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Full text of "A standard history of Kosciusko County, Indiana : an authentic narrative of the past, with particular attention to the modern era in the commercial, industrial, educational, civic and social development. A chronicle of the people with family lineage and memoirs"

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A STANDARD HISTORY 

OF 

KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

INDIANA 



An Authentic Narrative of the Past, with Particular 

Attention to the Modern Era in the Commercial. 

Industrial, Educational, Civic and Social 

Development. A Chronicle of the People, 

with Family Lineage and Memoirs. 



HON. L. W. ROYSE 

Supervisinu: Ei'itor 

Assisted by a Board of Advisory Editors 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



PUBMSHKRS 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING C(^MPANY 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 
1919 



1320399 



History of Kosciusko County 



John Frederick Be\t;r. Kosciusko County eould claim no bet- 
ter citizen and one of more distinctive achievements during the past 
thirty-eight years than John Frederick Beyer of Warsaw. It was 
Mr. Beyer who was the primary factor in establishing one of the 
largest provision packing and commission firms in Northern Indiana, 
and as this concern is still in operation in Warsaw, there need be no 
further reminder of his connection with that widely known com- 
mercial enterprise. However, Mr. Beyer has made more than a com- 
mercial success, and has been one of the vital energizers and up- 
builders in the county and the City of Warsaw. 

A native of Germany, he was born in the Kingdom of Hesse 
Cassel, now a part of Pitissia, October 17, 1850. He was one of a 
family of five sons, whose parents were August and Mary (Eckhart) 
Beyer. His father died when his youngest child was three months 
old, and the widow subsequently married George Pfeifer, by whom 
she had four more children. 

Of the five sons, J. Frederick Beyer was the second. His older 
brother is still living on a fami in Germany. Reared in an attractive 
section of rui-al Germany, after leaving the common or volk schools 
he served a thorough five years' apprenticeship in the blacksmith's 
trade. In 1869, at the age of nineteen, he came to America to visit 
relatives. The steamer "Donau" on which he made the passage 
was twelve days in crossing the Atlantic. In his company was his 
brother Albert. He first went to Goshen, Indiana, where his relatives 
were living, and remained there seven years, a part of the time 
working at his trade. However, it was while at Goshen that he laid 
the foundation for his highly prosperous business career. He began 
on a small scale and with hardly any capital, to collect and handle 
butter and eggs, which he gathered up from local producers and 
shipped to outside markets. This was the germ of the present 
wholesale packing business of Beyer Brothers, with three main offices 
at Wai-saw, Kendallville and Rochester, and with commission houses 
in New York City, Boston and Providence, Rhode Island, besides nu- 
merous branch establishments throughout the country. It would be 
interesting if space permitted to give a detailed history of the growth 
385 



386 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

of this industry. It was started hy Mr. Beyer with a capital of only 
about $5,000 and with two wagons. It is now an incorporated com- 
pany under the title Beyer Brothers Company, has a vast capital 
employed, and its equipment includes hundreds of wagons and auto- 
mobile trucks, and an independent refrigerator line. In the course 
of time two more brothers. Christian C. and J. Edward, came to this 
country and threw in their energies with the business. 

It was in February, 1877, that Mr. Beyer came to "Wai-saw and 
extended his bu.siness to this town. In the early days he had many 
difficulties to surmount, but by hard work, good business manage- 
ment and indomitable energ>^ succeeded beyond his most sanguine 
expectations. Gradually, however, he withdrew from the active 
management of the packing business. It was not a retirement from 
business altogetlier, since in the meantime he conceived the idea of 
establishing an educational and pleasure park at Winona Lake. 
Toward that end he acquired extensive tracts of land along the 
eastern shore of the lake, and then in 1888, with his brothers, founded 
Spring Fountain Park. Their first enterprise there was a creamer}-, 
and they also built a liotel. After a few years, in 189.5, Spring 
Fountain Park was sold to the "Winona Assembly and has ever since 
been the beautiful grounds of what is probably the most noted and 
best attended chautanqua assembly in the country. Though he sold 
the property. Mr. Beyer was asked to remain as superintendent of 
the grounds. He has ever since been actively identified with the 
assembly, and much credit is due him for the splendid condition of 
the park and facilities witli which thousands and thousands of peo- 
ple become acquainted every year. In a hardly less important man- 
ner ]\Ir. Beyer has heon a prominent factoi- in the making of modern 
Warsaw. He has l)een a liberal contributor to all worthy enterprises. 
Coming to America witli but little means at his command, i;nac- 
quainted with the language and customs of the people, he has been 
wonderfully prosperous, but better still has acquired an honest name 
and commands universal respect. 

In politics he is a republican, though he has never aspired for 
political office. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. On 
December 15, 1877, he married Miss Anna M. Miller, daughter of 
Jacob Miller, who was born in Poinisylvania and spent many years 
of his career in Elkhart County, Indiana. The children of Jlr. and 
;Mrs. Beyer are: Mae E., Carl F. and Harold R. Mr. and Mrs. 
Beyer are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In later 
years Mr. Beyer has devoted much of his attention to farming and 
stock raising, and is one of the most extensive cultivators of crops 
and general agi'icidtural enterprise in this section of Indiana. He 
owns about 500 acres, comprising a splendid country estate near 
Warsaw, where he spends most of his time, and he also o]ieratcs about 
700 other acres, largely in Kosciusko County. 

James A. Cook. One of the first of the hardy i.idiicers t<. settle 
in what is now Kosciusko Countv was John Cook, who became widely 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY :^87 

known as a local preacher and exhorter of the Methodist Church, and 
whose descendants have borne a prominent part in the development 
and all the subsequent history of Kosciusko County. Before chnrches 
were built here John Cook preached in the cabins of the early settlers, 
in the open at camp meetings, in the isolated school house and wherever 
two or three came together for religious worship. His familiar figure, 
traveling about on horseback, was a welcome sight to the lonely settler. 
"With his wife, whose maiden name was Ann Houston, John Cook set- 
tled in what is now Plain Township in 1834, when Kosciusko was still 
a part of Elkhart County. He then took np what was known as a 
"floater's claim" which, owing to uncertainty as to boundary lines, 
Tiltimately proved to have been previously settled upon. In this way 
he lost the claim and the round log cabin he had erected thereon, and 
then moved into the wilds of what is now Wayne Township, that being 
before Wansaw was platted as a town. He lived in Wayne the rest 
of his days, and because of his many admirable traits of cliaracter was 
universally esteemed. 

In the second generation of the Cook family's residence in Kosci- 
usko County was John W. Cook, a son of John and Ann (Houston) 
Cook. John W. was born in Ohio, and was quite young when he came 
with his parents to Kosciusko County in 1834. He liad much to do 
with those things which help make pioneer history. He was the firet 
man appointed to the office of constable in Kosciusko CoTinty after it 
was organized. He assisted in making the shingles that served for a 
roof on the first frame house built in Warsaw. Like his father he was 
prominently identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and did 
much to keep up religious worship in a new country. He was a mem- 
ber of the first jury empanneled in the county, and he assisted in 
blazing the road to Rochester through swamps and around hills. He 
was a strong man in a community which especially needed strong men. 
He was a thorough Christian and a man who made his deeds conform 
to Jiis beliefs. He gave liberally of his substance, aided many less 
prosperous than himself, and v/as the type of early settler whose 
character should be longest remem.bered by those who came afterward. 
John W. Cook married Ann Pettinger. Eight of his children were 
reared to mature years : Nicholas P., James A., Stephen N., Allen T., 
Henry, Mary D., Peter S. and William F. Peter and William were 
ministers of the Methodist Church and did pioneer missionary labors 
in Dakota Territory. 

James Asbury Cook, at the time of his death perhaps the oldest 
representative of the Cook family living in Kosciusko County, was born 
when Kosciusko County was still a wilderness. He was born on his 
father's farm September 22, 1843, a son of John W. and Ann (Pet- 
tinger) Cook. As a boy he had the advantages of the country- schools 
and for several terms taught school in the winter terms. His children 
and descendants will always be proud of the fact that he served as a 
soldier in the Civil war. He enlisted in Februar;s^ 1864, as a member 
of Company A, Seventy-Fourth Indiana Infantry. That regiment 
bore its full share of campaigning in the march and siege of Atlanta, 
but just before the battle of Resaca in that campaign he was taken 



388 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

ill and sent to a hospital. He subsequently rejoined the regiment, was 
with Sherman in his triumphant movements through Georgia and up 
through the Carolinas, and after participating in the grand review at 
Washington was honorably discharged in July, 1865. During the last 
few weeks of his service he was a member of the Twenty-Second In- 
diana Infantry. 

After the war 'Sir. Cook applied himself to the business of farming 
in Harrison Township. He was also active in that locality as a citizen, 
served in the office of constable, and in the spring of 1866 was elected 
assessor of Harrison Township for four years. He continued his 
eareer as a fanner until 1897. and then lived in Warsaw for a time, 
went back to his farm and managed it several years longer, but from 
1902 was a permanent resident of the county seat. For a number of 
years Mr. Cook served as ditch viewer, and in that connection had 
much to do with county impi-ovement. He sei-\'ed his second term as 
a member of the Warsaw city council. In politics he was a republican, 
was active in the Methodist Episcopal Church and affiliated with Kos- 
ciusko Post No. 114, Grand Army of the Republic. On September 6. 
1868, only a few >'ears after he returned from the war, ^Mr. Cook 
married Mary J. Huffer, daughter of Joseph Huffer. Five children 
were born to their marriage : John W., Jacob E., Anna B., Joseph M. 
and Matilda J. Two of these children, John W. and Joseph Merlin, 
are now deceased. Jacob E. is a stock buyer and farmer in Harrison 
Township. Anna B. is a deaconess in the Methodist Episcopal Church 
and for the past fifteen years has resided at Dubuque, Iowa. Matilda 
J. married Edward Levi, and thev reside in Warsaw. 

The mother of these children "died June 5, 1883. In March, 1884, 
Mr. Cook married Mrs. Mary C. (Harter) Lehman, daughter of 
Mathias Harter and widow of Benjamin F. Lehman, reference to both 
of whom is made in subsequent sketches. Mr. Cook died on Mav 
12, 1916. 

Mathias Harter, the father of Mrs. James A. Cook of Warsaw, 
was a prominent old settler in Kosciusko County. He was born in 
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in 1808, son of Christian and Eliza- 
beth Harter, and during his youth and early manhood he lived suc- 
cessivel.v in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio and Indiana. He was a 
blacksmith by trade. In 1833 he united with the United Brethren 
Church, and was one of its most earnest supporters wherever he lived. 
It was due to exposure while working on the camp meeting grounds 
at Warsaw that he was taken with the illness which brought about' his 
death on September 17. 1886. 

In December, 1831, Mathias Harter married Mary Easterly. She 
was born November 27, 1812, in Pennsylvania, a daughter of Lawrence 
and Catherine Eastei-ly. She was sixteen years of age when the 
family moved to Richland County, Ohio. Several years after their 
marriage Mathias Harter and wife came to Kosciusko County, and for 
many yeai's he was one of the prominent residents of Harrison Town- 
ship. His home was in section 15, west of Warsaw, and he developed 
a large and valuable farm in that loealitv. He and his wife were the 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 389 

parents of eight children, and those who reached mature years were 
George W., Henry, Susan, Mathias, William and Mary C. Four of 
the sons of Mathias Harter were Union soldiers. One of them, Jona- 
than, died while in the army at Chattanooga, Tennessee, July 4, 1864. 
The oldest, George, entered the army in 1862, was advanced from 
private to second lieutenant, to first lieutenant, and in March, 1864, 
was made captain in the Seventy-Fourth Indiana Infantry. 

Benjamin Fr.\nklin Lehm.\n, who spent nearly all his life in 
Kosciusko Coiuity, was a splendid citizen, and his record as a soldier 
during the Civil war should be especially remembered and made a 
matter of record in this publication. 

He was born in Ohio, a son of John Lehman. The family came to 
Kcsciusko County when Benjamin F. was a boy in his teens, and he 
grew up in this' locality and acquired his education in the public 
schools. From the schools he graduated into the active work of the 
farm and continued that vocation until the outbreak of the Civil wai-. 
Then, when the country most needed defenders, in July, 1862, he en- 
listed as a private in Company A of the Seventj'-fourth Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantrj'. For a time he was in the instriiction camp at Camp 
Allen at Fort Wayne, and was regularly mustered into service on 
August 21, 1862. He saw much of the arduous campaigning through 
Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia, fought at Hoover's Gap, and in the 
great battle of Chickamauga was wounded in the left leg by a minie 
ball. He recovered in time to join his regiment immediate]}' after the 
fall of Atlanta. Thence he marched with Sherman's splendid army 
to the sea, up through the Carolinas, and the last event of his service 
was the grand review at Washington. He received an honorable dis- 
charge at Indianapolis June 16, 1865. 

After the war Mr. Lehman resumed his life as a farmer in Kosci- 
usko County. On iMarch 10, 1872, he married Mary C, daughter of 
Mathias Harter. To their marriage were born two sons: Herbert C, 
who is in the railway mail service and has his home in Warsaw, and 
Edgar E., who is auditor of the Dalton Foundry at Warsaw. Both 
these sons made records in the Spanish-American war, the former as a 
private and the latter as sergeant in Company H of the One Hundred 
and Sixtieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 

Benjamin Franklin Lehman died January 5, 1878. His death was 
hastened by the wounds which he had received in the battle of Chicka- 
mauga and he practically laid down his life for the integrity of the 
Union. He was an active member of the United Brethren Church. 

Alpheus B. Ulrey. It indicates to a large degree the esteem 
in which he is held by his neighbors that Alpheus B. Ulrey was nom- 
inated for the ofBce of trustee of Jackson Township in 1918. He has 
also served as a member of the Township Advisory Board. He is a 
man of first-cla.ss ability and is known among his neighbors as a very 
successful farmer. The Ulrey home is in section 5 of Jackson Town- 
ship, two miles south and a mile and a half west of Sidney. 

Several branches of the Ulrey family were among the early set- 



390 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

tlei-s aud have long l)een well kiiowu in this southeastern curner of 
Kosciusko Coimty. Alpheus B. was born in the township August 
18, 1889, a son of Gabriel and ilary A. (Kreider) Ulrey. His father 
was born in Montgomery- County, Ohio, four miles from the Citv of 
Dayton, December 26, 1839, and died April 23, 1914. His mother 
was born in Ohio July 27, 1843, and is still living at the advanced 
age of seventy-five. The parents were children when their respective 
parents came to Indiana and located in Kosciusko County, and here 
they grew up and married May 8, 1862. Gabriel Ulrey was an or- 
dained elder in the Church of the Brethreii. His children were: 
Rosa, born August 23, 1863. wife of A. J. Wertenberger : Anna, born 
October 10, 1865, wife of Jacob X. ^Miller; Lizzie, born September 1. 
1868, wife of Jacob A. iletzger, of Jackson Township; Alice, born 
March 19, 1870, wife of Albert ^Miller, and she died in Februarv, 
1903; Mattie, born August 20, 1872, wife of S. N. Hawley, living in 
California : Asa, born December 4, 1875, a farmer in Jackson Town- 
ship ; Alpheus B. ; and Ella, born April 4, 1882 ; wife of E. P. Tridle, 
of Sidney. 

Alpheus B. Ulrey had as his bo.yhood euviromuent the old home 
farm, and he learned the common branches taught in the neighbor- 
ing district schools. At the age of twent.v. on April 12, 1900, he 
married Miss Cora Ross, who was born in Jackson Township, Janu- 
ary 12. 1878, daiighter of John and Jane (Stout) Ross. Jlrs. Ilrey 
was educated in the public schools of Jackson Township. 

After their marrigge they rented the Ross farm for a niuuber 
of years, but in 1905 moved to their present place of eighty acres, 
one of the high class and valuable farms of that township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ulrey have six children : Flossie, bom March 13. 
1902, a graduate of the common schools : Fern, born October 7. 1904, 
who has also completed the coui-se of the common schools; John A., 
born December 10. 1907 ; Irene and Pauline, twins, born April 20. 
1911 ; and Gladys, born Augiist 14, 1914. The family are members 
of the Church of the Brethren and j\Ir. Ulrey takes an active part 
in church affairs and is a deai-on. Politically his active part has 
been played as a republican. 

Revra DePuy is one of the men who have helped to make War- 
saw an indiistrial center. He first located in this city in 1896 and 
founded what is now the DePuy Manufacturing Company, a fac- 
tory that turns out products that are sold all over the couuti-A% 
employing a niimber of workmen, and the payroll is one of the im- 
portant assets of the community. 

Bv birth Mi: DePuv is a Michigan man, having been born in 
Grand Rapids JIarch 22, 1861. His father. James DePuy, was a 
lawj-er in Grand Rapids, but when the son Revra was still a child 
he "took his family to Canada, where he died. The mother subse- 
quentlv returned to the United States and lived in ^Marseilles, Illinois. 
■ Owing to the early death of his father. Revra DePuy came face 
to face with hard circumstances in his boyhood. He lived in a num- 
ber of diffei'ent localities and supported himself by many kinds of 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY :i!n 

work. He was compelled to fight the battle of life unaided, and his 
educatiou was largely such as he could pick \ip by au occasional 
term in the regular schools and by much reading and study in pri- 
vate. As a boy he worked as a clerk in a drug store, "and this 
led to his taking a course in chemistry' in the University of Toronto, 
from which institution he received his diploma. 

On leaving the university he went as a traveling salesman, and 
it was while making the rounds of his customers that he first came to 
Warsaw. He came to that city with a purpose. He had conceived 
the idea and had carefully worked out a plan for manufacturing a 
fiber splint to take the place of the wooden splints which up to then 
were almost entirely employed for broken bones. On the basis of 
this idea, Mr. DePuj' began in a very small way his manufacturing 
industry at Warsaw in 1896. He soon had the business on a profit- 
able basis. In 1901 he responded to some inducement and removed 
his factory to Niles, Michigan, where he incorporated the company. 
However, the concern did not prosper there in accordance with his 
plans and expectations, and in 1904 he returned the business to 
AVarsaw. He has continued with more than an average degree of 
success. With the progress of time the wood fiber splint, which con- 
stituted the basis of his manufacturing enterprise, gave way to wire 
cloth, and that is now the chief output of the DePuy factory. There 
are sixteen people employed in tlie local industry,' and six of these 
are traveling salesmen. 

Mr. DePuy is man-ied and is recognized as one of the substan- 
tial men of Warsaw and Kosciusko County. He is affiliated with 
the Masonic Order and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Owen S. Gasku^l. Any history of the Village of Burket, which 
was established thirty-five years ago, must repeat the name of Owen 
S. Gaskill in connection with nearly all its leading interests and in- 
dustries. Mr. Gaskill is a pioneer lumberman, having been in the 
business for over half a century, and in the past has owned several 
of the mills which at one time gave to Burket its chief industry, 
lumber manufacture. He is also a banker, practical farmer and stock 
raiser, and his long life has contained a succession of undertakings, 
beginning with the struggles of a poor boy and mounting gradually 
higher until they have become vitally identified with the entire com- 
munity. 

Mr. Gaskill is president of the Bank of Seward, wliich was organ- 
ized with a capital stock of .$10,000. The other executive officers are 
Mrs. Ida Huffer, vice president, and H. H. Roberts, cashier. The di- 
rectors of the bank are Mr. Gaskill, II. H. Roberts, W. S. Howard, 
George Alexander and Clem Jones, while the finance committee con- 
sists of Mr. Gaskill and W. S. Howard. ]\Ir. Gaskill and his son, 
E. E. Gaskill, are also large stock holders in the State Bank of War- 
saw and his son is one of the directors of the bank. The business of 
lumbering is still carried on under the name Gaskill & Son. Mr. 
Gaskill and .son have about 600 acres of land under their ownership 
in Kosciusko County. 



392 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Mr. Gaskill was born in Stark County, Ohio, December 25, 1838, 
a son of Levi and Nancy A. (Maxwell) Gaskill. His mother was a 
native of Meadsville, Pennsylvania. At an early age Owen S. Gas- 
kill was thrown on his own resources. A limited attendance at dis- 
trict schools was all the education he was able to secure. For five 
years he worked from early morning to late at night on a dairy farm. 
He also had another youthful experience as a laborer in a brick fac- 
tory. As a .youth he was modest, quick in comprehension, thrifty and 
industrious, and naturally gained the sympathy and earned the as- 
.sistance of the people around him. While he was attending school 
at Marlboro, Ohio, a proposal came to him to move to Indiana and 
teach a term of school. In the fall of 1858, at the age of twenty, he 
arrived at Bourbon, Indiana, and taught there during the following 
winter of 1858-59. Altogether he taught four years. After his first 
term he had no difficulty in securing a school. His first license for 
two yeare was renewed for two years more. He invested some of his 
first earnings in a tract of land and has never been without some 
practical interests in agriculture and land development. 

In 1863 Mr. Gaskill was drafted for service in the army and 
was with Company C of the Eighty-Third Indiana Infantry until 
the close of the war. He brought back from the army only $37.50. 
Returning to Bourbon, he .joined his brother, who had come from 
Ohio in 1860, and built a sawmill near that town. Mr. 0. S. Gaskill 
acquired a half interest in this mill and at the end of two years sold 
out and realized a cash capital of $3,700. He used $2,700 of this to 
buy a hardware store at Bourbon. The next ten years were spent in 
the hardware trade, but despite his best efforts his business failed to 
prosper. Having lost all his capital, he had to begin all over again. 
Here again he resorted to farming, buying thirty acres and paying 
for it out of the proceeds of his labor. Some friends who recognized 
his sterling honesty and industi-y supplied him with the capital to 
get into the lumber business again, and from the stumpage of a 
tract which he bought he cleared up a good profit and that started 
him again on the road to prosperity. 

In the fall of 1880 Mr. Gaskill came to Burket, which, however, 
had not yet been established, and acquired a half interest in the saw- 
mill through the backing of Jlr. C. L. Morris. In 1881 he moved 
into the Village of Burket, and has been his home now ever since. 
As a sawmill man he has cleared off and converted into lumber many 
tracts in Northeastern Indiana. In 1883 he lx)ught ninety-four acres 
near Burkett, and that was one among many profitable enterprises. 

Mr. Gaskill married ^Nlaiy J. Collins, who died in 1893, and was 
the mother of Mr. E. E. Gaskill of Warsaw. For his present wife Mr. 
Gaskill married Hattie Elliott, of New York. 

Mr. Gaskill is a member of the ilethodist Episcopal Church at 
Burket, is affiliated with Bourbon Lodge of ^Masons and is a former 
master of the lodge. In politics he is a republican, and has filled 
positions on the township advisorj' board. 




^yi^^^u^^ '^ Z/^^:^ 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 39:{ 

Andrew Gerow Wood, the dean ol' the Kosciusko County bar, 
not long ago celebrated his eightieth birthday anniversary. While 
there are many men who reach the age of fourscore, comparatively 
few make these yeai-s significant by such experience and achievement 
as have been the lot of Captain Wood. He earned a captain's com- 
mission by service in the Civil War during the dark da.ys of the 
sixties. For fully half a century he has practiced law at Warsaw. 
His fellow citizens in Kosciusko County do not need these statements 
of fact in order to appreciate his sterling character and his value as 
a citizen. As a matter of permanent record for the future, how 
ever, something more concerning his career should be noted here. 

He was born at Marysville in Union Count.y, Ohio, January 16, 
1835. Dr. Ira Wood, his father, who was of Irish ancestry, wa.s 
born in New Y'ork State, was reared there, read medicine, and in 
1821 became one of the early physicians to practice at Canton, Ohio. 
He was married at Canton to Margaret Hawley. She was the daugh 
ter of John Hawley, who was born in Ireland and married in that 
country at the age of twenty-one. John Hawley lived near Fingal's 
Cave and was of old strict Presbyterian stock. He immigrated to 
the United States, lived for a short time near Myers Lake, in Stark 
County, Ohio, and then moved to the locality of Marysville, Ohio, 
where his death occurred at the venerable age of eighty-nine years. 
When that movement in American polities was at its height he was 
a member of the knownothing party. 

In 1826 Dr. Ira Wood and his young wife moved to Marysville, 
Ohio. He built a two-story frame house, the first house of frame 
timbers erected in that locality. There he engaged in the practice 
of medicine with Dr. Andrew Gerow as his partner, and they were 
closely associated not only professionally but on terms of great 
friendship, and Captain Wood was named for his father's partner. 
Dr. Wood died at Marj-sville in 1839. He and his wife were the 
parents of eight children, three of whom died in infancy. One died 
in 1860, another in 1900, another in 1914, and still another in 1915. 
Captain Wood of Warsaw is the only living survivor of these chil- 
dren. 

Andrew Gerow Wood was reared at Marysville, Ohio. His youth- 
ful days were not particularlj' eventful. He attended school, and 
also developed a good constitution and helped pay his way by work- 
ing on farms belonging to his uncles. At one time he was paid $3.00 
a month for this kind of work, and at another $4.00 per month. He 
carefully put away the money thus earned and with it bought a 
scholarship at the Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware. He spent 
two years as a student there, and as he had little money beyond 
enough to pay his tuition, he maintained himself by working even- 
ings and on Saturdays. At the age of twenty he found employment 
in the general store of FuUington, Garwood & Company at Milford 
Center, Ohio. 

While living at Milford and employed as a struggling young 
clerk. Dr. Wood was married October 10, 1855, to Rose A. Reed, 
daughter of Samuel Reed, a farmer of Champaign County, Ohio. 



394 HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

In the same year of their marriage ilr. Wood and bride moved out 
to Waterloo, Iowa. That was then a remote community, and there 
were few white settlers around the Waterloo of that time. He spent 
fifteen months there as a member of the general mercantile firm of 
Elwells & Wood. They conducted a trading post and carried on 
most of their business with the Indians who lived around Water- 
loo. Then returning to Mil ford Center, Ohio, ilr. AVood resumed 
business under the firm name of Wood & Reed, handling retail dry 
goods stock, in which he continued for about four years. 

With this varied experience behind him Captain Wood then re- 
turned to his native town of Marysville and took up the study of 
law in the office of P. B. Cole. His preceptor afterwards became 
the father-in-law of Charles W. Fairbanks, Vice President nf the 
United States, and Mr. Fairbanks himself read law under ilr. Cole. 

Admitted to the bar of Ohio in August, 1860, Captain Wood in 
1861 moved to Lawrenceburg in Southern Indiana and took up 
practice as a member of the firm of Gregg & Wood. He handled his 
law cases as a rising young attorney in that city during tlie first 
years of the Civil War, but in February, 1864, enlisted in Company 
H of the One Hundred and Twenty-Third Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry as a private. He was later elected first lieutenant and .still 
later captain of his company, but owing to lack of men to complete 
the eompanv organization he never mustered in, though holding a 
captain's commission. His command was part of the division under 
the leaderehip of Gen. A. P. Hovey. who afterwards became gov- 
ernor of Indiana. Soon after he was mustered in he went to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, spent a week there in an instruction camp, and 
then for a short time was stationed at Fort Xegley. near Nashville. 
From there his command marched to Cleveland. Tennes.see, spent 
four days there, and thence on to Chattanooga, where he arrived in 
time to participate in Shennan's great campaign against Atlanta. 
During that compaign he was aid-de-camp nn the staff of General 
ilcQuistou. In the historic advance towards Atlanta he foiight at 
the battles of Resaca, Kingston, Rome, Ezra Church, Big Shanty, 
Kenesaw Mountain. His was the first brigade that crossed the pon- 
toon bridge spanning the river .six miles from Atlanta. With the fall 
of Atlanta Captain Wood aud his command were detached from 
Sherman's army, leaving that organization at Rome, then marched 
back to Chattanooga, took train to Nashville, and went to Columbia 
and across Duck River aud participated in those battles which finally 
broke the resistance of the Confederacy in the ^Mississippi Valley. 
He fought at Spring Hill, and at the great battle of Franklin he 
was on detached diity with the staff of General Strickland. From 
Franklin he accompanied the Federal troops to Nashville, where 
sixteen days later, under General Thomas, was fought the battle 
which effectually dissipated the Confederate army under Hood. 
From Tennessee Captain Wood was sent to Clifton, thence to Wash- 
ington, D. C, on to Wilmington, and at Jonesboro he again .ioiued 
Sherman's army. Wliile on the way to Raleigh he participated in 
the battle of Wise Forks, known in history as Kingston, which was 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY :i9r, 

the last important engagement of the long struggle between the 
North and the South. When peace was declared Captain Wood, 
along with the Twenty-Third Armj^ Corps, went to Charlotte, North 
Carolina, thence to Salisbury, and on September 14, 1865, was mus- 
tered out of service. On April 1, 1865, at Charlotte, North Carolina, 
he was appointed .judge advocate of that place, and he also had juris- 
diction at Salisbury until mustered out. 

On leaving the army Captain Wood returned to Indiana, and on 
November 8, 1865, located at Wai-saw. This has been his home ever 
since, now fully half a century, and all those years have been spent 
in the practice of his profession. But little important litigation has 
been tried in the local courts with which Captain Wood has not 
been identified on one side or the other. It is indeed a stranger in 
Warsaw who does not kno\\ Captain Wood's law offices. In fact, 
those offices are almost as much of a landmark in the city as the 
courthouse itself. For forty-one years he has interviewed his clients 
and has welcomed his friends in one and the same office building. In 
that long period he lias seen many of his former contemporaries 
leave the county or pass to their last reward. He has had a number 
of partners in practice. F. E. Bowser, now Judge of the Circuit 
Court, was a student under his direction and afterwards was for 
twenty years a partner. 

In politics Captain Wood is a democrat. He was the first demo- 
cratic coimcilman and mayor ever elected to those offices in War- 
saw. That was more of a compliment to his i-eeognized standing and 
per.sonal character, perhaps, than to the party of which he was a 
membei-. He has been affiliated with the Independent Oi'der of Odd 
Fellows for fifty-seven years, and is a member of both the subordi- 
nate lodge and the Hackleman Encampment of that order. He is 
also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, of the Loyal 
Order of Moose, and his chuVch is the Episcopal. 

Captain Wood and wife became the parents of three children. 
Charlotte was the wife of Abe Brubaker, but she and her husband 
and two of their children are now deceased, and the only survivor is 
a son, Lawrence Brubaker, an active member of the Warsaw bar. 
The daughter, Jennie, married 0. P. Eversole, they live at Port 
Wayne, and have two children, Sarah and Arthur. Mrs. Eversole's 
danghter is tlie wife of James Johnson, of Fort. Wayne, and she has 
two children, Jennie and Dorothy. Emma, the third daughter of 
Captain Wood, married Oscar Baker, and they live in Warsaw. 
There is one child in the Baker family. Edgar. Thus Captain Wood 
in his declining years has the comfoi-t and solace of fmir grandchil- 
dren. 

Hiram D. ;\Iiller. The chief financial institution in tlie south- 
eastern comer of Kosciusko County is the Bank of Sidney. Above 
and more important than its financial status and resources are the 
personnel of the men behind it and active in its management. A. B. 
Palmer is president, G. J. Smith is vice president, Hiram D. Miller is 



396 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

cashier, and the other directors are Sam Fnnk, Eli Circle and O. 
Palmer. 

Hiram D. Miller has been cashier of the bank nearly ten years. 
He is a well trained and efficient business man, and has lived in this 
community most of his life. He was born in Jackson Township, on 
a farm four miles south of Sidney. March 19, 1874. a son of Levi 
J. and Anna E. (Ulrey) Miller. Both his father's and mother's 
families have been long and usefully identified with this section of In- 
diana. His father was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, October 4, 
1845, while his mother was bom in Jackson Township of Kosciusko 
County, September 2. 1847. The grandparents were John and Mary 
A. (Mishler) Miller, who brought their family to Indiana in 1847 
and settled in section 18 of Jackson Township. The grandparents 
.spent the rest of their days on their farm, and they were active mem- 
bei's of the Church of the Brethren, the chief religious organization 
in that part of the township. Levi J. Miller was one of a family of 
six sons and four daughters. After his marriage to Anna E. Ulrey 
he located in Jackson Township, lived there until 1876, then had a 
farm two and a half miles east of Claypool.in Clay Township until 
the fall of 1882, when he returned to Jackson Township and contin- 
ued his active life as a farmer until 1908. His wife died in 190.5, and 
in 1908 he moved to Wabash County, lived on a farm there for ten 
years, and in the spring of 1918 retired to North Manchester, where 
he is still living. In his family were seven children by his first mar- 
riage, and those living today are : Joseph H., cashier of the Farmers 
State Bank of Cherubusco, Indiana, and who formerly served as 
postmaster of Syracuse, of Kosciusko County, fourteen years: Hiram 
D. ; Ora, wife of Vern Bushong; Melvin F., assistant cashier of the 
Bank of Sidney : Lizzie, wife of Ford Landis ; and Dayton, a farmer 
in Elkhart County. The one decea.sed child was named Alvin. 

Hiram D. Miller grew up in Clay and Jackson Townships. The 
education of his youth was supplied by the local schools, also the 
higher schools at North Manchester and the Tri-State Normal College 
at Angola. With this splendid education Mr. Miller was a .successful 
teacher for seven yeai-s, altogether in Jackson To^\^^ship. Then for 
six years he was engaged in the hardware business at Sidney, and 
.selling out removed to Syracuse, where he remained eight months, 
and for two years was located at North Manchester. Returning to 
Sidney in JIarch, 1909. he took up his pre.sent duties and responsi- 
bilities as ca.shier of the local bank. 

December 24. 1899, 'Slv. Miller married Miss Susie Ulrey, who was 
born in Kosciusko Coimty, member of one of the well knowni families 
of that name in the southeastern part of the county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Miller have four children: Paul and Pauline, twins, born JMay 8, 
1901, now in the third .rear of the local high school; Carl, born Au- 
gust 1, 1912 ; and Bennett, born July 8, 1914. 

The family are members of the Brethren Church, and Mr. Miller 
is clerk of the church society. He is now serving as Master of Sidney 
Lodge No. 579, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; he is also affil- 
iated with Chester Chapter No. 47 Royal Arch Masons. Politically 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 397 

he has taken a quite active interest in the republican party, and 
for several years has been a local committeeman. 

J. D. Lke Cline is superintendent of the Silver Lake public 
schools, has been identified with educational work since early man- 
hood, and unlike most educators is also a progressive and rather 
successful business man, having a number of interests as a farmer 
and formerly as a merchant, and is one of the leaders in local civic 
activities and in those movements which are helping -win the war. 

Mr. Cline was born in Adams County, Indiana, May 21, 1881. 
He represents an old and prominent family of Root Township in this 
county. His ancestors for several generations lived in the State of 
Pennsylvania. His grandfather, Jacob Cline, was born in Penn- 
sylvania, married Barbara Robinson of that .state, and immediately 
after marriage moved to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and about 1838 
loaded his household goods upon a wagon and with ox and horse 
teams crossed the country to Northeastern Indiana. He secured 160 
acres of land in section 14 of Root Township, and in a house of logs 
he and his family put up with the primitive conditions for a nimi- 
ber of years. They lived principally upon corn bread and wild 
meat. Jacob Cline was a resolute home maker, put all his land under 
the plow, and in his later years enjoyed the comforts of a good 
home and an ample competence. He was a class leader for many 
years in the first church of the Methodist denomination in his town- 
ship. 

The parents of Superintendent Cline were George B. and Lavinia 
(Luckey) Cline. George B. Cline was born in Root Township of 
Adams County March 26, 1842, and is one of the three surviving 
children of his father. The other two are Jonas and William. 

George Cline grew to maturity in Adams County, attended the 
di.strict schools, and after his marriage became a farmer, but is now 
living retired in Decatur, from which city he oversees his farming 
interests. He and his wife are active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. George Cline was a gallant soldier of the Union 
Army, serving more than four years in Company C of the Forty- 
Seventh Indiana Infantry. Politically he is a republican. He and 
his wife had three children : Martha D., who studied music in Ohio 
University and is the wife of Dr. W. E. Smith of Decatur; J. D. 
Lee; and Juna G., who died in infancy. 

J. D. L. Cline had a farm rearing, and his first advantages were 
supplied by the district schools. Later he attended the Decatur 
High School and was only seventeen when he taught his first winter 
term in a country district. In the intervals of teaching he attended 
higher schools and acquired an education which well fitted him for 
the responsibilities of leadcr.ship he now enjoys. He was a student 
in the Ohio Northern University of Ada, in Valparaiso University 
and also in Winona College under Dr. Rigdon. Mr. Cline holds the 
degrees A. B. and A. M., and is now possessor of a life certificate 
from the state. He has filled positions in all the grades of teaching 



398 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

work, and at one time was teacher of mathematies and science in 
Wiuona College. 

Mr. Cline has been a resident of Silver Lake since 1905. For a 
time he was in the drug business here and also resumed his work as 
an educator in charge of the grammar school, and is now superin- 
tendent of the entire school system of the village. 

Mr. Cline married Miss Daisy A. Cline, who was a student of 
music at Valparaiso University. They have one son. Eldred D.. 
born April 13, 1905, now a student in the eighth grade of the pub- 
lic schools. Mr. and Mrs. Cline are active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He is affiliated with the Kuight.s of Pythias, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, ^lodern Woodmen of America, 
and has filled chairs in these ordere. He is a republican and is now 
serving his fifth term as town clerk of Silver Lake. He is also 
president of the local Red Cross Chapter of Silver Lake Township, 
and Mrs. Cline gives much of her time to supervising the sewing 
department of that chapter. Mr. Cline owns a small farm of forty 
acres in Adams Township, and has an interest in another place of 
eighty acres in the same county. His own home in Silver Lake is 
a modern residence on Jefiferson street. 

Frank C. Tucker, M. D. V., whose work as a veterinary surgeon 
has made him well known in Claypool and suiTouuding tei'ritory, is 
a grandson of that splendid Kosciusko County pioneer Horace 
Tucker, and this is a point at which it is appropriate to mention 
some of the interesting details of the Tucker family history. 

Dr. Tucker's ancestors were New England people. His great- 
grandfather, John Tucker, was born in New Hampshire in 1791, 
and in 1815 settled as a pioneer in the woods of Richland County. 
Ohio. After three years of pioneer experience he returned to New 
Hampshire and married Mai-y Ward, who was born in 1800. In 1818 
the young couple returned to Ohio, and it is said that for six months 
Mrs. Tucker ne\er saw the face of a white woman, her neighbors 
being chiefly Indians. John Tucker was a man of fine education, and 
had a record of thirty-five consecutive terms of school teaching in 
Ohio. lu December, 1853, he moved to Kosciusko County, having 
bought .several years before laud upon which the Village of Sevas- 
topol was later situated. This village was sui-veyed and named by 
him. About that time the Crimean War was in progress and the 
achievements of the British army at Sevastopol were prominent in 
the popular mind. Though in advanced years John Tucker after 
coming to Kosciusko County also planted the seed and developed a 
tine apple orchard. His wife died February 27, 1876, and he soon 
afterwards returned to Ohio, and while there was taken ill and 
died December 25, 1879. He was laid to rest in Kosciusko County. 
John Tucker and wife had six children : Hotaee, Aurelius. Albert, 
Serena, Regulus and Livonia. 

The real pioneer of the Tucker family in Kosciusko County was 
Horace Tucker, who was born in Richland County, Ohio. November 
8, 1825. In 1846 he came to Kosciusko County, and paid .ii2.50 an 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY ;i9f) 

acre for a tract of 160 acres in section 20 of Fi-auklin Township. 
The following spring he cut down the first timber and erected a log 
cabin, and in the fall of 1847 went back to Ohio and married on 
January 13, 1848, Eliza Johnston, daughter of Francis and Ann 
(Fleming) Johnston. In the fall of that year they returned to Kos- 
ciusko County, and it was in their log cabin home that all their 
three children were born, namely: Albert L. ; Rosella, who mar- 
ried Jonathan Tinkey ; and Hollis C. 

Horace Tucker lived a life of great industry and was a man of 
remarkable business judgment, and came to be classed as one of the 
wealthy citizens of the county. He was a pioneer stock raiser and 
dealer, and it is said that with a partner he took the first carload 
of stock ever sent by railroad from "Warsaw. It is said that when 
Horace Tucker and his wife came to Kosciusko County he brought 
all their household possessions and goods in a small box. Much of 
their furniture was hand made and of the crudest description. But 
their prosperity enabled them to introduce many improvements as 
they came. They brought the first cooking stove into Franklin 
Township, an implement which Mr. Tucker bought at Fort Wayne. 
It is said that the neighbors for miles around came to view this 
wonderful improvement over the old style of cooking at the open 
fireplace. In 1871 Horace Tucker erected a substantial brick resi- 
dence, and it was the first home in Franklin Township heated by 
furnace steam. His windmill pump was the second in the town- 
ship. He not only made improvements himself, but fostered im- 
provements affecting the general community welfare, though he stead- 
fastly refused any political honors, being satisfied merely to vote as 
a republican. 

Dr. Frank C. Tucker was born in Franklin Township, a son of 
Albert L. and Elizabeth (Bechtelheimer) Tucker. His father was 
bom in Franklin Township in 1848, and his wife in the same local- 
ity. Doctor Tucker was only an infant when his mother died March 
16, 1888. He was the youngest of eight children, and was reared 
largely by a sister and also in the home of his grandfather, Horace 
Tucker. He attended district schools, and in 1906 entered the Mc- 
Killip Veterinary College at Chicago, from which he graduated with 
his degree in the spring of 1909. He began practice at South Whit- 
ley, Indiana, but on January 2, 1912, returned to Kosciusko County 
and located at Claypool, where he has his office and headquarters. 
His services are in almost constant demand by the farmers and 
stock raisers of that community. 

September 2, 1908, Mr. Tucker married Frances Kern, daugh- 
ter of Jacob and Martha Kern. Mrs. Tucker was born in Franklin 
Township, and had two years of high school work. Thej' have two 
sons, Marshall B., born July 22, 1909 ; and Carl C, born September 
15, 1911. Dr. and Mrs. Tucker are active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church at Claypool. He is affiliated with Lake City Lodge 
No. 73, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and is a democrat in 
politics. 



400 HISTORY OB^ KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

aioNBOE Paulus. In the Indiana plan of local government the 
most important office is that of township trustee. Through this office 
is administered the business and financial management of the local 
schools, and the conditions of the schools, highways and other im- 
provements are lai-gelj- an index of the character of the man chosen 
to fill that important office. The present incumbent of that office in 
Lake Township is Monroe Paulus, whose family was one of the first 
to locate in this section of the county, and the name Paulus has been 
prominently identified with that locality for over three quarters of 
a century. 

Monroe Paulus was born a mile and a half east of Silver Lake 
in Clay Township, February 5, 1858, son of Daniel and Maria A. 
(Miller) Paulus. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and his 
mother of Maryland, and after their marriage they lived in Mont- 
gomery County, Ohio, and in 1841 moved to Kosciusko County and 
settled in the wild woods, where they had a log cabin home until 
they could provide themselves with one of greater comforts. Daniel 
Paulus and his brother Jac-ob were the first merchants in what is now 
Silver Lake Village, and they were the founders of that town, the 
town being laid out on land owned by Jacob. Their old store, a 
hewed log structure, stood until 1884. Daniel Paulus and wife both 
died in 1886. They had their home on the farm where Monroe was 
born until 1864, when they moved to the Village of Silver Lake. 
Daniel Paulus was a democrat and a very active man of his party. 
He and his wife had the following children : Jacob M., Annie, David, 
Catherine, Henry, Maiy A., Susannah, Elizabeth, Lydia, Monroe and 
Sarah. Five of these children are still living 

Monroe Paulus grew up at Silver Lake, and after finishing his 
education went to work in a saw mill. He also had a splendid exper- 
ience in grist and flour mills and in a butter tub factor}'. For three 
years he was in the saw mill business in Eastern Tennessee, and for 
two and a half years was superintendent of the Nettleton Hardwood 
Lumber Business. He also spent two and a half years in the far 
west, in Utah, in the milling business. 

In January, 1898, Mr. Paulus married Alice Punk, a native of 
Kosciusko County. After his marriage Mr. Paulus spent another 
period of two and a half years in the saw mill business in the State 
of Mississippi. On returning to Lake Township he resumed farm- 
ing, and has since steadily devoted his time to his place of eighty-five 
acres three-quarters of a mile north of Silver Lake. 

He and his wife have four children : Cloiee, who is married and 
lives on the home farm and has twin sons, Corlyss and Corlyle; 
Glenn, a graduate of high school, now serving with the American 
forces in the war against Germany ; Meta, a graduate of the Silver 
Lake High School, and now a student in the South Bend College; 
and Thelma, who is in the second year of the local high school. 

Jlr. Paulus is affiliated with Deming Lodge No. 88, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons at North Manchester, and is also a Past Noble 
Grand and a member of the Grand Lodge of the Odd Fellows; his 
local affiliation being with Silver Lake Lodge No. 576. In politics 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 401 

he is a democrat and it was as a luember of that party, but chiefly 
as the man best fitted for the place, that his fellow citizens chose 
him for the responsibilities of township trustee. 

SiiiAS W. Chipman. Much that is worthy and estimable in human 
life was the lot of Silas W. Chipman, president of the State Bank of 
Warsaw. He was one of the early merchants of Kosciusko County, 
and for more than half a century lived up to his obligations as "a 
banker and business man, and it would be an effort to imagine the first 
prosperity of Warsaw dissociated from the influence and enterprise of 
this venerable citizen, who was one of the oldest and one of the few 
remaining at the time of his death of the very early settlers. For years 
his fellow citizens regarded him as their natural leader, though he 
never took any part in politics, and he gained his enviable position 
through the strictest integrity in every relation. 

Mr. Chipman died at Warsaw March"9, 1916, when within one week 
of ninety years of age. Death came very suddenly from heart failure. 
He was actively engaged in the banking business" until the day of his 
death. His was a long and useful life. He was a New Bnglander 
by birth and ancestry, and was born in Addison County, Vennont, 
March 16, 1826. His parents, Isaac and Sarah H. (Hemeiiway) Chip- 
man were of English ancestiy. The first of the family in America 
came when the country was in its colonial period of development, and 
members of subsequent generations have taken their full, share in 
the national wars, in the work of legislative bodies, and in business 
and the professions. Isaac Chipman was a farmer, but was a man 
of more than ordinary local influence in his section of Vermont. He 
served as a .justice of the peace, was a member of both the Lower 
House and Senate of Vermont, in polities was first a whig and later 
a republican, and was a member of the Congregational Church. Of his 
seven children two subsequently took a prominent part in business 
affairs in Kosciusko County, Indiana. 

Silas W. Chipman had the usual environment and experiences 
of a New England boy during the early half of the last century. He 
gained a training on one of the rugged farms of Vermont and was edu- 
cated in district schools. Soon after reaching manhood, in 1849, 
he came to the then small and isolated Village of Warsaw, Indiana. 
Here his first employment was as clerk in the store of Atwood & 
Pottenger, but not long afterwards he and his brother Samuel H. 
established a mercantile enterprise of their own. Mr. Chipman re- 
mained an active merchant of Wai-saw until 1881, and nearly all of 
the older settlers recall his store as one of the landmarks of the town. 
After the death of his brother Samuel he succeeded him as president 
of the State Bank of Warsaw. For more than a third of a century 
Mr. Chipman was president of this institution, and his name was in- 
variably used as synonym for integrity and sound commercial judg- 
ment. 

On April 18, 1867, he married Sarah M. Wilson. The children 
bom to them were : Arthur, who died in infancy : Walter M. ; Wilbur, 



402 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

who died in infancy ; Antoinette, who died at the age of thirteen ; and 
Helen M. A republican in politics, Silas W. Chipman steadfastly 
declined all political favors, and gave his greatest service to the 
community as a conservator of its financial resources and as a splen- 
did example of commercial integrity. For a gi-eat many .years he was 
an active member of the Presbyterian Church. Perhaps his greatest 
interest in life was his church. He sacrificed financially that he might 
give to the church and its missionaiy entei"prises. For twenty-two 
years he was superintendent of the Sabbath school and was a noble 
example of a Christian business man. 

JoN.STHAN TiNKEY. To live manj' years is something of an 
achievement, to live them usefully and well, to accumulate as well 
as to distribute prosperity and happiness, to bring a masterful mind 
and courage to the successive problems and obstacles of life — that 
is to deserve well of destiny and merit those items and practice 
which make up success 

Such has been the life of Jonathan Tinkey of Seward Township, 
whose career covers tliree-quarters of a century. He was born in 
Richland County, Ohio, October 21, 1842. It was in the same year 
that the Tinkey family became identified with Kosciusko County. 
His father, Noah Tinkey, was born in Washington County, Penn- 
sylvania, June 15, 1813, a son of Frederick and Mary Tinkey, who 
were of German ancestry. Noah Tinkey grew up in his native state, 
and in 1837 went with his parents to Richland County, Ohio. There 
on June 15, 1838, he married Eliza Easterlj'. She was born in Penn- 
sylvania June 14, 1819, a daughter of Lawrence and Catherine 
Easterly, natives of the same state. In 1842 Noah Tinkey brought 
his famil.y to Kosciusko County and found his destination west of 
Warsaw on the Tippecanoe River. Arriving there late one even- 
ing he unloaded his goods imder a beech tree, and under its shelter 
the family spent the night. He bought 160 acres of land, built a 
shanty, replaced it with a hewed log house, and then still another 
house of hewed logs, and finally a substantial frame dwelling arose, 
which sheltered him the rest of his days. Noah Tinkey was pros- 
pered, and accjuired altogether 420 acres. He and his wife were very- 
active and liberal members of the United Brethren Church, and in 
politics he was a democrat. He and his wife had eleven children, 
one of whom died in infancy. The others were named George, Fred- 
erick, Jonathan, ]\Iathias, Mahala, Catherine, Susan, Louisa, Arte- 
mesia and JMary. Of this family Mr. Jonathan Tinkey is the only 
sui-viving son. 

He grew up in Harrison Township and acquired a very liberal 
education, beginning in the district schools, was later in the War- 
saw schools, and finally in the State University. His education he 
utilized as a teacher for thirteen terms, all this woi-k being done in 
Kosciusko County. ]Mr. Tinkey is also one of the honored veterans 
of the Civil War. In 1864 he was enrolled in Company I of the 
Thirty-Third Indiana Infantry, and saw some active service during 
the latter months of that great struggle between the North and the 




cSa^M-ZA <y^i^^ 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 403 

South. He has long been interested in the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, is a member of Post No. 114, and in 1918 was chosen as a 
delegate to the National Reunion or Encampment at Portland, Oregon. 

While Mr. Tinkey had a modest inheritance, most of his pros- 
perity has been won by his individual abilities and labors. Of his 
holdings in Seward Township there is a large body of farming land 
amounting to 440 acres, besides 135 acres in Jackson Township. Mr. 
Tinke.y organized the Bank of Seward and was its largest stockholder. 
He is also interested in a number of other enterprises, local and else- 
where. He has a residence property in Warsaw and also has eighty 
acres of land in Wayne Township. 

He has been one of the stanch leaders of the democratic party in 
the county for many years. He has served as supervisor, and some 
years ago was the only democrat elected to the county council. 

Mr. Tinkey man-ied Rosella Tucker. Her father, Horace Tucker, 
who died Septeml)er 10, 1907, was one of Koseiiisko County's promi- 
nent citizens. Born in Richland County, Ohio, November 8, 1825, 
a son of John and Mary (Ward) Tucker, he came to Kosciusko 
County in 1846 and settled on 160 acres in Fi'anklin Township. He 
cut the first tree on the land, lived in a log cabin, and in the fall of 
1847 went back to Ohio, and on the following 13th of January mar- 
ried Eliza Johnston. They returned to Indiana and occupied their 
pioneer home in 1848, and in that log house their three children 
were horn, including Rosella. Horace Tucker was remarkably pros- 
perous in business and for many years ranked as one of the wealth- 
iest citizens of Franklin Township. He was a stock raiser and also 
a stock dealer, ;iiul it is said that be shijjped tlio first carload of stock 
ever sent by rail from Warsaw. Otlier r(^fereiices to his career will 
be found cm other pages of this ]iublicatioii. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tinkey had four children: Laura M., still at home 
with her parents; Alta M., who died at Rochester, Indiana, wife of 
Norman Stower ; Nellie A., wife of Isaac Kern of Seward Township ; 
and Horace G., who lives in Franklin Township and married Goldie 
Melons. 

Mr. Tinkey and wife are members of the Universalist Church at 
Roan in Wabash County. He is also a past noble grand and has 
been a member of tlie Givuid Lodge of tlie Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

John E. De.vton, representing a family of long residence in Kos- 
ciusko County, grew up on one of the farms in Clay Towni3hip, but 
for a number of years has applied his energies most successfully to 
business, and is proprietor of the Sidney Elevator in Jackson Town- 
ship. 

Mr. Deaton was born in Clarke County, Ohio, October 16, 1862, 
son of George W. and Frances C. (Fortney) Deaton. George W. 
Deaton, who died many years ago, was born and reared in Clarke 
County, son of William Deaton, a sawmill man. George Deaton 
married Miss Fortney March 9, 1856, and in March, 1863, they 
brought their family to Kosciusko County and located in Clay Town- 



404 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

ship. George W. Deatou was a hard worker, and succeeded iu es- 
tablishing his family in good circumstances before his death. He 
was an eloquent speaker and one of the leading advocates of the 
republican part}'. He served a tenu as trustee of Clay Township, 
and was the only republican ever elected to that office up to that time. 
He was also a charter member of the Grange at Claypool, and was 
an earnest member of the Jlethodist Episcopal Church. He and his 
wife had eight children, seven sons and one daughter: William S., 
Jacob O.,, Mary B., John E., all of whom were born in Ohio, and 
Samuel S., Ulysses, Cyinis B. and Charles G., who were born in 
Clay Township. Those still living are Jacob 0., John E., Shennan 
S., Cyrus B. and Charles G., the last a resident of Toledo, Ohio. 

John E. Deaton was less than a year old when brought to Kos- 
ciusko County. He grew up in Clay Township, attended the dis- 
trict schools there, and was a factor in the home circle until the 
age of twenty-one. March 11, 1888, he married Miss Louie E. Ball, 
who was born in Lake Township of this county. After their mar- 
riage they lived on a farm for several years, and then established 
their home in Claypool, from which town Mr. Deaton traveled for two 
years representing the Cleveland Stock Y^ards Company. Mr. Dea- 
ton came to Sidney in 1905. buying the local elevator interests, and 
has since handled a large share of the surplus grain marketed by the 
farmers throughout Jackson and adjoining townships. 

Mr. and Mrs. Deaton have three children : Sedie, a graduate of 
high school and wife of Dale H. Homma ; Russell B., a gi-aduate of 
high school and formerly a student of the Terre Haute State Nor- 
mal School, is now associated with his father in the elevator at Sid- 
ney, and married Gladys Baker; Mabel, a graduate of high school, 
still at home with her parents and is teacher of domestic science in 
the Sidney schools. 

The family are meml)ers of the Christian Church. Mr. Deaton 
is a trustee of the cliurch and is past noble grand of Sidney Lodge of 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, has sat in the Grand Lodge, 
and is also affiliated with the Masonic Order. He has been quite 
active in republican ranks for a number of years. 

J. H. WiNDBiGLER represents an old and honored name in Kos- 
ciusko County. His vocation has been that of an agriculturist, and 
while he has never sought those honors associated with public office, 
be has, nevertheless, rendered a valuable service to the community by 
his industrious career as a farmer and through his support of all 
public spirited enterprises, church, good schools and other affairs 
touching the community welfare. His farm, comprising eighty-nine 
acres of thoroughly cultivated land, is situated in Seward Town- 
ship. 

Mr. Windbigler was born in Newcastle Township of Fulton 
County, Indiana, March 10, 1851, son of John B. and Rebecca (Bark- 
man) Windbigler. His father and also his grandfather. John Wind- 
])igler, were shoemakers by trade, and the family came west from 
Pennsylvania, where they had lived for a number of generations. 



HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 40r. 

Mr. Windbigler's maternal grandfather, John Barknian, was also a 
shoemaker by trade. 

John B. Windbigler was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylva- 
nia, son of John and Mary (Buchter) Windbigler, natives of the 
same county. His parents moved to Richland County, Ohio, and in 
1852 the family came to Indiana, fii-st locating in Marshall County, 
later moving to a farm in Newton County, where John Windbigler. 
the gi-andfather died. His widow afterwards lived in Kosciusko 
County among her children. 

John B. Windbigler was reared in Ohio and married Miss Rebecca 
Barkman there. On coming to Indiana he settled in Pulton County, 
bought and cleared a tract of timbered land, and after living on it 
fifteen years sold and moved further west in 1867 to Carroll County, 
Missouri. From there two years later he returned to Indiana and 
bought his farm in Kosciusko County. Here he lived to improve his 
land, was a capable and industrious citizen, and one of the leaders 
in the local democratic party and a devout member of the Church 
of God. He died in 1913, aiid his widow in 1909. While a resident 
of Fulton County he served as justice of the peace two years. John 
B. Windbigler and wife had seven children : Jeremiah H. ; Mar\^ 
E., deceased; James W., deceased; John_F., who was born while the 
family lived in Missouri and is now a resident of Kansas; Rebecca 
L., deceased ; Louis A., of Wabash, Indiana ; and T. B., also of 
Wabash. 

Jeremiah H. Windbigler grew up in Fulton and Kosciusko 
counties and had the advantages of the local schools while a boy. 
When he was twenty-one years of age he left home to support him- 
self and carve out his own destiny. February 25, 1877, he married 
Miss Fanny Funk, who was born near Silver Lake in Kosciusko 
County February 20, 1852, daughter of Henry B. and Polly (Beigh) 
Fiuik. Her parents were natives of Pennsylvania and came to Kos- 
ciusko County from Ohio. The Funk family has long been a promi- 
nent one in this section of Indiana. Mrs. Windbigler is a grand- 
daughter of Jacob Funk, and her remote ancestors came to America 
from Germany. Jlr. and Mrs. Funk had three children : Fanny, 
Mrs. Windbigler; Anna C, wife of Aaron Boyer. of Jackson Town- 
ship; and Mary A., wife of Morrison Paulus, of Lake Township. 
Mrs. Windbigler was carefully educated at home and in the com- 
mon schools. After their marriage they started as renters on the 
old Funk estate, lived there for six years, then rented elsewhere, and 
finally bought a farm in Fulton County. Several exchanges of 
property followed and eventually they returned to Kosciusko County 
and bought their present i)lace. 

^Ir. and Mrs. Windbigler have three children: Levi B.. who is 
a resident of Franklin Township and married Pearl Norris; Mary, 
a graduate of the common schools and wife of Herman Swick, of 
Seward Township; and Anna L.. wife of Harrison Armey, who lives 
on Mr. Windbigler 's farm. Mr. Windbigler and wife are also proud 
of their ten grandchildren. The family are members of the Church 
of God, and in politics Mr. Windbigler is a democrat. 



406 HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Irvin H. Ulsh. a practical agriculturist, giving close attention 
to the management of his farm, Irvin H. Ulsh of Seward Township 
is meeting with well earned success in his work and is a popular 
and higlily esteemed citizen in his community. His farm lies three 
and a half miles southwest of Claypool. 

Mr. Ulsh was born in Miami County, Indiana, June 19, 1859, 
and is a son of Benjamin and Lydia (Lautsenhizer) Ulsh. His 
parents were both bom in Pennsylvania, but M^ere married after 
they came to Indiana and then settled in Kosciusko County on the 
farm now owned by C. M. Regnaous. Much of the land of this farm 
was cleared by the senior Ulsh, and he lived there until he went to 
Texas in 1884. He was a soldier of the Civil "War, serving in the 
Union Army for nine months, and it was at the close of that struggle 
that he settled in Seward Township. He died in Texas, while his 
wife passed away at North Manchester in 1865. They had three 
children: Irvin H. ; M. J., who is married and lives at Laketon, 
Indiana; and Viola H., who died in Oklahoma. 

Irvin H. Ulsh was about six and a half years old when his mother 
died, and that was the first important loss and handicap which he 
had to overcome in liis early life. As a lioy he attended school at 
North Manchester, Laketon audi in Seward Township, and took 
most of the studies taught in the common schools. He was at home 
until twenty-one, and gave to his father all that he made. He 
started out for himself as an agriculturist and at the age of twenty- 
nine married Mrs. Eliza M. Caldwell, whose maiden name was Nel- 
son. Her first husband was Joshua Caldwell. After their mar- 
riage Mr. and Mrs. Ulsh lived a half mile west of Claypool, where 
he farmed five years, and then sold out and came to his present place, 
where he ovnis eighty acres of good land. In addition to general 
farming, Mr. Ulsh has had a very unusual success as a poulti-yman. 
He has raised chickens and produced eggs on a large scale, and 
has developed a high class utility flock. 

Mr. Ulsh has two sons, Irvin V. and Benjamin F. The older son 
is a graduate of the common schools and also attended the Claypool 
High School. He is a Seward Township farmer, and married Ollie 
M. Poster. The younger son married Miss Parker and also lives 
in Seward Township. In political belief Mr. Ulsh is a socialist. 

Harvey Meredith is anothei'' Kosciusko County citizen who had 
to start life with very little capital, with such experience as he had 
been able to gather when a boy on the farm, and he has utilized his 
opportunities and directed his energies to a point where he is now the 
possessor of a good farm, is more than paying his way, and is looked- 
upon as one of the most substantial citizens of Seward Township. 
His home is on Rural Route No. 3 out of Akron, Indiana. 

Mr. Meredith was born a few miles west of where he now lives, 
in Franklin Township, March 26, 1875, a son of Simon and Sarah 
(Cattern) Meredith. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and 
his mother of Ohio. They married in Franklin Township of this 
county and were identified with farming in that locality until the 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 407 

death of the father. The widowed mother survived until 1911. 
There were three sous: Willis, who lives on the old homestead; 
Harry, whose home is three and a half miles southeast of Claypool • 
and Harvey. ' 

Mr. Harvey Meredith grew up in Franklin Township and attended 
the public schools of his home locality. He made himself useful by 
his work on the home place imtil he was twenty-tive, and then estab- 
lished a home of his own by his marriage on February 4, 1900, to 
Miss Ada Paxton. Mrs. Meredith was born in Silver Lake,' Indiana, 
and was educated in the schools of Seward Township. After their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Meredith chose the role of renters for a time, 
later bought land in Seward Township, and a few years ago traded 
that for the sixty-acre fanu where Mr. Meredith and his family still 
reside. Mrs. Meredith died July 12, 1917, and four children mourn 
her loss. These children are: Opal, Trelba, Alonzo and Donovan. 
Opal, the oldest, was born July 1, 1902, and has finished the work 
of the common schools. Mr. Meredith and children are members of 
the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and in politics he votes as a re- 
publican. 

Frank Alex.^ndek. Success has amply attended the efforts of 
Frank Alexander, who has devoted himself with diligence and energy 
to the farming business nearly all his life. He is a representative 
of the progressive type of farmer, and today is cultivating and 
handling the resources of one of the good farms in Seward Town- 
ship. The Alexander home is in section 36 of that township, one 
and a half miles west and one and a quarter miles north of Silver 
Lake. 

About three miles west of his present home Mr. Alexander was 
born January 4, 1870, a son of Mathew and Editha (Darlin) Alex- 
ander. His parents were both natives of Richland County, Ohio, 
grew up and married there, and in 1865 brought their family to Kos- 
ciusko County. The parents located on a tract of land in Seward 
Township about half way between Yellow Creek and Beaver Dam 
lakes. Thev spent their lives there. The father was a republican. 
Of the nine children six are still living. Peter, of Warsaw; Jona- 
than, of Seward Township; Ida, wife of Elias Parker; Nettie, wife 
of Hollis Tucker, of Akron, Indiana ; George M., of Seward Town- 
ship ; and Frank. 

Frank Alexander grew up on the old homestead and attended 
the district school in the same community. December 24, 1891, he 
married Miss Rose Stoffer. She was born 'in Miami County, Indiana. 
For a number of years Mr. Alexander owned eighty acres of the old 
homestead, but in 1907 sold that and came to his present farm, also 
comprising eighty acres. He is engaged in general farming and 
.stock raising. Mr. Alexander votes the republican ticket. 

He and his wife have three interesting young .sons : Myrl, a grad- 
uate of the common schools and high school ; Gurney L., who has fin- 
ished the course of the common schools; and Luhr, now attending 
the grade school. 



408 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Isaac B. Hire is one of the oldest native sons of Kosciusko 
County still living, and has spent his life actively and prosperously 
as a farmer and stockman. He is now living at Burket. 

The first stock buyers operating on an extensive scale through 
this section of Indiana were his father, Rudolph Hire, and Wash- 
ington Bybee. Long before railroads were built and when the only 
known means of getting livestock across the country was by driving, 
these men were among the chief drovers from this section of the 
countrj^ They frequently drove their cattle and other livestock to 
market at Cleveland. The business, still one of large proportions, 
was acquired in 1864 bj' Allen Bybee, and Milton E. and I. B. Hire, 
under the firm name of Hire, Bybee & Company, and they contin- 
ued buying and shipping hogs, cattle, sheep and horses for nearly 
forty years. Their operations were on a large scale, and while there 
were of course many transactions which did not yield a profit, the 
business on the whole was a prosperous one. They bought livestock 
all over Northern Indiana and Ohio, and in this way Isaac B. Hire 
came to be a well known figure to the stock raisers throughout many 
counties. ]Mr. Hire was also solicitor for passenger traffic on the 
New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad for fifteen years. 

He was born in Franklin Township of this county April 28, 
1844, a son of Rudolph and Hannah (Linsey) Hire. Rudolph Hire 
was born in Ross County, Ohio, April 2, 1817, and his wife was born 
in Indiana in 182.5. He was a small boy when his parents moved to 
Elkhart C'ounty. and from there he came to Prairie Township of 
Kosciusko County. He and his wife married in Franklin Township 
and they then located in that region, but eventually moved to Bur- 
ket. Rudolph Hire was one of the leading citizens of the county 
and was so esteemed at the time of his death in 1889. His widow 
survived until April 4, 1911. Both were members of the Dunkard 
church and he was a democrat They had eleven children, includ- 
ing: Milton E., deceased; Isaac B. ; Nancy A., widow of John 
Jones; Mary, who married Orlando Sludy, and both are now de- 
ceased; Eliza, deceased, wife of George Melons; Susan, was the wife 
of Alonzo Study ; Lillie, wife of Charles Eggleston, living in Califor- 
nia ; Alpheus, of "Warsaw ; and Allen, deceased. 

Isaac B. Hire grew to manhood on his father's place in Frank- 
lin Township and was given such advantages as the local schools 
could afl'ord. At the age of twent.y-one he married ^liss Maria War- 
ren. To their union were born five children, and the only one living 
is Noi-ma H. Hire of Blue Springs, Missouri. On April 24, 1891, 
Mr. Hire married for his second wife Amanda Wirick, who was 
Iwrn in Richland County, Ohio, May 21, 1852, and was brought to 
Kosciusko County at the age of two years. Mr. and Mrs. Hire have 
no children of their own and a nephew lives with them on their 
home place of seventy acres. Mr. Hire also owns 640 acres of 
good land in the State of Texas. In addition to farming and 
the stock business he has readily enlisted his energies and influence 
in behalf of every community undertaking. For two years he served 
in Franklin Township, and while in that office he set the 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 40;) 

record for speed iu compiling the assessment roll, doing the entire 
work in twenty-two days. Mr. Hire is a democrat in politics. 

John W. Fitton is one of the thoroughly businesslike farmers 
of Seward Township. He cultivates his fields, raises stock, buys and 
feeds cattle, is interested in the Equity Union Elevator Company at 
Burket, and in many other ways ke«ps in close touch with the prog- 
ress of his community and is doing what he can to increase the effi- 
ciency of this community as one of the many factors in America's 
stupendous war program. The Fitton farm is in section 28 of Sew- 
ard To\\^lship and comprises 100 acres of well-tilled fields, feed lots 
and building improvements. 

Mr. Fitton was born in the same township July 19, 1876, son of 
Robert and Jane (Parker) Fitton. His parents were also natives 
of this county, his fatlier l)orn February 17, 1839, and his mother 
February 20, 1851. Robert Fitton died in 1878. when his son John 
was only two yeai-s old. The latter was the only son and he grew 
to manhood without the care or supervision of a father. Until he 
was eleven years of age he lived with his mother on the farm now 
owned by George W. Bouse, and after that made his home in differ- 
ent places until he came to the farm he now owns, iu March, 1895. 

November 24, 1894, Mr. Fitton married Miss Sadie Rickel. She 
represents one of the oldest pioneer families of Kosciusko County. 
Her grandfather, Samuel Rickel, was born in Pennsylvania March 
14, 1810, son of Mathias and Catherine (Croyle) Rickel. The Rickel 
family left Penns.ylvania iu 1818, and Mathias and his wife spent 
the rest of their years in Ohio. In Wayne County, Ohio, Samuel 
Rickel married in 1835 JMiss Sarah Moyer, and of their nine children 
si.x were born in Kosciusko County. Samuel Rickel brought his fam- 
ily to Kosciusko County in 1842, and established his home in tlio 
woods of Franklin Township. He had many interesting pioneer 
experiences. He entered his land from the government and ac- 
quired patent signed by President John Tyler. His first house was 
a log cabin, and the roof was so low that a full grown man could 
not enter the door without stooping. He lived on wild game, veni- 
son and turkey, had experiences with wolves, plowed his fields with 
a yoke of cattle, and served as the first postmaster in Franklin 
Township of Beaver Dam postoffice, his commission being given him 
in 1844, and for twenty years he held that dignity, but doubtless 
paid in service more than he received, since it was the custom for 
people journeying a long distance to the postoffice to en.joy the hos- 
pitality of the postmaster at the meals and even staying over night 
occasionally. He was also the first tnistee of Franklin Township, 
and his son William, father of Mrs. Fitton, en.joyed similar honors. 
William Rickel was born in Wayne county, Ohio, April 19, 1836. 
He was a democrat in politics and served as trustee of Seward Town- 
ship eleven years. He married Miss Mary Swick, and they had 
seven children, three of whom are still living: Samuel and George, 
the former a resident of Jennings County and the latter of Han- 
cock, Wisconsin; and Sadie, Mrs. Fitton. Mm. Fitton grew up and 



410 HLSTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

spent her early life on the banks of Beaver Dam Lake, and attended 
the common schools there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fitton have seven children. Lloyd is now in the 
army as a mechanic in the aviation eoi-ps, having received his train- 
ing at the aviation field near Fort Worth, Texas. Edna is a gradu- 
ate of the common schools and the wife of Russell Barber. Ida has 
finished the common school course and is living at home, as is Ruth, 
while the younger children are Marie, Orville and Neva. The fam- 
ily are members of the United Brethren Cliurch and ^Ir. Fitton is 
a democratic voter. 

R.VNDOLPH B. Allison. The dui'able satisfactions of life are 
those won by hard work and by the overcoming of many obstacles. 
While he is now generally recognized as one of the successful and 
substantial farmers and stock raisers of Kosciusko County, there 
was a time when Randolph B. Allison had to depend upon the work 
of his hands at day and monthly wages. He paid for his first land 
in that way, and with the co-operation of a loyal wife has made 
progress over obstacles and has achieved his present position and 
success in the world. Mr. Allison is proprietor of the Lakeside Farm 
of eighty acres a half mile south of Yellow Bank in Tippecanoe 
Township. 

He is a native of Delaware County, Indiana, wliere lie was born 
November 28, 1859, son of Samuel and Martha .(Fields) Allison. 
The parents were lioth natives of Pennsylvania, wliei-c they grew up 
and married, from there moved to Ohio, and a little later to Dela- 
ware County, Indiana, and their next move took them to Sullivan 
County in this state, and from there they came to Kosciusko County, 
locating in Plain Township, where they acquii-ed seventy-two acres 
southeast of Leesburg. Eight years later they made their final 
move to Tippecanoe Township, where the mother spent her last 
yeai*s. The father died in Missouri. Of their twelve childi-en eight 
are still living, and the family are now widely scattered: Emma, 
unmarried, at Leesburg; Randolph B.; Samuel, of Kansas; William, 
of Missouri ; Perry, of North Dakota ; John A. and Madison, twins, 
the former in Wyoming and tlie latter in Oklahoma : and Arthur, 
in Wj'Oming. 

Randolph B. Allison grew up in Kosciusko County and attended 
public schools to the age of sixteen. Even before that he had been 
working and contributing his help to the support of the family. He 
has made his own way since early youth. 

On July 15, 1882, ^Ir. Allison married Miss Leuesa Steniler. 
^Irs. Allison was born at North Webster August 14, 1866, daughter 
of Jacob and Elizabeth (Arnold) Stemler. Her parents were both 
natives of Gennany. Her father came to this country w-hen a 
young man and her mother with her parents. They married in Ohio 
and from there moved to North Webster. JaeoJi Stemler became 
widely known in that community. He was the first shoemaker to 
locate in the town, and being a man of expert skill he had a large 
trade and continued active in the work until advanced years over- 



HISTORY -OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 411 

took hiin. He was a charter member of the Evangelical Church and 
a trustee. His wife died in 1893, while he passed away in 1901. In 
the Stemler family were eight children, four of whom died young. 
Catherine, the oldest of those who grew up, married Hiram Kindle. 
The second, Mary, is the wife of John Webber, of Nappanee, Indi- 
ana; Emma is the wife of Lewis Baugher; Leuesa, the j-oungest, is 
^[rs. Allison. Mrs. Allison was educated in the common schools. 

After his marriage Mr. Allison supported his little family by 
monthly wages, and for two years lived in Kansas. On returning to 
this country he again resumed his program of work bj^ the day. 
His first purchase of land was ten acres and it was paid for by his 
wages. He then bought ten acres more, also rented grouiul, and 
finally acquired sixty acres, and has gi-adually built up the Lakeside 
Farm, which is widely known for its fine Norman horses. 

Mr. and Mi-s. Allison have one daughter, Elizabeth. She is now 
the wife of Milo Daniels, and lives in Elkhart, Indiana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Daniels have four children : Kuth E., Marv E., Louise, and 
C. Wilber. 

The family are members of the Evangelical Church at North 
Webster, and Mr. Allison is one of the trustees and a class leader, 
and for twenty years was superintendent of its Sunday school. In 
polities he votes as a democrat. He is one of the directors of the 
Farmers State Bank at North Webster. 

H. G. Mickey, whose home is at Piereetou, has been successfully 
identified with Kosciusko County for practically all the years of his 
life, was formerly a farmer, but is now one of the leading contractors 
in cement work and especially in bridge building. Mr. Mickey is 
especially well known in Washington Township on account of his 
long and creditable service as township assessor. 

Mr. Mickey was born in Kosciusko County, west of Silver Lake, 
April 6, 1864, son of Isaac and Jlary (Bryan) Mickey. His father 
was a native of Penn.sylvania and his mother of Ohio. They married 
in Ohio, and coming to Indiana settled on a farm in Kosciusko 
County, where they spent the rest of their years. They were verj' 
active church members, and he was identified with the republican 
party, though never as an aspirant for office. Of their seven chil- 
dren three are still living: Marj', wife of Samuel Funk, of War- 
saw; Martha J., wife of Joseph Scott, of Ludlow, six miles southeast 
of Warsaw; and H. G. Mickey. 

H. G. Mickey spent his early life on a farm near Ludlow, was 
educated in the public schools there and lived with his parents until 
he was twenty years old. When he started out for himself he had 
no capital but diligence and readiness to accept responsibilities, and 
confidence in his own powers have taken him steadily along the road 
to success. He began farming as a renter, and was identified with 
agriculture as his chief vocation until 1914, when he formally took 
up contracting in cement and bridge building. 

October 18, 1888, Mr. Mickey married Miss Ida M. Hover,, a 
native of Kosciusko County. Three children are still living : Ralph 



412 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

E., a graduate of the common schools and married and living in Kos- 
ciusko County; Lawrence R., a graduate of the common schools and 
still single ; and Mary M., wife of Byron Davis. The family are 
members of the United Brethren Church at Wooster, Indiana. Mr. 
Mickey has served as superintendent of the Sunday school for twenty 
years and in church as well as in civic affairs has always tried to do 
"his utmost. In politics he is a republican, but has only sought to do 
his duty as a trustworth.y voter in politics and as a worker for com- 
munity progress. He was elected township assessor for four years, 
held the office for six years altogether, and later was again elected 
for a term of four years, so that when he resigned in the spring of 
1918 to engage in bridge building he had filled a term aggregating 
ten 3'ears. 

Levi Swick. The community to which Levi Swiek has con- 
tributed his energies as a successful farmer and as an upright and 
straight-forward citizen is in Seward Township, his valuable fann 
being five and a half miles northeast of Akron on rural route No. 2. 

Mr. Swick was born in Wyandot County, Ohio, March 7, 1859, 
son of William and Mary (Shoop) Swiek. His father was bom in 
Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, December 24, 1812, and his 
mother in Stark County, Ohio, September 1, 1817. The.v were mar- 
ried AugiTst 17, 1837, and in the fall of 1860 they moved to Indiana 
and located on a farm near Beaver Dam Lake. That community had 
the benefit of this industrious family until the death of Mrs. ilary 
Swick on June 15, 1885. The father then moved to Silver Lake, and 
spent his last years on the farm now owned by his son Levi, where 
he died December 9, 1897. Both the parents were very active workere 
and members of the Church of God, and in politics AVilliam Swick 
gave his allegiance to the democratic party. He and his wife had 
eleven children, six sons and five daughters, named : Mary, Eliza- 
beth, Catherine, Henry, Samuel, John, Di-ana, Alpheus, George, Levi 
and Lucinda. All are still living except ]Mary and Catherine. 

Levi Swick was about a .year old when brought to Indiana. As 
he grew to manhood he attended the district schools and lived in the 
home circle and shared in the responsibilities and work of the home 
fai-m until a short time after his mother's death. He then estab- 
lished a home of his own by his marriage on November 8, 1885, to Miss 
Maggie Wiece. She was born in the Republic of Switzerland Janu- 
ary 31, 1867, and was a young girl of sixteen when in 1883 she came 
to the United States with her mother. She lived near Silver Lake 
until her marriage, and her education was acquired in the schools of 
her native land. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Swick rented 
the old Swick farm for five years, and then with the other heirs 
bought the father's farm. It has been their home now for over 
thirty years, and eighty acres of excellent land have responded to 
the care and cultivation of Mr. Swick, though in recent years some 
of the heavier labore have been assumed by his sturdy sons. There 
are three bo.ys in the family: Ira, born October 21, 1888, is a grad- 
uate of the common schools, and is a resident of Seward Township. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 4i:i 

He married Goldie Jenkins. Sherman, the second son, born June 3, 
1892, married Viola Young and lives in Miami County, Indiana. 
Percy W., born October 6, 1895, is a graduate of the common schools 
and is now doing much of the farm work for his father. He married 
Olive M. Reddinger. Mrs. Swick is a member of the Church of God. 
Politically Mr. Swick votes as a democrat, and has always taken an 
active interest in local affairs and in questions of public policy. 

Ben.jamin F. WiLLi.vMSON. The community of Packerton recog- 
nizes in Benjamin F. Williamson one of its most important person- 
ages, a man of usefulness to the entire community. He is a veteran 
of the telegraph ke.y, having been operator and agent in railroad 
service for a number of years. He is still connected in that capacity 
with the Nickel Plate Railway, but is also a farmer and stock raiser 
at Packerton. 

Mr. Williamson was born at Burket in Seward Township of Kos- 
ciusko County January 13, 1886, son of John H. and Sarah A. 
(Byers) Williamson. His father was born in Miami County, In- 
diana, and his mother in Johnson County. Benjamin F. William- 
son has a common school education and attended Burket High 
School three .years. It was his early ambition to become a railroad 
man and he entered the service through the avenue of telegraphy, 
which he learned in one of the local offices. For a year and a half 
he was agent and operator for the Nickel Plate at Bremen and was 
then transferred to Packerton, both as agent and operator, and re- 
mained here steadily for seven and a half years. At present he 
is performing the duties of operator at Claypool, though his home 
is at Packerton. 

In 1907 Mr. Williamson married Zora C. Borton, who was born 
near Mentone, Indiana, and was educated in the common schools. 
Mr. Williamson's home at Packerton comprises a well-improved 
farm of forty-three acres, where he has a modern home and all the 
facilities for his business as a stock raiser. He specializes in hogs, 
and is rapidly earning a place among the stockmen of the county. 

He is a member of the United Brethren Church at Packerton, 
has served as class leader and superintendent of the Sunday school, 
and he and his wife have done much to uphold the varioiLS moral and 
religious activities of their community. In politics he votes as a 
republican. 

Perry Silveus. Thirty-four years" residence in Kosciusko 
County gives Mr. Silveus many interesting as well as honorable 
associations here, and his enterprise as a farmer, his kindly and 
genial disposition and his public spirit have earned him a place of es- 
teem in Seward Township, where he owns one of the best farms, four 
and a half miles west and half a mile south of Silver Lake. 

Mr. Silveus is of a Virginia family and was born in Rockingham 
County of that state August 8, 1858, a son of William and Susanna 
(Tusing) Silveus. His parents were bom in Virginia, grew up and 
married there, and soon afterward moved to Indiana and located in 



414 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Kosciusko County. The first summer was a dispiriting one to them, 
especially in the matter of climate, and they went back to Virginia. 
About the close of the Civil War they came west again, locating near 
Tiffin, Ohio, for four years. Again they spent a season of four years in 
Virginia, and after that lived one year in Seneca County, Ohio, and 
then moved to Henry County, Ohio, where the parents spent their 
last years. They were very active members of the Baptist Church, 
and William Silveus was a democrat. There were eleven children, 
five of whom are still living: Simon A., a retired fanner at War- 
saw ; Perry ; John, a cai-penter living in California ; Menassa, a Bap- 
tist minister and a farmer; Amos, a farmer in Ohio. 

Perry Silveus spent most of his boyhood and vouth in Seneca and 
Henry counties, Ohio. The district schools tliere gave him his edu- 
cation until he was thirteen years of age. and after that he sturdily 
helped his father on the home farm until he was past twenty-three. 
January 22, 1882, Mr. Silveus married Delia J. Steward, of Henry 
County, Ohio, where she was born January 4, 1864, daughter of 
Thomas Steward. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Silveus lived on a farm in 
Henry County, Ohio, for two years and then settled in Kosciusko 
Coimty, near Milford in Van Buren Township. Later they bought 
a farm in Jefferson Town.ship, and that was their home until 1907, 
when they came to their present happy location in Seward Town- 
ship. Mr. Silveus has 120 acres of land, and it is thoroughly devel- 
oped according to methods and principles of modern and "efficient 
farming. In politics he is a democrat. 

Burlington D. Hibschman. In giving honor where honor is due 
more than pa.ssing mention should be granted Burlington D. Hibsch- 
man, who began life empty-handed and has accumulated a good prop- 
erty by dint of energetic and well-directed effort. The Civil war, in 
taking its great toll of death, left many lads fatherless at a time when 
they needed not only the material support but the moral direction of 
the elder men. Many of these youths were forced to fight their own 
way through life, and of this class Mr. Hibschman, who is now one of 
the substantial agriculturists of the vicinity of Warsaw, is an excel- 
lent example. 

Mr. Hibschman was born in Kosciusko County, Indiana, February 
11, 1859, and is a son of Henry and Sarah J. (Boliu) Hibschman. His 
paternal grandfather was a native of Pennsylvania who moved to Indi- 
ana at a very early day and settled on a farm, where he passed tlie re- 
mainder of his life, while his maternal grandfather was Elisha Bolin, 
who passed the greater part of his active life in the country in Wabash 
County, Indiana, where his death occurred. Henry Hibschman was 
born in Ohio, and was still a youth when brought by his parents to. 
Kosciusko County. In young manhood he had learned the trade of 
stone mason, and this trade he was following when the Civil war came 
on and his patriotism led him to enlist. In 1862 he became a memlier 
of the Seventy-Fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with 
wliich he served bravely and faithfully until the battle of Chicka- 




i 



^yrtoiyiZh^ . w^. c^d-^.^^e-o^- 




^r:^,^..^^. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 415 

mauga, September 19, 1863, on which bloody field he lost his life. Mr. 
Hibschman was a republican in his political views, and a member of 
the United Brethren Church, to which Mrs. Hibschman also belongs. 
. She was born in Wabash County, Indiana, and now makes her home at 
Warsaw, having reached the advanced age of eighty-one years. They 
were the parents of two children : Burlington D. ; and Mrs. Edith 
Hollaway, who lives at Warsaw. 

The educational advantages of Burlington D. Hibschman were not 
numerous, as he was not five years of age when his father, who had ac- 
cumulated only a small property, lost his life. However, the lad made 
the most of his opportunities as granted in the country schools, and 
early learned to be self reliant and independent. His early training 
was on the farm, and it was but natural that he should adopt an ag- 
ricultural career. He was married in 1882 to Miss E. M. McKinsis, 
and to this union were born two children. Angle and Erba. They were 
industrious and thrifty and saved their earnings carefully, so that by 
1900 they were able to realize their ambition to become landholders, in 
that year purchasing their present property, a tract of 100 acres, all 
paid for by their hard and persistent labor. Under modern methods 
he is making a success of his operations, and now grows all the small 
grains in addition to breeding and shipping cattle, hogs, sheep and 
horses. His buildings are commodious and attractive, his machinery 
modern, and everything about the place gives evidence of the presence 
of thrift and good management. Politically Mr. Hibschman is a re- 
publican, but he has been so busily engaged with his farm work that 
he has found no time to enter politics as a seeker for office, atlhough all 
good movements have received his hearty and generous support. With 
his family he belongs to the IMethodist Episcopal Church, in which he 
has held a number of offices. 



Thomas B. Sarber. Now spending his declining years on his 
farm in Seward Township, enjoying peace and comfort, Thomas B. 
Sarber is one of the older residents of Kosciusko County, and the 
years have dealt kindly with him, but only to the extent of his deserts 
and the value of his citizenship. His home is in section 22, four 
miles west of Claypool. 

Mr. Sarber was born in Harrison Township of this county Octo- 
ber 4, 1842, a son of Abraham and Louisa (Hendren) Sarber. His 
parents were married in Franklin County, Ohio, and two years later 
sold their farm in that county and moved to Putnam County in 
the same state, where for a time they lived with their nearest neigh- 
bors ten miles away. Abraham Sarber was not only a pioneer in 
reclaiming the wilderness of Putnam County, but also laid out and 
founded the Town of Kalida, which has since grown and prospered 
and is the county seat. In 1836 he sold his Ohio interests and moved 
to Iroquois County, Illinois, and after four years in the Prairie 
State came in the fall of 1840 to Kosciusko County. 

Here his residence was marked by equal activity and enterprise. 



416 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

In 1841 he built a sawmill at Palestine, and in 1843 built a grist 
mill. His sawmill in 1843 supplied the Imnber for the first frame 
courthouse of Kosciusko County. The Sarber mills were the first 
institutions of any importance in the south side of Kosciusko County. 
He sold those properties in the fall of 1843 and bought a farm on 
the north side of Harrison Township. In 1863, after the death of 
his first wife, he bought a farm near Atwood and property in that 
town, and lived there until his death, February 27, 1880. For his 
second wife he married Miss Eliza Crane. They had one son, David. 
Abraham and Louisa Sarber were the parents of eight children: 
William, Adam, Melissa, Amanda, Mary, Thomas B., Dorothy and 
John. 

Thomas Benton Sarbei' grew up and spent most of his youth in 
Harrison Township on the old fai"m in section 4. The district 
schools furnished him his educational opportunities until he was 
sixteen, and during 1858-59 he was one of the first students in the 
public graded school at Warsaw, when that school was taught by 
D. T. Johnson and wife. Farming experience followed his educa- 
tion and on May 24, 1863, at the age of twenty-one, he married Miss 
Martha A. Timmons, daughter of William and Catheiine Timmons, 
natives of Delaware and ilaryland, respectively, who came from 
Fayette County, Ohio, in 1845 and settled in Wajoie Township of 
Kosciusko County. 

After his marriage Mr. Sarber spent a year in Eel River Town- 
ship of Allen County, then lived for a year on a farm north of 
Hellers Corners, and in the spring of 1866 acquired forty acres 
included in the Sarber farm of Seward Township. This land was 
covered with hea\';\- woods, and it was his task, worthily fulfilled, 
to clear it up and develop its possibilities as a productive farm. 
The only improvement on the land when he took possession was an 
old log cabin. Subsequent years brought him increase of comforts 
and prosperity, represented by the accumulation of a hundred acres 
of land, but most of this he has since sold his sous, and now retains 
only twenty acres as his individual home. 

IMr. Sarber 's name is prominently identified with the history 
of the Village of Burket. He built the first store there in the spring 
of 1882. He was also a passenger on the first train of ears in Sew- 
ard Township. He has been an active party man as a democrat, 
but only once accepted the honor of nomination for an important 
office, in 1884, when as candidate for sheriff he ran way ahead 
of his ticket. He has also sei^ved as a member of the democratic 
committees. 

Mr. Sarber was happily married for over half a century, and 
in 1913 he and his good wife celebrated their golden wedding anni- 
versary. Their companionship was continued five years longer until 
Mrs. Sarber died June 16, 1918. She was a devout member of the 
United Brethren church. To their marriage were born three chil- 
dren : Edson B., born ^March 11, 1864, a graduate of Valparaiso 
University, formerly a teacher, for thirteen years county superin- 
tendent of schools, and now connected with the Leonard Supply 



1320399 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 417 

Compan}^ Edson Sarber married Miss Ollie Rickel, dauo-liter of 
George W. and Mary Rickel. Louisa C, the only daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sarber, died in infancy. Andrew E., a native of Seward 
Township, wa.s for miany years a teacher in the county and is now 
engaged in farming and teaching. He married Ettie E. Anglin, 
daughter of S. D. Anglin, a former superintendent of public schools 
of this county. Thomas B. Sarber also has two grandchildren, Earl 
F. and Beulah May, son and daughter of Andrew E. and Etta E Sar- 
ber. Earl P., born October 21, 1889, worked on the farm in the summer 
and attended school at Burket in the winter until the winter of 1908 
and 1909, when he finished his course in the Warsaw high school On 
September 9, 1916, he was married to Miss Edna, the only child of Mr 
and Mrs. William Vernett, of Marshall County, Indiana. To them was 
born a daughter, March 4, 1918, named Ettiemae, and she is the 
delight of all her relations and always has a sweet smile for her 
great-grandfather. Beulah May, sister of Earl, was born on the 
10th of January, 1898. She has always been a diligent student, ever 
at the head of her classes, and she graduated from the high school 
at Burket in 1914, after which she spent two terms in Winona Col- 
lege. It was while there that her health failed, and she went to 
Hinsdale Sanitarium, Hinsdale, Illinois, where she regained her 
health and was so favorably impressed with the institution that she 
IS remaining there for a three years' training course in scientific 
nui-sing. 

A bright future is predicted for Earl and Beulah Sarber. Earl 
IS a successful young farmer and Beulah will make good at any- 
thing she luidertakes. Thomas B. Sarber may well be proud of his 
posterity. In his religious views Mr. Sarber is a devout Seventh Day 
Adventist. 

Ernest B. Williamson is the telegraph operator and railroad 
agent at Burkett, and also owner and manager of the Evergreen Stock 
Farm adjoining that village— all of which makes him one of the most 
useful and prominent men of that community. Mr. Williamson is a 
young man, of exceptional business enterpri.se and energy, and fo" a 
number of years has been engaged in the great es.sential industry' of 
railroading. 

He was born in Seward Township of this county January 19 1882 
a son of John H. and Sarah A. (Beyers) Williamson. He grew up 
on his father's fam with such advantages as the district schools 
aftorded, togetlier with high school. As a hoy lie took up telegraphy 
and has been employed as an operator or as operator and agent with 
this road fifteen years. However, there was an interval of two years 
when he was out of the service engaged in operating an elevator in 
Kaber. He ha.s a record of faithful and efficient service as a teleg- 
rapher, and IS particularly a business man and has done much to 
build up the volume of traffic for his road at Burket. He is one of 
the stockholders in the Burkett Grain Elevator. His stock fai-m 
compri,ses fifty acres, and it is the home of some of the finest Duroc 
Jersey hogs in Kosciusko County. His male is a registered pedi«^eed 



418 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

animal named Colonel Sampson. Besides his hogs Mr. Williamson 
has a flock of about 200 Rhode Island Red chickens. 

He married Miss Minnie Mollenhour, who was born in Franklin 
. Towaiship of this eountj' and is a graduate of the common schools. 
Their family of four children are Laura, Lena, Ward and Porter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Williamson are members of the Church of God and he is 
affiliated with the Order of Railroad Telegraphers, and is a republi- 
can voter. 

Charles C. Carter started life with nothing but the strength of 
his hands and the ambition of his mind to make the best of circum- 
stances, and has achieved a position of success and responsibilities in 
the community of Silver Lake, where he is a livestock dealer and an 
extensive farmer. 

Mr. Carter was born at Michigan City in LaPorte County, Indiana. 
January 14, 1850, son of John G. and Mary (Windle) Carter, both 
natives of Virginia. He is of old Virginia stock. His gi-andparents 
were Robert E. and Catherine (Gatewood) Carter. Robert E. Carter 
was at one time a principal in a leading military school in Virginia 
and volunteered his services with the Ignited States Army in the war 
with Mexico and gave up his life during that struggle. John G. Car- 
ter grew up in Virginia and as a young man came to Indiana and 
located in LaPorte County. He was a practical printer by trade, 
and became interested in a newspaper at Michigan City. Later he 
removed to Newton County, Indiana, took up fanning and spent the 
rest of his life in that section of the state. He was a democrat in 
politics. Of his six children three are living: Catherine, wife of 
Francis Yeager, of Newton County ; Jerome A., a farmer in Seward 
Towniship of this county and Charles C. 

Charles C. Carter spent his boyhood in LaPorte and Newton 
counties. His education was supplied by the district schools. He 
was at home until twenty-six and left to begin life on his own account 
with no capital and with only the experience of a practical farm youthJ- 

On December 31, 1884, he married Lillie ^I. Bull. She was born 
in Jasper County, Indiana, and grew up there, attending the district 
schools. After their marriage 'Sir. and Mrs. Carter were farm renters 
for nearly twenty years, and in that way they got their start in the 
world. In 1901 Mr. Carter bought 164 acres in Kosciusko County ad- 
joining the Village of Silver Lake on the east, and has used that valu- 
able fann as a basis for his extensive dealing in livestock. He has 
prospered, and throughout has relied on industry- and good judgment 
to put him ahead in the world. He is also one of the directors of the 
Commercial State Bank of Silver Lake and is a stockholder in the Fort 
Wayne Rubber Company. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carter have one daughter. Frances, wife of R. il. 
Fry of Silver Lake. The family are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church and Jlr. Carter is one of its trustees. He is affiliated 
with Silver Lake Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and has sem'ed as a Noble Grand and has sat in the Grand Lodge. 
Politically his faith is that of a democrat. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 419 

Hon. Harry W. Kline, of Silver Lake, is a well known farmer 
and stock buyer in that section of Kosciusko County and is well known 
all over this part of the state as a leading man of affaii-s, influential 
in politics, and a former representative in the State Legislature. 

Mr. Kline was born at Silver Lake June 29, 1873, a son of George 
W. and Mai-y (McClure) Kline. His father was born in Lake Town- 
ship of this county in 1848, while his mother was born on the old 
McClure farm in Seward Township in 1852. Her parents were 
Elias and Mary A. (Freeman) McClure, McClure being one of the 
oldest and best esteemed names in the county. George W. Kline was 
reared on a farm and was for many yeai-s engaged as a teacher in the 
public schools. 

Harry W. Kline acquired a good education in both the common 
and high schools of Silver Lake, and after graduating entered Val- 
paraiso University. Mr. Kline, like his father, followed educational 
woi'k for nine years in the local public schools. Some of his friends, 
admiring his many versatile qualities and his ability as a public 
speaker, induced him to enter politics in the campaign of 1902. He 
was placed in nomination for state representative and was elected in 
that year and re-elected in 1904, serving during the Sixty-Third and 
Sixty-Fourth General Assemblies. He was a member of several impor- 
tant committees and made a record highly creditable to himself and 
to his constituency. For four years Mr. Kline has served as vice 
chairman of the county central committee of the republican party. 

Mr. Kline is a stockholder in the People's Telephone Company of 
Silver Lake, and his business energies are chiefly engaged in buying 
and shipping livestock. In that capacity he is known to nearly all 
the farmers in this and several ad,joining counties. 

Mr. Kline married Miss Iva Oldfather, daughter of H. L. Old- 
father of Silver Lake. Mrs. Kline is a gi-aduate of the common 
schools. They have two children : Marcus H., born March 26, 1902, 
is a graduate of the common schools and a student in the Silver Lake 
High School. Fanehon, the second child, was bom in 1905 and has 
completed the work of the common schools. Mrs. Kline is a member 
of the United Brethren Church at Silver Lake. Fraternally he is 
affiliated with Denning Lodge No. 88, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Lake View Lodge No. 164, Knights of Pythias, in which he 
has passed all the chairs and has sat in the Grand Lodge, and is affil- 
iated with Warsaw Lodge No. 802 of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

Henry A. iloYER is a former Supervisor of Seward Township, and 
owner of one of the good farms in that locality. It goes without say- 
ing that he has lived with honor and with a satisfactory degree of ma- 
terial success. 

When he was thirteen he chose to support himself and help him- 
self to those things for which his talents and work fitted him. He 
was born in the township where he still lives November 26, 1865, son 
of Henry and Rachel (Bowman) Moyer. His father was bom in 
Pleasant Township of Wayne Countj', Ohio, February 1, 1823. His 



420 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

mother was born in Washington County, Pennsj-lvania, September 6, 
1825. His parents were married November 28, 1847, and several 
years later they moved to Kosciusko County and settled in Seward 
Township. The father died here Januarj^ 14, 1866, when his sou 
Henry was only a few montlis old, and his widow subsequently mar- 
ried and moved to Texas. The record of the children of Henry and 
Rachel Mojer is as follows: Orlanda H., born March 17, 1850; Jud- 
son L.. born May 3, 1852 ; Alonzo, born August 27, 1856 ; Andrew Y., 
bom June 17, 1859 ; Oliver M., bom April 24, 1861 ; Henry A., born 
November 26, 1865. It will be seen that Henry A. j\Ioyer is the young- 
est of the children. After his father's death he lived on the home 
farm in Seward Township, and attended the district schools as op- 
portunity offered during the winter terms, "^lien he took upon 
himself the role of a self-supporting boy it was as a farm hand, at 
monthly wages, and he continued in that way until he was twenty- 
one. 

September 11, 1887, IMr. Moyer married Miss Mary Skinner. She 
was born in Clay Township of this county November 26, 1865, and is 
therefore of the same age as her husband. She was educated in the 
common schools. After their marriage Mr. and I\Irs. Moyer lived in 
Seward Township, where they bought a farm, and since then have 
been steadily making their way toward better home conditions and 
that larger usefulness which is represented by a good farm, a grow- 
ing family, and an attitude of helpfulness in neighborly affairs. Mr. 
and Mrs. Moyer have two living children : Pearl, born August 22, 1890, 
a graduate of the common and high schools, now the wife of Elza Heek- 
man of Clay Township. Beatrice, the second daughter, was bom Oc- 
tober 22, 1892, is a graduate of the common schools and is the wife 
of Hershel Day of Seward Township. 

The family are verv^ active members of the United Brethren 
Church at Center, and Mr. Moyer is a class leader and for many 
years has been taking a large share of the responsibility in the Sun- 
day school and other departments of the church, ilrs. Moyer is a 
teacher in the Sunday school. Mr. Moyer is affiliated with the Knights 
of the Maccabees, and it was on the republican ticket that he was 
elected supervisor of the township. His farm comprises 166 acres of 
land, and the farm, its improvements and his fine home and family 
constitute an en\'iable record for a man who started life on his own 
resources as a poor boy. 

>Irs. Mart Ford has an interesting place in the historj- of Kos- 
ciusko County, due to her long residence here, and also to the fact 
that she is directly connected with some of the most notable pio- 
neers. Her father was Jacob Weirick, long one of the most promi- 
nent citizens of Franklin Township, and her hvisband, the late Cal- 
lender Ford, was a member of a family of similar pioneer connec- 
tions with this county. i\Irs. Ford has one of the fine farm homes in 
Franklin Township, located a mile south and two miles west of 
Burket. 

This branoli of the Ford family originated in England and was 




(t^alie/yt'cU/u^iy^ 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 42! 

transplanted to the American colonies before the Revolution. Four 
brothei-s served as patriot soldiers in the struggle for independence. 
One of them was George Ford of Virginia. Henry Ford, son of 
George, was born in Virginia, April 21, 1798, and married there 
June 20, 1822, Miss Phoebe Minear. She was bom in Harrison 
County, in what is now West Virginia, November 3, 1802, daugh- 
ter of Adam and Elizabeth Minear, who were of English and Ger- 
man ancestry. Henry and Phoebe Ford had eleven children, named 
Lanty, Franklin, Elizabeth, John, Isaac, Noah, Eliza, Jacob, Shad- 
rach, Callender and Daniel, the two last named being the last sur- 
vivors. Seven of these children taught school, and three of them 
read and practiced medicine. 

It was in 1836 that Henry Ford brought his family to Kosciusko 
County, first locating on the southeast quarter of section 35 in Frank- 
lin Township. His nearest neighbors were members of the Cook 
family three miles away. Later some New England families came 
to that neighborhood and the road came to be designated Yankee 
Street. Henry Ford lived there until 1858, having secured his land 
direct from the government at the price of a dollar and a quarter 
an acre. In 1858 he removed to section 13 of Franklin Township, 
and died there September 10, 1872, at the age of seventy-four. His 
wife died September 4, 1875. He was a justice of the peace, and 
he and his wife were active Methodists. In politics he was a demo- 
crat. 

Callender Ford, husband of Mrs. Mary Ford, was born in Bar- 
bour County, West Virginia, April 9, 1832, and was about four 
years old when brought to Kosciusko County. He grew up in the 
midst of frontier conditions, and achieved a place of distinction dur- 
ing his mature life as a farmer and citizen. He married for his first 
wife Susanna E. Weirick, who died leaving one son. After her 
death he married Mary Weirick Ford, widow of Isaac Ford and 
daughter of Jacob and Margaret Weirick. After their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Ford settled on a farm a mile north of Mount Pleasant in 
Clay Township, and in that locality spent eighteen or twenty years, 
then coming to Franklin Township and locating on the Jacob Weir- 
ick farm. Callender Ford died here in 1900. 

Mrs. Ford's father, Jacob Weirick, was born in Union County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1811, a son of George and Elizabeth (Frederick) 
Weirick. George Weirick was born in Union County, Pennsylvania, 
July 15, 1773, and his wife was born January 24, 1780. They mar- 
ried in 1801. Elizabeth Weirick died in 1816, the mother of seven 
children, including Jacob. The latter 's father married again and 
had twelve children. George Weirick died September 25, 1838. 

Jacob Weirick grew up in Pennsylvania and in 1843 took his 
family to Richland County, Ohio, and in 1854 came to Franklin 
Township of Kosciusko County and bought 520 acres of land from 
Washington Bybee. That large farm he extensively improved and 
increased its area until he had over 1,000 acres, and the Weirick 
place, now divided into several farms, has long been one of the 
landmarks of progressive agriculture and improvement in the south- 



422 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

west cornel" of the county. Jacob Weirick erected the second brick 
residence in the township in 1861. He was a man very much inter- 
ested in educational and religious affairs, and from 1834 to 1864 
he had taught school, pursuing that occupation in addition to his 
varied interests as a farmer and land owner. In Union County, 
Pennsylvania, September 2, 1841, Jacob "Weirick married Margaret 
Smith, daughter of Leonard and Susannah (Brifogle) Smith. They 
were the parents of eight children: Susannah, Mars-, ilatilda, 
Amanda, Harriet, Emeline. Isabella and Florence. The first was 
born in Pennsylvania, the next four, including Mrs. Ford, were 
born in Ohio, and the la.st three in Indiana. They were all daugh- 
ters, so that the male line of the Weirick family in this branch ended 
with Jacob "Weirick. However, there are a number of grandsons and 
great-grandchildren of this honored pioneer and noble citizen of Kos- 
ciusko Coiinty. 

One of the grandsons of Jacob "Weirick and of the pioneer Henry 
Ford is Henry Ford, who for a number of years has managed the 
home of his mother in Franklin Township. He was born in Clay 
Township, May 19. 1877, son of Callender and IMary ("Weirick) Ford. 
He received a common school education and also attended the North- 
ern Indiana Normal School at "^''alparaiso for thirty weeks. He had 
some idea of preparing for a profession, but came home instead and 
took charge of his mother's farm, and has suceessfullj^ managed it 
ever since. He is an active member of Mentone Lodge No. 576, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons, is a republican voter, but has cared 
little for the honors of politics. His mother is a hiember of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and is affiliated with the Order of the 
Eastern Star As a family they own 320 acres of rich and produc- 
tive land in Franklin and Wayne Townships, and other property 
elsewhere, ilrs. Ford is a stockholder in the Lake City Bank at 
Warsaw, and also owns some of the bonds of the Goshen Division 
of the Interurban Railway. 

Frank Funk. One of the oldest farms in Prairie Township is 
that occupied by Mr. Frank Funk, who has spent most of his life 
in that township. His home is seven miles northwest of Warsaw, 
and besides the farm he is well known as a business man at Atwood. 

Mr. Fimk was born at Goshen, Indiana, March 3, 1852, son of 
Fred and Elizabeth (Bower) Funk. His grandparents were Fred- 
erick and Elizabeth (Darr) Funk. Fred Funk was born in Piqua 
County, Ohio, May 10, 1820. and was fourteen years of age when, 
in 1834, his parents pioneered to Northern Indiana and settled in 
Elkhart County. He grew up there, and on January 2, 1844. in 
Turkey Creek County of Kosciusko County, married Miss Eliza- 
beth Bower. She was born in Richland County, Ohio, July 13, 
1823. After their marriage they lived near Syracuse, and on sell- 
ing their property there moved to Goshen, where Mr. Fred Funk 
was in the livery business a short time. Returning to Turkey Creek 
Township, he developed a good farm, and finally sold that property 
and moved to Leesburg. In 1861 he established his home in Prairie 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 42:] 

Towniship, and in that locality both he and his wife lived out their 
years. He died September 4, 1904, and his wife September 14, 1905. 
Their children were six in number, two of whom died in infancy. 
Clifford, who was born April 1, 1856, died April 21, 1877. Thomas, 
born February 13, 1858, died July 24, 1917, leaving: a widow, Re- 
becca (Harshner) Funk, but no children. Eliza J. Funk, who was 
born February 6, 1849, and her brother Franklin are now the only 
surviving members of the family, and both reside on the old home- 
stead. They were educated in the district schools and own some of 
the valuable property of Pi-airie Township. They have joint owner- 
ship of seventy acres, included in the old homestead, while Miss Funk 
owns in her own right 140 acres and Frank Funk has 120 acres near 
Atwood. Mr. Funk also operates a warehouse on his farm one mile 
from Atwood, and is an extensive buyer of hides, wool and junk. 

Mes. Mary C. Stout owns and occupies the old farm on which 
she spent her girlhood and also the years of her companionship with 
her late husband, William Stout. Mrs. Stout is mother of some noble 
sons and a daughter, and is one of the women properly considered in 
a work of this nature. 

She was born on the fann where she now lives October 12, 1858, 
daughter of Moses and Jane A. (Sands) Loop. Her father was born 
in Wooster, Ohio, and her mother in Pennsylvania. They were mar- 
ried in Ohio and were early settlers in Kosciusko County, where they 
took a tract of land in the woods, cleared it up and improved it, and 
made it the farm which it is today. Moses Loop died December 2, 
1891. and his wife on April 24, 1888. 

Mary C. Loop grew up in the home of her parents, and on March 
5, 1882, she became the wife of William Stout. He was just a year 
older than his bride, having been born in Paulding County, Ohio, 
June 13, 1857, son of Christian and Sarah (Haas) Stout. Chris- 
tian Stout brought his family to Indiana in 1864, locating on a farm 
on Eel River, where his wife died the following year. Three years 
later Christian Stout came to Kosciusko County, married a second 
wife, and for many years lived in Seward Township. It was in the 
vicinity of Laketon in Wabash County that William Stout spent 
part of his boyhood, and came to manhood in Seward Township in 
this county. After his marriage he located on the old Loop farm and 
was its capable manager until his death April 7, 1903. He was one 
of the highly esteemed citizens of the count.y and a man of good 
business judgment and capable in all his relations with his fellow men. 
He voted as a democrat and at one time served as a member of the 
advisory board. 

Mrs. Stout's four children are noted briefly as follows: Elsie, 
the only daughter, married Loren Yocnm, and is living near Etna 
Green, Indiana. The son, Robert R., is a graduate of the common 
schools and lives in Seward Township. He married Hazel Wyn- 
coop. Walter M., the second son, is a graduate of the local high 
school, of Indiana University with the degrees of A. B. and A. M. 
and also received the Doctor of Medicine degree from the State LTni- 



424 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

versity. He is now sei-\'ing iu the iledieal Reserve Corps with the 
rank of captain at Fort Riley, Kansas. The youngest of the family, 
Wilbur C. Stout, is a graduate of the high school at Silver Lake and 
has assumed most of the responsibilities in managing the home farm 
for his mother. This farm comprises 300 acres, and is regarded as 
one of the most valuable individual estates in Seward Township. 
Wilbur C. Stout married Pearl E. Minear. Mrs. Stout also has three 
grandchildren. 

Horace G. Thomas is a prosperous farmer in Franklin Town- 
sliip, and his home place, devoted to grain and stock raising, com- 
prises 1151A acres in section 31, a mile or so west of Beaver Dam 
Lake. 

Mr. Thomas was born near Pendleton in Madison County, Indi- 
ana, August 5, 1863, a sou of Abner and Margaret (Cateran) Thomas, 
the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. The I'e- 
speetive families came to Indiana and located in Madison County 
near the old town of Pendleton, where Abner and ilargaret grew up 
and married. They settled on a farm near there, but in 1863, soon 
after the birth of their son Horace, moved to Franklin Township 
of Kosciusko County and established their home on a farm in sec- 
tion 6. The father died here in 1881 and the mother in 1880. They 
were members of the Church of the Winbernarian, and he was a Past 
Noble Grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, was an 
active republican, and at one time filled the office of justice of the 
peace. He and his wife had five children : Edwai-d E.. of Fort 
Wayne, Indiana ; Horace G. ; William C, of Chicago ; Mary, wife of 
Thad K. Martin, living in Ohio; while the fifth and youngest child 
died in infancy. 

Horace G. Thomas grew up on a farm near Beaver Dam and at- 
tended the local schools. At the death of his parents he was thrown 
upon his own resources and was still under age. He worked for a 
time on the farm of John C. ileredith and later for Albert L. Tucker, 
and during a number of hard years of work for others gained the 
experience and the reputation for ability which constituted his best 
capital when he started for himself. 

In December, 1890. "Sir. Thomas married Miss Philana Petry. 
She was born on the farm where she is now living and was educated 
in the common schools. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have steadily gone 
ahead toward better circumstances, and have now equipped their 
farm until it ranks high in the productive scale, and constitutes one 
of the enviable country homes of the county. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas are active members of the United Brethren Church at Bea- 
ver Dam, and he serves as a church trustee. In politics he is a re- 
publican and has been a member of the township advisory board. 

They have had three children. Charles H.. died after reaching 
his majority and when a most promising career was open to him : 
MarA' E., attended the Akron High School and is the wife of Merle 
Tucker ; Olga M., is a graduate of the Beaver Dam High School, lives 
at home and is a teacher in the local schools. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 42r> 

Clarence A. Helvey is a careful and enterprising farmer in 
Jackson Township four miles northeast of North Manchester, and 
represents an old and well-known name in that township and also 
over the Wabash County line in Chester Township. 

He was born in the latter township of Wabash County February 
24, 1881, a son of Champion S. and Lillian (Enyeart) Helvey. Both 
parents were born in Chester Township, Champion Helvey in 1854. 
The name Helvey occurs as frequently as that of any other family in 
connection with the pioneer settlement of Wabash County. There 
were several brothers of the name, Champion, Richard and others, 
who pioneered into that locality during the sixties. 

Champion Helvey and wife still live on their farm in Chester 
Township. Thej^ are active members of the United Brethren Church 
and he is a republican. Of the nine children eight are still living: 
Mrs. Nora Perry ; Clarence A. ; Maude, wife of Clarence Hector, of 
Montana; Sarah, wife of Winfield Parker, living in North Dakota; 
John R., who is with the United States Army at Camp Taylor, Ken- 
tucky ; Laura; Cuba; at home with her parents; Russell in the United 
States Navy. 

Clarence Helvey is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and a republican in politics. On his farm in Jackson Town- 
,ship he is breeding Shorthorn cattle, but divides his efforts among the 
general branches of farming. 

Charles E. Leedy, M. D. Representing one of the oldest and 
most honored names in Kosciusko County, Dr. Charles E. Leedy has 
spent his life here and for twenty years has served an increasing 
number of the community in and ai'ound Pierceton as a physician 
and surgeon. 

Doctor Leedy was born on a farm a mile and a half north of 
Pierceton February 11, 1870, a sou of Ephraim and Sarah (Devenny) 
Leed3'. Both parents were natives of the State of Ohio and came 
to Kosciusko County when young with their respective families. After 
their marriage thej' settled on a fanu southwest of Pierceton and 
Ephraim Leedy was for manj- years one of the men whose names 
were most intimately and familiarly associated with progressive things 
in agricultural achievements. He and his wife became the parents 
of five children : Dr. Charles E. ; Edwin, who is general immigration 
agent for the Great Northern Railway ; Dela, wife of Arthur Munson ; 
Chester A., a fruit rancher in Washington ; and Josie M., deceased. 

