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ST. LOUIS 



History of the Fourth City 

1763-1909 



By WALTER B. STEVENS 



"//f saii^ he had found a situation udicre lie was going to form a settlement i^'hieh might 
become one of the finest cities of America.^' — Laclede's propliecy from the narrative of the settlement 
of St. Louis by Auguste Chouteau. 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOL. II 



Chicago -St. Louis: 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING CO. 

1909 



1142441 




E. O. STANARD 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



EDWIN O. STANARD. 

Edwin O. Stanard, president of the Stanard-Tilton Milling Company, stands 
as a representative of that class of business men who, when called to public 
service, have given proof not only of loyalty and patriotism, but also of business 
ability in handling public affairs that has made their service of signal value to 
the commonwealth and to the nation. As lieutenant governor and representa- 
tive of his district in congress his labors were of the utmost benefit to his con- 
stituents and the people at large. While political ambition has never been a 
characteristic of his life, when called by his fellowmen to serve them, he brought 
to bear in the discharge of his duties the same conscientious purpose, laudable 
ambition and unfaltering determination which have characterized him in every 
other relation. 

New Hampshire numbers him as a native son, his birth having occurred in 
Newport, January 5, 1832, his parents being Obed and Elizabeth N. (Webster) 
Stanard. He is descended from an honored New England ancestry. His great- 
grandfather W^ebster and his great-grandfather, William Stai\ard, both won 
renown as soldiers of the Revolution. The latter was a member of the com- 
mittee of safety of Newport, New Hampshire, and also served as a private under 
command of Captain Uriah Wilcox and Colonel Benjamin Ballou. His great- 
grandfather Webster was a lieutenant in Captain Joseph Dearborn's New Hamp- 
shire Company, which marched with the Continental troops against Canada in 
1776 under the leadership of General Montgomery. 

Obed Stanard. father of the Hon. Edwin O. Stanard, devoted his life to 
general agricultural pursuits and in 1836 left the old Granite state to become a 
resident of Van Buren county, Iowa, which at that time was under territorial 
rule. The Indians far outnumbered the white settlers save as the latter race 
had made settlement along the Mississippi river and were engaged in trade 
there. A few venturesome and courageous spirits had pushed their way into 
the interior and were reclaiming the state for the uses of civilization. 

Amid the scenes and environments of pioneer life Edwin O. Stanard spent 
his early boyhood. The state became rapidly settled, however, and provided 
excellent opportunities for a younger generation, especially in educational lines. 
Mr. Stanard attended the public schools of Iowa and afterward became a stu- 
dent in Lane's Academy at Keosauqua. Iowa, where he completed his course at 
the age of twentv vears. He afterward engaged in teaching school. On leaving 
Iowa he came to St. Louis and later went to Madison countv, Illinois, where he 



6 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

followed the profession of teaching for three years. Believing that it would 
prove a wise step to qualify more fully for the duties of a commercial career, 
he matriculated in the Jone^s Commercial College, of St. Louis, in the summer 
of iSs5 si^d in 1856 secured a position as bookkeeper with a business firm of 
Alton, Illinois. 

About two years later ^Ir. Stanard established a commission business in 
St. Louis,, continuing this until 1866. In the undertaking he manifested the 
same spirit of undaunted enterprise and unabating energy that has characterized 
him throughout his entire life and thus he laid the foundation for his present 
success. In fact the growth of his business was such that he felt justified in 
entering into broader fields of labor and established several branch houses in 
other cities. In 1865 he turned his attention to the milling business also in St. 
Louis, under the name of E. O. Stanard & Company and thus started upon a 
business career that has been crowned with splendid success. Two years later 
he purchased a large flour mill in Alton, Illinois, and since that time the name 
of Stanard has become synonymous with milling operations in the middle west. 
The name of the firm was changed to the E. O. Stanard INIilling Company in 
1886 and to the Stanard-Tilton Milling Company in January, 1906, with Mr. 
Stanard at its head. He has since been the chief executive officer, for a period 
of a third of a century, while Mr. Tilton has been secretary of the company for 
twenty years. Thoroughness and system have always characterized the conduct 
of the business and the several brands of flour which the company have pro- 
duced have become recognized as among the best on the market, while the sales 
have extended not only throughout the United States, but also into Europe 
as well. 

Mr. Stanard is a man of the keenest discernment. He looks from the cir- 
cumference to the very center of things and seems to recognize with almost 
intuitive perception the elements which enter into a business interest and consti- 
tute the features of its success or failure. Such is the regard entertained for his 
judgment that his advice has been again and again sought on matters of moment 
in the business world and his cooperation has been solicited for the furtherance 
of many enterprises. He is now a director in the St. Louis Union Trust Company 
and also a director in the Boatmen's Bank. 

His public service, too, has been of a most important nature. Few men 
have displayed such intense and active interest in the welfare of the city without 
hope of some reward for time and effort expended in promoting public progress. 
Mr. Stanard has been a conspicuous figure on the floor of the Merchants' 
Exchange and has for many years occupied official positions therein, serving as 
president in 1865. He has also been one of the vice presidents of the National 
Board of Trade. During the year 1903 he was president of the directorate of the 
St. Louis Exposition and was a leader in the Autumnal Festivities Association, 
now known as the Business Men's League. He has also been president of the 
Citizens Fire Insurance Company for fourteen years. He has displayed the 
utmost zeal and devotion in promoting interests of public moment and has been 
a frequent delegate to commercial and similar conventions in the principal cities 
of the Union, where his known standing in business circles has given his word 
weight in the councils. He is a close student of the questions of the day and of 
subjects of vital concern to the country and when he expresses an opinion 
thereon his views are always clear and forcible and based upon strong reasoning 
and logical deductions. 

While St. Louis has profited largely by his efforts in business and kindred 
avenues, the leaders of the republican party, to the principles of which he had 
long given stalwart support, recognized in him a man whose name and labors 
might prove of the strongest benefit in party work. Up to 1866 he had never 
been active in party ranks, but in that year the republicans of the state nominated 
him for lieutenant governor on the McClurg ticket. This honor came to him 
entirely unsolicited and in fact was a matter of intense surprise to him. When 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 7 

the leaders of the party impressed upon his mind the fact that it was a duty 
which he owed to the state to serve its interests, utihzing his abihty for the 
benefit of the commonweahh at large, he consented to become a candidate and 
entered heartily into the work of the campaign. He is naturally a tluent speaker 
and yet one wdio convinces rather by his clear, concise statement of facts than 
by the employment of any particular oratorical power. He readily understood 
all the strong points in his party's cause and the fact that a man of i\Ir. Stanard's 
well known business standing and integrity was endorsing certain measures was 
proof to many of his fellow citizens that they were worthy of uniform support. 
Sincerity, enthusiasm and loyalty marked all of his public utterances and he 
aided in molding the policy of the state during his service as lieutenant governor 
as few men in the second highest office in the commonwealth have done. The 
duties of his position included the forming of the committees of the senate as 
well as presiding over the proceedings of that body. In the former he dis- 
played the most clear and sound judgment in determining the various capaci- 
ties and aptitudes of the members whom he named for committee work. As 
a presiding officer he was always fair and impartial and public interests never 
suffered in the slightest degree in his hands. He made such an excellent record 
as lieutenant governor that on the expiration of his term of service his fellow 
citizens demanded that he should represent them in congress and in 1870 he 
became the republican candidate. He then resided in the lower congressional 
district of St. Louis, where the liberal republican sentiment was strongest. 
Colonel Grosvenor, editor of the Democrat, was made the candidate of the 
liberal party, with Governor Stanard as the nominee of the radical wing. The 
democracy had no candidate in the field, but in convention endorsed Colonel 
Grosvenor. Against this strong combination Lieutenant Governor Stanard was 
elected, largely through his forceful personal character and the implicit con- 
fidence which the people at large had in his ability and his fidelity to their in- 
terests. He took his seat in congress and at once began laboring earnestly and 
effectively toward promoting legislation which he deemed would prove of value 
to the country at large, and especially to the middle west. Up to this time con- 
gressmen from the east had been loath to vote appropriations for the mainte- 
nance and improvement of western and southern waterways. The question of 
cheap transportation to the seaboard involved the loading of vessels at New 
Orleans that might successfully pass the delta obstructions in the lower Missis- 
sippi. This question was of the utmost importance to St. Louis and other 
river points and Mr. Stanard devoted untiring energy to the presentation of the 
subject before the members of congress in such a way that sufficient legisla- 
tion should be enacted. At length congress consented to try the experiment of 
keeping a deep channel between New Orleans and the Gulf of ^Mexico by means 
of jetties and Captain Eads was placed in charge of the work, although limited 
to the least promising of the three passes or mouths of the jSIississippi river. 
All acknowledge the indebtedness of the middle west to Mr. Stanard and his 
associates in this w^ork. Through the building of the jetties the Mississippi 
was made navigable to the gulf and has been so continued by means of the 
work carried on since that time. 

His congressional work ended Mr. Stanard's active service in political cir- 
cles. He preferred to devote his time to his business interests and yet his finan- 
cial aid and personal cooperation have been given to many movements for the 
benefit of the city. He looks at life from no narrow or contracted view, but 
studies all vital questions from every standpoint, and gives his opinions as the 
result of careful consideration. . 

On the 5th of June, 1866, in Iowa City, Iowa, Mr. Stanard was married 
to Miss Esther A. Kauffman, who died in 1906, leaving two daughters and a 
son. The elder daughter. Cora, is the wife of E. D. Tilton, secretary of the 
Stanard-Tilton Milling Company. W. K. is vice president of the Stanard-Til- 
ton Milling Company. Ella is at home. 



8 ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 

Air. Staiiard has long been a devoted member of the ^^lethodist Episcopal 
church and was selected by the Missouri conference as a delegate to the Ecumen- 
ical council at London in 1881. He does not carry sectarianism to the point of 
aggressiveness ; on the contrary he is broad-minded and is in hearty sympathy 
with ever}- movement that tends to uplift mankind, believing that the race is 
drawing all the time nearer and nearer toward that Ideal which was placed 
before the world in Palestine more than nineteen hundred years ago. In man- 
ner he is unaffected, cordial and sincere and has a most extensive circle of 
friends in all classes of people, including those who have been high in authoritv 
in state and national councils, men who have been prominent in controlling mam- 
moth trade relations and also among those who occupy humble positions in life. 
True worth always wins his appreciation and recognition and the quality of 
honorable manhood always awakens his respect and regard. 



FIRAIIN DESLOGE. 



Firmin Desloge, possessing the power to control, to assimilate and to shape 
into unity the varied forces which go to make up a successful business enter- 
prise, stands today prominent among the business men of St. Louis as vice 
president, general manager and treasurer of the Desloge Consolidated Lead 
Company. This company in its mining interests is operating at the town of 
Desloge, ^Missouri, with general offices at St. Louis. Mr. Desloge, who is the 
moving spirit in the enterprise, was born in Potosi, Washington county, this 
state, in 1843. 

His father, Firmin Desloge, was born in Nantes, France, and in 1825 came 
to America, settling at St. Genevieve, Missouri, whence he afterward removed 
to Potosi. He became a prominent and influential spirit there, engaged in 
general merchandising and passed away in 1856. His wife, Mrs. Cynthia 
(Mcllvaine) Desloge, was a native of Missouri and a representative of an old 
Kentucky family, tracing her ancestry to the Hoards of that state and to the 
Mcllvaines, who were also prominent there. Representatives of these families 
are still found in Kentucky. ]\[rs. Desloge, surviving her husband for about six 
years, passed away in 1862. 

Firmin Desloge acquired his education in the St. Louis University, in the 
Edward Wyman school and in Bryant & Stratton College, pursuing a com- 
mercial course,, which he completed when about twenty years of age. He made 
his entrance into the business world as a clerk in St. Louis, where he continued 
for two years. On the expiration of that period he became connected with 
the development of the mineral resources of the state in the lead district of 
Potosi, taking up the actual work of the mines in order to thoroughly acquaint 
himself with the business in every department. His father had been the owner 
of lead property there and, taking charge of the business, Firmin Desloge so 
continued until 1873. He then went to St. Francois county in search of a larger 
field for operation, having been quite successful in his efforts in the vicinity 
of Potosi. In St. Francois county he organized what was known as the 
Desloge Lead Company anfl opened mines adjoining the St. Joseph Lead, estab- 
lishing works and developing and operating the property until 1886. This 
was an extensive mining enterprise and the business was successfully con- 
ducted until the concentrating plant was destroyed by fire-. This caused him to 
make arrangements to cooperate with the St. Joseph Lead Company, which 
he did upon terms that were very advantageous. Later with business associates 
he acquired and developed what is now known as the mines of the Desloge 
Consolidated Lead Companv, thi^- company takmg over the properties of the 
St. Francois Lead Mining Com])any, and the Mina A. Joe lead mine. These 
properties were developed under the management of Mr. Desloge, who had 




FIRMIN DESLOGE 



10 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

constantly enlarged and extended his operations and now has a mammoth plant- 
He is acquiring" new territory all of the time and making new improvements. 
The company mines, concentrates, smelts and sells pig lead. The Mississippi 
River & Bonna Terra Railroad has been extended through this property and 
the town of Desloge was established and incorporated in 1890. Something of 
the growth of the "business of the Desloge Consolidated Lead Company is indi- 
cated by the fact that employment is now furnished to five hundred men, although 
at the beginning there were only enough men to work a single shaft. Lewis 
Fusz is president of the company, with Mr. Desloge as the vice president, gen- 
eral manager and treasurer. He is also a director of the St. Joseph Lead. 
Company. 

In 1877 occurred the marriage of Mr. Desloge and Miss Lydia Davis, 
of Lexington, Missouri. They have two sons : Firmin, who was born in Desloge 
in 1878 and is now superintendent of the mines; Joseph, who was born January 
ij, 1888, and is attending the St. Louis University. The parents are com- 
municants of the Catholic Cathedral and Mr. Desloge is a member of the 
^Mercantile Club and the Merchants Exchange. He votes with the republican 
party, manifesting a citizen's interest in politics. The only office he has ever filled 
was that of treasurer of Washington county, Missouri, from 1866 until 1868. 
He has always preferred to concentrate his time and energies upon his busi- 
ness, keeping in close touch with all the details and so coordinating his forces 
as to produce the strongest possible results. His discriminative power enables 
him to determine with accuracy the value of any situation or possibility and to. 
bring into a unified force the various departments and complex interests of 
the business. His life record stands as an exemplification of the fact that 
success is not a matter of genius, as held by some, but the outcome of clear 
judgment, experience and intelligently directed effort. 



HENRY W. KIEL. 



Henry A\'. Kiel, president of the Kiel & Danes Bricklaying & Contracting 
Company, and secretary of the Contracting & Supply Company, of St. Louis,, 
belongs to that class of business men of whom the world needs more. While 
conducting a successful and growing business, he is at the same time interested, 
in the fair adjustment of all labor difficulties, and fully regards the obligations 
of the employer as well as of the employe. He is secretary of the Master Brick- 
layers Association since 1897, and in this connection is well known to the trade in 
the city. 

Mr. Kiel was born February 21, 1871, in St. Louis. His father, Henry F. 
Kiel, well known as a contractor, died March 31, 1908. He served for three 
years as a private in the Civil war and was prominent in Grand Army affairs. 
His wife, Mrs. Minnie C. Kiel, died August 28, 1879. 

The early education of Henry W. Kiel was acquired in the public schools of 
St. Louis, and between the ages of fourteen and seventeen years he was a stu- 
dent in Smith Academy, and pursued a year's course in architectural work after 
completing his academical studies. In his boyhood days he displayed consider- 
able mechanical ingenuity and interest in mechanical structure, and after leaving 
school he served an apprenticeship to the bricklayer's trade under the direction 
of his father and became thoroughly familiar with the business in principle and 
detail, acquainting himself with the practical work of building, as well as the 
great scientific ];rinciples which underlie construction. It was the father's desire 
that the son should succeed him in business and thoroughly qualify for the work. 
Henry W. Kiel is now president of the Kiel & Danes Bricklaying & Contracting 
Company, having served as vice president prior to his father's death. Follow- 
ing the incorporation of the Contracting & Supply Company, in 1903, he became 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 11 

its secretary and has thus been connected with it to the present time. The Kiel 
& Danes Bricklaying & Contracting Company is engaged in brick and mason 
work, having the contract for the brick and mason work on the new Soldan high 
school and the East St. Louis postofifice at the present writing. Many other im- 
portant contracts have been executed by them, the company being prominently 
known in building circles in St. Louis. The Contracting & Supply Company are 
dealers in building materials and have an extensive patronage, both business 
enterprises with which Mr. Kiel is connected constituting important factors in 
the commercial and industrial activity of the city. He is also acting as secretary 
of the Master Bricklayers Benevolent and Protective Association, which is an 
organization composed of master bricklayers, its object being mutual assistance 
and benevolence. He has occupied this official position in connection therewith 
since 1897. 

On the 1st of September, 1892, in St. Louis, Mr. Kiel was married to Miss. 
Irene H. Moonan. They have four children : Henrietta, fourteen years of age ; 
Elmer A., twelve years ; Clarence C, ten years ; and Edna, eight years of age. 

Aside from his business and home life Mr. Kiel takes an active interest in 
politics as an advocate of republican principles and for two years served as chair- 
man of the twelfth district of the Missouri republican congressional committee^ 
He is also a member of the republican city committee from the thirteenth ward, 
and treasurer of the republican city committee. He was nominated and elected a 
yjresidential elector at large from this state on the republican ticket in 1908 and 
was selected the messenger to deliver the electoral vote to the president of the 
United States senate. He feels that it is the duty as well as the privilege of 
every American citizen to express his opinions through the ballot on the ques- 
tions and issues of the day and to keep thoroughly informed concerning these. 
His devotion to his native city has been manifest in many tangible ways, includ- 
ing hearty and helpful cooperation in movements which have promoted civic 
virtues and civic pride, and that have advanced municipal welfare along sub- 
stantial lines. 



THOMAS WRIGHT. 



Thomas Wright, a retired merchant, long and successfully connected with 
the manufacturing and sale of cigars, from which point of operations he extended 
his activities in various lines, bringing him into close connection with financial 
and other interests is now enjoying a well earned rest that has followed as the 
logical sequence of his previous energy and enterprise. Born in New York city, 
January 27, 1841, he is a son of Robert and Martha Wright and in the public 
schools of the eastern metropolis pursued his education. He served through the 
Civil war in the Army of the Potomac, enlisting in May, 1861, as a private, and 
taking part in many sanguinary conflicts which led up to the final victory that 
crowned the Union arms. His valor and meritorious conduct won him success- 
ive promotions to the rank of major, and he was later brevetted lieutenant colonel, 
being mustered out in November, 1865. 

On the 3d of March, 1869, Mr. Wright was married in New York to ]\Iiss 
Emilie Garrigue. Their living children are : Waldemar R., who married Marian 
Wyeth and has four children, Margaret E., Roy Thomas, John Wyeth and Eliz- 
abeth ; Guy H., who married Frances Glenn ; and Ralph G., who is professor of 
chemistry at Rutgers College, New Jersey. They have also lost a daughter and 
son, Charlotte and Roy H. 

Coming to St. Louis after the close of the war Mr. Wright, in March, 1866, 
established a cigar business at the corner of Third and Olive streets under the 
firm name of T. Wright & Company, and so continued until 1896, when he 
retired, although the business has since been continued by his brother, John H. 
Wright and his son, Waldemar R. Wright, having been incorporated as the T. 



12 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

^^'right & Company Cigar Company. They are conducting business at No. 800 
Olive street and also at Xo. 300 Olive street. During thirty years connection 
with the business Mr. Wright enjoyed a large and grov^ang trade that made his 
one of the leading enterprises of the character in the city. He wrought along 
modern business lines, his energy and determination carrying him into progress- 
ive methods which proved resultant factors in the acquirement of gratifying suc- 
cess. As he prospered in his undertakings he made judicious investments in 
other lines that constituted good revenue-paying properties. He is now the pres- 
ident of the Chemical Building Company and the New Imperial Building Com- 
pany, Thomas ^^'rig■ht Investment Company and the Monetary Realty & Build- 
ing Compau}-, while in more strictly financial circles he is known as a director of 
the Third National Bank ; and of the Missouri Lincoln Trust Company. The 
soundness of his business judgment finds demonstration in the prosperity to which 
he has attained, while the integrity of his commercial methods is manifest in the 
high regard everywhere entertained for him by his business colleagues, associates 
and representatives. Mr. Wright is, moreover, a valued member of the Business 
Men's League and the Mercantile Club, while in fraternal lines he is connected 
with the ISIasons, and his interest in military affairs is indicated by his member- 
ship in the Loyal Legion and the Grand Army of the Republic. 



SAMUEL WESLEY FORDYCE. 

It has been given to some men to figure largely in the upbuilding of a great 
nation. When the final word is written due recognition must inevitably be 
accorded to those men who, with big brain, big heart and sturdy courage, led 
the wav in railroad building into the outposts of the far west and the imperial 
southwest and opened up a vast domain to the people, enlarging the opportuni- 
ties for the homeseeker and touching, in an ever widening circle, the activities 
of men of all professions, trades and callings. These men, the pioneers upon 
whom fell the brunt of initiating great enterprises in untried fields and who 
were trulv representative of the American spirit of enterprise and successful 
achievement, have largely passed away. 

Of the survivors is Samuel Wesley Fordyce, of St. Louis, Missouri. Born 
in Guernsey county, Ohio, February 7, 1840, the son of John Fordyce and Mary 
Ann Houseman, both of Pennsylvania, Samuel Wesley Fordyce inherited the 
strong qualities of the Scotch and the Dutch, his paternal grandfather, John, 
emigrating to western Pennsylvania from Scotland, shortly before the war of 
the Revolution, while his maternal grandfather emigrated from Holland to the 
same section soon after. The family included ten children, of whom three sur- 
vive, the others being J. B. Fordyce, of Hot Springs, Arkansas; and Dr. John 
A. Fordyce. the noted specialist, of New York city. 

Like many of the men who later became prominent in the larger affairs of 
the nation. Samuel Wesley Fordyce secured his earlier education in the common 
schools of his native county. Subsequently he attended what was then known 
as Madison College, at Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and later he studied at the 
North Illinois University at Henry, Illinois. Thus equipped with a better edu- 
cation than was the lot of the ordinary boy of that period, he returned home and 
at the age of twenty began his career as a station agent on the Central Ohio 
Railroad, now a part of the Baltimore & Ohio system. The following year found 
him enlisting as a private in the First Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and his record in 
the Civil war, like that of his subsequent career, is one of distinguished service. 
Enlisting as a private he was soon chosen second lieutenant and later promoted 
to a first lieutenancy of Company B, First Ohio Volunteers. In 1863 he was 
again honored by promotion to a captaincy in command of Company H and a 
few months later was made assistant inspector general of cavalry in the Army 




S. W. FORDYCE 



14 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

of the Cumberland and assigned to the Second Cavalry Division under the com- 
mand of General George Crook. He went through the battles of Murfreesboro 
and Chickamauga under Rosecrans and the battles of Shiloh and Perryville, 
Kentucky, under Buell, and many minor engagements. That he was in the thick 
of the light is evidenced by the fact that he was three times wounded and three 
times captured by the enemy, though he never served a day's imprisonment, 
having the good fortune to be recaptured twice and escaping once. 

At the close of the war in which he had acquitted himself with such credit, 
Mr. Fordyce located at Huntsville, Alabama, and established the banking house 
of Fordyce & Rison, taking a leading- part in the development of northern Ala- 
bama and acting as president of the first Agricultural Fair and Mechanical Asso- 
ciation at Huntsville, while he assisted in financing the North & South Alabama 
Railway from Decatur to Montgomery, Alabama, now a part of the Louisville 
& Nashville system. The banking house established by Mr. Fordyce over forty 
years ago is still in successful operation, the business now being- conducted by 
A. L. Rison, son of Mr. Fordyce's partner, under the name of the W. R. Rison 
Banking Company. His health having temporarily failed, Mr. Fordyce moved 
to Arkansas in January, 1876, and located in the mountains near Hot Springs. 
The value of the place as a health resort at once aroused his interest and it may 
be safely asserted that the development of the city of Hot Spring owes more to 
the initiative of Samuel W. Fordyce than to any other individual or influence. 

Through his efforts a bill was passed in the United States congress quieting 
title to four sections of land which had been in dispute for sixty years, while he 
was responsible for the introduction by General John A. Logan, then United 
States senator, of the bill for the erection of the finely equipped Army and Navy 
Hospital now in operation on the government reservation at Hot Springs. In 
addition to his efforts in exploiting the section Mr. Fordyce aided in financing 
the leading hotels, opera house, water, gas and electric light works, street rail- 
road system and other public enterprises and also financed and had constructed 
the first cotton compress at Dallas and at Dennison, Texas. 

Though such an active factor in advancing the welfare of Arkansas, Mr, 
Fordyce found opportunity to broaden his operations and soon became identified 
with the building and operation of a great network of railroads in the south and 
southwest. The number of important enterprises which claimed his attention is 
a significant index to the ability and forceful character of the man. The greater 
part of the St. Louis Southwestern Railway Company was built under the man- 
agement of Mr. Fordyce and for sixteen years he resolutely maintained and 
developed the property in the face of repeated setbacks, steadily overcoming each 
obstacle with the sturdy courage of his Scotch ancestors. Some idea of his 
labors in this connection may be gained from a recapitulation of his services ; 
vice president and treasurer of the Texas & St. Louis Railway for the three 
years ending April. 1885; receiver, April, 1885-May, 1886; president of the same 
road reorganized under the name of the St. Louis, Arkansas & Texas Railwav, 
from 1886 to 1889; receiver, 1889-1890, president, under the new title of the 
St. Louis Southwestern Railway Company, from 1890 to 1898. 

His services were recognized by his appointment as receiver of the Kansas 
City. Pittsburg & Gulf Railway in 1899. and in 1900 he became president of the 
road under its reorganized title of the Kansas City Southern Railway. Following 
this Mr. Fordyce built in 1900 and 1901 the Little Rock, Hot Springs & Western 
Railway, subsequently aiding in the building and financing of the St. Louis Valley 
line, now a part of the Missouri Pacific system. His other activities included 
cooperation in the building and financing of lines now operated by the St. Louis 
and San Francisco system, also the Missouri, Oklahoma & Gulf Railroad, the 
Illinois, Indiana & Minnesota Railroad, the Apalachicola & Northern in Florida, 
the St. Louis. Guthrie & El Reno Railroad in Oklahoma, the St. Louis, Browns- 
ville & Mexico in Texas, besides being one of the underwriters of the Fort Worth 
& Denver, now a part of the Colorado Southern system. In all it is estimated 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrY. 15 

that this one man has built, financed and helped to finance at least ten tliousand 
miles of railway. 

Apart from the remarkable work accomplished by Samuel W. Fordyce in 
developing the transportation interests of the nation, he is identified in a large 
way with various other important enterprises. He is a director and one of the 
organizers of the St. Louis Union Trust Company, a director of the Laclede 
Light & Power Company, of St. Louis, and the Jefferson Hotel Company, of 
St. Louis, vice president of the Arlington and New York Hotel Companies, of 
Hot Springs, Arkansas, president of the Hot Springs (Ark.) Water, Gas and 
Electric Light Companies, and of the Hot Springs Electric Street Railway Com- 
pany, director of the Illinois, Indiana & Minnesota Railroad, the Apalachicola 
& Northern, the Kansas City Southern, the Little Rock & Hot Springs Western, 
chairman of the executive committee of the St. Louis, Brownsville & Mexico 
and director in the American Rio Grande Land & Irrigation Company, of Texas, 
the largest irrigating canal system in the United States. He is a member of the 
University and Noonday Clubs of St. Louis, and is the president of the Houston 
Oil Company, of Texas, which is one of the largest timber and oil companies in 
America. He is a past commander of the Missouri Commandery of the Loyal 
Legion of America. His abilities as an executive were so generally recognized 
by his associates that while president of the St. Louis Southwestern, Mr. Fordyce 
was chosen by the unanimous vote of all the lines comprised in the Southwestern 
Traffic Association as chairman of its executive board. This association repre- 
sented practically the entire movement of traffic from the Atlantic seaboard to 
all points west of the Mississippi, to California and old Mexico, and so wisely 
did Mr. Fordyce discharge the duties of the important office that, on his retire- 
ment in 1898, he was presented with a set of resolutions, engrossed on parchment, 
approving the uniform fairness of his rulings. 

This confidence was not confined to his associates alone but was shared by 
his subordinates and employes as is evidenced by the fact that, while strikes pre- 
vailed on nearly all other railroads, the men under Mr. Fordyce relied on him to 
protect their rights and never once found occasion for striking. 

With all his activities in other lines Mr. Fordyce yet found time for playing 
an important part in the political affairs of the nation. In the reconstruction 
period following the Civil war Mr. Fordyce was active as a democrat, acting as 
delegate to the various conventions in Alabama, also as a member of the state 
committee in 1874, when, for the first time since the war, the entire democratic 
ticket was elected. 

On removing to Arkansas he again became prominent politically, acting as 
delegate to the state gubernatorial convention of 1880, also as delegate to the 
state judicial convention of 1884, member of the democratic national committee 
of Arkansas from 1884 to 1888, delegate to the national democratic convention 
of 1884, member of the committee to notify Cleveland and Hendricks of their 
nomination as president and vice president of the LTnited States, delegate at large 
to the national democratic convention of 1892 and chairman of the committee on 
permanent organization. He declined to go as delegate to the national dem- 
ocratic convention of 1896, and calling a meeting of the sound-money democrats 
at Little Rock, headed a delegation to the Indianapolis gold standard convention 
and was a member of the platform committee. Though often solicited to become 
a candidate for both the governorship and L^nited States senatorship of the state. 
Mr. Fordyce has always declined political honors, preferring to give his energies 
to the development of the great enterprises with which his life is identified. 

His unflinching integritv and loyalty is recognized by the leaders of both the 
great national parties, and, though a democrat, he has been signally honored by 
those of the republican faith as well. Because of his wide knowledge of con- 
ditions, Mr. Fordyce's advice was sought by President Hayes as to the selection 
of a member of the cabinet who should be acceptable to the southern people. Mr. 
Fordyce recommended John Hancock, then a member of congress from Texas. 



16 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

who, when the honor was offered him, decHned, to his subsequent regret. Later 
Mr. Fordyce was again approached with a similar request on behalf of the cab- 
inet of President Harrison, and in connection with others General John W. Noble 
was recommended by j\Ir. Fordyce and was duly chosen secretary of the interior. 
Mr. Fordyce also enjoyed the confidence and personal friendship of President 
McKinley. who sought his advice frequently in the matter of appointments in 
the southwest. 

]\Ir. Fordyce married ]May I, 1866. Susan E. Chadick, daughter of Rev. 
William D. Chadick. of Huntsville, Alabama, Of his two daughters and three 
sons four survive : Jane, wife of Major D. S. Stanley, of the quartermaster 
general's department. United States Army ; John, president of the Thomas-For- 
dyce ^Manufacturing Company of Little Rock, Arkansas ; William C, vice presi- 
dent of the Commonwealth Trust Company, of St. Louis, Missouri ; and S. W., 
Jr., who is now practicing law in St. Louis, Missouri. 

Samuel Wesley Fordyce, whether as soldier, financier, railroad builder, ex- 
ecutive or trusted counselor of statesmen, political leaders and workingmen, has 
been privileged to play an important part in the history of his time, and the 
influence of the great work accomplished by him in the development of the 
resources of the south and southwest will grow and expand with the years and 
insure him a place for all time among the distinguished men of achievement of 
the nation. 



EDWARD C. ELIOT. 



Edward C. Eliot, one of the distinguished lawyers of the ^Missouri bar, 
was born in St. Louis, July 3, 1858. His parents were William Greenleaf and 
Abby Adams (Cranch) Eliot and the ancestry of the family is traced back to 
Andrew Eliot, who came from England about 1650, thus establishing the family 
in the new world during the earliest epoch in its colonization. William Green- 
leaf Eliot, a minister of the Unitarian church and chancellor of Washington 
University, born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, was educated at Columbian 
College, in Georgetown, Mrginia, and in 1834 came to St. Louis, 
where he was a leading citizen for over fifty years. He married a daughter of 
Judge William Cranch, of Washington, D. C, who was a son of Richard Cranch, 
who came from Devonshire, England, in 1747 and settled at Quincy, Massa- 
chusetts. Richard Cranch served as judge of the probate court there and was 
prominent in the public life of his community. 

Edward C. Eliot was graduated A. B. from Washington University in 
1878 and in 1881 received the Master of Arts degree. In the meantime he had 
prepared for the bar as a student in the St. Louis Law School, from which he 
was graduated as Bachelor of Law in 1880. In the same year he was admitted 
to the bar and, entering upon the practice of his profession, has made steady 
progress resulting from close application and attention to the interests of his 
clients. He is a member of the law firm of Stewart, Eliot, Chaplin & Blayney. 
He is also well known as a law educator, having been lecturer on commercial 
law in the St. Louis Law School from 1887 until 1903. 

Mr. Eliot was married in Boston, Massachusetts, November i, 1883, to 
Miss Mary A. Munroe, a representative of an old New England family. They 
have five children : Edward M., twenty-three years of age, who is a graduate 
of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Frank M., twenty-one years of 
age, a graduate of the Washington University, and now connected with the 
Hydraulic Press Brick Company ; Alice, a graduate of Mary Institute and now 
attending Washington University; William Cranch, thirteen years of age, a 
student of Smith Academy ; and John Greenleaf, six years of age. Mr. Eliot 
resides at No. 5468 Maple avennc. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 17 

Not alone a student of his profession, he has kept abreast with the best 
thinking men of the age on the great sociological and economic questions and 
upon all those subjects which are of vital moment. His recognition of the 
needs and possibilities of the city has been manifest in active cooperation with 
various movements directed toward municipal upbuilding and progress. Since 
1903 he has been a trustee of the Missouri Botanical Garden and from 1897 until 
1903 was a member of the St. Louis board of education, acting as its presi- 
dent in 1898-9. During these years his work was of material assistance in es- 
tablishing the public school system upon a sound administrative basis. In ]:>< cl- 
itics he is a republican and in 1902 was a candidate of his party for tlic St. 
Louis board of appeals. He was a delegate to the universal congress of law- 
yers and jurists in St. Louis in 1904, which was attended by eminent members 
of the profession from the entire world. He belongs to the American liar 
Association, the Missouri State Bar Association, the St. Louis liar Associa- 
tion, of which he was president in 1898-9, and the Civil Service Reform 
Association. .He was also president of the Civic League in 1903 and 1904. and 
was honored with the presidency of the Xew England Society in 1907. He is 
connected w^ith the Soldiers Ori)hans Home, with the Unitarian church, the 
Round Table, and the Xoondav Club. 



HON. HARRY M. COUDREY. 

Hon. Harry M. Coudrey. prominent among the republican leaders as well 
as the business men of St. Louis, now representing his district in congress, was 
born in Brunswick, Missouri. February 28, 1867, his parents being J. N. and 
L. H. Coudrev. The mother stiil survives, but the father, who was an 
insurance adjuster, has passed away. The removal of the family to St. Louis 
in 1878 enabled Harry M. Coudrey' to enjoy the educational advantages offered 
by the public schools' of this city where, passing through consecutive grades, 
he was graduated from the manual training school with the class of 1886. A 
review of the business field with its manifold opportunities, in consideration of 
the question of a life work, eventually led Mr. Coudrey to enter the insurance 
field, wherein his rise has been rapid. h""or three years after leaving school he 
was special agent for the Travelers' Insurance Company, and in 1889 he or- 
ganized the insurance firm of Coudrey & Scott. This in 1901 was changed to 
i-iarry M. Coudrey & Company, although Mr. Coudrey is now sole owner of 
the business. His position in insurance circles, as taken aside from the financial 
success he has achieved, is most prominent — a fact indicated in his election to 
the presidency of the National Association of Casualty & Sureiy L'nderwriters. 
He has extended his business connections to other lines, being now a director 
of the Washington National Bank, a director and the treasurer of the I'niversal 
Adding Machine Company. 

Various official honors have been conferred upon him in difi'erent connec- 
tions. In 1906 he was the i)resident of the St. Louis l-'ire Insurance Agents 
Association and in the same year was secretary of the St. Louis Club. 1 Ic 
belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken the Knight Templar 
and Scottish Rite degrees and is also affiliated with the .Mystic Shrine. He 
belongs to the Merchants Exchange, the Business Men's League, the Loyal 
Legion and the St. Louis, University. Noonday, Mercantile. .Athletic, (ilen Echo 
and Field Clubs. His church relations are with the Presbyterian denomination. 

While all these associations indicate much of the nature of his character 
and interests, there is another phase in the life of Mr. Coudrey worthy of more 
than passing notice. In 1897 he was elected to the house of delegates for a 
term of two years, and as a member of the municipal assembly he won the com- 
mendation of the public by his vigorous opposition to all boodle measures. He 

L'— VOL. II. 



18 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

was almost alone in the fight, however, and declined to again accept the office 
at the expiration of his term. Intensely interested in politics and the adoption 
of the republican principles, he served at one time as president of the Twenty- 
eighth ^^'ard Republican League Club. He was chosen to represent the twelfth 
congressional district of Missouri in the fifty-ninth congress as the republican 
candidate, but owing to gross election frauds he was not seated until near the 
end of the first session, after successfully contesting the seat of Ernest E. Wood, 
democrat. Further endorsement was given him by a reelection to the sixtieth 
congress bv a majority of eight hundred and thirty votes over C. M. Selph, the 
democratic candidate. Strong and positive in his republicanism, his party fealty 
is not grounded on partisan prejudice and he enjoys the respect and confidence 
of all his associates, irrespective of party. Of the great issues which divide 
the two parties, with their roots extending down to the very bedrock of the 
foundation of the republic, he has the true statesman's grasp. While thoroughly 
familiar with the political maxims of the schools, he has also studied the les- 
sons of actual life, arriving at his conclusions as the result of careful investiga- 
tion and a thorough understanding of conditions existing in public life today. 
Strongly opposed to misrule, whether in municipal afl:airs or in the council 
chambers of the nation, he is identified with that movement toward higher poli- 
tics, which is common to both parties and which constitutes the most hopeful 
political sign of the period. 



SAMUEL CUPFLES. 



Samuel Cupples is a merchant and manufacturer of St. Louis. His business 
career has been characterized by a spirit of general helpfulness. He has dis- 
played many of the methods of the pioneer resulting in benefit to the business 
interests of the city at large, and along lines from which no personal profit has 
accrued he has labored to the benefit of the general public. The Manual Train- 
ing School of St. Louis owes its existence in large measure to him and the lines 
upon which it was established have served as a model for practically all of the 
training schools of the country. 

^Ir. Cupples was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, September 13, 1831, 
his parents bemg James and Elizabeth (Bigham) Cupples, both of whom were 
natives of County Down, Ireland, whence they emigrated to the United States 
in iSi-i-. The father was an educator of considerable note and the son was 
qualified for a business career in a school which his father established at Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. When fifteen years of age he made his way westward to 
Cincinnati and there entered the employ of Albert O. Tylor, the pioneer dealer 
in woodenware in the west. Industrious, painstaking and withal a capable youth, 
he quickly mastered the details of the business and won the confidence of his 
employers until the management of the Cincinnati business was practically en- 
trusterl to him. 

In 1 85 1 he came to St. Louis and established a woodenware house in this 
city. The business as originally organized was conducted under the firm style 
of Samuel Cupples & Company. In 1858 Thomas Marston became associated 
with him under the firm name of Cupples & Marston. The succeeding twelve 
years constituted an epoch of prosperity for the house, after which the part- 
nership was dissolved to be succeeded by the firm of Samuel Cupples & Com- 
pany, the junior partners being H. G. and R. S. Brookings and A. A. Wallace. 
A reorganization of the business in 1883 led to the adoption of the firm name 
of Samuel Cupples Woodenware Com])any, of which Mr. Cupples became pres- 
ident and has so continued to the i)resent writing in 1909. This establishment 
is the largest of its kind in the United States. There are many subsidiary 
companies which cluster around and contribute to the growth and prosperity 




SAMUEL CUPPLES 



•20 ST. LOriS. THE FOURTH CITY. 

of the citv. Chief among these are the St. Louis Terminal Cupples Station & 
Propertv Company, now belonging to the \\'ashington University by gift of 
Samuel Cupples and Robert S. Brookmgs, and the Samuel Cupples Envelope 
Companv. The "Cupples Station," as it is called, is an institution more val- 
uable to the merchants of the city than any other established for their benefit 
within the memorv of the present generation. To avoid expense and delay 
incident to the carting of goods to and from the various depots of the city, 
Mr. Cupples and ]\Ir. Brookings purchased a large tract of land adjacent to 
a point at which practically all the railroads of the city have a junction and 
there erected a system of warehouses, the basements of which are traversed 
by a network of railroad tracks. Here a vast business center has been created. 
at which merchants of St. Louis receive and reship goods, aggregating in value 
many millions of dollars annually, while the expense of handling such goods 
has been reduced to a minimum. The growth of the woodenware business, 
of which Mr. Cupples is still the head, has been phenomenal. From the first 
Mr. Cupples gathered around him, as all captains of industry do, a host of 
able lieutenants, and to them is accorded by him much of the credit of the 
wonderful growth of the business. To other fields he has extended his activ- 
ities in developing the manufacturing interests of the city. 

While the work he has accomplished in commercial fields would alone 
entitle him to distinction. Mr. Cupples has also been active in promoting the 
public welfare and the general interests of the city. He has labored earnestly 
to further the religious, educational and charitable institutions of St. Louis 
and has been particularly interested in the development of the public-school 
system. 

For more than half a century Mr. Cupples has been activelv and promi- 
nently identified with the Methodist Episcopal church South. Immediately 
after he came to the city in 185 1. he joined the "Old Fourth Street"" church, 
the second ]\Iethodist church established in St. Louis and then located on 
Fourth street and Washington avenue, where the Boatmen's Bank is now. 
Mr. Cupples took a class in the Sundav school w^ork the day he joined. 
His most notable and far-reaching Sunday school work was in connection 
with the Cote Brilliante development. When Mr. Cupples opened a Sunday 
school in that northwestern sttburb. which was coming into prominence for 
homes of people doing business in the citv. there was neither church nor Sun- 
day school west of Grand avenue. Mr. Cupples orgarazed a Sunday school in 
an old schoolhouse and carried it on until, through his efforts, a lot was 
bought and a chapel erected. Air. Cupples was the su])erintendent of that pioneer 
Sunday school and the active head of the religious organization in Cote Brilliante 
twenty-one years, until he moved into the city. The chapel was transferred to 
the Presbyterians, who now have a fine church on the site. Within the district 
from (irand avenue to the Six-Mile House and from Olive street road to the 
cemeteries, the Cote Brilliante chapel was at first the only church. The enroll- 
ment in the only ])ul)lic schocjl in the district — the Cote Brilliante school — was 
f)ne hundred and thirty-two children. Today, in that same district, there are 
fifteen or more churches and twenty-two thousand school children. Mr. Cup- 
ples led the movement for better school facilities in Cote lirilliante imtil bv 
special taxation a building considered a great improvement in those davs :,vas 
erected. He did not relax until a tract containing three and one-half acres was 
acquired from the funds thus rai.-ed. The iflea at the time was to provide a 
good plavgroimd. 'I'hat tract i^ now occu])ied by one of the finest school build- 
ings of St. Louis. 

Mr. Cupples was always dce])lv interested in education and soon after the 
old "Thirteenth Ward" became a ijermanent i)art of St. Louis. Mr. Cupples was 
chosen a member of the board of ]jublic schf)ols ; and a most valuable luember 
he was. During 1877-78 he made the acquaintance of Professor C. M. Wood- 
ward, of Washington University, then a member of the same board. From Pro- 



ST. LUUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 21 

fessor Woodward he learned of his proposal to establish a Manual Training 
School as a sub-department of Washington University. He was greatly pleased 
with the theory and plan of the scheme as outlined in a reprint of an address 
bv Dr. Woodward before the Missouri State Teachers' Association at Carthage 
in August, 1878. Believing that the scheme proposed was practical, he took the 
lead in the establishment of the school, offering to support the experiment for 
live years. Accordingly, he was placed on the first managing board when the 
act of establishment was passed by Washington University on June 17, 1879. 
Thus ^Ir. Cupples became ofiicially associated with Washington University. In 
this move he was heartily seconded by Messrs. Gottlieb Conzelman, Edwin Har- 
rison, Ralph Sellew and Dr. William G. Eliot, president of Washington Uni- 
versity. 

The history of the Manual Training School, the pioneer of the new de- 
l)arture in secondary education, ha? been given elsewhere. Suffice it to say 
that as the school grew in strength and popularity the interest of Mr. Cupples 
increased. In 1884 he proposed and secured for the school a special endowment 
to which ]\Ir. Ralph Sellew, Mr. Conzelman and himself were equal contribu- 
tors. Mr. Timothy G. Sellew. of New York, the nephew of Ralph Sellew, gen- 
erouslv carried out the intention of his uncle, who died during the negotiations. 
The definite purpose of this endowment was to promote the attendance of bright 
boys in straitened circumstances. 

The next logical step for Mr. Cupples to take after providing for an in- 
creasing attendance in the Manual Training School was to provide for the higher 
technical education of the graduates thereof. He was delighted, and possibly sur- 
prised, to find that the discipline and culture of the Manual Training School, 
in spite of its very practical side, served generally to inspire a strong desire for 
more and higher education, usually of a technical character. Mr. Cupples then 
saw that the success already gained was but the beginning of a greater suc- 
cess to be gained in the higher department of the university. His intimate ac- 
quaintance with Professor Woodward, the dean of the School of Engineering 
and Architecture, gave him every opportunity to study the needs of the uni- 
versity and to appreciate the splendid opportunity there presented for service 
to the cause of higher education. 

Various plans for carrying forward the work were drawn, discussed and 
laid aside as the horizon widened and the magnitude of the undertaking came 
into view. Finally, wdien the great university leader appeared in the person 
of Mr. Robert S. Brookings, the problem, how to build and equi]) a great uni- 
versity which should appeal not to a class or a few select classes, l^ut to all 
classes — not to humanists alone, but to humanity — was solved. 

This is not the place to speak of the magnificent work of Mr. Brookings 
in reestablishing and developing Washington University, but it is proper to 
add that Mr. Cupples was and is his worthy partner, not only in business, but 
in this great educational enterprise. He is to be credited not only with the gift 
of his half-ownership in Cupples Station ( q. v.) but with the gift of three 
splendid university halls — "Cupples F" for Civil Engineering and Architecture; 
"Cupples II" for ^Mechanical and Electrical Engineering; and the Engineering 
Laboratory. They stand today as monuments of his wisdom and his liberality. 

The educational work of Mr. Samuel Cupples will be finished only with 
his life. His benefactions to struggling institutions outside the city have been 
neither few nor small, and his helping hand, when help has been sorely needed, 
has been truly a godsend to those responsible for the administration of Central 
College, at Favette, Missouri ; Vanderbilt University, at Nashville. Tennessee ; 
the St. Louis Alanual Training School and the technical department of Wash- 
ington University. 

The same bent of mind which has enabled Mr. Cupples to develop his 
business interests and which has inclined him toward the most practical and 
useful forms of educational facilities has characterized his philanthropic and 



22 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrY. 

charitable work. Mr. Ciipples has been for many years an officer and is now 
the head of the St. Louis Provident Association, which has expended for the 
rehef of the poor of St. Louis one miUion three hundred and twenty-six thou- 
sand and three hundred and nine dollars. Perhaps in all of the history of char- 
itable work a like amount has not been expended elsewhere for relief of distress 
with less of waste or more of deserved benefit. The organization of this asso- 
ciation has been perfected under the study and supervision of Mr. Cupples and 
other business men like him to do the most for the worthy and to prevent 
imposition upon the generous by the unworthy. A cardinal principle of the 
Provident Association is to investigate all cases, to encourage people to help 
themselves and to discourage pauperism. 

Air. Cupples was married in i860 to Miss Martha S. Kells, of St. Louis, 
daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Finney) Kells. For a considerable portion 
of her married life Mrs. Cupples gave almost her entire time to philanthropic 
work. She devoted herself especially to the Girls Industrial Home when it was 
located upon Eighteenth and Morgan streets and to the Methodist Orphans 
Home. Mr. Cupples shared the interest of his wife during her lifetime in this 
work. After Mrs. Cupples" death, Mr. Cupples continued to give a great deal 
of attention to the institutions. 

Perhaps the strongest tribute that could be paid to Mr. Cupples as a philan- 
thropist has been the selection of him to carry out the wishes of several citizens 
of St. Louis desiring to do something for their kind. Dr. Bradford gave his 
estate toward the support of the Methodist Orphans Home. The beautiful 
structure on Maryland avenue, one of the handsomest and best equipped 
"Homes" in the country, was erected by Mr. Cupples as a memorial to Mrs. 
Cupples. The estate of Dr. Bradford became a notable part of the endowment. 
The administration of the Bradford bequest was left largely to the business 
judgment of Mr. Cupples. When Mr. Barnes decided that his estate should 
go to found a splendid hospital in the city of his adoption and lifelong business 
success, Mr. Cupples was one of those he consulted and selected to carry out 
the provisions of his will. When Richard M. Scruggs died, a partnership in 
good work of a third of a century was dissolved, but the business did not stop. 
Between Air. Scruggs and Mr. Cupples had existed an extensive cooperation in 
benevolence. Air. Scruggs had been president of the Provident Association. 
Air. Cupples took up the responsibility. He has passed his seventy-seventh mile- 
stone, but his relationship to his business, to the educational institutions, to the 
church, to the philanthropies, is still active and potent. Samuel Cupples, as the 
years go by. instead of passing out of the knowledge of his fellow citizens, 
seems to grow intellectually and morally upon the whole communitv. 



SCOTT BURRELL PARSONS, M. D. 

Dr. Scott Burrell Parsons was an eminent member of the medical profes- 
sion whose opinions were largely regarded as authority by his colleagues and 
associates in the practice of medicine and surgery in St. Louis. Aloreover, the 
salient qualities of his manhood v/ere such as won him the companionship and 
warm friendshinp of men of culture, who recognized his superior ability and 
who counted him a valuable addition to those social circles where intelligence 
is regarded as a necessary attribute to agreeableness. 

His life record began in Orono, Penobscot county, Maine, in 1843. His 
father, Elijah Parsons, also a native of New England, married Miss Perry, a 
descendant of the Commodore Perry family. Dr. Parsons supplemented his 
preliminary education by study in the Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1863. He then located for prac- 
tice at Sandwich, Illinois, where he remained for a short time, after which he 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 23 

returned to Chicago. He then spent some time abroad and was also for one 
year in King's Hospital College, where he added to his theoretical knowledge 
the broad and varied experience of hospital practice. 

Thus well equipped by thorough training, he came to St. Louis and entered 
upon the teaching of medicine as demonstrator of anatomy, lecturer on com- 
parative anatomy and professor of surgery in the St. Louis Homeopathic Medi- 
cal College of this city, of which he afterward became dean. Later, because of 
the strain of the college work, he gave it up and devoted his attention to the 
private practice of surgery. He acted as surgeon of the Good Samaritan Hos- 
pital and at the time of his death was surgeon for the Girls' Industrial Home 
and the St. Louis Children's Hospital. He was remarkably successful in his 
surgical work and his word was law among the physicians. He held to high 
ideals and entertained broad views on his profession and was constantly adding 
to his knowledge through his wide research and investigation. He thoroughly 
understood the component parts of the human body, the onslaughts made upon 
it by disease and the power of inherited tendencies, and in his work in the 
operating room his manner was most cool and collected, his touch gentle but 
sure. What he did was always for the best interests of his patrons and the 
honor of the profession and he enjoyed to the fullest extent the respect and 
admiration of his professional brethren. He was a member of the St. Louis 
Homeopathic Aledical Society, the Missouri Institute of Homeopathy and of 
the Hahnemann Club and was one of the recognized leaders of the homeopathic 
profession in the west. He also belonged to the St. Louis Club, to the Legion 
of Honor and to Valley Council of the Royal Arcanum. 

In 1867, i^^ St. Louis, Dr. Parsons was married to Miss Henrietta Knight 
Evans, a native of Wales, who on emigrating to the new world settled at Toron- 
to, Canada, and thence came to St. Louis with her mother, who died there at 
the age of ninety-four years. Her maternal grandfather was Sir Edward 
Knight. Unto Dr. and Mrs. Parsons were born a daughter and son. The for- 
mer, Henrietta Parsons, married and has one son, Clarence Parsons Gill. She 
resides in St. Louis and has been very active in public work, particularly in her 
advocacv of the movement for cleaning up the city that its sanitary interests 
may be improved. She holds advanced ideas on many questions of public 
moment and is a most broad minded and cultured lady. The son, Scott Elijah 
Parsons, married jNIiss Frances Mae Claphamson, a daughter of Jefferson Clap- 
hamson of St. Louis, and they have two children : Scott Guyon and Jane. Fol- 
lowing his father's professional footsteps, Scott E. Parsons was graduated from 
the Homeopathic Medical College and has become his father's successor as 
surgeon of the Children's Hospital and in general surgical w^ork. 

The death of Dr. Scott B. Parsons occurred in St. Louis, June 9, 1900. He 
was yet in the prime of life and was in the midst of a career of great usefulness, 
so that the news of his death caused wide-spread regret throughout the city, 
where he had come to be known and honored no less for his personal worth 
than his professional attainments. 



SAMUEL BROADDUS JEFFRIES. 

Samuel Broaddus Jeffries, attorney at law, was born in Lewis county, Mis- 
souri, February 3, 1869, a son of William and Elizabeth (Smallwood) Jeft'ries. 
He continued his more si:)ecifically literary education by graduation from La 
Grange College with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1891. The following year 
he spent one term as a student in the St. Louis Law School but largely pursued 
his preparation for the bar under private instruction with Judge Anderson, of 
Canton, Missouri, as his preceptor. His thorough preliminary reading enabled 
him to successfully pass the examination which secured his admission to the bar 



24 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH LTTY. 

in 1S93 and he entered upon his professional career at Canton, Lewis county, 
^Missouri, where he practiced until January, 1897. He practiced for two years 
as junior partner of the law hrni of Anderson & Jeffries and w^as then alone 
until his removal to St. Louis. In 1894 he was elected prosecuting attorney of 
Lewis count\- for a term of two years and reelected for another term of two 
years but resigned in January, 1897, and was appointed assistant attorney gen- 
eral of ^lissouri and remc^ved to Jefferson City, where he continued until Janu- 
ary, 1905, when, retiring from the office, he sought the broader field of labor 
offered at the St. Louis bar and in August of that year became one of the or- 
ganizers of the law firm of Harlan, Jeffries & Wagner. The reputation which 
he had previously made as assistant attorney general and in the private practice 
of lav>- assured his rapid acquirement of a large and important clientage here 
and in addition to his legal interests he is also connected with various important 
corporations in a professional capacity. Moreover, he is a factor in the man- 
agement of several corporations, being a director of the Central Missouri Trust 
Companv of Jeft'erson City, Missouri, the First National Bank of Canton, Mis- 
souri, Flome Telephone Companv of Detroit, Michigan, American Bakery Com- 
panv of St. Louis, Dean Electric Company of Cleveland, Ohio, and the Chippewa 
Bank of St. Louis. V\'hile his professional and business interests leave him little 
leisure time for other occupation, he turns his attention to farming and is much 
interested in agriculture. 

On the 8th of December. 1897, i" Lewis county, Alissouri, Mr. Jeft'ries was 
married to Miss Lutie Ball. He is connected with many public interests of im- 
portance, being now a member of the board of managers of the Baptist Sani- 
tarium and of the Law Library Association. He holds membership in the Baptist 
church, is associated fraternally with the Masons and the Odd Fellows and gives 
his political allegiance to the democracy. His professional career has been 
marked bv that steady progress which indicates the constant expansion of one's 
powers and capabilities, qualifying the individual more and more largely for 
handling the important and complex legal interests which are today demanding 
the attention of the advocate and the counselor. 



DANIEL CATLIN. 



Daniel Catlin is one of the eminently successful men of St. Louis whose 
efforts have contributed in no small degree toward making this the fourth city 
of the Union. He was for many years prominently identified with its com- 
mercial and financial interests and is now living retired as one of the city's 
most honored capitalists, owing his success to intelligently directed effort, to 
keen perception and to indomitable and unflagging enterprise. Moreover, his 
active cooperation has been a resultant factor in many measures of the greatest 
benefit to St. Louis and he has stood as a leader in progressive movements 
having marked and beneficial effect upon municipal interests. 

^Ir. Catlin comes of an ancestry honorable and distinguished and which 
in its lineal and collateral lines has through many generations been distinctively 
American. .At a more remote period, however, the ancestry is traced back to 
an ancient family of Norman origin which ranked among the armigeri for 
many centuries. While with tlie ])assing years various changes in the name 
have occurred, the lines of descent are too strongly marked to bear of any 
questioning as to the correctness of the ancestral tracing. At different times 
the name has been written Cattelin, Cattelyn, Catling, Ketling and in other 
forms, and is probably derived from the Norman Castellan or Chatelain. The 
founder of the family in America was Thomas Catlin, who on colonial records 
is mentionerl as Ketling and Catling. A native of England, he was born in 
1612 and during the first half of tin- sc-venteenth centurv became a resident of 




DANIEL CATLIiX 



26 • ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Hartford, Connecticut. The exact date of his arrival in the colony is not 
known, but, as Professor Edward Henry Tirining in the Tirining genealogy 
said, "Of the twenty thousand or more who emigrated between the years 1629 
and 1640. the time of onlv a relatively small number can be ascertained from 
the passenger lists of the vessels on which they sailed. If any came after the 
proclamation prohibiting emigration without license (May i, 1638) and prior to 
1640, when emigration had practically ceased, it is not difficult to see why his 
name did not appear in the register. In the first place, although ships left 
England almost daily. Hottens lists gave the name of but one ship in 1638 and 

1639. Further, these registers contained only names of those who left Eng- 
land legallv, i. e.. under license according to proclamation, and doubtless thou- 
sands left secretlv to avoid the oath of allegiance and supremacy and payment 
of subsidy to the crown, as well as to escape the annoyance and disabilities 
which attended those who' were disaflr'ected to the church. If he came after 

1640. in November of which year Long parliament assembled, he could perhaps 
have come without official registry." 

The colonial records of Connecticut show Thomas Ketling, of Hartford, 
to have been the successful defendant in a case at court there August i, 1644. 
Soon after his arrival in Hartford he was appointed constable, which position 
was a verv much more important one at that day, than it is at present. He held 
other positions of trust in the town and colony and was repeatedly elected 
selectman. He became a landholder in 1646 and received some property in 
the division of lands in 1672, while in 1684, in connection with his son John, 
he received a grant of ten acres from the town of Hartford. His realty hold- 
ings also embraced property in other parts of the colony and some of it is 
still in possession of one of his descendants. That he was married prior to 
his arrival in the colony is indicated by the fact that there is no record either 
of the ceremonv or of the birth of his three children. For his second wife he 
chose Mrs. Mary Ermer. the widow of Edward Ermer, and his death occurred 
in 1690, when he had reached the age of seventy-eight years. 

His only son, John Catlin, was baptized at Hartford, May 6, 1649, ^^^^l 
was made a freeman in 1665. On the 27th of July of the same year he wedded 
Mary Marshall, by whom he had six children, including Samuel Catlin, who 
was born at Hartford, November 4, 1672. The latter was married twice. On 
the 5th of January, 1702 or 1703, he wedded Elizabeth Norton, by whom he 
had eight children, and for his second wife he chose Sarah NichoUs Webster, a 
widow, who died December 12, 1762. There were no children of that mar- 
riage. Samuel Catlin passed away toward the close of 1760 at the venerable 
age of eighty-eight years. 

Thomas Catlin, son of Samuel Catlin. was born February 17, 1705 or 1706, 
and was married May 8, 1732, to Abigail Bissell, a daughter of Isaac and 
Elizabeth ( Osborn ) IHssell, her birth occurring January 16, 1712. Thomas 
Catlin, the third of the eight children born to Thomas and Abigail (Bissell) 
Catlin. first opened his eyes to the light of day at Litchfield, Connecticut, June 
18, 1737. During the opening period of the Revolutionary war he joined the 
American army and was commissioned an ensign May i, 1775. In December 
of the same year he was discharged, but in June. 1776, again joined the 
army and was comnn'ssioned second lieutenant in the Litchfield companv under 
Captain .Abraham r.radley. who organized a part of six battalions ordered by 
the general assembly to be raised and to march to New York to join the 
Continental trrx^^s and reinforce Washington. The company to which Mr. 
Catlin belonged formed a jiart of Colonel Gay's regiment of the Second Battalion 
of Wadsworth's lirigadc In the retreat from New York on September 15, 
1776. Lieutenant Catlin wa^ taken ])risoner and was incarcerated by the British 
until almost the close f>f the year, when he was sent to Connecticut for ex- 
change. A history of his im])risonment and the experiences which he met 
thereby appears in the History of the Town of Litchfield, jiublished in 1845. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 27 

It was a deposition found among" the Wolcott papers and was taken Alay 3, 
1777, before Andrew Adams, justice of the peace at Litchfield. In speaking 
of Lieutenant Cathn's treatment by the British it says, "that he was taken 
a prisoner by the British troops in New York Island, September 15, 1776, and 
confined with a great number in a close gaol for eleven days ; that he had taken 
no sustenance for forty-eight hours after he was taken ; that for eleven whole 
days they had only about two days' allowance, and their pork was ofit'ensive 
to the smell; that forty-two were confined in one house until Fort Washington 
was taken, when the house was crowded with other prisoners. After this they 
were informed that they should have two-thirds allowance, which consisted of 
very poor Irish pork, and bread which was hard, mouldy and wormy, made 
of canaille and dregs of flaxseed. The British troops had good bread. Brack- 
ish water was given to prisoners, and he had seen a dollar and a half given for 
a common pail of water. Only between three and four pounds of pork was 
given three men for three days. For nearly three months the private soldiers 
were confined in churches, and in one were eight hundrd and fifty. About De- 
cember 25, 1776, he, with about two hundred and twenty-five others, was put 
aboard the "Glasgow"' at New York to be carried to Connecticut for exchange. 
They were on board eleven days and kept on black, coarse, broken bread and 
less pork than before. Twenty-eight died during the eleven days. They were 
treated with great cruelty and had no fire for sick or well. They were crowded 
between decks and many died through hardships, ill usage, hunger and cold." 

In 1777 a Thomas Catlin was voted one of a committee to purchase and 
provide clothing for non-commissioned officers and soldiers in the Continental 
army who had enlisted from Litchfield. In 1780 Lieutenant Thomas Catlin, of 
Litchfield, was appointed one of the inspectors of provisions for the armv. 
Prior to engaging in military service he had been married, on the 25th of De- 
cember, 1763, to Miss Avis Buell. a daughter of Deacon Peter and Avis (Col- 
lins) Buell. She was born January 26, 1744, and died June 24, 1804, leaving 
a family of six children. Her husband survived her until December 29, 1829, 
and was nearly ninety-three years of age at the time of his death. 

Their son, Levi Catlin. was born August 31, 1803, and w^edded Anna Eliza- 
beth Landon. He was a farmer by occupation and made his home three miles 
southeast of Litchfield. He took a prominent part in public affairs there, gave 
his political allegiance to the whig party and held a number of town offices. 
He died October 16. 1841. 

Daniel Catlin, father of our subject, was born in Litchfield, November 
24, 1806, and in the east wedded Emily E. Merwin. In 1844 he re- 
moved to St. Louis, where he began the manufacture of tobacco, being the 
pioneer in that industry in the state. He thus laid the foundation for a business 
which has since attained such vast proportions and which has been one of the 
most important commercial elements in the business circles of St. Louis. He 
was a man of large enterprise and unfaltering energy and not only indirectly 
through his business affairs, but also directly, through his hearty cooperation, 
assisted in promoting the welfare of the city in a large degree. 

Daniel Catlin, whose name introduces this review, was a representative of 
the American branch of the Catlin family in the eighth generation. He was 
born at the old ancestral town of Litchfield, September 5, 1837, and there began 
his education, while following the removal of the family to St. Louis in 1850 
he became a student in the free schools of this city. On putting aside his text- 
books he entered his father's business and assumed the sole management in 
1859. While he entered upon , a business already established, he displayed 
marked enterprise in controlling and enlarging this, and his record proved the 
truth of the statement that success is not a matter of genius, but is the result 
of clear judgment, experience and unfaltering energy. In 1876 the expansion 
of the business rendered incorporation desirable and a charter was therefore 
secured and the name of the Catlin Tobacco Company adopted. From the be- 



28 ST. LOT IS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

o-inninsi- this house stood as the foremost representative of the tobacco trade 
m St. 1-ouis. and as the years passed Mr. Cathn, working along original Hnes, 
displayed, in administrative direction and executive force, a business ability of 
the highest order, ^^'hile the success of the Catlin Tobacco Company was at- 
tributable in largest measure to his efforts, he also took an active part in other 
enterprises, having been for thirty-eight years a director in the State Bank, now 
the State National Bank. He was also one of the founders of the St. Louis 
Trust Companv and served on its board of directors. In his business affairs 
he displaved an aptitude for successful management that resulted from his 
readv understanding of the complex interests which enter into every business 
situation. In 1895 "the Catlin Tobacco Company sold out to the American To- 
bacco Company and ^h. Catlin has since lived retired. 

In 1872 occurred the marriage of Daniel Catlin and ]\Iiss Justina Kayser, 
a daughter of Henrv Kayser, of St. Louis. They have three children. Daniel 
Kavser, a graduate of the Harvard Law School and Harvard University, is 
now a member of the St. Louis bar. Theron Ephron, also a member of the 
St. Louis bar and a graduate of Harvard University and the Harvard Law 
School, is now serving as representative of his district in the ^Missouri legis- 
lature. The daughter, Irene Catlin. is at home. 

Mr. Catlin has never sought to figure prominently in public affairs aside 
from his business interests, but has always exerted his influence for the pro- 
motion of municipal interests, nor have his labors been unavailing in advancing 
the citv's welfare. The fact that he gave his endorsement to any measure 
was a sufficient guarantee to many of his fellow townsmen of its worth. He 
has alwavs been a liberal patron of the fine arts and himself possesses a fine 
gallerv of paintings. He is a welcome figure in various clubrooms and was 
one of the organizers and incorporators of the Commercial Club, also one of 
the incorporators and a member of the St. Louis Club, of wdiich he is now the 
oldest representative, while his membership relations likewise extend to the 
Cor.ntrv, to the University and to the Forest and Valley Clubs. He was likewise 
one of the promoters of the Noonday Club, with which he has been associated 
from the beginning. He was formerly a director of the Art Museum and 
has been closely associated with other public interests. He finds his chief source 
of recreation in travel and he spends the heated summer months in his beautiful 
home at Dublin, New Hampshire. While his success has been such as to place 
him upon a plane far above the majority of his fellowmen he is thoroughly 
democratic in spirit and has never allowed the accumulation of wealth to in 
any wav affect his relations toward those less fortunate. Indeed, he is a broad 
and liberal minded man, gei-serous in thought, considerate in spirit and kindly 
in action, and association with him means expansion and elevation. 



HARRY CLARK T.ARKER. 

Ilarrv Clark Barker is one of the \ounger members of the St. Louis bar 
engaged in the practice of civil law and a member of the law firm of Carter, 
Collins & Jones. He was born in Hartford, Kansas, July 18, 1880. a son of 
Joel Arlington Barker. The family is of English origin and was founded in 
.America about 1752. 

Joel Arlington Barker was born in the state of Illinois in 1852 and at an 
early age removed to Kansas. I lis life has been devoted to religious and human- 
itarian work. A minister of the Methodist Episcoi)al church, he formerly 
occupied a pastorate in St. Louis from 1898 until 1905 and is now su])erintendent 
of the Children's Home I'inding .Society at Kansas City. 

Harry C. I>arker is a graduate of the high school at Fairbury. .\ebraska, 
of the class of 1898 atul ])nrsned a classical course in the State University of 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 29 

Xel:)raska in 1898-1900. He then entered McKendrick College at Leljanon, 
Illinois, but when a member of the senior class left that institution to enter 
business life. At St. Louis he com])lete(l his course and entered the law de- 
partment of the Washington l/niversit}', from which he was graduated with 
the Bachelor of Law degree in 1904. During the same time he read law in the 
office of C. C. Collins. 

^Ir. Barker began the practice of his profession immediately upon graduat- 
ing and in 1905 became a member of the firm of Carter, Collins & jijues, his 
business associates being W. F. Carter, Charles C. Collins and W'illiaiu T. 
Jones. He belongs to the St. Louis Bar Association and also the St. Louis 
Law Library. 

On the 2d of May, 1906, occurred the marriage of Mr. Barker and Miss 
Grace Lawrence b\M-guson, a daughter of Charles W. Ferguson. They have one 
child, H. C. Barker, Jr., born July 6, 1907. Mr. Barker belongs to Beta Theta Pi, 
a college fraternity. 



HEXRY STEWART CAULIHELD. 

Henrv Stewart Caulfield, representative in congress and one of St. Louis' 
distinguished lawyers and native sons, was born December 9, 1873, a son of 
John Caulfield. At the usual age he entered the public schools and afterward 
attended St. Charles College, in St. Charles, Missouri, while his professional 
course was pursued in Washington University. He was graduated therefrom 
in 1895 and the same year was admitted to the bar. He then located for 
practice in his native city and with the passing years his clientage has increased 
in extent and importance until it has today become of a distinctively representa- 
tive character. From 1897 until 1934 he was a director and attorney {or the 
Lincoln Trust Company and throughout that period devoted his entire time to 
its interests. He is, however, engaged at the present time in the general prac- 
tice of law and his ability is widelv acknowledged. He is concise in his apueals 
before the court and gives to his client the service of talent, unwearied in- 
dustry and broad learning. While his devotion to his clients' interests is pro- 
verbial, however, he never forgets that there are certain things due to the court, 
to his own self-respect and above all to justice and a righteous administration 
of the law which neither the zeal of an advocate nor the pleasure of success 
permits him to disregard. 

While Mr. Caulfield has attained distinction at the bar he is perhaps equally 
well known as one of the prominent representatives of the republican party in 
his district, and in November, 1904, was candidate for congress but was de- 
feated by a narrow margin. Again in November, 1906, he was nominated and 
his election followed, making him the present re])resentative from the eleventh 
^Missouri district. He has studied long and carefully the subjects that are to 
the statesman and the man of affairs of the greatest import — the questions of 
finance, political economy, sociology — and has kept abreast with the best think- 
ing men of the age. A vigilant and attentive observer of men and measures, he 
has discussed at jwlitical gatherings and in congress the great public questions 
which were agitated during the times and has efi'ectively furthered much pro- 
gressive legislation. 

In 1902 occurred the marriage of Mr. Caulfield and .Miss |'"annie Alice 
Delano, a daughter of William J. Delano, of Cuba, Missouri. He belongs to the 
Mercantile Club of St. Louis and is well known socially, professionally and 
politicallv, being recognized in his native city as a man of aft'airs and one who 
has wielded a wide influence. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, belonging to lodge No. 5, his father being a member of the same 
lodge for thirtv-five years or until his death, which occurred in 1897. He is 



30 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

the originator and had passed the ordinance which permitted the erection of 
pubhc buildings to the height of eighteen stories, making possible the Third 
National Bank building, the Directory, and all buildings in St. Louis over twelve 
stories high. 



WILLIAM HENRY WOODWARD. 

^^"hiIe the name of W^illiam Henry Woodward became synonymous with 
the printing business in St. Louis, it was not alone by reason of the mammoth 
enterprise of this character which he organized and developed that he was rec- 
ognized as one of the foremost residents of the city. He was entitled to promi- 
nence in other lines, for his activity in connection with various charities and 
benevolences did much to ameliorate hard conditions of life for the unfortu- 
nate, ^loreover, he was one to whom the word citizenship was no mere idle 
term. He rendered full return for the privileges and opportunities that were 
his because of his residence in St. Louis and gave in compensation faithful and 
ettective service in promoting public progress and advancing the general good 
in many lines. Wherever he was known and in whatever condition of life he 
was placed, he sought for all that is best in American manhood, and his influ- 
ence and memory remain as an indelible impress upon the lives of those with 
whom he was closely associated. 

His birth occurred on the nth of December, 1834, in Hereford, England, 
his parents being the Rev. William Hawkins and Elizabeth ( Hill) Woodward. 
In early life his father was apprenticed to the watchmaker's trade in Coventry, 
and later was graduated from Highbury College and entered the Congregational 
ministry. Rev. Woodward was pastor of a church in Hereford when Bishop 
Doane of Xew Jersey visited England in 1841, at which time a controversy 
upon certain theological subjects took place between the Bishop, himself and 
other dissenting clergymen. The result of this controversy was that the Rev. 
\\ illiam Hawkins Woodward came to America, was ordained in the Episcopal 
church by Bishop Doane at Burlington, New Jersey, and took charge of St. 
Mary's parish in West Philadelphia. He was afterward rector of Zion church 
at Pontiac. jMichigan. and later accepted the pastorate of Grace church at 
Madison, \\'isconsin, where he remained until his removal to St. Louis in 185 1. 
Here he became rector of Grace church in North St. Louis and continued to 
serve the parish until 1858, when, at the age of fifty-four years, he passed from 
this life. A contemporary biographer has said : "Mr. Woodward was a re- 
markable man in many respects. He was possessed of a liberal education and 
his tastes ran largely in pursuit of scientific subjects. He was especially fond 
of natural sciences and mechanics. He lectured on these subjects in several 
institutions of learning, among wh.ich were Professor Wyman's Institute for 
Boys, the Mis.souri Blind Asylum and the high school at Alton. He made all 
his own scientific apparatus. He was also an accomplished musician and was 
quite proficient in the use of several different instruments." 

After '•pending the first eight years of his life in the land of his nativity, 
William Henry Wooflward. who was one of a large family of children, then 
accompanied his parents to the new world in 1842. His equipment for life 
was a public-school education, and financial assistance was not forthcoming 
when he started f>ut in the business world. His record, however, is another 
proof of the fact that it is under the pressure of necessity and the stimulus 
of competition that the best and strongest in man is brought out and developed. 
Serving an ay;prenticeshij) at the printer's trade in Madison, Wisconsin, in the 
office of Colonel i^avid Atwood, publisher of the Wisconsin Statesman, he 
there rcmaincfl from 1849 until 1852, when the Woodward familv removed to 




W. H. ^^'OODWARD 



32 ST. LOL'IS, THE FOURTH LTTY. 

St. Louis, and in this citv he secured a position on the ^lissouri RepubHcan, 
then the leading- newspaper in the Mississippi valley. From the position of 
apprentice in the job department he worked his way steadily upward through 
successive promotions, continuing with the paper for thirteen years. Prompted 
bv the laudable ambition to one day engage in business on his own account, 
he not onlv thoroughlv mastered the business in order to gain a comprehensive 
knowledge of the trade, but also carefully saved his earnings until he felt that 
his capital and experience justified his establishing a printing business in the 
fall of 1864. Purchasing the plant of George H. Hanson on ]\Iain street, oppo- 
site the old State Bank, he bent his energies to the development of the business, 
which, in the course of years, grew to mammoth proportions until the present 
firm name of Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company is known throughout 
the countrv and is a synonym for all that is standard in this line of work. 

In establishing his business. Mr. Woodward formulated certain rules, from 
which he never deviated, nor did he allow any departure therefrom on the part 
of any employe. One of these rules was thoroughness, and at no time did he 
ever allow work to leave the office until it was well done, according to the 
terms of the contract. The house, therefore, soon gained a reputation for 
reliable and excellent workmanship, and the trade greatly increased until it 
was necessary that enlarged quarters should be secured. The first removal was 
made in 1868. when the style of the firm was changed to Woodward & Tiernan 
and the location of the business to the northeast corner of Third and Pine 
streets, James Tiernan being at that time admitted to a partnership. The re- 
lations between the two gentlemen continued until the death of Air. Tiernan, 
and under their capable control the business enjoyed phenomenal growth. In 
1872 A\*. B. Flale was admitted to a partnership under the style of Woodward, 
Tiernan & Hale, at which time still larger quarters were secured at the corner 
of Second and Locust streets. On the retirement of Air. Hale in 1882 the old 
firm name of Woodward & Tiernan was resumed. Each year chronicled grati- 
fying growth in their business, and in 1886 still larger accommodations were 
secured through an agreement with Cierard B. Allen, who erected for the firm 
a suitable building on his property at Xos. 309-315 North Third street. Before 
the foundation of the building was completed, however. Air. Tiernan passed 
away. September 16. 1886. 

Following the death of his partner, Air. Woodward purchased the interest 
of Air. Tiernan's estate ar.d organized a stock company, which was incor- 
porated under the style of the Woodward & Tiernan Stock Company, with 
W. H. ^^'oodward as president and treasurer. He continued as chief executive 
officer of the company throughout his remaining days and was always active 
in the control of the business, even after he associated his three sons with him 
in the enterprise. When the Allen building was erected it was thought that 
it would be adequate to the needs of the business for a long period, but in 1889 
the conipanv occupied an annex, which was erected for them bv Captain John 
Scudder. Nine years later the property adjoining the Scudder building was 
purchased by the Woodward & Tiernan Printing Company, and the capacity 
of the plant was increased by the erection of a building sixty-four by one hun- 
drcrl and seven feet, thus giving altogether one hundred and thirty-three thou- 
sand superficial feet of space. As the business has grown the number of em- 
ployes has increased, until eight hundrefl people are now earning their living 
within this mammoth establishment, anfl seventv men represent its interest in 
various ])arts of the wfjrld. 

One of the elements in Air. Woodward's success was his ability to sur- 
round himself with a corps of able assistants, manv of whom were raised in 
the business and have always been connected with the house. Air. Woodward 
always kept in close touch with advancement and ])rogress made in the printing 
business. Constar;t imjjrovement has marked this field of activity, and he was 
not only cpiick to aflopt new and practical ideas, but introduced many pro- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 33 

g-ressive methods which have since received the endorsement of the trade 
throughout the country. The name of Woodward has long been identified with 
all that is best in the printing business, and their establishment has set a stand- 
ard for other concerns in St. Louis, while Mr. Woodward's opinions were 
largely received as authority upon any vital questions connected with the print- 
ing trade. 

Pleasantly situated in his home life, Mr. Woodw^ard was married in De- 
cember, 1859, to Miss Alaria K. Knight, a daughter of Richard and Ann 
Knight. They became the parents of thirteen children, five of whom died in 
infancy and their oldest daughter, Mrs. Annie (Woodward) Brook, passed 
away August 20, 1889. The surviving children are Edgar B., Walter B., Mrs. 
Mary Ernst, Louis B., Grace, Julius W. and Sarah H. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Woodward held membership in the Episcopal church. 
Mr. Woodward was a communicant of Grace Episcopal church from the time 
of his arrival in St. Louis in 1852 until his demise, and for many years served 
as one of its vestrymen. He contributed generously to its support and took a 
helpful part in its various activities. Mrs. Woodward was ecjually prominent in 
church work, and for twenty-five consecutive years served on the board of the 
Episcopal Orphan Home. Her death, therefore, was deeply and widely re- 
gretted wdien, on the i6th of June, 1898, she passed away. On the 8th of Feb- 
ruary, 1899, Mr. Woodward was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Laura Alaria Bingham of Indianapolis, Indiana, a daughter of Joseph J. 
and Sophie B. Bingham, and a granddaughter of the Rt. Rev. George Upfold, 
D. D. LL. D., the first bishop of the Episcopal diocese of Indiana. 

In all the years of his residence in St. Louis, Mr. Woodward was closely 
connected with the public interests through his active service in behalf of many 
beneficial projects and through his influence and support of plans for the gen- 
eral good. He would have been repeatedly honored with public office had he 
consented to enter the political arena, but he felt that the demands of his busi- 
ness were too insistent to allow him to become an officeholder. At the time of 
the Civil war he was a member of the Missouri Home Guard and was ordered 
into active service as third sergeant of Company K of the First Regiment, which 
took the field under General E. C. Pike to aid in repelling the invasion of General 
Sterling Price in 1864. When six weeks later General Price had retreated 
into Arkansas, the brigade to which Mr. W^oodward belonged was ordered home. 
The only political office he ever filled was that of member of the city council 
for two years from the old Eleventh ward, his incumbency covering the ex- 
citing period of the Overstolz-Britton mayoralty contest. From the time when 
he proudly cast his first presidential vote for James Buchanan in 1856 he con- 
tinued a stalwart democrat. 

He was known in various fraternal organizations from the fact that he 
was always most loyal to their interests and greatly desired the adoption of their 
benevolent principles. He believed that much good was done through such 
organizations and w^as most closely associated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of which he became a member in 1858. He not only filled all of 
the chairs in the local lodge, but served as grand master and grand patriarch 
of Missouri, and for several years was president of the Odd Fellows Home 
at Liberty, Missouri. Aurora Lodge of Masons claimed him as an exemplary 
member, and he continued on through successive degrees, becoming a membei 
of the Missouri Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, Ascalon Commandery of 
Knights Templar and INIoolah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Realizing how 
valuable a fraternal and benefit order might become among the printers of the 
country, he was active in organizing the St. Louis Typothet?e, an association of 
master printers, of which he was several times elected president. This organ- 
ization extends over all the United States ■ and Canada, and at its session in 
Toronto, in 1892, JNIr. Woodward was elected president of the international 
body and presided over its meeting at the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893. He 

:!— VOL. II. 



34 ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 

was actively connected with various organizations, through the efforts of which 
St. Louis lias greatly benefited. He belonged to the Merchants Exchange and 
Business ]\Ien's League, the Manufacturers Association, the Spanish- American 
Club, the Office :\Ien's Club, the St. Louis Fair Club and the Mercantile Club. 
He became a member of the committee of two hundred having charge of the 
preparations for the ^^'orld's Fair held in St. Louis in 1904, was active in rais- 
ing funds for the enterprise and continued one of its stalwart champions until 
wtthin one dav of its successful close, when, on November 30 of that year, 
deatli overtook him, while actively at work in the interests of the exposition 
he had promoted and so ably assisted. 

In a review of his life it is seen that no good work done in the name of 
charitv or religion sought his aid in vain. He knew no dividing Une between 
religion and business, for high and honorable principles actuated him in all 
that^ he did, and all that was worthy and beneficial in the community received 
his endorsement. He was, moreover, a forceful man, possessing marked busi- 
ness abilitv and enterprise, and left as a substantial monument to his life work 
one of the most important industrial concerns in the middle Alississippi valley. 
There was in his entire career not a single esoteric phase. His position was 
at all times an unequivocal one, and the simple weight of his character and 
abilitv carried him into important relations with large interests. 



ROBERT BEYER. 



Robert Beyer, a fiorist, is conducting one of the largest business enter- 
prises of this character in St. Louis, his native city. He was born June 19, 
1859, a son of Charles and Wilhelmina (Matthes) Beyer. The father came with 
his famih^ from Germany and settled in New Orleans in 1848 but the same year 
made his way northward to St. Louis and was employed by the Jesuits of 
Florisant, Missouri, as a florist. He finally began business on his own account 
on Penn and Utah avenues, establishing one of the first gardens in that section 
of the city. He was very successful and remained at that place until 1867, when 
he purchased the site on which the present extensive business is now carried 
on. On one side of his place were extensive gardens and on the west were 
farms. He established the first florist business in this portion of the city and from 
the beginning met with prosperity in the undertaking, building up a business of 
large and profitable proportions. At the time of the Civil war he served as a 
member of the Home Guards. His death occurred in the month of May, 1896, 
just prior to the memorable c}xdone of that year. His wife died in 1900, leav- 
ing four children : Clara, the wife of Otto Doerste, of St. Louis ; Robert, of 
this review ; Louisa, the wife of H. Meyer, of this city ; and Charles, who is asso- 
ciated with his brother Robert in the florist business. 

Robert Bever was educated in the public schools of St. Louis and from 
early boyhood was more or kss familiar with the business in which he is now 
engaged through the assistance which he rendered to his father. On the death 
of the parent, he and his br(illi(r Charles took charge of the business, which 
has grown in volume to an enormous extent. They sell mostly to the city trade 
and have been the j)roducers of some of the finest flowers raised in this section 
of the state. They have made a close and discriminating study of the best 
methods of raising various kinrls of plants, arc familiar with their needs and 
in the cultivation of flowers have uscij llie most modern imjjrovements and have 
brought out many of the newest jjroduclions. Their greenhouses are now 
splenrlifUy equip])efl and they are prepared to care for a very extensive trade. 

On the iHth of November. 1893, Mr. Beyer was united in marriage to 
Miss Ida Kieling, a daughter of I'rederick and Catherine (Stocke) Kieling, who 
were natives of ^iermany and came to America in 186:^. Mr. and ^.frs. Beyer 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 35 

have four children : Wilhehnina, Charles, George and Robert. Mr. Beyer votes 
with the republican party but is not interested in politics to the extent of seeking 
office for himself, as he prefers to give his undivided attention to his business 
interests, which are constantly growing and now constitute an important enter- 
prise of his section of the city. 

' 1142J41 

E. LANSING RAY. 

E. Lansing Ray. advertising manager for the Globe-Democrat, is one of the 
young men of St. Louis who is rapidly forging to the front in business con- 
nections. He was born in .this city August 30, 1884, a son of Simeon Ray, who 
for many years, or until his death, in 1891, was connected with the Globe-Demo- 
crat, actmg as secretarv and business manager for a number of years. He mar- 
ried Jessie Lansing, who, still surviving her husband, yet makes her home in St. 
Louis. 

While spending his boyhood days under the parental roof E. Lansing Ray 
accjuired his education largely at Smith's Academy, and when he left school he 
secured a situation in the office of the Globe-Democrat, with which he has been 
connected throughout his entire business career. He has worked in many de- 
partments, holding a number of different positions, each change marking an 
upward step in his business progress. In 1905 he accepted the responsible posi- 
tion of advertising manager, thus handling a most important branch of the paper, 
one upon which the success of the modern journal depends, as it is a widely 
acknowledged fact that the sale ])rice of the modern paper, which has grown 
to colossal proportions, could never make it a paying investment. His mem- 
bership relations include the L'niversity. Racquet, Mercantile and Field Clubs. 



JAMES C. NIDELET, ^l.D. 

Although Dr. James C. Nidelet has passed the Psalmist's allotted span of 
three score years and ten, he is yet engaged in the practice of his profession, to 
which he has devoted his entire life, and in which he has gained distinction, 
prominence and success. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 
15th of January, 1834, and is a representative of one of the most noted pioneer 
families of Missouri. His maternal grandfather was the well known General 
Bernard Pratte, wdio was born in St. Genevieve, Missouri, and w^as educated 
at Sulsipitian College at ^^lontreal, Canada. Following his return to St. Louis 
he married Emilie I. Labadie, a daughter of Sylvester and Pelagie (Chouteau) 
Labadie. The father of Dr. Nidelet was Stephen F. Nidelet, who was of French 
extraction and w^as born at San Domingo. He was only seven years of age 
when his parents established their home in Philadelphia. In the course of years 
he became a member of the well known silk house of Chapron & Nidelet. While 
visiting in St. Louis he formed the acquaintance of Celeste E. Pratte, a daughter 
of General Pratte. and they were married on the 12th of August, 1826. He re- 
turned with his bride to Philadelphia, and in the eighth year following their 
marriage the birth of James C. Nidelet occurred. 

In the schools of his native city Dr. Nidelet acquired his early education, 
attending the classical school conducted bv James D. Bryant, a famous educator 
of that day. In 1844 the family removed to St. Louis, the father there spend- 
ing his remaining days, his death occurring in 1856. The mother, now deceased, 
had been one of the belles of St. Louis in her maidenhood, and her reminiscences 
of social life here in pioneer times were very distinct and interesting. 



36 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Continuing his education, Dr. Nidelet became a pupil of the St, Louis Uni- 
versity, where he spent a year or two, and in 1847-48 was a student in St. 
Mary's College at Emmettsburg, Maryland, In 1849 he entered the St. Louis 
University again and S]3ent five years there, but left that institution just before 
the graduation of the class of 1853, of which he was a member. He then 
prepared for the ^Military academy at West Point, but failed to receive appoint- 
ment as a cadet, from an accident to Congressman John F. Darby, whose absence 
from congress then in session, left the appointment to any one and was secured 
by General Kearney for his son William. Dr. Nidelet then took up the study 
of medicine. \'aluable preliminary training came to him through his practical 
experience in a drug store, as for three years he was employed by the well 
known houses of Bacon. Hyde & Company and Barnard, Adams & Company. 
Subsequently he attended the St. Louis Medical College under Dr. C. A. Pope, 
and the ^Missouri Medical College under Dr. Joseph N. McDowell, being gradu- 
ated therefrom in i860. Immediately afterward he began the practice of medi- 
cine, and in December, 1861, following the outbreak of the Civil war, he offered 
professional aid to the Confederate army and became assistant to the medical 
director and later became chief surgeon under Generals Price, Maury and 
Forney, in the army of east Louisiana and Mississippi. During the last year of 
the war he was transferred to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and his serv- 
ices covered four years, during which he was in every engagement in which the 
army corps engaged. Among the most notable of these conflicts were Vicks- 
inirg. Cornish, Big Black River, luka, and Hatchie's Run. During his entire 
military career he never lost a day from the service, was never ill, and on the 
contrary, was always on the field to assist his wounded comrades. His four 
years of service in war gave him practical experience in every branch of surgery, 
and in 1865 he returned to St. Louis, poor in purse but rich in his knowledge 
of the medical and surgical science. 

As the Drake constitution was then in force. Dr. Nidelet did not at once 
take up the practice of medicine. In the winter of 1865-66, however, he entered 
into active relations with his alma mater, the Missouri Medical College, and 
assisted in gathering the scattered faculty together once more. In the winter 
of 1866-67 the college was reopened, and for five years thereafter Dr. Nidelet 
held the chair of demonstrator. He had large success and assisted materially 
in bringing the old historic institution into popular favor again. He then re- 
sumed the private practice of medicine, in which he has met with notable success, 
keeping at all times in touch with the advancement and progress made by the 
members of the medical fraternity. For more than forty years he has now 
pursued his practice, and yet gives considerable time to professional service, al- 
though he has now reached the seventy-fifth milestone on life's journey. His 
success has been based upon comprehensive and accurate scientific knowledge, 
while his practical experience has brought him into close relations with the 
needs of suffering humanity. His labors have been attended with substantial 
success, and his work has brought him wide reputation and professional recogni- 
tion. He is today the only live member of the faculty of the old Missouri 
Medical College. 

In 1875 Dr. Nidelet was ap])ointe(l i)olice commissioner and served for a 
term of four years, acting during a half of that time as vice president of the 
board. His administration was characterized by determined effort to suppress 
the lotteries whicli llieii flourished in St. Louis. He took up this fight on his 
own responsibility and awakened such hostility among the proprietors of lot- 
teries that several attempts were made u|)on his life i)y ruffians hired bv the 
ring leaders of the lotteries. Charges of corru])ti()n were also made against 
him in an effort to unseat him and thus ])rcvent him from further prosecuting 
them. His indictment was sought at the hands of several successive grand 
juries, and he was accorded a most searching investigation, which resulted in 
the utter failure to make even a jjlausiblc case of official misconduct against 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 37 

him. It was through Dr. Xidelet's efforts that reform government was intro- 
duced into St. Louis and much of the lottery business of the city was crushed 
out. He has always stood for reform, progress, improvement, for justice, truth 
and right, and his influence has been a substantial element for the good of the 
city. He has always enjoyed to the full extent the respect of all law-abiding 
citizens and is honored most by those who know him best. He is a member of 
Royal Arcanum and has taken a prominent part in the work of that order in 
general and the Grand Council. 



JAMES MADISON FRANCISCUS. 

The name of Franciscus has long figured actively in connection with the 
financial interests of St. Louis and the untarnished reputation of the family 
in this connection is fully sustained by James M. Franciscus, the present city 
treasurer, who has in other ways represented the community interests of the 
city and in all has manifested an aptitude for successful management and judi- 
cious investment. Here he was born March 15, 1866, son of James M. Fran- 
ciscus, deceased, who was one of the pioneer bankers of the city and a prominenV 
factor in its commercial life. Excellent educational opportunities were afforded 
the son, who completed his course in M^ashington University by graduation. 
He then made his initial step into the business world as an employe for the 
Simmons Hardware Company, with which he continued for two years. He after- 
ward entered the office of the auditor of the Wabash Railroad, where he con- 
tinued in a clerical capacity for eighteen months, and then accepted position of 
bookkeeper for the Third National Bank, with which he was thus associated 
for three years. In 1889 he embarked upon an independent business venture as 
junior partner of the real-estate firm of Moffett & Franciscus, predecessors of 
the present firm of James M. Franciscus & Company, the present senior partner 
having acquired complete control of the business. 

In his early career, Mr. Franciscus displayed many of the qualities wdiich 
distinguished his honored father and made him a leader in commercial and 
financial circles. The recognition of his own personal worth and capability led 
to the selection of James M. Franciscus on two different occasions to act as 
special commissioner for the Lindell estate, and in control of its affairs he 
manifested such sound judgment and business enterprise that all concerned ex- 
pressed their entire satisfaction. He was placed under two bonds of nine hun- 
dred thousand and seven hundred thousand dollars respectively, and that he 
could give them without delay shows the high confidence reposed in him by the 
business community, and especially by those who stood as sponsors for him in 
this financial connection. He also acted as special commissioner for the D. A. 
January estate, giving a bond of four hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars, 
and served also as executor of his father's estate. In many other ways Mr. 
Franciscus has given proof of his unusual ability for the management of im- 
portant business interests and the firm of which he is now the head bears an 
unassailable reputation for reliability and for sound judgment. In addition to 
what may be termed as the realty brokerage department, the company also acts 
in a confidential capacity for its clients and enjoys the unqualified trust of 
those whom it represents. 

It was Mr. Franciscus' high standing and well known reliability in financial 
circles that led to his selection as the custodian of the public excheciuer. He 
was nominated by acclamation at the democratic convention in St. Louis, Febru- 
ary 12, 1901, and at the spring election was chosen for the office. The large 
majority he received, running twenty-two hundred votes ahead of his ticket, 
was an indication of his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him. 
He is the youngest man ever elected to the responsible position of city treasurer 



38 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

of St. Louis, but those who know him best felt that the pubhc had made no mis- 
take in choosing him for the ofhce and his service had justitied the trust re- 
posed in him. 

On the I2th of June, 1890. Mr. Franciscus wedded Miss Katherine G. 
Linsday, a daughter of the late Colonel A. J. Linsday, a retired army officer. 
Thev are now the parents of five children : James Linsday. Jane, Marian E.. 
James ^I. and John D. Mr. and Mrs. Franciscus are prominent socially and 
are most widelv known as representatives of prominent old families of the city. 

Mr. Franciscus holds membership with the Jefferson and the St. Louis 
Racquet Clubs, and is an enthusiastic admirer of manly outdoor sports. In 
1892 he Avas appointed a member of the Mullanphy board but resigned the fol- 
lowing year. He has filled the office of vice president of the St. Louis Real 
Estate Exchange and is known in this city as a loyal advocate of democratic 
principles. He" frequently attends the conventions of the party and his opinions 
have carried weight in its councils. While he has not yet attained the prime 
of life, prominent men whose years largely outnumber his own recognize his 
merit and abilitv, while his business colleagues and official associates entertain 
the warmest admiration for his many good qualities. He is known as a man 
who is readv to meet anv obligation of life, with the confidence and courage 
that come of' conscious personal ability, right conception of things and an habitual 
regard for what is best in the exercise of human activities. 



WILLIAM \'. BURTON. 

\\'illiam \'. Burton, largely interested in the ownership of hotels in St. Louis, 
is well known in the business circles of the city as a man whose business judg- 
ment is demonstrated in the .success which has attended his efforts. He is a 
western man not only by preference, but also by birth and training, and is 
imbued with the progressive spirit which has been the dominant factor in the 
upbuilding of the ^^lississippi valley. His birth occurred in Van Buren county, 
Iowa, in 1841. His father, John W. Burton, removing from Kentucky, became 
one of the earliest settlers of Iowa, taking up his abode there in 1835, when it 
was still under territorial government. At the time of the Black Hawk war, 
he served with the militia of the state of Illinois, having previously removed 
with his mother, Mrs. Catherine Springer Burton, to that state. They settled 
near Beardstown, Illinois, and suffered all of the vicissitudes and hardships of 
the pioneer. The death of John W. Burton occurred in 1891, while his wife 
survived until October 31, 1906. They were the parents of eleven children, four 
of whom are still living, namely: William V., of this review; Benjamin, a 
resident of California: Fannie B.. the widow of Calvin Smith; and Martha V., 
of Clinton, Iowa. 

William \'. Burton was educated in the district schools and afterward 
attended the academy at Bentonsport, Iowa. He then devoted his attention to 
farming until he reached the age of twenty years, in 1862. The same year, how- 
ever, he came to St. Louis. He had previously joined Captain Lawrence's 
company of Clark county, Missouri, but before the command was organized, 
the men dispersed. Mr. Burton made his way to St. Louis, where he spent 
the winter, after which he went to Arkansas and joined Captain Lesueur's 
battery in Price's army. He did duty with Parson's infantry and was engaged 
in southern Arkansas and LoiMsiana, taking part in many sanguinary battles, 
including the engagement of Mansfield, Louisiana; Camden, Arkansas, and 
others of lesser importance. He was also in the battle of Saline River, Arkansas, 
and proved reliable at all times of danger. He was mustered out at Shreve- 
port in June, 1865, after having for three years served in the artillery depart- 
ment. 




WILLIAM V. BURTON 



40 ' ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

When the war was over, ^Ir. Burton went to ^Mississippi, where he en- 
gaged in farming for three years. At the end of that time he turned his at- 
tention to merchandising, which he carried on in connection with agricuUural 
pursuits and was thus busily occupied until 1881, when he came to St. Louis 
and at once became interested in hotels. He not only owns and conducts one 
hostelry, but now has several hotels, and outside of his interests of this char- 
acter, he is connected with real-estate operations and owns some good income- 
paying propertv ; he is also the owner of a residence on Cabanne boulevard. 

In 1889, ]\Ir. Burton was married to Mrs. jMary L. Xixon, nee Delsher, a 
native of St. Charles, Missouri, and unto them have been born two sons, Walter 
P. and ^^'illiam \\'. Noting each opportunity which has come to him and utiliz- 
ing bis cliances to the best advantage, !Mr. Burton is now a representative 
citizen of St. Louis, with fair interests. 



GEORGE B. COUPER. 

George B. Couper was one of the early contractors and builders of the city 
and many of the substantial structures of the middle portion of the nineteenth 
century still stand as monuments to his skill and handiwork. He was born in 
South" Shields, England, near the North sea, a son of Joseph and Elizabeth 
Couper, the latter a descendant of one of the queens of England. Of their 
familv, two sons and one daughter are yet living. It was in the neighborhood 
which had long been the ancestral home of the family that George B. Couper 
was born and when he was a year and a half old his parents removed to Morris- 
town, St. Lawrence county. New York, where they spent their remaining days. 
His forefathers were shipbuilders and whether inherited tendency or natural 
predilection had most to do with his choice of occupation it is difficult to de- 
termine. At all events he turned his attention to the same line which had claimed 
the energies of his ancestors and became a carpenter and builder. 

He arrived in St. Louis about 1836 and something of the condition of the 
city at that time is indicated by the fact that he boarded in a log house on 
Fourth street, where are now seen high modern buildings. Many of the thorough- 
fares were unpaved and the limits of the city were small, while the district com- 
prised within its borders was but sparsely settled. Mr. Couper began contract- 
ing and building here and was closely associated with the early building interests. 
He continued a factor in this line of improvement until a few years prior to his 
death and to him were awarded the contracts for the erection of many of the 
substantial structures which are now numbered among the landmarks of the 
old St. Louis. The days were not all equally bright and in fact he faced many 
hardships and trials incident to the upbuilding of a new country, Then, too, 
there came periods of general financial depression throughout the nation and 
buikling iiUerests languished somewhat, but through all the years he kept steadily 
on his way and enjoyed his full share of the public patronage. He erected and 
owned an entire row of houses on Pine street and also built his own home at the 
corner of Pine and Beaumont streets. 

Mr. Couper was married in St. Louis, in 1859, to Miss Philinda Jones, of 
New York city, who was boni in Berlin, V^ermont, January 22, 1816, and who 
was visiting St. Louis at the time she formed the acquaintance of Mr. Couper. 
She still occupies the residence which he erected, having made her home since 
1 86 1 in the 2600 block on Pine street. In the years of his later prosperity Mr. 
and Mrs. Couper returned to I'Jigland, visiting South Shields and the graves 
of his ancestors. There in following back the old records he traced his parentage 
to noble birth. He was very fond of travel and gained much from his journeys, 
for he possessed an observing eye and retentive memory. 

At the time of the Civil war his sympathy was strongly in favor of the 
Union but he was too old to go to the front in defense of the stars and stripes. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. -.41 

He gave his political allegiance to the republican party from the time of its 
organization and was one of its most earnest advocates. A consistent Christian 
man, he held membership in the Pilgrim Congregational church and was very 
active in its work. To him was accorded an honored old age. He reached the 
ninetieth milestone on life's journey, his death then being occasioned by a fall 
from a car. In the early development of the city and in its later progress, when 
it was taking on all of the evidences of modern city building, Mr. Couper was 
well known here as a representative of trade interests and throughout his long 
connection with the business none ever called into question the integrity of his 
acts nor the sincerity of his purposes. 



EDGAR MORRISOX DAMS. 

Edgar Morrison Davis, who in 1905 organized the St. Louis Fire Insur- 
ance Company, of which he is a director and manager, has throughout the 
greater portion of his business career been connected with insurance interests, 
although in early manhood he prepared for the practice of law. He was born 
:n Alton, Illinois, in 1874, his parents being- Levi and Mary E. (Wise) Davis. 
His early education was acquired under private instruction and he also attended 
the high school of Alton, Illinois, from which he was graduated in the class 
of 1889. 

