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Full text of "The story of the Jubilee Singers, including their songs"

The Story 

OF THE • • 

JUBILEE SlFGE^RS 



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WITIi TJiEIR SONGS 



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THE STORY OF 

THE JUBILEE SINGERS 

INCLUDING THEIR SONGS 



BY 



J. B. T. MARSH 



WITH SUPPLEMENT 

CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THEIR SIX YEARS' TOUR AROUND 
THE WORLD, AND MANY NEW SONGS 



BY 



F. J. LOUD IN 



LONDON 

HODDER AND STOUGHTON 

27, PATERNOSTER ROW 

MCMin 



11 03 



Printed by Hazell, Watson cS* Viney, Ld., London and Aylesbury. 



CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I. 

PAGE 

THE YEAR OF JUBILEE I 



CHAPTER n. 
THE FORLORN HOPE ... .... 8 

CHAPTER in. 
ADRIFT ON STORMY SEAS l6 

CHAPTER IV. 
LIGHT IN THE EAST 24 

CHAPTER V. 
SUCCESS AT LAST ^^ 

CHAPTER VI. 
THE SECOND CAMPAIGN 40 

CHAPTER VII. 
THE FIRST VISIT TO LONDON 



545469 



vi CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER VIII. 

PAGB 

A BUSY WINTER IN GREAT BRITAIN .... 62 

CHAPTER IX. 
OVER THE OCEAN AGAIN 75 

CHAPTER X. 
EIGHT MONTHS IN GERMANY 90 

CHAPTER XI. 
PERSONAL HISTORIES OF THE SINGERS . . * lOI 



SUPPLEMENT. 

CHAPTER I. 
THE NEW MANAGEMENT 1 33 

CHAPTER II. 
BOUND FOR THE ANTIPODES . . . . . .134 

CHAPTER III. 
IN AUSTRALASIA 138 

CHAPTER IV. 
FROM AUSTRALASIA TO THE ORIENT . . . -143 

CHAPTER V. 
IN JAPAN 150 

THE JUBILEE SONGS 159 



NOTE. 

This volume is in part an abridgment of the two 
J ubilee Histories which were written by the Rev. 
G. D. Pike, and which have had a wide circulation, 
one giving an account of the first campaign in 
America, and the other of the first visit to Great 
Britain. But the interval between these two narra- 
tives is here bridged over, and the story is brought 
down to the return of the Jubilee Singers from 
Germany. 

The personal histories have been more fully writ- 
ten out, and a large number of new songs have been 
added, including several of the most popular pieces 
ever given in the Jubilee concerts. J. B. T. M. 



1892. 



Fisk University disbanded the company on its 
return from Europe in 1878, and since then has 
had no connection with it. 

The note by J. B. T. M. was written in 1879, 
when the Singers organized themselves into a joint 
stock company. They continued as such for 
nearly two years. 

In the Autumn of 1882, a reorganization was 
effected ; an account of which, and their subsequent 
six years' tour around the world, is given in the 
Supplement. 

There has also been added many new and beau- 
tiful songs. F. J. ly. 

RAVitNNA, Ohio. 



FISK UNIVERSITY'S GREAT NECESSITY. 

FiSK University is emphaticallya Missionary Institution. 
The people in wliose interest it has been founded were, six- 
teen years ago, slaves. The most of the students are depend- 
ent upon themselves, and must earn their own support while 
securing their education. The colleges of no section of our 
country rely upon their students, even though wealthy, for 
the salaries of professors. Colleges and Theological Semi- 
naries must be endowed, or raise the larger part of their 
annual expenses by constant appeals to the liberality of their 
friends. 

The current expenses of Fisk University have, thus far, 
been principally met by the American Missionary Associa- 
tion, but with the hope that the success of its work would 
create for it friends who would gladly endow it. The insti- 
tution is most favorably located with respect to healthfulness 
of climate, accessibility, and surrounding influences. Nash- 
ville is very properly called the Athens of the South, because 
of the number and importance of its educational establish- 
ments. 

Fisk University has a successful history of fifteen years of 
work and growth. It has its beautiful site of twenty-five 
acres and Jubilee Hall ; Livingstone Missionary Hall is being 
erected, and now it needs adequate endowment. We present, 
to all who have money and wish to use it in the interest of 
humanity, this opportunity of investing money in a perma- 
nent form, to do a noble work in behalf of Christian educa- 
tion for the centuries to come. We invite all who desire to 
help Fisk University, to come, if possible, and see its work 
for themselves. 

The magnitude of the interests centred in such an institu- 
tion cannot be overestimated in their relations to the wel- 
fare of our own country. To the millions of recently emanci- 
pated colored people of the South niiist be given a Christian 
education, or the nation must suffer far more in the future 
than in the past from the curse of slavery. 

E„ M. CRAVATH, 

Nashville, Tenn., October^ 1880. President. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE YEAR OF JUBILEE. 

The story of the Jubilee Singers seems almost as 
little like a chapter from real life as the legend of 
the daring Argonauts who sailed with Jason on that 
famous voyage after the Golden Fleece. It is the 
story of a little company of emancipated slaves who 
set out to secure, by their singing, the fabulous sum 
of $20,000 for the impoverished and unknown school 
in which they were students. The world was as un- 
familiar to these untravelled freed people as were the 
countries through which the Argonauts had to pass ; 
the social prejudices that confronted them were as 
terrible to meet as fire-breathing bulls or the war- 
riors that sprang from the land sown with dragons* 
teeth ; and no seas were ever more tempestuous than 
the stormy experiences that for a time tested their 
faith and courage. 

They were at times without the money to buy 
needed clothing. Yet in less than three years they 



2 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

returned, bringing back with them nearly one hun- 
dred thousand dollars. They had been turned away 
from hotels, and driven out of railway waiting-rooms, 
because of their color. But they had been received 
with honor by the President of the United States, 
they had sung their slave-songs before the Queen 
of Great Britain, and they had gathered as invited 
guests about the breakfast-table of her Prime Min 
ister. Their success was as remarkable as their mis- 
sion was unique. 

The civil war which broke out in the United 
States, 1861, was avowedly waged, on one side to 
overthrow the Union of the States, and on the other 
to preserve it. But back of this object it was really 
a war, on one side to perpetuate slavery, and on the 
other to abolish it. The South understood this from 
the start. So did those at the North who were wise 
to read the signs of the times, and especially those 
who had the spiritual instinct to interpret the mean- 
ing of God's providences. 

The anti-slavery reformers, who had sought, 
through the peaceful agencies of the press, the pul- 
pit, and the platform, to secure the abolition of 
slavery, went into the war with an ardor they never 
could have felt in the struggle of a slave-holding 
nation for mere political existence. No young men 
responded to the call for troops more heartily than 
those whose boyhood homes had been stations on 
the Underground Railway — that unique line whose 
stock was never offered in market ; whose trains ran 
only by night ; whose tracks were country by-roads; 
whose coaches were plain farm wagons ; whose pas 



THE CONTRABANDS, 3 

sengers were fugitive slaves ; whose terminus was 
the free soil of Canada. The first detachment of 
Union troops that passed through Baltimore on its 
way to Washington made the streets of that sullen 
city ring with a song in honor of old John Brown, 
the abolitionist of Harper's Ferry. And regiment 
after regiment of volunteers, the pride and flower of 
half a million Northern homes, '' rallied round the 
flag, shouting the battle-cry of freedom." 

The slaves, too, utterly ignorant as they were of 
common political issues and the proportions of the 
struggle, almost everywhere and at once read the 
significance of the great conflict. Tidings of every 
turn in the fortunes of war passed from cabin to 
cabin by some mysterious telegraphy, and every 
Union victory was the signal for secret thanksgiving 
services. 

It was the natural result that the camps of the 
Union army should at once become cities of refuge 
for fugitive slaves. A New England general, who 
had been in close political alliance with the slave 
power until it raised its hand to strike down the 
Union, gave them a name and a recognized standing 
in the military lines as '' contraband of war." And 
by and by there came from the good President who 
had so patiently bided the time, the proclamation 
that made the army, in the aim as well as the inci- 
dent of its work, an army of emancipation. 

Its advance was the signal for a rally of slaves 
from all the country round to follow it, they knew 
not whither, save that it was to freedom. They 
flocked in upon the line of march by bridle-paths 
and across the fields; old men on crutches, babies 



4 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

on their mothers' backs; women wearing the cast-off 
blue jackets of Yankee cavalry-men, boys in abbre- 
viated trousers of rebel gray ; sometimes lugging 
a bundle of household goods snatched from their 
cabins as they fled, sometimes riding an old mule 
*' borrowed" from '' mas'r," but oftener altogether 
empty-handed, with nothing whatever to show for 
their life-time of unrewarded toil. But they were 
free ; and with what swinging of ragged hats, and 
tumult of rejoicing hearts and fervent '' God bless 
you's," they greeted their deHverers ! " The year of 
jubilee," of which they had sung and for which they 
had prayed and waited so many years, had come at 
last! 

By this violent emancipation of war — so different 
in its process from the peaceful abolition for which 
the friends of the slave had been so long looking 
and laboring — over four millions of bondmen were 
suddenly made free. They were homeless, penni- 
less, ignorant, improvident — unprepared in every 
way for the dangers as v/ell as the duties of free- 
dom. Self-reliance they had never had the oppor- 
tunity to learn, and, suddenly left to shift for them- 
selves, they were at the mercy of the knaves who 
were everywhere so ready to cheat them out of their 
honest earnings. They had been kept all their lives 
in a school of immorality, and even church member- 
ship was no evidence that one was not a thief, a liar, 
or a liJDcrtine. Their former masters were so im- 
poverished by their emancipation, along with the 
other costs of the war, that they had little ability — 
and were so exasperated by it that they had usually 
still less disposition — to help them. 



HUNGER FOR THE SPELLING BOOK. 5 

The task of giving these freed slaves a Christian 
education was laid mainly, therefore, upon the 
Christian people of the North. It was a missionary 
work of such magnitude and character as no people 
was ever called to take up before. Schools were 
started — even before the close of the first six 
months of the war — in little cabins, in army tents, 
in unfloored log chapels, in abandoned slave marts, 
under the open sky. Hundreds of Northern ladies, 
many of them from homes of luxury and culture, 
came to teach those degraded people the A B C's of 
the spelling-book and of Christian citizenship. 

The work was full of discomforts, difficulties, and 
danger. By the varying fortunes of war the schools 
were often broken up, and the teachers forced to 
seek safety for their lives in flight. Overworked, 
unable sometimes to obtain suitable food, shelter, or 
medical attendance, many of these brave women laid 
down their lives in the cause, as truly as a soldier 
who is buried on the field of battle. Even after the 
war they were shunned as lepers in Southern so- 
ciety, and more than one teacher was assassinated 
by the Ku Klux banditti for refusing to obey their 
anonymous warnings to give up the work and leave 
the State. 

But their mission was not without its brighter 
side. God's Spirit was often present with convert- 
ing power in the schools, and in the prayer-meetings 
that always went hand-in-hand with the schools. 
All their lives, the lash or the auction-block had 
been the swift penalty for slaves who were caught 
learning to read. Now that the fetters had fallen 
from, mind as well as body there came an eagerness 



6 THE JUBILEE SINGERb. 

to learn that was like a consuming fire. The world 
never saw such a sight before as these schools pre- 
sented. 

Families pinched with hunger asked more eagerly 
for schools than for bread. Women of threescore 
and ten sometimes mastered the alphabet in a week. 
Old men bent over the same spelling-books with 
their grandchildren. Fathers would work all day 
to support their families, and walk every night to an 
evening school miles away. Girls suspended from 
school privileges for a few days, for some wrong- 
doing, would plead instead for the penalty of a 
whipping. Their gratitude for instruction was as 
fervent as their desire for it was ravenous, and their 
attachment to their teachers was most devoted. 

The first school for the freedmen was started by 
teachers sent out for that purpose by the American 
Missionary Association. This society was formed 
in 1846, because of the acquiescent attitude towards 
slavery of most of the older missionary organiza- 
tions. It had sustained missions among the negroes 
of Jamaica and West Africa. Its home missionaries 
in the slave-holding States, while striving to reach 
both white and black with schools and the preach- 
ing of the gospel, had always faithfully borne testi- 
mony against the great sin of slavery. It had the 
confidence and support of the friends of freedom. 
And when this great task of giving more than four 
millions of freedmen a Christian education was sud- 
denly laid upon the nation, its origin, its associa- 
tions, and its past labors, all pointed to it as provi 
dentially trained up for the occasion. And to it a 
large part of the work has fallen. 



THE SCHOOLS FOR THE FREEDMEN. J 

In 1863 it had 83 ministers and teachers in this 
field; in 1864, 250; in 1868, 532. Since the work 
began it has expended about $3,000,000 in it. As 
public schools came to be opened, to some extent, 
for the colored people, and as the importance of 
permanent institutions for the training of teachers 
and ministers from among the freedmen themselves 
became more apparent, and the necessity for them 
more imperative, the Association withdrew for the 
most part from this temporary primary work, and 
concentrated its efforts upon a system of training- 
schools. 

Besides the seventeen academies and normal 
schools which it has planted at central points 
throughout the South, and which require the ser- 
vices of nearly a hundred skilled teachers, it has 
under its fostering care seven chartered institutions 
for collegiate and theological education. These are 
located in as many different States, and no two of 
them are within three hundred miles of each other. 
They are Berea College, at Berea, Kentucky ; Hamp- 
ton Institute, at Hampton, Virginia ; Fisk Univer- 
sity, at Nashville, Tennessee ; Atlanta Universit)^ 
at Atlanta, Georgia ; Talladega College, at Talla. 
dega, Alabama ; Tougaloo University, at Tougaloo, 
Mississippi ; and Straight University, at New Or- 
leans, Louisiana. 



CHAPTER II. 

THE FORLORN HOPE. 

The first steps towards the establishment of Fisk 
University were taken in the autumn of 1865. Rev. 
E. P. Smith, after rendering invaluable service to the 
Union army during the war as the Field Agent of 
the United States Christian Commission, had just 
taken up the work of Secretary of the American 
Missionary Association at Cincinnati. Rev. E. M. 
Cravath, early in the war, had exchanged the min- 
istrations of an Ohio parish for those of an army 
chaplaincy. The son of a pioneer Abolitionist, whose 
home was a busy station on the '' Underground Rail- 
way,*' and whose children Avere thus inoculated from 
their earliest days with anti-slavery convictions and 
a special interest in the colored race, his army expe- 
rience had brought him into such acquaintance with 
the needs of the Freedmen, that, at the close of the 
war, he was commissioned by the Association for 
special service in organizing its schools in the same 
department to which Mr. Smith had been assigned. 

These two met at Nashville. Carefully surveying 
the field, they were convinced that this was a cen- 
tral point where a permanent university ought to be 
planted for the higher education of the freed people, 
to equip their ministers and teachers, and to give 



AN IDEA TAKES SHAPE. 9 

their leaders in all departments of the life now open- 
ing before them a Christian training for their work. 

As the capital city of Tennessee, and as the base 
of some of the most extensive and decisive military 
operations of the war, Nashville was not only a point 
of great business, social, and political importance, 
but the centre of a large colored population. Eight 
of the thirteen formerly slave-holding States sur- 
round and actually border upon Tennessee, and in 
it and them four fifths of the freed people have their 
homes. 

To aid in starting such an important enterprise, 
there were, providentially, two other efficient friends 
of the freed people at hand, — General Clinton B. 
Fisk, the distinguished Christian soldier then in 
charge of the Freedmen's Bureau in the District of 
Kentucky and Tennessee ; and Professor John Og- 
den, formerly Principal of the Minnesota State Nor- 
mal School, and afterwards an officer in the Union 
army, but at that time resident in Nashville as the 
agent of the Western Freedmen's Aid Commission, 
— a society which was afterwards merged into the 
American Missionary Association. 

These four took hold of the work, but were met 
at the outset by two formidable difficulties. A site 
and buildings of its own were absolutely essential to 
the success of the undertaking. The Association at 
that time had no funds that it felt at liberty to in- 
vest in real estate for such an enterprise. More 
than that, the dominant element in the coummunity 
was so hostile to any effort to elevate the colored 
people, that it was next to impossible to purchase 
land for such uses. But a favorable site was found 



10 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

and secured without the purpose for which it was 
wanted being made known to the seller ;• three of 
these friends of the work becoming individually re- 
sponsible for the entire purchase-money of $16,000. 

One of the chief advantages of the location was 
the fact that it was already occupied by a group of 
one-story frame buildings, which had been erected 
and used for hospital barracks by the Union army. 
It was known that these could be obtained from the 
government, and be easily and cheaply adapted to 
the present necessities of the enterprise. And so, 
in January, 1866, the new school was opened. The 
occasion was the most notable event of the sort in 
the history of the colored people of Tennessee. Gov- 
ernor Brownlow made a short address, and other 
distinguished gentlemen in civil and military life 
were present. There was inspiration for the freed 
people in the very thought of thus founding a uni- 
versity for the emancipated slaves, who had all their 
life long been forbidden the slightest knowledge of 
letters. 

The of^cers' quarters became the home of an earn- 
est band of teachers ; the sick-wards were fitted up 
as school-rooms, and filled with hundreds of eager 
children ; the dead-house was turned into a store- 
room of supplies for the naked and hungry. And 
there was an almost pathetic romance in the work 
when a pile of rusty handcuffs and fetters from the 
abandoned slave-pen of the city came into the pos- 
session of the school, and were sold as old iron, and 
the money invested in the purchase of Testaments 
and spelling-books ! 

The number of pupils in daily attendance the first 



A BUSY HIVE. n 

year averaged over one thousand. Some who began 
the first term never ceased attendance until they had 
graduated, ten years afterwards, from a full collegiate 
course. At first the instruction was, of necessity, of 
an elementary sort. But the idea upon which the 
school was avowedly founded, of providing the high- 
est collegiate advantages, was kept prominently in 
view. In 1867 the action of the city of Nashville, 
in making some provision for public schools at which 
colored people could be educated, relieved the school 
of many of its primary pupils and opened the way 
for more perfectly carrying out the original pur- 
pose. A university charter was obtained. Some 
of the buildings which had been used as school- 
rooms were refitted as dormitories, into which stu- 
dents from abroad, eager for a higher education, at 
once began to gather. It was not long before the 
number applying for admission was greater than 
could be accommodated. 

There never was a hive of busier workers. As 
they became qualified for the work, the students 
went out to teach, — missionaries to lift up their less- 
favored fellows. Many of them in this way earned 
the money that enabled them to return again and 
go on farther with their own studies. In a single 
year as many as 10,000 children have been enrolled 
in the schools taught by teachers sent out from Fisk, 
— teachers, some of whom a little while before did 
not themselves know one letter from another ! The 
school was pervaded, too, by a religious earnestness 
that was contagious. The conversion of new stu- 
dents was confidently looked for, and more earnestly 
sought than their progress in letters. 



12 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

But along with all this success there had been a 
steadily increasing occasion of anxiety. The build- 
ings, cheaply and hastily constructed, as they were, 
for temporary uses, were falling into decay. The 
site, which had been admirably adapted for the 
earlier work of the Institution, was found unsuited 
to its permanent uses. Year by year the problem 
of obtaining funds for a new site and new buildings 
grew more and more perplexing. The necessity for 
its solution at last became imperative, and the Uni- 
versity treasurer, Mr. George L. White, undertook 
to work it out. 

Mr. White was a native of Cadiz, New York, born 
in 1838. A village blacksmith's boy, his school 
privileges were limited to what he learned in the 
public school before the age of fourteen. Like so 
many other Yankee boys while waiting for their 
work, — or while getting ready for it, — he became 
a school-teacher. He had inherited from his father 
a special love for music, and though he had never 
had any musical instruction himself, and made no 
pretensions as a vocalist, his schools were famous 
for the good singing which he had the knack of get- 
ting out of his pupils. 

Leaving the school-room for the camp, he fought 
for the Union in the bloody battles of Gettysburg 
and Chancellorsville ; and the close of the war found 
him^ in the employ of the Freedmen's Bureau at 
Nashville. He had been actively interested in Sun- 
day-school work among the freedmen, and at the 
opening of Fisk School was invited by Professor 
Ogden, its principal, to devote his leisure hours to 
the instruction of the pupils in vocal music. When 



THE STUDENT CHOIR. 1 3 

Fisk University was chartered he became its treas- 
urer — in other words, its man-of-all-work in business 
matters. 

The progress made by his large singing classes 
was a surprise and delight to him. With a presenti- 
ment, seemingly, of what was coming, he began to 
pick out the most promising voices and give them 
that special training for which his own remarkable 
range of voice, instinct for musical effect, and mag- 
netism as a drill-master so well fitted him. 

In the spring of 1867 he gave a public concert 
with his school chorus, which was a great success 
financially, and a greater one in opening the eyes of 
the white people to the possibilities that lay hidden 
in the education of the blacks. A leading daily 
interpreted the concert as evidence that the negro 
was susceptible of education, and raised the question 
whether it was not the duty of the Southern people 
to take hold of the work, instead of leaving it to 
Northern people with so many radical bees in their 
bonnets ! 

In 1868 he gave another and better concert; and 
in 1870 his now well-drilled classes rendered the 
beautiful cantata of " Esther " before a large and 
delighted assembly. Taking a part of his choir to 
Memphis, he gave a concert to an audience that 
filled the opera-house ; and another trip southward to 
Chattanooga met with equal success. 

About this time the National Teachers' Associa- 
tion of the United States held its annual convention 
in Nashville, and arrangements were made for the 
Fisk choir to sing in the opening exercises, to the 
great disgust of some who were profanely indignant 



14 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

that '^ the niggers could not be kept in their 

own places." Other musicians were to favor the 
convention v/ith their services at the subsequent 
meetings* but the singing of the "niggers" proved 
to be so popular that they were in demand for every 
session until the close of the convention. 

All this while the thought had been taking firmer 
hold of Mr. White's mind that a student choir might 
be organized, which could travel through the North 
and sing out of the people's pocket the money that 
must soon be obtained in some way for the Univer- 
sity. The plan was talked over and prayed over for 
a year or two. But, turn it to the light in any way 
they could, the risks seemed too great. 

It was one thing to give a paying concert at home, 
or to make frying trips to points not far away ; it 
was quite another to start out on a campaign that 
would certainly involve large expenses, w^hile its 
returns might be quite inadequate to meet them. 
Large expenditures would be unavoidable at the 
start — for the outfit that would be absolutely nec- 
essary for these poorly clad students, and for the 
purchase of their railway tickets to Ohio. The 
University treasury was almost empty ; the Associa- 
tion did not feel at liberty to risk funds contributed 
for missionary work in such a speculative venture. 
And it was not easy to persuade the untravelled 
parents of some of the students to risk their children 
in it. But a few clear-headed friends had faith in 
tlie plan, and, after much prayer and perplexity of 
purpose, Mr. White felt the command laid on him 
from the Lord to go forward. 

Taking the little money that was left in the Unl 



THE FOI^I.ORN HOPE STARTS. i5 

versity treasury after buying provisions to last the 
school for a few days, putting with it all his own, 
and borrowing on his own notes an amount whos^ 
payment, if the venture was a failure, would strip 
him of every penny of his property, he started out 
with barely enough money to set his pnrty in working 
order on the north side of the Ohio River. 



CHAPTER III. 

ADRIFT ON STORMY SEAS. 

The company as it left Nashville, October 6, 1871, 
followed by the good wishes, prayers, misgiv- 
ings, and anxieties of the whole University, num- 
bered thirteen persons. These were Mr. White, who 
was at the same time the captain, supercargo, pilot, 
steward, and crew of the ship ; Miss Wells, the Prin- 
cipal of an American Missionary Association school 
at Athens, Alabama, who took the oversight of the 
girls of the party ; and eleven students — Ella 
Sheppard, Maggie L. Porter, Jennie Jackson, Minnie 
Tate, Eliza Walker, Phoebe J. Anderson, Thomas 
Rutling, Benjamin M. Holmes, Greene Evans, Isaac 
P. Dickerson, and George Wells. 

The day after reaching Cincinnati the Singers 
met with the Rev. Messrs. Halley and Moore, the 
pastors of the two leading Congregational churches 
of the city, who were so delighted with their songs 
that they immediately arranged to hold praise meet- 
ings in their churches on Sunday, the next day, that 
their *people might have the pleasure of hearing 
them. Full audiences greeted them in both ser- 
vices. On Monday a free concert was given and a 
collection taken at the close. The audience was 
large but the contribution small. 



THE FIRST CONCERT. T^ 

It was on this Sunday and Monday, so well re- 
membered all over the world, that the great Chicago 
fire swept away the houses of one hundred thousand 
people and property to the value of $200,000,000. 
In Ohio, as everywhere else, people could scarcely 
think or talk about anything else, much less give 
money to any other object. 

There had not been for ten years a week that 
would have been, to all appearances, such an un- 
favorable time for the Singers to commence their 
work. Out of money and in debt as they were, 
they donated the entire proceeds of their first paid 
concert, which amounted to something less than 
$50, to the Chicago relief fund. This was_ given in 
Chillicothe, and called out a card from the Mayor 
and leading citizens cordially commending to public 
patronage the two concerts that followed. 

