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Full text of "A story historical of Cornell University, with biographies of distinguished Cornellians"

DISTINGUISHED 
CORNELLIANS 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 



A STORY HISTORICAL 



OF 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

WITH BIOGRAPHIES OF 

DISTINGUISHED 
CORNELLIANS 



BY 

MURRAY EDWARD POOLE, LL.D., D.C.L. 
it 



1916 

PUBLISHED BY 

THE CAYUGA PRESS 

ITHACA, N. Y. 



COPYRIGHTED, 1916 

BT 
MURRAY E. POOLE 



HENRY MORSE STCPHCH* 



TO 

ANDREW DICKSON WHITE 
FIRST PRESIDENT OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



DREAMED A DREAM) IT WAS OF A GREAT UNIVERSITY WHERE THERE 
WOULD BE MORE LIBERAL TEACHINGS." 



"WE ARE ABOUT TO LAUNCH THE SHIP (CORNELL UNIVERSITY) ! 
THERE STANDS HER BUILDER (EZRA CORNELL) ! 
THERE STANDS HER CAPTAIN (ANDREW D. WHITE) ! 
THERE STAND HER OFFICERS AND CREW (THE PROFESSOR) ! 
THERE STAND HER PASSENGERS (THE STUDENTS) I" 



[PARAPHRASE OF THE SPEECH OF GEORGE WILLIAM CURTIS AT THE 
OPENING OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY] 



510696 



FOREWORD 

It was thought that this was an opportune time, on the eve of Cornell Uni- 
versity's Semi-Centennial, to publish a book, giving a history of the University, 
and also showing what Cornellians have accomplished in the world. 

The plan and scope of this work includes a brief history of the University; 
an announcement of the coming celebration and grand reunion; biographies 
of the founder, presidents and acting presidents; a list of distinguished pro- 
fessors (other than Comellians who will be found later in the alumni list, herein), 
giving their chairs, and years of service at Cornell, and any other important 
position held, or work done by them either before coming to, or after leaving, 
Cornell; biographies of distinguished alumni, arranged first by classes, com- 
mencing with that of '69, and then, for a cross-reference, by public offices, po- 
sitions, professions and occupations (though this arrangement may be reversed) ; 
followed by an alphabetical index. 

The basis of representation in this work is the ability to appear in published 
books of biography of distinguished Americans. 

There are also included a few who deserve recognition but have been over- 
looked. A few have been chosen because of their special interest to Cornellians. 
There are but few names from recent classes, say those of the past ten or fifteen 
years. 

It is regretted that the names of all the alumni can not appear, but, as they 
number 27,000, it is not possible in a book of such limited space. 

This book is of Cornell and Cornellians, for Cornellians primarily, by a Cor- 
nellian, and may also appeal to the general reading public. It seemed pre- 
sumptuous for the author to write even a brief history of Cornell University, 
after reading Professor W. T. Hewitt's valuable and comprehensive "History" 
in three large volumes, and the valuable contribution to University history 
found in President White's fine literary production, "An Autobiography," and 
Alonzo B. Cornell's history (data for the future historian he calls it) of his father, 
Ezra Cornell, the founder. 

The author felt some timidity in approaching the subject, particularly the 
literary side, and stated his fears to President White. "Oh," said he, "sail right 
in, and give your ideas in your own way, only don't use big words unless it be 
necessary." So, here we sail, and, if we lose compass, rudder, sails and all, yet 
will.we cling to the good old ship "Cornell" till we get through. 

As the only graduate in a regular undergraduate course to undertake such 
a work, we may see Cornell affairs from a different view-point than the other 
writers, and we will try to give our impressions as briefly and tersely as possible, 
only we feel put upon our mettle, to think that a layman undertakes the work, 
when there are so many brilliant literary and historical writers at the University 
to undertake it but they don't. 



x DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

The author hopes that he will be pardoned if at times he appears to use 
large or flowery language, for he can not bring himself to speak in commonplace 
terms of the great University and its makers and teachers. 

With these few remarks, we close, hoping that the verdict of the readers 
will not be against the University for anything that author has either said or 
omitted. Reader, be charitable. "Criticism is easy, art is difficult." 

Ithaca, N. Y. MURRAY E. POOLE, A.B., '80. 



GREETINGS FROM PRESIDENT SCHURMAN 

To Graduates and Former Students of Cornell University: 

Mr. Murray Poole informs me that, as a sort of contribution to the coming 
Semi-Centennial of the Foundation of the University, he is publishing a partial 
list of Cornellians, with a classification of the vocations they have followed, 
and notes of the distinctions they have achieved. 

In response to Mr. Poole' s request, I gladly avail myself of this opportunity 
to send friendly greetings to the men and women who have been enrolled in 
Cornell University during the past forty-seven years of its existence. From 
the studies they pursued here, and the associations they formed, I am confident 
they have gained a larger and more intelligent outlook on the world, a deeper 
inspiration for their work, and enhanced ability to perform it, while the friend- 
ships they made in those student days have been among the most precious pos- 
sessions of their lives. 

The members of this great family will appreciate and be grateful for the nurture 
they have received from their Alma Mater. And now that she is to celebrate 
in 1918 the close of the first half-century of her existence, they will desire to 
express their sentiments in such varied manner as each may deem appropriate. 
I make no suggestions as to the manner in which Cornellians may best express 
their feelings on this interesting and historical occasion. But I do take this 
opportunity of expressing the hope that all who find it practicable will revisit 
these scenes in October, 1918, and once more see their Alma Mater face to face. 

JACOB GOULD SCHURMAN. 
February 4, 1916. 

GREETINGS FROM MRS. GERTRUDE SHORE MARTIN 
ADVISER OF WOMEN 

Ithaca, N. Y., February 28, 1916. 
To Fellow Alumnae and Former Women Students: 

Mr. Poole has asked me, in connection with his forthcoming History of the 
University, to extend to you a special greeting in addition to the cordial words 
of greeting and invitation already addressed to you and your fellow alumni 
by President Schurman. Does the fact that it should be thought requisite, 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xi 

or at least desirable, that a special word should be addressed to the alumnae 
imply a lingering sense of our separateness from the rest of the University ? 
I have an uneasy suspicion that it does; that we who regard ourselves so con- 
fidently as true daughters of Alma Mater are still looked upon by some members 
of the family as changelings, slipped into the cradle by stealth, and to be ad- 
mitted to full membership, if at all, only after prolonged scrutiny, and then not 
by right but by an act of grace. 

Sed tempora mutantur. Last night I was reading in the current number of 
the Alumni News extracts from letters written by Goldwin Smith in the very 
early days of the University. "I believe," he wrote, "I have also done something 
towards averting, for the present, female students, a crotchet of Horace Greeley, 
who was driving us in that direction apace." That was written a trifle less than 
fifty years ago by one of the most scholarly and liberal minded men of his time. 
Since then co-education has become in this country the prevalent form of higher 
education for women. Out of the thousands of young women now pursuing 
their studies in institutions of higher learning, it is a constantly dwindling mi- 
nority that find themselves in separate institutions for women. Horace Greeley's 
crotchet has gotten itself accepted as a normal social arrangement. 

How bold a step it was that Cornell University took in admitting women 
almost from the beginning to equal privileges with men only those can know 
who have read the utterances of the period on the subject of co-education. The 
fact that this new institution, struggling for a foothold among the old and con- 
servative institutions of the East, nevertheless had the courage to adopt so 
radical a policy, must always give it a special claim upon the affection and the 
loyalty of its women. With the approach of the semi-centennial celebration 
will come the opportunity for expression of that loyalty. I am confident that 
in the chorus of gratitude to Alma Mater that will be called forth by that occa- 
sion the feminine note will not be lacking. 

Faithfully yours, 

GERTRUDE S. MARTIN. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY : A STORY HISTORICAL 

THE FOUNDING AND EARLY DATS 

Sons and daughters of fair Cornell, 
Here's to her we love so well! 

There is an old saying: 

"Great oaks from little acorns grow." 
There is another: 

"There were giants in those days." 

When we remember that only about fifty years ago, in the small inland 
town of Ithaca, on a barren hill-side farm, there was founded an institution 
of learning which has become one of the greatest in the world, we can liken it 
only to a modern instance of "Aladdin and his wonderful lamp." Ezra Cornell 



xii DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

could bring the young dreamer and afterwards great executive, Andrew D. 
White, and the latter could wave the magic wand of scholarship and bring a 
faculty of the most noted educators. The founder sank beside him, but he 
kept bravely on. 

The one has left an imperishable name. 

The other will be awarded a high niche in the Hall of Fame. 

It is not our purpose to tell in detail the early struggles and calumny under 
which they labored, but only to strew roses in the way, as we approach the 
Golden Age of Cornell. 

There was a beginning, of course. The magnetic telegraph flashed the money 
to the founder, and the kindly fates brought him face to face with the man who 
could point the way for both to become great benefactors of the human race. 

Our Alma Mater owes its material existence to the combined bounty of Ezra 
Cornell and the State of New York. 

It was chartered in 1865, and opened its doors to students in 1868. President 
White wished the infant university located in his home city, but Ezra Cornell 
chose, more wisely, his beloved Ithaca, where, 

"Far above Cayuga's waters, 

With its waves of blue, 
Stands our noble Alma Mater, 
Glorious to view." 

C. K. URQUHART 76. 

on the most sightly and beautiful campus in the world. 

No author has ever yet been able adequately to describe, or poet sing, or 
artist paint, the beautiful scene from its towers, with the quiet lake at the north, 
the busy city at the west, and the lovely vale lying to the south, with great 
gorges within the bounds of its campus, and down in their depths grand and 
beautiful falls, where dwells, according to Indian legend, "The Spirit of the Fall." 

The 7th day of October, A.D. 1868, one of the most glorious in the history 
of Cornell, was set apart for the formal public exercises, when its doors were 
flung wide open to the student world. There were speeches by many distin- 
guished orators. 

There were at the opening nineteen professors, four assistant professors, 
and eight non-resident professors. The last named were a university all by 
themselves. 

Three hundred students applied for admission, some of them from other 
colleges. Those early students were among the founders of the University. 

They came to find Cornell University, as did the seekers after the "Golden 
Fleece," or Ponce De Leon after the "Fountain of Youth.'* They thought that 
they could study and work their way through and many of them did. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xm 

The other colleges regarded it as an * 'Experiment," but they were judging 
the outward rather than the inner man, for they had earnest minds and were 
diligent students, and willing workers. They met on a democratic equality. 
The younger members of the faculty received very small salaries but worked 
hard to make a professional reputation as teachers, to build up the new insti- 
tution and to start the young men right upon their way. However, they were 
strangers to each other and it was many years before they could do good "Team- 
work." 

A baseball club was organized in the intervals between classes on the first 
day of recitations. 

A "navy" was organized by men who knew little more about rowing than 
those who joined with them. 

A glee club was organized and commenced to sing the ever famous Alma 
Mater. 

The Era literary magazine was started and is now one of the oldest of college 
publications. 

A gymnasium was opened by student subscriptions. New buildings were 
erected by the trustees without any visible means of paying for the same. 

Differences arose between the faculty and trustees, but both worked away 
with a will. The alumni and trustees also had some bickerings, but not very 
serious. 

Then the religious colleges lambasted Cornell unceasingly. 

The loss of the Fiske millions was keenly felt but was compensated for by 
the generosity of Henry W. Sage. However, the new institution prospered, 
to the great joy of its friends, and the confusion of its enemies. 

The new university started lif e without prestige, relying for success entirely 
upon its own merits. 

The students were allowed great liberty in the choice of studies, and a very 
large measure of personal liberty they were put upon their honor as gentlemen. 

The people of Ithaca, unlike the citizens of most college towns, gave the 
welcome hand to the new students, and this neighborly feeling has continued 
to the present day. 

A majority of the students roomed down town, and, as Cornell was a semi- 
military college, they wore their military uniforms all the time. 

As several of the entering students had taken advanced standing, the next 
year, 1869, witnessed the first commencement, when eight graduates received 
their diplomas. 

Women students first entered the University in 1871, and the first class to 
graduate women was that of 1873, when three of them were awarded diplomas. 



xiv DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

"Alma Mater, thine the glory 

Pioneer in college ways, 
Honored ever be the story 

Of the struggling early days." 

J. L. MOFFATT, '73. 

"Within my heart the longings swell, 
That I thy praises loud might tell, 
Thou who so proudly lookest down 
Upon the peaceful lake and town. 
Good night! Good night! Our fair Cornell, 
May peace forever with thee dwell, 
And ne'er misfortune frown." 

R. T. N. 



THE FOUNDER 

"Bountiful heart! bountiful hand! 
Bountiful heart and hand!" 

F. M. FINCH. 

Our noble founder, Ezra Cornell, was of New England Quaker ancestry. 
His parents were poor, and he had to make his own way in the world. By his 
native genius, and hard work, he acquired great wealth from his connection 
with the Morse telegraph interests. He had long cherished the project of found- 
ing a University, where the youth of the land could obtain a better education 
than he had received in his own boyhood. 

He expressed his ideas in his own happily-chosen words: 

"I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any 
study." This became the motto of the new university. 

He became a senator of the State of New York, in 1864. Andrew D. White 
was a colleague and Chairman of the Senate Committee on Education. 

In him our future founder found a sympathetic listener, and from that time 
forward they held many conferences. Ezra Cornell proposed the material side 
and Andrew D. White the soul of a bill to charter the new university, and, after 
it was drafted by Charles J. Folger, chairman of the Judiciary Committee of 
the Senate, it was submitted to the Legislature. 

That body was hostile to the new project, the only opposition coming from 
The Peoples College, at Havana, N. Y., some other feeble colleges, and from 
denominational colleges, that regarded the proposed non-sectarian university 
as "Godless." They wanted some of the U. S. Land Grants apportioned to 
the State of New York, all of which the new university was to receive. The 
bill finally passed. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xv 

After the granting of the charter in 1865, there came the immense work of 
organization, and building, the choosing of a president and faculty, and pre- 
paring a curriculum of study. The new university then started upon its course. 

Ezra Cornell was asked to become a candidate, because of his great services 
to the cause of education and agriculture, for Govenor of the State. 

Ezra Cornell pinned his faith to the Common People. He was especially 
interested in the education of poor young men, and wanted them to have an 
industrial education to help themselves in the world. He believed also in the 
higher education. 

His first large gift was the Cornell Library to his loved Ithaca and then, 
came the greater gift of the University. Some of his ideas about education, and 
especially about the self-support of students, while getting an education, were 
impracticable, and had to be greatly modified, or altered. 

He was a Hicksite Quaker, but broad in his religious views. If old Diogenes, 
with a lighted lantern in the day-time, had come around to find an honest man, 
he would have found him in the person of Ezra Cornell. 

He was one of the greatest of Americans in that he had a broad and liberal 
mind, and a charity for other men's opinions. 

He lived in the early years, when he was poor, at "The Nook," the little 
gothic house near the present Percy Field. After becoming more prosperous 
he made his home at Forest Park, Stewart and South Avenues, near the Campus. 
Then he removed to an old brick mansion "Down Town," where the Ithaca 
Savings Bank building now stands. 

Finally, he built, but did not live to occupy and enjoy, the splendid Elizabethan 
mansion on University Hill, over the portal of which were chiseled the words: 
"True and Firm." He died December 9th, 1874, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

"From Slander's driving sleet, 
From Envoy's pitiless rain, 
At rest, the aching feet! 
At rest, the weary brain. 

So calm, and grave, and still, 
Men thought his silence, pride: 
Nor guessed the truth, until 
Death told it as he died." 

F. M. FINCH. 

Cornell is now among the angels looking down, 
But his spirit marches on. 



xvi DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

THE FIRST PRESIDENT 

"If you ask whence comes our candidate, my answer shall be: from Ap- 
pomatox, and its famous apple-tree." ROSCOE CONKLING. 

If you ask whence came our great first President, the answer shall be: the 
words of a friend in introducing him to Prince Bismarck: 

"Born at Homer; reared at Syracuse; President of a college at Ithaca." 

Andrew Dickson White was born to great wealth, and might have attained 
the highest political honors, had he cared to enter practical politics. 

It was mostly owing to his great political sagacity that he steered the frail 
craft, with the Charter-Bill aboard, between the dangerous rocks of Scylla and 
Charybdis safe to its haven's pier. 

He was elected to the New York State Senate, and there met Ezra Cornell, 
who was to exert so powerful an influence upon his subsequent career. The 
friendship thus formed ended only with the life of the founder. The result of 
their meeting the man of wealth, and the educator was the founding of 
Cornell University. 

In every plan to that end Andrew D. White took a masterful part. The 
comprehensive and progressive plans which they then prepared have been 
literally carried out to the present day. 

At the first meeting of the Board of Trustees, he was unanimously chosen 
the President of Cornell University. He remained in the office twenty years, 
1866-1885, when he resigned. However, he continues as trustee and valued 
adviser, and constant benefactor and friend of the alumni. 

His early experiences at Albany in combating intrigue, lying and graft, dis- 
gusted him and he preferred to don the academic robes, and was later rewarded 
politically on his merits. He was of New England ancestry and Revolutionary 
stock. 

He graduated in Yale's famous class of '53, and afterwards studied abroad. 

Early in his college career he began to see visions; the narrow, stone walls 
of Hobart College, where he commenced, expanded into marble halls. At Yale 
where he attended later, he built castles-in-Spain and saw the Alhambra trans- 
formed into a great palace of learning. 

At Oxford and Cambridge his dreams began to take form as he saw the great 
Bodleian Library, Christ Church and Trinity Halls and the beautiful towers 
of Magdalen and Merton, and the quadrangles of Jesus and St. John's. 

Afterwards when professor of history at the University of Michigan, he 
began to talk with friends about the desirability of a great university in the 
greatest state his own native state New York, where there would be other 
than the one old-fashioned course in Arts with its Greek and Latin courses 
that would fit men for the special professions or occupations that they intended 
to follow in after life. 

As one of the creators of the university of universities, he, with Ezra Cornell, 
John McGraw, Henry W. Sage, and Hiram Sibley, ranks among the world's 
great benefactors. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xvn 

As the author of the Warfare of Science, the story of persecution in the Dark 
Ages of superstition and religious intolerance, he proved himself to be a great 
investigator, a profound historical scholar, and a seeker and teller of the truth, 
a work which ranks him with the world's great historians and benefactors. As 
a diplomat he rendered valuable services to his country abroad. As a benefac- 
tor of Cornell financially, and as one of the moving causes for others to give, 
he has rendered inestimable services to the University which were given gratu- 
itously. Besides he would never take any salary. Finally, as the author of 
a splendid "Autobiography" he has told the story of the founding of Cornell, 
and its early history, in a beautiful way, which no one else can more than 
imitate, for he is not only capable of doing great things in a great way, but 
he was one of the principal actors in the stirring events which he describes. 

President White was always interested in history, especially American his- 
tory, and, by his advice, Cornell was the first University in this country to have 
a chair of American History. 

He made a great study of methods of teaching, both in his own country and 
abroad, and the result was embodied in the system of education adopted at 
Cornell. 

He recognized the importance of, and incorporated in the Cornell system 
of education, industrial training. He thinks Latin of more value to the student 
than Greek. 

He has always been a friend of the secondary schools of the State. Freedom 
of choice of studies has always been a leading feature of education with him, 
and at Cornell. 

While serving as Minister and Ambassador his home was ever a center of 
hospitality, where could be met not only the greatest diplomats and statesmen, 
but also great scholars, artists and writers. 

He has made many valuable gifts, from time to time, from his own large 
private means; built the Presidents House, for the Presidents, when he is through 
with it; gave his own valuable historical library of 30,000 volumes, valued at 
more than $100,000; built the artistic entrance gateway, and in many other 
ways aided the University financially. His example and his high standing as 
an educator caused many wealthy friends to aid the University. All he seemed 
to have to say to them were the talismic words "open Sesame" and they helped. 

He was President of the American Delegation to the International Peace 
Congress at The Hague. 

President White, on the opening day of the University, expected that the 
founder would not survive the occasion, for he had been ill for a long time and 
had lain moaning on a bed of pain by night and day. He, himself, was ill and 
they were both borne upon litters to the place where the exercises were held. 
He bore up bravely until George William Curtis used the simile of the ship when 
his heart sank within him and he nearly collapsed such kind words after so 
much hard work and abuse of himself and the founder by enemies. 



xvm DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

He has often said: "The marvellous growth and the success of Cornell Uni- 
versity have exceeded my fondest anticipations." The high honors which Presi- 
dent White received abroad were very pleasing to his former students. 

He is honored by Cornellians everywhere. He is one of the greatest of living 
American diplomatists, statesmen and scholars. 

A bronze statue of President White, by Karl Bitter, the gift of H. R. Ickel- 
heimer, '88, stands in front of Goldwin Smith Hall in the university quadrangle. 

He now resides on the Cornell Campus, and, although four score and three 
years of age, retains his mental vigor and good health, and has not yet retired 
from the active duties of life. What a cloud of memories must rush upon him, 
and with what satisfaction he must view the work which his hand builded 
for it might have all miserably failed. 

Other colleges had arisen long enough to have their pictures taken, as it 
were, and then subsided, and were never heard of again. The wise ones attribute 
Cornell's success mostly to the inspiring ideas, example, words and deeds of 
Andrew D. White. That he may long live to enjoy the homage due to him is 
the ardent wish of every Cornellian. 

THE SECOND PRESIDENT 

Charles Kendall Adams was born January 24, 1835, at Derby, Vt., and was 
related to the Presidents Adams. He graduated at Michigan University in the 
class of 1861, where he became Professor of History and Dean of the School of 
Political Science. He became well known as a scholar and teacher, and upon 
the resignation of President White, he was chosen President of Cornell Uni- 
versity in 1885. President Adams showed great executive ability, and the Uni- 
versity grew in the number of buildings, endowments, professors and students. 
The Library Building, Barnes, Lincoln, Morse and Boardman Halls and the 
Gymnasium Annex were built during his administration. He was the author 
of a "Manual of American Literature," and a "Life of Christopher Columbus," 
and many magazine articles, and he delivered many public addresses. He was 
President of the American Historical Association, and a member of many his- 
torical and other learned societies. His connection with a non-sectarian and 
State University before he came to Cornell was of great value in preparing him 
for his new position. He visited Europe several times and carefully studied 
university methods of teaching there, and was thus enabled to choose the best 
methods adapted to American education. After serving as President of Cornell 
for seven years, 1885-92, he resigned. He then became President of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. Died July 26, 1902, at Redlands, California. 

THE THIRD AND PRESENT PRESIDENT 

"It was the crowded Senate Chamber." 

WEBSTER'S REPLY TO HAYNE. 

When President Jacob Gould Schurman addressed a vast assemblage in 
Sage Chapel, who listened attentively to every word, on the subject of The 
Bible, he not only did justice to a great subject, but he demonstrated that the 
speaker was a great historical student, a close reasoner and a great orator. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xix 

And when, at a great political meeting in Ithaca's Lyceum, he uttered bitter 
invective against all who should oppose the progressive measures of Governor 
Charles E. Hughes, he proved that the world had lost one of its greatest jurist- 
consults when he became one of its foremost educators. 

He possesses splendid qualifications for political leadership, and while he 
has twice served his country abroad in the field of diplomacy, yet had he cared 
to he might have attained still higher political honors at the hands of President 
McKinley, but he declined, feeling that he was consecrated to a Great Work, 
the upbuilding of Cornell University. 

And he has been very successful, for, under his administration, it has grown 
marvellously, not only materially and financially, but educationally. While a 
professor at Cornell, before being called to the administration of affairs, he was 
considered one of the most promising minds in the field of pure thinking. 

There will always be a warm corner in the hearts of Cornellians for President 
Schurman. For twenty-four years he has annually delivered a masterly address 
to the incoming Freshmen class, which made a profound impression and in- 
fluenced the lives of the young hearers, not only during their college course, 
but during their whole career. 

He visits the sick, a side of his nature, which may not be known to the general 
University public. 

He makes it a special point to attend personally as many of the alumni gather- 
ings as possible, often at great inconvenience to himself, whenever his university 
duties will allow him to do so, and speaks upon the subject nearest their hearts, 
their Alma Mater, its present condition, its growth, and its needs with a cordial 
invitation to revisit the scenes of their college days. 

He helps many of them to high positions. During his administration came 
about the co-operation of the State of New York, for that great Commonwealth 
decided to provide for the education of its farmers' sons and daughters, by giving 
agricultural college buildings to Cornell for their use. 

Whatever success President Schurman has attained in the world he owes to 
his own brain and his own hard work, without favor or influence, for he was a 
poor boy and worked his way up, round by round of the ladder till he is at the 
top. He will be heard from later, well and favorably, politically, if he will allow 
his name to be used in connection with the Republican nomination for some great 
political office, or, if he will accept appointive office. 

President Schurman has magnetism that compelling force that induces 
other men to think as he does and to do the acts which he wishes them to do; 
in other words he is clear-headed and forceful and persuasive and he is a bad 
opponent to meet in debate. 

He is physically large, strong and youthful, in strong contrast to President 
White, who was always somewhat frail, and likely to break down under great 
strain, while President Schurman takes plenty of out-door exercise, his chief 
recreation being golf. 



xx DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

President Schurman too, like President White, is called "Prexy," a classic 
term which means more on undergraduate lips, than the mere presidency of 
the institution. It carries with it an expression of esteem and admiration for 
the personality of the man, as well as respect for his official position. 



PROFESSOR HIRAM CORSON 

"All the world's a stage, and all the men and women in it are the actors." 

SHAKESPEARE . 

Professor Hiram Corson lived, worked, walked, talked and wrote in an at- 
mosphere of Shakespeare. 

His home was the favorite meeting place of lovers of Shakespeare and Brown- 
ing. 

He was at one time private secretary to Lewis Cass. He was also assistant 
reporter in the United States Senate and reported some of the speeches of Daniel 
Webster. 

There was a little one-story cottage that stood opposite his own grand old- 
fashioned home. He did not like its appearance and once in conversation with 
the writer said that it "lowered the moral tone." 

He greatly promoted the study of English literature at Cornell. 

His public readings from Shakespeare were literary treats of the highest order. 
He was the author of many books on English literature. 

He was dignified and picturesque appearing, being tall and slender, and 
going about clad in a long coat, and pants to match, with a soft felt broad- 
brimmed hat on his head, wearing glasses, and with hair and beard long, and 
wearing on his fingers curious antique rings. 

He was the ideal personification of an old-fashioned, college professor, and 
courteous gentleman. 

He lived for many years in Cascadilla cottage. He died only recently. 



JOHN McGRAw 

At the opening day exercises in Library Hall, John McGraw said to Henry 
W. Sage: "It is a shame for us to sit here and not do anything, after what those 
two men have done," referring to Ezra Cornell and Andrew D. White, after 
they had spoken. 

With him to think was to act, and so he built the McGraw Hall. He in- 
tended to do more, but left it to his daughter to carry out his wishes. 

His residence in Ithaca enabled him to participate very actively in the councils 
of the University in the early days and his knowledge of business affairs was of 
great value. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxi 

HIRAM SIBLEY 

He thought very highly of Ezra Cornell, although they differed politically. 
He had always been interested in industrial education. He gave the Sibley 
College and founded the Professorship of Practical Mechanics. 

When some particularly mean thing about Ezra Cornell appeared in the 
newspapers he sat down and wrote out and sent a check for $30,000, as a slight 
protest. 

This motto appears in Sibley College: 

THERE ARE TWO MOST VALUABLE POSSESSIONS WHICH NO 
SEARCH-WARRANT CAN GET AT, WHICH NO EXECUTION CAN 

TAKE AWAY, AND WHICH NO REVERSE OF FORTUNE CAN DE- 
STROY, AND THEY ARE WHAT A MAN PUTS INTO HIS BRAIN 

KNOWLEDGE, AND INTO HIS HANDS SKILL. 

HIRAM SIBLEY. 

HENRY W. SAGE 

It would be impossible to estimate in dollars and cents the value of his great 
services to the University. Besides his many gifts of buildings, endowments 
and money, amounting to about $2,000,000, he gave his valuable time and ser- 
vices, as Chairman of the Board of Trustees for many years. 

He was living in Brooklyn at the time of the founding of the University, 
but the work at Cornell appealed so strongly to his sympathies that he moved 
to Ithaca, to be near the institution that he loved so well. 

On his eightieth birthday his Cornell friends presented him with a beautiful 
silver vase, the workmanship of Tiffany, and addresses of congratulations, both 
written and spoken. 

He, was in advance of most other thinkers of his time, when he decided to 
aid women to a higher education. 

He helped greatly by his business acumen in saving the Western lands for 
higher prices, his opinion in this matter being largely defered to by others. 

"To truth our noblest temple hast thou reared, 
And one to piety, to womanhood 
A third, and each with finger upward points 
The path of Godlike souls; yea, Heaven annoints 
With aspiration all thy spirit would, 
And makes, as from itself, thy deeds revered." 

A NOTABLE TRUSTEE 

Stewart Lyndon Woodford was born September 3, 1835, in New York City. 
He was educated at Yale and Columbia Universities. 

He was a general in the Civil War and a distinguished lawyer in New York 
City. 



xxii DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

He bravely represented the State of New York at the opening services at 
Cornell, and made a gracious and felicitous speech. 

He was at the time, ex officio, trustee of the University, and was afterwards 
repeatedly elected to that office. 

He founded the Woodford Prize in Oratory. He was always a welcome 
guest at Cornell gatherings, and was frequently called upon for speeches, which 
were always polished and witty. 

He once explained the choosing of the Cornell colors by saying, that the 
carnelian was for Ezra Cornell, and the white for President White. 

He was always greatly interested in the military training of citizen soldiers 
at Cornell. 

He was U. S. Minister to Spain at the outbreak of our war with that country. 

Soon after he retired from the Spanish mission he attended a University 
alumni banquet and was asked to speak. He arose and said "A diplomat should 
have eyes to see and ears to hear but no tongue to speak." 

He died only recently. 



A NOTABLE WOMEN 

Jennie McGraw was an early friend of Cornell University, and soon after 
its founding, gave the beautiful chime of bells for the McGraw tower. 

At early morn their voices say: 

"Cling, clang, cling, the bells are ringing, 

Hope and help their chiming tells; 
Through the Cascadilla dell. 

'Neath the arches of Cornell 
Float the melody and music of the bells." 



F. M. FINCH. 



At eventide their voices say : 

"When the sun fades far away, 
In the crimson of the West, 
And the voices of the day 

Murmur low and sink to rest. 

Refrain: 

"Music with the twilight falls, 

O'er the dreaming lake and dell, 
'Tis an echo from the walls 

Of our own, our fair Cornell." 



H. TYRRELL, '80. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxm 

She was fond of literature and foreign travel. 

She afterwards married Professor Willard Fiske of Cornell. 

She built the beautiful Fiske mansion which stood on the site of an ancient 
Indian signal fire, overlooking lake and city. She filled it with art objects, ex- 
pecting that the collection would some day be used by the University. This 
mansion, though never officially connected with the University, yet always 
a romantic interest to Cornellians. 



She returned from abroad September 30, 1881, and died a few days later. 

She left by will her residuarv estate to Cornell University, for a library and 
hospital, but her will was broken. 

However, a friend came forward and built and endowed the library. 
The tablet at the entrance reads: 

"THE GOOD SHE TRIED TO DO SHALL STAND AS IF *T WERE DONE 
GOD FINISHES THE WORK BY NOBLE SOULS BEGUN. 

IN LOVING MEMORY OF JENNIE MCGRAW FISKE WHOSE PURPOSE TO 
FOUND A GREAT LIBRARY FOR CORNELL UNIVERSITY HAS BEEN DEFEATED 
THIS HOUSE IS BUILT AND ENDOWED BY HER FRIEND 

HENRY w. SAGE" 

The pathos of her early death was increased by the destruction of her palatial 
mansion by fire, near to one Christmas Eve, not long ago, with the loss of eight 
human lives. 

"When the gentle hand that gave, 

Lies beneath the marble grave, 
And the daisies weep with drippings of the shower, 
O believe me brother dear, 
In the shadows we shall hear, 
Guiding voices of our angel in the tower." 

F. M. FINCH. 

A CANADIAN FRIEND 

"He was one of the noblest men I ever knew." 

TRIBUTE OF ANDREW D. WHITE. 

Goldwin Smith was born August 23, 1823, at Reading, England. 

After graduating at Oxford University be became Regius Professor of His- 
tory there. 

In the dark days of our Civil War he championed the Union cause with 
voice and pen. He afterwards removed to Toronto, Canada. 

He early became interested in Cornell University, and was one of its earliest 
professors, filling the Chair of English History. His name attracted many new 
students. He was an elegant classical scholar and a splendid lecturer. His 
class-room was crowded. 



xxiv DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

He gave for the Campus a beautifully carved stone seat on which are 
chiseled these words: "Above all nations is Humanity." 

He left by will his entire estate, amounting to about $750,000, to the Uni- 
versity, for an endowment. 

He died June 7th, 1910. 

THE FIRST REGISTRAR 

The first incumbent of this office, the Rev. Dr. William D. Wilson, was greatly 
beloved. 

He possessed a marvellous memory for he would call by name every student 
upon entering his office. 

The present popular Registrar introduced the card index system, which 
greatly simplifies the work of keeping the records. 

The following refers to him, but is not to be taken seriously : 

"Everybody works at Cornell 
But David Fletcher Hoy. 
He sits up in Morrill 
Busts out many a boy. 

"Prexy does the talking, 

Williams takes the dough, 
Everybody works but Davy 
Now ain't that so ?" 

ANON. 

Here is another: 

"The opening of the year begins the book, 
The Frosh line up with timid, frightened look 
Before the Czar, who frightens them still more; 
Some he admits, and others shows the door; 
The first the meaning of their cards reveal; 
The others, luckless youths, are forced to travel. 
All ready to admit it's easier far, 
To fool St. Pete than bluff the Registrar." 

D. W. McG. 

CORNELL'S ENVIRONMENT 

At the time of the founding of the University, Ithaca, the seat of the Uni- 
versity, was a small inland town of about 6,000 people, with but one railroad, 
and a steamboat line. It is now a flourishing city of 22,000 population, includ- 
ing students. But it is the beautiful, natural scenery in and near the University 
Campus that mostly interests CorneUians. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxv 

The "Switzerland of America" is a proper descriptive term to apply to it. 

On the northern border of the original Campus lies the Ithaca Gorge, through 
which flows Fall Creek, between towering rocky walls. Here are five beautiful 
falls, the lowest and greatest being Ithaca Fall, having a height of 130 feet. 

The Taughannock Falls, at the north, and only a few miles away, are 213 
feet high, or 60 feet higher than Niagara Falls. 

Beautiful Enfield Falls and Glen are at the southwest, only a few miles 
away. The glen is soon to be fitted up with new walks. 

The white Buttermilk Falls are only two miles south. 

The scenic drives about Cornell are among the most beautiful in the world. 

The Cornell Campus is an academic grove, where landscape gardening, in 
the midst of natural beauty of lake and wooded hill and glen, has reached its 
perfection. There is inspiration for study in such surroundings. 

A Cornell professor, who is an authority on the subject, says that the winding 
courses of "Six Mile Creek" and "The Inlet" through the valley south of Ithaca, 
forms one of the most beautiful sights in the world, and, with the planting of 
more trees along their banks, the scene would be unsurpassed. 

"Within the valley curves a lake 
Whose waters bright with sunshine gleam, 
And like the cadence of a dream, 
Upon the shore in silver break; 
And 'gainst a city's restless tide 
Ripples from dawn to eventide." 

O. W. 

"In a wondrous valley there lies a town, 
Beneath a towering hill; 
Lapped by a silvery lake 
All quiet and sleeping and still; 
For years it has slept in the valley, 
And I think it always will." 

K. F. R. 



THE ALUMNI 

"I am thinking to-night of my old college town, 
I am dreaming of days that are flown, 

Of the joys and the strifes 

Of my old college life, 
Ah, those days were the best I have known." 

L. C. EHLE, '90. 



xxvi DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

With what conflicting emotions, of pride, joy and sadness, does the retiring 
graduate watch the commencenemt parade wending its way along the paths 
to the place of meeting! 

What Cornellian can ever forget the slow climb of the train up South Hill 
and that last look ? 

The alumni did not have representation on the Board of Trustees until 1874, 
and then could only vote in person at the annual meeting of the alumni hi June, 
at Cornell. Later they were given the privilege of voting by ballot by mail. 

It was thought best at first to choose but one of their number, because the 
vast possessions of the University required men of mature years and business 
judgment to manage them. 

There never was a college blessed with more loyal alumni than Cornell. 
Their sentiments are expressed in the following lines;: 

"The soldier loves his gen'ral's fame, 
The willow loves the stream, 
The child will love its mother's name, 
The dreamer loves his dream; 
The sailor loves his haven's pier, 
The shadow loves the dell, 
The student holds no name so dear, 
As thy good name, Cornell." 

Refrain: 

"We'll honor thee, Cornell, 
We'll honor thee, Cornell, 

While breezes blow, 

Or waters flow, 
We'll honor thee, Cornell." 

G. R. BIRGE, '72. 

At the first University alumni banquet President White was the guest of 
honor. 

When he arose to speak, the cheering by the old Cornellians, standing, was 
so great, and the applause so prolonged, that he was slightly embarrasesd, being 
innocent of the cause of the great ovation, but when he learned the truth he 
was greatly pleased. 

To illustrate still further this feeling, or sentiment: Wherever President 
White goes, there the local alumni make it a point to call upon him and pay 
their respects. While travelling to the Pacific Coast and Mexico, as the guest 
of Andrew Carnegie, the great iron-master, was greatly surprised, and became 
more interested in college life, because of this proof of loyalty. However, as 
they approached the City of Mexico, the host remarked that they were now too 
far from home to meet any more college men. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxvn 

They had no more than become settled at the hotel and the news of their 
arrival noised abroad, when a Cornell visitor was announced. 

"Why," said the surprised President, "what are you doing down here ?" 

"I am building the largest printing plant in the Republic of Mexico," re- 
plied our Cornellian. 



After all has been said, its students are the university; buildings, apparatus 
and professors are necessary, but it is the students and what they do that de- 
cides whether a university shall prosper or fail; they principally build up its 
prestige, or otherwise, and by that standard does it become known, favorably 
or unfavorably. 

An alumnus, at a University alumni banquet, said: "I have been a trustee 
for fifteen years; this morning the President's wife invited us to dinner, and 
then for the first time, I knew what I was trustee for." 

Another alumnus, at a political meeting, said, "I was a poor boy and at- 
tended Cornell, but I was too big for the University, or it was too big for me, so 
I quit." 

Another speaker commented: "A man was not slow, who came into town on 
a freight train and went out on a flyer." 

In the early days, when a certain Cornell student went home for a vacation, 
a farmer friend inquired how he was getting along at school; "Oh," said our 
Cornellian, "the trustees have boarded up the doors and windows of the school- 
house and the teachers and scholars have gone home." 

Joseph H. Choate says that among the products of America are college 
graduates. 

A man who graduates at Cornell is conscious that there is no better univer- 
sity anywhere and that gives him inspiration for work. However, the smaller 
colleges have strong bodies of alumni behind them. They say that Harvard 
men are all right in Boston, but that Yale men are good everywhere; that they 
are good "mixers." Cornellians are good workers everywhere. 

The Cornellian Council has raised a large sum annually among the alumni 
to help the University in places where no other funds were available. One re- 
sult has been the building of Founder's Hall, one of the new men's dormitories, 
at a cost of $100,000. It is making a special effort to raise a large endowment 
by 1918. 



THE INTERVENING YEARS 

The years from the opening day to the present time have been busy ones 
at Cornell. President White, after serving for twenty years, resigned, and was 
succeeded by President Adams, who remained only seven years, when he re- 
signed, and was succeeded by President Schurman. 



xxvm DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

After the first flush of prosperity the number of students began to dwindle, 
from various causes, until there were only 312 in one term in 1881-2, and it 
took several years to grow back to the old record; but from that time on the 
number increased steadily until we now have entering classes of more than one 
thousand students. 

Although Cornell is one of the richest of universities, yet its great handicap 
has always been lack of money. 

There are at Cornell so many different departments of education, and so 
many courses of study, that it requires extra buildings, equipment and professors. 

Cornell has realized in all over $5,000,000 from the sale of its Western lands, 
and has besides received large gifts of buildings and money, but needs more. 

The requirements for admission have been raised from time to time, and 
that has kept the number of students down to her resources to provide for them. 

Several brilliant young professors left Cornell in the early days because they 
were offered larger salaries by other universities. 

The following lines show the state of affairs: 

"We see new buildings day by day 
In beauty skyward rising, 
And our professors haste away 
In manner most surprising 
To other chairs, with higher pay, 
Than here they're realizing. 

The lack of funds affects us sore 
Although of buildings most a score 
We are the proud possessors, 
Yet we at least must need profess 
We likewise need professors. 

But our trustees most decently 
Have risen to the occasion 
And recommend recently 
An all-round salary-raising. 

Not slow to see the fallacy 
They're just as quick to stop it; 
This most short-sighted policy, 
We're glad they mean to drop it. 

We need the buildings badly, 
And welcome them most gladly 
Then pause and ponder sadly 
That building buildings without Profs, 
Is building without profit." 

R. J. K. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxix 

The "Dark Days" financially for Cornell were the seven years from 1873 to 
1880. 

In recent years many professors, especially in engineering and architecture, 
have left Cornell to engage in private business, tempted by higher salaries, and 
a chance to make more money as principals, and to take an active part in the 
affairs of the world outside of college walls. 

There have been many grave problems to solve, particularly how to keep 
down the financial deficit, which formerly appeared almost annually. The 
story is told in the following lines: 

"I am musing, softly musing, in my quiet little den, 
Erecting airy castles and comparing Now with Then, 
The Then of bitter struggle, with every omen ill, 
When Andrew D. was Prexy and Cornell was Cascadill; 
And I smile and idly wonder what those old boys would say 
Of what we call the problems we are up against to-day." 

"For though our yearly income is millions, more or less, 
Something more than J. P. Morgan makes on rainy days, I guess, 
The Trustees and the Faculty are ever in despair 
To see their fondest projects dissolving into air; 
And Prexy frets and worries till his heart is sad and sore 
To hear the hungry 'Lupus' come a-scratching at the door." 

"I am musing on the changes that thirty years have brought, 
And the reverential lessons those changes should have taught; 
For the things we call essentials, to those old boys would seem 
The evanescent fancies of a dreamer's idle dream; 
Yet the seeds by them were planted, and by others tended well, 
Till now the fruit has ripened in our glorious Cornell." 

F. A. N. 

THE QUARTER CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 

In 1893, the exact dates were October 6th, 7th, and 8th, there was a large 
"Home-Coming" of students and other friends of Cornell for a quiet celebration 
of the 25th anniversary of its opening. The orator of the occasion, Chauncey 
M. Depew, paid a glorious tribute to the noble character of Ezra Cornell, and 
complimented the University on its grand success. There were over 1,700 stu- 
dents then in regular attendance. 

To one then present, whose memory could compare that day with the past, 
the contrast was startling. The valley was as beautiful in the past as at this 
time, but the hills, four hundred feet above it, that now forms the Campus, 
were bleak and uninviting. Now, the rough hills and fields with their architec- 
turally poor buildings, had become a beautiful park, bounded by beautiful glens, 
with great elms shadowing the lawns, decorated with beds of flowers, and screened 
by fine shrubbery, with many pleasant walks and drives. To use a commercial 



xxx DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

term the "Advance Agent of Prosperity" had arrived at Cornell and forever 
since he has dwelt with us, as shown by the great buildings and growing endow- 
ments. 

CO-EDUCATION 

Co-education at Cornell has been weighed and not found wanting. 

Mrs. Stanford said that her husband founded Leland Stanford, Jr. Univer- 
sity primarily as a college for men, and that not more than one-third of its stu- 
dents should be women. 

Syracuse University has 300 more women than men students. 

The proportion of women to men students at Cornell will probably never 
be any greater than at present, because of the large number of technical courses 
like engineering, almost exclusively for men; and also, the veterinary course, 
and the agricultural courses, except in the department of Home Economics. 

Women have no cause to complain of the accommodations provided for 
them at Cornell, for almost from the beginning they had Sage College and now 
Prudence Risley Hall, two of the finest women's dormitories in the country, 
while the men had no college dormitories, except the old, badly arranged Cas- 
cadilla Building, and for a few years, Morrill and White Halls; though, of course, 
the men, or some of the most fortunate financially, had fraternity lodges, but 
they were maintained by private enterprise and capital. 

Presidents White, Adams and Schurman were ever staunch advocates of 
co-education. 

There was bitter opposition, among the alumni and undergraduates, in the 
early days, to co-education. This opposition was due to many causes, though 
no one could furnish a satisfactory "Bill of Particulars/' 

However, the girls were welcome, and they exercised a refining influence 
over the men in class room and elsewhere. Besides their scholarship was very 
high, in fact averaged higher than the men a fact which was very gratifying 
not only to themselves personally, but to their teachers and the other friends 
of co-education, and that made them all the more welcome. 

Moreover, co-education has come to stay at Cornell, and everybody might 
as well look and act pleasant about it. 

President William R. Harper of Chicago University, devised the method of 
segregation to stop the girls from the West from going to the Eastern women's 
colleges. 

"I want to have girls educated in the university as well as boys, so that they 
may have the same opportunity to become wise and useful to society that the 
boys have." 

EZRA CORNELL. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxxi 

"As to the question of sex, I have little doubt that within a few years the 
experiment desired will be tried in some of our largest universities. There are 
many reasons for expecting its success. * * * * 

Speaking entirely for myself, I would say that I am perfectly willing to under- 
take the experiment as soon as it shall be possible to do so, but no fair-minded 
man or woman can ask us to undertake it now, as it is with the utmost difficulty 
that we are ready to receive young men. * * * * 

I trust the time will soon come when we can do more." 

FROM PRESIDENT WHITE'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

"When you are ready to carry out the idea of educating young women as 
thoroughly as young men, I will provide the endowment to enable you to do so." 

HENRY W. SAGE. 

In the meantime one solitary woman student, Miss Emma Sheffield Eastman, 
who had attended lectures in the University, was formally admitted, consti- 
tuting the first female student, although Mrs. Jennie Spencer had presented 
herself as early as September, 1870, with a certificate entitling her to a State 
scholarship, and passed with credit the additional examinations required. 

Henry W. Sage built and endowed the Sage College for a house for women 
students. The corner-stone of this structure was laid March 15, 1873. 

"I lay this corner-stone, in faith 
That structure fair and good 
Shall from it rise, and thenceforth come 
True Christian womanhood." 

MRS. HENRY W. SAGE. 

The college was formally opened for the admission of women at the opening 
of the faU term, of 1874. 

The proportion of women students during the first years of the University 
was about one-tenth of the entire number of students. Since then it has very 
greatly increased. 

The Cornellian of 1869 has the following editorial on Co-Education : 

"The Woman's Rights monomaniacs are attempting to mislead the public 
into the belief that female students are to be admitted here. The foundation of 
the rumor probably exists only in the imagination of some enthusiast, who, 
thinking that the thing ought to be so, unhesitatingly sets up the cry that it 
is so. The remark attributed to Mr. Cornell in reply to two young ladies can 
have no foundation, for it has been met with an authoratitative denial. We 
rejoice at this, and we sincerely trust that Cornell University will never come 
to be ranked and classed among the Oberlins of America." 

The Cornellian of 1872 records the gift of Sage College and its endowment 
with the sigh, sic transit gloria. 



xxxii DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

The Cornellian of 1875-6, commenting on the last mentioned editorial, says: 

"How philosophically the writer submits to the inevitable, and what a contrast 
between this and former editorial references to the same vexing topic." 

The reasons the Cornell woman gives for valuing the College training may 
be summarized as follows: 

It has increased her usefulness. 

It has improved her health. 

It has added to her happiness. 

It enables her better to adapt herself to her circumstances. 

Here is one for the irreconcilables : 

"Do you growl against Co-education ? 
Does your prejudice make you rebel ? 
We be of one blood, Little Brother; 
The Co-eds are staunch for Cornell. 
Their loyalty never will fail 

Though they may not have lungs for the yell." 

E. N. R. 
Here is a "Dream" come true: 

"For there I saw some Co-eds fair 
'Bout whom I dare not joke 
Upon the crew 

With motion true, 
Pulling the winning stroke." 

CORNELLIAN 

Here is a little protest: 

"Why don't you make the Co-eds drill ? 

It surely is not right 
That we alone should work and swear 
And sweat for your delight. 

For equal rights they take the stand, 

You've heard their protests shrill. 
Now why not grant the just demand 

And let the Co-eds drill ?" 

C. V. X. 

THE MUSICAL DEPARTMENT 

"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast." 

One of the most refining influences at Cornell is music. A Glee Club was 
formed in the early years and the idea has been elaborated, so that we have 
combined Glee, Banjo, and Mandolin Clubs, which visit some of the larger 
cities, giving concerts, under the patronage of the local Cornell alumni. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxxm 

A few years ago the then president of the Glee Club invented "Senior Sing- 
ing," which has proved very popular; for several evenings before Commence- 
ment, there is community, student singing in front of Goldwin Smith Hall in 
the quadrangle. 

The Cornell Cadet Band, under instructor P. Conway, attained great skill. 
In the Summer School vocational music is taught. 

We must not forget the great pipe-organ, the second largest in America, 
the gift of President White and friends, which stands in Bailey Auditorium, 
nor the sweet-toned pipe-organ in Sage Chapel, the gift of William H. Sage. 
There is a surpliced choir at Sage Chapel services. 

There is an annual Musical Festival when some of the greatest singers, and 
some famous orchestra are heard at Cornell. 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

The Summer Session is mostly for teachers and for those students who desire 
to make up studies in which they may be deficient. 

It was for many years in charge of Professor Charles De Garmo, but in recent 
years it has been under the supervision of Professor George P. Bristol, Director. 

Some critic found fault with the Summer Students for singing Alma Mater, 
claiming that they were not regular students and had no right to sing Cornell's 
sacred hymn. 

The Porto Rican students one summer set the example to other students, 
as the electric cars bore them away home, by singing patriotically: 

"My Country, 'tis of Thee." 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

"Ignorance of the law excuses no person." 

LEGAL MAXIM. 
The Cornell Law School was founded in 1887. It has paid its own way. 

The money which built its home was intended for the College of Agriculture, 
but as a witty professor of law said the lawyers got it away from the farmers. 

The Law School was opened in the fall of 1887, with Judge Douglas Board- 
man as Dean, and Charles A. Collin, Francis M. Burdick and Harry B. Hutchins 
as Professors of Law, and Hutchins, Associate Dean. To these were added Moses 
Coit Tyler and Herbert Tuttle of the University Faculty. There were also 
several special lecturers. 

There was a large attendance the first year and the number of students has 
gradually increased. 



iv DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

The school could not fail to become a success from the ability of the men 
who have directed it. The instruction combines the so-called "Dwight Method" 
and the case method. The course requires three years of study. 

Its graduates have taken high rank in the profession and many of them 
have been elevated to the bench. 

Judge Boardman announced his appointment as Dean to the assembled 
alumni, at the first University banquet, in a humorous after-dinner speech. 
He said that when they built a sailing-ship in the olden time, they carved out 
of wood a figurehead, and placed it at the bow, and, "Now," said he, "the trus- 
tees have chosen for a figurehead a boardman." 

He was succeeded by Judge Francis M. Finch of the New York Court of 
Appeals. Then came a brilliant young teacher, Ernest W. Huffcut, '84, as Dean. 

He was succeeded by Dean Frank Irvine, '80, of the New York State Public 
Service Commission. While serving in this latter office his duties as Dean have 
been assumed by Professor Edwin H. Woodruff, '82, as Acting Dean, who was 
Acting Professor of Law at Leland Stanford, Jr. University before joining the 
Cornell Law Faculty. The last named has been several times called upon to 
preside at political mass-meetings of the Democratic party, and always makes 
a witty speech. On one occasion, a prominent public office-holder of the State, 
who heard him, remarked privately to some friends, bearing in mind his youthful 
appearance: "Your Professor Woodruff is a coming man." "Sir," said one of 
his hearers, "He has already arrived." 

The Cornell Law Faculty has never been partial to Ithaca lawyers in choos- 
ing professors, though Professors Francis M. Finch, William A. Finch and Edwin 
H. Woodruff are notable exceptions. Elmira is the "Happy Hunting-Ground" 
when there is a vacancy hi the Law Faculty, and the authorities have always 
done well by going there. 

Professor Woodruff is an old, though comparatively young, Ithaca boy 
whose career has been watched by many old friends with pleasure. While at 
Stanford he told some Eastern friends that when he felt lonesome he would 
rush out and kill a bear or an Indian. Professor Woodruff studies and teaches 
Domestic Relations but remains unmarried. 

The Cornell Law School now requires at least one year of college literary 
study as a requirement for admission. 

The Professors in the College of Law have been: Charles A. Collin, 1887-95; 
Francis M. Burdick, 1887-91; Harry B. Hutchins, 1889-95; Charles E. Hughes, 
1891-3; Ernest W. Huffcut, 1893-1907; William A. Finch, 1892-13; Francis 
M. Finch, 1895-03; Charles R. Pratt; Henry W. Harden, 1895-6; Frank Irvine, 
since 1901; Edwin H. Woodruff, since 1896; Alfred Hayes, since 1907; William 
L. Drew, 1904-14; C. L. Williams, 1913-14; C. Tracy Stagg and George G. Bogart. 

Among the noted Lecturers in the College of Law have been: Daniel H. 
Chamberlain, John W. Foster, Charles E. Hughes, Alfred C. Coxe, and William 
H. Taft. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxxv 

The Cornell law library is large, and includes the private library of the late 
Nathaniel C. Moak, of Albany, which was presented by the widow and daughter 
of the first dean. 

The following is addressed to Leland Stanford, Jr. University : 

"You may boast of your millions of dollars to spare, 
You may prate of all colleges beating; 
You may have an ex-President filling a chair, 
But Cornell boasts a Law School Prayer Meeting." 

ANON. 

THE NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

"Way Down on the Cornell Farm." 
This little song used to cause a smile, but it is different now. 

When the main building of the College of Agriculture was dedicated, Presi- 
dent White predicted that the participation of the State in providing Agri- 
cultural buildings was an event which marked an epoch in the history of Cornell. 

Scientific farming has caused a revolution in farm work. Rural life is now 
more attractive by reason of free-mail delivery, the telephone, the daily news- 
paper, good roads and the electric cars. 

The tuition is free to residents of the State of New York. 

There is a short Winter Course of twelve weeks. The students in the last- 
named course are called "Short-Horns." 

The "Farmers' Week," in February of each year, is a popular affair at Cor- 
nell, and brings 3,500 visitors to the University, for lectures and other enter- 
tainment. 

Professor Martha Van Rensselaer introduced the Home Economics course, 
which is very popular, and furnishes the farmers daughters with a practical 
education in Domestic Science, free of tuition. In connection with this depart- 
ment there is a modern Cafeteria, where pure food properly cooked is provided 
at a nominal price. 

"Hark, hark, the dogs do bark, 
The Short Horns are coming to town; 
Some in socks, and some in frocks, 
And some in hand-me-downs." 

ANON. 

Lewis Spaulding was Assistant Professor of Agriculture, 1869-70. Henry 
McCandless was Professor, 1871-3. Isaac Phillips Roberts, was Assistant Pro- 
fessor, 1873-4; Professor of Agriculture (Director of Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1888), (Director of College of Agriculture, 1890-96), 1874-1903; Dean 



xxxvi DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

of Faculty of Agriculture, 1896-1903; Emeritous Professor of Agriculture and 
Lecturer in Agriculture, 1903-6; Professor of Agriculture Emeritous, since 1906 
(Summer Session, 1899-00). 

Liberty Hyde Bailey was Professor of General and Experimental Horti- 
culture, 1888-03; and of Rural Economy, 1903-12; Director of the College 
and Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture, 1903-12; (Summer Session, 1899, 1900, 
1904). 

Professor William Alonzo Stocking, '98, Assistant Professor of Dairy Bac- 
teriology, since 1906, was in charge of the College of Agriculture, 1912-14. 

Professor B. T. Galloway, formerly Assistant U. S. Secretary of Agriculture, 
has been Dean of the College of Agriculture since 1914. 

John L. Stone, Professor of Farm Practice. There have been many other 
strong professors in this department, among others, Professors James E. Rice, 
'90, in Poultry Husbandry; Charles H. Tuck, '06, as Supervisor of Farmers' 
Reading Course, as Assistant Professor of Extension Teaching, and as General 
Secretary or Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements of Farmers' Week. 
Professor Hugh C. Troy, 96, has been in the Laboratory and Milk Testing De- 
partment, since 1906. George W. Cavanaugh, '96, has been Assistant Professor 
and Professor of Chemistry in its relations with Agriculture, since 1903. George 
F. Warren, '03, has been Assistant Professor and Professor of Agronomy, since 
1906. Harold E. Ross, '06, has been Assistant and Professor in Dairying In- 
dustry, since 1905. There are many other prominent professors in this depart- 
ment whose names can not now be recalled. 



DEAN LIBERTY HYDE BAILEY 

"There is properly no history, but only biography." 

EMERSON. 

He led in the movement to raise farming to the dignity of a profession, by 
ably helping to induce the State of New York to appropriate money for build- 
ings for a State College of Agriculture at Cornell. 

Professor Bailey is a great leader of the farmers. President Theodore Roose- 
velt appointed him Chairman of 1 the Commission on Country Life. He in- 
augurated the "Community Idea" for self-help and social improvement among 
the fanners. He was the editor for several years of Country Life in America 
Magazine. He has written a large number of books on Agriculture. He is now 
engaged in literary work. 

THE STATE VETERINARY COLLEGE 

A course in Veterinary Science was provided from the beginning of the Uni- 
versity. Many of its graduates have become eminent in U. S. Government 
employ. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxxvii 

The State under the lead of Governor Flower recognized the need of help 
for suffering dumb animals and provided buildings and apparatus for the study 
and teaching of this branch of medicine. The tuition is free to students resident 
in the State of New York. 

James Law was Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, 1868-96; 
Dean of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 1896-1911; Professor of Principles 
and Practice of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Sanitary Science and Veter- 
inary Therapeutics, 1896-1911; Director of the New York State Veterinary 
College, Cornell, 1896-1911. 

Veranus Alva Moore, '87, has been Professor of Comparative Pathology, 
Bacteriology and Meat Inspection, since 1896. He succeeded Dr. James Law 
as Dean of the New York State Veterinary College, in 1911 and is the second 
and present Dean. 

Professor Pierre A. Fish, '90, was Assistant Professor of Veterinary Physiology, 
Materia Medica and Pharmacy, 1896-'02; Secretary of Faculty of Vet. Med. 
1896; Professor of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, since 1902. 

Walter Long Williams has been Professor of Principles and Practice of Vet- 
erinary Surgery, Obstetric Zootechny and Jurisprudence, since 1896. 

Howard Jay Milks, '04, has been Assistant Professor of Materia Medica for 
several years. 

There are several more prominent professors in^this department whose 
names can not be now recalled. 

DR. JAMES LAW 

He was once called by the enemies of Cornell the "Horse Doctor" from 
Edinburgh, but he can now contentedly smile, for he has helped greatly to raise 
his calling, so that it is now recognized as a profession. His Veterinary medical 
books are very popular among the farmers and lovers of the horse. 

THE MILITARY DEPARTMENT 

"When at first we saw the Major, 
All hi scarlet and in blue, 
Ev'ry freshman had a vision 
That he'd yet be Major too." 

J. B. POTTER, 74. 

There was considerable concern at first about how to interpret the clause 
of the charter requiring military drill. 

Some suggested that they have a professor detailed from West Point to give 
lectures, but President White believed that we should heartily enter into the 
spirit of the thing, and fulfil our whole duty in the premises. Henry W. Sage 
told President White: "It is the best thing we have at Cornell." The Presi- 
dent did not fully agree with him, but thought that the discipline and setting- 
up of the students was very valuable. 



xxxvm DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Under the preparedness programme of the country we ought to be able to 
have a greatly increased interest in military affairs at Cornell. 

If U. S. Senator A. B. Cummings' bill becomes a law, Cornell ought to be 
one of the eight military colleges of his proposed measure. The McKellar bill 
in the lower House of Congress also provides for additional military schools in 
all the states. 

The new armory is the largest State armory in New York. Gen. Leonard 
Wood, Senior Major General U. S. A., recommended recently before the Con- 
gressional committee on Military Affairs, that two more U. S. Army officers 
be detailed to Cornell University, making one officer for each battalion. 

Willard D. Straight, '01, has given money for out-door drill in vacation. 

The graduates of this department include about a dozen Captains, besides 
other officers, at present in the Regular Army, including Gen. Geo. Bell, '94. 

Maj. Gen. Mario Garcia Menocal, '88, and Maj. Winchester D. Osgood, '92, 
aided Cuba in her struggle for freedom. 

Col. Charles S. Francis, '77, and Col. Henry W. Sackett, '75, were Aides-de- 
Camp on the Governor's Staff. 

The first officer detailed from the U. S. Army as Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics and Commandant of the Cornell Cadets, was Maj. Joseph H. Whit- 
tlesey, a West Pointer. 

Among others, afterwards, were Maj. James B. Burbank, who after leaving 
Cornell was Commandant of Governor's Island in New York Harbor, and Cap- 
tain Walter S. Schuyler, since Brigadier General, U. S. A. 

The Professors of Military Science and Tactics have been: Joseph Hotchkiss 
Whittlesey, 1868-70; William Edwards Arnold, (Assistant), 1869-73; Junius 
Wilson MacMurray, 1873-5; William Percy Van Ness, 1875-77, 1886-9, 1900-04; 
James Brattle Burbank, 1877-83; Walter Scribner Schuyler, 1883-6, 1896-8; 
Herbert Everett Tutherly, 1889-92; George Bell, '94, 1892-6; Alexander Bull 
Trowbridge, in charge of Military Department, 1898; Frank Arthur Barton, '91, 
1904-8; Ervin Louis Phillips, '91, 1908-11; William E. Gillmore, 1911-12; Henry 
T. Bull, since 1912-15; C. F. Thompson, since 1915. 

There will be two classes to drill, Freshman and Sophomore, when the new 
armory is completed and ready for occupancy in September, 1916. 

Military drill in the early years was not regarded with favor by those who 
took part but in recent years it has been made more attractive. 

It has always been a pleasure to welcome back to Cornell several Cornell 
graduates in the U. S. Army, as Commandants of the Cornell Cadets and Pro- 
fessors of Military Science and Tactics, particularly Frank A. Barton, '91, and 
Ervin Louis Phillips, '91. Attempts have been made to get back here Captain 
Joseph W. Beacham, '97, an old Cornell football star. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xxxix 

ATHLETICS 

Cornell first came into notice in the college athletic world by the sweeping 
victories of its crews at Saratoga Lake in 1875, and again in 1876. The Inter- 
collegiate Rowing Association, under whose auspices the meet was conducted 
thereupon burst up no crews cared to meet Cornell. The defeated crews, in 
derision, called Cornellians "Hayseeds," and said that they did not row "sci- 
entifically." Cornell used the "Git Thar" stroke. 

The triumphal arches, the parades, the music, the bon-fires, the fireworks, 
the banquets and speeches in honor of the returning heroes, were like those over 
a Roman triumph. And the town went as wild as the gown. On one occasion, 
when the returning crews stopped over in Syracuse on their way home the alumni 
there paraded, headed by a band playing: "There'll be a hot time in the old 
town to-night." 

Charles E. Courtney, for many years the Coach of the crews, affectionately 
called the "Old Man," by his "Boys," is deeply enshrined in the hearts of all 
Cornellians for his loyalty and his wonderfully successful training. 

Here is the refrain of a favorite rowing song: 

"Stroke, stroke, our crew is at the start, 
Stroke, stroke, we cheer with all our heart, 
Stroke, stroke, we can always tell 
That stroke, stroke, the winner's our Cornell." 

E. A. McCREARY, '00. 

There is an annual regatta on Cayuga Lake at Ithaca in May, and in the 
following month of June on the Hudson River at Poughkeepsie. It has been 
decided to hold the June races on Cayuga Lake, near Ithaca, commencing in 
1916. Later: Poughkeepsie for 1916 decided on since. 

"Eight little boys in blue, lads, 
Eight little boys in blue 
Are not in this land, with the requisite sand 
To tackle a Cornell crew, 
For well do these boys in blue, lads, 
Know that right from the start 
These men in their shell and our boys from Cornell 
Would soon have drifted apart." 

O. H. F. 

Here is another: 

" 'Twas on a sunny Summer morn 
By Saratoga's waters born, 
That of our rivals hopes the knell 
First rang the slogan of Cornell. 



XL DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Refrain: 

Cornell, I yell, yell, yell, Cornell! 
The ringing cheers the echoes swell, 
Till answer lake, and hill, and dell 
Cornell, I yeU, yell, yell, Cornell!' 

'Twas on a Summer evening bright, 
That Ithaca made day of night, 
And from its rock-built home, the bell 
Rang welcome back to old Cornell." 

Here is another: 

"Well, well, well! After twenty years! 

What did we do! The same old thing." 
"So we sang with merry voices in gay Poughkeepsie town, 
And the band played Alma Mater, as the sun was going down; 
And the sky was blue no longer, but was streaked with red and white, 
While we shouted loud the promise of 'A Hot Old Town To-night,' 
We had cashed in every voucher till our pockets could not hold 
The ripe, rich yellow harvest of Yale and Harvard gold. 

Refrain: 

Oh, the gold! Oh, the gold! 

Oh, the bright New Haven gold! 

Just as free as 'twas of old, 

When the day grew dark and cold 

For Eli's scions bold 

As they bit the dusty mould, 

And our gallant 'Farmers' rolled 

In the bright New Haven gold, 

Gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold! 

Since that pleasant summer evening in the turbid Husdon town, 

When we showed our friends from Harvard how to throw old Eli down, 

We've been constantly admonished by a friendly multitude 

To appear before the public in a novel attitude: 

They believed we ought to quibble, and to bicker and to fight, 

Just because at old Poughkeepsie there was nothing else in sight. 

But at last it is decided in the grand old Cornell way, 

We will row with anybody, anywhere, and any day; 

We will travel to New London, not quite penniless, I trust, 

And though gambling is immoral, if you must, of course you must. 

If to shake it in our faces both Yale and Harvard join, 

It will be our sacred duty to relieve them of their coin." 

ANON. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS XLI 

The departure of the Cornell Crew for the Henley Races in England took place 
May 28, 1895, and there was a big turnout by both citizens and students, by 
organizations and individually. 

The crew victories have brought many new students to Cornell, who other- 
wise would have attended other colleges. 

In football Cornell was not so successful for several years, but during the past 
season, under the skillful coaching of Dr. Albert H. Sharpe, a Yale man, and 
Daniel A. Reed, '98, and Ray Van Orman, '08, "The Big Red Team" of Cornell 
was placed in the front rank of College players. The superstitious may say that 
"Touchdown," the bear mascot, helped. At the games, one of the favorite songs 
is as follows: 

"Cheer till the sound wakes the blue hills around 
Make the scream of the north wind yield 
To the strength of the yell from the men of Cornell, 
When 'The Big Red Team' takes the field. 
Three thousand strong we march, march along 
From our home on the gray rock height, 
Oh! the vict'ry is sealed when the team takes the field, 
And we cheer for the red and white. 

Refrain: 

See them plunging down to the goal 
See the ruddy banners stream, 
Hear the crashing echoes roll, 
As we cheer for 'The Big Red Team.' " 

Music BY C. E. TOURISON '06. 
WORDS BY R. BERRY '04. 
Here is another: 

"See, the Big Red Team is coming; 
Greet them with a hearty yell. 
Show your loyalty by cheering; 
Show your love for old Cornell." 

In baseball Cornell always did well. Among the popular players were Harry 
L. Taylor, '88, President of the National League, and Hugh Jennings, '04, man- 
ager of the Detroit "Tigers." 

John F. Moakley has been for several years past the trainer of the track 
and cross-country teams, which under his skillful training have won many notable 
victories. 

Tell S. Berna, '12, won the world's record cross-country run and two-mile 
race. John Paul Jones, '13, won the intercollegiate and world's record for one- 
mile dash: 



XLII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

"He dashed a mile right straight ahead 
For Cornell and a name, 
And Fate was very kind to him 
For he dashed into Fame." 

P. E. M. 

Some credit towards graduation is now allowed for some forms of athletics; 
ome are excused from military drill to take part in athletics. 

The athletic coaches train the morals too, and do not allow intemperance. 

The following is from the speech of Coach John F. Moakley before the Cornell 
Alumni at Buffalo on February 19th, 1916: 

"Cornell's supremacy in intercollegiate athletics is now secure/ 7 Moakley 
told them at the start. "She has no rival in her leadership. She stands alone 
in number of championships won and has been the pioneer in demanding the true 
sportsmanship of all her athletes and in demanding sane methods of control of 
her athletics. 

"College athletic supremacy is not secured by one successful season's work, 
but must continue over a number of years. Our record since 1908 has been a 
succession of victories unparalleled in the history of college athletics. Our 
achievements are the result of an intelligent system of management and of 
coaching devoid of the usual rah, rah stuff, pictured so frequently as a necessary 
adjunct to a college athletic team. 

"At Cornell it is considered bad form not to try for some one of the many 
varsity, class and intercollege teams, with the result that 3,000 students are 
thereby kept in fine physical condition. Athletics for the many, and not for the 
few is the aim of all our coaches. 

"The coaches at Ithaca watch closely the University work of the men in 
their squads and are able to keep in close touch with that work through weekly 
reports sent to them by the faculty. Woe to the youth who fails to keep up in 
his studies! 

"Buffalo now has two worthy representatives on Cornell varsity teams. 
They are Fred Potter, '16, and Paul Miller, '18. Potter not only is a wonderful 
athlete, but is also one of Cornell's most brilliant students in electrical engineer- 
ing, having recently been elected to Tau Beta Pi, the honor engineering society. 
I rank him with John Paul Jones and Berna as the greatest of all Cornell dis- 
tance runners and one of America's best. 

"Paul Miller has a bright outlook for a niche in Cornell's athletic hall of fame 
and will, without doubt, be a member of the All-American eleven of next year. 
I also expect to see him an intercollegiate point winner in the hammer throw, 
as his work last year was full of promise." 

Concluding, Coach Moakley paid a high tribute to the late Henry Schoell- 
kopf . He spoke of him as one of the finest characters he had ever known and as 
a potent factor in developing the present Cornell spirit. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS XLIH 

CHARLES E. COURTNEY 

"He may not have been in command, 
But he fought to beat the band." 

FRANCIS M. WILSON'S TRIBUTE TO ADMIRAL SCHLEY. 

Charles E. Courtney may not be a member of the Faculty but they are now 
allowing some credit for athletics towards graduation. 

"Cornell's bold crews are widely known 
On every land and shore; 
Unbeaten still, their clarion shout 
Rings proudly out once more. 
The secret of this great success 
No student but can tell; 
Each day they learn to honor more 
Ye trainer of Cornell." 

ANON. 

Charles E. Courtney's unswerving loyalty to Cornell deserves great praise, 
for although many offers have been made to him to go elsewhere, yet he has 
refused all, though many of them paid a better salary than the position he now 
fills. The almost unbroken series of vistories of the Cornell oarsmen are the 
result of his coaching. 

His knowledge of the art of rowing, his skill in selecting good "timber" for 
a crew, his cleverness in properly rigging a boat and seating each man, and his 
unselfish devotion to the oarsmen who are under his care, win for him their respect 
and complete obedience. He looks closely after their physical training and diet. 

He has been coach of the crews since 1883. He takes as much delight in train- 
ing the young men of Cornell how to row to victory as he did when he himself 
was whining. 

They are called Courtney's "pets" and they idolize him. Their favorite name 
for him is the "Old Man." 

He has taught them a stroke which is called the Courtney and Cornell stroke 
by the public, and by their enthusiastic friends the "Git Thar" stroke. It has 
won for them nearly every race that they have rowed. Others have tried to 
imitate it, but unsuccessfully. 

"Who wins the races for Cornell ?" 

The fair young lady said. 
"Why Courtney is the man," 

Replied the wise Co-ed. 

"He picks the crew so wisely," 
And trains the hand and head. 
He's a wonder and a winner." 
The fair young lady said. 

P. E. M. 



XLIV DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

MINOR SPORTS AND PASTIMES 

Beebe Lake is the rendezvous of the students in winter, when it is covered 
with ice, for skating. There on its bank is located the toboggan slide. One of 
the trustees said that he rode down very fast once and that was enough for 
him. 

Then there is canoeing. The unmarked graves of many brave, but fool-hardy 
Cornell victims, are at the bottom of Cayuga Lake. 

Riding down hill has been prohibited on Buffalo Street hill. 
The following is an old coasting song: 

"Merrily gliding, 

Rapidly sliding, 
Smooth are the runners and white is the snow. 

Swift as an arrow, 

Our sled so narrow, 
Carries us gaily adown Buffalo. 

Carefully steering, 

Dangers not fearing, 
Guardian stars shining down through the night. 

Hold on tightly, 

While the sled lightly 
Leaps like a deer in its perilous flight. 

Laughter is ringing, 

Voices are singing, 
Life is worth living, and happy each face. 

Care for the morrow, 

Trouble and sorrow, 
Leaving behind in the wild merry race." 

A. F. W. 

CORNELL'S DAVID HARUMS 

There have been a great many of them but the public hears very little about 
them. They are too modest to publish their names in the papers. 

Professor Goldwin Smith helped many a poor student through Cornell. 
Professor James E. Oliver was another friend in need and a friend indeed. 
Professor William A. Finch, '80, was another good friend of poor students. 

There are many others, some now living, who would not care to have their 
names in print, but we have their names and record, and some day, after they 
are gone, they will be given due credit. 

The late Horace I. Smith, of Ithaca, is numbered among them by the pro- 
visions of his will. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS XLV 

Frederick W. Guiteau gave $175,000 for a students loan fund. 

Mr. P. L. Nunn, head of the Telluride Power Company, engineers, of Provo, 
Utah, which builds many great water-power dams in the West, built and en- 
dowed a few years ago, the Telluride Club Building at Cornell. It accommodates 
about 30 or 40 students, who are educated, clothed and boarded and otherwise 
provided for, till graduation, after which time they enter the employ of the firm. 



TOWN AND GOWN 

At the time of the opening of the University, Ezra Cornell asked the old* 
conservative and wealthy families of Ithaca to receive into their homes students 
as roomers or boarders, or both. There were accommodations for only sixty 
students in Morrill Hall, and Cascadilla Building was occupied for the most 
part by professors and their families. The modern student boarding-house 
had not yet appeared. 

Ithacans always took a lively interest in Cornell affairs; they always joined 
in our joys and sorrows. When a fund had to be raised to send a crew away 
the citizens always "chipped in" generously. They applauded, if Cornell won; 
and took defeat philosophically, hoping for a brighter day. They subscribed 
one-third of the sum to purchase the Cascadilla Building for the University, 
and they voted to bond the town to bring railroads to Cornell and Ithaca, and 
it is only recently that the last bond was paid off; and that is the reason why 
Ithaca has not had the money to build a new City Hall, or Tompkins County 
to build a new Court House and County Jail. 

When the Cornell crew departed for Henley, England, the citizens of Ithaca 
helped to raise the fund to send them, the volunteer firemen paraded, and the 
fire and church bells rang out a "God speed" to cheer them on their way. 

The Town and Gown Club was organized to foster a friendly understanding 
and communication between citizens and professors and other University officers. 

The people of Ithaca have always thought well and favorably of Cornell 
University. They realize that it is doing a great work for humanity, besides 
it greatly benefits them materially, as witness the large amount of money which 
teachers, students and visitors put into circulation, and furthermore, many of 
Ithaca's fair daughters marry students. 



CORNELLIANS IN THE FIRST, SECOND AND 
THIRD GENERATIONS 

The early Cornell alumni who married and had children sent them to Alma 
Mater. Doctor Tarbell, '72, a Union volunteer officer in the Civil War, who 
entered Cornell in 1868, married early and had the first Cornell grandson, George 
Schuyler Tarbell, '91, who married early and before his admission to the bar, 
and his daughter, Dorothy Tarbell, has been in Cornell three years, and will 
graduate in 1916. Clarence D. Tarbell, special student, 1903-6 is another son 
of D. Tarbell. The home of all, Ithaca. 



XL vi DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Another Ithaca family has the distinction of having sent four children to 
Cornell, namely: Walter Woodburn Hyde, '93, Howard Elmer Hyde, '00, Lulu 
Eloise Hyde '89, (who married Charles Statton Davis, '89), and Roger Davies 
Hyde, '08. 

The Mintz family, also of Ithaca, has sent four sons to Cornell, namely: 
Harry Benjamin Mintz, '98, Aaron Girard Mintz, '01, Jay Jerome Mintz, '07, 
and Lawrence Meyer Mintz, '11, all but the third one being graduates of the 
Law School. 

Rev. Alfred Kelly Bates, Princeton '74, Presbyterian, of Ithaca, married 
and had six children at Cornell, namely: James Lawrence Bates, '03, Alfred 
Kelly Bates, jr., '11, Edward Strong Bates, '13, Naomi H. Bates, '13, Mary 
Seymour Bates, '16, and Gertrude Strong Bates, '16. His daughter, Janet M. 
Bates married Harold Fanning Penney, '10; his daughter, Ethel L. Bates mar- 
ried Martin Buel Tinker, B.S., M.D., Lecturer on Surgery, Cornell, since 1903. 
Edward S. Bates, '13, was Commodore of the Cornell Navy, 1913. Gertrude 
S. Bates, '16 was stroke of the victorious girls' crew in 1914 and 1915. 

The Riley family, formerly of Ithaca, had five daughters who married Cor- 
nellians, in recent years. One daughter married Professor Asa C. King, '99, of 
Cornell. 

Judge Marcus Lyon (Yale '52), of Ithaca, had two sons at Cornell, namely: 
Philip Schuyler Lyon, '89, and Newell Lyon, '97; and three daughters who 
married Cornellians, namely: Lucy Lyon, who married Professor Walter Craig 
Kerr, '79, of Cornell; Laura Lyon who married Otis Lincoln Williams, '88; 
and Mary Lyon who married John H. Southworth, '93. 

William Cobb, of Spring Mills and Ithaca, sent two sons to Cornell: Fordyce 
Allen Cobb, '93, and Herbert Lawrence Cobb, '06. Theodore Cobb, of the same 
places, a brother of William Cobb, sent two sons to Cornell: William Cobb, '84, 
and Howard Cobb, '95. These students have three cousins, who are brothers, 
and former Cornell students, registering from Andover, N. Y. : Charles Simeon 
Cobb, '77, Horace Hamilton Cobb, '78, and Fred Carlton Cobb, '80. F. A. and 
Howard Cobb are members of the largest law firm in Ithaca, (F. A.) Cobb, (H.) 
Cobb, (Peter F.) McAllister, (A. W.) Feinberg, and (R.) Heath, all Cornellians. 

The Kent family of Franklinville, N. Y., sent three sons to Cornell: Clarence 
E. Kent, '97, Willard M. Kent, '98, and Ralph S. Kent, '02. 



CHURCH ATTENDANCE AND ACTIVITIES 

Sage Chapel is nearly always well-filled and often crowded, and occasionally 
too small for the number who desire to attend preaching, or vesper service, and 
admission is usually by card. 

The Ithaca churches are well attended by professors and students, the 1st, or 
Aurora St., M. E. church alone having over 600 student members. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS XLVII 

In the early days of the University there were an unusually large number 
of student members of the Protestant Episcopal church, attracted to Cornell 
by the influence of the Rev. Dr. William D. Wilson, and that denomination 
has always been largely represented among the students. 

Then there are a great many Presbyterians, Roman Catholics, Congrega- 
tionalists, Baptists, and members of other religious denominations. 

Some of the churches, at the beginning of each academic year, in the Fall, 
give a meeting for the purpose of giving its new student-members a chance to 
get acquainted with each other and with the older members. Most of the Ithaca 
churches have pews set aside for student visitors. There has been some dis- 
cussion about having club houses, or dormitories for various religious denomina- 
tions, to be established by the churches, but nothing very definite has come of 
this, except that the Episcopalians have a Huntington Club, which occupies 
Sheldon Court, a private dormitory, which is to become the property of the 
University on the death of Mrs. Sheldon. 



PROFESSOR THOMAS FREDERICK CRANE 

He was not only a member of the early faculty and an active professor for 
a great many years, but he has always been one of Ithaca's most popular towns- 
men. His reminiscences of the early days of the University and Ithaca are very 
interesting. His executive ability has been proven officially by his unanimous 
selection by the trustees as acting president on two occasions. Professor Crane 
was thought by some of his students to be quite strict in his class-room, but 
when they almost invariably passed a good examination under him, and especially 
when they met him socially and were put at ease by his pleasant manner, the 
class-room experience was quickly forgotten. Another thing that endeared 
him to the students was that he always kept his heart young by a kindly con- 
sideration for the feelings of others, and when some of the other professors in 
the early days talked harshly about the crews because of the absence of their 
members from the class-room for practice, it was always Professor Crane who 
stood up in faculty meetings and spoke a good word for the "Boys." 

