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Full text of "Statistics of income"

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STATISTICS OF INCOME . . . 1954 



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for 1954 



U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT • INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE 



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Statistics of Income / 1954 




Individual 

INCOME TAX 
RETURNS 



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for 1954 



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Prepared under the direction of the 
Commissioner of Internal Revenue 
by the Statistics Division 



U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



Internal Revenue Service • Publication No. 79 







Boston Public Library 
Superintpri'i''Tit of Documents 



d Mimt58 



S'-" 1 1 19»» 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1957 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. - Price 75 cents (paper cover) 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



Treasvky Department, 
Office or Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 

Washington, D. C, Octoher 22, 1957. 

Sir : In compliance with the provisions of section fil08 of the Internal Rev- 
enue Code of 1954, whicli states that statistics sliall be published annually with 
respect to the operation of income tax laws, I have the honor to submit this re- 
port for Statistics: of Income— 195^, Individiml Income Tax Retiii'mi for I9o4. 
Information relative to sources of income, items of deductions, exemptions, tax 
credits, and tax liability is tabulated by various classitications of income and 
taxpayers. 

Emphasis has been fjiven to several new features of the 1954 Code, such as 
exclusions from gross income for sick pay and dividends, retirement income and 
medical costs for significant age groups, contributions in excess of 20 percent of 
adjusted gross income, and the marital status for a surviving spouse. As the 
amount of taxable income was either reported or computed for each type of 
individual return, it was possible for the first time to classify the returns by the 
size of the tax base and to group them according to the applicable tax rate. 

Respectfully, 

Ri'ssELiv C. Harrington, 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue. 

Honorable Robert B. Anderson, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 



OTHER STATISTICS OF INCOME PUBLICATIONS 

FOR 1954 

Corporations Preliminary Statistics of Income, 1954 — Corporation Income 
Tax Returns 

Income statements, balance sheets, tax, dividends paid; classified 
by major industry groups. Historical summary of total compiled 
receipts, profit or loss, taxes, dividends paid by net income status, 
1950-54. (39 pp., 30fS) 
Statistics oj Income, 1954 — Corporation Income Tax Returns 
Income statements, balance sheets, taxes, dividends paid, tax 
credit. Classifications by industry groups, size of net income, size 
of total assets, accounting periods, accounting and inventory 
valuation methods. Special tables on beginning and ending inven- 
tories of manufacturing and trade corporations, cash dividends 
paid, corporations filing first returns, returns with foreign tax 
credits, Western Hemisphere trade corporations, personal holding 
companies. Historical summary 1945-54. 

Individuals Preliminary Statistics of Income, 1954 — Individual Income 

Tax Returns 

Adjusted gross income, taxable income, income tax liability, 
sources of income, exemptions, tax credits, itemized nonbusiness 
deductions; classified by size of adjusted gross income. Selected 
sources of income by States and Territories. (20 pp., 20^) 

Fiduciaries Statistics of Income, 1954 — Fiduciary Income Tax Returns 

Total income, taxable income, income tax, sources of income, deduc- 
tions, exemptions; classified by size of total income. Selected 
sources of income by States and Territories. Taxable income and 
income tax by size of taxable income. 

Estates Statistics of Income, 1954 — Estate Tax Returns 

Gross estate, deductions, net estate, taxes, and tax credits. Classifi- 
cations by size of gross estate, size of net estate before specific 
exemptions. Selected estate tax data by States and Territories. 
(26 pp., 25fi) 

FOR 1953 



Sole proprietor 
ships 



Partnerships 



(Subjects not included for 1954) 

Statistics of Income for 1953, Part 1, Individual Income Tax 
Returns, Estate Tax Returns, Gift Tax Returns 

Sole proprietorship income, business receipts, net profit or loss. 
Classifications by size of total receipts, industry groups. (138 
pp., 75fS) 
Statistics of Income, 1953 — Partnership Returns 

Partnership receipts, deductions, profit and loss, assets, liabilities. 
Classifications by industry groups, size of ordinary net income or 
deficit, size of total receipts. Frequency of returns by year of 
organization, new or successor business Self-employment income 
and family partnership data. (62 pp., 45(!) 

Statistics of Income, 1953 — Farmers' Cooperative Income Tax 
Returns 

Receipts, deductions, net income or deficit, tax, assets, liabilities, 
special deductions and adjustments. Classifications by size of 
business receipts, size of total assets, net income status. States and 
Territories, type of service performed, exemption status. (42 pp., 
40(S) 
Gifts Statistics of Income for 1953, Part 1, Individual Income Tax 

Returns, Estate Tax Returns, Gift Tax Returns 

Total gifts, exclusions, deductions, net gifts, tax. Classifications 
by size of net gifts, size of total gifts plus gift tax, tax status, type 
of property. (138 pp., 75^) 
Statistics of Income publications are for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. 
Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. 
IV 



Farmers' coop 
eratives 



CONTENTS 

Page 
Introduction 1 

INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS 

Characteristics of the year 5 

Composition of adjusted gross income 8 

Individual income tax provisions for 1954 8 

Returns from which data were tabulated 9 

Marital status of taxpayer 11 

Personal exemptions 11 

Salary exclusions for sick pay 12 

Dividends received 1 

Contributions 15 

Drug and medical costs 17 

Retirement income 17 

Tabulated data 19 

Description of sample and limitations of data 21 

Explanation of classifications and terms 23 

Classification of individual returns 23 

Sources comprising adjusted gross income 24 

Itemized nonbusiness deductions 26 

Exemptions 27 

Measures of individual income 28 

Tax items 28 

Basic tables, 1954: 

1. Number of returns, adjusted gross income, taxable income, and income tax, 

by adjusted gross income classes and classes cumulated 33 

2. Sources of income and loss and nonbusiness deductions, by returns with 

standard or itemized deductions 34 

3. Sources of income and loss and nonbusiness deductions, by adjusted gross 

income classes 35 

4. Sources of income and loss, exemptions, and tax items — all returns, joint 

returns, and other returns, by adjusted gross income classes 36 

5. Itemized nonbusiness deductions, exemptions, and tax items, by adjusted 

gross income classes — returns with itemized deductions 48 

6. Number of returns by size of source and by adjusted gross income classes 50 

7. Number of returns by size of nonbusiness deduction and by adjusted gross 

income classes 55 

8. Taxable income, tax credits, and income tax, by taxable income classes for 

applicable tax rates 56 

9. Adjusted gross income, taxable income, income tax, average tax, and effective 

tax rate, by types of income tax and by adjusted gross income classes 58 

10. Adjusted gross income, exemptions, taxable income, and income tax, by 

marital status of taxpayer, by returns with standard or itemized deduc- 
tions, and by adjusted gross income classes 59 

11. Exemptions by marital status of taxpayer and by adjusted gross income 

(jlasses 65 

12. Capital gains and losses, short- and long-term, and capital loss carryover, 

by adjusted gross income classes 69 

13. Selected sources of income by States and Territories 71 

14. Adjusted gross income and income tax, by States and Territories and by 

adjusted gross income classes 72 

15. Returns with self-employment tax — adjusted gross income and self-employ- 

ment tax, by adjusted gross income classes 75 

16. Returns with self-employment tax — adjusted gross income and self-employ- 

ment tax, by States and Territories 76 

Historical tables, 1945-54: 

17. Number of returns by major characteristics, adjusted gross income, deficit, 

and tax 79 

v 



VI CONTENTS 

Historical tables, 1945-54 — Continued 

18. Returns with income tax — number, adjusted gross income, income tax, and Page 

average tax, by adjusted gross income classes 80 

19. Sources of income by type 81 

20. Selected sources of income by adjusted gross income classes 82 

21. Itemized deductions by type 84 

22. Returns with adjusted gross income — number, adjusted gross income, and 

income tax, by States and Territories 85 

SYNOPSIS OF TAX LAWS 

Income tax: 

A. Requirement for filing return and exemptions 89 

B. Income tax rates 90 

Self-employment tax: 

C. Requirement for filing return and tax rate 91 

FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS, 1954 

Form 1040, Individual Income Tax Return 95 

Form 1040A, Individual Income Tax Return 125 

INDEX 
Alphabetical index 129 



INTRODUCTION 



This is one of several reports issued for StatiKticK of Income — lHoIt in which 
data for Individual Income Tax Returns are published in a separate volume. 
Formerly, statistical data for individual income tax returns were included in 
the annual report, Statistics of Income, Part 1. 

Information in this report was taken from individual income tax returns 
filed for the income year 1954 on Forms 1040, whether long- or short-forms, and 
on Form 1040A, the new card-form for income under $5,000. Althoujih these 
three types of returns varied in form and content, it was possible to integrate 
the data reported on each, so that the tabulations are a complete coverage for 
all individual returns. 

Many new items resulted from changes in the law under the 1954 Code. 
Several of the text tables are devoted to such features. In addition, there are 
sixteen basic tables giving comprehensive data distributed by significant cla.ssi- 
tications. No data were compiled this year from the business schedule V or the 
farm schedule 1040F attached to the return of a sole proprietor. Following 
the basic tables, there are six historical tables with important information as- 
sembled for the most recent 10-year period. 

A brief synopsis of the tax law, relating to individual income under recent 
acts, covering filing requirements, exemptions, income tax and self-employment 
tax rates, follows the statistical tables. 

Facsimiles of Individual Income Tax Returns, Form 1040 and Form 1040A, 
for 1954 are inserted at the end of tlie report. 

On August 21, 1957, a Preliminary Report, Statistics of Income — 19-^lt, In- 
dividual Income Tax Returns was issued containing four tables which are in- 
cluded in this report without change as tables 1, 4, 5, and 13. 

1 



Individual 



Income Tax 



Returns 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



CHARACTERISTICS OF THE YEAR 

The total number of individual income tax returns 
filed for the income year 1954 was 56.7 million, a de- 
crease of over one million from the all-time higji 
filed for 1953. There were 42.6 million returns with in- 
come tax after credits and 14.1 million with no income 
tax liability for 1954. 

Adjusted gross income of $230.2 billion, reported on 
56.3 million returns, was larger than for any previous 
year. This adjusted gross income exceeded that for 
1953 by nearly $400 million, even though there were 
1.1 million fewer 1954 returns with adjusted gross in- 
come. An adjusted gross deficit of $1 billion w^as re- 
ported on over 400 thousand 1954 returns with no ad- 
justed gross income. This deficit was 12 percent less 
than that for the previous year although there was a 
4 percent increase in the number of deficit returns for 
1954. The net amount of adjusted gross income for 
the 56.7 million 1954 returns was $229.2 billion, which 
was about $500 million above the corresponding amount 
for 1953. 

Taxable income, the tax base under the 1954 Code, 
was $115.3 billion on 42.8 million returns, some of which 
had no income tax liability after credits. Unlike 1953, 
the tax base was either reported on or computed for 
each 1954 return. 

Table 4.— NUMBER OF RETURNS, INCOME, DEFICIT, AND TAXES: 1964 AND 1963 









Increase or 


Items 


1954 


1953 
(adjusted) 


decrease 


Number or 
amount 


Percent 


All returns: 










Number of returns 


56,747,008 


57,838,184 


-1,091,176 


-1.9 


Adjusted gross income 

thousand dollars . . 


230,^35,855 


229,863,409 


+372,446 


+ .2 


Adjusted gross deficit 

thousand dollars.. 


1,014,480 


1,155,153 


-140,673 


-12.2 


Self-employiDent tax 

thousand dollars.. 


301,498 


226,614 


+74,884 


+33.0 


Taxable returns: 










Number of returns 


42,633,060 


44,159,622 


-1,526,562 


-3.5 


Adjusted gross income 

thousand dollars.. 


209,668,830 


210,483,602 


-814,772 


-.4 


Income tax thousand dollars . . 


26,665,753 


29,430,659 


-2,764,906 


-9.4 


Nontaxable returns: 










Total number of re turns 


14,113,948 
13,673,644 
20,567,025 


U, 678, 562 
13,256,263 
19,379,607 


+435,386 

+417,381 

+1,187,218 


+3.2 


With adjusted gross income: 

Number of returns 


+3.1 


Adjusted gross income 

thousand dollars.. 


+6.1 


With no adjusted gross income: 

Number of returns 


440,304 


422,299 


+18,005 


+4.3 


Adjusted gross deficit 




thousand dollars.. 


1,014,480 


1,155,153 


-140,673 


-12.2 



Income tax liability for 1954, reported on 42.6 million 
taxable returns, was $26.7 billion after the tax credits 
were deducted. The income tax after credits was 9 
percent, or $2.8 billion, below that for 1953. Several 
reasons contribute to the decrease. Direct causes were 
1.5 million fewer returns with income tax for 1954, lower 



income tax rates than for 1953, and two new tax credits 
granted under the 1954 Code. Other contributing 
causes were liberalized nonbusiness deductions and ex- 
emptions for dependents, and the broadened scope of 
taxpayers entitled to use split-income or the head of 
household rate. 

The total tax credits claimed amounted to $208 million, 
11 percent of which occurred on returns with no in- 
come tax liability after credits, that is, nontaxable re- 
turns. The tax credit for dividends received of $118 
million was reported on 2.5 million returns. This was 
more than two-thirds of the returns showing an amount 
of dividends in adjusted gross income. Retirement in- 
come credit, reported on less than one-half million re- 
turns, amounted to $71.2 million, of which 29 percent 
was on nontaxable returns. The remaining tax credits 
of $18.8 million for foreign tax paid, tax paid at source, 
and for partially tax-exempt interest were practically 
all on taxable returns. 

Self-employment tax imposed on self-employment in- 
come of individuals was reported on 4.2 million returns 
for 1954. The self-employment tax amounted to $301.5 
million, which is about $75 million greater than the self- 
employment tax for 1953. The rate for 1954 was 3 per- 
cent, three-fourths of 1 percent higher than last year. 

In text table A above, there is a comparison of 1954 
and 1953 data for the number of returns, adjusted gross 
income and deficit, income tax, and self-employment 
tax, stating the increase or decrease over 1953. The 
classification of taxable and nontaxable returns was 
based on the presence or absence of an income tax lia- 
bility after credits. The 1953 data in this comparison 
have been adjusted, since this classification for the 1953 
tabulations, as published originally, related to total tax 
liability, i. e., income tax and self-employment tax. 

The alternative income tax for 1954, reported on 
returns in the higher income classes which had a net 
long-tenn capital gain in excess of the net short-term 
capital loss, was $2.4 billion. The number of returns 
with this tax for 1954 was nearly 5,000 greater than the 
number for 1953, and the tax was $400 million greater, 
reflecting the increase in long-term capital gain for 1954. 

The optional tax table was used to determine the in- 
come tax on 33 million returns with adjusted gross in- 
come under $5,000 for 1954. 

Part or all of the income tax on 1954 returns was paid 
under the current taxpayment method by tax withheld 
from wages or by payments on dex?laration of estimated 
tax. These payments amounted to $27.7 billion; how- 
ever, there were tax overpayments to the extent of $3.7 
billion on approximately 35 million returns. Self- 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



employment tax was not paid currently but, if the in- 
come tax was overpaid, no refund was available until 
the self-employment tax was satisfied. Refunds re- 
quested were $3 billion and credit on 1955 estimated tax 
was $700 million. 

Adjusted gross income is a legally defined tei-m and 
the amount may be less than the total of all income re- 
ceived by the taxpayer throughout the year. Three 
major reasons were responsible for this occurrence for 
1954: (1) certain types of income, such as interest re- 
ceived on State and municipal bonds, are tax-exempt, 
(2) specific sources of income, such as salaries and wages, 
dividends received, and long-term capital gain, have 
certain legal limitations which can reduce the amounts 
received when they are included in adjusted gross 
income, and (3) most sources wliich result in a loss, 
instead of a gain or profit, can be subtracted when com- 
puting the composite adjusted gross income. Some of 
the outstanding features of the components of the 1954 
adjusted gross income follow. 

Salaries and wages reported in adjusted gross income 
for 1954 amounted to $186 billion. These salaries and 
wages were exclusive of the wages received under wage 
continuation plans for sickness or injury which, under 
the new Code, are excludable from gross income. Sala- 
ries and wages included in adjusted gross income for 
1954 were $1.8 billion below the amount reported for 
1953, and there were nearly 1 million less returns with 
salaries and wages than there were in the 1953 report. 
The amount of wages excluded from gross income on ac- 
count of sick pay is tabulated in text table E and dis- 
cussed under Salary Exclusions for Sick Pay, page 12. 

Dividends received from corporate stock and included 
in adjusted gross income for 1954 amounted to $7 
billion. This amount, reported on Form 1040, was ex- 
clusive of dividends that qualified for tlie exclusion from 
gross income of dividends up to $50, allowed under the 
new Code to each individual taxpayer (on joint returns, 
up to $100 if both spouses received such dividends). 
The increase of $1.2 billion of dividends in adjusted gross 
income for 1954 over the amount reported for 1953 was, 
to a large degree, the result of a change in method 
of reporting dividends received by beneficiaries from 
estates and trusts and by partners from their partner- 
ships. For 1953, dividends received through partner- 
ships and fiduciaries were reported as income from these 
entities, but for 1954, income that was accorded special 
treatment, such as dividends, retained its character and 
was reported separately. 

Among the 1954 returns under $5,000 adjusted gross 
income, 1 return in 28 had dividends in adjusted gi'oss 
income, while 1 in every 7 returns with adjusted gross 
income of $5,000 or more had dividends. In each case, 
the occurrence is less frequent than in 1953. The re- 
duced frequency of dividend occurrence in 1954 was, to 
some extent, a result of the fact that receipt of divi- 
dends totaling less than the allowable dividend exclusion 
did not enter into tiie composition of adjusted gross 



income. Additional information relating to dividends 
will be found under the section for Dividends Received, 
on pages 12-15. 

The deci-ease of $1 billion in tlie income from estates 
and trusts for 1954 resulted principally from the separa- 
tion of dividends received by beneficiaries from the other 
fiduciary income received. 

Interest received during 1954 income year was $2.4 
billion, an increase of 16 percent over that reported for 
1953. Annuities and pensions for 1954 showed an in- 
crease of $135 million, or 20 percent. 

In determining the income received from businesses, 
partnerships, rents and royalties, sales of capital assets, 
and sales of property other than capital assets, both the 
income and loss from each type of transaction should 
be considered. Combining these positive and negative 
amounts resulted, for 1954, in a business profit, partner- 
ship profit, rent and royalty income, gain from sale of 
capital assets, and a loss from sales of property other 
than capital assets. Both business and partnership 
profits increased for 1954, but the rent and royalty in- 
come showed a slight decrease, as compared with 1953. 
Gain on the sale of all types of capital assets showed an 
exceptionally large increase of 62 percent over 1953. 
The loss from sales of property other than capital assets 
was smaller than for 1953. The net operating loss de- 
duction was 28 percent less than that reported for 1953. 

Standard deduction was elected by taxpayers on 41 
million returns for 1954, or 72 percent of all returns 
filed. However, the proportion of standard deduction 
returns has been decreasing steadily for several years. 

More than two-thirds of the itemized deduction re- 
turns for 1954 had interest paid and 93 percent showed 
a deduction for State and local taxes paid. 

The deduction for contributions amounted to $3.9 
billion which was an increase of more than 9 percent 
over the deduction for 1953. This increase may be at- 
tributable to the increased allowance under the 1954 
Code for contributions and gifts to hospitals, churches, 
and educational institutions, and to tiie contributions de- 
ducted by 1.1 million more persons claiming contribu- 
tions on 1954 returns. A deduction was claimed on 93 
percent of the itemized returns. The allowable deduc- 
tion for contributions in excess of 20 percent of adjusted 
gross income is tabulated in text table H; and other fea- 
tures regarding the extra deduction are stated in tiie text 
under Contributions, page 15. 

Medical expenses were deducted on 8.6 million, or 55 
percent, of the 1954 returns with itemized deductions. 
There were 1.4 million more returns with this deduction 
than in the previous year. The medical deduction for 
1954 amounted to nearly $3 billion, which was an in- 
crease of $600 million, or 24 percent, above the 1953 de- 
duction. The increase was the result of the liberalized 
medical deduction under the 1954 Code which raised the 
amount of maximiun deduction and lowered the ex- 
cluded amount of such expenses from 5 to 3 percent of 
adjusted gross income. The latter enabled more tax- 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



payers to claim the deduction. The average medical 
deduction per return was $344 for the 1954 returns, as 
compared with $330 for the 1953 returns. The entire 
medical costs reported on the 1954 returns are set forth 
later in the text under the section for Drug and Medical 
Costs, together with its accompanying text table I, 
pages 16 and 17. 

The new allowance for child care was claimed on 
272,737 returns and the deduction amounted to $88.7 
million. Casualty losses showed an increase of 13 per- 
cent over the 1953 losses. 

In connection with the claim for retirement income 
credit against the income tax, data relating to the in- 
come of retired persons are available on tlie 1954 re- 
turns. Of the 493,418 persons with this tax credit, more 
than 433,000 were 65 or more yeare of age. Further in- 
formation about retired taxpayers is given in the section 
of the text on Retirement Income and text tables J and 
K, pages 17-19. 

In chart 1, data from returns with adjusted gross in- 
come for 1954 illustrate the proportion of total returns, 
total adjusted gross income, and total income tax which 
was contributed by each of the three following adjusted 
gross income groups : Under $5,000, $5,000 under $10,000, 
and $10,000 or more. 

The lowest income group, adjusted gi'oss income un- 
der $5,000, had 74 percent of all the returns with ad- 
justed gross income, which is one-half of 1 percent less 
than for 1953. Adjusted gross income was 46 percent 
of the total adjusted gross income, or 1 percent less than 



for 1953. Income tax was 28 percent of the total in- 
come tax, or 2 percent less than for 1953. -^ 

The middle income group, adjusted gross income 
$5,000 under $10,000, contributed 22 percent of the re- 
turns with adjusted gross income. Although this is a 
slight increase over the proportion contributed by this 
group for 1953, the number of returns for 1954 actually 
decreased by 120,652. The adjusted gross income was 
35.5 percent of the total, a proportion slightly smaller 
than for the previous year. Income tax was 34.6 per- 
cent of the total income tax, but it is about 1 percent 
below the corresponding tax reported for 1953. 

The highest income group, adjusted gross income 
$10,000 or more, contributed nearly 4 percent of the re- 
turns witli adjusted gross income. This group lias had 
a steady, though small, increase annually since 1949 
in the proportion of returns contributed. There was an 
increase of 127,463 returns for 1954 over 1953. This 
income group accounted for more than 18 percent of the 
adjusted gross income, as compared with less tlian 17 
percent for 1953. The dollar increase in adjusted gross 
income for 1954 was $3.3 billion. The proportion of 
adjusted gross income contributed by this group is the 
largest since 1949. Of the total income tax, this group 
reported over 37 percent, which is nearly 3 percent more 
than the 1953 proportion. However, there was a de- 
crease in tlie 1954 amount of income tax, which was also 
a characteristic of the other two groups. 

For the past few years, the lowest income group, ad- 
justed gross income under $5,000, has continued to show 
a decline in the proportion contributed toward the total 



Chad 1 -RETURNS WITH ADIUSTEO GROSS INCOME, BY INCOME GROUPS, 1954 



Percent of total 
1001 



Percent of total 
1 100 



90 



70 



60 



50 



30 



^^ NUMBER OF RETURNS 

ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME 




^ 



INCOME TAX 
LIABILITY 



^^ 



wmmm . 






80 



70 



50 



40 



30 



UNDER »S,aoo 



(S.OOO UNDER (10,000 
ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME GROUPS 



$10,000 OR MORE 



8 

of each item compared. However, the trend in the pro- 
portion contributed by each of the two higher income 
groups has changed somewhat for 1954. The middle 
income group, adjusted gross income $5,000 under 
$10,000, shows, for the first time since 1949, a decrease 
in the proportion of adjusted gross income and of in- 
come tax. The highest income group, adjusted gross 
income $10,000 or more, shows an increase in the pro- 
portion of adjusted gross income and of tax for the first 
time since 1950. 

COMPOSITION OF ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME 

The principal sources of income comprising adjusted 
gross income for 1954 are shown in chart 2 by their per- 
centage relationship to adjusted gross income. The four 
largest sources— salaries and wages, business, partner- 
ship, and dividends— are allotted separate areas. The 
remaining income, which is grouped together, includes 
interest, annuities and pensions, income and loss from 
estates and trusts, net income and net loss from rents 
and royalties, net gain and the deductible loss from sales 
of capital assets and other property, net operating loss 
deduction, and the other sources as reported in adjusted 
gross income. 

Eighty-one percent of adjusted gross income consists 
of salaries and wages. Business and partnership enter- 
prises together form 11 percent of adjusted gross income 
and dividends contribute 3 percent. The components 
of adjusted gross income for 1954 changed very little 
percentagewise when compared with their respective 
proportion of the 1953 adjusted gross income. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



Chait 2.- COMPOSITION OF ADIOSTEO GROSS INCOME, 


1934 


BUSINESS 1^^ 




SALARIES 


N 


\ 


PARIHERSHIP ^^jp"'llliffli| 


k. 


AND 
WAGES 




\ 


DIVIDENDS^^^jBH 
OTHER IKCOME^^i^^ 




/ 


T 




ei* 


y 


/ 


ADJUSTED GROSS 


1 NCOME 


(net) $229 


BILLION 





INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX PROVISIONS 
FOR 1954 

The Internal Revenue Code of 1954 revised the in- 
ternal revenue laws relating to the individual income 



tax in many respects. Several of these changes affect 
the inclusion and exclusion of income items comprising 
gross income and consequently the amount of adjusted 
gross income to be reported. Nonbusiness deductions 
are altered in some cases and a new deduction is allowed. 
Tax credits in addition to those formerly permitted are 
provided. Definitions of some of the basic concepts are 
revised including that for dependents and a new marital 
status is created. It is not possible to state all of the 
numerous changes, but there are specified below some 
of the important revisions which affect statistical data 
tabulated from individual income tax returns for 1954. 
Income tax provisions of the 1954 Code apply to in- 
come of individuals only with respect to tax years 
beginning after December 31, 1953, and ended after the 
date of enactment, August 16, 1954. 

The amount of gross income for which a return of 
income must be filed by an individual 65 years of age 
or over, unless self-employed, is raised from $600 to 
$1,200. 

The income tax rates applicable to 1954 income are 
lower than those applicable to 1953 income. For years 
beginning after December 31, 1953, two legislative ac- 
tions are effective: (1) The graduated surtax rates were 
reduced slightly by an amendment to the 1939 Code, and 
(2) in the 1954 Code, the 3 percent normal tax and the 
reduced surtax are combined into a single comprehensive 
rate schedule. For 1953 income, the normal tax was 3 
percent and the graduated surtax ranged from 19.2 
percent to 89 percent. For 1954 income, according to 
the amendment to the 1939 Code, the normal tax was 
3 percent and the graduate<l surtax rates were reduced 
so that they ranged from 17 percent to 88 percent. 
However, in the 1954 Code, the two latter sets of rates 
are combined into a single rat© schedule, applicable to 
taxable income, ranging from 20 percent to 91 percent. 

Three new credits against the income tax liability are 
pennitted under the new Code. The retirement income 
credit is equal to 20 percent of the amount of retirement 
income up to $1,200, but cannot exceed the tax otherwise 
due. Credit for dividends received is allowed on returns 
with tax year ended after July 31, 1954, in an amount 
equal to 4 percent of the domestic dividends (after ex- 
clusion) received subsequent to that date; however, the 
credit may not exceed the lesser of the total tax reduced 
by the foreign tax credit or an amount equal to 2 percent 
of taxable income for 1954 (4 percent in subsequent 
years). Tax credit for partially tax-exempt interest 
(allowed only if deductions are itemized) in the amount 
of 3 percent of such interest replaces the prior deduction 
from net income for normal tax purposes. 

The new law eliminates the concept of net income, of 
normal tax net income, and of surtax net income and 
in place of these substitutes taxable income which means 
adjusted gross income less deductions, standard or item- 
ized, and personal exemptions which are now a deduc- 
tion in computing taxable income. 

The new legislation makes changes which affect the 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



inclusion in gross income of amounts received from 
dividends, annuities, prizes and awards, alimony and 
separate maintenance payments, proceeds of life in- 
surance, employee's death benefits, and income earned 
over a period of yeai-s. 

Items specifically excluded from gross income are a 
partial exclusion of qualifying domestic dividends re- 
ceived, amounts received by employees under a wage 
continuation plan for loss of wages due to illness or 
personal injury to the extent of $100 per week, and 
scholai'ship and fellowship grants with certain limita- 
tions. 

The definition of adjusted gross income is modified 
in the case of employees to allow deduction from gross 
income of expenses as outside salesmen and non- 
reimbureed transportation expenses for local travel in 
connection with one's employment. 

A new itemized deduction is granted for a working 
woman or widower for the care of a dependent child 
or stepchild under 12 years of age or of a dependent 
physically or mentally incapable of caring for iiimself. 
The care must be for the purpose of enabling the tax- 
payer to be employed. The deduction is limited to $600. 
In case of a working wife, the deduction is allowed only 
if she files a joint return with her husband and the $600 
limitation is reduced by the amount by which their com- 
bined adjusted gross income exceeds $4,500, except where 
the husband is incapable of self-support. 

The limit on the amount of deduction allowed for 
charitable contributions and gifts is raised under the 
new law by allowing an additional amount equal to 10 
percent of adjusted gross income, if the excess contri- 
butions represent contributions to churclies or tax-ex- 
empt hospitals and educational institutions. 

The new law allows deduction for medical expenses 
that are in excess of 3 percent (formerly 5 percent) of 
adjusted gross income, but permits the inclusion of drugs 
and medicines only to the extent that they exceed one 
percent of adjusted gross income. Also, the limitation 
on the maximum deduction for medical expenses is 
raised to $2,500 per exemption other than age or blind- 
ness, with a maximimi deduction of $5,000 in the case 
of a single person or a married person filing a separate 
return, and a maximum deduction of $10,000 in the case 
of married persons filing a joint return, or of a head of 
household, or of a surviving spouse. 

The qualifications for head of household status are 
broadened to include any taxpayer who supports a de- 
pendent parent even though not living in the taxpayer's 
home, if the taxpayer provides over one-half the co.st of 
the household which is the parent's principal abode. 

The new Code allows a surviving spouse the full bene- 
fit of income splitting for 2 years following the death 
of a spouse, provided he has not remarried and main- 
tains a household as his home which is also the principal 
abode for a child or stepchild for whom tlie taxpayer 
is entitled to tiie $600 deduction for personal exemption. 

The concept of dependent is liberalized in several re- 



spects. The $600 gross income test is eliminated for a 
child or a stepchild who is under 19 years of age or who, 
regardless of age, is a student at an educational institu- 
tion. In addition, the new law adds to the list of those 
who may qualify as a dependent, any person supported 
by the taxpayer whose principal abode is the home of 
the taxpayer and who is a member of the taxpayer's 
household. Also, residents of Panama or the Canal 
Zone may be dependents if they otherwise qualify. 
Two changes in the support test for determining de- 
pendency are introduced. First, in cases where a group 
of taxpayers support a dependent, no one of whom con- 
tributes over one-half of the support, the dependency 
may be assigned to any one of the group who contributes 
over 10 percent of the support, if all other persons who 
contributed more than 10 percent agree in writing that' 
they will not claim the dependent for that year. Second, 
in case of a child or stepchild of the taxpayer, amounts 
received as scholarships will not be taken into account 
in determining whether the taxpayer provided over half 
of the child's support. 

The measurement of business income is modified by 
the more liberalized provisions relating to business de- 
ductions for depreciation, research and experimental ex- 
penses, soil and water conservation expenditures made 
by farmers, loss carryovers, and organizational expenses. 
Also, depletion and related allowances for mining and 
natural resource industries are revised. 

The business enterprise of a sole proprietor may be 
taxed as if it were a corporation when the owner elects 
the option to be so taxed. 

The self-employment tax rate of 3 percent on the 1954 
self-employment income subject to this tax was carried 
into the new Code from the 1939 Code without change ; 
however, this is an increase over the 214 percent rate 
applicable to 1953 self -employment income. 

RETURNS FROM WHICH DATA WERE 
TABULATED 

Individual income tax returns used to compile data 
for this report were unaudited returns and, therefore, do 
not reflect increases nor decreases in tax liability, in- 
come, deductions, or otl\er items reported by the tax- 
payer, that resulted from official audit of returns by tho 
Internal Revenue Service. 

Data were taken from all returns filed by citizens 
and resident aliens, except those with no infonnation 
regarding income and tax data. Returns from which 
data were tabulated included returns of adults and of 
dependent children earning less than $600 who were 
nontaxable but who filed a return to claim refund of 
income tax withheld, although they did not meet the 
income requirement for the filing of a return. Also, 
data were taken from returns of dependent children 
under 19 years of age and dependent students who re- 
ported $600 or more of income, whether taxable or 
nontaxable, which met the requirement for filing. 



10 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



The individual income, tax returns used were Fonns 
1040 and 1040A for the 1954 income year covering 
calendar year returns, fiscal year returns ended within 
the period July 1954 tlirough June 1955, and part year re- 
turns with the greater number of montlis falling in 1954. 
The majority of returns was for the calendar year 1954. 
Tentative returns were not used and amended returns 
were used only if the original returns were excluded. 
Fiscal year and part year returns beginning in 1953, and 
part year returns beginning in 1954 and ending before 
August 17, 1954, were subject to the 1939 Code. The 
1954 Code applies to returns beginning after December 
31, 1953 and ending after August 16, 1954. 

Foi-m 1040A, the new card-form return for 1954, was 
used by employees with less than $5,000 total income 
consisting of wages reported on the Withholding Tax 
Statement, Form W-2, and not more than $100 total 
of other wages, dividends, and interest. Husband and 
wife could file on this form if their combined incomes 
did not exceed these limits. Form 1040A could not be 
used as a separate return of a married pei-son if one 
spouse itemized deductions or if divided community 
income was to be reported. Neither could this return 
form be used by an individual claiming status as head 
of household or as surviving widow or widower. Al- 
though exclusion for sick pay was reported on this card- 
form, no other deduction from salaries and wages could 
be made, such as deductions for transportation and out- 
of-town expenses, reimbursed expenses, or expenses of 
outside salesmen. In repoi"ting other income on this 
form, dividends received from domestic coi-porations up 
to $50 ($100 on joint returns) were excluded but no 
provision was made to report, the amount of the ex- 
clusion. The income tax liability of taxpayers filing 
on this form was determined by the district director of 
internal revenue, on the basis of income reported, from 
the optional tax table applying to 1954 income. The 
tax in this table made allowance for exemptions and the 
standard deduction which takes the place of nonbusiness 
deductions and tax credits. 

Form 1040 for 1954, either the long-form or the short.- 
fonn, was used by individuals who, by reason of the size 
or source of their income, were not permitted to use 
Form 1040A and by individuals who, although eligible 
to use Form 1040A, found it to their advantage to use 
Form 1040. To claim the new tax credit for dividends 
received or for retirement income, it was necessary to 
use Form 1040. 

Individuals with adjusted gross income under $5,000 
from whatever source could elect to use the short-form 
return on which nonbusiness deductions were not re- 
ported, but on wliich allowable expenses in connec-tion 
with the employer's business wei'e deducted from salaries 
and wages. The income tax liability on this short-form 
was determined by the taxpayer from the optional tax 
table on the basis of adjusted gross income. The tax 
table made allowance fqr the standard deduction, ex- 



emptions, and tax credits other than for dividends re- 
ceived and for retirement income, both of which could 
be claimed on the short-fonn return. Individuals with 
adjusted gross income under $5,000 who wished to claim 
nonbusiness deductions in excess of the standard deduc- 
tion or to claim tax credits other than dividends received 
and retirement income used the long-form return and 
itemized their deductions, deducted their exemptions, 
and computed the taxable income. 

Individuals with adjusted gross income of $5,000 or 
more used the long-form return, claimed their exemp- 
tions, and computed their taxable income. In comput- 
ing the taxable income, tlie taxpayer could elect to use 
the standard deduction rather than to itemize non- 
business deductions. If he so elected, the standard 
deduction was the smaller of $1,000 or an amount equal 
to 10 percent of the adjusted gross income, except that, 
in the case of a married person filing a separate return, 
the standard deduction was $500. The standard deduc- 
tion was not allowed on a separate return of husband or 
wife if the taxable income of the other spouse was com- 
puted by using itemized deductions. When the standard 
deduction was used, only the two tax credits for divi- 
dends rex-eived and retirement income could be claimed. 

Individuals who used the long-form return, regard- 
less of the amount of adjusted gi-oss income, computed 
their income tax liability based on taxable income, by 
using the income tax rates from the tax rate schedule 
applicable to their marital status and claiming the rele- 
vant tax credits. 

Facsimiles of the 1954 individual income tax returns, 
Forms 1040 and 1040A, are placed at the close of this 
report, pages 95-127. 

In text table B below, the number of individual re- 
turns for 1954 is tabulated to show the volume of re- 
turns filed on the different forms, whether they had 
standard deduction or itemized deductions, and the di- 
vision between taxable and nontaxable returns. Of the 
56.7 million returns filed, 41 million, or 72.3 percent, had 
the standard deduction and the remainder itemized non- 
business deductions. Compared with 1953, the number 
with standard deduction decreased approximately 3 per- 
cent and the number with itemized deductions increased 
about 3 percent. 

The total number of long-form returns was 23.6 mil- 
lion. On these the taxpayer computed the income tax 
on the basis of his taxable income. Among these re- 
turns, 7.9 million showed that the taxpayer elected to 
use the standard deduction in computing his taxable 
income. 

The optional tax table applicable to total income un- 
der $5,000 was used to determine the income tax on 13.2 
million returns. Form 1040A, and on 19.9 million short- 
form returns. Form 1040, making a total of 33.1 million 
returns, or 58.4 percent of all returns filed for 1954. 
The optional tax was used on a smaller percentage of 
returns than last year. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



11 



T»blo B.— NUMBER OF RETURNS BV FORM OF RETURN AND BV TAXABLE AND NONTAXABLE 

RETURNS 



Tubls C— NUMBER OF RETURNS, ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME, AND TAXABLE INCOME BV 
MARITAL STATUS OF TAXPAYER 



Form of return 


Total 


Taxable 


Nontaxable 




56,747,008 


42,633,060 


14,113,943 




Standard deduction: 


13,248,741 
19,839,855 

7,906,817 


8, -^6,301 
12,263,724 

7,361,205 


4,452,440 
7,626,131 

45 612 


Short-form lOiO with adjusted gross income. . . . 
Long-form 1040 with adjusted gross income 








41,045,4U 


28,921,230 








Itemized deductions (long-form): 
Returns with adjusted gross income under 


9,013,125 
6,688,470 


7,091,244 
6,620,586 


1,921,881 
67,884 


Returns with adjusted gross income $5,000 or 




Total 


15,701,595 


13,711,830 


1,939,765 



MARITAL STATUS OF TAXPAYER 

Among the individual returns for 1954, there were 
3-1.6 million returns filed jointly by husband and wife. 
This group formed nearly 61 percent of all the returns. 
Also, there were 2.3 million returns filed by married 
persons who reported their respective income and 
claimed their own exemptions on a return separate from 
that of the other spouse. This marital group formed 
only 4 percent of the total returns. 

Single persons who did not claim status as head of 
household or surviving spouse filed 18.7 million returns 
for 1954, which was 33 percent of all returns. This was 
the second largest group of returns among the five mari- 
tal gi'oups. The remaining 2 percent of returns for 
1954 were filed by unmarried individuals, 1.1 million 
of whom claimed head of household status and nearly 
64,000 others who claimed status as surviving widow or 
widower. 

Seventy-seven percent of the total adjusted gross in- 
come (net) was reported on joint returns, and another 
18 percent was reported on returns of single persons not 
claiming head of household or surviving spouse status. 
The joint returns showed the taxable income (tax base) 
to be slightly less than half of the adjusted gross income 
reported on them, while in all other marital groups, the 
tax base was more than one-half of the adjusted gross 
income. The taxable income is all inclusive inasmuch 
as this item was computed for returns where it was not 
reported. 

Text table C shows the number of returns, amount of 
adjusted gross income, and taxable income for each 
marital status group. These data were taken from Part 
I of basic table 10. For tabulating purposes, the class- 
ification of marital status of taxpayer was determined 
with regard to such items as the listing of a spouse's 
name, exemption claimed for taxpayer and/or wife, sig- 
natures of husband and wife, and particularly the check 
mark for head of household or surviving widow or wid- 
ower, along with any other pertinent data supplied by 
the taxpayer. Each of the five classifications for mari- 
tal status of taxpayer is described under Marital Status 
Classification on pages 23-24. 

The marital classification was used in the distribution 
of data in basic tables 4, 8, 10, and 11, the last two of 

445805 O -57 -Z 





Returns 


Adjusted 

gross income 

less deficit 

(Thouwand 

dolt»rmJ 


Taxable 


Marital status of taxpayer 


Number 


Percent 
of 
total 


Income 

(Thoaaand 
dollmra) 


Joint returns of husbands and wives... 
Separate returns of husbands and wives 
Returns of heads of household 


34,568,482 
2,298,981 

1,089,440 
63,920 

18,726,185 


60.9 

4.1 

1.9 

.1 

33.0 


176,477,817 

6,203,322 

4,34^,178 

270,242 

41,925,806 


86,038.569 

3,239,780 

2,450,458 

145,238 


Returns of single persons not heads of 
household or surviving spouse 


23,457,155 


Total 


56,747,008 


100.0 


229,221,375 


115,331,301 







which show all five marital groups separately. Table 
8 shows certain of the marital gi-oups combined accord- 
ing to the applicable income tax rate. 

Both basic tables 10 and 11 show that there were 
nearly 64,000 persons who claimed status as surviving 
spouse. However, examination of data for returns of 
surviving spouse in table 11, relative to the distribution 
of returns by number of exemptions other than age or 
blindness, reveals that among the individuals who 
claimed marital status as surviving spouse, there are 
27,513 persons who had only one exemption otiier than 
age and blindness. This would indicate that during 
the first year in which the surviving spouse status was 
allowed, a considerable number of individuals misunder- 
stood the requirement that, to qualify there must be at 
least one child or stepchild dependent for whom the 
taxpayer is entitled to a deduction for personal exemp- 
tion of $600. None of these 27,513 persons had a de- 
pendent according to their return. It is problematical 
whether these individuals could have qualified for head 
of household status and its special tax rate, or whether 
they were single persons not entitled to any special tax 
rate. Since the 27,513 persons claimed surviving spouse 
status and computed their income tax by the split-in- 
come niethod allowed for that status, data for them are 
tabulated among data for returns having the split-in- 
come tax rate along with othere claiming this marital 
status, in Part I of basic table 8. 

PERSONAL EXEMPTIONS 

A total of 155.5 million pei-sonal exemptions were 
claimed on the 56.7 million individual income tax re- 
turns for 1954. These personal exemptions were ex- 
emptions for the taxpayer and, on joint returns, his 
spouse, exemptions for dependents, and the additional 
exemptions for age and blindness. A resume of exemp- 
tions is given on pages 27-28. Below in text table D, the 
number of each type of exemption claimed is presented 
by the five classifications for marital status of taxpayer. 

There were 91.3 million exemptions for the taxpayer 
and, on joint returns, his wife who is generally con- 
sidered a taxpayer; 58.2 million exemptions for de- 
pendents; and 6 million additional exemptions for age 
and blindness of taxpayer, including those for the 
spouse on joint returns. 

Of the 58.2 million exemptions for dependents, 50 
million, or 87 percent, were claimed on joint returns of 



12 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



husbands and wives. Other married persons filing sep- 
arate returns claimed 1.6 million dependents. 

Among the unmarried taxpayers, heads of households 
claimed 1.1 million dependents, surviving widows and 
widowers claimed 62,263, and other single persons 
claimed nearly 5 million dependents. Although exemp- 
tions for 27,513 individuals who claimed surviving 
spouse status without a dependent are tabulated in that 
marital group (as previously explained), it has no ef- 
fect on the number of dependents in this or any other 
group, since they did not have a dependent. 

As compared with the 1953 report, the number of 
dependents increased by 1.7 million in 1954. However, 
exemptions for age and blindness decreased, as did the 
taxpayer exemptions. 

Table D.— NUMBER OF EXEMPTIONS BV MARITAL STATUS OF TAXPAYER AND BY TYPE OF 

EXEMPTION 





Total 
number of 
exemptions 


Number of exemptions for — 


Marital status of taxpayer 


Taxpayer 


Age and 
blindness 


Dependents 


Joint retui-ns of husbands and wives. 
Separate returns of husbands and 


123,675,873 

4.011,966 

2,253,758 

148,616 

25,404,216 


69,136,964 

2,298,981 

1,089,440 

63,920 

18.726,185 


4,104,404 

79,590 
58,497 
22,433 

1,719,631 


50,434,505 


Returns of heads of household 


1,105,821 
62 263 


Returns of single persons not heads 
of household or surviving spouse... 


4,958,400 


Total 


155,494,429 


91,315,490 


5,984,555 


58,194,384 



SALARY EXCLUSIONS FOR SICK PAY 

The 1954 Code specifically exempts from the income 
tax amounts received, as wages or in place of wages, 
under a continuation plan for the period during which 
an employee was absent from work on account of per- 
sonal injury or sickness. The tax-exempt amount could 
not exceed a weekly rate of $100, unless the plan was 
one to which the employee had contributed, then 
amounts received which were attributable to his contri- 
bution were excluded without limit. In case of sickness, 
a special rule disallowed tax exemption of amounts re- 
ceived for the first 7 days of illness unless the employee 
was hospitalized at least 1 day any time during the 
period of absence from work on account of sickness. 

Each taxpayer was required to report his gross salary 
and wages and to give sufficient information to substan- 
tiate his claim for the sick-pay exclusion deducted from 
gross wages. The exclusion could be claimed on either 
Form 1040 or 1040A. 

In order to register the amount of sick pay excluded 
on account of this new provision, it was necessary to use 
an item not included in adjusted gross income. The 
excludable portion of wages received as sick pay was 
tabulated especially for this purpose. Text table E 
shows the amount of salary exclusion for sick pay in 
connection with the amount of salaries and wages en- 
tering into the composition of adjusted gross income, 
and the total salaiies and wages received. This table, 
by adjusted gross income classes corresponding to those 
in basic tables, also shows the number of taxable and 
nontaxable returns on which a sick-pay exclusion was 
claimed. 



There are 928,628 returns witli sick-pay exclusions 
amounting to $352 million deducted from gross salaries 
and wages. The exclusion was about two-tenths of 1 
percent of gross salaries and wages. Over one-half of 
the sick-pay exclusion was reported on returns with ad- 
justed gross income under $5,000. 

Tsble E.— SALARY EXCLUSIONS FOR SICK PAY BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 





Total 
salaries 
and wages 
received 

( 7h<xiaand 
dolUrat 


Salary exclusions for 
sick pay 


Salaries and 
wages (after 


Adjusted gross income classes 


Number 

of 
returns 


Amount 
( Jhoumand 
dallara) 


exclusions) 

(Thcuaand 
doltmr»i 


Taxable returns: 


996,636 
2,794,266 
3,763,445 
6,156,387 

8,564,533 
11,375,575 
13,974,643 
15,496,086 
15,653,723 

25,547,907 

19,561,328 

13,141,984 

8,437,226 

5,497,754 

9,330,721 
3,085,244 
2,936,768 
2,272,765 
1,553,979 

375,784 

120,404 

142,357 

17,011 

6,110 


3,524 
11,520 
18,579 
40,623 

55,198 
67,229 
84,780 
84,905 
69,168 

129,219 
103,260 
69,259 
48,074 
26,150 

38,355 
8,006 
6,345 
3,548 
1,763 

331 
83 
92 
6 

2 


1,086 
2,087 
8,010 
12,083 

16,140 
20,173 
26,494 
31 ,066 
19,199 

45,119 
36,894 
27,464 
15,825 
8,557 

17,614 
4,795 
4,341 
2,723 
1,609 

288 
73 

115 
9 
2 


995,550 


$1,000 under $1,500 

$1 500 under $3 000 ... 


2.792,179 
3,755,435 


$2,000 under $2,500 


6,144,304 
8,548,393 


$3,000 under $3.500 


11,355,402 
13,948,149 


$i,000 under $i,500 


15,465,020 
15,634,524 


$5 000 under $6 000 


25,502,788 




19,524,4X 


$7,000 under $8,000 

$8,000 under $9,000 

$9 000 under $10 000 


13,114,520 
8,421,401 
5,489,197 




9,313,107 


$15 000 under $20 000 


3,080,449 




2,932,427 


$30 000 under $50 000 


2,270,042 




1,552,370 


$100 000 under $150 000 


375,496 




120,331 


$200 000 under $500 000 


142,242 




17,002 




6,108 






Total taxable returns 


170,802,636 


870,019 


301 ,'766 


170,500,870 


Nontaxable returns: 


160,869 

1,146,887 
967,178 
1,647,731 
2,123,116 
1,977,245 

2,103,467 

1,931,186 

1,561,500 

874,048 

497,190 

354,653 
141,053 
(M 
11,425 


(M 
5,558 
5,512 
5,995 
5,984 
6,013 

9,512 
5,995 
6,006 
3,017 

(M 

(M 


9,205 
4,645 
6,029 
4,556 
2,363 

10,308 
2,290 
3,785 
2,153 

(M 
(') 


157,697 


Under $600 

$600 under $1 000 


1,137,682 
962,533 


$1,000 under $1,500 

$1 500 under $2,000 


1,641,702 
2,118,560 


$2,000 under $2,500 

$2 500 under $3 000 


1,974,882 
2,093,159 




1,928,896 


$3 500 under $^ 000 


1,557,715 


$A,000 under $4,500 

$4 500 under $5 000 


871,895 
497,136 




352,892 




141,053 




(M 


$10,000 or more 


11,425 


Total nontaxable returns 


15,502,074 


58,609 


50,321 


15,451,753 


Grand total 


186,304.710 


928,628 


352,087 


185,952,623 




93,765,711 
92,538,999 


492,135 
436,493 


184,898 
167,189 


93,580,813 




92,371,810 







See text for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 
^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. 
However, this value is included in each total. 

DIVIDENDS RECEIVED 

Two special tabulations were prepared to show the de- 
tails concerning dividends reported on individual re- 
turns, Form 1040, for 1954. The new features, provided 
under the 1954 Code for a partial exclusion of dividends 
and for a tax credit for dividends received, necessitated 
the reporting of information not required in previous 
years. 

The new Code provides that, for any tax year ended 
after July 31, 1954, gross income does not include 
amounts received by an individual as dividends from 
domestic corporations to the extent that the dividends 
do not exceed $50. In case the dividends exceed $50, the 
exclusion applies to the dividends first received in the 
tax year. The exclusion, however, does not apply to div- 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



13 



idends received from domestic corporations whose earn- 
ings are not fully taxable. 

Although dividend exclusions could be taken regard- 
less of the return form used, the amount of exclusion 
was not reported on Form 1040A. If husband and wife 
filed a joint return of income, the exclusion applied sep- 
arately to the dividends received by each as an individ- 
ual taxpayer. 

A credit against the income tax for dividends received 
is also allowed under the new law. The tax credit is 
allowed only for tax years ended after July 31, 1954, 
and only with respect to qualifying dividends received 
from domestic corporations after that date and included 
in gross income. Credit was allowed to the extent of 4 
percent of such dividends, provided this credit did not 
exceed the lesser of the total income tax reduced by for- 
eign tax credit, or 2 percent of taxable income. It was 
obligatory to file Form 1040, either long- or short-form, 
to claim benefit of this tax credit. 



Taxpayers filing Form 1040 were required to report 
domestic dividends qualifying for the exclusion in two 
categories: those re<'eived before August 1, 1954, and 
those received after July 31, 1954. Qualifying dividends 
received through fiduciaries and partnerships were in- 
cluded, a new feature of dividend reporting. The divi- 
dend exclusion of $50, or $100 for joint income of 
husband and wife, was first applied to the early receipts 
and, if sucli dividends were insufficient, the remaining 
exclusion was then applied to tlie late receipts. If the 
taxpayer's dividend receipts totaled less than the maxi- 
mum exclusion, they were nevertheless reported and the 
exclusion applied to that extent. Domestic dividends 
received after July 31, 1954, reduced by the applicable 
exclusions were eligible for the tax credit for dividends 
received. Foreign dividends and certain domestic divi- 
dends did not qualify for the exclusion nor for the tax 
credit. These were reported independently and com- 
bined with the dividends after exclusions to obtain the 
amount of dividends reported in adjusted gross income. 



Table F.— DIVIDENDS ELIGIBLE FOR EXCLUSIONS AND TAX CREDIT FOR DIVIDENDS RECEIVED, BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 



Adjusted gross income classes 



Total dividends eligible 
exclusions 



Number of 
returns 



f Thatittnd 
dolUrs) 



Total 
exclusions 



(Thauaand 
dolUes) 



Received before Aug. 1, 195'i 



Number of 
returns 



(ITioutand 
dallarMj 



Exclusions 



(Thousand 
dollara) 



Number of 
returns 



Received after July 31, 1?^ 
[eligible for tax credit) 



(Thousand 
dollara) 



Exclusions 



( Thousand 
dollara) 



Tax credit for 
dividends received 



Number of 
returns 



Amount 
(Thousand 



Taxable returns: 

$600 under $1,000... 
$1,000 under $1,500. 
$1,500 under $2,000. 
$2,000 under $2,500. 

$2,500 under $3,000. 
$3,000 under $3,500. 
$3,500 under $4,000. 
$4,000 under $4,500. 
$4,500 under $5,000. 



$5,000 under $6,000.. 
$6,000 under $7,000. . 
$7,000 under $8,000.. 
$8,000 under $9,000.. 
$9,000 under $10,000. 



$10,000 under $15,000. . 
$15,000 under $20,000.. 
$20,000 under $30,000.. 
$30,000 under $50,000.. 
$50,000 under $100,000. 



$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000. . . 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total taxable returns. 



Nontaxable returns: 

No adjusted gross income. 



Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500.. 
$1,500 under $2,000.. 
$2,000 under $2,500.. 

$2,500 under $3,000.. 
$3,000 under $3,500.. 
$3,500 under $4,000.. 
$4,000 under $4,500.. 
$4,500 under $5,000.. 

$5,000 under $6,000.. 
$6,000 under $8,000. . 
$8,000 under $10,000. 
$10,000 or more 



Total nontaxable returns. 
Grand total 



Returns under $5,000... 

Returns $5,000 or more. 



(1) 



(2) 



(3) 



(4) 



(5) 



(6) 



(7) 



(8) 



(9) 



(10) 



20,555 
38,750 
72,740 
95,496 

1117370 
138,280 
160,776 
167,086 
163,187 

337,472 
311,092 
269,775 
198,953 
170,136 



458 
202 

187, 

121 

59 



296 
',299. 
,714 

465 

t «» . 
0,605 
2,993 
3,067 
420 
196 



7,963 
15,048 
40,855 
55,055 

^3,947 

75,962 
88,217 
105,745 
125,337 

\ 188,957 
195,880 
252,394 
177,726 
151,760 

723,653 
524,108 
778,880 
863,074 
991,328 

S 4U,^70 
197, ICK 
367,931 
139,075 
197,965 



990 
1,699 
3,563 
4,677 

5,913 
6,912 
8,410 
8,660 

9,013 

17,876 
17,312 
16,472 
12,358 
10,721 

30,269 
14,089 
13,325 
9,280 
4,807 

891 

252 

257 

34 



19,055 
35,783 
69,193 
87,916 

101,846 
129,211 
146,651 
151,983 
154,647 

309,706 
290,860 
248,584 
186,278 
159,481 

429,407 
190,751 
176,181 
115,684 
57,603 

10,403 

2,948 

3,016 

420 

193 



4,440 

7,788 

23,203 

30,352 

32,865 
41,025 
47,345 
59,962 
70,040 

102,431 
106,762 
136, 501 
92,758 
TO, 046 

387,464 
276,670 
407,858 
442,826 
497,622 

207,285 
95,847 

176,357 
64,655 
88,559 



878 

1,490 
3,260 
4,080 

5,080 
6,012 
7,074 
7,253 
7,669 

14 ,941 
14,522 
13,704 
10,403 
9,205 

26,467 
12,595 

12,059 
8,567 
4,546 

857 

245 

251 

34 

14 



18,555 
34,744 
62,690 
85,399 

100,870 
127,679 
141,075 
143,437 
147,093 

305,263 
276,839 
249,650 
183,212 
154,352 

425,311 
189,717 
176,292 
116,021 
57,620 

10,411 

2,941 

3,029 

412 

195 



3,523 

7,260 

17,652 

24,703 

26,082 
34,937 
40,872 
45,783 
55,297 

86,526 
89,118 
115,893 
84,968 
72,714 

336,219 
247,438 
371,022 
420,248 
493,706 

206,485 
101,257 
191,624 
74,420 
109,406 



112 
209 
303 
597 

833 

900 
1,336 

1,407 
1,344 

2,935 
2,790 
2,768 
1,955 
1,516 

3,802 

1,494 

1,266 

713 

261 



{') 



15,522 
25,218 
51,593 
69,824 

82,739 

104,557 
101,328 
111,240 
111,891 

214,267 
203,389 
188,357 
145,465 
118,933 

362,617 
171,197 
164,555 
111,2X 
56,531 

10,276 

2,901 

2,974 

395 

185 



3,302,763 



6,736,814 



3,077,800 



3,012,807 



3,257,153 



26,588 



2,427,188 



29,841 

31,261 
58,842 
87,648 
69,873 
54,439 

36,413 
25,413 
11,118 
6,081 
5,040 

5,052 
3,029 
{') 
1,604 



16, 561 

8,393 
22,605 
43,417 
40,836 
37,370 

33,160 
25,575 
13,042 
5,809 
7,555 

7,540 

9,141 

17,525 



1,766 

1,483 
2,875 
4,632 
3,660 
3,028 

2,124 

1,465 

745 

533 

287 



i') 



371 

227 



26,292 

30,245 
55,319 

77,049 
64,826 
51,954 

35,424 
24,372 
10,618 
6,081 
5,040 

4,552 
2,540 
(') 
1,532 



9,919 

4,806 
12,882 
24,369 
23,908 
21,360 

18,865 
13,183 
7,488 
3,070 
4,150 

3,556 
4,432 
(=) 
8,681 



1,545 

1,214 
2,561 
4,042 
3,363 
2,735 

1,942 

1,300 

682 

495 

281 



(^) 



335 
173 



21,652 

26,256 
49,824 
72,684 
60,899 
46,858 

31,379 
22,366 
11,118 
5,081 
5,040 

5,052 
3,029 
(^) 
1,536 



6,642 

3,592 
9,723 
19,048 
16,928 
16,010 

14,295 

12,392 

5,554 

2,739 

3,405 

3,984 
4,709 
P) 
8,844 



269 
314 
590 
297 
293 

182 
165 
63 
38 
6 



(') 
7,040 
19,692 
12,152 

10,135 
9,135 
5,098 
3,048 

i') 

2,551 



426,177 



289,505 



396,367 



161,021 



363,297 



128,484 



2,538 



72,615 



221,116 



3,474,167 



191,990 



3,376,104 



3,385,637 



29,126 



2,499,803 



1,384 809 
2,344,136 



827,457 
6,198,862 



72,435 
148,681 



1,283,505 

2,190,662 



461,020 
3,179,662 



62,956 
129, OX 



1,214,699 
2,161,405 



366,437 
3,019,200 



9,479 
19,647 



743,707 
1,756,096 



(11) 



58 
151 
424 
657 

799 
1,241 
1,210 
1,894 
1,791 

2,992 
3,202 
4,026 
3,140 
2,639 

13,064 
9,472 
14,142 
16,017 
17,999 

7,293 
3,397 
6,163 
2,069 
2,962 



{') 



195 

157 
113 

116 

186 

71 

199 



(') 



1,222 



9,373 
108,651 



See text for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 

'Less than $500. 

'Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value i 



s included in each total. 



14 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



Table Q,— DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN DIVIDENDS RECEIVED \KD DIVTDENDS ELIGIBLE AND INELIGIBLE FOR EXCLUSIONS, BV ADJUSTED GR06S INCOME CLASSES 



Adjusted gross income classes 



Total domestic and foreign 
dividends received 



Nuiiibci' of 
returns 



(Thousand 
dDllarai 



vidends eligible 
exclusions 



Dividends not eligible for 
exclusions or credit 



Number of 
returns 



(Thousand 
dollara) 



Total 
exclusions 



(Thouand 
dotlara) 



Number of 

returns 



( Thousand 
doltara) 



Dividends 
(after exclusions) 



Number of 
returns 



( Thousand 
dollar aj 



(1) 



U) 



(3) 



M 



(5) 



(6) 



(V) 



(8) 



(J) 



Taxable returns: 

$600 under $1,000. 

$1,00© under $1,500.. 
$1,500 under $2,000.. 
$2,000 under $2,500.. 

$2,500 under $3,000.. 
$3,000 under $3,500.. 
$3,500 under $4,000.. 
$.4,000 under $4,500.. 
$4,500 under $5,000.. 

$5,000 under $6,000.. 
$6,000 under $7,000.. 
$7,000 under $8,000.. 
$8,000 under $9,000.. 
$9,000 under $10,000. 



$10,000 under $15,000.. 
$15,000 under $20,000.. 
$20,000 under $30,000.. 
$30,000 under $50,000.. 
$50,000 under $100,000. 



$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



23,623 
47,275 
86,386 
102,006 

129,472 
155,353 
174,866 

187,705 
191,770 

367,603 
341,138 
287,906 
214,538 
180,686 

475,217 
207,926 
190,958 
123,144 
59,913 

10,658 

3,007 

3,074 

426 

197 



8,915 
18,546 
46,395 
58,147 

62,986 
81,019 
92,553 
111,919 
134,822 

200,65] 
204,990 
257,265 
184,334 
156,553 

742,747 
534,030 
792,345 
875,692 
1,010,783 

421,093 
200,735 
375,280 
143,053 
203,012 



20,555 
38,750 
72,740 
95,496 

111,970 
138,280 
160,776 
167,086 
163,187 

337,472 
311,092 
269,775 
198,953 

170,136 

458,445 
202,296 

187,299 

121,714 

59,465 

10,605 

2,993 

3,067 

420 

196 



7,963 
15,CK8 
40,855 
55,055 

58,947 
75,962 
88,217 
105,745 
125,337 

188,957 
195,880 
252,394 
177,726 
151,760 

723,683 
524,108 
778,880 
863,074 
991,328 

413,770 
197,104 
367,981 
139,075 
197,965 



990 
1,699 
3,563 
4,677 

5,913 
6,912 
8,410 
8,660 
9,013 

17,876 
17,312 
16,472 
12,358 
10,721 

30,269 

14,089 

13,325 

9,280 

4,807 

891 

252 

257 

34 

14 



5,602 
10,003 
15,153 
13,526 

22,025 
24,640 
22,178 
28,221 
32,100 

43,752 
45,734 
26,706 

24,717 
20,181 

42,973 
21,013 
20,884 
15,438 
10,484 

2,408 
844 



952 
3,498 
5,540 
3,092 

4,039 
5,057 
4,336 
6,174 
9,485 

11,694 
9,116 
4,871 
6,608 
4,793 

19,064 
9,922 
13,465 
12,618 
19,455 

7,323 
3,631 

7,299 
3,978 
5,047 



22,123 
42,752 
74,769 
92,894 

121,420 
142,266 
150,691 
165,059 
172,643 

307,240 
286,674 
236,609 
184,722 
153,896 

421,750 
191,953 
179,527 
118,634 
58,885 

10,530 

2,975 

3,060 

425 

197 



7,925 
16,847 
42,832 
53,470 

57,073 
74,107 
84,143 
103,259 
125,809 

182,775 
187,684 
240,793 
171,976 
145,832 

712,478 
519,941 
779,020 
866,412 
1,005,976 

420,202 
200,483 
375,023 
U3,019 
202,998 



Total taxable returns. 



Nontaxable returns: 

No adjusted gross income. 



3,302,763 



6,736,814 



449,840 



6,720,077 



Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500.. 
$1,500 under $2,000.. 
$2,000 under $2,500.. 

$2,500 under $3,000.. 
$3,000 under $3,500.. 
$3,500 under $4,000.. 
$4,000 under $4,500.. 
$4,500 under $5,000.. 

$5,000 under $6,000.. 
$6,000 under $8,000.. 
$8,000 under $10,000. 
$10,000 or more 



35,896 

46,216 
84,412 
114,181 
98,673 
64,863 

45,444 

30,925 

13,624 

6,581 

6,074 

5,541 
3,529 

(M 

1,618 



18,732 

11,661 
31,851 
53,290 
56,276 
43,531 

39,660 
28,829 
15,592 
5,932 
9,263 

7,905 
9,476 
(M 
18,092 



29,841 

31,261 
58,842 
87,648 
69,873 
54,439 

36,413 

25,413 

11,118 

6,081 

5,040 

5,052 
3,029 
(M 
1,604 



16,561 

8,398 
22,605 
43,417 
40,836 
37,370 

33,160 

25,575 

13,042 

5,803 

7,555 

7,540 
9,141 
(M 
17,525 



1,766 

1,483 
2,875 
4,632 
3,660 
3,028 

2,124 

1,465 

745 

533 

287 



(M 



371 
227 



7,063 

15,443 
27,110 
28, 523 
34,823 
13,947 

10,548 
6,570 

4,495 

(M 
(M 

(M 
(M 
(M 



2,171 

3,263 
9,246 
9,873 
15,440 
6,161 

6,500 
3,254 
2,550 

(M 
(M 

{') 

(M 
(M 



29,849 

44,239 
84,412 
114,141 
93,712 
60,768 

42,893 
26,816 
13,624 
6,581 
6,074 

5,541 
3,529 
(M 
1,611 



16,966 

10,178 
28,976 
48,658 
52,616 
40,503 

37,536 

27,364 

14,347 

5,449 

8,976 

7,534 
9,249 
(1) 
17,992 



Total nontaxable returns. 



558,100 



351,111 



426,177 



289,505 



23,322 



152,172 



61,606 



534,313 



327,789 



7,268,982 



3,728,945 



7,026,319 



602,012 



3,681,007 



7,047,866 



Returns under $5,000... 
Returns $5,000 or mor.-. 



1,645,345 
2,477,604 



929,969 
6,339,0U 



1,384,809 
2,344,136 



827,457 
6,198,362 



72,435 
148,681 



323,504 
278,508 



102,512 
140,151 



1,507,726 
2,173,281 



857,534 
6,190,332 



See text for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 

^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. 



However, this value is included in each total. 



Tabulated data pertaining to dividends had to be 
limited to information reported on returns, Form 1040. 
On the Form 1040A, the amount of dividends after the 
exclusion was included in "other income," and the 
amount of the exclusion was not reported. 

In text table F, the number of returns, amoimt of 
dividends eligible for exclusions, and the amount of 
exclusions, are tabulated for all dividends eligible for 
the exclusion, as well as for dividends received before 
August 1, 1954, and for those received after July 31, 
1954. Since dividends received after July 31, 1954, less 
the exclusions are the only dividends eligible for the 
tax credit, the tax credit claimed in regard to such divi- 
dends is tabulated here. All these data are distributed 
by adjusted gross income classes, taxable and nontaxable, 
similar to those in basic tables. 

Text table G shows the total amount received by 
individuals from domestic and foreign dividends with- 
out regard to the exclusions. It also shows the amount 
of dividends included in adjusted gross income and the 
two components of dividends actually entering into this 



amount, that is, (a) dividends eligible for exclusion to- 
gether with the total exclusions claimed against these 
dividends, and (b) dividends not eligible for exclusion 
or credit. These items and their frequency are pre- 
sented by size of adjusted gross income separately for 
taxable and nontaxable returns, as in text table F. 

Data in table G reveal that the total dividend receipts 
repoi-ted for the income year 1954 was $7.3 billion, of 
which $7 billion qualified for the exclusion and $0.2 
billion were foreign and domestic dividends ineligible 
for exclusion or credit. Tax-exempt dividend exclusions 
of $0.2 billion reduced qualifying dividends to $6.8 bil- 
lion which together with the nonqualifying dividends 
of $0.2 billion were included in adjusted gross income. 
Receipt of dividends was reported on 4.1 million re- 
turns, but only 3.7 million returns showed dividends in 
adjusted gross income. 

Nearly one-half of the $7 billion of dividends qualify- 
ing for the exclusion were also eligible for the tax credit. 
These dividends, amounting to $3.4 billion (text table 
F), although eligible for the tax credit, did not termi- 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



15 



nate in a tax credit on each of the 3.4 million returns 
showing eligible dividends. In some cases, small divi- 
dend receipts may have been eliminated by the appli- 
cable exclusion. Returns without an income tax before 
credits naturally had no credit. On other returns where 
the taxpayer had taxable income and income tax, he 
failed to take advantage of the credit benefit even tliough 
lie was entitled to do so. There are 2.5 million returns 
that had a tax credit for dividends received, amounting 
to $118 million. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

Individuals who itemized their nonbusiness deduc- 
tions were allowed a deduction for charitable contribu- 
tions and gifts. A new provision under the 1954 Code 
allows a special additional deduction of up to 10 per- 
cent of adjusted gross income for contributions made 
to churches, associations of churches, tax-exempt edu- 
cational institutions, and tax-exempt hospitals. In case 
all contributions are made to such organizations, a de- 
duction up to 30 percent of adjusted gross income may 
be claimed. Contributions to organizations other than 
the above are still limited to 20 percent of adjusted gi'oss 
income unless the taxpayer qualified for the unlimited 
deduction, retained under the new Code. 

In computing the deduction for contributions the tax- 
payer must first figure his contributions to the special 
institutions to the extent of 10 percent of adjusted gross 
income, tlien any amount in excess of 10 percent can be 
added to the other contributions to which the 20-per- 
cent limitation applies. In reality, the deduction con- 
sists of two parts : one a deduction under the 10-percent 
limitation, tlie other a deduction under the 20-percent 
limitation. Both limitations apply to the combined ad- 
justed gross income on joint returns as well as the ad- 
justed gross income on separate returns. A description 
of contributions is given on pages 26-27. 

Text table H was prepared to show the number of 
returns that liad a deduction for contributions in excess 
of 20 percent of adjusted gross income and the amount 
of sucli excess. This was accomplished by a compari- 
son of the amount deducted on each return with 20 per- 
cent of the reported adjusted gross income. If the 
deduction was found to be over 20 percent of the ad: 
justed gross income, the number of returns with an ex- 
cess and tlie amount of the excess were tabulated in this 
table along with the total number of returns with con- 
tributions and the amount deducted. These data are by 
classes for taxable and nontaxable returns similar to 
those in basic tables. 

