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Full text of "Staten Island and Staten Islanders"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 06249706 4 






ADVERTISEMENTS 



"AN ENGLISHMAN'S 
HOME IS HIS CASTLE. " 

What's the matter with an American's home be- 
ing his castle also? 

It can be if he will abjure city flats and apart- 
ments, where he is in semi-slavery, and live IN A 
HOUSE OF HIS OWN in the country. 

How easily he can OWN A HOME at New 
Dorp or Oakwood, Staten Island, only 40 minutes 
from Battery, commutation $5.25 monthly, where 
CHOICE RESTRICTED BUILDING LOTS, 
with all city improvements (adjoining houses cost- 
ing from $4,000 to $7,000), are being sold from 
$150 up, on easy payments. 

100 houses built; plans out for additional build- 
ings. 

DON'T FAIL TO VISIT THE PROPERTY 

before locating a home site elsewhere. 

J. W. HUGHES, 45 Broadway, N. Y. 

WE HAVE ABOUT COMPLETED A 

SPLENDID BOARDING HOUSE 

in prominent location, on trolley line. Just the spot to establish a fur- 
nished room or boarding business. It contains ten beautiful sleep- 
ing rooms, each having steam heat, water basin, bath facilities and 
toilets on same floor. Lower part contains kitchen, dining room, par- 
lor, bath, steam heat, electric lighting, gas piped and handsomely 
finished with wide halls, and all windows fronting handsome views. 

Will rent furnished or unfurnished with privilege of purchasing. 

Call in forenoon at our city office, or afternoons at New Dorp 
Manor. Address for free map, 

STATEN ISLAND HOMES COMPANY 

49 Eighth Avenue, New York. 

nv.^:^^ T ^A-r, d^ An 4-^ CiQnn payable $3.00 to $8.00 monthly. Title guar- 
CnOlCe L-OtS ^IW to ipdUV) antee poUcy free with each deed. 

We assist you to build if you have a little money. 

"\7I7"^ TT^^r^ XT^,,oz^^ +^ CckU Just finished— come and see them. WewiJ' 
We Have Houses to :5ell accept $500 down and take monthly wh 
you are now paying for rent until fully paid for. Can you think of an easier wa- 
obtain a home and become independent of landlords ? 

WE CAN SHOW YOU 
A house with five rooms costing $900. 
A house, 5 rooms, concrete cellar, $1,200 
>^ A house, 5 rooms, bath, improvements, $3,000 

\ A "" A house, 8 rooms, all improvements, ^i.'" 

\ , If these are sold will build same for you. 



ii ADVERTISEMENTS 



Telephone 112 New Dorp. 



L. A. SE AVE R 



HIGH CLASS REAL ESTATE 



DOXGAX HILLS 



STATEN ISLAXD 



ADVERTISEMENTS 111 



J. STERLING DRAKE 

REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 

Broker, Appraiser and Loans 
42 BROADWAY, N. Y. THONE 4885 BROAD 

Your Business Solicited. 

Telephone call, Office, 683 Tompk.; Residence, 438 R. Tompk. 

GUSTAV A. EARTH, 

REAL ESTATE, MORTGAGE LOANS AND INSURANCE IN 

ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

535 Bay Street, 

Opposite New Stapleton P. O. 

STAPLETON, N. Y. 
Notary Public. Typewriting Done. 

Commissioner of Deeds. 

LIVINGSTON HEIGHTS, 
STATEN ISLAND. 

RESTRICTED SECTION. ALL IMPROVEMENTS. 
CONVENIENT TO TRAIN AND TROLLEY. 

Lots $600 and upwards. 
New Houses to Rent, $40 to $60 month. 
New Houses For Sale, $6,000 to $8,000 
Terms Easy. No Assessments. 

C. E. SIMONSON & CO., Agents, 
1595 Richmond Terrace, West New Brighton, S. I. 

E. COSSMANN 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

558 BAY ST. 
STAPLETON, STATEN ISLAND. 



IV ADVERTISEMENTS 



CORNELIUS G. KOLFF 

SELLS, RENTS, MORTGAGES, INSURES 

HOUSES 

IN ALL PARTS OF 

STATEN ISLAND 



A FEW GOOD PROPERTIES 

LIVINGSTON. 

New house of 7 rooms and bath with all improve- 
ments, near schools, and churches, clubs and Rapid 
Transit, $4,600. 

PORT RICHMOND. 

House on Alberton Avenue, 11 rooms, all improve- 
ments, including barn, chicken house, grape arbor, 
fruit trees, $7,000. 

NEW BRIGHTON. 

Choice building lots, 40x100, on "Westervelt Ave- 
nue and St. Marks Place, $2,000 to $3,000. 

WESTERLEIGH. 

House on Fiske Avenue with ten rooms and bath, 
gas, sewer, city water, steam heat, etc., $5,000. 

CONCORD. 

Fine house of 7 rooms and bath with all conveni- 
ences and view of the ocean, on beautiful Emerson 
Hill, $5,000. 

ANNADALE. 

3 acre farm and 10 room house, $4,500. 

CORNELIUS G. KOLFF, 

CRABTREE BLDG., ST. GEORGE. 
45 BROADWAY, - - - - NEW YORK 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



FRANK H. MOFFATT. A. L. SCHWAB. 

MOFFATT & SCHWAB 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

Mortgage Loans. 

Regularly Appointed Agents of 

Royal Insurance Company, North British and Mercantile Insurance 
Company, Home Insurance Company, Richmond Insurance Com- 
pany, Queen Insurance Company, New York Underwriters Agency, 
Fidelity and Deposit Company, Lloyds Plate Glass Insurance Com- 
pany, Insurance Company of North America. 

New York City Office, 57 & 59 WILLIAM STREET. 

Telephone 4237 John. 

TOMPKINSVILLE, - STATEN ISLAND, N. Y. 

Tel. 357 Tompkinsville. 

Telephone Call, 358 Tompkinsville. 

M. M. ADAMS 

REAL ESTATE OFFICE 

JAY STREET, ST. GEORGE. 

Near the Ferry Bridge, Staten Island. 

Houses and Rooms Furnished and Unfurnished. Some Fine Proper- 
ties for Sale. Desirable Building Sites. 

Insurance a Specialty. Loans Negotiated. 

St. George is a pleasant boat ride of twenty minutes from South 
Ferry. " L " Trains enter the ferry house. Boats every 15 minutes in 
busy hours. Fare 5 cents. 



URBRK 31 DEC'S*. 



VI ADVERTISEMENTS 



Tel. 854 W. Tompkinsville. Residence, 254 W. W. B. 

W. W. WHITFORD 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
60 RICHMOND TERRACE, NEW BRIGHTON (ST. GEORGE). 



MARY E. RUDMAX 



Real Estate Specialist 



61 RICHMOND TURNPIKE, - - TOMPKINSVILLE 



DO YOU WANT A FINE ESTATE 

In Exchange For 

UNINCUMBERED STATEN ISLAND PROPERTY.? 
FINEST PART OF NEW YORK STATE 

WILL SELL AT A BARGAIN 

Suitable for Summer Hotel or Stock Farm. 

JOHN LYNCH 

OTISCO VALLEY, N. Y. 



ADVERTISEMENTS Vll 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
AND TEA ROOM 



Visitors to Staten Island will find the Woman's 
Exchange situated near Ferry Bridge, St. George 
— a convenient place for luncheon and afternoon 
tea. Many attractive articles are also displayed, 
suitable for sale. 



JOHN W. TILLEY 

PROPRIETOR OF 

HOTEL ST. GEORGE 

JAY STREET. 

OPPOSITE THE FERRY. 
Table d'Hote. A La Carte. 



Vlll ADVEETISEMENTS 



A GOOD BANK IS THE MAINSTAY OF 

INDUSTRY 

Back of all industry and enterprise stands finance, always ready and 
willing to encourage anything worthy that will advance the interest 
of the community. But, first of all, must come individual thrift and 
industry — the loyal support of home banks by home people. Every 
dollar you save and deposit in our bank is not only advancing your 
own welfare, but it is encouraging and assisting home industry. Be- 
sides the material benefit you derive from a bank account, we offer you 
every courtesy and facility in handling vour business. 

fOTTENVILLE NATIONAL BANK, 

TOTTENVILLE, NEW YORK CITY 

G. S. BarneSj Presidekt. Ira J. Hortox, Cashier. 

SAFE, PROGRESSIVE AND READY TO SERVE YOU 



READ THE STATEN 
ISLANDER 



Semi-weekly. Published at St. George. 



KANE AND WORRELL, Publishers, 



Jay Street, New Brighton. 



ALL THE OFFICIAL AND LOCAL NEWS. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



IX 



Telephone 115 W. B. 



WILLIAM CONNELL 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR. 

1011 Castleton Avenue, West New Brighton, 
STATEN ISLAND. 



DECKER'S 
PHARMACY 

Amboy Road, 
tottenville, - - - n. y. 

PURE DRUGS AND 
CHEMICALS. 

" Quality " is Our Motto. 



Eastman Kodaks, Browmes and 
Photographic Supplies 

DEVELOPING, PRINTING 
AND ENLARGING. 

SEND FOR PRICES. 

ARTHUR F. DECKER, 

7328 Amboy Road 
TOTTENVILLE^ N. Y. 



N. Y. Telephone, 2506-79th. S. I. Telephone, 909 West Brighton. 



DR. HERMAN S. HIRSCHMAN 



"The Elmscourt," 
1356 Madison Avenue, 



N. Y. City. 



DENTIST 



292 Richmond Avenue, 

Port Richmond, 
Staten Island, N. Y. 



Tel. 1042 Tompk. 



JONES k FETHERSTON 



DRUGGISTS. 
514 RICHMOND TERRACE, NEW BRIGHTON, S. I. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



HOTEL MARTHA WASHINGTON 

NEW YORK'S EXCLUSIVE WOMAN'S HOTEL 

29 East Twenty-ninth St., near Fifth Ave. 
European Plan 

Restaurant and Tea Room for men and women. 450 Rooms with 
Telephone. Baths free on each floor. RATES, $1.00 AND UP. 
Convenient to subway and cross-town car-lines. Center of Theater 
and Shopping-District. A. W. EAGER. 



TERMINAL LUNCH ROOM 

IN THE 

FERRY HOUSE, ST. GEORGE 
Open All Night 



Telephone 303 Tompkinsville. 



P. O. New Brighton. 



HUGOT'S HOTEL 

CAFE AND RESTAURANT 

ST. GEORGE, STATEN ISLAND 

Opposite Ferry Landing 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS A la carte and table d'hote. 



It Is Not a 





RAIN COAT 

unless this circular registered 
trade-mark is stamped on the 
the cloth, and this silk label is at the collar or else-^i,' 
where. 6^ Look for both and insist upon seeing them^ 



»> 




Manufacturers of " Cravenette " Cloths, Mohairs, Dress Goods, etc. 
100 Fifth Avenue, Corner 15th Street, _ _ _ New York 



ADVERTISEMENTS XI 



ST. LOUIS ACADEMY 

TOTTENVILLE, STATEN ISLAND 

Boarding and Day School for Young Ladies and Children. 
Pleasantly situated in the most healthful part of the Island. 
Students prepared for Regents. English and French. 

For terms apply to 

Sister Superior. 

PRINCIPALS 

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE 

BEST PENCILS, PENS, COMPASSES 
AND PENHOLDERS 

CAN BE OBTAINED BY ORDERING UNDER ITEMS. 

5357— No 569 Compass 5611— Large Stub Pens 

5373— Leads for No. 569 5615— Vertical Pens 

5604— Pen Holders (Thick) 5618— Lead Pencils (soft) 

5609— Large Falcon Pens 5620 — Lead Pencils (rubber tipped) 

5610 — Business and College Pens 5622— Lead Pencils (large shaft and leads) 

1909 Supply List — Board of Education 

FREE SAMPLES UPON APPLICATION 

EAGLE PENCIL COMPANY, 
377-379 Broadway, New York 



TOMPKINS DEPARTMENT STORE 

THE STORE THAT SATISFIES 

West New Brighton 



J. OCHS, GROCER. 



Castleton Ave. West New Brighton 



Xll ADVERTISEMENTS 



A $100 Typewriter for 17 Cents a Day ! 

Please read the headline over again. Then its tremendous significance 
will dawn upon you. 

An Oliver Typewriter — the standard visible writer — the $100 machine — 
the most highly perfected typewriter on the market — yours for 17 cents a day! 
The typewriter whose conquest of the commercial world is a matter of 
business history — yours for 17 cents a day! 

The typewriter that is equipped with scores of such conveniences as 

" The Balance Shift "—" The Ruling Device"— 
" The Double Release "—"The Locomotive Base" 
— " The Automatic Spacer " — " The Automatic Tab- 
ulator " — " The Disappearing Indicator " — " The 
Adjustable Paper Fingers" — "The Scientific Con- 
densed Keyboard " — all 

Yours for 17 Cents a Day! 

We announced this new sales plan recently, just 
to feel the pulse of the people. Simply a small cash 
payment — then 17 cents a day. That is the plan in a nutshell. 

The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines that we 
are simply astounded. 

A QUARTER OF A MILLION PEOPLE ARE MAKING 

MONEY WITH 




Tlje 



T^peWri-fer 



The Standard Visible Writer 

The Oliver Typewriter is a money-maker, right from the word "" go!^^ 
So easy to run that beginners soon get in the "expert " class. Earn as you 
learn. Let the machine pay the 17 cents a day — and all above that is yours. 

Wherever you are, there's work to be done and money to be made by 
using the Oliver. The business world is calling for Oliver operators. There 
are not enough to supply the demand. Their salaries are considerably above 
those of many classes of workers. 

"AN OLIVER TYPEWRITER IN EVERY HOME!" 

That is our battle cry today. We have made the Oliver supreme in use- 
fulness and absolutely indispensable in business. Now comes the conquest 
of the home. 

Write for further details of our easy offer and a free copy of the new 
Oliver catalogue. Address 

THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY 
310 BROADWAY, *. NEW YORK CITY 



PUB LI' 



ASTOH, '^i-'- ^^■■ 



s^jM 




MAP 

SHOWINQ AUTO!^,QBIL£ 
ROUTES 



R ^ 



STATEN ISLAND 

AND 

STATEN ISLANDERS 

COMPILED BY 

The Richmond Borough Association 
of Women Teachers 



Co'ver Designed by JOSEPHINE THORNE 
Editor, MARGARET LOUISE LYND 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 



Alice J. Bloxham 
Elsa E. Evans 
Claka V. Fach 
Elsie Gardner 
Mary Wolcott Green 
Blanche M. Harris 



Jenny Clare Heath 
Mary G. Lynd 
Delia L. Mason 
Katherine L. Osincup 
Florence Bennett Scott 
Clara H. Whitmore 



THE GRAFTON PRESS 



NEW YORK 



1909 






E^ Yo- 



!Tr 




Copyright, 1909, 
By MARGARET LOUISE LYXD 



FOREWORD 

IN the compilation of this little book the Richmond 
Borough Association of Women Teachers has tried 
to tell those things which a stranger might most desire to 
know about New York's smallest borough. 

No doubt there are many omissions and mistakes, but the 
committee in charge of the work have endeavored to make 
the book authentic and fairly comprehensive. How well 
they have succeeded the public may now determine. 

Thanks are due Dr. Arthur Hollick for his valuable arti- 
cle and suggestions, and to Ira K. Morris, who has offered 
most helpful suggestions, and loaned some of the pictures to 
us. Nor are those who have so kindly replied to the numerous 
letters of inquiry sent out by the association, and the ad- 
vertisers who helped the book to success, forgotten. 

Suggestions for next year's book will be gladly received. 
If the reader has any suggestion to make whereby this book 
may be enlarged and made more helpful, the editor will be 
pleased to hear from him. 



GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTION 

Arthur Hollick 
location 

STATEN ISLAND is located between North Latitude 
40° 29'-40° 39' and West Longitude 74° 3'-74° 16'. 

Politically it represents the southernmost portion of the 
State of New York, of which it constitutes the County of 
Richmond, and also the Borough of Richmond of the City 
of New York. 