He has often presided as toast-master at University alumni banquets and 
frequently addresses Cornell alumni gatherings in other cities. 

He said on one occasion that after teaching students in the early days, it 
was with feelings of great pleasure that he welcomed their sons and daughters 
to Cornell. He also said that it was with mingled feelings that he witnessed 
football contests between Cornell and Princeton, his Alma Mater. 

He resides in the third house built upon the Campus, and can be seen almost 
any pleasant day in winter, when there is ice, skating on Beebe Lake. 

He is President of the City Hospital Association and a warden of St. John's 
(P. E.) church. 



XL vin DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

JOURNALISM 

Cornell has a great many alumni who are distinguished in metropolitan 
journalism, and several of them have lectured on that subject at Cornell. James 
Brooks, Professor Brainard G. Smith and Professor Willard Fiske, and Charles 
E. Fitch also lectured. The Cornell periodicals have trained many undergraduates 
in that branch of education, who have become editors after leaving college. 
If some one would give the money to found a School of Journalism, the trustees 
could select a faculty without going outside of the Cornell alumni. 

EARLY LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETIES 

In the early days the undergraduates formed the Philalathean, Irving, 
Adelphi and Curtis Literary Societies. They met soon afterwards in the room in 
Morrill Hall, where the Registrar's office is now. These societies developed 
oratory and debate, but did not greatly promote social life, and so, as at other 
colleges, they were finally abandoned. There was also organized the Debat- 
ing Club. 

The Cornell Congress has been in existence a great many years. It met in 
Deming Hall, "Down Town," for several years but now meets in Boardman Hall. 
It elects a President of the United States (fictitious) and he chooses a cabinet. 
The President of the U. S. (fictitious), sends in a "Message" for discussion and 
action. The members are divided into political groups. 

There are many societies and clubs formed by students in the various de- 
partments, as the Natural History Society, etc., etc. 

THE Y. M. C. A. AND THE Y. W. C. A. 

Twelve students came together January 23, 1869, and formed the Cornell 
Y. M. C. A. The society met for several years in the same hall as the literary 
societies, where is now the Registrar's office, in Morrill Hall. President White 
presented to these societies bronze statutes of Shakespeare and o f several other 
celebrities. 

Alfred S. Barnes, in 1888, built Barnes Hall, "For the Welfare of God Among 
Men," and this became the home of the Y. M. C. A. The Y. W. C. A. was or- 
ganized several years ago and occupies the Eastern part of Barnes Hall, on the 
first floor. 

Cornell has ever been proud of John R. Mott, '88, who is now a world's 
leader in Y. M. C. A. work, among colleges. 

THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

Early hi its history a Hoe printing-press was presented to the University, 
and it was set up and used in Sibley College. On it were printed examination 
papers and other work. It gave employment to quite a number of students. 
It was found to be cheaper to have the work done privately and the press was 
sold. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS XLDC 

The first University publication was the Cornell Era, a weekly paper, the 
first number of which was issued at the hour of midnight on December 1, 1868, 
just as the clocks were striking twelve. The edition numbered seven hundred 
copies. The first Era bears the date of November 28. It was first published 
by the members of the secret societies. The volume for 1874-5 was prepared 
by editors chosen from the senior and junior classes. This paper, afterwards 
changed to a monthly magazine, has had a continuous existence since its found- 
ing, and is one of the oldest literary college periodicals in the country. All ques- 
tions of university policy were discussed in its columns. 

Professor Willard Fiske was a regular contributor, under the head of "Cornell 
Notes," and sent in copy containing most of the official news of proceedings of 
the Board of Trustees and Faculty. 

Many other members of the faculty sent in valuable and interesting articles 
on university life abroad, travels, etc. 

The Cornell Times appeared as an opposition paper but soon ceased publica- 
tion. 

The Cornell Review, a literary magazine, appeared in October, 1873, pub- 
lished at first by representatives of the literary societies, Irving, Curtis and 
Philalathean, the later being represented in and after 1880 by an editor from 
the Debating Club. It was first a quarterly, but after the first year was a 
monthly. In June, 1886, it ceased publication. It was succeeded by The Cornell 
Magazine which appeared first on April 13, 1888, and for many years until 1900. 

The Cornell Daily Sun first appeared on September 16, 1880, and contained 
the daily University news. This valuable publication has had a continuous 
existence ever since that time. An added and valuable feature for several years 
past is its telegraphic press service. Its editors are chosen from the students by 
competition, the candidates being first tried out by actual journalistic expe- 
rience on the paper for a short period of time. 

The Cornell Alumni News, a valuable medium of communication between 
the University and the alumni, has been published weekly by private enterprise 
since 1899. Woodford Patterson, '96, for ten years on the editorial staff of the 
New York Sun, has been the able editor of the Cornell Alumni News since 1906. 

Cocagne, an illustrated comic weekly, appeared but one term. 

The Cornell Widow was its successor, after a long interregnum, and is issued 
monthly. 

There are several technical and departmental publications, including the 
Philosophical Review, the School Review, the Cornell Architect, the Cornell 
Countryman, the Sibley Journal of Engineering, the Crank, the Physical Review, 
and several others. 

The Cornellian has been published annually since the first year, 1868-9. 

The Cornell Class Books, with statistics and portraits, have been issued by 
the graduating classes in June of each year for the past twenty-five years. 



L DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

CORNELL PREPARATORY SCHOOLS AT ITHACA 

Cornell never had a preparatory department. As many Cornellians have 
been prepared at Ithaca preparatory schools, these schools will be briefly re- 
ferred to. 

In the early days William Kinne, a graduate of Yale, built a school building 
at the north-west corner of Seneca and Spring Streets, in Ithaca, in which he 
conducted a college preparatory school successfully for many years. When 
he came to sell it, he accepted the first offer made, about one-half its actual 
value, because, he said, he didn't want would-be purchasers passing over the 
carpets and through the rooms, to inspect them. Several years later, Frederick 
A. Sawyer, a Harvard graduate, a native of Massachusetts, who had been U. S. 
Senator from South Carolina, conducted a college preparatory school in the 
recitation and class-room building of the Kinne School, which was situated on 
Spring Street, back of the dormitory building, and is now a private residence. 

Professor Lucien A. Wait, of Cornell, started a college-preparatory school 
in the Cascadilla Building, hence the name which he gave to it, the Cascadilla 
School. Afterwards a brick school building, and later a dormitory building were 
erected on the high ground between Dryden Road and the bank of Cascadilla 
Gorge, just east of College Avenue, formerly Heustis Street. Charles V. Parsell, 
'72, was for many years its principal. It accommodates sixty boys, and has a 
boating club-house at the mouth of Fall Creek, on Cayuga Lake. 

Charles A. Stiles, '91, conducted the University Preparatory School, at 
Ithaca, for several years. The old Wick mansion on E. Seneca Street was its 
home for recitations for a long time and it had several houses fitted up as dor- 
mitories. 

Coney Sturgis, (P. G.) '05, has conducted a Tutoring School at Ithaca for 
several years. The main Preparatory School occupies Cascadilla Cottage, the 
former home of Professor Hiram Corson. 

Frank C. Edminster, '02, has conducted a Tutoring School at 502 Stewart 
Ave., near the foot of South Ave. and near the Campus, for several years. 

Then last but largest in the number of students prepared for Cornell, comes 
the old Ithaca Academy, and its successor, the Ithaca High School. This modern 
school has fulfilled its whole duty in preparing young men and women for Cornell, 
where they have taken high standing in scholarship and athletics. Among its 
principals have been many Cornellians, including Fox Holden, '72, from 1875 
to 1880; Daniel O. Barto, '77, from 1880 to 1888, and from 1890 to 1893; 
Lewis H. Tuthill, '84, from 1888 to 1890. Barto was succeeded in 1893, by 
Frank D. Boynton, the present Principal and Superintendent of Schools. 

There have always been a large number of Cornellians in the Faculty of 
the Ithaca High School. 

There are at the present time about six hundred students in the Ithaca High 
School, many of them non-resident students, who pay tuition. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LI 

The new High School building, erected two or three years ago, is a model 
school bulding, being fire-proof and well adapted to its purpose. The contract 
price for building it was $232,000, and there was $10,000 for pile-driving, be- 
sides there was the additional cost of equipment, apparatus and books. 

The tax-payers of Ithaca generously voted a sum not exceeding $300,000 for 
the building. 

Some people think it is a bad plan to have young men prepared for college 
in a college town, where they mingle with older college men and see so much of 
college life before actually entering college, but we leave that problem to the 
educators. 

TRAVEL TO AND FROM CORNELL 

President White says that on his return from Europe on one occasion, he 
inquired in New York City at the ticket office, for a ticket to Ithaca. The ticket- 
agent said to him : "Ithaca! Ithaca! It seems as if I have heard of such a place." 
That may be a little stronger than the ticket-agent put it, but anyway President 
White assured him that Ithaca was "On the map." The President deplored 
the fact that the travel facilities to Ithaca were not so good as they ought to be, 
nor the place as well advertised as it should be for the seat of a great university. 

In the early days the only railroad running into Ithaca was the "Lackawanna," 
over the "South Hill" switch-back, Ithaca being the end of the Cayuga division. 
This was the second railroad to be in operation, and the first one on which work 
was started, in the State of New York; it connected at Owego with the Erie 
R. R. The switch-back could have been eliminated, but it was easier and cheaper 
for the engineers to build the road in that way. 

Director Moses Taylor had a plan for it to run down the valley of Six Mile 
Creek and tunnel under Terrace Place, where the Andrus and Turner mansions 
stand, but he died before any work was done, and nothing more has been heard 
about it. 

Ezra Cornell nearly bankrupted himself to build railroads into and out of 
Ithaca. The old E. C. & N. R. R., on East Hill, was in the early days called 
the "Shoo-Fly." It entered the Campus because Ithaca was heavily bonded 
to help build it and only did so with the proviso that it must enter the corpora- 
tion of the village of Ithaca which it complied with, or very nearly did so, by 
coming into the Campus over a switch. The station was a wooden, unpainted 
shanty that stood where Professor Wilcox's residence is now situated. This 
railroad is now a branch of the L. V. R. R. Before its advent, if a person wished 
to go to Syracuse, he had to drive to Cortland and there take a train. 

Ezra Cornell also built the Ithaca and Athens R. R., the Ithaca and Geneva 
R. R., and the Cayuga Lake R. R., which runs from Ithaca to Cayuga, at the 
north end of the lake. All these last named railroads are now a part of the Le- 
high Valley system. 

At the end of the University terms both of the railroads furnish special Cor- 
nell trams to take the Cornell students to Chicago and New York City. The 
Lehigh and Lackawanna have fine depots at the "Inlet." 



LII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

In recent years the Ithaca and Auburn "Short Line" R. R. was built, using 
part way the old road-bed of the Auburn and Lansing R. R. 

The Cayuga Lake steamers were another means of travel and transportation, 
connecting with the N. Y. Central R. R. at Cayuga. 

The railroad travel facilities to and from Ithaca are very good. There are 
several fast expresses every day to New York City, Philadelphia and to Buffalo 
and the West. Sleeping coaches are attached at Ithaca for New York City and 
Philadelphia every night. Ithaca has the most important passenger traffic of 
any city between New York City and Buffalo. 

The means of transportation from Ithaca to the Campus in the early days 
was a bus-line, making two trips in the forenoon and one in the afternoon. In 
recent years there has been the electric railroad car service. 

There are several automobile bus-lines running to other near-by cities and 



CORNELL'S DISTINGUISHED VISITORS 

Cornell University has been visited at various times by many of the most 
distinguished statesmen, divines and scholars in the world. President and Mrs. 
U. S. Grant visited their son, Jesse Root Grant, '78, at Cornell, a short time 
previous to their trip around the world. 

President Rutherford B. Hayes, then Governor of Ohio, came to Cornell 
to enter one of his sons there. Eventually all of his five sons became Cornellians. 

President Grover Cleveland, then Governor of New York, laid the corner- 
stone of the Memorial Chapel. Mrs. Grover Cleveland, formerly Frances Fol- 
som, was a frequent visitor here during her college days at Wells College, at 
Aurora-on-Cayuga Lake, and has been here several times since. 

President Theodore Roosevelt has been a visitor on several occasions, when 
Governor, when President, and since. He was on one occasion the guest of the 
Chi Psi fraternity at their lodge, the former Fiske mansion. 

President William H. Taft delivered the Founder's Day address when Sec- 
retary of War, and has since delivered several addresses at Cornell. 

Captain, now Rear Admiral, Robert E. Peary, U. S. N., delivered the ad- 
dress at the unveiling of the memorial tablet to Professor Ross G. Marvin, '05, 
in Sage Chapel. 

Governor Horatio Seymour, Democratic candidate for President, was at 
the Clinton House, in Ithaca, an Commencement Day of the Class of '80, and 
was invited to attend, but was unable to do so. 

Chief Justice Alton B. Parker delivered the Founder's Day address a few 
years ago. 

Henry Ward Beecher addressed a vast assemblage in Sage Chapel. 
Gen. Leonard Wood was here recently. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS mi 

Bayard Taylor, Louis Agassiz, James Russell Lowell, and George William 
Curtis lectured at Cornell in the early days. 

Professor Edward A. Freeman of Oxford University, England, lectured at 
Cornell and pronounced its Campus the most beautiful and sightly college campus 
in the world. 

James Anthony Froude, the historian of England, also lectured at Cornell. 

When the Chinese Commissioners on Education were sent to this country 
by the Queen Dowager of China, a few years ago, they visited Cornell. Pro- 
fessor Jeremiah W. Jenks of Cornell, who had been adviser to the Chinese Gov- 
ernment on the coinage of that kingdom, was on hand to help entertain them. 
The main reception by the Cornell students was held in the Armory. Sao-ke 
Alfred Sze, '01, then attache of the Chinese legation in Washington, came on 
and introduced them to Cornellians and acted as interpreter. The Cornell Glee 
Club rendered some college songs as a greeting, the cheer-leaders, with the as- 
sistance of the students, gave the Cornell yell and a "Tiger" for the Commissioners 
and for Mr. Sze. Then one of the Commissioners read his address, which was 
written and spoken in the Chinese language. The other Commissioner kept 
nodding his head in approval of what his colleague said. Then Mr. Sze interpreted 
the address which told the purpose of their visit and all about it, with thanks 
for their cordial reception. The Commissioners were dressed in their native 
costume, keeping their round flat hats upon their heads even while the address 
was being delivered, and they kept on their long coats also; they looked just 
like pictures in the ancient geographies. 

The Japanese Merchants' Association sent a large Commission to the United 
States and Europe, a few years ago, and it visited Ithaca and Cornell, where 
it was entertained, after visiting the University and Campus, at a banquet at 
the Ithaca Hotel. After their return home they sent to the University a beau- 
tifully woven silk testimonial for its hospitality. 



AVIATION 

Cornell early formed an Aero Club. 

The Thomas Bros. School of Aviation, a local institution, connected with 
their Aeroplane factory, has furnished instruction in flying for a considerable 
number of Cornell students. 

Robert Elias Treman, '09, is President of the Cornell Aero Club. 



CLASSICAL AND LITERARY STUDIES AT CORNELL 

"Cornell is only a Scientific and Engineering College." These are the words 
that greeted the writer when he announced his intention of studying at Cornell. 

"You can see some Cornell specimens right here in our own community," 
naming them. 



LIV DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Well, the "Specimens" were all right, only some of them had only been at 
Cornell a term or two in the early years and had boasted that they were "Repre- 
sentative Cornellians," whatever that may mean. Even at the present day 
the Summer School students and "Short Horns" announce, some of them, that 
they are "Regular" Cornell students, whatever that may mean. 

Anyway, it is true that the public had some not very clear ideas about the 
new institution, which had announced so many different courses, besides the 
regular classical course. 

One rival college paper said sarcastically that the "Optional" course at Cor- 
nell must be a very hard one. 

Then it said that the "Non-Resident Professors" must be some "Joke," 
referring, of course, to their taking the "absent treatment." 

Then the specimens of entrance examination papers, published in the early 
Registers, caused a good many laughs at the expense of the University, because 
they appeared to be comparatively easy. But they don't laugh any more at 
Cornell, or crack any more jokes about her. 

One graduate of Princeton, in business at Ithaca, said that his brother was 
going to Princeton because it was a "Literary" college, instead of going to Cor- 
nell. He afterwards failed in business. However, Cornell has now, and for 
many years past has had, its share of classical and literary students. 

When the other colleges could not beat Cornell at rowing, they said that 
athletics was not the real test anyway; that scholarship was the thing; so they 
organized an intercollegiate Literary Contest and Cornell defeated them in that, 
too, till they quit. 

No university ever had greater teachers in the various departments, of 
Greek and Latin, in Modern Languages, in Literature, in History, or any other 
branch of literature than Cornell has had from the beginning to the present 
time. 

Professor Tracy Peck, after serving for many years, 1871-80, as head of the 
Latin Department at Cornell, left Cornell to succeed Professor Thomas Thatcher 
at his Alma Mater. He published several Latin College Text-Books. 

Professor Isaac Flagg, head of the Greek Department at Cornell, 1871-88, 
was a graduate of Harvard, and left Cornell to become head Professor of Greek 
in the University of California. He published several Greek college text-books. 

Professor Charles E. Bennett has been at the head of the Latin Department 
since 1892. 

Professor George P. Bristol, the present head of the Greek Department* 
has been connected with the department since 1888. 

Professor John R. S. Sterrett was Professor of Greek and head of the de- 
partment from 1901 till his death, June 15, 1914. 

Professor Herbert C. Elmer, '83, has been Assistant Professor and Professor 
of Latin since 1888. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LV 

William Gardner Hale was Professor of Latin from 1880 to 1892, when he 
went to the University of Chicago. 

They are ' 'Knocking" Greek not only at Cornell but at Harvard, and else- 
where, as Professor Horatio S. White tells us. During Professor Benjamin Ide 
Wheeler's absence in Athens, action was taken at Cornell, allowing modern 
languages to be substituted for Greek, to take the A.B. degree. On being asked, 
on his return, by the writer, what he was going to do about it, he said that he 
would do nothing, as it was now an accomplished fact. Even the Ithaca High 
School has given up its class in Greek. 

CORNELL'S GREAT NEEDS 

Cornell's greatest need is more endowment. Cornell's greatest need on the 
social side, is an Alumni Hall, one in which could be held class meetings, ban- 
quets, etc., and which would be a club house as well for the Campus community, 
a place in which to centralize the social interests of the professors and students 
and where all could meet together. The new University Club meets this want 
of a social gathering-place and has its headquarters as Sage Cottage, but needs 
more room. 

Another need of Cornell is a centrally-situated fire-fighting station, fully 
equipped and manned for emergency. Nearly every year some great building, 
either belonging to the University, or to some fraternity, is burned almost, or 
entirely, down, because the fire apparatus cannot reach the scene in time. 

There are many other, and still more important needs which are mentioned 
more fully in another article. 

THE FRATERNITIES 

The first secret societies to be instituted at Cornell were the Zeta Psi and 
Chi Phi fraternities. 

In the early days the fraternities met hi rooms over stores "Down Town," 
and later, about 1876, began to rent and afterwards to build and own lodges 
of their own. 



The fraternity movement is the strongest at Cornell of any of the col 
The establishment of new fraternities has always been favored by President 
White. One of the reasons is because it provides dormitories. 

While they were organized to provide for the social life of the students, which 
was found not much developed in the old literary and debating societies, yet 
the "Society" idea has become pretty well developed also, as witness the house- 
parties at the lodges during Junior, Navy and Senior Weeks, when an entire 
floor of each entertaining lodge is given over to fair visitors and their chaperones. 
On these occasions Cornellians give a very good sample of society in New York 
and Newport. 

It was feared at first that they would unite for mutual action, politically and 
otherwise, on any pending matters before the University, as the election of 
Alumni Trustee, etc., or that they might interfere with University discipline. 



LVI DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

It has been complained that the scholarship of fraternity men was not so 
high as that of the other students, on account of social diversions, etc., but 
recently the fraternities have made good showings in scholarship. 

President Schurman is not a member of any college fraternity and his ad- 
vice to others who do not belong is "Eat not thy heart with envy over the matter," 
for there are as good men outside as inside the fraternities. 

However, there are few students in good standing but receive an invitation 
to join some fraternity. 

There was once a bunch of fellows who wished to get a chapter of an old 
fraternity at Cornell, but there was one college that stood out against Cornell, 
whereupon the other fraternity men and the "Independents" had a song: 

"There's one more river to cross; 
It's deep and wide to the other side, 
There's one more river to cross." 

While the principal object is to get a bunch of congenial fellows together, 
yet they keep a "weather-eye open" for the youthful scions of wealthy families, 
for it costs a lot of money to build and keep up fraternity houses, and they are 
not going to object to a young man, who is otherwise all right, just because he 
happens to have money. Furthermore some of the fraternities who have had 
to run into debt for their lodges may have trouble to pay for them in compe- 
tition with the new men's dormitories. 

The old time "rushing" for fraternities is practically abandoned by agree- 
ment of the fraternities between themselves, a committee of each, at an ap- 
pointed time attending to this work. 

On one occasion, a few years ago, when an unusually desirable candidate 
was expected over the Lackawanna R. R., an enterprising fraternity sent its 
committee to the top of "South Hill" and they there boarded the train at the 
"Switch-back" and persuaded the young man that the University was right 
there near at hand and that he had reached the end of his journey. Mean- 
time, the representatives of other fraternities waited at the lower station at 
the "Inlet" till the train came in and they found that they had been flanked 
and outgeneraled. 

On another occasion a wag registered at the Ithaca Hotel as "Henry C. 
Frick, jr., Pittsburg, Pa." He was no myth, for Clyde A. Dunniway, '02, was 
his tutor, and tried to get him to attend Cornell. Anyway, the boys haunted 
the hotel lobby for a long time to find this elusive person, but the Clerk being 
"on" let them "fool" around for a while before letting them know that they 
were "sold." 

Many wealthy students did not join fraternities in the early years; some- 
times their parents were opposed, for they had heard unfavorable reports about 
the early fraternities. The death of young Morimer M. Leggett, '77, in 1873, 
was one ground, and it caused strong feeling against college fraternities. He 
was the son of Gen. Leggett, U. S. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, at Wash- 
ington. The unfortunate young man went with some companions to a lonely 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LVH 

spot on Giles Street, and while waiting for some companions to come to join in 
the initiation, and while standing under a pine tree, upon a rocky bluff, young 
Leggett felt himself falling and grasped his companions and all three went over, 
but he falling on the under side was crushed and died. His father came on and 
became satisfied that no harm was intended and that it was an accident due to 
carelessness, and consented to and was, afterwards, initiated himself in the 
same fraternity. There are now 48 fraternities that occupy chapter-houses, 
and there are several others that will probably soon build lodges. 

At Cornell the general fraternities take members from all classes, while at 
Harvard and Yale the most prominent among them, including Psi Upsilon, Alpha 
Delta Phi, and Delta Kappa Epsilon, choose only upperclass men, after the 
freshman year. 

Besides the old honorary Phi Beta Kappa fraternity, there are several other 
honorary and senior fraternities at Cornell, as "Quill and Dagger," etc. Then 
there is the honorary scientific fraternity, Theta Xi. 

The Delta Upsilon, claiming not to be secret, was formed at an early day 
from the "Independents," who were opposed to secret fraternities. The Kappa 
Alpha fraternity was third on the list, Nov. 27, 1868. 

Upon April 3, 1869, three others claimed recognition, Alpha Delta Phi, Chi 
Psi and Phi Kappa Psi. 

The Alpha Delta Phi was the first to build and own a chapter house, which 
was of brick and was located at the southeast corner of Buffalo and Spring 
Streets. 

There are now so many fraternities that it is hard for even a classical scholar 
to remember one third of them by their Greek names. 

CORNELL IN SONG 

" 'Tis a way we have at Cornell, boys, 
To drive dull care away." 

ANON. 

ALMA MATER 
Words by COLIN K. URQUHART, Ex-76. 

"Far above Cayuga's waters, 

With its waves of blue, 
Stands our noble Alma Mater 
Glorious to view. 



Chorus: 



Lift the chorus, speed it homeward, 
Loud her praises tell, 
Hail to thee! Oh, Alma Mater, 
Hail, all hail, Cornell! 



LVIII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Far above the busy humming 

Of the bustling town, 
Reared against the arch of Heaven, 

Looks she proudly down." 

STARS OF THE VALLEY 

"When the shadows shroud the hillsides, 

And the stars glow in the blue, 

When the night wind o'er Cayuga 

Breathes its tale of love anew; 

When there's silence deep and tender, 

Save when chimes the even bell, 
Sending far o'er vale and wavelet 

Gentle greetings from Cornell; 

Then upon the valley's bosom 

Gleam a thousand gems of light 
Mild and clear their radiance stealing 

Thro' the chambers of the night. 

Brighter they than heaven's jewels, 
Deeper sinks their beams bright dart, 

For they shine from Love's dear hearthstones 
Straight into the exile's heart." 

OREOLA WILLIAMS, '97. 



CORNELL 

"There is a name, of all the names, 

On which I love to dwell; 
It is and will be evermore 

Thine own dear name, Cornell." 



P. M. E. 



THE MUSICAL CLUBS 

"Thirty-two men in full-dress suits 
Furnished with banjos, songs and lutes, 
Travel around on annual toots. 



All of the rest are bright and gay; 
Half of the night they sing and play, 
As for the other half we can't say." 



ANON. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS ux 

DAVY 

"Ezra Cornell was an Indian; so was Henry Sage; 
Pale-faced students Dagoes! killed 'em at an early age. 
But there is another Indian. He may go to h 11; 
Up in Morrill, number Three, he gives his Cornell yell. 
Faculty! Faculty! Up in Morrill number Three 
Davy raises h 11 with me. 
Faculty! Faculty! Bust 'em; bust 'em that's the custom! Faculty! 

THE CENTENNIAL OF EZRA CORNELL'S BIRTHDAY 

This occurred on the llth day of January, 1907. Great preparations had 
been made for the celebration of this event. A large tent had been built, and 
new wooden benches provided for the audience, but the weather was inclement 
and so the exercises were held in the Armory. 

The occasion was also used to formally dedicate the new main building of 
the New York State College of Agriculture. The Governor, Charles E. Hughes, 
was one of the speakers. President White was another. Andrew Carnegie was 
expected but was ill and could not come. However, he had prepared for the 
occasion an address upon the "Life of Ezra Cornell," which was afterwards 
published. 

THE FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF CORNELL 

The formal exercises of this occasion took place at Commencement in June, 
1908. A special, and successful, effort was made for a Grand Reunion of the 
alumni. The exercises were held in front of Goldwin Smith Hall. President 
White spoke with his accustomed mental vigor. Judge Frank H. Hiscock, '75, 
of the New York Court of Appeals, spoke for the alumni. 

The graduating class and undergraduates, in a body, called upon President 
White at his home, where he addressed them, clad in his Oxford gown, out of 
compliment to the graduating class, who wore their caps and gowns. 



STUDENT CUSTOMS 

The early students were fond of making night raids on the old cider-mill at 
Forest Home, but that has long since passed away, with other familiar land- 
marks. 

"Rushes" are a thing of the past at Cornell. 

Commencement exercises for the past few years have been held in the open 
air on the slope in front of McGraw Hall, in a little natural ampi theatre, with 
board seats arranged in a semi-circle. 

The out-door Class Day exercises are still held in the little grove in the College 
quadrangle. 



LX DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Hallowe'en always brings student pranks, including the "borrowing" of 
gates, signs, etc. 

There are certain student rules that must be observed by undergraduates; 
for example, the Freshmen must wear regulation caps. At the end of the aca- 
demic year, at Commencement time, they have a big bon-fire at which the caps 
are burned. 

The University has printed "Rules for the Guidance of Students." There 
are also special rules for the guidance of the women students. 

STUDENT FESTIVITIES 

"Spring Day" comes annually with its fantastic parade and circus. Dr. 
Wilder used to issue a manifesto against its frivolities and plead for a more 
rational celebration. Nevertheless, he retains his great popularity. 

"Junior Week" is the great event in the social life of the University, when 
Cornell is crowded with bright visitors. It comes next after "Block," or term 
examination, Week, and comes either the last week in January or the first week 
in February of each year. Then comes "Navy Week," in May, followed by 
"Senior Week" in June. 

"Around the cycle of the season whirled, 
And Ithaca was filled with pretty girls, 
Who took our rooms, and made us sweep the floors, 
And clean the house, and then live out doors." 

D. W. McG.,'ll. 

STUDENTS AID 

The loan fund at the Treasurer's office has helped many students through 
their college course, and the money is always repaid. The Students' Relief 
Fund is another valuable aid. Then there are many fellowships and scholar- 
ships, besides the State scholarships which give free tuition to four students all 
the time from each assembly district. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

There have not been many serious breaches of discipline. Some students 
have been "removed" for "cribbing," or cheating, in examinations. They forgot 
the classical allusion to the ancient town of which modern Ithaca is the name- 
sake: "Ithaca is a poor place for horses," and we will add "or for ponies." 

There is a Committee on Student Affairs that now regulates those matters. 
It is composed of undergraduates with one faculty member. 

The proctor, Lieutenant T. H. Tweston, now is the adviser of men, and 
supervisor of their conduct, and is popular notwithstanding his unpleasant duties. 
The great army of students are left practically to their own sweet wills as to 
deportment, attendance upon routine duties and the general employment of 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXI 

their time. They are not required to attend Chapel exercises and they are not 
marked and tagged and watched by monitors. The night is their B own, to work 
or to waste, as they will. It is a true student Republic. If the student mis- 
behaves he is amenable to the law. If he neglects his studies and falls below 
the standard of scholarship he is dropped. Cornell is not a reformatory, but 
for the earnest young men and women it has no superior in the world. 

STUDENT MORALS 

About the "nineties" there was an organization in Ithaca called the "S. P. C.," 
or "Society for the Prevention of Crime," with Professor George W. Jones, of 
Cornell, President, and Fred J. Marsh, Agent. This society was in existence 
for several years. At the time of its formation there were in Ithaca several 
houses of bad repute, eighty places where liquor was sold, and several gambling 
places. There were a large number of convictions for crime during its existence, 
which it claimed to have secured. Still there were several of that class of houses 
in existence. It finally died from lack of financial support. It had accumulated 
a great variety of enemies and some respectable citizens doubted the efficiency 
of its measures. It was a singular coincidence that soon after it went out of 
existence, the "bad spots" of Ithaca were quietly but effectually put out of busi- 
ness by the sheriffs of that time, assisted by the local police, so that there has 
not been a house of bad repute in Ithaca during the past ten years, and there 
are not more than about twenty-five places for the sale of liquor in Ithaca, in- 
cluding drugstores, hotels and saloons, though Ithaca's citizen population has 
doubled, and its student number has quadrupled since that time. There is not 
nearly so much liquor-drinking among Cornell students now as there was in 
former years, as has been proven by careful investigation. 

FOUNDER'S DAY 

On the llth day of January comes the anniversary of the birth of the Founder, 
and every year it is observed by the suspension of all University work. There 
is an address by some distinguished orator on the occasion. 

In recent years among the speakers have been Lyman J. Gage, Justice Henry 
B. Brown of the U. S. Supreme Court, Alton B. Parker, William H. Taft, and 
General Leonard Wood, who recently spoke here on war preparedness. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS AT CORNELL 

In the early days there were quite a good many students from Brazil at 
Cornell, probably through the influence of Professor Charles F. Hartt of Cornell, 
who made a Geological Survey of that country. They continued to come to 
Cornell until about 1895, when a Brazilian student claimed that the require- 
ments for admission and graduation were too high, so he quit and went to Syra- 
cuse University; soon afterwards the rest of the Brazillian students left Cornell. 

The Metropolitan Club was formed by foreign students several years ago; 
soon afterwards the Spanish students left the Metropolitan Club and formed 
the Spanish-American Club. Their lodge is on Dryden Road. 



LXII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

In recent years there have been about thirty-five Chinese students at Cornell 
all the time. They are sent by their home Government, from the income of the 
"Boxer" indemnity, imposed upon China after the "Boxer" troubles. The 
United States refused to take its share and thereupon China set the sum aside 
as an educational fund, and out of compliment to our country directed that the 
beneficiaries of the fund should be educated in the United States. Some go to 
other colleges in our country but the largest number to attend any college, come 
to Cornell. After graduation they are obliged to return to their native land 
and enter the government service, to repay for the expenses of their education. 

There are about one-third as many Japanese as Chinese students at Cornell. 
They also are sent at the expense of their home government and afterwards 
enter its service. 

In their home countries many former Cornell students have attained great 
distinction, as witness: Sao-Ke Alfred Sze, '01, who was appointed Chinese 
Ambassador to the U. S. and is now Minister of Posts and Roads. 

Then there is Gen. Mario Garcia Menocal, '88, who is now President of the 
Republic of Cuba. 

Ryokichi Yatabe, '76, who was one of the few Commencement speakers at 
graduation, and spoke in beautiful English, has been for many years Professor 
of Botany and Director of the Botanical Gardens, University of Tokio. 

A few years ago there were several native students from India, in Agriculture. 
A native prince visited them for a period of about two weeks and examined the 
Cornell Agricultural plant. 



THE LIBRARY 

It first occupied the central section, on the ground floor, where the faculty 
room used to be, and where the Registrar's office now is located, in Morrill Hall. 
In 1870 it was removed to the ground floor, in the central section, of the McGraw 
Building. In 1891 it was removed to the new University Library Building. 

In 1871 it had 27,500 volumes. It now has nearly 500,000 volumes. Pro- 
fessor Willard Fiske was the first librarian. It was in financial distress, soon 
after its removal to the McGraw Building. Until 1880 the annual appropriation 
for the library was only $1,500. In that year the trustees appropriated $20,000 
for it. 

Professor Fiske, long afterwards, gave to it the splendid Dante collection, 
and many other books, and finally all his property, amounting to over $500,000 
for the increase of his own collection of books. 

George William Harris, '73, succeeded Professor Willard Fiske, as Librarian 
in 1883, and served until 1915, when he resigned and was succeeded by Willard 
Austin, '91, the third and present Librarian. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXIII 

Willard W. Ellis, '01, has been curator of the shelves for fourteen years. 

"In the library she studied, 
A Co-ed passing fair 
With her text-book and her pony 
And her pencil in her hair. 

But she rose with quick decision 
For another crib to look 
When a terrible explosion 
The massive building shook. 

And Austen murmured gently, 
As the little desk he dusted: 
'Alas! these awful Co-eds; 
Another lamp they've busted. " 

A. R. 

THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT 

The treasurer of Cornell University, with a $20,000,000 institution on his 
hands, has something to do. The early trustees were not all financiers but there 
have always been strong men on the Finance Committee of the Board of Trus- 
tees to manage its business affairs. 

George W. Schuyler was the first treasurer, 1865-74. 

When Joseph W. Williams, the second treasurer, 1875-9, died in 1879, Mr. 
Sage, in paying a tribute to his memory, said that his accounts were absolutely 
correct to a penny. His successor, Emmons L. Williams, 1879-1915, after thirty- 
five years of faithful service in that office, became Comptroller in 1915. 

The cashier of a great metropolitan bank does not often handle more money 
than does the Treasurer of Cornell, and he has a multitude of other duties placed 
upon his shoulders; the payments for new buildings, and apparatus, and equip- 
ment for the same, the improvement of the grounds, and repairs to buildings, 
and many other financial responsibilities are his burden. 

Charles D. Bostwick, '92, is the fourth, and present Treasurer, appointed 
in 1915. 

THE INFIRMARIES 

Florence Nightingale, the heroine of the profession of nursing, was an angel 
in disguise. 

If it had not been for the University Infirmary at the time of the great ty- 
phoid fever epidemic, the loss of student lives would have been much greater. 
As it was many students had to be sent home to be cared for there, on showing 
symptoms of the disease. There were nearly sixty cases of the disease in the 
Infirmary all the time, and even the attic of the old Sage mansion had to be 
used for sleeping apartments for the nurses. Additional houses were hired by 
the Trustees and converted into hospital annexes. 



LXIV DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

The new fire-proof Infirmary has eighty beds and the old mansion is now 
the nurses' home. Any professor, teacher or student, who is taken ill, can be 
admitted. It is a very important and necessary department of the University. 

The old home of Henry W. Sage could not have been put to a better use. 



THE GYMNASIUM 

"If by gaining the knowledge, we destroy our health, we labor for a thing 
that will be useless in our hands; he that sinks his vessel by overloading it, 
though it be with gold, and silver, and precious stones, will give its owner an 
ill account of his voyage." BACON. 

The first gymnasium was a small wooden building that stood about where 
the Sigma Phi fraternity lodge is now situated. The money to build it was 
raised, about 1873, by Professor William E. Byerly, of Cornell, afterwards of 
Harvard. It was a crude affair and had but little apparatus. 

When the old armory was completed it was used, and is used to the present 
day, as the gymnasium. An annex was added later, with an indoor running- 
track, and a general room for gymnastics, and in the basement lockers and 
bath-rooms, and a swimming-pool. 

Dr. Edward Hitchcock was Acting Professor of Physical Culture and Hy- 
giene, 1883-8; Professor, 1888-1903. 

Dr. Charles Van Patten Young, '99, has been Acting Professor of Physical 
Culture and Director of the Gymnasium, 1904-6; and Professor and Director, 
since 1906. 



ALUMNI FIELD 

This lies east of the original Campus on the east side of a new avenue, parallel 
with East Avenue running north and south. Its north and east sides face a new 
quadrangle formed by the new Agricultural buildings. To grade this field cost 
a large sum of money, the cost being borne by the alumni, hence the name. 

The field has three levels: The main field is for football practice games, 
and for minor sports. Another field is the Stadium for football contests with 
other colleges, with concrete seats on the east side. The Schoellkopf Memorial 
building for athletics flanks it on the north. The baseball field or lowest level, 
is not yet completed. 

PERCY FIELD 

This is still used for baseball contests with visiting college teams. It was 
given by William H. Sage and named as a memorial for an alumnus. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXV 

THE WHITE GATE 

The beautiful gate at the southern entrance of the Campus was the gift 
of President White. The inscriptions are as follows: 

East Tablet: 

"In remembrance 

Of all who with him had part in the founding of this University : 
Of all who here gave instruction, 

Of all who have pursued their studies under his presidency and with a God speed 
To all who have gone or shall go hence to their life work 
With noble purposes and firm resolves: 

This gateway is erected by 
ANDREW DICKSON WHITE 

1896." 
West Tablet: 

"So enter 

That daily thou mayst become 
More learned and thoughtful: 

So depart 

That daily thou mayst become 
More useful to thy Country and mankind." 

FAVORITE PLACES, SHRINES AND MEMORIALS 

The Goldwin Smith walk around Cascadilla Gorge, and Lover's Walk to 
Forest Home, on the bank of Fall Creek, are the favorite walks around Cornell. 

The entrance gates, the gift of President White; the stone arched bridge 
over Cascadilla Gorge, the gift of William H. Sage; the Sheldon seat, the Goldwin 
Smith seat, the Fernow seat, the memorial boulder to Professor R. S. Tarr, the 
statue of President White, the bell given by Rev. Robert Collyer to Sibley Col- 
lege, the Alaskan totem-pole, and the rows of beautiful elm trees are among 
Cornell's most prominent out-door memorials. There is the Memorial Chapel 
with the reclining statues, stained-glass memorial windows, and memorial tablets. 

The Sage Chapel proper contains the beautiful Sage Memorial Apse, and 
many stained glass memorial windows, and memorial tablets of brass and marble. 

Then there is the life-size bronze statue of Moses, the gift of President White, 
which stands in the White Library, where is also the porcelain vase given to 
President White by the Emperor of Germany when the Ambassador left Berlin. 

Then there are the two beautifully carved chairs for use at Commencements, 
one for the President, the other for the chairman of the Board of Trustees. 

There is the Sheldon marble memorial seat. 
The bronze statue of President White. 



LXVI DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

There is the bell that Rev. Robert Collyer brought from England and gave 
to Sibley College. It hung over a blacksmith shop and called him to work when 
he was an apprentice. 

Many paths have been built along the sides of the banks of Cascadilla Gorge, 
and to the bottom of the Gorge, just below, and also some near to Trip-Hammer 
Falls, from money contributed in recent years, by the alumni; these paths 
make Beebe Lake more accessible, and also gives an opportunity to view the 
falls from the depths of the Gorge. New paths have also been built, and old 
paths repaired in varoius other gorges and glens on the Campus, and the banks 
of the streams have been cleared of debris. The bank of Beebe Lake is a favorite 
resort for picnic parties in summer. 



THE FISKE WILL SUIT 

John McGraw died May 4, 1877, leaving all of his property to his only child, 
Jennie McGraw, who afterwards married Professor Willard Fiske of Cornell. 

At her death, without issue, she left $300,000 to her husband, and several 
large gifts to her other relatives, amounting in all to nearly $1,000,000, and 
made Cornell University the residuary legatee of the remainder of her property, 
estimated to be worth $1,500,000, for a library and its support, and for a uni- 
versity hospital. Had this bequest been carried out, it would have given to 
Cornell one of the largest libraries in the world. 

Professor Fiske, although he had signed an ante-nuptial agreement not to 
interfere with the control or disposition of his wife's property, became grieved 
over certain personal matters and brought suit to break the will. 

He soon afterwards associated his wife's relatives with him in the suit. The 
contestants, by their counsel, David B. Hill, claimed: 

I. That the Charter of the University limited the amount of property, 
which it could hold, to $3,000,000, and that it already held that amount. 

II. That she had given more than one-half of her property to a charitable 
institution, contrary to the provisions of law. 

The University contended, by Samuel D. Halliday, 70, and Judge Edwin 
Countryman, of Albany : 

I. That the University did not own $3,000,000 worth of property, nor any- 
where near that amount, and therefore it could receive the whole, or nearly 
all of the bequest. That the Western lands, given by the U. S. Government, 
were only held in trust, and were not therefore, a part of their absolute possessions. 

II. That she had not given more than one-half of her property to a chari- 
table institution. That her estate, instead of being free, was encumbered with 
great debts, which made its value much less than was generally supposed. 

Judge Douglas Boardman was the executor of her will, as well as that of 
her father. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXVII 

The Surrogate sustained the will but the New York Supreme Court reversed 
his decision, which latter view was confirmed by the New York Court of Appeals, 
and the United States Supreme Court. 

David B. Hill retired from the case on becoming Lieutenant Governor and 
ex officio trustee of the University, and Judge George F. Comstock, of Syracuse, 
took his place. U. S. Senator George F. Edmunds appeared for the University 
in Court at Washington. The decision of the Court was that the portion of the 
Western lands for which Ezra Cornell paid 30 cents per acre was a trust, but 
the surplus was not a trust, and therefore, Cornell University already owned 
$3,000,000 worth of property and could not take any under the will. 

THE GREAT TYPHOID FEVER EPIDEMIC 

This commenced in February, 1903, and was one of the largest in history. 
There were over one thousand cases. There were fifty-two deaths, about one- 
half of them being among students. 

The waters of Six Mile Creek, which supplies Ithaca with drinking water, 
became polluted by the sickness, with typhoid fever, of a laborer on its banks, 
while building the Ithaca Water Works' upper dam. The hospitals were crowded 
and extra nurses were called from other near-by cities to help. Many private 
homes were filled with the sick. Many poor students lost all their money but 
were reimbursed by Andrew Carnegie. 

The University faculty generously allowed the students who had been ill 
the highest credit in scholarship that they could afford, so that many were en- 
abled to graduate who might not otherwise have been able to do so. 

There were no sick persons among those who drank from the University 
water plant. 

The Ithaca Water Works Plant was purchased by the city soon afterwards 
by vote of the tax-payers, and it now has filtration. The University also has a 
filtration plant, the gift of Andrew Carnegie, soon after the fever epidemic. 

One Ithaca newspaper thought it was doing its duty in suppressing news 
of the great epidemic because it would hurt Cornell and Ithaca and keep intend- 
ing visitors away. The other paper published all the facts and especially was 
prompt in announcing any new cases. Perhaps both were right. 

LEST WE FORGET 

The early death of Professor Charles Frederick Hartt in Brazil, while con- 
ducting explorations for the government of that country caused great gloom at 
Cornell. 

Professor Ross G. Marvin, '05, had accompanied Peary on one of his Arctic 
expeditions, and went down to New York to say good-bye to the members of 
another, but the lure was too strong and he asked and obtained leave from the 
University to go. While alone with his Esquimau companions, he sank from 
sight in the Arctic waters and was never seen again. Captain Peary spoke at 
the unveiling of a tablet to his memory in Sage Chapel. 



LXVHI DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Then there was W. D. Osgood, '94, a Cornell football player, who was killed 
while fighting for freedom for Cuba. 

Then there was the death of eight young men in the Fiske mansion fire. 
Memorial windows to them, appear in Sage Chapel. The inscription on one of 
the windows reads: "Greater love hath no man, than that a man lay down his 
life for a friend." 

Then there are the losses by drowning in Cayuga Lake and other waters 
about Cornell. 

There was the death by his own hand of Dean E. W. Huffcut, on a Hudson 
River steamer. He was popular, but very sensitive, and feared that his pet 
measure, the Public Service Commission Bill, would fail, but it went through. 
His successor as Dean is a member of that Commission. 

Then there was Professor Willard Fiske; his heart was true to Cornell and 
at the end he gave to it his all. 

CORNELL CASUALTIES 

Frederick Gordon Rew, '97, a freshman from Buffalo, N. Y., disappeared 
in September, 1903, from Cornell. His father was State Secretary of the Good 
Templars. The boy's parents insisted that he had been murdered, presumably 
by tramps, though he had but little money. After a two years search he was 
found at the Island of Ceylon when a tramp cattle-steamer on which he worked 
his passage, arrived there. He claimed to be a victim of Aphasia. He claimed 
that while walking along the shore of Cayuga Lake he suddenly forgot his own 
name and identity and wandered about the earth. He did not try to conceal 
his name when he shipped as a helper, and thus was found by the Pinkertons 
and confronted with his own photograph and came to his right senses. 

Instructor Lucius S. Merriam of Cornell and Mary L. Yeargin, '96, of 
South Carolina, disappeared while out rowing on Cayuga Lake, Nov. 17, 1893. 
Her body was recovered. 

At one time a few years ago, two young men and two young women, all 
Cornell students, were drowned by the overturning of a canoe near the light- 
house. Their bodies were recovered. 

Several years ago, February 20th, 1894, Mrs. Henrietta Jackson, a colored 
woman, was poisoned by chlorine gas, while some sophomores were trying to 
break up a freshman class supper. The perpetrators of the crime were arrested. 
The presiding Supreme Court Judge told the Grand Jury it was merely a harm- 
less student prank or words to that effect, for which the New York World 
mercilessly scored him editorially. Professor Charles A. Collin told his law 
class that it was murder. 

The burning of the Fiske mansion, Dec. 7, 1906, was a great calamity be- 
cause of the death of eight persons, directly and indirectly caused by the fire, 
several of them Cornell undergraduates, and one of them, Alfred S. Robinson, 
'97, a former law student. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXDC 

When the A. T. O. fraternity lodge burned at the corner of University and 
Stewart Avenues, the Treasurer of the fraternity was suffocated. This fire 
occurred at the noon hour and during a "Junior Week," a few years ago. 

After repeated warnings from President Schurman and Coach Charles E. 
Courtney to be careful on Cayuga Lake and avoid sudden squalls and especially 
to keep out of canoes, and sending word to the parents of students and requiring 
their consent before the women students could go on Cayuga Lake, there have 
been few accidents and they not serious. 

A student was drowned in the experimental canal, and another near its 
mouth in Beebe Lake. 

Emil Schwertfeger, 78, committed suicide in 1877, because the physicians 
said that if he continued to study hard he would lose his eye-sight. He had 
been a prize-winner for Cornell in the Intercollegiate Literary Contest. 

Dean Ernest W. Huffcut, '84, with brilliant prospects, took his own life, 
in 1907, on a Hudson River steamer. 

Professor Ross G. Marvin '05, was lost in the Arctic. 

By the burning of the steamer "Frontenac" on Cayuga Lake, near Farley's 
Point, on the east shore in July, 1907, there were eight women drowned, two of 
them Cornell Summer School students. They were forced by the officers to 
jump off the boat to save being burned. A high wind caused high waves of water 
and the life-preservers did not save them. Some were badly burned by being 
forced by the wind and waves against the side of the burning steamer. 



DRAMATIC INTERESTS 

The Masque is an association of men students for the promotion and pro- 
duction of good plays. 

The Savage Club entertains many of the leading visiting members of the 
theatrical profession. 

The Cornell women students also have a dramatic association which recently 
presented "Quality Street." 

There have been several Cornellians who have become prominent on the 
stage, and also as playwrights, including Frank R. Luckey, '81, who took part 
in "Pinafore" in his student days, and is now a Congregational minister; Stephen 
T. King, '88, actor-manager; Robert L. Dempster, '04, in legitimate; Tripp 
Davey, '09, in musical comedy. Rennold Wolf, '92, has become a famous play- 
wright. 

The Lyceum theatre was provided by several wealthy Ithacans, who never 
expected, and never received, any dividends upon their investment. 

There is also one large moving-picture and vaudeville house, with two more 
about to be built, the Crescent on North Aurora Street near the corner of Buf- 



LXX DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

falo Street, and The Strand, on East State Street, just east of Aurora Street. 
Because of faculty and student patronage, Ithaca is considered one of the best 
one-night stand show towns in the country, the local managers having brought 
first class attractions. 

Said a Cornell student one day: 
"This 'Blue Jeans' I think will be gay, 

And so to the show, 

To-night I will go.' 
And he asked for a ticket in A. 

But Gutstadt looked up in a flutter, 
'You've mistaken the date/ he did mutter; 

"Tis a lecture to-day 

For the Y. M. C. A.' 
And they carried him out on a shutter." 

ANON. 



REMINISCENCES OF CORNELL 

There has been a division of opinion among the alumni over the advisability 
of conferring honorary degrees. There have been so many conferred at some 
other colleges, as a reward for gifts or for favors to come, or from favoritism, 
that the custom met with disfavor at Cornell. However, the Doctorate of Laws 
was conferred, in 1886, on President White of Cornell, and President David 
Starr Jordan, an alumnus. The alumni, in meeting assembled, having dis- 
approved the conferring of any more, the recipients offered to return them, but 
the offer was not accepted. 

When the University opened it was supposed that the number of applicants 
for admission would be about fifty and so when three hundred applied the au- 
thorities were not well prepared to examine so many very carefully. The ex- 
amination took place in Military Hall in the basement of the Cornell Library 
building. 

At first only the A.B. degree was given but the Classical students insisted 
that only those who had taken Latin and Greek ought to have that degree, 
so the second graduating class had some candidates for the B.S. degree. 

One of the early professors at Cornell was William Channing Russell, its 
only Vice-President. He was one of the oldest members of the faculty and 
had the duties of Acting President thrust upon him, without the authority of 
a President. 

President White once received a letter from a country bank president, say- 
ing that from the reports that he had received about Cornell University, that 
he would not "patronize" Cornell, but would send his son to another college. 
The President wrote back and told him that the patronage was all on the Uni- 
versity side that it cost three or four times as much to educate a young man 
at Cornell, as was received from him in tuition. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXI 

There was great excitement at the Agricultural College when the prize bull 
drank some liquid preservative, mistaking it for water he died. 

The first, last and only Junior Exhibition was broken up by student rowdy- 
ism. 

President Schurman showed good foresight when he had a ground-plan 
made of the Campus by noted landscape architects, showing where new build- 
ings should be located to make an harmonious setting. 

Who among the early professors and students can ever forget Jefferson 
Beardsley and his studio ? The latter stood on Linn Street at the foot of Uni- 
versity Aveune, on the south bank of Cascadilla Creek, near a beautiful water- 
fall. He was a true artist and many of his photographs of the early Cornell 
crews and of their individual members appeared in Harpers Weekly and other 
periodicals of that time. 

A certain member of '78, attended a faculty "Seance." When he came out 
of the room he was trembling and scared, and when some one asked him what 
time it was, fumbled at his watch and answered "Thirteen o'clock." 

A certain Professor was one day telling his class in German about Goethe. 
He said, "About this time Goethe fell in love with a rich banker's daughter in 
New York." Then realizing that he was telling his own love-story he colored 
up and dismissed the class. 

Professor Othon G. Guerlac, although an American citizen, is now fighting 
in the trenches for his native France. Professor G. Mauxion is also a soldier 
in the present European War. 

Joshua Hurst, an Englishman, was the janitor of the Museum in the early 
days. About 1878 the students subscribed the money for himself and wife to 
visit his old home in England. 

Joseph Genung, an aged farmer, who went about with his old white horse, 
"Kitty Clyde," selling to the students for many years, pure sweet cider, which 
he himself had made, is now no more; he sleeps with his fathers in the little 
cemetery by the white church, on Snyder Hill. 

One member of the Class of '76, from New York City, hired Dodsworth's 
famous New York Band for the Commencement of his class and paid the ex- 
pense out of his own pocket. 

The Freshman Class of '88 started for Auburn, to hold their class banquet; 
the sophomores lined up across their path at the "Inlet," with stockings filled 
with lamp-black, which they used with telling effect. However, the class reached 
Auburn all right and had their banquet. Freshman President Williams, '87, 
was kidnapped, but his captors became alarmed, and, on the promise not to 
prosecute them criminally, he was allowed to return in time to preside at the 
class banquet. 

Benjamin Ide Wheeler said once, at a University alumni banquet, that 
things were somewhat "mixed" at Cornell, with blacksmith shops and horse- 
doctors, etc. He is now President of the University of California, where things 
are "mixed" very much as at Cornell. 



LXXII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

President White, just before his departure for Berlin as American Minister, 
gave two receptions, one to the senior class, '79, the other to the junior class, '80, 
at his residence. 

The Cascadilla Gorge had only a foot-bridge, down near the bottom, be- 
tween Cascadilla Building and the Campus proper, and many a time when 
some dignified profesor tried to preserve his equilibrium in walking down the 
banks on either side, his footing would give way and he would slide ungracefully 
down the incline to the bottom, while the students grinned. 

A student once told Rev. Dr. W. D. Wilson that if he would read backward 
his lecture on the History of Philosophy, he would have the Philosophy of History. 

Professor James E. Oliver will be remembered for his habit of forgetfulness. 
On one occasion he stated in his class-room that he had forgotten his watch; 
then he felt in his pocket for it to see if he had time before the roll-call to go and 
fetch it. 

Thomas Frederick Crane was a young lawyer in Judge F. M. Finch's law 
office, became private secretary to Ezra Cornell, and was chosen Assistant Pro- 
fessor of South European Languages. He is now one of the few surviving mem- 
bers of the original faculty. He built the third or fourth house on the Campus, 
in which he still lives. 

Professor Hiram Corson wrote "An Introduction to Browning" for $1.00 A 
fellow commenting on this said that he wouldn't take an introduction to hJTn 
for $5.00 

President White showed great patience in sitting for his statue. He had to 
go to New York City and sit in the open air and be photographed a great many 
times. Karl Bitter, the sculptor, was soon afterwards killed by being run over 
by an automobile. 

SOME OPINIONS, COMMENTS AND EXPLANATIONS 

"Alumni retain and somewhat liberally exercise the traditional privilege of 
all children to freely criticise the ways of the household. Sometimes their fault- 
finding is but the result of their jealous regard for the honor of their college 
and an indirect expression of the fervor of their zeal for its more abundant pros- 
perity." NOAH PORTER. 

The statements made, and the opinions expressed in this work, are not the 
official views of the University, but only those of the author; they may be mis- 
taken, but they are honest; care has been taken not to say anything personal 
which would offend the most sensitive about any person, now or ever, connected 
with the University. The author is very zealous for the honor and good name 
of the University and everybody at any time connected with it as officer, teacher, 
or student. 

With an acquaintance of forty years with Cornell, and as an observant citi- 
zen of Ithaca, we have formed some opinions about university affairs. There 
have been many mooted questions of policy, and there have been many critical 
times in the affairs of Cornell, now happily tided over, and we shall not even 
refer to them except incidentally. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXHI 

Our face is turned towards the bright future of Cornell. We would write 
the story of Cornell on its human and personal side, like a Fourth of July ora- 
tion all the way through, if we had a large enough vocabulary and the proper 
power of expression. Optimism about everything Cornellian is the key-note 
of our story. The world is growing; Cornell is growing. If she remains a private 
institution, and shakes off every attempt to make of her a State University; 
if the successors of the present Faculty and Board of Trustees keep up ideals, 
traditions and precepts of the founder and his co-workers; if Cornell remains 
progressive, and allows no religious denomination to control her, or money- 
power octopus to fasten its tentacles about her, she may be the greatest of the 
great universities of the future. 

We notice in one of President Schurman's Reports that he attacks athletics 
pretty hard. We hope that time has softened the asperity of his utterances on 
that subject. The great success of Cornell in that field ought to cause our great 
hearted president to put his foot on the soft pedal. Athletic victories bring many 
new students to Cornell. Athletics ought to be, of course, only an incident in 
a young person's education, as President Schurman stoutly maintains. 

The author was advised to say nothing about athletics in his book. Leave 
out Courtney and those glorious days at Saratoga and Poughkeepsie ? Never! 

To write a complete history of Cornell University and do justice to the sub- 
ject, with all its various interests, would require years of hard study, and a com- 
prehensive mind and felicity of expression, which the writer does not claim to 



The first part of this book was written under pressure, figuratively speaking, 
and we hope for that reason any defects may be overlooked. The author in- 
tended to write only about "Distinguished Cornellians," and then he thought 
it would not look well to tell all about the children without saying something 
about Alma Mater. In other words the historical part of this work was written 
hastily, and only after conferring with some literary and scholarly friends, in 
whom the author had confidence, and from whom he received encouragement 
to write also some historical notes and reminiscences. There will be found few 
statistics and few dates, as there are other places where those facts can be found. 

Some reader may say that this story is largely a biography of President 
White, because his name appears frequently. Very well, he is one of the great 
men of the age; the Great Idea of a Liberal University was original with Ezra 
Cornell and Andrew D. White. As Minerva sprang full-armed from the brain 
of Jove, so this plan sprang full-matured from their brain and hearts. Other 
colleges evoluted from the needs of religious denominations for an educated 
ministry, but the "Cornell Idea" was different. The noble example of Ezra Cor- 
nell undoubtedly influenced other wealthy persons to found colleges. Take, for 
example, Senator Leland Stanford; he came to Cornell to find a President for 
his new university and found him in the person of David Starr Jordan, '72. 

The success of Cornell University, situated as it is so far from the great 
centers of wealth, is due to the confidence of parents, and men and women of 
wealth in President White and President Schurman, and to the fact that the 
"Cornell Idea" is absolutely right. 



LXXIV DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

There was once a poor young man in San Francisco who wanted to attend 
Harvard. He had no money to pay for travel so he "hoboed" it on trains till 
he reached Cambridge, his destination. When the Harvard Alumni Association 
of his home city heard of it they said that, if they had known it in advance, 
they would have cheerfully paid his transportation, and they immediately took 
hold and helped him financially through his course. 

There are plenty of young men and women too, who feel that way about 
attending Cornell, and it is too bad that they cannot be reached and helped. 
There ought to be a Committee of the Alumni, or a University Commissioner, 
to look after such cases. Many students try the examinations in their home 
counties for the State Scholarships at Cornell and then, if unsuccessful, attend 
some other college. The Committee could look after such cases and bring them 
into the Cornell fold. Wealthy men and women could not use their money 
to a better purpose than to help such cases. 

We are not the Committee on the Semi-Centennial Celebration, nor even 
a member of the committee, but we venture this opinion, namely: That with 
nearly 35,000 alumni, if only ten or twenty per cent of that number attends 
the Grand Reunion, together with the 6,000 or more undergraduates, there'll 
be a whole lot of enthusiasm and noise, when that great number gets together, 
notwithstanding the desire for quiet and scholarly exercises, by the authorities . 

We would like to see some concrete example of the love and gratitude of 
Cornellians for their Alma Mater shown, either by the gift of a large sum of 
money for an endowment, or by the erection of some grand buildings. If it is 
to be a building, like a great Alumni Hall, for instance, we would like to see it 
built and used on that great occasion. 

The recognition of the fact that students need a good literary preparation, 
a year or two in college, before taking up the study of the learned professions, 
as law or medicine, or a technical profession, as engineering, is a move in the 
right direction. 

Cornell should have bought Cornell Heights and Cayuga Heights, for future 
expansion. Columbia has 12,000 students, and there are two or three other 
universities that have nearly as many. Cornell has only about 6,000 students. 
There is nothing to prevent Cornell from having 12,000 or 20,000 students, 
except money for buildings and apparatus, and professors' salaries. 

The "Cornell Idea" is right and has been approved and we may confidently 
look forward to a time, near at hand, when we will get more help from the State, 
and from the National Government for the Military Department, and from 
private individuals. 

The memorable scene at the opening of the University ought to be commem- 
orated by a pageant, with moving-picture adjunct, at the semi-centennial cele- 
bration. 

While the study of law in a Law School is valuable, yet the theoretical side, 
as the laws of New York wisely provide, should be supplemented by study in 
a practicing lawyer's office; for example, a person cannot learn to swim by read- 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXV 

ing how out of a book; he must plunge into the water and learn how by ex- 
perience. The increase in the requirements for admission from time to time 
has always been a move in the right direction. 

We always feel like cheering when Cornell's President announces another 
gift. May his persuasive voice continue to be heard by the rich and charitably 
inclined, for many years to come! 

Ithaca has the largest per cent of educated people of any city in the country. 

Bismarck said that university men thought on graduation that they were 
qualified to be Governor of a Province at least. 

It is said that a Professor in Smith College (for women) resigned recently 
because three-fourths of his class were Anarchists, Socialists, or Suffragists. 
This is "interesting," if true. 

It is said that the favorite author among college men is Jack London, the 
Socialist. 

It seems too bad that Cornellians who are worthy of honorary degrees, must 
look to some other institution to confer them. 



THE PAST QUARTER OF A CENTURY 

"We are doing something now!" 

These are the words of a trustee a few years ago. The occasion was the 
establishment by the State of buildings for the College of Agriculture. As Presi- 
dent White predicted this event started a mild "boom" at Cornell, in the line 
of buildings and additions to the University's landed domain, and endowment. 
Cornell University is now a great corporation. This has its advantages and dis- 
advantages. In the old days when it was smaller there was a closer contact 
between the head teachers and the students 

During nearly the entire period of the past twenty-five years President 
Schurman has been at the head of affairs, though it seems only a short time 
ago that he commenced his duties as President. During this period the Uni- 
versity added to its possesions, among others, these new buildings: Goldwin 
Smith, Rockefeller, and Stimson Halls, the new Sibley Dome Building , Robert's 
Hall, the Agronomy and Dairy Buildings, the Hydraulic Laboratory, the new 
Power House and tunnel to it from Beebe Lake, the Carnegie Filter Plant, 
the rebuilt Sage Chapel, Alumni Field, the opening and grading of West Avenue, 
the establishment of a central heating plant; besides the new Veterinary College 
buildings, and the many new Agricultural College buildings, and heating plant, 
the new Armory, Schoellkopf Memorial for athletic training; and last, but 
not least, the Medical College Buildings in New York City, and the Men's Dor- 
mitories. 

The story of Cornell seems to be just one thing after another, as the saying 
is, building after building, endowments upon endowments, a perfect shower of 
gifts, and progress all along the line. 



LXXVI DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

President Schurman says that the wave of Co-education has reached its 
height. 

Some Cornell graduates say that the postgraduates at Cornell do not belong 
to any regular class; that they belong to some class at some other college. How- 
ever, the writer attached their names at the bottom of the class in which they 
took their advanced degrees. 

Also some Cornell graduates object to the Special students being assigned 
to any class, that they are running "Wildcat," so to speak in railroad language, 
but we attach them at the foot of the class in the year in which they attended 
Cornell. The reason for this is obvious, that regular graduates are jealous of 
their prerogatives, on questions of precedence, etc., etc. 



SUMMING UP 

"Cornell University is the largest educational plant in America." 

ANSON P. STOKES. 

The teaching force at the opening numbered 23 resident professors, and 
assistant professors. In 1913-14 it numbered 750. 

The number of students at the beginning was 300. In 1881-2, it was down 
as low as 312, but in a few years the number increased till it reached its former 
record. In 1914-15 it was 6,496. 

Cornell now has entering classes of over 1,000. There have been more than 
27,000 students in attendance. 

The number of buildings at the opening was 2. There are now 80 buildings 
among them Goldwin Smith and Prudence Risley Halls, which are fine, modern 
college buildings. Then there are 48 fraternity lodges, which help to solve the 
dormitory question. The library contained a few thousand volumes. In 1914- 
15, it had 423,570. 

The original Campus has been enlarged and the University's landed domain 
increased by the purchase of many farms on its eastern bounds, and now com- 
prises 1,500 acres. 

The first money amounted to $500,000, and then we had the unsold Western 
lands besides. 

The productive funds in 1914-15 amounted to $13,973,542. The total in- 
come in 1914-15 was $2,425,781. To this must be added the $4,200,000 endow- 
ment of the Medical College and the money for the new men's dormitories, 

Cornell is no longer in the "experimental" stage. It now has great prestige 
and popularity and many new colleges, especially in the Great West have taken 
Cornell for their model. 

Its alumni are filling with honor some of the highest positions in the world. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXVII 

The following is taken from President Schurman's speech before the Cornell 
Alumni at Buffalo, February 19th, 1916: 

"The total income of the University as a whole, including moneys received 
for buildings and other purposes, was in 1914-15 over $3,000,000, and the ex- 
penditures about the same. The total income of the university for normal 
operating expenses is over $2,000,000. Two million dollars make a large an- 
nual expenditure. But for the maintenance of a staff of over 600 teachers and 
the education of a student body of nearly 6,000 it has become inadequate. And 
the University is seriously in need of additional endowment funds. These en- 
dowments are needed to provide first of all adequate salaries for professors and 
other members of the instructing staff, so that the very best scholars and sci- 
entists in the country may be secured and held at the University. The second 
object for which moneys are now needed is the new system of residential halls 
for the young men on which a beginning has already been made. 

"I am very much struck with the way in which Cornell University in the 
forty-eight years of its existence has met and indeed anticipated the intellectual 
wants of America. First, as I have said, it was the recognition of pure science 
to a place in the University curriculum side by side with the classics. Then 
it was the recognition of applied science and engineering. Later came the recog- 
nition of agriculture. And nowadays when everybody is talking about Pre- 
paredness, we can point out that Cornell University ever since its foundation 
has been preparing its students by the requirement of military drill to take their 
part in the defense of the republic, should she ever be in need of it. 

"The object of the military department is to train students so that they 
may qualify as officers of volunteers. As you know, a professor a regular 
officer of the U. S. Army is sent to us by the War Department, and the War 
Department annually inspects his work. This inspector in his last report stated 
that Cornell was fitting its undergraduates for posts as officers and added that 
'conditions at this institution could not be better, and should there be a great 
need for volunteer officers, it is thought that Cornell could be drawn on to furnish 
a reasonable number.' 

"Milton has declared that the object of a higher education is to qualify 
young men in times of peace and war to discharge generously and magnani- 
mously all the duties of life. In view of what I have stated, I think we may 
claim that Cornell University is substantially realizing that ideal." 

SEMI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION AND GRAND REUNION 

"Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 
And never brought to mind ? 
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 
And days of auld lang syne ? 

And here's a hand, my trusty frien', 
And gie's a hand o' thine; 
We'll tak' a cup o' Kindness yet, 
For auld lang syne." 

ROBERT BURNS. 



LXXVIII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

The trustees have, by resolution, designated October 6th, to 8th inclusive, 
1918, for a celebration of the Semi-Centennial Anniversary of the Opening of 
the University. The main events will be held on the second day, in view of the 
fact that it will be just fifty years from the time that the first class entered the 
University. 

A statue of Ezra Cornell will be unveiled during the course of the celebration, 
by Andrew Dickson White. 

It is planned to raise a fund of $3,000,000 as an additional endowment. 

But little time during the celebration will be devoted to the past, though 
the history of the institution will be summarized. The key-note of the affair 
will be future development, and ideas for the future will be the chief considera- 
tion. 

The gathering for the celebration will be one of the greatest meetings of 
educational authorities ever brought together. A special effort will be made 
to bring together on this occasion as many of the alumni as possible in a "Grand 
Reunion" of all the classes. 

A PROPHECY AND A TOAST 

We are not a prophet, neither are we the son of a prophet, but it seems 

only a few years ago that Cornellians realized that their gresteat need was a 
large auditorium for commencements and mass-meetings of students; another 
was men's dormitories and an additional woman's dormitory; then a suitable 
athletic field. Now we have them. If we read the stars aright, great-hearted 
men and women will appear in the near future and provide Cornell with more 
dormitories for men and for women; a large gymnasium that is so much needed, 
an athletic club-house for "Kite Hill," and last, but not least, a much larger 
endowment. The alumni will also build an Alumni Hall. There will be many 
more new buildings and other gifts, as more fully set forth in our next article, 
a fulfilment of the prophecy. 

If the aforesaid prediction comes as true as one the author made about 
twenty years ago, we shall consider ourselves considerable of a prophet. It 
was published in an Ithaca paper at that time and looked as impossible as the 
prediction we now make for Cornell. 

Our toast is, "To A Greater And More Glorious Cornell!" We mean by 
this: within 10 years, more great and beautiful buildings, 1,000 professors, 
10,000 students, and in the valley below a busy city of 30,000 people. 

LOOKING FORWARD, OR CORNELL IN 1931 

We had just alighted at the Cornell Aerodome on "Kite Hill" from a Thomas 
flyer. 

You see, as Ira A. Place, '81, had predicted, the steam locomotive had been 
abandoned for electric motor-power on the railroads, but even then travel was 
too slow. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXK 

An Aviation School had become a department of the University. 

As we glanced around we were greatly surprised at the many changes and 
improvements that had taken place on the Campus. The Administration Build- 
ing loomed up large at the right. Cornell's foundation and possessions had grown 
to something like $40,000,000 and the University had to have larger business 
quarters. 

Then there was the new Karl Bitter College of Art on Cayuga Heights. The 
new College of Music, with its building, was situated near Prudence Risley Hall. 
The new Fuertes Astronomical Observatory, with one of the largest telescopes 
in the world, had been built on a sightly elevation just north of Beebe Lake. 
Then there was the new Schiff College of Commerce. Henry W. Sage Hall was 
the home of the Sage School of Philosophy. Thurston Hall was the name of 
one of the new buildings of the Sibley College group. The new White Hall was 
the home of the White School of History and Political Science. There was 
the Bristol School of Education Building. Then there was Schurman Hall, 
for the Graduate School, for research. Lincoln Hall for the College of Civil 
Engineering had been greatly enlarged. The University Library had another 
wing added for stacks for books. Then there was Babcock Hall for the College 
of Architecture. There were also a new Hydraulic Laboratory and a Laboratory 
for testing materials. The Cornell Summer School and modern Chautauqua 
now occupied a group of new buildings at Glenwood, on the west shore of Cayuga 
Lake. 

The plans which President Schurman had caused to be made years before 
had all been carried out and the old Campus all covered with great buildings 
and the University grounds were extended north nearly to Rogues' Harbor 
for building sites, and eastward nearly to Dryden for farm experimental work 
and the support of the Department. 

Through the influence and great exertions of George C. Boldt, George F. 
Baker, and other friends, the groups of Men's Dormitories had long since been 
all built and were occupied. 

Several more women's dormitories were added to Sage College and Pru- 
dence Risley Hall. 

The new million-dollar Gymnasium was thought to be the latest thing in 
everything for the development of indoor athletics. 

The Alumni Hall was a very beautiful building where the old graduates 
could assemble for class meetings and banquets, and also have rooms. 

The College of Journalism had a fine building. 

The faculty numbered more than 1,000 and there were more than 10,000 
students in attendance. 

The Armory built away back in 1916 was not nearly large enough to accom- 
modate the Military College, established under the bill of U. S. Senator A. B. 
Cummings, passed in 1916, and the U. S. Government had built several new 
large buildings for the Military Department. The fortifications of the Cornell 



LXXX ' DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Coast Artillery loomed up on Cayuga Heights, its guns sweeping Cayuga Lake 
for twenty miles. They looked down upon and protected the Cornell Naval 
Training School at Crowbar Point on the west shore. 

The New York Ship Canal had been completed, and the swift, light draft 
cruisers and submarines of the Naval Fleets of the Red and the White, com- 
manded by Cornellians, lay in plain sight, with the Cornell aeroplanes hovering 
over them to protect them. 

On Cayuga Heights stood one of the largest wireless telegraph stations in 
the country. 

The boom of the heavy guns of battery "Courtney" on the strongly fortified 
island off Union Springs, to protect the mouth of the Ship Canal, could be plainly 
heard at a distance. 

A crowd of super-war-correspondents from the Matthews School of Jour- 
nalism at Cornell hung like a cloud around the scene, anxiously awaiting news 
of war developments. 

Departing from Cornell's usual rule to have only schools at Ithaca under 
her immediate direction, she had accepted the invitation of Trustee Charles 
M. Schwab and annexed the Bethlehem Steel Works, for turning out heavy 
ordnance, as an auxilliary to our fighting strength, and its machine shops were 
known as the Schwab School of Practical Mechanics, as an auxiliary to Cornell. 

The Ithaca Gun Works supplied the small arms to equip the invincible Cor- 
nell Army and Navy. 

The Morse Chain Works had become a war munitions factory. 

Several foreign nations had threatened war with our country, but, upon 
reading the Cornell programme of preparedness, concluded that they wanted 
peace, because if the whole nation was prepared as well in proportion as Cornell 
was, it would be a useless effort to try to conquer the United States. 

Ithaca and its beautiful scenery had been advertised as a fine summer resort 
and the Cornell Sanitarium and the Cornell Inn, both on Cayuga Heights, at- 
tracted many summer visitors from the great cities. 

The City of Ithaca, with a population of over 30,000 people, had expanded 
and now covered all the territory round about as far as the water's edge at the 
north, and up the valley at the south. Forest Home was a large and beautiful 
suburb, and Enfield Falls Park was a popular outing place for the citizens. 

The Ithaca Automobile Works, near the head of the lake, was considered 
among the largest in the world. 

The new City Hall and the new County Court House were in evidence. 

The Wharton Moving-picture Studio at Renwick Park, was said to be one 
of the largest in the world. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXXI 

BENEFACTORS 

John McGraw was born May 22, 1815, at Dryden, N. Y. He engaged in 
the lumber trade and removed to New Hudson in 1840, to New York City in 
1850, and to Ithaca in 1861. He was the owner of large tracts of timber lands 
in the State of Michigan where, at Winona, he, with a partner, H. W. Sage, 
built the largest saw-mill in the world. He became interested early in the Uni- 
versity, and erected for it the McGraw Building in 1869-70. Trustee, 1865-77. 
He died May 4, 1877, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

Hiram Sibley was born Feb. 6, 1807, at North Adams, Mass. He removed 
in 1843 to Rochester, N. Y. He took an active part in the construction of the 
early telegraph lines, and was President of the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany from 1856 to 1866. He built and equipped the Sibley College of Cornell 
University and endowed the Sibley Professorship of Practical Mechanics. 
Trustee, 1865-88. Since his death his son, Hiram W. Sibley, has become a bene- 
factor of the University and Trustee, 1887, and since 1889. Hiram Sibley died 
July 12, 1888, at Rochester, N. Y. 

Henry W. Sage was born January 31, 1814, at Middletown, Conn. His 
parents were poor and he had to win his own success in the world. He removed 
in 1827 to Ithaca, N. Y., where he later engaged in business with his uncles, 
Williams Brothers, who were merchants and large shipping agents. In 1854 
he purchased a large tract of timber land around Lake Simcoe in Canada, where 
he engaged in the manufacture of lumber on a large scale. He afterwards be- 
came a partner with John McGraw in the same business in the State of Michi- 
gan. He was elected a member of the New York Assembly in 1847. In 1857 
he removed to Brooklyn, where he became an influential member of Henry 
Ward Beecher's church. In 1870 he was elected a trustee of the University 
and in 1875 became President of the Board of Trustees which office he continued 
to hold until his death. He gave Sage Chapel, and Sage College, a dormitory 
for women, with its endowment, the University Library, with its endowment, 
and the endowment for the Sage School of Philosophy. He also gave the Archaeo- 
logical museum. He died Sept. 18, 1897, at Ithaca, N. Y. His eldest son, Dean 
Sage, endowed the preaching fund at Sage Chapel, and gave Stimson Hall for 
the Medical College at Ithaca. His sons, Dean Sage and William H. Sage, 
after their father's death, gave his former mansion as a University Infirmary, 
and a sum of money to remodel its interior to adapt it for its new purpose. Will- 
iam H. Sage also gave Percy Field for athletics, the stone arch-bridge over 
Cascadilla Gorge and the Zarncke collection of books. 

Alfred S. Barnes, the New York School-book Publisher, gave Barnes Hall, 
for the Y. M. C. A. His son, Gen. Alfred C. Barnes, gave the astronomical 
observatory. 

Among the benefactors of Cornell in more recent years are Andrew Carnegie, 
who made one of the most gracious and appropriate gifts in his life, when he 
reimbursed the needy students who had spent their money to save their lives 
in the great Fever Epidemic in 1903; he also gave a water filtration plant, 
and later an Annex to Morse Hall for additional chemical laboratories. 



LXXXII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

John D. Rockefeller gave $250,000 for a home for the College of Electrical 
Engineering. 

Oliver H. Payne, of New York City, gave the Medical College Building and 
site in New York City, at a cost of about $1,000,000, and also an endowment 
for the same, amounting to $4,200,000. 

The State of New York gave the Veterinary and Agricultural buildings, 
and the Armory. 

Mrs. Russell Sage gave $350,000 for Prudence Risley Hall, a dormitory for 
women. 

Emerson McMillan, banker, of New York City, gave the site for Risley Hall. 
Jacob H. Schiff gave $50,000 for German culture. 

George F. Baker, of New York City, gave about $350,000 for men's dormitor- 
ies; some are already builtand others now building, on the western side of the 
Campus, overlooking the City of Ithaca. 

Charles L. Sheldon, of Auburn, N. Y., gave a marble seat as a memorial to 
his two sons, both Cornellians, and left, by will, Sheldon Court, a private dor- 
mitory, to Cornell, the gift to become effective at the death of his widow. 

Henry R. Ickelheimer, '88, banker, of New York City, gave the bronze 
statue of President White, and a beautiful oil painting, "The Meeting Place of 
Souls." 

Gari Melchers, the artist, gave one of his own works, a large oil painting, 
' 'A Communion Day in Holland." 

Willard D. Straight, '01, banker, of New York City, gave $10,000 for out- 
door military training at Ithaca in summer for the Cornell Cadets. 

Daniel B. Fayerweather, of New York City, left by will, in 1894, $270,000 
to Cornell. 

Frederick W. Guiteau left by will, $175,000 for a student loan-fund, to aid 
poor students. 

Mrs. Florence Osgood (Rand) Lang, in 1911 gave $60,000 for Rand Hall, 
in memory of her father, uncle and brother, Jasper Raymond Rand, Addison 
Crittenden Rand, and Jasper Raymond Rand, jr., '97. 

OTHER COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

When Cornell gets a great Graduate School it will be performing in the 
highest degree its functions as a University. President Schurman has asked 
that some rich person, or some group of wealthy persons, give $20,000,000, just 
to start a Graduate School at Cornell. That seems a large sum of money. How- 
ever, there are now many millionaires, and we hope that President Schurman's 
earnest prayer will be granted. A great School of Research at Cornell would, 
to a great extent, keep American students from going abroad to finish their 
education in special subjects. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXXIII 

President White long ago formulated plans for a great National University 
at Washington, where the students can have access to the records and collections 
of the Government Departments. However, Cornell has given for many years 
an example of what such an institution should be like. The post-graduates of 
Cornell have become some of the greatest teachers in the land, and not a few 
of them are at the head of universities and other large educational institutions. 
There are now about 350 post-graduate students at Cornell. 

THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE 

Professor Charles Babcock was appointed Professor of Architecture in 1871 
and remained until 1897. He was the architect of Sage Chapel and the Memorial 
Chapel, Sage College, and Lincoln and Franklin Halls. He was Dean of the 
Faculty and Director of the College of Architecture, 1896-7. 

Charles Francis Osborne was Assistant Professor of Architecture, 1881-92, 
and Associate Professor, 1892-8. 

Alexander Buel Trowbridge, '90, was Professor of Architecture, 1897-02, 
and Dean of the Faculty of Architecture, 1897-. Director of College of Archi- 
tecture, 1902. 

John V. Van Pelt was Assistant Professor of Planning and Design, 1897-00, 
and Professor of Architecture, 1902-4. 