This table shows the total deduction on account of 
charitable contributions to be $3.9 billion claimed on 
14.6 million returns. There were 132,073 returns on 
which the deduction exceeded 20 percent of adjusted 
gross income. On these returns, the additional deduc- 
tion allowed under the new provision amounted to $67.6 



T«bl» H.-DEDUCTIBLE CONTRIBUTIONS IN EXCESS OF 20 PERCENT OF ADJUSTED GROSS 
INC0K4E BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 



• 


Number of 
returns 
«Ith 
contri- 
butions 


Deduction 
for contri- 
butions 

( IJwtj tand 
doll art) 


Returns with deduction 

for contributions 

exceeding 20 percent of 

adjusted gross income 


Adjusted gross income classes 


Number of 
returns 


Amount in 

excess of 

20 percent 

(Thoaiand 

doIUri) 


Taxable returns: 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

il 500 under 42 000 


60,784 
184,179 
363,911 
546,431 

708,875 

988,001 

1,172,547 

1,375,148 

1,370,217 

2,199,234 

1,445,565 

845,034 

491,225 

282,426 

560,205 
226,164 

212,749 
135,864 
64.383 

a, 101 

3,108 

3,148 

427 

199 


4,020 
17,494 
41,850 
76,645 

109,366 
171,502 
208,668 
255,590 
269,870 

469,598 
360,462 
234,297 
162,502 
101,068 

258,773 
141,346 
175,617 
174,238 
170,576 

72,188 
35,984 
77,679 
31,409 
50,420 


2,489 
2,500 

5,012 
7,070 

6,502 
5,006 
5,023 
3,540 
2,523 

3,574 

(M 
(>) 

2,547 

2,959 

1,713 
1,647 
1,676 
1,552 

630 

301 

456 

97 

52 


113 

23 

460 






$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $3,500 

A3 500 under 4i 000 


892 
633 
568 


$4,000 under $4,500 

ti 500 under $5 000 


1,081 
240 


$5 000 under $6 000 


493 




(M 


$7 000 under $8 000 


(') 


$8,000 under $9,000 

$9 000 under $10 000 


759 






$15 000 under $20 000 


1,566 






i3Q 000 under i50 000 


3,156 


$50,000 under $100 000 


5,646 






$150 000 under $200 000 


2,906 






$500,000 under $1,000,000 


4,458 






Total taxable returns 


13,250,925 


3,671,162 


60,912 


54,073 


Nontaxable returns: 


9,388 

18,083 
112,049 
153,023 
183,523 
184,278 

184,619 
152,302 
124,246 
87,555 
47,732 

35,797 
18,632 

(M 

2,130 


1,374 

2.595 
10,129 
16,769 
24,518 
27,875 

31,790 
26,460 
24,409 
19,937 
12,474 

8,968 
6,040 

7,685 


4,057 

9,530 
13,125 
11,076 
11,144 

6,089 

6,993 
3,057 
2,534 

(M 
(M 

56 


472 


Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2 500 under $3 000 


1,560 
1,183 
1,233 
1,239 
666 

896 


$3,000 under $3,500 

$3,500 under $4,000 


794 
421 


$4,500 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $6,000 




$8 000 under $10,000 












Total nontaxable returns 


1,314,381 


221 , 384 


71,161 


13,489 


Grand total 


14,565,306 


3,892,546 


132,073 


67, 562 


Returns under $5,000 


3,026,891 
6,538,415 


1,353,335 
2,539,211 


109,259 
22,814 


13,593 







See text for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 

^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. 
However, this value is included in each total. 



million. However, this does not signify the entire 
amount contributed to the special institutions, because 
in those instances wliere the special contributions ex- 
ceeded the 10-percent limitation, the excess was mingled 
with the other contributions to which the 20-percent 
limitation applied, and in cases where the contributions 
did not exceed the 20-percent limitation, the deduction 
may have included contributions to the special organiza- 
tions. 

Less than 1 percent of the returns with a deduction 
for contributions showed the deduction to be in excess 
of 20 percent of adjusted gross income. Of the 132,073 
returns with charitable deduction exceeding the 20-per- 
cent limitation, 82 percent were returns under $5,000 
adjusted gross income, but only one-fifth of the addi- 
tional deduction occurred on these returns. The reverse 
situation was shown on returns over $5,000 adjusted 
gross income, where 18 percent of the returns had 80 
percent of the additional charitable deduction. 



16 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



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INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



17 



DRUG AND MEDICAL COSTS 

Information relating to medical cost was tabulated 
from the schedule for itemized deductions on long-form 
returns, Form 10-10, for 1954, if the taxpayer claimed a 
deduction on account of medical and dental expenses. 
These data are presented in text table I on page 16. 

Three major changes regarding the medical and den- 
tal expenses and the allowable deduction were made by 
the 1954 Code. First, medical expenses in excess of 3 
percent of adjusted gross income may be deducted. 
Second, outlays for drugs and medicines may be in- 
cluded in medical expenses only to the extent that they 
exceed 1 percent of adjusted gross income. Third, the 
limitations on the maximum deduction are raised to 
$2,500 per exemption and to $5,000 per return except 
that it is $10,000 on a joint return, a head of household 
return, or a surviving spouse return. 

When claiming a deduction for medical expenses, the 
taxpayer was I'equired to rej^ort the cost of drugs and 
medicines separately from other medical and dental cost. 
Each of these two amounts was reported in its entirety 
as net, that is, they did not contain any expenses com- 
pensated by insurance or otherwise. These repoi'ted 
costs, however, were before any of the limitations ap- 
plicable to the deduction had been applied. Drugs were 
reported without regard to an amount equal to one per- 
cent of adjusted gross income to be excluded later, and 
medical costs were reported without regard to an 
amount equal to 3 percent of adjusted gross income 
whether or not it was later excluded. 

In text table I, the entire expense of both drugs and 
medical costs, as reported by the taxpayer, are shown 
for each of two age groups: under 65 yeai"s and 65 
years or over. Data taken from joint returns where 
only one spouse was 65 years of age or over were tabu- 
lated with age group 65 years or over, because on such 
returns, the medical deduction was allowed as though 
both spouses were 65 or over. In addition to the drug 
and medical costs, there are tabulated also the actual 
medical deduction claimed, the related adjusted gross in- 
come, and number of returns involved. All of these 
items are shown for taxable and nontaxable returns, 
each by adjusted gross income classes used in the basic 
tables. 

A description of medical expenses to be considered for 
this deduction and the limitations on the amount to be 
deducted, whether under 65 or 65 or more years of age, 
whether joint or separate return, are given on page 
•2.1 in the description of Medical and Dental Expenses. 

There were 8.6 million returns which had a deduction 
for medical expenses; 7.6 million of these retui'us 
showed age under 65 years and 1.1 million showed age 
65 years or over. 

The cost of drugs was reported as $0.9 billion and 
other medical cost reported as $3.5 billion. Of the com- 
bined drug and medical costs amounting to $4.5 billion, 
$3 billion was claimed as a deduction from adjusted 



gross income. Thus two-thirds of the entire cost was 
taken as a deduction. However, there was a wide varia- 
tion in the pei'centage of cost claimed between the re- 
turns with age under 65 and returns with age 65 or over. 
Tlie combined drug and medical costs reported on re- 
turns with age under 65 were $3.8 billion of which $2.4 
billion, or 63.3 jiercent, was claimed as a medical de- 
duction. On returns with age 65 or over, tlie com- 
bined drug and medical costs were $0.7 billion of which 
$0.6 billion, or 84.8 percent, was claimed as a deduction. 
While both age groups show that there were disallowed 
medical expenses, the special provision for age 65 years 
or over permitted this group to claim 21.5 percent more 
of their expenses than could be claimed by the group 
under 65 years of age. 

Of the total deduction for medical and dental ex- 
penses, $1.6 billion was claimed on returns with adjusted 
gross income under $5,000. This deduction represented 
72 percent of the combined drug and medical costs re- 
ported on this category of returns. The remaining 
medical deduction of $1.4 billion, reported on returns 
with $5,000 or more adjusted gross income, was 58 per- 
cent of the combined drug and medical costs reported 
on these returns. By coincidence, the two categories 
of returns each reported $2.2 billion combined drug and 
medical costs before the limitations. 

RETIREMENT INCOME 

The new provisions relating to retirement income al- 
low an individual a credit against the income tax for 
retirement income, if certain conditions are met. To 
qualify, an individual must have received earned income 
in excess of $600 in each of 10 calendar years (not 
necessarily consecutive) before the beginning of the cur- 
rent year. Widows and widowers whose spouse had 
received such prior earnings are considered to have re- 
ceived such earned income. If husband and wife both 
qualify and have retirement income, each is entitled to 
the credit as individuals, even tliough filing jointly. 

For the purpose of tax credit, retirement income in 
the case of individuals under 65 years of age differs from 
retirement income of individuals 65 years of age or over. 
If the individual has not attained the age of 65 before 
the close of the tax year, retirement income means only 
amounts received fi-om pensions or annuities under a 
public retirement system. For individuals who are 65 
yeare of age or over before the close of the tax year, 
retirement income means amounts received as pensions, 
annuities, interest, dividends, and gross rents. To be 
considered retirement income, such amounts must be 
included in adjusted gross income. Regardless of age, 
tiie maximum amount of retirement income allowed for 
computation of tax credit is $1,200. However, the 
amount of retirement income allowed as the base of tax 
credit is the smaller of (a) the retirement income re- 
ceived, or (b) $1,200 reduced by amounts received and 
excluded from gross income as pensions or annuities 



18 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



under social security and railroad retirement, or tax- 
exempt pensions and annuities, and, in the case of an 
individual who is not 75 years of age before the end of 
the year, reduced by the amount of earned income in 
excess of $900 received during the tax year. 

The tax credit, computed at 20 percent on the base for 
tax credit, is limited in that it may not exceed the 
income tax reduced by credits for dividends received, 
partially tax-exempt interest, foreign tax paid, and tax 
paid at source on tax-free covenant bonds. In order to 
secure this tax credit, an individual must file Form 1040, 
either long- or short-form. 

Data relating to retirement income reported in sched- 
ule K, Credit for Retirement Income, on returns that 
had a tax credit for retirement income, are tabulated in 
two text tables. In both tables, data are distributed by 
adjusted gross income classes for the taxable and the 
nontaxable returns, corresponding to those in the basic 
tables. 



Text table J shows the number of returns with a tax 
credit for retirement income, tlie total amount of retire- 
ment income that met the specified definition, the tv. - 
deductions from the $1,200 limit, tlie base for credit, and 
the tax credit for retirement income. Frequencies in 
this tabulation are on a return-count basis. 

In text table K, the number of persons with a tax 
credit for retirement income, the amount of retirement 
income conforming to the definition, and tiie base for 
credit are shown for two groups: pei-sons under 65 yeare 
and persons 65 years or over. In addition, there are the 
total number of persons with a tax credit and tiie two 
deductions from the $1,200 limit, but the deductions are 
without the division as to age groups. Frequencies for 
items in this table are on a per capita basis. 

There were 473,248 returns witli a tax credit for retire- 
ment income. A total of $2.;^ billion of retirement 
income was reported on these returns. However, only 
a portioii of this retirement income was used as the base 
for credit, because of tlie limitation on the amount of 



Tabu J.-BETIREMENT INCOME. SPECIAL DEDUCTIONS, AND TAX CREDIT FOR RETKEMEOT INCOME. BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 



Adjusted gross income classes 



Taxable returns: 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500. 
$1,500 under $2,000., 
$2,000 under $2,500. 

$2,500 under $3,000. 
$3,000 under $3,500. 
$3,500 under $4,000. 
$i,000 under $i,500. 
$i,500 under $5,000. 



$5,000 under $6,000... 
$6,000 under $7,000... 
$7,000 under $8,000.. 
$8,000 under $9,000... 
$9,000 under $10,000. 



$10,000 under $15,000... 
$15,000 under $20,000.. 
$20,000 under $30,000. . 
$30,000 under $50,000. . 
$50,000 under $100,000. 



$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total taxable returns. 



Nontaxable returns: 

No adjusted gross income. 



Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500... 
$1,500 under $2,000... 
$2,000 under $2,500... 

$2,500 under $3,000... 
$3,000 under $3,500... 
$3,500 under $1,000... 
$4,000 under $i,500. .. 
$4,500 under $5,000.. 

$5,000 under $6,000.. 
$6,000 under $8,000.. 
$8,000 under $10,000. 
$10,000 or more 



Total nontaxable returns. 



Grand total. 



Returns under $5,000... 
Returns $5,000 or more. 



Number 
of returns 
with lax 
credit for 
retirement 
income 



(1) 



7,114 
16,158 

15,624 
25,318 
23,782 
26,751 
24,271 

28,886 
19,767 
19,171 
14,168 
8,040 

29,588 
12,709 
11,851 
8,192 

4,577 

1,013 

341 

354 

60 

29 



Total 

retirement 

income 



(2) 



(M 

19, «3 
50,346 
41,892 

25,238 

17,760 
6,615 
4,054 
4,546 

3,068 



174, 4?9 



9,922 
21,842 

34,074 
61,936 
61,362 
71,626 
73,126 

106,588 
92,103 
89,917 
98,587 
51,165 

247,792 
142,532 
191,196 
182,661 

187,541 

71,976 
35,310 
54,779 
21,079 
26,554 



Deductions from the $1,200 limit 



Retirement income 
excluded from adjusted 
gross income 



Number of 
returns 



(3) 



1,933,939 



(M 
23,210 
31,810 
82,159 

70,534 
53,279 
17,541 
12,091 
17,099 

11,882 



1,083 



371,534 



4,551 

9,601 

5,068 
11,614 
10,635 
7,085 
9,126 

7,597 
4,557 
5,533 
3,051 

(M 

9,142 
4,024 
3,935 
3,054 
1,534 

339 

134 

107 

13 

6 



Amount 



(Thousand 
dollars) 



(4) 



4,012 
6,766 

4,693 
8,380 
7,661 
5,348 
7,054 

6,808 
3,606 
5,031 
2,795 

8,330 
3,622 
3,453 
2,939 

1,405 

454 
131 
102 



Earned income in 
excess of $900 



Number of 
returns 



(5) 



(M 

10,584 
7,091 

(M 
(M 
(') 
(M 
(M 



26,334 



311,101 
162,142 



2,305,473 



692,728 

1,612,745 



128,557 



84,014 

44,543 



6,572 
3,942 

(M 
(') 
(') 

(M 



18,724 



(M 
4,051 

(M 
3,092 

(M 

4,540 
4,051 

2,547 
3,051 

(M 

(M 

(M 

1,685 
752 
449 
422 
232 

47 

15 

17 

2 

3 



(TTiouaand 
dollara) 



(6) 



3,534 






63,138 
40,328 



38,634 



27,945 

10,739 



(M 

2,845 

(') 
2,253 

5,499 
3,580 

6,308 
3,170 

(M 

(M 

(M 

3,327 
361 
1,126 
3,570 
2,037 

173 

226 

241 

16 

1 



Base for 
credit 



( Thousand 
dottara) 



Tax credit 
for retire- 
ment income 



f Thousand 
doitars) 



(7) 



40,253 



(') 






3,847 



44,100 



22,107 
21,993 



(M 
2,636 
6,981 

11,030 
18,401 
13,997 
19,434 
17,717 

25,590 
19,465 
15,696 
15,345 

7,759 

28,832 

13,702 

11,143 

7,453 

4,591 

937 

317 

351 

60 

30 



241,733 



18,657 
48,351 
40,932 

28,224 

20,392 

6,828 

5,932 

5,466 

5,322 



422,935 



266,225 
156,710 



See text for "Description of Sajrple and Limitations of Data." 

^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. 



(8) 



391 
1,517 

2,326 
3,989 
3,226 
3,836 
3,708 

5,311 
3,861 
3,537 
3,078 
1,533 

6,091 
2,519 
2,459 
1,557 
928 



50,323 



718 
4,344 
5,385 

3,643 

2,339 

1,208 

760 

911 

671 



20,875 



71,193 



38,383 
32,815 



However, this value is included in each total. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



19 



Table K.— RETIREMENT INCOME ^ND SPECIAL DEDUCTIONS FOR PERSONS WITH TAX CREDIT FOR RETIREMENT INCOME BY AGE GROUPS AND ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 



Adjusted gross income classes 



Taxable returns: 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500... 
$1,500 under $2,000.. 
$2,000 under $2,500... 

$2,500 under $3,000... 
$3,000 under $3,500.. 
$3,500 under $A,000.. 
$i,000 under $i,500.. 
$6,500 under $5,000... 

$5,000 under $6,000... 
$6,000 under $7,000... 
$7,000 under $8,000.. 
$8,000 under $9,000.. 
$9,000 under $10,000. 



$10,000 under $15,000... 
$15,000 under $20,000... 
$20,000 under $30,000... 
$30,000 under $50,000... 
$50,000 under $100,000.. 



$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000.. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total taxable returns. 



Nontaxable returns: 

No adjusted gross income. 



Under $600.-. 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500.. 
$1,500 under $2,000.. 
$2,000 under $2,500.. 

$2,500 under $3,000. 
$3,000 under $3,500. 
$3,500 under $4,000. 
$i,000 under $4,500. 
$4,500 under $5,000. 



$5,000 under $6,000... 
$6,000 under $8,000... 
$8,000 under $10,000.. 
$10,000 01* more 



Total nontaxable returns. 
Grand total 



Returns under $5,000... 
Returns $5,000 or more. 



Number of 
persons 
with tax 
credit for 
retirement 
income 



(1) 



16,158 

15,62i 
26,252 
23,782 
26,751 
24,271 

30,386 

22,790 
19,171 
15,692 
8,040 

32,164 
13,668 
12,418 
8,315 
4,728 

1,035 
362 
372 
60 
29 



310,182 



19,643 
50,346 
41,892 

25,238 

21,362 

7,689 

5,577 

5,070 

5,102 



Under 65 years of age 



Number of 
persons 



(2) 



(') 

(M 

2,023 

4,017 
2,000 
2,049 
6,119 
2,040 

3,068 
5,068 
2,523 

(') 

(M 

1,567 

412 

404 

142 

75 



4,557 
7,067 
4,568 

4,585 

(M 



(') 



183,236 



493,418 



318,258 
175,160 



Retirement 
income 



(Thoutand 
dollvra) 



(3) 



(') 

3,616 

7,604 
3,215 
3,176 
9,518 
6,039 

3,157 
12,552 
3,035 

3,072 
1,536 
1,660 
952 
1,460 

360 
327 



71,344 



5,550 

10,290 

7,017 

7,846 

(M 

(') 



(M 



36,676 



59,839 



43,537 
16,302 



108,020 



69,408 
38,612 



Base for 
credit 



(Jhouw»nd 
dollars) 



(4) 



(') 

1,950 

4,149 
1,515 
1,696 
4,763 
1,771 

2,082 
3,840 
2,659 

(M 
(M 

1,386 

323 

425 

145 

56 



4,397 
8,129 
4,657 

4,669 

(M 
(M 



25,570 



Age 65 years or more 



Number of 
persons 



Retirement 
income 



(Thoutand 
dollar!} 



6,097 
14,135 

11,607 
24,252 
21,733 
20,632 
22,231 

27,318 
17,722 
16,648 

14,175 
7,040 

30,597 
13,256 
12,014 
8,673 
4,653 

1,031 

359 

370 

60 

29 



274,63; 



15,086 
43,279 
37,324 

20,653 

19,845 

7,200 

5,577 

5,070 

4,585 



(6) 



9,279 
18,226 

26,470 
58,721 
58,186 
62,108 
67,087 

103,431 
79,551 
86,882 

94,222 
46,401 

244,720 
140,996 
189,536 
181,709 
186,081 

71,596 
34,983 

54,777 
21,079 
26,554 



1,862,595 



17,660 
71,520 
75,142 

62,688 
51,307 
15,736 
12,091 
17,099 

10,532 



1,083 



Base for 
credit 



( Thouaand 
doltara) 



(7) 



1,993 
5,031 

6,881 
16,886 
12,301 
14,671 
15,946 

23,508 
15,625 
13,037 
13,641 
6,650 

27,446 
13,379 
10,718 
7,308 
4,535 

933 

313 

350 

60 

30 



211,242 



41,708 
14,353 



274,721 
158,858 



334,858 



2,197,453 



623,320 

1,574,133 



14,260 
40,222 
36,275 

23,555 

18,857 

6,241 

5,932 

5,466 

4,702 



Deductions from the $1,200 limit 



Retirement income 

excluded from adjusted 

gross income 



Number of 
persons 



(8) 



4,551 
9,601 

5,068 
12,114 
11,652 
7,102 
8,609 

7,597 
5,546 
6,033 

3,051 
(M 

10,763 
4,600 
4,251 
3,247 
1,647 

346 

143 

116 

14 



(M 

10,584 

7,591 

(M 
(M 
(') 
(M 

(M 



Amount 
( Thouaand 



(^) 



4,012 
6,766 

4,693 
8,380 
7,661 
5,848 
7,054 

6,808 
3,606 
5,081 
2,795 

8,380 
3,622 
3,453 
2,939 

1,405 

454 

131 

102 

14 

5 



84,742 



6,572 
3,942 

(') 
(M 
(') 
(M 
(M 



Earned income in 
excess of $900 



Number of 
persons 



4,051 

(M 

3,092 

5,557 
4,051 

4,081 
4,051 

(M 

(M 

(M 

1,882 
858 
473 
430 
211 

50 
14 
17 
2 
3 



3,534 
(M 



Anvjunt 

( Thouaand 
doltara) 



(11) 



(') 
2,845 

(M 
2,253 

(M 
5,499 
3,580 

6,308 
3,170 

(') 

(') 

(') 

3,327 
861 
1,126 
3,570 
2,037 

173 

226 

241 

16 

1 



40,253 



1,355 

(') 



(') 

(M 



224,517 
142,352 



89,691 



18,724 



63,138 

40,328 



30,496 

13,589 



3,847 



44,100 



22,107 

21,993 



See text for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data. " 
^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing 



t separately. However, this value is included in each total. 



retirement income that could be used in the computation 
of i-etirement credit. The tabulations show that the base 
for credit was $0.4 billion. This is only 18 percent of 
the reported retirement income. The maximum retire- 
ment income allowed for computing the credit was $1,200 
for each retired person, but this maximum was reduced 
by the amount of nontaxable pensions and annuities and 
by the earnings in excess of $900. Moreover, this di- 
minished limitation was allowed as the base for credit 
only where it was less than the retirement income re- 
ceived. There were many instaaices in which retirement 
income was smaller than the diminished limitation and, 
therefore, became the base for credit. 

Deductions from the $1,200 limit were $103.5 million 
for nontaxable pensions and annuities and $44.1 million 
for the excess earned income. 

Text table K shows that there were 493,418 persons 
who claimed the tax credit for retirement income. Ap- 
proximately 20,000 of these individuals were the spouse 
of a retired person who also claimed a retirement in- 
come tax credit, both being reported on a joint return 



of husband and wife. Of the 493,418 persons with re- 
tirement credit, 12 percent were under 65 years of age. 
Their retirement income was $0.1 billion, less than 5 
percent of the total reported. Eighty-eight percent of 
the individuals were 65 years of age or over and they 
had $2.2 billion of retirement income. However, per- 
sons under 65 years, as a group, were able to use 52 
percent of their retirement income as the base for credit, 
while those 65 years or over were able to use only 17 
percent of theirs. 

TABULATED DATA 

In addition to the specific data tabulated in the text 
tables, financial data reported on individual income tax 
returns for 1954, relating to income, deductions, and 
taxes are tabulated in sixteen basic tables. The first 12 
tables and table 15 present information on a national 
basis, while tables 13, 14, and 16 present information on 
a State basis. Data are distributed by size of adjusted 
gross income in 12 of these basic tables, 6 of which show 



20 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



the taxable and nontaxable returns separately and in 
the remaining 6 they are combined. In one basic table, 
data are tabulated by size of taxable income, a new 
classification. In tables where data from taxable and 
nontaxable returns are tabulated together, the data from 
nontaxable returns are in the class indicated by the 
amount of adjusted gross income reported. 

Table 1 shows the number of returns with adjusted 
gross income, amounts of adjusted gross income, tax- 
able income, and income tax liability after credits, tab- 
ulated by adjusted gross income classes, as well as cum- 
ulations at every income class level from the lowest class 
and from the highest class, together with corresponding 
percentages of the total. In these distributions, taxable 
and nontaxable returns with adjusted gross income are 
combined, but nontaxable returns with no adjusted gross 
income are shown in aggregate, apart from the returns 
with income. 

In table 2, the amounts of income and loss from each 
of the sources comprising adjusted gross income are 
shown as reported on returns with standard deduction 
and with itemized deductions. For returns with item- 
ized deductions, these items are subdivided between re- 
turns with adjusted gross income and returns with no 
adjusted gross income, and the amount of each nonbusi- 
ness deduction is given for both categories of returns. 
These items include the combined taxable and nontax- 
able data. 

Table 3 contains the sources of income and loss com- 
prising adjusted gross income for all returns and the 
nonbusiness deductions reported on returns with item- 
ized deductions. These items are combined for taxable 
and nontaxable returns and are distributed by adjusted 
gross income classes, the intervals of which are broader 
in some instances than in other basic tables. 

Table 4 presents, by adjusted gross income classes, the 
amount of each source of income and loss comprising 
adjusted gross income, as well as exemptions, taxable in- 
come, income tax before credits, tax credits, income tax 
liability after credits, and items pertaining to taxpay- 
ments. In addition to the amounts, there are frequen- 
cies for these items where pertinent. Part I of this 
table includes data for all returns; Part II shows these 
data for joint returns only; and Part III has similar 
data for returns other than joint returns. Tiiroughout 
the table, taxable and nontaxable returns are shown 
independently. 

Table 5 includes data for returns with itemized non- 
business deduction only, tabulated separately for taxable 
and nontaxable returns, each by adjusted gross income 
classes. These data embrace the number of returns, 
amount of adjusted gross income, the various itemized 
deductions, exemptions, taxable income, income tax be- 
fore credits, tax credits, and income tax liability after 
credits, together with appropriate frequencies. 

In table 6, there is a distribution of the number of 
returns by adjusted gross income classes, cross classified 
by size of a specified source of income or loss reported 



in adjusted gross income. Most of the sources are in- 
cluded in this cross classification, however, frequencies 
for net operating loss deduction and fiduciary loss are 
not available. Taxable and nontaxable returns are com- 
bined and certain of the adjusted gross income classes 
are merged. 

Table 7 has a distribution of the number of returns 
by adjusted gross income classes, cross classified by the 
size of specified itemized deductions. Only four de- 
ductions — contributions, interest paid, taxes, and medi- 
cal expenses — are included in this tabulation. Taxable 
and nontaxable returns are combined and the adjusted 
gross income classes are the same as those in table 6. 

Table 8 shows data tabulated by a new classification 
based on the amount of taxable income. In this table, 
there are the number of returns with taxable income, 
the amount of taxable income, total tax credits, divi- 
dend received credit, retirement income credit, normal 
tax and surtax, and alternative tax, both taxes being 
after credits. Because different tax rates, depending on 
the marital status of taxpayer, are applied to taxable 
income, the tabulation of these data are set in three 
parts, each signifying an applicable tax rate. Part I is 
for joint returns and returns of surviving spouse, both 
of which are entitled to split-income. The taxable in- 
come class intervals correspond to the brackets of the 
graduated rate schedule used for such returns. Part II 
is for separate returns of husbands and wives and re- 
turns of single pereons not head of household or sur- 
viving spouse, both of which use the regular tax rates. 
The taxable income class intervals correspond to the 
brackets of that graduated rate schedule. Part III is for 
returns of heads of houseliold entitled to use the rates 
provided for this status. The taxable income class inter- 
vals in this part correspond to the bracket of that gradu- 
ated rate schedule. In each part, taxable and nontaxable 
returns are shown separately. Taxable income was me- 
chanically computed for short-form returns. Form 1040, 
and for returns. Form 1040A, so that all returns with a 
positive amount of taxable income were included in this 
table whether or not tlie amount was reported by the 
taxpayer. 

Table 9 contains data from taxable returns only and 
shows the number of returns with income tax, amount 
of adjusted gross income, taxable income, income tax 
liability after credits, average income tax per return, 
and effective income tax rate based on taxable income. 
All these data are distributed by adjusted gross income 
classes for all taxable returns, for returns with normal 
tax and surtax, and for returns with alternative tax. 

In table 10, tlie number of returns, amount of ad- 
justed gross income, exemptions, taxable income, and in- 
come tax liability after credits are shown for all re- 
turns and for returns in each of the five categories in 
the classification for martial status of taxpayer. These 
items are tabulated by adjusted gross income classes for 
taxable returns and for nontaxable returns. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



21 



Table 11 gives an analysis of the personal exemptions 
claimed by tlie taxpayer. Here are the total number of 
exemptions claimed, the number of additional exemp- 
tions claimed for age and blindness, and the number of 
exemptions otiier than age and blindness, tliat is, the per 
capita exemption for the taxpayer, his spouse on a joint 
return, and his dependents. In addition, there is a fre- 
quency distribution of returns by specified numbers of 
exemptions other than age or blindness (per capita). 
These data are distributed by size of adjusted gross in- 
come, separately for taxable and nontaxable returns, for 
each of the five categories in the classification for marital 
status of taxpayer. 

Data in table 12 pertain to tiie details making up the 
net gain and net loss from sales of capital assets included 
in adjusted gross income. Because of the different treat- 
ment for capital gain and for capital loss, details from 
returns with a deduction on account of a capital loss are 
shown apart from details from returns with a capital 
gain. Returns with a capital loss are subject to normal 
tax and surtax, but returns with a capital gain are sub- 
ject to the alternative tax under certain circumstances. 
Therefore, the latter returns are segregated in the tabu- 
lation to show details for capital gain subject to normal 
tax and surtax apart from details for capital gain sub- 
ject to alternative tax. In each breakdown, there are 
the amounts of net short-term capital gain and loss 
(after carryover), net long-term capital gain and loss, 
and capital loss carryover from the 5 preceding years. 
Other data include capital loss before statutory limita- 
tion regarding the deductible loss, amount of capital loss 
deducted from gross income, capital gain included in 
adjusted gross income, and the entire excess of net long- 
term capital gain over net short-term capital loss which 
was taxed at the special rate of 25 percent. All these 
data are shown separately for taxable and nontaxable 
returns, by adjusted gross income classes. 

Table 13 presents in aggregate for each State and 
Territory certain sources of income, adjusted gross in- 
come, and income tax liability after credits reported on 
returns with adjusted gross income. These data are for 
taxable and nontaxable returns combined. For the first 
time, Puerto Rico is a separate entity in the State and 
Territoi-y classification. The sources of income tabu- 
lated by States iiave been expanded this year to in- 
clude the combined business net profit and loss, the 
combined partnership net profit and loss, the combined 
net gain and loss from sales of capital assets, and the 
combined rents and royalties net income and loss, in 
addition to the amounts of salaries and wages, dividends, 
and interest, which were the only items of income for- 
merly tabulated. A frequency of the number of returns 
for each source presented is also shown. 

In table 14, the number of returns, amount of adjusted 
gross income, and income tax liability after credits, 
reported on returns with adjusted gross income, are 
tabulated for each State and Territory, by adjusted 
gross income classes established especially for this table. 



which differ somewhat from those used elsewhere for 
national distributions. Taxable and nontaxable returns 
are combined in tliis tabulation. 

Table 15 shows information taken from returns. Form 
1040, that had a self-employment tax reported by the 
taxpayer. This information is presented on a national 
basis by adjusted gross income classes without regard to 
the income tax status. The number of returns with self- 
employment tax, amount of adjusted gross income on 
these returns, and the self-employment tax are shown 
for all returns with this tax. In addition, the returns 
which had self-employment tax without an income tax, 
although included in the distribution for all returns 
with self-employment tax, are also shown by tliemselves. 

Table 16 presents data from returns, Form 1040, with 
adjusted gross income and with self-employment tax. 
These data include the number of returns with self- 
employment tax, amount of adjusted gross income, and 
self-employment tax, distributed on a State basis. No 
self -employment tax was reported on returns filed by 
citizens residing in Puerto Rico. Returns, Form 1040 
P. R., filed by Puerto Ricans for self-employment tax 
purposes were not processed for statistics. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE SAMPLE AND 
LIMITATIONS OF DATA 

The data presented for individual income tax returns 
for 1954 are based on a stratified systematic sample con- 
sisting of 100 percent of returns showing adjusted gross 
income of $150,000 or more and of various lesser per- 
centages of returns showing adjusted gross income un- 
der $150,000. More than 240,000 returns were selected 
in 64 district directors' offices. These represented about 
0.4 percent of the total population of 56.8 million in- 
dividual returns filed throughout the country. 

Description of the sample. — Table L shows the num- 
ber of returns processed, the number of returns in the 
sample, the prescribed sampling ratio, and the achieved 
sampling ratio, by estimating strata. The difference 
between the prescribed sampling ratio, and the achieved 
sampling ratio arises from three sources: incomplete 
numbering series, nonresponse, and the normal variation 
between expected sample size and actual sample size. 

In addition to the stratification imposed by selecting 
returns from each internal revenue district, the sample 
selection was adapted to the regular return sorting pro- 
cedures which are employed in the district offices to fa- 

Tsble L.— NUMBER OF INDIVIDllAL INCOME TAX RETURNS PROCESSED FOR 1964, NUMBER 
OF RETURNS IN SAMPLE, AND SAMPLE RATIOS, BV ESTIMATING STRATUM 



Sample stratum 


Number of 

returns 
processed 


Number of 
returns 
in sample 


Sample ratios 


Form 


Adjusted gross income 


lype of return 


Prescribed 


Achieved 








13,273,525 
41,456,390 

1 1,914,376 

1 161,777 
7,130 


26,204 
82,663 

79,304 

45,175 
7,130 


1/500 
1/489 

1/23 

9/30 
1/1 






/Under $10,000 


All 

Business .... 
Nonbusiness . 

Business 

Nonbusiness . 
All 


1/502 


1040 


($10,000 under $30,000. 
) $10,000 under $50,000. 
\$30,000 under $150,000 
/$50,000 under $150,000 
\ $150,000 and over 


l/S-i 
9/32 

1/1 






56,818,198 


240,476 


- 













22 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



cilitate collection and audit requirements. Returns are 
sorted on the basis of type of form, kind of schedules 
attached, size of adjusted gross income, and taxpayment 
status, as reported by the taxpayer. These sorts con- 
stituted effective sampling strata because the character- 
istics on which the strata are based correlate highly 
with income and tax characteristics. 

Inflating sample values to population size.— The 
sample values were extended to the returns they repre- 
sented by multiplying them by "weighting factors." 
These weighting factors were derived for each class of 
return by dividing the number of sample returns into 
the total number of returns filed. For instance, the 
weighting factor of 507 for Form 1040A returns was 
obtained by dividing the number of returns in the sam- 
ple, 26,204, into the total number of returns filed, 13,- 
278,525. The primary sources of population data were 
counts made and submitted by the district offices show- 
ing the numbers of Form 1040A and Form 1040 re- 
turns processed. 

In comparing the weighted sample numbers of re- 
turns with the figures presented as national totals for 
similar classes of returns, slight discrepancies will be 
noted. As shown in table M, the discrepancies i-esult 
from the elimination of certain returns and the reclass- 
ification of others in preparing the tables. 



Table M.— SOURCES OF DEVUTION BETWEEN WEIGHTED SAMPLE NUMBER OF RETURNS AND 
NUMBER OF RETURNS APPEARING IN TABLES FOR 1954 





Number of returns 


Deviation 

from 

weighted 

sajnple 


Source of deviation 


Adjusted gross income 
class 


National 
totals 


Weighted 
sample 


Returns 
with no 
informa- 
tion' 


Misclas- 
slfied 

returns 


Under $10,000 


54,617,989 

2,121,937 

7,082 


54,734,915 

2,076,153 

7,130 


-116,926 

+45,784 

-48 


-70,701 
-489 




-46,225 


$10,000 under $150,000.. 
$150,000 and over 


-(46,273 
-48 


All classes 


56,747,008 


56,818,198 


-71,190 


-71,190 






'These figures are estimated from sample returns filed with the Internal Revenue 
Service but which contain no Information on income . They are in the population of re- 
turns sampled but are excluded from tabulations. 

Separate systems of weighting were used for the na- 
tional tabulations and for the State tabulations. The 
weights for the national tabulations were derived from 
nationwide populations obtained by adding the popu- 
lations reported by the district directors' offices. The 
separate district office populations were used to derive 
the independent district office weights for the State tab- 
ulations. Achieved sampling rates varied sufficiently 
among districts to warrant using two separate systems 
of weights. 

As a result of using two weighting systems and 
rounded weighting factors, there exist slight discrep- 
ancies between items in tables showing distributions by 
States and corresponding items shown in the national 
tables. 

Sampling variability. — The data from returns witii 
adjusted gross income of $150,000 or more are not sub- 
ject to sampling variability since all such returns were 
included in the sample. However, the estimates which 
include data from returns with adjusted gross income 



of less than $150,000 are subject to sampling variability. 
Table N below shows the range within which we would 
expect to find 1!) out of 20 estimates prepared from 
samples similarly selected. In the preparation of this 
table, it was assumed that systematic selection within 
strata would yield results equivalent to simple random 
sampling. For instance, if data from returns showing 
adjusted gross income of under $10,000 reveal 500,000 
returns having a certain characteristic, the chances are 
19 out of 20 that the difference between this figure and 
the one that would have been obtained from a complete 
count is less than 31,530. 

Table N.— SAMPLING VARIABILITI' OF ESTIMATED NUMBER OF RETURNS 



If the estimated number of returns is- 



1,000 

5,000 

25,000 

50,000 

100,000... 
500,000... 
1,000,000. 
5,000,000. 



And if the adjusted gross income class of 
returns to which the estimate refers is — 



Under $10,000 



$10,000 under $50,000 under 
$50,000 $150,000 



Then the chances are about 19 out of 20 
that the difference between this estimated 
number of returns and the figure that would 
be obtained from a count of all returns is 
less than — 



3,160 
7,080 
10,010 

14,150 
31,530 
44,390 
95,490 



280 

630 

1,410 

1,980 

2,770 
5,480 
6,280 



100 
230 
460 
560 



'Sample is not large enough to give reliable estimate of the sampling variability 
for this item. 

A general table of sampling variability for estimates 
that are based on returns from the several strata is not 
practical to prepare because of the large number of 
entries in the tables. The sampling variability for the 
value in each such cell must be estimated individually. 

It is reasonable to assume that the estimates of ad- 
justed gross income by class are subject to less relative 
sampling variability than are the associated frequencies. 
Since other money amounts are closely related to or de- 
pendent on adjusted gross income, it may be confidently 
assumed that these too are subject to less sampling vari- 
ability. Presented in table O are selected aggregate 
money amounts together with the range in percent that 
would include 19 out of 20 estimates prepared from sim- 
ilarly selected samples. 

Table O.-RELATIVE SAMPLING VARIABILITY OF ESTIMATED ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME 
AGGREGATES FOJi SELECTED CLASSES OF RETURNS 



Adjusted gross income class 



Under $10,000 

$10,000 under $50,000. 
$50,000 under $150,000 
$150,000 and over 

All classes 



Estimated adjusted 

gross income 

aggregate 

(Thoua^nd dollars) 



188,190,533 

33,829,629 

6,047,527 

2,168,166 



230,235,855 



Estimated relative 

sampling varia- 
bility in percent 



0.35 
0.19 
0.25 
0.00 



0.29 



Deletion of certain entries.— Throughout the tables 
the policy has been followed of deleting where possible 
those entries where the estinuited relative error trace- 
able to sampling variability was judged to be excessive. 
These cells are appropriately noted in each instance 
where this deletion has occurred. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



23 



Other limitations of the data. — In iiddition to sam- 
pling variability, the data are subject to certain other 
limitations. The data do not reflect changes that re- 
sulted from the audit program aflfecting Form 10-10 and 
1040A for 1954. In addition, controls maintained over 
the selection and processing of the returns used in com- 
piling the data do not completely eliminate the possibil- 
ity of error. Practical operating considerations neces- 
sitate allowance of reasonable tolerances in processing 
controls. 

EXPLANATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 
AND TERMS 

Classifications for Individual Returns 

For the tabulations in this report, individual returns 
were classified by size of adjusted gross income, by size 
of taxable income, by size of certain sources of income 
and deductions, as standard or itemized deductions re- 
turns, as taxable or nontaxable for income tax, by types 
of tax, by marital status of taxpayer, by number of 
exemptions other than age and blindness, and by States 
and Territories. 

Adjusted gross income classes. — The amount of ad- 
justed gross income reported by the taxpayer was the 
basis for this classification. AVith one exception, the 
class intervals remain the same as last year. This year, 
the class $100,000 under $200,000 was subdivided into 
two classes: $100,(X)0 under $150,000, and $150,000 under 
$200,000. Returns with an adjusted gross deficit, what- 
ever the amount, and returns with a breakeven in ad- 
justed gross income are designated "No adjusted gross 
income" and appear as a separate class. Returns with 
no information on them were not used for statistics. In 
tables where the taxable and nontaxable returns are 
combined, the nontaxable returns are included in the ad- 
justed gross income class corresponding to the amount 
of adjusted gross income reported, without regard to 
the class interval into which nontaxable returns are 
grouped when shown separately. 

Taxable and nontaxable returns. — This classification 
was based on the presence or absence of an income tax 
liability after credits. This is a departure from the tax 
status classification for the years 1951 through 1953 in 
that the current basis included only the income tax, and 
disregarded the self-employment tax. 

Taxable returns are those which showed an income 
tax liability remaining after the five tax credits allowed 
for dividends received, for retirement income, for for- 
eign taxes paid, for tax paid at source, and for partially 
, tax-exempt interest. The last three tax credits were al- 
lowed only to taxpayers who itemized their nonbusiness 
deductions. 

Nontaxable returns are returns with no income tax 
liability after credits. Nontaxable returns may have 
had an income tax before credits, in which case the tax 
credits were sufficient to eliminate the original tax. 



Returns with standard deduction or with itemized 
deductions. — Returns classified as returns with standard 
deduction were card-form returns. Form 1040A, and 
short-form returns. Form 1040, on both of which the 
adjusted gross income wtvs less than $5,000 and standard 
deduction was automatically allowed through use of the 
optional tax table; and the long- form returns, Form 
1040, with adjusted gross income of $5,000 or more on 
which the optional standard deduction was elected by 
the taxpayer. 

Returns classified as returns witli itemized deductions 
were long-form returns. Form 1040, on which nonbusi- 
ness deductions allowed against adjusted gross income 
were reported in detail by the taxpayer, or on which no 
deductions (standard or itemized) were taken, and all 
returns with a deficit or a breakeven in adjusted gross 
income whether long-form or short-form returns. 

Size of income or deduction. — For the purpose of a 
frequency distribution of significant items, the returns 
were segregated according to the size of specified sources 
of income or loss comprising adjusted gross income and 
the size of certain itemized deductions. The class inter- 
vals are narrow providing adequate classifications of 
small items of income or deduction. 

Taxable income classes. — The amount of taxable in- 
come, which is the tax base, supplied the basis for this 
size classification. Taxable income was reported by the 
taxpayer on long-form returns. Form 1040, but was 
mechanically computed for returns, Form 1040A, and 
for short-form returns. Form 1040, on which the taxable 
income was not reported. This made it possible to 
classify all individual returns by taxable income classes. 
Returns with no taxable income are so designated. The 
class intervals coincide with the taxable income brackets 
of the three income tax rate schedules applying to (1) 
joint returns and returns of surviving spouse, (2) sepa- 
rate returns of husbands and wives and of single 
persons not head of household or surviving spouse, and 
(3) heads of liousehold. There are 24 income brackets 
in the first two groups and 26 brackets in the third 
group, each group having its distinct class intervals. 

Marital status. — Classification of returns for marital 
status of taxpayer was based on the marital status in- 
dicated by the taxpayer. The Code provides that the 
marital status be determined at the close of the tax year 
or on the date of the death of a spouse. The five clas- 
sifications are: joint returns of husbands and wives, 
separate returns of husbands and wives, returns of heads 
of household, returns of surviving spouse, and returns 
of other single persons. When using data tabulated by 
marital status, the user should first read the discussion 
under Marital Status of Taxpayer, on page 11. 

Joint returns of husbands and wives are those on 
which a married couple reported their combined income, 
or returns of a married person whose spouse had no 
income but who, nevei-theless, was entitled to claim ex- 
emption for the spouse. Tliis group includes joint re- 
turns filed on Form 1040A even though the district 



24 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



director may have determined the minimum tax on the 
basis of separate incomes of husband and wife, on some 
of these returns. 

Separate returns of husbands and wives are returns 
of married persons who filed a return independently 
from their spouse, each reporting his or her respective 
income and claiming his own exemptions. Returns 
showing divided community income were classified as 
separate returns of husbands and wives. This group 
does not include joint returns, Forai 1040A, even though 
the district director determined the minimum tax on 
the basis of separate incomes of husband and wife. 

Returns of heads of household are returns, Form 
1040, filed by individuals who indicated on the face of 
their returns that they claimed this status. The Code 
specifies head of household as an unmarried person who 
furnished over half the maintenance of a home which 
was his residence and which he shared during the entire 
year with any related person for whom he was entitled 
to the exemption (except multiple support), or with 
his unmarried child, stepchild, or grandchild even 
thougli such child was not a dependent, or who paid 
more than half the cost of maintaining a household 
which w^as the principal abode of his parents, either of 
whom qualified as a dependent. 

Returns of surviving spouse are returns. Form 1040, 
filed by a widow or widower who signified this marital 
status on the face of his return. The Code defines a 
surviving spouse as a taxpayer whose spouse died during 
either of 2 previous years and who had not remarried, 
but who had maintained as his home a household which 
was also the principal abode of a child or stepchild for 
whom the taxpayer was entitled to the deduction for 
personal exemption. 

Returns of single persons are returns of unmarried 
individuals who did not claim status as head of house- 
hold or as surviving spouse. 

Number of exemptions other than age and blind- 
ness. — For a frequency distribution of returns by num- 
ber of exemptions, only the per capita exemption of 
the taxpayer, his spouse on a joint return, and each 
dependent was utilized. This maintained the same basis 
for this distribution that was used in previous years. 
There is a class for each of 1 through 5 exemptions and 
for 6 or more exemptions for all returns and for joint 
returns; and a class for each of 1 through 3 exemptions 
and for 4 or more exemptions for separate returns of 
husbands and wives, for returns of heads of household, 
for returns of surviving spouse, and for returns of single 
persons not head of household or surviving spouse. 

Types of tax. — Returns were recognized as having two 
kinds of income tax, that is, the combined normal tax 
and surtax or the alternative tax, and as having an un- 
related self-employment tax. 

Normal tax and surtax was computed at tlie regular 
rates and occurred on all types of returns. This tax 
includes the optional tax paid in lieu thereof. Normal 



tax and surtax applied to all kinds of income as well as 
to the capital gain or loss from sales of capital assets 
unless the alternative tax was imposed in regard to the 
capital gain. 

Alternative tax occurred on returns with taxable in- 
come above $18,000 which included a net long-term cap- 
ital gain or an excess of net long-term capital gain over 
net short-term capital loss, but only if the alternative 
tax was less than the regular normal tax and surtax 
computed on taxable income containing capital gain 
subject to normal tax and surtax. 

Self-employment tax was imposed on the self-employ- 
ment income of individuals owning and operating a 
business that conformed to the statutory definition of 
trade or business for self-employment tax purposes. 

States and Territories. — This classification consists 
of the 48 States, Hawaii, District of Columbia, and 
Puerto Rico, determined by the location of the internal 
revenue district in which the return was filed, except 
that for the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, the 
geographic location was determined from the address of 
the taxpayer. Internal revenue districts, or groups of 
such districts, are coextensive with States and Terri- 
tories, with the exceptions that the District of Colum- 
bia is a part of the Baltimore (Md.) district, Puerto 
Rico and Virgin Islands are a part of the Lower Man- 
hattan (N. Y.) district, Alaska is a part of the Seattle 
(Wash.) district, and Canal Zone is a part of the Jack- 
sonville (Fla.) district. 

Sources Comprising Adjusted Gross Income 

On returns. Form 1040, where the taxpayer reported 
income attributable to several tax years and filed his re- 
turn under provisions of Subchapter Q, Part I, of the 
1954 Code, the amount of income tabulated is only that 
portion of income pertaining to the current year. 

Such income originates from back pay, created inven- 
tions or artistic works, and compensation for long term 
services either as an individual or as a partner, if the 
fee or compensation therefor was received in 1 year 
but the work was performed over a period of time in- 
cluding prior tax years. In general, the provisions for 
taxing such income have the effect of including the 
income ratably over the period in which it was earned. 
Therefore, only the portion of salaries, business, part- 
nership, or other income allocated to the current year 
was tabulated for these sources in current statistics. 

The descriptions given below relate to items reported 
under the 1954 provisions. 

Salaries and wages (after exclusions) are the 
amounts of compensation included in adjusted gross in- 
come, except wages reported in other income on Form 
1040A. Salaries and wages after exclusions are exclu- 
sive of amounts received as wages or, in place of wages, 
under a wage continuation plan for the period during 
which the employee was absent from work on account 
of sickness or personal injury. Generally, the exclu- 
sion was limited to $100 per week, but was reported on 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



25 



all types of returns. Total salaries and wages, that is 
before exclusions for sick pay, included bonuses, tips, 
commissions, and other kinds of compensation received 
by the employee for services rendered. Amounts paid 
to the employee by his employer to cover expenses in- 
curred in connection with the employer's business were 
included as income from wages. On Form 1040, travel 
and lodging expenses incurred while away from home 
overnight and transportation expenses were deducted 
before reporting the total salary and wages, while ex- 
penses other than travel and transportation were de- 
ducted only to the extent that reimbursed expenses were 
included in wages. Also, outside salesmen deducted all 
ordinary and necessary business expenses from their 
compensation before entering total salary. 

Dividends (after exclusions) included in adjusted 
gross income are those reported on Form 1040 but ex- 
clude up to $50 of domestic dividends qualifying for 
the exclusion, which were received by each taxpayer, or 
up to $100 on joint returns if both husband and wife 
received such dividends. Dividends repoi-ted included 
foreign and domestic dividends received directly, and 
dividends qualifying for the exclusion received through 
partnerships and fiduciaries, but excluded the so-called 
dividends from mutual savings banks, cooperative 
banks, domestic building and loan associations, domes- 
tic savings and loan associations, and Federal savings 
and loan associations, which tlie taxpayer was instructed 
to report as interest income. This is the first year in 
which any part of the dividends received through part- 
nerships and fiduciaries have been reported in this 
source. Formerly, all dividends received through these 
entities were left in the income from partnerships or 
from estates and trusts. 

Interest received is that reported on Form 1040; it 
includes interest on bonds, debentures, notes, mortgages, 
bank deposits, savings accounts, loans, and tax-free cov- 
enant bonds, together with the partially tax-exempt in- 
terest. The partially tax-exempt interest includes that 
received through partnerships and fiduciaries. Accord- 
ing to the instructions on the return, the so-called div- 
idends mentioned in the previous paragrapli were to be 
reported as interest income. 

Business or professional net profit or net loss was 
reported by individuals who were sole proprietors of a 
business, farm, or profession. If a taxpayer had more 
than one sole proprietorship activity during the year, 
the single amount of net profit or net loss reported in 
adjusted gross income represented a combination of the 
profits and losses from all of liis business activities. 

Business expenses deductible from total receipts from 
business activities included such items as cost of goods 
sold, salaries and wages to employees, interest on busi- 
ness debts, taxes on business and business property, bad 
debts arising from sales or service, depreciation and ob- 
solescence, dei)letion, casualty losses on business prop- 
erty, rent, repairs, supplies, advertising, selling expenses, 
insurance, and other expenses of running tlie business. 



Compensation of the sole proprietor was not allowed 
as a business deduction and the net operating loss deduc- 
tion was not reported among the business deductions. 

Partnership net profit or net loss was reported by 
individuals who were members of a partnership, syndi- 
cate, joint venture, or the like. If the taxpayer was a 
member of more than one partnership during the year, 
the single amount of partnership net profit or net loss 
reported in adjusted gross income represented a combi- 
nation of the ordinary net income or loss from all of 
his partnership shares (whether or not actually re- 
ceived). In reporting the net profit or the net loss from 
partnershij), however, the taxpayer was reqiiired to ex- 
clude his share of partially tax-exempt interest, of divi- 
dends qualifying for the exclusion, and of net short- and 
long-term capital gain or loss and to report them in 
their respective sources. 

Net operating loss deduction relates to net ojjerating 
losses sustained in business or partnership after Decem- 
ber 31, 1949, and losses suffered from fire, storm, or other 
casualty, or from theft after December 31, 1950, but 
prior to 1954. The deduction claimed in the current 
year represented the portion of such losses which had 
not been absorbed by the required carrybacks and carry- 
overs applied to the net income of prior years. 

Net gain from sales of capital assets included in ad- 
justed gross income is the amount of gain from sales or 
e?ichanges of properties that were treated as capital as- 
sets. It was a combination of net short-term capital 
gain or loss (including the capital loss carryover from 
1949-53) and 100 percent of the net long-term capital 
gain or loss. If the net long-term capital gain exceeded 
the net short-term capital loss, only 50 percent of the 
excess gain was included in adjusted gross income. If 
the net short-term capital gain exceeded the net long- 
term capital loss, then the entire excess short-term gain 
was included in adjusted gross income. In making this 
combination, net short- and long-term capital gain or 
loss from partnerships and net short- and long-term 
capital gain from fiduciaries were included. This is the 
first year in which capital gain from fiduciaries has been 
reported in this source of income. 

Net loss from sales of capital assets reported as a 
component of adjusted gross income is the deductible 
loss resulting from sales or exchanges of properties that 
were treated as capital assets. In determining the deduc- 
tible loss, all short-term capital gains and losses (in- 
cluding the capital loss carryover from 1949-53) and 100 
percent of all long-term gains and losses were merged, 
and the excess capital loss was allowed to the extent of 
(a) capital loss, (b) taxable income (adjusted gross in- 
come, if tax was determined from tax table) computed 
without regai-d to capital gains and losses and the deduc- 
tion for exemptions, or (c) $1,000, whichever was small- 
est. In the determination of tlie excess capital loss, net 
short- and long-term capital gain or loss from partner- 
ships and net short- and long-term capital gain from 
fiduciaries were included. Heretofore, capital gain 



26 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



from fiduciaries was not included. The excess capital 
loss not deductible in the current year may be carried 
into each of 5 succeeding years as a short-term capital 
loss until it has been eliminated by capital gains or 
through the capital loss deduction allowed in computing 
adjusted gross income. 

Short term applies to gains and losses from sales of 
capital assets held 6 months or less. Such gains and 
losses, together with the capital loss carryover, are 
merged to obtain the net short-term capital gain or loss. 
In this merger, the net short-term capital gain or loss 
from partnerships and the net short-term capital gain 
from fiduciaries are also included. 

Long term applies to gains and losses from sales of 
property treated as capital assets but held more than 6 
months. These gains and losses are taken into account 
at 100 percent. Long-term capital gains and losses to- 
gether with net long-term capital gain or loss received 
through partnerships and net long-term capital gain 
received from fiduciaries are merged to determine the 
net long-tei-m capital gain or loss. 

Capital loss carryover from 1949-53 is the remaining 
portion of net capital loss sustained in those years but 
which the taxpayer had not yet been able to eliminate 
through his capital gains or the $1,000 deduction al- 
lowed for capital losses in computing his adjusted gross 
income, in years subsequent to the year in which the 
capital loss arose. This carryover was reported with 
and treated as a current year, short-term capital loss 
by the taxpayer. 

Net loss from sales of capital assets before limita- 
tion is the entire net loss from sales or exchanges of prop- 
erty treated as capital assets and reported on returns 
showing a capital loss deduction from gross income on 
account of this loss. It is a combination of the net 
short-term capital gain or loss including the capital loss 
can-yover and the net long-term capital gain or loss, 
without regard to the statutory limitation on the allow- 
able deduction. 

Net long-term capital gain in excess of net short- 
term capital loss is the entire amount of this excess 
occurring on returns with the alternative tax; it is not 
the amount included in adjusted gross income. This 
excess long-term capital gain is the amount to which the 
special rate of 25 percent is applied in computing the 
alternative tax. 

Net gain or loss from property other than capital 
assets is that from sales or exchanges of property which 
was not treated as a capital asset. Unlike the excess 
net long-term capital gain above, all of this type of net 
gain was included in adjusted gross income. Also, a 
net loss of this type was wholly deducted in computing 
adjusted gross income. 

Annuities and pensions included in adjusted gross in- 
come are only the taxable portion of amounts received 
within the tax year. The full amount of a pension or 
annuity received by a retired employee who contributed 
nothing toward the cost was taxable. In cases where 



the annuitant contributed to the cost, new methods were 
provided for computing the taxable amount to be re- 
ported, each depending upon the type of pension or 
annuity but, in general, provision was made to exclude 
a portion of the receipts as recovery of cost. 

Rents and royalties were reported in a single schedule 
on the income tax return. Therefore, the annual net 
income or net loss which was available represented a 
combination of the net income and net loss from both 
types of investment. Rents included not only rents 
from real estate but also amounts received from renting 
any kind of property, and included the fair market 
value of crops received as rent from farm property. 
Royalties included revenue from copyrights, patents, 
trademarks, formulas, natural resources under lease, and 
the like. Deductions against the gross income received 
from these investments were claimed for maintenance, 
insurance, repairs, interest, taxes, depreciation, deple- 
tion, and other expenses pertaining to the respective 
income. 

Income or loss from estates and trusts is the tax- 
payer's share of fiduciary income from an estate or trust 
under which he was a beneficiary. Fiduciary income 
includes amounts required to be distributed, and 
amounts credited to the beneficiary's account whether ac- 
tually received or not, as well as amounts paid to the 
beneficiary. Income from estates and trusts was re- 
duced by the taxpayer's share of depreciation. Capital 
gain, dividends qualifying for the exclusion, and par- 
tially tax-exempt interests were excluded and reported ^ 
in their respective source. A loss from estates and ' 
trusts was disti-ibuted to a beneficiary only upon ter- 
mination of a trust or an estate which had a net operating 
loss carryover, or a capital loss carryover, or for its 
last tax year had deductions (other than exemption and 
charitable deduction) in excess of gross income. 

Other sources of income include alimony received, 
prizes, awards, sweepstakes winnings, gambling profits, 
recovery of bad debts and taxes deducted in a prior year, 
insurance received as reimbursement of medical expenses 
previously deducted, and any other item of income not 
separately reported. Also there was included a total of 
$22,912,000 which consisted of wages not subject to in- 
come tax witliholding, dividends after exclusions, and 
interest, not exceeding $100 per return, reported in one 
sum as other income on 431,819 returns. Form 1040A. 

Itemized Nonbusiness Deductions 

The descriptions of itemized deductions which follow 
are confined to the nonbusiness deductions permitted 
under the 1954 Code as a deduction from adjusted 
gross income. 

Contributions consist of gifts to organizations created 
in the United States or its possessions, or under our 
laws and operated for religious, charitable, scientific, 
literary, or educational purposes exclusively, or for the 
prevention of cruelty to children or animals; and gifts 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



27 



made to veterans' organizations or to governmental agen- 
cies whicli use the gifts for public purposes. Persons 
who were members of a partnership included their pro 
rata share of contributions made by their partnership. 
In general, the deduction may not exceed 20 percent of 
adjusted gross income, but under the new Code, there is 
allowed an additional deduction up to 10 percent of ad- 
justed gross income for contributions made to churches, 
tax-exempt hospitals and tax-exempt educational institu- 
tions. So it was possible to have a deduction equal to 
30 percent of adjusted gross income. Also, tliere is an 
unlimited deduction if, in the current year and in 8 of 
the 10 preceding years, the amount of contributions plus 
the amount of income tax paid during sucli year (in 
respect to such year or preceding years) exceeds 90 per- 
cent of taxable income for the respective year, computed 
with modifications. 

Interest paid is that paid on personal debts, mortgages, 
bank loans, and installment purchases of real or personal 
property, but does not include interest on money bor- 
rowed to buy tax-exempt securities or single-premium 
life insurance and endowment contracts; neitiier does it 
include interest relating to rents, royalty, or business 
income which was reported in those schedules. 

Taxes paid include personal property taxes. State in- 
come taxes, certain State and local retail sales taxes, 
State gasoline taxes and automobile license fees, taxes 
paid to a foreign country or possession of the United 
States unless a foreign tax credit was claimed, and real 
estate taxes except those levied for improvements that 
tended to increase the value of the property. Federal 
taxes were not deductible. Taxes paid on business prop- 
erty were repoi-ted in the rent and business schedules. 

Medical and dental expenses are allowed as a deduc- 
tion from adjusted gross income with limitations. Ex- 
penditures considered for this deduction were the actual 
amounts paid during the tax year for the care of the 
taxpayer, his spouse, and any dependent who received 
over one-half of his support from the taxpayer regard- 
less of the dependent's gross income. Such expenses in- 
cluded payments to physicians, surgeons, dentists, nurses, 
hospitals, oculists, chiropractors, and osteopatlis, as well 
as X-rays, tlierapy treatments, dentures, crutches, hear- 
ing aids, and the like. Amounts paid for medicines and 
drugs could be included only to the extent of 1 percent 
of adjusted gross income under the new law. However, 
the allowable deduction was liberalized in that medical 
costs in excess of 3 percent (formerly 5 percent) of ad- 
justed gross income were allowed. Any sick and health 
insurance or hospital coverage received was subtracted 
from the total medical expenses, after which the deduc- 
tion was allowed if within the limitations. If neither 
the taxpayer nor his spouse had attained the age of 65, 
the deductible medical expenses for botii, including those 
for their dependents, were that portion of such expenses 
which exceeded an amount equal to 3 percent of adjusted 
gross income. If either the taxpayer or his spouse was 
65 years of age or over before the close of the tax year. 



the deductible expenses for both were not restricted to 
the excess over 3 percent of adjusted gross income; and 
the entire medical expenses for both together witii medi- 
cal expenses for their dependents in excess of 3 percent 
of the adjusted gross income constituted their deductible 
expenses. However, the maximum deduction allowed in 
any case was limited to $2,500 nniltiplied by the number 
of allowable exemptions other than age and blindness, 
but could not exceed $10,000 for husband and wife filing 
jointly, for a head of household, or for a surviving 
spouse, nor could it exceed $5,000 for a single person, or 
for married persons filing separate returns. 

Child care is a deduction provided under the new Code, 
for working women and widowers. The deduction was 
allowed on account of expenses for the care of a depend- 
ent child or stepchild under 12 years of age, or of any 
dependent who was physically or mentally incapable 
of caring for himself, while tiie taxpayer was em- 
ployed. The deduction was limited to $600, regardless 
of the amount of expense incurred. In the case of a 
working wife, the deduction was allowed only if (1) 
she filed a joint return with her liusband, and (2) their 
combined adjusted gross income was less than $5,100 
(unless the husband was incapable of self-support.) 
This second limitation for a working wife resulted from 
the provision that the maximum allowable deduction of 
$600 is reduced by the amount of adjusted gross income 
in excess of $4,500. 

Losses from fire, storm, or other casualty, or theft 
reported as a deduction are the net losses on nonbusiness 
property resulting from destruction by fire, storm, au- 
tomobile accident, shipwreck, flood, or other natural 
physical forces, and from losses due to theft. The de- 
duction was limited to the net loss sustained, that is, the 
value of property just before the loss less salvage value 
and insurance or other reimbursement received. 

Other deductions include ail other authorized non- 
business deductions not separately reported, such as ali- 
mony and separate maintenance payments, expenses in- 
curred in the collection of taxable income or for the man- 
agement, conservation, or maintenance of property held 
for the production of taxable income, taxpayer's share 
of interest and taxes paid by a cooperative apartment 
corporation, gambling losses not in excess of winnings 
reported in income, and expenses in connection with the 
taxpayer's job, for example, dues to unions or profes- 
sional societies, cost of tools and supplies, fees to em- 
ployment agencies, and any allowable expense in connec- 
tion with his employer's business which was in excess 
of reimbursed amounts. 

Exemptions 

In computing taxable income for the tax year 1954, 
a deduction of $600 was allowed for each exemption to 
which an individual was entitled. A per capita exemp- 
tion of $600 was allowed for the taxpayer and, on a joint 
return, his spouse, and for each cliild ( including a step- 



44SS05 O -57 -3 



28 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



child or an adopted child) wlio received more than one- 
half of his support from tlie taxpayer and who was un- 
der 19 years of age or was a student. If the child was 
19 or over and not a student, exemption was allowed 
only if the child met the sujiport test and had gross in- 
come under $600. Also, an exemption was allowed for 
each other dependent (specified below) with less than 
$600 gross income who received over one-half of his sup- 
port from the taxpayer. To qualify as a dependent, the 
child or other dependent must have been a citizen or 
resident of the United States, or a resident of Canada, 
Mexico, Republic of Panama, or the Canal Zone. 

Additional exemptions of $600 for age 65 or over and 
$600 for blindness were allowed the taxpayer and, if a 
joint return was filed, the taxpayer's spouse. 

If the dependency qualifications were met, exemption 
was claimed for parent, grandparent, grandchild, 
brother, sister, stepbrotlier, stepsister, stepmother, step- 
father, mother-in-law, father-in-law, brother-in-law, sis- 
ter-in-law, son-in-law, and daughter-in-law; for uncle, 
aunt, nephew, or niece if related by blood; and for any 
person who lived in the taxpayer's home and who was 
a member of his household, whether or not related to the 
taxpayer. 

The new law made an exception to the support test for 
a dependent who was supported by several persons none 
of whom contributed more than one-half. Under this 
provision, any one of the group who had contributed 
more than 10 percent of the support could claim the ex- 
emption if each of the others who contributed more tlian 
10 percent of the support filed a declaration that he 
would not claim the exemption. 

The number of exemptions and the amount claimed, 
as tabulated in this report, include exemptions from 
every return filed. There is some duplication of exemp- 
tions inasmuch as dependents with less than $600 of 
gross income from wages subject to income tax with- 
holding filed a return to daim refund of tax; and chil- 
dren dependents under 19 years of age and children 
dependents over 19 years who were students, with gross 
income of $600 or more, filed a return because their in- 
come met the requirement for filing. Exemptions 
claimed on returns filed by these dependents wei-e tab- 
ulated, as well as the exemptions for these dependents 
reported on the return of the taxpayer rightfully claim- 
ing the dependent. 

Measures of Individual Income 

Items explained here are in accordance witli the defi- 
nitions under tlie new provisions of the 1954 Code. 

Adjusted gross income is defined as gross income 
minus (a) allowable expenses attributable to the tax- 
payer's trade or business, (b) expenses paid or incurred 
in connection with services as an employee under a re- 
imbursement or other expense allowance arrangement 
witli tlie employer, (c) expenses of travel, meals, and 
lodging while away from home incurred by the tax- 
payer in connection with services rendered as an em- 



ployee, (d) expenses of transportation paid by the tax- 
payer in connection with the performance of services 
as an employee, (e) expenses of outside salesmen at- 
tributable to business carried on by the taxpayer if such 
business consists of the performance of services as an 
employee and if the business is to solicit, away from the 
employer's place of business, business for the employer, 
(f) deductions attributable to rents and royalties, (g) 
deductions for depreciation and dej^letion allowable to 
a life tenant or an income beneficiary of property held 
in trust, (h) allowable losses from sales of capital as- 
sets and other property, and (i) a deduction equal to 
50 percent of the excess of net long-term capital gain 
over net short-term capital loss. 

Adjusted gross deficit occurred in the event that the 
deductions allowed for the computation of adjusted 
gross income, stated above, exceeded the gross income. 

Taxable income tabulated for individual returns is ad- 
justed gross income minus deductions, itemized or stand- 
ard, and personal exemptions. The amount of taxable 
income, shown throughout this report, includes both the 
taxable income reported by taxpayers on the long-form 
return, Form 1040, and a mechanically computed 
amount of taxable income for taxpayers who used the 
short-form return. Form 1040, or the return, Form 
1040A, wherein the amount of taxable income was not 
a factor because the optional tax table was used for tax 
purposes. Taxable income for the latter taxpayers was 
computed by (a) using the midpoint of the adjusted 
gross income bracket of the tax table into which the 
income fell as the amount of adjusted gross income, and 
(b) providing a 10-percent standard deduction based 
on the midpoint, and (c) allowing $600 for each exemp- 
tion claimed. This formula resulted in the actual 
amount of taxable income upon which the tax was based. 
This is the only instance in which an item, not reported 
on the individual income tax return, was supplied for 
the tabulations. 

The concept of taxable income may be considered sim- 
ilar to the concept of surtax net income of former yeai's, 
if the other changes in the new law are ignored. 

Tax Items 

The reduced tax rates, previously enacted as appli- 
cable to individual income on and after January 1, 1954, 
were carried from the 1939 Code into the 1954 Code. 
However, in tlie 1954 Code, tiie normal tax rate and the 
graduated surtax rates were consolidated into a single 
comprehensive rate schedule. 

The income tax rates for 1954 income were 20 percent 
of the first $2,000 of taxable income, increasing to 91 
percent of taxable income in excess of $200,000 for all 
persons except heads of household, and in excess of 
$300,000 for heads of household. However, under the 
split-income provision, the 91-percent rate was opera- 
tive only on taxable income in excess of $400,000 on 
joint returns and returns of surviving spouse. The 
maximum tax was limited to 87 percent of taxable in- 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



29 



come. These rates are somewhat lower than tliose on 
1953 income. 

Fiscal-jear and part-year returns covering: a period 
tliat embraced January 1, 1954, showed a proration of 
tax to give efTect to the change in tax rates on January 
1, 1954. 

The descriptions of tax items are given in terms of 
the 1954 tax provisions. 

Income tax before credits is the tax based on taxable 
income and calculated at the prescribed rates. It may be 
the optional tax, the regular income tax, or the alter- 
native tax and it is without regard to tax credits al- 
lowed as a reduction thereof. 

Normal tax and surtax is the regular income tax 
which includes the optional tax. The normal tax and 
surtax was computed on taxable income at the rates 
stated above and reported by taxpayere wlio filed the 
long-form return, Form 1040. Optional tax was re- 
ported by taxpayers who used the short-form return, 
Form 1040, while the optional tax was determined by 
the district director for taxpayers who filed tlie card- 
form return. Form 1040A. The optional tax table stated 
the tax for the various adjusted gross income brackets 
and numbers of exemptions, for taxpayers M-ith adjusted 
gross income under $5,000 from whatever source. 