Doctor Leedy spent his boyhood days on a farm near Pierceton, 
attended the local schools and high school, and prepared for work as 
a teacher by attending the normal school at Valparaiso. After four 
years of work as a teacher in his home county, he took up the study of 
medicine in the Detroit Medical College, from which he was grad- 
uated M. D. May 4, 1897. Since that date he has been one of the 
hard working physicians at Pierceton, and more and more his abili- 
ties have come to be appreciated and his service broadened over the 
surrounding countrj-. Doctor Leedy has seiwed as president of the 



426 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Kosciusko County Medical Society, and has always kept in close 
touch with professional affairs. 

Besides the business of his profession he might also be classed as 
a practical farmer and stock raiser. He owns 120 acres of land and 
has given much attention to the breeding and raising of high grade 
Shorthorn cattle. Doctor Leedy married in 1897 Clara Moody, who 
was born in New York state, but has lived in Kosciusko County since 
early girlhood. Dr. and Mrs. Leedy are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. In Masonry he is affiliated with the lodge at 
Pierceton, with the Chapter, Council and Commandery at Warsaw, 
and with the Scottish Rite at Fort "Wayne. He is also a Past Grand 
in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, and in politics casts his vote as a democrat. 

Sabin V. RoBisoN. One of the most capable farmers and citi- 
zens of Tippecanoe Township is Sabin V. Robison, who has earned 
the respect and esteem of his fellow men. 

He was born in the township May 16, 1863, son of Vincent and 
Joanna (Gordon) Robison. Both parents were natives of Perry 
County, Pennsylvania, the father born in 1800 and the mother on 
June 29, 1825. The Gordons were a prominent family of pioneers in 
Northeastern Indiana. Joanna Gordon was a daughter of Thomas D. 
and Elizabeth (Bull) Gordon, the former born October 6, 1788. and 
the latter on March 31, 1788. They came west and settled in Sugar 
Creek Township of Wayne County, Indiana, where her father was a 
cabinet maker. In 1833 he moved to Kosciusko County and spent 
the rest of his days here. 

Sabin V. Robison is the only living child of his parents. He at- 
tended public schools and also took a commercial course. Mr. Robison 
married Lulu E. Brenneman, who was born in Whitley County, 
Indiana, May 2, 1864. After his marriage he lived on a farm a couple 
of years, then conducted a store at North Webster four years, and 
in 1893 went on the road as a traveling salesman and general agent 
for the Piano Harvester Works. He was with that firm until 1897, 
when he joined the Deering Harvester Company, and in 1902 was 
appointed manager of that company at Elmira, New York, where he 
remained three years. He was then with the Eastern Roek Island 
Plow Company until Januaiy, 1913, and was two years in the hard- 
ware business at Leesburg, Indiana. He has since settled down to 
farming. 

Mrs. Robison is a daughter of Abraham and Jane (North) Bren- 
neman. Her father was bom in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and 
her mother in Champaign County, Ohio. After their marriage in 
Ohio they moved to Whitley County, Indiana, and settled near South 
Whitley, and about 1873 locnted near Oswego in Kosciusko County, 
where they died. Mr. and Mrs. Robison are the parents of four chil- 
dren, two of whom are deceased. The living are Rolland, who is in 
the hardware business at Leesburg, and Garland, who is married and 
resides at home, but is now in a training camp of the United States 
army. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 427 

August C. Cain is one of the prospering and progressive fanner 
citizens of Etna Township, and his intensively cultivated farm of 
forty acres 5^ miles northeast of Etna Green is known as the Clover 
Leaf Farm. 

Mr. Cain was born at Tippecanoe County, Indiana, January 10, 
1881, a son of "William and Mary (Miller) Cain. His parents were both 
born at Michigan City, Indiana, his father June 22, 1856, and his 
mother in September, 1860. Both are still living, and their family 
of children are as follows : Christ Cain of Scott Township ; August 
C. ; William of Kosciusko County ; Lydia, deceased ; Edward ; Ben- 
jamin H. ; Martha, deceased ; Sylvia, wife of T. Growcock ; James, who 
lives in Denver, Indiana, and Anna, unmarried and at home with 
her parents. 

August C. Cain grew up on a farm and had a common school 
education, supplemented by one year in the high school. March 2, 
•1907, he married Miss Maude Huffman. For the past ten years 
they have been working steadily to the improvement of their condi- 
tions, acquired the nucleus of a good farm, and have a long vista of 
prosperous and useful years ahead of them. Mr. and Mrs. Cain live 
in a new modem home and are highly esteemed in their community. 
They are members of the Church of God, and Mr. Cain is a republi- 
can and a member of the Horse Thief Detective Association. For 
three years he served in the National Guard at Monticello, Indiana, 
Company A, Third Indiana Regiment. 

George A. Walters has that degree of material prosperity rep- 
resented by the ownership of a good farm of 120 acres, and this pro- 
prietorship is the more significant of his thrift and industry when it 
is stated that he made the farm altogether as the result of his efforts, 
and taking the land in the woods cleared away year after year an 
additional space for cultivation and has put every improvement upon 
the land which enhances its value. 

The Walters family reside at the farm three and a half miles west 
and half a mile south of Claypool on Rural Route No. 1, in Seward 
Township. Mr. Walters was born in Knox County, Ohio, January 
29, 1864, a son of Edward and Hannah (Dean) Walters. The family 
came to Kosciusko County in 1874 and located on a farm in Seward 
Township. The parents died here. They had seven sons : Abe, Levi, 
Joseph, William, Isaac, George and Albert. 

George A. Walters was ten years old when he came to Kosciusko 
County. His early education begun in Ohio, was continued in the 
local schools here, and he was at home up to the age of nineteen. 

When Mr. Walters left home his material possessions consisted of 
a single dollar and some clothing wrapped up in a newspaper. Fur- 
ther than that he had his experience in various kinds of farm work, 
and he put this experience to test by hiring out to other farmers at 
wages of $14 or $15 a month. For seven years he labored for others, 
and the savings from his work he invested in twenty-three acres of 
land. That was his first purchase, and about that time he married, 
and thirty years have sufficed to give him his present farm and all its 



428 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

improvements, and at the same time he has provided a good home and 
reared his children to lives of usefulness and honor. 

August 18, 1888, Mr. Walters married Miss Susanna Adams. Their 
children are : Mertie M., wife of Harry Taylor ; Harley G., who mar- 
ried Nerley Hinsey; Artie, who married Ella Engle; and Roy, who 
is still at home. Mr. Waltei-s is a republican voter. 

Freeman E. Cbipe is an Indiana man by birth and training, grew 
up on a farm, and has found increasing .scope for his usefulness and 
service with the passing years. He is the leading doctor of veterinarj- 
surgery in Jackson Township, and combines his large practice with 
the operation of a farm M-here he resides two miles east of Sidney. 

Doctor Cripe was born in Carroll County, Indiana, September 4, 
1885, a son of Chris and Barbara (Wagoner) Cripe. His father was 
bom in Carroll County on the same farm where he now lives. The 
mother was a native of Tippecanoe County. They have spent their 
married lives in Carroll County and are active members of the 
Church of the Brethren, and in polities the father is a republican. 
The.v had five children: Dr. Earl J., who is now in training camp 
in the medical service of the United States Army ; Curtis E., a farmer 
in Wabash County; Dr. Freeman E.; Claude, a farmer in Carroll 
County ; and Floyd, who is in the army at Camp Taylor, Kentucky. 

Freeman E. Cripe grew up on a farm, and early evinced that 
fondness for animals and their care which was the basis of his pro- 
fessional interests. He was educated in the common schools, also in 
the North Manchester College, and from there entered the Veterinary 
College at Indianapolis, from which he gi-aduated in 1911 with the 
degi-ee D. V. M. He practiced about a year at Nappanee, Indiana, 
but in August, 1912, came to Sidney, and in connection with his 
profession operates a large stock farm of 160 acres two miles east of 
that town. 

August 4, 1912, Doctor Cripe married Miss Nora Ross, member of 
one of the oldest and most prominent families in this part of Kos- 
ciusko Count.v. She was educated in the common schools and took 
musical instruction at the Nortli ^Manchester College. They have one 
daughter, Helen, born June 5, 1915. Dr. and Mrs. Cripe are mem- 
bers of the Church of the Brethren. 

Robert Ross, father of Mrs. Cripe, is now living retired at Kinsey 
in Jackson Township. He was born in Clarke County, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 17, 1843, a son of George and Hannah (Heckman) Ross. His 
father was born in Virginia in April, 1815, in early manhood moved 
to Clarke Count.v, Ohio, where he married, and after his marriage 
settled in Clarke County, then spent two years in Shelby County, 
Ohio, then again rented a fami two yeare in Clarke County, and in 
September, 1849, brought his family to Kosciusko County. He had 
come to Jackson Township in the fall of 1848, secured land and erected 
a hewed log cabin in the woods. To this little home he introduced 
his family, and on that fami he spent the rest of his life. He was 
a man of very sturdy mold, active, energetic, acquired about 560 
acres of land, and was also a force in the moral uplift of that part 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 42il 

of the county. He always voted as a republican after the organiza- 
tion of that party. In his family were two sons and four daughters, 
the daughtei-s being now deceased, while the sons, Robert and John 
Ross, are both residents of Jackson To^vnship. 

Robert Ross was about six years old when brought to Jackson 
Township, and he spent part of his early life in the log cabin home of 
his father and attended the nearby district schools at Sidney. On De- 
cember 31, 1868, he married Susan Snell. The name Snell is also 
associated in the pioneer settlement of this section of Kosciusko 
County. Susan Snell was born in Jackson Township June 6, 1848, 
daughter of John and Magdalena (Brewer) Snell. Her father was 
born in Augusta County, Virginia, in 1809, and her mother in Rock- 
ingham Comity in the same state in 1812. After their marriage in 
Virginia they moved to Ohio in 1830, settling in Preble County, and 
while there six children were born to them. In 1844 the Snell family 
came to Kosciusko County, and here John and Magdalene spent their 
last years. Of their family of eleven children four are still living: 
Susan Ross ; John, of Wabash County ; Samuel, who lives in Ohio ; 
and Catherine, wife of Reuben Frantz, of North Manchester. 

Robert Ross after his marriage located on his farm, and that was 
his home and the scene of his activities as a prosperous farmer for 
forty-four years, operating 289 acres. AVhen he retired he moved to 
the Village of Kinsey. He is a republican. He and his wife had four 
children: Alonzo, a farmer in Jackson township; Amos W., a grad- 
uate of Nortli Manchester College and of Mount Montis College in 
Illinois, now ser-vnng as a missionary in India ; Elmer C, a farmer in 
Jackfion Township ; and Nora, Mrs. Cripe. Robert Ross is a member 
of the Church of the Brethren and one of its deacons. 

Calvin 0. Ketrow, of Jackgnn Township, has had a most inter- 
esting range of experience during his life. He had to shift for him- 
self from an early age, but in spite of handicaps and disadvantages 
secured a liberal education, and has been a farmer, a public official, a 
salesman, and has satisfactorily solved practically all the problems 
of life as they have presented themselves. He now owns and occiipies 
one of the good farms in Jackson Township, south of Sidney, and is 
cariying his share of public responsibilities in the office of township 
tnistee. 

Mr. Ketrow was bom in Montgomery County, Ohio, January 20, 
1865, son of Allen and Susanna (Ramsey) Ketrow. His parents 
were natives of the same county and state. The father died in 1868, 
when Calvin was only three yeai's old. In 1869 he was sent to live 
with a famil.v named Bond, and their home was near Mexico in Miami 
County, Indiana. It was in that vicinity that he first attended .school, 
and he grew up practically among strangers. His ambition led him 
to acquire a better education than could be furnished by the common 
schools, and he attended the State Nonnal and passed a successful 
examination for a teacher's license in Whitley County. Instead of 
taking up teaching, he went to work on a farm in Whitley County, 
and in 188.5 married Miss Nellie M. Warner, of Kosciusko County. 



430 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

For a time he was engaged in the live stock and butchei- business at 
South "Whitley, spent one year in Pierceton, rented a farm and em- 
ployed himself in different ways as a means of making a living and 
getting a real start in life. Finally he bought a farm, and for a num- 
ber of years has given close and skillful cultivation to his land. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ketrow have one son, Ernest E., born in 1886. He 
is a graduate of the common schools and is now a machinist in the 
foundry shop of the American Can Company at Detroit, ^Michigan. 

Mr. Ketrow was a deacon in the Church of the Brethren, in affil- 
iated with Sidney Lodge No. 579, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
also with the Royal Arch Chapter at Noi'th Manchester, and is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of America. Since early manhood 
he has given his enthusiastic support to the republican party and its 
principles. He has worked for the good of the community and has 
received several important honors at the hands of his fellow citizens. 
During the legislative session of 1901 he served as journal clerk in 
the House. When the office of tru.stee in Jackson Township became va- 
cant through the resignation of James Thompson, Mr. Ketrow was 
appointed his successor in November, 1914, and filled out the unex- 
pired term ending in January, 1919. He has used this opportunity 
to render some effective service in looking after the best interests of 
the local schools, and is one of the best qualified men who ever occu- 
pied the trusteeship in that township. 

Loyal W. Dome is upholding his end of farm enterprise in Jack- 
son Township, is a citizen whose public spirit is appreciated in that 
community, and at the request of his friends he recently became a 
candidate for township trustee on the democratic ticket. Mr. Dome's 
farm is three-quarters of a mile north of Sidney. 

The Dome family has been in Kosciusko County for over sixty- 
five years. His grandfather, Isaac C. Dome, was born in Elkhart 
County, Indiana, April 10, 1832. Isaac's grandfather died in In- 
diana, so that this state has had at least five generations of the Dome 
family among its residents. Isaac Dome went to California in 1850 
with his father, traveling overland, and they had many adventures 
and experienced much of the excitement and hardship of California 
life. Isaac Dome returned home in the spring of 1852, bringing with 
him less than a thousand dollars, representing the profit of his expe- 
rience in the west. A few weeks later he bought forty acres of land 
in Wayne Township of Kosciusko County, built a log cabin, and on 
December 18, 1853, married Mary J. Huff, who was born in Mercer 
County, Pennsylvania, July 18, 1835. Isaac Dome moved out to Mis- 
souri in 1865, but remained there only a short time and then returned 
to Kosciusko County and settled in Monroe Township. His first 
wife died in this county, and her only son was George W. Dome. 

George W. Dome was born in this county February 19, 1856, 
grew up here, and married Miss Ada Messmore. She was born in 
Kosciusko County December 17, 1856, and died in October, 1896. 
After their man-iage they settled on a farm in Jackson Township, 
but later removed to Warsaw, where George W. Dome is serving as 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 431 

street commissioner. He is an active member of the Christian 
Church. He and his wife had two children, Chalmer R., a resident of 
"Warsaw, and Loyal W. 

Loyal W. Dome was born in Jackson Township December 30, 1882, 
and has spent most of his life in that community. He was educated 
in the common schools, also attended high school, and for five years 
did splendid work as a teacher. 

August 9, 1908, he married Miss Frances Palmer, daughter of Mr. 
O. Palmer of Sidney. Mrs. Dome is a graduate of the Warsaw High 
School. They have three children : Geneva, born in 1912 ; Irene, 
born in 1914; and Harold, born in 1916. Mi-, and Mrs. Dome are 
active members of the Christian Church of Sidney. Be is a democrat 
in politics. His farm near Sidne.y comprises sixty-one acres, and is 
used both as a grain and a stock farm. 

Henry L. Oldfather. In the thirty odd years Henry L. Old- 
father has had his home in Kosciusko County the people have come 
to esteem and appreciate his sterling type of citizenship, the quality 
of liis business enterprise and the kindly and helpful attitude he has 
taken toward all matters of community welfare. Mr. Oldfather con- 
siders himself a retired farmer, but still lives in his fine country 
home a mile west of Silver Lake, and in many ways is as keenly ener- 
getic and active in affairs today as he was twenty years ago. 

He was born in "Wabash County, Indiana, May 24, 1852, son of 
Adam and Caroline (Borgher) Oldfather. Mr. Oldfather takes ap- 
propriate pride in the fact that his family has been in America for 
more than a century and a half. It was in 1769, six years before 
the outbreak of the American Revolution, that several of their fam- 
ily left their native city of Berlin, and after six months on the ocean, 
landed at Baltimore They made settlement in Bedford County, 
Pennsylvania, where they laid out a town named Berlin, in honor of 
their home city. One of the family, Frederick Oldfather, was the 
first elder of the First Reformed Church in that part of Pennsyl- 
vania. The grandfather of Henry L. Oldfather was Henry Old- 
father, a son of this Frederick. This accounts for four generations 
of the family in this country. Henry Oldfather emigrated with his 
family to Montgomery County, Ohio, in the year 1811, and was for 
many years identified with sawmilling and also operated flour mills. 

Adam Oldfather was horn near Farmersville, Ohio, and coming 
to Indiana in 1841, located in Wabash County. He and his wife, 
Caroline Borgher, were the parents of eight children, namely; Su- 
san, widow of Andrew Knoop, lives in Claypool, Indiana ; Sarah C, 
who is the only one of the children not now living; Samuel T., a 
retired poultry dealer, who lives at North Manchester; Mary E., 
wife of George Leffel, of North Manchester ; Henry L. ; Melissa J., 
wife of Thomas A. Joutz, of Seward Township, this county; John 
F., a resident of Silver Lake ; Irene B., wife of J. E. Byer, of Roches- 
ter, Indiana. 

Henry L. Oldfather grew up on his father's farm in Wabash 
County and made the best possible use of his advantages in the dis- 



432 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

triet schools. At the age of seventeen he began teaching, and for 
five years was identified with school work in Kosciusko County. He 
then took up farming, and has been a prominent resident of Kosciusko 
County .since 1878. 'Sir. Oldfather married Flotilla Loop, of Kos- 
ciusko County, where she was born and reared. Her father was 
Moses C. Loop. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Oldfather located 
on a farm, and since 1900 have lived at his pleasant country place 
near Silver Lake, where he has a fine improved farm of 200 acres. 
For five years he was also engaged in the livestock business, and for 
nineteen years he was secretary of the County Insurance Company 
and was general manager of the People's Mutual Telephone Com- 
pany of Silver Lake until he sold his interest April 1, 1915. Every 
undertaking which he has touched has prospered, and he has the 
deserved reputation in the county of being one of its most able 
business men. Mr. Oldfather has also been a strong party man in 
the republican faith, and is a past chancellor of Lake View Lodge 
of Knights of Pythias at Silver Lake. ]Many of his friends know 
Mr. Oldfather as a clever wi-iter of verse, and he has celebrated 
many of his experiences and many local incidents in verse forms that 
have been published and widely read. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oldfather are the parents of one daughter, Iva, 
who was born Februaiy 14, 1879. She is now the wife of former 
state representative Harry W. Kline of Silver Lake. Mr. Kline is 
one of the leading farmers of that community. Mr. and Mrs. Kline 
have two children: Marcus H., a student in high school, and Vein- 
chon, still in the grade schools. 

John F. Mitterling. One of the good homes and one of the 
productive farms of Kosciusko County lies a half mile east of Dutch- 
town in Tippecanoe Township, the home and scene of activities of 
the Mitterling family, including Mr. John F. Mitterling. 

The latter was born in Noble County February 25, 1867, son of 
John and Susanna (Shadow) Mitterling. Both parents were natives 
of Pennsylvania. His father was born in Juniata Countv Septem- 
ber 16, 1831, and died March 16, 1902. The mother was bom De- 
cember 17, 1830. They grew up in their native state and were 
married January 20, 1852, and in 1854 came west and settled in 
Noble County, Indiana. Their home was near Savilla until 1874, 
when they bought the farm where John F. Mitterling now lives in 
Kosciusko County. The parents were members of the German Bap- 
tist Church and were verv active and liberal in their support. Of 
their seven children five are still living: Jane, wife of John Stone- 
burner of Plain Township ; Michael, deceased, who married Sarah 
Moerzy; Joseph, who married Julia A. Hays and lives at Warsaw: 
Samuel, who married Elizabeth J. Plew and lives in Wayne Town- 
ship of this county; John F., and Emeline C. 0., wife of Isaac Ran- 
dall. 

John F. Jlitterling was seven years old when brought to the 
farm where he has since lived, where he was trained to industrious 
habits, and where he has made a successful career as a farmer. His 



HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 438 

education was acquired in the district schools, limited to attendance 
during the winter terms, while the summer was spent in the work of 
the fields. Harry S. Randall, a nephew of Mr. Mitterling, married 
Grace L. Tenny, and they have two children, John and Audry. 

Mr. Mitterling is affiliated with Warsaw Lodge of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, and is a past sachem of that order. He is also 
a member of the Moose lodge, and Harry Randall is affiliated with 
the same order. In politics Mr. Mitterling is a republican. One hun- 
dred twenty acres constitute the Mitterling homestead, and it is the 
home of some of the good livestock raised in this township. 

John S. Judd. Five miles northwest of Akron in Franklin Town- 
ship is a farm that has been under the ownership of the Judd family 
raore than forty years, and is now the home and scene of the progres- 
sive activities of John S. Judd, who was bom in the same locality 
and has lived there practically all his life. 

He was born Jlarch 6, 1879, a son of T. R. and Lucinda (Mickey) 
Judd. T. R. Judd was brought by his parents to Franklin Township 
when a boy, grew to maturity there, and after his marriage settled 
on the place now owned by his son John. Later he moved to Akron, 
where his first wife died in 1904. He maiTied again, and his second 
wife is also deceased. He is now living in Franklin Township. There 
were eight children, five still living : Etta, wife of Elmer Bybee, of 
Fulton County ; Eliza, wife of J. J. Smith, of Elkhart, Indiana ; John 
S. ; Lola, wife of C. C. Betters, of Elkhart; Howard, who is serving 
with the colors in France; Emma, Charles and another child died 
in infancy. 

John S. Judd grew up on the old fann, was educated in the dis- 
trict schools, and gave his time and labor to the home farm until 
twenty-one. On July 25, 1901, he married Mi.ss Myrtle Clifton. She 
was bom in Fulton County and is a graduate of tlie common schools. 
They have two sons: Thomas C, born September 4, 1903, who has 
completed the work of the district schools; and Charles W., born 
January 12, 1906, still a student. 

The family are members of the United Brethren Church at Beaver 
Dam, and Mr. Judd is superintendent of its Sunday school. In poli- 
ties he is a republican. 

Charles W. Ross. The Crown Hill Stock Farm, a mile east of 
Sidney in Jackson Township, of which Charles W. Ross is proprie- 
tor, is one of the centers of animal husbandry in Kosciusko County 
that attracts favorable notice and attention from many outside com- 
munities. The stock farm has as its chief asset a fine 'herd of Short- 
horn cattle, the herd being headed by Sultan's Defender. Mr. Ross 
IS also handling some Percheron horses, and has the well known 
Gazin, son of Juiy, son of Camot No. 66666. Other high grade 
live stock on the farm are some Dorset sheep and Duroc hogs. 

Mr. Ross was born in section 35 of Jackson Township April 1, 
1884. He is a son of John and Jane (Stout) Ross, the former a na- 
tive of Ohio and the latter of Whitley County, Indiana. They have 



434 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

four children : Albert, of Jackson Township ; Cora, wife of A. B. 
Uirey, of Jackson Township ; Eva, wife of Milton Miller ; and 
Charles W. 

Charles W. Ross grew up on a farm in Jackson Township, and 
from the age of sixteen has looked after his own welfare. He secured 
a better than ordinary education, attending the common schools and 
also the college at North Manchester, where he pursued a commer- 
cial course and later was a student in a commercial college at Indian- 
apolis. For a time he was employed in an insurance ofBce and whole- 
sale house at Indianapolis, and finally secured the equipment and the 
land for independent farming. The Crown Hill Farm comprises 
121.62 acres. 

December 10, 1904, Mr. Ross married Miss Minnie M. Priser. 
She was born in Monroe To^^^lship of this county May 31, 1883, 
daughter of John Priser. After their marriage ]\Ir. and Mrs. Ross 
lived in Monroe Township a year and a half, and in 1906 came to their 
present home in Jackson Town.ship. ^Mr. Ross is a republican and 
is one of the sterling and public spirited citizens of his community. 

Ctkus B. De.vton is one of the fortunate men who own good 
farms in Kosciusko County, and his place, representing all the mod- 
ern improvements and comforts, is in section 9 of Lake Township, two 
miles east and one mile south of Silver Lake. 

]\Ir. Deaton has achieved a worthy success in his career and his 
family name is of social interest in Kosciusko County. His father 
was George W. Deaton, a native of Clarke County, Ohio, son of "Wil- 
liam Deaton. "William Deaton owned a sawmill in Ohio and George 
"W. learned the milling trade there. IMarch 9, 1856, George "W. Dea- 
ton married iliss Frances C. Fortney, daughter of Jacob and Ann 
(Knoops) Fortney. In March, 1863, the Deaton family came to 
Kosciusko County, settling in Clay Township. George "W. Deaton 
was a successful farmer and was also well known because of his po- 
litical and civic activities. He was a stanch republican and was an 
eloquent speaker in advocating his position and principles. He had 
the distinction of being the first republican elected to the office of 
trustee in Clay Township. He was also a charter member of the 
Grange at Claypool and an active member of the ^Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. George "W. Deaton and wife had the following children : 
William S.. Jacob 0.. Mary B., John E., Samuel S.. Ulysses S., Cjtus 
B. and Charles G. The first four children were bom in Ohio and the 
others in Clay Township of Kosciusko County. 

C.vrus B. Deaton was born on his father's farm a mile and a quar- 
ter east of Claypool in Clay Township, July 29, 1869, and was the 
fifth son of the family. He grew up with his widowed mother, as- 
sisted in the work of the farm, and graduated from the common 
schools. He continued at home, a factor in the management of the 
old place, until the age of twenty-four. September 30, 1893, he 
married Miss May A. Ball. She was born in Ko.seiusko Countv July 
12, 1873. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Deaton spent about seven 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 435 

years at the Deaton home, and farmed in Clay Township until 1903, 
when he came to his present place. Besides the activities of the farm 
Mr. Deaton is a director in the Commercial Bank at Silver Lake. He 
is much interested in local affairs, is a republican, as was his father, 
and for a number of years has served as a member of the County 
Central Committee. He has a well improved farm of seventy-eight 
acres. Mr. and Mrs. Deaton have two children : Ross M., born De- 
cember 12, 1895, a graduate of the common schools and still at home ; 
and Hazel W., born June 9, 1900, a student in the Silver Lake 
High School. The family are members of the United Brethren 
Church at Silver Lake, and Mr. Deaton is one of the church trustees, 
and for a number of years has given strong support to both church 
and Sunday school activities. He is Past Noble Grand of Silver Lake 
Lodge No. 576, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a member 
of the Grand Lodge. 

C. F. White has spent a busy and industrious life in the south- 
west corner of Kosciusko County or over the line in Fulton County, 
has made what he has by his enterprise and resourcefulness, and is 
owner of a splendid farm of 120 acres in Franklin Township. 

He was born in Fulton County April 17, 1867, a son of Peter and 
Sarah A. (Prill) White. His father was a native of Summit County, 
Ohio, and his mother of Carroll County, Indiana. They married in 
Fulton County, and then settled on a farm. Their first place was 
twenty-one acres, and that tract of land was in the family ownership 
for fifty-one years. Peter White and wife had seven children, and 
the six still living are : Alfretta, wife of John Whaley ; Margaret, 
wife of William McEntire; C. F. ; John and William, twins; and 
George, who also lives in Franklin Township. 

C. F. White grew up in Fulton County and lived at home until he 
was twenty-one years of age, when he started out to make his own 
way in the world. July 20, 1893, he married Florence Ballenger. She 
was bom in Franklin Township December 26, 1869, and grew up on a 
farm and was educated in the local schools. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. White settled on a farm in 
Franklin Township, and they have made their present prosperity 
during the past twenty-five j-ears. Mr. and J\h-s. White are members 
of the Church of God and in politics he is a republican. They have 
three manly and enterprising young sons: Andrew, born November 
27, 1895, who married Mertie Wilcox on November 20, 1917 ; Charles 
E., horn September 4, 1897; and Fletcher E., born September 18, 
1899. 

Rev. Amos Freed is a well known minister of the Church of the 
Brethren, and performs his duties as a minister in addition to look- 
ing after one of the good farms of Jackson Township. His farm 
home is two miles south and a half mile east of Packerton. 

Mr. Freed was bom in Hancock County, Ohio, May 22, 1861, 
a son of Peter and Polly (Ream) Freed. His father was a native of 
Pennsylvania, while his mother was born in Stark County, Ohio. 



436 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

They married and spent their lives in Ohio. Peter Freed was a 
farmer and also a minister of the Brethren Church. He was twice 
married and had three children by his first wife, one of whom is 
living, Elizabeth, better known as "Betsy." He had twelve by the 
second wife, and those still living are : Ami, of ]\Ionticello, Indiana ; 
Amos; Henry, of Hancock County, Ohio; Neri, of Hancock County; 
and Ella, also of Hancock County. 

Amos Freed grew up in Ohio and lived in that state until 1890, 
when he moved to Indiana and established his home in White Count}'. 
He was a farmer there twelve ,yeai-s, and in 1902 came to his present 
home in Jackson Township. 

Mr. Freed married Miss Esther Bowers, of Ohio. Their oldest 
child died, and the three children now living are: Mar\'in, who is 
mari'ied and is a farmer; ]\Iary, wife of Charles Montel, of Lake 
Township; and Osuola, wife of Ealph ilontei, of Lake Township. 

Mr. Freed was elected to the ministrj^ December 9, 1911, and 
was ordained January 1, 1916, as an elder of "The Church of the 
Brethren." Since January 1, 1918, he has had charge of the church 
congregation at Eel River. He is a republican in politics. Mr. 
Freed owns a farm of 100 acres, while his son has sixty acres, all 
of it in one body and constituting in improvements and an-ange- 
ments one of the best country places in Jackson Township. 

Aaron Byrer is one of the solid, industrial meu of Kosciusko 
Coimt.v who have elected to remain largely in one locality all their 
lives and have bit by bit progressed and prospered to the achieve- 
ment of a fine farm, good home and all the esteem that is paid a 
useful member of a community. The Byrer farm is in Prairie 
Township, eight miles northwest of Warsaw. 

Mr. Byrer was born in Lancaster Count.y, Ohio, April 14, 18-57, 
and was brought to Kosciusko County when about a year old. His 
parents were Frederick and Christine (Hutt) Byrer, both natives 
of Ohio. After their marriage they lived in Ohio about seven j-ears 
before coming to Kosciusko County. Frederick Byrer located at 
Stony Point in Prairie Township, and he and his wife spent the rest 
of their days in that vicinity. He was very active in religious af- 
fairs as a member of the United Brethren Church and was a repub- 
lican voter. He and his wife had seven children: William, a resi- 
dent of Los Angeles, California ; Z. T., a retired farmer of Leesburg ; 
Aaron: Samuel M., a retired resident of Leesburg; Hudson, of Fort 
Wayne ; John C, a farmer in Prairie Township ; and George F., a 
mini.ster of the United Brethren Church at Warsaw. 

Aaron Byrer has spent practically all his life in Prairie Town- 
ship. He had the advantages of the district schools, and from the 
time he attained the age of twenty-one has been steadily working 
as a farmer. On April 7, 1888, he married Alma Hall, member of 
one of the oldest and most prominent families of Kosciusko County. 
She is a daughter of Joel and Mary (Roberts) Hall. Her 
father was born on the old homestead, a son of Samuel D. and Cath- 
erine (Anglin) Hall. Samuel D. Hall was born and married in 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 437 

West Virginia, and in pioneer times made a trip on horseback to 
Kosciusko County. He was one of the very first to take up land in 
Prairie Township. He acquired large tracts of land which were 
developed under his supervision. He was also a man of prominence 
in local affairs, was the first justice of the peace of Prairie Town- 
ship, and was one of the first associate judges of the county. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a democrat. 
His children were David, Hiram, Malinda, Lucinda, Elizabeth, Ma- 
tilda and William. Joel Hall and wife had the following chil- 
dren: Alma, Samuel 0., Eva, Ida, Flora, William R., and C. A. 
Hall. Mrs. Byrer was reared on her father's farm and had a dis- 
trict school education. She is the mother of three children: Lois 
E., unmarried and living at home; Avis, a graduate of the War- 
saw High School; and Ernest E., a student in the Warsaw High 
School. The family are members of the United Brethren Church 
and ]\Ir. Byrer is one of its trustees. He also belongs to the Horse 
Thief Detective Association and is a republican in politics. The 
land he has accumulated by his efforts and which he devotes to 
general farming comprises 157 of the good acres of Prairie Town- 
ship. 

Melville C. Cutler is one of the prominent farmers in south- 
eastern Kosciusko County. He has made all he has by hard work 
and intelligent management. He spent most of his early "life in White 
County, Indiana, and while there laid the basis of his prosperity. He 
is owner and proprietor of the Sunny Brook Farm, comprising 179 
acres, situated a mile west and a half mile south of Sidney. Mr. 
Cutler grows and handles a large number of stock of all kinds, and 
has made a success of his business, and while prospering individuallv 
has contributed something of value to the community and to tli'e 
world. 

Mr. Cutler was born in White County, Indiana, October 29, 1867, 
a son of John D. and Josephine (Kions) Cutler. His parents were 
both natives of Pickaway County, Ohio, the father born in 1834 and 
tlie inother in 1844. They came with their respective parents to 
White County, Indiana, the Kions family locating near Brookston, 
while the Cutlers established their home near Monticello. John D. 
Cutler was eight years old when he went to White County, and 
though a small boy he walked all the way from Ohio and led a steer. 
He was educated in the common schools and also in the University of 
Michigan. After his marriage he settled near Brookston, rented a 
farm there until about 1893, and then purchased the place upon which 
he IS still living. His wife is a membei' of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. John D. Cutler is a republican. Of their seven children 
three are still living: David L., who is farming a place a mile west 
of Warsaw; Louise, wife of L. S. Hart, of White Countv: and Mel- 
ville C. 

Melville C. Cutler was educated in the district schools of White 
County and remained at home until twenty-one. In starting for him- 
self he was employed by his father for some years. In June. 1894, 



438 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

he married Miss Ida C. Welever, who was born in White County in 
1870. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Cutler rented a farm in White 
County for nine years and they got their start as renters. With 
what modest means they had been able to accumulate in that time 
they came to Kosciusko County in 1903 and bought the present farm 
of 179 acres, and since then Mr. Cutler has also acquired another 
place of fifty-eight and one-half acres in Jackson Township. He and 
his wife are members of the Presbyterian church and in politics he is 
a republican. 

James A. Reed has cultivated and has been the owner of several 
farms over Kosciusko County, and his present home and the scene 
of his agricultural enterprise are at Yellow Creek Lake in Seward 
Township. 

His parents, Robert and Margaret (Bums) Reed, were living in 
Fulton County, Indiana, when James A. Reed was bom September 
13, 1852. His parents were both natives of Wayne County, Ohio, 
and were brought by their respective families to Indiana, where they 
grew up and married. They first settled on a farm in Seward Town- 
ship, a farm now owned by J. 'A. Carter, and after selling out they 
bought a place at the southeast corner of Yellow Creek Lake. They 
continued to live in that well known community the rest of their 
da.ys. Both parents were members of the United Brethren Church, 
and in politics the father was a republican. There were ten children, 
and six of them are still living: Miletus Reed, of Warsaw; Robert L., 
of Battle Creek, Michigan ; Elmira. wife of James Riley ; James A. ; 
Louise, wife of Thad McClue, of Silver Lake; and Ella, wife of Rob- 
ert Connor. 

James A. Reed spent his boyhood days on a fann, attended the 
common schools, and lives at home and gave his labor to the family 
until he was twenty-one. Not long after arriving at man's estate he 
assumed a man's obligations to support a family, and at the age of 
twenty-three, on July 11, 1875, married Miss Viola Hatfield. Mrs. 
Reed was born three miles north of the Fairview Church December 
22, 1858. daughter of William and Mary (Rose) Hatfield. Her father 
was born in Penns.ylvania, May 6, 1822, and died in Claypool, Indiana, 
June 2, 1895. Her parents were married January 9, 1845, and they 
had twelve children, eight daughters and foxir sons: Emeline. wife of 
John Anderson; Rebecca J., wife of Jonathan Creery; George, de- 
ceased, who married Hannah Delane ; Isabelle, wife of Thomas Linn ; 
Thomas, deceased ; Mary C. ; Edward, deceased ; Viola, Mrs. Reed ; 
Ida, deceased ; Willard ; Florence and Rosetta, both deceased. Mrs. 
Reed grew up in Seward township and attended school there. 

Since his marriage Mr. Reed has been a practical farmer, giving 
his undivided attention to his business, and has been abundantly pros- 
pered. He and his wife first lived on the Elmer Yocum farm for 
two years, spent two years in Fulton County, were also in Grant and 
Madison Counties for a time, and on returning to Kosciusko County 
located in Monroe Township. Later they bought a place of forty 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 439 

acres, in Lake Township, sold that and bought eighty-one acres, 
which the.y occupied only six months, and from there came to their 
place of sixty acres east of Yellow Creek Lake. They own nine acres 
at their home west of Yellow Creek Lake. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reed have an interesting family of boys: Frank, 
Dallas, Clyde, Carl, Ed and Freddie, twins, and Irwin. Freddie and 
Irwin are deceased. Mrs. Reed is a member of the Church of God, 
and in polities Mr. Reed is a republican. He has never had any 
aspiration to hold public office. 

Cyrus Musselman is a well-to-do farmer whose home is a mile 
and a half west of Sidney in Jackson Township. Mr. Musselman 
has spent half a century in this county, has lived close to the soil and 
to agricultural activities, and has always been a man of the highest 
standing in his community. 

He was born in Paulding County, Ohio, August 20, 1842, a son 
of John and Eliza (Clemmer) Musselman. His father was born in 
Virginia, and in early manhood went to Ohio, where he married his 
wife, a native of that state. They were pioneers in Paulding County, 
where they spent their lives. They made a farm from the woods, it 
being necessary to clear a spot in which to erect their log cabin. 
They were kindly, good-hearted neighbors and honest, hard-working 
people who well deserved the esteem in which they were held. Of 
their fourteen children two died in infancy, and all the others 
reached mature age. Those still living are : Amos, of Missouri ; Cyrus ; 
Ira, of Paulding County: Eliza, widow of William Merchant, of 
Ohio ; Minerva, widow of Orlando Coffin ; and Ida, a widow living in 
California. 

Cyrus Musselman spent his boyhood days on the old farm in 
Paulding County and was educated in the public schools. During 
his youth he learned the trade of tanner and shoemaker. After com- 
ing to Indiana in 1863 and locating in Kosciusko County he was in 
the saw mill business for seven years. For over forty years he has 
given his time and energy to farming, and he still owns and super- 
vises the management of 184 acres in the northwest corner of Jackson 
Township. 

Mr. Musselman married for his first wife Maria Clemmer. Of 
their four children three are living : Albert, of California ; Ida, liv- 
ing in Oklahoma ; and Laban, also in California. On June 27, i897, 
Mr. Musselman married Adella Lenwell, a widow. She was born in 
Monroe Township of this county January 25, 1864, and was reared 
m the home of Mrs. S. R. Wince near Piereeton. Her first husband 
was Chester Reason, and by that marriage she had two children 
Frederick and Charles. Mr. and Mrs. Musselman are members of 
the Church of God and he is a democratic voter. 



Jerome A. Carter. There are several counties and communities 
in Northern Indiana that have known Jerome A. Carter as a resi- 
dent and in every one he has enjoyed the reputation of being a 
hustling, enterprising farmer and good citizen and has succeeded 



440 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

beyond the average in all his undertakings. Mr. Carter now owns 
a well improved and valuable farm of 225 acres situated partly in 
Seward and partly in Franklin Townships. His place measures up 
to the best standards of farm improvement and management in this 
section of Indiana. 

Mr. Carter was born in LaPorte County, Indiana, January 10, 
1852, son of John and Mary (Windle) Carter. His parents were 
both natives of Shenandoah County, Virginia, the father born in 
1820 and the mother in 1827. When the "Windle family migrated 
from the famous valley of Virginia and settled in LaPorte County, 
Indiana, John Carter went along with them and he and Mary Win- 
dle were subsequently married. John Carter was a printer by trade, 
and for several years was employed on newspapers at LaPorte and 
in Michigan City. He gave up his trade to become a farmer and 
in 1862 moved to Jasper County, Indiana, and in 1871 to Newton 
County, and in that locality he lived until his death. He was a dem- 
ocrat in politics. Of his family of five children three are still living : 
Charles, of Silver Lake ; Jerome A. ; and Cathei'ine, wife of Francis 
Yeager, of Newton County, Indiana. 

Jerome A. Carter spent his boyhood days on his father's farm, 
received an education in the district schools and remained at home 
until he was twenty-one. Since then he has been making his own 
way in the world, and he had a most capable helpmate in the person 
of his good wife, whom he married in 1880. Her maiden name was 
Sarah A. Crisler. Mrs. Carter was bom in Bartholomew County, 
Indiana, but her people moved to Newton County when she was five 
years of age. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Carter rented land 
for a time, then bought a place in Newton County, and he has rather 
followed the policy of taking unimproved or partly run down fanns, 
building them up, and then selling and moving to a new location. 
In the course of his operations he has been a farm owner and man- 
ager in Newton, Jasper, LaGrange and Elkhart counties, and it was 
from the last named county that he moved to Kosciusko County in 
1905 and bought his present place. Mr. Carter is a democrat. 

He and his wife had five children: Lulu, at home; Charles, a 
hardware merchant at MentoJie, Indiana; John H., a farmer; Glenn, 
who is married and lives on a farm in Newton County: and Emmet, 
of Elkhart, Indiana. 

George M. Alex.vnder. The interests of the business and agri- 
cultural community that center at Bui'kett have a prominent factor 
in George M. Alexander, who has been a farmer in that locality for 
forty years, for a similar time has been engaged in the threshing 
business, and has also been officially and otherwise identified with 
several of those institutions which involve the business and domestic 
welfare of the community. Mr. Alexander is president of the Equity 
Union Elevator Company at Burkett. He is also one of the directors 
of the Bank of Seward. He is a director of the Farmers Mutual 
Relief Association, and is also president of the Farmers Co-operative 
Telephone Company. 




^9^e^:r^^t^^uuC^ 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 441 

Mr. Alexander, whose home place is 21^ miles south of Bur- 
ket, was born in Seward Township May 7, 1867, son of Mathew M. 
and Editha (Darling) Alexander. His parents were both natives 
of Richland County, Ohio, and after their marriage in that state 
they came to Kosciusko County and settled on a farm near Yellow 
Creek Lake. In that locality they were residents the rest of their 
lives. They were members of the Church of God at Lake Bethel. 
There is an interesting diversity in the politics of the three genera- 
tions of the Alexander family. Mathew Alexander was the only 
republican among his father's children, while George M. is the only 
democrat in his father's family. Mathew Alexander had eleven 
children, six of whom are still living: Peter, of Warsaw; Jonathan, 
of Seward Township ; Ida, wife of Elia.s Parker, of Claypool ; Nettie, 
wife of H. C. Tucker, of Akron, Indiana ; George M. ; and Frank, 
a farmer in Seward Township. 

George M. Alexander grew up on the old farm and had to be 
satisfied with such advantages as were afforded bj- the district 
schools. He lived at home till the age of twenty-four, and then es- 
tablished a home of his own by his marriage to Inez Blue, daughter 
of that pi'ominent old pioneer Peter A. Blue. Mrs. Alexander at 
her death was survived by five children : Elvin V., Russell F., Er- 
bie v.. Lulu L., and Retia. All the daughters were educated in the 
local schools and two of them were high school graduates. Mr. 
Alexander married for his present wife Bertha Crall, a native of 
Hairison Township. They have one son, Edwin. 

Along with fanning Mi'. Alexander earl,y took up the business of 
threshing, and has worn out a number of outfits in that business 
and could tell many interesting facts concerning the development 
of threshing machinery. He had some of the old time machines, 
even those operated by horse power, and in the early days practically 
every mechanical feature of the threshing outfit had to be operated 
by one or two men, while the most modern machines he has had are 
largely automatic and result in a large elimination and saving of 
man power. Mr. Alexander is a member of the Ancient Order of 
Gleaners and of the Loyal Order of Moose at Warsaw. 

John Ferverda is a merchant of successful experience, and has 
been identified with the hardware trade at Silver Lake for a num- 
ber of years, being one of the live and enterprising business men 
and citizens of that locality. 

He was born in Plain Township of this county December 26, 
1882, a son of Hiram B. and Eveline (Miller) Ferverda, both of 
whom now reside at Leesburg. John Fei-verda grew up on his 
father's farm in Plain Township and was liberally educated. He 
attended both the common and high schools of Oswego, being a 
graduate of both, and also was a student in the Tri-State Normal 
at Angola. For hLs scholarship he was granted a license to teach, 
but never used it in that profession. His life was spent largely at 
home imtil the age of twenty-two. Having mastered the art of 
telegraphy, he entered the service of the Big Four Railway as an 



442 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

operator, and was assigned at different stations along that system 
and remained in that service about ten years. In 1916 Mr. Fer- 
verda left the railroad to take up business, and is now a member of 
the F. and F. Hardware Company of Silver Lake. 

In 1907 he married Miss Bditli B. Lore, a native of Rush County, 
Indiana, and a high school graduate. They have one son, Harold L., 
born November 24, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Ferverda are members of 
the Lutheran Church, and he is afifiliated with Denning Lodge No. 88, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at North Manchester, and of 
the Knights of Pythias Lodge. In polities he is a republican. 

John F. Clymer, who is now busying himself with the manage- 
ment of his farm a quarter of a mile west of Silver Ivake, has had 
an unusual scope of experience and activity, having been a teacher, 
newspaper man, traveling salesman, and is a former postmaster of 
the Village of Silver Lake. 

Mr. Clymer was bom near Mansfield in Richland County, Ohio, 
March 18, 1855, a son of Henry and Mary (Landis) Clymer. His 
father was boi-n in Berks County, Pennsylvania, and his mother in 
Montgomerj' County, Ohio. They married in the latter county and 
soon located in Richland County, were farmers there until 1858, 
when they went out to Bond County, Illinois. They had their home 
there four years and in 1862, on coming to Indiana, located in Ran- 
dolph County for two years, and in 1864 moved to Kosciusko County, 
and in this county they spent their declining years. They were 
active members of the Dunkard Church and the father was a repub- 
lican. Of the nine children seven reached maturity: Samuel, of 
North Manchester; Elizabeth, wife of Peter Tredle, of California; 
John F. ; Mary, wife of Clay M. Wise ; Nancy, widow of Joshua Den- 
ser, living near Claypool; Sarah C, wife of Christian Dought; and 
D. H. Clymer, who is a newspaper writer at Logansport. 

John F. Clymer grew up in Kosciusko County from 1864, when 
he was nine years of age, and acquired his education in the local 
schools. He was a good student and at the age of twenty-one applied 
for a license as teacher. He taught and also attended the Methodist 
College at Fort Wa^'ne. His record as a teacher covered sixteen 
terms. When Benjamin Harrison was elected president Mr. Clymer 
was appointed postmaster at Silver Lake and filled that office sev- 
eral years. For nine .years he was on the road as traveling repre- 
sentative for the Deering Harvester Company, and for eighteen 
months he was connected with the South Bend Times. Otherwise 
his experience has been that of a farmer, and his home place com- 
prises forty acres of well cultivated and highly ii^ipi'oved land. 

In 1880 Mr. Clymer married Miss Lodelle Kerlin, who was born 
near Silver Lake in 1862 and was educated in the common schools. 
Their four children are: Oma 6., wife of Percy Perry, of Lake 
Township ; M. T., who is married and an operator with the Grand 
Trunk Railway, living at Granger, Indiana; Noble Ray, who is mar- 
ried and is connected with the Big Four Railway at Berrien Center, 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 443 

Michigan ; and Mary P., who is a graduate of the Silver Lake High 
School and is still at home. 

Mr. Clymer is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Masonic Order, and is a past chancellor of the former. He has al- 
ways been interested in the success of the republican party, and 
through it has given his chief public service. He is the present nom- 
inee for the office of trustee of Lake Township. 

Thomas E. Ball. Many of the best farmers in Kosciusko County 
are located in Seward Township, where local pride is shown in the 
substantial and attractive buildings and richly cultivated fields 
which stand as substantial evidence of the industry and intelligence 
of their owners. One of these capable men around Silver Lake is 
Thomas E. Ball, whose farm is four miles west of that village. 

In this township he was born June 25, 1858, a son of Henderson 
W. and Freela (Lumpkin) Ball. His father was a native of Ran- 
dolph County, Indiana, and his mother of Putnam County. They 
married in the latter coanty and after some years came to Kosciusko 
County and were well known residents of Sew'ard Township for many 
years. The father had a farm of 120 acres. Both father and mother 
were active in the Baptist Church, and the former was a well known 
local minister who did work here and in many other communities. 
He was also active in the republican party, and for a number of years 
held a commission as notary public. The death of this honored 
old tmie citizen occurred in January, 1910, while his widow passed 
away April 22, 1914. They earned the gratitude of coming genera- 
tions by establishing a large posterity. Of their children two died 
in infancy and one after reaching maturity. Those still living are : 
Martha, wife of William Williams; Lewis C, a farmer in Fulton 
County, Indiana ; Charity, wife of Calvin Moyer, of Warsaw ; John 
M., a farmer in Franklin Township; Freela, wife of George Swick, 
living in Texas ; Thomas E. ; Laura A., wife of Monda Gast ; Viola,' 
wife of Henry Meredith, of Akron, Indiana ; Jennie, unmarried ; and 
Robert N., a Baptist minister living at Indianapolis. 

Thomas E. Ball grew up on the old farm in Seward Township. 
The scene of his boyhood is only a mile and a half from his present 
home. He went back and forth to the district schools, especially dur- 
ing the winter tenns, and was a factor in the home circle until 
twenty-five. He then married Miss Laura Roberson. She died April 
18, 1891, the mother of two children, Angus G., a farmer in Seward 
Township, and Iva F., wife of Percy Helser, of Lake Township. For 
his present wife Mr. Ball married Mrs. Sarah A. (Friend) Utter, of 
Miami County, Indiana, where she was born. Her first husband was 
John Utter. Mr. Ball takes an active interest in various organiza- 
tions and movements, is a member of the Horse Thief Detective As- 
sociation, is a republican, and filled the office of justice of the peace 
four years. 

Jacob H. Moet has been a figure in the business life of Kosciusko 
County for a number of years. He is well known over a large scope 



444 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

of country as a former gi-ain and stock buyer, but is now eoueeu- 
trating his attention upon the management of the Highland Orchard, 
and is one of the largest and most successful fruit growers in the 
county. His entire farm comprises 100 acres, situated in Jackson 
Township, a mile south and a mile and a half west of Sidney. Mr. 
Mort has sixty-ifive acres in fruit trees and is a producer of fruit 
on a commercial scale, and has acquired all the facilities for the ex- 
pert handling of his crop. 

Mr. Mort was born in Allen County, Ohio, October 18, 1863, a 
son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Harpster) Mort. Joseph Mort was 
born in Harrison County, Ohio, sou of George and Man- Mort, the 
former a native of Marj'land and the latter of Pennsylvania. Joseph 
Mort at the age of three years accompanied his parents to Tuscar- 
awas County and at the age of fifteen he left home to live with an 
uncle. In his twentieth year he entered upon an apprenticeship to 
learn the trade of tanner and currier at Tiffin, Ohio, and followed 
that business for many years. In Allen County, Ohio, November 4, 
1849, he married Miss Elizabeth Harpster, who was born February 
15, 1831, in Fairfield County, Ohio, a daughter of Anthony and 
Sophia Harpster. Joseph Mort brought his family to Kosciusko 
County in 1871, and for some years operated a tannery at Warsaw. 
In July, 1882, he located upon a farm a mile and a half northwest 
of Warsaw, later farmed in Jackson Township and died in advanced 
years at Silver Lake. While living in Ohio he served as trustee, was 
a democrat in politics and a member of the Grange. He and his 
wife had children named Anthony, ilary, George, Emanuel, Lj'dia, 
Nancy, John M., Jacob H., and Emma. 

Jacob H. ^lort grew up in and from the age of seven to six- 
teen attended the public schools of Warsaw. Later he graduated 
from a business college in Chicago. He entered upon his business 
career as a haj^ and grain buyer and shipper, and owned an elevator 
for about a dozen .veai-s. He then came to his present farm in 
Jackson Township and is busy from one year's end to the other in 
looking after his trees and handling his enormous crops of fruit. 

ilr. Mort married Miss Ora Hinkson, a native of Kosciusko 
County. They have five children, Ruth, Russell, Berniee, Louis and 
Louise, twins, the last being seven years of age. The two older chil- 
dren are graduates of the common schools. Mr. and Mrs. Mort are 
membei-s of the Christian Church. He is affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias Lodge at North Manchester, and votes as a democrat. 
While he has never taken much part in politics or sought ofSee, he 
has accepted the nomination for assessor in his township. 

Albert E. Ross, when he married twenty years ago, had a team 
and twenty-seven dollars" worth of furniture. He applied himself 
to farming, the vocation to which he had been trained as a boy, and 
by hard and constant work and by paying attention to the selling 
as well as to the producing end of his business he has prospered so 
that he owns a large farm of 370 acres in Jackson Township, his 
home being in section 2 south of Sidnej', and his name is everywhere 




^ ^^.4-^^ 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 445 

in that community recognized as one of the good and substantial 
citizens. 

Mr. Ross was bom August 30, 1876, in the same township where 
he now resides, and his parents were John and Jane (Stout) Ross. 
His mother died in 1884 and his father is still living. Albert E. is 
the oldest of four children. His sister Cora is the wife of A. B. 
Ulrey, of Jackson Township. Eva is the wife of Milton Miller, of 
Jackson To^vnship, and Charles W. Ross is also a well known fanner 
in the same locality. 

Albert E. Ross grew up on the old homestead, attended the dis- 
trict schools near home, and was married in his twenty-first year, 
on February 26, 1898. Miss Rosa C. Fox was his bride. She has 
been a faithful manager of the home and has closely co-operated 
with her husband in their joint enterprise as farmers. Mr. Ross has 
fed many carloads of cattle, hogs and sheep during the last twenty 
years and he has made his money in stock and grain. He ships his 
own stock, buys by the carload, and keeps in close touch with market 
conditions. Mr. Ross is a republican, has been quite active in party 
interest, and he and his wife are members of the Church of the 
Brethren. They have two sons, Eugene, a graduate of the common 
schools, and Lawrence, eight years old. 

James B. Gill, a farmer living a mile and a half north and a 
mile and a half west of Silver Lake, is a man of wide and unusual 
experience, and has spent more than half a century as a citizen of 
Kosciusko County. 

His birth occun-ed in Champaign Coimty, Ohio, September 24, 
1843. His birthplace was near Mechaniesburg. His parenis were 
John D. and Sophia (Winett) Gill. His grandfather, David Gill, 
wa.s born in Maryland of Irish ancestry, and married Mary Dent 
of Scotch-Irish ancestry. They were married in Maryland, where 
Mary Dent's father was an extensive slave holder. When his daugh- 
ter married this planter gave her eight or ten slaves, but when 
David Gill and wife moved to Ohio the slaves automatically became 
free, and all of them remained in that state but one, who kept close 
to the family as long as she lived. David Gill had a home near 
Mechaniesburg, Ohio, and was both a farmer and a minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He and his -svife died in that vicinity. 
They had four sons and four daughters. John D. Gill was born in 
Pickaway County, Ohio, January 14, 1812. His wife, Sophia Winett, 
was born in Virginia June 25, 1808. They married in Champaign 
County, Ohio, and lived on a fann and later in the Village of Me- 
chaniesburg, where John D. Gill followed his trade as a shoemaker. 
He was the father of seven children : Henry and Susanna, deceased ; 
Newton A., a retired farmer living in Clay Township of this county ; 
James E. ; John J., of Warsaw ; Amelia A., wife of Joshua Rose, of 
Seneca County, Ohio ; and Sophia F., wife of Henry Baum, of Sew- 
ard Township. 

James E. Gill was eleven years old when he came to Kosciusko 
County. His education was such as could be supplied by the dis- 



446 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

trict schools of his day. His first important enterprise was in asso- 
ciation with a brother. Together they cleared and put into culti- 
vation a tract of eighty acres of land. This was the work that kept 
him busy until he was twenty-three, when he established a home of 
his own by his marriage April 1, 1866, to Miss Martha A. Rolland. 
She was born in Knox County, Ohio, March 7, 1845, and came to 
Kosciusko County at the age of ten years. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Gill went to housekeeping 
in a little log cabin 16 by 18 feet, furnished with the utmost sim- 
plicity of furniture and equipment. It remained their home for 
eight years, and they then bought a farm of 115 acres one mile 
west of Silver Lake. This was their second home and after eight 
years they sold it, and in 1884 came to their present home of eighty 
acres, constituting one of the well kept and productive farms of 
Seward Township. 

Mrs. Gill died August 10, 1912, and her death was the first break 
in the family circle in more than forty-five years. She was the 
mother of seven children, and one of them has died since her death. 
These children are: John D., of "Warsaw; Dellie, wife of Cal Wise, 
of Warsaw; Louis, deceased; James E., of Mentone, Indiana; La- 
verna, wife of Albert Whittenberger ; Samuel F., who lives in Mon- 
tana; Elmore, whose home is north of Warsaw. The family are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Gill is a demo- 
crat and has served as constable, and wherever possible has exer- 
cised an influence toward the betterment and upbuilding of his com- 
munity. 

Leonard Summe's carefully tended and valuable farm is in 
Franklin Township. He has spent practically all his life i!i the 
southern part of Kosciusko county and beginning life with little 
capital has proved his ability and won a comfortable competence 
and success. He owns 203 acres where he lives. 

He was born January 29, 1862, in Seward Township, a son of 
Samuel and Catherine (Rough) Summe. His father was born in 
Berne, Switzerland, January 25, 1836, and came to the United States 
when a young man in 1855. He settled in Columbiana County, Ohio, 
where lie met and married his wife, Catherine Rough, who was a 
native of that county, born November 20, 1840. In 1861 they moved 
to Indiana, locating near Claypool in Seward Township, and subse- 
quently established their home in Franklin Township. The parents 
are still living, in advanced years, and are among the highly esteemed 
old people in this part of the county. They had ten children, 
namely: Mary, wife of John F. Haney ; Amos, of Franklin Town- 
ship ; Leonard ; John, of Silver Lake ; Malinda, who is one of the 
deceased children ; Fred, of Silver Lake ; Frank, of Mentone ; Alva ; 
Alta, deceased wife of I. Tucker ; and Elmer, of Silver Lake. 

Mr. Leonard Summe grew up in Seward Township and was 
educated in the district schools there. When only a bo.y he started 
out to make his own way in the world, and has well earned the 
success now enjoyed. He married j\Iiss Effie D. Tucker, grand- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 447 

daughter of that well known and stalwart pioneer and leading citizen 
of Kosciusko County, Horace Tucker. Mrs. Summe was born in 
Franklin Township, June 7, 1875, daughter of Albert L. and Eliza- 
beth (Bechtelheimer) Tucker. Her mother died in 1888. Mr. and 
Mrs. Summe after their marriage lived on the Alva L. Tucker farm 
until 1902, and then came to their present home, where their children 
have grown up and where they have surrounded themselves with 
good neighbors and with most prosperous circumstances. 

They have four children : Delta R., a graduate of high school 
and wife of Orville Royer of Franklin Township; Albert L., who is 
a graduate of high school and is still at home ; Alta M. and Ralph 
M. Mr. and Mrs. Summe have one grandchild. Mr. Summe is a 
democrat in politics but has never cared to hold office. 

Ivan Tucker is a grandson of Horace Tucker and is a prosperous 
farmer in Franklin Township, in the vicinity which has been made 
memorable by the residence and activities of the Tueker family since 
pioneer days. 

His grandfather, Horace Tucker, was born in Richland County, 
Ohio, November 8, 1825, son of John and Mary (Ward) Tucker, 
Horace Tucker came to Kosciusko County in 1846 and paid $2.50 
an acre for a quarter section in section 20 of Franklin Township, a 
short distance northeast of the farm where Ivan Tucker now lives. 
He cut the first tree in the woods, erected a log cabin home, and then 
went back to Ohio, where on January 13, 1848, he married Miss 
Eliza Johnston. They came and occupied their log cabin home in the 
fall of 1848, and it was on that farm that their three children were 
born. Albert L., Rosella and Hollis. Horace Tucker was one of the 
pioneer stock raisers and dealers in Kosciusko County. He and 
another man shipped the first carload of stock ever sent by rail from 
Warsaw. The prosperity he and his wife enjoyed in later years was 
the more appreciated because their first home in the county was of 
the crudest description and with the most meager furnishings, much 
of it home made furniture with no pretense to style and with very 
little comfort. In 1871 Horace Tucker erected a brick house on his 
farm. It is said that his wind pump was the second in the township. 
He was in the stock business on an extensive scale, and in that line 
was succeeded by his son Albert. 

Albert L. Tucker was born in Franklin Township, September 19, 
1849, and in many wa.vs measured up to the business ability and 
sturdy character of his honored father. He married Elizabeth Bech- 
telheimer, who was born in Indiana in 1853 and died in March, 1888. 
They have eight children : Elmore, of Newcastle, Indiana ; Effie, wife 
of Leonard Summe, of Franklin Township ; Ida, widow of Lawrence 
Huffer, of Burket, Indiana; Ivan; Roy, a farmer in the state of 
Washington ; John, of Chicago ; Jlillie, wife of Arthur Gelty, of 
Silver Lake ; and Frank C, of Claypool. 

Ivan Tucker was born on his father's farm in section 31 of Frank- 
lin Township and in that community he grew to manhood, attending 
the local schools. At the age of eighteen he went to work for his 



448 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

gi-aiidfather, Horace Tucker, later farmed his place one year, spent 
one year in Ohio, and also a short time in the West. In December, 
1901, he married Miss Alta Summe. She died in August, 1902, 
without children. April 2, 1905, Mr. Tucker married Cecil McFar- 
land. She was born in Franklin Township, December 21, 1884, and 
was educated in the common schools. 

For a number of years Mr. Tucker owned and occupied the old 
Horace Tucker homestead, but finally sold that and in 1911 came 
to his present place in section 30, where he owns 144 acres of care- 
fully cultivated land. He is a breeder and raiser of graded stock 
and usually feeds a carload of cattle for the market every year. 
Politically he is a democrat. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tucker have two children: Mirabel, born August 
20, 1907, and Alton L., born March 19, 1909. 

Omer N. Igo is one of the influential citizens of Franklin Town- 
ship, is a farmer, stock buyer, and a leader in all the community 
activities. His fine farm, which represents almost a lifetime of effort 
and enterprise on his part, is situated five miles south and one mile 
east of Mentone. 

Mr. Igo was born in Edgar County, Illinois, September 16, 1866, 
a son of "William and Leah (Wilkins) Igo. His parents were both 
born and reared in Highland County, Ohio, where they married. 
"William Igo was a son of Henry Igo, one of the early settlers in that 
part of Ohio. From Highland County William Igo and wife moved 
to Edgar County. Illinois, were farmers there many years, and later 
moved out to Oklahoma, where they died. They were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Of their nine children five are still 
living, and two of the sous are in Kosciusko County, George and 
Omer, the former also a farmer in Franklin Township. 

Omer N. Igo was educated in Edgar County, Illinois, also 
attended school in Kosciusko County, and at the age of twenty he 
became self supporting and went to work for John R. Black, whose 
daughter, Minnie Black, he subsequently maiTied. After their mar- 
i-iage Mr. and Mrs. Igo settled on the fanu where they now live, and 
here he owns 127 acres of well improved soil. From his farm he 
carries on his extensive operations as a cattle man. He buys, feeds 
and ships several carloads of stock every year. ilr. Igo was one of 
the organizei-s of the Farmers Mutual Telephone Company and a 
director for some years. He also served one term as trustee of 
Franklin Township, and has taken quite an interest in politics as a 
democrat. 

He and his wife have a fine family of children, ten in number, 
briefly mentioned as follows : Icie, a graduate of the common schools 
and wife of Marion Taylor; Fro, a graduate of the common schools 
and wife of Floyd Tucker; Joe, who finished the common school 
course and is now with the colors; Nellie, who has completed the 
work of the local schools; Othello, a student, in high school; and 
Ernest, "Virgil, Lewis, Edgar and Lillian E., who are the younger 
children, still in the home circle. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 449 

Elias Leiningeb has been content to extend his usefulness and 
energy largely in one locality, and in the quiet but valuable vocation 
of farming. Mi-. Leininger lives on one of the good farms of Frank- 
lin Township, not far from Beaver Dam. 

He came to Kosciusko County when a boy. He was born in 
Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, September 12, 1849, a son of Isaac 
and Mary C. (Petry) Leininger. Both parents were natives of Penn- 
sylvania, the mother of Berks County. After their marriage in 
Berks County they settled in Schuylkill County, where the father 
died in 1856. The mother married again and subsequently came to 
Indiana, bringing some of her children and settling near Beaver Dam. 
She died in that community. She was the mother of ten children by 
her first husband, and those living today are: David, a farmer in 
Fulton County; Elias; Daniel, a merchant at Akron, Indiana, and 
Sarah, wife of Henry Halderman. 

Elias Leininger was about fifteen years old when he came to 
Kosciusko County. He finished his education here in the German 
and English schools and lived at home until eighteen. Having 
learned the cabinet-making trade, he worked at that occupation at 
Beaver Dam for fourteen years, being employed as a cabinet-maker 
largely during the winter seasons and working as a carpenter in the 
summer. Then for several years he was associated with his brother 
Jonas in a general merchandise store at Silver Lake. 

In 1875 Mr. Leininger married Miss Amanda Kistler, who was 
born and reared in the same locality of Pennsylvania as her husband. 
After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Leininger located at Beaver Dam, 
and in the spring of 1883 they came to their present fine farm in 
Franklin Township. Mr. Leininger is a breeder of Duroc hogs, but 
has not specialized to any extent, and has made his prosperity 
through general farming. He and his family en.jo.y the comforts of 
a very modern home, built in a most substantial manner, with brick 
veneering. He and his wife are members of the Church of God and 
he is a republican, though he voted as a democrat up to the campaign 
of 1896. 

Mr. Leininger is the father of eight children : Anina ; Loa ; Beulah ; 
Ida, in the employ of the government as domestic instructor ; Charles ; 
Mabel, wife of Carl Gast, of Akron; Daniel, who is a Second Lieu- 
tenant and now in Texas ; and Helen, at home. 

Isaac M. Shoemaker is one of the men of high sta)iding and 
substantial achievements in Franklin Township. His farm is in 
section 5, a mile east of Beaver Dam. He has lived in that com- 
munity many years and not least among his contributions to the 
community is his family of sturdy sons and capable daughters who 
have gi-own up in his home and gone forth most of them into homes 
of their own. 

Mr. Shoemaker was born in Franklin Township, February 27, 
1856. a son of Elias and Rebecca (Radbaugh) Shoemaker. " His 
father was born in Maryland and his mother in St. Joseph County, 
Indiana. Elias Shoemaker went to Ohio at the age of sixteen, later 



450 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

to St. Joseph Count}', Indiana, married, and after a few years came 
to Kosciusko County and established a home on the farm now owned 
by his son Isaac. He and his wife were active members of the 
Dunkard Church. In polities he was a democrat. Of the twelve 
children in the parents' family seven are living: Barbara A., widow 
of Albert Myers ; Mary J., wife of Amos Swihart ; Levi, of Blooms- 
burg, Indiana; Joseph, of Clay Township, this county; Isaac M. ; 
Benjamin, who lives in Kansas; Daniel, of Seward Township. 

Isaac M. Shoemaker grew up on his father's farm and had the 
advantages of the local schools. March 11, 1883, he married Miss 
Margaret Jliller. She was born in Ohio, September 23, 1859, but 
from early girlhood was reared in Kosciusko County. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. and ilrs. Shoemaker settled 
on the farm where they now reside, and that has been Mr. Shoe- 
maker's home ever since but for a period of five years. He has 
eighty-two acres that has long responded to his skillful and capable 
management, and has furnished him the resources for keeping up the 
home and providing for his children. 

He and his wife had fourteen children, and a brief record of 
those that grew up is as follows : Elva, wife of Elza P. Karns ; Clyde, 
who married Fern Regnos ; Ralph, who married Myrtle Gilmore ; 
Earl, who married Ruth Douglas, of Chicago: Edna, wife of Clark 
Chapman, of California ; Carl, a resident of California but now with 
the United States Army; Floyd, who married Elma Thornburg and 
lives in Fulton County; Russell, who married Isel Hill and is now 
with the United States forces in France ; Roy, at Camp Colt, Gettys- 
burg; Lester, who married Lavon Snyder and lives in Lake Town- 
ship ; Forest and Glenn, both at home, the latter still in high school. 
Mr. Shoemaker is an independent voter. 

Albert Sarber. One of the oldest residents of Franklin Town- 
ship is Albert Sarber, who has lived in that locality more than 
three-quarters of a century, and as a child knew it when the tim- 
ber was uncut, when the swamps were undrained, and when nearly 
every home was a log cabin. Every railroad in the county has been 
built within his recollection, and the journey which he can now 
make from his home farm to Warsaw by interurban in a few min- 
utes, required almost a day of hard traveling over rough roads 
when he was a young man. His own share and contribution to the 
development and improvements has been considerable, and he has 
always been looked upon as one of the sturdy American citizens of 
his locality. 

I\Ir. Sarber, whose home farm is a half-mile west and a quarter- 
mile south of Mentone, was born in Putnam County, Ohio, January 
3, 1841, a son of George and Lydia (Andreck) Sarber. He comes 
of an old Pennsylvania German famil.v, his great-grandfather, John 
Sarber, being a native of Germany. His gi-andparents were Adam 
and Catherine (Eusleu) Sarber, both natives of Pennsylvania, where 
they married, and in 1814 went into the western wilderness to Frank- 
lin County, Ohio. The^v lived there until about 1824, then moved to 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 451 

Putnam County, where they did their work as pioneers, and when 
old age came upon them they moved to Kosciusko County, where 
both of them died. Adam Sarber had a family of twelve children. 

Third among them was George Sarber, father of Albert. George 
Sarber was born in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, August 10, 1810. 
He married in Ohio Lydia Andreck, and in 1841 they came to Kos- 
ciusko County and bought 171 acres of uncleared land in Franklin 
Township. Their cabin was erected in the midst of the green woods, 
and years of hard work on the part of George Sarber brought much 
of his land under cultivation. He was a quiet, unassuming man, 
but active in church, and he and his wife were both members of the 
Methodist society at Mentone. He was a democrat in politics. In 
their family were three children : Catherine, now deceased, who 
married John Morgan ; Hiram, who married Mary E. Lee, and is 
also deceased ; and Albert, the only survivor. 

Albert Sarber was a small infant when brought to Kosciusko 
County. As strength came to him he helped on the farm and at- 
tended the little subscription school near home. On reaching his 
majority his father divided between him and Hiram the old home- 
stead, and they bought their sister's share. His brother Hiram 
had three children, and at his death Albert bought out their interests 
and thus practically became owner of the old farm. 

In August, 1861, Albert Sarber married Margaret Nellans. She 
was the mother of four children, two of whom are still living: Ma- 
randa H., wife of Abram Whetstone, and ]Mary M. The mother 
of these children died in 1872, and on September 27. 1874, Mr. Sar- 
ber married Amelia A. Garrison. She was born in Whitley County, 
Indiana, August 17, 1855. and came to Kosciusko County when a 
young lady. To this marriage were also born four children, and two 
are living: Macy, who married Bertha Smith, and has two chil- 
dren, and Ora, wife of William Boman, of Mentone. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sarber are very active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He is a democrat in politics, biit has never sought official honors. 

George G. Cook has given the years of an active life, thirty or 
more, to the business of farming and stock dealing, and his present 
home is a valuable body of land in section 36 of Franklin Township, 
five miles south of Mentone. 

He was born in the same section of Franklin Township, January 
16, 1866, a son of Alexander and Mary (Davidson) Cook. His par- 
ents were both born in Scotland and in the same locality. His father 
was born June 12, 1827, and in 1852 came to the United States. 
Landing in New York City, he went on to Ashland County, Ohio, 
where he went to work as a stone mason, a trade he had learned in 
Scotland. He worked in that line for several years in Ohio and then 
engaged in the saw mill business. After coming to the United States 
he earned money sufficient to bring over his widowed mother and 
other members of the familj', and on the same boat that transported 
them to America there came Mary Davidson, from the same Scotch 
neighborhood, and not long after her arrival she and Alexander Cook 



452 HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

were married. Then for several years he continued in the saw mill 
business in Ohio, and about 1863 brought his mill to Kosciusko 
County and set up the machinery in Franklin Township, where he 
sawed up vast quantities of timber and continued the operation of 
the mill until 1898. After coming to Indiana he went back to Ohio 
for the purpose of casting his vote at the second election of Abraham 
Lincoln in 1864. He was a sturdy and steadfast supporter of the 
republican party. He and his wife were members of the Christian 
Church and gave liberal support to all public and religious move- 
ments in their community. In their family were seven children, one 
of whom died in infancy, and the others were Alexander J., William 
A., Mary B., who married Clem Jones; Ida H., now deceased; 
Maggie J., also deceased, and George G. 

George G. Cook has spent practically all his life in Franklin 
Township, and as he gi-ew up here was educated in the common 
schools. In January, 1889, he married Miss Mary Thompson, who 
was also born in this locality. They had five children, and the three 
now living are: Grace J., a graduate of the common schools and a 
former student in the high school, which she attended nearly four 
years, now the wife of Oren C. Craig; Merle, a graduate of the 
common schools and high school, unmarried and living at home ; and 
Willis, who graduated from the Akron High School and is now 
ser\'ing with the rank of coi-poral in the United States Army. 

Mr. Cook is affiliated with Akron Lodge of Masons and with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Warsaw. He is a repub- 
lican and has been quite active in the party. His farm comprises 
100 acres, and this valuable estate represents his individual efforts 
and management, with the exception of about a thousand dollars 
which was his primary capital. Mr. Cook is also one of the directors 
of the Exchange Bank of Akron. 

William E. Davis has been continuously identified with the mer- 
cantile and civic affairs of the village of Burkett for over thirty 
years, almost in fact since the village was founded, and anyone who 
knows Burkett also knows William E. Davis. For the past eight 
years he has sei-ved as postmaster, handling those duties besides 
supervising his store. 

Mr. Davis was born in Union County, Indiana, August 25, 1858, 
a son of Edmund and Elizabeth (Krauss) Davis. His father was 
born in England, while his mother was a native of Germany. Both 
came to the United States when young people, were married at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and then moved to a farm in Union County, In- 
diana. They lived in Putnam County, Ohio, during their last years. 
They had only two children, William E. and Mary E. The latter is 
the "wife of S." C. Arnold, of Ottawa, Ohio. 

William E. Davis spent a portion of his youth on his father's 
farm in Union County. He also attended school there and completed 
his education in the high school at Ottawa, Ohio. After graduation 
from high school he taught for five years and left that vocation to 
identify himself with the Town of Burket in 1884. About two years 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 453 

later he built the building, 44 by 130 feet, which he has occupied by 
a large and varied stock of general merchandise and which has been 
one of the principal trading centers of this community for thirty 
years. Mr. Davis began with limited capital and has made individual 
service and hard work his principal asset in life. 

He takes justifiable pride in the fine family of children who have 
grown up in his home. March 19, 1879, he married Ada J. Parker. 
She was born at Kalida, Ohio. Their children are six in number. 
The oldest, Edmund P., a graduate of high school and of Indiana 
University, from which he received the degree Master of Arts, also 
has a degi-ee from Clark University, and for nine .years was head of 
the Department of Mathematics in the State College of Pennsylvania. 
Recently his services have l)cen acquired as professor of mathematics 
by the Pratt Institute at Brooklyn, New York. The second son, 
George E., who graduated A. B. from Indiana State University, has 
also been a successful teacher, and was head of the Science Depart- 
ment of the Mishawaka, Indiana, High School until he accepted a 
position in government service as a draftsman at Philadelphia, 
handling the plans for concrete ship construction. Guido W., a high 
school graduate, became identified in August, 1918, with the aero- 
plane department of the Packard Motor Works. The daughter, Mary, 
is the wife of H. E. Rancevan. Lena married H. J. McGinley. Ethel 
is the wife of Glen Hatfield. 

Mr. Davis and family are active members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. He has been a member of the official board and for 
four years was president of the Kosciusko County Sunday School 
Association. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Improved Order of Red Men, and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. Politically his associations have connected 
him with the democratic party since he attained voting age. 

Joseph E. Foreman has been one of the busy and enterprising 
factors in the citizenship of Seward Township for a number of years. 
His fundamental interests are as a farmer, but he is also secretary 
and treasurer of the Burket Equity Union Elevator. This is a busi- 
ness that furnishes the medium to many farmers and grain raisers 
around Burket for the adequate storage and marketing of their 
crops. The elevator company has as its officers and directoi-s the 
following well known local citizens : George M. Alexander, president ; 
A. D. Sands, vice president ; Joseph E. Forman, secretary and treas- 
urer; W. A. Hoffman and J. A. Bechtol, directors; and Albert H. 
Parker, manager. 

Mr. Foreman was boni two miles east of Burket in Seward 
Township, August 10, 1876. He is a son of Robert and Mary 
(Stumpff) Foreman, both of whom were natives of Snyder County, 
Pennsylvania. The grandfather, Elias Foreman, also a native of 
Pennsylvania, was the son of a native of Germany, who on coming to 
the United States located in Pennsylvania. Robei't Foreman, who 
was born October 30, 1844, grew up in Snyder County, Pennsylvania, 
married at Three Rivers, Jlichigan. February 29, 1872, and soon 



454 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

afterward he and his wife came to Kosciusko County and for two 
years rented a farm two and a half miles east of Burket. They then 
bought their own place of eighty acres and were thrifty farmei-s and 
good citizens of that locality the rest of their lives. Robert Foreman 
died February 12, 1911, and his wife February 15, 1918. They were 
devout members of the Lutheran Church and among its leading sup- 
porters. Robert Foreman voted as a republican and had a record as 
a soldier of the Civil "War, having been with Company H of the One 
Hundred and Eighty-Fourth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He 
and his wife had two children, Joseph E. and Sarah E. Sarah mar- 
ried for her first husband Albert Pumley and later became the wife 
of Jacob Hatfield. She was the mother of three children. 

Joseph E. Foreman grew up on his father's farm and acquired a 
liberal education. After utilizing all that the district schools could 
give him he attended the Tri-State Normal School at Angola, and 
with that preparation entered actively into educational work, a pro- 
fession he followed for twelve years. 

June 10, 1905, Mr. Foreman mai-ried Eliza J. Roberts. Mrs. 
Foreman was bom in Kosciusko County and was educated in district 
and select schools, and her record as a teacher covered terms through 
nineteen years. Mr. and Mrs. Foreman are active supportei's of the 
Church of the Living God. ]\Ir. Foreman is a member of the National 
Hoi-se Thief Detective Association. In March. 1918, he and his wife 
moved to the Village of Burkett. He owns and supervises the opera- 
tion of a farm of 120 acres, and also owns a half interest in another 
place of 100 acres. 

Clem A. Jones has been a factor in the community around Bur- 
ket and in Franklin To-miship for a number of years. From the 
farm and farm management his interests have extended to local banks 
and other business concerns, and he is one of the influential and rep- 
resentative citizens of that community. His farm is in Franklin 
Township, three miles southwest of Burket. 

He was born in Seward Township of this county, February 4, 
1867, a son of John and Nancy (Hire) Jones. He grew up as a boy 
on a farm two and a half miles southwest of Burkett, this old place 
being situated on the Angling road. The summer months he em- 
ployed working on the farm and usually attended school in winter. 
He was at home until past twenty-one, then married Mary Cook, 
daughter of Alexander Cook, one of the early and prominent pio- 
neers of Franklin Township. ^Irs. Jones was born in Ohio and was 
educated in the common schools. 

After their marriage Mr. and ]\Irs. Jones rented his father's farm 
five miles west of "Warsaw fourteen years, and then moved to the 
place where they now live and where they have eighty acres iinder 
cultivation and in a high state of improvement, ilr. and Mrs. Jones 
have two children : Golda, a graduate of the common schools, is the 
wife of Russell Ring. Ivan, who farms a mile south and two miles 
east of Burkett, married Roxie Kuhn. Mrs. Jones is a member of the 
United Brethren Church. In politics he is a democrat, but is satis- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 455 

fied to cast his vote, and has no desire for local office. He lives very 
busily, looking after his live stock and crops, and is also a stockholder 
in the Bank of Seward and is one of the directors, and is a stock- 
holder in the Equity Union Elevator at Burket. 

Ulysses B. Howard is one of the business men of constructive 
mold and special energy who are giving life and vitality to affairs at 
Burket. He is a business man, though he could be justly classified 
as a farmer, and it is to agriculture that he devotes most of his time. 
He is also one of the local bankers, and for many years was a railway 
man. He comes of a good old Indiana family, but his prosperity has 
been almost entirely the result of his efforts and well directed energies. 

Mr. Howard was born in Whitle.y Count.v, Indiana, April 11, 
1862, son of Daniel and Margaret (Blaine) Howard. His father was 
a native of Pennsylvania and his mother of Ohio. His mother was 
brought to Indiana when two yeai-s old and his father came here 
when about twenty-two. Daniel" Howard learned the trade of black- 
smith, and in 1862 enlisted in Company B of the Seventy-Fourth In- 
diana Infantry. He served until the end of the war, was a private, 
and a large part of the time was assigned to dut.y as a regimental 
blacksmith. After the war he returned to Whitley County, and in 
1883 moved to Kosciusko County, and was the honest village black- 
smith in Burket until his death in 1912. His wife passed away in 
1908. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he 
was a republican and member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
In their family were eight children, all of whom are still living. It 
is noteworth}^ that Daniel Howard, who died at a good old age, was 
the first break in the circle of thirteen children, the sons and daugh- 
ters of his father. The eight children of Daniel Howard are : Ulysses 
B. ; Cora, wife of Frank Vaneuren ; Dora, wife of S. R. Bunch ; Cur- 
tis, who lives in Northern Indiana ; Milo, a farmer in Seward Town- 
ship ; Stella, wife of Oscar Johnson ; James, a farmer in Seward 
Township ; Raymond, of Burket. 

U. B. Howard lived in Whitley County until he was twenty years 
of age, and while there gained his education in the district schools. 
Even prior to that he had worked at monthly wages and he early 
learned how to rely upon himself. December 29, 1887, at the age of 
twenty-five, he married Miss Edith Meyer, member of an old and well 
known family of Kosciusko County. She is a daughter of Aaron and 
Susanna H. (Dreisbach) Meyer. Her father was born in Lancaster 
County, Pennsylvania, and her mother was a native of the same 
state. Her mother was brought to Kosciusko County when a girl of 
twelve and her father came here at the age of twenty-one. In 1854 
they settled in Kosciusko County. Mrs. Howard was, reared in Sew- 
ard Township. 

After their marriage they began housekeeping at Hammond, In- 
diana, and soon afterwards moved to Chicago, where Mr. Howard 
went to work as a depot employe of one of the railroads. He was 
in the service of one company for thirteen years, and that service was 
(Jharaeterized by diligence and complete faithfulness to all the inter- 



456 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

ests of the corporation. It was with what he had earned and saved 
while in the city that he returned to Kosciusko County and bought 
his original farm of seventy-three and a third acres. In 1915 he 
acquired still more land, so that his present place, located a half-mile 
north of Burket, contains 116 2-3 acres. This is the farm and the 
home which reflects in large degree the substantial work of Mr. How- 
ard. He is also one of the directors of the Bank of Seward and in poli- 
tics is a republican. 

He and his wife have three sons. Cecil, a graduate of the Burket 
and Warsaw High Schools, is a graduate civil engineer from Purdue 
University, being now connected with the Smith Construction Com- 
pany at Detroit. Claude is also a high school graduate, and Homer, 
the youngest son, is now proprietor of the principal garage at Burket. 
Mrs. Howard is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

J. Warren Coleman. The county has had no more energetic and 
better citizen during the past forty years than J. Warren Coleman 
of Warsaw. Far and wide over this section of the state he is known 
as a capable insurance man, and has been the principal factor in 
making the Ohio Farmers Insurance Company one of the most im- 
portant conservatoi-s against fire losses in Kosciusko County. Out- 
side of his private business his name is closely associated with the 
organized welfare and progress movement in Warsaw. 

While not himself a native of Kosciusko County, he belongs to a 
family which may justly be considered among Indiana's pioneers. 
His grandfather, Daniel Coleman, settled in Allen Countj', this 
state, at a period when wild Indians were more plentiful than white 
men. In the course of years he acquired extensive holdings in real 
estate and was very intimately identified with the early history of 
the county of which Fort Wa\me is the metropolis. His son Augus- 
tus, father of J. Warren, spent his youth and early manhood after 
the manner of pioneer boys in northwest Indiana, and married Sarah 
M. Whittaker. In the fall of 1861 he offered his services in defense 
of the Union and was enrolled in the Forty-Fourth Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry. His service was brief. On April 4, 1862, he died 
from exposure while siiffering from an attack of the black measles. 
Two of his four children are still living. His widow aftei-wards 
married Robert Anderson and had two children by that union. 

J. Warren Coleman spent his early life on a farm in Allen County, 
and while thus engaged he enjoyed such advantages as the local 
district schools were able to bestow. In 1869, when rising to man- 
hood, he went to Logansport and for five years was employed in a 
lumber yard there, and that was the basis of his business experience. 
Afterwards, with his brother Louis F., he operated the old home- 
stead for one year, and the two then bought a fruit farm on Tippe- 
canoe Lake in Kosciusko County. 

From the scenes of country life Mr. Coleman in 1878 moved to 
Warsaw and engaged in the general insurance business. This has 
been his line for the past thirty-eight years, and he is probably the 
oldest man in the business in this section of Indiana. After twelve 




^^^^/^^(^-tCc.,-*-,..*^^ 



HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 457 

years he became general agent for the Ohio Farmers Insurance 
Company, and has now held that post and looked after local business 
for the company for a quarter of a century. In the meantime he has 
placed and adjusted millions of dollars of insurance. 

In many ways the wise counsel and material aid of Mr. Coleman 
have been utilized for the good of the community. For fifteeiir years 
he was a member of the city Board of Education, twelve .rears of 
that time serving as president of the body, and under his adminis- 
tration there was a wise provision for the local schools and in many 
directions a distinct advance and improvement. To no one organiza- 
tion does the county seat owe more for its present prosperity than 
the Warsaw Chamber of Commerce, and it should be noted that Mr. 
Coleman was one of the leading spirits in its organization, was a 
liberal contributor to its campaigns, and has always been a director 
since it was established. It was largely his idea and his active leader- 
ship that brought about the construction of the present splendid 
home for the Knights of Pythias at "Warsaw. He is a member of 
both the Knights of Pythias and the Improved Order of Red Men, 
and in politics is a republican. 

On October 22, 1874, Mr. Coleman married Miss Mary Aman. 
They became the parents of two children : Eugene A. and Mabel C. 
The daughter is the wife of Cyrus Hall, a banker of Leesburg, In- 
diana. 

The son, Eugene A., was born August 16, 1876, and acquii'ed his 
education in the public schools of Warsaw, at Notre Dame Univer- 
sity and in Otterbein College. Just prior to graduation from the 
latter institution, which however, subsequently awarded him his 
diploma, war with Spain was declared and he left school to become 
a member of Company H, One Hundred and Sixtieth Indiana In- 
fantry. At Matanzas, Cuba, he was employed as clerical aide to 
General Sanger. After the war was over he joined his father in the 
insurance business. When life was at its brightest, possessed of loyal 
friends, with wife and child, a beautiful new home, with every 
incentive to live, he was stricken by disease and died in 1910. His 
wife before her marriage was Miss Flora Hall, and their only child 
was named Eugenia. Eugene A Coleman, whose brief but pro- 
ductive career should long be cherished, was identified with the 
United Brethren Church, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Fred A. McSherey is a native of Kosciusko County, and for over 
thirty years has applied his energies to the business of farming and 
stock raising, and is easily one of the most substantial business men 
and citizens of Seward Township. His farm home is on Rural Route 
No. 4 out of Claypool, three and a half miles west and a mile and 
three-quarters north of that town. Mr. McSherry's interests are not 
alone identified with the farm, since his operations as a stock buyer 
and feeder have brought him high standing among the stock men 
of this section of the state, and he is one of the leading shippers out 
of Burket. 



458 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Mr. MeSherry was born on the farm where he now resides August 
28, 1867, and is the only sur\'iving child of Frederick and Elizabeth 
(Wilks) MeSherry. His father was a native of Ohio and his mother 
of Pennsylvania. His father was brought to Kosciusko County when 
three years old and grew up here. The mother came to Indiana when 
a young woman, and she and her husband were married in this county. 
They spent their lives here as practical and successful farmers. They 
were devout members of the United Brethren Church and Frederick 
MeSherry was a republican in politics. He and his son owned 458 
acres in Seward Township, and that estate is the basis of the son's 
enterprise as a farmer and stockman today. There were five chil- 
dren in the family, but four of them died while young. 

Fred A. MeSherry, after getting his education in the local schools, 
became his father's assistant on the farm, and gradually from year to 
year assumed more of its responsibilities, and since the death of his 
parents has been its owner and proprietor. He buys stock in car- 
load lots and practically all the resources of his farm are turned 
toward the raising of meat for the market. 

Mr. MeSherry married Dora Tucker, a native of this county, 
who was educated in the schools of Burket. To their union were 
born eleven children, ten of whom are still living: Lillie, wife of 
Robert Chinworth of Warsaw; Clancy, a gi-aduate of Burket High 
School, who is married and lives on the home farm in Seward Town- 
ship ; Charles, a graduate of the Burket High School, and now a 
soldier in tlie United States Army : Fjy, a graduate of the Burket 
High School and a teacher ; ilary, John and Edith, all high school 
students ; Catherine, who is in the seventh grade of the public schools ; 
Dorothj- ; Paul, deceased ; and Wilbur. In political faith Mr. Me- 
Sherry is a republican. 

William Hanes. Of the men who have made farming and the 
management of land and its resources their chief business in life, it 
is a special pleasure to refer to William Hanes, proprietor of the 
Sugar Lane Farm of 2D0 acres, situated four miles northwest of Sil- 
ver Lake in Seward Township. Mr. Hanes is an old timer of this 
community, has lived here all his life, and his boyhood strength and 
enthusiasm were contributed to the sum total of laboi-s by which 
his family succeeded in the heavy pioneer task of developing a por- 
tion of Kosciusko County's original wilderness. 

The Sugar Lane Farm was the old Hanes homestead where he was 
born ]\Iarch 19, 1849, a son of John A. and Catherine (Good) Hanes. 
Catherine Good was a native of Perry County, Ohio, daughter of 
Jacob and Hannah (Hoffman) Good, who were originally from Penn- 
sylvania and were settlers in Franklin Township of Kosciusko County 
about 1840. John A. Hanes in 1844, as a young man, moved from 
Hancock County, Ohio, to Kosciusko County, and lie married Cath- 
erine Good January 6, 1846. In the same year he located on the old 
Hanes homestead, and he made his home there imtil the death of his 
wife. John A. Hanes died at Terre Haute, Indiana. For his second 
wife he married Mary Moore, and there were six children bv each 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 450 

marriage. The six by his first wife, Catherine Good, were : Emeline, 
William, George, MaVy E., Leander and Catherine. 

Of these the only one still living is William Hanes. While a boy 
on the farm he attended the local schools and made such good use 
of his advantages that he entered the profession of teaching and fol- 
lowed it for ten winters. At the age of sixteen he tried to get into 
the nation's service as a soldier in the Civil War, which was then 
nearing its conclusion, but was rejected on account of his age. 

In December, 1874, Mr. Hanes married Miss Elizabeth Stout, 
who was born in Ohio and was brought to this county by her parents. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hanes have three children : Luella, who died in child- 
hood; Charles V., who lives on the home farm and married Nora Shoe- 
maker and Roy E., a graduate of the Silver Lake High School, and 
now in the dry goods business at Silver Lake, married Opal Kirland. 

Mr. Hanes' many years ago bought the old Hanes homestead and 
has kept it in a perfect condition of cultivation and improvement 
so that it is widely known for its crops and live stock. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hanes are members of the United Brethren Church, and he is a 
republican, without any aspirations for holding office. 

Joseph Smalley is one of Kosciusko County 's well known citizens 
who started life with no particular advantages or assets, and by 
thrift and industrj' has gradually accumulated those means which 
represent financial independence. Mr. Smalley has been a resident 
of this county over thirty-five j-ears, owns a farm, but in 1918 re- 
tired to a town home at Burket. 

Mr. Smalley was born in Noble County, Indiana, January 31, 
1842, a son of David and Margaret (Shoab) Smalley. The grand- 
father, Joseph Smalley, a native of Ohio, was a pioneer to Noble 
County, Indiana, going there about 1830, and enduring all the hard- 
ships and vicissitudes connected with the task of making a home in 
a wilderness. David Smalley grew up in Noble County, attended 
public school as opportunity offered, and after his marriage settled 
down to farming and made that his lifelong home. He and his wife 
had three children : Melissa, who never married and died at the 
age of seventy-four; Jacob, who lives on the old homestead and is a 
stock buyer; and Joseph. 

Joseph Smalley lived with his parents until he was grown, and 
his early youth was one of companionship with labor and without 
ready access to those liberalizing advantages of schools. On Novem- 
ber 17, 1871, he married Miss Mary Bybee, member of one of the 
oldest and most prominent families of Kosciusko County. Her father, 
Washington Bybee, was at one time county commissioner and was on 
the board when the court house was erected. Mrs. Smalley grew up 
on her father's farm in Franklin Township and was educated in the 
common schools. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Smalley lived 
for thirteen years in Noble County, but in 1882 moved to their farm 
of 160 acres,' half in Franklin and half in Seward townships. This 
property they still own, and Mr. Smalley also has a half interest in 



460 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

144 acres in Noble County. He is a republican in politics and Mrs. 
Smalley is a member of the United Brethren Church. 

Of their children two are deceased. Those still living are : Harry, 
who lives on a farm and man-ied Miss Borton; Gertrude, wife of 
Frank Bear, a farmer; and Lucinda, unmarried. 

George W. Bouse is one of the capable farmers and stock raisers 
of Kosciusko County, made his start in life at an early age, worked 
at one time for farmers at wages of $3 a month, and by thrift, energy 
and foresight has accomplished what most men desire, the establish- 
ment of a good home, a fair degree of prosperity, and has reared a 
family and kept all of his relations to his friends and his community 
honorable and straightforward. 

Mr. Bouse who lives on a farm in Seward Township four and a 
half miles northwest of Silver Lake, was born in Fulton County, In- 
diana, February 13, 1866, a son of John and Mary A. (Worley) 
Bouse. His father was born in Germany and his real name was John 
Prince. Brought to this country as an infant, his parents soon 
died and he was adopted and carefully reared by John Bouse, whose 
name he took. After reaching manhood, and with a very limited 
education, he began to carve out his own destiny. He married Mary 
A. Worley, a native of Ohio, and they began housekeeping in circum- 
stances just above the level of poverty, but by day labor, by thrift 
and economy, they got a start and finally secured a pieee of land in 
Monroe Township of Kosciusko County, where in the course of time 
they developed a good home. They did an excellent part by their 
children, twelve in number, nine of whom are still living: Cather- 
ine, wife of Ben Perry ; Nancy, wife of Jake Hulban ; Tena, wife of 
Charles Near ; Lydia, wife of A. J. Packer ; Harvey, a farmer ; Wil- 
liam, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, and is employed by the United 
States Government ; OUie, wife of James Craig, of Monroe Town- 
ship ; Dessie, wife of Al Cook of McCook, Nebraska ; and George W. 

George W. Bouse grew up on his father's farm in Monroe Town- 
ship, and left school at the age of eleven to begin work to support 
himself. Some of his early employment was with farmers in Seward 
Township, where he now lives. He gained the reputation of being 
hard working, honest and a thrifty young man, and that reputation 
was his principal capital when he married and settled down to achieve 
independence. Mr. Bouse is now the owner of 130 acres of land, 
most of which represents his individual efforts and striving, and he 
has been a very successful breeder of Shorthorn cattle and Belgian 
horses. He is a democrat in politics and he and his family are iden- 
tified with the United Brethren Church at Yellow Creek Lake. 

Mr. Bouse married for his first wife Miss Wava Mattix. She died 
the mother of two children, the only one now living being Walter, 
who is a graduate of the high school at Claypool. For his present 
wife Mr. Bouse married Etta Miller. They have two children, Alton 
D., born in 1915, and Lauretta, born October 6, 1917. 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 461 

Orven a. Heighway. A well situated and eireumstaneed farmer 
and stockman of Franklin Township is Orven A. Heighway, pro- 
prietor of the "Hillside Home" in section 26. Mr. Heighway is one of 
the vigorous and hustling younger men in the farming industry of ' 
Kosciusko County and has already reached a most satisfactory stage 
of progress, though doubtless the most fruitful j^ears of his life is 
still ahead of him. 

Mr. Heighway was born in Newcastle Township of Pulton County, 
Indiana, August 23, 1883. His parents were Empson A. and Keziah 
(Teel) Heighway, his father a native of Ohio and his mother of 
Franklin Township, Kosciusko County. Empson A. Heighway was 
born in Ohio, was reared in Illinois, and moved to Indiana when a 
boy, and after his marriage lived in Kosciusko County for a time and 
then settled in Pulton County, near Akron. He and his wife are 
members of the Church of Christ, and in politics he is a republican. 
There are six children in the family : Leslie M., a telegraph operator 
at Bluffton, Ohio; Charles W., of Plymouth, Indiana; Mary C, un- 
married; Maggie A., wife of Sidney Leininger; Cora, who died in 
infancy; and Orven A. 

Orven A. Heighway grew up on his father's farm in Fulton 
County and was educated in the district schools. He lived at home 
until he married in 1904 Miss Nellie M. Black. She is a daughter of 
John R. and Lueinda Black, both now residing in Montone. After 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Heighway lived for a year on the Black 
farm and then came to their present place, where they have 120 acres, 
and this land has responded magnificently in crops and products to 
their management and labors. 

Mr. and Mrs. Heighway had four children : Edith, Prances, 
now deceased, Robert and Wanda. The family are members of the 
United Brethren Church at Beaver Dam, of which Mr. Heighway is 
a trustee and secretary and treasurer. He carries insurance in" the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and also in the Farmers National Life. 
In politics he votes as a republican, and has served as a member of 
the Township Advisory Board. 

Theron D. Butterbattgh is one of the men of distinction living 
on the extreme southern line of Kosciusko County, his farm and home 
being in the southeast quarter of section 14, Lake Township, adjoin- 
ing the Wabash County line and only a mile or so from the Big 
Pour Railway. Mr. Butterbaugh has a fine farm and is also a man 
of education and of leadership in civic aifairs and is an ordained 
minister of the Church of the Brethren. His home is 51/2 miles south- 
east of Silver Lake. 

Mr. Butterbaugh was born in Pleasant Township of Wabash 
County June 18, 1872, a son of George W. and Lydia (Miller) But- 
terbaugh. His father was born in section 14 of Lake Township 
September 28, 1846. The Butterbaugh families were pioneers here, 
coming to the county about 1840. The wife of George W. Butter- 
baugh was born in Pleasant Township of Wabash County October 17, 
1848. Both grew up in that locality, married there, settled in Wabash 



462 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

County and later in Lake Township of this county, where they owned 
185 acres close to North Manchester. They lived on that farm home 
thirty years and then bought a small farm where the widow is still 
living. There were three sons in the family. Theron D. ; Abraham, 
a resident of North Manchester ; and Esta, a well known citizen and 
business man of Warsaw, auditor and a stockholder in the Hugo 
Manufacturing Company of that city. 

Theron D. Butterbaugh was reared on the farm near North Man- 
chester and made for himself unusual opportunities in the way of an 
education. He is a graduate of the Bible department of the North 
Manchester College, and also attended the Indiana State Normal 
School at Terre Haute. Most of his experience has beeii in practical 
farming and on January 20, 1895, he married Miss Mary E. Wright. 
She was born in Manchester Township of Wabash County July 12, 
1876. 

Five years after their marriage Mi*, and Mrs. Butterbaugh located 
on the farm where they now reside, and where Mr. Butterbaugh owns 
the southeast quarter of section 14. He is engaged in general farming 
and stock raising. He has been an ordained minister of the Church of 
the Brethern since December, 1913, and now has charge of the West 
Eel River Church and does considerable evangelical work. Politi- 
cally he is a republican. 

Mr. and Mrs. Butterbaugh have seven children: Hazel M., a 
graduate of North Manchester, now in Bethany Bible School in Chi- 
cago preparing for foreign missionary work ; Rubie M., wife of Russell 
E. Werking, of Wabash County; Robert E., attending high school, 
as is the next child, Delbei-t W. ; James D. and Paul R., twins, born 
in 1910; and Mariam Lucile, born in January, 1917. 

William S. Person. The people of Pi-airie Township know Wil- 
liam S. Person as a most capable farmer, a citizen who responds to 
all the duties and obligations of his community, and a very straight- 
forward and capable official, now serving as trustee of the township. 
Many declare that the affairs of the township were never better man- 
aged than by the present trustee. 

Mr. Person was born in this township October 7, 1871, and has 
spent most of his life here. His present home farm is a mile west 
and a mile north of Atwood. His parents were William and Marga- 
ret (McCutcheon) Person, both now deceased. His father was born 
at Richmond, Indiana, in May, 1830, and when he was a small child 
his parents moved to LaPorte Count}', Indiana, where he grew to 
manhood. Margaret McCutcheon was born in Pennsylvania Febru- 
aiy 14, 1840, and came with her parents to Liberty Mills in Wabash 
Count}'. She married at the age of fourteen. She reared in her 
home after her marriage her baby brother, who later ran off and 
unlisted as a soldier in the Civil war. He made a record as a brave 
and gallant soldier, and is still living, a very capable business man. 
After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. William Person lived at Liberty 
Mills for several years and then moved to Collamer in Whitley County, 
where he established the first grocery store. Margaret Person was an 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 463 

active member of the United Brethren Church. They had a family of 
five sons and one daughter : Charles, of Bourbon, Indiana ; Edward, 
of Atwood ; Benjamin, of Bourbon ; Sarah, wife of Frank Henderson, 
of Warsaw; William S. ; and Rollie E., of North Dakota. 

William S. Person grew up on the farm where he still lives and 
acquired an education in the district schools, attending school in the 
winter and working on the farm in the summer. After leaving school 
he took employment with a neighboring farmer and spent six years in 
his service. 

In November, 1894, he married Miss Ida Mangus. She was born 
in St. Joseph County, Indiana, and was educated in the common 
schools of Kosciusko County, where her parents located when she was 
a small girl. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Person engaged in 
farming, and now have a place of fine improvements comprising sev- 
enty-five acres. Mr. Person is a successful stock raiser and has a 
number of graded Durham cattle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Person are the parents of four sons and one daugh- 
ter: Hershel, a graduate of the common schools, is now with the 
American Armies in France ; Hobard also finished the common school 
course and lives at Fort Wayne. Harley lives at home. Emma is a 
senior in high school, and the youngest, William, was born in 1913. 
Mr. Person is affiliated with Atwood Lodge No. 493, Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, of which he is the present Noble Grand. He is a 
republican in politics and has been one of the active leaders in local 
politics for a number of years. For fourteen years he served as su- 
pervisor, and in 1914 was elected township trustee, beginning his 
duties in January, 1915. 

S. B. Iden. Probably the only bank in the State of Indiana that 
is owned and managed from president to assistant cashier by one fam- 
ily is the Etna Bank at Etna Green. All the offices in this institution 
are held by persons named Iden. S. B. Iden is president, Mrs. S. B. 
Iden is vice president, the cashier is their daughter Altha M., the two 
assistant cashiers are also other daughters, Mary A. and Amy J. The 
Etna Bank was established in 1900, and supplies the only banking fa- 
cilities of the town of Etna Green. It has a capital of $20,000, sur- 
plus of $10,000, and a recent statement indicates that its deposits ag- 
gregate more than $300,000. all of which is a most creditable showing 
for a country bank, and indicates the confidence the people of that 
part of Kosciusko County have in the personnel of its management 
and ownership. 

Mr. Iden has been a resident of Kosciusko County since early 
childhood. He was born in Carroll County, Ohio, May 21, 1860, "a 
son of Washington and Eliza (Heston) Iden, and a grandson of 
George Iden. Both his parents were born in Carroll County, Ohio, 
Washington Iden in 1815 and his mother in 1818. They were reared 
and married in that county, lived on a farm there for" a number of 
years, and in 1864 brought their family to Etna Township of Kos- 
ciusko County and established a new home on a farm north of Etna 
Green. Washington Iden was one of the most capable fanners of his 



464 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

time. He was as progi-essive and ready to adopt new ideas as he was 
diligent and capable in routine affairs. He is credited with having 
introduced into this part of Kosciusko Countj- the tii-st Poland China 
hogs and the first Durham cattle. At one time he was president of 
the Bourbon Fair in Marshall County. His name also appears on 
some of the older official lists of the township. For a number of years 
he was township assessor. He began voting as a whig, and east a 
ballot for General William Henry Harrison. Later he was equally 
active in the republican party. He and his wife were members of 
the Christian Chiirch. They were the parents of eleven children, and 
seven are still living. The father died in 1903. The son Thomas J. 
lives in Iowa, while John, William A., L. A., Florence and S. B. are 
all residents of Etna Township. Mary C. is married and lives in New 
Mexico. 

S. B. Iden was four years old when brought to Kosciusko County, 
and here he attended the district schools of his home to^vnship, also 
the schools at Warsaw, and early qualified for work as a teacher. For 
ten yeai-s he taught school in different parts of the county, and after 
giving up that vocation took up the business of stock buying. Since 
the establishment of the Etna Bank he has concentrated his principal 
time and energies upon its management, and in 1910 erected the sub- 
stantial building in which the bank has its home. 

Mr. Iden lived at home with his parents until he was thirty 
years of age. February 15, 1891. he married ]Miss Viola Yeiter. She 
was born in Prairie Township of this county, was well educated, and 
had also taught school before her marriage. They have three daugh- 
ters: Altha May, who is a graduate of the Etna Green High School 
and is cashier of the bank ; Mary Avis, who is a high school graduate 
and also attended the State University three years; and Amy J., who 
graduated from the local high school with the class of 19i8 and is 
attending the State Univei-sity. The family are membei-s of the 
Christian Church and ilr. Iden is one of the church trustees. He is 
a loyal republican in politics, and served one term as trustee of Etna 
Township, and for about ten years has been a member of the County 
Council. 

Forrest Knepper has a number of interests to occupy his time 
and energies. He is the present trustee of Etna Township, has lived 
in that community for a number of years and gained a reputation as 
a farmer and stock man, and is one of Kosciusko County 's best kno«ni 
republican leaders. 

He was born in Whitley County, Indiana, Jime 4, 1873, a son of 
Lewis and Matilda (Sevits) Knepper. His parents were both bom 
in Ohio, and their respective families moved to Indiana when they 
were young. After their marriage they settled on a farm in Whitley 
County, but in 1888 moved to Kosciusko County and had their home 
in Etna TowTiship until October, 1917, when they moved to another 
farm in Tippecanoe To^vnship of Marshall County. They are still 
active and have a host of friends in Kosciusko Coimty. They are 
members of the Christian Church and Lewis Knepper is a democrat. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 465 

They had four children. Iva is the wife of Edwin Gay, of Etna 
Township. Dora died at the age of sixteen and Homer died when 
twelve years old. 

Forrest Knepper was fifteen jears old when the family eame to 
Kosciusko County, and he grew to manhood on the farm in Etna 
Township. He acquired a good education, at first in the common 
schools, later in the North Manchester College, and after a normal 
course began teaching at the age of eighteen. For six years teaching 
was his chief occupation. He had also acquired by experience a thor- 
ough knowledge of fanning, and for ten j^ears he worked with an ele- 
vator company at Warsaw, Indiana. 

April 4, 1898, Mr. Knepper married Miss Lucy Towns. She was 
born in Marshall County, Indiana, and is a graduate of the common 
schools. Mr. and Mrs. Knepper have three childi-en, Lucile, Robert 
and Lyudon. Lucile is a graduate of the Etna Green High School, 
attended the Winona School, and is now a teacher in Etna Township. 
Robert is a graduate of the common and high schools and spent one 
year in the State University. Lyndon is attending high school at 
Etna Green. 

The family are members of the Christian Church, and Mr. Knep- 
per is one of its deacons. He is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen 
of America and is a republican in politics. He has served as a mem- 
ber of the county central committee and in his present office as town- 
ship trustee is carefully looking after the welfare of the schools and 
highways, and all the other routine business connected with his 
office. Mr. Knepper has a good farm of 120 acres, and also rents 160 
acres. All this land is devoted to pasturing and the raising of grain 
crops, and he is one of the shippers of livestock out of the county. . 

Chakles C. Johnson has figured prominently in the business af- 
fairs and citizenship of Etna Green and Etna Township for many 
years. His present work in relationship to the community is as gen- 
eral farmer and stock raiser, his home being a quarter of a mile east 
of Etna Green. 

Mr. Johnson was bom in Stark County, Ohio, August 6, 1862, a 
son of Daniel and Jane (Brush) John.son. His father was born in 
Pennsylvania September 14, 1837, and his mother in New York state 
April 10, 1836. Both are still living and both are past the age of 
eighty years. They grew up from childhood in Stark County, were 
married there, and in 1874 moved to Kosciusko County and located 
south of Etna Green. They continued to live in that farming com- 
munity until 1892, when they moved into the village of Etna Green, 
where they are still living. Daniel Joknson owns 194 acres of well 
cultivated land in Etna Township. He is a republican voter and a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. There were four chil- 
dren in the family: Florence M., wife of Douglas Senour; Charles 
C. ; Oscar A., who married Lulu Shenefield and lives south of Etna 
Green ; and Daniel C, who died in fancy. 

Mr. Charles C. Johnson grew up on the old farm and obtained a 



466 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

good education in the local schools. He worked on the farm and 
lived with his parents to the age of twenty-two. 

December 9, 1887, he married Miss Cora A. Catell, who was born 
in Kosciusko County, June 2, 1865, daughter of Joseph B. and Alice 
(Garwood) Catell. Mrs. Johnson has spent practically all her life 
in Kosciusko County. After their marriage they farmed his father's 
farm two years, then lived on Mi's. Johnson's father's farm for a 
year and another year on the Senour farm. After this experience as a 
practical agriculturist Mr. Johnson went to Etna Green and became 
identified with the company as a partner operating the local flour 
milling industry, elevator and lumber yard. He was a factor in that 
business for seven years, at the end of which time he sold out his 
interests and resumed farming, though he made his home in the vil- 
lage for three years longer. He moved to his present farm in 1901. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have two children; Ethel J. is a graduate 
of the Etna Green High School, and is still at home. Charles H. was 
born November 5, 1905, and is still a school boy. The familj^ are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and Mr. Johnson is on 
its official board. Politically he is a republican. 

Charles A. Kintzel. The people of Kosciusko County know 
Charles A. Kintzel particularly for his very efficient service as sherifl: 
of the county, and many remember the fact that he was at the time of 
his election the j'oungest sheriff the county ever had. Aside from 
his activity in public affairs he has for many years been one of the 
successful and progressive farmers of Etna Township, and since 
leaving the court house has resumed farming on his place three- 
quarters of a mile north of Etna Green. 

Mr. Kintzel was born in Prairie Township, February 15, 1871, a 
son of Christian and Mary (Anglin) Kintzel. While he is of Ger- 
man ancestry, his people have been Americans for more than a cen- 
tury, in fact since the colonial period in Pennsylvania. 

David Kintzel, grandfather of Charles A., was a tanner by trade 
and owned and operated two tanneries in Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried ]\Iary Rathfang. and they had ten children, including Christian 
Kintzel, father of Charles A. In 1865 David Kintzel brought his 
family to Kosciusko County. Christian Kintzel was born near Har- 
risburg, Pennsylvania, in 1848, and was still a youth when the family 
came to Kosciusko County. He grew up in Prairie Township, and 
after his marriage moved to Etna Township, southeast of Etna 
Green, and that locality is still his home. He is a republican in poli- 
tics. His first wife died in February, 1871, her only child being 
Charles A. Kintzel. 

Charles A. Kintzel grew up on his father's farm, but was reared 
principally in the home of his grandparents and uncles. He had a 
common school education, and on January 3, 1891, he married Minnie 
B. Silvius. She was born in Etna Township March 3, 1873, daughter 
of Jacob and Emma (Hershner) Silvius. After their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Kintzel lived for a time on the Silvius farm, and then 
moved to another place, which they occupied for a time, following 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 467 

which they bought the eighty acres where they still reside. Mr. Kiut- 
zel gave all his time to his farming and stock raising until elected to 
the oiSee of sheriff in 1910. His tenn of service ran until January 

1, 1915, at which time he returned to the fann. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kintzel have one daughter, Erma C, born October 

2, 1899, and now a student in the Indiana Central University at In- 
dianapolis, specializing in music. The family are members of the 
United Brethren Church. Mr. Kintzel is affiliated with the Warsaw 
Lodge of Odd Fellows, and is a republican, and lias served as county 
chairman of his party. 

G. A. McClure. Kosciusko County has few large farms in the 
sense of states further west, and the possession of a section of land 
here gives its owner special distinction. During the past seventy or 
eighty years some of the largest and choicest tracts of fann land 
in the county have been owned by the McClures. One of this fam- 
ily is G. A. McClure, widely known as proprietor of the Bonnie 
Brae's Stock Farm, consisting of 600 acres, located three miles west 
of Silver Lake in Seward Township. 

Before further mention of Mr. McClure and his activities it is 
proper to take up the career of his honored father, the late Elias 
McClure, whose experiences furnish material for almost a chapter 
of valuable history of this locality. 

