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Full text of "The stone-cutter : a Japanese legend"

THE STONE-CUTTER 



A JAPANESE LEGEND 



ADAPTED BY 

ELIZABETH HARRISON 



MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT 
ARRANGED BY 

FRANCIS M. ARNOLD 



Published by 

CENTRAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

258 Wabash Ave. 

Chicago, 111. 



THE STONE-CUTTER 



A JAPANESE LEGEND 



ADAPTED BY 

ELIZABETH HARRISON 



MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT 
ARRANGED BY 

FRANCIS M. ARNOLD 



Published by 

Central Publishing company 

258 Wabash Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1906, by 

ELIZABETH HARRISON, 
In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



— Becktold — 

Printing & Book Mfg. Co. 

St. Louis, Mo. 



EXPLANATION 

Three years ago my friend, Francis JM. Arnold, 
suggested to me that we should use music in con- 
nection with symbolic stories for children much as 
it was being used by modern composers, i. e., to 
deepen the inner significance of the story without 
undue pressure or pedantic moralizing. I saw at 
once the added art value which appropriate music 
would give to a story, but did not realize until after 
the experiment had been tried, the added interest 
in music which the story would give. I happened 
at the time to be rewriting and giving a modern 
content to a Japanese legend which IMcCutcheon 
had cartooned for the Chicago Tribune and pro- 
posed that we should try a musical setting for it. 
The result is given in the following pages. The ex- 
periment proved so successful that Mr. Arnold has 
since adapted music to "The Legend of the Christ- 
Child," "The Story of Persephine" and several other 
stories. 

It goes without saying that the musician must be 
in sympathy with the story-teller and be able to 
modulate the music to the details of the story as 
well as to her voice, oftentimes improvising a con- 
nection between one motif and another. When 
rightly done the result is very beautiful and the 
effect remarkable. 

ELIZABETH HARRISON. 
Chicago, 111. 



Fortunately one is not called on to defend the use 
of leading motifs to emphasize situations and char- 
acters in story-telling with music, since Richard 
Wagner's mighty exposition in his music-dramas. 

3 



In arranging music for Miss Harrison's stories I 
have adopted this idea, and do not attempt to sug- 
gest scenes so much as soul conditions. 

In this story we have to deal with the discontent 
of Hashnu, his seeming satisfaction and the return 
to discontent, until through experience life reveals 
its secret. 

I have taken as the motif of Discontent the second 
part of Chopin's Prelude No. 15; the constantly re- 
curring tone in the upper part suggests at once the 
stone-cutting, and at the same tim.e the monotony 
of his work to Hashnu, while the sombre melody in 
the lower part points to his discontent. 

For the Temple of Buddha I have used the Wal- 
halla motif from Rhinegold, as it has the calm, con- 
fident, religious character necessary to suggest a 
great temple. 

The motif of the Wind, which forms so prominent 
a part in the story, is taken from the accompani- 
ment to the Erl-king by Schubert; but a change is 
necessary. Schubert used the octave figure in the 
upper part to suggest the beating of horses hoofs. 
I have ventured to change this by using a rapid 
tremolo effect of the same notes to suggest wind 
and retained the storm motif in the lower part to 
emphasize its rise and fall. Two uses of this motif 
are possible; before the answer to his prayer, it can 
be played as if approaching, and after the prayer the 
process may be reversed to suggest the return "to 
the farthest star." 

The voice of Buddha, I have not attempted to por- 
tray, even music has its limit. 

For riches I use the first part of the 3rd move- 
ment of Beethoven's Sonata Op. 31, No. 2. It is 
bright and sparkling, and by playing it rapidly with 

4 



quick changes of piano and forte can be made to 
suggest the glitter and sparkle of the jewels Hashnu 
wore to attract attention. 

For the Emperor, the ]\Iarch from Aida may be 
used, beginning after the Introduction. 

For the power and majesty of the Sun I use the 
"Invocation to the Sun"' as given in the introduction 
to "Thus Spake Zarathustra," bv Richard Strauss. 

For the Storm the first part of the Vorspiel to 
"Die Walkure," but first employing the motif of 
Thor. 

The change to the block of granite may be sug- 
gested by playing the second part of the Chopin 
Prelude, emphasizing the lower part and playing 
slowly and ponderously to bring out the idea of the 
unchanging and immovable so attractive to Hashnu. 