It is separated from the State at large by the New York 
Bay and the Narrows, which bound it on the east, while in 
all other directions it is circumscribed by the State of New 
Jersey, from which it is separated by the Kill von Kull 
on the north, Arthur Kill or Staten Island Sound on the 
west, and Raritan or the Lower Bay on the south. Thus, 
although politically it belongs to New York, geo- 
graphically it is a part of New Jersey, and, as a matter 
of fact, it was originally included in the colony or province 
of New Jersey when the latter was sold by James, Duke 
of York (afterwards King James 11.) , to Lord Berkeley 
and Sir George Cartaret, in 1664. 

In the deeds of transfer, dated respectively June 23 and 
24, 1664, the province of New Jersey is described in part 
as follows : 

" That tract of land adjacent to New England, and lying 
and being to the west of Long Island and Manhitas Island; 
and bounded on the east partly by the main sea, and partly 



b STATEN ISLAXD AXD STATEX ISLANDERS 

by the Hudson's River . . . which tract of land is 
hereafter to be called Nova Caesarea, or New Jersey." 

These boundaries manifestly include Staten Island, but 
it was, nevertheless, claimed by New York, and after various 
vicissitudes her title to it was finally confirmed by joint ac- 
tion of the Legislatures of the two States, and the Congress 
of the United States, in 1834; but it was not until 1887 that 
the exact boundary lines were determined and located. 

AREA, SHAPE AXD DIMEXSIOXS 

The area of the Island is approximately fiftj'-seven square 
miles. 

In shape it may be roughly regarded as an irregular tri- 
angle, the sides of which could be represented by lines drawn 
from Fort Wadsworth to Holland Hook, Holland Hook to 
Tottenville, Tottenville to Fort Wadsworth. 

The greatest length is along a straight line drawn in 
an almost northeast and southwest direction between Ward's 
Point at Tottenville and St. George, just west of the Ferry 
landing, a distance of a little less than fourteen miles. 

The greatest width, at or nearly at right angles to this 
line, is from Holland Hook to South Beach, a distance of 
about seven and a half miles. 

GENERAL GEOGRAPHIC FEATURES 

Shore line. The principal indentations in the Shore line 
are caused by Fresh Kills on the west side and Great Kills 
on the south side. Salt marshes border these waters and 
also Old Place Creek, New Creek and other lesser creeks and 
shore areas. The total salt marsh area of the Island is 
about nine square miles, having a uniform level surface ap- 
proximatel}" equal to that of high tide. 

From the Narrows to Great Kills the shore is low, for the 
most part consisting of barrier beaches between the water 






• • • 



GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTION 7 

and the salt marshes. From Great Kills to Prince's Bay 
the shore is characterized by a precipitous bluff, averaging 
about ten feet in height throughout most of its extent. It 
is broken at Seguine's Point by the outlet of Wolff's Pond, 
and a sandy beach which forms the point, and finally ends 
at a short distance to the west of Prince's Bay bluff, in 
which the lighthouse is located, where it reaches its max- 
imum elevation of about seventy-five feet. From thence to 
Ward's Point at Tottenville the shore is low, with the ad- 
jacent upland reaching to tide water and only limited areas 
of marsh and sand intervening. The entire beach from the 
Narrows to Ward's Point has a gentle slope, exposing a wide 
expanse at low water, and continuing quite uniformly for a 
long distance out, so that the adjacent waters are shallow. 

Between the Narrows and Holland Hook the shore is 
largely an abrupt slope to deep water, with but little beach ; 
although this portion has been so altered by artificial em- 
bankments, bulkhead, docks, etc., that the original con- 
tour and characters of the shore line are entirely obliterated. 

From Holland Hook to Rossville, salt marshes border the 
shore, with little or no beach, except a narrow muddy slope 
at low water. 

From Rossville to Tottenville the shore is irregular, but 
for the most part slopes abruptly, with a narrow margin 
of beach. 

ELEVATIONS 

The surface features of the Island are varied and in places 
quite striking. In general there are two well marked topo- 
graphic divisions, — the northern and the southern, — the 
line of separation between them being marked by the Fresh 
Kill marshes and the eastern and southern escarpment of 
the range of soapstone or serpentine hills extending from 



8 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

Richmond to St. George, the highest point being on the top 
of a knoll in the southwest angle formed by the Todt Hill 
and Ocean Terrace Road, where an elevation of three hun- 
dred and eighty feet is attr.ined, — the highest point in 
Greater New York and the highest point at the same dis- 
tance from the shore line anywhere between Maine and 
Florida. 

The northern division may be regarded as an uneven 
slope, averaging about four miles, extending from tide level 
at the Kill von Kull and the northern part of Staten Island 
Sound to an average elevation of about two hundred feet 
along the summit of the range of hills and then descending 
sharply, in places in a steep escarpment. This range is 
left at only two points : one known as the " Clove," through 
which the Clove Road runs, the other at Tompkinsville, 
marked by the old water course formerl}) known as the 
Arietta Street brook and the eastern end of the Richmond 
Turapike. 

The southern division may be regarded as a plain, over 
the greater part of which is scattered an irregular series 
of rounded, more or less gently sloping morainal hills, with 
a maximum elevation of about one hundred and seventy-five 
feet at two points. Fox Hills (Clifton), and Huguenot 
Heights. A limited area, extending from Garretsons' to 
Great Kills, lying south of the morainal hills, is almost 
devoid of surface irregularities, and in one of the Islands 
most striking topographic features, especially when viewed 
from the escarpment of the high hills to the north. 

Inland Waters. There are no streams of any consider- 
able size on the Island, either as regards their length or vol- 
ume of water, and all of them now remaining are smaller 
than they were originally by reason of artificial interference 
with their sources of supply or division from their natural 



GEOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTION SI 

channels. Some, like the Arietta Street and the Jersey 
Street brooks, have been entirely obliterated. 

The overflow from Silver Lake and its connection in the 
Clove Valley, which unite with Palmer's Run and finally 
discharge in common into the creek between Columbia Street 
and Jewett Avenue, West New Brighton, traverse the most 
extensive drainage area on the Island, — an area about five 
square miles in extent. 

The longest water course is Willow Brook, which has its 
source near the junction of the Ocean Terrace and Manor 
Road and discharges into a branch of Fresh Kills near Bull's 
Head, a distance of about three miles. 

Others of less extent are Sandy Brook, which rises near 
Woodrow and discharges into Lemon Creek at Prince's Bay ; 
Richmond, Sawmill or Stony Brook, which rises on Ocean 
Terrace, back of the Moravian Cemetery, flows through the 
Black House Ravine and discharges into the head of Fresh 
Kills at Richmond ; Moravian Brook, which rises on Todt 
Hill, flows through the Moravian Cemetery and discharges 
into the southern branch of New Creek near Grant City ; 
and Benham's Brook, with its branches, which have their 
origin on the heights north of Eltingville and discharge 
into Fresh Kills near Richmond, located in a morainal de- 
pression and supplied by springs and surface drainage. 

There are very few natural bodies of fresh water on the 
Island. The largest is Silver Lake, which has a superficial 
area of about twelve acres and a maximum depth of about 
seventeen feet. Seguine's Pond, Arbutus Lake and Wolff^'s 
Pond, at the southern end of the Island, occupy the lower 
parts of valleys, which are dammed across their outlets by 
barrier beaches. They are fed by streams and may be 
regarded as merely the confined lower portions of these 
streams. 



10 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

Many ponds have been artificially formed by the damnnng 
of water courses in almost every section of the Island. 
Those in the Clove Valley are the most prominent and most 
readily recognized as artificial ; but the wrecks of a number 
of others may be seen at Willow Brook and Bull's Head, 
Ketcham's Mill Pond, northwest of Richmond Hill, Brook's 
Pond at West New Brighton, etc. 

In addition to these there are a number of ponds occupy- 
ing depressions in the morainal hills, often without visible 
outlets or only overflowing after having rains. They are 
dependent upon surface drainage and many of them become 
swamps or dry up entirely during continued dry weather. 
They are particularly conspicuous features in the Fox Hills 
region, from Vanderbllt Avenue to the Fingerboard Road. 
Ipes', Brady's and Van Wagonen's Ponds are among the 
largest of these, but all of them have been more or less In- 
terfered with artlficlall}'. The level of Brady's Pond has 
been raised by a dam at the northern end, where the origi- 
nal outlet used to be, and It now overflows Into Van Wag- 
onen's Pond to the south. Ipes' Pond has also had its 
drainage direction reversed by damming and others have 
been completely drained and their basins Included in the Fox 
Hills Golf links. 

The climate is salubrious, although somewhat variable. 
In the agricultural sections market gardening and fruit 
growing have proven profitable industries. 



HISTORIC LANDMARKS 

Mary Wolcott Green, A. B. 

The author wishes to acknowledge her indebtedness to Mr. 
Ira K. Morris, the historian of Staten Island. 

O TATEN ISLAND, owing to its geographical situation, 
^^ guardian of the entrance to New York, has been, and 
must always be, of historical value. 

The Raritan Indians, who held the Island at the time of 
its discovery, were a branch of the Leni-Lenapes. They 
held it subject to the will of the Mohawks. This particular 
branch were known as the Aquehongas, and their name for 
the Island was Aquehonga Man-ack-nong, or the place of 
the bad woods. 

The burial places are scattered over the various parts of 
the borough, one large one being at Tottenville. At 
Springville, on the Corsen farm, at Holland's Hook, Great 
Kills, and Green Ridge may be found others. 

Staten Island was discovered by Verrazzani, who sailed 
under the flag of France, in 1524, He did not explore the 
interior, nor did France make any claim, through his voyage, 
to the Island. 

In 1609, Henry Hudson came to its shores upon his fa- 
mous first voyage, under the service of Holland, but it was 
not until 1624 that the first European settlers arrived. 
These first settlers were Walloons, natives of a country bor- 
dering on Flanders. 

The first settlement on Staten Island was at Oude Dorp, 

11 



12 STATEX ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

the present site of Arrochar Park, near Fort Wadsworth. 
It contained but few cottages and was destroyed three 
times by the Indians. 

At Stony Brook was the first permanent settlement. 

Nieuwe Dorp was a continuation of Stony Brook. Sev- 
eral foundations of the old buildings may yet be distin- 
guished. 

Long Neck was on the site of New Springville. It 
had one of the first public schools on Staten Island. 

Smoking Point, later called Blazing Star, now Rossville, 
is a very old settlement. 

Tottenville was formerly called the Manor of Bentley, 
named after the little vessel which brought Billopp to 
America. 

Tompkins ville was laid out in 1814 by Governor Tomp- 
kins, who gave to the streets the names of his children. 

The road from Tompkinsville to Richmond is full of his- 
tonc interest. 

On Pavilion Kill, at Tompkinsville, may be seen an old 
British breastwork, which was rebuilt by the Americans in 
the War of 1812. 

Concord was so named by the Emersons. Judge William 
Emerson, who was county judge of Richmond County, lived 
here in 1840, and his brother Ralph was a frequent guest, 
as was also Thoreau, the naturalist. " The Snuggery," 
the home of the Emersons, was located at the foot of the 
hill a few yards from the foot of Douglas Lane. 

West of Emerson Hill is the old Clinch homestead, built 
in 1700. It was confiscated by British officers during the 
Revolution. 

At Garretsons is the Perine home, erected about 1668 
by one of the Huguenot settlers, whose descendants still 



HISTORIC LANDMARKS 13 

hold it. Captain Coughlin of the British army, who married 
Margaret MoncriefFe, Hved in this house while his regiment 
was stationed on Staten Island. 

The old Moravian church at New Dorp was built in 1763. 
The British made an unsuccessful attempt to burn it. 

Opposite the cemetery gate at New Dorp is the Cortelyou 
homestead. There was a burglary committed in this house 
which led to the first legal execution in Richmond County. 
The offender was a negro, and at that time capital punish- 
ment was meted out to colored criminals. The gallows 
stood on the site of the present school at Richmond. 

Near the head of New Dorp Lane stood for nearly two 
hundred years the Rose and Crown farm house, built by a 
Huguenot settler named Bedell. 

On July 4, 1776, Sir William Howe, Commander-in-Chief 
of the British land forces in America, had his headquarters 
here. In this house he first saw and read the Declaration 
of Independence. Upon Lord Howe's arrival a few days 
later, he also came to the Rose and Crown. Llere was 
planned the massacre, the Battle of Long Island, to offset 
the influence of the Declaration. Sir Henry Clinton, Lord 
Comwallis, Baron Knyphausen, General Erskine, Sir Guy 
Carleton also were entertained here. 

When Major Aaron Burr escorted Margaret MoncriefFe 
to the Island a reception was given in this house. 

It later became the property of Major GifFord, an aide- 
de-camp on Gen. Washington's staff. It was demolished 
in 1854. 

The Black Horse Tavern is west of this site at the junc- 
tion of Amboy and Richmond roads. This was occupied by 
the British officers and here they received the reports of the 
spies. 



14 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

The old Fountain House at New Dorp is of historical in- 
terest. It was built by one of the first settlers about 1668, 
and in the early days court was held here. 

Generals Percy and Carleton, also Major Montresor, 
stopped under its roof, and it was in this house that Mar- 
garet MoncriefFe met Captain John Coughlin, whom she 
later married. 

A few hundred yards from Black Horse Tavern toward 
the west is Camp Hill, where stood the gambling den which 
witnessed the ruin of many British officers. Near this on 
the level depression now covered with trees was a duelling 
ground where many famous duels were fought. It is said 
these two places caused the dishonorable discharge of nearly 
fifty British officers. 

Beyond this on the Amboy Road lies Stony Brook, which 
was the home of the first permanent settlement on Staten 
Island. Here stood the first Waldensian church on the con- 
tinent, and the first church on Staten Island, the first trad- 
ing post ; the first county court house of Richmond County, 
built in 1683, and the second whipping post in this part 
of the country. 

When the persecuted French Huguenots arrived at the 
foot of New Dorp Lane on Christmas eve in 1658, it was 
the Waldensians who went to them from the little village 
at Stony Brook. 

West of Stony Brook may be seen the remains of the 
Britton homestead, which, until a few years ago, was prob- 
ably the oldest house standing on the Island. It is said 
that the first marriage on Staten Island was that of Cor- 
nelius Britton and Charlotte Colon. 

Old St. Andrew's Church in Richmond has been twice par- 
tially destroyed by fire, but portions of it have withstood 
the ravages of two centuries. It witnessed two battles be- 



HISTOEIC LANDMARKS 



15 




CUCKLESTOWX IkK 



tween the Americans and English, when Simcoe attempted 
to destroy the village by fire. 

On the comer back of the County Clerk's office, once 
stood " Cucklestown Inn," in which many noted officers of 
the Revolution stopped. 

It was here that Major Andre, the captain, wrote his 
will, which was probated in New York after his execution. 

West of Richmond on the hill may be seen the ruins of the 
Old Latourette house, at one time the headquarters of Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Simcoe of the 
Queen's Rangers. The council of 
war was held in this house which 
led to Knyphausen's invasion of 
New Jersey. It was during the in- 
vasion that Parson Caldwell's wife 
was murdered at the battle of 
Springfield. 

Near this is one of the forts erected by the British. It 
lies above the sandbed, and is yet in good condition. A sec- 
ond fort was farther on at the end of the ridge. On this 
site are several graves whose inscriptions are rapidly being 
obliterated by time. 

Across the Fresh Kill may be seen Green Ridge, noted for 
its having had the first Huguenot church. 

This church, built in 1695 (perhaps earlier), stood directly 
in front of the large dairy building of Mr. George W. 
White on what is familiarly known as the Seaman estate. 

Judge Benjamin Seaman, who was the last Colonial Judge 
of Staten Island, formerly resided on the Seaman estate. He 
was the father of Colonel Christopher Billopp's second wife. 
Col. Billopp was married at Judge Seaman's home. 

Beyond Green Ridge, between Huguenot and Rossville, is 
Woodrow. It once held one of the very earliest Methodist 



16 



STATEX ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 



churches built in America. In the old Van Pelt house 
Bishop Asburj- preached eleven days after his arrival in 
America. 