Elias McClure was born in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, Jan- 
ary 18, 1813, a son of Samuel and Eliza (Edwards) McClure, the 
former a native of Ireland and the latter of Scotland. After the 
death of Samuel McClure the widowed mother took her two sons, 
Elias and Robert E., to Ontario County, New York, and there she 
married a second husband. Largely on account of the early death 
of his father Elias McClure became dependent upon his own re- 
sources when a very small boy. He worked on a farm at $3 a month, 
and when this wage was increased to $14 it was the highest sum paid 
in that locality for farm labor. In the meantime he gained his edu- 
cation by the most strenuous efforts and self denial. While attend- 
ing district schools he did chores for his board, these chores includ- 
ing the milking of 12 cows, the feeding of 150 head of cattle and 
attending to several teams night and morning. At the age of four- 
teen he had become a capitalist. He loaned his employer $102, and 
soon afterwards experienced a sample of ingratitude when, hav- 
ing met with an accident and broken both his legs, he was thrown 
upon the care of the town, since his employer failed to repay the 
loan. He gradually worked back and accumulated several hundred 
dollars. 

Elias JlcClure first came to Kosciusko County in 1837, and en- 
tered 440 acres. This land was chiefly in Seward Township. Three 
months later he went to Michigan and from there returned to New 
York and spent one year as a student in an academy. He was well 
educated, and taught school several winter terms, working on farms 
during the summer. 

In 1840 Elias McClure married Miss Mary Freeman, who was 



468 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

l>orn at Rochester, New York, when that citj' contained only three 
houses. Her birth occurred September 30, 1822. After his mar- 
riage Elias IMcClure rented a farm for four years, but in 1844 
brought his wife and two sons, Andrew E. and Gideon C, to Kos- 
ciusko County, and they followed the lake and river route as far as 
Wabash and from there attempted to come overland with wagon 
and team. The roads were in a deplorable condition, and both he 
and his wife walked most of the way, carrying a child, and for miles 
they were in mud and water up to their knees. They spent one 
night at the home of a settler, and such was the scarcity of money 
in those days Elias McClure did not have enough to pay the nominal 
sum of 25 cents charged for his lodging. But he kept the debt in 
mind and promptly paid it some weeks later when he met his enter- 
tainer at a house raising. Arriving at his own land in section 3 of 
Seward To^vnship, Elias McClure erected a simple log cabin, which 
at fii-st contained neither dooi-s nor windows. "With various modi- 
fications and improvements this house sheltered the family for 
twenty-three years. Not a little pj-ejudiee existed again.st Elias Mc- 
Clure because he was a Yankee, and some of the neighbors expressed 
themselves as sorry that a lazy Yankee had come into the community 
instead of a good honest Dutchman. The first team he ever had 
consisted of a yoke of cattle and when one of the steers died this 
prejudice against the Yankee found expression, and it was diffi- 
cult for him to get credit for another animal. But in the coui-se 
of years this prejudice died down because he was not only extremely 
industrious but was honest and scrupulous to the la.st penny. His 
hard work rapidly broadened the area of cultivation surrounding 
his pioneer home, and his increasing prosperity enabled him to ac- 
cumulate land until at one time he was the owner of 3,000 acres. 
In 1867 he moved his family across the road from the old log house 
into a commodious and comfortable frame building. While he was 
always extremely adverse to holding any political office, he was 
devoted to the welfare of the locality and its moral and religious 
advancement. For a number of terms he served as trustee of Se- 
ward Township. 

At the time of his death, January 1, 1906, Elias McClure was 
one of the oldest men in Kosciusko County. He lacked only seven 
years in reaching the century mark in life. His good wife passed 
away January 20, 1892. They had a large family of children named 
Andrew E.. Gideon C, Phoebe E., Emma A., Mary, Gain A.. Alma 
and Pluuket. Both Andrew and Gideon were soldiers of the Union 
armj- and were captured. Andrew returned home, but Gideon was 
practically starved to death while a prisoner at Anderson\'ille. 

It was in the old log home of his father in section 3 of Seward 
Township that G. A. IMcClure was bom October 4. 1858. Of his 
lirothei-s and sistei-s only two are now living, Phoebe, wife of F. M. 
Jacques, of Lake Township, and Alma, wife of Levi Yount, of Se- 
ward Township. 

Mr. McClure grew up on the home farm, and besides the dis- 
trict schools spent three years in high school. He has always been 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 469 

identified with farming and stock raising, and usually on a large 
scale. He is well known as a breeder of Polled Durham and Short- 
horn cattle, and the stock that grows to maturity on his farm com- 
mands a ready sale, not only at the commercial markets but with 
the farmers and stock men who desire such blood for breeding pur- 
poses Mr. McClure is a stanch republican, and was trustee of Se- 
ward Township in 1903-04. His splendidly adapted farm of 600 
acres is all in one body, and its improvements and facilities are of 
the very best. He and" his wife are members of the United Brethren 

Mr. MeClure married Zadie V. Light, daughter of Peter S. and 
.lerusha (Garvin) Light. Mrs. McClure 's maternal grandfather, 
James Garvin, came to Seward Township in 1835, and Jerusha Gar- 
vin was the first white child born in that township. Her birth 
occurred September 30, 1839. Jerusha Garvin and Peter S. Light 
were married November 12, 18.57. Of their four children only two 
are now living, Mrs. MeClure and Minerva J., of Peru, Indiana. 
James Garvin became a prominent man in this county, was a repre- 
sentative in the Legislature during 1849-50 and was a leader in the 
democratic partv. Mr. and Mrs. Garvin were very religious people, 
belonging to the Baptist Church, and in early days opened their house 
for woi-ship until the people were able to erect churches. 

Joseph W. Light, an old and respected pioneer of Kosciusko County, 
was born in Virginia, August 25, 1803. He with his parents came to 
Ohio in mere childhood and there he grew to manhood. He was 
married, September 24, 1829, to Martha Dunn, a native of Ohio, born 
in 1808. To this union were born seven children : Rachel, Simraion, 
Peter S., Ruben, Virginia and America (twins), and one child that 
died in infancy. Virginia, now Mrs. William Banning of Marion, 
Michigan, is tlie only one of the family living. Mr. Light with his 
family moved to Kosciusko County, Indiana, in 1843, and bought 320 
acres of land in Tippecanoe Township. 

Having learned the carpenter trade in his youth and not liking 
agricultural work he followed his profession. He was a master me- 
chanic of his day and could make anything in wood and was called 
all over the couiitv to build the better houses. He and his wife were 
members of the Baptist Church at Oswego and he was a deacon in 
the church. He was a stanch republican and filled at different times 
some minor offices. He was a lover of his country and named his 
twins after his native state and country. 

Martha Light, his wife, departed this life November 17, 1865, and 
he died January 12, 1880. 

Mr. and Mrs. McClure have one daughter, Theressa, born Febru- 
ary 28, 1890, and a graduate of St. Mary of the Woods near Terre 
Haute. She is now the wife of George Davis of Philadelphia. Be- 
sides their own daughter Mr. and Mrs. McClure reared an adopted 
daughter, Mabel L. Sailors, from the age of nine years. She is 
also a gi-aduate of St. Mary of the Woods and of the local high 
school and is now a student of the State University of Indiana. 



470 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Joseph M. Gaskild, of Etna Township, has done much to train 
and educate the boys and girls of this county and those of other sec- 
tions of the state. He has been almost a lifeloiig teacher, and quali- 
fied for that profession after a youth in which he was denied many 
of the advantages of school. Mr. Gaskill is also a fanner, and has 
a well improved place of eighty acres a mile east and four miles north 
of Etna Green. 

He was born at an old log house that is still standing on his farm 
on March 22, 1860, a son of John P. and Anna (Shively) Gaskill. 
His parents were both born in Stark County, Ohio, his father Febi-u- 
ary 29, 1820, and his mother :\Iay 19, 1829. His father died March 
10, 1879, at the age of fifty-nine, and his mother on October 10, 1913, 
aged eighty-five. After their marriage in Stark County they lived 
for a time in Williams County, Ohio, then went to Marshall County, 
Indiana, and in 1850 located on the land now owned by their son 
in Etna Township. The mother was an active member of the Dunk- 
ard Church, while the father was of Quaker faith. His name appears 
on the official list of the to\raship as a trustee. A brief record of 
the children is as follows: Charles W. , a farmer in Kosciusko 
County; Priscilla, widow of William Huffer, living northwest of 
Plymouth; Isaac C, a twin, and one died in infancj^; Joseph M. ; 
John M., who died at the age of four years; and Hannah L. 

Joseph iM. Gaskill grew up on the home farm, and until he was 
seventeen j'ears of age had most limited privileges even in the district 
schools. Most of his education he acquired out of a spelling book, 
and in that branch of the literary art became so proficient that in 
spelling schools far and near he became recognized as one of the 
most redoubtable performers. Later he secured books, read and 
studied at home, and at the age of nineteen began applying his 
meager resources to a higher education. He secured a license to 
teach school, and in the interv-als of teaching attended Valparaiso 
University a number of terms and also the Plymouth Normal. There 
has been practically no year in the past thirty when he has not 
taught part of the time. For nine years he was principal of the 
Etna Green schools, taught thirty-five years in the country schools 
of Etna Township, and has also taught in ^larshall Countv. 

July 5, 1888. Mr. Gaskill married :\Iyrtle Leffel. She "was bom 
near Etna Green, ^March 29, 1868, a daughter of Joseph and Eliza- 
beth (Baker) Leffel. Mrs. Gaskill attended public schools at Etna 
Green when ilr. Gaskill was her teacher. Their only child died in 
infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Gaskill are members of the Christian Church 
at Etna Green. Mr. Gaskill is a Past Noble Grand of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and was formerly identified with the 
Encampment. In politics he is a republican. For a number of years 
he held the office of justice of the peace and has served as president 
of the Board of Trustees of Etna Green, and also treasurer and 
secretary of the town corporation. 

Noble W. Nepf is an able young veterinary surgeon living at 
Milford Junction, and continues the work which was his father's 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 471 

chosen vocation. The Neffs are an old and prominent family of 
Kosciusko and Elkhart counties, and the name has been identified 
with farming, the professional life and the ministry for several 
generations. The Neff family came out of Virginia to Elkhart 
County in pioneer times. 

Noble W. Neff was born at Milford Junction, August 16, 1897, 
a son of James and Mary J. (Miller) NefiE. His father wa.s bom 
in Elkhart County, October 11, 1857, and died June 8, 1917. His 
wife was born November 14, 1857. After their marriage they settled 
on a farm in Elkhart County and later moved to a farm in Kosciusko 
County, finally locating in Milford Junction. James Neff was an 
excellent veterinarian as well as practical farmer, and extensive de- 
mands were made upon his professional service for many years. He 
was active in the Church of the Brethren. There were three children 
in the family : Xoa, an invalid ; Grover C. and Noble W. Grover C. 
Neff has made a name for himself in engineering circles. He grad- 
uated from the Milford High School, and at Purdue University took 
the classical courses leading up to the degrees of A. B. and M. A., 
and is also a graduate civil engineer. For a number of years he has 
been general superintendent of the Southern Wisconsin Power Com- 
pany at Portage, Wisconsin, one of the largest hydraulic enterprises 
in that state. He married May Prehn, a graduate of the Portage 
High School. 

Noble W. Neff grew up at the old home at Milford Junction, was 
educated in the grammar and high schools, and in 1918 received the 
degree Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the Indiana Veterinary 
College. He now carries on his practice and also superintends the 
operation of a farm of eighty acres. He is unmarried and is a 
member of the Church of the Brethren at Bethany. 

Charles H. Petry. A tract of land owned and occupied by 
Mr. Charles H. Petry well justifies its appropriate name as the 
Golden Grain Farm. Mr. Petry understands the business of farm- 
ing in every detail, gets maximum results, and takes pride in keeping 
up his place not only as a means of greater production but also as 
a contribution to the general appearance of the community. The 
Golden Grain Farm is situated four miles south and a mile west of 
Men tone in Franklin Township. Mr. Petry has 160 acres. 

He was born in Richland County, Ohio, May 5, 1867. In Janu- 
ary, 1868, his parents, Jacob and Mary J. (Soveland) Petry, the 
former a native of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and the latter 
of Richland County, Ohio, moved to Kosciusko County and estab- 
lished a home in Franklin Township. Their location was close to 
Beaver Dam Lake, and Jacob Petry besides operating a farm also 
conducted a sawmill for a number of years. He was a very success- 
ful and highly prosperous man, and at the time of his death owned 
231 acres. He and his wife are members of the Church of God, and 
in politics he voted as a democrat. There were four children : 
Charles H. ; Phianna, wife of Horace G. Thomas; Franklin, who 



472 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

married Elvie East and lives at Lowell, Indiana; and John, who 
married Nettie Myer and lives in Charles City, Iowa. 

Charles H. Petrj' was eight months old when brought to Kosciusko 
County, and he has always considered this his home.' He had about 
the average experiences of an Indiana farm boy, attending school 
in winter and helping in the fields in the sunimer. He lived at home 
until his father's death. October 9, 1890, he married Miss Flora 
Loehr, who was born in Harrison Township of this county. 

After their marriage ilr. and Mrs. Petry continued to live at 
the old Petry homestead near Beaver Dam, and while that farm was 
under his management he did much to improve it, erecting a com- 
modious brick house and living in it until December, 1914. At that 
date he sold the old farm and bought his present place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Petry have four children: Feme L., a graduate of 
common and high schools, and has a successful record as a teacher; 
Ruth and Reth, both graduates of the high school, the latter the wife 
of Lester C. Rogers; and Charles G., who is a graduate of high 
school and had the remarkable record of being neither absent nor 
tardy during twelve years of school attendance. He is now connected 
with the brass works at Elkhart. Mr. Peti-y is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge at Akron, Indiana. He is one of the 
influential workers in the democratic party in Franklin Township. 

J. C. Grady is one of the men upon whom the nation can rely 
when it comes to a matter of producing food stuffs in a time of crisis. 
On his farm five miles southeast of Syracuse in Turkey Creek Towni- 
ship he has the reputation of producing more corn and wheat to 
the acre than any other man in that section. He has studied fanning, 
has had a lifelong experience at it, and stopped at nothing short of 
the very best returns and the maximum of efficiency. The raising 
of staple crops is only part of his varied business. He buys and 
feeds cattle and hogs in carload lots, and recently he sent to market 
$9,500 worth of cattle. He has a farm of 184 acres, and he actually 
runs the farm, instead of letting it run him. 

Mr. Grady was born March 31, 1878, in this county, a son of 
Isaac and Amanda (]\Iarkley) Grady. His parents are both natives 
of Ohio. His mother came to this country with her parents when 
eight years old, and the land acquired by the Markley family at 
that time is part of the present Grady farm. Mr. Grady's parents 
are now living at Goshen, Indiana. Both are active members of the 
German Baptist Church and in politics the father is a prohibitionist. 
There were three childi-en : J. C. ; Lauretta, a widow living at 
Goshen ; and Chaimcey. 

J. C. Grady was educated in the district schools, spent several 
winters in the college at North Manchester, Indiana, and for the 
past twenty years has applied the best of his talents and energies to 
the task of farming. May 8, 1904, he married Miss Hattie Elder, a 
native of Washington Township of Kosciusko County. They have 
two sons. Glen, born in 1907, and Dean, born in 1912. 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 478 

William B. Anglin, who for a number of years was a local 
merchant, has successfully given his work and enterprise to a mod- 
erate sized farm and has created therefrom most of the comforts and 
plenty which the family enjoy. He is one of the residents of Prairie 
Township and has served as trustee of that township. 

Mr. Anglin was born in Etna Township of this county May 29, 
1846, and is one of the oldest native born citizens of the county. He 
is a son of Isaac and Catherine (Biggs) Anglin. His mother was 
a native of Union County, Indiana, while his father was born in West 
Vii-ginia, October 29, 1814. Isaac Anglin when a young unmarried 
man came to Kosciusko County in 1836. He was one of the pioneers 
of Etna Township. His wife came to the county at the age of twenty- 
one, and after their marriage the.y located in Etna Township. 
Catherine Anglin died ou that farm in 1857, and her husband con- 
tinued to live there until 1871 and then moved to another locality, 
where he had his home until his death in 1891. Of the five children 
only two are now living, Elam H. and William B. The former is a 
farmer three-quarters of a mile from Crumett in Prairie Township. 
Isaac Anglin is remembered as one of the stalwart citizens of the 
early days in Kosciusko County. He was a loyal member of the 
Methodist Church, a democrat in politics, and served at one time as 
.iustice of the peace and township trustee. 

William B. Anglin grew up on the home farm in Etna Township 
was educated in the district schools and also in the Normal School 
at Valparaiso. Qualifying as a teacher, he followed that profession 
in the county for eight terms. Later he took up fanning, and eventu- 
ally located at Angleton, where he conducted a general store for 
twenty years, and during eleven years of that time was the local 
postmaster. In the meantime he was developing a farm, and now 
resides on a good place of 100 acres, the active operation of which 
is in the hands of his son. 

Mr. Anglin has had six children : Clarence, deceased ; Gertrude, 
Mho was a teacher for nine yeai's and is now the wife of E. H. Smith, 
of Prairie Township ; Grace, deceased ; ^Mabel, formerly a teacher, 
now living in Hancock County, Ohio; Ethel, a graduate of the com- 
mon .schools and wife of A. D. Holaway, of Chicago ; and Washington 
I., who was a graduate of the common schools, spent one term at 
Purdue University, and by his marriage to Grace Kitch has six 
sturdy young boys, this family living on the old homestead. Mr. 
Anglin is an active member, trustee and deacon of the Christian 
Church. He served six years as trustee of Prairie Township and 
was electa! on the democratic ticket by a margin of nine votes in a 
locality normally republican by thirty-. 

Hiram B. Ferverda has been a resident of Kasciusko County a 
quarter of a century, grew uo in Indiana from early boyhood, and 
had many hardships and difficulties to contend with in his earlier 
days. Industry and a determined ambition have lirought him an 
enviable station in life, and among other interests he is now vice 



474 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

president of the People's Bank at Leesburg and owns some of the 
fine farming land in the county. 

Mr. Ferverda was bom in Holland September 21, 1854, son of 
Banka and Gertrude D. (Young) Ferverda. His parents were also 
natives of Holland, married there, and the mother died in Holland 
leaving two sons, Henry and Hiram B. The father was a man of 
excellent education and very talented as a musician and in other 
pui-suits. He taught music. After the death of his first wife he 
again married and had two daughters by the second wife. He brought 
his family to the United States and located in Union Township of 
Elkhart County, Indiana, where he spent the rest of his life. He 
was a member of the Lutheran Church in Holland. 

Hiram B. Ferverda was thirteen j^ears old when his father eame 
to Elkhart County. He had begun his education in his native country 
and finished in the public schools of Elkhart County. The family 
were poor and he lived at home and gave most of the wages earned 
by farm work to the support of the family until he was nearly twenty- 
one yeai-s old. 

Mr. Ferverda married Evaline Miller, who was bom in Elkhart 
County, Indiana, March 29, 1857, daughter of John D. and Margaret 
(Lentz) Miller. Her parents were both natives of America and her 
maternal grandparents were born in Germany. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Ferverda moved to a farm 
four miles west of New Paris, Indiana, and two years later, in 1893, 
came to Kosciusko County and established their home on a farm 
near Oswego. Mr. Ferverda bought 160 acres, and developed a 
splendid farm. He yet owns the farm, but since March, 1909, has 
lived in Le&sburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ferverda have eleven children. Ira 0. is a grad- 
uate of the common schools and was a student in the North Man- 
chester College and beginning with the Spanish-American war saw 
three years of active service in the American army as quartermaster 
sergeant. He now lives at Oswego. Edith E. is a gi'aduate of the 
common schools and is the wife of Thomas Dye, of Plain Township. 
Irvin G. is a farmer in Plain Township. John W. is a high school 
graduate and is engaged in the hardware business at Silver Lake, 
Indiana. Gertrude E., a graduate of high school, married Lewis 
Hartman. Chloc E. is a gi-aduate of high school and the wife of 
Rollin V. Robinson. Ray E., a graduate of high school, is a farmer 
in Van Buren Township. Roscoe H. is a graduate of high school 
and is now serving as a train despatcher with the Southern Pacific 
Railroad. George likewise completed his education in high school 
and is in the army. Donald, who attended school twelve years and 
in all that time never missed a day nor was tardy, now in the United 
States service at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. ]\Iargaret is a high 
school student. The family are members of the Church of the Breth- 
ren and Mr. Ferverda is a republican. He was at one time captain 
of the local Horse Thief Detective Association, and is now inspector 
of the streets of Leesburg. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 475 

William R. Hall is a prosperous farmer of Prairie Township, 
and owns land which, a part of it at least, has been in the possession 
of the Hall family through three generations. 

He is a grandson of Samuel and Catherine (Anglin) Hall, who 
were natives of Virginia and of English and Irish ancestry. They 
were man-ied in 1822 and in the fall of 1834 Samuel Hall left 
Virginia and settled with his family in Plain Township of Kosciusko 
County. There he experienced many of the trials and hardships of 
the real pioneer, and had Indians as his neighbors. As soon as this 
was legally pos-sible in 1835 he entered land, including 320 acres, 
which under his management and by the joint labors of himself and 
sons came into a high state of cultivation. He filled many public 
offices, being justice of the peace and was also an associate judge and 
for one tenn state senator. He died in 1857, at the age of fifty-five, 
and his widow passed away in 1882, at the advanced age of eighty- 
three. In their family of eight children the next to the youngest 
was Joel Hall, who was born October 18, 1839, in Prairie Township, 
and spent a long and useful life there as a farmer. Joel Hall mar- 
ried Mary Roberts, and they were the parents of the following 
children : Alma, wife of Amos Beyer ; Eva, wife of Rev. Prank 
Beyers ; Phoda, widow of Eugene Coleman ; William R. ; and Cyrus, 
who is president of the People's Bank of Leesburg. 

William R. Hall was born on the old homestead in Prairie Town- 
ship, November 13, 1878, and from early youth to the present time 
has identified his energies and activities with farming. He now owns 
two well arranged and valuable places, one of 200 acres and another 
of 160 acres, all in Prairie Township. He is successfully engaged in 
the breeding of Poland China hogs and other good livestock. He is 
also interested in a manufacturing company at Warsaw. 

Mr. Hall married Mary Gilliam, daughter of William W. Gilliam. 
She was reared on the old Gilliam farm northea.st of Warsaw in 
Wayne Township. They have one son, Robert, born June 25, 1907. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hall are members of the United Brethren Church, arid 
in polities he is a democrat. Mr. Hall is now a resident of Warsaw, 
but looks after his farming 



David Jeffries, of Franklin Township, has had an enviable and 
useful and altogether happy life. In his time he has been a very 
hard worker, and that is a characteristic of the entire famil.y. He 
has produced fifty or more crops from his fields, and if the livestock 
he has raised were assembled it would it would be sufficient to feed 
a large army for several days at least. Mr. Jeffries has done his duty 
as he went along, has kept a good home, kept his obligations to his 
fellow men, has reared a family of noble sons and daughters, and at 
the age of seventy not only has his own children around him but 
grandchildren and great-grandchildren. 

Mr. Jeffries' farm is two and three-quarters miles south of Men- 
tone. This is the old Jeffries homestead, comprising 313 acres, and 
it was there he was born July 25, 1848, son of Pierce and Mary 
(Shrack) Jeffries. His father was born in Pennsylvania, April 8, 



476 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

1818, and his mother ou May 9, 1818. Pierce Jeffries died January 
7, 1893, and his wife January 18, 1892, both having lived nearly 
seventy-five j-ears. They g^-ew up in Ohio and after their marriage 
in that state came to Indiana and located in Kosciusko County. 
Pierce Jeffi-ies paid four hundred dollars for 160 acres of land. He 
prospected over Kosciusko County on hoi-seback, and brought his 
family to the country in a covered wagon. The last 2l^ miles of his 
journey he had to cut a road through the trees and brush. All his 
laud was covered with a heavy growth of timber and the clearing 
away of that obstacle to cultivation constituted several years of his 
early toil. A space even had to be cleared among the woods to erect 
his first log cabin. Pierce Jeffries was a brick layer by trade. Some 
time after coming to Kosciusko County he was given the opportunity 
of a job as a brick layer at Warsaw. That was the first piece of 
brick construction in the city and he wa.s paid 6214 cents a day for 
his skill and labor. Warsaw was fourteen miles from his home, and 
as long as the work lasted he set out from home very early ^londay 
morning, walked to Warsaw, stayed there during the week, and then 
walked home Saturday night in order to spend the Sunday with his 
family. Late in life he sold his old homestead to his son David, lived 
in Sevastopol until after the death of his wife, and his own last 
years were spent at ]Mentone. He had increased his original 160 
acres until he had 280 acres. Pierce Jeffries was a Baptist, and the 
church of that denomination in his community had many evidences 
of his liberality and interests. He was also a republican voter. A 
man of education, he taught some of the early schools of Franklin 
Towu.ship. Of the six children of Pierce Jeffries, David is the only 
survivor. The othei's were: Margaret, bom November 10, 1841; 
Martha A., born January 1, 1843; Amos, born May 2, 1844; Ruth, 
born March 13, 1855; and Andrew, bom April 2*9, 1860. All of 
them grew up and married. 

David Jeffries was reared on the old farm, attended the common 
schools, and on January 10, 1868, at the age of twenty, married Miss 
Catherine Engle. She was born in Ohio, May 31. 1849, and was 
brought to Kosciusko County when eight years old. Her parents 
located in Franklin Township, where she gi-ew up. 

After their marriage ilr. and Mrs. Jeffries lived on the old home- 
stead, and built a log house on an eighty aeres of that farm. They 
finally bought the old place and are now living on the spot where 
Mr. Jeffries was bom. Mr. Jeffries has done much in the breeding 
and raising of good livestock, and his farm is now the home of some 
big tjTJe Poland China hogs. He and his wife are members of the 
Baptist Church of Sevastopol and in politics he votes as a republican. 

Mr. and Mi-s. Jeffries had nine children: Emma, wife of William 
Smith; Rosa, wife of Lemuel Woods; Sarah, wife of David Jenkins; 
Mary, who man-ied Nathan Dawson; Oliver, who married Delia 
Green ; Isaac, who married Goldie Mclntire. The other children are 
deceased. All of them were given good school advantages. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jeffries have forty-five grandchildren and thirteen great-grand- 
children. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 477 

John C. Ritchison represents the agricultural activities of Kos- 
ciusko County, and is doing an extensive business as a producer of 
crops and livestock on a fine farm of 200 acres in Tippecanoe Town- 
ship, on rural route No. 1 out of Leesburg. 

Mr. Ritchison has spent most of his life in this country. He was 
born in Greene Coimty, Ohio, December 17, 1868, son of Milo A. 
and Maiy (Weade) Ritchison. His mother was a native of Sparta 
Township of Noble County, Indiana, while his father was an Ohio 
man by birth. Milo Ritcliison was a soldier in the Civil war, going 
out with an Ohio regiment and serving until peace came to the 
couuti-y. After the war he married in Noble County, Indiana, lived 
for several years near Wolf Lake, then went back to Greene County, 
Ohio, but soon bought a farm near Albion in Noble County, Indiana. 
In 1881 the Ritchison family came to Tippecanoe Township of 
Kosciusko County, and the father then bought the 200 acres of land 
where his son now resides. Milo Ritchison died here March 29, 1893. 
Both parents were members of the Christian Church. 

John C. Ritchison, only son of his parents, was fifteen years old 
when he came to his present home. He was educated chiefly in the 
common schools of Noble County. From youth up he has become 
familiar by experience and training with the handling of the farm 
that he now owns and has made it the center of a most useful and 
profitable career. In 1900 he married Miss Emma Scarlett, who was 
bom near Benton, Indiana, and was educated in the schools of New 
Paris, this state. Mr. and Mrs. Ritchison have one daughter, Erma 
B., a graduate of the common schools and now the wife of Howard 
Brockman of North "Webster. Mrs. Ritchison is a member of the 
Evangelical Church at New Paris. In politics Mr. Ritchison is a 
republican, as was his father. 

Lewis E. Sheoyer. To a profession and calling that is now 
exalted above all others Lewis E. Shroyer has given his best energies 
and study for over a quarter of a century. He was born on a farm, 
and while he made his independent start with modest capital he has 
built up and accumulated one of the valuable places of Plain Town- 
ship. The Shroyer home is 6i4 miles northeast of "Warsaw. 

Mr. Shroyer was bom in Plain Township, October 27, 1867, a son 
of Daniel and Matilda (Huffman) Shroyer, the former a native of 
Ohio and the latter of Indiana. Daniel Shroyer came to Indiana 
with his parents, George and Sarah Shroyer, who first settled in 
Elkhart County. George Shroyer died in Kosciusko County in 1880. 
Daniel married in Kosciusko County, and lived here to rear his 
family. He and his wife were very active in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, but he was also liberal in his support of all church causes. 
In politics he was a democrat. Daniel Shroyer and wife had eight 
children, four of whom are living: "William, of Plain Township, 
Lewis E., Luella, wife of Frank S. "Wilcox, on the old Shroyer home- 
stead in Plain Township ; and Charles, a graduate of the pharmacy 
department of Purdue University and now in the drug business at 



478 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Warsaw. The four deceased children were Sarah E., Hiram H., 
John and one that died in infancy. 

Lewis E. Shroyer grew up on the old farm and after his schooling 
remained at home to the age of twenty-three. On January 8, 1890, 
he married Lillie Mackenson, daughter of Andrew Mackenson and 
granddaughter of John Mackenson, who was one of the honored 
pioneers of Kosciusko County. 

After his marriage Mr. and Mrs. Shroyer lived on the old home- 
stead for several years, but in 1894 established a home of his own by 
the purchase of forty acres. This has grown by subsequent additions 
until it now comprises a tine and well arranged farm of 120 acres, 
devoted to the staple crops of this region and to good grades of 
livestock. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shroyer have one son and three grandchildren. 
The son, Carl L.. was bom October 8, 1891, and is now a telegraph 
operator with the Missouri Pacific Railway. Carl married Julia 
Robert, who died leaving three children, Robert, Lyman and Lillian. 

Mrs. Shroyer is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Mr. Shroyer has long maintained active relations with the 
Masonic Order and has gone both the York and Scottish routes, with 
membership in Warsaw Lodge No. 73, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Royal Arch Chapter, the Council, Royal and Select Masters, 
the Knight Templar Commandery at Warsaw, and the Fort Wayne 
Consistory of the Scottish Rite. He is also a member of the Eagles 
at Warsaw. Mr. Shroyer is a republican and is now serving as a 
member of the Township Advisory Board. 

Frederick D. Irvine is a hardware merchant and well known 
citizen of Syracuse and has spent most of his life in Kosciusko 
County, where his family is an old and prominent one. 

He was born in Prairie Township, September 1, 1879, a son of 
Joseph A. and Rachel (McCleary) Irvine, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania and the latter of Prairie Township. The grandfather, 
James Irvine, came from Pennsylvania to Kosciusko Count.y manj^ 
years ago and located on a tract of land in Prairie Township. On 
that farm Joseph A. Irvine grew to maturity, had a district school 
education and was also trained for teaching in the National Normal 
School at Lebanon, Ohio. Many of the older residents remember 
gratefully his services as a teacher in different schools of the county. 
After his marriage he farmed a short time, also teaching in the 
winter, and finally locating at Leesburg engaged in the drug and 
general merchandise business. With Frank Bortz and Joseph Hall 
he organized the People's Bank of Leesburg, and was its first cashier. 
He continued active in this bank until he retired. He and his wife 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias, being a past grand of the latter order. In politics he votes 
as a democrat. There are three sons in the family, Frederick D. 
being the youngest. Garrett W., the oldest, was at one time associ- 
ated with his father in business in Leesburg, later served as deputy 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 479 

auditor of Kosciusko County, for a time was with Strouse Brothers 
and is now at Detroit, Michigan, connected with the Union Trust 
Company. Howard L., the other son, is in business at Elkhart with 
the Sinclair Oil Company. 

Frederick D. Irvine was five years old when the family moved to 
Leesburg, and he grew up there, graduating from high school and 
for three years was a student in the Indiana Medical College. He 
entered the drug business at Leesburg, and for eleven years was also 
connected with the Standard Oil Company. January 1, 1916, he 
moved to Syracuse and has since succeeded in building up a large 
business as a hardware merchant. 

In 1904 Mr. Irvine married Ilah M. Brown, a native of Leesburg 
and a daughter of A. H. Brown. She and Mr. Irvine were schoolmates 
at Leesburg. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
and Mr. Irvine is affiliated with the Masonic Order and in politics is 
a republican. 

Francis M. Jaques. A well rounded and complete life has been 
that of Francis M. Jaques of Silver Lake. He was one of the youngest 
volunteer soldiers of the Union army during the Civil war. That 
constituted his first great experience in what has been otherwise an 
uneventful career. More than half a century has passed since he 
returned a youthful veteran from the army. In that time he ha-s 
been a farmer, merchant, home-steader in Kansas for a time, and for 
thirty years was identified with the business affairs of Silver Lake, 
retiring about a dozen years ago to the management of his exten- 
sive farming interests in that locality. 

Though most of his life has been spent in this county, where 
his people were early settlers, Mr. Jaques was born in Elkhart County, 
four miles north of Gashen, March 8, 1846, a son of Jobn Morris 
and Mary (Cox) Jaques. His grandfather, John Moses Jaquas, was 
a native of France and on coming to the United States lived in New 
York City and state for a time, and later moved to Ohio. John 
Morris Jaques was bom in Ohio and married there Mary Cox, a 
native of Virginia. Soon afterwards he located in Elkhart County 
and during the '40s moved to Kosciusko County, near North Webster. 
John M. Jaques was a California forty-niner and spent two years 
on the gold coast. Otherwise he lived on his farm in Indiana, and 
spent a useful and uneventful life. For fourteen months he was a 
soldier in the Civil war. He began voting as a whig and later was 
a stanch republican. He and his wife were zealous members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. They had eight children, two of whom 
died young. Those to grow up were Mary J., Oliver P., Ziprah E., 
Susan E. and Francis M. The onl.y other one now living is Susan, 
widow of Reuben James and a resident of Kansas. 

Francis M. Jaques was three years old when his parents moved 
to Tippecanoe Township of Kosciusko County. He worked at home 
and improved his mind in the local schools until he was a little past 
his sixteenth birthday. Then, on June 9, 1862, he enlisted in (Com- 
pany F' of the Twelfth Indiana Infantrj-. His sei-vice was for three 



480 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

years and eight days. He was practically in every skirmish in 
which his regiment engaged, and though twice slightly wounded was 
never absent from the line of duty more than two or three days on 
that account. He began his service with his regiment in Kentucky, 
fighting at the battle of Richmond, was at Vicksburg, Jackson, and 
later in those campaigns which are made vivid in American history 
by the battles of Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, 
Kenesaw Mountain, Nickajack Creek, and the siege of Atlanta, where 
he was on the battle line July 20, 21, 22 and 28, 1864. He was 
also at Jonesboro, was with the army of Sherman on the march to 
Savannah, fought at Griswoldville and Columbia in the march up 
through the Carolinas, and participated in those final battles at 
Bentonville and Raleigh. His regiment was almost under constant 
fire during the 100 days' advance upon Atlanta. In 1863 Mr. Jaques 
was promoted to corporal and held that rank at the time of his dis- 
charge. He was with Sherman's army at the Grand Review in Wash- 
ington and his company and Company A of the Twelfth Indiana 
formed the first that led the review. 

The three years after the war Mr. Jaques spent at Warsaw. He 
was engaged in the teaming business. He had been at home five 
months, returning from the army in June, when on November 27, 
1865, he married Miss Phebe E. McClure. She was a daughter of 
Elias and Mary A. McClure. Elias MeClure was an extensive land 
owner, and to Mrs. Phebe Jaques a large portion of the farm now 
owned by Mr. and Mrs. Jaques came by inheritance. In 1871 
ilr. Jaques moved out to Kansas and entered a quarter section 
of land, but remained there only two years. Coming back to 
Kosciusko County in 1873 he engaged in grain dealing at Silver Lake, 
in partnership with his brother-in-law A. T. S. Kist of Warsaw. In 
1874 he bought the grocery stock of James O'Connell, but sold it 
the next year, and in 1876 entered the general merchandise business 
at Silver Lake. In 1882 he moved his stock of goods to Packerton, 
but was there only eighteen months. In 1884 he set up as a mer- 
chant at Burket, but sold that stock after six months. He was also 
a lumber dealer, a mill operator, a hardware merchant, and finally 
resumed general merchandising at Silver Lake. Reviewing his busi- 
ness record in brief Mr. Jaques was an independent merchant for 
twenty -eight years and sold goods as a clerk six years, and with the ex- 
ception of two years at Packerton and Burket his entire business life 
has been spent in Silver Lake. He finally retired from commercial 
pursuits in 1906, and has since found abundant opportunity for the 
exercise of all his energies in the management of a fine farm of 436 
acres in Seward and Lake townships. He is also a stockholder in 
the Commercial State Bank of Silver Lake. 

Mr. Jaques is deservedly proud of his four children. The oldest. 
Dr. Schuyler C, is now a prominent physician and surgeon in New 
York City. Flora Mary is the wife of J. C. Cavender, a prominent 
banker of Hobart, Indiana. E. McClure is an attorney practicing law 
at New York Cit.y. Anna is the wife of Leroy W. Caldwell, of Clay 
Township. All the children were born in Kosciusko County. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 481 

Mr. Jaqiies and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church and he is one of the church trustees. He is affiliated with 
and is past chancellor of Lake View Lodge No. 164, Knights of 
Pj^thias, and has sat in the Grand Lodge. Politically he has been a 
stanch and undeviatiug republican from the time of the Civil war. 
In many waj'S he has been active in the party and during the '70s 
he served as deputy sheriff under his brother, Oliver P. Jaques. 

James A. Favs^ley. By his successful management James A. 
Favvley is regarded as one of the ablest farmers of Kosciusko County. 
He started with nothing, and from the position of a renter has im- 
proved his condition until he is now proprietor of one of the fine rural 
homesteads in the vicinity of Warsaw. 

His birth occurred in Kosciusko County April 18, 1860. His 
parents were Joseph and Maria (Guysinger) Fawley, both natives of 
Ohio, whence they came when young to Indiana and were married 
in this state and afterwards settled on a farm in Kosciusko County. 
The grandfather of Mr. Fawley was Jacob Fawley, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, whence he moved to Ohio, later to Indiana, and was one of 
tiie early settlers in Kosciusko County, where he owned a place of 
eighty acres. Joseph Fawley, the father, was also one of the hard 
working and honored citizens of this section, and at his death left 
an estate of ninety-two and a half acres of land. He and his wife were 
the parents of fourteen children, and the eight still living are: 
Delilah Rowe and Salome E. Harmon of Michawaka ; Ella Burwell 
of Atwood, Charles Fawley of Michigan ; James A., Perry, Edward 
and William Fawley, all farmers of this county. Mary J. Stoner of 
Claypool died in July, 1918, the others in childhood. The parents 
were active members of the Baptist Church and in politics the father 
was a democrat. He gave patriotic service to his country during the 
period of the Civil war, being for three months a member of the 
Thirty-third Indiana Infantry. 

James A. Fawley grew up in the country, received his education 
in the common schools and from first to last his experiences have been 
those of a progressive farmer. For seventeen years he rented land, 
worked hard and denied himself many luxuries in order to get a start. 
He finally was in a position to buy one hundred aiid twenty acres, 
and that is the nucleus of his present fine homestead. He added after- 
wards twenty-six and a half acres and still later a piece of forty acres. 

In 1885 Mr. Fawley married Gertrude D. Huffer, who was also 
born in Kosciusko County, a daughter of Rudolph Huffer, one of the 
early settlers. To this marriage were born two children : Albion R. 
and Chloe Pearl. On April 28, 1895, the wife of ilr. Fawley died, 
leaving him the care of these two small children. The following 
seven years were full of many discouragements and misfortunes. 
He himself suffered a very severe case of typhoid fever, but through 
this all he was ver.y fortunate in securing the services of a good house- 
keeper, Mrs. Rebecca Hood, the bereft wife of John Hood, formerly 
of Pennsylvania. She was as good a mother to the children as a 
housekeeper to the home. 



482 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

lu 1902 Mr. Fawley married Elizabeth Beber, daughter of Peter 
Beber of Kosciusko County. The seventeen j^ears previous to her 
marriage she had made her home with Owen S. Gaskill, a highly 
respected and successful dealer in lumber and farming of Burkett. 

Mr. Fawley was very anxious that his children obtain at least a 
practicable education and always took much interest in their studies. 
He was partially appeased in this when in 1904 both graduated from 
the common schools and again in 1907 when both started teaching 
school. 

Albion R. taught two terms, then entered and graduated from a 
business college at Fort Wayne before his marriage to Myrtle L. 
Likens, of Fort Wayne in 1911. He is at present (1918) general 
manager of a store for the Woolworth Company at Richmond, Indiana. 

Chloe Pearl taught five terms of school before her marriage to 
Heaven Cook in 1912. They live on their own farm of one hundred 
and fifty-seven acres in Kosciusko County. 

Mr. Fawley is always very active in church work, serving as Sun- 
day School superintendent at Palestine and Cook's Chapel for more 
than fifteen j'ears almost continuously, and was township president 
of the Sunday School for several years. He is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, and fraternally he is aiBliated with the 
Woodmen of America, is a member of the Detective Association, and 
in politics is a prohibitionist. As a farmer he has done much con- 
structive woi'k on his place in the way of improvements and in working 
out a satisfactory scheme for intensive cultivation. He raises large 
crops of grain, and does mixed farming, keeping a number of horses, 
cattle, sheep and hogs. 

Amber D. Sands is owner of one of the good farms of Seward 
Township, a half mile north of Yellow Creek Lake. But he is most 
widely known throughout this section of the county as a practical 
thresherman, and has been in that business for many years. He is 
president of the County Threshers' Association, and also a member of 
the Indiana Brotherhood of Threshers. 

Mr. Sands was born in Seward Township, two miles west and 
half a mile south of Silver Lake, May 27, 1869, son of Isaac N. and 
Amanda M. (Troutman) Sands. His great-grandfather Sands was 
a native of Ireland. Isaac N. Sands was born twelve miles south of 
Harri.sburg, Pennsylvania. His wife was bom three miles from 
Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio. Samuel Sands, the grandfather, 
moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and Isaac grew up and married there. 
He was a millwright by trade, and his occupation brought him to 
Indiana, where he engaged in the milling and farming business. He 
first settled near Silver Lake, sold his property there, and bought the 
fann now owned by his son Amber D. His wife was an active mem- 
ber of the Lutheran Church, and in politics he was a democrat. There 
were four children, three of whom are still living : Amber D. : A. V. 
Sands, a farmer in Northeastern Michigan ; and Winnie, wife of S. N. 
Rickel, of Northeastern ^Michigan. 

A. D. Sands grew up in Kosciusko County and was educated in the 



HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 483 

common schools. He married Miss Mary G. Miller. They started 
housekeeping a mile south of Silver Lake, lived there one year, then 
moved to the end of Mud Lake in Seward Township, and had their 
home in that locality until 1906. In that year they moved to their 
present place, their home farm constituting seventy acres, while thej' 
own ninety acres near Mud Lake and eighty acres two miles east of the 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sands have six living children : Otto A., Ethel F., 
Seta F., John I., Minnie A., and Lulu A., all of whom have received 
good educational advantages in the district and high schools. 

Mr. Sands is a past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and a member of the Grand Lodge, is a past sachem of the 
Improved Order of Red Men, and a member of the Loyal Order of 
Moose. He is a democrat in politics and a stockholder in the Com- 
mercial State Bank of Silver Lake, and a stockholder and vice presi- 
dent of the Burket Equity Union or Farmers Elevator Company of 
Burket, Indiana. 

Benjamin Kantner. A fine farm, a good home and an excellent 
family belong to Benjamin Kantner, one of the prominent residents 
of Plain Township, on i-ui-al route No. 1 out of Leesburg. 

Mr. Kantner came to Kosciusko County about fifteen years ago. 
He was born in Auglaize County, Ohio, March 3, 1852, son of Martin 
and Catherine (Beohdoldt) Kantner. His parents were both natives 
of Pennsylvania. The Kantner family came originally from Holland. 
Grandfather John Kantner was one of the pioneers of Auglaize 
County, where he located in the wilderness in 1832. Martin Kantnei- 
spent his life in that county as a farmer and was a member of the 
Lutheran Church and a republican voter. He was the father of 
fifteen children, all of whom grew to maturity except one daughter. 
Three are still living, the two daughters being Elizabeth, widow of 
Joseph Gagley of Auglaize County, and Hannah, wife of John Burden 
of Auglaize County. 

Benjamin Kantner grew to manhood on the old farm in Ohio, and 
as a schoolboy attended school kept in a log cabin. He was at home 
until twenty-one j'ears of age. April 13, 1873, he married Margaret 
R. Shank, a native of Franklin County, Ohio. 

After his marriage Mr. Kantner remained in Auglaize County and 
owned and cultivated a tract of eighty acres originally a part of the 
old homestead. In March, 1903, he came to Kosciusko County and in 
1912 located on his present fin? farm of 191 acres. He has made 
more than a local repiitation as a hog breeder, and has a number of 
the big type Poland Chinas, havine at the head of 1-ms herd one of 
the best boars in the country. Little Dawson. Mr. Kantner is affiliated 
with the Knights of the Maccabees. 

Twelve children were born to him and his wife, ten of whom are 
still livinsr. His son Leroy L., who completed his education in the 
Warsaw High School, is now serving as ouartermaster in the United 
States Army in France. The son Martin is married and lives i'l 
Ohio. Leslie, a graduate of the high school, is married and is in busi- 



484 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

ness in Chicago. Catherine is the wife of John A. Bitler, of Michigan. 
G. H. is married and lives at Elkhart, Indiana. Agnes A. is still at 
home. George W. is married and lives in Auglaize County, Ohio. 
Edwin is a graduate of the Winona High School and is now serving 
in the Sixteenth Railway Engineers Corps in Prance. Elizabeth, a 
graduate of the Warsaw High School, married John Ripley and 
lived in Elkhart. Lillian, a graduate of the Warsaw High School 
and valedictorian of her class, has spent two years at the University 
of Chicago and is now instructor in the high school at Leesburg. Mr. 
Kantner is a republican in polities. 

Albert M. Lentz is a well known ficrure in the industrial affairs 
in and around Milford, where for a number of years he has conducted 
an imoortant local enterprise for the manufacture of hardwood lum- 
ber. He is also a dealer in cnal and other supplies at Milford. 

Mr. Lentz was born on a farm in Elkhart County March 23, 1858. 
The farm where he was born is where the Gilbert school house is now 
located. His parents were Cyrus and ^lary (AVhitehead) Lentz. His 
father was born in Ohio and his mother in Elkhart County. Cyrus 
Lentz came to Indiana at the age eighteen, and later acquired a farm 
in Elkhart County and also bought 200 acres in Van Buren Township 
of Kosciusko County. He was a veiy industrious and capable farmer 
and business m^in and spent the rest of his life in this section of the 
state. He was a member of the German Baptist Church and a demo- 
crat. He and his wife had six children, and those still living are : 
Moses F.. Dessie. wife of John Dubbs, Jennie, wife of Charles Ham- 
mond, and Albert M. 

Albert M. Lent^ received his education in the district schools of 
Elkhart County. When he was sixteen his parents moved to Kosciusko 
County and he lived on the home farm to the ase of twenty-one. In 
1877 he married Mary Robinson, a native of Medina County, Ohio. 
After his marriage ^Mr. Lentz rented a farm, and in 1883 first engaged 
in the sawmill business. Since 1909 he lias been proprietor of a fac- 
tory at Milford for the manufacture of hardwood lumber. 

He and his wife had eleven children. Those still living are : Eliza- 
beth, Charlotte, Emma J., Cleo, Edward, Jennette. Richard. Lou and 
Helena. Elizabeth is a graduate of high school and is now in cnllege 
The family are members of the Brethren Church at Milford. He is 
affiliated with the ]\Iodern Woodmen of America and in politics is a 
democrat. 

Bert E. Dausman has been a factor in the bu.suiess affairs of Mil- 
ford Junction for a number of years. He recently retired from his 
local business connection and owns a fine farm in Turkey Creek Town- 
ship. However, he continues to reside with his family at Milford 
Junction, and owns and occupies there the handsomest residence in 
the village. He built this modern home in 1916. It is constructed 
of excellent material, the outer walls being laid with the noted Hytex 
brick. 

Mr. Dausman was born in Cass County, Michigan, on April 19, 



HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 485 

1874, a son of Henry and Sarah (Brinnbaugh) Dausman. His father 
was a native of Canada and his mother of Elkhart County. The 
family lived for a number of years in Cass County, Michigan, but in 
1876 moved to Jackson Township of Elkhart County, where they had 
their home until 1910, and the father then moved to Milford Junction. 
He died June 10, 1916. He was a man of progressive spirit, a demo- 
cratic voter, and had a good farm of 120 acres. 

Bert E. Dausman is the only survivor of the five children born to 
his mother, his father's first wife. He grew up on a farm in Elkhart 
County, had a district school education and lived with his father until 
he was twenty-one. His first real business exporienee was as a brake- 
man with the Baltimore and Ohio Railway. He had a run between 
Garrett, Indiana, and Chicago Junction, Ohio. After three years on 
the road he resigned and went into business at Garrett for two years. 
Selling out there, he removed to Milford Junction in 1905 and bought 
a restaurant. He continued this enterprise until April 1, 1918, when 
he sold out. He has been local agent for the Interurban Railway at 
Milford Junction since it was constructed. In 1918 Mr. Dausman 
sold or traded for a farm of 120 acres in Turkey Creek Township, 
and is now preparing to develop and cultivate that on an intensive 
scale. 

December 11, 1901, he married Miss Cecil Haney, who was born 
in Milford Junction in 1884 and was educated in the district schools. 
They are the parents of four children : Dorothy, born August 30, 
1902; Raymond, born February 26, 1904; Helen, born August 30, 
1905; and Trella, born May 9, 1909. Dorothy is a graduate of the 
common schools and has had two years in the high school. She has 
an interesting school record, having never missed a single day and 
never having been tardy. The son Raymond graduated from the 
common schools in 1918. Mr. Dausman is a democrat and has been 
quite active in local politics. 

Charles M. Regenos. There is a ready public recognition and 
appreciation of the man who struggles against hea^v odds to make 
himself useful, win a moderate prosperity, and achieves his proper 
place in the community. When Charles M. Regenos was five years 
old he was partially crippled, and has overcome the handicap of lame- 
ness and in spite of that fact has done all the work of a practical 
farmer, and is one of the successful men of that industry in Seward 
Township. His farm is four miles southwest of Claypool. 

At the same time he has been prominent in local affairs and has 
served four years as justice of the peace, is now filling his fourth year 
as township assessor, and has also been nominated and elected by a 
large majority by the democratic part.y as township trustee. 

Mr. Regenos was born in Seward Township, son of Jacob and Julia 
A. (Brown) Regenos, both now deceased. His parents were born in 
Stark County, Ohio, grew up and married there, and in 1868 settled in 
Kosciusko County. Here they bought a farm of eighty acres in section 
23 of Seward Township, and on that farm they made their home the 
rest of their lives. They were very active members of the Fairview 



486 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

United Brethren Church, and in polities the father was also a demo- 
crat. They have six children: Mary, wife of James Miller; Laura, 
wife of William Sehue, of Portland, Oregon ; Alice, wife of John 
Kintz ; Ira, who lives at Niles, Michigan ; Charles M. ; and Delia, 
deceased. 

Charles M. Regenos grew up on the home farm, and in winter 
attended district school and in summer worked on the farm. At the 
age of twenty he started out for himself and in the fall of 1895 he 
married Rozella Clink, who has been his most capable wife and com- 
panion in home making. She was born in the same community and 
when they married their joint possessions aggregated about $100 
worth of household goods. They rented a farm and continued as 
renters for ten years before they were able to make their first purchase 
of land. This consisted of forty acres, and after keeping it and im- 
proving it they sold and bought the eighty acres where they now live. 
All their prosperity represents their joint struggles, self denial and 
hard work of many years. ^Ir. Regenos is a practical farmer and stock 
raiser, and is one of tlie busiest men in the community. He and his 
wife are active members of the United Brethren Church and he has 
been prominent both in church and Sunday school work, serving as 
superintendent of the Sunday school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Regenos have two children, Golan V., a graduate of 
the high school who has spent two years in college; and Gradeii W.. 
a graduate of high school. Mr. Regenos is also rearing a daughter of 
his sister, Ethel Mortomore. 

George Hartter. In the last fifteen or twenty years many live 
and enterprising men seeking good farm lands and opportunities for 
investment have come to Kosciusko County from other states and 
eonnties and liave here realized their expectations in finding good 
lands and a good farming community, and are now among Kosciusko 
County's most prominent citizens. One of these is Mr. George Hartter, 
who has lived in Kosciusko County for the past fourteen yea7-s and is 
not only a large farm owner in Van Buren Township but is known 
throughout the Jiorthern part of the county as an unusually capable 
and progi'essive citizen. 

Mr. Hartter. whose farm is in section 17, just west of the corpora- 
tion limits of ]\li)ford, was born in Alsace Lorraine June 19, 1850. 
son of Mark and Catherine Hartter. He attended the common schools 
of his native counti*y until lie was fourteen years of age, and after 
that served an apprenticeship to learn the carpenter's trade. He was 
employed in that line until 1873 when he came to the United States 
to seek better opportunities in this country. Later his father followed 
him to America. Mr. Hartter did his first work as a carpenter at 
Morton, Illinois, but five years later invested his modest capital in an 
Illinois farm, and for a number of years was a prosperous agricul- 
turist in that state. He had only $50 when he arrived in 
America, but under his thrifty management his capital grew and 
expanded until he had 160 acres of Illinois farm land. In 1904 he 
sold out his property in Illinois and coming to Kosciusko County 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 487 

bought 320 acres where he now lives. He has always been an extensive 
stock raiser and has made most of his money in cattle and hogs. He 
is a stockholder in the Farmers State Bank at Milford. 

Mr. Hartter married Miss Lena Jacob. She was also born in Alsace 
Lorraine. They are the parents of the following children: George. 
Jacob, John, Samuel, William, Catherine and Lena, all of whom have 
grown to manhood and womanhood and are all married. 

Mr. Hartter is an influential republican and his fellow citizens 
have frequently honored him with public responsibilities. For the 
past four years he has served as assessor of Van Buren Township and 
in 1918 was honored with the nomination for commissioner to repre- 
sent the northern district of the county. 

D.\NiEL C. Darr is a man well known in the good citizcnshi]) of 
Van Buren Township, has acquired and improved a good farm, and 
he and his wife owe their present comfortable circumstances to their 
joint efforts, good management and well directed enterprise. 

Mr. Darr, whose home is half way between Milford and Syracuse, 
was born in Van Buren Township of this county February 17, 1867, 
a son of Thomas and Dorothy (Cory) Darr. His father was born in 
Elkhart County of this state November 24, 1844, and his mother in the 
same county in 1847. Dorothy Darr died leaving two children, John 
and Daniel. John is now living at Three Rivers. :Michigan. Thomas 
Darr married for his second wife Elizabeth Phebus, and she became 
the mother of twelve children. 

Daniel C. Darr was only six weeks old when his mother died, and 
after that he lived in the home of his grandmother Cory until he wa.s 
six years old. His father then having taken a second wife he returned 
home and lived there until manhood. His education was acquired 
in the district schools. After starting for himself he found emnloy- 
ment as a farm hand, and for five years worked at wages of $200 a 
year. This furnished him a good experience and thorough training 
for his subsequent career, and at the same time he saved some money 
with a view to the future-. On November 21. 1895, Mr. DarT' mnrried 
Flora E. Chilcote, of New Paris, Indiana. She was born August 2.3, 
1871, daughter of James I. and Hattie (Ebv) Chilcote. Her father 
was born near Wilshire, Ohio, August 27, 1837, and her mother was 
born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, March 12, 1834, and died 
May 21. 1915. Her father was a soldier in the Union army during 
the Civil war. 

Mr. and Mrs. Darr after their marriage located on forty aci-es 
of land, and later bought another forty acres. This farm they sub- 
sequently sold and came to the place of 115 acres where they now live. 
They have done much to improve and increase the value of their land 
and it is devoted to general farming and stock raising. Mr. and Mrs. 
Darr have one son. Earl J., born August 27, 1900. He is a graduate 
of the common schools and from the Milford High School with the 
class of 1917, and is now assuming most of the responsibilities con- 
nected with the home farm. The family are membci-s of the Methodist 



488 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COLTNTY 

Episcopal Church at Syracuse, and Mr. Darr has been active both 
in church and Sunday school. In polities he is a republican. 

Victor Fuller represents one of the oldest families of Kosciu.sko 
County, and the vigor with which he has prosecuted his enterprise as 
a farmer and all his business and private relations was the source of 
the confidence felt in him by his fellow citizens who recently elected 
him a trustee of Van Buren Township. He has the distinction of 
being the first republican trustee of the township in a period of twenty- 
eight years. 

ilr. Fuller, whose fine home is located two miles northea.st of ilil- 
ford. was born on that place ]\Iarch 13, 1874, a son of Preston and 
Mary C. (Brewer) Fuller. Preston Fuller was born in Pennsylvania, 
a son of Bena.iah Fuller, a native of the same state, and grandson of 
William Fuller, who was born in ^la.ssachusetts of English ancestry. 
Bena.jah Fuller came from Pennsylvania to Kosciusko County and 
entered a number of extensive tracts of land, being one of the pioneer 
land holders in this part of the state. Preston Fuller came to the 
county with his parents, grew up and after his marriage settled on 
the old Fuller farm. During the Civil war he served three years as a 
private in the Seventy-Fourth Indian Volunteer Infantry, and his 
record as a citizen was in keeping with the faithfulness and ardor of 
his patriotism. He was very active in the Christian Church and a 
republican in politics. His wife, ]\Iary C. Brower. was born in Penn- 
sylvania, a daughter of Isaac Brower, who brought his family west, 
first to Indiana, thence to Illinois, and back to Turkey Creek Town- 
ship four miles south of Syracuse in Kosciusko County, where she 
lived until her marriage. Preston Fuller and wife had seven children, 
five of whom are still living : Frank, of Fresno, California ; Stella, 
wife of Richard Fiiller of Glendale, Arizona ; Victor ; Ernest and 
Robert, both living in California, the latter at Riverside. 

Victor Fuller had a district school education. He married Almeda 
Leatherman, daughter of Conrad Leatherman. She was born in Jef- 
ferson Township of this county, and was educated in the common 
schools. After their marriage 'Slv. and ]Mrs. Fuller lived for a few 
years in the West, part of the time in Oklahoma, but finally returned 
to Kosciusko Cotmty and located in Van Buren Township, where their 
affairs have been greatly prospered as farmers. 

^Ir. and Mrs. Fuller have four cb'ldren : Floyd P., a gradunte 
of the common schools, married Savilla Cox : Royce, a graduate of 
the common schools and now in the United States Navy ; Hilda, wife of 
Lero.v Troster, who owns a good farm of ninety-seven acres near Mil- 
ford Junction in Van Buren Township ; and Donald C, a graduate of 
the ]Milford High School. The family are members of the Christian 
Church and Mr. Fuller is one of the church elders. 

Thom.\s J. Cot is one of the prosperous farm owners and well 
known citizens of Kosciusko County, and for his success the credit is 
due almost entireh^ to his individual efforts and his steadfast honesty 
and integrity. Mr. Coy has spent nearly all his life in Kosciu-sko 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 48'J 

County and has one of the best equipped farm homes in Turkey Creek 
Township north of Syracuse. 

Mr. Coy was born in Van Buren Township of Kosciusko County 
May 2, 1850, and represent a family that has long been identified 
with this section of the state. His parents were Henry and May A. 
(Grissamer) Coy, both natives of Ohio. They were married in Kosci- 
usko County and soon afterward settled in Elkhart County and from 
there went to Van Buren Town.ship, where they spent their worthy 
lives as farmers and as faithful members of the Dunkard Church. 
They had five sons and four daughters, three of the sons and the four 
daughters still living. 

Thomas J. Coy grew up on the old home farm, and as a boy at- 
tended the common schools. He married for his first wife Ellen 
Berry. She was the mother of four children : Charles B., a machinist 
now in Illinois ; Myrtle, deceased ; Laura, wife of Charles Lutz of Elk- 
hart County; and Harry E., a farmer in Elkhart County. For his 
present wife Mr. Coy married Mrs. Iva Jones Middleton. Mrs. Coy 
was born near Dunlap, Elkhart County, April 15, 1864, daughter of 
David H. and Susan (Stiitsman) Jones. Her father was a native of 
Ohio and her mother of Elkhart County. Mrs. Co.v was educated in 
the district schools and for her fir.st husband married Ozias Middleton. 
By that union she has one son, Floyd, who married Bulah Jones, of 
Chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Coy are active members of the Dunkard Church. 
Politically he is a republican. Mr. Coy has been a farmer in this 
vicinity for forty years or more and his present estate consists of 
13 acres in Kosciusko County and 117 acres adjoining in Elkhart 
County. In 1916 he built his modern country home, furnace heated 
and with all (he facilities such as are usually found in best city resi- 
dences. 

MiLO JIaloy. Some of the best farm homes of this county are 
located in Van Buren Township. One of them is owned and occupied 
by Milo Maloy, located two and a half miles northeast of Milford and 
two and a half miles west of Syracuse. The Maloy family have been 
in that locality for sixty years and the name is associated with good 
farming, good citizenship and active relations with all progressive 
community affairs. 

The family was founded here by John and Polly (Smith) Maloy, 
who in 1841 moved from Wayne County, Ohio, to Whitley County, 
Indiana, and in 1851 removed to Kosciusko County and settled in the 
woods of Van Buren Township. John Maloy lived there until the lat- 
ter part of his life, and then removed to Syracuse, where he died. 
His wife died on the old farm. They had twelve children, four of 
whom, John, Daniel, David and Seth, reached mature years. The 
son Andrew gave his life as a soldier in the Civil war. Four of the 
daughters were Mary, Lucy, Sarah and Catherine. 

Seth Maloy, a son of John and Polly Maloy, was born in Wayne 
County, Ohio, July 9, 1838, and was only three years of age when 
brought to Indiana and was thirteen when the family located in Van 



4D0 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Buren Township. He grew up on a farm, and in 1880 located a place 
of fifty acres in Van Buren Township, where he spent the rest of his 
life. December 10, 1865, he married Mahala J. Coy, daughter of 
Henry and I\Iary A. Coy, of Kosciusko County. Both were active 
members of the Church of God at Syracuse, and Seth ^laloy was 
trustee of the church propert}^ He was a republican in politics. He 
and his wife had four children, Simeon, who died at the age of five 
years; Milo; Prank, a farmer in Van Buren Township; and Ada. 
wife of Charles Visle.y. 

ilr. Milo Maloy was born on his father's place in Van Buren 
Township June 19, 1874. He had a district school education and 
most of his life's activities have been identified with farming. On 
September 4, 1898, at the age of twenty-four, he married Lulu Blough. 
She was born in Plain Township of Kosciusko County, daughter of 
David and Jane Blough. After tlieir marriage Mr. and Mrs. Maloy 
located on a farm, subsequently moved to another place, and also 
lived for a time in Benton Harbor, Michigan, and South Bend, Indi- 
ana, before returning to Kosciusko Count.v and establishing themselves 
in their present comfortable circumstances. 

Mr. Maloy is affiliated with Syracuse Lodge No. 458, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, and with the Knights of the Maccabees. He is 
one of the influential republicans of his township and is now nominee 
for the office of township trustee. 

Delbert W. Norris. The Norris family is one of the oldest in 
Kosciusko County, and while Delbert W. Norris was born and reared 
here he spent so many years in Canada that he became a nituralized 
citizen and a British subject and has only recently returned to Kos- 
ciusko County and is now renting the old Norris farm five miles south- 
east of Syracuse. 

He was born in Turkey Creek Township, January 13, 1870, a son 
of John L. and Emma (Stainer) Norris. His father was born in Van 
Buren Township of this county August 11, 1840, a son of William and 
Elizabeth (Knox) Norris. William Norris was a son of Joseph Norris. 
and a grandson of Thomas Norris. Thomas Norris. a native of Liver- 
pool. England, came to the United States in colonial times and located 
at Hagerstown, Maryland, where he lived during the period of the 
American Revolution. Joseph Norris, his son, was one of the men 
who responded to the call of the West and was one of the first to 
secure Government land in Van Buren Township of Kosciusko County, 
His sons entered fourteen eighty acre tracts of land in that locality, 
and thus the name of Norris appears on more abstracts of title than 
almost any other name in the county. 

William Norris, one of the sons who entered land in Kosciusko 
County, lived here for some years and in 1849 joined the exodus to 
the California gold fields. He prospered in the far West, later re- 
turned to Indiana, but spent his last years in Missouri. His children 
consist of John L., Joseph, Melvina, Lena, Rebecca and Dora. 

John L. and Emma (Stainer) Norris had three children, one i>\' 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 491 

whom died in infancy. The daughter Bertha is the wife of Lawrence 
Snodgrass, and they live in the Province of Saskatchewan, ( 'anada. 

Delbert W. Norris grew up on the old farm and lived there until 
the age of eighteen, after which he spent six years in Elkhart County. 
He then returned to Kosciusko County, and was a resident here until 
the age of thirty-three. On January 1, 1898, he married Edna Cripe. 
a native of Turkey Creek Township. In the spring of 1903 Mr. and 
Mrs. Non'is moved to Canada and homesteaded 160 acres in the west- 
ern part of the Dominion. They had their home there for fourteen 
years and only returned to Kosciusko County on April 8, 191 7. They 
now occupy the old Norris homestead comprising eighty acres. 

William W. Reed. Any city is fortunate that can claim among 
its assets such loyalty and progressive action as "William W. Reed has 
given to Warsaw. Those best acquainted with his work and influence 
sa.y that he has had as much to do with the prosperity of the city dur- 
ing the past decade as any other one individual. In his business he 
may he said to occupy a key position of influence, and during the 
twentj--tive years he has lived in Warsaw he has been continuously 
engaged in the hotel business and has made the house over which he 
presides a hotel of accommodations eonsi.stent and in keeping with the 
spirit of uplift and progress in the city. While he is widely known 
as one of the successful hotel managers of Indiana, his surplus energy- 
has been devoted to many other enterprises, particularly to the solid 
welfare and advancement of Warsaw. 

Born at :Mansfield, Ohio. July 8. 1861, he is one of the children 
born to the marriage of William Wallace and Mary Ann (Bale) Reed. 
Two years after his birth his mother died, and by a subsequent mar- 
riage to Jennie Butler his father had two other children. William 
Wallace Reed, Sr., was also in his time a popular landlord. He con- 
ducted a hotel at Mansfield, Ohio, and moving from there to Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, operated the old Mayer House until his death in 1880. 

William W. Reed was nineteen years of age when his father died. 
In the meantime he had attended the grammar and high schools of his 
native city, and under the direction of his father had gained an 
exact knowledge and practice of the fundan.ental principles of con- 
ducting a fii-st class hotel. After the death of his father he went to 
live with his paternal grandmother, ;Mrs. Permelia Reed, at Mansfield. 
Then in October, 1881, with his stepmother, he came to Warsaw and 
for two years operated the old Kirtley House, which .stood on the site 
now occupied by the interurhan railway station. Then for the follow- 
ing two yeai"s he conducted the Robinson House in Fort Wayne and 
for succeeding years was clerk in the Burnett House at Toledo, and 
for two years was chief clerk in the Wayne Hotel at Fort Wayne. 

Mr. Reed became a permanent resident of Warsaw in 1890, in 
which year he leased the property and bought the furniture of the 
Hayes Hotel. He has been in connnand of this well kno\ni hostelry 
ever since. He has made it not only a place of piiblic entertainment 
but a business enterprise that has properly rewarded his constant 
planning and oiitlay of energy. A number of years ago he bought 



492 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

the property outright, remodeled the hotel building, so as to give it 
accommodations and facilities up to the highest standard of a modern 
hotel, put on an annex, and also acquired a private residence property 
adjoining. 

That civic and public spirited work for which Mr. Reed will be 
longc'^t remembered in "Warsaw came from his realization, early in 
his stay here, that Warsaw was a town practically stagnant and mak- 
ing no" effort whatever to realize the magnificent opportunities which 
properly belong to its situation. It was largely through his initiative 
that the present Chamber of Commerce was organized, and through 
that very capable and enthusiastic body many factories were induced 
to locate in ^Varsaw and the city soon took on an unwonted air of 
vitality and progress. The industrial development was followed by 
municipal improvements, and Warsaw can now make just claims to 
association with the best towns of the state. Mr. Reed has been a 
director of the Warsaw Chamber of Commerce since its creation. 

He has also acquired some extensive busuiess interests. He is a 
stockholder in the Warsaw Overall Company, a director in the Warsaw 
Investment Company, and the Warsaw Building, Loan & Investment 
Association, and is president of the Cox-Kline Company, a local in- 
dustry for the manufacture of leather waterproof dressing In poli- 
tics he is a republican, and has fraternal associations with the Masons 
and the Elks. On April 3, 1883. Mr. Reed married :\Iiss Lillian C. 
Caldwell, of Wai-saw. Their onlv daughter. Bettie, is the wife of 
Dr. C. C. DuBois. 

Leander G.\rber, member of an old, solid and respected family 
of Kosciusko County, has made his years of usefulness and service 
through his work as a farmer. He has one of the good farms of Tippe- 
canoe Township, located a mile and a half southeast of North Webster 
on rural route No. 1 out of Leesburg. 

Mr. Garber was born in Tippecanoe Township September 2, 1875, 
and is a son of Samuel and Polly (White) Garber. His father was one 
of the early settlers and lived on his farm a mile and a half southeast 
of North Webster until his death. The mother was a member of the 
Christian Church. In the family were eleven children : Daniel M., 
of Tippecanoe Township ; JIary, wife of Milo StrOmbeck, of North 
Webster ; Jefferson, of North Webster : Albert, president of the Farm- 
ers Bank of North Webster; Clementine, wife of ileade Humble, of 
Washington Township ; Comodore, of Washington Township ; Emma, 
wife of Silas Cook ; Jacob, of Huntington, Indiana ; Barbara, wife 
of Charles Gandy, of the vicinity of Noblesville; Leander; and 
John, of Tippecanoe Township. 

Leander Garber grew up on the old fai-m, and had a common school 
education. At the age of thirteen he went to live with his sister, Mrs. 
Strombeck, and was in her home until he reached his majority. 

In 1898 ;Mr. Garber married Rosa Twarts. Mrs. Garber was boru 
in Noble County, Indiana. Three children have been born to their 
marriage, two of whom are living : Eva Helen and Louis. Their son 
Ray died at the age of seven years. Mr. and Mrs. Garber are active 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 493 

members of the Christian Church and in polities he is a republican. 
His well cultivated and improved farm comprises eighty acres and to 
it he is giving the best of his energies and ability as one of the pro- 
ducers of this county. 

Henry Kolberg. It is a lnni>- an.l hard climb to prosperity in 
farminc^ bv the avenue of reiitin- land frnm others, and it requires 
a man of great industry, persislonco and .letermined purpose to con- 
quer in that directiou. One of the men in Kosciusko County who are 
now most prosperously situated and won success primarily as a renter 
is Henry Kolberg. whose present home farm is in section 21 ot lurkey 
Creek Township, four miles southeast of Syracuse. 

Mr Kolberg was born in Germany November 3, 1854. He attended 
the common schools of his native country to the asre of fourteen, and 
at the age of twentv came to the United States. He was a poor boy. 
had no knowledge of English languas'e or American customs and had 
to struggle along as best he could for several years. In Kosciusko 
County he went to work on a farm and on September 13, 18 n gained 
one of' the prizes of life when he married Mary E. ITamman. She was 
born in Turkey Creek Township and was educated in the common 
schools. „ , -, 

Mr and Mrs Kolbersi were farm renters for twenty years, and 
while maintaining their home in comfort anrl rearing their children 
thev also gradually accumulated a fund which m 1899 he used to 
purchase eightv acres of land included in the present home farm 
Mr Kolberg now owns 160 acres, devoted to general farming and 
stock raising, and all this generous property he has made through his 
industry and the loyal cooperation of his good wife. 

Mr 'and Mrs. Kolberg have two children and three grandchildren. 
The daughter, Ann Eliza, married Elisha Hesh and lives at Goshen, 
Indiana. The son, Arthur C, married Violet Prentiss, and they are 
farmers in Turkey Creek Township. The family are members ot the 
Brethren Church, of which Mr. Kolberg is a trustee. He is also con- 
cerned in the community affairs of his locality and is a member of the 
township advisory board. Politically he votes as a democrat. 

C C Dukes, present trustee of Wa^■ne To\\nship. is a citizen of 
Warsaw whose services as a licensed embalmcr and undertaker have 
been widely appreciated, and is one of tlie men looked upon for lead- 
ership and influence in all local affairs. , o- i qto 

He was born on a farm near Peru. Indiana, November 2/, 1879, 
son of Mitchell M. and Mary (Case) Dukes. H's great-great-grand- 
father was a native of Scotland. His grandfather, Stephen Dukes, 
was born in Mar^dand and came west and settled near Richmond m 
Wayne County, 'Indiana, where he married Miss McKim, and some 
years later, in "1861, moved to M'ami County, Indiana, where he spent 
the rest of his life and died in 1881. Mitchell Dukes was a boy when 
taken to Miami County, grew up there and married and lived on his 
farm and followed farming actively until the spring of 1898. Since 
then he has lived somewhat retired in the Village of Denver. He and 



494 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is a 
republican. Mitchell M. Dukes and wife had six children, including : 
L. E. Dukes, of Denver, Indiana; Acel, of Denver; Myrtle, wife of 
Noble Hunt, cashier of the Denver Bank; Bertha, wife of N. Bohen, 
of Miami County. 

C. C. Dukes grew up on his father's farm in Miami County, at- 
tended the district schools there and two terms in high school. At 
the age of nineteen he gained his first experience in the undertaking 
business at Peru, working there 3iA years, and also eighteen months 
at Plymouth, Indiana. In February, 1903, Mr. Dukes moved to 
Warsaw and has since been in business on his own account 
and is looked upon as a man of thorough qualifications and with all 
the facilities and equipment for his business. 

He married Miss Cora Smith, of Fulton County, Indiana, but a 
native of Wabash County. They have two children : Juanita, born 
in December, 1903 ; and Mary, born in January, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dukes are members of the IMethodist Episcopal Church. He is affili- 
ated with the Knights of Pythia.s, Improved Order of Red Men and 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Politically his affiliation has 
always been as a republican. Mr. Dukes was appointed trustee of 
Wayne Township in February, 1916, to fill out an unexpired term, 
and in 1918 was nominated for a second term. 

Itasca J. Sharp has for a number of years been identified with the 
farming community of Van Buren Township, and is busily engaged in 
cultivating the land of his home a mile south of Milford." 

He was bom near ]\Iansfield, Ohio, November 13, 1873, a son of 
George W. and Elizabeth (Heist) Sharp. His father was born April 
5, 1850, and his mother January 24, 1843. They married in Ohio, 
were fanners in that state, and about 1875 settled in Van Buren 
Township of Kosciusko County. A year later George Sharp returned 
to Pennsylvania, but spent his last years in Kosciusko County, where 
he died May 1, 1903. He was a democrat in politics. In the family 
were two children, I. J. Shai-p and Pearl. The latter is now the wife 
of John W. Homan and lives at Milford. 

Itasca J. Sharp grew up on a farm and had a district school edu- 
cation. He has always lived at home with his parents and has never 
married. At present he lives with his widowed mother and has a 
farm of forty acres. 

Mr. Sharp is affiliated with Milford Lodge No. 478, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past grand and member of the 
grand lodge. He is also past chief patriarch of Milford Encampment 
No. 242 and a member of the grand encampment. Mr. Sharp is a 
democrat in politics and is now serving as supervisor of roads in his 
district. 

Stephen Freemax. With one of the finest lakes in northern Indi- 
ana within its boundaries, Kosciusko Coimty has long en.joyed the 
benefits of one of the leading summer resorts of the state. This lake 
and its tourist population present some imusual opportunities to men 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 495 

of enterprise, and one of those who have been attracted here as perma- 
nent settlers and not only home makers but providers of the supplies 
and facilities required by the situation is Mr. Stephen Freeman, pro- 
prietor of the Sunbeam Farm and of Truesdell Lodge on Lake Wa- 
wasee. 

Mr. Freeman is a veteran of the business of paper maiiufacture, 
was identified with paper mills in his native New England and was 
formerly superintendent of a paper coating factory at Wabash, Indi- 
ana. He was born at Montpelier, Vermont, Januarj^ 12, 1870, son of 
Stephen and Emma (Leslie) Freeman. His father was born in Barre, 
Vermont, in 1820, and his mother on May 7, 1836. She is still living 
in Vermont at the age of eighty-two. They had only two children, 
Stephen and Maiy. iMary is a graduate of the Montpelier High 
School, spent two years in Wellesley College and is now the wife of 
Moses French of Solon, Maine. 

Traditions of a good education were inherent in the family and 
Mr. Stephen Freeman is a man of college and university training. He 
attended the public schools of Vermont, graduating from high school 
there, and in 1894 received the bachelor of science degree from the 
University of Vennont. He specialized in chemistrj', and his pro- 
ficiency in that line .soon brought him into connections with the paper 
making industry at Nashua, New Hampshire. He especially had to 
do with the coating of paper, and was in that department of one firm 
in New Hampshire for four years. In 1901 Mr. Freeman eame to 
Wabash, Indiana, was foreman in the factory coating room and later 
became coating mill superintendent. He held the position of superin- 
tendent about three years. 

On December 26, 1902, at Wabash, Mr. Freeman married 
Josephine Walter. She was born at North Manchester, Indiana, grad- 
uated from high school at Wabash and also attended Lake Erie Semi- 
nary at Painesville, Ohio. For several years she was a teacher in 
the public schools. In 1907 Mr. and Mrs. Freeman moved to Pied- 
mont, West Virginia, and he was identified there with the West Vir- 
ginia Pulp and Paper Company until June, 1911. At that date he 
eame to the beautiful Lake Wawasee, and has here developed an 
attractive summer home and a productive poulti-y and fruit estate of 
sixteen acres. He is a member of Hannah Lodge No. 61, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, and in politics is a republican. At present 
writing he is nominee for trustee of Turkey Creek Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Freeman have a happv family of five children: 
Stephen, Jr. born January 7, 1904; Lucy, born December 23, 
1905 ; Margaret, bom August 15, 1908 ; Joseph W., born March 28, 
1915, and James B., bom December 9, 1916. 

Lant.\ W. Ford, M. D. While a large number of families in and 
around Syracuse count upon the pi'ofessional services of Dr. Ford 
for all their requirements in medicine and surgery, this profession 
is not the sole interest of this very capable physician and surgeon. 
Dr. Ford comes of a race of farmers, and with all the demands made 
Vol. n— 8 



496 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

upon his time and energy by his regular calling he is owner of two 
very fine farms in Wa^Tie and Seward townships. 

There are few names that have been longer identified with the his- 
tory of Kosciusko County than that of this family. Eighty years ago 
his grandfather was struggling with the vicissitudes of pioneer condi- 
tions in Wayne To^Tiship, and from that day to this the Fords have 
pulled more than their own weight in agricultural and community 
affairs. 

The histors' of the family begins when two Ford brothers came 
from England" and one settled in New York and the other in Virginia. 
The Kosciusko County family is descended from the Virginia settler. 
A son of this colonist was George Ford, who was one of four brothers 
to help the colonies in their struggle for independence during the 
Revolution. 

A son of the Revolutionary patriot was the founder of the faraily 
in Kosciusko County, Henry Ford by name, who was born in Mrginia 
April 21, 1798. He grew up in his native state and on June 20, 1822, 
married Miss Phoebe ^Minear, who was born November 3. 1802, in 
Harrison Coimty in what is now "West Virginia. She was of English 
and German descent, daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Minear. 

It was in the summer of 1836 that Henry Ford brought his f amily 
to Kosciusko County. His first location was on the southeast quarter 
of section 35 in Wayne Township, and his nearest neighbors of white 
people were three miles away. In the course of time several other 
families, mostly from New England, came to the same community, 
and because of their origin the rnad upon which they lived was called 
Yankee Street. Henry Ford paid $1.25 an acre for a quarter section 
of land and was its first claimant from the Government. American 
families who live under the most stringent conditions of war regula- 
tions are luxuriously provided compared with the simplicity which 
marked the home life and the food and clothing of such early day 
families as that of Henry Ford. To his other burdens was added 
that of illness from fever and ague then so prevalent in Kosciusko 
County, and at one time he was the only member of the household 
able to be up and at work. But he had the qualities which enable men 
to live and prosper even under such conditions, and he spent his last 
years in comfort and took undoubted satisfaction in the remarkably 
"capable family that grew up about him. In 1858 Henry Ford moved 
to section 13 of Wa^-ne Township and lived on the farm he developed 
there until his death September 10, 1872. His widow passed away 
September 4, 1875. He served as a justice of the peace in his com- 
munity a number of years, and he and his wife were active pioneer 
members of the ilethodist Episcopal Church. In politics he was a 
democrat. Henry Ford and wife had eleven children: Lanta, Frank- 
lin, Elizabeth, John, Isaac, Noah. Eliza, Jacob, Shadraeh, Callendar 
and Daniel. Of this family seven sons and daughters taught school, 
one of them had a classical education and three of the sons read and 
practiced medicine. 

Daniel Ford, a son of Henry and father of Dr. Lanta W. Ford, 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 407 

was born in Wayne Township September 19, 1841. He was educated 
in local schools, in the Warsaw High School, and studied medicine in 
the University of Michigan. However, he practiced only a few years, 
the sustaining business interests of his life being as a farmer and 
stockman. He also tauglit a number of winter terms of school in this 
and in Fulton counties. He acquired a large farm of 400 acres south- 
west of Warsaw and was one of the citizens who could be depended 
upon for any progressive movement in that locality. He was a demo- 
crat and with his wife an active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. January 1, 1873, Daniel Ford married Miss Harriet Weiriek. 
She was born in Richland County, Ohio, August 29, 1853, and was a 
child when brought to Kosciusko County by her parents, Jacob and 
Margaret Weiriek. Daniel Ford and wife had two children : Lanta 
W. and Rosella. The daughter was born April 28, 1876, was educated 
in the public schools of Warsaw and DePauw University. 

Lanta W. Ford was born on the old home farm in Wayne Township 
November 3, 1874. His boyhood days were spent as a farmer but his 
parents gave him the best of advantages in school. He attended the 
Warsaw High School and in 1901 graduated from the Indiana Uni- 
versity School of Medicine with the degree of M. D. In the fall of 
the same year he opened his office at Syracuse, and for over seventeen 
years has steadily attended to the needs of a growing practice. He is 
a member in good standing of the County and State Medical societies 
and is one of the talented professional men of the county. Dr. Ford 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Warsaw and is 
affiliated with Syracuse Camp of the Modern Woodmen of America 
and Kosciusko Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Po- 
litically he follows the family tradition as a democrat. 

As a farmer Dr. Ford specializes in the breeding and raising of 
high grade livestock. He is a breeder of Shorthorn cattle and of 
Belgian horses. 

Oscar Alfred Harding, a teacher and farmer, was born in Cork, 
Ireland, April 9, 1858. He was a son of Thomas and Mary (Lester) 
Harding, both of whom were born in Cork, Ireland, although his 
father was of English descent. The father was born September 24, 
1823, the mother February 8, 1828. They were united in marriage 
June 14, 1846, both being devoted members of the Episcopal Church. 
To them were bom five children who lived to maturity : George, 
Oscar, Robert, Minnie and Letitia. The mother died at Sturgis, Michi- 
gan, November 14, 1908, and the father, near Oregon City, Oregon, 
where he made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Letitia Allen, Decem- 
ber 28, 1912, being in his ninetieth year. 

The sub.ject of this sketch came to America in the spring of 1862 
with his mother and youngest brother, sailing from Queenstown and 
landing in New York, his father and oldest brother (George) having 
come the j-ear before. They located in Sturgis, Michigan. Oscar 
attended the Episcopal Parish School at Cork, Ireland, until he was 
nine years old and later attended the public school at Sturgis. He 



498 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

finished his education at Hillsdale College, Michigan. For nineteen 
years he followed the teaching profession, teaching his first school in 
Noble Count.y, Indiana, and later coming to Kosciusko County, where 
he met and on September 2. 1884, married Miss Emeline Weirick. 

Mrs. Harding is a daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Smith) Wei- 
rick. She was educated in the public school, attended St. Michael's 
Academy, PljTnouth, Indiana, also the Valparaiso Normal and later 
she was among the ranks of educators for twelve years. After their 
marriage I\Ir. and ]\Ii"s. Harding located on the farm where they now 
live, and where he continued teaching along with fanning several 
years. 

They have one daughter, Mary Alice, born August 9, 1886. She 
had her preliminary education at Mentone, later graduated from the 
Warsaw High School and in 1908 received her A. B. degree from 
DePauw T^niversity. Mars- A. Harding married Stanley Stephenson 
Boggs. They have one child. Stanley H. Boggs. Mr. Boggs is a grad- 
uate of the Warsaw High School, spent two years in the civil engi- 
neering department of Purdue University and was then employed for 
six years as resident and locating engineer on the Frisco Railroad in 
Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. He is now the nominee on the 
republican ticket for the office of county surs^eyor. 

All the family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Mr. Harding is a teacher of the Bible class. He is affiliated with 
Mentone Lodge No. 567, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, being 
a past master. His son-in-law, S. S. Boggs, is also a Mason. 

Joshua Zimmerman. Several of the most extensive farmers in 
Kosciusko County are comparative newcomers and came here from 
the rich and productive agricultural state of Illinois. One of them is 
Joshua Zimmerman, a large land owner and successful farmer in Van 
Buren Township. His large farm is two miles south of Milford. 

Mr. Zimmerman was born in Woodford County. Illinois, April 13, 
1864, a son of Michael and Kathryn (Naffzinger) Zimmerman. 

Michael Zimmerman was born in Baden, Germany, September 19, 
1820, a son of Andrew and Annie (Miller) Zimmerman, of Germany. 
He immigrated to America in 1839, with his father and family of five 
children, was thirty-one clays on the sea and settled in Butler County, 
Ohio, where his father died. In 1848 ilichael Zimmerman left Ohio 
and came to Illinois and settled in Tazwell County and later in Wood- 
ford County. He first purchased 100 acres of land and later owned 
330 acres of fine farming ground. He married ^liss Kathryn Naff- 
zinger, born on the Atlantic Ocean July 9, 1826. They were married 
in 1845, and raised a family of nine children. Mr. Zimmerman died 
February 7, 1913, at the age of ninety-two yeai-s, four months, eleven 
days. His wife still lives (July 3, 1918), and has sixty -seven grand- 
children and seventy-three great-grandchildren. 

Michael Zimmerman served as an elder in the Apostolic Christian 
Church. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman are: Anna, wife 
of John Witzig; Barbara, wife of John Ramseyer; John, a resident 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 49!J 

of Illinois; Lydia, wife of Abraham Rinkenberger ; Chris, who lives 
in Livingston County, Illinois ; Hannah, wife of John Hohulin ; 
Joshua ; Caleb, of Illinois ; and Lillie, wife of William Holliger. 

Mr. Joshua Zimmerman was reared and educated in Illinois, and 
lived at home until he was past his majority. For several years he 
worked out at monthly wages and began life with very little beyond 
what his labor had enabled him to accumulate. 

February 25, 1890, he married Miss Mary Wetui-ieh. After their 
marriage they rented land in Illinois and their first farm was eighty 
acres. Later they sold that and bought 219 acres, and on moving to 
Kosciusko Coiuity purchased 240 acres in Jefferson Township. Two 
years later they came to their present location in Van Buren Town- 
ship, where they acquired 160 acres. Mr. Zimmerman has 400 acres 
under his ownership, and several of his sons are now bearing an active 
part with him in managing this place. He is a general farmer and 
also keeps Norman horses. 

Ten children were born to him and his wife, nine of whom are still 
living: Ernest, Cathei-ine, Anna, Rosa, Levi (deceased), Michael, 
Harvey, Esther, Elmer and Ruth. The family are active members of 
the Apostolic Christian Church. Mr. Zimmerman is a republican in 
politics. 

John H. Bowser, ;\1. D., who graduated in medicine over thirty 
years ago, found his time and abilities more and more taxed as a com- 
petent physician and surgeon and was one of the ablest as he was one 
of the oldest practitioners in Kosciusko County at the time of his 
death. From the time of his graduation he was located at Syracuse 
and every one in that part of the county knew and esteemed Doctor 
Bowser and his fine family. 

He was born in Elkhart County, Indiana, May 1, 1860, a son of 
Philip and Cassandra (Druckamiller) Bowser. His maternal grand- 
father, John Druckamiller, came from the vicinity. of Philadelphia to 
Carroll County, Ohio, locating near Carrollton, and later moved to 
Elkhart County, Indiana. Philip Bowser was born at an old village 
called Bowsertown, near Dayton, Ohio, in 1829, a son of Daniel 
Bowser, who came from Providence, Rhode Island, and was a pioneei' 
in Montgomery County, Ohio. Daniel Bowser later did some pioneer 
work in Elkhart County, Indiana, and constructed a dam near Milford 
Junction and operated one of the early mills. Philip and Cassandra 
Bowser married in p]lkhart County, and then located on a farm mid- 
way between New Paris and Milford. In 1872 they moved to Goshen, 
where the father died in Ma.v, 1904. He was a stalwart i-epublican of 
the old school. In the family wei-e four children, one of whom died in 
infancy. Those still living are : Dr. Jolm H. ; Harley E., born in 
1864 and now living at Goshen, Indiana ; and Guy, born in 1878, who 
is a graduate of the Goshen High School and of the University of 
Michigan, and is now chief chemist with the National Portland Cement 
Company at Durham, Ontario, Canada. 

The early life of Doctor Bowser was spent on a farm. He attended 



500 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

common schools and high school, and entering Indiana Medical Col- 
lege graduated with the degree il. D. in 1SS5. On the fii-st of June 
in that year he located at Syracuse, and in this locality he gave his 
professional services to nearly two generations of people. He was a 
member of the Connty and State Medical Societies. 

Doctor Bowser married Susie E. Willey. Mi-s. Bowser is a gradu- 
ate of the Goshen High School and before her marriage was a teacher 
in Colorado. Five children were born to them, three still living: 
Howard A., born March 9, 1887 ; Harold J., born December 7, 1893 ; 
and Philip H., born January 30, 1896. These sons are fine specimens 
of stnrdj- American manhood and two of them are now serving their 
country'. Howard, the oldest, is a fireman with the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railway. He married Mabel Wi.se, daughter of the late Doctor 
Wise. 

The son Harold graduated from the Syracuse High School and 
spent four and a half years in the Indiana State University. For three 
years he was a member of the university football team. He enlisted 
in the United States Navy Reserve Force, took special trainin? course 
for six months, and is now an ensign in the navA'. The son Philip is 
a graduate of the local high .school, studied medicine four years in the 
State University Medical School, and enlisted in the Medical Reserve 
for the Navv. He was captain of the State University basketball 
team in 1918. 

Dr. Bowser affiliated with Syracuse Lodge No. 290, Knights of 
Pythias, and was a member and physician for the local lodge of 
Eagles. In politics he was a republican. He owned a fine modern 
home at Syracuse, having built it in 1892. 'Sir. Bowser died suddenly 
of angina pectoris on June 17, 1918. 

Jacob B. Miller. Some of the best farms and the most enterpris- 
ing farmers are found in Jackson Township, among them being Jacob 
B. Miller, whose place is a half mile east of Sidney, in a community 
where his jieople have lived since pioneer times. 

In Jackson Township he was born April 28, 1869, son of Samuel P. 
and Rachel (Heckman) ^Miller. His father was born in Ohio in 1842 
and died in 1914. His mother was also a native of Ohio and is still 
living. They came to Kosciusko County with their respective parents, 
married here, and then settled on a farm in Jackson Township. The 
father was a very active member of the Church of the Brethren, which 
is an especially strong denomination in Jackson Township. He voted 
the republican ticket. Of the eight children, iive are still I'ving: 
Albert, a farmer in Jackson Township ; Jacob B. ; Calvin C, of Cheru- 
busco, Indiana ; Reason A., of Pierceton ; and Elliott, a farmer in 
Jackson Township. 

Jacob B. Miller grew up on the home farm and was educated in 
the public schools at Sidney. He wa.s at home with his parents until 
twenty-one, and after that for twenty years farmed his uncle's place. 
On December 16, 1894, he married Miss Ollie Idle. iMrs. ^Miller was 
bom in Monroe Township of this county June 13, 1871, daughter of 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 501 

Marion and Huldah Idle. When she was thi'ee years old her mother 
died, and she lived in the home of her grandparents until her father 
married ao;ain. Her father was a soldier of the Union Army, was a 
very popular republican, filled the office of assessor of Monroe Town- 
ship, and for a number of yeare taught the public schools. Mrs. Miller 
was well educated and was also a teacher before her marriage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller have been farmers for many years. In 1910 
they went West and proved up 160 acres of government land, then 
sold it and returned to this county. Mr. Miller has eighty acres, 
highly cultivated and improved, and is handling some well graded 
stock. He and his wife are members of the Brethren Church at Sid- 
ney, and in politics he has always supported the men and measures 
in the republican party. 

Harlo W. Case. As the nation grows older and more and more 
honor is paid to men who offered their lives as sacrifices to the preser- 
vation of the Union in the dark days of the '60s. One of these veterans 
still living in Kosciusko County is Harlo W. Case, whose life since the 
war has been one of peaceful industry as a farmer in Indiana, and 
who is now enjoying a well earned retirement at his home in Syra- 
cuse. 

Mr Case was born in Warren County, Pennsylvania, at the town 
of Fine Grove, May 30, 1838. He has therefore attained the dignity 
of fourscore years. His parents, Rufus W. and Amarilla (Nichols) 
Case, were both natives of New York State and were married at West- 
field, from which locality they removed to Pennsylvania. Harlo W. 
Case was reared in Pennsylvania, in Lucas County, Ohio, and also 
lived in Michigan at Macomb and in ilonroe County. In early man- 
hood he returned to Toledo, Ohio, and from that city enlisted in Com- 
pany G of the Fourteenth Ohio Infantry. This was a ninety days 
regiment and at the conclusion of his term of enlistment he re- 
enlisted for three years in Company F of the Fourteenth Ohio In- 
fantry. Even that service was not sufficient to satisfy his ardor for 
his country, and he finally veteranized for another period of three 
years or to the end of the war. During the Atlanta campaign he was 
wounded with gunshot, and his last days in the armory were spent 
in hospital. He was granted his honorable discharge on account 
of disability February 16, 1865. 

With the close of the war Mr. Case returned to Monroe County, 
Michigan, and on February 9, 1870, married Josephine Morss. She 
became the mother of eight children, seven of whom are still living: 
Charles, Eva, Nora, Ellery, Mary, Arthur, and James. The mother 
of these children died while the family were living in White County, 
Indiana. For his second wife Mr. Case married Mary J. White, who 
died two years later. He then married Sarah A. Weimer, widow 
of Washington Weimer, who was a minister of the United Brethren 
church. Mrs. Case had one daughter, Bertha, wife of Frank Crandall. 

Mrs. Case is an active member of the United Brethren church. 
Mr. Case has long been an honored member of the Grand Army Post at 



502 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Syracuse and for sixteen years was its adjutant. During his resi- 
dence in Lucas County, Ohio, he served as trustee of his township. 
Mr. Case because of his long and arduous service in the war has a 
medal from the State of Ohio as an appropriate memorial for his 
sacrifices. In politics he is a republican. Mr. Case owns a fine farm 
of a 144 acres in Turkey Creek Township of this county but for a 
number of years has enjoyed the comforts of a good home in the 
Town of Syracuse. His farm is known as the Lake View Stock Farm. 

Chaeles H. Rookstool and his son are owners and managers of 
one of the notable stock fanns of Kosciusko County. This farm is 
in Van Buren Township, on rural route No. 2 out of Syracuse. It is 
the home of some of the finest Holstein-Friesian stock found in North- 
ern Indiana. 'Mr. Rookstool has been breeding Holstein cattle for a 
number of years, and some of his animals have received the highest 
marks and credits from competent judges. Both he and his son arc 
membei-s of the Holstein-Friesian Association of America. 

Mr. Rookstool was born in Elkhart County, Indiana, November 13. 
1863, but has spent most of his life in Kosciusko County. This is one 
of the pioneer families in Northern Indiana. Samuel and Mary 
Rookstool, grandparents of Charles H., moved from Preble County, 
Ohio, to Elkhart County, this state, in 1836. Samuel Rookstool was 
born in Virginia and his wife in Ohio. They were the parents of a 
large family of children. 

William Rookstool, father of Charles H., was born in Preble 
County, Ohio, August 13, 1835, and was a small infant when his par- 
ents moved to Elkhart County. He grew up there and in 1869 brought 
his family to Kosciusko County and settled on a farm in section 2 of 
Van Buren Township. At first his land had practically no improve- 
ments. There was a rough house 16x24 feet and very little land was 
cleared ready for eiiltivation. He went through the experiences of the 
real pioneer, and eventually made for himself and his family an ex- 
cellent property. He owned land in Van Buren Township and also 
another farm in Elkhart County. He died January 31. 1889. and his 
widow is still living. On February 5, 1857. William Rookstool married 
iliss Sophia Grisamer, who was born in Noble County, Indiana. Octo- 
ber 27, 1837. one of the nine children of Joseph and Ainia Grisamer. 
natives of Pennsylvania. William Rookstool and wife had seven cihl- 
dren. The first two died in early childhood. The third in age is 
Charles H.. Rosetta is the deceased wife of ilelviu Neft". and Ida M. 
died after her marriage to Daniel Nefl:'. Delia is the wife of R. E. 
Dewit of ]\Iilford. and Ira died in infancy. 

Charles H. Rookstool was born in Elkhart County November 13, 
1863, and was about six years of age when his parents left Benton 
Township of that county and moved to Van Buren Township of Kosci- 
usko County. Here he attended the district schools and lived at home 
until after his majority. 

In October, 1888, Mr. Rookstool married Miss Minerva J. Dewait. 
She was born on the farm where she now lives and was reared and 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 503 

educated in this coinnmnitj'. Mr. and Mrs. Rookstool have one child, 
Iman G., who wa.s born Aiignst 24, 1889, and is a graduate of the com- 
mon schools. He married Ethel M. Stiffler on June 16, 1908. She 
was born in Turkey Creek Township of this county. Iman G. Rook- 
stool and wife have three living children: Merritt, Everett and 
Wreathel, while one son, Alva, is deceased. 

It was in 1901 that Mr. Rookstool bought his present farm of 200 
aci-es. He paid only $5,600 for land which under his management 
and with extensive improvements is now conservatively valued ar 
$20,000. He has developed it as a thoroughly equipped stock farm. 
His fine barn was erected in 1907, and he extensively remodeled his 
home in 1908. Mr. Rookstool is a republican, and has received various 
honors from his party. Mrs. Rookstool is a member of the Church of 
the Brethren. 

Jesse D. Cory is a prosperous farmer whose home is two miles 
west of Syracu.se in Van Buren Township. The Corys are pioneers 
in Northern Indiana, and the family name has always been associated 
with honest, sterling worth and good citizenship. 

The family was established in Elkhart County in the fall of 1831 
by Jeremiah and Dolly Coi->% the former a native of Pennsylvania and 
the latter of Kentucky. A son of these parents, A. C. Cory, was 
then thirteen j-eai-s of age, having been born in Pickaway County, 
Ohio, April 19, 1818. A. ('. Cory in 1837 bought eighty acres of land 
in section 1 of Van Buren Township, Kosciusko County. He mauf 
the purchase at the general land sale at La Porte. In a clearing made 
in the woods he erected a log cabin, and his first year's crop was 
an acre of corn. Most of the meat was supplied by the wild game, 
principally venison. He was one of the earlier settlers in Van Buren 
Township, and lived there to see the entire community transformed 
by the work of civilizing mankind. He had many experiences with 
wolves and other wild animals, not to speak of the hardships he under- 
went in clearing and improving his land. He was a republican in 
politics, served as director of the local schools many years, was a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church and at one time a member of the Kosciusko 
County Pioneer Association. He first married, in 1839, Sally A. 
Mann, who died in 1845. January 4, 1846, he married Mrs. ]\Iatilda 
(Wood) Gunter. She was liorn in Ohio October 23, 1820, and her 
parents, John G. and Anna Wood, were settlers in Van Buren Town- 
ship in 1840. 

The father of Jesse U. Cory was Orange L. Cory, who was born in 
Elkhart County, Indiana, in 1846, and is now living in Syracuse. He 
married Selena Evans who was born in Kosciusko County. After their 
marriage they lived in Elkhart Countj' for several years, but finally 
moved to Warsaw. Orange Cory served as deputy .sheriff of the 
county. He finally moved to Syracuse, where he is now living. He 
and his wife had eleven children, seven of whom are still living. 

Je.sse D. Cory was born in Elkhart County July 15, 1S6M, hut has 
spent most of his life in Kosciusko County. He was educated in dis- 



504 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

trict schools and remained at home until twenty-one. For a number of 
years he has farmed his present place of eighty-nine acres and is a 
raiser of the staple crops and of good livestock. He is also a stock- 
holder in the local bank. ]\Ir. Cory is affiliated with the Eagles Lodge 
at Syracuse and in politics is a republican. 

CoLUMBi^s DiSHER. When Columlnis Dislier married, he and his 
wife had practically no capital to begin on. ard all they have accumu- 
lated since then represents a gi-eat volume of hard and earnest work. 
thrifty cooperation, and a strict utilization of all the opportunities 
that liave come their way. ^Ir. and IMrs. Disher now have a fine farm 
in section 29 of Turkey Creek Township, and besides their material 
circumstances they have reared a fine family of young sons. 

Mr. Disher was born in Prairie Township of Kosciusko Countv 
July 22, 1866. a son of Japeth and Malinda (Boggs) Disher. Both 
parents died many years ago, leaving their only son an orphan child. 
He was reared in the home of Robert Towns, and had all his earlv 
advantages in the district schools. Later he paid his way through 
the normal course of the University of Valparaiso, and for twenty 
years was one of the successful teachers of Kosciusko County. 

October 6, 1889, he married Margaret A. Thomas, who was born in 
Scott Township of this county, February 28. 1871. After their mar- 
riage i\Ir. Disher continued teaching school in the winter t'me and 
farmed in the summer, and in 1902 he and his wife were able to buy 
their present farm of 120 acres in sections 28 and 29 of Turkey Creek 
Township. Mr. Disher does general fnrming and stock raising, and 
has a number of good hogs besides other livestock. 

The following sons were born to their marriage : DeWitt, born Feb- 
ruary 11, 1891, is a graduate of the common schools and the high 
school, married Hattie Kuhn and they reside in Turkey Creek Town- 
.ship. Othello, born October 28, 1892, attended high school and is now 
with the Oliver Plow Company at South Bend. Ralph, born January 
21, 1900, is a graduate of the common schools and attended high 
school, but is now enlisted in the United States Army and is with the 
Expeditionary Forces in France. Lloyd and Floyd, twins, were born 
October 24, 1904. Columbus, the youngest, was born May 1, 1907. 

Mr. Disher is a democrat in politics. ]Mrs. Disher was reared and 
educated in Scott Township of this county. Her father, Andrew 
J. Thomas, was born in North Carolina and was brought to Indiana 
when a boy by his parents. The Thomas family was identified with 
the early settlement of Kosciusko County. Andrew J. Thomas mar- 
ried ilargaret Beckner. a native of Ohio. After their marriage they 
lived on a farm in Scott Township, where 'Sh: Thomas died in 1881. 
IMrs. Thomas died July 21. 1918. They had nine children, seven of 
whom are still living: William E., a retired farmer of Scott Town- 
ship; Jacob E.. a carpenter in Scott Township; Jennie, wife of Frank 
Binkley, of Bourbon, Indiana ; Ida, wife of Charles Yager, of Scott 
Township ; Lewis, principal of the Etna School ; Margaret A.. IMrs. 
Disher ; and Charles 0., a retired farmer. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 505 

Harley R. Regenos. Five and half miles southwest of Claypool 
on rural route No. 1 in Seward Township is a farm that has been 
under one management and in the possession of one family for three 
successive generations. Its present owner, Harlej' R. Regenos, is a 
grandson of the man who cleared the land from tlie woods and insti- 
tuted the arts and practices of agriculture. Harley R. Regenos is 
also a well known auctioneer and is one of the successful men of affairs 
in the township. 

He was born on the farm where he now lives January 23, 1883, and 
his parents were Jefferson and Mary (Warren) Regenos, the former 
a native of Ohio and the latter of Wabash County, Indiana. The 
pioneer grandfather was llartin Regenos, who came to Kosciusko 
County in 1860 and at that time located on the farm where his grand- 
son now lives. Martin Regenos is remembered as a very excellent 
type of citizen and was especially devout as a church member and for 
forty years was class leader of the United Brethren church. His 
son Jefferson was hardly less active in church affairs, while the grand- 
son Harley assumes as large a share of church activities as his re- 
sponsibilities permit. 

Harley Regenos spent part of his early life on the old homestead, 
and some years ago returned to it as owner and manager. He has a 
place of 100 acres, and it is gaining a wide reputation as the Yellow 
Creek View Farm, productive not only of all the staple crops of this 
region but of some very high grade livestock. Mr. Regenos has 
figured as a crier of public sales for a number of 3'ears and has much 
special talent in that direction. He is a leader of the republican 
party in his home community and has been nominated for trustee of 
Seward Township. He is also at present serving as president of 
Seward Township Farmei-s Institute. 

November 5, 1904, Mr. Regenos married Miss Minnie Mattix. 
She was born in Franklin Township of this county. They have four 
young children : Frankie L., Allen Dale, Orlando Dean and Ho Eliz- 
abeth. 

Jacob E. Doty is widely known over Kosciusko and adjoining 
counties as a successful and general contractor with home and head- 
quarters at Milford. He has been in the contracting business for a 
quarter of a century and has developed an organization that lacks 
nothing in efficiency and equipment for handling the largest as well 
as the smallest contra,pts for building and general industrial work. 

Mr. Doty was born on a farm 21/0 miles east of Milford April 12, 
1868, a son of Alonzo and Elizabeth (Rush) Doty, the former a native 
of New Jersey and the latter of Pennsylvania. Alonzo Doty grew up 
in Ohio and had a notable record as a soldier, being in the war with 
Mexico in the '40s and later serving as first lieutenant in the Civil war. 
He was wounded in the battle of Shiloh, but after recovering con- 
tinued until the end of the struggle. He married for his first wife 
Elizabeth Jloore, and they had four children : Elizabeth, wife of Louis 
Case; Jennie, wife of George Pentry ; Richard L., who lives in Ten- 
nessee, and William, who died in childhood. For his second wife 



506 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Alonzo Doty married Elizabeth Rush. By that union there were twci 
sons and two daughters, two of whom are still living: Alonzo 
Ulysses, a farmer and contractor in Van Bureii. Township of this 
county; and Jacob E. 

Jacob E. Doty has lived in Milford since he was six years of age. 
He attended pulalic schools here and at the age of fourteen began 
learning the stone mason's trade. He served a thorough apprentice- 
ship in that line, and the large experience gained as a journeyman 
brought him a complete and detailed knowledge of nearly every branch 
of the contracting business. He became a contractor at the age of 
twenty-five, and for a long period of years the business has been 
conducted as Doty Brothers. 

Mr. Doty married Samantha Miller, daughter of D. W. ililler. 
She was reared in Jackson Township of Elkhart County. They have 
three daughters : Erma, wife of Charles Troster, of Milford ; Maude, 
a graduate of high school and of the State University, wife of Prank 
Clover of Gary, Indiana; and Mary E., a graduate of the Milford 
High School and the wife of George Keller of Milford. The mother 
of these children is now deceased. In September, 1917, Mr. Doty 
married Lilah Seniour. He is affiliated with Kosciusko Lodge Xn 
418, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of which he is past mastei 
In politics he has been active as a republican, has served as tow" 
trustee, and for six years was county engineer of Kosciusko County. 
He has also served as a member of the City Council of Milford a num- 
ber of years. 

Isaac T. Smith. The records of early settlement in Kosciusko 
County contain few earlier dates than the year when Jacob Smith, 
father of the prosperous and well known farmer of Prairie Township, 
Isaac T. Smith, arrived here and acquired his first land in Prairie 
Township. The family has had a long and honorable history in con- 
nection with agricultural and local affairs since that time, extending 
over eight decades. 

The fine farm home of Isaac T. Smith is five miles northwest of 
Warsaw. He was bom in Prairie Township August 1, 1843, sob of 
Jacob and Jerusha (Thomas) Smith. His father was born in Erie 
County. Pennsylvania, in 1806 and his mother in Ross County, Ohio. 
Jacob Smith on starting west walked all the way from Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania, to Logansport, Indiana. He married in that town and lived 
there for a year, but in 1833 invaded the woods and prairies of Kosci- 
usko County. He entered a tract of Government land in Prairie 
Township, and cleared away a place in the midst of the woods for his 
log cabin home. He was a quiet, unassuming man, always industrious 
and capable in his work, and gained the high esteem of all the citi- 
zens of his localitj-. He acquired 340 acres, and was one of the pros- 
perous farmers. In politics he was a democrat. Jacob Smith died 
in August, 1891, and his wife in 1894. Of their eight children the 
following are named: Hiram Smith, who lived in Plain Township, 
married Bettie Irwin and died in 1918: Alwilda, widow of Robert 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 507 

MeBride, living at Leesbiirg; Mary, wife of William Webster, of 
Prairie Township ; O. H. P., who died in 1918 ; and Isaac T. 

Isaac T. Smith grew np in his native township and had a com- 
mon school education. He made good use of his educational oppor- 
tunities, and for fourteen years was a successful teacher. On Novem- 
ber 26, 1868, he married Maiy J. Rose. She was born in Elkhart 
County, Indiana, November 14, 1848, and lived there until her mar- 
riage. Mr. Smith has acquired a good farm of 260 acres and for 
many years has conducted it with a high degree of efficiency and 
profit. 

He and his wife have three children : Edward T., a graduate of 
the Fort Wayne High School and now lives in Indianapolis ; Claude 
M., a graduate of the common schools and living with his parents; 
Goldie E., a graduate of the Wai-saw High School, wife of Ralph 
Huifer, living in Prairie Township. 

Mr. Smith has always been a democrat in politics. In 1884 he 
was elected trustee of Prairie Township by a m^.iority of thirty-one, 
at a time when the township was considered safely republican by a 
margin of twenty-five. He was reelected by a ma.iority of forty-one 
in 1880 and 1882. He has always been active in his party and has 
neglected no opportunities to cooperate with every worthy movement 
in his locality. 

Edw^ard H. Smith. There are comparatively few families that 
have kept their residence continuously in Kosciusko County for a 
period of over eighty years. The present generation of such a family 
is represented by Edward H. Smith, one of the able citizens and good 
farmers of Pi-airie Township. Mr. Smith lived five miles northwest of 
Warsaw, and is now in practically the same locality where this branch 
of the Smiths established themselves at a time when Kosciusko County 
was filled with heavy woods, Indians and wild game. 

The founder of the family here was his grandfather, Jacob Smith, 
who was born in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1806, 
a son of Peter and Rachel (Reynolds) Smith. Peter and his wife 
were both natives of Pennsylvania and married about 1799 and had 
eight children. Peter spent his life in Pennsylvania and died there 
at the age of sixty-three and his wife passed away in Minnesota. 

After reaching maturity Jacob Smith in the fall of 1829 came to 
Indiana and explored a considerable portion of the wilderness of the 
northern part of the state. For several years he lived at Logansport 
in Cass County, but in 1833 was one of the early arrivals in Prairie 
Township of Kosciu.sko County. At that time niost of the land had 
been surveyed, but very little of it was occupied and a large part was 
not yet on the market. In 1834 Jacob Smith bought 320 acres 
of land from Edward McCartney, government agent and Indian inter- 
preter. Later he had an opportunity to sell half of this land and was 
busied with the development and cultivation of a quarter section. As 
his prosperity increased he bought other land until he had more than 
a half section, and most of it under cultivation. He was one of the 
men to whom credit is due for laying the substantial foundation which 



508 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COl^'TT 

the present generation of Kosciusko County people enjoy. Jacob 
Smith married November 16, 1832, the year before he came to Kosci- 
usko County, Miss Jeruslia Thomas, daughter of Isaac and Mary 
(Lumbeck) Thomas, natives of Kentucky. This pioneer couple had 
a family of eleven children: Edward, who died in infancy, was 
born August 31, 1834, and his was the first recorded birth of a white 
child on Turkey Creek prairie; Edward SleC. named for the gov- 
ernment land agent, was bom September 28, 1836, and was also one 
of the first white children born in this county; Alwilda was born 
January 28. 1839; Hiram was born ]March 18, 1841; Isaac T. was 
born August 1, 1843 ; Oliver H. P., born August 1, 1846 ; Henry 0., 
born July 9, 1848, and died at the age of seven years; Mary I., born 
November 9. 1850; Elizabeth A., born January 11, 1852, and died at 
the age of eight years ; Dange. born January 7. 1854, died at the ase 
of six years, and the youngest born in 1866 died unnamed. 

Edward ilcC. Smith grew up in Prairie Township, and was one of 
the well known residents of that locality until his death in 1914. He was 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and a democrat 
in politics. He married Jennie Thomas, and they had four children, 
Charles, deceased ; Hiram J., a farmer of Prairie Township ; Edward 
H. and Susan A., twins, the latter the wife of George Anglin of War- 
saw. 