When Hashnu returns to the stone-cutter after all 
his experiences, the first part of the Chopin Prelude 
(in d flat major) may be used and then as the com- 
pleted Temple of Buddha is described, the wonder- 
fully beautiful Walhalla JMusic from Rhinegold (page 
57 of the Klindworth edition), beginning at the 
words "Achieved the Eternal Work." 

FRANCIS MARION ARNOLD. 



HASHNU, THE STONE-CUTTER. 

By ELIZABETH HARRISON. 

Adapted from an old Japanese legend. 
Set to music by Francis M. Arnold. 

Prelude including Hasluin motif of discontent. 

The zvind motif and the calm majestic 

Walhalla music or temple motif. 

Hashnu sat beside the huge stone on which he 
had been hewing for weeks, aye, even for 
months. 

Hashnu motif. 

It seemed to him as he looked back upon the 
past, as if most of his Hfe had been spent in the 
quarry chiselHng this huge stone, shaping it for 
its place in the Temple of Buddha. 

Hashnu motif continued throughout the next 
t'lK.'o paragraphs as a low undertone. 

Click ! click ! click ! went his small hammer. 
Click ! click ! click ! and a bit of the rough sur- 
face gave way and the shining granite within 
glittered at the point from which he had hewn 
the rough exterior. It is true that part of the 
rock, even now showed the effect of his patient 
labor. One corner of it shone smooth and 
sparkling. This he had already shaped for its 



HASHNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 7 

place in the great Temple of Buddha. But this 
was not enough, the whole stone must be dressed 
and polished as well as hewn into shape, and the 
task seemed a long and weary one to Hashnu. 
Sometimes the dust on the roadside almost 
choked him. and again the sun poured down its 
sharp rays upon his head until he was dizzy. 
People came and went along the road nearby and 
took no note of him. What was he? Nothing 
but an obscure stone cutter, hewing and shaping 
a stone for its place in the Temple of Buddha. 

One day a rich man rode by in his luxurious 
carriage. The harness on his horses jingled and 
their hoofs raised such a dust that the stone 
cutter was hidden from sight for the time being. 

Hashnu motif ceases. 

Then Hashnu threw down his hammer, and 
rising to his feet he lifted up his arms to heaven 
and cried aloud. "Oh, Buddha ! Thou wise and 
great one ! I am thy child ! Hear thou my cry ! 
I am tired of being only a stone cutter; I would 
be rich and ride in mine own carriage as does yon 
proud grandee ! Help Thou, me, Oh Buddha !" 
He dropped his hands, his head sank upon his 
breast and he closed his eyes. 

U'i)id motif begins soft and lozv then rises in 

■volume and continues for a moment or 

/zc'o after the ne.vt sentence ends. 



8 HASHNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 

Then from the farthest star came sweeping 
down a mighty wind. 

Music ceases. 

And with the wind came a voice deep and low, 
unHke any voice that Hashnu had ever heard; 
for there was in it a tone which made all other 
sounds cease. And the deep, low voice whisp- 
ered unto Hashnu, "Oh, blind one ! thy prayer 
has been granted thee !" 

Wind motif gradually dying azvay as if receding 

into immeasurable distance. 

Motif signifying riches begins and continues 

through the next tzvo paragraphs. 

Then Hashnu opened his eyes. And beheld 
that he was arrayed in rich and gorgeous ap- 
parel ; and divans with rich cushions were round 
about him. The walls and roof of a handsome 
mansion surrounded him ; while slaves bowed 
obsequiously before him. "Ah," cried Hashnu, 
"Now I am rich. Now shall I be happy!" and 
he thought no more of the huge stone by the 
roadside which he had been slowly shaping for 
its place in the Temple of Buddha. 

One day as he sat on his veranda a messenger 
came running by, shouting aloud, "The emperor ! 
Tlje emperor comes ! Prepare ye the way !" 
Then Hashnu spread out his silken robes and 
stretched forth his feet, for his slippers were em- 



HASHJSfU, THE STONE CUTTER. i» 

broidered with precious jewels; looking proudly 
around him at his costly surroundings he said 
to himself, "Ah, now will the great emperor 
see Hashnu and will notice him for his riches !" 
But the emperor and his cavalcade of nobles 
and priests and foreign ambassadors rode past 
and none saw Hashnu nor his riches, for all eyes 
w^ere fixed upon the great emperor that each 
one might be ready to obey the slightest nod of 
his head or beck of his hand. 

Music changes to Hasliuii's motif of discontent. 