Near the site of the church stands the old Winant home- 
stead, a very ancient structure, occupied by Tory spies 
who foraged for the British. 

Purdy's Hotel at Prince's Bay, erected, perhaps, as early 
as 1690, was built on the Seguine estate, but was not the 

original Seguine 
mansion. The lat- 
ter was destroyed 
by fire in 1835. 

A military post 
was established at 
Seguine's Point 

during the Revolu- 
tion and the Purdy 
house was used as headquar- 
ters by the British commander. General 
Vaughan. 

A skirmish took place between the 
Americans and British near this house. 
The lower part of the Island was 
known as Bentley Manor and contains perhaps the greatest 
landmark historically in the borough, the Billopp house. 

When the apportionment of the islands surrounding New 
York and New Jersey was to be made, it was agreed that 
New York should have as many as could be circumnavigated 
in one day. 

Captain Christopher Billopp, the commander of a small 
vessel, succeeded in including Staten Island in one day's sail, 
an act which won from the Duke of York a tract of land 




Tory Quarters at 

WOODROW 




o 

W 
a 
o 



^ 



o 



< 

M 
1-1 



7^.f n;-w roRK 

.\KY I 



T1LD7LN "-"■ 
R 



HISTORIC LANDMARKS 17 

containing eleven hundred and sixty-three acres. This in- 
cludes the village of Tottenville. 

The famous old Billopp house at Tottenville is the oldest 
structure on Staten Island, built by Christopher Billopp 
soon after the land was presented to him in 1668. 

During the Revolution the head of the Billopp family 
was an ardent Tory, and entertained Generals Howe, Com- 
wallis, Clinton, Cleveland, Knyphausen, and Burgoyne. 

Under the roof of this Billopp house was held the only 
peace conference of the Revolution, which took place on 
September 6, 1776. Benjamin Franklin, of Pennsylvania; 
John Adams, of Massachusetts ; and Edward Rutledge, of 
South Carolina, were appointed as a committee by the Conti- 
nental Congress, then in session at Philadelphia, to confer on 
the issues of war. This had been done by the request of 
Lord Howe, representing the king. 

The peace conference came to naught, because the only 
power given to Lord Howe was to extend royal clemency 
and pardon to those who would lay down arms and return 
to their allegiance to the crown. 

This landmark, so rich in history, although well built, has 
withstood much, and is rapidly going to decay. 

The north shore of Staten Island is of interest to one 
seeking historic spots. 

The first object upon leaving St. George is the Old 
Pavilion Hotel, built about 1832, which was in the fifties 
the center of attraction for many wealthy Southerners. 
Since the war it has suffered varied changes and shows but 
little of its old-time splendor in its present deserted condi- 
tion. (See illustration.) 

The Ward homestead, commonly known as the " cement 
house," is a curiosity. It was built early in the nineteenth 



18 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

century of solid blocks of cement, which seem to have 
rivaled natural stone in tenacity and endurance. 

The " Stone Jug," near Sailors' Snug Harbor, dates 
back to 1770. It was the old Neville mansion, and its for- 
mer owner, Captain John Neville, a retired officer of the 
United States Navy, took great pride in its appearance. 

Sailors' Snug Harbor, a world-famous institution, is the 
outcome of a will made by Robert Randall, dated July 1, 
1801. This will was drawn up by Governor Daniel Tomp- 
kins and Alexander Hamilton. Many of the most learned 
men in legal affairs were employed. Among these were 
Daniel Webster and Robert Emmett. At last these suits 
were terminated, and on October 21st, 1831, the comer 
stone was laid. 

The Kruzer Homestead, known as the Pelton House, 
located at the cove, was built in 17S2. At the time of the 
Revolution it was kept by the " Widow Kruzer," and was 
the headquarters of General Courtland Skinner. William 
IV., at the time the youngest admiral of the British navy, 
stopped here. (See illustration.) 

The Swan Hotel, in West New Brighton, has been the 
scene of many interesting events, but none more perhaps 
than the great celebration held there by the colored people 
on July 4, 1825, on the occasion of the abolition of slavery 
in this State. 

At Tompkins Place and Richmond Terrace once stood 
the Fountain Hotel. It was but a cottage at the time of the 
Revolution. General Sullivan ordered this to be burned 
when he made his raid on Staten Island, but the British 
troops rescued it. It was the scene of more gaiety and 
social functions than any other of the ancient public houses 
on the Island. 

Among the names of the distinguished guests of the old 



HISTORIC LANDMARKS 



19 



hostelry are found Wendell Phillips, Garibaldi, George Wil- 
liam Curtis, Santa Anna, General Scott and Jenny Lind. 

Between Bodine and Cedar Streets on the Terrace, stood 
the residence of Governor Thomas Dongan, built shortly 
after his arrival here. It was destroyed by fire on Christ- 
mas night, 1878. 

At the foot of Columbia Street is the old DeGroot home- 
stead. Although over a hundred years old it is well pre- 
served and bids fair to become far more ancient. 

The Port Richmond Hotel, near the corner of Richmond 
Avenue and the Terrace, was built by Gozen Ryers for a 

private residence. It 

stands on the site of a 
small British fort. Colonel 
Aaron Burr spent most of 
the closing year of his life 
in this hotel, and here, on 
September 14, 1836, he 
died. 

Just beyond Richmond 
Avenue, at the left, is an 
old building which was 
unce a well-known academy presided over by Rev. Peter I. 
Van Pelt, pastor of the Dutch Reformed Church. 

The route beginning at Port Richmond going up Rich- 
mond Avenue, toward Bull's Head, is replete with historical 
sites. 

On Richmond Avenue, on the left going up, is a residence 
of Gothic architecture which was built by Isaac Jaques. 
The willow trees in front of this house were brought from 
the island of St. Helena, and the boxwood from Mount 
Vernon, Virginia. 

At Graniteville on the Morning Star Road, until a few 




FouKTAiN House 



20 



STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 



years ago, stood Butler's Tavern, occupied by British of- 
ficers during the Revolution. Not far from this occurred a 
battle in 1777, in which Lieutenant-Colonel Edward 
Vaughan Dongan of Skinner's Brigade lost his life. 

At Bull's Head once stood a tavern which was one of the 
most famous Tory headquarters during the Revolution. 

New Springville claims the honor of having had the 
first public school on the Island, built about 1690. It was 
finally demolished in 1888. (See illustration.) 

On Willow Brook road is the old Christopher homestead, 
which was used as a meeting place for the Committee of 
Safety during the Revolu- 
tionary War. 

The Corson homestead 
on Watchogue Road, now 
Prohibition Park, was 
erected in 1735. 

At Castleton Comers is 
Bodine's Inn, built by 
David Jacques for a resi- 
dence in 1770. Later it 
became an inn, and was a 
famous stopping place 
for stages. Thomas R. Eagleson, better known as " Thomas 
Keene," the actor, spent the last few years of his life here. 

At Castleton Corners was one of the oldest school houses, 
being the third on the Island. It was just back of the site 
of the present school and was built as early as 1784. 

Santa Anna, the famous Mexican general, resided in the 
Dubois house at the corner of Cherry Lane and Manor 
Road. It was after he had been condemned to death and 
pardoned upon condition of his leaving the country. His 
coming to Staten Island was of much interest. Gilbert 




DoxGA^' House 



HISTORIC liANDMABKS 21 

Thompson, a son-in-law of Governor Tompkins, was with 
his family anchored at Vera Cruz, in a small schooner when 
Santa Anna was ordered to leave the country. Mr. Thomp- 
son succeeded in getting the dethroned emperor on board, 
and out of the country, but in the hurry there was not time 
to get Mrs. Thompson on board. She was captured by the 
Mexicans and held as hostage, and over this international 
troubles arose. After considerable excitement, she was finally 
liberated and they returned to Staten Island, where later 
Santa Anna lived. He died in Mexico, however, in 1876. 

Just below this, at the comer of the Manor Road and 
Columbia Street, is the old Scott homestead. The date of 
this building is not known, but it was far from new when 
the British soldiers were entertained there at the time of the 
Revolution. It is one of the best preserved landmarks of 
the Island. 

At the junction of Brooks Avenue and Broadway is the 
Tyler house, the former residence of the wife of the tenth 
President of the United States, John Tyler. It later became 
the residence of the Russian Consul General, whose coach 
and four-in-hand were the delight of his neighbors. 

Old Place is interesting as the last Indian settlement or 
village on Staten Island. It is about a mile from the rail- 
road terminal. 

The Old Place mill, which was destroyed by fire a few 
years ago, was leased by the State of New York during the 
War of 1812. 

The Austin house at Clifton, said to have been built in 
1710, contains many relics of the past. On its front door 
is a knocker which was brought from a chateau at Rouen. 
The fireplace is surrounded by tiles brought from Amster- 
dam two centuries ago. These represent Biblical scenes. 

To the student of history Staten Island offers many spots 



2S STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

of deepest interest. Some of these landmarks are being 
destro^^ed by the elements and many more by those to whom 
these offer nothing sacred nor patriotic. Ancient grave- 
yards are going to ruin and unless something is done to pre- 
vent the destruction, soon nothing will be left to show the 
resting places of those whose courage and fortitude gave 
their descendants the right to life and liberty. 

FORT WADSWORTH 

Was first established during the War of 1812 by New 
York State. In 18-17 the United States Government bought 
the property, tore down the old forts, and built the present 
ones. 

The last shot of the Revolutionary War is said to have 
been fired at this fort by a British gunboat on Evacuation 
Day, 1783. 



TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES 

T N an account of this kind one must speak of the trans- 
^ portation facihties of the Island, and it is always with 
sincere regret that he who loves Staten Island approaches 
the subject. Despite the efforts of the several civic organ- 
izations, the transportation facilities have not kept apace 
of the borough's growth. The operation of the Municipal 
Ferry has opened a new era of prosperity, but the Island 
can never reach the highest development until trolley lines 
bring the several isolated communities into closer touch and 
make of many unimportant parts a most important whole. 
Nature has favored Staten Island to a remarkable degree ; 
man has not done his share. To be sure there is an adequate 
water supply in every part of the borough ; ample fire and 
police protection is assured; the streets are thoroughly 
lighted ; the mosquito, the bane of early days, has been 
completely exterminated ; but poor railroad service con- 
tinues to check the development of the interior and of the 
west shore. While it is true men commute daily from every 
hamlet, it is also true that good and fast service would 
bring to our shores a highly desirable class of inhabitants. 
The North Shore has a good trolley service, as has the 
East Shore, but the interior has but one line, which ex- 
tends from St, George to Richmond through a beautiful 
section. This line takes one past the beautiful Moravian 
Cemetery, where lie in an imposing sarcophagous Commo- 
dore Vanderbilt and all the Vanderbilt dead. It is well 
worth the stranger's time to leave the trolley at the east 
gate and to spend a busy hour here. There is perhaps no 

23 



24 STATEX ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

other cemeter}" in the State so attractively laid out or so 
well cared for. 

A complete account of the service is as follows : 

Staten Island (the Borough of Richmond) lies five miles 
down the baj' from New York, and is connected with Man- 
hattan by ferries from St. George to the Battery, and from 
Stapleton to the Battery ; with New Jersey by ferries at 
Port Richmond, to Bergen Point ; from Mariner's Harbor, 
to Elizabethport, and by ferry from Tottenville to Perth 
Amboy. 

The borough has a steam railroad running from St. 
George ferry to Tottenville ; from St. George to Arlington 
on the North Shore, passing through New Brighton, Port 
Richmond and Manner's Harbor, and on the South Shore 
through Tompkinsville, Stapleton and Clifton to South 
Beach. The fare from Arlington to South Beach and in- 
termediate stations is five cents. 

All trolley lines except the South Beach trolley from 
South Beach to Midland Beach, either run direct or trans- 
fer to the ferry and run as follows : 

From New York ferry along the North Shore through 
New Brighton, West New Brighton, Port Richmond, Mar- 
iner's Harbor to Elizabethport fen^y, connecting at Port 
Richmond with trolley to Bull's Head (one fare) and with 
ferry to Bergen Point. 

From New York ferry through New Brighton and Jersey 
Street. 

From New York ferry through Tompkinsville, Brighton 
Heights and Castleton Avenue to West New Brighton. 

From New York ferry through Tompkinsville, Richmond 
Turnpike and Jewett Avenue to Port Richmond. 

From New York ferry through Tompkinsville, Stapleton 
and Concord, to Port Richmond. 



TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES 25 

From New York ferry through Tompkinsville, Stapleton, 
Concord, Dongan Hills, Grant City and New Dorp to Rich- 
mond, the county seat. 

From New York ferry through Tompkinsville, Stapleton 
and Clifton to South Beach. 

From Broadway, West New Brighton, to Eckstein's 
Brewery, transferring at Castleton Corners for Port Rich- 
mond, Richmond, New Dorp, Concord, Stapleton, Tomp- 
kinsville and New York ferry. 

From Port Richmond through Richmond Avenue to Bull's 
Head, transferring at Port Richmond to New York ferry. 

There are twenty-two trains daily each way to and from 
New York, leaving Tottenville at intervals of thirty minutes 
in the morning and New York at intervals of fifteen minutes 
in the evening; the express trains making the run from 
Tottenville to the Battery in sixty-seven minutes ; locals, one 
hour and twenty minutes. There are two boats daily direct 
to New York, a passenger and freight boat in the morning 
and a freight boat in the evening. The boat landing in 
New York is convenient to the Chambers Street car line. 

The views from the trolley on any line are varied and at- 
tractive. 

The scenery is unsurpassed; wild-flowers overgrow the 
wayside, wild birds make the woods ring with music, pretty 
brooks ripple in and out of unspoiled woodland every- 
where. Dame Nature busies herself to make Staten Island 
a spot worthy of the artist's brush, or the poet's pen. 

One thing which is apt to confuse the stranger who visits 
the Island for the first time, is the sign-board on many of the 
stations of the Perth Amboy division of the Staten Island 
Rapid Transit, i. e.. Huguenot, Rossville, etc. This means 
that the first named place is the place at which the train is 



26 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

stopping and that the passengers for the last named place 
should also alight. Stage connection may then be made to 
other points. 

Staten Island roads are not surpassed in this State. The 
shore road which extends around the Island, although known 
by several names according to section, the Amboy Road 
leading from New Dorp to Tottenville, the Boulevards, not 
yet reaching the southern point of the borough, and several 
less important roads are all fit to please the most exacting 
automobilist. 

Along the route garages are found at convenient inter- 
vals. 



THE CHURCHES OF ALL DENOMINATIONS 

Elsa E. Evans 

THERE are seventy-eight houses of worship in this bor- 
ough, representing nearly all of the leading denomi- 
nations. Many of these church buildings are of historic 
value, having been associated with the development of the 
community. Following is a brief notice of the most inter- 
esting : 

On the North Shore, three blocks up the hill from St. 
George ferry in New Brighton, stands Brighton Heights 
Reformed Church. Its tall spire can be seen far out at sea, 
being used on some of the U. S. Government maps as a 
point for navigators in entering the channel of New York 
Harbor. The first building was erected in 1823 on land 
donated by Governor Daniel Tompkins. 

Rev. George C. Lennington is the present pastor. Preach- 
ing services are held every Sunday morning at 11 o'clock, 
and evening at 7:45. All are welcome to these services. 

Farther along on Clinton Avenue is the Church of the 
Redeemer (Unitarian), Rev. Hobart Clark, pastor. This 
society has erected three different buildings. It was in the 
second one that the late George William Curtis conducted 
the services most successfully for several years as a lay 
preacher. 

At West New Brighton is located the Church of the As- 
cension (Episcopal), the Rev. Pascal Harrower, rector. 

At Port Richmond is the Reformed Protestant Dutch 
Church, Rev. J. F. Berg, pastor. This church was founded 
in 1716, and destroyed during the Revolutionary War. It 
was erected anew in 1786 and enlarged and rebuilt in 1844. 