Here at Chillicothe they met with an indignity 
which was often repeated in the next year's expe- 
rience. Applying at one of the principal hotels 
for entertainment, they were refused admittance 
because of their color. Treated in the same way 
at a second, they only secured shelter at a third by 
the landlord's giving up his own bed- room to them 
to use as a parlor, and furnishing them their meals 
before the usua/ hour, that his other guests might 
not leave the house. This odious and cruel caste- 
spirit it was to be a part of their mission — little as 
it was in their plans and painful as it was in expe- 
rience — to break down. It was owing not a little 
to their triumphant success as singers, and to the 
story of the distinguished attentions they received 
from the people of highest rank and culture botiK 
2 



1 8 THE JUBILEE SINGERS, 

in America and Great Britain, that the prejudice 
against color, the hateful heritage of slavery, which 
was so prevalent and powerful as to make those 
insults common in their first year's work, was so 
broken down that they were quite unfrequent in 
their travels three years afterwards. People who 
would not sit in the same church-pew with a negro, 
under the magic of their song were able to get new 
light on questions of social equality. 

Returning to Cincinnati to fill engagements for 
the Sabbath they found a dense audience gathered 
at Mr. Moore's church, in spite of rainy and un- 
pleasant weather. It was hoped that the increas- 
ing enthusiasm manifested in connection with these 
praise-services would insure a good audience at the 
paid concert which had been appointed at Mozart 
Hall for Tuesday evening ; for hotel and travelling 
bills were already assuming serious proportions. 
But the receipts were barely sufficient to defray the 
local expenses of the concert. 

However, it was not altogether lost labor. *' It 
was," said one of the dailies, ** probably the first con' 
cert ever given by a colored troupe in this temple, 
which has resounded with the notes of the best 
vocalists of the land. The sweetness of the voices, 
the accuracy of the execution, and the precision of 
the time, carried the mind back to the early con- 
certs of the Hutchinsons, the Gibsons, and other 
famous families, who years ago delighted audiences 
and taught them with sentiment while they pleased 
them with melody." Jennie Jackson's rendering of 
the "Old Folks at Home," as an encore, was re- 
ceived with rapturous applause. Mr. Dickerson sang 



UPS AND DOWNS. IQ 

the " Temperance Medley" here for the first time, 
and tne class trembled for him, as he stood there 
with his knees beating a tattoo against each other, 
in a rusty coat that was as much too long for the 
fashion as his trousers were too short for neighborly 
acquaintance with his low shoes. But confidence 
came with the sound of his own voice, and the au- 
dience forgot the appearance of the singer in their 
enjoyment of his song. 

Journeying next to Springfield, to fill an appoint- 
ment for a concert at Black's Opera-house, they 
found less than twenty people gathered to hear 
them, and with heavy hearts they announced that 
they would postpone the entertainment. 

A Synod of Presbyterian ministers was in session 
here, and Mr. White obtained permission for the 
Singers to appear before them. Assigned a half- 
hour in which to sing, and state their cause, it was 
a full hour before the Synod would release them. 
And not only did they testify their delight '' in a 
vociferous, heartfelt, and decidedly unclerical man- 
ner, with hands, feet, and voice," but they passed a 
resolution " heartily commending them to the favor 
of the Christian community," and emphasized it by 
taking up a collection for their benefit of $105. 

Working their way in a zig-zag path northward, 
they gave a concert at Yellow Springs, where the 
colored Baptist church was kindly placed at their 
disposal. At Xenia two concerts yielded them $84, 
and afforded the colored students of Wilberforce 
University a stimulus that was worth, in another 
way, quite as much more. For those were days in 
which anything well done by a colored man was 



20 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

an inspiration to all the rest of his race to whose 
knowledge it came. 

At London, their singing in Springfield before the 
Synod bore fruit in the active efforts of the Presby- 
terian pastor in their behalf. The Sabbath was spent 
in Columbus, the Singers taking the place of the 
choir at one of the churches, and singing at a Sun- 
day-school concert which is remembered as an occa- 
sion of special interest. 

At Worthington they met a hearty welcome from 
Professor Ogden and his wife, their old instructors at 
Fisk, who had done work of lasting value in lying its 
foundation, but were now in charge of the Ohio State 
Normal School at that place. There they remained 
several days for much-needed rest, giving a concert 
meanwhile which, thanks specially to the active 
efforts of these two old friends, yielded $60. At 
Delaware their concert paid still better, and, for the 
first time on their trip, they were permitted to sit 
in the same parlors and at the same tables in the 
hotel as white people. Three concerts at Welling- 
ton netted them little more than enough money to 
take them on to Cleveland ; where they sang on Sun- 
day at the First Presbyterian and Plymouth Con- 
gregational churches, with the satisfaction that their 
unique praise-services invariably gave. 

All this time they were living, as the old phrase 
has it, from hand to mouth, — depending on the pro- 
ceeds of one concert to pay the next morning's hotel 
charges and buy their railway-tickets to the next 
appointment. Any special collapse in an evening's 
receipts left them helpless till some friend stepped 
forward — as there was almost always some friend in 



FRIENDS LOOK ASKANCE. 21 

such an emergency who did — and paid hall and hotel 
bills. 

But the great trial was that no light had dawned 
on their mission. They would have done better to 
stay at home if they were to make nothing above ex- 
penses. So scantily clad were they that Miss Shep- 
pard was obliged to travel one rainy day with no 
protection for her feet but cloth sHppers. It was not 
until some time after the biting weather of the North- 
ern winter, to whose severity they were quite unused^ 
had fully set in that Mr. White was able, by borrow- 
ing $5 that had been given to Minnie Tate, and pick- 
ing up $19 in other ways, to purchase overcoats for 
two of the young men, who had really been suffering 
for want of them. 

In one way and another a comfortable outfit had 
been secured for the young women ; but such were 
the varieties of style represented that it was not un- 
common for Ella Sheppard to be asked if Minnie 
Tate was her daughter, — the former being twenty 
and the latter fourteen. And Jennie Jackson, who 
was nineteen, was sometimes taken to be the mother 
of Eliza Walker, who was fourteen. 

The coolness, amounting often to indifference and 
sometimes to suspicion, with which even many of 
the warmest friends and supporters of the American 
Missionary Association looked upon this new agency 
for raising funds for its work, was one of the specially 
discouraging and trying features of the enterprise. 
Ministers were often loth, and not unnaturally, to 
let the Singers into their choirs ; and if they gave 
them the use of their churches for a praise-meeting, 
they sometimes showed a strong inclination to take 



22 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

their own seats among the audience and near the 
door! 

But Mr. White's grip upon his purpose was not 
easily loosened, and he learned to let none of those 
things move him, knowing that the enthusiasm of 
these doubting friends after the service was almost 
sure to be in about an inverse ratio to their expecta- 
tions before it. 

During these days of experiment and trial Mr. 
White was loaded down with the work of at least 
four men. In other enterprises of this sort — and 
the same plan was afterwards found to be essential 
to the largest success of the Jubilee Singers — it is 
considered necessary to have a business manager, who 
lays out the route, visits or corresponds with editors 
and public men, and arranges the general plan of the 
campaign. Then an advance agent goes forward 
and puts these plans in operation, while his alternate 
accompanies the troupe to take up the tickets, pay 
the bills, and look after the details of the evening's 
management. A musical director arranges the pro- 
gramme, drills the singers, and answers the rattling 
volley of questions from curious and admiring friends. 
And where school-girls are in the company, and es- 
pecially those hitherto unused to self-care and the 
demands of cultivated society, a governess is needed 
to look after their health and deportment. 

In those early days the duties of general manager, 
advance agent, musical director, ticket-seller, and 
porter all fell to Mr. White. When the Singers 
halted somewhere for rest, he pushed ahead to lay 
out a new route ; sometimes, when but a few appoint- 
ments remained, he left Miss Wells and Miss Shep 



DARK DA YS, %'S 

pard, the pianist, to attend to them while he went 
off to make new ones. The Singers he kept in drill 
the best he could. A rehearsal of some piece on 
their evening's programme was often the first course 
when they gathered about the dinner-table. 

With all this work on his hands, there lay on his 
heart the burden of increasing debt and the con- 
sciousness that, while the business affairs of the 
University were needing his presence, the fact that 
he was earning no money and sending them no en- 
couragement was adding to the uneasiness and anx- 
iety of his associates at home. Many a time their 
last dollar was paid out for provisions ; and he and 
they found frequent occasions to adopt the prayer 
of the old slave-song, — 

" O Lord, O my Lord, O my good Lord! 
Keep me from sinking down." 

But with a steadfast Christian faith, that seemed 
little less than obstinacy to those who could not 
read the Divine leadings, he held on. 



CHAPTER IV. 

LIGHT IN THE EAST. 

Mr. White had laid out the plan of his trip with 
special reference to reaching Oberlin in time to sing 
before the National Council of the Congregational 
churches, which was to assemble there on the 15 th 
of November. Consisting, as it would, of leading 
Congregational ministers and laymen from all parts 
of the land, and specially representing the constitu- 
ency of the American Missionary Association, he 
argued that to get a hearing before it would give 
him leverage of great advantage for his work. And 
his reasoning was not at fault. 

The Council consented to hear a few pieces dur- 
ing a recess in their deliberations. Everybody was 
delighted. A collection of over $130 was taken upon 
the spot ; and the seed sown was destined to bear 
much richer fruit after many days. Two of the sec- 
retaries of the Association v/ere present, and they 
agreed that it v/as advisable for Mr. White to push 
on eastward. To relieve him of some of his over- 
load of care, Mr. G. S. Pope, formerly in the service 
of the Association in its work among the freedmen, 
but now a theological student at Oberlin, was en- 
gaged to attend to the duties of advance agent. 

From Oberlin the company went to Cleveland to 



FRIENDS IN NEED. 2 5 

give two concerts in Case Hall. The churches had 
been filled the Sunday before to listen to the 
Singers, but at neither concert were the receipts 
sufficient to meet expenses. Before the close of the 
second evening's entertainment, on Saturday night, 
Mr. White made a few remarks explaining their 
mission, declaring his faith that God had called 
them to the work, and would somehow open the 
way; but frankly admitting that he had barely 
money enough to pay for the hall, and nothing with 
which to meet their hotel bills over Sunday and 
their expenses to Columbus, where they were ad- 
vertised for a concert. Before leaving the hall one 
gentleman sent up a check for $ioo, written on the 
back of a programme, and three others handed him 
$40 more. 

This gave encouragement at a time when en- 
couragement was never more needed. For it is to 
be remembered that the m^ovements of the Singers 
involved great expense. Case Hall rents for S75 ^i 
night ; to advertise a concert in such a city costs 
from $25 to I50 : and the hotel bills of the company 
were usually from $20 to I25 a day. There was 
abundant use, it will be seen, for the Si 40. 

At Columbus came two concerts, again, which did 
not pay expenses. Rev. H. S. Bennett, the pastor 
of the church at Nashville to which some of the 
Singers belonged, and also a trustee of the Univer- 
sity, was present, and a prayer-meeting was held to 
seek the Divine guidance in deciding what should 
be done with the enterprise. No hght was found 
on any other course but to go forward. 

Hitherto the company had had no distinctive name. 



26 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

They had been mentioned in a Cincinnati paper as 
'' a band of negro minstrels who call themselves 
Colored Christian Singers." It was at Columbus, 
after an anxious and almost sleepless night, that 
Mr. White decided to name them ''The Jubilee 
Singers." The Old Testament " year of jubilee" 
had always been the favorite figure of speech into 
which the slaves put their prayers and hopes for 
emancipation. Their year of jubilee had come — 
this little band of singers was a witness to it, an out- 
growth of it. There was thus a suggestiveness and 
obvious fitness in the name — it had a flavor of its 
own. There was a musical euphony in it, too, and 
it " took" at once. 

Only those who have made a study of catering for 
the public taste can realize how much there is in a 
name. A novelist knows that the sale of a new 
story depends almost as much upon its title as its 
plot. Those who have been most closely associated 
with the Singers have come to believe that Mr. 
White's christening of his company was the best 
night's work he ever did. 

At Zanesville, also, their concert did not meet ex- 
penses. But a friend paid their hotel bill, which 
amounted to $27. What figure it would have 
reached had not the six girls been put into a single 
room over a shed, where the bedclothing was so of- 
fensive that they were constrained to roll the most 
of it in a bundle and lay it on the porch while they 
slept wrapped in their waterproofs, is not known. 

Mount Vernon was their next point, where Rev. 
T. E. Monroe, who had met them at Columbus, wel- 
comed them heartily to his church on Sunday, and 



.3 LlTl^LE LIGHT, 2J 

aided to make their concert on Monday evening a 
decided success. Here Ella Sheppard, who had 
been for some time in poor health, became so ill 
that the physician advised that she return at once 
to Nashville. But Mr. White could not be made to 
believe that the Lord wanted the company to go 
East without their pianist, and declined to follow 
this advice. And in a few days she recovered suffi- 
ciently to resume her work. 

Feehng their way to the best method of raising 
money, the experiment was tried again, at Mans- 
field, of a free concert with a collection at its close. 
But the result was the same as almost invariably at- 
tended this expedient before and since — the house 
was full, the contribution boxes nearly empty. On 
the next night an admission fee was charged, but 
the audience was small. Some thoughtful friend 
was moved, however, to propose a collection and it 
enabled Mr. White to pay all bills and buy tickets 
to Akron, where they had an appointment for a con- 
cert on the evening of Thanksgiving Day. This 
yielded only $20, but the consideration with which 
they were treated at the hotel, and the fine Thanks- 
giving dinner which was set before them, made their 
memories of Akron very pleasant ones. At Mead- 
ville. Pa., their Sabbath services in the Methodist 
Church were well attended, and their concert on 
Monday evening moderately successful. 

Still moving eastward, they came next to James- 
town, N.Y., where the Congregational pastor, Rev. 
Col. Anderson, who was familiar from personal in- 
spection with the good work that was being done at 
Fisk, had made ready for them. A praise-meeting 



28 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

at his church was followed, on the next two nights^ 
by concerts. In spite of a severe snow-storm, which 
interfered greatly with street travel, the net receipts 
were sufficient for the purchase of tickets to New 
York City. 

Stopping at Elmira, they held a praise-meeting on 
Sunday afternoon in the First Presbyterian Church, 
to the disgust of a few of its supporters who spelled 
negro with two g's, and stayed away from the ser- 
vice, and to the great delight of all who attended. 
In the evening they sang a few selections at the 
Rev. T. K. Beecher's regular service in the opera- 
house ; and the next night gave a concert at his 
church, which was the greatest success, so far, of 
their trip. The leading hotels of the city had, it is 
true, one after another refused the party entertain- 
ment when they arrived on the midnight train. But 
the papers were lavish in praise of their services 
of song, and Mr. Beecher wrote a letter to his distin- 
guished Brooklyn brother, Flenry Ward Beecher, 
warmly commending them to his attention. 

The night had been long and dark, but it really 
seemed as if these flashes of light in their Eastern 
sky meant that the sunrise was at hand. At New 
York they were at the headquarters of the American 
Missionary Association, and so in a special sense 
among their friends. As no good hotel accommoda- 
tions could be secured at reasonable rates, three of 
the officers of the Association, who lived in adjoin- 
ing houses in Brooklyn, took the party into their 
own families. And there they found a home for the 
next six weeks. 

Prior to their arrival at New York, Rev. George 



'' BEECHER'S NEGRO MINSTRELSY 29 

Whipple, the senior secretary of the American Mis- 
sionary Association, had arranged with Rev. Henry 
Ward Beecher that they should attend his Friday 
evening prayer-meeting and sing a few slave-hymns 
at the close of the service. Mr. Beecher and his 
people were delighted. After singing about twenty 
minutes, the party started to retire from the plat- 
form. Mr. Beecher, jumping up, requested them to 
return. Standing in front of them, with pocket-book 
in hand, he indicated, with characteristic drollery 
and enthusiasm, that a collection would be taken up, 
after which they would have a few more songs. Be- 
fore the meeting closed he announced that this was 
but a foretaste of what was to come: the Singers 
were to give a concert in the church the next week^ 
and the congregation were to give them a benefit. 

As Mr. Beecher's lecture-room talks were widely 
circulated through the papers, this resulted in a very 
favorable introduction to the public. The concert 
at Plymouth Church was well attended, and the en- 
thusiam unbounded. Mn Beecher had urged his 
people from the pulpit the preceding Sabbath to 
give the Singers a hearty welcome, and they seemed 
bent on gratifying him to the utmost. The New 
York Herald headed the column containing its 
report the next morning " Beecher's Negro Min- 
strels." This helped to advertise their work, while 
it did not prejudice it in the minds of the Christian 
people whose opinion was worth most to it. 

The experience of the next few weeks was as uni- 
formly encouraging as that of the last two months 
had been depressing. A few songs in a prayer- 
meeting or Sunday-school, with a brief explanation 



30 THE JUBILEE SINGERS, 

of their mission, generally secured at once the offei' 
of the church for a concert, and a hearty commenda- 
tion of their work from the pulpit that rarely failed 
to bring out an audience. 

From Dr. Talmage's and Dr. Cuyler's prayer- 
meetings they went away richer by generous contri- 
butions on the spot. Dr. Storrs gave up his Sunday 
evening service for their praise-meeting. Dr. Scud- 
der invited them into his church. A concert in Dr. 
Burchard's church, the Thirteenth Street Presbyte- 
rian of New York, was thronged by a delighted au- 
dience of the highest culture and social position. 
Dr. Budington interested himself in promoting the 
success of a concert in his church in Brooklyn. At 
the Tabernacle Church, Jersey City, of which Rev. 
G. B. Willcox, a member of the Executive Committee 
of the American Missionary Association, was pastor, 
they were greeted by the largest audience that had 
ever yet attended one of their paid concerts — the 
receipts amounting to nearly $740. 

Preliminary to a flying trip to Boston to give a 
concert in the Music Hall, in connection with the 
annual Methodist Reunion, Mr. Beecher wrote to a 
Boston friend : '* They will charm any audience, 
sure ; they make their mark by giving the ' spirituals ' 
and plantation hymns as only they can sing them 
who know how to keep time to a master's whip. 
Our people have been delighted." And in a lecture 
which he delivered in Boston just before their com- 
ing Mr. Beecher took occasion to advise everybody 
to attend. 

Dr. Cuyler wrote to the New York Tribune of 
their concert in his church, the Lafayette Avenue 



GOOD PROSPECTS. 31 

Presbyterian of Brooklyn : " I never saw a cultivated 
Brooklyn assemblage so moved and melted under 
the magnetism of music before. The wild melodies 
of these emancipated slaves touched the fount of 
tears, and gray-haired men wept like little children. 
Their wonderful skill was put to the severest test 
when they attempted * Home, Sweet Home,' before 
auditors who had heard those same household words 
from the lips of Jenny Lind and Parepa. Yet these 
emancipated bond-women — now that they know 
what the word * home ' signifies — rendered that dear 
old song with a power and pathos never surpassed. 
Allow me to bespeak a universal welcome through 
the North for these living representatives of the only 
true native school of American music. We have 
long enough had its coarse caricatures in corked 
faces ; our people can now listen to the genuine 
soul-music of the slave cabins, before the Lord led 
his children ' out of the land of Egypt, out of the 
house of bondage ! ' " 

The news of their successes at this metropolitan 
centre of business enterprise, social culture, and 
Christian wor^, layed out, of course, in every direc- 
tion. Thenceforward a part of the heavy load that 
they had previously carried steadily grew lighter, — 
the labor of creating a demand for their entertain- 
ments wherever they offered them. Their enterprise 
was nearly out of debt, and the company were in 
that excellent working order which such an inspirit- 
ing change in their prospects might be expected to 
promote. A campaign through the principal towns 
of Connecticut was planned. Rev. G. D. Pike, one 
of the district secretaries of the American Missionary 



32 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

Association, as well as its other officers, had been 
actively interested in the work in and about New 
York. As Connecticut was in his district, he offered 
the Singers his services on this trip, which his spe- 
cial acquaintance with the field, as well as his busi- 
ness tact and energy, made most welcome. High 
hopes were cherished that they might be able to 
raise $500 a week above their expenses. 



CHAPTER V. 

SUCCESS AT LAST. 

This campaign was a succession of triumph?. 
The Singers, with their experiences of the last three 
months so vividly in remembrance, seemed to them- 
selves to be walking in a dream. Mr. White had 
expected success, but even he had not daredto hope 
for such a success as this. Ministers everywhere — 
and especially those who had cheered the Singers at 
Oberlin with their applause and contributions, and 
so felt a sort of proprietary interest m the work — 
gave themselves enthusiastically to promote arrange- 
ments for their concerts. And the audiences that 
crowded the churches and halls where they sang did 
not seem to be content merely with contributing an 
admission fee to their funds. 

Almost a furore for making them presents broke 
out, and spread from town to town as they went. 
At Bristol, famous for its manufacture of clocks, a 
gentleman pledged a supply of that useful article 
for the new Hall on its completion. At Winsted, 
another manufacturing centre, a few friends pro- 
mised a bell. The Douglass Manufacturing Co., at 
Middletown, asked the party to take from its cata- 
logue whatever goods the University might need. 
The Mcriden Britannia Co. gave them a full outfit 



34 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

of silver ware for the dining-hall ; another Merlden 
firm contributed gas fixtures ; and a president of one 
of the Meriden banks sent word that while he could 
not invite them to take us much as they might need 
from the bank, yet if they would call he would make 
them a present of $ioo. 

Several gentlemen in Birmingham contributed $50 
each to fit up a '' Birmingham Recitation Room" in 
the new building. At the concert in Waterbury, two 
gentlemen sent up $200; and the contributions, in 
cash and valuables, at the concert in New Haven 
amounted to $500. 

Here at New Haven the enthusiasm seemed to 
touch high-water mark. Two of the principal hotels 
had declined to entertain the Singers on account of 
their color. The fact became public through the 
papers, and some of the famiHes of highest social 
position in the city at once opened their doors to 
receive them. Their concert was announced for 
Thursday evening. By Tuesday morning all the de- 
sirable seats were sold. Rev. Heniy Ward Beecher 
was advertised for a lecture on the same night. But 
there was so little demand for the tickets that Thurs- 
day's papers announced that the lecture would be 
deferred on account of the concert ! Mr. Beecher 
attended the concert and made one of his felicitous 
speeches. No one was apparently more delighted 
than he that a day had come in that university city 
when, a company of freed slave singers could draw 
an audience away from the greatest preacher and 
lecturer in the land. 

The admission receipts at this concert were over 
1200. The collection taken for them the next 



INSULTS AND HONORS. 35 

Sunday evening, in the Second Congregational 
Church in Norwich, was the largest contribution 
they had ever received at a Sunday service, and the 
gross income of the last seven days of this Connect- 
icut campaign exceeded $3900. 

At the Sterling House, in Bridgeport, the party 
were assigned to some of the best rooms in that first- 
class hotel, and admitted to the same privileges in 
the dining-room as the most aristocratic guests. 
The answer of the proprietor, when asked if his 
boarders complained of such attentions to colored 
people, was pithy and to the point, "/ keep this 
hotel, sir!" 

At Norwich they were the guests of Connecticut's 
distinguished War Governor and Senator, the late 
Hon. William A. Buckingham. But the very next 
day they were turned out of a hotel in Newark, New 
Jersey, by a publican who would have felt honored 
by even a bow from Governor Buckingham on the 
street. This tavern-keeper had inferred, it seems, 
when accommodations were engaged for them in ad- 
vance, that they were a company of '' nigger min- 
strels." Although they had already retired to the 
rooms assigned to them before he discovered that 
their faces were colored by their Creator, and not 
with burnt cork, he promptly drove them into the 
street. 

The outrage was the harder to bear because they 
were in special need of rest ; for they had been 
riding all night, and their nervous energies were 
well-nigh exhausted after the draught which the un- 
usual excitement and success of the last few weeks 
had made upon them. The best citizens of Newark 



36 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

visited their indignation without stint on the land- 
lord. Some of his most valuable patrons immedi- 
ately left the house ; and it is said that the city- 
council took advantage of the favorable feeling 
toward colored people thus stimulated to pass an 
ordinance opening to them all the privileges of the 
public schools. 

A visit to Washington followed, which was no 
exception to the success which had of late so stead- 
ily attended them. The Vice-President, with his 
family, and many members of Congress, came to 
their concerts^. The President turned aside from 
pressing public duties to give them audience at the 
White House, assure them of his interest in their 
work, and hear them sing, '' Go down, Moses." 
" Parson Brownlow," the famous Unionist Senator 
from their own State, was so ill as to be unable to 
sit up, but received them in his sick-room, and cried 
like a child as these emancipated slaves sang that 
pleading, pathetic song of sorrow, — 

" O Lord, O my Lord, O my good Lord! 
Keep me from sinking down." 

Returning again to New York, a series of concerts 
culminated in two memorable gatherings at Stein- 
way Hall. The platform each evening was occupied 
by some of the most eminent divines of the metrop- 
olis, and the gt 12X hall was filled with a delighted 
audience in which the dite of the city was largely 
represented. Many went away unable to obtain 
seats. 