Clarence Augustine Martin (Special Student, 1886-8), was Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Architecture, 1895-04; Secretary, 1902-4; Professor in charge of Col- 
lege, 1904-8; Director of the College and Professor of Architecture since 1908. 

President White gave to this College his large and valuable collection of 
photographs of many of the architectural wonders of the world, the cathedrals 
and castles and public buildings of the various countries and cities of Europe. 
He also gave a valuable library, the White Architectural Library. 

Olaf M. Brauner, Assistant Professor, Drawing and Painting, since 1878. 

THE COLLEGE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

This has been, from the first, one of the greatest departments at Cornell. 
In the early years its home was the old wooden Chemical Building, until the 
building of Lincoln Hall, its home since then. 

William Charles Cleveland was Professor of Civil Engineering, 1868-73. 

Estevan Antonio Fuertes, was Professor of Civil Engineering, 1873-02; 
Sanitary Engineering, 1896-02; Director of the College and Dean of the Faculty, 
1896-1903; Professor of Astronomy, 1902-3. 

Charles Lee Crandall, '72, has been a Professor in this Department since 1875. 
Irving Porter Church, '73, has been a Professor since 1876. 

Eugene E. Haskell, '79, has been Director of the College of Civil Engineering 
since 1906, and Professor of Experimental Hydraulics. 



LXXXIV DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

There have also been a number of assistant professors. Charles B. Wing, 
Assistant Professor, 1890-1, Frank A. Barnes, Assistant Professor and Professor 
R. R. Engineering and Surveying, since 1905; Henry S. Jacoby, Assistant Pro- 
fessor, C. E., 1890-4, Associate and Professor Bridge Engineering and 
Graphics, since 1894. 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Samuel Gardner Williams was Professor of the Science and Art of Teaching, 
1886-90; Charles DeGarmo was Professor of the Science and Art of Education, 
1898-1915. 

There has been recently established a School of Education, with Professor 
George P. Bristol, Dean. 

THE COLLEGE OF FORESTRY 
The New York State College of Forestry was opened in 1898. 

Dr. Bernhard E. Fernow was Director and Professor of Forestry, 1898-03; 
Dr. Filibert F. Roth, Instructor, 1898-00, and Assistant Professor of Forestry, 
1900; John Gifford, Assistant Professor of Forestry, 1899-03. 

The College had some differences with the State over cutting some timber 
on State lands, and the Faculty was dismissed in 1903. 

There is a Department of Forestry which occupies the Forestry Building. 

SIBLEY COLLEGE OF MECHANIC ARTS 

John L. Morris was Professor of Practical Mechanics, 1868-74; Mechanical 
Engineering and Machine Construction, 1874-81, and Practical Mechanics and 
Machine Construction, 1881-03. It was found in after years, upon examination 
of the endowment papers, that his appointment was for life. 

John E. Sweet was Professor of Practical Mechanics, 1878-9. 

There were many assistant professors in the department who remained each 
but a few years. 

Robert Henry Thurston was Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Di- 
rector of Sibley College, 1885-1903. 

Albert William Smith, '78, was Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, 1887-91; Director of Sibley College since 1904; Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering, 1904; Steam Eng., 1904-7; Power Eng., since 1907. 

Rolla C. Carpenter (P.G.), '88, has been Associate Professor and Professor 
of Experimental Engineering, since 1895. 

John H. Barr (P.G.), '89, was Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
1891-5; Associate Professor of Machine Design, 1895-8, Professor, 1898-1903. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXXV 

Harris J. Ryan, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering, 1889-92, Assistant 
Professor, 1892-5; William N. Barnard, '97, Assistant Professor Machine De- 
sign, 1903-5, Assistant, 1905-7, Professor Steam Engineering, since 1907; George 
R. McDermott, Naval Architecture, in charge of Dept. of Naval Architecture and 
Marine Eng., since 1904. 

THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

This was founded and established in New York City through the princely 
gift of Col. Oliver H. Payne. 

Dr. William M. Polk has been President since it commenced, in 1898. 

The Ithaca branch finds a home in Stimson Hall, the gift of Dean Sage. 
Dr. Abram T. Kerr, '95, has been Secretary at Ithaca since 1902. 

In the beginning the first two years of the four years course were given both 
in New York City and at Ithaca, the women students being required to study 
at Ithaca for the first two years. Now only the first year is given at Ithaca as 
well as in New York City. 

A bachelor's degree from some literary or scientific college is required for 
admission to the Medical College. 

The Loomis Laboratory was a gift for the purposes of the Medical College 
in New York City. 

The Medical College uses Bellevue Hospital for the study of clinical medicine 
and surgery. 

Among the prominent Professors in the Medical College in New York City 
are: Silas P. Beebe, Therapeutics, since 1910; Charles L. Dana, Clinical Medi- 
cine; Frederick S. Dennis, Clinical Medicine, 1898- ; William B. Coley, Clinical 
Surgery, 1909- ; J. Clifton Edgar, Obstetrics and Clinical Midwifery, since 1899; 
George T. Elliot, Dermatology, since 1898; James Ewing, Pathology, since 1899; 
Austin Flint, Physiology, 1898-15; Robert A. Hatcher, Pharmacology, since 
1906; August Hoch, Psychiatry, since 1909; Edward L. Keyes, Clinical Surgery, 
since 1913; Alexander Lambert, Clinical Medicine, since 1898; Graham Lusk, 
Physiology, since 1909; Charles E. Nammack, Clinical Medicine, since 1898; 
William M. Polk, Clinical Surgery, since 1898; Newton M. Shaffer, Orthopaedic 
Surgery, since 1898; Lewis A. Stimson, Surgery, since 1898; Charles R. Stock- 
ard, Anatomy, since 1909; William G. Thompson, Medicine, since 1898; George 
Woolsey, Clincial Surgery, since 1898; Rudolph A. Witthans, Chemistry and 
Physics, since 1898. 

THE DEPARTMENTS 
AGRICULTURE 

Professor James G. Needham, Biology, Limnology and Nature Study, since 
1907; Henry H. Wing, Animal Husbandry and Allied Subjects, since 1891; 
Charles S. Wilson, Pomology, since 1907. 



LXXXVI DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

BOTANY, HORTICULTURE AND ARBORICULTURE 

The Professors in this Department have been: Albert Nelson Prentiss, 1868- 
95; William Russel Dudley, '72, (Asst.) Botany, 1876-83, Crytogramic Botany, 
1883-92; William Rane Lazenby, (Asst.) Horticulture, 1879-81; Liberty Hyde 
Bailey, General and Experimental Horticulture, 1888-03; George F. Atkinson, 
Asst. Professor, Botany, 1892-3, Asso. Professor, 1893-6, Professor of Botany 
with special reference to Morphology and Mycology since 1896; Willard W. 
Rowlee, Botany, since 1893. 

CHEMISTRY 

The Professors in this Department have been: George Chapman Caldwell, 
Agricultural Chemistry, 1867-75; Agriculture and Analytical Chemistry, 1875- 
93; General and Agricultural Chemistry, 1893-1902; James Mason Crafts, 
General Chemistry, 1867-70; Charles Ashmead Schaeffer, Analytical Chem- 
istry and Mineralogy, 1869-73; General and Analytical Chemistry and 
Minerology, 1874-87; Charles Hallett Wing, General Chemistry and Chem- 
istry Applied to Manufacturers, 1870-3; Abram A. Breneman, (Asst.) 1875-9, 
Professor Industrial Chemistry, 1879-82; Spencer Baird Newbury, (Asst.) Gen. 
Chem., Mineral and Assaying, 1882-6; (Acting) Organic and Applied Chem., 
1886-7; (Acting) Gen., Organic and Applied Chemistry, 1887-92; Wilder 
Dwight Bancroft, (Asst.) 1895-93, Professor, Physical Chem., since 1903; 
Louis M. Dennis, (Asst.) Analytical Chem., 1891-4; Asso. Professor Inorganic 
and Anal. Chem., 1894-7; Professor, Inorganic Chem. and Head of Dept. 
of Chem., since 1903. Joseph E. Trevor, (Asst.) Professor Chem., 1892-4, 
(Asst.) Professor Gen. and Physical Chem., 1894-00, Gen. and Phys. Chem., 
1897-1903; Phys. Chem., since 1903. William R. Orndorff, General and Org. 
Chem., 1890-3, Org. Chem., 1893-03, Org. and Physiological Chem., since 1903. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

This Department has had some notable professors at its head, or among its 
teaching force, including Hiram Corson, Charles C. Shackford, James Morgan 
Hart and Homer B. Sprague, in the early days. Later came Professor Brainard 
G. Smith. 

At the present time Professors William Strunk, jr., (G.P.) '96, and Lane 
Cooper are prominent Professors in that Department. 

Professor Duncan Campbell Lee, who was Assistant Professor of Elocution 
and Oratory, 1903-4, and afterwards a newspaper editor in Ithaca, and a prom- 
inent Democratic politician, is now a Barrister-at-Law in London, England. 
His law-partner is Counsellor of the American Embassy in London. 

Homer B. Sprague was Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, 1868-70. 

Hiram Corson was Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, 1870-1 ; Anglo-Saxon 
and English Literature, 1872-86; English Literature and Rhetoric, 1886-90; 
English Literature, 1890-03; Emeritus Professor of English Literature and 
Lecturer, 1903-6; Emeritus Professor of Eng. Lit., 1906-11; (Summer Ses- 
sion, 1900, 1901, 1903, 1905, 1906). 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXXVII 

Charles Chauncey Shackford was Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, 1871-86; 
Emeritus Professor of English, 1886-91. 

William Edward Lucas, '77, was Asst. Professor of Rhetoric and Composition, 
1881-3. Brainard Gardner Smith was Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Ora- 
tory, 1887-90; Elocution and Oratory, 1890-93. Martin W. Simpson, Professor 
of English, since 1908. 

GEOLOGY 

In the early days Professor Louis Agassiz led his classes on expeditions to 
nearby gorges, fields and the shores of Cayuga Lake to search for geological 
specimens and to observe the rock formations, and they were well rewarded for 
their work. There still grows in the cold depths of Fall Creek Gorge a little 
Arctic flower which was transplanted to this place on some glacier in the early 
days of the world. South of Ithaca about nine miles, near West Danby station, 
on the Lehigh Valley R. R. can be seen many little earth mounds or "humps" 
left by glaciers. The region about Cornell is rich in specimens for the geologist. 

Professor Charles Frederick Hartt was the first resident professor in this 
Department, and served from 1868 until his death in 1878. Theodore B. Corn- 
stock, '70, was an Assistant Professor, 1875-9. Professor Samuel Gardner Will- 
iams served from 1879 to 1886. Professor Henry Shaler Williams served from 
1879 to 1880, as Assistant Professor, of Geology, and from 1880 to 1884 as As- 
sistant Professor of Paleontogy, was Professor, 1884-6 of Paleontology, and 
Professor of Geology and Paleontology, 1886-92. He then went to Yale as the 
successor of Professor James Dwight Dana, but returned to Cornell in 1904, as 
Professor of Geology and Director of the Geological Museum, which chair he 
now holds. 

James Freeman Kemp was Assistant Professor of Geology and Minerology, 
1888-91. Gilbert Dennison Harris, '86, was Assistant Professor of Paleontology, 
1894-7, and has been Assistant Professor of Paleontology and Stratigraphical 
Geology, 1894-1909, and has since been Professor in the same subjects. Pro- 
fessor John Francis Williams succeeded Professor Kemp but died soon afterwards 
and was succeeded by Professor Ralph S. Tarr in 1892, who served until his death, 
March 21, 1912. Professor Adam C. Gill has been Assistant Professor of Miner- 
ology and Petrography since 1894. Many graduates of this Department 
occupy high positions as teachers. Henirich Reis, Assistant and Professor 
Econ. Geol., since 1902. 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

The Professors in this Department have been: Willard Fiske, 1868-83; 
George F. Behringer, '69, (Asst.) 1869-70; James Morgan Hart, (Asst.) 1869-73; 
Waterman Thomas Hewett, (P.G.), '79, (Asst.), 1870-83, Professor, 1883-1911; 
Bela P. MacKoon, (Asst.) 1870-77, Professor of German, 1877-83; Hjalmar 
Hjorth Boyesen, (Asst.), 1873-6, Professor of German Literature, 1876-80; 
Horatio Stevens White, (Asst.) German, 1879-83, Professor, 1883-02; Albert 
B. Faust, (Acting Asst.), German, 1904-5, (Asst.) Professor, German, since 1905. 



LXXXVIII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

HISTORICAL STUDIES 

President White, (1866-85), and his work in history, have been a great in- 
spiration for historical students. He saw to it that Cornell had the first Pro- 
fessorship of American History in any American university. Harvard and Yale 
and several other colleges immediately followed the example set for them. 

Professor Goldwin Smith, (1868-72), was Professor of English Constitutional 
History and attracted many others besides students to his class-room. 

Professor William Channing Russell, (1867-81), was a good teacher of Roman 
History. Then came Professor Moses Coit Tyler, (1881-1900), in American 
History, and President Charles Kendall Adams, (1885-9), followed by Professor 
Charles H. Hull, '86, in the same subject, since 1900. 

Professor George Lincoln Burr, '81, has taught Mediaeval History since 1902. 

President White founded the School of History and Political Science and 
gave to it his valuable library. 

Herbert Tuttle was Professor of Modern European History, 1890-4. Henry 
Morse-Stephens succeeded him in 1894 and served until 1902. Professor Ralph 
C. H. Catterall succeeded him and served until his death, August 3, 1914. 

Henry Augustus Sill, Assistant Professor of History, 1902-5; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Ancient History, since 1905. 

William Rufus Perkins, Assistant Professor of History, 1882-5. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

President White founded the School of History and Political Science and 
gave to it his valuable library. 

Herbert Tuttle was Associate Professor of the History and Theory of Politics, 
and International Law, 1883-7, and of the History of Political and Municipal 
Institutions and International Law, 1887-90, and of Modern European History, 
1890-4. 

Henry Carter Adams was Associate Professor of Political Economy, 1883-7. 

Elisha Benjamin Andrews was Professor of Political Economy and Finance 
1888-9. 

Frank A. Fetter, (P.G.) '92, was Professor of Political Economy and Finance 
1901-13. 

Jeremiah W. Jenks was Professor of Political, Municipal and Social Insti- 
tions, 1891-2, of Political Economy and Civil and Social Institutions, 1892-01, 
and of Political Economy and Politics, 1901-13. 

Edwin W. Kemmerer, (P.G.), '03, was Assistant Professor of Political 
Economy, 1906-13. 

Professor Samuel P. Orth, Professor of Political Science, since 1912. 

Walter F. Willcox, Professor of Political Economy and Statistics and allied 
subjects, since 1892. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS LXXXIX 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

The old lecture-room was at the west end of the McGraw Building until 
the erection of Franklin Hall, which has since been its home. Under Professor 
William Arnold Anthony there was a great growth of interest in this study at 
Cornell. 

The first Professor of Physics and Industrial Mechanics was Eli Whitney 
Blake, 1867-70. John Jackson Brown was Professor, 1870-1. Francis E. Loomis 
served, 1871-2. William A. Anthony came next, 1872-87. 

Professor George S. Moler, '75, has been connected with the Department 
since 1875, a period of over 40 years. 

Edward L. Nichols, 75, has been Professor since 1887. 

Professor Frederick Bedell, (P.G.) '91, has been connected with the Depart- 
ment since 1892. Ernest George Merritt, Assistant Professor, Physics, since 
1903. 

MATHEMATICS 

The Professors of Mathematics have been: Evan Wilhelm Evans, 1867-74; 
Ziba Hazard Potter, 1868-82; William Edwards Arnold (Asst.), 1869-76; Henry 
Turner Eddy, '70, (Asst.) 1869-73; William John Hamilton (Lieut., U. S. A.), 
1869-70; Lucian Augusta Wait, (Asst.), 1870-7, 1877-13; James Edward Oliver 
(Asst.), 1871-3, 1873-94; William E. Byerly, (Asst.), 1873-6; George William 
Jones (Asst.), 1877-93, 1893-95, 1895-07; John Henry Tanner, '91 (Asst.), 
1894-04, Professor since 1904; James McMahon (Asst.), 1890-04, Professor 
since 1904; Virgil Snyder, (P.G.), 1890-92, (Asst.), since 1903. 

Professors Oliver, Wait and Jones were the authors of several mathematical 
college text-books. 

MORAL AND INTELLECTUAL PHILOSOPHY 

The Professors in this Department have been: William Dexter Wilson, 
1868-86; Jacob Gould Schurman, on the Susan E. Linn Sage Foundation, 
1886-96; Frank Thilly, since 1906; Edward Bradford Tichener, Asst. Professor 
of Pschology, 1892-5, Sage Professor of Psychology since 1895; Ernest Albee, 
Asst. Professor, Philosophy, 1902-7, Professor, since 1907; James E. Creighton, 
Asso. Professor, 1892-5, Professor Logic and Metaphysics, since 1895; William 
A. Hammond, Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy, 1892-03, to which was added 
Aesthetics, since 1903. 

PHYSIOLOGY, ANATOMY AND ZOOLOGY 

Every Freshman had to take Physiology, the first term, under Dr. Burt 
Green Wilder, in the early days. His lectures were very interesting. The Pro- 
fessors in this Department have been: Burt Green Wilder, Comparative An- 
atomy and Zoology, 1867-78; Physiology, Anatomy and Zoology, 1878-93; 
Physiology, Vertebrate Zoology and Neurology, 1893-05; Neurology and Verte- 
brate Zoology, 1905-11. John Henry Comstock, '74, (Asst.) Entomology, 1876- 



xc DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

82; Professor Entomology and General Invertebrate Zoology, 1882-1915. Will- 
iam Stebbins Barnard, '71, (Asst.) Entomology, 1879-81. Simon Henry Gage, 
'77, (Asst.) Physiology, and Lecturer on Microscopical Technology, 1881-9; 
Asso. Professor, same, and Lecturer same, 1889-93; Asst. Professor, Anotomy, 
Histology and Embryology, 1895-6; Professor Microscopy and Embryology, 
1896-1911. Grant Sherman Hopkins, '89, (Asst.) Vet. Anatomy and Anat. 
Methods, 1896-03; Professor of Comp. Anat. and Anatom. Methods, since 1903. 
Benjamin F. Kingsbury, Microscopical Methods of Histology and Embryology, 
1899-02; Physiology, since 1902. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

The Professors in this Department have been: William Channing Russell, 
1867-81; Thomas Frederick Crane (Asst.), 1868-73; James Morgan Hart (Asst.), 
1868-9; William M. Howland (Asst.), 1869-73; Frederick L. O. Roehrig, 1869- 
84; Alfred Stebbins, 1870-82; Thomas Frederick Crane, Italian and Spanish, 
1873-81, Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, 1881-1909; William 
W. Comfort, Head of Department, since 1909; Othon G. Guerlac, French, since 
1904; Everett W. Olmsted, Romance Languages, 1896-13. 



THE GREAT BUILDINGS 

There are some eighty buildings but only the more prominent and the newer 
ones will be mentioned. 

MORRILL HALL 

Erected 1866. This was the first building to be erected, and was completed 
and occupied at the opening of the University. It was then called the South 
Building, but it was afterwards christened Morrill Hall in honor of U. S. Senator 
Justin S. Morrill of Vermont, the author of the U. S. Land Grant Bill. In the 
early days this building was a very busy place. 

WHITE HALL 

Erected 1868-9. This was originally the North Building, and the name was 
changed in honor of President White. 

CASCADILLA BUILDING 

Erected about 1865. Sometimes called Cascadilla Place. This was originally 
started, but not completed, for a water-cure, with "Willow Pond" to the east, 
where College Avenue crosses over to the Campus. It was finished and occupied 
at the opening of the University. It was occupied by the University for dormi- 
tory purposes and was crowded. It was remodeled in 1913. 

McGRAW BUILDING 

Erected 1868-9. This was the gift of John McGraw, and at first housed the 
library on the first floor, with museum above. In its tower were placed, at first, 
the chimes and the clock. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xci 

SIBLEY COLLEGE 

Erected 1870-1. The gift of Hiram Sibley. It houses in part the College of 
Mechanic Arts. It formerly contained the University Press, which was after- 
wards abandoned. 

SAGE COLLEGE 

Erected 1872-3. The first dormitory for women. The gift of Henry W. 
Sage. It was a very appropriate and most acceptable gift. It was opened in 
the fall of 1874. An Annex was built several years later. The Flower Conserva- 
tory is connected with Sage College Building. 

SAGE COTTAGE 

This is a dormitory for women. It was formerly the home of Professor A. 
N. Prentiss. 

SAGE CHAPEL AND MEMORIAL CHAPEL 

Sage Chapel was erected in 1874. The Mausoleum was erected in 1883. This 
was the gift of Henry W. Sage. His son William H. Sage, gave the organ. His 
son Dean Sage, gave the endowment to secure the preaching by ministers of all 
denominations. The original building was partly demolished to make enlarge- 
ment. The same money expended on a new building would have built a greater 
and grander structure, but on account of old associations the old form was re- 
tained. The new embellishments were the work of Tiffany and are very beauti- 
ful and costly. Lyman Abbot at the new dedication, declared it to be the second 
finest chapel in America. The Sage memorial apse at the eastern end, with its 
allegorical figures in Mosaic, are especially fine. Then there is a carved pulpit 
of one solid piece of Caen stone. There are many beautif ul stained-glass memorial 
windows. There are here found many memorial tablets to Cornellians and bene- 
factors, trustees, professors and friends of the institution. The mausoleum, 
opening from the main chapel, contains reclining statues of Ezra Cornell, the 
first Mrs. A. D. White, and Jennie McGraw Fiske, and more memorial windows 
and tablets. 

THE PRESIDENT'S HOUSE 

Erected 1873. This home is to be occupied by the presidents, when President 
White gets through with it. 

THE OLD ARMORY 

Erected 1882-3. This building has been used also for gymnasium purposes. 
An Annex was built later for physical purposes, with swimming-tank and lockers. 

BARNES HALL 

Erected 1887-8. This is the home of the Y. M. C. A. It is the gift of Alfred 
S. Barnes "For the welfare of God among men." 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

Erected 1891. The gift of Henry W. Sage. The cost was about $250,000. 
He also gave to it an endowment of $300,000. 



xcii DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

FRANKLIN HALL 

Erected 1881. This is the hall of physics. 

MORSE HALL 

Erected 1890. This building is for chemical lecture rooms and laboratories. 
The Annex was given by Andrew Carnegie. These buildings burned on the morn- 
ing of February 13th, 1916, since this article was written. 

LINCOLN HALL 

Erected 1889. The home originally of the College of Civil Engineering and 
Architecture. Now the home of Civil Engineering. Named for President Abra- 
ham Lincoln, who signed the U. S. Land Grant Bill. The plans have been made 
to enlarge this building, to enclose an inner court with four surrounding walls 
of building, running east as far as the railroad. 

BOARDMAN HALL 

Erected 1891-2. The home of the College of Law. Named for the first Dean, 
Douglas Boardman. 

STIMSON HALL 

Erected about 1900. The home of the Ithaca branch of the Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College. The gift of Dean Sage in honor of Dr. Lewis A. Stim- 
son, the noted New York surgeon. 

THE BAKER TOWER 

Erected 1914-15. This is one building of the new group of men's dormitories 
situated on the western bound of the Campus, between West Avenue on the east, 
University Avenue on the north, Stewart Avenue on the west, and the grounds 
of the home of F. C. Cornell on the south. They overlook the City of Ithaca 
and Cayuga Lake. This building is the gift of George F. Baker of New York 
City. The new buildings are of native stone, quarried on the spot, and in the 
English university Gothic style of architecture. 

BAKER HALLS 

Erected 1915-16. These two buildings are also the gift of the donor of Baker 
Tower. 

FOUNDER'S HALL 

Erected 1915. This was built by the alumni, through the Cornellian Council, 
and cost nearly $100,000. 

NEW MEN'S DORMITORIES 

Contracts will be let this year for two more units or buildings in the system 
of men's dormitories. A friend has given $20,000 towards a new dining hall for 
the men's dormitories. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xcm 

THE INFIRMIARIES 

The former home of Henry W. Sage, erected about 1878, became the first 
infirmary, by the gift of the same by his sons, supplemented with money to alter 
it and adapt it to its new purpose. Then an entirely new and separate fire- 
proof building was put up about 1911, just north and west of the old building 
and connected with it by an enclosed passageway. The older building is now 
a nurses' home. 

RAND HALL 

Erected about 1910. The home of machine construction and the machine 
shops and wood-working shops. The gift of Mrs. Florence Osgood (Rand) Lang, 
as a memorial to relatives. It cost $60,000 and was opened in 1912. 

THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Erected about 1900. This building is located in New York City. It is the 
gift of Col. Oliver H. Payne. It cost about $1,000,000 and has an endowment 
of $4,200,000. 

GOLDWIN SMITH HALL 

Erected about 1907. Here are taught the Humanities, classical and modern 
languages. It is named in honor of an early friend of the University. It cost 
$354,000, besides the equipment. It is one of the finest modern college buildings 
in the world. 

ROCKEFELLER HALL 

Erected 1907. The building of Physics and Electrical Engineering, was 
named Rockefeller Hall in honor of the donor. 

PRUDENCE RISLEY HALL. 

Erected 1913-14. The second dormitory for women. The gift of Mrs. Rus- 
sell Sage, in memory of her mother. This building cost about $300,000 and is 
one of the finest modern college buildings in the world. It was opened in 1914, 

SCHOELLKOPF MEMORIAL BUILDING 

This is for athletic training and is situated on Alumni Field. 

NEW YORK STATE VETERINARY COLLEGE 

Erected about 1900. This was the first of the State buildings to be erected 
at Cornell. 

JAMES LAW HALL 

Erected about 1912. This is the Veterinary Clinic. 

THE NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Erected about 1908. This building has the largest floor space of any building 
on the Campus, until the building of the new Armory. The central hall is named 
Roberts Hall. 



xciv DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

THE DAIRY BUILDING 

Erected 1908. This building is east of Roberts Hall and connected with the 
main Agricultural building. 

THE NEW ARMORY 

Erected 1915-16. This building occupies probably the largest ground space 
of any building. It is now roofed and enclosed. It is the largest State armory 
in the State of New York. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Erected 1911. This is the home of women students for studies hi cooking, 
dress-making, etc. It offers a valuable education to poor girls free of tuition. 
Here in the basement of the building is the modern cafeteria. 

CALDWELL HALL 

Erected about 1908. This is east of the Home Economics Building. It is 
occupied by departments of soil technology and rural education. 

AGRONOMY BUILDING 
Erected about 1908. This building is west of Roberts Hall. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY BUILDING 
Erected 1911. This is east of the main building of Agriculture. 

FORESTRY BUILDING 
Erected 1913. This is also east of the main building of Agriculture. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY BUILDING 
Erected 1911. This is near the eastern bound of the Campus proper. 

STOCK JUDGING PAVILION 
Erected 1911. This is east of the last named building. 

THE MODEL BARNS 

Erected about 1909. Are, as their name indicates, model barns. 
BAILEY HALL 

Erected 1912. The new Auditorium built by the State and which will seat 
2,800 people was named Bailey Hall in honor of Dean Liberty Hyde Bailey. 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS 

It will be well to bear in mind that Cornell is still a comparatively young 
university, and the early classes were small in numbers, while the older colleges, 
many of them, then had two or three tunes as many students as Cornell. 

Furthermore, they had long lists of alumni, running back from one hundred 
to two hundred years or more. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xcv 

In considering the alumni of any college we, of course, include all, which 
gives the older colleges a great advantage in that respect over Cornell. Many 
of our most promising graduates are still under the "Chloroform Age" (40) of 
Dr. Osier, and have yet many years to develop and attain still higher success. 
The names given below are but a small part of the total number. The next 
twenty years will find them holding many more of the highest positions in the 
world. 

A more detailed list and account of eminent Cornellians will be found in 
"Alumni By Classes" and "Alumni By Positions and Occupations," later on in 
this book. 

There is little said about athletics, because after leaving college few students 
continue their training and athletic work, and an athletic reputation is fleeting. 
To-day one man is victor and his name in print; to-morrow he is forgotten in 
the victory of some other man. 



IN POLITICS AND PUBLIC OFFICE 

The first Cornellian to come into prominence became a National figure, 
Joseph B. Foraker, of Cornell's first graduating class, that of '69. He has been 
for many years the greatest Republican political leader in Ohio, and he twice 
presented the name of Willian McKinley to National Conventions for the Presi- 
dency. He served as Governor and U. S. Senator. He has recently announced 
that he is out of politics. He has recently published a book, "Life Notes," 
which tells about his political victories and defeats. 

The most prominent Cornellian of recent years in politics belongs to the 
other of the two great leading parties, the Democratic party. He is Edward 
M. House, '82, the most intimate personal and political friend of President 
Woodrow Wilson. He was one of the greatest leaders in bringing about the 
nomination and election of President Wilson, and it is said that he picked out 
three members of the President's original cabinet, namely: Bryan, Burleson 
and Daniels. He was sent to the warring nations of Europe in the fall of 1915 
by President Wilson as a special diplomatic agent and he has just returned from 
a similar mission, supposedly in the interest of bringing about peace. He could 
undoubtedly have been in the cabinet had he desired, or have received an Am- 
bassadorship. He is called President Wilson's human barometer. He is the 
man who "sizes up" men and senses public opinion for the President. 

Mario Garcia Menocal, '88, is President of the Repubh'c of Cuba. 

Andrew B. Humphrey, '75, was Secretary of the National League of Repub- 
lican Clubs, away back in President McKinley's time, and was offered a high 
political office by that President. 

George T. Baker, '79, is one of the leading public men of the State of Iowa, 
and has been offered the nomination for several high political offices by the 
Democratic party. 



xcvi DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Among the younger men is Manton M. Wyvell, '01. At the time when 
William J. Bryan, the Democratic candidate for President, spoke at a mass 
meeting at DeWitt Park, in Ithaca, in 1900, several hostile students were hetch- 
eling Bryan with questions, and other students were making a noisy demon- 
stration against the speaker. The speaker noticed a young man leading the 
cheering for the Democrats, inquired his name, asked to meet him, and then 
invited him to accompany him on his speaking tour, which invitation was 
accepted. This friendship thus formed led to Mr. WyvelTs appointment as 
Private Secretary to William J. Bryan, when U. S. Secretary of State. After 
serving for about two years he was appointed Counsel to the International 
Boundary Commission. 

Another young and active politician is William L. Ransom, '05, who is now 
a City Judge in New York City, at a large salary. He is a National Progressive. 

Horace White, '87, a nephew of President White, became prominent in 
Republican politics in Syracuse, served as State Senator several terms, became 
Lieutenant Governor and when Governor Charles E. Hughes, formerly Professor 
of Law at Cornell, resigned to become a Justice of the U. S. Supreme Court, 
Mr. White succeeded him as Governor of New York. 

John A. Dix, '83, received a number of votes for Governor in the New York 
Democratic State Convention in 1906; two years later he ran for Lieutenant 
Governor; two years after that he became Chairman of the Democratic State 
Committee, and was nominated and elected Governor. 

John T. Morrison, '90, was Governor of Idaho. 

James B. Grant, '77, was Governor of Colorado. 

Herbert J. Hagerman, '94, was Governor of New Mexico. 

Cornellians have for many years last past taken a conspicuous part in the 
politics of the State of New York in all the great political parties, and many 
of them have held high State offices. There were four Attorney-Generals in 
succession: William S. Jackson, '91, Edward R. O'Malley, '91, Thomas Car- 
mody, '82, and James A. Parsons, '90. 

There were three State Superintendents of Public Works in succession: 
Frederick C. Stevens, '79, Charles E. Treman, '89, and Duncan W. Peck, '74. 

There were four Special Counsel to the Governor nearly in succession: Cuth- 
bert W. Pound, '87, Ernest W. Huffcut, '84, Owen L. Potter, '91, and Roger 
P. Clark, '91. 

There were three Private Secretaries to the Governor, Timothy L. Williams, 
'84, William J. Youngs, '72, and Chester C. Platt, '90. 

There have been two State Commissioners of Agriculture: Raymond A. 
Pearson '94, and Charles S. Wilson, '04. 

There have been two State Excise Commissioners: Patrick W. Culliuan, '73, 
and William W. Farley, '94. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xcvn 

There have been two State Civil Service Commissioners: DeForest Van 
Vleet, 77, and Cuthbert W. Pound, '88. 

There have been two Presidents of the State Board of Health in succession: 
Eugene H. Porter, '80, and Herman M. Biggs, '82. 

There are two members of the State Public Service Commission: DeVoe P. 
Hodson, 77, and Frank Irvine, '80. 

Francis M. Hugo, '97, is Secretary of State. 

There has been hardly a State political ticket nominated in recent years 
by any party without one or more Cornellians on it; one year there were five 
candidates. 

Clarence J. Shearn, '90, ran for Governor on the Independence League ticket, 
in 1908. 

William A. Deford, '90, ran for Attorney-General on the same ticket, the 
same year. 

John Ford, '90, was nominated for Attorney-General on the same ticket, 
in 1906. 

BENCH AND BAR 

There are now two Cornellians on the New York Court of Appeals, by elec- 
tion, namely: Frank H. Hiscock, 75, and William H. Cuddeback, 74, and 
another Cuthbert W. Pound, '88, by designation of the Governor, from the 
Supreme Court. 

There are now fourteen Cornellians on the New York Supreme Court bench, 
one in each of the nine judicial districts, except one, the ninth; in two districts 
there are three, and in two districts two. 

James O'Neil, 72, is a member of the Supreme Court of Wisconsin. 

Walter C. Noyes, '89, is a U. S. Circuit Judge. 

Sherman Moreland, '91, is a Judge of the Supreme Court in the Philippines. 

In the early days James Frazer Gluck, 74, was one of the most brilliant 
and promising members of the Buffalo bar, but he died comparatively young. 
At the time of his death he had 62 cases to argue in the Court of Appeals. 

Clarence J. Shearn, '90, was for several years the personal attorney for Will- 
iam Randolph Hearst, and is now on the Supreme Court bench in New York 
City. 

Henry W. Sackett, 75, is counsel for the New York Tribune. 

Several Cornell lawyers have become General Counsel to leading railroad 
companies. 



xcvm DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

IN DIPLOMACY 

Sao-Ke Alfred Sze, '01, was appointed Chinese Ambassador to the United 
States, but, owing to troubled times in his own country, did not come. He is 
now Minister of Posts and Roads in that country. 

Charles S. Francis, 77, was U. S. Ambassador to the Austro-Hungarian 
Empire. 

Willard D. Straight, '01, was U. S. Consul General at Mukden. He has now 
retired from banking to devote his time to the study of international law. 

Edward M. House, '82, Special Diplomatic Agent of the United States to 
the warring nations of Europe, 1915-16. 



IN FINANCE 

Joseph C. Hendrix, '74, was one of the leading financiers of the country, 
and became President of the American Bankers' Association. 

Dr. William Seward Webb, '74, married a member of the Vanderbilt family 
and became financially interested in many of their railroads and president of 
several large corporations. 

Robert H. Treman, '78, was President of the State Bankers' Association, 
and soon after the passage of the act creating the Federal Reserve Bank, he 
became one of its directors. 

Timothy S. Williams, '84, was Secretary to Governor R. P. Flower, who 
started him in his railroad career. He is now President of the Brooklyn Rapid 
Transit R. R. and allied lines. He was successful in getting some of the Subway 
lines for his company. 

Willard D. Straight, '01, represented a group of American bankers in the 
great international loan to China, and was afterwards a junior partner of J. P. 
Morgan & Co., of New York City. 



IN LITERATURE 

Dr. Robert T. Morris, '80, has recently written two very valuable books, 
the material for which he gathered from years of observation. In the first book 
he says that all geniuses, the great military leaders, statesmen, authors and 
others, were sick in mind, and he goes on to argue his case in a very interesting 
manner. 

Ruth Putnam, '78, has written several interesting historical books about 
the Dutch people of Holland and New York. 

Garrett P. Serviss, '72, has written many valuable books in an entertaining 
and popular way about astronomy and other scientific subjects. 

Francis W. Halsey, '73, has written several historical books on early New 
York Colonial history. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS xcix 

Hobart Chatfield Chatfield-Taylor, '86, has written many novels. 
Thomas S. Jones, '04, has published two volumes of verse. 
George L. Burr, '81, has written on "The Witchcraft Delusion." 
Waterman T. Hewett, (P.O.), '79, has written a History of Cornell University . 

Many Cornellians in the University faculty, and in other universities, have 
written college text-books. 

IN JOURNALISM 

Julius Chambers, 70, early attracted attention by pretending to be mad 
and having himself incarcerated in an insane asylum, for purposes of observation; 
he afterwards published a book "A Mad World," telling his experiences. 

Francis W. Halsey, '73, has been for many years an editor of the New York 
Times and is now editor of the large Book Review Supplement of that paper. 

Franklin Matthews, '83, has been for many years one of the editors of the 
New York Sun, and is now a Professor of Journalism in Columbia University. 

Charles S. Francis, '77, succeeded his father as owner and editor of the Troy 
Times. 

Theodore Stanton, '76, represents the New York Associated Press in Paris. 

These are only a few of the many Cornellians who have attained national 
fame in journalism. 

IN EDUCATION 

Under the head of College Professors will be found a long list of educators. 

One of the earliest Cornellians to be signally honored was David Starr Jordan 
(P.G.), '72, who, on recommendation of President White, was chosen by Senator 
Leland Stanford to be the first President of Leland Stanford Junior University. 
John C. Branner, '74, was his successor. 

Julia J. Thomas, '75, was President of Wellesley, and M. Carey Thomas, '77, 
is President of Bryn Mawr. 

George L. Burr, '81, is Professor of Medieval History at Cornell. 

Edward L. Nichols, '75, is Professor of Physics at Cornell, and has been a 
Dean. 

William Trelease, '80, was for many years Professor of Botany in Washing- 
ton University. 

Simon H. Gage, '77, is a scientific investigator. He has retired from his 
professorship at Cornell, to devote his entire time to study. 

John Henry Comstock, '74, was one of the greatest teachers ever at Cornell 
and made his subject, Entomology, interesting. He has now retired. 



C DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Willard C. Fisher, '88, Professor of Political Economy at Wesleyan, suffered 
for his opinions, and quit. The Cornell Faculty sent him resolutions of con- 
fidence and respect. 



IN THE SCIENCES 

The number of Dr. Burt G. Wilder's former pupils who have attained emi- 
nence in the scientific world is very large. 

A few years ago they published a book called "The Wilder Quarter-Century 
Book," (1868-1893), a collection of original papers, dedicated to Professor B. 
G. Wilder, at the close of his Twenty-fifth year of service in Cornell University. 
The contributors were David Starr Jordan (P.G.), 72, Anna (Botsford) Corn- 
stock, '85, John Henry Comstock, '74, Eugene R. Corson, '75, Leland O. Howard, 
'77, Theobald Smith, '81, William C. Krauss, '84, Susanna (Phelps) Gage, '80, 
Herman M. Biggs, '82, John C. Branner, '74, Veranus A. Moore, '87, Grant S. 
Hopkins, '89, Pierre A. Fish, '90, William R. Dudley, '74, Simon H. Gage, '77, 
and Milton J. Roberts, '75. 

As Cornell from the beginning has been a great Scientific School, it has 
many eminent graduates engaged in scientific work. 

Professor Simon H. Gage, '77, is one of Dr. Wilder's foremost students. 
His wife, Susanna Stuart (Phelps) Gage, '80, was his assistant in research work. 

Professor William R. Dudley, '74, was a famous teacher of botany. 

Dr. Daniel E. Salmon, '72, was a famous scientist in the U. S. Bureau of 
Animal Industry. 

Professor John H. Comstock, '74, Leland O. Howard, '77, and George W. 
Lewis, '84, were U. S. Entomologists. 

David Starr Jordan (P.G.), '72, is a noted Fishculturist. 

Herman M. Biggs, '82, was for many years pathologist to the New York City 
Board of Health. 



IN ENGINEERING 

William J. Krome, '99, built the "Over Sea" R. R., on concrete arches, on 
Coral Islands to Key West, Fla. 

James G. White (P.G.), '85, is at the head of a great engineering firm in 
New York City, which built, owns, manages and controls many great electric 
lighting plants and railroads, etc., in the United States, Manila, Havana, etc. 

Elmer E. Haskell, '79, is a member of the International Waterways Com- 
mission. 

Edwin B. Katte, '93, is chief of electrical traction for the New York Central 
Railroad. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS ci 

These are only a few of the many Cornellians who are occupying the highest 
positions in the engineering world. 

As Cornell has always been known as a great engineering school, its eminent 
graduates in engineering are numerous. 

IN MEDICINE AND SURGERY 
Dr. Robert T. Morris, '80, is one of America's leading surgeons. 

Dr. Louis L. Seaman, '72, is a famous army surgeon, who saw surgical work 
with the Japanese Army in the Russo-Japanese War; was a surgeon in the 
Spanish- American War; and studied contagious and infectious diseases of the 
Orient, in India. 

Dr. Charles G. Wagner, '80, is a well-known alienist. 

IN ART 

Cornell established a School of Art in 1903, which was in existence for two 
or three years. 

Charles G. Merrill was the first student. He decorated the walls of his home, 
at 212 South Albany Street, Ithaca, with beautiful figure-paintings. He also 
painted several large figure-paintings which may be seen at the Lyceum Music 
Store, on South Cayuga Street, Ithaca. He was invited to New York City, 
where he has a studio. 

Chester Loomis, '72, is a noted landscape and figure painter. 
William M. J. Rice, '74, is a portrait painter. 
Louis A. Fuertes, '00, is a famous painter of birds. 

Anna (Botsford) Comstock, '86, is an artist and wood-engraver. She illus- 
trated her husband's, (Prof essor John H. Comstock) text-book on Entomology. 

Truman E. Fassett, '09, is a painter. 
Tripp Davey, '09, is a painter. 

THE ALUMNAE 

Professor Martha Van Rensselaer, '04, is entitled to great credit for inaugur- 
ating Home Economic study at Cornell, including household management, 
scientific cooking and dressmaking and designing. The students in this depart- 
ment have free tuition. The Cafeteria is located in the basement of the Home 
Economics Building. 

Professor Anna (Botsford) Comstock, '85, is an artist and wood-engraver. 
She illustrated the book on Entomology, written by her husband, Professor 
John H. Comstock, 74. 

The late lamented Professor Alice G. McCloskey, '08, was a very hard and 
conscientious worker in Nature Study. 

Professor Flora Rose, (P.G.), '08, Lecturer and Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics, Cornell, since 1907. 



cii DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI 
THE CLASSES 

"Cornell, I yell, yell, yell, Cornell!" 
"Then fill up the glass, 

And around let it pass, 
And we'll drink to Care's utter confusion; 
To the Health of all Classes 
And all bonnie lasses, 
For Love only is not a delusion." 

A. B. 

Every class from the beginning, '69, has published the Cornellian. 

Every class since 1891, except 1892, 1895 and 1896, has published a Class 
Book in its senior year. However, it is a singular fact that few classes have 
published a class history in the years following graduation, notable exceptions 
being the classes of 73, 78, and '92. 

There is no recorded class yell, nor class colors, until the class of '86. 

'69 

The first class contained, among others, Senator Foraker, who is well known 
as an orator and statesman, and a political power. Judge Morris L. Buckwalter 
of this class was elected President of the Alumni Association in 1873, and on 
the occasion of his revisiting Cornell, about fifteen years ago. Its members 
came from other colleges and took advanced standing at Cornell. There were 
only eight to graduate, and, as the diplomas were handed out in alphabetical 
order, Charles F. Behringer received the first diploma from Cornell. 

Secretary, Morris L. Buchwalter, Carew Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

70 

In this class appears the name of Julius Chambers, the famous New York 
Journalist. 

Secretary, Charles Albert Storke, Santa Barbara, California. 

71 

This is pre-eminently the class of Supreme Judges, having no less than four, 
one in Wisconsin and three in New York. 

Secretary, Robert G. H. Speed, Ithaca, N. Y. 

72 

Here we find John DeWitt Warner, the great New York tariff reformer; 
and Daniel E. Salmon, Scientist. Then, as a post-graduate, we find David 
Starr Jordan, the first President of Leland Stanford Junior University. 

Secretary, Professor Charles L. Crandall, Ithaca, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cm 

73 

The 30th Anniversary Book is the first published history or class book of 
any class to be found in the University library. This is a fine book of biographical 
sketches prepared by William H. French, the class historian, accompanied by 
clever personal "skits" about several members, by the reader, Willi Brown, 
and called "St. Louis ginger," enclosed in brackets. There is also a 40th Anni- 
versary Book of the Class Reunion, with a directory. 

In this class are found the brothers Dunwell; James W. Dunwell was a 
Justice of the New York Supreme Court; Charles T. Dunwell was a Repre- 
sentative in Congress from Brooklyn. There are also the famous New York 
journalist, Francis W. Halsey of the Times. Judge Franklin Ferris, of St. Louis, 
is a prominent Western representative of this class. This was one of the largest, 
if not the largest, of the early classes and had many members who afterwards 
attained eminence. 

Secretary, Edwin Gillette, Ithaca, N. Y. 

74 

John C. Branner, of this class, succeeded David S. Jordan, 72, as President 
of Leland Stanford Junior University. Joseph C. Hendrix, a prominent New 
York banker, was for many years a popular and valued trustee of the University. 
James Fraser Gluck was a member of the Buffalo Bar. There was one Judge 
of the New York Court of Appeals, William H. Cuddeback. Wilmot M. Smith 
was Justice of the New York Supreme Court. There were two members of 
Congress, James H. Southard and Robert H. Wiles. Dr. William Seward Webb, 
the New York financier, allied with the Vanderbilt railroad interests, was for 
a short time a member of this class. George T. Winston was President of two 
universities, North Carolina and Texas. Birchard A. Hayes, the eldest of four 
sons of President Rutherford B. Hayes, all of whom attended Cornell, was a 
member of this class. 

Secretary, Professor John H. Comstock, Ithaca, N. Y. 

75 

Frank H. Hiscock, of the New York Court of Appeals, appears here. Also 
Col. Henry W. Sackett, counsel to the New York Tribune, and chairman of the 
committee for Cornell's Semi-Centennial celebration. Also Judge John M. 
Kellogg, Presiding Justice of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of 
New York, 3rd Department. 

Secretary, Professor Edward L. Nichols, Ithaca, N. Y. 

76 

Theodore Stanton, the American Journalist in Paris, is one. Another is 
Webb C. Hayes, the second son of President Rutherford B. Hayes. 

Secretary, Daniel Franklin Flanner, 816 "The Rookery," Chicago, 111. 



civ DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

77 

The genial Charles S. Francis, American Ambassador abroad, here appears. 
In his college days he was a popular Captain of the Cornell Cadets, and a vic- 
torious single-sculler at Saratoga Lake in 1876. Captain John N. Ostrom, the 
valiant captain and coach of the early crews, here appears. Also Miss M. Carey 
Thomas, President of Bryn Mawr College. Also Henry V. Borst, another New 
York Supreme Court Justice. James B. Grant was Governor of Colorado. 
Also DeVoe P. Hodson, State Public Commissioner of New York, at a large 
salary. 

Secretary, William Ogden Kerr, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'78 

This class, '78, has two good published biographical histories, with portraits, 
called the 30th and the 35th Year Histories. Ruth Putnam, daughter of George 
P. Putnam, the New York publisher, and sister of George H. Putnam, another 
great publisher, is an author of historical books. President U. S. Grant heard 
of the prowess of this class and sent to it his third son, Jesse Root Grant. Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Grant paid a visit to their son at Cornell and he went with them 
on their tour around the world. He is a noted Democratic politician in California. 

Secretary, Willard Beahan, Care L. S. & M. S. R. R. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

'79 

George T. Baker was Commodore of the Cornell Navy and he "fooled" 
Harvard. When it came to choosing a place to row the Freshman race in the 
spring of 1880, he told the representative of Harvard that he knew a little lake 
that would be just right. It was Owasco Lake and near Ithaca and when the 
race came off all Cornell and Ithaca were there to cheer the Cornell crew to 
victory. Walter C. Kerr was one of the greatest of salesmen and became Presi- 
dent of Westinghouse, Church, Kerr & Co., of New York City. 

Secretary, Calvin Tomkins, 17 Battery Place, New York City. 

'80 

"Here's to good old Eighty! 
Drink her down! 
Here's to good old Eighty! 
Drink her down! 
Here's to good old Eighty! 

For she's mighty, 

And she's weighty, 
Drink her down! 
Drink her down! 
Drink her down, down, down!" 

"What fairer name can echo bear 
Than Eighty ever true." 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cv 

Here we find Professor William Trelease, the botanist. Also Rutherford P. 
Hayes, the third son of President Rutherford B. Hayes Also Robert T. Morris, 
the eminent New York Surgeon, who has recently written some valuable books 
on the philosophy of life as he has observed it. Then there is Henry Terrell, 
who wrote the beautiful "Evening Song" at Cornell. The ever genial Dr. Charles 
G. Wagner who says he has reserved rooms at the Binghamton State hospital 
for members of his class. 

Secretary, Dean Frank Irvine, Ithaca, N. Y. 



'81 

There is a published Quarterly Century Book, with portraits of members 
while in college, and also portraits taken 25 years afterwards. Here we find 
Professor George Lincoln Burr, the American historian. Also George Shiras, 
son of Justice George Shiras of the U. S. Supreme Court, and himself a Repre- 
sentative in Congress. 

Secretary, Professor Hiram H. Wing, Ithaca, N. Y. 



'82 

"With weeping and with laughter 

Still is the story told, 
How '82, with heart so true 
Laid '80 out so cold." 

Here we find Dr. Herman M. Biggs, the great pathologist, of New York City. 
Secretary, Norton Townsend Horr, 1518 Williams Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 



Governor John A. Dix belonged to '83. Then there is Franklin Matthews 
of the New York Sun. 

Secretary, Franklin Matthews, 33 Van Buren Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



'84 

There is a Class Roster, 1904, with Reunion group photo. Then there is a 
Christmas Greeting to President White, 1909. Then there is the 25th Anni- 
versary Book, with group photo and Roster, with portrait of "Uncle" Josh 
Hurst, the old janitor, and photo of the wreck of the bridge over the hollow 
formerly near Sage Cottage but now filled and crossed by Central Avenue. 
Ernest W. Huffcut, Dean of the College of Law, was a prominent member of '84. 

Secretary, Dr. Henry Pelouse DeForest, 150 W. 47st, Street, New York City. 



cvi DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

'85 
Hurrah! Hurrah! '85! 

This class has a Directory, published in 1908. Walter G. Smith was at one 
time threatened with arrest for violation of the neutrality laws, being charged 
with an attempt to lead a filbustering expedition to annex Lower California. 

Secretary, Edward H. Bostwick, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'86 

Rah! Rah! Boom! Rah! '86! 
Class colors Royal Purple and Old Gold. 

Hobart Chatfield Chatfield-Taylor, the novelist, appears here. Also Judge 
George McCann of the New York Supreme Court. 

Secretary, Dr. Luzerne Coville, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'87 

Wahoo! Wahoo! '87 

Here we have Governor Horace White of New York. 
Secretary, Dean Veranus A. Moore, Ithaca, N. Y. 



Great! Great! Eighty-Eight! 
"Cornell, our Alma Mater great, 

Bright guiding star of Eighty-Eight." 
"I sat within my quiet room 
Before my glowing grate, 
Renewing o'er the trodden ground 
The scenes as passed, the four years round, 
In merry Eighty-Eight." 

This class has a published Biographical Class Book. The Republic of Cuba 
chose its gallant General Mario Garcia Menocal, of '88, for its present President. 
The popular baseball player, Harry L. Taylor, comes here. Also John R. Mott, 
one of the world's greatest leaders in Y. M. C. A. work. Judge Charles H. Blood 
has long been a trustee of Cornell. 

Secretary, Professor Willard W. Rowlee, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'89 

C! U! C! U! '89! 
Class Colors Gen'd'arme Blue and Tow. 

This class has a Book of Statistics and undergraduate history with brief 
biographical sketches, published in 1889. Also a Ten- Year Book, with brief 
biographies. Then there is a Twenty-five Year Book, with short biographies 
and portraits taken while in college and also portraits taken 25 years later. 

Secretary, Professor Henry N. Ogden, Ithaca, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cvn 

'90 

This class published a Book of Statistics in 1890. John Ford and Clarence 
J. Shearn are on the Supreme Bench in New York City. John T. Morrison was 
Governor of Idaho. 

Secretary, Charles James Miller, Newfane, Niagara Co., N. Y. 

'91 

This class has a Class Souvenir published in 1891. This class has published 
a Ten Year Book and a Twenty Year Book, with short biographies. Registrar 
David F. Hoy has a wonderful memory and a close acquaintance with the old 
graduates. 

Secretary, Registrar David F. Hoy, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'92 

Class yell : ' 'Hoo Wah hoo, 
Hoo Wah hoo, 
Long live C. U. Ninety-Two." 

Class Colors Peacock Blue and White. 

This class has a Class Souvenir published in 1892. This class has a good 
history published under the direction of Leon Nelson Nichols. 

Secretary, Charles D. Bostwick, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'93 

Class yell: "Rah! Rah! Ree! 
Rah! Rah! Ree! 
I yell Cornell, Ninety-Three." 

Class colors Old Gold and White. 

This class has a Souvenir Book, published in 1893; a Roster, published in 
Cornell Alumni News, 1904; 2nd Class Roster, published 1908, with biographies, 
3rd Class Roster, published 1913. 

'94 

"Oh, the thrill of other days, 
How its gripping mem'ry stays, 
How we hope to bear it with us evermore; 
For we never can grow old, 
Never be to Mammon sold, 
While within us leaps the blood of Ninety-Four." 

Class yell : ' 'Who Rah Roar ! Who Rah Roar ! 
C. U.! C. U.! Ninety-Four! 

Class Colors Cardinal and Seal Brown. 



cvin DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

There was the Record of '94, published in 1894, with class orations and sta 
tistics. Then there was the Souvenir Book of '94, published in 1894. Herbert 
J. Hagerman of '94, was Governor of New Mexico. 

Secretary, Elmer E. Bogart, Care, Morris High School, 1125 Boston Road 
Bronx, New York City. 

'95 

Class yell: "X C V, X C V, 

Cornell U ni ver si ty!" 

Class Colors Blue and Yellow. 

There is a Book of Statistics, published in 1895. Also a Class Lost, pub- 
lished in 1912, with addresses. 

Secretary, William Fitch Atkinson, 44 Court St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'96 

Class yell: "Boom Rah Rix! Boom Rah Rix! 
We are Cornell, Ninety-Six! 

Class Colors Brown and White. 

This class has a Book of Statistics, published in 1896. 

Secretary, George Solomon Tompkins, 47 S. Manning Boulevard, Albany, 

N. Y. 

'97 
Secretary, Professor George Newman Lauman, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'98 
Secretary, Jesse Fuller, 166 Montague Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'99 
Secretary, Dr. Royal Storrs Haynes, 391 West End Avenue, New York City. 

'00 
Secretary, George Hooper Young, Williamsport, Pa. 

'01 
Secretary, Arthur Harry Sherwood, 2469 Broadway, New York City. 

Secretary, (for Medical College) Dr. William Henry Cantle, Mamaroneck, 

N. Y. 

'02 

Class yell: "Ric Rac, Ric Rac Roo! 

Cornell, I yell, Nineteen Two!" 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cix 

Secretary, William John Norton, 120 W. Adams Street, Chicago. 

Secretary, (for women) Mrs. Ruth Bentley Shreve, Hastings-on-Hudson, 

N. Y. 

Secretary, (for Medical College) Dr. Nan Gilbert Seymour, 129 E. 17th 
Street, New York City. 

'03 

Class yell: "Rah Rah Rah, Rah Rah Reel 
Cornell, I yeU, Nineteen Three!" 

Class Colors Blue and White. 

Secretary, Raymond Parmalee Morse, 166 Gates Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'04 
Secretary, Cecil Jarvis Swan, 42 E. 23 Street, New York City. 

'05 
Secretary, Harold Jay Richardson, Lowville, N. Y. 

'06 
Secretary, Professor Charles Henry Tuck, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'07 
Secretary, Antonio Lazo, 56 William Street, New York City. 

'08 
Secretary, Seth Whitney Shoemaker, Scranton, Pa. 

'09 
Secretary, Robert Elias Treman, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'10 
Secretary, Ernest Clarke Heg, Elizabeth, N. J. 

'11 
Secretary, John Edward Oliver Winslow, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Secretary, (for women) Miss Clara Vivian Braymer, Shamokin, Pa. 

'12 

Secretary, Ross William Kellogg, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Secretary, (for women) Miss Mabel De Forest, Springfield, Mass. 

'13 
Secretary, George Helm Rockwell, Care, Secretary Cornell University. 

Secretary, (for women) Miss Sophie Margaret Becker, 420 Carey Street, 
Baltimore, Md. 



ex DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

BY POSITIONS, PROFESSIONS, OCCUPATIONS 
ALENISTS 

Atwood, Charles Edwin, '80. First Assistant Physician, Bloomingdale 
Asylum. 

Wagner, Charles Gray, '80. Superintendent, Binghamton State Hospital. 

ARCHITECTS 

Green, Edward Broadhead, 78. Architect of Bailey Hall, etc., at Cornell. 

Martin, Clarence Augustine, (Special Student), '90. Dean, College of 
Architecture. 

Miller, William Henry, '72. Architect of University Library, Prudence 
Risley Hall, Fiske Mansion, etc., at Cornell. 

Roehrig, Frederick L., '83. Architect of notable buildings in Pasadena. 

Trowbridge, Alexander Buell, '90. Dean, College of Architecture. 

Wright, Frank Ayres, '79. Sec'y, Architectural League, New York City. 

ARCTIC EXPLORER 

Marvin, Ross Gillmore, '05. Companion of Captain Robert E. Peary, 
U. S. N., on two North Pole expeditions. 

ARMY OFFICERS 

Barton, Frank Arthur, '91. Captain, U. S. A. 

Beacham, Joseph William, '97. Captain, U. S. A. 

Bell, George, '94. Brig.-General, U. S. A. 

Davis, Edward, '97. Captain, U. S. A. 

Doores, William Richard, '93. Captain, U. S. A. 

Eastman, William R., '95. Lieutenant, Asst. Surg., U. S. A. 

Harris, Jesse R., '02. 1st Lieutenant, Asst. Surg., U. S. A. 

Kilbourne, Louis H., '95. Captain, U. S. A. 

Mitchell, James Brady, '95. Captain, U. S. A. 

Menocal, Mario Garcia, '88. Major General, Cuban Army of Liberation. 

Mould, Stephen H., '90. Captain, U. S. A. 

Osgood, Winchester Dana, '92. Major, Cuban Army of Liberation. 

Phillips, Ervin Louis, '91. Major, U. S. A. 

Phisterer, Frederick W., '95. Captain, U. S. A. 

Springer, Anton, '93. Captain, U. S. A. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxi 

ARTISTS 

Comstock, Anna (Botsford), '86. Artist and wood-engraver. 
Davey, Randall Vernon, '09. Painter. 
Fassett, Truman Edward, '09. Painter. 
Fuertes, Louis Agassiz, '00. Painter of birds. 
Loomis, Chester, 72. Figure and landscape painter. 
Merrill, Charles George, Special Student, '03-'05. Figure, landscape and 
mural painter. 

Rice, William M. J., 74. Portrait painter. 



ASTRONOMERS 



Preston, Erasmus Darwin, '75. 
Serviss, Garrett Putnam, '73. 



ATHLETES 

Berna, Tell S., '12. Winner of world's record cross-country run and two- 
mile race. 

Jennings, Hugh, Special Student, 'OO-'Ol, '03-'04. Manager of the Detroit 
"Tigers" Baseball Club. 

Jones, John Paul, '13. Winner of Intercollegiate and world's record for 
one-mile dash. 

Lamed, William A., '94. National Lawn Tennis Champion. 

Ostrom, John N., '75. Father of rowing at Cornell. 

Reed, Daniel A., '98. Football coach at Cornell. 

Taylor, Harry L., '88. President of the National Baseball League. 

Van Orman, Ray, '08. Football coach at Cornell. 

Warner, Glenn S., '94. Athletic Director, Carlisle Indian School. 



AUTHORS 

Ayres, Phillip W., '84. Writer on charity work. 

Burr, George Lincoln. Writer on "Witchcraft," etc. 

Chatfield-Taylor, Hobart Chatfield, '86. Novelist. 

Elliott, Orrin L., '85. Author of "The Tariff Controversy in the United 
States." 

Fayant, Frank N., '98. Author of "Fools and Their Money," etc. 

Halsey, Francis W., '73. Author of the "Old New York Frontier," etc. 

Heermans, Forbes, 78. Novelist. Playwright. 

Hewitt, Waterman T., (P.G.) 79. Author of a "History of Cornell Uni- 
versity." 



cxii DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Johnson, Henry C., '73. Author of classical text-books. 

Mayo, Earl W., '94. Magazine writer. 

Payne, Phillips, '88. Novelist. 

Putnam, Ruth, '78. Author of "Annetje Jans' Farm," etc. 

Serviss, Garrett P., '72. Author of "Astronomy Through an Opera-Glass." 
etc. 

Shoemaker, Michael M., '74. Author of many books of travel. 

Shufeldt, Robert W., '74. Writer on Biology. 

Wolf, Rennold, '92. Playwright. Author of "The Red Widow," etc. 

BISHOP 
Williams, Gersham Mott, '79. P. E. Bishop of Marquette. 

BOTANISTS 
Arthur, Joseph C., '86. 

Atkinson, George F., '85. Professor, Cornell. 
Coville, Frederick V., '87. 

Dudley, William Russell, '74. Professor, Cornell and Stanford. 
Hasselbring, Heinrich, '99. 
Kellennan, William A., '74. 

Trelease, William, '80. The greatest living botanist. 
Van Schrenck, Herman, '93. 
Whitten, John C., '94. Professor, Missouri. 

CABINET OFFICERS 

Menocal, Mario Garcia, '88. Minister of the Interior, Cuba. 
Sze, Sao-ke Alfred, '01. Minister of Posts and Roads, China. 

CHEMISTS 
Hitchcock, Romyn, '72. 
Kent, Walter H., 76. 
Snyder, Harry, '89. 

CITY CHAMBERLAIN 
Bruere, Henry, '02. New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxm 

CIVIL ENGINEERS 

Baker, George T., ; 79. Chief Eng., "Soo" and S. W. R. R. 
Beahan, Willard, 78. Div. Eng., L. S. & M. S. R. R. 
Bissell, Frank E., 78. Chief Eng., L. S. & M. S. R. R. 
Church, Irving P., 73. Professor, Cornell. 

Cornell, Oliver H. P., 74. Chief Eng., Geneva, Ithaca and Athens, R. R. 
CrandaU, Charles L., 72. Professor, Cornell. 
Haskell, Elmer E., 79. Professor, Cornell. 
Hayford, John F., '89. 

Hyde, Howard E. Acting Chief Eng., Manila; Asst. Chief Eng., Providence 
Waterworks. 

Krome, W. J., '99. Chief Eng., "Oversea" R. R. to Key West. 

Marx, Charles D. Professor, Cornell. 

Pierce, Henry, '80. Supt., Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. 

Preston, Erasmus D., 75. With U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

Shaler, Ira A., '84. Chief Eng. for Subway Contractors, New York City. 

Turneaure, Frederick E., '89. 

Washburn, Frank S., '83. 

COLLEGE PRESIDENTS 

70 

Comstock, Theodore Bryant, Arizona University. 
Dixon, Brant V. B. Newcomb College of Tulane University. 
Eddy, Henry T. University of Cincinnati. 

72 

Jordan, David Starr, P.G. Leland Stanford Junior University. 
Salmon, Daniel E. Nat. Vet. School, Montevideo. 

73 

Johnson, Henry C. Central High School (City College), Philadelphia. 
Smith, Clinton D. Agri. College of Paricicabo, Brazil. 

74 

Branner, John C. Leland Stanford Junior University. 
Winston, George T. Universities of N. C. and Texas, and College of Agric. 
and Mech. Arts, N. C. 

75 
Thomas, Julia J. Wellesley College. 

77 
Thomas, M. Carey. Bryn Mawr College. 

78 
Kingsbury, Joseph T. University of Utah. 



cxiv DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

'90 
Sutliff, Phebe T. Rockford CoUege. 

'91 
Kerr, William J., Special Student. Agricultural Colleges of Utah and Oregon. 

'93 

Blackman, William F., P. G. Rollins CoUege. 
Duniway, Clyde A. Universities of Montana and Wyoming. 
Jameson, Joseph Moore. Girard College. 

'94 
Pearson, Raymond A. Iowa Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

'96 
Rammelkamp, Charles H. Illinois College. 

'97 

Meikeljohn, Alexander. Amherst College. 
Nichols, Ernest Fox, P. G. Dartmouth College. 

'98 

Gilmore, John W. University of Hawaii. 
Hill, Albert R., P. G. University of Missouri. 

'02 
Johnson, Lillian W. Western College for Women. 

COLLEGE VICE-PRESIDENTS 

74 
Branner, John C. Leland Stanford Junior University. 

'95 
Reade, Mebourne S. Colgate University. 

'96 
Brown, John F. Earlham College. 

COLLEGE DEANS 

'70 

Eddy, Henry Turner. Academic Faculty, Cincinnati University. Graduate 
School, Minnesota University. 

'72 
Hyde, Edward W. Faculty, Cincinnati University. 

73 

Bartley, Elias H. College of Pharmacy, Brooklyn. 

Smith, Clinton D. Special Courses, Michigan Agricultural College; Agri- 
cultural College of University of Illinois. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxv 

75 
Nichols, Edward L. Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Cornell. 

77 
Thomas, Martha Carey. Faculty, Bryn Mawr College. 

78 
Smith, Albert W. (Director), Sibley College of Mechanic Arts, Cornell. 

79 
Haskell, Elmer E. (Director), College of Civil Engineering, Cornell. 

'80 

Henry, William A. College of Agriculture, Wisconsin University. 
Irvine, Frank. College of Law, Cornell. 
Trelease, William. Shaw School of Botany, Washington University. 

'82 
Woodruff, Edwin H. (Acting), College of Law, Cornell. 

'84 
Huffcut, Ernest W. College of Law, Cornell. 

'86 

Hull, Charles H. Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Cornell. 
Merritt, Ernest G. Graduate School, Cornell. 

'87 

Moore, Veranus A. State Veterinary College, Cornell. 
Morgan, Ora S. College of Agriculture, Alfred University. 
Russell, James E. Teachers College, Columbia University. 

'88 
Pearson, Leonard. College of Agriculture, University of Pennsylvania. 

'89 

Hayford, John F. College of Civil Engineering, Northwestern University. 
Laird, Warren P. College of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania. 
Marston, Anson. College of Civil Engineering, Iowa State University. 
Turneaure, Frederick E. College of Civil Engineering, Wisconsin University. 

'90 

Martin, Clarence A. (Special Student) (Director), College of Architecture, 
Cornell. 

Trowbridge, Alexander B. (Director), College of Architecture, Cornell. 

'91 

Corey, Clarence L. College of Mechanical Engineering, University of Calif. 
Moreland, Sherman. College of Law, University of the Philippines. 

'92 
Trevor, Joseph E. (Special Student). Graduate School, Cornell. 



cxvi DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

'93 

Smith, Harold B. College of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, 
and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 

'94 
Hall, James P. College of Law, Chicago University. 

'95 

Taylor, Thomas N. College of Civil Engineering, University of Texas. 
Thomas, Carl C. College of Mechanical Engineering, Wisconsin University. 

'97 
Meikeljohn, Alexander, (Post Graduate). Faculty, Brown University. 

'00 
Martin, Gertrude Shorb, (Post Graduate). (Adviser of Women), Cornell. 

'01 

Kyle, Edward J. College of Agriculture, Texas State Agricultural and 
Mechanical College. 

COLLEGE PROFESSORS 

'69 
Behringer, George Frederick. German, Cornell. 

70 

Comstock, Theodore B. Geology and Paleontology, Cornell University; 
Mining Engineering and Physics, University of Illinois. 

Dixon, Brant Van Blarcom. Metaphysics, Tulane University. 
Eddy, Henry Turner. Mathematics and Civil Engineering, Cornell; Mathe- 
matics, Princeton University; Mathematics, Civil Engineering and Astronomy, 
Cincinnatti University; Mathematics and Mechanics, Minnesota Univ. 

71 

Barnard , William S. Entomology, Cornell; Natural History, Drake Univ. 
Edgren, Augustus H. Modern Languages and Sanscrit, Nebraska University. 

72 

Crandall, Charles L. Railway Engineering, Cornell. 
Hyde, Edward W. Mathematics, Cincinnati University. 
Jordan, David Starr, (Post Graduate). Zoology, Indiana University; Natural 
History, Lombard University, and Butler University. 

73 

Anderson, Rufus. Industrial Mechanics, Alfred University. 
Aubert, Alfred Bellamy. Chemistry, University of Maine. 
Bartley, Elias H. Chemistry, Swarthmore College, and Long Island College 
Hospital. 

Burt, Stephen S. Medicine, Post Graduate Medical College, New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxvn 

Church, Irving P. Applied Mechanics and Hydraulics, Cornell. 
Johnson, Henry C. Latin Language and Literature, Lehigh University. 
Moore, John G. German Language and Literature, Minnesota University. 
Newkirk, John G. History, Indiana University. 

Smith, Clinton D. Dairy Husbandry, University of Minnesota; Agriculture 
Michigan Agricultural College. 

74 

Branner, John C. Geology, Stanford and Indiana Universities. 
Comstock, John H. Entomology, Cornell University. 
Dudley, William R. Botany, Cornell and Stanford Universities. 
Fairchild, Herman L. Geology, Rochester University. 
Lazenby, William R. Horticulture and Forestry, Ohio State University. 
Patrick, George E. Chemistry, University of Kansas. 
Stone, John L. Agriculture, Cornell. 
Winston, George T. Latin, University of North Carolina. 

'75 

Bellows, Howard P. Otology, Boston University. 

Brayton, Alembert W. Pathology, Clinical Medicine, etc., Indiana Univ. 
Corwin, Richard W. Surgery, University of Colorado. 
Moler, George S. Physics, Cornell. 
Nichols, Edward L. Physics, Cornell. 
Simonds, Frederick W. Geology, University of North Carolina. 

76 

Foote, Charles W. Natural Sciences, Buchtel College. 
Maltby, Albert E. Natural Sciences and Mathematics, St. Lawrence Univ. 
Millspaugh, Charles F. Botany, University of West Virginia. 
VanVelzer, Charles A. Mathematics, Wisconsin University. 
Yatabe, Riokichi. Botany, University of Tokio. 

77 

Gage, Simon H. Histology and Embryology, Cornell. 
Stevens, George B. Systematic Theology, Yale University. 
Thomas, Martha Carey. English, Bryn Mawr College. 

78 

Brown, Charles C. Civil Engineering, Union University. 
Jordan, Whitman H. Agricultural Chemistry, Pennsylvania State College. 
Smith, Albert W. Mechanical Engineering, Cornell and Stanford Univer- 
sities; Machine Design, Wisconsin University. 

79 

Gifford Harold. Ophthalmology and Otology, Nebraska University. 
Gottheil, William S. Dermatology, New York School of Clinical Medicine, 
New York City. 



GXVIII DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Hathaway, Arthur S. Mathematics, Rose Polytechnic Institute. 
Hewitt, Waterman T., P. G. German Language and Literature, Cornell. 

'80 

Ewing, Addison L. Geology, Wisconsin University. 
Finch, William A. Law, Cornell. 
Henry, William A. Agriculture, Wisconsin University. 
Irvine, Frank. Law, Cornell. 

Messenger, Hiram J. Mathematics, University of the City of New York. 
Morris, Robert T. Surgery, Post Graduate Medical College, New York City. 
Roberts, Mary E. History, Wellesley College. 
Trelease, William. Botany, Washington University. 

'81 

Gregory, Emily L. Botany, Barnard College, Columbia University. 
Osmond, I. Thornton. Physics, Pennsylvania State College. 
Smith, Theobald. Pathology, Harvard University. 
Wing, Henry H. Animal Industry, Cornell. 

'82 

Rolfe, John C. Latin, University of Pennsylvania. 
Wait, John C. Civil Engineering, Lawrence Scientific School, Harvard Univ. 

'83 

Elmer, Herbert C. Latin, Cornell. 

Prosser, Charles S. Geology, Ohio State and Union Universities; Natural 
History, Washburn College. 

'84 

Huffcut, Ernest W. Law, Cornell, Indiana and Northwestern Universities. 
Mead, Daniel W. Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering, Wisconsin Univ. 
Webb, Walter L. Civil Engineering, University of Pennsylvania. 
Wilson, Charles B. German, Iowa State University. 

'85 
Parr, Samuel W. Chemistry; Illinois University. 

'86 

Harris, Gilbert D. Paleontology and Stratigraphic Geology, Cornell. 
Hill, Robert T. Geology, University of Texas. 

Hull, Charles H. Political Economy, and American History, Cornell. 
Merritt, Ernest G. Physics, Cornell. 
Summers, Harry E. Physiology, Illinois University. 
Thurber, Charles H. Pedagogy, Chicago University. 
Wing, Charles B. Civil Engineering, Stanford University. 

'87 

Moore, Veranus A. Comparative Pathology, Bacteriology and Meat In- 
spection, Cornell. 

Morgan, Ora S. Agriculture, Alfred University. 

Ryan, Harris J. Electrical Engineering, Cornell and Stanford Universities. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxix 

'88 

Carpenter, Rolla C. (Post Graduate) Experimental Engineering, Cornell. 

Fisher, Willard C. Political Economy, Wesleyan University. 

Jones, Forrest R. Electrical Engineering, Cornell. 

Newcomer, Alphonso G. English, Stanford University. 

Stedman, John M. English, Stanford University. 

Rowlee, Willard W. Botany, Cornell. 

'89 

Barr, John H. (Post Graduate) Machine Design, Cornell; Mechanical 
Engineering, University of Minnesota. 

Ferry, Ervin S. Physics, Purdue University. 

Hopkins, Grant S. Veterinary Anatomy, Cornell. 

Ogden, Henry N. Sanitary Engineering, Cornell. 

Marston, Anson. Civil Engineering, Iowa State University. 

Shepardson, George D. Electrical Engineering, Minnesota University. 

White, William A. Nervous and Mental Diseases, George Washington 
University. 

'90 

Ashley, George H. Chemistry, Charleston College. 

Bronson, Walter C. English Literature, Brown University. 

Fish, Pierre A. Veterinary Physiology, Cornell. 

Peirce, William Foster. Psychology and Pedagogy, Ohio State University; 
Psychology and Ethics, Kenyon College. 

Rice, James E. Poultry Husbandry, Cornell. 

Thomas, Mason Blanchard. Botany, and Dean, Wabash. 

Van Ingen, Gilbert. Geology, Princeton University. 

'91 

Botsford, George W. History, Columbia University. 

Chamot, Emile M. Sanitary Chemistry and Toxicology, Cornell. 

Emerson, Oliver F. English, Western Reserve University. 

Hibbard, Herbert W. Mechanical Engineering of Railways, Cornell. 

Lovell, Earl B. Civil Engineering, Columbia University. 

Lyon, Thomas L. Agronomy, Cornell. 

Northup, Edwin F. Physics, University of Texas. 

Olmsted, Everett W. French, Cornell. 

Slingerland, Mark V. Economic Entomology, Cornell. 

Tanner, John H. Mathematics, Cornell. 

'92 

Bedell, Frederick (Post Graduate). Applied Electricy, Cornell. 
Creighton, James E. (Post Graduate). Logic and Mathematics, Cornell. 
Fetter, Frank A. (Post Graduate). Political Economy, Cornell and Princeton. 
Fite, William B. Mathematics, Columbia. 
French, Ferdinand C. (P.G.) Philosophy, Nebraska University. 
Shurter, Edwin D. Public Speaking, Texas University. 
Thilly, Frank. (P. G.) Philosophy, Cornell. 



cxx DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

'93 

Rowland, Arthur C. Mediaeval History, Pennsylvania University. 
Hyde, Walter W. Greek, University of Pennsylvania. 
Kemmerer, Edwin W. Political Economy, Cornell. 
Nagle, James E. Civil Engineering, Texas Agricultural College. 
Nichols, Ernest Fox. (P. G.) Physics, Yale, Colgate, Dartmouth and Co- 
lumbia. 

Shearer, John S. Physics, Cornell. 

Smith, Harold B. Electrical Engineering, Purdue and Worcester. 

'94 

Albee, Ernest. (P. G.) Philosophy, Cornell. 
Beatty, Arthur F. English, Wisconsin. 
Carver, Thomas N. Political Economy, Harvard University. 
Kingsbury, Benjamin F. Histology and Embryology, Cornell. 
Washburn, Margaret F. Psychology, Vassar. 
Woodward, Frederick C. Law, Stanford and Northwestern Universities. 

'95 

Babcock, Stephen M. Chemistry, Wisconsin University. 
Cameron, Frank K. Chemistry, Catholic University of America. 
Hill, John E. Civil Engineering, Brown University. 
Kerr, Abram T. Anatomy, Cornell. 

Swisher, Charles C. Comp. Politics, George Washington University. 
Taylor, Thomas N. Civil Engineering, University of Texas. 
Thomas, Carl C. Marine Engineering, Cornell; Steam Engineering, Wis- 
consin University; Marine Engineering and Naval Architecture, New York Univ. 

'96 

Anderson, Leroy. Dairy Husbandry, University of California. 
Boyd, James E. Mechanics, Ohio University. 
Brown, John F. Education, Iowa State University. 
Franklin, William S. Physics, Lehigh University. 
Glasson, William H. Political Economy, Trinity, N. C. 
Norris, Henry H. Electrical Engineering, Cornell. 
Pillsbury, Walter B., Psychology, Michigan University. 
Rammelkamp, Charles H. (Post Graduate) History and Political Science, 
Illinois College; History, Summer Schools, Universities of Illinois and Missouri. 
Rawles, William A. Political Economy, Indiana University. 
Scott, George W. International Law and Diplomacy, Columbia University. 

'97 

Barnard, William N. Steam Engineering, Cornell. 
Barnes, Fred A. Civil Engineering, Cornell. 

Cole, Alfred D. (Summer School Student) Physics, Ohio State University. 
Dutcher, George M. History, Wesley an University. 
Ferguson, William S. Greek and Roman History, University of California. 
Meiklejohn, Alexander. (Post Graduate) Logic and Metaphysics, Brown 
University. 

Peirce, Paul S. Iowa State University. 
Stewart, Oscar M. Physics, Missouri University. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxxi 



Duggar, Benjamin M. Plant Physiology, Cornell. 

Gilmore, John Washington. Agriculture, Cornell and Pennsylvania State 
College. 

Needham, James G. Limnology, Cornell; Biology, Lake Forest University. 
Sanderson, Ezra D. Entomology, Texas University. 

'99 

Craig, John (Post Graduate). Horticulture, Cornell University. 
Durham, Charles L. (Post Graduate). Latin, CorneD. 

Everett, George A. Elocution and Oratory, and Extension Teaching, Cornell. 
Hasselbring, Heinrich. Plant Pathology, Illinois University. 
Shanks, Lewis E. P. Romance Languages, University of Pennsylvania. 
Young, Charles V. P. Physical Culture, and Director of the Gymnasium, 
Cornell. 

'00 

McCrea, Roswell C. Economics, Columbia University. 
McGillivray, Alexander D. Entomology, Cornell. 
Young, George. Architecture, Cornell. 

'01 

Groat, George G. Economics and Sociology, Ohio Wesleyan University. 
Kyle, Edwin J. Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
Lee, Edwin. Chemistry, Alleghany College. 
Munson, Welton M. Horticulture, University of Maine. 
Stewart, George W. Physics, Iowa State University. 
Whitbeck, Ray H. Geology, Wisconsin University. 

'02 
Stagg, C. Tracy. Law, Cornell. 

'03 

Brooks, Robert C. Cincinnati University. 
Wilson, Charles S. Pomology, Cornell. 

'04 
Martin, Lawrence. Geology, Wisconsin University. 

'05 
Marvin, Ross G. Civil Engineering, Cornell. 

'06 

Betten, Cornelius. Biology, Lake Forest University. 
Bogart, George G. Law, Cornell. 
Tuck, Charles H. Extension Teaching, Cornell. 

'07 

Hunter, Samuel J. Entomology, Kansas State University. 
Morgan, Ora S. Agriculture, Alfred University. 



cxxii DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

DIPLOMATISTS 

Chatfield-Taylor, Hobart Chatfield, '86. Consul General of Spain at Chicago. 

Francis, Charles Spencer, '77. U. S. Ambassador to Austro-Hungarian 
Empire. 

Miller Ransford S., '88. Consul General, Seoul. Secretary of Legation, 
Japan. 