Alternative tax applied only in case the taxpayer had 
an excess of net long-term capital gain over net short- 
term capital loss and only if the alternative tax was less 
than the regular income tax. Alternative tax was the 
sum of (a) a partial tax computed at the regular income 
tax rates on taxable income reduced by 50 percent of 
the excess net long-term capital gain over the net short- 
term capital loss, and (b) an amount equal to 25 percent 
of the entire excess. The alternative tax is not eflective 
on taxable income under $18,000. 

Tax credit for dividends received is a new income 
tax credit, allowed on returns with tax year ended after 
July 31, 1954, for domestic dividends received after that 
date. This credit is equal to 4 percent of the qualifying 
dividends in excess of the dividends excluded from gi"oss 
income. However, the credit could not exceed the lesser 
of (a) the income tax reduced by foreign tax credit, 
or (b) 2 percent of the taxable income. 

Tax credit for retirement income, under the new 
law, is allowed against the income tax, if the taxpayer 
qualified with regard to earned income in prior yeai*s. 
The credit is 20 percent of tlie retirement income, as 
defined by statute, with a maximum limit of $240 for 
each individual. The credit, however, could not exceed 
the income tax reduced by the other four tax credits. 

Tax credit for foreign tax paid was allowed against 
the income tax only to taxpayers who itemized deduc- 
tions but who did not deduct this tax among those 
deductions. Tlie credit pertains to income and profits 
taxes paid to a foreijrii country or possession of the 
United States, including the taxpayer's share of such 
taxes paid through partnerships and fiduciaries. The 
credit could not exceed the same proportion of the tax 



against which the credit was taken which the taxable 
income from sources in such foreign country bore to the 
entire taxable income computed without pereonal 
exemption. 

Tax credit for tax paid at source relates to income 
tax withheld and paid, by the debtor corporation, on 
interest from tax-free covenant bonds. Credit for the 
amount of tax paid including the taxpayer's share of 
such tax paid through partnerships and fiduciaries was 
allowed against the income tax but only if deductions 
were itemized. 

Tax credit for partially tax-exempt interest replaces 
the foi-mer deduction from net income and was allowed 
against the income tax only if deductions were itemized. 
The tax credit is 3 percent of the partially tax-exempt 
interest included in gross income, but was limited to 
the lesser of (a) 3 percent of taxable income, or (b) the 
income tax reduced by the credit for foreign tax paid 
and the credit for dividends received. 

Income tax liability after credits is the remaining 
tax after the subtraction of all tax credits, but prior to 
adjustments for tax withheld and the payments on 
declaration. 

Self-employment tax was reported by an individual 
who had net earnings from self-employment derived 
from a trade or business carried on by him, or from his 
share of self-employment net earnings from a partner- 
ship of which he was a member. However, farmers and 
most professional services were excluded from the defini- 
tion of self -employment earnings, and certain types of 
income and deductions were excluded, such as rents, in- 
terest, dividends, capital gains and losses, net operating 
loss deduction, and casualty losses. If such net earnings 
were $400 or more, they were considered self-employ- 
ment income. In determining the amount of self-em- 
ployment income to be taxed, three factors were con- 
sidered: first, the amount of net earnings from 
self -employment must be $400 or more; second, the 
maximum amount of self-employment income to be 
taxed is $3,600 ; and third, the amount of wages received 
on which social security tax had been withheld by an 
employer. If social security tax was withlield from 
wages, the amount of such wages was subtracted from 
the maximum amount of $3,600 to determine the limit 
on self-employment income to be taxed. The amount of 
self-employment income subject to tax was the smaller 
of (a) the amount of the limit on self-employment in- 
come to be taxed, determined as stated, or (b) the 
amount of net earnings from self -employment. No ex- 
emption was allowed against the self -employment in- 
come for purpose of computing the self -employment tax 
at 3 percent. 

Tax withheld is the income tax withheld at source on 
wages together with the over withholding of social se- 
curity employee tax. The amount of income tax to be 
witliheld by employers was stated in wage bracket with- 
holding tables or was determined by applying the pre- 



30 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME RETURNS FOR 1954 



scribed 18 percent withholding tax rate to the amount of 
wages in excess of withholding exemptions. Tlie over 
withheld social security tax, that is, the excess over the 
maximum tax of $72, occurred because the employer re- 
ceived wages from more than one employer. 

Payments on 1954 declaration of estimated income 
tax were reported on returns. Form 1040 only. These 
payments, made on account of the 1954 Declaration of 
Estimated Income Tax, Form 1040-ES, also included 
any credit which was applied against the estimated tax 
for 1954 by reason of an overpayment of the 1953 tax 
liability. 

Tax due at time of filing is the amount of tax that re- 
mained after the tax withheld and payments on 1954 



declaration had been applied against the total tax liabil- 
ity for the year which included both the self-employ- 
ment tax and the income tax liability after credits. 

Overpayment of tax occurred when the tax withheld 
and payments on 1954 declaration exceeded the com- 
bined self-employment tax and income tax liability after 
credits. Overpayment of tax gave rise to a refund or 
to a credit on the subsequent year's estimated income 
tax. 

Refund of tax overpayment is the amount indicated by 
the taxpayers who requested a refund. 

Credit on 1955 tax is the amount of 1954 tax overpay- 
ment which the taxpayers specified be credited on 1955 
estimated income tax. 



BASIC TABLES 
INDIVIDUAL RETURNS, 1954 

Page 

1. Number of returns, adjusted gross income, taxable income, and 

income tax, by ad j usted gross income classes and classes cumulated . 33 

2. Sources of income and loss and nonbusiness deductions, by returns 

with standard or itemized deductions 34 

3. Sources of income and loss and nonbusiness deductions, by adjusted 

gross income classes 35 

4. Sources of income and loss, exemptions, and tax items — all returns, 

joint returns, and other returns, by adjusted gross income classes. 36 

5. Itemized nonbusiness deductions, exemptions, and tax items, by 

adjusted gross income classes — returns with itemized deductions. 48 

6. Number of returns by size of source and by adjusted gross income 

classes 50 

7. Number of returns by size of nonbusiness deduction and by adjusted 

gross income classes 55 

8. Taxable income, tax credits, and income tax, by taxable income 

classes for applicable tax rates 56 

9. Adjusted gross income, taxable income, income tax, average tax, 

and effective tax rate, by types of income tax and by adjusted 
gross income classes 58 

10. Adjusted gross income, exemptions, taxable income, and income tax, 

by marital status of taxpayer, by returns with standard or item- 
ized deductions, and by adjusted gross income classes 59 

11. Exemptions by marital status of taxpayer and by adjusted gross 

income classes 65 

12. Capital gains and losses, short- and long-term, and capital loss 

carryover, by adj usted gross income classes 69 

13. Selected sources of income by States and Territories 71 

14. Adjusted gross income and income tax, by States and Territories 

and by adjusted gross income classes 72 

15. Returns with self-employment tax — adjusted gross income and self- 

employment tax, by adjusted gross income classes 75 

16. Returns with self-employment tax — adjusted gross income and self- 

employment tax, by States and Territories 76 



31 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



33 



Table 1.— NUMBER OF RETURNS, ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME, TAXABLE INCOME, AND INCOME TAX, BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES AND CLASSES CUMULATED 



Adjusted gross Income classes and classes cumulated 



Percent of 
total 



Adjusted gross income 



Amount 
( Thouaand 

dollMf) 



Percent of 
total 



Taxable income 



Amount 

( Thousand 
dollars) 



Percent of 
total 



Income tax liability 
after credits 



Amount 
( Thousand 
dollars) 



Percent of 
total 



(1) 



(2) 



(3) 



M 



(5) 



(6) 



(7) 



ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 



Returns with adjusted gross income. 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $3,500 

$3,500 under $4,000 

$i,000 under $4,500 

$4,500 under $5,000 



taxable and nontaxable; 



$5,000 under $6,000 

$6,000 under $7,000 

$7,000 under $8,000 

$8,000 under $9,000 

$9,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000... 
$150,000 under $200,000... 
$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total 

Returns with no adjusted gross income, nontaxable. 
Grand total 



CUMULATED FROM LOWEST ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASS 

Returns with adjusted gross income, taxable and nontaxable: 

Under $600 

Under $1 ,000 

Under $1 ,500 

Under $2 ,000 

Under $2 , 50O 

Under $3,000 

Under $3,500 

Under $4,000 

Under $4,500 

Under $5,000 

Under $6,000 

Under $7,000 

Under $8,000 

Under $9,000 

Under $10,000 

Under $15,000 

Under $20,000 

Under $30,000 

Under $50,000 

Under $100,000 

Under $150,000 

Under $200,000 

Under $500,000 

Under $1,000,000 

All returns 



Returns with no adjusted gross income, nontaxable. 
Total returns 



$50,000 or more. 
$30,000 or more. 
$20,000 or more. 
$15,000 or irore. 
$10,000 or more. 

$9,000 or more.. 
$8,000 or more.. 
$7,000 or more.. 
$6,000 or more.. 
$5,000 or more.. 

$4,500 or nore.. 
$4,000 or more.. 
$3,500 or more.. 
$3,000 or more.. 
$2,500 or more.. 

$2,000 or more.. 
$1,500 or more.. 
$1,000 or more. . 
$600 or more .... 
All returns.. . . . 



Returns with no adjusted gross income, nontaxable. 
Total returns 



3,939,817 
3,180,541 
4,520,595 
4,206,678 
4,311,673 

4,484,779 
4,607,975 
4,548,399 
4,202,754 
3,708,206 

5,189,199 
3,352,077 
2,016,601 
1,187,245 
721,146 

1,217,149 

368,907 

291,858 

161,995 

70,400 

11,628 

3,197 

3,245 

439 

201 



56,306,704 



56,747,008 



3,939,817 
7,120,358 
11,640,953 
15,847,631 
20,159,3(X 

24,644,083 
29,252,053 
33,800,457 
38,003,211 
41,711,417 

46,900,616 
50,252,693 
52,269,294 
53,456,539 
54,177,685 

55,394,834 
55,763,741 
56,055,599 
56,217,594 
56,287,994 

56,299,622 
56,302,819 
56,306,064 
56,306,503 
56,306,704 



440,304 



CUMUUTED FROM HIGHEST ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASS 

Returns with adjusted gross income, taxable and nontaxable: 

$1,000,000 or more 

$500,000 or more 

$200,000 or more 

$150,000 or more 

$100,000 or more 



56,747,008 



201 

640 

3,885 

7,082 

18,710 

89,110 

251,105 

542,963 

911,870 

2,129,019 

2,850,165 
4,037,410 
6,054,011 
9,406,088 
14,595,287 

18,303,493 
22,506,247 
27,054,646 
31,662,621 
36,147,400 

40,459,073 
44,665,751 
49,186,346 
52,366,887 
56,306,70i 



440,304 



7.0 
5.6 
3.0 
7.5 
7.7 

8.0 
8.2 
8.1 



9.2 
6.0 
3.6 
2.1 

1.3 

2.2 

0.7 
0.5 
0.3 
0.1 



1,294,816 
2,542,668 
5,630,728 
7,357,621 
9,703,996 

12,304,840 
14,979,298 
17,062,187 
17,849,574 
17,586,011 

28,346,771 
21,656,934 
15,025,572 
10,036,658 
6,312,309 

14,410,918 
6,323,542 
7,023,496 
6,071,673 
4,656,424 

1,391,103 

547,816 
919,072 
294,745 
406, 533 



0.6 
1.1 
2.4 
3.2 
4.2 

5.3 

6.5 
7.4 
7.8 
7.6 

12.3 
9.4 
6.5 
4.4 
3.0 

6.3 

2.7 
3.1 
2.6 
2.0 

0.6 
0.2 
0.4 
0.1 
0.2 



188,587 
1,072,631 
1,748, 6U 
2,915,272 

4,125,877 
5,606,880 
6,699,017 
7,409,011 
7,759,499 

13,786,654 
11,821,063 
8,945,178 
6,324,419 
4,479,948 

10,097,287 
4,809,174 
5,611,824 
5,052,815 
3,946,903 

1,170,329 
452,603 
740,497 
234,354 
332,335 



0.2 
0.9 
1.5 
2.5 

3.6 

4.9 
5.8 
6.4 
6.7 

12.0 
10.2 
7.8 



3.8 
4.2 
4.9 
4.4 
3.4 

1.0 
0.4 
0.6 
0.2 
0.3 



37,643 
213,519 
344,635 
575,180 

817,847 
1,120,604 
1,346,691 
1,489,975 
1,559,856 

2,770,109 
2,385,403 
1,820,597 
1,301,277 
932,992 

2,135,166 
1,145,589 
1,521,883 
1,683,981 

1,708,710 

614,555 
257,014 
455,363 
154,785 
222,374 



230,235,855 

'1,014,480 



115,331,301 



26,665,753 



^229,221,375 



115,331,301 



26.665,753 



7.0 
12.6 
20.7 
28.1 
35.8 

43.8 
52.0 
60.0 
67.5 
74.1 

83.3 
89.2 
92.3 
94.9 
96.2 

98.4 
99.0 
99.6 
99.8 
99.9 

99.9 
99.9 
99.9 
99.9 

100.0 



1,294,816 
3,837,434 
9,468,212 
16,825,833 
26,529,829 

38,834,669 
53,813,967 
70,876,154 
88,725,728 
106,311,739 

134,658,510 
156,315,494 
171,341,066 
181,377,724 
183,190,533 



601,451 
924,993 
948,439 
020, 162 
676, 536 

067,689 
615,505 
534,577 
329,322 

235,355 



0.6 
1.7 
4.1 
7.3 

11.5 

16.9 
23.4 
30.8 
38.5 
46.2 

58.5 
67.9 
74.4 
73.8 
81.7 

88.0 
90.7 
93.8 
96.4 
98.5 

99.1 
99.3 
99.7 
99.3 
100.0 



188,587 
1,261,218 
3,009,832 
5,925,104 

10,050,931 
15,657,861 
22,356,908 
29,765,919 
37,525,418 

51,312,072 
63,133,135 
72,073,313 
78,402,732 
82,882,680 

92,979,967 
97,789, Ul 
103,400,965 
108,453,730 
112,400,683 

113,571,012 
114,023,615 
114,764,112 
114,993,966 
115,331,301 



0.2 
1.1 
2.6 

5.1 

8.7 
13.6 
19.4 
25.3 
32.5 

44.5 
54.7 
62.5 
68.0 
71.9 

30.6 
34.3 
89.7 
94.0 
97.5 

98.5 
98.9 
99.5 
99.7 
100.0 



37,648 

251,167 

595,302 

1,170,932 

1,988,829 
3,109,433 
4,456,124 
5,946,099 
7,505,955 

10,276,064 
12,661,467 
14,482,064 
15,733,341 
16,716,333 

18,901,499 
20,047,083 
21,568,971 
23,252,952 
24,961,662 

25,576,217 
25,833,231 
26,238,594 
26,443,379 
26,665,753 



■'1,014,480 



'229,221,375 



115,331,301 



26,665,753 



0.2 

0.4 
1.0 
1.6 
3.8 

5.1 
7.2 
10.8 
16.7 
25.9 

32.5 
40.0 
48.0 
56.2 
64.2 

71.9 
79.3 
87.4 
93.0 
100.0 



406, 533 

701,278 

1,620,350 

2,168,166 

3,559,269 

3,215,693 
14,287,366 
21,310,862 
27,634,401 
42,045,322 

48,858,131 
58,894,789 
73,920,361 
95,577,345 
123,924,116 

141,510,127 
159,359,701 
176,421,383 
191,401,136 
203,706,026 

2U,410,022 
220,767,643 
226,398,371 
228,941,039 
230,235,855 



0.2 
0.3 
0.7 
0.9 
1.5 

3.6 
6.2 
9.3 
12.0 
18.3 

21.2 
25.6 
32.1 
41.5 
53.8 

61.5 
69.2 
76.6 
83.1 
88.5 

92.7 
95.9 
93.3 
99.4 
100.0 



332,335 

567,189 

1,307,686 

1,760,289 

2,930,618 

6,377,521 
11,930,336 
17,542,160 
22,351,334 
32,448,621 

36,928,569 
43,252,988 
52,198,166 
64,019,229 
77,305,883 

85,565,382 
92,974,393 
99,673,440 
105,280,320 
109,406,197 

112,321,469 

114,070,083 
115,142,714 
115,331,301 
115,331,301 



0.3 
0.5 
1.1 
1.5 
2.5 

6.0 
10.3 
15.2 
19.4 
28.1 

32.0 
37.5 
45.3 
55.5 
67.5 

74.2 
80.6 
86.4 
91.3 
94.9 

97.4 
98.9 
99.8 
100.0 
100.0 



222,374 

377, 159 

832, 522 

1,089,536 

1,704,091 

3,412,801 
5,096,782 
6,618,665 
7,764,254 
9,949,420 

10,332,412 
12,133,689 
14,004,286 
16,339,639 
19,159,798 

20,719,654 
22,209,629 
23,556,320 
24,676,924 
25,494,771 

26,069,951 
26,414,586 
26,628,105 
26,665,753 
26,665,753 



'1,014,480 



1^229,221,375 | 



115,331,301 



See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 

^Less than 0.05 percent. 

'Adjusted gross deficit. 

■'Adjusted gross income less adjusted gross deficit. 



34 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



Table 2 SOURCES OF INCOME AND LOSS *ND NONBUSMESS DEDUCTIONS. BY RETURNS WITH STANDARD OR ITEMIZED DEDUCTIONS 



20 
21 
22 
23 

24 
25 
26 



Sources: 

Salaries and wages (after exclusions). 

Dividends (after exclusions) 

Interest received 



Business or profession: 

Net profit 

Net loss 



Partnership: 
Net profit. 
Net loss.. . 



Net operating loss deduction. 

Sales of capital assets; 

Net gain 

Net loss 



Sales of property other than capital assets; 

Net gain 

Net loss 



Annuities and pensions. 

Rents and royalties; 

Net income 

Net loss 



Estates and trusts: 

Income 

Loss 



Other sources 

Adjusted gross income or deficit. 



Itemized nonbusiness deductions: 

Contributions 

Interest paid 

Taxes 

Medical and dental expenses 



Child care 

Losses from fire, 
Other deductions. 



storm, other casualty, or theft. 



Total itemized deductions. 



All returns ( taxabl'j and 
nontaxable ) 



Number of 
returns 



49,925,305 
3,681,007 
6,124,385 



6,320,812 
1,454,726 



1,588,046 
223,949 



2,411, U7 
664,084 



135,062 
207,456 



3,863,618 
1,143,837 



368,806 
12,258 



5,019,713 



56,747,008 



14,565,306 
10,727,798 
14,577,343 
8,639,147 

272,737 
2,107,002 
11,507,354 



15,243,545 



(Thoutand 
dollara) 



(2) 



185,952,623 
7,047,866 
2,370,230 



19,234,612 

2,308,809 



9,001,043 
478,242 



3,731,862 
379,446 



107,811 
199,058 

806,069 



3,536,292 
429,542 



685,140 
5,300 



'229,221,375 



3,892,547 
3,201,542 
4,085,362 
2,975,448 

88,714 

444,300 

2,731,267 



Returns with standard 
deduction 



Number of 
returns 



(3) 



36,304,499 
1,915,025 
3,533,688 



4,766,078 
753,186 



975,539 
94,978 



1,340,293 
304,181 



77,337 
87,844 



2,163,521 
534,497 



172,787 
5,482 



3,134,372 



(Thouiand 
dollars} 



(4) 



115,401,617 
1,584,015 
1,061,124 



12,069,791 
675, 529 



3,962,516 
70,255 



1,216,824 
160,593 



56,730 
56,613 



443,262 



1,661,011 
174,149 



239,025 
1,517 



136,887,797 



Returns with Itemized deductions 



Showing adjusted 
gross income 



Number of 
returns 



(5) 



13,525,349 
1,736,134 
2,544,793 

1,538,100 
361,734 



601,681 
86,068 



1,009,433 
335,305 



54,641 
98,128 



288,141 



1,650,108 
578,931 



193,970 
6,752 



1,825,258 



14,555,918 
10,721,354 
14,565,630 
8,633,875 

272,237 
2,106,457 

11,504,665 



15,229,351 



Amount 
( Thaisaattd 



(6) 



70,393,308 
5,446,885 
1,288,790 



7,143,782 
617,988 



5,011,377 
189,471 



2,397,190 
202,031 



48,151 
72,409 



1,836,905 
227,591 



444,408 
4,024 



93,348,058 



3,891,173 
3,201,287 
4,076,630 
2,971,172 

87,960 

444,245 

2,730,760 



17,403,227 



Showing no adjusted 
gross income 



Number of 
returns 



(7) 



95,457 
29,849 
45,904 



16,634 
349,806 



10,826 
47,903 



11,046 



61,371 
24,598 



3,034 
21,484 



2,575 



49,989 
30,409 



(M 
(M 



440,304 



See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 
Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value is included in each total. 

'Art llictud (mice innnmo loOO Ol^inctaH .TT•.^.^o Aafir^l* 



^Adjusted gross income less adjusted gross deficit. 
^Adjusted gross deficit. 



9,388 
6,444 
11,713 
5,272 

(M 
(M 
2,689 



Amount 
(Thauam^ 
dollar a) 



(8) 



157, 697 
16,966 
20,315 



16,041 
1,015,290 



30, 150 
218,518 



86,136 



117,850 
16,821 



2,881 
70,035 



38,375 
27,802 



(M 
(M 

11,624 



■■1,014,4 



1,374 
3,255 
8,732 
4,276 



(M 



18,953 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



35 






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t^ fA Al ON lA 
On 00 <n nD lA 
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-if >A ON NO <n 



O CO AI -^ Ai 
lA lA r^ "A ON 


rH in (A fA ON 


sssas 


0^ C^ O vO >H 










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0> lA ON ^ CO 
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^ ^ ^ lA O- 


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iM 







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U^ AJ en rH 0> 








AJ O vf rH O 
















in fH n o -J 

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lA O CO O AJ 


(>- AJ rH t> ON 


^O <n rH O lA 


ON ON 1-1 .H ON 







aSSSs 


C^ CO ON AJ CO 


r-J >A >£> 0> O 

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O Ai lA CO to 


A fA t>co 


982 
1,068 
2,030 
1,659 
'i,587 


2,214 
1,326 
1,447 
1,103 
546 


r- lA lA ^ tn 

O- AJ Al 


lA U1 sJD -4 to 

(n On O" O* lA 


S § In '^ "^ 
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O rH en vf C^ 
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nO ry vO nO -.t 

o a> r- CO >j 


ij O- NO rn to 
lA ^ D- C- AJ 


00 en rK lA lA 
en rH AJ 



•o r~ o o -J- 
a- •-< ON -A ii 


P S NO S CO 

ON nd ij -st r- 


O' fn AJ vO ,D 

■A r- o Aj f- 


m >* oj iH CO 

\0 {^ Al O ON 

OJ O vO nD ON 


lO O nO "A lA 

-H r^ m -o 0> 


fn -J Q m «o 

Cn On o ^ -7 

AJ AJ ON 


r- lA r- to o 


O O >0 fA Al 

Aj o r- -|j o 



[> Ai m .-1 u-i 

S NO O 00 ON 


\0 AJ AJ >n rH 
00 >A ^ t^ rH 
rH lA rH lA CO 


Aj [^ ^- U-. o 
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rH rH u^ <n >r 


°3 


OJ At to 

ry ^0 O 

m o --t 


D- O CO in n 
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r4 M ON -J 00 


ON -H O CO o 
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ON tn en o fn 
rH 00 m r- lA 
<n o ON AJ tf^ 


PS 


AJ t^ ^D 


^ ^ ^ M> 


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^ C-. ^ U>CO 


(A p- -^ O CO 

■^ e: E: ;S :? 

>D O in ON A) 


ON [^ CO lA o 


CO o 
r\i ON 


?i ^ AJ 


440 
3,939 
3,180 
4,520 
4,206 


4,311 
4,484 
9,156 
7,910 
L2,466 


1,217 

368 

291 

161 

70 


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36 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



t^ f^ IT* ffi lf\ 



rr-(\0 iOOO'r\CT> rncOt^tOCM rviTiiTviO^H aiCOC^^OiA «^ 

^U^■5 ■^r^sOCJ''-* tOfNiAOO^ CDiriO*''>60 CT'CO<^(^>i) ■£) 



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lA rH (N C^ .-( 



^ (*> (*l oj (^ r^ * 



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vO vO C^ -^^ vO 






nj >f 00 (^ C 



O^ Oj -O TO iH 

00 o^ ^ in c- 

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oor^oon-^ oon~j«) 



\0 "O r- CO o> 



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m iD f>j C-- fn 



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INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



37 



^ \0 C^ to 0> 






§£ 



^ 9 : 

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0\ O^ AI O 



3rr, r^ ^ to f 
si o^ <Ji O* u 



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INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



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41 



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42 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



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INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



43 

















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t«. lO o «o ^ 



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en "^ ft lA --t 



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■n rNj 



lA O^ Oi vO CO 



sD o o* a* vO 



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s^sss 


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ry -4- TO -O >D 
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r- o ^ o -H 

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en TO TO ry lA 
o o tn CO <j- 
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li 



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aO vO o 
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AJ '^ fn CO vO 



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- AJ en r\j TO 

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TO >i lO (jv c^ 
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o« P- 
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rn tf\ AJ r- AJ 
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lA AJ O AJ lA 
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lO O' TO lA r 
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lA -^ lA i-H 



to (^ P- en lA 

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o- TO >t o yD 



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\0 r\i >-* 



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O^HCNJAJ '^'^^i.iL"^ lOC^TOO^rH 

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S^S§§ §§§§§ §§S° 1^ 



CvBi-HrH™ "''^^iLii "^ '^ iS iri 



§s 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



45 



i%ot^cOa> O'-irM'" 



■in-jTlTtO P-tOO*0 



5 1 ' 



J -X o 3 
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S3 



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r^ lO [> -^ rO 

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;33R3 



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t-- r^ 1^ 







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l> in -^ -O -^ 






in TO ry 
<j\ O O •-( 



TO r- TO TO C- 
in TO ^ --X •£) 
^ oj "H lO m 



O- fv t^ ■* O 



m <^ m c^ TO 
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t»- (^ -^ oi >H 



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l£ 



3t 



888 = 



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a«* (. ^ L. 

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5888 

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ii u ;. 

01 01 01 

■o -o -o 

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11 



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388 

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C vO .-I .-I (M 

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in o m o m 

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w w w w w 



46 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



•> ■o [> m o^ 



o o - 



1 «■ 

I'- 



T C^ OJ ^ CO 

y lA in C^ \0 

H O OJ CT- t^ 



CO C- C^ \D 



lA S >!■ f\i fv 
CD r^ r-l «0 -.T 



rH rH Q> lO 

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fw •£) to C^<^ 






r- 




nn 






























a 












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3 


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■0 ^ 

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I el 



CT» ^ rv r^ -4 -J r 
•^ C~ r^ g^ \D -J C 
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iC^Aj-^ t^^viSryr 









r«OtM<A lAOCOf 
inOOO ■o^'a! 



IT. ^o ■O C^ >t 
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O l> -vf m ^ 



^ -J £> On 



O 15 -£> 



>0 P~ ^ CO 



o r^ IN lA o 

n (M (i« tn r- 

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lA <D vO tJN O 



t^ r^ ^ 

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■ * J3 01 

m B 

in X o 

c id o 



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vO C- O CO -J 
ry C^ CO O C^ 
CTi i-H (T- O O^ 



m -.1 O nO r 
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fn -£) o ry >o 
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rH O O C^ Ch 



< O lA -I 
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•D CT> r-H 00 O^ 

r^ n r- •O gv 

t»l AJ C- vj- ?NI 



AJ CO o 






CO cn (^ >o 
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Q^ ^ O <£) 



O -^ -J o* •-' 



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\D ^ O 

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r-t (^ 1^ 



I £ 



C CO ^ o *o 



f^ rH O O 

m lA CO -.J 

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\D f^ iO -it u 
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s-§ 



lA flN CT* r*^ 

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lO CT- >A O <-i 

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11 



to n r-H Ai 

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AI -J' c- 



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CO to r-l CT* fA 



■^ xO CO rH lA 
C^ O CO O -O 
CO -* CO sD O^ 



H ^ AJ sD 

aO vD 



O D- Aj .-H \0 

lA 1— I CO o\ CO 

>f O C^ AJ Al 

lA \D lA Nt I*! 



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CT> O At O •>* 

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»0 O 0> i? VI 
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l> vO 

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al 



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S e-8 



sp: 



r- (H Ai u 
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3 .H vD O fA 

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t Al fA »0 ■£> 



SAj r- ^ -sj 
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1 r>j lA lA o 



'■4 AJ 



o ^ c^ c^ 


lA .-H VA lA ^ 


lA AJ -si r- f- 

SKSSS 


S!=PS;3 

Ai (^ rH r- lA 


AJ >A CT, CO 


r- ^ >o NO kA 


CO W kA [^ -.1 


AJ .A .O rA AI 



lA AJ (A 
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38 88888 

D lA O lA O lA O 



O'-tAJAj fAfA^-liA -OOOOOvr-t 

■ ■ -<*«*** «>-<»«^ '!&'<«' «»«^'M^«e'«> 

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ss§§§ §§§ § § § § § § § 



BvO'HrHAj AjrA(A^%I iA>Or-000N 



u u ^^ u u 

<o m V v ^ 

tj "O T3 TJ ^ 

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Q O O O 

O O O O O 



OJ <U OJ <D (< 

■o -o -a -o o 
§§§§o 



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^388°. 



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Aj(A(A-^^ "Ayacop- 



> no t- 00 <^ o <-t 



aa? 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



47 



p. 



O o ^ 



I 5 s 
4 «■§ 






O o -^ 










rt rt M rt -H 


-1 rfM « ^ 


F5 oi k; ^ ?1 


?^ s 3 

rH (\ f^ 


2,402 
2,770 
2,357 
2,853 
3,911 


7,728 
5,043 
4,847 
4,657 
1,953 


3,792 
7,967 
2,205 

0,672 
0,294 


3,546 
1,500 
2,752 
847 
1,328 



rj St lO -£• 
C^ -.f CO 00 



> >r CO o t*- 
r- rH o o ^o 
O <0 f\i C^ >r\ 



O lA CO rij o 

rH 00 C- C- CO 

^D CO C^ P- »0 



r\i r\j r\] r\l r 



ITS OsO -«j rv 



ST ^O --J ft) 
re O- r^J i-H 
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'"'J S "^ =;? ^ 
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Ai O CO o c^ 
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0\ f^ lA O O 


CO CT> -D m CO 

CO Otn o> ry 


ss 


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8SS2 


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en [^ %o \o o 


CO tf^O -o g? 


OCO 


AI 


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a; Aj ^ C O 
(js »o lA vo tn 


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r-i m^ 





p-H to m en Aj 



C-- O o* O -«I 

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CT- CO CO CO -J 

r~- i-H o% iTi o 

>£> O -H O* 00 



m tn 03 CO tn 

vT O rS \0 -H 

(^ r- lA .-I (J. 



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oo O' m o O 



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o^ CO •£ tn '-i 
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o rjo \D c- 



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in >t %j Aj u 
to --J CO >i o 
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-^f (J. O [> O 
tn \D CO lA tn 
CO m :^ C-- 'O 



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>l■ 00 tn Aj 

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>0 -s* lA 00 M 
kA -} lA >J « 


;A;-;ro;-; 


to t> itMT, 






c^ sD ^ a> 00 









pv o> I-" <ri o 
F- in Aj r^ fl. 

lA n <n t^ rH 



vt CO u-i O O ^ AJ 

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(n (n o CO o 
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48 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



tr\ ^o D- 00 0\ 



oj (M oj oj ry 



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■-I O tOO'rH.jDC^ -Jf^JAJp-l 

t-OsO C^rHrHi-HAJ 0»AJOJr-tO >fOfAAl'- 

-■Ti-HfA iDAJlAiDiH OO^'HIA sDAJiH 

OOrH ^AJAJrHOs -.I-^AI'O-^I 

^C^ -J r^ .-• M .-I 

O^AJsOlA t^ncOi-llA %1COOOJO OlCO^JlAf 

oosO>oo ajiaojOO" fA:jr-ir--o r-Ajoj 

O^f-H*-! OJsOC-sroj l%JOOrAiA 

OrHtArH OssOr-tlAtA C^^tArH 

It- -O-vJAJrHAl-HOfsJO-JONl 

00 (ArA>J'-IOOO>rA<AAl 

0'--'~-'— - ^Vi.— %r-«IA>-l »OOssDfAi-l 

C^%-^v_-v_^ — --^lAAJsO '-I 

00 r-tO'ojeoco(^ps'AO'OC-oj 

8iAoj>D fAr-ojr-oi AJ 

^-^^-...-v — s^vlAiAlA COsD^tArH 



>£> O O lA r 

lA in OS -J C 

lA lA lA O sj 



rH fA lA lO ps 
r^ O -.1 lA F- 
O O sO ^ <H 



SOJO OsOf^OJ->J ^-J'COr 
0>AJ rHlA-^t<AOs CSJrH 
0>OvO lACOOslArH 



^ o o CO 



lA OS fA 00 ->* 
lA CO ->I to --i 

o o 00 r- fA 



■vj -H OJ ->l ^ r 



sOi-HtOsO-^ 0'AOtO^JD 
OJlArHrHfA fAAJlAOO 

cofM-oto-^ -sjojiAosr- 



OS C- 
CA O 



3S 



so o >r 



lA to >A r 
o c^ o P 



^_ OS <-H 



lA O O sO 

>r o -D OS 



- -f sO o 
r -3 Ai rH 



O O O Q Q 
_ _ OOQOO 
OiAO lAOOO " 

•^■fft-»» «» -to- -ft^ -«■■«■ 



iij (u n) ii> OJ II) m 

o|«§§ §§§§§ 

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31. QO QOQQO 

aOiOOiA OiAOOO 

t30'- *-.«»- 






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3 -o -a 
3§§ 



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■•>■«■■« *J- ♦* ■»» -W 4 « -W 



J -o o o 

O C rH tA 



52 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



•-' T3 '-' 



^■§c 



o -o c 



8*4 O 
0) O 
0*0 



o t, o 

o o o 

■A-O O 



?5 c? 



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O -D O 



■«J 3 <« 



O 73 O 



O aj O 

O T) O 



•2 *^ 



(M O iH J3 (\j >fv I-* 

r^ 1-1 lA O f^ ry 



I I ■£} t> -O <^ C 

vO i£p to ^0 « 

^ ^ (-^ -^ CD TO y 



■-I ojojeoo\D 0(Nii-i 

CTv lO 0> O CT> u^ <-< 



— ~ ry C-' r- <^ 



ir\ \D to 

(^ CM P- >T -J W •- 



-J--JCO 0>r'J3-^ir\J 






C^Ot^ r-ttOO--lt-- 



r-i ^ -4 r^ >r to ry ' 

8r^ nj O -iJ f^ C^ ( 
O i-l tM rsj >J O' < 



>£i *r, f^ O O^ 
CO O f^ P- "^ 

rv f\j (*^ O -O 



3 O O n \D r 



■( r% c^ (^ m c 



ITv r^ -f ifl o» CM r 






fc^^ *^Q*^»— <^ rvu 



300>O(N>-' rHr-liriCT''M 

^(^o^DO (M^tMO'fM 



o-*-^c^DO -Jvcoo>o oj>oa)r«rH p^movr 
r^irvrvOco rirH(-io\rH toeotntnio co-^o-" 



4 •O to <\i r 

- -0 ir\ m M 

J o r^ « 



■sj>jr^»-i^ tOOO'-If'J'O >C<MU^(MO fNlOOJf 

\D>}'-"i^tM C^'OO'-iO^ >0^--*'-JfV r^>rs->I 

iTiCT'irsCT-^I 0»0>OfMt^ r-eoO^f'JO fM 

-sjoo'Tvirt'O O'-JOi'^iTi vDo*eoir*(M 



rsi .-H eo r- to 
--1 (^ P- (M iri 
m >j (jv ^ O 



<f^ \0 to ^ -^ C^vO-OOtO 



r- CO 



3<r(fM tf\t^«o*^eo >r»oc>n-,i 
J-->ttO irvo-^noj rH-^m'^'-i 



H i-t est fV >0 (M ' 



O TO sD O 

m TO o> o> 



c^ o o 

f^ Q TO 

m O fM 



\ On to ^0 -vj 



■£) CT" C^ TO r 
Qv >J CM ■-< 



OJ OO iTi 
■i nO -O 
tn CM (M 



3fM C^<C-t^'-t fM .-( 
r-5 f-i 0\ >r\ t^ •-* 



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oooo Sooo 

pinS ^OOO "lAOOOO i-<CM 
5 » . . » ~ »o ,H CM r^ "A fH -Vi^ 
Dr^CM (Mf^-JkAM «»■»■<*■« ■«i> 



UOt-'UT) ■OTJ'D-OT) 55555 3 

SS«§§ §§§§§ 5SS35 

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IS 

3 



Ot-<CM CMt^^lArH 



mOOOO .-.(MiOr-ii 

rH CM m U-1 .-H '4»«»-t9-«» ( 

^ !- fc ^ • 



CM TO 



to iH CM -, 
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rH IM -J 

^ o» O 

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o +> 



■o. 0)1) ajOJOjaiaiTJ'O'O-a'a 55QS„'-' 

ajotH-o-o •a-D-D-a-a 555G5 :d3330 w 

1iS«§§ §§§§§ 33333 goooS S 

3*9- § QOQOO a S X S (t" ^ 



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jC-OrHiH CMOjr^^iri rHt-tcMr^iri i-i t-i c 

5 =>■«■■«■■«» -I*-**-**-**-** -t^^^-W-M-W- ■W-W-W 



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■0+^030 

C M <H 

w 3-(00 O 

a> -o t* o O 

rH 01 41 » _" 
£> -0 

O) O C <-H (^ 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



53 














1 I 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 ^ r-H 1 


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t 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


III AJ 


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1 1 1 1 t 


III (n 




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III 1 


lA -3 rH 


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At 


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3=^5 






































1 1 1 1 


t 1 1 1 1 


ff. ,-H 00 rH 00 


>f O rH TO --J 


;t 




1111 


1 1 1 1 






c 




lA 




§ fc§ 




































































































































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^-' 












^^ 


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t 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 










1 , 








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SS;8 




































































































in § c" 




































































































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1 1 1 




fv n c^ ^ 1 


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1 1 1 








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(?■ TO -H TO CT- 












































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>n 
















































































1 1 > 1 1 


1 1 >t o 




Ov PI r^ m 1 


m 




1 1 1 






SPS'^'^ 


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8fe8 




















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OS Qv TO TO AJ 






lA 0^ t^ 


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III 1 


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O' -J Al O -^I 


•fl OS rH >t OJ 
















rH rv -.1 O^ <-- 


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to -O A) fA OJ 


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8^8 
S§3 












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PA TO C P- Al 






o 


m .-< PA ^ 






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f^ -vj- -vT ^ J3 


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r- 




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Al AJ (M AJ 


AJ Al ^ lA O 






fe 




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i:;>^s^S 




f-. C^ TO rH 1 








in r-i o o» m 


O CT; r- TO ^ 








in 












Aj in o nO f^ 




P' 




o; O -O TO «A 

6 in rH nj r^ 












^•gs 














AJ rH vf ^ ai 


PA PA O O 0> 








£-- 




^ 




(^ ri ul -J 


(M r> lA AJ sD 






r-l 






lA lA TO vD PA 


































AJ AJ >A r- PA 






>r 




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1 > ai m 


5SP2*H e 


O O <A TO Ov 


C^ t- m r-« 1 














^ 








































8^8 


'■;" 






O o- O O sO 


«A lA O -O AJ 




^ 








m o AJ lA iH 


AJ 


-J' 


m [■- r-. ,0 






^^ 




'^ ^ -O ^ 


,0 Al -H iA O- 


AJ M .-1 




P- 




TO m p\ p\ p^ 














































































AJ 


















































:* 








O O g TO «A 


vD *A Q PA O 


























o 2; o "A lA 

vO O AJ AJ C-- 












L. 


(N 












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m m PA -.J^ 




- ry f-^ fNj 


>j ^ .-. IT. r- 


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in ^ <jv AJ o 






■n 




























p\ 




O m 

If 






m C^ -J lA .-1 






m Aj o so PI 


R 












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TO O --H ^ 








- 












O 






O .O -A rH C'- 




vO 






(M f^ ^ <T, rH 
■-H -J CO O 


c- ^o >r r^ vD 






















?5S:3:^a 






























i-l AJ AJ OJ 


































-h" 






pa' 


M 


^' 






o 

1 


















































































































































































































































































































































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2 












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1^- 










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1 


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^ : : : : : 










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1 1 


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50,000, 
00,000. 
00,000. 
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e 








50,000. 
00,000. 
00,000. 
,000, ooc 
e 


: g 
: i 














S 


£ 
























«,= :::: 




$15,000 
$20,000 
$30,000 
$50,000 
$100,OOC 






)00'0 
000' 
000' 
000' 
000' 


§ 










S- : :88 


$2,500 
$3,000 

$^,000 
$5,000 
$10,00 


?» :d§8 


88888 








S 




■«^«»*»-«» o 




S * 


■A O o o -^ 


^s° °s 


.-1 AJ lA rt I. 


: SS 


o 








11 


ffl O ■ O .-1 IN 




















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1 




























•D 


nd n 

sted 

600. 

der 

unde 

unde 


apun 

apun 
apun 
apun 
apun 


§§§§§ 


,000 un 
,000 un 
,000 un 
,000 un 
00,000 


■tJ 


S 


nd n 
sted 

600. 
der 
unde 
unde 


unde 
unde 
unde 
unde 
unde 


13 "O -D T3 -O 


,000 un 
,000 un 

,000 un 
,000 un 
00,000 


r-t c -a o -o rt 
♦J Tj *i o 3 o +• 








3le a 
adJu 

DO un 
,000 
500 


§§§§§ 


§§§§§ 






"•H.-^Soo 


88888 


§§§!§ 










O m o O O 










O in o O O 


O lA O O o 


8S88°. 


■So'SSS 








01 O C >0 rn .-. 


^■tfii^'*^-^ 






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54 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



o g o 
m 3 o 



;§S 



O f- o 

O a; O 

O -D O 

in 3 O 



8fe8 

O 13 O 
■tl- ■» 



O (- Q 
OHO 
m -o o 



O fH O 

o o o 

O XJ lA 



^§^- 



M-§^- 



f- o 

o o> o 
O -D O 



O "O o 



o -a o 
■» 3-w- 



O CT* O (N) ' 



1 o^ -nT O rg 



I I rH t^ o \0 u> « 

>!■ [^ ir\ c~ a- o 

----— N O O (\J \0 lA t^ 



I r\j c- to (^ c 

^ 03 >f 0\ u 



5^ r-l>>H->IC- fNJCMOOr 



^ o^ CT- <-! rv 
t rH in rH r^ 
1 O (? -O "-J 



-.-— xo o> o CO in (-1 






^%_-s_-v_- -S) 



■^ --to 



'\ vO o >J 
M ^ a; r-l c 
"i-— CD ry O u 



-J- to 



i-DC^^o njnj-H»ooj C^-J'0\0v0 •-imo^-J' 

iHrHO inrHtnchg> >-ii-<Q>'*oo \oo<j'<~i 

mmm ooOnTO stcooo^n <m.-i 

O COOOOiO"^ >Onj<M 

-^. — .. — <. f~~ ■ — .- — - m CT- CT" c- -^ •>! 

1 t---^r-ic--ro:jeoc^>nr-<!>jf^i 

r-l <*\ <-i r^OOOOO t-r^cn 

,-,—,—. ,-~.,~. OOO fMC^riOin 

.-^^—.—^ ^_^-^ -J- -^ CO Of t-H 

<nOf^ o^fMOm^ oor^C^t^ 

(MO\0 o^CTir^\Dr-i r\jr^'^ 

-~-^-~.,— «. — . . — .,— V oom o^co-Dt^m r-l 

_-^^-_^. — — -■.— t^ (^ to fM >-• 

O mnjcvjcp rHC^njtoo ■■o f^ -^ 

— .—..— .in ^— tnomo eomt^ni-xj .-i 

noo 0(MD-«fl\0 in-^OOry 

—*.—*-— .^—..'-^-^■no^ 0>-Jnjnjto <n 

.^..^ — .^ --w-^—in ^ >J ^ (M CM rH 

§(M>in t^OOC^rttO iHOCOOC^ OOQ<^^flv£i 

cyrjO ^-j<-ico-^ ojtonjmnj c^or^f^vO 

minrH i-i i-i C~ C^ (\l 0^-tM>fvO >JO0O^rH 

-.j-^ior^ ^O^nOvOf^ OOf^*©"-! (M 

^r-ifM t-ii-tcnryO -4 (^ rti r-i i-i 






!§§ 



UL.t-.t<F^ 4)0<UiDai •O'0'D-a( 

Tj-o'O'a'a ccccc dssdc 
§Si§§ §§§§§ qqoqS 



s s^, 



Q) O C 
T) O 



©•nOOO - " - - - QOOQC 

* . - - - OinoOO OmoO 
rgnjr^>tin fHr-trur^m .-(.-(fMu-ir- 



55 

01 -C 

a V 

0) 3 

a o 
e c 



o 



01 a 

■g p. 



c o 

O *J 0) 

-J (i> h 

3tU) 3 

u o 

<a CO n 



H tH 0) 

5 rJ p 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



55 



Table 7.— NUMBER OF RETURNS BY SIZE OF NONBUSINESS DEDUCTION /VND BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES— RETURNS WITH ITEMIZED DEDUCTIONS 



Adjusted gross income classes 



RETURNS «ITH CONTRIBUTIONS DEDUCTED 

Taxable and nontaxable returns: 

No adjusted gross income 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 



$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $A,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000... 
$150,000 under $200,000... 
$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total 

RETURNS WITH INTEREST PAID 

Taxable and nontaxable returns: 

No adjusted gross income 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1, 500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 



$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $i,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000... 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total 

RETURNS WITH TAXES PAID 

Taxable and nontaxable returns: 

No adjusted gross income 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 



$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000... 
$150,000 under $200,000. . . 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total 

RETURNS WITH MEDICAL EXPENSES DEDUCTED 

Taxable and nontaxable returns : 

No adjusted gross income 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1, 500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 



$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000.... 

$100,000 under $150,000... 
$150,000 under $200,000... 
$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total. 



Number of 
returns 



(1) 



9,388 
18,083 
172,833 

337,202 
547,434 
730,709 

893,494 
2,437,096 
2,880,652 
5,318,937 

561,669 

226,519 
212,877 
135,953 
64,449 

11,113 

3,111 

3,159 

429 

199 



6,444 

8,052 

51,297 

131,813 

227,102 

352,830 

514,386 
1,695,683 
2,300,186 
4,565,036 

437,650 

159,703 

141,505 

85,562 

39,259 

6,828 

1,957 

2,087 

279 

134 



11,713 
15,075 
166,947 
325,305 
533,930 
728,100 

890,074 
2,444,351 
2,897,022 
5,345,173 

562,313 
226,557 
212,783 
135,674 
64,372 

11,074 

3,035 

3,165 

425 

195 



14,577,343 



5,272 
10,553 
121,004 
240,176 
339,302 
513,312 

611,633 
1,601,379 
1,309,381 
2,878,048 

247,052 
80,736 
65,808 
36,487 
17,623 

3,413 

1,050 

1,126 

163 

74 



Number of returns by size of deduction 



Under 
$100 



4,607 
10,614 
124,017 

188, ail 
264,879 
305,918 

351,936 

837,183 

957, too 

1,296,725 

52,935 

14,060 
9,199 
4,160 
1,136 

114 
30 
29 



4,424,037 



3,557 

29,654 

73,332 

133,160 

179,541 

241,265 
638,696 
617,442 
735,143 

42,648 
18,332 
16,240 
11,573 
4,990 

322 
200 
180 
19 

11 



2,747,830 



2,599 
6,518 
116,561 
185,315 
322,622 
384,862 

400,175 
734,974 
432,556 
367,537 

11,620 

2,377 

2,333 

1,052 

341 

66 
19 



:, 639, 147 



(') 
4,064 
44,637 
78,802 
96,391 
112,832 

128,975 
321,656 
360,383 
570,732 

30,674 

3,461 

5,411 

2,797 

900 

143 

y, 

30 



$100 
under 

$200 



2,572 
3,970 
37,254 
117,168 
191,509 
223,521 

269,667 

737,630 

816,958 

1,407,944 

92,922 

25,806 

19,123 

8,233 

2,211 

174 

37 

45 

3 



3,956,750 



l') 
(') 
9,540 
31,233 
42,889 
90,916 

115,089 
390,733 
475,541 
693,960 

43,772 

15,202 

14,562 

7,196 

3,125 

376 
126 
104 



1,937,423 



2, MO 
4,999 
32,266 
84,060 
124,369 
202,895 

284,113 

918,163 

1,071,047 

1,172,726 

32,366 

6,788 

4,696 

1,790 

574 

87 

13 
9 
1 
1 



1,768,502 



(M 

4,016 

32,163 

59,760 

106,965 

132,120 

154,039 
386,431 
444,946 
638,626 

39,483 

11,189 

6,404 

2,945 

1,293 

217 
47 
54 

10 



$200 

under 

$300 



(4) 



9,528 
24,175 
64,310 
142,890 

166,463 
419,764 
469,530 

944,815 

92,044 

28,856 

20,109 

8,378 

2,597 

263 

46 
36 



(') 
(') 
5,568 
10,602 
18,720 
39,399 

74,931 
274,972 
427,527 
766,384 

45,704 

15,427 

11, 502 

6,290 

2,578 

330 
77 
91 
10 



1,703,239 



CM 

(M 

13,563 
35,749 
49,585 

83,764 

134,975 

482,330 

339,755 

-,575,634 

58, 130 
14,060 
7,741 
2,947 
733 

105 

21 

19 

2 

1 



3,302,807 



(M 

(M 

17,007 

40,203 

69,846 

96,556 

112,026 
305,290 
347,605 
511,297 

34,332 
9,528 
7,571 
3,308 
1,264 

212 

71 

80 

7 

3 



$300 

under 

$400 



(M 
'M 

4,934 
16,660 
31,150 

57,745 
266,300 
300,326 
642,623 

79,354 
23,131 
22,376 
10,015 
2,847 

270 
39 
36 

1 



1,466,403 



CM 
(M 

3,000 
9,608 
15,603 
19,751 

37,682 
207,753 
377,475 
383,670 

58,110 

16,703 

13,097 

6,939 

2,402 

348 
94 
59 

5 
3 



1,658,415 



CM 
CM 
3,017 
10,126 
21,744 
32,853 

43,411 
170,252 
342,350 
,223,604 

81,985 

16,344 

10,043 

3,921 

1,084 

lis 

28 

17 

3 

1 



CM 
CM 

9,574 
27,636 
46,719 
73,225 

82,316 
194,655 
232,124 
366,672 

26,418 
7,622 
6,091 
2,900 
1,282 

245 

62 

57 

6 



$400 

under 

$500 



(6) 



CM 
CM 
CM 
(M 
6,031 
19,098 

22,149 
99,430 
197,655 
377,426 

61,403 
23,982 
21,519 
9,763 
2,782 

319 
53 
33 



844,246 



CM 
CM 

CM 
CM 

9,602 
10,126 

24,740 
100,209 
215,351 
674,644 

61,366 
18,397 
12,233 
7,346 
2,727 

243 

74 

72 

7 

3 



1,141,719 



CM 
(M 

4,021 
8,059 
15,098 

17,241 

56,137 

108,266 

582,782 

93,343 

22,269 

13,143 

4,954 

1,414 

143 
33 
26 

3 
2 



933,507 



CM 
(M 
6,542 
13,693 
19,648 
31,676 

39,837 
129,722 
156,575 
255,261 

21,270 
6,255 
6,112 
2,535 
1,068 

263 
64 



$500 

under 

$1,000 



17) 



CM 

CM 
CM 

3,995 
8,108 

25,529 

74,272 

134,071 

596,762 

132,094 
69,059 
66,527 
38,929 
13,066 

1,202 
227 
164 



CM 
CM 

5,017 
7,119 
11,097 

19,679 

76,712 

179,231 

760,553 

152,975 

53,932 

44,913 

22,243 

3,119 

1,249 

286 

256 

26 



(M 
CM 
CM 

5,034 
6,551 
7,623 

9,142 

29,427 

50,986 

400,464 

244,151 

114,766 

82,465 

34,306 

8,863 

831 

172 

123 

18 

1 



2,021,247 1,557,239 1,078,151 691,621 1,113,455 



CM 
CM 

8,518 
13,437 
31,179 
55,350 

69,769 
214,260 
213,179 
406,095 

53,734 
17,477 
14,776 
8,558 
4,333 

705 

236 

232 

29 



$1,000 
under 
$1,500 



CM 
CM 



(M 

(M ' 

3,512 

45,533 

33,867 
20,606 
26,215 
22,441 
9,323 

1,092 
227 
137 
19 



166,018 



CM 



(M 
(M 

5,574 
6,085 
36,429 

22,559 
13,498 
14,972 
10,279 
4,382 

716 

188 

200 

24 



CM 



(M 
(M 
CM 

CM 
CM 
(M 

15,744 

26,633 
37,502 
57,065 
32,135 
10, 513 

972 

216 

153 

10 

7 



(M 

IM 
(M 

9,525 
9,491 

14,625 
23,635 
33,778 
62,630 

13,864 
7,389 
6,329 
3,320 
1,773 

381 

117 

126 

17 

10 



196,109 



$1,500 
under 
$2,000 



$2,000 

under 

$2,500 



C9) 



CM 
4,579 

10,530 
8,351 
11,394 
11,365 
6,606 

322 
193 
144 
11 



CM 
CM 
CM 

4,633 

6,210 
4,284 
5,703 
4,611 
2,640 

477 
137 
131 



CM 



CM 
CM 
CM 

4,965 
7,922 
21,991 
22,415 
8,533 

973 

173 

139 

18 

10 



(M 
(M 
CM 

4,023 
3,978 

3,995 
12,035 
10,109 
25,787 

7,931 
4,595 
3,517 
2,452 
1,023 

240 
85 
78 



(10) 



CM 

3,607 
3,537 
6,037 
6,479 
5,245 

754 
159 

94 
10 



(M 
CM ' 

3,085 

1,789 
1,383 
2,790 
2,673 

1,790 

300 
93 



CM 



(M 

2,067 

2,452 

7,773 
13,824 
6,850 

815 

158 

130 

16 



36,-195 



CM 



CM 
cM 
CM 

3,017 
7,029 
7,143 
15,612 

5,155 
2,102 
2,337 
1,573 
739 

196 
46 



$2,500 
under 
$3,000 



111) 



(M 

1,222 

1,783 

3,304 

3,682 

3,263 

677 

123 

100 

9 

3 



15,179 



IM 



CM 

929 
1,042 
1,756 
1,647 
1,297 

332 
61 
74 
13 



CM 
(M 



CM 

550 

747 

2,973 

8,709 

5,506 

669 
163 
116 
■17 



22,528 



CM 

CM 
CM 

3,01 

CM 
(M 

6,09 

CM 

13,217 

4,747 
3,054 
2,585 
1,809 
1,400 

255 

100 

120 

21 

13 



$3,000 

under 

$4,000 



1,338 
1,167 
3,599 
5,442 
4,197 

344 

241 

Ul 

9 

5 



732 

691 

1,475 

1,862 

1,603 

314 

121 

119 

11 

6 



7,438 



503 

447 

1,614 

6,113 

3,330 

1,131 
243 

235 

19 

5 



19,145 



c 
c 
(' 

6,551 

2,282 
1,495 
1,337 
1,222 
785 

144 
45 
60 



$4,000 

under 

$5,000 



$5,000 

under 

$10,000 



(13) 



303 

890 

1,377 

2,285 

2,352 

623 

174 

125 



(M 



CM 



543 
327 
808 
901 
919 

231 
82 
87 
13 



CM 



261 

239 

462 

2,019 

4,917 

1,071 
211 

196 



CM 
(M' 



CM 
CM " 

953 
722 
991 
1,151 
477 

101 
33 
43 



291 
1,598 

4,107 
5,111 

1,557 

478 

397 

32 

17 



13,588 



CM 



239 

408 

1,147 

1,522 

1,777 

570 
187 
223 

40 
10 



CM 



(M 

185 

120 

479 

1,199 

5,655 

3,337 

929 

664 

50 

10 



13,643 



CM 



CM 



3,017 

1,180 
397 
1,700 
1,321 
1,167 

290 

104 

134 

20 

10 



8,571 10,381 



See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 
^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value is included in each total. 



56 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



-TAXABLE INCOME, TAX CREDITS, AND INCOME TAX, BV TAXABLE INCOME CLASSES FOR APPLICABLE TAX RATES 

PART I JOINT RETURNS AND RETimNS OF SURVIVIIC SPOUSE 



— 


Taxable income classes 


Number of 
returns 
with 
taxable 
income 


Taxable 
income 

(ThouaBnd 
dollaraj 


Total of 

the 5 tax 

credits 

(Thausand 
dollars) 


Dividends recrived credit 


Retirement income credit 


Income tax liability after credits 


r^ 




Number of 
returns 


Amount 

CTTiouj.nrf 
dollars) 


Humber of 
returns 


Amount 

(Thousartd 
dollars) 


Normal tax and sm-t.jx 


Alternative tax 






Number of 
returns 


Amount 

(Thousand 
dollars) 


Number of 
returns 


Amount 
f Thousand 
dollar a) 






Taxable returns: 


ll) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


(9) 


(10) 


(11) 






20,653,492 

4,550,699 

680,064 

259,616 

142,310 

87,830 
56,890 
39,633 
27,760 
20,555 

16,159 
21,554 
19,070 
10,355 
6,005 

3, 931 
3,865 
2,244 
1,258 
809 

571 

1,202 

364 

490 


36,585,333 
24,300,529 
5,524,603 
3,575,927 
2,536,840 

1,919,341 

1,471,633 

1,182,355 

940,843 

780,125 

677,049 

1,028,256 

1,095,703 

719,415 

489,461 

372,847 
420,911 
289, 145 
187,660 
137,051 

108,316 
286,359 
124,073 

337,569 


18,044 
14,88? 
9,725 
7,260 
5,975 

4,887 
4,090 
3,378 
3,073 
3,007 

2,562 
4,273 
5,048 
3,639 
4,041 

2,350 
2,732 
2,311 
1,653 
1,361 

991 
2,876 
1,195 

3,371 


484,160 
479,035 
221,446 
120,617 
73,396 

51,063 
34,944 
26,238 
16,841 
14,649 

11,907 
16,621 
14,684 
6,404 
5,085 

3,377 
3,402 
1,957 
1,125 
724 

507 

1,104 

326 

444 


5,676 
8,870 
6,801 
5,818 

4,517 

4,107 
3,366 
2,898 
2,643 

2,158 

2,151 
3,607 
3,957 
3,179 
2,504 

1,956 
2,339 
1,503 
1,2U 
937 

799 
2,232 

667 
2,722 


84,552 
28,550 
10,549 
4,848 
2,901 

2,311 

1,779 

1,072 

928 

786 

486 
766 
695 
452 
323 

195 
• 195 

148 
93 
65 

34 

90 
33 
55 


11, 579 

5,397 

2,184 

978 

727 

422 
403 

164 
169 
128 

105 
159 
143 
94 
64 

37 
40 
30 
16 
12 

3 
20 

5 
13 


20,653,492 

4,550,699 

630,064 

259,516 

142,258 

87,809 
56,761 
39,435 
27,294 
13, 167 

9,791 
11,705 
9,248 
4,294 
2,407 

1,373 

1,272 

651 

329 

171 

138 

213 

58 

69 


7,299,805 

4,966,290 

1,414,859 

837,470 

640,152 

520,676 
427,474 
366,860 
306,311 
174,646 

150,851 
219,270 
227,852 
137,549 
95,339 

65,555 
75,916 
48,342 

29,609 
18,130 

17,111 
35,023 
14,375 
43,577 


8,254 

6,363 
9,849 
9,822 
6,061 
3,598 

2,508 

2,593 

1,593 

929 

638 

433 
989 
306 
421 


107,420 

97,747 
182,544 
235,519 
133,330 
138,078 

119,770 
144,692 
108,632 
76,024 
60,300 

47,471 
138,529 

62,983 
199,320 


1 


2 

3 

4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 

10 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 

21 
22 
23 
24 


Over $4,000 not over $8,000 

Over $8,000 not over $12,000 

Over $12,000 not over $16,000 

Over $16,000 not over $20,000 

Over $20,000 not over $24,000 

Over $24,000 not over $28,000 

Over $28,000 not over $32,000 

Over $32,000 not over $36,000 

Over $36,000 not over $40,000 

Over $40,000 not over $44,000; 

Over $44,000 not over $52,000 

Over $52,000 not over $64,000 

Over $64,000 not over $76,000 

Over $76,000 not over $38,000 

Over $88,000 not over $100,000 

Over $100,000 not over $120,000 

Over $120,000 not over $140,000 

Over $140,000 not over $160,000 

Over $160,000 not over $180,000 

Over $180,000 not over $200,000 

Over $200,000 not over $300,000 

Over $300,000 not over $400,000 

Over $400,000 


2 

3 
4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

U 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
16 
19 
20 

21 
22 
23 

24 


Ti 


26,606,776 


86, 143, 559 


113,079 


1, 594, 103 


76,968 


141,909 


22,917 


25,552,314 


18,134,092 


54,462 


1,908,114 


?5 




Nontaxable returns: 

Not over $4,000 

Over $4,000 not over $8,000 

Over $8,000 not over $12,000 

Over $12,000 not over $16,000 

Over $16,000 not over $20,000 

Over $20,000 




26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
11 


60,282 
130 
27 
75 
24 
33 


36,334 
367 
245 

1,072 
435 

1,393 


8,275 
180 
53 
256 
111 
561 


24,351 

51 

71 
24 
U 


656 
6 

1 

12 


55,306 
94 
24 
71 

24 
18 


7,469 
121 
46 
244 
111 
222 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 




Total nontaxable returns 

Grand total 




32 


60,571 


40,346 


9,437 


24,511 


675 


55,537 


3,213 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


33 


26,567,347 


86,183,905 


122,516 


1,613,619 


77,543 


197,446 


31,130 


26,552,314 


18,134,092 


54,462 


1,906,114 


33 



PART II SEPARATE RETURNS OF HUSBANDS AND WIVES AND OF SINGLE PERSONS NOT HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD OR SURVIVING SPOUSE 





Taxable income classes 


Number of 
returns 
»ith 
taxable 
income 


Taxable 
income 

(Thouaand 
dollars) 


Total of 
the 5 tax 
credits 

f Thousand 
dollars) 


Dividends received credit 


Retirement income credit 


Income tax liability after creaits 






Number of 
returns 


Amount 

(Thouaand 
dollara) 


Number of 
returns 


Amount 

(Thouaand 
dollars) 


Normal tax and surtax 


Alternative tax 






Number of 
returns 


Amount 
(Thousand 
dollars) 


Number of 
returns 


Amount 
(Thouaand 
dollars) 






Taxable returns: 

Not over $2,000 

Over $2,000 not over $-,000 

Over $4,000 not over $f,000 

Over $6,000 not over $8,000 

Over $8,000 not over $10,000 

Over $10,000 not over $12,000 

Over $12,000 not over $14,000 

Over $14,000 not over $16,000 

Over $16,000 not over $13,000 

Over $18,000 not over $20,000 

Over $20,000 not over $22,000 

Over $22,000 not over $26,000 

Over $26,000 not over $32,000 

Over $32,000 not over $38,000 

Over $38,000 not over $44,000 

Over $44,000 not over $50,000 ." 

Over $50,000 not over $60,000 

Over $60,000 not over $70,000 

Over $70,000 not over $80,000 

Over $30,000 not over $90,000 

Over $90,000 not over $100,000 

Over $100,000 not over $150,000 

Over $150,000 not over $200,000 

Over $200,000 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


l6) 


(7) 


(8) 


19) 


(10) 


(11) 




1 

2 

3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

6 

9 

10 

11 

12 
13 

14 
15 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 

21 
22 

23 

?4 


10,289,364 

3,970,670 

558,529 

U9,755 

45,124 

■ 29,607 
17,954 
12,319 
9,533 
7,296 
5,043 
7,462 
7,459 
3,956 
2,311 

1,751 

2,091 

1,296 

714 

574 

483 
828 
291 

477 


9,261,644 

10,889,328 

2,647,968 

814,502 

411,297 

325,527 
232,070 
184,348 
163,136 
U6,289 

125,533 
177,395 
2U,485 
137,024 
94,252 

81,953 
114,031 
33,530 
53, 297 
48,655 

46,410 
99,639 
49,846 
218,606 


12,175 

10,415 

5,874 

4,122 

3,131 

2,511 
2,012 
1,518 
1,475 
1,397 

1,073 
1,992 
2,549 
1,495 
1,122 

982 

1,458 

1,019 

712 

706 

614 
1,366 

324 
4,299 


252,192 

204,498 

126,754 

50,871 

27,206 

19,106 
12,779 
8,782 
7,681 
5,547 

4,767 
6,005 
6,431 
3,397 
1,937 

1,587 

1,875 

1,199 

545 

533 

414 
781 
271 

445 


2,613 
3,779 
3,435 
2,238 
1,853 

1,720 
1,346 
1,041 
1,187 
1,052 

632 
1,511 
1,979 
1,123 

846 

769 
1,063 
850 
541 
552 

459 
1,074 

549 
3,140 


65,713 
32,953 
15,134 
8,848 
5,718 

4,377 
2,730 
1,961 
1,374 
1,323 

1,003 

1,791 

1,705 

777 

465 

433 
492 
353 
192 

165 

172 
254 
87 

105 


9,498 
6,391 
3,411 
1,317 
1,162 

770 
550 
399 
251 
253 

213 
329 
326 
139 
32 

75 
121 
69 
40 
33 

39 

44 
17 

21 


10,289,384 

3,970,570 

558,529 

119,755 

46,124 

29,807 
17,954 
12,319 
9,538 
5,420 

4,484 
4,693 
4,583 

2,071 
1,110 

653 
899 
581 
232 
233 

130 
246 
92 

147 


1,633,203 

2,219,516 

557,906 

185, 154 

100, 597 

86,154 
65,729 
56,182 
52,750 
34,953 
33,861 
42,632 
56,394 
32,276 
21,843 

20,240 
26,099 
21,330 
10,443 
12,288 

7,924 
20,453 

11,579 

70,597 


1,376 

1,557 
2,771 
2,776 
1,885 
1,201 

896 

1,192 

715 

432 

341 

358 
582 
199 

330 


12,247 

11,552 
25,166 
32,395 
28,436 
22,659 

20,236 
32,390 
24,380 
19,693 
16,455 

20,249 
42,867 
21,253 
126,245 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 

6 
7 
6 
9 
10 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 

21 
22 
23 
24 










15,097,217 


26,634,130 


65,942 


745,704 


35,567 


148,146 


25,076 


15,030,054 


5,590,128 


17,163 


450,835 






Nontaxable returns: 

Not over $2,000 




?6 


116,961 
(') 

24 


61,139 
(') 

340 


12,565 

(M 

105 


47,087 


531 


115,401 

(M 

24 


12,020 
105 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 








28 
29 
30 

31 


Over $4,000 not over $6,000 

Over $6,000 not over $8,000 

Over $3,000 not over $10,000 

Over $10,000 


26 
29 
30 

31 




Total nontaxable returns 




32 


117,485 


62,810 


12,944 


47,037 


531 


115,925 


12, 398 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


33 


15,214,702 


26,596,940 


73,336 


792,791 


36,093 


264,071 


38,474 


15,030,054 


5,590,128 


17,163 


456,836 


33 









See footnotes at end of table. See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



57 



Table 8.-T4X*BLE INCOME, TAX CREDITS, AND INCOME TAX, BY TAXABLE INCOME CLASSES FOR APPLICABLE TAX RATES-Conlinued 

PART III RETURIIS OF HEADS OF HOUSEHOLD 



Taxable income classes 



Taxable returns: 

Not over $2,000 

Over $2,000 not over $i,000 

Over $4,000 not over $6,000 

Over $6,000 not over $8,000 

Over $8,000 not over $10,000 

Over $10,000 not over $12,000.., 

Over $12,000 not over $1A,000.., 

Over $14,000 not over $16,000... 

0\'er $16,000 not over $18,000... 

Over $18,000 not over $20,000... 

Over $20,000 not over $22,000... 

Over $22,000 not over $24,000. . 

Over $24,000 not over $23,000., 

Over $28,000 not over $32,000.. 

Over $32,000 not over $38,000., 

Over $38,000 not over $44,000.. 
Over $44,000 not over $50,000.. 
Over $50,000 not over $60,000.. 
Over $60,000 not over $70,000.. 
Over $70,000 not over $80,000.. 

Over $80,000 not over $90,000.. 
Over $90,000 not over $100,000. 
Over $100,000 not over $150,000 
Over $150,000 not over $200,000 
Over $200,000 not over $300,000 
Over $300,000 

Total taxable returns.... 

Nontaxable returns: 

Not over $2,000 

Over $2,000 not over $4,000 

Over $4,000 not over $6,000 

Over $6,000 not over $8,000 

Over $8,000 not over $10,000... 
0\'er $10,000 

Total nontaxable returns . 
Grand total 



Number of 
retui-ns 

with 
taxable 
income 



(1) 



439 

373 

70 

18 



114 
,004 

602 
,092 
1,520 

,,313 
1,0^5 
1,027 
1,021 
,,272 

.,051 
.,523 
.,061 

704 
742 

528 
308 
353 
209 
158 

55 
86 
126 
41 
30 
32 



3,017 



Taxable 
income 



(Thouaand 

t*>ttTM) 



433,419 

1,031,559 

332 , 388 

124,642 

75,385 

47,405 
40,081 
30,302 
34,179 
24,185 

22,064 
34,772 
27,423 
20,855 
25,763 

21,623 
14,620 
19, 101 
13, 533 
11,841 

4,732 
8,100 

14,740 
7,160 
7,235 

21,947 



Total of 

the 5 ta> 

credits 

( Thouaand 
dollmra) 



Dividends received credit 



(3) 



361 
758 
803 
455 
281 

255 
2U 
165 
387 
96 

134 
278 
156 
139 
482 

121 
92 
253 
154 
148 

44 
73 
143 
147 
105 
124 



Number of 
returns 



(4) 



13,641 
29,835 
18,419 
8,066 
4,236 

2,438 
1,808 
1,221 
1,429 
832 

660 
1,303 
735 
546 
572 

397 
240 
281 
174 
153 

47 
81 
118 
39 
26 
29 



87,376 



2,450,456 



( Thauaand 
dotlara) 



15) 



160 
658 
394 
270 
200 

162 
147 
121 
242 
82 

108 
251 
132 
121 
153 

109 
82 
U4 
127 
132 

34 
67 
127 
83 

80 
106 



Retirement income credit 



Number of 
returns 



(6) 



2,017 
1,024 
2,105 
1,422 
393 

383 
243 
194 
166 
43 

121 
75 
69 
58 

103 

60 
39 
46 
36 
49 

20 

12 

10 

6 

5 

5 



3,017 



(Thouaand 
dollara} 



3,017 



11,726 



201 
100 
409 
181 
80 

88 
53 
41 

33 

12 

24 
18 
10 
13 
18 



Income tax liability after credits 



Normal tax and surtax 



Number of 
returns 



(8) 



439,114 

373,004 

70,602 

18,092 

3,520 

4,313 
3,095 
2,027 
2,021 
1,243 

1,051 

1,470 

362 

439 

434 

198 
158 
172 
94 
51 

30 
24 
32 

11 
7 



Amount 
(Thouaand 



Number of 
returns 



85,908 
208, 299 
69,266 
27,256 
17,442 

U,553 
10,326 
8,286 
9,954 
7,138 

6,964 
10,914 
7,743 
4,876 
6,089 

3,560 
3,472 
4,444 
3,083 
2,034 

1,433 
1,311 
2,393 
1,373 
1,274 
1,597 



Alternative tax 



llO) 



276 
265 
308 

330 
150 
181 
115 
107 

25 
62 

94 
30 
23 



Amount 

(Thoua^id 
dollara) 



2,394 
2,849 
3,854 

5,697 
3,101 
4,436 
3,570 
4,U9 

1,U5 
3,215 
6,043 
3,053 
3,361 
U,699 



,541 



Sec text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data. 
'Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value is included in each total. 