Then Hashnu rose from the carved chair upon 
which he had been sitting, and buried his face in 
his hands, and cried aloud, "Oh, Buddha, thou 
art wise and great, I am thy child ! Hear thou 
my cry ! ]\Iy riches have not satisfied me, I 
would be an emperor ! Help me, oh Buddha !" 

Wind motif as before. 

And again from the farthest stars came sweep- 
ing down a mighty wind. 

Music ceases. 

And with the sound of the wind came a voice 
deep and low, but there was in the voice that 
which made all other sounds on earth cease, and 
the deep low voice whispered to Hashnu, "Oh, 
blind one ! Thy prater has been granted thee." 



10 HA8HNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 

lVi)id motif receding and slozvly dying out. 

Emperor motif begi)is, continuing tJirough next 

tiK.'o paragraphs. 

Then Hashnu opened his eyes and beheld that 
he was an emperor seated on a throne of gold, 
and the throne of gold stood upon a floor of 
mother-of-pearl ; and before him stood officers 
and nobles, and priests, and foreign ambassa- 
dors, arrayed in gorgeous apparel, each and every 
one of them anxiously watching him that they 
might know his will by the slightest nod of his 
head or beck of his hand. Then Hashnu said 
unto himself, "Now am I great, and I shall be 
happy !" 

After a time the summer came ; with it came 
fierce heat, so great that Hashnu, the emperor, 
could find no relief from the fiery rays of 
the sun in any room of his palace, nor in 
any part of the gardens which surrounded 
his palace. Then he sent for the head steward 
of his household and said unto him, "Tell 
the sun to withdraw his rays from my palace 
and from my gardens ! For I, Hashnu, the 
emperor, so command !" Then the head steward 
fell upon his face before Hashnu, the emperor 
and cried aloud, "All that a faithful steward 
can do have I done for thee !" "But the 
sun is mightier than all the emperors and kings 
of the earth and no mortal man can con- 



HASHNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 11 

tro! him. He shineth where he chooseth and 
drinketh up the waters of the brooks and parch- 
eth the face of the earth when he will ; even an 
emperor's palace may not escape his burning 
rays !" 

Music changes to Hashmt's motif of discontent. 

Then Hashnu buried his face in his royal man- 
tle and wept, and cried out, "Oh Buddha, Thou 
wise and great one, I am thy child ! Hear Thou 
my cry ! I would be the powerful sun who cares 
not for the anger of an emperor. Help thou 
me, oh, Buddha." 

Wind motif as before. 

Then from the farthest star came sweeping 
down a mighty wind. 

Music dies aieay. 
And with the wind came a voice so deep and 
low that all other sounds on earth ceased as it 
spoke, and it whispered to Hashnu, the em- 
peror, "Oh blind one! Thy prayer has been 
granted thee !" 

Wind motif receding and dying azvay. 

Sun motif played through the next tivo 

paragraphs. 

And lo and behold ! Hashnu was changed 
into the sun, and rolled through the heavens with 
a power such as was never dreamed of by mortal 



12 HASHNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 

man. Each morning he rose in the east and 
drank up the waters in the brooks and scorched 
the fields and caused the trees "and flowers in the 
garden of the emperor to wither and droop. 
Then the heart of Hashnu, which was aHve in 
the center of the sun, exulted and said unto itself, 
"Ah, now that emperors and kings must bow 
down before me and flee from my fierce rays, I 
shall be happy!" 

One day, however, the sun noticed a dark, sul- 
len cloud rising slowly from the face of the sea 
and he sent his strongest rays down to pierce the 
cloud and scatter it, but the dark sullen cloud 
swallowed up the ray and it was lost, while the 
cloud continued to grow larger and darker, and 
to spread out over the face of the heavens until it 
shut the earth away from the light of the sun. 
In vain the sun sent down ray after ray, even 
hundreds of rays to pierce the cloud. It merely 
opened its mouth and swallowed them all and 
continued to grow darker and heavier than be- 
fore. 

Music changes to Haslinii's discontent. 

Then the heart of Hashnu, which was in the 
center of the sun. cried out, "Oh Buddha, Thou 
wise and great one ! I am thy child ! Hear 
Thou my cry ! Make me to be the cloud which 
is stronger than the sun. Hear Thou mv crv, 
oh, Buddha!" 



HASHNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 13 

Wind motif as before. 

Then from the farthest star came sweeping 
down a mighty wind. 

Music dies azvay. 