The same year he took up the study of law and acted as official court re- 
porter in Southern Illinois, but, turning his attention to the insurance business, 
he became connected with the general agency at St. Louis for the German Fire 
Insurance Company, of Freeport, Illinois, and finding in this pursuit a con- 
genial as well as profitable vocation, he has since continued therein. In 1894 
he established the firm of Davis & Davis, fire insurance agents, and in November, 
1900, he purchased the interest of his partner and conducted business under his 
own name until June, 1905, when he organized the present firm of Edgar M. 
Davis & Company, with Charles W. and Arthur J. Davis as partners. In the 
same year he organized the St. Louis Fire Insurance Company, of which he is 
a director and manager. He has closely studied the entire field of fire insurance, 
is familiar wuth the business in every department and his comprehensive knowl- 
edge, combined with his power of administrative direction and keen insight into 
business situations, have gained him a place of leadership in insurance circles 
that promises well for a still more successful future. 

Mr. Davis was married in Jerseyville, Illinois, in 1898, to ]\Iiss Ida B. Cross. 
He is a Catholic in religious faith, a member of the Legion of Honor and in 
social connections is identified with the Tuesday, Field, Normandie Park, Glen 
Echo Country and the Mercantile Clubs. As he has advanced in years he has 
learned to value those things which are worth while in business, in citizenship and 
in social life, correctly judging life's contacts and its experiences. He is an 
enthusiast on the game of golf, devoting his spare time to the sport, and he 
recently won two silver cups in open tournament. 



JAMES KIN SELLA. 

Tames Kinsella, who for forty-five years held the position of city weigh- 
master. his term of service long exceeding that of any other incumbent in the 
office, was a native of Wexford, Ireland, born in 183 1. In the place of his 
nativitv he spent the first twenty-two years of his life in the acquirement of 
an education and in the performance of such duties as were allotted to him. 
He then came as a young man to the new world, attracted by its broader busi- 
ness advantages, and during the early period of his residence in St. Louis was 



42 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

employed by the ]^Iax\vell Hardware Company for a few years. On the expira- 
tion of tlaat period he became city weighmaster and was continued in the posi- 
tion for four decades and a half.' He was considered an exceptionally upright 
and honest man and performed his duties with conscientious zeal and ability. 
His position brought him into close connection with municipal affairs and he 
was alwavs interested in everything that pertained to the welfare of the city. 
Aside from his office he had some business interests and in their management 
met with good success. 

Mr. Kinsella was married in Ireland to Aliss ^Marguerite Sheridan, also a 
native of the Emerald isle, and they became parents of five children: Alary 
Catherine, Lawrence, Johanna, John Henry and Mary, all now deceased with ex- 
ception of the last named. The only one to marry was Lawrence, who left three 
sons. James A., Lawrence A. and Ralph A. 

Air. Kinsella erected for his family a fine home on West Pine street, where 
thev still reside. He was a communicant of the Catholic church and died in 
that faith in 1905. He had been a resident of the city for more than a half 
century and had witnessed many changes here, for during that period it grew 
from a town into a city of metropolitan proportions and advantages. He never 
had occasion to regret his determination to seek a home in the new world, for 
he enjoved opportunities which he could not have secured in his native land and 
gained here a comfortable competence as well as many warm friends. 



\MLLIAM FOLEY, 



William Foley, vice president of the William R. Compton Bond & Mort- 
gage Company, was born in Lincoln, Illinois, July 7, 1870. He is a son of 
Stephen A. and Hannah (Woodman) Foley. The family is of Irish lineage 
but has been represented in this country through two centuries and among its 
members have been prominent business men. Stephen A. Foley is a leading 
representative of financial interests in his section of Illinois, being president of 
the Lincoln National Bank. 

William Foley supplemented his early education by study in Kenyon College, 
where he won the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1891 and then entered in the 
post-graduate department of Harvard University. He received the degree of 
Master of Arts in 1894. He returned to his alma mater as teacher of modern 
languages and was thus connected with its faculty for three years. Returning 
to Illinois he engaged in making farm loans for three years, after which he 
went abroad, spending a year and a half at Lisbon, Portugal, where he was con- 
nected with export interests. When he again came to his native country he 
settled in Chicago and assumed the management of the bond department for 
King, Hodenpyl & Company, with whom he continued for three years or until 
1902. He then became manager of the Bond Department of the Mercantile 
Trust Company of St. Louis and since March, 1908, has been vice president of 
the William R. Comj^ton Bond & Mortgage Company. Each change in his 
business life has indicated progress, bringing to him a broader outlook and wider 
opportunities, and he is today numbered among the leading representatives of 
financial interests in this city. Few men are more thoroughly informed con- 
cerning the value of bonds and his long experience in connection with the 
handling of bonds well qualifies him for the onerous duties which devolve upon 
him at the present time, lu's position being one of large responsibility. 

In 1896 in Lincoln. Illinois. Mr. Foley was married to Miss Frances Curtiss 
and their children arc Hannah Jane and Frances Elizabeth. Pleasantly situated 
in an attractive home in Webster Grove, theirs is an enviable position in social 
circles. Mr. Foley is a member of the Masonic fraternitv and the St. Louis 
and XortiKlay Clubs. He also belongs to the Episcopal church and while a grow- 



ST. LOUIS," THE FOURTH CITY. 43 

ing business makes continuous demands upon his time and attention he yet 
finds opportunity for affihation with those movements which are factors in gen- 
eral progress and especiaUy in the city's development along social, intellectual 
and moral lines. 



WILLIAM E. GEORGIA. 

\\'illiam E. Georgia, president of the Georgia-Stimson Furniture & Carpet 
Company, is numbered among the enterprising, energetic and alert merchants, 
whose activity constitutes an influential element in the business progress of St. 
Louis. He is yet a young man but has made a notably successful record. He 
was born in Elmira, New York, June 29, 1865, his parents being Roswell S. 
and Phoebe Jane Georgia. At the usual age he became a public-school student 
and passed through successive grades in the accjuirement of his education. When 
he had put aside his text-books he entered upon his business career as a sales- 
man in a dry-goods house of Elmira, New York, where he continued from 1879 
until 1884, during which period he gained intimate knowledge of commercial 
methods, while his satisfactory services gained him promotion from time to 
time. In fact, such was his business ability that on his removal to Kansas City, 
Missouri, he became manager of the drapery department of an extensive furni- 
ture house there and so continued from 1886 until 1890. In that year he ac- 
cepted the management of the drapery department in the house of J. Kennard 
& Sons, of St. Louis, with whom he remained until 1897. From 1898 until 1903 
he was a salesman with the Lammert Furniture Company, and on the ist of 
February, 1903, he organized the Georgia-Stimson Furniture & Carpet Company, 
of which he has since been president. The firm are retail dealers in furniture, 
carpets and draperies and from its establishment the enterprise has proved a 
profitable undertaking, a liberal patronage being now accorded them, for the 
house has built up an excellent reputation for the character of its goods and its 
services and for its reliable business methods. 

On the 25th of January, 1892, following his arrival in St. Louis, Air. Georgia 
was here married to Miss Alice C. Coleman. They attend the services of the 
Episcopal church. Mr. Georgia votes with the republican party but is not at- 
tracted by the honors or emoluments of office. He belongs to the Mercantile and 
Missouri Athletic Clubs, organizations which find in him a social and genial 
member. 



HENDERSON RIDGELY. 

Henderson Ridgely, capitalist, was born in Springfield, Illinois, December 
10, 1853. His father, Nicholas H. Ridgely, a native of Maryland, was born in 
January, 1800, and was one of the early bankers of St. Louis. He came to this 
city in 1828, traveling across the mountains to the Ohio river, thence down that 
stream to Cairo on a flatboat, after which the men on board pushed their craft 
up the river to St. Louis. There were no steamboats at that early day and St. 
Louis was just emerging from villagehood, its geographical position being such 
as to make it an important center in connecting the trade relations of east and 
west. Arriving here, Nicholas H. Ridgely was appointed discount clerk of the 
LInited States Bank of St. Louis, with which institution he remained until 1835, 
when he removed to Springfield, Illinois, becoming cashier of the State Bank 
of that city. In 1866 he established the Ridgely National Bank, of which he was 
the president until his death in 1888. One of his sons, Charles Ridgely, is the 
father of William B. Ridgely, former comptroller of the United States currency 
and for a time president of the National Bank of Commerce of Kansas City, 



44 ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 

Missouri. The mother of Henderson Ridgely bore the maiden name of Jane 
Maria Huntington and was a native of Boston. The Huntingtons are one of 
the best known famiHes of ^Massachusetts and it is to this family that the dis- 
tinguished Bishop Huntington belonged. 

In the public schools of Springfield, Henderson Ridgely acquired his edu- 
cation, while' practical business training was received in his father's banking in- 
stitution, which he entered at the age of sixteen years, remaining there for many 
vears. during which time he gained comprehensive knowledge of banking busi- 
ness and of the rules and methods which are essential features of success in busi- 
ness. On leaving Springfield he came to St. Louis, where he has since resided. 
His interests here have been confined to real-estate investment and his hold- 
ings represent a handsome fortune. He has no active business interests at the 
present time outside of the supervision which he gives to his investments. He 
is. however, still connected as a stockholder with the Ridgely National Bank 
of Springfield and is yet one of its directors. 

On the 25th of January, 1889, Mr. Ridgely was married to Miss Emily S. 
Parker and they reside at No. 5738 Von Versen avenue. Both being extremely 
fond of music, at their home they have entertained many of the leading musicians 
of the city. Mr. Ridgely is an associate member of the Apollo Club, the Amphion 
Club and Provident Association. He gives his political allegiance to the repub- 
lican party. In recent years he has traveled extensively, both in America and 
Europe, spending the seasons where fancy dictates. His chief pastimes are 
fishing, hunting and billiards. He is a man of cjuiet tastes, who finds his greatest 
pleasure in his home and travel. His circle of friends is select rather than large, 
as befits one who finds pleasure in the home life and in the artistic rather than 
in extensive societv interests. 



SILAS HENRY H. CLARK. 

No compendium such as this volume afifords in its essential limitations can 
offer fit memorial to the life work of Silas Henry H. Clark, a man remarkable in 
the breadth of his wisdom, in his clear conception and in his intense and well 
directed activity. He became recognized as one of the foremost railroad men of 
the entire country — the worthy successor and associate of Jay Gould. The stress 
of circumstances forced him to become a factor in life's activities when but eleven 
years of age but no mere environment or condition was strong enough to keep 
him in the background. Through the inherent force of character and his marked 
ability he gradually advanced until his position was one of the most prominent 
and his name one of the most honored in business circles of the great west. 

Mr. Clark was bom October 17, 1836, upon a farm near Morristown, New 
Jersey. Owing to adversity which came to his father the boy was in early ycath 
compelled to provide for his own support. He also aided in the labors of the 
home farm, so that his educational advantages w^ere limited, but his mind con- 
stantly broadened through life's contacts and experiences, and in manhood his 
mental strength was seldom cfjualed in its exposition, clear conception and 
thorough understanding of intrir;itc ])roblems and of possibilities for the co- 
ordination of forces. Long before this, however, he used everv opportunity to 
obviate his lack of educational training in early life by devoting to reading and 
<:tudy the time usualiv absorbed in the occupations of leisure and enjoyment bv 
the average working boy. He manifested a keen love of books and not onlv read 
but mastered the contents of ail which came into his possession. He possessed a 
remarkably retentive memory, which was combined with a power of placing a 
correct relative valuation upon the knovvledge that he acquired. 

_ His identification with railrr,afl interests dated from an earlv period in his 
business career and though his initial position was a humble oue his capability. 




SILAS H. U. CLARK. 



46 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrY. 

fidelity and laudable ambition soon won recognition in advancement and through 
consecutive promotions he rose to the position of passenger conductor on one of 
the railroads connecting- New York and Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. It was while 
filling that position that he attracted the attention and gained the acquaintance of 
Sidnev Dillon, the distinguished railroad manager and financier Dillon was 
famoxis as an unerring judge of men, was notably quick to discover in the sub- 
ordinates with whom he was brought in contact capacities for usefulness or the 
lack of them.; and marks of peculiar adaptability to the necessities of advanced 
railroad service in Mr. Clark soon found recognition in a manner so substantial 
that it was a delightful surprise even to the recipient of his favor. Relieving the 
voung passenger conductor from the position in wdiich he had demonstrated his 
instincts for "railroading, he made him treasurer of the Flushing Railroad on 
Long Island. \\'hile thus engaged ^Ir. Clark was brought into intimate relation- 
ship with Mr. Dillon and the latter's associates in railroad circles in New York, 
and the marked ability with which he conducted the affairs of the road committed 
to his management soon attracted much attention and admiration from men who 
lost no opportunity of securing the services of those who gave proof of possess- 
ing peculiar capacities for railroad management. When the Dillon syndicate 
secured control of the Union Pacific Railroad system and was organizing the 
personnel of its interests in various positions of administrative direction and 
executive force, Mr. Clark's past achievements recommended him for higher 
honors and larger responsibilities and he was made general freight agent of the 
lines. Promotion again came to him when he was made second vice president 
and general manager of the L^nion Pacific Railroad system and in his dual 
capacity he formed the acquaintance of the late Jay Gould, whose position as 
the foremost representative of railroad interests in the country is universally ac- 
knowledged. The warm personal friendship which sprang up between Mr. 
Gould and ^Iv. Clark continued without interruption until the death of the 
former and led to ]Mr. Clark's severance of his relations wdth the L'nion Pacific 
Railroad in 1884, to become vice president and general manager of the Gould 
Southwestern Railway, comprising in main and subsidiary lines some seven 
thousand miles of trackage, while its earnings were over thirty millions of 
dollars annually. Mr. Gould displayed his unqualified confidence in Mr. Clark's 
ability by giving him full control, and he remained through the ensuing years 
one of the great financier's most intimate personal friends, constant advisers 
and able assistants in the conduct of his enormous transactions in the railway 
world. He was the recognized western representative of the entire Gould in- 
terests and when these were extended to include the L'nion Pacific Railroad, 
Mr. Clark again became vice president and general manager of that system, at 
the same time continuing in active connection with the gieat Southwestern 
.system. Tlie two were under his control until 1893, when impaired health 
forced him to largely ])ut a>ide the responsibilities of direction and management 
which devolved upon him. Severing his connection with the Missouri Pacific 
.system, he was elected to the presidency of the Union Pacific Railroad, in which 
position he continued until the road i)assed into the hands of the receivers, when 
he was made chairman of tlie rex-iver's board, being ]iractically manager of the 
great pro])erty up to the linn- it wa> reorganized in 1897. This reorganization 
was accrmiplishc-fl largely along lines instituted and ])erfecte(l bv ]Mr. Clark, 
and those {jrominent in railroad circles accord to him the credit resulting from 
the fact that the great pioneer overland system was finally enabled to relieve 
itself of its enormous debt to the gr)vernmcnt and enter ui)on a new and promis- 
ing era of progress and develo])menl. I'.y reason of tlie condition of his health 
he declined the ])residency of the road when it was ofl'ercd him in recognition 
of hi.> marvelous ability and management of railroad ir.terests and his powers 
of executive control. Ik- manifested the keenest insight in management, look- 
ing bevond the exigencies of the moment to the ]K)Ssibi]ities of the future. ITe 
saw with remarkable clearness the obstacles as well as the oi)i)ortunities and 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 47 

brought to bear the forces which would couquer the former and utihze the 
latter. His native sagacity and fertility of resource were most notable and 
the plans which he perfected accomphshed the result of activity with a notable 
absence of friction or delay. After thirty years' continuous service in most con- 
spicuous and influential administrative positions in the western railway world 
lie retired wholly from railroad management toward the close of the year 1898. 

A contemporary biographer said of ]Mr. Clark: "He is remembered among 
railroad men as the peer of the most able of his contemporaries, and as one 
who has contributed in an unusual degree to modern development, especially 
in the western field in which he was so long the guiding spirit. It was char- 
acteristic of Mr. Clark that while he enjoyed the confidence and zealous admira- 
tion of the great financiers and railroad capitalists, he was equally popular 
among the employes of the lines with which he was connected. He is recalled 
with reverential affection by many of the most humble employes of the Union 
Pacific, who have never forgotten his unfailing consideration for the most 
humble helpers of the great w^ork of which he was the reigning power. Out- 
side of railway circles Mr. Clark was equally popular, and his many unusually 
attractive qualities as a neighbor, a citizen and a man assembled about him a mul- 
titude of admirers wdio entertained for him in life the kindest regard, and pay 
reverence to his memory." 

In commenting editorially upon his life work one of the leading papers of 
the country said : "The selection of Air. S. H. H. Clark as president of the 
Missouri Pacific system was one of those peculiarly proper things which some- 
times inspire the minds of men. Mr. Clark has become so thoroughly familiar 
to the people of Missouri and the west that they have assumed a sort of pro- 
prietary interest in his triumphs, and his unanimous appointment as the suc- 
cessor of Air. Gould is, to their minds, a most emphatic endorsement of their 
opinion that he is the greatest railway manager in this country. He held, as 
did no other man, the confidence and friendship of Mr. Gould, a fact which 
grew out of the latter's knowledge that, with millions to be expended every 
year, not one dollar would be misappropriated or misapplied, and that in Air. 
Clark he had at the head of his great enterprise a man of incorruptible and 
unswerving integrity and a friend whose loyalty and devotion would remain 
unbroken to the end." 

Air. Clark was married to Aliss Annie Al. Drake, a daughter of Eliphalet 
and Caroline Drake, and a native of New Jersey. Unto them were born four 
children : John Emor}-, deceased ; S. Hoxie, a prominent attorney of St. Louis ; 
Caroline Stewart, deceased, and Abbie, also deceased. For fifteen years Air. 
Clark maintained a residence in St. Louis, although his manifold and complex 
railroad interests called him to all parts of the country. \Miile aft'airs of 
magnitude and often of the gravest import claimed his time anrl attention, he 
possessed a breadth of character and a business capacity that enabled him to 
turn to community interests and labor for their welfare. While a resident of 
Omaha he did much to further its interests along man\- lines of civic improve- 
ment and progress. In 1883 he became a factor in the street railwav depart- 
ment of the city and was also among the first to promote the interests of the 
Nebraska Telephone Company. His investments in r)maha real estate were 
extensive, and in other parts of the country he also had large realty holdings. 

A noteworthy event giving indication of one of his salient personal attri- 
butes occurred in 1894, when he was called into the United States circuit court, 
Judge Caldwell presiding, as a leading witness. When it was time to take his 
testimony the clerk of the court proceeded to administer to him the usual 
oath, but the judge, calling the clerk aside, stated that that would be unneces- 
sary, as Air. Clark's words alone were sufficient before the court. He was a 
man of the highest sense of honor and was entirely free from intrigue. Dur- 
ing his long business career his word was never known to be broken. Few 
men wdio have attained the prominence and the wealth which the world terms 



•IS ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

success have at the same time won the unsulHed reputation which the con- 
sensus of pubhc opinion accorded Silas H. H. Clark. His life record stands as 
a splendid example of what may be accomplished through individual effort 
and at the same time manifest an unswerving loyalty to the highest ideals of 
business integrity and honor. The last weeks of his life were passed in Ashe- 
ville. North Carolina, where he went for the benefit of his health, but the end 
came June i. 1900. The funeral cortege proceeded in private cars to St. 
Louis and thence to Omaha, attended by some of the most distinguished rep- 
resentatives of railroad and business interests in the west. Telegrams of sym- 
pathv and condolence were recsived from the Gould family and others of 
almost equal distinction, for the life and work of Silas Henry H. Clark were 
such as gained him the honor and high regard and the friendship of all with 
whom he was associated. Remarkable as was his career from the fact that 
he rose from a humble position in the business world to rank among the emi- 
nent American men. it was even more noteworthy from the fact that he bore 
so few of the signs of the conflict which is inevitable in a business career in- 
volving large interests and responsibilities. The same quality which enabled 
him to judge correctly everything bearing upon railroad interests, enabled him 
to place a correct valuation upon all those interests which enter into the com- 
plex fabric which we call life. To him may fittingly be applied the words of 
Pope: 

"Friend to truth ; of soul sincere. 

In action faithful and in honor clear; 

He broke no promise, served no private end. 

He gained no titles and he lost no friend." 



CHARLES NIEDRINGHAUS. 

Charles Xiedringhaus, president of the Charles Niedringhaus House Fur- 
nishing Company of St. Louis, came to America in his youth from his native 
country of Germany. He was born in Westphalia, June 10, 1843, his parents 
being William F. and ^lary (Siebe) Niedringhaus. At the usual age he became 
a public-school student and after his emigration to the new world attended night 
schools in this city in order to further equip himself for the responsibilities of 
a practical business career. At the age of fifteen he sailed from the fatherland 
and joined his brothers, William F. and F. G. Niedringhaus, in St. Louis, in 
whose employ he learned the tinner's trade, which he followed for ten years. 
His efficiency increased with the advancing years and successive promotions fol- 
lowed until he was made manager of the store conducted by his brothers. They 
were dealers in stoves and house furnishings and Mr. Niedringhaus continued 
as the executive head until 1875, when he became sole proprietor of the business. 
For fifteen years he conducted trade along those lines and then extended the 
scope of his interests by adding furniture and carpet departments in 1890. Six 
years later the business was incorporated under the present style of the Charles 
Niedringhaus House Furnishing Company, of which he has since been president. 
The trade has grown to large proportions, constituting an important element 
in the commercial life of the city. A branch store has 'also been established at 
Granite City. Illinois, and is ])roving a successful venture, with a capable resi- 
dent manager, under the general supervision of the St. Louis house. 

It was in this city that Charles Niedringhaus was married, . October 31, 
1867, to Miss Louisa Koenig, also of German lineage. They became the parents 
of twelve children: Arthur C. ; Mrs. Lillie A. Eisenmayer, deceased; Edwin 
A., deceased; John W. ; Ben F. ; Alice, the wife of Dr. Hamm, of Granite City. 
Illinois: Irving C, who is living at Homestead, Pennsylvania; Edith; Louise; 
Walter .S. ; Norman H. ; and Edna. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 49 

The family attend the German Methodist church, of which Mr. Niedring- 
haus is a member and steward. He is a Mason and belongs to the Aurora 
lodge, while he is also associated with General Lyon Post, G. A. R.. being 
entitled to membership from the fact that he served with the Fourth Missouri 
Infantry in defense of the L^nion cause. His early study of the political ques- 
tions and issues of the day led him to give inflexible support to the republican 
party, nor has he ever had occasion to change his views as the years have passed. 
His interest in politics, however, Is that of a citizen and not of a political 
aspirant, for the demands of a growing business have constantly claimed his 
time and attention. He made his initial step in the commercial world as an 
apprentice and as the result of his capability and laudable ambition passed on 
to positions of larger and larger responsibility until he is now in control of an 
extensive commercial enterprise that figures as one of the elements of St. Louis' 
commercial prosperity as well as a source of individual profit. 



TOHN SCOTT. 



John Scott, deceased, was a distinguished citizen of St. Louis who acquired 
wealth by honorable dealing in a builder's field. For many years he was a promi- 
nent railroad contractor and thus contributed in large measure to the develop- 
ment and improvement of the west and southwest. He was born December 25, 
1828, in County Roscommon, Ireland, and at the age of nineteen years came 
to America to seek his fortune. The reports which he heard concerning the 
business conditions and opportunities on this side of the Atlantic proved too 
attractive to be resisted, and in 1855 he took up his abode in St. Louis, where 
he resided up to the time of his death. 

St. Louis then was little more than a country town, and Missouri had no 
railroad interests, all traffic being done by way of the river. With keen insight, 
realizing the possibilities for the development of the state and its growth through 
the use of its natural resources, Mr. Scott became a prominent factor in rail- 
road building. A railroad system was inaugurated and three lines, extending 
from the city, were projected — the Northern Missouri, the Missouri Pacific and 
its southwest branches, and the Iron Mountain Railroad. Preliminary surveys 
were made and contracts for the construction were let. It was at that time that 
Mr. Scott's career as a railroad contractor began, and for over forty years he 
was successfully and prominently connected with that calling. Even in his 
advanced years he remained an active factor in railroad building in association 
with his sons as senior partner of the firm of John Scott & Sons. Hundreds 
of miles of railroad in ^Missouri and the southwest were built under his direc- 
tion, and in addition to extensive contracts in this state his operations extended 
to railroad work in Kansas, Colorado, Texas, Arkansas, New Mexico and 
Arizona. He also constructed millions of cubic yards of embankment on the 
levee systems in Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana. So extensive were his 
contracts that no man in Missouri has given employment to more people than he, 
and the labors of few others have equaled in importance what Mr. Scott accom- 
plished. Always prompt in the execution of his contracts, his reliability was 
never questioned, for he ever conformed to the highest standard of commercial 
ethics. This undoubtedly constituted one of the strong features in his success. 
He studied the subject of railroad building from every possible standpoint, and 
knew exactly when and where and how to utilize time and materials, and the 
labors of those who served him. As the years passed by he gained that wealth 
which constitutes the goal of all business activity, and investigation into his 
career will show that the methods which he employed were such as no man 
could call into question. He died January 12, 1908. 
4 -VOL. n. 



50 ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 

Mr. Scott was married in Davenport, Iowa, to Miss Ann Killeen, of that 
citv. and unto them were born three sons and two daughters : Addie ; Edmond 
T., of John Scott & Sons, residing in St. Louis ; Annie, wife of E. Meers, an 
"attornev of Johet, lUinois ; and John R. and Thomas J., of John Scott & Sons. 

Mr. Scott was a most warm-hearted, generous man. of charitable and benevo- 
lent disposition, recognizing fully the obligations of financial success. He re- 
mained an active factor in the world's work to an advanced age, and left the 
impress of his individuality upon the upbuilding and development of his adopted 
land. 



PETER A. O'NEIL. 

The historv of a self-made man is always of interest, as it contains some- 
thing of the elements of Avarfare and it represents the efforts of the conqueror 
who" in his contests with obstacles and difficulties, wins signal victories. Such 
was the record of Mr. O'Neil, who started out in life for himself at the age of 
twelve vears and became a prosperous business man of St. Louis. He was born 
in St. Louis about 1840, the son of James and Ellen (Long) O'Neil. The father 
was a contractor of St. Louis and a successful business man. 

At the usual age the son, Peter A. O'Neil, entered the Jesuit College of 
St. Louis and pursued his studies to the age of twelve years, when, desiring 
to become self-supporting, he started out in life on his own account and from 
that time until his demise depended entirely upon his own resources. He was 
first employed as a messenger boy in the Benoist Bank, and the first business 
in which he engaged as an independent venture was in pork packing with his 
brother Hugh. Later he became connected with the Fletcher Brothers in the 
same line of business and gradually made his way forward to the goal of pros- 
perity which was his objective point. In 1875, thinking tO' find a still more 
profitable field in the restaurant business, he took charge of the restaurant at 
the Union depot and as he had anticipated found it more congenial and remunera- 
tive than any other undertaking which had previously claimed his attention. 
He also secured the dining-car rights on all trains leaving St. Louis and in this 
field of activity he continued to meet with success for a number of years. Finally, 
however, he disposed of his interests in those lines and turned his attention to 
the real-estate business. Here his keen discrimination and sound judgment 
found ample scope and he was seldom if ever at error, even in the slightest de- 
gree, in his valuation of property or in his judgment concerning its possible 
rise or diminution in price. He negotiated manv important property transfers 
and at different times owned and sold considerable realty, realizing a gratifying 
profit on his investments. Lie was a director of the Mercantile Trust Company 
and became recognized as a forceful factor in business circles, possessing sound 
judgment and rare sagacit_\\ 

In 1875 ■^^^- O'Neil was united in marriage to Miss ]Mary Florez. a daughter 
of Bernard D. Florez, who was of Spanish descent and came to St. Louis at an 
early day. He served as a soldier in the Mexican war and later engaged in 
merchandising, continuing his residence in this city up to the time of his death. 
fie was always active in business affairs and as he saw opportunity for favor- 
able investment acquired much property, becoming recognized as one of the 
cub'^tantial business men of the community. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Eleanor Rhuyour. was born and reared in St. Louis, her people having 
been among the early residents of the city. Unto Mr. and Mrs. O'Neil were 
born three children : Eleanor, now the wife of Fred Nolker, of St. Louis ; Ellen, 
at home; and James, also of this city. Mr. O'Neil built the present beautiful 
home of the family on Lindcll boulevard. In his religious faith Mr. O'Neil 
was a Catholic. In municipal affairs he was deeplv interested and gave hearty 
co-operation to every movenu-iit for the iK-ncfit and welfare of St. Louis. He 




PETER A. O'XEIL 



52 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

served as one of the directors of the World's Fair grounds, also a member of 
the building- committee, and took a very active interest in the success of the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition. Realizing- the opportunities and possibilities 
which lie before St. Louis, he worked eagerly to promote its growth along 
substantial lines and his eitorts were not without avail in this direction. 



ADOLPH BRAUN, JR. 

Adolph Braun, Jr., secretary and treasurer of the Adolph Braun Manu- 
facturing- Company, was born in St. Louis about twenty-five years ago. His 
father, Adolph Braun, Sr., is a native of Germany and came to America in 
1876. He had been educated in his native country for the drug business and 
imm.ediately after his arrival he entered the employ of one of the old drug 
houses of this city, occupying that position for many years. In 1897 he started 
upon an independent business venture by organizing the Dodson-Braun Manufac- 
turing Company, of which he was made secretary and treasurer. This company 
has offices at Third and Cedar streets and does a very extensive business, amount- 
ing probably to more than one million dollars annually. Extending the scope of 
his activities in February, 1907, Adolph Braun, Sr., organized the Adolph Braun 
[Manufacturing Company, wath offices at Sixth and Gratiot streets. This is 
practically the only company engaging in the manufacture of high class vine- 
gars in St. Louis. While the company manufactures several kinds of vinegar, 
they are the only manufacturers of cane sugar vinegar in the United States, and 
this has had an extensive sale. Although the business has been established for 
only a short time, it has met with excellent success in the sale of its products 
and the trade is constantly increasing. They conduct a strictly jobbing trade, 
and although the father is now president of the company, the business is being 
carried on by his sons, Adolph and Marquard. These sons were reared and edu- 
cated in St. Louis, having attended the public schools there and largely received 
their business training under the direction of their father. Though they are 
still young men, they have demonstrated their ability and executive force and 
have directed their labors to good advantage in the development and upbuilding 
of the profitable and growing undertaking. 

In 1905 Adolph Braun, Jr., was united in marriage to Miss Charlotta 
Bauer, of St. Louis, whose father was an early settler and business man of this 
city. The young couple are both well known here and are greatly esteemed 
sociallv. 



THOMAS PAUL GLEESON. 

Thomas Paul Gleeson of the firm of Smilev & Gleeson, electrical manu- 
facturers' agents, was born in St. Louis, March 31, 1880. His father, Thomas 
P. Gleeson, Sr., formerly prominent in financial circles in St. Louis was for 
many years cashier of the Citizens Savings Bank. He was born in Ireland and 
was a half brother of Archbishop Ryan, of Philadelphia. His death occurred 
suddenly and was the occasion of deep regret in business and church circles. 
He was a prominent member of the Catholic church and as stated in a Catholic 
paper, "From his early youth he learned that the church was the one great 
object of Christian loyalty and the highest glory of a layman was to follow where 
the clergy led." He was untiring in his devotion to the church in all of its 
difficult phases of work and contributed most generously to its support as he 
prospered in his business undertakings. He married Miss Susie Cartan and they 
became parents of nine children, of wliom the eldest was but fourteen years of 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 53 

age at the time of the father's death. Mrs. Gleeson still survives her husband 
and makes her home in St. Louis. 

T. Paul Gleeson, of this review, was a pupil in a private school until his 
fifteenth year and also spent one year in the St. Louis University, while later 
he pursued a six months' course in a St. Louis commercial college. In his early 
business life he occupied various positions, making changes as he saw oppor- 
tunity for advancement, whereby he had broader scope for his labors and a wider 
outlook for the future. For two years he was with the American Carbon & 
Battery Company of St. Louis, and was treasurer of this company, when he 
resigned that position to engage in business on his own account. For three 
years he has been a member of the firm of Smiley & Gleeson, electrical manu- 
facturers' agents. He resides with his mother at No. 5581 Von Versen avenue. 
He is a Catholic in religious faith and a member of St. Rose's church. He is 
also a member of the St. Louis Athletic Association and in this city where his 
entire life has been spent he has many friends who esteem him highly for his 
cordiality, geniality and deference for the opinions of others. 



THOMAS HARPER COBBS. 

Thomas Harper Cobbs a member of the firm of Bishop & Cobbs, attorneys 
at law, with offices in the Third National Bank building, was born at Napoleon 
in Lafayette county, Missouri, on the 26th of August, 1868. His father, Thomas 
T. Cobbs, was a native of Tennessee and followed the occupation of farming 
as a life work. His father became a pioneer settler of Lafayette 
county, Missouri, where he built the first gristmill of the locality. 
Thomas T. Cobbs arrived in this state in 1830 and also, establish- 
ing his home in Lafayette county, operated his father's gristmill for 
many years. He served his southland as a soldier of the Confederacy under 
General Price during the latter part of the war. In his business affairs he pros- 
pered, becoming well-to-do and is now living in honorable retirement from fur- 
ther business cares at Odessa, Missouri, at the age of seventy-eight years. He 
married Catherine Harper, a native of Woodford county, Kentucky, and a rep- 
resentative of a prominent family of that state. The Harpers were widely known 
as leading horse breeders and owned Longfellow and Ten Brook, two famous 
horses of that day. Mrs. Cobbs' father died when she was but a young child 
and she is the voungest and the only survivor of a family of seven daughters. 

Thomas H. Cobbs was reared upon the home farm and attended the dis- 
trict schools to the age of seventeen years, after which he matriculated in Odessa 
College, at Odessa, Missouri, being graduated therefrom with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in 1889. For a short time afterward he engaged in teach- 
ing, then entered the Missouri Valley College at Marshall, pursuing the classical 
course. He did not complete it. however, but left school to become principal 
of the high school at Slater, Missouri, in January, 1892. In September of the 
same year he accepted the superintendency of the schools at Roodhouse, Illinois, 
and while there engaged spent the summer seasons as a student in the University 
of Chicago. In 1895 he resigned the superintendency at Roodhouse and turned 
his attention to the study of law in the St. Louis Law School, a department of 
Washington University. During the first year devoted to the study of law he 
also completed his classical course in the same institution and was graduated 
with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1896. He took the bar examination during 
the summer of that year and was admitted to the bar of Missouri in August, 
after which he went to the Yale Law school, where he won the Bachelor of Law 
degree in 1897. He always met the expenses of his university courses by teach- 
ing and while at Yale he won the thesis prize. He was also elected president of 



54 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

the famous Yale-Kent Club, a debating society, which was an unusual dis- 
tinction for one who had been no longer in the university than he. 

Returning to Chicago, ^Ir. Cobbs entered the office of the law firm of 
Flower, Smith & IMusgrave and brought his theoretical knowledge to the prac- 
tical test in law work with that firm until January, 1901. He then entered into 
partnership with John £. Bishop, of St. Louis, under the firm style of Bishop 
& Cobbs. with offices in the Laclede building, where they remained until 1908. 
Thev are now located in the Third National Bank building and enjoy a large 
general civil practice. This is recognized as a strong firm and their tendency is 
toward corporation law. The legal business entrusted to them is of an im- 
portant character and their clientage is constantly increasing. He is the author 
of a thesis on the liability for "Bills of Lading Given for Goods not in Fact 
Shipped, ■■ in which the above mentioned prize was won. Endowed by nature 
with keen intellectual force, which he has steadily developed through his study 
and subsequent research, he has made for himself a creditable place as a prac- 
titioner of law. 

In professional lines !Mr. Cobbs is connected with the St. Louis and the 
Missouri State Bar Associations. He likewise belongs to the Sigma Nu, a col- 
lege fraternity, to the Yale Alumni Association, to the Washington University 
Alumni Association and is a charter member of the Missouri Athletic Club. 
He is fond of all outdoor sports, including golf and tennis, and is well known 
for his pedestrian feats. 

On the 30th of August, 1898, Mr. Cobbs was married to Miss Lucie Mae 
Jones, of Carrollton, Illinois, a representative of a prominent and well known 
family. In fraternal lines he is associated wath the Masons and the Knights 
of Pythias, while both he and Mrs. Cobbs hold membership in the Presbyterian 
church, in which he has served as an elder for seventeen years, being also a 
member of the board of foreign missions of that church. 

He thoroughlv enjoys home life and takes great pleasure in the society of 
his familv and friends. He is always courteous, kindly and affable and those 
who know him personally have for him warm regard. A man of great natural 
ability, his success in his profession from the beginning of his residence in St. 
Louis has been uniform and rapid. As has been truly remarked, after all that 
may be done for a man in the way of giving him early opportunities for obtain- 
ing the requirements which are sought in schools and in books, he must es- 
sentiallv formulate, determine and give shape to his ow-n character and this is 
what Mr. Cobbs has done. His life is exemplary in many respects and he has 
ever supported those interests which are calculated to benefit and uplift human- 
itv, while his own high moral worth is deserving of the highest commendation. 



JAMES C. TRAVILLA. 

James C. Travilla is serving as street commissioner of St. Louis and over 
the record of his official career there falls no shadow of wrong nor suspicion 
of evil. On the contrary, his course has been characterized by the utmost fidel- 
ity to duty and his service has been most beneficial to the city. His appointment 
came to him without his solicitation and was therefore the expression of the 
mayor's belief in his capability and loyaltv to the municipal welfare. 

Mr. Travilla is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, born July ii, 1865. 
His parents were Henry C. and Mary Coxcy Travilla. The father, also a na- 
tive of the Keystone state, is still living there and is engaged in the flour and 
grain business, but the mother died in 1901. The son, James C. Travilla, was 
educated in the public schools of Philadelphia, in the State Normal and in the 
University of Pennsylvania, being graduated therefrom as civil engineer with 
the class of 1886. Having friends in railroad circles, he was offered a position- 



ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 55 

by the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company in the engineering department under 
Colonel James Way immediately after his graduation, and at once came to St. 
Louis to enter upon his duties here. He continued in that employ until 1890, 
since which time he has been continuously in the city's service, with the excep- 
tion of two years. From 1890 until 1894 he was connected with the board of 
public improvements and then during- the succeeding two years conducted a 
private business as civil engineer, associated with George Barnett. In 1896 he 
was recjuested by members of the board of public improvements and others to 
return to the City Hall and complying with this request served as office super- 
intendent of the street department until the spring of 1907, when Mayor Wells 
appointed him street commissioner without his solicitation or expectation. The 
appointment came as evidence of the trust reposed in him by the chief execu- 
tive and his behef in the ability of ]Mr. Travilla to efficiently and capably dis- 
charge the duties of the office. Though many men of merit fill public offices, 
it is seldom that they are bestowed wdthout desire on the part of the incumbent 
and this position came to ^Ir. Travilla as a marked acknowledgment of his merit. 
The public and the press have frequently voiced their approval of his official 
service since he became street commissioner. He has worked untiringlv and 
diligently to improve and beautify the city and has been identified with the 
Civic League and its work, being also a champion of the proposed boulevard 
system, in which he has taken great interest. He devotes his energies and at- 
tention exclusively to municipal work and no word of complaint or criticism is 
ever offered against him in this connection. While he has not become a wealthv 
man, he enjoys an enviable reputation for his professional ability, his upright- 
ness and his unquestioned integrity. When his present term of office expires 
he expects to retire from public service to engage in the private practice of his 
profession, feeling that he has done his full dutv in giving this much of his 
time to municipal business. 

On the 30th of March, 1892, in St. Louis, Mr. Travilla was married to 
Miss Mary Moffitt, a sister of John S. ]\Ioffitt, a leading druggist of this citv. 
They have three children : Helen, Dorothy and James C, aged respectively four- 
teen, twelve and eight years. 

Mr. Travilla has been president of the State Pennsylvania Societv for the 
past year and is identified with the Masonic and other fraternal orders. He 
is a man of domestic tastes, preferring the pleasures of his own fireside to the 
enjoyment of club life. While he frequently votes the democratic ticket, he is 
rather independent in politics and liberal in his views and has never obligated 
himself to political influence. He holds membership with the Union Methodist 
church and is a man in whom his fellowmen believe, for he is ever frank and 
honest and wdthout pretense. His well spent life, however, has gained him 
high regard and he justly merits the esteem which is uniformlv given him. 



CHARLES FREDERICK POMMER. 

Charles Frederick Pommer has been living a retired life for the past eight 
years. For a long period of time he was engaged in the furniture business, in 
which he had gained a wide reputation throughout the business circles of the com- 
munity. He is of German descent, his grandfather having been Charles Pommer. 
who was born in Halberstadt, Germany, in 1785. Earlv in life he went to Eng- 
land, where he was apprenticed to a piano maker, with whom he remained until 
he became familiar with all points in the manufacture of musical instnmients. 
In the year 1812 he came to America and settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
where he engaged in the piano manufacturing business until his death in 1845. 
The father of the subject was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in October of 
the year 1818. Having attended the public schools for a brief period, he engaged 



oLi ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

in business with his father until the year 1840, when he migrated to St. Louis. 
Here he engaged in the repairing and manufacturing of pianos at Gratiot and Fifth 
streets, later removing to jMarket street, which enterprise he followed until he 
passed away in ^lay, 1857. 

Charles Frederick Ponimer was born January 12, 1850, in St. Louis, where 
he attended the Laclede public school until he was eighteen years of age. Upon 
the death of his father his mother continued the piano business, in which her son 
engaged after leaving school and remained until the year 1888. Subsequently he 
became connected with a medical book firm, under the name of Simpson & Com- 
panv. He had not long been in the employ of this company when he became its 
owner and continued the management of its affairs until the year 1890, when he 
retired on account of ill health. He then established himself in a furniture busi- 
ness at 1825-1827 Franklin avenue. In this business he was quite successful and 
retired in 1900. 

AMiile ^Ir. Pommer does not take an active interest in the politics of the 
country, vet as far as concerns political platforms he is a republican and has al- 
wavs voted for the candidates on that ticket. In religious faith he is a Presby- 
terian. He was married in St. Louis to Aliss Bolmann and resides at 3642 Flora 
boulevard. 



WILLIA^I F. GRADOLPH. 

Among the citizens of St. Louis who claim Ohio as the state of their nativity 
William F. Gradolph is numbered, his birth having occurred in Toledo, August 
21, 1870. His father, William F. Gradolph, was for many years engaged in 
business in that city, but spent his last days in Chicago, where his death occurred 
in 1904. The family is of German descent and in 1847 William F. Gradolph, 
Sr., left the fatherland, crossing the Atlantic to the new world. At one time he 
was proprietor of the largest confectionery business west of New York. The 
grandfather, Frederick Gradolph, was connected with the Hudson Bay Com- 
pany. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Antoinette Jacobs, 
and was born at Niagara Falls, a daughter of the proprietor of the Niagara 
Hotel. 

The public schools of Toledo and Chicago enabled William F. Gradolph 
to gain a thorough knowledge of the elementary principles of English learning, 
but when fourteen years of age he put aside his text-books, for he desired to 
provide for his own support, and entered upon an apprenticeship with L. Beck- 
mann, a manufacturer and dealer in optical goods and surveying instruments 
at Toledo. After three years, however, he returned to Chicago and entered the 
employ of Dr. Frank Colburn. who was conducting an extensive optical business. 
He remained in that connection until the death of his employer about fifteen 
months later. In 1887 he became interested in the electrical business through 
attending the first Electrical Show held in Chicago. It is often the seemingly 
trivial incidents that prove the turning point in one's career, and Mr. Gradolph's 
chance visit to that exposition turned his attention in the direction that has con- 
stituted the largest feature in his success. He engaged with the Electro-Optical 
Company, manufacturers of electrical and optical apparatus, and for about a 
year continued witli that house. In 1888 he entered the employ of the West- 
ern Electric Company, at that time the largest electric manufacturers in the 
world, and remain today as the largest telephone apparatus manufacturers on 
the face of the globe. For about two and a half years Mr. Gradolph was in the 
employ of that company and then engaged with the Chicago Telephone Com- 
pany, working his way steadily upward from the foot of the ladder. He was 
promoted from one position to another until, when he severed his connection 
with the house in 1894, he was serving as wire chief. In that year he went to 
the east and settled at Newburgh. New "S'ork. where he became connected with 




\MLLIA^r F. GRADOLPH 



58 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

the Hudson River Telephone Company, with which he remained until 1902^ 
when he resigiied his position as acting chief engineer and again took up his 
abode in Chicago. In the same year he became foreman in the cable department 
of the American Electric Telephone Company, but in 1903 resigned his position 
as superintendent of the entire works. 

It was in ]\Iay of that year that Mr. Gradolph came to St. Lx)uis, accepting 
a position as chief engineer with the Central Telephone & Electric Company,, 
serving in that capacity until February. 1905. He resigned the same year for 
the purpose of looking after the interests of some inventions which were the 
outgrowth of his orig"inality and mechanical skill. This resulted- in the organ- 
ization of the Gradolph Electric Company, of which he was chosen president 
in 1907. This company is giving to the markets of the w'orld certain electrical 
machines which have come to be recognized as of particular value on the market. 
Mr. Gradolph is also the secretary and treasurer of the Economic Ore Treat- 
ment Company, which has a fully paid up capital of one hundred thousand 
dollars, with an office and testing plant at No. 8061/2 Chestnut street. In this 
he is associated with Charles A. Xeil, president of the company, and Edward 
C. Rice, chemist. 

On the 17th of October, 1893, at Rockford, Illinois, ]Mr. Gradolph led to- 
the marriage altar Miss Cornelia Rosevelt Blake, a daughter of Louis C. 
Blake, who was associated with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 
Companv. The children of this marriage are: Clinton Hazlet, fifteen years of 
age ; now attending the ]^lcKinley high school ; and Veronica Irene, five years 
of age. Their home is at Xo. 2908A St. Vincent avenue. 

Mr. Gradolph was formerly a member of the National Guard of Illinois 
and New York and in both connections received medals for efficient service. 
He is a member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and American 
Electro-Chemical Society, and something in the nature of his interests is indi- 
cated in the fact that he is a member of the Gilbert Lake Club, a fishing and 
hunting club. ]\Iany people can follow the leadership of others and under direc- 
tion do good work, but those who are capable of producing something new and 
valuable and of perfecting new^ plans for business development are compara- 
tively few. This Mr. Gradolph has done, however, and his work has been a 
worthv contribution to the electrical world. 



HOBART BRINSMADE. 

Not by leaps and bounds, but by the slow, steady progress that follows- 
the faithful performance of daily duties with constant striving for broader op- 
portunities and a wise utilization of the chances that have been offered him, has 
Hobart Brinsmade reached his present position as a leading representative of 
commercial interests in St. Louis, having for thirteen years been the president 
of the King Brinsmade Mercantile Company of St. Louis. He is a native of 
Trumbull, ContJfxticut, and a son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Fairchild) Brins- 
made. He is descended from an ancient English family which had its origin in 
the county of Somerset (^r the county of Devon in the west of England, known 
as Brinsmeade in that land. William Brinsmeade, leaving his native country, 
became a resident of Charlestown, ^^Tassachusetts, about 1639. His son John 
removed soon afterward to Stratford, Connecticut, and settled near the mouth 
of the Housatonic river. From him have descended all of the name of Brins- 
made now residing in the I'nited States. Hobart Brinsmade is one of his lineal 
descendants anrl the graves of his ancestors through seven generations have 
been made in the tov.^ns of Stratford and Trumbull, Connecticut. 

In the Easton and Stratford .Academy of Connecticut, Hobart Brinsmade 
pursued his cducatirm. which was also directed bv a private tutor. He thus- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrV. 59 

qiialilied for the sophomore year in the Sheffield Scientific School, a department 
of Yale College, but did not enter, owing to business inducements which at that 
time seemed very flattering. His early youth had been spent on his father's 
farm in Trumbull, Connecticut, with the usual experiences that fall to the lot of 
the agriculturist. His tastes were of a decidedly literary nature, much of his 
pleasure being derived from reading and study, and after leaving the farm he 
engaged in teaching school, being at first connected with the schools at East 
Durham, New York, while subsequently he was principal of the graded schools 
at Fairfield, New Canaan and Bridgeport, Connecticut. The four years which 
followed his leaving home at the age of seventeen were thus devoted to teaching 
and to the improvement of his own education. 

On attaining his majority Mr. Brinsmade purchased the Sterling House 
book store at Bridgeport, Connecticut, and soon after admitted the late Wil- 
liam B. Hincks to a partnership. Sometime later ]\Ir. Hincks withdrew to ac- 
cept the deputy coUectorship of the port and after continuing the business for 
about four years Mr. Brinsmade embraced a favorable opportunity for selling 
out and accepted an ofifer to go to Elmira, New York, to assume the manage- 
ment of the business of the Howe Machine Company for the western part of 
the Empire state and also for central Pennsylvania. Six years were devoted 
to that business, on the expiration of which he came to St. Louis in the interest 
of the Howe Machine Company and took the general western management of 
their business, covering all the territory west of Indiana to the Pacific ocean 
and south to the gulf. When his connection with the company in this position 
had covered eight years ^Nlr. Brinsmade accepted a position with the Wheeler 
& Wilson Manufacturing Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut, to take charge 
of their European business with headquarters at London, England. After re- 
maining abroad for nearly four years, by invitation of the directors of the com- 
pany he returned to Bridgeport and accepted the position of general manager of 
the company, so continuing for between one and two years. 

Having disposed of his interest in that business, Mr. Brinsmade returned 
to St. Louis to become a partner in the wdiolesale millinery business of D. H. 
King & Company under the firm name of King, Brinsmade & Company. In 1895 
the business was incorporated under the name of the King-Brinsmade Mercan- 
tile Company, with Mr. Brinsmade as president, and to the present time he has 
remained as the chief executive officer. The forw^ard steps in his business career 
are easily discernible and it will be seen that his judgment and even paced energy 
have carried him forward to the goal of success. He is a man of well balanced 
capacities and powers, a consistent master of himself and with thorough under- 
standing of life's contacts and experiences. He is eminently a man of business 
sense and easily avoids the mistakes and disasters that come to those who, though 
possessing remarkable faculties in some respects, are liable to erratic movements 
that result in unwarranted risk and failure. He has never been lacking in enter- 
prise of the kind that leads to great accomplishments, as his present position will 
indicate. 

On the 3d of January, 1872, at Bridgeport, Connecticut, Mr. Brinsmade was 
married to Miss Ella M. Lyon, a daughter of Alanson Lyon, of Redding, Con- 
necticut. Their elder son, Robert Bruce Brinsmade, a mining engineer, was 
graduated from Washington University and took a post-graduate course at Lehigh 
University. He has had large experience in mining interests and has held the 
office of president of the State Mining College at Platteville, Wisconsin ; was also 
professor of metallurgy at the New Mexico Mining College at Socorro, New 
Mexico. Louis Lyon Brinsmade, the younger son, is a mechanical engineer who 
was graduated from Washington Lliiversity and pursued a post-graduate course 
in Cornell. He is now the general eastern manager of the Westinghouse Machine 
Company with headquarters in New York city. He married Claribel Green, a 
daughter of Phillip Green, of St. Louis, and has two children : Eleanor Louise- 
and Hobart Louis. 



60 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

]\lr. Brinsniade is a member of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution 
in ^lissouri and the Society of Colonial Wars, being now secretary of the Mis- 
souri chapter, and a director of the New England Society. He also belongs to 
the Business !Men's League, the ^Mercantile Club and the Missouri Historical So- 
ciety. He served for eight years in the Connecticut National Guard, holding 
the office of orderly sergeant, second and first lieutenant, and for several years 
he served as captain of the Eighth regiment of Connecticut. Mr. Brinsmade was 
also resident commissioner of the state of Connecticut for the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition. In politics he has always been a republican, but without desire for 
office, although stalwart in his championship of the party principles. He belongs 
to the Pilgrim Congregational church, serving as deacon, as chairman of the board 
of trustees and as chairman of the building committee, which had in charge the 
erection of their new house of worship on Union avenue. He is likewise a direc- 
tor of the St. Louis Young ]Men's Christian Association and of the Provident 
Association. His various membership relations indicate how broad are his in- 
terests, prompted by a helpful spirit in the work of promoting material, intellectual, 
social and moral progress. 



^lARSHALL FRANKLIN McDONALD. 

Marshall Franklin ^McDonald was a young man of brilliant attainments in 
the legal profession, to which he devoted the last ten years of his life. He passed 
through many vicissitudes in a checkered career but never faltered in his deter- 
min.ation to utilize every opportunity for advancement and progressed in the face 
of difficulties which would have utterly discouraged many a man of less resolute 
spirit or more limited ability. His birth occurred near Council Bluffs, Iowa, March 
14, 1854. on the old homestead farm of his parents, Milton and Adelpha (Wood) 
McDonald. He worked at farm labor during the spring and summer months and 
in the winter seasons pursued his education in the public schools to the age of 
sixteen years, when he secured a position as salesman in a drug store, remaining 
there until 1875. I" the meantime, however, in 1873, ^e was graduated from 
the College of Pharmacy of Chicago and then took up the study of medicine and 
surgery, giving especial attention to the latter branch. He attended one course of 
lectures under Professor Boyd, of Chicago, and later this knowledge proved of 
great value to him in the trial of law cases involving expert medical and surgical 
testimony. 

Attracted by the discovery of gold in the Black Hills, Mr. McDonald went 
to that section of the country in 1876, making the journey with a four-mule team 
and three companions. They drove to Sidney, Nebraska, and thence on to their 
destination, but while engaged in mining in the northwest, Mr, McDonald con- 
tracted mountain fever and became seriously ill. His interests were neglected by 
those on whom he depended and he found himself penniless in that country. It 
was impossible to secure ])roper medical attendance in the camp, so he prevailed 
upon some freight haulers to take him out of the hills. In a trail wagon he was 
conveyed to Cheyenne. Wyoming, a distance of three hundred miles, from that 
point worked his way to Denver and then walked to Deer Trail, a distance of 
fifty miles. He was without funds and was still so weak that he was unable to go 
farther, so he remained at that point for two or three weeks, working at anything 
that he could get to do in order to pay his board. At the end of that time he 
engaged with a cattle shipjxr anrl in that way reached St. Louis, November 28, 
1877, lanrling at the National stockyards in East St. Louis with a train load of 
cattle consigned to Cassidy & Irons. 

.As he walked the streets of St. Louis tlie following day, without a cent in 
his pocket, he saw some coal being unloaded on a sidewalk in front of a restaurant 
on Broadway. He applied for a job of putting it in and for his service received 
twenty-five cents anci the first good meal which he had eaten in manv davs. He 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 61 

told the proprietor of his misfortune in the northwest and was allowed the privi- 
lege of working around the restaurant for his board for six weeks. His fortunes 
had then reached their lowest point and the tide turned. He lacked only the op- 
portunity to display his ability and when he secured a position he was not long in 
proving that he was capable of something better. Through the kindness of Meyer 
Brothers & Company he obtained a position as drug clerk with Mr. Beatty in a 
store at Tenth and Olive streets, where he remained until 1880, when he was 
appointed clerk in the office of circuit attorney by Joseph R. Harris, who had 
been elected to the superior position. Mr. Harris became interested in the young 
man and, recognizing the fact that he possessed ability of a high order, persuaded 
him to read law. This he did with such painstaking thoroughness that in 1881 he 
secured admission to the bar and during the illness of Mr. Harris conducted the 
business of an extensive and important clientage. From the time that he joined 
the ranks of the legal fraternity his progress was rapid and in 1884 he was elected 
assistant circuit attorney on the republican ticket for a term of four years. In 
the discharge of his duties he became known as a vigorous prosecutor, as a lawyer 
of keen analytical mind and of strong powers of reasoning. While in the office 
some of the most noted criminal trials in the history of St. Louis courts were 
before the public, including the Preller-Maxwell and the Chinese Highbinders 
murder cases. His skillful handling of the facts and his comprehensive knowledge 
of the medical-legal questions involved attracted wide attention among the mem- 
bers of the bar in the west. 

■Mr. McDonald became widely known as a most able criminal lawyer, being 
retained on the Vail and many other important cases. In the Vail case he had as 
his opponents four of the leading criminal attorneys of the west, but in this, as in 
other important litigation, he showed his ability to cope with the eminent mem- 
bers of the St. Louis bar and win the verdict which he desired. Fie was strong 
in argument, logical in his deductions and gave to each point in his case due rela- 
tive prominence. He did not confine his attention, however, to criminal law but 
was the legal adviser of several large firms and in ten years acquired a practice 
which many a man of life-time experience might well covet. 

Mr. McDonald was married in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Miss Anna B. 
Evans, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio. She has made her home in St. Louis since 
her husband's death and is well known here socially. Mr. McDonald was a mem- 
ber of the St. Louis Horseshoe Hunting Club and was a great lover of fishing. 
He was the owner of a number of fine horses and hounds and greatly enjoyed 
the chase. Fraternally he was connected with the Masons and was a worthy ex- 
emplar of the craft. He died March 6, 1898, when but forty-four years of age. 
It seemed that he was far too young to be taken from the field of activity, in 
which he was proving his great usefulness and ability. He had, however, made a 
splendid record and the story of his life may well serve as a source of inspiration 
and encouragement, showing that the buffetings of fate are never strong enough 
to keep down the individual who has resolution and perseverance enough to con- 
tinue his course in the face of difficulties. Mr. McDonald was honored for what 
he accomplished and enjoyed a personal popularity, which arose from his cour- 
tesy, geniality and deference for the opinions of others. 



JOHN DOOLEY, M.D. 

Dr. John Dooley, after long connection with the practice of medicine, ex- 
pects soon to retire and enjoy the rest which he truly merits because of his useful 
service in the professional field. He was born in Burton on Trent, England, and 
after attending the public schools of that day and locality, took up the study of 
medicine and was graduated in an old allopathic school, long since out of existence. 
Believing the opportunities in America superior to those of his native land, he 



62 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

came to the new world in 1863 and attended the Eclectic School of Medicine in 
Cincinnati. Ohio, being graduated therefrom in 1875. In the meantime he had 
settled in Kansas almost immediately after his arrival in this country, and prac- 
ticed for some time in the city of Leavenworth. That section of the state was 
then a pioneer district in which were few evidences of modern civilization. The 
homes were widely scattered, and it was no uncommon thing for Dr. Dooley to 
ride twenty or thirty miles on horseback to visit a patient, and perhaps would 
make but one call on the entire trip. Frontier practice involved many hardships 
and difficulties, but the conscientious physician thinks little of his own welfare 
when suffering humanity demands his aid, and Dr. Dooley did not hesitate to 
render professional service where it was needed. While living in Kansas he also 
served for a short time as a member of the Kansas Militia in 1864-65. Although 
he was not on active duty, some of his comrades were engaged with a portion of 
General Price's force under General Shelby during the spring of 1865, while Dr. 
Dooley was serving on detail to guard the stores of supplies for the United States 
at Topeka, Kansas. 

On leaving Leavenworth in 1877, the Doctor went to Kansas City, Missouri, 
where he was engaged in active practice until 1887, when he went to California, 
spending a year and a half on the Pacific coast. In 1889 he removed to St. Louis, 
where he has since engaged in active practice. He was one of the first and at 
this time is one of the oldest eclectic practicing physicians of St. Louis. His pa- 
tronage has grown beyond his fondest anticipation, and now, at a ripe age, he is 
preparing to retire permanently, having served his fellow citizens long and well 
in a professional capacity. He has always held to a high standard in his pro- 
fessional work, has continuously studied for further development, and his labors 
have won satisfactory results for the patients and a substantial financial return 
for himself. 

Dr. Dooley was twice married. Ere leaving England he wedded Miss Annie 
Parker Staley. of Burton on Trent, who died after their removal to the new 
world. His second marriage was to Josephine A. Mclntire, who by a former mar- 
riage has one daughter, now ]\Irs. Florence (Dooley) Boogher. 

The Doctor belongs to the Masonic fraternity, his membership being in Occi- 
dental Lodge.- Xo. 163. He was formerly a member of Leavenworth Lodge, which 
he joined in 1865, demitting from that organization to the present lodge. He also 
became a member of the Knights of Pythias of Leavenworth in 1876. While he 
has not S(jught to figure prominently in any public life outside of his profession, 
his life work has been one of signal usefulness, gaining him the gratitude of manv 
and the respect of all with whom he has come in contact. 



J. H. CARROLL. 



The spirit of self-help is the source of all genuine worth in the individual. 
It is the man who learns to justly rate his own powers and to correctly value 
his opportunities who iK-comes an exem])lification of that spirit of progression 
which has dominaterl .America since the inception of the republic. Such a man 
is Colonel John Haydock Carroll, an eminent lawyer of St. Louis and attorney 
general oi the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad system. 

Born in Eric county, New York, on the '27th of June, 1857, his parents soon 
afterward removed to Toledo, Ohio, and after the outbreak of the Civil war 
the father started for the front in 1861 to aid in the preservation of the Union. 
A brief time passed and in Cincinnati the mother was overcome by the heat and 
died, leaving her little son entirely alone and unidentified in a strange city. 
There wac one other son of the family but, being separated when little more 
than balK-. it was years before they learned of the other's whereabouts. John 
H. Carroll, thus deprivcrl by an mitoward fate of father and mother, became 




J. H. CARROLL 



64 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

an inmate of the Children's Home of Cincinnati in 1864. ^^'hile such institu- 
tions, beneficent in their purpose and doing- a great work for humanity and 
civihzation. furnish the opportunities for physical and to some degree mental 
and moral development, the home training with its sheltering love and care 
must of necessitv be forever lacking, and thus almost at the outset of life 
Colonel Carroll was deprived of that which in later years constitutes the happiest 
recollections of life. In 1866 arrangements were perfected whereby many of the 
children of that institution were sent out into the state to find homes and he was 
placed on a farm belonging to John Kester, a Quaker, of ^Martinsville, Ohio, 
with whom he lived for three years. He then went to live with Thomas E. 
Hadley, who followed general agricultural pursuits in Morgan county, Indiana,, 
and with whom ^Ir. Carroll remained until 1877. His life there was one of 
arduous and unremitting toil from the time of early spring planting until crops 
were harvested in the late autumn. When the work of the farm was practically 
over for the year he was allowed the privilege of attending the country school 
in the winter months and there acquainted himself with the elementary branches- 
of learning. Xature, as it were, held the bov upon her lap and spread before 
him her open book, saying, "Read and learn" and from the fields and the woods^ 
he gathered many lessons and from the outdoor life developed a strong", sturdy 
physical manhood. He had learned self-dependence, knew that his future lay 
in his own keeping and that he must work out his own success from the innate 
attributes of his nature. There awakened in him the laudable ambition to enter 
upon a professional career and to this end he became a teacher m the public 
schools, thereby providing the funds necessary to meet his needs while he was 
preparing for the bar. He studied law and in December, 1880, was admitted 
to practice m the Ohio courts at Cincinnati. 

In the meantime Mr. Carroll had studied the question of western migration^ 
believing that the great district beyond the IMississippi, w'here there was less 
competition than in the older east, held his opportunity. He then began study- 
ing the map and railroad folders and decided to try Missouri. In the meantime 
he had located his brother but had no other relatives in the world so far as he 
knew, nor were friends many. He therefore did not seek advice but followed 
the lead of his own judgment in this matter and in January. 1881, reached 
Linneus, ^lissouri. After two months, however, he removed to Putnam county, 
this state, and a few days later was adm^itted to the bar at Unionville, Missouri. 

The same thoroughness which he manifested in his preparation for legal 
examinations was also evidenced in the preparation of his cases. Gradually his 
clientage grew in volume and importance. In fact his ability was quickly recog- 
nized and in 1882 he became local attorney for the Chicago. Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad. The following year he was elected prosecuting attorney of 
Putnam county, which position he filled until 1885 and then, after an interval 
of two years, was again called to that office by appointment of Governor More- 
house, his incumbency continuing until 1889. His private practice also increased 
year by year as he gave tangible evidence of his ability to solve intricate legal 
problems and to correctly appiv his knowledge of law to the points in litiga- 
tion. In 1890 he was appointed attornev general for the great Burlington Rail- 
road system, a position which he has filled to the present time. In addition he 
has an extensive clientele, including individual patrons and corporations, where- 
by he is connected with much of the important legal work of the district. 

Colonel Carroll has not only attained prominence in professional circles 
but has become equally well known in political lines. In 1882 he was chosen 
a delegate to the democratic state convention, in 1886 was made a member of 
the democratic state central committee, whereon he served for ten years. He was 
then again elected in 1896, but the pressure of private duties compelled him to 
decline. In t888 he was sent as a delegate to the democratic national conven- 
tion, which nominated Grover Cleveland for a second term, and in 1892 was 
alternate at large. He ha^ been a delegate to every democratic state convention 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 65 

save one since his arrival in jMissouri. Ilis title of colonel was received from 
Governor Francis, on whose staff he ser\'ecl for a period of fonr )ears. 

Colonel Carroll was married ere his removal from Ohio, wedding- ]\lis.s 
Priscilla Woodrow. of Lynchburg-, that state, in December, 1880. They now 
have two children: Frances, born in 1886; and John H., in i8f;i. Their 
summer home is one of the most beautiful and commodious in n.)rthern Missouri 
a palatial residence of Alilwaukee brick, standing in the midst of broad acres 
at Unionville, Putnam county, Missouri. Its hospitality is one of its most at- 
tractive features, although its furnishings g-iyc every evidence of wealth directed 
by culture and refined taste. Colonel Carroll also has a beautiful city home 
at 5465 Delmar boulevard. The history of Colonel Carroll in his advance from 
the most humble surroundings to a position of distinction in legal and political 
circles is an added proof of the adage that truth is stranger than fiction. The 
orphaned boy, dependent in early life upon the beneficence of the world for 
home and shelter, is todav the cm-ner of one of the most attractive estate- in 
northern Missouri and is a potent force in the life of city and commonwealth. 



lAMES Y. PLAYER. 



James Y. Player is serving for the second term as comptroller of the city of 
St. Louis and moreover has been so closelv associated with public interests here 
as to render it imperative that mention be made of him in this volume. Born in 
Nashville, Tennessee, on the 14th of September, 185 1, he is a son of Thomson 
Trezevant and Emma ( Yeatman) Player, natives of South Carolina and of Ten- 
nessee respectively. The father was a lawyer by profession but gave the greater 
part of his life to the management of his plantation and died when his son, James 
Y., was but a year and a half old. The mother Avas a sister of James E. Yeatman, 
prominent in this city because of his eft'orts in connection with benevolent and 
educational interests. As a philanthropist he stood foremost among those whose 
practical labors accomplished far-reaching results. He was one of the founders 
of the Asylum for the Blind and also of the ]\Iercantile Library. He was equally 
well known as one of the originators of the Washington University, of the work 
of the western sanitary commission and of various charitable organizations tend- 
ing to ameliorate the hard conditions of life for the unfortunate. The Loyal Le- 
gion of Missouri numbered him among its most prominent and honored repre- 
sentatives and he enjoyed not onlv the respect but the sincere friendship and love 
of those with whom he was associated. His life was actuated by the highest prin- 
ciples and purposes and his death at St. Louis on the 7th of July, 1901. was the 
occasion of the deepest regret. 

James Y. Player pursued his education in the schools of his native city and 
in various preparatory schools of the east prior to entering the Yale Scientific 
School. Not long- afterward, leaving- school he became a resident of St. Louis 
and secured a position in the old Merchants' Bank, where he remained for a year 
and a half. Removing to Philadelphia, he was then employed by a brokerage 
firm and subsequently becan-ie private secretary to George De B. Keim, who was 
then the general solicitor of the Reading Railway Company. The west with its 
broader opportunities, however, attracted Mr. Player and since 1875 he has con- 
tinuously made his home in St. Louis. His life record does not compare unfavor- 
ably with that of his honored uncle. The same public spirit and interest in the 
general welfare seems to actuate him in much that he does and all conversant 
with the evolution of the present educational system of St. Louis know that much 
progress is directlv attributable to the discriminating efforts and practical views 
of James Y. Plaver, who for a quarter of a century has been a n-iember of the 
board of education. He was employed as secretary to the superintendent and 
secretary of committees for fifteen years and for seven years Avas secretary and 

5— VOL. II. 



m ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

treasurer of the board. He has never given half-hearted service to any pubHc 
work in which he is engaged. On the contrary he bends his full energies to the 
accomplishment of the best possibilities in that direction and St. Louis willingly 
acknowledges her indebtedness to him for his efforts in behalf of the public schools. 
After retiring from the school board he devoted three years to the real-estate 
business and was then again called to public office in his election to the office of 
comptroller of the city for a term of four years. Public endorsement of his 
service came in his reelection, so that he is now filling the office for the second 
time. 

On the /th of March, 1877, occurred the marriage of Mr. Player and Miss 
Susan S. Polk, of Tennessee, a niece of Leonidas Polk, the distinguished Con- 
federate general. Their family numbers three sons and two daughters : George 
Polk, James Yeatman, Ji'-. Susan Trezevant, Thomson Trezevant and Sallie Hil- 
liard. and their position is one of considerable social prominence. Mr. Player 
is well known as an ardent advocate of the democracy and while he is an unfalter- 
ing champion of the principles in which he believes, he never sacrifices the public 
good to partisanship nor places personal aggrandizement before the general wel- 
fare. On the contrary his course has been characterized by a patriotism and 
loyaltv which are above question. 



A\TLLIAM W. DAVIS. 

William W. Davis, a member of the firm of William W. Davis & George W. 
Chambers, manufacturers of decorative glass, has been thus connected with the 
industrial interests of St. Louis since 1889. He was born in ^leadville, Pennsyl- 
vania. December 5, 1848. His grandfather. James Davis, also a native of Penn- 
sylvania, served in the war of 1812 and was of Welsh lineage, the family, how- 
ever, being founded in America at an early day. The father. Judge William 
Davis, was born in 1812 and became a lawyer and was for fifteen years associate 
judge of Crawford county, Pennsylvania, having been elected for three consecu- 
tive terms. He was noted for the soundness and justice of his decisions, w'hile 
as a citizen he was progressive and ever ready to engage heartily in any enter- 
prise for the public good. In manner he was quiet, kind and obliging, and such 
was the hold which he had upon the aft'ections of his fellowmen that upon his 
retirement from the bench he was tendered a banquet at ]\Ieadville. Pennsylvania, 
by the entire bar of Crawford county, as a mark of appreciation of his personal 
character and of his impartial and upright judicial career. His death occurred 
July 3, 1 88 1. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Johnston, was a 
daughter of Lancelot Johnston. The Johnstons were of Scotch-Irish extraction. 
Lancelot Johnston served his country as a soldier and lived to the remarkable 
age of ninety-nine years. His wife was a Miss Stitt. 

In the public schools of ^^leadville, William W. Davis began his education 
and later attended Allegheny College in that City, tie did not pursue his course 
to graduation, however, but instead received training for the business world in 
P>ryant & Stratton Commercial College, where he completed his course. He then 
entered the banking business at Titusville, Pennsylvania, in 1869. in the capacity 
of bookkee]jer and later was jjiumoted to teller and cashier. On the organization 
of the Citizens Bank of that place he becaiue teller and so continued until July, 
1874, when he organizerl the Jamestovvii P>anking Company at Jamestown, Penn- 
sylvania, and became its cashier. i-Or eight years he ca])ably managed the affairs 
of that Ijank in his cjfficial ])ositinii and in i(S<S2 resigned, having been induced to 
accept the position of teller in tlie ( ommercial P.ank of Titusville. where he re- 
mained until 1884. He then went [n ( )il City in a similar capacitv and continued 
there until 1886. In that year he entered the em])loy of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany at ^'oungstown, Ohio, having charge of the pipe line construction. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 67 

]\Ir. Davis arrived in St. Louis in 1888 and because of ill health was not 
actively engaged in business until 1889, when he entered the William W. Davis 
& George W. Chamber Company in the manufacture of decorative glass. .Some 
beautiful examples of the output of the company are found in the Delmar Avenue 
Baptist church, St. Peter's, St. John's, St. George's and the Union Methodist 
Episcopal churches, while that seen in the Union station ranks among the finest 
in the country. In addition to his manufacturing enterprise jNIr. Davis also has 
coal mining interests of importance in the Indian Territorv. 

In August, 1874, occurred the marriage of Mr. Davis and Miss Minnie Teft, 
a daughter of Israel and ^lary Frances (Ames) Teft, her father being a member 
of the firm of Teft, Wells & Company, of New York city. Mrs. Davis was born 
in September, 1848, and died December 28, 1898, in Philadel])hia. Mr. Davis now 
makes his home at the W'est End Hotel. He was for several vears a member of 
the Alissouri Athletic Club and the Noonday Club and he is a member and vice 
president of the Penn Society. He also belongs to the Presbyterian church and 
he gives his political support to the republican party. He has wisely used his 
native talents in his business career and his various connections have been of 
importance, ranking him with the representative business men in the different 
cities in which he has made his home. 



FRANK ORVILLE SAWYER. 

For fifty A'ears Frank Orville Sawyer has been well known in the business 
circles of St. Louis and has been the guiding spirit of enterprises that have con- 
tributed in substantial measure to public activitv and prosperity here. He is now 
president of the F. O. Sawyer Paper Companv, known throughout the country, 
and of the American Insulating [Material ^lanufacturing Company, and has various 
other financial interests. 

Mr. Sawyer was born December 22, 1835, at Exeter, New Hampshire, a son 
of Almon and Charlotte Neil (Libbey ) Sawyer, the former a native of Norwich, 
Vermont, and the latter of Limington, Alaine. The mother was a representa- 
tive of the sixth generation of descendants of Captain John Libbey, who came from 
England in early colonial days and settled at Oak Hill in the town of Scarborough, 
[Maine. Her father. Esquire Abner Libbey, removed to Limington, Maine, in 
1792, and for forty years was magistrate and acting attorney for the entire town. 
On the paternal side Air. Sawyer is descended from Thomas I'righam Sawyer, 
who came to America in 1635 on the ship "Susan and Ellen," and settled near 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 1839 Almon Sav.-yer removed with his family 
from New Hampshire to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he engaged in the manufacture 
of oilcloth, beiu"- the first in that line in the west. There he died in 1878 at the 
age of seventy-live years, his birth having occurred in 1803. He was an old line 
whig, active in the support of the party during its existence. Fie was also a warm 
personal friend of Justice John McLean, of the United States su]K-eme court, 
and in his da\- one of the most ])ronounced opponents of slavery in public life. 

Frank O. Sawyer, reared and educated in Cincinnati, was graduated from 
the W^oodward College with the liachelor of Art degree. In 1859 he came to St. 
Louis where he engaged in the wholesale pa])er trade and has been identified 
with this line of business continuously since. He has handled all the intricate and 
involved interests of a growing and expanding business, vitally and conclusively, 
and his enterpr,ise has carried him to a foremost position in the ranks of the 
prosperous merchants and manufacturers of this citv. Today the F. O. Sawyer 
Paper Company is known throughout the countr)- in its trade connections. The 
American Insulating Material Manufacturing Company, of which he is president. 
is almost equallv well known, and he is identified with various other interests of 



68 ST. IJIIMS, THE FOl'RTH CITY. 

importance and magnitude which are numbered among his dividend-paying in- 
vestments. 

The onlv interruption to his contimious connection with the business interests 
of St. Louis came at the time of the Civil war. At the beginning of hostilities he 
enlisted in the Union army, being sworn in by Captain (later General) Nathaniel 
Lvon. He served for three months, participating in the early battles in ]\Iissouri, 
and was a member of Captain George Rowley's company. 

On the i6th of May, 1872. 'Sir. Sawyer was married to ]\Iiss Ellen S. Knowl- 
ton, of Bunker Hill, Illinois, a daughter of Samuel Knowlton, who removed from 
Connecticut in 1840 and settled at Bunker Hill. She is also a lineal descendant 
of Colonel Thomas Knowlton, who commanded Knowlton's Rangers in the Revo- 
hitionary war, and was killed while leading a charge in the battle of Harlem 
Heights. It was of him that ^^'ashington said in a general order issued the day 
after the battle : "The gallant and brave Colonel Knowlton, who was an honor 
to anv country, fell yesterday while gallantly fighting." A large bronze statue of 
Colonel Knowlton was unveiled at Hartford, Connecticut, November 13, 1895. 
Unto Mr. and ^Irs. Sawyer have been born a son and daughter, who are yet 
living, Frank Knowlton and ]\Iary Knowlton Sawyer. The family home is a 
beautiful residence at No. 4246 Lindell boulevard. 

Mr. Sawver and his family attend the Unitarian Church of the JMessiah, and 
he has been generous in his contributions to church and charitable work and to 
movements for the public good. Since 1856 he has been a Mason, has attained 
the thirtv-second degree of Scottish Rite and has held numerous official positions 
in the order. He has been a republican since the organization of the party and is 
interested in those affairs wdiich are matters of civic virtue and civic pride. His 
reputation for business probity is unsullied and in the city wdiich has been his 
home for a half century he is honored as a man among men, the guiding princi- 
ples of his life being such as ever awaken confidence and respect in any land 
and clime. 



ERANCIS HENRY LUDINGTON. 

Erancis Henrv Ludington. passing through stages of successive advance- 
ment to a position of distinction in business circles, has been president of the 
H." & L. Chase Bag Company since 1895. He was born in Boston, jMassachu- 
setts. September 3, 1836, his parents being Corbet and Lucy Hunnewell (Green) 
Ludington. His ancestral historv is notable from the fact that many were con- 
nected with the colonial wars and with the war of the Revolution. These included 
Major William Johnson, whu was dejnitv for captain lieutenant and was born 
in 1629 and died in 1704: Lieutenant John ^^'yman, who died in 1684; Seth 
Wyman. who was lieutenant captain and was born in 1663, while his death 
occurred in 1715: Seth W'xman, who was born in 1686 and died in 1725; Ross, 
who also held a ca])tain's commission and was born in 1717 and died in 1808; Cap- 
tain Edward Harrington, who was born in 1702 and died in 1792; and Jonathan 
Harrington, who was a ])rivate in the colonial wars and was born in 1741 and 
died in 1793. At the time of the Revolutionar\ war, however, he served as 
second lieutenant and Ross \\ \nian mentioned above was a ca])tain of artillery 
with the .American forces in the struggle for in(k'])endence. 

J''rancis H. Ludingtou attended successively the grammar schools of IJoston, 
Massachusetts. IMiillips Academy at .\ndover, the Middleboro (Mass.) Academy 
and the I>ridgewater Normal School at liridgewater, Massachttsetts, from which 
he was grarluated in i8/)0. At the age of sixteen he accepted a position at 
a salary of a flf»llar and a half per week anrl boarfled at home, his daily service 
being from half past six in the morning until nine at night. It was necessary 
that he start in business life at this early age because of the death of his father 




F. H. LUDIXGTOX 



70 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

and he was afterwards employed in two other grocery stores until he reached 
the age of twentv years. Desiring to improve upon his intellectual attainment 
at that time, he left the grocery business and attended a special school in Boston, 
later continuing his studies as previously indicated, always meeting the expenses 
of his course bv his own lahor. He likewise engaged in teaching school in 
Houlton, ]\Iaine : \\'eymouth, ^Massachusetts; Bridgewater, ^Massachusetts ; and 
Maiden of the same state. 

His time was thus passed from 1862 until 1866, when he engaged with H. 
& L. Chase, of Boston, ^Massachusetts, to represent their mercantile interests in 
St. Louis. He arrived in this city on the nth of October, 1866, and succeeded 
in ably managing the business of the house at this point, making it a profitable 
trade center. The original partners, Henry S. and H. Lincoln Chase, passed 
away, and following the death of William L. Chase in 1895 the old firm was 
dissolved and the business was reorganized under the name of the H. & L. Chase 
Bag Company, with F. H. Ludington as president. He has so continued to this 
time ( 1908) and under his guidance and discriminating direction the business 
has prospered, being recognized as one of the representative commercial interests 
of the city. He has likewise become financially interested in the Third National 
Hank and was one of its directors. 

Air. Ludington has by no means confined his attention to interests bearing 
solely upon his financial welfare, but has co-operated in man}' movements 
whereby social, educational and moral progress have been augmented. In the 
earlier years of its existence he was a director of the Young Men's Christian 
Association and was also formerly a director of the Provident Association. He 
belongs to the Second Baptist church and since 1867 has been treasurer, deacon 
and trustee. In politics he is a stalwart republican and in more specifically social 
lines he is connected with the St. Louis, Mercantile, Noonday and Glen Echo 
Clubs. 

Mr. Ludington lost his wife and children of his first marriage, and in 1877 
he wedded Harriet Nason Kingman, of Campbell, Alassachusetts, a part of 
Brockton. Her father was josiah W. Kingman, very prominent in the affairs 
of Brockton. The only child of Mr. Ludington is Elliott Kingman Ludington, 
who married Florence Bemis, a daughter of S. A. Bemis, of St. Louis, Missouri. 
He is very domestic in his tastes, finding his greatest happiness at his own fire- 
side and in the companionship of his closest personal friends. While he has 
passed the Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and ten he is yet an 
active factor in the business world, strong in his honor and his good name, 
strong in his ability to plan and to perform. In early life he manifested the ele- 
mental and resourceful forces of his nature in the acciuirement of an education. 
being of necessity early forced to enter business life. Since that time his advance- 
ment has been gradual, yet he has steadily progressed toward the goal of pros- 
perity, which is the ultimate hope of every individual who seriously sets himself 
to the tasks of life. 



im1':ri<i-: chol'tealt maffitt. 

'Hie life record of Pierre Chouteau Maffitt constitutes an important factor in 
the history of St. Louis. He has in former years filled various positions of ad- 
ministrative control and executive direction, but while his financial interests are 
now large, he has jjractically retired from active business management. A native 
of this city, Mr. Maffitt was born September 3, 1845. His ancestors came from 
Ireland and were of Scotch-Irish origin. The family has been represented in 
America since 1700. when a settlement was made in Maryland. The great-grand- 
father in the ]>aternal line was an officer of the Revolutionary army. The j^aternal 
grandfather, William Maffitt, married a Miss Carter, of Virginia. Dr. William 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 71 

INIaffitt. father of P. C Maffitt. was a surgeon of the United States arni_\-. His 
birth oecurred in Chantilly, h^airfax count}-, \irginia, November 17, 1811, and 
his education was acquired in Cohimbia I'niversity, in the District of Cohimbia, 
from v/liich institution he was graduated in 1831 with the degree of Al. D. The 
following year he was appointed a surgeon of the United States army and thus 
served until 1844, when he resigned. His duties brought him frequently to St. 
Louis and he decided to make his home here after leaving the army. During his 
military career he took part in the Seminole war in I'dorida and while there con- 
tracted malarial trouble, which tmdermined his health and finally caused his death, 
on the 17th of October, 1864. He led a very tjuiet, retiring life during- his resi- 
dence in St. Louis and continued to serve his fellowmen in a professional ca- 
pacity. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Julia Chouteau, was born in St. 
Louis February 28, 1816, and died July 2, 1897. Extended mention is made of 
this prominent old St. Louis family on other pages of this volume. 

Pierre Chouteau IMaffitt was educated under various tutors until Smith's 
Academy was opened in 1855, when he became a student in that school. Later 
he attended the Georgetown University in the District of Columbia and in i860 
returned to St. Louis, where he pursued an engineering course under private 
tutors. He next engaged with the Iron Mountain Company and was also secre- 
tary of the Chouteau, Harrison & Valle Rolling Mills Company from 1869, after 
which he was elected to the vice presidency. He severed his connection with 
that company in 1874, however, in order to engage in various other enterprises, 
and in 1881, in connection with Daniel Catlin and other men of prominence, he 
purchased from Erastus Wells the Olive, Laclede and jMarket street railway lines. 
Mr. Mafifitt became the active manager and president of the company and so con- 
tinued until he sold out in 1897. He is now a director of the Bell Telephone Com- 
pany of Missouri, and president of the Alafifitt Realtv & Investment Company, 
under which style he conducts his extensive private realty and financial interests. 
As the years have passed he has made large investments in real estate and is to- 
dav the owner of much valuable income-bearing property. 

On the I2th of August, 1868. Air. Mafiitt was married to Miss Mary Skinker, 
of St. Louis, a member of a very prominent and well known family. Their chil- 
dren are: William, who was born in 1869 and is now one of the vice presidents 
of the Alercantile Trust Company; Thomas S., who was born in 1876 and is agent 
for various estates ; and Julia C, born in 1884. The family residence is a palatial 
home at Xo. 4315 Westminster place. Mr. Mafifitt is an ardent equestrian and is 
a valued member of the St. Louis, Racquet, Country and Noonday Clubs. 



JACOB STOCKE. SR. 



Among the most enterprising characters of St. Louis and vicinity is Jacob 
Stocke, Sr. He was born Februarv 10. 1833, in this city. His father, a native of 
Pennsylvania, was George A . Stocke, his mother having been Lena Breitensten. 
When an eighteen year old lad the elder Stocke came west, reaching St. Louis 
in the year 1825. Here he procured work in a grocery store. For some time be- 
fore and at the time of the fire of 1849. which swept away so large a portion 
of the city, he had charge of the river patrol and later was made overseer at the 
workhouse. Subsequently he entered the grocery business, which he conducted 
successfully until his death, wdiich occurred in 1887, having attained the ad- 
vanced age of approximatelv eighty years. He was highly esteemed by all who 
knew him and in his demise it was acknowledged that there had passed away one 
of the most prominent pioneers of the city. 

Jacob Stocke was one of the five children born to George \\ Stocke and his 
wife, of whom but one other child. Airs. Rol:)ert I'.erry, was alive in 1899. The 
youngest of the children, Jacob Stocke, was educated in the public schools of St. 



72 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrV. 

Louis, attending what was known as the Lafayette and Clark schools. He began 
his business career very early in life. A\'hen a mere boy he was placed in charge 
of a vegetable stand in the old market, then situated between Market and Walnut 
on !Main streel. Here he was initiated into the market business, which he has 
since followed. 

When the Center market was opened at Spruce and Seventh streets. ^Ir. 
Stocke was among those who made the change to the new quarters. At the 
time of the removal many of the occupants of the old building marched, headed 
by prominent citizens, to the new location. In 1871 he removed to the Union 
market, from which he has since supplied the leading hotels, club houses and most 
prominent families of St. Louis with fruits and vegetables. Air. Stocke raises a 
great ileal of this produce on his farm, which is located in St. Louis county. This 
farm is remarkable as one of the most productive for fruit and vegetable pur- 
poses in the west and it is admitted that no other farm throughout the entire 
region has yielded such rich returns to its owner. He was also instrumental in 
establishing the Progress Pressed Brick & Machine Company of St. Louis, which 
has been in constant operation since 1891. 

Frugal in habits and of exceptional industry, Mr. Stocke has earned the re- 
ward of opulence and his present prominence in business circles. He is deeply 
interested in the pursuit of agriculture and has resorted to extensive travel for the 
purpose of investigating methods of farming and horticulture. He is insistently 
experimenting and by this means has deduced many valuable results pertaining 
to his occupation. 

At the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted with the Fifth ^Militia Regiment, 
with which he served in defense of the Union until the declaration of peace. 
\\'hile he has voted the republican ticket and at various times taken active part in 
political campaigns, he has declined numerous offers of office, preferring to devote 
his entire time to the transacting of his business affairs. He wedded J\Iiss Annie 
Schill. daughter of a well-to-do farmer and winemaker of Overbergen. They 
have the following children: Airs. Henr}- Frucli, Mrs. Louis Schurk, Mrs. Adolph 
Klinger, Mrs. Henrv C. Beckmann, Mrs. A\'illiam Schroedter and lacob V. Stocke. 



CHARLES NAGEL. 



Charles Xagel, a lawyer now giving his attention chiefly to the interests of a 
large clientage, was born on the 9th of August. 1849, ^^'^ Colorado county, Texas, 
his parents being Dr. Herman and Fredricka Nagel. His paternal grandfather 
was engaged in commercial pursuits and was a man of influence in his community. 
The maternal grandfather and great-grandfather of Charles Nagel both devoted 
their lives to the v/ork of the ministry. His father and mother in 1847 I'emoved to 
Texas, where they resided until 1863. The father's sympathy being with the 
north in its efforti^ to preserve the Union, it became necessary that he should leave 
a district where the sentiment was hostile to his views and he therefore chose St. 
Louis as a jjlace of residence. 

In early boyhood Charles Xagel attended the district schools of Texas and 
afterward pursued an academic course at a German private school. Eventually 
he entered the St. Lotus high school, from which he was graduated in due course 
of time. Determining u])on the practice of law as a life work, he made prepara- 
tion for this calling as a student in the .St. Louis Law wSchool, in which he com- 
pleted a two years' course, while later he spent a year as a student in the Uni- 
versity of I.erlin in fiermany. There he gave special attention to the study of 
Roman law, political economy, history and kindred subjects, a knowledge of 
which is so essential to the successful practice of jurisprudence. Upon his return 
to St. Louis in 1873 Mr. X^agel established an office and at once entered upon 
the active practice of the [profession, in which he feels the deepest interest. A 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 73 

contemporary biograplier said of him: "Stiulious habits and a. fonchicss for re- 
search within the scope of his chosen held of labor have made him especially 
eminent as a counselor, and his candor, fairness and careful consideration to all 
interest involved in cases presented to him by clients have given him an enviable 
position among" members of the St. Louis bar. As a trial lawyer, these character- 
istics are no less consj^icuously manifested, and his earnestness, sincerity and evi- 
dent honesty of purpose never fail to impress favorably both courts and juries. 
Thoroughly well versed in the science of law, he is apt in its application to cases 
at th.e bar and peculiarly forceful in his expositions of the priiiciples of common 
law." 

As a teacher of law as well as in practice Mr. Xagel has gained considerable 
distinction. Since 1875 he has been a professor in the St. Louis Law School and 
his ability in imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he has 
gained is a widely acknowledged fact. That which he desires to present to his 
pupils is given forth in such a cogent, logical way that it manifests itself upon 
the mind of bis hearers and proves an element in the accumulation of that legal 
learning wdiich is necessary for the attainment of success at the bar. 

In pohtics i\Ir. Xagel is a stalwart republican, giving unequivocal support to 
the party where the real issues are involved, while his opinions carry weight in its 
councils. He has been active in campaign work since 1880 and has frequently 
been a delegate to party conventions. He does not seek nor solicit office and yet 
when his fellow townsmen have requested that he serve them in public positions 
he has felt that his duty as a citizen demanded his acquiescence to their wishes. 
During the years 1881 and 1882 therefore he was a member of the Missouri house 
of representatives and, giving careful consideration to each question which came 
up for settlement, he left the impress of his individuality upon the laws enacted 
during his term. In 1893 he w^as called to the presidency of the city council of St. 
Louis and served for four years. He is deeply interested in the subject of public 
education and has been a useful and influential member of the board of trustees 
of the public library, of the board of trustees of the Washington University and 
of the board of control of the St. Louis Museum of Fine Arts. He is a man of 
social nature with high appreciation for that rarer conu-adeship which produces 
lasting friendships. He belongs to various clubs, including the St. Louis, the 
Universitv, the Commercial, the Round Table, the Mercantile and the Noonday 
Club and is also a member of the St. Louis Turners Society. As the years have 
passed he has grown in i)o])ularitv and regard of his fellow townsmen and today 
has a circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 
Throughout his entire life he has been faithful to every interest entrusted to his 
charge and wdiatsoever his hand finds to do, whether in his profession or in his 
official duties, or in any other sphere he does with his might and with a deep 
sense of conscientious obligation. 



JOHN CHESTER BARROWS. 

John Chester Barrows, who has devoted the last twenty-four years of his life 
to the insurance business, with offices in St. Louis since 1889, where he is under- 
writer for casualty and surety lines, is descended from an ancestry that is dis- 
tinctively American in its lineal and collateral lines through many succeeding gen- 
erations^ for the progenitor of the family in America was the Barrows who served 
as the first schoolma'ster of Plvmouth, Massachusetts. His parents were the Rev. 
N. Barrows, D.D., and Isabella G. Barrows, the former a distinguished divine, 
known throughout the entire country. The son completed his education by grad- 
uation from "Trinitv College at Hartford, Connecticut, in 1880, and four years 
of his life were devoted to the profession of teaching. In 1885 he turned his at- 
tention to the insurance business in New York city and in 1889 removed to St. 



74 ST. LOUIS. TJiE FOURTH CITY. 

Louis, wliere he has since been continuously engaged as an underwriter of cas- 
ualty and surety insurance, meeting with that success which comes from an exten- 
sive and constantly growing clientage. His ability in this line is most marked 
and has arisen from a close study of insurance in all of its various phases and 
branches. 

Mr. Barrows was married in 1886 to ]\lis$ Emma Louise Adams, of Xew 
York. He is a member of the Episcopal church and his social standing is indicated 
somewhat by the fact that he is a member of the Glen Echo Country Club. He 
also belongs to the ^Mercantile Club and is interested in those concerns of vital 
importance to the cit_\- in its material, intellectual and moral development, al- 
though his active business career precludes his cooperation to any extent with 
public work. 



A\ ILLIAM WILHELMY. 

St. Louis in the early period of its existence was largely a French settlement. 
Later during the closing years of the first half of the nineteenth century there 
came to the citv a large number of German people, and the Teutonic element 
has since been a most important one in the growth and progress of St. Louis. 
It is of this class that J\Ir. Wilhelmy is a representative and the sterling traits 
of his German ancestrv are manifest in his life, winning him an enviable position 
in the regard of his fellowmen. 

William Wilhelmy was born in Hedem, Prussia, on the 15th of January, 
1835, a son of Frederick and Wilhelmina ( Peel) Wilhelmy, the former a shoe 
manufacturer. In the private schools the son obtained his education and after 
putting aside his text-books learned the miller's trade. He came to St. Louis in 
1856, when a young man of twenty-one years, and secured a clerkship in a 
grocery store, but the laudable ambition, which is an indispensable element to 
success, prompted him to make arrangements whereby he might engage in busi- 
ness on his own account. He carefully saved his earnings and in 1859, feeling 
that his experience and capital justified such a step, he began business on his 
own account as proprietor of a grocery store at the corner of Eleventh and 
Buchanan streets. For twenty-three years he continued at that location and 
gained a comfortable competence through his capable management, for his fair 
dealing and undaunted enterprise gained for him a liberal patronage. 

Tn 1889 Air. Wilhelmy retired from mercantile lines. In the meantime he 
had a])preciated the fact that j)roperty in North St. Louis would some day be a 
valuable part of the city. He has since reaped the benefits of his wise judgment 
concerning the city's rapid growth. He was one of the founders of the IJremen 
Bank and for many years one of its directors. He is still a large owner of real 
estate and was one of the organizers of the North St. Louis Real Estate & Invest- 
ment Company and is yet one of its directors. He has likewise been interested 
in many other financial enterprises, but is not actively connected with any, his 
former labor being now crowned with an age of ease. 

Mr. Wilhelmy's activity, however, has not been confined to business lines. 
He was one of the organizers and supporters of the Apollo Singing Society and 
was instrumental in securing for the society its present home. He was also a 
member of the Nf)rth End Improvement Association and in this connection did 
much to promote the ])rogress and improvement of this section of the city, for 
when he located in North St. Louis there were no paved streets, no city water 
or city lights. His efforts have always been of a most practical character, proving 
resultant factors in ]}romrjting the best interests of the city. 

()n the i8th of December, 1859, Mr. Wilhelmy was married to ]Miss Kathe- 
rine Renzen. a daughter of John and Annie (Tumas) Renzen. Mrs. Wilhelmy 
wa.s born in Hanover, ricrniany, and came to America in 1858. The children 




WILLIA^r \MLHELMY 



76 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

of this marriage, six in number, are : Henry, who resides in St. Louis county, 
is married and his five children, Clara, \'era. Bertha, WilUam and Henry; Bertha, 
who is the wife of Christ Pleuger. and has two children, Adeline and William ; 
and \Mlhelm, Eddie, Annie and Frank, all of whom died in infancy. 

In the life record of ^Ir. Wilhelmy business enterprise and benevolence have 
been well balanced factors. His broad humanitarianism has prompted his help- 
ful cooperation in many movements for the benefit of those less fortunate. He 
is a member of the German Orphans' Home Society and has been one of its 
most liberal supporters. He has likewise been a generous contributor to the 
Altenheim Societv and has given freely in the support of all worthy charities of 
the citv. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, while in relig- 
ious faith he is not bound bv sectarianism or creed, but is in sympathy with the 
Protestant movement with the basic principles of all religious interests — morality 
and humanitarianism. 

During- the period of the Civil war ^Ir. Wilhelmy served as a member of the 
Home Guards and for many years he was prominent in the councils of the repub- 
lican party and contributed much to its success in the old twelfth ward. He 
served for a time as a member of the city park commission and his public spirit 
has always been manifest in the aid and help which he has given to measures 
and movements for the public good. A man of domestic tastes he has been looked 
upon as one of the sterling citizens of his section of the city, who in every rela- 
tion of life has stood as an upright, honorable man. advocating progressive inter- 
ests with a ready recognition of one's duties and obligations to their fellows. 
His life has been crowned with merited success and the chief factor in his 
prosperity has been his close application and a strict adherence to honest business 
principles. 



HEXRY BRO\\'X GRAHAAI. 

It is not given to the majority of men to attain prominence in military or po- 
litical circles, but the possibilities of a successful career in business are before 
every individual. The attainment of success, however, attests the possession of 
certain essential qualities. These are industry, concentration, close application and 
firm purpose and with all of these requisites Henry BrovvU Graham was richly 
endowed. By their exercise he gained a creditable position in manufacturing cir- 
cles, being at the head of one of the leading paper industries of St. Louis. 

His birth occurred in Cincinnati, (_)hio, in 183 1, his parents being James and 
Mary Graham. The father was born at New Geneva, Pennsylvania, and the 
mother in Middlesex, Indiana. They were married, however, in New York city 
and for some time James Graham engaged in the manufacture of paper at Hamil- 
ton, Ohio. In the year 1857 he arrived in St. Louis and established the first paper 
mills in the west. The new enterprise proved a success, becoming- an important, 
industry, employing a large force of workmen. 

It was to tiiis business that Henry B. Graham succeeded on the death of 
his father, at which time the enterprise passed into the hands of himself and his 
brother, Benjamin B. rjraham. In the meantime he had pursued his education 
in Hanover College of Indiana, where he had made a special study of mathematics. 
When his literary course was completed he joined his father in business, became 
acquainterl with the pajK-r trade in ])rinciple and detail and was thus well quali- 
fied to assume the management and active control of the concern on his father's 
death. He anrl his brother remained in active business association until a short 
time prior to the demise of Henry B. (Jraham, when he withdrew. He had 
helped to build up the business to large proportions, devoting his undivided time 
and attention to this work, and the house became well known to the trade not 
only by reason of the excellence of its output, but also owing to the straightfor- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CTrY. 77 

ward methods ever emplo_ved in the conduct of the business. The company was 
ever fair and just in its treatment of employes and if ever a mistake was made in 
a deal with a patron, the customer knew that mention of the fact w<ju1(1 Ijring 
speedy and correct adjustment. 

Mr. Graham was married iii Ouincy, Illinois, to Miss i^lvira l*rice, who died 
September 12, 1908, at .Mgonac, Michigan, where she had spent the summer. 
They had a son, Henry 15. Graham, Jr., whose birth occurred in St. Louis, A])ril 
12, 1875. He supplemented his preliminary education by a course in the Univer- 
sity School of Cleveland, Ohio, and in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
of Boston. He is now secretary and a director of the Graham Paper Company 
and is a wortliN- successor of his father, displaying- the same excellent business 
qualifications manifested by the former in his successful control of the establish- 
ment. On the 27th of September, 1898, at X'incennes, Indiana, he was married 
to Miss Florence Taylor, of Baltimore, Maryland, and after her demise wedded 
Miss Zulah Rooker, of Kansas Cit}'. His children are Dorothy Moore and ]\Iar- 
jorie Price. He is a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, the Alpha Theta Chap- 
ter, the jNIissouri Athletic Club and the Normandie Golf Club, and throughout 
his native citv is widely recognized as a popular and highly esteemed young man. 

Henry B. Graham, Sr., belonged to a republican /amily and ever adhered 
to that faith, believing the principles of the party best calculated to conserve the 
interests of good government. While a student in college he united with the 
Presbyterian church and remained a consistent member thereof until his demise. 
He passed away in Cleveland, Ohio, in June, 1904, leaving to his family a cred- 
itable record, his example being one well worthy of emulation. He always had 
great faith in St. Louis and its possibilities and was an enthusiastic advocate of 
its interests. He possessed a charitable nature, manifest in his generosity to 
those who needed assistance, while a kindly spirit permeated him in all of his re- 
lations to his fellowmen. 



TOHX T. \\^\LLACE. 



John T. \\'allace, the vice president of the Blackmer & Post Pipe Company, 
has throughout his entire connection with business interests, covering the period 
since 1880, been connected with this house and his advancement to his present 
position of administrative direction has come in recognition of his superior cpiali- 
fications, his unremitting application and his keen business discernment. He was 
born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, August 31, 1858, a son of H. H. and Betty S. 
(Crouch) Wallace, both of whom were natives of Mrginia. The father was for 
a long- period engage'd in tlie (pieensware business, but is now deceased. The 
mother still survives. 

At the usual age John T. Wallace became a public-school stu(lent in Fred- 
ericksburg and, mastering the branches which constituted the curriculum there, 
he eventuallv became a high-school student and afterward attended the Xaval 
Academv at' Annapolis. When he put aside his text-books, he sought a honie 
in the middle w^est, regarding the opportunities of this section of the country ui 
business lines as superior to those of the older and more thickly settled east and 
south. On coming to this city he secured the positicMi of bookkeeper with the 
Blackmer & Post Pipe Company, wdiich recognized his ability and later made him 
salesman. He has worked his' way upward through successive promotions with 
constantly increasing responsibilities and duties until in 1905 he became the sec- 
ond vice president. He is thoroughly familiar with the Inisiness in all of its de- 
partments and ramifying interests and has been active in extending and pro- 
moting its trade relations and is in hearty sympathy with the unassailable reputa- 
tion which the house bears in all the lines of its business. 



78 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

In 1897 ^^''- ^^ 'ill'^i^'t^ \\'^^-^ married to Mrs. Lulu Xorvell Meriwether. He 
belongs to the Algonquin and to the Mercantile Clubs and holds membership in 
the Rose Hill ^Masonic lodge, being a faithful follower of the craft. He also 
belongs to the Presbyterian church and gives expression of his political views by 
his support of the democracy at the polls. He has become thoroughly imbued with 
the progressive spirit of the middle Vv'cst, which is manifest, not only in his busi- 
ness connections, but also in his loyal support of and cooperation with many 
movements for the public good. 