58 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



Tuble 8.— ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME, TAXABLE INCOME, INCOME TAX, AVERAGE TAX, AND EFFECTIVE TAX RATE, BV TYPES OF INCOME TAX AND BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 



Adjusted gross income classes 



Number of 

returns with 

income tax 



Adjusted 

gross income 



( Thouaend 
doIlsrM) 



Taxable 
income 



(Thoaaand 
dollara) 



Income tax 

liability 

after credits 

(Thouamid 
dollara) 



Average 
income tax 



Effective tax 
rate — incoise 

tax after 
credits as a 

percent of 
taxable IncoDE 



ALL TAXABLE RETURNS 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $3,500 

$3, 500 under $4, 000 

$i,000 under $4,500 

$4,500 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $6,000 

$6,000 under $7,000 

$7,000 under $8,000 

$8,000 under $9,000 

$9,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15, 000, under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

RETURNS WITH NORMAL TAX AND SURTAX 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1, 500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2 , 500 under $3 , 000 

$3,000 under $3,500 

$3, 500 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $4, 500 

$4, 500 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $6,000 

$6,000 under $7,000 

$7,000 under $8,000 

$8,000 under $9,000 

$9,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$2O,0QO under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

RETURNS WIIH ALTERNATIVE TAX 

Under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Returns under $5,000 

Returns $5,000 or more 



(1) 



(2) 



(3) 



(4) 



(5) 



1,292,988 
2,426,670 
2,431,232 
3,078,559 

3,452,029 
3,867,430 
4,057,107 
3,959,609 
3,585,645 

5,108,368 
3,331,451 
2,008,053 
1,186,721 
720,646 

1,215,482 
368,492 
291,668 
151,897 
70,332 

11,617 

3,192 

3,234 

437 

201 



1,078,798 
3,047,987 
4,237,823 
6,922,726 

9,505,225 
12,592,640 
15,219,849 
16,818,643 
17,010,192 

27,910,808 
21,524,454 
14,961,906 
10,032,034 
6,808,273 

14,390,558 
6,316,307 
7,018,963 
6,067,727 
4,651,794 

1,389,769 
546,951 
915,760 
293,111 
406,532 



188,445 
1,069,613 
1,728,796 
2,390,502 

4,107,080 
5,594,041 
6,692,852 
7,40i,211 

7,754,769 

13,732,379 

11,821,062 

3,944,484 

6,324,419 

4,479,943 

10,096,351 
4,303,176 
5,610,769 
5,052,115 
3,946,268 

1,170,329 
452,450 
740,497 
234,354 
332,333 



37,648 
213,519 
344,635 
575, 180 

817,847 
1,120,6CK 
1,346,691 
1,469,975 
1,559,856 

2,770,109 
2,385,403 
1,820,597 
1,301,277 
932,992 

2,185,166 
1,145,589 
1,521,883 
1,683,981 
1,708,710 

614,555 
257, OU 
455,363 
154,785 
222,374 



29 
88 
142 
137 

237 
290 
332 
376 
435 

542 

716 

907 

1,097 

1,295 

1,798 
3,109 
5,213 
10,402 
24,295 

52,901 

80,518 

140,805 

354,199 

1,106,338 



42,633,060 



209,668,830 



115,226,743 



625 



1,292,988 
2,426,670 
2,431,232 
3,078,559 

3,452,029 
3,867,430 
4,057,107 
3,959,609 
3,535,645 

5,108,368 
3,331,451 
2,008,053 
1,136,721 
720,646 

1,215,432 
368,464 
235,773 
143,050 
34,553 

3,900 
374 

721 

74 



1,078,798 
3,047,987 
4,237,823 
6,922,726 

9,505,225 
12,592,640 
15,219,849 
16,818,643 
17,010,192 

27,910,808 
21,524,454 
14,961,906 
10,032,034 
6,808,273 

14,390,558 
6,315,756 
6,870,670 
5,270,463 
2,227,259 

461,847 
149,163 
200,453 

50,030 
96,253 



138,445 
1,069,613 
1,728,796 
2,890,502 

4,107,080 
5, 594, (XI 
6,692,352 
7,40;, 211 
7,754,769 

13,782,379 
11,821,062 
8,94^,484 
6,324,419 
4,479,948 

10,096,351 
4,807,668 
5,482,206 
4,358,078 
1,877,893 

384,746 
120,032 
155,105 
37,833 
72,842 



37,648 
213,519 
34^,635 
575,130 

817,847 
1,120,604 
1,346,691 
1,489,975 
1,559,856 

2,770,109 
2,385,403 
1,820,597 
1,301,277 
932,992 

2,185,166 
1,145,414 
1,475,203 
1,421,960 
313,611 

210,347 
73,622 

108,947 
29,774 
61,830 



29 
88 
142 

187 

237 
290 
332 
376 
435 

542 

716 

907 

1,097 

1,295 

1,793 
3,109 
5,162 
9,940 
23,547 

53,935 
84,235 

151,106 

402,351 

1,439,062 



203,703,810 



110,175,355 



24,242,262 



570 



(') 
5,895 
18,847 

35,779 

7,717 

2,318 

2,513 

363 

158 



148,293 

797,264 

2,424,535 

927,922 
397,788 
715,307 
243,081 

310,279 



(M 

128, 563 

694,037 

2,068,375 

785, 583 
332,418 
585,392 
197,021 
259,491 



(M 

46,675 
262,021 
895,099 

40;, 208 
183,392 
346,416 
125,011 
160,494 



7,918 
13,903 
25,017 

52,379 

79,117 

137,850 

344,363 

1,015,736 



73,618 



5,051,388 



32,920 



28,151,269 
14,481,791 



86,433,883 
123,234,947 



37,430,309 
77,796,434 



7,505,955 
19,159,798 



267 
1,323 



See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data. 
^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value is included In each total. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



59 











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>0 (*i -J rM nD 
TO <n m »o so 

CN -D en rH vO 


rH P- O P^ 


O TO <n m TO 


SSS3S 


r- ^ TO rH ■>! 
^ TO rH TO «6 


ON TO [^ TO TO 



I O CM 
>J ON 



S Z 



O nO f^ TO 

rH nj [> f>i 
rH TO CM CM 



P^ CM m TO rH 

(^ rn in TO -J 

CM en rH CM O 
On ON rH TO -^r 



S" c- ^ -^ *^ 
•J -J m n m 

en rH en ^0 t^ 

•n TO TO en rH 



3 nj -I en TO en ON 

3 TO »0 m rH CM <JN 

3 m O TO O TO TO 






^ in ON ON 
tn TO CM m 
>* ON o m 



TO ON Q ff< rn 

rH ON O 0« TO 

o ^ If) <o r^ 



r o ON CM o 



c^ no en "A 

_•>!■ <n ON rH 

m m m o c^ 



ON r- r- P- in 

■«J NO (T* m TO 

o* o en TO o 



nO en o t^ no >o m 
nD ffi ON o >J m CM 
rH m o >J TO -J- m 



m p- in "O t^ 
CM *n -* -^ >j 



o> t^ >» en t^ 
r-t ■^ CO >£> c~ 
m CM <-< 



;3S5 



nO Ov TO C- 
rH tn C- TO 

m o o in 



TO TO -4 m in 
o rH nj tn en 

rH >o (N nj fn 



% TO m p- TO 



-i) in in CM r 



Sin in %f rH 
in o m m 

rH in \0 o" TO 



3 o o o 
■CcTocTc 



OrHnjfNj (ncn-vi^im -op-ooo»rH «>4i>«>«»^«> 
5**^h^ *-^^!Hh ^^t,^,(,t. 



»«*« 



E oioiO) ii4>4ja)(ii i»<ua>a»4) •o'Oia'atJ cccc 

3IhT3t)t3 -o-oxJ-OTi -o-a-OTJ-o ^QCPC 3333c 

^22S SQSSS 9SSSQ QQOQv oSSoq 

* QOQ OQOQO oqooq ooooo .^.-o 

rHQOmo momoin OOOOO .«».- OOOOO 

■flq--* ^-«.i« -..»» Omooo o-noo- 

S^OrHrHrvj njcncn-rf-^ miDf^TOON rHrnnjtnin i~< i-t c^ ir\ ,-i 

»<«»'«r'4»4» «»«44»4^4& •m^«)'*«H>»' «9.«^^«^t^ «»«>«9'«»'M^ 



D rH CM AJ 



t> U Fh t. t 






H t. Q 

5 -O t- 



§§§' 



3«»«-*>** *»•»«» 



;4* 



3:f 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



61 











rH CM fA -J- 


•A \0 P- CO ON 


O rH CM fA 1* 


lA NO P^ CO ON 


O rH f\J (n ^f 

tM rM (N oj ry 


■A tO p-eot^OrH AjcAitiA^o p-oot^o --i 

CM CM AJAJAJfAfA fAfAfAiAcA fAfAtAit ^t 


0^ 5;}| 






^ r^ ^ r^ ^ 




> 

5 

■a 

q 

1 

3 
0) 

! 

Si 


Income tax 

liability 
after 
credits 


II 


5 


sssS 


O CM 00 00 tA 
tJN CO AJ P- nO 

O vD O rH ON 


ON it On "A rH 
"A ij ■;! e- tA 
ON AJ ij O t^ 


rH p. lO ON 00 


1 1 1 1 1 


O- 













CM CA CA CM 

rH CM -J 


rH CO lA -J fA 
nD P- P- tA -.f 


tA fA NO t- CM 


'O r^ -^ --t 




11 
e- ■■-> 


Ii 


^ 


,£) P- lA rH 
Al O ON AJ 
•O On ON tA 


tA AJ rH lA O 
ON -sf P- ij CD 

r- CM CM CO ON 


CM tA rH AJ fA 

33383 


rH rH tA 0« fA 

fA 00 tA CM O- 
00 O O It 00 




CNj" 


^ 


p- 
-1 


g 

N 


1.951,417 
314,022 




O P- >0 if 

rH ^D rH rH 

■-I CM 


tA tA tA 1>J AJ 


CM NO CA fA rH 


(A CM rH CM 




1 


i 1 


3 


CO P-O CO 
ON r- iT (A 


rH C> On >!■ O 
^ lA rH rH CD 


(A rH >0 O rH 


A? 




i 


136,439 

131,224 
97,031 
54,481 

52,108 
22,091 
17,916 
11,802 




s 


1,925,393 
73,132 




5sgg 


AJ rH rH rH rH 


O NO It vO AJ 

ij <-* 




^1 

3 

^1 


J! 


I 


^§Ss 


NO 5 tA St S 
nO CO CD nO AJ 


-J- CD t^ CA P- 
tA C^ 00 AJ lA 

CA CD CD tO P- 


CA CA CO lA ON 




ON 

(A 


83,723 
57,802 
100,029 
32,974 
47,289 

47,799 
21,266 
16,838 
10,486 


CO 
P- 


p 

N 


4,046,086 
413,451 




\0 00 nO (A 

rH CM -li- 


CA P- AJ -vt tA 
nO St ^ ''^ "^ 
lA \0 \0 ij- fA 


sas^^a 


ass'^ 




O 01 
^ ^< 

3 f-. 


§ 


152,746 

194,278 


206,231 
199,472 
166,223 

102,326 
75,137 


33,374 
13,268 
5,121 
5,087 
1,554 


CM 00 tA 


1 < 1 1 t 


ON__ 

CD 


253,692 
78,133 
81,302 

47,507 
20,677 

17,667 
6,554 
4,551 
2,520 


o 




1,832,512 
62,595 




s 

> 

1 

o 

g 

0) 


Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 


■0 -V 


a 


' o ^ S 

CD tf^ NO 


P- P- rH ij On 
O --t CD nO -^ 

r- P- Ot rH CA 


tA CM rH rH it 


O ON P- O^ tA 
vO tA O- >A O- 


(T> it tA it ON 


P- 

s 

O^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 t 1 


1 


p 

T 

•i 

p 

c 

o 


2,338,963 
7,158,694 




rH \0 rH 

AJ P~ 


CM P- CA 00 nO 
>0 00 nD rH O 
rH AJ vT •£> P- 


1,362 

1,257 

1,008 

738 

553 


1,089 
406 
361 
233 

116 


O fA it 






■0 -^ 

II 

ll 


£^ 


1 O ij P- 

23S 


rH CD ON P- CM 
00 tA -J- t^ 0» 

o AJ (i >j >t 


CO «0 rH if O^ 
it nO P- -J "A 
CO CD ij CD It 


CM CD ON CO ON 

<JN O nO CO CJN 

tA ij CA it rH 


fA P^ CM P- CD 

C^ f "^ f^ o* 

-J- O >0 tA o 


ON 


24 

906 

3,847 

3,539 
4,514 
2,046 
2,568 
2,068 

1,196 


1- 


ON 

O^ 
CM 


c 
p 


11,729,840 
33,497,218 




""Ss 


-.f rH <M "A CD 
rH it CM CT> tA 
CO -i (A O tA 


>0 O CD lA rH 
CM nD vD C^ vO 

00 (N c^ tA NO 


fA >t <^J Q P- 
00 CM tA O -O 
O I^ tA t^ AJ 


CD sO CD ^ 


\ 

tl^ 




rH (M CA fA 


-£1 >0 it fA CM 


tA rH rH 




a. 

1 


■0 ^ 


tt 


AJ O P- 


P- P- CD •£> 1* 
rH \D lA rH -i) 
CO P- rH ij xO 


lA p- CD ON C^ 


CA (JN t^ "A -O 
NO CA CD it P- 

nd -.J lA r^ >i 


C^ lA rH rH CM 


AJ 

i; 

fA 


1,037,006 
1,556,715 
2,513,681 
2,853,499 
2,520,037 

2,323,755 

1,853,781 

1,371,768 

652,574 

326,075 

197,578 
51,911 


p^ 


c 

r 

p 

1 


34,223,719 
14,514,573 




rH \0 -£> 
nO AJ lA 
^ ^ "^^ 


1,957 
2,634 
3,457 
3,815 
3,605 


5,063 
3,420 
2,104 
1,257 
789 


SS3^°" 


1 


,1 


1: 

m « 

si 


> 


O rH CO 

AJ tA O 


-J- CA ON C^ (A 
fA yD •£) -^ CM 


0> O (M (J- O' 
n CM ^ >I lA 
CT. ^ Ov f^ vO 


fA fA ON CM rH 


^ 'H P- tA rH 


g 


195,220 

657,362 

1,545,468 

2,180,334 

2,058,008 

2,054,925 

1,734,530 

1,295,197 

617,902 

319,143 

199,341 
51,839 


§ 

o" 

ON 


p 

p 
p 


44,790,960 
52,915,211 


Q 

1 


2; ° 2* 

CO CM CD 

rH NO NO 


ON c^ ON c^ r- 
r- CM rH r- CA 
O "A it >o ON 


O^ >0 C^ rH ^ 

o m m 0^ fn 
oj c^ to en m 


06 rH lA P- CM 


ON «0 CO --\ 
CA 


P;^ 

it" 
CO 


CA ij NO P- P- 


(-1 o r^ m n 

r-t •-* 


%0 OJ rH 


as 

S 


■3 « 

*^ 3 

1" 


"S 


134,356 
355,028 
750,791 


1,111,158 
1,387,572 
1,710,496 
1,806,195 
1,672,465 


2,415,063 

1,664,014 

1,054,665 

637,158 

406,213 


585,090 
123,542 
66,000 
21,051 
4,448 


(A 


o 

ON_ 


548,890 

310,148 

1,248,295 

1,237,629 

907,885 

760,602 
539,004 
344,419 
145,536 
68,327 

37,034 
8,007 

-71 


p- 

■o 

NO 


tr 


15,538,796 
7,022,755 


1 


c 
o 

■C3 

1 

♦J 

c 


Inoome ta/ 

liability 

after 

credits 


Ii 


5 


iT ^ lA AJ 

CA u-1 p- r- 

CM (A NO CO 


ON CO CM r^ o 
\D CM tA tA lA 

CO t^ o- St o 


<n o CD m t^ 
CT' o^ r- ^ fn 


it r^ CD no p- 

■^ >JD it 00 lA 

rH rH -} ON Ai 


it ON O fA it 

(A CA CD -ja -^ 

rH it P- It 0« 




t 1 1 1 1 t t 1 r 1 1 III 




a 


5,727,387 
3,313,835 


1 

a. 


nO O lA «0 

tA O O CO 

AI<A-4^ 


676 

887 

1,027 

1,055 

1,050 


1,727 

1,449 

1,130 

814 

604 


CM It It AJ rH 


K)-"" 




0) 


■0 -y 


vt 


CO O CA v^ 
CM lA CA S 


O nO CM r^ rH 
tA (M tA ON CM 
«A rH CM ON it 


ssSss 


tA CO rH AJ O 
CM O CM rH CO 
NO \D C^ rH It 


AJ ^ (A sO CD 


o 

AJ 


142 
2,867 
16,162 
19,937 

8,083 
6,579 
3,377 
2,568 
2,068 

1,196 




o 

s 


s 

ct 


28,569,265 
33,379,595 




rH CA CA CM 

38S? 


tO ij CM tO nD 


t^ lA CM fA CD 
in rH tA ON CO 


O tA fA CD ON 

[^ It It CO ON 

NO ON tA C- CM 


rH r- O rH 
-J ^ 


NO 
NO 




.-t ^ OJ 


tA It tA lA u^ 


CO P- tA fA ru 


lA rH rH 




1 


■ft -> 

P 


r\ 


C- >0 nD lA 
.D rH O rH 
CM n ON rH 


ij tf\ CA CD tA 


rH ON ^ nO CA 
ON (M ij (A lA 

AJ CA CM 00 rH 


CO it O rH it 
tA Al J3 tA rH 
AJO OU r-t O 


AJ fN P- rH (^J 


5 
3 

CD 


3,230,655 
2,497,625 
3,433,344 
3,453,996 
2,776,953 

2,435,833 

1,946,995 

1,421,563 

679,974 

334,154 

197,578 
54,911 

101 


fA 


Nl 


49,039,240 
15,326,899 




fA O lA CO 

r*- lA no lA 


Q O^ lA lA O 

5 p-00 ot ON 

tA 00 iJ it O 


•O CD O' O rH 
it lA rH tA 00 


rH <A r^ C^ O 

fA P~ ij ij rH 
CM' CM rH 

rH 




rH rH CM 


CA fA it it it 


lA (A CM rH 




II 

3 

si 


T5 -^ 


5 


J3 rH AJ 1* 
«D NO 00 P- 


rH O NO COCO 
-iJ O CA ij rH 
f3N 0> C^ ON CO 


lA vO CA it fA 

sssg;8 


P- i} rH at >t 


if >A CO ON rH 
rH tA CM P- O 
O O NO lA rH 


it 


1,283,661 
1,342,152 
2,325,491 
2,734,538 
2,300,359 

2,214,915 

1,328,433 

1,345,705 

642,967 

326,341 

199,341 
54,874 

81 /^ 


S 
i 





77,703,708 
59,184,089 




U1 .H ^O rH 
rH CD ij CD 
O P- tA lA 


ON fA CO rH CO 
CA AJ (A O Al 
It CM NO CO CA 


ON P- CO O ON 

tA On lA CO rH 


it -O nD CO -tf 

ij lA nO lA rH 
tA CA P- CO fA 


fA CO O r^ 
it --^ 


CM 
CD 




rH CM CA lA 


[^ o>o o o 

rH rH rH 


tA rH CO lA ij- 
rH r^ 


P- CM rH 




« 


5 


rH CA rH CO 


iaSil 


lA CD <A ^ -O 
O O On CD rH 


r- rH rH rH rH 
fA rH rH CO tA 
O CM CD nO On 


K5^"^ 


cd" 


3,909,214 
1,737,870 
1,894,746 
1,552,646 
1,016,074 

820,482 
568,169 
357,991 
151,556 
69,823 

37,034 
8,507 

71 


lA 
CO 

3 

oj" 




33,133,596 

7,906,817 




AJ *A CO P- 
AJ rH fACO 
CM CM O ij 


C^ CO CD lA rH 


CA CO rH vO lA 
CD CO rH -D -^ 


JSSS-' 




rH CM CM ry 


CM CM CM CNJ CM 


CM rH rH 




i 

c 

2 

.1 
5 




















'O" 

ll 

Q C 

-C 


£ 

Si 

a 

r-* 

Cd 
f- 


c 

•c 

1 


n 




dsis 




000 

000 

000 

,000 


$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 


$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 


1 
I 




( 

c 




c 


g 




g 




g 




g 










I 

i 






jle returns: 
)0 under $1,0( 
000 under $1 
500 under $2 
000 under $2 


500 under $3 
000 under $3 
500 under $4 
000 under $4 
500 under $5 


000 under $6 
000 under $7 
000 under J« 
000 under $9 
000 under $1C 


Total taxE 

xable returns 
adjusted gro. 


O rH CM A 
rH 

|lll 

g8 «^c 


$2,500 under $3 
$3,000 under $3 
$3,500 under $4 
$4,000 under $4 


0) a 

tfCxf 


U Q 




to -D rH rH AJ 


^SSi^;i 


^^^^^ 














rH CM CA >J 


lA .o r^ CO ON 


O rH AJ r-i it 
rA rM r-i r-< r-i 


f^ .o r- m <^ 


O rH AJ (A il 
CM CM CM CM (N 


u- 
A 




^ 


R 


a 


c 


? 


(^ 


r 




s 




nj: 


f- 


Ct 


sg 


-J 


^ 


si 


:! 


1 



62 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



^ vO r- CO O' 



I CO a t. r- ^ 



5; is 



e^ 



ly 00 in ^ 

r^ VO TO O 

r- t^ o* 00 



3 T, ^O 



TO n O 0^ TO 

^ U-l U-l m rH 

t- TO (N r-t Ov 

CO :n u-i r- o 

(-1 (T- "^ ^ ^ 

-J- ^ >r rn fv 



_ ^ f- i£) fM 

>o o> in >H -f 



OiiAtntn tnooO>od TOryTOrHoj rH'iJ'-iiriiA >rT»-J' 



eo a* O' o] 



O^TO^OC^ rHr-J>JiMO^ CMTOO-COTO 

lOtnTOrvst iri'jn-4'(J' -4'^DO*np^ 
mt^rHOTO mmfnoifn c^rvTOc-fn 



O TO 00 .H 
TO O r- TO 



DTOC^n ■OCMU~ir-<M rrivOriTOTO 

]-fno>-< ^OTOiTiTO or-oc-o^ 



rj r\j (- 



O O t^ m CM 
r\ en ro O O 
-J- O O -sj TO 



1 [- CT' TO ^ 

^ -^ -J- a> r- 
1 m lA -.t r- 



^ r^ ^ ^0 

^ a\ tji TO 

■J TO -Nf -.J 



\D ■£> r-l n C 
sD TO fn TO 
O O ijv (-1 r 

vO rH lO CM 



< [> O lA 

<N -J in 



> en ^ O -vT c^ O 

^ rH O^ rn fM r- CT» 

H CM t- c^ m <M r- 



O TO r- ^ rH 



i O m en TO 


vo o o --r 


TO yD "D %I O 
(T" \D ^0 -I -H 


TO en (jv Of 

0< >0 CM f-1 



3 IS \D >0 
■\ TO \D 0^ 

■\ C3 a^ cf 



^ CM 
O TO tf 



O «£> ^ 
tc ~i 1-1 
CO tn en 



•^ r- o 

O' o n 

m fvj CM 






5 : 



3123 



m TO -4 TO TO 

t^ r* « CM (M 

-J m fn t-- TO 



in\o>j-TO^ o^c>oc 
c^r-inrvjo >ocMTO-i 

CMr-imOCM CMO-^ru 



(n o 



5 C 



M •* nj ^o 
■- Q ruTO 


rH en CM »o >r 
TO -^ en 5 TO 


TO r4 vO CM tn 

<>; d 9 £ :£ 

\0 en (J> TO CM 


TO >n tn en TO 

SSa5K 


H -i) ^ in 


p- TO p- TO m 
>D en vO C^ TO 


SSSSi5! 


SSSS" 



I o r- 

CM d 



v£> O 
CM p-l 
TO t^ 



5 S 



O »o ->f <n 

^ M TO CT« 



H p- m m >j 

S-i) c^ o r- 
vD ij- r^ c- 



i> a^ ^D o t> 



SCSI o en TO m CT* 
sD TO fu O* C^ ON 

rH l-H O O en lA VD 



fv^m^O CMr-IQt-<\0 

o>0\ocMtn -J^Do^nc^ 



I en (7- I 
en CM 
in -i 



\D rH r- C nj 

c^ CM c> o^ en 



■< nj CM r\J CM 



r^ >t o> fv •- 
Ci -i e>j ^ 



\0 O »n en ov 
en o^ nj >t c*- 

i-H m CM en 



en CO ^D C^ 0> (M Q 

a»-<n m (M o^ o\ o 
O in m o 0> ^ m 



3 Q o S 



3 O O , 



8 O S 
O O O 
3 O O O •« 

' o" o" o" S 



■»«>■«> <©^ o 



a iH 



?8 



O O Q O O 
O O S Q O 
•n o «n 5 m 



I< t. Ih (h Lh 

dj 0) m v <D 

"O "O tJ xJ "O 

§§§§§ 

o o o o o 

88888 



B^Or^^-^rM cM(n<n-.t-j iniOr-cco 
■<■«*■«*■«»-« «»'«^«>«»'«^ <i**»*»-^'(» 



m \0 !:>« TO CT> 



t. Ch F^ F. h 
Qj <u ni oj 

mil 

88888 

o o o o o 

O inO (D O 
.H r-l (M tn lA 
♦> «> -SO- <» «» 

■n \0 C^ 00 O^ 



■a tj tj TJ o 



£13 
0) 



(0 TJ 



§u-,o<n Sino^ne 
rHcMcv mcn>*>*u- 



• «& (< Ih ^ 

. 0) Q) <U 

D t, -a -o -a 



^ Fh h ti (4 

oj 0) a> 0) <v 

'^ tl "O ^O "O 



o 
s^ u h e 

II O 0) 
XJ 'O 'O Fh 

0008 

O Q O O 
000 - 



33 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



63 











-" ^"-' 


m vo r- 00 O' 


O rH ojfn -J 


lA -i) r- TO a» 

t-J i-l rH iH r-C 


OJ OJ oi OJ OJ 


in 

OJ 


VJ3 
OI 


OJ fM OJ m (n 


(N en '^ *A >o 
(n fn fn (n (n 


RSSS 


>t 


3 


33 


> 

1 
1 

o 

■Jl 

c 

♦J 

a) 

g. 


« p. -J 

a. r-i 1' -^ 

e -1 -> -o 

O J3 <- 01 


1? 
li 


5 


--• S^o :^ 


C fV a u^ *<^ 
■J O^ to f\I \D 
lO CC Aj 0> (T- 

o to > -ja -J' 


O- >f O D- \0 

rH --t OJ O ^T 

fn r^ OJ r- OJ 
■A ^" c^ >o tn 


tn O ^ rH lA 

u^ OJ C^ to" C^ 


OJ t^ lA lA m 

r-- o7 o" oT sD 


fn 
fn 


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72 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 

-ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME AND INCOME TAX, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES AND BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 

(Returns with adjusted gross income) 



Adjusted gross income classes 



Taxable and nontaxable returns : 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Taxable and nontaxable returns: 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Taxable and nontaxable returns: 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Taxable and nontaxable returns 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000... 
$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Taxable and nontaxable returns 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000... 
$1,000,000 or more 

Total 



Number of 
returns 



Adjusted 
gross 
income 

( Thousand 
dollars) 



Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

f ^ouaand 

doUara) 



92,125 
143,651 
150, 372 
117,030 

85,462 

107,179 
9,773 
2,991 
2,834 
1,352 

511 

75 

14 

18 

1 

1 



50,594 
212,315 

375,050 
407,885 
380,713 

679,272 

116,171 

51,647 

67,603 

50,210 

33,776 
9,251 
2,372 
4,931 
790 
2,603 



2,445,188 



303 
6,550 
18,654 
21,098 
27,189 

72,500 
16,912 
9,176 
14, 523 
13,829 

12,852 
4,406 
1,097 
2,712 
386 
1,287 



223,474 



Colorado 



65,144 
81,888 
76,253 
84,895 
77,403 

117,012 

10,265 

3,732 

3,712 

1,438 

528 
81 
19 
16 
3 



37,069 
122,869 
187,777 
296, 64A 
348,001 

754,374 

121,536 

64,035 

88,277 

52,975 

36,535 
9,724 
3,450 
4,223 
2,050 
8,278 



449 

5,912 

12,701 

23,651 

27,840 

81, 504 
18,416 
U,560 
19,022 
14,604 

13,461 
4,563 
1,709 
1,974 
1,073 
4:244 



242,683 



Number of 
returns 



Adjusted 
gross 
income 

( Ihouaaod 
dollars} 



Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

(Thousand 

dollara) 



36,368 
48,987 
33,043 
39,600 
43, 590 

62,633 

6,295 

1,824 

1,262 

930 

296 



21,035 
69,953 
95,066 
137,770 
197,085 

410,453 
74,806 
31,233 
30,700 
34,461 

19,106 
5,931 
1,990 
2,468 



1,016 



279,907 1,133,078 



265 

3,456 

4,971 

3,270 

14,790 

43,592 

11, 545 

5,817 

6,979 

9,375 

7,084 
2,503 
1,006 
1,530 

471 



Connecticut 



91,773 
103,808 
134,411 
155,104 
132,315 

258,942 

23,524 

7,987 

6,041 

3,686 

1,664 

326 

93 

105 



163,769 
212,754 
195,447 
130,523 
121,545 

178,739 

22,721 

7,301 

5,779 

3,224 

1,273 

205 

64 

73 



89,486 
316,023 
488,767 
627,612 
543,602 

1,177,764 

271,936 

125,946 

141,019 

120,311 

33,405 

25,037 

10,753 

20,348 

5,652 

21,448 



4,069,109 



812 
10, 550 
22,707 
39,637 
39,633 

123,101 
40,722 
23,189 
30,113 
33,654 

31,250 
10,963 

4,922 
10, 2U 

3,036 
11,741 



441,261 



lUlnols 



426,122 
468,534 
475,796 
605,176 
535,026 

978,989 
102,165 
29,376 
21,357 
13,331 

6,964 

1,039 

207 

189 

25 

5 



3,664,301 



225,705 

696,041 

1,203, U7 

2,118,426 

2,401,507 

6,532,880 

1,205,568 

505,712 

515,450 

505,955 

447,291 

124,784 

35,519 

52,262 

17,118 

9,833 



16,597,198 



2,426 

33,370 

89,906 

186,043 

232,207 

763,892 
136, 339 
92,956 
U5,658 
146,234 

165,650 

56,017 

17,713 

27,670 

9,729 

5,905 



Kentucky 



127,338 
161,710 
149,635 
U2,326 

90, 507 

134,020 
11,513 
3,759 
3,406 
2,119 

739 

95 

6 



797,131 



73,199 
241,062 
373,576 
391,343 
404,062 

867,933 

135,778 

65,505 

82,796 

76,471 

46,530 

11,447 

992 

1,833 



2,772,532 



547 
7,573 
19,035 
28,727 
31,094 

98,004 
20,611 
11,743 
17,928 
20,791 

16,834 

4,959 

433 

926 



279,260 



49,008 
155,122 
338,826 
545,402 
594,845 

1,732,964 
278,434 
137,513 
146,485 
137, 544 

1U,593 
38,850 
15,965 

31,063 
5,474 
11,825 



4,330,913 



758 

9,220 

28,636 

48,580 

56,239 

206,989 
42,286 
24,809 
31,602 
38,299 

41,930 

17,333 

3,020 

15,696 

3,024 

6,106 



579, 527 



Georgia 



120,435 
134,043 
187,665 
132,941 
93,878 

140,632 

13,791 

5,032 

4,272 

2,615 

985 

145 

25 

18 

3 



70,054 
273,252 
466,714 
459,399 
416, 598 

921,003 
164,936 

86,130 
103,233 

96,903 

63,781 
16,646 
4,287 
4,268 

2,186 



3,149,390 



507 
8,423 
18,876 
28,022 
31,945 

97,603 
25,044 
15,593 
22,170 
26, 537 
23,004 
7,563 

2,m 

2,088 
1,346 



Indiana 



175,095 
232,325 
223,640 
266,228 
228,294 

359,616 

25,263 

7,398 

6,348 

3,223 

1,120 
165 
55 
39 
2 
1 



1,528,812 



90,227 
347,866 
562,799 
935,055 
1,023,425 

2,333,364 
296,658 
127,112 
151,465 
118,442 

73,797 
20,339 
9,282 
10,858 

1,590 
1,180 



6,103,459 



817 
14,573 
40,344 
77,434 
91,853 

271,025 
46,016 
23,382 
33,724 
33,640 

28,734 

10,032 

4,756 

5,781 

839 

581 



Number of 
returns 



Adjusted 
gross 
income 

CThousand 
dollars} 



Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

( Thousand 

dollars} 



63,485 
95,520 
82,419 
45,532 
45,091 

45,301 

4,435 

1,301 

1,789 

723 

226 

53 
3 

10 
3 
1 



390,397 



36,556 
142, 339 
205,641 
153,546 
202,389 

294,414 
52,796 
22,264 
43,922 
26,716 

15,306 
6,506 
1,300 
2,362 
2,157 
7,626 



133 

3,847 
8,234 
9,034 
14,817 

31,657 
7,995 
4,149 
9,296 
7,693 

5,673 
3,017 

570 
1,415 

904 
3,867 



21,000 
28,696 
15,908 
21,047 
16,097 

29,830 
4,073 
1,287 

1,148 
506 

375 
120 
30 
53 
23 
15 



140,208 



11, 3U 
43,866 
38,037 
73,451 
72,416 

195,713 
48,181 
22,372 
26,434 
18,346 

25,136 
14, 386 
5,155 
15, 579 
16,393 
31,996 



659,777 



148 
2,165 
2,528 
5,277 
6,433 

23,317 
7,557 
4,127 
5,923 
5,106 

9,322 
6,931 
2,355 
9,298 

10,195 
21,700 



122,882 



Number of 
returns 



Adjusted 
gross 
income 

f Thousand 
dollars) 



Income tax 
liability 
after 
credits 
( Thousand 
dollars) 



505,070 
587,573 
598,521 
728,544 
724,213 

1,348,346 

144,813 

39,781 

29,923 

17,544 

7,111 

1,343 

353 

326 

37 

18 



4,733,521 



271, 516 

865,002 

1,501,033 

2,566,270 

3,256;377 

3,955,936 

1,707,765 

682,025 

717,867 

652,732 

469,398 
163,300 
60,733 
94,099 

25,030 
33,860 



District of Columbia 



36,438 
54,041 
53,602 
81,255 
36,336 

67,356 

10,171 

2,918 

2,253 

1,110 

583 



26,908 
30,636 
38,699 
36,913 
23,466 

34,129 

4.002 
955 
603 
351 

131 

19 
1 
3 



196,816 



14,311 
45,232 
97,807 
129,024 
104,923 

224,360 
47,302 
16,023 
15,002 
13,501 

8,020 
2,292 

195 

300 



274 
2,439 
6,405 
9,444 
8,899 

24,268 
7,221 
2,924 
3,409 
3,890 

2,955 

1,018 

138 

400 



Iowa 



684,031 



Louisiana 



93,960 
131,752 
113,810 
128,828 

96,249 

136,255 

14,037 

5,LLL 

3,163 

2,054 

858 

165 

36 

27 

3 

2 



726, 310 



52,763 
196,540 
284,693 
452,252 
426,925 

884,076 
166,404 
33,206 
75,232 
77,141 

56,965 
19,968 
6,150 
8,085 
1,721 
2,895 



500 
6,032 
13,879 
23,280 
36,579 

93,968 
25,394 
16,831 
16,467 
22,176 

22,270 
9,409 
3,045 
4,595 
871 
1,276 



301,572 



155,378 

167,789 

182,413 

146,223 

115,353 

155,458 

16,903 

4,213 

3,345 

1,655 

499 
67 
14 



87,441 

250,256 

451,544 

508,520 

515,131 

1,006,169 

199,715 

72, 591 

80,362 

59,627 

32,376 
7,858 
2,403 
2,367 



3,276,360 



643 
9,629 
26,608 
39,019 
40,720 

112,571 
29,884 
13,274 
17,591 
16,341 

12,333 
3,657 
1,183 
1,331 



324,799 



Maine 



62,479 
73,687 
62,276 
59,488 
35,934 

37, 502 

3,204 

1,176 

861 

523 

U9 

12 

5 

5 



337, 301 



33,097 
110, 517 
155,799 
208,329 
153,946 

251,714 
38,498 
20,520 
21,794 
19,044 

9,804 

1,298 

852 

1,732 



383 

4,686 

7,991 

14, 620 

12, U2 

23,659 

5,966 

3,361 

4,979 

5,426 

3,619 

627 

335 

367 



94,161 



346,729 



20,745 
81, 377 
136, 613 
282,623 
165,402 

450,351 

120,090 

50,076 

55,463 

41,094 

39,467 

11,698 

3,419 

11, 178 

3,509 

1,603 



Idaho 



22,155 
31,974 
30,886 
42,476 
28,916 

37,826 

3,375 

1,100 

635 

232 

94 

7 



12,800 
47,373 
78,474 
146,179 
129,667 

246,759 

39,497 

13,593 

15,627 

8,948 

6,045 
733 



Kansas 



104,693 
133,626 
112,025 
120,712 
108,699 

132, 594 

12,688 

3,851 

2,925 

1,456 

516 
119 
18 
17 

6 
1 



733,946 



58,564 
200,032 
232, 107 

421, 116 
490, 501 

390,005 

152,427 

65,719 

70, 529 

55,714 

33,555 
14,443 
3,022 
5,338 
4,011 
1^103 



2,748,186 



Maryland 



121,805 
166,404 
157,577 
185,302 
150,251 

257,965 
27,951 
7,794 
4,918 
2,735 

1,201 
149 
52 

41 



1,084,152 



63,836 
245,087 
397,920 
643,313 
669,025 

1,705,227 
330,497 
132,466 
117,637 
102,869 

79,778 

17,633 

3,836 

10,958 

3,321 

2,029 



4,531,032 



531 
12,593 
23,910 
48,865 
57,025 

192,864 
49,030 
23,582 
25,221 
29,080 

28,591 
7,854 
3,997 
5,234 
2,039 
992 



5U,408 



See footnotes at end of table. See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



73 



-ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME AND INCOME TAX, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES AND BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES— Continued 

{Returns with adjusted gross income) 



Adjusted gross income classes 


Number of 
returns 


Adjusted 
gross 
income 

(Thoaaand 
dollar,) 


Income tax 
liability 
after 
credits 
( Thousand 
dellHTs) 


Number of 
returns 


Adjusted 
gross 
income 

f TTiousand 
dollars) 


Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

( Thousand 
dollars) 


Number of 
returns 


Adjusted 
gross 
income 

(Thousand 
dollars) 


Income tax 
liability 
after 
credits 
f Thousand 
dollars) 


Number of 
returns 


Adjusted 
gross 
income 

(Thousand 
dollars) 


Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

(Thousand 

dollars) 




Massachusetts 


Michigan 


Minnesota 


Mississippi 


Taxable and nontaxable returns: 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 


231,769 
306,223 

363,235 
333,017 
272,418 

383,530 
29,932 
9,101 
9,558 
4,714 

2,573 
387 
131 
108 
11 
1 


117,038 

460,892 

908,227 

1,161,937 

1,222,345 

2,482,095 
359,094 
155,594 
230,856 
175,944 

171,533 

46,375 

22,426 

31,122 

7,339 

1,118 


1,631 

28,128 
74,296 
95,076 
107,441 

273,191 
52,321 
27,323 
49,616 
46,314 

59,265 
18,515 
10,132 
13,580 
3,638 
480 


306,530 
315,119 
301,962 
366,112 
405,015 

820,448 

72,930 

16,524 

13,480 

8,047 

3,978 

540 

162 

155 

15 

12 


166,979 

464,427 

752,203 

1,293,998 

1,819,995 

5,435,756 
855,301 
233,003 
320,498 
298,153 

268,694 
64,359 
27,565 
44,934 
9,637 
23,243 


1,942 

21,933 

53,600 

109,257 

156,533 

638,155 

131,292 

52,064 

70,249 

85,390 

102,490 
30,438 
13,937 
25,437 
5,895 
14,784 


165,473 
201,827 
165,003 
184,496 
152,709 

207,555 

17,432 

5,343 

4,550 
2,608 

906 
186 
43 

45 
4 
1 


91,547 
299,348 
413,787 
551,134 
680,758 

1,329,632 
206,315 

91,620 
111,476 

97,759 

60,209 
21,260 
7,345 
11,550 
2,304 
1,001 


1,079 
13,248 
23,091 
51,411 
56,644 

140, 376 
30,838 
15,972 
23,212 
25,660 

21,972 

9,377 
3,130 
5,511 
1,160 
443 


50,763 
84,026 
68,886 
42, 306 
35,540 

46, 323 

4,748 

1,338 

1,375 

646 

187 
19 

7 
4 
1 


28,722 
125,273 
167,311 
145,201 
157,720 

299,182 
54,933 
22,932 
32,651 

24,341 

11,566 

2,386 

1,200 

967 

583 


313 
2,969 
6,761 
7,618 
11,921 

31,853 
3,184 
4,121 
6,347 
5,618 

4,244 

1,131 

552 

511 


$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 


308 




1,946,708 


7,553,935 


861,447 


2,631,029 


12,194,255 


1,523,997 


1,109,306 


4,077,055 


428,629 


336,270 


1,075,518 


93,955 




Missouri 


Montana 


Nebraska 


Nevada 


Taxable and nontaxable returns : 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 


221,131 
244,081 
229,125 
233,368 
185,125 

282,410 

25,161 

8,911 

7,097 

4,337 

1,907 

274 

73 

81 

9 

3 


114,357 
363,658 
574,443 
813,354 
825,877 
1,817,390 
298,905 
151,656 
169,705 
161,619 

126,744 

32,494 

12,591 

22,851 

5,798 

3,443 


852 
15,120 
34,257 
63,911 
72,642 

209,776 
45,826 
27,652 
36,132 
45,705 

48, U2 
13,599 
6,162 
11,497 
3,584 
1,900 


28,084 
35,627 
31,736 
33,927 
37,351 

44,152 

4,543 

1,710 

937 

297 

67 
6 

1 


13,497 

52,174 

79,692 

117,335 

167, 352 

287,456 
53,774 
29,156 
22,695 
10,757 

4,325 
706 
180 

1,093 


66 
2,547 
4,889 
8,984 
15,112 
33,116 
8,425 
5,618 
5,260 
2,937 

1,692 

405 

34 

522 


38, 373 
105,337 
80,553 
78,128 
51,349 

79,907 

7,686 

2,543 

1,899 

987 

337 
50 
7 
10 


49,463 
153,188 
200,192 
270,952 
229,374 

513,190 
92, 505 
43,706 
44,343 
37,288 

22,212 
5,891 
1,299 
2,504 


461 

5,912 

12,927 

20,087 

21,317 

53,637 

14,706 

8,292 

9,662 

10,543 

8,748 

2,705 

655 

1,319 


11,111 
11,182 

10,545 
13,978 
15,361 

22,494 

2,478 

711 

976 

243 

158 
46 

5 

17 


6,453 
16,129 
27,002 
49,667 
69,077 

148,085 

29,279 

11,900 

22,227 

9,420 

10,813 

5,435 

837 

4,558 


135 

803 

2,050 

3,819 

5,857 

18,917 
4,585 


$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200 000 under $500,000 


2,299 
5,236 
2,676 

4,423 
2,250 

374 
2,161 


$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 




Total 


1,443,093 


5,494,885 


636,757 


218,442 


840,262 


39,707 


497, luo 


1,666,113 


176,026 


89,406 


410,893 


55,585 




New Hampshire 


New Jersey 


New Mexico 


New York 


Taxable and nontaxable returns: 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 


34,478 
34,363 
41,147 
36,751 
27,793 

36,944 

2,216 

974 

733 

458 

114 
19 

4 
4 


19,296 

52,471 

103,866 

128,322 

124,269 

231,458 
27,065 
17,066 
17,661 

17,769 

7,328 

2,204 

702 

1,398 


160 
2,605 
7,831 
9,173 
9,871 

24,403 
4,287 
3,012 
3,921 
4,975 

2,522 
966 
384 
659 


231,925 
255,442 
303, 573 
352,763 
310,066 

585,894 

61,448 

17,039 

12,146 

6,830 

2,680 
437 
82 
80 
13 
7 


114,623 

381,822 

761,620 

1,232,377 

1,390,190 

3,390,324 
727, 561 
291,433 
291,495 
256,730 

177,050 
50,264 
14,047 
23,532 
8,931 
13,657 


1,158 

19,665 

57,292 

105,995 

125,371 

443,604 

109,333 

51,724 

62,038 

69,401 

56,483 
22,730 
6, 844' 
12,553 
4,300 
7,526 


37,838 
33,391 

34,970 
26,297 
25,749 

45,804 

4,750 

1,033 

898 

466 

150 

22 

4 

4 


22,310 
49,949 
87,706 
90,351 
115,819 

311,075 
55,451 
18,353 
21,119 
17,359 

10,131 

2,915 

538 

1,164 


201 
1,623 

3,504 
6,105 
8,183 

34, 386 
8,412 
3,520 
4,626 
5,529 

4,048 

1,547 

376 

626 


683,031 

829,150 

1,032,599 

1,047,963 

939, 584 

1,489,140 

170, 357 

58,977 

46,939 

27,556 

13,005 

2,497 

853 

927 

135 

56 


366,159 
1,248,683 
2,596,612 
3,667,810 
4,205,413 

9,828,112 
2,025,093 
1,008,913 
1,134,762 
1,046,041 

858,765 
298,750 
146,398 
253,264 
89,154 
113,586 


3,505 
58,000 
180,423 
299,440 
355,952 
1,030,384 
294,904 


$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 


172,094 
229,323 
267,222 

293,113 
122,341 
63,717 
120,912 
43,417 
53,665 




215,998 


750,875 


74,769 


2,140,475 


9,626,661 


1,166,222 


211,876 


804,415 


82,691 


6,347,819 


28,907,625 


3,643,412 




North Carolina 


North Daiota 


Ohio 


Oklahoma 


Taxable and nontaxable returr^: 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 


167,201 
241,552 
238,535 
175,064 
109,408 

145,707 
12,734 
4,130 
4,041 
2,668 

842 

106 

24 

24 
2 
1 


92,125 
360,360 
590,827 
607,963 
483,671 

953,239 

152,866 

71,458 

98,292 

99,794 

55,072 
12,825 
4,121 
6,782 
1,516 
1,033 


611 
10,145 
25,890 
31,467 
33,604 

94, 596 
21,729 
11,978 
19,609 
24,986 

18,552 

5,262 

1,671 

3,328 

634 

611 


47,658 

50,514 

32,504 

27,175 

19,821 

19,299 

2,173 

750 

399 

200 

48 
4 

2 


25,818 
74,477 
31,970 
95,366 
88,357 

127,757 
25, 370 
12, 388 
9,401 
7,145 

3,001 
418 

522 


212 
2,674 
3,950 
5,874 
7,501 

13,520 
3,731 
2,236 
2,053 
2,055 

1,032 
170 

323 


352,484 
407, 116 
435, 106 
534,467 
517,055 

351,146 
69,769 
20,764 
15,571 
3,583 

3,300 

590 

174 

174 

20 

2 


183,379 

612,875 

1,093,883 

1,878,383 

2,319,539 

5,589,624 
819,356 
356,177 
395,729 
322,132 

243,971 
70,425 
29,930 
47,797 
12,975 
2,373 


1,818 

31,126 

80,921 

155,079 

212,005 

642,236 

126,782 
66,878 
87,872 
91,384 

95,197 
32,713 
1^,352 
24,208 
6,960 
1,350 


104,600 
125,259 
100,310 
105,310 
88,815 

118,452 

10,637 

3,606 

3,344 

1,290 

694 
97 
26 
28 
4 
6 


55,905 
185,327 
249,357 
368,889 
401,477 

771,337 

126, 610 

62, 353 

81,197 

48,362 

45,978 
U,719 
4,397 
7,887 
2,575 
15,987 


423 

5,531 

11, X2 

22,978 


$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 


34,953 
19,252 
11,204 
18,043 
13,760 

16,553 
5,528 
2,055 
3,917 
1,173 
8,342 


$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 


Total 


1,102,039 


3,591,944 


304,673 


200,647 


552,491 


45,446 


3,218,821 


13,985,208 


1,670,881 


663,978 


2,440,907 


257,366 




Oregon 


Pennsylvania 


Puerto Rico 


Rhode Island 


Taxable and nontaxable returns: 

Under $1,000 

$1,000 under $2,000 


71,306 
76,046 
80,51A 
89,167 
96,019 

145,140 
12,252 
3,797 
2,412 

1,350 

653 
69 
26 

40 
4 
1 


40,861 
114,354 
199,438 
316,808 
429,328 

938,478 

143,870 

65,390 

59,247 

50,841 

42,240 
8,344 

4,465 

10,879 

2,290 

1,023 


442 
4,598 
13,647 
24,872 
35,572 

102,065 
22,112 
11,793 
12,891 
14,229 

15,364 
3,740 
2,176 
5,060 
1,051 
388 


490,653 

655,708 

630,230 

767,261 

640,693 

808,063 

63,116 

21,570 

16,569 

10,648 

4,883 

761 

206 

198 

24 

20 


262,477 

975,018 

1,579,330 

2,588,846 

2,868,513 

5,250,742 

809,112 

369, 394 

403,694 

400,143 

324,299 

91,321 

35,244 

54,763 

16,082 

38,269 


3,110 
43,349 
U0,797 
215,086 
255,706 

599,294 

125,578 
68,590 
39,593 

114,277 

123,744 
41,677 
17, 294 
27,858 
9,673 
21,114 


4,148 
5,075 
3,038 
4,143 
2,409 

{') 


2,720 

8,333 

7,400 

14,743 

10,706 

(^) 

{') 


79 
85 
87 
565 
15 

(^) 


49,327 
54,202 
56,169 
52,915 
44,397 

52,276 
4,588 
1,369 
1,393 
833 

360 
63 

15 
22 
4 
2 


25,324 
81,489 
135,638 
185,223 
194,243 

335,837 
54,092 
23, 548 
32,765 
30,353 

24,256 
7,233 
2,610 
6,275 
2,694 
2,148 


224 
4,424 


$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20 000 under $30,000 ... 


14,857 
17,707 

38,419 
7,921 
4,271 
5 940 






$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 


8,316 
2,934 




1,089 
3,562 
1,363 
1,296 


$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 








578,796 


2,427,856 


270, 500 


4,115,703 


15,157.247 


1,871,750 


21,325 


54,759 


1,230 


317,935 


1,145,238 


133,240 



See footnotes at end of table. See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 



74 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



-ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME AND INCOME TAX, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES AND BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES— Continued 

[Returns with adjusted gi'oss income) 



Adjusted gross income classes 


Number of 
returns 


Adjusted 
gross 
income 

( Thousand 
dollars} 


Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

(Thousand 
dollars) 


Number of 
returns 


Adjusted 
gross 
income 

(Thousand 
dollars} 


Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

(Thousand 
dollars} 


Number of 
returns 


Adjusted 
gross 
income 

(Thousand 
dollars} 


Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

C Thousand 

dollars) 


Number of 
returns 


Adjusted 
gross 
incoiie 

(Thousand 
dollars) 


Income tax 

liability 

after 

credits 

( Thousand 
dollars) 




South Carolina 


South Dakota 


Tennessee 


Texas 


Taxable and nontaxable retui-ns; 


73, 199 

100,968 

120,883 

79,505 

55,699 

76,975 

6,495 

2,172 

1,4U 

724 

269 

29 

4 

9 

1 


36,580 
150,040 
297,970 
275,163 
249,337 

490,132 
76,347 
37,274 
33,961 
25,914 

17,159 
3,543 

692 
2,340 

745 


311 
4,942 
13,610 
15,569 

17,415 

49,223 

11,047 

6,059 

6,915 

6,399 

5,903 
1,575 

293 
1,232 

436 


44,044 
43,833 
45,940 
36,702 
25,927 

19,438 

2,536 

647 

503 

254 

66 
4 
2 

1 


25,321 
72,491 
112,908 
126,080 
U5,526 

133,290 
30,003 
11,430 
12,627 
9,120 

4,042 
^609 
320 

204 


310 
2,765 
6,009 
8,065 
8,290 

15,676 
4,533 
2,134 
2,900 
2,528 

1,555 
339 
174 

114 


136,741 
182, 389 
179,327 
142,765 
96, 503 

148,892 

12,175 

4,054 

3,244 

1,716 

692 

123 

16 

22 

2 


77,749 
274,478 
445,268 
497,546 
427,438 

963,232 
U5,865 
69,865 
77,512 
64,345 

46,863 

1A,943 

2,733 

6,244 

1,420 


525 
7,513 
21,210 
30,966 
34,250 

104,160 
22,085 
12,715 
16,504 
18,093 

17,482 

6,707 

1,280 

3,089 

695 


350,155 
414,116 
409,196 
401,023 
333,798 

528,035 

52,810 

19,360 

15,648 

7,723 

3,707 
602 
167 

169 
48 
16 


199,121 

612,903 

1,016,867 

1,398,025 

1,502,679 

3,433,974 
627,156 
329,274 
376,683 
293,166 

246,458 
71,950 
28,600 
48,931 
32, 314 
30,532 


1,446 




20,927 




45,967 




89,333 


$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 


123,481 

382,178 
98,121 
63,374 


$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 


87,050 
87,861 

98,902 
34,801 
14,423 
25,330 
17,184 
17,738 




518, 343 


1,697,197 


140,929 


224,952 


653,976 


55,392 


908,671 


3,115,501 


297, 279 


2,536,573 


10,248,638 


1,208,671 






Utah 




Vermont 


Virginia 


Washington* 


Taxable and nontaxable returns: 


37,754 
35,181 
36,020 
39,953 
44,389 

47,214 

4,007 

1,035 

1,101 

471 

191 

8 

5 


20,043 

51,610 

88,709 

138,865 

198,552 

296,384 

47,653 

17,828 

25,596 

17,253 

12,179 
975 

830 


273 
2,487 
5,633 
9,354 
11,987 
29,494 
6,718 
3,041 
5,183 
4,751 

4,302 
265 

336 

It' 


21,780 
27,945 
27,354 
22,310 
12,157 

14,543 

1,722 

439 

425 

161 

47 

11 

2 

1 


13,946 
40,695 
67,125 
77,419 
55,660 

89,504 
20,035 

7,659 
10,343 

6,176 

2,983 

1,281 
359 

1,105 
961 


160 
1,559 
2,379 
5,612 
3,325 

8,884 
2,663 
1,398 
2,296 
1,707 

996 
440 
157 
690 
713 


150,118 
206,305 
210,339 
180,845 
124,746 

193,339 

21,733 

6,056 

4,224 

2,266 

786 

99 

35 

22 

2 

4 


79,275 
304,871 
525,339 
627,694 
558,210 

1,312,169 

255,398 

103,795 

102,129 

84,965 

51,574 

n,659 

5,962 

5,587 

1,566 

10,647 


786 
U,869 
30,184 
44,099 
44,097 

149,058 
37,753 
18,437 
21,357 
22,854 

18,697 
5,342 
2,314 
2,852 
933 
4,617 


117,541 
122,814 
134, 507 
147,187 
151,716 

266, 176 

27,616 

6,884 

5,382 

1,858 

636 
96 
25 
27 

2 
3 


61,457 
181,858 
336,941 
517, 176 
630,631 

1,762,740 
327,439 
U3,145 
130,490 
70, 521 

41,231 
11, 578 
4,2U 
7,394 

1,387 
10,074 


678 


$1,000 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 


8,944 
22,727 
46,019 
57,721 
205,026 


$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 


51, 545 
22,456 
30,673 
21,180 

16,069 


$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 


5,402 
2,029 
3,336 
629 
5,136 


Total 


247,331 


916,952 


83,989 


128,901 


J95,251 


33,979 


1,105,919 


4,040,340 


415,799 


982,470 


4,263,326 


500,075 




» 


est Virginia 




Wisconsin 


Wj'oming 




Taxable and nontaxable returns: 


86,339 
117,160 
89,932 
88,137 
90, 319 

84,200 
6,802 
2,372 

1,768 
864 

293 

42 

8 

8 
1 


46,388 
172,611 
223,306 
310,052 
401,721 

532,810 
81,907 
39,883 
40,602 
31,438 

19,296 

4,971 

1,456 

2,686 

556 


350 

6,529 

13,819 

20,312 

33,434 

59,452 

13,105 

7,339 

9,088 

9,162 

7,429 

2,533 

745 

1,420 

257 


192,279 
226,078 
188,976 
199,693 
196,360 

283, 386 

21,777 

7,034 

5,918 

2,342 

770 

U2 

57 

43 


102,962 
335,058 
471,854 
693,042 
879,617 

1,823,366 

258,890 

U9,695 

142,095 

86,929 

51,526 
13, 599 
9,722 

12,599 
2,403 


913 
15,505 
31,271 
53,950 
74,843 

204,352 
39,688 
21,401 
30,166 
23,125 

18,618 
6,026 
4,552 
6,312 

1,177 


16,089 
19,316 
14,816 
14,726 
14,044 

25,552 

2,129 

476 

328 

152 

87 

30 

1 

6 


8,289 
29,551 
37,986 
51,193 
62,790 

157,514 

25,297 

8,219 

7,552 

5,641 

5,338 

3,430 

154 

2,363 


100 
1,163 
2,682 
3,353 
5,831 

17,801 
4,002 
1,555 
1,738 
1,694 

2,329 

1,616 

75 

1,144 




















$5,000 under $10,000 












ftlQ 000 undpr 450 000 




t50 000 under AlOO 000 








*150 000 under $200 000 








$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 




Total 


563,245 


1,909,633 


184,974 


1,324,829 


5,003,957 


531,899 


103,252 


-•^5,817 


45,083 









See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data." 
^Includes Canal Zone. 

^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value is included in each total. 

■*The average amount of adjusted gross inccme per return exceeds the upper limit of the adjusted gross income class in which it is shown. This results from using a rounded weight- 
jig factor to inflate the sample. 
Includes Alaska. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



75 



Table 15.— RETURNS WITH SELF- EMPLOYMENT TAX— ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME AND SELF-EMPLOYMENT TAX, BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES 



Adjusted gross income classes 



Returns with self- employment tax 



Number of 

returns 



Adjusted 
gross 
income 

(Thousand 
dollars) 



Self-en^loy- 
ment tax 



C Thousand 
dollars) 



Returns with self-employm-^r.t tax 
but without income lax 



Number of 
re turns 



Adjusted 

gross 
income 

( Thousand 
dollars) 



Self -employ- 
ment tax 



(I) 



(2) 



(3) 



(^) 



(5) 



No adjusted gross income. . 

Under $«)0 

$600 under 51,000 

{1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $3,500 

$3,500 under $^,000 

$4,000 under $4,500 

$4,500 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $6,000 

$6,000 under $7,000 

$7,000 under $8,000 

$8,000 under $9,000 

$9,000 under $10,000 

^10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000... 
$150,000 under $200,000... 
$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 

Total 



13,305 

89,329 
224,318 
318,161 
359,380 
345,486 

366,493 
351,353 
305,975 
273,830 
213,792 

331,647 
226,415 
160,985 
118,262 
89,423 

217,070 
82,458 
68,004 
36,392 
15, 169 

2,531 

651 

616 

81 

30 



'35,900 

41,316 
176,942 
401,386 
632,036 
778,356 

1,004,362 
1,141,419 
1,145,534 
1,161,968 
1,013,465 

1,823,025 
1,466,335 
1,198,979 
1,000,984 
844,610 

2,614,057 
1,416,428 
1,622,503 
1,363,462 
995,053 

302,046 

111,445 

174,337 

53,531 

62,760 



756 

1,670 
5,294 
10,952 
15,994 
19,181 

24,733 
26,701 
25,052 
23,223 
18,288 

29,307 
20,635 
15,333 
11,188 
8,684 

22,446 
8,797 
7,242 
3,959 
1,644 

271 
71 
66 
8 
3 



13,305 

89,829 
181,461 
230,087 
210,398 

136,807 

124,343 
77,691 
42,354 
24,754 
7,262 

7,783 






'35,900 

41,316 
142,443 
286,785 
369,954 
309,606 

337,242 
250,081 
158,695 
1CK,958 
34,140 

41,886 
<^' 



1,247 



4,211,65c 



*22, 510,439 



301,498 



1,148,895 



'2,063,570 



(6) 



756 

1,670 
4,339 
7,845 
9,178 
7,776 

8,394 
5,824 
3,837 
2,109 
691 



699 









(=) 



9 
10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 



53,40; 



See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limitations of Data. " 

'Adjusted gross deficit. 

^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value is included in each total. 

^Less than $500. 

'Adjusted gross income less adjusted gross deficit. 



445805 O -57 • 



76 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



Table I6.-RETUBNS WITH SELF-EMPLOYMENT TAX— ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME AND SELF-EMPLOYMENT TAX, BY STATES AND TERRITOBES 

(Returns with adjusted gross income) 



States and Territories 



Alabama. . . . 

Arizona 

Arkansas. . . 

California. 
Colorado. . . 



Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida' 

Georgia 



Hawaii. . . 
Idaho. ... 

Illinois. . 
Indiana. . 
Iowa 



Kansas. . . ■ 
Kentucky. . 
Louisiana. 

Maine 

Maryland. . 



Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi. . . 
Missouri 



Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. 
New Jersey. . . . 



New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina. 
North Dakota.. . 
Ohio 



Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. 
Puerto Rico. . 
Rhode Island. 



South Carolina. 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 



Vermont 

Virginia 

Washing ton^... 
West Virginia. 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Number of 
returns with 
self -employ- 
ment tax 



(1) 



Total. 



50,036 
23,273 
37,917 
389,707 
42,617 

62,771 
8,448 
13,692 
102,720 
67,271 

9,910 

28,433 

258,543 

120,366 

86,494 

61,001 
62,525 
56,900 
30,541 
60,701 

119,609 
164,840 
88,445 
29,260 
100,258 

17,261 
41,253 
6,135 
16,926 
156,437 

14,002 

482,700 

79,662 

15,778 

2ai,137 

70,010 

59,752 

269,357 

19,676 

32,458 
20,308 
61,761 
217,370 
17,775 

9,960 
69,672 
87,720 
35,841 

106,082 
6,274 



Adjusted 
gross 
income 

{ Thousand 
doUarl) 



(2) 



4,194,635 



228,168 
128,772 
152,736 
2,439,926 
252,276 

364,579 
47,14.8 
85,559 
497,994 
352,024 

64,190 

125,615 

1,602,577 

594,843 

421,795 

336,859 
299,723 
323,709 
111,019 
340,690 

560,919 
1,076,363 
434,041 
128,513 
531,883 

103,203 
193,081 
46,870 
60,944 
806,541 

83,561 

2,734,423 

342,689 

67,019 

1,093,422 

328,543 

353,657 

1,414,402 

32,954 

152,045 
90,861 

283,367 

1,134,343 

99,475 

33,279 
351,516 
475,602 
145,607 
507,264 

35,722 



Self-employ- 
ment tax 



(Thousand 
dollara) 



(3) 



3,117 
1,792 
2,237 
29,621 
2,991 

4,654 

629 

916 

7,127 

4,207 

627 
2,112 
19,909 
8,564 
6,347 

4,394 
4,113 
3,867 
1,763 
4,488 

8,115 
12,844 
6,419 
2,050 
6,953 

1,395 

2,890 

522 

1,U4 

11,613 

1,096 
39,942 
4,815 
1,074 
15,175 

4,811 
4,647 
19,719 

1,307 

2,112 
1,539 
3,778 
1A,275 
1,397 

553 
4,591 
5,922 
2,070 
7,929 

409 



304,591 52 



See text for individual returns for "Explanation of Classifications and Terms" and for "Description of Sample and Limtations of Data. 
^Includes Canal Zone. 
^Includes Alaska. 



HISTORICAL TABLES 
INDIVIDUAL RETURNS, 1945-1954 



Page 



17. Number of retui-ns by major characteristics, adjusted gross income 

and deficit, and tax 79 

18. Returns with income tax — number, adjusted gross income, income 

tax, and average tax, by adjusted gross income classes 80 

19. Sources of income by type 81 

20. Selected sources of income by adjusted gross income classes 82 

21. Itemized deductions by type 84 

22. Returns with adjusted gross income — number, adjusted gross in- 

come, and income tax, by States and Territories 8.'i 



77 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1945-1954 



79 



Table 17.— NUMBER OF RETURNS BV MAJOR CHARACTERISTICS, ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME AND DEFICIT, AND TAX, 1945-1954 



Number of returns, total^ 

Returns with adjusted gross income, total 

Taxable returns 

Nontaxable returns 

Returns with no adjusted gross income, total^. 

Returns with only self-employment tax 

NontLxable returns^ 

Number of— 

Taxable returns 

Nontaxable returns ^ 

Returns with itemized deductions^ 

Taxable 

Nontaxable^ 

Returns with standard deduction 

Taxable 

Nontaxable 



Number of returns by source of income: 
Positive income: 

Salaries and wages 

Dividends ^ 

Interest received^ 

Annuities and pensions 

Income from estates and trusts 

Business profit 

Partnership profit 

Net gain from sales of capital assets. 
Net gain from sales of other property. 

Rents and royalties net income 

Other sources^ 

Losses: 

Business loss 

Partnership loss 

Net loss from sales of capital assets. 
Net loss from sales of other property. 

Rents and royalties net loss 

Net operating loss deduction' 

Loss from estates and trusts 

Amount of adjusted gross income, total 

Taxable returns 

Nontaxable returns 

Amount of adjusted'gross deficit, total... 
Returns with only self-employment tax... 
Nontaxable returns 

Amount of taxable income 

Amount of tax liability, total 

Income tax (after credits) 

Self-employment tax 



56,306,704 
42,619,755 
13,686,949 

440, 304 

13,305 

426,999 



..2,633,060 
14,113,948 

15,701,595 

13,711,830 

1,989,765 

41,045,413 
23,921,230 
12,124,133 



49,925,305 

3,681,007 

6,124,335 

730,279 

363, 306 

6,320,312 
1,588,046 
2,411,147 
135,062 
3,863,618 
5,019,718 



,464,726 
228,949 
664,084 
207,456 
,143,337 
34,781 
12,258 



57,838,184 

57,415,885 
45,206,129 
12,209,756 

422,299 

17,022 

405.277 



45,223,151 

12,615,033 

14,426,417 
12,932,132 

1,494,285 

43,411,767 
32,291,019 
U, 120, 748 



50,373,912 

4,495,133 

5,579,720 

735,471 

426,823 

6,121,474 
1,649,591 
1,987,723 
93,741 
4,061,630 
1,861,744 



1,281,395 
241,505 
739, 370 
151,152 

1,192,880 
33,205 



56,528,817 

56,107,089 
43,866,832 
12,240,257 

421,723 

9,441 

412,287 



43,876,273 
12,652,544 

12,835,776 
11,462,609 

1, 373, 167 

43,693,041 
32,413,664 

11,279,377 



49,342,862 

4,213,722 

5,196,439 

6X,831 

425,669 

5,791,797 
1,625,320 
2,034,196 
93,738 
3,365,368 



1,080,870 
203,170 
665,727 
124,402 

1,054,992 
29,987 



55,447,009 

55,042,597 
42,636,797 
12,405,800 

404,412 
11,813 
392,599 



42,648,610 
12,798,399 

11,581,696 
10,212,822 
1,363,874 

43,865,313 
32,435,788 
11,429,525 



43,533,699 

4,038,391 

4,824,056 

598, 330 

432,106 

6,127,629 
1,692,545 
2,132,037 
100,765 
3,335,620 
2,353,892 



1,047,713 
219,839 
582,413 
180,335 
977,080 
30, 570 



53,060,098 

52,655,564 
38,186,682 
14,468,382 

404,534 

404,534 



33,186,632 
U, 873,416 

10,320,298 
8,724,546 
1,595,752 

42,739,300 
29,462,136 
13,277,664 



46.147,211 

3,668,423 

4,410,271 

525,514 

387,293 

5,876,922 
1,872,550 
1,895,963 
117,067 
3,727,762 
2,278,576 



988,465 
250,928 
668,038 
182,540 
399,337 



51,301,910 
35,628,295 
15,673,615 

512,214 

512,214 



35,628,295 
16,135,829 

9,691,340 
7,899,061 
1,792,279 

42,122,734 
27,729,234 
14,393,550 



44,167,831 

3,656,582 

4,714,567 

545,763 

353,347 

5,317,827 
1,971,001 
1,439,221 
123,254 
3, 606, 363 
2,238,711 



896,247 
278,292 
697,010 
160, 209 
873,636 



51,745,697 
36,411,248 
15,334,449 

326,309 

326, 309 



36,411,248 
15,660,758 

8,823,927 
7,297,843 
1,531,084 

43,243,079 
29,1U,405 
14,129,674 



45,000,595 

3,321,922 

3,963,527 

377,317 

323,386 

6,337,370 
1,636,213 
1,694,230 

136,132 
3,174,410 
2,012,844 



820,474 
173,721 
586,123 
103,112 
821,073 



54,799,936 
41,578,524 
13,221,412 

299,072 

299,072 



41,578,524 
13,520,484 

10,401,107 
8,990,964 
1,410,143 

44,697,901 
32,587,560 
12, 110, 341 



47,657,623 

3,443,646 

3,835,126 

329, 513 

319,113 

6,266,633 
1,902,081 
1,866,853 
121,431 
3,163,086 
2,079,988 



774,649 
183,111 
610,349 
98,030 
852,354 



52,816,547 

52,600,470 
37,915,696 
14,684,774 

216,077 

216,077 



37,915,696 
14,900,851 

8,753,179 
7,566,176 
1,187,003 

44,063,368 
30,349,520 
13,713,848 



45,699,345 

3,306,931 

3,636,477 

308,957 

323,605 

6,301,650 
1,534,734 
2,244,938 
137,267 
3,106,963 
2,038,630 



642,131 
115, 186 
502,457 
85,473 
770, 224 



49,932,783 

49,750,991 

42,650,502 

7,100,489 

181,792 

181,792 



42,650,502 
7,282,281 

8,478,590 

7,800,550 

678,040 

41,454,193 
34,849,952 
6,604,241 



43,883,743 

4,952,101 

275,423 
291,859 

5,276,269 
1,421,871 
1,671,192 
83,283 
3,125,981 
1,853,076 



570,572 
108,247 
391,561 
79,707 
692,692 



(Thousand doltera) 



230,235,355 

209,668,830 

20,567,025 

1,014,480 

35,900 

978, 580 



26,967,251 

26,665,753 

301,498 



229,863,409 

212,421,184 

17,442,225 

1,155,153 

46,003 

1,109,150 



29,657,273 

29,430,659 

226,614 



216,087,449 

193,531,784 

17,555,665 

797,541 

23,425 

774,116 



28,020,288 

27,802,831 

217,45-' 



203,097,033 
185,171,964 
17,925,069 

760, 548 

23,912 

736,636 



24,439,073 
24,227,780 

211,293 



179,874,478 
158,545,122 
21,329,356 

726,202 



18,374,922 
13,374,922 



161,373,205 
138,566,406 
22,806,799 

799,280 

799,230 



U, 538, 141 
14,538,141 



164, 173, 861 
142,056,835 
22,116,976 

657,347 

657,847 



15,441,529 
15,441,529 



150,295,275 
135,301,876 
14,993,399 

559, 193 

559,193 



13,076,281 
18,076,281 



134,330,006 
113,050,027 
16,279,979 

247,206 

247,206 



16,075,913 
16,075,913 



120,301,131 

117,561,661 

2,739,470 



17,050,378 
17,050,378 



^For new definition of taxable and nontaxable returns for 1954, see page 23. 