Edward H. Smith was born in Prairie Township December 14, 
1869. His early environment was the home farm and his ediieation 
was supplied by the country schools. On June 12, 1901. be married 
]\Iiss Gertrude Anglin. who was born in Etna Township February 8, 
1875, daughter of William B. Anglin of this county. After their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs Smith located on a place a half mile west of 
where the.v now live. Their present farm comprises 368 acres, all in 
Prairie Township, is one of the high class estates of the county, 
devoted to general farming and stock raising. Mrs. Sm'th was edu- 
cated in the common schools, and for several years before her marriage 
taught in Prairie and Scott townships. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have two 
children : Charles W., born July 4, 1905. and Arthur E.. born Feb- 
ruarv 13, 1911. Mi-s. Smith is a member of the ^Millwood Chapel of 
the Christian Church. Mr. Smith is a democrat and is affiliated with 
Leesburg Lodge No. 192, Knights of Pj-thias. 

Fr.\xklix Byrer was brought to Kosciusko County over half a 
century ago, has lived in this and in surrounding counties of the 
state most of his life, and though formerly a shoemaker has gradu- 
allj' devoted more and more of his energies to farming and has one of 
the good places of Prairie Township, four miles northwest of Warsaw. 

He was born in Stark County. Ohio. April 25, 1848. son of Jacob 
and Barbara (Spiegel) Byrer. His father was born in Pennsvl- 
vania in 1821, and his mother in Ohio, in which state they married. 
They had only one child, Franklin, who was nine months old when 
his mother died in 1849. His father came to Indiana in 1865 and W 
cated at Clunatt in Prairie Township. He bought eighty-five acres 
at Stony Point, but made his home in Clunatt and followed the tvnA" 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 509 

of shoemaker tliere until his death on July 12, 1885. For his second 
wife he married Lydia ]\Iyers, and they had three children, only one 
now living, Wilson B.vrer, of Clunatt. 

Franklin Byrer attended school at Clunatt and under the direc- 
tion of his father learned the trade of shoemaker. He stayed at home 
working in his father's shop until 1880, when he moved to Marshall 
County and bought a farm. In 1890 he sold his place there and re- 
turned to Kosciusko County. On July 12. 1909, he came to his present 
place of ninety-five acres and by his long continued industry and 
good management has been prospered and has everything to satisfy the 
modest wants of himself and family. 

December 24. 1871, Mr. Bvrer married Anna R. Reisch. She was 
born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, and was brought to this 
eoiinty when a girl. To their marriage were born six children, three 
of whom are now deceased. Ellery is unmarried and living at home. 
Warren married Iva Moore, who died leaving two children. Clarence 
0., who lives in Etna Township, married Erbie Dunick and has two 
children. The family are members of the United Brethren Church. 

William G. Irwin. One of the families to be properly included 
in this record of Kosciusko County people is that of William G. Irwin, 
a farmer, I14 miles north of Atwood in Prairie Township. 

The Irwins have been here since pioneer times, and Mr. Irwin was 
born on his parents' farm in Washington Town.ship, northwest of 
Pierceton, May 10, 1862, son of Stewart and Sarah A. (Richie) Irwin. 
His parents were both natives of Ireland. His father was born in 
1812 and his mother in County Tyrone in 1831. Stewart Irwin came 
to the United States with his parents and located in Logan County, 
Ohio, while Sarah Richie's family first located at Greenfield in 
Hancock County, Indiana. Thej' were married in Ohio and lived on 
a farm in that state for a time, and on coming to Kosciusko County 
they settled in Washington Township, but after a year moved to 
Tippecanoe Township, spent another twelve months there, and then 
bought their home in Prairie Township where they lived until death. 
Mrs. Sarah Irwin was a member of the United Brethren church. He 
was a republican. They had eight children, two of whom died in in- 
fancy. The others are: Robert C. ; John R., a farmer north of 
Atwood; William G. ; Sarah, wife of Prank W. Harman of Prairie 
Township ; James S., a farmer in Wisconsin ; and Sherman C, a 
carpenter at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

William G. Irwin was reared in this county, attended the common 
schools and was an industrious helper at home until the age of twenty- 
si.x. He then married Miss Carrie A. Lutes, who died fifteen months 
later, leaving no children. Por his second wife Mr. Irwin married 
Clara J. Miner, and they became the parents of four children: 
Joseph S., Justin D., Sherman R. and Carrie A. After the death 
of his second wife Mr. Irwin married, September 4, 1913, Mrs. S. C. 
Webb. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Atwood. Mr. Irwin is a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias 
and is a republican, having served as local committeeman for twelve 



510 HISTORY OF K08C1U.SK0 COUNTY 

years. He is a man of quiet and unassuming citizenship, does his part 
in local affairs, and is industriously managing his home farm of forty 



Alonzo U. Doty. Practically every one in the northern part of 
Kosciusko County knows of the enterprise and vigor with which mem- 
bers of the Doty family manage all their affairs. Alonzo I^ Doty is 
both a practical and thorough farmer and also a member of the firm 
Doty Brothers, general contractors, who handle general building, road 
making and other work all over this and surrounding counties. 

Mr. Dotv was born in Jeffei-son Township of Kosciusko County 
July 4, 1863, son of Alonzo and Elizabeth (Rush) Doty. His father 
was born in New York City and his mother in Ohio. Both families 
came to Indiana in early days, and Elizabeth Rush grew up in Kosci- 
usko County. Alonzo Doty. Sr., was reared in New York State and 
learned the machinist's trade in Ohio. He had an interesting record 
as a soldier, going into the army at the time of the ilexican war. 
He was discharged as a lieutenant. When the Civil war broke out 
he organized a company and went in as lieutenant and was promoted 
to captain. After the war he came to Kosciusko County. His fii-st 
wife was Miss Moore, and her children still living are ]Mary. Richard, 
Jennie and Elizabeth. By his marriage to Elizabeth Rush, Alonzo 
Doty, Sr., had four children : Alonzo U. ; Rosa, deceased wife of Henry 
Newcomb ; Matilda, deceased wife of Harry Tripp ; and Jacob E., 
who is a partner with his brother in the firm of Doty Brothers. 

Alonzo U. Doty spent the first thirteen years of his life on his 
father's farm and in the meantime acquired a fair education in the 
district school. At the age of fourteen he went to work at the mason's 
trade, and that has been an important line of his work to the present 
time. He and his brother have handled some very large contracts in 
this part of the state. In October, 1896, ^Ir. Doty moved to his farm of 
eighty-three acres three quarters of a mile south and a quarter of a 
mile east of Milford and conducts his farm in the same thorough and 
efficient manner in which he does his contracting work. 

Mr. Doty married Cora B. Huffman and they began housekeeping 
at Milford. She was bom in Preble Count}-, Ohio, and was educated 
in the local schools. They are the parents of eleven children: Lulu, 
wife of Lloyd Felkner; Ollie, wife of C. A. Gawthrop; Harry, who 
married Nina Sharp ; Pearl, Ray, Bessie, Dwight, George, Bernice, 
Dorothy and Henry. Mr. Doty is a past gi-and of Milford Lodge 
No. 478, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has sat in the 
Grand Lodge. He is a republican in polities. For twenty years 
he held the office of constable. 

Martin V. McClintic, a prosperous farmer of Turkey Creek Town- 
ship, represents the third generation of a family that became identified 
with Kosciusko County about eighty years ago. The name has been 
associated with good citizenship, capable industry as farmers, and 
faithful performance of all community responsibilities. 

Mr. McClintic was born on the farm where he still resides, July 14, 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 511 

1878, son of John and Lydia (Koher) McCliutie. His father was born 
in 1837 and his mother in Adams County, Indiana, in 1845. The fam- 
ily was founded here by the grandfather, Esten McClintic, who when 
the country was all new acquired 563 acres in Turkey Creek Town- 
ship, and there developed a large farm and enjoyed every degree of 
prosperity corresponding to his time and generation. He was the 
father of a large family, consisting of Abbie, Elizabeth, William, 
Mitchell, Margaret, Lucinda, Julia A, Mary, Aaron and John. 

John McClintic grew up in Kosciusko County, and after his mar- 
riage settled on the land where his son Martin now lives. He and his 
wife spent the rest of their days in that home. He was a soldier of the 
Union Army, enlisting in Company I of the Thirty-Fifth Indiana, 
and saw much hard and active service. In politics he voted as a dem- 
ocrat. He and his wife had four children : Esten E., of Syracuse ; 
Charles F., formerly an engineer with the Interstate Steel Corpora- 
tion of Chicago ; Martin V. ; and John C, who was killed bv a horse 
in 1894. -^ 

:\Iartin V. McClintic grew up on the home farm and had a dis- 
trict school education. At the age of thirteen, when his mother died, 
he went to live in the home of his uncle, Mitchell McClintic. Mr.' 
McClintic also has an army record, gained during the brief war with 
Spain. He enlisted April 23, 1898, in Company H of the One Hun- 
dred and Sixtieth Indiana Volunteers, and saw three months of 
active service on the Island of Cuba. He was mustered out April 

On January 11, 1898, Mr. McClintic married Miss Sarah V. Hall. 
Five children have been born to their marriage: Marie, Gerald de- 
cea.sed. Donald. Mildred and Ethel. 

ilr. McClintic owns a half interest in the 139 acres of the old home- 
stead, and is busily engaged in general farming and stock raising. He 
IS an independent voter and is affiliated with North "Webster Lodse 
No. 367, Knights of Pythias. 

Sherman Huffer. Among the men of Kosciusko County who 
have won success by industry, good management and hard and well 
directed efforts is Sherman Huffer, whose home and farm are in 
Monroe Township, 21/0 miles south and two miles west of Pierceton 
on rural route No. 6. Huffer is a name that has long been well and 
favorably known in the county. One of the members of the family 
IS now sheriff, and the name has always been associated with hon- 
orable and straightforward living and good and useful citizenship. 

Sherman Huffer was born in Prairie Township of this county, Jan- 
uary 31, 1865, and is a son of the late Rudolph Huffer. Rudolph 
Huffer was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1831, 
son of Daniel and Sarah Huffer, natives of the same state. "He' is one 
of ten children and when he was four years of age his parents moved 
to Fairfield County, Ohio. In 1854 Rudolph Huffer came to Kosciusko 
County, living at Warsaw two years, and working at the trade of 
blacksmith, which he had learned in Ohio. From Warsaw he moved 
to Prairie Township, was a farmer there about eight years, and 



512 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

later settled upon a farm in section 28 of Harrison Township. He first 
acquired 160 acres, and gradually cleared away the heavy gi-owth of 
timber and added to his farm until he had 200 acres and was 
regarded as one of the most prosperous men of his community. At 
the time he came to the county his wealth consisted of .$530. He was 
also a man of affairs, ser-vdng as township tri;stee and as school direc- 
tor. In politics he was a republican and at one time took a very 
active part in the Kosciusko County Agricultural Society. 

In Kosciusko County Rudolph Huffer married, October 11, 1855, 
Miss Sarah Staymates, daughter of Jacob Staymates, one of the pio- 
neers of Harrison Township. Rudolph Huffer and wife had eleven 
children, nine of whom are still living : Jacob D., present sheriff of 
the county ; Horton C, of Warsaw ; Sarah C, wife of Charles Vander- 
mark, of Burkett, Indiana : Gertrude, who married James Falley ; 
Charles D., who lives in Franklin Township ; Lawrence, now deceased ; 
Joseph and Edmond, both of Harrison Township ; Jennie, wife of 
Tilden ]\Iilburn : Pearl, wife of Roll Anglin ; and Sherman. 

Sherman Huffer grew up on his father's fann in Harrison Town- 
ship, and gained his education in the district schools there. At the 
age of twenty-one he entered into a formal agreement with his father 
to work on the farm, and remained there one year. He then took 
employment with the late Horace Tucker, and put in good and faith- 
ful service with that well known farmer for three years before his mar- 
riage and remained with him seven years longer. He then bought 
131 acres where he now lives in ]\Ionroe Township, and has occupied 
this place continuously since the spring of 1898. The farm stands 
as a monument to his industry and good management. Mr. Huffer 
has always kept good grades of stock and his success is due to the same 
degree of efficiency that a merchant or manufacturer employs in his 
business. 

Mr. Huffer married Phoebe Smith, a native of Kosciusko County 
and daughter of Samuel Smith. They have four children : Russell 
E., who is a graduate of the common schools and married Mary 
Cook; Monroe R., a graduate of the common schools, married Florence 
Dunkelberger ; "\^esta M. and Velma G., both of whom have finished 
their education and are now married. Vesta M. married Harry R. 
Taylor, of Chicago, but who is now on the firing line in France. 
Velma G. married Carl Snell, whose home is in Jackson Township. 
He is now in training at Camp Custer, Michigan. The famih- are 
members of the Christian Church and in politics Mr. Huffer is a 
republican. 

Charles J\I. Tucker, a son of Albert Tucker and grandson of the 
pioneer John Tucker, both of whom are referred to more at length on 
other pages, is recognized as the largest land owner and farmer, feeder 
and shipper of livestock in Franklin Township. He does busi- 
ness on a large scale, employs a number of men on his farms, and has 
made a success of agriculture and stock husbandry without indulging 
in any fads and fancies. ]Mr. Tucker has gone in for registered and 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 513 

blue ribbon stock only on a very limited scale and without interfering 
with his major operations as a stock feeder. 

The farm where he lives today was the scene of his birth on July 
10, 1870. As a boy he attended the public schools, part of his educa- 
tion being acquired at Mentone. lie started out with an independent 
capital of about $2,500, and has since accumulated 1,500 acres of 
land and has more of it in cultivation to grain crops than any other 
farmer in that part of the county. As a rule Mr. Tucker cultivates 
about 170 acres in wheat, 160 in oats and 160 acres in corn. On his 
pastures and feed lots he runs about 250 head of cattle, 275 head of 
hogs, a few sheep, and for a number of years has been a breeder, 
buj'er and seller of horses. He has had as many as 100 horses at one 
time. Mr. Tucker is an unrivaled judge of livestock, and it was his 
keen judgment of stock that has brought him his chief success. 

Mr. Tucker married Miss Susanna Eiler, daughter of Henry and 
Ellen Eiler. She was born in Franklin Township and finished her 
education at Warsaw. Her father, Henry Eiler, was both a farmer 
and lawyer. While living on his farm he was elected to the office 
of prosecuting attorney of Kosciusko County, and then moved to 
Warsaw, where he died. He was one of the prominent republicans 
of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker had nine children : Nellie, the 
eldest, a graduate of the Mentone High School, and is the wife of 
Professor Earl Blue, of the Warsaw High School ; Mars, the second 
child, graduated from the iMentone High School and married Faun 
Doran, and has two children ; Floyd, a graduate of the common schools, 
married Flo Igo ; Cuba is a graduate of the high school at Beaver Dam ; 
Mary graduated from the high school at Beaver Dam ; Chauncey, aged 
eleven, Edison, aged seven, and Curtis, aged four, are the younger 
children in the home circle. Lillian, seventh child in order of birth, 
died when six months old. 

Mr. Tucker has always been a liberal supporter of churches and 
every worthy movement in his community. He is affiliated with Men- 
tone Lodge of Masons and with the Royal Arch Chapter Council and 
Knight Templar Commandery at Warsaw. Politically he is a repub- 
lican. Mr. Tucker is a stockholder in the Mentone Bank. 

George W. Smith has given about forty years of his career to the 
business of farming, and is still one of the useful men in Kosciusko 
County in keeping up the volume of production that constitutes the 
Quota of this county and state to fill the needs of the Government and 
the allies. Uv. Smith's farm is two miles south of Mentone in Frank- 
lin Township. 

In that township he has spent practically all the days of his life 
He was born February 3, 1856, son of Leonard and Mary (Heise) 
Smith. His parents were both natives of Pennsylvania, married 
there, and in 1849 came to Franklin Township, when that district 
was still in the woods. Leonard Smith did a good deal toward mak- 
ing a farm, but died at an early age in 1864. His widow survived 
him until 1892. Both were active church members, and he was 
affiliated with the republican party from the time of its organization 



514 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

until his death. In the family were four daughters and six sons, four 
of whom are living : Daniel, a farmer in Fulton County, Indiana ; 
A. J. Smith, of Franklin Township ; Albert, a farmer in Michigan ; 
and George W. 

George W. Smith as a boy attended the district schools and made 
such good use of his educational oppoi-tunities that he himself taught 
for several terms in Franklin and Seward townships. August 23, 
1884, he married Miss Rosa Jones. She was born in Seward Town- 
ship of this county June 10, 1865, daughter of Samuel and Eliza J. 
Jones. Mrs. Smith was reared on a farm a mile south of Burkett, and 
was educated in the public schools at Piereeton and in the high school 
at "Warsaw. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Smith located on the 
farm where they now reside. The home farm comprises 120 acres, 
and they also have eighty acres in Seward Township. 

Their only child, Cora F., was born August 15, 1885, and died 
September 13, 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are active members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at IMentone, and in politics he is a 
republican. For two terms he was honored by his fellow citizens for 
the office of trustee of Franklin Township, and made his administra- 
tion a forceful and wise one, productive of much good to the local 
schools. 

Albert L. Tucker. Member of one of the oldest families of 
Kosciusko County, Albert L. Tucker, of Mentone, has displayed 
many of the characteristics of the family in his makeup and experi- 
ence, and has become widelj- known through his success as a farmer 
and stock dealer. 

He was born in Franklin Township of this county September 19, 
1849, son of Horace and Eliza (Johnson) Tucker. Albert L. Tucker 
grew up on the home farm, attended the district schools in winter, and 
developed his strength by actual practice in the fields in summer. 

At the age of nineteen he married Elizabeth Bechtelheimer on 
March 4, 1868. After his marriage he lived at home two years and 
his father then gave him $6,000 and with it he bought a farm 
of 208 acres, assuming a debt of $6,200. Later he bought another 
eighty acres and he still owns the original 208 acres. He has been a 
practical farmer, but more particularly has been successful in the 
buying and selling of cattle, sheep and hogs. 

Mr. Tucker by his first wife had eight children: Elmore; Effie, 
wife of Leonard Summe ; Ivan, a farmer in Franklin Township ; Ida, 
widow of Lawrence Huffer; Roy, a farmer in the State of Washing- 
ton ; John, a railroad conductor living at Chicago ; Millie, wife of 
Arthur Getty, living at Silver Lake ; and Dr. Frank C, of Claypool. 

After the death of his first wife Mr. Tucker married Emma Mabe, 
and they had two children, Una and Horace, but the last named is 
deceased. For his third wife he married Lulu (Tipton) Tucker, and 
their two children are Deart A. and Rex Le Roy. Lulu Tucker by her 
first marriage to John Tucker, had three daughters, Ethel, Lena and 
Anna ; Ethel and Lena are attending the Mentone High School and 
Anna is deceased. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 515 

Albert L. Tucker is a democrat in politics, and the only member 
of the numerous Tucker family in Kosciusko County to espouse that 
political allegiance. He lives in a township that is republican normal- 
l.y. but when he was nominated by the democrats as candidate for 
trustee his well known ability and personal popularity elected him, 
and he served four years very creditably. 

William F. Baugher. It has been the good fortune of "William 
F. Baugher to spend his life 'in Kosciusko County, where he has been 
identified with the noble calling of agriculture, and has been consist- 
ently public spirited in his attitude toward all common and public 
duties. The farm from which he has long enjoyed the fruits and 
where he still lives is in Turkey Creek Township. 

He wa.s born in Tippecanoe Township of this county January 1, 
1859. The old homestead that M'as his birthplace is now owned by his 
brother. John A. Baugher. He is a son of Charles and Henrietta 
(Gugeler) Baugher. His father, a native of Germany, came to the 
United States when a young man in order to avoid and escape the 
enforced military duty, and from New York City he came westward, 
first to Ohio and later ai-rived in Kosciusko County. He was a suc- 
cessful and prosperous farmer and lived on his farm for many years, 
but finally retired to North Webster, where both he and his wife 
died. They were membei-s of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
their family were five sons and two daughters: Matilda and Jacob, 
both deceased ; John A., owner of the homestead in Tippecanoe Town- 
ship; William F. ; Louise, widow of William Gross; Christian, who 
lives in Kansas : and Henry, deceased. 

William F. Baugher grew up on the old home farm and attended 
the district schools to the age of thirteen. Since that time he has been 
more than paying his own way in the world, and he remained at home 
and worked the farm till twenty-one, and then entered into a formal 
agreement with his father to run the homestead. 

In 1891 he married Miss Alice Gross, a native of Turkey Creek 
Township. For two years after their marriage they continued to rent 
the old farm and Mr. Baugher then bought seventy-one acres included 
in his present farm. 

Mr. Baugher is a democrat in politics and is affiliated with Mil- 
ford Lodge No. 178 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
lost his wife March 20, 1896, after a married life of only five years. 
One child is still living, Zepha. She had a district school education 
and on February 22, 1911, married Clinton Cox. Mr. and ]\li-s. Cox 
have one child, Dallas, born March 15, 1916. 

David Lewellen is one of the oldest residents of Kosciusko County 
and was here when everything was in a pioneer condition. He has 
witnessed the events and changes of seventy years in this locality 
and is one of the few men still surviving who cast a vote for Abraham 
Lincoln. 

Mr. Lewellcn was born in Stark County, Ohio, July 4, 1838, a son 



516 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

of William and ^lavy (Fore) Lewellen, the former a native of the 
vicinity of Philadelphia and the latter of Ohio. They married in 
Ohio aiid in 1844 brought their family to Koseinsko County and located 
in Tippecanoe Township. David Lewellen grew up in the old home in 
Tippecanoe Township, and his advantages in the way of education 
was confined to only a few days in the district schools. After his 
father's death he lived with liis mother and later engaged in farming 
for himself. He has lived on his present home farm for thirty-four 
years. It comprises ninety- four acres in Turkey Creek Township and 
he also owns forty acres in another place. His success has been due to 
a combination of general farming and stock raising. 

Mr. Lewellen married Lizzie Kitten, daughter of David Ritten. 
Their children are William, Daniel, Sallie, Aquilla, Etta and Simeon. 
Though Mr. Lewellen cast a vote in war times for Abraham Lincoln 
he has as a rule been a democrat. 

Samuel Kelley. Though one of the newer residents of Franklin 
Township, Samuel Kelley has been a welcome addition to the local 
citizenship, since he is a man of enterprise as a farmer and is owner 
of one of the best places in the northern part of the township. His 
home is in section 14. two miles south and a mile west of ^lentone. 

This. branch of the Kelley family was identified with the pioneer 
settlement of Grant County, Indiana. The history of Grant County 
records that a Samuel Kelley located in Green Township as early as 
1846. and when the township was organized a year or so later the first 
election was held in Samuel Kelley 's home. It was in Green Town- 
ship that !Mr. Samuel Kelley was born ilay 5, 1864, a son of James 
and Susanna (IMcClain) Kelley. His father was a native of Henry 
County, Indiana, and his mother of Ohio. James Kelley was taken 
to Grant County when a bo.v, and grew up and married there. After 
his marriage he settled in Green Township and he and his wife spent 
the rest of their days there. Both were very active members of the 
Church of Christ, which he served as trustee, and as a republican he 
was honored with election as trustee of Green Township two terms. 
James Kellev and wife had eleven children : Elizabeth, deceased wife 
of David Tliearlkill: John C, who lives at Swayzee : William H., of 
Greentown, Indiana: Abraham L., of Howard County; Mary A., wife 
of Stephen Martin: Samuel; Adelia, wife of Eph Allen; Maria, wife 
of Frank Downs ; James, a farmer in Fulton County ; David, a farmer 
in Van Buren Town.ship of Grant County; and Cora, wife of George 
Horine. 

Samuel Kelley grew up in his parents' home in Grant County, was 
educated in the district schools and lived at home until grown. While 
working a farm he also bought and operated for six years a tile mill, 
and manufactured great quantities of tile used in draining the fields 
of his community. 

November 21, 1889, he married Rosa B. Morris. She was born 
in Carroll County, Missouri. January 25, 1870, but spent her girl- 
hood largely in ]\iiami and Grant counties of this state. After their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Kelley lived nine years in Green Township o-'' 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 517 

Grant County, and in 1898 came to Kosciusko County. Their first 
home, for four years, was in Warsaw, later they moved to the Pal- 
estine community, and from there came to their present farm. The 
prosperity represented in their land and its improvements is almost 
entirely the result of their work, thrift and careful management since 
they were married. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kelley had eight children : Belle B., a graduate of the 
Warsaw High School," for three terms a teacher and now wife of D. 
W. Henderson, of Atwood ; Dale, who graduated fi'om high school 
and from Muneie College with the degree A. B., was a successful 
teacher for four years, but when the war broke out with Germany 
he enrolled in an officer's training camp and is now serving with 
a commission as second lieutenant in France ; Carol, a graduate of high 
school, was also a teacher three terms, and is now the wife of Francis 
MeSherry, and lives in Seward Township ; Vere, a graduate of high 
school, is a practical farmer at home, and on August 24, 1918, mar- 
ried Miss Vera Blue, daughter of A. W. Blue ; the other three chil- 
dren still living, all at home are Blond, Blanche and Beulah L. The 
family are members and take an active part in the Church of Christ at 
Mentone. Mr. Kelley is an elder and trustee of the church. He is a 
republican, but has never sought nor held public office. 

Wa,LiAM M. Hartzell. It is the life of real performance and of 
quiet and effective work in all circumstances that offers the least ma- 
terial for description, and yet no life means more to the community 
in which it has been lived. 

This is true of the career of William M. Hartzell, one of the lead- 
ing farmers of Scott Township, who is now concluding his first 
term as tnistee of that township, an office conferred upon him by the 
confidence of his fellow citizens, and which he has completely justified 
by his administration. 

Mr. Hartzell was born in Etna Township of this county February 
15, 1869, a son of John and Belinda (Messimore) Hartzell. His 
parents were both born in Ohio and were married in Kosciusko County. 
They lived on a farm, and John Hartzell was also a carpenter. They 
were members of the Christian Church and in politics he was a re- 
publican. 

William M. Hartzell started his career as a wage earner and 
worker in the world at the age of thirteen. After that he was privi- 
leged to attend the local schools only two and a half months each year 
until he was eighteen. He got his start by working at monthly wages, 
and at the age of twenty-eight was able to boast the ownership of forty 
acres of land. 

In the meantime, in January, 1887, he married Ida Jones, who was 
born in Marshall County, Indiana, but was reared in Kosciusko 
County. After their marriage they lived on their first farm of forty 
acres for nine years, and then bought their present place of 105 acres 
in Scott Township. Mrs. Hartzell is a member of the Christian 
Church. He is a democrat in politics and was elected on that ticket 
trustee of Scott Township. His present term expires January 1, 1919, 



518 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

and he is now the party nominee for a second term, which he com- 
pletely deserves. 

Silas Duncan. One of the best known citizens of Scott Township 
is Silas Duncan, who for many years has lived in Kosciusko County 
and is still vigorously and diligently attending to his duties as a 
farmer and stock raiser on his place four and three-ciuarter miles 
southeast of Nappanee. 

]\Ir. Duncan was born in Putnam County, Missouri, June 7, 1855, 
a son of Silas and Isabelle (Cook) Duncan. He was the youngest of 
four children and his birth occurred after his father's death. He 
has a sister still living, Lucinda, widow of James Stackhouse of Bour- 
bon. Indiana. 

In April, 1863, Mrs. Silas Duncan, the widowed mother, came to 
Kosciusko County with her children and settled in Scott Township, 
where she lived until her death. She had married John ^l. Miller in 
Missouri, and they traveled overland from that state to Indiana in a 
wagon. The father of Silas Duncan, Sr., was an Englishman and his 
wife was an Irish woman. During the journey from ]\Iissouri to 
Indiana John M. Miller and family stayed all night with a farmer, 
and the next morning they were unable to find the proper change to 
settle the bill and it was agreed that ilr. Miller would leave the money 
with a merchant in the next town five miles away. On reaching that 
town Mr. Miller made the necessary inquiry and left the sum pre- 
scribed. The transaction was witnessed by a half dninken man. who 
came up to Mr. Miller and invited him to drink. j\lr. ^liller at first 
refused, but on being told by the bibulous individual that his father 
had often admonished him whenever he met an honest man to treat 
him, Mr. Miller conceded a point and accepted the treat. ;\Ir. and 
Mrs. Miller had one daughter, Anna B., wife of William H. dinger, 
of "Warsaw. 

Silas Duncan, Jr., was only eight years of age when he came with 
his mother to Scott Township. He lived at home until he was sixteen 
and then started out for himself, having some knowledge of farming 
and a fair district school education. On June 19. 1881. he married 
i\Iary A. Harlan, who was bom in Prairie Township of this county 
AugTist 24, 1854, daughter of William and Eliza (Boggess) Harlan. 
She was reared in Van Buren Township and attended the district 
schools there. After their marriage ]Mr. and Mrs. Duncan settled on 
her mother's farm and lived there for some years and then moved 
to Plain Township, and from there in 1906 came to their present place 
of fifty acres in Scott Township. Mr. and Mrs. Duncan are members 
of the Church of God and in politics he is a republican. Their chil- 
dren are : Morris, who is married and lives in Van Buren Township : 
William H.. whose home is west of Warsaw; Charles L.. deceased; 
Nora T.. wife of William Cain of Scott Township; Maude, wife of 
James McCubbin of Leesburg ; and Caroline, unmarried and at home. 
Mrs. Duncan is, as already noted, a daughter of William and Eliza 
Harlan. Her great-grandfather, George Harlan, was a native of Vir- 
ginia, moved in pioneer times to Kentucky, and in 1806 left that state 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 519 

and went to Ohio, and died near Dayton. He had eleven children, 
seven sons and four daughters, James, Samuel, John M., George, "Wil- 
liam, Elijah, Jacob, Elizabeth. Sarah, Nancy and Mary Jane. 

Samuel Harlan, gi'andfather of Mrs. Duncan, was born January 
11, 1800, and died December 22, 1842. On coming to Indiana he first 
settled in Wayne County and afterwards in Henry County. His sec- 
ond wife was Eliza Adney, and they had five children. 

William Harlan, father of Mrs. Duncan, was born in Henry 
County, Indiana, and in 1852 married Eliza Boggess. By that mar- 
riage there were four children : Jerome ; Mary, Mrs. Duncan ; Soph- 
ronia. wife of John Estep ; and George. Mrs. Duncan's mother died 
in 1859 and her father then married Caroline Raker, who bore him 
four children. 

Edpon B. S.vrber. For the past twelve years the county superin- 
tendent of schools in Kosciusko County has been Edson B. Sarber. 
Mr. Sarber has given nearly all his active lifetime to educational work, 
though for a considerable period he was trustee of his home township 
and looked after its educational interests more in a business and finan- 
cial way than as an instructor. In his work as a schoolman, particu- 
larly in furnishing wholesome instruction to the younger generation 
concerning the activities and character of the pioneers who developed 
this county, Mr. Sarber has many fruitful lessons in his own family 
history. He represents one of the oldest names of Kosciusko County, 
and his grandfather and father before him were very useful and 
influential citizens here in the early times. 

Abraham Sarber, his grandfather, was especially identified with 
the pioneer annals. He married Louisa Hendren, and after their mar- 
riage they lived for two years in Franklin County, Ohio, sold their 
farm there and moved to Putnam County, Ohio, and settled in the 
midst of a wilderness where their nearest white neighbors were ten 
miles away. In that isolated community they lived and worked for 
six years. Abraham Sarber acquired several tracts of land in Putnam 
County, and on one of these he founded the town of Kalida. In 1836 
he sold his interests in Ohio and moved to Iroquois County, Illinois. 

Prom Illinois in the fall of 1840 Abraham Sarber brought his 
family to Kosciusko County, Indiana. Thenceforward for a period of 
full three quarters of a century the name has been one of wide reach- 
ing influence in this locality. In 1841 Abraham Sarber built a saw 
mill at Palestine, and in 1843 he added a gi-ist mill to his plant. In 
1843 his mill sawed the lumber for the first frame court house built 
in Kosciusko County. His were the first mills of any importance in 
the southern part of the county. In the fall of 1843 Abraham Sarber 
sold his milling plant and bought a farm in the north part of Harrison 
Township, where he lived until the death of his wife in 1863. He then 
bought a farm near Atwood, and lived in the Town of Atwood until 
his death. For his second wife he married Miss Eliza Crane, of Ham- 
ilton Count.y, Ohio. The only son of this union was David, who 
became a newspaper man in California. The eight children of Abra- 
ham and Louisa Sarber were: William, Adam, Melissa, Amanda, 



520 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Mary, Thomas B., Dorothy and John, the first four having been born 
in Ohio and the last three in Kosciusko County, Indiana. 

Thomas B. Sarber, father of the county superintendent of schools, 
was born in Harrison Township of Kosciusko County, October 4, 1842. 
He was reared on a farm, acquired an education in the local schools 
and also attended school in Warsaw in 1858-59. On May 24, 1863, he 
married Miss Martha A. Timraons, daughter of William and Catherine 
(Dunnuck) Timmons. The Timmons family settled in Wayne Town- 
ship of Kosciusko County in 1845. After his marriage Thomas B. 
Sarber lived in Allen County, Indiana, one year, then returned to 
Harrison Township of Kosciusko County, and in 1866 bought his 
farm in Seward Township. The land which he acquired there was an 
unbroken wilderness. As his father had done before him, he under- 
took a pioneer task in its clearing and development. His first home 
there was an old log cabin that had been standing a number of years, 
and in 1868 he replaced that rude habitation with a comfortable resi- 
dence, and in the course of time that became one of the best improved 
and most valuable farms in Seward Township. Thomas B. Sarber has 
figured iu politics to a considerable extent, though as a democrat he 
was usually on the minority side. In 1884 he was an unsuccessful 
candidate for sheriff, but ran a hundred votes ahead of the state 
ticket. He has been a member of democratic committees and attended 
a number of conventions. He was a passenger on the fii'St train of 
ears that passed through Seward Township. In the Spring of 1882 
he built the first store in Burkett, Indiana. Thomas B. Sai'ber and 
wife became the parents of three children : Edson B. ; Louisa C. 
deceased; aud Andrew E. Andrew was for several years a teacher. 

Edson B. Sarber, who may well be proud of the sturdy stock from 
which he is descended, was bom on a farm in Allen County, Indiana, 
March 11, 1864. As already stated, his parents after their marriage 
lived about a year in Allen County, but then returned to Kosciusko 
County. Edson B. Sarber grew up on the old homestead of his father 
in Kosciusko County, acquired a primary education in the neighboring 
schools, and for a time attended the two-room school building at 
Sevastopol. When only sixteen years of age he taught his first term 
of school, in a school house located two miles from home. For ten 
years his -i^ork as an educator was confined to the country schools, and 
for eight years he was principal of the cshools at Burkett, the little 
village where his father had built the first store. In the meantime 
he had been bending his efforts toward gaining a broader and more 
liberal education. He spent several summer tenns in the Northern 
Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso, paying his own way from his 
own earnings as a teacher. He pursued an elective course, and is 
broadly educated without having acquired a college degree. 

On September 16, 1883, Mr. Sarber married Miss Olive A. Rickel, 
daughter of George W. and Mary Rickel. Her parents are substan- 
tial farming people living near the Village of Sevastopol. 

After having taught for a number of years Mr. Sarber in Novem- 
ber, 1900, was elected trustee of Seward Township, and was therefore 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 521 

obliged during his term of office to give up his work as a teacher. As 
the township trustees employ the teachers it would hardly have been 
ethical for himself as trustee to have employed himself as teacher. 
He continued in the office of trustee iihtW June, 1903, when he re- 
signed to assume his duties as superintendent of schools for the entire 
county, an office to which he had been elected a short time before. By 
re-election he has been kept in the office of county superintendent to 
the present time, and it can be said to the credit of his administration 
that the schools have never shown greater progress during any one 
ten year period than under the direction of Mr. Sarber. 

James P. Fogle has spent most of his life in Kosciusko County 
and his birth occurred in a house that stood on the interurban corner 
in Warsaw, June 30, 1860. Mr. Fogle is a baker by trade, was in 
the baking and confectionery business for many years, but about ten 
j-ears ago retired to a farm and is making a notable success as a farmer 
and stock raiser in Plain Township. 

Mr. Fogle is a son of Jacob J. and Christina (Perkey) Fogle. His 
parents were both born in Stark County, Ohio, his father at the City 
of Canton. Both the Fogle and Perkey families have long been iden- 
tified with Kosciusko County, the mother coming here with her parents 
at the age of fourteen. Jacob J. Fogle came here in 1855, locating at 
Warsaw, where he followed his trade as a brass molder. He was also 
a farmer and general laborer. He was affiliated with Kosciusko Lodge 
No. 62, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, serving as Noble Grand 
and as chief patriarch of the Encampment. The mother died in 1902. 
They had three children: James P., Nancy, who died at the age of 
three years, and John D., who lives at Bourbon, Indiana. 

James P. Fogle grew up at Warsaw and attended the public 
schools there. When fourteen years old he began learning the baker 's 
trade, and after following it for a time established a shop of his own 
at Bourbon, Indiana, but lost everything in a fire. After that he 
became a real journeyman, traveling over the countrj^ and spending 
a short time in Florida. Eeturning to Warsaw he opened a bakery 
and confectionery store and was steadily in business there for thirtj' 
years. 

In 1891 Mr. Fogle married Ida May Fletcher, of South Whitley. 
She was born in Whitley County, Indiana, and was educated in the 
common schools. Some years ago Mr. Fogle bought 115 acres in 
Plain Township, and he and his wife moved to the land and 
have occupied it as their home since 1907. Mrs. Fogle is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She is a past grand of Salome 
Lodge .No. 27, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, a past president of 
the Women's Relief Corps of Warsaw, and was secretary of the For- 
eign Jlissionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church for seven 
years. Mr. Fogle is past patriarch of the Encampment and for twelve 
years was trustee of his lodge. In politics he votes as a republican. 

James Cox is one of the high class and enterprising citizens of 
Franklin Township, has a good farm two miles south and half a mile 



522 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

west of Mentone, and has been hard at work at farming with scarcely 
a break for more than forty years. 

He was born near Laketon in Wabash Connty, September 30, 1857, 
son of John and Sarah (Fogerty) Cox. H's mother was a native of 
New Jersey. Both came in early days to Wabash County, were mar- 
ried there, and from that connty John Cox enlisted and served all 
through the Civil war in Companj^ I of the Forty-Seventh Indiana 
Infantry. He was present in many battles, saw much hardship, but 
was never woimded. After the war he returned to Wabash County, 
also lived for a time in Marshall County, for some years was a resi- 
dent of Franklin Township of this county, and finally moved to a 
place east of Warsaw, where he died at the age of fifty-seven. He and 
his wife were good, honest. Christian people and had a host of friends. 
He was affiliated as a charter member with the Odd Fellows Lodge at 
Sevastopol, serving as Noble Grand, and was also a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and a republican voter. Of the ten 
children, seven are still living: James; Jennie, wife of Charles Bash, 
of Mishawaka ; Lucinda, widow of Melvin Summe; John, of Warsaw: 
Robert, of South Dakota; Dell, of Goshen, Indiana; and Elza of 
Warsaw. 

Mr. James Cox has spent most of his life in Kosciusko County. 
After getting his education in the district schools he lived at home 
until he was twentv-one, and then for several vears worked out as a 
farm hand. In 1879 he married Miss Eva Hall. They began house- 
keeping on a farm in Franklin Township, and gradually progressed 
toward independence and prosperity. Mrs. Cox died in Anril. 1910, 
the mother of two children, one of whom died in infanev. The other. 
Delta M., was born October 6, 1881, is a graduate of the common 
schools, and is now the widow of Dr. S. J. Snodgrass. Doctor Snod- 
grass practiced medicine at Burkett, Indiana, for twentv-nine years. 
Mrs. Snodgrass has two children. David J., born in April. 1909. and 
Esther K.. born in October. 1913. In 1912 Mr. Cox marrie'^l for his 
present wife Lauro E. Rockhill Br'nslev, widow of Arthur Brinsley. 
]\trs. Cox is a member of the Jlethodist Episcopal Church a+ Mentone. 
Mr. Cox has always manifested a commendable intere';t 'n the welfare 
of his community and has been quite active in the republican party. 

, John W. Anglin. The fruits and experiences of the life of John 
W. Anglin have been gathered in Kosciusko County, where since early 
manhood he has been an active farmer, and has made his eiforts count 
in the direction of a steadily increasing prosperity, liberally dispensed 
in the rearing and training of his family and in effective all around 
good citizenship. 

Mr. Anglin, whose farm is in Prairie Township, ten miles north- 
west of Warsaw, was born in Scott Township of this county, August 
12, 1857, a son of Adrian and Rachel (Biggs) Anglin, the former a 
native of Virginia and the latter of Indiana. The Anglins were among 
the pioneers of Kosciusko County and have lived here seventy-five or 
eighty years. His parents were married in Kosciusko Connty and 
spent the rest of their days on a farm in Scott Township. They were 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 523 

members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and Adrian Anglin was 
an independent republican in politics. Of their children six are still 
living: Adeline, wife of John McCann ; John W. ; William and Grant, 
both residents of Nappanee, Indiana ; Mary, wife of William Smith, 
of Nappanee; and Abbie, wife of Ed Martin. 

John W. Anglin grew up on his father's farm and was educated 
in the district schools. At the age of twenty he started out to make 
his own way in the world, and not long afterward he married Miss 
Elva Cleveland. To this marriage were born four children : Emil, a 
painter living at South Bend ; Nellie, wife of Wake Wilt ; Clara, wife 
of Charles Lynch; and Milo, who is now in war service. These chil- 
dren were all small when their mother died, and Mr. Anglin was left 
with the responsibilities of the farm and their care. He later married 
Mary Light, and they have five children : Ethel, of Leesburg ; Fred, 
who married Nellie Roberts; Edith, Wilber, and Ida, born June 15, 
1907. The children were all given good educational advantages and 
have been well prepared for their respective duties in life. Mr. Anglin 
is an active member of the Church of God in Scott Township. He is 
a republican in politics, and is the only member of the Anglin family 
in the county to vote that ticket. The farm which he diligently super- 
vises and manages has 100 acres, and makes a splendid home for him- 
self and family. 

Jefferson Garber, the present postmaster of North Webster, has 
long been identified with commercial affairs here and in other parts 
of the state, and is that type of man whose energy means something 
in the constructive administration of the community's affairs. 

Mr. Garber represents one of the old and well known families of 
Kosciusko County. He was born in Tippecanoe Township, December 
22, 1863, son of "Samuel and Polly (White) Garber. His father was 
born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, in 1830 and died in Kosciusko 
County on his farm in 1888. The parents were married in Kosciusko 
County and were industrious and worthy farming people of that com- 
munity the rest of their lives. They were members of the Christian 
Church at North Webster and Mrs. Samuel Garber was very active 
in its membership. They had eleven children. 

The life of Jefferson Garber to the age of twenty-one was spent 
on the old farm near North Webster, and his education was supplied 
by the district schools. After reaching manhood he went out to 
Missouri and was a farmer in Jasper Count.v of that state for a couple 
of years. Returning to Kosciusko County, he laid the foundation of 
his mercantile career as clerk in a general store at Wilmot. A year 
later he and his brother Albert bought a general store at Noblesville, 
and for six years prosperously conducted it under the name of Garber 
Brothers. Selling out, they came to North Webster and in this old 
and substantial town of the county acquired the general store of John 
A. Ketring. The brothers continued their active relations as merchants 
eight years, when Albert Garber sold his interests to James Mock. For 
the next three years the store was continued as Garber & Jlock, and 
Mr. Garber then acquired his partner's interest and in ]\Iarch, 1917, 



524 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

took in his son-in-law, Edward Phelps, as partner. The title is now 
Garber & Phelps. They keep a large and well selected stock of general 
merchandise and supply the demands of a territory some miles in 
every direction around North Webster. % 

Mr. Garber married Ella J. Weade, daughter of John Weade. 
Mrs. Garber was born in Noble County and was educated in the com- 
mon schools. They have two daughters. Zelma, a graduate of the 
North Webster High School, is the wife of Edward Phelps, business 
partner of her father. Bessie, also a graduate of the North Webster 
High School, is married to Forest Croop, of Warsaw. Mr. Garber has 
three grandchildren, Devon and Donald Phelps, and Forest Croop, Jr. 

Mr. Garber has carefully administered the office of postmaster at 
North Webster for eight years. He owns his own store building and 
has two of the best dwelling houses in the town. Politically he is a 
republican and is past chancellor of North Webster Lodge No. 367, 
Knights of Pythias, and a member of the Grand Lodge. 

William S. Stocker is an honored veteran of the Civil war, in 
which he sustained a wound that sent him home when the struggle 
was still at its height. He has been a resident of Kosciusko County 
for more than half a centurj^ and the productive labors of the earlier 
years have enabled him to enjoy a comfortable retirement for some 
time, though he still lives on his farm in the northeast corner of Tip- 
pecanoe Township. 

He was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, May 1, 1842, son of 
Andrew and Margaret (Strieby) Stocker. His parents were both 
born in Stark County, Ohio. In the spring of 1863 the parents and 
eight children came to Indiana and settled .iust over the line in Noble 
County, opposite the farm of William S. Stocker. Andrew Stocker 
died near Webster, December 13, 1882, at the age of sixty-five. 

William S. Stocker was reared in Ohio and in that state on August 
17, 1862, enlisted in Company K of the Ninety-Eighth Ohio Infantry. 
He was sent into General Buell's army in the Kentucky campaign 
and only a few weeks after his enlistment took part in the Battle of 
Perryville, where he was wounded in the left side. He was sent to 
a field hospital at Perryville, was later removed to Lebanon and from 
there to Louisville, and after partial recovery was given an honorable 
discharge, December 28, 1862, and sent home. He accompanied his 
parents to Indiana. 

On November 19, 1868, Mr. Stocker married Sarah C. Knepper, 
who was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, January 29, 1847, 
and was brought to Indiana when a year and a half old, her parents 
settling in Noble County, where she grew to womanhood and where 
she lived until her marriage. Her father was a native of Cumberland 
County, Pennsylvania, and her mother of Franklin County. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Stocker settled on a farm in 
Noble County and a few years later moved to section 1 in Tippecanoe 
Township, where they have had their home nearly half a century. 
Mr. Stocker has prospered in his general farm work and has given 
attention to some specialties, especially bee keeping. He has always 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 525 

been a prominent man in his township aflfairs, is a republican voter 
and is a member of the United Brethren Church at Oak Grove. 

He and his wife had eight children, five of whom are still living: 
George E., of Spokane, Washington ; Edward H., of Noble County, 
Indiana : Rosa B., wife of Elmore Kohen, of Kosciusko County ; Sam- 
uel, of Turkey Creek Township ; and Myrtle, wife of Bert Earl, of 
Noble County. 

William Shroyer is one of the men who are properly accounted 
successful and are numbered among the enterprising citizens and 
farmers of Plain Township. Mr. Shroyer has lived in this county all 
his life and for the past quarter of a century has directed his ener- 
gies to farming and stock raising on his place consisting of 120 acres, 
one of the well arranged and productive homesteads of his locality. 

Mr. Shroyer was born in Plain Township June 11, 1865, son of 
Daniel and Matilda (Huffman') Shroyer, the former a native of Stark 
County, Ohio, and the latter of Kosciusko County. Daniel Shroyer 
came to Indiana with his parents, George and Sarah (Wolf) Shroyer. 
George Shroyer was born in Virginia, June 5, 1808, and married in 
Ohio. He and Sarah Shroyer had seven children. His first wife died 
August 28, 1861, and he was a second time married. George Shroyer 
on coming to Indiana settled in Elkhart County, but finally moved 
to Kosciusko County, and died here June 11, 1880. He was a member 
of the Lutheran Church and in politics a democrat. Daniel Shroyer 
after his marriage settled in Plain Township, and his wife died there, 
while he passed away in Elkhart County. He was an active member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and served as a trustee. In the 
family were nine children, four of whom are still living. William ; 
Lewis E., of Plain Township ; Luela, wife of Frank Wilcox, their 
home being the old home fai-m in Plain Township ; and Charles A., 
who graduated from the pharmacy department of Purdue University 
and is now a druggist at Warsaw. 

William Shroyer grew up on the old farm and had a common school 
education. He lived at home until his marriage, December 25, 1893, 
when Miss Catherine Brumbaugh became his wife. Mrs. Shroyer was 
born in Kosciusko County, a daughter of John and Elizabeth Brum- 
baugh. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Shroyer settled on the farm 
where they now live and where they have been prospered and have 
become objects of special esteem in that community. They are mem- 
bers of the Church of the Brethren, and ilr. Shoyer is aftiliated with 
Warsaw Lodge of the Masons. In polities he is a republican. He 
and his wife have one daughter, Grace, who finished her education 
with two years in the Warsaw High School. She is now the wife of 
Ralph McDaniel, of Plain Township, and her three children, grand- 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Shroyer, are named Charles, Lenore and 
Catherine. 

Howard L. Mauzy is a farmer located a mile east of Dutchtown 
in Tippecanoe Township, and is one of the young and enterprising 
men from whom a great deal can be expected in solid and substantial 



526 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

achievements, as already demonstrated by the work he has done in 
improving and carrying on his present place. 

Jlr. Mauzy was born on the farm where he now lives October 23, 
1885, son of X. W. and Harriet A. (Clark) Mauzy. His father was 
born in Pennsylvania in 1850. His mother died October 23. 1917. 
They were members of the Dunkard Church. Of their six children 
five are still living : John "W. ; Edward, who lives in Tippecanoe Town- 
ship and married Alta Heron ; Cardie, a traveling salesman living at 
Auburn, married Nellie Thorn : Ida is the wife of Harry Weaver, 
living in Whitley County, Indiana ; and Howard L. 

Howard L. ]Mauzy grew up on the old farm and had a district 
school education. He lived with his parents to the age of twenty-one 
and on December 22, 1907. married Hiss Rilla May Crist. Jlrs. Mauzy 
was born in Plain Township April 26, 1890, daughter of William and 
Marv J. (Ritter) Crist. 

After their marriage ilr. and Mrs. Mauzy began farming, and 
have been making much headway during the past ten years. In 1917 
they moved to their present place, which comprises forty acres, and 
which is managed with good equipment and with plenty of livestock. 
^Mr. and Mrs. ^Mauzy have one son, Leonard L., born September 24, 
1909. ilr. Mauzy and family are very active members of the Pro- 
gressive Brethren Church. He is secretary of his local church and 
superintendent of its Sunday School. In politics he votes as a re- 
publican. 

Joseph P. Weimer. One of the men whose name is spoken with 
special mark of respect in the North Webster community is Joseph P. 
Weimer, long identified with the agricultural affairs of that region 
and also a banker of North Webster. His country home is a mile 
north of the town. 

Mr. Weimer was Iwrn in Stark County, Ohio, June 5, 1860, son 
of Joseph D. and Hanna (Hurraw) Weimer. The parents were both 
natives of Pennsylvania but were married in Ohio and from there 
came to Kosciusko County in 1865. From that time until their death 
they lived on a farm east of Webster Lake. Jo.seph D. Weimer was 
very active in the United Brethren Church and served as an exhorter. 
In the family were nine children, five of whom are still living: Cyrus, 
a retired farmer of North Webster, fought as a Union soldier in the 
Civil war all the w:^y from 1861 to the close of hostilities ; Savilla. wife 
of Levi Fiddler, of Syracuse, Indiana ; Mary, wife of Frank Kuhn, 
of Wisconsin ; Joseph P. ; and Dessie, wife of Elias Fiddler, of North 
Webster. 

Joseph P. Weimer was five years old when his parents came to 
Kosciusko County, and here he grew to manhood and has found oppor- 
tunities for a busy and useful career. He was in school until about 
eighteen, and at the age of twenty-one began working his father's farm 
and after his father's death Iwught part of the old homestead. 

November 25, 1888, 'Sir. Weimer married Lillie Singer, of Oswego, 
Tjidiana. She was born at Wolf Lake in Kosciusko County. After 
their marriage ^Ir. and ^Irs. Weimer sold the farm and bought a 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 527 

place a mile and a half north of North Webster in Happy Corner 
eommunit.y. This was their home and there they prospered for 
eighteen years. Moving from there, they bought their present place 
a mile north of North Webster, where Mr. Weimer has a highly cul- 
tivated farm of a hundred and forty acres. It is devoted to general 
farming and stock raising. Mr. Weimer was one of the organizers of 
the Farmers State Bank at North Webster and is a member of its 
board of directors. 

He is a member of the official board of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at North Webster and has served as superintendent of the 
Sunday School. Politicall.y he votes as a republican. He and his 
wife have two children : Zermah and Dale R. Zermah is the wife 
of Robert Phelps, and they have one child, Charlon H. Phelps. 

MiLO H. Harmon. The most enviable class of people in the world 
today are the farmers, and those who have learned by experience to 
handle their affairs with more than ordinary capability and judgment 
are winning not onl.y material prosperity, but are performing a 
service reckoned in value as hardly less than bearing arms in the 
great conflict of civilization. 

Milo H. Harmon is proprietor of Maple View 'Farm, 4% miles 
north of Etna Green in Scott Township. Mr. Harmon has been a 
farmer most of his life, is a native of Kosciusko County, and his 
place has a more than local reputation as the home of some of the 
finest stock of Duroc strain of hogs in Northeastern Illinois. His hog 
herd is headed by French Royal No. 192015, and this high grade 
stock ilr. Hannon has found satisfactory from every point of view. 
He also handles much other livestock, and devotes practically all the 
resources of his farm to meat production. 

He was born January 13, 1866, a son of David S. and Susan 
(Bordner) Harmon. His father was bom near Harri.sburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and in youth moved to Henry County, Ohio. He married Miss 
Bordner, a native of Wood County, Ohio, and five years later they 
moved to the Stoney Point community in Prairie Township of Kos- 
ciusko County. David S. Harmon was one of the popular men of that 
community until his death in 1906. His widow is still living on the 
old farm. Both were members of the Dnnkard Church and he was 
a republican. Of their nine children, five are still living. John H., 
Albert, Milo H., Sarah, wife of John Q. McFarren, and Emma, wife 
of Peter Bowen. 

Milo H. Harmon grew up on the farm near Stoney Point, and 
besides the advantaares derived from the district schools took a course 
in the Valparaiso University in 1886. At the end of twent.y-eight 
weeks he was graduated in the commercial course and then returned 
home and went to farming. 

Mr. Harmon married Cora J. Bowman. After their marriage they 
farmed one summer on his father's farm, another year on the farm 
of his wife's father, and then bought eighty acres of land in Marshall 
County. That county was their home for five years, at the end of 
which time they returned to Kosciusko County and bought the Maple 



528 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

View Farm, regarded as one of the best in improvement and general 
production in the county, and comprising 120 acres. 

Mr. and Mi"s. Harmon have one son, Loyal V., bom January 21, 
1894, and a graduate of the common schools and the Etna Green High 
School. He married Goldie Johnson, and they are farmers living in 
Etna Green. Mr. Harmon is affiliated with Leesburg Lodge of Masons 
and is a very active republican. He is also a stockholder in the Mutual 
Telephone Company. 

Argfs B. "Whitehead. One of the names that is well known to 
the people of Kosciusko County as standing for expert agi'icultural 
ability and sound citizenship is that of Whitehead, represented by 
]Mr. Argus B. Whitehead, who is known among his neighbors of Tippe- 
canoe Township as a very practical and at the same time progressive 
farmer. Mr. Whitehead's home is Si^ miles northeast of Warsaw. 

He has spent most of his life in this county, but was born in Elk- 
hart County, ilarch 22, 1875. son of Emanuel and Elizabeth (Ulery) 
Whitehead. His father and mother were born and grew up and 
married in Elkhart County. They were fanners there, and about 1888 
moved to Kosciusko coimty and located where their son Argus now 
lives, acquiring a hundred aci'es. At that time land in Indiana was 
comparatively cheap, and they paid only forty dollars an acre for this 
homestead. Emanuel Whitehead made his home on the farm until 
after the death of his wife and has since lived in Warsaw. There 
were six children, four of whom are still living : Argus B. : Jesse, 
assistant postmaster of Warsaw : Dr. C. S. Whitehead, of Naperville, 
Illinois ; and Calvin, a railwav mail clerk with a run on the Pennsyl- 
vania between Chicago and Pittsburg. 

Argus B. Whitehead spent most of his life on the farm and has 
lived on his present place since he was thirteen years old. He had 
a district school education and on November 22, 1896. married IMiss 
]\Iyrtle Sparklin. ^Irs. Whitehead was bom in Kosciusko County July 
1, 1876, and was edxicated in the common schools. After their mar- 
riage Mr. and Mrs. Whitehead located on a farm in the northeast 
corner of Wayne Township, but a year later returned to the old Wliite- 
head farm, which they rented until ^larch 10, 1912. They now own 
200 acres, and it furnishes constant demands upon their united ener- 
gies. 'Mr. and !Mrs. Whitehead have four children : C. G. Whitehead, 
a graduate of the North Webster High School and now a student in 
North Manchester College; Laurie, who has had three years in the 
North Webster High School ; Earl, a graduate of the common schools ; 
and Dale, still in the district school. 

This is one of the prominent families of the Church of the Breth- 
ren in their part of the county. Mr. Whitehead is a deacon in the 
church, has always been one of its active workers, and has served as 
church clerk and is present church treasurer. For the past seven 
years he has been superintendent of the Sunday School. In matters 
of politics he supports the republican party. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 529 

James A. Stoneburner. One of the valuable men of Kosciusko 
County from the point of view of service rendered the public is James 
A. Stoneburner, fish and game warden, who for thirteen j'ears has 
occupied this office under the state government, and has used his 
influence and his official capacity to protect and conserve the game 
resources of the country and enforce the laws and regulations pertain- 
ing thereto. Mr. Stoneburner is also a farmer, aiKi has lived at his 
present place in Plain Township since 1911. One of the features of 
his farm is Stoneburner Beach, a very popular resort in the county. 

Mr. Stoneburner was born in Warsaw, February 19, 1S83, son of 
John and Angeline (Shaddow) Stoneburner, the former a native of 
Ohio and the latter of Indiana. His pai-ents married in Kosciusko 
County and spent the rest of their days in "Warsaw. They were the 
parents of five children : Samuel, Mary, Rose, Ruth and James A., 
all now deceased except the last. 

James A. Stoneburner grew to manhood in the city of Warsaw and 
attended the public schools there. His first vocation was as a station- 
ary engineer and for about eighteen months he was coimected with 
the Warsaw waterworks. He was then appointed deputy commissioner 
of fish and game for the state of Indiana, and has given his services 
in that capacity since 1905. 

March 31, 1905, Mr. Stoneburner mai-ried Bertha E. Wirieck, who 
was born in Kosciusko County, daughter of Napoleon and Sadie 
Wirieck. She is a graduate of the common schools. The.y have two 
children, Paul and Cleta May, both in the public schools. 

Mr, Sto)iehurner takes an active part in Masonry and other fra- 
ternities, and is affiliated with Warsaw Lodge No. 73, Ancient Free 
and Accepted JMasons, the Royal Arch Chapter, and is a thirty-second 
degree Scottish Rite ^Mason at Fort Wayne. He is also affiliated 
with Warsaw Lodge of the Knights of Pythia.s and is a charter mem- 
ber of the Loyal Order of iloose at the county seat. In politics he 
is a republican, but has held no office except as fish and game warden. 

John W. Mauzy. A large part of the population of Plain Town- 
.ship is familiar with and patronizes the store of John W. Mauzy of 
Dutchtown, finding that a reliable place for their general supplies 
and appreciating Mr. Mauzy 's enterprise and personal qualifications 
as a merchant and good citizen. 

Mr. Mauzy is a native of Kosciusko County, born in Tippecanoe 
Township. April 2, 1879, son of N. W. and Harriet A. (Cunningham) 
Mauzy. His father was a native of Virginia and his mother of Ohio, 
and both came to Kosciusko County when young and after their mar- 
riage here settled on a farm in Tippecanoe Township, where they spent 
the rest of their days. The mother died October 25, 1917. They were 
members of the Cjerman Baptist Church at Oak Grove and the 
father was a republican in politics. Of the six children five are still 
living, John W. ; Edward, a farmer in Tippecanoe Township ; Cirdie, 
a salesman at Auburn, Indiana ; Howard, a Tippecanoe Township 
farmer ; and Ida, wife of Harry Weaver, of Richland Township, Whit- 
ley County, Indiana, 



530 HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

John W. Mauzy grew up on the farm in Tippecanoe Township and 
had a common school education. He lived at home until September 
29, 1907, when he married Miss Nellie Van Curen, daugrhter of B. F. 
and Cora (Howard) Van Curen. Her people are well known and 
substantial farmers of Wayne Township of this county. Her father 
was born in Washington Township, this county, February 14, 1857, 
and her mother was born in Noble County, May 12, 1866. Mr. and 
Mrs. Van Curen have six children : Nellie, a graduate of the common 
schools; Bessie, a graduate of the common schools and wife of E. 6. 
Fletcher ; Forest, who married Elizabeth Shoda ; Wayne, Irene and 
Ruth. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Mauzy lived for a time in 
Warsaw, then on a farm in Plain Township, spent a year in Tippe- 
canoe Township, and for three years Mr. Mauzy had his home in 
Goshen, Indiana, where he was connected with the Curtis and Carmine 
Hardware Companv. This was followed by six months with a hard- 
ware store at Syracuse, Indiana, after which he utilized his experience 
and training by opening a stock of general merchandise at Dutchtowni. 
j\Ir. Mauzy is a member of Warsaw Lodge No. 73 Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons and in polities is a republican. 

John E. Hall. One of the families longest represented in Kos- 
ciusko County's citizenship is that of John E. Hall. The Halls have 
been here over fourscore yeai-s, and the name through all these decades 
has been synom-mous with good citizenship, industry and business 
success. 

The family was established here by his grandparents, Samuel and 
Catherine (Anglin) Hall, both of whom were born in Virginia of 
English and Irish ancestry. They married in 1822. Catherine Ang- 
lin was a daughter of Adrian and Mary f^IcClung) Anglin. In the 
fall of 1834 Samuel Hall left Virginia and came west and penetrated 
the wilderness of Eastern Indiana to a tract of Government land in 
Plain Township of Kosciusko County. He acquired 320 acres of land 
from the Government in 1835, not being permitted to register for 
land until that date. So he experienced many of the trials and hard- 
ships of the pioneer, lived for several years with as many Indians as 
white neighbors, but finally brought his land imder cultivation and 
was not only a successful farmer but conspicuous as a man of affairs. 
He held the office of justice of the peace, was also associate iudge for 
a number of years, and for one term, was state senator. He died in 
1857, at the age of fifty-five, and at the time was candidate for state 
representative. In politics he was a democrat. His widow survived 
him until 1882 and passed away at the age of eightv-three. They 
were parents of eight children : Melinda, lx)rn April 26, 1823 ; Elam, 
born Januarv 10. 1825: Hiram: Lucinda. born March 1, 1829; David, 
born January 18, 1832: Elizabeth, born ]»larch 5. 1837; Joel, born 
October 18. 1839.; Matilda, born February 22, 1846. 

Hiram Hall, father of John E. Hall, was born in Harrison Countv, 
Virginia. October 26, 1826, and was eight years old when the familv 
came west to Indiana. Most of his education therefore was acquired 



HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 531 

in subscription schools. For four months he attended Franklin Col- 
lege, and after that did some teaching. In 1850 he bought 166 acres 
of sparsely improved land in Prairie Township, and with the industry 
that characterized him as a farmer and by his commendable business 
enterprise he added to his possessions iintil he had over 660 acres, 
practicall}' all highly improved. He was also active in local affairs, a 
loyal democrat, and in 1851, when only twent.y-tive years old, was 
elected township trustee. He was also one of the first directors of the 
Lake City Bank at Warsaw. December 21, 1851, Hiram Hall married 
Carrie A. Powell, a daughter of John and Dorothy (Morris) Powell, 
natives of Ohio. Eight children were born to their marriage : Lemon, 
born October 2, 1853 ; Electa, born December 18, 1854, and died March 
7, 1881 ; Olive, born March 3, 1856, died January 10, 1872 ; Albert, 
born October 17, 1858. a resident of Leesburg; Nettie, born November 
30, 1861, a resident of Leesburg; Ella, born September 18, 1868, now 
deceased ; John E. ; and Rose, born September 1, 1875. 

Mr. John E. Hall was born at the old homestead in Prairie Town- 
ship, a mile and three quarters west of Leesburg, May 3, 1871. He 
grew up on the home farm and was educated in the common schools. 
On January 1, 1892, at the age of twenty-one, he married Miss Phoebe 
]M. Cormaney. She was born in Marshall County, Indiana, February 
5, 1870, daughter of S. T. and Eliza (Hite) Cormaney, the former 
a native of Elkhart County and the latter of Ohio. Her parents now 
live near Kosciusko Station in Washington Township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hall have two children : George L., born March 29, 1896, a graduate 
of the Warsaw High School, now a farmer in South Dakota ; and Iva 
M., born May 3, 1900, a graduate of the Warsaw High School with 
the class of 1918. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Warsaw and Mr. Hall is a Past Noble Grand of Leesburg 
Lodge, No. 432, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In politics he 
votes for the man regardless of his political views. 

Mr. Hall is proprietor of the Oak Grove Farm, a splendid place 
comprising 152 acres located three miles north of Warsaw on rural 
route No. 5 and eligibly situated on the Hoosier Dixie Highway. Mr. 
Hall is especially prominent as a breeder of Holstein cattle. He has 
at the head of his herd a fine bull called Jess, which is eligible to reg- 
ister among the thoroughbreds of that strain in America. 

William H. Bixler has been successfully identified with the farm- 
ing enterprise of Kosciusko County for a number of years. His home 
is in Tippecanoe Township, nine miles northeast of Warsaw, on rural 
route No. 1 out of Leesburg. Mr. Bixler 's present prosperity is the 
result of long years of honest toil and good management. He began 
life with small capital, having been left an orphan when a small boy, 
and the prosperity he now enjoys is to be credited to the earnest and 
faithful work and cooperation on the part of himself and his good 
wife. 

Mr. Bixler was born in LaGi'ange County, Indiana, October 14, 
1868, son of Henry and Hattie (Hair) Bixler, both of whom were 
natives of Ohio. They were married in Ohio, and soon afterwards 



532. HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

came to Indiana and settled on a farm near Howe in LaGrange 
County. Tlie mother died there and the father afterwards came to 
Kosciusko County and spent the last three years of his life in Tippe- 
canoe Township. They were active members of the ]\Iethodist Episco- 
pal Church and in politics the father was a republican. Of the seven 
children, only two are now living. William H. and Emma, the latter 
the wife of Charles Sidner of Covington, Kentucky 

"William H. Bixler was six years old when he was left an orphan, 
and he grew up in the home of a cousin in LaGrange. He had the 
advantages of the district schools there, and lived in his adopted home 
to the age of twenty-one. He then came to Kosciusko County and 
on October 4, 1892, married iliss May Tenney. Mrs. Bixler was born 
in Tennessee and was a girl when brought to Kosciusko County by her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Bixler have two children, Fred and Mildred. 
Fred, who completed his education in the high schools at North Web- 
ster and Oswego, is a farmer in Tippecanoe Township, and by his 
marriage to ]Miss Biltz has two children, named Delight and Winton. 
The daughter, Mildred, is a graduate of the North Webster High 
School and is the wife of Isaac Kline. Isaac Kline is now serving 
in the United States Army. He and his wife have one daughter, June. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. Bixler are active members of the Brethren church. 
He is affiliated with Lodge No. 192 of the Knights of Pythias at Lees- 
burg and in politics is a republican. The good farm and home which 
represents the best eiiforts of himself and wife thrpugh many months 
contains 100 acres and is situated in section 19 of Tippecanoe Town- 
ship. 

Frank 0. Eichcreek. A successful agriculturist, like the man 
who makes a success in any other line of endeavor, must not only 
possess the knowledge to keep abreast of the advancement of the times 
but also the ability to apply this knowledge so that it will be produc- 
tive of satisfying results. In Kosciusko County, where the average of 
intelligence and ability in farming and stock raising is more than 
ordinarily high, one who is contributing to this prestige is 1^'rank O. 
Eichcreek, proprietor of the Eden Stock Farm of 100 aci-es, situated 
in Tippecanoe Township, a mile west of North Webster. This is a 
property- that is paying valuable returns for the labor bestowed upon 
it. Mr. Eichcreek has a more than local reputation as a breeder of 
Norman horses, imported Jerse}^ cattle and Duroc hogs. His hog sales 
annuallj' attract a large number of buyers from this and other 
counties. 

Though Mr. Eichcreek has spent most of his life in Kosciusko Coun- 
ty, he was born in Barton County, ^Missouri, February 8, 1872, a son 
of Thomas and Eebecca (Hart) Eichcreek. Both parents were natives 
of Ohio but were married in Kosciusko County. They went out to 
Missouri and lived on a farm in Barton County for eleven years, re- 
turning to Kosciusko County Januarj' 13, 1879. The father, a sub- 
stantial farmer, died in 1891 and his widow in 1901. He was affili- 
ated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and a republican 
voter without office holding aspirations. In the family were twelve 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 533 

children, nine of whom are still living, three of them in Indiana : James 
E., a farmer at Pierceton, Indiana; Anna I., wife of Albert Menzel; 
Josie, wife of Thomas R. Boydston, of Chicago; Effie, wife of Michael 
DonaVan, of Chicago; Lulii, wife of Emanuel Manier, of Detroit, 
Michigan; Joseph, of Argo, Illinois; Charles, of New Orleans; and 
Harry, of Hudson, New Jersey. 

Frank 0. Richcreek was seven .years old when his parents returned 
to Kosciusko County, and here he grew up in rural environment and 
acouired his education in the common schools. He was also a student 
at North Manchester and at Winona College, and for seventeen years 
was one of the successful educators, having charge of several schools in 
Tippecanoe Township. 

In 1896 he married Miss Julia A. IMiller, a native of Kosciusko 
County and daughter of Emanuel and Nancy Jliller. They are the 
parents of three children: Florence, born March 12, 1898, is a grad- 
uate of the North Webster High School and is now a teacher ; Ruby 
R., born February 20, 1902, is a graduate of the common schools and 
of the North Webster High School with the class of 1918 ; and Dale 0., 
a student in the common schools. 

Mr. Richcreek is widely known as Elder Richcreek, being an elder 
in the Syracuse and Tippecanoe Congregation of the Church of the 
Brethren. He was ordained an elder in that church at the age of 
thirty years, and has carried many of the responsibilities of church 
leadership and maintenance. In politics he is a republican. Mr. 
Richcreek is one of the stockholders in the Farmers Bank at North 
Webster and for one year was vice president of the institution. 

Andrew J. Smcth has spent his days almost entirely in Franklin 
Township, and from early manhood has borne the reputation of being 
a successful farmer, an industrious and capable business man, and as 
a citizen whose loyalty and public spirit could always be relied upon. 
Mr. Smith is proprietor of the Burdock farm, comprising 340 acres, 
located 21/0 miles southwest of Mentone in Franklin Township. 

Mr. Smith was born in that township April 4, 1850, a son of Leon- 
ard and Mary (Heise) Smith. The parents were both born in Penn- 
s.vlvania, were married there, and in 1849 located in Kosciusko County, 
where they spent the rest of their days. The mother was a member of 
the Lutheran Church. Of the family of eleven children those still 
living are Andrew J., George, Daniel, and Albert, the last named a 
resident of Michigan. 

Andrew J. Smith grew up on the home farm and his early priv- 
ileges in the educational line were those of the common schools. The 
school he attended was known as the Jaybird School. He was eleven 
years of age when his father died and from that time forward bore 
an increasing share of the responsibilities of work and management 
on the home farm. He lived at home until twenty-one and on October 
1, 1871, married Miss Melinda C. Hipshen. Mrs. Smith was born near 
Palestine in this county February 25. 1851. 

They are the parents of three children : Marj^ A., wife of David 
Engle ; ' Laverne, who married Delia Jeffries; and Clement, who is 



534 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

married and lives in Clayton, New Mexico. Mr. Smith and family 
are members of the Baptist Church and keep up their interest in all 
current and local affairs. He is a republican voter. 

Allen Ruple. An honored veteran of the Civil war and a lifelong 
resident of Kosciusko County, Allen Ruple has made his influence and 
actions count for benefit to himself and his community. He repre- 
sents one of the older names of Turkey Creek Township, and is owner 
of one of the good farms in that locality, located five miles south of 
Syracuse. 

He was born in the township of his present residence September 
16, 1844, a son of Jacob and Catherine (Punk) Ruple, the former a 
native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. They came to Kosci- 
usko County in pioneer days, were married here, and spent the rest 
of their days as farmers. Both died on the farm now owned and 
occupied by their son Allen. They were very active members of the 
United Brethren Church, which was one of the oldest church organi- 
zations in the township, and the father followed the democratic party 
in his political allegiance. Of their five children only two are now 
living. Allen and Fred, the latter a resident of Van Buren County, 
Michigan, 

Allen Ruple grew up on the home farm and attended some of 
the early district schools here. About the time he reached his majority 
he enlisted, in 1865, in Company B of the One Hundred and Fifty- 
Second Indiana Infantry and saw some active service during the clas- 
ing campaigns of the war. When the war was over he returned home 
and for half a century has been assiduously identified with the work 
of agriculture in this county. 

In 1870 he married Orline Starner, who was born in Ohio but lived 
in Kosciusko County from early girlhood. Mrs. Ruple died Novem- 
ber 23, 1916. All their married lives they spent on the farm where 
Mr. Ruple owns 110 acres, all in one body and devoted it to general 
farming and stock raising. 

He and his wife had three children : Laura, deceased ; Alice, wife 
of Jessie Shock, of Syracuse ; and Ada, who married William Mallon, 
and the}' live with Mr. Ruple. Mr. Ruple is affiliated with the Grand 
Army Post at Sj-racuse and in politics is a republican. 

Thom.vs Jensen. There is no sturdier and better citizen of Kosci- 
usko County than this native of Denmark, who came to America when 
a young man and by sheer force of will and industry has created 
for himself and family an enviable prosperity, and lives on one of the 
best farm homes in Turkey Creek Township, in section 34, six miles 
southeast of Syracuse. 

Mr. Jensen was born in Denmark October 26, 1854, son of Jens 
Arickson and Cecil Larsen. His parents spent all their lives in Den- 
mark. The father was a blacksmith, and later followed the business 
of farming. Of their nine children seven are still living. Two broth- 
ers of Mr. Jensen came to the United States, Lars, who developed a 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 535 

farm near Ozark, Arkansas, and reared his family there, Andrew of 
Spokane, "Washington. 

Thomas Jensen lived in Denmark until he was nineteen years of 
age. He acquired a common school education and at the age of four- 
teen was apprenticed to learn the blacksmith's trade. When he put 
into practice his resolution to come to America he had to borrow money 
to pay his passage. His first employment here during one summer 
was as a workman on the Baltimore & Ohio Railway, and from his 
savmgs he sent back home the money to repay what he had borrowed. 
In the fall of the same year he went to work on a farm near Milford, 
Indiana, was there nineteen months, and then learned the miller's 
trade m a flour mill at Syracuse. He worked there eight years and 
was promoted to foreman and manager and continued the milling 
business altogether for twenty years. 

In March, 1880, Mr. Jensen married Miss Perrilla Hendrickson. 
She was born and reared near Syracuse. After his marriage Mr 
Jensen rented a farm on Elkhart Prairie four years, and for five years 
farmed along Solomon's Creek. In 1908 he acquired his present place 
ot lOo acres, known as the Jensen Stock Farm. His chief business is 
raising cattle, and the quiet and efficient way in which he handles 
his affairs is a satisfactory- explanation of his success. 

Mr. Jensen is a thorough American, is a naturalized citizen and 
IS thoroughlv in harmony with American ideals of democracy. He was 
tormerly affiliated with and passed the chairs in the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. In polities he 
voters as a republican. His wife is a member of the Church of God 

Six ciiildren were born to their marriage: Latone, a farmer in 
i^lkhart County ; Ladene, clerk in a general store at Svracuse ; Lafern 
now in the United States Army; Lamerle. who is emploved by the 
Lightning Rod firm at Goshen; Lela M., deceased; and Marie M. at 
home. The son Lafeni Jensen lived at home until he was nineteen 
years ot age, acquiring a common school education, and was then 
employed by Sol Myers & Company at Ligonier. He went south for 
a time, following which he entered the service of H. L. Solomon & Com- 
pany of Lima, Ohio, and left a salary of $2,500 a vear with that real 
estate firm to enlist as a mechanic in the aviation corps of the United 
States Army. He is now in training at Fort Worth, Texas. 

George Cox. In the course of a Ion- and active career George 
Cox has solved many of the problems of the agriculturist, has met 
and discharged the responsibilities of ffood citizenship and has gained 
an enviable prosperity and place in his eommunitv as a resident of 
Tippecanoe Township. 

His people were pioneers in Kosciusko Countv. Jlr. Cox was born 
nnrTnfM •l^wV""'' ^'« birthplace farm three quarters of a mile 
north of North Webster is now owned by him. It is not far from his 

^iT f XT^'lf w u'f ''^ 'i ' ""''" ^''■™ ""^ t«" ^"•'^s IV" miles south- 
Bante Webster and three quarters of a mile south of Yellow 

His parents were Jacob and Mary A. (Mock) Cox. His father 



536 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

was a native of Pennsylvania and his mother of Ohio. Jacob Cox 
when four years old accompanied his parents from Pennsylvania 
to Ohio, where he lived to the age of seventeen, and then came to 
Kosciusko County. Kosciusko County was at that time almost a 
wilderness. The family made the journey in a wagon and crossed 
through the Black Swamp. After a year's stay stay near North Web- 
ster Jlr. Cox returned to Ohio and on coming back to Kosciusko 
County walked the entire distance. He was a poor man and made his 
living by working at monthly wages until he was about twenty-eight 
years old. He did much of the heavy pioneering work, such as split- 
ting rails, grubbing stumps, as well as the usual routine of a farm. His 
wife, yiary A. Mock, was the daughter of Michael and Catherine Mock. 
She accompanied her parents to Kosciusko Countj' when seven years 
old and there she grew to womanhood. After their marriage Jacob 
Cos located on the homestead farm three-quarters of a mile north of 
North Webster and cleared and improved that and made it his home 
the rest of his life. They had four children, one of whom died in 
infancy, the others being: George; Luciuda, wife of Sylvester ilid- 
dleton ; and Franklin, who lives in Wisconsin and married Edith 
Fiddler. 

Mr. George Cox has spent all his life in Tippecanoe Township and 
was educated partly in the North Webster schools and partly in the 
Lindamood school. As a boy he also shared in some of the hard labor 
of his time by splitting rails and clearing land. In September, 1876, 
he shot and killed the last wild deer known to have been in Kosciusko 
County. This occurred a quarter of a mile west of North Webster. 

January 9, 1881, ilr. Cox married Miss Mary Jarrett, who was 
born in Turkey Creek Township of this county. After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Cox lived at Boydston PostoflSee a year and a half, and 
then moved to his present farm home. In 1905 he bought the old 
homestead and occupied it as his residence seven years, when he 
returned to his present place. 

Mr. and ili-s. Cox have two children : Lizzie, born June 26, 1882, 
spent two years in the high school at Warsaw and is now the wife 
of John Garber. They live on the old Albert Garber farm and have 
one son, Robert F., bom May 22, 1913. Clinton Cox, the second child, 
was born February 3, 1889, and married Zeffa Baugher, daughter of 
William Baugher. They have one child, Dallas E., born March 15, 
1916. Mrs. Cox is a member of the Church of God at North Webster. 
Politically Mr. Cox is a democrat. 

Austin Blue. A brief inspection of the farm of Austin Blue, a 
mile south and a half mile west of ]\Ientone in Franklin Township, 
bespeaks the enterprise of its owner and is one of the many testi- 
monials of his good citizenship and effective service in that community, 
where he has spent most of his life. 

Mr. Blue was trustee six years of Franklin Township. He was 
born in that township December 3, 1863, son of Peter and Elizabeth 
(Johnson) Blue. His father was born in Fayette County. Ohio, and 
the mother was a native of the same state. Peter Blue came to Kos- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 537 

ciusko County when six years of age, grew up here, and had only a 
common school education, but gained a thorough knowledge of busi- 
ness and practical affairs after his marriage. He was a democrat in 
politics and his wife was a Baptist. Of their six children Austin, 
Alonzo, Benjamin, James and Etta, wife of Edward Henderson, are 
still living. John died when about tliirty-four years old. 

Austin Blue grew up on his fatlier's farm, attended the public 
schools, and remained at home until the age of twenty-one. On March 
5, 1887, he married Nettie Sarber, daughter of Christian Sarber. She 
was bom in Harrison Township in this county and was educated in 
the common schools and in the schools at Mentone. After their mar- 
riage Mr. and Mrs. Blue located on the farm where they now live, and 
for thirty years have given it the best of their energies and abilities. 
For a time they lived in a log house, and later Mr. Blue constructed 
the modern home where he now lives. They have two children : Estey 
Em, a farmer at home, was educated in the common schools and 
married Gerne Bettleman. Delta, a graduate of high school, is the 
wife of A. 0. Miller, of Jlinneapolis. ^Minnesota. The family are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Church at ileiitoiie, and Mr. Blue is one of the 
church trustees. He is affiliated with the ilasonic Lodge at Mentone 
and he and his wife are actively identitied with the Eastern Star 
Chapter. Another fraternity with which he is affiliated is the Modern 
"Woodmen of America. Mr. Blue is a democrat, and it was on that 
ticket that he was elected trustee of his township., His farm comprises 
120 acres, devoted to the staple crops and good live stock. He is a 
breeder of Poland China hogs, pure-blooded Hereford cattle, and has a 
fine flock of Orpington chickens. 

John H. Miller is one of the well to do farming men of Kosciusko 
County and has reached a position in life where he can be classified 
as independent, though he is still doing a patriotic part as active 
manager of his farm in Tippecanoe Township, adjoining Yellow Bank. 
His farm there comprises ninety-eight acres of good land. 

Mr. Miller represents one of several Miller families in Kosciusko 
County and his own people have been identified with the best citizen- 
ship here for more than half a century. He was born in Tippecanoe 
Township July 2, 1867, a son of Emanuel and Nancy (Maurer) Miller. 
His parents are still living. Emanuel Miller, whose home is three 
miles southeast of North Webster, was born in Elkhart County, In- 
diana, December 9, 1838, and is now in the shadow of his eightieth 
year His parents were John J. and Elizabeth (Crow) Miller, both 
natives of Ohio, where they grew up and raan-ied. John J. Miller 
on moving to Indiana located in Kosciusko County, northwest of 
Webster, but after a short time went to Elkhart County as a pioneer 
and was a farmer in that locality during his active life. He finally 
sold his farm and moved to the vicinity of New Paris, in the same 
county, and died there. ' He was an active member of the German 
Baptist Church. Of the twelve children of John J. Miller and wife 
ten are still living: Emanuel C, Catherine, Nancy, Sarah, Enos, 
Isaac, William, Lizzie, Louisa and Lewis. 



538 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Emanuel C. Miller grew to manhood in Elkhart County and owing 
to the conditions of his youth had very little opportunity to attend 
school. He lived at home until the age of twenty-five, when he went 
to Darke County, Ohio, and married there in May. 1864, Nancy 
Maurer. She was a native of Darke County. After their marriage 
they lived in that county for a .year and then moved to Tippecanoe 
Township of Kosciusko County, which has been their home for more 
than half a century. Emanuel C. Miller still owns ninety-five acres, 
but at one time his possessions included 2-50 acres. He is a democrat 
in politics, and is a charter member of the Mock Christian Church. 
He was one of the trustees, his associates being Joseph Mock and Silas 
Huber, who erected the Christian Church where a flourishing congre- 
gation still worships. Emanuel -\Iiller and wife have eight children : 
Salome, wife of Eugene Shoemaker, of Wayne To\\niship; Levi, a 
farmer in Tippecanoe Township ; John H. ; Sarah E.. wife of Charles 
T. Mock, of Tippecanoe Township ; Samuel Miller, of North Webster, 
vice president of the Fanners State Bank; Charles Miller, a real 
estate man of Nappanee, Indiana ; Julia, wife of F. O. Richcreek ; and 
Belle, wife of Daniel C. Mock, of Tippecanoe Township. 

John H. Jliller giew up on his father's farm and had a common 
school education. He lived at home to the age of twenty-five, and 
after twenty-one worked out by the day and also rented land. On 
November 12, 1892, he married ^liss Minnie Kleek. She was reared 
in Tippecanoe Township, a daughter of Alfred and Mahala Kleek. 
She attended public school at North Webster. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Miller lived on the old Dell 
farm, four miles northwest of North Webster, one year, then for four 
years occupied a place three miles south of that village, lived on the 
old jMiller farm four years, and then bought a farm of their own, con- 
sisting of eighty acres, between Milford and Leesburg. They finally 
sold that place, and in 1893 came to their present home, which has 
been the center of their associations and labors now for a quarter of 
a century. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller have two children : Kenneth was born October 
26, 1893, is a graduate of the common schools and spent one year in 
high school, and is still at home. Sylvia, born September 16, 1900, 
was educated for two years in the high school. The family are mem- 
bers of the Christian Church. In politics Mr. Miller is a democrat. 
He was one of the organizers of the Farmers State Bank at North 
Webster. 

James M. Murphy. One of the recent additions to the good citi- 
zenship of Kosciusko County is James M. Murphy, who for many 
years had his home in Wabash County, but has beeji known among 
the people of Kosciusko County for a long time. Mr. Murphy owns 
one of the good farms of Jefferson Township, his home being six and 
a half miles southwest of ^lilford. 

He was bom in Noble Township of Wabash County, May 5, 1867, 
son of John and Anna (Judy) Murphy. His mother was a native of 
Ohio and his father was reared in that state in Tuscarawas Countv 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 539 

from the age of four years. After they married both families moved 
to Wabash County, and John Murphy settled on a farm 2V2 
miles north of the' City of "Wabash. He began life in limited cir- 
cumstances, had only eighty acres of land at first, but as his prosper- 
ity increased he accumulated 240 acres and had one of the finest farms 
in the countv when he died. Hei was a member of the Lutheran 
Church, but later affiliated with the Presbyterian Church at Wabash, 
and in politics was a republican. In his family were twelve children, 
nine of whom are still living: Joseph F. and John P., both of Wa- 
bash; Mary, wife of Dayton 0. Macey, of Miami County, Indiana; 
Sarah, widow of Douglas Kiser; Adaline, wife of W. A. Wildner, who 
occupies the old Mun^hy farm in Wabash County; David G., of 
Waba.sh; James M. ; Charles E., of Wabash; and Emanuel B., of 
Wabash. 

James M. Murphy grew up on the farm- where he was born and 
attended the local schools there. For twenty-four years he combined 
the business of threshing with practical farming. June 16. 1889, Mr. 
Murphy married Miss Sarah A. Scott, daughter of Henry Scott. She 
was bom and educated in Wab'>sh County. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy 
have six children. William A., John F.. Claude F., Orville Hale. Mary 
M. and Elizabeth 0. The son Claude is now the family's renresenta- 
tiv in the TTnited States Army, being stationed at Camp Tavlor. "Mr. 
and Mrs. Murphy are members of the Church of the Brethren and in 
politics he is a republican. On March 9, 1916. he moved to Kosciusko 
County and bought the old Cook farm in Jefferson Township. He 
owns eighty-one acres of land there and is also cultivating 110 acres 
more, so that he is doing his full share in the agricultural production 
of the county. 

Albert F. Krull. A Kosciusko County farm that represents 
many of the ideals in the way of cultivation, productiveness, arrange- 
ment and eauipment is that of Albert F. Krull in Jefferson Township, 
41/) miles .southwest of Milford. Mr. Krull is a thorougrhgoino: farmer, 
one of the older residents of the county, and has proved a resourceful 
business man and public spirited citizen. 

He was born in Union Township of Elkhart County, Indiana, Jan- 
uary 14, 1867, and came with the family to Kosciusko County when 
he was about thirteen years of age. 

His father, Frederick A. Krull. who died March 31. 19'^2, was born 
in the Netherlands, January 24. 1832. a son of Albert and Tena 
(Swarts) Krull. also natives of the Netherlands. He attended com- 
mon school in his native country until sixteen, after whieh he worked 
on a farm as a day laborer. In July, 1854, he arrived in America 
and for four years lived in Elkhart County. In 1858 he went out to 
California and did farm work and also improved and cultivated 340 
acres of his own. He was also a teamster and miner. After six or 
seven years in California he returned to Elkhart County in 1865. On 
March 15. 1866, he married Simkjen Rystra. daughter of B. Rystra 
of Elkhart Countv. She was born in the Netherlands. Ausrnst 20, 
1841. On April 30, 1880, Frederick A. Krull moved to Jefferson 



540 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Township of Kosciusko County and bought 160 acres, where he insti- 
tuted that industry which eventuated in a fine farm, excellent build- 
ings and all the comforts of a good rural home. In 1882 he was 
elected township supervisor and served two years. He was a prohi- 
bitionist in politics, and he and his wife were active members of the 
Jlennonite Church. They had eight children: Albert, John, Harry, 
Maggie, Ane, who died in infancy, and a second child also named 
Ane, George and Isaac. 

Albert F. Krull received his educatioii in the district schools of 
Elkhart and Kosciusko counties, and after reaching manhood he 
spent several years in the Southwest. In the territory of New ^Mexico 
on December 25, 1897, he married Miss Mary DeArcy. She was born 
at LaPorte, Indiana, December 18, 1867, a daughter of Daniel and 
Adelia (Welch) DeArcy. When she was nine years of age her par- 
ents moved to Kansas, and she grew to womanhood there and received 
a district school education. When she was twenty years of age her 
people moved to New Mexico, and she lived there until her marriage. 
Daniel DeArcy was a native of Canada, while Adelia Welch was born 
in Ireland and came to the United States at the age of five yeai-s. She 
is still living. Daniel DeArcy and wife had the following children: 
Patrick W., Anna Mary, John E., Daniel, Adelia, Emmett and 
Marion. 

After their marriage Mr. and ^Irs. Kndl remained four years 
longer in New ^Mexico and then returned to Kosciusko County and 
bought 233 acres in Van Buren and Jefferson townships. Besides 
this extensive farm they also have 140 acres in Noble County, Indiana. 
]\Ir. Ki-ull is a successful stock raiser, and is a practical and thorough 
going citizen who can always be counted upon for cooperation and 
assistance in any movement affecting the local welfare. He is a dem- 
ocrat and he and his wife are members of the Hastings Grange. Mr. 
and Mrs. Krull had eiglit children, but seven died in infancy. The 
only surviving child is Tina, born October 10, 1905. Mr. Krull also 
reared a boy, Ellis Brown, who is now in the service of his country 
in France, with the One Hundred and Fifty-First Indiana Infantry, 
Company G. 

Cleanthus M. Borton is one of the most widely known farmers 
in the southwest quarter of Kosciusko Count.y, being proprietor of the 
Walnut Ridge Farm, a half mile east of Mentone in Franklin Town- 
ship. He has a large acreage under his management, and has suc- 
cessfully handled this place and all its related interests for forty 
years or more. 

Mr. Borton was born in Franklin Township, April 13, 1857, son of 
Allen and Anna (Jeffries) Borton. Both parents were natives of 
Stark County, Ohio, and were brought to Kosciusko County when chil- 
dren. Allen Borton was a son of Ira Borton, who settled south of 
Mentone, lived there many j^ears, and spent his last days at the Village 
of Sevastopol. Allen Borton grew up in Franklin Township, and after 
his marriage located on the farm a half mile east of Mentone. He 
died there in 1864, when a young man. He built the first and onl.y 




Jccc^ .Mi-f^ 



QMjc^ 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 541 

shingle factory here, located on the farm where Mr. C. M. Borton 
now lives. His widow is still living, and is an active and attentive 
member of the Baptist Chiirch. Of their fonr children, two sons are 
living: "Wellington, of Franklin Towniship, and Cleanthns M. 

Cleanthus M. Borton grew up on the home farm, was educated in 
the district schools, and has always had a part in the management of 
the old farm. In November, 1884, he married Miss Alice Garwood. 
She was born and reared in Harrison Township. After his marriage 
Mr. Borton bought the old farm, built a good house, and has lived 
there in comfort and plenty for many years. 

He and his wife have three children. Charles G. lives in Franklin 
Township and married Daisy Black. Ethel, now deceased, was the 
wife of Dennis Andrews, and her three children were Charles, Alta 
and Wilma. Wilma, since her mother's death, has been reared by 
her grandparents. Allen 0. is a graduate of the common schools and 
is now attending the ilentone High School. The family are members 
of the Methodist Church and Mr. Borton is on the official board. He 
has served as a member of the Township Advisoiy Board, is a repub- 
lican and is affiliated vdth the Modem Woodmen of America. 

Jacob Slife. An honored citizen whose life has been identified 
with Kosciusko County for many years, and always with usefulness 
to the community as well as to himself, is Jacob Slife, now living 
retired in a comfortable home at Burket. 

Mr. Slife was born in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, Au- 
gust 10, 1838, a son of Frederick and Christina (Byerley) Slife. 
His parents were natives of the same county and state, married there, 
and all their children were born in Pennsylvania. In 1851 they came 
to Indiana. In Pennsylvania the father had been a renter, and with 
the modest capital he had managed to accumulate invested in eighty 
acres of land two miles east of Burket. To this he subsequently 
added another eighty acres, and was well prospered and became one 
of the substantial citizens of the county. He and his wife were 
active in the Lutheran Church, and he was a democrat. Of the 
eight children, three died in Pennsylvania and five came to Indiana. 
The only two living now are Geroge W., a Seward Township farmer, 
and Jacob. 

Jacob Slife 'was a young lad when his parents came to this county 
and he finished his education in the local public schools. He attended 
one of the old log sehoolhouses of the county At the age of 
twenty-one he inherited a modest share in the family estate, and 
lived at home with his parents until he was twenty-eight. In March, 
1865, he married Catherine Raker, who was born in Kosciusko 
County January 24, 1842. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Slife 
began renting, and after six years they bought fort.y acres, sold that 
and bought eighty acres, and that in turn they also sold and ac- 
quired a larger place of 160 acres. For two years they had their 
home at Burket, and then Mr. Slife bought ninety-three acres north 



542 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

of that village and to it gave his personal superintendence for another 
five years. After that he sold his farming property and has since 
been content with one of the comfortable homes of Burkett. He 
lost his good wife July 14, 1918, after they had been married more 
than half a century. Mr. Slife reared two boys. In politics he is a 
democrat. 

Ora G. Tucker. The Tuckers came to Franklin Township sixty- 
five years ago. In all the time since then no name has been more 
substantially identified with the farming, land owning and attendant 
activities and pursuits in that quarter of the county. 

The founder of the family in Franklin Township was John Tucker, 
who was born in New Hampshire in 1791. He married Mary Ward, 
who was born in 1800. John Tucker went to Richland County, Ohio, 
in 1815. He was one of the first settlers in that part of the state. 
Three years later he returned to his native state and married, and 
in 1818 brought his bride to Ohio. John Tucker was a man of fine 
education, and after a few other families had joined him in his pioneer 
community in Richland County he opened a school and for sixty-five 
consecutive terms was a teacher. On coming to Kosciusko County in 
1853 he acquired land, and was the original owner of the land now 
occupied by the Village of Sevastopol in Franklin Township. The 
town was surveyed and was named by him. At that time the Crimean 
war was in progress in Southern Russia, and the Battle of Sevastopol 
was the most conspicuous event in foreign lands. John Tucker also 
developed a fine apple orchard from seed of his own planting. He 
died in 1879 and his wife in 1877. One of his children was Horace 
Tucker and another is Albert Tucker, who is still living in this county. 

Albert Tucker was bom in Richland County, Ohio, February 21, 
1831. Since early youth he has been noted for his unusual business 
ability and enterprise. Before he was fifty years old he had accumu- 
lated 2,500 acres of land, nearly all of it in Kosciusko County. He 
also founded the Village of Mentone, which was surveyed and platted 
in May, 1882. He built the first elevator there in the spring of that 
year, and used his capital and influence to promote its growth and 
development in many ways. On his extensive acreage he raised and 
bred innumerable cattle, hogs and horses, and at one time he was said 
to be the largest dealer on his own capital in live stock in the county. 
He always possessed a keen knowledge of men, and he aided many 
with loans and with other forms of helpfulness, and never had to 
foreclose a mortgage. At one time it was said that he had given 
employment to more men and paid out more money for labor than 
any farmer in Franklin Township. 

In 1856 Albert Tucker married Mary E. Frame, who died leaving 
one daughter, Alta M. In 1860 Albert Tucker married Miss Sarah 
Blue, of Franklin Towaiship. She and her only son, John R., are 
both deceased. On January 14, 1866, Alfred Tucker married Miss 
Catherine McNeal, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth McNeal. To 
this union were born six children : Norman, born in 1868, now living 
in Lake Township ; Charles M. ; Lee, lx)rn in 1874, deceased ; Curtis, 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 543 

born in 1877, deceased; Nellie, born September 16. 1880, deceased; 
and Ora G. 

Ora G. Tucker is one of the pi'osperons farmers of Franklin 
Township and has much of the ability and business .indgment of his 
father. He was born in Franklin Township, ilareh 29. 1883, grew 
up on his father's farm, and had a good education in the local schools. 
He is now farming 320 acres in sections 22 and 23, and gives nmch 
attention to good live stock. 

In 1900 he married Miss Nora Sarber, daughter of Orville Sarber. 
She was born in Kosciusko County. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker have four 
children : Norman R., born March 17, 1905 ; Winifred K., born August 
16, 1909 ; Lillie Irene, born January 18, 1912 ; and Albert M., bom 
July 31, 1914. Mr. Tucker is an extensive stock dealer and has prob- 
ably made most of his money in that way. In politics he is a re- 
publican. 

Charles J. Shitdkr. Some of the heaviest burdens of produc- 
ing the foodstuffs for the world at the present time fall upoii men 
who are comparatively young and yet past the normal military age. 
One of these men in Kosciusko County is Charles J. Shuder, who has 
been engaged in farming here all his active career and now has one 
of the good farms in Tippecanoe Township, located 4i/j miles east of 
Leesburg on rural route No. 1 out of that city. 

Mr. Shuder was born in Tippecanoe Townsliip, Sei)tember 16, 
1883. His parents were Isaac and Nancy J. (Lavering) Shuder, the 
former born near Dayton, Ohio, and the latter in Kosciusko County. 
The father is deceased and the mother is still living. Her home is 
in Tippecanoe Township. Isaac Shuder was a democrat in politics. 
There were the following children in the family : Henry, of Tippe- 
canoe; Minnie, wife of Harry Larabee ; George, of Tippecmioe Town- 
ship; Charles J.: Elsie, wife of Charles Wiseman, of Tippecanoe 
Town.ship; Mabel, wife of Everett Leedy. of Plain Township; and 
Ezra and Cleveland, both unmarried and at home. 

Charles J. Shuder grew up on the old farm, and was educated in 
the common schools to the age of thirteen. After that he busied him- 
self with the respon.sibilities of the home place until he was twenty- 
one. 

In 1904 Mr. Shuder mai-ried Dessie Whissler. At lier death she 
left one child, Audrie G., now twelve years old. On October 12. 1912, 
Mr. Shuder married Miss Ina ]M. Kitson. i\Irs. Shuder was born in 
Northeastern Kosciusko County, in Turkey Creek Township, Julv 26. 
1880, a daughter of :\Iilton and iMargaret J. (Hire) Kitson. ' Her 
father was born in Preble County, Ohio, April 11. 1S.')2. and died 
August 22, 1914. Her mother was born in Elkhart County, Indiana, 
December 18, 1857. Her father went with his parents to Elkhai-t 
County in 1861, and on September 11, 1878, was married, and then 
moved to Turkey Creek Township. Mrs. Shuder 's mother died June 
16, 1907. She was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Richville. Her father was a democrat and served one term 
as assessor of Turke.\- Creek Township. In the family were four chil- 



544 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COtfNTY 

dren : Ina M., Mrs. Shuder ; Harrj' E., who married Macy B. Miller 
and lives in Whitley County, Indiana; Lucy C, wife of Carl Earn- 
hart and a graduate of the Syracuse High School and now living 
in Kosciusko County; and Floyd J., who lives in Whitley County 
and married Eva Hibschman. Mrs. Shuder was educated iu the 
public schools of Turkey Creek Township. The three children of 
I\Ir. and ilrs. Shuder are": iMilton H., born March 28, 1914; Neva M., 
born July 22, 1915 ; and Wilma J., born February- 23, 1918 

The operations carried on by Mr. Shuder as a practical farmer 
are on his home place of about seventy-one acres. After his marriage 
he lived in Turkey Creek Township for a time and also in Elkhart 
County but then returned to his present location. In politics Mr. 
Shuder is independent and his wife is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

Jacob D. Richer, M. D. No member of the medical profession 
has exhibited higher qualifications for his work and has acquired a 
better practice in Kosciusko County during the past twenty years 
than Dr. Jacob D. Richer. Doctor Richer represents the Homeopathic 
school of medicine, and has had a career of self-help and of intense 
effort and ambition since early boyhood. 

He was bom on a farm near Peru, Indiana, February 5, 1867. He 
was one of a family of six children, four of whom are .still living, 
whose parents were John C. and Sarah E. (Miller) Richer. Doctor 
Richer 's grandfather was John Richer, a native of Switzerland. In 
immigrating to America, and while on board a sailing ship he met a 
French woman, Magdalena Noftsinger. They were married soon after 
their arrival in this country. John Richer was a farmer, but also 
taught school, and he located in Miami County, Indiana, in 1848, and 
spent the rest of his days there as a substantial citizen. John C. 
Richer, his son, has been a farmer all his active career and now lives 
at North Manchester in Wabash County. On the home farm of his 
parents Dr. Jacob D. Richer was reared to manhood, and his principal 
advantages when a bo.v were afforded by the district schools. When 
sixteen yeai-s of age he took the county school examination and began 
teaching in the rural districts. From his savings he was able to attend 
the National Normal I^ivei-sity of Lebanon, Ohio, where he was grad- 
uated in 1889. All told he taught nine years in Miami County. After 
graduating he attended the Northern Indiana Normal School and 
also the McPherson College at McPhereon, Kansas. 

Thus it was by hard work and much self denial that Doctor Richer 
acquired the means necessary to his professional education. In 1893 
he entered the Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago, and remained 
a student there until he gi-aduated il. D. in 1896. Soon after grad- 
uating he located at Warsaw and has lived there now for twenty 
years, looking after a growing practice and each year enjoying a 
rising esteem in the estimation of his fellow citizens and his profes- 
sional associates. Dr. Richer is a member of the American and 
Indiana Institutes of Homeopath.y, and fraternally is identified with 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 545 

the Knights of the Maccabees and the Knights of Pythias. He and 
his wife are members of the United Brethren Chnreli. 

On September 18, 1S90, he married Miss Cora L. Wilson, a daugh- 
ter of Harmon II. Wilson, of Peru. Indiana. To their marriage have 
been born five children : Dr. Orville H., a graduate of Winona Col- 
lege and Hahnemann College, joined the army and is in Siberia in 
Government service ; Paul W., in the Coast Artillery service ; and 
Cecil 0., a graduate of the Indiana Dental College and now practicing 
in Gary, Indiana. Two others that died in infancy were named Ruth 
and Iva May. 

Albert Garber has for many years been one of the factors in 
business and agricultural affairs in Tippecanoe Township. He has 
been a farmer, a merchant, and while he still owns other interests in 
that comnnniity is now president of the Farmers State Bank at North 
Webstei-. He was one of the substantial local citizens who organized 
this bank in 1916. It was opened for business in August, 1916, and 
Mr. Garber has from the first been its president. The other officers 
are: Samuel Miller, vice president, and James E. Rule, cashier. The 
directors, all representing the substantial citizen.ship of the locality, 
are in addition to Mr. Garber and Mr. Miller, Arthur Johnson, Grant 
Bause, A. B. Warner, Joseph Weimer, John Bauher and Randolph 
Allison. The bank was organized with a capital stock of $25,000.00 
and its management has been conservative and at the same time has 
done much to promote every worthy business object in and around 
North Webster. 

Mr. Garber was born in Tippecanoe Township, February 6, 1864, 
son of Samuel W. and Polly (White) Garber. His father was a 
native of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and his mother of Pennsylvania. 
The Whites and Garbers came to Indiana in early days. After their 
marriage Samuel W. Garber and wife located on a farm in Tippecanoe 
Township and were honored residents of that locality the rest of their 
lives. They were members of the Christian Church. Samuel Garber 
was a member and past chancellor of his ^Masonic Lodge and is a 
republican and has served as justice of the peace. There were eleven 
childi'cn in their familv. Daniel, proprietor of the Twin Lake Can- 
ning Factory of North Webster; ]\Iary, wife of Milo Strombeck, a 
former trustee of Tippecanoe Township now living at North Webster ; 
Jefferson, who is postmaster of North Web.ster ; Albert ; Clementine, 
wife of George 'SI. Humble ; Commodore, whose home is in Washing- 
ton Township of this county; Emma, wife of Silas Cook; Jacob, of 
Huntington, Indiana ; Barbara, wife of Charles Gandy ; Leaner, of 
Tippecanoe Township ; and John, also a resident of Tippecanoe. 

Albert Garber grew up on his father's farm and with a district 
school education acquired a thorough familiarity with the practices 
of agriculture when a youth. He farmed independentlv for a year 
and then joined his brother Jefferson in business at Noblesville," In- 
diana, under the firm name of Garber Brothers. After six years they 
sold out and came to North Webster, where they bought a store. 
Albert Garber was a member of the firm for about ten years and on 



546 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

selling out moved to a fai'm in Tippecanoe Township, and was one 
of the practical agrienltnrists of the locality for nine years. For 
several years noM' he and his family have had their home in North 
"Webster. Mr. Garber owns 160 acres of land in sections 25 and 26 
of the township. 

He married Miss Minnie Hire, who was born in Elkhart County. 
Indiana. Mr. and ilrs. Garber have one son, Avery, a graduate of 
high school and later a student at "Winona, and is now clerk and 
deputy postmaster at North "Webster. Mrs. Garber is a member of 
the Church of God at North "Webster. Fraternally Mr. Garber is 
afiSliated with North "Webster Lodge No. 367, Knights of Pythias, and 
is a republican voter, never having had any aspirations for office. 

Charles S. Yeager. One of the farm homes that include good 
management and prosperity to owners and occupants is that of 
Charles S. Yeager in Scott Township, 6V2 miles southeast of Xap- 
panee. Mr. Yeager has seventy acres of the old homestead, and is one 
of the live and progressive citizens of that locality. 

He was bom in Tippecanoe Township of this county February 14, 
1856, a son of Andrew and Clarissa (Hull) Yeager. His father was 
a native of Canada and his mother of Ohio. They married in Kosci- 
usko County and from Tippecanoe Township the.v iinally moved to 
section 30 of Scott Township, where the wife and mother died. The 
father was married a second time, and spent his last years at Nap- 
pauee. He was a very active member of the Church of God and a 
republican, having held several township offices. Of his eleven chil- 
dren, seven are still living: Charles S. ; Annis, wife of Daniel Martin, 
of Prairie Township; Ida. wife of Jacob Thomas, of Scott Township: 
Rose, Mife of Hiram Zinn, of Etna Township ; Orvil S. and Orlando, 
twins, the former a resident of Jefferson Township and its trustee, 
and the latter deceased ; ( 'lementine, deceased : Eva, wife of Alfred 
Minor, of Etna : and Leonard, of Plain Township. 

I\Ir. Charles S. Yeager gi-ew to manhood in Tippecanoe Township, 
and attended district schools there. After reaching the age of twenty- 
one he became manager of the homestead and gradually acquired 
those interests and properties which now constitute his prosperity. 

April 8, 1883, he married Eliza Thomas, who was born in Scott 
Township, May 29, 1864. They have six children: IMinnie, wife of 
Orville Lutz : Clayton, who is married and lives at Nappanee ; "\''ersa. 
wife of Merle Freeman, of Prairie Township : "V^ictor, unmarried ; Bur- 
ten, who married Lodema Miller; and Thela, a graduate of the com- 
mon schools. The family are members of the Church of God, while 
Mr. Yeager is one of its elders. He is a republican in politics. 

JoHX A. Raugiier. This name is well known in Tippecanoe 
Township as representing one of the leading farmers of that locality, 
a banker, and a man of generous interests and inclinations as a citizen 
and an upbuilder of his community. 

Mr. Bauger was born in Tippecanoe Township, ^May 24, 1857, and 
his life from birtli to tlie present has been spent in practically one 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 547 

locality. His present home farm is V/^ miles southwest of North Web- 
ster. His parents, Charles and Henrietta (Gigeler) Baiigher, were 
both natives of Germany. His father was born in Bavaria June 24, 
1829, and his mother on September 23, 1823. Charles Baugher liame 
to the United States with his parents when he was eighteen years old. 
They landed in New York City, went on to Ohio, and in 1848 settled at 
North Webster, where the Baughers were pioneers and where the 
name has been known and honored now for seventy j-ears. The mother 
arrived in the vicinity of North Webster in 1847, and here Charlef 
and Henrietta lived until their marriage and then located for a time 
in the Village of North Webster, later three miles northeast of the 
village, and from there moved to the farm where they spent their last 
years. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and 
in polities the father was a democrat. A brief record of their seven 
children is as follows : Jacob, deceased ; Matilda, deceased : John A. : 
William P., of Turkey Creek Township; Christ H., of Kansas; Louise 
and Hem-y, both deceased. 

John A. Baugher as a boy attended the common schools of his 
home locality, and he lived with his parents until twenty-two He 
married Miss Clara Gross. At her death she left three children. Mary, 
Je.ssie and Charles, all unmarried and still living at home. Por his 
second wife Mr. Baugher married Celia J. See, a native of Virginia, 
but since early infancy a resident of Indiana. 'Sir. and Mrs. Baugher 
have one child, Kenneth W., who is a graduate of the common schools 
and is a farmer in Tippecanoe Township. Kenneth married Hattie 
Reed. 

As a business man Mr. Baugher 's interests are represented by the 
ownership of the 120 acres where he lives and also forty acres com- 
prising the well known fishing resort known as Tippecanoe Park. He 
is one of the directors of the Parmers State Bank at North Webster 
and in every sense is one of the substantial men of his community. 
He is a trustee and member of the official board of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church at North Webster. 

Calvin W. Burket, M. D. Fully half a centuiy of active practice 
in medicine in Kosciusko County has made Doctor Burket the dean of 
his profession, and he enjoys that rank not only liy reason of th(^ 
many years he has spent here but also for his ability and success as 
a practitioner. His service has been commensurate with the length 
of years in practice, and among the wide circle of his patients he has 
been both a friend and a physician. The doctor is a man of gentle 
manner in all his dealings, and these qualities, together with an expert 
knowledge and skill in medicine, have combined to win him the strong 
and enduring affection of hundreds of families in this county. 

An Indiana man by birth, he was born at Hagerstown in Wayne 
County, December 13. 1838. His parents were Samuel and Haniiali 
(Bi.shop) Burket, and of their seven children only three now live. 
The ancestors came originally from Germany, probably in the colonial 
epoch, and the name when first introduced in America was spelled 
Burkhardt. but in the coni-sc of many years has been simj^lified to its 



548 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

present form. Samuel Biirket, father of Doctor Burket, was bom iu 
Ohio and came with his father to Wayne County, Indiana. Grand- 
father Burket built one of the first grrist mills in that county and 
operated it for the benefit of the early settlers a number of j-ears. 

As a boy and youth in Hagerstown ilr. Burket had such advan- 
tages and experiences as were common to Indiana boys during the 
'40s and '50s. He had passed his majority when he took up the study 
of medicine with Dr. Calvin West at Hagerstown, and during the 
winter of 1860-61 took his first course of lectures in the University 
of Michigan at Ann Arbor. This career as a student was interrupted 
by the outbreak of the Civil war. Doctor Burket has an interesting 
record as a soldier during the great conflict between the North and 
the South, and he was a unit in those gi-eat armies which swept the 
heart of the Confederacy in the years 1863-64. He responded almost 
at the first call for volunteers, and enlisted in April, 1861. in a three 
months regiment. He was a member of Company I of the noted 
Eleventh Indiana Infantry, a regiment commanded by General Lew 
Wallace. The only engagemeiit in which he participated during that 
three months' term was a skirmish at Romney, Virginia. When he 
was discharged it was with the rrnik of orderly sergeant. He almost 
immediately re-enlisted in Company I of the Fifty-Seventh Indiana 
Volunteer Infanti-y, and on its organization was commissioned fii'st 
lieutenant. He went with the command from Indianapolis to Louis- 
ville. Kentucky, from there marched through Kentucky to Nashville, 
Tennessee, and .ioined Grant's army in time to participate in the 
great Battle of Shiloh. Then followed the siege of Corinth, and after 
that Buell's movements through Nashville and South Kentucky in 
the pursuit of General Bragg. He was with the Union forces at Stone 
River, and there sufi'ered a severe scalp wound from an exploded 
shell. However, he never left the regiment, but continued with it 
and took part in the battle of Perryville, went on to Chattanooga, was 
engaged in some of the important movements of the campaigns around 
that city, and fought in the picturesque engagement on Lookout 
Mountain. Following this he was sent home on recruiting duty, and 
while he was away his regiment fought in the battle of Chicka- 
mauga. He rejoined it in time to help lead in the historic charge at 
Missionary Ridge. Then followed the great Atlanta campaign, last- 
ing more than three months, and before the fall of Atlanta he was 
sent home and no hopes were held out for his recovery from the 
severe illness from which he was suffering. In July, 1864, he resigned 
his command and was granted an honorable discharge. In 1862 he 
had been commissioned captain of his company while at Nashville. 