By this time the business methods and machinery 
of concert work had been thoroughly perfected. Mr. 
Pike was relieved from the duties of his secretary- 



SECRET OF THE SUCCESS. 37 

ship to continue in this enterprise, for which he had 
shown such aptitude, and which was to owe so much 
of its subsequent success to his energy and sagacity. 
There was need that Miss Wells should return to 
her school in Alabama ; and Miss Susan Gilbert, 
who had been for some years in the service of the 
Association in North Carolina, and afterwards at its 
home office, took her place. 

The Singers at last had the tide in their favor. 
They were now so well known that they did not 
need to sing to half-filled halls until they could 
make a reputation. Their songs were unique, and 
people did not tire of hearing them over and over 
again. Thanks to Mr. White's unusual skill, both 
in choosing voices and drilling them, their singing, 
as all the critics agreed, was something wonderful in 
its harmony, power, and bell-like sweetness. 

Their history as emancipated slaves touched the 
interest and sympathy of the public, particularly 
that part of it which had been interested in the 
great anti-slavery struggle. And last, but by no 
means least, in accounting for their success, they 
furnished a refined and wholesome entertainment, 
which Christian people who did not care to visit 
the theatre and kindred places of amusement could 
attend and enjoy. There was need of, and a wide 
demand for, just such healthful and elevating diver- 
sion as these concerts afforded. 

Beginning with several concerts in Boston, they 
now visited successively the more prominent points 
in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and a number 
of places in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, 
meeting everywhere an enthusiasm and a helriful- 



38 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

ness from friends not unlike that by which they 
were borne through Connecticut the month pre- 
vious. 

Among the presents received in Boston was a 
$1000 organ for the University, from Smith Broth- 
ers. Hon. A. C. Barstow of Providence had heard 
them at OberHn, and tendered them the use of his 
beautiful music-hall at that city, where their con- 
certs were one repeated ovation. Returning to the 
same city some days subsequently, after singing at 
Worcester, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, Wakefield, An- 
dover, Cambridgeport, Taunton, and other points, 
another concert yielded them about $1000. 

At Andover and Taunton the good-will of the 
people took the shape of contributions for the pur- 
chase of books for the University library. Reach- 
ing Boston again, $1235 was taken in at a matme'c 
on Saturday afternoon, the largest sum ever realized 
up to that time from the admission receipts alone of 
any one entertainment. 

Their songs, which had been written out for the 
first time by Prof. Theodore F. Seward, the distin- 
guished teacher and composer, and published in 
book form, were sold by hundreds at their concerts, 
and hills and valleys, parlors and halls, wherever 
they went, were vocal with the Jubilee melodies. 

After a week spent in Cambridge, Chelsea, Salem, 
and Newburyport, they visited Portland, Maine, 
where the Council tendered them the free use of the 
city hall. Remunerative concerts followed at Con- 
cord and Hanover, New Hampshire ; St. Johnsbury, 
Vermont ; and Springfield, Massachusetts, the latter 
yielding $1050. With a night at Troy, New York 



HOME AG Am. 39 

and another at Poughkeepsie, the first season's 
singing campaign closed. The fruit of these three 
months' work was $20,000, more than three times 
as much as their enthusiasm had dared hope for 
when starting out from New York on the Connecti- 
cut campaign. 

It was a tired but light-hearted party that now 
started homeward. They had bought first-class 
tickets from New York to Nashville, and on arriving 
at the station in Louisville early in the morning, 
entered the unoccupied sittingroom assigned to 
first-class passengers. A railway employe, coming 
along soon afterwards, gave notice that " niggers" 
were not allowed in that room, and ordered the 
party out. Mr. White claimed the right to keep 
his company there by virtue of their tickets, and 
declined to leave until turned out by some responsi- 
ble authority. Thereupon a policeman was brought, 
who, with angry profanity, ejected them from the 
room, amid the applause of a cursing mob of one 
or two thousand people. The superintendent of the 
road, however, as he has made a habit of doing ever 
since when the party have had occasion to pass on 
his line, placed a first-class car at their disposal. 
The novel sight of such a carriage with colored 
faces at almost every window made a sensation at 
every station where they stopped. 

The company was received at the University with 
a joy and thanksgiving that cannot be described. 
They had gone forth weeping; but they returned 
bringing their sheaves with them — a marvellous 
harvest after those months of marvellous patience, 
privation, and triumph 



CHAPTER VI. 

THE SECOND CAMPAIGN. 

Under God's blessing their labors had saved the 
University from suspending, or even curtailing, its 
work. But their success, so far, in raising money, 
was chiefly valuable as evidence that a way had been 
found for obtaining the much larger sum that the 
necessities of the growing work required. The 
Singers had received an invitation to participate in 
the second World's Peace Jubilee, to be held in Bos- 
ton in June. Stopping in Nashville little more than 
a week, they again took the field. Giving a few 
concerts in Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio, they went 
on to Boston. Parts had been assigned them on 
the programmes of several days' exercises. The 
immense audience of 40,000 people was gathered 
from all parts of the land ; and the color prejudice 
that had followed the Singers everywhere reappeared 
here in the shower of brutal hisses that greeted their 
first appearance. But the air of that radical New 
England city is not kindly to colorphobia, and a 
delug-e of applause answered and drowned the in- 
sult. And a day or two after the Singers had a 
proud revenge. 

Mrs. Julia Ward Howe's stirring lyric, ''The Bat- 
tle-hymn of the Republic," was on the programme, 



AN INSULT ANSWERED. 4t 

to be sung to the air of *' John Brown." The first 
verses were to be taken by some colored singers of 
Boston. But for some unexplained reason the key 
was given to the orchestra in E-fiat, cruelly high 
under such circumstances, and the first verses were 
a painful failure. The Jubilee Singers were to come 
in with the verse beginning 
"He hath sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat." 

Fired by the remembrance of their reception on 
the previous day, and feeling that to some extent 
the reputation of their color was at stake, they sang 
as if inspired. Mr. White's masterly drill had made 
easy to them the high notes on which the others had 
failed. Every word of that first line rang through 
the great Coliseum as if sounded out of a trumpet. 
The great audience were carried away on a whirl- 
wind of delight ; the trained musicians in the or- 
chestra bent forward in forgetfulness of their parts ; 
and one old German was conspicuous, holding his 
violoncello above his head with one hand, and whack- 
ing out upon it his applause with the bow held in 
the other. 

When the grand old chorus, " Glory, glory, halle- 
lujah," followed, with a swelling volume of music 
from the great orchestra, the thunder of the bands, 
and the roar of the artillery, the scene was inde- 
scribable. Twenty thousand people were on their 
feet. Ladies waved their handkerchiefs. Men threw 
their hats in the air, and the Coliseum rang with 
cheers and shouts of " The Jubilees! The Jubilees 
forever!" Mr. Gilmore brought the Singers from 
their place below, and massed them upon his own 
platform, where they sang the remaining verses. 



42 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

Mr. White has never quite forgiven himself that 
he did not answer the thunderous encore that fol- 
lowed with *' John Brown" in the original version ! 
Musically speaking, it was the greatest triumph of 
their career, and they never recall it yet without a 
gleaming eye and quickened pulse. It was worth 
more than a Congressional enactment in bringing 
that audience to the true ground on the question of 
" civil rights." 

The number of the Singers had been increased to 
fourteen, with a view to division into two companies 
when it was desired to visit the smaller places where 
it would not pay to take the full number ; and the 
rest of the summer was spent in rest and drill at 
Acton, Mass. A faithful trial, during the fall, of 
the experiment of two small companies little more 
than paid expenses ; and at New Year's Day the 
troupe was reorganized, to consist of eleven mem- 
bers, as follows : Ella Sheppard, Maggie L. Porter, 
Jennie Jackson, Mabel Lewis, Minnie Tate, Georgia 
Gordon, Julia Jackson, Thomas Rutling, Edmund 
Watkins, Benjamin M. Holmes, and Isaac P. Dick- 
erson. 

A busy and successful campaign of three months 
followed. The Singers received a letter, drawn up 
at the suggestion of their distinguished and faithful 
friend, Hon. George H. Stuart of Philadelphia, and 
signed by such representative citizens as Mr. Stuart, 
Jay Cooke, Rev. Dr. Hawes, Bishop Simpson, Rev. 
Dr. Newton, John Wanamaker, etc., inviting them 
to visit that city. 

The Academy of Music, one of the finest halls in 
the United States, had been refused a few months 



THE VISIT TO PHILADELPHIA. 43 

before for an address by a United States senator, 
because he was a black man. But the names of the 
distinguished citizens by whose invitation the Sing- 
ers came to the city were sufficient to secure it for 
their concerts ; and the fact that they were the first 
representatives of the colored race to occupy that 
platform gave a special significance to the occasion. 
The great building was thronged night after night, 
and it was one of the most profitable series of con- 
certs ever given by the Singers. 

Application had been made to several of the lead- 
ing hotels for the entertainment of the party. But 
no hotel-keeper had been found v/ith the convictions 
and courage to risk the odium he might incur if he 
admitted colored guests, and they had been com- 
pelled to take up inconvenient and insufficient quar- 
ters in a small boarding-house. This fact being 
mentioned at one of the concerts, the proprietor of 
the Continental, the best hotel in the city, who was 
absent when application was made at his office, at 
once announced that the Singers were welcome to as 
good accommodations as his house afforded. Sub- 
sequently he entertained them in the best manner, 
and at a generous reduction from regular rates. 

While stopping at the Continental, the house- 
keeper one day kindly escorted the party on a semi- 
subterranean tour through the kitchen and other 
working departments of the great hotel. They were 
much interested in the novel sight, and asked per- 
mission to invite the working force of the hotel to 
their dining-room, that they might sing for them. 
Word came to the guests of the hotel of what was 
going on, and they gathered about the doors of the 



44 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

crowded room, begging that the concert might be 
adjourned to the larger dining-room. The Singers 
acquiesced on condition that their invited hearers, 
white and black, should have the front places. There 
probably was never a Jubilee concert that gave more 
pleasure to the occupants of the " reserved seats ;" 
nor to the rest of the audience, for that matter. 

At a concert to be given soon after, in the Ma- 
sonic Hall, Baltimore, a city noted for its intense 
pro-slavery feeling, the ticket-seller, acting in accord- 
ance with Baltimore usages, had taken upon himself 
the responsibility of refusing to sell reserved seats 
to colored people. This came to the ears of the 
company when they reached the city the day of the 
concert, and one of the Singers was sent incognito to 
the ticket-ofifice to buy a reserved seat, and test the 
truth of the story. His application for a seat to 
hear himself sing was refused ! 

Here was evidently a call to do a little missionary 
work, as well as furnish some entertainment for the 
people of Baltimore. The ticket-seller was relieved 
from further duty, and notice was immediately given 
that any well-behaved person could have any seat in 
the hall by paying the advertised price for it. A 
few colored people occupied reserved seats here and 
there on the main floor, but it was never heard that 
any one received harm from such a radical innova- 
tion in Baltimore customs. The audience were ap- 
parently so interested in the singing that they for- 
got to study the color of their neighbors' faces. 

The Singers were accustomed to being refused 
entertainment at hotels because of their color.^ This 
was not always, however, for fear merely of offend- 



FIGHTING THE CASTE SPIRIT. 45 

ing other guests. In one case, in Illinois, the hotel 
servants squarely refused to wait on the '-'■ nagurs," 
as they pronounced the word, and the Singers were 
their own boot-blacks and chamber-maids. At an- 
other hotel the landlord met a similar refusal by pay- 
ing the mutineers their wages and sending them en- 
viasse into the street. 

But the most offensive manifestation of caste prej- 
udice that ever flaunted itself in the face of the party 
occurred during this campaign, at Princeton, N. J. 
They had been invited by President McCosh, and 
other members of the Faculty of Princeton College, 
to visit the place, and one of the churches had been 
tendered them for their concert. A little while be- 
fore it was time for the concert to begin, they 
learned that an out-of-the-way corner of the church 
had been set aside for colored people, and that they 
were refused admission to any other part of the 
house. An estimable lady, who was a teacher in a 
colored mission school, had bought reserved seats for 
her class; but they, too, were compelled to take 
their place in the colored quarter under the gallery, 
regardless of the contract involved in the tickets 
which they held. The singers were so indignant 
that they would gladly have given up the concert. 
The fact that so many old friends of the slave had 
come from long distances to hear them alone per- 
suaded them to go on. 

During two seasons of concerts they had never 
before been subjected to this indignity, even in a 
public hall ; that it should be offered in a church of 
Christ was a grievance not to be passed over in si- 
lence, and Mr. White took occasion, in an interval 



46 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

of the concert, to characterize it in the terms it de- 
served. It was plainer preaching on that subject, 
probably, than had ever been heard in that church 
before. And most of those who greeted it with 
their angry hisses have doubtless already lived long 
enough to be heartily ashamed of them. 

A tract of twenty-five acres, on a commanding 
site overlooking the city of Nashville, had been 
purchased for the permanent location of Fisk Uni- 
versity. During the war the eminence had been 
crowned by Fort Gillem, one of the encircling line 
of fortifications that had defended the city in the 
memorable contests that had raged around it. The 
students had worked with the laborers to level the 
earthworks, and the foundations had been laid for a 
noble building for university purposes, to be called 
Jubilee Hall. 

The project of visiting England with a view to 
raising funds for its completion, had been for some 
time under prayerful consideration. During the 
winter campaign it was decided to start early in the 
spring, and the closing work of the season took the 
shape of farewell concerts in New York, Brooklyn, 
Boston, Providence, and elsewhere. One given in 
Boston, March 26th, in response to a request signed 
by Governor Claflin, Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd 
Garrison, Rev. E. E. Hale, Dr. Kirk, Phillips Brooks, 
and several other eminent citizens, was the most suc- 
cessful, financially, that the Singers had ever given 
in that city. 

And so the winter's work drew to a close. Its net 
result was the addition of another $20,000 to their 
fund, making $40,000 that they had now secured. 



PREPARING TO GO ABROAD. 47 

With exultation and thankfulness as they thought 
of past success, and with high hopes for the future, 
preparations were at once made for the visit to Great 
Britain. Very cordial letters of introduction, com- 
mending the music and mission of the Singers, were 
given by the governors of five of the New England 
States, Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, Hon. George H. 
Stuart, George Macdonald, — then on a lecturing tour 
in America, — and other influential friends. An open 
letter from Governor Brown of Tennessee, bespeak- 
ing favor for their work, was especially valuable as 
coming from the chief magistrate of a common- 
wealth that was so recently a slave State. 

They were not to get away, however, without still 
another conflict with caste prejudices. Cabin ac- 
commodations were refused the party by one after 
another of the leading ocean steamship lines. At 
last an application to the Cunard agents at Boston 
met with ready success; and when the Singers 
stepped on the deck of the good steamer Batavia, it 
was to enter upon a year's experience where such 
annoyances were to be unknown. 



CHAPTER VII. 

THE FIRST VISIT TO LONDON. 

A STUDY of the situation, on Mr. Pike's arrival in 
London in advance of the Singers, made it at once 
apparent that the indorsement and patronage of dis- 
tinguished people, which had been such a helpful 
feature of the work in America, were still more indis- 
pensable to an early and large success in England. 
Under a favoring Providence, the letters of intro- 
duction previously mentioned speedily opened the 
way to all of the assistance of this sort that could 
have been hoped for. 

The Earl of Shaftesbury, than whom no man in 
any station, on either side of the Atlantic, has given 
his life more untiringly and unselfishly to every spe- 
cies of philanthropic effort, at once manifested much 
interest in the enterprise. There was no one else 
in the kingdom whose rank, relations, and reputation 
would combine to make him such a valuable patron 
and friend. He was President of the Freedmen's 
Missions Aid Society, the English organization aux- 
iliary to the American Missionary Association. In 
accordance with his advice, arrangements were made 
for a private concert at Willis's Rooms on the after- 
noon of the 6th of May. Cards of invitation, issued 
in the name of the Earl of Shaftesbury and the Com- 



THE FIRST VISIT TO LONDON. 49 

mittee of the Society, were sent to the nobility, 
members o'' ParHament, the leading clergymen of 
different denominations, editors, and other persons 
of influence likely to be interested in such a cause. 
The visit to London had been timed with a view to 
reaching the influential ministers and laymen from 
all parts of the kingdom who throng there during 
the May anniversaries. Mr. Pike — and Rev. James 
Powell, who, being of English birth and used to 
English ways, had come with him to aid in launching 
the enterprise in foreign waters — had spent nearly 
a month in stirring up an interest through the press 
and in private effort. 

When the time for the concert came the hall was 
filled with a distinguished assemblage. The Singers, 
keenly eager to justify the promises made on their 
behalf, did their best. 

Before the programme was half finished they had 
carried their audience by storm. At the close con- 
gratulations were lavished upon them, and offers of 
cooperation were abundant. The Duke and Duchess 
of Argyll were foremost in expressing a desire to 
assist them, and before leaving the hall, arranged 
for a visit of the Singers to Argyll Lodge the next 
day. The leading dailies, the Times, the Standard, 
the News, the Telegraph, on the next morning gave 
cordial praise of the entertainment. Through this 
first concert, and the distinguished hospitalities to 
which it led, the Singers found themselves at once 
introduced to the British public under the most fav- 
oring auspices. ' 

The visit to Argyll Lodge was destined to be a 
more notable event than they, even in their great 

4 



50 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

gratincation at what was apparent in the invitation, 
couid at all foresee. The kind attentions with which 
they were received in the drawing-room were strik- 
ingly in contrast with their experiences of recent 
date in American hotels and railway stations. But 
what was their surprise and delight to learn, after a 
little time pleasantly spent in conversation with 
their noble hosts and other guests, that the Queen 
had been asked to be present and was expected 
soon ! 

They had been told, again and again, that if they 
could but sing before the Queen their success would 
be assured. But how to secure her notice for a 
company of young freed people, singers who had 
nothing of more renown to offer than the prayer- 
meeting hymns which they had learned in bondage, 
was a problem on which no light whatever had been 
cast until it lay suddenly solved before them. 

Soon after her Majesty's arrival the Duke in- 
formed them that she would be pleased to see them 
in an adjoining room. At his request they sang, 
first, '^ Steal away to Jesus ;" then chanted the 
Lord's Prayer, and sang " Go down, Moses." The 
Queen listened with manifest pleasure, and, as they 
withdrew, communicated through the Duke her 
thanks for the gratification they had given her. 
There was no stage parade or theatric pomp in the 
scene ; but the spectacle of England's Queen coming 
from* her palace to listen to the songs which these 
humble students learned in their slave cabins, and 
that not merely for her own entertainment, but to 
encourage them in their efforts to lift up their fellow 
freed people, was worthy a place in history. 



DISTINGUISHED HOSPITALITIES. $1 

Other hospitalities made the next three months of 
their stay in London memorable. Probably no pri- 
vate party of Americans was ever before treated 
with such distinguished attention. It was not pos- 
sible for them to accept all of the invitations of this 
nature which they received. While at Argyll Lodge 
Dean Stanley invited them to visit the Deanery at 
Westminster Abbey, a pleasure which they realized 
a few days after. 

An afternoon was spent at the delightful home of 
Samuel Gurney, the distinguished Quaker abolition- 
ist, near Regent's Park, introducing the Singers to a 
large party who were Friends in truth as well as 
name. To no one did the mission of the Singers 
mean more than to the noble circle of Quakers, who 
had all their lives long been such devoted friends of 
the oppressed. 

Mr. George Macdonald, the distinguished novel- 
ist, gave them a welcome invitation to his beautiful 
home on the banks of the Thames, on the occasion 
of one of his annual garden parties — a scriptural 
gathering of the poor and the lame whom he brings 
out from the crowded London tenements every sum- 
mer for a day's outing under the trees. No one 
could have enjoyed more than the Singers the op- 
portunity of contributing to its success. 

But the most distinguished attentions of this sort 
which they received came through the kind offices 
of Rev. Newman Hall, in mentioning the Singers to 
Mr. and Mrs. Gladstone. The latter were to give a 
lunch at their residence, Carlton House Terrace, to 
the Prince and Princess of Wales, and other mem- 
bers of the royal family. The Singers were invited 



52 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

to be present and chant the Lord's Prayer, as &. 
grace before lunch, and contribute in any other way 
that might seem desirable to the entertainment of 
the occasion. Standing in one of the alcoves of the 
dining-room, they had been unobserved by most of 
the company until the sweet harmony of that fine 
Gregorian chant stole through the room. Then ex- 
planations passed from one to another of the guests, 
and there was a call for more singing. Along with 
other pieces, "John Brown" was given, awakening 
that special enthusiasm with which English hearers 
have always received it. The Prince of Wales, 
looking over the book of songs, called for '' No more 
auction-block for me ;" and Mrs. Gladstone asked, 
as a special favor to the Grand Duchess Czarevna, 
whose imperial father-in-law had emancipated the 
serfs in Russia, that *' John Brown" might be re- 
peated. Special interest was manifested in the 
Singers, and many questions were asked of them, 
and many encouraging words spoken by the distin- 
guished guests. Among those present, beside the 
royal family, were the Duke of Sutherland, the 
Duke and Duchess of Argyll, Earl Granville, and 
other members of the nobility; Count Munster, Mr. 
Motley, and other representatives of the diplomatic 
corps ; the Hon. John Bright, the Bishop of Win- 
chester — son of the great Wilberforce, Mrs. Jenny 
Lind Goldschmidt, and others. 

But this was not all of their good fortune at the 
hands of the Prime Minister. A few days after a 
note was received, in which Mr. Gladstone said, " I 
beg you to accept the assurances of the great pleas- 
iire which the Jubilee Singers gave on Monday to 



GUESTS OF MR. GLADSTONE. 53 

our illustrious guests, and to all who heard them. I 
should wish to offer a little present in books in ac- 
knowledgment of their kindness, and in connection 
with the purposes, as they have announced, of their 
visit to England. It has occurred to me that per- 
haps they might like to breakfast with us, my family 
and a very few friends, but I would not ask this 
unless it is thoroughly agreeable to them." The 
note closed with suggesting a day on which he would 
be glad to entertain the party. 

The invitation was of course gladly accepted. 
Aside from the especial help it might give them in 
their immediate work, it was felt that such atten- 
tions to a company of colored people, just out of 
bondage, by the Prime Minister of Great Britain, 
was a rebuke to the caste spirit in America that 
would do great good. Their first visit to Carlton 
House Terrace was to eatertain its guests, now they 
were to be themselves its guests. Mr. Gladstone 
had spent the night at Chiselhurst, and was in such 
poor health that he had, by his physician's order, 
excused himself from attending the banquet to be 
given at the Mansion House that evening by the 
Lord Mayor to the Ministry. Nevertheless, he 
rode in twenty-five miles that morning to keep his 
appointment to meet his negro friends at breakfast. 
Several members of the Cabinet and of Parliament, 
with ladies of the nobility, were also among the 
guests. The Singers were distributed between them 
at the table, and were the recipients of the kind and 
assiduous attentions of all. Writing an account of 
the occasion for the New York Independent^ the 
Rev. Newman Hall, alluding to the color prejudices 



54 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

of SO many Americans, said: " I wish they had been 
present yesterday, to see Mrs. Gladstone and her 
daughters, and the noble lords and ladies present, 
taking their negro friends by the hand, placing them 
chairs, sitting at their side, pouring out their tea, 
etc., and conversing with them in a manner utterly 
free from any approach either to pride or condescen- 
sion ; but exactly as if they had been white people 
in their own rank in life. And this not as an effort, 
nor for the show of it, but from, a habit of social 
intercourse which would have rendered any other 
conduct perfectly impossible." 

After breakfast Mr. Gladstone showed to his 
guests some of the principal objects of interest in 
his collection of art treasures, explaining them in 
his fascinating style. '' Then," to quote Mr. Hall's 
account once more, *'all the party being gathered in 
the drawing-room, the Jub'lee Singers entertained 
us with their wonderful mus'C. First we had ^ John 
Brown.' I never heard them sing it as they did 
yesterday. It was not the music alone, but the 
features of the singers also which made it so im- 
pressive. Their eyes flashed ; their countenances 
told of reverence and joy and gratitude to God. 
Never shall I forget Mr. Gladstone's rapt, enthusi- 
astic attention. His form was bent forward, his 
eyes were riveted ; all the intellect and soul of his 
great nature seemed expressed in his countenance ; 
and when they had finished he kept saying, ' Isn't 
it wonderful ? I never heard anything like it ! ' The 
tender, thrilling words and music of ' Oh, how I love 
Jesus!' brought tears to the eyes of the listeners; 
and when they closed with the Lord's Prayer, all 



DINNER OF THE CONGREGATIONAL UNION 55 

the company, led by Mr. Gladstone, reverently stood 
with bowed heads in worship. 

"Just before leaving the room, they sang, ' Good- 
by, brother ; good-by, sister ; ' which went to every 
heart. As brothers and sisters, the Premier and 
Mrs. Gladstone, with their guests, bade them fare- 
well. It was just noon when we passed through the 
hall, where several persons were waiting on official 
business to see the Premier, who, doubtless, from 
that time till late at night was anxiously occupied 
with public affairs, but whose morning was given up 
to his negro friends with such heartiness and leis- 
ure of mind that a stranger m.ight suppose he was, 
of all present, the one whose time was most his 
own." 