RUSSELL A. RICHARDSON. 

-Vlthough situated across the river. East St. Louis is practically a suburb of 
the larger city on the Missouri side. It has become the location of many business 
enterprises which have St. Louis as their headquarters. This has brought about 
its extensive growth and consequent building operations, and it is in connection 
with the last mentioned line of activity that Russell A. Richardson is well known. 
He is one of the leading real-estate men and financiers of East St. Louis— a gen- 
tleman wdio has perhaps given more substantial aid toward commercial and in- 
dustrial development of the city than any other man. In his real-estate opera- 
tions he handles only his own property and as a speculative builder he has done 
much for the improvement of the city, being the promoter of many of its finest 
residence districts. 

Mr. Richardson was born in Quincy, Illinois, June 2, 1866, and is a son of 
Charles R. and ^leriba Avise Richardson. The father was a cotton planter of 
Louisiana. The family comes from Welsh and English ancestry and early rep- 
resentatives of the name lived in X'irginia and Kentucky, whence later removals 
w-ere made to Illinois and Louisiana. The first Richardsons in this country came 
in the early part of the seventeenth century. 

Russell A. Richardson was a pupil in the public schools of his native city 
to the age of sixteen }ears and then became connected with merchandising and 
cotton planting in Louisiana. There he carried on business until 1902, in which 
year he came to St. Louis, since which time he has been prominently connected 
with its real-estate and financial interests. As the business affairs of St. Louis 
have crossed the river and the Illinois town of East St. Louis has in consequence 
gained rapidl}-, Mr. Richardson recognized an advantageous field for other real- 
estate operations and today the cit\- owes much to his efiforts, for large divisions 
of the town have been u])built and improved through his efi:'orts. Within the 
past year he has erected many houses and has built more business houses, princi- 
pally modern office buildings, than any other individual or firm, having employed 
a special force of builders steadily during the past seven years. Among large 
office buildings which he built are the Richardson and Josephine buildings, the 
Russell and Luc\- blocks, the last named being the largest in East St. Louis. Mr. 
Richardson handles onI\- real estate owned by himself and he makes a specialty 
of creating new high class residence subdivisions. He is the sole owner of the 
following subdivisions, Oak (irove Heights, Richardson's First and Second sub- 
divisions to East St. Louis and Richardson's Washington I'ark subdivision. The 
two subdivisions of Oak Crove Heights proved to be the best selling ])roi)erty 
ever placed on the market. He is also one of the largest stockholders in Holly- 
wood Height-^. In financial as well as social circles Mr. Richardson is held in 
high esteem, his naiue being an honcjred one on commercial paper in the larger 
Missouri citv as well as in its fldurisliiiig suburl) on the Illinois side. Fle has 
learned to correctly y<'due every situation, to recognize o])]iortunities that others 
pass by heedlessly and as the \ears have advanced he has won a most creditable 
position as an alert, energetic business man. 

Mr. Richarrlson was married to .Miss Lucy I^. \. Methudy. a daughter of 
LeopoUl Mctlnulv. pronn'nentK' known as a hnuberman. They have two sons. 



ST. LOUIS, THE' FOURTH CITY. 79 

Charles and Russell, aged respectively twelve and six years, and arc now attendin^^ 
school. Theirs is a magnificent home at No. 1746 Waverly place. Mr. Richardson 
is an independent voter but not unmindful of his obligations in citizenship and 
is in thorough sympathy with the progressive spirit which is manifest in municipal 
improvement at the present time. In Alasonry he has attained the thirt\-secon<l 
degree in the Scottish Rite and is a member of the Mystic Shrine and various 
other organizations. ■ He belongs to the Athletic and Union Clubs, the Lieder- 
kranz and other social societies, and those wdio come within the closer circle 
of his friendship find him a most congenial companion. 



lOHN RING. 



No man has lived in vain who has given to the world something of value 
to his fellowmen, and this Mr. Ring has done through his inventive genius. 
America is preeminent in the field of invention. No other land has produced so 
many labor-saving devices or such varied kinds of machinery to promote the trade 
interests of the world and Mr. Ring has aided in winning the reputation which 
this land bears. He was born in Countv Cork, Ireland, in 1841, but was only 
five years of age when brought to St. Louis by his parents, Edward and Alary 
(Roche) Ring. The father left the native land in 1841. crossing the Atlantic to 
New Orleans, and in 1844 he became a resident of St. Louis. Two years later 
he brought his family to the new world and their home was established in this 
city, where John Ring has since lived. The father established the first lard oil 
factory in St. Louis and in 1857 added to this business the manufacture of can- 
dles. He was the first to improve on the process for making lard and in 1857, 
in connection with his son John, he instituted the improved processes for making- 
refined lard to meet the conditions in the south. Within a very short time all 
other manufacturers copied this process and it was not long before the entire 
market was supplied with this improved refined lard. Until the other manufac- 
turers adopted the methods instituted by Mr. Ring and his son they had a prac- 
tical monopoly on all lard sold in Cuba, Alexico and the southern part of the 
United States, as theirs w^as the only lard which would not melt into oil in the hot 
southern climate. It will thus be seen that the labor of Edward Ring was an 
element of marked value in commercial circles. His wife, also a native of Ireland, 
was a descendant of the famous old Roche family, so well known throughout the 
Emerald Isle. 

John Ring went to school in St. Louis until 1855, when he became associated 
with his father in business. He was for a time a student in private schools and 
afterward attended the St. Louis University and the Christian Brothers College, 
pursuing a course in chemistry in the latter institution. This has pnn-en of great 
value to him, especially in his efl:'orts to institute methods of value in the j^roduc- 
tion of lard. He continued in the manufacture of lard for a number of years and 
the business on the whole was successful, although at diflferent times fires had 
done some damage. In i88t, however, the disastrous fire broke out v.hicli com- 
pletely wrecked the entire plant, after which 'Sir. Ring turned his attention to 
other fields. 

Possessing natural inventive genius, in the lard business he luul constantl\- 
studied to overcome many of the difficulties which beset his competitors, and it 
was while striving to do away with the obstacles of refrigeration that he invented 
machinery for refrigeration and ice manufacture. In the lard making, as well 
as in the packing and brewing business, refrigeration was needed independent of 
ice, and after the fire of 188 1 he patented his refrigerating and ice-making ma- 
chines and began their manufacture and sale. lM)r nine years, or until i8<;o, he 
conducted the business and it proved a most profitable and growing venture. In 
fact, it stands prominently forth in representation of one of the most important 



80 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

inventions of the age. That the first machines which he produced possessed al- 
most every feature of perfection is indicated by the fact that the finest machines 
today are identical in ahnost every detail with the first machines which John Ring 
manufactured for sale in i8Si. The first two large machines which he built and 
sold were placed in the plant of the C. & L. Rose Packing Company, now the 
W'aldeck Packing Company, of St. Louis, and they are still in operation in the 
plant and giving good service. In 1885 he built two machines for Cox & Gordon, 
packers, which are also utilized today, serving for the entire plant, save in the 
extremely hot weather, when a new and larger machine is also used. 

Like many other men, Air. Ring did not secure the financial benefit of his in- 
vention which he should have enjoyed. He spent seventeen years in contesting 
his rights in the courts and when the decision was finally in his favor it was too 
late to reap any pecuniary reward, for the patents had by this time expired. The 
world, too, owes to him a debt of gratitude for his invention in ice-making ma- 
chines, which have placed ice within the reach of all because of its cheapness of 
manufacture through the processes which he instituted. Several other inventions 
owe their existence to his fertile brain and skilled hand and he stands today 
among those who have given America preeminence as the land of invention. 

On the 8th of September, 1868, occurred the marriage of Mr. Ring and Aliss 
Kate AI. O'Neil, daughter of Judge Joseph O'Neil, formerly president of the Cit- 
izens' Savings Bank. Their children were five in number. Vincent R., who died 
in 1904. inherited his father's great gift of invention and at the time of his death 
had charge of the manufacturing department of the Christy Fire Clay Company. 
The glass manufacturing industry of this country owes a great deal to the in- 
ventive mind of A'incent Ring. Their second son, John Ring, Jr., is advertising 
and purchasing agent for the Mercantile Trust Company of St. Louis. Joseph 
O'Xeil Ring is v^-orking for the American Tobacco Company. Alary is now the 
wife of Dr. L. R. Padberg, a successful physician of St. Louis. Genevieve Ring 
completes the family. 

The family residence is at No. 3924 Westminster Place. Air. Ring has been 
very prominent in charitable and benevolent circles and has done much efifective 
work in those directions. He was for twenty years secretary of the board of 
managers of the Roman Catholic Orphan asylums and for a similar period was 
secretary of the upper council of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, organized for 
charitable purposes. He is a member of the alumni association of the St. Louis 
University and a member of the Academy of Science at Philadelphia. A man of 
broad mind and scholarly attainments, he has given much time to scientific re- 
search and investigation and has long occupied a prominent place among those 
of similar interests. 



JAAIES HAGERAIAN. 



James Hagerman, actively connected with a profession which has always 
been regarded as a conservator of the rights and liberties of the individual and 
the foundation of all society and community interests, is numbered among the 
native sons of Alissouri. his birth having occurred in Jackson township, Clark 
county, November 26. 1848. His father, Benjamin F. Hagerman, was a native 
of Loudoun county, \"irginia, born in 1823. The years of his childhood and 
youth were passed in the Old Dominion and in early manhood he removed west- 
ward. settHng first in Lewis county, Alissouri, and subsequently he became a 
resident of Clark county, this state. It was there he met and married Miss Ann 
Cowgill, a native of Alason county, Kentucky, who had come to Alissouri wuth 
her parents. After arriving in this state, Benjamin F. Hagerman devoted his 
time anrl energies to agricultural jnirsuits and t(j school teaching, in what were 
then jjionccr districts, but in later years turned his attention to commercial 
interests in Alexandria, Clark county. 




JAMES HAGERMAX 



82 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

lames Hagernian, reared in the county of his nativity, is indebted to the 
pubHc schools for his early education, while later he became a student in the 
Christian Brothers College of St. Louis, and afterward attended Professor 
Tamenson's Latin School of Keokuk. Iowa, to which place his family removed 
in 1864. After leaving school he entered the law office of Rankin & McCrary, 
of Keokuk, a noted iirm, of which Justice ]\Iiller, of the United States supreme 
court, had shortlv before been a member. The firm occupied a position of dis- 
tinctive prominence in the ranks of the members of the bar of the west, and Mr. 
Hagernian was fortunate in that his studies were pursued in such an environ- 
ment. He was readv for admission before he had attained his majority, but the 
laws of Iowa precluded his becoming a member of the profession before he had 
reached the age of twenty-one. This led him to return to Missouri, where there 
was no prescribed age limit, and successfully passing the examination, he was 
admitted to the ^Missouri bar by Judge Wao;ner, of the supreme court of this 
state, when eighteen years of age. He returned to Keokuk, however, to enjoy 
the further advantage of professional discipline and instruction in the office of 
Rankin & McCrary, with whom he continued until 1869, when he formed a 
partnership with H. P. Lipscomb and opened a law office of his own in Palmyra, 
Missouri. A year was thus passed, on the expiration of which period he returned 
to Keokuk, and in 1875 became a partner of his old preceptor, Jud^e McCrary, 
under the tirm name style of McCrary, Hagernian & McCrary. This relation- 
ship was maintained until 1879, when the senior partner was appointed judge of 
the United States circuit court for the eighth district, and his place was filled by 
Frank Hagernian, now of Kansas Citv, Missouri, the firm becoming Hagerman, 
^^IcCrary & Hagernian. 

As senior partner of the newlv organized tirm, James Hagernian continued 
to practice in Keokuk until 1884. when he accepted the proffered general attor- 
neyship of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company. This necessi- 
tated his removal to Topeka, Kansas, where the general offices of the company 
were located. Judge ]\IcCrary. widelv recognized as a man of national emi- 
nence because of his standing at the bar and his capable service as secretary of 
war under President Hayes, had become the general counsel of this corporation, 
and thus I\Ir. Hagernian again came into personal and professional relations 
with his old preceptor in becoming general attorney for the Santa Fe Company. 
They were the legal advisers of the company during its formative period and 
contribrted in no small degree to the success of what is today one of the most 
important railway systems of the L^nited States. The records of the courts 
indicate the successes which they won in some railway litigation which attracted 
national attention. 

Mr. Hagerman"s active identiiication with tlie bar of Kansas City began 
in 1886, when he became a member of the firm of Warner, Dean & Hagerman. 
Two years later he was made general counsel for the receivers of the Missouri, 
Kansas & Texas Raihvax- and in addition enjoyed a large general practice until 
1891, when he accepted the apnointment to the general solicitorship upon the 
reorganization of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway Company. Since 1903 
he has been general counsel for the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway system. 
In 1893 he removed to St. Louis and the high re])utation which he had pre- 
viously gained won him alnir)st immediate recognition here. His practice has 
ever been of a distinctive!}- representative character and his abilitv is equallv 
pronounced as counselor or attorney. He is familiar with the long line of deci- 
sion.s from ^Marshall down by which the constitution has been expounded and 
is equally at home in all departments of the law, gained clistinction as a trial 
lawyer, and in civil jjractice he has s])ecialized to some extent in corporation law, 
anrj yet few men are more thoroughly informed in all departments of juris- 
prudence. He was presiflent of the St. Tyjuis Har Association for two years, in 
1892 and 1P93. and of the American i'.ar Association in 1893 and 1894. He is 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 83 

also a member of the Xoonday, AJercantile and .St. Louis Clubs, besides other 
social organizations. 

Mr. Hagerman's position upon any matter of moment is never an equivocal 
one. On the contrary, he stands as a stanch supporter of what he believes to 
be for the best interests of the public and the community at large and is a recog- 
nized leader in democratic circles, having since 1868 taken an active part in 
every national campaign. In 1879 ^^^ presided over the Iowa state democratic 
convention, which nominated H. H. Trimble for governor, and the following 
year was elected a delegate from Iowa to the national democratic convention 
which made General W. S. Hancock the presidential candidate. In 1888 he pre- 
sided over the Missouri democratic state convention which nominated D. R. 
Francis for governor. 

On the 6th of October, 1871, Mr. Hagerman was united in marriage to 
iNIiss ^Margaret M. Walker, of Palmyra, ]Missouri. Their children are Lee W. 
and James Hagerman. who are now members of the St. Louis bar. Mr. Flager- 
man is a friend and associate of many men prominent in national life as well 
as those who are recognized leaders in the ranks of the legal fraternity of the 
country. In a profession where success depends entirely upon individual merit 
he has gained distinction, the consensus of public opinion placing him among 
the men of wide learning and discrimination as regards legal matters, whereby 
enviable reputation, honor and success have come to him. 



SAMUEL CARSON ^IcCORMACK. 

Samuel Carson McCormack, who for many years carried on business as a 
contractor in St. Louis and was also recognized as a leader in local democratic 
circles, was born in Niagara county. New York, January 8, 1828, and his life 
record covered the intervening period to the i6th of March, 1884, when he passed 
away in St. Louis. His parents were John and Nellie McCormack, of Niagara 
county. New York. The advantages and opportunities which he enjoyed in boy- 
hood were very limited. He attended school for only one or two terms in New 
York and was therefore largely a self-educated as well as self-made man. In 
the school of experience, however, he learned manv valuable lessons and increased 
his intellectual strength through reading and observation. 

At the age of fifteen years ^Ir. McCormack entered the employ of his 
brother, William ]\IcCormack, a contractor, with whom he continued for several 
years, gaining practical knowledge of building interests and becoming an expert 
workman. He was afterward employed by a Mr. Greenleaf, also a contractor, 
with whom he continued to the age of twenty-nine vears, occupying the position 
of foreman. At the age of thirtv years he began contracting on his own account, 
forming a partnership with Charles Smith, and for several years the firm en- 
joyed a prosperous and growing business. The partnership was then dissolved 
and Mr. ]\IcCormack was afterward alone in business up to the time of his death, 
enjoying a good patronage as a general contractor. He always lived faithfully 
up to the terms of his contract and his diligence and unremitting energy consti- 
tuted the foundation upon which he builded his own success. 

On the 4th of July, 1856, Mr. ^McCormack Avas married to Miss Harriet 
Louise Shaflfner, a daughter of Jacob and Eliza (Noble) Shafifner, of St. Louis, 
Missouri. The living children of this marriage are : Charles B., a contractor of 
St. Louis ; Airs. Ella Moffatt, of Peabody, Kansas : Samuel C. and Harry E., 
both residents of this city; and Mrs. Hattie E. Helfesrieder, also of St. Louis. 

]\Ir. ^McCormack was prominent in democratic circles and exerted a strong 
influence politicallv in the tenth ward. He was president of the water board for 
a number of y\ears and was a most active, earnest and efifective worker in sup- 
port of the principles in which he believed and the candidates of the party. He 



84 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

gave liberally to the support of various churches, and he held membership in 
Aurora Lodge, Xo. 267, A. F. & A. JNI., and also in the Odd Fellows lodge. 
He belonged to several camping clubs and was very fond of hunting and fishing. 
Friendship was to him never an idle word. He greatly appreciated the good 
will and regard of his friends and they found him a genial and obliging companion 
at all times, ever considerate of the rights and privileges of others. Though a 
quarter of a century has passed since he was called to his final rest, his memory is 
vet cherished by many who were his associates while he was still an active 
factor in business life. 



FREDERICK G. GERST. 

In small towns there are found men who are "leaders" in certain walks of 
life ; in the larger cities there are many who attain success in the control of ex^ 
tensive enterprises, each one of which contributes, however, to the commercial 
prosperity and the upbuilding of the locality in which they are situated. Mr. 
Gerst was actively connected with an important business, being president of the 
Gerst Brothers Company, engaged in the conduct of an iron foundry at No. 800 
Cass avenue for the last ten years of his life. He was born in Alsace-Lorraine, 
now Germany, in September, 1841. His parents were Jacob and jMagdalena 
Gerst. also natives of that land and representatives of an old French family. The 
grandfather served in the Napoleonic wars, under the great Bonaparte. In the 
year 1841 Jacob Gerst emigrated with his family to the new world and estab- 
lished and carried on the foundry which is now the property of his son. 

Frederick G. Gerst was only a few months old when brought by his parents 
to the United States. He pursued his education in the college of St. Louis, which 
he attended to his sixteenth year, and then took up the active pursuits of a busi- 
ness career, entering upon an apprenticeship with Gaty McCrum & Company in 
the iron foundry business and completing his full term of indenture — five years. 
In the meantime he had become an expert in his line and had gradually worked his 
way upward, increased duties and responsibilities devolving upon him as the time 
passed. On the expiration of that period he joined his brother in a partnership 
which continued up to the time of his death. They began operations at the present 
location, but started on a small scale. Through the perseverance, integrity and 
efforts of these men, however, they developed a business which is now extensive 
and profitable. The growth of the trade is indicated somewhat by the fact that 
employment is now furnished to about one hundred workmen. When they began 
they manufactured everything to order, but now make a specialty of structural 
iron for building purposes and annually handle over their counters several 
hundred thousand dollars, which represents the extent of their trade rela- 
tions. Tlie factory has always been equipped with the latest improved machinery 
and they have ever been careful to maintain the strictest justice in their treatment 
of employes, while their relations with their patrons are characterized by fair 
dealing that is unassailable. 

Mr. Gerst was married in St. Louis, in 1868, to Miss Caroline Hem, a daugh- 
ter of John Hem, who was foreman of the stone work at the time of the erec- 
tion of the courthouse in this city. Unto this marriage were born three sons and 
three daughters. John F., now thirty-nine years of age, is married and is acting 
as manager of his father's business. He attended college and displays a special 
talent as a draftsman. Jrjse])h, thirty-three years of age, is acting as superintend- 
ent of the foundry. Leo, thirty years of age, also has supervision over a part of 
the business. Annie L., Lillie and Agnes have all attended college and are cul- 
tured young ladies, occupying an enviable position in the social circles in v/hich 
they move. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 85 

Mr. Gerst erected his own home at No. 706 Cass avenue and the family is 
there pleasantly located. He voted with the democracy and was a member of the 
St. Joseph Catholic church. He also belonged to the Catholic Knights of Amer- 
ica and to the St. Louis Legion of Honor. He displayed the salient characteristics 
of the German race, combined with the vigor and enterprise of the American 
business man, and the predominant qualities of these two nations constitute a 
strong combination which made him a forceful factor in the industrial life of the 
community. After a useful and well spent life he passed away July 6, 1908. 



TAMES BLACK, SR. 



There are those who have failed in winning success who make the claim 
that environment, influence or fortunate circumstances enter largely into the ac- 
complishment of all who gain prosperity, but to such carping criticism and lack 
of appreciation as this it need onlv be said that if the individual will examine into 
the secret of success of the great majority of those who have passed their fellow 
travelers on the journey of life it will be found that their progress is due not to 
opportunities that do not encompass the whole race but to their wise and judicious 
use of advantages which others neglect. \A^ork, persistent and indefatigable work, 
is the basis of all success, and verification of this statement is found in the life 
record of James Black, Sr., who for fifty years was a leading contractor of St. 
Louis, within which time he executed more contracts than any other contractor 
of the city. He made a splendid record by reason of the straightforward businesi: 
methods which he ever followed and his record may well serve as a source of 
inspiration and encouragement to others if they will but follow the obvious les- 
sons which it contains. 

Mr. Black was born March 6, 1829, at Killynure, County Donegal, Ireland. 
His parents were John and Jane (^ Woods) Black who owned a large farm, on 
which were born three sons and two daughters. The son James was educated 
in a Donegal university, from which he was graduated at an early age. _ He 
excelled in mathematics and was a man of extensive knowledge, remaining 
throughout his entire life a student of the questions afi'ecting individual deveb 
opment and the world's progress. In early manhood he studied for the ministry 
and had comprehensive knowledge of theology but determined to devote his 
time and talents to business affairs. While a young man he was an enthusiast 
on the subject of athletic sports and devoted considerable time to hunting and 
fishing in early youth. He never neglected life's lessons, however, and his busi- 
ness career was marked by that steady progression which indicated constantly 
expanding powers. 

Mr. Black arrived in the United States in 1849 and devoted two years to 
work on the canal at Pittsburg. Pennsylvania. He then came to St. Louis and 
completed his trade as a mason and in 1855 became general superintendent for 
the Lvnch & AIcFadden Company. He was thus identified with building inter- 
ests until 1861, when he left for California and devoted five years to mining. 
He then returned to St. Louis in 1866 and organized the firm of Black & Davis, 
which continued until the death of the senior partner. Later partnership rela- 
tions existed and in 1892 the present firm was organized under the name of the 
James Black Alasonry & Contracting Company. Throughout the years of his 
active connection wath business interests here ]\Ir. Black occupied a prominent 
position as a representative of his chosen line of activity. He kept in touch 
with the advancement which has been continuously made in building lines and 
always stood for that which was highest and best in building construction. Many 
of the fine office buildings, business blocks and residences of St. Louis stand as 
monuments to his skill, 'thrift and ability. His business brought him into close 
contact with manv of the active business men of the citv and all who knew him 



86 ■ ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

entertained for him that respect and regard which are uniformly the tribute to 
genuine worth. As his business increased, bringing him added prosperity, he 
extended his efforts into other Hues although all were of a kindred nature. He 
organized the James Black Realty Company in 1900 and became its president; 
he" was also the president of the Grafton Quarry Company and the Dolmite 
Quarry Company ; and he had a large interest in the Frisco Building Company. 
tTie Kugarok Realty Company & Hotel Company, the November Inyestment 
Company and other large concerns in Aiissouri, Washington and Alaska. 

In 1861 ]\Ir. Black organized a company of volunteers of which he was 
elected captain but at that time the United States government had plenty of 
troops and the company disbanded. In 1865 he became a member of the Odd 
Fellows society and in i860 he joined the temperance lodge, called Lily of the 
Valley. Throughout his entire life he w'as a strict temperance man and did all 
he could to inculcate these principles among those with whom he w^as associated. 
His religous faith w-as that of the Presbyterian church and no man more earnestly 
attempted to shape his life in conformity to the principles of the Christian religion. 

On the 3d of January, 1867, in St. Louis, ]\Iissouri, Mr. Black was united in 
marriage to ]\Iiss Sarah Barry, a daughter of Edmund Barry, a descendant of 
Commodore Barry. Their sons and daughters are : Jane, the widow of Richard 
\\'eisel ; George S. ; James W. ; Emma A. ; William D., professor of otology and 
laryngology at Barnes University ; Charles L. ; Sarah B. ; and Albert E., a civil 
engineer. There is also one grandson, James H. Weisel. 

After a useful and well spent life, Mr. Black passed away June 9, 1907. 
Perhaps no better estimate of his character can be given than by quoting from 
his old time associate and dearest friend, the man who perhaps knew him better 
than any one outside of his family — Porter White. After fifty years' associa- 
tion with ISlv. Black, Mr. White said: "He was one of the grandest men the 
Lord ever created. He fulfilled his mission of doing good to mankind and he 
did his part toward making the world happier and better for his participation in 
its aflfairs in a self-sacrificing noble manner. He never spoke ill of any one but 
on the other hand tried to help struggling humanity. His success in life was due 
to his upright honorable methods of conducting business, his sterling integrity 
and nobility of purpose. His record was as an open book and each page was a 
brilliant tribute to the sturdy lessons of life well learned and thoroughly per- 
formed." 



CONDE LOUIS BENOIST. 

Conde Louis Benoist, giving his personal supervision to private business 
affairs and investments, is a representative of one of the oldest families of St. 
Louis and has back of him an ancestry bono -able and distinguished. The name 
of Benoist has figured prominently in the anr.als of the southwest for more than 
a century and in his private Dusiness career Mr. Benoist is making a record 
which is in harmony with that of his forebears. He was born in St. Louis, on 
the present site of the Wright building at the corner of Eighth and Pine streets, 
in r3ctober, 1846. 

His father, Louis Auguste Benoist, a pioneer banker and financier of the 
city, was born August 13, 1803, in St. Louis, which was then a little French 
village under Spanish control. He was a son of Francois Marie Benoist and 
his mother was a daughter of Charles Sanguinet, and both were numbered 
among those who laid the foundation of the present metropolis of the southwest 
and the fourth city of the Union. Both the parents were of noted families. 
Francois Marie Benoist was the only son of Jacques Louis Benoist, the eldest 
son of Antoine Gabriel Francois Benoist, chevalier of the Royal and Military 
Order of St. Ivniis, received from Louis XV of France in recognition of his 
distinguished service with the French army between 1735 and 1760. The 




L. A. BENOIST 



88 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Benoists were of an old and illustrious French family descended directly from 
Guillaume Benoist, chamberlain of Charles VII of France in 1437. 

Francois !Marie Benoist, grandfather of Conde L. Benoist of this review, 
was born in }iIontreal, Canada, and in the maternal line was a great-grandson 
of Lemovne de Sainte Helene, the second of the famous sons of the renowned 
Charles Lemoyne and brother of De Bienville, founder of New Orleans, and 
D'Iberville. who was the first to enter the mouth of the ^Mississippi river and 
was one of the greatest captains of his day. Francois Marie Benoist acquired 
his education in Laval University in Quebec and when yet a young man made 
his way to the French city of St. Louis. Like many of his contemporaries, he 
became a fur trader and very prosperous, so that his family enjoyed all the 
social and educational advantages. 

Louis A. Benoist, as stated, was born in St. Louis, August 13, 1803, 
acquired his early education under private tutors and at one time was a pupil 
of Judg'e Tompkins, later one of the territorial judges of Missouri. Subse- 
quently he was sent to St. Thomas College in Kentucky under Dominican 
priests. He thence returned to St. Louis and after three years began the study 
of medicine under Dr. Trudeau, a pioneer physician, who directed his reading 
for two years. It was not his intention, however, to become a practitioner and 
when two years had passed he took up the study of law in the office of Horatio 
Cozzens and was eventually admitted to the bar. He then formed a partner- 
ship with the well known Pierre Provenchere, with whom he was associated in 
practice until his father desired him to go to France to settle his grandfather's 
estate. His trip abroad was made in a sailing vessel and after a voyage of six 
weeks he reached the home of his ancestors. His return trip was a thrilling 
and perilous one, for in the wreck in the Bay of Biscay he almost lost his life. 
Finally, however, he was picked up by another vessel and eventually reached 
home. He then devoted his attention to financial affairs. Nature seemed to 
have intended him for a commercial rather than a legal career. Accordingly 
he opened a real-estate and brokerage office and in the conduct of his business 
represented many capitalists in investments and loans. He secured a very exten- 
sive clientage and the success which he met in that undertaking prompted him 
to regularly enter the banking business in 1832. The new enterprise proved a 
marked success and in 1838 he established a branch house in New Orleans 
under the firm name of Benoist & Hackney, which later became Benoist, Shaw 
& Company. These two institutions at St. Louis and New Orleans ranked 
among the strongest financial enterprises of the southwest. In 1842, however, 
the St. Louis house was temporarily compelled to suspend on account of the 
financial panic of the previous years, but very soon they weathered the storm 
and the bank doors were again open under most favorable conditions. All 
depositors were paid in full and this so increased the confidence in the institu- 
tion that it became stronger than ever. Mr. Benoist was justly considered one 
of the most eminent financiers of the west in his day, as well as one of its most 
progressive men. He seemed to possess almost intuitive wisdom in determining 
the value and possibilities of a business situation and his investments were 
therefore most carefully and judiciously made. During the widespread finan- 
cial panic of 1857, when banks throughout the country were in trouble, the insti- 
tution which he established in .St. Louis went through the storm unquestioned 
and unhurt, for the public had the utmost trust in the honor and fidelity of him 
who stood at the head of the institution. While he saw in his earlier business 
career some dark days, his financial valuation at his death was five million 
dollars. He passed away in 1867, while sojourning in Cuba. He was a man 
of broad capabilities anrl well developed powers, with thorough understanding 
of medicine, the law and general literature, while as a banker and financier he 
was unequaled in his day in the southwest. He stood as a central figure in 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 89 

money circles, enjoying" the admiration of all, the full trust of his contemporaries 
and the thorough respect of his colleagues. 

Louis A. Benoist was married three times and had seventeen children. 
He first wedded Miss Barton, of Cahokia, Illinois, and their only child died in 
infancy. For his second wife he chose Miss Hackney, of Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, and their children were : Sanguinet H. ; Anne Eliza, who became the 
wife of Dr. Montrose A. Fallen ; Louise A., the wife of Cornelius Tompkins ; 
Esther A., the wife of William F. Nast; and Conde L. Benoist, of this review. 
By the third marriage, to ]\Iiss Sarah E. Wilson, of New Jersey, there were 
born the following named: Henry; Eugene H.; M. Clemence, who is the wife 
of Charles A. Faris and has one son, Charleville Benoist Faris ; Helen A., the 
wife of John F. Carton ; Louis A. ; Theodore ; Leo De Smet ; and Howard. 

Conde L. Benoist attended the Jesuit College of St. Louis and also of Ken- 
tucky and after leaving school became a clerk in the bank of L. A. Benoist & 
Company, where he remained for a year or two. Following his father's death 
he devoted his attention to the supervision of property which he inherited as 
his share of the estate, and in his control of this has greatly developed his inter- 
ests and augmented his financial resources by judicious investment and careful 
management. He is recognized as a man of excellent business ability and sound 
judgment, commanding" the respect and confidence of business associates and all 
with whom his transactions have brought him in contact. 

In 1870 Mr. Benoist was married to Miss Clemence C. Christy, of St. 
Louis, a representative of the famous Christy family. Their children are : 
Conde A., who was born in 1878 and is now associated with his father in 
business; Louis M., born in 1887; Lami F., born in 1892; Clemence P.; and 
Marie B. 

Mr. Benoist has never sought to figure in public life, possessing a nature 
of quiet retirement rather than one which seeks publicity. His aid and influence, 
however, can be counted upon to further his city's welfare and he is everywhere 
regarded as a most worthy representative of one of the oldest and most honored 
families of St. Louis. 



LAUREXXE HARRIGAN. 

St. Louis has had no more efficient chief of police than was Laurence Harri- 
gan, now deceased, who at different times served as the chief executive officer 
in maintaining the rights and liberties of the law-abiding people. He was born 
in the County of Limerick, Ireland, June 15, 1834, a son of James and Johanna 
(Scanlan) Harrigan, the former a farmer by occupation. 

In the schools of his native land Laurence Harrigan acquired a fair educa- 
tion and in 1848, at the age of fourteen years, he crossed the Atlantic to New 
York, where he began learning the shoemaker's trade. He remained in that city 
until the year 1853 and then came to St. Louis, where he again worked at his 
trade but at length the close confinement made it necessary that he give his atten- 
tion to other pursuits and in June, 1857, he ceased to work at the bench and 
became connected with the police force. It was through the influence of the 
Hon. Frank P. Blair, in whom IMajor Llarrigan at all times found a stanch friend, 
that he received his appointment. His ability and fidelity soon won him promo- 
tion and within two years he was made sergeant. In that position his merit won 
him early recognition and he was later promoted to the rank of lieutenant. In 
1868 he became chief of detectives and in that connection made a most commend- 
able reputation. The Harrigan administration of the detective branch of the 
police department was replete with some of the cleverest work ever known in the 
United States. His name in this connection became known from New York to 



90 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

San Francisco and he succeeded in bringing some of the notorious culprits of 
the country to justice. Remaining- an active member of the pohce force until 
1870. Major Harrigan then resigned in order to engage in the livery business, 
but he had in the meantime become deeply attached to the work of the police 
department and. giving over his livery business to the charge of his son, Lau- 
rence P. Harrigan, Jr., he accepted the appointment of chief of police. On the 
1st of June, 1874, he once more resigned and on the i8th of November, 1875, 
was elected to the state legislature. He proved an able working member of the 
house, being connected with much of the constructive work done in the committee 
rooms. It was he who conceived the idea and secured the passage of a bill known 
as the "Harrigan anti horse shark bill" and which, becoming a law, is often 
quoted in the courts. On the 8th of January, 1884, Major Harrigan again joined 
the police force and continued as its chief until May 4, 1886, when he resigned 
to accept an appointment from President Grover Cleveland, who made him. 
appraiser of the port. On the expiration of his term in the government service 
in 1890, the name of JMajor Harrigan again figured in connection with the police 
service of the citv and he remained continuously as chief until May i, 1898, when 
he resigned, retiring permanently from the office. Under his guidance the work 
of the department had been thoroughly systematized and stringent resolutions 
were adopted for the protection of the interests of the city through police care 
and regulation. That he was again and again called to the office was proof of 
his marked ability and loyalty and there is no name which has had more honorable 
association with the police service of the city than that of Alajor Harrigan. 

In June. 1855, was celebrated the marriage of Major Harrigan and Miss 
Suzanne Cole, a ladv of Alsatian French parentage, who, however, was born in 
Bavaria and became a resident of St. Louis in early girlhood. By this marriage 
there were four children, Laura M., Laurence P., Susan E. and Philip S., but 
the last named died in infancy. In religious faith Major Harrigan was a devout 
Catholic and always an enthusiastic supporter of the church. He never had 
occasion to regret his determination to come to America in his youthful days, 
for he found opportunities here that led him to a position of prominence, plac- 
ing him for many years in a conspicuous position in the municipal life of St. 
Louis. His fellow-townsmen came to know and to honor him for his sterling 
worth and he made a record for public service over which there fell no shadow 
of wrong or suspicion of evil. 



AIEREDITH MARTIN, JR. 

Mcreflith ]\Iartin, Jr., is the efficient cashier of Joseph Glaser & Son, stock 
brokers. In this ca])acity he has been officiating since 1898. During his business 
career ^Ir. Martin has served in many responsible positions and is accounted 
one of the most proficient and reliable men in the commercial circles of the city. 
He was born in St. Louis, his parents being Dr. Meredith and Eliza (Gay) 
Martin. 

The public schools afforded Mr. Martin his early education. Completing 
his study in the grammar-school branches at the age of sixteen years, he became 
a student at the Edward Wyman's College. In this institution he pursued a two 
years' course of study and was graduated. Immediately he became affiliated with 
Gay & Ilanenkamp, wholesale grocers, working for this firm as a clerk for the 
period of one year. Here he acquired his first business experience and showed 
himself to be possessed of the qualities necessary to enable him to rise in the 
commercial world. 

Resigning his position with this firm, Mr. Martin entered the employ of the 
St, Louis National Bank, in the capacity of a collector, in which position he 
served for about a year. His interest in the welfare of the institution, attentive* 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUiY. 91 

ness to duty and business ability en.abled him to ascend from one station of trust 
to another until he was finally made ]Daying- teller. In the latter capacity he 
worked for some time when he resigned after eight years' connection with thai 
bank and entered the stock brokerage business for himself. Remaining in busi 
ness for the period of one year, he sold out and accepted the position of cashie. 
for Jones, Edwards & Company, wholesale liquor dealers. Resigning this posi- 
tion after a few years of satisfactory service, he was engaged as cashier for A. J 
Weil & Company Stock & Foreign Exchange. ^Ir. Weil sold his interest in the 
firm and it became known under its present name, Joseph Glaser & Sons. Mr, 
IMartin was retained as cashier, in wdiich capacity he is now serving. 

Mr. Alartin was united in marriage to Aliss Lilv [Millen in Alton, Illinois 
April 20, 1888. Their only child, Josephine, is a pupil of the public schools. In 
politics Air. Martin believes in the fundamental character of the principles of the 
republican party and uses his influence in working for the success of its candi- 
dates. His religious faith is apparent upon mention that he is a ]\Iethodist. He 
resides at 4443 \\'ashington boulevard, where he owns a beautiful home. 



WILLIAM CHADICK FORDYCE. 

\\'illiam Chadick Fordyce. whose diverse and extensive interests make him 
a factor in the city's development along modern lines of progress resulting from 
intense activity, is perhaps best known as the vice president of the Common- 
wealth Trust Company, and yet is connected with many other important finan- 
cial, commercial and industrial concerns. He was born November 28, 1871. in 
Huntsville, Alabama. His father, Samuel W. Fordyce, a native of Ohio, came 
to St. Louis in 1885 and has since been extensively engaged in the building and 
operation of railways and is also associated with many other business interests. 
He is still verv active and well known in financial circles as a promoter of large 
interests of far-reaching effect and importance. The Fordyce family came orig- 
inallv from the Highlands of Scotland, the founder of the family in America 
arriving about the middle of the eighteenth century. Representatives of the family 
have since been prominent in successive generations in West Virginia and west- 
ern Pennsylvania. The mother of William C. Fordyce was in her maidenhood 
Susan Elizabeth Chadick, descended from English and Welsh ancestry. The 
family was founded originallv in North Carolina, whence a removal was made 
to Kentucky with the emigration that accompanied Daniel Boone about 1765. 
The family has since been represented in Kentucky and middle Tennessee. Wil- 
liam C. Fordyce is the second of four children, all yet living. His brother, John 
R.. is engaged in the manufacture of cotton machinery at Little Rock, Arkansas. 
The sister, Jane, is the wife of Major David S. Stanley of the United States 
army, now on duty at Washington, D. C, while the youngest brother, Samuel W. 
Fordyce, Jr., is an attorney at law of this city. 

In his earlv boyhood the family removed to Arkansas, and there William 
C. Fordyce remained until fourteen years of age, when he came to St. Louis. 
He acquired his education here under private tutors and through extensive travel, 
also pursuing a college course in Harvard L^niversity to his graduation with the 
class of 1895. He has since been identified with railroad interests in the lines 
of organization, construction and promotion, and has also been a cooperant factor 
in the development of many steam and electric railways, manufacturing and bank- 
ing enterprises, gas and water works and various industries in many parts of the 
country. In 1905 he became vice president of the Commonwealth Trust Com- 
pany, to which he has since devoted much of his time, although still continuing 
his activity in his numerous other enterprises. He is now president of the Little 
Rock & Hot Springs Western Railway Company; vice president of the Hot 
Springs Street Railway Company ; vice president of the Hot Springs Water, Gas 



^2 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

& Electric Company ; vice president of the Planters Hotel Company of St. Louis ; 
vice president of the Hotel Jefferson Company of St. Louis ; and vice president 
-of the Thomas-Fordyce iManufacturing Company of Little Rock, Arkansas. He 
is a man of indefatigable energy, who knows no idle moments, his time being 
•completelv occupied in his manifold duties in connection with the organization 
and management of the various concerns with which he is now connected. His 
labors have been of an important character in the communities where he has 
operated, his business interests always being of that kind which have prompted 
general development and progress as well as- individual success. 

On the 1 6th of June, 1902, Air. Fordyce was married in St. Louis to Chris- 
tine Orrick, a daughter of the late John C. Orrick, of St. Louis, well known as 
an attorney here for many years. They have two children: William C, born 
' December 25, 1903 ; and- Allen Orrick, May 5, 1905. He indulges in literary 
work and in tennis as a source of recreation and has also traveled quite exten- 
sively. While frank and genial in his disposition he is also dignified in manner 
and stands as a high type of the cultured gentleman and the progressive Amer- 
ican whose intense and intelligently directed business activity has been an element 
in the development of the natural resources of the southwest. His seems to 
Tdc accumulative force, each new enterprise with which he becomes connected 
developing rather than depleting his store of energy and capability, his expanding 
powers finding expression in the constantly gro\ying number of business interests 
"with which he is connected. 



HENRY MARTYN BLOSSOM. 

Henry Alartyn Blossom, prominent as a representative of insurance inter- 
ests in the west, stands as a successful business man and yet does not belong to 
that class who have sacrificed every other interest in life in order to attain 
business prominence and prosperity. On the contrary, his has been a well bal- 
anced life in which due attention has been paid to the interests of public moment 
and to the development of aesthetic, intellectual and moral culture in the 
community in which he has lived. 

He was born in ^Madison, New York, in 1833, a son of Rufus and Tirza 
(Farnsworth) Blossom. The family was established in New England in early 
colonial days and Rufus Blossom was born in eastern Massachusetts. He 
removed from New England to the Empire state and late in life came to the 
middle west, passing away in St. Louis at an advanced age. His wife died in 
Indiana, in which state the familv resided for some vears after leaving New 
York. 

In his boyhood days Henry ]\I. Blossom acquired a public-school education 
and while still a youth began business life on his own account. He was identi- 
fied with what appears now as one of the picturesque epochs in the country's 
history — that of steamboat navigation on the Missouri and the Mississippi rivers. 
It was a period in which the steamboats were well termed "floating palaces" 
and the greater part of travel was done in this way, the Mississippi, the Missouri 
and other rivers being the great highways, for the era of railroad transportation 
"had not yet dawned in the west and south. 

Coming to St. Louis in 1852, Mr. Blossom was made second clerk on a 
boat of which his brother. Captain C. D. Blossom, was then the first clerk. A 
few years later he purchased his brother's interest in this boat and thus became 
part owner and first clerk, continuing in this capacity on the "Polar Star," later 
on the "Morning Star" and still later on the "Hiawatha." He was thus engaged 
until just before the Civil war and he then retired to engage in the insurance 
business, which has since claimcfl liis attention. He was first ofificiallv con- 




H. M. BLOSSOM 



£)4 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

nected with the Glohe ^lutual Insurance Company, a local corporation, as its 
secretary, and continued with that company up to the time of the Chicago fire. 
He then accepted the agency of other companies and began the development of 
his business, which by careful control and sound judgment has grown into one 
of the great insurance agencies of the west. ]\Ir. Blossom acts as representative 
of manv foreign as well as domestic companies. He had formed a wide 
acquaintance during his connection with steamboat interests and his unfailing 
courtesy, his intelligence and geniality had made him very popular and gained 
him manv friends who extended their patronage to him after he entered the 
field of insurance. 

Following his location in St. Louis, Air. Blossom soon became recognized 
as a representative business man and citizen, not alone because of his position 
and influence in insurance circles, but also by reason of his active and helpful 
cooperation in many movements of direct benefit to the city in other ways. 
He is a member of the St. Louis and Mercantile Clubs and is one of the original 
members of the Noonday Club. 

]\lr. Blosiom had been a resident of the west for only a brief period when 
he returned to his old home in New York and was married there to Miss Susan 
H. Brigham, with whom he had been acquainted from his childhood. Her 
father was Salmon Brigham, a well known leather manufacturer and a man 
of prominence. To them were born three sons and two daughters. The eldest 
of the sons, Edmund Dwight, is associated with his father in business. The 
second son, Russell, died six months after his mother's death, in August, 1896. 
The third son, Henry M. Blossom, Jr., is now a resident of New York and is 
known throughout the country as an author, librettist and playwright. Promi- 
nent among his productions is the well known play Checkers, dramatized by 
him from his widely read story of that title. He is also the author of the Yan- 
kee Consul, in which the actor Raymond Hitchcock starred ; Mile. Modiste and 
The Prima Donna, written for Fritzi Scheff ; and the Red Mill, written for the 
comedians, ^Montgomery and Stone, all of these productions having had almost 
phenomenal success. Henry M. Blossom, Jr., is a young man of ability and 
talent, with a clear perception of enlightened public taste and of the best dramatic 
and operatic forms. 

Henry M. Blossom, of St. Louis, became a member of the . Presbyterian 
church soon after locating here and has taken a great interest in all branches 
of church work, being an elder of this church for more than twenty-five years 
and for forty years a member of the board of trustees and the directing genius 
of the choir. He has always given his influence to those interests which pro- 
mote culture ir; lines of art, which work for the' christianizing of the race and 
whicli recoo-nize the common brotherhood of man. 



Samuel m. lederer. 

Prominent among the men to whom the city of St. Louis is indebted for 
the erection of many of its most imposing structures is Samuel M. Lederer, who 
has been president of the Pickel Stone Company for the past sixteen years. The 
offices and yards of the company are located at No. 1320 Old Manchester road. 
Mr. Lederer commenced his career with the advantages of an excellent education. 
This, however, while hclfjful to him in some measure, was not alone that to which 
was attributable the success with which his efiforts have been crowned. He 
possessed practical ability as well as theoretical energy and by thoughtful and 
provident transactions was able to make the world his servant to the extent of 
afi^ording him as comjK-nsation for his energetic application a prosperous career. 
Throughfiut his life he has been noted for his aggressive spirit. Ambition has 
aKvavs characterized jiim and from liis youth he has labored with firm resolu- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 95 

tion and devotion to business to become independent and useful in the commer- 
cial world. 

Air. Lederer was born in New York city, September 28, 1853, and is the son 
of Samuel and ]\lary Lederer. His fatlier was a native of Austria, where he 
received a liberal education in the common schools. Upon completing his studies 
he entered a tannery as an apprentice and, having remained at this occupation 
sufficient time to familiarize himself with the business, he launched out in the 
enterprise for himself. After having accumulated considerable means he came 
to America in 1844, and pursued the same enterprise in New Brunswick, New 
Jersey, where he still continues an active life, managing the afifairs of an exten- 
sive business at the advanced age of eighty-five years. 

His preliminary education Samuel 1\I. Lederer obtained in private schools of 
New York city, where he remained until he had attained the age of fourteen 
years. He then attended the College of the City of New York, where he was a 
student for four years. After pursuing the study of law for a period of two 
years he engaged in a mercantile business in New York city. This he had fol- 
lowed for three years and then he came to St. Louis county. He had been in the 
latter place but a short time when he became interested in a stone quarry in Mer- 
rimac Highlands and for four years he employed quite a number of men in work- 
ing it, greatly to his advantage from a pecuniary standpoint. In the meantime 
he purchased an interest in the Pickel Stone Company, one of the largest con- 
cerns of the kind in the vicinity, and of this concern he became president in the 
year 1892. During his career he has been very successful and has succeeded in 
adding greatly to the proportions of his business. Among the valuable proper- 
ties of which Mr. Lederer is the owner is the Washington Hotel, which he con- 
structed himself, and other important buildings in the city v/hich he erected are 
the \A^ashington L^niversity buildings, the Manual Training School, Smith Acad- 
emy, the Rialto building, new Brown Shoe Company building, the Silk Exchange. 
Mary Institute building, new city hall, all of the Carnegie libraries, the new Coli- 
seum, St. Francis de Sales Catholic church, entrance to Monticello Seminary at 
Godfrey, Illinois, the Graham Paper Companv buildings, a part of the Anheuser- 
Busch plant, the Lister building and the Dulanv Realty building. 

Mr. Lederer has also constructed a number of private residences, among 
which are those ow-ned by Dr. Tuholske, W. C. G. Luyties, Oscar Johnson, Theo- 
dore Hemmelmann, Samuel Kennard, G. W. Brown. J. H. Allen and Dr. Nichol's 
church. Air. Lederer is one of the most prominent men in the building industry 
in St. Louis. 

On January 2, 1884, Air. Lederer was united in marriage, in New York city, 
to Miss Augusta Bodenheimer. They have four children : Airs. Jeanette Hirsch- 
berg, of New York city; Lucile, a junior at Washington LTniversity ; Alarie, a 
junior at Central high school ; and James, wdio is attending the Alanual Training 
School, with the view of becoming a civil engineer. James, although but sixteen 
years of age, is manager of the school paper known as The Voice. The family 
reside at No. 3412 Washington avenue, where they have a beautiful home. Air. 
Lc l:rer has under construction at present an elegant residence on Lindell Ter- 
race, opposite Forest park, which he intends to occupy upon its completion. 



CHARLES ERNEST SWINGLEY. 

The year which chronicled the. proclamation of American independence also 
witnessed the arrival in America of the progenitor of the Locher family, from 
whom Charles E. Swingley is descended in the maternal line, although his ances- 
try is traced back to a much more remote period than the year 1 776. His par- 
ents were George and Anna Elizabeth (Locher) Swingley. His father was a 
descendant of Ulrich Zwingli, a distinguished Swiss nobleman and reformer, who 



96 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

was born in 1484 at W'ildhaus, St. Gall, Switzerland, and lost his life in the bat- 
tle of Kappel, October 11, 1531. The Locher family is also of Swiss lineage, 
descended from Jacob Philip Locher, a statesman of Switzerland, who was largely- 
instrumental in including the city of Zurich in the Rhenish alliance, a federa- 
tion of German-Swiss cities. Francis Antoine Locher, a membei of the family 
in the eighteenth century, settled in Bohemia, where he became the imperial san- 
itary otKcial. He was the grandfather of Flenry Locher, who in 1776 became 
the founder of the family in America, establishing his home in Washington 
countv, ^Maryland, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits and is accredited 
with having been the first farmer to cultivate red clover in this country. 

George and Anna Elizabeth (Locher) Swingley were residents of Ogle 
county, Illinois, at the time of the birth of their son, Charles E., on the 4th of 
January, 1849. -^^ the usual age he began his education as a district school stu- 
dent and subsequently continued his studies in the public schools of Mount Mor- 
ris, Illinois. He accompanied his parents on their removal in .1858 to Olathe, 
Kansas, the entire distance of six hundred and ninety miles being traveled by 
Avagon. Charles E. Swingley was but nine years of age at the time of the trip 
to the west. Three years later he returned to St. Louis, where he spent some time 
in school and on putting aside his text-books, he entered business life as a brick- 
layer. That trade claimed his time and energies until 1869, when he became con- 
nected with the city fire department and for almost forty years he has been asso- 
ciated with this branch of the municipal service. His valor, loyalty and coolness 
in critical times won him gradual promotion, and since 1895 he has occupied the 
prominent position of fire chief of St. Louis. He has made an untarnished record 
as one who has recognized and fulfilled every duty. He has labored also for the 
advancement of the department in lines of efficiency and modern progress, and 
today the well organized fire protection system of St. Louis is to the city a mat- 
ter of just pride. His salient characteristics are not unlike those of his Swiss 
ancestry, for the same spirit of loyalty which L^lrich Zwingli manifested in 
defense of his principles in the fifteenth century has found exemplification in the 
faithful service of Charles Ernest Swingley in the connections of his business 
career, which have demanded the utmost personal bravery as well as fidelity. 

In 1869 Air. Swingley was married to Miss Eliza Charlton, a daughter of 
Edward and Harriet Charlton who, coming to this country from England, set- 
tled in St. Louis in 185 1. The three sons of Air. Swingley, Charles Willoughby, 
Edward Charlton and Benjamin Ernest, are all yet living. In religious faith a 
Alethodist, Air. Swingley's membership relations also include the St. Louis Coni- 
mandery of Knights Templar, the Knights of Pythias and the American Legion 
of Honor. He is a stalwart republican, but takes no active part in politics, feel- 
ing that it would be inconsistent with his duties as chief of the fire department. 



CHARLES ALEXANDER ASTLEY EKSTROAIER. 

Charles Alexander Astley Ekstromer, deceased, who was vice consul of 
Sweden, and a leader in business, social and political circles in St. Louis, was 
born at Ballarat, Australia. January 28, 1857. His grandfather, Dr. Carl John 
I'.kstromer, was Sweden's foremost surgeon. His name was originally Ekstrom, 
but in 1836, when he was created a member of the nobility, the patent of nobil- 
ity was issued under the name of Ekstromer. Fie stood without a peer in sur- 
gical work in his native country and was a contemporary of Sir Astley Cooper, 
the great English surgeon. John Melcher, an uncle of Charles A. A. Ekstromer, 
was a member of the upper house of Sweden. Erik Christopher Ekstromer, 
father of Charles A. A. I':kstrr)mer, came to America in 1870, settling at St. Paul, 
Minnesota, where he rcjjrcsented the St. Louis Mutual Life Insurance Company 
until he returned to Sweden in 1873. Lie again came to America in 1884 and 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 97 

settled in Chicago, where he engaged in business until his death in 1891, at which 
time his son Charles became a nobleman at the head of the family of Ekstromer. 
The mother, who bore the maiden name of Emily Melville, was a native of Scot- 
land and died in Australia. The family numbered twelve children, of whom nine 
are living, only one being an own sister of our subject, however, while the others 
are children of the father's second marriage. 

When six years of age Charles A. A. Ekstromer was taken to Stockholm, 
Sweden, and acquired his early education in the public schools there. Brought 
to America by his father when thirteen years of age, he attended the public 
schools of St. Paul, Minnesota, and afterward engaged in the insurance business 
in that city, as a clerk in the employ of S. S. Eaton, with whom he remained until 
1875. In that year he removed to Dallas, where he engaged in the insurance 
business with John D. Kerfoot. who was also mayor of Dallas at that time. In 
1877 Mr. Ekstromer became a resident of Chicago, where he continued in the 
real-estate business with Robert W. Dunstan until 1880, when he started upon an 
independent venture, continuing as a real-estate agent of Chicago until 1890. In 
that year he went to New York city, where he did newspaper work until 1894, 
after which he was connected with newspaper interests in Washington, D. C, 
until Januarv, 1896 — the date of his arrival in St. Louis. Here he continued in 
newspaper work until 1898. when he became manager of the West Disinfectant 
Company, which office he tilled until his death. This was a small concern at the 
time he assumed control, but through his efforts the business has become one of 
the leading enterprises of this kind in the United States. 

After his arrival in St. Louis Mr. Ekstromer was very successful and prom- 
inent. By his interest in the city he took an active part in furthering its affairs. 
In 1899 l^e became a member of the St. Louis Manufacturers Association, and at 
the time of his death was a member of tne executive council of that organiza- 
tion. In 1898 he joined the St. Louis Railway Club, and was one of its execu- 
tive committee. In 1902 he became a member of the Business Men's League and 
was active in its work, while for many years he was a valued member of the 
Apollo and Amphion Clubs, and also a member of the Missouri Athletic Club 
almost from its organization. He attained further prominence in connection with 
the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, being appointed chairman of the committee 
which arranged for the celebration of Swedish Dav, the first foreign dav cele- 
brated here. He was instrumental in brmging to America as one of the attrac- 
tive features for that day the chorus from the L^niversity of Lund, Sweden, 
which afterward made a tour of the United States, visiting the principal Swedish 
centers of the country and creating unbounded enthusiasm wherever they went. 
Mr. Ekstromer was a prominent member of the Swedish American Society, of 
Stockholm ; the Tourists' Society of Sweden ; the Swedish American Historical 
Society of Chicago ; and the Swedish Chamber of Commerce of New York city, 
while in April, 1906, he was appointed vice consul for Sweden. By reason of his 
zealous interest in the welfare of St. Louis, in 1907 he was relieved of his appoint- 
ment as vice consul but was reappointed a few days later. Just before giving up 
his portfolio Mr. Cortelvou revoked the right of the Lewis Publishing Company 
to mail the Womans ]\Iagazine as second-class matter, thus prostrating a St. 
Louis enterprise of great magnitude. A meeting of the executive council of the 
St. Louis Manufacturers Association, of which Mr. Ekstromer was a member, 
resulted in his appointment to call together the civic organizations of the City to 
take action in the matter. Seventeen of these bodies jointly drew up resolutions, 
and appointed a committee, with ]Mr. Ekstromer as chairman, to present the 
resolutions to President Roosevelt. He was not received, however, and an inter- 
national controversv was the result of his connection with the affair and he was 
relieved of his appointment but a few days later upon the recommendation of the 
secretary of state and of the Swedish consul he was reappointed — an act which 
has no precedent in the annals of Sweden. In politics he was a stalwart repub- 
lican after becoming a citizen of the United States in 1898, and in the interven- 



98 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

ing years took an active interest in local politics. He served as judge of elections 
alniost continuously during this period of more than a decade but never sought 
or held any political positions other than his consular service. 

Mr. Ekstromer was married twice. In Chicago, on the 15th of May. 1882, 
he wedded Miss Katryn Granville Dunstan. a daughter of Robert W. Dunstan, 
a real-estate man of that city. Thev had one child. Emily Melville, born in 
Xovember. 1883. On the 3d of August, 1898, in St. Louis, Mr. Ekstromer 
wedded Ella ^lary ^latlack, of this city. His death occurred December 7, 1908. 
He was an Episcopalian in religious faith and was vestryman in the Church of 
the Redeemer for several years. He possessed a dignified manner, combined with 
unfailing courtesy. His ability and executive force were manifest not only in his 
business career but also in the fact that he was called to various official positions 
in manv of the organizations with v.hich he was connected and which regarded 
him as a valued member. 



FERDIXAXD C. SCHWEDTMAX. 

Ferdinand C. Schwedtman, inventor, consulting engineer; president of the 
Louisiana Contracting Company ; member of the American Institute of Electri- 
cal Engineers, of the Machinery Club of Xew York and of the Engineers, Mer- 
cantile and Oasis Clubs of St. Louis; secretary of the Xational Council for 
Industrial Defense ; secretary of the St. Louis Citizens' Industrial Association ; 
and secretary to the president of the Xational Association of Manitfacturers, is 
a prominent figure in the business and the civic life of St. Louis and of the 
whole region of which St. Louis is the industrial and the social center. 

Born in Hanover, Germany, Alay 13, 1865. his father being William 
Schwedtman, a mining engineer, and his mother Bertha Van der Wald, ^Ir. 
Schwedtman received a high-school education in that city and in Amsterdam, 
and came to the United States in 1881. Studying electrical and mechanical 
engineering in X^ew York, he followed his profession in Central and South 
America, in the western and southwestern parts of the L'nited States, and in 
Xew York city, chieflv in railway and water works construction, and removed 
to St. Louis in 1889, to take charge, as chief engineer, of the construction and 
operation of the Missouri Electric Light and Power Company. Resigning from 
that position in 1900, he became one of the organizers and the active head of 
the Wagner Electric ^vlanufacturing Company, but retired from its general 
management in 1904, the articles manufactured by that company up to today. 
however, being almost exclusively those covered bv his patents. In 1904 he 
■ started the Louisiana Contracting Company, manufacturers of patented special- 
ties, of which he is president, and at the same time established a practice as a 
consulting engineer. In 1904 he married Cora Gehner, daughter of Henry 
Gehner, of St. Louis. 

Recognizing, as a citizen and a business man, the importance of establishing 
and maintaining amicable relations between all elements of the community, Mr. 
Schwedtman for years, as president of the St. Louis ]\Ietal Trades Association 
and of the .St. Louis Founders' Association, framed trade agreements annually 
with the molders, machinists, brass workers, patternmakers and other labor 
unions, covering practicallv every shop in St. Louis and vicinity. When these 
agreements became impossible he aided in establishing a St. Louis branch of the 
Xational Civic Federation. This was in 1903. When this failed to do effective 
work he became active in organizing tlie St. Louis branch of the Citizens' Indus- 
trial Association of America, and of pojjularizing its methods and of broadening 
the field of its operations. 

Through his work as secretary of the Citizens' Industrial Association Mr. 
Schwedtman has had a prominent part in making it the largest, the most influ- 




F. C. SCHWEDTMAN. 



100 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

ential and the most effective of all the branches of this powerful order in the 
United States. A believer in conciliation, so far as this is practicable without 
the surrender of principle, and an ardent lover of peace when peace can be hon- 
orably obtained and maintained, he has, in this field, continued on a larger 
scale the work which he performed as head of the Metal Trades Association 
and of the Founders' Association in bringing employers and employes into 
agreement, on terms equitable to both sides. The fact that there has been no 
serious strike in St. Louis or vicinity in the past five years is due, in a large 
degree, to the concrete application of the doctrine of the square deal in the 
relations between the men who do the work and the men who pay for it. 

As secretary of the National Council for Industrial Defense ever since its 
organization in 1907, and as secretary to the president of the National Associa- 
tion of ^Manufacturers since early in 1906, Mr. Schwedtman's activities in the 
business field extend all over the country. The National Association of Manu- 
facturers has members from every state and territory. The National Council 
for Industrial Defense consists of one hundred and fifty-five national, state and 
local organizations of business men and good citizens, extending all over the 
country, the object of which is to guard the concerns of employers of all sorts, 
and thus to promote the real interests of workers in every field, especially in 
national and state legislation. He has a larger acquaintance with men at the 
head of great enterprises than has almost any other person in the United 
States. 

A successful business man and an earnest student of the political, social and 
economic conditions of the United States and of the leading old world nations, 
]\Ir. Schwedtman has made many trips to Europe to investigate the social and 
industrial situation at the imoortant centers in England, France, Germany. Aus- 
tria and other countries. Endowed with a many-sided mental equipment, 
Mr. Schwedtman has also the imagination which gives him the large view of 
large affairs, combined with an energy and an enthusiasm which make him a 
tireless and an effective worker in the manv fields of endeavor which he covers. 



W. H. GRUEN. 



W. H. Gruen, an architect of St. Louis, his native city, was born November 
13, 1876. His father, Jacob Gruen, a wine merchant, has been in business in 
St. Louis since i860. His mother, Mrs. Sophia (Sommers) Gruen, was born in 
Rock Island, Illinois. 

W. H. Gruen is indebted to the public-school system of St. Louis for his 
early educational privileges and he was graduated from the manual training 
department of the Washington University and also spent two years as a stu- 
dent in the Engineering School of the University. Subsequently he went abroad 
and studied architecture in European centers for two years. His observation 
of the fine old cathedrals, churches, business structures and residences, as well 
as those of modern construction, brought to him a wide knowledge of archi- 
tecture as preserved in the best forms in European centers, and added to this was 
a thorough technical training which well qualified him for the profession when 
in 1898 he returned to America and took charge of the offices of W. Albert 
Swasey. He occupied that position for two years, during which time he super- 
vised the construction of the Odeun and Masonic Temple building of St. Louis. 
He then had charge of the work for the water department of St. Louis and the 
New City Hospital of St. Louis for two years. 

Since 1901 Mr. Gruen has engaged in business on his own account and that 
he is winning most gratifying success for a young man is indicated in the fact 
that he made the plans and superintended the construction of the Church of the 
Redeemer ; the residence of John T. Millikin and the water tower, stables, etc.. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 101 

on his place at Crescent, Missouri ; and the building occupied as a factory and 
warehouse by the Moser Box Company. He had charge of a part of the work 
at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, including the special German exhibit in 
the Varied Industries building, town hall, village church and village buildings at 
the Tyrolean Alps. Some of the residences erected by Mr. Gruen are especially 
noted for their exterior beauty as well as interior adornment, including the Herold 
residence in Flora Court, the Hadley residence on Longfellow boulevard in 
Compton Heights, the Conrad residence in Webster Park, the Antrim residence 
in Kingsbury Place, and his own home on Russell avenue just east of Grand. 
He built the garage for the South Side Automobile Company on South Grand 
avenue and has just been awarded the contract for a large club house, natatorium 
and concert hall to be built on the southeast corner of Grand and Juanita avenues. 

On the 19th of July, 1900, Mr. Gruen was married to Miss Minnie M. Geb- 
hard, a daughter of Herman C. Gebhard, the vice president of the J. J. Schlange 
Leaf Tobacco Company, who for many years has been identified with the leaf 
tobacco business in St. Louis. 

Mr. Gruen is a member of the St. Louis chapter of the American Institute 
of Architects, is on the Municipal Arts Committee of the Civic League of St. 
Louis, a member of the Architectural Club, the Artists' Guild, the Liederkranz 
Club and the Tower Grove Turn Verein. He has also for some years been 
instructor of the night classes in the St. Louis Museum of Fine Arts, and this 
with his other public spirited works indicate the nature of his interests and asso- 
ciations. He is also a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church. His busi- 
ness record is a most creditable one, few men of his years having attained a place 
of such prominence and success in architectural lines as has been accorded Mr. 
Gruen in recognition of his abilitv. 



HERBERT DOUGLAS CONDIE. 

Herbert Douglas Condie, president of the Condie-Neale Glass Company, 
was born June 17, 1873, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His parents, Thomas 
Douglas and Mary Clara (Husted) Condie, were representatives of old Phila- 
delphia families and both were natives of that city. The father was a chemist 
there and they remained residents of Philadelphia until 1887, when business 
interests caused their removal to St. Louis. Here the mother died soon afterward. 

Thomas Douglas Condie is a descendant of the Gray family of Scotland 
and the Holmes family of England. He has in his possession a genealogical 
booklet brought from Scotland" in the middle of the eighteenth century. The 
familv had lived for generations at Kirkcaldy and practically all of the name 
through a long period were buried in Kirkcaldy churchyard. The Condie family 
intermarried with the Douglas family. On the mother's side H. D. Condie is 
related to the Hallowell family of Philadelphia and to other well known colonial 
and Quaker families. A granduncle of our subject in the paternal line was the 
first bov editor in the United States, publishing a paper at Philadelphia from 1808 
until 1812. The grandfather, Dr. .David Francis Condie, was one of the most 
eminent physicians and surgeons of his time and the author of a number of valu- 
able works, principally on diseases of children. These volumes were used as text- 
books in medical colleges of this country and abroad for more than a half century. 

Herbert D. Condie was educated "in the Park grammar school of Philadel- 
phia, the Central high school of St. Louis and the Missouri Medical CoUege, 
from which he was graduated in 1891 on the completion of a special private 
course in chemistry under Dr. Curtman. His early youth was passed amid 
Quaker influences, leading to conservatism and a reserved and quiet life. Upon 
tTie removal of the family to the west he was impressed with the spirit of push 
and progress then manifest in St. Louis and this combined with the influences of 



102 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

his earlv life made a combination which has served him well in later years. While 
becoming thoroughly imbued with the progressiveness which has led to the rapid 
upbuilding of the city, his tendency toward advancement has been guided by the 
mature retiection and deliberation which were fostered under his early training. 
After his course in the medical college he entered the employ of the F. A. Drew 
Glass Companv at St. Louis in October. 1891. Working his way upward through ' 
every position in the ot^ce until it sold out to the Pittsburg Plate Glass Com- 
panv. He removed to Alihvaukee to become assistant manager in that city for 
the company that was succeeding to the business. He afterward went to Pitts- 
burg on the opening of the company's branch in that city and was manager of its 
glass department for two years, or until organizing in St. Louis the Condie-Neale 
Glass Company in connection with H. G. Neale, in February, 1903. Of this com- 
panv Air. Condie has since been the president. His previous broad and practical 
experience, his knowledge of chemistry and his aptitude for successful manage- 
ment have all been factors in the attainment of that prosperity which the com- 
pany is now enjoying from the outside. 

On the 3d of November, 1897, Mr. Condie was married to ]^Iiss Sallie Case 
King, of Chicago, a descendant of the first inhabitants of that city. Their four 
children, two sons and two daughters are Douglas King, Bertha Botsford. Mar- 
garet Hallowell and Herbert Douglas Condie. 

The family residence is at Ferguson, Missouri, and the characteristics of 
music and poetry add to the charms of the household, where Mr. Condie's inter- 
ests center although he finds pleasure in the study of history, in travel, in chess 
and golf and other sports and manly interests. He served as a member of the 
St. Louis Light Artillery — Battery A — from 1893 until 1896 and is a member of 
the St. Louis ]Museum of Fine Arts and also of the Business Men's League. He 
rilled the office of city treasurer of Ferguson in 1900 and was a candidate for 
mayor on the citizens ticket in 1905. He belongs to Ferguson Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M. ; Missouri Consistory, No. i. A. A. S. R., with which he became identified 
in 1903 ; while in the same year he crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles 
of ]\Ioolah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise a member of the Penn- 
sylvania Society of St. Louis and of the St. Louis and Noondav Clubs. A com- 
municant of the Episcopal church, he has been secretary of the vestry of St. 
Stephen's church at Ferguson from 1897 to the present time. Following closelv 
the course that he has marked out for himself, he has won success in business 
without infringement upon the rights of others, has stood for purity and progress 
in municipal affairs and is an advocate of those social, artistic and moral inter- 
ests which promote, satisfv and uplift mankind. 



SAMUEL TAUSSIG. 



Samuel Taussig has for four years been connected with the St. Louis Leaf 
Tobacco Company. Like many of the residents of this city, he is of foreign 
birth but like the great majority of those who have come from across the water, 
he is most loyal to the interests of his adopted city and of the American nation 
at large. He was born in Bohemia, Austria, in December, 1854, a son of Laz- 
arus and Eleanor Taussig, his father being president of the congregation for 
many years. There are many Taussigs in America who come from the same 
ancestry, for the family has existed in Bohemia for hundreds of years. Lazarus 
Taussig there carried on the leather business throughout his entire life. 

In the acf|uircment of an education Samuel Taussig attended school in Hos- 
toun to his thirteenth year and then went to Prague, where he remained from 
1868 until 1886. In that city he engaged in the notion business, beginning as an 
apprentice but working his way steadily upward through successive promotions 
to the position of managing salesman. He believed that business advancement. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 103 

however, was slow there in comparison with the opportunities afforded in the 
new world and accordingly he came to the United States, making his way from 
New York to Chicago, where he remained until 1893. In that city he began learn- 
ing the leaf tobacco business under the direction of his brother, William Taus- 
sig, who was controlling an enterprise of that character there and still continues 
in business in the western metro]:)olis. Samuel Taussig remained with him as a 
salesman for a time and then went to [Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he began 
business on his own account, conducting the trade from 1894 until 1904. He 
engaged in the wholesale tobacco leaf business but in the latter year sold out 
and came to St. Louis, where he organized the St. Louis Leaf Tobacco Company, 
conducting his business for two years at Xo. in Market street, while for the past 
two years he has been at his present location at Xo. 221 Market street. He has 
succeeded well since his removal to this city, meeting with no financial reverses 
but gradually developing a trade that makes his a profitable concern. 

Mr. Taussig was married in Bohemia in February, 1885, to Miss Flora 
Bondy, a representative of an old and well known familv of Raudnitz, Bohemia. 
They have become the parents of four children : Irma. twenty-one years of age, 
who attended public and private schools and has been liberally educated in music. 
possessing a splendid soprano voice ; Blanche, sixteen years of age, who is now 
in school ; Frances and Lester, aged respectively thirteen and eight vears. The 
family home is a beautiful residence at Xo. 4027 McPherson avenue. JMr. Taus- 
sig belongs to the Order of the Oriental Lodge of B'nai B'rith. He adheres to the 
religious faith of the Israelite race and is patriotic in his devotion to his adopted 
country. While he usually votes with the republican party, he does not consider 
himself bound by party ties and freciuently casts an independent ballot. 



THOMAS H. ^IcKITTRICK. 

Honored and respected by all, the position which Thomas H. ^IcKittrick 
holds in commercial and business circles is a most enviable one, nor has this 
prominence been accorded him merely in recognition of his success but also as 
the tribute to the straightforward business methods which he has ever followed. 
He is today the president of the Hargadine-McKittrick Dry Goods Company 
and is also connected with various other corporate interests which have sought 
his cooperation that they might enjoy the benefits of his wise counsel and keen 
business discrimination. 

A life-long resident of St. Louis, ^Ir. McKittrick was born April 17. i8(>4. 
a son of Hugh McKittrick, who came to the United States from Ireland in 1849 
and entered the wholesale dry-goods house of Crow, McCreerv & Barksdale of 
St. Louis. That house was founded in 1835 under the style of Crow & Tevis 
and the Hargadine-McKittrick Dry Goods Companv is its successor. For seventy- 
three years it has had a continuous existence, being today the oldest mercantile 
enterprise with unbroken history in this city and throughout the years the repu- 
tation of the house has been unassailable. In 1856 Hugh McKittrick became a 
partner, when Mr. Barksdale withdrew from the business, the firm style of 
Crow, McCreery & Companv beine then assumed. Twenty years later the st\le 
of the firm was changed to Crow, Hargadine &: Compau}' and following the death 
of Mr. Crow in 1886 it became Hargadine, McKittrick & Company. In 1889 
the business was incorporated under its present name — the Hargadine-McKit- 
trick Dry Goods Companv, with Hugh McKittrick as president. 

Thomas H. McKittrick, the present head of the house, was reared in St. 
Louis, and educated at Washington L^niversity, from which institution he wa^; 
graduated in 1883. About six months later he entered the Hargadine-McKittrick 
Dry Goods house and in 1886 was admitted to a partnership. When he became 
connected with the store he made it his purpose to thoroughly familiarize him- 



104 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrY. 

self with the business in principle and detail and soon passed on to positions of 
executive control. Year by year the responsibilities devolving upon him 
increased and in 1895 he was chosen to the presidency of the company, since 
which time he has bent his energies to organization, to constructive efforts and 
to administrative direction. Under his management the growth of the house 
in its various departments has been rapid and steady, the business having more 
than doubled. This is today the pioneer mercantile establishment of St. Louis 
and the leading concern of its class in the west. He is preeminently a man of 
affairs and one who has wielded a wide influence not only in the house of which 
he is now the head but also in various other business connections, which have 
felt the stimulus of his cooperation and keen business discernment. His name 
is on the directorate of the National Bank of Commerce, the St. Louis Union 
Trust Company, the American Central Insurance Company, the Fourth National 
Bank of New York and the Broadway Savings Trust Company of St. Louis, 
and for fifteen years he was president of the Merchants Transportation Associa- 
tion. In the management of business interests he has looked beyond the exi- 
gencies of the moment to the possibilities of the future and drawing character 
lessons from the past has successfully solved the problems that day by day con- 
front the man of large business interests. The greatest respect is entertained 
for his business discernment and without invidious distinction he may be termed 
one of the foremost residents of St. Louis. 

On the 9th of Alay, 1888, Mr. ]\IcKittrick was married to Miss Hildegarde 
Sterling, a daughter of E. C. Sterling, long prominent in business circles in St. 
Louis. They now have two sons and one daughter. They reside at 4949 Bur- 
nett avenue and have a summer home at Dublin, New Hampshire. 

'Sir. ]\IcKittrick is identified with several social organizations, including the 
Noonday, the St. Louis, the Commercial, the Racquet, the Florissant Valley, the 
Country and the University Clubs. His interest in his city and its welfare has 
been manifest in many tangible ways and in none more actively and eft'ectively 
than as a director of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company, He served 
as vice chairman of its committee on ways and means and as a member of its 
committee on fine arts and entertainment, and the success of the exposition, the 
largest ever held on the American continent, was attributable in no small degree 
to his eft'orts. 



CHARLES F. ORTHWEIN. 

The building of cities begins with the work of a few men who lay the 
foundations, but the superstructure comes as the result, as the marked enter- 
prise and business ability of those who recognize in the complexity of interests 
the opportunity for the establishment and successful control of mammoth under- 
takings. It was because of his powers in this direction that Charles F. Orth- 
wein became one of the most conspicuous figures in the grain trade of the 
southwest, his interests making of St. Louis one of the important grain centers 
of the entire country. Born in Stuttgart, Wurtemberg, Germany, January 28, 
1839. his life record covered the intervening years to the 28th of December, 
1898 — years fraught with large accomplishment and important successes. His 
mother died when he was very young and he was reared and educated under the 
guidance of his father, a man of sterling worth, who taught his children the 
principles of Christian morality. The boy received his literary instruction in 
the best state schools of southern Germany and in 1854 came with his father, 
brothers and sisters to the new world. From Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, they 
made their way by the river route to St. Louis and after a brief period here 
passed removed to Logan county, Illinois, where they established their home. 

While living there Mr. Orthwcin became acquainted with Abraham Lincoln, 
who appeared frcf|uently in the courts of that county and at different times 




CHARLES F. ORTHWEIN 



106 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

gave advice to the voung man in a fatherly way — advice which was of great 
vakie to him as he started out in Hfe for himself. He became somewhat 
acquainted w-ith mercantile methods in a country store in Illinois, but his ambi- 
tion prompted him to seek broader scope for his labor and at the end of a year 
and a half he came to St. Louis, where he entered the employ of Edd Eggers 
& Companv. wholesale grocers and commission men, tmder wdiose direction he 
obtained his practical commercial schooling. About the time of the outbreak 
of the Civil war ^Ir. Eggers, then at the head of the house, died and the business 
was closed out. 

^Mr. Orthwein was accordmgly thrown out of employment, but although 
his means were limited he resolved to use this opportunity to make a start in 
the business w'orld on his own account. Accordingly he formed a partnership 
with Gustave Haenschen, who had also been in the employ of Edd Eggers & 
Companv, under the firm style of Haenschen & Orthwein, and they began opera- 
tions as grain and commission merchants. The outlook was not an extremely 
brilliant one because of the war which was greatly affecting southern trade. 
They, how^ever. looked to the west and northwest for business and started out 
to turn the tide of trade from those sections of the country to St. Louis. With 
many obstacles and difficulties to overcome, they persevered until they brought 
to this city much of the growing grain trade of the upper Mississippi country 
and the northwest, thus rendering to the city a service of inestimable value, at 
the same time advancing their individual interests. With keen business insight 
Air. Orthwein looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the possibilities 
of the future. \\'hen the steamboat men hesitated to assume the risk of carry- 
ing such cargoes ]\Ir. Orthwein at his ow"n risk dispatched towboats and barges 
to the upper Mississippi country and brought grain to St. Louis from the coun- 
try which had before shipped to Chicago and Milwaukee. He w^as one of those 
who saw the need of carrying grain to sea by way of New Orleans in bulk, on 
account of the limited railroad service, and greatly facilitated that industry. 
The question was one of great breadth and scope. It was not only necessary 
to make the purchase of grain and transport the product to and from St. Louis, 
but it also involved the question of the waterways, and Mr. Orthwein agitated 
the subject and was largely instrumental in securing the construction of the 
Eads jetties. He also built elevators and developed the business w'hich since 
1878 has given to St. Louis an annual export grain trade of from twelve to 
fifteen million bushels by way of the jetties route, seventy-five to eighty per 
cent of W'hich was shipped by ]\lr. Orthwein and his partners. Throughout 
the entire period of his residence in St. Louis he was connected with the grain 
trade and his operations not onlv equaled those of the most prominent grain 
merchants of this city, but were largely a factor in shaping the grain trade of 
the southwest. Different changes occurred in the firm, as indicated by the 
names, Haenschen & Orthwein, Orthwein & Mersmann, Orthwein Brothers, and 
Charles F. Orthwein & Sons. Constantly studying methods and means for the 
promotion of the business and its gradual extension Mr. Orthwein established 
branch houses in Kansas City, in order to make shipments from Nebraska and 
Kansas direct to New Orleans and thus save time, the Kansas Citv business 
being in charge of his son. He also established extensive connections in Europe. 
He was a potent factor in the promotion of the American corn trade abroad 
and during the short season of two or three months in each year exported over 
twelve million bushels of this grain. While the grain trade claimed his time 
and energies he became financially interested in other enterprises and was a 
director of various banks. He was also at one time the president of the Mer- 
chants' Exchange and held rither offices in that organization, the object of 
which was to further the trade relations of the city. 

On October 29, t866, Mr. Orthwein was married to Miss Caroline Nulsen, 
a daughter of John Clemens Nulsen, a prominent merchant of St. Louis. Her 
mother was a flaughter of Captain Creuzbauer and Baroness Von Homig, of 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CFfY. 107 

southern Germany. Mr. Xulsen arrived in St. Louis when sixteen years of age 
and Mrs. Nulsen when a httle maiden of eight summers. His death occurred 
in St. Louis about two years ago, when he had reached the advanced age of 
eighty-three years. Unto Air. and Mrs. Orthwein were born eight children : 
Wilham J., who is now in Switzerland; Charles C, living in Kansas City; 
Ottilia C, the wife of F. C. Everetts ; Max R., of St. Louis; Fannie E., now 
Mrs. Dr. W. S. T. Smith, of Kansas City; Ralph H., of St. Louis; Armin F.,. 
of Louisiana; and Ruth H., the wife of Arthur F. Ferurbacher. There were 
also twelve grandchildren. 

Mr. Orthwein was a man of broad business views and liberal culture who 
kept in touch with the advanced thought of the day and with those movements 
which recognize the responsibilities of wealth and man's obligations to his 
fellowmen. His splendid success resulted entirely from his own efforts and was 
the visible evidence of his superior business ability and enterprise. As he pros- 
pered he gave liberally to charities and benevolent institutions, doing much good 
with his w^ealth. Aside from his gifts of specific sums to different organizations 
he did much for St. Louis through his business relations and the city acknowl- 
edges her indebtedness to him, for she was an indirect beneficiary in all of his 
mammoth business transactions. 



ORMLLE PRESCOTT BLAKE. 

Orville Prescott Blake, sales manager for the Inland Steel Company, was 
born in St. Louis, December 19. 1870. His paternal grandfather, Simeon Blake, 
was an Ohioan and reared a family of eight children. Four sons entered the 
Union army, the number including Dr. Amasa Blake, who was surgeon under 
General Grant. Later he contracted yellow fever and died at Memphis, Tennes- 
see, during the progress of the war. Another of the brothers was Captain Elzy 
Blake, father of the subject of this sketch, who was general western agent for 
Van Antwerp, Bragg & Company, school-book publishers. He w^as born in Ohio 
and settled in St. Louis soon after the close of the Civil war, remaining a resident 
here until his death in 1882. His wife. Airs. Emma Blake, nee Pearson, was 
born in Maine, was married in Ohio and died in St. Louis in 1898. 

One who knew Elzy Blake long and well wrote of him : 'Tn all respects he 
was much more than an average man and in some directions he was a great man. 
He knew more of men than of books ; hence his life was more practical than 
theoretical. His accurate measure of men was the key to his successful business 
career. In the school-book contest for the patronage of a place he was, with- 
out question, the most formidable agent in the United States. He seldom failed 
in his purpose and when he did fail he could always trace his defeat to the treach- 
ery of some political influence. He was blessed with a full share of good sense, 
and success was the object of his life. He was earnest in all things, neutral in 
nothing. He was born to a life of hard labor, and labor was a love with him. 
It was his fate to work more for others than for himself. The accident of busi- 
ness position never fell in his wav. He was content in the field, actually sowing 
the seed from which a large future harvest will be reaped, while others of much 
less abilitv were promoted to places of greater influence and income. He was 
indeed a friendlv friend and a man absolutely incapable of doing any one a per- 
sonal wrong. There was nothing secret or puritanical in his composition. He 
was ready at all times to lend his name or money to assist a friend or even an 
acquaintance in need of help, thus exemplifying his faith and manhood in prac- 
tical confession. He was, without exception, the most accommodating man I ever 
knew. His religion was a religion of conduct — a sort of works without a creed — ■ 
for his worship was largelv unselfish devotion to his family and his friends. He 
was a noble husband and a tender father. If the heart is the measure of the man. 



108 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Elzv Blake holds a tirst place with all those who knew him thoroughly as I did. 
Hypocrisy formed no part in his character. His life is an emphatic illustration 
of the fact that the man who has the courage of his convictions and whose life 
is dotted with kind acts to his fellowman is respected and acknowledged, and 
those who knew him will join me in planting- a rose over his grave in sincere 
grief at his death just as he had entered the noonday of life." 

Orville P. Blake was a public-school student in Webster and Kirkwood 
between the years 1874 and 1882. The succeeding two years were passed in Glen- 
dale Academy, and from 1888 until 1892 he pursued a course in ^Marietta Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated with high honors, completing the classical 
course with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and securing the senior English lit- 
erature prize. He has always been extremely fond of outdoor sports and was 
captain and first baseman of the college ball team. He made his initial step in 
the business world in his fourteenth year as an employe in an office, and rose 
through successive promotions to the position of bookkeeper for the Goddard- 
Peck Grocery Company. He was connected with that house when he resigned 
to enter college in the autumn of 1888. Since graduation his time and energies 
have been devoted to three lines of business. From 1892 until 1898 he was with 
Kingman & Company, implement manufacturers, and in the latter year became 
chief clerk for the Evans Si Howard Fire Brick Compau}-, which position he occu- 
pied four years. From 1902 until 1906 he was assistant manager of sales for the 
American Sheet & Tin Plate Company, and in the latter year he became sales 
manager for the Inland Steel Company, which is his present business association. 
Each change has been prompted by a desire and an opportunity for furthering 
his business interests, the succeeding positions bringing him larger responsibil- 
ities and also a wider outlook. He is capable of controlling the sales department 
for the company which he now represents and is recognized as a man of keen 
businesss discernment and sound judgment. 

True to the teaching of his devout mother, Mr. Blake has not been unmind- 
ful of the higher, holier duties of life, his participation in the work of evangeliza- 
tion being in connection with the West Presbyterian church, of w^hich he is an 
elder. He is also a member of the board of managers of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. In politics he has always been a stanch republican, never fail- 
ing to support the candidates of the party at national elections, and is an active 
member of the Young Alen's Republican Auxiliary. He is likewise a member of 
the ^Mercantile Club and Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. 

On the 30th of September, 1896, in Kansas City, JMissouri, Mr. Blake was 
married to ^liss Lulu Carson. Her brothers are all well known in railroad cir- 
cles. Mr. and Mrs. Blake have three children, a daughter and two sons : Rhea, 
Howard and Eugene. Mr. Blake is strongly domestic in his tastes, deriving his 
greatest pleasure from the companionship of his family and congenial friends 
but caring nothing for social distinction, as such. While he has made creditable 
progress in the business world he has always regarded his own self-respect and 
the esteem of his fellowmen as infinitely preferable to prosperity, social position 
or political fame. 



HON. ROLLA WELLS. 

Hon. Rolla W^ells, mayor of St. Louis, is fortunate in having back of 
him an ancestry honorable and distinguished. That his lines of life have been 
cast in harmony therewith is due to his early recognition that the purpose of 
life is work — the development of inherent powers and their adjustment to the 
environment in the attainment of all that the opportunity offers. 

Born in St. Louis in 1856, he is a son of the Hon. Erastus Wells, who for 
more than four decades figured prominently in public life, leaving the impress 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 109 

of his individuality upon the history of his city and the nation as well. More- 
over, he believed in giving to his son the opportunities which would bring out 
the strongest forces in his nature and equip him for coping with life's responsi- 
bilities. The boy, therefore, was given the collegiate training of Washington 
University, while from his father he received instruction concerning the value 
of industry and energy. His education completed, he entered the office of the 
street railway corporation of which his father was then president. Paternal 
influence, however, did not lessen the arduousness of tasks assigned him but, 
on the contrary, his willingness and ability were tested in the performance of 
varied duties that would acquaint him with every department of the business. 
In this work he "found himself," as Ibsen expresses it, coming into recognition 
of his own limitations and his own powers and of the people and circumstances 
that made up for him life's conducts and experiences. The proof which he 
gave of his capability led to his appointment to the position of assistant super- 
intendent of the company under A. W. Henry, who was recognized as one of 
the competent railway men in the west. He became, as it were, ^Ir. 
Henry's understudy and was trained insistently and carefully in all the details 
of the position, to which he became the logical successor upon the death of his 
superior in 1879. He remained as general manager of the road until 1883, and 
in the intervening years brought about many improvements in keeping with the 
spirit of progress as manifest in city railway transportation. He retired from 
his position with the company when the road passed by purchase to a new 
corporation. 

Mr. Wells' next step in the business world was made in connection with 
the manufacture of cottonseed and linseed oil, but the declining health of his 
father necessitated his assuming in large part responsibilities and business duties 
heretofore borne by his father and upon the latter's death in 1893 he became 
administrator of the estate. While it brought him additional responsibilities, it 
also gave him a wider scope for the exercise of his energy and initiative spirit — 
his dominant qualities. In all business matters he moves somewhat cautiously, 
but always surely, toward the end desired, weighing every chance and deter- 
mining with accuracy that indicates a most sound judgment the value of his 
opportunity and the worth of conditions that surround him. 

It is a strongly marked tendency at the present time to select for office 
men who have not been especially trained for political service, but whose busi- 
ness careers have manifested their executive ability, their keen sagacity and 
proper adjustment between environment and condition, combined with a public- 
spirited devotion that none can question. In this lies one of the most hopeful 
political signs of the period, and it was the possession of these qualities that 
led to the selection of Rolla Wells as the executive head of this city in 1901. 
He was placed in nomination by the democratic party and received the endorse- 
ment of his fellow citizens at the polls. He has brought to the conduct of the 
municipal business the same keen discernment and careful control of complex 
interests that have been manifest in the management of his private business 
affairs. He has long been recognized as one prominent in democratic circles, 
yet one whose loyalty to the party does not transcend loyaltv to the public 
welfare. His attitude of independence was manifest in 1896, when, refusing to 
endorse the free coinage of silver plank in the democratic platform, he joined 
the movement which resulted in the national convention of gold democrats at 
Indianapolis, to which he was sent as a delegate from the twelfth congressional 
district of Missouri. Later he became president of the National Democratic 
Club of this city. 

In 1878 Mr. Wells was married to Miss Jennie H. Parker, of St. Louis, 
and their family now numbers five children, their home being one of the attrac- 
tive social centers, justlv celebrated for its cordial hospitality. ^Ir. \\'ells has 
been active in the St. Louis Fair Association and the Jockev Club. He is fond 
of outdoor life, wherein he attains his rest and recreation. While the surround- 



110 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

ing-s of his vouth were such as seemed to offer advantages superior to those 
which many boys enjoy, he was early taught that they also brought responsi- 
bilities, and it has been the aim and purpose of his life to meet these as a man. 
and the consensus of public opinion is that his has been an active career, in 
which he has accomplished important and far-reaching results, contributing in 
no small degree to the expansion and material growth of this city and the state. 



MEYER BAUMAN. 



]\Ieyer Bauman, president of the Alvin Realty Company, with various other 
business connections which give him a prominent place in commercial circles in 
St. Louis, his native city, was born December i8, 1846, a son of Louis and 
Marianna (Friede) Bauman, both of whom were natives of Germany. They 
came to America in 1838 and were married in New York. Louis Bauman was 
an expert jeweler and in 1839 established a jewelry business on Grand street in 
New York city. He had served an apprenticeship to the trade of eight years in 
Europe and had thus gained comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the busi- 
ness. In 1840 he removed his business to Mobile, Alabama, and became known 
far and wide in that section of the country as the most expert workman in his 
line in the south. In 1844 h^ removed to St. Louis and was one of the pioneer 
jewelers of this city, opening his store at the northeast corner of Fourth and Pine 
streets. He believed in advertising and his advertisements appeared in the daily 
papers as early as 1847. He was one of the first jobbers in his line west of Pitts- 
burg. Pennsylvania, and was the founder of the house which is now conducted 
by his grandsons and which remains one of the oldest and most prominent jewelry 
establishments of the city. 

Aleyer Bauman pursued his education in the public and private schools of 
St. Louis and also attended the Jonathan Jones Commercial College. He was 
fifteen years of age when in 1861 he entered his father's jewelry house and after 
several years" experience there as assistant he was admitted to the firm. In 1872 
upon the retirement of his father he succeeded to the business with his brother 
Solomon, his brother-inlaw, Meyer Rosenblatt, and August Kurtzeborn. In 1879 
Meyer Rosenblatt retired and was succeeded bv Samuel H. Bauman, the young- 
est son of Louis Bauman. The business was incorporated in 1882 as the L. Bau- 
man Jewelry Company, with ]\Ieyer Bauman as treasurer, which position he filled 
until 1893, when he became president of the company, serving as such until 1900. 
Since that time he has been a director and thus retains a voice in the management 
although he leaves the control of the business largely to the other partners, his 
son, Alvin Louis Bauman, succeeding him in the presidency. He has since 
extended his efforts to other departments of business activity. Since 1901 he has 
been president of the Alvin Realtv Company and this business now claims much 
of his time and energies, and in this connection he has control of important realty 
operations, his enter|jrising spirit and native sagacity constituting features in 
his success. 

In 1872, in New York city, ]\lr. Bauman was married to Miss Aliriam Rosen- 
blatt, a daughter of Ascher and Barbara (Goldsmith) Rosenblatt. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Bauman have been born five children: Alvin L., president of the L. Bau- 
man Jewelry Company; Elsworth S., who is acting as vice president of the com- 
pany ; Louis H., an attorney ; Florence ; and Daisy, wife of Samuel P. Fisher, 
president of the Atlas Brass Manufacturing Company of Cleveland, Ohio. The 
sons today are proud of the fact that their house is one of the few old business 
enterprises of .St. Louis, which has remained continuouslv in possession of tlie 
family thnjughout the many changes incident to ahnost three-quarters of a cen- 
turv of continuous business. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. Ill 

Merer Bauman is a member of Temple Israel and a member and director of 
the Columbian Club. While he had his father's assistance in a way as he started 
out in business, he nevertheless had to prove his own worth and as the years 
have gone bv he has maintained a place in business circles that is most creditable 
and honorable. 



CHRISTIAN BROTHERS COLLEGE. 

An institution closely identihed with the growth of St. Louis and one that 
has borne a prominent part in the educational progress thereof is the College 
•of the Christian Brothers. The College was founded in 1850, with the ap- 
proval and under the patronage of Archbishop Peter Richard Kenrick. The 
original incorporators were Brothers Patrick, Paulian, Dorothy, Barbas and 
Noah — all members of the order of Christian Brothers. In 1855 the incor- 
porators applied for and received from the legislature of Alissouri a charter em- 
powering the faculty to "bestow all literary honors usually conferred by uni- 
versities of learning, etc., etc." The original building was a rather small brick 
structure but additions were made thereto to accommodate the growing patron- 
age, which at the opening of the Civil war numbered four hundred students. 
The site at that time and for twenty years afterward was at the northwest cor- 
ner of Eighth and Cere streets. The adjoining building was ]\IacDoweirs Medi- 
cal College, which was converted into a Federal prison and was occupied as such 
for four vears. In spite of the untoward conditions thus imposed, the patron- 
age of the College increased from year to year. For the seventeen years fol- 
lowing the war the College continued its career of success, drawing students 
from nearlv every state in the Mississippi valley. However, the increased de- 
mand for railroad termini in the vicinity of the school was making the original 
site less available for educational needs and in 1880 the building of the new col- 
lege was begun. In 1882 it was ready for occupation, and in September of that 
year regular class work was resumed in the structure which now stands in the 
beautiful thirtv acre plat of ground at Easton avenue and King's Highway. 

During the tw^enty-five years which have passed since the new college was 
■opened it has developed its educational program to correspond with the demand 
for the kind of instruction best adapted to meet the requirements of the pros- 
pective business man. the skilled mechanic, architect, civil, electrical and me- 
chanical engineer. The foresight which has resulted in the existing curricula, 
including as they do all those subjects which belong to an advanced modern 
program, is splendidlv shown in the success which the graduates of the college 
have achieved in the commercial, industrial and professional world. The grad- 
uating list averages forty to fifty students annually. These are classified as 
Bachelors of Science, Bachelors of Arts and commercial graduates. An all 
round equipment is the ideal which the college management seeks to give its 
students, to which is added religious and moral instruction as the "sin qua non" 
-of the rightly educated man. 

The Rev. Brother Justin has held his present position for the past five years. 
An educator of vast and varied experience. Professor Justin has discharged 
the duties of his office with the greatest satisfaction to the faculty, the student 
hody and to patrons of the institution. Brother Justin was born in Ireland. 
Coming to the United States while yet a mere youth, he entered the Order of 
the Christian Brothers, after due scholastic preparation. He early gained a 
high reputation for scholarly ability as well as for executive cleverness. He 
taught in the academic and collegiate institutions of the order in Baltimore and 
New York and in 1879 was appointed to the presidency of the ^Manhattan Col- 
lege. New York city. In the councils of the order Brother Justin has occupied 
positions of the highest responsibility. For many years he was provincial of 



112 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

the New York province and was sent by the superior general of the Brothers to- 
estabhsh schools of the order on the Pacific coast. It was in 1868 that he went 
to California and took charge of St. Mary's at Oakland, and established the 
order there. In the discharge of this onerous duty, he exhibited qualities of 
mind and heart which won the applause of the secular and church authorities 
in California. The flourishing colleges, St. Mary's, Oakland, and the Sacred 
Heart, San Francisco, are monuments to his zeal, devotion and enterprise. 

Having placed these and other institutions on a permanent basis, Brother 
Justin was recalled to New York, where he introduced courses in pedagogy, 
opened numerous schools and incorporated the academic schools of the district 
under his care with the institutions affiliated with the university system of the- 
state. Amid all these labors Brother Justin found time to manage the internal 
affairs of the religious bodv to which he belongs and the Catholic Protectory 
of New York. The novitiates and scholasticates of the province found in him 
their best advocate and friend. 

In 1900 Brother Justin was called to France, where he assisted in the ped- 
agogic work of the normal schools. Passing over to his native country he secured 
for his brethren in religion the patronage of the Irish Hierarchy and this opened 
the way for the establishment of the AA'aterford Training College — one of the 
most famous pedagogic schools in Ireland. Under his vigorous administration 
the local college has "become an efficient factor in the educational activities of 
St. Louis and indeed of the entire section from which St. Louis draws the ele- 
ments of its social and commercial influence. The boarding department of the 
college is under the direct control of the faculty and students coming from a 
distance are thus enabled to pursue their studies under conditions which ensure 
the confidence of patrons and the moral and intellectual progress of the students 
themselves. 



S. VAN RAALTE. 



S. Van Raalte, a real-estate operator and broker, was born in Hesse-Cassel,. 
Germany, November 29, 1854, and when he was one year of age was brought 
to the United States by his mother. The family landed at Philadelphia. From 
the east thev removed' to Detroit, ^Michigan, where S. Van Raalte attended the 
public schools until eleven years of age, when the family home w^as established 
in St. Louis. After remaining in this city for three years he went to New 
York, but later returned to St. Louis and became a diamond setter and jeweler. 
In 1868 he began learning the jeweler's* trade and afterward started in business 
on his own account. In 1874 he formed a partnership with Henry Wilde under 
the firm style of Wilde & Van Raalte, as dealers in jewelry and diamonds, and 
so continued until 1878. when Mr. Van Raalte withdrew from the partnership^ 
continuing in business on his own account. In 1880 he established a jewelry 
and loan brokerage business and for twenty-two years was one of the well 
known merchants of the city, located during that entire time at No. 1244 South 
Fourth street. In 1900 he purchased the business of the Ben Walker Loan Com- 
pany at 213 Nortb Seventh street, and removed his Fourth street store to Nos. 
4 1 3- 1 5- 1 7 North Sixth street, where he is at present. He is well known as a 
representative of the jeweler's tragic in the city, but in more recent vears has 
become even more wiflely known for his operations in real estate, which have 
been of an important character and have reached mammoth proportions. He 
organized the Van Raalte Investment Company, and in addition to this he is 
president of the Vancoh Realty Company, the Ben Walker Loan Company, 
the Delmar Realty Company, the Regent Investment Company, the Bedford In- 
vestment Company and the Pendleton Investment Company. He has been very 
successful in all of his business affairs, watching closely all details of the 




S. VAN RAALTE 



8— VOL. II. 



114 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

business pointing to prosperity and so utilizing his opportunities that he has long 
since gained a place among the men of affluence in the city. 

^Ir. Van Raalte was married fifteen years ago to Miss Emma Rosenthal, 
and they have one son and two daughters. In his fraternal relations he is 
connected with Xaphtale lodge and with the Columbian Club, while his political 
allegiance is given to the republican party. There has been nothing sensational 
in his business career, which on the contrary has been the expression of his 
energy and determination — qualities which have led him into large and profitable 
inidertakins:s. 



EPHRON CATLIX, JR. 

Ephron Catlin, Jr., secretary and treasurer of the Southern Railway Supply 
Company, was born at Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island, July 29, 1885, and is 
the son of Ephron Catlin, Sr., and Emilie (Lassen) Kayser. His father is a 
capitalist of St. Louis. 

Ephron^ Catlin. Jr.. attended Smith Academy at St. Louis, afterward entered 
St. Paul's School in Concord, Xew Hampshire, and completed his studies at 
Harvard. Returning to St. Louis, he recently became secretary and treasurer of 
the Southern Railway Supply Company, which was incorporated under the laws 
of ]vIissouri in February, 1907. 

He is a member of the University, St. Louis Country and X^oonday Clubs, 
and likewise belongs to the Presbvterian church. 



REV. AXTHOXY SLIEMAX. 

Rev. Anthony Slieman, the efficient and beloved pastor of St. Anthony the 
Hermit's Church, was born in Ito. Alount Lebanon, Syria, July 18, 1870, son 
of Paul Anthony Slieman, who with his wife is living a retired life in their 
native city in Syria. Besides Rev. Anthony Slieman they had the following 
children : Assad, who is married and resides in Syria ; Tony, of this city ; Mrs. 
Rosa Joseph, of Syria ; Peter, who resides here ; and Alexander, who is married 
and lives in Syria. 