In spite of predictions to the contrary Captain Burket recovered 
his health and during the winter of 1864-65 resumed his med'cal 
studies in the University of [Michigan. In 1865-66 he attended the 
Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, which at the conclusion of his 
term awarded him the degree of Doctor of [Medicine. In 1866 he 
opened his office and began practice at Warsaw. That has been his 
home and the center from which have radiated his service and influ- 
ence as a physician and citizen for a period of half a centur^■. There 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 549 

is no physician now living in Kosciusko County who has more inter- 
esting reminiscences connected with the life of the people and the 
changes which he has witnessed in his own profession than Doctor 
Burket. 

In politics he is a republican whose loyalty has been a steadfast 
quality ever since he bore arms to preserve the Union in the dark and 
stormy daj-s of the '60s. He is a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic and belongs to the Masonic Order. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In 1867, soon after beginning his active practice, Doctor Burket 
married Miss Martha Elmer. To their union were boi-n five children : 
Prank, who died at the age of sixteen; Willard, a dentist at Warsaw; 
Ernest and Edith, twins, the former a dentist at Fort Wayne and the 
latter the wife of Edward Kulin. of Warsaw; and Milton, who died 
at the age of twelve years. 

WiLLi.vM Stackhouse, whose death occurred September 12. 1918, 
was an honored veteran of the Civil war and represented a family 
that has been identified with Kosciusko County for a long period of 
years, and have given their best efforts and enterprise as a contribu- 
tion to the good citizenship and substantial activities of this com- 
munity. Mr. Stackhouse owned a large farm, valuable land, well im- 
proved buildings, and gave it capable management. The farm is in 
Scott Township, about six miles south and a quarter mile east of 
Nappanee. 

Though a resident of Kosciusko County from infancy he was born 
in England June 10, 1843. a son of John and Hannah (Ellison'* 
Stackhouse. His parents in 1846, three years after his birth, came 
to America and in the fall of the same year located in Scott Township 
where they were numbered among the pioneers. Here they lived their 
good and useful lives, and both were identified with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, while the father was a republican in polities. In 
their family were fifteen children, two of whom are still living : Hugh, 
who lives on the old homestead in Scott Township ; and Wesley, of 
Scott Township. 

William Stackhouse grew up in Kosciusko County and his educa- 
tion was partly a product of the subscription schools and partly of 
the public schools. Before he was yet twenty-one years of age, on 
January 1, 1864, he enlisted in Company K of the 74th Indiana In- 
fantry, and was with that command during its marching and campaign- 
ing until the end of the war. He was with Sherman in the great 
campaign leading up to the siege and fall of Atlanta, and knows full 
well the dangers and hardships of a soldier's life. 

After the war he returned home and went to farming. He mar- 
ried Anna Teal, who died in 1873, her only child dying in infancy. 
On May 7, 1874, Mr. Stackhouse married Eliza Martin. She was 
born in Kosciusko County, daughter of John Martin. After their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Stackhouse went to housekeeping on the farm 
where they afterward resided. Here they have prospered in material 
circumstances and at the same time reared a family of children, seven 



550 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

ill number : Delia is the wife of Ora Anglin, of Scott Township ; Etta 
is the wife of Zeb Doty ; Rosa is the wife of William Harrison ; Cora 
married Clayton Harlan; Owen lives on the home farm and married 
Cleo Utter; Urshel and Hazel, the youngest children, are both gradu- 
ates of the common school and Hershel is a graduate of high school 
and is a farmer. Hazel is the wife of Harvey Moore. The family are 
members of the Christian Church and ]\Ir. Stackhouse was a repub- 
lican voter. 

Orlando F. Gerard has sustained a veiy prominent part in the 
business and civic interests of North Webster, one of the oldest towns 
in Kosciusko County. He is now giving practically all his time to his 
duties as trustee of Tippecanoe Township. 

]\rr. Gerard was born in that township March 26, 1859, son of 
Isaac and Loiiisa (Kirkpatriek) Gerard. His father was a native of 
Stark County, Ohio, and his mother of Kosciusko County, Indiana. 
Grandfather Abner Gerard after his marriage located in Stark 
County, Ohio, and from there came to Indiana and located near North 
Webster, where he had his home until his death. Isaac Gerard was 
about twenty years old when the family came to this county. He was 
married here and they then located on a farm in Harrison Township. 
His wife died live years later, and he continued to live in Harrison 
Township until 1877, when he moved to Tippecanoe Township and 
remained a resident of that locality until his death. He and his first 
wife had five children, four of whom are still living: Orlando F. ; 
Melissa, twin sister of Orlando and widow of 0. E. Little; il. C, of 
South Whitley, Indiana ; and William E., of North Manchester. The 
father by a second marriage had a son, M. M. Gerard, now deceased. 

Orlando P. Gerard gi-ew up on his father's farm in Harrison 
Township and had a district school education. At the age of twenty- 
one he began working for wages and on August 12, 1880, married 
Lavina Mock. Mrs. Gerard was bom in Tippecanoe Township, June 
7, 1860, daughter of John Mock. Without children of their own, Mr. 
and Mm. Gerard adopted a daughter. Bertha Gerard, who is now the 
wife of Ams}- Hamman, of North Webster. 

Mr. Gerard has always been a sturd.y republican in his political 
affiliations. The confidence felt in him by his fellow citizens is well 
indicated by the fact that he served as postmaster of North Webster 
during the administrations of Cleveland, Harrison and the second 
administration of Cleveland, altogether a consecutive period of ten 
years. In 1891 he entered business with his brother-inJaw, John 
Mock, of North Webster, and they were associated under the firm 
name of Mock & Gerard iiutil 1897. Mr Gerard then sold his inter- 
ests, and for a time was again postmaster. Later he was manager of 
the iloek General Store for eleven years and practically retired from 
business at the time of his election to the office of township trustee. 
The citizens of Tippecanoe Township feel that the school and other 
affairs of their locality were never in better hands than when <"•'- 
trusted to Mr. Gerard. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 551 

Isaiah Kuhn, a native son of Kosfiusko Connty, long identified 
with the agricnltural enterprise of this section, has directed his eflforts 
to such good purpose and now when far from being an old man he 
is able to retire and enjoy the comforts of a good town home at North 
Webster. 

Mr. Kuhn was bom in Tippecanoe Township, ^May 3, 1850, son of 
John and Susan (]\Iock) Kuhn. His fatlier was a native of Germany 
and his mother of Penns.vlvania. John Kuhn came to the United 
States when a .young man, and lived successively in Pennsylvania and 
Ohio, and in the fall of 1849 brought his family to Indiana and set- 
tled near North Webster, buying a farm a mile from that village. Here 
he spent the rest of his days. He was an active member of the Diink- 
ard Church. The death of this early settler occurred in 1860. He 
and his wife had thirteen childi-en, seven of whom are still living : 
John, Isaac, George, Julia, widow of Eli Hamman, Josiah, Daniel 
and Isaiah. The oldest, John, is living in Tippecanoe Township at 
the age of ninety-two. 

Isaiah Kuhn spent his boyhood days in his native township and 
had the advantages of the local schools there. He lived at home to the 
age of twenty-one. On February 7, 1875, he married Selma Young. 
^Irs. Kuhn was born in Ohio in 1854. After their marriage they lived 
at Melford a year, and then returning to Tippecanoe Township bought 
the old homestead of fifty-three acres. Mr. Kuhn added to this until 
he had an excellent farm of ninety acres, but in 1911 he sold out and 
moved to North Webster. He is still a fann owner, having a place 
of fifty-one acres a mile north of town. 

Mr. Kuhn has always afSliated with the republican party. He and 
his wife had four children : Lena, the oldest, is a graduate of com- 
mon and high schools and is now a teacher in the primary department 
of the North Webster school, of which her husband, Professor Warren 
Wilcox, is superintendent. The second child, Chloe, lost her life by 
drowning. Ada is a graduate of the common schools and is the wife 
of Jack Buttz, of Angola, Indiana. Professor Ray Kuhn is a man of 
thorough education and is superintendent of the Pierceton schools. 

Daniel M. Garber. Much of Kosciusko county's rapk and im- 
portance as a fruit growing section in a commercial way is due to the 
enterprise of Daniel M. Garber, one of the most successful horticul- 
turists of the county and founder and manager of the Twin Lakes 
Canning Company, an institution that is doing much to preserve the 
fruit products not only of his own farm but of the surrounding 
section. 

Mr. Garber represents one of the very old and prominent families 
of the county. He was born in Tippecanoe Township April 16, 1860. 
son of Samuel W. and Polly A. (White) Garber. His grandfather, 
Jacob Garber, was a native of Pennsylvania. After moving to Ohio 
he married Barbara Mock. They became early settlers of Kosciusko 
County, where they spent their last years. Their children were named 
Julia, Samuel, Jacob, Catherine, Allen, Henry and Mary. Of these 
Jacob, Catherine and Mary are still living. 



552 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Samuel "W. Garber was born August 24, 1832, in Tuscarawas 
County, Ohio, near Bolivar. His wife was born July 9, 1837. They 
married in Kosciusko County and lived here the rest of their days. 
The father died Febi-uary 19, 1888, and his wife November 24, 1885. 
To their marriage were born twelve children : George W., born March 
18, 1858, and died December 1, 1S60; Daniel M., born April 16, 1860; 
Mary J., born July 6, 1861: Thomas J., bom December 22, 1862; 
Albert, born February 6, 1864 : Clementione, born ]\Iay 15, 1865 ; 
Commodore, born March 20, 1866; Emma F., born November 10, 
1668; Jacob, born September 30, 1871; Barbara E., bom July 29, 
1873 ; Leander, born September 2, 1875 ; and John H., bom ilay 17, 
1877. Eleven of this large family are still living. 

Daniel ]M. Garber grew up on his father's farm in Tippecanoe 
Township and had the advantages of the district schools. On Sep- 
tember 20, 1880, he married Miss Eliza E. Reed, who was bom Decem- 
ber 11, 1856. After their marriage they began housekeeping in the 
same township where they had grown up, and thej' occupied the old 
homestead farm until 1903. Mr. Garber has always given more or 
less attention to the propagation of small fruits, and his farm at pres- 
ent is largely devoted to horticultural crops. Some years ago he 
established the Twin Lakes Canning factory, and that is now a suc- 
cessful corporation under the name D. M. Garber & Sons. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garber have children: Frances, a graduate of the 
common schools and wife of Allen C. Long, living near Wlieelock, 
North Dakota ; Charles J., whose home is with his father and who is 
an active business associate with him, married Truly Smith ; Letitia, 
wife of Charles L. i\Iiller, their home being near Oak Grove Church in 
Tippecanoe Township ; Samuel M., a resident of Tippecanoe Town- 
ship ; Mary, a graduate of the common schools, had one year of high 
school work. 

The family are members of the Christian Church at North Web- 
.ster. Mr. Garber has long been prominent as a leader in local 
republican politics, served two terms as tmstee of Tippecanoe Town- 
ship and for thirty years was a member of the County Central Com- 
mittee. He is also well known fraternally, being a past master and 
member of the Grand Lodge of Hacker Lodge No. 321, Ancient Free 
and Accepted ^Masons, a past chancellor of North Webster Lodge No. 
367, Knights of Pj^hias, and has sat in the Grand Lodge ; and has 
filled several chairs in the Knights of the Maccabees. 

James C. Jarrett. Some of the oldest names and some of the 
best people of Kosciusko County are represented by Mr. James C. 
Jarrett and family. ^Ir. Jarrett is himself a citizen whose work and 
character have broiight him enviable prominence and has lived prac- 
tically all his life in Kosciusko County. He is a soldier of the great 
Civil war. and in many ways his works and influence have justified 
his presence and the honor paid him by his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Jarrett, who lives on his farm three-quarters of a mile west 
of North Webster, was born in Tippecanoe Township on the east side 
of Webster Lake, June 17, 1848, son of Doctor Jonas and Julia (John- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 553 

son) Jarrett. His father was a native of Kanawha Connty, Virginia, 
and on coming to Kosciusko County located on the bank of Webster 
Lake as a pioneer. He studied medicine principally at Cincinnati, 
and began his practice at Boydson Mills, now Yohn's Mills. He was 
in professional work there for ten years, and then moved to North 
Webster, where he continued serving a large clientele until his death 
in 1887. 

He married in this county Julia Johnson, who was born in Vir- 
ginia. Her father, Benjamin Johnson, came from Virginia on foot 
to Kosciusko County, and was one of the arrivals here in 1835. He 
built his log cabin near the outlet of Webster Lake in the same year. 
Mi-s. Jarrett came with her father to Kosciusko Connty when she was 
a small girl. Doctor and Mrs. Jarrett had four children : Emily, wife 
of Captain B. F. James, of Warsaw; John W., who married Elizabeth 
Mock and now lives in Kansas; James C. ; Lucinda, wife of Eli Marks 
of Kelso, Washington. 

James C. Jarrett as a boy attended some of the primitive public 
schools of Tippecanoe Township. He lived at home until he was 
twenty-two years of age, and on October 14, 1870, married Chloe J. 
Warner. 

Mrs. Jarrett is also member of a prominent family. She is a 
daughter of Thomas K. and Hester A. (Benford) Warner. Her 
father was born near Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio, son 
of Henry Warner, who arrived in Tippecanoe Township of Kosciusko 
County in 1836. His location and the scene of his in<lustri(ius efforts 
as a pioneer was in section 9 of that township. His son, Thomas K. 
Warner, came the same year, and it was the distinction of this son 
to teach the first school in Tippecanoe Township during the winter of 
1838-39. After that he taught many terms, and was one of the best 
educated men of the county in the early days. Thomas K. Warner 
and wife had the following children : Hershel J., who gave up his 
life as a sacrifice to the Union at Murfreesboro while with the 
Thirtieth Indiana Infantry ; Chloe J., wife of Mr. Jarrett ; Albert ; 
Mary E., wife of Silas Kettering; Sarah A., wife of John A. Ketter- 
ing; Alice, wife of Sylvester Humble, of Wisconsin; and William, of 
Tippecanoe Township. 

Mrs. Jarrett grew up on the farm where she was born and had a 
good education in the country schools. After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Jarrett lived for fourteen years at North Webster; where they 
engaged in farming, and from there moved to their present place 
where they own forty acres of good land. 

Five children were born to Mr. and IMrs. Jarrett, three of whom 
died in infancy. Of the two living, B. J. Jarrett is now in business 
at Renssalaer, Indiana, and married Mollie Abshire. The younger 
child, Sadie, is the wife of Wesley Weimer, and they have their home 
on the east bank of Webster Lake. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Jarrett besides their 
two living children have eight grandchildren and one great-grand- 
child. They are active members of the Methodist church and Mrs. 
Jarrett has been connected with that church since 1862. 

The soldier record of Mr. Jarrett was made dui'ing the middle 



554 HIOTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

period of the Civil war. la July, 1863, he enlisted in Company G of 
the One Hundred and Eigrhteenth Indiana Infantry, and sei-ved until 
mustered out on ]March 25, 1864. He then reenlisted in Company G, 
Thirty-Eighth Indiana Infantry, and saw active service until the 
close of hostilities. He is a member of the Grand Army Post at War- 
saw, and has always been a decided republican in politics, though 
never an aspirant for any political office. Mr. and Mrs. Jarrett have 
three grandsons in the United States service, one in the ua\7- and two 
in the motor truck service. 

John Estep has lived in Kosciusko Count_y nearly half a c-entury. 
assisted when a boy in clearing up some of the primeval woods and 
making the land suitable for cultivation, and for a number of years 
owned one of the good farms in Scott Township, where he is rated as 
one of the most prosperous farmers. 

Mr. Estep was born in Rockingham, Virginia, June 15, 1851, a 
son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Tussing) Estep, both natives of Shen- 
andoah County, Virginia. Samuel Estep had some distinctly hostile 
views to the institution of slavery and secession, and it was to avoid 
conscripted service into the Confederate anuy that he left the South 
and went to Ohio and later came to Kosciusko County. He and his 
wife died in Jefferson Township, and he was always a loyal republican 
in politics from the formation of that party. There were nine chil- 
dren, and eight are still living: William, deceased: Rachel, widow 
of Washington Price; Amos, of Virginia: Josiah, of Leesbnrg. In- 
diana; John: Henry; Lyclia, widow of George Grinder: Sarah, wife 
of Rufus Leist ; and Elizabeth, widow of George Cummings. 

John Estep was about twenty-two years of age when he came to 
Kosciusko County, and he accpiired his early schooling in Ohio. He 
learned the value of industry as a means of self advancement, and 
gave his father his wages until he was twenty-one. He then worked 
by the month and has earned all the prosperity represented in his 
good farm of 120 acres which he owns today. 

He married Sophi-onia Harlan, who died leaving two sons : Walter 
H. and William L. Walter married Bessie Shively. For his second 
wife 'Sir. Estep married Lida Huffman, who died in 1910. Mr. Estep 
is a member of the Church of God and is a i-epublican in polities. 

Charles A. Williamson. Among the class tc which Kosciusko 
County must look for its future development along agricultural lines 
is found Charles A. Williamson, whose well-developed property is 
located in the vicinity of Burkett. With the exception of four years 
his entire life has been passed in this county, where he has devoted 
his energies and abilities to the cultivation of the soil, and at the same 
time has established himself in the confidence and esteem of his fellow- 
citizens, who, in recognition of his sterling qualities of character, 
have elected him to positions of public trust. 

Mr. Williamson was born in Kosciusko County, February 20, 1875. 
and is a sou of John H. and Sarah Ann (Byers) Williamson. His 
paternal grandfather, Jolm Conley Williamson, was born in Virginia 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 555 

(now West Virginia), and was an early settler of Miami Coiintj-, 
Indiana, where he took up land from the United States Government, 
and there followed farming and stock raising with success for many 
years. In the evening of life he came to Kosciusko County, but 
eventually went to Mississippi, where his death occurred, his body 
being brought back to this county for interment. One of his sons, 
Taylor Williamson, represented the family as an upholder of the 
Union during the Civil war, in which he fought as a member of an 
Indiana volunteer infantry regiment. John H. Williamson, father 
of Charles A., was born in 1852, in Miami County, Indiana, was reared 
as a fanner, a vocation which he adopted when he embarked on his 
own career, and after reaching his majority came to Kosciusko 
County. Here he settled on a farm in Seward Township, where he 
continued operations until his death. April .30, 1903, at which time 
he M'as the owner of 160 acres of good land, the improvements on 
which made it one of the be.st farms of its size in this part of the 
county. This was accumulated solely through his own labor, as he 
received no outside assistance and had only ordinary advantages in 
his youth. He was known as one of the sound and reliable men of 
his community who lent his aid to every movement that promised 
advancement and was an active factor in the development of Seward 
Township. He was a republican in his political views, but his activ- 
ities in this direction were largely confined to the interest taken by 
a good citizen with the welfai'c of his locality at heart. ^Ir. William- 
son was married in Kosciu.sko County to Miss Sarah Ann Byers, who 
was born in this county in 1856, the daughter of Jacob Byers, who 
was bom in Johnson County, Tndiaiia, and came at an early date to 
Kosciusko County, where his death occurred after a long and uni- 
formly successful career as a farmer. Mrs. Williamson, who was 
educated in the public schools, died ilay 30, 1911, in the fnith of the 
United Brethren Church, of which she had been a member since girl- 
hood. JMr. and Mrs. Williamson became the parents of nine children, 
of whom five are living, as follows: Early Conley, who is engaged in 
farming in Kosciusko County: Ernest, who is also an agriculturist of 
this county : Jennie E., who is the wife of David Bruner, also a farmer 
of this county: Benjamin Franklin, who farms in this county; and 
Charles A., of this notice. Ben.iaiiiin F. Williamson is also employed 
as an operator for tlie Nickel Plate Railway. 

Charles A. Williamson \\;is given the advantages of attendance at 
the district schools of his native county and the high school at Burkett, 
and during his vacations assisted his father and brothers in the opera- 
tion of the homestead farm. When he attained his majority, in Feb- 
ruary, 1896, he left this county and went to :Miami County, Indiana, 
where he rented a farm fi-oin his grandfather, and in the following 
y^ar purchased this property. However, he felt that conditifins and 
opportunities for advancement were better suited to his abilities in 
Kosciusko County, and accordingly, in 1899, sold his Miami County 
farm and returned to the vicinity of his birthplace. Here he secured 
by purchase a farm in Seward Township, consisting of eighty-six 
acres, the greater part of which is now under a high state of Vnltiva- 



556 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

tion. Mr. Williamson raises all the standard crops, including corn, 
wheat and oats, and has also met with satisfying success in raising 
and shipping cattle and hogs, while in former years he devoted a large 
part of his time to the raising of thoroughbred horses, although this 
department recently has not been operated. He has improved the 
residence and barn on the farm, and as a progressive, energetic farmer 
has installed much machinery of a modern character. He is vice pres- 
ident and a heaA'j' stockholder of the Bank of Seward at Bnrkett. 

Mr. Williamson was married in 1895 to Miss Eliza C. Rickel, of 
Kosciusko County, daughter of Reason Rickel. an old and honored 
native-born citizen of this county, where he still lives at the age of 
seventy-three years. Mrs. Williamson is a member of the United 
Pre.sbyterian Church. Mr. Williamson is a member, at Miami, of the 
Improved Order of Red Men, and has passed through the chairs of his 
lodge. A republican in his political views, he was appointed a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees in 1912, and in spite of the fact that this 
township is strongly democratic was elected to that office in the fall of 
1913 by a satisfying ma.jority. In 1915 he was the candidate of his 
party for the office of county auditor, but met with defeat owing to 
political conditions. 

John W. Montel, of the Atwood community, has recently' passed 
his seventieth birthday. He is one of the oldest native sons of 
Kosciusko Countv. and his career has been one of honorable and 
useful activity. He is a veteran of the Civil war, and most of his years 
have been spent in farming and in dealing in farm lands. He is 
now practically retired, and has a competence against his declining 
years. 

Born in Kosciusko County July 1, 1845, he is a son of John S. 
and Susan (Wolf) Montel. His parents were both natives of Penn- 
sylvania. The paternal grandfather was Christopher IMontel, who 
was bora in Germany and when a young man came to America, set- 
tling in Pennsylvania, and was there in time to take a part in the 
War of the Revolution. He after«'ards moved to Ohio and finally 
to Indiana, where he died. The maternal grandfather was Jacob 
Wolf, also a native of Pennsylvania, who migrated to Preble Coun- 
ty, Ohio, where he died after many years as a farmer. John S. and 
Susan Montel were married in Ohio, and after ten or twelve years 
in that state they came on to Indiana. John S. Montel is numbered 
among the very early settlers in Kosciusko County, having settled on a 
farm in this locality in 1837. This was an almost unbroken wilder- 
ness at the time and the Jlontel family supplied its table largely from 
the wild game which was abundant in the woods. He did his share 
in clearing up some of the firet lands brought under cultivation, and 
altogether he did a worthy part as an early settler. He was an active 
member of the Lutheran Church and in politics a democrat. 

John W. Montel, who was the youngest in a family of thirteen 
children, was reared in this community, attended the country schools, 
and his recollections are of one of the old fashioned log school houses, 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 557 

which had a puncheon floor and slab bench seats, and the curriculum 
of ■ instruction was strictly confined to the three R's. 

He was still quite young when the war broke out. On August 5, 
1862, in response to Lincoln's call for 300,000 men, he enlisted in Com- 
pany I of the Twelfth Indiana Infantry. Altogether he was in twenty- 
one battles and a large number of skirmishes. In one of the first bat- 
tles in which he participated, at Richmond, Kentucky, he was made 
a prisoner, but was subsequently exchanged, returned home for a 
furlough of twenty days, and then rejoined his command. He took 
part in those great movements which wrested the country between 
Chieamauga and Atlanta from the Confederacy, and he followed 
Sherman on his glorious march to the sea. 

Following the war Mr. Montel located at Silver Lake and applied 
himself vigorously to his duties as a farmer and agriculturist. He 
married Miss Elvira Eppler. She was bom in Marion County, Ohio, 
and came to Kosciusko County when only seven years of age. To their 
marriage have been born four children : Eleanora, wife of Benjamin 
Dancer, a carpenter at Atwood; William S.. who is in the railroad 
service and lives at Atwood ; Artie May, wife of Jacob Shank, of 
Mishawaka, Indiana, a groceryman there ; and Oris Clyde, who is 
employed in a factory at Mishawaka. 

Mr. and Mrs. Montel take an active part in the United Brethren 
Church. He keeps up his as.sociations with old army comrades as a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and in politics is a 
republican. At one time he was township supervisor. Some years 
ago Mr. Montel dealt quite extensively in farm lands, and his busi- 
ness dealings have always been characterized by honesty and success- 
ful results. A few ye^rs ago he retired from the major activities 
and responsibilities of the farmer, and now has an excellent home at 
Atwood. 

WiLLi.vM W. Warren. Now in the twilight of a well-spent life, 
William W. Warren is living retired in his comfortable residence at 
Mentone. His birthplace, a farm in Henry County, his boyhood 
passed amid the scenes and experiences of early Kosciusko County, 
and his mature years devoted to the cultivation of the soil and the 
development of the latter community — the record of .such a life, if told 
in its completeness, would make a volume of interesting reading. It 
is not our privilesre to place it before our readers in its entirety. 
As we may not follow evei-y curve of a river, but can only trace its 
general outlines from its source to the sea, so while we may not relate 
every incident in the life of Mr. Warren, we can, notwithstanding, 
narrate the principal events which have marked and characterized his 
career. 

Mr. Warren was born in Henrv County, Indiana, November 3, 
1843, and is a son of James and Polly (Beeson) Warren. His grand- 
father, James Warren, was born in South Carolina, and at an early 
period in Indiana's history migrated to this state, taking up his 
residence in Wayne County, where for several years he followed 
his trade of blacksmith, but later turned his attention to farming. 



558 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

in which occupation he passed his last years. His sou, James Warren, 
the father of "William W., was born in "Wayne County, in 1822, later 
7noved to Henry County, where he was married and lived for some 
years, and in I80I came to Kosciusko County, locating on a farm in 
Franklin Township. From modest circumstances he worked his way 
by industry and perseverance to the ownership of a valuable and 
well-cultivated farm, reared a family of chilclren who took their 
places as responsible members of their several communities, and won 
the respect and confidence of his fellow-citizens. He was a republi- 
can in his political views, but was content to devote himself to the 
labors of the aprrieulturist, and was not a seeker for public preferment. 
He was a member of the Dunkard faith and an honest, God-fearing cit- 
izen. Mr. "Warren was married in Henry County, Indiana, to Miss 
Polly Beeson, who was born in North Carolina in 1822, daughter of 
"William H. Beeson, who brought his family to Indiana in 1827 and 
settled in Henry County. Mr. Beeson, who was also a farmer all of 
his life, later hearkened to the call of the "West, and his death oecnrj-ed 
in Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. "Warren were the parents of seven children, 
of whom "William "W. is the only survivor. 

William W. Warren grew up amid rural surroundings on the 
Henry County homestead of the family, and there received his early 
ediieation in the public schools. This was supplemented by attend- 
ance at the district schools of Kosciusko County, to which community 
he was brought when eight years of age. and where he grew to sturdy 
and active manhood. As a youth he learned the carpenter's trade, 
at which he worked in connection with farming, and as a contractor 
erected a number of buildings in the commuuitj', which stood for many 
years as monuments to his skill and good workmanship. Howevei-. 
the greater part of his attention was devoted to the family occupation 
of farming, a vocation in which he gained marked success during the 
years of his activity. He is now the owner of 248 acres of well-devel- 
oped land, located in Franklin Township, where he has substantial 
buildings and improvements of a modern character, this having been 
conducted by his son since i\Ir. Warren retired from active life. He 
now makes his home at ilentone, where he has an attractive residence. 
Mr. Warren has worked his own way to a position of independence and 
prominence. He had few advantages in his youth save those given 
him by an ambitious and determined disposition, but these have proved 
sufficient to aid him in the accomplishment of his desires. He is a 
stockholder in the Farmers Bank of ^Mentone, one of the substantial 
institutions of this part of the county, and has other interests in land 
and investments, in which he has shown his faith in the continued 
advancement of Kosciusko County. 

In 1862 Mr. Warren was married to iliss Nancy J. Guekenliour. 
who was born in Ohio, and of their children two ai"e living: iliss 
Clara, who makes her home with her father, was given an excellent 
educational training, became a teacher in the public .schools, and aftei' 
seventeen years of educational work at Beaver Dam, Indiana, came, 
two years ago, to Mentone, where she now has a large and appreciative 
class: and Alva, who is engaged in carrying on the work of his father's 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 559 

farm in Franklin Township. Tho mother of these children died Oe- 
tober 7, 1915, firm in the faith of the Baptist churcli, of whieh she 
had been a devout member for thirty-five years, and to which I\Ir. 
Warren and their children still belong. ^Ir. Warren is one of the 
best known men iu this part of the state in the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, being the oldest member of Mentone Lodge, which he 
joined in 1872, and in which he has passed through the chaii-s tlirce 
times. He is a rejinblican in his political affiliation, and on that ticket 
was elected a member of the board of trustees of the Town of ilentone, 
a position in which he is now acting with ability and fidelity. 

William Graff is a member of the firm Graff Brothers in Seward 
Township, who have not been content merel.y with the business of 
producing crops as practical fanners, but have also furnished facilities 
for marketing and distributing the ei'ops and livestock of others, and 
handle much of the local produce of that section through their elevator 
and yards at Burkett. Mr. William Graff of this firm has his farm 
home a mile east of Burkett. 

He was born in Franklin Township of this county March 21, 
1875, a son of George and Julia (Kern) Graff. His father was born 
in Alsace-Lorraine October 4, 1852. He grew up there and in 1870 
came to America and spent his first two years at Warsaw. A cabinet 
maker by trade, he followed that occupation in Warsaw, and then 
moved to Sevastopol, where for twelve years he was in the employ 
of Mr. Peter Blue. While there he began buying stock and every 
year shipped a number of carloads out of this count.y. He finally re- 
moved to the Jacob Weirick farm, and after four years moved to 
Seward TowTiship, in 1885, and bought 100 acres of land. Here his 
business prospered and he continued as a farmer and stock buyer until 
his death in 1910. He accumulated an estate of 300 acres. After 
coming to this county George Graff married Julia Kern, who was also 
a native of one of the French provinces, and had come to America on 
the same boat with her prospective husband. Both were active mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church and George Graff was a democrat. They 
had three children : William, Emma, and George. Emma is the wife 
of James Howard, of Seward Township. 

George Graff, Jr., the younger member of the firm of Graff Broth- 
el's, was born in Franklin Township January 13, 1881. He married 
Lulu Brunner, and they have a son, High, born in 1904. 

The Graff Brothers have been iu active business as gi'aiu buyers 
at Burkett since April 1, 1911. The.v built the present elevator in 
1914. Both of them grew up with training and practical experience 
in the business of stock bu.ying, and they have been handling stock 
either as individual feeders or buyers for a number of years. Mr. 
George Graff is a stockholder in the Bank of Seward. 

William Graff mai-ried Oda Andrews. They have one son, Wayne, 
bom in 1905. Both the Graff brothers are democratic voters. 

T. H. Idle is well and favorably known all over Kosciusko Count\-, 
and enjoys the fruits of success due to his long continued labors as 

Vol. U— 12 



560 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

a farmer and stockman. At the urgent solicitation of his fellow citi- 
zens he has accepted various places of trust and responsibility and is 
the present trustee of Monroe Township. 

Mr. Idle was born in Champaign County, Ohio, June 7, 1856, son 
of Martin and Levina (Harbour) Idle. Martin Idle was born in Ohio 
March 3, 1818, a son of John and Catherine Idle, both of whom were 
natives of Virginia and pioneer settlers of Champaign County, Ohio, 
where John Idle died at the age of ninety-eight, and his wife also 
lived to a good old age. Long years and good and faithful work have 
apparently been characteristics of all the generations of the family. 
Levina Harbour was born in Champaign County March 4, 1820, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Harbour, who were also Virginians. 
Her father lived to be ninety years of age and was the father of thirty- 
two children. His wife, who was the grandmother of Mr. Idle, died 
at the age of forty-seven. Martin Idle and wife were married in Ohio 
and in the fall of 1856 came to Kosciusko County and located in 
section 16 in Monroe Township, acquiring a farm where thej' spent 
the rest of their years. Both died in the year 1900, Martin in June 
and his wife in July, having attained the age of fourscore or more. 
They were the parents of eleven children, only two of whom are now 
living, Jane and T. H. Idle. Jane is the widow of Stephen Norris 
and lives in Oklahoma. 

T. H. Idle was an infant when his parents came to Kosciusko 
County and on the old farm in Monroe Township he grew to manhood, 
acquired an education in the district schools and entered upon his 
serious career in the farming vocation. For the past twenty years 
he has been one of the leading stock shippers of the county, and has 
also served as solicitor for the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company 
of Kosciusko County. 

Mr. Idle married Melissa Heckman. She became the mother of six 
children, five of whom are still living and four of them are grad- 
uates of the common school. For his second wife Mr. Idle married 
Mary Delander and they have one son George, who has finished the 
work of the high school. They are members of the Christian Church 
and Mr. Idle is affiliated with Sidney Lodge No. 847 Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows which he has served as noble grand three 
times and has sat in the Grand Lodge three terms. As a democrat he 
has long been prominent and influential and his position has enabled 
him to overcome the adverse majorit.v of the republican organization. 
To the office of township trustee which he fills at present he was elected 
by a majority of eighteen at a time when the township was normally 
forty-two republican. He was once nominated for sheriff of the 
county and lacked only twenty-three votes of carrying the election. 

Fred S. Cl.\bk. It is a sterling English family which is repre- 
sented by Fred S. Clark in Kosciusko County. For almost half a 
century Fred S. Clark has lived in Wai-saw, and in that time has 
contributed a large and valuable share of service to the community, 
chiefly as a builder and contractor, though also as an earnest and pub- 
lie spirited worker for community development. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 561 

His father was the late William S. Clark, one of the oldest men 
who ever lived in Warsaw. William S. Clark died at his home in 
that city in July, 1914, when nearly a hundred and three years of age. 
He had come with his wife and seven children from England to Amer- 
ica in 1862. William S. Clark was born in County Kent and prior 
to coming to this country was a sailor. On reaching America he 
located in Ashland County, Ohio, where he bought a farm and en- 
gaged in farming, but after the death of his wife in April, 1904, when 
she was in her ninetieth year, he moved to "Warsaw and lived in that 
city for the last ten years of his life. 

Fred S. Clark, one of the children of William S. Clark, was 
born in England December 29, 1845. He was in his seventeenth year 
when the family immigrated to America. His education was limited, 
and he attendecl two winter terms of school after coming to the United 
States. For two years as a boy he worked with his father while the. 
latter was engaged in operating an oyster boat. After coming to 
America he turned his labor to the work of the home farm in Ashland 
County, Ohio, for one year, then went to Michigan, and learned the 
brick mason trade. 

In 1866 Mr. Clark married Mi.ss Lottie Philpott. In the fall after 
their marriage they moved to Warsaw and that city has been his home 
ever since. He worked at his trade as brick mason for a time, but 
gradually began taking contracts for himself, and from that drifted 
into the general building business. As a contractor and builder 
he has contributed many of the most substantial homes and other 
buildings to Kosciusko County during a period of nearly half a cen- 
tury. In time his son became identified with him in the business. 
Besides their work as contractors they now do a considerable business 
in the manufacturing of cement blocks and have large j'ards for the 
handling of building materials. 

Jlr. Fred S. Clark is a republican in general polities, but has 
strong views on the liauor traffic and favors anything which will bring 
about the abolition of that business. For four years he served as a 
member of the City Council of Warsaw. He is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Improved Order of Red 
]\Ien. ]Mr. Clark and wife have two children. Clyde, associated with 
his father in business, married Myrtle Noggle. Anne is the wife of 
Charles Helligas. 

Mr. Clark is a Methodist and has for twenty years been trustee of 
his home church in Warsaw. Although born in England, he is as loyal 
an American as ever breathed, and is a true and consistent believer 
in the ultimate as well as the preserit greatness of this nation, and 
whatever he can do by act or inflnence he is willing to do for the good 
of his community and the country of his adoption. 

Edgar Haymond. Much that is interesting in human experience 
was the lot of Judge Haymond of Warsaw, and during more than half 
a century of residence in that city he accomplished those things which 
are considered most worth while by ambitious men — years of honor- 
able activity in his profession, with satisfying material reward, the 



562 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

esteem of his fellow men, and a public spirited share in the social and 
civic life of his commuuity. He died October 13, 1917. 

While his earlier experiences led him to many parts of the coun- 
try, including several years spent on the California gold coast, Judge 
HaJ^nond had a perhaps unique record in Kosciusko County for per- 
manence of residence. He lived in the county for fifty-sis years, and 
all those yeai's his home was in the one house in "Warsaw, and as a 
local landmark there is none more familiar to the citizens than the 
"Judge Haymond home." 

He was a native son of Indiana, and was born at Bi-oolr\-ille, 
Franklin County, February 22, 1829. His was an old American 
family and in all the generations its vigor and vitality was never 
better exemplified than in the case of Judge Haymond. His first 
American ancestor was John Haymond, who was born in England, 
and came to this country during the colonial era, prior to the year 
1734. He located in Maryland, and became a slave-holding planter, 
a custom which was probably followed by several generations of his 
descendants. William Haymond. a son of the emigrant, was born in 
1740. and early in the Revolutionary war Governor Patrick Henry of 
Virginia commissioned him a captain in the Virginia troops of the 
Continental line. Later, November 12. 1781, he was commissioned a 
major by Benjamin Harrison, who had succeeded Captain Henry as 
governor of Virginia. Next in this ancestral line comes Thomas Ray- 
mond, who was born January 11. 1776, near Clarksburg, in what is 
now IMonongahela County of West Virginia, but then a part of 
Virginia, and he died in that city in 1853. It is apparent from 
this that the family early showed its pioneer instinct and had ven- 
tured into the mountainous district of western Virginia prior to the 
outbreak of the Revolution. Thomas Haymond was a farmer by occu- 
pation. One of his sous was Rufus Ha^^nond, who was born in 1805 
and about 1828 moved to Indiana. He was a physician by profession, 
and practiced medicine for more than half a century. His death 
occurred in 1886. He married Caroline Northrup, who died 1832, 
leaving two children, one of whom was Judge Edgar Haymond of 
Warsaw. Doctor Ha^nnond by a second marriage had three children. 

Judge Edgar Haymond, great-grandson of the first of his family 
to come to America, was reared in Franklin County, Indiana. During 
his youth the schools were very limited. In fact there were no public 
schools in the modern sense of the term, and instruction depended 
upon a co-operative effort among different families who kept up a 
school on the subscription plan, or in the case of the better to do fam- 
ilies the children had the benefit of instruction from a private tutor or 
were sent away to some select school. Judge Haymond had perhaps a 
little better than the ordinary advantages while he was a boy. He at- 
tended school until 1846, and then for a year clerked in a store at the 
old Village of America in Wabash County, a place that no longer ex- 
ists. Subsequently he served as a deputy county clerk of Franklin 
County, and while thus employed, at night, by the light of tallow can- 
dle, he read such law books as he could procure. The ambition to be- 
come a lawyer never left him, and he subsequently began a more sys- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 563 

tematic study imder the direction of George Holland, a lawyer at 
Brookville. In August, 1849, when not yet twenty-one years of age, he 
passed an examination and was admitted to the bar. The next four 
years were spent as a young and rising attorney at Brookville. In 1853 
he was unable to resist any longer the lure of the great West, to which 
thousands of the best young men in the country were going to share 
in the search, for gold and the venturesome life of California. He 
went out to that state bj' way of the Isthmus of Panama, and spent 
five years there, during which time he had a full share of all the 
experiences connected with mining. It was strenuous toil, and he 
spent many weary days in handling the pick and shovel, in blasting 
great rocks, in diverting the course of streams, and employing every 
known expedient to search out the hidden metal. 

In 1858 he returned by the same route which he followed when 
he went out, and for about a year was in the offices of Robert & 
Joseph Brackenridge at Fort Wayne. These lawyers were relatives 
of Judge Haymond. In August, 1859, he came to Warsaw to prac- 
tice his profession and lived in that city continuously from that year 
to his death. In 1859 Warsaw had a population of about fifteen hun- 
dred, and the Judicial Circuit in which he practiced was a very large 
one, including among other counties the County of Allen, of which 
Fort Wayne is the county seat. In the many j'eai"s spent at Warsaw 
as a lawyer Judge Haymond was at different times associated in part- 
nership with some of the best known members of the bar, and also 
carried on an individual practice for a long aggregate time. His 
leadersliip in the local bar was long acknowledged and in earlier years 
he was almost constantly identified with the more important litigation 
on one side or the other. 

In 1890 he was elected Circuit Court .iudge. and filled that honor- 
able place in public life for six years. Judge Haymond in later years 
seldom appeared either for plaintiff or defendant in any of the local 
courts, and after many years of successful service was justified in 
relieving himself of the heavier cares of affairs. Much of his time 
was given to the gentle art of fishing as practiced by Isaak Walton. 
He was a republican in politics, and was a stalwart in that ]iarty 
practically from the time it w.is tdundcd. 

In November, 1859, al)out the time he established his home in 
Warsaw, Judge Haymond married Helen ^M. McCarty. Their married 
life was measured by about nine years, and she passed away January 
4, 1868. She was the mother of four children, and the only one now- 
living is Lulu. On June 8, 1869, Judge Haymond married Emma 
H. Wing. There are two children by this marriage : Norman E. and 
JIabel. The latter is the wife of George M. Stephenson of Warsaw. 

JM.vTHEw C. Weavee is one of the enviable men of Kosciusko Coun- 
ty to enjoy the pi-osperity of a good farm, comforts of an excellent 
rural home, peace and plenty, and a substantial position in community 
esteem. His farm is in Washington Township, 2i4 miles northeast 
of Pierceton. 

Mr. Wciivcr was born in this county, near the Adams House, on 



564 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

November 11, 1869, sou of Horatio C. and Julia A. (Van Wurmer) 
"Weaver. Mr. Weaver's grandparents were George W. Weaver, who 
served as a soldier in the War of 1812, and was a pioneer settler of 
Kosciusko County where he died in 1858, and ]\Iary A. (Clarke) 
Weaver, a native of Virginia and closely related to the family which 
produced the great George Rogers Clarke, hero of the campaign which 
wrested the Northwest Territory from the control of the British dur- 
ing the Revolution. 

Horatio C. Weaver was born in Logan County, Ohio, and his wife 
was a native of New York State. His wife was a widow when she 
married him. Her first husband, Isaac Bennett, died during the 
Civil war. Horatio C. Weaver after his marriage settled on a farm 
in Washington Township and lived here until his death in 1912. His 
widow is still living. Of their two children the only one now living 
is Mathew C. 

Mathew C. Weaver grew i;p on the home farm, had a district 
school education and remained on the old homestead and managed it 
for his father until the latter 's death. The land here was entered 
from the government in 1836, its first owner being Dan Bratt. 

October 16, 1898, Mr. Weaver married Clara A. Zerbe, who was 
reared in Whitley Count}', Indiana. After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Weaver began housekeeping where they now live. Four childrt-n 
were born to them : Ralph, who died in the great war ; Ray, a grad- 
uate of the common schools in 1914; Vada G., who graduated from 
the common schools in 1918 ; and Lewis H., who is twelve years old. 
Mrs. Weaver is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Pierceton, and her two youngest children are also members of that 
church. Mr. Weaver is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica and in politics is a democrat. 

Samuel A. White is one of the old timers of Kosciusko County 
and has had his home in this section of Indiana since early infancy, 
and for more than three-quarters of a century. The honor and respect 
due him aie the results not only of his long residence, good work and 
management as a practical farmer, but also to his ei-editable record as a 
soldier in the Union Army during the Civil war. 

Mr. White, who is now living retired at Pierceton, was bom in 
Highland Countj', Ohio, December 12, 1840, son of George A. and 
May A. (Yohn) White. His parents were also natives of Highland 
County, grew up and married there, and in Februar.y, 1841, when 
Samuel was about two months eld. came to Indiana and located in 
Kosciusko County in Tippecanoe Township. Here they lived until 
advanced years, -when the father moved to Ligonier, Indiana, and died 
there. Tlie mother died at the home of her son Samuel in 1896. Of 
their large family of seventeen children only four are now living: 
Emma, widow of Conrad Fout'e; Milton White, of Noble County, 
Indiana; Frances, widow of Frank Wright; and Samuel A. 

Ml'. Samuel A. White grew up in Kosciusko County, and had his 
education in the district schools here. He was just about turned of 
age when in No\ember, 1861, he volunteered and enlisted in Comnany 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 565 

I of the Fni-t\ -Seventh Indiana Infantry. IIo was with that fonunand 
in many battles and eanqjaigns for two years, was discliarged and 
tlien veteranized and rejoined the same company and regiment, witli 
which he fought loyally and gallantly until mustered out in 1865 at 
the elose of the war. Mr. White has always kept in close touch with 
his old comrades, and is an honored member of John Muri'ay Post of 
the Grand Army at Pierceton. 

Mr. White married for his first wife Sarah Smith, and eight of 
their children are still living. He married for his present wife Mary 
A. Snodgrass, and they have a daughter, Elizabeth White. The fam- 
ilj- are members of the Christian Church and Mr. White has been 
active for manj' years in Larwell Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is a republican in politics and during his residence in 
Whitley Coiinty served as trustee of Troy Township. Much of his 
farming was done in Whitley Township and he still owns a highly 
developed place of 302 acres in that locality. He is a stockholder in 
the North Webster Bank. Mr. White and familv moved to Pierceton 
on .March 1, 1918. 

C. Edwin Stout. A very useful part in business affairs in Kosci- 
usko County is taken by C. Edwin Stout, whose name will hardly 
require introduction to the present generation of county citizens since 
he was recently the efficient county clerk and has been active in bank- 
ing and other affairs in the county for a number of years. 

One of the younger generation of native sons, he was born at 
Silver Lake in Kosciusko County, May 19, 1880, a son of Adam and 
Sarah (Blue) Stout. His early life was spent in the environment of 
the old home in Silver Lake, he attended the local schools there, and 
when quite young took up banking and rose to the position of cashier 
of the Commercial State Bank of Silver Lake. He resigned that office 
in 1908 to begin a term of four years as eount.y clerk. He had been 
elected to that office in 1906. In his election to count.v clerk Mr. Stout 
broke all records for the democratic party, since he was the only 
candidate of that organization who ever succeeded in being elected 
to this important county office. His record there was one of thorough 
competency and efficiency, and many have said that the affairs of the 
office were never in better hands than when Mr. Stout was clerk. In 
1912, on retiring from office, Mr. Stout became secretary-treasurer of 
the Warsaw Investment Company, one of the important financial con- 
cerns of the county, but resigned that position in 1916 to accept the 
position of secretary and treasurer of the Elkhart County Trust Com- 
pany of Goshen, Indiana, which position he still occupies. He is also 
secretary of the Warsaw Chamber of Commerce, and is doing a good 
deal to give and maintain vitality in local commercial affairs. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, while he and his wife ai-e members of the Presbj'terian Church. 
On February 8, 1910, he married ^liss Ethel Dickey. l'lic.\' are tlie 
parents of one daughter, Betty. 



566 1II8T0RY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

William A. ]\Iabie. It is nearly eighty years since the Mabie 
family became identified with Kosciusko County and this section of 
Indiana. The earlier generations were real pioneers. They helped 
to clear the forests, drain the swamps, break up the virgin soil, and 
institute the order of civilization where for centuries had been a 
wilderness. There are a number of names in this family which 
desei've special mention. To give some consecutive order to this rec- 
ord the heads of the several successive generations that have been 
identified with Kosciusko County will be mentioned, beginniuG; with 
Levi Mabie and continuing with Peter Mabie, Eli !Mabie and finallx- 
Dr. W. A. Mabie, who for fully thirty years has practiced his pro- 
fession as a veterinary surgeon at Warsaw. 

Levi Mabie was born in New York State, probably abont the close 
of the Revolutionary war. He moved to Ohio when it was a frontier 
and settled in Darke County. His wife was named Sarah. He fol- 
lowed some of his children to this section of Indiana in 1837, and 
located in Whitley County, building' a cabin half a mile from the 
Kosciusko County line. A little later he moved to North Webster and 
died there about 1838 or 1839. They were victims partly of the fever 
and ague which was then so prevalent a disease in the new country, 
and partly of the bungling practice of medicine which at that time 
prevailed. Both were stricken with the agiie, and a physician at 
Leesburg gave them calomel, and both died within twenty-four hours 
after taking the medicine. 

Peter ^labie, a son of Levi and Sarah Mabie, was born on Long 
Island, New York, in 1807, and after reaching manhood he moved 
to Huron County, Ohio, where he married Elizabeth McConkey. They 
lived in Ohio until 1836, and then came to Indiana. In 1856 Peter 
Mabie sold his farm to his son and moved out to Iowa, where lie 
entered land from the Government in Marshall County, but in 1868 
he went to Buena Vista County, Iowa, and died there June 20, 1885. 
His first wife, who was lioni in Holmes County, Ohio, in 1808, died 
October 14. 1851, in Whitley County, Indiana, and was buried at 
Web.ster. ' By her marriage there were the following children : Eli ; 
Lott who died at Warsaw in 1866 ; Eliza J., who died in Iowa in 1884 
as the wife of David Ingraham : Angolia, who married John Conklin 
and died in Elkhart County in 1862 ; Esther, who died in Whitley 
County in 1853 : and Ellen, who died at the age of ten months. 
Peter ilabic married for his second wife Jemima Taylor. The chil- 
dren of that nmrriage were : Jemima, who died at the age of nine 
years ; Samuel ; and Austin. 

Eli Mabie was born in Darke County, Ohio, December 19, 1829, 
a son of Peter and Elizabeth (McConkey) Mabie. He was in his 
seventh year when he came to Indiana with his parents, who settled 
upon the farm owned by A. Goble. It was wild land, and he first 
became ac(|uainted with conditions in this section of Indiana when 
the family lived in a log cabin. The family subsequently moved to 
Troy Township in Whitley County, and again went through the 
strenuous life of the pioneers, living in log cabins and clearing up the 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 567 

forests in order to secure laud for cultivation. Eli Mabie had only 
a limited education, but by reading became unusually well informed. 
He worked by the month on a farm until April 14, 1852, and he then 
married Eliza Ann Beezle.y. She was born in Ohio, January 3, 1836, 
a dano-liter of Isaac and Sarepta (McMillan) Beezley, the former born 
in Stark County, Ohio, June 13. 1814, and died in 1862, and the 
latter born January 27, 1813. After his marriage Eli ilabie with 
his brother Lott bought their father's farm, and after several years 
of hard work in clearing and planting in the northwest corner of 
Whitley County they sold and" in 1863 bought a place of about 
100 acres in section 21 of Tippecanoe Township in Kosciusko 
County. He worked hard here and eventually accumulated a large 
amount of land and other property. He was a member of the Baptist 
Church for over half a century and a great student of the Bible. He 
was a stanch republican, and served in the offices of school director 
and road supervisor. Most of his life was spent on his farm in Tippe- 
canoe Township, and he died there May 17, 1910. while his wife 
passed away February 7, 1905. During the war Eli Mabie was a 
warm supporter of Lincoln's administration. A crippled hand pre- 
vented his entering the army, but he did all in his power to assist 
the cause at home and very frequently pulled the copperhead cent 
and butternut breast pin from the coats of rebel sympathizers. Eli 
Mabie and wife had tive children, one of whom died in infancy. Those 
who were reai-ed to matui'ity were : John B., William A., Rose and 
Jessie O. 

Dr. William A. :\Iabie. of Warsaw, a son of Eli Mabie, was born 
on the Tippecanoe Township farm in this county May 16, 1857. He 
was reared after the manner of farmer boys in' that" time and place 
and his early schooling was obtained in the public and subscription 
schools. From boyhood he manifested an uinisual fondness for and 
knowledge of live stock. This naturally made him very proficient 
in handling live stock as a farmer, and he was one of the" substantial 
agriculturists of the county foi' a number of years. During 1889-90 
and 1890-91 he attended the Chicago Veterinary College, where he 
combined scientific knowledge with his practical "skill and experience, 
and was graduated with the degree D. V. S. in a class of eightv-seven! 
Smce then for many years he has practiced his profession in Kosci- 
usko County, and is the leading representative of that profession and 
has all the business he can attend to. 

In politics he is a republican, and has been a member of the War- 
saw Board of Health four years. He also served in the City Council 
four years. In an official capacity he is best known through h's for- 
mer service as sheriff of Kosciusko County, to which he was elected 
in 1914. He served two years. 

On December 3, 1876, "Doctor Mabie married Catherine M. Secrist. 
They are the parents of three children: Bert 0., Thomas A. and 
Blanche E. Jlrs. ^Mabie is a daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Long) 
Secrist, and her father died when :\Irs. :\Iabie was two rears of age. 
Doctor Mabie is affiliated with the Masonic Order, and he and his 
wife are members of the :\retliodist Ejiiscopal Church. 



568 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Godfrey Jacob Smith. One of the fine farms that lend distinc- 
tion and dignity to Kosciusko County is that of Godfrey Jacob Smith 
in Wayne, Washington and Monroe Townships. His home is in Wayne 
Township, seven miles southeast of Warsaw. Mr. Smith has been a 
farmer all his life and he knows the business as only one can know 
it through years of practical experience and common sense applica- 
tion of his energies to the task at hand. 

He was born in Washington Township of this county June 22, 
1857, son of John Sleeper and Rose Ann (Keith) Smith. 

His father, the late John Sleeper Smith, was horn near Hagers- 
town, Maryland, in 1806, of German ancestry. When nine years old 
the family moved to Bedford County, Pennsylvania, where he grew 
up on a farm. At the age of eighteen he started out to make his own 
way in the world and in Bedford County on March 9, 1830, he mar- 
ried Rose Ann Keith. Her brother, Lewis Keith, was the original 
owner of the land in Kosciusko County on which Pierceton is located. 
In 1838 John S. Smith and wife, with some of their children and 
with several other people in the party, started west from Pennsylvania 
for Kosciusko County. They traveled partly on foot and partly by 
wagon, and after crossing the Ohio State line they had to cut their 
road and construct bridges across streams. On reaching Washington 
Township John S. Smith entered eighty acres of Government fand 
and after clearing a spot in the midst of the woods erected his first 
log cabin home, in which the family first sheltered themselves on 
Christmas Day of 1838. Both he and his brother-in-law, Lewis Keith, 
had much to do with the pioneer activities of the present town of 
Pierceton. John S. Smith cleared up and improved his land, and 
was one of the substantial citizens of Kosciusko County until his 
death on October 14, 1869. He was a Presbyterian and one of the 
first members of the church of that denomination at Pierceton. His 
widow survived him until 1890. They were the parents of eleven 
children, but only two are now living, Daniel J., of Iowa, and God- 
frey J. 

Godfrey J. Smith grew up in Kosciusko County, and was liberally 
educated, partly in the district schools and also in normal institutes 
at Pierceton and Warsaw. For fourteen years he was one of the 
liberal and progressive minded men engaged in educational affairs in 
the county. 

November 10, 1881, Mr. Smith married Miss Lavina Stotes, who 
was reared on a farm in Washington Township, daughter of David 
and Barbara Stotes. Her parents were charter members of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Pierceton. ilrs. Smith was a small child when 
her mother died. 

Mr. Smith has been on his present farm since 1887 and has over 
two hundred acres, which furnishes ample grounds on which to carry 
forward his activities as a general farmer and stock breeder and 
dealer. He specializes in Duroc Jersey hogs and every year buys a 
number of cattle in Chicago markets and finishes them off for the 
packers. Mr. Smith is also vice president and one of the directors 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 569 

of the Bank of Sidney in Jackson Township. The family are mem- 
bers of the United Brethren ehurch and Mr. Smith is a "past gi'and 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In politics he*" is a 
democrat. 

He and his wife have two children, Ethel and Rnlo W. Ethel is 
a graduate of the common schools and is the wife of Homer T. Menzie 
of Washington Township. Mr. and Mrs. Menzie have three children, 
Lueile, Audrey and Jacob. The son Rulo has perhaps an unique record 
in scholarship. He graduated at the age of thirteen from the common 
schools with the highest grade in his classes and at seventeen finished 
the work of the Pierceton High School, also with the highest honors 
of scholarship. From there he entered th.e Tri-State Normal College 
at Angola, and graduated also with a splendid record in all his studies. 
He has a state license as a teacher and the general average of his 
examinations was ninety-eight per cent. 

Hon. James S. Feazer. For fully seventy years the name Frazer 
has been one of prominence in association with the Kosciusko County 
bar. Not only in his home county but in the state and nation was 
the late James S. Frazer distinguished. He was a splendid lawyer, 
was a great .iudge, and had diplomatic and administrative ability 
which brought him some delicate responsibilities in connection with 
the national government. 

His death occurred at his home in Warsaw. James S. Frazer was 
born July 17, 1824, in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. His grand- 
father came to America from Scotland as a British soldier at the 
beginning of the Revolutionary war, but soon left the British service 
and became an outright American citizen. Judge Frazer 's parents 
were James and Martha Frazer, substantial farming people, who did 
all they could to provide their ambitious and studious son with oppor- 
tunities such as he craved in the way of education and learning 
The mother died when Judge Frazer was quite young and in 1837 
James Frazer. Sr., moved to Wayne County, Indiana, and there Judge 
Frazer grew to manhood. 

In 1840 he entered the office of Moorman Wav at Winchester 
Indiana, to take up the study of law. He also taught school part of 
each year to defray expenses, and was finally admitted to the bar 
in Wayne County in March, 1845. In the following April he opened 
his office in Warsaw. That was a little more than seventy years ago 
Judge Frazer was a Warsaw citizen the rest of his life, though dut'e.s 
called him to the state capital and to the national capital and else- 
where. There has been a Frazer on the member.ship roll of the county 
bar ever since. 

The late Judge Frazer was first a whig, but helped to organize 
the republican party in his section of Indiana, and it is said that 
from 1846 throughout the rest of his career he was a participant in 
practically every campaign. During 1847. 1848 and 1854 he served 
in the House of Representatives of the State Legislature He was 
elected prosecuting attorney in 1851. In 1862, during the war he 



570 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

was appointed assessor of internal revenues. He reached the culmina- 
tion of his service as a lawyer when he sat as a member of the Indiana 
Supreme Court from 1865 to 1871. On :\Iay, 1871, a treaty was 
entered into with Great Britain providing for the appointment of a 
commission of three to settle and adjudicate the various claims arising 
out of the Civil war. Under the terms of this treaty President Grant 
selected Judge Frazer of Warsaw as the American commissioner, the 
English commissioner was Russell Gurney, while the neutral member 
of the commission was appointed by the Italian Government. During 
1873-75 Judge Frazer was connected with the treasury department at 
Washington and assisted in adjusting many claims for cotton captured 
or destroyed by the Government during the war. He was also ap- 
pointed by the Indiana Supreme Court as one of the three commis- 
sioners to revise and codify the laws of the state according to the 
act of ilarch 28, 1879. Judge Frazer impressed his ability upon the 
affairs of Indiana and the nation in many ways. His influence as a 
judge, lawyer, diplomat and public leader were written on many 
pages. He was one of the charter members of Kosciusko Lodgn Xo. 
62, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, which was organized at Wai- 
saw, Februarv 7, 1849. He was reared a Presbyterian, thoiigh hi- 
was not an active communicant of that church. His last important 
otHce came to him in 1889, when Governor Hovey appointed him judge 
of the Kosciusko Cii'cuit Court, and he remained on the Circuit Bench 
for one year. 

Judge Frazer maiTied October 28, 1848, at Goshen, Indiana, Caro- 
line ^I. Defrees, a daughter of James Defrees, and a member of the 
very prominent family of Defrees in Goshen, members of which have 
made their mark in the public service, in the law and in other lines. 
Judge Frazer and wife became the parents of six children. 

William D. Fra/^er. The oldest son of the late Judge James S. 
Frazer is William D. Frazer, who for forty ^-ears has been one of 
the leading lawyers of the Kosciusko County bar and has done much 
to maintain the high prestige of the name established by Judge Frazer. 

Born in Warsaw, Xovember 26, 1849. William D. Frazer grew up 
in that then small town, acquired his primary ediication there, and 
attended college at Wabash College in Crawfordsville, of which insti- 
tution he is an alumnus. He read law under the direction of his 
father and later for many years the two were associated in practice. 

While Mr. Frazer has not been called to the distinguished posi- 
tions which his father filled, and has liad little ambition for the mere 
honors of polities, he has given srevice of great capability in various 
ways. In 1881 and in 1S83 he was elected a member of the Lower 
House of the State Legislature on the republican ticket. In 1898 and 
in 1900 lie was chairman of the Kosciu.sko County Republican Central 
Committee. In ^March, 1899, he was appointed a national bank exam- 
iner, and for several years filled that position. 

However, first and la.st, the practice of law has been his cliief 
vocation and the object of his highest ambition. In many ways he 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 571 

has been identified with the growth and welfare of liis liunie city. Ills 
name is fonnd associated with a number of enterprises that have 
brought good to both Warsaw and Kosciusko County. He was one 
of the organizers of tlie present Chamber of Commerce at Warsaw, 
which organization more than any other has brought about an awak- 
ening in the city to modern progress. From the beginning he has 
served as president and as one of the directors of this body. For 
years he was president of the Warsaw Gas Light & Coke Company, 
and is now the president and genei-al manager of the Winona Inter- 
urban Railway Company, is vice president of tlio Indiana Tjoan (t 
Trust Company, also president of the Winona Electric Light & Water 
Company, and in many less conspicuous ways has found opportunity 
for an exhibition of good citizenship and public spirit. 

Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On September* 5, 1876, Mr. 
Frazer married Miss Flora C. Ristine of Crawfordsville, Indiana. 
They are the parents of two sons : James R. and Theodore C. 

Joseph Scott. Now that our nation is again at war there is a 
more general appi-eciation on the part of the present generation of 
the struggles and sacrifices made by the boys in blue of the '60s who 
preserved and perpetuated the union of states. One of the honored 
soldiers of that conflict between the North and the South was Joseph 
Scott, for more than half a century a well known farmer and active 
citizen of Kosciusko Count}". 'Sir. Scott spent the last years of his 
life retired from the heavier duties of his earlier years on his farm 
in section 36 of Wayne Township, on route No. 6 out of Warsaw. The 
farm is six miles southeast of Warsaw. 

He was born in Stark County, Ohio, sixteen miles east of the City 
of Canton, May 29, 1842, son of Caleb and Mary (Ivens) Scott. His 
parents were both natives of New Jersey, his father of English ances- 
try. Caleb Scott brought hi.s family to Kosciusko County in the 
summer of 1850, covering the entire distance from Stark County, Ohio, 
by team and wagon. He located in Wayne Township about five miles 
southeast of Warsaw, and died there in September, 1867, survived 
by his widow several years. Caleb Scott married for his first wife 
Rebecca Garwood, and thej- moved from New Jersey to Stark County, 
Ohio, and she died on the farm there. Rebecca Garwood Scott was 
the mother of two daughters, one of whom died young and the other, 
Sarah, was twice man-ied and is now deceased. Caleb Scott had 
bought land in Kosciusko County prior to his removal here in 1850. 
He was a member of the Bible Christian Church, was a whig and 
went from that party into the ranks of the republicans. By his mar- 
riage to Mary Ivens he had thirteen children. Six of the sons were 
Civil war soldiers, named Caleb S., Isaac and Samuel, who were in 
Company B of the Thirtieth Indiana Infantry, William, a member of 
Company I of the Twelfth Indiana Infantry, Joshua F. in Company 
H of the Seventy-Fourth Indiana, while Joseph was in Company F of 
the Forty-Sixth Indiana. 



572 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

It was on October 21, 1861, that Joseph Scott enlisted in Company 
F of the Forty-Sixth Indiana Infantry. He saw service practically 
throughont the period of the war until the fall of 1865, and though 
constantly exposed to danger was never wounded. He was present 
in some of the notable campaigns and battles of the war, including 
New Madrid, a number of the battles and campaigns along the Miss- 
issippi, including Fort Pemberton, one of the approaches to Pitts- 
burg, Champion Hills, the siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Port Gibson, 
Manstield and others. He was taken prisoner at Champion Hills but 
was immediately paroled, re-entered the army and was four j-ears in 
service with the exception of about three months. 

After the war Mr. Scott returned to his old home in "Wayne Town- 
ship and engaged in farming. On July 3, 1867, he married Miss 
Martha J. Mickey, who was born in Wood County, Ohio, June 26, 
1847, daughter of Isaac and Mary (Bryan) Mickey, of a family of 
early settlers in Kosciusko County. Her father, Isaac ilickev, was 
born in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, March 7, 1819. and 
died June 30, 1884. His parents were Isaac and Susana (Brinley) 
Mickey. Prior to 1734 six brothers named Mickey emigrated from 
Ireland to the Ignited States, locating in Westmoreland Conntv, Penn- 
.sylvania. Isaac Mickey, grandfather of Mrs. Scott, married for his 
first wife Elizabeth Metcalf, and they had three sons: John R., born 
January 9, 1812, died October 3, 1849: Robert R., born Aua'ust 22, 
1814. and died December 8, 1849 ; and Henry H., born April 13, 1816. 
Elizabeth Metcalf Mickey died in Pennsvlvania June 24, 1816. Isaac 
Mickey then married for his second wife Susana Brinlev, and their 
family consisted of five sons and three daughters, named Isaac, Joseph, 
Margaret, Daniel, Hiram, Mary, Lucinda and Harmon. Isaac iMiekey 
moved with his family to Indiana and located in the southwest corner 
of Franklin Township in 1846, and on October 3, 1849. both he and 
his wife died and were buried in the same grave in Nichols cemetery. 

Isaac Mickey, father of Mrs. Scott, grew to manhood in Ohio and 
married Mary Bryan. In 1851 he moved to Kosciusko County, locat- 
ing near Silver Lake in Lake Township. That locality remained his 
home until 1864, and in the following year he settled in Wayne Town- 
.ship, where he spent his last years. Of the seven children of the 
Mickey family three are still living: Martha J.; Mary A., wife of 
S. C. Funk, of Warsaw ; and Hiram G., of Pierceton, Ind'ana. 

Mrs. Scott was reared in Kosciusko Coiinty and lived at Silver 
Lake until 1865. After completing her work in the common schools 
she taught in this county live terms. After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott located in Harrison Township and lived on a farm near 
Atwood for seven years. Selling out that place, he came to the pres- 
ent home in 1874 and in this locality they prospered and performed 
their duties to home, family and community and well earned the 
wealth of esteem and afifection which was showered upon them when 
on July 3, 1917, they celebrated their fiftieth or golden wedding anni- 
versary in the pi-esence of a host of children, grandchildren and great- 
grandchildren and loyal friends. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 573 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott had the following children: Cora A., widow 
of William H. Funk; Mary C, wife of Irvin Sheely, of Montana; 
Musetta B., wife of William F. Hetzler, of New Mexico; Walter S., 
who married IMattie Bogg and lives in Monroe Township ; Blden D., 
who married Elizabeth Rock and lives at Lake Charles, Louisiana ; 
Freddie, who died in childhood ; Vernice 0., wife of Sherman Fike 
of Wayne Township ; and Joseph R., who married Gusta M. Harley 
and lives on the old homestead farm. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have eighteen 
grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. 

Mrs. Scott is a devout member of the United Brethren Church. 
Mr. Scott was long affiliated with Kosciusko Post No. 14 of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and Mrs. Scott is a member of the Woman's 
Relief Corps. In politics he simply voted the republican ticket with- 
out seeking any of the honors of office. Mr. Scott died July 3, 1918. 

Andrew Jackson Log.\n. Now giving all his time to his duties 
as county treasurer of Kosciusko County, with home at Warsaw, Mr. 
Logan has had a long and successful career both in teaching and as 
a farmer in this county. His family has been identified with Kosci- 
usko County since pioneer times and fully three generations have 
done their part and contributed their lives in whole or in part to 
the improvement of material and social conditions in this locality. 
Mr. Logan's record as an official has been characterized by such 
efficient performance and obliging courtesy to all who use his office 
that he is one of the most popular men in the courthouse at Warsaw. 

He is probably the only one of the present set of county officials 
to claim a log cabin as his birthplace. It was in such a home, then 
the prevailing type of residence in this section of Indiana, that he 
was born on a farm in Washington Township of Kosciusko County, 
June 10, 1856. Out of a family of eleven children he is one of the 
four survivors. Their parents, Thomas W. and Chloe (Marquis) 
Logan, were natives of Penn.sylvania and Ohio respectively. Thomas 
W. Logan was a carpenter by trade, and part of his skill was required 
in the early days in makiiig coffins when some member of the com- 
munity passed away. He had migrated to Kosciusko County during 
the decade of the '40s and he found here a wild and practically 
untamed wilderness, and his own industry and good citizenship were 
not unimportant factors in the progress of the community where he 
lived so long. Both he and his wife died in Kosciusko County. They 
were members of the Presbyterian Church and were charter members 
of the church of that denomination at Warsaw. His father is remem- 
bered for his strictly temperate character, and though he lived in a 
time when such habits weie more practiced than at present he never 
used either tobacco or liquor. He reared his children to the same 
wholesome principles and ideals. 

Though the present county treasurer was named for one of the 
greatest leaders of the early democracy in America, he has belied his 
name to the extent that he is ;i republican. As a boy he lived on 
the home fann, attended the district schools and the public schools 



574 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

at Warsaw, and when only nineteen was qualified with a certificate 
as a teacher and began a work for which lie is hest remembered among- 
a large number of people. For seventeen terms he taught in different 
districts, all in Kosciusko County, and combined that profession with 
his work as a farmer. He continued farming until called awa\- from 
the country to assume his present office as treasurer of the county, 
to which he was elected in 191-1:. Pie still owns the beautiful and 
highly improved farm of 217 acres in Washington Township. He 
has long been a member of the Patrons of Husbandry in this county. 
On March 22, 1881, :\Ir. Logan married ^Miss Elizabeth Dunham. 
They have one son. Ward T. 

John C. Meredith is a native of Franklin Township, has lived 
there nearly all his life, and has accumulated many interests and 
associations to identify himself prominently with that community. 
Mr. Meredith's business town is Akron in Fulton County, and he 
divides his time between the management of his large stock farm in 
Franklin Township and his varied interests in Akron, Mr. Meredith 
is one of the leading stock buyers of this section of Indiana. His 
large and valuable farm is a half mile east and seven miles south 
of Mentone. 

He was born in Franklin Township, September 20, 1852, a sou of 
Simon C. and ^lary A. (Middleton) Meredith. His father was a 
native of Pennsylvania and his mother of New Jersey. The respec- 
tive families moved to ilahoniug Coi;nty, Ohio, where Simon ilere- 
dith and his wife grew up and married. In the spring of 1852 they 
arrived in the southwestern part of Kosciusko County, bought a tract 
of land that was completely covered with woods, and made their first 
home in a log cabin. Simon ^Meredith was a very industrious and 
capable farmer, cleared away the woods and made room for his crops, 
and lived there in comfort and growing prosperity the rest of his 
life. He and his wife were both birthright Quakers and were always 
faithful to that religion. In politics he was a repiiblican. Simon 
Meredith had ten children by his first wife and three by his second 
marriage. 

John C. Meredith grew to manhood in Franklin Townsliip, 
attended the district schools there, and since the age of fourteen has 
been making his own way in the world. He worked out at day wages, 
also by the month, and was willing to take any employment that 
oifei'ed an opportunity to earn an honest living. He established a 
reputation for faithful performance and good honest work, and that 
reputation was his chief asset when he married and started to make 
a home of his own. 

October 12, 1873, he married Miss ilary Burkett, a native of 
Franklin Township, where she wa.s born December 20, 1849. :\lr. and 
Mrs. Meredith had about five hundred dollars when they married and 
they used it to buy some equipment and located on a rented farm. 
The land was for the most part in the woods, and ISIr. ileredith cleared 
up a number of acres and got his real start by clearing land. Later 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 575 

he bought stock and has been a stock dealer for thirty-five years. The 
Meredith farm comprises 300 acres, and in the past Mr. Meredith has 
owned much other land in this and adjoining counties. 

Six children were born to their marriage, and the four now living 
are : Frank, of Deming, New Mexico ; Elmore E., a farmer in Frank- 
lin Township ; Zora, wife of Ora I\IcFarland of Franklin Township ; 
and Martha, who is a graduate of the common schools and the wife 
of Alvin Clinker of Fulton County. 

Mrs. Meredith is a member of the Beaver Dam United Brethren 
Church. Mr. Meredith has long been an interested participant in 
local politics and is one of the republican leaders in the southwest 
quarter of Kosciusko County. A number of years ago when the Leg- 
islature passed a law establishing county councils to maintain general 
supervision over the finances of the county, Mr. Meredith was selected 
as a member of the first council and served continuously in that 
capacity for fourteen years. He is a member of the County Central 
Committee from Franklin Township and a member of the Township 
Advisory Board. 

Of his interests at Akron Mr. ]\Ieredith is a director in the Akron 
State Bank, a .stockholder in the Grist Mill and Lumber Company, 
and also owns a large barn used in connection with his stock buying 
and stock feeding enterprise. The Akron State Bank has as its 
officers : V. J. Lidecker, president ; J. J. King, vice president ; John 
McCullough, cashier; and John C. Meredith, Merl Whittenberger, E. 
0. Strong and Wade Arnold, directors. 

David J. Utteb. Some of the best farms and some of the most 
capable farmers of Kosciusko County are found in Franklin Town- 
ship. One of them is David J. Utter, who has spent all his life on the 
farm where he was born and has given a good account of his ener- 
gies and his time in the capable manner in which he has conducted 
his affairs. He gives nuich attention to stock raising, and conducts 
one of the well ordered and profitable places in the southwestern 
corner of the county. 

Mr. Utter was bom November 15, 1854, son of Edwin A. and 
Elizabeth (Bj-ers) Utter. His father was a native of Fayette County, 
Indiana, but was reared and married in Johnson County and from 
there came in October, 1851,. and located on the tract of land in 
Franklin Township which with its many improvements is now the 
home of his son David. The farm today bears little resemblance to 
the tract of wild land which Edwin Utter acquired. He first intro- 
duced his family to a log cabin home. He lived there many years 
but in 1882 went to Akron, Indiana, later lived with his son David, 
but his death occurred in Fulton County. He was a man of unim- 
peachable integrity and it was said that his word was as good as his 
note. He served as supervisor of the township and as school director, 
and was a republican in his political proclivities. He constituted an 
exception to his family in the matter of politics. He had seven broth- 

Vol. 11—13 



576 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

ers and two half-brothers, and all of them were democrats. Edwin 
Utter and wife had ten children, and those living today are : Miltnu 
H., of Claypool; David J.; Jacob B., of Fulton County; Luella, wife 
of Irvin Friend. 

David J. Utter had his earliest recollections in the same environ 
meut where he is today busily engaged with farming. While a bov 
he attended the schools in winter sessions, and worked with his father 
in the summer. On March 23, 1882, he married Miss Eliza Landis, 
who was born in Fulton County. 

After their marriage I\Ir. Utter and his oldest brother bought the 
160 acres of the old homestead and conducted it in partnership for 
twenty years. He then bought his brother's interest and is now sole 
owner and proprietor. He breeds good grades of live stocif, and his 
principal annual income comes from stock raised and fed on the 
farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Utter have six children : Cora is the wife of John 
Eber of Fulton County; Clarence is a farmer in Franklin Town- 
ship : Frank married Ida Beeler, of Fulton County, and is now with 
the National Army at Camp Custer; Tressie is the wife of Henry 
D. Smith and they live on the home farm of ilr. Utter ; Arthur mar- 
ried Bertha Baker, of Fulton County ; James married Fern Gall and 
lives in Fulton County. Mr, Utter and family are members of the 
United Brethren Church at Beaver Dam. He is a republican and has 
served as supervisor. 

George W. Groves, representing some of the oldest names in 
Kosciusko County history, is one of the prominent farmers and land 
owners of Wayne Township. His farm is known as Grovesland Farm, 
located four miles northeast of Warsaw. He has lived here nearly 
all his life and since acciuiring the old homestead has developed it to 
the purposes of general farming and stock raising. It comprises 240 
acres. 

Mr. Groves was born on the farm where he resides, a son of Daniel 
and Amanda (Lightfoot) Groves. His father was born in Jackson, 
Ohio, in 1812. and his mother in Springfield, Ohio, September 2, 1815. 
The Groves family arrived in Kosciusko County about 1837, a year 
after the county was organized. They entered land in Wa3^le Town- 
ship. The Lightfoots were also early arrivals, and Christopher Light- 
foot, maternal grandfather of George W. Groves, was a surveyor b.y 
profession and laid out the Village of Leesburg. Daniel Groves and 
wife were married at Leesburg, and they then lived in that town for 
a time and from there moved to the farm owned by their son George. 
They were very liberal and active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and attended worship at Warsaw and at Morris Chapel. 
Daniel Groves was a leading republican of his day and a man who 
always kept himself well posted on current affairs. He died in 1875 
and his widow passed away in 1895. They had four children : ]\Iary 
E., wife of H. H. Conrad, of Anderson, Indiana; Catherine L., de- 
ceased, was the wife of Garrett W. Brown ; W. A. Groves, who mar- 
ried Mary Selser, of Fayette County, Ohio; and George W 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 577 

George W. Groves grew up on the old farm, and was educated in 
the country schools and the high school at Warsaw. He has always 
lived at home and looked after his parents during their lives and since 
then has been busily engaged in farming the old place. He is one 
of the prominent and sustaining members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Warsaw, and has served the church as trustee. He is 
affiliated with Warsaw Lodge No. 46, Knights of Pythias, the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, and is a member of the Horse Thief Detec- 
tive Association of the county. Politically he is a republican. 

Joseph S. Metzger. The Metzgers are one of the oldest and most 
substantial families in the eastern part of Lake Township. They 
cleared much of that region from the wilderness, and as extensive 
land owners, farmers and citizens have used their resources to the gen- 
eral good and advancement of the community. One of the character- 
istics of the topography of that township is iletzger Ditch, which 
drains and has served to reclaim many valuable acres, and the Metzgers 
as a family bore a large share of the assessments required for the con- 
struction of this drainage outlet. 

Mr. Joseph S. Metzger is one of the most successful members of 
this family. He has a large farm four miles east of Silver Lake, and 
in this community he was born August 24, 1865, son of Joseph and 
Elizabeth (Studabaker) Metzger. His parents were both natives of 
Ohio, were married there and were early day comers to Kosciusko 
County. The country was then all in woods and swamps, and Joseph 
Metzger, Sr., had to clear out a space before he could erect his log 
cabin home. He was industrious, a man of exceptional judgment, and 
his prosperity was measured by the ownership of about a thousand 
acres of land. He was also one of the early leaders in the German 
Baptist Church. His large family consisted of six sons and six 
daughters, and those still living are Abe, Phoebe, Rebecca, Lydia, 
Isaac, Joseph S. and John S. 

Joseph S. Metzger grew up on the home farm, was educated in 
the district schools, and carried an increasing burden of responsibil- 
ities on the home place until he was twenty-four. 

February 27, 1890, he married Sarah G. Garber. They have three 
daughters : Alma, wife of Mark Miller ; Elva, wife of Roy Cline ; and 
Dorothea, unmarried. The two married daughters are both gradu- 
ates of the common schools. The family are members of the Brethren 
Church at West Eel River. Mr. Metzger votes as a democrat. His 
farm comprises 342 acres, all in Lake Township, in sections 1 and 2, 
arid it is one of the important units in the volume of production of 
grain and live stock by which Kosciusko County makes its showing in 
agricultural statistics of Indiana. 

Hon. Francis E. Bowser. With thirty years of continuous mem- 
bership in the Kosciusko County Bar, Judge Bowser has won all 
the better distinctions and successes of the able lawyer, and to his 
present office as judge of the Fifty-Fourth Judicial Circuit he brought 



578 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

all the experience, technical and temperamental qualifications which 
insure the impartial and thorough administration of justice. 

A son of William H. Bowser, a prominent Kosciusko County citi- 
zen and old timer. Judge Francis E. was born in Kosciusko County, 
February 1, 1861. On the old homestead farm he spent his youth 
in the usual manner of country boys, attending local school and work- 
ing as strength permitted. When he \yas about sixteen his parents 
moved into Warsaw, and in 1881 he graduated from the Warsaw High 
School. Then for two years he was a student in the University of 
Indiana at Bloomington, and also studied law with W. S. Marshall at 
Warsaw. His law studies covered altogether a period of about five 
years, and he was admitted to the bar in 1885. In the meantime he 
had also taught school, and taught his last term after his admission 
to practice. 

Judge Bowser became an active member of the Warsaw bar in 
the fall of 1885 as a partner of A. G. Wood. This relationship was 
continued altogether for about twenty-three years, and there are few 
partnerships that endured longer and more successfully in the annals 
of the Kosciusko County Bar. In 1908 Francis E. Bowser was elected 
judge of the Fifty-fourth Indiana Judicial Circuit, and in 1914 he 
was re-€lected for another term of six years. As a judge he has 
the confidence of both the bar and the general public, and he is 
regarded as one of the most competent men who have ever sat on 
the Circuit Court Bench in this district. 

In politics Judge Bowser is a democrat. Fraternally he is a 
Knight Templar Mason and a Knight of Pythias. On June 20, 1894, he 
married I\Iiss Regina Bitner. Her father, Daniel S. Bitner, was a 
well known citizen of Kosciusko County, and Mrs. Bowser is a grand- 
daughter of George Moon, one of the early pioneers of this county. 
Judge Bowser and wife have two sons: Francis K. and George M. 
Francis K. is now a first lieutenant and adjutant with the Five 
Hundred and Thirty-ninth Engineers in France. George M. is in 
high school. 

Ben.j.vmin F. Richardsox. a great many people recognize in 
Benjamin F. Richardson the strongest individual force for general 
civic improvement and development in the City of Warsaw. In 
fact it would not be too much to credit him with Warsaw's present 
condition of prosperity. Mr. Richardson is a man who came up 
through struggle and adversity to a position as one of the foremost 
merchants in Northern Indiana, and the ability which enabled him 
to win business success also gained for him the confidence of his fel- 
low citizens, who as frequently as he would consent has sought his 
leadership in public affairs. Mr. Richardson has been a resident of 
Kosciusko County for the past thirty-five years. 

His birth occurred on a farm in ilonroe County, Michigan, in 
Ida Township, August 9, 1851. The family were early settlers in 
Southern ]\Iichigan, and originated in England, where his paternal 
grandfather, Joseph Richardson, was born. He became a weaver 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 579 

by trade and reached the foremanship in shops at Halifax, York- 
shire. As a young man he had also served with the British Army, and 
while stationed in Ireland wooed and won his bride. In 1848, with 
his wife and three married children, he came to America, settling in 
Jlonroe County, where he turned his attention to farming. There 
he and his wife spent the rest of their days. James Richardson, 
father of the Warsaw citizen and merchant, was born, reared and 
educated in England, and married there Mary Bradley. They were 
both quite young when they came with other members of the family 
to the United States in 1848. James Richardson in a few years 
had become a prominent factor in the life and affairs of Monroe 
County, Michigan. While living in England he had served a seven 
years' apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade in Manchester, but after 
coming to America farming was his principal work. He was a man of 
high general intelligence and sound practical sense, and these qual- 
ities led to his election as a member of the Michigan State Legislature. 
He was a loyal and patriotic citizen and during the Civil war one of 
his sons, Bradley Richardson, served as a private in the Federal army, 
became corporal of his company, and was severely wounded on the 
battlefield of Bull Run. When James Richard.son died at his old 
home in Monroe County his passing was the occasion for many sincere 
tributes to his honorable and self-respecting career. 

It was on the old home farm in Michigan that Benjamin F. Rich- 
ardson had his youthful training and experience. A great deal of 
hard work was his portion in those days, and it was a steadfast ambi- 
tion to amount to something in the world that enabled him to make 
better use of his limited advantages than would otherwise have been 
true. He attended the neighboring schools, taught in a log cabin, and 
early made np his mind to get into a broader field of activities than 
was bounded by the horizon of the farm on which he was reared. 
Before reaching his majority he left home and started the battle of 
life for himself by clerking in a feed store and driving a dray in 
Toledo, Ohio. Toledo was the training ground for his busine.ss career. 
He worked as clerk in a grocery store, and with experience in that 
occupation and with a capital, very slowly and gradually realized, 
he finally was able to embark in the grocery trade for himself. 

It was in 1883 that IMr. Richardson came to Warsaw, Indiana, 
and still with very limited capital established a retail dry goods busi- 
ness. He encountered many adversities, but determination to suc- 
ceed coupled with hard work finally had its just rewards, and he is now 
undoubtedly one of the foremost merchants of the city. While he 
has had a man's work in looking after his own store and enterprise, 
public spirit has been one of the dominating qualities of his char- 
acter. For years he has advocated a better and greater Warsaw. It 
was largely his views and vigorous opinions on municipal affairs that 
led to his election to the City Council. While a member of that body, 
and under his energetic and shrewd leadership, the city acquired 
those substantial municipal improvements represented by sewerage, 
sidewalks, waterworks and other facilities. In 1901 he was elected 



580 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

mayor of the city to fill out an unexpired term, and this was followed 
by a full term, at the end of which it was his hope and expectation 
to retire from public affairs. However, in 1912, the citizens of 
Warsaw again required the leadership of such a man as Mr. Rich- 
ardson, and he again consented reluctantly to acceptance of the office. 
He has been a wise and painstaking, capable and thoroughly able 
public official. In fraternal affaii-s he is a Knight Templar and 
thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, and while a member of no 
religious organization has been an active supporter of religious work 
and charity. 

In 1887 Mr. Richardson married Miss Julia E. Moran, of Toledo. 
Their two children are both deceased. 

Jacob B. Nepp is one of the best known residents of Kosciusko 
and Elkhart Counties. He is a man who has made his success in 
life by a tremendous exertion of energy and natural ability. When 
"lie married he had little or no property, but at the present time is 
owner of one of the best farms in Van Buren Township of this county, 
is also president of the Farmers State Bank of Milford, and is in a 
position to influence much of the business and community life. 

Mr. Neff was born on a farm in Elkhart County, Indiana, Decem- 
ber 29, 1859, son of Daniel and Lydia (Brown)" Neff. His father 
was a native of Virginia and his mother was born near Toronto, 
Canada. Their respective families settled in Elkliart County in pio- 
neer times, and Daniel Xeff and wife were married there and be- 
came farmers in Jackson Township, where thej^ spent the rest of 
their years. Daniel Neff was a man of more than ordinary local 
prominence, was known for his upright and honest character, and 
for a number of years was a minister in the Church of the Brethren. 
He and his wife had ten children: William B., now living in 
Michigan ; James, who died in Kosciusko County ; Jacob B. ; Lydia, 
widow of Jacob R. Symensma. living in Elkhart County: Daniel, of 
Milford ; Henry, of Elkhart County ; Jesse and Omar F., both of 
Milford; Frances M., of Van Buren Township; and Susie, wife of 
Chai'les Snyder, living in Jackson Township of Elkhart County. 

Jacob B. Neff taught school for eight years continuoi^sly before 
his marriage. At the age of twenty-eight he married Chloe Dubbs. 
She was born in Elkhart County. ' After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Neff moved to a fann southeast of ]\Iilford, and resided there 
for seventeen years. Since then they have made their home in ^lil- 
ford, but Mr. Neff still owns a fine estate of 270 acres. He was one 
of the organizers and charter members of the Farmers State Bank 
of Milford, which was established in 1915. He has been its president 
from the beginning, and is associated with some of the best known 
citizens in this part of the state on the board of directors. Mr. Neff 
is also president of the Royal Telephone Company. He is a demo- 
crat in politics, has taken quite an active part in local affaire, and 
is one of the deacons of the Church of the Brethren at Milford. He 
was nominated for the office of Trustee of Van Buren Township 
in 1918 by the democrats of the township. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 581 

He and his wife have two living children: Gladys is a graduate 
of the Milford High School and of Goshen College, and is now the 
wife of Lawrence Dewart, and they live in Van Buren Township. 
Bertha M. is a graduate of the Milford High School, tinished a music 
course in the North Manchester College, and was also a student in 
the American Conservatory of Music at Chicago. 

Ira Gans. The business and records of Kosciusko County have 
never been entrusted to more efficient hands than to the present coun- 
ty recorder, Ira Gans, who entered upon his official duties in January, 
1915, for the regular term of four years. Mr. Gans is a native son of 
Kosciusko County and his family were among the most substantial 
early settlers. His active career has been divided between farming, the 
postal service and other duties and interests, and as a citizen his 
popularity has been of that type which is only extended to men of 
the highest integrity and public usefulness. 

The Gans family was established in Kosciusko County by his 
grandfather John Gans, who came from Stark County, Ohio, to Kosci- 
usko Count.v, Indiana, a number of yeare before the Civil war and 
settled in Turkey Creek Township near the head of what was then 
called Ninc-]\rile Lake, now Lake Wawasee. John Gans had married 
Elizabeth Shafer, and out of their nine children only two are now 
living. Jacob Gans, one of their sons, was a very small boy when 
brought to the wilderness of Kosciusko County, grew to manhood 
there, and as a boy finished his limited schooling in the old log school- 
house in the McClintick woods. He farmed all his active years, held a 
few local offices, was a member of the Dunkard religious faith, a dem- 
ocrat in polities, and, like his father before him, commanded universal 
esteem. Liberal in his regard for his fellow men, charitable in his 
views, he fitly represented the best elements of citizenship in Kosci- 
usko County. Jacob Gans. married Ellen Shock, daughter of Isaiah 
Shock, whose people were also pioneer settlers in Kosciusko. She 
died in 1907, while Jacob Gans passed away in 1913. Their five chil- 
dren were: Ira, Ida, Emma, John and William, and of these Emma 
died at the age of twenty-two. 

The present recorder of Kosciusko County was the oldest of his 
parents' children, and was born April 20, 1869. Having spent all 
his years in this county, he is intensely loyal to its interests and its 
general welfare and progress. His earl.v home was one nf simple com- 
forts and high ideals, and after he had finished his education in the 
public schools he took up the substantial vocation of the farmer. For 
sixteen years he carried the mail fi'om Vawter Park to Leesburg by 
waj' of Oswego and North Webster. 

Mr. Gans has a large and loyal following among the people of 
Kosciusko County. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and 
the Loyal Order of Moose and has long been active in the republican 
party. It was the votes of a handsome majority which called him 
to his present office in 1914, his official term beginning January 1, 
1915. On December 5, 1899, he married Miss Lena Poppenfoose, 



582 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

daughter of Harmena Poppenfoose. The two children of their mar- 
riage, Margaret and Carroll DeWitt, both died in early childhood. 
Mrs. Gans is a member of the Church of God. 

Edgar S. Hover is a native of Kosciusko County and for many 
years has been successfully identified with the farm enterprise of 
Monroe Township. He is perhaps most widely known over the county 
as operator of a grain threshing outfit. He gained his first experience 
in this business in Illinois and since 1900 has been proprietor of a com- 
plete equipment for power threshing and has threshed grain for most 
of the farmers throughout the county. The Hover farm is in section 7 
of ilonroe Township, on rural route No. 6 out of Warsaw. 

Mr. Hover was born in Washington Township, this county, on 
section 34, southwest of Pierceton, December 27, 1859. He is a son 
of Samuel S. and Minerva J. (Pratt) Hover. His father was born 
in Logan County, Ohio, and after his marriage came to Indiana and 
located on land in section 34 of Washington Township. The family 
lived there to the spring of 1860. when they removed to Monroe Town- 
ship. Samuel S. Hover died here February 17, 1897. He is a repub- 
lican and a member of the Presbyterian church. His wife, who is 
still living in Monroe Township, is a Methodist. They had two sons, 
James S. and Edgar S., the former also a farmer in Monroe Township. 

Edgar S. Hover grew up on his father's farm, and was educated 
in the common schools. At the age of nineteen he left home, and had 
a varied experience for some years in Illinois and other localities. On 
]Mareh 12, 1882, he married Miss ^lary S. Linn. She was born in 
Prairie Township of Kosciusko County March 31, 1858. When she 
was thirteen years old her parents moved to Clay Township, where 
she finished her education in the district schools. Jlr. and Mrs. Hover 
after their marriage moved to a farm near the old homestead but 
subsequently sold that and bought the place where they now reside, 
with all the improvements and comforts and conveniences of country 
living. 

They have six children: Bessie B., a graduate of the common 
schools, is the wife of Frederick Hartsock; Walter D. married Bessie 
East and lives in JMonroe Township ; Emma G., a graduate of the high 
school and of Valparaiso University, is the wife of Edward Polk, of 
Monroe Township; Callie is the wife of Arch Kirkendall, of Clay 
Township; Lenna L., a graduate of the common schools, married 
Herschel Boyer ; Wilma, who is now attending high school at Warsaw. 
The family are members of the Jlethodist Episcopal church. Mr, 
Hover has served as trustee of the church. He is a member of Kosci- 
usko Lodge No. 62 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and in 
politics has been quite prominent in his locality as a republican. 

William H. Butterbaugh, proprietor of a farm in Lake Township, 
has made his years and experience count toward useful ends not only 
as a farmer but as a good citizen and as a worker in church, politics 
and other affairs of his communitv. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 583 

The farm that he now owns was his birthplace. He was born 
April 18, 1851, son of John and Sarah (Montel) Butterbaugh. His 
father was bom in Montgomery County, Ohio, and came to Kosciusko 
County about 1840. His wife was also a native of Montgomery Coun- 
ty. They grew up and married in Indiana, and soon settled on the 
farm now owned by their son William. The father died here in 
1895 and the mother July 3, 1885. They were members of the 
Dunkard church and in politics the father was a republican. Of their 
eight children only two are now living, William H. and Mahlon, the 
latter a resident of Bloomington, Indiana. 

William H. Butterbaugh spent his early life on the home farm, 
attended the district schools, and in 1876 married Miss Viola Dirck. 
She was born in Seward Township of this county, November 18, 1857, 
and was reared in Wabash County. Her father, Henry Dirck, was 
a native of Ohio, and died in September, 1916. He married in Ohio, 
but spent most of his life in Indiana. Mrs. Dirck is still living. Her 
family comprises eight children : Ida, wife of Emanuel Homan ; Viola, 
Mrs. Butterbaugh ; Orpha, deceased wife of Charles Wells ; Sadie, 
wife of John Landis ; Leonard, a farmer in Michigan ; Samantha, 
wife of Joe Swihart, of Silver Lake ; Ada, wife of Robert Warren ; 
and Asa, who farms part of the old homestead. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Butterbaugh rented the old 
farm and finally bought 1971/) acres there. The farm has since been 
reduced to 148 acres, and during his more active .years Mr. Butter- 
baugh gave much attention to the breeding of Hereford cattle. He has 
been prospered, and has used his means and position in the community 
to forward many worthy enterprises. He and his family are members 
of the First Brethren Church and in politics he has been active as a 
republican. Mr. and Mrs. Butterbaugh have two children and four 
grandchildren. Hazel, their older daughter, is a graduate of the com- 
mon schools and wife of Alvin Perry of Wabash County. Nellie M. 
is also a graduate of the common schools and the wife of Glenn 
Walthen. Mr. and Mrs. Walthen live with her father. 

Levi Fruit has been one of the leading farmers and stockmen of 
Lake Township for many yeai-s. For twenty-five years he has annu- 
ally fed a bunch of cattle and hogs on his farm, and for the past 
seven years has been an extensive shipper both of his own stock and 
of that of other growers. Mr. Fruit's farm comprises 160 acres in 
Lake Township, and 101 acres in Jackson Township, 21/^ miles south 
of Packerton. 

Most of his life has been spent in the southeastern corner of Kosci- 
usko County, and he was born two miles south in Wabash County 
November 26, 1864, a son of Christian and Frances (Snell) Fruit. His 
father, who was born in Germany in 1827, was brought to the United 
States a boy of twelve years, and about that time the Fruit family 
established a pioneer home in Jackson Township of this county. 
Christian Fruit married Frances Snell, a member of the old and 
prominent name of that family in Jackson Township. After their 



584 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

marriage they located in Wabash County, but eventually returned 
to Jackson Township and spent the rest of their days here. He died 
in 1914 and the mother in 1915. Both were members of the Conserva- 
tive Brethren Church. Of their nine children six are living: Anna, 
wife of John Brumbaugh, a prominent citizen of Huntington Coun- 
ty ; Sophia, wife of Ellis Lehmer, of North Manchester ; John, of North 
Manchester; Levi; Frances, wife of Charles Livezy, of Lake Town- 
ship ; and Susan, wife of Joseph Cripe, of North Manchester. 

Levi Fruit spent his boyhood and youth in Jackson Township, and 
attended the neighboring district schools. On April 8, 1891, he mar- 
ried Miss Florence C. Ganote, who was bom in Clarke County, Indi- 
ana, November 28, 1864. She came to Kosciusko County at the age 
of twenty-two, and had in the meantime completed the course of 
the common and high schools. Mr. and INIrs. Fruit have five living 
children, Calvin, a graduate of the common schools; Frank, who has 
taken one year in a commercial school ; Louise and Ernest, both grad- 
uates of the common schools; and Walter, who finished the common 
school course in 1918. The family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at North Manchester. Mr. Fruit's politics has been 
in line with the republican party for many years. 

WiLBERT F. McGaby, manager of the Pierceton Immber Company, 
is the example of a young man of enterprise and ability who started 
life without capital and by his undivided energies attains a successful 
and influential position in business and community affairs. 

He was born at Middlebury, Indiana, June 23, 1881, a son of 
Charles and Mary (Miles) McGary. His parents are still living at 
Middlebury. Of their two children the daughter Rosa died at the 
age of twenty-one. 

Wilbert F. McGary was educated in the public schools at Middle- 
bury, also had a high school course and learned and followed for four 
years the painter's trade. Since then he has given his attention almost 
entirely to the lumber business. For seven years he was with the 
Griner Brothers at Middleburj-, then for two years was with a lumber 
firm at Schoolcraft, Michigan, and on March 4, 1917, came to Pierceton 
and with W. B. Schaefer of South Bend owns the Pierceton Lumber 
Company yards and Mr. McGary is the active manager of the business. 

j\Ir. McGary married for his first wife Elnora T. Anderhalt. She 
was reared at Sturgis, Michigan, and died in 1914. At Schoolcraft, 
Michigan, Mr. McGary married Ivah Schug. She is a graduat^ of 
the high school at Schoolcraft and was a teacher before her marriage. 
They are active members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. 
McGary is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge and Royal Arch Chapter 
at Schoolcraft. In politics he is a republican, and while a resident 
of Middlebury served as a member of the city board. 

E. M. Radclipf is one of the successful business men of Kosciusko 
County, has had a long and varied career as a merchant, teacher and in 
other business affairs, and is now proprietor of the E. M. Radcliff 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 585 

Flour & Feed Exchange at Piereeton. Mr. Radeliff knows the general 
provision and feed business from the standpoint of an expert in experi- 
ence and of long study, and while he is a thorough business man it is 
also his ideal and aim to make his business and his experience count 
as a real service to the community in which it is located. 

Mr. Radeliff was born in Vinton County, Ohio, June 1, 1853, a son 
of Hiram and Margaret (Rogers) Radeliff. Both parents were na- 
tives of Vinton County. The father was born there in 1828. The 
mother died in Vinton County when a comparatively young woman. 
She left two children, E. M. and Rachel A. The latter is the wife of 
I. N. Bryan, of Piereeton, Indiana. In 1862 Hiram Radeliff moved 
with his family to Whitley County, Indiana, and spent the rest of 
his life there as a farmer. By a second wife he had the following 
children : John L. and C. 0., merchants at Piereeton ; Frank H., de- 
ceased : Roscoe R., a coal dealer at Piereeton ; and Zelda, wife of 
John McDonald, a farmer in Whitley County. 

E. M. Radeliff was nine years old when his father moved to Whit- 
ley County, and he grew up on a farm there and was educated chiefly 
in the public schools of Larwell. He did his first work as a teacher 
in Whitley County and taught seven winter terms in the country 
district. He also had some experience in the intervals as a merchant. 
Mr. Radeliff was one of the early students of the old Northern Indiana 
Normal School at Valparaiso, now Valparaiso University. He first 
entered that institution in 1872, about the time it was founded, and 
graduated in both the normal and commercial courses. For five years 
he was a merchant at Larwell, sold out and moved to Sidney, where he 
bought a tract of land and laid out the town of Sidney and gave that 
village its first impetus to growth. He remained there 41/0 years and 
in 1884 came to Piereeton, a date which makes him one of the oldest 
business men and residents of that village. He was first in business at 
Piereeton under the firm name of Radclift" & ^McNamara. This firm 
continued for sixteen years. Mr. Radeliff then sold his interests and 
for four years was alone in business, and after selling out his store 
to his brother entered his present special line as a flour and feed 
merchant, and has conducted the E. M. Radeliff Flour & Feed Ex- 
change successfully for seven years. 

March 30, 1876, Mr. Radeliff married Mary M. Norris, who was 
born and reared in Whitley County, and had a good public school 
education. They have only one child. Dr. F. E. Radeliff, of Bourbon, 
Indiana. Doctor Radeliff was educated in the high school at Piereeton, 
and is a graduate of the Indiana Medical College, since which date 
he has pursued his professional career with marked appreciation and 
success. He married Lela Knox. 

The Radeliff family are members of the Baptist church. Mr. 
Radeliff has been active in church affairs, and is also affiliated with 
Piereeton Lodge No. 377, Ancient Free and Accepted ilasons, War- 
saw Chapter No. 48, Ro.yal Arch Masons, and Warsaw Commandery 
No. 10, Knights Templars. Politically he is a republican, but has 
practically given all his time to business witliout seeking the honors 
of office. 



586 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Clyde L. Bishop is a jeweler by trade, was in that business at 
Pierceton for a number of years, but is now finding profitable and 
congenial employment in looking after his broad acres and his other 
interests as an agriculturist and stockman on his farm near Pierceton 
in Washington Township. 

A native of Kosciusko County, he was born in Monroe Township 
December 16, 1877, son of Marquis and Harriet (Baker) Bishop. His 
father was born in Crawford County, Ohio, and his mother in Hancock 
County, that state. She came with her parents to Kosciusko County, 
while Marquis Bishop reached here in young manhood. After his mar-, 
riage he farmed successfully, owned a large amount of land, and was 
especially well known as a breeder of registered livestock. He was 
an active factor in politics and at one time held the office of township 
trustee. 

Clyde L. Bishop was one of two children and the only one now liv- 
ing. He grew up on the home farm in Monroe Township, and attended 
both the grammar and high schools. At the age of eighteen he went 
to Elgin, Illinois, and served a long and thorough apprenticeship at 
the watchmaking and jewelry trades. • He followed his occupation as 
a journeyman in different places and for five years was in business 
for himself at Pierceton. His farm of 155 acres adjoins the corpora- 
tion limits on the north, and he is one of the men in this coimty who 
are helping swell the volume of agricultural products not only as a 
matter of professional pride and good business practice, but also as 
an aid toward winning the war. 

October 25, 1899, !Mr. Bishop married Miss Jessie Knox. Mrs. 
Bishop is a graduate of the Pierceton High School. They have four 
children : Merwood, a high school boy ; Harold, in the grade schools ; 
and Robert and Mary. Mrs. Bishop is a member of the ^lethodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Bishop is a republican in politics and is 
affiliated with Pierceton Lodge No. 277, Ancient Free and Accepted 



John L. Axdre.vs. When fny new and progressive enterprise 
breaks the routine of the community life of Pierceton it 's pretty 
certain that John L. Andreas has a hand in it, if he is not primarily 
responsible for the undertaking. ]\Ir. Andreas during his residence 
at Pierceton has been a lumberman, farmer, manufacturer, and more 
than any one else has helped revive an old time agricultural industry, 
hemp raising and manufacturing. There has never been any diffi- 
culty in raising hemp, but the handling of the crop has presented dif- 
ficulties that could only be overcome by the hardest and most arduous 
manual labor. Mr. Andreas is responsible for some of the machinery 
and appliances which lighten the burden of hemp culture. He is 
inventor and manufacturer of hemp breaking machinery and of prac- 
tically a complete installation of apparatus used in preparing hemp 
between the field and the final processes of manufacture. 

Mr. Andreas is a native of Ohio. He was born near Nevada in 
Wyandotte County in June, 1867. His boyhood days were spent there 
but in 1877 he came to Indiana and finished his education with a 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 587 

business course in Valparaiso. For the next five years he did ofiSce 
work and floor work in a general store at Akron, Indiana, and then 
came to Pierceton and for a niimber of years was chiefly identified 
with the lumber industry. He was associated with his brother and 
they both bought and sold lumber and timber. Mr. Andreas made this 
business his chief work until 1911. 

In 1895 he married Miss Ida A. Brower, of Kosciusko County. She 
is a graduate of the local high school. They have three children. 
Susie 6. is attending high school, and she was a student of St. Mary's 
University. The two younger children are John L., Jr., aged seven, 
and Sarah, aged three. Mrs. Andreas is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Andreas is a charter member of the Knights of Pythias 
Lodge at Akron, Indiana, and in politics is independent. 

His home farm comprises 188 acres adjoining Pierceton, but alto- 
gether he has under cultivation about 315 acres. He is a specialist in 
some of the truck crops, including cabbages and tomatoes. As a 
hemp raiser he began on a very small scale, but especially emphasized 
the matter of quality. He increased his fields until he has 300 acres 
in cultivation. He also began the manufacture of hemp breaking 
machinery^ on a very small scale, and he put in the first drying kilns 
for curing hemp. A large part of his time is now taken up with 
installing and manufacturing hemp dryers, breaking machines and 
cleaning plants. He has patents to cover his special original ma- 
chinery. 

Elmer E. McCarter. Among the men who have lived longest in 
Kosciusko County a place of special honor belongs to Elmer E. Mc- 
Carter for his unique record as a teacher in Washington Township. 
In later years Mr. McCarter has applied his industry successfully to 
the management of a first class truck farm, and is the present trustee 
of the township. 

He was born in Hamilton County, Indiana, April 4, 1861, son of 
Alfred G. and Sarah A. (Stinson) McCarter. The McCarter family 
are of old Pennsylvania stock. Grandfather William McCarter was 
born in Pennsylvania January 1, 1800, and was a bricklayer by 
trade. He married Harriet McCord, who was bom in Philadelphia 
November 27, 1800. 

Alfred G. McCarter^ father of Elmer E., was born at Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania, May 16, 1827, and is well remembered in Kosciusko 
and other Indiana counties for his work as a Methodist missionary 
and minister. He grew up in Montgomery County, Ohio, began the 
trade of cabinet maker at Dayton, and in that trade worked as a 
.iourneyman for seven or eight years in different towns and localities. 
In 1852 he was licensed as a local preacher of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Logansport and in 1853 was received into the North Indiana 
Conference. He did his work as a missionary preacher in nearly 
every county of Northern Indiana, and was retired from the ministry 
in 1880. In 1854 he was pastor of the churches west of Warsaw in 
Kosciusko County, in 1856 was on the Pierceton circuit, in 1858 on 
the Leesburg circuit, in 1872 on the Silver Lake circuit, and in 1873 



588 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

on the West circuit. After 1880 he lived retired on his wife's farm 
in section 17 of Washington Township. 

Rev. ilr. McCarter married June 17, 1858, Sarah A. Stinson, who 
was born in Pike County, Ohio, February 26, 1838. She came with her 
parents to Indiana and grew up in Kosciusko County. Five children 
were born to their marriage and four are still living: George W., of 
Warsaw; Elmer E. ; Luella, widow of Morton Little; and Harriet, 
wife of Dr. A. B. Rimer, of Remington, Indiana. 

Elmer E. MeCarter grew up on a farm, and was educated in public 
schools in different localities. He also attended the Methodist College 
at Fort Wayne. He began teaching in early life, and for twenty-nine 
consecutive years had charge of one school in Wa.shington Township, 
where toward the last he taught some of the children of his early 
pupils. 

April 7, 1886, Mr. ]\IcCarter married Miss Lou Baker, who was 
born in Kosciusko County and was educated in the local public schools. 
For a number of years Mr. and Mrs. MeCarter have lived on a small 
but highly productive farm in Washington Township, comprising 
seventeen acres, which they have operated as a fruit and truck farm. 
They have three children : Nina is a graduate of the Warsaw High 
School, also carried her higher education through the University of 
Chicago, and is now a teacher in the Pierceton High School. Jacob C, 
a graduate of the local high school, is connected with a wholesale jewel- 
ery house in Chicago. Alfred F. is a graduate of the Pierceton High 
School and is still at home with his parents. The family are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Church at Pierceton and ilr. JlcCarter has served 
on the official board and also as superintendent of the Sundaj' school 
for over twenty yeai-s. In politics he is a republican but his only pub- 
lic office has been his present responsibility as trustee of Washington 
Township. 

Joshua We.\ver is one of the prominent residents of ilonroe Town- 
ship, where he has conducted a well managed and profitable farm for 
a number of years. His hom.e is on route Xo. 1 out of Sidney and 
located four miles northeast of that village. 

Mr. Weaver was born in Wood County, Ohio, Augiist 17, 1851, 
and lived in that section of the Buckeye state for many years before 
coming to Indiana. His parents, John and Harriet (Martin) Weaver 
were born and married in Washington County, Pennsylvania, and 
from there moved to Bloom Township in Wood County, Ohio. They 
were among the substantial farming element of that section the rest 
of their lives. The father was a democrat and quite active in party 
affairs and filled office as township asses.sor, treasurer and trustee. Of 
the ten children only two are now living : ]Mary E. and Joshua. Mary 
is the wife of Samuel Kachensbarge, of North Baltimore, Ohio. 

Jo-shua Weaver was reared on his father's farm in Wood County 
and was given a district school education. He lived at home with his 
parents to the age of twenty-five. On September 13. 1877, he married 
Amv A. Whitacre. She was born in Wood County and was educated 
in the schools of that localitv. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 589 

. Mr. and Mrs. Weaver spent nearly thirty years on a farm in Wood 
County but in 1905 sold out and moved to Monroe Township of Kosci- 
iisko County, where they have a large and well managed fann of 120 
acres. Mr. Weaver has always been very successful in handling live- 
stock and makes that an important feature of his farm work. 

They have four children. Mary, a graduate of the high school and 
formerly a teacher, is the wife of Charles Dickinson and lives at 
Bakersfield, California. Isaac is a worker in the oil fields of Cali- 
fornia. Alta, a graduate of high seliool, married Charles Tracy, living 
near Casey, Illinois. Earl is an oil well driller in California. 

Mr. Weaver is one of the deacons of the Christian Church in his 
neighborhood. As a democrat he has filled several offices and while 
in Bloom Township, Ohio, was township trustee. 

Samuel Guy, whose country home is known as Springdale Farm, 
situated two miles northwest of Pierceton on route No. 3, has spent 
practically all his life in Kosciusko County. He began here with 
small means, and his own work has contributed to his success until he 
now has one of the better and larger farms of this section of the 
county. 

He was born in Prairie Township of Kosciusko County, July 11, 
1858, son of Robert and Mars^ (Vanator) Guy. His mother was born 
in Morrow County, Ohio. His father died January 1. 1866, and after 
his death the mother married Mr. E. J. Smith. Both are now de- 
ceased, and her children were by her first marriage, named Harriet 
and Samuel. Harriet is unmarried and lives with her brother. 

Samuel Guy lived on the old homestead in Prairie Township until 
he was sixteen, when his mother moved to the place he now occupies in 
Washington Township in 1874. His education was the product of 
attending the district schools until the age of sixteen and after that he 
went to work and used his strength in plowing and planting and other- 
wise helping in the management of the farm. In that way he grew to 
maturity and his associations with agricultural enterprise in this coun- 
ty have been continuous for forty years. 

On November 24, 1887, he married Miss Ina V. Crum. Mrs. Guy 
was born in Turkey Creek Township in June, 1869, but at the age of 
three years her parents died and after that she grew up in Wabash 
County with her paternal grandmother. She was educated in the 
public schools until about the time of her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Guy 
had one child, Roy Martin, who died at the age of fifteen. 

Mrs. Guy is one of the prominent members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church at Pierceton. Mr. Guy is affiliated with Pierceton Lodge 
No. 377, Free and Accepted ]\Iasons, and with the Consistory of 
Scottish Rite at Fort Wayne. Both are active in Pierceton Chapter 
No. 56 of the Eastern Star, and Mrs. Guy is a past worthy matron of 
its Chapter and is also past lady commander of the Ladies of the Mac- 
cabees. In politics Mr. Guy votes as a republican. The farm which 
has been the scene of his mature activities for so many years and 
which has amply repaid his efforts and management comprises 140 
acres and it fully justifies its name and title as Springdale Farm. 



590 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

John W. Faulkner. One of the enterprising and progressive 
men who are principally engaged in agricultural pursuits in Kosci- 
usko County, John W. Faulkner brought to his calling excellent judg- 
ment and good business methods, and his labors have been crowned 
with success. He owns a good and well managed farm of 160 acres in 
Monroe Township, 3i/^ miles south of Pierceton on rural route No. 2. 

Mr. Faulkner was born in this township September 7, 1850, son 
of Nelson and Julia A. (King) Faulkner. His father was born in 
New York State and his mother in Ohio. Nelson Faulkner came to 
Indiana at the age of twenty-one, and became a resident of Kosciusko 
County. The King family came to the state in pioneer times and first 
located at Kendallville, and afterwards moved to Noble County, where 
they died. Nelson Faulkner and wife had six children, four of whom 
are still living: Barbara, wife of Mr. Hoagland, of Warsaw; John 
W. ; Louisa, wife of "William Klingle ; Hannah, wife of William Moun- 
son ; Rachel, who married John Kegg, and is now deceased ; and Isaac 
N., deceased. 

John W. Faulkner spent his early days on the old farm in Monroe 
Township, was educated in the common schools, and lived at home 
until his parents moved to Pierceton. On September 2, 1874, he 
married Jliss Alice V. Norris. Mrs. Faulkner was born in Wabash 
County, Indiana, December 9, 1854, but was brought to Kosciusko 
Countj^ as a child by her parents, who located in Monroe Township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Faulkner have the following children living: Lilly M., 
wife of George W. Campbell; Lura 0., wife of James R. Winsley; 
Lula A., wife of George W. Winsley; Loyal C, who married Eva 
M. Headlee and lives on an adjoining farm ; and Lyman M., who mar- 
ried Fannie F. Clover and is a farmer in ]Monroe Township. 