Subsequently Mr. Gladstone sent them a valuable 
present of books for the University library ; as did 
Mr. Motley, in accordance with a promise made to 
them on their first visit to Carlton House Terrace. 

Several other occasions served to introduce the 
Singers to the public, in a way that gave them spe- 
cial assistance in their work afterwards. By the 
kind assistance of Dr. AUon, and one or two other 
friends, arrangements were made for them to appear 
at the annual dinner of the Congregational Union. 
Six or seven hundred leading ministers and laymen 
from all parts of the kingdom were present, and 
gave rapturous applause to one after another of the 
songs. As at Oberlin, this served as a favorable in- 
troduction to the denomination throughout the whole 
country. The promises of cooperation v/ere many, 
and were well kept. 

At the anniversary of the Freedmen's Missions 



56 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

Aid Society the Singers were advertised as one of 
the attractions, and the hall was much too small. 
to hold all who came. Lord Shaftesbury presided. 
The venerable Dr. Moffat was among the speakers, 
and eloquently testified to the renewed hope he had 
for Africa as he listened to the Jubilee Singers. He 
had been *' holding his tiny rushlight amidst the 
desolations of that continent, and holding it with the 
feeling that his efforts were almost futile." But as 
he thought of the trained missionaries who might 
yet be raised up among the emancipated slaves of 
America, he saw light ahead. Here again the '' John 
Brown" song electrified the audence. As the stir- 
ring refrain rang out, 

" John Brown died that the slave might be free !" 

the dense audience rose to their feet, hats and hand- 
kerchiefs waved in the air, and the deafening ap- 
plause was kept up until the Singers answered with 
" God Save the Queen." 

The American Missionary Association, in its work 
among the freedmen, had always taken strong ground 
against the use of liquor — a position which Chris- 
tian people in England do not always take. The 
National Temperance League therefore looked upon 
the Singers as allies in its work, and gave them a 
cordial welcome to their annual sotj-ee at the Cannon 
Street Terminus Hotel. Such was the eagerness to 
hear tjiem, after they had filled the parts assigned 
them on the programme, that the other exercises 
were shortened to give them more time for singing. 

At the great annual fete of the League at the 
Crystal Palace in July, the free use of the opera- 



A PERPLEXING QUESTION. 57 

house was tendered to the Singers for a concert, 
and all the advertising was done for them by the 
committee, without charge. The great event ol 
this occasion, which was attended by thousands of 
excursionists from all parts of the kingdom, was the 
concert given in the central transept, by a choir of 
five thousand children, under the management of 
Mr. Frederick Smith. The audience was immense. 
At the close of the programme the Jubilees came 
upon the platform and sang one or two songs. One 
of them, of course, was " John Brown," and at the 
last verse Mr. Smith suddenly rapped up his army 
of singers to join in the chorus. The effect was 
very fine, and the song closed with round after 
round of long-continued applause. 

These occasions, however, added little to the Ju- 
bilee Fund, valuable as they were in the way of ad- 
vertising for their future work. The best method 
of raising money was, in fact, a perplexing question. 
Friends generally advised free concerts with collec- 
tions at the close. But experience with this plan in 
America was not at all encouraging. And, with one 
or two exceptions, in the few cases where it was 
tried the collection did not usually yield them more 
than one half as much as would have been received 
if the same audience had paid the common price for 
tickets. One of these exceptions was a concert of 
a semi-private character, planned by Dr. Allon, and 
given in his chapel at Islington. Special cards of 
invitation were sent out, on which the mission of the 
Singers was explained, and the fact stated that a 
contribution would be taken up for their work. Of 
this concert Dr. Allon wrote to Rev. Henry Ward 



58 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

Beecher : " The desire to hear them was so great 
that three times the number of tickets printed were 
appHed for. There was a great and most enthu- 
siastic crowd. The collection produced about ^80. 
Since then the interest in them has been growing, 
and they will certainly have a hearty reception now 
that they are about to visit the provincial cities 
and towns of the kingdom. Their songs produce 
a strange, weird effect. Notwithstanding the oc- 
casional dash of negro familiarity and quaintness of 
expression, they are full of religious earnestness and 
pathos, and one loses all sense of oddity in the feel- 
ing of real and natural piety. It will greatly help 
them that their performance is such as the most fas- 
tidious will not hesitate to welcome in our churches." 
Dr. AUon's high standing, both as a Christian min- 
ister and as an editor of works to promote the ser- 
vice of song in the churches, gave to his testimony 
special value. 

The singing in the Nonconformist churches being 
generally congregational, there seemed to be no 
opportunity for the Singers to take that special part 
in the Sabbath services to which they had become 
so much accustomed in America, and in which it 
was believed that they had done no little good. An 
invitation from Rev. Newman Hall, therefore, to 
sing at his morning service in Surrey Chapel was 
specially welcome as opening the way to such work. 
The/ were seated near the pulpit, and their singing 
both before and after the sermon seemed to be re- 
garded by the congregation as every way befitting 
the Lord's house and its worship. 

There were special reasons why it would be better 



AT MR. SPURGEON'S TABERNACLE. 59 

to give concerts in public halls, where the people of 
all denominations could meet on a common footing 
and with equal interest in the work. But it was 
foreseen that it would often be impossible to secure 
suitable assembly-rooms of this sort. And as it was 
by no means common to open even Nonconformist 
chapels to gatherings where an admission fee was 
charged, Mr. Hall was again of timely service to the 
company by his offer of Surrey Chapel to them for 
a paid concert. A crowded audience attended, and 
the precedent thus established was of much value. 

Concerts were given in these days at St. James's 
Hall and other places of repute for first-class enter, 
tainments. But the expenses were so large as to 
eat up most of the receipts. The concerts in chap- 
els paid better, enlisting as they did, in the case 
of strong city churches, a corps of co-workers in 
the congregation who were usually sure to fill the 
house. 

The most notable of these was the one given in 
Mr. Spurgeon's Tabernacle. Mr. Spurgeon had 
signified, in his hearty way, his interest in their 
mission, and had tendered them the use of his large 
church. The Sunday previous to the concert they 
attended service there, and at the close tarried to 
shake hands with the great preacher. While wait- 
ing their turn in the room adjoining that where Mr. 
Spurgeon receives his visitors, some of the people 
present asked for a song. The Singers, with tender 
and earnest feeling, sang, " O brothers, don't stay 
away." They had scarcely finished when Mr. Spur_ 
geon summoned them into his room. He had heard 
the song, and was so affected by it that he wanted 



6o THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

them to attend the evening service and repeat it 
there. 

'' I do not know whether you will approve or not,'* 
he said to his people in commencing the service, 
*' but it seems to me it is the right thing, and I will 
take the risk. After the morning service I heard 
the Jubilee Singers sing a piece, ' O brothers, don't 
stay away, for my Lord says there's room enough 
in the heavens for you.' I found tears coming in 
my eyes ; and looking at my deacons I found theirs 
very moist too. That song suggested my text and 
my sermon to-night. Now as a part of the sermon, 
I am going to ask them to sing it, for they preach 
in the singing ; and may the Spirit of God send 
home this word to some to-night — some who may 

remember their singing if they forget my preach- 

>> 
mg. 

Then followed the singing, so clear and strong as 
to reach every person in the great audience of five 
or six thousand people, and Mr. Spurgeon preached 
with great effect from the text, '•'■ It is done as thou 
hast commanded, and yet there is room." In giving 
notice of the concert on Wednesday, he added the 
exhortation, " O brothers, don't stay away." And 
his counsel was well heeded. It was advertised that 
the doors would be open at seven o'clock, but long 
before that the crowds about the gates were such 
that it was necessary to open them to avoid blockad- 
ing t*he street, and the attendance was estimated at 
seven thousand. Every song, with the inspiration 
and enthusiasm of such an audience, was a triumph. 

At the close, Mr. Spurgeon said : '' Now our friends 
are going to Scotland, and I have told them to come 



INVITATION TO COME AGAIN. 6 1 

here and hold their first concert when they return to 
London. They have come to Great Britain to raise 
;^6ooo: they will do it; and if they want ;^6ooo 
more, let them come back to this country again, and 
we will give it to them." 



CHAPTER VIII. 

A BUSY WINTER IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

The Singers had spent over three months in Lon- 
don, and arrangements were now made for a tour in 
Scotland, with a visit to a few of the larger cities on 
the way. 

Hull, the birthplace of Wilberforce, was reached, 
by a pleasant coincidence, on the first of August, the 
anniversary of emancipation in the British colonies. 
Here it was decided to try the plan adopted at Dr. 
Allon's chapel in Islington, and find how it would 
work in the provinces. Fifteen hundred invitations 
to a concert in the Hope Street Chapel were sent 
out to those most likely to be interested. The col- 
lection, which seemed a very large one to the friends 
who had charge of the arrangements, amounted to 
about £^2. When it was explained that not less 
than ;^ioo ought to be realized from each evening's 
work, if the mission to Great Britain was to be a 
success, some of the good friends insisted on another 
trial, with an admission fee. When the time came, 
Hen^ler's Cirque, in spite of a rainy evening, and to 
the delight of all, was crowded, and the receipts were 
£\AO. 

Sitting by his window at the hotel in Hull on 
Sunday evening, and noting the tide of people flow- 



OFF FOR SCOTLAND 63 

ing idly by, Mr. White proposed an extempore relig- 
ious service for their benefit. Taking the base of 
the King William monument as a platform, Mr. 
Pike preached and the Singers sang of the love of 
Christ to a crowd that filled the street farther than 
the voice of either speaker or singer could be heard. 
Tears trickled down the cheeks of many to whom 
the sound of prayer or religious song was apparently 
almost unknown. 

In Scarborough, a free concert yielded a collection 
of about £(^0 and on Sunday the Singers sang, in 
a heavy rain, to a Sunday-school gathering of four 
thousand people on the green. At Newcastle, Rev. 
H. T. Robjohns had so thoroughly worked up the 
public interest that every seat was sold before it was 
time for the concert to commence. At Sunderland, 
Moody and Sankey had been holding meetings not 
long before, at the beginning of what afterwards be- 
came such a famous work, and the special interest 
thus awakened in religious song prepared the way 
for the Singers. J. Candlish, Esq., M.P., presided, 
the ministers of the different denominations were 
advertised as patrons, and the large Victoria Hall 
was filled before many who wished to attend could 
obtain admission. 

Lord Shaftesbury, with characteristic kindness and 
foresight, had given the Singers a cordial letter of 
introduction to his friend, John Burns, Esq., of the 
Cunard Steamship Line, at Glasgow. Mr. Burns's 
sympathies were at once awakened, and he arranged 
for a garden party at Castle Wemyss, his residence 
on Wemyss Bay. Invitations were sent out to four 
hundred persons of prominence and influence in 



64 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

the west of Scotland ; and Lord Shaftesbury, who 
was also present, made a very effective appeal for 
their cooperation in promoting the mission of the 
Singers. 

To crown these helpful efforts to forward their 
work in Scotland, his lordship placed in Mr. Pike's 
hands, before their departure from Castle Wemyss, 
letters of introduction to the Lord Provost of Glas- 
gow, and the Lord Provost of Edinburgh. Their 
contents were at that time unknown. Least of all 
was it suspected that they contained a proposal that 
the authorities of Glasgow and Edinburgh should 
vote a welcome to the Singers, and bring them be- 
fore the public under the auspices of the "Lord 
Provost, the magistrates, and the Town Council" 
of these two leading cities ! Reports of this gath- 
ering at Castle Wemyss had prominent place in the 
daily papers, kindling a general desire to hear the 
Singers. 

A series of successful concerts followed. At Largs 
the pastor of the Established (Presbyterian) Church 
set a desirable precedent by opening his church for 
a concert with an admission fee. The city authori- 
ties at Greenock gave the Singers the use of the 
town hall, which holds two thousand people. It 
was densely crowded on two evenings with audi- 
ences as sympathetic and enthusiastic as could be 
desired. 

As this was the season when many of the people 
of the larger towns in Scotland were at the summer 
resorts, it was decided to pay a short visit to Ireland. 
Letters from Mr. Burns, and the indorsement of the 
Hon. George II. Stuart, who is held in high regard 



THE RECEPTION AT EDINBURGH. 65 

in that country of his birth, prepared the people to 
welcome them. Dr. Henry, President of Queen's 
College, presided at the first concert in Ulster Hall, 
Belfast, and Rev. William Johnson, the Moderator 
of the General Assembly, aided heartily in the sub- 
sequent work there. At Londonderry their wel- 
come accorded with the historic fame of that old, 
liberty-loving town, so foremost in Protestant zeal 
and good works. 

Returning to Scotland, they were met with the 
announcement that the authorities of Glasgow had 
acted upon Lord Shaftesbury's suggestion, and voted 
to invite them to give a concert at the city hall 
under their official patronage. Looking backward 
to the bondage and ostracism that was still so fresh 
in their memory, such a thing, in that great city of 
five hundred thousand people, seemed almost in- 
credible. The city hall was full. The Lord Provost 
presided, and beside him, on the platform, sat the 
magistrates and leading clergymen of the city. The 
Singers were eager to do their best, and the Lord 
Provost in his closing remarks declared that he " never 
attended a more delightful meeting." 

Their reception at Edinburgh was equally hearty 
and inspiring. The authorities gave them a vote of 
welcome. The Lord Provost presided at their first 
concert, and afterwards gave a dinner-party in their 
honor at his own residence. At Paisley a most 
helpful friend was found in Sir Peter Coats, whose 
name as a thread manufacturer is a household word 
throughout the world, but whose highest praise where 
he is personally known is his Christian philanthropy. 
He entertained the Singers at his country-house on 

S 



66 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

the banks of the " bonny Doon," piloted them in 
visits to the many places of historic and poetic in- 
terest in that vicinity, attended personally to the 
preliminary arrangements for and presided at their 
concert. At Kilmarnock, Ayr, Aberdeen, Perth, 
Dundee, and other cities, concerts were given that 
were a series of triumphs. Many presents were made 
in money and books for the University, and the peo- 
ple everywhere vied with each other in showing a 
most gracious hospitality. 

From the first the Jubilee music was more or less 
of a puzzle to the critics; and even among those who 
sympathized with their mission, there was no little 
difference of opinion as to the artistic merit of their 
entertainments. Some could not understand the 
reason for enjoying so thoroughly, as almost every 
one did, these simple, unpretending songs. This 
criticism led to the publication, by Mr. Colin Brown, 
Ewing Lecturer on Music in the Andersonian Univer- 
sity, Glasgow, of a series of articles, analyzing this 
style of music, in which he said: *' The highest 
triumph of art is to be natural. The singing of these 
strangers is so natural that it does not at once strike 
us how much of true art is in it, and how careful and 
discriminating has been the training bestowed upon 
them by their accomplished instructor and leader, 
who, though retiring from public notice, deserves 
great praise. Like the Swedish melodies of Jenny 
Lind, it gives a new musical idea. It has been well 
remarked that in some respects it disarms criticism, 
in others it may be truly said that it almost defies it. 
It was beautifully described by a simple Highland 
girl, — ' It filled my whole heart ! ' The richness and 



REVIVAL LABORS WITH MR. MOODY, 6 J 

purity of tone, both in melody and harmony, the 
contrast of light and shade, the varieties of gentle- 
ness and grandeur in expression, and the exquisite 
refinement of \\\q piano, as contrasted with the power 
of i\\Q forte, fill us with delight, and at the same 
time make us feel how strange it is that these un- 
pretending singers should come over here to teach 
us what is the true refinement of music, make us feel 
its moral and religious power." 

The labors of the Singers in connection with the 
meetings of Messrs. Moody and Sankey were one oi 
the most memorable features of this visit to the 
North. They first met the evangelists at Newcastle 
on-Tyne, and for some days lent daily assistance ii 
the great work. Their songs were found to be es- 
pecially adapted to promote the revival. One inci- 
dent in connection with one of the noonday prayer- 
meetings, of which Mr. Moody often spoke after- 
wards, cannot be better told than in the words of 
Rev. Mr. Robjohns : '' The Jubilee Singers had been 
specially prayed for. A moment's pause, and there 
went up in sweet, low notes a chorus as of angels. 
None could tell where the Singers were, — on the floor, 
in the gallery, or in the air. The crowd was close, 
and the Singers — wherever they were — were sitting. 
Every one was thrilled, for this was the song they 



sang: 



There are angels hovering round 
To carry the tidings home.' 

The notes are before us as we write, simple enough, 
— the words, too ; but one should hear the Jubilees 
sing them. It was like a snatch of angelic song 
heard from the upper air as a band of celestials 



68 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

passed swiftly on an errand of mercy." And he 
adds: *'Nor are these all our obligations to our 
beloved friends. They have gone in and out the 
churches, Sunday-schools, and mission-rooms, sing- 
ing for Jesus. Such services to souls and Christ have 
opened wide the people's hearts, and the Jubilees 
have just v^alked straight in, to be there enshrined 
for evermore." 

In the great work at Edinburgh, also, the Singers 
rendered special assistance, sometimes taking part 
in as many as six meetings a day, — prayer-meetings, 
inquiry-meetings, Bible readings, preaching services, 
etc. On one Sunday evening Mr. Moody preached, 
and they sang, to an audience of between six and 
seven thousand working-people, gathered by special 
cards of invitation in the Corn Exchange, w^hich was 
followed by an inquiry meeting, at which some seven 
hundred asked for prayer. 

After the engagements of the Singers took them 
away from Mr. Moody, missionary and revival meet- 
ings were frequently held on Sundays ; and at them 
and at Sunday-school gatherings Mr. Dickerson and 
Mr. Rutling — as well as Mr. White and Mr. Pike — 
often made addresses. 

January brought a very whirl of work and a har- 
vest of money, in connection with the campaign 
through the midland counties. Wherever the Singers 
went * they met crowded houses at their concerts. 
Many subscriptions were made to furnish rooms, at 
a cost of ;^io each, in Jubilee Hall. Mr. Frederick 
Priestman, though carrying the cares of an extensive 
business of his own, interested himself in perfect- 
ing arrangements for a private concert at Bradford, 



ONE MONTH'S WORK. 69 

which was so well worked up that it yielded ;^I50, 
Sir Titus Salt, who was unable to be present, send- 
ing £2"^. Under the patronage of Rev. Eustace 
Conder and Edward Baines, Esq., M.P., the first 
concert at Leeds, in a pecuniary point of view, was 
the most successful one so far that had been given 
in the kingdom. At Halifax, John Crossley, Esq., 
M.P., the great carpet manufacturer, pledged a sup- 
ply of carpets for Jubilee Hall. One of the results 
of a second visit to Hull was the presentation, for 
the library of the University, of a fine oil portrait of 
Wilberforce, purchased through a subscription by 
the citizens, a memento of the Jubilee work that 
will always be held in high regard. The Hon. John 
Bright was absent from home when the Singers vis- 
ited Rochdale, but his family subscribed £\Q to fur- 
nish a room to bear his name; and afterwards he 
wrote a letter commending their mission as " one 
deserving of all support," which went the rounds of 
the papers and was of much help to them. At Bol- 
ton, J. P. Barlow, Esq., gave £^0 for five rooms, one 
of them to be named after President Charles G. Fin- 
ney, of Obcrlln College, in remembrance of his evan- 
gelistic labors during a great revival in that town 
years before. 

At Manchester they were fortunate in enlisting 
the services of Mr. Richard Johnson, the apostle of 
ragged schools. No town was ever before more 
thoroughly ploughed with advertising and sown with 
information, and such work never yielded a better 
harvest. The proceeds of the four concerts in the 
Free-Trade Large Hall amounted to over ^1200. 
This sum was further swollen by the sale of the 



70 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

books giving the history of their first American cam- 
paign, the profit on these sales in one evening being 
£/\o. Three concerts followed in the Philharmonic 
Hall at Liverpool, with large receipts, the first one 
yielding £z'^%' The total receipts of the month of 
January amounted to ^3800, or about $i9,(X)o! 

But this success was achieved at the cost of an 
appalling amount of work. Requests for concerts 
flowed in from all parts of the kingdom. It was 
impossible to comply with half of them, and the 
investigation involved in deciding where to go was 
an exhausting strain on time and strength. A vast 
amount of correspondence was unavoidable in reply- 
ing to invitations to breakfasts, dinners, and teas, 
and in answering the many requests that came for 
concerts for the benefit of schools, churches, asylums, 
and charities of every sort. Much thought had to 
be given to the preparation of newspaper notices 
and other advertising, and much time had to be 
spent in enlisting the interest and assistance of those 
whose patronage would be valuable. Adding to all 
this the incessant demands in meeting the thousand 
details of concert management and hotel arrange- 
ments, and the watchful guidance of the Singers in 
this new life to which they were so unused, it is no 
wonder that one after another of the working force 
broke down under the load. 

Miss Gilbert, whose labors had been as inces- 
sant as they were invaluable, was taken very ill, and 
obliged to give up all work. Mr. Pike, who had 
been doing the work of two men, succumbed next to 
serious nervous prostration, and had scarcely settled 
down for the rest that was imperatively necessary, 



OVERWORK AND ILLNESS. ft 

when his only assistant gave way under the load 
that he was carrying, and was forbidden by his med- 
ical adviser to give any further attention whatever 
to business. 

Mr. White was thus left alone. His lungs were 
weak, and the heavy fogs and the night-work were 
telling seriously upon them. And at this juncture 
came word that his wife, whose health had not been 
good, and who, with her children, was in lodgings 
in Glasgow, was ill. Yet as the gross income of the 
concerts at that time was averaging $1000 a night, 
and it seemed to be so manifestly **now or never" 
with their mission, he felt that it was his duty to 
keep on, at whatever sacrifice of personal feelings 
or strength, with the work. But a few days after 
he received intelligence that impressed him with the 
conviction that his wife, who had been taken with 
typhoid fever, was more seriously ill than he sup- 
posed. Hurrying to her bedside, he reached it less 
than two days before she died. She had been a val- 
ued teacher with him at Fisk before their marriage ; 
and her death, which would have been a terrible blow 
at any time, in these peculiar circumstances of his 
health and work was unspeakably trying. A loss 
of sleep and appetite followed which so reduced his 
strength that he was finally obliged to give up work. 
And in the midst of this prostration he was attacked 
with haemorrhage of the lungs, and for some time 
seemed to be lying at the very gates of death. 

These facts becoming known to friends interested 
in the work, offers of assistance were numerous, and 
by relying largely on volunteer help, the Singers 
were able to go on and fill all their appointments. 



72 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

At Sheffield, Derby, Wolverhampton, Norwich, 
Ipswich, Cambridge, Leicester, Nottingham, Bir- 
mingham, and other cities, the experiences of Jan- 
uary were repeated in crowded audiences, generous 
contributions, and the good cheer of true English 
hospitality. 

There was a large harvest still ungathered when 
the time drew near that had been fixed for their 
return to America. But circumstances were such, 
especially the health of those who had the charge 
of the work, that a longer stay than was originally 
proposed was impracticable. 

A trip to the south of Wales, with concerts at 
Newport, Cardiff, Merthyr Tydvil, and Swansea, was 
followed by successful visits to Bristol, Southamp- 
ton, Bath, Brighton, and a few other cities. Mr. 
Spurgeon, not forgetful of his farewell words when 
they left London, not only opened his Tabernacle 
to them for a second concert, but made one of his 
happiest addresses in connection with the present of 
a full set of his works for the library. The house 
was densely crowded, and the receipts exceeded even 
those of the first concert in the same place. 

The closing concert was given in Exeter Hall, and 
yielded a larger sum than any other of the whole 
campaign in Great Britain. That steadfast friend, 
the Earl of Shaftesbury, presided. Dr. Allon, whose 
counsels had been of great value to them from the 
beginning, gave the audience some account of the 
winter's work. Nearly ;f 10,000 had been raised for 
the Jubilee Hall, aside from special gifts for the pur- 
chase of philosophical apparatus, and donations in 
money for the library, and of books from Mr. Glad- 



THE RETURN TO AMERICA, 73 

stone, Mr. Motley, Dean Stanley, Mr. Spurgeon, Mr. 
Thomas Nelson, and many other friends. 

Lord Shaftesbury, in his parting address, spoke 
with much feeling of the pleasure their visit had 
given the English people, and of the affection and 
respect in which they would always hold the Jubilee 
Singers. The Doxology was sung by the entire 
assembly, and his Lordship, amid the cheers of the 
audience, and in their behalf, bade them good-by, 
shaking hands with each of the Singers as they left 
the platform. 

To the Singers personally, aside from the finan- 
cial success that had attended their work, the visit 
had been one of almost unalloyed satisfaction. They 
had been everywhere the object of hospitable atten- 
tions that, if they had any fault, were sometimes so 
urgent and abounding as to be wearisome, after the 
strain which their work made upon their energies. 
Few of them had suffered from sickness, and the 
shorter distances to be travelled, and the warmer 
temperature in v/inter, had made concert-work easier 
than in America. In no way were they ever offen- 
sively reminded, through look or word — unless by 
some rude American who was lugging his caste 
conceit through a European tour, or by a vagrant 
Englishman who had lived long enough in America 
to "catch" its color prejudices — that they were 
black. 