28 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

For the purpose of developing a strong social and re- 
ligious work among the Italians on our Island a church 
has been erected at Mariner's Harbor, with Rev. D. A. 
Rocco as rector. The work is carried on under the general 
direction of the Yen. Archdeacon Charles S. Burch, D. D. 

The First Presbyterian Church of this Island was organ- 
ized and erected at Stapleton in 1856. The Rev. Oliver 
Paul Bamhill, M. A., is the present pastor. 

St. Mary's Parish at Rosebank was organized in 1852, 
and a beautiful brick church erected five years later. This 
was the first Roman Catholic Church on the East Shore. 
Before 1852 it was included in St. Peter's Parish at New 
Brighton, the latter being the first Roman Catholic Church 
on the Island. There are attached to this parish two 
priests. Rev. Michael CuniflP, rector, and Rev. C. J. Cronin, 
assistant. The hours for Sunday masses are 6, 7 :30, 9 and 
10:30 A. M. 

Further on is St. John's Episcopal Church, a charming 
edifice of rose-colored Connecticut granite, built after the 
Gothic style of the fourteenth century, at a cost of 
$120,000. It is a pleasant reminder of many of the Eng- 
lish parish churches which were built in the reign of Ed- 
ward III. 

One of the most interesting places of worship on the 
Island is St. Cuthbert's-by-the-Sea, at Arrochar. It was 
commenced in 1901 by Mr. Mills from his own design, and 
under his own direction, by day labor. It was built entirely 
of rough stone collected on the Island, and driftwood col- 
lected on the beach. Owing to the death of Mr. Mills this 
chapel has never been completed. 

The Church of the Immaculate Conception at Stapleton 
was built in 1887. In 1895 the parish was taken charge of 



THE CHURCHES OF ALL DENOMINATIONS 29 

by Rev. William J. M. Clure, and he is building the new 
church in the renaissance style of architecture to be fin- 
ished this year. 

The church commonly known as the Huguenot Reformed 
was organized in 1849. Two years later the new church was 
incorporated. This new church was early known as the 
Church of the Huguenots, as a number of Huguenot families 
had settled in the neighborhood. Gradually the name of 
the village was changed from Bloomingview to Huguenot. 
Rev. David Junor, M. A., is the present pastor. 

At Tottenville, the most southerly part of the Island, we 
find two very flourishing Methodist Churches, Bethel and 
St. Paul's, the former being the eldest daughter of the 
Woodrow M. E. Church. In the early part of 1800 services 
were held at the houses of the different members of the 
Woodrow Church residing in this portion of the town. In 
1822 a plain wooden building, called the Tabernacle, was 
erected in Richmond Valley, and 1841 the present beautiful 
brick structure, under the name Bethel, was dedicated. 

In 1857, for the better accommodation of that portion 
of the congregation living in Tottenville, a site was pur- 
chased and St. Paul's chapel erected. 

Not far away on the Amboy Road is the Church of Our 
Lady Help of Christians, which was erected in 1898 by the 
Rev. James M. Byrnes, who has been the pastor since. 
Sunday masses are at 8:30 and 10:30. 

Between these two is St. Stephen's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, of which the Rev. Guy A. Jameson is rector. 

The South Baptist Church is on Main Street, the Rev. 
W. Parkison Chase, pastor. This society was organized in 
1859 and is planning to celebrate its semi-centennial an- 
niversary this fall. 



30 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

One of the most interesting churches not on the line of 
the raih'oad, is the one known as the Old Moravian Church, 
situated in the Moravian cemetery. The square white church 
is comparatively a modem building ; but to the right stands 
the old house of worship and parsonage built in 1768. It 
was in this building that the members of the Vanderbilt 
famil}^ worshipped. Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt gave 
more than 50 acres of land to the society, which has since 
become the most beautiful cemetery on the Island. 

Following the road past this church Richmond is reached. 
Near this place is St. Andrew's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, which is rich in historical traditions. In 1708 
Queen Anne granted the parish a Royal Charter, legalizing 
all gifts, and exacting an annual payment of one grain of 
pepper com and two shillings and six-pence to be paid into 
her Custom House, New York. 

She also gave to the church a silver service, a prayer book 
and a pulpit cover adorned with her name. The present 
church occupies the site of the original building and is the 
third erected thereon, the first having been burned shortly 
after the Revolution. During the War of Independence, 
the Queen's Rangers, a troop of Tories, were quartered in 
the old church, and the pulpit and reading desk were used 
as targets. A party of Americans once came over from 
Jersey and drove the troops to shelter in the church. Then 
by pouring a volley through the windows they drove them 
out again, and took many prisoners, whom they were 
obliged to release when British reinforcements arrived. 

The Rev. Charles Burch is the rector of this church. 

The Emanuel Church of Westerleigh was organized as a 
Union Congregational Church in 1893. Services were held 
in the hotel parlors for one year, when the Deems Memorial 



THE CHURCHES OF ALL DENOMINATIONS 31 

Chapel was erected. In 1894 the Rev. Charles R. Kingsley 
was called to the pastorate. He still has the parish in 
charge. 

St. Joseph's Catholic Church at Rossville was built 
about sixty years ago, by the contributions of Irish and 
Irish-Americans in this district. It became dilapidated in 
the course of time, and was rebuilt, enlarged and decorated, 
mostly at the personal expense of the present rector, the 
Rev. Peter J. Harold. 

At Rossville is also St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, the Rev. Charles Josiah Adams, D. D., rector. This 
society was organized in 1883. The church was erected af- 
ter plans by the celebrated artist, Cropsy, after the general 
plans of the Parish Church of Ross Castle, in 1887. Its 
interior lines are of great nobility, made so by its rows of 
pillars separating the aisles from the nave, its groined 
arches and its high ceiling. This is one of the most beau- 
tiful parish churches in America. 

Between Rossville and Huguenot is the Woodrow Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, which is called the Mother of 
Methodism on the Island. The history of this old church 
dates back to 1771, when Francis Asbury landed at Ross- 
ville. He called the widely scattered farmers together at 
the residence of Peter Van Pelt, and expounded to them the 
principles of Methodism as he had learned them direct from 
the lips of its great founder, John Wesley. 

The first church was built in 1787. Many changes have 
since taken place. The old church was torn down and a 
new one erected in 1842. A communion plate of Ger- 
man silver used for many years in the old church is still in 

use. 

The most sacred of all relics is the old Bible, handled 



32 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

for half a century by the fathers of the church. The fly- 
leaf of this ancient volume bears the following inscription: 
" A gift from Nancy Dissosway, to the Methodist Church 
on Staten Island, July 4th, 1795." 

The Moravian Church at Great Kills, Rev. John S. 
Romig, pastor, was erected by popular subscription in 1896, 
although the society had begun its work in the village long 
before that date. Improvements have been made since un- 
til now the church has a large Sunday School annex and a 
gj^mnasium. Sunday services are at 10:'30 and 7:30. 

The Prince Bay Union Church had its origin in a little 
Episcopal mission started by the eff'orts of Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnston and other interested friends, about fifteen years 
ago. For the last six years the Rev. H. Handel, an or- 
dained Baptist clergyman, has had charge of the work. One 
interesting feature regarding this church is that it has 
never been in debt. Sunday morning service at 10:30. 
Evening service at 7 :30. 

St. Mary's Protestant Episcopal Church at New Brigh- 
ton was incorporated in 1849 and began to hold services in 
a small chapel. In 1853 the present stone church was erected 
by subscription, among the donors being such old Staten 
Island names as Bard, Livingston, Delafield, etc. The Rev. 
Francis L. Frost, Ph.D., is the present rector. Services on 
Sunday are at 8 and 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 

Another parish which is in a flourishing condition is that 
of " St. John Baptist de la Salle " at Stapleton, the Rev. 
John P. Neumann, rector. Sunday services, 8:30, 10:30, 
and 4. 

Other churches with their hours of service are as follows: 

Christ Church, P. E., New Brighton— Rev. F. W. Crow- 
der, rector. Morning service, 11 ; evening service 8 o'clock. 



THE CHURCHES OF ALL DENOMINATIONS 33 

St. Simon's, P. E., Clove Road — Rev. William G. Thomp- 
son, rector. Morning service 11 ; evening service 4. 

St. Paul's Memorial, P. E., St. Paul's Avenue, Tompkins- 
ville — Rev. Wallace H. Watts, rector. Morning service 8 
and 11 ; evening service 4. 

Trinity M. E., West Brighton — Morning service 10:30; 
evening service 7 :45. 

Grace M. E., Port Richmond — Morning service 11 ; even- 
ing service 7 :45. 

Summerfield M. E., Mariner's Harbor — Rev. William 
RedhefFer, Ph.D., pastor. Morning service 10:30; evening 
service 7 :45. 

Wandell Memorial M. E. Church, Concord — Rev. David 
Ausmus, pastor. Morning service 10:45; evening service 
7:30. 

St. Mark's M. E., Pleasant Plains — ^Rev. Alfred R. 
Evans, pastor. Morning service 10 :45 ; evening service 
7 :30. 

Kingsley M. E., Stapleton — Rev. J. B. J. Rhodes, pastor 
— Morning service 10:45; evening service 7:45. 

African Church, A. M. E. Z. (colored), Bogardus Cor- 
ners, Westfield — Rev. James Sarjeant, pastor. Morning 
service 10:45; evening service 7:45. 

Moravian Church of Castleton Comers — Rev. Charles 
Nagel, pastor. Morning service 10:'30; evening service 
7:45. 

Calvary Presbyterian Church, Castleton Avenue, West 
Brighton — Rev. Edward J. Russell, pastor. Morning ser- 
vice 10:45; evening service 7:45. 

St. Peter's, R. C, New Brighton — Rev. Charles A. Cas- 
sidy, rector; Rev. Joseph Farrell, assistant. Sunday serv- 
ices: Masses, 6:30, 8, 9:30, and 11 a. m. ; Vespers 8 p. m. 



34 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

Church of the Sacred Heart, West Brighton — Rev. Wil- 
Ham C. Poole, rector; Rev. Fathers Mulcahy and O'Brien, 
assistants. Sunday services 7, 8, 9, and 10:30 a. m. ; Ves- 
pers 7 :30 p. M. 

St. John's, Port Richmond, and ]\Iission at Linoleumville 
— Rev. J. C. Borth, pastor. Morning service 10 :30 ; even- 
ing sem'ice 7 :30. 

German Evangelical, Stapleton — Rev. F. Sutter, pastor. 
Morning service 10:30; evening service 7:30. 

Park, Baptist, Port Richmond — ^Rev. L. T. Griffin, pas- 
tor. Morning service 11 ; evening sei-^^ice 7:45. 

Mariner's Harbor — Rev. John H. Tory, pastor. Morn- 
ing service 10:45; evening service 7:45. 

St. Philip's (colored). Elm Street, Port Richmond — Rev. 
John W. Griffin, pastor. Morning service 11 ; evening ser- 
vice 8. 

Swedish Evangelical Zion Church, Masonic Hall, Port 
Richmond — Rev. J. H. Carlson, pastor. Sunday school 11 ; 
evening service 8. 

Zion Scandinavian Lutheran, Avenue B, Port Richmond 
— Rev. O. E. Eide, pastor. Morning service 10:30; evening 
service 7 :45. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist, No. 25 Stuyvesant 
Place, St. George — Morning service 10:45; evening ser- 
vice 8. 

Wells Memorial (Christian Alliance), Tottenville — Rev. 
C. E. Cox, pastor. Morning service 10:30; evening service 
7:45. 

Congregation B'nai Jesherum, Richmond Turnpike, 
Tompkinsville — Rev. Samuel Kantrovitz, reader. Worship 
Frida^^s 6 p. m. 

Temple Emanuel, Port Richmond — ^Rev. Albert Gold- 
farb, pastor. Service, Friday, 6 p. m. ; Saturday, 8 :30 a. m. 



THE CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 

Dexia L. Mason 

^ I ^HE Richmond County Society for the Prevention 
-*- OF Cruelty to Children occupies a double modem 
house on Castleton Avenue, opposite the Smith Infirmary. 

The society was incorporated in December, 1880, George 
Wilham Curtis being one of the charter members. 

During 1907, the society investigated 109 complaints, 
involving 172 children, for various causes, the greatest 
number being cases of desertion, neglect, and cruelty. 

In support, the annual city appropriation is $1,000 and 
the balance is made up by subscribers, who numbered 71 in 
1907. 

Officers. President, Charles H. Ingalls, Bement Avenue, 
West New Brighton ; Resident Agent, Charles Cowan, 
Broadway, West New Brighton. 

Directions. From St. George, take the Castleton Avenue 
trolley. Telephone 305 W. Tomp. 

The Sailors' Snug Harbor is beautifully located on the 
banks of the Kill von Kull, a part of New York Harbor. 
The grounds comprise about 200 acres, some sixty of which 
are laid out in lawns, flower-beds, and fine shade trees. 

On this part of the grounds stand all the buildings, cost- 
ing several millions of dollars. The remainder of the ground 
comprises the farm and a thickly wooded piece of ground 
to which the inmates have free access. 

Buildings. The buildings, of which there are more than 
thirty, are the chief feature of the institution ; the eight 
main buildings used for dormitories and mess-halls are con- 

35 



36 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

nected with corridors of stone and brick as one building. 
The rooms are all bright and cheerful, well heated and ven- 
tilated, lighted by electricity, furnished with every comfort, 
and kept scrupulously clean. The number of occupants to 
a room varies from two to five, most of the rooms having 
but two occupants. 

This institution was founded by Robert Richard Randall, 
Esq., of New York City, on June 1, 1801, over one hundred 
3^ears ago. IMr. Randall executed his last will and testa- 
ment, drawn by Alexander Hamilton, bequeathing prac- 
tically his entire estate for the establishment and mainte- 
nance of a Home for Aged, Decrepit, and Womout Sailors, 
to be known as Sailors' Snug Harbor. 

This estate consisted chieflv of a farm of about 20 acres 
located on Manhattan Island, and which is now, roughly 
speaking, bounded by 4th and 5th Avenues, and 6th and 
10th Streets. So well has the property been managed that 
the present income is ample to supply all the needs of the 
Harbor. 

Officers. The will provided that the administration of 
this trust be committed to the following persons, viz: 

The Mayor, the Recorder, the President of the Chamber 
of Commerce, the President of the Marine Society, the First 
Vice President of the last named Society, the Rector of 
Trinity Church, and the Minister of the First Presbyte- 
rian Church, all of the City of New York. 

The officers of the Institution comprise the Governor, 
Capt. Andrew J. Newberry, Resident Physician and Staff, 
Chaplain and Steward. 

Opening. Owing to litigation and other causes, the site 
for the Home was not purchased until June, 1831. 

The first building was erected in 1831-S and in the fol- 
lowing year fifty sailors were admitted. 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 37 

Inmates. On March 1, 1909, there were 926 inmates. 

An applicant for admission, to be ehgible, must be a 
native born sailor, physically disqualified for self-support, 
and must have sailed at least five years under the American 
flag. If foreign bom, he must prove 10 years' service in the 
navy or merchant marine. 

The fullest liberty is allowed the inmates, consistent with 
good order and a due regard to the peace and comfort of 
the community. 

Direction. Take the Rapid Transit R. R., North Shore 
division, to Sailors' Snug Harbor, or the Elizabethport trol- 
ley to the main gate. Telephone 18, West Brighton. 

Visitors welcome except Saturday p. m. 

Mount Loretto is beautifully located on a commanding 
rise of ground fronting Raritan and Prince Bays at the 
southern end of the Island. 

Foundation. This institution is a Mission of the Immacu- 
late Virgin for the Protection of Homeless and Destitute 
Children of New York City, founded in 1871, by Rev. John 
C. Drumgoole. The Mt. Loretto branch was opened in 
1883 and now includes the Mt. Loretto Home for Boys, St. 
Joseph's Trades School, St. Elizabeth's Home for Girls, 
and St. Joseph's Blind Asylum. 

Equipment. The school buildings, dormitories, and 
church are surrounded by over 500 acres of land, compris- 
ing gardens, woodland, and lawns. 

