORTLAND. MAINE 

W. L. SAMPSON 

Monumental Works 

Imported and American Granite and 
Marble. Up-to-Date Designs. Pneu- 
matic Tools. ESTABLISHED 1879 
Long Distance Tel. Office 121-2, Res. 121-S 
FOXCROFT, -MAINE 
Works, 45 Union Square, Dover, Maine 



Straw & Martin 

Fire Underwriters 

36 Main Street 
Guilford, Maine 



Good Line of Books, Maga- 
zines and Fine Stationery at 
Union Square Pharmacy 

The Dover and Foxcroft 

REXALL STORE 



WE GUAR- 
ANTEE 



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Liar&e Bottle-50c-at your dealer 
Or we will send direct three full size 
50c hottles on receipt of f 1.00 

Send 10c for large sample, and our booklet 
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Fidelity Bld^. 
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SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY xxv 



This space is reserved for tlie 

Moose River House 

at Jackman Station, liAaine. 



It is only a few steps from 
the C. P. Ry. Station and on 
the hne of the old highway 
leading from the Kennebec 
country in the State ot Maine to 
the city of Quebec in Canada. 
It is in the midst of the charm- 
ing and picturesque Moose 
River Valley, 15 miles from the 
boundary line, and is in the 
heart of the game, trout and 

salmon region of the Maine Woods. 
Comfortable rooms with hot and cold 
water, baths and toilets and all modern 
equipments. Autoists should keep this 
place in mind. 

N. W. BARTLEY, Prop. 

The Shaw 

BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

OUR SHORTHAND DEPARTMENT— Will qualify 
you for a position in the Business Office, the Banking 
House, the Lawyer's Office or the Government .Service 
OUR COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT-Will aid you 
in securing employment with excellent opportunities 
for advancement, such as Cashier, Bookkeeper, Clerk 
or Public Accountant. 

OUR TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT-Will qualify 
you for a position in the Railroad or Commercial Ser- 
vice. 

OUR SUMMER SCHOOL— at South Casco, by Seba- 
go Lake. 
MORAL — If you wish to guard against failure, attend 

The Shaw Business College 



New York 
Syndicate 

113 MAIN STREET 

BANGOR, MAINE 

Maine's Biggest Cut 
Price Store in Men's 
Clothing, Furnishing 
Goods, Shoes and 
Rubbers. 



PORTLAND — BANGOR 



AUGUSTA 



Simon Cohen 

Manager 

REAL ADVANTAGES 



The ample capital of this bank, its 
financial position and established 
reputation for conservative business 
methods are among the substantial 
advantages offered to present and 
prospective customers. 

It is the aim of the officers and di- 
rectors to maintain, and in every 
way feasible, increase these advan- 
tages. 

Our equipment in each and every 
department is thorough, modern, effi- 
cient, and we invite YOUR account 
with assurance that we are fully pre- 
pared to meet the requirements of 
present and prospective patrons in a 
spirit of fairness to all interests con- 
cerned. 

Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent 

Guilford Trust Co. 

Guilford and Greenville, Maine 



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xxvi SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



THE WORK OF 

SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL 
OF MAINE HISTORY 

has been heartily endorsed by the press of Maine 
and other leading Journals in the country and by 
many of the most prominent men of Maine and 
New England. 

Thus we desire to call your attention to the fact that this is the 
only publication in the world today that is devoted exclusively to 
the advancement of historical subjects and historical research along 
the lines of Maine's early history. 

We need the hearty aid and co-operation ot every person in 
Maine interested in this matter. If you are not a subscriber, kind- 
ly send your name and address with one dollar for one year's sub- 
scription. If you are already a subscriber, bear in mind that the 
success of the enterprise owes much to prompt payments. 

Sprague's Journal of Maine History 
DOVER, MAINE 



DENNYSTOWN CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Fancy Groceries, Hay, Grain, Phosphate 
and Lumbermen s Hardzuare 

Pittsburg Perfect Wire Fencing 
JACKMAN, - - - MAINE 



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SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY xxvii 




™VdTor.he" Moose River House 

at Jackman Station, Maine. 
It is only ? few steps from the C. P. Ry. Station and on the line of the 
old hiehwav leading from the Kennebec country m the State of Mame to 
S e citf of Quebec \n Canada. It is in the midst of the charmmg and p>ctur- 
;^mip Moos^ River Valley. 15 miles from the boundary Ime, and is m the 
St oY the gaie trout and salmon region of the Maine Woods. Comfort- 
abk rooms with hot and cold water, baths and toilets and all modern equip- 
,.ents. Autoists should keep this place m mind. 



MOVING PICTURES 
at The Station Hal 

DANCING AFTER 
THE SHOW 

Watch the Sign 



Fruit and Confectionery 
Stand 



EDLORD FOURNIER, Prop. 

Jackman Station, Maine 



Murtha House 

T. A. Murtha. Prop. 



Employnient Agency and 
Boarding House 

Jackman Station, Me. 



We have positive evidence of the reliability of the advertisers on these pages. 



xxviii SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY 



YOUR 
PRINTING 

If it is worth doing at all, its worth doing 
well. First class work at all times is our 
motto, and your job, however small, will 
receive the same careful attention that we 
give the state printing. Let us figure 
with you on your next job. 

Waterville Sentinel Pub. Co. 

Printers to the State 
Job and Catalogue Printing a Specialty 



The Value 

of well printed, neat 
appearing Business Sta- 
tionery as a means of 
getting and holding the 
respect of desirable 
business men has been 
amply demonstrated. 