The Singers reached Nashville in time to attend 
the Commencement exercises. The trustees passed 
resolutions testifying to the interest and sympathy 
with which they had followed their career, to their 



74 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

industry and devotion in their work, and to the high 
honor they had achieved for themselves and their 
people, adding: '* No one can estimate the vast 
amount of prejudice against the race which has 
perished under the spell of their marvellous music. 
Wherever they have gone they have proclaimed to 
the hearts of men in a most effective way, and with 
unanswerable logic, the brotherhood of the race." 



CHAPTER IX. 

OVER THE OCEAN AGAIN. 

In 1875 Fisk University completed its first dec- 
ade. During the ten years thousands of young 
people had been gathered in its classes. Its stu- 
dents, in turn, had taught tens of thousands in Sab- 
bath and day-schools, communicating far and wide 
among the freed people its uplifting influences. It 
had conquered the respect of those who began by 
hating it. It had opened to the vision of vast num- 
bers of colored people new possibilities of Christian 
attainment and manly achievement. It had demon- 
strated the capacity of that despised race for a high 
culture. It had raised up the Jubilee Singers, who 
had done great things for their people in bre;aking 
down, by the magic of their song, the cruel preju- 
dice against color that was everywhere in America 
the greatest of all hindrances to their advancement ; 
who had raised the money to buy a new site for the 
University, and erect on it a substantial and beau- 
tiful hall to take the place of the tottering hospital 
barracks ; and who stood on the threshold of its sec- 
ond decade as its special and providential reliance 
in laying the foundation of its needed endowments. 

This year was marked by several events of special 
interest. Hitherto the Universitv had been without 



^6 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

a president. Its work had been outlined and guided 
in its g^eneral features by the American Missionary 
Association. It was felt that the time had come 
when a capable president should take charge of it, 
supported by a fully-organized faculty. For this 
place, Rev. E. M. Cravath was the unanimous first 
choice of its trustees and friends. More than any 
one else he had had the responsibility of its estab. 
lishment ; and, during his subsequent service for 
several years as field secretary of the Association, 
the burden of planning its work and providing for 
its wants had rested chiefly upon him. Educated 
at anti-slavery Oberlin, and identified all his life with 
anti-slavery effort, he was felt to be specially adapted 
and providentially guided to the place. And as soon 
as events shaped so that he could well be spared 
from those duties, he resigned his secretaryship in 
the Association and entered upon the new work. 

In 1875, also, the University graduated its first 
college class. It had taken some of them, ten years 
before, with little more than a knowledge of the 
alphabet, and carried them through extended pre- 
paratory studies and a thorough classical course, to 
the point where a rigid examination awarded them 
the degree of A.B. At graduation one was chosen 
instructor in the University, and others found re- 
sponsible positions awaiting them as teachers in the 
city schools at Nashville and Memphis. Two were 
the sons of an unlettered freed woman, who had 
consecrated every spare dollar of her hard earnings, 
for these ten years, to aid her boys in getting an 
education. It was a proud hour for her when they 
stepped upon the stage to receive their diplomas — 



PROGRESS AT FISK UNIVERSITY. 7/ 

a scene that it would have done the heart of every 
contributor to Fisk University good to see. 

The completion and occupancy of Jubilee Hall was 
another of the important events of 1875. Both in 
its architectural appearance and substantial con- 
struction of the most durable materials, as well as 
in its admirable adaptation to the permanent uses of 
the University, it is all that could be desired. Its 
walls are of brick, with stone foundations and facings ; 
every part of the work upon it has been done in the 
most thorough manner, and it is believed to be the 
best building of its kind in the Southern States. 
Crowning a commanding eminence overlooking the 
capital city of Tennessee and the beautiful encircling 
valley of the Cumberland, it stands, not only an 
enduring and most fitting monument to the toils and 
triumphs of the Jubilee Singers, and to the sympathy 
and generosity shown them by the Christian public 
on both sides of the Atlantic, but a perpetual in- 
spiration to the freed people as they struggle out of 
the slough of ignorance and social proscription in 
which emancipation found them. 

But the very success of these years had increased 
the demands upon the University faster than it 
had supplied the means of meeting them. It had 
achieved results that demonstrated the necessity of 
its existence and guaranteed its permanence. But 
its needs were greater than ever. Its new site, and 
the new hall standing upon it, was simply the solid 
foundation for future growth, and it was entirely 
without the means, within itself, of supporting, to 
say nothing of enlarging, its work. Money was 
urgently needed for endowments from which to pro- 



78 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

vide for the support of teachers and to aid earnest, 
struggling students to educate themselves for Chris- 
tian work as teachers and ministers of the gospel. 
In the poverty of the freed people the revenue from 
tuition fees could be but a trifle at the best, com- 
pared with its expenses. 

The continual financial pressure throughout the 
country caused a serious shrinkage in the receipts 
of the American Missionary Association. Many 
who were wont to give liberally to such objects were 
unable to do so longer. Urged by these pressing 
necessities and convinced that God pointed out the 
way by his providences, the Jubilee Singers, after a 
few months of rest, again took the field. Mr. White's 
health was still so seriously impaired that it was im- 
possible for him to undertake such exhausting work 
as was involved in the entire care of a concert cam 
paign, and Prof. T. F. Seward, of New York, who 
first wrote down the Jubilee Songs, and had been 
deeply interested in the work, was fortunately se- 
cured to share the labor. 

A series of concerts was given during the winter 
and spring in the larger cities of the North, prelimi- 
nary to another tour abroad. Some of them were 
ve-ry successful, but the net receipts of the winter's 
work were not large. The '' Times" were hard ; the 
weather was unusually cold and unfavorable; and 
rival companies, some of whom appropriated not 
only the name, but even the testimonials belonging 
to the Jubilee Singers, had taken the field, and, to a 
considerable extent, had trampled down the harvest 
where they had not the ability to gather it. 

On May 15th the company, reorganized to consist 



RETURN TO LONDON. 70 

of ten members, sailed for England in the Cunard 
steamer Algeria. It was a sign of progress that 
more than one steamship line, which had refused 
them cabin accommodation two years before, offered 
reduced rates if they would accept them now. Mr. 
White accompanied them, to give, so far as his 
health would permit, the counsel and assistance 
which his previous experience made so valuable, and 
President Cravath followed in the autumn to take 
charge of the general interests of the enterprise, 
and to reenforce the working force when the heavy 
drafts of the busy season began. 

The announcement that they would be present 
and sing a few of their slave-songs at the annual 
meeting of the Freedmen's Missions Aid Society, in 
the City Temple, London, Monday evening, May 
31st, was to many of their friends the first news of 
their return from America ; but it was news that 
travelled quickly, and it drew an audience that not 
only packed every inch of space in that capacious 
church, but filled the large lecture hall below with 
an overflow meeting. 

So great was the gathering about the building 
that to get even to the doors was a formidable task, 
and the chairman, Lord Shaftesbury, was delayed 
some minutes in reaching the platform by the diffi- 
culty of penetrating the dense crov/d that filled the 
corridors. In ascending the stand his eye caught 
sight of the singers in the gallery, whom he greeted 
with a cordial salutation, and in his remarks on tak- 
ing the chair he said : '' I am delighted to see so 
large a congregation of the citizens of London come 
to offer a renewal of their hospitality to these noble 



8o THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

brethren and sisters of ours, who are here to-night 
to charm us with their sweet songs. They have re- 
turned here, not for anything in their own behalf, 
but to advance the interests of the coloured race in 
America, and then to do what in them lies to send 
missionaries of their own colour to the nations spread 
over Africa. When I find these young people, gifted 
to an extent that does not often fall to the lot of 
man, coming here in such a spirit. I don't want them 
to become white, but I have a strong disposition my- 
self to become black. If I thought color was any- 
thing — if it brought with it their truth, piety, and 
talent, I would willingly exchange my complexion 
to-morrow. In the name of this vast mass of British 
citizens, and, I may say, in behalf of thousands and 
tens of thousands who are absent, we receive them 
with joy again to our shores, and will do all that in 
us lies to advance their holy cause ; and, besides our 
prayers and hospitality, we will do as Joseph did to 
his brethren, send them back loaded with all the 
good things of Egypt." Rev. Dr. Parker, pastor of 
the City Temple, reechoed these words of welcome 
in an eloquent address, and the occasion could not 
have been more of an ovation to the Singers than if 
it had been planned for that purpose. 

The next evening they gave their opening concert 
to a large and very enthusiastic audience in Exeter 
Hall» with an address full of a genuine English wel 
come from the chairman, Rev. LI. D. Bevan. 

At this time Messrs. Moody and Sankey were in 
the midst of their great work in London. The Sing- 
ers had not been in the city an hour before a request 
came from Mr. Moody that they would take part in 



MEETINGS WITH MR. MOODY. 8 1 

the service that afternoon at the Haymarket Opera- 
house. The next day he desired them to sit on the 
platform, and sing *^ Steal Away" after the sermon. 
That remarkable series of meetings at the West 
End was drawing to a close. The house was packed 
in every part with an audience representing much 
of the wealth and rank of London ; upon whom Mr. 
Moody urged the claims of Christ in a discourse of 
peculiar tenderness and power. At its close the 
great congregation bowed, with tearful faces, in 
silent prayer. Soon the soft, sweet strains of '' Steal 
Away" rose from the platform, swelling finally into 
a volume of conquering song that seemed to carry 
the great audience heavenward as on angels' wings. 
The effect could not have been happier had the song 
been written for the sermon, or the sermon for the 
song. 

Thereafter their services were in almost constant 
demand in the London meetings. For several weeks 
they declined nearly all applications for concerts, in 
order that they might be free for this work. After 
Messrs. Moody and Sankey had closed their services 
at Bow-Road Hall to go to Camberwell, the meet- 
ings were continued at the former place, with preach- 
ing each night by the Rev. Mr. Altken or Mr, Henry 
Varley, and singing by the Jubilee choir. The at- 
tendance was so large, on week-day as well as on 
Sunday evenings, that hundreds were sometimes 
turned away, even after a congregation of ten or 
twelve thousand had crowded into the hall. 

After these meetings closed, Mr. Altken gave 
them a letter testifying to his misgivings at first ia 
employing in such a work an agency that might seem 
6 



82 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

SO sensational, but cordially declaring that his mis- 
givings were quite at fault, and that he should carry- 
away most pleasing recollections of their work to- 
gether. In recognition of their services in these 
meetings, a subscription of over ;!f 500 was made 
for Fisk University by a few members of the com- 
mittee having the meetings in charge. Mr. Moody 
gave them an open letter to his friends everywhere, 
warmly commending their mission; and before leav- 
ing the country purchased and presented to each 
of the party a duplicate of that copy of Bagster's 
Bible, whose almost constant use in his meetings he 
has made so famous and popular. 

Nothing could have better prepared the way for 
their special work, nothing could have better pre- 
pared them for it, than these revival labors. The 
religious papers carried reports of the meetings 
throughout the kingdom ; and wherever they went 
thereafter, the great Christian heart of England gave 
them a specially fraternal greeting. 

During July and August, months usually unfavor- 
able to concert receipts, the appointments at various 
places in Wales and the South of England drew, 
generally, good audiences. It was, however, after 
the fall work began in Scotland that it was most 
manifest how wide-spread and hearty was the inter- 
est with which their return was awaited. Applica- 
tions for concerts poured in from every quarter of 
the kmgdom. Full houses met them everywhere. 
At Inverness, where they appeared under the pat- 
ronage of the provost, magistrates, and other lead- 
ing citizens, the Music Hall was much too small to 
accommodate the eager crowds that thronged the 
doors on two successive evenings. 



SUCCESSES IN SCOTLAND^ 83 

At Aberdeen, Lord Kintore was active in efforts 
to make their visit a great success. At Dundee, 
Provost Cox presided at their concert, and the re- 
ceipts were larger than on their first visit to that 
city in the high tide of enthusiasm two years before. 
At the first concert in Glasgow, given in the Kibble 
Crystal Palace, the receipts for tickets, and the 
profits on the sale of books for the one evening, 
amounted to nearly ^^325. At Edinburgh, where 
the chair was taken on one evening by Lord Provost 
Falshav/, hundreds were turned away from the doors 
of the Music Hall, even after all standing-room had 
been exhausted. 

The religious effect of their concert-work was 
never more gratifying nor manifest. Several of 
their new songs, particularly, seemed to have a pe- 
culiar power in reaching the hearts of their au- 
diences. After one of the concerts in Glasgow, an 
unknown friend placed ;^I5 in the hands of one of 
the Singers, as a contribution to their fund, accom- 
panied with the request that they would sing " I've 
been Redeemed" at every concert they should give 
in Great Britain. Their singing of this and other 
hymns at the Glasgow Evangelistic Conference, in 
October, was spoken of in all reports as one of the 
special attractions of that inspiring meeting. Their 
services were sought also at the similar Conference 
in Dublin a few weeks later. This was their first 
visit to Dublin; and at these meetings, and at the 
concerts which followed, Irish enthusiasm was thor- 
oughly enkindled. Mr. Russell, known through the 
three kingdoms for his efficient services to the tem- 
perance cause, gave most valuable assistance in 



84 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

"working up" the concerts; and at the first concert 
in the Exhibition Palace it was estimated that fif- 
teen hundred appHcants for tickets were turned 
away after every seat in the great hall was filled. 

Religious meetings with the Sunday-school chil- 
dren, on Saturday or Sunday, came to be, also, a 
common and important feature of their work. Ad- 
mission was always given by free tickets, previously 
distributed to a certain proportion of teachers and 
scholars ; and the exercises consisted of singing, al- 
ternated with short addresses. At Aberdeen, 4000 
teachers and scholars filled the Music Hall, at nine 
on Sunday morning ; and over 5000 gathered in the 
Drill Hall, Edinburgh, at ten o'clock, on a Sunday. 
At Liverpool the tabernacle erected for Mr. Moody's 
meetings — one of the largest ever built for his ser- 
vices — was crowded by over 12,000 children, repre- 
senting over ninety different schools. Each of 
these meetings, like others in smaller cities, were 
occasions of sweet and solemn interest that will be 
long remembered. 

Nor was this visit any less marked than the first 
one for the social attentions shown to the Singers. 
The Earl of Kintore, Lord Lieutenant of Aberdeen- 
shire, entertained them at his ancestral seat, Keith 
Hall, — whose walls were laid before the Pilgrims 
landed on Plymouth Rock, — and made them his 
debtors by the memory of the delightful day spent 
there and by subsequent kindly attentions. Their 
visit to Chester brought a pleasant note from Mr. 
Gladstone, recalling their former acquaintance, and 
inviting them to spend an afternoon at Hawarden 
Castle, his country home in North Wales, and pro- 



LIVINGSTONE MISSIONARY HALL. 85 

posing to send his carriages to meet them at the 
railway station two miles away. A memorable after- 
noon was spent in social intercourse with the great 
statesman and his family, in the inspection of his 
art and literary treasures, and in wandering about 
the ruins of the older castle, — which dates back to 
the days of Edward the First. No one could have 
had a more gracious welcome to the hospitalities of 
this historic English mansion. The Duke and Duch- 
ess of Argyll also invited them, for the second time, 
to Argyll Lodge, where they met a company of dis- 
tinguished guests, including the Princess Louise, 
on terms of pleasantest intercourse and most friendly 
interest. 

It was in the midst of this year's work, and when 
Jubilee Hall had been but a little time occupied, that 
the need of another building at Fisk University be- 
came so apparent and imperative as to demand 
immediate action. The ordinary earnings of the 
Singers were all needed in meeting the other press- 
ing necessities of the school, and much prayerful 
deliberation was had concerning ways and means 
for supplying this want. It was finally decided to 
undertake to raise by subscription ;^ 10,000 for the 
erection of a companion building to Jubilee Hall, 
which should be called — with obvious fitness and 
significance — ''Livingstone Missionary Hall." It 
was when this decision was but just reached, and 
before any general announcement had been made 
of the plan, that a check was received from the 
Baroness Burdett-Coutts for two per cent of the 
entire sum, — ;^200. And Mrs. Agnes Living- 
stone Bruce, Dr. Livingstone's daughter, — the 



S6 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

loved '' Nannie" of whom he so fondly and proudly 
speaks in his journal, — testified to her interest in 
the Singers, and to her appreciation of this trib- 
ute to her father, by a handsome subscription. 
Soon after this the movement was publicly inaugu- 
rated in London by means of two invitation con- 
certs, under the patronage of Lord Shaftesbury 
and other distinguished friends. The chairman at 
the first of these concerts, Samuel Morley, Esq., 
M.P., himself subscribed ;^ioo; and under the 
impetus thus given to the effort over $15,000 was 
secured that year for Livingstone Hall, while con- 
cert work yielded good returns for the general uses 
of the University. 

Would concerts on the Continent pay? Would 
the slave songs keep their power where the words 
lost their meaning? These were questions that 
had been asked often during the work in England. 
While the Singers were taking a brief summer rest 
in Geneva, Switzerland, an experiment had been 
tried which, if one swallow only made a summer, 
micfht have seemed conclusive as an answer to these 
questions. Just before their departure they gave a 
concert in the Salle de la Reformation at which Pere 
Hyacinthe presided. The distinguished chairman, 
and, with few exceptions, the audience, did not un- 
derstand English — much less the vernacular of the 
slave songs. But the hall was crowded and the en- 
thusias-m rose to white heat. When asked how they 
could enjoy the songs when they could not under- 
stand the words, the answer was, " We cannot un- 
ierstand them, but we can />r/ them." With all the 
encouragement which this concert gave, the certainty 



VISIT TO HOLLAND. 87 

of heavy loss if a tour on the Continent proved a 
failure, made the venture still seem a hazardous and 
doubtful one. 

One of the London concerts was the means of 
turning the scale in which this question lay balanc- 
ing. Mr. G. P. Ittman, Jr., an eminent Christian 
gentleman of Rotterdam, and a leading merchant 
there, was in London on business when his attention 
was attracted one day by an advertisement in the 
Times of a Jubilee concert that evening at Sur- 
rey Chapel. He attended, and was so greatly inter- 
ested that he came forward at the close of the cort- 
cert and urged the Singers to visit Holland, offering 
to do all in his power to make their trip a success. 
When the time came, some months afterward, to go, 
Mr. Ittman was found to be as good as his word. 
He not only gave his own time and influence lav- 
ishly in preparing the way for the Singers, but he 
enlisted the active co-operation of influential and 
generous friends all through the kingdom. The 
*' Story" found an admirable translation at the hands 
of Rev. Adama van Scheltema, who rendered the 
songs, even, into Dutch with remarkable success. 
The publisher, Mr. A. van Oosterzee of Amsterdam, 
was one of the most serviceable helpers whom the 
mission of the Singers ever enlisted. 

Local committees of leading citizens were formed 
in almost every place the Singers planned to visit, 
who assumed the burden of preparing for the con- 
certs, and whose patronage was itself a guarantee of 
success. Where there were no halls of suitable 
dimensions the churches were tendered to the Sing- 
ers, and even the great cathedrals^ as at Utrecht, 



88 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

Leenwarden, Harlegen, Zwolle, Dordrecht, Delft, 
Alkmaar, and Schiedam were opened for their con- 
certs. Nowhere have the Singers found a heartier 
welcome or left dearer friends than in the Nether- 
lands. 

The most distinguished attentions which they had 
hitherto received from the great and the learned 
were quite eclipsed in the splendor of the reception 
given them in the palatial mansion of the Baron and 
Baroness van Wassenaer de Catwijck at The Hague, 
where they met the Queen of the Netherlands — 
famous as well for her own accompHshments as the 
patronage she has given art and literature — and 
other members of the royal family, and a hundred 
or more of the nobility and diplomatic corps of the 
Dutch capital. All but the Singers were in court 
dress, and the files of soldiery that lined the path 
to the door, the liveried servants that ushered the 
guests to cloak-room and salon, the brilliant cos- 
tumes of the ladies, and the no less brilliant uni- 
forms and decorations of soldiers and diplomats, the 
coronet of the queen flashing with diamonds, and 
the rich furnishings of the elegant apartments made 
a scene of dazzling splendor which was only height- 
ened by the attentions shown to their dusky guests. 
The Queen gave the Singers a pleasant greeting indi- 
vidually, and testified to the sincerity of her expres- 
sions of pleasure in listening to their songs by hon- 
oring t*heir public concert, a few evenings later, with 
her presence. The King also received them, not 
long after, at his royal residence, the Loo, and added 
a generous subscription to the fund for Livingstone 
Hall. 



A SUCCESSFUL TOUR. 89 

After two months spent thus with their Dutch 
friends, the Singers returned to their work in Eng- 
land, their treasury the fuller by $10,000 for this 
excursion to the Netherlands, and their plans now 
taking shape for a visit to Germany, 



CHAPTER X. 

EIGHT MONTHS IN GERMANY. 

The field in Great Britain had been well har- 
vested. The diminished receipts of concert work, 
cwing to the hard times which rested like a leaden 
pall on English industries, warned the Singers that 
the longer they delayed their contemplated visit to 
Germany, the less revenue it would probably yield 
them, because of the increasing stringency there. 
In October, 1877, therefore, they set their faces, not 
over-confidently, toward the country which is the 
fatherland of Christian song, and where they might 
expect that their work would meet severer critical 
tests than it had yet encountered. Stopping in 
Holland to sing at a few places that they were 
obliged to pass by on their previous visit, they met 
everywhere with attentions that made this hurried 
passage through the Netherlands seem like a holi- 
day excursion. Crowned heads could scarcely have 
been treated with more distinction at some of the 
hotels, even, where they were guests. 

President Cravath had preceded them to Berlin, — 
accredited by letters from their unwearied friend, 
Lord Shaftesbury, to the British ambassador and 
other influential personages, — to make known their 
mission and prepare for their ccming. To do this 



AT THE NEW PALACE. 9 1 

with success was a delicate and difficult task. But 
the speedy entrance which they found, on their ar- 
rival, into the best circles of the German capital 
showed how wisely and well it had been done. 
Baron von Bunsen, son of the great scholar, gave a 
dinner-party in their honor, at which they met, 
among other distinguished people, leading represen- 
tatives of the diplomatic corps at the imperial court. 
And reception followed reception in the drawing- 
rooms of the dite, which made them and their mission 
known to the leaders in the philanthropic, musical, 
and religious circles of the city, and, to some extent, 
of the whole empire. One of the court preachers, 
Rev. Dr. Bauer, and his estimable wife extended to 
them the hospitalities of an ideal German Christian 
home. The Singers were permitted to share in the 
Christmas festivities of the household — which were 
advanced several days on the calendar to give them 
acquaintance with this domestic anniversary as Ger- 
man families delight to observe it. 

But no other occasion in Berlin — nor any in their 
varied experience elsewhere — was so significant or 
memorable as their reception by the Crown Prince 
and Crown Princess at the " New Palace" in Pots- 
dam. They were invited to attend there at four 
o'clock on a Sunday afternoon. German usage, in 
high places as well as low, is so far removed from 
the stricter views of Christian people in the United 
States regarding Sunday observance, that the Sing- 
ers had some misgivings about accepting the invita- 
tion. But the advice of their most judicious Chris- 
tian friends was in favor of going, and the result 
proved that their fears were indeed at fault. The 



92 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

imperial carriages, under charge of an officer of the 
household, were sent for them. Arrived at the pal- 
ace, there was none of the distinctive pageantry of 
royalty to be seen, beyond the grim troopers who 
stood sentinel at the doors and clanked their sabres 
through the corridors. After their wraps had been 
laid aside the Singers were ushered into an elegant 
salon — selected for this occasion, as the Crown Prin- 
cess afterward informed them, because of its admir- 
able acoustic properties. The Crown Prince and 
Crown Princess quickly came in to greet them, and 
were followed by their children and other members 
of the imperial family, including Prince Frederick 
Charles, the hero of Metz. 

It was as much of a gratification as a surprise to 
the Singers to find that the emperor himself, who 
had come out from Berlin to dine at the New Palace, 
had detained his special train, and suspended his 
engagements at the capital, that he might remain 
longer and hear their songs. As the straight, stately 
old soldier entered the room he bowed pleasantly to 
the Singers, and, taking his place near President 
Cravath, asked such questions about the freed peo- 
ple and the mission of the Singers as gave a pleasant 
insight into his largeness and kindliness of heart. 
An aide brought him an easy-chair, to which he was 
well entitled by his years as well as his relation to 
the company, but he declined It, and with the polite- 
ness of the old-school gentleman, remained standing 
during the half hour of conversation and singing 
that preceded his departure. Those who thus met 
him will never be able to think of him other than as 
gracious in manner and noble in character as he is 
eminent in imperial position. 



AT THE NEW PALACE. 93 

The Singers, at intervals, sang '' Steal Away," 
** I've been Redeemed," '' Who are these in Bright 
Array," and others of their most effective spiritual 
songs. '' Nobody knows the Trouble I See" filled 
the eyes of the Crown Princess with tears, and she 
apologized for seeming '' so weak," saying that the 
thought of the wretchedness of the slave life which 
gave birth to such a wail as that quite overcame her. 
In the familiar conversation during the intervals of 
the singing, the Crown Princess told the Singers 
that she had been anxious for a long while to hear 
them. Her mother — Queen Victoria — had excited 
her interest in them by a long letter which she wrote 
giving an enthusiastic account, at the time, of their 
singing when she heard them at the Duke of Argyll's. 
Beyond her Majesty's courteous and formal thanks 
on that occasion, they had had no hint of the im- 
pression which their singing made upon her, and 
this intelligence, so many years after, was specially 
gratifying. 