The boys' dormitory is a fine new brick structure, lodg- 
ing 600 boys. St. Elizabeth's Home is imposing and stands 
near Prince Bay Lighthouse. All the buildings are well 
lighted, and are heated by steam. 

Inmates. On March 20, 1909, there were about 1,600 
children in the Home, 1,080 being boys, the total being in- 



38 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

elusive of fifty blind girls, who are given special manual 
instruction in addition to common school branches. Chil- 
dren are received from 4 to 16 years of age. 

Instruction is given in all common branches from Kinder- 
garten to High School, and military tactics. 

St. Joseph's Trades School equips many of the boys 
with mechanical skill to earn good wages. The Mt. Loretto 
Band is a justifiable source of pride — Juniors numbering 
85, Seniors 40. 

This band formed a part of the inaugural procession of 
President Taft, and later played by request in the East 
Room. 

Homes are found for many children, but all are guarded 
and an interest shown in placing them under good influences 
when they leave the Home. 

Officers. Rector, Rev. Mallick J. Fitzpatrick, 375 La- 
fayette Street, New York City. 

Local Assistant. Rev. W. E. Cashin, Mt. Loretto, 
Prince Bay, N. Y. Telephone 21, Tottenville. 

Support. The chief support of the Mission is from the 
sale of " The Homeless Child," a small magazine which is 
edited and published by the boys. 

Voluntary contributions aid the work materially. 

Directions. Take the S. I. Rapid Transit R. R. to 
Pleasant Plains. Children's friends received third Sun- 
days. Visitors always welcome. 

The New York City Farm Colony, on Manor Road, 
is 2^ miles from Castleton Corners P. O. It occupies 165 
acres, formerly the Richmond County Alms House Farm. 

Buildings. The old brick and stone buildings on the west 
side are in good condition, while the home cottages, A, B, 




Paviliox Hotel 



CciiTKiYou Homestead 




Baune Tvsex Homestead 




Kruzer Homestead 



TMI iNEW YORK 

P'JBLIC LfBRAlfY 



TfLDEN KOUMDATlONsl 



/ 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 39 

and C, on the east side, are models of their kind. The large 
new dormitory is nearing completion. The Farm Colony 
has its own sewer and water plant. 

Crops. The farm is under high cultivation, showing what 
scientific agriculture can do for mediocre soil. In 1908 the 
value of farm and garden crops was about $10,000. Many 
premiums on vegetables have been won at the County Fair 
the past two years. Most of the Farm work is done by in- 
mates. Basketry is taught to many by a worker of the 
State Charities Aid Society. 

Inmates. On March 19, 1909, the inmates numbered 
333. 

Much care is taken in selecting from the city's dependents 
to choose those who will render the community life agree- 
able. Cottage A is occupied entirely by aged married 
couples. All the inmates take the greatest care in their own 
cottage and room, where each is allowed to retain personal 
belongings. 

Officers. The New York City Farm Colony is under the 
direction of Commissioner of Public Charities, Robert W. 
Hebbard; Supervising Matron, Mrs. Agnes M. Dickerson. 

Directions. By securing a pass from the Department of 
Public Charities in East Twenty-sixth Street, visitors may 
secure free transportation in the stage which leaves Cas- 
tleton Corners daily at 11 :30 a. m. ; from St. George take 
the Silver Lake car to Castleton Comers. If walking, leave 
the trolley to Bradley Avenue and walk to Manor Road. 
Telephone 189, West Brighton. 

The Sea View Hospital, now in course of construction, 
occupies large grounds adjoining the Home Cottages. This 
is to be the largest hospital of New York City and will be 
completed in two years. 



40 STATEN ISLAND AXD STATEN ISLANDEES 

The Actors' Fund Home is located on Brooks Avenue, 
West New Brighton. Architecturally and by the beauty 
of its situation, the house is most charming. It is sur- 
rounded by 20 acres of land commanding riparian rights on 
a small lake to the south, while on the street side it is densely 
shaded by old trees. 

Foundai'ion. Through the agitation of The New York 
Herald, the Actors' Fund Home was opeped May 8, 1902, 
by the late Rev. Dr. Houghton, of " The Little Church 
Around the Comer." 

Building. From a turret ed gateway, the walk leads to 
the Stucco building, planned on the pleasing lines of the 
Elizabethan style, and built at the cost of $80,000. Within, 
the tasteful and luxurious furnishings are well calculated 
to render happy the declining years of those men and 
women who now cherish the memory of applause received 
before the footlights. There is a fine fruit orchard, while the 
garden furnishes the vegetables and strawberries needed. 

Guests. To meet the expenses of maintaining the Actors' 
Fund Home, subscriptions are solicited from members of 
the profession and the general public. Address, Theodore 
BrumlefF, Asst. Sec. of Actors' Fund, Gaiety Theater Bldg., 
Forty-sixth Street and Broad, New York City. 

Officers. The Board of Governors consists of the officers 
and trustees of the Home — Daniel Frohman, President, 
1907-8. Mr. Robert E. Stevens, Supt. 

SerA'ices are conducted Sunday afternoons by pastors of 
various churches on the Island. Home talent furnishes 
many enjoyable entertainments, while Founders' Day, May 
8, the guests keep open house. Visiting hours from 10 A. 
M.-l p. M. daily. 

Directions. From St. George take the Rapid Transit R. 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 41 

R. to West New Brighton, thence by the Manor Road 
trolley to Brooks Avenue, five minutes' walk. Or take the 
Castleton Avenue trolley to Columbia Street, seven minutes' 
distant. Telephone 195, West Brighton. 

The Diet Kitchen is located on Richmond Road, cor- 
ner of Grant Avenue, Tompkinsville. 

Founded in 1882 by the late Mrs. Sara B. McFallen 
of Arrochar. The Diet Kitchen occupies its own two-story 
modem building, well suited to its needs. 

Yearly about 150 patients are furnished free beef, tea, 
chicken or mutton broth, milk, eggs, etc., from one to ten 
weeks upon the recommendation of physicians. 

Support. Voluntary subscriptions and donations and the 
interest on a small investment. 

Officers. President, Mrs. Stephen D. Stephens, New 
Brighton ; resident matron. Miss Wamecker. 

Directions. From St. George take the Richmond or 
Concord trolley to Grant Avenue. Telephone 115 W, 
Tompkinsville. Visitors always welcome. 

The Mariners' Family Asylum, connomonly known as 
" The Old Ladies' " Home, is on Center Street, near Van- 
derbilt Avenue, Stapleton. 

Founded in 1843 by the Female Bethel Society of 
New York, to provide work, at a fair remuneration, for the 
female members of the families of seamen. In 1849 the 
society was incorporated, and on June 9, 1855, the present 
building was suitably dedicated. The four-story brick 
building is heated by steam and has an elevator. 

Support. The Asylum is richly endowed and the annual 
report of 1908 shows a bank account of several thousand 
dollars. Donations of $5,211.62 were received from S. I. 
companies. 



42 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

Inmates. On March 2'3, 1909, there were 33 inmates, 
over 60 years of age, all wives, mothers, sisters, or daugh-^ 
ters of seamen from the Port of New York. 

Officers. Mrs. Francis MacDonald, Townsend Avenue, 
Stapleton, First Directress ; Miss Etta Rhodes, Matron. 
Telephone 412 J, Tompkinsville. 

Directions. From St. George take the Rapid Transit to 
Clifton. Walk out Vanderbilt Avenue to Center Street, 
turn to the right. The Home is in sight from Clifton 
station. 

The Society for the Relief of the Destitute Chil- 
dren OF Seamen is located on Castleton Avenue, New 
Brighton, next St. Vincent's Hospital. 

The Society was organized 63 years ago and has always 
been non-sectarian in its management. 

Buildings. The rented brick building is located in a 
large well shaded yard and commands a fine view of Sailors' 
Snug Harbor, with which it is in no way officially connected. 
A new steam plant was installed last year. 

Enrollment. In 1908-9, 87 : admitted during the year, 
30; discharged, 22; age of admission, 2 to 10 years. Dur- 
ing the past ten years 35^ of all children admitted have 
been restored to their parents. 

Officers. Mrs. Courtland W. Gnable, First Directress ; 
Miss Doyle, Matron. Telephone 184 L, West Brighton. 

Directions. From St. George, take the Castleton Ave- 
nue trolley to main gate. 

The three Day Nurseries of Staten Island are doing a 
most useful work in caring for the young children of moth- 
ers who go out to work during the day. These societies 
also distribute baskets for Thanksgiving and Christmas, 
and donations of clothing and shoes. 

The Lakeveew Home for Girls faces Havenwood Es- 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 43 

planade, Brighton Heights, overlooking Silver Lake, and 
commands one of the most beautiful views on the Island. 

Building. The double cottage, equipped with every im- 
provement, is prettily furnished and accommodates an aver- 
age of 14 girls. 

Object. The Home endeavors to make wayward girls and 
unmarried mothers economical by independent means of in- 
dustrial training, and is the only Home of its kind in this 
country. 

Support. It is supported by the Council of Jewish 
Women, and the direction of Miss Sadie American. Particu- 
lars will be gladly furnished by the Supt., Mrs. Sarah Lib- 
bin. Telephone 16 L, Tompkinsville. 

Directions. From St. George take the Castleton Avenue 
Trolley to Havenwood Esplanade. 

A Public Playground was opened in New Brighton for 
the three summer months of 1908, where over 10,000 chil- 
dren played during the day, under supelrvision of paid 
helpers. 

Location. The Playground adjoins the New Brighton 
Day Nursery on Fifth Street, and is supported by the New 
York Playground Society. 

In Stapleton a plot of land 150' by 200' has been se- 
cured between Gordon and Targee Streets, near the Church 
of the Immaculate Conception. This playground will be 
opened in 1909 under the supervision of the local School 
Board, District 46. 

In New Brighton, the local Board District 45 expects 
to open a Public Playground this summer between La- 
fayette and Henderson Avenues. 

In West New Brighton near Broadway, a site has been 
secured for a recreation center. 

St. Michael's Home, on the Fresh Kill Road, Green 



44 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEX ISLANDERS 

Ridge, is conducted by the nuns of St. Michael's Presenta- 
tion Convent, Mother Mary Columbo, Superior, one-half 
Professed Sisters, three Novices, and three Lay Sisters. On 
April 14, 1909, there were 100 children in the Home, and a 
few receiving da^^ instruction. 

Directions. From St. George, take the Rapid Transit to 
Annadale of the Midland trolley to Richomnd, thence by 
carriage. Telephone 16 L, Tottenville. 

The New^ Brighton Day Nursery, under the auspices 
of the Women's Club of S. I., is located on Fifth Street, be- 
tween Jersey Street and Westervelt Avenue. It occupies its 
own home and is free of debt. 

From 1,500 to 2,000 children are cared for yearly. Moth- 
ers' meetings and sewing classes are held in connection with 
the work. 

Chairman. Mrs. S. McKee Smith, 2 Hamilton Park, New 
Brighton. 

Directions. From St. George, take the Jersey Street 
trolley to 5th Street. 

The Stapleton Day Nursery is on Broad Street, op- 
posite P. S. 14. 

The Nursery was founded 14 years ago and is supported 
by voluntary contributions and by the 5 cent charge for 
each child left in its care. The managers hope to build 
soon. Contributions from the King's Daughters' sales and 
allied societies are gratefully acknowledged. 

In addition to the work mentioned above, work is found 
for deserving women. 

The annual roll averages S,200. 

Officers. President, Mrs. J. L. Feeney, Beach Street, Sta- 
pleton. 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS 45 

Directions. From St. George take the South Beach 
trolley to Broad Street. 

The Port Richmond Day Nursery, at 86 Maple Av- 
enue, was founded in 1897. It occupies its own comfort- 
able house, of which four rooms and a bath are given over 
to the children. Surrounding it is a small fenced play 
ground. 

In 1908, 2,000 children, from infants to 10 years old, 
were cared for. 

Support. Voluntary contributions, small subscriptions, 
donations at the Harvest Home, Thanksgiving, and Christ- 
mas ; and collections from Union Services, Deems Memorial 
Chapel, St. Mary's R. C. Church, and allied church socie- 
ties. 

Officers. President of Board of Managers, Mrs. James 
Wheeler, 49 Burgher Avenue, West New Brighton. Matron, 
Mrs. Matthews. 

Directions. From St. George take the Rapid Transit 
R. R. to Tower Hill or Port Richmond, thence 7 minutes 
walk. 



THE SCHOOLS 

Florence Bennett Scott 

AS the ferryboat approaches St. Georg-e, the stranger 
first visiting Staten Island is sure to be impressed by 
its high stretch of land just back from the ferry slips. 
Crowning the height of land, is a large grey stone build- 
ing, whose square towers and massive proportions arouse 
one's interest. If he ask any resident what it is, he will 
receive the answer, filled with just pride, " That is the 
Curtis High School." 

It stands as a pledge to all new comers that education is 
held in the highest esteem, and that the work of the ele- 
mentary schools is of a character to make possible such a 
high school. 

The Richmond borough schools are part of the Greater 
New York system, but the buildings are usually more com- 
modious than those in the city and the schools have large 
play gi'ounds and more quiet situations. 

As a healthful place to study, they are far ahead of the 
city schools. There are thirty-four elementary schools with 
a teaching force of two hundred and seventy-six teachers. 

The total attendance is 14,000. Each school is super- 
vised by a special teacher in each of the following subjects: 
Physical culture, music, drawing, cooking, and manual train- 
ing. Some of the larger schools have the boys and girls 
in separate classes, but the smaller ones have mixed classes. 

Darwin L. Bardwell is superintendent of the 45th and 46th 
districts, comprising the whole island. Members of the 

46 



THE SCHOOLS 47 

Board of Education are Dr. Arthur Hollick and Mr. Ralph 
McKee. The schools are known by number, No. 1 being at 
Tottenville. This school, Principal N. Lowe, has a large new 
building and is one of the best equipped schools of Greater 
New York. No. 19, located at '33 Greenleaf Avenue, West 
New Brighton, has perhaps the most interesting history, 
having been organized in 1889, and known as District 
School No. 5, Castleton. At the annual district meeting, 
in August, 1892, it was unanimously voted to call the 
school the George William Curtis school. 

This action was indorsed by the State Superintendent. 

A feeling exists that Staten Island grows very slowly. 
The growth of this school under Charles T. Simons, prin- 
cipal, and Miss Jennie Smith, now Mrs. Samuel, is there- 
fore interesting. At its opening, in a three-room school, 
there were sixty pupils. Now, with its three additions, 
the school contains twelve class rooms, a science room, a 
kitchen, a library and a workshop. The present enrollment 
is 400. It publishes a quarterly, the Curtis Echo, which is 
edited by the members of the departmental classes. 

The popularity of this name as well as the apprecia- 
tion of one of Staten Island's foremost former citizens is 
shown in the naming of the High School in his honor, also. 

The George William Curtis High School is situated in 
New Brighton, St. Mark's Place and Hamilton Avenue. It 
commands a beautiful outlook over New York Bay, the 
Kill von Kull and the Narrows. 

It is now the only High School in the borough. Previous 
to the year 1902, there were three schools which main- 
tained High School departments, one in Tottenville, an- 
other in Stapleton, and the third in Port Richmond. In 
September, 1902, the Tottenville High School department 
was transferred to Stapleton; in February of 1904, the 



48 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

Stapleton and Port Richmond departments were united at 
Curtis under Mr. Oliver D. Clark, principal. Mr. Clark's 
untiring efforts and executive ability laid for the school a 
firm foundation of good scholarship. Upon liis death, in 
1906, he was succeeded by Mr. Harry F. Towle, the present 
principal. 

The High School has a teaching force of nineteen women 
and sixteen men. It offers a general course of four years, 
leading to college entrance, to complete which a student 
must satisfactorily pursue required subjects for a given 
number of hours and pass examinations in the same. 

These subjects are in the departments of language, math- 
ematics, history, science, drawing, music and physical train- 
ing. There is also a commercial course with instruction in 
bookkeeping, stenography, and typewriting. The registra- 
tion of pupils has averaged about 650. 