^Includes returns with no information, 1945-52. 

^Excludes returns Form 1040A or W-2 with this source of income which was reported as other income. 

^Includes returns 1040A or W-2 showing wages not subject to income tax withholding, dividends, and interest, not exceeding $100 per return, reported in one sum as other income. 

'Not available prior to 1951. 



80 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1945-1954 



Table 18.— RETURNS OTTH INCOME TAX— NUMBER, ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME, INCOME TAX, AND AVERAGE TAX, BV ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES, 1945-1954 



Adjusted gross income classes 



NUMBER OF RETURNS 



$500 under $1,000 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000. . . 
$150,000 under $200,000. . . 
$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total. 



ADJUSTED GROSS INCCME 



$500 under $1,000 

$600 ujlder $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000... 
$150,000 under $200,000... 
$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total . 



INCOME TAX LIABILITY (APTER CREDITS) 



$500 under $1,000 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total. 



AVERAGE INCOME TAX PER TAXABLE RETURN 



$500 under $1,000 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000... 
$150,000 under $200,000... 
$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



1,29.;, 988 
2,426,670 
2,431,232 
3,078,559 

3,452,029 
7,924,537 
7,545,254 
12,355,239 

1,215,482 
368,492 
291,668 
161,897 
70,332 

11,617 

3,192 

3,234 

437 

201 



42,633,060 



1,361,444 
2,632,034 
2,787,231 
3,335,910 

3,685,629 
3,202,537 
7,666,402 
12,490,576 

1,158,199 
348,741 
254,008 
150,931 
60,260 

\ 12,461 

2,692 

372 
145 



1,420,812 
2,760,133 
2,963,805 
3,568,839 

3,333,313 
8,552,203 
7,279,244 
10,609,222 

983,014 
324,033 
252,333 
152,900 
65,396 

14,114 

3,195 

416 
148 



1,610,092 
2,754,588 
3,115,581 
3,314,734 

4,178,241 
8,858,530 
6,949,135 
3,699,138 

831,819 

295,919 

24S,459 

149,837 

67,447 

12,045 

4,008 

3,905 

523 

171 



42,833,675 41,594,222 



1,570,113 
2,663,366 
3,333,412 
4,132,168 

4,585,740 
3,663,606 
5,740,400 
6,114,699 

679, 114 
256,019 
223,432 
136,462 
62,689 

11,564 

3,943 

4,053 

623 

219 



38,186,682 



1,538,863 
2,742,356 
3,385,746 
4,413,528 

4,750,944 
8,076,430 
4,727,478 
4,837,794 

531,572 
220,420 
181,989 
105,718 
46,130 

8,028 
2,723 
2,572 

379 
120 



2,619,795 
3,623,233 
4,683,599 

4,914,112 
3,280,683 
4,880,174 
4,666,206 

599, 545 
236,433 
192,771 
114,526 
52,725 

9,619 

3,122 

2,975 

415 

149 



36,411,248 



2,790,569 

4,178,437 
5,660,010 
6,439,111 

6,171,703 
3,695,346 
3,318,391 
2,837,585 

436,961 

201,300 

160,010 

89,158 

38,049 

6,353 

2,057 

2,018 

302 

114 



41,578,524 



3,153,2U' 

4,744,514 
5,928,686 
6,072,132 

5,310,256 
5,677,207 
2,757,501 
2,331,353 

452,271 

192, 540 

156,674 

38,913 

39, 101 

6,373 

1,994 

1,997 

323 

94 



(Tbouaand doltai 



27 



1,073,793 
3,047,987 
4,237,823 
6,922,725 

9,505,225 

812,439 
828,835 
237,475 

14,390,553 
6,316,307 
7,018,963 
6,067,727 
4,651,794 

1,389,769 
546,951 
915,760 
293, lU 
406, 532 



209,663,830 



37,648 
213,519 
344,535 
575,180 

817,847 
2,467,295 
3,049,831 
9,210,378 

2,185,166 
1,145,589 
1,521,383 
1,683,981 
1,708,710 

614,555 
257,014 
455,363 
154,785 
222,374 



26,565,753 



1,146,237 
3,299,452 
4,865,679 
7,493,336 

10, 156, 359 
28,746,397 
34, 370, 599 
81,752,818 

13,718,699 
5,983,194 
6,355,250 
5,682,111 
3,994,325 

■ 1,633,413 

753,081 
252,379 
275,263 



210,483,502 



46,165 
255,864 
449,872 
595,210 

933,259 
2,371,975 
3,545,531 
10,443,227 

2,358,258 
1,233,380 
1,566,556 
1,786,009 
1,645,090 

[ 312,499 

414,246 
149,012 
169,496 



29,430,659 



1,191,714 
3,463,102 
5,176,783 
8,030,291 

10,717,097 
29,930,509 
32,575,069 
58,763,095 

U,577,403 
5,561,110 
5,034,077 
5,757,127 
4,340,235 

1,863,390 

391,963 
273,310 
289,224 



195, 590,999 



46,964 
271,039 
477,751 
743,512 

1,022,509 
2,941,559 
3,323,844 
8,849,343 

2,024,375 
1,158,592 
1, 520,467 
1,830,556 
1,811,292 

934,339 

495,864 
164,964 
180,195 



1,354,605 
3,452,761 
5,446,157 
8, 578, 144 

11,530,006 
30,946,234 
31,016,329 
55,838,698 

9,923,727 
5,073,155 
6,003,939 
5,551,016 
4,500,312 

1,440,965 
; 687,244 

1,100,454 
349,694 
344,640 



183,243,590 



50, 542 
241, 320 
461,740 
721,975 

998,321 
2,728,262 
2,919,633 
5,607,555 

1,594,410 
973,921 
1,387,753 
1,577,415 
1,778,160 

687,725 
[ 356,130 
612,301 
211,452 
213,553 



27,802,831 24,227,780 



1,310,810 
3,381,544 
5,318,935 
9,290,893 

12,552,390 
30,154,986 
25,557,691 
39,045,068 

8,148,940 
4,395,990 
5,391,854 
5,144,080 
4,192,517 

1, 385, 519 
576,791 

1,141,235 
419,462 
433,407 



158,545,122 



40,337 
197,079 
4U,125 
547,370 

390,984 
2,177,241 
2,043,783 
3,983,698 

1,157,379 
757,996 
1,121,239 
1,382,086 
1,517,006 

513, 196 
323,914 
502,558 
239,881 
260, 550 



18,374,922 



1,289,971 
3,474,249 
5,925,539 
9,926,073 

13,084,856 
28,027,397 
21,029,837 
30,970,695 

6,971,830 
3,783,153 
4,376,718 
3,975,070 
3,074,224 

961,006 
466,140 
718,256 
254,332 

255,509 



38,437 
191,102 
394,473 
650,080 

875,700 
1,919,402 
1,609,173 
3,039,306 

951,397 

525,709 

869,547 

1,022,535 

1,052,365 

407,379 
216,042 
359,959 
143,465 
146,459 



3,347,031 
6,347,058 
10,523,553 

13,535,912 
28,714,750 
21,709,135 
29,818,294 

7,200,558 
4,054,251 
4,642,297 
4,313,111 
3,515,082 

1,153,456 
534,345 
335,589 
274,704 
258,072 



142,056,885 



37,706 

187,415 
435,023 
704, 578 

914,648 
1,990,235 
1,637,046 
2,960,914 

1,002,044 

684, 138 

945,484 

1,136,288 

1,247,150 

503,298 
256,026 
441,954 
155,865 
151,715 



15,441,529 



5,295,521 
9,974,180 
14,507,256 

16,951,476 
29,914,610 
16,917,330 
18,433,619 

5,870,655 
3,455,452 
3,847,922 
3,351,904 
2,525,752 

759,938 
352,544 
574,611 
201,811 
214,945 



135,301,875 



337,787 

844,726 

1,291,807 

1,510,628 
2,757,106 
1,751,421 
2,550,665 

1,172,385 
350,451 
1,167,726 
1,277,583 
1,186,450 

411,090 
201,923 
340,804 
122,749 
131,253 



18,076,281 



2,425,223 

6,021,539 
10,435,174 
13,559,329 

14,545,694 
22,924,649 
12,205,197 
15,288,504 

5,460,356 
3,306,371 
3,769,976 
3,347,587 
2,593,410 

751,223 
340,333 
563,822 
216,896 
184, 145 



118,050,027 



432,817 
848,453 

1,142,625 

1,227,337 
2,099,585 
1,277,523 
2,160,367 

1,105,837 
824,524 
1,150,231 
1,291,755 
1,223,315 

410,973 
192,264 
327,245 
127,571 
U0,117 



Average income tax . 



U2 
187 

237 
311 

404 
/745 

1,798 

3,109 

5,218 

10,402 

24,295 

52,901 

80,518 

140,805 

354,199 

1,106,338 



625 



34 
97 
161 
208 

258 
350 
452 
836 

2,036 
3,537 
5,934 
11,329 
27,300 

65,203 

153,880 
400,570 
,168,938 



98 

161 
210 

263 
344 
457 
334 

2,059 
3,575 
5,026 
11,972 
27,697 

66,238 

155,200 

396, 548 

1,217,541 



148 
189 

239 

303 
420 

760 

1,917 

3,308 

5,585 

11,195 

26,354 

57,096 

38,855 

156,927 

404,306 

,249,433 



532 



26 

74 
124 
157 

194 
251 
355 
651 

1,704 
2,961 
5,017 
10,128 
24,199 

53,026 

83,312 

144,485 

385,042 

1,189,726 



481 



25 
70 
U7 
147 

134 
238 
340 
623 

1,537 
2,839 
4,779 
9,672 
23,030 

50,745 

79,340 

143,845 

391,728 

1,220,492 



408 



72 
120 
150 

185 
240 
346 
535 

1,671 
2,894 
4,905 
9,922 
23,654 

52,323 
82,007 
148, 555 
375,581 
1,018,221 



424 



93 
U9 
201 

245 
313 
461 
899 

2,408 
4,225 
7,293 
14,331 
31,182 

54,708 

98, 166 

168,382 

406,454 

1,151,430 



435 



91 
U3 
138 

231 
3W 
463 
927 

2,445 
4,232 
7,405 
U,527 
31,286 

64,437 
96,421 
163,868 
395,266 

,171,457 



424 



^For new definition of taxable returns for 1954, see page 23. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1945-1954 



81 



Table 19.— SOURCES OF INCOME BY TYPE, 1946-1964 



Sources of income 



(Tbouaand dollara) 



Returns with adjusted gross income: 
Positive income: 

Salaries and wsges^ 

Dividends^ 

Interest received^ 

Annuities and pensions 

Income from estates and trusts 

Business profit 

Partnership profit 

Net gain from sales of capital assets. 
Net gain from sales of other property 

Rents and royalties net income 

Other sources^ 

Total 

Losses : 

Business loss 

Partnership loss 

Net loss from sales of capital assets.. 
Net loss from sales of other property. 

Rents and royalties net loss 

Net operating loss deduction' 

Loss from estates and trusts 

Total 

Adjusted gross income 



Returns with no adjusted gross Income : 
Positive income: 

Salaries and wages 

Dividends 

Interest received 

Annuities and pensions 

Income from estates and trusts 

Business profit 

Partnership profit 

Net gain from sales of capital assets- 
Net gain from sales of other property. 

Rents and royalties net incane 

Other sources 

Total 

Losses: 

Business loss 

Partnership loss 

Net loss from sales of capital assets. 
Net loss from sales of other property. 

Rents and royalties net loss 

Net operating loss deduction' 

Loss from estates and trusts 

Total 

Adjusted gross deficit 



185,79i,926 

7,030,900 

2,349,915 

799,292 

633,434 

19,218,571 
8,973,393 
3,614,012 

104,930 
3,497,917 

679,067 



232,746,355 



1,293,519 
259,724 
362,625 

129,023 

401,740 

58,829 

5,540 



2,511,000 



230,235,855 



157,697 
16,966 
20,315 
6,777 

16,041 
30,150 
117,850 
2,381 
38,375 
11,624 



420,382 



1,015,290 
213,518 
16,821 
70,035 
27,302 
86,136 



1,434,862 



187,607,862 

5,804,993 

2,021,869 

670, 329 

1,636,754 

18,646,959 
8,784,424 
2,473,436 
60,359 
3,605,573 
889,025 



232,251,633 



1,073,477 
266,799 
437,849 
111,682 
457,509 
40,391 



2,338,207 



229,863,409 



126,058 
23,286 
20,780 

(') 

4,722 

30,740 
13,476 
65,040 
2,526 
53,693 
19,731 



365,487 



940, 584 
248,916 
24,888 
70,954 
73,894 
161,411 



1,520,647 



1,014,480 1,155,153 



174,193,394 
5,834,215 
1,822,337 

581,672 
1,700,139 

13,180,679 
3,799,142 
2,761,038 

102,826 
3,432,513 

794,378 



213,202,833 



1,009,459 
241,285 
343,557 

39,145 
333,212 

43,724 



2,115,382 



216,037,449 



U5,638 
25,409 
24, 562 
2,139 
11,096 

14, 314 
34,656 
74,777 
13,770 
56,583 
6,953 



409,902 



373,919 
150,234 
16,905 
50,624 
24,392 
90,365 



160,336,699 
6,030,895 

1,684,015 

499, 306 

1,739,064 

18,131,463 
3,852,180 
3,185,644 
83,761 
3,299,943 
1,199,951 



205,042,926 



939,922 
231,766 

268,802 
126,056 

342,834 
36,511 



1,945,391 



144,993 

25,120 

18,200 

503 

22,361 

31,078 
18,865 
96,777 

5,142 
53,415 

8,598 



425,057 



756,666 
227,316 
16,373 
78,267 
38,322 
68,663 



133,956,127 

6,130,906 

1,582,398 

429,767 

1,689,754 

16,846,649 
3,554,469 
3,181,051 
101,494 
3,183,655 
1,008,812 



181,665,582 



340,420 
223,547 
313,886 
132, 306 
280,930 



1,791,139 



179,874,478 



116,993 

26,793 
12,706 
2,043 
10,313 

16,785 
21,038 
77,520 
1,694 
40,797 
10,262 



336,959 



758,250 

187,740 

16,742 

53, UO 

47,293 



726,202 



124,798,953 

5,218,206 

1,511,555 

441,969 

1,435,302 

15,613,095 
7,394,590 
1,386,459 
100,890 
3,024,215 
1,030,824 



162,956,058 



635,138 
243,735 
331,192 
101,036 
266,667 



161,373,205 



84,195 

23,021 

16,275 

1,439 

3,066 

16,451 
17,638 
69,061 

5,602 
35,417 

9,965 



292,130 



763,734 

189,353 

19,501 

72,716 

46,104 



125,814,826 

4,939,627 

1,279,044 

293,103 

1,307,280 

18,029,409 
3,043,862 
2,455,675 

106, 571 
2,572,772 

748,276 



165,590,445 



646,141 
166,030 
235,344 
82,481 
236,092 



1,416,588 



164,173,861 



66, 576 
31,273 
14,406 
1,315 
7,287 

19,360 

20,163 
43,987 

4,607 
26,650 

6,814 



242,438 



644,436 
149,679 
12,725 
66,844 
26,599 



900,233 



657,847 



114,736,671 

4,278,371 

1,115,258 

226,330 

1,227,282 

16,370,491 

3,231,785 

2,410,102 

97, 121 

2,201,090 

645,294 



151,539,795 



519,098 
152,156 
279, 314 
67,003 
226,940 



150,295,275 



67,076 

16,819 

10,156 

502 

3,399 

10,073 
16,797 
42,195 

4,013 
26,579 

4,332 



201,946 



519,312 

143,121 

18,281 

56,080 

23,345 



761,139 



99,144,074 

3,670,587 

1,064,219 

231,309 

1,106,134 

16,004,322 
8,083,097 
3,296,217 

121,384 
1,903,726 

749,093 



U5, 374, 162 



442,906 
108,554 
233,156 
67,271 
192, 270 



1,044,157 



29,585 

3,270 

2,843 

825 

1,529 

7,005 
2,558 
22,344 
1,295 
8,668 
1,997 



81,919 



248, 514 
29,254 
16,974 
25,131 

9,251 



247,206 



91,658,219 

3,906,025 

194,685 
945,594 

12,572,022 

7,195,884 

2,275,701 

63,922 

1,758,131 

595,186 



121,165,369 



350,118 
86,503 

181,669 
69,963 

175,992 



364,245 



41,580 
13,625 
(') 

U,462 
12,862 
32,332 

3,903 
13,321 

4,872 



142,817 



290,074 
62,445 
11,856 
57,169 
13,745 



292,472 



^Excludes wages of less than $100 per return from which no income tax was withheld, reported on Form 1040A or W-2 as other income. 
^Excludes dividends reported on Form 1040A or W-2, and for 1945-53 dividends received through partnerships and fiduciaries. 
^Excludes interest of less than $100 per return reported on Form 1040A or W-2. 
Includes wages not subject to income tax withholding, dividends, and interest, not exceeding $100 per return, reported in one sum as other income on Form 1040A or W-2. 
'Not available prior to 1951. 
^Sample variability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value is included in each total. 



82 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX KbTUKNS J:''UK 1945-1954 



Table 20.— SELECTED SOURCES OF INCOME UV ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES, 1945-1954 



Adjusted gross 



SALARIES, WAGES, CGiaaSSIONS' 
Returns with adjusted gross income: 

Under $500 

$500 under $1,000 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,00C under $1,500^ 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $6,000 

$4,000 under $5,000^ 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Returns with no adjusted gross income... 

Grand total 

DIVIDENDS' 
Returns with adjusted gross income: 

Under $500 

$500 under $1,000 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500^ 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $-4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000' 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Returns with no adjusted gross income... 

Grand total 

INTEREST RECEIVED' 
Returns with adjusted gross income: 

Under $500 

$500 under $1,000 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500^ 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000' 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Returns with no adjusted gross income... 

Grand total 

See footnotes at end of table . 



( Thousand Hollara) 



1,137,682 
1,953,083 
4,433,831 
5,873,995 

8,119,136 

10,641,552 
28,790,162 
32,468,575 
72,550,811 

9,319,192 
3,033,117 
2,933,567 
2,270,315 
1,553,470 

375, 500 

120,346 

142,322 

17,062 

6,108 



185,794,926 
157,697 



185,952,623 



10,178 
36,901 
65,505 
95,448 
93,973 

94,609 
200,461 
243,493 
946,788 

721,459 
520,773 
780,502 
868,526 
1,008,076 

420,263 
200,724 
376,622 
143,601 
202,998 



7,030,900 
16,966 



21,955 
53,966 
94,934 
107,508 
106,019 

92,588 
176,014 
186,123 
544,444 

254,104 
149,775 
176,403 
173,144 
128,428 

38,203 

13,916 

21,099 

5,441 

5,851 



2,349,915 
20,315 



1,208,770 
1,974,738 
4,587,925 
6,267,596 
8,470,037 

10,956,687 
29,243,923 
32,721,872 
73,196,798 

9,062,659 
2,970,569 
2,714,536 
2,272,934 
1,383,787 

\ 430,495 

124,054 
16,289 
4,193 



187,607,862 
126,058 



137,733,920 



16,520 
45,296 
91,647 
104,656 
103,491 

109,970 
194,240 
202,211 
923,150 

603,683 
429,583 
613,459 

719,058 
730,003 



259,377 
98,413 
118,724 



5,804,993 
23,286 



21,171 
58,011 
89,031 
94,303 
85,395 

83,890 
167,893 
153,417 
463,900 

210,473 
127,417 
150,275 
143,019 
103,112 

42,148 

18,497 
4,969 
4,948 



2,021,869 
20,780 



1,197,251 
1,964,031 
4,763,672 
6,761,372 
9,147,821 

11,757,228 
30,554,952 
31,342,772 
60,361,693 

7,172,156 
2,590,932 
2,435,160 
2,102,804 
1,415,540 



140,748 

17,596 
4,439 



174,193,394 
145,638 



174,339,032 



18,236 
42,567 
68,815 
89,248 
90,694 

101,725 
196,131 
199,570 
845,370 

592,188 
417,070 
593, 180 
729,432 
802,253 



312,377 
100,881 
132,139 



5,834,215 
25,409 



19,615 
48,018 
81,132 
84,774 
82,537 

75,986 
128,429 
138,933 
397, 137 

184,467 
116,168 
147,089 
137,266 
105,893 



21,114 
3,994 
4,897 



1,822,337 



24,562 



1,146,950 
2,154,234 
4,765,216 
7,062,581 
9,758,253 

12,474,191 
31,270,695 
29,561,094 
47,621,929 

5,626,778 
2,308,530 
2,443,317 
2,020,299 
1,421,555 

( 372,495 

I 139,834 

160,592 

24,074 

4,077 



160,336,699 
144,993 



160,481,697 



11,126 
39,969 
71,780 
88,011 
95,036 

102,454 
199,416 
229,364 
853,185 

551,141 
404,406 
604,679 
735,213 
841,279 

359,342 
199,297 
364,894 
130,601 
149,702 



6,030,895 

25,120 



17,963 
45,531 
71,327 
76,550 
74,709 

71,350 
131,610 
128,569 
358,724 

165,038 
102,492 
127,927 
129,189 
105,539 

31,971 

14,334 

20,710 

5,124 

5,358 



1,093,015 
2,247,748 
5,003,951 
7,866,925 
10,830,063 

13,996,835 
30,717,185 
23,861,823 
31,515,233 

4,175,514 
1,855,309 
2,053,211 
1,768,317 
1,256,903 

330,615 
133,105 
164,845 
27,827 
7,693 



138,956,127 
116,998 



139,073,125 



13,255 
44,003 
83,102 
38,256 
93,956 

101,619 
207,767 
227,541 
780, 146 

525,708 
398,190 
602,621 
758,936 
866,875 

386,392 
205,692 
408,322 
158,822 
179,203 



6,130,906 
26,793 



19,571 
44,154 
74,529 
77,866 
68,066 

66,922 
119,396 
126, 364 
318,921 

145,219 
92,049 
122,404 
126,715 
98,683 

31,302 
14,514 
23,040 
7,035 
6,148 



1,114,198 
2,288,944 
5,357,515 
8,253,360 
11,740,607 

14,578,344 
28,413,731 
i9, 170,123 
23,996,697 

3,593,899 
1,663,462 
1,742,438 
1,438,038 
964,043 

248,736 
93,689 
112,328 

13,066 
5,729 



124,798,953 
84,195 



124,383,148 



16,387 

55,742 

90,554 

108,496 

128,090 

119,276 
261,941 
226,052 
732,138 

446,940 
334,989 
485,815 
591,314 
671,926 

282,804 
156,844 
289,075 
110,833 
108,943 



5,218,206 
28,021 



16,964 
53,510 
83,989 
91,703 
79,073 

71,703 
135,397 
127,540 
303,637 

123,606 
81,961 

100,995 
99,397 
78,621 

25,386 

11,679 

15,370 

5,106 

5,415 



1,511,555 
16,275 



826,510 
2,635,294 



5,115,343 
8,689,482 
12,295,300 

14,986,787 
29,124,813 
19,849,534 
22,430,789 

3,408,527 
1,656,210 
1,740,103 
1,487,639 
1,036,658 

261,642 
110,022 
114,897 
18,247 

7,033 



125,814,826 
66, 576 



125,881,402 



9,967 
52,192 



77,767 
85,121 
90,802 

86,675 

183,714 
187,515 
643,704 

428,719 
322,247 
470,908 
601,495 
697,785 

315,007 
169,879 
300,382 
102,760 
112,999 



4,939,627 
31,273 



11,179 
49,095 



65,681 
59,229 
60,162 

53,935 
112,523 

95,717 
244,735 

113,620 
76,060 
93,092 
94,149 
78,294 

25,220 

12,301 

17,353 

5,493 

6,215 



1,279,044 

14,406 



1,037,379 
3,276,375 



6,503,166 
11,080,052 
15,017,923 

16,744,993 
27,869,323 
14,498,899 
11,454,941 

2,438,346 
1,335,786 
1,380,574 
1,089,868 
695,377 

169,356 
62,296 
68,106 

8,772 
3,140 



114,736,671 
67,076 



114,803,747 



13,837 
61,798 



92,637 
96,006 
105,857 

105,762 
207,702 
175,112 
615,424 

403,488 
307,659 
421,074 
479,275 
510,842 

202,748 
117,895 
199,634 

77,499 
84,071 



4,278,371 
16,819 



13,041 
53,537 



63, 533 
64,019 
62,898 

60,552 

99,829 

72,382 

201,061 

100,902 
66,414 
76,771 
73,091 
58,062 

17,709 

8,477 
12,653 
4,107 
6,161 



1,115,258 
10,156 



1,164,941 
3,738,859 



7,629,891 
11,999,384 
14,674,070 

14,458,092 

20,707,132 

9,793,932 

8,667,136 

2,057,229 

1,131,172 

1,210,667 

955,150 

630,800 

148,021 
53,200 
61,620 
10,648 

2,031 



99,144,074 
29,585 



99,173,659 



8,535 
59,667 



81,931 
89,860 
95,006 

103,472 
178,881 
174,753 
545,815 

352,637 
257,682 
356,406 
393,093 
420,466 

168,684 
84,603 

162,371 
72,273 
59,255 



3,670,587 
3,270 



3,313 
44,087 



55,947 
59,111 
59,121 

57,108 
97,259 
66,734 

138,060 

96,714 
64,469 
79,432 
73,277 
60,866 

19,906 
3,039 

12,709 
6,420 
6,041 



1,064,219 
2,843 



1,067,062 



(Reported 
> with 
dividends) 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1945-1954 



83 



Table 20.— SELECTED SOURCES OF INCOME BY ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME CLASSES, 1945-1954— Continuod 



Adjusted gross income classes 



BUSINESS PROFIT 
Returns with adjusted gross income: 

Under $500 

$500 under $1,000 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,00C 

$1,000 under $1,500^ 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$';,000 under $5,000^ 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Returns with no adjusted gross income 

Grand total 

PARTNERSHIP PROFIT 
Returns with adjusted gross income: 

Under $500 

$500 under $1,000 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500' 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 

$2,500 under $3,000 

$3,000 under $4,000 

$4,000 under $5,000^ 

$5,000 under $10,000 

$10,000 under $15,000 

$15,000 under $20,000 

$20,000 under $30,000 

$30,000 under $50,000 

$50,000 under $100,000 

$100,000 under $150,000 

$150,000 under $200,000 

$200,000 under $500,000 

$500,000 under $1,000,000 

$1,000,000 or more 

Total 

Returns with no adjusted gross income 

Grand total 

RENTS AND ROYALTIES NET INCOME 
Returns with adjusted gross income: 

Under $500 

$500 under $1,000 

Under $600 

$600 under $1,000 

$1,000 under $1,500^ 

$1,500 under $2,000 

$2,000 under $2,500 



$2,500 under $3,000.. 
$3,000 under $4,000. . 
$4,000 under $5,000'. 
$5,000 under $10,000. 



$10,000 under $15,000.. 
$15,000 under $20,000.. 
$20,000 under $30,000.. 
$30,000 under $50,000.. 
$50,000 under $100,000. 



$100,000 under $150,000... 
$150,000 under $200,000... 
$200,000 under $500,000... 
$500,000 under $1,000,000. 
$1,000,000 or more 



Total 

Returns with no adjusted gross income. 
Grand total 



(Thousand dot lor %} 



HO, 3m 

351,725 
727,315 
874,895 
982,191 

1,068,887 
2,030,897 
1,659,320 
4,587,587 

2,214,822 
1,326,095 

1,447,476 

1,103,339 

546,550 

97,073 

25,205 

25,587 

4,815 

3,893 



19,218,571 
16,041 



15,958 
42,612 
78,154 
109,592 
139,110 

195,356 

499,378 

524,379 

1,918,999 

1,188,504 

795,926 

1,106,191 

1,085,314 

845,897 

226,849 

76,267 

97,570 

18,696 

9,141 



9,004,043 



41,127 
104,290 
188,819 
187,277 
179, 552 

159,779 
257,957 
279,887 
826,065 

331,573 
189,840 
243,355 
225,645 
168,164 

54,837 
16,968 
23,660 

7,544 
11,577 



3,497,917 
38,375 



3,536,292 



122,992 
314,182 
669,833 
899,563 
990,469 

1,117,768 
2,161,646 
1,738,647 
4,437,881 

2,073,531 

1,244,881 

1,290,636 

965,832 

472,823 



28,707 
3,950 
3,622 



18,646,959 
30,740 



28,178 
41,165 
122,912 
136,585 
191,775 

189,498 

468,679 

543,540 

1,907,899 

1,114,341 

786,303 

1,071,845 

1,019,460 

754,121 

287,404 

83,977 
7,504 
9,238 



45,824 
124,392 
222,799 
202,593 
177,305 

156,324 
326,818 
286,877 
825,030 

334,700 
207,280 
226,338 
218,637 
157,403 

55,024 

22,779 
7,812 
7,638 



3,605,573 
53,693 



105,506 
300,727 
672,572 
922,504 
995,599 

1,137,327 
1,994,450 
1,608,172 
4,087,451 

1,952,696 
1,207,256 
1,338,082 
1,105,699 
563,419 



37,901 
8,703 
4,537 



18,180,679 
14,314 



19,096 
30,079 
99,112 
122,307 
167,412 

208,154 

481,853 

523,664 

1,897,693 

1,118,743 
794,807 
995,687 

1,078,931 
824,082 



94,503 
12,179 
6,737 



1,799,142 
34,656 



50,957 
126,348 
205,770 
180,549 
193,229 

164,104 
298,717 
309,033 
703,866 

305,642 
182,740 
220,726 
205,145 
165,823 



30,245 

9,747 
9,457 



3,432,513 
56,583 



3,489,096 



110,282 
295,738 
728,071 
963,095 
1,143,414 

1,199,742 
2,137,886 
1,643,200 
3,845,706 

1,845,160 
1,111,531 
1,252,849 
1,030,518 
592,568 

120,833 

45,980 

49,098 

10, 149 

5,593 



18,131,463 
31,073 



16,706 
48,311 
96,867 
160,234 
200,335 

262,254 

588,258 

519,093 

1,737,359 

1,051,772 
705,792 
980,999 

1,075,101 
860, 375 

263,131 

120,821 
130,461 
22,340 
11,971 



,852,180 
18,865 



48,165 
122,690 
188,913 
184,474 
163,802 

178,832 
286,648 
269,209 
725,908 

275,666 
164,292 
203,403 
201,880 
157,566 

49,728 
24,002 
38,128 
10,807 
5,835 



3,299,948 
53,415 



3,353,363 



114,250 

324,004 

760,470 

1,028,688 

1,112,835 

1,148,598 
1,987,815 
1,512,663 
3,433,953 

1,672,108 
930,517 

1,124,333 
915,644 

518,650 

108,929 

45,033 

42,470 

10,005 

5,684 



16,846,649 
16,785 



21,497 
60,550 
141,159 
194,078 
258,331 

296,255 

590,004 

533,728 

.,671,464 

979,046 
655,394 
928,450 
945,936 
790, 584 

232,332 
104,599 
120, 174 
20,875 
9,513 



,554,469 
21,038 



8,575,507 



50,527 
123,492 
193,824 
191,576 
192,632 

168,665 
298,103 
274,183 
634,310 

266, 130 
157,472 
191,722 
136,746 
143,211 

46,093 

20,212 

31,614 

8,065 

5,028 



3,183,655 

40,797 



3,224,452 



142,904 
385,642 
875,216 

1,108,237 
1,177,748 

1,183,369 
1,873,273 
1,467,623 
3,208,082 

1,401,008 
803,714 
873,342 
646,875 
336,899 

62,852 

24,904 

27,131 

6,919 

7,352 



15,613,095 
16,451 



29,511 

78,898 

184,555 

247,548 

289,089 

301,493 

631,215 

568,877 

1,605,933 

908,351 
588,482 
778,884 
772,636 
596,882 

158,266 

66,021 

69,628 

12,524 

5,795 



7,894,590 
17,638 



7,912,228 



57,607 
141,386 
210,344 
196,083 
179,564 

175,012 
321,801 
271,163 
565,413 

239,904 
141,043 
164,552 
156,417 
115,131 

36,687 
18,466 
24,432 
6,563 
2,651 



3,024,215 
35,417 



76,949 
431,734 

863,773 
1,191,803 
1,242,922 

1,285,909 
2,113,114 
1,676,585 
3,824,338 

1,752,694 
998,677 

1,065,369 
809,288 
471,907 

97,849 
39,342 
43,201 
7,665 
9,802 



13,029,409 
19,360 



8,618 
61,416 



116,436 
178,756 
217,559 

272,664 
502,040 
531,716 
,596,027 

970,018 
676,680 
855,453 
871,434 
768,871 

212,467 

82,028 

97,443 

18,455 

5,782 



,043,862 
20,163 



8,064,025 



30,184 
123,187 



153,703 
152,144 
146,120 

133,420 
264,848 
202,593 
480,429 

212,988 
135,127 
159,037 
152,596 
121,802 

41,248 
18,526 
23,793 
10,975 
5,050 



2,572,772 
26, 650 



2,599,422 



95,729 
469,456 



927,023 
1,156,495 
1,297,021 

1,223,001 
2,056,996 
1,561,828 
3,553,866 

1,480,375 
790,126 
789,329 
562,105 
294,896 

55,609 

18,237 

25,951 

6,757 

5,684 



16,370,491 
10, 078 



14,828 
75,237 



157,358 
246,243 
325,522 

363,194 

701,011 

526,409 

1,651,083 

1,000,096 
678,497 
839,632 
733,330 
590,699 

145,297 
52,200 
57,732 
13,859 
4,555 



8,231,785 
16,797 



8,248,582 



43,155 
127,450 



144,671 
147,834 
151,639 

142,594 
258,636 
178,584 
392,360 

175,005 
100,992 
113,786 
98,054 
75,248 

20,541 
7,725 

15,739 
4,042 
2,035 



2,201,090 
25,579 



2,227,669 



93,703 
522,234 



962,166 
1,198,703 
1,270,771 

1,210,883 
1,974,603 
1,425,547 
3,292,959 

1,408,127 
786,973 
812,440 
592,011 
331,981 

66,553 
21,588 
25,239 
2,275 
4,569 



16,004,322 
7,005 



9,883 
57,430 



112,106 
185,085 
234,725 

299,286 

546,468 

457,915 

1,499,254 

1,022,357 
736,388 
916,083 
919,140 
735,452 

175,976 

73,504 

78,034 

14,394 

8,605 



8,083,097 
2,558 



8,085,655 



29,500 

113,590 



135,545 
135,913 
135,626 

142,956 
220,856 
148,711 
323, 549 

149,281 
87,128 
97,968 
81,982 
61,925 

15,717 
6,917 
12,333 

1,674 
2,548 



1,903,726 
8,658 



1,912,394 



104,131 
537,936 



891,498 
969,473 
959,734 

895,152 
1,427,700 
1,000,881 
2,456,694 

1,105,146 
542,021 
559,595 
483,745 
296,036 

68,579 
30,043 
32,631 
6,327 
4,700 



12,572,022 
11,462 



9,765 
57,731 



125,003 
162,895 
193,565 

232,466 
416,415 
369,608 
,315,963 

864,155 
539,952 
827,912 
351,198 

715,221 

197,847 
73,969 
92,958 
24,013 
3,148 



7,195,884 
12,852 



37,485 
126,913 



144,965 
128,525 
127,946 

125,403 
208,136 
131,424 
290,757 

123,609 
75,518 
81,306 
68,285 
50,391 

15,063 
6,962 

10,986 
1,257 
2,195 



1,753,131 
13,321 



1,771,452 



Excludes wages of less than $100 per return from which no income tax was withheld, reported on Form 1040A or W-2 as other income. 

For 1945, this class includes nontaxable returns with income exceeding the class limit. 

For 1946-52, this class includes nontaxable returns with income exceeding the class limit. 
'■Excludes dividends reported on Form 1040A or W-2, and for 1945-53 dividends received through partnerships and fiduciaries. For 1945, includes interest reported on Form 1040. 
'Excludes interest of less than $100 per return reported on Form 1040A or W-2. 



84 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1945-1954 



Table 21.— ITEMIZED DEDUCTIONS BV TYPE, 1945-1954 



Itemized dedactions 


1954 


1953 


1952 


1951 


1950 


1949 


1948 


1947 


1946 


1945 




(Thouiand dotUra) 










Returns with adjusted gross income: 


3,201,287 
4,076,630 
3,891,173 
2,971,172 
87,960 

444,245 
2,730,760 


2,735,359 
3,639,153 
3,552,448 
2,391,339 

392,6a 
2,878,234 


2,221,353 
3,167,778 
3,114,739 
2,133,130 

367,517 
2,552,035 


( (Not 
(available) 


1,494,928 

2,199,940 

2,258,009 

1 1,556,294 

306,572 
2,097,950 


1,224,004 
1,952,731 
2,029,550 
1,482,699 

227,596 
1,337,156 


1,000,439 
1,619,370 
1,878,080 
1,300,516 

241,569 
1,817,912 


913,922 
1,625,601 
1,969,641 
1,394,818 

250,426 
1,633,553 


738,364 
1,324,609 
1,633,151 
1,093,326 

178,096 
1,300,137 


694,782 




1,245,603 




1,448,208 




932,956 




- 


Losses from fire, stoniij other casualty, or 


152,476 




1,051,477 


Total 


17,403,227 


15,589,177 


13,556,552 


11,856,378 


9,913,693 


8,753,738 


7,857,838 


7,787,962 


6,277,683 


5,525,492 




3,255 
8,732 
1,374 
•4,276 

(M 
(M 

507 


4,117 
3,289 
4,169 
5,873 

(M 
(M 


6,123 
7,918 
1,744 
5,104 

5,905 


( (Not 
(available) 


/ 4,084 
1 5,376 
\ 2,333 
1 4,164 

I 1,228 
\ 2,021 


5,244 
3,186 
2,244 
5,111 

1,350 
3,734 


3,292 
8,208 
2,651 
3,711 

2,443 
10,843 


4,236 
5,954 
3,939 
3,307 

3,4-49 
4,746 


662 
1,846 

831 
1,405 

1,247 
6,025 


2,093 




3,777 




1,803 




2,820 




- 


Losses from fire, stomi, other casualty, or 


797 




1,748 


Total 


18,953 


25,416 


26,799 


26,456 


19,203 


25,871 


31,153 


25,682 


12,015 


13,044 




17,422,180 


15,614,595 


13,583,351 


11,882,834 


9,932,896 


8,779,609 


7,889,041 


7,813,644 


6,289,698 


5,538,536 



^Sample varability of this item is too large to warrant showing it separately. However, this value is included in each total. 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1945-1954 



85 



Table 22.— RETURNS WITH ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME— NUMBER. ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME. AND INCOME TAX, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES. 1945-1954 



States and Territories 



NUMBER OF HETUHNS 

Alabaica 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida^ 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentuct^ 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland^ 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New lork' 

North Carol ina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Puerto Rico 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington' 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total 

ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida' 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland^ 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New Yort' 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

See footnotes at end of table. 



713,389 
279,907 
390,897 
<, 733, 521 
522,393 

919,793 
1.10,208 
346,729 
1,093,433 
886,480 

196,816 

199,676 

3,664,301 

1,528,812 

949,318 

733,946 
797,181 
726,310 
337,301 
1,084,152 

1,946,708 
2,631,029 
1,109,306 
336,270 
1,443,093 

218,442 

497,166 

89,406 

215,998 

2,140,475 

211,876 
6,347,819 
1,102,039 

200,647 
3,218,821 

663,978 

578,796 

4,115,703 

21,325 

317,935 

518,343 
224,952 
908,671 
2,536,573 
247,331 

128,901 
1,105,919 

982,470 

568,245 
1,324,829 

108,252 



56,305,881 



731,401 
269,193 
399,806 
4,640,312 
527,275 

932,475 

142,296 

358,314 

1,051,866 

920,035 

200,739 

200,197 

3,780,956 

1,582,879 

960,696 

74^,285 
823,859 
745,188 
341,047 
1,220,258 

2,013,356 
2,706,164 
1,136,124 
345,964 
1,467,128 

221,685 

501,474 

84,721 

222,857 

2,191,420 

211,922 
6,510,765 
1,099,125 

201,670 
3,365,384 

674,504 

582,873 

4,261,351 

(') 
333,802 

525,688 
220,008 
928 , 575 
2,492,889 
243,910 

133,947 
1,100,376 

994,502 

607,584 
1,353,327 

111,093 



57,422,765 



710,102 
263,008 
384,317 
4,598,269 
509,876 

903,371 
139,153 
397,855 
979,277 
884,131 

198,799 

204,223 

3,702,881 

1,560,771 

956,125 

735,424 
800,819 
706,734 
341,265 
1,240,098 

2,010,392 
2,550,755 
1,114,900 
331,583 
1,432,531 

219,313 
502,089 
82,165 
216,777 
2,117,199 

204,076 
6,435,701 
1,067,239 

211,000 
3,254,058 

652,877 

586,167 

4,217,689 

(*) 

331,571 

514,812 
221,491 
873,469 
2,454,639 
249,544 

132,687 
1,082,020 

979,781 

610,803 
1,335,781 

106,711 



56,316,869 



706,228 
235,389 
366,990 
4,290,151 
501,563 

896,247 
134,674 
371,578 
904,277 
844,144 

189,836 

199,127 

3,711,052 

1,521,399 

953,011 

709,666 
781,023 
674,174 
328,614 
1,309,272 

1,965,876 
2,555,269 
1,082,642 
320,712 
1,398,118 

213,104 

502,962 

69,903 

216,956 

2,089,995 

194,157 
6,299,130 
1,034,528 

203,780 
3,207,570 

675,187 

574,454 

4,180,537 

{') 

335,221 

490,804 
222,991 
856,721 
2,374,600 
241,693 

131,591 

1,001,078 
953,480 
589,091 

1,319,702 
106,318 



55,041,685 



634,960 
214,002 
344,316 
4,078,066 
471,209 

870,345 
128,079 
373,762 
822,036 
770,782 

179,871 

191,116 

3,593,433 

1,464,200 

938,132 

669,904 
715,431 
637,844 
320,488 
1,152,059 

1,931,414 
2,477,041 
1,076,359 
291,822 
1,345,958 

208,597 

478,657 

65,544 

210,103 

2,003,440 

179,164 

6,123,930 

953,858 

198,529 

3,065,256 

606,613 

552,769 

4,060,469 

(') 

327,753 

452,555 
215,239 
804,601 
2,237,638 
225,356 

125,495 
956,580 
910,934 
599,684 
1,285,947 
101,191 



52,664,631 



610,931 
203,174 
326,192 
3,998,611 
459,267 

326,426 
120,793 
396,604 
770,284 
725,497 

182,803 

187,650 

3,619,255 

1,409,222 

954,663 

654,528 
679,542 
623,020 
322,300 
1,104,545 

1,902,361 
2,333,558 
1,054,193 
282,472 
1,358,024 

210,026 

475,954 

61,605 

201,461 

1,941,010 

175,767 

6,106,261 

906,710 

217,305 

2,977,078 

500,921 

541,639 

3,974,815 

(') 

321,003 

423,338 
214,937 
771,083 
2,124,368 
216,304 

127,061 
917,380 
906,292 
596,393 
1,267,743 
101,625 



51,499,609 



616,539 
206,128 
304,152 
4,060,087 
440,969 

871,497 
122,255 
339,450 
749,657 
741,220 

182,227 

190,204 

3,690,962 

1,441,605 

923,294 

645,843 
713,550 
619,475 
336,902 
958,698 

1,947,309 
2,410,194 
1,066,112 
281,508 
1,287,540 

210,143 

466,438 

63,581 

211,073 

1,993,768 

155,756 

6,203,398 

901,457 

198,521 

3,090,503 

577,105 

557,588 

4,073,136 

(') 

331,699 

424,012 
212,645 
769,354 
2,037,366 
221,326 

131,103 
905,559 
902,157 
618,189 
1,285,103 
99,279 



51,788,146 



643,182 

215,398 

330,597 

4,536,857 

491,025 

924,812 
126,584 
431,551 
773,670 
752,365 

205,054 

208,128 

3,871,396 

1,489,451 

948,755 

677,835 
726,498 
653,422 
344,861 
950,502 

2,040,169 
2,707,237 
1,113,143 
293,530 
1,395,876 

213,085 

503,212 

72,909 

220,524 

2,061,055 

154,001 

6,537,319 

918,643 

201,455 

3,213,254 

625,253 
616,911 
4,193,136 
(') 
342,760 

454,974 
213,445 
795,462 
2,243,691 
232,765 

133,032 
918,801 

1,018,941 
611,357 

1,332,645 
96,535 



54,809,740 



609,799 
201,375 
317,400 
4,382,029 
439,460 

904,255 
122,107 
418,468 
721,943 

753,773 

191,218 

192,884 

3,711,832 

1,425,205 

916,945 

637,397 
670,579 
639,996 
326,599 
913,281 

1,998,784 
2,444,609 
1,080,195 
288,542 
1,342,278 

203,050 

453,480 

71,079 

214,420 

2,023,646 

145,943 

5,343,055 

910,445 

188,034 

3,106,666 

593,569 

553,967 

4,127,644 

(') 

339,075 

402,279 
195,414 

755,103 

2,111,121 

224,578 

131,297 
861,239 
997,732 
573,963 
1,279,962 
90,191 



52,579,956 



(Thousand dollars) 



2,445,188 
1,133,078 
1,221,340 
22,023,493 
2,137,817 

4,330,913 
559,777 
1,474,718 
4,069,109 
3,149,890 

719,347 

750,695 

16,597,198 

5,103,459 

3,276,360 

2,748,186 
2,772,582 
2,800,016 
1,031,944 
4,531,032 

7,553,935 
12,194,265 
4,077,055 
1,076,518 
5,494,835 

840,252 

1,656,113 

410,893 

750,875 

9,626,661 

804,415 

23,907,625 

3,591,944 

552,491 
13,985,208 



2,451,310 

1,065,139 

1,178,792 

20,861,528 

2,072,905 

4,275,315 
591,070 
1,488,832 
3,807,180 
3,080,357 

705,874 

676,761 

16,558,187 

6,309,457 

3,282,905 

2,687,459 
2,783,890 
2,731,283 
1,066,856 
4,323,309 

7,309,602 
12,619,118 
4,010,779 
1,058,530 
5,539,955 

811,541 

1,703,596 

358,385 

750,947 

9,623,391 

805,671 

28,338,061 

3,503,692 

581,462 
14,793,481 



2,287,310 
1,028,023 
1,064,449 
20,100,403 
1,924,615 

3,901,967 
652,433 
1,666,677 
3,447,667 
3,040,741 

662,698 

685,693 

15,797,279 

5,855,932 

3,098,004 

2,556,368 
2,625,929 
2,515,010 
1,036,442 
4,716,487 

7,494,638 
10,347,852 
3,911,846 
1,012,679 
5,181,397 

784,291 

1,636,387 

365,899 

553,649 

8,855,507 

792,097 

25,946,431 

3,358,545 

591,704 
13,298,984 



2,247,438 
853,869 

1,075,003 
17,781,044 
1,800,684 

3,656,371 
603,774 
1,455,473 
3,058,460 
2,670,353 

653,248 

669,047 

15,291,223 

5,542,162 

3,057,144 

2,372,300 
2,389,552 
2,307,393 
924,022 
4,523,162 

6,382,364 

10,414,660 

3,608,219 

954,077 

4,839,219 

772,597 

1,648,425 

277,413 

657,231 

8,256,719 

696,934 

25,421,567 

3,150,874 

617,192 
12,579,855 



1,836,199 

747,769 

948,913 

15,558,376 

1,609,065 

3,219,023 
545,893 
1,413,048 
2,594,907 
2,303,074 

583,615 

580,309 

13,469,090 

4,815,972 

2,887,395 

2,075,564 
2,116,509 
2,079,747 
847,446 
3,817,212 

6,309,165 
9,204,619 
3,429,054 
820,156 
4,346,393 

694,052 

1,474,351 

257,323 

578,200 

7,307,069 

620,901 

22,977,515 

2,759,007 

549,467 

10,711,935 



1,634,742 

642,640 

859,742 

13,978,169 

1,454,809 

2,651,537 
448,332 
1,376,898 
2,263,498 
2,064,459 

540,358 

529,931 

12,510,306 

4,374,124 

2,735,521 

1,888,733 
1,829,511 
1,895,155 
781,219 
3,381,243 

5,912,113 
7,760,425 
2,993,559 
743,415 
4,152,012 

629,115 

1,356,295 

207,747 

515,591 

6,453,503 

531,172 

21,202,910 

2,335,044 

565,172 
9,636,409 



1,679,746 

660,433 

308,796 

14,307,829 

1,333,092 

2,901,236 
435,791 
1,128,555 
2,184,806 
2,060,766 

586,944 

519,785 

12,959,004 

4,364,014 

2,736,718 

1,948,127 
1,934,941 
1,841,078 
825,415 
3,036.471 

5,949,383 
8,175,360 
3,071,555 
743,541 
3,784,449 

664,243 

1,402,937 

217,275 

565,176 

5,628,354 

472,944 

21,437,148 

2,359,574 

610,211 
10,095,554 



1,523,984 

564,075 

758,538 

13,248,199 

1,285,356 

2,683,657 
402,502 
1,276,150 
1,979,727 
1,834,569 

585,771 

486,531 

11,839,400 

3,970,315 

2,573,459 

1,829,340 
1,754,365 
1,662,1% 
746,701 
2,694,318 

5,324,044 
7,330,259 
2,936,738 
673,561 
3,502,099 

593,857 

1,348,932 

229,985 

505,288 

6,036,480 

391,122 
20,015,459 
2,098,719 

545,809 
9,053,107 



1,322,550 

490,704 

671,122 

12,420,324 

1,052,470 

2,409,751 
369,825 
1,153,335 
1,925,713 
1,794,224 

477,568 

443,330 

10,314,057 

3,459,564 

2,153,414 

1,502,964 
1,453,125 
1,485,555 
670,226 
2,412,911 

5,008,564 
6,332,542 
2,448,952 
602,284 
3,217,094 

490,014 

1,133,081 

212,170 

457,343 

5,523,596 

343,841 

18,577,158 

1,945,057 

437,914 
7,994,633 



605,871 
184,246 
310,517 
4,083,251 
403,785 

837,399 
107,709 
386,412 
690,505 
751,585 

190,431 

180,678 

3,471,774 

1,333,572 

837,040 

638,076 
635,437 
635,453 
311,807 
873,857 

1,858,647 

2,273,787 

992,060 

298,510 

1,308,035 

185,907 

460,076 

65,174 

194,999 

1,981,047 

140,033 

6,063,750 

842,833 

175,955 

2,953,543 

571,7% 
518,109 
3,872,854 
(') 
315,963 

400,838 
192,316 
695,825 
1,983,628 
214,841 

113,448 
817,140 
959,567 
545,803 
1,209,941 
82,206 



49,769,196 



1,210,859 

426,052 

592,339 

10,989,863 

949,265 

2,178,897 

299,012 

993,047 

1,559,373 

1,546,107 

522,070 

376,559 

9,026,694 

3,160,005 

1,775,146 

1,348,436 
1,294,558 
1,350,598 
618,253 
2,148,457 

4,594,761 
5,748,698 
2,145,778 
570,858 
2,820,759 

409,214 
980,087 
177,485 
392,882 
5,225,042 

294,776 
16,816,795 
1,623,637 

350,539 
7,287,283 



INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURNS FOR 1945-1954 



Table 22.— RETURNS WITH ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME— NUMBRR, ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME, AND INCOME TAX, BY STATES AND TERRITORIES. 1945-lflS4— Continued 



States and Territories 



(Thousand dollars) 



ADJUSTED GROSS INCCME— Continued 



Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania. 
Puerto Rico. . 
Rhode Island . 



South Carolina. 
South Dakota . . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 



Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington' .. . 
West Virginia. 

Wisconsin 

%oroing 



Total . 



INCOME TAX LIABILITY {AFTER CREDITS) 



Alabama .... 

Arizona 

Arkansas . . . 
California. 
Colorado . . . 



Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia . 

Florida^ 

Georgia 



Hawaii . . . 
Idaho. . . . 

Illinois. 
Indiana. . 
Iowa 



Kansas .... 
Kentucky . . 
Louisiana. 

Maine 

Maryland^ . 



Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 



Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire . 
New Jersey. . . . 



New Mexico 

New York^ 

North Carolina. 
North Dakota. . . 
Ohio 



Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . 
Puerto Rico. . 
Rhode Island . 



South Carolina. 
South Dakota. . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 



Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington' . . . 
West Virginia. 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Total 26,707,201 



2,i40,907 


2,426,682 


2,259,852 


2,209,293 


1,925,065 


1,713,487 


1,719,212 


1,529,733 


1,336,871 


1,211,284 


2,427,856 


2,290,259 


2,316,087 


2,228,677 


2,004,399 


1,781,983 


1,835,879 


1,664,988 


1,454,319 


1,314,582 


16,167,247 


16,851,700 


15,877,555 


15,140,296 


13,420,151 


12,094,363 


12,656,320 


11,303,195 


10,074,916 


9,137,829 


54,759 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


C) 


C) 


C) 


(') 


1,145,238 


1,213,827 


1,183,436 


1,130,209 


1,055,155 


902,320 


1,025,377 


919,538 


824,923 


742,535 


1,697,197 


1,739,783 


1,714,230 


1,500,042 


1,306,858 


1,114,879 


1,056,583 


1,023,441 


872,048 


765,464 


653,976 


631,981 


600,477 


626,089 


557,863 


540,617 


596,537 


545,223 


437,344 


347,498 


3,115,501 


3,121,764 


2,828,368 


2,690,510 


2,376,817 


2,155,940 


2,041,261 


1,865,052 


1,675,853 


1,413,075 


10,248,638 


9,636,925 


9,297,753 


3,793,470 


7,374,215 


6,863,925 


6,482,687 


5,850,745 


5,131,712 


4,492,619 


916,952 


930,959 


909,692 


347,179 


712,171 


630,231 


653,441 


601,185 


518,138 


474,067 


395,251 


381,610 


387,605 


384,539 


352,663 


307,216 


331,730 


292,559 


257,371 


214,858 


4,040,840 


3,889,100 


3,721,293 


3,271,159 


2,927,108 


2,606,750 


2,568,408 


2,271,229 


1,943,521 


1,709,765 


4,263,326 


4,140,917 


3,963,940 


3,789,088 


3,254,719 


2,949,863 


2,970,439 


2,304,714 


2,495,347 


2,329,276 


1,909,683 


2,063,685 


2,065,157 


1,837,849 


1,727,911 


1,620,262 


1,730,239 


1,539,024 


1,254,981 


1,143,302 


5,008,957 


5,163,817 


4,985,584 


4,706,494 


4,116,769 


3,764,343 


3,802,274 


3,392,629 


3,003,996 


2,713,434 


405,817 


437,277 


412,350 


399,292 


353,090 


327,103 


320,222 


281,391 


226,444 


198,750 


230,401,432 


229,952,507 


216,939,912 


203,338,874 


180,064,994 


162,209,696 


164,272,520 


150,326,429 


134,232,475 


120,183,733 


223,474 


250,142 


231,192 


211,212 


148,496 


116,224 


121,400 


147,328 


129,357 


134,976 


122,154 


123,797 


128,313 


97,987 


74,310 


50,452 


55,947 


59,622 


51,344 


55,000 


112,351 


109,740 


100,262 


95,093 


74,320 


57,636 


63,875 


72,768 


68,731 


63,215 


2,712,536 


2,836,356 


2,761,782 


2,320,749 


1,739,734 


1,373,923 


1,483,005 


1,744,077 


1,663,781 


1,764,266 


242,683 


257,037 


250,542 


209,202 


160,012 


128,524 


124,155 


150,660 


124,269 


131,725 


579,527 


621,055 


593,247 


499,452 


379,930 


267,465 


309,598 


358,789 


317,093 


341,245 


122,882 


128,749 


124,124 


113,465 


110,057 


77,209 


72,369 


73,909 


66,368 


62,637 


198,493 


219,126 


249,113 


205,066 


170,054 


141,467 


124,884 


167,712 


153,100 


158,284 


441,261 


450,395 


408,481 


347,360 


254,167 


138,663 


192,187 


233,665 


252,429 


256,002 


310,837 


322,706 


340,067 


270,254 


192,170 


161,959 


161,964 


203,838 


192,335 


186,806 


73,664 


82,129 


80,683 


72,761 


54,964 


47,120 


57,618 


69,937 


53,168 


84,330 


68,057 


68,342 


77,978 


64,198 


44,927 


39,354 


38,408 


49,056 


41,454 


41,483 


2,131,725 


2,343,043 


2,215,931 


2,000,619 


1,511,346 


1,226,823 


1,344,871 


1,578,607 


1,342,554 


1,359,845 


684,031 


792,854 


710,958 


623,066 


449,731 


371,821 


374,381 


446,091 


372,151 


404,739 


324,799 


358,389 


331,511 


304,518 


247,277 


207,742 


216,959 


284,944 


216,778 


209,777 


285,953 


307,052 


306,250 


248,399 


191,037 


155,623 


173,592 


204,776 


156,244 


165,636 


279,260 


305,518 


285,662 


232,064 


178,429 


132,687 


145,904 


178,268 


144,358 


145,151 


301,572 


321,701 


310,305 


254,285 


201,705 


167,711 


170,322 


179,684 


159,774 


171,090 


94,161 


110,151 


110,076 


86,170 


65,225 


56,381 


59,554 


71,607 


64,681 


72,621 


511,408 


595,562 


596,218 


512,850 


367,626 


290,284 


279,058 


314,292 


280,951 


301,693 


861,447 


1,014,510 


980,446 


830,396 


650,438 


518,417 


543,751 


639,973 


599,115 


665,426 


1,523,997 


1,772,474 


1,470, '551 


1,287,949 


968,137 


700,399 


752,115 


837,662 


712,855 


804,959 


428,629 


472,187 


457,051 


378,824 


299,539 


238,292 


267,983 


321,326 


257,035 


273,639 


93,956 


97,173 


97,146 


86,585 


66,758 


53,677 


56,054 


66,656 


58,709 


63,495 


636,757 


734,844 


631,645 


581,951 


438,202 


351,445 


347,794 


426,254 


371,454 


378,763 


89,707 


94,791 


90,524 


84,505 


63,894 


51,468 


56,269 


66,661 


52,176 


43,520 


176,026 


194,096 


183,130 


177,406 


135,422 


109,937 


121,768 


154,795 


124,482 


123,919 


55,585 


49,767 


52,654 


39,455 


32,262 


22,506 


25,796 


30,688 


30,962 


30,566 


74,769 


87,626 


72,411 


66,059 


49,158 


38,463 


42,075 


53,480 


46,751 


47,393 


1,166,222 


1,275,118 


1,166,757 


998,208 


742,837 


590,326 


615,496 


720,213 


551,721 


737,972 


82,691 


91,501 


94,464 


77,542 


57,740 


45,204 


40,598 


42,088 


35,234 


34, 3U 


3,643,412 


3,851,980 


3,656,252 


3,315,250 


2,626,329 


2,137,040 


2,265,751 


2,702,269 


2,513,095 


2,743,072 


304,673 


330,854 


327,289 


283,634 


218,691 


165,890 


177,614 


201,703 


190,630 


131,173 


45,446 


53,685 


53,426 


56,000 


41,173 


37,986 


47,331 


57,856 


39,588 


36,705 


1,670,881 


2,024,999 


1,794,080 


1,550,625 


1,087,976 


879,644 


949,747 


1,079,062 


925,025 


1,015,220 


257,366 


276,194 


267,793 


230,307 


180,553 


136,048 


153,119 


154,120 


125,451 


137,486 


270,500 


290,606 


302,123 


273,303 


205,952 


162,938 


179,362 


202,580 


131,532 


193,654 


1,871,750 


2,185,934 


2,055,379 


1,797,449 


1,344,389 


1,073,079 


1,145,176 


1,340,819 


1,143,927 


1,275,957 


1,230 


(') 


C) 


{') 


(') 


(*) 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


133,240 


154,676 


152,007 


138,096 


109,031 


78,973 


101,231 


112,729 


100,905 


103,643 


140,929 


161,242 


177,746 


135,665 


101,903 


75,146 


72 , 509 


90,511 


80,812 


78,993 


55,392 


59,375 


56,670 


54,347 


40,509 


36,833 


45,329 


59,443 


40,141 


34,301 


297,279 


332,233 


300,640 


271,546 


210,346 


158,539 


156,520 


194,432 


181,932 


173,584 


1,208,671 


1,223,160 


1,222,734 


1,102,785 


882,519 


673,383 


684,526 


721,707 


619,742 


609,637 


83,989 


99,119 


92,647 


75,732 


53,033 


42,750 


43,489 


54,193 


47,016 


51,630 


33,979 


38,227 


37,008 


34,380 


26,871 


21,774 


23,562 


28,439 


22,593 


24,229 


415,799 


443,127 


427,054 


346,541 


253,349 


203,112 


205,210 


240,012 


203,099 


210,710 


500,075 


541,342 


530,356 


472,971 


335,349 


271,847 


290,582 


338,268 


294,913 


328,913 


184,974 


209,892 


219,542 


168,267 


132,030 


109,570 


123,794 


150,393 


112,489 


113,312 


531,899 


631,280 


605,472 


524,133 


. 384,750 


303,588 


313,340 


373,185 


317,496 


337,027 


45,083 


51,410 


51,524 


48,911 


34,327 


28,461 


29,368 


32,328 


23,996 


25,603 


26,707,201 


29,447,266 


27,889,716 


24,268,092 


18,389,534 


14,580,808 


15,459,310 


18,084,485 


16,062,353 


17,005,431 



^Includes Canal Zone. 

^For 1951 and prior years, includes all returns from Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands and for 1952 part of such returns. 

^Includes part of the returns from Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands for 1952 and all such returns for 1953. 

*See notes 2 and 3. 

'includes Alaska. 



Synopsis of 
Tax Laws for 



Individual Income 



INCOME AND SELF-EMPLOYMENT TAX LAW TABLES 

Income tax : Page 

A. Requirement for filing return and exemptions 89 

B. Income tax rates 90 

Self-employment tax : 

C Requirement for filing return and tax rate 91 

88 



SYNOPSIS OF LAWS 

Table A.— REQUIREMENT FOR FILING RETURN AND EXEMPTIONS UNDER THE INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX LAW, 1946-64' 



89 





Income 
year^ 


Gross income 

requirement 

for filing 

return-' 


Exemptions* 




For married 
couple filing 
joint return^ 


For single 
person, head 
of household, 

surviving 
spouse,' and 

married 

person filing 

a separate 

return 


For each 
dependent "^ 


Additional* 


Federal income tax law 
(date of enactment) 


For age 
65 or 
older 


For 
blind- 
ness 


Internal Revenue Code of 195-; (Aug. 16, igS-i) 

Internal Revenue Code of 1939 amended by- 
Revenue Act of 1951 (Oct. 20, 1951) 

Revenue Act of 1950 (Sept. 23, 1950) 

Revenue Act of 1948 (Apr. 2, 1948) 

Revenue Act of 1945 (Nov. 8, 1945) 

Individual Income Tax Act of 1944 (May 29, 1944).. 


1954 

1948-53 . . 
1 1945-47.. 


Dollars 

600 

600 

500 


Dollars 

1,200 

1,200 
'1,000 


Dollars 

600 

600 
500 


Dollars 

600 

600 
i°500 


Dollars 

600 

600 


Dollars 

600 

600 



^This table relates only to citizens and resident aliens of the 
United States. For income years prior to 1945, see Statistics of 
Income for 1950, Part 1, pages 308-309. 

^Returns are permitted for fiscal years also except on Form W-2 
for 1945-47 or on Form 1040A for 1948 and subsequent years . 

^Gross income includes all gains, profits, and income, derived 
from whatever source except income that is specifically exempt 
from income tax. 

The amount of income for which married persons are required to 
file a return is the separate gross income of husband or wife. 
Husband and wife file separate returns unless they elect to com- 
bine their income and file a joint return. A joint return may be 
filed even though one spouse has no income. For 1948 and there- 
after, a joint return is permitted if one spouse dies during the 
year and the survivor does not remarry. A joint return is not 
allowed if either spouse is a nonresident alien or if husband and 
wife have different tax years. The marital status is determined 
as of the last day of the income year or as of the date of death 
if one spouse dies during the year. 

A person with less than the required amount of gross income, 
which includes wages subject to withholding of income tax, should 
file a return to claim refund of tax withheld unless such income 
is included in a joint return. Also, an individual with less than 
the indicated amount of gross income should file to claim refund 
of any payments made on declaration of estimated tax. 

For filing requirement of Individuals having net earnings of 
$400 or more from self-employment after Dec . 31, 1950, see table C . 

*Exemption for the taxpayer and additional exemptions for age 
and blindness are determined from the marital status at the close 
of the year (or at death of a spouse), but exemption for dependents 
is determined from tests regarding gross income, support, and other 
qualifications. No proration of exemption is required because of 
death during the year of a taxpayer, his spouse, or a dependent. 

Exemptions are termed "normal-tax exemption" and "surtax exemp- 
tion" for 1945 and "exemption" for 1946 and thereafter. 

Exemptions are allowed as a credit against net income for both 
normal tax and surtax prior to 1954, except as stated in notes 9 
and 10 for the year 1945. For 1954, exemptions are allowed as a 
deduction in computing taxable income , 



'a citizen whose gross income is principally from sources with- 
in a possession of the United States, even though filing a joint 
return, is allowed only one exemption of $500 for 1945-47 and $600 
for 1948 and thereafter. 

'Head of household status applicable for tax years beginning 
after Oct. 31,1951 and surviving spouse status applicable for tax 
years beginning after Dec. 31, 1953. 

''An exemption for a dependent is allowed each closely related 
dependent specified by law, over half of whose support was received 
from the taxpayer and whose gross income for the tax year was less 
than $500 for 1945-50, or less than $600 for 1951-53. 

For 1954, exemption is allowed for a dependent over half of whose 
support was provided by the taxpayer and whose gross income was less 
than $600, except that the gross income test is disregarded in the 
case of a child who is under 19 years or who was a student. If 
the dependency tests are otherwise met, certain specified related 
dependents may live outside the taxpayer's household, but any other 
dependent must live in the taxpayer's home. An exception to the 
support test for a dependent is made under the multiple support 
agreement provision. 

Dependents must be either a citizen of the United States or a 
resident of the United States, Mexico, Canada, or for 1954 a resi- 
dent of Panama or Canal Zone, or a resident of the Republic of the 
Phillipines who was born to or adopted by a serviceman before 
July 5, 1946. 

Credit for dependent is not allowable to citizens whose gross 
income is principally from sources within a possession of the 
United States . 

^Additional exemptions are allowed only to the taxpayer and, if 
a joint return is filed, his spouse. 

'Each spouse is allowed $500 "surtax exemption" and $500 "normal- 
tax exemption," except that for 1945 where the adjusted gross in- 
come of one spouse was less than $500, the combined "normal-tax 
exemption" was the sum of the adjusted gross income of such spouse 
and the $500 exemption of the other spouse. 

"^Exemption for each dependent is a "surtax exemption" for 1945 
and allowed against net income for surtax purposes only. 



90 



SYNOPSIS OF LAWS 



Table 


B.— MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM INCOME TAX RATES UNDER INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX LAW, 1945-54' 










Tax rate^ 








Surtax rate' for — 


Combined 
tax and 


normal 
surtax 


















Lowest bracket of 


Highest bracket of 


rates^ 


at — 










surtax income, not 
over — 


surtax income, 
over — 






















(a) $2,000 for 


(a) $200,000 for 






Maximum 


Federal income tax law 


Income year^ 




married person 


married person 






rate 


(date of enactment) 


Normal 
tax rate*^ 


filing separately, 


filing separately, 


Lowest 


Highest 


limita- 






and single person 


and single person 


bracket 


bracket 


tioni" 








(b) $2,000 for 


(b) $300,000 for 
head of household* 


of surtax of surtax 










head of household* 


income 


income 










(c) $4,000 for 


(o) $400,000 for 














married couple 


married couple 














filing jointly,' 


filing jointly,'' 














and surviving 


and surviving 














spouse' 


spouse' 












Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


Internal Revenue Code of 


Calendar year 1954 


- 


- 


- 


20.0 


91.0 


87.0 


1954 (Aug. 16, 1954). 
