The Crown Prince chatted socially of matters in 
America, and begged a copy of the songs, saying 
that he should wish to play and sing them with his 
family. "These songs, as you sing them," said he, 
" go to the heart ; they go through and through one." 
Both he and the Crown Princess not only expressed 
great delight in the singing, but asked of their plans 
for work in Germany, gave some suggestions, and 
expressed a hearty hope that their visit might be a 
very successful one. Tea was served for the Sing- 
ers before their departure, and the Crown Princess 
brought her children forward to shake hands with 
each of them. It was a delightful glimpse of the 



94 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

home-life to-day in the palace of Frederick the Great, 
with its fine culture, warm feeling, and religious 
sincerity. In its bearing on the future work of 
the Singers it was worth everything. As Rev. Dr. 
Joseph P. Thompson said, in an account of it 
written for the New York Independent^ " The kindly, 
hearty approbation of such an audience was a cer- 
tificate of character as well as of musical merit. 
They were received at the palace not as a strolling 
band of singers, but as ladies and gentlemen, and 
the degree of culture and politeness they exhibited 
were gracefully recognized by their illustrious hosts." 

Subsequently the Domkirche in Berlin — the church 
where the imperial family worship — was tendered to 
them withbut charge for their concerts, and the 
Sing-Akademie — a music hall into which nothing 
but entertainments of high tone and the best char- 
acter are admitted — was opened to them, and the 
concerts were every way a complete success. At 
their concerts in the Sin?-Akademie, on their return 
to the capital some weeks afterwards, the Empress 
Augusta was present on tv/o occasions, and sending 
for Professor White, during the intermission, to come 
to the imperial box, manifested by her many ques- 
tions her curiosity to know about the history of the 
Singers, and her interest, especially, in the religious 
aspects of the work at Fisk University. 

German critics, it was found, yielded as readily to 
the mysterious charm of the Jubilee songs as had 
those of other countries, and were quite as unani- 
mous and hearty in their praise. Rev. Dr. Kogel, 
another of the four court preachers, and perhaps 
the most eloquent devine in the empire, wrote an 



GERMAN CRITICISM. 95 

excellent article for " Dahclm," In which he spoke in 
the highest terms of their work. He said : " Berlin 
is, indeed, not Germany, as some modest inhabitants 
of this metropolis think, still a good part of it, and^ 
to tell the truth, one highly critical. Should they 
only stand first (so said to themselves the travelling 
Singers from the emancipated negro-folk of North 
America) the fire-proof of musical Germany, espe- 
cially on the hard ground of the central province, 
then would they win the game in the more out-of- 
the-way parts of our German fatherland. And they 
have v/on !" And elsewhere the same writer says : 
" These are not concerts which the negroes give ; 
they are meetings for edification, which they sus- 
tain with irresistible power." The Berlirier Musik- 
Zeitungy a severely critical journal, in a long and dis- 
criminating article took up the concert programme, 
piece by piece. Of "Steal Away," and the '' Lord's 
Prayer," it exclaims, "What wealth of shading! 
What accuracy of declamation ! Every musician felt 
then that the performances of these Singers are the 
result of high artistic talent, finely trained taste, and 
extraordinary diligence. Such a pianissimo, such a 
crescendo, and a decrescendo as those at the close of 
' Steal Away' might raise envy in the soul of any 
choir-master." The same critique closes, " Thus the 
balance turns decidedly in favor of the Jubilee Sing- 
ers, and we confess ourselves their debtors. Not 
only have we had a rare musical treat but our musi- 
cal ideas have also received enlargement, and we 
feel that something may be learned of these negro 
singers if only we will consent to break through the 
fetters of custom and long use." And the critics 



96 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

of the Volks-Zeitung, the Biirger-Zeitungy the Tag- 
blatt, and the Konigliche privilegirte Berlinische Zei- 
iung\Ntrt all of one accord in the same favorable ver- 
dict upon both the songs and the singing, as judged 
from artistic standards. 

Now and then there would be, of course, here as 
everywhere, a growling discord in the general har- 
mony of the greeting. One crusty journalist pub- 
lished an article disparaging their work, and declar- 
ing that their pretence of raising money for a school 
was probably a Yankee swindle. This served a good 
purpose in calling out a fine tribute to their mis- 
sion from a German gentleman who was a stranger 
to the singers, but who had travelled in the United 
States. In speaking of what they had accomplished 
he likened the famous " Sing-Akademie" of Berlin 
to a cow-shed, in architectural comparison with 
Jubilee Hall. 

In England that earnest, evangelistic element in 
the churches which stood by Mr. Moody's work 
everywhere took a special interest in the Singers, 
and prized their services of song as an effective ally 
in gospel effort. The same class of Christian peo- 
ple in Germany met them with the same fraternal 
heartiness, and rejoiced in this unique instrumental- 
ity for bringing gospel truth to the formalists and 
the materialists whom it was so difficult to reach. 

After this good start at the capital the company 
went successively to most of the larger cities in the 
empire. At Wittenberg they made joyful pilgrim- 
age to the places associated with Luther's memory, 
and sang '' Praise God, from whom all blessings flow" 
in his room in the old monastery. At Weimar 



VISIT WITH PROF. CHRISTLIEB. gj 

noted for its musical and art atmosphere, they had a 
crowded house, the Grand Duke and his retinue at- 
tending, with much courtly clatter of military escort. 
At Wiesbaden they sang in the Curhaus, the now 
dismantled old gambling hall, and in Homburg also 
the Jubilee songs echoed to the same strange asso- 
ciations. Visits to Gottingen, Cassel, Hanover, 
Hamburg, Liibeck, and other of the old free cities 
thereabouts, followed. 

At Brunswick they sang in the hall where Franz 
Abt was wont to conduct concerts, and received 
from the great composer a cordial greeting and 
many attentions. Thence their appointments took 
them, among other places, to Osnabruck, Munster, 
Dortmund, Essen, Elberfeld, and Dusseldorf. At 
the latter city they were the recipients, after the 
concert, of a formal reception and fraternal address 
from the evangelical Protestant element of the Gity. 
At Barmen, the capital of the iron and coal district, 
with its large operative population, they had an 
overflowing house. Spending a Sunday there, they 
visited the great Sunday-school, one of the largest 
in the world, singing for the children, and listening 
to their singing; the name of Jesus, the name that 
made them one, being the only word that either could 
recognize in the other's songs. 

At the Catholic city of Cologne, where the Protes- 
tant minority has little vigor for Christian work, their 
concerts were not successful. At the CathoHc city 
of Bonn, on the contrary, where the Protestant ele- 
ment has more of apostolic ardor, they found full 
houses. Their stay at this university town is re- 
membered with special interest for a delightful Sun- 

7 



98 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

day afternoon hour spent in the charming atmos- 
phere of the great Professor Christlieb's home. In 
the conversation the professor spoke with enthusi- 
asm of his pleasant experiences in the United States, 
during his visit to attend the meeting of the Evan- 
gehcal Alliance. Just then, he said, he was reading 
with the deepest interest President Finney's me- 
moirs, and making notes therefrom for use in his 
classes. Asking about Oberlin, he begged Professor 
White to say to its Faculty that its religious influ- 
ence was felt and gratefully owned in Bonn Univer- 
sity. He spoke with admiration of Mr. Finney and 
Mr. Moody as men of power, because they were men 
of positive convictions. 

Their visits to Darmstadt were lifted to a high 
place in memory by the pleasant acquaintance they 
made with that most charming lady and noble woman 
who was so greatly beloved by every one in her royal 
circle, and so idolized by her people, the late Prin- 
cess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hessen. The court 
theatre was placed at the disposal of the Singers, 
and the Grand Duchess attended the concert with 
her children, whom she spoke of in answer to a vis- 
itor's admiring glance, with motherly pride and 
daughterly loyalty, as the "■ Queen's grandchildren." 
The Grand Duke was absent from home at this 
time, and the Princess Alice expressed the hope that 
the Singers would be able to visit Darmstadt again, 
when her husband could have the opportunity of 
hearing them. Returning for another concert a few 
weeks later they were gratified to find not only the 
Grand Duke and Grand Duchess present in the 
royal box, but also the Prince of Wales and Duke 



THE PRINCESS ALICE. 99 

of Connaught, who had stopped at Darmstadt for a 
visit to their sister, on their way to London from the 
ceremonies of the grand royal double wedding at 
BerHn. After the concert the Singers were sum- 
moned to the royal box ; the Princess Alice received 
each with a pleasant greeting, and expressed the 
hope that they might have continued success. The 
Prince of Wales spoke of the enjoyment their sing- 
ing gave him at Mr. Gladstone's, asked which of the 
party were present on that occasion, and added the 
hope that they would make another tour of England 
before returning home. 

At Dresden there was a successful concert, at- 
tended by the King and Queen of Saxony, who man- 
ifested much interest in the slave songs that were 
such a novelty to German ears. In Leipzig, distin- 
guished for music and learning, their reception was 
all that could be desired. The Gewandhaus, in 
which, as in the Berlin Sing-Akademie, only the best 
class of concerts is allowed, was placed at their dis- 
posal, and the concerts were a great success. 

A visit was made to Stettin at the invitation of a 
German gentleman, who was formerly engaged in 
business in Memphis, who entertained them in the 
finest manner in his elegant home. Concerts were 
given in Breslau, Munich, and other cities. A brief 
visit was made to Switzerland, and then, retracing a 
part of their v/inding track northward, they filled out 
their eight months' campaign in Germany. 

Financially, it had not been the success that was 
desired. The hard times had been growing harder 
every month ; it was expensive work to break up 
such new ground ; and it was found necessary, in 



lOO THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

the abundance of low-priced musical entertainments 
in that country, to place the admission fees lower 
than in England or the United States. But testi- 
mony came from many sources, and in many ways, 
that their visit had been rich in results. It was a 
good thing to go up and down Germany singing 
Christian truth to multitudes who would have turned 
from it had it come in any other guise. Their visit 
was a revelation of the qualities and capacities of the 
negro to those who had known so little of him, that 
was in his favor. Listening to the Singers, thought- 
ful people said with surprise, *' We could not take 
even our German peasantry and reach such results 
in art, and conduct, and character, in generations of 
culture, as appear in these freed slaves." Their 
presence and work gave, as it could be seen, an 
added impulse — far more than it could have done 
in this country — to the freshened interest that all 
the western nations feel in everything that relates 
to the exploration, civilization, and Christianization 
of the continent of Africa. And doubtless it was of 
less consequence in the Divine thought that the 
Singers shor.ld take away much money with them, 
than that they should leave such influences at work 
behind them. 

At the close of this campaign future prospects for 
successful concert work abroad seemed so uncertain 
that it was deemed best to disband the company. 
Some of the Singers remained on the Continent for 
study, and the others turned their faces westward, 
for that visit home which their three years' absence 
had prepared them to enjoy so much. 



CHAPTER XI. 

PERSONAL HISTORIES OF THE SINGERS. 

In an account of the original company of Jubilee 
Singers in the first edition of this book it was stated 
that the children who were set free by the abolition of 
slavery in the United States occupied a position 
which no other generation, of any colour, or in any 
land, were ever placed before. Behind them were all 
the disabilities and cruelties of that bondage in which 
their lives began. Before them were all the possi- 
bilities of culture, distinction, and usefulness that are 
open to the citizens of one of the foremost nations of 
the earth. Such facts added a peculiar interest to the 
personal histories of the original band of Jubilee 
Singers. 

With the misguidances and limitations of their eariy 
life, such as they were — and it was not possible for any 
one to have an adequate idea of them who had not stood 
face to face with them — the readiness with which the 
Singers met the new social demands that were made 
upon them in their work was as remarkable as the 
quiet modesty and self-possession with which they 
received the attentions and honours that came so 
suddenly to them. It was a dizzy change, from a 
breakfast of hominy and bacon in a slave-cabin to 



102 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

dinners in the mansions of the wealthy and receptions 
in the drawing-rooms of the nobility. But their 
heads were not turned by it. They probably felt 
more at home on the concert platform, than they 
were able to do at first, but their manners there still 
remained as natural and unaffected — as free from 
professional ahs, as if they had never sung outside of 
their own school-rooms. 

To some of the company it was naturally a daily 
regret that they had had to forego their school 
advantages in the days of early youth. At the same 
time they had made amends for all that, as well as 
they were able, by giving attention to special studies 
and courses of reading, so far as the circumstances of 
their nomad life year after year would allow. 

Each member of the original company was a pro- 
fessing Christian, one or two having been converted 
in connection with the religious influences that had, 
through the Divine blessing, ever attended the work. 
Christian profession is still a characteristic of each 
member of the present company. Whenever the 
exigencies of hotel life or of railway travelling do not 
prevent, family worship is observed on each morning, 
the service being, as a rule, a novelty to hotel servants, 
while it is a season of spiritual refreshment, which 
friends, who are occasionally present, will afterwards 
refer to with peculiar interest. 

A few years ago, when twenty-four persons in all had 
been associated with the company of Singers, twenty 
of the number had actually served as slaves, while 
three of the remaining four were of slave parentage. 
Although none of the present company were them- 
selves slaves, there arc several of them whose parents 



PERSONAL HISTORIES OF THE SINGERS. 103 

were in bondage. There is not space in this volume 
even for brief biographies of all who have from the 
first been among the singers. The selection given 
from those who are now actually engaged in the 
service, will, at least, give a correct idea of slavery as 
it was in the days of that generation which preceded 
the present Singers ; of the changes and difficulties to 
which the Emancipation introduced them ; and of 
the sympathy and assistance which their descendants 
still need and deserve. The still living parents of 
many of the Singers can tell of things which happened 
in their own experience, and which bring out the 
dreadful realities of slavery in a way which no mere 
graphic story-writer or eloquent preacher could in any 
wise rival. 

Many changes have come since the organisation of 
the Jubilee Singers in 1871 ; and as \hQ personnel oi 
the company has also almost entirely altered, a few 
words concerning the first members of the choir will 
be interesting. 

Death has claimed five of those who took part in 
the early struggles and triumphs of the organisation. 
Mr. George L. White, who organised the company 
in 1 87 1, died in Ithaca, N.Y., in 1895. JULIA jACKSON, 
who was paralysed during the second visit to Great 
Britain, passed away in Chicago soon after her return 
to America. Patti J. Malone and MAGGIE A. 
Caines died during the winter of 1896-7. ELLA 
Sheppard is married, her husband, the Rev. George 
Moore, being one of the secretaries of the American 
Missionary Association. The husband of JENNIE 
Jackson De Hart is a Principal of one of the 
public schools in Cincinnati ; while the husband of 



I04 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

Georgie Gordon Taylor is carrying on a very- 
successful business as an undertaker in Nashville. 
Maggie Porter Cole married a gentleman who 
is engaged under the Municipal Government of 
Detroit. MINNIE Tate Hall, now a widow with 
one child, resides in Nashville. Mabel Lev^IS Imes, 
who married some years ago, has feeble health and 
is living in Cleveland. 

Of the men who belonged to the original com- 
pany, Benjamin M. Holmes is dead. Messrs. 
DiCKERSON, Watkins, and RUTLIZE are still in 
Europe. 



Frederick J. Loudin* is a native of Charles- 
town, Portage County, Ohio. His grandparents on 
his father's side were natives of Africa, and were 
stolen and brought to America in a slave-ship. 

They were held as slaves in the State of Con- 
necticut up to the time of the abolition of the slave 
system ; but under the law which was enacted before 
Emancipation in that State their children were born 
free, excepting the oldest (an uncle of F. J. Loudin's), 
who was born before the passage of this act. 

On his mother's side, his grandfather's father was 
a Scotchman, by the name of Morie Clark. His 
great-grandmother was a native African, named 
Diana .Tatcher. They lived at New Millford, Con- 
necticut, where Mr. Loudin's grandfather, Clark, was 
born. He served in the Federal army in the war 
of 1812. 

* Became manager and director of the company in 1882. 



FREDERICK J. LOUD IN. IO5 

His great-grandfather on his mother's side was an 
EngHsh sea-captain. His grandmother, who Hved 
in Vermont, was bound to a Mrs. Tuttle, who en- 
deavoured to enslave her, but failed. 

Though living in a free State, Mr. Loudin was, 
from his earliest recollection, under the hateful shadow 
of slavery. The Northern States, though they had 
the vitality to throv/ off the slave system earlier in 
their history, had still fostered the cruel prejudice 
in which the colored people were held everywhere 
as the representatives of an enslaved race. In some 
respects, this ostracism was even more complete and 
unchristian in the free than in the slave States. 

Loudin's father had accumulated some property, 
and had given generously, according to his means, 
for the endowment of a college a few miles from his 
home. But when he asked that one of his children 
might be admitted to the advantages of its pre- 
paratory department he was coolly informed that they 
did not receive colored students. His farm was taxed 
for the support of the public schools, but it was an 
exceptional favour of those days that his children 
were allowed to share their privileges. In Ravenna, 
where Loudin went to school for a time, the seats in 
the school-room v/ere assigned according to scholar- 
ship. He was studious and quick to learn, but when 
he was found entitled by the rules to a higher seat 
than several members of his class, their parents took 
their children out of school, in a white heat of wrath 
that he should not only have a seat beside but above 
them ! Subsequently he had the honor of being a 
pupil of Mr. President Garfield. 

Converted when a lad, he was admitted to mem- 



I06 THE JUBILEE SINGERS, 

bership in the Methodist church at the same place. 
He was then a printer's apprentice. His wages were 
S45 a year, and he gave $5 of this to the church. 
Having a reputation among his acquaintances as a 
good singer, he applied, two or three years after he 
became a church member, for admission to the choir. 
To his surprise and indignation his application was 
refused, because of his color. He made up his mind 
that he was not likely to get or do much more good 
in that church, and he never troubled it with his 
presence afterward. 

When a young man he found himself in the city 
of Cleveland, and obliged to obtain lodgings for the 
night. Going from one hotel to another he was re- 
fused by each in turn. It was nearly midnight ; and 
only one remained unvisited, and that the leading 
hotel of the city. Using a little strategy here, he 
led them to suppose he was a slave travelling in ad- 
vance of his master, and they gave him a room at 
once, thanks to the reflected refulgence of this sup- 
posed ownership by a white man ! He could not 
have got one at any price had they known that he 
was a free man and paid his own bills. 

There was one college in Ohio, that at Oberlin, 
which admitted colored students to the same privi- 
leges as white ones, and his parents would have 
gladly aided him in obtaining a college education. 
But the obstacles in the way of using it, either as 
a means of usefulness or of earning a livelihood, 
were so great that it seemed to them not worth the 
while. In those days the most a colored man could 
look forward to was a position as waiter or hostler 
in a white man's hotel ; or possibly, if he was excep- 



MABEL LEWIS. IO7 

tionally thrifty and subservient, to the ownership of 
a small barber's shop. After he had learned the 
printer's trade, in fact, he found it of no use to him. 
White printers would not tolerate the presence of a 
black compositor, and he was obliged to seek other 
means of getting a livelihood. 

Going to Tennessee after the war, he became 
interested in the work of the Jubilee Singers, and 
joined them previous to their second visit to Great 
Britain in 1875. 



Mabel Lewis was born, as she supposes, in New 
Orleans. But of her parentage, and the date of her 
birth, she knows nothing beyond vague supposition. 
She has reason to think that her mother was a slave 
and her father a slave-holder, and that it was owing 
to the interest her father felt in her that she was 
sent North, when two years old, and carefully reared 
in a wealthy family. Her earliest recollection is of 
a pleasant home, of being sent to and from school in 
the family carriage, and of being carefully guarded 
even from association with the servants. But, when 
she was about ten years old, for some unknown 
reason there came a change in the treatment which 
she received. The family, who had used her as 
kindly as if she were their own child, went abroad, 
and left her to the care of the servants. Their cruelty 
and neglect were such that she finally ran away to 
escape her sufferings at their hands. She drifted 
about from one place to another, a homelesss, friend- 
less waif, cursed by the slight strain of negro blood 
that appeared in her hair and complexion, working as 



I08 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

she had opportunity, and as well as she knew how, 
for her board and clothes. A benevolent gentleman 
in Massachusetts finally became interested in her, and 
provided her with school advantages. Other friends 
afterwards aided her in obtaining the special instruc- 
tion in music which her fine voice deserved, and finally 
introduced her to the Jubilee Singers, whom she 
joined in 1872. 

Her health gave way during the exhausting labours 
of their first visit to Great Britain, and she was unable 
for several years to take up again the exacting duties 
of concert work. 



Minnie Tate's parents were both free coloured 
people. Hor grandmother, on her mother's side, v/as 
a slave in Mississippi, but her master gave her and 
some of her children, including Minnie's mother, their 
freedom. Designing to make their home in a free 
State, the family took such of their possessions as 
they could carry in bundles on their heads, and 
started on foot for Ohio, little realising how long a 
tramp they had undertaken. They had to work for 
their living as they went along, and often stopped 
several montlis in a place before they could get 
enough money saved to warrant them in again taking 
up their pilgrimage. Finally they reached a German 
settlement in Tennessee, where the good people 
treated them so kindly that they decided to bring 
their journey to an end, and make their home among 
them. Minnie's mother was allowed to attend school 
with the white children, and obtained quite a good 
education in the common English branches. After- 



LINCOLN I A C. HAYNES, IO9 

wards she removed to Nashville, where she married, 
and where Minnie was born. 

Her mother gave her her first lessons in reading at 
home, but when older she went to Fisk School. She 
was one of the original Jubilee Singers, and the 
youngest of the company which made the first 
visit to Great Britain, where her sweet voice and 
her youth drew to her many friends. On the return 
to America she was obliged, by the prostration 
of her voice, to give up singing, and resumed her 
studies. 



LiNCOLNiA C. Haynes was a daughter of slave 
parents, and was born in Macon, Georgia. Her 
father's grandparents came directly from Africa, and 
v/ere sold into Maryland. They had five children, one 
of whom in early youth was sold into Georgia. There 
he married, and in course of time became the father 
of six children, the youngest of whom, named Mary- 
land, afterwards became Lincolnia's father. Her 
parents were married in 1870 and had two children, 
Lincolnia being the youngest. At the close of the 
civil war neither could read or write, but after their 
marriage both entered the school of the American 
Missionary Association, the husband attending at 
night, as he was compelled to work during the day. 
They both were very good singers, and early in life 
their little daughter Lincolnia began to show signs of 
musical talent ; for when only a tiny tot she would 
make a piano for herself out of her high chair, and 
play away on its cane bottom for hours together. She 
entered the Ballard High School at her home when 



1 10 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

quite young, finishing the course as valedictorian of 
her class. Shortly after this her father died, and, being 
desirous of a higher education, she managed, by means 
of concerts and other help, to secure enough m.oney to 
enter Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, where in 
1892, she graduated. 

While there Lincolnia was also a student in the 
voice-culture department, the principal of the depart- 
ment being responsible for her tuition. 

After graduating she engaged in missionary work 
under the American Missionary Association, labouring 
in Tennessee and Georgia. On two occasions she was 
chosen with others to travel through the North and 
East to sing and thus raise money for the Missionary 
Society ; she also taught in Ballard School until, 
resigning that service, she became a member of the 
Jubilee Singers. 

Carrie S. Sadgwar, of Wilmington, North 
Carolina, is the daughter of Frederick C. and Caro- 
line Sadgwar, who were slaves at the time of Carrie's 
birth. 

Her father is a carpenter, and when learning that 
trade while still a slave he also mastered the arts 
of reading and writing. A friend wrote the letters 
of the alphabet on a board in chalk ; and when the 
overseer happened to come near the precious letters, 
that *were of such value to him, would have to be 
hurriedly destroyed with a jack-plane. Many tears 
of sorrow and earnest longing were assuredly curled 
up in those shavings. Her mother never learned to 
read or write until she became free at the time of 
the Emancipation. 



CARRIE S. SADGIVAR— AGNES HAYNES. Ill 

Carrie Is her parents' third child, and at nine years of 
age she was sent to Gregory Institute, one of the schools 
of the American Missionary Association, where she 
remained until she finished the course. Having won 
the hearts of her teachers, and proving worthy of a 
higher education, she was sent by one of them — Miss 
Hannah L. Fitts — to Fisk University. There she 
gained a scholarship and worked her way until she 
finished the normal course. 

It seemed that Carrie was born to be a Jubilee 
Singer. In the year 1871, on the 6th of October, the 
first company of Singers went out from Nashville^ 
Tenn., that being the day before she was born. About 
that time of the year, eighteen years later, she entered 
Fisk University, where she became one of the leaders 
of Jubilee songs. Almost at the same time of the year 
she joined the present company of Singers. 

When Carrie, after two years, went to New Hamp- 
shire and met Miss Fitts — the teacher who had done so 
much for her. Miss Fitts embraced her and with tears 
of joy said, " If I had done ten times more for you, 
Carrie, I would not regret it one bit, for I thank God 
for my Carrie's progress." 