In February of 1909, owing to the increase in num- 
bers, which reached 7'35, it became necessary to establish 
an annex at Rosebank, where first grade pupils, of whom 
there are 110, are instructed. This is in charge of Mr. W. 
A. Crane. 

Special attention is drawn to the fact that at five schools 
evening courses in all ordinary subjects, English to foreign- 
ers, mechanical drawing, freehand drawing, stenography, 
typewriting, business, English, bookkeeping, sewing, cook- 
ing, dressmaking and millinery are given, with attendance of 
1,S85 scholars. 

The introduction of. public lectures into the educational 
system of our city should be favorably commented on as 
an important element in the education of our people. 

During the year 1908 there were 104 lectures delivered 
to an average attendance of 350 persons. 

Just northwest of the High School, corner of Wall and 



THE SCHOOLS 49 

Stuyvesant Place, half-way down the hill, is a dark brick 
building, the Staten Island Academy. It was founded in 
1884. Mr. Franklin Page is now the principal. The course 
of study extends from the Kindergarten to college entrance 
without examination. The purpose of the Academy has 
been thorough preparation and a long list of students who 
have attended college attest its success. Besides the school 
proper, the Academy has the Winter Memorial Library of 
over 10,000 volumes and a fireproof lyceum, seating 500 
persons, with a well-equipped stage for Academy plays. 
Below the lyceum is a beautiful gymnasium. Besides its 
indoor interests, it has a large field where basket-ball, base- 
ball, and various sports are maintained. 

There are several other private schools, chief among them 
St. Peter's Academy, New Brighton, Westerleigh Institute 
at New Brighton, the Augustian Academy, Grymes Hill, 
and, at the far end of the Island, Tottenville, St. Louis 
Academy. This is essentially a French school. The usual 
school branches as well as music, vocal and instrumental, 
drawing and painting are pursued. The object is to give 
a Christian education and thorough instruction to fit for 
future duties. The Academy is located on Main Street. 

THE SCHOOLS ARE LOCATED AS FOLLOWS 

1. Academy Street . . Tottenville. 



S. Wiener Street 

■3. School Street 

4f. Shore Road 

5. Amboy Road 



Richmond Valley. 
Pleasant Plains. 
Kreischerville. 
Huguenot. 



6. Rossville Avenue . Rossville. 

7. Fresh Kill Road . Green Ridge. 

8. Lenwood Avenue . Great Kills. 

9. Knight Avenue . . New Dorp. 



50 



STATEX ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 



10. Richmond Road 

11. Jefferson Street . 

12. Steuben Street 

13. Pennsylvania Avenue 

14. Brook and Broad Sts. 

15. Grant Street 

16. ]\Iadison Avenue 
IT. Prospect Street 

18. Broadway 

19. Greenleaf Avenue 

20. Heberton Avenue 

21. Sherman Avenue 

22. Richmond Avenue 

23. Andros Avenue 

24. Washington Avenue 

25. Chelsea Road 

26. Richmond Turnpike 

27. Richmond Avenue 

28. Freshkill Road . . 

29. Manor Road 

30. Fish Avenue . 

31. Pleasant Avenue 

32. Osgood Avenue 
'33. Washing Avenue 
34. Fingerboard Road 



New Dorp. 
Dongan Hills. 
Concord. 
Rosebank. 
Stapleton. 
Tompkinsville. 
Tompkinsville. 
New Brighton. 
West New Brighton. 
West New Brighton. 
Port Richmond. 
Port Richmond. 
Graniteville. 
Mariner's Harbor. 
Mariner's Harbor. 
Bloomfield. 
Linoleumville. 
New Springville. 
Richmond. 
Castleton Corners. 
West New Brighton. 
Bogardus Corners. 
Stapleton. 
Grant City. 
Rosebank. 



Our libraries may well be considered part of our public 
education system. Four Carnegie Libraries, at Tottenville, 
St. George, Stapleton, and Port Richmond, respectively, 
afford ample recreation and opportunity for research. 

There are branch libraries at Great Kills and at New 
Dorp, and it is probable that another Carnegie Librar}^ will, 
within a few years, be located at the latter place. 



HOSPITALS 

rXlHAT Staten Island does not forget the sick who are 
-*- among her inhabitants or those whom fate brings to 
her shores is shown by the four prosperous hospitals which 
are here. Of these the one most often seen, because in plain 
view of the harbor and of the railroad, is the Marine Hospital 
at Clifton. 

The establishment of U. S. Marine Hospitals in our 
nation is a long story, dating back to 1798, the object be- 
ing to enable seamen of the Merchant Marine, when sick or 
disabled, to be cared for by the general Government, instead 
of leaving them to the tender mercies of the poor laws of 
the different cities when landed at their ports, thus encour- 
aging them to go to sea and incidentally aiding in our com- 
merce, foreign and domestic. 

U. S. Marine Hospitals are established at all the larger 
ports, and at the smaller ports the Government rents wards 
in a municipal or private hospital, where the sailors are 
cared for by a Commissioned Officer of the Service. 

This hospital building and grounds for the Port of New 
York was rented by the Government in May, 1883, and 
purchased from the Marine Society of New York City in 
1903. The Hospital was built some 60 or 70 years ago, 
and is therefore not up-to-date in its appointments, but the 
Government proposes to remodel it inside (the walls are too 
attractive to pull down), for which Congress appropriated 
$250,000 last year. 

It is an ideal location for the Sailors' Hospital and well 
" patronized " by those who need its ministering care — 



52 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

some 4,000 to 5,000 patients being cared for during the 
year. 

The Smith Infirmary began its existence as a dispensary, 
operated mainly through the efforts of Dr. WilHam M. An- 
derson, of Bay and Union Streets, Stapleton. Its growth 
was rapid and under the name, the " Samuel Russel Smith 
Infirmary," it continued to grow until, in 1864, it was 
formally opened in one of the old buildings located in the 
Quarantine Ground on the east side of Tompkins Avenue, 
New Brighton. 

Five years later the institution was incorporated under a 
board of trustees and the following year a lot and house 
on Hannah Street, Tompkinsville, was purchased. 

From time to time more land was bequeathed or purchased 
and in 1888 the corner stone of the Main Building of the 
present structure was laid. As the institution grew new de- 
partments were added, among them being a training school 
for nurses. The Infirmary is up-to-date and thoroughly 
equipped, and were it not for two things the management 
would be well satisfied. 

The great needs of the hospital at this time, aside from 
an increased income, are, first, a dormitory for the women 
servants, who are now housed in inadequate and unsuitable 
rooms in the basement of the administration building, which 
rooms are badly needed for drug room and store room pur- 
poses ; and, second, an adequate and properly equipped 
maternity pavilion, with ward rooms, and a number of pri- 
vate rooms. 

St. Vincent's Hospital, which is situated on Bard and 
Castleton Avenues, West New Brighton, is under the man- 
agement of the Sisters of Charity, though open to persons 



HOSPITALS 53 

of any race or creed. It is but five years old yet, and is 
now organized as a separate institution, having outgrown 
its dependence on St. Vincent's of New York. 

The Tuberculosis Annex, which has been established in 
conjunction with the city authorities, is producing the 
most gratifying results. 

There has also been formed a Training School for Nurses, 
which is doing splendid work in thoroughly equipping for 
their future work helpers of humanity. It is, in fact, al- 
ready conceded that this modest school compares favorably 
with those of older institutions. On May 25th, 1907, five 
young ladies who had completed a course of three years' 
training, received the first graduation honors given by the 
Hospital to its nurses. 

At present the Hospital urgently needs a laundry and 
boiler room. 

St. John's Guild, a corporation existing " for the relief 
of sick children of the poor of the City of New York, 
without regard to creed, color, or nationality," maintains 
at New Dorp the institution known as the Sea Side Hospi- 
tal. The nucleus of this hospital was the Sea Side Nursery, 
established in 1881. Six years later it gave place to the 
Sea Side Hospital, and its work was greatly extended. It 
has every natural advantage. Its grounds cover over 15 
acres, and its sea-washed coast measures 500 feet. Within 
are a^fccommodations for 400 women and children. It draws 
its own water from its own artesian well; it has its own 
refrigerating plant; its own electric lighting; and its own 
heating plant. Its diet kitchen for prepared foods is un- 
excelled, and its operating equipment is complete. 

Admissions to the hospital are by tickets widely distrib- 
uted through the Department of Health, hospitals, day nurs- 



54 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

eries, churches, physicians, etc. The ministrations of the 
hospital are absolutely free. No sick child Is denied ad- 
mission. Neither is a sick child detained pending an in- 
vestigation as to whether it is entitled to care. The sole 
bar is a contagious disease. 

It is the mecca of the sick child of the tenements and the 
good which it is doing Is Immeasurable. 



AMUSEMENTS 
Clara V. Each 

WITHIN easy access of all parts of Staten Island are 
the two delightful pleasure resorts, known as Mid- 
land Beach and South Beach. 

Both lie on the south shore of the Island, and have the 
broad expanse of the lower bay lying majestically before 
them. 

At both places may be found all the delights of " a 
Coney Island." Helter-skelters, those wonderful winding 
slides : scenic railways, where one has a glimpse, as he passes 
through tunnels, of marvelous angels and demons ; old 
mills, where the waters glide peacefully in and out of the 
maze, and you float on, pleased with the scenic effects that 
meet the eye at every turn ; Ferris wheels, that lift you up, 
up, up, until you view with vast satisfaction the great 
panorama of the sea with its numerous ships, and graceful 
sailboats, gliding like swans over its mighty bosom; 
saucy little tugs skimming along and leaving in their wake 
billowy clouds of black smoke. In the distance Sandy 
Hook, with its stretch of white sand, and Jersey's rugged 
shore curving around to the west. On the other side the 
straight shores of Long Island, and beyond, and to the 
south, " Coney," and nearer two pretty islands raise their 
dainty heads above the surface of the green waters, while 
to the north stretches the hills, the meadows and the verdant 
woods of our glorious island ; merry-go-rounds, which the 
children and, indeed, the grown folks, enjoy riding round 
on prancing steeds and wild animals ; punching machines 

55 



56 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

to test the strength; target-shooting; ring-throwing for 
canes, Japanese ball rolling, and many other happy amuse- 
ments. 

Then there is the tin-type tent where you may have your 
photograph taken in a bathing suit or an automobile (ac- 
cording to taste). 

The dance halls, the vaudeville performances, etc., all 
contribute amusement to the pleasure seeker. 

The large Casino at Midland Beach has recently been 
utilized as a skating rink, and daily at this place a large 
number of young folks find diversion and healthful exer- 
cise. 

There is a great long pier at South Beach where one may 
fish and be well compensated for his labor ; or, if not 
tempted by this sport, may enjoy the glorious sea breeze 
that fills one with life and vigor. 

Fine board walks line the full extent of the beaches, and 
here, on a pleasant day, may be found many loiterers watch- 
ing the numerous bathers that are enjoying the gentle 
surf of the bay, while others linger to hear the fine music 
rendered by the band or listen to the dashing of the waves 
along the sands. 

If one is hungry and does not care to dine heartily, his 
desire may be gratified at any of the restaurants, where he 
can always obtain good oysters (from Blue Points to Sad- 
dle Rocks), or delicious clams, clam broth, chowder, etc., 
or mayhap he will only care for a cup of good coffee and a 
sandwich, which he can easily obtain. 

All kinds of dinners are served in open air terraces. Chief 
among these are the Italian dinners, with their mysterious 
little side dishes and good wine, served you by dark-eyed 
natives of Sunny Italy. Also the German dinners, where 



AMUSEMENTS 67 

you have music and vaudeville in combination with the 
good style of German eating and drinking. 

There are also numerous other restaurants kept by many 
other nationalities where one may please his palate. 

Then, when one who has satiated his longing for sea- 
breeze, he returns to his home by trolley or train through the 
beautiful country, redolent with the perfume of wild flowers, 
and is impressed with the glory of the green woods (that 
skirt the road) and the joyous inhabitants thereof, flitting 
about from tree to tree, and he feels satisfied that the day 
has been well spent. 



THEATRES 

IX the heart of Stapleton, a thriving village on the shores 
of the Narrows, is located the chief winter amusements 
of the Island. 

A small theatre, managed by Messrs. Conness and Ed- 
wards, has given much pleasure to the people. An excel- 
lent company and well selected plays draw a full house at 
every performance, of which there is one six evenings dur- 
ing the week, and a matinee on each Wednesday, Friday 
and Saturday. 

The theatre is tastefully decorated, the seats comfortable, 
and the place well-ventilated. 

There is a new play each week. Real comedies for those 
who desire only to laugh. Serio-comedies for those who 
desire sentiment, and tragedies for the serious-minded. In 
fact, plays are presented to suit the taste of every kind 
of theatre-goer. 

On the North Shore, Port Riclimond, is the Bijou The- 
atre, where one can enjoy a vaudeville performance any 
evening of the week, or a moving picture show any after- 
noon. 



WOMEN'S CLUBS 
Blanche M. Hareis 

THE women of Staten Island have interested themselves 
at various times in the formation of Women's Clubs, 
which have represented some time the social, literary, musi- 
cal and philanthropic life of the Island. The threadbare 
argument against Women's Clubs have met their best 
refutation in the fine results these clubs have attained. They 
have not only sought for and secured the advancement of 
their individual members, but have reached out helping 
hands in many directions, and to-day they represent the 
most progressive methods of conducting and distributing 
charity which New York knows. 

THE women's UTERARY CLUB OF PORT RICHMOND 

* The Women's Literary Club of Port Richmond was or- 
ganized Sept. 19, 1903, in the Parsonage of the Reformed 
Church of Port Richmond. Mrs. Ruth Treadwell Berg 
was the mother of the organization and served for two 
years as president. 

The club was formed with ten charter members, six of 
whom are still active in the club work. The membership now 
numbers one hundred and eleven, with four honorary mem- 
bers, of whom the club is justly proud, Mrs. Edwin Mark- 
ham, Mrs. Florence Morse Kingsley, Mrs. Stephen D. 
Stephens and Mrs. Francis Brewer. The name of Miss M. 
Erwin, who guided the club in its pioneer days, is also soon 
to be added to this list. 

This club has not engaged in the great world's work 



60 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDEES 

pursued by so many federated clubs. It has advocated 
but one public measure — a petition to the Public Service 
Commission, asking them to induce the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad to place gates at the unprotected crossings in 
Port Richmond. 

The mission of the Club has been to promote social and 
intellectual intercourse and to extend the hand of friend- 
ship and hospitality to the women of the community. 

Meetings are held on the first Monday of each month in 
the Reformed Church Chapel, when a business meeting, fol- 
lowed by a literary and musical program, is enjoyed by the 
members and their guests. This is followed by a social hour, 
which has been especially designed to promote a spirit of 
cordiality' and comradeship. 

PHILEMON LITERARY AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

The Philimon Literary Club was organized March 18, 
1897, through the efforts of Miss Lillie Warford, at whose 
home the organization was effected. Mrs. Cynthia M. Lit- 
tle was the first president. 

Formed with only the thought of literary culture, the 
Club later widened its usefulness. The first circulating 
library on the Island was started at Tottenville through 
the instrumentality of the Club, and this nucleus gave the 
first Carnegie Library in Richmond County. 

The members have worked untiringly to secure an appro- 
priation for the care and perpetuation of the old historic 
Billopp House, which was erected in 1668. In this was held 
the only peace conference assembled during the Revolu- 
tionary War, Major Howe, representing King George, 
Beoijamin Franklin, John Adams and Edward Rutledge 
being present. Through the agency of the man who built 
this house and whose name it bears, Staten Island became 



women's clubs 61 

a territorial possession of the province of New York, 
thus making it possible to incorporate it in recent years 
into the City of New York. 

The Club consists of one hundred and five members, and 
was federated with the New York City organization in 1903, 
and with the New York State organization in 1907. Its 
name was changed in 1909 to the Philimon Literary and 
Historical Society. 