Internal Revenue Code of 
















1939 amended by — 


Calendar years 1952-53 


) 












Revenue Act of 1951 


Fiscal years beginning after 
Oct. 31, 1951 and ending 


3.0 


19.2 


89.0 


22.2 


92.0 


88.0 


(Oct. 20, 1951). 


before Jan. 1, 1954. 


) 














Calendar year 1951 


3.0 


17.4 


88.0 


20.4 


91.0 


87.2 




/ Fiscal years beginning after 


3.0 


17.0 


88.0 


20.0 


91.0 


87.0 




1 Sept. 30, 1950 and ending 
















\ before Nov. 1, 1951. 














Revenue Act of 1950 


( Calendar year 1950 


3.0 


17.0 


88.0 


17.4 


84.4 


80.0 


(Sept. 23, 1950). 


) Fiscal years ending after 
















( Dec. 31, 1949 and before 


3.0 


17.0 


88.0 


16.6 


82.1 


77.0 




\ Oct. 1, 1950. 














Revenue Act of 1948 


Calendar years 1948-1949 














(Apr. 2, 1948). 
















Revenue Act of 1945 


Calendar years 1946-1947 


3.0 


17.0 


88.0 


19.0 


86.5 


85.5 


(Nov. 8, 1945). 
















Individual Income Tax 


Calendar year 1945 


3.0 


20.0 


91.0 


23.0 


94.0 


90.0 


Act of 1944 (May 29, 
















1944) . 

















^Thls table relates only to rates for citizens and residents of 
the United States. It does not cover the optional tax although 
the same rates are used to produce the optional tax as are other- 
wise used (for 1954 optional tax table, see page 114). For tax 
rates prior to 1945, see Statistics of Income for 1950, Part 1, 
pages 308-309 and 318-321. 

^In case of a change in tax rates during a fiscal year other than 
those listed, the total tax is prorated according to the portion 
of time in the tax year under each rate . 

'For 1946 through calendar year 1950, the normal tax and surtax 
rates produced a tentative tax which was subject to reduction as 
described in note 9. 

On joint returns of married persons for 1945-47, normal tax and 
surtax rates were applied to the combined income. For 1948-53, 
both rates were applied to one-half of the net income reduced by 
one-half of the applicable credits against net income and the re- 
sult multiplied by two. For 1954, on joint returns and returns 
of surviving spouse, the single combined tax rate is applied to 
one-half of the taxable income and the result multiplied by two. 

*The normal tax rate applies to normal tax net income which is 
net income less the credit for partially tax-exempt interest and 
the exemption allowed for normal tax . 



^Surtax rates apply to surtax net income which is net income less 
the exemptions allowed for surtax. 

'Head of household status is applicable for tax years beginning 
after Oct. 31, 1951. 

''Prior to 1948, the lowest bracket of surtax income for a married 
couple filing jointly Is $2,000 and the highest bracket is $200,000. 

'Surviving spouse status is applicable for tax years beginning 
after Dec. 31, 1953 and ending after Aug. 16, 1954. 

'For 1946 through calendar year 1950, the combined rates shown 
are after tax reductions and the rates so computed are rounded . 
For 1946 and 1947 the tentative normal tax and surtax are reduced 
by 5 percent thereof. For tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 1947 
and ending before Oct. 1, 1950, the combined tentative normal tax 
and surtax is reduced by 17 percent of the first $400, plus 12 
percent of the next $99,600, plus 9.75 percent of the excess over 
$100,000. For calendar year 1950, the tentative normal tax and 
surtax are reduced by 13 percent of the first $400, plus 9 percent 
of the next $99,600, plus 7.3 percent of the excess over $100,000. 

"^"The combined normal tax and surtax shall not exceed the indi- 
cated percent of net income for 1945-53, or taxable income for 1954. 



SYNOPSIS OF LAWS 

Table C— REQUIREMENT FOR FILING RETURN AND TAX RATE UNDER THE SELF-EMPLOYMENT TAX LAW, 1951-54 



91 



Federal self-employment tax law 
(date of enactment) 


Income year^ 


Self-employment 
net earnings^ 

requirement for 
filing return^ 


Maximum self- 
employment 
income 


Tax rate on self- 
employment income 
subject to tax' 


Internal Revenue Code of igs-i amended by- 
Social Security Amendment of 195^ (Sept. 1, 1954) 

Internal Revenue Code of 1954 (Aug. 16, 1954) 

Internal Revenue Code of 1939 amended by — 

Social Security Act Amendment of 1950 (Aug. 28, 1950) 


Fiscal years ending 
after 1954 

1954 

1951-53 


Dollars 

400 

400 

400 


Dollars 

4,200 

3,600 

3,600 


Percent 
3 

3 

2 1/4 



^Returns are permitted for taxable years other than a calendar 
year. 

^If net earnings from self-employment are less than $400, they 
are disregarded . 

For the calendar year 1954 and prior years, net earnings from 
self-employment are the gross income derived from trade or business 
reduced by allowable deductions attributable thereto, plus shares 
of partnership income or loss, but exclude income from services 
as a public official, employee, railroad worker, minister, or 
member of religious order, and income from farming, certain pro- 
fessions, dividends, interest, real estate rentals except those 
of dealers, and gain or loss from sales of capital assets or other 
property neither inventoriable nor held primarily for business 
sales. 

For a fiscal year ending in 1955, self-employment earnings were 
extended to include income of farmers, architects, accountants, 
funeral directors, and professional engineers. Ministers and 
members of religious orders who had not taken the vow of poverty, 
and Christian Science practitioners may elect coverage as self- 
employed persons . 



Casualty losses on business property, net operating losses for 
other years, and personal exemption are not allowable deductions 
for the computation of self-employment earnings in any year. 

^A citizen or resident of the United States, or a resident of 
Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands having net earnings from self- 
employment of $400 or more is required to file a return. 

If husband and wife both have self-employment earnings, each 
must report his net earnings independently, even though a joint 
return is filed. 

'Self-employment income subject to tax is the smaller of (a) 
self-employment net earnings, or (b) the maximum self-employment 
income indicated in the table reduced by any wages received from 
which social security tax was withheld by the employer. 

On a joint return where both spouses are self-employed, the tax 
rate is applied separately to the amount of self-employment income 
subject to tax reported by each spouse. 



44SS05 O -57 -7 



Facsimiles of 

Individual Income 

Tax Returns 

for 1954 



Page 

Form 1040: Individual Income Tax Retui-n 95 

Schedule C, Business or Profession 115 

Schedule D, Sales of Property 119 

1040F, Farm Income and Expense 121 

Form 1040 A: Individual Income Tax Return 125 

94 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



95 



FORM 



1040 



U. S. Treasury Deportment 
Internal Revenue Service 



U. S. INDIVIDUAL 

IE TAX 



or other taxable 
year beginning 



FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1954 
, 1954, and ending 



, 195 



PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT PLAINLY 



Nanne 



Home 
Address 



If this is a joint return of husband and wife, use first names oi both 



Street and number or rural route 



City, town, or post office; Postal zone number; State 



Your Social Security No. and Occupation 



Wife's (Husband's) S. S. No. and Occupation 



1954 



Do not v/rite in these spaces 

Serial 
No. 

(Cashier's Stamp) 



Your 
exemp- 
tions 



u 

K ■ 

U 

X 

(M 

i 

u 
o 

Cm 

Cm come 
o 

CO 
u 

b 
o 

O 



Your 
in- 



E- 
U 
K 

< 



O 

< 

H 

< 



How to 
figure 
the tax 



Tax 

due or 
refund 



Li3t your name. If your wife (or husband) had no 
income or if this is a joint return, list also her (or his) 
name: 



Check below if at the end of 

ycur taxable year you or 

your wife were — 



65 or over □ 
65 or over Q 



Blind n 
Blind n 



On lines A and S below— 
If neither 65 nor blind write the figure 1 
if either 65 or blind write the hgure 2 
If both 65 and blind write the figure 3 

Number of exemptions for you . . . 

Number of her (or his) exemptions . 



B — -.-.- 

(Your wife's name — do not list if she is filing a separate return 

or if she had income not included in this return) r . u 

C. List names of your children ^ ^['^^ number 



who qualify as dependents; give 

address if different from yours 

D. Enter number of exemptions claimed for other individuals listed in Schedule I on page 2 . 

E. Enter total number of exemotions claimed in A to D above 



children 
listed 



2. Enter your total wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, and other compensation received m 1954, bcjore payroll iedudions. 
Persons claiming traveling, transportation, or reimbursed expenses, and Outside Salesmen, see instructions. 
A. Employer's Name B. Where Employed (City and Slate) C. Total Wages, Etc. D. Income Tax Withheld 



3. Less excludable portion received under wage 

continuation plans for sickness or injury. (See instructions) 



4. Balance (item 2 less item 3) 

5. If you received dividends, interest, or any other 

income (or loss), give details on page 2 Enter total here ■ 

6. Adjusted Gross Income (sum of items 4 and 5) . . Enter total here ■ 



(Unmarried or legally separated persons qualifying as "Head of Household," check hereCJ. See instructions.) 

(Surviving wridow^s and ^widowers Twho qualify for special tax computation, check here LJ. See instructions.) 

IF YOUR INCOME WAS LESS THAN $5,000— Use Tax Table unless you itemize deJudions. This table allows about 10 percent 

of your income for charitable contributions, interest, taxes, medical expenses, etc. If your deductions exceed 10 percent, it 

will usually be to your advantage to itemize them and compute your tax on page 3. 
IF YOUR INCOME WAS 55,000 OR MORE— Compute tax on page 3. Itemize or use standard deduction, whichever is 

to your advantage. 



7. Enter your tax from the Tax Table, or from line 13, page 3 

8. Less: A. Dividends received credit (line 8 of Schedule J) 

B. Retirement income credit (line 10 of Schedule K) 

9. Balance (item 7 less the sum of items 8A and SB) 

10. Enter your sell-employment tax from line 36, separate Schedule C . . . . 

11. Add amounts shown in items 9 and 10 

12. Credits for amounts paid on your 1954 income tax: 

A. Tax withhi^ld (in item 2, Column D above). Attach Forms W-2 . . . . 

B. Payments on 1954 Declaration of Estimated Tax. Indicate District 
Director's office where paid. __ 



13 



If your tax (item 1 1) is larger than payments (item 12), the balance must be paid in 

full with return. Enter such balance here 

14. If your payments (item 12) are larger than your tax (item 11) Enter the ooerpcymert here- 
Enter amount of item 14 you want: Credited on 1955 estimated tax $ ; Refunded $ 



Make check or mot\ey order payable to District Director, I. R. S.. for amount, if any, shown in item 13. 



Did you pay any one for assistance in the preparation 

of your return? I I Yes I I No. H "Yes," enter his 

name and address. 



Do you owe any other Federal tax? I I Yes j I No. If 

"Yes," to which District Director's office and what kind of 
lax. 



Is your Wife (or husband) making a separate return 
for 1954? n Yes dl No. If "Yes," wiite her 
(or his) name. 



I declare under the penalties of perjury that this return (including any accompanying schedules and statements) has been examined 
by me and to the best of my knowledge and belief is a true, correct, and complete return. 



(Signature of taxpayer) (Date) (Signature of taxpayer's wife or husband if this is a joint return) 

To assure split-income benefits, husband and wife must include all tlieir income and, even though only one has income, BOTH MUST SIGN. 



(Date) 
16 — 709a7-l 



96 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



Page 



Schedule A.— INCOME FROM DIVIDENDS (First see Schedule J) 



1. Enter amount of dividends reported on line 6 of Schedule I 

2. Enter total of all other dividends; itemize below, listing name of corporation and amount. 



Enter total here«^ 



Schedule B.— INCOME FROM INTEREST 



Name of payor 



Name of payor 



Amount 



Enter total here^ 



Schedule C Summary.— PROFIT (OR LOSS) FROM BUSINESS. FARMING. AND PARTNERSHIP 



1. Business profit (or loss) from separate Schedule(s) C, line(3) 24 . 

2. Farm profit (or loss) from separate schedule, Form 1040F 

3. Partnership, etc., profit (or loss) from Form 1065, Schedule K . . . . 

Partnership name and address 

4. Total of lines 1, 2, and 3 

5. Less: Net operating loss deduction (Attach statement) . 

6. Net profit (or loss) (line 4 less line 5) 



Schedule D.— GAINS AND LOSSES FROM SALES OR EXCHANGES OF PROPERTY 



1. From sale or exchange of property other than capital assets (from separate Schedule D) , 

2. From sale or exchange of capital assets (from separate Schedule D) 



Schedule E.— INCOME FROM PENSIONS OR ANNUITIES (See instructions) 



Port I.— General Rule 



1. Investment in conhact 

2. Expected return 

3. Percentage of income to be excluded 
(line 1 divided by line 2) 



4. Amount received this year $. 

5. Amount excludable (line 4 multi- 
plied by line 3) 



$- 



6. Taxable portion (excess of line 4 over line 5) . 



Part II. — Where your cost will be rec overed withirv three years and your employer has corttributed part o£ the cost 



1. Cost of annuity (amounts paid in) . . . . 

2. Cost received tax-free in past years . . 

3. Remainder of cost (line 1 less line 2) . . 



4. Amount received this year |$_ 

5. Taxable income (excess of line 4 
over line 3) 



Schedule F.— INCOME FROM RENTS AND ROYALTIES 



1. Kind and location of property 



2. Amount of rent or 
royalty 



3. Depreciation (explain In 
Schedule H) or depletion 



$ 



1. Totals $ 

2. Net profit (or loss) (column 2 less sum of columns 3, 4, and 5) . 



4. Repairs (attach 
itemized list) 



5. Other expenses (attach 
itemized list) 



Schedule G.— INCOME FROM OTHER SOURCES INCLUDING ESTATES AND TRUSTS 



1. Estate or trust (Name and address) 

2. Other sources (state nature) 



TOTAL INCOME (OR LOSS) FROM ABOVE SOURCES (Enter here and as item 5, page 1) . 



Schedule H.— EXPLANATION OF DEDUCTION FOR DEPRECIATION CLAIMED IN SCHEDULE F 


1. Kind of property (if buildings, state material of 

which consUucted). Exclude land and other 

nondepreciable properly 


2. Date acquired 


3. Cost or other 
basis 


4. Depreciation al- 
lowed (or allowable) 
in prior years 


5. Method 


6. Rate(%) 
or life (years) 


7. Depreciation 
for this year 






$ 


$ 






$ 

































Sch. I.— EXEMPTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH GROSS INCOME OF LESS THAN $600, OTHER THAN WIFE AND CHILDREN 





2. Relationship 


3. Did individual have 
gross income of $600 
or more in 1954? 


4. If answer to 3 is "No" enter amount spent for 
individual's support in 1954 by— 


1. Name of individual. Also give address if different from yours 


You (and your wife if this 

is a joint return). If 100% 

write "ah" 


Others, and by individual 
from own funds 








$ - 


$ 
















































FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



97 



Page 3 



ITEMIZED DEDUCTIONS— FOR PERSONS NOT USING TAX TABLE OR STANDARD DEDUCTION. 

If Husband and Wif e (Not Legally Separated) File Separate Returns ond One Itemizes Deductions, Ihe Other Mu3t Also Itemize. 
Dascribe deductions and state to whom pcid. If more space is needed, attacK additional sheets 



Contributions 



$.. 



Total Contributions (not to exceed 20 percent of item 6, page 1, except where contributions to 
churches, schools, and hospitals ore included). (See instructions) 



Interest 



Total Interest . 



Taxes 



Medical and 

dental expense 

(// over 65, see 

instructions) 



Total Taxes 



Do not enter any expense comper\sated by insurance or otherwise A. Medicine and Drugs 



1 . Net Expenses (Attach itemized list) 

2. Enter in Column A, 1 percent of item 6, page 1 

3. Enter in Column B, excess of Column A, line 1 over line 2 . 

4. Total of Column B, lines 1 and 3 

5. Enter 3 percent of item 6, page 1 

6. Allowable amount (excess of line 4 over line 5). (See instructions for limitations) . . . . 



B. Other 



$- 



Child Core 



Losses from 
iire, storm, or 
other casualty, 
or theft 



Miscellaneous 



Expenses for care of children and certain other dependents (see instructions) . 
(Attach statement) 



Not to exceed $600. 



Total Allowable Losses (not compensated by insurance or otherwise) 



Total Miscellaneous Deductions. 



TOTAL DEDUCTIONS (Enter on line 2 of Tax Computation, below) 



TAX COMPUTATION 

la Enter Adjusted Gross Income as shown in item 6, page 1 _■ ■ 

2a If deductions are itemized above, enter total of such deductions. If deductions are not itemized and line I, abode, is 
$5,000 or more: (a) married persons filing separately enter $500; (b) all others enter 10 percent of line 1, but 
not more than $ 1 ,000 

3. Subtract line 2 from line 1 . Enter the difference here 

4. Multiply $600 by total number of exemptions claimed in item IE, page 1. Enter result here 

5. Subtract line 4 from line 3. Enter the difference here. This is your Taxable Income 



6> If you are a single person, a married person filing separately, or a head of household — 

Single persons and married persons filing saporately use Tax Rate Schedule I in the instructions to figure tax 
on amount on line 5; heads of household use Tax Rate Schedule II 



7a If this is a joint return, or if you qualify to file as a surviving widow or widower — 

(a) Enter one-half of amount on line 5 

(b) Use Tax Rate Schedule I in t!ie instructions to figi-ire tax on amount on line 7 (a) . 
(c) Multiply omount on line 7 (b) by 2 



8. If alternati .'e tax is applicable, enter tlie tax from separate .Schedule D. 



Disrsgord lines 9 through 12, and copy on line 13 the same figure you entered on line 6, 7 (ci, or 8, unless you 
used itemized deductions. 



9a Enter here income tax payments to a foreign country or U.S. possession (Attach Form 1116) . . $.. 

10a Enter here any income tax paid at source on tax-free covenant bond interest 

lla Enter here credit for partially tax-exempt interest (See instructions for limitation) 

12. Add the figures on lilies 9, 10, and 11. Enter the total here 

13. Subtra'-t line 12 fro-n line 6, 7 (c), or 8, v/hichever is applicable. Enter difference here and os item 7, page 1 , 



16—70997-1 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



Page 4 



Schedule J.— EXCLUSION AND CREDIT FOR DIVIDENDS RECEIVED FKOM 
QUALIFYING DOMESTIC (U.S.) CORPORATIONS. (See instructions) 



1. Name ot corporation declaring dividend: 



Amount received 
before 8/1/54 



Amount received 
after 7/31/54 



2. Total 

3. Less: Exclusion of $50. Apply exclusion first to Col. A and excess, if any, to Col. B . . . 

4. Balance 

5. Enter in Column B, the amount from Column A, line 4 

6. Total dividends to be entered on line 1, Schedule A, page 2 (total of Column B, lines 4 and 5). 

CREDIT COMPUTATION 

7. (a) 4% of amount on line 4, Column B, above 



(b) Tax shown on line 6, 7 (c), or 8, page 3, less the amount, if any, on line 9, page 3; or, if Tax Table is used, 
the tax in item 7, page 1 



(c) 2% of taxable income — line 5, page 3; if alternative tax is applicable, line 20, Schedule D (twice line 20 in 
the case of a joint return) 



(Taxable income, for those using the Tax Table to compute tax, is the amount shown in item 6, page 1, less 
10% thereof and less the deduction for exemptions (item IE, page 1, multiplied by $600)) 

8. Enter here and as item 8A, page 1, the smallest of the amounts on lines 7 (a), 7 (b), or 7 (c), above 



NOTE: If both husband and wife have qualifying dividends, an exclusion shall be allowed to each on line 3 to tlie extent of the dividends 
recei v ed but not to exceed $50 each. 

Schedule K. — CREDIT FOR RETIREMENT INCOME. (See inshructions for definitions and other details) 



If separate return, use Column B only. If joint return, use one column for husband and 
one for wife. 

Did you receive earned income in excess of $600 in each of any 10 calendar years before 
the taxable year 1954 ? 

If answer above is "Yes" in either column, furnish all information below in that column. 

1. Retirement income for taxable year: 

(a) For taxpayers under 6S years o£ age : 

Enter only income received from pensions and annuities under public retirement 
systems. (Do not enter pensions, annuities, and retirement pay from Armed Forces) . 

(b) For taxpayers 65 years of age and older: 

Enter total of pensions and annuities, retirement pay from Armed Forces, interest, 
rents, and dividends included in gross income in this return 

Limitation on Retirement Income 

2. Enter here amount shown in line 1 or $1,200, whichever is lesser 



Deduct: 

(a) Amounts received in taxable year as pensions or annuities under the Social 
Security Act, tiie Railroad Retirement Acts, and certain other exclusions from 
gross income. (See instructions) 

(b) Compensation for personal services received in the taxable year 1954 in excess of $900 . 
(Line 3 (b) does not apply to persons 75 years of age or over.) 



4. Total of lines 3 (a) and 3 (b) 

5. Balance (line 2 minus line 4) 

6. Tentative credit (20 percent of line 5) 

7. Total tentative credit on this return (total of columns A and B, line 6) . 

Limitation on Retirement Credit 



C. Amount of tax shown as item 7, page 1 

Less: Credit for dividends from line 8, Schedule J, above . 
9. Balance of line 8 



[] Yea []] No 



□ Yes □ No 



10. Retirement income credit. Enter here and as item 8B, page 1, the amount on line 7 or line 9, whichever 
is smaller ^ 



*^'^^ 



Statement of Person (other than taxpayer) Preparing Return 

I declare under the penalties of perjury that I prepared this return for the person(s) named herein; and that this return (including any 
accompanying schedules and statements) is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, a true, correct, and complete return based on all the 
information relating to the matters required to be reported in this return of which I have any knowledge. 



(Individual or Firm Signature) 



(Address) 

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 16 — 70807-1 



(Date) 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



99 



HELPFUL INFORMATION ON 



How to 



prepare your 



income tax 



return 



ON FORM 1040 FOR 1954 







""iis^m.s* 



You can save money for yourself and 
the Government, if you — 

File your return early 

Make sure the figures are right 

Under the new law, the final date for 
filing is April 15, but taxpayers who 
wait until the last minute often make 
costly mistakes. 

Give yourself time to double check 
every figure on your return — this will 
save time and money in the long run. 

If you need help or more forms 
(including Form 1040-ES for decla- 
ration of 1955 estimated tax), go to 
the nearest Internal Revenue Service 
Office. 



Commissioner. 



IRS Pub-3 



100 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 

HOW TO USE THIS PAMPHLET 



The information contained in this pamphlet has been selected to help the average taxpayer in preparing his return. You 
need only read those items that concern you. Use the following checklist in deciding which items you wish to read. 



Page 

• How To File Your Re- 
turn: 

n Who must file 3 

□ Why you must file a 
return 3 

n When to file 3 

n How to pay ^. 3 

□ How to sign 3 



□ Where to get forms, 
n Where to get help.... 

□ Your rights of appeal . . 

• How To Choose Your 
Return: 

n The three types of re- 

turns 

n Income less than $5,000 

n Income of $5,000 or 

more 

□ Married persons — joint 
or separate returns . • • 



4 
4 



Page 

□ Unmarried persons — 
Head of household... 4 

n Surviving widow or 

widower 5 

• How To Claim Your 
Exemptions: 

□ Exemptions for you and 
wife 5 

□ Exemptions for your 
children 5 

□ Exemptions for depend- 
ents other than your 
children 5 

□ Exemptions for individ- 
uals supported b\' more 
than one taxpayer.... 5 

• How To Report Your 
Income: 

O What income is taxed. . 6 

□ Wages, salaries, etc... 6 

□ Exclusions from salaries 
and wages 6 



Page 

□ Trade and business de- 
ductions of employees. 6 

□ Dividends 7 

□ Interest 7 

□ Business or profession. 7 

□ Farming 8 

□ Partnerships 8 

□ Net operating loss de- 
duction 9 

□ Self-employment ta.\ . . 9 

□ Sale and exchange of 
property 9 

n Special rule for sale of 

residence at a gain .... 9 

□ Annuities and pensions. 10 

□ Rents and royalties. .. . 11 

□ Estates and trusts 11 

□ Other income 11 

□ Depreciation 11 

□ Accounting methods 
and records 11 



Free 

• How To Claim Non- 
business Deductions: 

□ Contributions 12 

D Interest 12 

□ Taxes 12 

□ Casualty losses and 
thefts 12 

□ Medical and dental ex- 
penses 13 

□ Expenses for the care 
of children and certain 
other dependents 13 

□ Miscellaneous 13 

□ Declaration of esti- 
mated tax 14 

• How To Figure Your 
Tax: 

n Using the tax table. .. . 14 

□ Making a long-form 
computation 14 

n 1954 tax rate schedule. 14 
n Credits against tax. ... 14 
D Tax table 16 



WHERE TO FILE YOUR RETURN 

Mail your return to the ''District Director of Internal Revenue" for the district in which you live 



AIABAMA---Birmingham 3, Ala. 
ALASKA- __Tacoma 2, Wash. 
ARIZONA___Phoenix, Ariz. 
ARKANSAS---Litlle Rocic, Afk. 
CALIFORNIA: 

Counties of Imperial, Kern, los An- 

feles. Orange, Riverside, San Bernar- 
ino. San Diego. San Luis Obispo. 
Santa Barbara, and Ventura Loi An- 
geles 12, Calif. 

All other counties Son Froncisco 

2, Calif. 

CANAL ZONE Jacksonville, Fla. 

COLORADO Denver 2, Colo. 

CONNECTlCUT_--Harlford, Conn. 
DELAWARE... Wilmington 99, Del. 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA--.Bal!imoie 7, 

Md. 
FLORIDA._-iacksonvilIe, Fla. 
GEORGIA-. -Atlanta 3, Ga. 
HAWAII---Honolulu 13, T. H. 
IDAHO---8oise, Idafio 
ILLINOIS: 

Counties of Bonne, Bureau, Carroll. 
Cook. De Kalb, Du Page. Grundy. 
Henry. Jo Daviess. Kane. Kankakee, 
Kendall. Lake, La Salic. Lee. McHenry, 
Marshall. Mercer. Ogle, Putnam. Rock 
Island. Stark. Stephenson, Whiteside, 
Will, and Winnebago-. Chicago 2, HI. 

All other cnundts Springfield, III. 

INDIANA--. Indianapolis 6, Ind. 
IOWA---Des Moines 8, Iowa 
KANSAS--. Wichita 21, Kans. 
KENTUCKY-__Louisville 1, Ky. 
LOUtSIANA---Nev/ Orleons 16, la. 

MAINE Augusta, Maine 

MARYLAND.- -Baltimore 2, Md. 
MASSACHUSETTS -Boston IS, MosS. 
MICHIGAN--. Detroit 31, Mich. 
MINNESOTA---St. Paul 1, Minn. 
MISS(SS1PPI---Jack$on 5, Miss. 
MISSOURI: 

Counties of Adair, Audrain, Bol- 
linger. Boone. Butler, Callaway, Cape 
Girardeau. Carter. Cl.irk. Crawford. 
Dent. Dunklin, Friinklin. Gasconade. 
Howard. Iron, Jefferson, Knox. Lewis, 
Lincoln. Linn, Macon, Madison. 
Maries, Marion, \f ississippi. Monroe, 
Montgomery. New Madrid. Oregon. 
Osage. Pemiscot. Perry. Phelps. Pike, 
Pulaski. Ralls. R.indr.lph. Re\noIds. 
Ripley, St. Charles, St. Francois. Stc. 



Genevieve. St. Louis, Schuyler, Scot- 
land. Scott. Shannon, Shelby, Stod- 
dard. Warren, Washington, and 
Wayne-— St. Louis I, Mo. 

All other counties Kansos CHy 6, 

Mo. 

MONTANA,, -Helena, Mont. 

NEBRASKA---Omaha 2, Nebr. 

NEVADA. --Reno, Nev. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE-, -Portsmouth, N. H. 

NEW JERSEY: 

Counties of Bergen. Essex. Hudson, 
Hunterdon, Middlesex. Morris. Pas- 
saic, Somerset. Sussex, Union and 
Warren Newark 2, N. J. 

All other counties 7lh ond Cooper 

Sis., Camden 1 , N. J. 

NEW MEXICO--_AIbuquerque, N. Mex. 

NEW YORK: 

Brooklyn: Counties of Kmgs, Nas- 
sau. Oueens, and Suffolk Brooklyn 

1, N. Y. 

Lower Manhattan: All that part of 
Manh3tt.in Island south of 34th Street 
(this includes both sides of 3'<th 
Street ) and Rictimond County Cus- 
tomhouse BIdg., New York 4, N. Y. 

L'pper M.Tnh3ttan: That part of 
Manhattan Island north of 5'lth Street 
(this includes Welfiire Island, Ran- 
d.ill's Isl.ind. and Ward's Island) and 
counties of Bronx. RockUnd. and West- 
chester.. 484 Lexington Ave., New York 
17, N. Y. 

Eastern New York State: Counties of 
Albany. Clinton. Columbia, Dutchess. 
Esstx. Fulton. Greene, H.imilton. 
Nlontgomcry. Orange. Putnam, Rens- 
selaer. Saratoga, Schenectady, Scho- 
h.iric. Sullivan. Ulster. Warren, and 
Washington---Albany 1, N. Y. 

Central New York State: Counties 
of Broome, Cayuga. Chenango. Cort- 
land. Delaware. Franklin, Herkimer, 
Jefferson. Lewis. Madison, Oneida. 
Onondaga. Oswego. Otsceo. St. Law- 
rente, Scluivler. Seneta. Tini;a. Tomp- 
kins, .ind Wayne Syracuse 2, N. Y. 

Western New York State: Counties 
of Allcg.inv. Cnttaraugus. Chautauqua, 
Chemung. Erie. Genesee. Livineston. 
Monroe, Niagara. Ontario. Orleans. 

Steuben. Wyoming, and Yates Buf- 

folo 2, N. Y. 



NORTH CAROLINA Greensboro, N. C. 

NORTH DAKOTA---Fargo, N. Dak. 
OHIO: 

Northeastern: Counties of Ash- 
land, Ashtabi;l.i. Belmont. Carroll. 
Columbiana. Cuyahoga. C-eauga. Har- 
rison. Holmes, JetTerson. Lake. Lo- 
rain. Mahoning, Medina, Monroe, 
Portage. RichLind. Stark, Summit, 

Trumbull. Tuscarawas, and Wayne 

Cleveland 15, Ohio 

Sou im.ASi>:RN: Counties of Adams, 
Athens. ( osiiocton, Delaware, Fair- 
field. Franklm, Gallia. Guernsey. 
Hocking, Jatkson, Knox. Lawrence. 
Licking, Madison. Marion. Meigs, 
Morgan, Morrow, Muskingum, Noble, 
Perry. Pi. kaw;iy. Pike. Ross. Scioto, 

Union. Vinton, and Washington 

Columbus 16, Ohio 

NoK rnw rsTTRN: Counties of Allen, 
Auglaize. Cliampaign, Crawford, 
Darke, Defiance, trie. Fulton. Han- 
cock. Hardin. Henry. Huron, Logan. 
Lucas. Mercer. Ottaw.i, Paulding, Put- 
nam, Sanduskv, Seneca. Shelby. Van 
Wert, Williams. Wood, and Wyan- 
dot Toledo I, Ohio 

SoLiTHw rsTFRN : Tounties of Brown, 
Butler. Clark. Clermont. Clinton, Fay- 
ette. Grct-nt. Hamilton, Highland. 
Miami. NI<intt:omciv, Preble, and War- 
ren Cincinnati 2, Ohio 

OKLAHOMA-. .Oklahoma City, Okla. 
OREGON-- Portland 9, Oreg. 
PENNSYLVANIA: 

South F ASTFR.M: ( ounties of Adams, 
Bedford. Berks. Blair. Bucks. Chester, 
Cumberland. Dauphin. Delaware, 
Fr.inklin, Fulton, Huntrngdnn. Juniata, 
Lancaster, Lebanon. Lehigh. Mifflin. 
Montgomery, Perry. Philadelphia. 
SLhu\lkilI, Snyder, and York___PhiIo- 
delphio 7. Pa. 

North FASTFRN: Counties of Brad- 
ford, Carbon, Centre, Clinton. Colum- 
bia. Lackawanna. Luzerne. I.ycommg. 
Monroe. Montour, Northampton, Nor- 
thumberland. Pike. Potter, Sullivan. 
Susquelianna. Tioga. Union. Wayne, 
and W\ommg Scronlon 14, Pa. 

Wf sTrRN : Counties of Allecheriy. 
Armstrong. Beaver, Butler. Cambria, 
Camtion, Clarion, Clearfield, Craw- 



ford. Elk. Erie, Fayette. Forest, Greene, 
Indiana, Jefferson. Laurence, MiKean, 
Mercer, Somerset. Venango, Warrtn, 

Washington. and Westmoreland 

P. O. and Courthouse BIdg., 

Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 
PUERTO RICO Sanlurce BIdg., San- 

turce, Puerto Rico. 
RHODE ISLAND.-.Providence 2, R. I. 
SOUTH CAROLINA-, -Columbia 1, S. C. 
SOUTH DAKOTA---Aberdeen, S. Dok, 
TENNESSEE--, Nashville 3, Tenn. 
TEXAS: 

Southern: Counties of Aransas, 
Atascosa. Austin. Bandera, Bastrop, 
Bee, Bell, Bexar. Blanco. Bosque, Bra- 
zoria. Brazos. Brewster. Bmoks. Bur- 
leson. Burnet, Caldwell, Calhoun, 
Cameron, Chambers, Colorado. Comal, 
Coryell. Culberson. De Witt. Dimmit, 
Duval. Edwards. El Paso, F.ills, Fay- 
ette. Fort Bend. Freestone. Frio. Gal- 
veston. Gillespie. Goliad. Gonzales, 
Grimes. Guadalupe, Hamilton, Har- 
din, Harris, Hays. Hidalgo. Hijl. 
Hudspeth, Jackson. Jasper. Jeff Da\is, 
Jefferson, Jim Hogg, Jim Wells. 
Karnes. Kendall, Kenedy, Kerr. Kim- 
ble. Kinney. Kleberg. Lampasas, La 
Salle. Lavaca. Lee. Leon. Liberty, 
Limestone, Live Oak. Llanti. McCul- 
loch, Mclennan. Mc^fuIlen, Madi»on, 
Mason, Matagorda. Maverick. Medina, 
Milam. Montgomery, Newton. Nue- 
ces, Orange. Pecos. Polk. Presidio. 
Real. Reeves. Refugio, Robert-.on. San 
Jacinto, San Patricio. San S.iba. Som- 
ervell, Starr. Terrell, Travis. Trinity. 
Tyler. Uv.ilde, Va! Verde. Victoria. 
Walker, Waller. Washington. Webb, 
Wharton. Willacy. Williamson. Wil- 
son. Zapata, and Zavala,.. Austin 14, 
Tex. 

North prn: All other counties 

Dallas 1 , Tex. 

UTAH -Salt Lake City, Utoh 
VERMONT. .Burlington, Vt. 
VIRGINIA. -.Richmond 19, Vo. 
VIRGIN ISLANDS-. .Customhouse BIdg., 

New York 4, N. Y. 
WASHINGTON. .^Tocoma 7. Wosh. 
WEST VIRGINIA_-_Parkersbu»g, W. Va. 
WISCONSIN--. Milwoukee 1, Wis. 
WYOMING-, -Cheyenne, Wyo. 



Taxpayers with legal residence in foreign countries Baltimore 2, Md., U. S. A, 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



101 



SPECIAL FOR EMPLOYEES 

This pamphlet contains the forms and instruc- 
tions used by most taxpayers. However, if 
your gross income was less than $5,000 and 
consisted entirely of wages reported on with- 
holding statements (Form W-2) and not more 
than $100 total of other wages, interest, and 
dividends, the law provides a simple way for 
you to file. Merely enter the required infor- 



EARNING LESS THAN $5,000 

mation on the prescribed card form (1040A), 
and the Internal Revenue Service will figure 
your tax and send you a check for any refund 
or a bill for any amount due. You may obtain 
the card jorm jrom your District Director. IJ 
you qualijy and decide to use Form IO40A, do 
not use any oj the forms in this pamphlet. 



NEW PROVISIONS OF THE TAX LAW 

Many changes in the income tax lav/ were made by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. 
efits are listed below. 



The more important ben- 



Page 

Reduced rates for certain surviving widows or 

widowers .— 5 

Exemption for children and other dependents 5 

Exemption for individuals supported by more than 

one taxpayer 5 

Exclusion of sick pay 6 

Deduction for trade and business expenses of em- 
ployees 6 

New dividend provisions 7 and 15 



Pagf 

Expenditures for soil and water conservation 8 

New methods of computing income from annuities 

and pensions 10 

Additional methods for computing depreciation 1 1 

Additional deduction for contributions to churches, 

schools, hospitals... 1 2 

Deduction for interest on installment obligations 12 

Additional deduction for medical expenses 13 

Deduction for child care 13 

Retirement income credit 15 



HOW TO FILE YOUR RETURN 



Who Must File 

Every citizen or resident of the United States — whether an 
adult or minor — who had S600 (SI, 200 if 65 years of age or 
over) or more gross income in 1954 must file. For require- 
ments respecting self-employment tax, see page 9 of these 
instructions. Citizens of Puerto Rico who are also citizens 
of the United States and nonresident aliens who were bona 
fide residents of Puerto Rico during the entire taxable year 
must also file United States individual income tax returns 
if they meet the income test. 

Why Yon Must File a Return 

Most of your tax is withheld from your wages every pay- 
day or paid on Declarations of Estimated Tax every quar- 
ter. (See page 14, relative to the Declaration of Estimated 
Tax.) However, the law requires you to file an annual 
return to determine whether you owe more or should get 
a refund. 

When and Where To File 

File on or after January 1 but not later than April 15, 
1955, with the District Director of Internal Revenue for 
your district. Try to avoid the last-minute rush. Tax- 
payers who keep books on a fiscal-year basis must file by 
the fifteenth day of the fourth month after the close of their 
taxable years. 

How To Fay 

Any balance of tax shown to be due in item 13, page 1, of 
your return on Form 1040 must be paid in full with your 
return. Checks or money orders should be made payable 
to "District Director, I. R. S." 

How To Sign 

You have not filed a valid return unless you sign it. If 
you and your wife are filing a joint return, both of you 
must sign. You do not need to have your return notarized, 



since your signature has the same legal effect as swearing 
to the truthfulness of your return. 

Preparer's Statement 

The statement on page 4 of the Form 1040 is required to 
be signed by any person(s), firm, or corporation who pre- 
pares the taxpayer's return. If the return is prepared by a 
firm or corporation, the return should be signed in the name 
of the firm or corporation. The statement is not required 
if the return is prepared by a regular, full-time employee of 
the taxpayer such as a clerk, secretary, bookkeeper, etc. 

Where To Get Forms 

As far as practical, the District Director mails forms 
directly to taxpayers. If you need additional forms you 
can get them from any Internal Revenue Service office, 
and also at most banks and post offices. Many employers 
also keep forms for the convenience of employees. 

Where To Get Help 

After reading these instructions you should be able to 
prepare your own return, unless you have complicated 
problems. If you do need help, you can get it at any 
Internal Revenue Service office. A more detailed publica- 
tion entitled, "Your Federal Income Tax," may be pur- 
chased for twenty-five cents from the Superintendent of 
Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, 
D. C. 

Your Rights Of Appeal 

If you believe there is an error in any bill, statement, or 
refund in connection with your tax, you are entitled to 
have the matter reconsidered by the District Director. He 
will give you an opportunity to dispute any change in your 
tax which he proposes, and will advise you of further appeal 
rights if you cannot reach an agreement with him. All 
deductions claimed by you must be supported by canceled 
checks, receipts, or other evidence if there is an audit of 
your return. 



102 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 
HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR RETURN 



The Three Types Of Returns 

Three different forms are provided to meet the needs of 
the 50,000,000 persons who file tax returns — Form 1040A, 
Short-Form 1040, and Long-Form 1040. 

Income Less Than $5,000 

1. Form 1040A. — This form has been revised this year so 
as to offer eligible taxpayers the simplest return and to put 
the form on a punch card which can be processed efficiently. 
If you file this form, the Internal Revenue Service will 
compute your tax. You may use it if your total income 
was less than $5,000 and consisted entirely of wages reported 
on Withholding Statements (Form \V-2), or of such wages 
and not more than $100 total of other wages, interest, and 
dividends (after exclusion as explained on page 7), all of 
which must be entered on the tax return. From your answers 
to the questions, the Internal Revenue Service will figure 
your tax for you, and send you a bill or a refund. 

You may not use Form 1040A but must file your return 
on Form 1040 if (1) you had income from any other sources, 
such as annuities, rents, royalties, a business or profession, 
farming, transactions in securities or other property, part- 
nerships, estates, and trusts, or reimbursements includible 
as income, (2) you wish to deduct from your wages travel, 
transportation, reimbursed expenses, or business expenses 
of an outside salesman, (3) you wish to claim credits against 
the tax with respect to dividends or retirement income, or 
(4) you wish to claim the status of head of household or 
surviving widow or widower. 

2. Short-Form 1040. — Form 1040 may be used either as a 
short or long form. The short form is simpler than the long 
form. It differs from Form 1()40.\ in that (a) you must find 
your own tax; (b) you must include income from sources not 
eligible for reporting on Form 1040 A; (c) you may deduct 
from your wages certain reimbursed expenses, travel, trans- 
portation, and outside salesman's business expenses; and 
(d) you may deduct from your tax the credits for dividends 
and retirement income. If your income was less than $5,000 
and your nonbusiness deductions (contributions, interest, 
etc.) were less than 10 percent of your income, find your 
tax from the Tax Table and enter the amount in item 7, 
page 1 of the return. 

3. Long-Form 1040. — If your nonbusiness deductions are 
more than 10 percent of your income, you will ordinarily 
save money by itemizing them on Long-Form 1040. You 
will then figure your tax according to the computation 
on page 3. If your nonbusiness deductions are so close to 
10 percent that you are in doubt which is the better form, 
try both the short form and the long form to make sure. 

Income Of $5,000 Or More 

If your income was $5,000 or more, you must use Long- 
Form 1040. However, in that case, you can either take a 
standard deduction or itemize and claim your actual deduc- 
tions. The standard deduction is 10 percent of your income 
but not more than $1,000. However, if husband and 
wife file separate returns and each had income of $5,000 
or more, the standard deduction is $500 for each. Compare 
your actual deductions with the amount of the standard 
deduction. 

Married Persons — Joint Or Separate Returns 

Are You Married? — If married at the close of your taxable 
year, you are considered married for the entire year. If 
divorced or legally separated on or before the close of your 
year, you are considered single for the entire year. If your 



wife or husband died during the year, you are considered 
married for the entire year, and may file a joint return. 
joint or Separate Returns. — If husband and wife liave separate 
income (for example, if both work), they may file separate 
returns or a joint return. A separate return accounts for 
the income and deductions of only one person. If married 
persons living in community property States file separate 
returns, each must report half of any community income. 
A joint return must include all the income and deductions 
of both husband and wife. A husband and wife may file 
a joint return even though one of them had no income. 
A joint return may not be filed if either husband or wife was 
a nonresident alien at any time during the taxable year. 
How To Make a Joint Return. — In a joint return you include 
all income and deductions of both husband and wife. In 
the return heading, list both names (for example: "John 
H. and Mary D. Doe"). Both must sign the return. 
Advantages oj a Joint Return. — In most cases it is advanta- 
geous for married couples to file joint returns. The law pro- 
vides a "split income" method of figuring the tax on a joint 
return which often results in a lower tax than would result 
from separate returns. 

Joint Tax or Rejund. — When a joint return is filed, the couple 
a<sume full legal responsibility for tiie entire ta.x, and if one 
fails to pay, the other must pay it. 

Hoic To Make a Separate Return. — Husband and wife must 
each have income under the laws of their State and they 
must fill out separate forms. The "split income" provisions 
of the Federal tax law do not apply to separate returns of 
husband and wife. When filing separate returns, the hus- 
band and wife should each claim the allowable deductions 
paid with his or her own funds. (In community propertv 
States, deductions resulting from payments made out of 
funds belonging jointly to husband and wife may be divided 
half and half) If one itemizes and claims actual deductions 
on the long form, then both must. 

Unmarried Persons — Head Of Household 

The law provides a special tax rate for any individual 
who qualifies as a "Head of Household." To qualify you 
must Ije unmarried (or legally separated) at the end of your 
taxable year. In addition, you must have furnished over 
half the cost of maintaining as your home a household 
which during the entire year, except for temporary ab- 
sence, was occupied as the principal place of abode and 
as a member of such household by (a) any related person 
(see those listed under 5 (a), page 5) for whom you are 
entitled to a deduction for an exemption, unless the deduc- 
tion arises from a multiple support agreement or (b) your 
unmarried child, grandchild, or stepchild, even though such 
child is not a dependent. 

You also qualify if you pay more than one-half the cost ot 
maintaining a household (not necessarily your home) which 
is the principal place of abode of your father or mother and 
either qualifies as your dependent. 

The cost of maintaining a household includes expendi- 
tures for such items as: 

1 . Maintenance of the dwelling and premises. For exam- 
ple, rent (or if the taxpayer owns his home, real estate taxes 
and interest on a mortgage on the home), insurance on the 
dwelling and premises, repairs, and upkeep. 

2. Utilities. For example, gas, telephone, electricity, 
water, and fuel. 

3. Food consumed in the home. 

The cost of maintaining a household is computed without 
regard to the value of personal services performed by a 
member of the household, including the taxpayer. 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



103 



The above expenditures are to be used only for determin- 
ing whether you are entitled to the use of the head of house- 
hold tax rate. Do not claim them as deductions on your 
return unless they are otherwise allowable. 

If you are married to a nonresident alien at any time dur- 
ing your taxable year but otherwise meet *he foregoing tests, 
you are considered a "Head of Household" since you are 
not permitted to file a joint return. 

If you qualify as a surviving widow or widower as 
described in the next paragraph, as well as a head of 
household, it will be to your advantage to compute your 
tax as a surviving widow or widower. 



Surviving Widow Or Widower 

Under certain conditions a taxpayer whose husband or 
wife has died during either of his two preceding taxable 
years may compute his tax by including only his income, 
exemptions, and deductions but otherwise computing the 
tax as if a joint return had been filed. 

The conditions are that the taxpayer must not have 
remarried, and must (a) maintain as his home a household 
which is the principal place of abode of a child or stepchild 
for whom he is entitled to a deduction for an exemption 
and {b) have been entitled to file a joint return with his 
wife (or husband) in the year of death. 



HOW TO CLAIM YOUR EXEMPTIONS 

You are Allowed a Deduction of $600 for Each Exemption for Which You Qualify as Explained Below 



Exemptions For You And Wife 

For You. — You, as the taxpayer, are always entitled to at 
least one exemption. If, at the end of your taxable year, 
you were blind or were 65 or over, you get two exemp- 
tions. If you were both blind and 65 or over, you get 
three exemptions. 

For Your Wife. — You get exemptions for your wife (or 
husband) if you and she are filing a joint return. If you 
file a separate return, you may claim her exemptions only 
if «he had no income and did not receive more than half 
her support from another taxpayer. Otherwise, your wife's 
exemptions are like your own — one, if she was neither 
blind nor 65 or over; two, if she was either blind or 65 or 
over; three, if she was both blind and 65 or over. 
In Case Of Death. — If wife or husband died during 1954, 
the number of his or her exemptions is determined as of the 
date of death. 

Proof Of Blindness.- — If totally blind, a statement of such fact 
must be attached to the return. If partially blind, attach 
a statement from a qualified physician or a registered 
optometrist that (1) central visual acuity did not exceed 
20/200 in the better eye with correcting lenses, or (2) that 
the widest diameter of the visual field subtends an angle 
no greater than 20°. 

Exemptions For Your Children 

You are entitled to one exemption for each child (in- 
cluding a stepchild, or legally adopted child), if during 
the taxable year, that child: 

1. Received more than one-half of his or her support 
from you (or from yoiu- husband or wife if this is a joint 
return), and 

2. Had not attained the age of 19 or was a student (if 
the child is 19 or over and not a student, he must have 
rersived less than S600 gross income), and 

3. Did not file a joint return with her husband (or his 
wife), and 

4. Was either a citizen or resident of the United States or 
a resident of Canada, Mexico, the Republic of Panama or 
the Canal Zone. For the exemption in the case of children 
wlio are residents of the Republic of the Philippines and 
were born to or were legally adopted by servicemen in the 
Philippine Islands before July 5, 1946, consult your Internal 
Revenue Service office. 

The law defines a student as an individual who during 
each of five calendar months during the calendar year in 
which the taxable year of the taxpayer begins is a full-time 
student at an educational institution or is pursuing a full- 
time course of institutional on-farm training under the 
supervision of an accredited agent of an educational insti- 
tution or of a State or political subdivision of a State. The 
term educational institution means only an educational in- 



stitution which normally maintains a regular faculty and 
curriculum and normally has a regularly organized body 
of students in attendance at the place where its educational 
activities are carried on. 

Amounts received as scholarships for study at an educa- 
tional institution need not be taken into account in deter- 
mining whether a child who qualifies under the above 
definition as a "student" received more than one-half of 
his or her support from you. 

Exemptions For Dependents Other Than Your 
Children 

You are entitled to one exemption for each other depend- 
ent who meets all the following requirements for the year: 

1. Received less than $600 gross income, and 

2. Received more than one-half of his or her support from 
you (or from husband or wife if this is a joint return), and 

3. Did not file a joint return with her husband (or his 
wife), and 

4. Was either a citizen or resident of the United States or a 
resident of Canada, Mexico, the Republic of Panama or the 
Canal Zone, and 

5. (a) Was related to you (or to husband or wife if this is 
a joint return) in one of the following ways: 

Mother Stepbrother Son-in-law 

Father Stepsister Daughter-in-law 

Grandmother Stepmother The following if 

Grandfather Stepfather related by blood: 

Brother Mother-in-law Uncle — 

.Sister Father-in-law Aunt — 

Grandson Brother-in-law Nephew — 

Granddaughter Sister-in-law Niece — 

or, (b) had as his principal place of abode your home and 
was a member of your household, even if not related to you. 

Exemptions For Individuals Supported by More 
Than One Taxpayer 

If several persons contributed toward the support of an 
individual during the taxable year, but none contributed 
over half of the support, they may designate one of their 
number to claim the exemption, if: 

(a) They as a group have provided over half of the sup- 
port of the individual; and 

(b) Each of them, had he contributed over half of the 
support, would have been able to claim the individual 
as a dependent; and 

(c) The person claiming the exemption for the individual 
contributed over 10 percent of the support; and 

(d) Each person described in (b) above (other than the 
person claiming the exemption) who contributed over 10 
percent of the individual's support files a declaration that 
he will not claim the individual as a dependent for the year. 
Consult your Internal Revenue Service office for informa- 
tion regarding the filing of these declarations. 



104 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 
HOW TO REPORT YOUR INCOME 



What Income Is Taxed 

The law says all kinds of income in whatever form 
received are subject to tax with specific exceptions. This 



means that all income which is not specifically exempt 
must be included in your return, even though it may be 
offset by expenses and other deductions. 



Examples of Income Which Must Be Reported 

Wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions 

Tips and gratuities for services rendered 

Dividends and other earnings from investments 

Interest from loans and bonds, including Federal bonds issued on or 
after March 1, 1941 

Industrial, civil service and other pensions, annuities, endowments 

Rents, and royalties from property, patents, copyrights 

Profits from business or profession 

Profit from sale of real estate, securities, autos 

Your share of partnership profits 

Your share of estate or trust income 

Contest prizes 

Gambling winnings 

Alimony, separate maintenance or support payments received from 
(and deductible by) your husband (or wife). For details see Mis- 
cellaneous Section relative to deductions. 



Examples of Income Which Should Not Be Reported 

Armed forces pay due to active service in a combat zone or while 
hospitalized from such service after June 24, 1950 — enlisted men's 
entire service pay for each month; officers' service pay up to S200 
for each month. Your service withholding statement (Form W-2) 
does not include this nontaxable service pay but shows only the pay 
you must report 

All Government payments and benefits made to veterans and their 
families, except nondisability retirement pay and interest on ter- 
minal leave bonds 

Dividends on veterans' Government insurance 

Federal and State Social Security benefits 

Railroad Retirement Act benefits 

Gifts, inheritances, bequests 

Workmen's compensation, insurance, damages, etc., for bodily injury 
or sickness 

Interest on State and municipal bonds 

Life insurance proceeds upon death. 



Wages, Salaries, Etc. 

You must report your wages, salaries, fees, commissions, 
bonuses, and other payments for your pensonal services even 
though tax has been withheld by your employer. 

Exclusions From Salaries And Wages 

The new law allows you to exclude from wages amounts 
received as wages or in place of wages under a wage con- 
tinuation plan for the period during which you were absent 
from work on account of personal injuries or sickness. This 
amount may not exceed a weekly rate of SIOO. (This limi- 
tation applies only to amounts received under plans which 
are financed by the employer. If the plan is one to which 
you contributed, the amounts received which are attribut- 
able to your contributions are excludable without limit.) 

If your absence is due to illness, the exclusion does not 
apply to the amounts received for the first 7 calendar days. 
However, if you were hospitalized on account of sickness 
for at least one day during the illness then the exclusion 
applies from the fir.st day of absence. In cases where the 
payments e.xceed a weekly rate of SIOO, the exclusion is 
figured by multiplying the amount received by 100 and 
dividing the result by the weekly rate of payment. If you 
received such payments, enter your gross wages in item 2, 
page 1 of Form 1040, and enter in item 3 the amount to be 
excluded. Attach a statement showing your computation. 

You may also exclude from gross income amounts 
received under an accident or health plan which are paid 
directly or indirectly to you to reimburse you for expenses 
for the medical care of yourself, your wife (or husband), 
or your dependents. However, you may not claim a 
deduction for medical expense for these amounts. 
Report Total Wages Bejore Pay-Roil Deductions. — When your 
employer deducts taxes, insurance, union dues, savings 
bond subscriptions, social security, pension fund contribu- 
tions, community chest, or other items from your pay, 
these amounts are still part of your wages. You must 
report your total wages in the amount that would have been 
paid if your employer had not made any deductions. 
Tips and Gratuities. — The law requires you to include in 
your wages all tips, gratuities, bonuses, and similar pay- 
ments for services rendered whether you get them from a 
customer or from your employer. Legally, these are not 
"gifts," even though sometimes called by that name. 
Payment In Merchandise, Etc. — If your employer pays part 
or all of your wages in merchandise, services, stock, or 



other things of value, you must determine the fair market 
value of such items and include it in your wages. 
Meals and Living Qjiarlers. — Employees who, as a matter of 
choice, receive meals and lodging from their employers 
whether or not it is stipulated to be part of their salaries 
must include in income the fair market value of the meals 
and lodging. 

However, if, for the convenience of your employer, your 
meals are furnished at your place of employment or you are 
required to accept lodging at your place of employment as 
a condition of your employment, the value of the meals or 
lodging is not to be reported in your return. 

Trade and Business Deductions of Employees 

Reimbursed Expenses Other Than Jor Travel and Transporta- 
tion. — If your employer pays you an "expense account" or 
otherwise reimburses you for money spent for him in con- 
nection with your employment (other than "travel and 
transportation"), you should add these payments to your 
wages, and then subtract your actual allowable expenses 
of this type but not more than the reimbursements. Attach 
a detailed statement in explanation. Any allowable ex- 
pense in excess of the reimbursed amount may be deducted 
as Miscellaneous Expenses on page 3 of your return if you 
itemize your deductions. 

Out-Of-Town Travel Expenses. — The law provides special 
deductions for the expenses of travel while away from home 
in connection with your employer's business. Traveling 
"away from home" means going away from the city or 
town where you normally work and remaining away at 
least overnight. "Travel expenses" means the cost of 
transportation fares, meals, and lodging, and includes 
porters' tips, hire of public stenographers, baggage charges, 
and similar expenses necessary to travel. Travel expenses 
do not include any entertainment expenses or any personal 
expenses such as laundry. Any amount paid to you to cover 
these expenses must be included in your wages. You can 
deduct your full "travel expenses" from your wages before 
writing the balance of your wages in item 2, page 1. Attach 
a statement to your return explaining in detail the expenses 
you deduct. If you choose to live away from the city where 
you regularly work, or do not transfer your home when your 
employer transfers your work to a different city, the law 
does not allow any "travel deduction" resulting from your 
choice of residence. 

Other Transportation Expenses. — Even though you do not 
travel away from home, as explained above, you may 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



105 



deduct from your wages or other compensation, before 
entering the balance on page 1, transportation expenses 
paid in connection with the performance of services for your 
employer. Transportation expenses include payments for 
actual travel or, if you use your own car, the business por- 
tion of the cost of operation, including fuel, repairs, and 
depreciation. Any reimbursement of these expenses must 
be included in your income. Attach a statement to your 
return explaining in detail the expenses you deduct. 
Going To and From Work. — The law regards the cost of 
transportation between your residence and your principal 
place of employment as personal expense and does not 
allow you to deduct such cost, no matter how far you live 
from work, or how expensive the transportation may be. 
Expenses Of Outside Salesmen. — The new law allows "Outside 
Salesmen" to deduct all their ordinary and necessary busi- 
ness expenses from their compensation before entering the 
balance in item 2, page 1. This applies only to sales- 
men who are engaged full-time in soliciting business for 
their employers away from their employer's place of busi- 
ness. The term does not include one whose principal 
activities consist of service and delivery such as a milk-driver 
salesman. 

Other Expenses 0/ Employees. — The expenses set forth above 
are the only ones which may be deducted from salaries and 
wages on page 1 of Form 1040 by employees. If you file a 
Short-Form 1040, or if you take the standard deduction on 
a Long-Form 1040, you automatically receive an allowance 
for a deduction which takes the place of all other employ- 
ment expenses and nonbusiness deductions. On the other 
hand, if you itemize your deductions on a Long-Form 1040, 
you can deduct the cost of tools, materials, dues to unions 
and professional societies, entertaining customers, and other 
expenses which are ordinary and necessary in connection 
with your employment. These items may be itemized and 
deducted on page 3 under the heading "Miscellaneous." 

Dividends 

If you own stock, the payments you receive out of the 
company's earnings and profits are called dividends and 
must be reported in your tax return. Usually dividends 
are paid in cash, but if paid in merchandise or other prop- 
erty, they are taxable at their fair market value. 

If a distribution is not paid from earnings and profits, it is 
not taxable as a dividend, but is treated as reduction of the 
cost or other basis of your stock. These distributions are not 
taxable until they exceed your cost or other basis, after 
which you must generally include any additional receipts 
as gains from the sale or exchange of property, for which 
special tax treatment is provided. 

In some cases a corporation distributes both a dividend 
and a repayment of capital at the same time; the check 
or notice will usually show them separately. In any case, 
you must report the dividend portion as income. 

There arc special rules applicable to stock dividends or 
stock rights; ask your Internal Revenue Service office for 
more complete information. 

If your taxable year ends after July 31, 1954, you may 
exclude from your income S50 of dividends recei\ed from 
domestic corporations during your taxable year. Use 
Schedule J, page 4, to show the exclusion. However, this 
exclusion does not apply to dividends recei\ed from: 

(a) life insurance companies, and mutual insurance com- 
panies (other than mutual marine or mutual fire insurance 
companies issuing perpetual policies). 

(b) China Trade Act corporations. 

(c) so-called exempt organizations (charitable, fraternal, 
etc.) and farmer's cooperative organizations. 

(d) mutual savings banks, cooperative banks, domestic 



building and loan associations, domestic savings and loan 
associations. Federal savings and loan associations on de- 
posits or withdrawable accounts. Dividends from these 
organizations must be reported as interest in Schedule B, 
on page 2 of Form 1040 and not as dividends. 

(e) regulated investment companies except to the extent 
designated by the company to be taken into account as a 
dividend for these purposes. 

(f) corporations deriving 80 percent or more of their 
income from U. S. possessions and 50 percent or more of 
their income from active conduct of a business therein. 

If a joint return is filed and both husband and wife have 
dividend income, each one may exclude up to $50 of 
dividends received from qualifying corporations, but one 
may not use any portion of the S50 exclusion not used by 
the other. For example, if the husband has S200 in divi- 
dends, and the wife has S20, only S70 may be excluded on a 
joint return. 

See page 15 for the dividends received credit. 

Interest 

You must include in your return any interest you receive 
or which is credited to your account (whether entered in 
your pass-book or not) and can be withdrawn by you. All 
interest on bonds, debentures, notes, savings accounts, or 
loans is taxable, e.xcept for certain governmental issues. 
For example, some of the interest which is fully exempt 
from tax is (a) interest from State and municipal bonds and 
securities and (b) interest on any S5,000 principal value of 
Treasury bonds issued before March 1, 1941. 

You must include in your gross income the interest from 
certain United States securities issued prior to March 1, 
1941, which was exempt from the normal tax by the 
acts authorizing their issuance. However, under the new 
law you now receive a credit against your tax computed 
according to the instructions on page 14. The following 
securities are examples of those for which the credit for 
partially tax-e.xempt interest is allowed: (a) Treasury 
bonds in excess of S5,000 issued before March 1, 1941; (b) 
"dividends" on shares of Federal savings and loan associa- 
tions if the shares were issued before March 28, 1942. 

The interest on U. S. Government bonds and securities 
issued on or after March 1, 1941, is fully taxable. 

If you own United States Savings or War bonds (Series 
A to F, inclusive), the gradual increase in value of each 
bond (as shown in the table on its back) is considered in- 
terest, but you need not report it in your tax return until 
you cash the bond or until the year of final maturity which- 
ever is earlier. However, you may at any time elect to 
report each year the annual increase in value, but if you 
do so you must report in the first year the entire increase 
to date and must continue to report the annual increase 
each year. 

Itemize your interest in Schedule B, page 2, stating the 
name of the payor and the amount of interest received. 

Business Or Profession 

General. — The law taxes the profits from a business or 
profession — not its total receipts. Therefore, separate 
Schedule C, which contains further instructions, is pro- 
vided to help you figure your profit or loss from business. 
Generally, you may deduct the ordinary and necessary 
expenses of doing business — cost of merchandise, salaries, 
interest, taxes, rent, repairs, and incidental supplies. In 
the case of capital investments and improvements in depre- 
ciable property, such as buildings, machines, fixtures, and 
similar items having a useful life of more than one year, the 
law provides a depreciation allowance as the method of 



106 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



deducting the cost over the life of the property. For further 
information on depreciation, see page 11. 

If some of your expenses are part business and part per- 
sonal, you can deduct the business portion but not the per- 
sonal portion. For instance, a doctor who uses his car half 
for business can deduct only half the operating expenses. 

Everyone engaged in a trade or business and makiiig pay- 
ments to another person of salaries, wages, commissions, 
interest, rent, etc., of S600 or more in the course of such 
trade or business during his taxable year must file informa- 
tion returns. Forms 1096 and 1099, to report such payments. 
If a portion of such salary or wage payments was reported 
on a Withholding Statement (Form W-2), only the re- 
mainder must be reported on Form 1099. Information 
returns are not required unless the payments are made in 
the course of business. 

Individuals in business may under certain conditions elect 
to report and pay income tax on such business income on 
the same basis as a domestic corporation. For full details 
consult your Internal Revenue Service ofTice. 

Accrual-Method Taxpayers Only — Prepaid Income and Reserves 
jor Estimated Expenses. — Under the new la\v a taxpayer using 
the accrual method of accounting in a trade or business may 
elect to take prepaid income into account proportionately 
in the year of receipt and subsequent taxable years (not to 
exceed five), and may elect to deduct for the taxable year an 
addition to a reserve for estimated expenses. Prepaid income 
is income received in a transaction in which you undertake 
to render services, furnish goods or other property, or allow 
the use of property beyond the end of the taxable year. 

An election to deduct additions to reserves for estimated 
expenses applies to expenses part or all of which would 
be taken into account for subsequent taxable years but 
are attributable to income received in the current taxable 
year. In order to qualify as a deduction it is necessary that 
such expenses be estimated with reasonable accuracy. The 
election to take estimated expenses into account does not 
apply to expenses attributable to income which you elect 
to treat as prepaid income nor does it apply to additions to 
reserves for bad debts. For additions to reserves for bad 
debts see separate Schedule C. 

For more information concerning the requirements to 
make elections with respect to prepaid income and esti- 
mated expenses (and the detailed statements which must 
be submitted when making the election) consult your 
Internal Revenue Service oflice. 

Farming 

For tlie assistance of farmers, a separate schedule. Form 
1040F, is provided and must be used by all farmers who 
report on the cash method. This form is optional with 
farmers who keep books on the accrual method. 

Farmers must report as business income all Government 
payments, such as milk subsidy and conservation payments 
and amounts received under the Soil Conservation and 
Domestic Allotment Act, as amended, section 303 of the 
Agricultural Adjustment Act, as amended, and the Sugar 
Act of 1937. A taxpayer may elect to treat as income 
loans received from the Commodity Credit Corporation. 
If he does so, he must continue to report them as income 
unless he secures permission to change. 

Farmers who market produce through a cooperative 
should add any patronage dividends received in the 
taxable year to their gross receipts from farming. Farmers 
who buy, through a cooperative, implements, gasoline, 
seed, fertilizer, or other items for use in their business 
should either reduce the cost of such items by the amount 



of patronage dividends received or add the patronage 
dividends to income. Patronage dividends received as 
reljates on purchases of items not used in yotir business 
should be omitted from your return. Patronage dividends 
are considered paid when remitted in cash, merchandise, 
stock certificates, or when credited to you. 

If livestock are sold or exchanged because they are dis- 
eased, or if property is sold or disposed of to meet acreage 
limitations under Federal reclamation laws, the sale or dis- 
position may be treated as an involuntary conversion pro- 
vided proceeds are reinvested in similar property. Such 
reinvestment must generally be made within a year. 

Soil and Water Conservation Expenditures. — If you are en- 
gaged in the business of farming, you may deduct certain 
expenditures made by you (including any amount paid on 
any assessment levied by a soil or water conservation or 
drainage district to defray expenditures made by such 
district) for soil or water conservation and the prevention 
of erosion if such expenditures are in respect of land used 
by you in your farming operations. The term expendi- 
tures means expenditures (a) for the treatment or moving 
of earth, including but not limited to leveling, grading, 
terracing, contour furrowing; (b) the construction, control, 
and protection of diversion channels, drainage ditches, 
earthen dams, watercourses, outlets, and ponds; (c) the 
eradication of brush; and (d) the planting of windbreaks. 
You may not deduct expendianes for the construction, in- 
stallation, or improvement of facilities which are subject 
to the allowance for depreciation. 

The allowable deduction for any one year may not 
exceed 25 percent of your gross income from farming but 
any excess may be carried over to succeeding years with 
the same limit applying to those years. The phrase "gross 
income from farming" means the gross income of the farmer 
from the production of crops, fruits or other agricultural 
products or from livestock and includes such income from 
a farm other than the one on which expenditures for soil 
and water conservation or for the prevention of erosion 
were made. 

To claim a deduction for these expenditures you must 
(a) elect to do so for the first taxable year which began after 
December 31, 1953, and ended after August 16, 1954 for 
which such expenditures are paid; or, (b) .secure consent 
from the Internal Revenue Service. Once you have elected 
to do so, you must continue to treat these expenditures as 
deductions in all future taxable years unless you secure con- 
sent from the Internal Revenue Service to change. 



Partnership 

A partnership does not pay income tax in the firm's 
name. Each partner must report in his personal tax return 
his share of his partnership's income and pay tax on it. 

Include in Schedule C Summary, page 2 of Form 1040, 
your share of the ordinary net income (whether actually 
received by you or not) or the net loss of a partnership, 
joint venture, or the like, whose taxable year ends within 
the year covered by your return. Other income and de- 
ductions to be carried to your individual return are shown 
in Schedule K of the partnership return. 

If the partnership is engaged in a trade or business, the 
individual partner may be subject to the self-employment 
tax on his share of the partnership's self-employment in- 
come. In such a case the partner's share of partnership 
self-employment net earnings (or loss) should be entered 
on line 30, separate Schedule C. 



8 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



107 



Net Operating Loss 

If. in 1954, your business or profession lost money instead 
of making a profit or if you had a casualty Ids';, or a loss 
from the sale or other disposition of depreciable property 
(or real property) used in your trade or business, you can 
apply these losses against your other 1954 income. If these 
losses exceed your other income, the excess of this "net oper- 
ating loss"' may be carried back to offset your income for 
1952 or 1953, and any remaining excess may be carried for- 
ward against your income for the years 1955 through 1959. 
If a carryback entitles you to a refund of prior year taxes, ask 
the District Director for Form 1045 to claim a quick refund. 
For further information, see section 1 72 of the Internal Rev- 
enue Code of 1954 and section 122 of the 1939 Code. 

If you had a loss in preceding years which may be carried 
over to 1954, you should claim a net operating loss deduc- 
tion on line 5 of Schedule C Summary, page 2. of Form 1040 
whether or not there are other items to be entered, and file 
a conci.se statement setting forth this computation. 

Self -employment Tax 

Every self-employed individual will ha\e to file an annual 
return of his self-einplovnient income on Form 1040 if he 
has at least S400 of net earnings from self-employment in liis 
taxable year, even though he may not iiave sufncient income 
to rec|uire the filing of an income tax return. 

If your income is derived solely from salary or wages, or 
from di\idends and interest on investments, capital gains, 
annuities, or pensions, you will have no self-employment 
income and no self-employment tax to pay. 

Generally, if you carry on a business as a sole proprietor, 
or if you render service as an independent contractor, or as a 
member of a partnership or similar organization, you will 
have self-employment income. 

The computation of your self-employment tax is made on 
separate Schedule C which, with attached Schedule C-a, 
should be filed with your individual income tax return. 
The self-employment tax is a part of the income tax. 

Any declaration of estimated tax required to be filed need 
not include estimated tax on self-employment income. 