Mowrer, Frank G., '94. Consul General, Copenhagen. 

Straight, Willard D., '01. Consul General, Mukden. 

Sze, Sao-ke Alfred, '01. Chinese Ambassabor to the United States. 

Williams, Oscar F., '69. Consul General, Singapore, Straits Settlements. 

Wyvell, Manton M., '05. Private Secretary to U. S. Secretary of State, 
William J. Bryan. 

DISTRICT ATTORNEYS, U. S. 
Bailey, Leon O. '81. Indiana. 
Bennett, Burton E., '85. Alaska. 
Cole, Willoughby, '78. Southern California. 
Worthington, Thomas, '73. Southern Illinois. 
Youngs, William J., '72. Eastern New York. 

DISTRICT ATTORNEYS, STATE 

Abbott, Frank A., '90. Erie County, N. Y. 
Adams, Arthur G., '07. Tompkins Co., N. Y. 
Kent, Willard M., '98. Tompkins Co., N. Y. 
Kline, Jay B., '74. Onondaga Co., N. Y. 

DIVINES 

Wilson, William DeLancey, '71, P. E. 
Van de Water, George Roe, '78, P. E. 

EDITORS 

Brown, Charles C., '78. Municipal Engineering. 
Butler, Jay Sylvester, '70. Buffalo Express and Elmira Gazette. 
Chambers, Julius, '70. New York World, and Herald. 
Chatfield-Taylor, Hobart Chatfield, '86. America Magazine. 
Crandall, Arthur F. J., '77. New York Evening Post. 
Curtis, Charles Locke, '83. Toledo Blade. 
Fitch, George H., '75. San Francisco Chronicle. 
Francis, Charles Spencer, '77. Troy Times. 

Gannett, Frank E., '98. Ithaca Journal and Elmira Star-Gazette. 
Gifford, George Francis, '80. St. Paul Globe. 
Halsey, Francis W., '73. New York Times. 
Halsey, Frederick A., '78. American Machinist. 
Hoyt, Albert E., '88. Albany Argus. 
Lawrence, John B., '72. Kansas City Journal. 
Matthews, Franklin, '83. New York Sun. 
Nixon, Clarence E., '80. Dramatic and musical editor. 
Patchin, Frank G., '84. Rochester Post-Express. 

Patterson, Woodford, '95. Telegraph editor, New York Evening Sun. 
Editor of the Cornell Alumni News. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxxm 

Severance, Frank H., 79. Buffalo Illustrated Express. 
Smith, Frank P., 75. Cosmopolitan Magazine. 
Smith, Walter G., '85. Hawaiian Star. 
Stutz, Harry G., '07, Ithaca Journal. 
White, Howard G., 70. Syracuse Standard. 

EDUCATORS 

Barto, Daniel H., 77. Principal, Ithaca High School. 
Elliot, Orin L., '85. 

Holden, Fox, 72. Principal, New Paltz (N. Y.) State Normal School. 
Miller, Mary Rogers, '96. Nature Study. 
Parsell, Charles V., 72. Principal, Cascadilla School. 
Tuthill, Lewis H., '84. Principal, Ithaca High School. 
Wheelock, Charles F., 76. Asst. State Com. of Education, New York. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 

Arnold, Bion J., '89. 

Ensign, Orville H., '84. Chief Electrical and Mechanical Engineer, U. S. 
Reclamation Service. 

Gerry, Martin H., '94. 

Jackson, Dugald C., '87. 

Katte, Edwin B., '93. 

Kerr, Walter C., 79. Of firm of Westinghouse, Church, Kerr & Co., New 
York City. 

Westinghouse, H. H., 75. 

FORESTERS 
Rane, Frank W., '92. 
Sterling, Ernest A., '02. 

FINANCIERS 

Barclay, Charles, 76. President of Mobile, Volante & Penscaola, and other 
Alabama railroads. 

Dickinson, Charles C., '91. President, Carnegie Trust Co., New York City. 

Ely, W. Caryl, 78. President, International Traction Co., Buffalo. 

Hendrix, Joseph C., 74. President, American Bankers' Association. 

Kerr, Walter C., 79. President of Westinghouse, Church, Kerr, & Co., 
New York City. 

Miller, Harry I., '83. Vice President, Mo. Pacific R. R. Co. 

Morris, William Torrey, 73. President of a score of gas companies. 

Palmer, Edward H., 77. President of numerous gas companies. 

Pearson, Edward J., '83. Vice Preisdent Mo. Pacific R. R. Co. 

Pierce, William K., 73. President of Pierce, Butler & Pierce Manufacturing 
Company, Syracuse. 

Place, Ira A., '81. Vice President, N. Y. Central R. R. Co. 

Price, Charles S., 72. President, Combria Steel Co. 

Stambaugh, John T., '84. One of the owners of the Youngstown Iron Works. 

Straight, Willard D., '01. Member of firm of J. P. Morgan & Co., New 
York City. 

Teagle, Walter C., '99. Vice President, Standard Oil Co. 



cxxiv DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Treman, Charles E., '89. Vice President, Ithaca Trust Co. 

Treman, Robert H., 78. Director, New York Federal Reserve Bank. 

Van Cleef, Mynderse, '74. President, Ithaca Trust Co. 

Webb, William Seward, '74. President, Adriondack & St. Lawrence and 
Rutland R. R., and Wagner Palace Car Co. 

Williams, Roger B., jr., '01. President, Central New York Southern Cor- 
poration. 

Williams, Timothy S., '84. President, Brooklyn Rapid Transit R. R. Co. 

GEOLOGISTS 

Ashley, George H., '90 Assistant U. S. Geol. Survey. 
Derby, Orville A., '73. Chief Geologist, Survey of Brazil. 
Holmes, Joseph A., '81. One of the greatest of American geologists; in 
employ of U. S. Government many years. 

Martin, George C., '98. Geologist, U. S. Geol. Survey. 

GLOBE TRAVELERS 
Gillig, Harry, '80. 
Shoemaker, Michael M., '74. 

GOVERNORS 

Dix, John A., '83. New York. 
Foraker, Joseph B., '69. Ohio. 
Grant, James B., '77. Colorado. 
Hagerman, Herbert J., '94. New Mexico. 
Morrison, John T., '90. Idaho. 
White, Horace, '87. New York. 

JUDGE, U. S. CIRCUIT COURT 
Noyes, Walter C. '89. 

JUDGES U. S. DISTRICT COURT 
Emory, George M. '90. Washington (State). 
Gunnison, Royal A. '96. Alaska. 

JUDGES, HIGHEST STATE COURT 
Cuddeback, William H. '74. New York Court of Appeals. 
Hiscock, Frank H. '75. New York Court of Appeals. 
McMillan, Daniel H. '72. Supreme Court, New Mexico. 
Moreland, Sherman '91. Supreme Court, Philippines. 
O'Neill, James '72. Supreme Court, Wisconsin. 

JUDGES, NEW YORK SUPREME COURT 
Benton, George A. '71. 
Borst, Henry V. '77. 
Crouch, Leonard C. '89. 
Davis, Rowland L. '97 
De Angelis, Pascal C. J. '71. 
Dunwell, James W. '73. 
Ford, John '90. 
Hiscock, Frank H. '75. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxxv 

Horton, Randolph 76. 
Hubbs, Irving G. '91. 
Kellogg, John M. 75. 
Le Boeuf, Randall J. '92. 
McCann, George '86. 
Maddox, Samuel T. 74. 
Marcus, Louis W. '89. 
Pound, Cuthbert W. '87. 
Sewell, Albert H. 71. 
Smith, Wilmot M. 74. 
Taylor, Harry L. '88. 

JUDGES, NEW YORK COURT OF CLAIMS 
Cunningham, William D. '00. 
Fennell, Thomas F. '96. 

JUDGES, STATE CIRCUIT COURTS 

French, Leroy N. '96. Nevada. 
Mayer, Charles H. '98. Missouri. 

JUDGES, STATE SUPERIOR COURTS 
Card, Ernest M. '04. Washington. 
Moll, Theophilus J. '96. Indiana. 

JUDGES, STATE DISTRICT COURTS 

Irvine, Frank '80. Nebraska. 
Tibbetts, Addison S. 77. Nebraska. 

JUDGE, COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 
Buchwalter, Morris L. '69. Hamilton Co. (Cincinnati), Ohio. 

JUDGES, COUNTY COURT 

Bodine, George F. '98. Seneca, N. Y. 
Blood, Charles H. '89. Tompkins, N. Y. 
Borst, Henry V. 77 . Montgomery, N. Y. 
Chandler, Walter M. 79. El Paso, Texas. 
Coville, Henry D. '93. Oswego, N. Y. 
Kent, WiUard M. '89. Tompkins, N. Y. 
Knapp, Clyde W. '93. Wayne, N. Y. 
McCann, George '88. Chemung, N. Y. 
North, Safford E. 72. Genesee, N. Y. 
Parsons, Robert S. '89. Broome, N. Y.. 
Swartwood, Charles B. '97. Chemung, N. Y. 
Sweetland, Monroe M. '90. Tompkins, N. Y. 
Taylor, Harry L. '88. Erie, N. Y. 

JUDGES, CITY COURT 

Bostwick, Edward H., '85. Ithaca. 
Clymer, Paul K., '97. Ithaca. 
Crowley, Daniel, '06. Ithaca. 



cxxvi DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Hart, Harold L., '03. Binghamton. 
Heller, David N., '88. Elmira. 
Hodson, De Voe P., 77. Buffalo. 
Ransom, William L., '05. New York City. 
Roberts, James H., '86. Binghamton. 
Rogers, Edgar A., '05. Salt Lake City. 
Sweetland, Monroe M., '90. Ithaca. 

LAWYERS 

Bramhall, William E., 77. Gen. Counsel, Northern Pacific R. R. Co. 

Foraker, Joseph Benson, '69. Of the Cincinnati bar. 

Gluck, James Fraser, 74. Of the Buffalo bar. 

Halliday, Samuel D., 70. Attorney for Cornell University. 

Jenney, William Sherman, '94. General Counsel for the "Lackawanna" 
R. R. Co., New York City. 

Parson, Frank, 73. Of the Boston bar. 

Place, Ira Adelbert, '81. General Counsel for the N. Y. Central R. R., Co. 
New York City. 

Preston, Harold, 79. President of the Washington (State) Bar Association. 

Sackett, Henry Woodward, 75. Counsel for the New York Tribune. 

Shearn, Clarence J., '90. Formerly personal Attorney for William Randolph 
Hearst. 

Van Cleef, Mynderse, 74. Attorney for Cornell University. 

LIBRARIANS 

Austen, Willard, '91. Cornell University. 
Brigham, Johnson, 70. Iowa State. 

Burr, George Lincoln, '81. President White Historical Library, Cornell. 
Colson, Frederick D., '97. State Law, New York. 
Harris, George William, 73. Cornell University. 
Harrison, Joseph L., '82. Providence Athenaeum. 
Kephart, Horace, '84. St. Louis Mercantile. 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNORS 
Jackson, Frederick H., 73. Rhode Island. 
White, Horace, '87. New York. 
Winston, Francis D., 77. North Carolina. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Bennett, Charles P., '90. Vice-Pres., Singer S. M. Co. 

Ballantine, J. Herbert, '89. 

McKinley, Robert C., 76. 

Morse, Everett Fleet, 79. Pres. Morse Chain Works. 

Osborn, L. A., '91. Vice-Pres., Singer S. M. Co. 

Pierce, William K., 73. Pres., Pierce, Butler & Pierce Co., Syracuse. 

Price, Charles S., 72. President, Cambria Steel Co. 

Wyckoff, Clarence F., '98. 

Wyckofif, Edwin G., '89. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxxvii 

MAYORS 

Baker, George T., '79. Davenport, Iowa. 
Fisher, Willard C., '88. Middletown, Conn. 
Hoffman, Harry N., '83. Elmira, N. Y. 
Horton, Randolph, 76. Ithaca, N. Y. 
Hugo, Francis, M. '97. Watertown, N. Y. 
Kline, Jay B., '74. Syracuse, N. Y. 
Newman, Jared T., '75. Ithaca, N. Y. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

Bissell, George W., '88. 
Chamberlain, Paul M., '90. 
Christie, William W., '93. 
Floy, Henry, '91. 
Gerry, Martin H., '94. 
Kingsbury, Albert, '89. 

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 
Connolly, Maurice, '98. Iowa. 
Dunwell, Charles T., '73. New York. 
Gould, Norman J., '99. New York. 
Haskell, Reuben L., '98. New York. 
Hendrix, Joseph C., 74. New York. 
Parker, James S., '88. New York. 
Shiras, George, '81. Pennsylvania. 
Southard, James H., 74. Ohio. 
Tuttle, William E., '91. New Jersey. 
Waldo, George E., 72. New York. 
Warner, John DeWitt, 72. New York. 
Wiles, Robert H., 74. Illinois. 

MEDICAL MISSIONARY 
Shepard, Fred D., '80. 

MATHEMATICIAN 
Harris, Rollin A., '85. 
Harshman, Walter S., '89. Professor of Mathematics, U. S. Navy. 

NATURALISTS 

Rathbun, Richard, 75. Asst. Sec'y, Smithsonian Institution. 
Smith, Herbert H., 72. 

NAVAL ARCHITECT 
Gardner, William, '81. Designer of yacht "Atlantic." 

PAINTERS 

Davy, Randall Vernon, '06. 
Fassett, Truman E., '09. 
Loomis, Chester, 72. 



cxxvin DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

PHYSICIANS 
Burt, Stephen S., 70. 
Coolidge, Evelyn L., '00. 
Corson, Eugene R., 75. 
DeForest, Henry P., '84. 
Gottheil, WiUiam S., 79. 
Krauss, William C., '84. 

POET 
Jones, Thomas S., '04. He has published two volumes of verse. 

POLITICIANS 

Grant, Jesse Root, 78. Democratic candidate for U. S. Senator from Cali- 
fornia. 

Hanson, Bert, '93. Anti-Tammany Democrat, New York City. 

House, Edward M., '82. Intimate political friend of President Woodrow 
Wilson. 

Menken, S. Stanwood, '90. Democrat, New York. 

POSTMASTER 
Hendrix, Joseph C., 74. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PRESIDENT OF A REPUBLIC 
Menocal, Mario Garcia, '88. Cuba. 

PUBLISHERS 
Ames, Charles W., 78. 
Thurber, Charles H., '86. 

REGISTRARS 

Elliot, Orrin L., '85. Stanford. 
Grant, Arthur H., '87. Cornell. 
Hoy, David F., '91. Cornell. 

SENATOR, U. S. 
Foraker, Joseph Benson, '69. Ohio. 

SENATORS, STATE 
Blauvelt, George A., '90, N. Y. 
Cassidy, Thomas F., '96. Massachusetts. 
Halliday, Morris S., '06. N. Y. 
Horton, Clinton T., '98. N. Y. 
McMillan, Daniel H., 72. N. Y. 
Mills, Charles E., '98. Pa. 
Murtaugh, John F., '98. N. Y. 
Seeley, John, '97, N. Y. 
Slater, Samuel S., '97. N. Y. 
Smith, Sanford W., '90. N. Y. 
Stevens, Frederick C., 79. N. Y. 
Walters, J. Henry, '96. N. Y. 
Wende, Gottfried H., 72. N. Y. 
White, Horace, '87. N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS cxxix 

SANITARY ENGINEER 
Fuertes, James H., '83. 

SPEAKER, STATE ASSEMBLY 
Edwards, William S., 79. W. Va. 

SCIENTISTS 
Biggs, Herman M., '82. 

Comstock, John H., 74. U. S. Entomologist. 
Gage, Simon H., 77. 
Gage, Susannah Phelps, '80. 
Howard, Leland O., 77. U. S. Entomologist. 
Hunter, Samuel J., '97. Entomologist. 
Jordan, David Starr, 72. Fish culturist. 
Lewis, George W., '84. U. S. Entomologist. 
Salmon, Daniel E., 72. 
Sanderson, Ezra D., '98. 
Smith, Herbert H., 72. Naturalist. 

SINGER 
Isham, Edward S., '90. Of the Bostonians. 

STATE OFFICERS 

Baker, George T., 79. Member State Board of Education, Iowa. 
Biggs, Herman M., '82. Commissioner of Health, N. Y. 
Carmody, Thomas, '82. Atty Gen., N. Y. 
Clark, Roger P., '91. Counsel to Governor, N. Y. 
Cullinan, Patrick W., 73. Excise Commissioner, N. Y. 
Cumming, Robert C., '89. Drafting Commissioner, N. Y. 
Farley, William W., '94. Excise Commissioner, N. Y. 
Hodson, DeVoe P., 77. Public Service Commissioner. N, Y. 
Huffcut, Ernest W., '84. Counsel to Governor, N. Y. 
Hugo, Francis M., '97. Secretary of State, N. Y. 
Irvine, Frank, '80. Public Service Commissioner, N. Y. 
Jackson, William S., '91. Atty Gen., N. Y. 
McCarthy, Dennis, 75. Fiscal Supervisor of Charities, N. Y. 
Newton, Whitney, 79. Treasurer, Colorado. 
O'MaUey, Edward R., '91, Atty. Gen., N. Y. 
Parsons, James A., '90. Atty. Gen., N. Y. 
Pearson, Raymond A., '94. Commissioner of Agriculture, N. Y. 
Peck, Duncan W., 74. Supt. Public Works, N. Y. 
Platt, Chester C., Sp. Student, '90. Sec'y to Governor, N. Y. 
Porter, Eugene H., '80. Commissioner of Health, N. Y. 
Potter, Owen L., '91. Counsel to Governor, N. Y. 

Pound, Cuthbert W., '88. Counsel to Governor and Civil Service Com- 
missioner, N. Y. 

Stevens, Frederick C., 79. Supt. Public Works, N. Y. 

Treman, Charles E., '89. Supt. Public Works, N. Y. 

Van Namee, George R., '02. Drafting Commissioner, N. Y. 



cxxx DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

VanVleet, DeForest, '77. Civil Service Commissioner, N. Y. 
Willaims, Timothy S., '84. Sec'y to Governor, N. Y. 
Wilson, Charles S., '04. Commissioner of Agriculture, N. Y. 
Youngs, William J., '72. Sec'y to Governor, N. Y. 

STATISTICIAN 
Weber, Adna F., '94. 

SUFFRAGETTE 
DeForest, Nora Stanton (Blatch), '05. 

SURGEONS 

Besemer, Howard Burhanse, '89. 
Morris, Robert T., '80. 
Seamon, Louis L., '72. 
Shufeldt, Robert W., '74. 

TARIFF REFORMER 
Tompkins, Calvin, 79. 
Warner, John DeWitt, '72. 

WAR CORRESPONDENT 
Emerson, Edward, '90. 

Y. M. C. A. WORLD'S LEADER 
Mott, John R., '88. 



BIOGRAPHIES 

DISTINGUISHED CORNELL TRUSTEES 

BARNES, ALFRED SMITH. Trustee, 1878-88. Born Jan. 28, 1817, New 
Haven, Conn. Removed in 1827 to Hartford. Employed in publishing 
house of D. F. Robinson & Co., 1833. Removed with them to New York 
City, 1835. Founded the publishing house of A. S. Barnes & Co., 1838. 
Removed to Philadelphia, 1840. Returned to New York City, 1845. Erected 
Barnes Hall, Y. M. C. A., Building at Cornell, 1887-8. 
Died, Feb. 17, 1888, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BOARDMAN, DOUGLAS, A.M. Trustee, 1875-91. Born in 1819, at Covert, 
Seneca County, N. Y. He graduated at Yale College in 1842. He was 
District Attorney of Tompkins County, N. Y., 1847-50, County Judge, 
1851-5, and Justice of the New York Supreme Court, 1865-88, serving part 
of the time as a Justice of the General Term. He presided at the famous 
first trial of Edward S. Stokes for the murder of James Fisk, jr., and sen- 
tenced Stokes to be hanged, a fact which made his name familiar throughout 
the State. He was executor of the will of John McGraw and later that of 
Jennie McGraw Fiske, over whose estate there was great litigation in con- 
nection with her bequest of nearly all her property to Cornell University. 
He was a judge of solid legal attainments and his decisions gave him high 
legal standing. He became the first Dean of the College of Law at Cornell, 
in 1887, and remained in that position during the rest of his life. He was 
also a trustee from 1875 until 1891, where he was greatly respected for his 
good judgment and wise counsel. He was President of the First National 
Bank for many years. After his death his widow, Mrs. Ellen Boardman, 
and his widowed daughter, Mrs. Ellen Williams, purchased and presented 
to the College of Law, the great law library of Nathaniel C. Moak, of Albany, 
as a memorial to Judge Boardman. 
Died, Sept. 5, 1891, at Sheldrake, N. Y. 

CORNELL, ALONZO B. Life Trustee, 1865-04. Born, Jan, 22, 1832, Ithaca, 
N. Y. Eldest son of Ezra Cornell, Founder of the University. Educated 
at the Ithaca Academy. Telegraph operator, and later telegraph manager. 
Owner of a line of steamers on Cayuga Lake. Vice President and Cashier, 
First National Bank, Ithaca, 1864-9. Director, Western Union Telegraph 
Co., 1868-99. Republican candidate for Lieut.-Governor, 1868. Surveyor 
of Customs, N. Y., 1869-73. Member and Speaker of the New York As- 
sembly, 1873. Chairman, Republican State Committee, 1870-8. Naval 
Officer port of New York, 1876-8. Governor of New York, 1880-3. Author: 
Life: of Ezra Cornell. 

Died, Oct 15, 1904, Ithaca, N. Y. 

CORNELL, EZRA. Trustee, 1865-74. Born, Jan. 11, 1807, at Westchester, 
N. Y. He removed in 1819 to DeRuyter, Madison Co., N. Y. He settled 
in 1828, in Ithaca, N. Y., and was occupied with mechanical pursuits, 1830- 
40. Associated with Professor Samuel F. B. Morse in the construction of 
the experimental telegraph line between Washington and Baltimore, 1843-4. 



132 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Aflst. Superintendent, 1843. Superintendent of the construction of the line 
between New York and Baltimore, 1845. Contractor for the line from 
New York to Albany, 1846, and for that from Troy to Montreal, 1847. 
President and Director, Erie and Michigan Telegraph Co., 1847-55. Di- 
rector Western Union Telegraph Co., 1855-74. Delegate to the Republican 
National Convention, 1856. President, State Agricultural Society, New 
York, 1862, and delegate from the Society to the Royal Agricultural Exhi- 
bition, London, 1862. Founded the Cornell Library at Ithaca, 1863. Mem- 
ber of the New York Assembly, 1862-3. State Senator, 1864-8. President 
of the Board of Trustees, Cornell, from its foundation in 1865, until his 
death. 
Died, Dec. 9, 1874, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

FINCH, FRANCIS MILES, LL.D Trustee, 1865-75, 1877-82. Born, June 
9, 1827, at Ithaca, N. Y. He graduated at Yale CoUege in 1849, where 
his class poem attracted considerable attention. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1850 and practiced his profession in his native town. He, when a 
a young lawyer, attracted attention to himself, by shrewdly insisting, as 
junior counsel for the defence, in the trial of the celebrated Edward Ruloff 
for the murder of his wife, that in order to convict his client the prosecution 
must produce her body, it having been alleged that it was sunk in the bottom 
of Cayuga Lake in a box filled with stones, and the argument saved his 
client's life. His practice increased rapidly and he was sought after by 
litigants and brother members of the bar for counsel, and there were few 
cases of great importance in his part of the State in which he was not en- 
gaged, on the one side or the other. He was Collector of Internal Revenue 
for four years. A life-long friend of Ezra Cornell, he became his trusted 
counsellor, and during the trying days of the organization and early days 
of Cornell University his legal advice and judgment were always consulted. 
He was a trustee from 1865 to 1875, and from 1877 to 1882. With his 
trenchant pen, in both prose and verse, he refuted the slanders which as- 
sailed the beloved founder, his friend, and when Ezra Cornell's son, Alonzo 
B. Cornell, became Governor, he did not forget the faithful attorney, who 
was otherwise in every respect qualified for the position, and appointed him 
in May, 1880, Associate Judge of the New York Court of Appeals, to fill 
a vacancy, for six months. In 1881 he was re-appointed to fill a vacancy, 
for one year, and elected in the fall of 1881 for a full term of fourteen years, 
and served until Dec. 31st, 1895. He became Director and Dean of the 
Faculty of the College of Law, Cornell, in 1896, and served in that position 
until his death. President of the New York State Bar Association, 1899. 
Republican. Judge Finch's manner was one of unassuming modesty; 
he was eloquent, yet not demonstrative; forcible and logical a model in 
forensic disputations. Upon the benchhe never indulged in captious criti- 
cisms of counsel to try to show superior legal wisdom. His poems treat 
largely of college life, his "Smoking Song" being a great favorite, but the 
one which brought to him the most fame was "The Blue and The Grey." 
He has been called the only true poet of Yale. A busy professional life 
took him from literature but he sometimes managed to take time for it. 
His prose writings and public addresses are models of chaste and beautiful 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 133 

thought, and even in his written judicial opinions when on the bench the 
literary style clung to him, making them more interesting reading than is 
ordinarily the case. LL.D., Hamilton, 1885, Yale, 1892. 
Died, July 30, 1907 at Ithaca, N. Y. 

McGRAW, JOHN. Trustee, 1865-77. Born, May 22, 1815, at Dryden, N. Y. 
Engaged in the lumber trade and removed to New Hudson, 1840, to New 
York City, 1850, and to Ithaca, 1861; erected the McGraw Building of 
the University, 1869-70. 
Died, May 4, 1877, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

SAGE, HENRY WILLIAMS. Trustee, 1870-1897. Born, Jan. 31, 1814, at 
Middletown, Conn. He began as a clerk for his uncles, Williams Bros, of 
Ithaca, and in 1837, succeeded to their business. Member of the New York 
Assembly in 1847. He was a resident of Brooklyn from 1857 to 1877, where 
he was a trustee of Plymouth Church, and a,friend of Henry Ward Beecher. 
He became one of the largest land-owners in the State of Michigan. In 
1854 he extended his business enterprises and built a lumber manufactory 
on Lake Simcoe, Canada, and a few years later, with John McGraw, built 
another at Winona, Michigan, which was at that time regarded as the 
largest in the world. He also became the owner of extensive salt-works in 
Michigan. A life-long friend of Ezra Cornell, he became deeply interested 
in Cornell University, of which he was elected a trustee in 1870, which office 
he held until bis death. He, desiring to afford to women the same oppor- 
tunity for a liberal education as men, gave Sage College to Cornell, about 
1873, at a cost of over $100,000, and endowed it with $150,000 more. He 
soon afterwards gave Sage Chapel, which another member of his family 
endowed with a preacher's fund, and where ministers of all demoninations 
are invited to preach. He, during the pendency of the Fiske Will Suit, 
offered to carry out the wishes of the testatrix, Jennie McGraw Fiske, by 
advancing the money to build and endow a University Library Building, 
the money to be considered a loan in case the University was successful, 
otherwise to be a gift. The suit having terminated unsuccessfully for Cornell 
University, at its dedication he gave the library building, together with an 
endowment of $300,000. The building had cost $250,000 and this brought 
his princely gifts up to and exceeding $1,000,000. He, as chairman of the 
Board of Trustees, had great responsibilities, and as the funds amounted 
to several million dollars, consisting largely of Western lands, his business 
experience and sound judgment were of great value to the University. 
He unselfishly gave a large part of his time from his vast private business 
to the interests of the University, and it can never repay the debt of grat- 
itude which it owes to his memory. Hia name will be forever associated 
with those of Ezra Cornell, Andrew D. White, John McGraw, and Hiram 
Sibley as the founders of Cornell University. 
Died, Sept. 18, 1897, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

SCHUYLER, GEORGE WASHINGTON. Trustee, 1865-88. Born, Feb. 2, 
1810, at Stillwater, Saratoga Co., N. Y. Removed, in 1812, to Ithaca, N. Y. 
Graduated from the University of the City of New York, 1837. Merchant. 



134 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

State Treasurer, N. Y., 1864-5. State Bank Superintendent, 1866-70. 
Member of the New York Assembly, 1875. State Canal Auditor, 1876-80. 
Author: Colonial New York, 1885. 
Died, Feb. 1, 1888, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SIBLEY, HIRAM. Trustee, 1865-88. Born, Feb. 6, 1807, at North Adams, 
Mass.; was apprenticed to a shoemaker, 1823; and later worked in factories 
of various sorts; removed to Rochester, N. Y., 1843; Sheriff of Monroe Co., 
1843; took an active part in the construction of the early telegraph lines; 
President of the Western Union Telegraph Company, 1856-66; built and 
equipped the Sibley College of Cornell University, and endowed the Sibley 
Professorship of Practical Mechanics. He was in later life the largest seed- 
man in the world, and owned the largest farm in the world, in the State of 
Illinois. 

Died, July 12, 1888, at Rochester, N. Y. 

WILLIAMS, JOSIAH BUTLER. Trustee, 1865-83. Born, Dec. 16, 1810, 
at Middletown, Conn. Lumber merchant. Removed, in 1826, to Ithaca, 
N. Y. Engaged in banking, 1837. State Senator, N. Y., 1852-5. Presi- 
dential Elector, 1856. President, First National Bank, Ithaca, 1876-83. 
Died, Sept. 26, 1883, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WOODFORD, STEWART LYNDON, LL.D., D.C.L. Trustee, 1865-1913. 
Born, Sept. 3, 1835, New York. Son of Josiah Curtis and Susan (Terry) 
Woodford. Educated at Yale and Columbia, graduating at the latter in 
1854. A.M., Yale and Columbia. LL.D., Trinity. D.C.L., Syracuse. 
Married, (1st) in 1857, Julia E. Capen, New York City, (died); (2nd), 
Sept. 26, 1890, Isabel Hanson. Began law practice in 1857 in New York 
City. Official Messenger of the Presidential Electoral College, New York, 
1860. Asst. U. S. Dist. Atty., 1861-2. Served in Union Army in Civil War, 
1862-5, becoming Brevet Brig. Gen. of Volunteers. Lieut. Gov., N. Y., 
1866-8. Defeated for Governor, 1870. Presidential Elector and President 
of the Electorial College, 1872. Member of Congress, 1873-5. U. S. Dist. 
Atty., Brooklyn, 1877-83. Member of Greater New York Charter Com- 
mission, 1896. U. S. Minister to Spain, 1897-8. 
Died, Feb. 14, 1913. 



PRESIDENTS OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

WHITE, ANDREW DICKSON, LL.D., L.H.D., D.C.L 1866-85. Born, 
Nov. 7, 1832, at Homer, N. Y. Son of Horace and Clara (Dickson) White. 
A.B., Yale, 1853, with Yale Lit. and DeForest gold medals and 1st Clark 
prize. Post-graduate studies at the Sorbonne and College de France, and 
University of Berlin, 1853-4, Yale 1856. LL.D., University of Michigan, 
1867, Cornell, 1886, Yale, 1887, St. Andrews (Scotland), 1902, Johns Hopkins, 
1902, Dartmouth, 1906; L.H.D., Columbia, 1887; Ph.D., University of 
Jena, 1889; D.C.L., Oxford (England), 1902. Married, in 1859, Mary A. 
Outwater (died 1887;) (2nd), in 1900, Helen, daughter of Dr. Edward Hicks 
Magill. Attache, U. S. Legation, St. Petersburg, 1854-5. Professor of 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 135 

History and English Literature, 1857-63, Lecturer on History, 1863-7, Uni- 
versity of Michigan. State Senator, New York, 1863-7. First President 
of Cornell, 1866-85. He personally contributed $300,000, and in 1887, 
founded the White School of History and Political Science, at Cornell, 
giving to it his historical library of over 40,000 volumes. Chairman of the 
State Republican Convention, 1871. Delegate to Republican National 
Conventions, 1872, 1884, and 1912. U. S. Commissioner to Santo Domingo, 
1871. Presidential Elector, 1872. Chairman of the Jury of Public Instruc- 
tion, Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia, in 1876. U. S. Minister to 
Germany, 1879-81, to Russia, 1892-4. Member of Venezuelan Commission, 
1896-7. U. S. Ambassador to Germany, 1899-1902. Member of the Peace 
Commission at the Hague, 1899, and president of the delegation. Trustee 
of Hobart College, 1866-77, Cornell, since 1866, Carnegie Institution, Wash- 
ington. Regent of the Smithsonian Institution. Officer of the Legion of 
Honor, France. Received the Royal Gold Medal of Prussia for Arts and 
Sciences, 1902. Honorary member of the Royal Academy of Sciences, 
Berlin. First President of the American Historical Association, 1884-5. 
Honorary member of the New England Historical and Genealogical. Society. 
Member of Massachusetts Historical Society, and American Academy of 
Arts and Letters. President, American Social Science Association, Amer. 
Philos. Soc., and member of many other societies in the U. S. and abroad. 
Trustee, Carnegie Endowment of International Peace, since 1910. Clubs: 
Century and Union League (New York), and Cosmos (Washington). Author: 
Outlines of Lectures on History, Medieval and Modern, at Michigan and 
Cornell Universities, 1858 and 1872; The Greater States of Continental 
Europe, Syllabus of Lectures Before the Graduating Classes of Cornell 
University, 1874; Relations of the National and State Governments to 
Advanced Education, 1874; Abridged Bibliography of the French Revo- 
lution, in Morris's History of the French Revolution, 1875; Paper Money 
Inflation in France, How It Came, What It Brought, and How It Ended, 
1876-1896; Battlefields of Science, 1876, English edition, 1876, Swedish 
translation, 1877; The new Germany, 1882 (German translation, 1882); 
Message of the 19th Century to the 20th, 1883; The French Revolution, 
Syllabus of Lectures, 1859-1889; The Teaching of History in Our Public 
Schools, 1890; Democracy and Education, 1891; Erasmus, in the Library 
of the World's Best Literature, 1896; A History of the Warfare of Science 
with Theology in Christendom, 1895-7 (French translation, 1899, Italian 
translation, 1902); The Warfare of Humanity with Unreason, Including 
Essays on Sarpi, Grotius, Thomasius, Turgot and Cavour (Atlantic Monthly, 
1903-7); Autobiography of Andrew Dickson White, 1905. Contributor to 
many leading reviews and magazines. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

ADAMS, CHARLES KENDALL, LL.D. 1885-92. Born, Jan. 24, 1835, at 
Derby, Vt. Educated at the University of Michigan, College de France, 
and the Universities of Leipzig, Berlin, Bonn, Munich, Rome and Paris. 
LL.D., Harvard, 1886. Married. Asst. Professor of History and Latin, 
1862-7, Professor of History, 1867-85, University of Michigan. President 
of Cornell, 1885-92, and of the University of Wisconsin, 1892-1902. By 



136 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

founding an historical seminary in the University of Michigan in 1869, he 
became the first introducer of the German seminary method of teaching in 
the United States. He was at one time Dean of Political Science in the 
University of Michigan. President of the American Historical Association, 
1888. Author of a "Manual of Historical Literature," "Democracy and 
Monarchy in France," and "Christopher Columbus." Editor-in-Chief of 
Johnson's Universal Cyclopedia. 
Died, July 26, 1902, at Redlands, Cal. 

SCHURMAN, JACOB GOULD, LL.D., Sc.D. 1892-. Born, May 22, 1854, 
at Freetown, P. E. I. Son of Robert and Lydia Schurman. He is of New 
York Dutch descent. He won the Canadian Gilchrist scholarship, in 1875, 
in connection with the University of London. A.B., Univ. of London, 
1877, A.M., 1878. Studied at Paris and Univ. of Edinburgh, 1878. Sc.D., 
Univ. of Edinburgh, 1878. Studied at Universities of Heidelberg, Berlin, 
and Gottingen, and in Italy, 1878-80. LL.D., Columbia, 1892, Yale, 1901, 
Edinburgh, 1902, Williams, 1908, Dartmouth, 1909, and Harvard, 1909. 
Married Barbara Forrest, daughter of George Munro, the publisher, of 
New York City. Professor of English Lit., Political Economy and Psy- 
chology, Acadia College, 1880-2. Professor of Metaphysics and Eng. Lit., 
Dalhousie College, 1882-6. Sage Professor of Philosophy, Cornell, 1886-92. 
President of Cornell, since 1892. President of first U. S. Philippine Com- 
mission, and spent most of 1899 in the Philippine Islands. Vice President 
of the New York Constitutional Convention in 1915. Author: Kantian 
Ethics and the Ethics of Evolution, 1881 ; The Ethical Import of Darwin- 
ism, 1888; Belief in God, 1890; Agnosticism and Religion, 1886; A Gener- 
ation of Cornell, 1898; Report (to Congress) of the Philippine Commission, 
4 vols., 1900; Philippine Affairs A Retrospect and Outlook, 1902; The 
Balkan Wars, 1913. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

ACTING PRESIDENTS OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

RUSSEL, WILLIAM CHANNING, LL.D. 1876-81. Vice President, 1870-6. 
Nephew of the famous William Charming. Graduated at Columbia College, 
1852. Married. Lawyer in New York City until 1863. Professor of Meta- 
physical, Moral and Political Science, Antioch College. Associate Pro- 
fessor of History, and Professor of South European Languages, 1867-81. 
Died, Feb. 24, 1896, at Yonkers, N. Y. 

CRANE, THOMAS FREDERICK, Litt.D. 1899. 1912-13. Born, July 12, 
1844, New York. A.B., Princeton, 1864, A.M., 1867, Litt.D., 1903. Mar- 
ried, July 10, 1872, Sarah Fay Tourtellot, of Ithaca, N. Y. Professor of 
Modern Languages, 1868-73, Spanish and Italian, 1873-84, Romance Lan- 
guages, 1884-1909. Dean of College of Arts, 1896-02, of University Faculty, 
1902-9, Acting President, 1899. Emeritous, 1909. Acting President, 
1912-13, Cornell. He recently gave his valuable Folk-Lore Library of 300 
volumes to the University Library. Author of many books on folk-lore 
and Romance literature. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 137 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELL PROFESSORS 

BAILEY, LIBERTY HYDE. Born, March 15, 1858, S. Haven, Mich. Son 
of Liberty Hyde and Sarah (Harrison) Bailey. B.S., Michigan Agricultural 
College, 1882, M.S., 1886. Married, June 6, 1883, Annette Smith, Lansing, 
Mich. He has given much attention to botanical and horticultural subjects, 
and to the economics of agriculture, agricultural education and general 
rural questions. Assistant to Professor Asa Gray, Harvard, 1882-3. Pro- 
fessor, Horticulture and Landscape Gardening, Mich. Agric. College, 1883- 
8. Professor, Horticulture, 1888-1903, Director, College of Agriculture, 
Cornell, 1903-13. Awarded Veitchian Medal, 1898. Chairman, Roosevelt 
Commission on Country Life. Fellow of American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. Member of Amer. Philos. Soc., Society of Plant Morphology and 
Physiology, and Society of Horticultural Science. Author: Survival of the 
Unlike; Evolution of Our Native Fruits; Lessons with Plants; Botany, an 
Elementary Text for Schools; Beginners' Botany; Principles of Fruit 
Growing; Principles of Vegetable-Gardening; Plant Breeding; Garden 
Making; Horticulturists' Rule-Book; Principles of Agriculture; Nursery- 
Book; Forcing-Book; Pruning-Book; Practical Garden-Book; The Nature- 
Study Idea; Outlook to Nature; The Training of Farmers; Manual of 
Gardening; The State and the Farmer; and many other valuable books. 
Editor: Cyclopedia of American Horticulture, 4 vols.; Rural Science 
Series; Garden Craft series; Rural Text-Book series; Cyclopedia of Agri- 
culture, 4 vols. Contributor to periodicals. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

COLLIN, CHARLES AVERY. Born, May 18, 1846, Benton, Yates Co., N. Y. 
Son of Henry C., and Maria (Park) Collin. A.B., Yale, 1866, A.M., 1868. 
Taught in Norwich Free Academy, 1866-70. Married May 23, 1871, Emily 
Lathrop Ripley, Norwich, Conn. (Died.) Admitted to the bar, 1870. 
Practiced law at Elmira, N. Y., 1870-87. Professor of Law, Cornell, 1887-95. 
Practiced law in New York City, since 1895. Special Counsel to Governors 
Hill and Flower, N. Y., 1887-95. One of Commissioners of Statutory Re- 
vision, State of New York, 1889-95. 

Address, 5 Nassau Street, New York City. 

CORSON, HIRAM. Born, Nov. 6, 1828, Philadelphia. Academic education. 
A.M., Princeton, 1864. LL.D., St. John's College (Md.), 1878. Litt.D., 
Princeton, 1903. Married, Sept. 13, 1854, Caroline Rollin, Paris, France 
(died May 21, 1901). Connected with Smithsonian Institution Library, 
1849-56. Lecturer on English Literature, Philadelphia, 1859-65. Pro- 
fessor of Moral Science, History and Rhetoric, Girard College, 1865-6. 
Professor of Anglo-Saxon, and English Language and Literature, St. John's 
College (Md.), 1866-70. Professor of English Literature, Cornell, 1870- 
1903. Emeritus, 1903-1911. Author of a very large number of books on 
his favorite subject. 
Died, June 16, 1911. 



138 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

EVANS, EVAN WILHELM Born, Jan. 6, 1827, Swansea, Wales. Removed, 
in 1831, to Bradford Co., Pa. Graduated at Yale College, 1851. Principal 
of Delaware Literary Institute, Franklin, N. Y., 1852-5. Tutor, Yale Col- 
lege, 1855-6. Professor of Astronomy and Natural Science, Marietta Col- 
lege, 1857-64. Engaged in mining engineering, 1864-7. Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Cornell, 1867-74. Author: Primary Elements of ' Plane and Solid 
Geometry, 1862; Studies of Cymric Philology in the Archeologia Cam- 
brensis. 

Died, May 22, 1874, Ithaca, N. Y. 

HARTT, CHARLES FREDERICK. Born, Aug. 23, 1840, Frederickton, New 
Brunswick. Graduated at Acadia College, 1860. Spent three years as a 
special student in geology under Professor L. Agassiz, in the Museum of 
Comparative Zoology at Cambridge. Assistant on the Geological Survey 
of New Brunswick, 1864-5. Geologist of the Thayer Expedition to Brazil, 
1865-6. Chief of the Geological Commission of the Empire of Brazil, 
1874-8. Author: Geology and Physical Geography of Brazil, 1870; also 
numerous scientific papers. 

Died, March 18, 1878, Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 

HUGHES, CHARLES EVANS. Born, April 11, 1862, Glens Falls, N. Y. 
Student, Colgate University, 1876-8. A.B., Brown Univ., 1881, A.M., 1884. 
LL.B., Columbia, 1884. LL.D., Brown, 1906; Columbia, Knox and La- 
fayette, 1907; Union and Colgate, 1908; George Washington, 1909; Har- 
vard, 1912. Married, Dec. 5, 1888, Antoinette Carter. Admitted to the 
bar, 1884. Prize Fellowship, Columbia Law School, 1884-7. Practical law 
in New York City, 1884-91, 1893-1906. Professor of Law, 1891-3, Special 
Lecturer, 1893-5, Cornell. Special Lecturer, New York Law School, 1893-1900. 
Counsel to the Stevens Gas Commission of the New York Legislature, 1905, 
and Armstrong Insurance Commission, 1905-6. Special Asst. to U. S. Atty. 
Gen., in Coal Investigation, 1906. Nominated for Mayor of New York 
City, by Republican Convention, 1905, but declined. Governor of New 
York, 1907-1910. Justice of the U. S. Supreme Court, since 1910. Trustee, 
Brown University. Member of American, New York State, and New York 
City Bar Associations. 

Address, Washington, D. C. 

LAW, JAMES. Born, Feb. 13, 1838, Edinburgh, Scotland. Educated at 
burg schools, Dunbar; veterinary and medical schools, Edinburgh; L'Ecole 
Veterinaire, Alfort, Paris; L'Ecole Veterinaire, Lyons, France; Grad. 
Highland and Agricultural Society Veterinary Board, 1857 (V. S.) ; Royal 
College of Veterinary Surgeons (M. R. C. V. S.) 1863. F.R.C.V.S., 1870. 
Professor of Anatomy and Materia Medica, Edinburgh New Veterinary 
College, London, 1860-5. Professor of Anatomy, Albert Veterinary College, 
London, 1865-7. Professor of Veterinary Science, Cornell, 1868-96. Di- 
rector and Dean, New York State Veterinary College, Cornell, 1896-1911. 
Consulting Veterinarian to the New York State Agricultural Society, 1869- 
96. Chairman, U. S. Treasury Cattle Commission, 1882-3. Field Chief 
of Bureau of Animal Industry for Extinction of cattle lung plagues in Illinois 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 139 

and New York, 1887-8. Author of General and Descriptive Anatomy of 
Domestic Animals; Farmers' Veterinary Adviser; Text-Book of Veterinary 
Medicine; and numerous scientific monographs. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

ROBERTS, ISAAC PHILLIPS. Born, July 24, 1833, in Seneca Co., N. Y. 
M.Agr., Iowa State College, 1875. Married, Nov. 3, 1857, Margaret Marr. 
Professor of Agriculture and Dean of Faculty of Agriculture, Cornell, 1873- 
94; Director, Ag. Experiment Station, 1888-1903; Professor Emeritus and 
Lecturer on Agriculture, Cornell, since 1903. Asst. Editor of the Country 
Gentleman. President, N. Y. State Dairymen's Association, N. Y. Agri- 
cultural Society, A. A. A. S., and Western N. Y. Hort. Society. Author: 
The Fertility of the Land, 1898; The Farmstead, 1900; The Farmers' 
Business Handbook, 1903; The Horse, 1905. 
Address, Palo Alto, Cal. 

SMITH, GOLDWIN. Born, Aug. 23, 1833, at Reading, England. Son of 
Dr. Richard Smith. A.B., Magdalen College, Oxford University, 1845. 
A.M. Fellow, Univ. College, Oxford, 1847. LL.D., Brown, 1864, Princeton, 
1896. D.C.L., Oxford, 1882. L.H.D., Univ. State of New York. Married, 
in 1875, Mrs. Harriet (Dixon) Boulton, daughter of Thomas Dixon, of 
Boston. Called to the English bar, 1847. Regius Professor of Modern 
History, Oxford, 1858-66. Spoke and wrote for the Union cause during 
our Civil War. Visited the United States in 1864. Came to the United 
States, 1868. Professor, 1868-71, English History, CorneU. Resided in 
Toronto, Canada, from 1871 to time of his death. Active in educational 
associations. Vice Pres., Canadian Land Law Amendment Asso. Presi- 
dent, Modern Language Association of America. Advocate of closer political 
relations between Canada and the United States. Author of an immense 
number of books and magazine articles on history, politics, etc., etc. 
Died, June 7, 1910. 

THURSTON, ROBERT HENRY. Born, Oct. 25, 1839, Providence, R. I. 
C.E. and Ph.B., Brown University, 1859, A.M., 1869, LL.D., 1889. Doctor 
of Engineering, Stevens Inst. Tech., 1885. Trained in his father's shops 
until 1861. In U. S. Navy, 1861-72. Asst. Eng. and Eng. in charge of 
vessels. At U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Acting Asst. Professor of 
Natural Philosophy, 1865-71. Professor of Mechanical Eng., Stevens Inst. 
Tech., 1871-85. Married (1st) on October, 1865, Susan Taylor Gladding, 
Providence (died in March, 1870); (2nd), Aug. 4, 1880, Leonora Boughton, 
New York. Director of Sibley College and Professor of Mech. Eng., Cor- 
nell, 1885-1903. First President, American Society of Mech. Engineers, 
1880-3. Vice Pres., A. A. A. S., 1877-8, 1884. Vice Pres., Amer. Inst. 
Mining Engineers, 1878-9. Inventor of testing machines, engine governors 
and other devices. U. S. Commissioner to Vienna Exposition, 1873, Paris, 
1889. Served on many U. S. and State Commissions. Member of U. S. 
and foreign scientific societies. Loyal Legion. Officer de L' Instruction 
Publique de France. Author of a large number of books on Mechanical 
Engineering, materials, heat, engines, boilers, the steam engine, etc., etc. 
Writer of 300 professional and scientific papers, He was an editor of Science, 
and of Johnson's and Appleton's Cyclopedias. 
Died, Oct. 25, 1903. 



140 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

WILDER, DR. BURT GREEN. Born, Aug. 11, 1841, Boston. B.S., Lawrence 
Scientific School, Harvard, 1862. M.D., Harvard, 1866. Married, (1st), 
June 9, 1878, Sarah CoweU Nichols, Boston (died Nov. 14, 1904); (2nd), 
June 11, 1906, Mary Field. In U. S. A., July, 1862 to Sept., 1865, as Med- 
ical Cadet, Asst. Surgeon and Surgeon, 55th Regt. Mass. Infantry (Colored). 
Assistant in Comparative anatomy, Museum of Comparative Zoology, 
1866-8. Curator, Herpetology, Boston Society of Natural History, 1867-8. 
Professor of Neurology and Vertebrate Zoology, Cornell, 1867-1911. Lec- 
turer on Comparative Anatomy, Anderson (Agassiz) Summer School of 
Natural History, 1873-4, and 1875, Summer Schools at Peoria and Normal, 
111.; on Physiology, Medical School of Maine, 1875-84, and Univ. of Mich- 
igan, 1876; at Lowell Institute, 1866, 1871. Member of many societies. 
He has prepared nearly 2,000 vertebrate brains, including 13 from educated 
persons. Author of many books. 
Address, Brookline, Mass. 



LIST OF DISTINGUISHED NON-RESIDENT 
CORNELL PROFESSORS 

AGASSIZ, JEAN LOUIS RODOLPHE, LL.D. Natural History, 1868. 

Died, Dec. 14, 1873, at Cambridge, Mass. 
CURTIS, GEORGE WILLIAM, LL.D. Recent Literature, 1869-71. 

Died, Aug. 31, 1892, on Staten Island, N. Y. 

DWIGHT, THEODORE WILLIAM, LL.D. American Constitutional 
Law, 1869-73. 

Died, June 28, 1892, at Clinton, N. Y. 
GOULD, JOHN STANTON. Agriculture, 1869-74. 

Died, Sept. 8, 1874, at Hudson, N. Y. 
LOWELL, JAMES RUSSELL, LL.D. English Literature, 1869-77. 

Died, Aug. 12, 1891, at Cambridge, Mass. 
SMITH, GOLDWIN, LL.D., L.H.D., D.C.L. English History, 1872-81. 

Died June 7, 1910, at Toronto, Canada. 
SMITH, GREENE. Ornithology, 1870-1. 
TAYLOR, BAYARD, A.M. German Literature, 1870-7. 

Died, Dec. 19, 1878, at Berlin, Germany. 



LIST OF DISTINGUISHED CORNELL LECTURERS 

ADAMS, CHARLES KENDALL, LL.D. English Constitutional History, 
1882-5. 

Died, July 26, 1903, at Redlands, Cal. 
ADAMS, HENRY CARTER, Ph.D. Political Economy, 1880-3. 

Address, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
ADLER, FELIX. Ph.D. Hebrew and Oriental Literature, 1874-6. 

Address, 123 E. 60th Street, New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 141 

CHAMBERLAIN, DANIEL HENRY, LL.D. The Relation of the States to 
the United States under the Constitution, 1888-. 

Died, April 12, 1907. 
FINCH, FRANCIS MILES, LL.D. The Statute of Frauds, 1888- . 

Died, July 30, 1907, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
FISKE, JOHN, A.M. American History, 1881. 
FREEMAN, EDWARD AUGUSTUS, D.C.L. General European History, 

1881. 

FROUDE, JAMES ANTHONY, A.M. English Rule in Ireland, 1872. 
GREENE, GEORGE WASHINGTON, A.M. American History, 1871-3. 
Grandson of Gen. Nathaniel Greene of the Rev. War. 

Died, Feb. 2, 1883, at E. Greenwich, R. I. 
SANBORN, FRANKLIN BENJAMIN, A.M. Social Science, 1885-. 

Address, Concord, Mass. 

VON HOLST, HERMANN EDWARD, Ph.D. American and German Con- 
stitutional History, 1879. 
WARNER, CHARLES DUDLEY, A.M. Recend Literature, 1884. 

Died, about 1895. 
WHITE, ANDREW DICKSON, LL.D., L.H.D., D.C.L. Honorary; History 

and Political Science, 1887 . 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



LIST OF DISTINGUISHED CORNELL PROFESSORS 

(Other than Cornellians) 

ADAMS, CHARLES KENDALL, LL.D. History, 1885-9. President, 1885-92. 

Died, July 26, 1902, at Redlands, Cal. 

ANDREWS, E. BENJAMIN, D.D. LL.D. Political Economy and Finance, 
1888-9. President, Denison University, 1875-9, Brown University, 1889-98. 
Chancellor, University of Nebraska, 1900-8. Author. 

Address, Lincoln, Neb. 

ANTHONY, WILLIAM ARNOLD. Physics, 1872-87. Author. Consulting 
electrician. 

Died, May 29, 1908. 

BABCOCK, CHARLES. Architecture, 1871-97. Dean and Director, College 
of Architecture, 1896-7. 
Died, Aug. 27, 1913. 

BAILEY, LIBERTY HYDE. General and Experimental Horticulture, 1888- 
1903, Rural Economy, 1903-12. Dean, College of Agriculture, 1903-12. 
Author. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BANCROFT, WILDER DWIGHT. Physical Chemistry, since 1895. He is 
a grandson of George Bancroft, the historian. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



142 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

BENNETT, CHARLES EDWIN, L.H.D. Latin, since 1892. Author. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BOYESEN, HJALMAR HJORTH. N. European Languages, 1873-6, Ger- 
man Literature, 1876-80. Afterwards a professor in Columbia University. 
Author of "Norse Tales," and "Goethe and Schiller." 

Died, in 1895. 

BRISTOL, GEORGE PRENTICE. Greek, since 1888. Director of the Sum- 
mer School, since 1906. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BURDICK, FRANCIS MARION. Law, 1887-91. Professor of Law, Columbia 
University, since 1891. Mayor of Utica, N. Y. Author. 

Address, New York City. 

CALDWELL, GEORGE CHAPMAN. Chemistry, 1867-07. 
Died, Sept. 5, 1907, at Canandaigua, N. Y. 

COLLIN, CHARLES AVERY. Law, 1887-95. General Counsel, Brooklyn 
Rapid Transit R. R. Co., and allied lines. 
Address, 1038 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

COOPER, LANE. English Language and Literature, since 1906. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

CORSON, HIRAM, LL.D., Litt.D. Rhetoric and Oratory, 1870-1. Anglo- 
Saxon and English Literature, 1872-86, English Literature and Rhetoric, 
1886-90, English Literature, 1890-03. He was a great Shakespearean 
scholar. Author. 

Died, June 16, 1911. 

CRAFTS, JAMES MASON, LL.D. General Chemistry, 1867-70. President, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1897-1900. 
Address, 111 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

CRANE, THOMAS FREDERICK, Litt.D. Romance Languages, 1868-1909, 
Emeritus, since 1909. Dean, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 1896-02, Uni- 
versity Faculty, 1901-9. Acting President, 1899, 1912-13. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
DANN, HOLLIS E. Music, since 1904. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

DE GARMO, CHARLES. Science and Art of Education, 1898-1914. Dean. 
Summer Session, 1899-190^. President, Swarthmore College, 1891-8, 
Author. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
EVANS, EVAN WILHELM. Mathematics, 1867-74. 

Died, May 22, 1874, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

FINCH, FRANCIS MILES, LL.D. Law, 1895-1903. Director, College of 
Law, 1896-1903. Dean, Faculty of Law, 1895-1903. Judge of the Court 
of Appeals, New York. Author of the "The Blue and The Grey," and other 
poems. 

Died, July 30, 1907, at Ithaca, N. Y, 

FISKE, WILLARD. N. European Languages, and Librarian, 1868-83. 
Died, Sept. 17, 1904, at Frankfort, Germany. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 143 

FLAGG, ISAAC. Greek, 1871-88. Professor of Greek, University of Cali- 
fornia, since 1888. 

Address, Berkeley, Cal. 

FUERTES, ESTEVAN ANTONIO. Civil Engineering, 1873-02, Sanitary 
Enginering, 1896-02, Astromony, 1902-3. Dean, College of Civil Engineer- 
ing, 1896-03. 

Died, Jan. 16, 1903, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
HAMMOND, WILLIAM ALEXANDER. Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy, 

1892-03, and Aesthetics, since 1903. 

HART, JAMES MORGAN, L.H.D. South European Languages, 1868-9, 
North European Languages, 1869-72, Rhetoric and English Literature, 
1890-03, 1903-7. 

Died April 18, 1916, Washington, D. C. 
HARTT, CHARLES FREDERICK. Geology, 1868-78. 

Died, March 18, 1878, at Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 

HAYES, ALFRED, JR. Law, since 1907. Candidate for Justice of the New 
York Supreme Court, of National Progressive party, 1912, of National 
Progressive and Democratic parties, 1914. 

HUGHES, CHARLES EVANS, LL.D. Law, 1891-3. Governor, New York, 
1907-10. Justice, U. S. Supreme Court, since 1910. 

Address, Washington, D. C. 

HUTCHINS, HARRY BURNS, LL.D. Law, 1887-95. Dean, Law Faculty, 
1892-5. Dean, College of Law, and Professor of Law, since 1895, Acting 
President, 1897-8, and 1909-, and President, since 1914, University of Michi- 
gan. 

Address, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

JENKS, JEREMIAH WHIPPLE, LL.D. Political Economy, Political. Mu- 
nicipal, Civil and Social Institutions and Politics, 1891-1910. Special Expert 
to Government of Mexico on currency reform, 1903. Advisor to China on 
coinage. Professor, New York University, since 1910. 

Address, New York City. 
JONES, GEORGE WILLIAM. Mathematics, 1877-95. 

Died, Oct. 29, 1911. 

LAW, JAMES. Veterinary Science, 1868-96. Dean, New York State Veterin- 
ary College, 1896-. Author. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

MORRIS, JOHN LEWIS. Practical Mechanics, 1868-74, Mechanical Engi- 
neering and Machine Construction, 1874-81, Practical Mechanics and Ma- 
chine Construction, 1881-1903. 

Died, Nov. 19, 1905, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
OLIVER, JAMES EDWARD. Mathematics, 1871-95. Author. 

Died, March 27, 1895, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

POLK, WILLIAM MECKLENBURG, LL.D. Gynecology and Obstetrics, 
1898-06, Clinical Surgery, since 1906. Director, Cornell Medical College 
and Dean of Faculty, since 1898. Son of Maj. Gen. Leonidas Polk, U.S.A. 
Author. 

Address, 7 E. 36 Street, New York City. 



144 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

PRENTISS, ALBERT NELSON. Botany, Horticulture and Arboriculture, 
1868-95. 

Died, Aug. 14, 1896, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

ROBERTS, ISAAC PHILLIPS. Agriculture, 1873-1903. Director, New 
York State College of Agriculture, 1890-6. Dean, Faculty of Agriculture, 
1896-03. 

Address, Palo Alto, Cal. 
ROEHRIG, FREDERICK L. O Living Asiatic Languages, 1873-86. 

Died, July 16, 1908, at Pasadena, Cal. 

RUSSEL, WILLIAM CHANNING, LL.D. History and South European 
Languages, 1867-81. Vice President, 1870-86. Acting President, 1876-81. 
Afterwards Professor in Brown University. 

Died, Feb. 24, 1896, at Yonkers, N. Y. 

SCHAEFFER, CHARLES ASHMEAD. Chemistry and Mineralogy, 1869-87. 
Dean, General Faculty, 1886-7. President, Iowa State Univ.. 1887-98. 

Died, Sept. 23, 1898, at Iowa City, la. 
SCHMIDT, NATHANIEL. Semetic Languages and Literature, since 1896. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SCHURMAN, JACOB GOULD, LL.D. Philosophy, 1886-96. President, 
since 1895. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
SHACKFORD, CHARLES CHAUNCEY. Rhetoric and Oratory, 1871-86. 

Died, Dec. 25, 1891, Brookline, Mass. 

SMITH, GOLDWIN, LL.D., L.H.D., D.C.L. English History, 1869-70. 
Formerly Regius Professor of History. Oxford Univ. Author. Benefactor. 

Died, June 7, 1910. 

SPRAGUE, HOMER BAXTER. Rhetoric and Oratory and English Litera- 
ture, 1868-70. President, University of North Dakota, 1887-91. 
Address, 142 E. 27th Street, New York City. 

STEBBINS, ALFRED. South European Languages, 1870-82. 
Died, July 15, 1887, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

STEPHENS, H. MORSE, Litt.D. Modern European and English History, 
1894-02. Professor of History, University of California, since 1902. Presi- 
dent of American Historical Association. 

Address, Berkeley, Cal. 

STERRETT, JOHN ROBERT STITLINGTON, LL.D. Greek, and Head of 
the Department, 1901-14. 

Died, June 15, 1914. 
TARR, RALPH STOCKMAN. Geology and Physical Geography, 1892-1913. 

Died, March 21, 1912. 

THURSTON, ROBERT HENRY, LL.D. Mechanical Engineering, and Dean 
of Sibley College, 1885-1903. Dean, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, 
1896-1903. Author. 

Died, Oct. 25, 1903, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

TITCHENER, EDWARD BRADFORD, LL.D. Psychology, since 1892. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 145 

TUTTLE, HERBERT History and Theory of Politics and International Law, 
1883-7, History of Political and Municipal Institutions and International 
Law, 1887-90, Modern European History, 1890-94. Author of a History 
of Prussia. 

Died, June 21, 1894, at Binghamton, N. Y. 

TYLER, CHARLES MELLEN, D.D. History and Philosophy of Religion 
and Christian Ethics, 1891-03. 
Address, Scranton, Pa. 

TYLER, MOSES COIT, LL.D. American History, 1881-00. Author. 
Died, Dec. 28, 1900, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

WAIT, LUCIEN AUGUSTUS. Mathematics, 1870-1910. Founder and Presi- 
dent of the Cascadilla School. U. S. Consul, Athens, Greece, 1873-4. Author. 
Died in 1914. 

WHEELER, BENJAMIN IDE, LL.D. Greek, and Classical and Comparative 
Philology, 1886-99. President, University of California, since 1899. 
Address, Berkeley, Cal. 

WHITE, ANDREW DICKSON, LL.D., L.H.D., D.C.L. History, 1866-85, 
President, 1866-85. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WHITE, HORATIO STEVENS, LL.D. Ancient Languages, 1876-8, German, 
1878-83, German Language and Literature, 1883-02. Dean of the Faculty, 
1888-96, of the University Faculty, 1896-02. Professor of German, Harvard, 
since 1902. 

Address, Cambridge, Mass. 

WILDER, BURT GREEN. Comparative Anatomy, Zoology and Neurology, 
1867-1910. 
Address, Brookline, Mass. 

WILLCOX, WALTER FRANCES, LL.D. Social Science, Statistics and 
Political Economy, since 1892. Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science, 1902-7. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WILLIAMS, HENRY SHALER. Geology, and Paleontology, 1879-92, 
Geology, since 1904. Dean of General Faculty, 1887-92. Professor of 
Geology, Yale, 1892-04. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WILLIAMS, SAMUEL GARDNER. Geology, 1879-86, Teaching, 1886-00. 
Died, June 19, 1900, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

WILSON, WILLIAM DEXTER, D.D., LL.D., L.H.D. Moral and Intellectual 
Philosophy, 1868-86. Registrar, 1868-86. Warden, DeLancey Divinity 
School, 1886-00. 
Died, July 30, 1900, at Syracuse, N. Y. 



146 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI BY CLASSES 

'69 

BEHRINGER, GEORGE FREDERICK, A.B., D.D. (Hartwick Theo. Sem. 
1896). Born Oct. 13, 1846, in New York City. Attended Pennsylvania 
College, 1866-8, and Cornell, 1868-9, graduating A.B., 1869. Attended 
Halle, Tubingen, Leipzig and Geneva Universities, 1870-3. Asst. Professor 
of the German Language and Literature, Cornell, 1869-70. Acting Professor 
of Rhetoric, German and French, Howard University, 1874-5. Ordained 
a minister in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1876. Pastor at Indiana- 
polis, 1877-8, Mendon (111.), 1879-80, Des Moines, 1880-2, Brooklyn, 1882-7, 
and New York City. Engaged in editorial work for Funk & Wagnalls, 
publishers, of New York City. Professor of Church History, Hartwick 
Theological Seminary, New York, 1886-. In charge of one of the depart- 
ments of the Lutheran Observer. Contributor to the Lutheran Quarterly 
Review. Translator and editor of Rein's "Life of Luther," and Grob's 
"Life of Zwingle." Editor in charge of the American edition of Mayer's 
"Commentaries," 1883. At commencement the diplomas were given out 
alphabetically and he received the first diploma given by Cornell. 
Died, March 3, 1909, at Nyack, N. Y. 

BUCHWALTER, MORRIS LYON, A.B. Born, Sept. 8, 1846, at Halls- 
ville, Ross Co., Ohio, of German-Swiss ancestry. Attended Ohio 
Wesleyan University. Attended Cornell, 1868-9, graduating A.B., 1869. 
LL.B., Cincinnati Law CoUege, 1870. Lawyer. Married, May 14, 1873, 
Louise Timmerman, of Wooster, Ohio (died Dec. 10, 1902). Trustee, Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, 1872-7. Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of 
Hamilton County, in which Cincinnati is situated, Ohio, 1881-7. President 
of the Cornell Alumni Association, 1892. 

Home, 3315 Reading Road, Cincinnati. Office, Carew Building, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

FORAKER, JOSEPH BENSON, A.B. Born, July 5, 1846, at Rainsboro, 
Highland County, Ohio, of English ancestry. Enlisted July 14, 1862, as 
a private in the 89th Ohio Infantry, and served to the end of the war, be- 
coming First Lieutenant and Brevet Captain. With a soldier as a com- 
panion, he carried the news, by a boat, floating and rowing down the river, 
from Gen. Sherman to Admiral Foote, and the fleet at Savannah, Ga., 
announcing for the first time to the North, the success of Sherman's March 
through Georgia. Attended Ohio Wesleyan University, 1866-8, and CorneD, 
1868-9, graduating A.B., 1869. Admitted to the bar and began practice 
at Cincinnati, 1869. Married, Oct. 4, 1870, Julia Bundy, daughter of 
Hezekiah S. Bundy, Representative in Congress, of Jackson County, Ohio, 
whom he had met as a fellow student at Ohio Wesleyan University, at Dela- 
ware, Ohio. Judge of the Superior Court of Cincinnati, 1879-80; resigned 
on account of ill health. Republican candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1883; 
was defeated, but elected Governor in 1885 and 1887; again defeated, 1889, 
for same office. U. S. Senator, 1897-1903, 1903-9. Chairman of Republican 
State Convention, Ohio, 1886, 1890, 1896, 1900. Delegate-at-Large from 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 147 

Ohio to Republican National Conventions, 1884, 1888, 1892, 1896, 1900, 
1904. Chairman of the Ohio Delegation, 1884 and 1888, and presented to 
both Conventions the name of Hon. John Sherman for nomination for the 
Presidency. In the conventions of 1892 and 1896 served as chairman of 
committee on resolutions, and as such reported the platform each time to 
the convention. Presented the name of Hon. William McKinley to the 
conventions of 1896 and 1900 for nomination to the Presidency. As a Sen- 
ator in Congress he had the great pleasure of voting for the confirmation 
of the nomination of President Andrew D. White of Cornell as U. S. Am- 
bassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the German Empire in 1897. 
Author: Life Notes, 1915. 
Address, Traction Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

WILLIAMS, OSCAR FITZALAN, A.B. Born, June 29, 1843, at Livonia, 
Livingston County, New York. Son of Mason and Wealthy Green Williams, 
Attended Genesee College and Michigan University. Attended Cornell, 
1868-9, graduating A.B., 1869. Married, July 11, 1872, Arabella Amanda 
Sanford, of Livonia, N. Y. Teacher. Lecturer on the Laws of Commerce 
and Instructor in Mathematics, Rochester Business University, 1872-92. 
Author of several commercial text-books. Republican. U. S. Consul to 
Havre, France, 1889-93. He was the last U. S. Consul to Manila, Philippine 
Islands, appointed in 1897, and at the outbreak of the Spanish-American 
War went to Shanghai, China, where he helped Admiral George Dewey, 
U. S. Navy, and accompanied him and the fleet, and was a spectator at 
the battle and victory of Manila Bay. After the war he took an active 
part in the adjustment of the islands to the new conditions. U. S. Consul 
General to Singapore, Strait's Settlements. 
Died, Dec. 6, 1909, at Singapore. 

70 

BRIGHAM, JOHNSON. Born, March 11, 1846, at Cherry Valley, N. Y. 
Married, Dec. 20, 1892, Lucy Hitchcock Walker, of Ottumwa, la. U. S. 
Consul, Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany, 1893. State Librarian, Iowa, since 
1898. President, National Association of State Libraries, 1904. 
Address, Des Moines, la. 

CHAMBERS, JULIUS. Born, Nov. 21, 1850, at Bellefontaine, Ohio. Jour- 
nalist. Author. On staff New York Herald, in various capacities, and in 
all parts of the world, 1873-89. Editor, Herald, 1886-9. First Editor, 
Paris Herald. Managing editor, New York World, 1889-91. Devoted to 
travel and literary work, since 1891. Lecturer on Journalism, Cornell, 
1903-4. Author and editor of many books. 
Address, Lotos Club, New York City. 

COMSTOCK, THEODORE BRYANT, B.S. Bora, July 27, 1849, at Cuyahoga 
Falls, Ohio. Married, Dec. 9, 1880, Blanche Huggins, of Cleveland. Mining 
Engineer. Geologist. Acting Professor of Geology and Paleontology, 
Cornell, 1875-9. Mining Engineering and Physics, University of Illinois, 
1885-9. Founder and Director, Arizona School of Mines, 1891-5. Presi- 



148 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

dent University of Arizona, 1893-5. Consulting engineer of some of the 
largest mining companies in the world. Vice President (presiding), Na- 
tional Irrigation Congress, 1893. Author and editor. 
Died in 1915. 

DIXON, BRANDT VAN BLARCOM, A.B. Born, Feb. 27, 1850, at Patterson, 
N. J. Married, June 24, 1873, Eliza R. Carson, of Caledonia, Mich. Or- 
ganized, in October, 1887, and President of H. Sophia Newcomb College 
for Women, and Professor of Metaphysics, Tulane University, since 1887. 
Writer. His son, James Carson Dixon, B.S., '96. 
Address, 1220 Washington Ave., New Orleans. 

EDDY, HENRY TURNER, C.E., Ph.D. (1872), LL.D. (Centre CoUege, 1892). 
Born, June 9, 1844, at Stoughton, Mass. Married, Jan. 4, 1870, Sebella 
Elizabeth Taylor, of New Haven, Conn. Asst. Professor of Mathematics 
and Civil Engineering, Cornell, 1869-73, Mathematics, Princeton, 1873-4, 
Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering, 1874-90, Dean of Aca- 
demic Faculty, 1874-7, 1884-9, Acting President and President-Elect, 1890, 
University of Cincinnati. President, Rose Polytechnic Institute, 1891-4. 
Professor of Engineering and Mechanics, 1894-7, Head Professor of Math- 
ematics and Mechanics, College of Engineering, since 1907, Dean of Grad- 
uate School, since 1906, University of Minnesota. Author. 
Address, 916 Sixth St., Minneapolis, Mum. 

71 

BARNARD, WILLIAM STEBBINS, B.S. Married Miss Nichols, of Boston. 
Zoologist of the Woodruff Scientific Expedition, 1878. Asst. Professor of 
Entomology, and Lecturer on Zoology, Cornell, 1879-81. Professor of 
Natural History, Drake University, 1886-7. Author. 
Died, Nov. 13, 1887, at Des Moines, la. 

BENTON, GEORGE ALDEN, A.B. Born, May 7, 1848, at Tolland, Conn. 
Married, July 8, 1892, Catherine Westerdeck, of Batavia, N. Y. Dist. 
Atty., Monroe Co., N. Y., 1886-92, Surrogate, 1895-05. County Judge, 
1906. Justice of the New York Supreme Court since 1907. 
Address, Rochester, N. Y. 

DE ANGELIS, PASCAL CHARLES JOSEPH, A.B. He attended Hobart 
CoUege, 1867-8. LL.B., Hamilton, 1875. Admitted to the bar, 1878. 
Justice of the New York Supreme Court since 1907. 
Address, Utica, N. Y. 

EDGREN, AUGUSTUS HJALMER, Ph.B. Lieutenant, Swedish Army. 
Lieutenant, Engineers, U. S. Army, 1861-3. Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages and Sanscrit, University of Nebraska, 1885-. Author (with W. D. 
Whitney) of a German-English and English-German Dictionary, 1877. 
Translator. 

Address, Lincoln, Neb. 

O'NEILL, JAMES, A.B. He attended St. Lawrence University, 1863-7. 
LL.B., Union, 1873. Editor of the Neillsville Times, 1880-4. Member of 
Wisconsin Assembly, 1885. Judge of the Wisconsin Circuit Court. 
Address, Neillsville, Wis. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 149 

SEWELL, ALBERT HENRY, B.S. Born, Oct. 30, 1847, at Hamden, N. Y. 
Married, in 1889, Mary E. Wright. Assemblyman, 1877-8. County Judge, 
Delaware Co., N. Y., 1889-99. Justice of the New York Supreme Court 
since 1899. Alumni Trustee, 1908-13. 
Address, Walton, N. Y. 

VAN CLEEF, CHARLES EDWARD, B.S. Born, Sept. 29, 1850, at Seneca 
Falls, N. Y. Son of Alexander M. VanCleef, and brother of Mynderse 
Van Cleef, '74. Unmarried. M. D., Homeopathic Medical College, New York 
City, 1874. Resident Surgeon, Homeopathic Hospital, 1874-5. Member 
of Brooklyn Board of Health, 1875. Attending Physician, Brooklyn Nursery, 
1876. President, Tompkins Co. Homeo. Medical Society. President, 
Alumni Association, Ithaca. Director, Ithaca Trust Company. 
Died, Aug. 4, 1896, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

WILSON, WILLIAM DsLANCEY, A.B., D.D. (Hobart, 1896). Born, May 
21, 1847, Geneva, N. Y. Son of Rev. Dr. William D. Wilson, of Cornell. 
Married, May 18, 1876, Henrietta Georgia Harlow, New Brighton, N. Y. 
Protestant Episcopal Minister. 

Address, St. Mark's Rectory, Syracuse, N. Y. 



'72 

BIRGE, GEORGE KINGSLEY. Born in December, 1849, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Married, Carrie Humphrey. Author of "Alma Mater," Cornell. Manu- 
facturer. 

Address, The Circle, Buffalo, N. Y. 

CRANDALL, CHARLES LEE, B.C.E., C.E. (1876). Born, July 20, 1850, 
at Bridgewater, N. Y. Married, Aug. 20, 1878, Myra G. Robbins. Asst. 
Professor, 1875-91, Asso. Professor, 1891-5, Civil Engineering; Professor 
of Railway Engineering and Geodesy, 1895-8; Railway Engineering, 1908- 
15; in charge of College of Engineering, 1903-6, Cornell. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

HEADLEY, RUSSELL, B.S. Born, Sept. 27, 1852, Stockbridge, Mass. Son 
of Joel T. Headley, the historian. Married, Oct. 31, 1888, Adelia Jenkins, 
New York City, Dist. Atty. Orange Co., N. Y., 1883-. Author and editor 
of several law books. 
Died, in 1915. 

HITCHCOCK, ROM YN Born, Dec. 1, 1851, at St. Louis, Mo. Married, 
April 21, 1875, Emma Louise Bingham, of Ithaca, N. Y. Professor of Chem- 
istry, Medical College, Chicago, 1876-7. Professor Koto, Chiu Gakko, 
Osaka, Japan, 1887-9. Curator, National Museum, Washington, D. C., 
1884-99. Consulting Chemist and Technologist, since 1899. Lecturer, 
Cornell, 1909. U. S. Commissioner to China, for Chicago Exposition, 
1890-2. Author. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



150 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

HYDE, EDWARD WYLLIS, B.C.E., C.E. (1874). Born, Oct. 17, 1843, at 
Saginaw, Mich. Lieutenant, U. S. Vols. in Civil War. Asst. Professor, 
1875-8; Professor, 1878-, Mathematics; Dean, 1892-3, 1898-00; Chair- 
man of Faculty, 1894-5, University of Cincinnati. ' Treasurer and Actuary, 
Columbia Life Ins. Co., 1903-. Author. 

Address, 814 Lincoln Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

LOOMIS, CHESTER. Born, Oct. 18, 1852, near Syracuse, N. Y. Married, 
Aug. 23, 1883, at Kansas City, Mo., Sarah S. Dana, of St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Figure and landscape painter, A. N. A., 1906. 
Address, Englewood, N. J. 

McMILLAN, DANIEL HUGH. Born, March 7, 1848, at York, N. Y. Mar- 
ried, Oct. 9, 1872, Delphia Jackson. Delegate-at-Large, New York Con- 
stutitional Convention, 1894. Justice of the Supreme Court, New Mexico, 
1900-3. 
Died, June 2, 1908, at Denver, Col. 

MILLER, WILLIAM HENRY. Born in 1848, in Trenton, N. Y. Married, 
in 1876, Emma Halsey, of Ithaca, N. Y. Architect of the President's House, 
Barnes Hall, University Library, Boardman Hall, Infirmaries, and Pru- 
dence Risley Hall, and Chi Phi Lodge, Cornell; Fiske, Mrs. McGraw and 
W. H. Sage mansions; High School, Savings Bank, Congregational, Bap- 
tist and Unitarian Churches, Ithaca; Main Building at Wells College, and 
many other public and private buildings. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

NORTH, SAFFORD ELISHA. Born, Jan. 27, 1852, at Alexander, N. Y. 
Married, Nov. 23, 1881, Cora Munroe Griswold, Batavia, N. Y. Dist. 
Atty., 1881-7. County Judge, 1888-98. 
Address, Batavia, N. Y. 

PARSELL, CHARLES VICTOR. Born, Nov. 14, 1851, Akron, N. Y. Mar- 
ried, in 1882, Genevieve L. Carroll, Camden, N. Y. Principal, Cascadilla 
School, Ithaca, 1893-15. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

PRICE, CHARLES SIVERMAN, B.C.E. Born, Aug. 27, 1852, at W. Chester, 
Pa. Married, June 7, 1883, Sarah H. Haws, of Johnsontown, Pa. Presi- 
dent, Cambria Steel Company, since 1910. 
Address, Johnstown, Pa. 

SALMON, DANIEL ELMER, D.V.S., D.V.M. (1876). Born, July 23, 1850, 
at Mt. Olive, N. J. Married. Chief of the U. S. Bureau of Animal In- 
dustry, 1884-06. Director, National Veterinary School, Montevideo, 
Uruguay, 1906-15. President, U. S. Veterinary Med. Asso., 1898. Author. 
Alumni Trustee, 1888-93, 1895-6. 
Died, in 1915. 

SEAMAN, LOUIS LIVINGSTON. Born, Oct. 17, 1851, at Newburgh, N. Y. 
Married, (1st), in 1889, Fannie Blackstone Freeman, (died in 1895); (2nd), 
Dec. 12, 1907, Mary Stuart Huntington, of Boston. Army Surgeon, U. S. 
Vols., Spanish- American War. Special studies of contagious and epidemic 
diseases, in India. Delegate to several international congresses. Author. 
Address, 247 Fifth Ave., New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 151 

SERVISS, GARRETT PUTNAM, B.S. Born, March 24, 1851, Sharon Springs, 
N. Y. Married Ella Belts, of Ithaca, N. Y., (died). Editor, New York 
Sun, 1872-92. Lecturer on history and travel, since 1892. Author of 
books and articles on astronomy and science. 
Address, 8 Middaugh St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SMITH, HERBERT HUNTINGTON. Born, Jan. 21, 1852, Manlius, N. Y. 
Married, Oct. 15, 1880, Amelia Woolworth Smith, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Naturalist. Explorer. Best known as collector of natural history speci- 
mens. Traveled in Brazil, Mexico, West Indies and Columbia. Collection 
(nearly 500,000) in nearly every large museum in the world. Curator, 
Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, 1896-8. In scientific and literary work 
since. 
Address, 325 Water St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

TREMAN, EBENEZER MACK. Born, Dec. 13, 1850, at Ithaca, N. Y. Son 
of Lafayette L. and Eliza (Mack) Treman. Married, (1st), Eugenie Mac- 
Mahon, of Lyons, la., (died Aug. 17, 1886); (2nd), April 23, 1891, Isabelle 
Norwood, adopted daughter of Miles L. Clinton, Instructor, Cornell. 
President, Ithaca Gas Light Co., Ithaca Water Works Co., Ithaca Electric 
Light Co., Ithaca Ice and Coal Co., and Lyceum Theatre Co. Director, 
Tompkins County National Bank, and Ithaca Trust Co. Patron of music. 
Member of Board of Public Works, Ithaca. 
Died, Dec. 31, 1915, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

WALDO, GEORGE ERNEST. Born, Jan. 11, 1851, Brooklyn. Married, 
May 11, 1896, Flora A. Henderson, Tallahassee, Fla. Assemblyman, 1896. 
Commissioner of Records, Kings Co., 1899-06. Delegate to Republican 
National Convention, 1900. Member of Congress, 1905-9. 
Address, 290 Broadway, New York City. 