Our prices are rea- 
sonable. 



Holman Day's New Book 

The X. Y. Times in reviewing The 
Landloper, says : 

"Holman Day has been known 
chiefly a's a writer of galloping ro- 
mance, stories of intricate plot and 
swift action sweetened with plenty of 
sentiment, and all served up with the 
sauce of a gallant, rose-hued style. 
But those who have read and liked 
his previous novels must be prepared 
for something very different in this 
new book. It is the tale of a modern 
knight-errant who, though not look- 
ing for adventure or for any chance 



to put hi's lance in rest, presently 
finds himself drawn into the biggest 
kind of a fight. The interest of the 
story is almost as much in ho-w he 
is led to throw down the gage of 
battle as in the way in which he after- 
ward proves himself equal to the 
situation. And it is all, in motive, 
theme, and style, quite different from 
the author's previous novels." 

The Landloper is just from the 
press of Harper & Brothers, and is 
]\Ir. Day's first long novel since The 
Red Lane which appeared a number 
of years ago. 



Farm-Smiles out of Bangor 

BEAUTIFUL VIEW— A few miles 
from several lakes : will take party 
of five; private parlor with fireplace 
and piano ; private liath ; modern 
house; $15 per week. For further 
particulars address A. C. K.A.VA- 
\.\GH. Ohio St., Bangor, Maine, R. 
F. D. 4- 



Persons having business in the 
Kennebec region, or at the capital of 
the State at Au'justa, or traveling by 
auto, will be well pleased if they tarry 
for awhile with the genial Frank and 
Fred Wors'er, who have recently 
taken the Hallowell House, Hallow- 
ell. Maine. These gentlemen are too 
well known as first class hotel mana- 
gers to require any introduction to 
die public. They are making a suc- 
cess of 

THE HALLOWELL HOTEL 



WM. W. ROBERTS CO. 

stationers ancJ BlanR Book. yVlanufaoture>rs 

Office Supplies, Filing Cabinets and Card Indexes 
233 Middle Street, PORTLAND, MAINE 



The Established Leader 

All kinds of Typewriters bought, sold, 

exchanged and repaired. 

LESLIE E. JONES 

130 Main St., BANGOR, MAINE 



PUBLIC AUTO 

Tire Repairing and Vulcanizing 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 

FRED W. PALMER 

DOVER, MAINE 



Send Your Linen by Parcel Post to 

Iford &t<saLm Laundry 

V. H. ELLIS, Prop., GUILFORD, MAINE 
We Pay Return Postage 



IT l^AY^ TO ^^ A y F Lay your plans to start your savings account 
■ I I Ha if I U <i^ n W L with this bank on your very next pay-day. 
Set aside One Dollar — more ii you can spare it — come to the bank and 
make your urst deposit. Small sums are welcomed. 

Put system into your savings. Save a little every week and save that 
little regularly. Make it an obligation to yourself just as you are duty bound to 
pay the grocer or the coal man. SAVE FAITHFULLY. The dollars you save 
now will serve you later on when you will have greater need for them. 
PISCATAQUIS SAVINGS BANK, Dover, Maine. 
F. E. GUERNSEY.Pres. W. C. WOODBURY, Treas. 



Money Back If Not Satisfied 
Is Your Protection 

JOHN T. CLARK & Co. 

CLOTHIERS 

BANGOR, - MAINE 



SMITH & SALE 

PRINTERS OF 

De Luxe Editions 

45 Exchange Street 

PORTLAND, MAINE 



Bangor & Aroostook 

DIRECT ROUTE to Greenville, Fort 
Kent, Houlton, Presque Isle, Cari- 
bou, Fort Fairfield, Van Buren and 
Northern Maine. 

Excellent Roadbed, Splendid Service, First 
Class Equipment, Solid Vestibule Trains. 

Any ticket agent will be pleased to furnish 
all information or literature desired or same 
can be obtained by writing to the Passenger 
Traffic Manager. 

Geo. M. Houghton 

Passenger Traffic Manager 

Bangor, Maine 



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LIBRftRY OF CONGRESS 



iiiliilll nil lllllllillllllll 
014 041 019 6 



Henry Hudson 



Leslie E. Hudson 



H. Hudson & Son, 



.Dealers in. 



Horses and Cattie 



Guilford, 



Maine 



KINEO TRUST CO., 

DOVER, MAINE 

Organized in 1905 to meet the bank- 
ing needs of tliis community. Kineo 
Trust Company has steadily grown in 
strength and public favor, until today 
it is universally recognized as one of 
the large and strong financial institu- 
tions of Eastern Maine. 

Liberal Interest Paid on 

Savings Deposits 

J. F. HUGHES, Pres., C. C. HALL. V.Pres 
G. L. ARNOLD, Treas. 



FOREST 




CO 



Masonic Building 

PORTLAND, ME. 

We want your business and promise 
our best efforts to give you good ser- 
vice. 



Portland-Monson 
Slate Co. 

Quarriers and Manufacturers 



SLATE GOODS 

of Every Description 
Monson, Me. 

SLAXE 

For Plumbing, Struc- 
tural and Electrical 
Uses a Specialty 
Monson Roofing 
Slate 



Office and Factory 

25 Central Wharf 

PORTLAND, - MAINE 



Quarries and Mill 
MONSON, - MAINE 



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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

Hill mil mil mil 




014 041 019 6 



HoUinger