The education and training of Agnes Haynes was 
due to the remarkable energy and ambition of her 
mother, who was born a slave. 

Having so-called strict owners who thought it a 
heinous crime for a slave to learn to read or write, she 
had to gain by stealth all she learned. Accordingly, 
when sent to take care of her master's children when 
they were attending school, she took advantage of the 



112 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

teaching by the governess, and learned to read as 
thoroughly as the children did who were properly 
taught. 

Feeling her inferiority, as in this way she could 
acquire the rudiments of an education alone — the 
children being sent away to school when they grew 
older — the slave attendant determined that, if ever she 
had any children of her own, they should be educated 
better than herself To effect this, it was necessary to 
be free. Three times she endeavoured to reach 
Canada — the Mecca of all those who were bound by the 
chains of slavery — but each effort was unsuccessful. 
Still, undaunted by repeated failure, hope was not 
extinguished ; when, during the war, the Northern 
soldiers came into the vicinity, she determined to 
make another effort and go away with them. The 
end of the war drew nearer, however ; the Emancipation 
proclamation was issued and she was free. 

Having four girls, the slave-mother sent them to 
school in Staunton, Virginia, where she lived ; but as 
they grew older she longed to give them better 
opportunities than those afforded by the public 
schools. 

While working at a summer resort she heard, throucrh 
one of the guests, that Fisk University offered the 
opportunity so ardently sought. By dint of hard 
work and saving she accumulated sufficient to pay 
her eldest daughter, Eliza's, railway fare and first 
month's board in that institution, trusting that God 
would help her to earn the next month's expenses. 
So the mother, toiling on, sent three of the girls to 
Fisk, and finally the fourth, Agnes, was started. But, 
being then quite old and having laboured so con- 



GEORGIANA E. FOWLER. 1 13 

tinuously, the brave woman's health began to fail, so 
that she could not help Agnes as she had the others. 
But Agnes inherited somewhat of her mother's energy 
and ambition, and after her mother's health gave way 
she pushed on alone, and was thus enabled to complete, 
not only the course at Fisk University, but also to 
obtain some voice culture as well. 

It was the evening she graduated from the normal 
course at Fisk University that Mr. Uoudin heard her 
sing, and wished her to become a member of his 
organisation. Longing to repay in some degree her 
mother for the care and labour bestowed on her 
children, and seeing that she could best do this by 
accepting the offer made, Agnes became one of the 
Jubilee Singers. 



Georgiana E. Fowler is a native of Savannah, 
Georgia. Losing her parents when very young she 
has but a faint recollection of them, and knows but 
little of their early history, save that they were born 
under the yoke of slavery. 

When four years of age her mother died, and she 
v*'as given to a friend of her mother's, who cared 
for her and sent her to school when a few years 
older. This was done only at the cost of con- 
siderable toil and many sacrifices ; but the friend 
proved true to her trust, Georgie was kept at 
school until able to help herself, which she did by 
dressmaking. 

When but a little child, Georcjie showed a love for 
Ciiisic, in the lullaby s she used to sing to her doll, and 
this talent was fostered by friends, who, though 
8 



114 THE JUBILEE SINGERS. 

unable to help her to any cultivation of the voice, yet 
enjoyed her singing. 

She early became a Christian, and, on uniting with 
the Church, also became a leading member of the 
choir, and continued such until she joined the present 
company of Jubilee Singers. 



William Early's parents were both slaves m 
Georgia and were sold into Mississippi. Their 
owners were very cruel people, his mother even now 
bearing marks of the beatings she received. She has 
told William of how, when she was sold, she was 
stripped to the waist for purchasers to examine her 
body, to see if she was sound in all respects, so 
as to be a good bargain ; and how they opened her 
mouth to be assured that her teeth were good ; and, 
finally, how they made her walk up and down in order 
to show " how she picked up her feet." 

This slave-woman's husband, after being repeatedly 
punished, ran away at the beginning of the war, and 
for a long time lived in the woods for fear of being 
killed. He ultimately succeeded in getting possession 
of his wife, and they made their way to Augusta, 
Georgia, where William was born. 

It was a hard struggle for a long time to get along ; 
but by strenuous efforts the poor fugitives managed to 
send William for a time to school ; but as soon as he 
was old enough to work he was obliged to give up 
books and learning for other things. Still, he obtained 
some education while working at anything he could 
get to do, with his father's help. He early showed a 
love for music, and would take part in all the musical 



JOHN L. A. LANE-MAGGIE E. WILSON. Ilj 

events among the colored people in Augusta. He 
joined the present company of Jubilee Singers in 
1895. 

John L. A. Lane's father was a slave, born in 
Loudon Co., Virginia. His mother was a free woman. 
Often does his father tell his children of the cruel 
treatment he received from his master ; how he 
used to be beaten, and then how salt was rubbed 
into the sores caused by the whip. He finally ran 
away and went to Georgetown, where John was 
born. 

John went to school until he Vv^as old enough to go 
to work. He partly learned the trade of a carpenter ; 
but all spare time was devoted to music, of which he 
was passionately fond. Having a good tenor voice 
he was greatly in demand for all the amateur musical 
entertainments given among his people. Mr. Loudin 
heard him sing, and liking his voice, engaged him as 
a member of the company of Jubilee Singers in 1885. 
He has remained with them ever since that date. 

Maggie E. Wilson was born of slave parents, 
who were born in Prince George's Co., Md., and who 
were Emancipated after the civil war. Maggie was 
the thirteenth child, and her home was in Washington, 
D.C., where she was educated. The father, being 
shrewd and industrious, determined that he would 
buy a house, and made one payment on a small 
suitable homestead. As a result of an accident he 
died within a year after, however, leaving his wife 
with nine small children and the house unpaid for. 



1 16 THE JUBILEE SINGERS, 

To rear and send to school so many little oner? 
being no easy task, Mrs. Wilson experienced a hard 
struggle in getting bread for the large household ; and 
at the same time, not being able to make any further 
payment, lost the home she had so earnestly hoped 
to call her own. 

As the elder children grew able to work, her task 
lightened somewhat ; but to her great sorrow she was 
not able to give them as good a schooling as she had 
earnestly desired to do. 

One day Maggie followed some children into the 
schoolhouse, and remained until the pupils were dis- 
missed. After that adventure she insisted upon being 
sent to school, and the elder children united with the 
mother in trying to give the youngest child that edu- 
cation which they had failed to obtain for themselves. 

As the young people w^ere not able to earn very 
much, the weight of the burden fell upon the already 
overtaxed mother, who struggled on, toiling from 
early dawn till late into the night to keep hunger at 
bay, and at the same time to keep Maggie at school. 

Maggie's desire to learn encouraged the whole 
family in their efforts, and they one and all deprived 
themselves of almost every comfort that the child 
might be benefited. 

Being always fond of singing, Maggie took a pro- 
minent part in the choir of the church she attended, 
until, in 1882, she became a member of the company 
of Jubilee Singers, and she has remained such until 
the present time. 

In this congenial situation Maggie has been able to 
provide for her now aged mother, Mrs. Wilson being 
at the present time seventy-five years of age. The 



PEARL M. CRAWFORD. 11/ 

daughter thus makes a good return for the sacrifices 
that were cheerfully made on her account in earlier 
days. 

Pearl M. Crawford's parents were slaves in 
Athens, Alabama. After the Emancipation they 
moved to Huntsville, in the same State, where Pearl 
was born. 

In 1877 they settled at Memphis, Tennessee, where 
scon after they died of yellow fever, which was then 
raging, leaving three children, Pearl and two younger 
brothers. Mrs. Hayes, a widow, sister-in-law of Mrs. 
Crawford, took the children and cared for them, as if 
they were her own. 

Mrs. Hayes' husband had been employed by a Mr. 
Menkin as a carter, and at Hayes' death his widow, 
though totally uneducated, continued to carry on his 
work, although many efforts were made to supplant 
her. But Mr. Menkin, vv'ho camxC from the North to 
Memphis, had sympathy for a v/oman who had these 
three orphan children to care for, and so continued to 
employ her. Men would often apply for this work, 
offering to do it cheaper, and asking v/hy it was giver^ 
to a Negro woman ; but by earnest pleadings and 
careful attention Mrs. Hayes succeeded in keeping 
her work. From a child, as soon as she learned how 
to count, Pearl used to help her aunt to keep the 
accounts ; and, therefore, although there were several 
teams employed, Mrs. Hayes kept the business 
straight, to the entire satisfaction of her employer ; 
thus being able to fulfil the promise made to Mrs. 
Crawford that the children should not be separated. 

So Mrs. Hayes worked on, keeping the children 



118 THE JUBILEE SL\GERS. 

at their books, until Pearl (who often had to be away 
from school on account of other work) graduated from 
the normal department of the Lemoyne Institute, 
which was under that Society which has done, and is 
still doing, so much for Negro education — the American 
Missionary Association. 

After leaving school Pearl taught in the public 
school at Memphis until she joined the Singers. 

FiSK University, still the embodiment of all that 
represents the uplifting of the Negro race in America, 
has more than doubled its capacity and trebled the 
number of its students ; the average attendance being 
over five hundred. Hundreds arc anxiously wishing 
to enter, and are only hindered by inability to raise 
even the small amount needed for the course. There 
is no abatement of the desire for education ; but, owing 
to great financial depression in the United States, 
the American Missionary Association, which has the 
University in charge, is obliged to curtail expenses 
rather than extend its enterprise, although such 
extension is urgently needed. 

Additional buildings added to the first Jubilee Hall, 
are Livingstone Hall, now fully occupied, a Theo- 
logical Hall, Gymnasium, a Model School, Magnolia 
Cottage, for lodging accommodation, and a beautiful 
Chapel, called Fisk Memorial, after the late Gen. 
Clinton B. Fisk, being paid for by a legacy left by 
the General. To these is now being added a much- 
needed home for President Cravath, who hitherto has 
been compelled to occupy rooms in Jubilee Hall. It 
would gratify those who have contributed to the 
University could they see the progress made, and 



PISK UNIVERSITY. Itg 

take account of the vast benefits, spiritual, physical, 
and literary, which the Institution has been enabled 
to bestow. 

Since 1 878, when the University ceased to use the 
Jubilee Singers as a means of revenue, the Trustees 
have depended almost entirely upon the generosity of 
friends for support, there being practically no endow- 
ment. Occasionally students have been sent out to 
deepen the interest of the public in the Institution 
by telling of its work and singing the melodies of the 
South ; for as the work extends the need for help 
becomes proportionately greater. 



SUPPLEMENT. 



BY 



F. J. LOUDiN. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE NEW MANAGEMENT. 

With this chapter begins a new epoch in the 
*' Story of the Jubilee Singers." 

Hitherto, the triumphs and wonderful achieve- 
ments had been accomplished under the direction 
and management of the so-called dominant race, 
but in September, 1882, a Negro steps to the helm 
and henceforth directs the now famous Jubilee 
Craft. He fully realized that it was no easy task 
to come out of the ranks, where he had been on 
equal terms with the rest of the company, and take 
command ; that it would greatly damage the cause 
of the Negro, if, under the management of one of 
the race, there should be in any respect a failure, 
and how thousands, who have no confidence in the 
leadership of the Black Man, would say significant- 
ly, " I told you so," or " I knew it." Many were 
the predictions which came to our ears of the utter 
failure of the company under the new management. 

In May, 1882, Mr. White, who had been manag- 
ing the company since 1879, told us, when disband- 
ing for the season, that he sav/ no prospect of 
keeping the company together longer, and I was 
urged by some of the members, who, with myself, 
Ihouoht the work of the Singers not ended, to take 



124 ^^^ A^^jr MANAGEMENT. 

the management and direction of the company. 
Having waited until the latter part of August in 
the vain hope that Mr. White would again take up 
the work, I set about the task of re-organization. 

Not quite ail were willing to continue in the 
company under the new conditions and the task of 
filling those places thus made vacant, for the time 
had already passed when, if we were to be in the 
field, the work of organizing should be complete, 
was by no means easy. 

After searching through several states, the va- 
cancies were well filled and the work of rehearsal 
began. After nearly a month spent thus, the new 
parts of the Craft were fitted to their places, and 
the vessel, with its new helmsman, v/as, with all 
sails set, soon under Avay. 

Two very successful years were spent in the 
United States and Canada. But a desire for new 
and greater achievements than the little band had 
ever won was ever present with me ; but to find a 
field where this Vv^as possible was the perplexing 
question. 

It did not seem possible to do this in either 
Europe or America, for they Vv^ere neither of them 
new fields ; so, finally, it was decided to circum- 
navigate the globe ; and we resolved to sing these 
sweet, tuneful melodies in lands vdiere they had 
not yet been heard, and where we v/ere entire 
strangers. 

With this end in view, we sailed from New York, 
April 3, 1884, bound for Great Britain, 



IN GREAT BRITAIN. 125 

IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

Landing in Iviverpool after a rather rough pas- 
sage, we went on to London and found that the 
" May Meetings," as the annual gatherings of the 
various churches and other organizations are 
called, were already in session. As soon as it was 
known that we were in the city, invitations came 
thick and fast for us to take part in tliese various 
meetings, only three of which were v/e able to ac- 
cept, viz: the Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A., and 
the Freedmen's Missions Aid Society; the last was 
held in Westminster Church, the other two in the 
great historic Kxeter Hall, both buildings being 
crowded to their utmost capacity. 

At the Young Women's meeting, that lamented 
and beloved Christian nobleman. Lord Shaftesbury, 
presided. Among the many good things he said, 
was the following: 

*' He had never hoped to see such a grand sight 
as that before him. Some of the Jubilee Singers 
had borne the yoke of servitude, which, by the 
mercy of God, had been broken; and the use they 
made of their liberty was to devote their talents 
and energies in the earlier part of their career to 
help their kith and kindred. Some of them were 
old friends of his. It had nov/ come to pass that 
colored people came to England to advance the 
temporal and eternal interests of the white popu- 
lation. God forbid that we should hear any more 
of that blasphemous nonsense, that there was any 



126 IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

material differejtice between races redeemed by the 
same Savior and destined to the same immortality. 
He had derived great benefit from the meeting and 
enjoyed a rich and happy treat." 

Our agent being new to the Vvork and to the 
country, made the very sad mistake of booking us 
in the South instead of the North of Great Britain, 
when at this season of the year it was so warm that 
all indoor entertainments were failures, and our 
concerts were no exceptions, so that our losses up 
to the close of the season, July 6, amounted to 
several thousand dollars. A vacation of six weeks, 
which was spent in Scarborough, the " Queen of 
Watering Places," as its surpassing beauty entitles 
it to be called, followed. 

Notwithstanding our most pleasant surroundings, 
they were anxious weeks as we looked forward to 
the outcome of the approaching season, for which 
plans were formulated and engagements made. 

A new difficulty arose at this point. An agent, 
who had been discharged before leaving America, 
and a man for whom we had given a number of 
concerts, were taking advantage of our absence 
from the country to organize a company which they 
called " The Original Fisk University Jubilee 
Singers," and were making advances through an 
approachable member of our company, to several 
others, by offering them increased pay to return 
and join them. All v/ith one exception refused, 
being thoroughly loyal to the management. The 
knowledge of this treachery did not come to me 



IN GREAT BRITAIN. IZJ 

until within a week or ten days before the time for 
beginning the season's work, when it was an- 
nounced at morning rehearsal that he and one of 
my principal singers were about to leave. This 
meant a delay of about a month in getting new 
sineers and an additional two or three weeks to fit 
them in their places ; and the breaking of more than 
a score of good contracts, making myself liable for 
damages; besides the additional expense of an idle 
company, to which, in order that the situation may 
be appreciated, the losses already incurred must be 
added. 

After a long, exhausting discussion with the par- 
ties, I succeeded in showing the one whom I want- 
ed to retain, and who was an excellent singer, the 
dishonor of such action, and he agreed to remain. 

September found us in excellent condition and a 
bright prospect before us, which gave vigor to our 
work. 

Our third concert was at Hull, where we sang to 
an audience of over five thousand in Hengler's 
Circus, sharing the proceeds with a Methodist 
Church. 

The next appointment v/as at the old historic 
city of York, where w^e had one of the grandest 
array of patrons the company had ever been hon- 
ored with at any single concert. It was given in 
the '' Festival Concert Room," September 4. 
Among those under whose patronage and in whose 
presence the concert was given were the Earl and 
Countess of Zetland, Lord and Lady Wenlock, Sir 



128 IN GREAT BRITAIN, 

F. G. Milne, Bart., M. P., and Lady Milne, the 
Right Hon. the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, 
the Sheriff of York, Major-Gen. Willis, C. B., and 
Mrs. Willis, Major-Gen. Nason and Mrs. Nason, 
the ex-Lord Mayor and Mrs. T. Varey, Sir James 
Meek, Rev. Canon Fleming, B. D., and thirty-one 
other distinguished personages of York and vicin- 
ity. An enormous crowd filled every available 
space in the concert room. So greatly were the 
people pleased that they demanded a second con- 
cert, which was given at a later date. 

We pass over many interesting events, as space 
compels us to do so, and take the reader with us to 
Chillingham Castle, in the North of England, the 
home of the Karl of Tankerville. 

The Earl and the Countess of Tankerville are 
among the most active Christians of that region. 

The old castle dates back well nigh a thousand 
years, and we had been invited here to stay from 
Saturday till Monday. 

We went there on the 4tli of October. The day 
was beautiful, and the estate of nearly two thou- 
sand acres, in the midst of v/hicli the castle stands, 
was decked in all its autumnal beauty. The native 
cattle, white in color and in a wild state, which are 
found on this estate and that of the Duke of 
Hamilton's only, number nearly one hundred head. 
They have about seven hundred acres of a deer 
park through which to roam. 

It seemed like a dream to us that we, who had 
been, and still are, driven from so many hotels in 



IN GREAT BRITAIN. 129 

the '' Sweet Land of Liberty " because of our 
color ; and some, too, who had been born in slavery, 
should now be entertained by an Earl for three 
days in his home. What took place on Sunday I 
will let his lordship tell. In a letter he wrote to a 
friend the next day, and which by permission was 
published in a paper called '' The Service for the 
King," (I regret that space will not permit the 
entire article to be published,) he says : 

'' Yesterday was such a day as Chillingham never 
saw before — the old castle turned into an impromptu 
cathedral was fairly taken by storm — a vast mul- 
titude having gathered to hear the Jubilee Singers 
and their touching hymns, which we thought might 
be turned to good account in connection with an 
address from Mr. Stevenson Blackwood, who was 
here with us. We fancied that the court-yard " (a 
large square, on the four sides of which the castle 
with its four corner towers is built) ''would be 
large enough for any number who were in reach, 
but when the gates were opened the first rush 
filled it, and they still came pouring in like a river ; 
so I desired them to go up the tower staircases and 
man the battlements, which made excellent galler- 
ies — but still more came, some of whom were al- 
lowed to go into all the rooms looking into the court. 

" The scene was very striking, all these crowds of 
faces so intent, so quiet, so orderly. Still, there 
were many who were disappointed, for we expected 
perhaps five or six hundred, and there were, I am 
told, upwards of two thousand. 



130 IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

"The distances they came from were out of all 
calculation ; some as far as Rothbury and the sea- 
side ; and from Wooler and Belford in quantities. 

" From the stone steps, in the centre of one side 
of the court, which lead up to the Hall, there was 
a platform raised for the Singers, and from which 
Mr. Blackwood spoke. After settling the crowd, 
who marshalled themselves to order like soldiers, 
the Jubilee Singers began. You heard only a faint 
note in unison, like the wind among leaves, which 
resolved itself into a beautiful chord on an ^olian 
harp, and then they swelled their voices into full 
song. The hymn, " My Redeemer," was most im- 
pressive, and when it died away you might have 
heard a pin drop. 

" Mr. Blackwood then began, and was splendid^ 
fixing the whole audience, although nine-tenths of 
them only came to hear the Jubilee Singers. 

^jC ^i^ ^f>- ''i^ *^ ?j^ 

" The elements, too, were under command, for 
though we are now late in the season for fine 
weather and subject to equinoctial gales, the day 
was as bright and still as any summer's day that 
we have had; and though boys and men were 
perched upon all the tower tops and rickety old 
battlements, not an accident or contre-temps of any 
kind occurred, while 2,000 people wandered at will 
through all the gardens and flower beds, and never 
trod upon one or gathered a single flower, though 
there was no one to hinder them. About sixty or 
eighty came afterwards into the Hall, before finally 



IN GREAT BRITAIN. 1 31 

going away, where we had a parting prayer with 
them. 

* s{J ♦ >}i :is if! 

" I could not help thinking when that weird music 
chimed in so meltingly, that these songs of their 
captivity (as they call them) might have been 
something of an echo of the songs of the captive 
children of Israel, when they hung their harps on 
the willows, and w^ept by the waters of Babylon ; 
and their songs, if they could have been handed 
down to us, must have been most beautiful, for the 
Jews are the first musicians and the first composers 
in the world. But as song, like poetry, is the out- 
come of the passions, whether of joy or of sorrow, 
all the world over, these wild, plaintive hymns, 
longing to be away in the Home to come, might 
have some resemblance to those of ages past, as 
* like causes produce like effects.' 

" Altogether, our October 5th was a very mem- 
orable one, and I do hope and believe will be a day 
to be remembered by many, who went away with 
very different thoughts than those they came with ; 
and certainly these old walls never saw such a 
day.'» 

It was evident now that the tide had set in in our 
favor and success followed success from day to day 
and from month to month. February 17 we sang 
in Hengler's Circus in I^iverpool, before an audience 
numbering nearly seven thousand. The concert 
was given under the auspices of the Y. W. C. A. of 
Gordon Hall. It was a most enthusiastic audience 



132 IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

and the bursts of applause which followed many of 
the pieces fairly shook the great building. 

This was the largest audience where an admis- 
sion fee was charged to which the Jubilee Singers 
had ever sung. Of this concert, the Liverpool 
Courier of the i8th, among other things, said : 

" The Jubilee Singers are not a numerically strong 
choir, but long association, careful practice, and 
above all a deep sympathy with their songs have 
brought the members individually and collectively 
to a high state of perfection. The peculiar weird- 
ness which characterizes many of their songs, the 
richness and yet softness and simplicity of the 
melodies and the exquisite taste and feeling with 
which they are rendered, combine to give any 
audience who have had the pleasure of listening to 
them a rare musical treat, and such was the concert 
last night. 

"Frequently throughout the evening the Singers 
had to respond to demands for repetition, and this 
they did with a pleasure the sincerity of which was 
evident to all the listeners." 

IN IRELAND. 

On each former occasion the Jubilee Singers had 
visited only a few of the larger towns of Ireland, 
and these only in the North, for the reason they 
feared that the towns and cities where Roman 
Catholicism predominated would not give paying 
audiences, but it was resolved to try it, and the re- 
sults fully justified the venture ; for we were 



IN GREAT BRITAIN. 1 33 

greeted almost universally with good houses of very 
enthusiastic people. Queenstown, Cork, and many 
other of the southern towns were visited with good 
results. At Abbey Leix, we had the honor of the 
patronage of the Viscount and Lady De Vesci, who 
attended the concert, accompanied by Lady Ken- 
mare, wife of Baron Kenmare, of Killarney House, 
Killarney Co. We were honored with an invitation 
to lunch the next day with Lady De Vesci at her 
beautiful home. Lady Kenmare was also present 
and invited us to Killarney House, should we visit 
that most charming part of the Emerald Isle, 
putting one of her cottages and a yacht at our 
disposal during our stay ; but time would not permit 
us to accept her most cordial invitation, much to 
our reo-ret. 

o 



CHAPTER II. 

BOUND FOR THE ANTIPODES. 

It had been decided to start for the Antipodes in 
the spring of 1886, so we returned to England in 
March, after sending our agent on one month in 
advance, with full instructions. It required no 
small amount of persuasion to induce all of the 
Singers to put the earth's diameter between them- 
selves and home, and their parents as well to 
allow them to go so far from the parental roof. 
All, however, finally decided to go, with one ex- 
ception, and his place was filled by a young man 
from Georgia. 

We reached I^ondon about March 27, and the 
next four days were very busy ones, as the reader 
may know, getting things together ready for a start. 
Five thousand copies of the " Story of the Jubilee 
Singers " had to be shipped, as well as eight or 
nine hundred dollars' worth of various kinds of 
printed matter which, as was learned afterward, 
could have been done as well, if not so cheaply, in 
Australia as in England. Numerous friends came 
to say farewell and wish us God-speed, one of our 
old friends, Richard Johnson, coming all the way 
from Manchester for that purpose. 



OUR VOYAGE. 135 

OUR VOYAGE. 

April ist found us astir, bright and early, and on 
our way to the railway station, where we took the 
train which conveyed us to the great Albert docks, 
some dozen miles down the Thames. Arriving at 
the docks, our party, save myself, saw for the first 
time the beautiful staunch steamer " Orient," of the 
Orient line of steamers, which was to be our ocean 
home for the next six weeks. It was, up to this 
time, the finest ship we had ever made a voyage 
upon. 

There were twelve of our party and the fare 
alone was about three hundred dollars each, beside 
the agent, who had already gone. 