WARNER, JOHN DEWITT, Ph.B. Born, Oct. 30, 1851, in Schuyler Co., 
N. Y. Married, June 14, 1877, Lillian Augusta Hudson, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Journalist. Lawyer. Member of Congress, 1891-5. Democrat, Tariff 
reformer. President, American Free Trade League, 1905-. President, 
Art Commission, New York City, 1902-5. Alumni Trustee, 1882-7, 1893-8, 
1903-8. Author. 
Address, 60 Wall St., New York City. 

WENDE, GOTTFRIED HERMANN. Born, in 1852, Alden, Erie Co., N. Y. 
Lawyer. Assemblyman, 1909-12. State Senator, N. Y., 1913-15. 
Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 

YOUNGS, WILLIAM JONES, B.S. Born, June 24, 1851, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lawyer. Assemblyman, N. Y., 1880-1. Dist. Atty., 1890. Secretary to 
Governor Theodore Roosevelt, 1899-1900. Deputy State Supt. of Banks. 
U. S. Dist. Atty., E. D., N. Y., (Brooklyn), 1898-10. 
Died April 27, 1916, Oyster Bay, N. Y. 



152 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

POST GRADUATE 

JORDAN, DAVID STARR, M.S., LL.D. (1886, Johns Hopkins, 1902, 111. 
Coll., 1905, Ind. U., 1909). Born, Jan. 19, 1851, Gainesville, N. Y. Mar- 
ried, (1st), March 10, 1875, Susan Bowen, Peru, Mass, (died) 1885; (2nd), 
Aug. 10, 1887, Jessie L. Knight, Worcester, Mass. Professor of Natural 
History, Lombard, 1872-3, Butler, 1875-9. Asst. U. S. Fish Com., 1877- 
88. Professor of Zoology, 1879-85, President, 1885-91, Indiana University. 
President, Leland Stanford Jr. University, 1891-13; Chancellor . since. 
U. S. Commissioner in charge of fur-seal and salmon investigations. In- 
ternational Commissioner of Fisheries, since 1908. President American 
Asso. for Advancement of Science, 1909-10. Author. Peace Advocate. 
Alumni Trustee, 1887-92. 

Address, Stanford University, Cal. 

'73 

BARTLEY, ELIAS HUDSON, B.S. Born, Dec. 6, 1849, at Bartley, N. J. 
Married, Nov. 5, 1888, Mary Frances Harloe, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, Toxicology and Pediatrics, L. I. College Hospital, 
since 1886. Dean, Brooklyn College of Pharmacy, 1892-1902. Author. 
Address, 65 S. Portland Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BURT, STEPHEN SMITH. Born, Nov. 1, 1850, at Oneida, N. Y. Un- 
married. Professor of Medicine, New York Post-Graduate Medical Col- 
lege, 1884-1908, and member of corporation. Professor of Thoracic Di- 
seases, University of Vermont, 1884-5. Attending Physician, New York 
Post-Graduate Hospital. Author of medical books, pamphlets and papers. 
Member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. 

Address, No. 219 W. 44th St., New York City. 

CROSBY, GEORGE HEMAN. Treasurer and Secretary of the "Rock Island" 
System of Railroads. 
Address, Chicago, 111. 

CHURCH, IRVING PORTER, B.C.E., C.E. (1878). Born, July 22, 1851. 
at Ansonia, Conn. Married, June 15, 1881, Elizabeth P. Holley (died). 
Assistant Professor, 1876-91, Associate Professor 1891-2, of Civil Engi- 
neering; Professor of Applied Mechanics and Hydraulics, 1892-16, Cornell. 
Author of College Text Books on Engineering and Hydraulics. 
Address, No. 9 South Ave., Ithaca, N. Y. 

CULLINAN, PATRICK WILLIAM. Born, June 26, 1851, Oswego, N. Y. 
Married, June 3, 1896, Katherine Washburn. Assemblyman, 1880-1. 
State Excise Commissioner, 1901-6. Delegate-at-Large to New York 
Constitutional Convention, 1915. 
Address, Oswego, N. Y. 

DERBY, ORVILLE ADELBERT, B.S., M.S. (1874). Born, July 23, 1851. 
Director of the Geographical and Geological Commission of the Province 
of Sao Paulo, 1886-1904. Chief of the Geological Survey of Brazil, 1907-. 
Writer. 

Address, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 153 

DUNWELL, CHARLES TAPPAN. Born, Feb. 13, 1852, at Newark, Wayne 
Co., N. Y. Married, April, 1880, Emma B. Williams, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Brother of James W. Dunwell, Ex.-'73. Lawyer. Republican State Com- 
mitteeman, New York, 1891-2. Member of Congress, from Brooklyn, 
1903-5. 

Died June 12, 1908. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DUNWELL, JAMES WINSLOW. Born, Dec. 19, 1849, at Newark, N. Y. 
(Brother of Charles Tappan Dunwell, Ex.-'73). Married, May 22, 1878, 
Mary Ella Groat. Delegate to Republican National Convention, 1892. 
Justice of the Supreme Court, New York, 1896-1907. Resided at Lyons, 
N.Y. 

Died, May 22, 1907, Lyon, N. Y. 

FERRIS, FRANKLIN, B.S. Born, Sept. 22, 1849, at Peru, N. Y. Married, 
Feb. 10, 1880, Elizabeth Simon, of St. Louis, Mo. Judge of the 8th Judi- 
cial Circuit, Missouri, 1898-1903. General Counsel, Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition Company. 

Address, Rialto Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

FRANKENHEIMER, JOHN, Ph.B. Born, July 15, 1853, New York City. 
Married, in 1886, Fanny Fechkeimer, New York City. Judiciary Nominator 
candidate for Justice of the Supreme Court, New York, 1906. Active in 
municipal reform movements. 

Address, New York City. 

GILBERT, FREDERIC WOLCOTT. Superintendent of the Northern Pacific 
Railroad. 

Address, Sprague, Wash. 

HALSEY, FRANCIS WHITING, B.S. Born, Oct. 15, 1851, at Unadilla, N. Y. 
On staff of New York Tribune, 1875-80, New York Times, 1880-1902. 
Edited New York Times Saturday Review from its first number, Oct. 15, 
1896, until June, 1902. Literary adviser of D. Appleton & Co., 1902-5, 
Funk & Wagnalls, 1905-. Lecturer. Editor of many important literary 
books. Author of "An Old New York Frontier," and other books. 

Address, No. 44 E. 23d St., New York City. 

HARRIS, GEORGE WILLIAM, Ph.B. Born, Dec. 18, 1849, at Pictou, N. S. 
Married in 1895, Annie Smith, of Campbellton, N. B. Assistant Librarian, 
1873-83, Acting Librarian, 1883-90, Librarian, 1890-1915, Cornell Univer- 
sity. Editor. Secretary of the Cornell University Alumni Association. 

Address, No. 3 Grove Place, Ithaca, N. Y. 

JACKSON, FREDERICK HARVEY. Born at Kirkland, N. Y. Married. 
Broker and Fiscal Agent. Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island, 1905-7. 
Trustee of Mt. Holyoke CoUege. 

Died, July 28, 1915. 

JOHNSON, HENRY CLARK, A.B. Born, June 11, 1851, at Homer, N. Y. 
Married, Kate Loder Webb, of Cortland, N. Y. Lawyer. Educator. Pro- 
fessor of Latin Language and Literature, Lehigh University. President of 
the Central High School (City College), Philadelphia, Pa., and Professor 
of Constitutional and International Law in the same, 1888-94. Editor of 
many Classical College Text Books, etc. Assistant Corporation Counsel, 
New York City. 

Died, May 9, 1904, in New York City. 



154 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

LACY, CHARLES YOUDAN, B.Ag Assistant Professor and Professor, 
1874-80, Agriculture, University of Minnesota. 

Address, Long Beach, Cal. 

LELAND, WARREN, B.S. Born, June 11, 1855, New York City. Proprietor 
of Ocean Hotel at Long Branch, N. J., and Leland Hotel at Syracuse, N. Y. 

Died, Jan. 21, 1901, in New York, City. 

MOORE, JOHN GEORGE, A.B. Born, Nov. 12, 1848, at Schney, Germany. 
Married, Aug. 26, 1877, Anna Cole, of Covert, N. Y. Professor of the 
German Language and Literature, University of Minnesota, 1874-. Presi- 
dent of the Board of Charities and Correction, 1899-1903. 

Address, No. 2810 University Ave., S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 
MORRIS, WILLIAM TORREY, B.S. Born, Sept. 12, 1853, Rushville, N. Y. 
Unmarried. Lawyer. President of the U. S. Electric Light and Gas Co. 

Address, Perm Yan, N. Y. 

MORROW, JOHN HENRY. Born, Jan. 6, 1851, Brooklyn, N. Y. Editorial 
writer on the Brooklyn Daily Union and Union-Argus. Editor of the Water- 
bury Republican. Manager of the Los Angeles Tribune. 

Address, Los Angeles, Cal. 

NEWKIRK, JOHN GRAY, A.B. Professor of History, Indiana University, 
1879-86. Lawyer in Minneapolis, Minn. 

Died, June 26, 1907, in Berlin, Germany. 

PARSONS, FRANK, B.C.E. Born, Nov. 14, 1854, at Mt. Holly, N. J. Lawyer. 
Educator. Author. Professor of History and Political Science, Kansas 
Agricultural College, 1897-1900. Law Lecturer, Boston University, 1892-. 
Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Extension Lecture Depart- 
ment, Ruskin College, Trenton, Mo. Writer on monopolies, and eco- 
nomic and sociological subjects. 

Died in 1908. 

PATRICK, GEORGE EDWARD, B.S., M.S. (1874). Born, Oct. 22, 1851, 
at Hopedale, Mass. Married, June 19, 1879, Hattie E. Lewis, of Lawrence, 
Kan. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics, 1874-5, Professor, 
1875-83, University of Kansas. Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, 
Iowa State College, 1890-5. Chemist U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
Writer. 

Address, Washington, D. C. 

SMITH, CLARENCE LEROY, B.S. Bora, Feb. 5, 1851, Ulysses, Tompkins 
Co., N. Y. Married, 1879, Evelyn D. Spaulding. District Attorney, 
1883-7. City Recorder, Ithaca, 1890-4. He became crippled with rheuma- 
tism and retired to a farm several years ago. 

Address, Trumansburg, N. Y. 

SMITH, CLINTON DEWITT, B.S., M.S. (1875). Bom, March 7, 1854, at 
Trumansburg, N. Y. Married, June 16, 1892, Anna Cora Smith, Trumans- 
burg, N. Y. Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Director of Experiment 
Station, University of Minnesota, 1891-3. Professor of Agriculture and 
Director of Experiment Station, 1893-1900; Director of Experiment Station 
and Dean of Special Courses, 1900-8, Michigan Agricultural College. Presi- 
dent of the Agricultural College, Parricicaba, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil, 
1908. 
Address, Parricicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 155 

SPRAGUE, HENRY LYNDES, B.S. Lawyer. Member of the New York 
Assembly, 1882. Commissioner of Board of Education, 1886-. Commis- 
sioner of Accounts, New York City. Director in corporations. Clubs: 
Union League, Metropolitan, Alpha Delta Phi, University, Country Club 
of Westchester. 

Address, No. 75 Broad St., New York City. 

TURNER, AVERY Vice President of the Pecos Valley Railroad Lines and 
Southern Railway Co. of Texas, (543 miles). 
Address, Third and Buchanan Streets, Amarillo, Texas. 

TURNER, GEORGE BRINKERHOFF, B.S. Born, Nov. 2, 1848, at Fair 
Haven, N. Y. Lawyer. Surrogate of Cayuga Co., N. Y., 1890-. Alumni 
Trustee of Cornell University, 1892-1907. 
Address, Auburn, N. Y. 

WADHAMS, FREDERICK EUGENE. Born, Sept. 27, 1852, at Wadhams 
Mills, Essex Co., N. Y. Secretary, New York State Bar Association, 1899-. 
Treasurer, American Bar Association, 1902-. Editor. 
Address, No. 37 Tweddle Building, Albany, N. Y. 

WHEELOCK, CHARLES FRANCIS, B.S., LL.D. (University of State of New 
York). Born, Oct. 17, 1849, Litchfield, N. Y. Married, March 31, 1885, 
Mary E. Finehout, Canajoharie, N. Y. Assistant State Commissioner of 
Education, New York. 
Address, Albany, N. Y. 

WORTHINGTON, THOMAS, Ph.B. Born, June 8, 1850, Spencer, Term. 
Married, Nov. 16, 1892, Miriam Weeks Morrison, Jacksonville, 111. Mem- 
ber of the Illinois General Assembly, 1882-4. U. S. District Attorney, 
Southern District of Illinois, 1901-. Presidential elector, 1888. 
Address, Jacksonville, 111. 



74 

ANDERSON, MELVILLE BEST, LL.D. (Aberdeen, 1886). Born, March 28, 
1851, Kalamazoo, Mich. Married in 1875, Charlena VanVleck, Appleton, 
Wis. Professor of Modern Languages, Butler, U., 1877-80; English Lit., 
Knox, Coll., 1881-6; Lit. and Hist., Purdue U., 1886-7; Eng. Lang, and 
Literature, Iowa State Univ., 1887-91; Eng. Lit., Stanford Univ., since 
1891. Author, editor, writer, translator. 
Address, Menlo Park, Cal. 

BRANNER, JOHN CASPER, B.S. (1882), LL.D., University of Arkansas, 
1897, Maryville College, 1909). Born, July 4, 1850, at New Market, Term. 
Married, June, 22, 1883, Susan Kennedy, Oneida, N. Y. Professor of 
Geology, Indiana University, 1885-92. Professor of Geology, 1892-. Acting 
President, 1898-9, President, 1913-15, Leland Stanford Junior University. 
Author of publications on Brazil, Geology and Physical Geography. 
Address, Stanford University, Cal. 



156 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

CORNELL, OLIVER HAZARD PERRY, C.E. Son of The Founder. In- 
structor in Mathematics, Cornell University, 1870-1. Chief Engineer of 
the Geneva and Ithaca Railroad, 1871-5, and of the Utica, Ithaca and El- 
mira Railroad, 1872-4. Division Engineer of the New York, West Shore 
and Buffalo R. R., 1882-4. Assistant Engineer of Construction of a Vir- 
ginia railroad. 

Died in 1914 in Virginia. 

COMSTOCK, JOHN HENRY, B.S. Born, Feb. 24, 1849, at Janesville, Wis. 
Married, Oct. 7, 1878, Anna Botsford, B.S., '85. Assistant Professor of 
Entomology, Cornell University, 1877-8. U. S. Entomologist, Washington, 
1879-81. Professor of Entomology and Invertebrate Zoology, Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1882-1914. Lecturer on Zoology, Vassar College, 1877. Non- 
resident Professor of Entomology, Leland Stanford Junior University, 
1891-1900. Author of College Text Books on Entomology. Writer. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

CUDDEBACK, WILLIAM HERMAN. Born, March 25, 1854, Deer Park 
Orange Co., N. Y. Corporation Counsel, Buffalo, 1898-1902. Judge of 
the Court of Appeals, New York, since 1913. 
Address, Albany, N. Y. 

DUDLEY, WILLIAM RUSSEL, B.S. Born, March 1, 1849, Guilford, 
Conn. Unmarried. Assistant Professor of Botany, 1876-83, in charge of 
Cryptogamic Botany, 1883-92, Cornell University. Professor of Botany, 
Leland Stanford Junior University, 1892-1911. Author. 
Died, June 5, 1911. 

FAIRCHILD, HERMAN LE ROY, B.S. Born, April 29, 1850, at Montrose, Pa. 
Married. July 25, 1875, Alice Egbert, of Ithaca, N. Y. Professor of Geology 
and Natural History, 1888-96, Geology since 1896, University of Rochester. 
Author. 

Address, Rochester, N. Y. 

GLUCK, JAMES FRAZER, A.B. Born, April 28, 1852, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Married, June 15, 1877, Erne D. Tyler, daughter of Professor Charles M. 
Tyler of Cornell. Lawyer. One of the attorneys for the N. Y. Central 
R. R. Co. Professor of the Law of Corporations, University of Buffalo. 
Alumni Trustee of Cornell University, 1883-8. 
Died, Dec. 15, 1897, in New York City. 

HAYES, BIRCHARD AUSTIN, Lit.B. Born, Nov. 4, 1853, Cincinnati. 
Son of President Rutherford B. Hayes. Married, Dec. 30, 1886, Mary 
N. Sherman, Norwalk, Ohio. Lawyer. 
Address, Toledo, Ohio. 

HENDRIX, JOSEPH CLIFFORD. Born, May 25, 1853, at Fayette, Mo. 
Married, Oct. 28, 1875, Mary Alice Rathbone, Norwich, Conn. Postmaster, 
Brooklyn, 1886-90. Member of Congress, 1893-5. Trustee of the New York 
and Brooklyn Bridge. President of the National Bank of Commerce, 
1903-4. President of the American Bankers' Association, 1897. Trustee 
of Cornell University, 1895-1904. 

Died, Nov. 8, 1904, in Brooklyn, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 157 

KELLERMAN, WILLIAM ASHBROOK, B.S. Born, May 1, 1850, at Ash- 
ville, Ohio. Married, July 25, 1876, Stella Dennis. Professor of Botany 
and Horticulture, State College of Kentucky, 1881-2. Professor of Botany 
and Zoology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1883-8. Professor of 
Botany, 1888. State Botanist, Kansas, 1888-96. 
Author. 

Died, March 8, 1908, in Guatemala, Central America. 

KLINE, JAY BUTLER. Married Jennie Seaman, of Ithaca, N. Y. District 
Attorney, Onondaga Co., N. Y., 1903-6. Mayor of Syracuse, N. Y., 1906-8. 

Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

LAZENBY, WILLIAM RANE, B.Ag. Born, Dec. 5, 1850, at Bellona, N. Y. 
Married, Dec. 15, 1896, Harriet E. Akin, Columbus, O. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Botany and Horticulture, Cornell University, 1874-81. Professor 
of Botany and Horticulture, 1881-92, Horticulture and Forestry, 1892-, 
Ohio State University. Director, Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, 
1882-7. Writer. 

Address, Columbus, Ohio. 

MADDOX, SAMUEL THOMAS. Born, Dec. 27, 1863, Brooklyn. Justice 
of the Supreme Court, New York, 1909-16. 

Died, March 12, 1916. 

PECK, DUNCAN WORTH. Born, May 3, 1853. Member of New York As- 
sembly, 1893. State Superintendent of Public Works, New York, 1913-16. 

Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

RANDALL, EMILIUS OVIATT, Ph.B. Born, Oct. 28, 1850, at Richfield, 
Ohio. Married, Mary A. Coy, of Ithaca, N. Y. Professor of Law, Ohio 
State University, 1893-. Official Reporter of the Supreme Court of Ohio, 
1895-. Delegate to Republican National Convention, 1904. Author. Editor. 

Address, Columbus, Ohio. 

SHOEMAKER, MICHAEL MYERS. Born, June 26, 1853, at Covington, 
Ky. Has traveled the world over in the study of the people of the earth. 
Author of numerous books of travel and history, etc. 
Address, Union Club, New York City. 

SHUFELDT, ROBERT WILSON. Born, Dec. 1, 1850, in New York. Married 
(1st), Sept. 12, 1876, Catharine Babcock, of Washington, D. C.; (2nd), 
Sept. 5,1895, Florence, granddaughter of J. J. Audubon; (3rd), March 14, 
1898, Alfhild Dagny Lowum, daughter of Lieut. Eversen, of the Norwegian 
Navy. Served in the Civil War under his father, Rear Admiral Robert 
Wilson Shufeldt, U. S. Navy, 1864-5, in E. Gulf Squadron. Surgeon, 
Lieutenant to Major, U. S. Army, 1876-91, retired 1891. Author of many 
books on Osteology, Biology, Natural History, Birds, etc., and about 1,100 
titles in articles on medicine, science, travel, etc. 

Address, No. 3356 Eighteenth St., Washington, D. C. 

SMITH, WILMOT MOSES, B.S. Born, March 21, 1852, in Suffolk Co., 
N. Y. Married, Nov. 24, 1881, Lizzie L. Mott, Patchogue, N. Y. District 
Attorney, 1884-90. County Judge, 1891-5, Suffolk County, N. Y. Justice 
of the New York Supreme Court, 1895-1906. 
Died, March 29, 1906, Patchogue, L. I., N. Y. 



158 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

SOUTHARD, JAMES HARDING, B.S. Born, Jan. 20, 1851, in Washington 
Township, Lucas Co., Ohio. Married, March 23, 1882, Carrie T. Wales, 
Toledo. Prosecuting Attorney, Lucas Co., 1882-. Member of Congress, 
1895-1905. 
Address, Toledo, Ohio. 

STONE, JOHN LEMUEL, B.Ag. Born, July 6, 1852, Waverly, Pa. Married, 
Aug. 30. 1876, Jennie D. Parker, Clark's Green, Pa. Asst. Professor of 
Agronomy, 1903-7, Professor of Farm Practice, Cornell, since 1897. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

VAN CLEEF, MYNDERSE, B.S. Born, Aug. 29, 1853, at Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Son of Alexander M. and Jane E. G. VanCleef. Brother of Charles Edward 
VanCleef, B.S., '71. Married, Dec. 21, 1882, Elizabeth L. Treman, daughter 
of Elias Treman of Ithaca, N. Y., and sister of Robert Henry Treman, 
B.M.E., '78, and Charles Edward Treman, B.Litt., '89. Lawyer. Financier. 
President, Ithaca Trust Company and Ithaca Security Company, and 
Tompkins Co. Bar Association. Attorney for Cornell University. Director, 
Tompkins County National Bank, and Cayuga Lake Cement Co. Trustee, 
Ithaca Savings Bank, Cornell Library Association, City Hospital and 
Presbyterian Church. Alumni Trustee of Cornell, 1881-91; Trustee since 
1895; Chairman of the Committee of the Board of Trustees on General 
Administration. Republican. Presbyterian. President Kappa Alpha Asso. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

VAN DE WATER, GEORGE ROE, B.S., D.D. (Columbia). Born, April 25, 
1854, Flushing, L. I., N. Y. Married, in 1879, Cornelia Townsend Youngs, 
of Oyster Bay, N. Y. Rector of St. Andrews (P.E.) Church, Harlem, New 
York City. Chaplain of Columbia University, 1892-1905. Chaplain, 71st 
Regt., N. Y. Vols., in Spanish-American War. Author, editor and writer. 
Address, 2067 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

WEBB, WILLIAM SEW ARD. Born, Jan. 31, 1851, in New York. Son of 
Gen. James Watson Webb, U. S. Minister to Brazil. Grandson of Gen. 
Samuel B. Webb, of Rev. War. Married, in 1883, Eliza Osgood Vanderbilt, 
daughter of William H. Vanderbilt. Financier. President of the Wagner 
Palace Car Co., for many years. President of the St. Lawrence & Adiron- 
dack Railway Co., Addison R. R., Fulton Chain Railway Co., Rutland 
R. R. Co., and many others. Director, Pullman Co., L.S. & M. S. Railway 
Co., and many others. Purchased 200,000 acres and converted it into a 
game preserve in the Adirondacks. Member of Vermont Legislature. 
Colonel and Aide-de-Camp on the Staff of the Governor of Vermont. Presi- 
dent-General of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution. Author of books of history and biography. Homes, Shelburne, Vt., 
and New York City. 
Office, No. 51 East 44th St., New York City. 

WILES, ROBERT HALL, B.S. Born, Nov. 8, 1850, Mt. Carroll, 111. Married, 
Aug. 22, 1876, Alice Russell Bradford, B.S., '75. Lawyer. Member of 
Congress from Illinois. 

Died, March 30, 1907, at Chicago, 111. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 159 

WINSTON, GEORGE TAYLOE, B.Lit., LL.D. (Trinity College, N. C., 1885). 
Born, Oct. 12, 1852, at Windsor, N. C. Married, June 5, 1876, Caroline 
Sophia Taylor, Cornell, 1872-4, of Hinsdale, N. H. Asst. Professor Latin, 
1875-6, Professor, 1876-9; President, 1891-6, University of North Carolina. 
President, University of Texas, 1896-9. President, N. C. College of Agr. 
and Mechanic Arts, 1899-1908. 
Address, Asheville, N. C. 

'75 

BELLOWS, HOWARD PERCY, B.S., M.S. (1879). Born, April 30, 1852, 
Fall River, Mass. Married, June 20, 1880, Mary A. Clarke. Professor of 
Physiology, 1877-85; Professor of Otology since 1886, Boston University. 

Address, 220 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass. 

BRAYTON, ALEMBERT WINTHROP, LL.D. (Purdue, 1885). Born, 
March 3, 1848, at Avon, N. Y. Married, June 25, 1875, Jessie May Dewey, 
of Chicago. Professor of Chemistry, Physiology, Pathology, Clinical Med- 
icine, Dermitology, etc., Indiana Medical College, 1882-. Editor. Author. 

Address, Indianapolis, Ind. 

BROWN, GOODWIN. Born, April 5, 1852, Henderson, N. Y. Married, 
1877, Lillian Spencer Woodhouse. State Commissioner in Lunacy, New 
York, 1889-99. Author. 

Died, July 19, 1912. 

CORSON, EUGENE ROLLIN, B.S. Born, July 20, 1855, at Washington, 
D. C. Married, in 1894, Cora Wirt Baker, New Orleans, La. Physician. 
Author and writer. 

Address, Savannah, Ga. 

CORWIN, RICHARD WARREN, LL.D. (University of Colorado, 1905). 
Professor of Surgery, University of Colorado. Surgeon for several railroads. 
Surgeon General, National Guard. President of American Association of 
R. R. Surgeons, 1902. Member of State Board of Health. Member of 
many medical and health associations, both national and state. 

Address, Pueblo, Col. 

FITCH, GEORGE HAMLIN, B.S. Born, Nov. 25, 1852, at Lancaster, N. Y. 
Asst. Night City Editor of the New York Tribune, 1876-9. Literary Editor 
of the San Francisco Chronicle, 1880-. Contributor to Century, Harpers 
Weekly, etc. 

Address, San Francisco, Cal. 

GARDINER, EDMUND LE BRETON, B.M.E. Born, Nov. 7, 1851, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. Married, Oct. 26, 1887, H. Louise Sprague. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mechanical Engineering and Machine Construction, Cornell, 
1879-80. Capitalist. President of several Electric Light and Water Com- 
panies. 

Address, 2 Wall St., New York City. 

HISCOCK, FRANK HARRIS, A.B. Born, April 15, 1856, at Tully, N. Y. 
Married, Oct. 22, 1879, Elizabeth Barnes, of Syracuse, N. Y. Justice of 
the Supreme Court, New York, 1896-1915; sitting in the Court of Appeals, 
1906-14. Judge of the Court of Appeals since 1915. Alumni Trustee of 
Cornell University, 1889-94; Trustee since 1901. 
Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 



160 DISTINGUISHED CORNEL LIANS 

HUMPHREY, ANDREW BEAUMONT. Married. School Commissioner 
of Tompkins County, N. Y. Secretary of the National League of Republi- 
can Clubs. Executive Officer of the National Security League. Invest- 
ments. 

Address, Republican Club, West 40th St., New York City. 

IRVINE, JULIA JOSEPHINE (THOMAS), A.B., Litt.D. (Brown, 1895). 
Married, 1875, Charles James Irvine (died, 1886). Professor of Greek, 
1890-9, President, 1895-9, Wellesley CoUege. 
Address, Munroe & Co., 7 Rue Scribe, Paris, France. 

KELLOGG, JOHN MORRIS, Born, Aug. 28, 1851, in Taylor, N. Y. Married, 
Henrietta Guest Matthews. County Judge of St. Lawrence County, N. Y., 
1882-. Judge of the State Court of Claims, 1899-1902. Justice of the 
Supreme Court, 1902-, and Presiding Justice of the Appellate Division, 
3rd Department, since 1915. 
Address, Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

LEFFINGWELL, WILLIAM ELDERKIN. Born, July 10, 1855, at Aurora, 
N. Y. President and General Manager of the Glen Springs Sanitarium, 
Watkins, N. Y., since 1890. Presidential Elector, 1904. State Commis- 
sioner of the Watkins Glen Reservation since 1906. Member of the New 
York Assembly, 1908 and 1909. 
Address, Watkins, N. Y. 

MCCARTHY, DENNIS. Bora in 1854. Member of State Board of Charities, 
N. Y. State Fiscal Supervisor of Charities. Pres., D. McCarthy & Son. 
Merchant. 

Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

MOLER, GEORGE SYLVANUS, B.M.E., A.B. (1882). Born, Oct. 4, 1851, 
Columbus, Ohio. Married, Aug. 9, 1876, Ida M. Lighthall. Instructor, 
1875-80, Assistant Professor, 1880-1913, Professor, since 1913, Physics, 
Cornell University. He and Professor W. A. Anthony, as electricians, 
built the first American dynamo, of the Gramme pattern. For this they 
received medals at St. Louis Exposition. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

NEWMAN, JARED TREMAN, Ph.B., LL.B., (Union, 1879). Born, Nov. 4, 
1855, at Enfield, Tompkins Co., N. Y. Married, Oct. 7, 1886, Jane Edwards 
Williams, daughter of Senator Josiah B. Williams, of Ithaca, N. Y. Special 
County Judge, Tompkins County, N. Y., 1882-6. City Attorney, Ithaca, 
N. Y., 1895-9. Mayor of Ithaca, 1907-8. Law Lecturer, Cornell University, 
1897-9. Alumni Trustee of CorneU University, 1895-1903. Trustee since 
1907. Trustee, Auburn Theological Seminary, 1898-1906. Founder (with 
Charles H. Blood '88) of Cayuga Heights and Renwick Heights, beautiful 
residential sections north of the Cornell Campus. Bank and railroad di- 
rector. President, Tompkins County Bar Association, 1916. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

NICHOLS, EDWARD LEAMINGTON, B.S., LL.D. (University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1906). Born, Sept. 14, 1854, of American parentage, at Leamington, 
England. Married, May 25, 1881, Ida Preston, Cornell, Ex.-'76, of South 
Dover, N. Y. With Edison at Menlo Park, N. J., 1880-1. Professor of 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 161 

Physics and Chemistry, Central University of Kentucky, 1881-3. Pro- 
fessor of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, 1883-7. Professor 
of Physics, Cornell University, since 1887. Dean of the Faculty of Arts 
and Sciences, Cornell University, 1912-15. Editor-in-Chief of Physical 
Review, 1893-. President of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, 1907, and American Physical Society, 1908-9. Author of 
many college text-books on Physics. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

PRESTON, ERASMUS DARWIN, B.C.E., C.E. (1880). Born, March 28, 
1851, in Lancaster County, Pa. Attached to the French Transit of Venus 
Commission, 1882; to U. S. Solar Eclipse Party, S. Pacific Ocean, 1883. 
Astronomer, National Observatory, Cordoba, Argentine Republic, 1884. 
Member of U. S. Scientific Expedition to Africa, 1889; Transit of Mercury 
International latitude observations, Honolulu, 1891. U. S. Delegate 
to International Geodetic Association, Stuttgart, 1898. Executive officer of 
the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1895-9. Author of 44 papers on 
Astronomy, Geodesy, etc. 
Died, in 1913. 

RATHBUN, RICHARD. Born, Jan. 25, 1852, at Buffalo, N. Y. Married, 
Oct. 6, 1880, Lena Augusta Hume, of Eastport, Me. Naturalist. Curator, 
U. S. National Museum since 1880. Scientific assistant on U. S. Fish Com- 
mission, 1878-96. U. S. Representative on Joint Commission with Great 
Britain relative to preservation of fisheries in waters contiguous to U. S. 
and Canada, 1892-6. Asst. Secretary, Smithsonian Institution since 1897, 
in charge of National Museum since 1899. Writer. 
Address, Washington, D. C. 

ROSSITER, EHRICK KENSETT, B.Arch. Born, Sept. 14, 1854, Paris, 
France. Married, June 16, 1877, Mary Heath, of Pittsburgh, Pa. Architect. 
Address, 15 W. 38 St., New York City. 

SACKETT, HENRY WOODWARD, A.B. Born, Aug. 31, 1853, in Enfield, 
Tompkins Co., N. Y. Married, in 1886, Elizabeth Titus. Lawyer. Edi- 
torial writer and Counsel for the New York Tribune. Colonel and Aide- 
de-Camp on the staff of the Governor of New York, 1897-1900. Editor of 
law book, "Law of Libel for Newspaper Men," etc. Alumni Trustee of Cor- 
nell University since 1899. 

Address, Tribune Building, New York City. 

SIMONDS, FREDERICK WILLIAM, B.S., M.S. (1876). D.Sc. (University 
of Arkansas, 1893). Born, July 3, 1853, at Charlestown, Mass. Married, 
Aug. 21, 1877, Norma A. Wood, Syracuse, N. Y. Professor of Geology, 
Zoology and Botany, and Librarian University of North Carolina, 1877-81. 
Lecturer on Economic Geology, Cornell University, 1887. Professor of 
Geology and Biology, University of Arkansas, 1887-90. Associate Professor, 
1890-5, Professor since 1895, University of Texas. Author of many books 
and reports on Geology, Geography, etc. 
Address, No. 2504 Wichita St., Austin, Texas. 

SMITH, FRANKLIN PIERCE. Editor of the Cosmopolitan Magazine, 1888-. 
Died, Nov. 6, 1903, at Rochester, N. Y. 



162 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

TOMPKINS, DAVID JAMES, Ph.B Born, April 22, 1854, at Fulton, N. Y. 
Married, 1883, Ada Parsons. President, U. S. Guarantee Company. 
Address, 111 Broadway, New York City. 

WESTINGHOUSE, HENRY HERMAN. Born, Nov. 16, 1853, at Central 
Bridge, N. Y. Married, May 27, 1875, Clara L. Saltmarsh, of Ithaca, N. Y. 
Financially interested in the Westinghouse Air Brake Co. ; also in the Morse 
Chain Works, Ithaca. Trustee, Cornell, since 1905. 
Address, 111 Broadway, New York City. 

76 

ASHLEY, JAMES MACEREIL, B.S. Vice-President, Toledo, Ann Arbor, 
and N. Michigan R. R. Co., since 1885. 

Address, The Nasby, Toledo, Ohio. 

BARCLAY, CHARLES, B.S. Born, Feb. 1, 1852, at Brownsville, Pa. Married, 
Oct. 19, 1882, Ellen C. Cooper. Lawyer. President, Mobile, Volante & 
Pensacola, R. R. Co., and Gulf, Birmingham & Northern R. R. Co. Presi- 
dent, Baldwin Co. Bank. 

Address, Volanta, Ala. 

HAYES, WEBB COOK. Son of President Rutherford B. Hayes. Manufac- 
turer. 

Address, Fremont, Ohio. 

HORTON, RANDOLPH. Born, Sept. 23, 1850, at Truxton, Cortland Co., 
N. Y. Married, May 18, 1881, Adah A. Puff, of Newfield, N. Y. Lawyer. 
Supervisor 11 years and Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Tompkins 
County, N. Y. Justice of the Supreme Court, New York, 1914. Member 
of the Board of Education, Ithaca, N. Y., since 1915. President, Tompkins 
County Bar Association, 1915. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

KENT, WALTER HENRY, B.S. Born, March 29, 1851, at Levant, Chau- 
tauqua Co., N. Y. Instructor in Chemistry, Cornell, 1877-81. Professor 
of Chemistry, Drake University, 1881-2. Chemist, Brooklyn Health De- 
partment, 1885-94. Chemist, New York Navy Yard, 1895-9. Author 
and writer. 

Died, May 20, 1906. 

McKINNEY, ROBERT COCHRAN. Born, Feb. 3, 1865, at Troy, N. Y. 
Married, Oct. 15, 1879, Eleanor Beckett, of Hamilton, Ohio. Manufacturer. 
President of Niles-Bement-Pond Co., Pratt & Whitney Co., of Hartford, 
Conn., and First National Bank of Hamilton, Ohio. 
Address, 111 Broadway, New York City. 

MILLSPAUGH, CHARLES FREDERICK. Born, June 20, 1854, at Ithaca, 
N. Y. Married, Sept. 19, 1877, Mary Louise Spaulding (died, Dec., 1907). 
Curator, Department of Botany, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago , 
1894-. Professor, Med. Botany, Chicago Homeopathic Medical College, 
1897-. Professorial Lecturer on Economic Botany, University of Chicago, 
1895-. Explored in Mexico, West Indies, Brazil and Bahama Islands, in 
interest of botanical science. Editor, author and writer. 
Address, Chicago, 111. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 163 

STANTON, THEODORE, A.B. Born, Feb. 10, 1851, at Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Married, in 1881, Marguerite Berry, of Paris, France. Berlin Correspondent 
of New York Tribune, 1880-1. European Agent of North American Review, 
1889-. Paris representative of Harper & Bros., 1899-1902, D. Appleton & 
Co., 1902-. Member of International Jury, Paris Exposition, 1889. Paris 
Agent of N. Y. Associated Press, 1890-3. Resident Commissioner in Paris 
of Chicago Exposition, 1891-3. Author and Editor. 
Address, 7 bis Rue Reynouard, Paris, France. 

URQUHART, COLIN KEITH. Born, July 10, 1855, New York City. Married, 
1878, Annie M. Gillender. Author of Alma Mater, Cornell. Editor of Paper 
Trade Journal. 

Address, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

VAN VELZER, CHARLES AMBROSE, B.S. Instructor in Mathematics, 
Cornell, 1877. Instructor, 1881-3, Asst. Professor, 1883-5, Professor, 1885-, 
of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin. 
Address, Madison, Wis. 

WASSON, CHARLES WILLIAM. Born, April 20, 1854, Cleveland. Married, 
(1st), in 1882, Jettie Morrill; (2nd), Margaret Wright; (3rd), Mabel Breck- 
inridge. Established as electrical engineer in Cleveland; became distin- 
guished as expert on application of electricity to propulsion; largely inter- 
ested in street railway company stocks; now retired. R. R. President. 
Member Amer. Inst. Elec. Eng. Clubs: Electric, Union, Euclid. Member 
of Kappa Alpha fraternity. 

Address, 9209 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

YATABE, RIOKICHI, B.S. Professor of Botany and Curator of Botanical 
Gardens, University of Tokio, Japan. 
Died, Aug. 7, 1899, Kamakura, Japan. 

77 

BORST, HENRY VROMAN. Born, July 6, 1853, at Cobleskill, N. Y. Mar- 
ried (1st), June, 1878, Mattie Earner; (2nd), May, 1872, Alida Yerdon. 
District Attorney, Montgomery County, N. Y., 1884-6. County Judge, 
1888-9. Justice of the Supreme Court, New York, 1916-. 

Address, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

BRAMHALL, WILLIAM ELY, B.C.E. Lawyer. General Counsel of the 
Northern Pacific R. R. Co. 
Address, St. Paul, Minn. 

CRANDALL, ARTHUR FITZ-JAMES. Born, Aug. 11, 1854, at Easton, 
Washington Co., N. Y. Married, Jan. 1, 1892, Marion Stevens of Orwell, 
Vt. News Editor of the New York Evening Post, 1892-. 

Address, The Evening Post, New York City. 

FRANCIS, CHARLES SPENCER, B.S. Born, June 17, 1853, at Troy, N. Y. 
Son of John M. Francis, U. S. Minister to Austria. Married, May 23, 1878, 
Alice, daughter of Professor Evan W. Evans of Cornell. City editor and man- 
ager of the Troy Times; became equal partner with his father in 1887, and 
succeeded to editorial direction and sole ownership at the death of his father 
in 1897. U. S. Minister to Greece, Roumania and Servia, 1900-2. Ambas- 
sador to Austria-Hungary, 1906-10. 
Died, Dec. 12, 1911. 



164 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

GAGE, SIMON HENRY, B.S. Born, May 20, 1851, in Otsego County, N. Y. 
Married, Dec. 15, 1881, Susan Stuart Phelps, Ph.B., CorneU '80, of Morris- 
ville, N. Y. (Died, Oct. 5, 1915.) Instructor, 1878-81, Asst. Professor, 
1881-9, Asso. Professor of Physiology, 1889-93; Asso. Professor of Anatomy, 
Histology and Embryology, 1893-5, Professor, 1895-6; Professor of Histology 
and Embryology, 1896-1908, CorneU; Professor Emeritus since June, 1908, 
to undertake special investigations, on an allowance from Carnegie Founda- 
tion for the advancement of Teaching. Editor, author and writer. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

GRANT, JAMES BENTON Born, June 2, 1848, in Russell County, Ala- 
Served as boy of 16 for 1 year in Confederate States Army. Married, Jan- 
19, 1881, Mary Matteson Goodell, in Chicago, 111. Interested in mines 
and smelting furnaces in Gilpin Co., and Leadville. His mines, etc., con- 
solidated afterwards with the American Smelting and Refining Co., of which 
he is a member of the Executive Committee. Vice-President of Denver 
National Bank. Governor of Colorado, 1883-5. 

Address (Home), 770 Pennsylvania Ave., Denver, Col. 

HODSON, DEVOE PELL. Born, March 23, 1856, at Ithaca, N. Y. Married, 
Dec. 23, 1880, Mariette Wood, Dunkirk, N. Y. City Attorney, Niagara 
FaUs, N. Y. City Judge, Buffalo, 1906-11. Member of School Board, 1900-. 
State Public Service Commissioner, N. Y., since 1913. 
Address, 12 Colonial Circle, Buffalo, N. Y. 

HOWARD, LELAND OSSIAN, B.S., M.S. (1883). Born, June 11, 1857, at 
Rockford, 111. Married, April 28, 1886, Marie T. Clifton, of Washington, 
D. C. Asst. Entomologist, 1878-94, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology, 
since June, 1894, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. Consulting Entomologist, 
U. S. Public Health and Marine Hospital Service, since 1904. Alumni 
Trustee of Cornell, 1900-5. Permanent Secretary, American Association for 
the Avdancement of Science. President, Asso. of Econom. Entomologists, 
1894. Member of many scientific societies. Editor, and author and writer. 
Lecturer at Swarthmore College and Post-Graduate School of Georgetown 
University. 

Address, 2026 Hillyer Place, Washington, D. C. 

LUCAS, WILLIAM EDWARD, Ph.B. Asst. Professor, Rhet. and Comp., 
1880-2, Cornell. Private Secretary to the Mayor of New York City, 1883-4. 
Merchant. Member of Psi Upsilon fraternity. 
Address, Railway Exchange Building, Chicago, 111. 

OSTROM, JOHN NELSON, B.C.E. Born, June 6, 1851, at Corinth, N. Y. 
Married, June 16, 1903, Caroline Eunice Demming, of Salem, Ohio. Captain 
of the first University crew, Cornell, in 1875, and the second University 
crew, in 1876, victors in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association's meet at 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y. in 1875 and 1876. Bridge Engineer, "Burlington" 
R. R. System, 1882-6, and Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe R. R., 1886. Chief 
Engineer, Pittsburg Bridge Company. Consulting Bridge Engineer. Author 
of "The Art of Rowing," 1876, and "College Work and CoUege Play," 1882. 
Address, Farmers' Bank Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 165 

PALMER, EDWARD HERENDEEN, B.S. Born, May, 17 1855, at Clinton, 
Iowa. Married, May 25, 1880, Cornelia H. Rouse, of Rochester, N. Y. 
President of the Empire Electric and Gas Company. 

Address, Geneva, N. Y. 

STEVENS, GEORGE BARKER, D.D. (University of Jena, 1886, Illinois Col- 
lege, 1902). LL.D. (University of Rochester, 1902). Born, July 13, 1854, 
at Spencer, N. Y. Married, Nov. 23, 1880, Kate A. Mattison, of Oswego, 
N. Y. Congregational minister, in Buffalo, and Presbyterian minister in 
Watertown, N. Y., 1880-5. Professor of New Testament Criticism and In- 
terpretation, 1886-95, Professor of Systematic Theology, 1895-1906, Yale 
Divinity School, Yale University. 

Died June 22, 1906. 

THOMAS, M. CAREY, A.B., LL.D. (Western University of Pennsylvania, 
1896). Born, Jan. 2, 1867, at Baltimore, Md. Unmarried. Professor of 
English since 1885, Dean, 1885-95, President, since 1895, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege. Alumni Trustee and First Woman Trustee, of Cornell, 1895-9. Trus- 
tee of Bryn Mawr College, since 1903. Author. Lecturer. 

Address, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

THROOP, WILLIAM BRYANT, B.C.E. Gen. Supt., Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy R. R. 

Address, Burlington, Iowa. 

TIBBETTS, ADDISON SEABURY, B.C.E. Born, Oct. 28, 1850, at Belfast, 
N. Y. Married, Sept. 11, 1888, Mary E. Miller. Judge of the District 
Court, 3rd Judicial District, Nebraska, 1891-6. Chairman, Board of Police 
Commissioners, Lincoln, Neb., 1896. 

Address, Richards Block, Lincoln, Neb. 

VAN VLEET, DEFOREST, B.S. Born, Aug. 10, 1855, at Fenton, Broome Co., 
N. Y. Married, Oct. 19, 1880, Ada Belle Lacey, of Dryden, N. Y. Cor- 
poration Counsel, Ithaca, 1881-4, 1889-90. Attorney for the Ithaca Street 
R. R. Co. Democrat. State Civil Service Commissioner, New York, 1893-5. 
Alumni Trustee of Cornell, 1896-1901. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WHITE, HAMILTON SALISBURY, B.S. Born, Dec. 21, 1853, at Syracuse, 
N. Y. Married, Miss Whitebread. President Board of Fire Commission- 
ers. R. R. President. 

Died, March 13, 1899, at Syracuse, N. Y. 

WINSTON, FRANCIS DONNELL. Lawyer. Lieutenant Governor of North 
Carolina. 

Address, Windsor, N. C. 

78 

AMES, CHARLES WILBERFORCE, Lit.B. Born, June 30, 1855, at Minnea- 
polis, Minn. Married, June 25, 1883, Mary Lesley. Engaged in Railroad 
Engineering and on Pa. State Geological Survey, 1877-9. Asst. Editor of 
Christian Register, Boston, 1879-80. Secretary, Vice-President, President 
since 1899, General Manager of the West Publishing Co., publishers of 
law books, St. Paul. 

Address (Office), 44 W. 3rd St., St. Paul, Minn. 



166 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

BAKER, EUGENE, B.S. Born, April 16, 1853, at Northampton, N. Y. Mar- 
ried (1st), in 1889, Mary L. Colling, Utica, N. Y. (died); (2nd), Caroline 
M. Pierce, Worcester, Mass. Physician. Lecturer, Medicine and Obstret- 
rics, Cornell, 1903-8, Asst. Professor, 1908-. President, Tompkins Co. 
Med. Society. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BALLARD, ALVAH HOVEY. Born, Jan. 24, 1858, at Syracuse, N. Y. Edi- 
torial writer on the New York Evening Post for several years. President 
of an advertising agency. 

Address, Yonkers, N. Y. 

BALLARD, SAMUEL THURSTON. Born, Feb. 11, 1855, Louisville, Ky. 
Married, Jan. 25, 1888, Sunshine Harris. Flour miller. Member of National 
Industrial Commission by appointment of President Woodrow Wilson. 

Address, Louisville, Ky. 

BEAHAN, WILLARD, B.C.E. Married Bessie Bell DeWltt, A.B., CorneU 78. 
Asst. Eng., Mississippi River Commission, 1879. Asst. Eng., Texas and 
Pacific R. R., 1880; Resident Engineer, 1881. Resident Eng., Ft. Worth 
and Denver R. R., 1882. Asst. Eng., Mo. Pacific R. R., 1884-. Division 
Eng., Lake Shore and Mich. Southern R. R. Alumni Trustee, CorneJl, 
1900-5; Trustee, 1912-. 

Address, Room 43 Lake Shore Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 

BISSELL, FRANK EDWARD, B.C.E., C.E.( 1879) .Chief Engineer of the 
Lake Shore and Michigan Southern R. R. 
Address, Cleveland, Ohio. 

BROWN, CHARLES CARROLL. Born, Oct. 4, 1856, at Austinburg, Ohio. 
Married, Sept. 10, 1878, Cora Stanton, of Dublin, Ind. Professor of Civil 
Engineering, Rose Polytechnic Institute, 1883-6, Union University, 1886-93. 
Consulting Eng., N. Y. State Board of Health, 1888-93. City Eng., Indiana- 
polis, 1894-5. Editor of "Municipal Engineering," since 1900. Author 
and writer. 

Address (Office) 2247 Commercial Club Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

COLE, WILLOUGHBY. Born, Nov. 20, 1857, Sacramento, Cal. U. S. District 
Attorney, Southern District of California. 
Died, Oct. 12, 1912, Los Angeles, Cal. 

ELY, W. CARYL. Born, Feb. 25, 1856, at Middlefield, N. Y. Lawyer. Mem- 
ber of New York Assembly, 1883, 1884, 1885, from Otsego County. Presi- 
dent of the International Traction Company, owner of the electrical rail- 
roads of Buffalo and Niagara Falls. President of the American Street and 
Interurban R. R. Co. Association. President of the Noiseless Typewriter 
Company. 
Address, Care Noiseless Typewriter Co., New York City. 

GRANT, JESSE ROOT. Born, Feb. 6, 1858, at St. Louis, Mo. Son of Presi- 
dent U. S. Grant. Married, in 1880, Elizabeth Chapman of San Francisco. 
Traveled around the world with his father in 1876. Interested in mining 
enterprises. Nominee of the Democratic Legislative Caucus for U. S. 
Senator form California. 
Address, Manhattan Club, New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 167 

GREEN, EDWARD BROADHEAD, B.Arch Born, May 10, 1855, at Utica, 
N. Y. Architect of the Kappa Alpha Lodge, Bailey Hall (Auditorium), 
Home Economics, Poultry Husbandry and Animal Industry Buildings, 
and Stock Judging Pavilion at Cornell, besides many other important 
buildings in Buffalo and elsewhere. 

Address, 110 Franklin St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

HALSEY, FREDERICK ARTHUR, B.M.E. Born, July 12, 1856, at Unadilla, 
N. Y. Married, May 12, 1885, Stella Diantha Spencer, Ph.B., Cornell, '82. 
Engineer, the Rand Drill Co., 1880-90. Eng. and Gen. Manager, Canadian 
Rand Drill Co., 1890-4. Associate Editor, 1894-1907, editor since Feb. 1, 
1907, of the American Machinist. Opponent of the metre system. In- 
ventor of the ''Premium Plan" of paying for labor, adopted by many leading 
manufacturers. Author and writer. 
Address (Office) 505 Pearl St., New York City. 

HEERMANS, FORBES, B.M.E. Born, Oct. 25, 1856, at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Journalist, Author and Playwright. Author of several novels and dramas. 
Address, 217 Highland Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

KINGSBURY, JOSEPH THOMAS. Born, Nov. 4, 1853, at E. Weber, Utah. 
Married. Aug, 7, 1879, Jane Mair, of Dundee, Scotland. President of the 
University of Utah since 1897. 

Address, 222 S. 12th East St., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

JOHNSON, BEN., B.M.E. Born, Oct. 15, 1858, at Ithaca, N. Y. Married, 
June 8, 1886, Mary Vinton, of Nugent, Iowa. Superintendent of Motive 
Power of the Havana Street Railway System. 
Address, Havana, Cuba.- 

LEHMAIER, JAMES SCHWARTZ, Ph.B. Born, May 19, 1859, at New York 
City. Married, Jan. 30, 1889, Isabel Winslow Macy, of Somerville, Mass. 
Lawyer. Commissioner of Accounts, New York City, 1895-7. 
Address, 132 Nassau St., New York City. 

MARX, CHARLES DAVID, B.C.E. Born, Oct. 10, 1857, at Toledo, Ohio. 
Married, July 18, 1888, Harriet Elizabeth Grotecloss, B.S., Cornell, '84, of 
Suffern, N. Y. U. S. Asst. Eng., Mo. River Improvement, 1882-4. Asst. 
Professor of Civil Engineering, Cornell, 1884-90. Professor of Civil Enginere- 
ing, University of Wisconsin, 1890-1, Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 
since 1891. 

Address, Palo Alto, Cal. 

MERRILL, THOMAS DAVIS, B.C.E. Born, Oct. 26, 1855, at Bangor, Me. 
Married, Oct. 25, 1892, Elizabeth M. Croswell. Engaged in extensive 
lumber operations in Minnesota and on the Pacific Coast. 
Address, Greysdon Road, Duluth, Minn. 

PUTNAM, RUTH, B.Lit. Born, in 1857, at Yonkers, N. Y. Daughter of 
George P. Putnam, the New York Publisher. Alunmi Trustee, Cornell, 
1899-1909. Author of "Annetje Jan's Farm," 1897; "William the Silent," 
1894; "A Mediaeval Princess," 1904; "Charles the Bold," 1908; "Jac- 
quelin of Holland." Translator of "Bok's History of the People of the 
Netherlands." Member Soc., Dutch Letters Leiden. Clubs: Women's 
University and MacDowell (New York). 
Address, 2025 O St., Washington, D. C. 



168 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

REEVES, ARTHUR MIDDLETON, B.S. Born, Oct. 6, 1855, at Cincinnati. 
Editor, author and translator. 

Died, Feb. 25, 1891, at Hagertown, Ind. 

REXFORD, CHARLES MYRON, A.B. Born, April 25, 1855, at Watertown, 
N. Y. Married, in September, 1879, Emma A. Smith. Physician. Presi- 
dent, City National Bank, Watertown, N. Y. President, Board of Education. 
Address, Watertown, N. Y. 

SMITH, ALBERT WILLIAM, B.M.E., M.M.E. (1886). Born, Aug. 30, 1856, 
at Westmoreland, Oneida Co., N. Y. Married, Aug. 16, 1905, Mrs. Ruby 
G. Bell, of Stanford University, Cal. Asst. Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering, Sibley College, Cornell, 1887-91. Professor of Machine Design, 
University of Wisconsin, 1891-2. Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1892-1904. Director, Sibley College, 
Cornell, since Aug. 1, 1904. Author. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

TREMAN, ROBERT HENRY, B.M.E. Born, March 31, 1858, at Ithaca, 
N. Y. Son of Elias and Elizabeth (Love joy), Treman and brother of Charles 
Edward Treman, B.Lit., '89. Married, June 25, 1885, Laura Hosie, of 
Detroit, Mich. Financier. President, Tompkins County National Bank, 
Ithaca, N. Y., and Treman, King & Co., (Inc.). Trustee of the Ithaca 
Savings Bank. Director, Ithaca Trust Company, Cayuga Lake Cement 
Co., and Ithaca Security Co. President of the New York State Association 
of Hardware Jobbers, 1910, 1911, 1912, and 1913. Vice President of New 
York State Bankers Association, 1912, President, 1913. Director, New 
York Federal Reserve Bank. Member of Creek and Drainage Commis- 
sion, Ithaca, 1907, and Board of Public Works, 1909. Graduate Treasurer 
of the Cornell Athletic Association, 1892-1901. Alumni Trustee, Cornell, 
1891-6; Trustee, since 1896. Democrat. Presbyterian. Chi Phi. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

POST-GRADUATE 

JORDAN, WHITMAN HOWARD, D.Sc. (University of Maine, 1896). LL.D. 
(Michigan Agricultural College, 1907). Born, Oct. 27, 1851, at Raymond, 
Me. Married, March 3, 1880, Emma L. Wilson of Orono, Me. Professor 
of Agricultural Chemistry, Pennsylvania State College, 1881-5. Director, 
Agricultural Experiment Station of Maine, 1885-96, of New York, since 
1896. Author. 
Address, Geneva, N. Y. 

'79 

BAKER, GEORGE TITUS. Born, Sept. 24, 1857, at Homestead, Iowa. 
Son of Albert Watson and Freelove Mellissent (Kenyon) Baker. Iowa State 
University, 1874-5, Cornell, 1876-9. Married, April 26, 1879, Clara Isabel 
Poole, daughter of Edward V. Poole of Ithaca, N. Y. Member of victorious 
Cornell Freshman crew at Saratoga Lake, 1876. Commodore of the Cornell 
Navy, 1877-8. Lieutenant, Cornell Cadets. Civil Engineer. Resident 
Engineer, "Rock Island" R. R., 1879-85. Locating Engineer, "Santa Fe" 
R. R., 1885-8, and superintended the construction of a line through Gales- 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 169 

burg, 111., and a branch near St. Joseph, Mo. Chief Engineer, Sault St. 
Marie and South Western R. R., 1886. Chief Engineer, Muscatine, 1888-90, 
Clinton, 1890-1, and Winona, 1891, steel bridges over the Mississippi River. 
Chief Engineer, Superintendent and Director, State Electrical Co., of Clin- 
ton and Lyons, Iowa. Chief Engineer, Manager and Director, Edwards 
and Walsh Construction Co., and later of the Tri-City Construction Co. 
Builder of the Ind., 111., and Iowa R. R., the Davenport, Rock Island and 
North Western R. R. and the Tri-City R. R.; also the Davenport Water 
Works, the Western Illinois Insane Asylum at Watertown, 111., the State 
Normal School at Macomb, 111., Victoria Sanitarium, Coif ax, Iowa, the 
West Davenport School Building, Argyle Apartment House, Peterson Office 
Building, and many other public works, and public and private buildings, 
at Davenport, Iowa, and elsewhere. President of the Business Men's Asso- 
ciation, Davenport. President of the West Davenport Improvement Asso- 
ciation. Vice President of the Gates Lumber Co., of Davenport and Yellow 
Pine, Alabama. President of the Park Commission, Davenport. Demo- 
cratic State Committeeman 6 years. Representative in the Iowa Legisla- 
ture, 1885-7. Mayor of Davenport, 1898-1900. Delegate-at-Large from 
Iowa to Democratic National Convention, 1900. Member of the State 
Board of Education, Iowa, since 1909, and, Ex-officio, Trustee of Iowa 
State University, State Teachers College, State Agricultural and Mechani- 
cal College, etc. Vestryman of Trinity (P. E.) Church. Beta Theta Pi. 
Address, 1514 Farnam St., Davenport, Iowa. 

CHANDLER, WALTER MARK, B.S. County Judge of El Paso County, 
Texas, 1886. Mining Engineer. 

Address, Box 149, Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa. 

EDWARDS, WILLIAM SEYMOUR, B.S. Born, Sept. 14, 1856, at New York 
City. Married, July 5, 1902, Hope M. Christensen, of London, Eng. Mem- 
ber of W. Va. House of Delegates, 1892-5, Speaker, 1894-5. Republican 
Candidate for U. S. Senator in the Legislature, 1914. Author and writer. 
Address, Charleston, W. Va. 

GIFFORD, HAROLD, B.S. Born, Oct. 18, 1858, at Milwaukee. Married, 
Dec. 30, 1890, Mary Louise Willard, at Geneva, Switzerland. Professor of 
Ophthalmology and Otology, University of Nebraska, since 1903. Surgeon 
to several hospitals. Author and writer. Editor of Ophthalmic Record, 
since 1897. 

Address, Brandeis Block, Omaha, Neb. 

HASKELL, EUGENE ELWIN, B.C.E., C.E. (1890). Bora, May 10, 1855, 
at Holland, N. Y. Married, Feb. 4, 1888, Lettie E. Wright, of Perrysburg, 
N. Y. With U. S. Lake Survey, Detroit, 1879-80, Mississippi River Com- 
mission, St. Louis, 1880-5, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Washington, 
1885-93, U. S. Lake Survey, Detroit, 1893-1906. Director, College of Civil 
Engineering, Cornell, since 1906. Member of the International Waterways 
Commission. Consulting Engineer, Barge Canal, New York, 1916. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



170 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

KERR, WALTER CRAIG, B.C.E. Born, Nov. 8, 1858, at St. Peter, Minn. 
Married, Dec. 27, 1883, Lucy Lyon of Ithaca, N. Y. Asst. Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering, Cornell, 1880-3. President of Westinghouse, 
Church, Kerr & Co., of New York City, 1902-10. Alumni Trustee, Cornell, 
1900, Trustee, 1900-10. 
Died, May 8, 1910. 

MORSE, EVERETT FLEET, B.M.E. Born, at Ithaca, N. Y. Married. 
Inventor. Manufacturer. President of the Morse Chain Works, Ithaca, 
N. Y. Director City Hospital. 

Died, Nov. 11, 1913, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

PRESTON, HAROLD. Born, Sept. 29, 1858, at Rockford, 111. Married, Feb. 
8, 1888, Augusta Morganstern, of Seattle, Wash. Lawyer. State Senator, 
Washington, 1897-1901. He was second in balloting for U. S. Senator in 
Legislature, 1903. Republican. President, Washington State Bar Asso- 
ciation, 1898, Seattle Bar Association, 1909-10. 
Address, Lowman Building, Seattle, Wash. 

NEWTON, WHITNEY, B.S. Born, April 5, 1858, Monroe, Wis. Married, 
Dec. 29, 1881, Mary Rose Quigg, of Ithaca, N. Y. State Treasurer, Colorado, 
1903-4. Lumber Manufacturer. Member of Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 
Address, P. O. Box 1344, Denver, Col. 

SEVERANCE, FRANK HAYWARD, B.S. Born, Nov. 28, 1856, at Man- 
chester, Mass. Married, Aug. 19, 1885, Lena Lillian Hill, B.S., Cornell, '79, 
of Isle LaMotte, Vt. Journalist. City editor, Erie (Pa.) Gazette, 1879-80, 
Buffalo Express, 1881-6. Managing editor, Illustrated Buffalo Express, 
1886-1902. Lecturer on history. Secretary-Treasurer, Buffalo Historical 
Society. Author and editor of several books. 

Address, (Home) 150 Jewett Ave., (Office), Historical Building, Buffalo, 
N.Y. 

SKINNER, FRANK WOODWARD, B.C.E. Born, June 6, 1858, at Brown- 
ville, N. Y. Married, Sept. 7, 1881, Rachel Sumner, of Buffalo, N. Y. 
Bridge Engineer, N. J. Steel & Iron Co. Resident Engineer, Dominion 
Bridge Co., Montreal. Engineer of Bridges, St. Paul & N. P. R. R. Co. 
Practicing as Consulting and Expert Constructional Engineer, since 1886. 
Asso. Editor of The Engineering Record. Since 1898 Lecturer in charge of 
course in Field Engineering, Cornell. Lecturer on Field Engineering, Mc- 
Gill University, Harvard, Yale, Mass. Institute of Technology, etc. In- 
ventor of many important improvements in sheet piles, foundation con- 
struction, and reinforced concrete building design and construction. Author. 
Address, (Home) Tompkinsville, S. I., N. Y., (Office), 114 Liberty St., 
New York City. 

STEVENS, FREDERICK CHARLES. Born, July 5, 1856, at Attica, N. Y. 
Married, Jan. 12, 1879, Belle C. Sprowle, of Hannibal, Mo. President, 
Commercial National Bank, Washington, D. C. Director, Windsor Trust 
Co., New York City, and U. S. Trust Co., Washington, D. C. State Senator, 
New York, 1903-4, 1905-6. State Superintendent of Public Works, New 
York, 1907-11. Republican. Trustee of Cornell, 1911-15. 
Died in March, 1916. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 171 

TOMKINS, CALVIN, B.S. Born, Jan. 26, 1858, at E. Orange, N. J. Married, 
Dec. 4, 1889, Kitty Neilly Tomkins. Merchant. Tariff Reformer. Presi- 
dent, Municipal Art Society, New York City, 1904-5. Commissioner of 
Docks, New York City. 
Address, 21 W. 10th St., New York City. 

WHITE, HOWARD GANSON. Born, May 5, 1856, at Syracuse, N. Y., 
Nephew of President Andrew D. White. Married (1st), Sept. 25, 1879 
Emma, daughter of U. S. Senator Philetus Sawyer of Wisconsin, (died in 
1896); (2nd), Kathryn VanDyck, of Philadelphia. President, Porter Man- 
ufacturing Co. Member of New York Assembly, 1889-90. State Senator. 
Sole owner of the "Syracuse Standard," 1887-97. 
Died, March 29, 1908, at Williamsport, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, GERSHAM MOTT, D.D. (Hobart, 1895). Born, Feb. 11, 1857, 
at Fort Hamilton, N. Y. Married, in 1879, Eliza Bradish Biddle, of Grosse 
Isle, Mich. Protestant Episcopal Minister; Pastorates at Detroit, Buffalo, 
Milwaukee and Marquette, 1880-96. Editor. Protestant Episcopal Bishop 
of Marquette, since 1896. 

Address, 213 E. Ridge St., Marquette, Mich. 

WRIGHT, FRANK AYRES, B.Arch Born, Nov. 19, 1854, at Liberty, Sullivan 
Co., N. Y. Married, Jan. 9, 1883, Elizabeth Hanford. Instructor in Archi- 
tectural Drawing, Cornell, 1876-9. One of the founders and Secretary, 
1885, Architectural League of New York. Author. 
Address, 110 E. 23rd St., New York City. 

POST-GRADUATE 

HEWETT, WATERMAN THOMAS, Ph.D. Born, Jan. 10, 1846, at Miami, 
Mo. Married (1st), June 22, 1880, Emma McChain, of Ithaca, N. Y., 
(died, Sept. 18, 1883); (2nd), Dec. 18, 1889, Katherine Mary Locke, of 
Germantown, Pa., (died in 1913). Asst. Professor of North European 
Languages, 1870-83, German Language and Literature, 1883-1911, Cornell. 
Author and editor of many books. Author of a History of Cornell University. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'80 

ATWOOD, CHARLES EDWIN, B.S. Born, July 21, 1861, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Married, Feb. 5, 1896, Helen Pearce Jarvis, of New York. Neurologist. 
Asst. Physician, Hudson River State Hospital, 1885-7, Utica State Hospital, 
1887-92. First Asst. Physician, Society of the New York Hospital, Bloom- 
ingdale, 1892-1905. Asst. Neurologist, Vanderbilt Clinic, Columbia, since 
1892. Neurologist, New York Hospital for Nervous Diseases. Asso. 
Editor of the New York Journal of Insanity, 1887-92. Author, editor and 
writer. 

Address, 16 E. 60th St., New York City. 

COOLIDGE, MARY ELIZABETH BURROUGHS (ROBERTS), Ph.B. 
Born, Oct. 28, 1860, at Kingsbury, Ind. Daughter of Professor Isaac Phillips 
Roberts, of Cornell. Married, July 30, 1906, Dane Coolidge. Instructor 
in History and Economics, 1886-90, Wellesley College. Asst. and Asso. 
Professor of Sociology, Leland Stanford Jr. University, 1896-1903. 
Address, Dwight Way End, Berkeley, Cal. 



172 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

EWING, ADDISON LUTHER, B.S., M.S. (1885). Professor of Geology and 
Zoology, Pennsylvania State College, 1882-4. Professor of Botany, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

Address, Madison, Wis. 

FINCH, WILLIAM ALBERT, A.B. Born, June 8, 1855, at Newark, N. J. 
Unmarried. Lawyer. Professor of Law, Cornell, 1891-1913. Secretary 
of the College of Law. Editor of law books. 

Died, March 31, 1912, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

GAGE, SUSANNAH STUART (PHELPS), Ph.B. Born, Dec. 26, 1857, at 
Morrisville, N. Y. Married, Dec. 15, 1881, Professor Simon H. Gage, of 
Cornell. Scientific writer. Writer of numerous articles on scientific subjects, 
published in transactions of scientific societies. Illustrated scientific papers 
for Professor Gage and Dr. Burt G. Wilder. 

Died, in December, 1915, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

GARDNER, WILLIAM, B.S. (1881). Born, May 10, 1860, at Oswego, N. Y. 
Married, in 1900, Julia Palmer, of Bayhead, N. Y. Naval architect. De- 
signer of yacht "Atlantic." Member of Delta Phi fraternity. 

Address, 1 Broadway, New York City. 

GIFFORD, GEORGE FRANCIS, B.S. Born, Sept. 19, 1856, at Winchester, 
Ky. Married, July 14, 1880, Kate E. Genung, Ithaca. Editor of St. Paul 
Globe, 1896. On Editorial staff of Trades-Herald, Record-Herald, and 
Chicago News. 

Address, 6231 Monroe Ave., Chicago, 111. 

GILLIG, HARRY. Famous Globe-traveler. 
Address, Care Bohemia, San Francisco. 

GOTTHEIL, WILLIAM SAMUEL. Born, April 5, 1859, in Berlin, Germany. 
Married, Aug. 11, 1896, Viola Sheppard. Specialist in Dermatology. Pro- 
fessor of Dermatology, New York School of Clinical Medicine. Editor and 
author. 

Address, 144 W. 4th St., New York City. 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD PLATT, B.S. Son of President Rutherford B. 
Hayes. Cashier, Fremont (Ohio) Savings Bank. Farmer. 

Address, R. F. D. 3, Asheville, N. C. 

HENRY, WILLIAM ARNON, B.S., D.Sc. (University of Vermont, 1904; 
Mich. Ag. College, 1907). Born, June 16, 1850, at Norwalk, Ohio. Mar- 
ried, Aug. 19, 1881, Clara Roxana Taylor. Professor of Botany and Agri- 
culture, 1881, Agriculture, 1883, Dean of the College of Agriculture, 1891- 
1907, Director of Agricultural Experiment Station, 1889, Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Agriculture since 1907, University of Wisconsin. Author. 

Address, Madison, Wis. 

IRVINE, FRANK, B.S. Born, Sept 15, 1858, at Sharon, Pa. Married, Nov. 
16, 1887, Clara Christy, of Sharon, Pa. Lawyer. Asst. U. S. Dist Atty., 
Washington, D. C., 1883-4. District Judge, Nebraska, 1891-3. Supreme 
Court Commissioner, 1893-9. Professor of Pleading and Practice, 1901-16. 
Dean, 1907-16, College of Law, Cornell. State Public Service Commis- 
sioner since 1914. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 173 

LEARY, JAMES THOMAS, B.S. Born, Sept. 17, 1858, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Married, in Oct., 1892, Alice Hughes, of Ft. Wayne, Ind. General Auditor. 
Baltimore and Ohio R. R. Co. 
Address, Baltimore, Md. 

MESSENGER, HIRAM JOHN, Lit.B., Ph.D. (1886). Bora, July 6, 1855, 
Canandaigua, N. Y. Asso. Professor of Mathematics, University of the 
City of New York, 1886-90. Actuary of the Travelers Life Ins. Co., 1898-13. 
Died, Dec. 15, 1913. 

MORRIS, ROBERT TUTTLE. Born, May 14, 1857, at Seymour, Conn. 
Son of Gov. Luzon B. Morris. Married, June 4, 1898, Mrs. Aimee Reynaud 
Mazergue, of New York. Professor of Surgery, New York Post-Graduate 
Medical College since 1898. President of American Association of Obstret- 
ricians and Gynecologists, 1907. Author and writer. Alumni Trustee of 
Cornell, since 1905. 
Address, 616 Madison Ave., New York City. 

NIXON, CHARLES ELSTUN. Born, May 25, 1860, in Clermont Co., Ohio. 
Married, in November, 1887, Eldora Lynde Mann, at Kansas City, Mo. 
Dramatic and musical editor. Editorial writer, editor the Sunday paper 
1892-4, Chicago Inter-Ocean. Published in 1893 the Illustrated Colored 
Supplement, the first newspaper in America printed upon a Web perfecting 
press. Dramatic and musical editor, Chicago Inter-Ocean, 1894-9. Estab- 
lished the Helena (Mon.) Daily Record, 1900. Editor of The Philharmonic, 
Chicago, 2 years. Musical editor, Chicago Daily News. Writer of songs, 
dramas and dramatic sketches. 

Address, (Office), 246 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

PIERCE, HENRY, B.C.E. Married Miss Hyatt, daughter of George Hyatt, 
of Ithaca, N. Y. Civil Engineer. Superintendent of the Chesapeake and 
Ohio R. R. 

Died, Aug. 23, 1911, at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

POOLE, MURRAY EDWARD, A.B. "Who's Who In America," for 1903-5, 
says of him: "Born, July 17, 1857, at Centre Moreland, Wyoming Co., Pa. 
Son of Edward Valentine Poole, banker, and Susan (Carey) Poole, of Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. Descendant of Captain Myles Standish and John Alden. 
Prepared at Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, Wilkesbarre, Pa., and graduated 
at Cornell University, A.B., 1880. He attended the Cornell Law School, 
1888-93. (LL.D., Nashville College, 1900; D.C.L., American Univ., 1901). 
Admitted to the bar, May 3, 1889, at Syracuse, N. Y. Has practiced law 
at Ithaca, N. Y., since 1889. Married, Nov. 4, 1891, Eva Zeliffe, of Lime- 
stone, Cattaragus Co., N. Y. Justice of the Peace, 1891-5. Acting Recorder 
of the City of Ithaca, 1893-5. Special County Judge and Surrogate of 
Tompkins County, N. Y., 1889-90. Special Deputy Attorney General, 
1907-9. Democrat. Secretary of County Committee, 1900-01; Demo- 
cratic candidate for Delegate to Constitutional Convention, 1903. State 
Committeeman, 1906-12, and Chairman of County Committee, 1906-12, 
of the Independence League political party, and Member of the National 
Independence Convention, Chicago, 1908; nominated its first candidate 
for State Engineer, in 1906; General Organizer of the Independence League, 
1906-12. Independence League candidate for Justice of the New York 



174 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

Supreme Court, for Member of Congress and for Member of Assembly. 
Prominently mentioned for Atty. Gen., on Ind. League State ticket. Mem- 
ber of the American Bar Asso., Amer. Historical Asso., Sons of the Revolu- 
tion, and over 100 historical and learned societies. Founder and President 
of the American Genealogical Society and the National Historical Society, 
since 1900. President of the New York State Asso. of Democratic Clubs, 
1903-12. Thirty-second Degree Mason. Episcopalian. Author: The His- 
tory of Edward Poole of Weymouth, Mass., (1635), and His Descendants, 
1893; Five Colonial Families (2 vols., 2,400 pages), 1901; History of Jan 
VanCleef of New Utrecht, L. I., N. Y. (1659), and Some of His Descendants, 
1909; Williams Geneaology, Wethersfield, (Conn.), Branch, 1910; A Story 
Historical of Cornell University, with Biographies of Distinguished Cornel- 
lians, 1916. Contributor to Harpers Weekly, the Green Bag, The American 
University Magazine, and other periodicals. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

PORTER, EUGENE HOFFMAN. Born, Aug. 7, 1856, at Ghent, N. Y. 
Physician. Professor of Physiological Materia Medica, and of Medical 
Chemistry, Hahneman Medical College, N. Y. City, for several years. 
President, New York State Board of Health, 1905-15. 
Address, 181 W. 73rd St., New York City. 

SHEPARD, FRED DOUGLAS. Born, Sept. 11, 1855, Ellenburg, N. Y. 
Married, July 2, 1882, Fanny P. Andrews, of Ann Arbor, Mich. Medical 
Missionary. Professor of Surgery, 1882-8, Acting President, 1884-5, 1895-6, 
Central Turkey College. 
Address, Anitab, Turkey. 

SIBLEY, EDWIN HENRY, A.B., Litt.D. (Alfred, 1908). Born, Feb. 12, 1857, 
Bath, N. Y. Business man. Author and writer. 
Address, Franklin, Pa. 

TRELEASE, WILLIAM, B.S., Sc.D. (Harvard, 1884). LL.D. (University of 
Wisconsin, 1902, University of Missouri, 1903, Washington University, 
1907). Born, Feb. 22, 1857, at Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Married, July 19, 1882, 
Julia M. Johnson, of Madison, Wis. The greatest living botanist. In 
charge of Summer School of Botany, Harvard, 1883-4. Lecturer on Botany, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1884. Instructor, 1881-3, Professor, 1883-5, 
Botany, University of Wisconsin. Engleman Professor of Botany, and 
Director of the Shaw School of Botany, Washington University, 1885-1915. 
Director, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Mo., 1889-1915. First 
President of the Botanical Society of America, 1894-5. President, American 
Society of Naturalists, 1903. President, Academy of Sciences, St. Louis, 
1909. Editor. Translator. Writer of many papers on Botany and En- 
tomology. 

Address, St. Louis, Mo. 

TYRRELL, HENRY. Born, Feb. 3, 1865. Married, April 26, 1906, Nellie 
Kerslake, of New York. Journalist on the staff of the New York Sunday 
World, since 1903. Author of the beautiful "Evening Song," at Cornell, 
Lee of Virginia, and Shenandoah. 

Address, Care, The World, New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 175 

WAGNER, CHARLES GRAY, B.S. Born, at Minden, Montgomery Co., 
N. Y., Married, Nov. 2, 1903, Lizzie S. Bennett, of Binghamton, N. Y. 
Assistant Physician, Utica Insane Asylum, 1884-92. Superintendent of 
Binghamton State Hospital since 1892. Alumni Trustee of Cornell, 1896- 
1906. 
Address, Binghamton, N. Y. 

WHITE, FREDERICK DAVIES, B.S. (1882). Son of President Andrew D. 
White. Married Miss Bruce, daughter of Gen. Dwight H. Bruce, of Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. Lawyer. 

Died, July 8, 1901, at Syracuse, N. Y. 

'81 

BAILEY, LEON ORLANDO. U. S. Attorney, Indiana. 
Address, 5 Nassau St., New York City. 

BURR, GEORGE LINCOLN, A.B. LL.D. (University of Wisconsin, 1904). 
Litt.D. (Western Reserve, 1905). Born, Jan. 30, 1857, at Oramel, N. Y. 
Married, Aug. 20, 1907, Martha Martin, of Dublin, Va. (died, Jan. 31, 1909). 
American Historian. Instructor, 1881-4, 1886-7, 1888-9, Asst. Professor of 
History, 1889-90, Asst. Professor, 1890-91, Asso. Professor, 1891-2, Pro- 
fessor, 1892-1902, of Ancient and Mediaeval History, Cornell. Librarian of 
of the President White (Historical) Library, Cornell, since 1902. Historical 
Expert, Venezuelan Boundary Commission. Writer on the history of super- 
stition and persecution. Vice President, 1915, President, 1916, American 
Historical Association. Author of the Literature of Witchcraft; The Fate 
of Dietrich Flade. Editor, American Historical Review; Century Historical 
Series. Professor, Mediaeval History, Cornell, since 1902. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

EIDLITZ, OTTO MARC, B.C.E. Born, Sept. 18, 1860, at New York. Un- 
married. Builder. Tenement House Commissioner, appointed in 1890, by 
Governor Theodore Roosevelt. Commissioner, appointed in 1905, to ex- 
amine causes of collapse of buildings in New York City, and report on same. 
Member of Commission to investigate and report on question of employers 
liability and the causes and effects of unemployment in the State of New 
York. President, Mason Builders' Association of New York, 1900-4. 
Address (Office), 489 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

GREGORY, EMILY LOVIRA, Litt.B. Associate in Botany, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 188-. Professor of Botany, Barnard College, Columbia. 
Died, April 21, 1897, in New York City. 

HOLMES, JOSEPH AUSTIN, B.Ag. D.Sc. (University of Pittsburgh). 
LL.D. (University of North Carolina). Born, Nov. 3, 1859, at Lawrence, 
S. C. Married, Oct. 20, 1887, Jennie L. Sprunt, of Washington, D. C. 
Professor of Geology and Botany, University of North Carolina, 1881-91, 
Lecturer later. State Geologist, N. C., 1891-1904. In charge of U. S. 
Geological Survey Laboratories for testing fuels and structural materials, 
St. Louis, 1904-7; Pittsburgh after 1908. Chief of technological branch, 
U. S. Geological Survey, in charge of investigation of mine accidents. Chief 
of Dept. of mines and metallurgy, St. Louis Exposition, 1904. 
Died in July, 1915. 



176 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

HOUGH, ROMEYN BECK, A.B. Born, March 30, 1877, at Albany, N. Y. 
Author of "American Woods." 
Address, Lowville, N. Y. 

HOYT, WILLIAM BALLARD, Ph.B. Born, April 20, 1858, at East Aurora, 
N. Y. Married, Dec. 20, 1887, Esther Lapham Hill, of Buffalo, N. Y. 
Lawyer. Asst. U. S. Dist. Atty., W. Dist., New York, 1886-9. Asst. Atty. 
Gen. Alumni Trustee, Cornell, 1895-1900. 
Died, in June, 1915. 

OSTRANDER, WILLIAM STERLING, B.S. Born, June 28, 1858, at Schuy- 
lerville, N. Y. Married, Oct. 17, 1883, Cora E. Laing. Surrogate, Saratoga 
Co., N. Y., 1915. Republican Candidate for Supreme Judge, 1915. Author. 
Address, Schuylerville, N. Y. 