The family are members of the Christian Church and 'Sir. Faulkner 
is a republican. 

Elson V. Bowman. One of the prosperous farmers of Monroe 
Township who conducts his extensive operations with method and 
good judgment is Elson V. Bowman, whose home is 2^4 miles southeast 
of Pierceton on rural route No. 2. 

Mr. Bowman was born on the farm where he now lives February 
22, 1886, son of Thomas and Eliza (Vandergrift) Bowman. His par- 
ents are still living. Thomas Bowman was born in Stark County, Ohio, 
November 23, 1844, was reared and educated there, and married on 
February 23, 1886, Miss Vandergrift, who was born May 14, 1846. 
In 1872 they came to Kosciusko County, Ohio, and have been among 
the substantial people of this community for over forty-five years. 
Thomas Bowmfin is a veteran of the Union Army, having enlisted in 
the 25th Ohio Battery and saw active service for three years. He 
is now a member of the Grand Army Post at Pierceton, Indiana, 
and in polities is a republican. Thomas Bowman and wife have six 
children, all still living : 0. H. Bowman, of Monroe Township ; Grace, 
wife of J. L. Helwig, of Warsaw; Emily, wife of 0. H. Harmon, of 
Burlington, Colorado; Josephine, wife of C. L. Hass, of Pierceton; 
Crete, who is unmarried ; and Elson. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 591 

Elson V. Bowman was educated in the district schools, also at- 
tended Pierceton High School one year, and the scene of his active 
labors as a farmer is the place where he was born and reared. 

December 18, 1907, Mr. Bowman married Miss Alta Tatman, of 
LaPorte County. She is a graduate of the Union Mills High School 
and was a teacher two terms before her marriage. They have two 
children, Alice, attending the Pierceton public schools and Florence, 
aged five years. The family are members of the Presbyterian Church 
and in polities Mr. Bowman is a republican. 

Orvil S. Yeager. There is no local office for which the qualifi- 
cations of candidates are more carefully scrutinized than that of town- 
ship trustee. The citizens of Jefl'erson Township have congi-atulated 
themselves upon the work and efficiency shown by the present incum- 
bent of that office. Orvil S. Yeager, who has fully deserved the confi- 
dence of the community and is giving a very careful administration of 
the aflPairs entrusted to him. 

Mr. Yeager, whose home is 6Vo miles southwest of Milford. was 
born in Tippecanoe Township of Koscin.sko County, August 27, 1866, 
son of Andrew and Clarissa (Hull) Yeager. His father was a native 
of Canada and his mother of Ohio, and they married in Indiana. They 
lived for several years in Tippecanoe Township and finally settled 
near Nappanee. Both were members of the Church of God and the 
father was a deacon. In politics he voted as a republican. They had 
eleven children, and those now living are Charles, Annis, Ida, Rosa, 
Orvil and Orlando, twins, Clemma, Eva and Leonard. 

Orvil S. Yeager grew up on the homestead and attended the com- 
mon schools. At the age of twenty-one he started out on his own 
account and was a farm worker for several years. 

December 28, 1889, he married Miss Lizzie Carris, a native of 
Indiana and reared in Kosciusko County. Mr. and Mrs. Yeager are 
members of the Evangelical Church and he is one of the church 
trustees and is very active in Sunday school. His fine home comprises 
twenty-seven acres in Jefferson Township. In politics he is a re- 
publican. 

D.wiD H. Lessig. There was no more admirable figure in "Warsaw 
business circles than the late David H. Lessig, who passed away, and 
with his passing left vacant a high position in the community, on 
February 12, 1913. Those who were only familiar with him during 
the last twenty or thirty years of his life knew him as a man pros- 
perous and influential beyond the ordinary. Those whose memory 
went further back could recall some of the hardships and obstacles 
which he had to overcome in his advance to success. Along the strict 
lines of integrity and honor he gained some of the best prizes of life. 

A native of Indiana, he was born on a farm near Goshen Septem- 
ber 4, 1851, a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Hart) Lessig. When he 
was a small boy his parents moved to Leesburg in Kosciusko County. 
There the father engaged in merchandising. David H. Lessig was 
reared to manhood in the Leesburg locality, educated by private tutors 



592 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUXTY 

and in the public schools of Leesburg, and when only eighteen taught 
his first term of school. He continued teaching for two years. Early 
in life he had realized the importance of securing a good education. 
He never relaxed his studies, his close observations of men. and he was 
a sound reasoner in everything he undertook. 

He was only sixteen yeai-s of age when his father died. From 
that time forward he had to mold his destiny according to his own 
energies, ambitions and ideals. ^lany men more fortunate in their 
early environment might well en\y what Mr. Lgssig accomplished. 

Prior to attaining his majority he came to Warsaw as deputy 
county clerk under Gen. Reub. Williams. He remained in the Court 
House for three yeare. Returning to Leesburg, he took the post of 
station agent for the Big Four Railroad Company, and also served 
as bookkeeper for the tirm of H. B. Stanley, grain dealers. Gradually 
he accumulated experience and some limited capital, and with this as 
a basis engaged in mercantile pursuits on his own account. He also 
during this period of his life served as trustee of Plain Township for 
four years, and for a similar length of time as postmaster of Leesburg. 

No man in the county was better fitted for public responsibilities. 
In 1894 he was elected auditor of Kosciusko County, and remained 
in charge of that office in the Court House at Warsaw for four years. 
The day following the expiration of his term of office he was elected 
president of the Lake City Bank, and this was the office with which 
he was most familiarly identified and which he administered with 
exceptional ability until his death. He had also assisted in organizing 
the Lee-sburg Grain and Jlilling Company and served as president of 
that until the close of his life. 

For nine years ^Ir. Lessig was a member of the Board of Education 
and was its secretary when the fine new high school building was 
erected in Warsaw. He was one of the organizers of the Warsaw 
Chamber of Commerce, and continued on its board of directors until he 
was called away by death. 

On March 29, 1877, Mr. Lessig married Miss Fannie Richardson, 
of Rochester, New York. She died on the first anniversary of their 
wedding. She left one daughter, Frances R., who married Earl Con- 
rad and they have a daughter named ]\Iary Louise. On March 9, 1888, 
Mr. Lessig married Miss Mary Eugenia Killbury. of Hornellsville, 
New York. Mrs. Lessig still lives at the old home in Warsaw, and is 
the mother of four children. The oldest, Harriet Louise, is Mrs. Harry 
Wann. The other three children are Joseph S., Donald H. and 
Eleanor H. 

The early years of Mr. Lessig were fraught with hardships and 
privations. This fact undoubtedly led to his being ever read}' to lend 
a helping hand to those less fortunate than himself. Of a studious 
turn of mind, he was also genial, making friends readily, and in- 
variably retaining these friendships to the end. Few men stood higher 
in the eommunitj- because of native ability, energy and unostentatious 
charity. He was a Royal Arch Mason, a republican in politics, and a 
member of the Presb-s-terian Church. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 593 

Andrew J. Hill. An esteemed and highly respected citizen of Kos- 
ciuseo County and one of its enterprising and progressive farmers, 
Andrew J. Hill has for many years been intimately associated with 
the development and promotion of agricultural interests in Seward 
Township. The esteem in which he is held is well reflected in the fact 
that he is the present trustee of the township, and this is not the only 
position for which his fellow citizens have indicated their absolute 
trust and confidence in his ability to fill. 

Mr. Hill was born in Lake Township of this county February 18, 
1863, a son of Charles and Mary (Batzner) Hill. His father was born 
in Pennsylvania July 6, 1809. His mother was born in Germany 
December 11, 1829, and as a girl of nine years was brought to this 
country by her parents, who settled in Southeastern Indiana. Mary 
Batzner was the second wife of Charles Hill, and their five children 
were : Sarena, who died at the age of fifteen ; Andrew J. ; Albert, 
who died at the age of eleven ; Danie, who died when twenty-one yeare 
old; and Mary, wife of Clyde McKnight, of Indianapolis. 

Andrew J. Hill grew up in Lake Township, made the most of his 
advantages in the district schools, and he called his parents' home his 
own until he was twenty-one. But from the age of nineteen he was 
making his own way in the world and on June 9, 1888, at the age 
of twenty-five, he really established himself in life when he married 
Emma Perry. Mrs. Hill was bom in Pleasant Township of Wabash 
County. After their marriage they moved to the Village of Silver 
Lake, where he was in business for a time, but in 1892 moved to his 
farm of 161 acres, and to its improvement and cultivation he has 
given his closest attention now for over a quarter of a century. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hill became the parents of nine children : Dean C, 
a graduate of the common schools is now serving in the United States 
Army ; Herbert, also a common school graduate, is still at home but 
may also be called into the army ; Eunice, wife of David "Wood ; Icel, 
wife of Russell Shoemaker; Augustus D., who is a graduate of the 
high school of Silver Lake and of the Normal English department 
of North Manchester College ; Grace, a high school student ; Priscilla, 
John and Pauline, who are the younger children and are still to 
finish their education in the common schools. 

Mr. Hill is affiliated with Lake View Lodge No. 165, Knights of 
Pythias, and with the Loyal Order of Moose. In polities he is a dem- 
ocrat. Before his election to his present office he served as township 
assessor and at this writing is democratic nominee for county com- 
missioner. 

Wesley Stackhouse, a native of Kosciusko County, and practi- 
cally a lifelong resident of Scott Township, has given his capable 
attention to farming and with such good results that he now enjoys 
an enviable prosperity and is well able to relieve himself of the heavier 
responsibilities that formerly engaged him. However, he is still living 
on his comfortable rural estate in Scott Township. 

He was born in that township October 15, 1851, son of John and 
Hannah Stackhouse. His parents were both natives of England, 



594 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

where they were reared and married, and all their children except 
Weslej- were born in England. As a family they came to the United 
States about 1847 and were pioneers in Kosciusko County. They took 
an active part in church mattere and the father was a republican. Of 
their children three are still living: Hugh, William and Wesley. 
Hugh still occupies the old homestead, while William is also a well 
known farmer of Scott Township. 

ilr. Wesley Stackhouse was well educated, partly in district and 
partlj' in select schools. He married Miss Celestia Gearhart, who was 
also born in Scott Township. She was a faithful companion and 
mother to her children, and her loss was widely lamented. She died 
in January, 1914. Of her nine children all but one are still living: 
Ella, James, Ed, Leonard, Lulu, William, Allie, Fred and Hobert. 

The family are members of the Christian Church and Mr. Stack- 
house is one of the trustees. In politics he is a republican. His farm, 
representing his labor and good management, comprises 180 acres. 
Mr. Stackhouse has accepted the opportunities afforded by his pros- 
perity to see much of this country. In 1914 he made an interesting 
journey to California and saw much of the country that has been so 
widely celebrated in literature. In the fall of 1917 he toured the 
East, including the cities of Boston, New York and Washington, and 
was there at a time when he could observe the National Legislature 
in session and see much of the life of the capital. On each of these 
trips he was absent from home about two months. 

J.VMES E. Guy. The world is now interested as never before in 
the production of farms both in the aggregate and individually. That 
Kosciusko County is doing its full share toward swelling the volume 
of farm products is well known, and one of the men in the vanguard 
of this work is James E. Guy, whose name and experience are espe- 
cially associated with the breeding of Hereford cattle. He has prob- 
ably the best herd of Wliite Faces in the county. His herd leader is 
ileal Ticket No. 101793, an animal that exemplifies all the splendid 
qualities of this great beef stock. Mr. Guy has twelve cows and heifers. 
His farm is in Wayne Township 21/2 miles west of Warsaw, and com- 
prises 130 acres in his home place, while he owns another eightj^ acres 
two miles south. 

On the home farm where he now lives Mr. Guy was born May 
4, 1870, son of James and Ruharaa (Creighton) Guy. His father was 
a native of Ohio. Both families came to Kosciusko Coianty m early 
days, and the parents grew to maturity here and married and then 
settled on the farm where they spent the rest of their lives, ilr. 
James Guy, Sr., was born in 1819. The mother died fifteen years 
ago. In politics James Guy, Sr., was a republican. Of the nine chil- 
dren eight are still living: Henry, a farmer in Wayne Township; 
Laura, wife of B. F. Foulk, of Wai-saw ; Mary, wife of George Heater, 
of Warsaw ; Jennie, wife of George Wolfe : Anna, wife of Lem Cook, 
of Wayne Township; Ella, wife of Eli Grissom; Electa, wife of J. 
G. Longfellow, of Wayne Township ; and James E. 

James E. Guy was reared to manhood on the old farm and attended 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 595 

the district schools of Wayne Township. He married Miss Nannie 
Zimmennan, who died leaving two children, Ralph and Nannie. Both 
were educated in the common schools. Ralph married Gladys Phil- 
lips and now lives in Wayne Township, while Nannie is the wife of 
Ralph Remy and lives on the old farm. Mr. Guy married for his 
present wife Sarah Miller. They are members of the United Brethren 
Church at Warsaw and politically he votes as a republican. 

John H. Harmon. One of the thriftiest residents of Prairie 
Township is John H. Harmon, whose home is near Etna Green. In 
the main work which he chose for his career, agriculture, it is needless 
to say that Mr. Harmon has been prospered beyond the ordinary. He 
was reared and has spent most of his life in this county and his works 
and his influence have brought him an estimable station among his 
fellow men. 

He was horn in Crawford County. Ohio. February 23, 1852, a 
son of David S. and Susan (Boardner) Harmon. Both his parents 
were natives of Columbiana County, Ohio. The paternal grand- 
father was John Harmon, a native of Pennsylvania, from which 
state he moved to Ohio and finally to Indiana, where he died. He 
saw some service during the Revolutionary "war. The maternal 
grandfather was John Boardner, also a native of Pennsylvania, who 
subsequently became an Ohio farmer. David S. Harmon and wife 
brought their family out to Indiana in 1861, and located on a farm 
in Kosciusko County. They were active members of the Dunkard 
Church and in politics he was a republican and gave some good serv- 
ice as a member of the school board in the early days. His thrift and 
industry enabled him to accumulate 160 acres of land, which he 
placed under a state of high improvement. There were eleven chil- 
dren in the family and six are now living. 

The oldest of these, John H. Harmon, while a boy in Ohio, at- 
tended a German school, and also attended the public schools of 
Indiana after the family moved to this state. Reared on a farm, he 
naturally took to the vocation for which his early training fitted him, 
and for a period of forty years or more has been industriously en- 
gaged in that line. His present place of eighty acres is situated in 
Prairie Township, and he has a good home and has practically per- 
formed all the improvements about his farm by his own hand or 
under his direct management. He combines crop growing with the 
raising of good stock. 

Mr. Harmon married Sarah Knabenshue. She was born in Vir- 
ginia, but her parents brought her to Indiana when she was quite 
young. Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Harmon five are living: 
Isaac is a Kosciusko County farmer; Walter is also a farmer in 
this county ; Leona is the wife of Mr. Yarmon, an engineer living at 
Port Wayne; Gertrude married Mr. Girard, and they live on the 
Harmon farm; Glenn is a machinist living at Warsaw. In politics 
Mr. Harmon is a republican and from time to time has interested 
himself in those movements which bring about the improvement and 
betterment of his home community. 



596 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Horace Tucker. Perhaps to no one of the old pioneers of 
Kosciusko County is more frequent reference made than to the late 
Horace Tucker. He was an exemplary citizen, successful in a mate- 
rial way, and his influence counted for much in the development and 
progress of the county. The following sketch of his career will serve 
to supplement other minor notices of him found in this publication. 

He was born in Kichland County, Ohio, November 8, 1825, son of 
John and ^lary (Warde) Tucker. His grandfather, Ezra Tucker, was 
a native of New Hampshire and his children consisted of Daniel, John, 
Ezra, Cyrus, David and Eliza. Ezra Tucker served in the War of 
1812. John Tucker, his son, enli.sted in the same war but was never 
called into the field. 

John Tucker grew up on a farm in New Hampshire, had the 
average education of his time in the subscription schools, and made 
such good use of his advantages that he taught for a time. About 
1820 he moved to Richland County, Ohio, walking the entire distance 
of 800 miles. Northern and Western Ohio were then a total wilder- 
ness, with as many Indians as white people. John Tucker entered 
160 acres of land in Union Township and industriously cleared it 
away acre by acre, lived in a rude log cabin, and for a time his nearest 
neighbor was four miles distant. The first season he cleared up a 
small patch and planted it with potatoes. The following year he 
returned to New Hampshire, walking as before, and there married 
Mary Warde. He brought his bride to his Ohio home in a one-horse 
wagon, and that wagon also contained practically all their movable 
possessions and goods. The wagon served not only as a vehicle by 
day, but as a shelter by night against the storms, and the roadside 
supplied the campfires where they cooked their simple meals. One 
of the implements which they brought with them on this journey 
from New Hampshire was a skillet which was handed down in the 
family and was owned by Horace Tucker. John Tucker and wife 
spent thirty-three days on this home seeking and honeymoon tour, 
and the last six miles he had to break the way through the brush 
and woods. In Richland County they put up with the hardships and 
trials of most of the pioneers, but were prospered perhaps above the 
ordinary and in course of time had a good farm and a substantial 
log house and still later a good frame house. 

The children of this pioneer couple were : Horace. Aurelius. who 
married Isabel Alexander ; Sarena, who married Francis Wager ; 
Albert, who became a resident of Mentone, Indiana ; Regulus, who 
married Jane Blue; Livona, who married John Yandermark. 

John Tucker and his son Horace Tucker came to Kosciusko County 
in 1846, for the purpose of inspecting the land in this then compara- 
tively new community. Satisfied with what he saw, Horace Tucker 
bought 160 acres in sections 19 and 20 of Franklin Township. His 
father went back to Ohio leaving Horace to clear away some of the 
woods and brush, and this accomplished he too walked back to his 
Ohio home, having 200 miles to make the .iourney on foot. Wliile in 
Ohio he continued work on his father's farm, and on January 13, 
1848, married Eliza Johnson, daughter of Francis and Anna (Flem- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 597 

iiig) Johnson. The Johnson family came originally from Ireland, 
and William Johnson, grandfather of Mrs. Horace Tucker, on com- 
ing to the United States shortly after his marriage located in Penn- 
sj'lvania, where Mrs. Tucker's father was born. Francis Johnson 
was a blacksmith and a sickle maker. He spent most of his life in 
Ohio. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Horace Tucker 
out of his generous prosperity was able to give each of his children 
money or property to the value of $6,000 upon their marriage and 
leaving home. Their children were: Albert L., born September 19, 
1849, elsewhere mentioned in this publication ; Rosella, born in De- 
cember, 1853, who married Jonathan -Tinkey ; Hollis C, born in Feb- 
ruary, 1857, married Nettie Alexander. 

Horace Tucker was the type of pioneer who was not merely a 
good manager but was willing to get into the heaviest and most ardu- 
ous toil himself. Thus many acres of heavy forest which originally 
covered his land was cleared away by the steady blows of his axe. He 
was not less efficient in the skill and judgment he showed in manag- 
ing the men who worked for him. The first spring he was in Kosci- 
usko County he planted six acres of corn among the stumps, breaking 
the land with a yoke of runaway oxen that he had secured in the 
woods and which belonged to some distant neighbor. He yoked them 
up when they came to his barn for something to eat. In 1871 Horace 
Tucker began erecting a substantial brick house, which is still a land- 
mark in that vicinity. It was the first house of that construction in 
the township and the firet to be supplied with steam heat. Exclusive 
of his own work he invested $4,000 in the house. He also put up the 
first windmill pump in the township. In 1874 he built a large and 
substantial barn. Much of his money was made in handling and 
marketing cattle. He was in that business for about half a century. 
He was the first man to ship a carload of livestock to "Warsaw in. 
1856. 

While it. was not possible for him to make his money as easily as 
many men of the present generation, he was not lacking in great 
liberality in its use, and contributed liberally of his means to churches 
and to every worthy undertaking. He began voting as a whig and 
subsequently was an equally stanch republican. He served as treas- 
urer and trustee of his township, and was always an influence in 
county politics. Besides his farm he accumulated extensive tracts 
of land in Kosciusko and other counties, and always used livestock 
as a means of making his land profitable. In 1900 he sold from his 
farms, $8,000 worth of fat graded cattle, that being one of the largest 
single stock sales ever recorded in this county. 

Horace Tucker and wife began their housekeeping with utmost 
simplicity. Their first table consisted of an ordinary^ store box and 
their first bed was made of poles stuck in auger holes in the wall, 
these holes being covered with clapboards instead of slats, and the 
bed put on top. During his last j^ears and after the death of his wife 
Horace Tucker received most devoted attention and care from hi.<4 
grandson, Ivan Tucker. As a result of an accident he spent his last 
six months in bed. He died September 12, 1907, and his wife Novem 



598 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

ber 11, 190-1:. He died beloved of all who knew him, and the memory 
of many of his kind deeds are still preserved. 

Arthur Smith has his home in Silver Lake in Lake township, but 
for a long period of years his activities as a farmer and thresherman 
have made him known over the area of several townships of this 
county. 

He represents one of the old families here. His father, Mark 
Smith, came from Ohio to Kosciusko County in 1843. He drove across 
the country with him a hundred head of sheep, and was a pioneer in 
sheep husbandrj- in this county. The maiden name of his wife was 
Nancy Garvin. Mark Smith was born near Akron, Ohio, June 27, 
1826, and his wife was born in Indiana in December. 1831. She died 
June 12, 1864, while he lived to very advanced yeai-s, passing away 
April 12. 1904. He and his wife were members of the Baptist church, 
being charter members of the church in Seward Township, and the 
first services of that denomination were held in their own home. Their 
affiliation was with Franklin Baptist Church, ilark Smith was an 
active republican and for one term served as trustee of Seward Town- 
ship. He and his wife had five children, the three now living being 
S. E. Smith, of Paris, Texas, Arthur, and Jonathan 6., of Seward 
Township. The son Lucius died at the age of twelve years and Ida 
when only nine months old. 

Arthur Smith was born on his father's farm in Seward Township 
December 18, 1857. He grew up there, having the advantages of the 
common schools, and from the age of twenty until he was twenty-eight 
assumed a large part of responsibilitv in the management of the home 
farm. On March 21, 1886, Mr. Smith married Samantha J. Herald. 
She was bom in Seward Township December 17, 1861, and was edu- 
cated in the common schools. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have two children : 
Worden K, is a graduate of the common schools, is a farmer in Seward 
Township, and married Bessie Drudger. Cleo A. is the wife of Eugene 
Way, of Seward Township. 

Mr. Smith still owns eighty acres of good farming land, and for 
many years has operated a threshing outfit, supplying that indispens- 
able ser\'ice to a large circle of farmers in this county. Mr. Smith 
is president of the Seward Horse Thief Detective Association. He 
has been precinct chairman of the republican party for a number of 
years, and is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the Knights 
of the Maccabees. 

Jacob Sparks, a resident of Kosciusko County most of his active 
life, has given a good account of his years in his chosen occupation as 
a farmer. His farm and home are well known in the southeast corner 
of the township, being located in section 34 of Jackson Township, a 
mile east and half a mile south of Sidney. 

Mr. Sparks was born in Rock Creek Township of Wells Count}*, 
Indiana, February 8, 1864. The record of his family in Indiana goes 
back several generations. His great-grandparents, Solomon and Char- 
ity Sparks, came from Virginia and after a time spent in Muncie, 
Indiana, moved to Wells County, locating in Rock Creek Township, 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 599 

three miles south of Markle. Solomon Sparks entered a hundred sixty 
acres of government land there, and on it spent the rest of his days. 
His children were Isaac, Jackson, David, Solomon, William, John, 
Rachel, Charity and one other daughter. "William Sparks, grandfather 
of Jacob, married Hettie Miller, and among their children were IMoses, 
Henry, James, K. P.. John and Rachel. Jacob Sparks is a son of 
Moses and Hannah A. (Bane) Sparks. Moses Sparks had three other 
children : John F. of Huntington, Indiana ; Isaac, who also lives in 
Huntington ; Elizabeth, wife of Jacob Cordle ; while another daughter, 
Sarah M., is now deceased. 

Jacob Sparks gi-ew up in his native township of Wells County, 
but at the age of twelve his parents moved to Huntington County, 
and about 1884 he came to this county. For over thirty .years he has 
lived in Jackson Township. Mr. Sparks married Jennetta Ross. 
They had one daughter, Ruth, and both mother and daughter died in 
1900. On July 13, 1901, Mr. Sparks married Cora E. Smith, widow 
of William C. Smith. They have two sturdy young sons, William H. 
and Adam L. 

Mr. Sparks is a democrat in political affiliations. The farm which 
is the center of his enterprise and through which he has provided well 
for his family and made himself a contributing factor in Kosciusko 
County agriculture, comprises about a hundred forty-three and a half 
acres in section 34 of Jackson Township. In livestock he specializes 
in Duroc hogs, Shorthorn cattle and also the Polled Durhams. 

Edmund S. Lash. Some of the finest farms and the best farmers 
reside in the community around Etna Green. One of these is Edmund 
S. Lash, who is a native son of Kosciusko County, and has not only 
prospered and done well in his business vocation, but has identified 
himself in a useful way with county affairs, has filled several of the 
important offices, and always exerts his influence in behalf of com- 
munity betterment. 

His birth occurred in Hai-rison Township August 26, 1862. His 
parents were Philip and Sarah (Kehler) Lash, both natives of Ohio, 
his mother born near Wooster. The paternal grandfather, John 
Lash, was also a native of Ohio, and was one of the verj^ early settlers 
of Kosciusko County, where he became a large land owner and took 
much part in early affairs. The maternal grandfather was John 
Kehler, who also came early to Kosciusko County, and was a mill- 
wright by trade, and most of his sons grew up to mechanical profes- 
sions. Philip Lash was born in 1826 and died in 1863. His wife was 
born in 1824 and died in 1892. They both came as children to Indiana 
and were married in this state. Of their five children four are living. 
Mrs. Cora Harris, a widow ; Jennie, wife of Mr. Wolper, who is in the 
real estate business at Dayton, Ohio ; Mrs. Tillie Blue, whose husband 
is a retired farmer at Mentone ; and Edmund S. The parents of these 
children were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
the father was a republican. Philip Lash grew up in Kosciusko County 
when it was comparatively a wilderness. As a boy he frequently saw 



600 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Indians, and the school he attended had among its pupils several 
Indian children. 

Edmund S. Lash began his serious career with a valuable equip- 
ment of knowledge and practical experience. After attending the com- 
mon schools he spent two terms in the Methodist college at Port 
Wayne. He has a grateful memory of the two yeare he himself spent^ 
as a" teacher. From teaching he gravitated into farming and that has 
been his steady vocation now for fully thirty years. His success is 
of his own making and the property he owns is an adequate testimonial 
to his enterprise and industry. His farm comprises 180 acres, and its 
buildings and various improvements are the direct result of his work 
and supervision. He raises corn, hay and wheat, and has some good 
grades of cattle and hogs. 

On August 26, 1884, Mr. Lash married Miss Emma Eckert. She 
was born in Ohio, daughter of Sullivan and Rachel Eckert, who were 
Ohio people and early settlers in Hancock County of that state. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lash have four children : May Wilson is the wife of a teacher 
at Mentone ; Mrs. Madge Jackson lives in Elkhart, where Mr. Jackson 
is a ti-ain inspector for the Lake Shore Road; Raymond is a teacher 
and farmer in Kosciusko County, and Gladys, the youngest, is still at 
home. 

Mr. Lash has always been interested in public affairs and by the 
choice of his fellow citizens served two terms very capably in the office 
of county commissioner. He is a republican, he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the United Brethren church, and fraternally he is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen 
of America, and has held several of the ofBeial chairs in these fraternal 
bodies. 

Jerome H. Lones. It is truly the individual and exceptional case 
when a man can point to nearly a third of a century of continuous serv- 
ice for one organization or in one position. That was one of the dis- 
tinctions of Mr. Lones' citizenship in Warsaw, where from August 30, 
1883, until his death he was local agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad 
. Company. To a great many people in Warsaw Mr. Lones during that 
time was the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, having served as its 
representative so long that to think of the Pennsylvania Company was 
also to think of its genial and energetic agent. Furthermore, Mr. 
Lones was very closely and actively identified with the material 
progress and development of the city, and was one of the most highly 
esteemed as he was one of the best known men of Warsaw. 

The lesson of his career should not be lost as an example to young 
men who have to take up the responsibilities of life with little train- 
ing and with no influence to advance them. He was born on a farm 
in Crawford County. Ohio, August 20, 1853, the eldest of the three 
children of Harrison and Celia (Benson) Lones. When he was eight- 
een months of age his parents moved out of Iowa by way of Cincinnati 
and the Ohio and ilississippi rivers, but owing to the continued ill 
health of his mother they remained only a short time and returned to 
Ohio, taking up residence in Wyandotte County. There the father died 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 601 

in 1859, and for a number of years thereafter the members of the lit- 
tle household suffered many hardships and privations. In the mean- 
time Jerome H. Lones managed to attend the local public schools and 
gained the rudiments of an education. At the age of sixteen he left 
home, and spent several months as a corn husker near Watseka, Illinois, 
hut in the ensuing spring returned home and looked after the opera- 
tion of the old homestead during the next season. However, he could 
not content himself with the narrow horizon of an Ohio farm, and it 
was through a better education that he could see the vista of greater 
opportunities opening before him. By economy and hard work he 
managed to pay his way for three years in the Northern Ohio College 
at Ada, where he showed special proficiency and gained honors in 
mathematics. While in college his mother died, and not long after- 
wards he had to determine his future location. There were two forces 
that appealed to him, either to gain a place as a bank cashier with its 
consequent possibilities, or to engage in railroad service. Before he 
could make a beginning in either career he needed business training, 
and consequently taught school and with the earnings of that work 
and with some money which he borrowed paid his way through the 
long course at the Iron City Business College at Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. Then during another season at home, when he dug ditches and 
husked corn, he was finally able to attempt the realization of his 
dreams. He went to Fort Wayne, made application for employment 
with the Pennsylvania Company, but he was promptly refused owing 
to his lack of knowledge of telegi-aphy. Undoubtedly one of the quali- 
ties which enabled him to succeed was a persistency in the face of dis- 
couragement. Turned back at one point, he applied for another line 
of work, and finally went on the road as a freight brakeman. After 
thirteen months he was given employment in the freight office as a 
clerk, and was promoted to assistant cashier. Then, having demon- 
strated his capabilities and his reliability, he came to Warsaw in 1883 
as station agent. This position he ever afterward held, with credit to 
himself and satisfaction to his company, and while nominally his du- 
ties were the same, the responsibilities grew with the growth and de- 
velopment of the city and its importance as a traffic center. 

Unlike many men in the railroad service who are content to isolate 
themselves from the community which they serve and become merely a 
cog in the routine of the corporation which employs them, Mr. Lones 
from the first identified himself with local citizenship. For yeai-s he 
contributed from his means and his experience to the aid of all worthy 
enterprises undertaken in Warsaw. He was one of the organizers of 
the modern Commercial Club. He also helped in the organization and 
was one of the principal stockholders and vice president of the Indi- 
ana Loan and Trust Company. In polities he was always identified 
with the republican party. Fraternally he was a thirty-second degree 
Scottish Rite ]\Iason and a Knight Templar, and also a member of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. For his helpmate through life he was 
fortunate in the selection of Miss Jennie Logan, of Fort Waj^ne, whom 
he married in 1878. 

^Ir. Lones continued in the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad 



602 HISTOKT OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Company until the date of his death, which occurred very suddenly, 
after less than a week's sickness, on September 7, 1917. His memory 
is respected and his death was mourned by the entire community. 

He was laid away by the Knight Templars and his funeral was 
largely attended by the citizens of Warsaw and representatives of the 
Pennsj'lvania Railroad Company from all stations on the western divi- 
sion. 

Charlie A. Ht'ghs. One of the oldest families of Kosciusko 
County is that of Hughs, which located here over eighty years ago. 
The Hughs famih^ came to Indiana when it was a territory, more than 
a century ago. 

A splendid farm in Prairie Township, long owned by this family, is 
now under the capable management and supervision of Charlie A. 
Hughs, who is not only a general farmer but a breeder and shipper of 
livestock, and as such is well known all over this part of the state. He 
was born on the farm where he now lives September 10, 1879, son of 
John W. and Prudence (Wallace) Hughs. John W. Hughs was born 
in Prairie Township .January 11, 1851, a son of the original settler here. 
Prudence Wallace was born in Kosciusko County July 6, 1854. The 
parents since their marriage have lived on the old homestead in Prai- 
■rie Township. John W. Hughs is a republican voter. Of their two 
children one died at the age of three years. 

Charlie A. Hughs has always lived at home, and was well educated 
in the common schools and a business college at Warsaw. That he has 
more than ordinary- responsibilities is manifest in the fact that he 
super\-ises the farming of 287 acres and looks after a large number of 
livestock. He pereonally owns 46i/'2 acres. 

July 11, 1907, Mr. Hughs married Edith Kimes, a native of Plain 
Township of this county, ilr. and Mrs. Hughs attend the Jlethodist 
Episcopal Church. He is a republican and is affiliated with St. Leon 
Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. 

James Whitney Parker has lived in Kosciusko County most of his 
life, and out of his experiences as a worker and farmer has accumu- 
lated one of the most elTective farm estates in Tippecanoe Township, his 
postoflfiee being North Webster. His farm is three miles southeast of 
that village. 

Mr. Parker was born near Lima in Allen County, Ohio, December 
12, 1855. His parents were J. W. and Elizabeth (Lippencott) Parker. 
The grandfather, Sylvester Parker, was a native of England, and at 
the age of twenty-one he and his brother Herman Parker came to the 
United States and settled in Seneca County, New York. They married 
sisters, Sylvester marrying Elizabeth Harper, who was also a native 
of England. They became the parents of seven children, J. W., Elias, 
Martin. Silas, Jason, Cerenus and ^Martha. 

J. W. Parker was born in Seneca County, New York, November 22, 
1822. When a young man he went to Allen County, Ohio, married 
there, and in 1863 brought his family to Kosciusko County. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Lippencott, daughter of Joseph and Eliza J. (Bland) 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 603 

Lippencott. Eliza J. Bland was a native of Virginia and daughter of 
a slave owner. Joseph Lippencott and wife moved to Allen County, 
Ohio, where the.v lived until his death and his widow spent her last 
years in Kosciusko County. J. W. Parker and wife had twelve 
children including : Sylvenus, deceased : Joseph, who was in the 
"West ; Hayman, of LaGrange County, Indiana ; James W. ; Mary, 
wife of Henry Lentz; Sabrina, Anna and Emma, all deceased and 
Albert of Starke County, Indiana. 

James Whitney Parker was eight years old when his parents came 
to Kosciusko Coiinty. and here he grew up, attending the district 
schools in winter and working on the farm in summer. On March 22, 
1885, he married Miss Ada A. Dorsey. Mrs. Parker was born in Darke 
County, Ohio. November 22. 1863, daughter of William and Martha 
J. (Coppeias) Dorsey. Her father was a native of Maryland and her 
mother of Ohio. Mrs. Parker was two years old when her parents came 
to Kosciusko County, where she grew up and received a district school 
education. Mr. and Mi-s. Parker have four children : Lulu JI., born 
in MRrch, 1886, is the wife of Vern Gross, of Turkey Creek Township ; 
Roy is married and lives in Tippecanoe Township ; Ray is a graduate 
of the common schools and is now a wireless operator in the United 
States Navy : Edna M. is the wife of Robert Twants. 

Mr. Parker is a republican voter. As a farmer he gives active su- 
perintendence to the management of his sevent_y-six acres and is one 
of the large producers of agricultural crops in this county. He is also 
one of the Kosciusko County citizens who have made a profitable busi- 
ness out of commercial poultry growing. Mr. and Mrs. Parker are 
clever and obliging people and stand high socially in their community. 

C. F. Starner. In these critical modern times it is results that 
count, and the principal contributory factor toward getting results is 
intelligently directed work. Kosciu.sko County ranks high among 
Indiana's counties as an agricultural center, and one of the men who 
has long carried a goodly share of respon.sibilities in this field is "Sir. 
C. F. Starner, one of the progressive and up-to-date farmers of Plain 
Township. His farm is a mile northeast of Leesburg. 

Mr. Starner was born in Plain Township July 25, 1875, son of 
George and Elizabeth (Fisher) Starner. His parents are still resi- 
dents of the county and represent old time families here. 

Mr. C. F. Starner was reared on a farm, had a district school edu- 
cation, and at the age of seventeen left the parental roof to find work 
on hisown responsibility. He worked at any employment that offered 
an opportunity to earn an honest living, and for some four or five 
years was connected with a threshing outfit. Later he bought his first 
land and has thriftily improved his place until he now has a well ar- 
ranged farm of 145 acres. Mr. Starner married Miss Viola Noel. They 
have a family of seven daughters : Lucy, a graduate of high school ; 
Cecil, who is a student in high school ; and Rilla, Hazel, Pauline, Mary 
and Florence. Mr. Starner is a democrat in politics. 



604 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Manpord Morris. While his efforts for a number of years have 
been concentrated upon the management of his farm and stocl^ ranch 
in Turkey Creek Township, Manford Morris is a man of varied inter- 
ests, is a stockholder in several banks and other concerns, and belongs 
to one of the pioneer families of Indiana. 

He was born in Noble County of this state February 12, 1871, a son 
of Andrew J. and Lavina (Morrow) Morris. His father was bom in 
Preble County, Ohio, November 6, 1828, and is still living at the vener- 
able age of ninety. The grandfather, Biven Morris, was a pioneer of 
Kosciusko County. He moved his family from Preble to Darke County, 
Ohio, in 1834, and in 1838 came into the wilderness of Kosciusko 
County and located in Turkey Creek Township. Biven Morris had the 
distinction of being the fii-st trustee chosen to office in that township. 
He entered a hundred acres of government land in section 2, and lived 
there until 1880. Biven ]\Ion-is and wife had the following children ; 
Lucinda, Andrew J., Isaac, John, Tolman, Barbara and Nancy. 

Andrew J. Morris grew to maturity in Kosciusko Countj' and later 
went out to Iowa where he married March 20, 1858. He brought his 
wife back to Indiana and settled on a farm in Noble County, one mile 
east from the homestead, where they lived together fifty-nine years. 
January 20, 1917, Lavina, his wife, died at the age of eighty years. 
She was a pioneer of Noble County, born near Ligonier December 22, 
1836. She moved with her parents to Iowa in 1852, living there six 
years. Mr. Morris served as county commissioner of Noble County 
from 1900 to 1904. He and his wife had four children : J. C. Morris, 
a farmer in Noble County; Mary J., wife of J. F. Eagles of Noble 
County ; Sherman, also a Noble County farmer ; and Manford. 

Manford Morris grew up on his father's farm in Noble County and 
was educated in the district schools. He lived at home for a number 
of years and on September 28, 1905, married Vada F. Sloan, daughter 
of Jonathan and Sarah S. Sloan. She moved with her parents to Kos- 
ciusko County in 1875. They have two children: Arthur J., born 
January 6, 1909 ; and Marjorie Frances, who was born December 15, 
1913, died August 10, 1917. 

Mr. Morris' fann comprises 148 acres. It is a highly cultivated 
place and is especially well known as the home of some high grade 
Poland China hogs and Shorthorn cattle, in the breeding of which 
he has been very successful. Mr. Morris is a stockholder in the Sparta 
State Bank at Cromwell, Indiana, and is also a stockholder in a busi- 
ness at Lebanon and is a member of the Farmers' Shipping Associa- 
tion. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Cromwell and was a charter member of Cromwell Lodge No. 408, 
Knights of Pj'thias, and served as chancellor and a member of the 
Grand Lodge. Politically he is a republican and was formerly a mem- 
ber of the Township Advisory Board. 

John Jones. It has been observed that the happiest nations are 
those without history, and it is true of individuals as well. Some 
of those who are most useful to themselves and their fellow men, 
living their lives most simply and with utmost faithfulness to their 



HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 605 

duties and responsibilities, figure in few of the conspicuous and ab- 
normal events which are so often celebrated in the newspaper col- 
umns. 

This was all true of the late John Jones, one of the kindliest and 
best citizens of Seward Township. John Jones died at his home in 
that township February 26, 1918, aged eighty-one years, eleven 
months and twenty days. His farm, two miles southwest of Burket, 
had been his home continuously for over half a eentur3^, his work 
and sacrifice counted most in its improvement, and there he reared 
his children, and with obligations all fulfilled he bore his last long 
illness with Christian fortitude until the end. 

He was bom in Coshocton County, Ohio, ilarch 8, 1836, a son 
of Samuel and Patsy Jones. In 1863 he came to Indiana with his 
brother Samuel Jones, and from that time forward Kosciusko County 
was his home. His parents spent most of their lives in Ohio. His 
father wa.s a native of Ohio and his mother of Marj'land. His father 
died in 1854 and his mother in 1869. 

]\Iareh 16, 1865, John Jones married Miss Nancy Hire, member 
of one of the oldest prominent families of Kosciusko County. Her 
parents were Rudolph and Hannah (Linsey) Hire, the former a 
native of Ross County, Ohio, and the latter of Fayette County, 
Ohio. Rudolph Hire and wife were married in Kosciusko County, 
and then for a j-ear lived in Elkhart County, after which they re- 
turned to a farm in Franklin Township of this county. Mrs. Jones' 
father died at Burket in April, 1889. Her mother died at the home 
of Mrs. Jones in April, 1909. There were eleven children in the 
Hire family, and the four now living are : Isaac B. ; Lillie, wife of 
Charles C. Eggleston, of California ; Alfred, a resident of Warsaw ; 
and Mrs. Jones. 

Mrs. Jones was reared on her father's farm in this county and 
was educated in the common schools. She still lives on the old Jones 
farm in Seward Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones had eight children: Clement A., who mar- 
ried Mary Cook, and lives in Franklin Township ; Lugarda R., un- 
married; Milton E., who married Jennie "Wilson and lives in Harri- 
son Township ; Charles H., who married Stella Warren, and lives 
at Burket; Rudolph G., who married Bessie Kesecker, and lives on 
the old homestead; Myrtle, wife of George W. Dickey, of Harrison 
Township; Vernon, who married Rohad Mollinhour of Franklin 
TowTiship ; and Neva G., who was born March 6, 1892, and still lives 
with her mother. 

Mrs. Jones is a devout member of the United Brethren church at 
Burket. Mr. Jones was converted to that faith in early manhood, 
and lived an exemplary Christian life for forty-three years. He 
was a democrat in politics. 

Besides her own children. ]\Irs. Jones is comforted in her declin- 
ing years by the presence of eighteen grandchildren and also four 
great-grandchildren, besides many relatives and the hosts of friends 
who esteem it a privilege to be accorded a place in the friendship o' 
this kindly old lady. 



606 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Percy M. Bergen. Any locality or section is benefited by the in- 
troduction of pro^essive useful enterprise from other regions. With- 
out such admixture of other ideas and other methods any community 
is bound to stand still. 

One of Kosciusko County's leading stock farmers and feeders is 
Percy M. Bergen, who came to this county from Iowa, where his father 
has long been prominent in the stock feeding business and every year 
sends cattle to the market by the train load. His father is owner of 
extensive tracts of land in Iowa, and it was in that state that Perc3- M. 
Bergen acquired his practical knowledge of farming and stock 
husbandry. 

Mr. Bergen was born in Benton County, Iowa, March 20, 1890, son 
of William and Blanche (MartjTi) Bergen. He was reared on the 
home farm, educated in common schools, and in 1907, entered Winona 
College in Indiana, where he was graduated in 1911. Having a thirst 
for adventure, he then enlisted in the Coast Artillery Service of the 
United States Army and is now a retired army man with a creditable 
record of three years' sei-viee and an honorable discharge. After leav- 
ing the anny Jlr. Bergen came to Kosciusko County and bought the 
farm where he now lives on route No. 6 in Wayne Township. He has 
109 acres, and is following the practice of buying cattle and hogs in 
Chicago and feeding them for market. 

Mr. Bergen married Olive Mitterling, who was born in Kosciusko 
County and is also a graduate of Winona School. They have two 
children, ]\Iar.y and Jeanne. Mr. and ]\Irs. Bergen are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Charlie H. Hapner has been a well to do citizen of Kosciusko 
County through his continued enterprise spread over a period of years 
as a farmer. The farm which he now owns and which has become so 
productive and profitable under his management is the place where he 
spent his early life, known as the old Hapner farm in section 2 of 
Monroe Township, a mile and a half south and three-quarters of a mile 
west of Pierceton, on the rural route No. 3. 

Mr. Hapner was born there IMarch 6, 1879, son of Henry C. and 
Janette S. (Weston) Hapner. Henry C. Hapner was born in Mont- 
gomeiy County, Ohio, October 13, 1831, and died August 11, 1915, at 
the advanced age of eighty-four. He was a pioneer of Kosciusko 
County, having located in Jackson Towniship in September, 1839. 
After coming to the county some years later he married for his first 
wife Sarah Zimmerman. In 1863 he moved to Monroe Township, and 
here his first wife died. Their children were Jacob, Anna M., George, 
Nancy C, Elmer, Nathan, Cyrus and Harrison. Henry C. Hapner 
by his second wife had .iust one child, Charlie H. The mother of 
Charlie H. Hapner was bom in Moni'oe Township and spent all her life 
there. She died March 10, 1913. She was a member of the Disciples 
Church at Salem. Henry C. Hapner was a farmer all his life, and at 
the same time operated extensively as a thresherman and saw miller. 

Charlie H. Hapner grew up on the old farm, and attended school in 
District No. 10 in Washington Township. On October 8, 1898, he 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 607 

married Miss Etta J. Clouse, who was born in ^Monroe Township No- 
vember 2, 1880, daughter of Lewis and Ann (Idle) Clouse. Her father 
was born in Monroe Township May 18, 1848, and died September 5, 
1914. Her mother was born in Champaign County, Ohio, August 14, 
1842, and died June 3, 1912, having been brought to Kosciusko County 
at the age of sixteen. Both Mr. and Mrs. Clouse were active in the 
Christian Church. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hapner located upon the farm 
where they have managed so industriously and have been so successful 
in accumulating those things which make life comfortable and happy. 
They have one daughter, Mildred M., born ilarch 9, 1902. She gradu- 
ated from the common schools at the age of fourteen and is now a stu- 
dent in the Pierceton High School. The family are members of the 
Christian Church and have done much to sustain the various church 
activities. Mr. Hapner is a republican but his citizenship has been 
of the quiet kind, evidenced chiefly in voting and in doing his part un- 
officially to support wise and well considered community enterprises. 

William Shand is a native of Scotland, has lived in America 
nearly half a century and has exemplified all the sturdy and keen traits 
of his native land. He has been a successful farmer and is rated as one 
of the men of achievement, intelligence and fine citizenship in Monroe 
Township, where for a number of years he has owned a good farm com- 
prising the northwest quarter of section 1 7. 

His birth occurred in Forfarshire, Scotland, March 10, 1846, and 
his parents, William and Elizabeth (Smith) Shand, spent most of 
their lives in Scotland, but in 1872 came to tlm United States and lo- 
cated at Troy, Missouri, where the father died. The mother passed 
away in Indiana. 

Mr. Shand grew to maturity in his native land, and attended 
schools to the age of fourteen. After that he worked and had a good 
deal of experience in making his own way in the world before he set 
out for America in 1869. For a number of years Mr. Shand was a 
resident of Missouri. He married there on October 10, 1872, Miss 
Namev Pressley. She was bom September 12, 1856, ten miles from 
Troy. Missouri, in Lincoln County, and was reared and educated there. 
For five years after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Shand continued to 
live in Missouri on a rented farm. In 1877 they came to Indiana and 
were residents at Goodland for thirteen years. They moved in 1903 
to IMonroe Township of Kosciusko County and bought the fine farm of 
180 acres where they now reside and where they have been prospered 
abundantly. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shand have two sons, Frank, born March 1, 1874, 
lives in Montana and married Gertrude Goldsbury. William A., born 
June 4. 1893, is married and lives in Indiana. The family are niembers 
of the Presbyterian Church and Mr. Shand is a republican. 

Orange H. Bowman. Among the substantial people of Kosciusko 
County with whom industry has been the keynote of their lives a fam- 
ily of special interest is that of Orange H. Bowman. jMr. Bowman has 



608 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

spent nearly all his life in Kosciusko County, and for a number of- 
years was a very successful and talented teacher. He is now pro- 
prietor of the Stony Brook Farm in Monroe Township near Pierceton, 
and is performing that service which means so much in this present 
critical time, supplying a large quantity of pure milk to the community 
of Pierceton. 

Mr. Bowman was born in ]\Ionroe Township of Kosciusko County 
December 10, 1868, a son of Thomas and Eliza (Vandegrift) Bowman. 
His parents were bom and reared and married in Stark County, 
Ohio, and in 1868 moved to Kosciusko County, Indiana, where they 
spent the rest of their lives. They had six children. 

Orange H. Bowman was reared on a farm in Monroe Township, 
had a common school education, and afterwards graduated from the 
State Normal School and has a life certificate as a teacher. He did 
some fine work in the schoolroom both as a teacher and school adminis- 
trator, and at one time was superintendent of the ]Mentone and South 
"Whitley schools. While his abilities were such as to justify his re- 
maining in the educational profession, his hearing became impaired 
and he had to abandon that vocation for farming. The Stony Brook 
Farm comprises 133 acres a mile and a half from Pierceton in Monroe 
Township. It is the home of a herd of fine Jersey cattle and ilr. Bow- 
man has shown as much vigor and ability in managing his dairs- farm 
as he formerly did in educational work. His farm largely supplies the 
town of Pierceton with pure milk. 

Mr. Bowman has six children : Emily, a graduate of the Illinois 
University ; Thomas, a graduate of the local high school ; Eva, also a 
high school graduate,' and now in training in Chicago for a nurse ; and 
Agnes, Philip and David, who are still in school. ]\Ir. Bowman is 
affiliated with the ilasonic Lodge and the Eastern Star, and in politics 
is a republican. 

EsTON E. McClintic has been a factor in the good citizenship of 
Kosciusko County for a number of years and at Syracuse his business 
has been as a contractor in the manufacture and handling of cement 
products. He lias done much cement construction of all types, and his 
contracts cover a wide area around Syracuse. It is a very successful 
business and he is a man of such experience and ability as to carry 
out fully and in detail every contract he undertakes. 

He represents a family that has been in Kosciusko Count.v for 
three generations. ]\Ir. McClintic was born in Turkey Creek Town- 
ship July 12, 1875, a son of John and Lydia (Koher) McClintic. His 
grandfather, Eston McClintic. came to Kosciusko County more than 
eighty years ago and developed a homestead from the midst of the 
wilderness. John ^IcClintic was bom in Turkey Creek Township 
February 7, 1837. Lydia Koher was born ;\Iarch 19, 1849. They mar- 
ried September 20, 1874, and then began housekeeping at the old 
ilcClintic farm and homestead. John ]McClintic acquired that prop- 
erty and he and his wife spent their years on it. He was an active 
member of the United Brethren Church and a democrat in politics. 
There were four sons in the family : Eston E. ; Charles F., bora Oc- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 609 

tober 28, 1876 ; Martin V., bom July 14, 1878, and now representing 
the third generation of the family to live on the old homestead; and 
John C, born February 22, 1885, lost his life by accident December 
30, 1894. 

Eston E. McClintic grew up on the home farm and attended dis- 
trict school until the age of fourteen. He then started to make his own 
way in the world and for a time was a farm laborer at wages of 
ten dollars a month. On February 8, 1896, he married Miss Blanch 
M., a daughter of Daniel and Rebecca Angel Searfoss. Mrs. McClintic 
was born in Turkej'^ Creek Township November 13, 1880. Her father 
was born in Pennsylvania March 2, 1849, and her mother in Turkey 
Creek Township in 1853. Both are still living. 

Mr. and Mi-s. McClintic have five children: John B.,,born Sep- 
tember 6, 1896, married Velma Poppenfos ; Harry D., born February 
3, 1901; Elizabeth, born January 7, 1909; Charles born March 20, 
1913; James W., born June 12, 1915. The family are members of the 
United Brethren Church and Mr. McClintic is trustee of the par- 
sonage. He is affiliated with Syracuse Lodge No. 454, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, and the Royal Arch Chapter No. 124. He has always 
taken a keen interest in local ai?airs, and is considered one of the men 
of influence in the democratic party in his section of the county. 

Jonas H. Allsbaugh has been one of the useful citizens in Kosci- 
usko County for many years. The medium through which he has given 
his most productive service is as a farmer and stockman. Mr. Alls- 
baugh 's home farm is in section 16 of Jackson Township, three and 
one half miles north of Manchester and four and one half miles south- 
west of Sidney. Besides his eighty acres there he has eighty acres just 
over the Wabash County line in Chester Township. What he has today 
he has made largely through his industry and thrifty energy, and has 
never asked for opportunities and privileges that were not open to 
every other man. Mr. Allsbaugh has made something of a specialty 
of the breeding of Duroc hogs. He was born in Montgomery County, 
Ohio, October 20, 1863, a son of John and Rebecca (Horning) Alls- 
baugh. His father was born at Berne, Switzerland, and came to the 
United States when about twenty-five years of age. He had worked at 
and learned the trade of miller in the old country, and though paid ex- 
ceedingly meager wages he saved enough to bring himself and a brother 
to the United States. He first located at Cincinnati, Ohio, and en- 
gaged in the dairy business, but soon lost all he had in that venture. 
From there he moved to Montgomery County, and found employment 
on a farm at eight dollars a month. A few years later his wages were 
raised to $100 a year, and he eventually married the daughter of his 
employer. She was a native of Pennsylvania. They rented a farm 
for a time and eventually they left Ohio, and started on a journey 
across country with wagons and teams bound for Kansas. The little 
property he had he traded for forty acres of Kansas land, but later 
returned to Indiana and settled three miles southeast of North Man- 
chester. Later he rented another farm, and finally bought eighty 
acres and on that homestead spent the rest of his life. He and his 



610 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

wife were members of the Progressive Dunkard Church. There are 
six children: Edwin, a farmer five and one half miles southeast of 
North Manchester ; Jonas H. ; Martha, wife of Elmont Kosher, of 
North Manchester; Emma, unmarried; Ella, wife of T. E. Reed, of 
Hope, Indiana ; and Delia, unmarried and living at Akron, Ohio. 

Jonas H. Allsbaugh grew up on his father's farm in Wabash 
Comity, attended the district schools there, and at the age of twenty 
started out for himself. Like his father he also worked by the month 
on farms, and earned his living in that way for five years. 

December 28, 1887, Mr. Allsbaugh married Miss Nancy D. Scholl. 
She was born in LaGrange County, Indiana, June 10, 1866, and was a 
small girl when her parents moved to Wabash County, where she 
grew up and received her ediieation in the district schools. They have 
two children : Verling R., a graduate of the common schools "and is 
now running the old Allsbaugh farm in Wabash County. He married 
Lydia Heater. Orin K., tlie second son, is a graduate of the local 
schools, attended high school, and is now in the Great Lakes Naval 
Training Station at Chicago. 

The Allsbaugh family are active members of the Antioch Christian 
Church. Politically he is a republican. 

John S. Vanderveer is a sterling representative of the agricultural 
interests of Kosciusko County, and in his work lias exemplified 
many of the careful, industrious and methodical traits of the people 
of Holland, of which countrj' he is a native. 

]\Ir. Vanderveer was born in Holland June 22, 1869, a son of Se- 
brant and Gertrude (Gilstraa) Vanderveer. These honest Dutch par- 
ents brought their family to America in 1871, seeking better opportuni- 
ties for them, and located in Elkhart County. The mother died there 
October 22, 1873, and the father aftei-wards moved to Kosciusko 
County and died here in 1907. Thej- had five children, two of whom 
died in Holland. The two stilU living besides John S. are Richard, 
a lawyer and a member of the Warsaw bar, and Edith, wife of John 0. 
Sheets of Elkhart County. 

John S. Vanderveer was two years old when brought to America 
and he has no conscious recollections of his native land. He grew 
up on a farm, was educated in the common schools, and from early life 
has been dependent upon his own resources. The prosperity he has 
accumulated is the result of his energy- and the eft'ective co-operation 
of his good wife. His home comprises eighty acres of good land in 
section 2 of Jefferson Township. 

Mr. Vanderveer married Elizabeth Brown, who died leaving no 
children. For his second wife he married Ella Overholt, and they have 
two children living and one dead, Howard R., who was born in 1909, 
and died in 1910. The two living are Merrill 0., born in 1911, and 
Verda Maree, born in 1914. Mrs. Vanderveer is an active church 
member, and in polities Mr. Vanderveer votes as a democrat. 

Conrad D. Longenecker. The position which Conrad D. Longe- 
necker has occupied during the last five years as county clerk of Kos- 



HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 611 

ciusko County is in the nature of a consistent tribute not only to his 
individual and personal qualifications for that office, but also to the 
high standing of the Longenecker family, which has been identified 
with this section of Northern Indiana for more than sixty years, and 
has exemplified some of the best virtues of manhood and good citizen- 
ship. 

The old Longenecker homestead was near North "Webster, and it 
was on the farm there that Conrad D. Longenecker was born March 18, 
1859. He was one of four children, and all of them are still livina:. 
Their parents were Isaac and Sarah (Brumbaugh) Longenecker, early 
representatives of that sterling stock of early settlers known as German 
Baptists or Dunkards. Isaac Longenecker, who was born in Juniata 
County, Pennsylvania, came to Kosciusko County in 1852, bringing 
with him his wife and two children. He settled in Tippecanoe Town- 
ship and while living there accumulated a fine farm and en.ioyed the 
best of reputation among his fellow men. He had grown up im- 
pressed by the teachings of honesty, truthfulness and industry, prac- 
ticed those qiialities all his life, and was a lover of country and mani- 
fested a deep veneration for the Almighty. He took no active part in 
politics but gave his life to his home and to the endeavors in which 
he was successful to provide liberally and wisely for his loved ones. 
His death occurred January 24, 1888, while his widow passed away 
January 21, 1906. When the Longenecker family came to Kosciusko 
County much of the land was still wild and unimproved, and Isaac 
Longenecker deserves credit for bringing a large number of acres 
from the dominion of the wilderness into fruitful crops. 

Not all the hard work had been accomplished on the old homestead 
when Conrad D. Longenecker grew to years where his work could be 
utilized. Almost as far back as he could remember he was employed at 
some task on the home farm, and his early education was limited to 
winter terms of the district schools. He lived at home with his parents 
until the age of twenty-five and had in that time learned and thor- 
oughly practiced the principles of honest.v, industry and thrift upon 
which he has relied for his advancement through the world. 

On November 20, 1884, he married ^liss Amanda Stull, whose peo- 
ple were among the earliest settlers of Elkhart County. After his 
marriage Mr. Longenecker took up farming on his own responsibilities 
and combined that with the carpenter trade, which he learned and in 
which he became skillful as a young man. From his farm he was 
called into the county seat of Warsaw by his election to the office of 
county clerk in 1910, and has now given five years of much appre- 
ciated service in that office. He still owns eighty acres of farming 
land, and is one of the county's highly successful and popular citizens. 

In politics he is a republican, and he and his wife are members of 
the Progressive Dunkard Church. Not least among his distinctions is 
the fine family of children whom he and his wife have brought into the 
world and have endeavored to give the best of training and advantages. 
Their names are : Charles I. ; Beatrice, Mrs. I. C. Harbaugh ; William 
R. ; Rose ; Claude M. ; Chester M. ; Opal ; Fern ; and Gerald H. 



612 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Robert C. Irwin is a member of the Irwin family that has been 
identified with Kosciusko County for over half a ceuturj- and his own 
life, beginning at manhood without capital, has been made effective 
through his energy and industry, so that he has been able to provide 
his family with the comforts of a good farm and home. His farm is in 
Prairie Township on rural route No. 5 and eight miles northwest of 
Warsaw. 

Mr. Irwin was born in Logan County, Ohio, June 11, 1851, son of 
Stewart and Sarah A. (Richie) Irwin. The parents were both natives 
of Ireland. His mother came to the United States at the age of nine- 
teen, and his father when a young man. After their man-iage they 
lived on a farm six miles northwest of Bellefontaine in Logan County, 
Ohio, until 1856, and then brought their family to Kosciusko County. 
In Washington To^vnship near Wooster they bought 160 acres, but 
sold that in 1863 and for a year owned a place of 160 acres near North 
Webster. Selling this, the family settled in Prairie Township April 4, 
1864, and that was the home of the parents the rest of their years. 
Stewart Irwin died in Harrison Township and his wife passed awaj- 
October 12, 1917. He was a republican in politics. Their children 
still living are as follows: Robert C; John R., a farmer north of At- 
wood ; William G., who also lives north of Atwood ; Sarah, wife of 
Frank Harmon ; James S., whose home is in Wisconsin ; and Sherman 
C, of Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

Robert C. Irwin spent his boyhood from the age of five years in 
Washington, Tippecanoe and Prairie townships of this county, and 
during the winter terms attended the neighboring district schools. He 
was well prepared for the responsibilities of life by training at home, 
but when on October 25, 1873, he married Ellen J. Bradley he had no 
capital that would suffice for an independent existence. Therefore, 
they adapted themselves to circumstances and began housekeeping in 
a log building. He worked at anything that he could find, rented land, 
and by much work and thrift accumulated the means which enabled 
him to buy sixt.y acres of the land where he now lives. 

^Irs. Irwin died July 24, 1893. She was the mother of seven chil- 
dren, five of whom are still living: Clark W., a graduate of the common 
and high schools, married C. Hawley, a graduate of high school ; 
Charles W., who is married and lives in Wisconsin ; Thomas C. un- 
married and at home: Howard, who is married and lives in North 
Dakota ; Fay, wife of Frank Huffer of Prairie Township. Mr. Irwin 
is a member of the Ancient Order of Gleaners, and has been satisfied 
merely to vote as a republican without aspirations for public office. 

A. H. Brown is one of the live and highly successful business men 
of Leesburg. He came to Kosciusko County in 1890, being at that 
time a young man of twenty-seven years who, however, had never 
accumulated any money as a result of his varied experiences and hard 
work. He continued his hard working plan after coming to the county, 
helped operate a threshing machine outfit, but laid the foundation of 
his real success by using his experience and native ability as a trader. 
Mr. Brown is regarded by his frieiids and associates as almost infalli- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 613 

ble in his business judgment, and the large amount of property he 
has amassed is proof that his friends are well justified in making the 



He is one of the leading farmers around Leesburg and is still 
extensively engaged in real estate. Mr. Brown owns a 540-acre farm 
in Plain township, has 200 acres in Wayne Township, owns a large 
amount of valuable property in Turkey Creek Township, and has a big 
business as a hardware and building material merchant at Leesburg. 
He also owns a section of land in North Dakota. 

He was born in Carroll County, Indiana, October 12, 1853, son of 
Thomas and Charlotte (Wells) Brown. His father was born in Ha- 
gerstown, Maryland, while the mother was a native of Dayton, Ohio, 
and they married in that state. On moving to Indiana they located 
in Carroll County and spent their last years in Cass County, Mich- 
igan, where they died. His father was a farmer and the mother was 
active in the United Brethren Church. Of the nine children only 
four are still living : Jennie, widow of Loren Moody ; Lucy, widow 
of William Van Norman ; William H., a resident of Dowagiac, Mich- 
igan ; and A. H. Brown. 

Mr. A. H. Brown married Miss Fannie Ni.xon. They had one 
daughter, Ilah M., who is a graduate of the Leesburg High School and 
is the wife of F. D. Irwin. Mr. Brown lost his wife in 1885, and now 
lives with his daughter. He is affiliated with the Elks Lodge at War- 
saw and in polities is a republican. 

Calvin A. Poor. The name of Calvin A. Poor is familiar among 
the agriculturists of Kosciusko County as belonging to one of its most 
industrious citizens and a man who occupies a high position in busi- 
ness circles. He has been the architect of his own fortune, having 
made his owa way in the world from a modest beginning, and has 
proven a fine example of the beneficial results of patient industry, a 
wise economy and well-directed judgment. While he is practically 
retired from active affairs, having passed the age of three score and 
ten years, he is still interested in the advancement and prosperity of 
his community, in which practically all of his life has been passed, and 
the growth and development of which he has watched and fostered. 

Mr. Poor was born in Jackson County, Ohio, September 13, 1844, 
and is a son of John and Sabina (Crarey) Poor, his grandfather being 
Hugh Poor, who died in the Buckeye State. John Poor was born in 
Ohio in 1810, and in early life learned the trade of shoemaker, which 
time-honored vocation he followed during his early years. However, 
he decided that agriculture offered better opportunities for success, 
and accordingly, in 1847, he gathered together his possessions, and 
with his family came to Kosciusko County, settling on a farm in the 
near vicinity of Warsaw. Here he labored faithfully and indus- 
triously to such good purpose that he accumulated 240 acres of land, 
which iie improved with good farm structm-es, and which was his home 
at the time of his death, in 1894. While Mr. Poor was not what would 
be termed a scholar at this time, he was fairly well read and educated 
for his day, and his sterling qualities of character fully made up for 



614 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

auy book learning which he might have lacked. He was a faithful 
member of the ilethodist Episcopal Church and took an active and 
helpful part in its work, as did also his wife, and his children were 
reared in that faith. Mr. Poor was a republican, but not a politician, 
while his fraternal affiliation was with the Masons. While still a 
resident of Ohio Mr. Poor was married to Miss Sabina Crarey, who 
was born in Virginia, in 1814, and died at the age of seventy years in 
Kosciusko County, and they became the parents of eight children, of 
whom five are living, as follows: Mary, who is the widow of Eli 
Hayden and resides in the State of Oregon ; David, who is engaged 
in agricultural operations in Kosciusko County ; Calvin A. ; Susanna, 
who is the wife of Mr. Pike and lives on the old homestead ; and Ellen, 
who is Mrs. Rudolph Huffer, and also lives on the old famil.v place. 

Calvin A. Poor received his education in the country schools of 
Kosciusko County, and like other farmers' sons of his day and locality 
when not employed with his books was expected to devote himself to 
the cultivation of the homestead land. He grew to manhood with the 
ambition and determination to become a good farmer, and remained 
under the training of his father until long after he had reached his 
majority. Mr. Poor established a home of his own at the time of his 
marriage, in 1875, to Miss Mary 0. Stinson, who was born in Kos- 
ciusko County, Indiana, daughter of John W. Stinson, one of the early 
settlers of this county, who still resides here at an advanced age. 

Mr. Poor came to his present property in 1885, and during thirty 
years has brought about many changes. He has a full set of commo- 
dious, modern buildings, equipped with every implement for the expe- 
ditious and thorough cultivation of the soil, and during the period 
of his active career devoted himself principally to general farming, 
raising corn, wheat, oats and hay. This eighty-acre farm, one of the 
most valuable of its size in the locality, is now being rented, Mr. Poor 
having practically retired from active life. He is a republican in his 
political views, and he and Mrs. Poor are faithful members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Poor's life has been a long, full 
and useful one, and he is eminently entitled to the comfort and rest 
which he now enjoys, as well as to the respect and regard of his fellow- 
citizens, among whom he has lived so long. 

Charles W. Tucker has known Kosciusko County as his home all 
his life and is junior partner of the firm Downer & Tucker, furniture 
dealers and undertakers at Claypool. 

Mr. Tucker was born in Seward Township of this county February 
26, 1873, a son of Joshua and Catherine (Hartung) Tucker. His 
father was born in Wabash Coimty, Indiana, in 1844, and served four 
years as a soldier of the Union Army, enlisting as a boy and coming 
out of the war when scarcely of age. After the war he came to Kos- 
ciusko County, married, and settled in Seward Township, and lived 
there until his death. Though he began life poor, he gave a good 
account of his abilities and services and developed a good farm 
of 120 acres. His wife was born in Pennsylvania in 1843. 
They had ten children, all of whom are still living, five sons and five 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 615 

daughters, namely: Lewis; Charles W. ; Ellis; Otis C. ; Ova E. ; Dora, 
wife of Fred McCherry; Phiella J., wife of Orville Blue; Leona, wife 
of Justin Bunner ; Zuda K. ; and Jlertie Wertenberger. 

Mr. Charles W. Tucker grew up on his father's farm and had a 
district school education. He married Miss Birdie W. Arnold, who 
was born in Claypool and was educated in the schools of that village. 
They have had six children. Merle, Clarice (deceased), Jennie, 
Chauneey, Mahlon and Eva. Mr. Tucker is a past noble grand of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He votes as a republican. Be- 
sides his business he is a stockholder in the local bank at Claypool. 

Otis C. Dick is a native of Kosciusko County, and has proved 
his worth and value to his community as a hard worker and progressive 
young business man. He is now secretary and treasurer and manager 
of the Claypool Lumber and Coal Company. 

Mr. Dick was bom in Clay Township, November 13. 1881, a son of 
Ira and Flora (Marshall) Dick, the former a native of Ohio and the 
latter of Kosciu.sko County. Tra Dick has for many years been one 
of the skillful carpenters of Clay Township. He is a democrat and a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In the family were 
two children, Otis C. and Jlattie. 

Otis C. Dick attended the village schools of Cla.ypool until finishing 
the work of the common schools, and then started out to make his own 
living and way in the world. He learned the trade oC carpenter, and 
worked at it several years. He then entered the service of a local lum- 
ber company at Claypool, and at the end of eighteen months was made 
manager. When the company was incorporated he was elected secre- 
tar.y and treasurer. 

Mr. Dick married Florence Linn. They have two children, Robert 
and Herbert. They are active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and Mr. Dick is past noble grand of Claypool Lodge, No. 515, 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has sat in the Grand 
Lodge. He is also past commander of the Knights of the 3Iaecabees. 
Politically he votes as an independent. 

Michael A. Caupfman. Though not a native son of Kosciusko 
County, Michael A. Cauffman has lived here since early childhood, and 
is a member of a family whose activities have made them during the 
last half century among the most prominent and substantial citizens 
of Clay Township. 

Mr. CaufiPman was born in ilichigan June 5, 1859, son of John and 
Eva (Sellers) Cautfman. His parents were born and married in Penn- 
sylvania, and after their marriage moved west to Michigan and lived 
in the vicinity of Niles about five years. They then came tn Clay 
township, and bought the land in section 29 where their son Michael 
now lives. John Cauffman was not only a capable farmer, but was a 
minister of the Evangelical Church, and continued preaching until 
overtaken by advanced age. He was a republican, but was satisfied 
merely to vote. He was twice married, and had four children by his 
first wife, all now deceased, and nine by the second marriage, six of 



616 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

whom are still living: Michael A.; Amelia, wife of Jacob 0. Deaton, 
of ClajTDOol ; Levi F., of Lake Township ; Nancj', wife of Richard 
Brown, of Nebraska; Pierce, roadmaster for the Big Pour Railway 
Com]:)ai).v, with headquarters at Wabash, Indiana; and John A., who 
is the present trustee of Clay Township. 

Michael A. Cauffman grew up on the farm where he now lives and 
attended the district schools until he was about thirteen years old. 
After that he lived at home and helped work the farm until twenty- 
four. 

In September, 1886, he married iliss Elizabeth Bause, who was 
born in Seward Township of this county, a daughter of George Bause. 
Alter their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Cauffman lived twelve years on a 
farm two and one half miles east of Claypool. They then moved into 
the village of Claypool and he worked there and in the vicinity until 
the spring of 1900, when he bought the old homestead, and his capable 
management of this farm of eighty-nine acres has given him his most 
solid prosperity. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cauffman have four children. Tressie B., a graduate 
of the common schools, is the wife of Eli Smith, of Clay Township. 
Elsie G., a graduate of high school and a former teacher, is now the 
wife of Lawrence Beigh, of Clay Township. Foster "\Y. is a graduate 
of the common and high schools, also taught for a time, and is now a 
farmer in Clay Township. He married Testa Arnold. Lester R., a 
graduate of high school, lives in Lake Township and married Ruth 
Garman. All of Mr. Cauffman 's children are farmei-s. He has one 
grandchild. Mr. Cauffman is a republican. 

James F. Denny settled on his present farm four and one half 
miles southeast of Claypool, in Clay Township, thirty years ago, and 
although he and his wife began as renters, they have since aeciuired the 
land and done much to develop it in value and facilities. Mr. Denny 
has not only prospered in a business way, but is father of a family 
that does him credit, and altogether the Denn.ys are people much above 
the average in education, general intelligence, and in their usefulness 
to themselves and their community. 

jMr. Denny was born on the farm that he now owns March 4, 1863, 
a son of James and Luciuda (Fisher) Denny. His father was born 
in North Carolina in 1826 and died February 22, 1867, his death being 
the result of an accident while he was loading logs. His wife was born 
in Seneca County, Ohio, in 1840, and died October 14, 1912. Both 
the Denny and Fisher families came to Indiana in early days and 
James and Lucinda were reared here, and after their marriage settled 
in Wabash County, but later moved to the farm in Clay Township 
where they spent their last years. Mi-s. Lucinda Denny was an active 
member of the Christian Church. Of their seven children five are still 
living: Emanuel F., a banker and cattle man of Nebraska; Elizabeth, 
wife of Henry Crider, living in Kansas ; Joseph, of Elkhart, Indiana ; 
James F. ; and Rosella, wife of Oscar Feigley, of Wisconsin. 

James F. Denny grew up on the old homestead and early learned 
its duties in barn and field, working industriously every summer while 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 617 

the winters were spent attending the district school. On March 10, 
1888, a few days after his twenty-fifth birthday, he married Miss 
Letti'e V. Corrall. Mrs. Denny was born in Kosciusko County and was 
educated here in the local schools. After their marriage they located 
on the farm of 120 acres which their united thrift and industry en- 
abled thcin to buy later, and here they have made their success in life 
and enjoy the esteem of an entire community. Mr. Denny is also a 
stockholder in the Packertown Elevator Company. He is independent 
in politics and his wife is a member of the United Brethren Church at 
Claypool. 

Their six children are: Roy, who is married and lives at Three 
Rivers, Michigan ; Cecil, wife of William Richardson, of South Whit- 
lev, Indiana ; Prudy, wife of George Petrie, of Clay Township ; Da- 
frema, wife of Ermon McGown, of Harrison Township; James, who 
is in the service of the United States Government in Texas ; and Sparks, 
who lives on the home farm with his father and married Clara Shull. 
Mr. and Mrs. Denny also have eight grandchildren. 

George Merkle. There seems to be no limit to what a man may 
achieve and the forces and instruments of industry he may come to 
control provided he has the proper equipment of intelligence and 
industry and directs his efforts in the right place and with sufficient 
persistency. Thus twenty-five or thirty yeai-s ago George Merkle was 
known to only a small community in his native State of Illinois as a 
hard-working tenant farmer. Nearly every one in Kosciusko County 
knows him in the role of an extensive farmer and land owner, banker 
and business man, one of the men most directly concerned and inter- 
ested in the business affaii-s of Claypool. 

l\Ir. Merkle 's home farm is three and one fourth miles southeast of 
Claypool. He was born in Iroquois County, Illinois, June 30, 1868, 
son"of Christ and Helen (Thascher) Merkle. His parents are both now 
deceased and their lives were spent as Illinois farmers. George Merkle 
grew up on a farm, had a district school education, supplemented by 
commercial and preparatory courses in the Grand Prairie Seminary, 
and his life was spent quietly at home until twenty-one. 

His marriage to Jennie Wallace, of the same county and state, 
brought him a most valued companion and coadjutor, and together 
thev have solved many of the problems and difficulties that vexed their 
progress. Mr. and Mrs. Merkle farmed on the renting plan for eight 
years. For ten years or more Mr. Merkle supplemented his earnings 
by teaching school. After realizing some capital in Illinois, he sold 
his interests and moved to some of the cheaper lands of Paulding 
County, Ohio. He was in that section about two years, and in 1907 
came to Kosciusko County, where he bought his present place of 300 
acres. Since then his business interests have reached out in various 
other directions. 

Mr. Merkle was one of the organizers and from the first has been 
president of the State Bank of Claypool. The other officers and 
directors are: J. 0. Deaton, vice president; E. W. Kinsey, cashier; 
and Leroy W. Caldwell, secretary of the Board of Directors. 



618 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Mr. Merkle is also president of the Farmers Elevator Company 
at Packertown. Levi Frnit is vice president, W. M. Reed is secretary, 
and the other directors are Samuel Smith and Ode Fisher. 

Mr. and Mrs. Merkle have five children : Roy, born in 1897 ; 
Frank, born in 1899 ; Alice, born in 1907 ; George, born in 1909 ; and 
Robert, born in 1916. Mrs. Merkle is a member of the Catholic 
Church. Mr. Merkle is affiliated with the Odd Fellows Lodge at 
Claypool. 

Jacob 0. Deaton. Clay Township, the village of Claypool, and 
all that section of Kosciusko County have in many waj's been impressed 
by the abilities and influence of ihe Deaton famil.y, who have lived 
here over half a centur\'. Few names recur more frequently in the 
annals of that locality. 

The old Deaton homestead of 200 a^^res. a mile and a half 
east of Claypool, is now owned and managed by Jacob 0. Deaton. who 
when a youth had the responsibility of helping his widowed mother 
and the other children in lifting the heavy incumbrance upon the farm, 
and after those obligations were cleared away Mr. Deaton settled down 
to a life of prosperity and vigorous agricultural management which 
continues to the present time. 

His great-grandparents were George W. and Susanna (Ream) 
Deaton. George W. Deaton was born in Botetourt County, Virginia, 
in 1785, and died in that state in 1826. His wife was also' a native of 
Virginia. During the War of 1812 he bore arms for his country, and 
after his death his widow moved to Clark County, Ohio, taking with 
her six sons and three daughters. She died there in 1867. All her 
children grew up and became well to do and prosperous citizens. 

William Deaton. grandfather of Jacob 0. Deaton. was proprietor 
of a saw mill in Clark County, Ohio, and spent his life there. William 
Deaton married Catherine Leffel, and their oldest son was George W. 
Deaton. 

The founder of the family in Kosciusko County w^s George W. 
Deaton, who was born and reared in Clark County, Ohio. March 9, 
1856, he married Miss Frances Fortney, a daughter of Jacob and Ann 
(Knoops) Fortney. In March, 1863. George W. Deaton brought his 
family to Kosciusko County and settled in Clay Township on land 
now owned by his son Jacob 0. He continued to live in that locality 
the rest of his life. He and his wife were verj- active members of the 
Mount Pleasant Episcopal Church, and he was chorister and other- 
wise active in the chiirch service. He was prominent in local repub- 
lican politics, had much eloquence as a speaker, and in 1872 his per- 
sonal popularity enabled him to overcome the nonnal democratic 
majority of eighty, and he had the distinction of being the first repub- 
lican elected trustee of Clay Township. He was also a charter mem- 
ber of the Grange at Claypool. He was a hard worker, and but for the 
fact that his life came to a close when still in the prime of his years 
he would doubtless have accumulated a large estate. As it was he left 
to his family over 200 acres of land, and they assumed and 
paid off the obligation. George W. Deaton and wife had eight chil- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 619 

dren: William S., born October 15, 1856, died December 25, 1871; 
Jacob 0., born August 26, 1858; Mary B., bom December 12, 1860, and 
died October 10, 1862 ; John E., born October 16, 1862 ; Sherman S., 
born February 23, 1865 ; Ulysses Grant, born May 19, 1867, and died 
May 31, 1918 ; Cyrus B., born July 29, 1869 ; and Charles G., born 
April 1, 1874. 

Jacob 0. Deaton was born'in Clark County, Ohio, and was about 
five years of age when his parents came to Kosciusko County. He 
grew up here, attended the common schools, and was nineteen years 
of age when his father died. He remained at home, and worked stead- 
ily until $8,000 was cleared off the homestead, and for that time he 
received wages of .$100 a year. He now owns 200 acres of the old 
homestead, having greatly improved and enhanced the value of the 
property, and now owns one of the most complete modern rural estates 
in the county. 

August 21, 1883, Mr. Deaton married Miss Mealy Cauffman, a sis- 
ter of Mr. J. A. Cauffman, elsewhere noted in this work. Mr. and Mrs. 
Deaton have nine children: George W., born June 2, 1884; John L., 
born September 23, 1885 ; Florence E., born June 1, 1888, wife of Carl 
Haines ; Fluella B., born June 16, 1890, and now the wife of Horace 
Tucker, grandson of Horace Tucker; Pern C, bom March 30, 1892, 
a former school teacher and now the wife of Ernest Carr, of Lake 
Township; Sherman B., born February 5, 1895, a former school 
teacher but now a farmer ; Ruth A., born November 23, 1896, and also 
a teacher; Orie B., born July 29, 1898, who has taught school two 
terms; and Delphia, born March 7, 1903. 

The family are active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
at Claypool. Mr. Deaton is affiliated with the Knights of the Maccabees, 
and is one of the influential republicans of this part of the county. He 
served as committeeman from 1880 to 1912, and was a member of the 
county commissioners from 1900 to January, 1907. 

Besides his farm Mr. Deaton now gives much of his time to the 
State Bank of Claypool, which he helped organize in 1917. The 
officers of the bank are George Merkle, president; J. 0. Deaton, vice 
president ; E. W. Kinsey, cashier ; while the other directors are Boyd 
Popham; Leroy Caldwell, Emery Metzger, Theodore Parker. 

John A. Pittenger. As breeder and raiser of thoroughbred 
Shropshire sheep, Berkshire hogs, Belgian horses and Shorthorn cattle, 
John A. Pittenger has a reputation far beyond the limits of Kosciusko 
County. Men far and near are accustomed to making more or less 
regular trips to the Big Oak Stock Farm in order to secure the finest 
pedigreed strains for improving their own herds. Mr. Pittenger 's 
farm in Wayne Township is a model place of its kind, and its improve- 
ments and adaptation to the uses of modern stock raising are the 
results of an exceptional degi-ee of enterprise on his part. He has 
spent money, patience and labor in laying the foundation of his various 
herds, and when it is considered how many years he has spent in this 
business and how carefully he has studied it it is a matter of no sur- 
prise that his stock on exhibition has taken more first premiums than 



620 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

have been bestowed upon any other individual stock breeder in the 
county. 

The Pittenger is a well known and prominent old family of Kos- 
ciusko County. Mr. Pittenger was born on the farm he now owns May 
20, 1863, son" of A. D. and Asenath (Poulson) Pittenger. He grew 
up here, his education coming from the common schools and the 
Warsaw High School. Mr. Pittenger* married Vera Elder, also a 
native of Kosciusko County. They have three children: Ada F., 
Allen Dean and Vera. Mr. Pittenger is affiliated with the Improved 
Order of Red Men. 

As a fanner he started early to develop good grades of livestock, 
and at first handled Shorthorn cattle exclusively. Gradually he has 
broadened his enterprise to include cattle, hogs, horses and sheep. His 
horses are all registered Belgian Percherons with recorded pedigrees 
recognized in all the registers of this country and abroad. He has 
exhibited his stock at all the county fairs, and is himself an authority 
on some fine points of the various strains which he has developed. Mr. 
Pittenger owns two fine farms, his homestead being registered under 
the name of Oak Stock Farm. 

Rev. John B. Dunkleberger. The esteem and respect paid to Rev. 
John B. Dunkleberger is not confined to the people of Kosciusko 
County. As a minister of the Gospel he has served communities in 
various sections of Indiana and in other states, but at the same time 
has carried on progressive farming as a resident of Monroe Township 
for many years. Rev. ]\Ir. Dunkleberger 's home is nine miles south- 
east of Warsaw, and he is one of the foremost citizens of that locality. 

He was born in Wayne Township of this county April 9, 1867, son 
of Daniel and Hannah V. (Peterson) Dunkleberger. His father was 
born in Pennsylvania and his mother in Ohio, and they married in the 
latter state and subsequently came to Kosciusko County and found a 
tract of farming land in Wayne Township southeast of Warsaw, where 
they were quiet and industrious and prosperoiis people the rest of their 
lives. Both were members of the United Brethren Church. Of their 
ten children eight are still living : Samuel, a retired farmer in Arkan- 
sas ; William, a minister of the Christian Church living in Arkansas ; 
Daniel, a preacher in the same church in Missouri ; Andrew, of Clay- 
pool, Indiana; Hannah V., who is married and lives in Wyoming; 
David L., a minister of the Christian Church at Shelbyville, Indiana ; 
John B. ; and Mrs. Martha B. Black, of Oklahoma. 

John B. Dunkleberger grew up on the old farm in Wayne Town- 
ship and afterwards supplemented the education he acquired in the 
district schools with theological and literary studies in various locali- 
ties. He spent two years in the Theological School at Canton, Missouri. 
He was ordained to the ministry of the Christian Church in Kosciusko 
County, but the first seven years of his practical ministry were spent 
in Iowa. On returning to Indiana he had charge of churches at St. 
Joseph and Newville. Then for seven years he did farming and 
preaching alternately. 

On Januan' 22, 1888, ^Ir. Dunkleberger married Anna E. Pot- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 621 

teiiger. Mrs. Dunkleberger, a daughter of William K. Pottenger, was 
born on the farm where she now lives and was educated in the district 
schools. They are the parents of two children : Rnssell H. and Edith 
M. Russell is a graduate of the public schools, has attended Val- 
paraiso Universitj' and Winona Lake Schools, and is a teacher. Edith 
has acquired a good education in the public schools and has had three 
years of musical training. One child of Rev. Mr. Dunkleberger and 
wife is deceased. He carries insurance with the North American 
Union, and in politics is a republican. As a farmer Mr. Dunkleberger 
is successfully applying his efforts to the management of a hundred 
acres of land, and operates it as a general farm, with good livestock 
as the chief source of his revenue. 

John A. Cauffman. No one could spend much time in Clay 
Township without coming to know or know of John A. Cauffman, one 
of the older residents, a capable and thrifty farmer, and a man whose 
usefulness has made him an important factor in the community's wel- 
fare. Mr. Cauffman is now serving as township trustee. 

He was born in Clay Township January 28, 1864, son of John and 
Eva (Sellers) Cauffman, both of whom were natives of Juniata 
County, Pennsylvania. They grew up and married there, and after 
their marriage lived about five years in Michigan, and from there 
moved to Kosciusko County and settled on a farm two miles south of 
Claj'pool, in Clay Township. John Cauffman was not only a practical 
farmer, but also a minister of the Evangelical Church for many years. 
He was a republican voter. By his second wife he had nine children, 
five of whom are still living: Michael, a farmer on the home place 
two miles south of Claypool ; Amelia, wife of J. 0. Deaton, of Clay 
Township ; John A. ; Levi, a farmer in Lake Township ; Nancy, wife of 
Richard Brown, living in Nebraska; and the other members of the 
family, including one who died in infancy, are Alice, who married 
Jacob W. Shoemaker, and Cora, who became the wife of Rev. Mr. Hill. 

John A. Cauffman spent his boyhood days on the old farm south 
of Claypool. After attending the district schools he went to work for 
the railway on the section gang, and for sixteen years was section fore- 
man. In the meantime he married Mary Garman, who left him three 
sons : Earl O., a graduate of the common schools and high school and 
now a resident of Montana ; Carl, who also graduated from high school 
and lives on one of his father's farms ; Edward, who in addition to his 
high school course, graduated from Winona and was formerly super- 
intendent of the Burkett public schools, is now serving in the United 
States Army. For his second wife Mr. Cauffman married Lydia Dick. 
They have two children, Raymond and Marjorie, both graduates of the 
common schools. 

The family are members of the United Brethren Church at Clay- 
pool. Mr. Cauffman has been a sturdy republican and his personal 
popularity is reflected in the fact that while Clay Township normally 
has a margin of thirty-eight democratic majority, he was elected to 
his office as trustee by one vote over his opponent. Mr. Cauffman 's 
work and character deserve all the support he has received in public 



622 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

affairs. His home farm comprises 120 acres, and he has another place 
of seventy-seven acres, and all of this represents his individual toil 
and good management. He is also one of the stockholders in the 
Farmers State Bank at Claypool. 

John Kimes. Representing a family that came to Kosciusko 
County more than eightj^ years ago, and one of the most enterprising 
and prosperous agriculturists of Clay Township, John Kimes owns a 
splendid farm a mile and a half east and a mile north of Claypool. He 
has his land improved with buildings, equipped with machinery and 
other facilities, with home and everything in perfect order, and it con- 
stitutes a place such as may well arouse pride in what he has done. 

Mr. Kimes, who is also one of the count.y commissioners of Kos- 
ciusko County, was born in Plain Township, about three miles north 
of Warsaw, January 23, 1851, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Gen- 
singer) Kimes. 

His father, Jacob Kimes, was born in Dauphin County, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 17, 1814, a son of Peter and Nancy (Leggett) Kimes. 
He grew to manhood in his native state, and he and Elizabeth Gen- 
singer were married in 1833. In 1836 they moved from Ohio, where 
they had spent the fii-st three years of their married life, and settled 
on a farm in section 31 of Plain Township, entering 118 acres from 
the government in the old "Monoquet Reserve." That land, situated 
three and one half miles north of Warsaw, was in the midst of the 
heavy woods, and many times in the early days he had to go only a 
short distance from his log cabin to kill a deer ; in fact it is recorded 
that he killed a deer the first day he arrived in the county. For years 
he was a noted hunter, and most of the meat consumed by the family 
was furnished b.v his rifle. In early times he took his corn to Lafayette 
and also to Goshen, and had many experiences in traveling over the 
rough roads and trails of those days. He began farming immediately 
upon his arrival in Kosciusko County. Prosperity came to him in large 
measure, and in time he owned 600 acres of land. He was a republican, 
first voting as a whig, and at one time served as road supervisor. His 
wife died in 1884, and he lived to very advanced years. He and his 
wife had been married more than half a century. They were the par- 
ents of eleven children, and those to reach mature years were George, 
Jacob, Daniel, John, Susan and Catherine. Only two are now living, 
John Kimes and his sister Catherine, wife of Salem Black, of Warsaw. 
The son George saw more than two j'ears of service as a soldier in the 
Civil war. 

Mr. John Kimes grew up on the old farm north of Warsaw and 
his school advantages were limited to the district schools during the 
winter, while his summers were spent on the farm. He was part of 
the home circle until July 4, 1875, when he married Miss Alice Kelle.v. 
Mrs. Kimes was born in Plain Township July 2, 1854, daughter of 
William and Celina (Parker) Kelley, the former a native of Ohio and 
the latter of Pennsylvania. Her parents were married in Kosciusko 
County and they lived in Plain Township until the death of her father. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kimes kept house and did their work as farmers on 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 623 

the old farm homestead five years after their marriage, and in 1880 
they bought the farm wliere they now live, and have occupied it con- 
tinuously since 1881. Mr. and Mi*s. Kimes own about 300 acres. They 
also lived five years in the village of Claypool. 

They are the parents of four children: Ona, a graduate of the 
common schools, is the wife of Charles Clace, of Wayne Township ; 
Minnie is the wife of Joseph Leiter, of Clay Township ; Avery, a grad- 
uate of the common schools, married Lucy Leckrone ; and Horace J. 
lives in Clay Township and married Alma Parker. 

The family are members of IMount Pleasant Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and Mr. Kimes is one of the church officials and very active 
in its behalf. He is a republican in politics and has always been inter- 
ested in the good of his party and the welfare of his community. As 
county commissioner he served one entire term, and was i-e-elected for 
a second term, but on account of ill health resigned after one year. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kimes have a most interesting family, and besides their 
own children they have seventeen grandchildren. 

Emsley a. Arnold. There is perhaps no better known citizen in 
the southern part of Kosciusko County than Emsley A. Arnold, who 
has been a practical farmer in Lake Township most of his life. 

He was born on the fann where he now resides November 19, 1861. 
He was reared by his grandfather, Martin Arnold, who was born in 
Knox County, Ohio, in 1809, and was one of the pioneer settlers of 
Kosciusko County. He entered 160 acres of Government land and 
lived there until his death. He was an ordained minister of the Chris- 
tian Church and voted as a republican. 

Emsley A. Arnold grew up on the farm, attended district schools, 
and lived with his grandfather until his marriage. December 31, 1881, 
Miss Amanda Garman became his wife. She was born in Allen County, 
Indiana, but her parents came to Kosciusko Coimty when she was 
three months old, and here she grew up and received her education. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Arnold farmed the old home 
place for seven years, then bought a farm, and subsequently acquired 
the 145 acres which constitutes their present home. They have two 
children, Oder A. and Vesta M. Oder lives just across the road from 
his father, and by his marriage to Alma Whitmer has one daughter. 
Vesta is a graduate of the common schools and is the wife of Poster 
Caufifman of Clay Township. 

Mr. Arnold is a republican in politics. His fellow partisans and 
citizens have manifested such confidence in his good judgment that 
he is now the nominee of his party for county commissioner to repre- 
sent the southern district. 

Leroy "W. Caldwell. Leroy W. Caldwell is a member of an old 
Clay Township family, is a man of university training and education, 
and is applying his efi'crts to the business of agriculture. His farm 
home two miles southwest of Claypool illustrates much of the spirit of 
progressiveness and efficiency that are characteristic of the intelligent 
and high minded generation of modern farmers. 



624 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Some of the first things in the history of Clay Township revolve 
around the Caldwell family. His great-grandfather, Joshua Caldwell, 
came from West Virginia to Kosciusko County in January, 1837, and 
entered land near Claypool. He came along with members of the 
Minear family, who were also among the first pioneers of that town- 
ship. History records that the first religious services were held in 
Joshua Caldwell's cabin in the winter of 1837, a Methodist missionary 
preaching. The first Sunday school was organized in the same cabin 
the next year. 

Joshua Caldwell had two sons, Isaac and David. David died at the 
age of twenty-eight, leaving a son, David A., who is now living in Fort 
Wayne. Indiana. Isaac Caldwell married Eliza Jameson, and their 
two sons were William and Joshua V., the latter dying in 1884. Wil- 
liam Caldwell, father of Leroy W., was Iwm in Clay Township in 
October, 1852, grew up on the old farm and had a district school edu- 
cation. He married Anna Wells, a daughter of William P. and Almira 
(Truax) Wells. Her parents were also early settlers of Kosciusko 
County. William Caldwell and wife have two children, Leroy W. 
and Clare. 

Leroy W. Caldwell, who was born on the old farm in Clay Town- 
ship August 10, 1881, grew iip in the country', attended the district 
schools, the Claypool High School, and later graduated A. B. from 
Indiana University. While in university he paid his way largely 
through his earnings as a teacher. He was principal of the Claypool 
High School, and for two years was a teacher in the Central High 
School at Pueblo, Colorado. He finally gave up the occupation of 
teacher and returned to Kosciusko County and engaged in farming. 
Besides his farm he is one of the directors of the State Bank of Clay- 
pool. Mr. Caldwell is a democrat in politics, is affiliated with Lake 
City Lodge No. 73, Free and Accepted Masons; Warsaw Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Warsaw Commandery No. 10, Knights Templar, 
and is also affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
at Warsaw, and is a member of the Kappa Sigma College fraternity. 

In August, 1906, he married Anna Jaques. Mrs. Caldwell is a 
graduate of the Silver Lake High School. They have two children : 
William Isaac, born October 28, 1907 ; and Florrie C, born March 
18, 1916. 

Joel F. Thompson. A long life lived with honor, with fidelity to 
high principles, with worthy service to his family and his fellow men, 
has been that of Joel F. Thompson, one of the best known residents of 
Clay Township. His home is six miles southeast of Claypool, and he 
has been a resident of Kosciusko County more than half a century. 

Mr. Thompson was born in Pennsylvania June 28, 1836, a son of 
William and Catherine (Young) Thompson, and a grandson of Wil- 
liam Thompson, of English ancestry. His grandfather spent most of 
his life in Pennsylvania. His father, William Thompson, Jr., was 
apprenticed to the tailor's trade, but also lived on thirty acres of land 
and combined farm supervision along with tailoring. He and his wife 
were both active Methodists. They had a family of five children: 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 625 

Sarah, widow of John Chase, who now lives in Wisconsin; William, 
deceased ; Daniel W., who saw service as a Union soldier in the Civil 
war, is now married and lives in Clay Township of this county ; John, 
who died in 1913 ; and Joel F. 

Joel F. Thompson grew up in Pennsylvania and was educated by 
means of the subscription and public schools of his native state. When 
he was about seventeen years old he attended a high school in Pennsyl- 
vania, and soon afterward came to Indiana and entered upon a work 
that occupied him for twenty-eight years, that of teaching. With the 
exception of one term in Huntington County and one in Wabash 
County, all his work was done in Kosciusko County, and there are 
many people still living past middle age who have kindl.y and inter- 
esting memories of him as a teacher. This occupation he followed 
during the winter terms, and the rest of the year was a farmer. 

In 1859 Mr. Thompson married Elizabeth Fisher. The following 
year he bought eighty acres of land covered with brush and timber, 
and in 1863 moved to the farm where he now lives in Clay Township, 
consisting of 200 acres. He also has another place of 120 acres north of 
the home farm. It was as a fanner that he acquired his substantial 
prosperity, and for many years he has lived in comfort and liberally 
provided for the children who grew up under his roof, and most of 
whom are now settled in homes of their own. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thompson had ten children, and seven are still living. 
Sarah is the wife of Simon Shults, of Clay Township : Samuel is also 
a resident of Clay Township; Luella is the wife of Jacob Galls, of 
Scott Township; Calvin, a Clay Township farmer; Emma, wife of 
Layman Vance, who manages and lives on the home fann ; Melissa, 
who is the wife of James Snoke, of Clay Township ; and IMai-shall, who 
is a graduate of the Boston Conservatory of Music and lives in Fort 
Wayne. The mother of these children, after more than half a century 
of happy married life, died in the fall of 1915. 

Mr. Thompson is a member of the Presbyterian Church at Packer- 
town, and was formerly one of the church trustees. In politics he is 
a democrat. He served one term as trustee of Jackson Township, and 
for two terms was honored with a similar office in Clay Township. He 
is also a stockholder in the Packertown Farmers Elevator Company. 

Thomas B. Hatfield. While Clay Township is noted for the fer- 
tility of its soil, the success which attends the labors of some of the 
agriculturists there cannot be altogether attributed to this fact. A 
thorough undei-standing of the principles of farming and the posses- 
sion of the good judgment and the industry to apply them are, after 
all, the greatest factors in making a farmer's life pleasant and profit- 
able. One of the intelligent, well informed farmers of this section is 
Thomas B. Hatfield, proprietor of ]\Iaple Grove Fann, situated a mile 
and a half west of Claypool, in Clay Township. 

Mr. Hatfield was born in what is now Lake Township of Kosciusko 
County, January 31, 1856, son of Jacob and Lydia (Shook) Hatfield. 
The name Hatfield has been rather numerously and prominently iden- 
tified with Kosciusko County from almost pioneer days. Jacob Hat- 



626 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

field and his wife were both natives of Ohio. He was born October 4, 
1830. and died in 1880, and his wife was born ]\Iay 24, 183.5. Their 
respective families came to Kosciusko County in the early days, and 
Jacob and Lydia were married here. Much of their farming was done 
on the land now owned and occupied by their son Thomas. The 
parents were faithful members of the United Brethren Church at 
Center, and Jacob Hatfield was a loyal democrat. Jacob and Lydia 
Hatfield were splendid people, and the merit of their own lives and 
characters was transmitted to their children. The record of their chil- 
dren is a remarkable one, since there were eighteen sons and daughters, 
and most of them grew to maturity, and a number of them are still 
in Ko.sciusko County. The names of these children, with the dates 
of their birth and some other facts, are recorded as follows: Leander 
v., born May 27, 1854, a farmer in Clay Township ; Thomas B. ; Sarah 
E. and Aurilla I., twins, born Jlay 6, 1857, both now deceased; Mary 
C, born December 16, 1858, wife of Z. Gunder, of Jackson Township ; 
Isaac E., born September 11, 1860, now deceased; Chester N., born 
IMay 8. 1862, a farmer in Jackson Town.ship of Huntington County; 
Jacob M., born November 21, 1863, a resident of Indianapolis; Delia 
E.. born September 9, 1866, deceased ; Emma J., bom March 7, 1865, 
wife of A. J. Gunter; Martha C, born September 2, 1868, wife of 
William Rhoads, of Onatchee. Washington ; Alice E., born September 
9. 1869, wife of George iladdux, of Plymouth, Indiana; Andrew D., 
born March 22, 1871, deceased; Phoebe V., born August 11, 1872, wife 
of Charles Ernsberger, of Elkhart. Indiana ; Florence B., born Jiily 
23, 1874, decea-sed ; Rosella, born July 10, 1875, deceased ; Laura E., 
born February 9, 1877 ; and Nora E., born July 81, 1879, deceased. 

Thomas B. Hatfield grew up on the farm where he now resides. 
His education was supplied by the district schools, and at the age of 
eighteen he took an effective part in the handling of the home farm. 
About two years later he became a saw mill worker, and followed that 
occupation for eight or nine years. On December 24, 1886, Mr. Hat- 
field married Elnora Thompson. ]Mrs. Hatfield was born in Clay 
Township June 24, 1865, a daughter of D. W. and Anna (Fisher) 
Thompson, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of 
Jackson Township of this county. ^Irs. Hatfield was reared in Clay 
Township and was educated in the local schools there. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Hatfield became manager of the 
C. L. Lucas farm, but after two years moved to Jackson Township 
and bought a small tract of land, and lived there altogether for seven- 
teen yenrs. In 1910 he moved to his present place in Clay Township, 
the old Hatfield farm, and in the cultivation of its fertile acres he is 
finding ample return for his labors and is enjoying the comforts of 
one of the good country homes of the county. Mr. and ^Irs. Hatfield 
are members of the United Brethren Church at Claypool. He is atfil- 
iated with Claypool Lodge No. 515, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, of which he is past noble grand. He is now and for a niimber 
of years has been quite active in the cause of temperance and the pro- 
hibition party. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield have a family of eight children : Ethel ]\I., 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 627 

a graduate of the common schools and wife of Charles Horner of 
Hegewisch, Illinois; Charles L., a soldier, who married Cordelia Jef- 
fries; Lillie A., a graduate of the common schools, wife of Ernest 
Jameson, of Monroe Township ; James I., who represents the family 
with the United States armies in France; Daniel R., who lives in Clay 
Township and married Letitia Rhodes; Donald D., a graduate of high 
school and still at home ; Susie P. and Esther T., who are also members 
of the home circle. 

Levi F. Cauffman is one of the men who are upholding the record 
of Kosciusko County as a great agricultural center, and is directing 
the productive forces of a fine farm of 200 acres in Clay and Lake 
townships, one and one half miles east and two miles south of Clay- 
pool, on rural route No. 2 out of that town. 

Mr. Cauffman was horn on a farm in Clay Township, August 26, 
1869, a son of John and Eva (Sellers) Cauffman. His parents were 
both born in Pennsylvania, and after their marriage the father lived 
five years in Michigan and then came to Kosciusko Count.y. He located 
two miles south of Claypool and here he spent the rest of his days. 
For fifteen years he was an ordained minister of the Evangelical 
Church, and served as a local preacher for a number of .years in Kos- 
ciusko County. He had a fluent command of both the English and 
German languages, and conducted services in both tongues. He was 
twice married and by his first wife had five children. The children 
of his second marriage were : Michael A., a farmer in Clay Township ; 
Amelia, wife of Jacob 0. Deaton, of Clay Town.ship ; Alice, deceased ; 
John A., present trustee of Clay Township ; Nancy, who married Rich- 
ard Brown and lives in Nebraska ; Levi F. : Pierce, who lives at 
Wabash. Indiana, and is track master for the Big Four Railway ; and 
Cora, wife of Silas Hill. 

Levi F. Cauffman grew up on the old homestead two miles south 
of Claj'pool, attended the district schools there, and was identified with 
the work of the home farm for a number of years. On May 26, 1894, 
he e-stablisbed a home of his own by his marriage to Gertrude Bodkin. 
She was born in Clay Township. After their marriage they farmed 
the old Cauffman farm four years, then rented the Wilson farm, and 
gradually out of experience and their modest accumulations ventured 
to make their first purchase of thirty-nine acres, going in debt for 
the land. After they had paid for it they sold and bought eighty 
acres contained in their present farm. This was their home for a year 
and a half. Mrs. Cauffman then inherited eighty acres of land, "and 
together they bought forty acres adjoining, so that their present place 
comprises 200 acres. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cauffman have two children. Flossie, bom August 
25, 1899, is a graduate of the common schools and still at home. Beulah 
was born May 10, 1906. Mr. Cauffman is a republican. 

Thomas W. Boggs, whose farm home is in Clay Township, five 
miles south of Warsaw, is a member of an old family of this county, 
where the people of that name have lived since this country was a 



628 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

wilderness of woods aud swamp. "What Kosciusko Cotinty is today is 
largely the reflection of the energies and activities aud influences 
created by such sturdj- and upright families as that given particular 
attention in this sketch. 

The founder of the name here was Andrew Hamilton Boggs, whose 
death on his ninety-sixth birthday, :March 7, 1917, removed perhaps 
the oldest pioneer from the county's citizenship. He was born in 
Jackson County, Ohio, ilarch 7, 1821, son of Andrew and Susanna 
(Bowen) Boggs, who were natives of Greenbrier County, Virginia. 
Andrew Boggs, Sr., took his family to Indiana about 1825, living in 
Wayne and Henry Counties, where his wife died May 4, 1834. Soon 
after her death he moved to Blackford County, where he married a 
second time, and served for a period a.s associate judge of the County 
Court of Delaware County. He was also one of the proprietors of 
Hartford City, county seat of Blackford County. His long and 
useful life came to a close January 27, 1854. 

Andrew H. Boggs had very limited educational opportunities, but 
nevertheless his powers of obser^'ation aud keen intelligence elevated 
him to a position where he en.joyed the respect of the best citizens of 
hLs community. From the age of fourteen he was practically on his 
own resources. In the spring of 1835, with two brothers, he left Wayne 
County for LaPorte County, making the journey on foot. During the 
same year he made a further journey to the Miami Reserve at Peru, 
but in the fall of 1835 came to Kosciusko Count}' and for a time made 
his home with his brother-in-law, Joel Long, Sr., near Leesburg. His 
principal asset was ability to work hard and untiringly, and many 
days he labored at wages of only twenty-five cents a day. This indus- 
try, coupled with integrity and thrift, brought him gradually up the 
road to independence. December 14, 1843, he married Miss Martha 
Ann Thomas, a native of Indiana and daughter of Antipas and Axsa 
Thomas, natives of Tennessee. The Thomas family also became resi- 
dents of Kosciusko County in the fall of 1835. After his marriage 
Andrew H. Boggs lived on part of the Thomas farm, but soon after- 
wards engaged in the hotel business at Leesburg four years. He then 
resumed his residence in Prairie Township, and in 1868 moved from 
there to a farm near Clunette. In that locality his years were peace- 
fully and usefully spent until his death. He was a man of very char- 
itable disposition, was devout in his religious practices, and a demo- 
cratic voter. His wife died June 3, 1886. Their children were : Axsa 
S., who now lives at Warsaw, widow of S. D. Anglin, a former 
county superintendent of schools in this county ; Thomas W. ; John L., 
who married Rose Norris and lives in Monroe Township ; Lucinda, 
deceased ; Samuel, of Kosciusko County ; Clinton, of ilentone, Indiana ; 
Jennie, wife of Mr. Shinn, of Oklahoma ; Rose, deceased ; and Harvey 
D., of Prairie Township. 

Mr. Thomas W. Boggs was born on his father's place three miles 
west of Leesburg in March, 1849. He grew up there, attended the 
public schools, and from early manhood has been identified steadily 
with farming. Mr. Boggs and family now have 150 acres in Clay 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 629 

Township, and it has been under his management as a general farm 
and stock proposition for many years. In politics he is a democrat. 

Mr. Boggs married Matilda Hildebrand. They became the parents 
of three children : Alice V. is the wife of Prank McKrill ; Lillie is 
the wife of Joseph Huffer ; Edward H. is a resident of Clay Township. 
The mother of these children died December 25, 1913. For his present 
wife Mr. Boggs married Birtie Boggs, formerly a resident of Okla- 



WiLLiAM Heisler has long enjoyed a substantial position in the 
community of Clay Township, where he has spent most of his active 
years, and is proprietor of a fine farm, well adapted to general agri- 
culture and stock raising. This farm and his home are in section 6 of 
Clay Township, on rural route No. 4 out of Claypool. 

Mr. Heisler was born in Stark County, Ohio, July 6, 1845, a son 
of John and Mary (Zeiders) Heisler. His father was a native of 
Germany and his mother of P'ranee. Both came to the United States 
when young people, were married in Stark County, Ohio, and in the 
fall of 1863 brought their family to Kosciusko County and located on 
the farm in Clay Township where their son "William now resides. 
They were active members of the Lutheran Church, and the father 
was a democrat. In their family were five children : Catherine, now 
deceased, was twice married, her first husband being Mr. Byerly, and 
her second Mr. Valentine ; Paulina lives in Clay Township, the widow 
of Sylvester Kinsey ; "William is the third in age ; Emanuel is a farmer 
near Hiawatha, Kansas; and John is a farmer near Etna Green, 
Indiana. 

"William Heisler was eighteen years old when he came to Kosciusko 
County, and his early education was acquired in the district schools 
of Ohio. He grew up inured to the rugged discipline of the farm, and 
made his home with his parents as long as they lived, and now owns 
110 acres, including the old homestead. 

Mr. Heisler married Mary Bules, and three children were born to 
them, two of whom are living. They are : "Winfield, who is unmar- 
ried and still at home: and William, who lives in Seward Township 
and married Nora Saulsgoer. The mother of these children died and 
Mr. Heisler married for his present wife Ida Good. They have a son 
Charles, who is a graduate of the common schools, and Floyd, who is 
also still at home. 

The family are members of the Lutheran Church. He has been a 
man of prominence in his locality, served four years as trustee of 
Clay Township, and also as a member of the advisory board. He votes 
as a democrat. 

Daniel "W. Smith is one of the more recent additions to the citi- 
zenship of Kosciusko County, and is especially well known in the Clay- 
pool community, where for several years he has been rendering the 
service of a general merchant. 

Mr. Smith is a Southerner by birth and ancestry. He was born 
in the State of Mississippi, June 14, 1879, a son of Nicholas and Mary 



630 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

(Mussehvhite) Smith. Both parents are deceased, and their four 
children are: Laura, W. C, Daniel W. and Katie. Both daughters 
are married and living in the South. 

Daniel W. Smith grew up on a farm, had a public school educa- 
tion and attended a commercial college. He lived at home until nine- 
teen years of age, and his first business experience was working in a 
grocery store for eighteen months. He then invested his modest cap- 
ital in" 110 acres of raw land, opened up part of it, and then sold at 
a handsome profit. Following that for ten years he was engaged in 
the woodworking business and made much headway as a furniture 
manufacturer. In July, 1911, ilr. Smith came north and was located 
at Peru, Indiana, until January 1, 1912, when he came to Claypool. 
Here he bought a half interest in a general store, and on December 15, 
1917, became its sole proprietor. He has a good business, and his 
patronage is steadily growing and extending over all the trade terri- 
tory natm-ally tributary to Claypool. 

September 10, 1910. ilr. Smith man-ied Edna Mabel Black at Clay- 
pool. She was born in Seward Township of this county, and is a grad- 
uate of the Claypool High School. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members 
of the United Brethren Church at Claypool. He is a member of the 
Woodmen of the World, and ]\Irs. Smith is active in the Rebekahs. 
Politically he votes as a democrat. 

Francis M. Downing is well known in Kosciusko County as a 
former teacher, and is now senior partner of the firm Downing & 
Tucker, a progressive firm of merchants at Claypool. 

ilr. Downing was bom in Clay Township of this county January 
8, 1874, son of Francis and Mary E. (Allison) Downing. His father 
waJ5 born near Newcastle, Indiana, May 15, 1847, and spent most of 
his boyhood near Swayzee, in Grant County, Indiana. At the age of 
twenty he married Miss Allison, who was born near Peru, in Miami 
County, Indiana. In 1868 they moved to Kosciusko County and 
located three miles east and a half a mile north of ClaAT)ool. At that 
time they had no resources and worked hard and saved in order to get 
a start. ' Francis Downing was one of the good farmers of the town- 
ship, and also enjoyed a large practice as a veterinary surgeon. He 
died in December, 1911, and his widow is still living on the old farm. 
Both were members of the United Brethren Church. The father was 
a republican. Of their five children one died in infancy. The others 
are : Arthur A., who lives near Dickinson, North Dakota ; William H., 
of Clay Township ; Francis M, ; and Delia, wife of Calvin Thompson, 
of Clay Township. 

Francis M. Downing grew up on the farm, and besides the district 
schools attended college at North ]\Ianchester, and through his own 
earnings paid his way through Valparaiso University. After grad- 
uating he taught school, and has seven terms of successful work to his 
credit. From teaching he engaged in business at Claypool. 

November 18, 1899, Mr. Downing married ilaude I. Arnold, who 
was born in the village of Claypool and was educated in the local 
schools. She is a daughter of M. W. and B. J. (Foust) Arnold, both 
now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Downing have two children: Donald, 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 631 

a graduate of the common schools and now a high school pupil, and 
Francis M., who is in the grade schools. Mrs. Downing is a member 
of the Christian Science Church. Mr. Downing is affiliated with the 
Masonic Lodge and Chapter at Warsaw, and also with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of the Maccabees. In the Odd 
Fellows he is a past noble grand and member of the Grand Lodge. 
Politically he votes as a republican. 

George B. Pontius. Since 1851 the name Pontius has figured 
prominently in the affairs of Clay Township, and" in fact in the entire 
county. Members of this family did some of the pioneer work of 
clearing away the wilderness and making new farms, some of them 
have always been farmers and have lived in close touch with the soil, 
some have been business men, and all have represented that class of 
citizenship which means most to any progressive community. Mr. 
George B. Pontius represents the third generation of the family in 
Kosciusko County, and for many years he has been successfully en- 
gaged in business at Claypool, where he is owner of the Claypool 
Elevator. 