Rev. Slieman received his preliminary education in the village school of 
his native country, and when he had completed his studies there he entered 
high school at ten years of age and was graduated from that institution at the 
age of eighteen years. He then returned to his native town, where for three 
years he jnu-sued a course of study at Mount Lebanon, preparing himself for the 
priesthood, and on October 20, 1891, he was ordained by Archbishop Stevens 
and assigned to the church in the city of Saint Sarres. He continued as pastor 
of that congregation until the year 1902 and later came to the United States. 
Immediately after giving up his charge, however, he spent some time traveling 
throughout Syria as a missionary. Upon his arrival in the new world he re- 
paired to Peoria, Illinois, where he remained for a period of six months and 
then located in Minneapolis, ^Minnesota, where he realized that there was a 
broarler field and better prospects for him in the work of the ministry. Pur- 
chasing the church building and property at 323 Alain street, in northeast 
Minneapolis, he retained the pastorship of the congregation for two vears and 
seven months, and in 1905 resigned the charge and located in St. Louis, where 
he established the first Syrian school in the United States. At present it has 
two teachers, one an American who teaches in the English language, and the 
other a .Syrian who teaches in her native tongue; and fifty-six pupils. So 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 115 

successful has this school been that recently one of the same kind has been 
organized in New York city. 

Rev. Slieman possesses all those higher qualifications requisite to enable him 
to successfully follow the vocation to which he has devoted his life. He is an 
exceptionally energetic man and aside from being a theological scholar, well 
versed along exegetical and Biblical lines, he is also a zealous Christian of an 
aggressive character and one who is profoundly interested in the calling which 
he is following and in the general work af the church and the ministry. He is 
a man Vv^ho to the fullest measure realizes the great responsibility resting upon 
him as a minister of the gospel and a leader of men in the way in which they 
might attain that efficient knowledge of the truth which will enable them to 
conduct their lives in such a way as to be beneficial and desirable members of 
society, and also to educate within them those higher spiritual and moral qualities 
which will impress upon their minds the fundamental truth that the individual 
lives well only in so far as he is educating within him the traits and qualities 
of character which belong to immortality. His kindness and sympathy, to- 
gether with his lovable disposition, have endeared him to the members of his 
congregation and as well have won him the respect and esteem of the citizens 
of the community in which he resides. He devotes his undivided attention to the 
work of the church and is ever alive and active in striving to fulfill his obligations 
as a minister of the gospel in quickening the spiritual and moral life of the mem- 
bers of his congregation and in doing all in his power to establish the kingdom 
of the Man of Nazareth on the earth. 



GEORGE L. EDWARDS. 

Among those whose names carry weight in financial circles in St. Louis, 
is numbered George L. Edwards, senior member of the firm of A. G. Edwards 
& Sons. He is yet a comparatively young man. having hardly reached the prime 
of life, and yet, has become recognized as a forceful factor among the moneyed 
men of his adopted city. 

His birth occurred in Kirkwood. Missouri, September 7, 1869, his parents 
being, Albert Gallatin and ^larv Evving (Jencks) Edwards. Having acquired 
his education in the public schools of his native city, he entered business circles 
in 1885, in the employ of the firm of Francis Whitaker & Son. He afterward 
became an employe of the old Laclede Bank and later with the Mechanics Bank, 
with which he was associated until 1891. He became a member of the firm 
of A. G. Edwards & Sons, bankers and brokers, in 1891 ; is president of the 
Bank of Kirkwood, Missouri ; a director of the National Bank of Commerce : 
a member of the St. Louis and Chicago Stock Exchanges ; a director of the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition, and chairman of its committee on concessions. 
He was married in 1892, to Florence N. Evans, and they have one son and one 
daughter : George L. and Mav E. 



PHILIP W. COYLE. 



The present age has brought about a recognition of the possibilities result- 
ing from systematized and organize 1 efl:'ort. This is manifest in every walk of 
life and m none more than the organization of business men into societies for 
the promotion of interests bearing upon trade relations. In St. Louis it has 
tangible evidence in the Business Men's League, of wdiich ^Ir. Covle is now serv- 
ing as traffic commissioner, in which connection his executive ability, keen sagac- 
ity and persistency of purpose are proving strong elements for the general good. 



116 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

He was also qualified for this position by reason of his long connection with the 
railroad service. He was born July lo, 1850, in Greenwood, Steuben county, 
Xew York, a son of Bernard and Susan (Killduff) Coyle, and while spending his 
boyhood days under the parental roof lived in Allegany county. New York, pur- 
suing his education in the public schools. He began service with the Erie Rail- 
road, which he represented as telegraph operator and station agent from 1865 
until 1 88 1. He was then promoted to the position of general freight and passen- 
ger agent with the Lackawanna & Pittsburg Railroad, continuing in that capacity 
for six years, and in 1887 became assistant general freight agent of the Wabash 
Railroad. He was thus identified with railroad interests until the ist of May, 
1906, when he was appointed trafific commissioner of the Business Men's League 
of St. Louis. In taking up this work for the achievement of practical results by 
the business men of the city he based his actions upon broad and intimate knowl- 
edge of railroad interests and perhaps no one could have been chosen for the 
ofifice who would better meet the demands that are imposed upon him in this 
connection. 

On the 6tli of January, 1872, in Dunkirk, New York, Mr. Coyle was united 
in marriage to Miss Eloise Mulkin, and unto them were born a daughter and 
son : Gertrude S. and Clifford D. Mr. Coyle is independent in politics but like 
everv true American citizen keeps well informed on the questions and issues of 
the day and his influence is given on the side of whatever he deems will prove 
of general benefit. He is a member of the Episcopal church and socially is con- 
nected with the Glen Echo and Alton Country Clubs, while in fraternal relations 
he has become a Knight Templar Mason. He finds his chief source of recrea- 
tion in golf and chess. In an analyzation of his life record it is noticeable that 
from the beginning of his business career he has made it a purpose to thoroughly 
master everv task that he has undertaken and thus qualify for still broader 
responsibilities. His gradual advancement shows that his promotion has come 
through the merit system and that he occupies a position of prominence today 
bv reason of personal ability and worth. 



CHESTER H. KRUM. 



Chester H. Krum, recognized as one of the best equipped and ablest mem- 
bers of the Missouri bar, was born in Alton, Illinois, September 13, 1840, a 
son of Judge John M. and Mary (Harding) Krum. As a student in the Wash- 
ington University he pursued a classical course, which was terminated by grad- 
uation in 1863, when he won the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Whether inherited 
tendency, natural predilection or deliberate choice had most to do with shaping 
his professional career it is impossible to determine. However, he resolved upon 
the practice of law as a life work and prepared for this calling as a student in 
the law department of Harvard University, which conferred vipon him the Bach- 
elor of Laws degree in 1865. 

Mr. Krum had been admitted to the bar the previous year, and following 
his graduation at once located for practice in St. Louis. Advancement in the 
law is proverbially slow and in no profession does success depend more entirely 
upon individual merit and efifort. Gradually, however, Mr. Krum won a good 
clientage and in 1867 joined the firm of Krum, Decker & Krum as its junior 
partner. Two years later he became United States district attorney by appoint- 
ment and served in that capacity until 1872. He then resigned and in the same 
year was chosen by popular vote for the ofifice of judge of the St. Louis circuit 
court. For three years he remained upon the bench, discharging his multitu- 
dinous duties with strict impartiality and fairness, his legal learning, his analytical 
mind and the readiness with which he grasped the points in argument making 




CHESTER H. KRUM 



lis - ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

him a capable jurist, the vahie of whose service was recognized and acknowl- 
edged by the public and the profession. 

On his retirement from the bench, Judge Krum resumed the private prac- 
tice of law and has thus been identified with the St. Ix)uis bar for a third of 
a centurv. He has not followed the prevalent tendency toward specialization, 
but in each department of the law is well versed and in the general practice 
has shown himself equally at home in various branches of jurisprudence and 
has won a large percentage of the cases which have been intrusted to his care. 
His is a natural discrimination as to legal ethics and he has, moreover, been 
an unwearied student of the science of the law and of the trend of public 
thought and feeling, wdiich has so much to do with shaping the interests which 
come before the courts. He is also recognized as a popular law educator, and 
foi nine years, beginning in 1873, was a member of the faculty of the St. 
Louis Law School. 

On the 26th of October. 1866, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Krum 
and ]Miss Elizabeth H. Cuttler, the daughter of Norman and Frances Cuttler. 
Their children, six in number were : Mary F., John M., Clara R., Flora, Eliza- 
beth H. and Alabel. John M. is deceased. The family are Unitarians in re- 
ligious faith, holding membership with the Church of the Messiah. Judge 
Krum has been well known in political circles. He was recognized as a stal- 
wart republican from 1864 until 1888, when with the fearless advocacy that he 
has ever displayed in support of his honest convictions he joined the ranks of 
the democracy, and when free silver was made the issue he became a champion 
of the gold standard wing of the democratic party. 



LOUIS A. JAMINET, M. D. 

Dr. Louis A. Jaminet, who came to be known to the world at large as one of 
the most eminent surgeons of his day, was born in Paris in 1823 and was a 
descendant of one of the distinguished families of France. He pursued his edu- 
cation in that country under Professor Valpo and when thirty-five years of age 
came to the United States. His thorough preparation for his profession proved 
an excellent foundation for his later success and prominence. He entered upon 
the practice of medicine and surgery in St. Louis and was fortunate in soon win- 
ning the close and warm friendship of James B. Fads and other distinguished 
residents of the city. He was the family physician in the home of Daniel Bell 
and Judge Treat and was no less esteemed for his social qualities and his superior 
intellectual attainments than his professional skill. He acted for a year as resi- 
dent physician in the City Hospital and in his practice made a specialty of surgi- 
cal work. He became a recognized authority on surgery in this part of the state. 
A perfect master of the construction and functions o^ the component parts of the 
human body, of the changes wrought in them by the onslaught of disease, of the 
defects cast upon them as a legacy by progenitors, of the vital capacity remain- 
ing in them throughout all vicissitudes of existence, his professional labors were 
attended with splendid results and he became numbered among the famous physi- 
cians and surgeons of the Mississippi Valley. As the years passed he prospered 
by reason of the large practice accorded him and became one of the wealthy resi- 
dents of St. Louis. 

Dr. Jaminet was married in 1863 to Mrs. Mary A. Newton, nee Meyer, a 
native of London, England, and they had one daughter, Leontine Harriet. The 
old familv residence was on the corner of Locust and Eleventh streets and was 
erected by the Doctor. In religious faith he was a Roman Catholic, while his 
wife and daughter are communicants of the Episcopal church. He was gener- 
ous in support of all those measures and movements whicli he deemed beneficial 
to St. Louis as a future city. He died December 17, 1890, after a residence of 
almost a half century here. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrY. 119 

Dr. Janiinet was a man of remarkable presence, a linguist and an author of 
some note and of the best social position. In 1870 he wrote a remarkable treatise 
on the Physical Effects of Compressed Air in the Construction of the Illinois and 
St. Louis Bridge. In all non-professional relations he was found to be singu- 
larly modest and unusually gentle and tender-hearted and a true friend to the 
poor and needy. He was faithful in his friendships, fixed in an honest hatred 
of all shams and pretenders of an internal piety, and exhibited in every judg- 
ment of his mind a strong common sense that illumined every dark corner into 
which he looked with fearless candor. 



MARY HAXXOCK ^IcLEAN, M.D. 

The medical profession was among the first to open its ranks to woman and 
her fitness for the calling none have cjuestioned, as long- before she won a place 
with the graduate physicians her skill in the care of the sick and the administra- 
tion of remedial agencies was widely acknowledged. Dr. McLean, as physician 
and surgeon, has won a place among the able representatives of the profession in 
St. Louis and has been accorded a liberal practice, which has constantly grown 
both in volume and importance. 

Dr. McLean was born in Washington, Missouri, February 28, 1861, a 
daughter of Elijah and Alary (Staft'ord) McLean. Her father was born near 
Lexington, Kentucky, and was a son of the Rev. David McLean, a baptist min- 
ister, who came to Missouri to fight the Indians. Elijah AIcLean saw one of 
his brothers scalped by the red men. He had opportunity to attend school for 
only three months, for the school was broken up by the Indian wars. He was, 
however, a great student and became a well educated man, constantly promot- 
ing his knowledge by reading and investigation. He possessed an observing 
eye and retentive memory and these qualities, combined with his reading, count- 
eracted his lack of opportunity in early years. He made his own way in the 
world from his thirteenth year, leaving home with but fifteen cents in his 
pocket. He became ambitious to enter professional circles and determined upon 
the practice of medicine as a life work. He educated himself for this calling 
and was very successful therein up to his sixtieth year, when he retired and 
gave his attention to the management of his properties. He reached his ninety- 
fourth year and was a wonderfully well preserved man, retaining all of his 
faculties up to the time of his death. When ninety-one years of age he rode 
horseback. He lived in Franklin county, Missouri, where he owned extensive 
lands on the Missouri river, and he was not only successful in the profession 
and in business aft'airs but was also a recognized leader in political and church 
circles. At one time he represented his district in the state legislature and he 
was an elder in the Presbyterian church. He stood at all times for good citizen- 
ship, for high ideals of life and for continuous progress in all those lines which 
make the world better. His wife was born in North Carolina of English ances- 
try, and was a daughter of the Rev. James Stafford, a Presbyterian minister, 
who left the south because he was refused the privilege of preaching to the 
negroes. He then removed to Illinois. His daughter, Mary Staft'ord, became 
a teacher in the public schools and was engaged in teaching in Missouri when 
she became acquainted wnth Elijah McLean, who won her hand in marriage. 

Dr. McLean was reared at home, acquiring her education under private 
tutors up to her thirteenth year, when she entered Lindenwood College at St. 
Charles, Missouri, being graduated therefrom with the class of 1878. 
She also studied for one year under tutors, after wdiich she entered 
Yassar College, which she attended until she completed the work of the 
sophomore year. In the meantime she had determined to become a member of 



120 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY, 

the medical fraternity and to this end she matriculated in the medical depart- 
ment of the University of jMichigan, being graduated therefrom with the class 
of 1883. One of her classmates was the distinguished Dr. William J. Mayo. 
She then returned to St. Louis and a year later was made an interne in the female 
hospital of this city, being the only lady physician to fill an interneship in the 
St. Louis Hospital. She remained in the position for one year and soon after- 
ward was elected a member of the St. Louis Medical Society. For fifteen years 
she was the only one of her sex who belonged to that society but her brethren 
of the fraternity have had to acknowledge her ability as manifest during twenty- 
four years of active practice, in which she has shown marked power and skill 
in coping with intricate phases of disease. She has made a specialty of the 
treatment of diseases of women and of surgical cases connected therewith. She 
is the only female surgeon in St. Louis attempting major surgical cases and is 
regarded as most skillful in the line of her specialty. For fourteen years she 
has been on the stafif of the Evening Dispensary for Women. She belongs now 
to the American Medical Association, the St. Louis Medical Society and the 
]\Iissouri State ]\Iedical Society. 

While Dr. McLean has gained prominence in professional lines, she has also 
become well known for her work in the missionary field. She has for years 
been deeply interested in foreign missions and during the World's Fair she had 
opportunity to meet and study the Chinese people. In 1905, accompanied by 
a sister, she traveled for nine months through China and Japan, studying con- 
ditions in those countries. She had attended Vassar College with Marchioness 
O. Yama, of Japan, and through her friendship received letters of introduction 
and presentations to the leading people of that country. She has assisted several 
Chinese and Japanese students in their education, among these being a minister 
who has made ten thousand converts in Japan and is doing grand work in 
Christianizing the people of that country. On her trip to China, Dr. McLean 
brought back with her a young woman of that country, who is now being edu- 
cated to take up the missionary work in her native land, her education to be 
completed by graduation from the Women's Medical College at Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. Dr. McLean is a Presbyterian in religious faith but is in sympathy 
with all Christian work and is a most broad-minded woman, of wide charity 
and generous views. She has attained notable distinction in the two fields of 
labor to which she has largely devoted her energies. Gifted by nature with 
strong intellectual power and ready sympathy, she has so directed her efforts 
that those with whom she has been iDrought in contact have profited and benefited 
bv her labors. 



BENJAMIN BROWN GRAHAM. 

In the history of those who have cbntributed not alone to the city's material 
development but also to its intellectual and social progress was Benjamin Brown 
Graham, who came to St. Louis in 1857 from Graham Mills, Ohio — a town which, 
was named by his father, James Graham, who went to that place in early days 
and there established the first paper mills in the west. Removing to St. Louis, 
he became a factor in the industrial interests of this city by organizing the 
Graham Paper Company and establishing the paper mills, which became an im- 
portant industry of the city, employing a large force of workmen and returning 
a gratifying income to the owners. He continued in the manufacture of paper 
until his death, when he was succeeded by his sons, Benjamin and Henry Graham, 
who greatly increased the business and extended its scope. Benjamin Graham 
was the president of the company and the active spirit of the firm. Honored and 
respected by all, there was no man who occupied a more enviable position in com- 
mercial and manufacturing circles, not alone by reason of the prosperitv which 
he won, but also owing to the honorable, straightforward methods which he 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 121 

pursued. After succeeding his father in the ownership of the business, he en- 
larged its scope, keeping in touch with modern business methods and creating 
a demand for his product by reason of its excellence and also owing to the busi- 
ness methods employed in his relations with the trade. He was likewise a trustee 
of the Mechanics Bank and his name was ever an honored one on commercial 
paper. Success, as generally estimated, is achieved by concentration and not by 
diffusion, and it was thus that -Mr. Graham won his position of prominence in 
industrial circles, having concentrated his energies largely upon a single line of 
business, which he thoroughly mastered, so that he became a leader and not a 
follower in the paper trade. 

Pleasantly situated in his home life, Mr. Graham was married in St. Louis 
in 1884 to Miss Christine Blair, a daughter of Hon. Francis P. Blair, Jr., who 
arrived in St. Louis in 1845 ^^'^^1 became not only one of the distinguished resi- 
dents of this city but also a man of national reputation in his championship 
of measures which had been important factors in molding the history of the 
country. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Graham was born a daughter, Christine, who is 
now attending Smith College. In 1899 Mr. Graham erected a beautiful home 
at No. 5145 Lindell boulevard overlooking Forest Park. He found his greatest 
happiness in ministering to the welfare and comfort of his little family and yet 
he was by no means exclusive in his interests. His nature was social and genial 
in its characteristics and he was a valued and popular member of the Commercial 
and Noonday Clubs, while of the St. Louis Country Club he was a charter 
member. He was also a director and at one time president of the University 
Club and was interested in all that pertained to intellectual progress and to the 
advancement of the city in municipal lines. Alert and energetic the various in- 
terests with which he was connected felt the stimulus of his enterprising spirit. 
His death was the occasion of widespread regret, when in December, 1904, at 
the age of sixty-four years, he passed away. Mrs. Graham, yet residing at the 
home built for her by her husband, is a member of the Christian church. She 
belonged to one of the prominent families of St. Louis and is rich in the memory 
of an honored husband and father, both prominent and successful, each in his 
own work in life. 



W. H. KAYE. 



W. H. Kaye is manager of a business which has had a continuous existence 
of forty years, being now the chief officer in control of a railroad supply business 
of considerable importance. He was born February 9, 1862, in Sheffield, Eng- 
land, his parents being John and Elizabeth Kaye, of that city. After attending 
private schools there, he became a student in the Collegiate College of England, 
being graduated with the first class in 1878. Early in his business career he 
engaged in clerking for a short time and at the age of sixteen came to America, 
arriving in St. Louis in 1879. Here he learned the railroad supply business 
under his uncle, E. H. Linley, with whom he remained for twelve years, on the 
expiration of which period he went to Nebraska and was identified with farming 
operations, in that state for five years. The venture there, however, proved un- 
profitable and Mr. Kaye returned' to St. Louis, accepting the position of manager 
for the C. & W. McClean Sporting Goods Company. Subsequently he purchased 
an interest in the business, with which he was connected for five years. On the 
expiration of that period, however, he sold out and again became a factor in his 
uncle's establishment, in which he is now manager. This business has been a 
feature in trade circles of St. Louis for four decades and receives the patronage 
of many of the leading corporations handling goods of this character. The 
business' policy of the house is one well worthy of emulation, for if mistakes 
occur they are always matters of speedy adjustment, while the integrity of the 
firm is never called into question. 



122 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

In September, 1892, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Kaye and Miss 
Sarah J. Onigley. \Vith their two daughters they reside at No. 5216 East 
Kensington avenue. In his pohtical views Mr. Kaye is a stalwart republican, 
who served as postmaster while living at Glenwood, Nebraska, and was also 
justice of the peace and treasurer of the school board. His official duties were 
discharged with the utmost capability and fidelity. He belongs to St. Peter's 
Episcopal church and is a gentleman of genuine worth, as is attested by his 
extensive circle of friends. 



JUDGE CHARLES SPRAGUE HAYDEN. 

Few lawvers have made more lasting impression upon the bar of the state 
both for legal abilitv of a high order and for the individuality of a personal char- 
acter which impresses itself upon a community than did Judge Charles Sprague 
Havden. Of a family conspicuous for strong intellects, indomitable courage and 
energv, he entered upon his career as a lawyer and such was his force of char- 
acter and natural qualifications that he overcame all obstacles and wrote his name 
upon the keystone of the legal arch. His legal learning, his analytical mind, the 
readiness with which he grasped the points in an argument, combined to make 
him one of the most capable jurists that has ever graced the court of last resort 
in ^Missouri and the public and the profession acknowledged him the peer of any 
member of the appellate court. 

The life record of Judge Hayden covered almost seventy years. He was 
born in Boston, February 27, 1833, and died in Florida, February 4, 1903. Many 
of the intervening years were spent as a member of the St. Louis bar. His 
parents were William and Maria (Deming) Hayden. The father was born in 
A'irginia in 1795, and became a resident of Boston in early life. He was 
appointed the first city auditor of Boston in 1824 and held the position for seven- 
teen years, after which he resigned to accept the position of editor of the Boston 
Atlas, a whig newspaper. At a later date he served for a short time as post- 
master of Boston, also acted as a member of the city council and represented 
his district in the state legislature. He was political manager for Daniel Web- 
ster, the great statesman, and at the whig convention in Baltimore in 1852 advo- 
cated the nomination of Webster for the presidency, but the distinguished New 
England leader died in that year. During the period of his residence in Boston, 
\A'illiam Hayden was prominently associated with public interests and did much 
to mold public thought and opinion and thus he left his impress upon the history 
of the city. 

Reared in Boston, Judge Hayden was provided with liberal educational 
advantages, attending the city schools, Chauncy Hall and the Latin school. He 
afterward became a student in the law school of Harvard University, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1856. He then became private secre- 
tary to his father in the Boston postoffice and continued in the same capacity 
after his father's retirement. 

The year 1857 witnessed the arrival of Judge Hayden in St. Louis. He 
located here for the practice of law and entered into partnership with John H. 
Rankin, the relation between them existing from the ist of January, 1867, until 
1877. ^Ir. Hayden then went upon the bench of the St. Louis court of appeals, 
where he served for four years and then resumed the private practice of law, 
in which he continued until 1889, when he went south to Florida to make his 
home, there retaining his residence until called to his final rest. 

Devotedly attached to his profession, systematic and methodical in habit, 
sober and discreet in judgment, calm in temper, diligent in research, conscien- 
tious in the discharge of every duty, courteous and kind in demeanor and inflexi- 
bly just on all occasions, these qualities enablerl Judge Hayden to take first rank 




C. S. HAYDEN 



124 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

amono- those who have held the highest judicial offices in St. Louis and made 
him tlie conservator of that justice wherein is the safeguard of individual lib- 
erty and happiness and the defense of our national institutions. His reported 
opinions are monuments to his profound legal learning and superior ability, 
more lasting than brass or marble and more honorable than battles fought and 
won. Thev show a thorough mastery of the questions involved, a rare simplicity 
of style and an admirable terseness and clearness in the statement of the principles 
upon which the opinions rest. 

On the 25th of June, 1884, in St. Louis, Judge Hayden was united in mar- 
riage to ^liss ]\Iatilda Brock, of this city, a daughter of William and Eliza 
Brock, and unto them were born two daughters, Sydney Louise and Ruth 
A'assall. Following the death of Judge Hayden the family returned to St. Louis, 
•where they now^ reside. Judge Hayden was an advocate of the democracy and 
when the division occurred concernmg the money question he espoused the cause 
of the gold wing of the party. He was an earnest student of the science of 
government and although he held but few political offices and while upon the 
bench carefully lifted the judicial ermine above the mire of partisanship, he was 
a more active and efficient politician than many who have devoted their undi- 
vided time to public affairs. A vigilant and attentive observer of men and meas- 
ures, his opinions were recognized as sound and his views broad and his ideas 
therefore carried weight among those with whom he discussed political or public 
problems. Those who met him socially had the highest appreciation for his 
sterling qualities of manhood and a genial nature which recognized and appre- 
ciated the good in others. The ties of home and friendship were sacred to him 
and he took genuine delight in doing a service for those wdio were near and 
dear to him. 



LEY P. REXFORD. 



Ley P. Rexford as president of the American Paper Cutter & Manufac- 
turing Company is closely associated with the industrial life of St. Louis and as 
chief executive officer of this concern is bending his energies toward constructive 
effort and administrative direction, with the result that the business is reaching 
out to broader fields and has more extended connections than ever before. 

Mr. Rexford was born in Somerville, Massachusetts, January i, 1877, ^^^ 
is a direct descendant on his mother's side of the Petersons, who, with other 
settlers from Sweden, made Delaware their home in the United States. His 
grandfather, Alexander Peterson, came to St. Louis in 1844 and engaged in the 
banking business. ^Ir. Rexford was a pubHc-school student in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, until the age of fourteen years. The succeeding year was spent 
with a law firm in Chicago and, coming to St. Louis, he accepted the position 
of messenger in the Third National Bank, being gradually advanced to positions 
of increasing responsibilities until he became correspondent. 

There he remained about twelve years and resigned his position in the bank 
to become secretary and treasurer of the American Roll Paper Company. The 
company was incorporated in 1884 principally by Air. Hopking, who was the 
inventor and patentee of the first roll paper holder ever made. At the time of 
Mr. Rexford's first association with the company, it was dealing in roll paper 
and manufacturing roll paper holders and cutters. The business was first located 
on North Second street, but it grew and developed so that it was necessary to 
seek more commodious quarters and a removal was made to the corner of Third 
and Spruce streets. Upon the reorganization of the business they removed to 
their present location at Second and Bremen avenue, being here located since the 
1st of March, 1908. The business was organized in June, 1907, under the name 
of the American Paper Cutter & Manufacturing C(>m]:)any, at which time Mr. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FULRTll CITY. 125 

Rexford was made president. In addition to the manufacture of the paper cut- 
ter they do a large hardware and corrugated paper specialty manufacturing busi- 
ness and are now making shipments to all parts of the United States and Can- 
ada and to most of the European countries. The business has assumed extensive 
proportions and is an enterprise of considerable magnitude, and the reputation 
of the house is a most commendable one, reflecting credit upon the trade condi- 
tions of the city. The plant is well equipped with modern facilities, and the rela- 
tions between employer and employe are always just and equitable. The business 
is carefully systematized and the work is conducted along well defined lines of 
labor. 

On the I2th of October, 1905, Mr. Rexford was married in St. Louis to 
Miss Lucv L. Whitelaw, and they have two children, Louise Augustine and Oscar 
Whitelaw. Mrs. Rexford is a daughter of Oscar L. Whitelaw, one of the prom- 
inent and prosperous merchants of St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. Rexford hold mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian church, and he exercises his rights of franchise in 
support of the republican party, being in full sympathy with its principles 
and purposes. 



JAMES W. VAN CLEAVE. 

James W. Van Cleave, president of the Buck's Stove & Range Company, one 
of the largest concerns in its field in the Lmited States ; member of the Business 
Men's League of St. Louis ; vice president of the Missouri Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation and for years chairman of its traffic committee ; president of the St. 
Louis branch, which is also by far the largest and most influential branch, of 
the Citizens Industrial Association of America, and president of the National 
Association of Manufacturers, is one of the leaders in the business and social 
life of St. Louis and of ^^lissouri. For years also he has been a national figure. 

John Van Cleef came from Amsterdam about 1680 and settled in Staten 
Island. This was the first of the family who located in America. He and his 
son Isabrant remained there, but the latter's son Aaron moved to New Jersey. 
This Aaron, who was the great-great-grandfather of James W. Van Cleave, 
immigrated from New Jersey and settled in Rowan county, North Carolina, 
where he died about 1776 at an advanced age. The line of descent in the family 
down to today is through the second Aaron Van Cleave, Carey Van Cleave, and 
Henry Mason Van Cleave, the father of the subject of this sketch. The second 
Aaron Van Cleave was a sturdy defender of the rights of the colonists against 
encroachment by England, was an early advocate of independence, was promi- 
nent in the Revolution, and, a few years after the establishment of the country's 
independence, or in 1790, he and his brothers crossed the mountains into the 
western wilderness and located near Louisville. Thus he was one of Kentucky's 
pioneers. He married into the Brent family, which was distinguished in the 
annals of the state, and he and his son Carey and his grandson Henry ]\Iason 
were among the builders of Kentucky. 

James W. Van Cleave, son of Henry Mason and Eliza Jane (Burks) Van 
Cleave, was born in Marion county, Kentucky, July 15, 1849, ^"^ ^^'^^ educated 
in the Springfield Academy in that state. As a member of one of 
the oldest families in Kentucky, he sympathized with the Confederate 
cause. As a boy of thirteen he was under the command of General John H. 
Morgan until the capture of that dashing cavalry leader in 1863, and he rendered 
other service for the Confederacy later on. 

Accepting the results of the war promptly and heartily, he started his life 
work by connecting himself with Lithgow & Company, prominent stove manu- 
facturers of Louisville, learned the business in all its branches, and, coming to 
St. Louis in 1888, became an ofBcer in the Buck's Stove & Range Company. 



126 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

He quickly passed through the various grades up to the presidency of the com- 
pany. 

On ^Nlarch 27,, 1871, Air. Van Cleave was married to ]\Iiss Catherine Louisa 
Jefferson, a daughter of Thomas L. and Ehzabeth (Creagh) Jefferson, of Louis- 
ville. Thev have had seven children — Edith Corinne, wife of James Humphrey 
Fisher; Hiram, who died in infancy; Giles Bell; Wallace Lee; Harry Fones; 
\Mlhelmina Born ; and Brenton Gardner. 

He is a Presbyterian, is a member of the Mercantile, the Glen Echo and the 
Countrv Clubs, and has been a republican ever since 1896. While he had been a 
democrat along to that time, Mr. Van Cleave in 1896 left the democratic party 
because, as he believed, it had ceased to be democratic. To him the party's 
platform of that vear and the utterances of its candidate meant revolution and 
reaction. He said its free-silver propaganda attacked business morality, and he 
declared that its strictures on the injunction and its covert threat to pack the 
supreme court in the interest of its radical policies assailed the nation's stability 
and prestige and endangered the foundations on which the entire social structure 
rests. But in politics, as in religion and in everything- else, Mr. Van Cleave is 
very far from being a bigot. He approaches every question with an open mind, 
and his views on it are reached only after he has studied all that question's sides. 
He is devoted to the right, as he sees it, and his respect for others is not dimin- 
ished in the slightest degree, when, after honest deliberation, they reach con- 
clusions opposite to his own. 

As an active member of the St. Louis Business Men's League and of the 
St. Louis [Manufacturers Association, now the Missouri Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation, yir. Van Cleave quickly saw that the transportation difficulties com- 
plained of by the manufacturers of the city were due to the lack of terminal 
facilities. As head of the St. Louis Manufacturers Association traffic commit- 
tee he brought this need to the attention of the business men and the people of 
the city and pointed out the obstructions to the city's business expansion which 
the bridge arbitrary set up. While offering no objections to the building of 
bridges across the river, he contended that the quickest, the cheapest and by far 
the most effective way to abolish the transportation embargo was to devote a 
large part of the river front to railroad yards for the loading, the unloading 
and the storage of cars. His views on these points were presented with clear- 
ness and force. 

]\Ir. Van Cleave was one of the pioneers in the movement wdiich led to the 
formation of the Citizens Industrial Association of America. As temporary 
chairman of the convention of business men and employers from many states 
which met at Chicago in 1903, from which the association dates, he took a 
prominent part in the creation of that organization. He was chosen first vice 
president of the national organization and was unanimously selected to be the 
president of the St. Louis branch of the order, which was immediately formed, 
which has now (1908) nearly nine thousand members, and which is the organiza- 
tion's most powerful section, in numbers, in activity and in influence. 

As indicated by the "open shop," — open to non-members and to members of 
the labor unions on equal terms, — which is the leading principle in its creed. 
the chief object of the association is the protection of the employer and the 
worker against the anti- American demands and practices of many of the labor 
societies. The association will aid the regularly constituted authorities, national 
and state, in putting down intimidation, coercion and violence, and aims to 
establish harmony between em])loyers and workers on the basis of equal justice 
to both sides. In carrying out this policy the St. Louis branch of the association 
has largelv diminished the number of strikes and labor disturbances of all 
sorts anrl has gone a long way toward establishing complete industrial peace in 
the city. 

These principles have always been Mr. Van Cleave's rule of conduct as an 
employer. He freely recognizes the right of the workers to organize and to get 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrV. 127 

such terms regarding wages and hours of labor as they can secure through 
amicable agreement with their employers, but he insists on having the con- 
trolling voice in the management of his factories. His relations with his own 
workers have always been cordial. The friendship which they feel toward him 
is shown by the circumstance that the proportion of the men who have been 
in his employ for many years is probably greater than it is in any other concern 
in his field in the country. As one of the first persons who proceeded against the 
American Federation of Labor for its boycotting vice, and as the author of the 
overthrow of that monarchical weapon of oppression, Mr. Van Cleave has, at 
great expense to himself, fought the battles of every employer, and has earned 
the everylasting gratitude of every business man and of every patriotic American. 

F>om the early days of the National Association of Manufacturers Mr. \'an 
Cleave was an active member of that organization, and became vice president of 
the Missouri section at the convention in New Orleans in 1903. That was the 
convention which adopted the "open shop" platform, advocated by Mr. Parry 
of Indianapolis, then president of the association. ^Ir. Van Cleave was chair- 
man of the resolutions committee and assisted in drawing that declaration. He 
ably and successfully assisted in defending that declaration against the assault 
of some of the more timid members, who imagined that it would disrupt the 
association. It has strengthened the association instead. Mr. Van Cleave soon 
became the recognized leader in the organization and was chosen its president 
in 1906, and was reelected in 1907 and 1908. In the years in which he has been 
at its head the association has vastly increased in membership, activity and in- 
fluence in public affairs. On its rolls every state and territory and every calling 
are represented. 

Alore than any other one person Mr. Van Cleave has brought business men 
in all fields into active cooperation. This led to the formation, in 1907, of the 
National Council for Industrial Defense, of which he is chairman. That federa- 
tion consists of one hundred and fifty-five national, state and local organiza- 
tions of employers, business men and good citizens. He and representatives of 
all the organizations in the council were active in Washington in defeating the 
attempts of the labor union leaders in the early months of 1908 to coerce con- 
gress into enacting anti-injunction and pro-boycott legislation. They were active 
also at the republican national convention in June in Chicago in defeating the 
plots of the same leaders to stampede the convention in favor of that anti-repub- 
lican and anti-democratic policy. For his work on both of those occasions yir. 
Van Cleave has received the plaudits of public-spirited Americans of all parties 
and all localities. 

Earlier than any other man in public or quasi-public life Mr. Van Cleave 
urged a revision of 'the tarifif for 1909. This he did in the citadel of the anti- 
revisionists, the Boston Home Market Club, at the club's annual dinner in 1906. 
Through its platform of 1908 and the expression of its candidate the republican 
party pledged itself to revise the tarifif in an extra session, to meet as soon as 
possible after the inauguration on ]\Iarch 4, which is just the time that ^Ir. Van 
Cleave mentioned as the proper date for the work. He urges a permanent, 
expert, non-partisan tariff commission, to study the subject scientifically, and 
to recommend changes in duties whenever and wherever such changes are neces- 
sary. This reform,\vhich will deal with the tariff as a business matter and take 
the' whole subject out of politics, is favored by the progressive members of both 
parties and is likely to be adopted soon. 

Likewise more than any other one person. ]\Ir. Van Cleave has been the 
means of inducing business men in all parts of the country to take an active part 
in politics. This does not mean the politics which sees nothing bad in our own 
party, whichever party it is, and nothing good in its antagonist. It is the politics 
which considers every question on its merits, irrespective of the party which 
promotes or opposes it, and which supports or condemns measures and men re- 
gardless of the partv labels which they carry. His aim has been to induce busi- 



12S ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

ness men to accept candidacies for public office, to make them strike at dema- 
gogism and revolutioijism under whatever mask they present themselves, and to 
bring the standard of honor among politicians up to the same high level as it is 
in business and professional life. 

As every intelligent observer can see, politics throughout the country is 
raising itself to a higher plane than it ever touched before within the memory of 
anvbodv now living. When the social and political history of the United States 
in the twentieth century's opening years is written by a man who grasps the 
subiect in its vital phases it will single out as a large factor in this moral uplift 
the words and deeds of James W. A'"an Cleave. 



TERET^IIAH FRUIN. 



Though practically retired from business life, Jeremiah Fruin still occupies 
the presidency of the firm of Fruin & Colnon, contractors. Energetic, prompt 
and notablv reliable, his business record was the story of steady progress re- 
sulting from his thorough understanding of the work which he has undertaken. 
With a genius for planning and executing the right thing at the right time, he 
has made no false moves in his business career, and many of the fine public 
buildings as well as private structures of St. Louis are monumental evidence 
of his ability. 

]\Ir. Fruin claims the Green Isle of Erin as the land of his nativity, his 
birth having occurred in the Glen of Aherlow, County Tipperary, Ireland, in 
1 83 1. Two years later his parents, John and Katherine (Baker) Fruin, brought 
their family to the United States and took up their abode in Brooklyn, New 
York. The father was a graduate of Maynooth College, an intelligent and 
successful man of affairs, who for many years was actively engaged in the 
building of public works in Brooklyn and elsewhere. He became well known 
as a prominent contractor, continuing in business in Brooklyn until his death 
in 1861. His wife passed away six years later and was laid by his side in 
Holy Cross cemetery. 

As a student in the public schools of Brooklyn, Jeremiah Fruin pursued his 
education to the age of sixteen years, when he put aside his text-books to learn 
the more difficult lessons in the school of experience. He became associated 
with his father in contracting lines, retaining his residence in Brooklyn until 
i860, during which time he was not only active in business, but was also con- 
nected with various organizations around which cluster historic associations. 
He became a member of the famous Water Witch Hose Company No. 8, which, 
in the old days of the volunteer fire department, was the pride of Brooklyn. 
He was also captain of Company E of the Second Regiment of the National 
Guard of Brooklyn, belonging to the old-time Charter Oaks Baseball Club 
of that city. In later years, following his removal to St. Louis, he was also 
actively interested in baseball, becoming captain of the Empire Ball Club of 
this city. 

Following his removal from Brooklyn in i860, Mr. Fruin went to New 
Orleans, but after a short period came to St. Louis. This was about the time 
of the outbreak of the Civil war, and not until its close did he engage in busi- 
ness for himself, for during the period of hostilities he was connected with 
the quartermaster's department of the Union army, and most of the time 
was stationed in St. Louis. On retiring from that position he engaged in the 
construction of sewers and the paving of streets under contract, and for 
thirty years was largely occupied with work of that character and of a kindred 
nature. He was closely associated with the construction of the street railway 
system of St. Louis, taking many important contracts of that character, and 
through his extensive business interests he has been the employer of a large 




lEREAJlAll FRl'lX 



130 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

force of workmen, thus contributing largely to general prosperity and business 
activity as well as to his individual success. 

In 1872 he formed a partnership with W. H. Swift and together they 
conducted an extensive contracting business until 1885, when the Fruin- 
Bambrick Construction Company was organized with W. H. Swift as presi- 
dent, J. Fruin as vice president and P. Bambrick as secretary. This com.pany 
operated extensive stone quarries in St. Louis, in addition to the execution 
of large contracts for railroad and other public works. Their operations ex- 
tend from the Indian Territory to the Atlantic Ocean, and in 1897 the com- 
pany had contracts for building a large masonry dam at Holyoke, jMassachu- 
setts, and for laying several asphaltum street pavements in the cities of New 
York and Brooklyn. City waterworks contracts in some of the larger and 
many of the smaller cities of the country were also awarded this company and 
the firm became wddely known throughout the country as foremost general 
contractors. In 1900 Mr. Fruin severed his connection with the Fruin-Bambrick 
Company, the business being continued, however, by its president, W. H. Swift. 
He then organized the firm of Fruin & Colnon, contractors, with offices at 615 
Merchants-Laclede building. Of this firm he is president, but leaves the active 
management of the business largelv to others, while he is now practically living 
retired. He has passed the seventy-seventh milestone on life's journey and 
his rest is a merited reward of a long life of activity and usefulness, in which 
his well directed labors, uii faltering diligence and capable management brought 
him a measure of success that numbers him among the citizens of affluence 
in St. Louis. 

In 1856 ]\Ir. Fruin was married tO' Miss Catharine Carroll, of Brooklyn, 
Xew York, and thev have become parents of one son and a daughter. Mr. 
Fruin is a Knight Templar Mason, and also a member of the Royal Arcanum. 
In politics he has ever been identified with the democratic party, has laboied 
efifectively for its welfare and his opinions have carried weight in its councils. 
In 1895-96 he served as one of the police commissioners of the city and has 
always been interested in public affairs, his cooperation being accounted a val- 
uable asset in matters relating to the public good. During the years of his 
residence in St. Louis he has earned for himself an enviable reputation as a 
careful man of business and in his dealings is known for his prompt and 
honorable methods, which have w.m him the deserving and unbounded confi- 
dence of his fellowmen. 



LUTHER HENRY CONX. 

Luther Henrv Conn, a cajMtalist of St. Louis, has been identified with many 
important financial, commercial and industrial undertakings which have 
had direct bearir.g ujion the develo])ment and progress of this sec- 
tion of the state. Llis time is now given merely to the supervision 
of his in\-e>ted interests, which relieve him of the necessity for strenuous effort, 
and leaves him leisure for the development of those graces of character that 
make him a most cultured anfl entertaining gentleman. He feels just pride in 
the ownershi]) of the historic "Oant farm," which was once the old home place 
of General V. S. Grant, and which is regarded by the American public much 
as is Mount X'crnon and tlie Hermitage, the homes of Washington and Jackson. 

Further investigation into the life record of Mr. Comi shows that he comes 
from an ancestry honorable and distinguished. The family originated in Ireland, 
whence rej)resentatives of the name came to America in 1750. Thomas Conn, 
the proifcnitor of the familv in the new world, settled in Maryland and sub- 
sequently removerl to Culpeper county, Virginia, while in 1783 he took up his 
abode in Bourbrjii count)', Kenluckw It was at that i)eriod in the history of 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 131 

the state when Kentucky was still known as the dark and bloody ground be- 
cause of the hostility of the Indians to the white men who were penetrating into 
the interior. Thomas Conn took with him a negro to build a log cabin and when 
the negro was at work Air. Conn stood guard to protect him from the Indians. 
His son, Captain Jack Conn, grandfather of our subject, was born in Bourbon 
county, Kentucky, and was a soldier of the war of 1 812. He is accredited by 
contemporaries with having killed the Indian Chieftain, Tecumseh, at the battle 
of the Thames, although others claim the distinction for Colonel R. M. Johnson, 
afterward vice president of the United States. Dr. James V. Conn, father of 
Luther H. Conn, was one of the strong and forceful characters in church and 
educational work and moreover was a leading and influential citizen of Carroll- 
ton, Kentucky. He was born at Centerville, Kentucky, May 11, 1810, and pre- 
pared for his profession as a student in the medical college at Lexington,* Ken- 
tucky. Many years have passed since he was called from this life. 

Luther Henry Conn, who was born at Burlington, Boone county, Kentucky, 
March 14, 1842, a son of Dr. James A\ and Alary E. (Garnett) Conn, was par- 
tially educated at Carrollton, Kentucky, in an old-time seminary which was 
among the leading institutions of learning of the state at that day. 
He atso pursued a special course of study under Professor Cloud and Major 
Magruder, the latter a graduate of West Point, from whom he obtained a knowl- 
edge of military tactics. He was still pursuing his education when the Civil war 
was inaugurated, and although but nineteen years of age he espoused the south- 
ern cause and joined the Confederate army as a private. Soon afterward he 
was promoted to a captaincy and served under the famous General Morgan, 
participating in all the campaigns with him. In a hot engagement at Alurfrees- 
boro, Tennessee, he was shot through both legs and his clothing w^as perforated 
with bullets. He was captured with Morgan's command during the raid through 
Ohio and Indiana and w^as held as a prisoner of war at Johnson's Island, Alle- 
gheny City, Point Lookout, Fort McHenry and Fort Delaware, being trans- 
ferred to these different prisons in the order named. In the fall of 1864 he 
was exchanged and participated in the subsequent campaigns with his command 
in 1864-5. ^n the surrender of General Lee and the evacuation of Richmond 
his command was made the special escort of President Davis and the Con- 
federate officials on their retreat into Georgia. 

When the war was ended Mr. Conn returned to his old home in Kentucky. 
He had determined upon a business career and to thjs end went to Arkansas, 
where he engaged in cotton planting. In 1867 he became a resident of St. Louis, 
where he engaged in the real-estate business as a member of the firm of Flournoy 
& Conn, which later became Conn & McRee. For twenty years this firm held 
rank with the leading firms of St. Louis, operating extensively in real-estate, 
and then in 1887 Air" Conn retired. He had by no means confined his atten- 
tion to one line but had extended his efiforts into various fields of activity which 
brought him distinguished successes and constituted him a most helpful factor 
in the upbuilding of this section of the country. He is now a director of the 
Laclede Gas Light Company and of the Tiger Tail Alill & Lumber Company. 
He was prominent in railroad construction, including the building of the W est 
End Narrow Gauge Railway and the Jefferson Avenue Railway. He was also 
instrumental in building the Southern Hotel and the Merchant's Exchange and 
was the moving spirit" in the establishment and improvement of Forest Park, 
one of the most beautiful parks of all the world. He was at one time a com- 
missioner of Lafavette Park, serving in that position for many years and was 
also president of the park board. He declined various political appointments, 
including that of police commissioner of St. Louis, which was tendered him by 
Governor Phelps. His political allegiance has always been given to the demo- 
cratic party. 

In 1871 Mr. Conn was married to Aliss Louise Gibson, the eldest daughter 
of Sir Charles and A'irginia Gibson. Their daughter, \'irginia Alay Conn, a 



132 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

reigning belle during- her young womanhood, is now the wife of Frank \'. 
Hammar. The family residence is at No. 1728 Waverly Place. As stated, Mr. 
Conn is also the owner of the old home of General U. S. Grant. The posses- 
sion of this earlv home of the great soldier is something in which he takes justifi- 
able pride, being thoroughly appreciative of its historic associations and there- 
fore keeping it up in excellent condition. His broad mindedness is shown in 
this work, for although a soldier of the Confederate army, he recognized the 
splendid military qualities of the Union leader and while differing from him in 
viewpoint, he pays his tribute of admiration to the ability of the 
soldier and president. ]\Ir. Conn is a member of the St. Louis Confederate 
\'eterans. He is a lover of music and a patron of the arts and has found pleasure 
and delight in extensive travel, manv times visiting foreign lands and truly 
enjoving the opportunities for the cultivation of artistic appreciation in the 
centers of the old world. 



JOHN RABOTEAU, 



John Raboteau, who figured in commercial circles in St. Louis as proprietor 
of a wholesale and retail drug business conducted under the firm style of Rabo- 
teau & Company at No. 700 North Broadway, remained a factor in the business 
life of the citv until his demise January 22, 1909. His life record began in 
Shelbyville, Tennessee, on the 12th of June, 1855, and he was but two years 
of age when he accompanied his parents on their removal from that state to St. 
Joseph, ^Missouri. His father, J. B. Raboteau, was born in Tennessee, July 12, 
1830. and for twent3--five years was prominent in the business circles of New 
York city. He was also connected with commercial interests in Tennessee and, 
as stated, removed with his family to Missouri in 1857. For eight years he was 
a resident of St. Joseph and in 1865 came to St. Louis, where he established a 
large and profitable wholesale and retail drug house. After seeing his son firmly 
established in the business he decided to enjoy in well earned rest the few years 
yet allotted him and so retired from business and is now living in Webster Grove, 
enjoving the fruits of his former activity. His wife, who was born in Tennessee 
in 1835, died in 1893 and was laid to rest in the old family burying ground in 
Bellefontaine. 

John Raboteau, whose name introduces this review, was about ten years of 
age when his parents removed to St. Louis and in the schools of this city he 
largely acquired his education, first entering the Benton public school, where he 
spent two years. He was afterward a student for two years in the Christian 
Brothers' school and later became a student in the Jesuit College on Ninth street 
and Washington avenue, where he remained for two years. This constituted his 
literary training, which served as a foundation on which to rear the superstruc- 
ture of professional knowledge. His father was engaged in the drug business 
and to qualify his son for the same field of labor, sent him to the St. Louis Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, from which he was graduated in 1875. He at once entered 
his father's wholesale and retail drug business, which was established in 1870 at 
No. 714 North Broadway. l'>om the age of sixteen vears until his demise he 
was actively connected with that business and from 1877 was in full charge. 
This is one of the rjldest drug houses of the city and is well known throughout 
St. Louis and vicinity, having an extensive ])atronage. while the business methods 
of the house have gainer! for its owners an unsullied reputation in commercial 
circles. 

( )n the 14th of July, 1891. in Chicopee l'"alls, Massachusetts, !Mr. Raboteau 
was united in marriage to Miss [Elizabeth C. Canterbury, whose parents are still 
living in that city. Unto Mr. anrl Mrs. Raboteau were born two sons: Philip C, 
who was born June 12. 1892. but liverl only three months; and Nathan C, now 
twelve years of age. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CrFY. 133 

At the time of the death of the husl:)and and father the wife and son were 
visiting at her old home in Chicopee Falls. Becoming ill, Mr. Raboteau was 
taken to the ^^lullaiiphy Hospital bnt it was not thought his condition was at all 
alarming" and he wrote to his wife not to return home. Death came to him very 
unexpectedly, removing from the ranks of business men one of its successful and 
reliable representatives. He was a member of the Mercantile and also of the 
^Missouri Athletic Club and had the warm regard of many friends of those organ- 
izations. In politics he was an independent democrat, caring little for the honors 
and the emoluments of office, preferring to devote his time and energies to his 
business pursuits, which, capably conducted, were meeting with most gratifying- 
success. He had high regard for the ethics which control honorable relations 
in business life and was moreover loyal, faithful and helpful in his friendships and 
in his family relations. 



BEN [AM IX BOGY. 



Benjamin l)Ogv was a representative of one of the prominent old families 
of Missouri. He was born in St. Genevieve, July 2^, 1829, and died in Joplin, 
Missouri, September 29, 1900. His parents were Joseph and Marie (St. Gemme ) 
Bogy, the former born in Kaskaskia, Illinois, on the 26th of April, 1786, and 
the latter in the same place on the 27th of February, 1782. The father was con- 
nected through official interests with Governor ^lorello when this country was 
under the dominion of Spain. He was also a member of the first legislature 
that convened after ^Missouri was admitted into the Union in 1820 and was also 
a representative from this state in congress. 

Benjamin Bogy pursued his education in the schools of St. Genevieve, ^lis- 
souri, to the age of twelve years. He came to St. Louis at that time, in 1841, and 
for four years was a pupil in the St. Louis University. When his education w'as 
completed he went to Idaho with Mr. Beauvais of St. Louis and was in his em- 
pl()\- in the fur business in the northwest for two years. In 1847 he returned 
to St. Louis to accept a i)osition with the Shapleigh & Day Hardware Company 
and for fifty-three years was traveling representative for the firm. For twenty 
vears he traveled over the southwest territory on horseback, carrying his samples 
until the railroads were built. The onlv interruption to his continuous service 
with this house was during the period of the Civil war, for in 1861 he enlisted 
in Arkansas as a member of the Confederate armv and served under General 
]\Iarmaduke until the close of hostilities, when he returned to the hardware firm 
which he represented for more than a half century. The amicable relations be- 
tween himself and the house were well indicated by his long continuance in their 
service, wdiich also bore evidence of his faithfulness and his caijability in business 
lines. He had many patrons throughout the territor_\- over which he traveled and 
the number of these continuallv increased. He always kept in touch with modern 
business methods and ideas, remaining throughout his days an alert, energetic 
business man. 

On the 2Sth of July, 1853, in (ialena, Illinois, ]\Ir. Bogy was united in 
marriage to Miss Charlotte MacKay, a daughter of Col. ^^neas AlacKay, of 
the United States army, and Helen (Le Gate) MacKay. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Bogy were born two sons and a daughter, who survive him: Joseph A., now a 
{•nerchant of Colgate, Oklahoma : Alexander ]\I., secretary of the Ferguson- 
McKinney Dry Goods Company of this city; and Cornelia McKnight Bogy. 

In his religious views Mr. Bogy was a Catholic. His political support was 
given to the democracy until 1896, when his ideas being at variance with the 
free silver plank in the democratic party, he joined the ranks of the republican 
])arty, which he continued to support until his demise. He was a man of genial 
spirit, always kindly, approachable and courteous and wherever he went made 
friends. All over the route that he traveled there were those who held him in 



134 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

highest regard and looked forward eagerly to his periodical visits. In St. Louis, 
too. there were many who gave him \varm friendship, so that outside of his own 
home his death w^as the occasion of deep and widespread regret, while at his 
own fireside the family mourned the loss of one who had ever been a devoted 
husband and father. 



JOHN P. BOOGHER. 



lohn P. Boogher, in whose life geniality, pronounced business ability and 
appreciation for the rights and privileges of others were well balanced forces, 
was born in Alount Ple'asant, Frederick county, Maryland, October 8, 1834, and 
died in St. Louis, December 2^. 1893. He was descended on the paternal line 
from German ancestry, the original name being Bucher, and on the distafif side 
from English Quaker stock. He was descended from one of the old families 
of Nordlingen, Bavaria. Peter Bucher was born in Bavaria about 1400 and 
was granted a coat of arms in 1450 for military service rendered in defense 
of his country against the adjoining Palatinates. Nicholas Bucher, born in 
1690 in the upper valley of the Rhine, came to America with his wife and 
children in the ship Friendship, landing at Philadelphia October 17, 1727. 

lacob Boogher, a descendant of Nicholas Bucher, was a soldier in the 
]\Iarvland line "during the Revolutionary war. He married Elizabeth Christ, 
also of Frederick county, Alaryland, and their son Nicholas w^edded Rebecca 
Davis Coomes. She was descended from William Richardson, a gentleman planter 
of Anne Arundel county, Maryland, who came from England in 1655, and Eliza- 
beth Ewen, his wife. William Richardson was a member of the lower house of the 
assembly and a member of the committee on military affairs for the defense 
of the colony. He was also one of the leaders of the Society of Friends, not 
onlv of the West River Meeting of Anne Arundel county, but of the entire 
colony. Elizabeth Ewen, the wife of William Richardson, was a daughter of 
Richard Ewen, who came to Maryland in 1649. At different periods in his 
life he was a member of the upper house of the assembly and acted as its 
speaker during the last two years. He was likewise justice of the provincial 
court of Anne Arundel county and was captain of militia, and later he held 
the rank of major. He was likewise high sheriff of the county, and from the 
14th of March, 1654, until the i6th of September, 1657, he was one of the high 
commissioners to govern the colony of Maryland under the lord protector, 
Cromwell. 

The environment of John P. Boogher in his youth was that of the home 
farm. His education was acquired at Frederick City, where he later entered 
business life in the employ of a dry-goods merchant. He was thus engaged 
until 1856, when he came to St. Louis. The city was then of comparatively 
small proportions, but was advantageously located and was already enjoying 
an era of growth and prosperity. Mr. Boogher believed that it afforded a far 
better field for business advancement than his home town and accordingly he 
made his way to the middle west, where he secured employment in the wdiole- 
sale dry-goods house of Pomeroy, Benton & Company. He remained with 
that firm until 1862, and then on account of his strong sympathy with the south 
he was placed in the McDov/ell military prison, where he was confined for 
some months. When his liberty was restored he again became a factor in 
wholesale dry-goods circles, being admitted to a partnership in the firm of Henry 
Bell & Son, with whom he continued until the death of the senior partner in 
1878. The present Carleton Dry Goods Company is the outcome of this old 
establishment, which was conducted originally under the firm style of Henry 
Bell & Son and later Daniel W. Bell & Company, John P. and his brother, Jesse 
L. Boogher, constituting the company. After the death of Daniel W. Bell, 



136 ST. LDL'iS, THE FOfRTH CITY. 

John P. and Jesse L. Boogher consolidated their interests with those of James 
H. ^^"ear under the firm style of \\'ear, Boogher & Company, and later the 
name was changed to that of the Wear & Boogher Dry Goods Company, the 
business being incorporated, at which time John P. Boogher was chosen treas- 
urer of the company and continued to hold that office until his death in 1893. 
Later the name of the company was changed again to its present style — the 
Carleton Dry Goods Company. 

}*lr. Boogher was twice married, his first union, in 1866, being with i\Iiss 
Laura Wallace Brown, who died ir: 1867 and left him one son, John Wallace. 
On the 6th of September, 1871, he married Miss Eliza 15. Silver, a daughter of 
Joseph Silver, a wealthy planter of Baldwin county, Alabama. 3*Irs. pjoogher 
was born at Montgomery Hill, l)aldwin county, Alabama, in 1849. Her father 
was of English descent and when a young mari went from his home in Hart- 
ford county. ]\Iarylar:d, to Alabama, becoming a successful planter on the Ala- 
bama river. He was a member of the secession convention from Baldwin 
count \' and was one of those who signed the ordinance of secession for Ala- 
bama. He married Miss ^lartha Booth, a daughter of Captain Joseph Booth, 
who Avas born in South Carolina and was with General Jackson at the capture 
of Pensacola. Pie was also one of Captain Moore's company that escorted 
General La Fayette from Georgia to ^lobile and was afterward captain of this 
companv for some time, ^^'hcn the Creek war broke out he volunteered wdth 
David ]\Iims and was elected captain of a company, with which he served until 
the expiration of his term. He lived for many years at [Montgomery Hill, 
Baldwin county. Alabama, and was an extensive cotton planter. Mrs. Boogher 
and six of their children, besides ]\Ir. Boogher's son, John Wallace Boogher, 
survive the husband and father. The sons and daughters are : Joseph Silver ; 
Ernest Hastie ; Martha Silver, the wife of Orren W. Stone; Ethel; John P., 
who married Susan Meriwether; and Elise. 

Mr. Boogher was a member of the Centenary Methodist Episcopal church 
South and for many vears was prominent in its work. He contributed most 
generously to its support and did all in his power to further its interests. 
Throughout the entire church connection in this section of the country he was 
known for his charitv and religious influence. He enjoyed to the fullest the 
confidence and esteem of his business associates and won their admiration and 
respect by reason of the straightforward policy which he inaugurated at the 
outset of his career and which he alwa}s strenuouslv followed. His commer- 
cial integrity was never called into question. He never deviated from what 
he believed to be right between himself and his fellowmen and held to high 
ideals in every relation. In politics he was a pronounced democrat. His uni- 
form kindliness and tact and his cordial disposition were always a source of 
pleasure to his many friends, while his effective labors in the church made him 
one of its most valued members. His loss came with greatest force, however, 
to his family, who knew him as a devoted husband and father and one who 
made the interests of his wife and children paramount to all else. 



J( )Sl<:iMl !ICXTh:R BYRD. 

I'inancially interested in many business enter])rises of importance and with 
voice in their management, Joseph Hunter P\rd stands among the ])rominent 
representatives of commercial and financial interests in St. Louis. He was born 
in Cape Girardeau county, near Jackson, this state, Ma\- 8, 1880. His father, 
Abram Ruddcll I5\rd. was a son of Ste])hen Pyrd. and his mother, Mrs. Sarah 
Minerva fHunter) i'.yrd. was a daughter of Josei)h llunter, of New Madrid, 
^lissouri. Both families have residerl in southeastern ^lissouri since 1803. the 
Byrds holding a grant of land from Spain. Abram R. Ijyrd is a ranchman, 



ST. LOUIS, THE l-X)rRTll Cn"Y. 137 

miner and tionr manufacturer of San Antonio, Texas. The r>yi'<l family is of 
Scotch origin and was founded in X'irginia while this country was still num- 
bered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain. The early representatives 
of the name adhered to the English cause during the Revolutionary war. Two 
branches of the family emigrated to Missouri, the first settling in Cape Girardeau 
county in 1803 and the other at Birds Point in 1820. 

J. Hunter Byrd pursued his education in the academic department of the 
University of A'irginia and also attended the University of Texas. He left 
college, however, in the fall of 1901 and entered business life, devoting that 
year to mining and prospecting for gold in Xew Mexico. During the succeed- 
ing two years he was engaged in prospecting and exploring in northern }^Iexico 
in lower Pacific Mexico and on the Central American border. He s])ent the 
year of 1904 as a flour salesman and in 1905 became connected with the Alsop 
Process Company, dealers in electrical equipment for flour mills at St. Louis. 
He has since been associated with the company with which he became con- 
nected as salesman. The following year he was elected treasurer. He has also 
extended his efforts to other ilelds of activity. In 1906 he assisted in the organ- 
ization of the Central National Ban.k, of which he became a director and cashier. 
In 1907 he was elected to the directorate of the Missouri Lincoln Trust Company, 
to the ^lissouri State Life Insurance Company and to the Alsop Process Com- 
pany, of which he still remains as treasurer. He is associated in a partnership 
with his father and brother in the firm of A. R. Byrd & Sons, investments, and 
is also president of the \'alle\- Llardwood Company, which operates in timber 
and railway interests in Arkansas. Other corporations number him as a director 
and although yet a young man he has become widely recognized as one of 
sound business judgment and discernment. He is in touch with the progressive 
spirit of the times which utilizes each opportunity for advancement and has 
come to understand the value of concerted effort in the accomplishment of large 
results. 

Mr. r>yr(l was married in Jackson. Missouri, November 30, 1904. to Miss 
Emma Evangeline Howard, of Cape Girardeau county, who was educated at 
Randolph-Macon Women's College at Lynchburg, Mrginia. In politics 'Sir. 
Byrd is a democrat, stanchly advocating the party since age conferred upon him 
the right of franchise. Plis membership relations are with the Alpha Tan ( )mega 
fraternit}', the Alercantile Club and the Southern }\Iethodist church — associa- 
tions which indicate much of the character of his interests and his purposes. 
He has already made himself felt as a potent factor in business circles and his 
outlook is most promising because of his ability to recognize and utilize oi)]^or- 
tunities. 



ADOLPH BALLASEl'X. 

Adolph Ballaseux, vice president of the Grannemann-Kuelka Commission 
Company, was born January 2, 185 1, in Germany. His father, A\'illiam Ballaseux, 
was a court official at Alarienwerder, West Prussia, and the son pursued his edu- 
cation in the public schools there to the age of twelve vears, after which he 
spent two years in a lawyer's office in his native city. Then occurred one of 
the most momentous events in his life — his emigration to America. 

Beginning work in St. Louis in the grocery store of A. ]\[oll. the fact that 
he remained in that establishment for nineteen years stands in incontrovertible 
evidence of his fidelity, constantly increasing ability and trustworthiness. As 
his financial resources increased he became owner and manager of steamboats 
on the ^Missouri river and four years of his life succeeding his grocery experience 
were devoted to that pursuit. He then sold out and established a general mer- 
cantile business, also dealing in railroad timber in Calloway county, ^Missouri. 



138 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

In 1896 he returned to St. Louis and started in the wholesale butter and cheese 
business as vice president of the Grannemann-Kuelka Commission Company. 
He has since continued in this line, covering a period of twelve years and the 
business of the house is now extensive. It has always conducted its interests 
in accordance with the old adage that honesty is the best policy and in trade 
circles sustains an enviable reputation. 

On the I2th of February, 1874, Air. Ballaseux was married to Miss Clara 
B. S. Grapevine, a daughter of Captain Fredrick Grapevine, one of the oldest 
river captains of St. Louis. They have four daughters : Clara, who married 
John Pfeilter, secretary of the National Paper Company; Alamie, the wife of 
James H. Billington, manager of the Smith Premier Typewriter Company at 
Springfield, Illinois ; Heda. the wife of William \\'heatley, who is in the shoe 
business at Denver, Colorado ; and Jennie. 

In his social relations Mr. Ballaseux is a Alason and a Knight of Pythias, 
while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the St. James Epis- 
copal church. Starting out in life for himself at the age of twelve years and de- 
pendent entirelv upon his own resources since he first came to St. Louis at 
the age of fourteen, his career has been marked by successive forward steps and 
illustrates the fact that prosperity is not a matter of genius, as held by some, 
but is rather the outcome of clear judgment, experience and close application. 



PHILIP ROEDER. 



Philip Roeder has justly won the proud American title of a self-made man 
and has found that diligence and perseverance are keys that w411 unlock the por- 
tals of success. He was born January 8, 1846, at Offenthal near Frankfurt-on- 
the-Main, Germany, his parents, John and Anna M. Roeder, being farming- 
people of that locality. The immigration of the family to America during the 
boyhood of Philip Roeder enabled him to pursue his education in the public 
schools and passing through successive grades, he graduated from the St. Louis 
high school in 1861. Owing to the limited financial resources of the family he 
entered business life as an errand boy in the employ of W. H. Gray, a news- 
dealer, and aided in the support of his parents. He early learned to place a 
correct value upon money and opportunity and realized the fact that success is 
more often attributable to earnest, persistent labor than to any qualities of genius 
or fortunate circumstances. Gradually he worked his way upward as his useful- 
ness increased. 

In 1879 ^^^ f^^t that his capital, secured through his industry and careful 
expenditures, justified him in embarking in business on his own account, which 
he did at No. 322 Olive street as a bookseller, stationer and newsdealer. For 
thirty years he has thus been connected with the trade in St. Louis, his business 
being one of the old established and reliable houses of the city. The increase 
in his trade necessitated his removal from original quarters about 1890 and he 
went to the corner of Fourth and Olive streets. In 1894 the business was re- 
moved to No. 307 North Fourth street and since 1903 he has been at his present 
location, at No. 616 Locust street. He carries an extensive and carefully selected 
line of books, stationery and magazine publications and has many patrons who 
have been with him for years, while he is daily adding to the list. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party but, while he keeps well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day, he has never sought nor desired ofiice. 

On the 30th of April, 1870, in St. Louis, Mr. Roeder was married to Aliss 
Amanda C. Sennewald, who died in 1901. Their children were: Oliver and 
Charley, both in business with their father, the former now married but the 
latter at home; Philip, who is secretary of the wholesale notion firm of Shryock, 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 139 

Todd & Company; Emma, the wife of Oscar O. Dunham; and Amanda, the wife 
of Lonis F. Abel. 

Mr. Roeder has Hved a strictly business life, conlining his attention to his 
mercantile interests and his home. When free from business cares, he prefers 
to spend his time at his own hreside. He has been a most active, energetic man 
and his success is due entirely to his close application, unfaltering energy and 
keen outlook in commercial lines. 



LOUIS E. DENNIG. 



Louis E. Dennig has been connected with various business interests of 
importance in commercial and industrial life of St. Louis, his enterprise proving 
a factor in the development of substantial trade relations over the city. He 
w^as here born, December 22, i860. His father, E. G. Dennig, was a native of 
Kaiserslautern, Germany, born July 25, 1826, and in 1848, at the age of twenty- 
two years, he immigrated to the United States. He had just been an active 
participant in the revolutionary movement, which was inagurated to free the 
country from some of its monarchical measures and because of the failure of the 
revolution had to flee to America, together with Carl Schurz and many others 
who were prominent factors in the movement. Settling in New York city, he 
there remained until 1856, when he opened the first leather goods manufactory 
in St. Louis. He also extended the scope of his business activity by conducting 
a book bindery and eventually he became connected with the wine and licjuor 
business as a partner of John Boeringer. He died April i, 1877, while his wife, 
Margaret Juengst Dennig, who was born in Worms, Germany, September 4, 
1835, passed away in St. Louis, November 14, 1894. 

In the private schools of this cit}^ Louis E. Dennig pursued his early edu- 
cation and in 1877 was graduated from the German Institute under Professor 
Eyser. In his business career he started at the bottom of the ladder but has 
mounted round by round until he has long since reached the plane of affluence. 
On the 3d of September, 1877, he became associated with Carl Conrad, of the 
firm of C. Conrad & Company, at No. 613 Locust street, the originators of the 
Budweiser bottle beer. There he was advanced through various promotions and 
was serving as buyer, wdien in January, 1883, the business was turned over to the 
Budweiser Beer & Wine Company, of which he became secretary, with Adolphus 
Busch as president. On the ist of July, 1895, the company retired as jobbers 
and Mr. Dennig assumed the local managership of the Anheuser-Busch Brew- 
ing Association. Each change in his business connections have marked a for- 
ward step, bringing him broader opportunities. In 1900 he became the secretary 
and treasurer of the Delmar Garden Amusement Company and in January, 1906, 
he became a member of the firm of Busch & Everett, in the oil and gas busi- 
ness. While on the 15th of January, 1908, he was elected president and treas- 
urer of the Busch & Everett Company, its successors. In February, 1906, he 
became interested in the St. Louis Independent Packing Company, controlling 
the largest packing interests in this city and was elected vice president, in which 
capacity he has since remained. His business interests have been extensive and 
of an important character as factors in the commercial and industrial circles 
of the city and in positions of responsibility he has displayed keen executive 
force, bending his energies to constructive eft'orts which have resulted in the 
development of large and profitable concerns. 

On the 22d of November, 1898, Mr. Dennig was married to ]\Iiss Marie 
Schaefer, the second daughter of Louis Schaefer, of 3323 Russell avenue, and 
they have one son, Louis S. Dennig. Her father, now living retired, was 
formerly the president of the St. Louis Dressed Beef Company. Mv. Dennig 
is greatly interested in big game and duck shooting, fishing and kindred sports 



140 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

and along those recreative lines secures needed rest from business. He is of 
the Protestant faith and his poHtical behef is indicated by the stalwart support 
which he gives the republican party. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons, the Elks and the Eagles. He also belongs to the Travelers Protective 
Association, the Business ]^lcn's League, the Liederkranz, the Union Club, [Mis- 
souri Athletic Club. Automobile Club and the Cantine Plunting & Fishing 
Association, serving as secretarv of the same almost continuously since becom- 
ing" one of its charter members. He is likewise connected with the St. Louis 
Trap Shooters Association and is popular in social circles where congeniality 
and similar tastes have drawn men together in social organization. 



HOWARD WATSOX, 



The nature of Howard \\'atson was many sided. He never concentrated 
his energies so exclusivelv along one line as to bar out active and helpful inter- 
est in ot'her affairs which are elements in the hfe of the individual, the munici- 
pality and the nation. While he became a successful business man, he was 
equallv well known in political, church and [Masonic circles, and all felt the 
stimulu.- of his activity and benefited by his sound judgment. A native of Illi- 
nois, he was born in [Mount Vernon, [May 13. 1855, and passed away in St. 
Louis. lulv 7, 1908. He was the second son of the late Joel F. Watson, of 
[Mount Vernon, and had two brothers. Albert, a lawyer, and Dr. ^^'alter W^atson, 
well known professional men of this city. 

The public schools of his native town aiTorded Howard Watson his edu- 
cational privileges and after equipping himself for the duties of bookkeeper he 
sought and obtained a situation with George H. \'arnell, who was then exten- 
sive'lv engaged in the lumber business in Mount \'ernon. It was through his 
emplover' that [Mr. V.'atson became acquainted with Jack P. Richardson, a 
well known lumber commission merchant of St. Louis, and in 1880, removing 
to this citv, he became associated with [Mr. Richardson in business and con- 
tinued in active and successful connection with the lumber trade until a short 
time prior to his death, when his health failed him. He readily solved intri- 
cate business problems, carefully formulated his plans and instituted new busi- 
ness methods, which resulted in the establishment and development of a mam- 
moth enterprise. The years chronicled for him almost phenomenal success, and 
vet investigation into his life record shows that the methods he employed and 
the plans which he pursued were such as might be carried into effect in any 
business with excellent results. He knew how to use his forces so that there 
was no needless expenrliture nf time, labor or material, and his understanding 
of the lumber trade enabled him to make judicious purchases and profitable 
sales. 

In i8f;Q [Mr. Watson was united in marriage to [Mrs. Fannie Fisk, of St. 
Louis, who, with one daughter, [Martha Watson, survives the husband and 
father. In all of his life [Mr. AN'atson was deeply interested in political problems 
and the issues of the day. Sodu after attaining his majority, while still residing 
in Illinois, he served for a term as collector of [Mount Vernon township, which 
was the only political office he ever sought or accepted. This may be cited as 
an instance of his personal poi)ularity. for at that date — 1878 — the township 
was overwhelmingly democratic, and [Mr. Watson, the only republican in hi? 
family, was elected. He was ever stanch and fearless in support of his honest 
convictions, and his fidelity to ])rinci])le was never weighed in the scale of 
public policy. 

He stanchly enf!or'-ed the jniri^oscs of the [Masonic fraternity and became 
one of its distinguished representatives, serving with great honor in the chapter 
and grand lodge of his adopted state, w'hile for several years he was deputy 




HOWARD WATSOX 



142 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

grand lecturer. His membership was in Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, A. F. & 
A. ^L, in which he served as worshipful master and, advancing beyond the 
initial three degrees, he became a member of the Knight Templar Commandery 
and of the Alvstic Shrine. While thus interested in matters of citizenship and 
of man's ethical relations, he was also connected with the transcendent inter- 
ests and purposes of religion, his belief in the Christian faith finding expression 
in his dailv life and in his support of the Alethodist Episcopal church. He 
became a member of the board of trustees of the Maple Avenue Methodist 
Episcopal church and contributed in large measure to the success of the various 
activities for establishing on a firm basis the principles of Methodism in the 
Cabanne district in which he resided. It was largely due to his unremitting 
labor and unfaltering zeal that the present church edifice was erected. It is 
one of the most handsome churches of the city and was completed at a cost 
of no less than one hundred thousand dollars. His Christian faith was the 
permeating influence in the life of Mr. Watson, who always endeavored to 
closelv follow the teachings of the ^Master and to entertain a spirit of brotherly 
kindness toward his fellowmen. He greatly enjoyed the society of his family 
and friends and the best traits of his character were reserved for his own house- 
hold. He was willing to make any personal sacrifice to further the interests of 
his wife and daughter, for whom he entertained unbounded love. To them he 
left not only the substantial rewards of a successful business career, but also 
the priceless heritage of that untarnished name which is rather to be chosen 
than great riches. At his death the following resolutions were passed: 

Whereas, Our Heavenly Father in His infinite wisdom has removed from 
our midst our friend and brother, Howard Watson, who was one of the charter 
members of the ]\laple Avenue JMethodist Episcopal church and a member of 
the official board continuously from its organization until the time of his death, 
and who was also for many years secretary of our Sunday school ; therefore : 

Resolved : That in the death of our associate we recognize the loss of a 
man of sterling integrity, a discreet and wise counselor, a faithful and con- 
scientious officer, a self-sacrificino- brother, a true husband and an affectionate 
father, w'hose greatest joy and pleasure was in ministering to the comfort and 
happiness of his family and his friends. He was a devout man, warmly at- 
tached to the church, greatlv interested in all its institutions, and was ever ready 
and willing to assist to the utmost of his ability in carrying its burdens. In 
every station in life he was recognized as a man of sincerity and truth, a man 
among men esteemed and beloved. 

Resolved: That we hereby express our deepest sorrow at his death and ex- 
tend our most sincere sympathv and condolence to his family, and that these 
resolutions be spread upon the records of the official board and a copy be pre- 
sented to Mrs. Watson. 

P)V order of the official board. 

C. W. Woods, 
H. C. Beckwith, 
Frederic A. Kepil, 

Coininittee. 



j.WWS RL'SSELL DOUGAN. 

James Russell Dougan. secretary of the Acme Cement Plaster Company. 
was bom at Mount Pleasant, Kansas, August 22, 1870, a son of Francis Marion 
and \1rginia (Tackitt) Dougan, the former a farmer. The paternal grand- 
father, a native of Tennessee, removed thence to Indiana and afterward to 
Kansas. The maternal grandfather was James Tackitt, who married a Miss 
McCartne\- anrl Ijoth were from X'irginia but l^ecamc residents of Holden, Mis- 
souri, about 1850. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 143 

James R. Doiigan attended the county schools and was graduated from the 
high school at Seneca, Kansas, in 1886. His opportunities in youth were limited 
and it has only been through force of character, his inherent qualities of per- 
severance and determination and his ready adaptability to circumstances that he 
has worked his way upward to a place among the substantial business men of 
his adopted city. After leaving school he accepted a position with a civil engi- 
neering corps in Kansas on the Kansas City & Northwestern Railroad, remain- 
ing in that service for three years on the construction of the road. It was 
a life of deprivation. The corps was supplied with a camping outfit and lived in 
tents, while the meals were of the coarsest provisions. 

jNIr. Dougan obtained his position through the influence of S. L. Davis, 
a contractor. He performed willingly, however, any service that was assigned 
him, and his diligence and fidelity naturally led to his promotion. Thus he 
gradually worked his way upward. He was one of a family of six children and 
it was necessary that he aid in their support after the father's death. After 
leaving the engineering corps 2\Ir. Dougan became bookkeeper in the State Bank 
at Summerfield, Kansas, continuing there for three years, when he resigned 
and accepted a position in the P"irst National Bank at Seneca, Kansas. He left 
that bank to become bookkeeper for the Acme Cement Plaster Company in St. 
Louis in 1899 and here his worth and business capacity were recognized, when 
in 1 90 1 he was elected secretary, while the following year he was also chosen 
treasurer. Deprived in youth of manv of the advantages which most boys enjoy, 
he has designated \\'. E. Wilkinson as his greatest benefactor and friend. He 
says that he received aid in many ways from ]\Ir. ^^llkinson vshich aid vcas re- 
sponsible for his present position. However, influence availeth little or naught 
if the individual does not possess the capacity that qualifies him for the work in 
hand, and that yir. Dougan has been prompt and faithful in every duty is indic- 
ative of his fidelity, his unwearied diligence and his readv mastery of the intri- 
cate problems presented in this as in every important business concern. 

In Seneca, Kansas, on the 19th of November, 1900, Mr. Dougan was 
married to Aliss Nellie May Johnson, and unto them have been born two children : 
Dorothv E., who was born April 14, 1903; and Alice Virginia, born September 
17, 1905. In his political views Air. Dougan is somewhat independent, yet 
generallv votes the republican ticket. Since 1899 he has been a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and since 1905 of the Mercantile Club. He is a Universalist 
in religious faith and is a man of broad and liberal ideas, not only in religion 
but in all those interests of life which concern man in his relations with his 
fellowmen. There is nothing narrow^ nor contracted in his judgment and views 
and in citizenship, as in business, he is actuated by a progressive spirit ancP de- 
sire for constant advancement and improvement. 



SAMUEL THOAIAS RATHELL. 

Samuel Thomas Rathell. deceased, was during an active and useful life 
engaged in real-estate operations of a nature that greatly benefited the public and 
at the same time proved a source of gratifying individual revenue. His life 
record began at Easton, Alaryland, October i, 1849, his parents being William 
K. and Dorothy (Hopkins) Rathell. His education was acquired in the private 
and high schools of his native city, and in early manhood he made preparation 
for having a home of his own by his marriage, in Lexington, Alissouri. in 1873. 
to Miss Oleatha Didawich. Her father was Judge Jacob Didawich, who for 
thirty years presided over the courts at Montana and was regarded as an eminent 
and able jurist of the state. His wife, who bore the maiden name of ?yl?.rgaret 
Grant, was a native of \'irginia, and her ancestors were among the soldiers of the 
Revolutionarv war. 



144 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Mr. Rathell began his business life as a dry-goods merchant and continued in 
that Hue until 1866, after which he became connected with real-estate opera- 
tions in St. Louis. He gained prominence in this line of activity, t)ie extent of 
his interests making him one of the leading real-estate dealers of the city. He 
was the president of the Rathell Real-estate Company, of the Harlem Heights 
Land & Improvement Company and secretary of the Lakeview Improvement 
Company. Few men had so comprehensive or correct a knowledge of realty 
values or contributed in greater degree to the material development of the city 
through the purchase, sale and improvement of property. 

]\lr. Rathell was also well known because of his activity in other lines. He 
was a stalwart advocate of the democratic party and served as state fish com- 
missioner in 1898. Neither was he unknown in military circles, for in earlier 
manhood he belonged to the old Company A of the Missouri National Guard. 
In his fraternal relations he was connected with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, and the Legion of Honor, while his religious faith was indicated by 
his membership in the Methodist church. 

Unto ]\Ir. and ]Mrs. Rathell were born six children: Oleatha, the wife of 
A. ]\I. Field: Robert \\\, who is in Texas: Samuel T. : 3*Iargaret G., the wife 
of R. \V. Hall: Grace ?\lcPheeters : and Dorothy Flopkins, both at home. About 
thirteen vears ago, ]\Ir. Rathell erected a fine residence for his family. He was 
preeminently a home man, who found his greatest happiness with his wife and 
children. He possessed a kindly nature and charitable disposition and his life. 
was the exponent of his Christian faith. He was honored and respected by all 
bv reason of his genuine worth and wdien he passed away April 16, 1906, his 
death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret to the many friends whom 
he had made. 



CLARENCE OLIVER SIMPSON, D.D.S., M.D. 

Clarence Oliver Simpson, professor of operating dentistry and dental embry- 
ologv and histology in the Barnes University, and a successful practitioner in 
St.'Louis, was born at Hindsboro, Illinois,' September 8, 1879. His parents 
were Taylor and Elizabeth :\Iary (Watson) Simpson. His father was a pioneer 
resident of eastern Illinois, where, for many years, he carried on merchandising. 

In the public schools of his native town Dr. Simpson acquired his early 
education and later attended the high school at Terre Haute, Indiana. Sub- 
sequently he became a student in the University of Illinois, where he 
remained for two years and was then graduated from the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery in 1902. He afterward entered the medical department of Barnes 
University and was graduated in 1906. Following his graduation in dentistry 
he located at Champaign, Illinois, but in November, 1902, removed to St. Louis, 
where he has been ' engaged in the general practice of dentistry continuously 
since. He has been a member oi the faculty of ihe ilental department of Barnes 
University since its organization in 1903, and as ])rofessor of operating dentistry 
and flental embryolog}- and histology he is proving a valued representative of 
the teaching force of that institution.' He holds to high ideals both as a teacher 
anfl a practitioner, and does all of his professional services with a sense of 
conscientious obligation that has made his labor of worth in his chosen field 
of enfleavor. 

CJn the i6th of October, 1900, in Chicagcj, Illinois, Dr. Simpson was united 
in marriage to Miss Bertha Barnes. His recreation comes through athletics, 
foot-ball, base-ball, tennis and the drama. He is popular and prominent in 
various organizations, being a member of the Mis.souri State Dental Association; 
a member and secretary of the St. Louis Society of Dental Science; a member 
of the Ka]jpa Sigma; a grand master of the St. Louis Alumni of the Kappa 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 145 

Sigma; a member of the Xi Psi Phi, a dental fraternit}', and president of the 
St. Louis Alumni Association of that fraternity. Lie was also a member of the 
fourth international dental congress, and his work in these various organizations 
iias been a factor in their success and far reachinsr influence. 



THEODORE SHELTON. 

Theodore Sheltou, who is accorded a place with the capable and successful 
representatives of mercantile life in St. Louis and has for seven years been the 
vice president of the White-Branch-Shelton Hat Company, was born at Shelton- 
ville, Forsyth county, near Atlanta, Georgia, June 18, 1844, his parents being 
V. P). and Emily (Connally) Sheltou. The Shelton family is of English origin 
probably connected with the Sheltons seated in Norfolkshire. John Shelton, who 
came from England to America in 1680, was a wealthy man who owned his own 
ship and traded between England and the colonies. The family tradition, sup- 
ported by a coat of arms which was used by John Shelton, gave him descent from 
Sir John Shelton and his wife, Anne Boelyn. John Shelton married a daughter 
of William Park, who was of English birth, and was the first editor of the ]\Iary- 
land Gazette, which he published in 1727. He married Mrs. Sarah Pack, a 
widow, and their daughter, Sarah, became the wife of Patrick Henry, and the 
son of that marriage, David Henry, married a Miss Rice. Their son. Major 
Thomas Henry, of Louisa county, Virginia, was commander of a body of troop 
in the Revolutionary war and served under General La Fayette, who, in token of 
friendship, presented him with a ring engraven with his name, "La Fayette," 
which is now worn by the Major's great-granddaughter. He was a legislator 
from Louisa county, where he had large tracts of land and a handsome home. 
His first wife, a Miss Dabney, was a cousin to Dr. R. L. Dabney, of the L^ni- 
versity of Virginia, who served on General "Stonewall" Jackson's stafli. She 
traced her ancestry back to the D'Aubigneys, being descended from Auglaise 
Dabney. 

Tracing another line of the family we find that John P. Shelton, son of 
Major Shelton, married his cousin, Massie Shelton, and their son. George P. 
Shelton, married a kinswoman, Katharine Dabney, whose mother was a Jack- 
son. A daughter of this marriage, Katharine Massie, became the wife of 
Archibald Hait Anderson. For his second wife George Shelton chose ]\Iiss 
Winston, of Virginia. Archer Anderson, a son of Archibald Hait and Katharine 
Massie Anderson, was married to Nannie Trabue, a daughter of ^^'illiamson 
Haskins Pittman, a descendant of the Pays-Trabues. Archer Anderson and his 
wife reside in St. Louis and had one daughter, Jean Hamilton Anderson, who 
was born November 20, 1892, and died April 20, 1902. It will thus be seen 
that Theodore Shelton of this reyiew is connected with various southern families 
of distinction. 

Theodore Shelton attended the public schools of Booneville, [Missouri, to 
the age of sixteen years, and then, ambitious to provide for his own support, he 
accepted a clerkship in the store of Cloney. Crawford & Company at Sedalia, 
Missouri. That he was trustworthy and industrious is indicated by the fact 
that he was for five years a clerk in that establishment. On the expiration 
of that period he came to St. Louis and for a year was in the employ of Hender- 
son, Ridgely & Company, wdiolesale dry-goods merchants. He next became 
salesman for Gauss, Hunicke & Company, dealers in hats, whom he represented 
as a salesman until 1875, when his business ability gained him recognition in 
admission to a partnership. In 1878 a change in ownership led to the adoption 
of the firm style of Gauss, Shelton Hat Company, and Mr. Shelton was elected 
vice president, filling that position for thirty-five years, or until 1902, when he 
sold out to Mr. Gauss. At that date he became vice president of the White- 

10— VOL. II. 



146 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Branch-Shelton Company, conducting a large wholesale hat business, its ramify- 
ing interests reaching out to all the western and southern cities. They occupy 
a building five stories in height with basement, and the business has reached 
mammoth proportions, being today one of the important and profitable commer- 
cial enterprises of this city. Mr. Shelton's long connection with the hat trade 
has given him an experience that makes his services of marked value to the new 
company and no one is more thoroughly familiar with the trade than he. 

On the 20th of February, 1868, Mr. Shelton was married at Oak Dale near 
Sedalia, ]^Iissouri, to jMiss Janie Gentry, a daughter of Judge William Gentry, 
for many years a prominent and honored citizen of this city. He was born 
April 14, 1818, in Howard county, Missouri, and in 1840 married Ann Redd, a 
daughter of ^lajor Louis Redd, of Frankfort, Kentucky, and Mildred Elvira 
(Thomson) Redd, of Scott county, Kentucky. Judge Gentry was the owner of 
a very large plantation of six thousand acres near Sedalia, Missouri, upon which 
he resided and in addition to the management of this estate he occupied the 
bench of the county court for twenty years. In 1874 he was the "people's can- 
didate" for governor of the state and for a long period he occupied a most prom- 
inent position in the public life of the community. He was eminently a man of 
altairs and one who wielded a wide influence, his superior power well fitting 
him for leadership, while his patriotic devotion to his state was a recognized 
feature in his life. L'nto Mr. and j\Irs. Gentry were born eleven children, eight 
of whom are yet living and are now in homes of their own. As stated, their 
daughter Janie became the wife of Theodore Shelton and they have two sons, 
Richard T., who is now secretary of and the buyer for the AVhite-Branch-Shelton 
Hat Company, and William G.. who is living in Chicago, where he is conducting 
a large business under the name of Shelton Electric Company. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shelton reside at No. 4467 Lindell boulevard, where they own a beautiful, mod- 
ern home. 

]\Ir. Shelton gives his political support to the principles of the democracy 
and is a charter member of the Mercantile Club. He has always based his 
business principles and actions upon the rules which govern strong and unswerv- 
ing integrity and unfaltering industry, throughout his entire business career re- 
garding his word given or an engagement made as a sacred obligation. 



HARRY TROLL 



The name of Troll has figured prominently in public afl:airs for many 
years. Captain Henry Troll, father of him whose name introduces this re- 
view, belonged to that class of liberty-loving German people who, failing in 
their efl:'orts to secure more tolerant laws and the overthrow of certain mon- 
archical customs, left Germany at the time of the uprising in 1848 and came to 
America to enjoy the benefits of a republican government. He became a promi- 
nent factor in Civil war times and for thirty-two years was one of the influential 
men in the public life of St. Louis. He was twice sheriff and later circuit clerk 
of the city. 

His son, Llarry 'I" roll, a native of this city, benefited by the educational 
arlvantages here ofl^ered and when his more specifically literary course was com- 
pleted began preparations for the bar as a student in the law department of 
Washington L'niversity, from which he was graduated with honors, the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws being conferred upon him. For many years he was con- 
nected with the courts in various important capacities and then entered upon 
the active practice of hi^ chosen profession, being for some time associated with 
William Dee Becker. In the trial of cases before the courts he gave evidence 
of careful preparation and the utmost zeal in his devotion to his client's in- 
terests. The qualities which he displayed, both as a lawyer and citizen, led to 




HARRY TROLL 



148 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

his selection for political honors, arid he received from the republican party the 
unanimous nomination for the office of public administrator. Further endorse- 
ment was given him at the polls and he is now^ for a second term filling the 
position to which he was again chosen by popular suffrage in 1908. In this con- 
nection his service is characterized by accuracy, promptness and system, and the 
multitudinous duties which devolve upon him are most ably handled. 

]\Ir. Troll is recognized as one of the leaders of the republican party in 
his native city and. keeping well informed on the questions and issues of the 
day, his natural eloquence and clear and logical reasoning enable him to present 
his causes in cogent manner. None doubt the sincerity of his own convictions 
upon a subject which he handles and his influence has been an important element 
in shaping the policy and conducting the campaigns of the republican party. 

]\Ir. Troll is equally well known socially as a representative of one of the 
old and prominent families, while his personal characteristics have made him 
very popular, with a constantly increasing circle of friends. He belongs to all 
the leading clubs of St. Louis. He has been spoken of as reserved in manner 
and careful in making acquaintances, but nevertheless cordial and the prince of 
men with those he knows in his social communion. He is rich in the materials 
which make for the highest type of citizenship and the highest love of coun- 
try. Fie has much of the philosopher in his character but practicability has 
alKvays appealed to his judgment more than theory. He believes that the 
greatest triumph that one can achieve i? the life that one lives and the man- 
ner in which he lives it. Believing in truth in all things he lives this belief. 
He is free in the expression of his honest convictions and does not reserve 
opinion about men and measures, so that this position is never an equivocal one. 



EDMLIND BURKE PICKETT. 

Edmund Burke Pickett, who during the years of his residence in St. Louis 
lived retired although well known as a distinguished lawyer, was born October 
20, 1820, in Carthage, Tennessee. His father. Colonel Jonathan Pickett, was a 
native of Lebanon, Tennessee, while the mother, who bore the maiden name of 
Mary Vance, was a native of West Virginia. The former served with the rank 
of colonel in the war of 1812. He became the founder of the town of Lebanon, 
Tennessee, practically owning the entire town site and promoting in large meas- 
ure the growth and development of the entire community. He was a wealthy man 
and gave liberally to those in need, and did the utmost in his power to further 
public progress and improvement. He built the first school house and also the 
first tannery in that part of the state, and contributed in substantial measure 
to the growth and development of the community. Edmund Burke Pickett was 
a brother to the distinguished Colonel Pickett who, at the battle of Gettysburg, 
made one of the most brilliant militarv charges ever known to history, his un- 
daunted braver\- and militarv skill winning him the honor and admiration of 
northern as well as southern troops. 

In the schools of his native city Edmund Burke Pickett acquired his early 
education and afterward spent nine years as a student in Harvard Liniversity, 
where, in addition to literary studies, he completed the full law course. He then 
returned to ^Temphis, Tennessee, where he opened an office and engaged in 
practice. While advancement at the bar is proverbially slow, no drearv novitiate 
aw'aited him. On the contrary he won almost immediate success, for his prepara- 
tion was thorough and his understanding of the demands of the profession was 
clear and accurate. He jjrepared his cases with the utmost thoroughness and 
care, presenting them with i)recision, clearness and force, and was seldom, if 
ever, at fault in the application of a legal principle. He became recognized as 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 149 

the most prominent lawyer in his section of the state and for years enjoyed a 
most extensive and important cHentage. 

Mr. Pickett was married twice. He first wedded Miss Louisa Jamison, 
and unto them were born seven children, of whom only three are now living. 
The wife and mother passed to her final rest in 1867, and on the 3d of November, 
1870, Mr. Pickett was married at Nashville, Tennessee, to Miss Laura Massen- 
gale, daughter of Henry White and Rebecca (Lowe) Massengale. She 
survives him. One son, Porter, now forty years of age, is living with his mother 
at the old homestead. He held a position in the State National Bank in this 
city for twenty-two years, and on the ist of June. 1908, became secretary, treas- 
urer and general manager of the Security building. 

.Mr. Pickett was not only recognized as a distinguished, able and forceful 
lawyer but was also known as a preceptor, whose ability in professional training 
was most marked. He had four students in his law office and directed their 
reading in their preparation for a professional career. On the ist of December, 
1876, on account of the yellow fever plague, he left ^Memphis, where he had so 
long practiced, and removed to St. Louis. He did not resume professional duties 
here, and after residing for a few years in this city went to Mexico where he 
remained for five years on account of his health. He then returned to St. Louis 
and continued to remain here in the enjoyment of well earned rest until he was 
called to his home beyond, his death occurring in 1903 at No. 4012 Olive street, 
♦vhere his wife and son still reside. He was very prominently connected with 
the Odd Fellows and Masonic fraternities in ^Memphis, and was also a member of 
the Historical Society and of the Tennessee Society of St. Louis. He was a most 
warm-hearted man of generous spirit, who gave freely to assist the poor and 
needy, and always had a hand outstretched to help a fellow traveler on the 
journev of life. His natural endowments were a quick and strong temper and 
a warm heart, a gentle manner and an attractive courtesy. To control the first 
and to make his life the flower and expression of the other traits was the task 
which nature assigned him. We know nothing of the struggle but were daily 
witnesses of the victory. Kindness was the motive of his life. He had a well- 
spring of afifection and a quick and generous sympathy which increased by giving 
and became richer by being a very spendthrift. He presented a medal for scholar- 
ship at John Allen College in Carthage, Tennessee, taking an active interest in 
educational afifairs. 



LE\T WADE CHILDRESS. 

The consecutive progress in business which admits of no other interpretation 
than that of merit and ability has characterized the career of Levi Wade Chil- 
dress, now president of the Columbia Transfer Company. He was born in Mur- 
freesboro, Tennessee, March 20, 1876, his parents being William S. and Inez 
(Wade) Childress, who were also natives of Murfreesboro. The father devoted 
his life to agricultural pursuits. He was a graduate of the university at Sewanee. 
Tennessee. He died November i, 1891, at the age of thirty-eight years, and 
the mother now resides with her son, John Whitsett Childress, of Washington, 
D. C. Their family numbered three children : John \\niitsett, Levi \\'ade and Ida 
Lea, the daughter'being now the wife of Judge William Cummings, of Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee. 

A sister of John W. Childress, the grandfather of our subject, became the 
wife of lames K. Polk, president of the United States, while Betty Childress, 
a sister of William S. Childress, married John C. Brown, an early governor of 
Tennessee, who was afterward president of one of the Gould railroads. John 
W. Childress, an uncle of our subject, is now one of the circuit judges of the 
Nashville (Tenn.) circuits. The mother of Mrs. Inez Childress, Virginia Barks- 
dale, was a member of the prominent ?^Iississippi family of Barksdales and a 



150 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

sister of \\illiani Barksdale. a major general of the Confederate army, who was 
killed in the battle of Gettysburg. Ethelbert Barksdale served for twenty years 
in congress as a representative from ^lississippi. Levi Wade, the maternal grand- 
father of L. W. Childress, was a large planter and slaveowner prior to the Civil 
war, but the fortunes of war destroyed his property and left him with almost 
nothing. He, too, was prominent in legislative history, serving for several terms 
in the general assembly of Tennessee. 

His grandson, a namesake, Levi Wade Childress, pursued his education in 
the public schools of Alurfreesboro, Tennessee, and in 1893, at the age of seven- 
teen vears. came to St. Louis, where he entered upon his business career in a 
clerical capacitv with the St. Louis Drayage Company. Subsequently he became 
a clerk in the freight department of the Illinois Central Railroad and afterward 
was clerk and freight agent in St. Louis for the ^Missouri, Kansas & Texas Rail- 
road. His next position made him commercial agent for the same road at Shreve- 
port. Louisiana, w^here he continued until February, 1902, when he returned to 
St. Louis and became traffic manager of the Columbia Transfer Company, en- 
gaged in local freight transfer in transporting shipments between the depots and 
business houses. His capabilitv has gained him successive promotions and in 
October. 1903, he was made general manager, while since ]\Iay, 1905, he has been 
president and general manager of this company, in which connection he is con- 
ducting a most extensive, growing and profitable business. 

In Wicklifi:e, Kentucky, on the 7th of October, 1903, ]\Ir. Childress was 
married to ^liss Lucv Alarshall Turner, and they have two sons. Wade Turner 
and Fielding Turner. The family attend the Presbyterian church, with which 
^Ir. Childress holds membership. He also belongs to the ^Mercantile Club, Busi- 
ness Glen's League and is a director in the Citizens Industrial Association. Cour- 
teous, genial, well informed, wide-awake and enterprising, he stands today as 
one of the leading representative men of his adopted city and his success is most 
commendable, in that it has been gained through his own intense and well di- 
rected activitv. 



JOHN LAWRENCE AIAURAN. 

In a great city like St. Louis, wdiere every line of business has hundreds 
of representatives, the man whose name becomes widely known in a business 
connection must display qualities that are superior to those of his contempo- 
raries and colleagues. Alodestly inclined, John Lawrence Mauran takes no spe- 
cial credit to himself, and yet the character and extent of his work have gained 
him prominence in architectural circles and made him a large contributor to the 
task of upbuilding and adorning St. Louis. Carlyle has said, "The story of 
any man's life would have interest and value if truly told," and he who thought- 
fully ponders over the record of Mr. jMauran will see that his success has come 
from his careful preparation, his close and unremitting application to the high 
standard which he set up for himself and toward which he is ever working. A 
native of Providence, Rhode Island, he was born November 19, 1866, and is a 
son of Frank and Mary Louise (Nichols) Mauran. His education was acquired 
in the grammar and high schools of his native city and in the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, where his thorough and comprehensive training laid 
the founrlation for his success in later life. After completing his course there 
by graduation with the class of 1889, he travelled abroad and continued his edu- 
cation by studying the styles of architecture of the old world. Following his 
return to .America he entered the office of Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, prominent 
architects of Boston, thus putting his theoretical knowledge to a practical test. 
That he was able and competent is indicated in the fact that after two years he 
was sent by that firm to Chicago, where he was engaged in work on the Chicago 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 151 

I-'ublic Library, and the Art Institute, two of the notably fine buildings of the 
country. In 1893 ^^^ came to St. Louis to represent Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, 
and afterward was admitted to a partnership in their St. Louis business. In 
1900, however, he withdrew from that connection and was joined by Earnest 
John Russell and Edward Gordon Garden in organizing the present firm of 
Mauran, Russell & Garden. His position here is one of eminence in architectural 
circles, his ability and the confidence reposed in him by the public both being 
indicated in the liberal patronage that is accorded him. Many of the finest struc- 
tures in this city stand as monuments to his skill, and the name of Alauran 
is today largely synonymous for that which is highest, and best in architecture 
in St. Louis. By appointment of Mayor Wells he became chairman of the Pub- 
lic Buildings Commission. He was sent as a delegate from the United States 
to the Sixth International Congress of Architects, held at Madrid, Spain, in 
1904. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and was formerly 
president of the St. Louis chapter. While Mr. Mauran is well known in pro- 
fessional circles, those who meet him in his home and in social circles speak of 
him as a man of genial nature and most attractive courtesy. He was married 
in St. Louis in 1899 to Miss Isabel Chapman, a daughter of J. G. Chapman, and 
their children are Isabel and Elizabeth Chapman Mauran. 

Mr. Mauran has never gained success at the price of anything that is hon- 
orable in manhood or by sacrificing another's rights and opportunities. On the 
contrary he has marked appreciation for all those movements and measures 
which tend to assist and benefit his fellowmen, and various charitable and benevo- 
lent organizations have received his hearty cooperation. He is now a director of 
the St. Louis Skin & Cancer Hospital and of the Hospital Saturday and Sunday 
Association. That he is interested in his adopted city's welfare is manifest in the 
fact that he is now a director of the Civic Improvement League and a member 
of the board of control of the St. Louis Museum and School of Fine Arts and 
also of the public library board as well as president of the Mercantile library. 
His interest in research work is evidenced in his membership in the Missouri 
Historical Society and the American .Vrchseological Society. He belongs to the 
Unitarian church, while his social nature finds expression in his membership in 
the Round Table, of which he is a director, the LTniversity Club, of which he was 
formerly vice president, the St. Louis Club, the Noonday Club, of which he was 
formerly president, the Country Club, of which he is a director, the Florissant 
Valley Club, of which he is the president, St. Anthonv Club, the Tavern Club of 
Boston and the Strollers of New York. These various associations indicate him 
to be a man of well rounded character, recognizing fullv the duties, obligations 
and privileges of life. He has never been one to measure any vital question by 
the inch rule of self, but rather by the breadth of advanced public opinions. 