PLACE, IRA ADELBERT, A.B. Born, May 8, 1854, at New York. Married, 
Jan. 10, 1893, Katharine B. Gauntlett, of Ithaca, N. Y. Lawyer. General 
Attorney, 1902, General Counsel of all lines East of Buffalo, since 1905, 
Vice President, since Dec. 5, 1906, N. Y. Central & Hudson River R. R. 
Company. Trustee of Cornell. President, Cornellian Council. Member 
of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa Fraternities. 
Address, Grand Central Station, New York City. 

REEVE, BENJAMIN HARRY. Born, March 11, 1857, at Mattituck, N. Y. 
Married. State Senator. Dist. Atty. County Judge, Suffolk Co., N. Y., 
1900. 

Died, Jan. 7, 1902, at Greenport, L. I., N. Y. 

RITES, FRANCIS MARION, B.M.E. Born in 1858, near Springfield, 111. 
Married, Oct. 1, 1891, Perie Clapp, of Ithaca, N. Y. Inventor of an 
automatic governor for steam boilers. 

Died, in 1913, at SlaterviUe Springs, N. Y. 

SHIRAS, GEORGE. Born, Jan. 1, 1859, at Alleghany, Pa. Son of Judge 
George Shiras of the U. S. Supreme Court. Married, Oct. 31, 1885, Frances 
P. White, of Marquette, Mich. Lawyer. Representative, Pa., 1889-90. 
Member of Congress, 1903-5. Writer. 
Address (Home), Stoneleigh Court, Washington, D. C. 

SMITH, THEOBALD, Ph.B. Born, July 31, 1859, at Albany, N. Y. Mar- 
ried, May 17, 1888, Lillian May Eggleston, of Washington, D. C. Director, 
Pathological Laboratory, Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agri., 
1881-95. Director, Pathol. Laboratory, Mass. State Board of Health, since 
. 1895. Professor of Bacteriology, George Washington University, 1886-95. 
Lecturer on Hygiene and Bacteriology, Cornell, 1887-8. Professor of Zool- 
ogy, 1895-6, Comparative Pathology, since 1896, Harvard. Member of 
Board of Directors of Rockefeller Inst. for Medical Research, New York, 
since 1901. 
Address (Home), Forest Hills, Boston, Mass. 

WING, HENRY HIRAM, B.Ag., M.S. in Ag. (1891). Born, Nov. 29, 1859, 
at New York. Brother of Professor Charles Benjamin Wing, C.E., '86. 
Married, July 16, 1885, Lillian Watson, of Clyde, N. Y. Adj. Professor of 
Agriculture, University of Nebraska, 1884-8. Department Director and 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 177 

Sec., Cornell Agricultural Experiment Station, 1888-94. Asst. Professor of 
Animal Industry and Dairy Husbandry, 1891-1903, of Animal Industry, 
since 1903, Cornell. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'82 

BIGGS, HERMANN MICHAEL, A.B. LL.D. (Elsewhere) .Born, Sept. 29, 
1859, at Trumansburg, N. Y. Married, Aug. 18, 1898, Frances M. Rich- 
ardson, of Hornell, N. Y. Physician. Asst. Pathologist, 1886-92, Patholo- 
gist, 1892-9, Bellevue Hospital, 1886-92, City Hospital. Lecturer and Pro- 
fessor of Pathological Anatomy, Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1885- 
94, Consulting Physician, Hospital for Contagious Diseases, since 1889. 
Pathologist and Director of Bacteriological Laboratories, 1892-1901, Gen- 
eral Medical Officer, New York Department of Health, since 1901. Pro- 
fessor of Therapeutics and Clinical Medicine, and Asso, Professor of Medi- 
cine, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical Colleges, since 1897. At- 
tending Physician, Bellevue Hospital, since 1894, St. Vincent's Hospital, 
since 1897. Director, Rockefeller Inst. for Medical Research, since organ- 
ization, in 1901. President, National Association for Prevention of Tu- 
berculosis, 1906-7. President, Public Health Council, State of New York. 
State Commissioner of Health, New York, 1915-. 
Address, 113 W. 57th St., New York City. 

CARMODY, THOMAS. Born, Oct. 9, 1859, at Milo, N. Y. Chief Examiner, 
New York State Board of Civil Service Examiners, 1892-4. Attorney Gen- 
eral, New York, 1911-15. 
Address, New York City. 

DIBBLE, HENRY MONTGOMERY, B.Lit. President, Bank of Western 
Carolina. 
Address, Aiken, S. C. 

HISCOCK, ALBERT KING, A.B. Born, Oct. 21, 1861, at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Son of U. S. Senator Frank Hiscock. President, State Bank, Syracuse. 
Member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. 
Died, April 7, 1908, at Syracuse, N. Y. 

HOUSE, EDWARD MANDELL. Born, July 26, 1858, at Houston, Texas- 
Married, Aug. 4, 1881, Loulie Hunter, of Austin, Tex. Active in Demo- 
cratic politics in Texas; has directed the campaigns of many successful 
Democratic nominees for Governor since 1892; never a candidate for office. 
He is the most intimate personal and political friend of President Woodrow 
Wilson. He was prominent and active in bringing about the nomination 
and election of Mr. Wilson to the Presidency. Diplomatic Agent of the 
United States to the warring nations of Europe in the Summer of 1915, 
and again in the Winter of 1915-16. Planter. 
Address, Austin, Texas. 

KELLEY, FLORENCE, B.Litt. Born, Sept. 12, 1850. Daughter of William 
D. Kelley, M.C., of Philadelphia, Pa. Author, writer, translator and lec- 
turer. Secretary, National Consumers' League, since 1899. 
Address, 265 Henry St., New York City. 



178 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

WAIT, JOHN CASSAN, C.E. Born, June 4, 1860, at Norwich, N. Y. Married, 
June, 1886, Ginevra Caroline Westlake, Ironton, Ohio. Asst. Professor, 
Civil Engineering, Harvard, 1887-94. Engineer in charge of New York 
State Canals, $9,000,000 Improvement, 1896-7. Asst. Corporation Counsel, 
New York City, 1900-04. Lawyer. Civil Engineer. Author. 
Address, 38 Park Row, New York City. 

WOODRUFF, EDWIN HAMLIN, LL.B. (1888). Born, Sept. 2, 1862, at 
Ithaca, N. Y. Unmarried. In the Astor Library, New York City, 1883-4, 
Cornell University Library, 1884-7. Instructor, English, Cornell, 1888-90. 
Librarian, 1891-6. Acting Professor of Law, 1893-6, Leland Stanford Junior 
University. Professor, Law, since 1896, Acting Dean of College of Law, 
Cornell, 1914-16. Dean of the Faculty of Law and of the College of 
Law, appointed April 29, 1916. Author. Editor. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'83 

CURTIS, CHARLES LOCKE, A.B. Born, Sept. 2, 1860, at Auburn, N. Y. 
Married, 1883, Lucy Heggie, Ithaca, N. Y. Editor of the Toledo Blade. 

Address, Toledo, Ohio. 

DIX, JOHN ALDEN. Born, Dec. 25, 1860, at Glens Falls, N. Y. Married, 
1889, Gertrude Allen Thomson. Lumber and paper manufacturer. Di- 
rector in many banks. Vice President, First Nat. Bank, Albany, N. Y. 
Delegate, National Democratic Convention, 1904. Democratic candidate 
for Lieutenant Governor, 1908. Chairman, Democratic State Committee, 
1910. Governor, New York, 1911-12. Episcopalian. Member of Theta 
Delta Chi fraternity, and Ft. Orange and Country Clubs. 

Address, Thomson, N. Y. 

ELMER, HERBERT CHARLES, A.B. Born, March 30, 1860, at Rushford, 
N. Y. Married (1st), 1886, Rose Elmore (died); (2nd), 1891, Bertha E. 
Beebe. Acting Asst. Professor, 1888-90, Asst. Professor and Professor, 
Latin, Cornell, since 1890. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

FUERTES, JAMES HILLHOUSE, C.E. Born, Aug. 10, 1863, at Ponce, 
Porto Rico. Son of Professor Estevan A. Fuertes, of Cornell. Married, 
Jan. 10, 1895, Mary Hill Cable. Sanitary Engineer. Designed and con- 
structed numerous works for the sewerage, drainage, refuse disposal, water 
purification, and water supply of cities in the U. S., Canada, and Brazil. 
Consulting Engineer. 

Address, 140 Nassau St., New York City. 

HOFFMAN, HARRY NATT, B.Ag Born, Nov. 24, 1861, at Elmira, N. Y. 
Married, Nov. 1890, Anna M. Wray. Mayor of Elmira, N. Y., 1914-15. 
Nurseryman and Florist. 
Address, Elmira, N. Y. 

MATTHEWS, FRANKLIN, A.B. Born, May 14, 1858, at St. Joseph, Mich. 
Married, in 1886, Mary Crosby. Editor, Philadelphia Press, 1886-90; The 
Sun, New York, 1890-1909. Professor of Journalism, Columbia, 1915-. 
President of Cornellian Council. Alumni Trustee of Cornell, 1914-. Author 
of several books. Contributor to periodicals. 
Address (Office), The Sun, New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 179 

MILLER, HARRY IRVING, LL.D. (Mt. St. Mary's College, 1909). Born, 
Jan. 12, 1862, at Cleveland, Ohio. Married, May Burbank, of Richmond, 
Ind. President, since 1906, C. & E. I. R. R., Evansville Terre Haute R. R., 
Evansville & Indianapolis R. R., etc. 
Address, 144 VanBuren St., Chicago, 111. 

PEARSON, EDWARD JONES, B.C.E. Born, Oct. 4, 1863, at Rockville, Ind. 
Married, June 7, 1899, Gertrude S. Simmons. Chief Engineer, C. M. & 
St. Paul R. R. Vice President, Mo. Pacific R. R. Co., and Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & Puget Sound R. R. Co. 
Address, Seattle, Wash. 

PROSSER, CHARLES SMITH B.S. Ph.D. (1907). Born, March 24, 1860, 
Columbus, N. Y. Married, Aug. 28, 1893, Mary F. Wilson, of Albany, 
N. Y. Professor of Natural History, Washburn College, 1892-4. Professor 
of Geology, Union College, 1894-9. Asst. Professor of Hist. Geology, 1899- 
1901, Professor of Geology, since 1901, Ohio State University. Author and 
writer. 

Address, Columbus, Ohio. 

ROEHRIG, FREDERICK LOUIS, B.Arch. Born, Dec. 24, 1857, at LeRoy, 
N. Y. Son of Professor F. L. O. Roehrig, of Cornell. Married, Oct. 29, 
1885, Gavina Hungerford, of Ithaca, N. Y. Architect of many prominent 
buildings. 

Address, Pasadena, Cal. 

WASHBURN, FRANK SHERMAN, B.C.E. Civil Engineer. Alumni Trus- 
tee of Cornell, 1895-1902. 
Address, Nashville, Tenn. 

POST-GRADUATE 

JOHNSON, GEORGE HENRY, M.S. Professor of Mathematics and Engi- 
neering, National College of Nicaraugua, 1883-5. Writer, editor and statis- 
tician. 

Address, 22 Thames St., New York City. 

'84 

AYRES, PHILIP WHEELER, Ph.B. Born, May 26, 1861, at Winterset, Iowa. 
Married, Aug. 8, 1899, Alice Stanley Taylor, of Newton, Mass. General 
Secretary, Associated Charities of Cincinnati, 1889-95, Chicago, 1895-7. 
Assistant Secretary, Charity Organization Society, New York City, 1897- 
1900. Forester of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire forests, 
and of the Dartmouth College, since 1900. Writer. 
Address, Concord, N. H. 

DEFOREST, HENRY PELOUZE, B.S. M.S. (i887). Bom, Dec. 29, 1864, 

at Fulton, N. Y. Married, Dec. 6, 1891, Anna Catherine Gilmore (A.B., 
Smith, 1889), of Fulton, N. Y. Physician. Asso. Professor of Obstretrics, 
New York Post Graduate Medical College, since 1903. Writer. President, 
Association of Class Secretaries, Cornell. 
Address, 150 W. 47th St., New York City. 



180 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

ENSIGN, ORVILLE HIRAM. Born, July 8, 1863, Ithaca, N. Y. Married, 
Aug. 15, 1888, Jennie Kirtland, of Schenectady, N. Y. Electrical and Me- 
chanical Engineer. Chief Electrical Engineer, U. S. Reclamation Service. 
Address (Office), Citizens' Nat. Bank Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

HUFFCUT, ERNEST WILSON, B.S. LL.B. (1888). Born, Nov. 21, 1860, 
at Kent, Conn. Unmarried. Professor of Law, University of Indiana, 
1890-2, Northwestern University, 1892-3, Cornell, 1893-1907, and Dean 
of College of Law, 1903-7. Special Counsel to Governor Charles E. Hughes. 
Author and editor. 

Died, May 4, 1907, on Hudson River, N. Y. 

KRAUSS, WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER, B.S. Bora, Oct. 15, 1863, at Attica, 
N. Y. Married, Sept. 4, 1890, Clara Krieger, of Salamanca, N. Y. Physi- 
cian. President, American Microscopical Society, 1898. Author and writer. 

Died in 1909. 

MEAD, DANIEL WEBSTER, B.C.E. Born, March 6, 1862, at Fulton, N. Y. 
Married, Nov. 20, 1886, Katie Ross Gould, of Rockford, 111. Civil Engineer. 
Professor of Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering, University of Wisconsin, 
since 1904. Author and writer. 

Address, Madison, Wis. 

PATCHIN, FRANK GLINES, A.B. Born, Dec. 19, 1861, at Wayland, N. Y. 
Married, in Sept., 1895, Elizabeth Calisher, of New York City. City editor, 
New York Journal, 1893-5. Editorial writer on several other New York 
and Washington newspapers. Author of 'many books. 
Address, 449 W. 22nd St., New York City. 

PATTEN, HENRY JAY, Ph.B. Trustee of Cornell, 1915-. Grain Commis- 
sion. Merchant. 

Address, Western Union Building, Chicago, 111. 

SHALER, IRA ALEXANDER, B.C.E. M.C.E. (1886). Born,Sept. 19, 1862, 
at Ridgefield, N. J. Son of Maj. Gen. Alexander Shaler, U. S. Vols. Mar- 
ried. Civil Engineer. Chief Engineer for the contractors and builders of 
the New York Subway. Major, 1st Regt., U. S. Vol. Engineers. Member 
of Military Order of the Loyal Legion. 
Died, June 29, 1902, at New York City. 

STAMBAUGH, JOHN TOD, Ph.B. Bora, Feb. 15, 1862, at Girard, Ohio. 
Married, 1887, Cora L. Bunts, of Cincinnati. Secretary and Treasurer, 
Youngstown Steel Co. Vice President, William Tod Co., since 1899. 
Address, Youngstown, Ohio. 

WEBB, WALTER LORING, B.C.E. C.E. (1889). Bora, June 25, 1863, at 
Rye, N. Y. Married, Sept. 1, 1886, Mary Tremaine Hubbard. Asst. Pro- 
fessor, Civil Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 1893-1901. Consult- 
ing Engineer, since 1901. 

Address, 1026 Real Estate Trust Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, TIMOTHY SHALER, A.B. Born, Aug. 1, 1862, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Brother of Chauncey Grant Williams, C.E. '87. Married, in 1895, Mrs. 
Alice W. Kelley, of Albany, N. Y. Journalist. Private Secretary to Gover- 
nors Hill and Flower. President, Brooklyn Heights R. R. Co., Brooklyn 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 181 

Rapid Transit Co., Brooklyn Elevated R. R. Co., Nassau Electric R. R. Co., 
Kings Co. Elevated R. R. Co., and several other electric railways, and 
electric light and power companies. 

Address, (Home), Cold Spring Harbor, L. I., N. Y.; (Office), 168 Montague 
St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WILSON, CHARLES BUNDY, A.B. Born, May 9, 1861, at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Married, June 25, 1896, Frances Colquhoun, of Ithaca, N. Y. Professor 
of German Language and Literature, Iowa State University. Editor. 
Address, Iowa City, Iowa. 

POST-GRADUATES 

KEPHART, HORACE. Born, Sept. 8, 1862, at E. Salem, Pa. Married, 
April 12, 1887, Laura White Mack, of Ithaca, N. Y. Librarian, St. Louis 
Mercantile Library, 1890-. 
Address, St. Louis, Mo. 

ROLFE, JOHN CAREW, Ph.D. Born, Oct. 15, 1859, at Lawrence, Mass. 
Married, Aug. 29, 1900, Alice Griswold Bailey. Asst. Professor, 1890-2, 
Acting Professor, 1892-3, Professor, 1894-1902, of Latin, University of Mich- 
igan. Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, University of Penn- 
sylvania, since 1902. 

'85 

ATKINSON, GEORGE FRANCIS, Ph.B. Born, Jan. 26, 1854, at Raisin- 
ville, Monroe Co., Mich. Married, in Aug., 1888, Lizzie S. Kerr. Asst. 
Professor, 1885-6, Asso. Professor, 1886-8, of Entomology and Gen. Zoology, 
University of N. C. Professor of Botany and Zoology, Univ. of S. C., and 
Botanist to Expt. Station, 1888-9. Professor of Biology, Ala. Poly. Inst. 
and Agri'l and Mech. College of Ala., 1889-92. Asst. Professor, 1892-3, 
Asso. Professor, 1893-6, of Cryptopamic Botany, Professor of Botany, since 
1896, Cornell. Author of College text books of Botany. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BENNETT, BURTON ELLSWORTH, B.S. Born, April 17, 1863, at N. Brook- 
field, N. Y. U. S. District Attorney, Alaska, 1895-8. Commissioner, Pan- 
American Exposition, 1901. 

Address, 613 Pacific Building, Seattle, Wash. 

ELLIOTT, ORRIN LESLIE, Ph.B. Ph.D. (1890). Born, March 8, 1860, 
Centerville, N. Y. Married, Dec. 28, 1886, Ellen Coit Brown, B.S. '82. 
Instructor, English, Cornell, 1886-91. Registrar, Leland Stanford Jr. Uni- 
versity, since 1891. Author. 

Address, Stanford University, Cal. 

HARRIS, ROLLIN ARTHUR, Ph.B. Ph.D. (1888). Born, April 18, 1863, 
Randolph, N. Y. Married, June 13, 1880, Emily J. Doty, of Falconer, 
N. Y. Mathematician, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, since 1890. 
Writer. 

Address, 49th and Albany Sts., Washington, D. C. 



182 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

POST-GRADUATES 

JACKSON, DUGALD CALEB. Born, Feb. 13, 1865, at Kenneth Square, Pa. 
Married, Sept. 24, 1889, at Orono, Me., Mabel A. Foss, of New Gloucester, 
Me. Electrical Engineer in active practice for several years in important 
work. Professor of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Wisconsin, 1891-1907, 
Mass. Inst. Tech., since 1907. Member of International Jury, Chicago and 
Buffalo Expositions. Author of many college text books on electricity. 
Address, (Home), Brookline, Mass.; (Office), 84 State St., Boston, Mass. 

PARR, SAMUEL WILSON, M.S. Born, Jan. 21, 1857, at GranviUe, 111. Mar- 
ried, Dec. 27, 1887, Lucie A. Hall, of Champaign, 111. Professor, General 
Science, Illinois College, 1886-91. Professor, Applied Chemistry, Univ. of 
Illinois, since 1891. Inventor of the Parr Calorimeter, for determining the 
heat value of coal and other hydrocarbons, widely used in America and 
Europe. Writer. 
Address, Urbana, 111. 

PENNY, GEORGE BARLOW, B.S. Professor of Music, Dahousie College, 
1886-7. Professor and Dean, Washburn CoUege. Dean of School of Ec- 
clesiastical Music, Fine Arts Institute. 
Address, Kansas City, Mo. 

WHITE, ANDREW CURTIS, Ph.D. Born, Nov. 25, 1854, at Kirkland, N. Y. 
Married, in 1890, Minnie Langworthy, of Utica, N. Y. Instructor, Latin, 
1885-6, Greek and Latin, 1886-9, Assistant Librarian, since 1889. Reader 
in Greek, 1895-, Cornell. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WHITE, JAMES GILBERT, Ph.D. Born, Aug. 29, 1961, at Milroy, Pa. 
President of J. G. White & Co., New York City, Engineers, Builders and 
Owners of Electrical Light and Power Plants, Railroads, and Manufacturing 
Plants, etc., etc., in the U. S., London, Manila, and other places, including 
the Cayuga Lake Portland Cement Plant, Ithaca Gas Works, etc., etc. 
Organized recently The Latin-American Corporation. Trustee of Cornell, 
1915-. 
Address, (Office), 43 Exchange Place, New York City. 

SPECIAL STUDENT 

SMITH, WALTER GIFFORD. Member of New York Assembly. Editor of 
the Hawaiian Star. 

Address, Honolulu, H. I. 

'86 

BRUNK, THOMAS LAFAYETTE, B.S. Professor of Botany and Horti- 
culture, Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, 1887-. Physician. 
Address, Decatur, 111. 

CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, HOBART CHATFIELD, B.S. Born, March 24, 
1865, at Chicago, 111. Married, June 19, 1890, Rose, daughter of U. S. 
Senator Charles B. Farwell of Illinois. Editor of "America," 1888-90. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 183 

Consul of Spain at Chicago, 1892-4. Chevalier of the Legion of Honor, 
France; Order of Isabella the Catholic Spain ; Order of St. James, Portugal. 
Author of many novels. Contributor to many periodicals. 
Address, (Home), Lake Forest, 111.; (Office), 100 Washington St., Chicago, 

COMSTOCK, ANNA (BOTSFORD), B.S. Born, Sept. 1, 1854, at Otto, N. Y. 
Married, Oct. 7, 1878, Professor John Henry Comstock, B.S. '74, of Cor- 
nell. Artist and wood engraver. Lecturer in Nature Study, 1902-6, in Ex- 
tension Teaching, 1906-, Cornell. Lecturer, in Extension Work, Leland 
Stanford Jr. University, 1899-1900. Author. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

HARRIS, GILBERT DENNISON, Ph.B. Born, Oct. 2, 1864, at Jamestown, 
N. Y. Married, Dec. 30, 1890, Clara Stoneman, of Lakewood, N. Y. On 
U. S., Texas and Arkansas Geological Surveys, 1887-93. Asst. Professor of 
Paleontology and Strategraphic Geology, 1894-1900, Professor, since 1900, 
Cornell. Editor. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

HARRISON, JOSEPH LEROY. Born, Oct. 12, 1862, at North Adams, Mass. 
Editorial writer on New York Commercial Advertiser, 1885-8. Sub-Librarian 
New York State Library, 1893-4. Librarian, Providence Atheneaeum, 
since 1894. Editor. Author. 
Address, Providence, R. I. 

HILL, ROBERT THOMAS, B.S. Born, Aug. 11, 1858, at Nashville, Tenn. 
Married, Dec. 28, 1887, Justina Robinson, of Ware, Mass. Engaged in 
Geological and Geographical explorations in Central America and West 
Indies. Lecturer, University of Michigan. Professor of Geology, University 
of Texas, 2 years. Author and writer. 

Address, Trinity Building, New York City. 

HULL, CHARLES HENRY, Ph.B. Born, Sept. 29, 1864, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Unmarried. Asst. Librarian, Cornell, 1889-90. Instructor in Political 

Science, 1892-3, Asst. Professor of Political Economy, 1893-1901, Professor 

of American History, since 1901. Dean of Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 

1908-, Cornell. Member of Board of Education, Ithaca. Trustee, City 

Hospital. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
McCANN, GEORGE, B.S. LL.B. (1888). Born, June 23, 1864, at Elmira, 

N. Y. Married, Florence Fillingham, of Ithaca, N. Y., (died, 1915). 

County Judge of Chemung County, N. Y. Justice of the Supreme Court, 

New York, since 1915. 

Address, Elmira, N. Y. 
MERRITT, ERNEST GEORGE, M.E. Born, April 28, 1865, at Indianapolis, 

Ind. Married, April 10, 1901, Bertha A. Sutermeister, of Kansas City, Mo. 

Asst. Professor, 1892-1903, Professor, since 1903, Dean of Graduate School, 

1909-, Cornell. Editor and writer. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
STONER, STANLEY, B.S. Born, Jan. 19, 1865. Lawyer. U. S. Consul 

General, Calcutta, India, 1905. 

Address, 608-9 Security Building, St. Louis, Mo. 



184 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

SUMMERS, HENRY ELIJAH, B.S. Born, Aug. 8, 1863, at Rochester, N. Y. 
Asst. Professor of Biology, University of Term., 1888-91. Asso. Professor 
of Human Physiology and Vertebrate Anatomy, Univ. of 111., 1893-8. Pro- 
fessor of Zoology, Iowa State College of Agric. and Mech. Arts, since 1898. 
Address, Ames, Iowa. 

THURBER, CHARLES HERBERT, Ph.B. Born, March 24, 1864, at Owego, 
N. Y. Married, June 25, 1891, Anna E. Billings. Registrar and Secretary, 
Cornell, 1886-8. Professor of Pedagogy, Colgate, 1893-5. Asso. Professor 
of Pedagogy, Univ. of Chicago, 1895-1900. Editor, and member of firm of 
Ginn & Co., publishers, since 1904. Editor and author. 
Address, 29 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

WHITE, DAVID, B.S. Born, July 1, 1862, at Palmyra, N. Y. Married, Feb. 
2, 1888, Mary Elizabeth Houghton. Geologist, U. S. Geol. Survey, since 
1899. 
Address, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

WING, CHARLES BENJAMIN, C.E. Born, Jan. 8, 1864, at Willow Brook, 
N. Y. Brother of Professor Henry Hiram Wing, B.Agr. '81, of Cornell. 
Married, (1st), Sept. 18, 1888, Anna Maria Paddock, of Auburn, N. Y., 
(died, Feb., 1905); (2nd), Feb. 20, 1908, Mrs. Marian (Colt) Brown, Cornell, 
1887-9, of Palo Alto, Cal. Professor of Structural Engineering, Leland 
Stanford, Jr. University, since 1892. Author. 
Address, Palo Alto, Cal. 

POST-GRADUATE 

ARTHUR, JOSEPH CHARLES, D.Sc. Born, Jar. 11, 1850, at Lowville, 
N. Y. Married, June 12, 1901, Emily Stiles Potter, of Lafayette, Ind. 
Professor of Vegetable Physiology and Pathology, Purdue Univ., since 
1887. Author and writer. 
Address, Lafayette, Ind. 

SPECIAL STUDENT 

PLATT, CHESTER CHILDS Born, Oct. 30, 1857, at Somers, Westchester 
Co., N. Y. Married, Aug. 23, 1880, Miss Fidelia Brown, of Ludlowville, 
N. Y. Journalist. Editor of Ithaca Democrat, 1900-3, and Batavia Times, 
since 1903. Secretary to Governor William Sulzer of New York, 1913-14. 
Interested in social and political reforms. 
Address, Batavia, N. Y. 

'87 

COVILLE, FREDERICK VERNON, A.B. Born, March 23, 1867, at Preston, 
Chenango Co., N. Y. Married, Oct. 4, 1890, Elizabeth Harwood Boynton, 
of Lockport, N. Y. U. S. Botanist, Dept. of Agriculture, since 1893. Curator, 
U. S. National Herbarium, since 1893. Secured foundation of Desert Bot. 
Laboratory by Carnegie Foundation. Author and writer. 
Address, Dept. of Agr., Washington, D. C. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 185 

GRANT, ARTHUR HASTINGS, Ph.B. Born, Nov. 18, 1865, at New York 
City. Married, Nov. 1st, 1904, Jessie (Bennett) Jeliffe. Registrar and 
Secretary, Cornell, 1888-90. Unitarian minister. Circulation manager, 
McGraw Publishing Co. 

Address, 356 Bay Way, Elizabeth, N. J. 

MOORE, VERANUS ALVA, B.S. Born, April 13, 1859, at Houndsfield, 
Jefferson Co., N. Y. Married, July 12, 1892, Mary L. Slawson, of Cicero, 
N. Y. Engaged in investigation of infectous diseases, Bureau of Animal 
Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 1890-6. Cheif of Division of Animal 
Pathology, U. S. Dept. of Agr., 1895-6. Professor of Comparative Pathology, 
Bacteriology and Meat Inspection, since 1896, and Dean since 1910, New 
York State Veterinary College, Cornell. Author of College text books. 
Writer. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

POUND, CUTHBERT WINFRED. Born, June 20, 1864, at Lockport, N. Y. 
Married, June 22, 1887, Emma Frances White, of Lockport, N. Y. State 
Senator, New York, 1894-5. Professor of Law, Cornell, 1895-1904. State 
Civil Service Commissioner, 1900-5; President, 1902-5. Counsel to the 
Governor, appointed Jan. 3, 1905. Justice of the Supreme Court, New 
York, since May, 1906, sitting in the Court of Appeals, since October, 1915. 
Republican. Trustee of Cornell, since 1912. 
Address, Lockport, N. Y. 

RUSSELL, JAMES EARL, A.B. LL.D. (Dickinson, 1903, University of Col- 
orado, 1905, McGill University, 1909). Born, July 1, 1864, at Hamden, 
Delaware Co., N. Y. Married, June 19, 1889, Agnes Fletcher, of Delhi, 
N. Y. Professor of Philosophy and Pedagogy, University of Colorado, 
1895-7. Professor of Education, since 1897, Dean, since 1898, Teachers 
College, Columbia University. Author. Editor. 
Address, 500 W. 121st St., New York City. 

RYAN, HARRIS JOSEPH, M.E. Born, Jan. 8, 1866, at Powell's Valley, Pa. 
Married, Sept. 12, 1888, Katherine E. Fortenbaugh, of Halifax, Pa. Pro- 
fessor of Electrical Engineering, Cornell, 1889-1905; Leland Stanford Jr. 
University, since 1905. Author of college text books. 
Address, Stanford University, California. 

WHITE, HORACE, B.L. Born, Oct. 7, 1865, at Buffalo, N. Y. Nephew of 
President Andrew D. White. Married, March 14, 1903, Jane L. Dennison, 
of Syracuse, N. Y. Lawyer. State Senator, New York, 1896-1908. Lieu- 
tenant Governor, 1909-10, Governor, New York, Oct. 6, 1910 to Jan. 1, 1911. 
Republican. Trustee of Cornell, 1916. Member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. 

Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

WRIGHT, ELLSWORTH DAVID, A.B. Ph.D. (1894). Professor of Latin, 
Lawrence University. 
Address, Appleton, Wis. 

POST-GRADUATE 

OSMOND, I. THORNTON, M.S. Professor, Pennsylvania State College. 
Address, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 



186 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 



BISSELL, GEORGE WELTON, M.E. Born, July 14, 1866, at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. Married, June 25, 1889, Fannie Hubbard Speed, of Ithaca, N. Y. 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 1892-7, and Vice Dean of Engineering, 
1904-7, Iowa State College. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Dean 
of Engineering, Michigan Agricultural College, since 1907. 
Address, E. Lansing, Mich. 

BLOOD, CHARLES HAZEN, Ph.B. LL.B. (1890). Born, April 7, 1866, at 
Ithaca, N. Y. Son of Gen. Charles F. Blood. Married, Oct. 1, 1905, Marie 
Louise Macbeth, of Greenville, S. C., granddaughter of George A. Trenholm, 
Secretary of the Treasury of the Confederate States. District Attorney of 
Tompkins Co., N. Y., 1898-1904. County Judge and Surrogate of Tomp- 
kins County, 1904-10. Director, Ithaca Trust Co. and Tompkins County 
National Bank. Trustee, Ithaca Savings Bank. Alumni Trustee of Cornell, 
since 1901. Founder (with Jared T. Newman, '75), of Cayuga and Renwick 
Heights, beautiful residential sections, north of Ithaca and the Cornell 
Campus. Member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

CHAMBERLAIN, JOSEPH REDINGTON, B.S. Born, Sept. 22, 1861, at 
Kanona, N. Y. Professor of Agriculture, Live Stock and Dairying, and 
Director, North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 
Address, Raleigh, N. C. 

EDWARDS, JAMES HARVEY, C.E. Born, at Oxford, Chenango Co., N. Y., 
June 19, 1864, and graduated from Cornell, Class '88, with C.E. degree. 
He was elected to the honorary scientific society, Sigma Xi, and is also a 
member of the honorary scientific society, Tau Beta Pi. After graduation 
he entered the employ of the Berlin Iron Bridge Company, East Berlin, 
Connecticut, as a draftsman, and held the position of Chief Engineer of the 
Company for six years until 1900, when the Berlin Company became a part 
of the American Bridge Company. Since then he has held the position of 
Assistant Chief Engineer of the American Bridge Company. Mr. Edwards 
is associated with the following professional and social organizations, namely : 
Member American Society of Civil Engineers, has served on the Board of 
Directors of this Society, and has been Chairman of its Publication Com- 
mittee for three years; member, American Railway Engineering Association; 
member, Engineers' Club of New York; member Cosmos Club, Washington, 
D. C.; member Cornell University Club, New York; member Machinery 
Club, New York; member Cornell Society of Civil Engineers. 
Address, Passaic, N. J. 

FISHER, WILLARD CLARK, A.B. Born, March 4, 1863, at Westerlo, N. Y. 
Professor, Economics and Social Science, Wesleyan University, 1892-1913. 
Mayor, Middleton, Conn., 1906-8. 
Address, Middletown, Conn. 

HELLER, DAVID NEISH, B.L. Born, Jan. 29, 1865, at Elmira, N. Y. Lawyer. 
County Clerk, Chemung Co., N. Y., 1894-6. Member of New York Assem- 
bly, 1899. City Judge, Elmira, since Jan. 1, 1916. 
Address, Elmira, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNEL LIANS 187 

HOYT, ALBERT ELLIS, A.B. Born, Oct. 25, 1865, at Potsdam, N. Y. Mar- 
ried, March 15, 1893, Belle M. Carter, of Adams, N. Y. Editor, of the 
Lockport Sun, 1892-5. Associate editor, 1895-01, editor, since 1901 of The 
Albany Argus. Secretary, New York State Conservation Commission, 
1914-15. 
Address, Albany, N. Y. 

ICKELHEIMER, HENRY RUBENS, B.L. Born, March 14, 1868, at New 
York City. Banker. Trustee, Cornell, since 1895. Donor of the painting, 
"The Meeting Place of Souls," and the bronze statue of President Andrew 
D. White, to Cornell. 
Address, 49 Wall St., New York City. 

JONES, FORREST ROBERT, M.E. Born, Dec. 12, 1861, at Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Married, Oct. 17, 1892, Miss Johnnie House Fletcher. Professor, Machine 
Design, Cornell, 1903-5. Consulting Engineer. 
Address, 315 W. 96 St., New York City. 

KING, STEPHEN TROWBRIDGE. Actor-manager. 
Address, 153 LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

MEAD, WINSLOW MORRISON. Born in Ohio. Married, Sept. 27, 1888- 
Harriet Barnes, of Ithaca, N. Y. Deputy State Superintendent of Public 
Works, New York, 1908-11. 
Address, Albany, N. Y. 

MENOCAL, MARIO GARCIA, C.E. Major General, Cuban Army of Libera 
tion. Chief of Police, Havana. Secretary of the Interior, Cuba. President 
of the Republic of Cuba, since 1913. 
Address, Havana, Cuba. 

MILLER, RANSFORD STEVENS, A.B. Born, Oct. 21, 1867, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Married, Aug. 23, 1895, Lily Murray, of Lockport, N. Y. Secretary of 
Embassy, Tokio, Japan, 1906-9. Chief Div. of Far Eastern Affairs, U. S. 
State Department, Washintogn, D. C., 1909-13. Consul General, Seoul, 
since 1913. 

Address, Seoul, Corea. 

MOTT, JOHN R., Ph.B. LL.D. (Princeton, 1914). Born, May 25, 1865, at 
Livingston Manor, N. Y. Married, Nov. 26, 1891, Leila Ada White, of 
Wooster, Ohio. Student Secretary of International Committee, Y. M. C. A., 
since 1888. Chairman of Executive Committee of Students' Volunteer 
Movement, since 1888. General Secretary of World's Student Christian 
Federation, since 1895. Foreign Secretary of International Com., Y. M. 
C. A., since 1898. Associate General Secretary of International Com. of 
Y. M. C. A., since 1901. Author. Speaker. 
Address, 124 E. 28th St., New York City. 

PAYNE, PHILIP, A.B. Born, Dec. 14, 1867, at Dayton, Ohio. Unmarried. 
Lawyer. Journalist. Author of several novels. 
Address, Minneapolis Journal, Minneapolis, Minn. 



188 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

PEARSON, LEONARD, B.S. in Agr. Born, Aug. 17, 1868, at Evansville, 
Ind. Nephew of Professor George W. Jones of Cornell. Unmarried. Pro- 
fessor of Veterinary Medicine, 1891-, and Dean, 1897-, University of Penn- 
sylvania. State Veterinarian, Pa., 1895-. President, American Veterinary 
Medical Association, 1899-1900. Editor of Veterinary Magazine. 
Died in 1912. 

ROWLEE, WILLARD WINFIELD, B.L. D.Sc. (1893). Born, Dec. 15, 1861, 
at Fulton, N. Y. Married, Dec. 22, 1887, May Howard. Asst. Professor, 
1893-06, Professor, Botany, and Superintendent of Grounds, Cornell, since 
1906. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

TAYLOR, HARRY LEONARD, A.B. LL.B. (1893). Born, April 14, 1866, 
Halsey Valley, N. Y. Lawyer. President National Baseball League. 
County Judge, Erie County, N. Y., 1888-1912. Justice of the New York 
Supreme Court, since 1912. Alumni Trustee, Cornell, since 1903. 
Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 

WILLIAMS, OTIS LINCOLN, M.E. Born, Aug. 3, 1865, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Married, (1st), 1889, Laura Lyon, (died, March 31, 1894); (2nd), April 26, 
1899, Nancy Blakewell King, Alleghany, Pa. Director and Treasurer of 
Westinghouse, Church, Kerr & Co., of New York City, 1894 and after, 
and Westinghouse Machinery Co., of Pittsburgh, Pa., 1897 and after. 
Stock broker. 

Address, 111 Broadway, New York City. 

POST-GRADUATE 

CARPENTER, ROLLA CLINTON, M.M.E. LL.D. (Michigan Agricultural 
College, 1903). Born, June 26, 1852, at Orion, Mich. Married, 1876, 
Marion Dewey, of Greenville, Mich. Instructor and Professor, Mathe- 
matics and Civil Engineering, Michigan Agricultural College, 1875-90. 
Asso. Professor, Engineering, 1890-5, Professor, Experimental Engineering, 
Cornell, since 1905. Consulting Engineer for several Portland Cement 
plants. He has constructed numerous power stations for electric railways, 
and has had active charge of many engineering constructions. Patent 
expert in several important cases. Judge of machinery and transportation, 
Chicago and Buffalo Expositions. Member of U. S. Scientific Commission, 
appointed by the National Academy of Sciences, at the request of Presi- 
dent Woodrow Wilson, which visited, studied and reported upon the earth 
slides at the Panama Canal, 1915. Author. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

DENSMORE, HIRAM DELOS Professor, Botany, Beloit College, 1908-. 
Address, Beloit, Wis. 

MARSTERS, VERNON FREEMAN. Professor, Geology, Indiana Univer- 
sity. Director, Geological Survey, Peru. 
Address, Lima, Peru. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 189 

NEWCOMER, ALPHONSO GERALD, A.M. Born, Sept. 13, 1864, at Mt. 
Morris, 111. Married, Sept. 23, 1887, at Franklin Grove, 111., Carrie M. 
Jackson, of Oregon, 111. Asst. Professor, 1891-5, Asso. Professor, 1895-06, 
Professor, Engb'sh, Leland Stanford Junior University, since 1906. 
Address, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'89 

ADLER, SIMON LOUIS, B.L. Born, Aug. 30, 1867, at Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Lawyer. Member of New York Assembly, since 1911, and Republican 
leader of the Assembly. 

Address, 229 Granite Building, Rochester, N. Y. 

ANDERSON, JOHN WENDELL. Lawyer. He is one of the head officers of 
the Ford Automobile Manufacturing Company, Detroit. Member of Chi 
Psi fraternity. 

Address, 519-520 Moffat Building, Detroit, Mich. 

ARCHBOLD, WILLIAM KIBBE, M.E. Born, June 5, 1866, at W. Farming- 
ton, Ohio. Married, May 10, 1893, Helen Moore Cornell. President, 
Archbold-Brady Co., engineers and contractors, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Address, Greenway Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

BALLANTINE, J. HERBERT, B.S. Married, Sept. 24, 1890, Lois N. Wilgus, 
Ithaca, N. Y. Manufacturer. Member of Chi Phi fraternity. 

Address, 90 West St., New York City. 

BARDOL, FRANK VALENTINE ERHARDT, C.E. President, Eastern 
Steel and Concrete Co., engineers and contractors, Buffalo. 
Address, 400-401 D. S. Morgan Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

BENNETT, CHARLES PERRY, LL.B. Vice President, Singer Sewing Ma- 
chine Company. 
Died in 1915. 

BESEMER, HOWARD BURHANSE, Ph.B. Born, Oct. 19, 1869, in the 
Town of Dryden, Tompkins Co., N. Y. Son of Dr. Martin and Emma 
(Wolcott) Besemer. Married, Sept. 20, 1910, Ida May Burling, of Ithaca, 
N. Y. M.D., New York University, 1891, Cleveland Homeopathic Medical 
College, 1892. Physician and Surgeon, devoting his entire time to Surgery; 
has practiced at Ithaca, N. Y., since 1895. Member of American Institute 
of Homeopathy, American Medical Association and Delta Chi fraternity. 
Socialist. Club: Town and Gown. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

CHURCHILL, WILLIAM WILBERFORCE, M.E. M.M.E. (1890). Born, 
Jan. 16, 1887, at Monroe, Wis. Married, (1st), Sept. 28, 1894, Georgia 
P. Dadum, of Boston, (died, Jan. 6, 1896); (2nd,) June 25, 1902, Lettie 
E. Wood. Vice President, Westinghouse, Church, Kerr & Co., New York 
City. 

Died, in 1915. 

CORNELL, CHARLES LORIN, M.E. Born, Sept. 7, 1861, at Hamilton, 
Ohio. Married, Oct. 2, 1889, Elizabeth Colquhoun, of Ithaca, N. Y. Treas- 
urer, Niles-Bement-Pond Co., New York City. 
Address, 111 Broadway, New York City. 



190 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

CROUCH, LEONARD CALLENDER, Ph.B. Born, July 30, 1866, Kings- 
ton, N. Y. Lawyer. Justice of the New York Supreme Court, since 1912. 
Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

CUMMING, ROBERT GUSHING, LL.B. LL.M. (1891). Lawyer. State 
Bill Drafting Commissioner, New York, since 1914. Editor (with Charles 

C. Dickinson, '91), The General Municipal Laws of the State of New York, 
1892. 

Address, 23 S. Pearl St., Albany, N. Y. 

CURTIS, ARTHUR MILLS, B.S. in Arch. Educator. 
Address, Oneonta, N. Y. 

FERRY, ERWIN SIDNEY, B.S. Born, June 14, 1868, at Croydon, N. Y. 
Married, Aug. 21, 1900, Ruth M. White, daughter of President Andrew D. 
White. Professor, Physics, Purdue University, since 1899. 
Address, LaFayette, Ind. 

HAYFORD, JOHN FILLMORE, C.E. Born, May 19, 1868, at Rouse's Point, 
N. Y. Married, Oct. 11, 1854, Lucy Stone, of Charlotte, N. Y. Inspector 
of Geodetic Work and Chief of Computing Division, U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic Survey, 1900-09. Dean, College of Civil Engineering, North- 
western University, since 1909. Author. 
Address, Evanston, 111. 

HOPKINS, GRANT SHERMAN, B.S. D.Sc. (1893). Born, Sept. 23, 1865, at 
Westfield, N. Y. Asst. Professor of Anatomical Methods and Comparative 
Veterinary Anatomy, 1896-1903, Professor of Veterinary Anatomy, since 
1903, Cornell. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

KINGSBURY, ALBERT, M.E. Born, Dec. 23, 1862, near Morris, 111. Mar- 
ried, July 25, 1893, Alison Mason, of Stanford, Conn. Professor of Mechan- 
ical Engineering, New Hampshire College, 1891-9. Professor of Applied 
Mechanics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Mechanical Engineer with 
Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Co., since 1903. 
Address, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LAIRD, WARREN POWERS. Born, Aug. 8, 1861, at Winona, Minn. Mar- 
ried, Nov. 15, 1893, Clara Elizabeth Fuller, of Philadelphia. Professor of 
Architecture, since 1891, Founder and Director, College of Architecture, 
University of Pennsylvania. Consulting Architect for State of Penn., 
Cities of Pittsburgh, Springfield (Mass.), University of Wisconsin, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, Union Theological Seminary, Carnegie Tech. Schools, 

D. L. & W. R. R. Co., etc. 

Address, Univ. of Penn., Philadelphia, Pa. 

MARCUS, LOUIS WILLIAM, LL.B. Born, May 18, 1863, at Buffalo, N. Y. 
Married, Nov. 19, 1889, Ray R. Dahlman, of Buffalo. Lawyer. Surro- 
gate of Erie County, N. Y., 1895-1905. Justice of the Supreme Court, 
since 1905. 

Address, City and County Hall, Buffalo, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 191 

MARSTON, ANSON, C.E. Born, May 31, 1864, at Seward, 111. Married, 
Dec. 14, 1892, M. Alice Day, of Seward, 111. Engaged in construction 
work, 1889-92. Professor of Civil Engineering, since 1892, Dean of College 
of Engineering, since 1904, Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts. 

Address, Ames, Iowa. 

MAYNARD, MILA FRANCES (TUPPER), B.L. Born, Jan. 26, 1864, at 
Brighton, Iowa. Married, May 24, 1893, Rezin Augustus Maynard. Uni- 
tarian Minister. Editorial writer. Author and writer. Asst. Lecturer, 
U. S. Reclamation Service, since 1909. 

Address, 5088 Tennyson St., Denver, Colo. 

NOYES, WALTER CHAD WICK .Born, Aug. 8, 1865, at Lyme, Conn. 
Married, Oct. 22, 1895, Luella Shapley Armstrong. U. S. Circuit Judge. 
Author. 

Address, New London, Conn. 

OGDEN, HENRY NEELY, C.E. Born, April 30, 1868, at Dexter, Me. Mar- 
ried, Dec. 26, 1896, Mary G. Smith, of Portland, Me. Instructor, 1889-92, 
1894-8. Asst. Professor, 1898-1903, of Civil Engineering, Asst. Professor, 
1903-, of Sanitary Engineering, and Professor, Cornell. Engineer in charge 
of Sewer System, Ithaca, N. Y., and of construction of stone arch bridge 
of 64 feet span, and retaining wall 30 feet high, Cornell. Engineer to New 
York State Board of Health, since 1906. Author. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

PARKER, LEE HAMILTON, M.E. Railway Engineer, with the Stone & 
Webster Engineering Corporation, Boston, Mass. 
Address, 147 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

PARKER, JAMES SOUTH WORTH .Born, June 3, 1867, at Great Barring- 
ton, Mass. Married, June 21, 1902, Marion Williams. Assemblyman, 
1904, 1905, 1908-12. Member of Congress, since 1913. 
Address, Salem, N. Y. 

PARSONS, ROBERT SWAN, LL.B. County Judge of Broome County, N. Y., 
1909-14. Lawyer. 

Address, Binghamton, N. Y. 

POTTER, OWEN LINCOLN, LL.B. Born at Ithaca, N. Y. Lawyer. Spe- 
cial Counsel to the Governor, New York. State Commissioner of Statutory 
Revision, N. Y. Executive Legal Assistant. 
Address, Albany, N. Y. 

SHEPARDSON, GEORGE DEFREES, M.E. Born, Oct. 20, 1864, at Cheviot* 
Ohio. Married, in 1892, Harriet B. King, of King's Mills, Ohio. Professor 
of Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, since 1891. Member 
of Jury of Awards, St. Louis and Buffalo Expositions. Author. 
Address, Minneapolis, Minn. 

SMITH, SANFORD WILLARD, LL.B. State Senator, New York, 1913-14. 
Deputy Attorney General, New York, since 1915. 
Address, Albany, N. Y. 



192 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

SNYDER, HARRY, B.S. Born, Jan. 26, 1867, at Cherry Valley, N. Y. Mar- 
ried, in 1890, Adelaide C. Craig, of Rochester, N. Y. Professor of Agri- 
cultural Chemistry and Soils, University of Minnesota. Author. 
Address, St. Anthony Park, St. Paul, Minn. 

TREMAN, CHARLES EDWARD, B.L. Born, Oct. 11, 1868, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Son of Elias and Elizabeth (Lovejoy) Treman, and brother of Robert Henry 
Treman, '78. Married, Dec. 5, 1898, Mary A. Bott, of Ithaca, N. Y. En- 
tered business, in August, 1889, with Treman, King & Co., and became a 
member of the firm in 1892. Treasurer and Director of same, since its 
incorporation, in 1902. Vice President and Treasurer, Ithaca Trust Com- 
pany. Director, Tompkins County National Bank, Ithaca, Telephone Co., 
Ithaca Security Co., and Ithaca Realty Co. Formerly President, Ithaca 
Conservatory of Music. Treasurer, Cayuga Lake Cement Co. Democrat. 
Presbyterian. Delegate to several State Democratic Conventions. Mem- 
ber of Democratic State Executive Committee, 1910-16. Delegate to 
Democratic National Convention, Baltimore, 1912. State Superintendent 
of Public Works, New York, 1911. Member of New York State Highway 
Commission, 1911. Chairman, New York State Highway Advisory Com- 
mission. Alumni Trustee of Cornell, 1902-. Member of the Board of 
Stewards of the Poughkeepsie boat races. Member of Kappa Alpha fra- 
ternity. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

TURNEAURE, FREDERICK EUGENE, C.E. Born, July 30, 1866, at 
Freeport, 111. Married, Aug. 25, 1891, Mary Donna Stewart, B.L., '90, of 
Anchor, 111. Professor of Bridge and Sanitary Engineering, 1892-1902, 
Acting Dean of College of Engineering, 1902-3, Dean and Professor of 
Engineering, since 1903, University of Wisconsin. Author of many college 
text books. Writer. 
Address, Madison, Wis. 

WADE, FRANK EDWARD, Ph.B. Born, Dec. 14, 1865. Lawyer. Vice- 
Chairman, State Prison and Probation Commissions, New York, since 1910. 
President, New York Conference of Charities and Correction. Vice Presi- 
dent, National Probation Association. 

Address, D. S. Morgan Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

WAKEMAN, BERTIS RUPERT, B.S. in Agr. Born, July 12, 1867, at Hornell, 
N. Y. Married, June 24, 1903, Sophia Susan Reynolds. Physician. 

Address, Hornell, N. Y. 
WASHBURN, ALBERT HENRY, Ph.B. Lawyer. 

Address, 12 Broadway, New York City. 

WHITE, WILLIAM ALAN SON. Born, Jan. 24, 1870, at Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Unmarried. Asst. Physician, Binghamton, (N. Y.) State Hospital, 1892- 
1903. Superintendent, U. S. Government Hospital for the Insane, Wash- 
ington, D. C., since Oct. 1, 1903. Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases, 
Georgetown University, since 1903. Professor of Nervous and Mental 
Diseases, George Washington University, since 1904. Lecturer on Insanity, 
U. S. Naval and Army Medical School. Editor, translator, and writer. 
Address, Govt. Hosp. for Insane, Washington, D. C. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 193 

WILKINSON, JOHN, M.E. Chief Engineer of the Franklin Automobile 
Manufacturing Co. 
Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

WYCKOFF, EDWIN GUILD. Born in 1867, at South Lansing, Tompkins 
Co., N. Y. Married, in 1888, Edith T. Clymer, of Boston. President, and 
Owner of the Ithaca Street R. R. Founder of Cornell Heights, President, 
Cornell Heights Land Co., Heights Improvement Co., and other corpora- 
tions. Treasurer, Ithaca Electric Light and Power Co. Director, Reming- 
ton Typewriter Co., and W^yckoff, Seamon & Benedict. Commissioner 
to the last Paris Exposition. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

POST-GRADUATES 

ARNOLD, BION JOSEPH. Born, Aug. 14, 1861, at Cazenovia, Mich. Married, 
(1st), Jan. 14, 1886, Carrie Estelle Berry, of Reading, Mich.; (2nd), Dec. 
22, 1909, Mrs. Margaret Latimer Fonda, of New York. Electrical Engineer. 
Consulting Engineer for Chicago office of General Electric Co. Independent 
Consulting Engineer, since 1893. Consulting Engineer on some of the 
largest electrical systems in the country. Chief Engineer in rebuilding the 
Chicago Traction System at a cost of $40,000,000, and Chairman of the 
Board of Supervising Engineers of the same. Consulting Engineer, New 
York Public Service Commission, 1st Dist., in connection with subway 
and street railway matters. President of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, 1903-4. Delegate to International Electrical Congress, Paris, 
1900. President of the American Association for Advancement of Science, 
1906-7. First Vice President, International Electrical Congress, St. Louis, 
1904. 

Address, (Home), Chicago, 111.; (Office), 154 Nassau St., New York City, 
and 181 LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

BARR, JOHN HENRY, M.M.E. Born, June 19, 1861, at Terre Haute, Ind. 
Married, June 4, 1884, Katherine L. Kennedy, of Minneapolis. Instructor, 
Asst. Professor and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Minn., 
1885-91. Asst. Professor and Asso. Professor, 1889-98, Professor of Machine 
Design, 1898-1912, Sibley College, Cornell. Second Vice President, and 
Factory Manager, Union Typewriter Co., Syracuse, N. Y., since 1912. 
Alumni Trustee of Cornell, since 1905. 
Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

'90 

ABBOTT, FRANK ADDISON, B.L. Born, at Abbott's Corners, Erie Co., 
N. Y. Married, Dec. 21, 1902, Jane Ludlow Drake, Cornell 1899-1902, 
sister of Elizabeth Guest Drake, A.B., '99, who married Judge John R. 
Hazel, U. S. District Judge, of Buffalo, N. Y. Lawyer. District Attorney 
of Erie County, N. Y. 
Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 



194 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

ASHLEY, GEORGE HALL, M.E. Born, Aug. 9, 1866, at Rochester, N. Y. 
Married, July 11, 1895, Mary E. Martin, of Buffalo, N. Y. Professor of 
Biology and Geology, and Curator of Museum, College of Charleston, 
1900-3. Professor of Pharmacognosy, Medical College of State of South 
Carolina, 1901-3. Geologist, since 1904, U. S. Geological Survey. Writer. 
Address, Washington, D. C. 

BLAUVELT, GEORGE ALANSON, B.L. Born, Nov. 11, 1866, at Monsey, 
N. Y. Married, Jan, 6. 1896, Cora Demarest, of Nannet, N. Y. Member 
New York Assembly, 1911-12. State Senator, 1913-15. 
Address, Monsey, N. Y. 

CHAMBERLAIN, PAUL MELLEN, M.E. Born, Feb. 28, 1865, at Three 
Oaks, Mich. Married, April 23, 1891, Olivia Langdon Woodward. Asst. 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan Agricultural College, 1893-6. 
Asst. Professor of Drawing and Design, 1896-9, Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering, 1899-1906, Lewis Institute, Chicago. Consulting Engineer. 
Inventor of the curved glass blue print machine and of metal dynamograph. 
Author. 

Office, Marquette Building, Chicago. 

DALTON, WILLIAM, M.E. Chief Engineer American Locomotive Company. 
Address, Schenectady, N. Y. 

EMERSON, COL. EDWIN, A.B. Born in Dresden, Saxony. Unmarried. 
Historian and war correspondent. Was at the front in the Spanish- Ameri- 
can War, the Russian- Japanese War, and the great European War of 1914- 
16. Author of many war and other books. 
Address, Harvard Club, New York City. 

EMORY, GEORGE MEADE, LL.B. U. S. District Judge, District of Wash- 
ington (State). 

Died, July 7, 1906, at Seattle, Wash. 

FISH PIERRE AUGUSTINE, B.S. D.Sc. (1894). D.V.M. (1899). Born, 
Feb. 17, 1865, at Chatham, N. Y. Married, Aug. 25, 1897, Arethusa Poff, 
of Wakefield, Md. Asst. Professor of Comparative Physiology and Phar- 
macology, 1896-1902. Professor, since 1902, Cornell. Author of college 
text books. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

FORD, JOHN, A.B. Born, July 28, 1862, at Knowlesville, N. Y. Married, 
Sept. 16, 1891, Lulu Fairchild VanAken, of Ithaca, N. Y. State Senator, 
N. Y., 1896-1901. Author of "The Franchise Law" act now in operation in 
N. Y. Justice of the Supreme Court, N. Y., since 1906. Author. 
Address, 700 West End Ave., New York City. 

ISHAM, EDWARD SCHUTT. Born, Jan. 1, 1867, at Dunkirk, N. Y. Singer 
with the "Bostonians." Musician. 

Address, 27 W. 67th St., New York City. 

MENKEN, S. STANWOOD, B.L. Born, July 29, 1870, at Memphis, Term. 
Married, 1899, Gretchen von Briesen, of New York City. Lawyer. Prom- 
inent and influential public man. President, National Security League. 
Address, 52 Williams St., New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 195 

MORRISON, JOHN TRACY, LL.B. Born, Dec. 25, 1860, in Jefferson Co., 
Pa. Married, July 8, 1886, Grace Darling Mackey, of Jamestown, N. Y. 
Lawyer. Governor of Idaho, 1903-5. 

Address, Boise, Idaho. 
PARSONS, JAMES A. Lawyer. Attorney General, New York, 1914. 

Address, HorneD, N. Y. 

RICE, JAMES EDWARD, B.S. in AG Born, March 12, 1865, at Aurora, 
111. Married, Sept. 14, 1888, Elsie Van Buren, of Stockport, N. Y. Lec- 
turer in Farmers' Institutes, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Min- 
nesota, (winters), 1893-1903. Professor, Poultry Husbandry, Cornell, 
since 1903. Writer. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SHEARN, CLARENCE JOHN, B.L. Born, 1869, at Leeds, Mass. Married, 
April 12, 1899, Eva Petty, of Spartansburg, S. C. Lawyer. Personal 
attorney for William Randolph Hearst, for many years, and prosecuted for 
him cases against the Ice and Coal Trusts. Independence League candidate 
for Governor of New York, 1908. For many years was a politican campaign 
speaker organizer and writer of political platforms. Always a friend and 
helper of the common people. Justice of the New York Supreme Court, 
since 1914. President, Cornell University Club, New York City, 1900-02. 
Member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. 
Address, Court House, New York City. 

STRONG, ROBERT GRAY, LL.B. Lawyer. District Judge. 
Address, Greeley, Colo. 

THOMAS, MASON BLANCHARD, B.S. Dean and Professor of Botany, 
Wabash College. 

Address, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

TROWBRIDGE, ALEXANDER BUELL, B.S. in Arch. Born, Sept. 3, 1868, 
at Detroit, Mich. Married, 1896, Gertrude Sherman, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dean, Director and Professor, Architecture, Cornell, 1897-1902. Architect. 

Address, 114 E. 38th St., New York City. 

VANINGEN, GILBERT. Born, July 30, 1869, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Married, Sept. 3, 1903, Harriet Galusha, Rochester, N. Y. Asst. Professor, 
Geology, Princeton, since 1908. 
Address, Princeton, N. J. 

POST-GRADUATES 

BRONSON, WALTER COCHRANE, A.M. Litt.D. (Colby, 1904). Born, 
Aug. 17, 1862, at Roxbury, Mass. Married, 1905, Elsie M. Straffin, A.M. 
Professor, English, De Pauw University, 1890-2. Asst. Professor, 1892-5, 
Professor, English Literature, Brown, since 1895. 

Address, Providence, R. I. 

CRAIG, MOSES, M.S. Professor, Botany, Oregon Agricultural College. 
Herbarium Asst., Shaw School of Botany, Washington University. 

Address, St. Louis, Mo. 

FLATHER, JOHN J., M.M.E. Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, since 1898. 
Address, Minneapolis, Minn. 



196 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

PEIRCE, WILLIAM FOSTER, D.D. (Western Reserve, 1908). L.H.D. (Ho- 
bart, 1896). Born, Feb. 3, 1868, at Chicopee Falls, Mass. Professor of 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Ohio State University, 1891-2. Professor of 
Psychology and Ethics, 1892-6, President, since 1896, Kenyon College. 
Address, Gambier, Ohio. 

SUTLIFF, PHEBE TEMPERANCE, A.M. Born in 1859, at Warren, Ohio. 

Head of Department of History and Economics, Rockford College (111.), 

1892-6; Head of Department of Modern European and U. S. History, and 

President, 1896-1901. 

Address, Warren, Ohio. 
SWEETLAND, MONROE MARSH, L.L.M. Born, Aug. 14, 1863, in the 

Town of Dryden, Tompkins Co., N. Y. Married, July 17, 1901, Georgia 

M. Smith, of Ithaca. Lawyer. County Clerk of Tompkins Co., 1888. 

City Recorder, 1903-8, and City Judge, 1909-10, Ithaca, N. Y. County 

Judge and Surrogate of Tompkins Co., 1910-16. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SPECIAL STUDENT 

MARTIN, CLARENCE AUGUSTINE. Born, Sept. 29, 1862, in Medina 
County, Ohio. Married, June 30, 1896, Gertrude Shorb, Ph.D., Cornell '00, 
Adviser of Women, Cornell, of Decatur, 111. Asst. Professor, 1896-1903, 
Professor, since 1903, Director, since 1908, College of Architecture, Cornell. 
Author. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'91 

AUSTEN, WILLARD. Born, December, 1860, at Jackson, Mich. Married, 
Jessica Tyler, daughter of Professor Moses Coit Tyler, of Cornell. Asst. 
Librarian, 1892-15, Librarian, since 1915, Cornell. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
BARTON, FRANK ARTHUR, M.E. Major, U. S. Army. 

Address, War Dept., Washington, D. C. 

CHAMOT, EMILE MONIN, B.S. in Chem. Married, Cora Genung, singer, 
of Ithaca, N. Y. Asst. Professor of Chemistry, 1901-3, Sanitary Chemistry 
and Toxicology, since 1903, Cornell. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
CLARK, ROGER PHELPS. Lawyer. Special Counsel to the Governor, N. Y. 

Address, Binghamton, N. Y. 
COOKE, WALTER PLATT, LL.B. Lawyer. Alumni Trustee, since 1915. 

Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 

DICKINSON, CHARLES COURTER, B.L. LL.B. (1894). Lawyer. Presi- 
dent, Carnegie Trust Co., New York City. Trustee, Cornell. 

Died, May 17, 1910. 

FLOY, HENRY, M.E. Born, Sept. 19, 1866, in Elizabeth, N. J. Married; 
in 1895, Alice Van Benschoten, of East Orange, N. J. Consulting engineer; 
special reputation as electrical engineer in connection with hydraulic and 
high tension long-distance transmission work. 
Address, 165 Broadway, New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 197 

HIBBARD, HERBERT WADE, M.E. Asst. Professor, 1898-00, Professor, 
1900-, Mechanical Engineering of Railways, Cornell. 
Address, Columbia Mo. 

HOY, DAVID FLETCHER, B.S. M.S. (1893). Born, Oct. 6, 1863, in Bovina, 
Delaware Co., N. Y. Married, Aug, 6, 1895, Silence Howard, of Fulton, 
N. Y. Asst. Registrar, 1891-5, Registrar, since 1895, Cornell. Trustee, 
Cornell Athletic Association. Member of C. U. Class Secretaries Associa- 
tion. Trustee and Treasurer, Cornell Chapter of Kappa Sigma fraternity. 
Republican. Presbyterian. Member of Kappa Sigma, Sigma Xi, and 
Quill and Dagger fraternities. Editor of the Ten Year Book, Cornell, 1898, 
1908, and Address Catalogue of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. Contributor 
to Clute's Flora of the Upper Susquehanna River. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

HUBBS, IRVING G., LL.B. Born, Nov. 18, 1870, at Sandy Creek, Oswego 
Co., N. Y. Married, Jan. 5, 1893, Nannie Clark Dixon, of Pulaski, N. Y. 
Justice of the New York Supreme Court, since 1912. 

Address, Pulaski, N. Y. 
JACKSON, WILLIAM SCHUYLER. Attorney General, New York, 1907-9. 

Address, Care Buffalo, N. Y. 

LOVELL, EARL BRINK, C.E. Professor of Civil Engineering, Columbia, 
since 1907. 

Address, Care Columbia University, New York City. 

LYON, T. LYTTLETON, B.S. in Agr. Ph.D. (1904). Born, Feb. 17, 1869, 
at Pittsburg. Married, hi 1899, Bertha L. Clark, of Chicago. Professor 
of Agronomy, University of Nebraska, 1895-06, Cornell, since 1906. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

MATHEWS, CLARENCE WENTWORTH, B.S. in Agr. Dean, College of 
Agriculture, Kentucky State College. 

Address, Lexington, Ky. 

MORELAND, SHERMAN, B.L. LL.B. '94. Married. Assemblyman, New 
York. Judge of the Supreme Court, Philippine Islands. Dean, College of 
Law, University of the Philippines. 

Address, Manila, P. I. 

OLMSTED, EVERETT WARD, Ph.B. Ph.D. '97. Born, May 12, 1869, at 
Galesburg, 111. Married, June 19, 1895, Bula Hubbell, of Buffalo, N. Y. 
Asst. Professor, Romance Languages, 1898-09, Professor, Romance Lan- 
guages and Literatures, 1909-13, Cornell. Head Professor, Romance Lan- 
guages and Literatures, University of Minnesota. 

Address, Minneapolis, Minn. 

O'MALLEY, EDWARD RICHARD, LL.B. Assemblyman, 1900-2. Attor- 
ney General, New York, 1909-11. 

Address, Erie Co. Bank Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

OSBORNE, LOYALL ALLEN, M.E. (E.E.). Born, June 22, 1870, at Newark, 
N. J. Married, Nov. 27, 1895, Emma Louise Hines, of Newark, N. J. 
Second Vice President, Westinghouse Electrical and Manufacturing Co., 
since 1906. 
Address, Pittsburg, Pa. 



198 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

PHILLIPS, ERVIN LOUIS, A.B. Born, at Franklinville, N. Y. Major, 
U. S. A. Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Cornell, 1909-12. 

Address, Care War Dept., Washington, D. C. 
ROYSE, DANIEL. Editor of the Railway Age. 

Address, 160 Harrison St., Chicago, 111. 

SLINGERLAND, MARK VERNON, B.S. in Agr. Born, Oct. 3, 1864, at 
Otto, N. Y. Married, Sept. 10, 1891, Effie Brown Earll, (Special student, 
Cornell, '89-'91). Asst. Professor, Economic Entomology, Cornell, 1899-09. 

Died in 1909. 

SMITH, HAROLD BABBITT, M.E. Born, May 23, 1869, at Barre, Mass. 
Married, June 15, 1894, Laura Bertha Smith, of Ithaca, N. Y. Professor, 
Electrical Engineering, Arkansas University, 1892, Purdue (Director, Sch. 
E.E.), 1893-6, Worcester Polytechnical Institute, (Director Dept.), since 
1896. 

Address, Worcester, Mass. 

TANNER, JOHN HENRY, B.S. Born, March 1, 1861, at Fort Plain, N. Y. 
Married, June 20, 1893, Clara M. Williams, of Ithaca, N. Y. Asst. Pro- 
fessor, 1894-04, Professor, since 1904, Mathematics, Cornell. Secretary, 
Faculty Arts and Sciences, 1897-03. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

TUTTLE, WILLIAM EDGAR. Born, Dec. 10, 1870, at Horseheads, N. Y. 
Member of Congress, 1911-15. Lumberman. 
Address, Westfield, N. J. 

POST-GRADUATES 

BEDELL, FREDERICK, M.S. Ph.D. '92. Born, April 12, 1868, at Brooklyn, 
N. Y. Married, July 1, 1896, Mary L. Crehore. Asst. Professor of Physics, 
1893-04, Professor of Applied Electricity, Cornell, since 1904. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BOTSFORD, GEORGE WILLIS, Ph.D. Born, May 9, 1862, at West Union, 
Iowa. Married, Aug. 30, 1891, Lillie M. Shaw, of Kalamazoo, Mich. Adj- 
Professor of Ancient History, Columbia, since 1905. Author. 

Address, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

CORY, CLARENCE LINUS, M.M.E. Born, Sept. 4, 1872, at Lafayette, Ind. 
Married, Dec. 25, 1905, Mayme Pritchard, of Harlan, Iowa. Professor of 
Electrical Engineering, since 1892, Dean, College of Mechanics, since 1901, 
University of California. 

Address, Berkeley, Cal. 

EMERSON, OLIVER FARRAR, Ph.D. Asst. Professor, Rhetoric and Eng- 
lish Philology, 1892-6, Cornell; English, Western Reserve University, since 
1896. 

Address, 98 Wadena St., E., Cleveland, Ohio. 

NORTHRUP, EDWIN FITCH. Born, Feb. 23, 1866, at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Married, Oct. 9, 1900, Margaret Jane Stewart, of Pittsburgh. Professor 
of Physics, University of Texas, 1896-7. Assisted in development of Row- 
land's multiplex printing telegraph system, 1898-02. Manufacturer of 
electrical instruments. 

Address, 4901 Stenton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 199 

'92 

ATWOOD, WILLIAM GREENE, C.E. Chief Engineer of the Rutland R. R. 
Member of the Valuation Board of the Interstate Com. Commission. 
Address, Care Brookville, Pa. 

BACON, GEORGE WOOD, M.E. (E.E.). Born, May 6, 1869, at Greenwich, 
N. J. Married, June 1, 1904, Caroline Tilden Mitchell, of St. Cloud, Minn. 
Member of the firm of Ford, Bacon & Davis, Consulting Mechanical and 
Electrical Engineers, of New York City, and New Orleans. President, 
Alumni Field Committee. 

Address, 115 Broadway, New York City. 

BALDWIN, ARTHUR J., A.B. Born, Aug. 26, 1868, at Cortland, N. Y. 
Married, in 1892, Frances S. Smalley. Lawyer. Member of the law firm 
of (John W.) Griggs, Baldwin & Baldwin, attorneys for many great cor- 
porations. 

Address, 27 Pine St., New York City. 

BALDWIN, LEONARD D E WITT, A.B. Born, May 29, 1866, at Cortland, 
N. Y. Married, in 1892, Gertrude G. VanWagonen. Brother of Arthur J. 
Baldwin '92. Lawyer. Member of firm of Griggs, Baldwin & Baldwin. 
Address, 27 Pine St., New York City. 

BOSTWICK, CHARLES DIBBLE, A.B., LL.B. '94. Born, April 30, 1870. 
Married, August 12, 1903, Lera Lawrence Cobb, daughter of William 
Cobb, of Ithaca, N. Y. Asst. Treasurer, and since 1915, Treasurer, Cornell. 
Asst. Secretary, Board of Trustees. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BURROWS, BION LUCIENE, Ph.B. Born, Aug. 1, 1869, at Chatham, N. Y. 
Married, April 9, 1896, Elizabeth L. Bain, of Newark, N. J. News editor 
of the New York Press, 1899-00. Secretary, Rapid Transit Board, 1899-. 
Secretary to Mayor William L. Strong, 1897. 

Address, 320 Broadway, New York City. 

CARLTON, WILLARD GILBERT, M.E. (E). Superintendent, Power, 
Electric Division, New York Central and Hudson River, R. R. 
Address, Grand Central Station, New York City. 

CAROLAN, EDGAR ALFRED, M.E. (E.E.). Born, Jan. 7, 1871, at Sacra- 
mento, Cal. High officer with General Electric Co., New York City. Mem- 
ber of Kappa Alpha fraternity. 

Address, Care Gen. Elec. Co., New York City. 
CORNELL, JOHN BEELER. Cashier of Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 

Address, 111 Broadway, New York City. 

CROUCH, CALVIN HENRY, M.E. Dean, College of Mechanical and Elec- 
trical Engineering, University of North Dakota. 

Address, Grand Forks, N. Dakota. 

DAVIS, GEORGE HENRY, M.E. (E.E.). Bora at N. Hannibal, Oswego Co., 
N. Y. Married, 1898, Katherine McGrath of New Orleans. Engineer 
and Manager of Street Railroad, Light and Gas properties. Member of 
engineering firm of Ford, Bacon & Davis, New York City. 
Address, 115 Broadway, New York City. 



200 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

DsFORD, WILLIAM ALLAN, LL.B. Deputy Attorney General. Asst. Dist. 
Attorney. Independence League Candidate for Attorney General, 1908. 
Address, County Court House, New York City. 

DUNIWAY, CLYDE AUGUSTUS, A.B. Born, Nov. 2, 1866, at Albany, 
Oregon. Married, June 11, 1901, Caroline M. Gushing, of Oakland, Cal. 
Professor of History, Stanford, 1897-08. President, University of Montana, 
1908-12, University of Wyoming, since 1912. 
Address, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

ELLIOTT, JOHN LOVEJOY, B.L. Born, Dec. 2, 1868, at Princeton, 111. 
Unmarried. Teacher, Ethical Culture School, New York City, since 1894. 
Address, 436 W. 27th St., New York City. 

GREEN, ANDREW HEATLEY, M.E. Manager, Solvay Process Co., Detroit. 
Address, 64 Lafayette Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

GOLDSBOROUGH, WINDER ELWELL, M.E. (E.E.). Born, Oct. 10, 1871, 
at Baltimore. Married, Charlotte Poole Wallace. Chief of Dept. of Elec- 
tricity, St. Louis Exposition, 1903. Manager, Engineering Department of 
J. G. White Co. 

Address, Lafayette, Ind. 

HARSHMAN, WALTER SCOTT. Born, July 19, 1859, at N. Jackson, Ohio. 
Married, Dec. 9, 1890, Frances M. Hodges. Professor of Mathematics, 
U. S. Navy, since 1900. Director of the Nautical Almanac. 

Address, Sta. A, Washington, D. C. 

HAYES, SCOTT RUSSELL. Born, Feb. 8, 1871, Columbus, Ohio. Son of 
President Rutherford B. Hayes. Member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fra- 
ternity, and many clubs. 

Address, 71 Broadway, New York City. 

HILLS, ELIJAH CLARENCE, A.B. Dean, and Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages, Rollins College. 

Address, Winter Park, Fla. 

HINMAN, EDGAR LENDERSON, A.B. Ph.D. '95. Married, Alice Julia 
Hamlin, Ph.D. '96. Adj. Professor, Philosophy, University of Nebraska. 

Address, Lincoln, Neb. 

JENNEY, WILLIAM SHERMAN. Born, Oct. 30, 1867, at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Married, at Syracuse, N. Y., April 16, 1895, Nina Bevan, of Chicago. Gen- 
eral Attorney for the "Lackawanna" R. R. Co., New York City. 
Died, Dec. 14, 1914. 

LEBOEUF, RANDALL JAMES, LL.B. Bom, March 10, 1870, at echoes, 

N. Y. Married, June 3, 1896, Katharine Washburn. Justice of the New 
York Supreme Court, 1909-10. Commissioner to Revise Bank Laws, 1913. 
Address, Albany Trust Co. Building, Albany, N. Y. 

MCALLISTER, PETER FRANCIS, ph.B. LL.B. '96. Bom, Sept. 4, 1870 

Married, (1st), Sept. 20, 1900, Margaret O'Shea, A.B. '93, of Nashville, 
Tenn. (died March 7, 1906). Married (2nd), Aug. 7, 1909, at Bath, Maine, 
Mary Catharine Finnerty, of Peekskill, N. Y. Lawyer. His law firm are 
attorneys for the L. V. R. R., for several counties of New York, and for the 
Ithaca & Auburn R. R. Co., and Ithaca Traction Corporation. Member 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 201 

of the Board of Education, since 1901. City Attorney, 1899-06. Justice 
of the Peace, 1899-93. Trustee, George Junior Republic. Chairman, Dem- 
ocratic County Committee. Democratic candidate for Mayor, 1906. 
Member of University Club. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

NICHOLS, LEON NELSON, B.L. Born, Nov. 10, 1868, at Middlefield, N. Y. 
Married, Nov. 18, 1897, Mary Josephine Genung, Ph.B. '97. Head of the 
Department of American History, New York Public Library. Author and 
writer. Author, with wife, of Genung Genealogy. 

Address, Care Public Library, New York City. 
OSGOOD, WINCHESTER DANA. Major, Cuban Army of Liberation. 

Killed in battle, Oct. 18, 1896, Guimaro, Cuba. 

O'SHEA, MARTIN VINCENT, B.L. Born, Sept. 17, 1866, at LeRoy, N. Y. 
Married, in June, 1894, Harriet Frisbie Eastabrooks, of Milledgeville, 111. 
Professor, Science and Art of Education, University of Wisconsin, since 
1897. Author. 

Address, Madison, Wis. 

ROOT, LOUIS CARROLL, A.B. Born, Sept. 29, 1868, at Port Byron, N. Y. 
Married, March 26, 1892, Alice S. Beers, of Ithaca. Vice President, New 
York Security and Trust Co., 1902-4. Banker. 

Address, 25 Broad St., New York City. 

SHURTER, EDWIN DU BOIS, Ph.B. Born, Oct. 24, 1863, at Samsonville, 
N. Y. Married, Aug. 16, 1893, Alice Burtt, of Ithaca. Professor, Public 
Speaking, University of Texas, since 1899. Author. 

Address, University Sta., Austin, Texas. 

WOLF, RENNOLD, Ph.B. LL.B. '94. Born, April 4, 1872, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Admitted to the bar. Dramatic critic of the Morning Telegraph. Play- 
wright. Author (with another), of the lyrics in "The Red Widow," "My 
Best Girl," "Her Little Highness," "The Beauty Shop," all comic 
operas; also "Review of Ziegfield's Follies." He (with another) has written 
a serial, "Who Killed Simon Baird," which is now being produced by the 
moving pictures. 

Address, 342 W. 56 St., New York City. 

POST-GRADUATES 

ASHE, WILLIAM WILLARD, M.S. Forester. 
Address, Raleigh, N. C. 

CREIGHTON, JAMES EDWIN, Ph.D. Born, April 8, 1861, at Pictou, N. S. 
Married, Dec. 20, 1892, Katherine F. McLean, of Pictou. Professor of Logic 
and Metaphysics, Cornell, since 1894. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

FETTER, FRANK ALBERT, Ph.M. Born, March 8, 1863, at Peru, Ind. 
Married, July 16, 1896, Martha Whitson, Atglen, Pa. Professor, Indiana 
University, 1895-8, Leland Stanford, Jr. University, 1898-00. Professor, 
Political Economy and Finance, Cornell, 1901-12. Professor, Princeton, 
since 1912. Author. 

Address, Princeton, N. J. 



202 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

FRENCH, FERDINAND COURTNEY, Ph.D. Born, Dec. 14, 1861, at 
Berkeley, Mass. Married, July 1, 1896, Caroline Mott West, of Hamilton, 
N. Y. Professor of Philosophy, Colgate, 1892-4, Vassar, 1894-01, Univer- 
sity of Nebraska, since 1903. 

Address, Lincoln, Neb. 

RANE, FRANK WILLIAM, M.S. Born, Dec. 11, 1868, at Whitmore Lake, 
Mich. Married, Sept. 6, 1893, Elizabeth Bailey, of Windsor, Canada. 
Massachusetts State Forester, since 1906. 
Address, 7 State House, Boston, Mass. 

FELLOW 

THILLY, FRANK. Born, Aug. 18, 1865, at Cincinnati. Married, March 23, 
1895, Jessie Matthews, of Columbus, Mo. Professor, Philosophy, Univer- 
sity of Mo., 1893-04; Psychology, Princeton, 1904-6; Philosophy, Cornell, 
since 1906. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SPECIAL STUDENT 

TREVOR, JOSEPH ELLIS, (1888-90). Born, Oct. 11, 1864, at Lockport, 
N. Y. Married, June 17, 1890, Mary Tuft Guild, of Lockport. Professor 
Chemistry, 1892-08, Thermodynamics, Cornell, since 1908. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'93 

BOOTH ARTHUR WOODWARD. Born Jan. 17, 1871, Elmira, N. Y, 
Married, Nov. 19, 1913, Jeannette Van Cleef, of Ithaca, N. Y. M.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1894. Physician. Member of Elmira City. 
Elmira Country and Century Clubs, Amer. Med. Asso. and Sons of Rev. 
Director Merchant Nat. Bank. 
Address, 150 Main St., Elmira, N. Y. 