His great-grandfather's name was Napoleon Pontius. His grand- 
father, David Pontius, was born in Ohio, in Pickaway County, and 
grew up in that state. In Seneca County he married Anna Helzel, 
who was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia, daughter of Henry 
Helzel. Henry Helzel became a prominent citizen of Noble County, 
Indiana, filled a number of places of public trust, including recorder, 
treasurer and tax collector, and collected taxes in the early days, rid- 
ing horseback all over the comity. David Pontius and wife had chil- 
dren named Susanna, Elizabeth, James, Rebecca, Amos, Lucinda, Isaac, 
Sarah, Huldah, Catherine and Henry. All were born in Ohio except 
Henry. In April, 1851, David Pontius and family located on a farm 
in Clay Township of Kosciusko County. He lived there until his 
death in 1871. Before Clay and Lake Townships were set off he served 
two tei-ms as assessor of the district. He was a very consistent member 
of the United Brethren Church. His son Isaac died while a soldier in 
the Union Army in the Twelfth Indiana Infantry. 

Amos Pontius, father of George B., was born in Ohio, and was 
thirteen years of age when the family came to Kosciusko County. He 
had a district school education, and after his marriage settled on a 
farm near Claypool. He also did business as contractor and builder 
at Warsaw and Pierceton, and in 1866 built a lumber mill in Franklin 
Township. It was in 1873 that he bought the interests of the other 
heirs in the homestead farm, and he lived there quietly engaged in the 
pursuits of agriculture until his death in 1915. He was a charter 
member of Claypool Lodge No. 515 of the Odd Fellows, served as its 
first secretary, and was a member of the Grand Lodge. He was a live 
and energetic democrat in politics, and a man distinguished always by 
good citizenship. In 1860 he married Miss Amanda M. Huff, who was 
born in Ashland County, Ohio, and was brought to Kosciusko County 
by her parents in 1858. She is still living at the old home. Amos 
Pontius and wife had four children: Oliver C, of Brown County, 



632 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Indiana ; George B. ; Isaac N- of Monroe, Indiana ; and Edward E., 
of Claj'pool. 

George B. Pontius spent most of his boyhood on the old farm, 
attended district school during the winter time, and from the age of 
nineteen until twenty-eight lived at home and assisted his father in 
tending the crops. He then entered the livestock business, and for 
twenty years has had his home and interests concentrated at Claypool. 
Some years ago he bought the local elevator and a large part of the 
grain that goes to market every year from this vicinity is handled by 
him. He is also a stockholder of the State Bank of Claypool. In 1918 
he contributed a hotel and two new business rooms to the village, and 
all that concerns the welfare of his community is a matter of deep 
interest to him. He is active as a democrat, is a member of the county 
committee, and attended the Baltimore Convention in 1912 when 
Woodrow "Wilson was nominated. He is a member of the Masonic 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Improved Order of Red 
Men, and the Knights of the Maccabees. He and his family are also 
identified with the United Brethren Church. 

Mr. Pontius married Miss Eva Williams, a native of Kosciusko 
County, and a successful teacher before her marriage. They have two 
children. Delta is a graduate of the high school and specialized in 
music at the Indiana Central College, and is now the wife of Walter 
K. Lohr, of Claypool. Lowell B. is a graduate of high school and of 
the Fort Wayne Business College, and is associated with his father in 
the management of the Claypool Elevator. 

Charles E. Thomas, M. D. A very successful and talented physi- 
cian and surgeon. Dr. Thomas has been a leader in his profession in 
Kosciusko County for a number of years, and has built up a large and 
successful practice at Leesburg. He is the present secretary and treas- 
urer of the County Medical Society. 

Dr. Thomas was born in Cass County, Indiana, December 7, 1874, 
son of Alvin H. and Sarah (Canine) Thomas. His father was a native 
of Preble County, Ohio, while his mother was born in Cass County, 
Indiana, where they married. Alvin Thomas went to Cass County 
when a youth, and at the age of seventeen volunteered for service in 
the Lfnion Army, being a soldier for two yeaj-s with the 130th Indiana 
Infantry. After the war he returned to Cass County, and in 1869 
married and settled on a farm near Galveston. In 1887 he retired 
from the farm and moved to the village of Galveston, where he fol- 
lowed merchandising. He was always active in the Methodist Church 
and was a good, lo.yal democrat. In his family were four children, 
John 0., a graduate of high school and now in the insurance business 
at Tipton, Indiana; Dr. Charles E. ; Cora J., a graduate of high school 
and wife of Rev. T. J. Johnson, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
Conference located at Fort Wayne; and Audra, a graduate of high 
school and stenographer with the Public Utility Company at Fort 
Wayne. 

Dr. Charles E. Thomas was reared on a farm to the age of thirteen. 
During this time he attended district schools and later graduated from 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 633 

the Galveston High School. He also carried literary studies in the 
Indiana University and graduated from the Indiana Medical College 
at Indianapolis. Following his graduation he spent a year as interne 
in Hope Hospital, and was also an assistant at the Home for Feeble 
Minded. Dr. Thomas came to Leesburg in 1900, and his service and 
skill have been given every test of reliability and high minded profes- 
sional conduct. He is a member in good standing of the various local 
and district medical societies and of the American Medical Association. 
Dr. Thomas is now serving as president of the Board of Education of 
Leesburg. He is one of the official members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, and for the past fifteen years has served as superin- 
tendent of the Sunday School. He is affiliated with Leesburg Lodge 
No. 182, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; is past chancellor of 
his Lodge of Knights of Pythias, and is a member of both the subor- 
dinate and encampment degrees of Odd Fellowship. Politically he 
is a republican. 

Dr. Thomas married Ina B. Fettro, daughter of Rev. J. T. 
Pettro, for many years a minister of the Methodist Church. Mrs. 
Thomas was born at Mount Aetna in Huntington County, Indiana, and 
is a graduate of the Goshen High School and spent one year in DePauw 
University. Doctor and Mrs. Thomas have two children, Everett Win- 
ton and Frances E., the former aged ten and the latter six years. 

Charles Thomas is one of the best known business men of Lees- 
burg, has been a general merchant there for sixteen years, and is now 
postmaster. He represents one of the oldest families of Kosciusko 
County, one that was established in Plain Township more than eighty 
years ago. 

His grandfather, Antibas Thomas, was a native of North Carolina. 
About 1828 he moved with his parents to Union County, Indiana, and 
in 1834 settled in the wilderness of Kosciusko County, where he spent 
his last days. He died in 1838. 

Andrew J. Thomas, father of the Leesburg postmaster, was bom in 
Prairie Township of Kosciusko County November 25, 1835, the young- 
est of thirteen children. He grew up in a frontier district, attended 
the common schools, and in the fall of 1861 enlisted in the Second 
Indiana Cavalry. He was with his regiment in many campaigns and 
in much scouting service, and during the advance upon Atlanta he 
had a horse shot from under him and was captured by the enemy and 
was a prisoner of war at Anderaonville from July, 1864, until Febru- 
ary, 1865, when he was exchanged. At the close of the war he received 
an honorable discharge and returning to Kosciusko County, married 
and engaged in farming. He was one of the valued and esteemed resi- 
dents of the county. His death occurred in May, 1887. Politically he 
was a democrat. He married Cynthia Inman, and of their six children 
four are still living: Charles; George, a farmer and stock buyer at 
Leesburg; Jennie, living at Warsaw, widow of IMilo Hunter; and 
Nellie, who is deputy postmaster under her brother. 

Mr. Charles Thomas was born in Plain Township, three miles north- 
east of Leesburg, September 1, 1866. His early life was spent on a 



634 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

farm and his ambition for an education and a place in the world ex- 
ceeded the opportunities afiforded by the common schools. He gradu- 
ated with the degree Bachelor of Science from the Tri-State Normal at 
Angola, and for six years was a teacher in the high school at Oswego. 
From teaching he got into business and for many years has been one 
of the leaders in affairs at Leesburg. 

July 28, 1914, he married Miss Bertha Stanton. They have one 
son, Charles S.. born October 26, 1917. Jlr. Thomas is past chancellor 
of Lodge No. 192 of the Knights of Pythias and has sat in the Grand 
Lodge. Politically he has always been active as a democrat and for 
four years was trustee of Plain Township, and received his appoint- 
ment to the office of postmaster to fill a vacancy on August 1, 1914. 

George M. Neher. For fity or sixty years the name Neher has 
been identified with the agricultural enterprise of Kosciusko County, 
and the old homestead in Jefferson Township which was cleared and 
developed by "William Neher and was subsequently owned and greatly 
improved by George ^I. Neher is now occupied by the third generation 
of the family. George M. Neher recently retired from the farm and 
since March, 1917, has enjoyed the comforts of a good town home at 
Milford. 

He was bom on the old farm in Jefferson Township, Milford 
County, July 26, 1865, a son of William and Martha (Teeplc) Neher. 
His father was born in Stark County. Ohio, in 1836. and is still living 
at the advanced age of eighty-two. He came to Indiana at the age of 
sixteen, lived in Marshall County for several years, and at the age of 
twenty-three came to Kosciusko County. Here he married and settled 
on a farm in Jefferson Township, and was identified with its cultiva- 
tion and management until about fifty-five years old, since which time 
he has lived in ]\Iilford. He is a member of the Christian Church and 
a democrat in politics. His wife died in Milford some years ago. Of 
the four children, three are still living: MarA', widow of G. W. Pinker- 
ton, of Jefferson Township; Emma, widow of James Pinkerton, for- 
merly of Jefferson Township, her present home being in Milford; and 
George M. 

George M. Neher grew up on the old farm, attended the district 
schools until about sixteen years old, and helped work the farm until 
he was of age. 

On October 20. 1888, Mr. Neher married Rachel Estep. She was 
born in Virginia October 7, 1871, and was a small girl when her 
parents, William E. and Hannah (Beeler) Estep. came to Indiana 
from Virginia and settled in Prairie Township of Kosciusko County. 
Mrs. Neher's parents were both born in Virainia. and the father was 
a farmer. The family were members of the Baptist Church. He died 
aged sixty-eight and the mother died in her seventieth year. They 
were a well known, honored and highly respected family. They 
were the parents of fourteen children, twelve of whom grew to ma- 
turity and ten are living at this writing. Jlrs. Neher is the seventh 
child and was but six .vears old when she came to Indiana. She at- 
tended the district schools of that township and of Jefferson Township. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 635 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Neher rented the old homestead, 
and later they bought and acquired that property, which comprises 
120 acres of highly cultivated land in Jelferson Township. 

On that farm their only daughter, Zona M.. was born and has 
spent practically all her life. She is a graduate of the common schools 
and of the South Bend Business College, and is now the wife of Cash 
Arnold. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold now have the active superintendence of 
the farm in Jefferson Township. They have two children : Verona S., 
born December 25, 1910 ; and Elwood C, born February 12, 1914. The 
family are members of the Christian Church at Milford, and Mr. 
Neher is a democrat in politics. 

James T. Shepard, of Milford, has disproved the oft repeated as- 
sertion that an educator is not a practical business man. In fact he 
showed a high degree of administrative and executive ability during 
his superintendence of the Milford public schools, and since resign- 
ing his post in school work has been even more notably engaged in the 
practical aifairs of business at Milford, where among other relations he 
is cashier of the Farmers State Bank. 

Mr. Shepard was born in Pike County, Indiana, November 23, 1879, 
son of R. W. and Mary A. (McCleary) Shepard. His parents were 
both natives of Pike County, the former born in 1851 and the latter in 
1853. They have spent most of their lives m that county as farmers, 
and now live in Southern Indiana. They had six children, five of 
whom are still living : William, James T., Flora, Hattie and Luther. 

James T. Shepard was reared on his father's farm, and the op- 
portunities he received in the district schools were improved further 
by attending high school at Spurgeon, Indiana. Later he entered the 
State Normal School, graduating with the class of 1908. Mr. Shepard 
came to Milford to take the superintendence of the local schools and 
filled that office seven years. When he began his work ]\lilford was 
maintaining a two year high school. Under his leadership the com- 
munity put up a new school building, and while he was still superin- 
tendent the high school was placed on the roll of commissioned high 
schools of Indiana. 

On leaving school work Mr. Shepard became one of the principal or- 
ganizers of the Farmers State Bank. It was organized in May, 1916, 
with the following officers : J. B. Neff, president ; Moses F. Lentz, vice 
president; James T. Shepard, cashier and director; Harlan H. Sharp, 
Harry R. Phend ; George Krull, Perry Hoover, E. W. Felkner and 
James F. Peterson. 

Mr. Shepard is also one of the directors of the Milford Grain & 
Milling Company, a director in the Milford Loan & Investment Com- 
pany, and a director of the Milford Commercial Club. In 1909 he 
married Miss Ina M. Shoenian. She is a graduate of the Columbia 
City High School of Columbia, and spent three years in the State Nor- 
mal. They have one son, James S., born in January, 1915. The family 
are members of the Baptist Church. Mr. Shepard is also affiliated with 
Milford Lodge No. 478, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, i^s a past 
grand, and in politics is a democrat. 



636 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Harry R. Phend represents one of the oldest families of Kosciusko 
County, and his own life and accomplishments have been on a plane 
consistent with the family record. He is one of the leading business 
men of Milford, being manager of the Royal Telephone Companj' and 
connected with several other local industries. 

His great-grandparents were John and Susanna (Kibley) Phend, 
both natives of Switzerland, where they were married in 1824. In 
1832 they brought their family from Canton Berne to America, first 
locating in Carroll County, then in Greene County, Ohio, and in 1852 
moving to Marshall County, Indiana, where John Phend died in De- 
cember, 1859. 

Jacob Phend, grandfather of Harry R., was born in Canton Berne, 
Switzerland, June 14, 1827. and was five years of age when brought to 
this country. In Carroll County, Ohio, August 27, 1847, he married 
Louisa Fisher, daughter of Michael and Christina (Houck) Fisher, 
both natives of Germany. In 1849 Jacob Phend moved to Indiana, in 
1851 located in ^Marshall County, and in 1868 came to Kosciusko 
County and bought 120 acres of sparsely improved land in section 11 
of Scott Township. He built a fine residence and developed a farm 
which was well considered one of the best in the township. He was 
a republican and he and his wife were members of the Evangelical 
Church. He spent his la.st years at Nappanee, Indiana. He and his 
wife had seven children : John, born August 1, 1848 ; Christian D., 
born :\Iay 12, 1851 ; Samuel, born July 6, 1854 ; William, born Septem- 
ber 6, 1856, and died in 1857: Jacob J., born August 22, 1859: Sophia 
L., born November 9, 1862 : and Henry A., born November 7, 1865. 

Christian D. Phend, who was born on the old farm in Scott Town- 
ship, grew up there, had a district school education, and was actively 
identified with farming in the township until 1898, when he removed to 
Nappanee, Indiana, where he is still living. He is an active member of 
the United Brethren Church. Christian D. Phend married Mary 
McConnell, and they became the parents of nine children, seven of 
whom are still living: Clarence D., a Presbyterian minister; M. Ora, 
a farmer in the State of Washington ; Harry R. ; Waldo, a farmer in 
Iowa ; Hattie, wife of John Rhodes, a farmer in Marshall County, 
Indiana: Iva, wife of Frank Wehrley, of Nappanee, Indiana: Belle, 
wife of A. L. Miller, a farmer in Iowa. 

Mr. Harry R. Phend was born in Scott Town.ship of Kosciusko 
County September 25, 1885. He had a farm training and was edu- 
cated in the local district schools and the high school at Nappanee. He 
was not yet of age when his work and energies were directed into the 
telephone business, and he is a past master and expert in every phase 
of telephone construction and operation. He began as a lineman at 
Nappanee, and for several years did line work, finally being promoted 
to wire chief. He came to Milford on April 14, 1910, to superintend 
the Royal Telephone Company. This is a corporation, the executive 
ofificers of which are : Jacob B. Neff . president : Egbert Gawthrop. sec- 
retary; E. W. Higbee, treasurer; Harry R. Phend, manager, and be- 
sides these the directors are John Defreese, George Krull, Milo Gever 
and William H. Neff. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 637 

Mr. Phend is also local manager for Hawk's Electric Companj- of 
Goshen and is proprietor of the Milford Electric Company. He is a 
director of the Farmers State Bank of Milford, is vice president and 
one of the directore of the Milford Grain and Milling Company, and 
is generally looked upon as one of the most capable young business men 
of this locality. 

Mr. Phend married Mary E. Parker. She was born in Marshall 
County, Indiana, is a graduate of the Bourbon High School and holds 
the collegiate degree Bachelor of Science. For eight years she was 
a successful teacher. They have two children : Mary A., born May 3, 
1915, and Parker H., born in April, 1918. Mr. and Mrs. Phend are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is trustee and sec- 
retary of the official board. He is a past master of the Masonic Lodge 
at Nappanee, member of Syracuse Chapter Royal Arch Masons, and 
the Knight Templar Commandery at Warsaw. 

Jehu Beer is proprietor of one of the profitable and interesting in- 
dustries of Milford, being a manufacturer of circus supplies. He is a 
man who has made his own opportunities in the world and has pro- 
moted himself by his detennination and efforts to a commendable place 
in his home community. 

]Mr. Beer was born in Richland County, Ohio, November 2.5, 1871, 
son of Hans and Ursula (Lantz) Beer. The parents were both born in 
Switzerland, his father January 1, 1835, and his mother on the same 
date. They grew up and married in their native country and in 1867 
brought their family to America, tii-st locating in Richland County, 
Ohio. Hans Beer was a cooper by trade. In 1873 he removed to West 
Virginia, living there until 1897, when he came to Kosciusko County 
and had his home in Milford until his death in 1917. He and his wife 
were members of the New Apostolic Christian Church. They had a 
family of five sons and five daughters, eight of whom are still living: 
Elizabeth, wife of John Fuhrer ; Mary, wife of Godfrey Witchey ; Jon- 
athan, of Milford ; David, of Mansfield, Ohio ; John ; Christian, a 
farmer in Jackson Township of Elkhart County ; Emma, still at home : 
Elsworth, a farmer in Jackson Township of Elkhart County : and 
Jehu. 

Mr. Jehu Beer received most of his schooling in Ohio and it was 
largely through his own efforts that he acciuired a good practical edu- 
cation. He learned by experience and study the profession of station- 
ary engineer, and holds a state license in Ohio. After a number of 
years of varied experience elsewhere he came to ^Milford and in the 
spring of 1910 established a manufacturing plant for the making of 
circiis supplies. This business he has brought to successful proportions. 
Mr. Beer is a republican and a member of the New Apostolic Christian 
Church. 

Jerome H. Lones. It is truly the individual and exceptional ease 
when a man can point to nearly a third of a century of continuous serv- 
ice for one organization or in one position. That is one of the distinc- 
tions of Mr. Lones' citizenship in Warsaw, where ever since August 



638 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

30, 1883, he has been local agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany. To a great many people in Warsaw Mr. Lones is the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company, having served as its representative so lonsr 
that to think of the Pennsylvania Company is also to think of its genial 
and energetic agent. Furthermore. ]\Ir. Lones has been very closely 
and actively identified with the material progress and development of 
the city, and is one of the most highly esteemed as he is one of the 
best known men of "Warsaw. 

The lesson of his career should not be lost as an example to young 
men who have to take np the responsibilities of life with little train- 
ing and with no influence to advance them. He was born on a fana 
in Crawford County, Ohio. Ausrust 20, 1853, the eldest of three chil- 
dren of Harrison and Celia f Benson 1 Lones. "When he was eightee" 
months old his parents moved out to Iowa by way of Cincinnati and 
the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, but owing to the continued ill health 
of his mother they remained onlv a short tim<» and returned to Ohio, 
taking up residence in "Wvandotte Countv. There the father died in 
1859. and for a number of years thereafter the members of the little 
household suffered many hardships and privations In the meantime 
Jerome H. Lones managed to attend the local public schools and gained 
the rudiments of an education. At the age of sixteen he left home, 
and spent several months as a com busker near "Watsek;i. Illinois, 
but in the ensuing spring returned home and looked after the opera- 
tion of the old homestead dnrinar the next season. However, he could 
not content himself with the narrow horizon of an Ohio farm, and it 
was through a better education that he could see the vi&ta of greater 
opportunities opening before him. By economy and hard work he 
managed to pay his way for three years in the Northern Ohio Colleee 
at Ada, where he showed special proficiencv and gained honors in 
mathematics. "While in college his mother died, and not long after- 
wards he had to determine his future location. There were two forces 
that appealed to him, either to gain a place as a bank cashier w'th its 
consequent possibilities, or to engage in railroad service. Before he 
could make a beginning in either career, he needed business trainin", 
and conseauently taught school and with the earnings of that work 
and with some money which he borrowed paid his way thro'agh the 
long course at the Iron City Business College. Then there was an- 
other season at home, when he dug ditches and husked corn, and finally 
he was able to attempt the realization of his dreams. He went to Fort 
"Wayne, made application for eraplovment with the Pennsylvania 
Company, but he was promptly refused owing to his lack of knowledge 
of telegraphy. Undoubtedly one of the oualities which have enabled 
him to succeed was a persistencv in the face of discouragement. 
Turned back at oiie point, he applied for another line of work, and 
finally went on the road as a freight brakeman. After thirteen months 
he was given employment in the freight office as a clerk, and was pro- 
moted to assistant cashier. Then, having demonstrated his capabilities 
and his reliability, he came to "Warsaw in 1883 as station agent. This 
position he has held ever since with credit to himself and satisfaction 
to his company, and while nominally his duties have been the same, 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 639 

the responsibilities have grown with the growth and development of 
the city and its importance as a traffic center. 

Unlike many men in the railroad service who ai'e content to isolate 
themselves from the community which they serve and become merely 
a cog in the routine of the corporation which employs them. Mr. Lones 
has from the first identified himself with local citizenship. For years 
he has contributed from his means and his experience to the aid of all 
worthy enterprises undertaken in Warsaw. He was one of the or- 
ganizers of the modern Commercial Club. He also helped in the or- 
ganization and is one of the principal stockholders and vice president 
of the Indiana Loan and Trust Company. In politics he has always 
been identified with the republican party. Fraternally he is a thirty- 
second degi'ee Scottish Rite Mason and a Knight Templar, and also 
a member of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. For his helpmate 
through life he was fortunate in the selection of Miss Jennie Logan, 
of Fort Wayne, whom he married in 1878. 

David Baee. Thirty-five years of continuous residence on one 
farm in Washington Township gives Mr. David Barr the characteris- 
tics of a man of settled ])urpose and permanent possessions and activi- 
ties, and he is in fact one of the men upon whom some of the larger 
responsibilities of agricultural production in this part of Kosciusko 
County have devolved. 

He was born at Warsaw January 23, 1871, son of Isaac N. and 
Hester D. (Baker) Barr. Both parents were natives of Ohio but were 
brought to Kosciusko County in youth and after their marriage set- 
tled in the City of Warsaw. Isaac Barr was a successful teacher and 
taught in the public schools of Warsaw until his death. He died when 
his son David was eighteen months old. The mother, an active mem- 
ber of the Christian Church, died in 1880. They had four children : 
Ollie, formerly a teacher and now wife of William Botkins; Dora, a 
graduate of the Tri-State Normal School at Angola and now for a 
number of years a teacher of fourth grade in Warsaw; Melvin. of 
Warsaw ; and David. 

i\Ir. David Barr was reared partly in Warsaw and partly on a farm 
and received his education in the eountrs- and city public schools. 
After reaching manhood he engaged in farming, and thirty-five years 
ago came to his present place in Washington Township. Mr. Barr has 
combined crop raising with good livestock and for a number of years 
specialized in the famous 0. I. C. hogs. He is active in agricultural 
affairs and is treasurer of the Oak Grove Grange in Washington Town- 
ship. He is a democrat and is affiliated with the Loyal Order of Moose 
and the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Warsaw. 

Rudolph Huffee, Se. When Rudolph Huffer died at his home in 
Harrison Township September 29, 1911, there could be only affection 
and esteem for the memory of a nian who had lived so long and so use- 
fully in Kosciasko County. He was one of the early settlers and his 
life was a link between the earliest pioneers and the present generation. 
While there were few abnormal and conspicuous events in his life, he 



640 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

deserves the full complement of praise for the manner in which he 
went about performing his duties and oblig-ations and his quiet courage 
and persistency in the face of many obstacles which he overcame in his 
youth. This is a family that has properly won a place among the lead- 
ing households in Kosciusko County. Nearly all the children of the 
late Rudolph Huffer now have substantial homes and places of honor in 
their respective communities in Kosciusko County, and one of the 
widely known citizens in the county now is a son, Jacob D. Huffer, the 
present sheriff. 

The late Rudolph Huffer, Sr., was a native of Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania. His father, Daniel Hoffer, as the family name was then 
spelled, was born in Germany and came to America when a small boy, 
became a farmer, and finally moved to Fairfield County, Ohio, where 
he died. Rudolph Huffer, who was born February 6, 1832, was a very 
small boy when he went with his parents to Ohio and when he was 
about nine years of age his father died. In consequence from that 
time forward his life was one of no little hardship and adversity. He 
gained a home and food by employment as a chore boy, but his edu- 
cational opportunities were exceedingly limited. He had the inheri- 
tance of a sturdy nature, developed good habits, and throughout his 
life was a man of the most honorable principles and character. In 
that period of his life when most boys are in school he was industri- 
ously learning the blacksmith 's trade, and in 1849, at the age of seven- 
teen, came with a married sister, ]Mrs. Mary East, to Kosciusko County. 
Kosciusko County was then only a little way removed from the wilder- 
ness conditions which the fii-st pioneers had found here. The first 
winter he spent in working at his trade in Clunett, and he then re- 
moved to Warsaw. For a number of years he followed his trade in that 
cit.y, and it is said that he built the first ca.st spindle wagon ever manu- 
factured in this county. 

In a few years he was esteemed for his excellent craftsmanship and 
his reliability, and was in a position where he was justified in estab- 
lishing a home of his own. Then, in 1855, he married Miss Sarah 
Stamets (sometimes spelled Stamate). He continued working at his 
trade in Warsaw for several years, but finally sold his shop and closed 
out other local interests and invested in a farm in Prairie Township, 
two and one half miles northwest of Warsaw. That was his home for 
nine years. He next bought and moved to a farm in Monroe Town- 
ship, and still later to Harrison Township, in which community he 
spent the remainder of his days. 

The late Mr. Huffer should be remembered as a man gifted with an 
unusual degree of good, sound, practical sense, and for this reason if 
for no other he was naturall.y a leader in any community in which he 
made his home. In politics he adopted for himself the principles and 
policies of the republican party at the time of its organization, and ex- 
emplified the best qualities of good citizenship. His most important 
official service was as trustee of Harrison Township. He was industri- 
ous, thorough in everything he did, and this quality, combined with 
good management, enabled him to accumulate a sufficient competency. 

While a member of no religious denomination, he believed in Chris- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 641 

tianity and for a number of years his services were much esteemed in 
the position of trustee of the Christian Church. 

He and his wife became the parents of eleven children, all of whom 
they reared to maturity, and they thus founded a sturdy greneration 
whose descendants will look back and honor these Kosciusko County 
pioneers for years to come. All the children married and had fami- 
lies, and nine of them are still living. A brief record of the family is 
as follows : Jacob D. ; Horton C, who is now serving as deputy sheriff 
at Warsaw and married Jennie Haines; Sarah C, wife of Charles 
"Vandermark, a farmer of Harrison Township ; Gertrude, wife of 
James Fawley. a Harrison Township farmer; Sherman, a fanner in 
Monroe Township, who married a Miss Smith, now deceased ; Charles 
D., who is a farmer in Franklin Township and married Effie Blue; 
Lawrence, who died in September, 1907, married Ida Tucker ; Joseph 
E., a farmer in Harrison Township, married Lillie Boggs ; Mary J., 
now Mrs. Tilden Milburn, of Harrison Township ; Edmund R,, of Har- 
rison Township, married Nora Stickler; and Pearl C, Mrs. Rowland 
Anglin of Wayne Township. To the mother of this family enough 
praise cannot be given. She bore her part with uncomplaining cheer- 
fulness in the time of adversity, helped to provide a living for her 
rapidly increasing household, and in the early days wove cloth and 
made clothing for the entire family. Her house was invariably neat 
and clean, and she was one of the model old fashioned housewives of 
whom so much has been written in history and fiction. At one time 
her parents came to live in the Huffer home, and though their presence 
increased the burdens upon her own shouldei-s, she bore that as 
everything else with a sense of devotion to duty which could be re- 
garded with nothing short of admiration. She was an active member 
of the Christian Church, and in that faith she died July 27, 1915. 

The oldest son and representative of the family of the late Ru- 
dolph Hufifer is Jacob D. Huifer, the present sheriff of Kosciusko 
County. He was born June 1, 1856, in Warsaw, but his early experi- 
ence and associations were centered around the old homestead in Har- 
rison Township. He attended the common schools there, and the pub- 
lic schools in Warsaw, and afterward for nineteen consecutive years he 
taught two terms of school each year. After that he was long asso- 
ciated with his brother Horton C. in the livery business at Warsaw. 
He has well merited the confidence and trust of the people of Kosciusko 
County who in 1914 elected him sheriff, and to that office he is now 
giving all his time and attention. 

In polities Mr. Huffer is a republican, and is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. On May 5, 1895, he married Miss Maggie A. Sel- 
lers. They both have membership in the Christian Church. 

Lucius C. Wann. While there is hardly anyone in the city of 
Warsaw not acquainted with the genial postmaster, it is worth while 
to record briefly some of the main features of his career, which for 
many years has been identified with Kosciusko Coutny. He is, in fact, 
a native son, and it was fully sixty years ago that the name first be- 
came identified with this section of Indiana, then comparatively a 



642 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

wilderness, though the pioneers had been making some advance since 
the period of first settlement. 

It was in Franklin Township of Kosciusko County that Lucius C. 
Wann was born February 3, 1861. His father, Amos Wann, was born 
in Pennsylvania, of Pennsylvania Dutch stock, was reared there, but in 
1856 came to Indiana. He was a man of considerable mechanical en- 
terprise, and started a steam sawmill in Franklin Township which 
served to work up some of the splendid forest material in that vicin- 
ity and furnished lumber for the construction of many of the early 
homes and other buildings. Subsequently he moved to Marshall 
County, and was engaged in merchandising at Tippecanoetown. 
There he passed away in 1876. Amos E. Wann married Sophia Shu- 
man. She subsequently married for her second husband Simeon Blue, 
and she died at "Warsaw in 1912. 

While he was born in Kosciusko County, Lucius C. Wann spent 
most of his early youth up to manhood in Marshall County. He at- 
tended the primarv schools of Tippecanoetown, and for two years was 
a student in the old ]\Iethodist Episcopal College at Fort Wayne. Be- 
fore gaining the altitude of man 's estate Mr. Wann engaged in mer- 
chandising in Tippecanoetown, and continued there until 1881, after . 
which he moved his enterprise to Claypool. Selling out his interests 
there, Mr. Wann in 1886 came to Warsaw, and that city has now been 
his home for over thirty years. His first work was traveling on the 
road and handling teas and coffees, but a few yeai-s later he became a 
merchant in chinaware, and continuously for eighteen years he was in 
that line of business. On May 4, 1914, Mr. Wann received appoint- 
ment as postmaster at Warsaw, and since then has given a very close 
attention to the details of that office and has already instituted some 
changes and improvements to increase the efficiency of the local postal 
service. He was reappointed postmaster on the 4th of September, 
1918. 

In many ways his influence has helped to make the modern War- 
saw, lie was one of the organizei-s and since organization has been a 
director of the Warsaw Chamber of Commerce. He has served as 
chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, and in Ma- 
sonry is affiliated with the Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter, Knight 
Templar Commanderj' and the Eastern Star, and has served as wor- 
shipful master of the lodge, and as eminent commander of Wai"sa\v 
Commandery No. 10. 

On May 1, 1884, he married Miss Retta M. Burket, daughter of Dr. 
Bcn.iamin Burket of Warsaw. The three sons of their marriage are : 
Louis, Harry V. and Frank B. Mr. Wann and family are active mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he is a trustee, and 
is also a member and secretary of the Building Committee which at 
this writing has in charge the erection of the new Methodist Church at 



Benjamin Burket, M. D. In recalling the older physicians of 
Kosciusko County some particular attention should be paid to the 
memory of the late Dr. Benjamin Burket. who devoted many years to 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 643 

the unselfish service of his profession in this county, and who died at 
Warsaw in advanced years. 

He was born in Wayne County. Indiana, in 1829, a son of Nathaniel 
Burket, who married a Miss Kessler. His parents were members of the 
Dunkard Church, and were substantial farming people. In their home 
near Hagertown Doctor Burket was reared and educated, and he did 
not take up a professional career until he had passed the age of thirty- 
five. In the meantime he had been identified with farming, and al.so 
became a skillful carpenter. 

About 1858 Doctor Burket moved to Kosciusko County and was 
first known in this county as an industrious carpenter. About 1865 he 
began reading medicine at home, and subseauenty gave it a more sys- 
tematic attention under the direction of Dr. Calvin W. Burket, a 
nephew, who was then engaged in practice at Warsaw. During the 
winter of 1866-67 he took his first course of lectures in the medical de- 
partment of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and subse- 
quently attended the Indiana Medical College of Indianapolis, where 
he was regularly graduated. Doctor Burket for many years prarticed 
his profession in different towns, includinff Knox, Bourbon. Leesburg 
and Warsaw, and it was in Warsaw that he spent his last days. 

He was an esteemed member of the Kosciusko County Medical So- 
ciety, was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
his church was the Methodist. He married Catherine Holman. There 
were two children by that union : Retta is now the wife of Mr. L. C. 
Wann of Warsaw. Charles Edwin, the only son, is now a practicing 
dentist at Spokane, Washington. 

Jacob C. McLaughlin. It would not be possible to name a bet- 
ter known citizen at Milford than Jacob C. McLaughlin, a veteran 
business man, lawyer and former public official, whose citizenship and 
relations with that community run back practically seventy years and 
actively for more than half a century. 

]\Ir. McLaughlin was born in Pennsylvania November 21, 1843, a 
son of Martin H. and Priscilla (Edmunson) jMcLaughlin. His grand- 
father fought as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Martin H. Mc- 
Laughlin was reared and educated in Pennsylvania and had a liberal 
training and at one time was a teacher. He married in his native state, 
and on March 29, 1848, he and his family arrived in Kosciusko County. 
They established their home on the north bank of Turkey Creek, near 
Milford, and in a short time Martin McLaughlin was busily identified 
with local and pioneer affairs. He was a school teacher, a'so helped 
survey some of the first ditches in the county, and was a man of in- 
fluence in the whig and republican parties. He died February 18, 
1869, and his wife on May 25, 1860. They had eleven children, five of 
whom are still living: Emma, wife of George Stuckman. and she is 
now eighty-three years of age; Mary is the wife of Jerre Stephenson, 
a former sheriff of Kosciusko Count.A"; Jacob C. ; George W., of Elk- 
hart County ; and Catherine, wife of Tom Boulton, of Warsaw, 
Indiana. 

Jacob C. McLaughlin was a child a little past four years of age 



644 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUXTY 

when his parents came to Kosciusko County. He grew up near Mil- 
ford, and attended school in an old frame building. His vacations 
were spent on the home farm and his early experiences gave him a 
good substantial training for the long career he has had. On December 
26, 1864, when a little past twenty years of age, he enlisted in Com- 
pany I of the Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantr\-, and saw .some of the con- 
cluding service of the great rebellion. He was mustered out June 26, 
1865. 

The war over, he returned to Kosciusko County and for a year 
owned a half interest in a harness shop at Milford. He then bought 
a half interest in a boot and shoe store and gave his attention to that 
business for fifteen months. Later he took up fire insurance, and is 
one of the oldest insurance agents in Kosciusko County, still handling 
the business for one or two companies at Milford. He has always been 
interested in politics, and served eight years as justice of the peace, 
and as alternate delegate to republican national convention in 1912. 
By private study and practical experience Mr. McLaughlin qualified 
himself for the legal profession, and was admitted to the bar of both 
Elkhart and Kosciusko counties. He has practiced law for many 
yeai-s at Milford, and still handles his practice and is busied with 
many private investments. He ov.ns the ilcLaughlin Block, which was 
erected in 1902, and has two other business rooms at Milford. 

November 2, 1871, he married Sara A. Potter. By a previous mar- 
riage she is the mother of Dr. J. E. Potter, of ililford, who was reared 
and educated in the home of ^Ir. and Mrs. ilcLaughlin. They have 
one daughter, Maude L., a graduate of the ^Milford High School and 
of the Chicago Musical College. She also attended Northwestern Uni- 
versity two summers. She is well known in Milford as teacher of 
music and English in the high school. Jlrs. McLaughlin and her 
daughter are active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Fraternally he is a past noble grand of Milford Lodge No. 478, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, has sat in the Grand Lodge, and 
is now adjutant and past commander of the Grand Army Post. In 
politic-s he is a republican. 

Homer Longfellow. The present generation of Kosciusko 
County citizens needs no introduction to Homer Longfellow, who at the 
time this publication is being prepared is worthily and competently 
filling the position of prosecuting attorney. His large circle of friends 
speak admiringly of his qualifications as a lawyer, his trustworthiness 
in all responsibilities, and the vigorous manner in which he has handled 
the affairs of his office. 

A native of Indiana, he was born in Noble County ilarch 3, 1873, a 
son of David S. and Sarah E. Longfellow. His father was a farmer 
and settled in Noble County in 1853, spending most of his life there and 
passing away in 1904. 

It was on the old farm in Noble Comity that Homer Longfellow 
spent his youth, with an environment such as many successful profes- 
sional men have had and from which he derived strength of body and 
vigor of mind. Up to the age of .seventeen he attended district schools. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 645 

He worked hard to gain an education, and first pursued his higher 
studies in the Ohio Wesleyan Universit3' at Delaware, where he re- 
mained one year, then was out of school a year and taught, following 
which he returned to the Ohio Wesleyan and was graduated A. B. in 
the class of 1898. The next four or five years were spent in educa- 
tional work. He was superintendent of the Bethel Township schools 
in Clark County, Ohio, and principal of the township high school until 
he resigned to take up the study of law 

Admitted to the bar in Kosciusko County in 1905, Mr. Longfellow 
began practice at South Bend, but was there only a short time be- 
fore he located in Pierceton. Pierceton was his home from January 1, 
1906, to January 1, 1915, and at the latter date he came to Warsaw to 
fill the office of prosecuting attorney, to which he had been elected in 
1914. 

Mr. Longfellow is a republican, and is affiliated with the Masonic 
Order, the Knights of Pythias, and is a member of the Methodist 
Church. 

William W. Kiekpatrick represents a family that has been identi- 
fied with Kosciusko County more than eighty years. He is one of the 
prosperous farmers of Washington Township and his rural home, 
marking the best improvements and developments and productiveness, 
is situated two and one half miles north of Pierceton. 

His great-grandfather, John Kirkpatrick, was born in the high- 
lands of Scotland and came to the American colonies in 1775 at the 
beginning of the Revolutionary war. He first settled in Pennsylvania, 
afterwards moved to near Lexington, Kentucky, and in 1804 bought 
land adjacent to what is now the City of Springfield, Ohio, where he 
died. 

The grandfather of Mr. Kirkpatrick was John Kirkpatrick who 
was born in Kentucky March 6, 1795. He moved with his parents to 
Greene County, Ohio, afterwards went with them to Clark County, 
and on November 15, 1817, he married Jane Cowan. She was born in 
Kentucky September 26, 1798, and was reared in Clark County, Ohio. 
Her father, William Cowan, was born in Pennsylvania in 1768 and 
died in Kosciusko County, Indiana. John Kirkpatrick died in Clark 
County, Ohio, August 17, 1826, leaving his widow and six children. 

One of these children was the late William Kirkpatrick, who was 
born in Clark County, Ohio, July 19, 1822. He came to Kosciusko 
County on September 20, 1836, and lived with his mother and four 
sisters in section 25 of Plain Township. His mother had entered 160 
acres of land there in 1836, and this is one of the early records of land 
entry in that section of the county. William Kirkpatrick was only 
fourteen years old when he came to this county, and due to circum- 
stances of the fact that very few schools were maintained his early 
education was limited. He worked the land under the direction of his 
mother until sixteen, after which he managed the place for himself. 

February 18, 1847, William Kirkpatrick married Miss Ann Pierce, 
who was born in Clark County, Ohio, March 6, 1824, but at the time 
of her marriage was living in Madison County, Ohio. Her parents 



646 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

%yere ]\Ioses R. and Mary (Cowan) Pierce, while her grandnarents 
were Gilbert and Sarah (Quimbv) Pierce. Gilbert Pierce was a na- 
tive of Massachusetts and died at Springfield, Ohio, in 1845. His wife 
was born February 23, 1769, and died in Ohio in 1839. Thus these 
family records go back into American citizenship to the time of the 
Revolution and even earlier. 

After their marriage William Kirkpatrick and wife went to house- 
keeping on a rented farm, but the next year bought 100 acres in sec- 
tions 24 and 19, Plain Township. William Kirkpatrick built in sec- 
tion 19 a substantial hewed log house a stoiy and a half high, which 
made a very comfortable home. They lived in that house until 1883, 
nearly thirty-five years. They then moved to Washington Town- 
ship, owning a farm in section 10, and lived here until his death on 
March 26, 1898. His wife passed away February 27, 1892. They 
were among the very elect of the substantial farming popidation of 
Kosciusko County and their names and records desen^e a proniinent 
place in this history. They were members of the Presbyterian Church 
and William Kirkpatrick served as an elder of the church and was 
a democrat in politics. They became the parents of nine children, 
four of whom are still living: Sarah J., who was bom September 5, 
1852, and lives at Warsaw, widow of John T. Gilliam : Margaret E., 
who wa.s born July 21, 1857, and is unmarried and lives with her 
brother William W. ; M. Pierce, who was born October 30, 1860, and 
married Hortense Crawford, of Pierceton : and William W. The de- 
ceased children are : John W, born June 8, 1848, died April 4 1849 : 
Mary E., born February 16, 1850. died December 12, 1861 ; Eliza A., 
born January 12, 1855; was married, September 24, 1879, to Samiiel 
B. Long, and she died January 10, 1914; Eunice A., bom July 25, 
1865, died :May 7, 1884 ; and Alvin W., born December 25, 1867, died 
August 18, 1872. 

William W. Kirkpatrick was born in Tippecanoe Township of this 
county February 5, 1863, and lived among the old home surroundings 
in that locality until he was twenty years old. In 1883 he accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Washington Township, and 
here he made his first essay as a practical and independent farmer. 
On November 18, 1896, ilr. Kirkpatrick married Nettie Goshert, who 
was born in Prairie Township of this county September 9, 1874. Her 
parents were Jasper and Electa (Hall) Goshert. Her father was bom 
in Prairie Township September 9, 1845, just twenty-nine years to the 
day before the birth of his daughter. The juother was born in Prair 'e 
Township December 18, 1854. ilr. and Mrs. Goshert married Sep- 
tember 11, 1873, and were the parents of three daughter: Mrs. 
Kirkpatrick ; Pearl, who married Eugene Harley and is now deceased ; 
and Edith, wife of Professor Edwin Gerraaun, of Fort Wayne. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. William W. Kirkpatrick are : Edith Hope, 
Iiorn ]\Iay 17, 1S99, and William Merrill, born November 27, 1900. 
Both graduated from Pierceton High School and Edith Hope is teach- 
ing. Merrill is at home on the farm. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 647 

Edmond C. Doke. There is )io citizen of Washington Townshii) 
who more thorouglily enjoys the esteem and respect of his fellow 
citizens than Edmond C. Doke. He is a native of Kosciusko County 
and now occupies one of the best homesteads in the township. His 
individual prosperity has not been accomplished without benefit to 
the community in which he has lived, and his enterprise has been 
one of the stimulating factors of the county's general prosperity. 

Mr. Doke was born on the farm where he is now living March 1, 
1845. This farm is three and one-half miles northeast of Pierceton. 
It is one of the centers of early settlement in the county. Mr. Doke 
is a son of John S. and Harriet M. (Turner) Doke, while his grand- 
father, Alexander Doke, was a pioneer blacksmith at Urbana. Ohio, 
and commanded a company of volunteers as captain in the "War of 
1812. John S. Doke was born in Champaign County, Ohio, June 30, 
1809, while his wife was born in Logan County, that state, August 12, 
1809. They grew up and married in Logan County and on October 
11, 1837, arrived in Kosciusko County, which was then to a large ex- 
tent just as nature had left it. John S. Doke made choice of the exten- 
sive government lands open to settlement by selecting a ciuarter section 
in section 13 of "Washington Township. His individual labors brought 
about remarkable transformation in the course of years, though at 
the beginning he lived in the woods and had a cabin home on a space 
which he cleared with the axe. He was a prosperous and highly 
esteemed citizen of this locality for many years, but finally moved to 
Iowa and died in that state. His wife died in Kosciusko County. 
Of their nine children seven grew to maturity and four are still 
living : Thompson Doke, of Bloomfleld, Iowa ; Elizabeth, widow of 
A. D. Stinson, of Spokane, "Washington ; Ilattie, widow of George 
Messiek, of Kansas; and Edmond C. 

Edmond C. Doke has spent nearly all the days of his life in Wash- 
ington Township. For his education he attended one of the old log 
cabin schools such as were typical of the institutions of learning in the 
early days. "While a schoolboy he found employment on the home 
farm, and finally left home to enlist in Company D of the One Hun- 
dred and Fifty-Second Indiana Infantry. Though he was extremely 
young he did his part as a fighting soldier in that great struggle and 
was still under age when he retui-ned home. Since the war for a 
period of more than half a centur.y he has been active on the old 
farm, and is now owner of 290 acres of land. He has been a prom- 
inent figure in the live stock industry of the county and has fed and 
bred many cattle and has also been a breeder of Shetland pojiies. 

Mr. Doke married for his first wife Miss Mary A. Scott, who died 
leaving no children. By his second marriage, to flattie "Wr'ght, he 
has one daughter, Mary "W., who is a gi'aduate of the common schools 
and the Pierceton High School. Mr. Doke is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church and fraternally is affiliated with Pierceton Lodge No. 
377, Ancient Free and Accepted I\Iasnns, Chapter No 88, Warsaw 
Council, Royal and Select Masons, and the Knight Templar Com- 
mandery No. 10 at W^arsaw. In politics he is a democrat and has 



648 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

always sustained his part as a public-spirited citizen of the com- 
munity. 

George E. Swongee learned his business as a farmer and stock- 
man when a boy in Marshall County and having added to knowledge 
and experience the qualities of industry and prudence has been get- 
ting steadily ahead in the world since he began his independent 
career. For a number of years he has lived in Kosciusko County and 
now has one of the well managed farms of Wa.yne Township, located 
on the Fort Wayne Eoad six miles southeast of Warsaw on rural 
route No. 6. 

Mr. Swonger was born in Marshall County, Indiana, July 20, 
1871, son of James A. and Elizabeth (Shreck) Swonger. His father 
was born in Cumberland County and his mother in Dolphin County, 
Pennsylvania. Both went when young to Crawford County, Ohio, 
locating between Bucyrus and Gallon. Elizabeth Shreck 's father 
owned a tavern in that locality and she grew up there and married. 
In the spring of 1871 the Swonger family moved to Marshall County, 
Indiana, where the parents spent the rest of their years. They were 
members of the Evangelical Church. James A. Swonger was twice 
married and had two children by each wife. George E. is the young- 
est of these children. He has one half-brother still living. 

Mr. Swonger was born near Bourbon, Indiana, and had a district 
school education. To the age of twentj'-one he was at home and after 
that he farmed the old homestead until he was thii'ty-four. The 
place was then sold and the proceeds divided between him and his 
half brother. j\Ir. Swonger then came to Kosciusko County and 
bought the eighty-acre farm in Wayne County which he now occupies 
and manages. 

October 28, 1900, he mamed Miss Cora Cress. Mrs. Swonger was 
born and reared in Washington Township of this county. Four chil- 
dren have been born to their marriage : Willard, Margaret, Leah and 
Floyd. They are members of the United Brethren Church and in 
politics Mr. Swonger is a republican. 

Andrew Peterson. Members of the Peterson family have been 
closely identified with Kosciusko County for more than half a cen- 
tury. One of the principal business men at Warsaw is now David A. 
Peterson, proprietor of the Peterson Lumber Company. He is a 
son of the late Andrew Peterson, who died in Warsaw in 1870. It 
was he who founded the family in Kosciusko Count.y, and something 
of his career should be given a permanent record where it may be 
read by following generations. 

A native of Southeastern Ohio, Andrew Peterson was reared in 
that state, and became a farmer and sawmill operator. For a time 
he lived in Iowa but about 1859 he moved into Kosciusko County, and 
for four j-ears lived near Silver Lake in this county. In 1864 he 
moved his residence to Warsaw and was first in the contracting and 
later in the grocery business. He was one of Warsaw's leading mer- 
chants at the time of his death. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 649 

The first year after he located in Warsaw he was elected a justice 
of the peace and continued to administer that office throughout the 
remainder of his life. In politics he was a republican of the stalwart 
kind, and was active and devout as a Baptist, serving as deacon in 
the church before coming to Kosciusko County. He is remembered 
as a man of medium height, but was rather large and weighed over 
200 pounds. Courteous in demeanor and strictly just and up- 
right in his intercourse with his fellow men, he at once made friends 
and retained them, and was universally respected for his many sterling 
qualities of mind and heart. In his home he was kind, and instead 
of commanding obedience through fear he governed entirely b.y love. 
Few fathers were ever better loved or respected. He selected for his 
life's companion Martha Linn. They became the parents of seven chil- 
dren, five of them still living. Two sons, Sylvanus and John A., both 
served their country during the Civil war, and the former gave up his 
life for his country. 

David A. Petei-son, one of the younger children of the late Andrew 
Peterson and wife, was born at Waterloo, Iowa, where his parents were 
living temporarily, on August 29, 1858. He was only six months of 
age when the family moved to Kosciusko County, and since then his 
home has never been outside the county limits. The local public 
schools supplied his early education, and during much of his boyhood 
he assisted in conducting a grocery business at Warsaw. In March, 
1889, he was appointed to the United States railway mail service, and 
for the first six months traveled from Michigan City to Indianapolis. 
After that his run was between Pittsburg and Chicago over the Pitts- 
burg, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway. 

Resigning from the mail service in March, 1897, Mr. Peterson in 
conjunction with Silas Meyers, his partner, engaged in the retail lum- 
ber business at Warsaw In April, 1902, he became sole owner, and 
has since conducted this large and completely stocked yard as the 
Peterson Lumber Company, and is its sole owner. Politically Mr. 
Peterson is a i-epublican, and he is a popular member of the Knights 
of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. 

John F. Boyee is one of the substantial agriculturists of Kosciusko 
County who have made their way against obstacles and difficulties, 
and with practically nothing but the work of his bare hands to begin 
with has effected a good home, gained prosperity and achieved a com- 
mendable position in the community. The Boyer home is a mile and 
three quarters east of Piereeton on rural route No. 1 in Washington 
Township. 

Mr. Boyer represents some of the old families of Kosciusko County. 
He was born in Jackson Township near Sidney, February 27, 1875, 
son of Jacob and Leah (Hoppis) Boyer. His father was born in Sen- 
eca County, Ohio, and when a boy came with his father to Kosciusko 
Countj', the family first locating in Clay Township and afterwards 
in Jackson Township. Leah Hoppis was born in Kosciusko County, 
daughter of Christopher Hoppis. Both parents grew to maturity in 



650 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

that section of Kosciusko County and after their marriage settled on 
the farm where they are still living. All their nine children are liv- 
ing, namely : Loretta, wife of William Deemer : John F. ; Charles, 
who married Josie Snyder: Ellen, wife of Albert Beber ; William, who 
married Myrtle Metzger ; Pearl, wife of Scott Keeper, of Warsaw; 
Merle and ilyrtle 'SI., twins, the former unmarried and the latter the 
wife of Lloyd Hunter ; and Hersehel, who married Lena Hoover. 

John F. Boyer grew up on the old Jackson Township farm, and had 
his education in the district schools. At the age of twenty-one he 
left home and began working as a farm hand by the month. On De- 
cember 25, 1898, he married Miss Minerva Krider, who was born in 
Lake Township of this county July 31, 1878, daughter of Monroe 
Krider. Mrs. Boyer was reared and educated in Lake Township. 

After their marriage they lived in Lake Town.ship and ^Ir. Boyer 
continued working by the month for some time. He acquired the first 
land of his own when he bought eleven acres, but after living on this 
tract for a year or so sold it and moved to the George A. Lepper farm 
in Washington Township. He rented there three years and then 
bought the place he now lives on, consisting of 61i,o acres, a farm that 
he has brought to an enviable state of improvement and production. 

Mr. and ilrs. Boyer have had three children, but one died in in- 
fancy. The son Arthur is now a student in the common schools, and 
Alene is two years old. They are members of the Brethren Church at 
Sidney and Mr. Boyer is affiliated with the Moose Lodge at Warsaw 
and is a democrat in politics. 

Thomas A. Hoover. One of the oldest and most prominent fami- 
lies of Kosciusko County, in the State of Indiana, is represented by Mr. 
Thomas A. Hoover, a well known retired farmer who still lives in his 
country home half a mile east of Pierceton. He is a son of Alfred 
Hoover, grandson of Henry Hoover, and great-grandson of Andrew 
Hoover. 

The Hoover family was brought to America in the person of three 
brothers from Germany, all of whom first settled on Pipe Creek in 
Maryland. Subsequently two of them moved into Pennsylvania, while 
the other branch of the family went to Randolph County, North Caro- 
lina, and became identified with a Quaker settlement there. Andrew 
Hoover in 1807 brought his family west from North Carolina, first lo- 
cating at Dayton, Ohio, and soon afterward moving to Wayne County, 
Indiana, where the.v fere among the first pioneers of that wilderness 
section. Andrew Hoover had sevei-al sons, including Heniy and David 
Hoover. David Hoover with other membei-s of the family acquired a 
large tract of land and he was responsible for laying out the towni 
which is now the city of Richmond. He gave the name to that town. 

Henry Hoover, grandfather of Thomas A., was born in North Caro- 
lina September 22, 1788, and was about nineteen years old when his 
parents came out to Indiana. Though he had a limited education, he 
fitted himself by reading and study for some of the higher responsibili- 
ties of public as well as private life. In 1825 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the first Legislature that convened at Indianapolis. In 1832 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 651 

General Lewis Cass, secretary of war, appointed him secretary of the 
commission to hold two Indian Treaties. Henry Hoover married in 
Wayne County Susanah Clark. After his marriage he settled at 
Whitewater in Wayne County and in 1830 bought a farm in the vi- 
cinity of Washington in that county, where his wife died August 9, 
1853. In December, 1854, he married Jlrs. Lydia C. Vaughan, and in 
1855 he moved to Richmond and lived in that city until his death, 
July 23, 1868, in his eightieth year. He was reared a Friend, but 
rather late in life joined the Methodist Church. He could not be- 
come accustomed to the forms and ceremonies of that church, which 
were much at variance with the simple worship of his boyhood, and 
strenuously opposed the introduction of organs and choirs. Thus 
during the last years of his life he was again a member of the 
Society of Friends at Richmond. The children of this honored pioneer 
were : Alfred ; Mary, who became the wife of David Culbertson, of 
Iowa; Ann, who married Thomas Harvey: Martha, who married 
Daniel Culbertson ; Allen, who moved out oflowa ; Daniel, who became 
a resident of Kosciusko County ; and Henry, who was also an Iowa 
resident. It is a matter of widespread interest at the present time that 
of these children Allen Hoover was the grandfather of the present 
Herbert Hoover, food commissioner of the United States. 

Alfred Hoover, father of Thomas A., was born near Richmond, 
Indiana, March 8, 1811, grew up on a farm and was with his parents 
until the age of twenty-seven. On February 9, 1837, he married Miss 
Mary Allred, a native of Ohio, though married in Wayne County, In- 
diana, where her parents were pioneers. She was the daughter of 
Thomas and Margaret (Allred) Allred, who came from North Carolina 
to Ohio about 1808, and her father subsequently served in the War of 
1812. After his marriage Alfred Hoover lived on a farm in Wayne 
County until 1853, when he sold his possessions and moved to Kos- 
ciusko County and settled on land in Washington Township. A num- 
ber of years before, in 1837, he had acquired it dii-ect from the Govern- 
ment. He owned 320 acres. At the beginning this land was covered 
with poplar and walnut timber, but gradually it was cleared away, and 
cultivated fields took its place. Alfred Hoover served several times as 
trustee of Washington Township, and was always loyal to the church 
in which he had been reared. His wife was a Methodist. He was one 
of the quiet and substantial citizens of Kosciusko County until his 
death. He became a man of wide information through his studious at- 
tention to books, and was a man above the ordinary in character and 
general information. He and his wife had ten children, seven of 
whom are still living : Franklin of Kosciusko County ; Thomas A. ; 
John, who served as a soldier in the Civil war and is a resident of 
Cambridge City, Indiana ; Henry, of Kosciusko Countv ; Marv, widow 
of Rev. M. H. Smith ; Gertrude, wife of Joseph Snyder, of LaGrange, 
Indiana ; Lillie, wife of Mart M. Bradwick. 

Thomas A. Hoover was born in Wayne County, near Richmond, 
October 15, 1841, and was twelve years old when tlie familv moved to 
Kosciusko County. He attended the public schools of Washington 
Township and after reaching manhood he enlisted, in 1864, in Com- 



652 HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

pany E of the Oue Hundred Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry. He saw 
some active service during the six months he was in the arm.y aud was 
granted an honorable discharge. Following the war he took up farm- 
ing, and that was his steady vocation until he retired. 

In 1878 Mr. Hoover married Elizabeth Heagy, who was born in 
Wayne County, Indiana, December 11. 1850, daughter of John and 
Sarah Heagy. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hoover located 
on the farm where they have lived now continuously for forty years 
and where their labors and mutual sacrifices have brought them ample 
prosperity. 

Two children were born to them, Edna and Florence E. The lat- 
ter died at the age of sixteen. Edna was born in 1879, graduated from 
the common schools and studied in high school and is now the wife of 
Alvin B. Rusher. Mr. and Mrs. Rusher had one child, Robert H., who 
died when seven months old. 

The family are active members of the ]\Iethodist Epicopal Church 
at Pierceton. Mr. Hoover has been one of its most liberal supporters 
for a number of years. His daughter Edna is secretary of the "Wom- 
an's Missionary Society. Mr. Hoover is past commander and present 
adjutant of John ilurray Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, is 
a past grand of Pierceton Lodge No. 257 of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and past chief patriarch of the Encampment. Politically 
he is a republican, and in his younger years was a man of much influ- 
ence in local politics in this section. 

Amos Ringle. It was forty years ago when Amos Ringle first be- 
came acquainted with Kosciusko County. For more than a quarter of 
a century he has been a continuous resident of Warsaw, and until re- 
cently was proprietor of one of the largest and best known mercantile 
establishments in that city. His standing as a business man and citi- 
zen is above question, and those who know Amos Ringle best know 
that his spoken promise can be relied upon. 

By birth he is a native of one of Ohio's oldest counties. He was 
born near ]Minerva in Stark County, the county seat of which is 
Canton, on January 21, 1854. He is one of the seven surviving children 
in the family of eight born to John and Sophia (Bortz) Ringle. who 
were natives of Westmoreland County, Penns.vlvania, and Stark 
County, Ohio, respectively. Mr. Ringle 's grandfather was also named 
John Ringle. The latter did teaming across the mountains to Pennsyl- 
vania before railroads were constructed and he also operated a small 
farm. He was of German stock but his wife was a native of Ireland. 
Grandfather John Ringle 's father had served in the Revolutionary 
war and was with Washington in the terrible winter spent at Valley 
Forge. John Ringle, father of Amos, left his parents' home in Penn- 
sylvania and went to Stark County, Ohio, where he met and married 
Miss Sophia Bortz. He died in Stark County about forty years ago, 
while Mrs. Ringle died in 1913. One of their sons, the oldest of the 
family, served his country during the Civil war and is now living in 
Canton, and the son of this old veteran, named Homer, saw active serv- 
ice in the Spanish-American war. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 653 

On the old home farm in Stark County Amos Ringle spent his 
youth and early manhood. His experiences were not different from 
those of other Ohio boys of the time. He attended district schools, and 
learned how to work on the farm. In 1875, at the age of twenty-one, 
he came to Kosciusko County. The presence of a number of his moth- 
er's relatives in the county was what brought him here. He soon 
afterwards secured a school to teach, known as the Best school, south 
of Nappanee. He continued teaching for three yeai's and used the 
proceeds of that work to defray his expenses at Professor Reubert's 
school at Bourbon. 

About 1878 Jlr. Ringle went to Emporia, Kansas, where for eight 
years he was engaged in the retail grocery business and also acquired 
ownership of several ranches in that section of Kansas. In 1889 he 
returned to Kosciusko County and for seven years was in the furniture 
house of R. H. Hitzler at Warsaw. He then engaged in the furniture 
business on his own account and developed a trade and maintained a 
stock in furniture and kindred lines second to none in Kosciusko 
County. Mr. Ringle sold out his furniture industry in December, 1917, 
and is now retired from active business. 

In politics he is a democrat, and is a member of the Knights of the 
Maccabees. On April 15, 1878, he married Miss Priscilla Shaffer. Her 
father, Henry Shaffer, had for many years been a well known farmer 
and citizen of Kosciusko County. Mr. and Mrs. Ringle are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. To their marriage were born three 
children: IVIabel died at the age of twenty-one. Jessie Ethel died at 
eighteen months. The only one now living is Benjamin Franklin. 

William W. Gilliam. About forty-five years ago when William 
W. Grilliam married, he had a very small piece of land as a start 
towards farming, and since then his own energies and sound intelli- 
gence have enabled him to accumulate a property which makes him 
one of the leading farmers and land owners of Wayne Township. 

Mr. Gilliam was born in Washington Township of this county 
April 26, 1850, son of William F. and Mary Elizabeth (:Morris) Gil- 
liam. His father was born in Virginia, and on reaching his majority 
moved to Ohio and from Payette County, that state, came to Kosciusko 
County in the fall of 1845. He lived in Washington Township for 
some years and later moved to Tippecanoe Township, where he had 
a farm. In that locality he died September 5, 1882, when nearly sixty- 
seven years of age. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Mary Elizabeth Morris was a native of Ohio and survived her 
husband. They were the parents of twelve children, those still living 
being as follows : Clavin, who served as a soldier in the Union army 
and is now a stock buyer at Warsaw; Minerva, who lives in Rich 
Creek; William W. ; Angeline, wife of Nathaniel Hover; Emma, wife 
of French Berry ; Edward, of LaGrange County, Indiana ; and Hattie, 
wife of Harry Kelley, of Warsaw. 

William W. Gilliam grew up on the old farm in Tippecanoe Town- 
ship. He had a common school education and was at home with his 
parents until twenty-one, when he started out to carve his own for- 
tune in the world. 



654 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

111 1872 he married iliss Mary C. Baker, a native of Kosciusko 
County. His career has been spent as a progressive farmer of this 
county. He now owns 330 acres comprising his home place in Wayne 
Township and also has 145 acres in LaGrange Count.y. He combines 
good stock with productive fields, and his farm is one of the chief pro- 
ducing centers of agricultural supplies in the county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilliam have three children : Mabel, who finished her 
education in high school and is now the widow of George A. Snyder 
of Warsaw; Mary, a graduate of the common schools and wife of 
William R. Hall, of Warsaw ; and Fred E., who was educated in the 
public schools and is a farmer in Plain Township. He married Irene 
Hill. 

Mr. Gilliam and family are members of the Progressive Brethren 
Church at Warsaw and he is "one of the deacons. Politically he is a 
republican and is at present serving on the Township Advisory Board. 

Rev. George H. Thayer. Hon. John D. Thayer. For a period 
of more than fifty-five years the name Thayer has been one of greatest 
significance in Kosciusko County, ilembers of the family have been 
effective upholders of the Christian religion and every phase of mor- 
ality and intellectual and spiritual progress. They have been business 
men of more than ordinai-y ability, have been leaders in public af- 
fairs, and the City of Warsaw in particular has cause to remember 
their attainments and influence with gratitude. 

The Rev. George H. Thayer was best known to this community and 
all over Northern Indiana as a pioneer Methodist preacher, one who 
was a true missionary and carried the Gospel word to many isolated 
communities. He was born December 29, 1807, in Brown County, 
New York. His father was James Thayer, a native of Massachusetts 
and of colonial ancestry. James Thayer served as captain of a com- 
pany of militia during the War of 1812. Rev. George H. Thayer was 
graduated from Onondaga Academy and both prior to his graduation 
and afterwards he taught school. When about eighteen years of age 
he was converted and joined the Methodist Church. In 1836 he en- 
tered the ministry and for a number of .years pursued the work with- 
out compensation, undertaking the arduous role of the itinerant min- 
ister, walking and riding horseback for miles to keep his appointments. 
He is properly remembered among the pioneer evangelists of that 
faith in Northern Indiana. In 1845 he located at Peru, Indiana, and 
three years later moved to Marshall County. From there in 1859 he 
came to Bourbon in Kosciusko County, and laid out Thayer's Addi- 
tion to that town. Rev. George H. Tha.yer was a man of strong force 
of character, was public spirited, an earnest worker on matters per- 
taining to religious and educational development, and for these and 
many other reasons his life .should be a matter of record in Kosciusko 
County. He was not only devoted to his duty as he saw it, but was an 
original and profound thinker on many subjects, and a man of en- 
lightened opinions and convictions. He cast his fii-st presidential 
ballot for Andrew Jackson, but later became a whig, and still later 
supported the republican principles. He was a Knight Templar in the 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 655 

JMasonie fraternity. His death occurred December 6, 1899, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-two yeai-s. His first wife was Hannah Griffin, 
who died in 1865. She was the mother of three children : Henry G., 
John D. and Frances Augusta. Both the sons became prominent men 
in Indiana. In 1867 Rev. Mr. Thayer married Mrs. Amelia Crockett. 
To that union were born two daug^hters : Lillie and Emma G. 

Hon. John D. Thayer, who left an indelible impress not only upon 
business affairs but upon the public life of Kosciusko County, was one 
of the sons of the late Rev. George H. Thayer. John D. Thayer was 
born in Syracuse, New York, May 27, 1840, and when about five years 
of age accompanied his father to Peru, Indiana, spent part of his early 
youth in Marshall County, and went with his father to Bourbon in 
Kosciusko County in 1859, and helped the latter develop a farm there. 
Thus the early circumstances of John D. Thayer were those of a rural 
community. He gained his education in district schools and came to 
manhood "on the old farm near Bourbon. He also supplemented his 
early education by a course in DePauw University at Greeneastle, 
Indiana. He had also taught school prior to going to college. 

It was his early ambition to become a lawyer, though destiny over- 
ruled and his life work was chieflv in business and industrial affairs. 
He lived at both Bourbon and Plymouth for several years, and at 
Plymouth clerked for a brother in a grocery store. Subsequently the 
two brothers engaged in the grain business. 

In 1862 John D. Thayer married Sara Erwin, daughter of Eli.iah 
and Mary (Scott) Erwin, who were Quaker settlers in Mar.shall 
County, Indiana. About a year after his marriage Mr. Thayer moved 
to "Warsaw, and that city was thenceforth his home. "With his brother 
Henry G. he bought the mill west of the square which originally was 
built by Colonel Chapman. This industry they operated for a num- 
ber of years. In 1876 John D. Thayer bought the Big Four grain ele- 
vator, and operated it until he sold the building to J. F. Beyer to be 
used as a bam. He next bought the elevator originally owned by Sam- 
uel Oldfather. He continued in the elevator and grain business until 
his death. 

In many ways Mr. Thaj^er was prominently identified with the 
affaii-s of "Warsaw. He was an ardent republican and was twice hon- 
ored by election to the Lower House of the State Lecrislature, and 
once to the State Senate. He was fiot a silent member of the legislative 
body, but did much to shape legislation during his term of service. He 
was author of some of the measures still found on the statute books 
of the state. Fraternally he was active in the Masonic Order, attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, and was also a Knight 
Templar. Anything that was undertaken to make a better and greater 
city was sure to appeal to him, and he took a great deal of pride in the 
prosperity and welfare of his own community, and in every way possi- 
ble assisted its progress. 

This sterling citizen of "Warsaw passed away January 28, 1895. He 
and his wife were the parents of six children, two of whom died in in- 
fancy, and the other four are Mattie 0., now Mrs. E. E. Hcndee, of 
Vol. n— 18 



656 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

San Diego, California ; Jessie ; Harry D., a resident of California ; and 
Mary. 

Mrs. Thayer was of the Quaker religious belief, but owing to the fact 
that there was no organization of Quakers at Warsaw she and the rest 
of her family attended the Presbyterian Church. In her younger days 
she taught school, and through all her life she kept in close touch with 
educational affairs. She was an able helper and adviser to the able 
man with whom she lived for a period of thirty-three years. Her death 
occurred September 10, 1914. She took a very active part with other 
Warsaw women in the work of the W. C. T. U., and some forty years 
ago she was one of the participants in the liquor crusades. She was 
also a member of the Zerelda Reading Club, and she and Mr. Thayer 
were among the charter members of the local chapter of the Order of 
Eastern Star. 

John S. Conklin has become well known to different farming sec- 
tions in Kosciusko County as a veteran thresherman. He has been 
operating threshing outfits over this district for over twenty-five years. 
Mr. Conklin is also a practical farmer and his home is 2yo miles south- 
east of Warsaw. 

He was born on the southeast corner section of Wayne Township 
on February 8, 1869, son of Cyrus E. and Isabel J. (Lvicas) Conklin. 
Mr. Conklin grew up on the farm where he was born and attended the 
district schools to the age of eighteen. After that he worked at home 
and at the age of twenty-one, on July 12, 1890, married Miss Laura J. 
Walker. Mrs. Conklin was born half a mile north of her husband's 
birthplace, and they attended the same school and were in the same 



After their marriage they took charge of the Conklin home farm, 
later lived on the Walker farm, and from that moved to another place 
nearby. When twenty-five years old, in 1895, Mr. Conklin bought his 
first threshing outfit and has been continuously in the business with all 
the changes and incidents thereto for more than twenty-five years. He 
is now using his fourth outfit, which represents a remarkable advance 
over the first machinery, which at the time was the best on the 
market. Mr. Conklin had the distinction of operating the first wind 
stacker over a district between the Nickel Plate Railroad and the 
Pennsylvania lines. 

Mr. and Mrs. Conklin have seven living children. Frank, a grad- 
uate of the Warsaw High School and who also studied at Winona, be- 
came first sergeant in the One Hundred and Thirteenth Mobile Ord- 
nance repair shops and now in France. Harry, who also represents 
the family in armj^ service, is a graduate of the common schools and is 
a member of Battery D of the One Hundred Thirty-seventh Field Ar- 
tillery and now in New Jersey. IMaiy is a graduate of the common 
schools and is the wife of Carl Funk. Eva is still at home and Zola 
May and Lola Faj% twins, born December 17, 1911, have recently be- 
gun their school careers. The youngest of the family is Ralph, aged 
five yeai-s. 

Mr. Conklin is affiliated with Lodge No. 515 of the Independent 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 657 

Order of Odd Fellows at Claypool and is also a member of the Loyal 
Order of Moose. Politically he votes as a democrat in national affairs, 
but is liberal and gives his support to the best man in local questions. 

Jacob W. Matz, who has a fine farm property in the northeast cor- 
ner of Wayne Township, is of that type of citizens who begin life with- 
out special advantages or the inheritance of means except the ability 
to toil and make the best of environment. 

He has proved himself one of the sturdy characters of Kosciusko 
County, and though he and his wife had absolutely nothing when they 
married they are now possessed of some valuable property and have 
gained an enviable station in life. 

Mr. Matz was born in Franklin County, Ohio, April 18, 1860, son 
of Daniel and Mary A. (Matz) Matz. Both parents were natives of 
Berks County, Pennsylvania. They spent their last years in Ohio. 
Of their six children five are still living : Sidney ; Orlando Franklin ; 
Ida J., a graduate of the Wooster High School and of Akron College, 
and now a teacher in the schools of Akron ; and Ella, wife of Loren 
Lounsbury, of Akron. 

Jacob W. Matz grew to manhood in Wayne County, Ohio, and was 
educated in the district schools. He was only thirteen when he started 
to make his own living. For several years he worked on a farm at 
wages of only $4 a month. On the 24th of December, 1882, he arrived 
in Kosciusko County. He was poor and practically a stranger, and 
for several years he continued to do farm work at wages. 

On November 19, 1885, he married Lydia Freesner. Mrs. Matz 
was born in Hocking County, Ohio, and was two years old when her 
parents moved to Kosciusko County, where she grew up and received 
her education in the district schools, and she also taught school in the 
county. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Matz rented land in the 
county until 1900, when they achieved one definite advance in pros- 
perity by purchasing seventy-three acres of land where they now live. 
Since then other items have iDeen added to their prosperity, and besides 
they have twenty-five acres in Tippecanoe Township and fifty acres in 
Plain Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Matz have also been active in the affairs of their com- 
munity and are members of the Progressive Brethren Church at Dutch- 
town. In politics Mr. Matz is a republican. He and his wife have 
three children : Ida A., a graduate of the common schools and wife of 
R. W. Kile; Anna, who has finished the work of the common schools 
and lives at home ; and Luella, who is also at home. All are graduates 
of the common schools. 

John D. Goddard, owner of one of the largest farms of Kosciusko 
County, has spent practically all his life in Indiana, and is an honored 
surviving veteran of the Civil war. He fought valiantly for the cause 
of the Union, and his entire career may be described as a battle, since 
he had to struggle for his own living when a mere boy. With the aid 
of a good wife he has acquired substantial means and is one of the 



658 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

leading men of this county. His farm home is in section 2 of Wayne 
Township. 

Mr. Goddard was bom in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, near Battle- 
ground, November 9, 1842, son of Benjamin H. and Nancy (Deardofif) 
Goddard. His father was a native of the State of Maine and his 
mother of Ohio. Both families were pioneers in Tippecanoe County, 
Indiana, where Benjamin Goddard and wife married and where they 
lived on a farm until 1846. In that year they removed to Newton 
County, Indiana, which was then just beginning to be settled. Benja- 
min Goddard died there in 1847. His wife married again and survived 
him nearly fifty years. She passed away at Morocco, Indiana, in 1904. 
Benjamin Goddard and wife had five children : Sarah Ann, who died 
in 1874; Matilda, widow of Lafayette McCullough, living at Leon, 
Kansas ; Catherine, widow of Finlcy Shaffer, a soldier of the Civil war ; 
John D. ; Melissa, wife of John Smart, living near Morocco. The sec- 
ond husband of Nancy Goddard was Andrew ^Murphy, who gave up his 
life as a soldier of the Union during the Civil war. 

John D. Goddard started to make his own way in the world when 
only ten .years old. He was employed at monthly wages on a fann to 
the age of eighteen. He responded with all he had to the call of 
President Lincoln for volunteers to put down the rebellion and on 
September 7, 1861, enlisted in Company D of the Ninth Indiana In- 
fantry. He was with the regiment on constant duty until mus- 
tered out three years later in September, 1864. He was wounded in 
the great battle of Chiekamauga. His first battle was at Greenbrier, 
following which he participated at Stone River, Chiekamauga, and a 
number of the battles leading up to the Atlanta campaign. Following 
the war he returned to Newton County, Indiana, and resumed his ca- 
reer as a farmer. 

On February 15, 1866, Mr. Goddard married Mary J. Kessler. 
Mrs. Goddard was born in Newton County September 4, 1845, daugh- 
ter of David and Rachel (Fisher) Kessler. Her father was a native of 
Virginia and her mother of Indiana. Her parents were the first couple 
married at Battle Ground. Mrs. Goddard was reared in Jasper 
County, now Newton County, Indiana. Her father was a stanch re- 
publican and a member of the United Brethren Church. 

After their marriage Mr. and ^Irs. Goddard settled on the farm of 
his father-in-law, and later he bought the farm and was greatly pros- 
pered as a farmer in Newton County until he left there in 1901 and 
came to Warsaw. In Kosciusko County Mr. Goddard has invested 
heavily in land and now owns 535 acres. 

Mr. Goddard is one of the interesting men who voted for President 
Lincoln during the Civil war times. He became a republican then and 
has always been true to the doctrines of the party. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Warsaw, and he is 
afiSliated with his old army comrades in the Grand Ai-my Post. 

Mr. and Mrs. Goddard have had the following children : Clara, of 
Denver, Colorado; Anna, deceased; Rachel Raye, wife of Alexander 
Craig, of Bristow, Connecticut ; William, who owns a farm in Call- 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 659 

fornia ; Belle, wife of Charles Hines and living in San Francisco ; and 
Blanche, wife of Clint Dederich, of Warsaw. 

William H. Orr. The winning of a comfortable prosperity after 
many struggles with fortune and the establishment of a home and 
place as an honored and influential citizen of his community is a short 
measure of the accomplishment of William H. Orr, who for many 
years has been identified with Kosciusko County. Mr. Orr is proprie- 
tor of the well known Brookside Farm, comprising 160 acres 314 miles 
northeast of Warsaw in Wayne County. 

He is a native of Waj-ne County, Ohio. His first place was in Orr- 
ville, a town which was laid out by three brothers. Smith, James and 
Samuel Orr, all of whom emigrated from Ireland, first settling in Phila- 
delphia and from there going to Wayne County, Ohio, when it was a 
wilderness connnunity. Of these three brothers James Orr was grand- 
father of William H. Orr. His children were named Barr R., Samuel, 
James, William, Henry, Elizabeth, ]\Iariah, Margaret, Mary, Amanda. 

Samuel Orr, the father of William H. Orr, married Mary McClel- 
lan, of Apple Creek. They had two children, William H. and Ann 
Eliza, the latter dying at "the age of fourteen. Samuel Orr died in 
Ohio, and his widow, about 1852, brought her family to Indiana, locat- 
ing at Andereon, and about 1855 going by ox team to Noble County, 
Indiana. 

When he was sixteen years old William H. Orr left home and 
started to make his own living. He had the equipment of a district 
school education. After some years of self support he entered, at the 
age of twenty-three, Valparaiso College and was graduated in the 
teachers and business course. For a time he was located at Ligonier, 
and for about eighteen years was in business in Northern Indiana and 
Southern Michigan. In April, 1891, he traded for a farm and later 
bought his present place, the Brookside Farm in Kosciusko County. 

Mr. Orr has four children : Mabel, wife of Homer Van Curen ; Iva, 
wife of Walter Hover ; Mary, wife of Earl D. Keefer ; and William A., 
who is a graduate of the Warsaw High School and is still at home. The 
family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Morris 
Chapel, and Mr. Orr is one of the trustees. He is affiliated with the 
Knights of the Maccabees at Ligonier and in politics is a democrat. 
Judge William Orr, a prominent figure in the bar and afi'airs of 
Wayne County, Ohio, is a first cousin of Mr. Orr's father. 

H.vuRY L.VTHROPE is ouc of the oldest residents of Kosciusko County. 
He has been identified with the county in the capacity of a substantial 
mechanical workman or as a farmer for fully half a century. He is 
now proprietor of a good farm of forty acres known as the Silvias 
Ramble Farm, located SVo miles southeast of Warsaw in Wayne Town- 
ship, on rural route No. 6. 

Mr. Lathrope is a native of England, having been born at Denby 
Dale in Yorkshire April 8, 1849. He was sixteen years old when he 
came with his parents to the United States in August, 1865. The 
family located at Warsaw, where Harry Lathrope grew to maturity. 



660 HISTOKY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

He was educated in the schools of England, and spent a three years' 
apprenticeship learning the blacksmith's trade. 

ilr. Lathrope married Huldah Elder. Mrs. Lathrope was born 51/2 
miles from "Wai-saw in Washington Township September 25, 1858. 
After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lathrope located at Warsaw, where 
he followed his trade for many years. In 1910 they moved to their 
present comfortable home in the country. They became the parents of 
two children, both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Lathrope made a trip 
back to England in April. 1892, and spent several months in the old 
eountrj- visiting friends and familiar scenes. Mr. Lathrope is a mem- 
ber of the Church of England and is a republican in politics. 

JoNATH.\N Wyland. Some highly developed farms lie along rural 
route No. 6 out of Warsaw in Wayne Township, and one of them is 
the place of Jonathan Wyland in the southeast comer of that town- 
ship, in section 36. Mr. Wyland has given a good account of his en- 
ergies and abilities and deserves to rank well to the front among the 
farming men of one of the richest agricultural sections of Indiana. 

]\Ir. Wyland is a native of Kosciusko County, bom in Tippecanoe 
Township April 22, 1862, son of Jonathan and Kebecca (Bowman) 
Wyland. His father was a native of Ohio and his mother of Penn- 
sylvania. Both parents came to Indiana in early days, the Wylands lo- 
cating in Kosciusko County and the Bowmans in Noble County. Jon- 
athan, Sr., and wife after marriage located on a farm in Tippecanoe 
Township, where he entered 126 acres of government land, and there 
they spent their useful careers. Both were active Christians, and very 
fine people. Of their fifteen children the following are still living: 
Daniel, of ^Michigan : Nathaniel, of Oregon ; Alfred, of Michigan ; Ford, 
who lives in the State of Washington ; Emanuel, of Kosciusko County ; 
Elizabeth, wife of Emanuel Fanciel, of Noble County, Indiana ; Mary 
M., wife of Daniel Llewellyn, of Elkhart County, Indiana; and 
Jonathan. 

Jonathan Wyland grew up on the old homestead in Tippecanoe 
Township and was educated in the district schools. At the age of 
twenty he started to make his own living and did farm work until his 
marriage in December, 1885, to Miss Caroline Mindline, of Tippecanoe 
Township. Mrs. Wyland is a native of Ohio, but has spent most of her 
life in Kosciusko County. 

The first live years after his marriage ilr. Wyland did farming 
and saw milling and in 1890 moved to Waj-ne Township, and has 
owned and occupied his present home in the southeast quarter of that 
township since 1910. By the united industry and economy of himself 
and good wife he has built up a fine estate of 180 acres. His reputation 
as a farmer is most widely known as a successful breeder of Shorthorn 
cattle. His herd is headed by Wai-saw Victor. He also breeds Duroc 
and Poland China hogs. He is a prohibitionist in politics and is very 
active in the United Brethren Church. 

He and his wife have two children : Lester E., born May 20, 1891, 
is a graduate of the common schools and of Winona Academy in 1910, 
and by his marriage to Margaret Hiekok has four children, named 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 661 

Margaret, Rose M. and Catherine, twins, and Florence V. Both he 
and his family are members of the United Brethren Church. Devona, 
the second child, born Februarj' 22, 1897, is the wife of Royee Harsh- 
mer, of Wayne Township. 

Homer T. Menzie is one of the residents of Kosciusko County with 
whom love of land, of peace and industry is a dominant characteristic. 
Mr. ilenzie has one of the good farms seven miles east of "Warsaw, on 
rural route No. 3, and does a splendid business in general farming and 
stock raising. 

He was born at the place he now owns December 24, 1884, son of 
William T. and Emily (Groves) Menzie. His parents were also born in 
Kosciusko County and represented early pioneer families here. The 
mother was born in Washington Township October 8, 1848. After 
their marriage they settled on the farm where their son Homer now 
lives, and the father lived there until his death on December 8, 1885. 
There were five children: Verna, wife of H. C. Rosselot, of Long 
Beach, California; Ada, wife of D. F. Van Nattor, on a farm in Wash- 
ington Township ; Mary, wife of F. P. Benton, at Warsaw; and A. G., 
who is foreman for the Winona Electric Light & Water Company. 

Homer T. Menzie grew up on the old homestead, gained his educa- 
tion in the common schools, and was reared and trained in the occu- 
pation which he has followed chiefly throughout his active career. On 
reaching manhood he went east and for eleven months was foreman 
in the plant of the New York Glucose Company at Jersey City and was 
also weighmaster for the same company. After his marriage he re- 
turned to Kosciusko County and has been busily engaged in farming, 
supervising his fields and crops, and he also buys carload lots of live- 
stock, pasturing and finishing them for market. 

Mr. Menzie married Miss Ethel Smith, daughter of G. J. Smith of 
Kosciusko County. She was born in Wayne Township and was edu- 
cated in the common schools. They have three children : Lucile, aged 
ten; Audra, aged nine; and Morris J., aged seven. The family are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Morris Chapel and 
Mr. Menzie is one of the official board and has served as superintendent 
of the Sunday school. He is a republican in politics. 

George B. Salmon is one of Kosciusko County's well known citi- 
zens who started life without particular advantages and assets and by 
self denial, thrift and industry gradually accumulated those means 
which represent financial independence. He is now possessor of a 
good farm home in Washington Township, a mile south and 11/2 miles 
west of Pierceton, on rural route No. 3. 

Mr. Salmon is a native of Whitley County, Indiana, born near Lar- 
well July 13, 1866. His parents were Benjamin B. and Susanna (Sick- 
afoose) Salmon. His father was born near Marietta in Washington 
County, Ohio, and his mother was a native of the same state. When 
he was three years old his parents moved to Delaware County, Ohio, 
where he grew up to the age of twenty-one and then came to Indiana in 
1843 and located a mile north of Larwell, where he was one of the 



662 HISTOEY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

early settlers. His wife's people had come to Indiana in 1837 and es- 
tablished their home near Lee's Corners in Cleveland Township of 
"Whitley County, where the maternal grandparents of George B. Sal- 
mon spent their last years. Benjamin B. Salmon married in ^Yhitley 
County and was one of the substantial farmers and highlj- respected 
citizens of the Larwell community until his death in 1894. He and his 
wife had three children, Michael dying at the age of six years. Delia, 
who was born in 1864, became the wife of Rev. C. A. Bellheimer, of 
Elwood, Indiana. 

George B. Salmon had the old farm in Whitley County as the scene 
of his j-outh and in that locality he attended the common schools to the 
age of fourteen. After that he was on his own responsibility and 
worked at any honorable occupation he could find. 

After considerable experience and with a view to a settled future 
he married on Jlarch 1, 1892, Miss Elizabeth Ring, who was born and 
educated in "Whitley County. Mi-. Salmon worked for some years in a 
saw mill. He finally bought the old farm in "Whitley County, but in 
March, 1894, moved to Kosciusko County and acquired a good farm of 
eighty acres where he ajid his family now reside, ilr. Salmon has 
prospered here as a general farmer and stock raiser and is a man who 
takes an active interest in local welfare. He has served as a member 
of the township adyisorj- board and politically votes the republican 
ticket. 

Mr. and ilrs. Salmon had three children. The daughter Neva was 
graduated from the common schools and died about the time she at- 
tained womanhood. Garth B. is a graduate of the common schools and 
the local high school, spent one term in Winona and one term in Han- 
over College, and is still living at home. The youngest is Dorothy, 
aged sixteen years. All the family are members of the Presbyterian 
Church at Pierceton and Mr. Salmon is one of its elders. 

John L. Boggs, whose concentrated energies through a long period 
of years have been directed to farming and who owns one of the good 
places on route No. 6 out of Warsaw, is a member of one of the very 
earliest families to establish their homes in the wilderness of what is 
now Kosciusko County. His father was in fact in this county before 
it was organized and about the time the boundaries were laid out. 

Mr. Boggs' grandparents were Andrew and Susannah (Bowen) 
Boggs, both of whom were born in Greenbrier County, Yirginia. They 
came to Indiana in 1825, about the time Indianapolis was established 
as a city, and made their home in Wayne County and from there 
moved to Henry Count}-, where Susannah Boggs died ilay 4, 1834. 
Her husband soon afterward located in Blackford County, where he 
married a second time. He served as a justice while living in Delaware 
and Blackford counties and was also associate judge of the latter 
county. He was a man of affairs and was one of the proprietoi-s of 
Hartford City, county seat of Blackford County. After a long and 
useful life he died January 27, 1854. 

The father of ]Mr. John L. Boggs was Andrew Hamilton Boggs, who 
was bom in Jackson County. Ohio, March 7, 1821. He was four vears 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 663 

old when brought to Indiana and grew to manhood in Wayne, Henry 
and Blackford counties. The sons of the early settlers had very little 
opportunity to obtain what would now be called a very liberal educa- 
tion, since public schools in the modern sense of the term did not then 
exist in Indiana. But he wisely made use of such advantages as came 
to him, and developed a good mind, a resourceful energy, and a char- 
acter that entitled him to the respect of all who knew him. At the age 
of fourteen he was practically thrown upon his own resources. At that 
time, in the spring of 1835, he accompanied two of his brothers from 
"Wayne County to LaPorte County, making the entire journey on foot. 
He and his brothers worked for a time as farm laborers at ten dollars 
a month. Later he pursued his journey to Peru in the Miami Reserve, 
but ni the fall of 1835 came to Kosciusko County. For a time he made 
his home with his brother-in-law Joel L. Long," near Leesburg. Then 
followed years of toil and careful economy in order to realize his ambi- 
tion to become a farmer, and land owner, and eventually he acquired 
a generous property in Prairie Township of Kosciusko County, where 
he lived until his death. He was a democrat in politics and was a mem- 
ber of the Seventh Adventist Church. 

Andrew H. Boggs married, December 14, 1843, JIartha Ann 
Thomas, daughter of Antepas and Axsa Thomas, also natives of Ten- 
nessee. The Thomas family were also among the pioneers of Kosciusko 
County, arriving here in the fall of 1835. Mrs. Andrew H. Boggs died 
June 3, 1886. She was a member of the Christian Church. They had 
a large family of children, and those now living are.- Axsa, wife of 
Samuel Anglin, of Wausau ; Thomas W., a farmer in Clay Township; 
John L. ; Ellen; Samuel, who lives in Kosciusko Countv:" Jennie, wife 
of Edward Shinn, of Oklahoma ; Harvey D. of Prairie Township. 

John L. Boggs was born on his father's farm in Prairie Township 
January 7, 1855. In that locality he gi-ew to manhood and acquired an 
education in the district schools and was a worker on the home place 
to the age of twenty-three. 

On October 25, 1880, he married Miss Rosa Norris. Mrs. Boggs was 
born in Prairie Township and at the age of three years was left an 
orphan. She found a good home with Mr. Horn in Elkhart County 
and was given a good common school education. After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Boggs rented his father 's farm in Prairie Township for 
seven years, and then bought his present place in Monroe Township, 
comprising ninety-six acres, devoted to general fanning and stock 
raising. 

He and his wife have three children : Andrew H., a graduate of 
the common schools who lives on his father's farm, married Ruble 
Fisher. He also owns fifty-three acres of his own. Virginia, the sec- 
ond child, is the wife of Calvin Smith, owner of a eood farm of sixty 
acres in Clay Township. Mattie is the wife of Walter S. Scott, of 
Jlonroe Township. Mr. Boggs has seven grandchildren, five bovs and 
two girls. In politics he is a democrat. 

Charles W. Smith is one of the prosperous farm owners and well 
known citizens of Washington Township and for his success the credit 



664 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

is due almost entirely to his individual efforts and his steadfast hon- 
esty and integrity. 

Mr. Smith was born in Richland Township, Holmes County, Ohio, 
August 13, 1848. He is a son of Peter and Hannah (Patton) Smith. 
His father was born in Ontario, Canada, and his mother in Pennsyl- 
vania. Peter Smith grew to maturity in Canada and then moved to 
New York State, where he married a iliss Springenberger. She died 
in New York State, the mother of eleven children. Later he moved to 
Pennsylvania and married Miss Hannah Patton, and they finally 
brought their family to Holmes County, Ohio, where they spent their 
last years. Peter Smith was a very successful man in handling his 
affairs whether farming or business, and owned a large place of 400 
acres. He was the father of twenty-six children by his two wives. 

Charles W. Smith grew up on a farm in Holmes County, Ohio, and 
had training afforded by the public schools of his day. When a single 
man he moved to Indiana and in Allen County he mariied Miss Clara 
Bushong. After their marriage they located on a farm in Allen 
County and he acquired forty acres there. Selling that they moved 
to Kosciusko County and bought forty acres in Washington Township, 
and now own a well improved place of eighty acres li/^ miles southwest 
of Pierceton, on rural route No. 2. Mr. Smith is a republican in poli- 
tics, but has never sought any of the honors of public affairs. He is a 
general farmer and stock raiser, and a man whose reputation is one of 
the best in his part of the county. 

Mr. Smith has been twice married. His first marriage, to Clara 
Bushong, occurred March 26, 1876. His second marriage, to AUie 
Zinninger, occurred April 12, 1899. 

Milton I. Koontz. One of the names that is well know^l to the 
people of Kosciusko County as representing expert agricultural ability 
and sound citizenship is that of Milton I. Koontz, who grew up in this 
county and has distinguished himself by his progressive measures and 
achievements as a farmer of Monroe Township. 

Mr. Koontz was born in Jennings County, Indiana, September 27, 
1882, a son of William and Hannah (Bowman) Koontz. His parents 
were married in Ohio and both were born on the same day, month and 
year. The father died in 1908. From Ohio they moved to Jennings 
County, Indiana, and in 1887 located in Monroe Township of Kosci- 
usko County, where they had their home the rest of their lives. Will- 
iam Koontz was a very well to do farmer, and his efforts enabled him 
to accumulate a large property of 390 acres. He was a member of 
the Masonic Lodge and in politics a republican. William Koontz and 
wife have four children : Sadie, wife of Frank Richards, of Whitley 
County, Indiana ; Rilla, widow of Charles Bamhart ; Calvin M., of 
Monroe Township ; and Milton. 

Milton I. Koontz has lived in Kosciusko County since he was five 
years old. He was educated in the common schools of Monroe Town- 
ship and lived at home until his marriage to Miss Elnore Workman. 
Mrs. Koontz is a native of Kosciusko County and was reared and edu- 
cated here. 



• HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 665 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Koontz settled on 160 acres 
which he bought from his father's estate. He has made a splendid suc- 
cess both in his fields and in the handling of his livestock. The farm 
equipment of the Koontz place measures up to the very best found 
anywhere in the county. The barn is in its main dimensions 40 by 60 
feet, with an L 30 by 40 feet. There is a basement under the entire 
structure and it has capacity for holding an immense amount of stock 
and farm matei-ial. The Koontz home is one that many city people 
might envy. It contains nine rooms, is furnace heated, and has all 
the up-to-date conveniences and facilities. 

Mr. and Mrs. Koontz are the parents of five children : Leota, Am- 
men, Esther, Ruth and Marie. Fraternally Mr. Koontz is affiliated 
with the ^Modern Woodmen of America and in politics is a republican. 

Calvin M. Koontz is one of the substantial element of agricul- 
turists in Kosciusko County and is said to have one of the best kept 
farm homes in Monroe Township. This farm is known by the popular 
name of Woodside Farm and comprises ninety-five well cultivated 
and managed acres located Sy^ miles northwest of South Whitley, on 
rural route No. 3. 

Mr. Koontz was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, February 19, 
1880, son of William and Hannah Bauman Koontz. Three weeks 
after his birth his parents moved to Indiana and located in Jennings 
County and eight years later came to Kosciusko County, where Cal- 
vin M. Koontz has spent all his subsequent years. He was educated 
in the common schools and also in ]\Ianchester College. 

Mr. Koontz has two children, Thelma, aged ten years, and Edith 
Stafford. The latter is the daughter of his wife by a former mar- 
riage. Thelma is his first wife's child. In 1914 Mr. Koontz married 
Mrs. Zelma Idle Stafford, daughter of T. H. Idle. 

Mr. Koontz is a very active and prominent member of the Chris- 
tian Church, being president of the board of trustees and serving as 
superintendent of the Sunday school now in his eighth year, and for 
four years was superintendent of the Monroe Township Sunday 
School Association and is now its vice president. He is affiliated with 
Springfield Lodge No. 213 of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and is part grand of the lodge and member of the Encamp- 
ment. He is also affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America 
and in politics is a republican. He has been party committeeman, 
and in many other ways takes an active interest in local affairs. 

Abraham Pfleiderer. A mark of special esteem and confidence 
has been reposed in Abraham Pfleiderer by his fellow citizens in 
Monroe Township, who have continuously kept him in the office of 
township assessor for the past eight years. 

Mr. Pfleiderer was born in Liberty Township of Crawford County, 
Ohio, December 19, 1846, a son of David and Mary (Hackenleble) 
Pfleiderer. His father was born in Germany December 4, 1822, and 
was brought to this country by his parents in the fall of 1830, when 
only eight years old. The Pfleiderers located in Crawford County, 



666 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

Ohio, where David Pfleiderer grew to manhood and married Mary 
Hackenleble, a native of Crawford County. Their children were: 
Linda iloore, Anna Stafford, Mary Huffman, James B., Clara Sim- 
mons, ilattie Fridle and Abraham. 

Abraham Ptleiderer grew up in Ohio and has been a practical 
farmer of Jlonroe Township for many years. He is a member of the 
Baptist Church and in politics a democrat, has served as supervisor, 
as township committeeman and. was appointed to the ofBce of assessor 
in 1911. He is now in his second four-year term. 

!Mr. Pfleiderer married Sarah A. Wert, who was bom in Sandusky 
Township of Crawford County, Ohio, June 16, 1844, daughter of John 
and Saloma (Shaffer) Wert. Her parents were both natives of 
Pennsylvania but spent their last years in Crawford County, Ohio. 
In the Wert family were seven children, three of whom are still 
living: J. B. Wert, of Carrollton, Ohio; Eliza Roop. now living with 
Mr. and Mrs. Pfleiderer; and Sarah A. 

Mr. Pfleiderer has twenty grandchildren and four great-grand- 
children. 

WiLLi.\ii E. Merrick is one of those fortunate men who possess 
farms and landed interests in Kosciusko County. He has lived in 
this county all his life, came to manhood with ample experience and 
training in what has proved his permanent vocation, and gradually 
from year to year has accumulated a property and the other inter- 
ests that furnish a solid basis of satisfaction and comfort. His home 
is in Washington Towiiship, 2iy4 miles southwest of Piercetou, on 
rural route No. 2. 

Mr. Merrick was born in Van Buren Township of this county 
July 13, 1864, son of Henry Edward and Mahala E. (Wright) :Mer- 
rick. The ilerricks are a pioneer family in Kosciusko County. His 
grandfather, Richard H. ilerrick, was born in Montgomery County, 
Maryland, August 10, 1813, and during his early life there followed 
teaming and blacksmithing. He had a very limited education. In 
Maryland June 6, 1837, he married Miss Nancy Halbert, who was 
born in Morgan County, Virginia, daughter of Noah and Susan Hal- 
bert. In 1848 Richard H. Merrick moved from Maryland to Mont- 
gomery County, Ohio, and in 1857 came to Kosciusko County. For 
seven years he worked the farm of William Felkner south of Milford, 
and afterwards owned and improved eighty acres in Monroe Town- 
ship. He died November 29, 1884. He was a member and for many 
years an elder in the Christian Church and his widow belonged to 
the same denomination. They had three children, Henrietta S., who 
married 0. O. Felkner, Henrj- Edward, and Mary C, who married 
ilyron Potter. 

Henry E. IMerrick was born in Maryland and was a small boy 
when brought to Kosciusko County. He grew up on a farm in Van 
Buren Township, had a common school education supplemented by 
a course in Hillsdale College in ^Michigan, and for a number of years 
he was a successful teacher. On July 4, 1863, Henry Edward Mer- 
rick married JIahala Wright, who was bcrn in Kosciu.sko County 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 667 

August 28, 1843, and spent all her life in this county, ilr. Merriek 
died in 1911 and his wife in November, 1917. He was very active in 
the affairs of the Christian Church, which he served as an officer, and 
was a democratic in politics. He and his wife had eii^ht children, two 
of whom died young. Those still living are : William E. ; Charles 
E., of Monroe Township; Frank M., of Milford ; Neil W., of South 
Bend; Harry E., of Youngstown, Ohio; and Ralph E., of Elkhart 
County, Indiana. 

William E. Merrick lived on a farm in Van Buren Township 
to the age of sixteen. His early advantages were supplied by the 
public schools of Milford and Monroe Township, and he also attended 
the County Normal and the College at Valparaiso. His early work, 
like that of his father, was as a teacher, and he had nine terms of 
teaching to his credit in this county. 

November 8, 1888, he married Sarah A. Frank. She was born in 
Wood County, Ohio. August 13. 1874, daughter of Thornton and 
Catherine (Wiley) Frank. Her father was bom in Fayette County, 
Pennsylvania, April 20, 1832, and moved to Wood County, Ohio, in 
1843. " He married there December 20, 1860, Catherine Wiley, who 
was bom in Wood County June 16, 1840, daughter of James M. and 
Sarah (Wright) Wiley. James M. Wiley was born in 1809. Thorn- 
ton Frank enlisted in Company E of the One Hundred and Forty- 
fourth Ohio Infantry for service in the Civil war. 

After his marriage William E. Merrick began farming in Monroe 
Township, and after three years moved across the road fi'om his 
former place to his present farm in Washington Townshin. Five chil- 
dren were born to them. Dongola, born October 4, 1890, is now de- 
ceased ; Alaroma, born July 10, 1894, is the wife of Frank Green, of 
Piereeton, and they have one daughter, a granddaughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Merrick, named Sarah E. Green, who was born January 1, 
1913. Bunola, the third child, was born February 10, 1897, is a 
graduate and post-graduate of the Piereeton High School, and is 
now the wife of Walter W. Wiggs. Catherine, next youngest of the 
family, was born August 5, 1907, and is a student in the common 
schools, while the youngest, Donnabelle, was bom July 31, 1912, and 
has already begun her schooling. The family are members of the 
^Methodist Episcopal Church at Piereeton and Mr. Merrick has sei-ved 
as church trustee. He is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and in politics is a democrat. 

Edgar H. Henderson has been individually carrying the burdens 
of agriculture in Kosciusko County for a number of years. Business 
has prospered under his hand and he has enjoyed many of the 
good things of life, including a good home and the riches of esteem 
paid him by his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Henderson's home is in Washington Township on rural route 
No. 2 out of Piereeton. He is a native of Ohio, born in Perry County 
October 11, 1880, son of George and Almeda (Voorhes) Henderson. 
His parents were also natives of Perry County, Ohio, were married 
there and in 1885 brought their family to Wayne Township of Kos- 



668 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

ciusko County. They are active members of the :\Iethodist Episcopal 
Church at Warsaw and the father is a prohibitionist. They have 
five children: Ruth, wife of J. W. Keefer, of Monmouth, Illinois; 
Edgar H. ; Margaret, wife of Harry Van ]\Ieter, of Wayne Town- 
ship; Edith, a graduate of the Warsaw High School and now a 
stenographer at Elkhart; and Harold, who married Chloe Thomp- 
son and who as a United States soldier took part in the :Mexican 
trouble in 1916 and is now with the army cantonment at Hatties- 
burg, Mississippi. 

Edgar H. Henderson was five years old when brought to Kosciusko 
County. He grew up in this locality, was educated in the district 
schools and remained at home to the age of twenty. He first married 
Bertha E. Funk, daughter of S. C. Funk and member of an old and 
prominent family of this county. Mrs. Henderson died in January, 
1912, the mother of four children, :Mary, Ward, Edith B. and Fred. 
Fred is now deceased. Mr. Henderson married for his present wife 
Edith E. Hawkins. They have two young children, Russell, aged four, 
and Ralph, aged two. Mr. Henderson is affiliated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Loyal Order of Moose and in 
politics is a republican. His farm comprises forty-three acres in 
section 30 of Washington Township. 

J. R. Hover, editor and proprietor of the Pierceton Record, is 
descended from one of the first pioneer families of Kosciusko County. 
Four generations of the Hovers have lived in this county. His father 
and great-grandfather bore the name Peter and they lived a portion 
of their lives at least in Kosciusko County. They came to the county 
in 1837, locating in the vicinity of where the Village of Wooster 
now stands in Washington Township. When the first election was 
held in that township there were only five voters and grandfather 
Peter Hover was one of them. The Hovers as a rule have been agi-i- 
culturists and in politics their affiliation has been steadily with the 
republican party since it was organized. The family also' furnished 
charter members to the Presbj-terian Church at Warsaw. Peter H. 
Hover, father of the Pierceton editor, spent his active life as a farmer 
in this county, and in religion he first was a member of the Baptist 
Church and later belonged to the United Brethren denomination. He 
married Lucy Van Ness, a native of Logan County, Ohio. Of their 
five children three are still living : George A., of Stillwater, Oklahoma ; 
Ida, wife of H. G. Mickey, of Pierceton ; and J. R. Hover. 

J. R. Hover was born at Wooster in Washington Township March 
7, 1870, and grew up in agricultural surroundings. He attended the 
public schools at Wooster. leaving at the age of sixteen. For about 
twenty years Mr. Hover suffered from rheumatism, almost to the 
extent of being completely incapacitated for regular work. He has 
always been a busy man, and in May, 1910, bought the Pierceton 
Record which he has siiccessfully managed and edited since that 
date. He is now serving his third consecutive term as town clerk and 
is a leader in the republican party. 

Mr. Hover married Miss Effa L. Yohn, of Pierceton. They are 
members of the Christian Science Church at Wai-saw. 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 669 

William Kirkendall, a prosperous farmer of Washington Town- 
ship, represents a family that has been identified with Kosciusko 
County for over eighty years. The good and substantial qualities of 
the race are exemplified in the career of Mr. William Kirkendall, who 
began life with practically no means and assets but has promoted him- 
self until he is now proprietor of one of the excellent farms of the 
county. 

Mr. Kirkendall was born near Milford, Indiana, May 19, 1868, 
son of Jacob and Christiana (Cook) Kirkendall. Both parents were 
natives of Ohio and came to Kosciusko County when young people. 
They married and then settled on a farm near Milford, where the 
mother died. The only daughter died at the age of twelve years. Her 
name was ^Mary. William Kirkendall lost his mother in early infancy, 
and after that was reared by his grandfather Cook. His grandfather 
gave him a good home and sent him to school, but at the age of twelve 
years practically made him manager of the Cook farm. Mr. Kirken- 
dall remained there with added responsibilities and duties until he was 
twenty-three years old. 

On March 19, 1894, he married Miss Minnie Wilkinson, a native of 
Noble County, Indiana, but reared in Whitley County. After their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Kirkendall settled near the A-Square School- 
house on twenty acres of land and gradually added to this until he had 
a farm of eighty acres. He finally traded that for the 158 acres where 
he now lives and this home and property represents his substantial 
achievements. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kirkendall have three children, Fred, Hazel and 
Blanche, all of whom have received the best advantages of the local 
schools. Mr. Kirkendall is a democrat in politics. 

Floyd Striebt is a present trustee of Turkey Creek Township. In 
every way he has justified the expectations of "his fellow citizens who 
elected him to that office and it is highly consistent that a member of 
the Strieby family should be endowed with these responsibilities. The 
Striebys are a deep rooted stock of Kosciusko County and their names 
and activities have been a factor in Turkey Creek Township for four- 
score years. 

The family was established here by William Strieby, grandfather 
of Floyd. William was born in Pennsylvania March 23, 1811, a son 
of John and Maria (Richel) Strieby, also natives of Pennsylvania. 
In the same year that William was born his parents moved to Tusca- 
rawas County, Ohio, and he grew up there and married. His father 
died in Tuscarawas County in 1841 and his mother in 1839. 

December 28, 1830, in Tuscarawas County. William Strieby mar- 
ried Elizabeth Stiffler, who was born in Bedford County, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 17, 1814, and was only three weeks old when her parents 
moved to Stark County, Ohio. Her father, Conrad Stiffler, was born 
in Huntington County, Pennsylvania, in 1792, and her mother, Rachel 
(Fitters) Stiffler, was born in the same county in 1789. Several of the 
Stiffler children were early settlei-s in Kosciusko County. 

The migration which brought the Strieby family into Kosciusko 



670 HISTOKT OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

County occurred in July, 1836. The removal was made with two 
yoke of oxen, a covered wagon, and besides household goods they 
brought with them two cows and two yearling heifers. William 
Strieby bought eighty acres of land in Van Buren Township, but in 
the following April sold and acquired the 160 acres in section 29 of 
Turkey Creek Township in which locality he had his home the rest 
of his life. The trials and adversities which beset the pioneers can 
be told from the experiences of "William Strieby. He paid ten dollars 
for the first barrel of salt he used in this county. His round log 
cabin was burned down soon after it was completed, and in order 
to re-establish himself he made the journey back to Ohio on foot to 
secure money for the pxirchase of his place in Turkey Creek Town- 
ship. One of the main sources of dependence for provisions was 
the venison which could be had in abundance. He frequently hunted 
deer and sold the meat for three cents a pound. At times the family 
lived on a diet of potatoes, venison and pumpkins. "William Strieby 
bought corn and paid sixty cents a bushel for the first lot and seventy- 
five cents for the next quantity. He had a wife who was equal to 
every emergency and without her encouragement and assistance the 
family would doubtless have returned to Ohio. She helped to clear 
many an acre of land, cutting all the small timber and even accom- 
panied her husband in hunting deer. As a result of hardships and 
prevalent fever and ague the family became so discouraged in the fall 
of 1837 that they determined to return to Ohio. A purchaser was 
found for their cows but in a day or so ]\Irs. Strieby decided it would 
be better for them all if they remained. She was an expert in all 
the housewifely accomplishments of her time, spinning and weaving 
wool and yarn and flax and making all the clothing used in the home. 
She frequently dug up ginseng and lady slipper roots, for which there 
was an active commercial demand, and at one time she sold a quantity 
for forty-six dollars. The first wheat harvest was hauled with ox 
teams to Michigan City in 1840 and sold for two and a half cents a 
bushel. Large quantities of butter were produced on the farm and 
it sold for about twelve and a half cents a pound. ]Mrs. Strieby once 
carried twenty-five or thirty pounds of butter to .Milford, a distance 
of eight miles. 

For all these early disadvantages Mr. and ]Mrs. "William Strieby 
were greatly prospered in the course of years, and besides their home 
farm of about 240 acres they gave their children land and money and 
saw them all well established. On December 28, 1880, "William Strieby 
and wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary and though 
it was one of the coldest days of the winter, nearly fourscore people 
gathered to do them honor. Before they died they could count nearly 
sixty grandchildren, and over thirty gi-eat-grandchildren. Their 
children born in Tuscarawas County were Henry. Anna, and Andrew, 
while those natives of Kosciusko County were "William, -Joel, Elizabeth, 
John, Conrad, Sarah, Alfred. Minerva and Barbara. 

John B. Strieby, father of Floyd, was born in Turkey Creek 
Township February 23, 1844, and was one of the sons of the family 
who served in the Union army. He enlisted in 1864 in Company G 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 671 

of the 38th Indiana Infantry, joining his regiment in Coldsboro, North 
Carolina. He was on detail service between Chattanooga and Atlanta, 
around Nashville, and received his honoral)le disduu-ge July 15, 1865. 
After the war he engaged in farming, and ac(iuired over "a hundred 
acres of land in section 28 of Turkey Creek Township. He was an 
active member of the United Brethren church, and in polities a re- 
publican. John B. Strieby married on October 14, 1866, Delilah 
Cable. She was born in Turkey Creek Township, June 19, 1847, 
daughter of Cornelius and Margaret (Mock) Cable. John B. Strieby 
and wife had four children: Ida, born November 9, 1867, wife of 
Richard Guy, a former trustee of Turkey Creek Township ; Alfaretta. 
born September 15, 1869, wife of David Clayton, of Turkev Creek 
Township; Floyd; and John Franklin, born August 4, 1877, who 
fai*ms the old homestead. 

Mr. Floyd Strieby was born in Turkey Ci'cek Township, 0<tobei- 
10, 1871. He has spent all his life in the locality of his birth, was 
educated in the local schools, and the cultivation of the land has 
claimed the largest share of his energies since early manhood. He 
ov^^ls sixty acres and is a general farmer and stock raiser. 

In 1894 he married Miss Stella Whitehead, dauorhter of J. A. and 
Martha (Blanchard) Whitehead. She was reared and educated in 
Turkey Creek Township. They have two children. Mai-ie, a araduate 
of the common school and the Syracuse High School, was a college 
student three years and taught school several years. She is living at 
home. George, a gi'aduate of the common schools, is also at home. 
Mrs. Strieby is a member of the Radical United Brethren Church. In 
politics he is a republican. He was first appointed and served 
one year as township trustee and was then elected foi' the regu'ar term 
of four years. Mr. Strieby has done much to maintain tlie best 
standards of the township schools and has proved honest, competent 
and efficient in every responsibility whether official or of a private 
nature. 

Russell H. Butler was born August 7, 1876, at Plymouth, Mar- 
shall County, Indiana. Three years later his fatiier. Harris E. Butler, 
disposed of his business interests and entered the ministry, which 
calling he faithfully followed for forty years over vai-ions fields of 
labor scattered throughout the northern half of Uidiana. familiarly 
known to members of the United Brethren Church as St. -losrph Cnn- 
ference. From place to place the family was shifted that the fiither 
might labor for the betterment of mankind. Althoutrh tlie > cai-s were 
filled with privations and disappointments, the father's faith never 
wavered and every trial only served to strengthen his detei-mination 
for greater service. It was this s;iiiMt of service he instilled in tlie 
members of his familv. 

In the fall of 1897'the family moved ti'om Albion, Indiana, U> War- 
saw. Since then Russell H. Bntler has been a resident of this 
county. He was educated in the common seiiools of Westfield. Ful- 
ton, Logansport, Galveston and Dayton. Indiana. His high school 
education was completed in Albion in 1896. The following yeai' he 
Vol. n— 19 



672 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

pui-sued a literary course in North Manchester College ; 1901-02 were 
spent in Northwestern Universitj'. 

When President McKinley issued his call for volunteers for the 
Spanish-American war, Russell H. Butler, who was away from home, 
responded to the call and enlisted June 27, 1898, at Plymouth, in 
Company JI, 157th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Col. George M. 
Studehaker, and was sent into training at Port Tampa. Florida. On 
his return from the service he enlisted as a sergeant in Company H.. 
Indiana National Guard, June 20, 1900. The family points with pride 
to its record as defenders of home, country and liberty. 