MERRELL P. WALBRIDGE. 

Merrell P. Walbridge one of the youngest merchants of vSt. Louis, but 
none the less successful because of the limit of vears, was born in this citv 
September 5, 1884, a son of Cyrus Packard and Lizzie (Merrell) Walbridge. 
The father is now president of the J. S. Merrell Drug Company. As a pupil 
in the Marquette school Merrell P. Walbridge mastered the elementarv branches 
of learning and afterward attended the Smith's Acadeniv in St. Louis. He 
then continued his education in the east, being graduated from Amherst College 
in 1907. He afterward went into business with his father and at the annual 
meeting of the stockholders and directors, on the 20th of January, 1908, he 
was elected director and secretary of the J. S. Merrell Drug Company. He 
brought to the work the alertness, enterprise and ambition of a young man and 
has studied business conditions at large, in addition to the specific line of trade 



152 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

in which he is engaged, with the result that he is making progress and is con- 
tributing to the success of the enterprise with which he is connected. 

Air. ^^'albridge is a member of the University Club, Normandie Golf Club, 
the First Congregational church. His political support is given to the repub- 
lican party and he has recently cast his first presidential vote in support of the 
Hon. William Taft. He is well known in the city where he has always resided 
and attractive social qualities make him popular with a large circle of friends. 



THE PAPIN FAAIILY. 

There are certain family names occurring in the earliest archives of St. 
Louis history which continue to appear throughout its annals and which are 
familiar household names to its citizens of today. The name of Papin so stands 
in the historv of this city and no biographical record would be complete without 
especial mention of this respected, broadly ramified and typical old St. Louis 
family. It is now in the sixth and seventh generation of its St. Louis descend- 
ants and is connected by marriages during these succeeding generations with 
many contemporary families of prominence and distinction. An extended sketch 
would fail to include an individual record of all, even of its most worthy and 
best known members and connections. Thus, in the second and following gen- 
erations in St. Louis, the Papin family is found to be closely affiliated through 
marriages and intermarriages with the Lacledes, Chouteaus, Gratiots and Laba- 
dies, whilst having earlier connections in Canada with the Le Ber, Chauvin, Vil- 
ray, Chenie, Raymond, Boucher and other old established Canadian families, 
whose younger scions became colonists of the later French settlements in the 
upper Louisiana Territory, so that a complete enumeration of its members, alli- 
ances and connections would be found to ramify throughout the colony and to 
include practically its entire best elements in the French colonial days. 

Later, after the Louisiana purchase, new settlers began to arrive and the 
little French village to grow rapidly into a vigorous young American city. As 
the original French families and colonists had come from Canada and Louisiana, 
or from the mother countrv direct, the American pioneers and settlers began to 
arrive first from \'irginia and Kentucky and soon thereafter from the more 
remote eastern states. 

Then followed the great foreign immigration period that added to the city's 
growth and strengthened through the '"20s, '30s, '40s and '50s. Thus the settle- 
ment continued to grow and develop, and the newcomers settled down and 
became incorporated into the life and citizenship of the vigorous community, 
adding to its ability and development and gaining in turn full recognition and 
affiliation with its best social life and interests. Matrimonial alliances followed 
earlier business connections and associations, so that we find the old aristocratic 
Papin family, with other prominent families of the original French and earlier 
colonists, allied by marriages and ramifying widely throughout the influential 
elements of the community through the succeeding generations. 

Of the direct descendants of the Papin name in St. Louis, we can mention 
but a few in each generation. Joseph Papin was the first of the family to come 
to St. Louis. He was born at Boucherville. Canada, about 1710, the son of 
Gilles Papin and grandson of Pierre Papin, who came to Canada in 1653 in the 
company of Alaisonneuve to found the city of Montreal. Joseph Papin was 
originally educated as a civil engineer. He received appointment into the French 
army under Louis XV and prior to the English rule held several important posi- 
tions. He was married in 1740 to Marguerite Pepin, of the distinguished families 
of Boucher and Lemoine, and by her had one son, Joseph Marie Papin, born at 
Alontreal, November 6, 1741. Joseph Papin, Sr., was at Cahokia in 1764 when 




THEOPHILE PAPIN 



154 ST. LUL'IS, THE FOURTH LTTY. 

Laclede arrived with his pioneers to estabhsh his settlement at St. Lonis. He 
became interested in the colony and bought ground in the town. After the 
English occupation of Canada he left that country, bringing with him his only 
son, Joseph ]\larie, who had been sent to France for his education. Father and 
son settled permanently in St. Louis and the former died here in 1772. 

Joseph Marie Papin, born November 6, 1741, at ]vlontreah son of Joseph 
Papiii and ^Marguerite Pepin, was a man of brilliant accomplishments and per- 
sonal distinction" He was educated at the Jesuit College at La Fleche in France, 
then the greatest educational establishment of the mother country. In 1779 he 
married Marie Louise, third and yoimgest daughter of Pierre de Laclede-Liguest, 
the foimder of St. Louis. He died in 181 1, leaving seven sons and three daugh- 
ters, from whom the various local branches of this family at the present day 
are descended. 

Li the third and fourth generations were both men and women of talent 
and abilitv. It was the epoch of the Indian fur trade and the Papins were promi- 
nent in this important local commerce. Pierre Millicour Papin, Pierre Didier 
Papin. Theodore d'Artigny and Alexander Papin were all noted fur traders in 
their dav. Hvpolite LeBer Papin and Silvestre Yilray Papin were manufac- 
turers of Indian hardware, cutlery, tomahawks, hunting knives, lances, arrow- 
heads, beaver and otter traps, etc. Their foundry near Pine and ^Nlain streets 
'was the first in St. Louis and they purchased steel and iron from the Jate 
Henry Shaw. 

The fourth generation becomes too numerous for individual mention. During 
its time the cityhad become the recognized American metropolis of the Missis- 
sippi vallev and the Papin family had formed many alliances with other promi- 
ment families of the rapidly developing community. A man of marked ability in 
this generation, rather reserved in character and yet commanding the highest 
respect and admiration of all who knew him, was Silvester Yilray Papin, the 
eldest son of Silvestre Mlray and Clementine (Loisel) Papin. He was born in 
1820. He studied for and received appointment to West Point, but on account 
of failing health was obliged to abandon the plan of a military career and took 
up the studv of law. About 1856 he engaged in the real-estate business with 
his vounger' brother. Theo])hile, and the business was continued by them until 
his death. 

Dr. Timothv Loisel Papin, brother of Silvester Yilray and Theophile Papin, 
was a physician of note in the community. He was born in 1825 and studied 
medicine both in this country and in Paris. He afterward became a professor 
in the St. Louis Hospital and the Missouri Medical College. He had a large 
private practice and with the cooperation of Dr. Moore he organized St. John's 
Hospital. He not only attained distinction in his profession, but also as a most 
charitable and benevolent man, unceasing in his care of and attention to the 
poor. 

Perhaps the most active and best known member of the Papin family in its 
fourth generation was Theophile Papin. younger brother of Silvester Yilray 
and Timothy Loisel Papin. Energetic, intelligent and cultivated, with a genial 
and sympathetic nature, he led a life of usefulness to the community and of 
successful personal achievement. He was born in 1827, studied at the St. Louis 
University and graduated at St. Mary's, Kentucky, with honors and distinction. 
In 1849 he became first a reporter, but was soon made assistant editor on the 
St. Louis Reveille, then edited by Joseph M. Field. Seven years later he engaged 
in the real-estate business, his own anrl his family's holdings being considerable 
and requiring his direct attention. He never, however, lost his interest in and 
taste for journalism and contrilnited fref|uer=t articles to the local press. His 
letters to the Missouri Rejmblican from Europe in i88i and 1882 were widely 
read and copied throughout the country. He contributed some charming papers 
on early St. Louis days to the Historical Society, of which he was a charter 
member, and wrote frequent articles for magazines and periodicals. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 155 

Theophile Papin achieved a laudable political career. In 1853 he was a 
member of the city council and was reelected several times, serving as president 
of the council during one term. He was also state and county collector during 
a period of two years. In 1862 he was appointed assessor of internal revenue by 
President Lincoln for St. Louis and the county. It was a position of importance 
in a time of difficulty. He was reappointed by President Lincoln and later by 
President Andrew Johnson. In the discharge of his duties he made a most 
creditable record. During his term of office he turned over twenty-five million 
dollars to the national treasury at Washington. Mr. Papin was one of the organ- 
izers of the St. Louis Real Estate Exchange and served for several terms as its 
president. He also served as a director in the Boatmen's Bank. ]\Iany perma- 
nent citv improvements have resulted from his foresight and energy. He was 
one of the three commissioners to purchase and appraise the site of Forest Park 
and cooperated in the acquisition of the ground for Lafayette Park by the city. 
The beautiful little triangle in Lindell boulevard known as Kenrick Garden 
owes its present condition to his initiative. He laid out many additions which 
have become incorporated into the busiest sections of the city and in many ways 
contributed during his term of business activity to the growth and development 
of the St. Louis of today. He was twice married, being first joined in wedlock 
in 1855 to Julia, daughter of William and Marie (Pombre) Henri, of Prairie 
du Rocher, Illinois. Some years after the death of his first wife, he married 
Emily, daughter of William and Mary (Goode) Carlin. of Carrollton, Illinois. 
Five children were born of these two unions: Theophile. Jr., William Henri, 
Julie Henri. Emily Lucile and Edward Vilray Papin. Theophile Papin died on 
the 17th of August, 1902, in the seventy-fifth year of his age, and his loss came 
wath a deep sense of personal bereavement to many. 

Henry Papin, son of Theodore d'Artigny Papin, was a scholarly and culti- 
vated member of this familv. He lived a retired student's life in his beautiful 
country place at Webster Groves, where he made a rare collection of books, 
paintings and works of art. He died at an early age, leaving his wife, nee 
Wilkinson, and five children. 

Joseph Loisel Papin, Eugene Papin, Alexander Raymond Papin, Theodore 
Adolph Papin, John Theodore Papin, INIillicour Papin, Leon Papin and others 
were the heads of families well known and respected in the community, who 
represent the Papin family of St. Louis in its fourth and fifth generations. 

Theophile Papin, Jr., the elder son of Theophile and Julia (Henri) Papin, 
w^as born in this city in 1857. He is a prominent representative of his family 
in its fifth generation. A sojourn in Paris, where his grandparents w^ere living, 
in his early youth was an opportunity to acquire the French language and his 
education was started there with the Christian Brothers. Afterward he con- 
tinued his studies at the St. Louis LTniversity and then at Washington L'niversity. 
This was followed by a further residence in Germany, where he studied at 
Cassel and Marburg, attending a course of philological lectures at the latter 
university and spending the vacations in travel. In 1881 he returned to St. 
Louis and went into the real-estate business with his father, Theophile Papin. 
.Soon after the retirement from business of the senior member of the firm, ^^Ir. 
Papin, Jr., associated himself with Louis H. Tontrup. ^^Ir. Papin is socially 
prominent. He is a member of the St. Louis Club and is associated with many 
of the civic and charitable organizations of the citv. He is a man of broadlv 
cultivated taste, inclined to books, interested in matters of reform and civic 
welfare ; a student of the early history of St. Louis and an authority in the 
genealogy of its old families, of which he himself is esteemed one of the foremost 
of the present day representatives. 

Edward A^ilray Papin, the second son of Theophile and Emily (Carlin) 
Papin, was born December 2, 1869. He began his studies at the W^ashington 
L'niversity and completed his education at St. Louis LTniversity. In i88i and 
1882 he accompanied his parents to Europe, where he was thoroughly instructed 



158 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

in French prior to beginning more serious studies for his collegiate course. 
Later he entered the insurance business, which he has continued as a capable and 
successful business man. In 1895 he married Marie Julia, youngest daughter of 
Charles P. and Julia (Gratiot) Chouteau. Two children, Julia Marie and Edward 
Chouteau Papin, have been born to them. Mr. Edward Vilray Papin is a man 
of scholarly attainment and an enthusiastic supporter of all manly outdoor sports. 
He is a member of the advisory board of the Missouri Historical Society and is 
popular in both social and business circles. 

\Mlliam Booth Papin, son of the late Eugene and Mary (Booth) Papin, is a 
descendant in the fifth generation of the Hypolite LeBer branch of the Papm 
family. Whilst continuing successfully the real-estate business of his grand- 
father. William Booth, and conducting the interests of his family estate, Mr. 
Papin is a close student of both literature and science. He has cultivated highly 
a taste for architecture and in his extended travels in Europe and America 
attained unusual knowledge of his favorite branch of the science — ecclesiastical 
architecture. Alany of his drawings have been favorably commented upon by 
leading students of this branch of scientific construction. Mr. Papin is unmarried 
and resides with his mother's family in a residence planned and erected under 
his personal direction. 

J. A'ion Papin, also a descendant of the Hypolite LeBer branch, is a young 
journalist of talent and recognized ability. Mr. Papin is at present engaged on 
the staff of the Republic and is a creditable representative of the family. 

Rene Papin, a brother of the last mentioned, residing in England, has had 
a successful career in music. 

Henry Edward Papin, second surviving son of Timothy Loisel and Lida 
(Yarnell) Papin, is a well known, respected and successful business man of the 
younger generation. Air. Papin is engaged in the insurance business. In 1895 
he married Olint Clara, daughter of William Frederick and Mary (Bittner) 
Xiedringhaus. They have two children: Pierre Loisel, aged ten years; and 
Henry Edward, Jr., aged eight. 

Such in brief is an outline and limited biographical sketch of one of the 
most typical and respected of the old St. Louis families. The Papin family of 
the present day is known and respected throughout the community and their 
history constitutes an important chapter in the annals of the city. They have 
maintained their family name and tradition with credit and dignity and are 
worthy citizens of the city founded by their ancestor, Laclede Liguest. 



HENRY J. RUEHMKORF. 

Henr\- J. Ruehmkorf, early adopting the motto, ''Don't recognize defeat," 
has made steady progress in his business career and is now secretarv and treas- 
urer of the Feuerborn Toy Company, dealers in toys and notions. Born in Red 
Bud. Illinois, November 6, 1859, he is descended from German ancestry, his 
parents having come from Hanover. He attended the public schools of his na- 
tive town and there entered upon his business career, spending five years as an 
employe in dry goods and general mercantile establishments. Thinking to find 
better opportunities in the broader business field of St. Louis he came to this 
city in 1888. His financial condition rendered it imperative that he find imme- 
diate employment and for some time he occupied positions that gave him little 
opjjortunity, but eventually entered the service of the firm of Hennen & Com- 
pany, dealers in notions. He continued with that house as a salesman until 
1905, when he became a partner. Later the old concern sold out and the business 
was continued and incorporated under the style of the Feuerborn Toy Com- 
pany, of which Mr. Ruehmkorf became secretary and treasurer. They employ 
twenty-five or more salesmen and handle a large line of toys and notions, in- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 157 

eluding the products of the best known manufacturers. Their sales have reached 
a large figure and they make quite extensive shipments to the south and south- 
west. Mr. Ruehmkorf is an exponent of modern business methods and in this 
connection is becoming well known. 

In 1888 occurred the marriage of Air. Ruehmkorf and Miss Anna Bahren- 
burg, a daughter of Dr. Bahrenburg. They are the parents of three daughters 
and a son. The eldest daughter, Lucille, is an accomplished musician and is well 
known to St. Louis concertgoers. The daughter Ruth is a student in the high 
school. In his political views Mr. Ruehmkorf is somewhat inclined to be inde- 
pendent, but usually votes wnth the republican party. He is, however, in sym- 
pathy with the tendency of the times in the effort to set aside machine-made 
politics and made an election the expression of the will of the people. Frater- 
nally he is connected with the Royal Arcanum and he also belongs to St. Paul's 
Methodist Episcopal church. Forceful and resourceful, he has steadily worked 
his way upward and his success is such that his record may well encourage others 
to adopt and follow the motto, "Don't recognize defeat." 



RENE BAKEWELL. 



Rene Bakewell, treasurer of the Rutledge & Kilpatrick Realty Company, was 
born in St. Louis, August 6, 1864, his parents being Hon. Robert Armytage 
and Marie Anne (de Laureal) Bakewell. His father, a distinguished lawyer 
who served as judge of the court of appeals, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 
November 4, 1826, and died in St. Louis, June 30, 1908. He was the grandson 
of Robert Bakewell, the geologist, who was born at Nottingham, England, March 
10, 1767, and died August 15, 1843, ^" London, England. William Johnstone 
Bakewell, the son of Robert Bakewell, was born in Wakefield, Yorkshire. Eng- 
land, July 4, 1794. In early life he was Unitarian minister, but afterward be- 
came a Roman Catholic. The year 1839 witnessed his arrival in America, at 
which time he located in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, his death occurring in Geneseo, 
New York, August 2, 1861. His son, Robert Armytage Bakewell, was a youth 
of twelve years at the time of the emigration to the new world. Becoming a 
resident of St. Louis, he was engaged in the practice of law, winning prestige 
at a bar that numbered many eminent members, and becoming one of the three 
first judges of the St. Louis court of appeals. He was married May 3, 1853. in 
St. Louis, to Marie Anne Coudroy de Laureal, who was born August 26, 1832, in 
Guadeloupe, West Indies. She was educated at Limours, near Paris, France, and 
was a daughter of Edward de Laureal, whose birth occurred at Guadeloupe, 
West Indies, in 1808, on his father's plantation. He was educated in France, was 
married in that country in 1829 to his cousin, Octavie de Laureal, and in 1848 
removed from Guadeloupe to the United States, settling in St. Louis. His father 
was Evremont de Laureal. The de Laureal family owned sugar plantations on 
the isle of Guadeloupe for several generations. 

Rene Bakewell completed his education in the St. Louis University and, 
leaving school in 1881, accepted a position with the Valley National Bank, where 
he remained until that institution was consolidated with the Laclede National 
Bank. He was afterward in the employ of L. G. McNair, subsequently McNair 
& McPherson, afterward the firm of McPherson-Switzer & Company, bond and 
stockbrokers, until the last-named firm went out of business. He afterward be- 
came connected with the Kansas and Texas Coal Company as agent at their 
mines in Huntington, Arkansas, for eighteen months, but in February. 1893, 
wishing to return to St. Louis, he accepted a position with Rutledge-Kilpatriclc, 
real-estate agents, now the Rutledge & Kilpatrick Realty Company, of which he 
is the treasurer. Their business is constantly increasing in volume and impor- 



15S ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

_ 1 ~ -^ 

tance. and thev have handled much vahiable property and negotiated many im- 
portant realty transfers. 

^Ir. Bakewell is a democrat in his political faith, and a Roman Catholic in 
his religious belief. He is identified with no clubs or societies, preferring to 
concentrate his energies upon his business interests. 



NATHAN FRANK. 



Nathan Frank, attorney at law, with a large clientage indicative of his pro- 
fessional abilitv and the confidence reposed therein by the general public, has 
also been connected with the framing of the laws of the land, as a member of 
the fiftieth and fifty-first congresses. His parents, Abraham and Branette Frank, 
were natives of Germany, in which country they were reared and married, becom- 
ing residents of the United States in 1849. For two years they maintained their 
home at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and then removed to Peoria, Illinois, where 
Nathan Frank was born, February 23. 1852. The son became a student in the 
public schools and remained in his native city until 1867, when he removed to 
St. Louis with his parents. Here he entered the high school, from which he 
was graduated in 1869, and after accjuiring his more specifically literary educa- 
tion in Washington Lhuversity, he qualified for a professional career as a law 
student in Harvard LTniversity at Cambridge, Massachusetts. He won the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1871. but ambitious to enter upon his profession thor- 
oughly equipped for its onerous duties, he remained a student at Harvard for 
another vear. Following his return home in 1872, Mr. Frank was admitted to 
the [Missouri bar and for a few years devoted himself to commercial and bank- 
ruptcy law, with which he had become thoroughly familiar. He compiled and 
edited Frank's Bankruptcy Law, which was published in 1874 and became a 
recognized authority. Four editions were placed upon the market and were 
followed in 1898 by a compilation of the bankrupt act of that year. 

In his practice Mr. Frank was associated for three years with ex-Mayor 
John !M. Krum. a former judge of the circuit court. He afterward became jun- 
ior partner of the firm of Patrick & Frank, upon Mr. Patrick's retirement from 
the position of LTnited States district attorney and afterward practiced as senior 
partner of the firm of Frank, Dawson & Garvin and later Frank & Thompson, 
his associate in the latter partnership being Seymour D. Thompson. 

That Mr. Frank attained distinction and won success in his profession was 
indicated by the fact that political honors were conferred upon him. Had he 
remained in obscurity professionally, he would never have won political distinc- 
tion. Becoming a worker in the ranks of the republican party, he was hon- 
ored by election to the fiftieth congress from the central district of St. Louis 
and received endorsement of his first term in reelection to the fifty-first con- 
gress. In both of these he served on several important committees and was active 
in securing the passage of some notable legislation. He gave careful considera- 
tion to each question which came up for settlement and stood fearlessly by the 
course which he believed to be right and for the best interests of the people at 
large. In this way he took his stand in opposition to his party in seeking to 
enact a national election law, and to pass what was known as the anti-gerryman- 
der bill, restricting or limiting the state legislature in apportioning congressional 
districts in the several states. He could easily have won further congressional 
honors had he so desired, but since his retirement at the close of his second term 
he has refused a nomination and has also declined to become a candidate for 
any other ]>ublic office, ]>refcrring to concentrate his time and energies upon his 
professional interests and the su])ervision of the affairs of the St. Louis Star, 
which he founded and of which he is the owner. 

Mr. Frank has ever been interested in progressive measures relative to the 
city's welfare and was a member of the congressional committee on the World's 




NATHAN FRANK 



160 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Columbian Exposition, to which he gave much attention while cooperating with 
the leading citizens of St. Louis in an attempt to locate the fair near this city. 
In recogni'tion of the fact that he was one of the earliest movers in that project, 
Governor Francis appointed him a member of the world's fair commission. He 
took a verv active part in the preliminary work for the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition.'was a member of the board of directors from the beginning and was 
one of the most regular attendants at committee meetings. He was also a mem- 
ber of the executive committee, the most important committee in connection 
with the great fair, and also of the press and publicity committee in connection 
with which he did most active and effective work in exploiting the interests of 
the exposition and bringing to the people of the countr}' a knowledge of the 
attractions it had to oft'er. He was also chairman of the entertainment commit- 
tee of the Business jNIen's League, which entertained many distinguished visitors, 
and in this connection he presided at many banquets which were held. He 
proved a most capable and efficient presiding officer, possessing the utmost tact 
as well as readiness of resource and adaptability, and thus as the presiding genius 
of manv important social functions he was highly complimented by his friends. 
His admirable social qualities and unfeigned cordiality render him a most popu- 
lar member of the L^niversity, Columbian and Aero and Westwood Country 
Clubs. He is a member of the Jewish church but does not devote any time to 
sectarian matters and while a recognized leader among the people of his own 
race he is altogether too broad in his interests and associations, his thoughts and 
his purposes, to confine his attention to any one people or belief. 



JULIUS H. GROSS, M. D. 

Dr. Julius H. Gross, an oculist whose ability finds its best expression in 
the extensive practice accorded him, was born in St. Louis, March 8, 1872. His 
parents were Julius and Lisette ( Steff'enauer ) Gross, the former a native of 
Prussia and the latter of Switzerland. They came to this country in early life 
and the father was educated in decorative art painting. Prior to his emigra- 
tion to the new world he decorated some of the palaces in Potsdam, Germany. 
He was gifted by nature with much artistic ability, which he developed through 
continuous study and practice, and after coming to the United States he took 
up portrait painting, to which he gave his attention during the remainder of 
his active life. On crossing the Atlantic he landed at New Orleans, but later 
the yellow fever drove him north and he settled at St. Louis in 1853. For more 
than a half century he continued a resident of this city, passing away here in 
June. 1904, while his wife died in 1898. He gained much more than local 
distinction as a portrait artist, his ability well entitling him to the honor he 
received in that direction. 

Dr. Gross was reared in St Louis, and passing through consecutive grades 
he eventuallv became a high-school student. Determining upon a professional 
career in 1889 he entered the medical department of the Washington University 
and was graduated therefrom in the class of 1893. Following his graduation, 
he accepted a position with the city board of health and was connected therewith 
for eighteen months, after which he began making preparation for practice as 
a specialist in the treatment of the eye. In 1898 Dr. Gross went abroad, studied 
in Paris for six months and in Kiel. Germany, for a year. After a tour of the 
continent he then returned home and entered upon the practice of his profession 
as a specialist. He is now located in the Oriel building, at 316 North Sixth 
street, and is recognized as one of the leading oculists of the city. He is now 
instructor in the ophthalmological department of Washington University. Is a 
member of the .American Medical Association, the Missouri State and the St. 
Louis medical societies and the St. Louis Ophthalmological Society. He is 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CrfY. 161 

continually broadening his skill by research and investigation, and experience 
has taught him many valuable lessons. His practice is large and of an important 
character and his prominence is well merited. 

Dr. Gross was married in 1903 to Miss Alarie Kuenzel, of St. Louis, and 
they have one daughter, Lisette. The Doctor is an honored member of the 
Phi Beta Pi, a Greek letter fraternity. He is a member of the St. Louis Ethical 
Society and has taken an advanced stand upon many questions of public interest 
and importance. He is very conscientious as well as able in his professional 
duties and a spirit of unfaltering devotion marks him in all of his practice. 



WILLLVM J. KINSELLA. 

The name of William J. Kinsella is so well known in connection with the 
business history of St. Louis that he needs no introduction to the readers of 
this volume. His business career had a most humble beginning and his life rec- 
ord is such as would be possible in no other land or clime. It is only in a re- 
public, where every man stands equal before the law, where labor, effort and 
ability are not hampered by caste or class, bv custom, tradition or precedent, that 
the individual may by his own labors reach a position of prominence that places 
him among the foremost men of the country. 

Mr. Kinsella was born in County Carlow, Ireland, in 1846. a son of Patrick 
and Ellen (Keating) Kinsella. His father was an architect of prominence and 
the son was carefully reared and educated, attending the schools of his native 
town and St. Patrick's College. He entered business life as an employe in the 
wholesale house of A. F. McDonald & Company of Dublin, one of the largest 
and most widely known commercial establishments of that city. 

The business opportunities of the new world, however, attracted him and, 
determining to try his fortune in America, he bade adieu to friends and native 
country at the age of nineteen years, arriving in New York city in 1865, just 
about the time of the close of the Civil war. The dry-goods house of A. T. 
Stewart & Company was then the most important in the metropolis. He was 
told that there was no opening in a position such as he desired, but that his 
services could be utilized as a bundle wrapper. Scorning no honest employment 
that would yield him a living and constitute the first round on the ladder of suc- 
cess, he accepted the work that offered and remained with the house until he 
secured a better position with the firm of Flamilton, Easter & Sons, of Baltimore. 
There he continued until 1870, wdien he embarked in business on his own ac- 
count in Cleveland, Ohio, as a retail grocer, being joined by his brother, who had 
come to this country subsequent to the arrival of Mr. Kinsella. 

The new venture, however, did not prove profitable and in seeking another 
field of labor William J. Kinsella chose St. Louis, entering the ranks of its busi- 
ness men as an employe of the firm of Porter, Worthington & Company. The 
house recognized the value of his service and felt deep regret when ]\Ir. Kin- 
sella resigned his position with them to become manager for the Kingsford- 
Oswego Starch Company of this city. In this capacity he established an enviable 
reputation as a salesman and manager, bringing to him the attention of other 
large houses, so that his services were solicited for a managerial position with 
the Thompson-Taylor Spice Company, of Chicago. The new position, offering 
better opportunities, was accepted and after two years spent as manager he 
purchased the business and established the firm of W. J. Kinsella & Company. 
The head of the house, uniformlv recognized as a man of exceptional executive 
abilitv and keen business insight, developed the trade along substantial lines and 
in 1866 the business was incorporated under the style of the Hanley & Kinsella 
Coff'ee & Spice Company, Mr. Kinsella since remaining as president and execu- 
tive head. The rapid growth of the business has made St. Louis one of the 

It— VOL. II. 



162 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

leading spice markets of the United States and one of the largest inland coffee 
markets in the world. In developing the business Mr. Kinsella has manifested in 
large degree the traits of the military commander who knows best how to mar- 
shal his forces to produce the desired result, using each advantageous position 
and economizing time, eft'ort and distance. At any point in his career he seems 
to have accomplished the entire measure of success possible at that point. In- 
tricate business problems he readily solves and with little hesitation, for through 
the intervening years he has studied the business so thoroughly that he brings 
to the solution of the questions which constantly arise a ready understanding, re- 
sulting in their thorough mastery. 

Mr. Kinsella is interested in organizations having direct bearing upon the 
business conditions of the country. He belongs to the Wholesale Grocers and 
Business ]\Ien's League, to the Western Commercial Travelers Association, of 
which he has been the vice president, and to the Mercantile Club of St. Louis. 
He is also a member of the Royal Arcanum and the Knights of St. Patrick. In 
1880 he was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Hanley, of New York, and unto 
them have been born three children, William Hanley, Dalton Louis and Ella 
Marie Kinsella. 

Mr. Kinsella is a man of charitable and benevolent spirit, whose contribu- 
tions to public interests along those lines have been frequent and generous. In 
all matters of citizenship he is progressive and public spirited and his cooperation 
in interests of benefit to St. Louis has been far-reaching and effective. Though 
his start in the business world in America was most humble, he has continually 
advanced until he is a recognized power in the trade circles of St. Louis, stand- 
ing as he does at the head of one of the leading spice and coff'ee houses of the 
countrv. 



LORENZ LAMPEL. 



Lorenz Lampel, deceased, was numbered among the German-American cit- 
izens who have contributed to the commercial and industrial development of St. 
Louis. He was born in the town of Graefenberg, in the kingdom of Bavaria, 
Germany, May 2, 1831, a son of Carl and Philipine Lampel. The former was a 
government officer, holding the position of royal commissioner of revenues and 
serving also as lieutenant of the reserves in the Bavarian army. 

Lorenz Lampel was educated in one of the gymnasiums of the city of 
Bayreuth, and then served an apprenticeship to the brewer's trade, being pre- 
pared for the business after the thorough fashion which constitutes one of the 
chief characteristics of German industrial education. Coming to the United 
States in 1853 "'' search of better business opportunities that would lead to rapid 
advancement, he arrived in St. Louis in 1855 and for fourteen years thereafter 
served as brew master and foreman in some of the leading breweries of St. 
Louis, including the old Waggoner and Lemp breweries, the English brewery, 
the Fritz & Wainwright brewery and the Anheuser-Busch brewery. His knowl- 
edge of both the mechanical process and the science of beer making caused his 
services to be sought by the pioneer brewers of the city. He became financially 
interested in the business of this character, as a partner in the Arsenal brewery, 
with which he was connected for only one year. In 1870 he entered into part- 
nership with Samuel Wainwright as a member of the brewing firm of Wain- 
wright & Company and was actively connected with the conduct and management 
of the business for fifteen years, after which he retired to private life with an 
ample fortune. Desiring again to see his native land, he went to Europe, spend- 
ing some time in Germany, and in 1886 he returned to St. Louis with the inten- 
tion of estabhshing another brewing business. Failing health prevented, how- 
ever, and in less than two years he passed away. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 163 

Mr. Lampel was not only a competent business man but was also a man of 
broad education and literary inclination, and always kept thoroughly conversant 
with the leading questions of the day. He belonged to the Merchants Exchange, 
the Germania Club, the Liederkranz and Turner societies, and to the Orpheus 
Singing Society. He w^as greatly interested in the measures which were intended 
to advance education and culture among the German-x\mericans of this city. 
He held membership in the German Evangelical church and was a liberal con- 
tributor to church, charitable and educational interests. He gave loyal allegiance 
to the republican party, was a pronounced Unionist at the time of the Civil war, 
and served with the Home Guard of St. Louis. 

In 1857 Lorenz Lampel w^edded Miss Caroline Dieckmann, well known for 
her philanthropy and valuable work for charity. She still survives her husband 
and has passed the seventieth milestone on life's journey. The surviving mem- 
bers of their familv are : William, well known in insurance circles in St. Louis ; 
Franklin L. ; and Charles P., an electrician. One daughter, Philipine, who be- 
came the wife of Z. ^^^ Tinker, died in 1892, leaving two children. Carrie E. and 
Georg^e Tinker. 



FRANKLIX L. LA^^IPEL. 

Franklin L. Lampel, president of the Lampel Sponge & Chamois Company, 
also of the Lampel-Schlegel Manufacturing Company, has always been a resident 
of St. Louis, his birth having here occurred Alarch 20, 1866. He attended the 
public schools of this city and Bryant & Stratton Business College, and at the 
age of seventeen was employed by the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company as 
weighmaster, there remaining for three years. When he resigned that posi- 
tion he became one of the organizers of the Moffitt-West Drug Company. Sub- 
sequently he withdrew^ from that company and assisted in the organization of 
the Daughertv-Crouch Drug Company, with which firm he remained for eight 
years, when they sold out to the Meyer Brothers Drug Company. In 1902 ^Nlr. 
Lampel organized the Lampel Sponge & Chamois Company, and about 1903 he 
organized the Lampel-Schlegel ^lanufacturing Company, manufacturers of book- 
binders' specialties, etc. Both companies sell goods throughout the United 
States, INIexico and Canada, covering the same territory. These enterprises, 
although comparativelv new business concerns of St. Louis, have already reached 
profitable proportions and are steadily growing. 

In April, 1889, 'Sir. Lampel was married in Ouincy, Illinois, to Miss Ida 
Dick, the voungest daughter of John and Louise Dick, of Ouincy. They are now 
parents of two children, Gertrude and Stella. Mr. Lampel is a member of the 
Union Club but prefers home interests to club life. He is an advocate of all 
things beautiful and a lover of fine art and music. Moreover, he possesses great 
civic pride and is a liberal contributor to those causes which have for their pur- 
pose the advancement and progress of his native city. 



H. A. REDHEFFER. 



H. A. Redheft'er, who is prominent in business circles of St. Louis, being 
proprietor of H. A. Redhefifer & Company, electrical contractors, was born in 
St. Louis, ^Missouri. March 10, 1879. Among his ancestors were the illustrious 
names of David Rittenhouse and Benjamin West, and on his mother's side of 
the family he is a distant relative of General La Fayette. Andrew Redheffer. 
his father, was a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, having been born De- 
cember 18. 1847, and his mother. Agnes H. (Apache) Redheffer. was born in the 



164 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

same citv, her birth occurring- August 9, 1849. She passed away June 29, 1905. 
For manv vears Andrew Redheffer was a prominent business man, having a 
large tine arts estabhshment under the name of Redheffer & Koch at 419-421 
North Broadway. He was past grand master of the Masonic Grand Lodge of 
Missouri, and was also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
During the Civil war he was a member of Company B, One Hundred and 
Xinetv-second Regiment of Pennsylvania A'olunteer Infantry. Andrew Red- 
heft'er passed out of this Hfe August 9, 1889. The subject of this review is one 
of the following children : j\Irs. Agnes E. Alanion. who has two children ; Mrs. 
May C. Loevy. who also has a family of tw^o children ; Clara H. ; Virginia V. ; 
and Ruth, who passed away February 18, 1896. 

H. A. Redheffer at the usual age became a student at the Webster public 
school in North St. Louis, where he remained until seven years of age, when 
the familv moved to Benton, Missouri, and there he attended the Roe School 
until he was twelve years old, while later he pursued his studies in the Hodgedin 
school at Henrietta and California avenues, St. Louis. At the age of fifteen 
years he assumed a clerical position in the postofifice, under the Little and Car- 
iyle administration, serving for three months, and then entered the employ of 
tile Ludlow-Saylor Wire Company, at Fourth and Elm streets. He worked for 
this firm for a period of one year, during which time a cyclone swept the city, 
damaging many buildings, among wdiich was that of the Ludlow-Saylor Wire 
Company. Leaving the employ of this firm, he entered the services of W. F. 
Parker Real Estate Company, at 617 Chestnut street, with which he remained 
for nine years. While in their employ he evidenced himself to be possessed of 
the necessary qualifications for successful business. transaction. Being ambitious 
to engage in business for himself, he resigned his position, and on July 14, 1906, 
started in the electrical contracting business under the firm name of H. A. Red- 
heffer, at 617 Chestnut street. Lmder the careful and conservative management 
of Mr. Redheffer the business of the firm is gradually growing and has already 
attained such proportions as to place it in the upper rank among the influential 
commercial enterprises of the city. 

Mr. Redheffer has never affiliated himself with any lodge, secret order or 
social organization, as his business affairs have demanded his undivided attention. 
In politics he is allied with the republican party, to which he gives his hearty 
support. 



THEODORE FREDERICK MEYER. 

Theodore Frederick ]\Ieyer, connected with the executive department of 
one of the important commercial enterprises of St. Louis as president of the 
Mever Brothers Drug Company, was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, June 4, 
1857, a son of Christian F. G. and Franciska Therese (Schmidt) Meyer. His 
education was acquired in the German Lutheran parochial schools ; the public 
schools of St. Louis ; Concordia College at Fort Wayne, Indiana, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1876 ; and the University of Michigan, 
where he was graduaterl in 1878, on the completion of the course in the college 
of pharmacy. 

Mr. Mevcr thus (|ualificd for the calling which he has made his life work 
and soon after his graduation entered the employ of the firm of Meyer Brothers 
& Company, at Fort Wayne, Indiana. The following year, 1879, he was trans- 
ferred to the house of \Ieyer Brothers & Company in Kansas City, Missouri, 
and in 1883 was sent to St. Louis to become a factor in the house of the com- 
pany at this point, l-'rom 1887 until 1889 he was in charge of the branch at 
Dallas, Texas, anfl in the latter year was elected vice president and manager of 
the Mever Brothers Drug Companw The fact that branches are conducted in 
these different trade centers is indicative of the success and extent of the busi- 




THEODORE E. MEYER. 



166 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

ness. The company are importers and wholesale druggists, manufacturers of 
pharmaceutical preparations, Imperial Crown perfumes, drug millers and paint 
grinders. The business had its beginning in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1852, and 
rhe St. Louis house was established in 1865. Twenty- four years later the 
enterprise was incorporated under the present firm style and its growth has 
been continuous and along substantial lines to the present time. After careful 
preliminary training, Theodore F. Meyer passed on to positions of executive 
control and in recent years has bent his energies largely to organization, to 
constructive efiforts and administrative direction. 

On the 20th of June, 1888, in San Antonio, Texas, was celebrated the mar- 
riage of ]\Ir. Aleyer and ]\Iiss Eda Hampmann. They now have two children, 
Theodore F. and Elizabeth K. Air. Meyer belongs to several of the leading 
clubs of his adopted city, including the Commercial, the St. Louis, the Union 
and the Glen Echo Clubs. He is independent in politics, but not remiss in citi- 
zenship, for his cooperation is a valued asset in many movements relating to the 
city's development and substantial growth. His has been an active career, in 
which he has accomplished important and far-reaching results, contributing in 
no small degree to the expansion and material growth of trade interests in the 
various localities where he has labored, and from which he himself has also 
derived substantial benefits. 



ERNEST ARGO. 



Ernest Argo was born in Fulton county, Illinois, September 27, 1853, and 
is of English descent, his grandfather, a native of England, coming to America 
about 1800. His parents were William and Clarissa Argo. The mother died in 
1862 and the father in 1865. The latter lived for twenty years in Fulton county, 
Illinois, and for twelve years in Jersey county, that state, devoting his entire 
time to farming. 

Ernest Argo pursued his early education in various district schools of Illi- 
nois and afterward attended the high school at Brownsville, Illinois, and the 
State University, at Lincoln, Nebraska, where he was graduated in his eighteenth 
year. The following year he joined his brother in a grain elevator business and 
continued the association until 1875, when the partnership was dissolved and he 
went to Texas, remaining for two years in that state, during which time he was 
engaged in the live-stock business. The year 1877 witnessed his arrival in St. 
Louis and he entered business circles here as clerk with the Laclede Fire Brick 
Alanufacturing Company. When he had served in that capacity for sixteen months 
he was promoted to the position of secretary and remained with the company 
until 1884. He then resigned to enter upon active relations with the firm of 
Blackmer & Post, which was incorporated in 1892 as the Blackmer & Post Pipe 
Company, and he has since served continuously as its secretary. Mr. Argo is 
deservedly popular and maintains most just and cordial relations with his busi- 
ness associates. His executive ability, keen insight into complex business prob- 
lems and his capable control of business affairs have brought him continuous 
success since becoming a member of this company. 

In May, 1877, he was married to Miss Eleanor Brandt, a daughter of Mr. 
anrl Mrs. John P. Brandt. They have one child, Miss Jaclyn Argo, who possesses 
unusual musical talent, an especially fine singing voice. The family residence is 
a fine home at No. 41 10 Delmar avenue. 

'\\r. Argo is a member of the Mercantile Club, belongs to the Royal Ar- 
canum, the Western Commercial Travelers' Association, and is a Master Mason. 
He casts an independent local ballot, but where questions of state and national 
importance are before the public he votes with the democratic party. He is now 
identified with various leagues and organizations for the promotion of business 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 167 

conditions and his high standing in business circles is shown by the fact that he 
now holds the position of treasurer of the Missouri Manufacturers Association. 
His advancement has come as the legitimate sequence of well defined and intel- 
ligently directed labor, combined with a keen recognition of the possibilities that 
the business world ofters. 



VALENTINE J. GOESSLING. 

A'alentine J. Goessling, who has been prominently connected with the mer- 
cantile interests of St. Louis as a member of the Meyer & Goessling Cloak Com- 
pany since 1896, was born in this city on the 5th of August, 1874, his parents 
being August and Anna Goessling. The father is interested in the Ferguson- 
Mclvmney Dry Goods Company and the National Paper Company. The mater- 
nal grandfather of our subject, John M. Feldman, was one of the pioneers of 
South St. Louis, conducting a hotel and bus line. He also served as county 
treasurer and his labors were an important element in the work of early develop- 
ment and upbuilding in South St. Louis. 

Valentine J. Goessling attended the Christian Brothers school at St. Vincent 
church and subsequently entered the St. Louis University, which was then located 
between Ninth and Eleventh streets, graduating from that institution at the 
age of seventeen years. After leaving the university he went abroad for nine 
months and on his return home became connected with his father in the dry- 
goods business at No. 1248 South Broadway. Subsequently he associated him- 
self with L. J. Meyer for the conduct of a skirt manufacturing enterprise and 
has since been successfully engaged in this line of activity under the firm style 
of the Meyer & Goessling Cloak Company. At the time when these two gentle- 
men established their business there were only a few retailers who handled 
ready-made skirts and the industry was practically in its infancy. It has now, 
however, reached large proportions and the business of the Meyer & Goessling 
Company is steadily growing under the able management and careful control of 
the partners. 

In November, 1898, at Ouincy, Illinois, Mr. Goessling was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ida Verne Kreitz. Her grandfather, Mr. Merssman, was one of 
the pioneer settlers of that place and erected the first three-story building, in 
which he conducted a private bank and general store. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Goessling have been born two sons : Gerald Augustus, seven years of age ; and 
Paul Henry, who is five years old. They have a handsome residence at No. 4016 
Flora boulevard, the cordial hospitality which is there extended being greatly 
enjoyed by their many friends. 



J. T. McLAIN. 



The life record of J. T. McLain is a notable example of the fact that in 
America, where labor is unhampered by caste or class, iDy precedent or condi- 
tions, the individual may work his way upward from a humble position to one 
of prominence, for his initial step was made in a humble capacity, but as he has 
proceeded in his business career he has secured a broader outlook and brighter 
opportunities, and through their improvement he has become a leading business 
man of St. Louis, as president of the McLain-Alcorn Commission Company. 
He was born March 31, 1854, in Carlyle, Illinois, his parents being Joseph and 
Marguerite (O'Connell) INIcLain, the former a native of Ireland and the latter 
of Gasglow, Scotland. The father was well known in business circles in Car- 
lyle, being connected with several successful enterprises there. 



168 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

J. T. ^NIcLain was a student in the public schools of his native city until he 
completed the high-school course by graduation. He also attended college at 
Teutopolis. Illinois, and on leaving school became connected with the butchering 
business, to which he devoted four years. On the expiration of that period he 
entered the employ of the Ohio & ^lississippi Railroad, with which he was asso- 
ciated for eighteen years. Five years before leaving the railroad service, how- 
ever, he established a commission business, and in 1893 left the railroad employ 
that he might devote his entire time and attention to this undertaking. He or- 
ganized the J. T. AIcLain Commission Company and in 1900 incorporated the 
business under the name of the McLain-Alcorn Commission Company, Mr. Mc- 
Lain remaining as its president to the present time. As a commission merchant 
he has built up an extensive business. Displaying excellent qualities of admin- 
istrative and executive ability, he has also placed a correct value upon life's 
contacts and experiences and he has possessed sufficient courage to venture 
where favoring opportunity has presented, while his judgment and even paced 
energy generally carry him forward to the goal of success. 

On the 27th of April, 1880, Mr. ]\IcLain was married to Aliss Florence 
Myers, a native of Salem, Illinois, and a daughter of D. P. IMyers. who was 
a prosperous hardware merchant of that city for many years, or until his death 
in 1905. They now have two children : ]. T. AIcLain, Jr., who is with the 
St. Louis Dressed Beef Company ; and ^Marguerite Merle, the wife of Dan 
Schierbaum. Mr. McLain belongs to the Irish-American Club and the Mer- 
chants' Exchange, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. This, in brief, 
is the life history of one of St. Louis' successful business men, who, brooking 
no obstacles that can be overcome by determined purpose and laudable ambition, 
has w^on for himself a place in the ranks of the prosperous business men. 



DA\TD COALTER GA^IBLE, M. D. 

Dr. David Coalter Gamble, wdio passed away May 4, 1908, was w^ell knowm 
in medical circles of St. Louis as a general practitioner and also as clinical pro- 
fessor of otology in the medical department of Washington L^niversity. He was 
born in this city September 16, 1844, a son of the Hon. Hamilton Rowan and 
Caroline (Coalter) Gamble. The father was chosen governor of Missouri in 
1 861 and was the war governor of the state, continuing in the office until his 
death, which occurred January 31, 1864. He was otherwise prominent in mold- 
ing the policy and shaping the destiny of the state during that critical period in 
the history of the country. 

Dr. Gamble spent his entire life in St. Louis. He was a student in his boy- 
hood days in ^^^yman Institute of St. Louis and afterward attended a private 
school in LawrCnceville, New Jersey, and Norristown, Pennsylvania, and later 
became a student in the Washington and Jefferson College at Washington, Penn- 
sylvania. With broad general knowledge to serve as the superstructure upon 
which to rear professional learning, he took up the study of medicine and was 
graduated from the St. Louis Aledical College with the class of 1869. He then 
entered upon active practice in St. Louis and so continued for almost forty 
years. For a long time he was widely known as a general practitioner, but later 
gave special attention to diseases of the ear and in the line of his specialty gained 
much more than local distinction. He won the recognition of the profession in 
that he was made clinical professor of otology in the medical department of 
Washington University and so continued until his demise. 

Dr. Gamble was married on the 22d of December, 1864, in St. Louis, to 
Miss Flora Matthews, a daughter of John and Mary R. (Levering) Matthews, 
and unto them were born eleven children who survive : Mary, who is known as 
Minnie, and is the wife of F. W. Abbot, of New York; Hamilton Rowan, also 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrV. 169 

of New York; John Matthews, Flora Alay. ]Maud, Edna Miller and David C, 
who are residents of St. Lonis ; Walter Gny, of New York ; Clarence Oliver ; 
Ethel Ray and Allan Preston. 

Dr. Gamble was devoted to the welfare and interests of his family and 
found his greatest happiness in ministering to the pleasure of his wife and chil- 
dren. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church and he possessed 
a ready sympathy, a kindly spirit and a generous disposition which won for him 
the friendship of all with whom he came in contact. In his profession he made 
steady progress and was a member of the St. Louis Medical Society, the Alis- 
souri State Medical Association, the American Medical Association and the 
Alumni Association of the medical department of Washington University. He 
kept constantly in touch through these relations with the progress of the pro- 
fession in its wide research, investigation and experiment, bringing to each in- 
dividual a broader knowledge and thus extending the scope of his activity. He 
held to high ideals in his profession and in manhood and in all life's relations 
v/as actuated by lofty purposes. His life record covered more than sixty-three 
vears and was characterized bv much good done. 



LOYAL LO\'EJOY LEONARD. 

Loyal Lovejoy Leonard is widely known as a practitioner of law and also 
through his identification with that movement toward higher politics as mani- 
fest in municipal and national virtue. The salient facts in his life record are 
herein given. He was born February 7, 1873, in West W^aterville, now Oakland, 
Maine, his parents being Watson Vaughan and Irene (Stuart) Leonard, tKe 
former a merchant. The Leonards were colonial settlers of New England, three 
brothers coming from England and embarking in the iron business when the 
seeds of commercial and industrial development had scarcely been planted on 
American soil. At Taunton, ^Massachusetts, they built the first forge in Nev." 
England at a date prior to King Phillip's war. The Lovejoys from whom Mr. 
Leonard is descended through his paternal grandmother were early pioneers of 
Maine, penetrating into the wilderness of the Pine Tree state from the Alas- 
sachusetts Bay colony on horseback and taking their slaves with them. That 
the sentiment of the family underwent a great change is indicated on one of the 
tragic pages of American history, recording the death of Elisha P. Lovejoy, 
formerly of Albion, Alaine, who was an ardent abolitionist and was killed by a 
mob at Alton, Illinois, where his printing presses were ruined because he had 
advocated abolition in his newspaper. At the time of the Revolutionary war 
the Lovejovs were tories and the given name of Loyal is a family name de- 
scended from a loyalist of that period. 

In the maternal line L. L. Leonard is descended through the grandfather 
from the Stuarts and through the grandmother from the Halletts. The Stuarts 
were of Scotch descent, and the American branch, being of Quaker faith, were 
opposed to warfare for many generations. The Halletts trace their ancestry to 
Jonathan Hallett, an early settler at Cape Cod, Barnstable county, ^lassachu- 
setts. They were prominent in defense of the colonial interests in the Revolu- 
tionary war, Elisha Hallett, the great-grandfather, serving as an oflicer in the 
American army throughout the period of hostilities. 

Loyal L. Leonard, passing through consecutive grades in the public schools 
of Oakland, Maine, was graduated from the high school in the year 1889 at the 
age of sixteen. He afterward pursued a course in the Coburn Classical Insti- 
tute at W^aterville, Maine, where he was graduated in 1890 and later was for 
two years engaged in business in the east. He then entered Trinitv College at 
Hartford. Connecticut, in 1892 and was graduated in 1896. He came to St. Louis 
soon after his graduation and entered the insurance business, thus providing for 



170 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

his livelihood while preparing for a professional career as a student in the St. 
Louis Law School, the law department of Washington University, from which he 
was graduated in 1902. He had lost his father when ten years of age and had 
been self-supporting from the age of seventeen. While studying law he engaged 
in business to meet the expenses of his course and daily living and immediately 
following his admission to the bar began practice. In the second year thereafter 
he was appointed assistant special counsel of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition 
Company and later was made special counsel, in which capacity he engaged in 
winding up the affairs of the corporation in addition to conducting a general law 
practice. He has never specialized in any department of the law but has kept in 
touch with all and has handled various cases, which have brought him into con- 
nection with many of the departments of jurisprudence. He belongs to the St. 
Louis Bar Association and also to the Law Library Association. 

\Miile in college Mr. Leonard became a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
and for many years w'as an officer of and active in the Mississippi Valley xA.lumni 
Association of his alma mater. He has long been a member of the New England 
Society and he belongs also to the University Club and to the Merrimac Canoe 
Club. He has done active and effective work with the Civic League as chairman 
of some of its important committees and is particularly interested in improving 
the appearance of the city by abolishing billboards and other objectionable fea- 
tures and promoting its parks and the adornment of its public roads. He usually 
votes with the republican party and is identified with that movement which re- 
gards the fitness of the candidate as the most important thing rather than his 
political affiliation. He has long been interested in reform politics and has done 
his share of work in the ranks as a precinct committeeman. His labors are an 
acknowledged helpful factor in bringing about those purifying and wholesome 
reforms which have been gradually growing in the political, municipal and social 
life of the city. It is true that his chief life work has been that of a successful 
lawyer, but the range of his activities and the scope of his influence have reached 
far beyond this special field and he belongs to that public spirited, useful and help- 
ful type of men, whose ambitions and desires are centered and directed in those 
channels through wdiich flow the greatest and most permanent good to the 
greatest number. 



FRANK VOLLMER. 



St. Louis is largely a monument to its German-American citizens. The 
determination and progressive spirit of the Teutonic race have largely been 
elements in the city's substantial upbuilding. One of the native sons of the 
fatherland, Frank Vollmer, was born in Westphalia, January 9, 1845, ^ son of 
Henry and Gertrude (Eisenbach) Vollmer, the former a shoe manufacturer. 
To the public schools of his native land he is indebted for the educational privi- 
lee"es which he enjoyed. He continued his studies to the age of fourteen years, 
when he became a tailor's apprentice, serving for a term of four years, after 
which he spent several years as a journeyman in the line of his trade and at the 
age of twenty-four years came to America, making his way direct to St. Louis. 

For five years he was here employed in the tailoring business, and in 1873 
established business at No. 220 Locust street, as a member of the firm of Vollmer 
& Knabe, his partner being Henry Knabe. They remained at that location for one 
year and then removed to 825 North Fourth street. This relation existed for nine- 
teen years anrl was crowned with gratifying and well merited prosperity. In 1892, 
however, they severed their business interests and Mr. Vollmer then opened a tailor- 
ing establishment at No. 806 Pine street, where he continued until 1903, when he 
sold his place and retired to private life. In the meantime he had become a large 
owner of real estate anrl his investments have proven very profitable. 




FRANK A^0LL:MER 



172 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

On the 25th of August, 1874, Mr. Vollmer was married to IMiss Maria 
Hoelscher, who was born February 25, 1847, at the corner of Fourteenth street 
and Clark avenue in this city. Her parents were Bernard and Gertrude (Aver- 
buckj Hoelscher. The father, a native of Germany, came to St. Louis in 1842 
and was one of the earlv contractors and builders of this city. His wife was 
likewise a native of the fatherland and they were married in the year 1842. 
Their children were : Mrs. Eliza Dana ; Maria, now Mrs. Vollmer ; and Henry, 
who died in infancy. L'nto ^Ir. and Mrs. Vollmer were born the following 
named: Bernard, who was born July 10, 1875, and died April 9, 1884; Maria, 
who is the wife of Henry Warren, of St Louis and has one daughter, Maria 
Francisco: Joseph, who was born February 22, 1879, and died April 11, 1885; 
Henrv, who died in infancy; Frank, who also died in infancy; Agnes, a grad- 
uate of Sisters of St. Mary"s high school, who is musically inclined and is living 
at home : Josephine, graduate of St. Mary's high school ; and Frank, a graduate 
of St. Mary's high school and also of the St. Louis University. The family resi- 
dence at Xo. 2133 California avenue is the abode of warm-hearted and generous 
hospitality. 

In his political views ]\Ir. A'oUmer is a democrat, giving his support to the 
partv since he became a naturalized American citizen. He belongs to St. Fran- 
cis Catholic church and to St. Vincent de Paul's Society, which is for the benefit 
of the poor. ' He is also one of the trustees and directors of St. Vincent's Orphan 
Society, belongs to St. Mary's School Society and has been a generous con- 
tributor to all. As he has prospered in his undertakings he has never hoarded 
his wealth for selfish interests, but has shared liberally with others. He came to 
St. Louis with a capital of only twenty-eight dollars, but possessed what is far 
better — a resolute heart and willing hands. His undaunted industry, even in the 
face of discouragement, his straightforward dealing and his careful investment 
have enabled him to build up an independefit fortune and he is now among the 
most prosperous of the German-American residents of St. Louis. 



WILLIAM CHARLES STAMPS. 

Each individual who does well his daily tasks, faithfully meeting the duties 
and obligations that devolve upon him and utilizing his opportunities to the best 
advantage, contributes to the world's progress. A well spent life was that of 
\\'illiam Charles Stamps, who for a long period was connected with the indus- 
trial interests of St. Louis as a manufacturer of brick. He was born in this city, 
January 9, 1844, and pursued his education in the schools here. His early sur- 
roundings were neither those of dire poverty nor of wealth, yet he was reared 
in comfortable circumstances and given the opportunities that would lead to 
advancement if he would improve them. That he neglected his chances in no 
wav is indicated by the success which attended him as the years went by. His 
father. AX'illiam S. Stamps, was one of the early residents of the city and in 
pioneer times here purchased a tract of ground at Herbert and Jefferson streets, 
where he established a brick factory, the business being conducted there for more 
than a half century. After William C. Stamps completed his education he joined 
his father in business and in early manhood became manager of the enterprise, 
which he controlled for his father until the latter's death. He then became pro- 
prietor of the business, which he conducted until a few years prior to his own 
death. .All through that period he was ever alert to gain new ideas concerning 
brick manufacturing that he might improve the plant and thus produce a still 
higher quality of brick. That his output was such as the public demanded is in- 
dicated in the liberal patronage that was accorded him. He conducted a well 
equipped establishment, employed eflficient workmen at good wages and the ex- 
cellence of his manufactured product enabled him to command for it a ready sale 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 173 

upon the market. The business was conducted at the original site for more than 
fifty years, at the end of which time Wilham C. Stamps sold the land and the 
business. He installed the first Yankee bolster in St. Louis at this brickyard and 
introduced many other modern improvements. His father was for some time 
treasurer of the Builders" Exchange and for years William C. Stamps acted as 
its secretary. He figured prominently in building circles of the city and was very 
active in the development of St. Louis, giving loyal support to many measures and 
movements which he believed would prove beneficial to the citv and upon which 
the years have set their approval. 

On January ii, 1876, in St. Louis, ]\lr. Stamps was united in marriage to 
Miss Amanda Stagg, a daughter of Edward Stagg, who came to this city from 
New York city, where he was born and reared. In this city he married Miss 
Daggett, a daughter of John D. Daggett, a very old and prominent citizen of St. 
Louis. Following his removal to the middle west Mr. Stagg engaged with the 
Laclede Gas Light Company here. He was not onlv known as a successful busi- 
ness man but also as a gentleman of considerable literary ability, his writings con- 
taining much of merit. He contributed many valuable articles to one of the early 
newspapers of St. Louis, called the Organ, was the writer of considerable verse 
and also the author of several prose works. His cultured mind and marked 
individuality made him a guiding factor in the intellectual progress of the com- 
munity. He was also numbered among the Sons of the American Revolution, 
his grandfather having been General Staddeford, of New York, who served with 
the American army in the war for independence. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Stamps was born but one child, Mary Shapleigh, who is 
living with her mother on Washington boulevard. The death of Mr. Stamps, oc- 
curred in Los Angeles, California, in 1900. He was reared in the faith of the 
Presbyterian church, although he never united with the denomination. His 
widow is a Christian Scientist. Mr. Stamps gave his political allegiance to the 
democracv and was a member of the Liederkranz Club. In all his life he was 
energetic and diligent and eminently practical. He brought sound judgment to 
bear on the solution of all questions which came to him for decision, whether 
relative to business or social life or matters of public concern. He remained from 
his birth until his death a resident of St. Louis and had many warm friends here 
who gave him their high regard and entertained for him feelings of good will and 
confidence. 



WILLIAM HENRY SCUDDER. 

William Henry Scudder, born in St. Louis, August i, i860, was a son of 
William H. and Catherine ( Hinde ) Scudder. He pursued his education in the 
public schools until he had mastered the elementary branches of learning and 
then supplemented his preliminary training by study in Washington University. 
He pursued a course of law^ there and further prepared for the bar as a student 
in the law department of the ^lichigan State University at Ann Arbor in 1881. 
In July, 1882, he was admitted to the Missouri bar and became a member of 
the firm of Douglas Scudder & Company, engaged in the general practice of 
law. In no profession does advancement depend more largely upon individual 
merit than in the law, and the fact that Mr. Scudder secured a liberal clienta,ge 
was indicative of his knowledge and his correct application of legal principles 
to the points in litigation. With a mind naturally logical and inductive, his 
reasoning was always clear and cogent, and his presentation of his cause was 
forceful. He became a member of the State Bar Association and enjoyed in full 
measure the respect and admiration of his fellow members of the bar. 

On February 10. 1885. Mr. Scudder was united in marriage to ^liss Amelia 
Cupples, a native of St. Louis, and they became parents of three children : 



174 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

jMartha, Gladys and Maude. The family circle was broken by the hand of 
death on the 12th of November, 1899, when Mr. Scudder passed away in Colo- 
rado Springs, where he had gone for the benefit of his health. He left behind 
him many warm friends who felt sincere grief at his demise. He was well 
known and popular in the Manufacturers, St. Louis, Noonday and Country 
Clubs, in which he held membership, and was the first president of the first Coun- 
try Club. He was always deeply interested in St. Louis and her welfare and 
had great faith in her future. He always gave enthusiastic support to interests 
calculated to promote the city's growth and development and his influence was 
ever found on the side of those plans which are helpful in upbuilding com- 
munity interests or in promoting individual development. 



GEORGE D. BARNARD. 

There are certain names around which center the history of business devel- 
opment and progress in every community. George D. Barnard needs no intro- 
duction to the readers of this volume, for he is closely associated with business 
concerns which have conserved the interests of the city in lines of substantial 
commercial upbuilding and from which he himself has derived substantial bene- 
fits. Entering the commercial field as a manufacturing stationer in 1872, with 
careful management his business has been extended until its ramifying interests 
reach to all parts of the country. Other lines as well have felt the stimulus of 
his cooperation and his sound judgment, while concerns of public importance 
have profited by his activity. 

Mr. Barnard, a native of New Bedford, Massachusetts, was born October 
6. 1846, his parents being Henry L. and Elizabeth Robinson (Curtis) Barnard. 
Through the medium of the public schools he acquired his education and when 
he had completed about half of the work of the high school at New Bedford, 
^Massachusetts, he was obliged to abandon his studies because of the death of 
his father and the necessity of his entering the business world. Throughout his 
entire connection with commercial pursuits he has been a representative of the 
stationery trade. He became an employe in a house of that character in i860, 
remaining in the east until September, 1868, when he came to St. Louis and ac- 
cepted a clerkship in a manufacturing stationery house, where he remained until 
1872. In the interim he gained a comprehensive knowledge of the business, not 
only in relation to its sales but also in relation to the manufacture of the product, 
and believing the time was ripe for him to start in business on his own account, 
he joined two others in the establishment of a manufacturing stationery enter- 
prise. The new venture proved successful, enjoying a steady growth, but in 
1876 one of the partners died and in 1877 the death of the other occurred. This 
threw upon Mr. Barnard the responsibility of carrying on the business, but he 
had in his employ at that time some young men who were willing to help and 
who have since proved their worth not only to the business in which they are 
now interested with Mr. Barnard, but as citizens of St. Louis. In 1885 the busi- 
ness was incorporated under the style of George D. Barnard & Company with 
Mr. Barnard as president. The constant expansion of the trade has made it pos- 
sible for the company to utilize the entire large factory building, three hundred 
and forty-five by two hundred and twelve feet, since 1895. The business has 
been most carefully systematized, the plant is equipped with the latest improved 
machinery and the most thorough methods prevail in the sales departments. The 
name of Barnard has become a synonym for the stationery trade in St. Louis. 

In an intensely active business career Mr. Barnard has not felt satisfied with 
the e-tablishmcnt and successful control of this mammoth undertaking, but has 
extended his efforts to other fields with equally good results. He is now vice 
president of the Art Metal Construction Company, vice president of the Embree- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 175 

McLean Carriage Company and vice president of the Continental Warrant & 
Investment Company. 

If liis name can be secured in support of any public movement it is consid- 
ered a most valuable asset, for he never enters upon a work in a half hearted 
manner and his activities have greatly benefited the city in many of its public 
movements and measures. He belongs to the Merchants' Exchange, of which 
he was formerly vice president, and he has been vice-chairman of the committee 
on fall festivities, which have done so much to exploit the interests and oppor- 
tunities of St. Louis. He was one of the original World's Fair committee of two 
hundred and has been chairman of many committees to raise money for public 
purposes and has always been a liberal donor thereto. His political position is 
somewhat independent. Indeed he is in hearty sympathy with the tendency of the 
times which is manifest by many progressive, thinking men, who consider results 
rather than party successes and feel that there are interests which are paramount 
to machine rule. 

Air. Barnard was married in Alton, Illinois, in 1874, to Miss Alary L. Tin- 
dall. He belongs to the Episcopal church, and for more than a quarter of a 
century was a vestryman of St. Peter's. Admirable social qualities render him 
popular in the Mercantile, the St. Louis, the St. Louis Country and the Glen 
Echo clubs. W^hen he entered the business field he had no ambition to ac- 
complish something especially great or famous, and throughout his business 
career he has followed the lead of his opportunities, seizing legitimate advan- 
tages as they have arisen and taking a forward step whenever the way was open. 
He has always been ready for advancement and, fortunate in possessing ability 
and character that have inspired confidence in others, the weight of his char- 
acter, his ability and his willingness to work have carried him into important 
relations with larsfe interests. 



JOSEPH D. HESSE. 



In European countries young men learn a trade or business and in the 
majority of cases continue throughout their lives in the employ of others, ham- 
pered in their efforts by caste or class and by the burdensome taxation of mon- 
archical rulers. In America, however, the young man can master his trade, and 
passes on, if he be diligent and determined, to positions of ownership and control, 
and in time becomes a leading representative of the line of business to which 
he directs his enterprise. 

Joseph D. Hesse, serving his apprenticeship as architect and receiving prac- 
tical training in the profession as an employe of others, is now at the head of a 
profitable business of his own and as a speculative builder has done much to 
improve certain sections of the city. He was born in Pacific, Missouri, in Jan- 
uary, 1869, and is a son of Ignatz and Emily Hesse. The father was a barber 
who resided in St. Louis, and the mother, still living, is engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine, having the degree of M.D. Both parents came of German 
ancestry, although the mother's people have long been represented at Washing- 
ton, ^Missouri. 

Josph D. Hesse attended the public schools of Pacific, Alissouri, until his 
thirteenth year, and then came to St. Louis, where he pursued his education 
as a public-school student for three years. His natural talent for drawing and 
his interest in the work led to his preparation for the profession of an architect 
in the employ of John Johnson, one of the oldest and best known architects of 
the country. Mr. Hesse remained with him for two years and then entered 
the service of George I. Barnett & Son, predecessors of the present firm of Bar- 
nett, Haynes & Barnett, with wdiom he continued for about three years. He 
next engaged as draftsman for Charles Hellmers. and two years later he en- 



176 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

gaged as interior designer with Eniil F. Seidel, a well-known cabinetmaker. 
Wliile thus engaged, Air. Hesse gained a comprehensive knowledge of the busi- 
ness and furnished many attractive designs for interiors. When he embarked 
in business on his own account, he also continued interior designing and plan- 
ning interiors for architects, cabinetmakers and others. For six years he devoted 
his attention solely to that line, having an office in the Commercial building for 
two years. He then removed to the Chemical building, where he remained for 
four years. During this time he began building flats and organized the Heston 
Investment Company, with which he is still connected. He sufifered during the 
widespread tinancial panic of 1893 ^^^^'^ was forced to close his office, bitt a man 
of such resolution as ^Nlr. Hesse possessed could not be discouraged, and when 
he could not continue in one line, he directed his talents in another. He began 
designing cars for the American Car Foundry Company and made the designs 
for many private cars. When times were better he resumed business on his 
own account and is now connected with the company, which has different prop- 
erty rights throughout the city. As an architect, his work is worthy of note, 
for it combines utility with adornment and solidarity with beauty. The apart- 
ment buildings which he has arranged contain the most modern conveniences 
and are artistic in their arrangement and interior designing. 

On the 1 2th of October. 1904, Mr. Hesse was married in New York city 
to Aliss Alinnie A an Duzer, whose acquaintance he formed while she was visit- 
ing the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. She is of Holland lineage, connected 
with a family of well known pillow-sham manufacturers. They have one daugh- 
ter, Laberne, fifteen months of age. 

In his political views Mr. Hesse is independent, nor is he active in club life, 
preferring to give his attention outside of business hours to his home interests 
and his immediate circle of friends. A resolute will and constantly increasing 
capital coi\stitute the salient features of his progress in professional lines. 



HON. FRANXIS PRESTON BLAIR. 

The name of Francis Preston Blair figures upon the pages of our national 
history as that of one who aided in molding public opinion and in shaping the 
destiny of the country during a most momentous period in its existence. The 
honesty of his views was never called into ciuestion and he stood ever as a man 
of lofty patriotism whose devotion to the welfare of his country was one of 
his distinguishing characteristics. He won fame as a lawyer, soldier and states- 
man and his record reflects credit and honor upon the city which honored him. 

Born in Lexinyton, Kentucky, on the 19th of February, 1821, he was a 
son of Francis P. Blair, Sr., a native of Virginia and an eminent lawyer of 
that state, who afterward became attorney general of Kentucky and still later 
was the well known editor of the Globe, a Washington, D. C, newspaper. 
Francis P. Blair, Jr., was but nine years of age at the time of his parents' re- 
moval to the capital city, where his boyhood days were passed. After prepar- 
ing for college in the schools of Washington he matriculated in the College of 
New Jersey at Princeton and when he had completed his university course re- 
turned to Kentucky to enter upon the study of law with Lewis Marshall as his 
preceptor. He completed his legal training in the law school of Transsylvania 
University, of Kentucky, and in 1843 came to St. Louis for the purpose of en- 
tering upon the active practice of his ])rofession in this city. Delicate health, 
however. ]jrevented him fnjm at once becoming a member of the St. Louis 
bar and hojjing to be iK-nefited by outdoor life he -went with a party of trap- 
pers aiul traders to the Rocky mountains and in 1845 accompanied Bent and 
Saint X'rian tf; their fort, which occupied a site in the southern part of the 
present state of Colorado. He remained in that region until the expedition 




FRANK P. BLAIR 



12— vol.. II. 



178 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

under command of General Stephen W. Kearney crossed the plains and pro- 
ceeded to ^lexico to take part in the ]\Iexican war. Air. Blair joined that ex- 
pedition and in a military capacity served until the close of hostilities. His 
health improved under the rigorous life of the west and in 1847 ^ie returned to 
St. Louis, where the same year he married ]\Iiss Apolline Alexander, of Wood- 
ford county, Kentucky. 

i\Ir. and i\Irs. Blair established their home in St. Louis and he entered at 
once upon the active practice of the law. While advancement at the bar is pro- 
verbiallv slow no dreary novitiate awaited him. In the trial of his first cases 
he proved his marked ability in the handling of complex legal problems and 
from the beginning enjoyed an extensive and important practice. He devoted 
himself to the more congenial branches of professional work and to the ad- 
vocacv of political principles which he deemed essential in forming the state 
and national policy. His position was never an equivocable one and he soon 
became recognized as one of the strongest opponents of slavery and one of the 
most stalwart originators and advocates of the free-soil movement. In 1852 
he was elected on the free-soil ticket as a member of the state legislature, 
where his representation of the interests of his constituents was such as to 
insure his reelection for a second term. While serving in the house he made 
several speeches in favor of the free labor system, which attracted general at- 
tention and aroused public sentiment to the inic|uities of the slave system. He 
had been a close and discriminating student of the conditions of the south and 
became an opponent of a system which he fully understood was undermining 
national interests and proving a detriment to national progress, while at the 
same time it was opposed to all humanitarian ideals. The stand which he took 
on this question aroused the pro-slavery party which manifested the utmost 
hostility to him. Angry threats and protests, however, did not deter him in the 
least and he continued to make anti-slavery speeches upon the slave soil and to 
use his influence in favor of the free labor movements. Mr. Blair gained a 
strong following in St. Louis, although the movement was not a popular one 
outside of the city. Here, however, it found endorsement from the liberty- 
loving German element and Mr. Blair never ceased to clearly express his views 
as occasion offered. Under his leadership the free-soil party placed a ticket 
in the field in St. Louis in 1856 and elected its nominees. 

In the same year Mr. Blair was chosen to represent this district in con- 
gress and in the national councils. He boldly advocated the emancipation doc- 
trine, also supporting the views which Clay had held years before, that the 
emancipation of the negroes should be followed by their transportation to 
Africa. Had this course been pursued the country would have been spared the 
grave race problem which it is today facing. 

In 1858 Air. Blair was again a candidate for congress but in that year 
was defeated although at the next election he was again sent to the national 
halls of legislation as congressman from this district. He there served as chair- 
man of the committee on military affairs and as a member of other important 
committees. He was one of the earnest working members of that body and 
exerted strong influence in the house. Remaining ever a student of the ques- 
tions and issues of the day, when a new party was formed to prevent the ex- 
tension of slavery, he joined its ranks, putting forth earnest effort to promote 
its growth and secure its success. It was at his suggestion that in i860 a meet- 
ing of Missouri republicans was called to select delegates to the national con- 
vention of the party to be held that year in Chicago. Mr. Blair was chosen as 
a delegate anrl became a conspicuous figure in that memorable gathering. Fol- 
lowing his return to St. Louis after the adjournment of the convention he made 
a ratification speech at tlie old Lucas Market and was instrumental in organiz- 
ing the uniformed campaign club, known as the Wide-Awakes — an organiza- 
tion that played a most important part in the subsequent campaign. Following 
the election of President Lincriln. .Mr. I'.lair was among the first of the coun- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 179 

try's eminent men to perceive that Civil war was inevitable and to realize that 
the effort must at once be made if Missouri was to be saved to the Union. He 
therefore inaugurated a movement which resulted in enlisting, organizing and 
drilling some of the earliest defenders of the Union in this city. When the at- 
tempt at secession was made, followed by the declaration of war, Mr. Blair be- 
came captain of the first company of Union soldiers enlisted in the state and 
assisted materially in defraying the expenses incident to arming and equipping 
them. When a number of companies had been organized and united as a regi- 
ment ]\Ir. Blair was unanimously elected colonel of the First Regiment of 
]\Iissouri Volunteers. This was followed by promotion to the rank of brigadier 
general of volunteers in August, 1861, and on the 29th of November, 1862, he 
was made major general. At the same time and until 1863 he was repre- 
sentative from his district in congress but resigned his seat. He was instru- 
mental in unearthing a plot of the state authorities of Missouri to capture the 
United States arsenal in St. Louis containing the sixty-five thousand stand of 
arms belonging to the general government. This was soon after the organiza- 
tion of the Confederacy. During Sherman's campaign in 1864 and 1865 General 
Blair was at the head of the Seventeenth Corps and participated in the march to 
the sea. He succeeded General McPherson in command of the Seventeenth 
Army Corps and thus served until the close of the war, with conspicuous gal- 
lantry, rendering important aid to his country in the darkest hour of her his- 
torv. He then returned to his home in St. Louis, where the people received 
him with enthusiastic demonstrations of affection and esteem. 

In matters relating to the civic mterests of his country Mr. Blair was also 
prominent. He served at one time as commissioner of the Pacific Railroad and 
in 1868 was the democratic candidate for the vice presidency on the ticket with 
Horatio Seymour. He regarded the measures adopted by the republican party 
toward the southern states as unduly harsh, and because of this he returned his 
allegiance to the party with which he had been connected in early life, and in 
187 1 he was again elected to the Missouri legislature and afterward was chosen 
to fill a vacancy in the United States senate, where he represented Missouri 
until 1873. W'hen he passed away in this city two years later the news of his 
death brought a sense of personal bereavement to almost every individual in 
St. Louis and the state and was deeply lamented by those who knew and hon- 
ored him throughout the nation. At meetings of the bar, of the veterans of 
the Civil war and of various public bodies in St. Louis, resolutions were adopted 
and speeches delivered in wdiich the story of his upright life, his unfaltering 
devotion to duty and his unquestioned honesty in support of his convictions 
was then retold. As a patriotic citizen, a distinguished lawyer and able states- 
man, he inscribed his name high on America's roll of fame and is today num- 
bered with Missouri's honored dead. 



TAMILS W. ALCORN. 



Honored and respected by all, few men occupy a more enviable position 
in the regard of those with wliom they are brought in contact than does James 
W. Alcorn, the vice president of the McLain-Alcorn Commission Company. 
This is not alone by reason of the success that he has attained, but also owmg 
to the straightforward business methods which he has followed. He was born 
April 26, i860, of the marriage of William E. Alcorn and Anna M. Rowe. The 
father was a native of Baltimore, Maryland, and removing to Cincinnati, _ there 
engaged in the tent and awning business for many years. His wife died in 
that "citA- in 1863 and Mr. Alcorn afterward removed to Olney, Illinois, where 



ISO ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

he turned his attention to farming, being identified with that pursuit until his 

demise in 1S96. 

Tames W. Alcorn was but a young lad at the time of the removal of the 
family from Cincinnati to Illinois,' in which state he acquired his education in 
the public schools. He was a voung man of eighteen years when he came to 
St. Louis and entered the employ of Erasmus Wells, a street railway builder 
and operator of this city. He afterward engaged in the baggage and express 
business in connection with the steam railroad service and was thus connected 
until 1900. when he joined W. T. JNIcLain in organizing the McLain-Alcorn 
Commission Company! \Miile in the service of the railroad he had speculated 
on the side in the commission business until he found that he was making good 
money in that way and decided that he would join a partner in that line and 
leave railroading entirely. 

On the 3d of June,' 1885, jNIr. Alcorn was married to Miss Edna Hopkin- 
son, who was born and reared in Olney. Illinois, a daughter of Ambrose H. 
Hopkinson, who engaged in contracting in Olney until his death in 1906. 

Mr. Alcorn has attained prominence in the Masonic fraternity, belonging 
to the Knight Templar Commandery, the Consistory and to the Mystic Shrine. 
He is also a member of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis, is a Methodist 
in religious faith and a republican in his political belief. His life has been one 
of continuous activity in which has been accorded due recognition of labor and 
he is rapidly forging to the front in commercial circles, nor has his activity con- 
tributed alone to his individual success, for he is found among those who en- 
dorse public interests which are calculated to promote the general welfare. 



GORDON WILLIS. 



Gordon Willis, vice president and secretary of the Hunkins-Willis Lime 
& Cement Company of St. Louis, was born in Galena, Illinois, on the 29th of 
:\Iay, 1859, his parents being W. B. and Ellen T. (Pratt) WilHs. who in 1865 
removed with their family to this city. Accordingly Gordon Willis acquired 
his education in the public schools here, and his early business training was 
received in the service of the Wiggins Ferry Company as superintendent of the 
car ferry for eight years. On severing that connection he spent four years with 
R. S. ]\IcCormick & Company, and in 1889 became secretary of the Thorn & 
Hunkins Lime & Cement Company, which was established in 1875. The busi- 
ness was conducted under that style until 1896, when it was taken over by the 
newly organized firm of the Hunkins-Willis Lime & Cement Company, with 
Gordon Willis as vice president and secretary. The volume of business which 
has been secured makes theirs a most important industry of this character. ' It 
was but a natural and logical step for Mr. Willis to become connected with the 
National Builders Supply Association, of which he was elected president in Jan- 
uary, 1906. reelected in 1907, and again in 1908. This is a rapidly growing 
organization, having more than seven hundred members in the principal cities 
of the United States. It is in harmony with the marked tendency of the times 
CO so cooperate in business life that different parties may enjoy the benefits of 
mutually developed trade interests. Mr. Willis as president is bringing the 
Supply Association into national prominence and is becoming recognized as one 
of the foremost representatives of his line of trade in the middle west. He 
is vice president of Best Brothers Keene's Cement Company, Cleveland, Ohio, 
and secretary and treasurer of the Peerless White Lime Company, St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

In 1891, in St. Louis, Mr. Willis was married to Miss Letha Tindel and 
they have one son, Barnard. Mr. Willis belongs to the Mercantile Club and 
finds his chief recreation in travel and athletics, but that he is preeminently a 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 181 

business man is indicated by his activity in the Business Men's League, the Citi- 
zens Industrial Association and the Traffic Club, the St. Louis Railway Club, 
and the Manufacturers Association. Tireless energy, keen perception and a 
genius for devising and planning the right things at the right time are some 
of the elements which have constituted his success, enabling him to make rapid 
and substantial advancement in the business world. 



JUDGE CHARLES CLELLAND BLAND. 

The Bland family of which Judge Charles C. Bland is a representative is 
of English origin and was planted on American soil in Virginia during the 
colonial epoch in the history of this country. In 1776 Richard Bland, of the 
Virginia colony, published an "Inquiry mto the Rights of the British Colonies." 
He was elected a delegate to congress in 1774 and died four years later, but 
left the impress of his individuality upon the history of Virginia in its forma- 
tive period. The name of Bland has frequently figured prominently in the na- 
tion's annals. Stoughton E. and Margaret (Nail) Bland, parents of Judge 
Bland, were representatives of two old Kentucky families, the former born on 
what became the home of ex-Governor Proctor Knott of that state. Their son, 
the late Hon. Richard P. Bland, was a candidate for presidential honors at the 
Chicago convention of 1896. 

Judge Bland, coming of an ancestry honorable and distinguished, has added 
new laurels to the family name as a lawyer and jurist. He was born in Hart- 
ford. Ohio county, Kentucky, February 9, 1837, and on the death of his parents 
came to Arcadia, Missouri, in 1850, with his uncle, G. B. Nownall, and pursued 
an academic education in that place. His early professional service was de- 
voted to educational interests as a teacher in the schools of Missouri and Mis- 
sissippi, and while thus engaged his leisure hours were spent in mastering the 
principles of jurisprudence through private reading. In i860 he successfully 
passed an examination before Judge James H. JNIcBride of the circuit court of 
Dent county, Missouri, and entered at once upon the practice of his profession, 
but had scarcely time to gain recognition as a lawyer when the Civil war was 
inaugurated. 

Judge Bland stood as a stalwart defender of Union supremacy. He had 
been a student of the great questions which were to bring the two opposing 
forces into armed conflict and, although of southern birth, became a stanch ad- 
vocate of the Union, manifesting his loyalty by active service at the front after 
the inauguration of hostilities. He joined the army as a private of Company 
D, Thirty-second Regiment of Missouri Infantry, and was elected captain of 
his company, with which rank he served throughout the war. He was with 
General Sherman and General Blair at Chickasaw Bayou and Arkansas Post. 
He afterward participated in the sieges of Vicksburg and of Jackson, Missis- 
sippi, and of Atlanta, Georgia, taking part in the battles of Brandon, Lookout 
Alountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Ezra Church, Jonesboro and others of lesser 
importance. He commanded his company in at least one-half of the engage- 
ments in which Sherman's army participated in its progress from Chattanooga 
to Atlanta, and after the capitulation of that city the Thirty-second Alissouri 
Infantry was consolidated with the Twenty-first Regiment. He was mustered 
out after the consolidation. 

When the w^ar was over Judge Bland located for practice at Rolla, Mis- 
souri, where he was in partnership with his brother, Richard Bland, from 1866 
until 1868, in which year the brother removed to Lebanon, Missouri. As the 
years passed Judge Bland gradually gained renown based upon a thorough and 
comprehensive understanding of the law and accuracy in the application of its 
principles. The ability which he displayed as an advocate in the courts led to 



1S2 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

his election to the circuit court bench in 1880, followed by a reelection in i 
and 1892. During his twelve years' faithful service as circuit judge few ap- 
peals were taken from his decisions and his fairness and impartiality none 
seriously questioned. In fact, he received public endorsement of his service on 
the circuit bench in an election as associate judge of the St. Louis court of ap- 
peals. It is a high tribute to his sterling worth that none of his decisions have 
ever aroused a feeling of personal antagonism, his honesty, his solid judicial 
qualities and his remarkable industry and executive force being recognized by 
all. He is a man of well balanced intellect, thoroughly familiar with the law 
and practice, and possesses, too, a comprehensive general information which 
enables him to understand the complexity of human interests and the motive 
springs of human conduct. In the court of appeals he is making a record which 
places him with the distinguished jurists who have sat upon that bench and, as 
a contemporary biographer has expressed it, "his opinions have been as note- 
worthv for the honesty as for the ability that he has put into them." 

On the 25th of September, 1865, Mr. Bland was married to Miss Luticia 
Goodykoontze, who died December 24, 1869, leaving a daughter, Vivian, who 
was born April 16, 1867, and passed away January 19, 1872. On the 25th of 
I\Iay, 1871. Judge Bland wedded Hattie B. Keene, whose death occurred April 
2, 1888. Their children were : Thomas C, who was born April 27, 1873, and 
died September 30, 1895 ; Richard E., who was born November 29, 1874, and 
died September 16, 1897; Harry O., born October 8, 1877; Charles P., born 
May II, 1880; lone, September 14, 1883; Joseph R., October 22, 1885; and 
George R., April 2, 1888. On the 25th of April, 1889, Judge Bland married 
^lary Goodykoontze, a sister of his first wife, and their son, Clark B., was born 
August 21, 1890. 

Judge Bland is a member of the Royal Legion and has long been promi- 
nent in ^lasonic circles. He enjoys association with observant, thinking men, 
and the delights of literature have long been his. He has gained an enviable 
and well merited fame in his profession. Of stern integrity and honesty of 
purpose, despising all unworthv or questionable means to secure success in 
any imdertaking or for any purpose or to promote his own advancement ' in 
any direction, whether political or otherwise, not even the tongue of calumny 
has ever uttered a word to the contrary. The faithful use of his native talents 
has worked out to a logical conclusion and he has wrought along the line of 
the largest public good. 



ROBERT McCULLOCH. 

Robert McCulloch, president and general manager of the L"'^nited Railway 
Company of St. Louis, was born in Missouri, September 15, 1841, and is a rep- 
resentative of old Virginia families. His father was Roderick Douglas Mc- 
Culloch, of Amherst county, Virginia, and his mother, Elizabeth McClanahan 
CNash) McCulloch, a native of Roanoke, Virginia. During the infancy of their 
■^on Robert the parents both died and he returned to the Old Dominion, settling 
in Rockbridge county, where he mastered the elementary branches of learning 
as a pupil in private schools. Subsequently he attended the Virginia Military 
Institute and was given his diploma of graduation after the close of the 
Civil war. 

At the outbreak of hostilities he put aside his text-books and on the 19th 
of April. t86t, joined the Confederate army as drill master. He afterward 
enlisted for active duty at the front as a private, but was promoted successively 
to the rank of lieutenant, of adjutant and then to captain of Company B of 
the Eighteenth Virginia Infantry, which was a part of Garnett's Brigade, Pick- 
ett's Division, of the Army of Northern Virginia. He thus served under the 




ROBERT Mcculloch 



lS-1 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

gallant Pickett, who won undying- fame at Gettysburg and who perhaps had 
the personal love and respect of his soldiers more than any other Confederate 
leader. Captain ]\IcCulloch was wounded at First Manassas, again at Second 
^lanassas. also in the seven days' battle in the vicinity of Richmond, and twice 
at Gettvsburg in Pickett's charge. Xo American citizen of the north or of the 
south can ever hear or read the story of that charge without being thrilled 
bv the braverv of men who in the face of the bullets' fire — to the very mouth 
of the enemv's guns — left their dead and dying almost as thickly strewn over 
the field as was the wheat over which they trod. It was on the 3d of July, 
1863. that ]\Ir. McCulloch. being wounded, was reported among the dead. He 
was taken prisoner, was afterward exchanged and remained on active duty until 
the surrender in April, 1865. 

Returning home to take up the pursuits of peace, Air. McCulloch remained 
a resident of A'irginia until January, 1869, when he came to St. Louis and 
soon afterward procured employment in a minor position with the Bellefontaine 
Railwav Company. It was his initial step in a business career that has con- 
tinuallv broadened in its responsibilities and in its successes. He has been 
uninterruptedlv connected with street railway interests since that time and has 
been associated with every department of the service. He has seen the horse- 
car svstem superseded by the cable and that in turn by electric motor power, and 
has been a factor in that progressive move which has brought street railway 
service up to its present perfect condition. He was for several years general 
manager of the Chicago City Railway Company and in 1904 returned to St. 
Louis, becoming director, vice president and general manager of the United 
Railways Company of this city and then president. His ready adaptability in 
business, his clear comprehension of possibilities, his outlook beyond the ex- 
igencies of the moment to the opportunities of the future, his habits of systematic 
labor and of clear thought all combine to make him one of the best known and 
most competent street railway managers of the country. 

During the interval following his return from the war and his removal to 
St. Louis. Air. AlcCulloch was married in Rockbridge county, Virginia, to Miss 
Emma Paxton, on the i8th of June, 1868. The household now includes three 
children, Richard, Roberta and Grace. In Alasonry Mr. McCulloch has at- 
tained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, is also identified with the 
Knight Templar commandery and the Mystic Shrine. He has been honored 
with official preferment, being an ex-grand commander of Missouri. He is a 
member of the St. Louis, the Alercantile and Racquet Clubs, Sons of the Revo- 
lution and Colonial Wars, and his political belief is that of the democracy, 
while his religious ideas are in harmony with the Protestant faith. An analyza- 
tion of his life work shows a ready adaptability, a thoroughness in purpose and 
a persistency in carrying out plans that constitute the salient elements in his 
rise in the business world. 



ARTHUR W. LAAIBERT. 

Arthur W. Lambert is now treasurer of the Lambert Pharmacal Company, 
with which he has been connected continuously since coming to St. Louis in 
1887, while since 1895 he has occupied his present position. He was born in 
Alexandria, X'irginia, May 18. 1867, and is a son of William H. and Laura 
C Steer) Lambert. His father devoted his life to the banking business and was 
president of the Citizens National IJank of Alexandria. The family is of Eng- 
lish lineage, anrl when re)jrcsentatives of the name came to America they settled 
in Maryland, while later the family was founded in Alexandria, Virginia, where 
they had been known for three generations. They are descendants of John 
Lambert, who was the commander-in-chief of Cromwell's army. The sons of 
the present generation are grand ncijliews of I'cnjamin Higden, of the city of 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH UiTY. 185 

Philadelphia, who was a member of the Revolutionary congress from 1777 until 

1779- 

Arthur \\ . Lambert attended school in his native city to the age of sixteen 

years and then became connected with the banking business in Alexandria, 
Virginia, where he remained until his removal to St. Louis in 1880. Here he 
entered the employ of the present company in a clerical capacity and eventually 
was promoted to the position of chemist and treasurer. He is thus active in the 
control of the enterprise, which is an important commercial concern of the 
city, and, moreover, has directed his efforts to other fields of labor, being now 
widely known in business circles. He is a director of the Commonwealth Trust 
Company, a director of the Grand Avenue Bank, a director of the Lambert 
Deacon Hull Printing Compan}-, a director of the Kansas City Home Telephone 
Company, a director of the Detroit Home Telephone Company and a trustee 
of the Lambert estate. His varied interests claim from him the services of a 
capable man of keen discrimination, and what he has accomplished represents 
the tit utilization of his innate talents and powers. His ability has developed 
through the exercise of his native talents, and as the years have gone by dif- 
ficult business problems have become easy of solution for him, while in the control 
of important interests he displays keen sagacity that looks beyond the exigencies 
of the moment to the possibilities of the future. 

In November, 1889, In St. Louis, Mr. Lambert was united in marriage to 
Miss Virginia Webb, of this city, a daughter of Dr. William Webb, who was 
a very prominent physician here. They have four children : Arthur W ., who 
is attending- Washington University; William H., attending Culver Military 
Academy at Maxincuckee, Indiana ; Samuel B., at home ; and Mary Webb, who 
is a student in Mary Institute. 

The family attend the Grand Avenue Presbyterian church, of which Mr. 
Lambert is a member. He also belongs to the blue lodge of Masons and is a 
prominent and welcome figure in several of the leading clubs of the city, in- 
cluding the Noonday, Mercantile, St. Louis and Missouri Athletic. Coming to 
St. Louis as a young man of twenty-three years, he has found in its business 
conditions the opportunities which he sought, and through their improvement 
has reached a prominent position in the business world, wdth interests that re- 
turn him a most gratifvins' annual income. 



HENRY I. D'ARCY 



Henry I. D'Arcy was a representative of the bar of St. Louis. He was 
born at Port Arlington, Ireland, in 1846, and was educated in the schools of 
his native country, graduating at the age of twenty-four from Trinity College 
in Dublin. He came to America about this time and made his way to St. 
Louis, where he turned his education to account by acting- as professor of Latin 
and Greek in the Christian Brothers College for two years. Desiring, however, 
to make the practice of law his profession, he attended the St. Louis Law 
School, where he completed his course in six months and was admitted to the 
bar. He was recognized as a lawyer of ability and as a student of the principles 
of law. He was cogent in his reasoning, clear in his deductions and seldom 
at fault in the application of a legal principle. His ability was recognized by 
his colleagues and contemporaries, and the general public regarded him as a 
strong advocate and wise counselor. 

Mr. D'Arcy was married in St. Louis in 1872 to Miss Hattie L. Cheever, a 
native of this city and a daughter of Joshua Cheever, who for many years was 
a prominent resident here. j\Ir. Cheever came to St. Louis from Boston when 
nineteen years of age and was actively connected with river navigation, owning 



186 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

a ijreat number of steamboats. He continued actively and successfully in that 
business for a number of years, and afterward became closely associated with 
mercantile interests, first organizing- Warne-Cheever & Company, and afterward 
the firm of Cheever & Birch Hardware Company, which was the leading hard- 
ware house of those days and controlled an extensive trade reaching over many 
sections of the west. He was regarded as an authority on matters of trade 
interest and was in close touch with the important business matters of the city. 
He was a member of the Home Guards during the war and was always in- 
terested in public matters. In addition to his other business interests he was 
interested in bank matters, and in connection with Mr. Edgar established the 
Continental Bank. He was one of the organizers of the Provident Associa- 
tion and took an active and helpful part in its work. He also was interested 
in organizing the Unitarian church and was connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. His life was characterized by many good deeds that 
endeared his memory to all who knew him. He married Miss Susan Ann 
Simpson, who was a native of Kentucky, but was at that time a resident of 
St. Louis. They had two children, ]\Irs. D'Arcy and Ammi B. Cheever. The 
father died in California in 1877. St. Louis still bears the impress of his 
individuality. 

^Ir. and ~\Irs. D'Arcy had eight children, of whom five are yet living: 
^^"illianl C, who is engaged in the advertising business ; Edward, a lawyer ; 
Susan, the wife of A. H. Roudebush ; Maud and John. The husband and 
father died in 1888. He was a public-spirited citizen and interested in what- 
ever pertained to the welfare of St. Louis. He was known among his friends 
as a student of the classics and as a man of general culture and wide learning. 
He was one of the best after-dinner speakers of the city and enjoyed, to the 
fullest extent, the friendship, admiration and respect of men of learning and 
abilitv. 



RICHARD JORDAN COMPTON. 

St. Louis has drawn its population from every state in the Union and from 
almost every country on the face of the globe. Among those who claimed 
Xew York as the place of their nativity was Richard Jordan Compton, who 
was born November 9, 1833, and became a resident of this city when it was 
just emerging from villagehood and foreshadowing in its increased business 
activity the metropolitan growth of the future. He was then a young man 
of twenty-one years. His bo3-hood and youth had been passed in the east as 
a member of his father's household. He was a son of John Compton, a native 
of Rochester, England, who after coming to America lived and died in Buf- 
falo, New York. The mother, who bore the maiden name of Ann Jordan, was 
also a native of Rochester, England. 

Richard Jordan Compton was indebted to the public-school system of Buf- 
falo for his educational privileges and he remained in his native city until he 
attained his majority, when, thinking that the business opportunities of the 
growing west were superior to those of the older east, he made his way to 
.St. Louis and here engaged in the lithographing and engraving business. With 
the growth of the city and as a result of his enterprising efforts and progressive 
'spirit, his business developed until it assumed extensive and profitable propor- 
tions. It is today one of the oldest established industrial concerns of the city, 
being still carried on by his sons, who are worthy successors of their father 
in this line of activity. 

At the time of the Civil war Mr. Compton served as major in the militia 
and was one of the home guards. The growth and development of St. Louis 
was a matter of intense interest to him. prompting his earnest cooperation and 
helpful labors. He was one of the first men to promote and organize the 




R. J. COMPTON 



188 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

\'eiled Prophets Association, which holds its annual festival each fall and has 
gained wide distinction as one of the largest and best enterprises of this char- 
acter ever held anvwhere. He was also one of the first promoters of the Louis- 
iana Purchase Exposition and in fact no project for the benefit of St. Louis 
nor the promotion of its growth in material, intellectual, social and moral Hues 
failed to elicit his hearty support and substantial aid. 

Mr. Compton was married in Buffalo, New York, to Miss Ella Louise 
Cleveland, a relative of ex-President Cleveland, and they became the parents 
of eight children, of whom two died in infancy. Those still living are Mrs. 
Lillian Long, P. Cleveland, Richard J., Jr., George B., Paul and Mrs. Mildred 
E. \\'oods. There are also fourteen grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. 

Mr. Compton built a fine residence on Washington boulevard, where the 
familv still reside, and there he passed away in May, 1899. He attained high 
rank in ^lasonry, taking the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, and he 
belonged also to the old Germania Club and to the Mercantile Club. His polit- 
ical support was unswervingly given to the republican party and he was senior 
warden of St. Peter's Episcopal church for ten years. He seemed cognizant of 
the various forces which enter into municipal progress and in all was helpfully 
interested, while through all his life the motive power of his activity was 
found in commendable principles and a firm belief that progress and not retro- 
gression is indicative of the world's pace. 



HEXRY SAMUEL PRIEST. 

Henry Samuel Priest, a member of the Missouri bar since 1873 and a prac- 
titioner at St. Louis since 1881, was born in Ralls county, this state, February 
7, 1853, a son of Thomas J. and Amelia E. (Brown) Priest, natives of Virginia 
and Kentucky respectively. The family comes of the same ancestry as General 
Samuel Houston, liberator of and president of the Republic of Texas. The 
acquirement of his early education was followed by stucly in Westminster Col- 
lege at Fulton, ^Missouri, from which he was graduated in the class of 1872. 
He prepared for the practice of law at Taylorsville, Kentucky, with Major M. 
E. Houston as his preceptor, and later continued his reading at Hannibal, Mis- 
souri, in the ofifice of Judge James Carr, who was then general attorney for the 
Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad Company. Following his admission to the bar 
at Hannibal in the spring of 1873, after examination by Judge J. T. Redd, Mr. 
Priest located for practice in ]\Ioberly, Missouri, where his devotion to his cli- 
ents' interests and the ability which he displayed in handling intricate legal prob- 
lems soon gained him a large patronage. Not long after his arrival in Moberly he 
was elected city attorney and for two years acceptably filled that position, dis- 
charging his duties without fear or failure and winning high encomiums from all 
fair-minded citizens, whose influence is found on the side of law and order. 

Following his appointment as assistant attorney for the Missouri Pacific 
Railroad Company, he represented that corporation in numerous important cases 
in the courts of St. Louis and elsewhere between October, 1881, and December, 
1883. At the latter date he was apjxjinted attorney for the Wabash, St. Louis 
& Pacific Railroad Company, now the Wabash system, and rendered capable 
service in that capacity for seven years, or until appointed general attorney for 
the Missouri Pacific Railroad, December i, 1890. He had become associated 
with this corporation in a legal capacity upon his removal to St. Louis and con- 
tinued as general attorney until 1894, when he resigned to accept the appoint- 
ment of President Cleveland as judge of the United States district court, suc- 
ceeding Judge Thayer, who had been elevated to the United States circuit 
bench. ^Ir. Priest remained upon the bench, however, only a year and then re- 
sumeri the private practice of law as a member of the firm of Boyle, Priest & 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 189 

Lehman. Judge Priest possesses a mind of singular precision and power. It is 
in a marked degree a judicial mind, capable of the impartial view of both sides 
of a question and of arriving at a just conclusion. In his practice he has been* 
absolutely fair, never indulging in artifice or concealment, never dealing in in- 
direct methods, but winning his victories, which have been many, and suffering ■ 
his defeats, which have been few, in the open field, face to face with his foe. He 
has achieved distinction and he deserves it. Calm, dignified and self-controlled, 
he gives to his clients the service of great talent, unwearied industry and rare 
learning, yet he never forgets that there are certain things due to the court, 
to his own self-respect, and, above all, to justice and a righteous administration 
of the law, which neither the zeal of an advocate nor the pleasure of success 
permits him to disregard. 

On the 9th of November, 1876, Judge Priest was united in marriage to Miss 
Henrietta King Parsell, of Webster Grove, St. Louis county, Missouri, a daugh- 
ter of George B. and Elizabeth (Wright) Parsell, of Portland, Maine. Their 
children are: George T., Grace E., Jeannette B., and Wells Blodgett Priest. 
The position of the family in social circles is one of prominence and Judge Priest 
is a welcome member at the Mercantile, St. Louis, Noonday, Country, Log 
Cabin and Racquet Clubs. He finds pleasure in discussion with observant, 
thinking men, and the delights of literature are familiar to him. That he occu- 
pies a prominent position in professional circles is indicated by the fact of his 
unanimous election to the presidencv of the ^Missouri State Bar Association. 
He is an able, faithful and conscientious minister in the temple of justice and in 
private life has become endeared to all who know him by the simple nobility of 
his character. 



WILLIAM H. FRANTZ. 

William H. Frantz. a prominent and enterprising general contractor of the 
west side, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on July 2, 1853. His parents were Peter 
and Rosena (Wey) Frantz, the former a native of Alsace-Lorraine and the lat- 
ter of Baden, Germany. They came to America before they were married and 
here Peter Frantz followed his' occupation of a tanner, continuing in this business, 
in which he was both skillful and successful, until his death in 1894. He sur- 
vived his wife for twenty-four years. Beside William H. Frantz the parents had 
the following children: Caroline, widow of Eli Miller, of Kansas City; Chris- 
topher A., a mechanic of St. Louis; Louisa, who is survived by her husband, 
Thomas Kavanaugh ; Amelia, wife of Charles jModer ; and Lena Mary, deceased. 