COBB, FORDYCE ALLEN, LL.B. Born, March 26, 1872, at Spring Mills, 
Allegany Co., N. Y. Son of William and Adelia (Lawrence) Cobb. Un- 
married. Lawyer. His law firm are attorneys for the L. V. R. R. hi several 
counties of New York. City Attorney, 1905-09, City Assessor, 1907-11, 
Ithaca. Director, Ithaca Trust Co. Secretary, Va. Blue Ridge Railway, 
Asst. Sec. and Treas. Tye River and Leftwich Lumber Companies. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

COVILLE, HENRY DART, LL.B. LL.M. '94. County Judge, Oswego Co., 
N. Y. 
Address, Central Square, N. Y. 

DOORES, WILLIAM RICHARD, C.E. Captain, U. S. A. 
Address, Care War Dept., Washington, D. C. 

HANSON, BERT, LL.B. Asst. U. S. District Attorney. 
Address, 42 Broadway, New York City. 

HOWLAND, ARTHUR CHARLES, A.B. Professor, Mediaeval History, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 

Address, Care of Univ. of Penn., Philadelphia, Pa. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 203 

HYDE, WALTER WOODBURN, A.B. Born at Ithaca, N. Y. Unmarried. 
Professor of Greek, University of Pennsylvania. Author. 
Address, Care Univ. of Penn, Philadelphia, Pa. 

JAMESON, JOSEPH MOORE, Ph. B. President, Girard College, since 1914. 
Address, Philadelphia, Pa. 

KATTE, EDWIN BRITTON, M.E. M.M.E. (1894). Born, Oct. 16, 1872, 
at St. Louis. Married, Jan. 26, 1907, Elva King. Chief Engineer of Elec- 
trical Traction, N. Y. Central and Hudson River R. R. Member of Kappa 
Alpha fraternity. 
Address, Grand Central Station, New York City. 

KNAPP, CLYDE WILSON, LL.B. Lawyer. County Judge, Wayne County, 
N. Y. 

Address, Lyons, N. Y. 

LOVELL, ROSS MEACHAM, A.B. Born, Sept. 25, 1871, at Marathon, N. Y. 
Married, 1915, Isabella Reynolds Campbell. Lawyer. Member of law 
firm of Stanchfield, Lovell, Falck & Sayles, attorneys for the Lackawanna 
and Erie R. R. Companies. Member of Elmira City Club. 
Address, Elmira, N. Y. 

McGUIRE, JOHN JAMES, LL.B. LL.M. (1894). Born, Nov. 25, 1868, at 
Cicero, Onondaga Co., N. Y. He is an able and successful trial lawyer. 
Member of the American, New York State and Tompkins County Bar 
Associations. Member F. & A. M. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SHEARER, JOHN SANFORD, B.S., Ph.D. (1901). Born, Oct. 30, 1865. 
Married, June 26, 1888, Minnie Lee. Professor, Physics. Cornell, since 1903. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SMITH, HAROLD BABBITT, M.E. (E.E.). Born, May 23, 1869, at Barre, 
Mass. Married, June 15, 1894, Laura Bertha Smith. Dean, College of 
Electrical Engineering, Purdue University and Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute. 
Address, Worcester, Mass. 

SPRINGER, ANTON. Captain, United States Army. 
Died, 1901, Philippine Islands. 

VON SCHRENK, HERMANN, B.S. Born, March 12, 1873, at College Point, 
N. Y. Timber Engineer. Lecturer, Yale and Wisconsin. Connected with 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture and Forestry. Author. 
Address, St. Louis, Mo. 

POST-GRADUATE 

BLACKMAN, WILLIAM FREMONT, Ph.D. Born, Sept. 26, 1855, at Pitcher, 
N. Y. Married, July 1, 1884, Lucy Worthington, of Washington, D. C. 
Professor, Christian Ethics, Yale, 1893-01. President, Rollins College, 
since 1901. Congregational minister. 
Address, Whiter Park, Fla. 



204 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

KEMMERER, EDWIN WALTER, Ph.D. Born, June 29, 1875, at Scranton, 
Pa. Married, Dec. 24, 1901, Rachel Dickel. Asst. Professor, Political 
Economy, 1906-9, Professor Economics and Finance, Cornell, 1909-. 
Address, Care Ithaca, N. Y. 

NICHOLS, ERNEST FOX, M.S. D.Sc., '97, LL.D. (Colgate, Clark, Wesleyan, 
1909). Born, June 1, 1869, at Leavenworth, Kan. Married, June 16, 1894, 
Katherme Williams West, Hamilton, N. Y. Professor, Physics, Colgate, 
1892-8, Dartmouth, 1898-03, Columbia, 1903-9. President, Dartmouth, 
1909-16. Professor-Elect, Physics, Yale. 
Address, Hanover, N. H. 

'94 

BELL, GEORGE, LL.B. Brigadier General, U. S. Army, Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics, Cornell, 1892-6. In command at El Paso, Texas, since 
March 15, 1916. 

Address, Care Military Secretary, Washington, D. C. 

HAGERMAN, HERBERT JAMES, L.B. Born, Dec. 15, 1871, at Milwaukee. 
Unmarried. Secretary of Embassy, Petrogad, 1898-01. Delegate to Re- 
publican National Convention, 1904. Governor of New Mexico, 1906-7. 
Knight of Order of St. Anne,Russia. President of South Spring Ranch and 
Cattle Co., and Felix Irrigation Co. 

Address, Roswell, New Mexico. 

HALL, JAMES PARKER, A.B. Born, Nov. 30, 1871, at Frewsburg, N. Y. 
Married, in 1900, Evelyn H. Movins, of Buffalo. Asso. Professor of Law, 
Leland Stanford Jr. University, 1900-2. Professor of Law, since 1902, 
Dean of Law School, since 1904, University of Chicago. 
Address, Chicago, 111. 

LANDFIELD, JEROME BARKER, A.B. Born, May 7, 1871, at Newark 
Valley, N. Y. Married, March 3, 1907, Princess Louba Lobanoff-Rotovsky, 
of Petrogad. Instructor, European History, University of California. En- 
gaged for some time in mining explorations in Siberia. Organized, and 
since 1909, Director and Secretary, Hotchkiss Lock Metal Form Co. 
Address, 2520 Gough St., San Francisco, Cal. 

LARNED, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS. National Lawn Tennis Champion. 
Address, Racquet Tennis Club, New York City. 

MAYO, EARL WILLIAMS, A.B. Born, May 5, 1873, at Springville, N. Y. 
Married, Jan. 29, 1900, Marie Susanne Thill, of New York City. Journalist. 
Magazine writer. Editor for Lewis, Scribner & Co., publishers, 1902. 
Address, 1133 Broadway, New York City. 

MOWRER, FRANK ROGER, LL.B. Born, July 7, 1870, at Xenia, Ohio. 
Married, at Copenhagen, Denmark, Nov. 18, 1908, Genevieve Winter- 
botham, of Chicago. U. S. Consul, Antigua, Jan. 9-Oct. 17, 1901, Ghent, 
Belgium, 1901-6. Consul-General, Adis Ababa, Abysinia, 1906-7. Consul, 
Leghorn, Italy, April 12- June 24, 1907. Consul General, Copenhagen, Den- 
mark, 1907-9. 

Address, 234 S. Marengo Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 205 

PEARSON, RAYMOND ALLEN, B.S.inAgr. M.S.inAgr., '99. LL.D. 
(Elsewhere). Born, April 9, 1873, at Evansville, Ind. Married, in 1915. 
Professor of Dairy Industry, 1903-8, Cornell. State Commissioner of Agri- 
culture, New York, 1908-12. President, Iowa Agricultural and Mechanical 
CoUege. 

Address, Ames, Iowa. 

WEBER, ADNA FERRIN, Ph.B Born, July 14, 1870, at Springville, N. Y. 
Married, May 3, 1899, Mabel Norris, of Springville. Chief Statistician, 
New York State Public Service Commission, 1st Dept., since 1907. 
Address, Tribune Building, New York City. 

WELLER, STUART, B.S. Born, Dec. 26, 1870, at Maine, N. Y. Married, 
Sept. 23, 1897, Harriet A. Marvin, of Springfield, Mo. Geologist, U. S. 
Geol. Survey, since 1906. Asst. Professor, 1901-8, Professor of Paleontologic 
Geology, University of Chicago, since 1908. 
Address, 5813 Madison Ave., Chicago, 111. 

WOODWARD, FREDERICK CAMPBELL, LL.B. LL.M., '95. Born, Feb. 
23, 1874, at Middletown, N. Y. Married, July 28, 1904, Elizabeth Ray- 
mond, Evanston, 111. Professor of Law, Dickinson, 1898-02, Northwestern, 
1902-7, Leland Stanford Jr., since 1907. 
Address, Stanford University, Cal. 

POST-GRADUATES 
ALBEE, ERNEST. Professor of Philosophy, Cornell. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
BEATTY, ARTHUR F. Professor of English, University of Wisconsin. 

Address, Madison, Wis. 
CARVER, THOMAS N. Professor of Political Economy, Harvard. 

Address, Cambridge, Mass. 
GERRY, MARTIN HUGHES. Chief Engineer, Missouri River Power Co. 

Address, Helena, Mon. 
KINGSBURY, BENJAMIN F. Professor of Physiology, CorneU. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SAUNDERS, SAMUEL J., D.Sc Professor, Physics and Astronomy, Hamilton 
since 1892. 

Address, Clinton, N. Y. 
WASHBURN, MARGARET FLOY. Professor, Psychology, Vassar. 

Address, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
WHITTEN, JOHN C. Professor, Botany, University of Missouri. 

Address, Columbia, Mo. 

SPECIAL STUDENT 

CHRISTIE, WILLIAM WALLACE. Born, July 12, 1866, at Paterson, N. J. 
Married, March 14, 1895, Carrie E. Ker. Mechancial Engineer. 

Address, 140 Market St., Paterson, N. J. 

CLARK, FARLEY GRANGER. Superintendent, Power, Pennsylvania Tun- 
nel and Terminal R. R. 

Address, Long Island City, N. Y. 



206 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

COBB, HOWARD, LL.B . Born, Jan. 16, 1872, at North Bingham, Potter Co., 
Pa. Married, Oct. 5, 1904, Frederica Robinson, of Ithaca, N. Y. Lawyer. 
Member of law firm, Cobb, Cobb, McAllister, Feinberg & Heath, attorneys 
for the Lehigh Valley R. R. Co., for ten or twelve counties of the State of 
New York, between Manchester, N. Y. and the Pennsylvania State line, 
since 1906. Treasurer, N. Y. & Pa. R. R. Co., Virginia Blue Ridge Rail- 
way Co., and Up-to-Date Advertising Co., of Canisteo, N. Y. President, 
Leftwich and Tye River Lumber Companies of Amherst and Nelson Coun- 
ties, Virginia. Director, First National Bank, Ithaca, N. Y. Knight 
Templar. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

KERR, ABRAM TUCKER, B.S. Born, Jan. 7, 1893, at Buffalo, N. Y. Mar- 
ried, July 10, 1895, Agnes Rogers Sherman, of Newark, N. Y. Professor, 
Anatomy, University of Buffalo, 1898-00. Asst. Professor, 1900-4, Pro- 
fessor, Anatomy, and Secretary, since 1904, Cornell University Medical 
College at Ithaca. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

MITCHELL, JAMES BRADY. Born, July 12, 1872, at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Captain, U. S. A. 

Address, War Dept., Washington, D. C. 

MONE, EDWARD JOHN, LL.B. LL.M. '96. Born, April 2, 1874, at Ithaca, 
N. Y. Married, Oct. 16, 1907, Mary Margaret Devoy, of Ithaca, N. Y. 
City Attorney. Deputy Attorney General of New York, since 1911. 
Address, Albany, N. Y. 

THOMAS, CARL CLAPP, M.E. Born, July 14, 1872, at Detroit, Mich. 
Married, July 14, 1899, Katharine L. Nash, of Pasadena, Cal. Professor, 
Marine Engineering and Naval Architecture, New York University, 1901-3. 
Professor, Marine Engineering, Cornell, 1904-8. Professor, Steam Eng., 
1908-15 and Dean, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin. Pro- 
fessor, Johns Hopkins University. 
Address, Baltimore, Md. 

POST-GRADUATES 
ABBOTT, WILBUR CORTEZ. Professor in Yale. 

Address, New Haven, Conn. 

CAMERON, FRANK K Professor, Chemistry, Catholic University of 
America. 

Address, Washington, D. C. 
HILL, ALBERT R., LL.D. (Elsewhere). President, University of Missouri. 

Address, Columbia, Mo. 
HILL, JOHN E. Professor, Civil Engineering, Brown University. 

Address, Providence, R. I. 
READE, MEBOURNE S. Vice President, Colgate. 

Address, Hamilton, N. Y. 

SWISHER, CHARLES C. Professor, Comparative Politics, George Wash- 
ington University. 

Address, Washington, D. C. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 207 

SAYLOR, THOMAS U Dean, College of Civil Engineering, University of 
Texas. 

Address, Austin, Tex. 

'96 

BURDEN, OLIVER DUDLEY, Ph.B. LL.B., '97. Born, March 15, 1873, 
at Nelson, N. Y. Married, June 26, 1905, Irene de Tamble, of Chicago. 
Trial lawyer. Junior Counsel for Theodore Roosevelt in William Barnes 
vs. Theo. Roosevelt. Campaign political speaker. Republican candidate 
in the Primary Election for Justice of the New York Supreme Court, in 1914. 
Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

FENNELL, THOMAS FRANCIS, LL.B. LL.M., '97. Born, May 25, 1875, 
at Jersey City. Lawyer. Deputy State officer. Judge of the Court of 
Claims, N. Y., since 1915. 
Address, Elmira, N. Y. 

FRENCH, LEROY NOAH, LL.B. Born, July 7, 1874, at Reber, Essex Co., 
N. Y. Judge of the Circuit Court, Nevada. 
Address, Reno, Nev. 

GLASSON, WILLIAM HENRY, Ph.B. Born, July 26, 1874, at Troy, N. Y. 
Married, July 12, 1905, Mary Beeler Park, A.B., '03, of Speedwell, Ky. 
Professor of Political Economy and Social Science, Trinity College, N. C., 
since 1902. 

Address, Durham, N. C. 

GUNNISON, ROYAL ARCH, LL.B. U. S. District Judge, Alaska. 
Address, Juneau, Alaska. 

MILLER, MARY FARRAND (ROGERS), B.S. Born, April 21, 1868, in 
Dallas Co., Iowa. Married, June 8, 1899, Wilhelm Miller. Lecturer in 
Nature Study, Cornell, 1897-03. Author. 
Address, Elizabeth, N. J. 

MOLL, THEOPHILUS JOHN, LL.B. Dean, Indianapolis Law School. 
Judge of Superior Court. 

Address, Indianapolis, Ind. 

NORRIS, HENRY HUTCHINSON, M.E., (E.E.). Born, April 26, 1873, at 
Philadelphia. Married, Dec. 23, 1899, Annie T. Reese, of Baltimore. Asst. 
Professor, 1900-5, Professor, since 1905, Electrical Engineering, Head of 
Department, since 1909, Cornell. Author. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

PATTERSON, WOODFORD, A.B. Born, Oct. 6, 1870, at Newark Valley, 
N. Y. Unmarried. Journalist. Telegraph editor of the New York Evening 
Sun for ten years. Editor of the Cornell Alumni News, since 1906. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

RAMMELKAMP, CHARLES HENRY, Ph.B. Ph.D., '00. Born, Feb. 25, 
1874, at New York. Married, June 28, 1907, Rhoda Jeannette Capps. 
Asst. Professor, 1902-3, Professor, 1903-5, History and Political Science, 
and President, since 1905, of Illinois College. 
Address, Jacksonville, 111. 



208 DISTINGUISHED CORNEL LIANS 

SEELEY, JOHN, Ph.B. Born in 1872, at Woodhull, Steuben Co., N. Y. 
Unmarried. M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1900. Assemblyman, 
1911-13. State Senator, N. Y., 1913-15. Democratic candidate for Con- 
gress, 1914. 
Address, Hornell, N. Y. 

WALTERS, J. HENRY, LL.B. Born, Jan. 23, 1873, at Syracuse, N. Y. 
Lawyer, firm of Costello, Burden, Cooney & Walters. Assemblyman, 
1908-11. State Senator, N. Y., since 1911. 
Address, University Block, Syracuse, N. Y. 

POST-GRADUATES 

BROWN, JOHN FRANKLIN, Ph.D. Married, May 26, 1904, Frances D. 
Guion, Ph.M., '96, of Elmira, N. Y. Vice President and Professor of Phil- 
osophy, Earlham College, 1898-01. 
Address, Carmel, Ind. 

DURAND, E. DANA, Ph.D. Director, U. S. Census, since 1909. 
Address, 2614 Woodly Place, Washington, D. C. 

FRANKLIN, WILLIAM S. Professor of Physics, Lehigh. 
Address, S. Bethlehem, Pa. 

PILLSBURY, WALTER B Professor of Psychology, Michigan. 
Address, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

STRUNK, WILLIAM. Professor, English Language and Literatures, Cornell. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'97 

BARNARD, WILLIAM NICHOLS, M.E. Asst. Professor, 1903-5, Mach. 
Design, Asst. Professor, 1905-7, and Professor, since 1907 of Steam Engi- 
neering, Cornell. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
BEACHAM, JOSEPH WILLIAM, LL.B. Captain, U. S. Army. 

Address, Care War Dept., Washington, D. C. 

CHRISTENSEN, PARLEY PAKKER, LL.B. Chairman Republican State 
Committee. 

Address, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

COLSON, FREDERICK DIAMOND, B.L. LL.B., '98-. Married, Edna 
Martin McNary, Cornell, 1896-8. State Law Librarian, N. Y. 

Address, Albany, N. Y. 

DAVIS, ROWLAND LUCIUS, LL.B. Born in October, 1871, at Dryden, 
N. Y. Married, in 1905, Iva Yager. Justice of the New York Supreme 
Court, since 1915. 

Address, Cortland, N. Y. 

DUTCHER, GEORGE MATTHEW, A.B. Ph.D., '03. Born, Sept. 16, 1874, 
at Pleasant Valley, N. Y. Married, June 17, 1909, Adrienne Van Winkle of 
Stratford, Conn. Asso. Professor, 1901-5, Professor, since 1905, History, 
Wesleyan. 

Address, Middletown, Conn. 



DISTINGUISHED OCRNELLIANS 209 

FARLEY, WILLIAM W. Born, June 4, 1874. Married. Chairman, Demo- 
cratic County Committee. State Committeeman. State Commissioner of 
Excise, 1911-16. School Commissioner. Manager State Hospital. 

Address, Binghamton, N. Y. 

FUERTES, LOUIS AGASSIZ, A.B. Son of Professor E. A. Fuertes. Born, 
Feb. 7, 1874, at Ithaca. Married, in 1904, Margaret F. Sumner, of Ithaca. 
Painter of birds. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

HUGO, FRANCIS MARKS, LL.B. Born, March 5, 1870. Lawyer. Secre- 
tary of State, New York, since 1915. Mayor of Watertown, 1906-14. Dele- 
gate to National Republican Convention, 1912. 

Address, Watertown, N. Y. 

RAND, JASPER RAYMOND Born, Sept. 3, 1874, at Mt. Clair, N. J. 
President, Rand Drill Co., New York City. 

Died in 1911. 

SWARTWOOD, CHARLES BROWN, LL.B. County Judge, Chemung 
County, N. Y., since 1915. 
Address, Elmira, N. Y. 

POST-GRADUATE 
FERGUSON, WILLIAM S. Professor, Greek and Roman History, California. 

Address, Berkeley, Cal. 
MEIKLEJOHN, ALEXANDER. President, Amherst. 

Address, Amherst, Mass. 
STEWART, OSCAR M. Professor, Physics, Wisconsin. 

Address, Madison, Wis. 

SUMMER STUDENT 

COLE, ALFRED D. Professor, Physics, Ohio. 
Address, Columbus, Ohio. 

'98 

BODINE, GEORGE FLOYD, LL.B. Born, Aug. 30, 1875. Married, May 24, 
1902, Sarah D. Hoffman. District Attorney, 1905-. County Judge, Sen- 
eca Co., N. Y. 

Address, Waterloo, N. Y. 

CONNOLLY, MAURICE, A.B. Born, in 1877, at Dubuque, Iowa. Unmarried. 
Member of Congress, 1913-15. Manufacturer. Trustee, Smithsonian 
Institution. 

Address, Dubuque, la. 

FAYANT, FRANK. Born, Jan. 16, 1876, at Ft. Plain, N. Y. Journalist. 
Writer on economics and finance. Author. 

Address, Ft. Plain, N. Y. 

GANNETT, FRANK ERNEST, A.B. Born, Sept. 15, 1876, at Naples, On- 
tario County, N. Y. Graduate of Bolivar, N. Y., Union School and Academy, 
June, 1893. Entered Cornell September, 1894; graduated with class of 
1898, in Arts course. On editorial staff of Cornell Sun, 1895. Manager of 



210 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

the Cornell Magazine, 1897-8; editor of '98 Class Statistics, campus cor- 
respondent of the Ithaca Journal, and correspondent of many newspapers. 
During vacations was employed on the staff of the Syracuse Herald. In 
January, 1899, was chosen by President J. G. Schurman as his secretary 
on the first Commission to the Philippines and went with him to Manila, 
January 20, 1899, returning to the United States, after a three months' trip 
in India and Europe, in March, 1900. While in Manila translated Jose 
Rizal's famous novel "Noli me Tangere" into English under the title "Friars 
and Filipinos," which attracted considerable attention because of the light 
it threw on the Philippines. On June 1, 1900, became editor of the Ithaca 
Daily News, then published by Professor Duncan C. Lee. October 15, 1902, 
became editor of the Cornell Alumni News, still holding position of editor 
of the Ithaca Daily News. In June, 1904, became manager of Ithaca Daily 
News, leaving in April, 1905, to become editor-in-chief of the Pittsburgh 
Index. In June, 1906, acquired a half interest in the Elmira Gazette and 
assumed the duties of editor. In June, 1907, brought about the consolida- 
tion of the Elmira Gazette and Elmira Evening Star, the new paper taking 
the name of the Elmira Star-Gazette, which at this time is the largest daily 
newspaper in the state outside the cities of the second class. February 1, 
1912, purchased the Ithaca Daily Journal and for some time carried on the 
duties of editor and continues as its publisher. In January, 1910, appointed 
Commissioner of Public Relief of the City of Elmira, and still continues to 
have charge of the Poor Department of that city. In January, 1916, was 
elected President of the New York State Associated Dailies. Mr. Gannett 
has been active in all Cornell affairs and was president of the Cornell Alumni 
Association of the Southern Tier, 1910. In 1915, Mr. Gannett was delegate 
from New York State to the World's Press Congress in San Francisco, 
having been appointed by New York State Associated Dailies and the New 
York Press Association. He also was delegate to the National Convention 
of the Sons of American Revolution at Portland, Oregon. Mr. Gannett is 
a member of the Hobasco Lodge, F. & A. M., of Ithaca; St. Augustine 
Commandery, K. T., Ithaca, Kalurah Temple, Mystic Shrine, Binghamton; 
Newtown Battle Chapter, S. of A. R.; Town and Gown Club of Ithaca; 
Elmira Tennis Club, Ithaca Lodge, No. 636, B. P. O. E.; and various other 
organizations. 

Address, Elmira, N. Y. 

GILMORE, JOHN WASHINGTON, B.S.A. M.S. in Agr., '05. Born, May 9, 
1872, in White Co., Ark. Married, Aug. 23, 1900, Elizabeth May Vetter- 
Hitchcock, of Ithaca, N. Y. Established Agricultural College, in Wuchang, 
China, 1898-00; Agricultural Normal School, Honolulu, H. I., 1900-1, 
Agricultural schools in Philippine Islands, 1901-2. Professor, Agriculture, 
Cornell, 1902-7; Pennsylvania State College, 1907-8. President, Univer- 
sity of Hawaii, since 1908. 
Address, Honolulu, H. I. 

HASKELL, REUBEN LOCKE, LL.B. Born, Oct. 5, 1878, at Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Married, Oct. 8, 1902, Aleda C. Baylis. Member of Congress, 1915-. 
Address, 44 Court St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 211 

HORTON, CLINTON THOMPSON, A.B. LL.B., '99. Born, in 1876, at 
Petrolia, Pa., but was brought up at Silver Creek, N. Y. Lawyer. Assem- 
blyman, 1812, 1913, 1914. State Senator, since 1915. Professor of Law, 
University of Buffalo. 
Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 

KENT, WILLARD MORRELL, LL.B. Born, Sept. 29, 1876, at Genoa, Ohio. 
Married, Dec. 25, 1900, Helen Jane Bissell, of Limestone, N. Y. City 
Recorder, Ithaca. District Attorney of Tompkins County, N. Y. County 
Judge and Surrogate, since Jan. 1, 1916. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

MARTIN, GEORGE CURTIS, B.S. Born, July 18, 1875, at Cheshire, Mass. 
Married, Oct. 12, 1903, Estella A. Wood, of Adams, Mass. Geologist, 
U. S. Geological Survey, since 1909. 
Address, 1318 Harvard St., Washington, D. C. 

MAYER, CHARLES HOLT, LL.B. Circuit Judge. 

Address, St. Louis, Mo. 

MURTAUGH, JOHN FRANCIS, LL.B. LL.D. (St. Boneventures, AUeghany, 
N. Y., '09). Born at Elmira, N. Y. Corporation Counsel. State Senator, 
New York, 1911-15. Delegate-at-Large to New York Constitutional Con- 
vention, 1915. 

Address, Elmira, N. Y. 

SANDERSON, EZRA DWIGHT, B.S. in Agr. Born, Sept. 25, 1878, at Clio, 
Mich. Married, Sept. 19, 1899, Anna Cecilia Blandford, of Prince George's 
Co., Md. Entomologist. Director, N. H. Agri. Expt. Station, since 1907. 
Address, Durham, N. H. 

SCOTT, GEORGE WINFIELD. Born, Aug. 25, 1875, at Adams, N. Y. 
Married, 1901, Anna Wells, of Scranton, Pa. Professor, Law, George 
Washington University, 1905-6. Law Librarian of Congress and U. S. 
Supreme Court, 1903-7. Professor, International Law, University of 
Penn., 1906-7. Professor, International Law and Diplomacy, Columbia 
since 1907. 

Address, Care of Columbia Univ., New York City. 

STOCKING, WILLIAM ALONZO, B.S.A. M.S. in Agr., '04. Married, 
Harriet Miranda Whitson, Cornell, 1891-3, 1896-8. Assistant Professor, 
Dairy Bacteriology, since 1906, in charge of College of Agriculture, 1913-14, 
Cornell. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WYCKOFF, CLARENCE FREDERICK. Married a daughter of Rev. T. 
DeWitt Tallmadge, D.D., of Brooklyn. Financially interested hi the 
manufacture of the Remington typewriter. Manufacturer of motor trucks. 
President, Hyomei Co. 

Address, 1743 Broadway, New York City. 



212 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

POST-GRADUATES 

DUGGAR, BENJAMIN M. Professor, Plant Physiology, Cornell. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

NEEDHAM, JAMES G Professor, Limnology, Cornell. Author of many 
college text-books. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'99 

GOULD, NORMAN JUDD, M.E. Born, March 15, 1877, at Seneca Falls, 
N. Y. In employ of Gould Manufacturing Co., since Sept., 1899. Presi- 
dent of the Gould Manufacturing Co., since 1908. Member of Congress, 
since 1915. 

Address, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

HASSELBRING, HEINRICH, B.S.A. Born, Jan. 12, 1875, at Flint, Mich. 
Unmarried. Botanist, with Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, since 1909. 
Address, Care of Dept. of Agri., Washington, D. C. 

KROME, WILLIAM JULIUS. Chief Engineer, Florida E. Coast R. R. and 
built the "Over-Sea" R. R. to Key West. 
Address, Miami, Fla. 

SHANKS, LEWIS EDGAR PIAGET, Ph.B. Professor, Romance Languages, 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Address, West College Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. 

TEAGLE, WALTER CLARK, B.S. Vice President, Standard Oil Co. 
Address, 26 Broadway, New York City. 

YOUNG, CHARLES VAN PATTEN, A.B. Born, Nov. 30, 1876, at Middle- 
town, Ohio. Married, June 3, 1902, Eleanor Mahaffing, of Williamsport, 
Pa. Professor, Physical Culture, and Director of the Gymnasium, Cornell, 
since 1904. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

POST-GRADUATES 

CRAIG, JOHN. Professor, Horticulture, Cornell, 1903-11. 
Died, Aug. 10, 1911. 

DURHAM, CHARLES LOVE. Professor, Latin, Cornell. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

'00 

AVERILL, EARL AMOS, M.E. Editor, American Engineering and R. R. 
Journal. 
Address, 140 Nassau St., New York City. 

COOLIDGE, EMELYN LINCOLN, M.D. Born, Aug. 9, 1873, at Boston. 
Unmarried. Physician. Engaged in practice as childrens' specialist, 
since 1900. 

Address, 7 W. 92d St., New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 213 

CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM DAVID, LL.B. Born, May 4, 1870. Married, 
Feb. 11, 1904, Ettina Marie McMullan. Assemblyman, 1904-7. District 
Attorney, 1907-. Judge of the Court of Claims, New York, 1916. 
Address, Ellenville, N. Y. 

HAIG, MAHAM HUME, M.E. Editor, Railway Master Mechanic. 
Address, 510 Security Building, Chicago, 111. 

HITCHCOCK, HARRY ALTON, B.S. Born, Jan. 9, 1877, at Bath, Me. 
Married, Nov. 11, 1914, Alice Lillian Miller, of New York City. With 
Houghton, Miflin Co., for five years, two years of which with Atlantic 
Monthly as reader, and three years as assistant to editor-in-chief of book 
department. On New York "Nation" about one and a half years. Junior 
officer of a corporation for two years. On staff of publishing department 
of the Baker & Taylor Co., for about two years. Managing editor for 
Robert M. McBride & Co., publishers of books and magazines, in New 
York City, for several years. Secretary of Cornell University, since May 1, 
1916. Member of Beta Theta Pi college fraternity. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

HYDE, HOWARD ELMER, C.E. Acting Chief Engineer, Manila, P. I. 
Asst. Engineer, Water Works, Providence. 
Address, Providence, R. I. 

MAcGILLIVRAY, ALEXANDER DYER, PhB. Ph.D., '04 Born, July 15, 
1868, at Inverness, Ohio. Married, Sept. 17, 1891, Fanny M. Edwards, of 
Forest Home, N. Y. Asst. Professor, Entomology and Invertebrate Zoology, 
Cornell, since 1906. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

POST-GRADUATES 
McCREA, ROSWELL C. Professor, Economics, Columbia. 

Address, Care Columbia University, New York City. 

MARTIN, GERTRUDE (SHORE). Born, at Decatur, 111., Oct. 21, 1869. 
Educated in the public schools of Decatur, the University of Michigan 
(Ph.B., 1894) and Cornell University (Ph.D. 1900). Taught in secondary 
schools, Decatur, 111.; Mt. Clemens, Mich.; and Ithaca, N. Y. Married, 
June 30, 1896, Clarence A. Martin, then Professor, since Dean of the Col- 
lege of Architecture, Cornell University. Two children, daughter born 
Feb. 1902, and son born Oct. 1903. Adviser of Women, Cornell University 
1909-16. Member of the Board of Education, Ithaca, N. Y., since 1913. 
Author of articles on educational subjects and lecturer on kindred topics. 
Member of various clubs and civic and philanthropic organizations. Mem- 
ber of the Advisory Committee of the Intercollegiate Bureau of Occupa- 
tions, N. Y., and of the Appointment Bureau of the Women's Educational 
and Industrial Union, Boston. Chairman of the national committee on 
Vocational Opportunities for Women of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. 
Active in suffrage work and a leader in the movement for widening the voca- 
tional opportunities open to women. She resigned as Adviser of Women 
at Cornell, her resignation to take effect at Commencement, 1916. First 
Executive Secretary of the National Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 
since April 15, 1916. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



214 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 
JENNINGS, HUGH. Manager of the Detroit "Tigers" Baseball Club. 

Address, Detroit, Mich. 

VANRENSSELAER, MARTHA. Born, June 24, 1864, at Randolph, N. Y. 
School Commissioner, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., 1894-00. Instructor in 
Teachers' Institutes, New York State, Department of Education 1898-02. 
Editor and Supervisor, Reading Courses for Farmers' Wives, Cornell, 
1901-7. Secretary, State Summer Institutes, Chautauqua, 1896-02. Pro- 
fessor, Home Economics, Cornell. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

LATER CLASSES 

ADAMS, ARTHUR GARFIELD, LL.B., '07. Born, Oct. 22, 1880, at Wood- 
hull, N. Y. Married, Jan. 20, 1909, Minerva A. Skiff, of Alleghany Co., 
N. Y. Election Commissioner, 1911-15, District Attorney, 1916-, Tompkins 
Co., N. Y. Trustee, Starkey Seminary, 1915-. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BOLDT, GEORGE CHARLES, A.B., '05. Junior Proprietor, Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel. 

Address, New York City. 
BRUERE, HENRY, '02. City Chamberlain, New York City. 

Address, New York City. 
CARD, ERNEST MASON, LL.B., '04. Judge of the Superior Court. 

Address, Tacoma, Wash. 

CROWLEY, DANIEL, LL.B., '08. Born, Oct. 24, 1883, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Alderman, 1907-9. City Judge, since 1912. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 
DAVEY, RANDALL VERNON, '09. Painter. Actor, in musical comedy. 

Address, 32 Munn Ave., E. Orange, N. J. 

DEFOREST, NORA STANTON (BLATCH)., C.E., '05. Married Lee De- 
Forest. Advocate of Woman's Suffrage. 
Address, 315 W. 97th St., New York City. 

DEMPSTER, ROBERT LEDGER, LL.B., '04. Actor, in Legitimate. 
Address, 157 Highland Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

DUGAN, WILLIAM JOHN, A.B., '07. Secretary of Cornell University. 
Manager, Cornell Athletic Association. 

Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 

ELLIS, WILLARD WALDO, A.B., '01; LL.B., '03. Born near HorneU, N. Y. 
Married, Edith Anna Ellis, B.L., '90. Asst. in Library, Cornell, since 1900. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

FASSETT, TRUMAN EDWARD, '09. Born, May 9, 1885, at Elmira, N. Y. 
Married. Painter of portraits, landscapes, etc. 

Address, Strathmont, Elmira, N. Y. 

FEHR, LOUIS WHITE, A.B., '07. Journalist, with New York American and 
New York Times. Secretary of the Park Board. 
Address, Care, New York Times, New York City. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 215 

GOULD, LAWRENCE EBENEZER . Editor, Electric Railway Review. 
Address, 5429 Jefferson Ave., Chicago, 111. 

HALLIDAY, MORRIS SAMUEL, LL.B., '06. Born, April 26, 1883, at Ithaca, 
N. Y. Son of Samuel D. Halliday, '70. Unmarried. District Attorney, 
Tompkins Co., N. Y., 1910-15. State Senator, 1915-. Assistant Coach 
of Football Team for several years. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

KENT, RALPH SHERLOCK, A.B., '02; LL.B., '05. Born, Aug. 2, 1878. 
Married, Alice Kyle, of Ithaca. Prominent member of the Buffalo bar. 

Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 
JOHNSON, LILLIAN W., Ph.D., '02. President, Western College for Women. 

Address, Care, Professor J. S. Clark, Evanston, 111. 

JONES, THOMAS SAMUEL, A.B., '04. Bora, Nov. 6, 1882, at BoonvUle, 
N. Y. Journalist. Editor. He has published some volumes of verse: 
"The Path o' Dreams," "The Rose Jar," "Quiet Valleys," and "Interludes." 

Address, Utica, N. Y. 

McCLOSKEY, ALICE GERTRUDE, A.B., '08. Asst. in Nature Study, 
1899-03; Asst. in Extension Dept., 1903-05; Asst. Supervisor in Ext. Dept., 
1905-07; Asst. Sup. of Nature Study, 1907-08; Supervisor of Nature Study, 
1908-09; Lecturer on Nature Study, 1909-11; Asso. in Rural Education, 
1911-13; Asst. Professor, Rural Education, Cornell, 1913-15. 
Died, Oct. 19, 1915, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

MARVIN, ROSS GILMORE, A.B., '05. Asst. Professor, Civil Engineering, 
Cornell. Companion of Capt. Robert E. Peary. Memorial tablet in Sage 
Chapel. 

Died, April 10, 1909, in the Arctic. 

MERRILL, CHARLES GEORGE, Special Student, '03-'05 Born, July 4, 
1883, at Ithaca, N. Y. Unmarried. Instructor, Cornell. Painter, mural, 
figure and landscape subjects. Studio, 74 Cortlandt St., New York City. 
Address, Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

MILKS, HOWARD JAY, D.V.M., '04. Born, June 25, 1879, at Candor, N. Y. 
Married, July 12, 1906, Lena M. Vose, of Auburn, N. Y. Professor, Materia 
Medica, N. Y. State Vet. College, Cornell. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

POST, GEORGE ADAMS. President, Railway Business Association. Presi- 
dent, Standard Coupler Co. 

Address, 2 Rector St., New York City. 
RANSOM, WILLIAM LYNN, LL.B., '05. City Judge, New York City. 

Address, New York City. 

SCHOELLKOPF, HENRY, A.B., '02. Athlete. Lawyer. The Schoellkopf 
Memorial Building on Alumni Field was erected in his honor. 

Died, in 1912, in Milwaukee, Wis. 

STRAIGHT, WILLARD DICKERMAN, B.Arch. Born, Jan. 31, 1880, 
at Oswego, N. Y. Married, Dorothy Whitney, daughter of Secretary of 
the Navy William C. Whitney. U. S. Consul General, Mukden, 1906-8. 
Acting Chief, Division of Far Eastern Affairs, U. S. Dept. of State, Nov. 



216 DISTINGUISHED CORNEL LIANS 

1908-June, 1909. Appointed Representative in China for the American 
Group of Financiers, June 8, 1909. Con. Gen., Mukden, 1909. Private 
banker, member of firm of J. P. Morgan & Co., New York City. Retired, 
1915. 
Address, New York City. 

STUTZ, HARRY GEORGE, LL.B., '07. Born, March 30, 1885, at Albany, 

N. Y. Married, April 22, 1908, Edith Swan, of Glen Falls, N. Y. Lawyer. 

Journalist. With the Ithaca Daily News, as telegraph editor and editorial 

writer. With the Ithaca Journal as managing editor, since February, 1914. 

Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

SZE, SAO-KE ALFRED, A.B., '01. Attache, Chinese Legation, Washington, 

D. C. Appointed Chinese Ambassador to the United States, but did not 

come because of the troublous times in his country. Minister of Posts and 

Roads in the Cabinet of President of the Republic and Emperor of China. 

Address, Peking, China. 

TENNANT, HENRY FRY, LL.B. Secretary of Legation. 
Address, San Salvador, Salvador. 

TRAVIESO, MARTIN, LL.B., '03. Born, July 6, 1882, at Mayaguez, Porto 
Rico. Secretary; President, Executive Council; Acting Governor, Porto 
Rico. 
Address, San Juan, P. R. 

TREMAN, ROBERT ELIAS, A.B., '09. Born, April 21, 1888, at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Son of Robert H. Treman, 78. Unmarried. Merchant. Director, Tomp- 
kins County National Bank. President, Cornell Aero Club. Member of 
Kappa Alpha fraternity. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

TUCK, CHARLES HENRY, A.B., '06. Assistant Professor of Extension 
Teaching, since 1907. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WILLIAMS, ROGER BUTLER, C.E., '01. Born, Dec. 29, 1879, at Ithaca, 
N. Y. Son of Roger Butler Williams. Married, Oct. 4, 1904, Louise Miller, 
daughter of Judge Rumsey Miller. Consulting Engineer, New York City. 
President, Central New York Southern R. R. Corporation, owner of the 
Ithaca and Auburn "Short Line" R. R.. President, Ithaca Traction Cor- 
poration, owner of the Ithaca Street Railway. President, the Withburn 
Corporation, owner of terminal facilities for said railroads. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WILSON, CHARLES SCOON, A.B., '04; M.S., '05. Married Miss Miller. 
Asst. Professor, Pomology, Cornell, 1907-15. State Commissioner of Agri- 
culture, New York 1915-. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WYVELL, M ANTON MARBLE, A.B., '01; LL.B., '03. Born, May 2, 1878, 
at Scottsville, N. Y. Journalist. Lawyer. Private Secretary to William 
J. Bryan, U. S. Secretary of State, 1913-14. Counsel to the International 
Boundary Commission, since 1914. 
Address, Washington, D. C. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 217 

VARIOUS CLASSES 

ASHLEY, JAMES MACERIEL, B.S., 76. (Additional.) Student, Univer- 
sity of Michigan Law School, 1877-8. Asst. Supt., Toledo, Ann Arbor and 
N. Mich. R. R., 1878; Superintendent, 1879-80; Gen, Manager. 1881-4; 
Vice President, 1885-. 
Address, Toledo, Ohio. 

ATWOOD, WILLIAM GREENE, C.E., '92. (Additional.) Asst. Diet. Eng., 
United States Valuation Board, 1914-. 
Address, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

BALLANTINE, JOHN HERBERT, B.S., '89. (Additional.) Born, Feb. 16, 
1867, at Newark, N. J. Vice President and Treasurer, Neptune Meter Co., 
New York City, since 1907. Member Chi Phi fraternity, Union League, 
New York Yacht and Cornell Clubs (New York City), Essex Union and 
Essex Country Clubs of New Jersey. Member of National Association of 
Manufacturers. 
Address, 90 West St., New York City. 

BARNARD, WILLIAM NICHOLS, M.E., '97. (Additional.) Born, April 
24, 1875, at Canton, 111. Instructor, 1897-00, Asst. Professor, 1903-05, 
Mach. Design; Asst. Professor, Steam Eng., 1905-07; Professor, Power 
Eng., Cornell, since 1907. Member of Sigma Xi. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

BARTON, FRANK ARTHUR, M.E., '91. (Additional.) Born, July 23, 1869, 
at Washington, D. C. Married, April 20, 1898, Louise Wilkeson, of Buffalo, 
N. Y. Attended U. S. Army School, Ft. Leavenworth. Served in Spanish 
American War three years in the Philippines. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant, U. 
S. Army, Aug. 1, 1891, Major, 1916. Professor of Military Science and Tac- 
tics, Cornell, 1904-. Member of Military Order of the Caraboa, Order of 
the Philippine War, and Delta Upsilon fraternity. Clubs: Army and Navy, 
Sierra (San Francisco), Town and Gown and Country (Ithaca),. 
Address, Care of Military Secretary, Washington, D. C. 

BISSELL, FRANK EDWARD, B.C.E., 78; C.E., 79. (Additional.) On 
U. S. Eng. Corps, 1879. Res. Eng., Mo., Kan., and Texas R. R., 1882-5. 
Res. Eng., Ft. Worth and Denver City R. R., 1885-6. Chief Eng., Pan 
Handle Construction Co., Quanah, Texas. Prin. Asst. Eng. of Construction, 
and for several years past Chief Eng., Lake Shore and Mich. Southern R. R. 
Address, Cleveland, Ohio. 

BLAUVELT, GEORGE ALANSON, B.L., '90. (Additional.) Born, Nov. 
11, 1866, at Monsey, N. Y. Married, Jan. 22, 1896, Cora Demarest, of 
Nannet, N. Y Attended Columbia Law School. A.M., Columbia, 1892. 
Address, Monsey, N. Y. 

BOOTH, ARTHUR WOODWARD, '89-91. (Additional.) Regents Examiner, 
representing New York State Medical Society. 
Address, Elmira, N. Y. 



218 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

BRUERE, HENRY, '02. (Additional.) Born, Jan. 15, 1882, at St. Charles, 
Mo. Married, Aug. 4, 1904, Jane Munroe. Engaged in Social Settlement 
work in Boston, 1901-2; Chicago, 1903-05; New York City, 1905-. Sec- 
retary, Bureau of City Betterments, New York City, 1906-7. Director, 
Bureau of Municipal Research, 1907-. City Chamberlain, 1914-16. 
Address, New York City. 

BRUNK, THOMAS LAFAYETTE, B.S., '86. (Additional.) Born, July 30, 
1859, at Ottawa, 111. Married, July 25, 1883, Lizzie C. Clifford, of Ottawa, 
111. M.D., Harvey Medical CoUege (Chicago), 1898. Professor, Botany, 
Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1887-90; Maryland State 
Agricultural College, 1890-92. In Horticultural Dept., U. S. Columbian 
Exposition, Chicago, 1892-3. Professor, Chemistry and Physics, Jefferson 
High School, Chicago, 1899-1911. Practicing physician, since 1911. 
Address, Joplin, Mo. 

CARMODY, THOMAS, '82. (Additional.) Born, Oct. 9, 1859, at Milo, N. Y. 
Admitted to the bar, 1887. District Attorney, 1891. 
Address, Care Penn Yan, N. Y. 

CHRISTENSEN, PARLEY PARKER, LL.B., '97. (Additional.) Born, 

March 4, 1877, at Weston, Utah. County and Prosecuting Attorney, 
1900-06. Member of Delta Chi fraternity. 
Address, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

CLARK, ROGER PHELPS, '91. (Additional.) Born, March 14, 1869. Ad- 
mitted to the bar, 1893. District Attorney, 1902-11. Member of State 
Probation Commission, 1905-08, and of the State Prison Commission, 
1907-08. Republican. Presbyterian. 
Address, Binghamton, N. Y. 

CROSBY, GEORGE HEMAN, '73. (Additional.) Born, March 27, 1849, 
at Lawrence, Mass. Married, Jan. 24, 1871, Jennie M. Ball, of Trumans- 
burg, N. Y. Secretary and Treasurer "Rock Island" R. R. system, since 
1907. Member of Union League and South Shore Clubs. 
Address, 144 Van Buren St., Chicago, 111. 

CROUCH, CALVIN HENRY, M.E., '92. (Additional.) Born, April 25, 
1870, at Mexico, N. Y. Married, Oct. 6, 1898, at Oswego, N. Y. Dean, 
College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, University of North 
Dakota, since 1901. 

Address, Grand Forks, N. Dak. 

CURTIS, ARTHUR MILLS, B.S. in Arch., '89. (Additional.) Born, June 
12, 1866, at Danby, N. Y. Married, June 26, 1895, Mary Parmelee Mc- 
Nair, of Mt. Morris, N. Y. Teacher, State Normal School, Oneonta, N. Y., 
since 1895. Member of Delta Upsilon fraternity. 
Address, Oneonta, N. Y. 

GUSHING, HENRY PLATT, Ph.B., '82; M.S., '84. Born, Oct. 10, 1860, 
at Cleveland, Ohio. Married, June 3, 1886. Professor, Geology, Adelbert 
College of Western Reserve University, since 1893. Member of Alpha 
Delta Phi fraternity. 
Address, Cleveland, Ohio. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 219 

DAVIS, ROWLAND LUCIUS, LL.B., '97. (Additional.) Born, July 10, 
1871, at Dryden, N. Y. Son of Major Lucius and Harriet L. (Francis) 
Davis. Married, June 15, 1905, Iva A. Yager. City Judge, 1899-03. Jus- 
tice of the New York Supreme Court, since 1915. Member of Phi Delta 
Phi fraternity. 

Address, Cortland, N. Y. 

DEFORD, WILLIAM ALLAN, LL.B., '92. (Additional.) Adjutant, 20th 

Regt., Kansas Vols. in the Philippines, in the Spanish- American War. 
Member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. 
Address, Dist. Atty's Office, New York City. 

DICKINSON, CHARLES COURTER, B.L., '91; LL.B., '94. (Additional.) 
Born at Cobleskill, N. Y. Married, Jan, 19, 1905, Grace Georgette Kidd, 
of New York City. Admitted to the bar, 1894. Chairman, Board of Di- 
rectors, Merchants and Traders Bank, New York City, Organizer, Vice 
President and Director, Colonial National Bank. President, Carnegie Trust 
Co. Democrat. Episcopalian. Editor of several law books. President of 
Delta Tau Delta fraternity of the United States. Member of Phi Delta 
Phi fraternity, Lotos, Manhattan, National Democratic and Cornell Clubs, 
Huguenot and Mayflower Societies and Sons of the Revolution. Trustee 
of Cornell. 
Died in 1914. 

DUGAN, WILLIAM JOHN, A.B., '07. (Additional.) Born, Feb. 21, 1886, at 
Pueblo, Col. Married, in December, 1884, at Denver. Graduate Manager, 
Cornell University Athletic Association, 1907-10. Secretary of Cornell 
University, 1910-14. With the Buffalo Forge Co., since 1914. Member 
of Phi Delta Theta fraternity and Nalanda. 
Address, 87 Erie County Bank Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

ELMER, HERBERT CHARLES, A.B., '83. (Additional.) Professor of 
Latin, Cornell. Member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

EMORY, GEORGE MEADE, LL.B., '90. (Additional.) Born in 1869. Mar- 
ried. U. S. District Judge, Washington (State). 
Died, July 6, 1906, Seattle, Wash. 

EWING, ADDISON LUTHER, B.S., '80; M.S., '85. (Additional.) Born at 
LaGrange, Wis. Married, June 28, 1882, Delia Jane Newman. Attended 
Milton College, 1870. Instructor, Workingman's School, New York City, 
1884-8. Instructor, Science, State Normal School, River Falls, Wis., 1888- 
05. Professor, Phys. of Agriculture, University of Wisconsin, since 1905. 
Address, Madison, Wis. 

FISH, JOHN CHARLES LOUNSBURY, C.E., '92. Asso. Professor, Civil 
Engineering, Leland Stanford Junior University. 
Address, Palo Alto, Cal. 

FLACK, HAROLD, '12. Secretary, Cornellian Council. Member of Beta 
Theta Pi fraternity. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 



220 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

FLATHER, JOHN JOSEPH, M.M.E., '90; P.G. (Additional.) Born, June 
9, 1862, at Philadelphia, Pa. Married, June 18, 1890, Harriet Frances 
Lum, of Stamford, Conn. Ph.B., Yale, '85. Professor, Mechanical Engi- 
neering, Purdue, 1891-8. Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Head of 
Department, University of Minnesota, since 1898. Consulting Engineer 
for power plants in the Northwest. Member of Tau Beta Pi and Sigma 
Xi fraternities, and of many engineering societies. 

Address, Minneapolis, Minn. 

GIFFORD, GEORGE FRANCIS, B.S., '80. (Additional.) Born, Sept. 19, 
1856, at Winchester, Ky. Married, July 14, 1880. On editorial staff of 
Chicago News, since 1904. 

Address, Care Chicago News, Chicago, 111. 
GILLIG, HARRY, '80. Member of Zeta Psi fraternity. 

Address, Care Bohemia, San Francisco, Cal. 

HANSON, BERT, LL.B., '93. (Additional.) Born, July 26, 1867, at San- 
ford, Me. A.B., Yale, '90. Admitted to the bar, 1894. Third Deputy 
Police Commissioner, New York City, 1907. Asst. U. S. Dist. Atty. In- 
dependent Democrat. Member of Zeta Psi fraternity, and Yale, Cornell 
and Reform Clubs. 

Address, 42 Broadway, New York City. 

HATHAWAY, ARTHUR STAFFORD, B.S., 79. (Additional.) Born, at 
Keeler, Mich. Married, Susan Hoxie, Cornell, '75-8. (Died March 13, 1880, 
at Baltimore, Md.). 

Address, Terre Haute, Ind. 

HAYES, BIRCHARD AUSTIN, B.Lit., '74. (Additional.) Born, Nov. 4, 
1853, at Cincinnati. Married, Dec. 30, 1886, Mary Sherman, of Norwalk, 
Ohio. LL.B., Harvard, 1877. Lawyer. Member of Delta Kappa Epsilon 
fraternity. 

Address, 49 Produce Exchange, Toledo, Ohio. 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD PLATT, B.S., '80. (Additional.) Born, June 24, 
1858, at Cincinnati. Married, Oct. 24, 1874, Lucy Hayes Platt, of Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. Cashier, Fremont Savings Bank, 1888-94. Farmer, since 
1901. President, Appalachian Forest Reserve Association, 1902-07. Mem- 
ber of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. 
Address, R. F. D., 3, Asheville, N. C. 

HAYES, SCOTT RUSSELL, '92. (Additional.) Born, Feb. 8, 1871, at Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. Salesman, Railway Steel Spring Co., New York City. 
Member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, Ohio Society of New York, 
Republican, Lambs, New York Athletic, Fulton, Boston Athletic, Univ- 
ersity (St. Paul), Toledo, Euclid and Columbus Clubs. 
Address, Republican Club, New York City. 

HAYS, WEBB COOK, '76. (Additional.) Born, March 20, 1856, at Cincinnati. 
Unmarried. Major, 1st Regt., Ohio Cavalry U. S. Vols.; Lieutenant 
Colonel, 31st Regt. Infantry U. S. Volunteers, 1899-1901, Spanish- American 
War. He participated in many battles. Awarded the Congressional Medal 
of Honor. President, China Battlefield Commission. Secretary, Santiago 
Battlefield Commission. Manufacturer. Vice President, National Carbon 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 221 

Co., Cleveland. Member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, Union, Country 
(Cleveland). Army and Navy (Washington and New York City) Clubs, 
Society of Army of Santiago de Cuba, of Porto Rico Invasion, Military 
Order of Caraboa. Decorated with the Military Order of the Dragon, China. 
Address, Spiegel Grove, Fremont, Ohio. 

HEADLEY, RUSSELL, B.S., 72. (Additional.) Born, Sept. 27, 1852, at 
Stockbridge, Mass. 
Died, in 1915. 

HIBBARD, HERBERT WADE, M.E., '91. (Additional.) Born, Sept. 10, 
1863, at Moulmain, Burmah, India. Son of Rev. Charles and Susan Ann 
(Robinson) Hibbard. Married, (1st), Sept. 30, 1891, Mary P. Scofield, of 
Richford, Vt. (died, March 8, 1895); (2nd), Aug. 20, 1896, Mary C. Davis, 
of Walpole, N. H. A.B., 1886, A.M., 1899, Brown University. Asst. Pro- 
fessor, Machine Design and Locomotive Engineering, University of Minn- 
esota, 1895-8. Asst. Professor, Mechanical Engineering of Railways, Cornell, 
1898-00; Professor, 1900-10. Professor, University of Missouri, since 1910. 
Author. Member of Sigma Xi fraternity, Amer. Soc. M. E., and Amer. 
Master Mechanics Asso. Chairman, Railway Master Mechanics Com., 
1895-7. 
Address, Columbia, Mo. 

JACKSON, WILLIAM SCHUYLER, '91. (Additional.) Born in 1869, at 
Buffalo, N. Y. Married. LL.B., Buffalo Law School, 1893. 2nd Lieu- 
tenant, 65th N. Y. Regt., U. S. Vols., Spanish-American War. 2nd Asst. 
District Attorney, Erie County, N. Y., 1902-05; 1st Asst., 1905-06. At- 
torney General, 1907-09. 
Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 

JENNINGS, HUGH. Special Student, '00-01, '02-'04.' (Additional.) Born, 
April 2, 1871, at Pittston, Pa. Married, Jan. 10, 1911, Nora O'Boyle, of 
Scranton, Pa. Manager, Detroit Baseball Club, since 1904. Lawyer. 
Member of Phi Delta Theta and Phi Delta Phi fraternities, Round Table 
and Sphinx Head. 

Address, Scranton, Pa. 

JOHNSON, LILLIAN WYCKOFF, Ph.D., '02; P.G. (Additional.) Born, 
June 16, 1864, at Sheby, Tenn. A.B., University of Michigan, 1891. Asst. 
Professor, History, Department of Education, University of Tennessee, 
1902-04. President, Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1904-06. 
Traveling and lecturing, 1906-07. 

Address, Care of Professor J. S. Clark, 2114 Sheridan Road, Evanston, 111. 

KENT, GEORGE ERVIN, '10. Graduate Manager, Cornell Athletic Asso- 
ciation, since 1910. Member of Theta Delta Chi fraternity. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

KNAPP, CLYDE WILSON, LL.B., '93. (Additional.) Born, April 4, 1871, 
at Toledo, Tama Co., Iowa. Married, Dec. 13, 1900. Admitted to the bar, 
1893. County Judge. 
Address, Lyons, N. Y. 



222 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

LACY, CHARLES YOUDAN, B.Ag., 73. (Additional.) Born, July 28, 1850, 
at Riga, Monroe Co., N. Y. Married, Oct. 5, 1888, Ella Frances Peck, of 
Providence, R. I. Wool grower, 1888-99. 
Address, Ft. Benton, Mon. 

LOVELL, EARL BRINK, C.E., '91. (Additional.) Adjunct Professor, 1898- 
07, Professor, Civil Engineering, Columbia, since 1907. Consulting R. R. 
and Hydraulic Engineer. 

Address, Columbia University, New York City. 

LUCAS, WILLIAM EDWARD, Ph.B., '77. (Additional.) Born, Feb. 27, 
1851, at Columbia, Ind. Married, Sept. 15, 1887, Leonora Blanche Day- 
Smith. Representative of American International Fuel and Petroleum 
Co., Tampico, Mexico, 1900-. Member of Psi Upsilon fraternity. 
Address, Duluth, Minn. 

LYTLE, LOUIS EDWARD, '96. Married, June 28, 1898, Emma Cobb, daugh- 
ter of William Cobb, of Ithaca, N. Y. General Superintendent, Westing- 
house Air Brake Co. 

Address, 729 St. Clair St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MCCARTHY, DENNIS, 75. (Additional.) Born, June 27, 1854, at Syracuse, 
N. Y. 
Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

MACK, JOHN GIVAN DAVIS, M.E., '88 Born, Sept. 5, 1867. Professor* 
Machine Design, University of Wisconsin. B.S., Rose Polytechnic Inst. 
1887. 
Address, Madison, Wis. 

MARVIN, ROSS GILMORE, A.B., '05. (Additional.) Born, Jan. 28, 1880. 
Unmarried. Member of Peary Arctic Club Expedition, 1905-07. Instructor, 
Mathematics, Mercersburg Academy. Instructor, Civil Engineering, 
Cornell, 1907-09. 
Died, April 10, 1909. 

MENKEN, S. STANWOOD, B.L., '90. (Additional.) Born, July 29, 1870, 
Memphis, Term. Chairman, Hall of Records Association. Candidate for 
City Court Judge on Reform and Henry George tickets, 1896. 
Address, 52 William St., New York City. 

MOLL, THEOPHILUS JOHN, LL.M., '96; P.G. (Additional.) Born, May 
25, 1872, at Evansville, Ind. Married, June 21, 1898, Floy Carnes, of 
Greenwood, Ind. Professor, Law, 1901-5, Dean, 1905-07, Indianapolis 
Law School. Member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and Phi Delta Phi frater- 
nities. 

Address, Indianapolis, Ind. 

MORSE, EVERETT FLEET, 78. M.E., '84. (Additional.) Born, June 28, 
1857, at Ithaca, N. Y. Son of Ben and Sarah Morse. Married, May 20, 1882, 
Louise DeMund. Invented and patented about 1893, the Morse Chain, 
designed originally for bicycles and now adapted to various purposes, through 
subsequent patented improvements by him and his brothers associated with 
him. The chain is now used for power transmission in practically every 
country on the Globe. He also invented and patented the Morse Thermo 
Gage. Began manufacturing chains at Trumansburg, N. Y. in 1893, and 
removed the plant to Ithaca, N. Y. in 1906. Received two medals from 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 223 

the Franklin Institute. President, Village of Trumansburg. Alderman, 
City of Ithaca, 1912-13. Secretary and Director, Morse Chain Company. 
President, Ithaca City Hospital Association. Unitarian. Thirty-second 
Degree Mason. 

Died, Nov. 11, 1913, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

MOULD, STEPHEN HYATT, B.L., '90. Captain, U. S. Army. 
Address, Military Secretary, Washington, D. C. 

MURTAUGH, JOHN FRANCIS, LL.B., '98. (Additional.) Born, Feb. 6, 
1874, at Elmira, N. Y. Married, April 26, 1901, Nellie O'Day, of Elmira, 
N. Y, A.B., St. Bonaventures College, Alleghany, N. Y. Supervisor, 
1900-03. City Attorney, 1906. Corporation Council, 1907. Member of 
Quill and Dagger fraternity. 
Address, Elmira, N. Y. 

O'MALLEY, EDWARD RICHARD, LL.B., '91. (Additional.) City Attor- 
ney, 1895. Assemblyman, 1902-04. Attorney General, 1909-11. 
Address, Buffalo, N. Y. 

O'NEILL, JAMES, A.B., '71. (Additional.) Born, Sept. 3, 1847, at Lisbon, 
St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. Married, Jan. 6, 1876, Marian Robinson, of Neills- 
ville, Wis. LL.B., Union, '73. Delegate to National Republican Conven- 
tion, 1888. District Attorney, 1888. Republican candidate for Attorney 
General, 1890 and 1892. Elected Circuit Judge (not Supreme Judge as 
stated in previous biography), 1897; re-elected 1904. 
Address, Neillsville, Wis. 

OSGOOD, WINCHESTER DANA, '92. (Additional.) C.E., Pennsylvania; 
'95. He joined the Cuban Army a few months later, and was killed in battle. 
Member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. 
Died, Oct. 18, 1896, at Guaimero, Cuba. 

PARSONS, JAMES A., LL.B., '90. (Additional.) Born, July 24, 1868, at 
Woodhull, N. Y. Corporation Counsel, Hornell, N. Y., 1896-9. City 
Judge, 1900-06. Attorney General, 1914. 
Address, Care Hornell, N. Y. 

PARSONS, ROBERT SWAN, LL.B., '89. (Additional.) Born, May 8, 1867, 
Town of Barker, Broome Co., N. Y. Married, May 6, 1903, Mary E. Ter- 
williger, of Binghamton, N. Y. President, Broome County Agriculture 
Society. County Judge, 1901-12. Trustee, Chenango Valley Savings 
Bank. Thirty-second Degree Mason. 
Address, Binghamton, N. Y. 

PATTEN, HENRY JAY, Ph.B., '84. (Additional.) Born, June 30, 1862, 
at Sandwich, 111. Married, Dec. 14, 1893, Emma Herpin, Pasadena, Cal. 
Grain Commission Merchant, firm of Bartlett, Crozier & Carrington, one 
of the largest grain firms in the world, and firm member of the New York 
Stock Exchange. Member of Phi Beta Kappa fraternity, University and 
Union League (Chicago) and Glen view Golf Clubs. Trustee, Cornell. 
Address, Evanston, 111. 



224 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

PENNY, GEORGE BARLOW, B.S., '85. (Additional.) Born, June 30, 1861, 
at Haverstraw, N. Y. Married, Aug. 25, 1887, Jessie Smith, of Wimbledon, 
England. Musical education in New York City and abroad. Professor of 
Music, Girton College, Halifax, N. S., 1885-6; Dalhousie, 1886-7; Metro- 
politan College of Music, New York City, 1887-8; State Normal School, 
Emporia, Kan., 1888-90. Dean, School of Fine Arts, University of Kansas, 
1890-03; Washburn College, Topeka, Kan., 1903-05. President, Kansas 
City College of Fine Arts, 1905-06. Dean, School of Ecclesiastical Music, 
Kansas City, 1906-07. Secretary and organizer of Fine Arts Institute and 
City organist, Topeka, and Professor of Music, Washburn College. 
Address, 3042 Grand Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

PETERS, HEBER WALLACE, A.B., '14. Secretary of Cornell University, 
1914-16. 

Address, Care Packard Motor Car Co., Detroit, Mich. 

PIERCE, HENRY, C.E., '80. (Additional.) Married Minnie Hyatt. 
Died, Aug. 23, 1911, at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

RANSOM, WILLIAM LYNN, LL.B., '05. (Additional.) Born, June 24, 
1883, at Panama, Chautauqua Co., N. Y. Married, Sept. 14, 1909, Mary 
Crawford Hope, of Sunny South, Ala. Member of State Bar Association. 
Address, New York City. 

SENIOR, JOHN LAWSON, LL.B., '01. Born, March 31, 1879, at Mont- 
gomery, N. Y. Admitted to the bar. Graduate Manager, Cornell Athletic 
Association, 1901-07. With publishing house, New York City, 1908. Mem- 
ber of Psi Upsilon fraternity, Sphinx Head and Aleph Samech. 
Address, 246 Woodward Ave., Jackson, Mich. 

SHANKS, LEWIS EDGAR PIAGET, Ph.B., '99; Ph.D., '08. (Additional.) 
Born, March 24, 1878, at Albany, N. Y. Married, April 4, 1904, Ethel 
Rollins, '05. A.M., Columbia University. Instructor, French, University 
of Wisconsin, 1906-08. Professor, University of Idaho. Professor, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 
Address, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SLATER, SAMUEL SCOTT, B.L., '94; LL.B., '94. Born, Jan. 24, 1870, at 
New York City. Married, Carrie Ingersoll Adsitt, Ph.B., '91, of Ithaca, 
N. Y. State Senator. 

Address, 76 William St., New York City. 

SMITH, SANFORD WILLARD, LL.B., '89. Born, Aug. 19, 1869, at Kinder- 
hook, N. Y. Married, July 1, 1896, Maude P. Harding. Admitted to the 
bar, 1890. Assemblyman, 1901. County Judge, Columbia Co., N. Y., 
1902-06. State Senator, 1906-. Deputy Atty. Gen., 1915-. Republican. 
Thirty-second Degree Mason. Member of Board of Education. Director, 
Chatham Electric Light, Heat and Power Co. 
Address, Chatham, N. Y. 

STAGG, CHARLES TRACEY, LL.B., '02. Born, Dec. 16, 1878, at Elmira, 
N. Y. Married, June 24, 1903, Madeleine Estelle Goff, of Elmira, N. Y. 
Admitted to the bar, 1902. Instructor, 1908-09, Asst. Professor, 1909-14, 
Professor of Procedure, 1914-16, Law, Cornell, 1916-. Secretary, Cornell 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 225 

College of Law, since 1914. President, Village of Cayuga Heights, since 
June 24, 1915. Justice of the Peace, since Feb. 1, 1915. Director, Cornell 
Co-operative Society, and Ithaca Savings and Loan Association. Member 
of Phi Delta Phi, Acacia and Order of the Coif (Vice President of Cornell 
Chapter), Hobasco Lodge, No. 716 F. & A. M., Eagle Chapter, No. 58, 
R. A. M. (High Priest), St. Augustine Commandery, K. T., fraternities; 
Craftsman's Club (President), Town and Gown Club; American, State, 
and Tompkins County (Vice President) Bar Associations, and New York 
State Law Teachers' Association. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

STAMBAUGH, JOHN, Ph.B., '84. (Additional.) Born, Feb. 15, 1862, at 
Girard, Ohio. Married, 1887, Cora Bunts, of Olmsted Falls, Ohio. Chemist, 
1885; Asst. Manager, 1887; Manager, 1893, The William Tod Company. 
Secretary and Treasurer, Youngstown Steel Co., since 1900. Member of 
Alpha Delta Phi and Theta Nu Epsilon fraternities. 
Address, Youngstown, Ohio. 

STOCKING, WILLIAM ALONZO, B.S. in Ag., '98; M.S. in Agr., '04. (Ad- 
ditional.) Born, May 13, 1872, at Hartford, Conn. Married, June 27, 
1900, Harriet Miranda Bliss, Ph.B., '98, of Binghamton, N. Y. 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

STRONG, ROBERT GRAY, LL.B., '90. (Additional.) Born, Dec. 11, 1869, 
at Louden, 111. Married, Oct. 19, 1904, Edith Nancy Curry. Dist, Atty., 
Thurston Co., Neb., 1895-8. 
Address, Greeley, Col. 

SWARTWOOD, CHARLES BROWN, LL.B., '97. (Additional.) Born, 
May 20, 1872, at Cayuta, N. Y. Married, June 25, 1902, Mary Frances 
Carroll, of Elmira, N. Y. Corporation Counsel, 1902-03. County Judge, 
since 1914. Member of Delta Chi fraternity, Holland Society and Society 
of Sons of American Revolution. 
Address, Elmira, N. Y. 

TEAGLE, WALTER CLARK, B.S., '99. (Additional.) Born, May 1, 1878, 
at Cleveland, Ohio. Married, Oct. 3, 1903, Edith Castle Murray, of Cleve- 
land. Merchant. Member of Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 
Home, Plainfield, N. J. ; Office, 26, Broadway, New York City. 

TENNANT, HENRY FRY, '05. (Additional.) Born, March 5, 1886, at 
Mayville, N. Y. Member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Delta Theta fraternities. 
Address, Mayville, N. Y. 

THOMAS, MASON BLANCHARD, B.S., '90. (Additional.) Born, Dec. 
16, 1866, at New Woodstock, N. Y. Married, June, 21, 1893, Annie M. 
Davidson, Crawfordsville, Ind. Professor, Biology, 1891-07, Dean of Fac- 
ulty, Wabash College, since 1905. Member of Sigma Xi and Phi Beta 
Kappa fraternities, Amer. Mic. Soc., and Amer. For. Associations. Presi- 
dent, Ind. Acad. Sc. Author. 
Address, Crawfordsville, Ind. 



226 DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 

TURNER, AVERY, 73. (Additional.) Born, March 8, 1851, at Quincey, IU. 
Married, Sept. 23, 1866, Mary H. Ten Eyck, of Topeka, Kan. 
Address, Amerillo, Texas. 

VAN NAMEE, GEORGE RIVET, LL.B., '02 (Additional.) Born, Dec. 23, 
1877, at Watertown, N. Y. Lawyer. Clerk of New York Assembly. State 
Drafting Commissioner, 1914-. Member of Psi Upsilon fraternity. 
Address, Watertown, N. Y. 

WASHBURN, ALBERT HENRY, Ph.B., '89. (Additional.) Born, April 11, 
1866, at Middleboro, Mass. Married, Jan. 11, 1906, Florence B. Lincoln, 
of Springfield, Mass. LL.B., Georgetown University, 1895. U. S. Consul, 
Magdeburg, Germany, 1890-3. Asst. U. S. Attorney, Mass., 1897-01. 
Special Counsel, U. S. Treasury Dept., 1901-04. Member of Beta Theta 
Pi fraternity. Clubs: Metropolitan (Washington), University (Boston), 
Lotos, Athletic, Cornell (New York City), Lawyer. 
Address, 12 Broadway, New York City. 

WESTINGHOUSE, HENRY HERMAN, 75. (Additional.) Born, Nov. 
16, 1853, at Central Bridge, N. Y. Married, May 27, 1875, Clara Louise 
Saltmarsh, of Ithaca, N. Y. Vice President, Westinghouse Air Brake Co. 
Clubs: Century Asso., Grolier, Eng. (New York City), Duquesne (Pitts- 
burgh), Union League (Chicago). 

Address, 111 Broadway, New York City. 

WILKINSON, JOHN, M.E., '89. (Additional.) Born, Feb. 11, 1868, at 
Syracuse, N. Y. Married, April 23, 1896, Edith Belden, of Syracuse. Mem- 
ber of Psi Upsilon fraternity. 
Address, Syracuse, N. Y. 

WILSON, CHARLES SCOON. A.B., '04; M.S. in Agr., '05. (Additional.) 
Born, Dec. 11, 1879, at Hall's Corners, N. Y. Member of Alpha Zeta and 
Sigma Xi fraternities. 
Address, Albany, N. Y. 

WINSTON, FRANCIS DONNELL, 77. (Additional.) Born, Oct. 2, 1857, 
at Windsor, N. C. Married, May 30, 1889, Rosa Mary Kenny. A.B., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 79. Lawyer. State Senator, N. C., 1886-7. 
Assemblyman, 1898-9, 1900-01. Judge of the Superior Court, 1901-02. 
Lieut. Gov., 1905-09. President, N. C. Bar Association, 1911-12. Trustee, 
Univ. N. C., 1887-. Presidential Elector, 1906; Elector-at-Large, 1912. 
Grand Master of Masons, 1907-8. 
Address, Windsor, N. C. 

WRIGHT, ELLSWORTH DAVID. A.B., '89; Ph.D., '94. (Additional.) 
Born, Feb. 13, 1861, at Danby, N. Y. Married, June 28, 1904, Edith Al- 
genia Allen, of Waupun, Wis. Professor, Latin, Lawrence University, since 
1907. Member of Phi Beta Kappa fraternity. 
Address, Appleton, Wis. 



DISTINGUISHED CORNELLIANS 227 

WYCKOFF, CLARENCE FREDERICK, '98. (Additional.) Born, Jan. 
2, 1876, at Ithaca, N. Y. Married, April 9, 1902, Miss Tallmadge, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. President, Wyckoff, Church & Partridge, formerly De- 
cauville Automobile Co., '05-'07. Member of Peary Relief Expedition, 
1901. Clubs: Peary Arctic, Arctic, New York Athletic, Chi Psi, Triton, 
Automobile of America, Town and Gown (Ithaca). 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

WYCKOFF, EDWARD GUILD, '89. (Additional.) Vice President, Wyckoff, 
Seamon and Benedict, and Remington Typewriter Co. Clubs: Chi Psi, 
Loyal Legion, Amer. Geographical Society, Amer. Unmismatic and Arch- 
aeological Society, Peary Arctic, Arctic of U. S., Cornell (New York City). 
Address, Ithaca, N. Y. 

ADDITIONAL 

HALLIDAY, SAMUEL DUMONT, A.B. Born, January 7, 1847, near Ithaca, 
N. Y. Married, Jennie Leonard, of Ithaca, N. Y., (died in January, 1916). 
Lawyer. Practiced law at Ithaca. District Attorney, Tompkins County, 
1873-5. Corporation Counsel, 1874-80. Member of the New York As- 
sembly, 1876 and 1878. Delegate to Democratic National Conventions, 
1876, 1880. State Committeeman, 1884. Trustee, Binghamton State 
Hospital, 1879-. Director, First National Bank. Member of Board of 
Education, 1899-. President, D wight Farm and Land Company. Alumni 
Trustee, 1874-84. Trustee, 1898-07. Chairman, Executive Committee of 
Board of Trustees. 
Died, Oct. 2, 1907, at Ithaca, N. Y. 



HISTORICAL INDEX 



ABBOTT, FRANK A cxxn 

ABBOTT, LYMAN xci 

ADAMS, ARTHUR G cxxn 

ADAMS, PRESIDENT CHARLES KENDALL. 