Sale and Exchange of Property 

If you sell your'house, car, furniture, securities, real estate, 
or any other kind of property, you must report any profit 
on your tax return. Generally, such profits are capital 
gains if the property was not held for sale to customers in 
the ordinary course of business. Separate Schedule D is 
provided to compute capital gains and losses, and the 
results from other transactions in property. 
Sale of Homes, Etc. — Gener.\l Rule. — The law requires you 
to report any gains from the sale or exchange of your resi- 
dence or other nonbusiness property, but does not allow 
you to claim any loss from the sale of a home or other asset 
which was not held for the purpose of producing income. 
Your gain from the sale of this kind of property is the 
clifTcrence between (1) the sales price and (2) your original 
cost plus the cost of permanent improvements. If deprecia- 
tion was allowed or allowable during any period because 
you rented the house or used part of it for business purposes, 
then the original cost must be reduced by the amount of 
depreciation which was allowed or allowable. 
Speci.al Rule for Sale of Residence .\t a Gain. — If you 
sold or exchanged your residence during 1954 at a gain and 
within one year after (or before) the sale, you purchased 
and occupied another residence, none of the gain is taxable 
if the cost of the new residence equals or exceeds the ad- 
justed sales price of the old residence. See, however, in- 



structions below for inforn^iation to be furnished. If in- 
stead of purchasing another residence, you begin construc- 
tion of a new residence (either one year before or within 
one year after the sale of your old residence) and occupy it 
not later than 18 months after the sale, none of the gain 
upon the sale is taxable if your cost of construction plus 
the cost of land (acquired within the period beginning one 
year before the sale and ending 18 months after the sale) 
equals or exceeds the adjusted sales price of the old residence. 

If the adjusted sales price of your old residence exceeds the 
cost of your new residence, the gain on the sale is taxable to 
the extent of such excess. The adjusted sales price is the 
gross selling price less commissions and the expenses for 
work performed on the residence in order to assist in its sale, 
such as selling and redecorating expenses. Redecorating 
expenses, however, must be for work performed during the 
90-day period ending on the day on w hich a contract to sell 
is entered into, and must be paid within 30 days after date 
of sale. 

For example, assume yoiu" adjusted sales price is SI 5.000 
for a residence \vhich cost you 510,000 and you purchase 
a new residence for $14,000. The taxable portion of your 
gain is only SI, 000, the diflerence between the adjusted 
sales price of your original residence and the purchase 
price of the new residence. The nontaxable portion of the 
gain of S4,000 ser\es to reduce the basis of the new property. 
Therefore in any future transaction its adjusted basis would 
be 110,000 (cost of 514,000 less non-taxable gain of §4,000). 

Special rules apply if (a) a part of your old or new 
residence is used for rental or business purposes, (b) you 
sell within one year more than one property used as your 
principal residence, (c) the shares of the husband and wife 
in the old and new residences are not identical, (d) you 
own more than one residence at the same time, or (e) you 
acquired your new residence because your old residence 
was destroyed by a casualty (such as fire) or condemned. 
Consult your Internal Revenue Service office for assistance 
in reporting the disposal of such property. 

If you sold or exchanged your residence, report the details 
of the sale in separate Schedule D. If you do not intend to 
replace, or if the period for replacement has passed, report 
the details in the year of sale. If you have acquired and 
occupied your new residence, enter in coliunn (h) of .Sched- 
ule D only the amount of taxable gain, if any, and attach 
statement showing the purchase price, date of purchase, 
and date of occupancy. 

If you have decided to replace, but ha\e not done so, or 
if you are undecided, you should enter "None" in coluinn (h) 
of Schedule D. When you do replace within the required 
period, you must advise the District Director, giving full 
details. When you decide not to replace, or the period has 
passed, you must file an amended return, if you previously 
filed a return. Since any additional tax due will bear in- 
terest from the due date of the original return until paid, 
it is advisable to file the amended return for the year of sale 
as promptly as possible. 

The running of the 1-year period or the 18-month period 
will be suspended during the time, if any, in which you serve 
on active duty in the .'Xrmed Forces after the date of sale of 
the old residence and during an induction period, pursuant 
to a call or order for an indefinite period or for more than 
90 days. This suspension applies only where your service 
begins before the end of the 1-year period or the 18-month 
period, as the case may be, and cannot extend such period 
beyond a date which falls 4 years after the date of sale. 

If your residence is destroyed or condemned, or even if 
you sell because of the threat of condemnation, you may be 
entitled to the benefit of other provisions of law which give 
you a longer time in which to buy a new residence. If you 



445805 O -57 -8 



108 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 

require more information about your particular case, you nuities. The multiples are set out in actuarial tables wWch 

should apply to your Internal Revenue Service office. will be furnished by your Internal Revenue Service office 

J^onbusiness Bad Debts.— U you fail to collect a personal loan, upon request. 

you can list the bad debt as a "short-term capital loss" pro- ''Payment received'^ is the total amount received ior a year 

vided the loan was made with a true expectation of collect- under the contract. , , nco 

in°- So-called loans to close relatives, which are really in Example: D purchased a life annuity on January 1 1 )b2 

thS nature of eifts, must not be listed as deductible losses. for 515,000 which provides for annual payments of 51,200 

beginning January 1, 1953. The multiple applicable in 

Annuities and Pensions D's case as of January 1, 1954, is 15.0. During the year 

, -u , A ;■ . Th^ f„n ^mrinnr of an annuitv or 1953, D received tax-free under the existing tax laws $750 

Noncontnbutory Annuities.— Tht full amount ot an annuity or ^ SI 5,000). The amount of each payment 

a pension of a retired -7?'°^-' jh-e the em ^ d^d ^^.-""j^'Y;/^ ^ ^,;^^ ^,^J ^^ i„,,^, beginning with 

not contribute to the cost ^^J^as not taxable on hi em ^ .^ determined as follows: 

plover s contributions, must be included in his gross in- i- / 

come. The total of the payments received during his tax- f-sil'^Y^X- -;;,,::: ■.;:•.:;;;;:::;;• $15; 0^ ''■'°" 

able year should be shown on line 6, t'art 1 01 Scneauie t. ^ess; Amount recovered tax free in prior years . 750 

Other Annuities. — Amounts received from other annuities, 

pensions, endowments, or life insurance contracts for a Investment in the contract as of 1/1/54, the annuity 

reason other than the death of the insured, whether paid ^Jtanrng ^ate as^ defined^ab<^e . . . . . . . . . .......... . S14, 250 

for a fixed number of years or for life, may have a portion r^^^ amount to be excluded based on the formula above: 

ofthe payment excluded from gross income. The following $14,250 ,^ -, „. ... ,, corn 

types are included under this rule: (a) pensions where the sjg^OOO >< ^''""^ '""^'^ "^""'^ ^"" 

employee has either contributed to its cost or has been p ^jn include in his income S250 (Sl,200 — S950) in the 

taxed on his employer's contributions, (b) amounts paid for yg^^ 1954 g^d each subsequent year as long as he lives, 

a reason other than the death of the insured under an ^ . ^ , ^ , , a :• 

annuity, endowment, or life insurance contract, and (c) Special Rule for Certain Types of Employees Annuities 

amounts paid to a beneficiary, through an option in the There is a special rule provided for amounts received as 

policy or otherwise, in installments or in a lump sum under employees' annuities where part of the cost is contributed 

a life insurance contract at a date or dates later than the ^y t^e employer and the amount contributed by the employee 

insured's death where the death occurred on or after ^,\\\ i^g returned within 3 years from the date (whether or 

August 17, 1954. not before January 1, 1954) of the first payment received 

Schedule E on Form 1040 and the following instructions under the contract. If both of these conditions are met, then 
should enable you to compute the taxable portion of the ^\\ jp,g payments received under the contract are to be ex- 
annuity. If you are receiving payments on more than one eluded from gross income until the employee recovers^ his 
pension or annuity, fill out a separate schedule for each one. (-qs( (jhe amount contributed by him plus the contributions 
General Rule jor Annuities made by the employer on which the employee was previ- 

In general, amounts received from annuities and pen- ously taxable); thereafter all amounts received under the 
sions are included in income to the extent they exceed the contract are fully taxable. This method of computing tax- 
exclusion described below. You may exclude from your able income also applies to employee's beneficiary if em- 
income an amount found by using the following formula: ployee died before receiving any annuity or pension payments. 
Investment in the co ntract , • »H Example: An emplovee receives S200 a month under an 
___^_--- X payment receivea annuity. While he worked, he contributed $4,925 toward 

This formula means that you divide the investment in the cost of the annuity. His employer also made contribu- 

the contract by the expected return and multiply the tions toward the cost of the annuity. The retired employee 

result by the payment received under the annuity, pension, would be paid 57,200 during his first 3 years, which amount 

or contract. Formula terms are explained below. exceeds his contribution of $4,925. Therefore, he excludes 

"Investment in the contract" is, in general, the total amount of from gross income all the payments received from the 

the premiums or other consideration paid (the amount con- annuity until he has received $4,925. All payments 

tributed by you plus the contributions made by your em- received thereafter are fully taxable, 

olover on which you were previously taxable) for the con- , ~ , . 

tract as of the annuity starting date. This investment must Other Types of Annuities 

be reduced by the amounts received under the investment Amounts Received Under Life-insurance Policies By Reason Of 

before the annuity starting date to the extent excludable Death. — In general, a lump sum payable at the death of the 

from gross income under prior income tax law. The insured under a life insurance policy is excludable from 

"annuity starting date" is the first day of the first period for the gross income of the recipient. When, however, the 

which a payinent is received as an annuity under the con- beneficiary of a life insurance contract leaves a sum on 

tract; except that if the date was before January 1, 1954, deposit with the insurer, and receives interest on it under 

then the annuity starting date is considered January 1, 1954. an agreement with the insurer the interest is includible in 

"Expected return"— There are two methods for determining its entirety in the beneficiary's gross income. If the bene- 

cxpected return depending on the type of contract. ficiary receives, through his option or otherwise, installment 

(a) If the contract provides for amounts to be received payments at dates later than the insured s death he or she 
for a fixed number of years, then the expected return is the may be taxed on a part of the amount or amounts so received, 
total amount of the payments to be received after the Special rules also apply in the case of joint and survivor 
annuity starting date. annuities where the first annuitant died in 1951, i;5z, or 

(b) If the contract provides for amounts to be received for 1 953; where a refund feature is involved; where amounts are 
the life of the annuitant, then the expected return is found received under an annuity, endowment, or life insurance 
by multiplying the amount of the annual payment by the contract, if such amount is not received as an annuity; and 
multiple applicable to the age and sex of the annuitant as in cases which have not been otherwise explained in the 
of the annuity starting date. Special multiples are appli- instructions. See your Internal Revenue Service office for 
cable in the case of payments under joint and survivor an- more detailed instructions. 

10 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



109 



Rents and Royalties 

If you are not engaged in selling real estate to customers 
but receive rent from property owned or controlled by you, 
or royalties from copyrights, mineral leases, and similar 
rights, report the total amount received in Schedule F on 
page 2 of Form 1040. If property, other than cash, was 
received as rent, its fair market value should be reported. 

You are entitled to various deductions which are indi- 
cated in Schedule F. In the case of buildings you can de- 
duct depreciation, as explained elsewhere in these instruc- 
tions. If you have depletion, consult your Internal Revenue 
Service office for more detailed information. 

You can also deduct all ordinary and necessary expend- 
itures on the property such as taxes, interest, repairs, insur- 
ance, agent's commissions, maintenance, and similar 
items. However, you cannot deduct capital investments or 
improvements. For example, a landlord can deduct the 
cost of minor repairs but not the cost of major improve- 
ments such as a new roof or remodeling. 

Expenses, depreciation, and depletion should be listed in 
total in the columns provided in Schedule F. 
IJ You Rent Part of Tour House, Etc. — If you rent out only part 
of your property, you can deduct only a similar portion of 
the expenses. For example, if you rent out one-half of your 
home, and live in the other half, you can deduct only one- 
half of the depreciation and other expenses. 

Room rent and other space rentals should be reported as 
business income in separate Schedule C if services are ren- 
dered to the occupant; otherwise, report such income in 
Schedule F. If you are engaged in the business of selling 
real estate, you should report rentals received in separate 
Schedule C. 

Estates and Trusts 

If you are a beneficiary of an estate or trust, report in 
your personal tax return any of its income which is required 
to be distributed to you or which has been paid or credited 
to your account for the taxable year. The administrator, 
executor, or trustee should advise you what to report. 

Include in Schedule G of your return your share of such 
income (whether actually received by you or not) of an 
estate or trust for its taxable year which ends with or within 
the year covered by your return. Subtract from your share 
of such income any depreciation on estate or trust property 
which is allocable to you and show the net amount (or 
loss). There may be distributions (other than ordinary 
income) by an estate or trust, such as capital gains, dividends, 
etc., which are properly reportable in other schedules in 
your return. The fiduciary should advise you of such items 
requiring this special treatment. 

Other Income 

If you cannot find any specific place on your return to list 
certain types of income, you should report it in Schedule G, 
page 2. This is the proper place to report amounts received 
as alimony, support, prizes; or recoveries of bad debts, ta.\es, 
etc., which reduced your tax in a prior year. 

Depreciation 

The law does not allow you to deduct the full cost of your 
capital investments or improvements in the year made in 
figuring your profits from rents, royalties, businesses and 
professions. For most property with a life longer than one 
year, with the exception of land, the law provides for a de- 
duction from gross income called "depreciation" as the 
method of recovering your cost (less any salvage value) over 
the useful life of the asset. 

What is "Usejul Lije"? — The useful life of an asset can be 
measured in units of production or machine hours (for 



machinery), in miles of operation (for automotive equip- 
ment), etc., but the ordinary practice is to measure useful 
life in years. Business experience, engineering information, 
and other relevant factors provide a reasonable basis for 
estimating the useful life of property. For your guidance, 
comprehensive tables of "average useful lives" of various 
kinds of buildings, machines, and equipment in many 
industries and businesses have been published in a booklet 
called Bulletin F, which you can buy for 30 cents from the 
Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, 
Washington 25, D. C. 

Figuring the Deduction — Straight Line Method. — The most 
common method of computing depreciation is the "straight- 
line" method. It allows for the deduction of cost in equal 
annual amounts over the useful life of the property, with 
only salvage value remaining at the end of its useful life. 
To figure the deduction add the cost of improvements to 
the cost (or other basis) of the asset and deduct both the 
estimated salvage value and the total depreciation allowed 
or allowable in past years. Divide the result by the number 
of years of useful life remaining to the asset — the answer 
is the depreciation deduction. 

Special Rules for Mew Assets Acquired After December 31, 1953. — 
New assets acquired by the taxpayer after 1953 and the 
portion of the basis of property attributable to construc- 
tion or reconstruction by the taxpayer after 1953 may be 
depreciated under methods proper in the past or under 
additional methods provided in the new law. These 
methods (which may be employed only with respect to tan- 
gible assets having a useful life of three years or more) are — 

(a) "Declining balance method." — The deduction is com- 
puted by applying a uniform rate to the cost or other basis 
of the asset reduced by depreciation previously allowed or 
allowable. This rate cannot exceed twice the straight line 
rate computed without regard to salvage value. 

(b) "Sum of the years-digits method." — The deduction is the 
cost or other basis of the asset (reduced by estimated salvage 
value) multipled by the number of years of useful life re- 
maining to it (including the year of the deduction) divided 
by the sum of all the digits corresponding to the years of 
the asset's estimated useful life (in the case of a 3-year life 
such sum would be 6, that is 1-1-2+3). 

(c) "Other methods." — Other methods may be employed 
subject to special limitations; for details consult your Inter- 
nal Revenue Service office. 

Accotwting Methods and Records 

Your return must be on the "cash method" unless you 
keep books of account. "Cash method" means that all 
items of taxable income actually or constructively received 
during the year (whether in cash or in property or services) 
and only those amounts actually paid during the year for 
deductible expenses are shown. Income is "constructively" 
received when it is credited to your account or set aside 
for you and may be drawn upon by you at any time. 
Uncashed salary or dividend checks, bank interest credited 
to your account, matured bond coupons, and similar items 
which you can immediately turn into cash are "construc- 
tively received" even though you have not actually con- 
verted them into cash. 

An "accrual method" means that you report income when 
earned, even if not received, and deduct expenses when 
incurred, even if not paid within the taxable period. 

If you keep accounting records, your return must be on 
the same method as your records. The method used in 
keeping your records may be the cash receipts and dis- 
bursements method, or an accrual method, so long as in- 
come is clearly reflected. However, in most cases you must 
secure consent of the Commissioner before changing your 
accounting method. 

11 



110 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



HOW TO CLAIM NONBUSINESS DEDUCTIONS 



Contributions 

If you itemize deductions on a Long-Form 1040, you can 
deduct gifts to religious, charitable, educational, scientific, 
or literary organizations, and organizations for the pre- 
vention of cruelty to children and animals, unless the organi- 
zation is operated for personal profit, conducts propaganda 
or otherwise attempts to influence legislation, or partici- 
pates or intervenes in any political campaign on behalf 
of any candidate for public office. You can deduct 
gifts to fraternal organizations if they are to be used 
for charitable, religious, etc., purposes. You can also 
deduct gifts to veterans' organizations, or to a governmental 
agency which will use the gifts for public purposes. A 
contribution may be made in money or property (not 
services). If in property, it is measured by the fair market 
value of the property at the time of contribution. 

For the contribution to be deductible, the recipient of the 
contribution must have been organized or created in the 
United States or its possessions, or under our law. The 
law does not allow deductions for gifts to indi\ iduals, or to 
Other types of organizations, however worthy. 

In general, the deduction for contributions may not 
e.^ceed 20 percent of your adjusted gross income. 

L'nder the new law, there is a special additional deduction 
of up to 10 percent for contributions made to churches, a 
convention or association of churches, tax-e.xempt educa- 
tional institutions, and ta.x-e.xempt hospitals, which must 
be computed as explained below. If all your contributions 
were to these churches, schools, and hospitals, you can deduct 
up to 30 percent of your adjusted gross income. To com- 
pute the deduction for contributions you should first figure 
the contributions to these special institutions to the extent 
of 10 percent of your adjusted gross income and the 
amount in excess of 10 percent should be added to the other 
contributions to which the 20 percent limitation applies. 
Attach a schedule showing this computation. 

While you can deduct gifts to the kind of organizations 
listed below, you cannot deduct dues or other payments 
to them for which you receive personal benefits. For 
example, you can deduct gifts to a YMCA but not dues. 

Some examples of the treatment of contributions are: 

You CAN Deduct Cijts To: 
Churches, including assessments 
Salvation Army 
Red Cross, community chests 
Nonprofit schools and hospitals 
Veterans' organizations 
Boy Scouts, Girl .Scouts, and 
other similar organizations 



Nonprofit organizations pri- 
marily engaged in conducting 
research or education for the 
alleviation and cure of diseases 
such as tuberculosis, cancer, 
multiple sclerosis, muscular 
dystrophy, cerebral palsy, 
poliomyelitis, and diseases of 
the heart, etc. 

Social clubs 
Labor unions 
Chambers of commerce 
Propaganda organizations 



i'ou CANNO T Deduct Gtjts To: 

Relatives, friends, other indi- 
viduals 

Political organizations or caifdi- 
dates 

Interest 

If you itemize deductions on a Long-Form 1040, you 
can deduct interest you paid on your personal debts, such 
as bank loans or home mortgages. Interest paid on 
business debts should be reported in separate Schedule C 
or Schedule F, page 2, of Form 1040. Do not deduct 
interest paid on money borrowed to buy tax-exempt 
securities or single-premium life insurance. Interest paid 
on behalf of another person is not deductible unless you were 
legally liable to pay it. In figuring the interest paid on a 
mortgage on your home or on an installment contract for 
goods for your personal use, eliminate such items as carry- 
ing charges and insurance, which are not deductible, and 

12 



taxes which may be deductible but which should be item- 
ized separately. 

The new law provides a deduction for interest paid for 
purchasing personal property (such as automobiles, 
radios, etc.) on the installment plan where the interest 
charges are not separately stated from other carrying 
charges. This deduction is equal to 6 percent of the 
average unpaid monthly balance under the contract. 
Compute the average unpaid monthly balance by adding 
up the unpaid balance at the beginning of each month 
during the year and dividing by 12. The interest deduc- 
tion may not exceed the portion of the total carrying 
charges attributable to the taxable year. 

You CAN Deduct Interest On: 



A life insurance loan, if you pay 

the interest in cash 
Delinquent taxes 

enforceable obligation 
A life insurance loan, if interest 
is added to the loan and you 
report on the cash basis 



Vour personal note to a bank or 

an individual 
A mortgage on your home 
You CANNO T Deduct Interest On: 
Indebtedness of another person, 

when you are not legally liable 

for payment of the interest 
A gambling debt or other non- 

Taxes 

If you itemize deductions on a Long-Form 1040, you can 
deduct most non-Federal taxes paid by you. You can 
deduct State or local retail sales taxes if under the laws 
of your State they are imposed directly upon the consumer, 
or if they are imposed on the retailer (or wholesaler in 
case of gasoline taxes) and the amount of the tax is sepa- 
rately stated by the retailer to the consumer. In general, 
you cannot deduct taxes assessed for pavements or other 
local improvements, including front-foot benefits, which 
tend to increase the value of your property. Consult vour 
Internal Revenue Service office for circumstances under 
which local improvement taxes iriay be deducted. If you 
paid foreign taxes you may be entitled to a credit against 
your tax rather than a deduction froin income. 

Do not deduct on page 3 any nonbusiness Federal taxes, or 
any taxes paid in connection with a business or profession 
which are deductible in Schedule F or separate Schedule C. 
You CAN Deduct: 



Auto license fees 

State capitation or poll taxes 

State gasoline ta.xes 



Hunting licenses, dog licenses 
Auto inspection fees 
Water taxes 

Taxes paid by you for another 
person 



Personal property tcixes 

Real estate taxes 

State income taxes 

State or local retail sales ta.xes 

You CANNO T Deduct: 

Any Federal excise taxes on your 
personal expenditures, such as 
taxes on theater adiTilssions, 
furs, jewelry, cosmetics, rail- 
road tickets, telephone, etc. 

Federal social security taxes 

Casualty Losses and Thefts 

If you itemize deductions on a Long-Form 1040, you 
can deduct your net loss resulting from the destruction of 
your property in a fire, storm, automobile accident, ship- 
wreck, or other losses caused by natural forces. Damage 
to your car by collision or accident can be deducted if due 
merely to negligent driving but cannot be deducted if due 
to your willful act or your willful negligence. You can 
also deduct in the year of discovery losses due to theft, but 
not losses due to inislaying or losing articles. 

You should determine the amount of any casualty loss by 
comparing the fair market value of the property just before 
and just after the casualty. This loss or the acJjusted basis 
of the property, whichever is lower, should then be reduced 
by any insurance or other reimbursement to arrive at 
your deductible loss. Explain in attached statement. 

If your 1954 casualty losses exceed your 1954 income, the 
excess may be carried back as a "net operating loss" to 
offset your income for 1952. If the loss carried back 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



111 



exceeds your 1952 income, the excess may be used to 
offset your 1953 income. Any remaining excess may be 
carried over to the years 1955-1959, inclusive. 

Tou CAN Deduct Losses On: 

Property such as your home, is stolen from you 

clothing, or automobile de- Loss or damage of property by 

stroyed or damaged by fire flood, lightning, storm, explo- 

Property, including cash, which sion, or freezing 
rou CANNO T Deduct Losses On: 

Personal injury to yourself or transit 

another person Damage by rust or gradual ero- 

Accidental loss by you of cash or sion 

other personal property Animals or plants damaged or 

Property lost in storage or in destroyed by disease 

Medical and Dental Expenses 

If you itemize deductions on a Long-Form 1040 you can 
deduct, within the limits described below, the amount you 
paid during the year (not compensated for by hospital, 
health or accident insurance) for inedical or dental expenses 
for yourself, your wife, or any dependent who received over 
one-half of his support from you. If you pay medical 
expenses for a dependent who gets over half of his support 
from you, you can deduct the payments even though you 
are not entitled to a deduction for an exemption for that 
dependent because he had more than $600 of gross income. 

You can deduct amounts paid for the prevention, cure, 
correction, or treatment of a physical or mental defect or 
illness. If you pay someone to perform both nursing and 
domestic duties, you can deduct only that part of the cost 
which is for nursing. 

You can deduct the cost of transportation primarily for 
and essential to medical care, but you cannot deduct any 
other travel expense even if it benefits your health. Meals 
and lodging may not be treated as medical expense while 
away from home receiving medical treatment unless they 
arc part of a hospital bill. 

Figuring the Deduction. — You can deduct only those medical 
and dental expenses which exceed 3 percent of your ad- 
justed gross income. However in figuring these expenses, 
the amount paid for medicine and drugs may be taken into 
account only to the extent it exceeds 1 percent of your 
adjusted gross income, item 6, page 1 . There is a schedule 
provided on page 3 to make this computation. 
Limitations. — The deduction mav not exceed $2,500 mul- 
tiplied by the number of exemptions other than the 
exemptions for age and blindness. In addition there is a 
maximum limitation as follows: 

(a) $5,000 if the taxpayer is single and not a head of 
household or a qualifying surviving widow or widower; 

(b) $5,000 if the taxpayer is married but files a separate 
return; or 

(c) $10,000 if the taxpayer files a joint return, or is a head 
of household or a qualifying surviving widow or widower. 
Special Rule For Persons 65 Or Over. — If either you or your wife 
were 65 or over, the maximum limitation for amounts spent 
is the same as set out above. However, amounts deductible 
for medical and dental expenses for you and your wife are 
not restricted to the excess over 3 percent of your adjusted 
gross income. In effect, the 3 percent rule may be disre- 
garded. But the amounts spent by you for your medicine 
and drugs are still limited to the excess of 1 percent of your 
adjusted gross income, and amounts spent by you for your 
dependents' medical expenses are deductible only to the 
extent they exceed 3 percent of your adjusted gross income. 
Special Rule For Decedents. — In the case of a decedent, ex- 
penses for medical care may be treated as paid by the 
decedent at the time incurred, if such expenses are paid 
from his estate within one year after his death, and provided 
they are not deducted in computing the decedent's taxable 
estate for Federal estate tax purposes. If the expenses are 



allowable for estate tax purposes, but it is preferred to 
deduct them for income tax purposes, there must be filed 
with the Form 1040 a statement that this amount has not 
been claimed in the estate tax return, and a waiver of the 
right to have this amount allowed at any time for estate tax 
purposes. 

Any expense claimed as a deduction for the care of chil- 
dren and certain other dependents should not be included 
in your computation of the deduction for medical expense. 
Tou C.iJV Deduct Payments To or For: 
Doctors, dentists, nurses, and hos- cal or surgical appliances, 

pitals braces, etc. 

Drugs or medicines X-ray examinations or treatment 

Transportation necessary to get Premiums on health and accident 

medical care insurance, and hospital or med- 

Eyeglasses, artificial teeth, medi- ical insurance 

t'ou C.iJV.UO T Deduct Payments For: 

Funeral expenses Travel ordered or suggested by 

Cemetery plot your doctor for rest or change 

Illegal operations or drugs Premiums on life insurance 

Expenses For the Care of Children and Certain 
Other Dependents 

Generally, there is allowed a deduction not to exceed a 
total of $600 for expenses paid by a woman or a widower 
(including men who are divorced or legally separated 
under a decree and who have not remarried) for the care of 
one or more dependents if such care is to enable the tax- 
payer to be gainfully employed or actively to seek gain- 
ful employment. For this purpose, the term "dependent" 
is limited to the following persons for whom the taxpayer 
is entitled to a deduction for an exemption: 

(a) a child or stepchild of the taxpayer who is under 
12 years of age; or 

(b) a person who is physically or mentally incapable of 
caring for himself, regardless of age. 

The deduction is not allowable to the extent the payments 
are made to an individual who the taxpayer claims as a 
dependent. 

In the case of a woman who is married, the deduction is 
allowed only if she files a joint return with her husband; 
and the deduction is reduced by the amount (if any) by 
which their combined adjusted gross income exceeds $4,500. 
If the husband is incapable of self-support because mentally 
or physically defective these two limitations do not apply. 

If the person who receives the payment performs duties 
other than dependent care, only that part of the payment 
which is for the dependent's care may be deducted. 

Miscellaneous 

If you itemize deductions on a Long- Form 1040, you can 
deduct several other types of expenses under the heading 
"miscellaneous." 

If you work for wages or a salary, you can deduct the 
ordinary and necessary expenses which you incur for your 
employer's benefit and which have not been claimed on 
page 1. For example, if your job requires you to furnish 
small tools, you can deduct the cost of such tools. 

You CAN Deduct Cost OJ: 

Safety equipment Entertaining customers 

Dues to union or professional Tools and supplies 

societies Fees to employment agencies 
Tou CANNO T Deduct Cost OJ: 

Travel to and from work Bribes and illegal payments 

Entertaining friends Educational expenses 

You can deduct all ordinary and necessary expenses 
connected with the production or collection of income, or 
for the management or protection of property held for the 
production of income. 

If you are divorced or legally separated and are making 
periodic payments of alimony or separate maintenance 
under a court decree, you can deduct these amounts. 

13 



112 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



Periodic payments made after August 16, 1954, under either 
(a) a written separation agreement entered into after that 
date or (b) a decree for support entered after March 1, 1954, 
are also deductible. Such payments must be included in 
the wife's income. However, you cannot deduct lump-sum 
settlements, specific maintenance payments for support of 
minor children, or any voluntary payments not under a 
court order or a written separation agreement. 

You may not deduct gambling losses in excess of gam- 
bling winnings. If you are a tenant-stockholder in a co- 
operative housing corporation, you can deduct your share 
of its payments for interest and real-estate taxes. 

Declarations of Estimated Tax 

For many taxpayers the withholding tax on wages is not 
sufiicient to keep them paid up on their income tax. The 
law requires every individual (including an alien who is a 
resident of Puerto Rico during the entire taxable year) to 
file a Declaration of Estimated Tax, Form 1040-ES, and to 
make quarterly payments in advance of filing the annual 
income tax return if: 



(a) his gross income can reasonably be expected to con- 
sist of wages subject to withholding and of not more than 
$100 from other sources and to exceed — 

(1) S5,000 for a single individual who is not a head of 
household or a surviving widow or widower or for a married 
individual not entitled to file a joint declaration; 

(2) S10,000 for a head of household or a surviving widow 
or widower; or 

(3) $5,000 for a married person entided to file a joint 
declaration and the total income for both husband and 
wife can reasonably be expected to exceed $10,000; or 

(b) his gross income can reasonably be expected to 
include more than $100 from sources other than wages 
and to exceed the sum of $600 multiplied by the number of 
exemptions plus $400. 

The District Director will mail Form 1040-ES, as far as is 
practical, to each person who may need it. Anyone else 
required to file should obtain the form from an Internal 
Revenue Service office in time to file by April 15, 1955. 
Farmers may postpone filing their declarations for 1955, 
until January 15, 1956. 



HOW TO FIGURE YOUR TAX 



Using the Tax Table.— To relieve the average ta.xpayer 
from computing the tax, the law provides a table which 
shows the correct tax for any income up to $5,000. If you 
file a Short-Form 1040, use the Tax Table on page 16, to 
determine your tax. The table is based on the same rates 
used in a Long-Form 1040 computation. If your actual 



deductions are larger than 10 percent of your income, you 
may file a Long-Form 1040 and claim them. 
Making a Long-Form Computation. — To figure your tax on 
the amount on either line 5 or line 7(a), page 3, of Long- 
Form 1040, use the schedule below. 



1954 Tax Rate Schedule 



I FOR ALL TAXPAYERS EXCEPT UNMARRIED (OR 
LEGALLY SEPARATED) PERSONS QUALIFYING AS HEAD 

OF HOUSEHOLD 
// the amount on line 5 or 7 {a) is: Enter on line 6 or 7 ib): 

Not over $2,000 20"; of the amount on line 5 or 7 (a) 

Over $2,000 but not over $4,000. . . .$400, plus 22^:; of excess over $2,000 

Over $4,000 but not over $6,000 $840, plus 26% of excess over $4,000 

Over $6,000 but not over $S,000. . . .$1,360, plus 30'-c of excess over $6,000 
Over $8 000 but not over $10,000. , .$1,960, plus 34<-c of excess over $8,000 
Over $10,000 but not over $12,000. $2,640, plus 38% of excess over $10,000 
Over $12 000 but not over $14,000. .$3,400, plus 43% of excess over $12,000 

$4,260, plus 47% of excess over $14,000 
$5,200, plus 50%, of excess over $16,000 
$6,200, plus 53% of excess over $18,000 

^„. ^^^^^ . „ $7,260, plus 56% of excess over $20,000 

Over $22^000 but not over $26,000 . .$8,380, plus 59% of excess over $22,000 
Over $26,000 but not over $32,000 . .$10,740, plus 62% of excess over $26,000 
Over $32,000 but not over $38,000 . $14,460, plus 65% of excess over $32,000 
Over $38,000 but not over $44,000. .$18,360, plus 69%. of excess over $38,000 
Over $44,000 but not over $50,000 . $22,500, plus 72% of excess over $44,000 
Over $50,000 but not over $60,000 $26,820, plus 75% of excess over $50,000 
Over $60,000 but not over $70,000 . .$34,320, plus 78% of excess over $60,000 
Over $70,000 but not over $80,000. .$42,120, plus 81% of excess over $70,000 
Over $80,000 but not over $90,000. ,$50,220, plus 84% of excess over $80,000 
Over $90,000 but not over $100,000 $58,620, plus 87% of excess over $90,000 
Over $100,000 but not over $150,000 $67,320, plus 89% of excess over $100,000 
Over $150,000 but not over $200,000 $111,820, plus 90% of excessover$150,000 
Over $200,000 $156,820, plus 91%ofe.xcessovcr $200,000 



Over $14,000 but not over $16,000 
Over $16,000 but not over $18,000 
Over $18,000 but not over $20,000 
Over $20,000 but not over $22,000 



IL OSLY FOR UNMARRIED (OR LEGALLY SEPARATED) 
TAXPAYERS WHO QUALIFY AS HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 



1/ the amount on line 5 is: 

Not over $2,000 

Over $2,000 but not over $4,000 

Over $4,000 but not over $6,000 .... 
Over $6,000 but not over $8,000 .... 
Over $8,000 but not over $10,000 . . . 
Over$10,000butnotover$12,000. . 
Over$12,000butnotover$14,000. . 
Over $14,000 but not over $16,000. . 
Over$16,000butnotover$18,000. . 
Over $1 8,000 but not over $20,000 . . 
Over $20,000 but not over $22,000 . . 
Over $22,000 but not over ^24,000 . . 
Over $24,000 but not over $28,000 . . 
Over $28,000 but not over $32,000 . . 
Over $32,000 but not over $38,000. . 
Over $38,000 but not over $44,000 . . 
Over $44,000 but not over $50,000 . . 
Over $50,000 but not over $60,000 . . 
Over $60,000 but not over $70,000 . . 
Over $70,000 but not over $80,000 . . 
Over $80,000 but not over $90,000 , . 
Over $90,000 but not over $100,000 . 
Over $100,000 but not over $1 50,000 
Over $150,000 but not over $200,000 
Over $200,000 but not over $300,000 
Over$300,000 



Enter on line 6: 

20% of the amount on line 5- 
$400, plus 21% of excess over $2,000 
, $820, plus 24% of excess over $4,000 
.$1,300, plus 26% of excess over $6,000 
. $1 ,820 , pi us 30% of excess over $8,000 
. $2,420, plus 32% of excess over $10,000 
. $3,060, pi us 36% of excess over $12,000 
. $3,780, plus 39% of excess over $14,000 
. $4,560, plus 42%, of excess over $16,000 
. $5,400, plus 43% of excess over $18,000 
. $6,260, plus 47% of excess over $20,000 
. $7,200, plus 49% of excess over $22,000 
.$8,180, plus 52% of excess over $24,000 
.$10,260, plus 54%, of excess over $28,000 
. $12,420, plus 58% of excess over $32,000 
. $15,900, plus 62% of excess over $38,000 
.$19,620, plus 66% of excess over $44,000 
. $23,580, plus 68% of excess over $50,000 
. $30,380, plus 71% of excess over $60,000 
. $37,480, plus 74% of excess over $70,000 
. $44,880, plus 76%, of excess over $80,000 
, $52,480, plus 80%, of excess over $90,000 
$60,480, plus 83% of excess over $100,000 
$101,980, plus 87%, of excessover$150,000 
$145,480, plus 90% of excessover $200,000 
$235,480, plus 91%of excess over $300,000 



Credits Against Tax 

Credit For Foreign Taxes. — If you claim credits for such taxes, 
you should submit with your return Form 1116 which con- 
tains a schedule for the computation of the credit with 
appropriate instructions. This form may be obtained from 
your Internal Revenue Service office. 

Credit For Partially Tax-Exempt Interest. — If you itemize your 
deductions, you may deduct on line 11, page 3, a credit 
for partially tax-exempt interest. This credit is 3 percent 

14 



of the partially tax-exempt interest included in gross 
income. See instructions on page 7 for the type of 
securities for which a credit is allowed. The credit may 
not exceed the lesser of (a) 3 percent of the taxable income 
(line 5, page 3, Form 1040, or line 20, separate Schedule D 
(twice line 20 in the case of a joint return or the return of a 
surviving widow or widower), whichever is applicable) for 
the taxable year or (b) the amount of tax less the credit 
for taxes paid to foreign countries and possessions of the 
U. S. and the credit for dividends received. 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



113 



Credit For Dividends Received. — ^The new law provides a 
credit against tax for dividends received from domestic 
corporations after July 31, 1954. This credit is equal to 
4 percent of the dividends in excess of those which you 
may exclude from your gross income (see page 7). The 
credit may not exceed the lesser of: 

(a) the total income tax reduced by the foreign tax 
credit; or 

(b) 2 percent of the taxable income (4 percent for tax- 
able years ending after December 31, 1954). 

Schedule J has been provided to compute the dividend 
credit. Dividends from certain types of corporations do 
not qualify for either the credit for dividends received or 
for the exclusion previously explained. These corporations 
are the same corporations as those listed on page 7 
under the explanation of the dividend exclusion. The 
credit does not apply to a nonresident alien who is not 
engaged in trade or business in the United States and whose 
gross income from sources within the United States is not 
more than $15,400. 

Example: Assume a single individual with no dependents 
had gross income consisting of salary of S3, 300 and divi- 
dends of S3,050 received from domestic corporations after 
July 31, 1954 (S50 of the dividends are excluded from gross 
income). The credit is computed as follows: 

Adjusted gross income (83,000 + 83,300) 86, 300 

Standard deduction 630 

S5, 670 
One exemption 600 

Taxable income 85, 070 

Tax before credit $1, 118. 20 

Dividends received credit; 4 percent of 83,000 or 8120 but 

limited to 2 percent of 85,070 or 101. 40 

Net tax liability 81,016.80 

Credit For Retirement Income. — Under the new law you may 
qualify for a retirement income credit if you received earned 
income in excess of S600 in each of any 10 calendar years — 
not necessarily consecutive — before the beginning of your 
taxable year. If you qualify, you are entitled to a credit 
for retirement income you are now receiving. If your 
deceased husband (or wife) would qualify for this credit, if 
living, you may claim the credit even though you did not 
meet the earnings test. If a husband and wife both qualify 
and each has retirement income, each one is entitled to 
the credit. 

The credit is 20% of the retirement income (as defined 
below) with a maximum limit of S240 for each qualified 
individual. The credit may not exceed your tax (item 7, 
page 1) reduced by the dividends received credit in item 
8A, page 1. Schedule K of the return is provided to make 
this computation. 

Retirement income for the purpose of the credit means — 

(a) In the case of an individual who is 65 years of age or 
over before the close of his taxable year, income from pen- 
sions, annuities, interest, rents, and dividends, which were 
included in gross income in your return. (Gross income 
from rents for this purpose means gross receipts from rents 
without reduction for depreciation or any other expenses.) 

(b) In the case of an individtial who is not 65 years of 
age before the close of his taxable year, only that income 
received from pensions or annuities under a public retire- 
ment system (one established by the Federal Government, 
a State, county, city, etc., but not including one estab- 
lished by the United States for members of the Armed 
Forces). 



The amount of the retirement income used for the credit 
computation may not exceed SI, 200 reduced by: 

(a) any amount received and excluded from gross 
income as a pension or annuity under the Social Security Act 
and Railroad Retirement Acts and by tax-exempt pensions 
or annuities. This reduction does not include that part of 
a pension or annuity which is excluded from gross income 
because it represents, in effect, a return of capital or tax-free 
proceeds of a like nature. Moreover, this reduction does 
not include amounts excluded from gross income which are 
received as compensation for injuries or sickness or under 
accident or health plans; and 

(b) in the case of any individual who is not 75 before the 
close of the taxable year, any amount of earned income in 
excess of $900 received in the taxable year. 

Example: Assume that a qualified individual, who is 
married and over 65 but not 75, has the following items 
of income for 1954: 

Dividend income after exclusion 8700 

Pension under the Railroad Retirement Act (entirely ex- 
cludable from gross income) 500 

Disability payments under a workmen's compensation act 

(entirely excludable from gross income) 400 

Rental income (Gross) 600 

Earned at odd jobs 1 , 200 

The credit is computed as follows: 

Retirement income includes — 

Dividend income 8700 

Rental income 600 

Total retirement income 81, 300 

But the retirement income is limited to 81, 200 

Less: 

Railroad retirement pension 8500 

Earned income in excess of 8900(81,200-8900)... 300 8800 

Base for computation of credit 8400 

Retirement income credit 20 percent of 8400 880 

Credit For Withholding Tax. — Itemize the taxes withheld in 
item 2, page 1, and report the total amount as item 12A, 
page 1 . If you have lost any Withholding Statement, ask 
your employer for a copy. If you cannot furnish With- 
holding Statements for all taxes withheld from you, attach 
an explanation] 

Credit For F. I. C. A. Ta.x.—\i more than $72 of F. I. C. A. 
(Social Security) employee tax was withheld during 1954 
because you received wages from more than one employer, the excess 
should be claimed as a credit against income tax. Enter 
any excess of F. I. C. A. tax withheld over $72 in the 
"Income Tax Withheld" column of item 2, page 1, and 
write "F. I. C. A. tax" in the "Where Employed" column. 
If a joint return compute the credit separately. 

Credit For Estimated Tax Payments. — If you paid any esti- 
mated tax on a Declaration of Estimated Tax (Form 
1040-ES) for 1954, report the total of such payments as 
item 12B on page 1. If on your 1953 return you had an 
overpayment which you chose to apply on your 1954 tax 
include this in item 12B. 

Bjlance Of Tax Or Refund.— After figuring your tax either 
from the Tax Table or from the long-form computation, 
enter the amount as item 7, page 1. Enter as item 1() 
the amount of your self-employment tax shown on line 
35, separate Schedule C. Show as item 1 3 any balance you 
owe, or as item 14 the amount of any overpayment due you, 
after taking credit for the amounts entered as item 12. 

15 



114 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



TAX TABLE FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1954 
FOR PERSONS WITH INCOMES UNDER $5,000 NOT COMPUTING TAX ON PAGE 3 OF FORM 1040 

Read down the shaded columns below until you find the line covering the a-iiusted jross income you entered In Item 6, page 1, Form 1040. Then read across to the appropriate 
column headed hy the number corresponding to the number ot exemptions claimed in item IE, page 1. Enter the In you find there in Item 7, page 1. 



And Ihe number ol exemptions 
claimed in item IE, page 1, is— 



If total income in 
item 6. page I, is— 



If total income in 
item 6, page 1 , is- 



At least 



»0 
675 

700 

725 

750 

775 

800 

825 

850 

875 

900 

925 

950 

975 

1,000 

1,025 

1,050 

1,075 

1.100 

1,12^ 

1,150 

1,175 

1,200 

1,225 

1, 250 
1,275 
1,300 
1.325 
1,350 
1,375 
1,400 
1,425 
1,450 
1,475 
1,500 
1,525 
1,550 
1,575 
1.600 
1,625 
1,650 
1,675 
1,700 
1,725 
1,750 
1,775 
1,800 
1,825 
1,850 
1,875 
1,900 
1,925 
1.950 
1,975 
2,000 
2,025 
2.050 
2,075 
2,100 

2, 125 
2,150 
2,175 
2,200 
2,225 
2.250 
2,275 
2.300 



But less 
than 



$675 

700 

725 

750 

775 

800 

825 

850 

875 

900 

925 

950 

975 

1,000 

1,025 

1,050 

1,075 

1, 100 

1,125 

1,150 

1, 175 

1,200 

1,225 

1.250 

1,275 

1,300 

1,325 

1,350 

1,375 

1,400 

1,425 

1,450 

1,475 

1,500 

1,525 

1,550 

1,575 

1,600 

1,625 

1,650 

1,675 

1.700 

1,725 

1,750 

1,775 

1,800 

1,825 

1,850 

1,875 

1,900 

1,925 

1, 950 
1,975 
2,000 
2,025 
2,050 
2,075 
2,100 
2,125 

2, 150 
2,175 
2.200 
2,225 
2,250 
2,275 
2,300 
2,325 



SO 

4 

8 

13 

17 

22 

26 

31 

35 

40 

44 

49 

53 

58 

62 

67 

71 

76 

80 

85 

89 

94 

98 

103 

107 

112 

116 

121 

125 

130 

134 

139 

143 

148 

152 

157 

161 

166 

170 

175 

179 

184 

188 

193 

197 

202 

206 

211 

215 

220 

224 

229 

233 

238 

242 

247 

251 

256 

260 

265 

269 

274 

278 

283 

287 

292 

296 



4 or 
more 



$0 


SO 





























u 



































u 




























































































1 





5 





10 





14 





19 





23 





28 





32 





37 





41 





46 





50 





55 





59 





64 





68 





73 





77 





82 





86 





91 





95 





100 





104 





109 





113 





118 





122 


2 


127 


7 


131 


11 


136 


16 


140 


20 


145 


25 


149 


29 


154 


34 


158 


38 


163 


43 


167 


47 


172 


52 


176 


56 



SO 





































































At least 



$2, 325 

2, 350 
2,375 
2,400 
2,425 
2,450 
2,475 
2,500 
2,525 
2,550 
2,575 
2,600 
2.625 
2,650 
2,675 
2,700 
2,725 
2.750 
2,775 
2,800 
2,825 
2,850 
2,875 
2,900 
2,925 
2.950 
2,975 
3,000 
3,050 
3,100 

3, 150 
3,200 

3, 250 
3,300 
3,350 
3,400 
3,430 
3,500 
3,550 
3,600 
3,650 
3,700 
3,750 
3,800 
3,850 
3,900 
3,950 
4,000 
4,050 
4,100 

4, 150 
4,200 
4,250 
4,300 
4,350 
4,400 
4,450 
4,500 
4,550 
4,600 
4,650 
4,700 
4,750 
4, 800 
4,850 
4,900 
4,950 



But less 
than 



$2, 350 
2,375 
2,400 
2,425 
2.450 
2,475 
2.500 
2,525 
2.550 
2,575 
2,600 
2,625 
2,650 
2.675 
2,700 
2,725 
2,750 
2,775 
2,800 
2,825 
2,850 
2.875 
2,900 
2,925 
2,950 
2,975 
3,000 
3, 050 
3. 100 

3, 150 
3,200 
3.250 
3.300 
3,350 
3,400 
3,450 
3,500 
3,550 
3,600 
3,650 
3,700 
3,750 
3,800 
3,850 
3,900 
3,950 
4,000 
4,050 

4, 100 
4, 150 
4.200 

I 4. 250 

! 4, 300 

4,350 

4,400 

4,450 

i 4,500 

4. .550 

i 4,600 

4,650 

! 4.700 

: 4,750 

4.800 

4,850 

4,900 

4,950 

5,000 







A 


nd the number of 


exemptions daime 


d in item IE. page 


1. is- 






1 


2 


3 










And you are — 


And you are — 


And you are- 










Single 




Single 




• 


Single 




• 


cr a 


An un- 


Of a 


An un- 


A 


or a 


An un- 


A 


4 


5 


6 


7 


married 


married 


married 


married 


married 


married 


married 


married 


person 


head of 


person 


head of 


couple 


person 


head of 


couple 










filing 


a house- 


filing 


a house- 


filing 


hiing 


a house- 


filing 










sepa- 


hold 


sepa- 


hold 


jointly 


sepa- 


hold 


jointly 










rately 




rately 






rately 















$301 
305 
310 
314 
319 
323 
328 
332 
337 
341 
346 
3.50 
355 
359 
364 
308 
373 
377 
382 
3S6 
391 
395 
400 
405 
410 
415 
420 
427 
437 
447 
457 
467 
476 
486 
496 
506 
516 
526 
536 
546 
556 
566 
575 
585 
595 
605 
615 
625 
635 
645 
655 
665 
674 
684 
694 
704 
714 
724 
734 
744 
754 
764 
773 
783 
793 
803 
813 



$301 


$181 


.SlSl 


SlSl 


$61 


$61 


S61 


$0 


$0 


$0 


SO 


305 


185 


185 


185 


65 


65 


65 














310 


190 


190 


190 


70 


70 


70 














314 


194 


194 


194 


74 


74 


74 














319 


199 


199 


199 


79 


79 


79 














323 


203 


203 


203 


83 


83 


83 














328 


208 


20S 


208 


88 


88 


88 














332 


212 


212 


212 


92 


92 


92 














337 


217 


217 


217 


97 


97 


97 














341 


221 


221 


221 


101 


101 


101 














i 346 


226 


226 


226 


106 


106 


106 














350 


230 


230 


230 


110 


110 


110 














355 


235 


235 


235 


115 


115 


115 














' 359 


239 


239 


239 


119 


119 


119 














i 364 


244 


244 


244 


124 


124 


124 


4 











; 368 


248 


248 


248 


128 


128 


128 


8 











i 373 


253 


253 


253 


133 


133 


133 


13 











; 377 


257 


257 


257 


137 


137 


137 


17 











i 382 


262 


262 


262 


142 


142 


142 


22 











; 386 


266 


266 


266 


146 


146 


146 


26 











i 391 


271 


271 


271 


151 


151 


151 


31 











i 395 


275 


275 


275 


155 


155 


155 


35 











i 400 


280 


280 


280 


160 


160 


160 


40 











: 404 


284 


284 


284 


164 


164 


164 


44 











: 409 


289 


289 


289 


169 


169 


169 


49 











i 414 


293 


293 


293 


173 


173 


173 


53 











1 419 


298 


298 


298 


178 


178 


178 


58 











• 426 


305 


305 


305 


185 


185 


185 


65 











! 435 


314 


314 


314 


194 


194 


194 


74 











445 


323 


323 


323 


203 


203 


203 


83 











i 454 


332 


332 


332 


212 


212 


212 


92 











i 464 


341 


341 


341 


221 


221 


221 


101 











• 473 


350 


350 


3.50 


230 


230 


230 


110 











i 482 


359 


359 


359 


239 


239 


239 


119 











i 492 


368 


368 


368 


248 


248 


248 


128 


8 








i 501 


377 


377 


377 


257 


257 


257 


137 


17 








; 511 


386 


386 


386 


266 


266 


266 


146 


26 








i 520 


395 


395 


395 


275 


275 


275 


155 


35 








i 530 


404 


404 


404 


284 


284 


284 


164 


44 








i 539 


414 


413 


413 


293 


293 


293 


173 


53 








i 549 


424 


423 


422 


302 


302 


302 


182 


62 








1 558 


434 


432 


431 


311 


311 


311 


191 


71 








i 567 


443 


441 


440 


320 


320 


320 


200 


80 








: 577 


453 


451 


449 


329 


,329 


329 


209 


89 








i 586 


463 


460 


458 


338 


338 


338 


218 


98 








i 596 


473 


470 


467 


347 


347 


347 


227 


107 








i 605 


483 


479 


476 


356 


356 


356 


236 


116 








i 615 


493 


489 


485 


365 


365 


365 


245 


125 


3 





: 624 


503 


498 


494 


374 


374 


374 


2.54 


134 


14 





i 634 


513 


508 


503 


383 


3S3 


383 


263 


143 


23 





! 643 


523 


517 


512 


392 


392 


■ 392 


272 


152 


32 





i 653 


533 


527 


521 


401 


401 


i 401 


281 


161 


41 





• 662 


542 


536 


530 


410 


410 


i 410 


290 


170 


50 





! 671 


552 


545 


539 


420 


■ 419 


419 


299 


179 


59 





i 681 


562 


555 


548 


430 


429 


428 


308 


188 


68 





; 690 


572 


564 


557 


440 


438 


437 


317 


197 


77 





; 700 


582 


574 


566 


450 


448 


' 446 


326 


206 


86 





• 709 


592 


583 


575 


460 


457 


■ 455 


335 


215 


95 





i 719 


602 


593 


584 


470 


467 


■ 464 


344 


224 


104 





1 728 


612 


602 


593 


480 


476 


. 473 


353 


233 


113 





1 738 


622 


612 


602 


490 


486 


. 482 


362 


242 


122 


2 


• 747 


632 


621 


611 


500 


495 


; 491 


371 


251 


131 


11 


; 756 


641 


630 


620 


509 


504 


■ 500 


380 


260 


140 


20 


■ 766 


651 


640 


629 


519 


514 


509 


389 


269 


149 


29 


i 775 


661 


649 


638 


529 


523 


. 518 


398 


278 


158 


3S 


i 785 


671 


659 


647 


539 


533 


. 527 


407 


287 


167 


47 


i 794 


681 


668 


656 


549 


542 


• 536 


416 


296 


176 


56 



it This column raaj also be used bj a surviving widow or widower who meela certain qualiOcaliooa which are explained in the inatructione. 

g. S COVCRNMCNT PtINTINC OtflCt lj&'-70993-l 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



115 



SCHEDULE C 



FORM 

1040 

U. S. Treasury Department 
Internal Revenue Service 



PROFIT (OR LOSS) FROM BUSINESS OR PROFESSION 

(For Computation of Self-Employment Tax, see Page 3) 

PARTNERSHIPS AND JOINT VENTURES SHOULD FILE ON FORM 1065 



1954 



For Calendar Year 1954 or other taxable year beginning 



, 1954, and ending 



195 



Owner's Name and Address (from Form 1040) 



Item (see instructions — page 2) 
A. Principal business activity 



(Retail trade, wholesale trade, lawyer, etc.) 



(Principal product or service) 



B. Business name - - 

C. Number of places of business - - 

D. Did you pay social security taxes for any employees for any quarter of 1954? LD Yes Ll No. 

E. Enter your employer identification number, if any -. - 

P. Business address: ... 



G. How many months in the year did 
you own this business? 

Did you own this business on Decem- 
ber 31, 1954? n Yes D No. 
Was this a seasonal business which 
was closed for more than two 
months during the year? □ Yes 
DNo. 



(Street and number or rural route) 



(City, town, post office) 



(County) 



(State) 



Line (see instructions — page 2) 

1. Total receipts $ , less allowances, rebates, and returns $.. 

2, 
3. 



Inventory at beginning of year 

Merchandise purchased $ less any items vrithdrawn 

from business for personal use $ 

Cost of labor (do not include salary paid to yourself) 

Material and supplies 



4. 
5, 

6. Other costs (explain in Schedule C-2) 

7. (Dost of goods manufactured or purchased (total of lines 3, 4, 5, and 6) 

8. Total of line 2 plus line 7 

9. Enter inventory at end of year 

10. Cost of goods sold (line 8 less line 9) 

11. Gross profit (line 1 less line 10) 

OTHER BUSINESS DEDUCTIONS 

12. Salaries and wages not included in line 4 (except any paid to yourself) 

13. Rent on business property 

14. Interest on business indebtedness 

15. Taxes on business and business property 

16. Losses of business property (attach statement) 

17. Bad debts arising from sales or services 

18. Depreciation and obsolescence (explain in Schedule C-1) 

19. Repairs (explain in Schedule C-2) 

20. Depletion of mines, oil and gas wells, timber, etc. (attach schedule) 

21- Amortization of emergency and grain storage facilities (attach statement) 

22. Other business expenses (explain in Schedule C-2) 

23. Total of hnes 12 to 22 

24. Enter net profit (or loss) (line 1 1 less line 23). Also enter on line 25, page 3 of this schedule, and on line 1, 

Schedule C Summary, Form 1 040 



Schedule C-1 


. EXPLANATION OF DEDUCTION FOR DEPRECIATION CLAIMED ON LINE 18 




1 . Kind of property (if buildings, state material of 
whicti constructed). Exclude land and other 
nondepreciable property 


2. Date 

acquired 


3. Cost or 
other basis 


4. Depreciation al- 
lowed (or allowable) 
in prior years 


5. Method 


6. Rate(%) 
or life (years) 


7. Depreciation 
for this year 






$ 


$. __... 






$ 





















































SchedtUe C-2. EXPLANATION OF LINES 6, 19, AND 22 




Line No. 


Explanation 


Amount 


Line No. 


Explanation 


Amount 






$ 






$ __ 





























































16—70995-1 



116 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



INSTRUCTIONS 



Page 2 



If you owned a business, or practiced a profession, you should 
fill in separate Schedule C on other side and enter the net profit 
(or loss) on line 1, Schedule C Summary, page 2, Form 1040. 

Separate Schedule C should include income from (1) sale of 
merchandise, or products of manufacturing, mining, and construc- 
tion; (2) business service; and (3) professional service. In general, 
you should report any income in the earning of which you have 
incurred expenses for material, labor, supplies, and the like. A 
farmer keeping his books of account on the accrual method may 
include the income in such schedule from the sale of products of 
agriculture in lieu of including such income in Form 1040F. 

Item A — Business Activity. — State the general classification of 
business activity, as well as the principal product or service. For 
example, "Wholesale food," "Retail men's apparel," "Manufac- 
ture of upholstered wooden household furniture," "Transportation 
by truck,'' "Broker, real estate," "Contractor — carpenter work,|^ 
"Physician," etc. Do not use such terms as "partnership," "owner," 
"student," etc. The "principal business activity" is the one which 
accounts for the largest percentage of your total receipts. All 
trades and businesses except those specitically excluded are sub- 
ject to self-employment tax. 

Item E — Employer Identification Number. — This is the 
number given on Form 941, Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax 
Return, which you file as an employer. 

Item F — Business Address. — Do not use home address as 
business address unless business is actually conducted from home. 

Line 1 — Total Receipts. — You should include all income 
derived from your trade or business. Enter in the space provided 
such items as returned sales, rebates, and allowances from the sale 
price or service charge. 

If you have dividend income from stocks held by you in the 
ordinary course of carrying on your trade or business, such dividends 
must be considered together with your dividends from stocks regu- 
larly held for investment purposes in computing your dividend 
exclusion and credit. 

Installment Sales. — It you use the installment method of report- 
ing income from sales, you should attach to your return a schedule 
showing separately for the years 1951, 1952, 1953, and 1954 the 
following: (a) Gross sales; (b) cost of goods sold; (c) gross profits; 
(d) percentage of profits to gross sales; (e) amounts collected; and 
(f) gross profits on amount collected. 

COST or COODS SOLD 

Lines 2-10. — If you are engaged in a trade or a business in 
which the production, purchase, or sale of merchandise produces 
income, you should take inventories of merchandise and materials 
on hand at the beginning and end o! the taxable year in order to 
reflect the gross profits correctly. The usual methods of valuing 
inventory are (a) cost and (b) cost or market whichever is lower. 
The method properly adopted for the first year in which inventory 
is taken must be continued unless permission to change is secured 
from the Commissioner. Application for permission to change the 
method of valuing inventories must be made in writing and filed 
with the Commissioner within 90 days after the beginning of the 
taxable year in v/hich it is desired to effect a change. You should 
enter the letters "C" or "C or M" immediately before the amount 
column if inventories are valued either at cost, or at cost or market 
whichever is lower. 

Other methods for valuing inventories of material or merchandise 
are provided for dealers in securities, for farmers, for miners, for 
manufachjrers who produce more than one product from a single 
process, and for retail merchants using the "retail method." 

A special method based on cost, LIFO, is allowable only if you 
file an application on Form 970 with your return for the first year 
used. The reguirements for adopting and using the LIFO method 
are set forth on Form 970. Thereafter, you should attach a separate 
schedule showing; (a) a summary of all inventories; (b) with respect 
to inventories computed under the LIFO method, the computation of 
quantities and cost by acquisition levels. 

OTHER BUSINESS DEDUCTIONS 

Line 12 — Salaries and Wages. — You should enter all salaries 
and wages not included as "Cost of Labor" in "Cost of Goods 
Sold." Do not deduct any salary or wages for your own services 
or services of others not performed in connection with your business. 

Line 13 — Rent on Business Property. — Rents paid or accrued 
on business property in which you have no equity are deductible. 
Do not include rent for a building, or any part, which you occupy 
solely for residential purposes. 

Line 14 — Interest on Business Indebtedness. — Interest on 
business indebtedness to others is deductible. Do not include 
interest to yourself on capital invested in or advanced to the business. 



Line 15 — Taxes on Business and Business Property. — Include 
taxes paid or accrued on business property or incurred for carrying 
on your business. Federal import duties and Federal excise and 
stamp taxes are deductible if paid or incurred in carrying on a 
trade or business. Do not include taxes assessed against local 
benefits of a kind tending to increase the value of the property 
assessed, as for paving, sewers, front foot benefits, etc. 

Line 16 — Losses of Business Property. — You may deduct losses 
of business property by fire, storm, or other casualty, or theft, not 
compensated by insurance or otherwise and not made good by 
repairs claimed as a deduction. Attach a statement showing a 
description of the property, date acquired, cost, subsequent improve- 
ments, depreciation allowable since acquisition, insurance, 
salvage value, and deductible loss. 

Line 17 — Bad Debts Arising From Sales or Services. — Include 
debts, or portions thereof, arising from sales or professional services 
that have been included in income, which have been definitely 
ascertained to be worthless, or such reasonable amount as has been 
added to a reserve for bad debts within the taxable year. A debt 
previously deducted as bad which reduced your tax in a prior year, 
if subsequently collected, must be returned as income for the year 
in which collected. 

Line 18 — Depreciation and Obsolescence. — You may deduct 
a reasonable allowance for exhaustion, wear and tear, and 
obsolescence of property used in the trade or business. For 
additional information regarding depreciation, especially on new 
property acquired or constructed after December 31, 1953, see 
depreciation section in the instructions for Form 1040. 

if a deduction is claimed on account of depreciation, you should 
fill in Schedule C-1. In case obsolescence is included, state sepa- 
rately amount claimed and basis upon which it is computed. The 
value or cost of land must not be included in this schedule, and 
where land and buildings were purchased for a lump sum, the cost 
of the building subject to depreciation must be established. The 
adjusted property accounts and the accumulated depreciation 
shown in the schedule should be reconciled with those accounts 
as reflected on your books. 

Line 19 — Repairs. — You may deduct the cost of incidental 
repairs, including labor, supplies, and other items, which do not 
add to the value or appreciably prolong the life of the property. 
Expenditures for new buildings, machinery, equipment, or for 
permanent improvements or betterments which increase the value 
of the property are chargeable to capital accounts. Expenditures 
for restoring' or replacing property are not deductible, since such 
expenditures are chargeable to capital accounts or to depreciation 
reserve depending on how depreciation is charged on your books. 

Line 20 — Depletion of Mines, Oil and Gas Wells, Timber, 
Etc. — If a deduction is claimed on account of depletion, you should 
procure from your District Director Form M (mines and other natural 
deposits). Form O (oil and gas), or Form T (timber), fill in and file 
with return. If complete valuation data have been filed with 
questionnaire in previous years, then file with your return infor- 
mation necessary to bring depletion schedule up to date, setting 
forth, in full, statement of all transactions bearing on deductions 
from or additions to value of physical assets during the taxable 
year with explanation of how depletion deduction for the taxable 
year has been determined. (See sections 615 and 616 of the In- 
ternal Revenue Code of 1954 lor election to capitalize or deduct 
expenditures for exploration and development of mineral properties.) 

Line 21 — Amortization. — If you elect the deduction with respect 
to the amortization of the adjusted basis of (a) any emergency 
facility with respect to which the Government has issued a certificate 
of necessity, or (b) a grain storage facility, a statement of the perti- 
nent facts should be filed with your election. (See sections 168 
and 169 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954.) 

For the election to amortize research or experimental expenditures 
not subject to depreciation or depletion, see section 174 of the Code. 

Line 22 — Other Business Deductions.— You should include all 
ordinary and necessary business expenses for which no space is 
provided in the schedule. Any deduction claimed should be 
explained in Schedule C-2. Do not include cost of business equip- 
ment or furniture, expenditures for replacements, or lor permanent 
improvements to property, or personal living and family expenses. 

Soil and Water Conservation Expenditures. — Taxpayers 
engaged in the busmess of farming may under certain conditions 
expense amounts paid for soil and water conservation. For more 
detailed instructions, see the instructions for Form 1040. 

Net Operating Loss Deduction. — Any net operating loss 
deduction should be entered in Schedule C Summary, Form 1040, 
instead of in this schedule. 

Accrual-Method Taxpayers Only. — If you have (a) receipts 
which constitute prepaid income, or (b) reserves for estimated ex- 
penses, see the instructions for Form 1040. i6— 70995-1 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



117 



Page 3 

• IMPORTANT — If you have more than one business, □ separate page 1 must be completed for each business. However, only one page 
3 should be completed and filed showing the aggregate net profit from such businesses. 

(See Iiuixuctions — Page 4) 
COMPUTATION OF SELF-EMPLOYMENT TAX 
(For old-oge and survivors in»orance) 

NAME or SELF-EMPLOYED PERSON (a separate schedule must be filed for each eeli-employed person) 



STATE BUSINESS ACTIVITIES. IF ANY. SUBJECT TO SELF-EMPLOYMENT TAX (for eiample: Restaurant, Building Contractor) 



Line (See instructions — Page 4) 



2S. Net profit (or loss) shown on line 24, page 1 (Enter aggregate amount if more than 
one business) 



26. Losses of business property shown on line 16, page 1 . 

27. Total of lines 25 and 26 



28. Less: Net income (or loss) from excluded services or sources included in line 27. 
Specify excluded services or sources 



29. Net earnings from self-employment (line 27 less line 28) 

30. Net earnings (or loss) from self-employment from partnerships, joint ventures, etc. (from column 11, Schedule 
K, Form 1065) 



31. Total net earnings (or loss) from self-employment (line 29 plus line 30) 

(If total of net earnings is under $400, do not make any entries below) 



32. Maximum amount subject to self-employment tax 

33. Less: Wages paid to you during the taxable year which were subject to withholding for 
old-age and survivors insurance. (If such wages exceed $3,600, enter $3,600) 



34. Maximum amount subject to self -employment tax after adjustment for wages. 

35. Self -employment income subject to tax — Line 31 or 34, whichever is smaller . 



$ 3,600 



00 



36. Self-employment tax — 3 percent of amount on line 35. Enter here and as item 10, page 1, Form 1040 



IMPORTANT— FILL IN ITEMS BELOW COMPLETELY BUT DO NOT DETACH 



SCHEDULE C-o (Fonn 1040) 
U. S. Treasury Department 
Internal Revenue Service 



U. S. REPORT OF SELF-EMPLOYMENT INCOME 

(For Federal Old-Age and Survivors Iixsuronce) 



1954 



I CHECK n Calendar Year 1954 

°^^ D Other Taxable Year Beginning . 



1954, and Ending 195- 



2. 



state Business Activities Subject To Sell-Employment Tax 



Business Address (Street and Number, City or Town, Postal Zone Number, State) 



4. PRINT BELOW NAME AND ADDRESS OF SELF-EMPLOYED PERSON 



Name as shown on Social Security Account Number Card 



HOME ADDRESS (Street and Number, or Rural Route) 



(City or Town, Postal Zone Number, State) 



5 ENTER HERE THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACCOUNT NUMBER 
OF THE PERSON NAMED 
IN LINE 4 



000 


00 


0000 



6. Enter Total Earnings 
From Self Employment 

Shown on Line 31 above $-. 

7. Enter Wages Shown on 

Line 33 above $. 



8. Enter Self-Employment 

Income Shovim on Line 35 above. . .$-. 



16—70996-1 



118 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



PURPOSE OF THIS FORM 



Page 4 



Schedule C (Form 1040) .—Schedule C serves two purposes. 
First, it provides for the determination of net profit (or loss) from 
business or profession to be used in computing income tax. Second, 
it provides for the computation of the self-employment tax in accord- 
ance with Chapter 2 of Subtitle A of the Internal Revenue Code 
of 1954. 



Schedule C-a (Forra 1040). — ^The lower portion of page 3, 
Schedule C, which is designated as Schedule C-a (Form 1040), is 
designed to provide the Social Security Administration with the 
information on self-employment income necessary for old-age and 
survivors insurance purposes. 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1954 



SELF-EMPLOYMENT TAX 

In general, every individual deriving income during the taxable 
year from a trade or business carried on by him or from a partner- 
ship of which he is a member is subject to the self-employment tax, 
the computation of which is made on lines 25 through 36. 

"Net earnings from self -employment" (line 31) is the gross income 
derived by an individual from any trade or business carried on 
by him, less the allowable deductions attributable to such trade or 
business, plus his share of self employment net earnings (or loss) 
from a partnership of which he is a member. 

No Deductions for Personal Exemptions. — The deductions for 
personal exemptions are not allowable in determining the net 
earnings from self-employment. 

EXCLUSIONS 

In determining the amount of net earnings from self-employment 
report on line 28 income from the following sources or deductions 
attributable thereto: 

1 . Certain professions. — Income from the performance of service 
OS a physician, lawyer, dentist, osteopath, veterinarian, chiro- 
practor, naturopath, optometrist, Christian Science practitioner, 
architect, certified public accountant, accountant registered or 
licensed as an accountant under Slate or municipal law, full-time 
practicing public accountant, funeral director, or professional en- 
gineer; or income from the performance of such service by a 
partnership; 

2. Religious services. — Income *rom the performance of service 
by a duly ordained, commissioned, or licensed minister of a church 
in the exercise of his ministry or by a member of a religious order 
in the exercise of duties required by such order; 

3. Farming. — Income from farming or from any other business 
in which, if the business were carried on exclusively by employees, 
the major portion of the services would constitute agricultural labor; 

4. Employees and public officials. — Income from the perform- 
ance of service as: 

(a) a public official, including a notary public; 

(b) an employee or employee representative under the railroad 
retirement system; or 

(c) an employee. "Employee" includes among others: 

(1) an agent-driver or commission driver engaged in 
distributing meat, vegetable, fruit, and bakery prod- 
ucts, beverages (other than milk), or laundry or dry- 
cleaning services; 

(2) a full-time life insurance salesman; 

(3) a home worker performing work subject to licensing 
requirements under State law; and 

(4) traveling or city salesmen generally, engaged upon 
a full-time basis for their principals (except for sideline 
sales activities on behalf of another person). 

Note. — The income of an employee over the age of 18 from 
the sale of newspapers or magazines to an ultimate consumer 
is subject to the self-employment tax if the income consists of 
retained profits from such sales. 