At the usual age William H. Frantz attended the public schools in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. Upon completing his education he repaired to St. Louis, being then 
but seventeen years of age, and engaged in the occupation of stair-building 
with his brother. He learned the trade and continued to work as a journeyman 
for the succeeding five years. Being a skilled mechanic and familiar with every 
phase of carpentering and stair-building and ambitious to establish himself in- 
dependently in life, he began contracting in 1892. During the twenty years he 
was engaged in stair-building he had purchased a lot of ground, on which he 
built his first house. Fie then gave up stair-building and devoted his time to 
the construction of dwelling houses, which he afterward oft"ered for sale. Since 
commencing business he has erected and disposed of seven hundred and fifty 
residences in the west end of the city. He engages only in the construction of 
first class houses and has won a wide reputation for doing excellent work. 

In 1877 ^Ii"- Frantz wedded Miss Wilhelmina Durr, a native of Franklin 
county and a daughter of Michael and Catherine (Conrad) Durr. who were na- 
tives of Germanv and emigrated to America prior to the war of i860, locating in 
St. Louis, at which time it was little more than a village. Mr. and Mrs. Frantz 



190 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

have four children : Lorena, AMlHam A., Alinnie Rosena and Lewis M. The last 
named was married November 28, 1906, to Miss Charlotte Patten, a daughter of 
Dr. F. A\'. and ^Margaret Patten, and they now have one daughter, Louise Wane- 
ford Frantz. 

2\Ir. Frantz gives his political support to the republican party. Although he 
is not an active politician he uses his vote and influence during campaigns to se- 
cure the election of the candidates of his party. 



\'ERY RE\'. M. S. RYAN, CM., D.D., Ph.D. 

A'ery Rev. ]\I. S. Ryan, CM., D.D., Ph.D., the president of Kenrick Semi- 
nary, and one of the leading representatives of the Catholic ministry in the mid- 
dle west, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, December 22, 1875. He was edu- 
cated at St. Clary's Seminary, in Perryville, Missouri, and the Dominican Uni- 
versity in Rome. Preparing for the priesthood, he took holy orders December 
17. 1898. and has since devoted his time and energies to teaching in Catholic 
schools. He was professor of theology and a director of students in Kenrick 
Seminary from 1899 until 1903 and in the latter year became president of the 
St. Louis Diocesan Seminary of New Orleans, where he continued until 1906. 
In September of the latter year he assumed the office of president of Kenrick 
Seminary and is doing excellent work in this institution. 

It will be interesting in this connection to know something of the history of 
this school, which is the outgrowth of St. Vincent's Seminary at Cape Girardeau, 
Missouri, and St. Mary's Seminary at the Barrens, Perryville, Missouri. 

"Tn the spring of 1818, the Very Rev. Felix De Andreis, founder of the con- 
gregation of the Mission in the United States, according to the request of Bishop 
Dubourg and the earnest prayer of the Catholic colony in Perry county, Missouri, 
consented to open St. !AIary's Seminar}-. Rev. Joseph Rosati, CM., was the 
first president of St. ]\Iary's. Associated with him in the opening and early 
days of the seminary were the Vincentian Fathers Dahmen, Caretti, Ferrari and 
Cellini. Great poverty and privation attended its beginnings, but the heroic 
spirit and zeal that animated its founders triumphed over every difficulty and the 
Barrens soon became a beacon light of ecclesiastical learning in the then wilder- 
ness of the great ^Mississippi valley. 

Father De Andreis, the founder of St. Mary's Seminary of the Barrens, 
died in St. Louis, October 15, 1820. During the three years of his residence in 
the diocese he had filled the office of vicar general to Bishop Dubourg and pastor 
of the only church in St. Louis. His death was attended by events which were 
looked on by those who knew and loved him as supernatural evidences of his 
sanctity. The process of his canonization is now pending before the Congrega- 
tion of Rites in Rome. His remains are entombed under the church of the Bar- 
rens, whither they were escorted from St. Louis, by a funeral cortege that resem- 
bled a triumjjhal march. Shortly after its opening St. Mary's had eighteen semi- 
narians and, during several succeeding years this number grew steadily but 
slowly. In the early '30s the attendance reached thirty-five. In 1823 Father 
Rosati was appointed coadjutor to the bishop of New Orleans. In the apostolic 
brief of appointment Leo XII positively ordered him to accept the position and 
to enter at once on his duties. During the preceding year he had refused the 
appointment of Vicar-Apostolic of the Floridas. In 1826, on the division of the 
diocese of New Orleans, Bishop Rosati became the first incumbent of the See 
of St. Louis. During his three years of coadjutorship he continued to make the 
seminary his residence. The Rev. Leo DeNekere, CM., succeeded Bishop 
Rosati as president, but while the latter was established in St. Louis, he was vir- 
tually the head of the seminary. Father DeNekere was a man of rare talents 
but of delicate health. The cosmopolitan character of the establishment over 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrV. 191 

which he presided may be seen from the fact that he used to give conferences 
in English, ItaHan, French, German, Spanish and Flemish, each of which he 
spoke fluently. His health not improving in Missouri, Father DeNekere was sent 
by his superiors to Louisiana, and in 1829 he was appointed bishop of New Or- 
leans. In 1822 there came to the Barrens a young French student who entered 
the novitiate of the Vincentians. He was ordained priest the following year and 
at once became a prominent factor in the seminary's life. His name was John 
Mary Odin. He was a most valued assistant to Father DeXekere and, on the 
latter's retirement in 1826, succeeded him as president of the seminary. Father 
Odin had as a fellow novice a young man of American birth named John Timon. 
The two became warm friends in the novitiate and afterwards for twenty years 
they were most intimately associated in working for the glory of God and the 
salvation of souls, as professors in the seminary and as missionaries in Missouri. 
Arkansas and Texas. From 1826 to 1830, Fathers Odin, Timon and Paquin 
were the only priests at the Barrens. In the latter year Father Tornatore ar- 
rived from Italy and was added to the faculty. The weekly recreation day and 
Saturdav and Sunday were devoted to missionary work among the people of 
the surrounding country. Fathers Odin and Timon, each taking a seminarian 
as a companion, were accustomed to set out on Saturday to some settlement 
many miles distant, where the priest heard confessions and administered the 
sacraments Saturday night and Sunday, while the seminarian preached to the 
people and taught catechism. Father Odin's presidency continued until 1833, 
when he went to Europe to trv to secure financial aid and extra priests for the 
seminary and the missions depending on it. During his absence Father Timon 
acted as president of the seminary. Father Odin returned in 1835. As a result 
of his visit to Europe Father Timon was appointed first visitor of the Vincen- 
tians in the United States. Up to this time the country had merely been a 
mission of the Italian province. After Father Timon's appointment as visitor 
Father Paquin filled the office of president of the seminary until 1843. -^^ 
early as 1823 a collegiate department was opened at the Barrens. This was con- 
sidered a necessary step for the financial support of the institution and there was 
a strong popular demand for it. The roster of students soon showed an attend- 
ance of eighty and in 1833 the number was one hundred and thirty. In 1844 
the college was transferred to Cape Girardeau, and St. Alary's, under the presi- 
dency of Rev. M. Domenech. C.AL, was continued as a seminary, both prepara- 
tory and theological. The latter was intended only for the students of the con- 
gregation of the mission but a goodly number of secular priests and bishops 
claim St. j\Iary's as their alma mater, after the change above referred to. Be- 
sides the many drawbacks that poverty imposed, St. Mary's Seminary was ham- 
pered during nearlv half a century by two heavy contributions it was compelled 
to give religion. The first of these was continuous missionary work throughout 
the entire region from the Alissouri river to the Gulf of Mexico, and westward 
as far as the Kansas state line ; the second was the loss to her of her ablest men, 
who were taken from her and compelled to assume the duties of the episcopacy. 
Long missionary excursions through jNIissouri, Arkansas and Texas were com- 
mon. Sometimes they lasted for weeks and sometimes for months, and the mis- 
sionary returned to the Barrens only to start off in another direction after a 
few days' rest. The names of Rosati, DeNekere, Odin, Timon, Lynch. Amat. 
Domenech and Ryan form St. Mary's roll of honor in the American hierarchy 
and their success as bishops tells how much she lost when they were taken from 
her. In 1859 the theological seminary for the education of secular priests was. 
after many changes and removals, reestablished at Cape Girardeau, where it con- 
tinued until the opening of the Kenrick Seminary in 1893. Rev. James ]\IcGill. 
CM., was president from 1859 until 1863. when he was succeeded by Rev. Joseph 
Alizeri, CM. Rev. Anthony \>rrina succeeded Father Alizeri in 1868 and was 
followed by Rev. J. W. Hickey. CM., in 1876. Rev. P. McHale. CM., became 
Father Hickey's successor in 1884. Then followed Rev. P. \'. Byrne, C ~Sl.. in 



192 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

1S87 and Rev. F. \". Xngent. C.iM., in 1889, at the close of whose term hi 1893, 
the seminary was transferred to St. Louis. Shortly after the celebration of his 
Episcopal Golden Jubilee in 1891, the Alost Rev. Archbishop Kenrick purchased 
the property of the old Msitation Convent on Cass avenue. The Archbishop 
transferred "the property to the Very Rev. Thomas J- Smith, CM., visitor of the 
Congregation of the jNIission, to be held and used for seminary purposes. The 
work of renovating the former convent and rendering- it fit for the needs of a 
seminary was immediately begun and pushed vigorously to a conclusion. In or- 
der to bring the old and somewhat dilapidated buildings into keeping with modern 
requirements, great sums of money were necessary. But the various parishes of 
the city responded generously to the appeals which at the suggestion of the 
^lost Rev. Archbishop were made to them. The work of preparation was urged 
rapidly and to such satisfaction that on the opening day, the seminary, it was 
said, stood in the completeness of its appointments, inferior to no similar insti- 
tution in the country. The seminary was opened to the reception of students 
on the 14th of September, 1893. The formal opening and dedication did not, 
however, take place until one week later, September 21st. The ceremony was 
a memorable one and argued well for the future of the institution. Spcial inter- 
est attached to the event from the fact that on that occasion Archbishop Kain 
was to make his first appearance in St. Louis and greet his clergy in an official 
manner. During the past fifteen years two hundred and seventy students rep- 
resenting twenty-five dioceses, have been ordained priests. As a class they are 
working zealously and fruitfully, winning souls to God and reflecting honor on 
their alma mater. In September, 1900, a day school for boys preparing for the 
holy priesthood was opened in connection with the larger seminary. At the 
present writing, ]\Iay, 1908, there are eighty boys in attendance." 



^ CHRISTIAN FREDERICK GOTTLIEB MEYER. 

To those familiar with the history of Christian Frederick Gottlieb Meyer it 
would seem trite to say that he has arisen from an obscure position to rank 
among the prominent merchants of the country, but it is only just to .say in a 
history that will descend to future generations that his has been a record which 
any man might be proud to possess. Beginning at the very bottom round of 
the business ladder, he steadily climbed upward until his record is today a val- 
uable asset in contemporaneous historv. He was the founder of the Meyer 
Brothers Drug Company, operating extensively in several cities, with one of the 
most important wholesale drug establishments in the middle west at St. Louis. 
His business record was such as any man might be proud to possess, for it was 
characterized by strict, unswerving industry and integrity, and by the faithful 
fulfillment of every obligation. He thus enjoyed in unusual measure the ad- 
miration of the general public and the respect and esteem of his contemporaries 
and associates. He stood ])rominent among the German-American citizens who 
in the utilization of the excellent business opportunities offered by the new 
world attained distinction and success. 

His birth occurred in the ])rovince of Westphalia, Prussia, where in the 
village of Haldem the estate of his ancestors has been known almost from 
times immemorial as Meyer von der Ilwede. These manor estates are required 
to remain intact and descend to the eldest son, even if the rest of the children 
receive little or nothing as a heritage. The natal day of Frederick Meyer, for by 
that name he has always been known, was December 9. 1830, and when he 
was to be christened at the church, five miles distant, a four-in-hand gala turn- 
out was brought into requisition. He was only three years of age at the time 
of his father's death and was left an rtrphan by the demise of his mother when 
he was sixteen years of age. It was in tlie following year that he came to 




C. F. G. MEYER 



13- VOL. 11. 



194 ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 

America, as did many of his fellow countrymen who were attracted by the 
storv of the better wages paid in the new world and of the opportunities for 
rapid business advancement. 

In company with his brother William, ]\Ir. JMeyer sailed from Bremen 
on the sailing- vessel Swanton, Captain Duncan commanding, on the 226. of 
September, 1847. and arrived at New Orleans on the 14th of November, after 
a long and tedious voyage of seven and a half weeks. The brothers pro- 
ceeded up the ^Mississippi and Ohio rivers to Cincinnati and started by canal 
boat for Fort Wayne, Indiana, but the river freezing over, they could not 
proceed far on their journey in that way and were forced to walk the remaining 
distance over a bad country road covered by mud and snow. Their choice of 
a destination was influenced by the fact that they had a sister living about 
eighteen miles south of Fort Wayne. They traveled on and when night over- 
took them on the second day a neighbor of their sister escorted the brothers 
through the forest with a torchlight of hickory bark. They reached their des- 
tination on the evening of December 3, 1847, ^^''^ for about two months assisted 
their brother-in-law and his grown sons in clearing away the forest. 

A momentous day in the history of Frederick Meyer was the 14th of 
February, 1848, for on that day he accompanied his brother-in-law to Fort 
W'ayne and after a day or two determined to remain there. His advent into 
business life in that city was a most unpretentious one. He made arrangements 
to live with a dry-goods merchant by the name of Hill and was to do some 
general work as a recompense for his board and the opportunity of attending 
school. He had thus pursued his education for ten consecutive weeks when 
his teacher became ill. In that time, however, he had made marvelous progress 
in acquiring a knowledge of the English language and had nearly finished the 
third reader. It is said that after he had been in Fort Wayne for a year he 
could speak English with the fluency of a native born American. The un- 
daunted spirit of energy and enterprise which has always characterized him 
was immediately manifest when he could no longer attend school in his efifort 
to secure other occupation. 

From his early boyhood it was his ambition to become a druggist and he 
now secured a position in a drug store as an apprentice in May, 1848, when in 
his eighteenth year. It is said there are two indispensable elements to success : 
an objective one — the opportunity; and the subjective one — the energy to im- 
prove the opportunity. The opportunity came to Mr. Meyer and it was found 
that he had the requisite qualities to utilize it. When the Asiatic cholera was 
epidemic in this country in 1849, those who were older and more experiencd in 
the profession in the store in which he was employed either fled from their 
posts of duty or were stricken with the dreadful disease, his principal being 
among the latter, and following the death of his employer it was necessary 
that Mr. Meyer take charge of the business. Although merchandising was 
brought to a standstill in every other line, the drug trade flourished, and Mr. 
Meyer was kept busy night and day filling prescriptions and dealing out drugs, 
his meals even being brought to him at the store. He showed that he had in 
him the qualities necessary to meet the situation, and his fidelity, ready adapta- 
bility and trustworthiness soon gained him promotion and in less than two weeks 
he was head clerk of the establishment. In this connection he made occasional 
trips to Cincinnati to purchase goods, and in August, 1852, he was approached 
by another druggist in Fort Wavne with an oi¥er to become his partner, and 
thus he associated himself with Watson Wall under the firm name of Wall & 
Meyer. The next month lie went to New York city to purchase an additional 
stock of goods. A trip to the metropolis was far dift'erent at that time than 
at present, when in a few hours one crosses the country in a Pullman palace 
car. He then traveled by canal to Toledo, by lake to Buffalo, by rail to Albany 
and thence down the Hudson river to New York, and on the return trip he 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrV. 19o 

crossed the Alleghenies partly by rail and partly by stage. The capital of the 
new firm was quite limited. Mr. Wall had only been in business a short time 
and had been assisted by a few men of wealth at Fort Wayne, one of whom was 
the Hon. Hugh McCulloch, who was then president of the State Bank of In- 
diana and subsequently comptroller of currency of the United States and secre- 
tary of the treasury. Mr. Meyer had managed to save four hundred and twenty 
dollars in cash and he borrowed eighty dollars from a friend, so that he had 
a capital of five hundred dollars to invest, while Mr. Wall's assets, after de- 
ducting liabilities, were about six hundred and twenty dollars. The partnership 
was continued for five years, on the expiration of which period Mr. Meyer 
purchased the interest of Mr. Wall, paying him between ten and eleven thousand 
dollars — such has been the rapid growth and success of the business. Not 
long after Mr. Meyer gave his l3rother, J. F. W. IMeyer, an interest in the house 
and the firm style of Meyer & Brother was assumed. 

Mr. Meyer had been in business on his own account about two years when, 
in 1854, he wedded Miss Francisca Schmidt, who had come to America a year 
or two previously from the vicinity of Strasburg, Germany, and had taken up 
her abode at Fort Wayne. Soon after their marriage Mr. Meyer purchased nine 
acres of land a short distance from the corporation limits of the city and built 
thereon a residence and stables that he might enjoy country life. He has 
always been interested in the production of flowers and at his country home he 
built greenhouses and engaged in gardening, floriculture and horticulture. He 
had hotbeds for market gardening and had soon developed a large nursery. 
His business in that line grew rapidly, and it is a matter of history that a 
large majority of the evergreen and ornamental trees at or near Fort Wayne 
that have grown to great size came from "Glendale," Mr. Meyer's country 
home. He has always been a lover of flowers and is said to have imported 
the first specimen of Begonia Rex. He became so deeply interested in flori- 
culture and horticulture that he frequently wrote for the magazines of the 
day upon these subjects. 

A man of resourceful business ability, ]Mr. INIeyer extended his efforts into 
other lines and undertook no business interest in which he did not reach success. 
In those days a German paper was published at Fort Wayne, but Mr. Meyer 
did not consider it creditable to the city or his nationality and so purchased 
the paper and assumed the editorship. He raised it to a high standard of 
journalism and later presented it to one whom he regarded qualified to edit 
it satisfactorily, and it is still in existence. All this time he continued in the 
drug business, in which he met with excellent success, save that in 1863 the 
store was almost entirelv destroyed by fire and the loss above the insurance 
amounted to fifteen thousand dollars. JBefore the flames had been extinguished, 
however, Mr. Meyer had leased other premises and the next day started for 
New" York to buy a complete stock of drugs and druggists' sundries, and in a 
short period the business was in good running condition, and the trade con- 
stantly increased until theirs became the largest retail drug house in the state 
of Indiana. They also developed an extensive jobbing business, Mr. Meyer 
often making trips to surrounding towns on horseback or by carriage to look 
after his trade. 

His success and ambition prompted him to reacH out to other fields, and 
believing that he might profit bv the opportunities of larger cities than Fort 
Wayne he considered both Chicago and St. Louis as a place of location and 
determined upon the latter. In August, 1865, therefore, he opened a branch 
house in St. Louis, which at that time contained about two hundred thousand 
inhabitants and had twelve wholesale drug houses. The period following the 
Civil war was one of depression in all lines of trade. The inflated war prices 
sank daily, but the safe, conservative business methods upon which it was 
founded and the unassailable integrity of the house enabled the firm to grad- 
ually build up a trade until the St. Louis house far outranked the original estab- 



196 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

lishment at Fort Wayne. Mr. jMeyer removed to St. Louis to take charge here 
and at the same time continued the active supervision of the Fort Wayne 
store. The business in this city developed until it exceeded in volume and 
importance that of all other drug houses of St. Louis, and in fact is the most 
important establishment of this character in the west. All this, hov^rever, meant 
close and unremitting effort. The company always adhered to high standards, 
endeavoring to reach an ideal business in the character of its service to the 
public, in the quality of goods handled and in its personnel as well. Mr. Meyer 
would never deviate from the high standard which he set up and in the end un- 
doubtedly it proved one of the elements of his splendid business success. His 
name was long an honored one on commercial paper, and he was well known 
in financial circles. He was a director of three different banks, becoming thus 
associated with the State Bank of Indiana before he was thirty years of age, 
while two banks of St. Louis made him a member of their directorate. 

Unto ]Mr. and Mrs. Meyer were born nine children, seven sons and two 
daughters, but one died in infancy, another at the age of twenty-one and a 
third at the age of twenty-eight years. There still survive five sons and a 
daughter, and four of the sons are in the establishment of Meyer Brothers 
Drug Company, Theodore F. Meyer being president of the company ; O. P. 
]\Ieyer, vice president; G. J. Meyer, secretary; and A. C. Meyer, assistant sec- 
retary ; while C. W^ Wall, son of Mr. Meyer's partner, is treasurer ; and William 
Graham is assistant treasurer. 

Mr. and Airs. Meyer held membership in the German Lutheran church 
and contributed in large measure to its development and growth. During his 
last years Mr. Aleyer was in ill health and they traveled quite extensively for 
recuperation as well as recreation. His death occurred July 12, 1905, at 
Homburg-vor-der-Hoehe, Germany, and his remains were brought back to St. 
Louis on the 2d of August, being interred in the German Evangelical Lutheran 
cemetery here. It was fitting that in the evening of his days he should enjoy 
well merited rest, for his life through many vears was one of intense activity 
and enterprise. Although he had passed the Psalmist's span of three score 
years and ten, his mental vigor was unimpaired and he took an active interest 
in the living issues and events of the day. Surrounded at his home by a circle 
of friends who appreciated his true worth, and admired and esteemed by the 
citizens of the community, his name will be honored for many generations 
as that of one of the most enterprising of the early merchants of St. Louis — a 
man who acted well his part and who lived a worthv and honorable life. 

\ 



PATRICK O'DONNELL. 

Patrick O'Donnell, a well known contractor of St. Louis, who has put in 
practically all of the principal water mains of the city during the past thirty 
years, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, near Westport, March 5, 1852. His 
parents, Owen and Winifred (Hester) O'Donnell, are both now deceased. His 
father, grandfather and great-grandfather all bore the name of Owen, as does 
one of the surviving brothers of our subject. There is also another living son 
of the family, John O'Donnell, and all three brothers are yet residents of St. 
Louis. 

Patrick O'Donnell came with his parents to America in 1864 when a youth 
of twelve years, the family home being established in St. Louis, where the father, 
who had followed farming on the Emerald isle, turned his attention to contract- 
ing. Here he died, September i, 1870, while his wife survived until October 
26, 1896. Beginning his education in his native land, Patrick O'Donnell con- 
tinued his studies in St. Louis, and under the direction of his father became 
interested in contracting lines. He has engaged in business for himself as a 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 197 

contractor in St. Louis since 187 1 and for thirty years was a member of the 
firm of John O'Donnell & Brother, general contractors, in which connection he 
has been closely identified with the construction of all of the principal water 
mains of the city through three decades. His patronage has ever been such 
as to make him a most busy man and his ambition has promoted energetic and 
well defined effort leading to success. 

On the 15th of September, 1885, Mr. O'Donnell was married to Miss 
Nannie L. Hook, who was born near Fulton, Missouri, a daughter of William 
and Madaline Hook, the former now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. O'Donnell have 
two daughters, Winifred and Maud, both yet at home with their parents. The 
family are communicants of St. Mark's Roman Catholic church and Mr. O'Don- 
nell is a democrat in his political relations. As the years have passed and he 
has prospered in his undertakings he has made judicious investment in real 
estate and is now the owner of much valuable improved property in this city 
from which he derives a gratifying annual income. He early learned that suc- 
cess is gained only at the cost of earnest, self-denying labor, and his unfaltering 
diligence and perseverance have been basic elements in his present prosperity. 



ADAM WIEST. 



Adam Wiest, deceased, was for many years prominent in the cotton busi- 
ness in St. Louis, being thus closelv associated with a business that has been 
one of the chief sources of revenue and business activity in the city. He was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland, ]\Iarch 20, 1854, and was a young man of twenty- 
three years when, in 1877, he came to St. Louis and entered the employ of the 
Adler-Goldman Commission Company. He was also associated with other firms, 
gaining broad, practical experience that enabled him to successfully carry on 
business for himself at a later date. When he felt that his knowledge of busi- 
ness methods and his capital, saved from his earnings, was sufficicient to enable 
him to embark in business on his own account ; he established a cotton broker- 
age business and from its inception up to the time of his demise was connected 
with the cotton trade of the city. In his closing years he was one of the few 
living men of the Cotton Exchange who were present at its formal opening. 
He served the Cotton Exchange as director and vice president and his services 
were always in demand in the arbitration of disputes, for it was well known 
that he was fair and impartial in his judgment, being swayed neither by passion 
nor prejudice in considering matters of dissension between others. For many 
years he had been the St. Louis representative of the Patrons of Liverpool and 
other large cotton concerns, buying for factories in all parts of the country. 
He made a close and discriminating study of the cotton market and his labors 
resulted in the acquirement of gratifying success. His opinions were largely 
received as authoritv on matters connected with the cotton trade and his own 
activity largely set the standard for accomplishment in business interests of the 
same character. As he prospered in his undertakings he invested quite exten- 
sively in property in St. Louis and was the owner of considerable valuable realty. 

Mr. Wiest was married in St. Louis, February 10, 1881, to Miss Florence 
A. Wandell, of Tennessee, a daughter of William A. and IMary E. (Brazee) 
Wandell and a granddaughter of H. P. Brazee, a noted judge. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wiest have two children : Adam has succeeded his father as president of the 
Adam Wiest Cotton Company and is also a junior partner of R. F. Phillips & 
Company. He is a Mason, belonging to Tuscan Lodge, No. 360, A. F. & A. M. ; 
Missouri Chapter, No. i, R. A. M. : and Ascalon Commandery, No. 16, K. T. 
He was married, February 25, 1908, to Miss Virginia Elizabeth Yates, of Mis- 
sissippi. Mary F. Wiest, daughter of our subject, is now the wife of E. Van 
Wilkinson, general manager for the A. A. Eberson Paint Company. Mr. Wiest 



198 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

was devoted to the welfare of his family and did everything in his power to 
promote their happiness and comfort. 

In social and fraternal relations Air. Wiest was well known and enjoyed in 
large measure the friendship and high regard of those with whom he was asso- 
ciated. He belonged to Occidental Lodge, No. 163, A. F. & A, M. ; to Missouri 
Chapter, No. i, R. A. ^NI. ; to St. Aldemar Commandery, No. 18, K. T.; and 
]\Ioolah Temple of the Alystic Shrine. He was also a member of Ivanhoe Coun- 
cil of the Legion of Honor, the Normandie Golf Club and the Missouri Athletic 
Club and was one of the trustees of the Maple Avenue Methodist Episcopal 
church and served on its board of directors. Public spirited, he was generous 
in support of movements for the welfare of the city and delighted in everything 
that promoted the growth and progress of St. Louis. He was one of the most 
substantial business men of the city, while his personal qualities gave him a 
strong hold on the aft'ections of those with whom he came in contact. It was 
therefore a matter of deep and widespread regret when the final summons came 
for him and ties of friendship were severed. His memory, however, is yet 
enshrined by those who were his associates, while he was still an active factor 
in the world's work. He passed away in St. Louis, May 18, 1905, soon after 
reaching the half century milepost on life's journey. 



GUSTAV CRAMER. 

There are certain names which stand for leadership in specific business 
lines, and the name of Cramer is such a one, having become a recognized syn- 
onym for a near approach to perfection in the manufacture of dry plates and 
for photographic supplies. Mr. Cramer prefaced his successful manufacturing 
interests by about twenty-five years' experience as a photographer, and that he 
possesses artistic ability is attested by those who were among his patrons while 
he maintained a photographic studio in this city. He has been accorded high 
honors in professional circles, including election to the presidency of the Na- 
tional Photographers Association, and in all of his work he has striven toward 
higher ideals, his manufacturing interests being marked by steady advancement 
in methods of manufacture and production. 

Mr. Cramer is a native of Eschwege, Germany, born Alay 20, 1838, of the 
marriage of Emanuel and Dorothea (Vieweger) Cramer. He attended the local 
schools, where he early manifested a partiality for the study of chemistry 
and physics, and the eagerness with which he gathered knowledge in this field 
of science particularly fitted him for his chosen profession in after years. 

He was graduated at the head of his class when he was sixteen years of 
age and subsequently engaged in commercial pursuits. In 1859 he came to 
this country and immediately afterward established his home in St. Louis, to 
which city his brother, John Frederick Cramer, had preceded him. He familiar- 
ized himself with the photographic art under the direction of John A. Scholten, 
then leading photographer of this city and one of the earliest friends of Mr. 
Cramer. He found the work entirely congenial, and his knowledge of the 
science, coupled with his artistic tastes, enabled him to master many intricate 
problems connected with the wonderful art, which had then only fairly entered 
upon the process of development which it has undergone in the ensuing years. 

In i860 Mr. Cramer began business on his own account, opening a photo- 
graphic studio, but early in 1861, following the inauguration of the Civil war 
and President Lincoln's call for volunteers to serve for three months, he joined 
the Federal army, becoming a sergant of Company A, Third Regiment of Mis- 
souri Volunteers, under command of his brother. Captain Cramer, and Colonel 
Franz Sigel. Mr. Cramer took part in the battle at Carthage, Missouri, and 
on the expiration of his term of enlistment resumed his profession as a photog- 




GUSTAV CRAMER 



200 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

rapher of St. Louis, forming- a partnership in 1864 with J. Gross under the 
firm name of Cramer & Gross. From the beginning they enjoyed an extensive 
patronage, coming to them from among the best people of St. Louis, and they 
brought" photographic portraiture up to a high standard. Mr. Cramer pos- 
sessed not onlv knowledge of the scientific principles underlying the profession, 
but also a keen artistic sense which enabled him to recognize the value of light 
and shade and of pose. Constantly studying along the line of his art, Mr. 
Cramer in 1880 associated himself with H. Norden, under the firm style of 
Cramer & Xorden, for the purpose of manufacturing photographic dry plates. 
These gentlemen were among the first in this country to introduce this new 
improvement in photography, an innovation which has since revolutionized the 
entire art. Thev had many obstacles to overcome in the beginning, but their 
indomitable energy and resourcefulness enabled them to more than realize 
their expectations and their manufacture of dry plates has grown to large pro- 
portions. The establishment, of which Mr. Cramer has been the head since it 
came into existence, is today one of the most famous enterprises of its kind 
in the United States. Throughout the length and breadth of the land its prod- 
ucts are known, the Cramer plates having won a world-wide reputation by 
reason of their excellence, as is manifest in their extensive use by both amateur 
and professional photographers. The business was originally conducted under 
the name of the G. Cramer Dry Plate Works, but was afterward incorporated 
as the G. Cramer Dry Plate Company, with Mr. Cramer of this review as the 
president : Emil Cramer, vice president ; F. Ernest Cramer, treasurer ; and 
Adolph Cramer, secretary. ]\Ir. Cramer has been honored with the presidency 
of the Photographers Association of America, and in that capacity presided 
over its deliberations at the session held in Chicago in 1887. 

Mr. Cramer laid the foundation for pleasant domestic relations in his mar- 
riage to ]\Iiss Emma Rodel Alilentz, of St. Louis, who was born in New York 
city. Their living children are F. Ernest, Emil Rodel and G. Adolph, and they 
also have an adopted daughter, now Mrs. Matilda Besch. The three sons are 
all active in the management of different departments of the G. Cramer Dry 
Plate Company, whose plant is one of the best equipped and most perfect of 
its kind in existence. 

While an active business man Air. Cramer has yet found time for partici- 
pation in the work of various charitable and benevolent organizations. He 
is a member of the supervisory board of charitable penal institutions of the city 
of St. Louis, a member of the board of directors of the St. Louis Provident 
Association and one of the directors of the German Protestant Orphans Home. 
He was one of the founders of the St. Louis Altenheim, a home for the aged, 
which is conducted by the German-Americans of St. Louis and supported by 
a gentlemen and ladies' society, of which Mr. and Mrs. Cramer, respectively, 
are the presidents. He is also a member of Erwin Lodge, A. F. & A. M., with 
which he has been identified for more than forty years. All through his life 
he has enjoyed the respect of intelligent men and the love of little children, and 
he has, moreover, the lasting gratitufle of manv to whom he has in substantial 
measure indicated his belief in the brotherhood of man. 



WTLLT.\M HENRY DITTMANN. 

William Henry Dittmann. ff)r forty \ears identified with shoe manufacture, 
is now president of the Dittmann .Shf)e Company of St. Louis and has also been 
closely associated with banking interests and other enterprises which have been 
factors in the commercial development and prosperity of his native city. It 
was in St. Louis, on the 21st of October, 1852, that William Henrv Dittmann 
was born, his parents being George F. and Caroline fAlmstcdt) Dittmann. At 



ST. LOUTS, THE LUURTII CITY. 201 

the usual age he became a public-school student and passed through consecutive 
grades in the acquirement of a practical education. He was a youth of sixteen 
when he became connected with the shoe manufacture and his close adherence 
to the business in which he embarked as a young tradesman is undoubtedly one 
of the elements of his success. Moreover, he has made it his custom to do 
with thoroughness everything that he has undertaken and by his fidelity and 
merit has gradually worked his way upward until he is today at the head of a 
large and profitable industrial concern of his native city, being president of the 
Dittmann Shoe Compan}-, manufacturers and jobbers. As the years passed, he 
also gave proof of a keen discernment and unflagging enterprise in business 
that won him favorable regard throughout the business circles of the city and 
was the cause of his cooperation being sought in the furtherance and promo- 
tion of various other business enterprises. His name is a prominent one in 
financial circles, for during several years he served as vice president of the 
Fourth National Bank, resigning in 1902. He was also one of the organizers 
of the Germania Trust Company and at different periods has been its vice pres- 
ident and president. He is likewise a member of the board of directors of 
Tower Grove Park and every municipal movement for advancement and upbuild- 
ing receives his sympathetic endorsement and many times his active assistance. 
On the loth of November, 1877, in St. Louis, Mr. Dittmann was married 
to Miss Emma Biebinger and unto them have been born a daughter and son : 
Adele, now the wife of Philip A. Becker; and Robert W. At the polls Mr. Ditt- 
mann gives stalwart endorsement to the republican party, but is without political 
ambitions for himself. He is a valued member of the Mercantile and the Union 
Clubs and aside from social interests finds his chief recreation in hunting- and 
fishing. His entire life having been passed in St. Louis, his acquaintance is a 
very wide one and his life has ever been an open scroll, inviting closest scrutiny, 
his achievements representing the result of honest endeavor along lines where 
mature judgment has pointed the way. 



WARREN GODDARD. 

Warren Goddard. vice president of the Goddard Grocery Company, is a 
native of Brookline, Massachusetts. He was born August 29, 1871, of the 
marriage of Joseph W. and Maria Goddard. The father was the organizer and 
is the president of the Goddard Grocery Company, one of the substantial com- 
mercial concerns of the city. The family had its origin in England, but about 
eight generations of the family have been represented in x-Xmerica, and un- 
doubtedly the progenitor of the family in the new world arrived in this country 
about the time the Mayflow^er reached Plymouth Rock. Their long residence 
here and participation in the events which have shaped the history of the 
nation have made them thoroughly imbued with the spirit of American institu- 
tions and champions of all that is progressive and beneficial in the life of the 
country. 

Warren Goddard, brought to St. Louis in early boyhood, was a pupil in 
Smith Academy, where he completed a full course, being graduated in the 
class of 1890. The following year he entered his father's grocery house as a 
clerk in the shipping department and from time to time was promoted as he 
proved his capabilitv and worth. Parental influence w^as not exerted to favor 
him at the outset and, on the contrary, he received thorough training that he 
might learn the business in principle and detail. Gradually, however, he earned 
his own advancement, and in 1898 was chosen vice president of the company. 
Through the past six years he has been virtually the head of the business, his 
father having practically retired from its management. Important commercial 
problems therefore depend upon him for solution and his conduct of the af- 



•202 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

fairs of the house is characterized by thoroughness, accuracy, keen insight and 
an enterprising spirit. 

Mr. Goddard was married to Aliss Mary Irene Wahace, a daughter of A. A. 
W'ahace. who is associated with the Samuel Cupples Woodenware Company. 
]\Irs. Goddard died in 1900, leaving two daughters, Jane and Irene, who are 
now students in the ^lary Institute, the preparatory department of Washington 
University. The family residence is at No. 67 Vandeventer Place. 

^Mr. Goddard gives stalwart allegiance to the republican party, which he 
has supported since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He is a 
member of the Royal Arcanum and belongs also to the St. Louis, St. Louis 
Country and the Missouri Athletic Clubs. In the business world he has proven 
his substantial worth, while those who meet him in social relations entertain for 
him the warm regard which is always won by straightforward and honorable 
manhood. 



BERNARD H. STOLTMAN. 

Bernard H. Stoltman, engaged in the real-estate business at No. 4005 Chou- 
teau avenue, was born in St. Louis in 1872. His father, Mathias Stoltman, 
was born in Germany seventy-eight years ago, and his mother was also a native 
of that country. Spending his boyhood days under the parental roof, Ber- 
nard H. Stoltman attended the parochial schools and further continued his edu- 
cation in Christian Brothers College, from wdiich institution he was graduated 
in the class of 1892. 

Following his graduation he entered business life as an employe of a large 
furniture company in the city, but later became connected with real-estate opera- 
tions, his first association being with Albert J. Aiple, with whom he continued 
until he established business on his own account in 1897. His previous ex- 
perience had well qualified him to open an office of his own, for he had learned 
to correctly value property and to study the market, keeping posted on property 
that was for sale or purchase. He has secured a good clientage and has nego- 
tiated many important realty transfers. His business is constantly growing in 
volume, and he has come to be recognized as one of the most reliable and 
enterprising young real-estate dealers of the city. Neither is he unknown in 
financial circles, for he was one of the organizers and promoters of the Man- 
chester Bank of St. Louis, now- serving as a director. 

In 1893 ^^^- Stoltman was married in St. Louis to IMinnie Ritter, the 
daughter of John Ritter, who for many years conducted a large retail business 
at Twelfth and Olive streets. Thev have two children, Catherine and Bernard 
H.. Jr.. who are the life and light of the household. Mr. Stoltman is a mem- 
ber of the Catholic church, the Knights of Columbus and the St. Francis 
Xavier Sodality of the College church. The familv home at No. 6169 West- 
minster place is attractive bv reason of its cordial hospitality and has become 
the center of a cultured societv circle. 



FRANCOIS V. DUBROUILLET. 

1 he financial interests of St. Louis find a worthy representative in Francois 
V. Dubrouillet, the treasurer of the St. Louis Union Trust Companv. He was 
born on the 22d of July, 1870, in Linn, Missouri. His father, Theophile Dubrou- 
illet. who is now a banker of Linn, Missouri, fought throughout the entire Civil 
war as an advocate of the T'nion cause and has always been progressive in his 
citizenship. He married Tulic Melin and she, too, survives, occupying with her 
husband a pleasant home in Linn. Missouri. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrY. 203 

It was there that Francois A\ Dubrouillet was reared and in tiic acquire- 
ment of an education he attended the pubhc schools, while in early manhood he 
came to St. Louis to enjoy the better business opportunities here offered. He 
first entered the employ of the Orr & Lindsley Shoe Company, wholesale dealers, 
with whom he continued until April, 1897, when he secured a position with the 
St. Louis Union Trust Company, with which he has since been connected. The 
recognition of his business capacity and enterprise has placed him in the promi- 
nent position which he now occupies as treasurer of the company. 

On the 24th of April, 1895, Air. Dubrouillet was married to Aliss Hattie 
Brown and they now have one child, Julie Mary. Air. Dubrouillet belongs to 
the Normandie Park Golf Club, which indicates his chief source of recreation. 
He has closely applied himself to his business interests, knowing that unwearied 
diligence and unfaltering energy will eventually win that success, for which all 
who enter the business world are striving. He is clear-sighted enough to know 
the methods which must be pursued to gain advancement and has never feared 
that unfaltering industry and laborious attention to detail which eventually wins 
promotion. 



SYLA'ESTER R. FIORITA. 

Since the first white man on American soil, unless we heed the voice of 
tradition, came to the shores of the new world, the sons of Italy have consti- 
tuted an important factor in that part of our citizenship which works and labors 
and ultimately achieves successful results. The American-born citizen seldom 
stops to realize how superior are his advantages to those offered in the old coun- 
tries but the young men of foreign lands often look with longing eyes toward 
the new world and many heed the persuasive voice of opportunity. Such has 
been the record of Sylvester R. Fiorita, who is now president of the Scalzo 
Fiorita Fruit Company of St. Louis. Air. Fiorita was born in Palermo, Sicily, 
November 22, 185 1, a son of Antonio and Severia Fiorita, both of whom are now 
deceased. The father, who followed merchandising in his native land, came to 
America in 1886 and spent his remaining days with his son Sylvester, who in 
his youth had been a pupil in the public schools of Palermo to his eighteenth 
year. He is self-educated in English, however, and not only gained a knowl- 
edge of the language but also of the manners and customs of this people after 
arriving in the United States in 1871. He remained here for eleven months 
and then returned to Palermo, where he engaged in dealing in wheat for some 
time. Again, however, he sought a home in America in 1876 and engaged in 
selling fruit from a wagon until 1879. He lived economically and his industry 
and careful expenditure at length enabled him to engage in business on his own 
account, being admitted to a partnership in the Scalzo Fruit Company at Frank- 
lin and Cherry streets. He remained at that location for a quarter of a cen- 
tury and then ni 1891 withdrew from the partnership and began business in asso- 
ciation with his sons, A. R. and V. R. Fiorita, at No. 1012 North Third street. 
There he remained until 1893. when he removed to another location in the same 
street and in October, 1907, he opened his fruit house at No. 414 Wash street. 
These various removals were prompted bv the demands of his business, which 
had grown and needed larger quarters. In October, 1907, the business was 
incorporated under the name of Sclazo Fiorita Fruit Company with Sylvester 
R. Fiorita as president. Their trade interests now extend to various parts of 
the United States and the enterprise has become one of the leading fruit houses 
of the Alissisippi valley, employing twenty-five people. Their store is fifty by 
two hundred feet, extending from Wash to Fourth street. They carry all kinds 
of domestic and foreign fruits and have one of the most attractive establish- 
ments in St. Louis by reason of its neat and tasteful arrangement. 



204 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

In Tulv, 1877, ^Ir. Fiorita was married to Miss Mary Loss and they became 
the parent's of eight children, of whom five are hving: Antonio, who is now 
treasurer of the company ; A'incenz, also connected with the business ; John, who 
won several diplomas when a student in the Jones Commercial College; Pas- 
quala. who is attending the Eugene Field public school ; and Floriana, who is 
attending the same school. The family residence is situated at No. 4437 Wash- 
ington boulevard, having been purchased by Mr. Fiorita in 1907. He belongs 
to the Columbian Knights, and is a Roman Catholic in his religious faith, while 
in his political views he is a republican. His labors have been attended with a 
measure of success that seems almost phenomenal, when we remember the fact 
that in 1876 he was selling fruit from a wagon. A third of a century has passed 
and todav he is one of the prosperous fruit merchants of the city with an exten- 
sive and growing business. What he has undertaken and accomplished should 
serve to encourage not onlv his fellow countrymen but also those of the Amer- 
ican nation, who at the outset of their careers have little opportunity but who 
can through determination achieve similar success. 



GERRIT H. TEN BROEK. 

Gerrit H. Ten Broek, consul for the Netherlands at St. Louis, lawyer and 
editor, whose business career has been of direct service to the general public 
in his conception and organization of the Associated Law Offices, is numbered 
among the native residents of the city in which he now makes his home. He 
was born Alarch 30, 1859, and, as the name indicates, comes of Holland an- 
cestrv, his parents being Henry and Gepke (Diekenga) Ten Broek. When he 
had completed his public-scho'ol course as a high school student, he began 
preparation for the bar by matriculation in the St. Louis Law School. Ad- 
mitted to practice, he at once opened an office in St. Louis and, speciaHzing in 
the department of mercantile law, he established the Ten Broek Agency, through 
which he became acquainted, either personally or by correspondence, with several 
thousand attorneys scattered throughout the United States and other countries. 
In 1886 he conceived the idea of uniting these correspondents into a regular 
organization for more effective work through cooperation, and as the result of 
a plan which he carefully formulated, established the Associated Law Offices. 
The aim of this organization is to secure for its members, who are all lawyers, 
through cooperation and interchange of information and through the employ- 
ment of the same contracted correspondents, the highest efficiency in their re- 
spective collection departments. This organization has become one of the 
most noted and most thoroughly efficient legal agencies of the country. 

In 1885 he established the Mercantile Adjuster, of which he is still the 
editor and the principal stockholder. This publication is issued monthly at 
New York and St. Louis and contains information of especial interest and 
value to credit men and lawyers. Its circulation has now reached more than 
ten thousand copies, the Adjuster being sent into every country in the world 
having commercial relations with the United States. 

For the past ten vears ^\r. Ten Brock's work in legal lines has been 
mainly in connection with the formation of industrial corporations, part of 
his work in this direction having resulted in the organization of the American 
Steel & Wire Company and the American Bridge Company, which were subse- 
quently absorbed by the United States steel corporation. In connection with 
thi= class of work and in supervision of the publication of the Mercantile Ad- 
juster, Mr. Ten Broek spends a portion of his time in New York, where he 
maintains an office, although he regards St. Louis as the place of his residence. 
and his home is here located. 

Mr. Ten Broek was married in 1893 to Mrs. Frances Lorraine Colby, of 
St. Louis. He. is a communicant of the Grace Episcopal church; is vice presi- 




G. H. TEX BROEK 



206 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

dent of the American Sunday School Union ; and secretary of the St. Louis 
Protestant Hospital Association. He is a member of the Mercantile Club and 
jNIerchants Exchange. Mr. Ten Broek was the royal commissioner for the 
Netherlands to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, and in recognition of his 
valuable services to the Holland government during the exposition period, Queen 
\Mlhelmina conferred on him a knighthood in the Order of Orange and Nassau. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party, but he has never sought 
political preferment. A contemporary biographer has said: "The formative 
genius of Mr. Ten Broek has been such that he has made a marked impress 
upon the legal profession in St. Louis, and his connection with commercial 
law has caused him to become prominentlv identified with enterprises of large 
magnitude and national celebrity." 



JULIUS LESSER. 



"Earn thy reward : the gods give naught to sloth,'' said the Greek sage Epi- 
carmis, and the truth of this admonition has been verified in all the ages which 
have run their course since that time. With full realization of this fact Julius 
Lesser, dependent upon his own resources from an early age, steadily earned his 
reward, gaining that measure of success which is the outcome of clear judg- 
ment, experience and indefatigable energy. 

He was born at Crone, Germany, February 6, 1853, a son of Philip and Dora 
(Joseph) Lesser. He was educated in the public schools of Germany and in 
July, 1867, when a youth of fourteen years, crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States. He began his business career by learning the shoemaker's trade, to 
which he devoted two years, when he became clerk, bookkeeper and porter in 
a country store. His unfaltering industry and careful expenditure at length 
brought him sufficient capital to enable him to engage in business on his own 
account and he opened a small general mercantile store at Marianna, Arkansas, 
in 1875. For seven years he conducted business there and then sold out, estab- 
lishing at the same place the Lee County Bank, which he still owned up to the 
time of his death. 

^Ir. Lesser also engaged in the cotton business, which was his first step in 
the direction of successful enterprise that he was conducting when called to 
his final rest on the 5th of July, 1908. Finding that his operations in cotton 
were meeting with prosperity, he sought a broader field of labor and in 1892 
removed to St. Louis, where he established the Lesser-Goldman Cotton Com- 
pany, of which he was the vice president and general manager. This company 
buys and sells from four hundred to five hundred thousand bales of cotton for 
domestic and export trade annually and Mr. Lesser was one of the well known 
dealers in this important southern product. He was also connected with other 
interests which promoted the business development of the south, being president 
of the St. Louis Cotton Compress Company ; also of the Marianna Cotton Oil 
Mills; of the Lee County Bank, of Marianna; and of the Commercial Bank at 
Nashville, Arkansas. 

Mr. Lesser married and had two children, Harry and Blanche, the latter 
now the wife of Alvin D. Goldman. That he was prominent in the Columbia 
Club is indicated by the fact that he was honored with its presidency. He was 
also president of the Jewish Hospital at the time of his death and was always 
active in charitable work. His political allegiance was given to the democracy 
and he served as a member of the city council of St. Louis. He was also pres- 
ident of the St. Louis Cotton Exchange and kept in close touch with the cot- 
ton industry of the country, few men being better informed concerning the con- 
ditions of the trade and opportunities along this line. Thus through consecutive 
stages of advancement Mr. Lesser worked his way upward after coming to the 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 207 

United States and those who knew him as a prosperous cotton merchant and one 
whose opinions carried weight in trade circles, while his name was an honored 
one on commercial paper, hnd it hard to realize that forty years ago he came a 
stranger and an almost penniless lad to the new world. 



WILLIAM D'OE.XCH. 



Success is determined by one's ability to recognize opportunity and to pur- 
sue it with resolute and undagging energy. It results from continued labor 
and a man who accomplishes his purpose usually becomes an important factor in 
the business circles of the community with wdiich he is connected. Mr. D'Oench 
through such means has attained a leading place among the representative busi- 
ness men of St. Louis, and his well spent and honorable life commands the 
respect of all wdto know him. He was boru in St. Louis, June 21, i860. His 
parents, William and Marie (Braaschj D"(3ench, were married in Hamburg, 
Germany, but from 1841 until 1872 resided in St. Louis, after which they returned 
to their native land. The father was a wholesale druggist here and is now liv- 
ing in Baden, Germany, at the very venerable age of ninety years. His wife 
died December 20, 1900, in Gernsbach, Baden, at the age of eighty-two years. 

The ancestors of the family emigrated from Xamurs to Prussia during the 
period of Huguenot persecution and Johann Ernst D'Oench. the great-grand- 
father of \\'illiam D'Oench, was master of royal revenues for the district of Stet- 
tin. His son, Johann Ernst D'Oench, Jr., was born in Stettin, studied law at 
the L'niversity of Halle and became public prosecutor at Bromberg, Silesia. 
Later he settled at Liegnitz in the province of Silesia in eastern Prussia, where 
he engaged in the publication of a newspaper until 1836. He married the daugh- 
ter of the Prussian minister of finance, Rosenstiel, in Berlin in August, 1808, 
and one of the children of this marriage was W'illiam D'Oench, who was born in 
Liegnitz, Silesia, Prussia, August i, 1817. He studied medicine in early man- 
hood but later devoted himself to chemistry and eventuallv entered the drug 
business, becoming, as previously stated, a wholesale druggist. He was married 
August I, 1 841, to Marie Braasch, whose father w^as an exporting and import- 
ing merchant and a senator of the Free City of Hamburg, wdiich at that time 
was a member of the "Hanseatic Confederation" and a free and independent city. 
Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. D'Oench came to St. Louis, crossing 
the Atlantic to New Orleans in a sailing vessel and thence proceeding up the 
Mississippi. They became residents of St. Louis in 1841 and Mr. D'Oench 
established here a wholesale drug business. He was also identitied with many 
other enterprises and of the Boatmen's Bank was a director, while of the Frank- 
lin Insurance Company he was president. 

William D'Oench, whose name initiates this review, first attended school in 
St. Louis as a student in the Clinton school, wdiile subsequently he became a 
student in \\'ashington University. In 1872 he accompanied his parents to Stutt- 
gart, Germany, where he attended the Royal Real Schule. After graduation 
he pursued a course in the Commercial College and in September, 1878, returned 
to America. In his school days he devoted his attention largely to languages, 
German, English and French, and was especially interested in history and geog- 
raphy. Following his graduation in 1878 he returned home. The parental 
household was ever pervaded by an air of culture, intelligence and hospitality 
and many distinguished foreigners were entertained there, including Mr. Kepp- 
ler, of "Puck," of New York, Carl Schurz and many other prominent Ger- 
man Americans. The daughters of the household possessing considerable musi- 
cal talent, the afternoon and evening hours were frequentlv devoted to enter- 
tainment of that character. Reared amid such surn^undings, -Mr. D'Oench has 
always retained a liking for musical and social gatherings and i-^ himself a most 
hospitable host. 



•208 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

After leaving school he returned to America to enter commercial life. Two 
of his brothers had determined upon a professional career, but Wilham D'Oench 
was attracted to pursuits which had occupied his father's attention and became 
a merchant and manufacturer. He remained in New York until January, 1879, 
and during- that time occupied a clerical position with a hardware broker. He 
afterward'went to Jefferson City, Missouri, to enter the employ of Giesecke, 
Aleysenburg & Company, a wholesale shoe house, whose factory was located in 
Jefiferson City. The senior partner was his brother-in-law and Mr. D'Oench 
remained in active connection with the house until the spring of 1881, when he 
was transferred to the St. Louis office of the company. In the fall of that year 
the old company was dissolved and he became the secretary and treasurer of 
the newlv incorporated firm of Giesecke Boot & Shoe Manufacturing Company, 
a boot and shoe manufacturing enterprise located at Jeft'erson City. He was 
identified with the active management of that corporation until 1898, when he 
organized the D'Oench-Hays Shoe Company of Jeffersonville, Indiana. In 1899 
he removed to Louisville, Kentucky, opposite Jeft'ersonville on the Ohio river, 
and engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes in the Indiana town. In 
1901 the D'Oench-Hays Shoe Company and the Giesecke Boot & Shoe Manu- 
facturing Company were consolidated and Mr. D'Oench once more removed to 
Jeft'erson City, Missouri, where he remained in charge of the manufacturing 
"department of the Giesecke-D'Oench-Hays Shoe Company until 1903, when he 
again became a resident of St. Louis, assuming the management of the office at 
this place. He has been president of the company since the amalgamation of 
the two houses and as chief executive officer is controlling an extensive business 
which has been gradually developed to large proportions. 

On the i6th of December, 1885, at Jeft'erson City, Missouri, Mr. D'Oench 
was married to ^Nliss Nannie Bishop Berry, a daughter of Green C. Berry and 
Virginia Terrill (Parsons) Berry. Mrs. D'Oench was born in Cole county, Mis- 
souri, which was also the birthplace of her father. Her mother, however, was 
born in Charlottesville, Virginia, and was a daughter of General G. A. Parsons, 
an adjutant general of Missouri. She was a niece of General M. M. Parsons 
of the Alissouri Division of the Confederate Army. Mr. and Mrs. D'Oench have 
one daughter, Virginia Marie, born in Jefferson City, Missouri. 

In his political views J\lr. D'Oench is a democrat, who cast his first presi- 
dential vote for Cleveland. He was president of the Gold Democratic Club of 
Jefferson City, ^Missouri, during the first Bryan campaign and is interested in the 
success of the principles, which he regards of vital importance to the country, 
yet the honors and the emoluments of public office have had no attraction for 
him. He is a gentleman of social disposition and his kindliness, geniality and 
deference for the opinions of others have gained him an extensive circle of 
warm friends. 



JOSEPH CHARLESS CABANNE. 

Joseph Charless Cabanne, president of the St. Louis Dairy Company, but 
now practically retired from active business management, is a representative of 
one of the oldest families of the city and in his business career has made a 
notable record in devising and formulating new plans and methods and carrying 
them forward to successful completion in connection with an enterprise that has 
reached extensive proportions and is accounted one of the important business 
concerns of the city. He was here born October 16, 1846, and was named for 
Joseph Charless, whose father was editor of the Missouri Gazette. He is a son 
of John Charles Cabanne and a grandson of John Pierre Cabanne. The latter 
was a pioneer resident of St. Louis, born in 1773 at Pau in the south of France. 
His father was Jean Cabanne, of Pau, France, and his mother was a sister of 




J. CHARLESS CABANNE 



14— VOL. II. 



210 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

General Litcien Duteil. who commanded republican forces at the siege of Toulon. 
At his house Xapoleon remained during the siege. In grateful remembrance 
Napoleon bequeathed to him five hundred thousand francs in his will, dated at 
St. Helena. 

John Pierre Cabanne was educated and trained for mercantile life in France 
and came to the United States in 1803 with considerable capital. He first settled 
at Charleston. South Carolina, where he was engaged in the sugar trade for 
over a year, but met with financial reverses through the loss of his ships. He 
afterward removed to Xew Orleans, where he was connected with mercantile 
interests, and in 1805 came to St. Louis, where he Was first connected with 
John Jacob Astor in the American fur trade and later with Pierre Chouteau, 
Jr.. and Bernard Pratt. He was a member of the firm of Berthold, Pratt, 
Chouteau & Company for many years, and in this connection operated in the 
Indian country very successfully. He was also one of the organizers of the 
Bank of St. Louis, founded December 17, 1816, and was a member of the first 
public school board of St. Louis. He was likewise one of the incorporators of 
the city, was a substantial supporter of every progressive movement and insti- 
tuted many plans and measures for the development and upbuilding of the new 
city. He w-as married in St. Louis, in 1806, to Miss Julie Gratiot, a daughter 
of Charles Gratiot, one of the leading residents of Missouri. Five sons and 
three daughters were born unto them. This number included John Charles 
Cabanne. the father of our subject. 

J. Charless Cabanne of this review is a descendant of the first white woman 
to establish a home on the west bank of the Mississippi, Madam Chouteau. In 
the maternal line he traces his ancestry to Judge William Carr, his maternal 
grandfather, who arrived in St. Louis in 1804 and assisted in organizing the 
local government. He was also the speaker of the first Missouri house of rep- 
resentatives, elected in 1812. 

In the city of his nativity J. Charless Cabanne was reared and educated, and 
throughout an active life has been in various ways associated with the city's 
growth and development. For forty years he has confined his attention to ex- 
tensive dairy interests. He started in business in 1868 on the present site of 
Forest Park, having nine hundred cows which pastured in that district. In 
1872 he sold his dairy interests and began receiving shipments of milk by rail 
from the farmers in the adjacent territory. He has revolutionized the methods 
of handling milk, has lowered the prices and has developed a perfected system 
of distribution in this great city. Forty years ago no "whole milk" was sold 
in St. Louis. Skimmed milk sold at twenty-eight cents per gallon, and cream, 
containing ten per cent butter fat, at a dollar and a quarter per gallon. Mr. 
Cabanne. on establishing his system in 1872, secured an improved quality of 
milk and greatly reduced the prices, so that the city was benefited from a health 
standpoint as well as from a financial. He made a close study of the business 
of dairying, watched the experiments in England at the Aylesbury Dairy Com- 
pany and other places and finally organized the St. Louis Dairy Company, 
being associated with several other prominent business men, including J. B. C. 
Lucas, Robert E. Carr, John F. Lee, Charles P. Chouteau, Henry Hitchcock, 
Colonel Thomas T. Gantt. Dr. I. G. W. Steadman and Thomas T. Turner, and 
others, and Mr. Cabanne became general manager. When his plan was announced, 
dairymen in other cities predicted commercial failure and for the first four years 
the new company encountered many obstacles, but these were finally overcome, 
the system perfected and the business carried on until it has long since become 
a very profitable undertaking. In 1896 the company erected a complete model 
milk depot at its present location, Xos. 2008 to 2018 Pine street. From time 
to time ^Ir. Cabanne has introduced some decided improvements in the method 
of caring for and handling milk. In 1872 he introduced covered milk wagons 
for general use; in 1876 introduced iron clad milk cans; and in 1878 erected the 
first creamery to -upply the city. In 1880 he delivered the first milk in bottles, 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 211 

also operated the first separator and delivered the first separator cream in 1884,. 
while in 18S7 he introduced parchment paper for wrapping butter. In 1896 
he inaugurated the system of filtering milk. The same year, after careful in- 
vestigation into practical workings of the Walker-Gordon Laboratory Company, 
of Boston, he added a Walker-Gordon department to the St. Louis Dairy Com- 
pany. In 1891 Professor T. M. Rotch, M. D., of Harvard University, and G. E. 
Gordon, a practical dairyman, worked out the method of modifying milk, which 
method is now followed in the Walker-Gordon laboratories of the United States. 
The- modified milk is used for infants and invalids and the laboratory fills exactly 
all prescriptions of physicians, who alone direct the feeding. The dairy com- 
pany employed eighteen men at its organization, and the growth and extent 
of the business is now indicated by the fact that one hundred and fifty-five names 
are now on the payroll. 

While the enterprise he has developed is a most important and extensive 
one, Mr. Cabanne has always found time for cooperation in affairs of public 
moment and of vital interest to the city at large. He was one of the organizers 
of the Civic League of St. Louis and acted as its first president in 1897. It is 
today one of the most useful and the most potent directing force in the conduct 
of the city's affairs. It was organized to uphold municipal virtue and to secure 
needed reforms and progress and it has accomplished much good politically and 
otherwise. Mr. Cabanne is also executive officer of the Citizens Industrial 
Association. 

In 1868 Mr. Cabanne was m.arried to Miss Susan P. Mitchell, a great- 
granddaughter of Major William C. Christy, a noted pioneer, who became a 
resident of St. Louis in 1804. Their children are : John Pierre, born January 
16, 1869, who is now active manager of the St. Louis Dairy Company; Virginia 
Eliot, who was born January 12, 1870, and is the wife of E. W. Little, of New 
York city; Martha M., who was born September 27, 1872, and became the wife 
of Robert L. Kayser ; Sunie M., born October i, 1873, who is the wife of J. 
Shepard Smith, of St. Louis ; Fannie M., who was born January 12, 1875, and 
is the wife of A. L. Pearson, Jr., of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Mary M., who 
was born January 12, 1875, was in the Order of Visitation Convent and died in 
Jime, 1907; Arthur Lee, whose birth occurred March 7, 1876; and Sallie Shan- 
non, who was also born March 7, 1876, and died in infancy. 

Spending his entire life in St. Louis. J. Charless Cabanne is most widely 
known and the people of the city rejoice in what he has accomplished and in 
the successes to which he has attained. He is a man of most courteous man- 
ners and yet firm and unyielding in all that he believes to be right. While his 
chief life work has been that of a remarkably successful operator in the dairy 
business, yet the range of his activities and the scope of his influence have 
reached far beyond this specific field. He belongs to that class of men who 
wield a power which is all the more potent from the fact that it is moral rather 
than political and is exercised for the public weal rather than for personal ends. 
L^nselfish and retiring, he prefers a quiet place in the background to the glamour 
of publicity, but his rare aptitude and ability in achieving results make him 
constantly sought and often bring him into a prominence from which he would 
naturallv shrink were less desirable ends in view. 



HARRISON HOPKINS MERRICK. 

Harrison Hopkins Merrick needs no introduction to the readers of this 
volume, for as president of the Merrick, Walsh & Phelps Jewelry Company he 
is known not onlv here but throughout the middle west as one of the most 
prominent representatives of the jewelry trade. He was born January 22. 1841, 
in Carmel. Putnam countv. New York, while his ancestrv through manv gen- 



212 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

erations has been distinctly American both in its lineal and collateral lines. It 
can be traced back to a still more remote period when the family figured prom- 
inently in Wales. Burke's Peerage (p. 946 — Edition 1887) says: "The Mer- 
ricks are the purest and noblest of Cambrian blood and have possessed the same 
ancestral estate and residence at Bodorgan, Anglesey, Wales, without inter- 
ruption above a thousand years. They have the rare distinction of being lineally 
descended both from the Sovereign Princes of Wales of the right royal family 
and from King Edward I, whose eldest son was the first Prince of Wales of the 
English royal family." 

Harrison H. jNIerrick is a direct descendant in the eighth generation of 
William Merrick, who was born in Wales and left that country in the spring of 
1636 on the ship James, reaching Charlestown, Massachusetts, in the same year. 
There he took up his abode and after settling in the colony gave his attention to 
farming. He was also connected with the Colonial Militia, serving as lieutenant 
under Captain Miles Standish. David Merrick of the sixth generation, grand- 
father of H. H. Merrick, was born in Carmel, New York, in 1768, and lived to 
the remarkable old age of ninety-five years. When a young man he was 
acquainted with General Washington. His uncle. Captain David Merrick, was a 
commander of a company in Colonel Ludington's Seventh Regiment of Dutchess 
County Militia in the Revolutionary war. Isaac Merrick, his brother, was a 
private in Captain Waterbury's company of the same regiment. Allen Merrick 
of the seventh generation was born in Carmel, December 24, 1812, and died 
February 13, 1881. Throughout his entire life he carried on general agricultural 
pursuits. His wife, Caroline (Hopkins) Merrick, who was born January 2, 
1810, and died December 8, 1887, was a direct descendant of one of the passen- 
gers on the Mayflower. 

Harrison Hopkins Merrick was educated in the district schools at Carmel, 
Xew York, pursuing his studies through the winter months but aiding in the 
labors of the farm in the summer. The time was not equally divided, for about 
four months were given to the acquirement of an education and eight months 
to the work of the fields. Nor did he attend school after he reached the age 
of fifteen years. The school of experience, however, furnishes opportunity to 
those who desire to learn and through his labors in the business world, his 
broad research and investigation, Mr. Merrick has become recognized as one 
of the most keen and forceful men of intellect, capable not only of solving in- 
tricate business problems but, of ready understanding as well, the important 
questions that concern the American citizen in his varied relations. He has long 
figured as one of the prominent merchants of St. Louis and yet it has been 
through successive stages of careful development and consecutive promotion 
that he has won his present high standing in the commercial and financial world. 

In the fall of 1856, leaving his old home at Carmel he went to New York 
city and secured a position as errand boy in a jewelry store. From that time 
forward his business associations were in the jewelry line. He remained with 
the firm for six years and then secured a position as salesman with the Ball 
Black Company, one of the largest jewelry establishments of the city, continu- 
ing with that house and Robert Rait & Company for four years. In the fall of 
1866 he formed the acquaintance of Eugene Jaccard in New York city and was 
induced by him to remove to St. Louis. He was thereafter for twelve years con- 
nected with the E. Jaccard Company and during the last years of that period 
had entire charge of the diamonds. In the fall of 1878, however, he severed his 
connection with the company to engage in business on his own account, becom- 
ing associated with William Walsh and H. W. Phelps, under the firm style of 
Merrick, Walsh & Phelps. The business was conducted under a partnership 
relation until 1894, when it was incorporated under the style of the Merrick, 
Walsh & Phelps Jewelry Company, of which Mr. Merrick became the president. 
From the beginning the business was successful because it was managed along 
lines of liberality combined with care, watchfulness and economv. The house 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 218 

always stood at the head of the trade in the hue of stock carried and in its pro- 
gressive business poHc}'. Meanwhile in the spring of 1900 the old firm of E. 
Jaccard & Company had become bankrupt and a trustee was appointed to take 
charge of the business for the benefit of the creditors. The stock and fixtures 
of the bankrupt company after being appraised were advertised for sale and 
were purchased on the 226. of September, 1900, by the Merrick, Walsh & Phelps 
Company. On the 8th of the following October a very successful auction was 
commenced at E. Jaccard's location on Sixth and Olive streets and was con- 
tinued until the evening of December 24. At that time the auction and store 
were closed for the purpose of installing and arranging an entirely new lot of 
store fixtures as well as changing the entire store front of the building. As the 
contract for new fixtures had been made several months previously the w'ork 
had been so prepared that the new store was ready for occupancy about the 
1st of January, 1901. During the period when the auction was in process, Mer- 
rick, Walsh & Phelps w^ere at the same time conducting their regular retail 
business at No. 511 Olive street, enjoying continued success there. After the 
auction was closed and the new fixtures installed, the two stocks were combined, 
for the finer and more expensive part of the Jaccard stock had remained unsold. 
This was combined with the stock of the Merrick, Walsh & Phelps Jewelry 
Company under that firm style and a removal was made to the new location at 
the corner of Olive and Sixth streets. Here the company entered upon an era 
of prosperity but for some time previous to the consolidation there was an 
endeavor being made to obtain an option on the shares of stock of the Merrick. 
Walsh & Phelps Jewelry Company and this was finally obtained. The members 
of the company had no desire to sell but the price offered was so satisfactory 
that they decided to dispose of the business and the entire stock, fixtures and 
company name became the property of the Mermod Jaccard Jewelry Company. 
Thus was terminated Mr. Merrick's connection with the mercantile interests of 
St. Louis, in which he had figured so prominently and honorably. His success, 
too, was of a most conspicuous nature in that while controlling a most extensive 
trade the integrity of the house w^as never called into cjuestion. Mr. Merrick's 
early training was such that he was thoroughly informed concerning all branches 
of the jewelry business but the department that gave him the most pleasure 
was the handling of precious stones, of which he became an expert judge. His 
memory of individual stones was such that he was often able to distinguish and 
remember a diamond or other gem which he had carefully examined under a 
magnifying glass even after several years had elapsed after the examination 
was made and when the stone had been reset in an entirely new setting. This 
knowledge of gems is almost intuitive and cannot be acquired by every person 
engaged in the setting of stones, yet experience aids greatly in the development 
of this faculty. Mr. ]Merrick has always felt genuine pleasure in the beauty and 
perfection of fine stones and has thus taken delight in his business from the 
artistic and aesthetic as well as from the commercial standpoint. 

On the 15th of August, 1876, at Galion, Ohio, Mr. Merrick was married to 
Miss Dell Markland Martin, the youngest daughter of Captain John and Mary 
(Smith) Martin. Her father was a Virginian by birth and the town of Mar- 
tinsburg. Virginia, was named in honor of his family. He became one of the 
pioneer settlers of Ohio and entered a quarter section of land in Richland county 
from the government. As there was splendid water power upon his place he 
built and operated grist and saw mills, cabinet shop and distillery and became 
one of the leading representatives of industrial and productive interests in that 
part of the state. He also laid out the village of Martin's Mills but later the 
name was changed to Millsboro. Aside from his industrial interests he con- 
ducted the village inn and was prominent in community affairs, serving as post- 
master, while for fourteen years he was county commissioner. His wife was 
the daughter of the Hon. Thomas Smith, one of the most famous and brilliant 
men of Pennsylvania, who served as judge of the supreme court for the west- 



214 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

ern district and was also a colonel in the Revolutionar_y war. His brother James 
was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 

Both ]Mr. and ^Nlrs. ]\Ierrick were members of the First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, ^Massachusetts, and also of the First Church of Christ. 
Scientist, in St. Louis. His political allegiance is given to the republican party 
and with a citizen's interest in the political situation of the country he has kept 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day, yet the honors and emolu- 
ments of office have had no attraction for him. His business career has been 
characterized by a steady promotion that has led to his present well earned ease. 
His name in St. Louis is a synonym for commercial integrity as well as business 
activity and has been prominently identified with business progress here. This 
bare statement is of itself no empty eulogy. It is the assignment to a place 
in life, a position in the ranks of the toilers in carrying on the great affairs of 
societv, of prominence to that extent, that the careful historian of the times 
will look into and weigh and estimate accurately. He belongs to that class of 
men who quietly move with force in shaping influence along the line of the city's 
material progress and at the same time he has gained through his personal char- 
acteristics the unqualified esteem of his fellowmen. 



WILLIAAI H. THOMSON. 

William Holmes Thomson, one of the most respected and honored men in 
social and banking circles in St. Louis, has for more than half a century been 
connected with the Boatmen's Bank, of which he has been cashier for thirty- 
eight years. Throughout this entire period there has not been a single esoteric 
phase in his career, which on the contrary has been as an open book inviting 
closest scrutiny. 

His life record began April i6, 1837, on the noted Hawthorne farm in Fred- 
erick county, ]\Iaryland, and he is of English, Scotch and Irish lineage, although 
both his paternal and maternal ancestors became residents of Maryland during 
the colonial epoch in its history. His parents were William James and Mar- 
garetta Ann (Davis) Thomson. His great-great-grandfather in the maternal 
line was John Lackland, who came from Scotland and settled in Maryland 
when it was still numbered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain. 
His son, James Lackland, became an officer in the Revolutionary war, was after- 
ward a stanch advocate of Jeffersonian principles and was a gradual emancipa- 
tionist more than a half century before Lincoln's proclamation freed the colored 
people of the south. In 181 2 he made a will that his negroes and their descend- 
ants should be set free as they reached certain specified ages. In the year 1775 
James Lackland, then nineteen years of age, joined an exploring party who 
went from ^Maryland on a trip through the wilderness of Kentucky on horse- 
back. He entered a large tract of land in the Blue Grass state when it was 
still one of the counties of Virginia and therefore he aided in planting the seeds 
of civilization which have since resulted in producing one of the leading com- 
monwealths of the country. He was twenty years of age when, on the 14th 
of May, 1776, he was commissioned by the council of safety second lieutenant 
of the company formed in the lower district of Frederick county, iMaryland, for 
service in the Revolutionary war. This company became part of the Twenty- 
ninth Battalion, and with it he did active duty for American independence.' He 
wedderl Catherine, a daughter of David Lynn, who came from Dublin, Ireland, 
and settled in Maryland about 171 7, becoming afterward a judge of the Fred- 
erick county court and holding a commission under King George as justice of 
the peace. He was also one of three commissioners appointed by the general 
assembly of Maryland in 1751 to lay out Georgetown, now in the District of 
Columbia. He had three sons, who espoused the cause of liberty in the Revo- 




WILLIAM H. THOMSON 



216 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

lutionarv war. one serving as lieutenant, another as captain and the other as 
surgeon. One of the daughters of James and Catherine (Lynn) Lackland was 
the maternal grandmother of \\'illiam H. Thomson. She became the wife of 
Ignatius Davis, of "^Nlount Hope," Frederick county, Maryland, and their chil- 
dren include ^Slargaretta Ann Davis, who in early womanhood became the wife 
of \\'illiam James Thomson. ]\Ir. Thomson was also born in Frederick county, 
]\Iarvland, and was a son of John Popham and ^Margaret (Holmes) Thomson, 
the former of English lineage, while the latter was a native of Carlisle, Penn- 
sylvania. The birth of \Mlliam James Thomson occurred in Frederick county, 
June 26, 1808, and he attended Dickinson College at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 
where he was graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1828. ^ He studied 
law, but soon gave his attention to farming, and his place, "Hawthorne," became 
one of the noted plantations of that locality. Thereon he resided until his death, 
June 21, 1841. 

William Holmes Thomson was but four years of age at the time of his 
father's demise. He was reared in Frederick county, attended the public 
schools near his boyhood's home, was afterward a student in the city schools of 
Frederick and later attended a boarding school in Pennsylvania. After putting 
aside his text-books at the age of sixteen years he was employed for a year 
with a civil engineering corps, after which he entered the service of a Baltimore 
commission house. In the meantime he was studying business conditions in the 
east and in the west, and a comparison of the opportunities offered led him to 
the belief that young men could more rapidly secure advancement in the Mis- 
sissippi valley than they could upon the coast. 

Therefore, in April, 1857, he made his way to St. Louis and on his twentieth 
birthdav ( April 16) entered the employ of the banking house where he has 
continued to the present time, covering a period of more than fifty-one years. 
The Boatmen's Saving Institution had been organized ten years before by a 
few leading and philanthropic citizens who wished to promote thrift and economy 
among the steamboatmen who at that time constituted the larger part of the 
laboring class in St. Louis. Success attended the venture from the beginning 
and a second charter was taken out in 1856 under the name of the Boatmen's 
Saving Bank, which was capitalized for four hundred thousand dollars. Mr. 
Thomson's early connection with the institution was in a clerical capacity, but 
gradually he worked his way upward, his duties and responsibilities increasing 
as his faithfulness and efficiency were recognized. In 1869 ^e was appointed 
assistant cashier, and the following year saw him in the position of cashier, in 
which he has since continued, becoming thus the chief executive officer of an 
institution which in its reliability is second to none in the west. The success 
of the bank is attributable in large measure to the efforts, enterprise and sound 
business judgment and conservative methods of Mr. Thomson, and the growth 
of the bank is indicated in part by the fact that the capital stock during his in- 
cumbency has been increased to two million dollars as the result of accumulated 
profits after paying the stockholders in dividends more than six millions of 
dollars. Since the capital stock has been increased to two million dollars the 
bank has regularly paid to its stockholders semi-annual dividends of from three 
to five per cent and has accumulated, in addition, a surplus of one million 
dollars, and an undivided profit account of more than six hundred thousand 
dollars. The net earnings since 1856 have been $9,701,318.48; paid cash divi- 
dends, $6,320,000.00: paid stock dividend, $1,600,000; held as surplus and un- 
divided profits, $1,781,318.48; total, $9,701,318.48. 

Mr. Thomson is regarded as one of the most astute, clear-sighted and able 
financiers of the country, and there is no point connected with banking with 
which he is not perfectly familiar, while his word is usually accepted as authority 
on all banking questions in St. Louis and the middle west. He Is not unknown 
in other business lines, for he has cooperated financially and officiallv with vari- 
ous manufacturing establishments in .St. Louis and has largely promoted business 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 217 

interests as a member of the Merchants Exchange, the Cotton Exchange and 
as chairman of the committee of management of the St. Louis Clearing House. 

In 1862 Mr. Thomson was married to Miss Margaret Foote Larkin, the 
eldest daughter of Thomas H. and Susan (Ross) Larkin, of St. Louis. Mrs. 
Thomson died in 1863, and in 1864 he lost their child. In 1872 Mr. Thomson 
married Annie Lou, the eldest daughter of William A. Hargadine, of the Harga- 
dine-McKittrick Dry Goods Company. They became parents of seven daugh- 
ters and one son and, with the exception of a daughter who died in childhood, 
all are yet living, namely : Julia Hargadine, who married C. C. Collins, an 
attorney of St. Louis ; William Hargadine, who married Miss Elizabeth John- 
son, of Corsicana, Texas; Virginia McCullough. the wife of George W. Tracy, 
a dry-goods merchant of St. Louis; Susan Larkin, the wife of Lieutenant A. B. 
Coxe. of the LInited States Army ; Holmes Lackland, who married Dr. Allen 
G. Fuller ; Annie Lou and ]\Iary McCreery. 

Mr. Thomson has always given his political allegiance to the democracy, 
but when the party swerved from its old standard in 1900 in accepting the 
Bryan platform of that year he espoused the gold standard as embodied in the 
Indianapolis platform. Although reared in the faith of the Presbyterian church 
he became a member of the Trinity Episcopal church of St. Louis in 1859 and 
has since been connected with that parish, active in promoting its charities and 
prominently identified with other benevolent movements. He has for many years 
been a vestrvman of Trinity church and for some years its senior warden. He 
was one of the founders of St. Luke's Hospital in 1865 and since 1889 has been 
president of its board of trustees. He is never impelled by a sense of stern 
duty in his benefactions, but gives generously of his means in response to the 
promptings of a kindly spirit Avhich recognizes fully the obligations and re- 
sponsibilities of wealth. He has figured in movements for the substantial devel- 
opment of St. Louis through his membership in the Merchants. Exchange, the 
Business i\Ien's League and the Creditmen's Association, and his social nature 
finds expression in his membership in the Missouri Athletic, the Noonday and 
St. Louis Clubs. With advancing years his activities have increased rather 
than diminished and his interest broadened, and he has long been recognized 
as an influential citizen of St. Louis whose word and work have featured in 
the development of the citv in material, moral and benevolent lines. 



LEWIS DAVID DOZIER. 

Lewis D. Dozier is now living retired, although financially interested in 
various important enterprises, in which he also has a voice in the methods of 
control. He needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, for he has 
been so closelv associated with business afifairs here as to make his life record 
an integral chapter in the city's commercial development. A native of St. 
Charles" countv, ^Missouri, he was born August 25. 1846, of the marriage of 
Captain James and Mary Ann (Dudgeon) Dozier, the father a native of North 
Carolina and the mother of Kentucky. When he was fourteen years of age he 
came to St. Louis, his father's family arriving five years later. As a pupil in 
the Washington public schools he continued his education and further qualified 
for a business career by study in Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College. It 
has always been characteristic of him that the duty nearest at hand was the one 
which claimed his attention and was carefully performed. It is in this thorough- 
ness and concentration of purpose that the secret of his success lies. Soon after 
completing his college course, he became a silent partner in the firm of Garneau 
& Dozier," which firm had been recently organized by his father, James Dozier, 
and Joseph Garneau, for the conduct of a bakery business. The partnership 
expired by limitation January i, 1872, but the experience of Mr. Dozier led him 



218 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

to regard the field of labor as an advantageous and profitable one and he con- 
tinned in that line bv becoming a partner, in i\pril of that year, in the Dozier- 
Wevl Cracker Company, in which his father was senior member. Upon the 
father"? death a corporation was formed for continuing the business under the 
same firm name and another son, John T. Dozier, became president. In i88S 
Lewis D. Dozier purchased the interest of Mr. Weyl and the enterprise was 
then conducted under the name of the Dozier Cracker Company for two years, 
when the corporation was merged into the American Biscuit & jManufacturing 
Company, and in 1898 was purchased by the National Biscuit Company, in which 
ISIt. Dozier is a large stockholder and director. He continued to act as manager 
of the Dozier bakery in St. Louis until his retirement from active business. 

His fertilitv of resource, his ability in placing a correct valuation upon busi- 
ness opportunities and his laudable desire to extend his efforts into other lines 
led to his connection with several other business concerns of importance and he 
now has an office in the Security building of St. Louis, from which point he 
controls the manv lines of trade in which he is interested. He was for several 
vears the first vice president of the Manufacturers' Association and is a director 
of the ^lerchants-Laclede National Bank and the Mercantile Trust Company. In 
lines less specifically commercial he is also known, being a life member of the 
board of trustees of the Bellefontaine cemetery, a director of the Mercantile 
Library, a member of the Missouri Historical Society and a member of the 
Commercial Club, which is the leading organization among business men of the 
city. Mr. Dozier was among the first to advocate the holding of an exposition 
in St. Louis to celebrate the Louisiana purchase and when the plan was brought 
into definite form, he became a member of the board of trustees and was 
appointed a member of the executive committee. While business interests have 
made extensive demands upon his time and energies, Mr. Dozier has ever found 
and utilized opportunities for assisting in the work of progress and development 
along lines that have been provocative of good for the city in its material, intel- 
lectual, social and moral advancement. As a generous patron of the Young 
]\Ien"s Christian Association and the St. Louis Hospital, he has largely furthered 
their interests and contributed generously for the erection of their buildings. 
The Provident Association and other benevolent and charitable institutions have 
also received his ready aid. He is likewise interested in all educational matters, 
did effective service for the public schools by four years' work as a member of 
the board of education and with other leading citizens contributed liberally 
toward placing \\'ashington University and ]\Iary Institute upon a broad and 
permanent basis. 

Lewis David Dozier was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca E. Lewis. 
a daughter of Benjamin W. and Eleanor (Turner) Lewis, of Glasgow,, 
^Missouri. Her father, now deceased, was one of the early residents and promi- 
nent merchants of this state. Mrs. Dozier died January 5, 1889, but her memory 
is enshrined in the hearts of all who knew her, while her influence remains as a 
blessed benediction to those with whom she was associated. She possessed a 
most charitable spirit and her kindliness was felt by all with whom she came in 
contact. Her own great love for her four children, Lewis, Mary, Eleanor and 
Anna Lewis Dozier, prompted her mother heart to go out in fullest sympathy to^ 
all children, especially to the homeless ones, and she endowed a bed in Martha 
Parsons Hospital. She held membership with the Episcopal church and to her 
religion was a matter of daily living and not of ceremonial weekly worship. 
Hers was a contagious enthusiasm for all those causes which tend to ameliorate 
the hard conditions of life for mankind. 

In one of the most beautiful residence districts of St. Louis — Westmoreland 
Place, near Forest Park — stands the Dozier home and it is one of the city's most 
attractive residences. Mr. Dozier is ever a welcome visitor of the Noonday, St. 
Louis, Country and University Clubs, with which he holds membership and of 
the first two he has served as vice president. Politically he endorses the 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 219 

democracy, while fraternally he is connected with the Masons and the Elks. 
His love of outdoor sports is manifest in his membership in the St. Louis Gun 
Club, of which he was for many years president, the King's Lake Shooting- 
Club, and the Missouri State Sportsman's Association. He has also been presi- 
dent of the last named and he finds pleasure and recreation in camp life with 
all the opportuntiy it affords for the exercise of his skill as a hunter. Such in 
brief is the life record of Lewis D. Dozier, whose entrance into business circles 
was not one of especial brilliance or prominence, but who through the slow 
moving processes of an honorable business has worked his way upward until his 
name stands foremost among those whose opinions have become a power in 
commercial and financial circles. 



FRANK PERIX HAYS. 

Carlyle says "Biography is the most profitable as well as the most pleasant 
of all reading," and there is certainly much of interest in the career of a man 
who, without special advantages at the outset of his career, by the inherent 
force of his own character, his strong purpose and a commendable ambition, 
achieves distinction and success. Such has been the record of Frank Perin Hays, 
vice president of the Little & Hays Investment Company, dealers in municipal 
and corporation bonds and dividend paying stocks. He began the journey of 
life near Columbus, Ohio, March 12, 1861, and while spending his boyhood days 
in the home of his parents, \\*illiam B. and Celina (Perin) Hays, pursued a pub- 
lic-school education, which was continued in the high school of Lancaster, i\Iis- 
souri. He afterward attended the normal school at Kirksville, this state, and 
pursued a full course in H. B. Bryant's Business College in Chicago. His 
physical development kept pace with his intellectual progress, for he enjoyed 
the benefit of the free, open life of the farm, spending his summers between 
the ages of twelve and twenty years upon farms belonging to his father and 
assisting to no inconsiderable extent in the work of their development and cul- 
tivation. His entrance into commercial life was made as a partner in the firm 
of W. B. Hays & Son. His time was thus occupied from 1880 until 1882, and 
for four years thereafter he conducted a general mercantile establishment at 
Lancaster, INIissouri. During this period he won a goodly measure of success 
that enabled him to engage in the banking business at Lancaster. Missouri, in 
1886, as an equal partner with his father in what has become known as the Hays 
Bank. 

In 1888 he purchased a controlling interest in the Schuyler County Bank 
of Lancaster, Missouri, and further extended his efl:'orts by establishing in 1889 
the Hays Banking Company of Queen City, Missouri, of which he was the prin- 
cipal stockholder. In 1891 he established the Merchants Exchange Bank at 
Downing, ^Missouri, owning a large majority of the stock, and in 1893 the Atlanta 
State Bank, at Atlanta, ]\Iacon county, Missouri, came into existence through his 
efforts. He also owned the greater part of this and thus became largely iden- 
tified with financial interests at various points in the state, forming at the same 
time a wide acquaintance that proved of marked benefit to him in his present 
line of business. He won public confidence and to him were intrusted many 
investment matters. He began dealing in bonds in 1892 and his business devel- 
oped with such rapidity that in 1897 he removed to St. Louis and formed a 
partnership with W. C. Little & Brother under the firm style of the Little & 
Hays Investment Company. He soon gained a foremost place in financial circles 
in this city, was bond officer of the Mississippi \"alley Trust Company in 1901- 
02 and in the following year was vice president of the Colonial Trust Company. 
He then resumed partnership relations with ^^^ C. Little and others in ]\Iay, 
1904, and is the present vice president of the Little & Hays Investment Com- 



220 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

panv, dealers in municipal and corporation bonds and dividend paying stocks. 
As "a valuator of commercial paper, he has gained a reputation that places him 
in the front rank among the investment brokers of the middle west. With 
remarkable prescience he has recognized the possibilities of diminution or appre- 
ciation in bonds and other investment paper and has controlled his clients' inter- 
ests with such care that those who know him in business circles place the utmost 
contidence in the accuracy of his judgment. Aside from his investment business 
he is a director of the Chicago Railway Equipment Company, and that he occu- 
pies an honored place in moneyed circles is indicated by the fact that he was 
secretary for seven years of the [Missouri Bankers Association and in 1899 was 
chosen to the presidency. 

Pleasantly situated in his home life, Mr. Hays was married in Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, August 18. 1882, to Aliss Harriet Lane Celleyham and their chil- 
dren are: Helen. Hilda, Elizabeth, Forrest Perin, and Margaret Frances. Mr. 
Hays votes with the democracy and he finds his chief recreation in golf and ten- 
nis,' being an enthusiastic advocate of manly outdoor sports. Never unmindful 
of the duty and obligation of man toward his fellowmen, Mr. Hays has labored 
eltectivelv' and earnestly in many public movements for the general welfare. 
Moreover, he has done effective service for the Lindell Avenue Methodist Epis- 
copal church, for the Young Men's Christian Association, and other organiza- 
tions for moral development. Of the latter he has been chairman of the finance 
committee of the general board of directors. He was for two years treasurer 
of the City Evangelistic Union, for three years president of the Missouri Sun- 
day school Union, for one year president of the City of St. Louis Sunday 
school Union, and president of the [Missouri Sunday school Association. His life 
has never been self-centered in its purpose nor in its work. While he has made 
a success in business, he fully recognizes the brotherhood of man and has ren- 
dered readv assistance to those less fortunate than himself. 



SAMUEL MORRIS DODD. 

Prompted by laudable ambition at the outset of his career, Samuel Morris 
Dodd has advanced through consecutive stages of development until he has long 
occupied a place among the leading residents of St. Louis. A strong mentality, 
an invincible courage and a most determined individuality have so entered into 
his makeup as to render him a natural leader of men and in this connection he 
has controlled business enterprises of large importance to the city as well as to 
the individual stockholders. He was born in Orange, New Jersey, June 3, 1832, 
a son of Stephen and Mary (Condit) Dodd. The ancestral home of the family 
in America was at Brantford, Connecticut, where representatives of the name of 
English birth located at a very early day. Later a removal was made from 
Connecticut to New Jersey by the branch of the family to which Samuel M. 
Dodd belongs. Beginning his education at the usual age, he was a pupil in the 
public schools of Orange and at Bloomfield (N. J.) Academy and his early busi- 
ness training came to him in mercantile lines. When sixteen years of age he 
became a clerk in a hat and fur store of New York city, where he spent three 
years, but the great west with its broad possibilities and growing opportunities 
attracted him and St. Louis thereby gained a citizen whose worth and value have 
long been widely recognized. 

Following ills arrival here Mr. Dodd entered the employ of Nourse, Crane 
& Company. Later he became a partner in the firm of Baldwin, Randall & 
Company. Gradually acquiring larger interest in the enterprise, Mr. Dodd 
became sole proprietor in 1862 and for a time conducted the store under his 
own name. Seeking a still broader field of labor, he became the founder of the 
w^holesale dry-goods house of Drxlrl, Brown & Company in 1866, the location of 




S. M. DODD 



'222 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

the tirm being" at the corner of ^Nlain and Locust streets. The partners were 
men of marked enterprise, of indefatigable energy and of fertihty of resource 
and through their combined eltorts their estabHshment soon became one of the 
leading wholesale dry-goods houses of St. Louis, with a trade extending through- 
out the entire ^Mississippi valley. Another notable feature of his business career 
lies in the fact that Mr. Dodd and his associates were among the first to leave 
the old wholesale center and remove from the lower streets up to the plateau 
of Fifth street. Foreseeing the growth of the business, Mr. Dodd recognized 
that the old location would not be adecjuate to the demands of the larger and 
increasing wholesale business and in consequence advocated the removal of the 
house of which he was senior partner, and his plan was carried out, although 
his contemporaries regarded the undertaking as an exceedingly hazardous one. 
The Collier estate built for Dodd, Brown & Company a large building at the 
corner of Broadway and St. Charles street and soon the wholesale business was 
removed to the new location. While pioneers in this wholesale district, they 
were soon followed by others and the wholesale center has been changed until 
it extends as far westward on St. Charles street and Washington avenue as 
Eighteenth street. jNIr. Dodd continued at the head of the house until 1885, 
when the firm was dissolved and he withdrew from the dry-goods trade. He 
had made for himself a most creditable name in mercantile circles. His record 
was such as any man might be proud to possess. From a clerkship he had 
worked his way upward until he became one of the foremost merchants of the 
middle west. He has in recent years been extensively connected with corporate 
enterprises of various kinds, continually recognized as one of the foremost men 
of St. Louis who has carved his name deep upon its business annals. His recog- 
nized administrative ability has- caused him to be sought in filling official posi- 
tions of responsibility in connection with these enterprises and he was formerly 
president of the Broadway Real Estate Company, of the Missouri Electric Light 
& Power Company, of St. Louis, vice president of the American Central Insur- 
ance Company and a director of the National Bank of Commerce. He was also 
president of the American Brake Company, which was later leased to the West- 
inghouse Air Brake Company. He is also a director in the Commonwealth 
Trust Company and president of the Central Real Estate Company. 

Mr. Dodd is well known in club circles, belonging to the St. Louis, Noonday, 
the Country and Cuivre Clubs and the National Arts Club of New York city. 
He is likewise a trustee of the Young Women's Christian Association and is 
very active in this work and also along charitable and philanthropic lines. 

An enumeration of the men of the present generation who have won honor 
and public recognition for themselves and at the same time have honored the 
city with which they have been connected would be incomplete were there failure 
to make prominent reference to the one whose name initiates this review. He 
helfl distinctive precedence as a prominent merchant and as a man of splendid 
executive and administrative ability and in every relation of life he has borne 
himself with such signal dignity and honor as to gain him the respect of all. He 
has been and is rlistinctively a man of affairs and one who has wielded a wide 
influence. 



PHILLIP A. MEINBERG. 

When death claims an individual it is customary and fitting that a review of 
his life shall be mafic that the lessons of value may be considered and pondered 
and bear fruit in the lives of others. When Phillip A. Meinberg passed away 
his death was the occasion of dee]) and wides]jread regret to many friends who 
had known him as a straightffjrward, conscientious business man, whose active 
force in various relations contributed to the progress and upbuilding of his com- 
munity. He was born in ^luhlhausen, Ciermany, April 21, 1840, a son of Gott- 



ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 223 

fried and Christina (Barlosius) Aleinberg, also natives of Germany. When four 
3'ears of age he was brought to America by his parents, the family settling in 
St. Louis, where the father established a shoe business which he conducted up 
to the time of his death. The son was sent to a private school in the basement 
of the old Lutheran church on Lombard, between Third and Fourth streets, 
there pursuing his studies until fourteen years of age. At that time he entered 
business circles as an employe of Charles ^loritz, in whose establishment he 
learned book binding. There he remained for ten years. On the expiration of 
that period he felt that his broad experience and his carefully saved earnings 
justified his embarkation in business on- his own account and he established a 
kindergarten supply and book binding business on South Broadway in 1872. He 
furnished supplies for all the schools of St. Louis for many years and continued 
in the business up to the time of his death, while since his demise his sons have 
carried on the same enterprise. Starting in life without capital, he possessed, 
however, a strong heart and willing hands nor did he fear that laborious attention 
to business so necessary to success. Work — earnest, persistent work — was the 
foundation of his prosperity and year after year he closely studied the problems 
that arose in connection with his business interests, bringing to bear keen 
discrimination in their solution. 

At the time of the Civil war Mr. ]\Ieinberg enlisted as a member of Com- 
pany E, Second Regiment of Missouri Volunteer xVrtillery, with the rank of 
corporal, joining the army on the 30th of October, 1861. He saw active service 
in the southwest and almost lost his life at Bloomfield, Missouri. He was hon- 
orabl}^ discharged August 24, 1863. at Benton Barracks, and returned to again 
became a factor in the commercial life of this city. 

In 1864 Mr. Meinberg was married to [Nliss Anna Ritter, of St. Louis, who 
died in 1891, and on the 25th of March, 1896, he wedded INIrs. A. O. Priest, of 
St. Louis. Four sons survive him, Edward, Paul, Daniel and Joe. and the first 
three still conduct the business. In his political views Mr. Meinberg was a 
republican and always kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day, 
as every true American citizen should do. He served for two terms as a mem- 
ber of the house of delegates and gave careful consideration to each cpiestion 
which came up for settlement that had effect upon the municipal welfare and 
progress. He was a member of the German Lutheran church and his life 
accorded with its teachings and belief. He tried to make the most of the passing 
years and so lived that his fellowmen trusted in his business honor, while those 
who knew him socially entertained for him warm and enduring friendship. 



WILLIA^I ARSTE. 



William Arste, who since 1892 has published the Waterways Journal in St. 
Louis, his native city, was born on Christmas day of 1867. He is descended from 
ancestry who came from Hanover, Germany. His father, Frederick W. Arste, 
who crossed the Atlantic in 1863, is now a retired printer. His mother, Mrs. 
Wilhelmina Arste, died December 22, 1907. 

The son was a pupil in the Laclede and Madison public schools and com- 
pleted the grammar-school course at the age of thirteen years, being thus qualified 
to enter the Polytechnic school, but being an only child and his father in rather 
limited financial circumstances, it was necessary that he earn his own living from 
that time and he secured a position as office boy with F. C. P. Tiedeman. who 
was city surveyor and also secretary of the republican city central committee. 
For five years he remained with Mr. Tiedeman and was promoted from time to 
time until he became draftsman and surveyor. Having gained a good knowledge 
of the mechanical principles underlying this work, he secured a more profitable 
position with Julius Pitzman, with whom he continued for five years, eventually 



224 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

becoming" general utility man of the business. In early life he became acquainted 
with the printing- trade, having set type for his father when but eight years of 
age, his father at that time being proprietor of a newspaper in La Salle, Illinois, 
the issue being called the La Salle County Volksblatt. Later Mr. Arste again 
took up the printers" trade and when he had mastered the business, traveled in 
various states of the Union, working in that line. He settled in St. Louis in 
1889 and became connected with the Evening Call, owned by Rev. Ben Deering. 
After the failure of that paper he engaged with the St. Louis Republic, with 
which he remained for three years and then spent one year in the office of the 
St. Louis Globe-Democrat. On the expiration of that period he purchased from 
John A. Groeninger the Waterways Journal, which he has since successfully 
published. 

INIr. Arste is a member of Red Cross Lodge, No. 54, K. P., and belongs 
to the Olympic Athletic Club, in which connection he has won several medals, 
being very skillful in athletic sports. He is a pronounced republican, giving to 
the party intlexible support. 

In April, 1893, in St. Louis, Mr. Arste was married to Miss Cordelia Monger, 
and the same year he purchased a pleasant residence at No. 2912 Pine street. 
His advancement in the business world has come through the promotions which 
follow broad experience resulting in constantly expanding powers. Laudable 
ambition has prevented anything like inertia or inactivity in his career. Diligence 
and determination have enabled him to work his way steadily upward and he is 
now well known in journalistic circles. 



THOMAS FURLONG. 



The name which introduces this review is one now largely familiar to the 
residents of all sections of the Union, and it suggests to the honest man a feeling 
of confidence and security, while to the evil-doer it betokens a power which is 
feared as the instrument through which he is most likely to meet with appre- 
hension and thereafter expiate for his malfeasance to the laws which are the 
stable foundation of the peace and prosperity of his fellow beings. There is a 
distinctive element of psychical interest attaching to the thought that a mere 
name can thus produce in two different beings such conflicting sentiments. To 
have traced through the intricate career of a subtle criminal, be he in high 
station or low, cannot fail of having granted a deeper insight into the intrinsic 
essence of character, nor can it fail to inspire a wholesale pity for the wrong- 
doer, whose punishment is essential to the security and protection of the public 
as well as protecting himself from his own misguided tendencies. We are led 
to this train of reflection in considering the life work of Thomas Furlong, presi- 
dent and manager of the Furlong Secret Service Company, with offices in St. 
Louis. 

He was born in Jamestown, Chautauqua county. New York, February 22, 
1844. His father, John Furlong, was a native of Clyde, Scotland, and at an 
early age came to America. His entire life was devoted to the blacksmith's 
trade in the new world, while in his younger days he was a veterinary surgeon 
in the IJritish army. He died in 1868, having about twelve years survived his 
wife, who passed away in 1856. She bore the maiden name of Mary McCormick, 
was of Irish lineage and was reared in Hartford, Connecticut. 

Thomas Furlong was educated in the public schools of his native town and 
afterwarrl removed to Elk county, Pennsylvania, where he had an uncle who 
was in the lumber business. The nephew was employed in the lumber camp 
in the winter of t86o-6i. After the outbreak of the Civil war, on the 20th of 
April, 1 861, Thomas L. Kane carried into the lumber camp the first tidings of 
war and at F>enozet, Pennsylvania, he distributed hand bills asking for recruits 
who could shoot, owned a rifle and knew how to handle it. 




THOMAS Fl'RLOXG 



15 -VOL. ir. 



226 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

[Mr. Furlong responded, enlisting with the famous Forty-first regiment of 
Pennsylvania Bucktails and is today the youngest surviving member of that 
regiment. His companv was soon organized and joined the command which 
started down the state to Harrisburg along the Sinamahoning. Seeing a pile 
of lumber, the question of building rafts for the men to float down the stream 
on was considered and the idea was adopted. Three hundred and sixty-seven 
men started down on ten rafts to the Susquehanna river at Harrisburg. On the 
27th of April, 1908, a monument was unveiled at Driftwood, Pennsylvania, in 
honor of this event. The Bucktails were the first regiment to cross the Mason 
and Dixon line and were probably under fire more than any other regiment. 
On the 14th of September, 1862, Air. Furlong was detailed, after being selected, 
to the first secret service our govenment ever had. He was on lieutenant's pay 
and received his discharge from the United States army as an enlisted man May 
28, 1864, but continued in the secret service until May 28, 1865. Much of this 
time he was in the Confederate lines, was in the siege of Suffolk with the 
Confederates, December 2C, 1861, and was wounded at Drainesville, Virginia. 

\Miile thus engaged, Mr. Furlong developed much of the power which has 
later characterized him in his detective work. He learned how to go among 
people and learn of their purpose, intent and lives without revealing anything 
concerning himself, and his secret service work was therefore of the utmost benefit 
as a training school for his later labors in life. After the war he was made the 
first chief of police at Oil City, Pennsylvania, in 1866. The place at that time 
was one of the roughest of cities, like any mining camp, and Mr. Furlong at 
once entered upon the duties of maintaining law and order. He was three times 
appointed to the position, but declined to serve after the second appointment. 
\Vhile in office he kept perfect order and gained a wide reputation as detective 
and chief. Only one murder was committed during his regime and crime and 
lawlessness were reduced to a minimum. 