THE woman's club OF STATEN ISLAND 

The Woman's Club of Staten Island was organized in 
1893, with nine members, under the presidency of Mrs. 
George William Curtis. It was federated the next year and 
became a corporated organization in 1896, with a member- 
ship of nearly one hundred. The first meetings were held 
in the Old Village Hall, then in the Brighton Heights 
Seminary, and in 1897 in the St. George Bank Building, 
where it still finds its home, though it hopes in the near fu- 
ture to have an adequate club house. 

It is now composed of one hundred and thirty members, and 
its work is accomplished through three departments, that 
of literature, whose members study and write upon ap- 
pointed themes, and discuss the questions of the day; that 
of music ; and that of philanthropy, which has made the 
Woman's Club of Staten Island one of the most prominent 
in the State. It has built and owns a beautiful Day 
Nursery building, where over one thousand children are 
cared for each year, and in which sewing classes, mothers' 
meetings, and employment and clothing bureaus for the 
poor are conducted. It has co-operated in the establish- 
ment of a public playground, where over eleven thousand 
children have been kept during the summer from the 
streets and given healthful vent to their activities. It has 



62 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

engaged a teacher during the winter months to help the 
children of the public school, to overlook their sports, after 
school hours, and to provide cocoa and crackers to those 
insufficiently fed. It has provided a fund to help the 
worthy poor with coal and groceries in times of necessity 
and it has reached out many other arms of usefulness. 

The Club holds monthly meetings of its departments, and 
a general meeting each month, when a musical program is 
presented, followed by a social hour. Once a year a Presi- 
dent's Day is held, when the hospitality of the Club is 
especially extended to the Presidents of other Clubs and 
an interchange of ideas encouraged. 

The Club has become a recognized power in the com- 
munity, and many notable movements have been launched 
to success under its auspices. 

THE EICHMOND BOROUGH ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN 

TEACHERS 

The Richmond Borough Association of Women Teachers 
was organized in 1907, mainly through the efforts of Miss 
Margaret L. Lynd, who called the first meeting in Curtis 
High School. Miss Katharine L. Osincup, Mrs. Jessie 
I. Yates, Miss Dina H. Hope, Mrs. Clara V. Fach and 
Miss Clara H. Whitmore, with Miss Lynd as Chairman, 
formed the first executive board, and are still serving in that 
capacity. It is to these ladies that the club owes much of 
its progress and popularity. 

The objects of the Association are to promote a higher 
intellectual and ethical culture throughout the borough ; 
to maintain a feeling of good fellowship among the teach- 
ers ; and to promote the professional interests of the mem- 
bers. 

The meetings are the second Friday of each month, from 



women's CI.UBS 63 

October till May, Inclusive, at 8 p. m. in the Woman's Club, 
St. George. 

The membership is S0£. Officers : 

President — Clara H. Whitmore, Fox Hill Villa, Fort 
Wadsworth. 

Vice President — Katharine L. Osincup, Bement Av- 
enue, West New Brighton. 

Secretary — Elsie Gardner, West New Brighton. 
Treasurer — Josephine Daily, 40 Westervelt Avenue, 
New Brighton. 

Chairman of Executive Board — Margaret L. Lynd, 
156 Third Street, New Dorp. 



ASSOCIATIONS OF GENERAL INTEREST 

THE STATEN ISLAND ASSOCIATION OF AUTS AND SCIENCES 

ORGANIZED as the Natural Science Association of 
Staten Island on November 12, 1881. 

Reorganized and incorporated as the Staten Island As- 
sociation of Arts and Sciences, May 17, 1905. (Chapter 
526, Laws of New York, 1905.) 

Members of the Board of Trustees for 1908-9: 

Howard Randolph Bayne, president ; Charles Arthur 
Ingalls, treasurer; Arthur Hollick, secretary; John Blake 
Hillyer ; Philip Dowell ; William Armour Johnston ; William 
Thompson Davis ; George Scranton Humphrey ; William 
Hinman Mitchell ; Stafford Clarence Edwards ; Samuel Mc- 
Kee Smith ; Samuel Alexander Henszey ; John DeMorgan. 

The President of the Borough of Richmond, Hon. George 
Cromwell, and District Superintendent of Schools in the 
Borough of Richmond, Darwin Long Bardwell, ex-officio. 

Membership about 330, including 5 patrons, 2 life, 4 
corresponding and 2 honorary members. The remainder 
active members. 

The Association holds regular meetings on the third Sat- 
urday evening of each month from October to May, in- 
clusive. The sections of the Association hold meetings at 
their own pleasure. Three sections have been organized 
for the prosecution of special lines of work. Biology, Art, 
Literature. 

The Museum and Library are housed in room 309, Bor- 
ough Hall, St. George. The Museum is believed to be the 
best equipped and most complete local institution of its 



ASSOCIATIONS OF GENERAL INTEREST 65 

kind in the country, and the Library is exceedingly valuable 
for scientific reference work. It is open to the members at 
all reasonable times and to the public in the afternoons of 
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, and all day 
Saturday of every week. 

The City has each year for the past two years appro- 
priated $4,000 for equipment and maintenance. 

In every part of the Island are found clubs and societies 
of various kinds, and it may be a matter of some surprise 
to residents of other boroughs that within the county is 
maintained one of the most flourishing agricultural socie- 
ties in the State. 

In 1895 the Richmond County Agricultural Society was 
formed for the purpose of bringing the inhabitants into 
closer touch with each other and of utilizing the acreage 
that then lay waste. The County Fair is held annually in 
September, beginning on Labor Day and lasting a week. 
It is a genuine County Fair and a sight worth visiting, 
especially for the person who has always lived in the 
crowded city. 



A FEW STATEN ISLANDERS 

SPACE has limited the number of persons chosen for 
mention in this first volume of *' Staten Island and 
Staten Islanders." and it has been an extremely difficult 
task to make the best selection. Among so many who are 
furthering a spirit of helpfulness and progress it has 
seemed herculean, but at last a compromise between " space 
limitation " and inclination was effected and a brief mention 
of the best known writers, of the three men who know 
Staten Island as none others know it. and one politician, 
who is a politician in the best sense of the term, and two 
public spirited citizens is the result. 

In our subsequent editions we hope to tell you about 
other Staten Islanders. 

Edwin Maekham 

Edwin ]VIarkham. the poet, who needs no introduction to 
a New York public, resides in Westerleigh, in a beautiful 
cottage, which has been recently completed. He was bora 
in Oregon City, Ore., April 23, 1852. 

DurincT his boyhood and early manhood he worked at 
farming, blacksmithing, herding and sheep raising, and 
earned his way throug'h the common and normal schools. 
He devoted much time to the study of ancient and modern 
history and sociolocry. In 1897 he married Anna Cather- 
ine ]\Iurphy, a teacher and writer of verse and stories. 

Since early boyhood he has written poetry and his poems 
breathe of the spots he loved or the great questions which 

66 




Florence Morse Kingsley 



^1 



A FEW STATEN ISLANDERS 6*7 

have vexed mankind for centuries, but which the great 
hearted poet feels as few can feel. In the earlier years he 
taught school, but soon devoted himself to literature. 
" The Man with the Hoe," " Lincoln," and " Field Folks," 
are among his writings. 

He is widely known as a poet, a prose writer, and a lec- 
turer. He is deeply interested in the child labor problem. 

Mrs. Markham still writes and is at present contributing 
a series of articles to the Designer. 

They have one son, Vergil. 

W1LI.1AM Winter 

Was born at Gloucester, Mass., July 15, 1836'. He was 
the son of Charles and Louisa Winter, and received his 
elementary education in the public schools, and at Harvard 
and Brown Universities. In 1860 he married Elizabeth 
Campbell. They have five children, four sons and one 
daughter. 

He has been the dramatic critic and reviewer of the 
New York Tribune since 1865. He wrote, " Shakespeare's 
England," " Gray Days and Gold," " Old Shrines and Ivy," 
"Life and Art of Edwin Booth," etc., etc. 

He has taken a great interest in Staten Island Academy 
and was until 1906 a trustee. The Winter Memorial 
Library is his gift. 

His address is the New York Tribune, New York City. 

Florence Morse Kingsley 

Every reader of those delightful books, " The Transfig- 
uration of Miss Philura," " The Resurrection of Miss Cyn- 
thia," and "The Singular Miss Smith," will be glad to 
learn more of Mrs. Kingsley. 

She lives in Westerleigh, where she prefers to be known 



68 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

only as the wife of the Rev. Charles Rawson Kingsley, the 
pastor of the Deems Memorial Church at that place. 

She is pleasant and unassuming, very approachable and 
frequently appears before the local clubs, where her stories 
never fail to please. 

She was bom near Medina, 0., July 14, 1859, daughter 
of Jonathan Bradley and Eleanor Morse; and educated at 
Whitestown Seminary and at Wellesley College. She was 
married in 1882 to Rev. Charles Rawson Kingsley. She 
is a prolific writer and a frequent contributor to current 
magazines. Her last book is " The Queer Browns." 

George Daulton 

Was bom in Missouri of English descent and Southern 
parentage, during the hardships of war and the settlement 
of a new country. He inherited a taste for writing from* 
both his parents, his father being editor of a Southern 
paper, and his mother implanting in him a reverence for 
the English classics so early in childhood that the music 
of the uncomprehended phrases held his fancy until he was 
inspired into an understanding of them. Being physically 
frail, his education was almost wholly at home, and after 
the unsettled boyhood, in the retirement of his own library. 
His first published productions were on Shakespearian and 
dramatic subjects. Subsequent poems and stories for 
periodicals led him into magazine writing as a profession. 
He married Agnes Warner McClelland, a writer of Cleve- 
land, and as their work developed it became necessary 
for them to remove from Chicago to the wider literary 
field of New York. 

The range of his work is from the thoughtful to the 
fanciful, from poems and essays to practical business stories 
of banking and mining for men ; and again to the fantastic 



A FEW STATEN ISLANDERS 69 

and weird. Mr. Daulton has an inborn fondness for the city, 
and also for the sea, and in his Staten Island home he has 
for six years found the best way to blend the two. 

Agnes McClelland Daulton 

Was bom at New Philadelphia, Ohio, in the Tuscarawas 
Valley, with the historic village of Gnadenhutten on one 
hand, in the quaint community of Zoar on the other, and 
in a family keenly appreciative of humor and personal 
anecdote, which they drew from the earliest settlement of 
Ohio. 

After receiving her education at Oberlin, Mrs. Daulton 
began writing and drawing to amuse herself during a pro- 
longed illness. The first story and the first sketch sold; 
and from that time she became a regular contributor to a 
number of periodicals. While living in Cleveland, she be- 
came a member of the Women's Press Club of Ohio, and 
was married to George Daulton, of Chicago. She has writ- 
ten and illustrated numberless stories for children, and 
these books on nature, " Wings and Stings ; " " The Auto- 
biography of a Butterfly ; " and " Dusk Flyers." She is 
the author of the " Philamaclique " stories published in the 
Outlook, stories drawn from the delightful material with 
which she was familiar in her childhood. Of late she has 
been working for young people again. The St. Nicholas 
has published three serials by Mrs. Daulton in rapid suc- 
cession, which the Centura/ Company are bringing out in 
book form : " From Sioux to Susan ; " " Frilze ; " and 
" The Gentle Interference of Bab ; " while these were ap- 
pearing in St. Nicholas others were running for younger 
children in " Little Folks ; " " The Things Moppet Did ; " 
" Bobbie and Joy and Pester Peter ; " and " The Capers 
of Benjy and Barbie." Mrs. Daulton is a member of the 

51 



70 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

Fortnightly Club and has lived on Staten Island for six 
years in one of the old places overlooking the bay. 

Rev. Guy A. Jamieson 

Mr. Jamieson is at once a successful author and an 
earnest preacher. He is rector of St. Stephen's Church, 
Tottenville, where his earnest sermons attract attention. 

He was bom in Arkansas, and early in life was thrown 
on his own resources. He gladly did what opportunity 
offered to be done. First as a farm hand, then on a railroad, 
next as a tea^cher and an editor, and finally as a minister, 
the same earnestness and conscientious attendance to duty 
stamped his character. 

His literary career is only beginning, but is rich in prom- 
ise. He has had many short stories published and one 
novel, " At the Edge of the Yellow Sky," and has another 
in preparation which will be brought out within a few 
months. 

Etta Anthony Baker 

Like Mr. Jamieson, is a new comer into the literary 
field, but her stories are so delightfully original, that a 
mention of local writers without her would be incomplete. 
Mrs. Baker writes only for recreation. She began writ- 
ing by accident — through having called upon an author. 
Her children's stories have been well received and she is 
gaining recognition among the best magazines. She is viva- 
cious, and charming in manner, and these qualities reflect 
themselves in her writings. The future seems bright for 
the young writer. 

Anna Shaw Curtis 

In the Curtis home on Bard Avenue, West New Brighton, 
Anna Shaw Curtis, widow of George William Curtis, lives 



A FEW STATEN ISLANDERS 71 

her happy, useful life. She takes an active interest in 
local affairs, is a member of the Local School Board, Dis- 
trict 45, and well known as a philanthropist.' 

Her daughter, Elizabeth Burril Curtis, lives with her. 

Arthur Hollick, Ph. B., Ph. D 

Arthur Hollick was born on Staten Island and has always 
resided here. He graduated from Columbia College School 
of Mines, class of 1879, with the degree Ph. B., receiving 
the degree Ph. D. from Columbia (now George Washington 
University), Washington, D. C, in 1897. 

He is now assistant geologist in the United States Ge- 
ological Survey and curator in the department of Fossil 
Botany, in New York Botanical Garden. He is an active 
member of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science; of the Geological Society of America; of the 
Botanical Society of America ; of the New York Academy 
of Science ; of the Torrey Botanical Club ; of the American 
Association of Museums ; and of the Staten Island Asso- 
ciation of Arts and Sciences. He was one of the organizers 
of the latter in 1881, and has served continuously as its 
secretary ever since. 

He has always been active in civic affairs. He served as 
a member of the New Brighton Board of Health from 1886 
to 1892, and was a member of the Richmond County Park 
Commission (Vice-president 1897-1900, President 1901). 
He assisted in organizing the Good Government and Citizens' 
Union Movements on Staten Island. He was elected a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education in 1907 and is still serving. 

He has traveled entensively through the United States and 
Alaska in connection with work for the U. S. Geological 
Surveys, and the State Geological Surveys of New York, 
New Jersey, Maryland and Louisiana. 



72 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

Immediately after graduation at Columbia College he 
served as private assistant to Dr. J. S. Newberry, in the 
Department of Geology, and was subsequently appointed 
instructor in Geology until appointed Curator of the De- 
partment of Fossil Botany in the New York Botanical Gar- 
den in 1901. 

He is the author of numerous papers in botany and geol- 
ogy, particularly of New Jersey, New York and New 
England, and many government reports and monographs. 

Howard R. Bayne 

Staten Island has not had the honor to be represented in 
the State Legislature by one of her own citizens since 1873 
until 1909, when Howard R. Bayne was elected State 
Senator, an office entirely unsought by him. While there 
he has been untiring in promoting the interests of Richmond 
whenever possible, and has worked hard to have the bill 
providing for the preservation of the Billopp House enacted 
into law. Whether this property will be purchased and 
turned over to the city for a park and museum at this 
writing can not be determined. 

Howard R. Bayne was bom at Winchester, Virginia, up- 
wards of fifty years ago. He breathed in his youth the air 
of statesmen and public men ; in that fine old State he im- 
bibed Democratic principles of the genuine type, his father, 
grandfather and great-grandfather being Democrats. 

He was the son of Mary Ellen Ashby and Charles Bayne. 
He is descended from the Popes, Turners, Strothers, Mene- 
fees, Dabneys, Stuarts, Wades, Savages and Thorntons, all 
old and well known families in Virginia. 