5. Real estate rentals. — Rentals from real estate, except rentals 
received in the course of a trade or business as a real estate dealer. 
Payments for the use or occupancy of rooms or other space where 
services are also rendered to the occupant, such as rooms in hotels, 
boarding houses, apartment houses furnishing hotel services, tourist 
camps, tourist homes, or space in parking lots, warehouses, or 
storage garages do not constitute rentals from real estate and there- 
fore are included in determining net earnings from self-employment; 

6. Interest and dividends. — Dividends on shares of stock, and 
interest on bonds, debentures, notes, certificates, or other evidences 
of indebtedness, issued with interest coupons or in registered form 
by a corporation, or by a government or political subdivision thereof, 
unless received in the course of a trade or business as a dealer in 
stocks or securities; and 



7. Property gains and losses. — Gain or loss (A) from the sale or 
exchange of a capital asset, (B) to which sections 631 and 1 23 1 
are applicable, or (C) from the sale, exchange, involuntary con- 
version, or other disposition of property if such property is neither 
(1) stock in trade or other property of a kind which would properly 
be includible in inventory it on hand at the close of the taxable 
year, nor (2) property held primarily lor sale to customers in the 
ordinary course of the trade or business. 

Net operating losses. — In determining the net earnings from 
self-employment, no deduction for net operating losses of other years 
shall be allowed. 

MORE THAN ONE TRADE OR BUSINESS 

If an individual is engaged in more than one trade or business, 
his net earnings from self-employment are the total of his net earnings 
from self-employment of each trade or business carried on by him. 
Thus, the loss sustained in one trade or business will operate to 
reduce the income derived from another trade or business. 

JOINT RETURNS 

Where husband and wife file a joint return, page 3 of Schedule C 
(Forra 1040) should show the name of the one with self -employment 
income. Where husband and wife each have self-employment 
income, a separate Schedule C must be attached for each. In such 
cases the total of amounts shown on line 24 of each separate schedule 
should be entered on line 1, Schedule C Summary, page 2, Form 
1040, and the aggregate self -employment tax (line 36) should be 
entered as item 10, page 1, Form 1040. 

COMMUNITY INCOME 

For the purpose of computing net earnings from self-employment, 
if any of the income from a trade or business is community income, 
all the income from such trade or business is considered the income 
of the husband unless the wife exercises substantially all the man- 
agement and control of the trade or business, in which case all of 
such income is considered the income of the wife. 

If separate returns are filed by the husband and wife, a complete 
Schedule C should be attached to the return of the one with self- 
employment income. Community income included on such a 
schedule must, however, be allocated between the two returns (on 
line 1, Schedule C Summary, page 2, Form 1040) on the basis of the 
community property laws. 

In computing his aggregate net earnings from self-employment, 
a partner should include his entire share of such earnings from a 
partnership. No part of that share may be attributed to the part- 
ner's wife (or husband) even though the income may, under State 
law, be community income. 

FISCAL YEARS 

For fiscal years ending after December 31, 1954, the amounts of 
$3,600 appearing on lines 32 and 33, page 3, in the computation 
of the self -employment tax should be changed to $4,200. 

If you are a Christian Science practitioner, architect, accountant, 
funeral director, engineer, minister, member of a religious order, or 
a farmer, reporting on a fiscal year basis, consult your nearest 
Internal Revenue Service oHice for the recent changes in the law 
which affect your liability for self-employment tax. 

SCHEDULE C-a (Form 1040) 

To assure proper credit to your account, be sure to enter your 
name and social security account number on Schedule C-a (Form 
1040) exactly as they are shown on your social security card. If 
you do not have a social security account number, you must get 
one. These account numbers are obtainable from any of the 
approximately 500 Social Security Administration offices through- 
out the country. The telephone directory or your local post office 
will give you the address. Do not delay filing your return beyond 
the due date even though you have not obtained your social security 
account number. 

Regardless of whether a joint or separate returns on Form 1040 
are filed by husband and wife. Schedule C-a (Form 1040) should 
show only the name of the one with the self-employment income. 
If both had net earnings from self -employment, a separate Schedule 
C-a must be filed by each. 



U. S. COVCBNMENT PRINTrnCi OFFICE 16 — 70995-1 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



119 



SCHEDULE D 

For use vrith 

Forms 1040. 1041, 

ar>d 1065 



U. S. Treasury Department — Internal Revenue Service 

GAINS AND LOSSES FROM SALES OR EXCHANGES OF PROPERTY 

USE WITH INDIVIDUAL, FIDUCIARY, OR PARTNERSHIP RETURNS 



1954 



For Calendar Year 1954, or other taxable year beginning 



1954, and ending 



195 



Name and Address 



Check type of return filed: 

□ Form I I Form I I Form 
1040 I I 1041 1 I 1065 





(I) 


PROPERTY OTHER THAN CAPITAL ASSETS 






a. Kind of proparly (if necessary, altacli statement 
of descriptive details not stiown below) 


b. Date 
acquired 

(mo., 
day, yr.) 


c. Date 
sold (mo., 
day. yr.) 


d. Gross sales price 
(contract price) 


e. Depreciation 

allowed (or 

allowable) since 

acquisition or 

March 1, 1913 

(attacti scfiedule) 


f. Cost or other 
basis and cost of 
subsequent im- 
provements (if not 
purchased, attach 
explanation) 


g. Expense of sale 


h. Gain or loss (column d 
plus column e less sum 
of columns f and g) 


I __. 






$..._ ___. 


$ 


$ 


$ _... 


$ 






























2. Net gain (or loss). Enter here and on line 1, Schedule D, Form 1040, or as item 8 (a), page 1, Form 1041, or as 
item 1 1, page 1, Form 1065 


$ 



(II) CAPITAL ASSETS 



Short-Term Capital Gains and Losses — Assets Held Not More Than 6 Months 



3. 



4. Enter your shore of net short-term gain (or loss) from partnerships and fiduciaries 

5. Enter unused capital loss carryover from 5 preceding taxable years (Attach statement) 

6. Net short-term gain (or loss) from lines 3, 4, and 5. Enter here and in Schedule D, Form 1041, or as item 26, page 
1, Form 1065 



Long-Term Capital Gains and Losses — ^Assets Held More Than 6 Months 



7. 



$-. 



8. Enter the full amount of your share of net long-term gain (or loss) from partnerships and fiduciaries 

9. Net long-term gain (or loss) from lines 7 and 8. Enter here and in Schedule D, Form 1041, or as item 27, page 
1, Form 1065 



LINES 10 THROUGH 25 NOT APPLICABLE TO FIDUCIARIES AND PARTNERSHIPS 



Gain or Loss To Be Token Into Account 


a. Gain 


b. Loss 


10- Enter net short-term gain (or loss) from line 6 . . . . 




S 






<; 


11a hnter net lona-term aain (or loss) irom line y 


.« 




Use lines 12 through 15 only if gains exceed losses in lines 10 and 11. 

12. Enter short-term gain (hne 10, col. a) reduced by any long-term loss (hne 1 1, col. b) 

13. Enter long-term gain (line 1 1, col. o) reduced by any short-term loss (hne 10, col. b) 

14. Enter 50 nercent of line 13 




$ 




$ 


IS. Enter here and on line 2, Schedule D, Form 1040, the sum of lines 12 and 14 


$ 




Use lines 16 and 17 only if losses exceed gains in lines 10 and 11. 


iR 


17- Enter here and on line 2, Schedule D, Form 1040, the smallest of the following: (a) the amount on line 16; (b) tax- 
able income computed without regard to capital gains and losses and the deduction for exemptions; or (c) $1,000. . 


$ 



COMPUTATION OF ALTERNATIVE TAX FOR INDIVIDUALS (Form 1040) 
(See instructions on other side as to when the alternative tax applies) 



18. Enter from page 3, Form 1040, the income from line 5 if separate return or line 7 (a) if joint return 

19. Enter amount from line 14, column a, above, if separate return, or half of such amount if joint return 

20. Balance (line 18 less line 19) 

21. Enter tax on amount on line 20 (Use applicable Tax Rate Schedule in Form 1040 Instructions) 

22. If joint return, multiply amount on line 21 by two 

23. Enter 50 percent of line 19 

24. If joint return, multiply amount on line 23 by two 

25. Alternative tax Oine 21 plus line 23 if separate return; line 22 plus hne 24 if joint return). If smaller than amount 
on line 6 or line 7(c), page 3, Form 1040, enter this alternative tax on line 8, page 3. Form 1040. 



NOTE. — In lines 18 to 25 the treatment in the case of a joint return is also applicable to a return of a surviving widow or widower. 



120 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



INSTRUCTIONS— (References cue 

GAINS AND LOSSES FROM SALES OR EXCHANGES OF 
PROPERTY. — Report details in schedule on other side. 

"Capital assets" defined. — The term "capital assets" means 
property held by the taxpayer (whether or not connected with his 
trade or business) but does NOT include — 

(a) stock in trade or other property of a kind properly includible 
in his inventory if on hand at the close of the taxable year; 

(b) property held by the taxpayer primarily for sale to cus- 
tomers in the ordinary course of his trade or business; 

(c) property used in the trade or business of a character which 
is subject to the allowance for depreciation provided in 
section 167; 

(d) real property used in the trade or business of the taxpayer; 

(e) certain government obligations issued on or after March 1, 
1941, at a discount, payable without interest and maturing 
at a fixed date not exceeding one year from date of issue; 

(f) certain copyrights, literary, musical, or artistic composi- 
tions, etc.; or 

(g) accounts and notes receivable acquired in the ordinary 
course of trade or business for services rendered or from 
the sale of property referred to in (a) or (b) above. 

In connection with (b) above, the law allows dealers in securities 
capital gain or loss treatment with respect to certain securities 
which were clearly identified as being held for investment. Also, 
in the case of a taxpayer other than a corporation, certain real 
property subdivided for sale may be treated as capital assets. 
Sections 1236 and 1237. 

If the total distribution to which an employee is entitled under 
an employees' pension, bonus, or profit-sharing trust plan exempt 
from tax under section 501(a), is received by the employee in one 
taxable year, on account of the employee's separation from the serv- 
ice, the aggregate amount of such distribution, to the extent it 
exceeds the amounts contributed by the employee, shall be treated 
as a long-term capital gain. See section 402. 

A capital gain dividend, as defined in section 852 (relating to 
tax on regulated investment companies), shall be treated by the 
shareholder as a long-term capital gain. 

Gain on sale of depreciable property between husband and wife 
or between a shareholder and a "controlled corporation" shall be 
treated as ordinary gain. Section 1239. 

A transfer (other than by gift, inheritance, or devise) by an 
individual "holder" of all substantial rights evidenced by a patent, 
or an undivided interest therein, shall be considered the sale or 
exchange of a capital asset held for more than 6 months. 

Gains and losses from transactions described in section 1231 
(see below) shall be treated as gains and losses from the sale or 
exchange of capital assets held for more than 6 months if the total 
of these gains exceeds the total of these losses. If the total of these 
gains does not exceed the total of these losses, such gains and losses 
shall not be treated as gains and losses from the sale or exchange 
of capital assets. Thus, in the event of a net gain, all these trans- 
actions should be entered in the "long-term capital gains and losses" 
portion of Schedule D. In the event of a net loss, all these trans- 
actions should be entered in the "property other than capital assets" 
portion of Schedule D, or in other applicable schedules on Forms 
1040, 1041, or 1065. 

Section 1231 deals vrith gains and losses arising from — 

(a) sale, exchange, or involuntary conversion, of land (includ- 
ing in certain cases unharvested crops sold with the land) 
and depreciable property if they are used in the trade or 
business and held for more than 6 months, 

(b) sale, exchange, or involuntary conversion of livestock held 
for draft, breeding, or dairy purposes (but not including 
poultry) and held for 1 year or more, 

(c) the cutting of timber or the disposal of timber or coal to 
which section 631 applies, and 

(d) the involuntary conversion of capital assets held more than 
6 months. 

See sections 1231 and 631 for specific conditions applicable. 

Description of property listed. — State following facts: (a) For 
real estate (including owner-occupied residences), location and 
description of land and improvements; (b) for bonds or other evi- 
dences of indebtedness, name of issuing corporation, particular 
issue, denomination, and amount; and (c) for stocks, name of corpo - 
ration, class of stock, number of shares, and capital changes 
affecting basis (including nontaxable distributions). 

Basis. — In determining gain or loss in case of property acquired 
after February 28, 1913, use cost, except as specially provided. 
The basis of property acquired by gift after December 31, 1920, is 
the cost or other basis to the donor in the event of gain, but, in the 
event of loss, it is the lower of either such donor's basis or the fair 
market value on date of gift. Generally the basis of property 
acquired by inheritance is the fair market value at time of acqui- 
sition which usually is the date of death. For special cases involving 
property acquired from a decedent, see section 1014. In the case of 
sales and exchanges of automobiles and other property not used in 



to the Internal Revenue Code of 1954) 

your trade or business, or not used for the production of income, 
the basis for determining gain is the original cost plus the cost of 
permanent improvements thereto. No losses are recognized for in- 
come tax purposes on the sale and exchange of such properties. 
In determining GAIN in case of property acquired before March 1, 
1913, use the cost or the fair market value as of March 1, 1913, 
as adjusted, whichever is greater, but in determining LOSS use 
cost as adjusted. 

Sale of a personal residence. — See Form 1040 instructions for 
special rules applicable to sale or exchange of your residence. 

Losses on securities becoming worthless. — If (a) shares of 
stock become worthless during the year or (b) corporate securities 
with interest coupons or in registered form become worthless during 
the year, and are capital assets, the loss therefrom shall bo con- 
sidered as from the sale or exchange of capital assets as of the last 
day of such taxable year. 

Nonbusiness debts. — If a debt, such as a personal loan, becomes 
totally worthless within the taxable year, the loss resulting therefrom 
shall be considered a loss from the sale or exchange, during the 
taxable year, of a capital asset held for not more than 6 months. 
Enter such loss in column (h) and describe in column (a) in the 
schedule of short-term capital gains and losses on other side. This 
does not apply to (a) a debt evidenced by a corporate security with 
interest coupons or in registered form and (b) a debt acquired in 
your trade or business. 

Classification of capital gains and losses. — The phrase 
"short-term" applies to gains and losses from the sale or exchange of 
capital assets held for 6 months or less; the phrase "long-term" 
applies to capital assets held for more than 6 months. 

Treatment of capital gains and losses. — Short-term capital 
gains and losses will be merged to obtain the net short-term 
capital gain or loss. Long-term capital gains and losses (taken into 
account at 100 percent) will be merged to obtain the net long- 
term capital gain or loss. If the net short-term capital gain exceeds 
the net long-term capital loss, 100 percent of such excess shall be 
included in income. If the net long-term capital gain exceeds the 
net short-term capital loss, 50 percent of such excess shall be 
included in income. In the case of a hduciary, see section 1202. 

Limitation on allowable copital losses. — If the sum of all the 
capital losses exceeds the sum of all the capital gains (all such 
gains and losses to be taken into account at 100 percent), then 
such capital losses shall be allowed as a deduction only to the 
extent of (1) current year capital gains plus (2) the smaller of either 
the taxable income of the current year (or adjusted gross income if 
tax table is used) or $1,000. For this purpose taxable income is 
computed without regard to capital gains or losses or the deduction 
for exemptions. The excess of such allowable losses over the sum 
of items (1) and (2) above is called "capital loss carryover" (not 
applicable to partnerships). It may be carried forward and treated 
as a short-term capital loss in succeeding years. However, the 
capital loss carryover of each year should be kept separate, since 
the law limits the use of such carryover to the five succeeding years. 
In offsetting your capital gain and income of 1954 by prior year 
loss carryovers, use any capital loss carryover from 1949 before 
using any such carryover from 1950 or subsequent years. Any 
1949 carryover which cannot be used in 1954 must be excluded in 
determining total loss carryover to 1955 and subsequent years. 

Collapsible corporations. — Gain from the sale or exchange of 
stock in a collapsible corporation is not a capital gain. Section 341. 

"Wash sales" losses. — Losses from the sale or other disposition 
of stocks or securities are not deductible (unless sustained in con- 
nection with the taxpayer's trade or business) if, within 30 days 
before or after the date of sale or other disposition, the taxpayer 
has acquired (by purchase or by an exchange upon which the 
entire amount of gain or loss was recognized by law) or has entered 
into a contract or option to acquire, substantially identical stock 
or securities. 

Losses in transactions between certain persons. — No deduc- 
Hon is allowable for losses from sales or exchanges of property 
directly or indirectly between (a) members of a family, (b) a cor- 
poration and an individual (or a fiduciary) owning more than 50 
percent of the corporation's stock (liquidations excepted), (c) a 
grantor and fiduciary of any trust, (d) a fiduciary and a k)eneficiary 
of the same trust, (e) a fiduciary and a fiduciary or beneficiary of 
another trust created by the same grantor, or (f) an individual and 
a tax-exempt organization controlled by the individual or his 
family^ 

ALTERNATIVE TAX.— If the net long-term capital gain 
exceeds the net short-term capital loss, or in the case of only a 
long-terra capital gain, individual taxpayers (a) filing separate re- 
turns with taxable income exceeding $18,000, or (b) filing joint re- 
turns or as surviving widows or widowers with taxable income ex- 
ceeding $36,000, or (c) filing as head of household with taxable 
income exceeding $24,000, vrill usually find it to their advantage 
to compute the alternative tax on the other side. The alternative 
tax, if less than the tax computed on page 3 of Form 1040, shall be 
the tax liability. opo jo-Tomo-i 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



121 



FORM 1040 F 

U. S. Treasury Department 
Internal Revenue Service 



Attach This Form to Your 
Income Tax Return Form 
1040 and File It With the 
District Director of Internal 
Revenue for Your DIstrlcL 



SCHEDULE OF FARM INCOME AND EXPENSES 

For Calendar Year 1954 
Or other taxable year beginning -— , 1954, and ending , 195. 



1954 



Name _ 

Address _ 

Location of farm or farms 

Number of acres in each farm . 



If Your Accounts Are Kept on 
the Cash Method, Fill in 
Pages 1 and 2. 
If You Keep Books on an 
Accrual Method and Desire 
to Use This Form, FIN In 
Pages 2 and 3 Instead. 



FARM INCOME FOR TAXABLE PERIOD COMPUTED ON THE CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS METHOD 
(See Instructions on Schedule D (Form 1040> for tax treatment of certain livestock held for draft, breeding, or dairy purposes) 



l.SALE OF LIVESTOCK RAISED 


2. SALE OF PRODUCE RAISED 


3. OTHER FARM INCOME 


Kind 


Quantity 


Amount 


Kind 


Quantity 


Amount 


Items 


Amount 


Cattle 

Horses 




$ 


Grain 

Hay 

Cotton 

Tobacco 

Vegetables. . . . 
Fruits and nuts. 
Dairy products. 

Eggs 

Meat products . 
Poultry, dressed 

Wool 

Honey 




$ 


Mdse. rec'd for produce. . 
Machine work 


$- 


Mules . . 






Hire of teams 




Sheep 

Swine 










Breeding fees 

Rent rec'd in crop shares. 

Wood and lumber 

Other forest products .... 
Agricultural program 
payments 














Fur-bearing 
animals. . . . 


















Chickens .... 












Turkeys 












Ducks 










Patronage dividends, re- 
bates or refunds, if 
not reported elsewhere 
in return 




Goats . . 












Bees 








Other (specify): 






Sirup and sugar. 

Other (specify): 












Other (specify): 




























Total 


$ 


Total 


$ 


Total 


$ 




(Enter on li(] 


e 1 of summary below) 




(Enter on li 


le 2 of summary below) 


(Enter on li 


ie 3 of summary below) 



4. SALE OF LIVESTOCK AND OTHER ITEMS PURCHASED 



. Description 



2. Date acquired 



3. Gross sales price 
(contract price) 



4. Cost or other basis 



5. Depreciation al- 

lowed (or allowable) 

since acquisiton or 

March 1. 1913 



6. Profit (column 3 plus 

column 5 minus 

column 4) 



Total (enter on line 4 of summary below) $ 

SUMMARY OF INCOME AND DEDUCTIONS COMPUTED ON THE CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS METHOD 



1. Sale of livestock raised 

2. Sale of produce raised 

3. Other farm income 

4. Profit on sale of livestock and other 

items purchased 

Gross Profits 



5. 



$ 



$ 



6. Expenses (from page 2) . . . . 

7. Depreciation (from page 2). 

8. Other deductions (specify): 



9. 



Total Deductions. 



$-. 



10. Net farm profit (or loss) (line 5 minus line 9) to be reported in Schedule C Summary, Form 1040. 



16— 7U99S-1 



122 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



FARM EXPENSES TOR TAXABLE YEAR (Sec Instructions) 

(Do nol include personal or living expenses or expenses not alUibulable 1o pioduclion of farm income, such as ta»es, insurance, repaiii, etc., on yout dwelline) 



Labor hired 

Feed purchased 

Seed and plants purchased 

Machine hire 

Supplies purchased 

Cost of repairs and maintenance 

Breeding fees 

Fertilizers and lime 

Veterinary and medicine for livestock . . . . 
Gasoline, other fuel and oil for farm busi- 



ness. 



2. Amount 



3. Hems 
(Continued) 



Rent of farm, part of farm, or pasturage. . . 

Freight, yardage, express, and trucking. . . 

Automobile upkeep (farm share) 

Amortization of grain storage facilities (at- 
tach statement) 

Soil and water conservation expenses (at- 
tach statement showing computation) . 

Other farm expenses (specify): 



4 Amount 
(Continued) 



$ 



Storage and warehousing. 
Taxes 



Insurance on property (except your dwell- 
ing) 

Interest on farm notes and mortgages .... 

Water rent, electricity, and telephone 

Total of Columns 2 and 4 (enter on line 6 of summary on page 1 (cash method) or line 7, page 3 
(accrual method)) 



DEPRECIATION (See Instructions) 



1. Kind ot ptopprly (if buddings, 
stale materrai cl which cofi- 
sUucled). Exclude land and 
other nondepreciable properly 


2. Dale 
acquiied 


3. Cost or olJier basis 


1. Dftprpciation allowed (or 
allowable) in piiur yeats 


5. Method 


6. RafeC;^) 
01 life (years) 


7. Depreciation for 
this year 






$ ^ 


$. 






$-- 










































































































































































































































































































































































































Total (enter on 


lineVo 


' summary on page 1 (cash method) c 


)r line 8, page 3 (accrual method)) . . 


$ 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



123 



FARM INVENTORY FOR INCOME COMPUTED ON AN ACCRUAL METKOD Pa£8 3 

(Do not include certain livestock held for draft, breeding, or dairy purposes. Se« Instructions on Scliedule D (Form 1C4D}.) 



Deccriplton 

(Kind oi hvesloctt. crops, 

or other products) 


On Hand at Be£inning 
of Year 


Purchased During Year 


Raised During Year 


Consumed or Lost 
During Year 


Sold During Year 


On Hand at End of Year 


Quan- 
tity 


Inventory value 


Quan- 
tity 


Amount paid 


Quan- 
tily 


Inventory value 


Quan- 
tity 


Inventory value 


Quan- 
tity 


Amount received 


Quan- 
tity 


Inventory value 






$ 




$ 




$ 




$_ 




$. 




$ 








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































$ _ 

(Enter on line 4) 




$ 




$ _ 




? - 




(Enter on line 2) 




$ 




(Enter on line 5) 




(Enlor on line 1) 



SUMMARY CF INCOME AND DEDUCTIONS COMPUTED ON AN ACCRUAL METHOD 



1. Inventory of livestock, crops, and products at end of 

year 

2. Sales of livestock, crops, and products during year. . 
la. Other miscellaneous receipts (specify): 



Total. 



3. 

4. Inventory of livestock, crops, and 

products at beginning of year 

5. Cost of livestock and products pur- 
chased during year. 



6. Gross profits (line 3 minus the sum of lines 4 and 5). 



7- Expenses (from page 2). . . . 

8. Depreciation (from page 2). 

9. Other deductions (specify) : 



10. 



Total Deductions 



11. Net farm profit (or loss) (line 6 minus line 10) to be reported in Schedule C Summary, Form 1040. 



$-. 



10— 70b9S-l 



445805 O -57 -9 



124 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



INSTRUCTIONS 

METHOD OF ACCOUNTING 

Farmers may compute their income either on the cash receipts and 
disbursements method or the accrual method, but whichever method 
is adopted in filing their first return must be followed until the 
consent of the Commissioner is received to change the method. 



Page 4 

Supplies purchased. — Cost of twine, spray material, poisons, dis- 
infectant, cans, barrels, baskets, egg cases, bags, and other smular 
farm supplies purchased. 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS METHOD 

A farmer reporting on the basis of cash receipts and disbursements 
shall include in his gross income for the taxable year ( i ) the amount 
of cash or the value of merchandise or other property received from 
the sale of livestock and produce which were raised during the tax- 
able year or prior years, ( 2 ) the profits from the sale of any livestock 
or other items which were purchased, and (3) gross income from 
all other sources. The farm expenses will be the actual amounts paid 
out during the taxable year. 

ACCRUAL METHOD 

For a farmer reporting on the accrual method, the gross profits 
are obtained as indicated in summar>- of income and deductions on 
page 3 of this form. The farm expenses will be the actual expenses 
incurred during the year, whether paid or not. 

Farmers who compute income on an accrual method and use 
inventories, may value their inventories according to the 'farm-price 
method " which provides for the valuation of inventories at market 
price less direct cost of disposition. If the use of the farm-price 
method" of valuing inventories for any taxable year involves a 
change in method of valuing inventories from that employed in prior 
years! permission for such change shall first be secured from the 
Commissioner. Farmers raising livestock may value their inventories 
of animals according to either the "farm-price method or the unit 
livestock price method." 

INCOME 

All the farm income from whatever source must be reported in this 
schedule. Anything of value received instead of cash, such as gro- 
ceries received in exchange for produce, must be treated as income 
to the extent of its market value. 

The value of farm produce consumed by the farmer and his 
family need not be reported as income; but expenses incurred in 
raising such produce must not be claimed as deductions. 

Recoveries for hail and fire insurance on growing crops should 
be included in gross income. 

Rents received in crop shares shall be reported in income in the 
year in which the crop shares are reduced to money or the equiva- 
lent of money. 

A taxpayer electing to include in gross income amounts received 
during the year as loans from Commodity Credit Corporation 
should file with his return a statement showing details of such loans. 
(See section 77 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954) 

Report gains and losses from sales or exchanges of capital assets 
and other property in separate Schedule D (Form 1040). 

The term "farm" embraces the farm in- the ordinarily accepted 
sense, and includes stock, dairy, poultry, fruit, truck farms, and all 
land used for farming operations. A person cultivating or operating 
a farm for recreation or pleasure, the result of which is a continual 
loss from year to year, is not regarded as a farmer. 

EXPENSES AND OTHER DEDUCTIONS 

In general, a farmer who operates a farm for profit is entitled to 
deduct from gross income as necessary expenses all amounts actually 
expended in carrying on the business of farming, except those which 
represent capital investment. The following is a list of such expenses 
(taken from the classification appearing on page 2 of this form 
though any other equally descriptive classification may be used): 

Labor hired.— Amounts paid for regular farm labor, piece work, 
contract labor, and other forms of hired labor. Do not deduct the 
value of your own labor or that of your wife. Only that part of the 
board which is purchased for hired labor should be deducted. The 
value of products furnished by the farm and used in the board of 
hired labor is not deductible. Rations purchased for laborers or share- 
croppers are deductible. Do not deduct amounts paid to persons 
engaged in household work, except to the extent that the services of 
such persons are used in boarding and otherwise caring for farm 
laborers. Services of such employees engaged in caring for the 
farmer's own household are not deductible. 

Feed purchased. — Cost of grain, hay, silage, mill feeds, other con- 
centrates and roughages purchased, and amounts paid for grinding, 
mixing, and processing of feed. 

Machine hire. — Amounts paid for threshing, combining, silo 
filling, baling, ginning, and other machine hire. 



Cost of repairs and maintenance. — Amounts expended for repairs 
and maintenance of farm buildings (except your dwelling), fences, 
drains, and other farm improvements, and for repairs and rnam- 
tenance of farm machinery and equipment; cost of small tools of 
short life such as shovels, rakes, etc. Amounts expended for replace- 
ments of, or additions to, farm machinery, farm buildings, or othe» 
farm equipment of a permanent nature are not deductible. 

Fertilizers and lime. — Cost of commercial fertilizers, lime, and 
manure purchased during the year, the benefit of which is of short 
duration. 

Taxes. — State and local taxes. Do not deduct Federal income 
taxes; estate, inheritance, legacy, succession, and gift taxes; nor 
taxes assessed for any improvement or betterment tending to m- 
crease the value of the property assessed. Do not deduct taxes on 
your dwelling or household property and other personal taxes. 
Insurance.— Cost of all insurance on farm buildings (except your 
dwelling) and improvements, equipment, crops, and livestock. 

Interest on farm notes and mortgages. — Interest paid on farm 
mortgages and other obligations incurred to carry on farming. 

Water rent, electricity, and telephone. — The farm share of these 
expenditures. Do not deduct personal expenses. 

Rent of farm, part of farm, or pasturage.— Rent paid in cash. 
A tenant farmer paying rent to his landlord in the form of "ops 
raised on the farm (under a cropshare agreement) may not deduct 
as rent the value of the crop given to the landlord, but the tenant 
may deduct all amounts paid by him in raising the crop. 

Automobile upkeep. — For automobiles used exclusively in farm 
operations, all expenses of operation, repair, and depreciation. For 
automobiles used both for farm and for personal transportation, only 
that part of the expense corresponding to the farm use may be 
deducted. 

Soil and water conservation expenses.— See instructions to Form 
1040 for explanation of these expenses. 

Other farm expenses.— Fees paid for advertising farm products; 
expenditures for stamps, stationery, account books, and other othce 
supplies purchased for farm use ; expenditures for travel in connec- 
tion with the farm and similar expenditures. Amounts expended for 
purchase of automobiles, farm machinery, farm buildings, or other 
farm equipment of a permanent nature are not deductible. 

Depreciation.— Allowance for depreciation of buildings, improve- 
ments, machineiy, or other farm equipment of a permanent nature. 
In computing depreciation do not include the value of farm land nor 
the land on which farm buildings are located. Do not deduct repairs 
or depreciation on the dwelling you occupy or on your personal or 
household equipment. Do not claim as a separate item depreciation 
on livestock or any other property included in your inventory. 
Depreciation, however, may be claimed on livestock acquired for 
work breeding, or dairy purposes which are not included in your 
invcntorv of livestock purchased or raised for sale. See the instruc 
tions to Form 1040 for methods of computing depreciation. 



Losses.— Losses of farm buildings, machinery, and other farm 
property not included in your inventory, resulting from fire storm, 
or other casualty and not compensated for by insurance or otherwise. 
Losses of property included in your inventory are taken care ot by 
the reduced amount of the inventory at the close of the year. Ihe 
total loss of a prospective crop by frost, storm, flood or fire, is not 
deductible. When reporting on the cash basis, the value of animals 
raised by you and lost by death is not deductible, while in the case 
of animals purchased and lost by death, the cost less depreciation 
allowed or allowable is deductible. 

Amortization.— If you elect the deduction with respect to the 
amortization of the adjusted basis of a grain storage facility, a 
statement of the pertinent facts should be filed with your election. 
(See section 169 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954-) 

Net operating loss deductions.— Every farmer claiming a net 
operating loss deduction shall file with his return a concise statement 
setting forth the amount of the net operating loss deduction claiined 
and ail material facts. The deduction should be entered in Schedule 
C Summary, Form 1040, instead of on Form 1040F. 

Fiscal year farmers.— If you report income on a fiscal year basis 
and your year ends after December 31, 1954, consult your local 
Internal Revenue S»rvicc office for the recent changes in the law 
which affect your liability for self-employment tax. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 16 — 70D93-1 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



125 



R.od instrucHons carefully. U. S. INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURN 

Complete both sides o( (orm. 

Please print. If you use this form, the Internal Revenue Service v^ill compute your tax. 


1954 \ 


zu 

hill 

ecu) 

Ju 
lil3 
QZ 

>> 

3ir 
< J 

L'< 

az 

HIT 

< 
o 

o 

IS 


1. NAME 




.ocs 

12 

JO 


§^m^^$^^l Taxpayer's 


Your Wife's (Husband's) 


2. WIFE'S (HUSBANDS) NAME 


7. Social Se- 
curity No. 




3. HOME ADDRESS (NUMBER AND STREET OR RURAL ROUTE) 


8. Wases *■ 


(a) 




— >■ 
E 

o 


(b) ; 


9. Tax 

Withheld *■ 


(a) 




(b) 1 


(CITY, TOWN. OR POST OFFICE) (ZONE) (STATE) 


10. Other 

Income "^ 


(a) 




(b) ; 


4. (C/iccJt) n Sinsle D Morried 


11. Special 
Credit •*• 


(a) 




(b) 1 


5. Is this a joint return? D Yes D No 


12. Exclusion-*. 


(a) 




(b) ! 


6. Is wife (husband) filing seporately? Q Yes D No 


• List your exemptions on other side. 


1 DECLARE UNDER THE PENALTIES OF PERJURY THAT THIS IS A TRUE. CORRECT. 
AND COMPLETE RETURN TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE AND BELIEF. 


(FOR USE OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE) 
C ,B 


TAXPAYERS SIGNATURE AND DATE 


IF JOINT RETURN. WIFE'S (HUSBAND'S) SIGNATURE 








t- 



13. EXEMPTIONS FOR YOURSELF AND WIFE (OR HUSBAND) 



EXEMP- 
TIONS 



(a) For your own exemption, write the FIGURE 1 

(b) If you were 65 or over at the end of 1954, write the FIGURE 1- 

(c) If taxpayer was blind at the end of 1954, write the FIGURE 1- 



(d) If your wife (or husband) had no income in 1954, or if this is a joint return, write the FIGURE 1 for her (or his) exemption- 

(e) If she (or he) is claimed as an exemption in (d) obove and wos 65 or over at the end of 1954, write the FIGURE 1 

(f) If she (or he) is cloimed as an exemption in (d) above ond was blind ot the end of 1954, write the FIGURE 1 



14. EXEMPTIONS FOR YOUR CHILDREN AND OTHER DEPENDENTS (List below) 










Name (also sive address If different from yours) 


Relationship 


Answer ONLY for dependents other than children 




^ Enter Figure 1 in the lost column to right for each name 
listed. 


Did dependent 

liave gross 

income of $600 

or more? 


Amount YOU spent for 
dependent's support. 
If 100%. write "All" 


Anioiint spent by OTHERS 
including dependent 














>► 














>- 














>► 














>> 














>► 
>- 
















15. Enter total number of exemptions listed in items 13 ai 














-^ 





126 




1 



4 



FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 

FOR EMPLOYEES EARNING LESS THAN $5,000 

The enclosed card, Form 1040A, offers a simple way for employees receiving less than $5,000 total 
income to file their 1954 U. S. income tax returns. 

To use this form: 

Read instructions below. Be sure you qualify. If you don't, obtain and file a Form 1040. 

Fill out the copy on other side for your records. 

Transfer answers from your copy to card. 

Sign the card and mail it, together with your withholding statements (Forms W-2), to your 
District Director in the envelope provided. The Internal Revenue Service will figure your tax 
and send you a check for any refund due you or a bill for any amount you owe. 



!The tax table sfioum below is only for your information. You do not use this table in preparing Form 1040A. The Internal^ 
Revenue Service will use the table to figure your tax. The table allows you about 10% of your income as deductions. 
This 10% allowance takes Ike place of deductions which are allowed only if you itemize your deductions on Form lOiO, such as the 
deductions for charitable contributions, interest, taxes, losses, medical expenses, miscellaneous items, and the new deduction for chtld | 
care expenses. If your deductions exceed 10% of your income, it will be to your advantage to use Form 101,0 and itemize them. 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

Who Must File. — Every citizen or resident of the 
United States under 65 who had $600 ($1,200 
if 65 or over) or more gross income. 

Who Moy Use U. S. Individual Income Tax 
Return, Form 1040A. — If your total gross in- 
come was less than $5,000 and consisted entirely 
of wages reported on Withholding Statements 
(Forms W-2) and not more than $100 total of 
other wages, dividends, and interest, you may 
use this form. A husband and wife may file a 
joint return if their combined incomes do not 
exceed these limits. If you had income from 
any other sources, you may not use this form 
but must file your return on Form 1040. Like- 
wise, Form 1040 must be used (1) in making a 
separate return of a married person domiciled in 
a community property State, (2) if husband or 
wife itemizes deductions, (3) if you claim the 
status of head of household or surviving widow 
or widower, or (4) if you wish to claim credit for 
dividends received or retirement income. 

When to File.— On or after January 1, 1955, 
but not later than April 15, 1955. 

Where to File.— With the District Director of 
Internal Revenue for your district. 

Where to Get Forms. — If you need a Form 1040 
you can get one from any Internal Revenue 
office, and from most banks and post offices. 
Your employer will furnish you with a With- 
holding Statement. 

Married Couple — Advantage of Joint Re- 
turn. — A husband and wife may make a joint 
return even though one has no income. To as- 
sure any benefits of the split-income provisions, 
they should file a joint return. Both husband 
and wife must sign a joint return. A joint re- 
turn on Form 1040A never results in more tax 
than separate returns. 

Sick Pay Exclusion. — If an employer contin- 
ues to pay wages to an employee under a wage 
continuation plan while the employee is absent 
from work due to injury or sickness, such pay- 
ments may be excluded from the employee's 
income, but only to the extent they do not exceed 
a weekly rate of $100. However, the exclusion 
does not apply to the first seven calendar days of 
an absence due to sickness unless the employee 
is hospitalized for at least one day during the 
period of sickness. 

Form lOlOA Instructions 







TAX 


TABLE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE WILL USE TO 


FIGURE YOUR TAX 






II youi tol»l 
Income il— 


And ttie 


umbel al eiempl 


.n„_ 


"""m 


total 
ell— 








And the 


umber ol eiempttoni 


la— 
























Andfou 


And ruu v^~ 


3 
And you ate- 












Al t«asl 


But leu 

thin 


1 


2 


1 


4 01 


Al least 


But lest 

than 


a"S; 

(aiel, 


smile 0, 
amartied 

tiKni 
lepa- 
laleiif 


A 
mained 
couple 

lOlnlf, 


Sinjlo 01 

amairied 

peiion 

liiini 

talel, 


A 

maided 
couple 

lO'nlTy 


4 


5 


G 


7 


8 01 




Tourt 


«i»- 












Youi lai 


I- 










SO 

675 


$675 
700 


SO 
4 


SO 




$0 



$0 




J2. 325 
2.350 


$2. 350 
2.375 


$301 
305 


$181 
185 


$181 
185 


$61 
65 


$61 
66 


$0 



SO 



SO 



$0 



$0 



700 
725 
750 
775 


725 
750 
775 
800 


8 
13 
17 
22 




















2,375 
2,400 
2,425 
2.450 


2,400 
2,425 
2.450 
2,475 


310 
314 
319 
323 


190 
194 
199 
203 


190 
194 
199 
203 


70 
74 
79 
83 


70 
74 
79 
83 
































800 
825 
850 
875 


825 
850 
875 
900 


26 
31 
35 
40 




















2.475 
2.500 
2.525 
2.550 


2.500 
2.525 
2.550 
2.575 


328 
332 
337 
341 


208 
212 
217 
221 


208 
212 
217 
221 


88 
92 
97 
101 


88 
92 
97 
101 
































900 
925 
950 
975 


925 

950 

975 

1.000 


44 
49 
63 
58 




















2.575 
2,600 
2,625 
2,650 


2.600 
2. 625 
2.650 
2,675 


346 
350 
355 
359 


226 
230 
235 
239 


226 
230 
235 
239 


106 
110 
115 
119 


106 
110 
115 
119 
































1,000 
1,025 
1.050 
1.075 


1,025 
1,050 
1.075 
1,100 


62 
67 
71 
76 




















2.675 
2,700 
2.725 
2,750 


2,700 
2,725 
2.750 
2,775 


364 
308 
373 
377 


244 
248 
253 
257 


244 
248 
253 
257 


124 
128 
133 
137 


124 
128 
133 
137 


4 

8 
13 
17 











s 














1,100 
1.125 
1.150 
1,175 


1,125 
1,150 
1,175 
1,200 


80 
85 
89 
94 




















2,775 
2.800 
2.825 
2.850 


2.800 
2,825 
2,850 
2,875 


382 
386 
391 
395 


262 
206 
271 
275 


262 
266 
271 
275 


142 
146 
151 
165 


142 
146 
151 
155 


22 
26 
31 
35 


























1.200 
1.225 
1,250 
1,275 


1,225 
1.250 
1.275 
1,300 


98 
103 
107 
112 




















2.875 
2,900 
2,925 
2,950 


2.900 
2,925 
2,950 
2,975 


400 
405 
410 
415 


280 
284 
289 
293 


280 
284 
289 
293 


160 
164 
169 
173 


160 
164 
169 
173 


40 
44 
49 
53 


























1,300 
1,325 
1,350 
1,375 


1,325 
1,350 
1,375 
1,400 


116 
121 
125 
130 




1 

5 
10 














2,975 
3,000 
3,050 
.1.100 


3.000 
3,050 
3.100 
3. 150 


420 
427 
437 
447 


298 
305 
314 
.323 


298 
30S 
314 
323 


178 
185 
194 
203 


178 
185 
194 
203 


58 
65 
74 
83 


























1.400 
1.425 
I. 450 
1.475 


1,425 
1,450 
1,475 
1,500 


134 

139 
143 
148 


14 
19 
23 
28 














3. 150 
3.200 
3.250 
3.300 


3. ioo 

3.250 
3.300 
3.350 


457 
467 
476 
486 


332 
341 
350 
359 


332 
341 
350 
359 


212 
221 
230 
239 


212 
221 
230 
239 


92 
101 
110 
119 


























1.500 
1.525 
1,550 
1.575 


1,525 
1.550 
1,575 
1,600 


152 
157 
161 
166 


32 
37 
41 
46 














3,350 
3,400 
3,450 
3,500 


3.400 
3.450 
3. 500 
3.550 


496 
506 
516 
526 


368 
377 
386 
395 


368 
377 
386 
395 


248 
257 
206 
275 


248 
257 
266 
275 


128 
137 
146 
155 


8 
17 
26 
35 




















1,600 
1,625 
1,650 
1,675 


1.625 
1,650 
1,675 
1.700 


170 
175 
179 
184 


50 
55 
59 
64 














3,550 
3,600 
3,650 
3,700 


3,600 
3.650 
3.700 
3.750 


536 
546 
556 
566 


404 
414 
424 
434 


404 
413 
422 
431 


284 
293 
302 
311 


284 
293 
302 
311 


164 
173 
182 
191 


44 
53 
62 
71 




















1,700 
1,725 
1,750 
1.775 


1.725 
1.750 
1,775 
1,800 


188 
193 
197 
202 


68 
73 
77 
82 














3,750 
3,800 
3.850 
3,900 


3.800 
3,850 
3,900 
3,950 


575 
585 
595 
605 


443 
453 
463 
473 


440 
449 
458 
467 


320 
329 
338 
347 


320 
329 
338 
347 


200 
209 
218 
227 


80 
89 
98 
107 




















1.800 
1.825 
1.850 
1,875 


1.825 
1.850 
1,875 
1,900 


206 
211 
215 
220 


86 
91 
95 
100 














3,950 
4.000 
4.050 
4,100 


4.000 
4.050 
4. 100 
4,150 


615 
625 
635 
645 


483 
493 
503 
513 


476 
485 
494 
503 


356 
365 
374 
383 


356 
365 
374 
383 


236 
245 
254 
263 


116 
125 
134 
113 



5 
14 
23 














1.900 
1,925 
1.950 
1,975 


1,925 
1,950 
1.975 
2,000 


224 
229 
233 
238 


104 
109 
113 
118 














4,150 

4,200 
4,250 
4,300 


4,200 
4,250 
4,300 
4.350 


655 
665 
674 
684 


523 
533 
542 
552 


512 
521 
530 
539 


392 
401 
410 
420 


392 
401 
410 
419 


272 
281 
290 
299 


152 
161 
170 
179 


32 
41 
60 
59 














2,000 
2,025 
2,050 
2,075 


2,025 
2.050 
2,075 
2,100 


242 
247 
251 
256 


122 
127 
131 
136 


2 
7 

11 

16 








4.350 
4,400 
4.450 
4,500 


4.400 
4,450 
4,500 
4,550 


694 
704 
714 

724 


562 
572 
582 
592 


518 
557 
566 
675 


430 
440 
450 
460 


428 
437 
446 
456 


303 
317 
326 
335 


188 
197 
200 
216 


68 
77 
86 
95 














2,100 
2, 125 
2. 150 
2.175 


2.125 
2, 150 
2.175 
2,200 


260 
265 
2G9 
274 


140 
145 
149 
154 


20 
25 
29 
34 








4,550 
4,600 
4,650 
4.700 


4,600 
4,650 
4,700 
4,750 


734 
714 
754 
704 


602 
612 
622 
632 


584 
593 
602 
611 


470 
480 
490 
500 


464 
473 
482 
491 


344 
353 
362 
371 


221 
233 
242 
251 


104 
113 
122 
131 




2 

n 








2,200 
2,225 
2.250 
2.275 


2.225 
2.250 
2.275 
2.300 


278 
283 
287 
292 


158 
163 
107 
172 


38 
43 
47 
52 








4.750 
4,800 
4.850 
4,900 


4.800 
4,650 
4.900 
4.950 


773 
783 
793 
803 


641 
651 
661 
671 


620 
629 
638 
647 


509 
519 
629 
539 


600 
509 
518 
527 


380 
389 
398 
107 


260 
269 
278 
287 


140 
119 
158 
167 


20 
29 
38 
47 








2,300 


2.325 


296 


176 


56 





4,950 


5.000 


813 


681 


656 


549 


536 


416 


296 


176 


56 






FACSIMILES OF TAX RETURNS FOR 1954 



127 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR FRONT OF FORM 1040A 

Item 7. — Enter your social security number and your wife's (hus- 
band's) social security number, if any, even though she (he) files 
a separate return. 

Items 8 ond 9. — Enter the total amount of your wages subject to 
income tax and the total amount of income tax withheld as shown on 
your Withholding Statements, Forms W-2. 

Item 10, — Enter all other taxable income from wages, dividends, or 
Interest. Exclude dividends received from corporations in the 
United States up to $50. This exclusion does not apply to dividends 
received tom mutual savings banks or building and loan asso- 
ciations. If joint return and both husband and wife had dividend 
income, each is entitled to a $50 exclusion provided it is apphed 
against his individual dividend income. If the sum of items 10 (a) 
and 10 (b) exceeds $100, you must file a Form 1040. 
Item 11. — If more than $72 of F.I.C.A. (Social Security) employes 
tax was withheld during 1954 because you worked for more than 
one employer, enter the excess, and it vrill be credited against your 
income tax. Figure separately for husband and vriie. 
Item 12. — See "Sick Pay Exclusion" in general instructions. If 
you received such payments and your employer has not excluded 
them from the amount of wages shown on your withholding state- 
ment (Form W-2), enter your exclusion here. Enclose a state- 
ment showing your computation and your name and address. 

Items 8(b) to 12(b). — Complete these items only if this is a joint 
return. The signatures of both taxpayer and his wife (or husband) 
ore required on joint returns. 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR BACK OF FORM 1040A 

Items 13(a) to (f). — Fill out these items to receive credit for your 
exemptions and those of your wife (or husband). Marital status, 
age, and blindness must be determined as of December 31, 1954, 
except that if the wife or husband of the taxpayer died during the 
year, the determination is made as of the date of death. 

Item 14. — Fill in this schedule to receive credit for your children, 
stepchildren, and other dependents. Each dependent must meet 
all of the following tests: 

a. Received more than one-half of his or her support from you (or 
from wife or husband if this is a joint return). 

b. Received less than $600 gross income. (This test does not 
apply to your children or stepchildren who are under 19 or who are 
students.) 

c. Did not file a joint return vrith her husband (or his wife). 

d. Was either a citizen, or resident of the United States or a resi- 
dent of Canada, Mexico, the Republic of Panama or the Canal Zone. 

e. Either (1) had as his principal place of abode your home and 
was a member of your household; OR (2) was related to you (or to 
husband or wife if this is a joint return) in one of the following ways: 



Child 

Stepchild 

Mother 

Father 

Grandparent 

Brother 



Sister 

Grandchild 

Stepbrother 

Stepsister 

Stepmother 

Stepfather 



Mother-in-law 

Father-in-law 

Brother-in-law 

Sister-in-law 

Son-in-law 

Daughter-in-law 



The following if 
related by blood: 

Uncle 

Aunt 

Nephew 

Niece 



FRONT 



YOUR COPY 



Read instructions carefully. 
Complete both sides of form. 
Please print. 



U. S. INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURN 

If you use this form, the Infernal Revenue Service will compute your tax. 



1954 



l-u 
zo 

I- LI 

Km 

< 

QZ 

<j 
u< 

fz 

HE 

■ y 



< 

o 
o 



1. Name 



2. 


Wife- 


(Husband's) Name 






3. 


Home 


Address (Number 


and Street < 


>r Rurol Route) 


(City, Town, or Post Office) 


(Zone) 


(State) 


4. 


(C/iec 


k) n Sinsle 


D Married 






5. 


Is this 


a joint return? 


DYes 


DNo 





6. Is wife (husband) filing separately? D Yes D No 



7. Social Se- 
curity No.'^ 



8. Wases 



9. Tax 
Withheld ■*" 



10. Other 

Income ^ 



11. Special ^ 
Credit •*■ 



12. Excldsion->- 



Taxpayer's I Your Wife's (Husband's) 



(a) 



(b) 



(a) 



(a) 



(a) 



(a) 



C 

•^ 

B 

o 



(b) 

(bT 

(bT 

(bT 

(bF 



• List your exemptions on other side. 



.5 CM 

12 
-SO 



I declare under the penalties of perjury that this is a true, correct, and complete return 
to the best of my knowledge and belief. 



Taxpayer's Signature and Date 



If joint return. Wife's (Husband's) Signature 
and Date 



(FOR USE OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE) 



BACK 



YOUR COPY 



13. EXEMPTIONS FOR YOURSELF AND WIFE (OR HUSBAND) 



EXEMP- 
TIONS 



(a) For your own exemption, write the FIGURE 1 

(b) If you were 65 or over at the end of 1954, write the FIGURE 1 

(e) If taxpayer was blind at the end of 1954, write the FIGURE 1 

(d) If your wife (or husband) had no income in 1954, or if this is a joint return, write the FIGURE 1 for her (or his) exemption- 

(e) If she (or he) is claimed as an exemption in (d) above and was 65 or over at the end of 1954, write the FIGURE 1 

(f) If she (or he) is claimed as an exemption in (d) above and wos blind at the end of 1954, write the FIGURE 1 — 



14. EXEMPTIONS FOR YOUR CHILDREN AND OTHER DEPENDENTS (List below) 



Name (also give address if different from yours) 

* Enter Figure 1 in the last column to right for each name 
listed. 



Relationship 



Answer ONLY for dependents other thon children 



Did dependent 

have gross 

income of $600 

or more? 



Amount YOU spent for 
dependent's support. 
If 100%, write "All" 



Amount spent by OTHERS 
Including dependent 



1^ 



15. Enter total number of exemptions listed in items 13 and 14 obove.' 



INDEX 



* Page 

Accounting period 10, 90-91 

Adjusted gross deficit 5, 28, 33-35, 38, 75, 79, 81 

Adjusted gross income: 

Amount 5-6, 11, 2<V-28, 33-35, 38, 42, 46, 

48, 58-64, 71-86 

By marital status 5, 8, 9-11, 23, 27, 59-68 

By States and Territories 24, 71-74, 76 

Classes 12-19, 21-23, 33, 35-54, 58-70, 

72-75, 80, 82-83 

Composition 8 

Definition of 6, 9, 28 

For returns with alternative tax 5, 24, 26, 29, 

56-58, 70 

For returns with itemized deductions 5-6, 8, 

10-11, 23, 25-28, 33-34, 

48, 54-55, 63, 79, 84 

For returns with self-employment tax.. 5-6, 9, 23-24 

Groups 7-8, 10 

Percentage distribution 7-8, 33 

Sources 23-26, 33-47, 79, 81-83 

Aggregated and simple distributions of number of 
returns, adjusted gross income, and tax lia- 
bility 33 

Aliens 9 , 28 

Alimony and separate maintenance payments 9, 26 

Alternative tax 5, 24-26, 29, 56-58, 70 

Amended returns 10 

Annuities and pensions 6, 8-9, 17, 19, 26, 34-35, 

37, 41, 45, 53, 79, 81 
Average tax 58, 80 



Capital gains and losses — Continued Page 

Net short-term capital gain or loss... 5, 25-26, 28, 

69-70 

Returns with alternative tax 5, 24-26, 29, 

56-58, 70 
Returns with net gain from sales of capital 

assets 6, 8, 25-26, 28, 34-35, 37, 41, 

45, 52, 69-71 
Returns with net loss from sales of capital 

assets 6, 8, 25-26, 28, 34-35, 37, 41, 

45, 52, 69-71 

Returns with normal tax and surtax 24, 28-29, 

56-58, 90 

Short-term, definition of 26 

Synopsis of Federal tax laws affecting 91 

Casualty losses 7, 27, 29, 34-35, 48, 84 

Characteristics of the year 5 

Charts 7-8 

Child care 7, 9, 27, 34-35, 48, 84 

Citizens and resident aliens 9, 28 

Classifications of individual returns 23-24 

Community property income 10, 24 

Comparative data, 1953 and 1954. (See also 

Historical data . ) 5 

Computation of tax 6, 10, 15,17, 23-24, 28-29, 89-91 

Contributions, charitable: 

Amount deducted 6, 9, 15, 26, 34-35, 48, 55, 84 

Exceeding 20^ limitation 6, 15, 27 

Under 10^ limitation 15, 27 

Under 20^ limitation 9, 15, 27 

Credit on 1955 estimated tax 30, 39, 43, 47 



B 

Business or profession: 

Deductible expenses 25-28 

Income 6, 8-9, 27 

Net profit or net loss 25, 34-36, 40, 44, 51, 

71, 79, 81, 83 



Capital assets: 

Long-term 26, 69 

Net gain and/or net loss from sales.... 6, 8, 25-26, 
28, 34-35, 37, 41, 45, 52, 69-71 

Short-term 26, 69 

Capital gains and losses: 

Capital loss carryover 25-26, 69-70 

Description 25-26 

Excess of net long-term capital gain over 

net short-term capital loss 5, 25-26, 

28-29, 70 

Fiduciary income inclusion of 25-26 

Long-term, definition of 26 

Net gain or loss from sales of capital 

assets 6, 8, 25-26, 28, 34-35, 37, 41, 

45, 52, 69-71 

Net long-term capital gain or loss 5, 25-26, 28, 

69-70 



Declaration of estimated tax 5, 30 

Deductions : 

Child care 7, 9, 27, 34-35, 48, 84 

Contributions 6, 9, 15, 26-27, 34-35, 48, 55, 84 

Expenses as outside salesman 9-10, 25, 28 

Gifts 6, 9, 15 

Interest paid 6, 26-27, 34, 48, 55, 84 

Itemized 5-6, 8, 10-11, 23, 25-27, 33-34, 

48, 55, 63, 79, 84 
Losses from fire, storm, other casualty, 

theft 7, 27, 29, 34-35, 48 

Medical and dental expenses (including drug 

costs) 6-7, 9, 16-17, 27, 34-35, 48, 55, 84 

Net operating loss 6, 8, 25-26, 29, 34-35, 37, 

41, 45, 79, 81 

Nonbusiness 5, 8, 10, 26-27, 34-35, 55 

Other 9, 27, 34, 48, 84 

Sick-pay exclusions 6, 9-10, 12, 24-25 

Standard 6, 10-11, 23, 28, 34, 61, 79 

Taxes 6, 27 

Total 11, 34, 48, 79, 84 

Transportation expenses not reimbursed 9, 10, 

25, 28 

Deficit, adjusted gross 5, 28, 33-35, 38, 75, 79, 81 

Dependents : 

Defined 8-9, 24, 27-28, 89 

Students 9, 28 

Test for determining 9, 28 



129 



130 



INDEX 



Page 
Description of sample and limitations of data... 21-23 
Dividends received: 

After exclusions 10, 1^, 25-26, 35-36, AO, 44, 

50, 71 

Credit for 5-6, 8-10, 12-15, 29, 38, 42, 

46, 49, 56-57 

Eligible for exclusion 13-14, 25-26 

Foreign and domestic 25, 29 

Total 5-6, 8, 10, 13-15, 38, 42, 46, 

49, 56-57, 79, 81 



Effective tax rates. (See also Tax rates.) 58 

Employee ' s death benefits 9 

Estates and trusts, income and/or loss from 6, 8, 

25-26, 34-35, 38, 42, 46, 54, 79-81 

Estimated tax 5, 30 

Exemptions : 

Age and/or blindness 8, 11-12, 17-19, 27-28, 65, 

67, 87 

Amount of 9-12, 26-28, 36-44, 46-47, 49, 

59-64, 89 

Marital status 5, 10-12, 23, 27-28, 89 

Number 11-12, 27-29, 65-68, 89 

Other than age and/or blindness 24-25, 27-28, 

65-68, 89 

Per capita 5, 12, 24, 27-28, 89 

Personal 8-12, 27-28, 89 

Expenses as outside salesman 9-10, 25, 28 

Explanation of classifications and terms 23-27 



Facsimiles of income tax returns 94-127 

Federal tax laws , synopsis of 87-91 

Filing requirements 89, 91 

Fiscal year returns 10, 29 

Foreign tax credit 5, 8, 13, 29, 43, 47, 49 

Forms (1040 and 1040A) . . . 1, 10-14, 21-26, 28-30, 95-127 



Pagg 

Income. (See Adjusted gross. Gross, Other, 
Sources of. Taxable.) 

Income earned over period of years 8-9, 17 

Income from estates and trusts (fiduciaries).... 6, 8, 

13, 25-26, 34-35, 38, 
42, 46, 54, 79, 81 

Income tax before credits 29, 42, 46, 49 

Income tax laws. (See also Internal Revenue 

Code of 1954.) 87-92 

Income tax liability 5, 7, 9-10, 29, 33, 39, 43, 47, 

49, 56-64, 71-74, 79-80, 86 

Income tax liability after credits 29, 33, 39, 43, 

47, 49, 56-64, 71-74, 79-80, 86 
Income taxes paid to foreign countries and 

United States possessions.... 5, 8, 12, 29, 43, 47, 49 
Individual income tax provisions for 1954: 

Gross income, 65 and older 8, 17-18, 28 

Income tax rates 5, 8, 10-11, 28-29, 56-58, 

90-91 

Period of time covered 

Insurance as reimbursement of medical expenses. 



(See 



90-91 
17 
26-27 



29 



Interest from tax-free covenant bonds 

al so Tax paid at source . ) 

Interest paid 6, 26-27, 34, 48, 55, 84 

Interest received 6, 25-26, 29, 34-36, 40, 44, 

50, 71, 79, 81 

Internal Revenue Code of 1954 Ill, 8-10, 12, 15-16, 

24, 26, 28, 89-91 

Introduction 1 

Itemized deductions: 

Explanation of 23, 26-27 

Nonbusiness 5, 8, 10, 26-27, 48, 55 

Returns with 6, 10-11, 33-34, 48, 54, 63 



Joint returns of husbands and wives 6, 10-13, 15, 

23, 27-28, 36-43, 56, 59, 
61, 63, 65-66, 89-90 



Gambling losses and profits 26 

Gifts 6, 9, 15 

Gross income: (See also Adjusted gross income.) 

Exclusions from 6, 8-9 

Requirements for filing 28, 89 



H 

Heads of household 5, 



9-12, 23-24, 27-28, 57, 60, 
62-64, 67, 89-90 
Historical data, 1913-1944. (See "Statistics of 

Income for 1950, Part 1.") 
Historical data, 1945-1954: 

Adjusted gross deficit 79, 81 

Adjusted gross income 79-86 

Adjusted gross income classes 79-80, 82-83 

Average income tax per taxable return 80 

Deductions 79 , 84 

Effective income tax rate 90 

Laws, synopsis of Federal tax 89-91 

Losses 79, 81 

Nontaxable returns 79 

Number of returns 79-80 , 85 

Sources of income 79, 81-83 

States and Territories 85-86 

Tax liability (income and self-employment 

tax) 79-80 

Tax rates (1944-1954) 90-91 

Taxable returns 79 

Husbands, returns of. (See also Married persons 

and Marital status.).. 9-12, 27, 59, 61, 63, 65-66, 89 



Laws , synopsis of Federal tax 87-92 

Life insurance 9 

Long-form returns. (See Forms.) 

Long-term capital assets 26, 69 

Long-term capital gain or loss, net 5, 25-26, 

28-29, 70 
Losses, casualty 7, 27, 29, 34-35, 48, 84 



M 

Major characteristics of 1954 

Marital status 5, 8-11, 23, 27, 59 

Married persons : 

Deductions 

Returns of 9-12, 17, 23-24, 27, 56, 

63, 65, 67-68 
Tabulation of returns for 

Maximum rate limitation 

Medical and dental expenses: 

Cost of medicine and drugs 9, 16' 

Deductions for 6-7, 9, 16-17, 27 

Insurance compensation for 17 

Total 6-7, 9, 16-17, 27, 35, 48, 

Methods of taxpayment 



N 

Net capital gain or loss. (See Capital gains 

and losses . ) 
Net deficit. (See Adjusted gross deficit.) 



■68, 89 



9 


-12 


59, 


61. 


, 89 


-90 




11 


28, 


90 


-17, 


27 


. 34 


-35 


. 26 


-27 


55. 


84 




5-6 



INDEX 

Page 



131 



Net gain and/or loss from sales of capital 

assets 6, 8, 25-26, 28, 3^-35, 37, 41, ^5, 

52, 69-71, 79, 81 
Net gain and/or loss from sales of property 

other than capital assets 26, 79, 81 

Net income. (See Taxable income.) 

Net operating loss deduction 6-8, 25-26, 29, 3'i-35, 

37, Ul, 45, 79, 81 

Net profit or loss from business or profession.. 25, 

34-36, 40, 44, 51, 71, 79, 81, 83 

Net profit or loss from partnerships 6, 25, 34-36, 

40, 44, 51, 71, 79, 81, 83 

Net profit or loss from rents and royalties 6, 8, 

26, 34-35, 37, 41, 45, 

53, 71, 79, 81, 83 

No adjusted gross income (deficit), returns with 5, 23, 

33, 36-55, 59-69, 75, 77, 81-84 

Nonbusiness deductions 5, 8, 10, 26-27, 34-35, 55 

Nontaxable and taxable returns combined 5, 11-15, 

18-19, 33-57, 59-69, 71-74, 79 

Nontaxable returns 5, 10-12, 23, 33-57, 59-69, 

71-74, 79 

Normal tax 8, 90 

Normal tax and surtax 8, 24, 28-29, 56-58, 90 

Normal tax net income. (See Taxable income.) 

Number of exemptions 11-12, 27-29, 65-68, 89 

Number of exemptions classes 24, 65-68, 89 

Number of returns. (See the specific classifi- 
cations of interest.) 
Number of returns filed 5-7, 11, 21, 33-36 



Operating loss deduction, net 6-8, 25-26, 29, 34-35, 

37, 41, 45, 79, 81 

Optional return. Form 1040A 1, 10-11, 21-26, 28, 

125-127 
Optional standard deduction. (See also Standard 

deduction.) 10' 23-24, 28 

Optional tax 5, 10, 24, 28-29 

Other deductions 9, 27,. 34, 48, 84 

Other sources of income 8, 14, 26, 34-35, 38, 

42, 46, 79, 81 
Other "Statistics of Income" Publications for 



1954. 



IV 



Overpayment (refund, or credit on 1954 estimated 

tax) 5-6, 30, 39, 43, 47 



Partially tax-exempt interest credit... 5, 8, 25-26, 29, 

39, 43, 47, 49 

Part year returns 10, 29 

Partnerships: 

Deductible expenses 25 

Dividends received ^> 25 

Net profit or net loss 6, 25, 34-36, 40, 44, 

51, 79, 81, 83 

Payments on 1954 declaration of tax 30, 39, 43, 79 

Pensions. (See Aimuities and pensions.) 
Percentage distribution of number of returns, 

adjusted gross income, and tax liability 33 

Percentage increase or decrease in number of 
returns, income, deficit, and taxes: 1954 and 

1953 5 

Personal exemptions 9-11 

Prior years, compensation for 25-26, 69-70 

Prizes and awards 8-9 , 26 

Property other than capital assets, sales of.. 6, 8, 28, 

34-35, 37, 41, 45, 52, 79, 81 



R Page 

Receipts, total, from business or profession 6, 25, 

34-36, 71, 81, 83 
Receipts, total, from partnership... 6, 34-36, 71, 81, 83 

Recovery of bad debts 26 

Refunds 5-6, 28, 30, 39, 43, 47 

Rents and royalties: 

Deductions for 28-29 

Definition of 26 

Interest relating to 27 

Net profit or net loss from.... 6, 8, 26, 34-35, 37, 

41, 45, 53, 71, 79, 81, 83 

Requirements for filing 89 , 91 

Resident aliens '^ > 28 

Retirement income and credit 5, 7-8, 10, 17-19, 29, 

38, 42, 46, 49, 56 

Returns from which data were tabulated 1, 9-10 

Retiirns , method of taxpayment used 5^6 

Revenue Acts amending Code 89-91 

Rewards. (See Prizes and awards.) 

Royalties, rents and 6, 8, 26-29, 34-35, 37, 41, 

45, 53, 71, 79, 81, 83 



Salaries and wages 6, 8, 10, 12, 24-25, 29-30, 

34-36, 40, 44, 50, 71, 79 
Sales of capital assets, net gain or net loss... 6, 8, 

25-26, 28, 34-35, 37, 41, 45, 
52, 69-71, 79, 81 
Sales of property other than capital assets, net 

sain or net loss 6, 8, 28, 34-35, 37, 41, 45, 

^ 52, 79, 81 

Sample, description of ^^'^^ 

Scholarship and fellowship grants 9 

Self-employment tax 5-6, 9, 23-24, 29, 75-76, 

Separate returns of husbands and wives 9-12, 16, 

23-24, 27, 56, 59, 61, 63, 
66, 89-90 
Short-form returns. (See Forms.) 

Short-term capital assets 26, 69 

Short-term capital gain or loss, net 5-6, 24-26, 

28-29, 69-70 

Sick pay exclusions 6, 9-10, 12, 24-25 

Simple and aggregated distributions of number 
of retiorns, adjusted gross income, and tax 

33 

9, 11-12, 27, 56, 60, 62, 
64, 68, 89-90 

Size of deduction 23, 55 

Size of source 23, 50-54 

Sole proprietors. (See also Business or pro- 

f ession. ) •_ ^' ^-^ 

Sources of income or loss comprising adjusted 

gross income 23-24, 34-47, 79, 81-83 

Split-income rate 5 , 9 , 11 , 28 

Standard deduction 6, 10-11, 23, 28, 34, 61, 75 

6 

6 



liability. 
Single persons, returns of. 



State and local taxes 

State and municipal bonds 

States and Territories 24, 71-74, 76, 85-86 

Summary, general. (See Major characteristics.) 

Surtax: 

Amount of -^L 

Defined 29 

Percent limitation of taxable income 90 

Rates 8, 24, 28-29, 58 

Returns with • 56-58 

Surtax net income. (See Taxable income.) 

Surviving spouse 9-12, 23-24, 27-28, 56, 60, 

62, 64, 67-68, 89-90 

Sweepstake winnings ^° 

Synopsis of tax laws for Individual income 87-92 



132 



INDEX 



T Page 

Tabulated data. (See also Basic tables. Indi- 
vidual Retiirns, 1954, pp. 33-76.) 5, 11-15, 

17-2^, 28 

Tax. (See Alternative, Average, Computation of , 
Effective rate. Estimated, Foreign, Federal 
tax laws. Normal, Optional, Method of payment. 
Self-employment, State and local. Surtax.) 

Tax base. (See Taxable income.) 

Tax computation 6, 10, 15-16, 23-2-4, 28-30, 

89-91 

Tax credits: 

Dividends received 5-6, 8-10, 12-15, 29, 38, 

A2, Ae, A9, 56-57 

Foreign tax 5, 8, 29, 39, '43, /V?, A9 

Partially tax-exempt interest 5, 8, 25-26, 29, 

39, A3, 47, A9 

Retirement income 5, 7-8, 10, 17-19, 29, 38, 

A2, 46, 49, 56 

Tax paid at source 5, 29, 39, 43, 47, 49 

Tax due at time of filing 30, 39, 43, 47 

Tax-free covenant bonds, interest on. (See also 

Tax paid at source, ) 29 

Tax items 28-30 

Tax liability: 

Amount 5, 33, 39, 43, 47, 49, 56-64, 

71-74, 79-80, 86 

Income tax 5, 7, 9-10, 29, 33, 39, 43, 

47, 49, 56-64, 71-74, 79-80, 86 

Returns 5, 9, 56-57 

Self -employment tax 5, 23, 79 

Tax limitation 28-29, 90 

Tax overpayment. (See ai so Refunds. ) 5-6 

Taxpayments 5-6, 29-30, 39, 43, 47 

Tax paid at source credit 5, 29, 39, 43, 47, 49 

Tax rates '5, 8, 10-11, 28-29, 56-58, 90-91 

Tax rates, effective 58 



Page 

Tax refund 5-6, 28, 30, 39, 43, 47 

Tax withheld 5, 29-30, 39, 43, 47 

Taxable income: 

Amount of 5, 11, 33, 38, 42, 46, 49, 

56-64, 77 

Classes 23, 26, 56-57 

Computation of 8, 10, 15, 25-28 

Definition of 8, 28 

Returns with itemized deductions 6, 10, 26-27, 

33-34, 48, 54, 63 
Taxable and nontaxable retxirns: 

Classification of 5 

Combined 5, 11-15, 17-19, 33-57, 59-69, 

71-74, 79 

Taxable returns 5, 10-19, 23, 33-74, 79-80 

Taxes paid 6, 26-27 

Tax paid to a foreign country or possession of 

the United States 5, 8, 13, 29, 43, 47, 49 

Tentative returns 10 

Total deductions 11, 34, 48, 79, 84 

Travel expenses not reimbursed 9-10, 25, 28 

Trusts, income and/or loss from estates and... 6, 8, 25, 

34-35, 38, 42, 46, 54, 79, 81 
Types of tax. (See also Normal tax. Surtax, 
Alternative tax. Optional tax, and Self- 
employment tax. ) 24 



Wage continuation plan 9 

Wages, salaries and 6, 8, 10, 12, 24-25, 29, 

3^36, 40, 44, 50, 71, 79 
Wives, returns of. (See also Married persons 

and Marital status.) 9-12, 27, 59, 61, 63, 

65-66, 89 
Withheld tax 5, 29-30, 39, 43, 47 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1957 O -445805