In 1870 jMr. Furlong entered the employ of Thomas S. Scott, president of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and organized the first secret service on 
railroads in the United States. His history in this connection is a most inter- 
esting one, known in detail, and the world is conversant with the general results. 
He produced the evidence for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company against the 
Pittsburg & Allegheny Company and obtained judgment for two million dollars. 
His work in connection with the railroad company was of a most important 
character and the company was loathe to lose his services when, on the 3d of 
January, 1880, he resigned and accepted a position offered him by Jay Gould, 
whereby he became a resident of St. Louis. Here he organized the first secret 
service on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. He saw active and stirring times dur- 
ing the riots and labor troubles attending that period, but did much valuable 
work through the secret service agency which he organized. In 1888 he left 
the service and received his charter for the organization of the Furlong's Secret 
Service Company. He does business only for large corporations such as railroads 
and for the past two years has been engaged on a case for the Mexican govern- 
ment, pursuing a band of anarchists for two years and traveling over fifty 
thousand miles. In August, 1907, he succeeded in capturing the entire band and 
turned them over to the Mexican government. He was highly lauded for this 
remarkable piece of detective work. In 1886 he captured the famous Wyan- 
dotte gang, and he secured evidence for the Maxwell case, well known in St. 
Louis, at the suggestion of .Ashley Clover, circuit attorney. During the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition in St. Louis he maintained for the protection of the banks 
his famous bank squad, during which time his men captured nineteen notorious 
sneaks and thieves. 

On the 4th of October, 1864, Mr. Furlong was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Florence Hagerty in Franklin, Chenango county. Pennsylvania. They have three 
children: Mrs. Eva Dawson, who is now secretary of the company; Mrs. Mary 
Johnson, of St. Louis: and Thomas, who is now at Washington University. Mr. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 227 

Furlong- is a representative of Masonry, belonging to Cosmos Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M.; the Royal Arch Chapter; Hiram Council, R. & S. M.; St. Aldemar Com- 
mandery, K. T. ; and St. Louis Consistory of the Scottish Rite. He is likewise 
connected with Moolah Temple of the Mystic Shrine and with Bellefontaine 
Chapter of the Eastern Star. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in Trinity Episcopal church. 

It is scarcely necessary to add that Mr. Furlong is a man endowed with the 
strongest individuality and intrepid bravery when in the face of most desperate 
situations, and a phenomenal coolness and presence of mind under all circum- 
stances. His record is such as clearly demonstrates these facts and his career, 
in it success, shows that he has not only been endowed by nature with a vigorous 
mind and great physical courage, but that these attributes have been accentuated 
by the many thrilling experiences which have been his in treading the dark and 
devious paths where crime uplifts its sullen and desperate front. Master of him- 
self in every particular, he has in his work only to gain the mastery of others, 
and such is his intimate knowledge of human nature and its vagaries, and such 
his results under given circumstances, that he is enabled to make many a des- 
perate man play directly into his owai hands. As a man among men, he holds 
the confidence and esteem of those with whom he comes in contact in either busi- 
ness or social relations. Learning in his life work that crime and wrong-doing 
are often a result rather than an innate tendency, his business has tended to 
broaden sympathy, and among those whom he meets socially he is known as a 
most genial, courteous and entertaining companion. 



WALTER BLISS WOODWARD. 

Walter Bliss Woodward, vice president of the Woodward & Tiernan Print- 
ing Company, entered this house more than twenty-three years ago in a minor 
capacity, but through advancing years has worked his way steadily upward until 
he now occupies a position of administrative control in an establishment that 
manufactures over a million and a half annually. He is one of the native sons 
of St. Louis, his birth having occurred August 27, 1869, his parents being William 
H. and Maria (Knight) Woodward. The public schools afforded him his edu- 
cational privileges and after putting aside his text-books he began learning the 
more difficult lessons in the school of experience as employe of the Woodward & 
Tiernan Printing Company in 1885. He made it his purpose— to which he has 
steadfastly adhered — to master the business in principle and detail, gaining a 
thorough "understanding of every department, and now in a place of administra- 
tive direction he is able to solve problems that may arise in connection with any 
division of the work. His close application and ability won him promotion from 
time to time and on the ist of January, 1905, he was elected to his present posi- 
tion as vice president and general manager of the Woodward & Tiernan Printing 
Companv. Something of the immense volume of business annually conducted 
by the house is indicated by the fact that there are eight hundred and fifty 
names on their payroll and theirs is one of the best equipped plants of its kind 
in the world. The members of the company are men w'ho believe in orderly 
progression and have adopted modern business methods in the development of 
their trade and business connections. 

Pleasantlv situated in his home life, Mr. Woodward was married November 
28, 1894, in St. Louis, to Miss Emma Belle Buchanan, and they now have a son 
and daughter. Knight and Marv Willie. The parents are communicants of the 
Episcopal church and Mr. Woodward belongs to several social and fraternal 
organizations. He has attained high rank in Masonry, belonging to the Misssouri 
Consistorv. S. P. R. S. ; St. Louis Commandery. K. T. and :\Ioolah Temple, A. 
A. O. N.'M. S. He also belongs to the St. Louis, Mercantile. Noonday, Missour 



228 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Athletic. Dardenne Shooting and Kings Lake Hunting and Fishing Clubs, the 
last three being indicative "of the nature of his interests and recreation. His 
political allegia'nce is given to the democracy, but aside from the interest in 
municipal affairs and national welfare, which every public-spirited citizen must 
feel. ^Ir. Woodward takes no active part in politics, as he finds that the demands 
of a constantlv increasing business fully occupy his time and attention. 



SIGMUND LOUIS KRAAIER. 

Sigmund Louis Kramer is the well known proprietor of the Burlington 
Hotel. He has established for himself quite a record in the political world, hav- 
ing been elected to several important public offices. He was born in Germany, 
^larch 28, 1 85 1, but in his native land he was afforded very little schooling, 
though he was a pupil in the public schools until he attained the age of twelve 
years, when he was brought by his parents to America, the family settling in 
^lissouri, and in 1864 they located in St. Louis. Here Sigmund L. Kramer was 
compelled to seek employent and succeeded in getting work in a confectionery 
and bakery establishment. He remained in this position for seventeen years, dur- 
ing which time he completely mastered the trade and familiarized himself with 
every phase of the business. In the meantime, being of saving habits, he laid 
bv a considerable sum of money. Desiring to go into business for himself and 
being ambitious to become independent, he assumed charge as chief chef in the 
Laclede Hotel and served in this capacity until 1885, when he secured quar- 
ters at Nos. 1622-26 Alarket street, where he opened the Burlington Hotel, of 
which he is now proprietor, 

]ylr. Kramer has always been activelv interested in politics as a stanch sup- 
porter of the republican party and served at a municipal post under MaA'or Wal-. 
bridge from 1889 until 1891. Subsequently he became republican representa- 
tive in the house of delegates, and in 1898 was a candidate for justice of the 
peace in the fourth district but was defeated. He is well known for his admin- 
istrative ability, being very popular and still active in local and state politics. 

In 1874 ^^'*- Kramer was united in marriage with a cousin, Marie Kramer, 
and they have two children. Arthur Kramer married with Clara Cahn, of Mil- 
waukee, and to them have been born two daughters, Irma M. and Leona I. 
Arthur is a graduate of Washington L^niversitv of the class of 1897, receiving 
the degree of B. S., and he is a member of the Alumni Association of the col- 
lege. He is a civil engineer and for ten years was government inspector of 
timber. Later he was the engineer of the St. Louis water department, but now 
conducts the hotel for his father. Sophia Kramer wedded Julius E. Weissen- 
born and they have one daughter, Marie. Mr. Kramer is well known both in 
business and political circles throughout St. Louis and vicinitv and his hotel is 
one of the most popular in the city. 



SAMUEL HERMANN. 

.Samuel Hermann, deceased, was numbered among those whose understand- 
ing of legal principles contributed to the fame of the St. Louis bar. He came 
to America as a child. He was a graduate of Trinity College and afterward 
studied law, was admitted to the bar and located for the practice of his profes- 
sion in Memphis, Tennessee, where he resided until 1876. In that year he left 
the city on account of the yellow fever and removed to St. Louis, where he 
opened his law office and began practice. He was associated at different times. 
with several attorneys and later formed a partnership with Judge Valle Reyburn. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 229 

devoting his attention mostly to civil law. He was well versed in the various 
departments of the profession, his knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence 
being evidenced in the careful and masterly manner in which he handled the 
litigated interests intrusted to him. He was forceful in argument, strong in his 
reasoning and logical in his deductions and had for many years a large clientele 
and was connected with a number of notable cases. That his practice was exten- 
sive is indicated by the frequency with which his name appears upon the court 
records. Many of the leading residents of St. Louis were his clients and his 
legal ability gained him the success which made him one of the leading members 
of the St. Louis bar. 

Mr. Hermann was married in St. Louis to Miss Caroline Thorp, a native 
of Connecticut, and they became the parents of four children, two sons and two 
daughters. Of these one son is now deceased, w^hile the surviving son is J. L. 
Hermann, well known in St. Louis. The daughters are Mrs. Payson E. Tucker, 
of Boston, Massachusetts; and one at home. 

Mr. Hermann was preeminently a home man, devoted to the interests and 
welfare of his wife and children. He found his greatest happiness with his 
family at his own fireside, where he enjoyed dispensing its hospitality to his 
many friends. He was always very charitable, was generous in his assistance to 
the poor and needy and was, moreover, a public-spirited man, who took an 
active and helpful interest in affairs pertaining to the welfare of St. Louis. His 
cooperation could always be counted upon to further progressive, civic move- 
ments or to assist an individual who was in need. He found rest, recreation and 
pleasure in music, in which he took deep interest. He belonged to several socie- 
ties and to Trinity church, of which he was a vestryman. He was likewise a 
member of the Bar Association, of Alissouri. He continued his residence in 
St. Louis up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1888 and which was 
the occasion of deep and widespread regret to his many friends. In the years 
of his residence here he had endeared himself to the majority of those with whom 
he had come in contact, while those who knew him in professional relations 
entertained for him respect and good will for what he accomplished in the field 
of his chosen life work. 



GEORGE ^lORRISON WRIGHT. 

Forming at the outset of his business career certain rules of action and 
business principles, from which he has never deviated, George Morrison Wright 
has made steady advancement, and stands today at the head of the Barr Dry 
Goods Company, the largest commercial enterprise of this character in St. 
Louis. He was born in New York city, February 12, 1844. His father, John 
Wright, was a native of Scotland and in his youthful days crossed the Atlantic 
to New York, where he engaged in business until his death. He was successful, 
owing to his industry and early frugality, his capable management and the 
careful utilization of every opportunity that presented. He married Margaret 
Finnic, also a native of Scotland, who died in 1858. Their family numbered 
five sons and three daughters, of whom four yet survive. 

George Morrison Wright, the fifth in order of birth, spent his boyhood days 
to the age of eighteen years in New York, and acquired his education in the 
public and private schools there. He came to St. Louis in i860 and entered 
the employ of the Ubsdell, Pearson & Company Dry Goods House as assistant 
cashier. His capability won him promotion to the position of cashier and book- 
keeper, and through gradual changes in the firm he made advance, becoming a 
partner in the early '80s, w4ien the firm became the William Barr Dry Goods 
Company, while in 1900 he was elected president. This is the largest retail 
dry-goods house in St. Louis, and is conducted in keeping with the most pro- 



230 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

gressive ideas of modern merchandising. Mr. Wright is also president of the 
Wright Building Company, owning a modern office building at Eighth and Pine 
streets, and is a director of the State National Bank. 

In Philadelphia, in 1874, occurred the marriage of George M. Wright and 
Miss Sarah Sterett, of Philadelphia. They have five children, of whom four 
are living : Jessie and ^largaret, at home ; Mrs. James L. Ford, Jr. ; and Mrs, 
Sturgis Dav. both of St. Louis. The family residence, erected by Mr. Wright in 
1895, is at No. 4457 Westminster Place. 

]\Ir. Wright is well known in the leading clubs of the city, holding mem- 
bership in the Noonday, Mercantile, St. Louis, Country, Log Cabin, Commercial^ 
Racquet and Ctiivre Clubs. He also belongs to the Legion of Honor and Royal 
Arcanum, and is a communicant of the Episcopal church. He votes with the 
republican party and finds his principal recreation in golfing, hunting and fishing 
and is a liberal patron of music and the arts. While well known as a most 
successful merchant his social relations place him among that class who consider 
intelligence an essential feature to attractiveness, for nature and culture have 
vied in making him an interesting and entertaining gentleman. 



NELSON COLE. 



Nelson Cole was a business man who enjoyed the highest respect of all with 
whom he was brought in contact, while his military record was most creditable 
and honorable. The many sterling traits of his character so endeared him to his 
fellow citizens that his death brought a sense of personal bereavement to the 
great majority of those with whom he has been associated. One of the native 
sons of the Empire state, he was born at Rhinebeck, Dutchess county. New York, 
November 18, 1833, his parents being Jacob and Hannah (Kip) Cole. The father 
was a native of Holland and after his emigration to the new w'orld resided irt 
New York but died when his son Nelson was only five years of age. 

The boy was sent as a pupil to the public schools of his native town and soon 
after putting aside his text-books he heard and heeded the call of the city, going 
to the eastern metropolis, where for a time he was employed in a planing mill 
and lumberyard. It was during the period of his residence there that General 
Narciso Lopez organized his expedition for the invasion of Cuba and attracted 
attention anew to that unfortunate island by his ill-starred venture and tragic 
death. Six months after General Lopez landed at Cardinas Nelson Cole was sent 
to superintend the building of a sugar refinery in Cuba and thus gained his first 
intimate knowledge of the island, at the same time acquiring good business ex- 
perience through the execution of the work entrusted to his care. 

The year 1854 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Cole in St. Louis and soon after- 
ward he secured a situation with the lumber and planing mill of Ward & Trost. 
He was afterward in the employ of other manufacturing firms of the city until 
the Civil war was inaugurated, when his patriotic spirit was aroused by the 
attempt of the south to overthrow the Union, and he put aside all personal 
considerations that he might aid in its defense. He had studied with interest the 
progress of events in the south and when the first blow was struck began recruit- 
ing a company of infantry volunteers, of which he became captain. The com- 
mand enlisted for three months as Companv A of the Fifth Missouri Infantry 
and from the 22d of y\pril until the TOth of May. 1861, Captain Cole was on duty 
at the United States arsenal in .St. Louis, where the capture of Camp Jackson was 
made on the latter date. Five flays afterward he commanded an expedition to- 
southeastern Missouri and was transferred with his company to the First Mis- 
souri Volunteer Infantry, which was enlisted for three years and in which he 
was commissioned captain of Company E, June to, 1861. Later this was made 
a light artillery regiment known as the First Missouri Light Artillery and on the 




NELSON COLE 



232 ST. LOL'IS, THE FOURTH CrrY. 

20th of Mav. 1862, ^Ir. Cole was commissioned major but declined to accept. 
He was in active service from his earliest connection with the army occupying 
Tetterson Citv with General Lyon's command June 15, 1861, and participating in 
the engagement at Boonville on the 17th of June. From that point the Union 
troops "marched to Springfield. ^Missouri, where they arrived on the 3d of July 
and on the 25th of that month Captain Cole participated in the battle of DruQ 
Springs. He also took part in the skirmish at McCuIlougli's store July 26, and 
in the'battle of ^^'ilson*s Creek on the loth of August sustained a gun-shot wound 
in the face. From that point the regiment returned to St. Louis, where it was 
reorganized as a regiment of light artillery and from that point Captain Cole 
removed with his battery to Jellerson City in the latter part of September. His 
command together with other batteries proceeded successively to Syracuse, 
Springfield, Sedalia, Otterville and Lexington, remaining on duty at the last 
named place until June, 1862. Captain Cole was afterward on duty at Sedaha, 
Spring-field. Xewtonia and other points in Missouri and Arkansas until his battery 
was attached to the First Division of the Army of the Frontier. He was then 
assigned to dutv as chief of artillery and ordnance on the staff of General John 
AT Schofield and acted in that capacity on the frontier until April, 1863, when 
with his command he went with other troops to the relief of General Blount. He 
was afterward at Van Buren, Arkansas, Fayetteville, Pea Ridge, Huntsville and 
Springfield and was assigned to duty as chief of artillery in the Department of 
Missouri. On the 6th of June, 1863, he proceeded to Vicksburg. Mississippi, 
where his command was attached to the First Brigade, Huron's Division, Thir- 
teenth Armv Corps of the Army of the Tennessee and took part in the siege of 
Vicksburg. Following the capitulation of that city he again became chief of 
artillerv to General Schofield and was afterward made chief on the staff of Gen- 
eral Pieasanton, commanding the cavalry of the Department of ^Missouri. He 
commanded the force sent in pursuit of General Joseph Shelby in 1863 and aided 
in repelling Price's advances in the following year. Major Cole was commis- 
sioned Colonel of the Second Regiment of the Missouri Artillery February 24, 
1864, and after considerable service in the southwest was on duty at St. Louis as 
chief of artillery until June, 1865, when he assumed command of the right col- 
umn in the Powder River Indian Expedition, continuing thus on active duty until 
honorablv discharged November 13. 1865. He made a splendid record as an 
efficient and gallant officer, winning high commendation from Generals Scho- 
field. Rosecrans and Dodge, on whose staffs he had served. His military duty 
was often of a most hazardous nature but he inspired and encouraged others by 
his own valor and loyalty. 

When the country no longer needed his military aid Colonel Cole returned 
to St. Louis and entered into partnership with Mr. Glass under the firm style of 
Cole & Glass in the conduct of a planing mill and lumberyard at Sixteenth and 
Market streets. In this line ^fr. Cole continued until his death in 1899, having 
survived his partner. Mr. Glass, for about three years. The business constantly 
grew in volume and importance ainl the firm ever sustained an unassailable repu- 
tation in the business circles of the city. Mr. Cole placed his dependence upon 
the substantial qualities of straightforward dealing, unfaltering energy and 
watchfulness over all the details of the business so that there was no needless 
expenditure of time, money or labor. His enterprise was undaunted by the 
minor obstacles which continually arise in any business undertaking and diffi- 
culties of a more serious nature seemed but to serve as an impetus for renewed 
efifort on his part. As the }ears passed therefore he gained gratifying success, 
justly attributerl to his own labor. 

General Cole was married June 18, 1856. to Mrs. Anna Scott, of St. Louis, 
who in her maidenhood was Miss Anna Macbeth, of Ohio. Her father, Francis 
D. Macbeth, was a native of Ireland and after coming to the new world settled 
in Ohio, where Mrs. Cole was hnrn and where his death occurred during the 
early girlhood of his dau.ghtcr. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Philinda 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 233 

Heath, was born in Buffalo, New York, and was a daughter of one of the patri- 
otic soldiers of the Revolutionary war. Following the death of her husband she 
came to St. Louis with her children. Her son James H. Macbeth engaged in 
business here until his death about nine years ago. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cole 
w^ere born six children of whom three are living: Fred D. ; Missouri W., the 
wife of A. Miller, of St. Louis ; and Blanche, the wife of Charles H. Hoke, of 
St. Louis. There were also three sons : Lieutenant George W. Cole, of the 
United States Army ; Arthur F. Cole ; and Herbert M. Cole. 

On the 28th of May, 1898, ]\Ir. Cole was again called into military service, 
being at that time appointed brigadier general of volunteers by President ^IcKin- 
ley for service in the Spanish-American war. He went to the camp at Middle- 
town, Pennsylvania, and afterv/ard to South Carolina but was not called into 
active service. He was a charter member of the Loyal Legion and had a very 
wide acquaintance in military circles, being prominent in this department of life. 
He was held in the highest esteem wherever he was known and won many 
friends, for his entire life commanded the respect and confidence of his fellow- 
men and he had those traits of character which win personal popularity and gain 
the highest regard. Mrs. Cole has made her home here for many years and is 
most hishlv esteemed. 



WILLIAM SCHILLER. 

William Schiller, senior partner of the firm of W. Schiller & Company, 
wholesale and retail dealers in photo supplies, has placed his dependence upon 
the substantial qualities of energy, careful management and commercial integrity, 
and thus has developed a large and profitable business. The German-American 
element has been a most important one in the citizenship of St. Louis and from 
the fatherland William Schiller also comes, his birth having occurred at Frank- 
fort-on-the-Main, November 21, 1867. He is a son of William and Louise 
Schiller, and the family is an old one of Nuremberg, in the kingdom of Wur- 
temberg. From the same ancestry came Schiller, the poet. The records trace 
the familv history back to the beginning of the fourteenth century. William 
Schiller, Sr., was engaged in the photo supply business in Germany. 

In his native city William Schiller of this review pursued his education and 
in his eighteenth year came to America, landing at New York city in 1885. 
After spending eight months at Syracuse, New York, he came westward to St. 
Louis and has since made his home here. Immediately after his arrival he 
sought and obtained employment with the M. A. Seed Dry Plate Company, with 
whom he continued for almost two years. He then opened a photographic studio 
on South Fourth street, where he continued for two years, and afterward car- 
ried on the photo supply business at the same address for about eight years. 
The increase of his business made it necessary that he seek more commodious 
quarters and since 1898 he has been located at his present address, at No. 6 
South Broadway. Connected with the business from boyhood, he is familiar 
with the trade, thoroughly understands the processes of manufacture, knows 
the best goods on the market and has enjoyed an extensive business as a whole- 
sale and retail dealer in photo supplies. 

On the ist of Januarv, 1887, in St. Louis, 'Sir. Schiller was married to Miss 
Pauline Schnelzenbach, a daughter of Thaddeus Schnelzenbach, who was a wine 
grower, of Jennings, Missouri. Of this marriage there are three daughters and 
one son : Johanna, a music teacher, who is now a member of the faculty of 
the Weltner Conservatory ; Louise, who is attending Yateman high school and 
is now president of the Yateman College Club; Rudolph, also a pupil in the 
Yateman high school ; and Ella, who is a student in the grammar school. The 
family residence is at No. 1701 Cora avenue. 



234 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

^Ir. Schiller is a member of the Dixon Hunting and Fishing Club — an asso- 
ciation whicli indicates the nature of his recreation and sport. He is also a 
member of the Baden Saengerbund and has the characteristic German love of 
music. Since becoming a naturalized American citizen he has endorsed and 
supported the principles of the republican party, is a member of the Twenty- 
seventh Ward Republican Club, and in 1908 served on its finance committee. 
AMiile he does not seek nor desire office for himself he stanchly believes in the 
party principles and does all in his power to further its growth and secure its 
success. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to seek a home 
in America, for he has found here the opportunities which he desired and which 
have led him to the plane of affluence. 



RICHARD ^^'ALDRON SHAPLEIGH. 

Richard AA'aldron Shapleigh, never faltering in any task to which he had 
set himself, has therefore achieved creditable success in the business world and 
is today first vice president of the Norvell-Shapleigh Hardware Company. His 
life record is a creditable one to the city of his nativity. He was born in St. 
Louis, September 28, 1859, and is descended from New England ancestry. His 
father, Augustus Frederick Shapleigh, was a native of New Hampshire and in 
1843 came to the middle west, settling in St. Louis, where he founded the hard- 
ware business of which his son is now first vice president and of which he 
remained the head until 1901. On that date the business was reorganized, the 
name being changed from the A. F. Shapleigh Hardware Company to its pres- 
ent style of the Norvell-Shapleigh Hardware Company, the father retiring at 
that time from active connection with the business. He died in February, 1902, 
at the venerable age of ninety-two years. In Philadelphia he had married Eliz- 
abeth Anne Umstead, a native of Pennsylvania, who died in 1894 at the age of 
seventy-seven years. Of their family of eight children five still survive, namely r 
Mrs. J. W. Boyd, A. F. Shapleigh, jr.. Dr. J. B. Shapleigh and A. L. Shapleigh,, 
all of St. Louis. 

The other member of the family, Richard Waldron Shapleigh (a name which 
has descended through many generations in the Shapleigh family) was born in 
the family home near the corner of Sixth and St. Charles streets. His educa- 
tion was acquired in Professor Wyman's school and in the Washington Univer- 
sity, being graduated from the latter in the class of 1876. Following his grad- 
uation he entered his father's hardware store but no parental influence was 
exerted to make his business training an easy one ; on the contrary he had to- 
master the business with the same thoroughness of other employes and it was 
his diligence, enterprise and intelligently directed efforts that gained him promo- 
tion from time to time until he became the first vice president. When he 
became connected with the business the company occupied two small store rooms 
at Nos. 414-416 North Main street and conducted an exclusive wholesale hard- 
ware trade. The house, however, has kept abreast with the rapid growth and 
development of the city until it is today one of the largest hardware jobbing con- 
cerns in the United States, its trade connections covering a wide territory, while 
its annual sales reach a large figure. 

Richard W. Shapleigh has cooperated in various important public measures 
and his labors have been a resultant factor in securing the end desired. For 
two years he was president of the Western Commercial Travelers Association, 
then a very influential body and for four years was one of its directors. He 
has been interested in the affairs of the city generally and is a member of the 
Municipal Bridge & Terminal Commission, having been appointed by Mayor 
Wells in accordance with the ruling of the general assembly in 1905. He is 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 235 

interested in various commercial and financial enterprises and has invested to 
a considerable extent in real estate in this city. 

On the 22d of September, 1886, Mr. Shapleigh was married at Xewton,^ 
Alassachusetts, to Helen Shapleigh, a third cousin, of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. They have one child, Dorothy, born August 5, 1887, who attended the 
Mary Institute of St. Louis and is a graduate of Miss Low's school at Stamford, 
Connecticut. The family residence at No. 4471 Pine street was erected by Mr. 
Shapleigh in 1888. 

In his early manhood Mr. Shapleigh was not unknown in military circles. 
He enlisted in the militia during the memorable railroad strike of 1877 ^^^^ ^^^^ 
a member of Battery A of the National Guard of Missouri for about ten years, 
acting as first sergeant when he resigned. In politics he is independent, the 
nature of his interests and the principles that govern his conduct are indicated 
in large measure by the fact that he is a member of the Episcopal church and 
also belongs to the Business Alen's League, the St. Louis Country, the Noonday,, 
the St. Louis, the Racquet and the Normandie Golf Clubs, his principal recrea- 
tion being golf. Wliile he is closely associated with many interests bearing upon 
the social and municipal life of the city he is preeminently a business man and 
diligent worker who is always found at his desk during business hours, setting 
an example for those in his employ while the success of the establishment with 
which he has been connected throughout the years of his manhood is undoubtedly 
due in large measure to his rigid adherence to the motto "Good Service."' 



T. WILL BOYD. 



J. Will Boyd, who was well known in St. Louis in connection with the 
brokerage business, was born in Martinsburg, W^est Virginia, May 31, 1844. He 
pursued his education in the schools of that state and in St. Joseph, Missouri,, 
and his mental discipline well qualified him for quick and correct decisions such 
as are necessary in the conduct of the business to which he later gave his atten- 
tion. When twenty years of age he came to St. Louis and entered the employ 
of the firm of Ware & Hickman, with whom he received his initial training in 
that line of business activity to which he afterward gave his attention for many 
years. He withdrew from that connection, however, to become junior partner 
of the firm of J. H, Ware & Company. He became a member of the ]\Ier. 
chants Exchange and acted in the capacity of its vice president for a year. He 
afterward conducted a grain brokerage business until his life's labors were 
ended and secured an extensive and important clientage in that connection, being- 
recognized as one of the most energetic and promising business men of the city. 

In 1869 Mr. Boyd was united in marriage in St. Louis to Miss Lizzie Shap- 
leigh, a daughter of A. F. Shapleigh, who for many years was a distinguished, 
prominent and honored business man of St. Louis and of whom extended men- 
tion is made elsewhere in this work. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Boyd were born three 
children : A. Shapleigh, now a member of Myers & Boyd Commission Com- 
pany ; J. Will, a broker of this city : and Elizabeth, the wife of John Burton 
Kennard, of St. Louis. Their son, A. Shapleigh, married Miss Mary Newby,. 
a daughter of J. B. Newby, a distinguished physician of this city. 

There was nothing narrow nor contracted in the nature of Mr. Boyd. While- 
he had laudable ambition to attain success he possessed also a deep and abiding 
interest in his adopted citv and his aid could always be counted upon to further 
its progress and promote its development along substantial lines. He aided in 
manv projects for the public good and was one of the organizers of the Veiled 
Prophet Association, which promoted interests that proved most attractive to- 
thousands of vistors each fall and constituted a source of revenue to the city 
as well as a means of exploiting its interests, advantages and resources. His- 



-23-6 ST. LUL'IS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

progressive citizenship, his activity and reliabiUty in business, combined with 
attractive social quahties made the death of Mr. Boyd the occasion of deep and 
widespread sorrow to his many friends as well as his immediate family when on 
the 2d of Xovember, 1887, he passed away. He was a deacon of the Central 
Presbyterian church for manv years, and was also a member of the Legion of 
Honor and the Royal Arcanum. Mrs. Boyd still makes her home in St. Louis, 
where she is widelv known. 



ALAN SON D. BROWN. 

In an extended search it would be difficult to find one who better than 
Alanson D. Brown gives substantial proof of the wisdom of Lincoln when he 
said, "There is something better than making a living — making a Hfe." With 
a realization of this truth, he has labored persistently, energetically and indefati- 
gably, not only to win success, although he is today at the head of the most 
extensive shoe house in the world, but to make his life a source of benefit to his 
fellowman and he has done this in his efforts to assist others in making the 
most of life. He has been aptly termed a man of purpose and the story of his 
career is the story of honest industry and thrift. He stands prominently today 
among the world's captains of industry, having given St. Louis first rank in 
the production of shoes, and yet the pleasure of success nor the substantial 
rewards of industry could not cause him to swerve in the slightest degree from 
the high principles which in early life he set up as the governing rules of his 
career. 

His birth occurred on a farm in Granville township, Washington county, 
New York, ]\Iarch 21, 1847. He comes of a family that has furnished many 
distinguished names to the pages of American history, being connected with the 
Brown family of Rhode Island — men who concentrated their talents and gave 
much of their wealth to promote the public good. They were liberal in support 
of churches and colleges and one of the number founded Brown University, 
the first Baptist university of the world. The line of descent is traced back 
to Chad Brown, who in 1638 arrived from England. He was the associate and 
friend of Roger AA'illiams and was connected with him in founding the first 
Baptist church in America and succeeded Roger Williams as its pastor. Chad 
Brown was the father of Daniel Brown and the grandfather of Jonathan Brown. 
The last named was the great-grandfather of Alanson David Brown, of this 
review, and some time between 1770 and 1780 removed from Rhode Island to 
Charlotte countv. New York, settling on the land and establishing the homestead 
where A. D. Brown was born. In 1784 Jonathan Brown was among the organ- 
izers of the Baptist church at Truthville. The teachings of that denomination 
have represented the faith of the family from the time when Chad Brown came 
to America. Jonathan Brown n'as a deacon and trustee in his chiuxh and often 
in the absence of the pastor conducted the meetings. On the occasion of his 
death in 1826 there was recorded : "The pastor has lost one of his most trusted 
helpers. Jonathan Brown, a man of rare gifts and ability and a man of Intelli- 
gence and piety, true to the best interests of the cause of Christ." His son. 
David Brown, grandfather of Alanson D. Brown, was born in 1793 and served 
as a lieutenant in the war of 1812. He. too. was a man of sterling character, 
but died in 1828 at the comparatively earlv age of thirty-five years. He had 
married Cornelia Warren, a daughter of Charles Warren and a descendant of 
Joseph Warren, wdio fell at the battle of Bunker Hill. 

David Brown, son of David and Cornelia (Warren) Brown, was born at 
the old family homestead in Charlotte, now Washington county. New York, 
February 4. 1820. He was left an or])han when but six years of age and early 
took up the burr'ens and responsil)ilities of life. He married Malinda O. Roblet. 




ALANSON D. BROWN 



'23S ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

descended from French Huguenot ancestors, who brought with them to this 
country their Puritan virtues and the French love of beauty. David Brown 
took his bride to the old homestead and there their six children, three sons and 
three daughters, were born, Alanson being the eldest. In his farming opera- 
tions he prospered and spent the evening of his life on a farm in the suburbs 
of Granville, remaining to the end of his days a leading and respected citizen 
of the community. Though he was of the democratic faith he was frequently 
elected to office in a republican community — such was the confidence reposed in 
his ability. He became one of the founders of the first Baptist church of Gran- 
ville and' remained a generous contributor thereto and an active worker in its 
interests throughout the remainder of his days. Both he and his wife were 
earnest Christian people who strove to impress upon the minds of their children 
religious principles that should serve to guide them through all life's relations, 
and j\Ir. Brown of this review has often expressed his indebtedness to his 
parents for their rigorous training, setting for him daily tasks and requiring 
their performance. Thus was firmly laid the foundation for his habits of indus- 
try. At the same time lessons of truth and virtue were instilled into his mind 
that opened into noble character. 

From early boyhood Mr. Brown seems to have displayed a keen business 
instinct. Fie earned his first five dollars by picking up the small potatoes on his 
fathers farm that had been left by the diggers. He took for this his father's 
note, which he traded for a calf and by furthur trades he soon found that the 
five dollar note had brought him one hundred and twenty-five dollars. This with 
other money he had saved was invested in fine sheep and he started with his 
flock for Columbus, Mississippi, where he turned his sheep into the pasture of 
a relative, but they soon broke out and wandered ofif. Thus the fortune which 
he had been years in gathering disappeared in the canebrakes of Mississippi and 
he had nothing left of it but the lessons of industry and thrift he had learned 
in its accumulation and his realization of the need of concentration and watch- 
fulness in every undertaking. Perhaps no career illustrates more clearly than 
does that of 'Sir. Brown that the boy is father to the man, for the habits which 
he formed in early life have controlled his later years. One of these had its 
origin in his joining a temperance organization and he has since solemnly held 
to his vow. His early mental training was received in the district schools, 
which he attended until seventeen years of age and at the same time he enjoyed, 
as every healthy boy should, the games in which the youths of the period 
indulged. His father desired that he should remain upon the farm, but the 
mother believed that the boy should be left to make his own choice of a life 
work and after thoughtful consideration he determined to attend the commer- 
cial school at Rutland, Vermont, in preparation for a mercantile career. There 
he graduated with the first honors of a class of one hundred and twenty-five. 
Soon afterward he secured a clerkship in a drug and grocery store at Middle 
Granville, where he remained until his uncle, Charles W. Brown, of Columbus, 
]^lississippi. paid a visit to the family, and, observing his nephew's diligent and 
methodical attention to business, prevailed on him to go south to become his 
assistant in a store, so that at the age of nineteen Alanson D. Brown severed 
his business associations in Granville and started out in the world. 

Although reared in a Christian home, it was not until after his removal to 
Columbus that Mr. Brown united with the Baptist church, of which he has since 
remained a devoted member. In 1871 he was selected as a delegate to the 
Southern Baptist Convention wliich met in the Third Baptist church of St. 
Louis. His attendance at this convention proved an epoch in his life, for he 
was so impressed with the city, its people and geograi:)hical location as a distrib- 
uting center, that he determined to locate here. In the meantime he had become 
part owner of a store in Mississippi, but disposed of his interests there and in 
January, ]^/2, when twenty-four years of age, arrived in St. Louis with a capital 
of thirteen thousand dollars. It was his intention to engage in the wholesale 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 239 

grocery business, but, not finding a favorable opening in that line, he joined 
James \V. Hamilton in a partnership in the shoe trade, investing thirteen thou- 
sand dollars in the business, while Mr. Hamilton put in ten thousand dollars. 
Their store was twenty-five by forty feet and they occupied two floors and a 
basement. employing four salesmen the first year. Success attended the 
venture froni the beginning and their sales for the first year amounted 
to two hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars. The policy inaugurated 
by the new firm was difi:'erent from that of other shoe houses of St. 
Louis, who were accustomed to do a credit business, allowing purchasers 
about four months' time. The firm of Hamilton & Brown began business on a 
cash basis. Friends predicted failure, but there is no such word as fail in the 
vocabularv of Alanson D. Brown and though all days in his career have not 
been equally bright, he has so utilized his opportunities that the business has 
o-one steadily forward until the record constitutes a most important chapter in 
the commercial history of St. Louis. They early adopted the motto, "Good 
shoes, prompt shipments, cash payments," and they never swerved in loyalty to 
this banner. Realizing always that satisfied customers are the best advertise- 
ment, thev came later to put their ideas concerning good goods into a motto, 
''Keep the quality up," which has become the recognized watchword of the 
house. This motto is in a conspicuous place in every room of their extensive 
factories today and it has been the guiding principle upon which the business 
has been conducted. There have been times, such as the panic of 1873, when 
the mettle and merit of Air. Brown have been tested, but such times have served 
to show that the business was founded upon a substantial basis and conducted 
upon reliable lines. It was about this time that eastern manufacturers began to 
realize the fact that Mr. Brown must be reckoned with in utilizing St. Louis 
as an outlet for their products. As the years passed by the business constantly 
increased, demanding larger quarters and from their original location the firm 
removed to No. 411 North Main street, where they had three floors and a 
basement, twenty-five by one hundred and twenty -five feet. In 1876 still more 
commodious quarters were sought in the four-story building at the corner of 
Main and Washington. As the years went on not only the actual sales increased, 
"but the policy of the house, under the guidance of ^Ir. Brown, developed and 
■expanded. He began to associate with him in the ownership of the business 
some of his more successful employes and this policy has been continued until 
there are now over two hundred and fifty employes of the company who are 
stockholders therein and the stock today sells at four hundred dollars when the 
par value is one hundred dollars. One secret of the wonderful success of this 
institution is undoubtedly due to the fact that Mr. Brown has ever been willing, 
anxious and ready to assist those in his employ for their own good as well as 
for the interests of the house. Early in his career it is said that one day at the 
noon hour he discovered a porter intoxicated and asleep. He dismissed him 
immediately. As the years went by, with increased experience and a broader 
view of life, he mapped out a new course and now is never known to discharge 
an employe until he has exhausted every means within his power to eliminate 
the weakness and help the unfortunate one with counsel and encouragement to 
fill the place. He is quick to encourage those in his employ and as quick to 
reward faithful and meritorious service. It has always been his policy to sell 
the stock of the company only to old and trusted employes and when one wishes 
to retire from the business ]\Ir. Brown uses every endeavor to secure the sale 
of the stock to some other employe who will benefit thereby. He thus recognizes 
•capacity and ambition and rewards merit. He has displayed notably keen 
sagacity in judging of the character of an individual and his capacity and he 
never demands of his representatives anything that he is not willing to do him- 
self. He is careful, painstaking and thorough in his examination and investiga- 
tion before giving a man employment, but when one is on the list of his employes 
he will make sacrifices to retain him and will not discharge an employe if 



240 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

there is anv wav to avoid it. His business life is filled with incidents where 
men have gene v.rong and been straightened out time and again, until finally 
thev made "splendid men. He never hesitates to extend a helping hand and 
few men who have such complete self-control exercise so much charity for 
weakness in others as does Mr. Brown. He counts a good habit an asset ; a bad 
habit a Hability; and he thus endeavors to inculcate in his representatives a desire 
to form only good habits. 

Another feature in the success of Air. Brown has been due to the fact that 
he has recognized that a personal interest will stimulate effort and activity on 
the part of others and he has therefore always endeavored to make each man 
feel that he was in part responsible for the business. It is this that has caused 
him, when men have shown an interest in the business and capacity for its 
work, to urge them to buy stock in the company and to loan them money with 
which to make the purchases. To meet the demands of the rapidly growing 
business and to open the door of opportunity to those who were helping to build 
up the enterprise, the capital stock has been increased from time to time until 
twenty-three thousand dollars at the beginning is today three million five hun- 
dred thousand dollars. After the business was conducted for several years 
for the sale of shoes the firm took up the manufacturing branch of the business 
and today the six large factories of the Hamilton Brown Shoe Company employ 
five thousand five hundred people and have a capacity of over thirty-eight thou- 
sand pairs of shoes daily. For every working day in the year it pays out in 
wages, salary and dividends over twelve thousand dollars. We have in America 
many records of rapidly increasing wealth, but in most cases it has been the 
result of a discoverv in science, the invention of a device for utility, protected by 
patent, creating a monopoly, or by securing control of some of nature's vast 
stores of mineral, oil, coal or some other substance that contributes to the com- 
fort of man and which his necessities demand. But we have few instances in 
this era of marvelous things that surpass the achievement of Mr. Brown's thirty- 
six years of labor, in a field that is famous for the brilliancy and thoroughness 
of its workers and in which competition is, perhaps, sharper than in any other 
of our great industries. Mr. Brown attributes his success to concentration and 
cooperation and to the fact that the house has ever adhered to the motto, "Keep 
the quality up." Today the capital of the Hamilton Brown Shoe Company is 
three million five hundred thousand dollars, fully paid, and their annual ship- 
ments are twelve million dollars. The company has a directory of thirteen 
members elected by the stockholders and an advisory committee of thirteen. 
Until recently they have had for their mark fifteen million dollars, but in 
October, 1908, Mr. Brown made a quiet trip to Boston, no one outside the direc- 
tors knowing his mission, but on the morning of Thin^sday, November 19, 1908, 
the daily papers came out with the announcement that Hamilton Brown Shoe 
Company had purchased the old established firm of Batchelder & Lincoln, of 
Boston. Since that time Mr. Brown has spent most of his time in Boston reor- 
ganizing this business and putting it on a genuine Hamilton Brown basis. The 
company immediately set a new mark of twenty million dollars for their annual 
shipments. They now cover every state in the Union and are going to give an 
opportunity to the wearer of shoes in each town from Maine to California tO' 
purchase Hamilton Brown shoes. That the business is still on the increase is 
indicated in the fact that a new factorx- has been erected at Columbia, Missouri, 
while an addition has been made that has doubled the capacity of the Sunlight 
factory at Ninth and Marion streets, St. Louis. He also built an addition to the 
Union factory in St. Louis. The plant is well styled the Sunlight factory, for 
every care has been taken to make it light and airy, so that no employe has to 
work by artificial light. .Aside from his extensive business as a shoe maiiufac- 
turer and dealer Mr. Brown is a director of the Commonwealth Trust Company, 
president of the Pitchfork Land & Cattle Company of Dickens county and King 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CiTY. 241 

county, Texas He is a member of the Prosperity Association and is thus 
contributing to the material development and upbuilding of the city. 

It was in 1877 that Mr. Brown was married to Miss Ella Bills, of Boston, 
and unto them have been born six children : Estelle, Jane, Alanson, Helene, 
Vesta and Ruth. Of these, Helene, the wife of John E. Ritchey, died April 25, 
1908. The family occupy a palatial residence at No. 4616 Lindell boulevard, 
which was erected by j\Ir. Brown in 1894. He has no active interests outside 
of his church, his charities, his family and his business. He has never been a 
club nor society man, but has made the rule of his life, "God first, family second 
and shoes third." This is the keynote of his character and of his work. For 
more than forty years he has been a devoted member of the Baptist church and 
nothing but illness can keep him away from the church services. As his finan- 
cial resources have increased his contributions to the church have steadily grown 
in volume and at the same time he has remained an active personal worker, 
serving at different times as deacon, trustee and assistant superintendent of the 
Sunday school of the Third Baptist church of St. Louis. He has been a liberal 
contributor to mission work and is one of the twelve who organized what is 
known as the City Mission, the purpose of which is to help unfortunate men and 
women. He is one of the founders of the Alissouri Baptist Sanitarium, has lib- 
erally aided the Missouri Baptist Orphans" Home, William Jewell College and 
other institutions. He is now a trustee of that college and of Stephens College, 
is president of the Missouri Baptist Sanitarium and is a member of the Orphans' 
Home and City Mission boards. In his entire life there has been no sensational 
chapter. He acts quickly and results show that the points were well weighed and 
delays would have been at a sacrifice or loss of opportunity. Matters large and 
small receive his careful attention and when he acts it is the result of well 
grounded decision. His purity of purpose is unimpeached. By reason of his 
decided spirit and clean-cut method of doing things Mr. Brown has a strong 
influence on the circle and time in which he lives — an influence that will widen 
with increasing force. In a history of Mr. Brown, written by Dr. J. T. M. John- 
ston, the author says : "Mr. Brown has used his genius and wealth in a way 
that tends to advance the best interests of his city and state. Although he has 
given thousands to religion, philanthropy and education, his greatest benefaction 
has been the giving of employment to his fellowmen. The enormous force of 
his example is such that it has ingrafted itself into the life of all his employes 
and attaches, from the humblest porter to the highest in the councils of his cabi- 
net. His influence is not confined to the circle of his associates in business and 
employes, but his ideas and methods have forced themselves on all the shoe 
centers of the United States and largely revolutionized this industry throughout 
America." 



JAMES N. LORING. 

James X. Loring figured for manv years as one of the distinguished members 
of the St. Louis bar and in other lines as well his record is inseparabl\ inter- 
woven with the history of the city. He was a factor in its educational, political 
and moral development and in every relation of life measured up to the true 
standard of honorable nianhood. He was born in St. Louis county, January 15, 
1840, and passed away Januarv 2^, 1907. The intervening period, covering 
fifty-seven years, was for him a period of intense activity accompanied by sub- 
stantial results in the various, fields into which he directed his efforts. His 
parents were Charles E. and ]\Iarv ( Young) Loring. The father came from 
Kentucky in 1840 and settled in St. Louis count}-, where in the course of years 
he was recognized as one of the most prominent and influential agriculturists, 
owning one of the largest farms of the locality. In the management of his 
property and the development of his fields he met witli success anrl after the 

J — VOL. II. 



242 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

close of the war he sold his farm and lived retired in St. Louis in the enjoyment 
of well earned rest. 

Tames N. Loring pursued his education in the schools of this city, passing 
through consecutive grades to his graduation from the Central high school. 
He afterward matriculated in Harvard University, being a member of the class 
of 1862. Immediately after leaving college he returned to St. Louis and for 
two vears was connected with the Globe-Democrat as reporter. On the expira- 
tion of that period he took up the active practice of law and in the course of 
vears won notable distinction as an able and leading member of the St. Louis 
bar. His reasoning was clear and cogent, his deductions logical, and he never 
failed to give a thorough and comprehensive preparation, preparing for defense 
as well as for attack. Experience increased his ability and he remained to the 
last a close student of his profession, having comprehensive knowledge of the 
principles of legal science. He was also familiar with statutory law and prece- 
dent and the ablest members of the St. Louis bar found him worthy of their 
esteem. Had he figured in no other way in the aft'airs of the city he would 
still have been entitled to consideration as a representative resident of St. Louis, 
but in other departments of activity he also did efficient and valuable service. 
In 1872 he was elected superintendent of schools and served for four years, 
during which time he largely advanced the standard of public education here. 
In 1884 he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature and ever 
gave careful consideration to each momentous question. His political views 
were in accord with the principles of democracy and at no time was his position 
on an important question an equivocal one. His religious faith was that of the 
Baptist church, which found in him a devoted member and generous supporter. 

In 1864 ^Ir. Loring wedded Miss Albertine Glyckherr, a daughter of Casimir 
A. and Frederika ( Hirmanutz) Glyckherr, of St. Louis, who came to this coun- 
try from Germany in 1849. The children of this marriage are: Casimir G. ; 
Ethelyn ^^^, the wife of Theodore Humphreys, of Minneapolis, Minnesota ; and 
Hayden Y. and Thomas, deceased. On the 23d of September, 1902, Mr. Loring 
was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Anna P. Cleaveland, the 
widow of James P. Cleaveland, of East Boxford, IMassachusetts, and a daughter 
of A. C. and Anne F. ( Folsom) Palmer, of Boston, Massachusetts. Her father 
was prominently connected with the Equitable Life Insurance Company, of 
that city. 

'Sh. Loring was a member of the Harvard Club, of this city, which holds 
an annual banquet each year, and thus the graduates meet in yearly reunion. 
He possessed considerable literary ability, wielding a facile pen. He wrote many 
articles and was also the author of a volume entitled the Old World Through 
Xew AVorld Eyes, which was written by him during six months' journey abroad 
and dedicated to his wife, Mrs. Anna P. Loring, and his daughter, Ethelyn W. 
Loring. The death of Mr. Loring occurred January 23, 1907, and thus passed 
away one whose labors made the world better for his having lived. His influence 
was always on the side of mental, esthetic and moral culture, and through his 
efiforts he contributed to the world's progress in those directions. 



HOWARD BOOGHER. 

There have been no unusual ])]iases in the life record of Howard Boogher 
and he has attained step by step to his present responsible position as president 
of the Boogher, Force & Goodbar Hat Company. Born in St. Louis on the 
2d of January. 1876. he was a son of Jesse L. and Sarah (Goodfellow) Boogher. 
who, affording their son excellent educational privileges, arranged for him to 
attend Smith Academy at St. Louis after he had completed his preliminary 
course. He was graduated from tlie academy in 1894 and in further pursuit 




HOWARD BOOGHER 



•244 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

of an education attended the Vanderbilt University at Nashville, Tennessee, where 
he won a Bachelor of Law degree in 1898. 

The same vear ^Ir. Boogher located for practice in St. Louis and was closely 
associated with the profession for four years, or until 1902, when he passed 
from professional to commercial circles in his election as treasurer of the 
Boogher. Force & Goodbar Hat Company. He continued at the head of the 
tinancial interests and in 1905 the duties of secretary were added to those of 
treasurer. He thus filled the dual position until the death of his father, when 
he was elected to the presidency of the company, conducting an extensive whole- 
sale business in hats. The volume of trade annually transacted over their counters 
makes this one of the most important commercial enterprises of St. Louis and 
its radiating interests now cover a broad territory. In addition to his duties as 
president of the Boogher, Force & Goodbar Hat Company, Mr. Boogher is also 
serving as secretary of the Gould Directory Company. 

On the 31st of October, 1901, Mr. Boogher completed his arrangement for 
having a home of his own in his marriage on that day at Hillsboro, Illinois, to 
^liss Bessie Lane, and they now have one son. Lane Boogher. The family attend 
the Methodist church, in which Mr. Boogher holds membership. His club rela- 
tions are with the St. Louis and Missouri Athletic Clubs. He is also treasurer 
of the Latin American Club and a member of the Business Men's League and 
the Credit Men's Association. His political support is given to the republican 
party. These various connections are an indication of the nature of his interests 
and his activities, indicating him to be a man whose outlook is broad, and he is 
in close connection with the trend of public thought and action as manifest in 
lines of general progress and advancement. 



TAMES CAMPBELL. 



"Tenacity and endurance count for more than genius in business success.'' 
This is the philosophy of James Campbell. Other men have expressed similar 
sentiment. Few other men have lived up to it so consistently and persistently 
as has ]\Ir. Campbell in the forty-odd years of his residence in St. Louis. 

James Campbell was Irish, born on a twelve-acre farm in 1848. His inheri- 
tance was two fine blue eyes, a saving sense of humor, and an extraordinary 
capacity for work. The parents moved to America in 1850 and settled in \Mieel- 
ing. There were six in the family. The father began as a drayman at day 
wages. He became the owner of his own trucking outfit. The mother, ambitious 
for her children, saw to it that they received all possible school advantages. But 
at the age of eleven, the boy James felt the craving for business life and 
engaged himself to a grocer at eight dollars a month, sweeping out the store at 
day break, and carrying around to customers the cofifee, sugar and other things. 

There was a military camp in the suburbs of Wheeling. James Campbell 
went there with groceries. General Fremont was in command. He wanted a 
quick witted. reliable messenger boy. James Campbell got the place at nearly 
double the pay of the grocer's boy. He stood at the door of the tent, admitting 
this caller and turning away that with such tact and judgment that when the 
Pathfinder went tf) .\ew York he took his messenger with him. Through the 
vicissitudes of his career, I'Vemont kept Campbell with him until they came west 
together to St. Louis to built railn^ads in Missouri. Civil engineering appealed 
to the boy's tastes. James (Jamj^bell was several vears under age when he began 
to carry the chain with surveying parties. I le studied engineering bv practice. 
He was in the field until, at twenty-five, he held the i)osition of chief of an 
engineering corps. In that ])eriod, he had ])articii)ated in "running the lines" 
of what are now considerable sections of the PYi.sco and Missouri, Kansas & 
Texas Railroads. He had learned interior Missouri, the natural resources and 



ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 245 

possibilities of development more inlimatel}- than he coulcl have done in any 
other oecupation. 

With the savings from his salary as eivil engineer, he bought Missouri 
land in advance of the immigration : he sold as prices appreciated with the result 
that some time after the panic of 1873, he came to St. Louis with a fortune of 
between eighty thousand dollars and one hundred thousand dollars. Then his 
knowdedge of JMissouri and his strong confidence in the future of the state were 
combined. His last railroad position had been chief engineer of what was 
known as the Kansas City, Memphis & ^Mobile Railway. 

The business debut of Mr. Campbell in St. Louis was as a bond and stock 
broker in 1876-7. But that did not mean for him speculating on Wall street by 
m&rgins and quick turns. In the financial depression of 1873 and following, 
seventy-four counties of Misouri ( two-thirds of the state ) defaulted in inter- 
est on countv and township bonds, fames Campbell began investment in these 
bonds, selecting those which he felt sure would become good with better times. 
He bought some of these securities as lovv- as ten cents on the dollar and made 
it a rule not to go above twenty-five cents. He became knov.n as an expert on 
such bonds. When he had tied up his ready capital in this way, he talked bank- 
ers into faith of ultimate redemption, borrowed money on these defaulted bonds 
as collateral and bought more. Later when some counties began to realize that 
time was onlv postponement of a day of certain judgment, when other counties 
had resorted to law in vain attempts to repudiate, ]\lr. Campbell was sought to 
arrange compromises by which new bonds at lower rates of interest were sub- 
stituted for those in default. 

As his capital grew, James Campbell made local investments. He studied 
St. Louis by personal observations, as he had already learned interior ]\Iissouri. 
From being receiver of a bob-tail, mule-motor street railroad, built into North 
St. Louis in advance of the population's needs, he became the owner. He 
increased his street railroad holdings. He combined with John Scullin and 
adopted a transfer system, on which the person wdth leisure could ride two or 
three hours for a nickel. He went in with ^Ir. Scullin for the electrification of 
street railroads with the trolley system. Railroad surveying and constructing 
developed the engineering bent of James Campbell. But study did not stop 
with that. Mr. Campbell took up other branches. He delved into the possibil- 
ities of electricitv for power and for lighting. He forecast the future when 
electrical utilities in St. Louis were in their infancy. He invested in plant after 
plant — lighting and power — until his holdings enabled him to bring about devel- 
opment and economies to the point of profitable operation. "It pays to hold 
the hand of an infant venture until it can stand alone," he once said. 

James Campbell's comprehensiveness in business is notable. A few' years 
age, following his engineering investigations, he became much interested in the 
use of natural w-ater power for supplying heat, power and light, especially in 
the western mining regions where coal had been used heretofore. Large invest- 
ments have followed faith in this direction, until Mr. Campbell is today one of 
the principal promoters of this use of water power for the creation of high ten- 
sion electric currents and the application of them to reduce the cost of mining. 

In the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, James Campbell as a director and 
member of the executive committee, was a forceful factor. He gave his time 
and his thought unsparingly, and with a measure of public spirit not generally 
known, \\dien Festus J. Wade laid the foundations of the Mercantile Trust 
Company, James Campbell was one of the men who backed and encouraged the 
enterprise until it reached its present great proportions. 

Never losing his first love for the railroads, Mr. Campbell has steadily 
increased his investments in stocks and bonds of systems which have grown 
with the great southwest. Sitting in many boards of directors, he is known as 
the silent member, waiting for sentiment to crystallize and usually forming one 
of the great majority. He is not stubborn in his individual opinions. He has a 



246 ST. LOUIS, T?IE FOURTH CITY. 

saying of this kind: "Xo man can go contrary to the direction in which his 
fellow beings are moving and be a success. Pull in the same direction with the 
other fellows, but pull longer and pull stronger." 

Three personal friends in St. Louis have had great influence upon the life 
of Mr. Campbell: Joseph B. McCullagh, the editor; George A. Madill, the 
lawyer; William H. Thompson, the banker. In a third of a century as a business 
man in St. Louis. Mr. Campbell has had two law suits. One of the earliest pro- 
motors of the I'niversity Club, he is a member of the St. Louis Club, Noonday 
Club, Country Club, Glen Echo Club and many other social organizations. 



GUY N. HITCHCOCK. 

Guv X. Hitchcock, assistant cashier of the Xational Bank of Commerce, 
was born in St. Louis, December 22, 1874. His father, Charles O. Hitchcock, 
was in the plantation supply business and at the time of the Civil war espoused 
the cause of the Confederacy and fought for the interests of the south. He 
married Anna V. Newcomer, a native of Maryland, and died in 1880. 

Guy N. Hitchcock was a lad of six years when he entered upon his public- 
school course, which he continued to the age of fourteen years, when in 1888 he 
put aside his text-books to enter the field of business. Banking was attractive to 
him and because of this he secured a position as messenger boy in the Conti- 
nental National Bank. He worked faithfull}- and diligently and these qualities 
won him the approval of those whom he served and gained him promotion as 
opportunity offered. Thus he gradually worked his way upward until in 1902 
he was made assistant cashier. When the National Bank of Commerce bought 
out and took over the Continental National Bank he went to the former institu- 
tion as assistant cashier and has since been connected with it. 

Mr. Hitchcock is an Episcopalian in religious faith and is now a vestryman 
in the Qiurch of the Holy Communion. He belongs to the Missouri Athletic 
and to the St. Louis Field Clubs, being much interested in all athletic and manly 
outdoor sports. He is yet a young man with probably the major part of his 
life before him, and the opportunities for advancement he is improving, having 
already made for himself a name in business circles as one wdio is most reliable 
as well as capable in carrying forward banking interests. 



ARTHUR RICHARD DEACON. 

Arthur Richard Deacon, whose business activities bring him into close 
connection with various important corporate interests, gives his time and ener- 
gies most largely, however, to the duties of the secretaryship of the Lambert 
Pharmacal Company, of St. Louis. A native of England, he was born at 
W'itham, in Essex county, November 7, 1858, a son of Arthur and Mercy Eliza- 
beth (Tuck) Deacon. He pursued his education at Witham school and in 
early life became connected with the manufacture of pharmaceuticals in Eng- 
land. To this experience he added several years spent in the drug store of 
Samuel Dupont, at Detroit, Michigan, and in 1881 he entered the employ of 
Lambert & Company, of St. Louis. Three years later, in 1884, this company 
was incorporated by Jordan W. Lambert, J. R. Peacock and A. R. Deacon, as 
the Lambert Pharmacal Company, in which Mr. Deacon has continued to take 
a very active part as director and secretary. Nor has he confined his efforts to 
one line, for he is also the vice president of the Allen & Hanbury's Company, 
Ltd., manufacturing pharmacists, of Toronto, Canada, and Niagara Falls, New 
York; director of the Lambert-Deacon-Hull Printing Company; the St. Louis 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 247 

Surface!- & Paint Company; and the Webster Groves Trust Company. He is 
likewise the president of the Webster Park Realty Company for real-estate deal- 
ino- and for the improvement and development of that section of St. Louis 
county. He is also treasurer of the Knights Island Alaska Copper Company, 
operating in the mining regions of Alaska, in which connection he has made 
trips to the northwest. The company owns land in Kiacco Cove, situated at 
the head waters of Drier Bay, Knights Island, Prince William Sound. The 
name of Kiacco Grove was given in the spring of 1907 by a corps of United 
States geographical engineers engaged in taking soundings in its waters and 
who, in order to distinguish this body of water upon their charts, formed' the 
word from the initial letters of the Knights Island Alaska Copper Company, 
which they noted upon the buildings there. Mr. Deacon and Frank Everts, one 
of his associates in this enterprise, have prepared a most interesting account of 
their trip to the northwest and the conditions there met. After a voyage of ten 
days from Seattle they arrived at Valdez and thence went to Knights Island, 
seventy-five miles to the southwest, with the intention of opening and operating 
mines in a district that is known to be rich in copper. Investigation into these 
conditions proved to them how valuable is the property which the company 
owns. They hold eighteen claims of twenty acres each and around them are 
several companies who are operating successfully on land similar to their own. 
It is known that the district bears good ore and modern methods are being 
employed in opening the mines and taking out the copper. 

Mr. Deacon was married at Toronto, Canada, in 1897, to Miss Edith ]M. 
Harris and their children are Arthur Philip, Edith Victoria and Virginia Ketter- 
ing. Mr. Deacon is a member of the Masonic fraternity and is president of the 
Algonquin Golf Club. He also belongs to the Mercantile Club, to the Dardenne 
Shooting Club and to the Horseshoe Lake Hunting & Fishing Club, of which he 
was president for a number of years, and his is a well rounded character, not 
so abnormally developed in any direction as to make him a genius, but one who 
looks at life from no narrow nor contracted view, realizing that the man wdio 
becomes an influencing factor in his community is not one who concentrates 
his energies along one line to the exclusion of other interests which claim the 
attention of mankind. 



WILLIAAl F. SCHULTE. 

William F. Schulte has worked his way upward from the position of clerk 
to that of secretary of the Christian Peper Tobacco Company. Obstacle after 
obstacle has been overcome and the difficulties which he has met have seemed 
to serve as an impetus for renewed effort and closer application on his part. 
Born in St. Louis, October 23, 1877, he is a son of B. Rudolph and Anna (Tirre) 
Schulte. He emigrated from Hanover, Germany, to the new world in 1868. 
The father died in America at the comparatively early age of thirty-lave years. 
During his early manhood he had engaged in business as a retail grocer and 
afterward turned his attention to the manufacture of soda. 

William F. Schulte is indebted to the public-school system of his native 
city for the educational privileges he enjoyed. He was only eight years of age 
at the time of his father's death and early found it necessary to start out in 
business on his own account that he might assist his mother, to whom he was 
a most devoted and loyal son until her death, when she was forty-four years of 
age. He made his initial step in the business world as errand boy in the employ 
of Mr. Deimer. afterward the head of the Deimer Flower Company. A year 
later Mr. Schulte became clerk in the Geisler drug store, but his health obligetl 
him to give up this position and abandon the plan which he cherished of 
one dav engaging in the drug business on his own account. His next position 
was a clerical one with the Simmons Hardware Company and he there remained 



248 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

for a vear and a half, or until his promotion to the catalogue department, where 
he remained for two and a half years. On the expiration of -that period he 
felt justified in beginning business on his own account and established a grocery 
store at the corner of Jeli'erson and Arsenal streets. He conducted this business 
successfully until his mother's death, when, feeling a desire to get away from 
the city, he traveled for about a year. He then returned to St. Louis and became 
a clerk for the Campbell Iron Company, taking this position only as a tem- 
porary expedient until something better should offer. After eight months he left 
the Campbell Iron Company to accept a position with the Christian Peper 
Tobacco Company as clerk. Six months after this he was made bookkeeper in 
the establishment and when he had been with the house for twenty-eight months 
his business ability was recognized in his election as secretary of the company. 
He is also one of its directors and is active in the management of an enterprise 
which is now a profitable one, bringing an annual remunerative return for the 
investment. 

On the 13th of May, 1903, in St. Louis, Mr. Schulte was married to Miss 
2vlay Cavendish, a daughter of Richard Cavendish, who was a colonel in the 
Civil war. They have two sons: William F., three years of age; and Bernard 
Richard, in the first year. Mr. Schulte has been an Odd Fellow for ten years. 
He belongs to the Church of Christ and in politics is a pronounced republican, 
fleeting him, one is impressed with his strength of character and determined 
spirit. Laudable ambition has prompted his continual advancement in the busi- 
ness world and he is now devoting his entire time and concentrating all his 
energies toward the supervision of the active details of the business, having the 
heart to resolve, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute all its 
various transactions. 



JOHN C. BENSIEK. 



John C. Bensiek was a representative of that strong Teutonic strain in the 
citizenship of St. Louis which has been a most important element in the growth 
and substantial upbuilding of the city. He was born in Westphalia, Germany, 
October 12, 1841, and when twenty years of age came to the United States. He 
carved out his own career, his life being another illustration of the fact that no 
matter what the educational opportunities or the advantages of early life may be, 
one must earnestly formulate, plan and determine his own character. Through- 
out his life he was actuated by high purposes and laudable ambitions. Soon after 
his arrival in St. Louis he married Sophia Birkenkemper, and to them were born 
five children, Mrs. Clara Boehmer, Mrs. Minnie Niehaus, John C, Jr., August 
and Leonora. 

For more than thirty years Mr. Bensiek was engaged in the livery business 
and met with prosperity in his chosen field of labor. He also- figured prominently 
in public afifairs and for four years, beginning in 1893, served as a member of the 
city council, exercising his official prerogative in support of the various measures 
for the municipal improvement. At the time of his death he was a member of the 
republican precinct committee of the third ward. At one time he was a candidate 
for the office of sheriff but was defeated. At the time of the Civil war Mr. Ben- 
siek loyally advocated the Union cause and proved his devotion to his adopted 
country by active service at the front. It was thus that he gained his right to 
membership in General Lyon Post, G. A. R., in which he was an honored com- 
rade. He was equally prominent in various fraternal and social organizations, 
belonging to Phoenix Lodge, A. O. U. W. ; Golden Rule Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; 
Humboldt Turn Verein ; the Social Singing Society ; the Sons of Hermann ; the 
Harugari ; the .St. Louis Sharp Shooters; and the American Protestant Associa- 
tion. He was a member of the Bethania Evangelical church at the corner of 




TOHX C. BEXSIEK 



250 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Twentv-third and \\'asliington streets. He was also a Mason of high standing 
and his Hfe was exemplary of the beneficial purposes of the craft. He died 
December 20. 1899, and thus closed a life of usefulness and honor, which had 
constituted an element for good and for progress in the city of St. Louis. 



ANTON REISING. 



Anton Reising, well kiiOwii in insurance circles of this city and for a number 
of vears actively engaged in municipal politics, was born in Watterheim, Hesse- 
Darmstadt, Germany, Alarch 10, 1840. His parents were Valentine and Barbara 
Reising. i\Ir. Reising holds a proirarient place in the financial circles of this 
city, to which he has risen on the strength of his own resources. Having been 
born and reared on a fai'm- in a small town and surrounded by meagre circum- 
stances, he had few advantages along educational lines. He was sent as a pupil 
to the common schools of his native land during the winter months and spent 
the summer time in laboring with his father on the farm. When still a child 
he was compelled to give up his studies at school and he remained with his 
father, tilling the soil, until the year 1858, when he removed with his parents to 
America. They spent a few weeks in New York and then came to St. Louis. 

Here Anton Reising with difficulty secured a situation. However, it was 
of little or no advantage to him aside from giving him some experience. He 
was employed as grocery clerk for Kleeburg Brothers, for whom he worked 
during the first six months for nothing. At the expiration of this time he had 
made himself valuable to the store and at the same time had acquired some 
familiarity with the English tongue. He was then given a small salary. He 
remained with this company until the opening of the Civil war in 1861. At that 
time he enlisted in the First Regiment of Missouri Volunteers as a private sol- 
dier and was in service for three months as a volunteer. He received honorable 
discharge August 13, 1861. 

Following his brief military career he returned to his former employer and 
worked in the grocery business for a period of five months. At that time, being 
offered a better position by Anton Mennemeyer, a well-known grocer, he accepted 
it. Shortly after he had begun work his employer passed away. Mr. Reising 
still remained in the employ of the store and in 1866 was united in marriage 
with his employer's wife, Elizabeth Mennemeyer, who died in 1884. They had 
one child. Mrs. Wehlermann. In 1886 he again united in marriage with Magda- 
lene Dolte, of St. Louis. She passed away in October, 1900. 

In 1871 Mr. Reising began to interest himself actively in politics and was 
appointed inspector of the waterworks. Gradually he acquired influence and 
became clerk, then chief clerk, and finally was appointed acting assessor. In 
all he served the city in a political capacity for twenty-four years. When the 
republicans gained power Mr. Reising's political career ceased, and since that 
time he has not aspired to hold ofifice. Mr. Reising is a stanch democrat and 
was active in politics for a period of twenty-four years. While he is still enthu- 
siastic for the election of the candidates of his party, he does not interest himself 
in political lines beyond casting his vote and using his influence to bring its 
candidates into office. 

At the termination of his political career Mr. Reising took up a fire insur- 
ance agency with an office in the Temple building. In this he has been quite 
successful and has been appointed agent for all the leading fire insurance com- 
panies. He is a member of the Knights of America, Lodge No. 156, of which 
organization he holds the honor of having established the first German council, 
of which he was president for sixteen years. He resigned this office, but for the 
past twenty-eight years has still continued an active member. For two years 
he served the organization as state president. He also belongs to St. Joseph's 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 251 

Benevolent Association and Holy Trinity Association. For forty years he has 
been affiliated with the German Orphan Asylum. He is a member of the State 
Fire Insurance Association. Mr. Reising has been very successful in bu'^iness 
and has succeeded in accumulatins: some valuable real estate. 



WALTER H. XOHL, LL.B. 

Walter H. Nohl, engaged in the practice of law in St. Louis, was born May 
24, 1875, in this city. His parents are Charles F. C. and Dorothea Nohl, nee 
Buddecke. The father was born in Germany and came to the United States 
in 185 1. For five generations the Nobis have largely been a family of teachers 
and ministers. In the maternal line Walter H. Nohl is descended from the Ger- 
man nobility. His early education was accjuired in the public schools of St. 
Louis, and in preparation for the practice of a profession with which he desired 
to become identified from his early boyhood, he attended the Benton College of 
Law of St. Louis and was graduated in 1904. He did not immediately pursue 
his law course, however, after leaving the public schools but spent one year in 
newspaper work and also engaged in mercantile pursuits to obtain a good prac- 
tical business experience, devoting seven years to various duties in the whole- 
sale district in St. Louis. For four years he has been engaged in the practice 
of law and his professional record is a notably successful one. He has made 
rapid progress and won fame in connection with the Hollman will case. He 
prepares all of his cases with great thoroughness and care and his presentation 
of his cause is ever clear, forceful and logical, while in his application of a legal 
principle to a point at issue, he is rarel}^, if ever, at fault. 

In republican circles Mr. Nohl is also well known. He believes strongly 
that every citizen should recognize his obligation as well as his privilege in the 
matter of civic duties and acting in accordance with his ideas upon this ques- 
tion he has endeavored to get men in office who would regard their position as 
a public trust and would be most loyal to its interests. He also was active in his 
efforts to bring about a settlement of the street car strike in St. Louis in 1899. 
He stands stanchly in support of everything that is opposed to misrule in pub- 
lic aft'airs and holds to high ideals in citizenship. 

Socially Mr. Nohl is connected with the ]\Iasons, belonging to Itasca Lodge, 
F. & A. M., and is also a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is also iden- 
tified wath various political and social organizations and is a member of the 
St. Louis Bar Association. He has always been fond of the study of politics 
and of history and has read broadly along these lines, while at the present day 
he keeps in touch with those questions which are of gravest import to the states- 
man and the man of aft'airs. He is fairlv active in outdoor sports, recognizing 
the value of a normal physical as well as mental development. 



GEORGE REPPERT BARCLAY. 

George Reppert Barclay has since March, 1875, been connected with the 
Simmons Hardware Company, one of the most important commercial enterprises 
of this character in the middle west, and his capability, unwearied industry and 
fidelity have opened to him the road to success and promotion until he is now 
vice president. 

He was born in Sacramento, California, December 2"], 1854, his parents 
being George R. and Julia (Johnson) Barclay. He acquired his education in 
the public schools of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, and of Marietta, Ohio, after 
which he secured a clerical position in the local freight office of the North Mis- 



-252 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

souri Railroad Company at St. Louis. He remained with that company in vari- 
ous positions from the ist of October, 1870, until March, 1875. when he resigned 
to enter the employ of the Simmons Hardware Company as entry clerk. An 
employer is always cognizant of faithful and capable service and of possibilities 
for development in an employe and Mr. Barclay, by reason of his worth, gained 
promotion to the chief clerkship of the correspondence department and later 
became manager of the credit department. He was elected a director of the 
company on the 1st of January, 1898, with the office of assistant treasurer and 
in u;04 was elected to his present position as vice president of the compan}-. 
This is the brief outline of a business career in wdiich the salient characteris- 
tics have been such as have won for him the admiration and respect of his col- 
leagues and the confidence and regard of his contemporaries. 

On the 19th of October, 1881, Mr. Barclay was married in St. Louis to 
Miss Lillie L Swain, and they now have three children: George F., who is now 
connected with the St. Louis Union Trust Company : Julia, who is a graduate 
of \'assar College ; and Thomas S., who is now a high-school student. 

Mr. Barclay is a member of the Civic League Association and the Citi- 
zens Industrial Association. He is also a member of the Mercantile Club and 
the Officers Club of the National Guard of Missouri, having been connected 
with Company G of the First Regiment. In religious faith he is an Episcopa- 
lian. 



WARREN BELL OUTTEN, A. M., M. D. 

The promoter of a great enterprise or the founder of a new movement in 
which the public is a large indirect beneficiary, is deserving of the gratitude of 
his fellowmen, for he who does such a work advances the race in its progress 
toward a higher civilization and clearer views of life and its purposes. The 
labors of Dr. Outten have been of a most beneficent character in his private 
practice, in his teaching of the science of medicine and in his establishment and 
promotion of the great railway hospital system of the west. 

The parents of Dr. Outten w^ere Warren and Mary J. ( ^Morris) Outten, 
both natives of Fayette county, Kentucky, in which state they continued their 
residence until some years after the birth of their son Warren B. at Lexington, 
December 3. 1844. He was still a boy at the time of the removal to St. Louis and 
he pursued his literary education in the Christian Brothers College and the 
Wyman's University. A mental review of the various fields of business which he 
considered open to him led him to the choice of the medical profession as a life 
work and beginning preparation therefor he was eventually graduated from the 
St. Louis Medical College with the class of 1866. 

Throughout almost his entire professional career he has been connected 
with educational work in medical lines and has gained distinction therein. Soon 
after his graduation he was made prosector to the chair of surgery in the Hum- 
boldt Medical College and in 1867 became assistant demonstrator in the St. 
Louis Medical College. Early in his practice he acted as assistant surgeon in the 
military service at St. Louis, being detailed to attend troops suffering from 
cholera. His labors in that capacity continued until December, 1866. Continuing 
his practice and in connection therewith his educational work, he was elected pro- 
fessor of anatomy in the St. Louis College of Physicians & Surgeons in 1869. 
His appointment in 1876 as supervising surgeon for the St. Louis, Iron Mountain 
& Southern Railway Company, proved the initial step in what has been one of 
the great works of his life. Acting for the railroad company, he established, in 
188 1, a line of hospitals along the road and in 1884 he was appointed chief sur- 
geon of the Iron Mountain Railroad and the Wabash Railroad east, establishing 
hospitals at Springfield and at Danville, Illinois, for the Wabash line. In 1885 
"he was made chief surgcr,n of the Missouri Pacific system and rebuilt the Fort 




DR. W. B. OUTTEX 



254 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CFfY. 

Worth Hospital at Fort Worth. Texas, and also established hospitals at Marshall 
and Palestine, Texas. In this work Dr. Outten has been a pioneer in the middle 
west, being the first surgeon to make the suggestion for the establishment of such 
hospitals. At the time he advanced his idea the only railway hospital in exist- 
ence was on the Central Pacific Railway and through his efl:orts the second one 
in the United States was established at Washington, Missouri. There are now 
to his credit nine hospitals which have been established through his instrumental- 
ity, at which have been treated, as the records show, over 96,934. There are so 
many emergency cases in connection with railroading that it seems odd, to say 
the least, that hospital work was not organized before. It remained for Dr. 
Outten, however, to recognize the great need in this direction and to formulate 
plans for obviating it. Throughout the United States Dr. Outten is widelv known 
as a railway surgeon and the distinction which he has won is well merited. He 
has become a recognized authority upon the subject of railway hospitals and the 
methods of treatment followed therein, and wherever he has gone he has been 
received by th^ medical fraternity as one of its most prominent and honored rep- 
resentatives. A perfect master of the construction and functions of the com- 
ponent parts of the human body, of the changes induced in them by the 
onslaughts of diseases, of the defects cast upon them as a legacy by progenitors, 
of the vital capacity remaining in them throughout all vicissitudes of existence. 
Dr. Outten by his splendid work in the practice of medicine and surgery has 
gained distinction second to none in the profession in St. Louis. 

Continuing his w^ork as an educator in medical lines. Dr. Outten was elected 
professor of the principles and practice of surgery and dean of the Beaumont 
Hospital Medical College in 1886, and his ability is widely recognized among 
the medical educators of the country. He has also contributed much to the liter- 
ature of his profession and is the author of "Railway Injuries: Their CHnical 
and Medico-Legal Features." and of numerous monographs and special papers. 
He has been the editor of The Railway Surgeon, and his writings embrace a 
volume entitled "Plan's Inherited Martyrdom; or, A Fitful Studv of Degenera- 
tion." 

Dr. Outten was married in 1877 to Miss Alary F. Burnet, of St. Louis 
county. He is recognized in this city and wherever he is known as a man of 
remarkable presence, of high moral character and of the best social position. 
W hile to those who are admitted to share the intimacy of his friendship he often 
exhibits qualities which others scarcely suspect, he is in all of his professional 
relations found to be singularly modest, light hearted, faithful in his friendships, 
fixed in an honest hatred of all shams and pretenders, and exhibiting in every 
judgment of his mind a strong, common sense that illumines every dark corner 
into which he looks. He is one of the great men whose names the medical pro- 
fession will always treasure with gratitude and respect. He is great because 
nature endowed him bountifully and because he has studiouslv. carefullv and con- 
scientiously increased the talents that have been mven him. 



CflARLFS M. RICE. 



Charles M. Rice, attorney at law and well ktiown in various business con- 
nections anrl as a jjromotcr of interests U>r social and benevolent development 
here, was born in St. Louis, Aj)ril 8, 1882, his parents being Jonathan and 
Aurelia Rice. The father was vice president of the Rice, Stix & Company and 
a most prrmiinent and influential citizen here, mention of whom is made on 
another page of tliis volume. 'Jlie son pursued a public-school education to 
the age of sixteen years, afterward devoted two years to studv in Smith Acad- 
emy anrl later went to Washington Universitv, from which he was graduated 
with the I'.arhelor of Arts degree in 1904. Sul)sc(|nently lie attended the St. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 255 

Louis Law School, from whicli lie was graduated with the Bachelor of Law 
degree. Entering upon the active practice of his profession he has remained 
continuously with the firm of Lyon & Swartz and his constantly expanding 
powers in professional lines are making his services of value to those who 
desire safe counselor or capable advocates. Aside from his profession he has 
some business interests, being secretary and treasurer of the Kugarok Realty 
& Hotel Company and is financialK- interested in the Rice, Stix Drv Goods 
Compau}'. 

Air. Rice was married September 23, 1908, to Aliss May Goldman, a 
daughter of J. D. and Sarah (Hirsch) Goldman, and they are now erecting 
a nice residence on Kingsbury Terrace. Air. Rice is well known in social cir- 
cles, wdiere a genial manner and unfailing courtesv render him popular. He is 
the secretary of the West Wood Country Club and a director of the Columbian 
Club. He is vice president of the Washington L'niversity Alumni Association, 
a member of the Paddle & Saddle Club, of the Amateur Athletic Association, 
the Missouri Athletic Association, the St. Louis Automobile Club, the Academy 
of Science, the St. Louis Bar Association, the Legal Aid Society and a director 
of the St. Louis Play Grounds Association. There is nothing that indicates 
more clearly the characteristics of a man, the trend of his thought and the 
nature of his interests than his membership relations, which in this instance 
bear evidence of the genial nature, the enterprising purpose and the charitable 
and benevolent spirit of Air. Rice. His political allegiance is given to the re- 
publican part}'. 



WILLIAAI HEMAHXGHAUS, SR. 

William Hemminghaus, Sr., deceased, was a prominent carpenter and builder, 
with offices at 141 7 Destrehan street, St. Louis. He was a native of Germany, 
born July 26, 185 1, and was one of four children, the others being: Anna, wife 
of William Schlaf , of Westphalia, Germany ; Henry, who resides in the same 
locality; and Marie, wife of a Mr. Unterbaumann. 

Mr. Hemminghaus attended the common schools of his native land, where 
he obtained his education, and upon leaving school at an early age served his 
apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade and for a time plied his craft as a journey- 
man. Arriving- in the new world in 1871, he stopped for awhile in New York 
city, later in Cincinnati, and finally settled in Indianapolis, Indiana, in all of these 
places working at his trade. After engaging in carpenter work as a journeyman 
in Indianapolis for three years, came to St. Louis in 1874, wdiere he followed his 
trade until 1875, (li-U'ing which year he entered the contracting business for him- 
self. He immediately unrlertook general contracting in stone, brick and carpenter 
work and from the outset his career was marked with exceptional progress. 
Foremost among the buildings he erected are the edifice in which Edward \\'esten 
carries on a coffee and tea enterprise, the building being constructed at a cost of 
thirty-five thousand dollars; the Duncker building, located on Page avenue, west 
of Grand avenue, at a cost of fiftv thousand dollars, and a number of elegant 
residences in the western portion of the city. He was an enter])rising and aggres- 
sive business man and was wonderfull)- successful in intlustrial lines. The busi- 
ness increased in volume from its inception antl acquired such ])roportions as to 
require his undivided attenti(^n. His wonderful success becomes apparent when 
it is noted that upon his arrival in New York city he possessed but five dollars 
and later through his enterprise and industry he established himself in a business 
which made him one of the wealthiest contractors in North St. Louis. He always 
closely applied himself to his business and in all his dealings aimed to be straight- 
forward and honest, and to this in great measure he attributed his success. W hen 
he arrived in Indianapolis and secured a position at his trade as a journeyman 



256 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

carpenter he received but two dollars and a half a day, all of which was con- 
sumed in the suni^ort of his family, so that when he landed in St. Louis he had 
onlv six dollars, but with this small capital he entered into business and through 
hard work and practical economy became one of the most prominent factors in 
the financial circles of the city, owning three elegant flats, two at 1419 Destrehan 
street and one on Gano avenue. 

In 1876 Mr. Hemminghaus wedded Miss Emma Krallmann, her parents 
having been natives of Germany, who came to the new world in 1857, ^vhere she 
was born. The other children of the family are : Lizzie, deceased ; Anna, wife 
of Henrv A'ollmar. of this city; John, deceased, who left one child residing here; 
and Emma. Unto INIr. and Airs. Hemminghaus were born the following chil- 
dren : Henrv and Anna, deceased: John; George; Oscar; Irvin ; Adele ; Edna; 
Hilda ; and \\'illiam. The family belong to the Evangelical Lutheran church, 
and politicallv Mr. Hemminghaus gave his allegiance to the republican party. 
He died August ig. 1008. and was buried in Evangelical Lutheran cemetery, St. 
Louis countv. Missouri. 



WILLIAAI HEMAHXGHAUS, JR. 

William Hemminghaus. Jr.. a contractor and builder doing business under 
the name of William Hemminghaus. was born June 12. 1878, and was educated 
in the public schools of this city. Having completed his studies at the age of 
eighteen years, he went to work for his father, with whom he learned his trade 
and with whom he afterward became associated in the business. In 1902 he 
was taken into partnership by his father and is now active in the management 
of the business. He was associated with his father in the erection of many ele- 
gant buildings, particularly residences throughout the city, and has participated 
in much general contracting work for himself. On January i, 1909, he purchased 
the interests of the other heirs in his father's business and now continues the 
same as \A'illiam Hemminghaus. 

On ]\Iay, 17. 1905. Mr. Hemminghaus was united in marriage with Miss 
Marie Wehmcier. daughter of Casper H. and Mary Wehmeier, the family having 
emigrated from Germany and settled in St. I^ouis county, Missouri, where she 
was born. ]\Ir. and Airs. Hemminghaus have one child, Orville, born August 
20, 1906. IJoth are adherents of the Lutheran church. Politically, Mr. Hem- 
minghaus is not allied with any particular party, but takes the stand of an inde- 
pendent in politics and uses his vote and influence in behalf of candidates whom 
he think-; qualified to satisfactorily serve in the offices they seek. 



ERNEST COLE DODGE. , 

Ernest Cole Dodge, ])racticing at the St. Louis Ixir, was born in IJelleville, 
Illinois, Februar\- 11, 1862, a son of Egbert and Sarah (Sherwood) Dodge. 
While spending his boyhood days under the parental roof he pursued his educa- 
tion in the graderl and high schools of St. Louis, later attending the Salem 
(Missouri) Academy and the State L^niversity at Columbia, Missouri, where he 
remained as a student from 1880 until 1882. He afterward attended the St. 
Louis Law School, from which he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in 1885 and was admitted to practice on the T2th of June of that year. 
From May, 1887, to March, 19^)5, he engaged in the general practice of law in 
St. Louis as senior partner of the law firm oi Dodge & Mulvihill, and since the 
latter date has been alone. He has been commissioned notary public by Gover- 
nors Francis. Stone. .Stephens and Dockery and he is a member of the St. Louis 
Bar Assrjciation anrl the Missouri State TUir Association. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 257 

On the 17th of April, 1895, i" St. Louis, Mr. Dodge was married to Miss 
Bertha G. Layton, and unto them have been born two daughters, Odile PhyUis 
L. and Mary Lois. The family attend the Roman Catholic church, of winch 
Mr. Dodge is a member. He has a military record as a member of the state 
militia for three years, after which he was honorably discharged. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and from December, 1894, until April, 
1899, he served as assistant city attorney under Mayor Walbridge. He is also 
connected with the Illinois Society and with the Missouri Chapter of the Sons 
of the Revolution. 



EDWIN W. HAWLEY. 

Edwin W. Hawley, general agent of the American Powder Mills, the Aetna 
Powder Company and the jVIiami Powder Company, was born in Chicago, Illinois, 
January 17, 1869, his parents being Charles A. and Electa E. (Weaver) Hawley. 
The. father was for many years a hardwood lumber merchant of Chicago, estab- 
lishing business there in 1855. 

Edwin W. Hawley is indebted to the public-school system of Chicago for the 
early educational privileges he enjoyed, while later he pursued a course in the 
high school of Muskegon, Michigan, to his graduation with the class of 1888. 
Immediately after leaving high school he became a representative of his father's 
business interests in Michigan, the elder Hawley owning interests in the lumber 
woods. He returned to Chicago in 1902 and accepted the position of bookkeeper 
with the Aetna Powder Company, with which he has since been connected, being 
in charge of their St. Louis offices since 1894. 

On the first of January, 1899, ii'^ Lyons. Michigan, Mr. Hawley was married 
daughters and one son : Frank S., a student in the University of Michigan ; Marie 
to Miss Estella D. Kellv, a daughter of Rufus Kellv. and thev now have two 
L. ; and Ruth M. ' 

Mr. Hawley owns a handsome residence at No. 6123 Kingsbury boulevard, 
which the family now occupy. He is a Knight Templar Mason and also a mem- 
ber of the Mvstic Shrine. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and his political belief is in accord with the principles of the republican 
party. Well known in St. Louis, he became a charter member of the ]\Iissouri 
Athletic Club, and during the period of his residence here he has gained a wide 
and favorable acquaintance. 



ED^^^\RD anson more. 

From humble clerkships have sprung many of the most prominent merchants 
and business men and the great veins and arteries of trade are now controlled 
by those who at the outset had the most unimportant environment and meager 
advantages. This statement finds verification in the life record of Edward A. 
More, president of the More & Jones Brass & Metal Company, of St. Louis. 
He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 7, 1848, and is a son of 
Edward B. and Margaretta (Rambo) More. He was educated in the West 
Jersey Academv, completing his course in 1863, and began his business career 
as a clerk for the firm of "More & Company, located on North Second street. 
He was with that house from 1865 until 1876, when, desirous of engaging in 
business on his own account, he employed the capital which he had acquired 
through his industry and careful expenditure in the manufacture of journals, 
railroad engine bearings, solders, babbitt metals, etc.. in connection with >>Ir. 
Jones. He started the business in 1874, but retained his clerkship until 1876, 



258 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

when he resigned in order to give his undivided attention to the further devel- 
opment of the metal business which was already expanding along substantial 
lines. The business was incorporated in 1899 under the firm style of the More- 
Jones Brass & iMetal Company, of which Mr. ]\Iore is the president and treas- 
urer. This house continues the manufacture of the above mentioned branches 
and is also jobbers of all kinds of metals except iron. The patronage has stead- 
ily increased and they have found their straightforward methods, reliability and 
careful attention to the wants of their patrons to be their best advertisement. 
Mr. ^Nlore is also president and treasurer of the St. Louis Chilled Bearing 
Company. 

On the 20th of ]\Iarch, 1879, ^^^- ^lore was married in St. Louis to Miss 
Mary C. More and their children are : Lucius Elmer, Enoch Anson, Cyrus 
Burnham and Catherine Alice, but the last named is now deceased. Mr. More 
is a stalwart republican, interested in the success of his party and at all times 
able to support his position by intelligent argument, yet without desire for office. 
He is a trustee of the West Presbyterian church and is a member of the St. 
Louis, Country and Mercantile Clubs. Golf and outdoor sports furnish him 
rest and recreation and he is now splendidly located in life in a substantial 
position with large business interests in his control returning to him a gratifying 
annual income. 



HENRY MEIER. 



In the history of pioneer business men of St. Louis Henry Meier deserves 
more than passing notice. Content to enter business circles in a humble capacity 
but not willing to remain therein, he used his talents and opportunities to good 
advantage and for years figured as one of the best known merchants and finan- 
ciers of the city. His activities covered a wide scope, yet always followed where 
discriminating judgment led the way and on his entire business record there 
were few evidences of mistaken judgment. 

A native of Germany, Henry Meier was born in the province of Hanover, 
March 25, 1819. He possessed many of the sterling traits characteristic of the 
Teutonic race and stood as a high type of our German-American citizenship. His 
father, W'illiam Meier, participated in the Napoleonic wars, including the battle 
of Waterloo. He was a man noted for his strict adherence to what he believed 
to be his duty and the same quality was manifest in his son, who never faltered 
in his allegiance to what he believed to be right. He was fearless in conduct, 
faultless in honor and stainless in reputation and thus made for himself an envi- 
able record. He was a youth of nineteen years when he accompanied his father 
and the family to America. The father remained a resident of St. Louis until 
his death, which occurred in 1865. 

Before leaving his native country Henry Aleier had acquired a good educa- 
tion in the schools of Germany and after reaching the new world he devoted 
two years to agricultural pursuits on his father's farm in St. Charles county, 
Missouri. Coming to St. Louis when twenty years of age, he sought employment 
that would yielfl him an honest living but with laudable ambition to work his way 
upward. For about a year and a half he was employed as a driver of a delivery 
wagon and then ])urchased a delivery wagon of his own and did teaming for 
others until 1846. 

In that }ear Meier entered into jjartnership with John G. Kaiser in the own- 
ership and control of a grocery store on Franklin avenue between Sixth street 
and Broadway. The new venture proved profitable and gradually the trade ex- 
tended throughout the fifteen years of their partnership. In the meantime Mr. 
Meier was becoming well known in business circles of the city and gained a posi- 
tion of further prominence when in 1861 he organized his own firm, which was 




HEXRY MEIER 



260 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

succeeded in the year 1900 by the Henry jMeier Grocery Company, a wholesale 
concern located at Nos. 905 and 909 Franklin avenue. Each year chronicled a 
growth in the business, owing to the capable management and progressive meth- 
ods of the owner. Systematic in all that he did, he placed his business upon a 
paying basis and developed the house in accordance with modern, progressive 
business ideas. For some years prior to his death he left the management of 
the business in the care of his eldest son, Henry Meier, Jr., and since his death 
the company has sold out. 

Not alone in mercantile lines did Mr. Aleier become widely known. He 
gained equal, if not greater, prominence in banking and financial circles, for in 
1867 he organized the Franklin Bank and from its inception to the time of his 
death was its able and worthy president. In 1855 he became connected with the 
Franklin Fire Insurance Company, of which he was a director until 1879, when he 
was elected to the presidency and continued at its head until his demise. His 
plans were always carefully formulated and, moreover, he had the ability to unify 
interests into a harmonious whole. He seemed to know exactly how to gain the 
best results with the means at hand and this knowledge came to him as the result 
of earnest study and careful consideration of the questions involved. 

On the 19'th of January, 1850, Mr. Meier was married to Miss Catherine 
Kaiser, a sister of John G. Kaiser, and unto them were born three sons and three 
daughters : Henry, who is a director in the Franklin Bank and is now living 
retired; Julius, who is teller in the Franklin Bank; Edward H., who is now con- 
nected with the Kaiser-Huhn Grocer Company ; Minnie, the wife of Henry 
Rohde, vice president of the J. B. Sickles Saddlery Hardware Company ; and 
Emma and Lillie, both at home. 

yir. ^leier was always devoted to the welfare of his home and family and 
put forth his most earnest effort for the happiness of his wife and children. He 
was not neglectful, however, of his duty to his fellowmen and a warm heart and 
generous sympathy were manifest in his relations toward the unfortunate. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he was chairman of a local committee which looked after the 
families of Union soldiers and supplied their needs. His charitable spirit was 
further manifest in his will, whereby he endowed several worthy and needy 
benevolent institutions which will long hold him in grateful remembrance. Death 
claimed him on the 13th of October, 1900, when he had passed the eighty-first 
milestone on the journey of life. x\ review of his career showed that he had acted 
well his part and while there was nothing spectacular in his history, it is none the 
less interesting or worthy of emulation. In fact, it furnishes a splendid example 
to those who seek in the ordinary afl^airs of a business career an honorable suc- 
cess. 



JAMES CRAWFORD FLYNN. 

James Crawford Flynn, in his youth an apprentice at the shoemaker's trade, 
is now conducting a prosperous contracting business and as the architect of his 
own fortunes has built wisely and well. A native son of the Emerald isle, he 
was born in County Cavan on the 12th of April, 1840, his parents being Ow^en 
and Martha (Crawford) Flynn, who came to the United States about ten years 
after the arrival of their son James, although they never lived west of Connecti- 
cut. The mother died in that state, after which the father returned to his native 
country, where he remained until his demise. He was a carpenter by trade and 
in that field of labor provided for the support of his family. 

James C. Flynn obtained his education in his native country and came to 
the United States in the year 1857 when a youth of seventeen. Favorable reports 
reached him concerning America and her opportunities and proved too attractive 
to be resisted. He therefore 1:)ade adieu to friends and native land and joined 
his sisters, who were living in Cormecticut. I fc had previously served an appren- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 261 

ticeship to the shoemaker's trade in Ireland and after reaching America was 
apprenticed to the carpenter's trade, for he beheved he would find it more con- 
genial than the occupation for which he had been trained in Ireland. He thor- 
oughly mastered the builders' art, becoming an expert workman and, believing 
that the middle west offered still better advantages, he removed to St. Louis in 
1866. Here his first day's wages were four dollars and a half, while in Connecti- 
cut he had received only one dollar and seventy-five cents per day. He was 
employed as a carpenter in this city for five years and then took up the business 
of contracting on his own account, continuing in this line to the present time. 
Success has attended him, for the extent and nature of his business has brought 
him continually increasing prosperity, and he has long since reached a place of 
affluence. 

Mr. Flynn gives his political endorsement to the republican party and keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day. His church relations are 
with the Protestant Episcopal denomination, while socially he is connected with 
the Odd F"ellows' Society. He was married March 4, 1864, to Aliss Louise M. 
Matthews, of Southington, Connecticut, a daughter of Harry Matthews, a manu- 
facturer of that place. Two children were born unto them : Annice, now the 
wife of Charles Hutton, of Oswego, Kansas; and Cecily, now Mrs. E. Knapp, 
of Havana, Cuba. They also lost a daughter and son: Mattie, who married 
Ferdinand Essman and is now deceased ; and Ben, who died in childhood. 

Mr. Flvnn has never had occasion to regret his determination to seek a 
home in the new world, for he here found the opportunities which he sought 
and which, by the way, are always open to ambitious, energetic young men. He 
has persevered in the pursuit of a persistent purpose and has at length gained a 
satisfactory reward. 



FREDERICK W. HOYT. 

Frederick W. Hoyt, engaged in the wholesale jewelry business in St. Louis, 
with residence in Kirkwood, is separated by half the continent from the place 
of his nativity, for he was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, November 6, 1853. 
His parents were George J. and Frances E. (Beardsley) Hoyt, the former a 
leather manufacturer of Bridgeport, Connecticut. The grandparents on both 
sides of the family were born and reared in the Charter Oak state and the 
Hoyt ancestors, who founded the family in America, came from England at an 
early period in the colonization of the new world. 

In the public schools of his native city, Frederick W. Hoyt pursued his 
early education, attending the same schoolhouse in wdiich his mother had pur- 
sued her studies and which was used for educational purposes for an entire 
century. His commercial training was received in Bryant & Stratton Business 
College. He first engaged in the drug business as an apprentice and later be- 
came clerk until, feeling that his experience was sufficient to justify his em- 
barkation in business on his own account, he established a retail drug store in 
Chicago, conducting the enterprise with success from 1877 until 1881. In 
February of the latter year he came to St. Louis and engaged in the wholesale 
jewelry business, with a trade which extends throughout the country but princi- 
pally in the west. His association with commercial interests in St. Louis, cover- 
ing a period of twenty-eight years, has demonstrated beyond a doubt that he 
has passed beyond the majority in the development of those powers which are 
so essential for the successful conduct of commercial enterprises. Watchful 
of all the indications pointing to the increase of trade and the growth of sales, 
he has wrought along modern business lines and the spirit of determined en- 
terprise which he has manifested has enabled him to overcome the difficulties 
and obstacles wdiich constitute an element in every business undertaking. 



262 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Mr. Hovt's military experience is confined to service with the Fifth Mary- 
land Regiment at Baltimore and with the First Regiment of the Illinois National 
Guard of Chicago. His political endorsement is given unfalteringly to the re- 
publican party, and in the Masonic fraternity he has become a Knight Templar 
and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He also belongs to the Mercantile Club 
and to the Grace Episcopal church of Kirkwood. These membership relations 
indicate that his interests are broad and varied, that his outlook of life, its 
opportunities and its obligations, is a wide one. He was married in Kirkwood, 
October 26, 1881, to Miss Mary Andrews and they maintain their home in that 
city, from which Mr. Hoyt goes daily to St. Louis to superintend the inter- 
est's of the wholesale trade, which has now claimed his time and energies for 
almost three decades. 



ELIAS S. GATCH. 

In this age of mammoth business enterprises it is no unusual thing to find 
a man at the head of extensive concerns who is bending every energy to the 
accomplishment of a given purpose but while persistency and ambition are to 
be commended, the man of well developed and well rounded character must 
have other interests to serve as a balance wheel. While Mr. Catch has be- 
come widely known by reason of his success as president of the Granby Mining 
& Smelting Company, he is also well known for social qualities which are man- 
ifest in his association with various clubs and societies and for his activity in 
connection with church and charitable work. There is, therefore, another side 
to the life of Mr. Catch in addition to that which is manifest in his capable con- 
trol of important business interests — a side which responds readily to social 
amenities and to the needs of those who have been less fortunate in fife. 

A native of Ohio, he was born in Milford, Clermont county, February 14, 
1859, the eldest son of John Newton and Georgianna (Hutchinson) Catch, the 
latter a native of New Hampshire. The father was a farmer of Clermont 
county and while spending his boyhood days under the parental roof Elias S. 
Catch improved the educational advantages offered by the public schools. He 
afterward attended Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio, from which he was grad- 
uated, and subsequently completed a course in the Iowa Wesleyan University 
at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, by graduation with the class of 1882. His initial 
step into the business world was made in connection with educational interests, 
serving as principal of the schools of Woodville, Ohio, in 1879 and 1880. 

Becoming interested in mining, his gradually expanding powers in that di- 
rection led to his selection for the secretaryship of the Cranby Mining & Smelt- 
ing Company in 1894. He so continued until 1896, when he became general 
manager, his incumbency in the dual office of secretary and general manager, 
continuing from 1896 until 1906. On the expiration of that decade he was 
elected to the presidency of the company. He has made it his purpose and plan 
to inform himself thoroughly upon the subject of mining from the scientific 
and from the practical standpoint, to know ore, to recognize its possibilities 
anrl unrjcrstand the probable results of the development of mining properties. 
Me is likewise known in financial circles of St. Louis as a director of the Mer- 
chants Laclede National Bank. 

That he occupies a prominent place as a representative of mining interests 
is indicated by the fact that he is now a member of the American Institute of 
Mining Plngineers and a life member of the American Mining Congress, while 
of the iiureau of Geology and Mines of the state of Missouri he is serving 
as vice president of the board of managers. He is also a member of the 
Merchants Exchange of St. Louis and of the Business Men's League. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 263 

On the 7th of June, 1887, occurred the marriage of Mr. Gatch and Miss 
Katherine Burnes of St. Joseph, Missouri, a daughter of Daniel D. Burnes and 
the adopted daughter of James N. Burnes, who represented his district in con- 
gress and died while so engaged. Mr. and Mrs. Gatch became the parents of 
three sons and a daughter: Nelson Burnes, who is a freshman in Columbia Col- 
lege ; Hayward Hutchinson, who is attending Smith's Academy ; Katherine, a 
student in Mary Institute at St. Louis ; and Calvin F., who is also a pupil in 
Smith's Academy of St. Louis. 

Mr. Gatch was a member of the vestry of St. George's church, which 
merged into the cathedral, and he is now a member of the Chapter of Christ 
Church Cathedral. In church work he is active and prominent, cooperating 
in the various lines which extend and promote church influences. Deeply in- 
terested in the moral training of youth, he served for seven years, from 1897 
until 1904, as superintendent of the Sunday school of St. George's church. No 
good work done in the name of charity or religion solicits his aid in vain. 
He belongs to the St. Louis Club, to the Normandie Golf Club of St. Louis, 
is a member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity and also of the Society of Sons 
of the American Revolution, while of the Ohio Society of St. Louis he was 
president in 1903. A little above medium height, he is a man of fine personal 
appearance, dignified and forceful, with a personality that commands respect 
and wins regard. His influence is ever found on the side of progress and 
association with him means expansion and elevation. 



FREDERICK L. WESTERBECK. 

Frederick L. Westerbeck, for a half century a resident of St. Louis, is a 
representative of the German-American element in our citizenship — an element 
that has been of large practical strength, value and utility, playing an important 
part in the progress of the city. He is today president of the Columbia Can 
Company, which he organized in 1878 and which is recognized as one of the 
important industrial concerns of St. Louis. His birth occurred in Branden- 
burg near Berhn, Germany, July 3, 185 1, and in 1858 he was brought to the 
/ United States by his parents, Fred and Mary Westerbeck. After arriving in 
this city the father was identified with various business interests and served 
as a soldier of the Union army during the Civil war. His death occurred in 
the year 1876. 