In his youth, after taking the preparatory course at 
Richmond College, Richmond, Virginia, he took the full 
college course and graduated therefrom in 187S, receiving 



A FEW STATEN ISLANDERS 73 

the academic degree of M. A. During his college course he 
carried such honors as the best debater's medal, salutato- 
rian and final orator. After his collegiate course he was 
principal of the Pampatike Academy, in King William 
County, Virginia. He subsequently took a law course un- 
der Professor John B. Minor, the celebrated teacher of law 
at the University of Virginia, and in 1879 took the profes- 
sional degree of B. L. at Richmond College. He was ad- 
mitted to the Richmond Bar in 1879 and practiced there for 
some years. In 1882 he left the Capital of Virginia and 
took his residence in the City of New York. Here he was 
admitted to the New York Bar in July, 1882, and has prac- 
ticed at the Bar of this State continuously ever since. 

In 1886 he married Miss Lizzie S. Moore, of Richmond, 
Virginia, daughter of Dr. Samuel Preston Moore. 

He is member of the New York City Bar Association, the 
Sons of the Revolution, Society of Colonial Wars, Rich- 
mond County Club House, Virginia Historical Society, ves- 
tpyman of the Christ Church, New Brighton; the Staten 
Island Association of Arts and Sciences, of which he has 
been president for many years ; Society of the Cincinnati, 
counsel to the Richmond Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children, vice-president of the New York City 
Committee of the State Charities Aid Association and 
chairman of the Richmond County branch. 

He was-twice elected president of the State Society, " The 
Virginians," in New York, and for many years he has been 
one of the governors of New York Southern Society. For 
many years also he was a trustee of the Staten Island 
Academy. He is a director of the Prospect Park Bank of 
Brooklyn. 

In 1905 he was appointed by Governor Higgins a mem- 
ber of the Probation Commission of the State of New York, 



74 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

and while such was the draftsman of the first General Pro- 
bation Law that was submitted to the legislature. 

This bill, while not passed, became the type of the general . 
measure now in force. Mr. Bayne is also an author, having 
while he was a member of the Virginia Bar, edited Con- 
verse's Indexes (Virginia and West Virginia Law) and w^as 
a joint author of the " Travels of Ego and Alter," describ- 
ing a walking tour of 800 miles through the State of Vir- 
ginia, taken by himself and Dr. Peyton H. Hoge. Mr. 
Bayne is also the author of monographs, " The Year 1619 
in the Colony of Virginia," " A Rebellion in the Colony of 
Virginia," published by the New York Society of Colonial 
Wars, and a number of other papers. He has also con- 
tributed numerous articles on legal subjects to various 
periodicals. Mr. Bayne has been prominently connected 
with numerous movements for the uplift of social and civic 
conditions in this community. 

William T. Davis 

William T. Davis was born in New Brighton, where he 
still resides. He is thoroughly conversant with the Island 
and has contributed much to the local literature. 

His little volume " Days Afield on Staten Island " was 
published in 1892 and is widely read. The Natural Science 
Association of Staten Island published a paper on the 
" Homestead Graves of the Island," and one entitled 
*' Staten Island Names, Ye Olde Names and Nicknames," and 
supplements to these papers. Mr. Davis has contributed 
many articles on the natural history of the Island to the 
proceedings of the Staten Island Association of Arts and 
Sciences. 



a few staten islanders 75 

Ira K. Morris 

Mr. Ira K. Morris resides at West New Brighton. He is 
a lecturer and writer of ability. His " Memorial History of 
Staten Island " is the standard work of reference and en- 
titles him to a high place among historians. His lectures 
on local history draw large audiences, because of his able 
and impartial treatment of his subjects. He has contributed 
much to the historical literature of the Island. 

Sidney Fulker Rawson 

Sidney Fuller Rawson was born at Schroon Lake, Essex 
County, New York, December 15th, 1843. He served from 
June, 1862, to June, 1865, as a soldier in the 118th New 
York Volunteers in the Civil War, and is a member of Gordon 
T. Thomas Post of the Grand Army of the Republic. At the 
close of the War he entered as a law student with Hon. 
Byron Pond, at Elizabethtown, Essex County, New York, 
and was admitted to the Bar at Plattsburgh in May, 1867, 
and removed to Staten Island immediately and became as- 
sociated with Lot C. Clark and Alfred DeGroot in the prac- 
tice of law at Port Richmond and in New York. He was 
elected District Attorney of Richmond County and served 
one term, three years, and declined renomination. In 
December, 1893, he was admitted to practice in Supreme 
Court of the United States. He was a Director in the First 
National Bank of Staten Island for many years and is now 
an Advisory Director in the Corn Exchange Bank. He was 
Counsel to the Board of Police of Richmond County, Board 
of Supervisors, Board of Trustees of New Brighton and Port 
Richmond, and has acted as Counsel for many other public 
corporations, such as : The Staten Island Savings Bank, 
S. R. Smith Infimary, Mariners' Family Asylum, Staten 



76 STATEN ISLAND AND STATEN ISLANDERS 

Island Building, Loan & Savings Association, and Sailors 
Snug Harbor. He is a member of the Staten Island Club. 
He is a Democrat in politics and has been a prominent polit- 
ical speaker in the various campaigns since coming to 
Staten Island. His law firm, DeGroot, Rawson and Staf- 
ford, is one of the oldest, if not the oldest firm, in the City 
of New York. Mr. Rawson resides on Heberton Avenue, 
Port Richmond. 

Mr. Rawson is a public speaker of ability, and is fre- 
quently heard before Staten Island audiences. He takes 
an active interest in all that pertains to the development of 
Staten Island. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Xlll 




SCHOVERLING, DALY AND GALES 

ATHLETIC OUTFITTERS 
302-304 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



MILTON BRADLEY COMPANY 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



New York City Office, 11 East 16th Street 



Other Agencies: Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, San Francisco. 



Manufacturers of Kindgarten Supplies and Primary School Aids. 
Publishers of Kindergarten Guides. Song and Story Books, Water 
Color Paints and School Art Materials a Specialty. Raphia, Reed 
and Other Basketry Goods with Books on this and Other Handwork 
Always in Stock. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



XIV 



ADVEETISEMENTS 



A. E. WOOD 


CHAS. H. HIGBEE 




WATCHMAKER 


GROCERIES 


JEWELER 




161 MAIN ST. 


PRINXE'S BAY 


TOTTENVILLE 
TELEPHONE 103 


M. A. BKOWX 


KUTSCHER'S 


ICE CREAM AND CONEEC- 
TIONERY 


DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

TOMPKINSVILLE 


PLEASANT PLAINS 


TEL. 18l. 


NELLIE ALBERT 


PETER E. 




LOREXZER 


MILLINERY 


PLUMBER 


WEST BRIGHTON 


MARINER'S HARBOR 



LAUNDRY 

FIRST CLASS HAND WORK. 

CHAS. FONG 



7524. AMBOY AVE., 



TOTTENVILLE 



C. H. BRADY 

E^^RYTHING IN MEATS 
AND FISH 

1211 CASTLETON AVE. 
WEST BRIGHTON, - S. I. 



JAMES M. ROBERTS 



GROCER AND BUTCHER 



NEW BRIGHTON 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



XV 



TEL. 41J. W. N. B. 

H. M. VERE, D. D. S. 

West New Brighton^ N. Y. 

GEO. L. EGBERT 
HATS 

TOMPKINSVILLE 

TEL. 485-J. TOMP. 

H. SIMON 

Merchant Tailor 

19 RICHMOND TURNPIKE 
TOMPKINSVILLE, - S. I. 

S. SACKS 

CUSTOM TAILOR 

211 Main Street, 
tottenville, - - - n. y. 

O. S. MANEE 

GROCERIES 
PLEASANT PLAINS 



DR. GEO. A. DOW 

SURGEON DENTIST 

146 Amboy Road, 

TOTTENVILLE, - N. Y. 

MRS. P. 
SCHNEIDER 

SHOES 

gents' furnishing 

GOODS 
PLEASANT PLAINS 

A. GERST 

TAILOR 
West New Brighton 
Telephone 262 W. 

RED FRONT 
CASH GROCERY 

A. & L. Sher 
Main Street, 

TOTTENVILLE 
TEL. 53-M. 

W. J. PENTON 

GROCERIES 
PLEASANT PLAINS 



XVI 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



SCHWEIZER'S 


C. A. SHEA 


MEAT AXD PROVISION 
MARKET 


CIGAR MANUFACTURER 


Pleasant Plains, - - S. I. 


PLEASANT PLAINS, S. I. 


ja:mes w. lee 


HARRY W. PELCHER 


ARCHITECT AND BUILDER 


architect 


TOTTENVILLE 


Port Richmond, - - N. Y. 


E. E. V. 


BENJ. WILLIAMS 


BRAXDENBERG 

DRUGGIST 


REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE 


NEW DORP 


TOTTENVILLE, - N. Y. 


DR. A. D. DECKER 


GRAY B. SULLIVAN 


PHARMACY 


pharmacy 


PLEASANT PLAINS 


WEST NEW BRIGHTON 




E. W. DECKER 


BLASSER'S PHARMACY 


PHARMACIST 


West New Brighton 


MARINER'S HARBOR 



ABVEUTISEMENTS XVll 



H. Traeger 



HIGH-GRADE PIANOS, 
PIANO PLAYER PIANOS, 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 
Terms cash or on easy monthly payments. Allowance made 
on old pianos. Tuning and repairing a specialty. 

PIANO WAREROOM: 

MosEL Ave., near Steuben St., ------ Concord, S. I. 

Two blocks from Grasmere Railroad Station. 
Telephone^ 264 J. Tompkinsville 

Sharrott Brothers 

DEALERS IN 

FLOUR, FEED, HAY, STRAW AND ICE 

PLEASANT PLAINS, S. I. 
Telephone, 55 R. 

COPIES OF 

"STATEN ISLAND 
AND STATEN ISLANDERS ' 

AT NEWS STANDS OR BY MAIL 

RICHMOND BOROUGH ASS'N WOMEN TEACHERS, 

Box 133, New Dorp, S. I. 

JAMES La FORGE 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, FEED, HAY AND STRAW AND 
GRAIN OF ALL KINDS 

warehouse, pleasant plains. 
Branch, Amboy Ave. & Main St., Tottenville, N. Y. 

p. O. ADDRESS, PRINCE BAY, 

RICHMOND BOROUGH, NEW YORK CITY 

TELEPHONES^ 54-J ; RESIDENCE 7-R. 



• • • 



XVlll ADVERTISEMENTS 



C. P. STORBERG 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

GROCER AND BUTCHER 

Headquarters for Elgin Creamery Butter 

Tel. 216-L. 
82-84-86 broadway 
2-4-6-8-10 west union st. 
1-3-5-7 state ST. 

WEST NEW BRIGHTON, - - - STATEN ISLAND 

HENRY ROWOHLT 

CHOICE MEATS, FISH, VEGETABLES AND GROCERIES 

COR. BROADWAY & CASTLETON AVE. TELEPHONE 680 W. B. 

WEST NEW BRIGHTON, S. I. 

CHARLES SCHNEIDER 

DEALER IN 

FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES 

Tel. 60 W. B. 

I671-I673 Richmond Terrace 

Dishes, Glassware and Table Decorations Furnished for 

Weddings, Parties, etc. 



ADVERTISEMENTS XIX 



W. W. MANEE 

JOBBER AND DEALER IN 

STOVES, RANGES, HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS, 
VARNISHES, GLASS, ETC. 

HOUSEFURNISHING GoODS 
AGENT FOR F. W. DEVOE LEAD AND ZINC PAINT 

Amboy Ave., Pleasant Plains. 
Phone 112-r Tottenville. 

H. S. BROWEE 

LICENSED PLUMBER 

Gas, Steam and Hot Water Fitting 

— dealer in — 

STOVES, RANGES AND FURNACES. 

jobbing promptly attended to. 

Telephone 148-j^ Great Kills, S. I. 

OTTO WOEHRLE, 

Heating, Plumbing and Tinsmithing, 

2922-2924 RICHMOND TERRACE, 

Between Union and Central Avenues, 

Mariners Harbor, Staten Island, N. Y. 

TELEPHONE 331j, W. B. 

GENERAL HARDWARE^ ETC. GENERAL HARDWARE^ ETC. 

CONTRACTORS' AND BUILDERS' SUP- 
PLIES. PAINTS AND OILS. 

WINDOW SCREENS GARDEN HOSE 

HOUSE NUMBERS LAWN MOWERS 

SCREEN DOORS SHIP CHANDLERY 

J. C. MULLER'S EMPORIUM 

Bay St., corner Union Place, Stapleton, S. I. 



XX ADVERTISEMENTS 



A. P. SEMLER, PROP. 

SOUTH SHORE COAL CO. 

Grassmere, S. I. 



TELEPHONE 121 WEST BROOKLYN. 

THOMAS F. QUIXLAN 

DEALER IX THE BEST GRADES OF 

COAL AND WOOD 

Yard: Richmond Terrace, adjoining r. r. station. 

West New Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y. 

James Thompson Edward W. Thompson 

Arthur G. Thompson 

JAMES THOMPSON & SONS 

LUMBER AND TIMBER 
Trim, Sash, Doors, Blinds, &c., Masons' Materials 

TEL. CALL 880 TOMPKINSVILLE. 

Stapleton, N. Y. 

L. A. ESSNER, Mgr. Telephone SQ. 

TOTTEXVILLE AUTO GARAGE 

197 Johnson A^^., Tottenyille, N. Y. 

Repairs and Supplies — General Machine Work 
Foreign Cars a Specialty — Marine Engines Overhauled 



ADVERTISEMENTS XXI 



DONGAN HILLS FEED & COAL CO, 

W. B. Stephens, Manager, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Flour, Feed, 
Grain, Oats, Hay, Straw, Salt, Coal, Wood, 
Brick, Lumber, Lime, Cement, Sand and 
Roofing Paper. ..... 

office: buel ave. and Richmond road 

STOREHOUSE AXD YARD: BUEL AVE. AXD RAIT.ROAD, 
DONGAN HILLS, S. I. 



Tel. Calls : Office, 2 1-R, New Dorp ; Residence, 37-L, New Dorp. 



On the New York City Supply List 

THE ALDINE SYSTEM OF TEACHING 

READING 

list no. 

4969 Aldine Primer Grade lA 

4970 Aldine First Reader Grades lA and IB 

4971 Aldine Second Reader Grades 2 A and 2B 

4982 Learning to Read — A Manual for Teachers 

4974 Phonic Cards (23 in set) Grade lA 

4973 Sight Word Cards, Primer Set (89 in set). .Grade lA 

4972 Sight Word Cards, Chart Set (55 in set).. Grade 1A\ 

4975 Rhyme Cards Grade lA 



NEWSON & COMPANY, Publishers, 
27 & 29 West Twenty-third Street, 

NEW YORK CITY. 






XXIV 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




If you wish to secure any 
license to teach in New 
York City, go to one who 
lias helped more than 
2.>()() candidates earn 
success. Correspondence 
courses and class instruc- 
tion. 

HOAV TO PASS 
EXAMINATIONS 

Use the McEvoy Books. 

1. The Science of Education. 
264 pages of condensed matter 
on the essentials of pedagogics. 
Discussions, questions, answers. 
For all city licenses, $2. 

2! Epitome of HistoiS^ and 
Principles of Education. The 
whole subject presented in easy 
form for mastery. Not a mere 
outline nor a bulky text. 266 
pages, $1 board, or 75c. flexible. 

3. Methods in Education. Six 
hundred topics discussed. Based 
upon the New York City Sci- 
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SI. 50. 



T. J. McEvov 



cation. 



4. Examination Manual in 
History and Principles of Edu- 
tlie Xew York Cit\' in all examination for ten vear.s, with 



references to suitable answers. ■?! net. 

5. Examination Manual in Methods of Teaching. Similar to 
1 in form and scope. .9l. net. 

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One-third the book is typical answers. 

7. Part IV. of McEvoy Course. 
License Xo. 1. 75e. 



Similar to 1- in scope. 
$1. net. 

Approved answers for 



SPECL\L OFFERS. 

Books 1. 2. 3. ($4.50). po.stpaid for $4. <1 

The seven books (88.2.5), postpaid for 87. \ 

T. J. McEVOY ^^ 



306 FuLTOx St., 



Ekooktyx", X. Y. 



n 



m 1 7 193S