General Biography of, vin 

Professor LXXXVIII 

Second President vin 

ADAMS, HENRY CARTER LXXXVIII 

ADELPHIA LITERARY SOCIETY XLVIII 

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, predicted LXXIX 

AGASSIZ, Louis. Non-Resident Professor LIII, LXXXVII 

AGRICULTURE, NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE OP xxxv, xxxvi 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE BUILDING LXXV 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT LXXXV 

AGRONOMY BUILDING LXXV, xciv 

ALBEE, ERNEST LXXXIX, cxx 

ALMA MATER SONG xn, LVII 

ALPHA DELTA PHI FRATERNITY LVII 

ALUMNAE, THE ci 

ALUMNI, DISTINGUISHED, By Positions, Professions, Occupations ex 

General Observations on the xciv 

In Art ci 

In Diplomacy xcvin 

In Education xcix 

In Engineering C 

In Finance xcvin 

In Journalism xcix 

In Literature xcvin 

In Medicine and Surgery ci 

In Politics and Public Life xcv 

In The Sciences c 

On the Bench and at the Bar xcvm 

ALUMNI FIELD LXIV, LXXV 

ALUMNI HALL LXXIV, LXXIX 

AMES, CHARLES W cxxvm 

ANDERSON, LEROY cxx 

ANDERSON, RUFUS cxvi 

ANDREWS, ELISHA BENJAMIN LXXXVIII 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY BUILDING xciv 

ANTHONY, WILLIAM A LXXXIX 

ARCHITECTURE, COLLEGE OF LXXXIII 

ARMORY, ANNEX xci 

ARMORY, NEW LXXV, LXXIX, xciv 

OLD.. xci 



ARNOLD, BION J cxxm 

ARNOLD, WILLIAM E xxxvm, LXXXIX 

ARTHUR, JOSEPH C cxn 

ASHLEY, GEORGE H cxix, cxxiv 

ATKINSON, GEORGE F LXXXVI, cxn 

ATKINSON, WILLIAM F cvm 

ATWOOD, CHARLES E ex 

AUBERT, ALFRED B cxvi 

AUSTEN, WILLARD LXII, cxxvi 

AVIATION LIII 

AVIATION SCHOOL LXXIX 

AYRES, PHILIP W cxi 



B 

BABCOCK, CHARLES LXXXIII 

BABCOCK HALL, predicted LXXIX 

BABCOCK, STEPHEN M cxx 

BAILEY, LEON O cxxn 

BAILEY, LIBERTY HYDE, Biography of xxxvi 

Dean xxxvi 

Hall xcv 

Professor LXXXVI 

BAKER, GEORGE F., Benefactor LXXIX, LXXXII, xcn 

Halls xcn 

Tower xcn 

BAKER, GEORGE TITUS xcv, civ, cxm, cxxvii, cxxix 

BALLANTINE, J. HERBERT cxxvi 

BANCROFT, WILDER DWIGHT LXXXVI 

BARCLAY, CHARLES cxxm 

BARNARD, WILLIAM N LXXXV, cxx 

BARNARD, WILLIAM STEBBINS xc, cxvi 

BARNES, ALFRED C., benefactor LXXXI 

BARNES, ALFRED S., benefactor XLVIII, LXXXI, xci 

BARNES, FRANK A LXXXIV 

BARNES, FRED A cxx 

BARNES HALL xci 

BARR, JOHN H LXXXIV, cxix 

BARTLEY, ELIAS H cxiv, cxvi 

BARTO, DANIEL H L, cxxm 

BARTON, FRANK A xxxvm, ex 

BATES, REV. ALFRED K XLVI 

BEACHAM, JOSEPH W xxxvm, ex 

BEAHAN, WILLARD civ, cxn 

BEARDSLEY, JEFFERSON LXXII 

BEATTY, ARTHUR F cxx 

BECKER, SOPHIE M cix 

BEDELL, FREDERICK LXXXIX, cxix 

BEEBE, SILAS P LXXXV 

BEECHER, HENRY WARD LII 

BEHRINGER, GEORGE F LXXXVI, en, cxvi 



BELL, GEORGE xxx vui 

BELLE VUE HOSPITAL LXXX v 

BELLOWS, HOWARD P cxvn 

BENCH AND BAR xcvm 

BENEFACTORS LXXXI 

BENNETT, BURTON E cxxn 

BENNETT, CHARLES E LIV 

BENNETT, CHARLES P cxxvi 

BENTON, GEORGE A cxxiv 

BERNA, TELL S XLI, XLII, cxi 

BERRY, R XLI 

BESEMER, H. BURHANSE cxxx 

BETHLEHEM STEEL WORKS LXXX 

BETTEN, CORNELIUS cxxi 

BIGGS, HERMAN M xcvin, c, cv, cxxix 

BIRGE, GEORGE R xxvi 

BISMARCK, quoted LXXIII 

BISSELL, FRANK E cxm 

BISSELL, GEORGE W cxxvii 

BITTER COLLEGE OF ART, predicted LXXEX 

BITTER, KARL xvm, LXXII, LXXXII 

BLACKMAN, WILLIAM F cxiv 

BLAKE, ELI W LXXXIX 

BLAUVELT, GEORGE A cxxvin 

BLOOD, CHARLES HAZEN cvi, cxxv 

BOARDMAN, DOUGLAS xxxin, xxxiv, LXVI 

BOARDMAN, MRS. DOUGLAS XXXV 

BOARDMAN HALL xcn 

BODINE, GEORGE F cxxv 

BOGART, ELMER E cvm 

BOGART, GEORGE G xxxiv, cxxi 

BOLDT, GEORGE C LXXIX 

BORST, HENRY V civ, cxxiv, cxxv 

BOSTWICK, CHARLES D LXIII, evil 

BOSTWICK, EDWARD H cvi, cxxv 

BOTSFORD, GEORGE W cxrx 

BOYD, JAMES E cxx 

BOYESEN, HJALMER HJORTH LXXXVII 

BOYNTON, FRANK D L 

BRAMHALL, WILLIAM E cxxvi 

BRANNER, JOHN C xcix, c, cm, cxm, cxiv, cxvn 

BRAUNER, OLAF M LXXXIII 

BRAYMER, CLARA V cix 

BRAYTON, ALEMBERT W cxvn 

BRENEMAN, ABRAM A LXXX vi 

BRIGHAM, JOHNSON cxxvi 

BRISTOL, GEORGE P xxxm, LIV, LXXXIV 

BRISTOL SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, predicted LXXIX 

BRONSON, WALTER C cxix 

BROOKS, JAMES XLVIII 

BROOKS, ROBERT C cxxi 



BROWN, CHARLES C cxvn, cxxn 

BROWN. HENRY B LXI 

BROWN, JOHN F cxiv, cxx 

BROWN, JOHN JACKSON LXXXIX 

BROWN, WILLI cm 

BRUERE, HENRY cxn 

BRYAN, WILLIAM J xcv, xcvi 

BUCHW ALTER, MORRIS L CII, CXXV 

BULL, HENRY T xxxvm 

BURBANK, JAMES B xxxvm 

BURDICK, FRANCIS M. . . . xxxiv 

BURLESON, ALBERT S xcv 

BURNS, ROBERT LXXVII 

BURR, GEORGE LINCOLN LXXXVIII, xcix, cv, cxi, cxxvi 

BURT, STEPHEN S cxvi, cxxvm 

BUTLER, JAY S cxxn 

BYERLY, WILLIAM E LXIV, LXXXIX 



C 

CALDWELL, GEORGE C LXXXVI 

CALDWELL HALL xciv 

CAMERON, FRANK K cxx 

CANTLE, WILLIAM H cvm 

CARD, ERNEST M cxxv 

CARMODY, THOMAS xcvi, cxxix 

CARNEGIE, ANDREW LIX, LXVII, LXXV, LXXXI 

CARPENTER, ROLLA C LXXXIV, cxix 

CARVER, THOMAS N cxx 

CASCADILLA BUILDING xc 

CASSIDY, THOMAS F cxxvm 

CATTERALL, RALPH C. H LXXXVIII 

CAVANAUGH, GEORGE W xxxvi 

CENTENNIAL OF EZRA CORNELL'S BIRTHDAY LIX 

CHAMBERLAIN, DANIEL H xxxiv 

CHAMBERLAIN, PAUL M cxxvn 

CHAMBERS, JULIUS xcix, en, cxxn 

CHAMOT, EMIL M cxix 

CHANDLER, WALTER M cxxv 

CHAPEL, MEMORIAL xci 

CHAPEL, SAGE xci 

CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, HOBART C xcix, cvi, cxi, cxxn 

CHEMICAL BUILDING LXXXIII 

CHINESE COMMISSIONERS, VISIT CORNELL LIII 

CHI PHI FRATERNITY LV 

CHI Psi FRATERNITY LVII 

CHOATE, JOSEPH H xxvn 

CHRISTIE, WILLIAM W cxxvii 

CHURCH ATTENDANCE AND ACTIVITIES XLVI 

CHURCH, IRVING P LXXXIII, cxm, cxvn 

CITY HALL, new, predicted LXXX 



CIVIL ENGINEERING, COLLEGE OF LXXXIII 

CLASSICAL AND LITERARY STUDIES AT CORNELL LIII 

CLARK, ROGER P xcvi, cxxix 

CLASS COLORS, LIST OF cvi, cvn, cvm 

CLASS SECRETARIES, LIST OF en, cm, civ, cv, cvi, cvn, cvm, cix 

CLASS YELLS, LIST OF cvi, cvn, cvm 

CLASSES, THE en 

CLEVELAND, FRANCES FOLSOM LII 

CLEVELAND, PRESIDENT GROVER LII 

CLEVELAND, WILLIAM C LXXXIII 

CLYMER, PAUL K cxxv 

COBB FAMILIES XLVI 

COCAGNE XLIX 

CO-EDUCATION xi, xxx 

COLE, ALFRED D cxx 

COLE, WILLOUHLEY cxxn 

COLEY, WILLIAM B LXXXV 

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE LXXXIII 

COLLEGE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING LXXXIII 

COLLEGE OF LAW xxxm 

COLLEGE OF Music, predicted LXXIX 

COLLIN, CHARLES A xxxiv 

COLLYER, REV. ROBERT LXV, LXVI 

COLSON, FREDERICK D cxxvi 

COMFORT, WILLIAM W xc 

COMSTOCK, ANNA (BOTSFORD) c, ci, cxi 

COMSTOCK, GEORGE F LXVII 

COMSTOCK, JOHN HENRY LXXXIX, xcix, c, cm, cxvn, cxxix 

COMSTOCK, THEODORE B LXXXVII, cxm, cxvi 

CONNOLLY, MAURICE cxxvii 

CONSERVATORY, FLOWER xci 

CONWAY, P xxxm 

COOLIDGE, EVELYN L cxxvm 

COOPER, LANE LXXXVI 

COREY, CLARENCE L cxv 

CORNELL, ALONZO B ix 

CORNELL ALUMNI NEWS XLIX 

CORNELL ARCHITECT XLIX 

CORNELL CASUALTIES 

CORNELL CLASS BOOKS XLIX 

CORNELL COUNTRYMAN XLIX 

CORNELL ERA XLIX 

CORNELL, EZRA. Bought Western lands for University LXVII 

Built railroads through Ithaca LI 

Centennial of his birth LIX 

Death of xn 

Founds Cornell University xn, xiv, xv, xvn 

Induces Andrew D.White to become President ... xi 

"Life," written by his eldest son LIX 

Mentioned LIX, LXXII, LXXIII 

State Senator. . xiv 



Statue of xci 

Statue of, to be unveiled LXXVIII 

Tribute to, by Chauncey M. Depew xxrx 

Tribute to, by George William Curtis vn 

Views of, on Co-Education xxx 

CORNELL CONGRESS XLVIII 

CORNELL IN SONG LVII 

CORNELL INN, predicted LXXX 

CORNELL, LARGER FOUNDATION FOR, predicted LXXEX 

CORNELL MAGAZINE XLIX 

CORNELL, OLIVER H. P cxin 

CORNELL, POEM LVIII 

CORNELL PREPARATORY SCHOOLS IN ITHACA L, LI 

CORNELL REVIEW XLIX 

CORNELL SANITARIUM, predicted LXXX 

CORNELL SONG xxvi 

CORNELL SUMMER SCHOOL, prediction Lxxrx 

CORNELL SUN XLIX 

CORNELL TIMES XLIX 

CORNELL WIDOW XLIX 

CORNELL WOMEN STUDENTS' DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION LXIX 

CORNELL'S DAVID HARUMS XLIV 

CORNELL'S DISTINGUISHED VISITORS LII 

CORNELL'S FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY LIX 

CORNELL'S GREAT NEEDS LV 

CORNELLIAN XLIX 

CORNELLIAN COUNCIL XXVII, XCIII 

CORNELLIANS, in the First, Second and Third Generations XLV 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY: A Story Historical xi 

It's Environment xxiv 

Medical College Building LXXV 

The Semi-Centennial Celebration ix, x, xi 

The largest educational plant in America LXXVI 

CORSON, EUGENE R. C cxxvm 

CORSON, HIRAM xx, L, LXXII, LXXXVI 

CORWIN, RICHARD W cxvn 

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB, mistakenly called Metropolitan Club LXI 

COUNTRYMAN, EDWIN LXVI 

COUNTY COURT HOUSE, new, predicted LXXX 

COURTNEY BATTERY, predicted LXXX 

COURTNEY, CHARLES E XXXEX, XLIII, LXIX, LXXIII 

COVILLE, FREDERICK V cxn 

COVILLE, HENRY D cxxv 

COVILLE, DR. LUZERNE cvi 

COXE, ALFRED C xxxiv 

CRAFTS, JAMES M LXXXVI 

CRAIG, JOHN cxxi 

GRAND ALL, ARTHUR F. J cxxn 

CRANDALL, CHARLES L LXXXIII, en, cxin, cxvi 

CRANE, THOMAS FREDERICK, General Biography of XLVII 

Private Secretary of Ezra Cornell LXXII 

Professor. . LXXII, xc 



CRANK, THE XLIX 

CREIGHTON, JAMES E LXXXIX, cxrx 

CRESCENT THEATRE LXIX 

CROUCH, LEONARD H cxxiv 

CROWLEY, DANIEL cxxv 

CUDDEBACK, WlLLIAM H XCVII, CIII, CXXIV 

CULLINAN, PATRICK W xcvi, cxxix 

CUMMINGS, ROBERT C cxxix 

CUMMINGS, ALBERT B xxxvm, LXXIX 

CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM D cxxv 

CURTIS, CHARLES L cxxn 

CURTIS, GEORGE WILLIAM. His use of the simile of the Ship xvm 

Lecturer Lm 

Paraphrase of part of his address at 

opening of University vii 

CURTIS LITERARY SOCIETY XLVIII, XLIX 

D 

DAIRY BUILDING LXXV, xciv 

DANA, CHARLES L LXXXV 

DANA, JAMES D LXXVII 

DANIELS, JOSEPHUS xcv 

DAVEY, RANDALL VERNON cxi, cxxvii 

DAVEY, TRIPP LXIX, C i 

DAVIS, CHARLES S XLVI 

DAVIS, EDWARD ex 

DAVIS, ROWLAND L cxxiv 

DAVY, SONG LIX 

DEANGELIS, PASCAL C. J cxxiv 

DEBATING CLUB XLVIII, XLIX 

DEFORD, WILLIAM A xcvn 

DEFOREST, HENRY P cv, cxxvm 

DEFOREST, MABEL crx 

DEFOREST, NORA STANTON (BLATCH) cxxx 

DEGARMO, CHARLES xxxin, LXXXIV 

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON FRATERNITY LVII 

DELTA UPSILON FRATERNITY LVII 

DEMPSTER, ROBERT L ; LXIX 

DENNIS, FREDERICK S LXXXV 

DENNIS, Louis M LXXXVI 

DEPARTMENTS, THE LXXXV 

DEPEW, CHAUNCEY M xxrx 

DERBY, ORVILLE A cxxiv 

DICKINSON, CHARLES C cxxni 

DIPLOMACY xcvm 

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI en, ex 

Dix, JOHN ALDEN xcvi, c v, cxxiv 

DEXON, GRANT V. B cxm, 

DODSWORTH'S BAND 

DOORES, WILLIAM R c x 

DRAMATIC INTERESTS LXIX 



DREW, WILLIAM L xxxiv 

DUDLEY, WILLIAM R LXXXVI, c, cxn, cxvn 

DUGGAR, BENJAMIN M , cxxi 

DUNIWAY, CLYDE A LVI, cxiv 

DUNWELL, CHARLES T cm 

DUNWELL, JAMES W en, cxxiv 

DURHAM, CHARLES L cxxi 

DUTCHER, GEORGE M cxx 

E 

EARLY LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETIES XLVIII 

EASTMAN, WILLIAM R ex 

EDDY, HENRY TURNER LXXXIX, cxm, cxiv, cxvi 

EDGAR, J. CLIFTON LXXXV 

EDGREN, AUGUST H cxvi 

EDMINSTER, FRANK C L 

EDMUNDS, GEORGE F LXVH 

EDUCATION, SCHOOL OF LXXXIV 

EDWARDS, WILLIAM S cxxix 

EHLE, L. C xxv 

ELLIOT, GEORGE T LXXXV 

ELLIOTT, ORRIN L cxi, cxxm, cxvm 

ELLIS, WILLARD W LXIII 

ELMER, HERBERT C LIV, cxvm 

ELY, W. CARYL cxxm 

EMERSON, EDWARD cxxx 

EMERSON, OLIVER F cxrx 

EMORY, GEORGE M cxxiv 

ENSIGN, ORVILLE H cxxm 

EVANS, EVAN W LXXXIX 

EVENING SONG xxn 

EVERETT, GEORGE A cxxi 

EWING, ADDISON L cxvm 

EWING, JAMES LXXXV 

F 

F., O. H xxxix 

FAIRCHILD, HERMAN L cxvii 

FARLEY, WILLIAM W xcvi, cxxix 

FARMER'S WEEK xxxv 

FASSETT, TRUMAN E ci, cxi, cxxvn 

FAUST, ALBERT B LXXXVII 

FAVORITE PLACES, SHRINES AND MEMORIALS LXV 

FAYANT, FRANK N cxi 

FAYERWEATHER, DANIEL B LXXXII 

FEINBERG, ABRAHAM W XLVI 

FENNELL, THOMAS F cxxv 

FERGUSON, WILLIAM S cxx 

FERNOW, BERNHARD E LXXXIV 

FERRIS, FRANKLIN cm 



FERRY, ERVIN S cxix 

FETTER, FRANK A LXXXVIII, cxix 

FEVER EPIDEMIC, The Great Typhoid LXVII, LXXXI 

FINANCE xcvm 

FINCH, FRANCIS M. Dean of College of Law xxxiv 

Founder's Hymn written by xiv xv 

Law preceptor LXXII 

Poem on "The Bells" by him xxn, xxm 

Professor of Law xxxiv 

FINCH, WILLIAM A xxxiv, XLIV, cxvm 

FISH, PIERRE A xxxvn, c, cxix, 

FISHER, WILLARD C c, cxix, cxxvn 

FISKE, JENNIE McGRAW, General Biography of xxn 

Mansion built by her, burns LXVIII 

Statue of her xci 

Will made by her, broken xm, LXVI 

FISKE, WILLARD, Contributor to Cornell Era XLEX 

Gave his all to Cornell University LXVIII 

Lecturer LXVIII 

Librarian LXII 

Professor LXXXVII 

FITCH, CHARLES E XLVIII 

FITCH, GEORGE H cxxn 

FITE, WILLIAM B cxix 

FLAGG, ISAAC LIV 

FLANNER, DANIEL F cm 

FLINT, AUSTIN LXXXV 

FLOWER CONSERVATORY xci 

FLOWER, ROSWELL P xc vm 

FLOY, HENRY cxxvn 

FOLGER, CHARLES J xiv 

FOOTE, CHARLES W : cxvn 

FORAKER, JOSEPH B xcv, en, cxxiv, cxxvi, cxxvm 

FORD, JOHN xcvn, evil, cxxiv 

FOREIGN STUDENTS AT CORNELL LXI 

FORESTRY BUILDING xciv 

FORESTRY COLLEGE LXXXIV 

FOSTER, JOHN W xxxiv 

FOUNDER'S DAY LXI 

FOUNDER'S HALL xcn 

FOUNDING AND EARLY DAYS xi 

FRANCIS, CHARLES S xxxvm, xcvm, xcix, civ, cxxn 

FRANKLIN HALL LXXXIII, xcn 

FRANKLIN, WILLIAM S cxx 

FRATERNITIES, THE LV 

FREEMAN, EDWARD A LIII 

FRENCH, FERDINAND C cxix 

FRENCH, LEROY N cxxv 

FRENCH, WILLIAM H cm 

FROUDE, JAMES A LIU 

FUERTES, ESTEVAN A LXXXIII 



FUERTES, LOUIS A CI, CXI 

FUERTES, JAMES H cxxix 

FUERTES OBSERVATORY LXXIX 

FULLER, JESSE c vm 

G 

GAGE, LYMAN J LXI 

GAGE, SIMON H xc, XCEX, c, cxvn, cxxrx 

GAGE, SUSANNA STUART c, cxxrx 

GALLOWAY, B. T xxxvi 

GANNETT, FRANK E cxxn 

GARDNER, WILLIAM cxxvii 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS xciv 

GENUNG, JOSEPH LXXI 

GERRY, MARTIN H cxxin, cxxvii 

GIFFORD, GEORGE F cxxn 

GIFFORD, HAROLD cxvn 

GIFFORD, JOHN LXXXIV 

GILL, ADAM C LXXXVII 

GILLETTE, EDWIN cm 

GILLIG, HARRY cxxiv 

GILMORE, JOHN W cxiv, cxxi 

GILLMORE, WILLIAM E xxvni 

GLUCK, JAMES F xcvn, cm, cxxvi 

GOLD, THE RIVER OF XL 

GOLDWIN SMITH HALL LXXV, xcm 

GOULD, NORMAN J cxxvii 

GRADUATE SCHOOL LXXXII 

GRANT, ARTHUR HASTINGS cxxvm 

GRANT, JAMES B xcvi, civ, cxxiv 

GRANT, JESSE ROOT LII, civ, cxxvm 

GRANT, JULIA DENT civ 

GRANT, PRESIDENT ULYSSES S LII, civ 

GREEN, EDWARD B ex 

GREETINGS, From President Jacob Gould Schurman x 

GREETINGS, From Mrs. Gertrude Shorb Martin x, xi 

GREGORY, EMILY L cxvm 

GUERLAC, OTHON G LXXI, xc 

GUITEAU, FREDERICK W XLV, LXXXII 

GUNNISON, ROYAL A cxxiv 

GUTSTADT, MAX M LXX 

GYMNASIUM, new, predicted LXXIX 

GYMNASIUM, OLD LXIV 

H 

HAGERMAN, HERBERT J xcvi, cvm, cxxiv 

HALE, WILLIAM G LV 

HALL, JAMES P cxvi 

HALLIDAY, MORRIS S cxxvm 

HALLIDAY, SAMUEL D LXVI, cxxvi 



HALSEY, FRANCIS W xcvm, xcix, cm, cxi, cxxn 

HALSEY, FREDERICK A cxxn 

HAMILTON, WILLIAM J LXXXIX 

HAMMOND, WILLIAM A LXXXIX 

HANSON, BERT cxxvm 

HARDON, HENRY W xxxiv 

HARRIS, GEORGE W LXII, cxxvi 

HARRIS, GILBERT D LXXXVII, cxvm 

HARRIS, JESSE R ex 

HARRIS, ROLLIN A cxxvii 

HARRISON, JOSEPH L cxxvi 

HARSHMAN, WALTER S cxxvii 

HART, HAROLD L cxxvi 

HART, JAMES MORGAN LXXXVI, LXXXVII, xc 

HARTT, CHARLES F LXI, LXVII, LXXXVII 

HASKELL, EUGENE E LXXXIII, c, cxm, cxv 

HASKELL, REUBEN L cxxvii 

HASSELBRING, HEINRICH cxn, cxxi 

HATCHER, ROBERT A LXXXV 

HATHAWAY, ARTHUR S cxvm 

HAYES, ALFRED xxxiv 

HAYES, BIRCHARD A cm 

HAYES, PRESIDENT RUTHERFORD B LII, cm, cv 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD PLAIT cv 

HAYES, WEBB COOK cm 

HAYFORD, JOHN F cxm, cxv 

HEARST, WILLIAM RANDOLPH xcvn 

HEERMANS, FORBES cxi 

HEG, ERNEST C cix 

HELLER, DAVID N cxxvi 

HENDRIX, JOSEPH C xcvm, c, cm, cxxm, cxxvii 

HENRY, WILLIAM A cxv, cxvm 

HEWITT, WATERMAN T ix, LXXXVII, xcrx, cxi, cxvm 

HIBBARD, HERBERT W cxix 

HILL, ALBERT R cxiv 

HILL, DAVID B LXVI, LXVII 

HILL, JOHN E cxx 

HILL, ROBERT T cxvm 

HISCOCK, FRANK H LIX, xcvn, cm, cxxiv 

HITCHCOCK, EDWARD LXIV 

HITCHCOCK, ROMYN cxn 

HOCH, AUGUST LXXV 

HODSON, DEVOE P xcvn, civ, cxxvi, cxxix 

HOFFMAN, HARRY N cxxvii 

HOLDEN, Fox L, cxxm 

HOLMES, JOSEPH A cxxiv 

HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING xciv 

HOPKINS, GRANT S xc, c, cxix 

HORR, NORTON T cv 

HORTON, CLINTON T cxxvm 

HORTON, RANDOLPH cxxv, cxxvii 



HOUSE, EDWARD MANDEL xcv, xcvm, cxxvm 

HOWARD, LELAND O c, cxxix 

HOWLAND, ARTHUR C cxx 

HOWLAND, WILLIAM M xc 

HOY, DAVID FLETCHER xxiv, LIX, cvn, cxxvm 

HOYT, ALBERT E cxxn 

HUBBS, IRVING G cxxv 

HUGO, FRANCIS M xcvn, cxxvii, cxxix 

HUFF cur, ERNEST W. 

XXXIV, LXVIII, LXIX, XCVI, CV, CXV, CXVIII, CXXEX 

HUGHES, CHARLES EVANS, Governor XLX, xcvi 

Justice of the U. S. Supreme Court xcvi 

Lecturer xxxiv 

Professor xxxiv 

Speaker LIX 

HULL, CHARLES H LXXXVIII, cxv, cxvm 

HUMPHREY, ANDREW B xcv 

HUNTER, SAMUEL J cxxi, cxxix 

HURST, JOSHUA LXXI, c 

HUTCHINS, HARRY B xxxiv 

HYDE, EDWARD W cxiv, cxvi 

HYDE, HOWARD E XLVI, cxm 

HYDE, LULU E XLVI 

HYDE, ROGER D XLVI 

HYDE, WALTER WOODBURN XLVI, cxx 

HYDRAULIC LABORATORY LXXV, LXXEX 

I 

ICKELHEIMER, HENRY R XVIII, LXXXII 

INFIRMARIES, THE LXIII, xcm 

INTERVENING YEARS, THE xxvn 

IRVINE, FRANK xxxiv, xcvn, c, cv, cxv, cxvm, cxxv, cxxix 

IRVING LITERARY SOCIETY XLVIII, XLLX 

ISHAM, EDWARD S cxxix 

ITHACA AUTOMOBILE WORKS, predicted LXXX 

ITHACA GUN WORKS LXXX 

J 

JACKSON, DUGALD C cxxm 

JACKSON, FREDERICK H cxxvi 

JACKSON, MRS. HENRIETTA LXVIII 

JACKSON, WILLIAM S xcvi, cxxix 

JACOBY, HENRY S LXXXIV 

JAMESON, JOSEPH M cxiv 

JAPANESE MERCHANTS' ASSOCIATION, visits Cornell LIII 

JENKS, JEREMIAH W LIII, LXXXVIII 

JENNEY, WILLIAM S cxxvi 

JENNINGS, HUGH XLI, cxi 

JOHNSON, HENRY C cxn, cxm, cxvn 

JOHNSON, LILLIAN W cxiv 



JONES, FORREST R cxix 

JONES, JOHN PAUL XLI, XLII, cxi 

JONES, THOMAS S cxxvm 

JORDAN, DAVID STARR, First President of Leland Stanford Junior 

University LXXIII, xcix, en, cm, cxm 

Only alumnus to receive an honorary de- 
gree from Cornell LXX 

Professor cxvi 

Scientist c, cxxix 

JORDAN, WILLIAM H cxvn 

JOURNALISM XLVII 

JOURNALISM, COLLEGE OF, predicted LXXIX 

JUNIOR EXHIBITION. . LXXI 



KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY LVII 

KATTE, EDWIN B c, cxxm 

KELLERMAN, WILLIAM A cxn 

KELLOGG, JOHN M cm, cxxv 

KELLOGG, Ross W crx 

KEMMERER, EDWIN W LXXXVIII, cxx 

KEMP, JAMES F LXXXVII 

KENT, CLARENCE E XLVI 

KENT, RALPH S XLVI 

KENT, WALTER H cxn 

KENT, WILLARD M XLVI, cxxn, cxxm 

KEPHART, HORACE cxxvi 

KERR, ABRAM T LXXXV, cxx 

KERR, WALTER C XLVI, civ, cxxm 

KERR, WILLIAM O civ 

KEYES, EDWARD L LXXXV 

KlLBOURNE, LOUIS H CX 

KING, ASA C XLVI 

KING, STEPHEN T LXIX 

KINGSBURY, ALBERT cxxvii 

KINGSBURY, BENJAMIN F xc, cxx 

KINNE, WILLIAM L 

KLINE, JAY B cxxn, cxxvii 

KNAPP, CLYDE W cxxv 

KRAUSS, WILLIAM C c, cxxvm 

KROME, WILLIAM J c, cxm 

KYLE, EDWARD J cxvi, cxxi 

L 

LAIRD, WARREN P xcv 

LAMBERT, ALEXANDER LXXXV 

LAND GRANT OF U. S., given to Cornell University xiv, xc 

LANG, FLORENCE OSGOOD (RAND) LXXXII, xcm 

LANMAN, GEORGE N cvm 

LARNED WILLIAM A. . . cxi 



LAW COLLEGE xxxm, xxxiv 

LAW HALL xcm 

LAW, JAMES xxxvn 

LAWRENCE, JOHN B cxxn 

LAZENBY, WILLIAM R LXXXVI, cxvn 

LAZO, ANTONIO cix 

LEBOEUF, RANDALL J cxxv 

LEE, DUNCAN CAMPBELL LXXXVI 

LEE, EDWIN cxxi 

LEGGETT, GEN LVI 

LEGGETT, MORTIMER M LVI 

LEST WE FORGET LXVI 

LEWIS, GEORGE W c, cxxix 

LIBRARY, THE LXII, LXXIX, xci 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM xcm 

LINCOLN HALL LXXIX, LXXXIII, xcm 

LITERATURE xcvm 

LONDON, JACK LXXV 

LOOKING FORWARD, or Cornell in 1931 LXXVIII 

LOOMIS, CHESTER ci, cxi, cxxvn 

LOOMIS LABORATORY LXXXV 

LOVELL, EARL B CXEX 

LOWELL, JAMES RUSSELL LHI 

LUCAS, WILLIAM E LXXXVII 

LUCKEY, FRANK R LXIX 

LUSK, GRAHAM LXXXV 

LYCEUM THEATRE LXIX 

LYON FAMILY XLVI 

LYON, THOMAS L cxix 

M 

McCANN, GEORGE cvi, cxxv 

MCCARTHY, DENNIS cxxix 

McCLosKEY, ALICE G ci 

McCREA, ROSWELL C CXXI 

McCREARY, E. A XXXIX 

McDERMOT, GEORGE R LXXXV 

MCGILLIVRAY, ALEXANDER D cxxi 

McGRAW BUILDING xc 

McGRAW, JENNIE xxn 

McGRAW, JOHN xvi, xx, LXVI, LXXXI, xc 

MCKELLER, CONGRESSMAN xxxvm 

MCKINNEY, ROBERT C cxxvi 

McKiNLEY, WILLIAM xcv 

McKooN, BELA P LXXXVII 

McMAHON, JAMES LXXXEX 

MCMILLAN, EMERSON LXXXII 

MCMILLAN, DANIEL H cxxiv, cxxvm 

MACMURRAY, JUNIUS W XXXVIII 

MADDOX, SAMUEL T cxxv 

MALTBY, ALBERT E cxvn 



MARCUS, Louis W cxxv 

MARSH, FRED J LXI 

MARSTON, ANSON cxv, cxix 

MARTIN, CLARENCE A 

MARTIN, GEORGE C cxxiv 

MARTIN, GERTRUDE SHORE x, xi, cxvi 

MARTIN, LAWRENCE cxxi, 

MATTHEWS, FRANKLIN xcix, cv, cxn 

MARVIN, Ross G LII, LXVII, LXIX, ex, cxxi 

MARX, CHARLES D cxin 

MASQUE, THE LXIX 

MATTHEWS, FRANKLIN xcix, cv, cxn 

MATTHEWS SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, predicted LXXX 

MAUSOLEUM xci 

MAUXION, G LXXI 

MAYER, CHARLES H cxxv 

MAYO, EARL W cxn 

MEAD, DANIEL W cxvm 

MEDICAL COLLEGE LXXXV, xcm 

MEIKELJOHN, ALEXANDER cxiv, cxvi, cxx 

MEMORIAL CHAPEL LXXXIII, xci 

MENKEN, S. STANWOOD cxxvm 

MENOCAL, MARIO GARCIA xxxvni, LXII, xcv, cvi, ex, cxn, cxxvni 

MELCHERS, GARI LXXXII 

MEN'S DORMITORIES LXXV 

MERRIAM, Lucius, S LXVIII 

MERRILL, CHARLES G ci, cxi 

MERRITT, ERNEST G LXXXIX, cxv, cxvin 

MESSENGER, HIRAM J cxvm 

MILKS, HOWARD J xxxvii 

MILITARY DEPARTMENT xxxvii 

MILLER, CHARLES J evil 

MILLER, HARRY I cxxin 

MILLER, MARY ROGERS cxxm 

MILLER, PAUL XLII 

MILLER, RANSFORD S cxxn 

MILLER, WILLIAM H ex 

MILLS, CHARLES E cxxvm 

MILLSPAUGH, CHARLES F cxvn 

MINOR SPORTS AND PASTIMES XLIV 

MINTZ FAMILY XLVI 

MITCHELL, JAMES B ex 

MOAK, NATHANIEL C xxxiv 

MOAKLEY, JOHN F XLI, XLII 

MODEL BARNS xciv 

MOFFAT, JOHN L xiv 

MOLER, GEORGE S LXXXIX, cxvn 

MOLL, THEOPHILUS J cxxv 

MOORE, JOHN G cxvii 

MOORE, VERANUS A xxxvii, c, cvi, cxv, cxvm 

MORELAND, SHERMAN xcvn, cxv, cxxiv 



MORGAN, J. P xcvm 

MORGAN, ORA S cxv, cxvm, cxxi 

MORRILL, JUSTIN S xc 

MORRIS, JOHN L LXXXIV 

MORRIS, ROBERT T xcvm, ci, cv, cxvm, cxxx 

MORRIS, WILLIAM T cxxm 

MORRISON, JOHN T xcvi, cvn, cxxiv 

MORSE CHAIN WORKS LXXX 

MORSE, EVERETT FLEET cxxvi 

MORSE HALL xcn 

MORSE, RAYMOND P crx 

MOTT, JOHN R cvi, cxxx 

MOULD, STEPHEN H ex 

MOWRER, FRANK G cxxn 

MUNSON, WELTON M cxxi 

MURTAUGH, JOHN F cxxvm 

MUSICAL CLUBS, poem LVIII 

MUSICAL DEPARTMENT xxxn, xxxm 

N 

NAGLE, JAMES E cxx 

NAMMACK, CHARLES E LXXXV 

NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY XLVIII 

NAVAL TRAINING SCHOOL, predicted LXXX 

NEEDHAM, JAMES G LXXXV, cxxi 

NEWBERRY, SPENCER B LXXXVI 

NEWCOMER, ALPHONSO G cxix 

NEWKIRK, JOHN G cxvn 

NEWMAN, JARED T cxxvn 

New MEN'S DORMITORIES xcn 

NEWTON, WHITNEY cxxix 

NEW YORK SHIP CANAL, predicted LXXX 

NEW YORK STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE xcm 

NEW YORK STATE VETERINARY COLLEGE xcm 

NICHOLS, EDWARD L L, LXXXIX, xcrx, cm, cxv, cxvn 

NICHOLS, ERNEST F cxiv, cxx 

NIGHTINGALE, FLORENCE LXIII 

NIXON, CLARENCE E cxxn 

NORRIS, HENRY H cxx 

NORTH, SAFFORD E cxxv 

NORTHUP, EDWIN F cxix 

NORTON, WILLIAM J crx 

NOYES, WALTER C xcvn, cxxiv 

NUNN, P. L xiv 

O 

O'MALLEY, EDWARD R xcvi, cxxrx 

O'NEILL, JAMES xcvn, cxxrx 

OGDEN, HENRY N cvi, cxix 

OLIVER, JAMES E XLIV, LXXII, LXXXLX 



OLMSTED, EVERETT W xc, cxix 

ORNDORF, WILLIAM R LXXXVI 

ORTH, SAMUEL P LXXXVIH 

OSBORN, L. A cxxvi 

OSBORNE, CHARLES F LXXXIH 

OSGOOD, WINCHESTER D xxxvm, LXVIII, ex 

OSLER, Dr. WILLIAM xcv 

OSMOND, I. THORNTON cxvm 

OSTROM, CAPT. JOHN N civ, cxi 

OTHER COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS LXXXII 

P 

PALMER, EDWARD H cxxm 

PARKER, ALTON B LII, LXI 

PARKER, JAMES S cxxvn 

PARR, SAMUEL W cxvm 

PARSELL, CHARLES V L, cxxm 

PARSONS, FRANK cxxvi 

PARSONS, JAMES A xcvi, cxxix 

PARSONS, ROBERT S cxxv 

PAST QUARTER OF A CENTURY LXXV 

PATCHIN, FRANK G cxxn 

PATRICK, GEORGE E cxvn 

PATTERSON, WOODFORD XLIX, cxxn 

PAYNE, OLIVER H LXXXII, LXXXV, xcm 

PAYNE, PHILLIP cxn 

PEARSON, EDWARD J cxxm 

PEARSON, LEONARD cxv 

PEARSON, RAYMOND A xcvi, cxiv, cxxix 

PEARY, CAPT. ROBERT E LII 

PECK, DUNCAN W xcvi, cxxix 

PECK, TRACY LIV 

PEIRCE, WILLIAM F cxix 

PENNEY, HAROLD F XLVI 

PEOPLES COLLEGE xiv 

PERCY FIELD LXIV 

PERKINS. WILLIAM R LXXXVIH 

PHI BETA KAPPA LVII 

PHI KAPPA Psi LVII 

PHILALATHEAN LITERARY SOCIETY XLVIII, XLIX 

PHILLIPS, ERVIN L xxxvm, ex 

PHILOSOPHICAL REVIEW XLIX 

PHISTERER, FREDERICK W ex 

PHYSICAL REVIEW XLIX 

PIERCE, HENRY cxni 

PIERCE, PAUL cxx 

PIERCE, WILLIAM K cxxm, cxxvi 

PILLSBURY, WALTER B cxx 

PLACE, IRA A LXXVIII, cxxm, cxxvi 

PLATT, CHESTER C xcvi, cxxix 

POLK, WILLIAM M LXXXV 



POLITICS AND PUBLIC LIFE xcv 

POOLE, MURRAY EDWARD v, vi, x, XLII, XLIII, LVIII 

PORTER, EUGENE H xcvn, cxxix 

PORTER, NOAH LXXII 

POTTER, FRED XLII 

POTTER, J. B xxxvn 

POTTER, OWEN L xcvi, cxxix 

POTTER, ZIBA H LXXXIX 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY BUILDING xciv 

POUND, CUTHBERT W xcvi, xcvn, cxxv, cxxix 

POWER HOUSE LXXV 

PRATT, CHARLES R xxxiv 

PRENTISS, ALBERT N LXXXVI, xci 

PRESIDENTS' HOUSE xci 

PRESTON, ERASMUS D cxi, cxm 

PRESTON, HAROLD cxxvi 

PRICE, CHARLES S cxxm, cxxvi 

PROPHECY AND TOAST LXXVIII 

PROSSER, CHARLES S cxvm 

PUTNAM, GEORGE H civ 

PUTNAM, GEORGE P civ 

PUTNAM, RUTH xcvm, civ, cxn 

Q 

QUARTER CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION xxix 

QUILL AND DAGGER LXII 

R 

RAMMELCAMP, CHARLES H cxx 

RAND, ADDISON C LXXXII 

RAND HALL LXXXII, xcin 

RAND, JASPER R LXXXII 

RAND, JASPER R., JR LXXXII 

RANE, FRANK W cxxm 

RANSOM, WILLIAM L xcvi, cxxvi 

RATHBUN, RICHARD cxxvn 

RAWLES, WILLIAM A cxx 

READE, MELBOURNE S cxiv 

REED, DANIEL A XLI, cxi 

REGISTRARS xxiv 

REIS, HEINRICH LXXXVII 

REMINISCENCES OF CORNELL LXX 

REW, FREDERICK G LXVIII 

RICE, JAMES E . xxxvi, cxix 

RICE, WILLIAM M. J ci, cxi 

RICHARDSON, HAROLD J cix 

RILEY FAMILY XLVI 

RISLEY, PRUDENCE, HALL LXXXII, xcin 

ROBERTS HALL LXXV, xcin, xci v 

ISAAC P xxxv, xxxvi 



JAMES H cxxvi 

MARY E cxvm 

MILTON, J c 

ROBINSON, ALFRED S LXVIII 

ROCKEFELLER HALL 

ROCKEFELLER, JOHN D 

ROCKWELL, GEORGE H cix 

ROEHRIG, FREDERICK L ex 

ROEHRIG, FREDERICK L. O xc 

ROGERS, EDGAR A cxxvi 

ROLFE, JOHN C cxvm 

ROOSEVELT, THEODORE LII 

ROSE, FLORA ci 

Ross, HAROLD E xxxvi 

ROWLEE, WlLLARD W LXXXVI, CVI, CXIX 

ROTH, FILIBERT F LXXXIV 

RUSHES LIX 

RUSSEL, WILLIAM C LXX, LXXXVIII, xc 

RUSSELL, JAMES E cxv 

RYAN, HARRIS J LXXXV, cxvm 



S 

SACKETT, HENRY W xxxvm, xcvi, cm, cxxvi 

SAGE CHAPEL LXXV, LXXXIII, xci 

SAGE COLLEGE LXXXIII, xci 

SAGE COLLEGE ANNEX xci 

SAGE COTTAGE xci 

SAGE, DEAN LXXXI, LXXXV, xci, xcm 

SAGE HALL, predicted LXXIX 

SAGE, HENRY W. Benefactor xvn 

Founds Library xii, xxm, xci 

General Biography of xxi, LXXXI 

Mansion of LXIV, xcm 

Mentioned LIX, xcm 

Views on Military Drill xxxvn 

SAGE, MRS. RUSSELL LXXXII, xcm 

SAGE SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY LXXXIX 

SAGE, SUSAN E. LINN xxxi, LXXXIX 

SAGE, WILLIAM H xxxm, LXIV, LXV, LXXXI, xci, xcm 

SALMON, DANIEL E c, en, cxm, cxxxix 

SANDERSON, EZRA D cxxi, cxxix 

SAVAGE CLUB LXIX 

SAWYER, FREDERICK A L 

SCHAEFFER, CHARLES A LXXXVI 

SCHIFF, JACOB LXXXII 

SCHIFF SCHOOL OF COMMERCE, predicted LXXIX 

SCHLEY, ADMIRAL W. S XLIII 

SCHOELLKOPF, HENRY XLII 

SCHOELLKOPF MEMORIAL BUILDING LXXV, XCIII 

SCHOOL REVIEW XLIX 



SCHURMAN, PRESIDENT JACOB GOULD, Administration prosperous . . . LXXV 

Advises students to keep out of canoes LXIX 

Annual address xviu, LVI 

Announces gifts LXXHI 

Asks for a Graduate School LXXXII 

Confidence of parents in LXXIII 

General Biography of xviu 

Greetings by him to alumni x 

Plan of Campus made by him LXXI, LXXIX 

President of Cornell University xxix 

Professor in Cornell University LXXXIX 

Remarks by him on Athletics LXXIII 

Remarks by him on Co-Education LXXVI 

Remarks by him on Fraternities LVI 

Speech by him to Buffalo Alumni LXXVII 

SCHURMAN HALL, predicted LXXIX 

SCHUYLER, GEORGE W LXIII 

SCHUYLER, WALTER S xxxvm 

SCHWAB, CHARLES M LXXX 

SCHWAB SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL MECHANICS, predicted LXXX 

SCHWERTFEGER, EMIL LXIX 

SCOTT, GEORGE W cxx 

SEAMAN, Louis L ci, cxxx 

SEELEY, JOHN cxxvm 

SEMI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION AND GRAND REUNION . . ix, x, xi, LXXVII 

SERVISS, GARRETT P xcvm 

SEVERANCE, FRANK H cxxm 

SEWELL, ALBERT H cxxv 

SEYMOUR, HORATIO LII 

SEYMOUR, NAN G cix 

SHACKFORD, CHARLES C LXXXVI, LXXXVII 

SHAEFFER, NEWTON M LXXXV 

SHALER, IRA A cxn 

SHANKS, LEWIS E. P cxxi 

SHARPE, ALBERT H XLI 

SHEARER, JOHN S cxx 

SHEARN, CLARENCE J xcvn, cvn, cxxvi 

SHELDON, CHARLES L LXXXII 

SHELDON, MEMORIAL LXV 

SHEPARD, FRED D cxxvn 

SHEPARDSON, GEORGE D cxix 

SHERWOOD, ARTHUR H cvm 

SHIRAS, GEORGE cv, cxxvii 

SHOEMAKER, MICHAEL M cxn, cxxiv 

SHOEMAKER, SETH W cix 

SHREVE, RUTH BENTLY cix 

SHUFELDT, ROBERT W cxn, cxxx 

SHURTER, EDWIN D cxix 

SIBLEY, HIRAM. Benefactor xvn, xci 

Building named for him xci 

General Biography of xxi, LXXXI 



SIBLEY, HIRAM W LXXXI 

SIBLEY COLLEGE LXXXIV, xc 

SIBLEY DOME BUILDING LXXV 

SIBLEY JOURNAL XLIX 

SIGMA PHI LXIV 

SILL, HENRY A LXXXVIH 

SIMONDS, FREDERICK W cxvn 

SIMPSON, MARTIN W LXXX vn 

SLATER, SAMUEL S cxxvm 

SLINGERLAND, MARK V cxix 

SMITH, ALBERT W LXXXIV, cxv, cxvn 

SMITH, BRAINARD G XLVIII, LXXXVI, LXXXVII 

SMITH, CLINTON D cxin, cxiv, cxvn 

SMITH, FRANK P cxxin 

SMITH, GOLDWIN. Benefactor XLIV 

General Biography of xxm 

Letters of xi 

Professor in Cornell University LXXXVIH 

SMITH, GOLDWIN, HALL xcm 

SMITH, HAROLD B cxvi, cxx 

SMITH, HERBERT H cxxrx 

SMITH, HORACE I XLIV 

SMITH, SANFORD W cxxvm 

SMITH, THEOBALD c, cxvm 

SMITH, WALTER G cvi, cxxm 

SMITH, WILMOT M cm, cxxv 

SNYDER, HARRY cxn 

SNYDER, VIRGIL LXXXIX 

SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENITON OF CRIME LXI 

SOME OPINIONS, COMMENTS AND EXPLANATIONS V LXXII 

SOUTHWORTH, JOHN H XL VI 

SPANISH- AMERICAN CLUB LXI 

SPAULDING, LEWIS xxxv 

SPEED, ROBERT G. H en 

SPRAGUE, HOMER B LXXXVI 

SPRINGER, ANTON ex 

SOUTHARD, JAMES H era, cxxvn 

STAGG, C. TRACEY xxxiv, cxxi 

STAMBAUGH, JOHN T cxxm 

STANFORD, LELAND LXXIII 

STANTON, THEODORE xcrx, cm 

STARS OF THE VALLEY LVIII 

STEBBINS, ALFRED xc 

STEDMAN, JOHN M cxix 

STERRETT, JOHN R. S LIV 

STEVENS, FREDERICK C xcvi, cxxvm, cxxrx 

STEVENS, GEORGE B cxvn 

STEWART, GEORGE W cxxi 

STEWART, OSCAR M cxx 

STILES, CHARLES A L 

STIMSON HALL LXXV, LXXXV, xcii 



STIMSON, LEWIS A LXXXV, xcii 

STOCKARD, CHARLES R LXXXV 

STOCKING, WILLIAM A xxxvi 

STOCK JUDGING PAVILION xciv 

STOKES, ANSON PHELPS LXXVI 

STONE, JOHN L xxxvi, cxvn 

STORKE, CHARLES A en 

STRAIGHT, WILLARD D xxxvm, LXXXII, xcvm, cxxn, cxxm 

STRAND THEATRE LXX 

STRUNK, WILLIAM, JR LXXXVI 

STUDENT AID LX 

STUDENT CUSTOMS LIX 

STUDENT FESTIVITIES LX 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT LX 

STUDENT MORALS LXI 

STURGIS, CONEY L 

STUTZ, HARRY G cxxm 

SUMMER SCHOOL xxxm 

SUMMERS, HARRY E cxvm 

SUMMING UP LXXVI 

SUTLIFF, PHEBE T cxiv 

SWAN, CECIL J cix 

SWARTWOOD, CHARLES B cxxv 

SWEET, JOHN E LXXXIV 

SWEETLAND, MONROE M CXXV, CXXVI 

SWISHER, CHARLES C cxx 

SZE, SAO-KE ALFRED LIII, LXII, xcvm, cxxn 

T 

TAFT, WILLIAM H xxxiv, LII, LXI 

TARBELL FAMILY XLV 

TARR, RALPH S LXV, LXXXVII 

TANNER, JOHN H LXXXIX, cxix 

TAYLOR, BAYARD LII 

TAYLOR, HARRY L XLI, cvi, cxi, cxxv 

TAYLOR, MOSES LI 

TAYLOR, THOMAS N cxvi, cxx 

TEAGLE, WALTER C cxxm 

TELLURIDE CLUB XLV 

TERRELL, HENRY xxn, c v 

THETA Xi LVII 

THILLY, FRANK LXXXIX, cxix 

THOMAS BROTHERS' AVIATION SCHOOL LIII 

THOMAS, CARL C cxvi, cxx 

THOMAS, JULIA J xcix, cxm 

THOMAS, M. CAREY xcix, civ, cxm, cxv, cxvn 

THOMAS, MASON B cxix 

THOMPSON, C. F xxxvm 

THOMPSON, WILLIAM G LXXXV 

THURBER, CHARLES H cxvm, cxxvm 

THURSTON HALL, predicted LXXIX 



THURSTON, ROBERT H LXXXIV 

TIBBITTS, ADDISON S cxxv 

TICHENER, EDWARD B LXXXIX 

TINKER, MARTIN B XLVI 

TOMKINS, CALVIN civ, cxxx 

TOMPKINS, GEORGE S cvin 

TOURISON, C. E XLI 

TRAVEL TO AND FROM CORNELL LI 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT LXIII 

TRELEASE, WILLIAM xcix, cv, cxn, cxv, cxvm 

TREMAN, CHARLES E xcvi, cxxiv, cxxix 

TREMAN, ROBERT E LIII, cix 

TREMAN, ROBERT H xcvin, cxxiv 

TREVOR, JOSEPH E LXXXVI, cxv 

TROWBRIDGE, ALEXANDER B xxxvm, LXXXIII, ex, cxv 

TROY, HUGH C xxxvi 

TUCK, CHARLES H cxxi 

TUNNEL FROM BEEBE LAKE LXXV 

TURNEAURE, FREDERICK E CXIII, CXV 

TUTHERLY, HERBERT E xxxvm 

TUTHILL, LEWIS H L , cxxm 

TUTTLE, HERBERT LXXXVIII 

TUTTLE, WILLIAM E cxxvn 

TWESTON, T. H LXI 

TYLER, MOSES COIT LXXXVIII 

U 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY LXXIX, xci 

UNIVERSITY PRESS XLVIII, xci 

URQUHART, COLIN K 77 xii, LVII 

V 

VANCLEEF, MYNDERSE cxxix, cxxvi 

VANDERBILT FAMILY xcvm 

VAN DE WATER, GEORGE R cxxn 

VAN!NGEN, GILBERT cxix 

VANNAMEE, GEORGE R cxxix 

VANNESS, WILLIAM P xxxvm 

VANORMAN, RAY XLI, cxi 

VANPELT, JOHN V LXXXIII 

VANRENSSELAER, MARTHA xxxv, ci 

VANSCHRENCK, HERMAN CXII 

VANVELSER, CHARLES A cxvn 

VETERINARY COLLEGE CLINIC xcm 

VETERINARY COLLEGE, NEW YORK STATE xxxvi, xxxvn, LXXV 

W 

WAGNER, CHARLES G ci, cv, ex 

WAIT, JOHN C cxvm 

WAIT, LUCIAN A L, LXXXIX 



WALDO, GEORGE E cxxvn 

WALTERS, J. HENRY cxxvni 

WARNER, GLENN S cxi 

WARNER, JOHN DEWITT en, cxxvn, cxxx 

WARREN, GEORGE F xxxvi 

WASHBURN, FRANK S cxm 

WASHBTJRN, MARGARET F cxx 

WEBB, WALTER L cxvin 

WEBB, DR. WILLIAM SEWARD xcvm, cm, cxxiv 

WEBER, ADNA F cxxx 

WENDE, GOTTFRIED H cxxvin 

WESTINGHOUSE, HERMAN H cxxin 

WHARTON MOVING PICTURE STUDIO LXXX 

WHEELER, BENJAMIN IDE LV, LXXI 

WHEELOCK, CHARLES F cxxm 

WHITBECK, RAY H cxxi 

WHITE, PRESIDENT ANDREW DICKSON. Alumni honor him xxvi 

Benefactor xxxm, LXV 

Building named for him xc 

Chooses Cornell Faculty xii 

Christmas greeting to cv 

Co-Education, his views on xxxi 

Confidence of parents in LXXIII 

Dedication of this book to vii 

Donor of Architectural Library LXXXIII 

Donor of the Presidents' House xci 

Founder of School of History and Political Science LXXXVIII 

General Biography of xvi, xvii, xvin 

Gives reception to '79 and '80 LXXII 

Historical work, by him LXXXVIII 

Liberal University, the idea of a, original with hi LXXIII 

Military Drill, his views on xxxvii 

One of the great men of the age LXXII 

Plans a National University LXXXIII 

Prediction made by him xxxv, LXXV 

President of Cornell University xvi, xvii, xvin, xxix, LI 

Receives honorary degrees from Cornell LXX 

Resigns Presidency xvin, xxvn 

Says parents do not "patronize" Cornell LXX 

Sits for his statue LXXII 

Statue of xvin, LXXXII 

Statue of Ezra Cornell to be unveiled by him LXXVIII 

Tribute of George William Curtis to vn 

WHITE, MRS. ANDREW D., THE FIRST, STATUE OF xci 

WHITE GATE LXV 

WHITE HALL xc 

WHITE HALL, new, predicted LXXIX 

WHITE, HORACE xcvi, cvi, cxxiv, cxxvi, cxxvin 

WHITE, HORATIO S LXXXVI 

WHITE, HOWARD G cxxm 

WHITE, JAMES G c 



WHITE, WILLIAM A cxix 

WHITTEN, JOHN C cxn 

WHITTLESEY, JOSEPH H xxxvm 

WILDER, DR. BURT G LXXXIX, c 

WILES, ROBERT H cm, cxxvii 

WILLCOX, WALTER F XL, LXXXVIII 

WILLIAMS, C. L xxxiv 

WILLIAMS, EMMONS L xxiv, LXIII 

WILLIAMS, GERSHAM M cxn 

WILLIAMS, HENRY S LXXXVII 

WILLIAMS, JOHN F LXXXVII 

WILLIAMS, JOSEPH W LXIII 

WILLIAMS, MRS. GEORGE R xxxv 

WILLIAMS, OREOLA LVIII 

WILLIAMS, OSCAR F cxxn 

WILLIAMS, OTIS L XLVI 

WILLIAMS, ROGER B., JB cxxiv 

WILLIAMS, SAMUEL G LXXXIV, LXXXVII 

WILLIAMS, TIMOTHY S LXXI, xcvi, xcvm, cxxiv, cxxx 

WILLIAMS, WALTER L xxxvn 

WILSON, CHARLES B cxvm 

WILSON, CHARLES S LXXV, xcvi, cxxi, cxxx 

WILSON, FRANCIS M XLII 

WILSON, WILLIAM DEL.ANCEY cxxn 

WILSON, WILLIAM DIXON xxiv, XLVII, LXXII, LXXXIX 

WILSON, WOODROW xcv 

WING, CHARLES B LXXXIV, cxvm 

WING, CHARLES H LXXXVI 

WING, HENRY H LXXXV, cv, cxvm 

WINSLOW, JAMES E. O cix 

WINSTON, GEORGE T cm, cxm, cxvn 

WINSTON, FRANCIS D cxxvi 

WITTHAUS, RUDOLPH A LXXXV 

WOLF, RENNOLD LXIX, cxn 

WOOD, LEONARD xxxvni, LII, LXI 

WOODFORD, STEWART L xxi, xxn 

WOODRUFF, EDWIN H xxxiv, cxv 

WOOLSEY, GEORGE LXXXV 

WORTHINGTON, THOMAS CXXII 

WRIGHT, FRANK A ex 

WYCKOFF, CLARENCE F cxxvi 

WYCKOFF, EDWIN G cxxvi 

WYVELL, MANTON M xcvi, cxxn 



YATABE, RIOKICHI LXH, cxvn 

YEARGIN, MARY L LXVIII 

YOUNG, CHARLES V. P LXIV, cxxi 

YOUNG, GEORGE H cvm 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION XLVIII, xci 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION XLVIII 

YOUNGS, WILLIAM J xcvi, cxxn, cxxx 



ZETA Psi 



LVII 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



ABBOTT, FRANK A 193 

ABBOTT, WILBUR C 206 

ADAMS, ARTHUR G 214 

ADAMS, CHARLES KENDALL . . . 135, 140 

ADAMS, HENRY CARTER 140, 141 

ADLER, FELIX 140 

ADLER, SIMON L 189 

AGASSIZ, Louis 140 

ALBEE, ERNEST 205 

AMES, CHARLES W 165 

ANDERSON, JOHN W 189 

ANDERSON, MELVILLE BEST 155 

ANDREWS, ELISHA BENJAMIN 141 

ANTHONY, WILLIAM ARNOLD 141 

ARCHBOLD, WILLIAM K 189 

ARNOLD, BION J 193 

ARTHUR, JOSEPH C 184 

ASHE, WILLIAM W 201 

ASHLEY, GEORGE H 194 

ASHLEY, JAMES M 162, 217 

ATKINSON, GEORGE F 181 

ATWOOD, CHARLES E 171 

ATWOOD, WILLIAM G 199, 217 

AUSTEN, WILLARD 196 

AVERILL, EARL A 212, 217 

AYRES, PHILLIP W 179 



B 

BABCOCK, CHARLES 141 

BACON, GEORGE W 199 

BAILEY, LEON 175 

BAILEY, LIBERTY HYDE 137, 141 

BAKER, EUGENE 166 

BAKER, GEORGE TITUS 168, 169 

BALDWIN, ARTHUR J 199 

BALDWIN, LEONARD D 199 

BALLANTINE, J. HERBERT. . . .189, 217 

BALLARD, ALFRED H 166 

BALLARD, SAMUEL T 166 

BANCROFT, WILDER DWIGHT 141 

BARCLAY, CHARLES 162 

BARDOL, FRANK V. E 189 

BARNARD, WILLIAM NICHOLS. .208, 217 

BARNARD, WILLIAM STEBBINS. . . . 148 

BARNES, ALFRED SMITH 131 

BARR, JOHN HENRY 193 

BARTLEY, ELIAS H 152 

BARTON, FRANK A 196, 217 

BEACHAM, JOSEPH W 208 

BEAHAN, WILLARD 166 

BEATTY, ARTHUR F 205 

BEDELL, FREDERICK 198 

BEHIRNGER, GEORGE FREDERICK.. 146 

BELL, GEORGE, JR 204 



BELLOWS, HOWARD P 159 

BENNETT, BURTON E 181 

BENNETT, CHARLES E 142 

BENNETT, CHARLES P 189 

BENTON, GEORGE A 148 

BESEMER, HOWARD BURHANSE ... 189 

BIGGS, HERMAN M 177 

BIRGE, GEORGE K 149 

BISSELL, FRANK E 166, 217 

BISSELL, GEORGE W 186 

BLACKMAN, WILLIAM F 203 

BLAUVELT, GEORGE A 194, 217 

BLOOD, CHARLES HAZEN 186 

BOARDMAN, DOUGLAS 131 

BODINE, GEORGE F 209 

BOLT, GEORGE C., JR 214 

BOOTH, ARTHUR W 202, 217 

BORST, HENRY V 163 

BOSTWICK, CHARLES D 199 

BOTSFORD, GEORGE W 198 

BOYESEN, HJALMAR HJORTH 142 

BRAMHALL, WILLIAM E 163 

BRANNER, JOHN C 155 

BRAYTON, ALEMBERT W 159 

BRIGHAM, JOHNSON 147 

BRISTOL, GEORGE P 142 

BRONSON, WALTER C 195 

BROWN, CHARLES C 166 

BROWN, GOODWIN 159 

BROWN, JOHN F 208 

BRUERE, HENRY 214 

BRUNK, THOMAS L 182 

BUCHW ALTER, MORRIS L 146 

BURDICK, FRANCIS M 142 

BURDEN, OLIVER D 207 

BURR, GEORGE LINCOLN 175 

BUROWS, BION L 199 

BURT, STEPHEN S 152 



CARLTON, WILLARD G 199 

CALDWELL, GEORGE CHAPMAN ... 142 

CAMERON, FRANK K 206 

CARD, ERNEST M 214 

CARMODY, THOMAS 177, 218 

CAROLAN, EDGAR A 199 

CARPENTER, ROLLA C 188 

CARVER, THOMAS N 205 

CHAMBERLAIN, DANIEL HENRY. . 141 

CHAMBERLAIN, JOSEPH R 186 

CHAMBERLAIN, PAUL M 194 



CHAMBERS, JULIUS 147 

CHAMOT, EMIL M 196 

CHANDLER, WALTER M 169 

CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, HOBART C. . . 182 

CHRISTENSEN, PARLEY P 208, 218 

CHRISTIE, WILLIAM W 205 

CHURCH, IRVING P 152 

CHURCHILL, WILLIAM W 189 

CLARK, FARLEY G 205 

CLARK, ROGER P 196, 218 

COBB, FORDYCE A 202 

COBB, HOWARD 206 

COLE, ALFRED D 209 

COLE, WILLOUGHBY 166 

COLLIN, CHARLES A 137, 142 

COLSON, FREDERICK D 208 

COMSTOCK, ANNA (BOTSFORD)... 183 

COMSTOCK, JOHN HENRY 156 

COMSTOCK, THEODORE BRYNAT. . 147 

CONNOLLY, MAURICE 209 

COOK, WALTER P 196 

COOLIDGE, EVELYN L 212 

COOLIDGE, MARY E. B. (ROBERTS) 171 

COOPER, LANE 142 

CORNELL, ALONZO B 131 

CORNELL, CHARLES L 189 

CORNELL, EZRA 131 

CORNELL, JOHN B 199 

CORNELL, OLIVER H. P 156 

CORSON, EUGENE R 159 

CORSON, HIRAM 137, 142 

CORWIN, RICHARD W 159 

CORY, CLARENCE L 198 

COVILLE, FREDERICK V 184 

COVILLE, HENRY D 202 

CRAFTS, JAMES MASON 142 

CRAIG, JOHN 212 

CRAIG, MOSES 195 

CRANDALL, ARTHUR F. J 163 

CRANDALL, CHARLES L 149 

CRANE, THOMAS FREDERICK . 136, 142 

CREIGHTON, JAMES E 

CROSBY, GEORGE H 152, 218 

CROUCH, CALVIN H 199, 218 

CROUCH, LEONARD C 190 

CROWLEY, DANIEL 214 

CUDDEBACK, WlLLIAM H 156 

CULLINAN, PATRICK W 152 

GUMMING, ROBERT C 190 

CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM D 213 

CURTIS, ARTHUR M 190, 218 



CURTIS, CHARLES LOCKE 178 

CURTIS, GEORGE WILLIAM 140 

GUSHING, HENRY P 218 



DALTON, WILLIAM 194 

DANN, HOLLIS E 142 

DAVEY, RANDALL VERNON 214 

DAVIS, GEORGE H 199 

DAVIS, ROWLAND L 208 

DEANGELIS, PASCAL C. J 149 

DEFORD, WILLIAM A 200, 219 

DEFOREST, HENRY P 179 

DEFOREST, NORA S. (BLATCH) . . 214 

DEGARMO, CHARLES 142 

DEMPSTER, ROBERT L 214 

DENSMORE, HIRAM D 188 

DERBY, ORVILLE A 152 

DIBBLE, HENRY M 177 

DICKINSON, CHARLES C 196, 219 

Dix, JOHN ALDEN 178 

DIXON, BRANT V. B 148 

DOORES, WILLIAM R 202 

DUDLEY, WILLIAM R 158 

DUGAN, WILLIAM J 214, 219 

DUGGAR, BENJAMIN M 212 

DUNIWAY, CLYDE A 200 

DUNWELL, CHARLES T 153 

DUNWELL, JAMES W 153 

DURAND, E. DANA 208 

DURHAM, CHARLES L 212 

DUTCHER, GEORGE M 208 

DWIGHT, THEODORE W 140 



F 

FAIRCHILD, HERMAN L 156 

FARLEY, WILLIAM W 209 

FASSETT, TRUMAN E 214 

FAYANT, FRANK 209 

FEHR, Louis W 214 

FENNELL, THOMAS F 

FERGUSON, WILLIAM S 209 

FERRIS, FRANKLIN 153 

FERRY, ERVIN S 190 

FETTER, FRANK A 201 

FINCH, FRANCIS M 132, 141, 142 

FINCH, WILLIAM A 172 

FISH, JOHN C. L 219 

FISH, PIERRE A 194 

FISHER, WILLARD C 186 

FISKE, WILLARD 142 

FITCH, GEORGE H ; 159 

FLACK, HAROLD 219 

FLAGG, ISAAC 143 

FLATHER, JOHN J 195, 220 

FLOY, HENRY 196 

FORAKER, JOSEPH BENSON 146 

FORD, JOHN 194 

FRANCIS, CHARLES SPENCER 163 

FRANKENHEIMER, JOHN 153 

FRANKLIN, WILLIAM S 208 

FRENCH, FERDINAND C 202 

FRENCH, LEROY N 207 

FUERTES, ESTEVAN A . 143 

FUERTES, JAMES H 178 

FUERTES, Louis A 209 



EDDY, HENRY T 148 

EDGREN, AUGUST H 148 

EDWARDS, JAMES H 186 

EDWARDS, WILLIAM S 169 

EIDLITZ, OTTO M 175 

ELLIOTT, JOHN L 200 

ELLIOTT, ORRIN L 181 

ELLIS, WILLARD W 214 

ELMER, HERBERT C 178, 219 

ELY, W. CARYL 165 

EMERSON, EDWIN. 194 

EMERSON, OLIVER F 198 

EMORY, GEORGE M 194, 219 

ENSIGN, ORVILLE H 180 

EVANS, EVAN W 138, 142 

EWING, ADDISON L 172, 219 



GAGE, SIMON H 164 

GAGE, SUSANNA STUART (PHELPS) 172 

GANNETT, FRANK ERNEST 209 

GARDINER, EDMUND L. B 159 

GARDNER, WILLIAM 172 

GERRY, MARTIN H 205 

GIFFORD, GEORGE F 172, 220 

GIFFORD, HAROLD 169 

GILBERT, FREDERICK W 153 

GILLIG, HARRY 172, 220 

GILMORE, JOHN W 210 

GLASSON, WILLIAM H 207 

GLUCK, JAMES FRASER 156 

GOLDSBOROUGH, WlNDER E 200 

GOTTHEIL, WILLIAM S 172 

GOULD, JOHN ST ANTON 140 

GOULD, LAWRENCE E 215 



GOULD, NORMAN J 212 

GRANT, ARTHUR HASTINGS 185 

GRANT, JAMES B 164 

GRANT, JESSE ROOT 166 

GREEN, ANDREW H 200 

GREEN, EDWARD B 167 

GREENE, GEORGE WASHINGTON. . 141 

GREGORY, EMILY L 175 

GUNNISON, ROYAL A 207 



HAGERMAN, HERBERT J 204 

HAIGH, MAHAM H 213 

HALL, JAMES P 204 

HALLIDAY, MORRIS SAMUEL 215 

HALLIDAY, SAMUEL DUMONT 227 

HALSEY, FRANCIS W 153 

HALSEY, FREDERICK A 167 

HAMMOND, WILLIAM A 143 

HANSON, BERT 202, 220 

HARRIS, GEORGE WILLIAM 153 

HARRIS, GILBERT D 183 

HARRIS, ROLLIN A 181 

HARRISON, JOSEPH L 183 

HARSHMAN, WALTER S 200 

HART, JAMES MORGAN 143 

HARTT, CHARLES FREDERICK. 138, 143 

HASKELL, EUGENE E 169 

HASKELL, REUBEN L 210 

HASSELBRING, HEINRICH 212 

HATHAWAY, ARTHUR S 220 

HAYES, ALFRED, JR 143 

HAYES, BIRCHARD AUSTIN.. 156, 220 
HAYES, RUTHERFORD PLATT 172, 220 

HAYES, SCOTT RUSSELL 200, 220 

HAYES, WEBB COOK 162, 220 

HAYFORD, JOHN F 190 

HEADLEY, RUSSELL 149, 221 

HEERMANS, FORBES 

HELLER, DAVID N 186 

HENDRIX, JOSEPH C 156 

HENRY, WILLIAM A 172 

HIBBARD, HERBERT W 197, 221 

HILL, ALBERT R 206 

HILL, JOHN E 206 

HILL, ROBERT T 183 

HILLS, ELIJAH C 200 

HINMAN, EDGAR L 200 

HISCOCK, ALBERT K 177 

HISCOCK, FRANK H 159 

HITCHCOCK, HARRY A 213 



HITCHCOCK, ROMYN 149 

HODSON, DEVOE P 164 

HOFFMAN, HARRY N 178 

HOLMES, JOSEPH A 175 

HORTON, CLINTON T 211 

HORTON, RANDOLPH 162 

HOPKINS, GRANT S 190 

HOUGH, ROMEYN B 176 

HOUSE, EDWARD MANDEL 177 

HOWARD, LELAND 164 

HOWLAND, ARTHUR C 202 

HOY, DAVID FLETCHER 197 

HOYT, ALBERT E 186 

HOYT, WILLIAM B 176 

HUBBS, IRVING G 197 

HUFFCUT, ERNEST W 180 

HUGHES, CHARLES EVANS... 138, 143 

HUGO, FRANCIS M 209 

HULL, CHARLES H 183 

HUMPHREY, ANDREW B 160 

HUTCHINS, HARRY B 143 

HYDE, EDWARD W 150 

HYDE, HOWARD ELMER 213 

HYDE, WALTER WOODBURN 203 



ICKELHEIMER, HENRY R 

IRVINE, FRANK 173 

IRVINE, JULIA J. (THOMAS) 160 

ISHAM, EDWARD S 194 



JACKSON, DUGALD C 182 

JACKSON, FREDERICK H 153 

JACKSON, WILLIAM SCHUYLER 197, 221 

JAMESON, JOSEPH M 203 

JENKS, JEREMIAH W 143 

JENNEY, WILLIAM S 200 

JENNINGS, HUGH 214, 221 

JOHNSON, BEN 167 

JOHNSON, GEORGE H 179 

JOHNSON, HENRY CLARK 153 

JOHNSON, LILLIAN W 215 

JONES, FORREST R 187 

JONES, GEORGE W 143 

JONES, THOMAS S 215 

JORDAN, DAVID STARR 152 

JORDAN, WHITMAN H 168 



KATTE, EDWIN B 203 

KELLERMAN, WILLIAM A 157 

KELLEY, FLORENCE 177 

KELLOGG, JOHN MORRIS 160 

KENT, GEORGE E 221 

KENT, RALPH S 215 

KENT, WALTER H 162 

KENT, WILLARD MORRELL 211 

KEPHART, HORACE 181 

KERR, ABRAM T 206 

KERR, WALTER CRAIG 170 

KING, STEPHEN T 187 

KINGSBURY, ALBERT 190 

KINGSBURY, BENJAMIN F 205 

KINGSBURY, JOSEPH T 167 

KLINE, JAY B 157 

KNAPP, CLYDE W 203 

KRAUSS, WILLIAM C 180 

KROME, WILLIAM J 212 



LACY, CHARLES Y 154, 222 

LAIRD, WARREN P 190 

LANDFIELD, JEROME B 204 

LARNED, WILLIAM A 204 

LAW, JAMES 138, 143 

LAZENBY, WILLIAM R 157 

LEARY, JAMES T 173 

LEBOUEF, RANDALL J 200 

LEFFINGWELL, WILLIAM E 160 

LEHMAIER, JAMES S 167 

LELAND, WARREN 154 

LOOMIS, CHESTER 150 

LOVELL, ELGIN B 197, 222 

LOVELL, Ross MEACHAM 203 

LOWELL, JAMES RUSSELL 140 

LUCAS, WILLIAM E 164, 222 

LYON, T. LYTTLETON 197 

LYTLE, Louis E 222 

M 

MCALLISTER, PETER F 200 

McCANN, GEORGE 183 

MCCARTHY, DENNIS 160, 222 

MCCLOSKEY, ALICE GERTRUDE.. 215 

McCREA, ROSWELL C 213 

MCGILLIVRAY, ALEXANDER D. . . . 213 

McGRAW, JOHN 133 

McGumE, JOHN JAMES 203 



MACK, JOHN G. D 222 

McKiNNEY. ROBERT C 162 

MCMILLAN, DANIEL H 150 

MADDOX, SAMUEL T 157 

MARCUS, Louis W 190 

MASTERS, VERNON F 188 

MARSTON, ANSON 191 

MARTIN, CLARENCE A 196 

MARTIN, GEORGE C 211 

MARTIN, GERTRUDE (SHORE) .... 213 

MARVIN, Ross G 215, 222 

MARX, CHARLES D 167 

MATTHEWS, CLARENCE W 197 

MATTHEWS, FRANKLIN 178 

MAYER, CHARLES H 211 

MAYNARD, MILA F. (TUPPER) . . . 191 

MAYO, EARL W 204 

MEAD, DANIEL W 180 

MEAD, WINSLOW M 187 

MEIKELJOHN, ALEXANDER 209 

MENKEN, S. STANWOOD 194, 222 

MENOCAL, MARIO GARCIA 187 

MERRILL, CHARLES G 215 

MERRILL, THOMAS D 167 

MERRITT, ERNEST G 183 

MESSENGER, HIRAM J 173 

MILKS, HOWARD JAY 215 

MILLER, HARRY 1 179 

MILLER, RANSFORD S 

MILLER, MARY F. (ROGERS) 207 

MILLER, WILLIAM HENRY 150 

MILLSPAUGH, CHARLES F 162 

MITCHELL, JAMES B 206 

MOLER, GEORGE S 160 

MOLL, THEOPHILUS J 207, 222 

MONE, EDWARD J 206 

MOORE, JOHN G 154 

MOORE, VERANUS A 185 

MORELAND, SHERMAN 197 

MORRIS, JOHN LEWIS 143 

MORRIS, ROBERT T 173 

MORRIS, WILLIAM T 154 

MORRISON, JOHN T 195 

MORROW, JOHN H 154 

MORSE, EVERETT FLEET 170, 222 

MOTT, JOHN R 187 

MOULD, STEPHEN H 223 

MOWRER, FRANK R 204 

MURTAUGH, JOHN F 211, 223 



N 

NEEDHAM, JAMES G 212 

NEWCOMER, ALPHONSO G 189 

NEWKIRK, JOHN G 154 

NEWMAN, JARED TREMAN 160 

NEWTON, WHITNEY 170 

NICHOLS, EDWARD L 160 

NICHOLS, ERNEST Fox 204 

NICHOLS, LEON NELSON 201 

NIXON, CHARLES E 173 

NORRIS, HENRY H 207 

NORTH, SAFFORD E 150 

NORTHUP, EDWIN F 198 

NOYES, WALTER F .191 



O'M ALLEY, EDWARD R 197, 223 

O'NEiL, JAMES 148, 223 

O'SHEA, MARTIN V 201 

OGDEN, HENRY N 191 

OLIVER, JAMES EDWARD 143 

OLMSTED, EVERETT W 197 

OSBORNE, LOYAL A 197 

OSGOOD, WINCHESTER DANA. 201, 223 
OSMOND, I. THORNTON 185 

OSTRANDER, WlLLIAM S 176 

OSTROM, JOHN N 164 



PALMER, EDWARD H 165 

PARKER, JAMES S 191 

PARKER, LEE H 191 

PARR, SAMUEL W 182 

PARSELL, CHARLES V 150 

PARSONS, FRANK 154 

PARSONS, JAMES A 195, 223 

PARSONS, ROBERT S 191, 223 

PATCHIN, FRANK G 180 

PATRICK, GEORGE E 154 

PATTEN, HENRY J 180, 223 

PATTERSON, WOODFORD 207 

PAYNE, PHILIP 187 

PEARSON, EDWARD J 179 

PEARSON, LEONARD 188 

PEARSON, RAYMOND A 205 

PECK, DUNCAN W 157 

PEIRCE, WILLIAM F 196 

PENNY, GEORGE B 182, 224 

PETER, HEBER WALLACE 224 

PHILLIPS, ERVIN L 198 



PIERCE, HENRY 173 

PILLSBURY, WALTER B 208 

PLACE, IRA ADELBERT 176 

PLATT, CHESTER C 184 

POLK, WILLIAM MECKLENBURG. . 143 

POOLE, MURRAY EDWARD 173, 174 

PORTER, EUGENE HOFFMAN 174 

POST, GEORGE A 215 

POTTER, OWEN L 191 

POUND, CUTHBERT W 185 

PRENTISS, ALBERT NELSON 

PRESTON, ERASTMUS D 161 

PRESTON, HAROLD 170 

PRICE, CHARLES S 150 

PROSSER, CHARLES S 179 

PUTNAM, RUTH 167 

R 

RAMMELKAMP, CHARLES H 207 

RANDALL, EMILIUS 157 

RANE, FRANK W 202 

RANSOM, WILLIAM L 215 

RATHBUN, RICHARD 161 

REEVE, BENJAMIN H 176 

REEVES, ARTHUR M 168 

REXFORD, CHARLES M 168 

RICE, JAMES E 195 

RITES, FRANCIS M 176 

ROBERTS, ISAAC PHILLIPS 139, 144 

ROEHRIG, FREDERICK L 179 

ROEHRIG, FREDERICK L. 144 

ROLFE, JOHN C 181 

ROOT, Louis C 201 

ROSSITER, EHRICK K 161 

ROWLEE, WlLLARD W 188 

ROYCE, DANIEL 198 

RUSSEL, WILLIAM CHANNING 136, 144 

RUSSELL, JAMES E 185 

RYAN, HARRIS J 185 



SACKETT, HENRY W 161 

SAGE, HENRY WILLIAMS 133 

SALMON, DANIEL E 150 

SANBORN, FRANK B 141 

SANDERSON, EZRA D 211 

SAUNDERS, SAMUEL J 205 

SAYLOR, THOMAS U 207 

SCHAEFFER, CHARLES ASHMEAD . . 144 

SCHMIDT, NATHANIEL 144 



SCHOELLKOPF, HENRY. 215 

SCHURMAN, JACOB GOULD .... 136, 144 

SCHUYLER, GEORGE W 133 

SCOTT, GEORGE W 211 

SEAMAN, Louis L 150 

SEELEY, JOHN 208 

SENIOR, JOHN L 224 

SERVISS, GARRETT P 151 

SEVERANCE, FRANK H 170 

SEWELL, ALBERT H 149 

SHACKFORD, CHARLES CHAUNCEY 144 

SHALER, IRA A 180 

SHANKS, LEWIS E. P 212, 224 

SHEARER, JOHN S 203 

SHEARN, CLARENCE J 195 

SHEPARD, FRED D 174 

SHEPARDSON, GEORGE D 191 

SHIRAS GEORGE D 176 

SHOEMAKER, MICHAEL MYERS. . . 157 

SHUFELDT, ROBERT W 157 

SHURTER, EDWIN D 201 

SIBLEY, EDWIN H 174 

SIBLEY, HIRAM 134 

SIMONDS, FREDERICK W 161 

SKINNER, FRANK W 170 

SLATER, SAMUEL S 224 

SLINGERLAND, MARK V 

SMITH, ALBERT W 168 

SMITH, CLARENCE LEROY 154 

SMITH, CLINTON DEWITT 154 

SMITH, FRANKLIN P 161 

SMITH, GOLDWIN 139, 140, 144 

SMITH, GREENE 140 

SMITH, HAROLD B 198, 203 

SMITH, HERBERT H 151 

SMITH, SANFORD W 191, 224 

SMITH, THEOBALD 176 

SMITH, WALTER G 182 

SMITH, WILMOT M 157 

SNYDER, HARRY 192 

SOUTHARD, JAMES H 158 

SPRAGUE, HENRY L 155 

SPRAGUE, HOMER BAXTER 144 

SPRINGER, ANTON, JR 203 

STAGG, C. TRACEY 224 

STAMBAUGH, JOHN T 180, 225 

ST ANTON, THEODORE 163 

STEBBINS, ALFRED 144 

STEPHENS, HENRY MORSE 144 

STERRETT, JOHN R. S 144 

STEVENS, GEORGE BARKER 165 



STEWART, OSCAR M 209 

STOCKING, WILLIAM A 211, 225 

STONE, JOHN L 158 

STONER, STANLEY 182 

STRAIGHT, WILLARD DICKERMAN 215 

STRONG, ROBERT G 195, 225 

STRUNK, WILLIAM, JR 208 

STUTZ, HARRY G 216 

SUMMERS, HENRY E 184 

SUTLIFF, PHEBE T 196 

SWARTWOOD, CHARLES B 209, 225 

SWEETLAND, MONROE MARSH . . . 196 

SWISHER, CHARLES C 206 

SZE, SAO-KE ALFRED 216 



TANNER, JOHN H ... 

TARR, RALPH S 144 

TAYLOR, BAYARD 140 

TAYLOR, HARRY L 188 

TEAGLE, WALTER C 212, 225 

TENNANT, HENRY F 216, 225 

THILLY, FRANK 202 

THOMAS, CHARLES C 206 

THOMAS, M. CAREY 165 

THOMAS, MASON B 195, 225 

THROOP, WILLIAM B 165 

THURBER, CHARLES H 184 

THURSTON, ROBERT H 139, 144 

TIBBETTS, ADDISON S 165 

TITCHENER, EDWARD B 144 

TOMKINS, CALVIN 171 

TOMPKINS, DAVID J 162 

TRAVIESO, MARTIN 216 

TRELEASE, WILLIAM 174 

TREMAN, CHARLES EDWARD 192 

TREMAN, EBENEZER MACK 151 

TREMAN, ROBERT ELIAS 216 

TREMAN, ROBERT HENRY 168 

TREVOR, JOSEPH E 202 

TROWB RIDGE, ALEXANDER B 195 

TUCK, CHARLES HENRY 216 

TURNEAURE, FREDERICK E 192 

TURNER, AVERY 155, 226 

TURNER, GEORGE B 155 

TUTTLE, HERBERT 145 

TUTTLE, WILLIAM E 198 

TYLER, CHARLES MELLEN 145 

TYLER, MOSES COIT 145 



URQUHART, COLIN KEITH 163 



VANCLEEF, CHARLES EDWARD ... 149 

VANCLEEF, MYNDERSE 158 

VAN DE WATER, GEORGE R 158 

VAN!NGEN, GILBERT 195 

VANNAMEE, GEORGE R 226 

VANRENSSELAER, MARTHA 214 

VANVELZER, CHARLES A 163 

VANVLEET, DEFOREST 165 

VONHOLST, HERMANN E 141 

VONSCHREXCK, HERMANN 203 

w 

WADE, FRANK E 192 

WADHAMS, FREDERICK E 155 

WAGNER, CHARLES G 175 

WAIT, JOHN C 178 

WAIT, LUCIAN A 145 

WAKEMAN, BURTIS R 192 

WALDO, GEORGE E 151 

WALTERS, J. HENRY 208 

WARNER, CHARLES DUDLEY 141 

WARNER, JOHN DEWrrr 151 

WASHBURN, ALBERT H 192, 226 

WASHBURN, FRANK S 179 

WASHBURN, MARGARET F 205 

WASSON, CHARLES W 163 

WEBB, WALTER L 180 

WEBB, WILLIAM SEWARD 158 

WEBER, ADNA F 205 

WELLER, STUART 205 

WEXDE, GOTTFRIED H 151 

WESTINGHOUSE, HENRY H. . . 162, 226 

WHEELER, BENJAMIN IDE 145 

WHEELER, CHARLES F 155 

WHITE, ANDREW D 134, 141, 145 

WHITE, ANDREW C 182 

WHITE, DAVID 184 

WHITE, FREDERICK DA VIES 175 



WHITE, HAMILTON, S 165 

WHITE, HORACE 185 

WHITE, HORATIO S 145 

WHITE, HOWARD G 171 

WHITE, JAMES G 182 

WHITE, WILLIAM A 192 

WHITTEN, JOHN C 205 

WILDER, BURT GREEN 140, 145 

WILES, ROBERT H 158 

WILLCOX, WALTER F 145 

WILKINSON, JOHN 193, 226 

WILLIAMS, GERSHAM MOTT 171 

WILLIAMS, HENRY S 145 

WILLIAMS, JOSIAH B 134 

WILLIAMS, OSCAR F 147 

WILLIAMS, OTIS L 188 

WILLIAMS, ROGER BUTLER, JR. ... 216 

WILLIAMS, SAMUEL GARDNER. . . . 145 

WILLIAMS, TIMOTHY S 180 

WILSON, CHARLES B 181 

WILSON, CHARLES S 216, 226 

WILSON, WILLIAM DEL.ANCY 149 

WILSON, WILLIAM DLXON 145 

WING, CHARLES B 184 

WING, HENRY H 176 

WINSTON, FREDERICK D 165, 226 

WINSTON, GEORGE T 159 

WOLF, RENNOLD 201 

WOODFORD, STEWART LYNDON. . . 134 

WOODRUFF, EDWIN HAMLIN 178 

WOODWARD, FREDERICK C 205 

WORTHINGTON, THOMAS 155 

WRIGHT, ELLSWORTH D 185, 226 

WRIGHT, FRANK A 171 

WYCKOFF, CLARENCE F 211, 227 

WYCKOFF, EDWARD G 193, 227 

WYVELL, MANTON MARBLE 216 



YATABE, RIOKICHI 163 

YOUNG, CHARLES V. P 212 

YOUNGS, WILLIAM JONES 151 



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