His son, Frederick L. Westerbeck, was for a time a pupil in the public 
schools but is largely self educated, for he started in the business world in 
his fourteenth year. For a time he attended night school but the fact that he 
is now a well informed man is attributable largely to his reading, investigation 
and the valuable lessons which he has learned in the school of experience. He 
began earning his own living in the rope works in the northwestern part of 
the city and later secured a situation in the chair factory of Conradies & 
Logeman, with whom he continued for about a year and a half. On the ex- 
piration of that period he became connected with the business of can manu- 
facturing, entering the employ of A. L. Gesrich, with whom he continued for 
five years. He was next with the J. H. Pocock Can Company and after three 
months took charge of the factory, continuing there for eight years. In the 
meantime he had gained comprehensive knowledge of the business, so that he 
was well qualified for the position which he occupied as an executive official. 
On severing his connection with that house he formed a partnership with 
William F. C. Quehl under the name of the Western Can Company, with 
whom he was associated for two years. He then withdrew from that partner- 
ship and took charge of the interests of the St. Louis Beef Canning Company, 
having supervision over a plant in which twenty-five hundred people were 



264 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

employed. His supervision of his interests proved a strong element in its 
success but in 1882 he withdrew in order to begin business on his own account 
under the name of the jSIound City Can Company. In 1901 he sold out to the 
American Can Company but remained in charge of the plant for a year and 
a half, after which he resigned. He then organized the Columbia Can Com- 
pany, which is an important productive industry, furnishing employment to 
about two hundred people. His business interests have ever been conducted 
along safe and conservative yet progressive lines and, regarding no detail of 
the business as too unimportant to receive his personal attention, Mr. Wester- 
beck has infused into this concern the spirit of energy and determination which 
has characterized him throughout his entire life. He stands today as one of 
the prominent representatives of trade interests in the city and aside from the 
presidency of the Columbia Can Company, he has for the past thirteen years 
been treasurer of the St. Louis Paint, Oil & Drug Company and is a director 
of the Northwestern Savings Bank. 

In St. Louis in 1871 Mr. Westerbeck was married to Miss Wernerman 
and unto them were born six children: Fred, vice president of the company; 
Emil, who is secretary and treasurer of the company; Anna, the wife of Charles 
Doermann, who is manager of the company ; Emma, the wife of John Briggs, 
traveling salesman for the house ; Laura, who is a graduate of the high school 
and is the wdfe of Valentine Beiser ; and Clara, who is now a high school student. 
In 1894 j\Ir. Westerbeck was again married, his second union being with Miss 
[Mary Koestering, a daughter of the Rev. Koestering, a Lutheran minister. 
There is one child of this marriage, Ida, who is yet in school. 

Mr. Westerbeck has also been a member of various St. Louis organiza- 
tions for the promotion of business development and trade relations and his 
efforts in this direction have been effective and far reachuig. He was reared 
in the Lutheran church, in which he holds membership. His political support 
is given to the republican party on questions of state and national importance 
but he casts an independent local ballot. He has many friends who recognize 
his genuine worth and appreciate the manly qualities that he has always dis- 
played in every relation of life. Entirely free from ostentation or display, 
he is well known nevertheless as one whose sterling traits of character have 
been in harmony with his high ideals of manhood and of citizenship. 

\ 



JUDGE ALBERT DEXTER NORTONI. 

Through stages of consecutive progress that have marked the development 
of his native powers and energies Albert Dexter Nortoni has risen in the legal 
profession to rank with the eminent jurists of the state and is now serving as 
associate justice of the IMissouri court of appeals. In the interim since his 
election to the bench he has shown himself the peer among the ablest members 
who have labored in the courts. Few men of his years have been honored with 
election to the high office which he is now filling. 

His life recorrl began July 26, 1867, at New Cambria, Macon county, Missouri, 
his parents being Dr. Edward Warren and Hannah T. (Howell) Nortoni. 
Through the medium of the common schools and under private instruction he 
mastered the fundamental branches of English knowledge that have served as a 
sound basis upon which to rear the superstructure of professional learning. 
Careful preparation for the bar was followed by his admission in 1888 and from 
the age of twenty-one years he continued in the practice of law as a representa- 
tive of the bar of Macon, Linn and Chariton counties. Later he removed to 
the city of St. Ivrmis, where he continued in active practice until called to the 
bench. With indomitable courage and energy, fearing not that laborious at- 
tention to details so necessary in the preparatioti of his cases, he entered upon 




ALBERT D. NORTON I 



266 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

his career as a lawyer, and such was his force of character and natural qualifi- 
cations that he has overcome all obstacles and carved his name high upon the 
keystone of the legal arch. 

Judge Xortoni has again and again been called to public office, though 
usually he has declined political honors save in the strict path of his profession. 
However, he served as school director at New Cambria, Missouri, for one term, 
and for one term was private secretary to Congressman C. N. Clark of the first 
^Missouri district. In more specifically professional lines there stands to his 
credit two terms as city attorney at New Cambria, during which time he prose- 
cuted the cases for the city without fear or favor. In 1893 he was prominent 
in the prosecution of the naturalization cases and secured the conviction of 
several prominent politicians. He also prosecuted Senator Burton of Kansas 
during the first trial. He marshals the points in evidence with the skill of a 
military leader, each detail bearing full upon the case, while he never loses sight 
for an instant of the important point upon which the decision of every case 
finally turns. In 1894 he received the unanimous support of the republican 
party in the nomination for probate judge of Macon county, but declined to 
make the race. He was made the nominee of his party in 1896 for state senator 
in the ninth district, but was defeated, and again met defeat when republican 
candidate for circuit judge of the second district in 1898. 

On the ist of January, 1903, he was appointed first assistant United States 
district attorney to serve with Colonel D. P. Dyer, now judge of the federal 
branch, and located in St. Louis. His capability in that office made his election 
as judge of the St. Louis court of appeals but a logical step in his professional 
career. He was elected in November, 1904, for a twelve years' term. His re- 
ported opinions are monuments of his profound legal learning and superior 
ability, more lasting than brass or marble and more honorable than battles fought 
and won. They show a thorough mastery of the questions involved and rare 
simplicity of style and an admirable terseness and clearness in statement of the 
principles upon which the opinions rest. 

On the 22(1 of December, 1892, Mr. Nortoni was married to Miss Maggie 
i^. Francis, a daughter of Thomas Francis, of Macon county, Missouri. She 
died September 30, 1894, and on the 3d of August, 1906, Judge Nortoni was 
again married, his second union being with Emma I. Belcher, of Columbia, 
Missouri. 

Judge Xortoni is well known in other relations than as a representative 
of the judiciary, being a loyal exponent of the basic principles of Odd Fellowship 
and of the Modern Woodmen of America. He is also a member of the Presby- 
terian church and in various ways has received expression of the high consid- 
eration which his fellowmen entertain for the integrity, dignity, impartiality, 
love of justice and strong common sense which mark his character as a judge 
and as a man. 



CLINTON ROWELL. 



Clinton Rowell, for forty years a practitioner at the St. Louis bar, was 
one of the native sons of New England, his birth having occurred in Concord, 
Essex county, Vermont, November 12, 1838. His parents were Guy and 
Clarissa (Rankin) Rowell, both representatives of old families of that section 
of the country. They removed to New Hampshire during the infancy of their 
son Clinton and his boyhood and youth were spent upon a farm in the old 
Granite state. As a public-school student he acquired his preliminary education, 
which was supplemented by a preparatory course in the academies of New 
Hampshire prior to his matriculation in Dartmouth College, where he com- 
pleted his more specifically literary course. Soon after leaving college he 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CIT^'. 267 

engaged in active and successful practice. St. Louis was then taking on a 
new lease of life and business activity following the depression occasioned by 
conditions of the Civil war. 

Mr. Rowell became a partner of D. D. Fisher, with whom he remained 
in active professional connections until Mr. Fisher's election as judge of the 
circuit court in 1889. Not long afterward Mr. Rowell became senior partner 
of the firm of Rowell & Ferriss, being joined by Franklin Ferriss in organizing 
what became recognized as one of the strongest law firms of the west. A 
contemporary biographer has said of Mr. Rowell: "Deeply in love, apparently, 
with both the study and the practice of the law Mr. Rowell has been, in all 
that the term implies, a lawyer, and he has neither wandered into the tempting 
field of politics nor allowed commercial or business interests to divert his at- 
tention from the calling to which he pledged his best efforts, his time and 
his natural endowments in early manhood. Throughout a third of a century 
almost, during which he has been a member of the St. Louis bar, there has 
been, in his case, a steady growth of attainments, a constant expansion of 
reasoning and analytical powers and a broadening of knowledge, and gratifying 
success as a practitioner has come to him as the reward of merit. Having 
many of the attributes of a popular orator, he has been eloquent, forcible and 
convincing as an advocate and trial lawyer, and being, at the same time, a 
close student of the law, with large capacity for research and investigation 
and an unusually retentive memory, he has achieved a no less enviable dis- 
tinction as a wise, candid and judicious counselor." 

Mr. Rowell was not learned in the law alone, for he studied long and care- 
fully the subjects that are to the statesman and the man of atTairs of the 
greatest import — the questions of finance, political economy, sociology — and kept 
removed to the middle west and began preparation for the bar as a student 
in the law ofifice of a leading law firm of Bloomington, Illinois. In that city 
he was admitted to the bar and in 1866 he removed to St. Louis, where he 
abreast with the best thinking men of the age. His study of these questions 
was not alone from the theoretic standpoint, for his knowledge was also 
gleaned from discussions with the merchants, manufacturers, financiers and 
prominent business men of St. Louis, and in 1893 ^""^ ^^^s sent to Washington 
as one of the representatives of the business and financial interests of the 
city to urge the repeal of the silver purchase clause of the Sherman Law before 
a committee of congress. It is said that his argument was one of the most 
clear, logical and convincing ever made before the assembled legislators on 
a subject which was then attracting the attention of the whole country. He 
always stood as a stalwart defender of the democracy but had no political aspira- 
tion for himself. On the contrary, he preferred to perform his public service 
as a private citizen and his influence was perhaps all the more potent, from the 
fact that it was moral rather than political and because it was well known that 
he had no personal interest to serve but sought general good. His familiarity 
with literature and with art, added to his specific information in many other 
lines, made him a man of broad general culture and there was seldom a sub- 
ject broached in any gathering on which he was not qualified to speak in- 
telligently and entertainingly. 

Mr. Rowell was married in 1868 to Miss Carrie M. Ferriss and they became 
the parents of two children. His circle of friends was a most extensive one. 
bringing him into close connection with the best and oldest families of the 
city. Mr. Rowell stood as one of the foremost citizens of St. Louis, by reason 
of his long residence here, by reason of his active, honorable and successful 
connection with its professional interests and by reason of the helpful part 
which he took in promoting those plans and measures which have been of 
direct benefit to the city. 

Death came to him suddenly, November i, 1908. He remained an actiw 
factor in the afifairs of life to the last and when he was laid to rest his funeral 



268 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

was attended by the most distinguished members of the bar and prominent 
citizens who recognized his worth and abihty, and gathered to pay the last 
tribute of respect to one whom they had known and honored. They regarded 
him as one among the foremost of those 

"Men who their duties know 
But also know their rights, and knowing, dare maintain." 

His considerate courtesy and uniform urbanity to all, old or young, with 
whom he came in contact, are the rare qualities of the old school gentleman, 
and wdiile he manifested these traits he also kept in touch with the advanced 
thought of the day in all of the relations bearing upon public interests. 



GEORGE N. LYNCH. 



George N. Lynch, who for many years was connected with one of the 
oldest business enterprises of St. Louis, was born in St. Charles, Missouri, 
November 30, 1824, and passed away in St. Louis in 1896. His parents were 
Thomas and Catherine (Saucier) Lynch, who in the year 1829 removed from 
St. Charles to St. Louis, their son George being at that time a little lad of 
five years. He was educated in the public schools and in St. Xaviers College. 
He also pursued a course of study in St. Charles College and likewise attended 
private schools in St. Louis. At an earl}^ age Mr. Lynch received business 
training under his father, who was proprietor of a furniture and undertaking 
establishment, which was then located at the corner of Vine and Charles streets. 
The association between father and son was continued until 1852, when the 
latter succeeded to the business in partnership with his brother William, who, 
after about two years, was killed in the Gasconade Railroad wreck in 1855. 
Mr. Lynch was then alone in business and capably controlled his interests, 
remaining at the original location until 1864, when a removal was made to No. 
608 Olive street. The growth of the business necessitated another removal 
in 1879, when quarters were secured at No. 1008 Olive street. Again more 
room was demanded in 1886 and the business was established at No. 1216 Olive 
street. Beside his interest in the undertaking business, Mr. Lynch also became 
a partner of R. R. Scott in the ownership of a livery business, which was con- 
ducted at No. 114 Elm street, under the firm style of Scott & Lynch. The 
undertaking business was one of the oldest of the city, having been established 
in 1829 and Mr. Lynch continued in active connection therewith until his death. 

He was married twice, his first wife being Miss Annie C. McGovern, of this 
city, whom he wedded May 8, 1849. Six children were born unto them but only 
one, George N. Lynch, is now living. The wife and mother died in May, i860, 
and several years later Mr. Lynch wedded Miss Charlotte Fidler, of St. Louis, 
by whom he had eleven children, six daughters and five sons. The name of 
Lynch has long been known in the business circles of St. Louis and has ever 
been synonymous with integrity and fair dealing. Mr. Lynch of this review 
fully sustains the reputation made by his father and through his own worth 
of character gained not only the patronage but the good will and kind regard 
of his associates. 



JOHN h'RANCIS McMAHON. 

John ]'>ancis McMahon, a contractor and not unknown in democratic 
circles, was born in St. Louis, September 13, 1863, a son of John and Bridget 
(Hoganj McMahon, both of whom were natives of Ireland. The father came 
to America about 1850 and has since been a resident of St. Louis where he 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 269 

is now residing at the age of seventy years. His wife arrived in the United 
States in her girlhood days — ahout 1853 — and has now reached the age of 
sixty-eight years. The family numbered nine children of whom John F. was 
the second in order of birth and four younger members of the family are 
still living. He was educated in Christian Brothers College of St. Louis and 
in 1893 opened a real-estate office which he conducted alone until 1898. In 
that year he became engaged in the construction of streets, sewers and public 
improvements and still continues in a general contracting line. He placed the 
first sewers in Webster Grove and has done extensive business, employing a 
large force of workmen in the execution of numerous important constructions 
which bring to him a desirable annual income. 

On the I2th of February, 1890, in St. Louis Air. McAIahon was married to 
Miss Margaret E. Murphy, a daughter of Bernard and Katherine (Quan) 
Murphy, .of St. Louis. Seven children have been born unto them : Joseph F., 
eighteen years of age ; Bernard, sixteen years of age ; Alphonse, a youth of 
fourteen years ; Miriam, Gerard and Katherine, aged respectively twelve, six 
and three years; and Elizabeth, an infant. The family residence, Xo. 45.14 
Westminster place, is the property of ]\Ir. ]^IcMahon, who erected it in 1905. 
A democrat in his political views he has been active in campaign work, espe- 
cially in the support of D. R. Francis for mayor. The only office he has ever 
filled has been that of chief clerk in the water rates office from 1886 until 
1893. A Catholic in his religious faith, he belongs to Cathedral parish and 
is a member of the Knights of Father ]\Iatthew and the Knights of Columbus. 
He is fond of athletics and interested in all manly outdoor sports. A self- 
reliant character and the faithful performance of duty have been the basic 
elements whereby Mr. McMahon has worked his way upwai d until he now 
controls a profitable general contracting business. 



ISAAC HENRY ORR. 



Isaac Henry Orr, who has given undivided attention to the practice of law 
and has gained recognition in a large and distinctively representative clientage, 
is numbered among ^Missouri's native sons. His birth occurred in the town of 
Louisiana, February 14, 1862. His parents were William C. and Eliza J. Orr 
and his ancestrv in both lineal and collateral lines has been distinctively Ameri- 
can through many generations. 

At the usual age, Isaac H. Orr entered the public schools of Louisiana, 
and passing through successive grades was graduated from the high school 
in 1880. His earlv inclination was toward the legal profession and he resolved 
to follow his taste in this direction and become a member of the bar. He made 
preparation for practice as a student in the law department of the ^^'ashington 
LTniversitv of St. Louis, from which he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Law in 1883. His early experience was not that of a dreary 
novitiate. On the contrary, he very soon gained a liberal clientage, which has 
constantly increased in volume and importance. As counselor, too, he has 
achieved an enviable reputation and has important interests in that connection. 
In 1886 he became a partner of Harvey L. Christie, with whom he has since 
been associated, although the partnership was enlarged to include J. L. Bruce 
in 1893 and Charles W. Bates in 1896, at which time the firm name of Orr. 
Christie, Bates & Bruce was assumed. Mr. Orr is also personally the trust 
officer for St. Louis Union Trust Company, one of the largest financial cor- 
porations in the west, looking after the trust estates under its mana«iement. 
He was for fifteen years one of the directors of the St. Louis Law Library 
Association, and it is conceded that the law library of St. Louis is one of the 
four best of the countrv. He has some financial interests outside of his law 



270 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

practice, being a director of the Illinois State Trust Company, of the Evans 
& Howard Fire Brick Company and the Greeley Printery of St. Louis. 

Politically Mr. Orr is a republican and, while zealous in his party's in- 
terest, he manifests aside from any political connection the deepest interest 
in the welfare and upbuilding of his adopted city. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, and socially is a member of the Mercantile, Glen Echo 
Country and the Maine Hunting and Fishing Clubs. His home associations are 
most pleasant. In 1893 he married Miss Genevieve Pitman, a daughter of 
Professor R. H. Pitman, of San Jose, California. Mr. and Mrs. Orr hold 
membership with the King's Highway Presbyterian church and are interested 
in all activities working for the material, intellectual, aesthetic and moral de- 
velopment of the citv. 



CHARLES E. KIRCHER. 

In the history of St. Louis it is imperative that mention be made of 
Charles E. Kircher, who at the time of his death, which occurred October 12, 
1907, was filling the position of vice president of the German- American Bank. A 
resident of St. Louis from the age of six years, he was always keenly alive to 
the interests and welfare of the city, and, while his business duties constituted 
his chief interest, he yet found time and opportunity for participation in activ- 
ities relating to the city's benefit. 

He was born in Witterda, province of Saxony, Germany, January 16, 1846, 
a son of Casper Kircher, who died in St. Louis. The son was only six years 
of age at the time his parents left the fatherland and sailed for America, arriving 
in this city in July, 1852. iVfter attending the public and parochial schools until 
1864 Charles E. Kircher crossed the threshold of the business world, becoming 
a messenger with the firm of Ladue Lonsey & Company, with whom he con- 
tinued for a year. On the expiration of that period he was appointed messenger 
to President Felix Coste of the St. Louis Building & Savings Association, now 
the National Bank of Commerce. He remained in that institution until 1867, 
when further promotion awaited him in his appointment to the position of teller 
in the German Bank, wdiere he continued until 187 1. In that year he was made 
cashier of the IMullanphy Savings Bank, occupying the position for five years, 
when he was given a similar but more lucrative position in the Lafayette Sav- 
ings Bank, with which he continued until it was consolidated with another 
banking institution under the name of the Lafayette Bank, by which style it 
is well known. 

Air. Kircher then went to the Breman Savings Bank, where he acted as 
cashier until 1884, in which year he became cashier of the German-American 
Bank, which he thus represented for twenty-three years, when he was elected 
its vice president, continuing in that position until his death. His record was 
most creditable, being characterized by steady progression, resulting from his 
ability, close application and faithful services. Early in his career he learned 
that success is not the result of fortunate environment or influence, but must 
depend upon individual effort, and he made it his purpose to serve those he 
represented so faithfully as to establish the value of his work and cause his 
eflForts to be regarded as an indispensable factor in the conduct of the enterprise. 
No man in banking circles in St. Louis enjoyed in fuller measure the confidence 
and good will of those who re])resented the money interests of the city, and he 
was one of the best known bankers of St. Louis outside of the city. Continu- 
ing in one line of business throughout his entire life, he became thoroughly 
familiar with it and, with clear understanding of banking in everv detail, his 
opinion came to be regarded as authoritv upon any intricate financial problem. 

Mr. Kircher was married in this city to Miss Josic Cornett. Mr. Kircher 
was devoted to the welfare of his familv and was most faithful in his friend- 




CHARLES E. KTRCTIER 



272 ST. LOL'IS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

ships. He became one of the charter members of the Bank Clerks Association, 
which he assisted in organizing, and was for twenty-eight years treasurer and 
director of the North St. Louis Turners Association. He possessed executive 
abihty, keen discrimination and that energy which prompts an individual to ac- 
complish whatever he undertakes. As the years passed he gained a most en- 
viable position in the regard of his social acquaintances and his business asso- 
ciates, who found him at all times true to every trust reposed in him and faithful 
to a high standard of manhood. 



JAMES McCULLOCH ANDERSON. 

James AlcCulloch Anderson at the time of his death was the oldest whole- 
sale grocer of St. Louis. He was born in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, February 
26. 1837, and was educated at a private academy at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
When a young man of twenty-four years he succumbed to the alluring stories 
concerning the gold discoveries in California, and made the long trip across 
the sandy plains and over the mountain passes to the Pacific coast, where he 
joined the hundreds of other gold seekers who hoped to rapidly realize a fortune 
in that land of promise. For some time he engaged in prospecting but was not 
very successful, and after a few years spent in the Golden state he returned 
eastward, establishing his home at Potosi, Missouri, where he engaged in the 
grocery business. 

Thinking that the larger city of St. Louis offered still better opportunities 
he removed hither in i860 and became a member of the firm of Alkire & 
Company. Five years later he withdrew from that business association and es- 
tablished the present firm of J. M. Anderson & Company, his two sons, James 
W. and L. A. Anderson, being now his successors in business. He developed 
an extensive and profitable wholesale grocery house, his trade connections 
covering a wide territory, while throughout the entire period of his residence 
in St. Louis he enjoyed an unassailable reputation for the integrity of his com- 
mercial method and his straightforward treatment of his many patrons. At 
the time of his demise he was the oldest wholesale grocer in St. Louis, both 
in point of years and in the period of his connection with the business. 

It was in 1861 that Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Lucile 
(jwathmey, of Anchorage, Kentucky. They traveled life's journey together for 
many years, their mutual love and confidence increasing as time passed on. 
The death of ^Irs. Anderson occurred in March 1900. His life was unevent- 
ful in that his history shows no thrilling or exciting chapters aside from his 
ex])eriences in the far west. He commanded the uniform confidence of his 
fellowmen by reason of his devotion to duty, his strict conformity to a high 
standard of commercial ethics and his faithful performance of every task that 
came to him, in citizenship or in home and social relations. He left to his 
family not only a handsome competence secured through years of business activ- 
ity, but also tile princely heritage of an untarnished name. 

In addition to his two sons Mr. Anderson is still survived by a step- 
rjaughter, Florence T. Post, now the widow of James L. Post, who was a 
grandson of General Putnam Post, of New York state. He has for a number 
of years been a most ])rominent factor in business circles, his high standing 
being indicate<l in the fact that he is the youngest man ever elected a director 
of the Merchants Exchange. He became the chief flour inspector of St. Louis, 
anfj devoted his entire attention to the flour business, his enterprise and energy 
enabling him to control extensive commercial interests of that char- 
acter. In Masfjnry he was well known as a worthy exemplar of the craft, 
and he belonged to .Alpha CVnincil of the Royal Arcanum. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Post was born a son. James L. Post, who is now engaged in the advertising 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 273 

business in St. Louis. Mrs. Post is well known in social circles of this city 
and is proud of the fact that she is a resident of the Missouri metropolis, for 
it is endeared to her through the associations of her entire life. Her father 
was spoken of as one of St. Louis' best men, and the historian pays tribute to 
his honor in recording his life history with that of other distinguished and 
representative citizens of St. Louis. 



JAMES ASHBROOKE. 

Various occupations respectively require men of different dispositions and 
talents. To find the vocation for which one's natural faculties best fit him is 
an essential point in making a start in life. The study of the lives of men 
who have rendered admirable service in the professional or commercial world 
goes a great wav in enabling one to decide for what calling he is adapted and 
as well to acquire some knowledge of the methods to be followed in order to 
pursue it meritoriously. Not only should one profit by the failure of others 
but also by their successes. Every individual is qualified to do well in some 
line. However one can neither afford to wait until the proper position seeks 
him nor can he risk trying one vocation after another in order to discover his 
place among life's actors. Rather he should examine himself in the light of 
the lives of others and employ them as indices to direct him to the station in 
which he can serve with greatest usefulness. Having attained that station 
work is not a burden but a pleasure and his sole purpose will be to become more 
efficient in performing the duties devolving upon him. As superintendent for 
the Methodist Orphans Home for Boys, James Ashbrooke has officiated for 
the past eight years in such a manner as to readily convince one of the truth 
that he is serving in a capacity for which he is naturally, both in disposition 
and ability, fitted. He is a man of pleasing personality and is greatly inter- 
ested in all that pertains to the moral and religious life of boys. In the capacity 
in which he is now acting he serves in a manner worthy of the greatest praise. 
He is attentive to every detail of the work of the institution and under his 
management it has been commendable in the highest degree. 

Mr. Ashbrooke was born in Cheshire, England, January 9, 1857, the son of 
Sarah and Joseph Ashbrooke, who were natives of the same place. The fatiier 
was an agriculturist and cultivated a large farm in his native land until the 
time of his death. He is connected with the nobility of England, having had 
a niece who was united in marriage with Lord Brassey. 

James Ashbrooke received his preliminary education in the public schools. 
completing the course of study at twelve years of age. He then spent one 
year at Knutsford's Commercial College, where he completed a business course. 
His uncle, being a member of the firm of Platton & Dobell, wholesale com- 
mission merchants, engaged him as a clerk and he gradually advanced from 
one position of trust to another until he finally became cashier of the firm. After 
he had been employed by the company for thirteen years he resigned his po- 
sition and came to America, locating in Chicago, where he spent two 
years in fhe employ of the Anglo-American Provision Company. At the end 
of this period he withdrew from the activities of crowded cities and business 
establishments and repaired to the country, where for a period of live months 
he engaged in farming. Returning to Chicago he again engage(l with the 
Anglo-American Provision Company, with whom he remained for nine months 
and upon his resignation he became bookkeeper for Stern & .-Kdams. a dry- 
goods commission house, in which capacity he acted for the next eight years. 
Severing his relations with this firm, he was employed for seven years as book- 
keeper for the R. J. Gunning Company of Chicago and then located in St. 
Louis, where he worked as a solicitor for a real-estate firm. At the same time 

IS— VOL. II. 



274 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

he had charge of the repairing- and cleaning of the St. ]\Iark's Episcopal church 
and while serving in this position he was asked to assume the duties of super- 
intendent of the Methodist Episcopal Orphans Home, in which station he is 
now serving. ]\Ir. Ashbrooke possesses traits and qualities of character which 
have not only endeared him to all with whom he has come in contact but 
particularlv to the boys of the institution. No one could better serve in this 
position than he and during the eight years he has been manager of the home 
it has had less sickness than any other institution of the kind in the city. 

In January, 1883, Air. Ashbrooke was united in marriage to Miss Margaretta 
Webster, and they occupy a suite of rooms at the Orphans Home. In politics 
Mr. Ashbrooke is a republican, and upon mention that he is a member of the 
Methodist church his religious faith is apparent. For the past three years he 
has been associated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



TOHN PATTERSON RAMSEY. 

John Patterson Ramsey, who for almost a quarter of a century has been 
a representative of railroad interests, his course being marked by steady pro- 
motion resulting from his expanding powers, is president of the Chicago, Peoria 
& St. Louis Railroad Company. His parents, Joseph and Mary (Patterson) 
Ramsev. left Covington, Kentucky, where he was born, November 21, 1864, 
during his early childhood, and he was educated in the public schools of western 
Pennsylvania and in the Western University of Pennsylvania. 

He has been continuously connected with railroad service since 1885, rep- 
resenting various roads until 1887, in which year he became assistant on the 
engineering corps of the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad, with which 
he continued until 1890. He was then made supervisor of the Cincinnati, Ham- 
ilton & Indianapolis division of the same road, followed by promotion to gen- 
eral road master of the Fort Wayne, Cincinnati & Louisville Railroad, with 
which he was thus connected in 1890 and 1891. He then became engineer on 
the maintenance way of the Columbus, Hocking Valley & Toledo Railway, 
and in 1892 accepted the superintendency of the Ohio Southern Railway. From 
1803 until 1895 he was road master of the Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis Railway 
and the Litchfield, Carrollton & Western Railway. His next forward step 
made him engineer of maintenance way for the Peoria & Pekin Union Railway, 
and in 1896 he became general manager of the Madre & Pacific Railway and 
president of the El Paso Southern Railway, so continuing for eight years, or 
until 1904. at which time he became director and general manager of the Chi- 
cago. Peoria & St. Louis Railway Company ; general manager of the Litchfield 
& ]^Iadison Railway ; a director and member of the executive committee of 
the Peoria & Pekin Union Railway ; and director of the Missouri & Illinois 
Bridge & Terminal Railway. In October, 1906, he resigned the position of 
general manager of the Litchfield & Madison Railway, and in addition to his 
other duties became vice president of the Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis Railway 
Company, there being no president, but on the 14th of December, 1908, he was 
elected president of tliis company, which position he is now filling. The steps 
in his orderly progression which mark his life work are thus easily discernible. 
He has ])assed on to positions of executive control and the development of his 
latent powers and energies have qualified him for a successful conduct of the 
intricate interests of railroad ojjcration. He has learned to shape into unity 
adverse elements and to bring into harmony the manifold forces in the relative 
departments of railroad service. He has become recognized as one of the 
prominent representatives of railroad interests of the middle west. 

Mr. Ramsey belongs to the Railway Engineering and Maintenance Way 
Association. He is also a member oi the Railwav, the ^Mercantile and the 




JOHN P. RAAISEY 



276 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

Xoondav Clubs of St. Louis and the Lagonda Club of Springfield, Ohio, and of 
the Sangamo Club and the Chamber of Commerce of Springfield, Illinois. In 
his religious belief he is a Congregationalist. On the i8th of March, 1892, Mr. 
Ramsey wedded 2^Iary Grant Burrows and their children are Clorinda Burrows 
and John Patterson Ramsey. With his family he greatly enjoys automobiling, 
and outdoor life has for him strong attraction and constitutes his chief source 
of rest and recreation. 



GOODxMAN KING. 



Among the great enterprises which have made St. Louis a commercial 
center none is more widely known throughout the country than that which is 
conducted under the name of the Mermod, Jaccard & King Jewelry Company, 
of which Goodman King is the president. His rise in the business world is 
one of the notable examples of American enterprise, whereby the individual, 
through the force of his character and the utilization of opportunity, gains 
marked distinction, leaving the ranks of the many to stand among the success- 
ful few. 

Mr. King was educated in the public and private schools of St. Louis and 
in Clark's Academy. Entering upon his business career on the 7th of October, 
1865, on which day he assumed the position of bookkeeper and cashier with 
the Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Company, he has made consecutive advance- 
ment, continuing with the original house until the present time finally attain- 
ing the presidency of the Mermod, Jaccard & King Jewelry Company, of 
which he is the present directing head, this house being one of the world's 
most renowned jewelry and art establishments. In an analysis of his life record 
certain characteristics stand out prominently. He made it his purpose to learn 
the business thoroughly and did not feel that his duty was done when he had 
accomplished a task assigned to him. On the contrary, he made the interests 
of the house his own and thus passed on to positions of administrative import- 
ance, in which his acts and commercial moves have been the result of definite 
consideration and sound judgment. Energy and good system have been the 
foundation of his successful management of an establishment which by its 
greatness and success is a credit to the city of St. Louis and a source of pride 
to every resident of the city and the Mississippi valley. 

Mr. King's interests outside of the extensive jewelry house have been in 
the line of public civic improvements and aesthetic art culture. He was one 
of the founders and a director of the Fall Festivities Association and chair- 
man of its publicity and promotion committee. He has labored untiringly to 
make the occasion of the fall festival one of great attraction to non-residents 
of St. Louis and a source of exploiting interests and advantages of the city to 
its growth and promotion. He was one of the organizers and a member of the 
executive committee and vice president of the Business Men's League. He 
received recognition in art circles, when, in 1893, l"*^ was appointed judge and 
historian oi the art metal section of the department of liberal arts at the World's, 
Columbian Exposition in Chicago. He was also a director and department 
juror of the Louisiana i'urchase Exposition of St. Louis, also vice president of 
the liberal arts, manufacturers, anthropology and ethnology departments of the 
same anrl special commissioner to Japan on behalf of the exposition. Interested 
in all that furthers the advancement of knowledge concerning the sciences and 
the arts, he is a member of the St. Louis Academy of Science and of the Mis- 
souri Historical Association, the Archaological Institute of America, and the 
National Geographical Society, lie was created by the government of France 
an "Officer de r.Xcademie" with the title of "Officer dc I'instruction ])ublique," 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 277 

in recognition of his labors at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and his devo- 
tion to the cause of "Les Beaux Arts." 

Mr. King was married in St. Louis on the 30th of April, 1884, to Miss 
Mary Hopkins, and their son, Clarence Hopkins King, is a Yale graduate of 
1907. The family attend the Presbyterian church and in addition to his mem- 
bership therein Mr. King is identified through membership relations with various 
fraternities and clubs. He is a past master of Occidental lodge, A. 
F. & A. M. ; and a member of St. Louis chapter, R. A. M. ; St. 
Louis commandery, K. T. ; and Moolah temple of the Mystic Shrine. Fie 
was one of the organizers of the St. Louis Club, with which he is still connected, 
and is likewise a valued representative of the Noonday, Mercantile and Mis- 
souri Athletic Clubs. He stands today as the exponent of progress in many 
lines, not because he seeks distinction of this character but because of his deep 
interest in subjects which promote culture and broaden the intellect, and asso- 
ciation with him means expansion and elevation. 



MARTIN ALEXANDER SEWARD. 

Martin Alexander Seward, a member of the firm of More & Seward, at- 
torneys of St. Louis with offices in the Commonwealth Trust building, started 
upon the journey of life December 22, 1873, at Hamilton, Ohio, and has made 
rapid progress on the upward climb, having outdistanced many who started out 
ahead of him and gained with each advanced step a broader outlook and wider 
opportunities. His father, John Seward, was born and still lives in Hamilton, 
Ohio, where he is engaged in the insurance business. His father, George 
Seward, was a cousin of William Henry Seward, prominent in the Civil war 
period of our country's history. The Seward family is of Welsh origin and the 
original representatives of the name in America settled in New Jersey in 1700. 
They were two brothers, Samuel and Obadiah, the latter being the founder of 
the branch of the family to which our subject belongs. Esther Woodruff Hunter 
Seward, the mother of Martin A. Seward, was one of fourteen children and 
died in 1902. Her father was William Noble Hunter, who emigrated to America 
from Rockingham county, Scotland, and settled just outside of the corporation 
limits of Cincinnati, Ohio. He died just before his golden wedding celebration, 
for which invitations had been issued. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Esther Woodruff Symmes and was a cousin of Anna Symmes, the wife of 
William Henry Harrison and a daughter of Captain John Cleves Symmes, who 
was the original owner of the tract of land on which the city of Cincinnati is 
now located. The maternal great-grandmother of ]vlr. Seward was Phoebe 
Randolph, of Roanoke, Virginia, who became the wife of Judge Celadon 
Symmes, who was common police judge of New Jersey. 

It will thus be seen that Martin A. Seward comes of an ancestry honorable 
and distinguished, the names of various representatives of the family in both 
paternal and maternal lines figuring in connection with important historical 
events during the various periods in which they lived. Mr. Seward was edu- 
cated in the public school and was graduated from the Hamilton high school 
in June, 1892. He then took up the academic course at Cornell University in 
Ithaca, New York, completed it and eventually received the LL. P>. degree from 
the College of Law of that institution in 1897. The following year he located 
for practice in St. Louis and was alone in his profession until September 13, 
1901. when he became junior partner of the present firm of More & Seward. 
They confine their attention to civil law, making a specialty of corporation and 
commercial law, their clientage being extensive and of an im])ortant character. 
Mr. Seward was acting city attorney for four years, from 1898 until 1902. with 
P. P. Taylor. He has been financially interested in various business enterprises, 



278 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

while his official connection therewith has given him a voice in their manage- 
ment. He is a director and secretary- of the Jerome Chemical Company of St. 
Louis and was formerh- a director of various other corporations. 

Mr. Seward manifests only a citizen's interest in politics, voting for the 
republican party. He belongs to the Lindell Avenue Methodist Episcopal church 
and from 1898 until 1900 he was secretary of the Cornell Alumni Association. 
He was likewise the secretary of the Phi Delta Theta and wrote the history of 
that organization for the Greek letter societies of St. Louis. He belongs also 
to the Theta Xu Epsilon, a class fraternity, and was one of the organizers of 
the Round Table Law School Club and one of the organizers of the Boardman 
Club. He belongs to the Algonquin Country Club and is interested in tennis and 
golf. Fraternally he is associated with the Red Cross Lodge of the Knights of 
Fythias and with the National Union, while in more strictly professional lines 
he is connected with the Law Library Association. He has won for himself 
very favorable criticism for the careful and systematic methods which he has 
followed. In the discussion of legal matters before the court the wnde range of 
his professional acquirements is demonstrated through his correct application of 
legal principles. His utterances are clear and concise and, clothed in the sound 
logic of truth, carry conviction to the minds of those who hear him, while merit 
is enablingr him to mount the ladder of fame. 



HON. DAVID P. DYER. 

When the history of St. Louis and her public men shall be recorded, its 
pages will bear no more illustrious name than that of Hon. David P. Dyer, judge 
of the United States district court. He has been faultless in honor, fearless in 
purpose and stainless in reputation during the long period of almost a half cen- 
tury with which he has been identified with the St. Louis bar and with the pub- 
lic interests of the state, and now as a member of the United States district 
court he is proving himself to be the peer of the ablest members who have sat 
on the bench. 

He began the journey of life in Henry county, Virginia, February 12, 1838. 
He is a son of David and Nancy (Salmon) Dyer and is of English lineage, rep- 
resenting one of the old Virginian families established in America in colonial 
days. His grandfather, George Dyer, was a soldier of the Continental army in 
the Revolutionary war and when the country again became engaged in conflict 
with Great Britain, David Dyer, the father, joined a Virginian regiment for duty 
at the front. He also rendered conspicuous service for his district in the Virginia 
legislature, representing his constituents for a period of sixteen years, during 
which time he sat in both the upper and lower houses of the general assembly. 
He became a pioneer resident of Lincoln county, Missouri, in 1841, and three 
years later passed away, while his widow, surviving him for many years, reached 
the advanced age of ninety-five. 

The experiences of Judge Dyer in his youth were those on a farm upon the 
frontier. Lessons of inrlustry were early impressed upon his mind, while his 
primary intellectual training came to him through the medium of the common 
schools of Lincoln county. Later he enjoyed the advantages of instruction in St. 
Charles College and for a year was identified with educational work as a teacher 
in Lincoln and Warren counties, Missouri. His preliminary preparation for the 
1>ar was made in the office and under the direction of James O. Broadhead and 
in 1859 he was licensed to practice in the courts of Missouri. Along with those 
qualities indispensable to the lawyer — a keen, rapid, logical mind plus the busi- 
ness sense and a ready capacity for hard work — he brought to the starting point 
of his legal career certain rare gifts — eloquence of language and a strong per- 
sonality. He was possessed, too, of laudable ambition and unfaltering purpose 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 279 

and was not long in gaining that recognition which proved his initial step toward 
the fame and success that have been his in later years. In i860 he was elected 
circuit attorney of the third judicial district, which embraced the counties of 
Pike, Lincoln, Warren, Montgomery and Callaway. He was for two years asso- 
ciated in the practice of law with John B. Henderson and in the same year in 
which he formed his partnership — 1862 — was elected to represent his district in 
the house of representatives, while public endorsement of his first term's service 
came to him at a reelection in 1864 as the representative of Pike countv. He at 
once took his place with the leaders of the assembly, of which he was always an 
earnesj; working member, connected wdth much of the important constructive 
work done in the committee rooms. Although then but twenty-four years of 
age. he was made chairman of the judiciary committee and the course which he 
pursued in that connection won him high encomiums from the distinguished law- 
yers and judges of the day. 

The time of the Civil war drew on, when every citizen was deeplv interested 
in the political questions and issues of the hour. Judge Dyer took a firm stand 
in support of the supremacy of the government and used every effort in his 
power to favor measures designing to promote the national interests and espe- 
cially to save Missouri to the Union. Prior to the outbreak of hostilities he had 
been known as a Douglas democrat, but he felt that the hour had come when 
the national welfare transcended all political parties or partisan interests and, 
recruiting the Forty-ninth Regiment of Missouri Volunteers, he was joined by 
many who had learned to respect and honor him for his rational, conservative 
views and wdio felt that the step which he now took was no hasty or ill advised 
one. Commanding this regiment as colonel, he was stationed in the interior of 
Missouri during the momentous operations of the summer of 1864. He was 
then transferred to the Department of the Gulf, taking an active part in the 
battles about ]\Iobile, where his regiment sustained a considerable loss in killed 
and wounded. In August, 1865, three months after open hostilities had ceased, 
Colonel Dyer and his regiment were mustered out of the service. 

On his return from the south the practice of law was at once resumed and 
Judge Dyer gained almost immediate prominence, not only in legal circles, but 
also as one of the distinguished political leaders of the republican party in the 
state. He served for one term in congress, following his election in 1868, and 
in 1875 became United States district attorney for the eastern district of Mis- 
souri through appointment of President Grant. While filling that office he prose- 
cuted the famous "whisky fraud" cases and was so able, zealous and faithful to 
the interests of justice and the government in the discharge of his duties that 
high encomiums were bestowed upon him by the authorities at Washington, while 
the case brought him before the public eye and made him well known to the bar 
and the people of the country generally. In 1880 he was honored by his party 
with the candidacy for governor and received a flattering vote, although he did 
not overcome the large democratic majority that Missouri gave in those days. 

Judge Dyer became a member of the bar of St. Louis in 1875 and has since 
gained recognition as one of the eminent lawyers of the state. He received ap- 
pointment from President Roosevelt as United States district attorney and served 
in that capacitv for five years, during which time he prosecuted some very im- 
portant cases in the district court, including the celebrated Burton case. The 
last and most merited honor conferred upon him in connection with professional 
interests was his elevation to the United States district bench, whereon he is now 
serving. Before he became a member of this court he continued his active interest 
in politics and as a citizen in relation to public affairs has always been widely 
known for his patriotic devotion to the general good and for his active coopera- 
tion in manv movements and measures, which have been tangible factors in the 
progressive development of St. Louis and the state. He is a man of eloquence, 
who is always listened to with attention and whose appearance upon the ]niblic 
platform is usuallv greeted with tumultuous applause as the expression of public 



280 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTrl CITY. 

favor. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Repubhc and the military order 
of the Loyal Legion and is prominent in their national meetings, where he not 
only entertains his audiences, but also instructs them as a philosophical reasoner 
upon the topics discussed in such gatherings. In these addresses he has done 
much toward allaying the bitter sectional feelings growing out of the Civil war. 
Living on the border as he has done, knowing intimately leaders of both the 
north and the south and studying closely the great questions which have been 
involved in the adjustment of the interests between the two sections, few men 
are better qualified to discuss the issues which have arisen therefrom. It is not 
unusual for him to introduce to his hearers those who have borne arms against 
him, who are received as welcome guests and listened to with respectful atten- 
tion and warm sympathy. In this he displays his breadth of view and generous 
spirit — an example that might well be emulated by the majority. 

Judge Dyer was married in Pike county, Missouri, in i860, to Miss Lizzie 
Chambers Hunt, the second daughter of Judge Ezra Hunt and granddaughter 
of Judge Rufus Pettibone, who was one of the first judges of the supreme court 
of ^lissouri. He is the father of six children : Ezra Hunt, Mrs. Emma Grace 
(Dyer) Hunting, David P., Jr., Elizabeth L., Horace L. Dyer and Mrs. Louise 
(Dyer) Fay. Those who know Judge Dyer in social relations find him a most 
congenial and entertaining companion. He has throughout his life been a student, 
constantly gaining knowledge through observation, through research, through 
investigation and through discussion with those well informed on subjects which 
are of vital interest to the country and to the people in varied relations. In this 
wide general information is found one of the strong elements of his power and 
ability as lawyer and jurist. The broad knowledge enables him to understand 
life in its various phases, the motive springs of human conduct and the com- 
plexity of business interests, and this, combined with a comprehensive familiarity 
with statutory law and with precedent, makes him one of the ablest judges 
who have sat on the United States district court bench in Missouri. 



JOSEPH OILMAN MILLER. 

Joseph Oilman Miller, engaged in handling steel rails and railroad ma- 
terials, has through the gradual steps of successive development worked his way 
upward to a position in business circles where he is now controlling an extensive 
trade and deriving substantial benefits therefrom. He was born in St. Louis, 
May II, 1859, his parents being Joseph O. and Adele O. Miller. The father 
was a planter of Adams county, Mississippi, and a member of the firm of Chap- 
jjell & Miller, of St. Louis. On the father's side Mr. Miller is descended from 
English planters who settled in Georgia and on the mother's from French-Swiss 
ancestors who were associated with Lord Selkirk in the celebrated Red River 
of the North colony. 

At the usual age Joseph G. Miller was sent to the public schools, where 
he completed the work of each successive year until he was graduated from the 
high school with the class of 1877. He then entered at once upon his business 
career and was connected with various railroad and manufacturing interests of 
this city from the time of his graduation until 1889. In the latter year he 
was secretary of the Madison Car Company and so continued until 1893, when 
he began merchandising in steel rails and railroad materials. In this line he 
has built up an extensive business, which is constantly growing in volume and 
importance, so that the trade yields to him a most remunerative income annually. 

On the 5th of November, 1899, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss 
Caroline Cj'Fallon, a flaughter of John G. O'Fallon, and their children are Caro- 
line O'Fallon anrj John O'Fallon Miller. Mr. Miller has had some military 
experience, having served as a member of Battery A from 1881 until 1884. In 




J. G. MILLER 



282 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

politics he is a democrat and was identitied with the gold wing of the party 
when the national democratic convention favored the Bryan policy of sixteen 
to one. He belongs to the St. Louis, Noonday, Racquet, Field, Missouri Athletic, 
Western Rowing and Dardenne Hunting Clubs and is also an exemplary repre- 
sentative of the ^lasonic fraternity. He likewise belongs to the Presbyterian 
church and these associations indicate much of the nature of his interests and 
the principles which govern his actions. 



EDAIUND SHAKELFORD ROWLAND. 

Edmund Shakelford Rowland, state manager for iMissouri for the Pru- 
dential Life Insurance Company, was born in Richmond, Kentucky, January 17, 
i860, a son of Sidney Venable Rowland and Susan (Shakelford) Rowland. The 
father left Richmond at about the close of the Civil war and went to Cincinnati, 
where he engaged in the wholesale shoe business. He died in 1903. 

In the schools of Danville, Kentucky, our subject acquired his education, 
attending the military academy of that place. He afterward embarked in business 
with his father in Danville, conducting a retail shoe house, and thus made his 
initial step in the business world. In early manhood he was there married to 
]\Iiss Pattie Belle Bryant, the wedding being celebrated in 1882. Soon after- 
ward he went to Chicago and was on the Board of Trade for six years. He 
traveled in California for two years as representative of the Mayfield Woolen 
]Mills Clothing Company and was connected with the World's Fair during the 
period of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis. Since that time he 
has been identified with the life insurance business and is now the senior member 
of the well known firm of Rowland & Wilson, with offices in the Chemical build- 
ing. In this connection he is state manager for Missouri for the ordinary branch 
of the Prudential Insurance Company, and the extensive business which the 
Prudential controls in IMissouri and the fact that his firm is conceded to be one 
of the leaders in the west in volume of business, are to be credited to the push, 
energ}' and executive ability of Mr. Rowland. 

Mr. Rowland resides at the Buckingham Hotel and is identified with various 
different organizations for the promotion of civic, fraternal or social interests. 
He is a member of the Merchants Exchange of St. Louis, the Life Underwriters 
Association, the Kentucky Society, the St. Louis Club and is a prominent demo- 
crat, all of which indicate the nature and character of his interests and his 
activities. 



ERWIN G. OSSING. 



Erwin G. Ossing, an attorney at law, was born in St. Louis, March 9, 1883. 
He is a son of G. H. and Hermine (Ahrens) Ossing. The father has for fifty- 
six years been a resident of this city and for thirty-five years was a liquor mer- 
chant, but is now living retired. A veteran of the Civil war, he maintains pleasant 
relations with his old army comrades as a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, and he has not been unknown as a worker in republican ranks, for he 
believes firmly in the principles of the party and recognizes the obligations as 
well as the privileges of citizenship. In Masonry he has attained the Knight 
Templar degree, and he also belongs to the Odd Fellows society, to the North 
St. Louis Turn Verein and to the Freie Gemeinde. 

At the age of eleven years, Erwin Ossing left the public schools and be- 
came a student in Smith Academy, where he was graduated in 190T. He was 
an apt stuHcnt anrl was Cjreek salutatorian of the graduating class. Two years' 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 283 

study in Washington University was followed by his matriculation in 1903 in the 
St. Louis Law School, from which he was graduated in 1905. While in college 
he was very prominent in athletic circles and always played on the baseball team. 
His interest in athletics, however, was never allowed to interfere with his studies 
and he entered upon the active practice of law well qualified for the onerous and 
responsible duties of his profession. His readiness of resources, his understand- 
ing of the principles of jurisprudence and his analytical power enabling him to 
recognize the relative value of the minor and important points of his cases and 
to give to each its due prominence, are factors in his successes. He was asso- 
ciated with John P. Boogher until October, 1907, and has since engaged in inde- 
penderit practice, meeting with excellent success for one of his years. 

Mr. Ossing is a member of the Lutheran church. He is a third degree 
Mason and in politics manifests a contagious enthusiasm in his support oi repub- 
lican principles. He is, moreover, a lover of music and belongs to the Singing 
Society of the Freie Gemeinde. 

On the 14th of November, 1906, Mr. Ossing was married to Miss Lula 
Schilling, a daughter of Ernest Schilling, who was one of the early promoters of 
the St. Louis Car Company. Mr. Ossing has erected an attractive home at No. 
3216 Greer avenue and they occupy an enviable position in social circles. L. 
professional lines he has already gained a creditable place and his friends, rec- 
ognizing his power and laudable ambition, predict for him larger successes in 
the future. 



WILLIAM H. SIMPKINS. 

William H. Simpkins, a general contractor, was born in St. Louis, June 
9, 1867, a son of W. H. Simpkins, who at the age of twelve years removed to 
this city from Cape Girardeau. The family were previously residents of Penn- 
sylvania and of English parentage. VV. H. Simpkins, Sr., was married in St. 
Louis to Miss Mary A. Moore, who was born in this city in 1847, a daughter 
of David B. Moore, who was one of the first chiefs of the volunteer fire de- 
partment. The first lire engine in the city was christened by her. It had been 
brought across the river on the ice and was used by the old volunteer com- 
pany in fighting the fire element at a day wdien the population of St. Louis did 
not justify the maintenance of a paid department. The Moore family was 
among the earliest Scotch famihes of this city. W. H. Simpkins, Sr.. was a 
pioneer contractor for the real-estate agents here, doing repair work. He was 
engaged in this business from 1865 up to the time of his death. He had served 
with the First Missouri Regiment, being the second man to enlist in that com- 
mand, which was with the eastern army and accompanied Sherman on the 
celebrated march to the sea, Mr. Simpkins taking part in all of the battles on 
that memorable march and the Atlanta campaign. He was wounded on sever?.! 
occasions but whether in the thickest of the fight or stationed on the lonely 
picket line, he was always loyal to duty. He joined the army as a private and 
was mustered out with the rank of sergeant. He died in El Paso. Texas. April 
29, 1903. at the age of sixty-two years, and his wife passed away on the 3rd 
of July of the same year. Their surviving children are: Laura A.: William 
H., of this review; Emma R., the wife of R. E. Schroeder; Joseph; and 
Winifred. 

William H. Simpkins. whose name introduces this record, pursued his edu- 
cation in the public schools of St. Louis and in the Jones Business College, from 
which he was graduated at the age of eighteen. He then joined his father in 
business and has since been well known as a contractor, confining his attention 
exclusively to repair work for real-estate agents. He has the most extensive 
patronage of this kind in the city and the business established by his father 



"284 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

forty-two years ago is today of the oldest of this character in St. Louis. His 
life has been one of unremitting dihgence and his fidehty to the terms of a con- 
tract has gained him the extensive patronage now accorded him. 

On the 31st of December, 1901, Mr. Simpkins was married to Miss Jennie 
JM. }^IcCormack. a daughter of G. W. and Jennie A. (Calvin) McCormack. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Simpkins hold membership in the Presbyterian church. A resi- 
dent of St. Louis throughout his entire life, the fact that many of his stanchest 
friends are those who have known him from boyhood indicates that his career 
has at all times been honorable and upright. 



AUGUST F. KLASING. 

The world loves a hero whether he fights an opponent on the battlefield 
or wages a conflict wdth adverse conditions and discouraging circumstances. The 
same spirit of determination and unflinching bravery characterizes each. It is 
because of this admiration of the heroic qualities that August F. Klasing occupies 
today the position in public regard that is accorded him, for though he started 
out in life empty-handed and has met many discouragements and difficulties, he 
has continued on his way with resolute purpose and is now the owner of one 
of the largest retail stores in North St. Louis. 

He was born in Lippe-Detmold, Germany, October i, 1850. His father, 
Henry Klasing, was married in early manhood to Amalia Moritz, and with their 
family they sailed from Germany in 1878, settling in St. Louis. In previous 
years the father had engaged in brick manufacturing, but in this country lived 
a retired life, enjoying the rest which came to him as the merited reward of 
earnest labor in previous years. His death occurred in 1902, while his wife 
passed away about 1892. 

August F. Klasing is indebted to the common-school system of Germany 
for the educational privileges which he enjoyed. He was about eighteen years 
of age when he came to the L^nited States and, establishing his home in St. 
Louis, which has been the mecca of so many German emigrants and which owes 
its upbuilding largely to the enterprise of the Teutonic race, secured a clerkship 
in a grocery store. His cash capital when he arrived here was a single fifty- 
cent piece, but he realized the fact that determination and diligence constitute 
a safe foundation upon which to build success, and he resolutely set to work 
to conquer the conditions which barred his path to prosperity. At different times 
he met obstacles of considerable importance and he underwent many deprivations 
and trials in the early days. Hard work, too, fell to his lot, for in the first 
period of his residence here he gave his employer the benefit of his services 
from five o'clock in the morning until eleven o'clock at night. His remunera- 
tion was but seven dollars and a half per month, with board and lodging. 
Such a condition would strike terror in the hearts of the dictators in the labor 
unions at the present time, but Mr. Klasing proved his worth and not only 
labored diligently, but saved his cash earnings to send to his people in Ger- 
many, and thus provided the passage money which brought them to the new 
world. 

In 1872 he began business on South Broadway, where he handled gro- 
ceries and general merchandise. Being a young man and very popular, he soon 
made quite a success in this venture and won a goodly profit at this location. 
C^n the 8th of May, 1885, he removed to No. 5034 North Broadway, and at 
this point has one of the largest retail stores in North St. Louis. His business 
has constantly increased in volume and importance and he has from time to time 
enlarged his stock to meet the growing demands of the trade. He now carries 
an extensive and well selected line of goods and has a patronage scarcely equaled 
in the citv out of the downtown trade center. Aside from his mercantile inter- 




AUGUST F. KLASIX(; 



983 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

ests ]Mr. Klasing has other important and profitable business connections, being 
now president of the Lowell Bank, president of the Pocahontas Mining Gom- 
panv, director of the German Mutual Life Insurance Company, of St. Louis, a 
director and vice president of the Jeft'erson Mutual Fire Insurance Company and 
a director of the Altenheim, of St. Louis. For about ten years previous to 1903, 
]Mr. Klasing was secretary and treasurer of the German Emigrant Aid Society, 
of St. Louis. His services were marked by the same business abihty and fidel- 
ity, that has been shown in the management of his own affairs. When this 
organization was disbanded in 1903, the funds in the treasury amounting to 
about eight thousand dollars, were divided among the Orphans" Home, hospitals 
and the Altenheim. 

Pleasantlv situated in his home life, Mr. Klasing was married in St. Louis, 
November 28, 1873, to Miss Sophie Niemeyer. They have seven children: 
Sophie, Anna, Barbara, Louisa, Augusta, Laura and Elsa, all of whom are yet 
living and are still under the parental roof, while they have also lost two children. 

]^Ir. Klasing gives his political allegiance to the republican party, for his study 
of the questions and issues of the day when he became a naturalized American 
citizen led him to believe that its platform contains, the best elements of good gov- 
ernment and he has never had occasion to change his opinions concerning this. 
He belongs to the Liederkranz and to the Apollo and Harmonia smging socie- 
ties. While he has prospered and enjoyed the benefits which accrue from busi- 
ness success and from congenial social intercourse, he has never been neglectful 
of his duties toward those less fortunate and in fact ever has a hand downreach- 
ing to aid others who have not been so successful in the affairs of life. His 
sympathies go out strongly to the homeless little ones and because of this he 
has taken an active and helpful part in the work of the Orphans' Home Society 
and of the German Protestant Orphans' Society. He belongs to the St. Jacoby 
Protestant church and its teachings find exemplification in his life and in his 
efforts to promote the Christian spirit which is the foundation upon which our 
modern civilization rests. 



HERMAN WILLIAM KASTOR. 

Herman William Kastor is now living retired in St. Louis, having made 
rapid progress in his business career from the time of his connection with 
interests in this city from 1895 until he turned over the management of his 
commercial concerns to his sons. He was born in Bamberg, Bavaria, Germany, 
October 26, 1838, a son of Wolf and Gertrude (Ahlfeld) Kastor. He acquired 
his education in public and polytechnic schools of his native land, and on the 
1st of September, 1852, arrived in New York that he might take advantage 
of its broarler business opportunities with advancement more quickly secured. 
He engaged in the importing business with D. R. Rudolph, whose daughter 
Theresa he afterward married. Wlien the Civil war broke out he was corporal 
in the Sixth New York Regiment and with that command saw a short term of 
service at Annapolis, Maryland. 

In 1863 ^^^- Kastor disposed of his business interests in the eastern metrop- 
olis and came to the west, accepting a clerkship in a store at Leavenworth, 
Kansas. For two years he did duty as second lieutenant of the First Kansas 
Regiment and then went to Wyandotte, now Kansas City, Kansas, where he 
began the publication of Die Fackel the first German newspaper in the state. 
Subsequently he removed this paper to Atchison, Kansas, and afterward went 
to St. Josej)h, Missouri, where he became editor and part owner of the daily 
and weekly Volksblatt. He was thus identified with the German newspaper 
interests of the state from 1868 until 1895, when he sold out and caiue to St. 
Louis. Here he organizer] tlic 11. \\\ Kastor & Sons Advertising Company, 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOLiRTH CITY. 287 

his long experience in the newspaper field having brought to him comprehensive 
and progressive views of advertising, which he now put into effect in a busi- 
ness that soon developed into one of the most extensive of its characte: in 
the country. Year after year brought to the firm increased success and, with 
ample reward for his labor, Herman W. Kastor withdrew from the business 
in August, 1902, turning it over to his seven sons, who have since controlled 
and managed it. 

In 1899 Mr. Kastor was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, whom 
he had wedded in New York in i860. Their children are Benjamin H., Louis, 
Mollie, Ernest H., Fred W., Richard H., William B., Gertrude and Arthur G. 
His tw^o daughters and all his sons, with the exception of the oldest and 
youngest, Ben and Arthur, are married. Mr. Kastor is independent in politics 
and yet riot without the keenest interest in the country which has given to him 
the opportunities he sought when he left behind him kindred, friends and 
native land to establish a home in the new world. 



HEXRY C. KOENIG. 



Among those who in an important way have been identified with the busi- 
ness interests of St. Louis is numbered Henry C. Koenig, who is president of the 
Missouri Pressed Brick & Improvement Company, at Marine and Osage streets. 
In this high position he has been officiating for the past two years. This is one 
of the largest brick manufacturing plants throughout the entire west. Mr. 
Koenig has the credit of having been the founder of the company. It has been 
through his untiring energy and application to all the interests appertaining 
to the welfare of the firm that the business of the company has increased to its 
present proportions. At present under the employ of the company are about 
one hundred men, who are kept busy throughout the entire year. In conduct- 
ing the business the firm keeps steadily employed fifteen teams for local and 
freight deliveries. The brick manufacturing plant itself is built on the most mod- 
ern type, and they manufacture all classes and qualities of brick, having a yearly 
output of about eight million pieces. 

Mr. Koenig is of German origin, but was born in St. Louis in April, 1852, 
the son of Henry and ^lary Koenig. John Koenig, his grandfather, was a native 
of Prussia, Germany, and in 1844 came to St. Louis, where he lived a retired 
life until the date of his death. His son Henry was also born in Prussia. Ger- 
many, in January, 1809, and came to St. Louis with his father. In this city he 
followed the contracting business until he died, in 1867. 

Henry C. Koenig, son of the latter, completed his education at the public 
schools of St. Louis at the age of fourteen years and was then enrolled in the 
Jones Commercial College, from which he graduated after having taken a three 
years' business course. Immediately he vvas apprenticed to the brick-laying 
trade with his brother and followed that occupation for a period of five years. 
Giving up his craft, he established himself in the dry-goods business at Sidney 
and Second streets, and in this he was quite successful and succeeded in build- 
ing up an extensive trade. After having been in the business for a period of 
seven years, he disposed of his interests and engaged in brick manufacturing at 
Marine and Osage streets. Here his interests grew rapidly and he conceived 
the idea of founding a company, which materialized in the incorporation of the 
Missouri Pressed Brick & Improvement Company in 1896. with himself as presi- 
dent : his son Edwin C. as vice president ; and his son-in-law Theodore Eggers 
as attorney and secretary of the company. Since the founding of the firm the 
business has grown to wonderful proportions and is known throughout the en- 
tire west. Besides doing an immense local business they ship great quantities of 
brick to the eastern, western and southern states. . 



2SS ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

On September 5. 1875, Air. Koenig was united in marriage, in St. Louis, to 
Miss Lizzette Bruesselbach, and they have two children : Edwin C, vice presi- 
dent of the Missouri Pressed Brick & Improvement Company ; and Mrs. Ade- 
laide Eggers, Mr. Eggers being a prominent attorney and already mentioned 
as acting secretary of the company of which Mr. Koenig is president. 

Mr. Koenig is a Free & Accepted Mason, in which fraternal order he takes 
a profound interest. He is also a member of the Western Rowing Club, in which 
he has passed through all the chairs, and belongs to the Legion of Honor. He 
is a republican in politics, but not an active politician beyond his interest at 
election times to see the candidates of his party in office, and his religious faith 
is apparent upon mention that he is a Protestant. He owns a beautiful residence 
at 3836 Kosciusko street, wdiere he resides. 



GOLDBURN H. WILSON. M. D. 

With a nature that could never be content with mediocrity, Dr. Goldburn 
H. Wilson has made continuous progress as a representative of the medical 
fraternity and is still closely in touch with that onward movement which is 
bringing the practice of medicine to a high standard. He was born in Rock 
Island county, Illinois, April 29, 1864, his parents being Thomas P. and Sarah 
E. ( Quick) Wilson, who after a married life of sixty-three years are a most 
hale and hearty couple and bid fair to live for some time to come. They are 
both natives of Hunterdon county, New Jersey, where they were reared and 
married. The father was born September 22, 182 1, and the mother December 
29, 1827. He was reared to farm life and adopted that calling, which he has 
since followed. About 1856 he removed westward to Rock Island county, 
Illinois, where he lived for twelve years, and then took up his abode in Henry 
county, iMissouri, settling on a farm near Montrose prior to the reconstruction 
of the work following the Civil war. The district was then practically a 
frontier country and during the recollection of Dr. Wilson deer were numer- 
ous there, it being no infrequent thing to see them in the backyard of his own 
home. Other evidences of pioneer life w^ere also manifest and the family ex- 
perienced many hardships and privations incident to living on the frontier. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Wilson are still living in the old home in Henry 
county, their mutual love and confidence increasing as the years have passed 
by. Air. Wilson has long given his allegiance to the republican party and both 
he ancl his wife have been faithful and active members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

Dr. Wilson was but four years of age when he removed to Henry county, 
Missouri. There he was reared, mastered the branches of learning taught in 
the public schools and at the age of eighteen years entered the State University 
at Columbia, Missouri, where he pursued his studies for four years. During 
the last two years of that time his attention was devoted to the mastery of the 
principles of medicine and in 1887 he entered the St. Louis College of Phy- 
sicians, from which he was graduated in the class of 1889. In the spring of 
that year he made the run into Oklahoma on the opening of the country to the 
settlement of the white race, but the representatives of the medical fraternity 
there were of such a class that he determined to return to St. Louis, where 
he entered upon the practice of his profession. Here he showed the strength 
of his nature, his strong purpose and his laudable ambition. His father had 
furnished the money for his education, but while he offered the son more funds 
Dr. Wilson felt that he could now depend upon his own resources and refused 
further assistance. For a few months after ojK'ning an office he found it 
sometimes difficult to meet expenses, and some days he had but two meals a 
day, but his perseverance anrl ability soon won reco^.'^nition and he gained a 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 289 

creditable standing in professional ranks. After he had once gained a start, 
success came rapidly, and after a comparatively brief period his practice was 
a most remunerative one. In handling- many complex ])roblems he showed 
marked strength and ability, and the public soon came to recognize that he 
was most careful in the diagnosis of a case and correct in applying remedial 
agencies to the needs of his patients. From 1892 until 1894. inclusive, he w-as 
a professor of chemistry in Marion Sims ^ledical College and in 1894-95 he 
acted in the same capacity in the Woman's Hospital Medical College. He now 
belongs to the American Medical Association, to the Missouri State Medical 
Society, the St. Louis Medical Society and the Mississippi Medical Association. 

Aside from his profession, Dr. Wilson's membership relations extend to 
Mt. Moriah Lodge, No. 40, A. F. & A. ]\L, and to Montrose Lodge, Xo. 383, 
L O. O. F. He is a stalwart republican in his political views and in 1896 was 
elected to represent his district in the lower house of the ^^lissouri assembly. 
He has been continuously elected since that time, with the exception of the year 
1903, and has served for a longer period than an}- other member ever elected 
from his city. He was speaker pro tern in 1905 and has been recognized as a 
leader in the legislature. His entrance into politics was brought about through 
his recognition of the lax medical laws of ^Missouri, whereby any one with a 
diploma was allowed to practice medicine without regard to his education or abil- 
itv. It was after a six years" bitter contest that Dr. Wilson and his associates 
secured the passage of adequate laws, raising the standard of the qualifications 
necessary to become a practitioner of medicine and surgery. During the session 
of the legislature he was one of the champions of and was largely instrumental 
in securing the passage of the pure food laws. He has stood for practical ad- 
vancement and reform, placing the public welfare before partisanship and the 
interests of the commonwealth before personal aggrandizement. He has re- 
cently been a delegate to the republican national convention held in Chicago in 
1908. 

In 1896 Dr. Wilson was married to Miss Laura Phillips, of Union, Frank- 
lin countv, Missouri. They have two sons, Goldburn H. and Thomas Phillips. 

Dr. Wilson has long been recognized as a man of marked individuality and 
strength of character. He has been an entity in the public life and in political 
circles. He has never felt bound by custom or by precedent but has used his 
judgment to determine that which is valuable and trustworthy and has wrought 
along new lines and has advanced many mc>vlern ideas which have stood the test 
of public service and have therefore proved of worth. 



FRED ARTHUR BAXISTER. 

Fred Arthur Banister has since 1890 been connected with real-estate inter- 
ests in St. Louis and in recent years has also done much speculative building. 
Aside from business connections he is w^ell known as a prominent representative 
of Masonrv. He was born in Gasconade county. Missouri. November 2S, 1861, 
and is a son of John B. and ^liriam \^ Banister, both of whom were natives 
of England. Coming to this country in 1858. they settled in Cleveland. Ohio, 
where thev lived for several years prior to their removal to St. Louis. The 
father engaged in business as a contracting painter. 

Fred A. Banister is indebted to the public-school system of St. Louis for 
his educational advantages. Earlv in his business life he became secretary to 
Gains Paddock, the president of the Paddock-Hawley Iron Company, with whom 
he was thus connected for ten vears or until ^larch. 1896. when he resigned to 
learn the real-estate business w'ith E. S. Guignon. He continued for two years 
with Mr. Guignon and then entered upon an independent venture in real-estate 
lines, since which time he has promoted many sales and i)urchases of St. Louis 



1 0--VOL. II. 



290 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

property and has also been largely engaged in building, erecting many substan- 
tial and attractive structures, whereby unsightly vacancies have been transformed 
into pleasing residence districts. His operations in this line have proved a potent 
element in his success. 

On the 28th of November, 1888, at St. Louis, Missouri, Mr. Banister was 
married to Aliss Nonie E. Morton, and they have two children, Marian and Ed- 
ward, aged respectively eleven and eight years. Mr. Banister votes with the 
republican party and while he has never sought nor desired political office, he 
has been honored with official preferment in Masonic circles. He joined the Ma- 
sons in 1888, belonging to Occidental Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Missouri Chapter, 
R. A. M., St. Aldemar Commandery. No. 18, K. T., St. Louis Consistory of the 
Scottish Rite and Moolah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He has been secretary 
of the Grand Avenue Alasonic Temple Association since the project was started 
nine years ago and has been an active worker in promoting this to the complete 
success to which it has attained. He is a member of the Mercantile, Glen Echo, 
Oasis and Fishing Clubs, the last two being composed of Shriners. 



HON. HENRY HITCHCOCK. 

It is said of an eminent man of old that he has done things worthy to be 
written; that he has written things worthy to be read; and by his life has con- 
tributed to the welfare of the republic and the happiness of mankind. He of 
whom this transcendent eulogy can be pronounced with even partial truth is enti- 
tled to the gratitude of the race. Nowhere within the broad limits of the com- 
monwealth of Missouri has there died a man over whom this might more truth- 
fullv be said than of Henry Hitchock, one of the most eminent American 
lawyers. When he passed away and the St. Louis Bar Association mict to pay 
honor to his life and its accomplishment, the following memorial was prepared 
by the committee : "Henry Hitchcock was a great-grandson of Ethan Allen, of 
Revolutionary fame. His paternal grandfather, Samuel Hitchock, born in Mas- 
sachusetts, was a member of the Vermont convention which ratiiied the federal 
constitution, was attorney general of that state and later a United States district 
judge and circuit judge. His father, Henry Hitchock, born in Burlington, Ver- 
mont, in 1 79 1, removed to Alabama, where, between 18 19 and 1839, he was 
successively attorney general. United States district attorney and chief justice 
of the supreme court of Alabama. Judge Hitchcock married Annie Erwin, of 
Bedford county, Tennessee. Of that marriage Henry Hitchock, the subject of 
this memorial, was born at Springhill, near Mobile, Alabama, July 3, 1829. 
His father died in 1839 at Mobile. His mother went with him to live at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. At the age of seventeen years he was graduated from the 
L'niversity of Nashville and entered Yale College. He was graduated from 
Yale at nineteen with honors and with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. His alma 
mater in 1875 conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Law. 

"After his graduation from Yale in 1848, he was for a year an assistant 
classical teacher in the high school of Worcester, Massachusetts. He then 
returned to his home at Nashville, Tennessee, and entered upon the study of law 
in the office of William F. Cooper, afterward chancellor and judge of the supreme 
court of that state. There he remained for about two years. In October, 185 1, 
he was admitted to practice law in the courts of Missouri. November 18, 185 1, 
he was enrolled as attorney in the circuit court of the then county, now city, of 
St. Louis, and established an office here. In 1852 he was associated with the 
St. Louis Intelligencer, a newspaper of whig affiliations, and was a deleg^ite to 
the national whig convention at Baltimore, which nominated General Scott for 
president. 




HENRY HITCHCOCK 



29:^ ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

'"At the March term. 1854, he argued his first case in the supreme court of 
Missouri. September 7, 1857, he was enrolled a member of the bar of the 
United States district court for the eastern district of Alissouri, and in 1867 
of the supreme court of the United States. His practice in the supreme court 
of this state and in the supreme court of the United States, as well as in the 
lower courts, was important and varied. He conducted many cases of great 
moment. A record of the most important may be found in the Reports, begin- 
ning with the 20th ^lissouri and 6th Wallace and continuing to the present time. 
In 1859 he was chosen, and to the end of his life continued, a trustee of Wash- 
ington University. For many years, and to the time of his death, he was vice 
president. 

'Tn 1858 Mr. Hitchcock became a republican. In i860, on the eve of the 
presidential election, he made his first ])olitical speech, advocating the election 
of Abraham Lincoln. In February. 1861, he was elected a delegate from St. 
Lotiis to the ^^lissouri convention, called under authority of the act of the gen- 
eral assembly approved January 21, 1861. "to consider the then existing relations 
between the government of the United States, the people and governments of 
the different states, and the government and people of the state of Missouri ; 
and to adopt such measures for vindicating the sovereignty of the state and the 
protection of its institutions as shall appear to them to be demanded.' 

"Mr. Hitchcock and onlv five other members of that convention were repub- 
licans. He was. from the assembling of the convention till its final adjournment 
in Jtily, 1863, an active and potent advocate of "Lnconditional Union' and of 
the abolition of slavery in Missouri. On ]\Iarch 13, 1861, in that convention, he 
spoke with great force and effect in favor of the state's furnishing men and 
money to coerce the seceding states. He was against all compromise with the 
institution of slavery. In July, 1861, he voted for the ordinance which declared 
the offices of governor, lieutenant governor and secretary of state vacant, and 
instituted a provisional state government. In October, 1861, in support of an 
ordinance postponing the elections which had been ordered for November, he 
delivered a speech which his opponent, L'riel Wright is said to have acknowledged 
did credit to his intellect and powers of argument. At the final session of that 
convention in June, 1863, he made an earnest speech, advocating the emancipation 
of slaves in Alissouri. 

'Tn after years ^Ir. Hitchcock deplored what he regarded as his mistake in 
not entering the volunteer service in 1861. That was his desire; but his friends, 
and especially his uncle. General Ethan Allen Hitchcock, a major general of vol- 
unteers, insisted that his value to the cause of the Union would be greater as a 
member of the state convention than in the field. ]\Ir. Hitchock once said: T 
reluctantly acted on his advice, but year by year regretted it more, till in Sep- 
tember, 1864, before the fall of Atlanta, and when the issue of the war still 
seemed doubtful. I applied in person to Secretary Stanton for a commission and 
obtained one: not in the hope at that late day of rendering military service of 
any value, but simply because I could not endure the thought of profiting, in 
safety at home, by the heroism of others, and of having no personal share in 
the defense of my country against her enemies in arms.' He was appointed 
assistant adjutant general of volunteers, with the rank of major, and in October, 
1864, was assigned to flutv on General Sherman's staff, at the latter's request. 
His services on General Sherman's .staff were quite different from those of a 
mere military clerk. His duties were more confidential to his chief and re.sponsi- 
ble in their character. He was sent by (ieneral Sherman with dispatches to 
President Lincoln, announcing the terms of surrender arranged between General 
Sherman anrl Cicneral Joseph E. John.ston. June 23, 1865, he was honorably 
mustered out of the service, and in Julv sailed for Europe, where he spent four 
months in travel. .After his return to St. Louis, in December, 1865, he resumed 
the practice of law alone, until June. 1866. when the firm of Hitchcock & Lubke 
was formed, which continued until tlic spring of 1870, when he was obliged by 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOL'RTll Cl'^^■. 293 

ill health to retire from active practice. He then visited his brother, Ethan Allen 
Hitchcock, at Hong Kong, China, and subsequently made an extended foreign 
tour, returning to St. Louis in 1871, and resuming his practice. 

"On January i, 1873, he formed the partnership of Hitchock, l.>ubke & 
Player, which continued until January, 1883, when his partner, Mr. Lubke, took 
his seat on the circuit bench. Within a short time thereafter Mr. Player died, 
and Mr. Hitchcock practiced alone until April, 1884, when the firm of Hitch- 
cock, Madill & Finkelnburg was formed. This partnership expired by limitation 
April I, 1890, after which Mr. Hitchcock and Mr. h^inkclnburg continued the 
practice together until July 1, i8<ji. After that Mr. Hitchcock ])racticed alone, 
continuing active until the date of his last illness. 

"In 1867 Mr. Hitchcock took prominent part in founding the St. Louis 
Law School. He was for the first three years dean of the school, to the duties 
of which ofiice he devoted much of his time and energy. He made to it a 
donation of his salar}-. and Mrs. Hitchcock, his wife, made a handsome endow- 
ment for the library of the school. 

"In 1878, with three other eminent members of the profession, he united in 
a call for a convention of lawyers at Saratoga, New York, which resulted in 
the formation of the American Bar Association, of which Colonel James O. 
Broadhead, of St. Louis, was the first president. In 1880 he was president of 
the St. Louis Bar Association. In 1881 he was president of the Civil Service 
Reform Association of Missouri, and was then and until his death a member of 
the National Civil Service Reform League, ar,d was always an earnest worker 
in the cause of civil service reform. In 1882 he was president of the Missouri 
Bar Association. From 1889 till the time of his death he was one of the trustees 
of the i\Iissouri Botanical Garden, appointed by the will of Henry Shaw. In 
1889 he was president of the American l>ar Association, and in 1901 he was 
chosen one of the trustees of the National Institute established by Andrew 
Carnegie. 

"Mr. Hitchcock's great reputation beyond, as well as in, Missouri brought 
him invitations to deliver addresses before many learned bodies. Manx of those 
addresses evince great learning and ability. Among them may be mentioned a 
paper read in 1879 before the American Bar Association on 'The Inviolability of 
Telegrams ;' an address delivered before the New A^ork State Bar Association in 
1887 on 'American State Constitutions;' an address in the same year before the 
American Bar Association upon 'General Corporation Laws;' an address before 
the Political Science Association of the L^niversity of Michigan on "The Devel- 
opment of the Constitution of the United States as Influenced by Chief Justice 
Marshall ;' an address at the Centennial Celebration of the organization of the 
federal judiciary on 'The Supreme Court and the Constitution ;' and an address 
in 1897 before the National Civil Service Reform League on 'The Republican 
Party and Civil Service Reform.' 

"In 1857 Mr. Hitchock married ]\lary Collier, who. with their two sons, 
Henry and George Collier, survive him. 

"This remarkable record of a busy and a useful life is a clear indication of 
the worth and dignity of the man and a fitting tribute to his memorw Froni 
early manhood to the end of his life, he pursued with a steady and unfaltering 
purpose the aims and ideals of a strong intellect, guided by a keen moral sense. 
The evolution and growth of his character, as well as his sterling and useful 
qualities, are laid bare and shown by the restless activity and achievements of 
the man. No one can contemplate the variety, extent and importance of his 
work and undertakings, or the deer ''mpress of his personality upon the en.terprises 
with which he was identified, without amazement and applause. 

"In whatever capacity he mav be considered, in whatever light he may be 
viewed, whether as teacher of the~ classics in his early years : or as a soldier, 
maintaining with loyaltv and courage the cause of his country: or as a legisla- 
tor in the convention of his adopted state: or as the lawyer who achieved a 



294 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

national reputation for ability, learning, integrity and power ; or as a citizen who 
with a generous liberality gave the very best gift at his command, a part of 
himself and his own wonderful energy and zeal, his own well balanced judg- 
ment and superior wisdom for the public welfare ; or as the head of the house- 
hold where he entertained with rare grace and felicity, the notable men who 
came without our gates, and the companions of his private life, who loved and 
esteemed him on account of the gentler side of his nature, he was the same 
admirable, sincere, honest, strong and useful man. In every walk of life the 
same prominent qualities shone out ; directness, fearlessness, unmistakable sin- 
ceritv of purpose, candor in speech and in action ; these, coupled with his rare 
judgment and wisdom, his great intellectual strength, his untiring industry, his 
acquaintance with and participation in all human interests, gave him power and 
made him an imposing figure in our community. 

^Ir. Hitchcock was a man of broad and accurate information and learning 
in literature, in science, in art, and in his own chosen profession, the law. He 
was not merely an omnivorous reader, but a student, and he pursued his studies 
through all the years of his busy life, and found pleasure and delight in these 
pursuits. So strong was his love for the classics, and so well known was that 
love, that but shortly before his death, at the request of the Bibliophile Society 
of Boston, he undertook to edit one of the Odes of Horace, for an edition to 
be printed for its members, and although unfinished at his death, this work 
displays his interest in such matters and the industry which marked his whole 
Hfe. 

"]\Ir. Hitchcock was a man of deep and strong convictions. His participation 
in the events which led to the great American Civil war, and in the events of 
that war, and the period of reconstruction, was not only active and important, 
but showed his breadth of mind and political wisdom. Born and reared in the 
south, he understood the southern feeling, but his sagacity and wisdom, as well 
as the sympathies of his heart, convinced him that the ultimate welfare of the 
whole people and their liberties would be best subserved by maintaining the 
Union. The logic of events has justified his judgment. As a member of tfie 
convention which formed the provisional government of Missouri in 1861, he 
advocated the submission of the question of secession to a vote of the people. 
He also advocated the abolition of slavery in the state, to take effect in 1864. 
instead of 1870, as the convention finally determined. His speeches in that 
convention and in public, during that period, bear intrinsic evidence of his cour- 
age, his wisdom, his moderation and his power. His work in connection with 
the founding of the St. Louis Law School, and his. services to that school, must 
ever be regarded as of inestimable value to the cause of legal education and to 
the advancement of the study of law as a science. 

"He was a lover of nature. He revelled in the beauties and fragrance of 
the woods and fields. He was a lover of literature ; he delighted in poetry, in 
fiction, in history, in travels and in biographies. His mind was stranger to noth- 
ing that could interest a keen intellect, or broaden its vision or his sympathies. 
He was a lover of the law, and as a lawyer he was best known and will be best 
remembered. His conceptions of the lawyer's functions and duties were exalted. 
As a lawyer, he was broad, accurate, intense ; and his legal arguments were embel- 
lished and enriched by his familiar knowdedge of both ancient and modern liter- 
ature. He was a force in the administration of justice, and during his career 
at the bar was engaged in the most important cases pending in the state and 
federal courts in Missouri. His conduct of these cases laid the foundation for a 
reputation which was constantly widening; and it may be justly said that he 
was one of the foremost members of the bar of Missouri. This gave him promi- 
nence as an eminent member of the American bar, and won for him respect and 
distinction as a lawyer, at home and abroad. 

"As a citizen he occupied a position almost unique. Brave to the uttermost 
in upholding and defending what he considered right and good in the adminis- 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 295 

tration of public affairs, he never wavered in ihe conscientious performance of 
every duty which citizenship in a repubhc imposes upon the individual. No act 
or thing was done or said by him in a perfunctory manner. His active partici- 
pation in political events, discussions and campaigns marked the deep rooted 
imcerity of his nature and convictions, and showed that he considered and deter- 
mined his course of action in all these things from the standpoint of duty, duty 
to his country, duty to the people, duty to advocate and stand for that which was 
right, and to oppose and condemn that which was wrong from the standpoint 
of morals. In these matters he was uncompromising, and had no thought of the 
consequences to himself. He never stopped to debate, either with himself or with 
others, the question whether his advocacy or condemnation of a measure would 
have an unfavorable effect upon his own interests. Hence his recommendation 
of measures and men had a peculiar significance. This uncompromising spirit, 
which would not tolerate evasion, or timidity, where public duty w^as involved 
was one of Mr. Hitchcock's most noticeable characteristics. 

"Fitted by natural endowmients and by the training and acquirenients of 
constant study to fill any station in public life, possessed of rare capacity for 
work, he was content to pursue his labors without striving for official station ; 
and to be chosen as one of the board of trustees of the Carnegie Institute was 
for him a distinction more gratifying than to be chosen to fill a political office. 

"So rich and rare a spirit has been taken from the scenes and activities of 
life. By his death the community has lost a most useful and courageous citizen ; 
the bar has lost one of its most distinguished and honored members." 

Aside from the above memorial several members of the bar addressed the 
committee. Speaking of his personal characteristics Henry T. Kent said : "He 
never sought nor looked after popularity, but I think that any one who met him 
in the social life can bear testimony to the charm and affability of the man, and 
without wishing to invade the privacy of home, I can say that no one ever sat 
at his hospitable board, who saw him there with tactful and engaging manner 
carrying the conversation and causing all .to follow, with the brilliancy of his 
conversation, running from grave to lighter moods, replete with reminiscence and 
anecdote, with humorous disquisitions upon the topics of the time and literature, 
who would not bear cheerful testimony that he was the incomparable host." 
In relation to his professional career Mr. Kent said: "By common consent he 
was the ripest scholar and the most cultivated member of the St. Louis bar. He 
walked upon the mountain ranges of the law. He stood for more than an ordi- 
nary lifetime in the very front rank, towering high above most of his associates. 
He was a man of remarkable versatility of learning. I have sometimes thought, 
as I have seen him conduct causes that involved problems of scieiitific research 
or the examination of witnesses upon deep scientific problems, that he showed to 
best advantage. He stood with us as Mr. Choate and Mr. Carter have so long- 
stood with the bar of New York; illustrating, I think, the fact that the strength 
of a lawyer is not weakened, but added to by breadth of learning and luster of 
scholarship. He looked with disdain upon any one whose standard was, first, 
success no matter what the means. He threw himself with all the zeal of his 
nature and with all of his great learning into the cause of his client. He was 
ambitious for success, but he never wished it at the price of his honor. He 
belonged to that class of lawyers who looked upon the profession of the law as 
an order of government, and that whether in office or out of it he who measured 
up to his full height should. give public service." In his tribute to the memory 
of Mr. Hitchcock, Judge Jacob Klein said : "No other man at the bar occupied 
exactly the same position that Mr. Hitchcock did. He stood for those things 
which, sav what we may, are still held in the very highest estimation 1)\' the 
lawyers as well as by the community at large. He stood for the open and candid 
and forcible upholding of the right as against the wrong. As a lawyer he stood 
as an example and exemplification of what a lawyer's life and attitude should be, 



•296 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CUrY. 

not merely to the bar, not merely to his clients, but more important still, to his 
country at large and to the community in which he lives." 

As a fitting close to the tribute of one of Missouri's most honored sons may 
be added the words of F. N. Lehmann : "Active as he was in his profession, and 
that a profession of controversy, active as he was in the public life of his time, 
taking part upon one side or the other definitely and certainly, active as he had 
been during the Civil war and in what led up to it, a time which stirred the 
feelings of men to their depths, there never was reproach upon his character. 
He bore a good repute among men. Not the repute of faint praise, which damns 
a man : but the repute of respect, which he had even from those to whom he was 
most earnestly opposed. He lived out the Psalmist's allotted time, and all his 
years were active and useful. We need for a man like that to have no regret 
except that in the order and law of nature his days are necessarily numbered. 
In that story which has described so well the part that St. Louis had in the open- 
ing of the Civil war, the leading character is said to have been drawn from 
Mr. Hitchcock. And certainly J\Ir. Hitchcock was worthy of the high tribute. 
Those who knew him in those days can see the resemblances, and in nothing 
more, perhaps, than in his devotion to and in his support of the measures and 
the fame of Abraham Lincoln ; and we can say of him, as was said of Lincoln 
himself when he passed away, that he has 'sailed into the fiery sunset and left 
sweet music in Cathay." "' 



ADOLPHUS BUSCH. 



Adolphus Busch was born in Mainz, Germany, and emigrated to America 
before reaching his majority, landing in St. Louis in 18.57. He secured a position 
as clerk on a Mississippi river steamer and held clerkships in mercantile houses 
until he established himself in. the general commission and malting business in 
1859, which venture at once proved a success. 

In 1 86 1 he married the daughter of the late Eberhard Anheuser, who was 
then interested in a beer brewing plant known as the Bavarian Brewery. In 
1865 Mr. Busch purchased the controlling interest in this establishment, a primi- 
tive affair with an annual output of about eight thousand barrels. In fact, when 
Mr. Busch took hold of its business affairs, the Bavarian Brewery was one of 
the smallest brewing plants in St. Louis, but through his enterprise and energy 
we find its sales to have grown to eighteen thousand barrels in 1870, and twenty- 
seven thousand in 1873. 

It was in the latter year that Mr. Busch hit upon a process of bottling beer 
to withstand the temperature of all climates, an innovation in the brewing indus- 
try. He was not slow in recognizing his advantage over his competitors and 
pushed his bottled product upon all markets, so that now the famous Budweiser 
is known in the remotest nooks of the globe. 

In 1873 the firm of E. Anheuser & Co. was incorporated, Mr. Anheuser 
becoming president and Mr. Busch secretary and general manager, and upon 
the death of Mr. Anheuser in 1880, the corporate name was changed to the 
Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association, and Mr. Busch became the president, 
which position he has retained ever since. Under Mr. Busch's management the 
business increaserl phenomenally, adding at first from forty thousand to fifty 
thousand barre.ls, annually, to its output, and in later years more than one hun- 
drerl thousand barrels annually, so that in the year 1901, the sales of the Anheu- 
ser-Busch Brewing Association passed the million barrel mark, and in 1907 
amounted to one million five hundred and ninety-nine thousand five hundred and 
nineteen barrels, which by far exceeds those of any other brewery in the world. 

Besides holding the majority of the stock in the Anheuser-Busch Brewing 
Association anrl of five brewing plants in Texas, Mr. Busch is president of a bank. 




ADOLPHUS BUSCH 



298 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

a director in several banking institutions and trust companies, and the Ameri- 
can Car & Foundry Company. He is also heavily interested in steam and street 
railways and many ice plants throughout the country, and through the Adolphus 
Busch Glass Alanufacturing Company, which he practically owns, he is one of 
the largest bottle manufacturers in the world. 

]\Ir. Busch is easily one of the most popular men in the United States, but 
his popularity is more attributable to his philanthropy and generosity than to his 
wealth and vast business interests. His liberal hand is not only felt by the needy, 
the charitable institutions, the institutions of learning and churches of all denomi- 
nations of his home city and state, but throughout the United States, and in many 
instances his charity has cheered the hearts of the suffering beyond great oceans. 
His donations vary from small sums to those of many thousands of dollars, and 
among his principal gifts in recent years were those to the San Francisco suffer- 
ers of one hundred thousand dollars ; Washington University, St. Louis, one 
hundred thousand dollars ; the Germania ]\Iuseum, Harvard L'niversity, Cam- 
bridge, fiftv thousand dollars. 



JESSE W. BARRETT. 



Jesse W. Barrett, a lawyer of the St. Louis bar, was born ]March 17, 1884, 
at Canton ^Missouri, a son of Harry H. and Jeannette A. Barrett, who are still 
residents of Canton, where the father is editor and publisher of the Canton Press. 
He is a son of Jesse W. Barrett, who came to Missouri about 1855 and founded 
the Canton Press in 1863. He was also the promoter and organizer of the Alis- 
souri Press Association and was its first president. He was likewise prominent 
both in the INIasonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, serv- 
ing as grand master of the latter. He was likewise a member of the state 
legislature which elected Cockrell for the first time and was the associate and 
intimate friend of many of Missouri's most prominent men of that period. He 
married a Aliss Hooven, who was related to the Cramp family, the noted ship- 
builders of Philadelphia. Mrs. Jeannette A. Barrett bore the maiden name of 
Bushman and was descended in the maternal line from the New England Scran- 
ton family, for whom the city of Scranton, Pennsylvania, was named, one branch 
being founded in that part of the country. 

Jesse W. Barrett, whose name initiates this review, was graduated from 
the Canton high school in 1898. He was also graduated from the Christian 
University at Canton in 1901 with the degree of Bachelor of Literature and in 
1902 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He pursued both literary and scien- 
tific courses and in preparation for a professional career he entered the George 
Washington University at Washington, D. C, where he was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Law in 1905. In his early life he was recognized as 
an apt student and broad reader, keeping always well informed upon current 
events and matters of general interest. He was still quite young when he de- 
termined to enter the legal profession and after his graduation he came direct 
to St. Louis, where he entered upon the active practice of law and has here 
since remained. He has concentrated his energies chiefly upon civil law, special- 
izing in the departments of contract and corporation law. For several years 
he was affiliated with the firm of Harlan, Jeffries & Wagner, but on the ist of 
September, 1908, he formed a partnership with Milton M. Bearing, assistant 
United States attorney in charge of naturalization for the government in the 
middle west district, and the new firm has taken the name of Barrett & Bearing. 
Mr. Barrett's private interests are important and growing, and he now has a 
clientage of distinctively representative character. In June, 1907, he was ap- 
pointed special assistant Unitcrl States attorney to represent the United States 
in the cases in which the incoming flistrict attorney was disqualified. 



ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 299' 

Early in life Air. Barrett displayed sterling traits of character and indica- 
tions of ability which have constituted strong elements in his professional suc- 
cess and advancement. In Christian University he was president of the liter- 
ary societies and with success represented the university in intercollegiate de- 
bates. In George Washington University he was elected president of the De- 
bating Society and gained the first prize at the Public Debate. He was also 
chosen presiding officer at the memorial exercises held in 1905 by the students 
of the university at Alonticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson, and for one year 
in his college days he was editor-in-chief of the Universitv Weekly. His ora- 
torical power, which he early displayed, has been an important feature in his 
success, enabling him to present forcibly the subjects under discussion in the 
courts. His mind, too, has been trained in the severest school of reasoning until 
close investigation has become habitual with him. 

In politics Mr. Barrett is a republican and while manifesting that interest 
which always indicates loyal and progressive citizenship, he has never been a 
politician in the sense of seeking office as a reward for party fealty. He belongs 
to the Phi Sigma Kappa, a college fraternity, and holds membership with St. 
John's Methodist Episcopal church South. By reason of personal worth, pro- 
fessional skill and his close conformity to a high standard of ethics in both pri- 
vate and public life, he has gained a prominent place in the regard of those who 
know him. 



HERBERT LAWRENCE PARKER. 

Herbert Lawrence Parker, whose well directed activity, guided at all times by 
discriminating judgment, is manifest in his success as a manufacturer of electric 
motors, comes to the middle west from New England. His birth occurred in Pep- 
perell, Massachusetts, June 28, 1854, his parents being John Loring and ]\Iarinda 
Corcoran (Blake) Parker. The district schools afforded him his early educational 
training and he afterward attended the public schools of Worcester, ^Nlassachu- 
setts, while he qualified for a business career as a student in the Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute. Throughout his entire career he has made it his plan to do with 
all his might what his hand has found to do and he has wrought industriously, 
intelligently and conscientiously in business fields, with the result that he has 
made continuous progress. He was first employed by John L. Parker & Com- 
pany, manufacturers of seamless wrought iron goods, in Worcester, Massachu- 
setts, from 1870 until 1872. In the latter year he entered upon a four years' 
apprenticeship as engraver, w-as then with the King & Eisele Jewelry Company 
of Buft'alo, New York, from 1877 until 1879, after which he entered an entirely 
different field of labor. 

In 1880 he began railroading with the Eitchburg Railroad Company at 
Boston and in 1882 went to Paso del Norte, Mexico, with the Mexican Central 
Railway. In 1886 he became connected with the Santa Fe Railroad at Topeka, 
Kansas, and in 1888 entered the service of the INIexican National Railway at 
Chicago, while in 1890 he became the Santa Fe general agent in the city of 
Mexico. Two years were passed in that position and, removing to St. Louis, 
he began the manufacture of electric motors and electric fans as president of 
the Emerson Electric Manufacturing Company, which has now been his business 
association for sixteen consecutive years. As chief executive manager he has 
constantly broadened the scope of the enterprise and has kept pace with the 
remarkable progress that has been made in the manufacture of electrical machin- 
ery at this period in the w^orld's history, which might well be termed the electrical 
age. His business has grown to large proportions, with a constantly increasing 
patronage. 

On'the 2d of April. 1892, occurred the marriage of Herbert L. Parker and 
Miss Emilv L. King, the wedding being celebrated at ^^^lorgan Park. Illinois. 



300 ST. LOUIS, THE FOURTH CITY. 

They are parents of two sons and two daughters : King Lawrence. Herbert 
Lloyd. Katharine Amanda and EHzabeth Blake. In his social relations Mr. 
Parker is connected with the Glen Echo, the Missouri Athletic, the Dardenne 
Hunting and Fishing, the Lone Gum Island Outing and the Maine Hunting and 
Fishing Clubs, associations which indicate much of the character of his interests 
and his recreation. He is never happier than when with rod and gun he is 
sojourning in the wildernesses with opportunity to try his skill in these direc- 
tions. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, but while he feels 
a citizen's interest in the questions of the day, he has no inclination for active 
participation in office holding, preferring to give undivided attention to the de- 
velopment of a growing business. 



PAUL A. FUSZ. 



Paul A. Fusz is a man whose constantly expanding powers have taken him 
from humble surroundnigs to the field of large enterprise and continually broad- 
ening opportunities, in which he has brought to bear a clear understanding that 
readily solves complex problems and unites into a harmonious whole unrelated 
and even diverse interests. A native of Haricourt, France, he was born August 
5. 1847, of the marriage of Francis H. and Marie R. (Tschaeu) Fusz. The arrival 
of the family in St. Louis during his early childhood enabled him to pursue his 
education in the public schools of this city and in the St. Louis University. He 
was yet but a youth, when in September, 1864, he enlisted as a private in the 
Confederate army, with which he served until honorably discharged in March, 
1865. He was taken a prisoner and confined in the Gratiot ]Military Prison of 
St. Louis, was tried by court martial and sentenced to the Jefferson ^lilitary 
Prison, but was afterward paroled by special order of President Lincoln. His 
advance in the business world has been made almost by leaps and bounds and 
yet there has been nothing esoteric in his entire career. He has employed the 
methods which may be utilized, bringing to bear close application and thorough 
mastery of every task in the performance of the duties which have devolved upon 
him. He has worked his way steadily upward from the position of errand boy 
with the old firm of Chouteau, Harrison & VaWe to that of general manager of 
the Laclede Rolling Alills. He has been connected with many other corporate in- 
terests, displaying many of the qualities of generalship, such as make the military 
commander a power in marshaling forces so as to produce the best results in his 
military operations. 

Mr. Fusz has seemed to know just how to use opportunity and when and 
where to put forth his efifort to win the signal victories in the world of commerce 
and trade. He was one of the incorporators and until 1893 a director of the 
Merchants Bridge Company. He also assisted in organizing the Hibernia 
Building Associations, which has successfully terminated to a profit to all stock- 
holders. He was active in incorporating the Colonial Trust Company, the prede- 
cessors of the Commonwealth Trust Company, and he occupies the presidency 
of the Granite & Bimetallic Consolidated Mining Company. He is also the chief 
officer of the American Gem Mining Syndicate, the Coal Land Syndicate, and the 
Hope Mining Company, and a director of the Desloge Consolidated Lead Com- 
pany, the lola Street Railway Company, and of various other corporations. He 
has become extensively connected with the operations in the mining fields of the 
west, while legitimate business advantages he has seized and in their conduct 
has proved his business ability, which is of superior order. 

Mr. Fusz is not unknown in community affairs as the promoter of measures 
for the general good. He has served three years as a director of the St. Louis 
school board and for one term on the Mullanphy board and is interested in all 
matters concerning civic virtue and civic pride. He holds the rank of major 



ST. LOUIS. THE FOURTH CITY. 801 

general of the United Confederate X'eterans in the Northwest Division, and he 
is a member of the Elks' lodge, the Mercantile, the Noonday, Racquet and the 
University Clubs and the American Institute of Mining Engineers. His political 
allegiance is given to the democracy, while his religious faith is that of the Roman 
Catholic church. In the achievement of well merited success he has gained rank 
among the most forceful and resourceful business men of St. Louis. 



WILLIAM O. GIBSON. 

Many men achieve success but bear the marks and scars of the battle. C'oni- 
paratively few there are whose natures are not warped and whose kindly spirit 
is not in some degree lessened by those things which are apt to make men lose 
faith in their fellows and in the beneficent plan which governs the universe. 
William O. Gibson, however, was a notable exception of this rule. His life record 
covered more than seventy-four years and from early boyhood he was active in 
business circles but all through his life he maintained a spirit of appreciation for 
that which is highest and best and left an example of personal and commercial 
integrity that is well worthy of emulation. 

Mr. Gibson was a native of Scotland, his birth having occurred about 
eighteen miles from the city of Edinburgh. The father's household numbered 
seven children and the educational advantages which he received were those 
ofifered by the schools of his native land. He attended school between his fifth 
and tenth years and then accompanied the family on the emigration westward. 
His uncle, Peter Gibson, who erected the well known Gibson house at Cincin- 
nati, made the voyage in the same ship and daily held services and family wor- 
ship in one end of the vessel. 

The limited financial circumstances of the family made it imperative that 
William O. Gibson should early earn his own living and he secured employment 
in a cotton factory at Ramapo, New York. He was still a youth, however, when 
he came to Missouri and for a time was employed on a farm in St. Louis county. 
He afterward resided in W^arren county for four years and it was there his father 
built a schoolhouse, making it free to all the children of the district at a time 
when there were no public schools in the locality. Wdien eighteen years of age 
William O. Gibson returned to St. Louis county to live with his uncle. Dr. Gibson, 
of Bellefontaine road, and in 1846 he entered upon his mercantile career in the 
capacity of a clerk in the employ of David Nicholson. He there received his 
initiative training in the grocery business and there grew in him a desire to own 
a store of his own. Carefully saving his earnings and incurring no expense when 
it could be avoided, he at length became the possessor of a capital of three hun- 
dred dollars which he invested in a stock of groceries, opening a store on ^Market 
street. From the beginning the new enterprise prospered and for many years he 
remained sole proprietor of a store which enjoyed a constantly increasing patron- 
age. In 1882, however, he admitted his son Charles to a partnership, while his 
brother had previously become his associate in business. His first year's sales 
amounted to eighteen thousand dollars and there was no year in which he did 
not receive a good profit on his investment. His store was always neatly and 
attractively arranged, while his reasonable prices and earnest efforts to please lus 
patrons were features in his prosperity. 

Mr. Gibson was married twice, but his first wife, whom he wedded in 1852, 
and their two daughters died, th