And with the wind came a voice deep and low, 
yet at the sound of that voice the thunder of the 
storm cloud and the flash of its lightnings were 
hushed while all sounds on earth ceased as it 
whispered, "Oh blind one ! Thy prayer has been 
granted thee !" 

Storm motif continues through next tzuo 
paragraphs. 

And lo and behold Hashnu was no longer in 
the center of the sun. He had become the dark, 
sullen storm-cloud which kept the rays of the sun 
from reaching the surface of the earth. Then 
the storm-cloud poured down torrents of rain 
that swelled the brooks and overflowed the fields 
and tore up the trees by their roots. And the 
heart of Hashnu, which had entered the storm- 
cloud, cried out exultantly, "Now am I the 
strongest of all things in heaven or on earth ! 
Even the sun cannot conquer me ! And all 
things on earth quail and flee before my wrath !" 

But beside the road was a huge rock of 
granite which moved not as the rain beat upon it. 
When the storm cloud saw this it poured forth 



14 HASHNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 

such a flood of rain as had never been seen be- 
fore, and it darted great flashes of lightning 
down upon the stone, and thundered until the 
heavens shook, but the rock lay quiet and un- 
disturbed. 
Music changes to motif of Hashnn's discontent. 

Then Hashnu cried out from the dark, sullen 
rain-cloud, "Oh, Buddha, Thou great and wise 
one, I am Thy child! Hear Thou my cry! I 
have been deceived! That rock by the roadside 
is greater than I! I would be the huge stone 
which even the storm cannot move. Hear Thou 
my cry ! oh, Buddha !" 

Wind motif as before. 
Then came the sound of a mighty wind sweep- 
ing down from the farthest star. 

Music ceases. 
And with the wind came a voice deep and low. 
But at the sound of the voice the storm cloud 
hushed, and all things on earth ceased to stir. 
Then the voice whispered, "Oh, blind one! Thy 
prayer has been granted thee!" 

IVind motif dies azvay. 
Rock motif continuing through the next tzvo 

paragraphs. 
And lo and behold ! the dark, sullen, storm 
cloud was changed into a huge piece of granite 
rock that lav on the roadside, and the heart of 



HASHNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 15 

Hashnu entered into the silent rock and re- 
joiced exultantly and exclaimed, "Now am I 
the greatest of all! The unmoved! Nothing 
can change me ! I am stronger than the storms 
of heaven !" 

One day, however, the huge rock felt a prick- 
ing in its side, and again another pricking, prick, 
prick, prick came the sharp little pain, and with 
it came the sound, click ! click ! click ! and a bit 
of the huge surface fell off and the rock silently 
groaned. 
Music changes to Haslinu's motif of discontent. 

And the heart of Hashnu, which was within 
the rock, cried out, "Oh. Buddha, Thou wise and 
great one ! I am Thy child ! Hear Thou my 
cry ! I am not all-powerful as I had thought. I 
would that I were the tiny man who is hewing 
this rock into such shape as he chooses. I am 
powerless in his hands. Help Thou me, oh 
Buddha !" 

]Vind motif as before. 

Then once again sweeping down from the far- 
thest star came the mighty wind. 

Miisic ceases. 

And with it came a voice deep and low, yet 
at the sound of that voice the sun, the moon and 
all the stars stood still, and all other sounds on 
earth ceased while it whispered, "Oh, blind one ! 



16 HASHNU, THE STONE CUTTER. 

At last thou scest! Be thou Hashnu, the stone 
cutter ! And sit by the roadside hewing and 
shaping- the great rock for its place in the Temple 
of Buddha !" 

The music gradually changes from the motif of 
Haishiiu reconciled to the Temple motif zvhich 
is played slozvly and softly for a niimite 
or tzvo before the tvords of the 
story are resumed. 
And a thousand years passed by; and strang- 
ers came into the land where emperors and kings 
had once ruled, but who had long since been 
buried ; where rich men had accumulated vast 
fortunes which were now scattered and forgot- 
ten; over there were the fields which the sun 
had parched, and they were once more green and 
fertile; and the ravages which the storms had 
made were once more healed. But the Temple 
of Buddha stood grand and glorious in the midst 
of the valley! As the strangers gazed upon it 
their hearts were stirred, for they saw how per- 
fectly fitted into its place was each glittering 
block of granite which the unknown stone cutters 
had hewn, day after day, that they might be 
fitted each for its place in the great Temple of 
Buddha. 

The Temple music continues several moments 

after the story closes. Then dies 

softly azcay into silence.