The great-great-grandfather, Uriah Butler, was a soldier in the 
American revolution. The grandfather, Alfred Austin Butler, served 
in the Mexican war of 1846. also during the Civil war. The father. 
Rev. H. E. Butler, was one of Indiana's youngest .soldiers in the Civil 
war, where he spent the better part of three years of his young life. 
His uncle, Richard Butler, served in the Philippine Islands during 
the Spanish-American struggle. 

The mother of Russell Butler was Rebecca Uncapher Butler, 
daughter of Israel and ^Margaret ITneapher. The Uncaphers came 
from Saxony, Germany, in colonial days and settled in Virginia on 
the Lord F'airfax estate at an annual rental of two pounds, fifteen 
shillings and six pence. They were neighbors of George Washington. 
One member of the famil.v. Dr. Abigal Uncapher, was twice elected to 
Congress from Mar.vland. 

May 12, 1902, R. H. Butler married Elizabeth Vindora Foreman, 
the youngest of a family of six girls born to Daniel and Malinda 
Foremen of Goshen, Indiana. She was educated in the common and 
high .school at Goshen. When she was but a mere child her fathei' 
died and before completing high". school the death of her mother left 
her an orphan. To this union was born one child, Wilbur Foreman 
Butler, March 11, 1903, a graduate of the common schools and a mem- 
ber of the high .scliool. The family are all members of the Presbyte- 
rian Church and prominently identified with the church's activities. 
Mr. Butler has served as a teaehei- and superintendent for several 
.vears in the Siniday school. Under his leadership the school increased 
to over five hundred in mendjership. He is a true blue republican 
in politics and has taken much interest in his party in recent years. 
He defeated five of his opponents in the fii-st primarv election, involv- 
ing county candidates ever held in Kosciusko County. Jla.v 7. 1918, 
and was elected to the office of county clerk November o, 1918, by an 
overwhelming majority. Nearly nine years of his life were spent in 
the employ of the postal department of the government. He resigned 
this position to engas-e in business for himself. In 1908 lie establisheil 
The W. F. Butler Company and did an extensive business, through 
catalogue, with more than 10,000 schools throughout the states and 
the island possessions. When the United States entered the World's 
war the business was suspended. 

Rev. N. D. Shackelford. A pioneer ^Methodist minister of North- 
ern Indiana, well remembered by many citizens of Kosciusko County, 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUOTY 673 

the late Rev. Mr. Shackelford prosecuted his unselfish labors in 
the hearts and bettei- natures of his fellow men and was the type ai 
man whose-memory endures because of the thousand acts of kind- 
ness and of love which he performed as he went through the world. 

A native of Ohio, he was born in Fayette County October 22, 
1826. He was reared on a farm and educated in district schools. 
At the age of nineteen he came with his parents to Wabash County, 
Indiana, and soon afterwards was ' converted to Christianity and 
joined the Methodist Episcopal Church. He early decided to dedi- 
cate his life to the cause of the Master, and having become an ex- 
horter was ordained to the ministry in 1853 and admitted to the 
_ North Indiana Conference. For forty years he was engaged in 
active ministerial work, and with the exception of three years spent 
in the Southern Illinois Conference his labors were confined to North- 
ern Indiana. As is the custom of Methodist ministers, he moved 
from station to station, and there are many communities which have 
grateful remembrance of his work and infiuenee. He became widely 
known for his piety and his exalted character. 

In 1891 Rev. Mr. Shackelford retired from active ministerial work, 
but the habits of four decades had become a part of his nature and 
he never wholly gave up preaching. 

On May 2, 1854, he married Mary J. Wilson. She was his help- 
mate in woi'd and deed and his chief adviser for nearly half a cen- 
tury. 

While the late Mr. Shackelford did not acquire wealth in the ma- 
terial sense of the word, he enjoyed the riches of esteem, and passed 
away happy in his religious faith. His death occurred at Warsaw 
Febniai-y 7, 1900. Mrs. Shackelford was born in Ross County, Ohio, 
October 14, 1832, a daughter of Philip and Sarah (Holiday) Wilson. 
Her death occurred December 7, 1911. 

Tiffin J. Shackelford, M. D. The spirit of service in Rev. N. D. 
Shackelford was continued and represented in Kosciusko County 
many years by his son, the late Dr. Tiffin J. Shackelford, who prac- 
ticed medicine there over thirty years. 

He was born February 12, 1855, while his parents were living in 
Clinton County, Indiana. He gained his early education in several 
different localities. He graduated from the Logansport High School, 
and in 1879, after .some preliminary study, he entered the College 
of Phj^sicians and Surgeons at Baltimore and was graduated M. D. 
in 1882. He served as interne in the Maryland Woman's Hospital 
and for one year was resident physician of that institution. In the 
fall of 1883 he became- a resident of Warsaw. - His standing as a 
physician and man was the very highest, until his death more than 
thirty years later. He was always a student of his profession, tak- 
ing post-graduate courses in New York, Chicago and Baltimore. He 
was active in those civic, educational and commercial affairs that are 
most familiar in the city of Warsaw. He served on the County Board 
of Health for years and as secretary of the City Health Board foi- 
several years. He was president and secretary of the County Me«Ji- 



«74 HISTORY OP KOSCIOSKO COUNTY 

t-al Society several times, and in 1914 was president of the Thirteenth 
District Medical Society. He was identified with the Indiana State 
Medical Association, the American Medical Association, was a Knight 
of Pythias and past eminent commander of Warsaw Commandery No. 
10 of the Knight Templar Masons. He was a director of the Lake 
City Bank, and at his death was first vice president. In many In- 
diana households a much prized volume is that entitled "Indiana 
Writers of Poems and Prose," published in 1902. In this volume, 
among selections by John Hay, Whitcomb Riley, Charles Major, Lew 
Wallace and many other noted Indiana authors, there is a poem from 
the pen of Doctor Shackelford. 

June 5, 1902, he married Mrs. Emma Irlaud, a daughter of John 
Grabner, a Kosciusko County citizen whose career is briefly referred 
to in following sketch. 

Dr. T. J. Shackelfoi'd died November 17, 1915, among his friends 
of many years' service at Warsaw, Ind. He was busy ministering to 
the sick up to within a few hours of his death and was stricken while 
on a duty of his profession. He prized his many friendships and 
never betrayed the trust of his patrons, all of whom honored him 
with their confidence. 

John Grabner. For fully half a century, and until his death at 
the age of fourscore and ten, John Grabner was one of the best known 
and most valuable citizens of Warsaw. 

He was born in Germany November 24, 1827, and was a small 
boy when brought to America. He came over on a sailing vessel 
and his youth and early manhood were spent in and around Mans- 
field, Ohio. He eventual!}' entered the railroad service and for eigh- 
teen years had charge of a locomotive either as fireman or engineer. 

On moving to Warsaw, Indiana, in 1865, he became a hardware 
merchant on a small scale. That business continued as part of his 
enterprises the rest of his life. It became the oldest hardware store 
under one proprietorship in Kosciusko County. John Grabner was 
steadily prospered, having that within him which supplemented his 
untiring industry and enabled him to succeed in all his affairs. He 
was for many years interested in agriculture, becoming the owner 
of more than 600 acres in Kosciusko County. Early in the history 
of the Lake City Bank he became a stockholder, and during his' later 
years was president of that institution. 

Though reared in the Roman Catholic religion his spiritual views 
changed, and for nearly half a centurj- he was identified with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Fraternally he was a Mason and a 
Knight Templar. Politically he was a republican. 

C. Leroy Leonard has for many jears played an important role 
in the business affairs of Silver Lake and surrounding community. 
He is proprietor of the Leonard Supply Company of that town, and 
is also one of the prominent stock men of Kosciusko County. 

Mr. Leonard was born in Miami County. Indiana, March 6, 1863, 
a son of Thomas and Mary (Love) Leonard. His father was born in 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY ti7r) 

Henry County, Indiana, and when he was a boy his parents settled 
at Mexico in Miami County. C. Leroy Leonard spent his boyhood 
days on a farm not far from Macy, Indiana, and attended the dis- 
trict schools during the winter terms. At the age of nineteen he came 
to Silver Lake and in April, 1884, at the age of twenty-one, married 
Clara Bilger, of that town. She was born in Ohio and came to Kos- 
ciusko County when a small girl. Mr. Leonard for a number of years 
was employed by his father-in-law, John Bilger, in the hardware busi- 
ness. During seven years in the store he learned the business in evei7 
detail and then for twelve years was a traveling salesman, represent- 
ing agricultural and harvesting machinery. He also had an inter- 
est in a business of his own, but sold that and took up farming and 
stock business, and later established his present supply house. Mr. 
Leonard is widely known among the Shorthorn cattle men of the state. 
He is a member and director in the Fort Wayne District Shorthorn 
Breeders' Association and president of the Kosciusko County Short- 
horn Breeders' Association. He also has some fancy hogs of the big 
type Poland China breed, his drove of fifty being headed by Murphy's 
Wonder, one of the finest males of that breed in the country. Mr. 
Leonard owns 256 acres of land, divided into two farms, one of them 
known as the Lakewood Farm and the other the Wildare Farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard have two daughters : Lela is a graduate of 
high school and is the wife of Myron E. Murphy, who is acting man- 
ager of the Lakewootl Farm and owns half the stock interests there. 
The second daughter, Mina, who graduated from the Silver Lake High 
School, married Charles Raber, ofifiee manager of the Leonard Supply 
Company. 

Mr. Leonard is a republican and for four years was trustee of 
Lake Township. He is a member of the Masonic blue lodge at War- 
saw, also the Royal Arch Chapter, Council and Commandery branches 
of the lodge. His wife and daughters are active members of the Eng- 
lish Lutheran Church, and he is one of the financial supporters of the 
church. The appellation of which Mr. Leonard is most proud is busi- 
ness man and farmer and the success which he is meeting in business 
and farming and pure bred stock raising is of great delight to him. 

Sarah Roxana Chapun Wince. Life is a strenuous affair in 
these modern times, even in Kosciusko County. It is a restful in- 
.spiration therefore to review a career of such a woman as Mrs. Wince, 
who has had her full share of the buffets of fortune both good and 
ill, and yet has passed the age of fourscore with equanimity undis- 
turbed and with a perfect faith in both the present and the ultimate 
things. Her home for over eighty years has been in Kosciusko County, 
and her life in many waj's reflects the history of its economic, social 
and spiritual development. 

Mrs. Wince was born February 10, 1838, in a little log cabin on 
the banks of Eel River near Collamer in Whitley County, Indiana. 
She was the elder daughter of Stedman Atherton Chaplin and Sarah 
McQuigg. Her father was born at Baltimore, Windsor County, Ver- 
mont, June 2, 1809, and was the oldest son of James Chaplin and Sal- 



676 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

lie Whitney, both of English ancestry. . James Chaplin was a son of 
David Chaplin. The latter 's great-grandfather, whose name was prob- 
ably also David, came from England about 1690 accompanied by a 
brother and settled in Massachusetts, probablj' near Boston, and later 
in Lunenberg, Worcester County. James Chaplin was born in Lunen- 
berg, July 6, 1778. There were four sons and four daughters in the 
family of James Chaplin, three of the sons becoming ministers. Jo- 
seph Chaplin, the great-uncle of James, served through the Revolu- 
tionary war, and one of his brothers in the War of 1812. James 
Ghaplin and Sally Whitney were married about 1808. Sally Whit- 
ney's father, John WTiitne.y, was a soldier in the Revolution and served 
xmtil its close." He again entered his country's service and was sta- 
tioned on the Oconee River a few miles below Milledgeville, Georgia, 
from 1793 until 1800. He died April 20, 1800. 
■ Mrs. Wince's mother Sarah McQuigg was born at Spencer, Tioga 
County, New York, April 2, 1802. Her first American ancestor was 
John McQuigg, who was bom in May, 1706, and died November 29, 
1794, in Litchfield, New Hampshire, and was buried at Bedford. He 
came to America from the north of Ireland in 1740, escaping from 
a British press gang on the way by jumping from one hogshead into 
another. He had eight sons, John, Jr., being born on the way over. 
Pour of these sons served in the Revolutionary war, Daniel, John and 
David and one whose name is not known. One of them died in the 
old Sugarhouse prison in New York City. John McQuigg, Sr. 's wife 
was jMildred Lawson, also a native of the north of Ireland and of 
Scotch ancestry. 

John McQuigg, Jr. was twice married. His first wife was Mollie 
Gilmore, by whom he had one child, John M. McQuigg. His sec- 
ond wife was Sarah Coburn, b.y whom he had eleven children, five 
sons and six daughters. John, Jr., served in Captain Philip Put- 
nam's company in the regiment commanded by Colonel Nahum Bald- 
win of Amherst, New Hampshire, and Lieutenant-Colonel Gordon 
Hutchins of Concord. The regiment was raised in the latter part of 
September, 1776, to re-enforce the army in the State of New York. 
Whether the other brothers who fought in the War of the Revolu- 
tion were in the same regiment is not known. John McQuigg, Jr., 
was one of the pioneers of New York, having gone into the Valley of 
the Susquehanna by way of Otsego Lake, following the old Indian 
trail to Owego. 

His oldest son, John M. McQuigg, born October 19, 1771, in New 
Hampshire, died August 18, 1812, at Spencer, Tioga County, New 
York. He married Lucy Lee, daughter of Henry Lee. Henry Lee 
was a soldier in the Revolution, came home on a furlough, was stricken 
with the smallpox and died, his wife dying of the same disease. 
He left three small girls. John M. McQuigg and Lucy Lee were mar- 
ried by a minister named Spaulding. The young couple were in- 
vited to a wedding, and after the first pair had been securely tied 
and had taken their seats, John and Lucy were married, no one be- 
ing in the secret but the minister. They were the grandparents of 
Mrs. Wince. Nine children were born to them, the fourth among 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 677 

whom was Sarah, who married Stedman A. Chaplin. Lucy McQuigg, 
after the death of her first husband, married a Revolutionary sol- 
dier named Michael Burge, who afterwards became a Methodist min- 
ister. In that war he was captured by the British and the story is 
told how he amused himself by picking the graybacks from his clothes, 
confining them in a quill, and blowing them on to any luckless British 
officer who came near. 

Stedman Chaplin and Sarah McQuigg were married September 
24, 1834, in Lawrence County, Tennessee. They remained in Ten- 
nessee about two years after their marriage, and then came by way 
of boat and schooner wagon to Whitley County, Indiana, reaching 
there ,iust after New Year's. 1836. Their first child, Byron Engle- 
bert, was born April 2, 1836. The farm they entered was not far 
from Collamer and was a lovely place in springtime, being a perfect 
garden of flowers. The Indians were numerous and quite a party 
of them, hideously painted stayed one night at the Chaplin home, 
sleeping on the floor. Stedman Chaplin's father, James Chaplin, 
had settled on Eel River in 1835. Both the Chaplin families moved 
to Kosciusko County in the fall of 1838, settling on ad.ioining fanns 
about two miles south of where Pierceton now stands. Mrs. Wince's 
second brother Virgil Maro was born in the new home April 24, 
1840; her sister Henrietta Su.san was born June 7, 1842; and her 
brother John Willard was born August 18, 1846. Byron died No- 
vember 11, 1858; John, October 15, 1858; Virgil, July 16. 1891: 
Henrietta still living, married William Clover, March 12, 1868. He 
died May 13, 1903. Mrs. Clover has four children, all living. 

Roxana Chaplin had that type of mind and heart which absorbs 
abundantly of the great life around her, whether that life is the woods 
and the wilderness conditions of her youth, or the life of crowded 
cities. The .joys and sorrows of the home, the beauty of nature, the 
incidents of school and church, were woven into her very being and 
transmuted there into that patience, kindliness, charity and poetic 
fervor which have become her habitual expression and the means by 
which she has accomplished .so many worthy and good things in her 
community. She was an eager student of poetry when a girl and for 
years she has written l)oth poetry and prose, and all her writing has 
been inspired by a purpose to elevate and do good. As a girl she 
attended the common schools of Washington Township, and for part 
of one term was in school at Warsaw, and part of another term at 
Wolf Lake in Noble County. However, a large part of her educa- 
tion was acquired at home under the wise tuition of her father, who 
was a man of splendid education, a teacher and a minister of the 
Gospel. Mrs. Wince taught school for many years, has gardened 
and raised small fruits on a small .scale, has marketed both vegetables 
and fruit in the Town of Pierceton, and this brief statement would 
account for the external facts of her life. However, the people that 
know her best care least for these external circumstances, and love 
her for those deep and intimate attributes which are not capable of 
description. She has alwa.ys been a prohibitionist and wrote the first 
article on prohibition ever published in Kosciusko County. She was 



678 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

actively identified with the Good Templars in some of those early 
crusades to overthrow saloons, and has been a member of the Good 
Templars since the first organization was started at Pierceton. She 
and her family have always had deep religious experiences, and Mrs. 
Wince for many years has been identified with the Age to Come Ad- 
ventists. 

On March 13, 1867, at the home of her father in Washington Town- 
ship she was married to Mr. John L. Wince, a minister and farmer, 
son of Philip and Martha f Scott) Wince. His father was of Ger- 
man ancestry and his mother was of mingled Scotch, English and 
Welsh. The Wince family emigrated from Virginia to Ohio when 
John L., the first child, was a baby. The trip was made in cold No- 
vember weather by means of a schooner wagon, and the baby cried 
all the way. From Ohio they moved to Whitley County, Indiana, 
but not until J. L. Wince had grown to manhood. He was one of 
ten children. Mr. and Mrs. Wince were one in their faith, their 
tastes, their aspirations. He too was a writer of verse, and some of 
his poems were greatly admired and widely copied. He also wrote 
extensively in prose, and was for many years the pastor of five dif- 
ferent churches, and being a man of spotless character, he is still 
held in fond memory by all who knew him. Mi-s. Wince had only 
one child, a son, born in March, 1872, who died five weeks later, but 
has brought up two. One, Frances Adella Lenwell, motherless, taken 
when she was ten years of age, and who grew up to become a beloved 
and lovely woman. 

Miss Lenwell married Christopher Bcason for her first husband, 
by whom she had two sons. She lived with him until her sons were 
young lads of ten and five years of age, when he became insane and 
was taken to Longeliff Asylum, where he ultimately died. Mrs. Bea- 
son's second husband is a Mr. Cyrus Musselman, still living near 
Sidney. 

A short time after taking Adella Lenwell, Mrs. Wince took Mrs. 
Henrietta Clover's youngest son, 21/3 years old, who had unfor- 
tunately been injured by a fall that made it necessary to isolate him 
from all other children, the fall having brought on epilepsy. He 
is still with Mrs. Wince, was never cured, is now in his forty-fifth 
year. Mrs. Wince has mothered nearly a dozen other children at va- 
rious periods, and has taken into her heart and watched over witli 
tender interest, many, many more. She is "Auntie" to all the chil- 
dren everywhere. 

Noble Headlee is proprietor of the Twin Elm Farm of Monroe 
Township. A farm is known by its products just as a factory is, and 
the distinguished quality of the productiveness of the Twin Elm 
Farm is a fine herd of Jersey cattle and I C hogs. Mr. Headlee, 
its proprietor, is a widely experienced and thoroughlj' competent 
agriculturist, and knows how to get the best out of any given acreage 
or farm plant. His place consists of eighty acres located 31^ miles 
southeast of Pierceton in section 1 of Jlonroe Township. 

Mr. Headlee has an interesting family histoi-j'. He was born in 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 679 

Bureau County, Illinois, August 5, 1850, son of Jehu and Diantha 
(Pratt) Headlee. His great-grandfather, John Headlee, was a Hol- 
lander and on coming to the United States settled in North Caro- 
lina in 1776, while the Revolutionary war was in progress. He mar- 
ried in that state and spent there the rest of his days. His son, John 
Headlee, gi-andfather of Noble, married in North Carolina Elizabeth 
Long. They then moved to Pennsylvania, lived on a farm, and sub- 
.sequentl}^ moved to what is now Morrow County, Ohio, and were 
pioneers of that location. After another period of residence in Bel- 
mont County, Ohio, the family moved out to Bureau County, Illinois, 
about 1828. That is one of the earliest years in the annals of what 
is now one of the richest and most progressive fanning communities 
of Northern Illinois. John Headlee died in that county. 

Jehu Headlee was reared in Ohio and Illinois, married in the lat- 
ter state, and finally moved to Iowa, where he died. He was active 
as a member and elder of the Disciples Church and in politics was a 
republican. He and his wife had .six children, only two of whom are 
now living, Hattie and Noble. Hattie is the wife of Capt. T. P. Cray, 
a clerk in the pension department at "Washington, District of Co- 
lumbia. 

Noble Headlee was reared partly in Illinois and partly in Iowa, 
gaining his education in the common schools. He lived with his 
father to the a^e of twenty-one and after that made his own way 
in the world. 

January 1, 1888, he married Susan Leedy, who was born in Rich- 
land County, Ohio, April 4, 1853, daughter of David S. and Mary 
(Tenley) Leedy. When she wa.s a child her parents moved to Whitley 
County, Indiana, where she' grew up and was educated in the public 
schools. From this locality Mrs. Headlee went to Illinois and was 
married there. Four cliildren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Headlee, 
three now living: Eva M., who is the wife of L. C. Faulkner and 
lives on the Headlee farm, their child, E. M. Faulkner, being the only 
grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. Headlee. Harvey Headlee is now with 
the Aviation Corps of the United States army. Alle D. is a grad- 
uate of the common schools and wife of E. S. Lancaster, living in 
Michigan. The family are members of the Disciples Church and 
Mr. Headlee votes his politics independently. 

William Polk. In the death of William Polk, which occurred 
at his home farm in Wayne Township of Kosciusko County on Feb- 
ruary 21, 1915, a large community in this section of Indiana lost an 
honored citizen and a tried and true friend and supporter of all that 
was good in the affairs of human life. He had been for thirty-five 
years a resident of Kosciusko County. 

A native of Pennsylvania, William Polk was born January 25, 
1834, a son of John Polk. He was four years of age when his par- 
ents moved to Monroeville, Indiana, and they were among the early 
settlers in that section of Allen County. On the old homestead there 
William Polk grew up, gained an education in the district schools, 
and started his independent career as a buyer and seller of lumber 



680 HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

and horses. He sold a great quantity of ties for the equipment of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad. His later years were spent in the quiet 
routine of farming. 

In 1855 William Polk married Mary S. Van Buskirk. She was 
born in Ohio September 2, 1837, and died January 14, 1915, just five 
weeks before the death of her husband. Almost ten years before 
their death they celebrated the fiftieth anniversary, their golden wed- 
ding day. 

In 1880 "William Polk moved to Kosciusko County, Indiana, and 
located on the farm where he spent the rest of his life. He and his 
wife were the parents of five sons: John H., James L., Marcellus D., 
Franklin P. and George "W". These are all still living. John H. and 
James L. operates the old homestead in Wayne Township. Marcellus 
D. and Franklin P. reside at Fairmount, Indiana. George W. lives 
in Warsaw. 

There was nothing out of the ordinary in connection with the life 
of the late WiUiam Polk. He was honest, industrious, paid his just 
debts, commanded the respect of his fellow men and worthily filled 
the niche in life to which he was allotted. He was first a Presby- 
terian, but in later j-ears was affiliated with the ^Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Pleasant Valley. It is such men as William Polk who 
make up the bone and sinew of any community, state or nation. 

George W. Polk, youngest son of the late William Polk, has for 
several years been one of the successful business men at the county 
seat. He was born at Monroeville in Allen County, Indiana, February 
2, 1878, and has lived in Kosciusko County since he was two years 
of age. As a boy he attended district schools and spent ome term in 
the Normal School at Warsaw. Though he received a teacher's license 
he never taught a term of school. Though all his early experiences 
were associated with the farm, farming did not appeal" to him as a 
permanent vocation, and since early youth he has been identified with 
some line of active enterprise. For a short time he was in the livery 
business at Pierceton. Then for a few years he was connected with 
S. B. Whittenberger, who had stores both at Claypool and Warsaw. 
In 1902 Mr. Polk established a buggj- and harness store in Warsaw, 
starting on a very modest scale. He is the proprietor of a garag:e 
and is the distributing agent for the Buick, Miller and Ford cars 
and is also engaged in buying and selling live stock. Anything he 
undertakes he carries through with a purpose and energy that brings 
results. 

Mr. Polk married Neul J. Huffer. They are the parents of two 
children: Lawrence and Norman. Mr. Polk is affiliated with the 
Masonic Order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellow.s, the Modem 
Woodmen of America, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and the Travelers Protective Association. 

M. L^VFAYETTE Van Dorn is One of the intelligent and progressive 
farmers of Seward Township, and is a native of this county. Suc- 
cess has come to him as a reward of long continued and well directed 
effort. He did not begin life with a fortune and was content with 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 681 

his inheritance of lionesty and the qualities of thrift and industry 
which are after all more to be desired than money. 

His family record might well be used as a text for sermons on 
the value of righteous and simple living. They have been in this 
country for a number of generations and every generation shows 
strong men and strong women, nearly all of them blessed with great 
physical strength and many attained ripe age. Mr. Van Dorn's great- 
grandfather, named William Van Dorn, was a native of New Jei-sej', 
and lived to be ninety years old. His grandfather was also named 
William, was a native of New Jersey, and lived to be eighty-nine vears 
old. 

M\Ton B. Van Dorn. fatlier of M. Lafayette Van Dorn, was born 
in Ohio and lived to be almost eighty-eight. He was the eighth child 
in a family of twelve, named in order of age as follows : William, who 
was born in New Jersey; Polly; Lizzie; Patty; Sallie; Nathaniel, 
who is now living in his ninety-ninth year at Stromsburg, Nebraska ; 
Nicholas ; Myron B. ; Philo ; Melissa ; Nelson and Freedom. 

Myron B. Van Dorn married in Ohio Elizabeth Teel, also a native 
of that state. Shortly after their marriage they came to Indiana, 
seeking a new home, with most of their possessions on a wagon and 
with a single cow following behind. They were thirteen days in 
making the journey. Their first home was near Sevastopol, where 
Myron B. Van Dorn leased forty acres and began the work of clear- 
ing. He was a man of great physical vigor and had a reputation in 
the early days as a champion rail splitter, and many feats of great 
physical strength are remembered by his children and others. There 
was great need for such strength in pioneer times when the principal 
indu.stry was clearing farms, making rails, and building log cabins. 
He was always a hand in great demand at the log rollings, then so 
common. On one of these occasions he was appointed captain on one 
side while a champion wrestler of the neighborhood was captain of 
the other side. The captains divided the hands by choice, alternately. 
A yoke of o.xen was given to the wrestler and his men to aid them in 
their work. Myron Van Dorn and his men worked without a team. 
The clearing was divided and the contest began. When it was tin- 
ished the honors were all with the Van Dorn team. The other cap- 
tain was not satisfied with this defeat and consequently challenged 
his rival to wrestle. Myron Van Dorn was lotli to do this, l)ut after 
a continued banter for .some time accepted the challenge and again 
won. At another time his brother Philo Van Dorn was a hand in a 
log rolling where four men were trying to lift a log, two men at each 
end. Two had succeeded in raising their end, but the other two were 
unable to lift theirs from the gi'ound. Philo then ordered the men 
to step aside, and he alone picked up the end and carried it to the 
log heap quite easily. The few old settlers who are alive and who 
were acquainted with him will recall many other facts to substantiate 
his remarkable strength. 

Myron B. Van Dorn never had any school privileges, all his in- 
struction having been gathered in one short term. When he had 
grown to young manhood he became a member of a singing school, 



682 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

aud at that time was unable to read. Singing with the class, he 
soon committed the songs to memory. He immediately began to 
associate the spelling of the words of the songs with the spelling of 
other words, and in this manner his knowledge in reading broadened 
until he became quite proficient. He was also a good Bible student 
and well versed in its doctrines. In oral arithmetic he stood above 
the average, and frequently aided his children in developing mathe- 
matical problems in their early school work. He often said to his 
son Lafayette that he knew wliat it meant to be uneducated, and 
was determined to do all he could to give his children appropriate 
advantages. Even at that time the terms of the public schools were 
very shoi-t, and though Myron Van Dorn had no more money than 
the other settlers in a time when currency was seldom seen, he was 
not satisfied with the short terms of the public schools and he wil- 
lingly co-operated with bis neighbors to hire a teacher for a few 
months' term in addition to the regular term afforded by taxation. 
He was willing to go to any rea.sonable sacrifice in order to attain 
his high ideals of giving his children a worthy preparation for life. 
No one appreciates these sacrifices and the value of them more than 
ilr. Lafayette Van Dorn. 

After several years on his first farm above notetl llyron Van 
Dorn moved to where the Village of Burket now is and bought land 
now included in the Isaac Hire farm. That land he also cleared up. 
sold, and then bought fifty acres near Burket. where he bad his home 
luitil his death. This land was also in its virgin .state, with an abun- 
dance of prime beech, sugar, ash, oak, poplar and walnut timber. He 
cleared a small spot, built a log cabin, moved in and immediately be- 
gan vigorously swinging the axe to clear away the rest of the woods. 
Timber at that time was of little value, and there was seldom a mar- 
ket for it at any price. ]\Ir. Lafayette Van Dorn recalls his father 
selling eight large walnut trees for $7. At another time he traded 
for ten bushels of com one large walnut tree, about five feet in diam- 
eter at the stump. It made five logs, each twelve feet long, up to the 
first limb. Aftei-wards the tree was found to be curley, making a 
wood especially prized in fine cabinet work. Such a tree today would 
be worth a small fortune. Much of this fine timber was made into 
rails and the farm was fenced into fields containing about four acres 
each. All the timber not needed for such purposes or for fuel and 
which could not be sold was piled into heaps and burned. In this 
way be proceeded until the farm was all cleared and in a state of 
good cultivation. Mr. and Mrs. Van Dorn were members of the same 
church. In pioneer times the building in which they met to worship 
consisted of a school house over six miles distant. Later on the mem- 
bers of this congregation and people of the vicinity erected a countrv 
church building, kno-mi as tlie Christian Church at Sycamore, this 
building received its name from a large sycamore tree that stood near. 
Mr. and Mrs. Van Dorn retained their membei-ship with this congre- 
gation until death. 

M. Lafayette Van Dorn was Iwm at his father's home in Kos- 
ciusko County April 20, 1852. He was one of six children, four of 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 683 

whom are still living. The two deceased were named Marion and 
James. The four living are: M. Lafayette; Hiram M., living near 
Burket; Margaret D., wife of Leonadus H. Alexander, of the Burket 
eommunity; and Noah L., whose home is also near Bui'ket. 

M. Lafayette Van Dorn has many interesting memofies of his own 
boj^hood and recollections that indicate many of the hardships his 
parents endured. He has seen his father grate corn for meal for 
bread, flail his wheat by hand, and he was an expert at cradling grain. 
His mother would take the wool that came from the sheep, wash and 
pick it, and after it was carded into rolls, spin it into yarn and color 
it, and when woven into cloth she would cut and make it into clothing 
for the family, doing all the work by hand in the old fa.shioned ways, 
using only shears, needle and thread to do all the sewing. She would 
bake bread in a east, perhaps the word cast-iron would be better, 
oven by raking some of the live coals to the front of the rude old fire- 
place, then put the oven on this bed of coals and cover the lid with 
other coals. 

Mr. Van Dorn recalls how his father would take the mother and 
himself and his brother Hiram in a cart drawn by a yoke of oxen 
and drive six miles to his grandfather Teels, his father walking all 
the way to drive the oxen. The team would then be left at the Teel 
home and father and mother would walk a mile through the woods 
to church. At other times they would naake the entire journey on 
foot and the boys would be carried alternately on their fathers 
shoulders. Myron Van Dorn was a member of the Christian Church 
and very strict in the observance of his religious responsibilities. In 
politics he was a democrat. 

M. Lafayette Van Dorn grew up in Seward Township, and started 
to school when about eight years old. He remembers many inci- 
dents of that first term. It was taught in an old log school house 
situated in a dense woods .just a few rods north of the present graded 
and high school building in Burket. The roads to this old school- 
house consisted principally of footpaths through the forest. At that 
time and for .several years afterwards the Van Dorn family used 
tallow candles and lard lamps for light. Mr. Van Dorn himself used 
such lights and sometimes studied his lessons and read by the light 
furni.shed from the rude old fireplace. Despite the meag;erness of 
these early advantages he qualified and became a very competent 
teacher, a profession he followed for about twenty years, and taught 
in a number of district schools and also in the schools of Burket Vil- 
lage. 

In growing to manhood he shared many of the pioneer hard- 
.ship.s with his parents, especially on the last farm of fifty acres which 
his father bought. This farm he helped to clear and improved until 
he left the parental home, at which time he was near twenty-four years 
old. During the last few years of his life he has not been so actively 
engaged in farm work as formerly. 

When the Town of Burket was laid out he bought two lots, on 
which he built a house and moved into it. At fii-st much of his time 
when he was not teaching was occupied in the stores at this jjlace 



68-1 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNT V 

and he at one time spent about four months in Chicago. Later oil 
the court appointed him triistee of the George Miller estate, consist- 
ing of 169 acres, which he superintended until the old gentleman's 
death, after which he settled up the estate. ]Mr. Van Dorn then bought 
a farm, and in connection with the management of this farm he and 
his wife operated the People's Jlutual Telephone Company's Ex- 
change at Burket. also collected rent for the same, using one room of 
their home for the office. This work they continued for over twelve 
years, until the death of the wife. A few months after her death 
Mr. Van Dorn discontinued the work of this office and it was moved 
from his home. Since that time he has been living alone and direct- 
ing his attention to his home and farm. 

July 4, 1875, Mv. Van Dorn married Maggie Everly. She was 
born in this county and was educated in the common schools. When 
she was only fourteen years old she taught her first term of school 
and continued that work for .some years. Mr. and ]Mrs. Van Dorn 
lived on a farm and cultivated it during the summer and during the 
winter he did his work as a teacher. Two cliildren were born to their 
marriage. OUie is the wife of Emmett Benton, who is a railway 
employe living at Elkhart, Indiana : Effie, the second daughter, now 
decea.sed, married Robert Eaton. Mr. ^'an Dorn lost his good wife 
and companion by death ]May 15. 1914. She was a devout member 
of the Chri.stian Church. 

Ml-. Van Dorn owns a farm of ninety acras and is also a stock- 
holder in the elevator at Burket. He is affiliated with the Improved 
Order of Red Men and the ilodern Woodmen of America and in pol- 
itics is a democrat. He served two terms as justice of the peace. He 
is a member of the Christian Church. 

Hon. Jesse E. Eschbach. Here is a name that bespeaks a large 
relation.ship and many prominent associations with affairs in Kos- 
eiu.sko County during the past sixty years. Members of the family 
have been loyal soldiers and loyal citizens in whatever position duty 
has called them, and there is no name entitled to greater respect in 
Kosciusko County. 

The late Aaron F. Eschbach, who died October 28, 1913, was a 
well known merchant in Warsaw for thirtA- years, and prior to that 
had been a farmer. He was born at Huntingdon. Penn.sylvauia, Jan- 
uary 19, 1838, a son of Tobias and Catherine Eschbach. A\Tien a boy 
he came to Indiana with his parents, who first located in Huntington, 
and from there the family in 1857 moved to Kosciusko County and 
established their home on a farm south of Warsaw. Aaron F. Esch- 
bach w^ent out to Kosciusko County to give his service to the Union dur- 
ing the latter months of the Civil war. He was enrolled in Company 
G of the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Regiment of Indiana In- 
fantry on Februan- 11, 1864, and received his honorable discharge 
August 29. 1865, several mouths after the close of actual hostilities. 
At the time of his muster out he was a sergeant. He married Sarah 
A. Knox, and they are the parents of six children, four of whom are 
still living. 



HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 685 

Jesse E. Eschbach who for a number of years has been one of 
the leading members of the Warsaw bar and has made a notable record 
in public life, particularly as a legislator, was born at Warsaw July 
23, 1876, a son of Aaron F. and Sarah A. (Knox) Eschbach. His 
boyhood was spent in his native city, and in 1892 he graduated from 
the Warsaw High School, completed a literary course in Otterbein 
University in 1896, and for a number of years before taking up his 
legal career was a successful teacher. He was superintendent of the 
Silver Lake High School four years, and altogether a teacher in Kos- 
ciusko County for six yeai-s. Mr. Eschbach graduated from North- 
western Law School at Chicago in 1903, and in April, 1907, began 
active practice at Warsaw. He has since built up a splendid private 
practice, though much of his time has been required by his duties as 
a legislator. 

Mr. Eschbach served as a member of the Sixty-fifth, Sixty-sixth, 
Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth and Sixty-ninth General assemblies and 
was a member of the Special Session in September, 1908. He was 
republican leader in the House of Representatives during the Sixty- 
seventh, Sixty-eighth and Sixty-ninth assemblies. He was chairman 
of the committee of labor in the Sixty-fifth Assembly and a member 
of the ways and means committee in the Sixty-sixth, Sixty-eighth and 
Sixty-ninth assemblies. One fact which indicates his popularity and 
hold upon the confidence of his fellow citizens is that in 1906 he was 
the only republican elected on his ticket during the democratic land- 
slide of that year. His name is also associated with much beneficial 
legislation. He was author of the drainage law of the State of In- 
diana, which was passed in 1907, and was also author of a number 
of acts for the protection of the inmates of the state institutions. He 
also brought about changes in laws providing for the qualifications of 
teachers in the public schools and the regulations for the common 
and high school system of the state. Mr. Eschbach is affiliated with 
the Benevolent and Protective Ordei' of Elks and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

Joseph Schoonovek B.vker, who among other distinctions is an 
honored survivor of the Civil war, in which he fought as a Union 
soldier, has been a prominent resident of Kosciusko County for many 
years and is well known over this and other counties in the real estate 



He was born in Hancock County, Ohio, September 8, 1838, son 
of Isaac and Rebecca (Schoonovcr) Baker, the former a native of 
Rockingham Coimty, Virginia, and the latter of Fairfield (Jounty, 
Ohio. His father w'a.s of German ancestry and his mother of Holland. 
Isaac Baker was a farmer, an old-line whig in politics and a member 
of the Methodist Church. 

Mr. Baker lived on a farm luitil he was eighteen years old, and in 
the meantime acquired a common school education. He was still in 
the flush of voung manhood when in October, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company E "of the Twelfth Indiana Infantry as a private. After 
his militarv service he became a commercial traveling salesman and 



686 HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

was on the road almost constantly until 1878, when he was elected 
county auditor of KosciiLsko County. The efficiency with which he 
performed his duties is testified to by the fact that his constituents 
kept him in office steadily for eight years. For the past twenty years 
Mr. Baker has been as.sociated with the Straus Brothers Company of 
Ligonier, Indiana, the largest dealers in improved farms in the United 
States. 

Mr. Baker has always been a republican, but never .sought any im- 
portant office except that of county auditor. He has been a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church for sixty-seven years and has 
held some official post in his home church for over sixty years. He 
was a delegate from the North Indiana Conference to the General 
Conference of the church at New York in 1888. His affiliation with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows is almost as long and con- 
tinuous as that with the Methodist Church. He has heen a member 
for sixty years and has filled all the offices in the local lodge. He 
has been a Mason for half a century, and a Knight Templar for over 
forty years, also a member of the Scottish Rite. 

On November 23, 1862, at Warsaw, Mr. Baker married Angeline 
Runyan, of Irish ancestry. She is a daughter of Peter L. and Mary 
(Ervin) Runyan. Jlr. and Mrs. Baker have three children, all bora 
in "Warsaw : iSeorge Bramwell, the only son, is now a banker at Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, Blanche is a kindergarten teacher, and Ethel G. 
is assistant in the Public Library at South Bend, Indiana. 

Lemuel W. Royse. supei-vising editor of this history of KosciiLsko 
County, was born near Pierceton, this county, in 1847. Much of his 
knowledge of pioneer history was derived from his father, who was 
one of the first settlers. 

His father, George W. A. Royse, a native of New Hampshire, came 
to Kosciusko County in 1835. He was a blacksmith by trade, but had 
previously been ordained a Methodist minister and had been an Ohio 
circuit rider. He officiated as local minister in several of the early 
Methodist churches in Kosciusko County. He also taught school, be- 
ing one of the first teachers in the county. He was also for many 
years a justice of the peace in Turkey Creek Township. He wa.s a 
whig and later one of the first adherents of the republican party in 
this county. His death occurred at Larwill, Whitley County, in 
April, 1859, at the age of fifty-seven. The maiden name of his wife 
was Nancy Choplin, who was horn near the old Bennington l)attlefield 
in Vermont. She and her husband were married in Wood County, 
Ohio, and she spent her last years with her son at Warsaw. 

Lemuel W. Royse was twelve years old when his father died, and 
after that he lived with a Kosciusko County farmer and worked for 
his board to the age of sixteen. He then contributed his support to 
his widowed mother and acquired his education in the intervals of 
employment and with considerable difficulty. At the age of eighteen 
he began teaching, and continued alteraately to teach winter terms 
and work on farms for about eight years. Such leisure as he had from 
this strenuous employment he used to study law, and in the spring of 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 687 

1872 entered the office of Prazer & Encell at Warsaw. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Wai-saw in September, 1873, and began his prac- 
tice at the county seat the following year. Mr. Royse has thus had 
a continuous association with the Kosciusko county bar for forty-five 
j^ears. 

In 1876 he was elected prosecuting attorney for the thirty-third 
circuit and served two years. He was chosen mayor of Warsaw in 
1885, and held this office for six years following. He was elected to 
Congress for the Thirteenth District of Indiana in 1894, and again 
in 1896. Under an appointment from the governor he served as .iudge 
of the Kosciusko Circuit Court of Indiana from February, 1904, 
until November, 1908. Under the selective draft law he served as a 
member of District Board No. 2 of Indiana until the close of the war. 
He is a republican and is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Red Men and the Elks. 

July 10, 1883, at Hillsdale, Michigan, he niarried Miss Belle Me- 
Intyre. 

LoMAN A. Iden. The record of farm owners and cultivators, good 
citizens and upbuilders of the community in Etna Township earrie-s 
the name of Iden prominently, since that family has been here for 
over half a eenturj^ and its members have alwa.ys"^ been people of con- 
sequence. The experience of Mr. Loman A. Iden has been largely 
along the line of farming, but his home is in Etna Green. 

He was bom in Carroll County, Ohio, January 27, 1854, a son of 
Washington and Elizabeth (Heston) Iden. His father was a native 
of Virginia and settled in Ohio in early days, and in 1864 moved to 
Indiana and located north of Etna Green. He later sold his farm 
there and bought another tract of land to the north, eventually shar- 
ing this fai-m of a hundred and seventy acres with his children. He 
finally acquired eighty acres in the same locality, and there spent the 
rest of his life. He was a hard working citizen, and was greatly pros- 
pered in all his undertakings. His wife was a greatly beloved woman 
in the community, and attained the great age of ninety-three. They 
were members of the Christian Church and he served as an elder. 
In politics he was a republican, and for many yeare he was township 
assessor. Of the ten children of the parents, seven are still living 

The eighth in order of birth, Loman A. Iden, had a farm training 
and was educated in the district schools. In September, 1884, he 
married Miss Tena Shively, daughter of Daniel B. and Hannah (Sla- 
baugh) Shively. Her parents were both bom in Ohio, but came to 
Kosciusko County when young. Her mother's people died in Ohio 
and Mrs. Shively was reared by an uncle. Dauiel B. Shively after his 
marriage settled on a farm in Marshall County. Mrs. Iden was edu- 
cated in the district schools. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mra. Iden settled in Etna Township, 
and their labors have been rewarded with a good farm of sixty-seven 
acres. Eleven years ago they moved to the Village of Etna Green 
and among other interests Mr. Iden is a stockholder in the Mutual 
Telephone Company. 



688 HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

They have two sons. Chester, a graduate of the common schools 
and the business course of Valparaiso University, is bookkeeper for a 
large wholesale house at Las Vegas, New Mexico. The son Earl, who 
perfected himself as a stenographer, afterwards studied law and was 
a Federal Court reporter at Santa Fe, New Mexico. He is now an 
attorney at Roswell in that state, and is doing a large business in his 
profession. 

Mr. and Mrs. Iden are membei-s of the Christian Church, and in 
polities he is a republican. 

John D. Widaman. Those older citizens of the county seat at 
Warsaw whose memories go back to a period between thii*ty-five and 
forty years ago can recall John D. Widaman as a poor and sti'uggling 
young lawyer, who was not a.shamed of any honorable occupation in 
order to make ends meet, and who at that time occupied a place of 
I'omparative obscurity among the many brilliant lights composing 
the Kosciusko County bar. It would be ungrateful to recall these 
facts had not Mr. Widaman overcome the obstacles in his path at that 
time. To the present generation he is known only as a very successful 
and able lawyer, a man who has identified himself with many of the 
business and civic institutions of Warsaw, and whose position and 
standing in the community are above question. 

Coming of substantial Gei-man lineage, he was born in Westmore- 
land County, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1851. Michael Widaman, his 
father, was the son of a German count. This count was reared to 
enter the Catholic priesthood, but instead embarked upon a military 
career. He fought with the troops of the German Empire in many 
campaigns until he lost an arm. He finally went to Paris, conducted 
a military school there for a time, and thence emigrated to America. 
After his marriage he located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and 
became a minister of the Lutheran faith. His death occurred in 1835. 
Michael Widaman was a native of Pennsylvania and married Cath- 
erine Jliller. Through her the Warsaw attorney is directly descended 
from soldiers who bore a conspicuous part in the American Revolution. 

John D. Widaman had a comfortable home and opportunities for a 
liberal education. After the common schools he finished the course 
in Mount Union College in Ohio, and his father ofl:"ered to defray the 
expenses of a theological training. However, he had already made up 
his mind that his profession should be that of the law, and he declined 
to accept further aid from his father, and thenceforward paid his own 
way. While still under age he secured a certificate and began teach- 
ing school. He followed that occupation for three years, and used all 
his leisure intervals to read Blackstone and other legal authorities. He 
was not yet a qualified lawyer when on October 1, 1875, he came to 
Warsaw, Indiana. For a time he read law in the office of W. S. Mar- 
shall, uncle of Thomas R. Marshall, now vice-president of the United 
States. It is an interesting fact that Thomas R. Marshall had only 
shortly before completed his legal studies under W. S. Marshall and 
had gone to Columbia City, Indiana, to start his career towards emi- 



HISTORY OF KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 689 

On November 29, 1875, only a few weeks after his arrival iu War- 
saw, Mr. Widaman married Estella, the only child of Allen and 
Lueinda Saine. His struggles to obtain a living share of practice 
at a bar then famous for brilliant members were both long and dis- 
heartening, and he oftentimes wondered if he could raise means to 
meet the next week's living obligations. Through his preceptor, 
Mr. Marshall, and others he was frequently employed to transact 
minor matters connected with the law, and in this way he managed 
to make a living. At one time Sheriff 0. P. Jaques appointed him 
bailiff, and b.y carrying wood upstairs to the court room and perform- 
ing similar menial duties he managed to eke out an existence. Such 
was the early career of one who is now among the most prosperous men 
of Kosciusko County and conceded a position among Indiana's ablest 
lawyers. 

In polities Mr. Widaman is a republican and in Masonry he has 
attained all the degrees of the Scottish Rite except the thirty-third. 
Mr. Widaman was one of the prime movei-s in the organization of 
the Indiana Loan & Trust Company at Warsaw in 1899, and ever 
since its beginning has been president. He is materially interested in 
various other enterprises closely connected with the commercial pros- 
perity of Warsaw, but is most widely known as a wise counselor, a 
superior lawyer, and one frequently mentioned as the leader of the 
local bar. 

A. L. Sellers, one of the farmers of high standing in Monroe 
Township, owns and occupies the old homestead that was established 
by the Sellei-s family here in pioneer times. This fai'm is three miles 
north of Sidney in Monroe Township. 

Mr. Sellers was born here April 14, 1875, son of F. P. and Mary 
M. (Tillman) Sellers. The parents were both natives of Ohio. The 
father died in 1905, at the age of eighty-one and the mother is still 
living at that age. Of their ten children eight are still living: 0. G. 
Sellers, of Grenola, Kansas ; M. H. Sellers, of Pierceton, Indiana ; 
Isadora, wife of Leandro Pottenger; C. H. Sellers, of Bourbon, 
Indiana ; M. W., of Brant, Michigan ; Lenna, wife of Frank Brown, of 
Claypool ; and Everett E., of Bourbon. 

Mr. A. L. Sellers grew up on the fai-m he now owns and besides 
the advantages of the common schools attended the high school at 
Pierceton and was given a license to teach, though he never used it. 
Since early manhood all his energies have been absorbed in farming. 

February 5, 1899, he married Miss Grace Hoaglund, who was 
born in Monroe Township, daughter of J. R. and Barbara (Faulkner) 
Hoaglund. Mrs. Sellers was educated in the common and high 
schools. After their marriage they lived on a farm north of Warsaw 
for eleven years, but then sold and bought eighty acres of the old 
Sellers homestead, and later he bought another eighty acres, giving 
them a well balanced and productive farm of 160 acres. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sellers have two children, Clifford L., bom May 29, 1900, a 
gi-aduate of the Sidney High School in 1918; and Dula H., born 
September 21, 1913. The family are members of the Brethren Church, 



690 HISTORY OP KOSCIUSKO COUNTY 

and Mr. Sellers is a deacon and is superintendent of its Sunday school. 
Politically he is a republican. 

William H. IVLvston has been a resident of Kosciusko County 
forty years, and is a citizen looked up to as a most successful and 
substantial farmer in Washington Township and one who can be de- 
pended upon for co-operation in every wholesome and worthy public 
movement. His farm of 180 acres in section 14 of that township is 
situated on rural route No. 3 out of Pierceton. 

Mr. Maston was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, April 23, 1852, 
son of John and Margaret (Meredith) Maston, the former a native 
of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. The father moved from Vir- 
ginia to Coshocton County in early days, married there, lived on a 
small farm in the county until 1862, when he sold out and moved to 
Whitley County, Indiana. After farming there for a year he sold 
and went further west to Cass County, Illinois, but not liking that 
location returned to Coshocton County, and from there came in 1875 
to Kosciusko County. In this county the father bought 160 acres, 
and occupied it as a farm until 1888. He then bought sixty acres in 
Whitley County and he and his wife spent their last years there. His 
wife was a member of the Baptist Church and in politics he voted 
as a democrat. They had ten children, eight of whom are still living : 
John W., William H., Marion H., Eliza. Aaron B., Ida, Jesse L. and 
Rosa B. 

William H. Maston was reared in Ohio chiefly, gained his educa- 
tion in the district schools there, but has lived in Kosciusko County 
since he was about twenty-two years of age. He married for his 
first wife Barbara Heffelfinger. One of their children died in infancy. 
Flora B. is also deceased, and the only one now living is Minnie A., 
wife of Noah E. Block. For his second wife Mr. Maston married 
Margaret Fulbright, who died childless. His third wife was Mary 
E. Cross, and by that marriage there were two children : Maude M., 
wife of John J. Wolfe; and John P., who died at the age of eight 
J years. For his next wife Mr. Maston married Maria Galbreath, whose 
only child, Loren, is a graduate of the Columbia City High School, 
graduated in law from Valparaiso Universit.y, and in 1916 was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Kosciusko County and is now located in prac- 
tice at Freedom, Pennsylvania. For his present wife Mr. Maston 
married Emma J. Bennett. In politics he is independent. 



INDEX 



Abolitionist, first, 105 
Adjutants-General, 64, 74 
Adoption of Greenville treaty, 40 
Aerie No. 1339, Fraternal Order of 

Eagles, 287 
A Good Woodsy Road (illustration), 

181 
Agricultural extension work, 199 
Agriculture, teaching of, 163; pioneer 

times, 187; progressive, 195 
Alexander, Frank, 407 
Alexander, George M., 440 
Aley, Robert J., 73, 162 
Algonquins, 29 
Allison, Randolph B., 410 
Allsbaugh, Jonas H., 609 
Amendments to the Constitution, 76 
American Northwest, 11; Father of, 12 
Anderson, Edward, 229 
Andreas, John L., 586 
Anglin, John W., 522 
Anglin, William B., 473 
Armstrong, John, 64 
Arnold, Emsley A., 623 
Associate Judges, 132 
Athon, James S., 70 
Attorneys-General, 64, 73 
Attorneys, prosecuting, 145 
Atwood, 350 
Auditors, 63 
Auditors of State. 71 
.Auditor's report. 128 
Automobiles, 183 

Bain, I. R., 85 
Bain, W. B., 85 

Baker, Conrad, 68. 69 
Baker. Joseph S.. 685 
Baldwin, Daniel P., 72 
Ball, Thomas E., 443 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. 177 



Banks, Warsaw. 293; Syracuse, 324; 
Pierceton. 341; Milford, 345; Etna 
Green, 356; Claypool, 358; Leesburg, 
361; North Webster, 367; Sidney, 
371 

Baptist church. First, Warsaw, 280 

Baptists. 380; Syracuse, 322; Pierce 
ton, 339 

Barbee Lakes (illustrations), 368 

Barr, David, 639 

Barrett, Edward, 74 

Bartol, Walter H., 246 

Barton, William, 64 

Bass, Simon S., 215 

Baugher, John A., 546 

Baugher, William F., 515 

Beaver Dam. 379 

Beaver Dam Lake, 108, 369 

Beer, .Jehu, 637 

Benack and his hundredth tongue, 52 

Bench and Bar, 129, 150 

Benevolent societies, Warsaw, 283 

Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, Warsaw, 287 

Bergen, Percy M., 606 

Bethany Girls, 305 

Beveridge, Albert J., 66, 67 

Beyer Brothers, 399 

Beyer, C. C 299 

Beyer, J. E.. 299 

Beyer, John F., 299. 385 

Bible Conference, 305 

Big Four Railroad, 175 

Bigger. Samuel, 68 

r.iggs. William. 65 

Bigler, Warren, 71 

Billheimer, John C, 71 

Bingham. James, 73 
Bishop. Clyde L.. 586 
Bittler. George A., 72 
Bixler, William H., 531 



692 



INDEX 



Black Hawk, 31 

Blaines family of Leesburg, 101 

Blatchley, Willis S., 74 

Bloss, John M., 73 

Blue, Austin, 536 

B'lythe, Benjamin I., 71 

Board of Education, State, 156 

Boggs. John L., 662 

Boggs, Thomas W., 627 

Bond, Shadrack. 65 

"Bone" Prairie, 51, 96 

Boone. Ratlifif, 67, 69 

Borton. Cleanthus M.. 540 

Boundaries, 106 

Bouse, George W., 460 

Bowman, Elson V., 590 

Bowman. Orange H., 607 

Bowser, Francis E.. 141. 577 

Bowser. John H.. 499 

Boyer, John F.. 649 

Boyston Lake, 107 

lioydston. Nelson N., 21.i 

Brett. Matthew L.. 72 

Bridges. Franklin L., 74 

?;right, Jesse D.. 66. 69 

British and French Northwest, 1 

British Northwest. 9 

Brown, A. H., 612 

Brown, Colonel, 212 

Brown, Ryland T., 73 

Brown, William J., 70 

Brubaker, John H., 152 

Brubaker. Walter, 152 

Bryan, William J., 309 

building bee. 100 

Business Street. Mentone (illustn 
tion). 352 

Bush. Edgar D.. 70 

Buskirk, Clarence A., 72 

Burket, 370 
Burket. Benjamin. 642 
Burket. Calvin W., 547 
Butler. Russell H., 671 
Butterbaugh. Theron D.. 461 
Butterbaugh. William H.. 582 
Byrd. Charles W.. 63 
Byrer. Aaron. 436 
Bvrer. Franklin. 508 



Cadillac. Antoine de la Motte, 6, 33 
Cain. August C, 427 
Caldwell. Leroy W., 623 
Camp Benjamin Harrison, 241 
Camp Meeting, first Methodist, 276 
Camp No. 3555, Modern Woodmen of 

America. 286 
Canahan. James R., 74 
Carnahan"s Military Park. 300 
Carr. Bruce. 71 
Carter, Charles C, 418 
Carter, Jerome A., 439 
Case. Charles, 229 
Case, Harlo W., 501 
Cathcart, Charles W.. 67 
Catholics, 282 
Cauffman, .John A., 621 
Cauffman, Levi F., 627 
Cauffman, Michael A., 615 
Census figures. 125 
Center Lake. 108 
Chamberlain. E. M.. 116. 13!* 
Chambers, Benjamin, 65, 66 
Chaplin. Stedman, 53 
Oiapman. Charles W.. 220, 222 
Chapman. John B., S6, 104. 116. 220. 

255 
Chapman's Lake, 108 
Chase. Ira J.. 68. 69 
Checase Indian reservation, 90 
Che-cose, 49, 53 

Cliildren's Musical Pageant. 313 
(.hipman. Silas W.. 401 
Chicago Boys' Club, 305 
Cliicago Boys' Club in Bathing, Win- 
ona Assembly (illustration), 311 
Christian church. Warsaw. 279 
Christian Scientists. 283 
Christians, Warsaw. 279: Milford. :U8 : 

Leesburg. 360 
Churches, Warsaw. 274: Syracuse. 322; 
Pierceton. 339: Milford. 348; Silver 
Lake. 354: Etna Green. 356; C\ay- 
pool. 358: Leesburg, 360; Sidney, 
:!71 : Franklin township, 378 
Cincinnati. Wabash A ^lichigan Rail- 
road. 175 
Circuit and county prosecuting at- 
tornevs. 146 



INDEX 



Circuit Court, first session, 114: most 
representative, 130; early, 132; to- 
day, 136 

Circuit preachers, pay of early M. E.. 
273 

Civil divisions, 135 

Civil war, 204; Three Months' Regi- 
ment, 205; Ninth Infantry Regi- 
ment, 305; Eleventh Infr-ntry Regi- 
ment, 306; Twelfth Infantry Regi 
ment, 306; Thirteenth Infantry 
Regiment, 309; Sixteenth Infantry 
Regiment, 210; Seventeenth Infantry 
Regiment, 211; Twentieth Infantry 
Regiment, 213; Twenty-first In- 
fantry Regiment. 212; Twenty-sec- 
ond Infantry Regiment, 213; 
Twenty-sixth Infantry Regiment. 
214; Twenty-ninth Infantry Regi- 
ment, 314; Thirtieth Infantry Reg 
iment, 315; Thirty-fifth Infantry 
(First Irish) Regiment, 316; Thirty- 
ninth Infantry (afterward Eighth 
Cavalry), 316; Forty-first Infantry 
(Second Cavalry). 216; Forty-sec- 
ond Infantry Regiment, 217 : Forty- 
fourth Infantry Regiment. 217; 
Forty-sixth Infantry Regiment. 318; 
Forty-seventh Infantry Regiment. 
318; Forty-eighth Infantry Regi- 
ment. 218; Fifty-eighth Infantry 
Regiment, 219; Fifty-ninth Infantry 
Regiment, 219; Sixty-eighth In- 
fantry Regiment. 220; Seventy- 
fourth Infantry Regiment, 320 ; 
Seventy-seventh Regiment (Fourth 
Cavalry), 224; Eighty-third Infantry 
Regiment, 225; Eighty-eighth In 
fantry Regiment. 235; Ninetieth 
Regiment (Fifth Cavalry). 236: 
One Hundred and Eighteenth In 
fantry Regiment, 226; One Hundred 
and Nineteenth Regiment (Seventh 
Cavalry), 327; One Hundred and 
Twenty-seventh Regiment (Twelfth 
Cavalry), 338; One Htindred and 
Twenty-ninth Infantry Regiment. 
339; One Hundred and Thirtieth In 
fantry Regiment, 230; One Hundred 
and Thirty-eighth Infantry Regi- 
ment. 230: One Hundred and Fifty- 



first and One Hundred and Fifty- 
second Infantry Regiments, 331; 
Light Artillery, Fifteenth Battery, 
233: Twentieth Battery. 333; 
Twenty-third Battery, 233 

Clark. Fred S.. 560 

Clark, George Rogers. 12, 15 

Clarke. William. 65 

Clay township, surveyed. 90; census. 
125: farms, value of. 126; total 
wealth. 127; school statistics, 169: 
early settlers, 356; first permanent 
resident, 357; first union school and 
church. 357 

< laypool. census. 125; total wealth. 

127; value of real estate. 137, 358; 

churches. 358; schools. 358; banks, 

358 
Ciays. 110 
Cleveland. Cincinnati. Chicago & St. 

Louis Railroad. 175 
(line. J. n. I.ec. 397 
Clippers. 118 
Clubs. Warsaw, 396 
Clymer. .lohn F.. 442 
Coburn Henry P.. 74 
Coleman. Eugene A.. 457 
Coleman. .J. Warren, 456 
C (lUege Building. Winona .Assembly 

(illustration), 314 
Colleges, Winona Lake. 314 
Collins Erasmus B.. 70 
f ollett. .lohn. 74 
Columbia Reading Circle. 346 
Commercial Telephone Company. 273 
Commissioned High Schools, 159 
Comniissioners" Court, first session, 94 
( oiniuoii Pleiis Court. 143; abolished. 

144 

< omiiion Pleas Districts. 144 
( niiunon Pleas .Tudges. 145 
Comnmnity Chautauqua. Syracuse. 325 
( oiii|iulsory education, 160 

( (inference Against Crime, 312 

( iinjiressional townships. 36 

( onklin. John S.. 656 

Conner. William W.. 74 

( onsolidafed rural schools, 170 

Constitutional, amendments to. 76 

( onstitution.Tl Convention of 1816. 74 



INDEX 



Constitutional Convention of 1850-51, 
75 

Construction of highways, 182 

Contest for county seat, 116 

Cook, George G., 451 

Cook, Homer L., 71 

Cook, James A., 386 

Cook, John, 386 

Cook, John W., 388 

Cooper, John J., 73 

Corn (illustrations), 186 

Corn husking bees, 189 

Cory, Jesse D., 503 

Corydon, 26 

Cotton, Fassett A., 73, 161 

Council No. 88, Royal and Select Mas- 
ters, Warsaw, 284 

Counties, original Indiana, 17; crea- 
tion of, 28; names of, 77 

County, first under Ordinance of 1787, 
15 ; creation of 28 ; Indian villages 
in, 49; godfather of, 104; area 106, 
195; civil divisions, 125 

County agent, 195 

County Agents' Conference, 197 

County Agricultural Society, 195 

County bar, 150 

County board of education created, 
160 

County buildings in 1848, 115 

County Examiners, 159 

County Fair Association. 193 

County Infirmary, 124 

County oflicers, first. 111 

County officials, pioneer, 111 

County school system, Sarber's sketch 
of, 164 

County schools, present status of, 169 

County seat, contest for, 116 

Country of the Illinois, 15 

Court House (illustration), 123 

Court House, temporary, 114: third, 
124; present, 124 

Court reminiscence, 133 

Courts, 129 

Courts of Conciliation, 144 

Covered Bridge (illustration), 184 

Cox, Edward T,, 74 

Cox, George, 535 
Cox, James, 521 
Coy, Thomas J., 48S 



Cravens, John R., 69 
Crawford, Colonel, 31 
Creation of counties, 38 
Crevecoeur Fort, 3 
Gripe, Freeman E., 428 
Crittenberger, Dale J., 71 
Croghan, George, 35 
Crow, Nathaniel, 333 
Crow's Nest, 333 
Cumback, Will, 69 
Cunningham, Abraham, 96 
Cunningham, Nathaniel F., 72 
Curry, William W., 70 
Cutler, Melville C, 437 

Daily, Americus C, 71 
Dairy Herd and Modern Buildings (il- 
lustration), 191 
Dairy products, 192 
Darr, Daniel C, 487 
Daughters of Pocahontas, Warsaw, 388 
Daughters of Rebekah, Warsaw. 285 
Dausman, Bert E., 484 
Davis. Jeff. C, 213 
Davis, Thomas T., 65 
Davis, William E., 452 
Deaton, Cyrus B., 434 
Deaton, .lacob O., 618 
Deaton, John E., 403 
Deepest lake, 109 
Defrees, Joseph H., 175 
Denny, James C, 72 
Denny, James F., 616 
DePuy, Revra, 390 
De Soto, 1 
Dick, Otis C, 615 

Dickey, Sol C, 301; (portrait) 302 
Disher, Columbus, 504 
District prosecuting attorneys, 145 
Dodd, John W., 71 
Doke, Edmond C, 647 
Dome, Loyal W., 430 
Doty, Alonzo V.. 510 
Doty, Jacob E., 505 
Downing, Francis M., 630 
Drake, -lames P,. 72 
DuBois. C. C, 252 
Dukes, C. C, 493 
Duncan. Silas, 518 
Dunham, Cyrus L., TO 
Dunham. .Tohii. 337 



695 



Dunkards, Milford, 348 
Dunkleberger, John B., 620 
Dunn, George H., 72, 155 
Dunn, John P., 71 
Dunning, Paris C, 68, 69 
Durbin, Winfield T., 68 
Duroc Hogs of the County (illustra- 
tion). 193 

Eagle Lake Hotel, 299 

Early Settlers, 85 

Eddy, Norman, 70, 218 

Education, compulsory, 160 

Kdueational development, 153 

Educational system, present, 163 

Eel River Indians in 1835, 53 

Electric light and power, Milford, 345 

Elkhart county organized, 83 

EUingham, L. G., 71 

Ellis, Erastus W. H., 71 

Ellis, Horace, 73 

Elm Street, Pierceton (illustration), 
340 

Emergency Labor Bureau, 200 

Episcopalians, Warsaw. 282; Pierce- 
ton, 330 

Erwins family, 96 

Eschbach, Aaron P., 684 

Esehbaeh, Jesse E.. 684 

Estep, John, 554 

Etna Green, census. 125; value of real 
estate, 127; total wealth, 127; 
banks, 356; churches, 356 

Etna township, 90; census. 125; farms 
value, 126; total wealth, 127; school 
statistics, 169; one of the smallest, 
355; pioneers of, 355 

Evangelical Association, Syracuse. 322 

Evans, John D., 71 

Extinguishment of Indian claims, 18 

Factory at Pierceton (illustration), 

339 
Fairbanks, Charles W., 67 
Falls of the Ohio, 12 
Farmers State Bank, North Webster. 

367 
Farming machinery, pioneer, 188 
Farm lands, value per acre, 195 
Farms and rural population. 194 
Farms, value of, 126 



Farquhar, John H., 70 

Faulkner, Alice V., 590 

Faulkner, John W., 590 

Fawley, James A., 481 

Ferverda, Hiram B., 473 

Ferverda, John, 441 

Fifty-fourth Circuit, Judges, 139 

Finances, 111, 128 

Fire Department, Milford, 344 

Firemen as Union Soldiers, 263 

Fires. Warsaw, 363 

First Baptist church, Warsaw, 280 

First cabin and store in Warsaw, 255 

First county under Ordinance of 1787. 
15 

First legislature for Indiana Terri- 
tory, 17 

First Methodist Camp Meeting, 276 

First postoffice, Warsaw, 258 

First Presbyterian church, Warsaw, 
278 

First railroad engines, 174 

First schoolhouse in county, 167 

First settler, 84 

First Spring Fountain Park Assem- 
bly, 300 

First trains. 176 

Fischer, George, 65 

Fishing da.ys, old, 337 

Fish propagation, 328 

Fitch. Graham N., 67, 218 

Fitton. John W.. 409 

Five Nations. 30 

Flag. State. 78 

Flatbelly (Miami chief), 49, 57 

Fleming, William, 72 

Fletcher. Miles J., 73 

Floyd. Davis, 63, 65 

Fogle. James P., 521 

Ford. Callender, 421 

Ford, Lanta W., 495 

Ford, Mary, 420 

Foreman. Joseph E., 453 

Forest land along Indian highways, 

I'orest Lodge No. 4. Knights of Pyth- 
ias. Warsaw, 285 

Fort Chartres. founded. 6; sur- 
rendered, 7 

Fort Harmar. 15 

Fort of Crevecocur, 3 



INDEX 



Fort of St. Louis, 5 

Fourteenth Circuit, Judges of, 138 

Franklin township, surveyed, 90; cen- 
sus, 125; farms value, 126; total 
wealth, 127; school statistics, 169; 
area, 377; pioneers, 377; school and 
church, 378; industries, 379 

Frasier, George W., 151 

Fraternal Order of Eagles, Warsaw, 
287 

Fraternal organizations, Syracuse, 325 

Frazer, Harriet D., 140, 252 

Frazer, James R., 243, 252 

F'razcr, James S., 140, 569 

Frazer, William D., 140, 252, 570 

Frazer, Theodore, 252 

Freed, Amos, 435 

Freeman, Stephen, 494 

French and British Northwest, 1 

French and Indian war, 6 

French evacuation, 7 

Friedley, George W.. 69 

Fruit, Levi, 583 

Fuller, Victor, 488 

Funk. Frank, 432 

Fur traders, 34 

Gall, Albert, 73 
Galveston, platted, 374 
Gans, Ira, 581 
(>arber, Albert, 545 
Garber, Daniel M., 551 
Garber, Jefferson, 523 
Garber, Leander, 493 
GaskiU, Joseph M., 470 
(iaskill, Owen S., 391 
Gecting, David M., 73, 160 
General Assembly, 131; acts of, 137 
Gerard, Orlando F.. 550 
Gibson, John, 63 
Gilbert, Newton W.. 70 
Gill. James E., 445 
Gilliam, Bab, 245 
Gilliam. William W., 653 
Gilraan, Joseph. 65 
Clover, John B.. 72 
Goddard, John D.. 657 
Godfather of the county, 104 
Goodrich, James P., 68 
Good Roads movement. ISO; promot- 
ers of. 183 



Gorby, Sylvester S., 74 

Gore, James K., 74 

Goshen. Warsaw & Wabash Railroad, 
175 

Governors of Indiana. 63. 67 

Grabncr, John, 674 

Grady, J. C, 472 

Graff. William, 559 

Grand Army of the Republic, 235 

Grand Army Posts, 235 

Grand Indian Council of August, 1838, 
45 

Grassy Creek, on the Shores of (illus- 
tration), 365 

Gravel road building, 182 

Gravelton, 376 

Graves. William, 101 

Graves, William C, 56 

Gray, Isaac P., 68, 69, 234 

Greathouse, Cliarles A., 73, 162, 164 

Great Indian treaty maker, 42 

Greenawalt, John C, 74 

Greenville Treaty, 36; adoption of, 40 

Griffin. Charles F.. 70 

(iriffin. John, 65 

"Griffin, The," 2 

Griffith, Francis M., 69 

(iriswold. Wliedon W., 332 

Groves. George W., 576 

Guy. James E., 594 

Guy, Samuel, 589 

Gwathmey. Samuel, 66 

Hackelman Kncampment, I. O. 0. F.. 

285 
Hackelman. Pleasant A., 311 
Hadley, Oscar, 72 
Haggard. William S.. 69 
Hall, Frank J., 70 
Hall, John E., 530 
Hall. Samuel, 69 
Hall. Thomas. 85 
Hall. William R., 475 
Hammond. Abram A.. 68. 69 
Hammond Lake, 365 
Hanes. William. 458 
Hanly, J. Frank, 68 
Hanna, Bayless W.. 72 
Hanna, Robert. 66 
Hanna, Thomas. 69 
Hannali. Samuel, 72 



INDEX 



697 



Hannegan, Edward A., 66 

Hapner, Charlie H., 606 

Harlan, Elijah, 85, 93 

Harlan family, 95 

Harmon, John H., 595 , 

Harmon, Mile H., 537 

Harding, Oscar A., 497 

Harris, Horatio J., 71 

Harrison, Benjamin, 67 

Harrison, Christopher, 69 

Harrison township, surveyed, 90; 

pioneers, 93; census, 125; farms 

value, 126; total wealth, 127; school 

statistics, 169, 349; first settlers, 

349 
Harrison, William H., 20, 24, 62, 63, 

65; portrait, 16; great Indian treaty 

maker, 42 
Hascall, Milo S., 211 
Hart, William H., 71 
Harter, Mathias, 388 
Hartter, George, 486 
Hartzell, William M., 517 
Harvey, Jonathan S., 72 
Hatfield,. Thomas B., 625 
Hay, John, 66 
Hayden, Nehemiah. 70 
Raymond, Edgar, 140, 561 
Hawn, Emanuel R., 70 
Headlee, Noble, 678 
Healy, Joshua, 331 
Heekaman, 376 
Heighway, Orven A., 461 
Heisler, William, 629 
Helvey, Clarence A., 435 
Hemenway, James A., 67 
Henderson. Ebenezer, 71 
Henderson, Edgar H., 667 
Henderson, John O.. 71 
Hendricks. Thomas A., 66, 67. 6S 
Hendricks, William. 66. 67 
Henr}', Patrick, 12 
Hibschman, Burlington D., 414 
High School, Milford (illustration). 347 
High School, Pierceton (illustration). 

154 
High School. Warsaw (illustration). 

154 
High Schools, commissioned. 159: 

present, 167 
Highways, 171 



Hill. Andrew J., 593 
Hill, Nathaniel U., 72 
Hill, Roswell S., 72 
Hillis, David, 69 
Hire, Isaac B., 408 
Hire, Amanda, 408 
Hobbs, Barnabas C, 73 
Hoflfman. Max F. A., 70 
Hogs, 193 

Holeombe. John W., 73 
Home economics, 162 
Home Guard, 243 
"Home-spun", 189 
Honan, Thomas M., 73 
Hoover. Thomas A., 650 
Hopkins, Alexander C, 73 
Hopkins, Milton B., 73 
Hord, Francis T.. 73 
Hord, Oscar B., 72 
Horick. J. Forest. 244 
Horses and colts, 192 
Hoss, George W., 73 
Houshour, Samuel K., 83 
Hover, Edgar S., 583 
Hover, J. R., 668 
Hovey, Alvin P., 68 
Howard, C. Norman, 352 
Howard. Ulysses B., 455 
Huffer, Jacob D., 641 
Fluffer, Rudolph, Sr., 639 
Iluffer, Sherman, 511 
Hughs. Charlie A., 602 
Humphrey, George, 336 
Hunt, Union B., 70 
Hurst, Henry. 64 

fdeu, Loman A., (iSi 

Iden. 8. B.. 463 

Idle, T. H.. 559 

Igo, Omer N., 448 

Illinois county, 13 

Illustrations: Marquette, tlu* Peace 
Jlaker. 1 ; Pioneer Fireplace and 
Household Articles, 82; Old Indiana 
Mill, 88; Pioneer Water Wheel, 88; 
Pioneer Cabin Completed, 98; Tippe- 
canoe River View. 107; Picturesque 
Kosciusko County, 113; Winona 
Lake, 113; Turkey Creek Bridge, 
Milford. 112: Syracuse Lake. 112: 
Wawasee Lake. 112: Tippecanoe 



INDEX 



Lake, 112; Kosciusko County Court 
House, 123; Some Kosciusko County 
Schools, 154; Old Eight-sided Schooi- 
house. Plain Township, 165; Wayne 
Township Consolidated School, 166; 
Ready for the Iron Highway, 174; 
A Good Woodsy Road, 181 ; Old Cov- 
ered Bridge of the "buggy" period, 
184; Kosciusko County Corn, 186; 
Dairy Herd and Modern Buildings, 
191; Duroc Hogs of the County, 193: 
Modern Teaching in the Field. 196; 
Winona Agricultural Display, 198; 
Ready to Leave for the Front, 
Spanish-American War, 337; Typ- 
ical Pioneer Woman, 254; On 
Winona Lake near Warsaw, 360; 
One of Warsaw's Main Business 
Streets, 268; McDonald Island. 303; 
Consecration of Indian Mound, Win- 
ona Assembly, 304 ; Restful Scenes 
on Winona Lake, 307: Winona As- 
sembly Grounds, 308; On the Shores 
of the Lake, Winona Assembly, 
310; Chicago Boys' Oub in Bathing, 
Winona Assembly, 311; College 
Building, Winona Assembly, 314: 
Westminster Chapel, Winona As- 
sembly, 316; Wawasee Lake and 
Vicinity, 320; Factory at Pierceton, 
339; Elm Street, Pierceton, 340; 
Looking South on ilain Street, Mil- 
ford, 344; The High School, Miltord, 
347; Interurban Station, 347; Busi- 
ness Street, Mentone, 352; Public 
School, Mentone, 352; Silver Lake 
Street, 354; Postoffice at Oswego, 
Oldest Building in the County, 362; 
Scene on Tippecanoe Lake, 363: 
Stony Ridge Hotel, Tippecanoe 
Lake, 363; On the Shores of Grassy 
Creek, 365; Scenes Around Webster 
Lake, 366; Barbee Lakes, 368; Scenes 
in the Rural Townships, 373 

Improved Order of Red Men, Warsaw, 
286 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Warsaw, 284 

Independent Protective Engine Com- 
pany No. 1, 261 

Indian agent, 45 

Indian Council of August, 1838, 45 



Indian Mound, Consecration of, Win- 
ona Assembly, 304 

Indiana, creation of State, 26; present 
population, 59; pivotal state, 60: 
political record, 60; governors, 63 

Indiana counties, original, 17 

Indiana Loan and Trust Company, 295 

Indiana State Normal School, 158 

Indiana Territory created, 16; first leg- 
islature, 17; secretary, 63; judges 
of, 65: legislature, 65 

Indiana University Biological Station, 
315 

Indiana University trustees, 163 

Indiana Year Book, 77 

Indians: Wars, 3; extinguishment of 
claims, 18; replaced by whites, 18; 
treaties, IS, 25. 39; depredations. 
23 ; departure of, 27 ; dispossession 
of, 29: Algonquin family. 39; re- 
ligious exercises at missions, 33; 
reservations, 39; divided by war of 
1812, 41; lands, title to, 4*3; titles, 
extinguishment of, 43; Pottawato- 
mies of Northern Indiana, 44; vil- 
lages in Kosciusko county, 49; hab- 
its and dispositions of, 54; fun, 55; 
noted chiefs, 56; population, 58; 
trails, 100; highways, forest land 
along, 377 

Industries, Warsaw, 295; Pierceton, 
341; Milford, 345; Lcesburg, 361: 
Franklin township, 379 

Interdenominational Association of 
Evangelists, 313 

Interurban Railway. 177 

Intenuban Station, Milford (illustra- 
tion), 347 

Interurban system (map), 178 

Iroquois, 30 

Irvine. Frederick D., 478 

Irwin. Robert C, 612 

Irwin. William G., 509 

•lackson, Ed, 71 

Jackson. George W., 227 

Jackson township, surveyed, 89; cen- 
sus, 125: farms value, 126; total 
wealth. 127: school statistics, 169. 
370; early settlements and settlers. 
370 

•Taques, Francis M.. 479 



INDEX 



•Tuques, Phebe E., 480 

Jarrett, James C, 553 

Jefferson township, surveyed, 90; cen- 
aus, 125; farms value, 136; total 
wealth, 137; school statistics, 169; 
375; settlement. 375; first school, 
376 

Jeffries, David, 475 

Jennings, Jonathan, 65, 67 

Jensen, Thomas, 534 

Jesuit missionaries, 33 

Johnson, Charles C, 465 

Johnson, James, 64 

Johnson, John, 65 

Johnston, W., 63, 54 

Tones, Aquilla, 72 

Jones, Clem A., 454 

•Tones, Frank L., 73, 161 

•Tones, James G., 73. 317 

.Jones, John, 604 

■Tones, John R., 64, 66 

Jones, Nancy, 605 

•Tones, Peter, 63 

Judd, John S,, 433 

Judges, Tenth Circuit, 137; Four- 
teenth Circuit, 138; Fifty-fourth 
Circuit. 139; Probate Court, 141 

Justices Court, 130 

•Justices of the Peace, duties of, 148 

Kantner, Benjamin, 483 
TCelley, Samuel, 516 
Kern, John W., 67 
Ketcham, William A., 73 
Ivetrow, Calvin 0., 439 
Kibby. John F., 73 
Kilmer, 0^ B. (portrait), 250 
Kimball. Nathan, 73 
Kimes. .John, 622 
King, Edward A., 220 
"King Jimmy", 101 
King, Myron D., 70 
Kintzel, Charles A., 466 
Kirkendall, Isaac (sheriff). 111 
Kirkendall, William, 669 
Kirkpatriek, William W., 645 
Klauss, Otto, 71 
Kline, Harry W., 419 
Knepper, Forrest, 464 
Ivnights of Pythias. Warsaw, 385: 
Pierceton, 340 



Knights of the Maccabees, Milford. 
348 

Knights Templar, Warsaw, 284 

Kolberg, Henry, 493 

Koontz, Calvin M., 665 

Koontz, Milton I., 664 

Kosciusko county, first under Ordi- 
nance of 1787, creation of, 15, 38; 
Indian villages in, 49; first seat of 
justice in, 94; godfather of, 104; 
area, 106, 195; civil divisions, 135 

Kosciusko County Corn (illustrations), 
186 

Kosciusko County Court House (illus- 
tration), 133 

Kosciusko Lodge No. 62, I. O. O. F.. 
284 

"Kosciusko IJepublican", 289 

Kosciuzko, Thaddeus, 104; will, 105 

Krontz, George W., 74 

Krull, Albert F., 539 

Kuder. .Teremiah, 231 

Kuhn, Isaiah, 551 

Labor Bureau, 300 

Ladies of the Maccabees of the World, 

LaFollette, Harvey M., 73 

Lake City Bank, 394 

"Lake City Commercial", 391 

Lake City Lodge No. 371, F. & A. M.. 
383 

Lake City Lodge No. 430, I. O. O. F.. 
285 

Lake City Lodge No. 443, I. O. O. F., 
285 

Lakes, 107; depth of, 109; beautiful 
cluster of, 297 

lakeside Park, 299 

Ijake township, surveyed, 90, 351; cen- 
sus, 125 ; farms value, 136 ; total 
wealth, 137; school statistics, 169 

Lake View, 331 

La-le-was-i-kaw, 19 

Landis, J., 74 

Land survey, public, 25 

Jjands, public, reckless .^peculation in, 
16 

Lane, Daniel C, 71 

Lane, Henry S., 67, 68 

Lange. Albert, 71 



700 



Larrabee, William C, 73 

LaSalle, 2, 33; death of, 5 

Lash, Edmund S., 599 

Lathrope, Harry, 659 

Lee. Levi, 93 

Leedy, Charles E., 425 

Leesburg, beginning of, 93; as county 
seat, 116; census, 126; value of real 
estate, 127; total wealth, 127; 
school statistics. 169; lodges, 360, 
359; incorporated, 359; newspapers, 
360; churches, 360: banks. 360; in- 
dustries, 360 

Leesburg Lodge No. 432, I. 0. 0. F., 
360 

Leesburg Public School (illustration), 
154 

Legislature, first for Indiana Terri- 
tory, 17 

Lehman, Benjamin F.. 389 

Leininger, Elias, 449 

Lemcke, Julius A., 72 

Lentz, Albert M., 484 

Leonard, C. Leroy, 674 

Lessig, David H., 591 

Levy, Leopold, 72 

Lewellen. David, 515 

Liberty Loan drives, 241, 243. 245. 247 

Libraries, township, 156 

Library, Syracuse, 325 

Lieutenant-Governors, 69 

Ljlley, William H.. 71 

Line, James H., 69 

Little Thunder, 25 

Little Turkey Prairie. 342 

Little Turtle. 18; speech of, 36 

Live stock, 185 

Lodges, Syracuse. 325; Milford, 348: 
Silver Lake, 354; Leesburg, 360 

Logan, Andrew J.. 573 

Lones. .Jerome H., 600 

Lones, .Jerome H., 637 

Long. Elisha V., 138 

Longenecker, Conrad D.. 610 

Longfellow, Homer, 644 

Losier House, 121 

Lowry, Eobert R., 136 

Loyal Order of Moose, Warsaw, 287 

Lutherans. Syracuse, 322 

I.ymmes, Daniel, 64 

T.Von, Milford H., 241 



Mabie, William A.. 366 

Maguire, Douglas, 71, 74 

Main Street, Milford (illustration). 344 

Makemson, .Johnny, 336 

Maloy. Milo, 489 

ilanson. Mahlon D.. 69. 71 

Manual training. 162 

Maps: Northwest Territory of 1787. 
10; Kosciusko County's Interurban 
system. 178; Winona Assembly and 
Summer School Association, 298 

Marquette, Jacques. 2, 33; mission, 3 

^Jarquette, the Peace Maker (illustra- 
tion), 1 

Marshall. Thomas R., 68 

Masons. Warsaw. 283; Milford, 348 

Maston, William H., 690 

Matthews. Claude. 68, 70 

Matz. Jacob W.. 657 

Mauzy. Howard L.. 525 

Mauzy. .John W., 529 

Mayhew. Royal, 72 

McCarter. Elmer E., 587 

McCarthy. Thomas P., 71 

McClintic. Eston E., 608 

McClintic. Martin V., 510 

McClure. Daniel, 70 

McClure. G. A., 467 

JIcHure, Zadie V., 469 

McConnell, Carl W.. 252 

McCoy, George W., 74 

McDonald Island (illustration). 303 

:\IcDonald. Joseph E.. 72 

McGary. Wilbert F.. 584 

Mcintosh. William. 63 

McLaughlin, Jacob C. 643 

McMillan. .James W.. 212 

McMurtrie. Vz. 72 

ilcSherry. Fred A., 457 

Meigs. Return J., 65 

Menard. Pierre. 66 

Menominee's eloquent defi, 46 

Mentone, census. 125; total wealth, 
127; value of real estate. 127; pres- 
ent, 351 

Mentoup Public School (illustration). 
154 

Menzie. Homer T., 661 

Merchants, pioneer, 85 

Meredith, Harvey, 406 

Meredith. .John C., 574 



INDEX 



701 



Merkle, George, 617 

Merrick, William E., 666 

Merrill, Samuel, 71 

Methodists, pay of early circuit 
preachers, 275; first camp meeting. 
376; first and present Sabbath 
schools, 376; edifices, 276; Syra- 
cuse, 323; Pierceton, 339; Milford, 
348; Clay township, 357; Claypool, 
358; Leesburg, 360 

Methodist Episcopal Conference, War- 
saw, 375 

Methodist missionaries, 375 

Metzger, Joseph S., 577 

Meurin, Father, 34 

Miamis, 29, 31; public executioners. 
32; confederacy, 30; chiefs, 49 

Michener, Louis T., 73 

Mickey, H. G., 411 

Milburn, Richard M., 73 

Miles, George W., 326; death of, 330 

Milford, platted, 93; census, 126; value 
of real estate, 127; total wealth, 
127; pioneers, 343; first things, 343; 
incorporated as Milford Junction, 
343; water works and fire depart- 
ment, 344; electric light and power, 
345; industries, 345; banks, 345; 
newspapers, 345 ; library, 345 ; 
schools, 346; churches, 348; lodges. 
348 

Milford Grain Milling Company, 344 

Milford Junction, 343 

Milford Lodge No. 478, I. O. 0. F., 
348 

"Milford Mail, The", 345 

Milford Public Library, 346 

Milford Public School (illustration). 
154 

Mill (illustration), 88 

Miller, Charles W., 73 

Miller, Hiram D., 395 

Miller, Hugh T., 70 

Miller, Jacob B., 500 

Miller, John F., 214 

Miller, John H., 537 

Mills, Caleb, 73 

Mills, pioneer, 87 ; Monroe township. 
380 

Millwood, 376 

Milroy, Robert H., 205 



Missionaries. Jesuit. 33 

Mitterling, John F., 433 

Modern Woodmen of America, War- 
saw, 386 

Modern Teaching in the Field (illus- 
tration), 196 

Mo-no-quet, 49. 56; end and succes- 
sor, 51 

Monoquet Reserve, 90 

Monroe township, surveyed, 89; cen- 
sus, 126; farms value, 136; total 
wealth, 137; school statistics, 169; 
area, 380; pioneers, 380; mills, 380; 
organization, 380 

Montel, John W., 556 

Morris, Manford, 604 

Morris, Morris, 71 

Morrison, James. 70, 73 

Morrison, John I., 72 

Morrison, William A.. 74 

.Mort, Jacob H.. 443 

Morton. Oliver P., 66, 69 

Mo-ta, 49 

.Mota's Reserve, 90 

Mount, James A., 68 

Moyer, Henry A., 419 

Murphy. James M., 538 

Mus-quaw-buck. 49, 57 

Musselman, Cyrus, 439 

Myers, James H., 333 

Myers. William R., 70 

National census. 125 

National politics, 118 

Neher, George M., 634 

Neff, Chloe D., 580 

Neff, Grover C, 471 

Neff, Jacob B., 580 

Neff, John E., 70 

Neff, Noble W.. 470 

New, Harry, 67 

New, Robert A., 70 

Newland. Elijah. 72 

Newspapers, Warsaw, 289; Syracuse, 
324; Pierceton, 341; Milford, 345: 
Leesburg, 360 

New York. Chicago & St. Louis Rail- 
road, 176 

Nickel Plate Railroad. 176 

Niles, John B., 135 

Nine Mile Lake, 49. 107, 319 



INDEX 



Noble, James, 66 

Noble, Lazarus, 74 

Noble, Noah, 68 

Nofsinger, William K., 72 

Norris, Delbert W., 490 

North Webster, 367; bank, 367 

"Northern Indianian", 290 

Northern Indiana, Pottawatomies of, 

44 
Northern townships, first schools, in. 

167 
Northwest, French and British, 1; 

American, 11 
Northwest Territory, organization of, 

14; divided, 16; secretaries, 63; 

Judges of. 64; legislature, 65 
Northwest Territory of 1787 (map), 

10 
Northwestern Indian League, 4 
Noted Indian chiefs, 56 
Nye, Mortimer, 69 

Oakwood Park, 331 

O'Brien. William H., 71 

Old Covered Bridge of the "buggy" 

period (illustration), 184 
Old Eight-sided Schoolhouse, Plain 

Township (illustration), 165 
Old Indiana Mill (illustration). 88 
Oldfather, Henry L., 431 
Olds. Walter, 138 
O'Neill, William P., 70 
On the Shores of Grassy Creek (illus- 
trations), 365 
On the Shores of the Lake, Winona 

Assembly (illustration), 310 
One of Warsaw's Main Business 

Streets (illustration), 268 
Ordinance of 1787, 35; Kosciusko, 

first county under, 15 
Original Indiana counties. 17 
Orr, William H., 659 
Orth. Godlove S., 69 
Ossem, Henry, 84 
Oswego, as county seat candidate, 117; 

decline of, 361 
Oswego PostofEce (illustration), 362 
Owen, David D., 73 
Owen, Richard, 74 
Owen, William D., 70 



Palestine, 349; rise and decline of, 350 

Palestine Lake, 108 

Palmer. Nathan B., 73 

Parke. Benjamin, 64, 65 

Parker, James W., 602 

Parrish, Charles S., 330 

Parsons, Samuel H., 64 

Paulus, .Jacob, 353 

Paulus, Monroe, 400 

Peashwa Tribe, No. 83, Improved Or- 
der of Red Men, 286 

Peelle, William A., 70 

Pennsylvania Railroad, 173 

Pen-picture of Winona Assembly, 305 

Peoples Bank of Leesburg, 360 

Pepper, Abel C, Indian agent, 45 

Perry, Oran, 74 

Person. William S., 462 

Personal and corporation property 
valuation. 127 

Peterson, Andrew, 648 

Peterson, David A., 649 

Petit. John. 67 

Petry. Cliarles H., 471 

Pfleiderer, Abraham, 665 

Phend. Harry R., 636 

Physical features, 104 

Pierceton, census, 126; total wealth 
127; value of real estate, 127 
founded. 338; incorporated, 338; 
schools. 339; churches. 339; societies 
339; lodges, 340; banks, 341; news 
papers, 341; industries, 341; of the 
present. 341 

Pierceton Factory (illustration), 339 

Pierceton High School (illustration). 
154 

Pierceton Lodge No. 377, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, 340 

Pierceton Lodge No. 257, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Pierceton, 340 

Pierceton 'T?ecord", 341 

Pike Lake, 108 

Pioneer Cabin Completed (illustra- 
tion), 98 

Pioneer Fireplace and Household Ar- 
ticles (illustration), 82 

Pioneer Water Wheel (illustration), 88 

Pioneer Woman (illustration), 254 

Pioneer county officials. 111 



INDEX 



708 



I'ioiieer farming nmfliim'iy, IHs 

rioneer marriages, srsfi 

Pioneer merchants, Hr, 

Pioneer mills, 87 

Pioneer teacher, 358 

Pioneer times, 187 

Pioneers, of the prairic^. 85; Turkey 
Creek township, 91; Syracuse, 319; 
Washington township, 334; Mil- 
ford, 343; Etna township, 355; Tip- 
pecanoe township, 365; Seward 
township, 369; Jackson township. 
370; Prairie township, 372: Frank- 
lin township, 377; AFonroe town- 
ship, 380 

Pittenger, John A., 61!) 

Pittsburgh, Fort Wayiio & Chicago 
Railroad, 172 

Pivotal State (Indiana), 60 

Plain township, surveyed, 90; pion- 
eers, 95; census, 126; farms, value. 
126; total wealth, 127; school sta- 
tistics. 169; county seat. 359 

Plymouth, 173 

"Plymouth", 174 

Political record of Indiana. 60 

Polk, George W., 680 

Polk, William, 679 

Pontiac, 8, 31, 35 

Pontius, George B., 631 

Poor, Calvin A., 613 

Pope, William J., 256 

Population of state, by decades. 59; 
rural, 194 

Porter, Albert G., 68 

Portraits: William Henry Harrison, 
16; Tecumseh, 21; Major General 
Anthony Wayne, 37; O. B. Kilmer, 
350; Rev. Sol. C. Dickey, D. D.. 302 

Posey, Thomas, 18, 63, 74 

Postoffice, Oswego (illustration), 362 

Post Vincennes, 13 

Pottawatomies, derivation of name, 
31; of Northern Indiana, 44; first 
migration of, 45; migration of 1838. 
47; last of leave in 1840, 48; chiefs 
and their villages, 50 

Politics, 111 

Prairie township, surveyed, 90; pion- 
eers, 91; census, 126; total wealth, 
137; farms, value, 126; school sta 
vm. n— 21 



tistics, 169; area, 372; pioneer>. 

372 
Pratt, Daniel D., 67 
Preachers, first, 103 
Presbyterian church, First, Warsaw. 

278 
Presbyterians, Warsaw, 378; Pierci'- 

ton, 339; Qay township, 358 
President Judges, 131; first, 131 
Prince, William, 63 
Probate Court Judges, 141 
Progressive agriculture, 195 
Prophet, The, 20, 42 
Prophet's Town, founded, 19 
Prophetic Conference, 312 
Prosecuting attorneys, 145 
Poultry and eggs. 193 
Powell, John, 91 
Public executioners, 33 
Public Instruction, Superintendents of 

73 
Public land survey, 35 
Public lands, reckless speculation in 

16 
Public School, Leesburg (illustration) 

154 
Public School, Mentone (illustrations) 

154, 352 
Public School, Milford (illustration) 

154 
Public J^chool. Syracuse (illustration) 

154 
Public Utilities and Necessities, War- 
saw, 271 
Putnam, Rufus, 64 
Pythian Sisters, War-saw, 286 

Radeliff, E. M., 584 

Railroad engines, first, 174 

Railroad statistics, 179 

Railroads, 173 

Ralston, Samuel M., 68 

Randolph, Thomas, 64 

Ranney. Stephen, 74 

Ray. James B.. 67 

Ready for the Iron Highway (illus 
tration), 174 

Ready to Leave for the Front, Span- 
ish-American War (illustration). 
237 

Real estate valuation. 137 



704 



INDEX 



Koelainied lands, 185 

Ked Cross, World War, 241 

Red Cross work, 313 

Reed, Hugh B., 317 

Reed, James A,, 438 

Reed, James G., 69 

Reed, William W,, 491 

Uegenos, Charles M., 485 

Regenos, Harley R., 505 

Religious exercises at Indian Mis- 
sions, 33 

Religious services, first, 103 

Restful Scenes on Winona Lake (illus 
trations), 307 

Reynolds, David, 74 

Rice, James H., 71 

Richer, Jacob D., 544 

Richardson, Benjamin F., 57S 

Richardville, 18 

Richcreek, Frank O.. 533 

Ricker, Orville, 252 

Ringle, Amos, 652 

Rippey, David, 97 

Rippey family, 97 

Rippey, Henry, 100 

Ristine, Joseph, 71 

Ritehison, John C, 477 

Roach, William A., 71 

Road building, 182 

Roads, early, 171; by townships. 180: 
movement for good, 180 

Robertson, Robert S.. 69 

Robbins, Irvin, 74 

Robinson, R, R., 103 

Robison, Sabin V., 426 

Rookstool, Charles H., 502 

Rose, Frank A., 233 

Ross. Albert E., 444 

Ross, Charles W.. 433 

Ross, Robert, 428 

Rosseau, 84 

Rosseau, John H., 310 

Royal Neighbors of America, Warsaw. 
288 

Royse, Lemuel W., 140, 686 

Ruckle, Nicholas R., 74 

Rugg, Samuel L., 73 

Runyan, John A., 221 

Runyan, John N., 123, 223 

Runyan, Peter L., 290 

Runyan, Peter L. Sr., 120 



Kuide. Allen, 534 

Rural consolidated schools, 166, 170 

Rural schools, betterment of, 161 

Rural population, 194 

Rural townships, scenes in, 373 

Russ, George W., 74 

Ryan, James B., 72 

Ryerson Cemetery, 337 

Sabbiitli schools, first and present 
Methodist. Warsaw, 376 

Salmon, George B., 661 

Sample. Samuel C. 114, 131 

Sands. Amber D., 482 

Sarber. Albert, 450 

Sarber, Amelia A., 451 

Sarber, Edson B., 519 

Sarber. Martha, 415 

Sarber. Thomas B.. 415 

Sarber's sketch of school system. 164 

Sargent, Winthrop, 63 

Scenes in the Rural Townships (ilhis 
trations), 373 

Scholz, Frederick J.. 72 

Sclioolhouse. Old Eight-sided, riaiii 
Township (illustration). 165 

Schools, early. 100; Superintendent of. 
155; text books uniform, 159; State 
superintendents of public instruc- 
tion. 160; rural, 101; teachers, 162: 
teaching of agriculture, manual 
training, home economics. 162; pres- 
ent educational system, 163: sub 
scrlption, 165; rural consolidated. 
1R6, 170; first schoolhouse in conn 
ty. 167: first in Northern townships. 
167; High schools, 167; statistics. 
169; number of, 169; enrollment. 
169: teachers, 169; value of prop- 
erty. 169; Warsaw. 358, 259, 265: 
Winona Lake, 314; Syracuse, 322: 
Washington township, 335; Pieree- 
ton. 339: Milford, 346; Silver Lake. 
354; Claypool, 358; .Jefferson town- 
ship, 376; Franklin township, 378 
School system, Sarber's sketch of. 164 
Scott, Joseph, 571 

Scott township, surveyed, 90; census. 
126: farms, value, 126; total 
wealth. 127: school statistics. 169: 
settled. 376 



INDKX 



705 



Secretaries of StatC) 70 

Secret and Benevolent Societies, War- 
saw, 383 

Selective draft. World War, 239 

Sellers, A. L., 689 

Senators, U. S., 66 

Sevastopol, 379 

Seward township, surveyed, 90; cen- 
sus, 126; farms, value, 136; total 
wealth, 137; school statistics, 169; 
area, 369; early settlers and events, 
369 

Sexton, Leonidas, 69 

Shackelford, N. D., 672 

Shackelford, Tiffin J.. 67:; 

Shand, William, 607 

Slianklin, John G., 70 

Shanks. John P. C, 327 

Sharp, Itasca J., 494 

Sharpe. Davie, 330 

Shaw, Benjamin C, 72 

Shawnee Prophet, 42 

Sheep and Wool, 192 

Sheets, William, 70 

Shepard, James T., 63'> 

Sheridan Fountain. 300 

Sherrick. David E., 71 

Shively. Benjamin F., 67 

Shoemaker, Isaac M., 440 

Shoemaker, John C. 71 

Sliroyer, I^ewis E.. 477 

Shroyer. William, 535 

Shuder, Charles J., 543 

Sickle and flail, times of. 1S7 

Sidney, value of real estate, 127; total 
wealth, 127, 371; banks, 371; 
church, 371 

Silos, 201 

Silver Lake, 108. 351; census, 125: 
value of real estate, 127; total 
wealth, 127: village today. 353: 
schools, 354; lodges, 354; churches. 
354 

Silverlake (School, Silverlake (illustra- 
tion), 154 

Silver Lake Street (illustration). 354 

Silveus, Perry, 413 

Sims, Fred A.. 70 

Six Nations of the East, 35 

Slack, John R., 218 

Slife. Catherine. 541 



SHfo, Jacob, ;-.41 

Small, John, 64 

Smalley. Joseph. 459 

Smart. James H., 73 

Smith, Alonzo G., 73 

Smith. Andrew J., 533 

Smith. Arthur, 598 

Smith. Charles. 64 

Smith, Charles W.. 663 

Smith, Daniel W.. 629 

Smith, Edward H.. 507 

Smitli. George W.. 513 

Smith. Godfrey J.. 568 

Smith. Harry B., 74 

Smith. Isaac T., 506 

Smith, Oliver H., 66 

Societies. Pierceton, 339 

Soldiers Memorial, 236 

Soldier^ Monument, 336 

s<immcrville, George. 337 

South Park, 330 

Spanish- American War, 336; One 
Hundred and Sixtieth Regiment, 
336; Ready to Leave for the Front 
(illustration). 337 

Sparks, Jacob. 598 

Speculation, reckless, in public lands. 
16 

Siiooiier. Benjamin J., 235 

Springer. Matthew D., 355 

Spring Fountain Park, 399 

Sjiring Fountain Park .Asseinlilv. lii-^t. 
300 

■Squires. 147 

St. Andrew^ K|iiscopal chnrcli. War- 
saw. 382 

St. Clair. Arthur. 15, 63, 63 

St. Leon Lodge No. 193. Knights of 
Pythias. 360 

Stackhouse. Wesley, 593 

Stackhouse. William. 549 

Stansbury. Ele, 73 

Stapp, Milton, 69 

Starner. C. F., 603 

Starved Rock, Battle at, 3 

State Bank of Claypool, 358 

State Bank of Syracuse, 334 

State Bank of Warsaw, 393 

State Board of Education, 156; reor- 
ganization of. 157; control of text 
books, 160 



706 



INDEX 



state Fair Exhibits, 197 

State Flag, 78 

State Flower, 78 

State Geologists, 73 

State Military Band, 344 

State Song, 79 

State superintendents of public in- 
struction, 160 

Statistics, 111 

Status of county in 1816. 37 

Stocker, Sarah C, 524 

Stocker, William S., 534 

Stoneburner, James A., 539 

Stone Ridge Hotel, Tippecanoe Lake 
(illustration), 363 

Storms, Daniel E., 70 

Stotsenburg, Evan b., 73 

Stout, C. Edwin, 565 

Stout, Mary C, 423 

Stout. William, 423 

Strieby. Floyd, 669 

Subscription schools. 165 

Sullivan. Daniel, 64 

Sullivan, Jerre C, 309 

Summe, Leonard, 446 

Summer resort pioneer. 336 

Sunday schools, first and present 
Methodist. Warsaw. 376 

Sunken lakes, 109 

Superintendents of Public Instnic- 
tion. 73, 155, 156 

Supreme Court clerks. 04 

Surface geology. lOS 

Swiek, Levi, 413 

Swonger, George E., 648 

Synimes, John C. 64 

Syracuse, census. 136; value of real 
estate, 127: total wealth, 137: 
.school statistics. 169, 319; pioneer 
settlement. 319; founded. 331: 
churches, 333: .schools. 323; banks. 
324; newspapers, 324; library, 335; 
lodges, 325 

Syracuse Community Chautauqua. 325 

"Syracuse and i>akc> Wawasee Jour- 
nal", 324 

Syracuse Lake. 107. :ir.l (illustration). 
113 

Syracuse Library. 325 

Syracuse Public School (illustration). 
154 

Syracuse scliodl. 333 



Taggart, Tom, 66, 67 
Talbott, Hiram E., 71 
Taylor, Waller, 64, 66 
Taylor, William L., 73 
Teachers, 163 

Tecumseh, 19, 42 (portrait), 31 
"Ten-mile strip", 37 
Tenth Circuit, Judges of, 137 
Terrell, W. H. H., 74 
Territorial officers, 62 
Test, Charles H., 70 
Text books uniform, 159 
Thayer, George H., 654 
Thayer, Jessie. 656 
Thayer, John D., 654 
Thom, Allen D., 64 
Thomas, Charles, 633 
Thomas, Charles E., 632 
Thomas. Horace G., 424 
Thomas, Jesse B., 65 
Thompson, Joel F., 624 
Thompson. John H.. 69. 70, 96 
Thompson. James M.. 74 
Tiffin. Edward, 65 
Tinkey. Jonathan. 403 
I'inkey, Rosella, 403 
Tippecanoe Lake. 107 
Tippecanoe Lake region. 103 
Tippecanoe Lake Resorts, 364 
Tippecanoe Lake (illustration). 112. 

363 
Tippecanoe river. 107 
Tippecanoe River View (illustration). 

107 
Tippecanoe township, .surveyed. 90; 

pioneers. 103: census, 136; farms. 

value. 126; total wealth, 127: 

school statistics. 169; description. 

364: pioneer settlements. 36.1 
Tipton. John. 66 
Todd. John, 14 
Tonti, 3: death of, 5 
Topography, 108 

Town and city property, value of. 137 
Town of Winona Lake. 317 
Township libraries, 156 
Township surveys and surveyors. 

early, 89 
Trains, first. 176 
Travel. 171 
Treasurers of State. 63. 71 



Treaties, adoption of GiecnviDc 

treaty, 40 . 
Treaty making, 35 
Tribe of Ben Hiir, Warsaw, 388 
Trusler, Nelson, 70 
Tiieker, Albert L., 514 
Tucker, Charles M., 512 
Tucker, Charles W., 614 
Tucker, Frank C, 398 
Tucker. Horace, 59fi 
Tiieker, Ivan, 447 
Tucker, Ora O., 54.'> 
Turner, George, 64 
Turpie, David, 67 
Turkey Creek, 90 
Turkey Creek Bridge. Milford (illus 

tration), 112 
Turkey Creek township, surveyed, 91: 

pioneers. 91; census, 126; farms, 

value, 136; total wealth, 137; school 

statistics, 169 
Turkey Prairie. 91 
Typical Pioneer Woman (illustration). 

354 

Ijlrey, Alpheus B., 389 

ITlsh, Irvin H., 406 

tTncle Peter", 120 

Union school and church. Clay town- 
ship, 357 

United Brethren. Claypool. 358; War- 
saw, 381 

I'sher, John P.. 72 

rtter, David J.. 575 

\'_alue of seliool property. 169 

Value of town and city property, 127 

Van Buren townsliip. surveyed, 89: 

pioneers, 93; census, 126; farms, 

value, 126; total wealth, 127; 

school statistics. 169; description of. 

343 
Vanderbur<;h. Henry. 65 
X'anderveer, .John S.. 610 
\an Dorn, 11. Lafayette, 680 
Varnum. James M., 64 
Vawter Park, 331 
Veateh, James C, 74 
\'iche, Frederick W., 69 
Vincennes, founded, 6; early days. 27 
Vollmcr. William H.. 72 



Von Schon, John C. H.j 292 
Voorhees, Daniel W., 66, 67 
Voris, Hervey D., 73, 160 

Wabash Railroad. 177 • • 

Walker, John C, 216 

Wallace. David, 68, 69 ■. . 

Wallace, .John M., 74, 206 

Wallace, Lewis, 74, 206 

Walters, George A., 427 

Wann. Lucius C, 641 

War of 1813, 23, 41 

Ward, .John R.. 74 

Warren. William W., 557 ■ 

Wars. 203 . , 

Warsaw, critical years, 115; county 
seat victor, 119; census, 136; value 
of real estate. 127; total wealth. 
137; school statistics, 169; pioneers. 
353; godfather of, 255; first plat of, 
355; first cabin and store, 256; fir«t 
store, 356; pioneer industries, 256; 
residents of 1837, 256; first postof- 
lice, 358; pioneer teacher. 258; in- 
corporated as a town. 238; sehools, 
359: fire department organized, 361; 
fires, 363; schools, 26S; library; 368; 
public utilities and necessities, 271; 
churches. 374; secret and benev- 
olent societies. 383; press, 389; 
banks, 293; industries, 395^ clubs. 
396 
Warsaw Business Street (illustra 

tion), 268 
Warsaw Chapter No. 48, Royal Arcli 

Masons, 284 
Warsaw Chapter No. 88. "Ordei- of the 

Eastern Star. 384 
Warsaw Commercial Club, 296 
Warsaw "Democrat", 390 
Warsaw Fire Department, orgartizedl 



(illustration). 



361 

Warsaw Cas (onipany. 

Warsaw Hi-)i School 

154 

\Varsaw l,.,,!;;,. No. 7 3. Free and Ae- 

ce|)ted ilasons, 383 

Warsaw Lodge No. 803. Brotlieititxi.i 

Protective Order of Klks, 387 

Warsaw Public Lihrnrv. 368 



708 ■ 



INDteX 



W'arsaw Surnmer Resort Association. 

299 - - 

'Warsaw UnioH", 292 
Washington township, surveyed, 89 ; 

census, 126; farms, value, 126; total 

wealth, 127; school statistics, 169; 

pioneer settlers. 334; early times. 

334; schools; 335; some pioneer 

marriages, 336 ' 
Water Wheel (illustration). 8s 
Water works. Milford, 344 
Watson, James E.. 67 
Waveland Beach, 332 
Waw-wa-esse, 49, .57 
Wawasee Inn. 326 

U'awasee Lake. 107, :;2.">: first im- 
provements. 328 
Wa'wasee Lake (illustration). 113 
WawaSee Lake and Vicinity (illustra 

fibii*), 320 
Watt'4see Proltetive A.ssociatifin. :12k 
Wawa.see •State- Hatchery. 329 
Wa^'ASee Station, 326 
Wayne,' Anthony. 31. 36: portrait, 37: 

fntlfan fiwfctcr and pacificator. 37 
\\'a>iie 'township, surveyed, 90; cen- 

xiis, l'36;^arm9. value. 126; school 

^tatisfics. 169; pioneers, 253 
Wayrrp township consolidated school 

{ illustration), 166 
Wea^h of county. 127 
Weaver. Joshua. 588 
Weaver.Mathew C. 563 
Wehster Lake. 107 
Webster- Lake (illustrations). 366 
Week, William W.. 70 
A\'eimer; Joseph P., 526 
Westminster Chapel Winona Assembly 

(illustration), 316 
Wheatley, William M.. 214 
Whitcomh, James. 67 
White. Albert S., 66 
White. C. F., 435 
White, Samuel A., 564 
Whitehead. Argus B.. 528 
Widaman. John D.. 688 
Wildman. .Tames A., 71 
Willard. Ashbel P., 68. 69 
Williams, .tames D.. 68 
Williams, Reuben, 307, 291 
Williams. William. 256 



Wfffiamson', Benjamin F., 413 

Williamson, Charles A., 554 

Williamson. Delana E., 72 

Williamson, Ernest B., 417 

Wince. Sarah R. C, 675 

Wince. .Tohn L.. 678 

Windbigler. J. H., 404 

Winona Agricultural Display (illustra- 
tion), 198 

Winona Assembly, 297; founders, 3d3; 
incorporated, 303; site purchased. 
303; pen-picture of. 305: side con 
ferences, 310 

Winona Assembly Grounds (illustra- 
tion). 308 

Wirii^na Bible Conference. 3(l<i 

Winona church. 316 

Winona College, 314 

Winona College of Agriculture. :!1.-, 

Winona Electric Light and Water 
Company, 271 

Winona Tntenirban Railway, ir; 

Winona Lake. 108 

Winona Lake (illustrations). U'-' 

Winona Lake, near Warsaw (illiistni 
tionsK 260 

Winona Lake. Restful Scenes on (illus 
trations), .307 

Winona Lake (town), valui' of vciil 
estate. 127: total wealth. 127: 
schools and colleges. :;14: town or 
ganized 317 

Winona Lake Training Cam|.. M,„n..<l. 
248 

Wolfe. K.lward H.. 71 

Wood, .\aron. 103 

Wood Andrew C. ].-,^. 39:; 

Woodden. .Tames. 93 

Woodmen of t)ie Worlil. Miltonl. ;i48 

Woo.ls. Jolm C. 1.;T 



\\i 



192 



Woolh.n. Thomas W.. 72 

Wovjlen. James I... 138 

World's War, 233. 238: selective draft, 
239: oflicers and organixatiun. 
.\ugust, 1917. 23!) : examinatiim of 
registrants. 340; Red Cross drives. 
341: First Liheity Loan drive. •;41 : 
Camp Benjamin Harrison. 241: 
Third Indiana Tnf:intry reorgani/c<l. 



343; Second Liberty Loan drive, 
343; Food administration, 243; first 
gold star, 343; Home Guard organ- 
ized, 343; State Military Band, 244; 
World's champion pistol shot, 244; 
lirst personal battle news, 344 ; 
Third Liberty Loan campaign, 345 ; 
War stamps, 346; Chateau Thierry, 
246; Men registered, 347; High 
School boys enrolled. 347; Fourth 
Liberty l^oan, 347; first man of the 
new draft. 348: Winona Lake 
Training Camp opened, 348; United 
War Work fund, 348; Riot of 



peace, 349; total man-powe 
country, 349; close of the 
War. 353 
Wright. .lo>.cph A.. 67, 68 
Wvland. .lonathiin, 660 



^'ello\v Creek Lake, 369 

^cllow Lake. 108 

^■oung People's Clubs. 197 



■ of the 
WorWs 



Zechiel, W. 
Zimmerman, 



{., 199 
Joshua. 498 



I^MP^ 







1 





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