One might have thought we were leaving home 
rather than going from one foreign country to an- 
other, from the large number of dear English 
friends who were down to bid us good-bye. 

Promptly at ten o'clock, the appointed time, the 
lines were hauled in and the ponderous 5,000 
horse-power engines began their motion, and we 
were on our way to the '' lyand of the Golden 
Fleece." 

The voyage was most pleasant and interesting. 
The death of an infant and the breaking of a leg 
by a third-class passenger made up the chapter of 
accidents during the voyage. I shall try to tell 
in another book some of the interesting events of 
this voyage, and here mention only the detour 
made by some half-dozen of our company to Cairo 



136 OUR VOYAGE. 

during tlie two days our ship took to pass through 
the Suez Canal, one of the greatest events of our 
lives up to the present. 

At the end of forty-four days our ship lay 
alongside the wharf at Williamstown, the port of 
Melbourne. The long association on vshipboard 
had made for us many friends. There was none 
of that insolent color prejudice to confront us, as we 
were the only Americans on board. 

We had been asked by the ^'Aged Seamen's 
Home," of Liverpool, to give a concert on the way 
out. We did so, and the lady passengers managed 
the financial part by selling programs, which they 
printed and ornamented. The net results were 
something over $150, which amount the purser re- 
mitted to the "Home." 

Before leaving the ship on the morning of May 
14, 1886, the following was handed to me by a 
committee of our fellow passengers : 

S, S. ''Orient,'' May ij, 1886. 
To F, J, Loiidin, Esq., 

Dear Sir : — We cannot allow our voyage in the 
S. S. "Orient" to terminate without tendering to 
you and the other members of the Fisk Jubilee 
Singers our best thanks for your unremitting efforts 
to contribute to our entertainment during the six 
weeks we have been together. You have at all 
times been ready to assist in making the evenings 
pass pleasantly, and with so much cheerfulness 
have you displayed your ability to entertain that 



OLTR VOYAGE. 137 

your presence on board lias been most welcome to 
us all. 

We also beg to express our liigli estimation of 
the character of your musical entertainment as ex- 
pressive of the religious feeling and the religious 
life of the colored people while in bondage in the 
Southern States ; we think the music not only 
touching and interesting, but unique. We sin- 
cerely hope that in your visit to the Australian 
Colonies you will meet with the great success and 
will receive the high appreciation which, from our 
experience, we feel sure you most certainly deserv^e. 
We are, dear sir, yours very sincerely, 

Then follow the names of all our fellow passen- 
gers in the first saloon. 



CHAPTER III. 

IN AUSTRALASIA. 

We landed in Melbourne, the beautiful capital 
of the colony of Victoria, and found things in a 
very bad shape for us. Our agent, who had started 
a month in advance of us, had only been on shore — 
or rather on the mainland — four days in advance of 
us, as there had been a case of small-pox on his 
ship and all had been quarantined for three 
weeks. 

We went to the Grand Hotel, the best in Mel- 
bourne, and in a few days began practice in the 
Y. M. C. A. Hall, which was very generously 
placed at our service for that purpose. 

We can never forget the cordial welcome we re- 
ceived. Numerous social gatherings were arranged 
by leading citizens of Melbourne, by members of 
Parliament and their wives, and by leading mer- 
chants, until finally the social courtesies culminat- 
ed in a grand reception and private concert at the 
Grand Hotel. 

The invitations sent out were as follows : " The 
Very Reverend, the Dean of Melbourne, upon be- 
half of the committee especially formed to welcome 
the Jubilee Singers to Australia, requests the 



IN MELBOURNE. 1 39 

pleasure of company at a private 

concert and reception, which will be given at the 
Grand Hotel, on Monday afternoon, 31st May. 

The chair will be taken at three o'clock by the 
Very Reverend, the Dean. Morning dress. Car- 
riages at 4:30 P. M. 

Committee : The Honorable Jones MacBain, 
President of the Legislative Council ; the Right 
Worshipful, the Mayor of Melbourne ; the Very 
Reverend, the Dean of Melbourne ; the Honorable 
James Balfour, M. L. C; the Honorable C. J. Ham, 
M. Iv. C; the Honorable F. C. Beaver, M. L. C; 
the Rev. Rentoul, D. D.; the Rev. H. B. Macart- 
ney, Jr., M. A.; the Rev. H. A. Langley ; the Rev. 
D. S. McEachran ; the Rev. J. Watsford ; the Rev. 
Wm. Allen ; Andrew Harper, Esq.; M. A. Duncan 
Love, Esq." 

The greeting given us on this occasion was most 
memorable ; more than two hundred of the best 
people of this wonderful city were present. Gen- 
tle women and strong men grasped our hands in 
such a manner as to assure us that, though among 
strangers in that part of the earth farthest from 
our homes, we were yet in the midst of warm and 
true-hearted friends. 

The singing seemed to touch their hearts, and, 
indeed, wherever we went through Australia, 
flowers were strewn along our pathway. 

Following this came an invitation from Lady 
Loch to attend her reception at Government House, 
where we were made most welcome by the Gov- 



140 IN AUSTRALASIA. 

ernor and his estimable wife, and were cordially 
greeted by those who attended. 

On the 7th of June, we gave our first concert. 
We had rented the Town Hall, seating 3,200. His 
Excellency, the Governor, Sir Henry Ivoch and 
Lady Loch, with suite, honored us with their 
patronage on the opening night. The hall was 
packed almost to suffocation, as it was also on the 
twenty-five succeeding nights. Hundreds were 
frequently turned away. We eclipsed all records 
of concert companies (jubilee or classical) during 
our stay in Melbourne, for we gave eighty success- 
ful concerts during this visit to Melbourne. 

In each of the capital cities of Australasia, the 
governors and their wives honored us v/ith their 
patronage. We sang sixty nights in Sidney, forty 
in Adelaide, and thirty in Brisbane. We were in 
beautiful New Zealand seven months, in Tasmania 
one mionth — remaining in. Australasia altogether 
three and one-half years. 

Space will permit the narration of only a few of 
the more remarkable incidents which were crowded 
into our visit to Australasia. 

The aborigines of Australia are said to be the 
lowest type of the human family ; they are very 
black, with long, wavy hair and very coarse feat- 
ures.* We were invited by a missionary at Meloga, 
a Mission Station, to come out and sing to them. 
We gladly consented, and after a drive of fourteen 
miles through thickly wooded forests, arrived at 
the station. We found these black people far from 



THE ABORIGINES OF AUSTRALIA. 141 

cordial, in fact they gave us to understand by their 
actions that they did not wish to have anything to 
do with us. After we had spent about an hour in- 
specting their schools, homes, etc., the church bell 
rang, and when they had assembled we took our 
places and began to sing that sweetly pathetic 
song evolved from the crushed hearts of the en- 
slaved black people of America, '^ Steal Away to 
Jesus." Up to this time they seemed like unwil- 
ling children forced to go to Sabbath school ; but 
what a change of expression the tones of the old 
slave song awoke ! First, wonder, which seem.ed 
to say, " What strange sounds are these which for 
the first time fall upon our ears ? " then joy, as the 
full volume of the melody filled the humble little 
church. The song ended, we sang another, and 
still others of ^' sweetly solemn, wildly sad " old 
melodies. 

" And the song of our devotion 
Filled their hearts with strange emotion," 

for long before the " Benediction " had been chant- 
ed, they were weeping like children, tears of joy ; 
and when we had finished they gathered about us, 
and, with tears still flowing, they clasped our 
hands and in broken accents exclaimed, " Oh ! God 
bless you ! we have never heard anything like that 
before ! " As we drove away, they climbed upon 
the fences and up in the trees, and until our car- 
riages were lost to view, they waved us good-bye. 
The Maoris of New Zealand are the aboriginal 
people of those beautiful mountainous islands. 



142 THE MAORIS OF NEW ZEALAND. 

Unlike the aborigines of Australia, they are a 
strong, vigorous, intelligent people. They seemed 
to take to us at once, and, though their songs have 
a limited scale of only three tones, still they were 
charmed with our music. I have known them to 
follow us from town to town simply to talk with us 
and hear us sing. One woman who, with her two 
children, was on the train with us going to the 
next town, said to me, '^ It seems as if your singing 
makes me crazy ; I have been to two places to 
hear you sing and I am now going to a third." 

Three and a half years were spent among the 
warm-hearted, go-ahead people of Australasia with 
as great profit and pleasure to us as in any similar 
period of our history. 



CHAPTER IV. 

FROM AUSTRALASIA TO THE ORIENT. 

On the 25tli of October, we embarked on the 
magnificent ship " Orizaba,"of the Orient line, home- 
ward bound via Ceylon. I own it was with rather 
a sad heart that we bade farewell to our numerous 
friends in Australasia, although we were homeward 
bound. 

Our trip to Ceylon was pleasant and uneventful. 
On a beautiful morning in November we landed in 
Columbo, after seventeen days' sail. Unfortunately, 
we found that our agent, who had preceded us by a 
month, was unable to fix a date for us which would 
suit the date of our arrival and departure, as the 
only available hall in Columbo had been previously 
engaged; so, after three days spent in Ceylon, 
during which time some of us visited Kandy, about 
forty miles from Columbo, we left for Calcutta, 
greatly pleased with what we had seen. A number 
of Europeans at Columbo were greatly disappointed 
because we did not give a concert, and, after our 
arrival, succeeded in having the parties consent to 
vacate the hall for one night, but fearing the short 
advertisement would not insure successful results, 
I declined to give a concert — a decision I have al- 



144 ^^ INDIA. 

ways regretted, for if not financially successful it 
would have been a rare experience. 

Our voyage to Calcutta was a very rough one, as 
during two days we were on the edge of a cyclonic 
storm, consequently our arrival was delayed two 
days ; but our agent, having taken this possibility 
into account, we arrived a day ahead of our open- 
ing date. 

His Excellency, Lord Landsdowne, and his wife 
accorded us their patronage ; the American consul 
and wife were also among our distinguished pa- 
trons. Our audiences were frequently very large 
and enthusiastic, almost exclusively European and 
Eurasians, as the natives were but little attracted 
by us. After a season of about two v/eeks in the 
hall, we opened a season of six or eight nights in 
Bishop Thorburn's Church, with marked success, 
and enabled them to free themselves from a debt 
which had hung over them for years. 

In Bombay we sang with even greater success, 
as the Parsees came in large numbers to hear us, 
and our hall was nightly crowded to its utmost 
capacity, many persons sitting on the stage behind 
us. Madras was also one of our most successful 
points in India. 

At Agra we had an experience which stands out 
prominently among our long list of wonderful ex- 
periences. At Agra is built that wonderful tomb, 
the Taj-Mahal, acknowledged by the whole world 
to be the most beautiful monument the earth has 
yet possessed. Poets and painters alike have 



AT THE TAJ-MAHAL, 145 

striven to describe tliis world's wonder, and, having 
exhaiisted the power of pen and brush, they have 
been compelled to give up in despair and acknowl- 
edofe that ^' the half has never been told." 

It goes without saying that we, like the others 
who have made pilgrimages to this tomb, built by 
Shah Jehan for his devoted wife, Banos Begum, 
were overpowered by its indescribable beauty, but 
we were destined to have an experience of which 
we had not dreamed. 

At the close of our first night's concert, a gentle- 
man came up to the platform, extended his hand 
to me and gave expression as best he could to the 
pleasure the concert had given him, and then added 
that he would be glad to show us through the Taj- 
Mahal, as he was custodian of the place. A thought 
flashed across my mind that we might have an 
experience enjoyed by no other Christian people — 
namely, singing a Christian song in a Mohammedan 
tomb or temple, and that temple the most beautiful 
on earth. Thanking the gentleman for his kind 
offer, I at once asked if it would not be possible 
for us to sing a song there ; he looked a little sur- 
prised, hesitated a moment, then answered, " Yes." 

We told a few friends, including the proprietor 
of one of the leading papers, who engaged a special 
reporter to write up the event. 

We were up bright and early, having been ad- 
vised by the custodian to be there in the early 
morning or late afternoon as the best time to see 
it. Quite a large number of people drove out to be 
present at this remarkable event. jq 



146 IT THE TAJ-MAHAL. 

As we Catered the arched door- way, we met 
Mohammedans coming out ; they had been within 
to bedeck the tombs of Shah Jehan and his wife 
with the fresh flowers of the morning, and with 
shoeless feet had repeated in the (to them) sacred 
presence their morning prayers. We looked with 
friendly glances into one another's dark faces as 
we met and passed ; they inquiringly, while our 
faces must have been aglow with expectant de- 
light. 

Ivightly we tread the rich mosaic floot until the 
centre of the octagonal temple is reached, where 
under the snow-white dome, two hundred and 
sixty-two feet high, are located, exactly above the 
real tombs in the crypt below, two sarcophagi du- 
plicates of the real ones below, ornamented with 
texts from the Koran, traced in precious stones — 
sapphires, rubies, emeralds, garnets, jaspar, mala- 
chite, lapis-lazuli, carnelian, agate, and blood-stone. 

We gather around the sarcophagi and soon the 
great lofty dome echoes the first Christian song it 
has ever caught up, and that song the cry of a race 
akin to those whose dust sleeps in the crypt be- 
neath. As the tones of that beautiful slave song, 
'' Steal Away to Jesus," which we had sung before 
emperors, presidents, kings and queens, awoke the 
stillness of that most wonderful of temples, we were 
so much overcome by the unique circumstances 
that it was with the utmost difficulty we could sing 
at all. ''I've Been Redeemed" and ''We Shall 
Walk Through the Valley " were sung, and thus 



IN BURMAH. 147 

closed one of tlie most remarkable events in the 
history of the Fisk Jubilee Singers. 

Life in the Orient was full of interest — Cawnpore, 
IvUcknow, and Madras were particularly so; but 
space forbids dwelling longer upon this most in- 
teresting portion of our trip around the world. We 
sailed from Madras along the east coast of India, 
calling at the various ports until Coconada was 
reached ; then, crossing the Bay of Bengal, our next 
stop was at Rangoon in Lower Burmah. For a 
stay of one week our work here was very profitable, 
most of our concerts being given in the Methodist 
Church. Here also we had the opportunity of 
coming in contact with the native population. The 
Baptists have a strong hold here, especially among 
the Karens. 

We were asked to sing to their schools, and one 
beautiful morning we drove out to where they were 
located and found gathered in the large hall nearly 
half of their students, packed like sardines in a box. 
They were gentlemanly and lady-like and greeted 
lis most heartily. We sang a number of pieces for 
them, which they seemed most thoroughly to enjoy, 
many of them being moved to tears. They, in turn, 
sang for us a number of the Moody and Sankey 
hymns, which they did very well, indeed. The 
Methodist Church was just opening a mission in 
Rangoon, under the direction of Bishop Thorburn 
and the immediate charge of Rev. Clancy. One of 
the very first teachers at Fisk University was also 
engaged here, and it was a real treat to meet so old 



148 IN CHINA. 

and tried a friend as Miss Matson. Another of the 
Reverend Clancy's assistants was a Miss Lillian 
Black, who impressed us as being one of the most 
effective workers we have met in the mission field. 
Leaving Rangoon, we sailed down the bay, along 
the coast of the Malay Peninsula to Penang and 
Singapore. At the latter place we were especially 
successful, the hall being crowded nightly to its 
utmost capacity ; our prices of admission were one 
and two dollars. We made a trip also over to Je- 
hore, which is situated on the mainland, where we 
gave a concert for Dato Meldrum. We made 
many friends here and the week was very pleasant- 
ly spent. Leaving here by a German steamer, our 
next stop was at the beautiful city of Hong 
Kong. We were unfortunate here as to the 
time of our concert, for it was race-week and 
the people of Hong Kong give up their entire 
time, night and day, to the festivities of this 
great annual event — all business being suspended 
from ten o'clock in the day, while the nights 
are given up to dinner-parties and balls, which 
are given not only at the homes of the residents 
but by the officers of the various men-of-war, 
of which there are always from twenty to thirty in 
the harbor. Some of us made a trip up the Canton 
River* to the wonderful city of Canton. Leaving 
Hong Kong, we went to Shanghai, but, as many of 
the leading Europeans of the French and English 
colonies, as well as the American colony, had gone 
to the races at Hong Kong and had not yet returned, 



IN CHINA. 149 

it proved to be an inauspicious time to visit Shang- 
hai; still, we did a good business here and re- 
mained about two weeks. From here we sailed for 
beautiful Japan. 



CHAPTER V. 

IN JAPAN. 

We found to our surprise that nearly all of the 
accommodations in the various steamers sailing to 
San Francisco were engaged, except in one ship, 
which was the poorest of them all, so it was neces- 
sary either to cut our stay shorter than we had 
planned, or remain a number of weeks longer than 
it would be profitable to do. Our first stop was at 
Nagasaki, and, having arranged with the Steam- 
ship Company to delay the sailing of our steamer 
for about twelve hours, we were enabled to give a 
concert, which was very successful indeed. Our 
next stop was at Kobe, where we spent about a 
week, singing to crowded houses nightly, our audi- 
ences here consisting, as in other Oriental cities, 
chiefly of Europeans ; still, a much larger percent- 
age of the Japanese attended our concerts than any 
of the other Oriental races. We had here a very 
interesting and pleasant experience. The young 
ladies of the Congregational School, under the 
charge of the Rev. Atkinson, were very anxious to 
have us come and sing for them and sent down to 
know how much we would charge. We regarded 
it as a labor of love and refused to accept anything. 



IN JAPAN, 151 

It was a most interesting and pleasant occasion. 
The day was the closing of the term, and the usual 
exercises for such an occasion were gone through 
with; declamations, essays, singing, etc., were ren- 
dered in English and Japanese, but they seemed 
impatient to hear us. Your humble servant was 
introduced and made a little speech, which was 
interpreted by Mr. Atkinson, but they seemed very 
anxious to hear the singing. I have never seen a 
more interested and enthusiastic audience ; they 
gave expression to their delight by clapping their 
hands and deep-drawn sighs, which, Mr. Atkin- 
son informed us, was their mode of express- 
ing the highest degree of delight, and when we 
left, the girls ran down to the hedge which sur- 
rounds the school-house grounds and waved us 
good-bye as we were drawn away in our Rickshaws. 

Our next stop was at Yokohama, where also our 
hall was crowded nightly with eager listeners, many 
of whom were Japanese. 

We met a ver)^ enthusiastic American here, who 
was engaged in the shipping business on an exten- 
sive scale. Our agent had engaged him to land 
our baggage, deliver it at the hotel, and load it 
again on the ship at our departure. I called to 
settle with him before leaving ; he told me how 
much he had enjoyed the concerts (I had seen him 
every night in the two-dollar seats), and expressed 
his deep regret that we were leaving so soon. He 
said that if we were going to remain a month, he 
would go every night, adding further that he dii^^ 



152 HOMEWARD BOUND. 

not feel as tliough lie had given enough for his en- 
joyment. I jokingly said, *' Very well, I do not 
know of any law that will prevent you from giving 
more." Whereupon he handed me my receipted 
bill, amounting to twenty-five dollars, and refused 
to accept any money in payment, adding that he 
did not feel that even such a favor paid for the 
pleasure and benefit he had received. 

It is now Thursday, the 3d of April — and 
at ten o'clock in the morning, we are on 
board of the Rio de Janeiro. The ship weighs 
anchor and we are on our way home again, it being 
just six years to the very day of the week, day of 
the month, and hour of the day, since we had sailed 
from New York. The morning is rough. Hours 
after our ship had started, Fujiyama was still in 
plain view, and we looked with longing eyes back 
to this beautiful land where our stay had been 
much too short, either for profit or pleasure. The 
sea is rough and grows rougher with each succeed- 
ing hour, until we find ourselves in a veritable cy- 
clone. Our progress is slow and gets laborious as 
the ship rolls and tosses day after day. At last we 
enter the Golden Gate after a voyage of seventeen 
days, being two days behind the time of this, one 
of the slowest ships plying between China and San 
Francisco via Japan. 

After a few weeks' stay in San Francisco, we 
start on our way eastward, and we are not long in 
finding out that we are no longer free from that 
prejudice which confronts a Negro at every turn in 



AT HOME. 153 

life, and wliicli we had not met with in any other 
quarter of the globe. We sang at Pueblo. Our 
next point eastward was Colorado Springs, forty- 
two miles distant, but we were compelled to return 
to Pueblo after our concert to get a place to sleep, 
as no hotel in Colorado Springs would keep us. 
Our next appointment was still east of Colorado 
Springs, so I was compelled to pay the passage of 
twelve people eighty-four miles to get a place to 
sleep. Surely this is the '' land of the free and the 
home of the brave." We arrived at our various 
homes on the third of June, thus having made the 
circuit of the globe in six years and two months. 

As an answer to the predictions of our failure 
under the new management, of which mention has 
been made, I would say that at no period in the 
history of the company v/as its success more 
marked. Some of the singers were enabled to buy 
for themselves comfortable homes ; while I may 
refer, with, I trust, pardonable pride, in view of 
the discussion now being waged on the ^' Negro 
Problem," to the fact that I was able to become the 
largest stockholder in a shoe manufactory at my 
home, Ravenna, Ohio ; that the stockholders did 
me the honor to name the company The F. J. 
Ivoudin Shoe Manufacturing Company, and the 
shoes we manufacture the " F. J. Loudin Shoe.'* 

So, I trust, my readers will pardon the reference 
I make to the above, as well as to the fact of my 
being the first man to make a successful six years 
concert tour around the world, and that, too, with 



154 ^^ HOME. 

2l company of colored singers, singing chiefly music 
composed by the Negro ; for it is such things which 
go far towards solving the much debated '' Negro 
Problem.'* 



JUBILEE SONGS. 



PREFACE TO THE MUSIC. 

!n giving these melodies to the world in a tangible form, 
it seems desirable to say a few words about them as judged 
from a musical standpoint. It is certain that the critic stands 
completely disarmed in their presence. He must not only 
recognize their immense power over audiences which include 
many people of the highest culture, but, if he be not thor- 
oughly encased in prejudice, he must yield a tribute of ad- 
miration on his own part, and acknowledge that these songs 
touch a chord which the most consummate art fails to reach. 
Something of this result is doubtless due to the singers as 
well as to their melodies. The excellent rendering of the 
Jubilee Band is made more effective and the interest is inten- 
sified by the comparison of their former state of slavery and 
degradation with the present prospects and hopes of their 
race, which crowd upon every listener's mind during the 
singing of their songs. Yet the power is chiefly in the 
songs themselves, and hence a brief analysis of them will be 

. of interest. 

\ Their origin is unique. They are never "composed " after 
the manner of ordinary music, but spring into life, ready- 
made, from the white heat of religious fervor during some 

; protracted meeting in church or camp. They come from no 
musical cultivation whatever, but are the simple, ecstatic 
utterances of wholly untutored minds. From so unpromis- 
ing a source we could reasonably expect only such a mass of 
crudities as would be unendurable to the cultivated ear. On 
the contrary, however, the cultivated listener confesses to a 



156 PREFACE TO THE MUSIC. 

new charm, and to a power never before felt, at least in its 
kind. What can we infer from this but that the child-like, 
receptive minds of these unfortunates were wrought upon 
with a true inspiration, and that this gift was bestowed upon 
them by an ever watchful Father, to quicken the pulses of 
life, and to keep them from the state of hopeless apathy into 
which they were in danger of falling. 

A technical analysis of these melodies shows some inter- 
esting facts. The first peculiarity that strikes the attention 
is in the rhythm. This is often complicated, and sometimes 
strikingly original. But although so new and strange, it is 
most remarkable that these effects are so extremely satisfac- 
tory. We see few cases of what theorists call mis-for7n, al- 
though the student of musical composition is likely to fall 
into that error long after he has mastered the leading princi- 
ples of the art. 

Another noticeable feature of the songs is the rare occur- 
rence of triple time, or three-part measure among them. 
The reason for this is doubtless to be found in the beating 
of the foot and the swaying of the body which are such fre- 
quent accompaniments of the singing. These motions are 
in even measure, and in perfect time ; and so it will be found 
that, however broken and seemingly irregular the movement 
of the music, it is always capable of the most exact measure- 
ment. In other words, its irregularities invariably conform 
to the " higher law" of the perfect rhythmic flow. 

It is a coincidence worthy of note that more than half the 
melodies in this connection are in the same scale as that in 
which Scottish music is written ; that is, with the fourth and 
seventh tones omitted. The fact that the music of the 
ancient Greeks is also said to have been written in this scale 
suggests an interesting inquiry as to whether it may not be a 
peculiar language of nature, or a simpler alphabet than the 
ordinary diatonic scale, in which the uncultivated mind finds 
its easiest expression. 

THEO. F. SEWARD. 



INDEX TO MUSIC 



Preface to the Music. 



PAGB 



NO. J'AGK 

114. A great Camp-meeting in the 

promised land 280 

92. A Happy New Year 247 

60. A little more faith in Jesus... 212 

99. Anchor in the Lord 255 

70. Angels waiting at the door... 223 
20. Been a listening 178 

128. Benediction 299 

105. Bright sparkles in the 

Church-yard 262 

16. Children, you'll be called on. 174 
6. Children, we all shall be free. 164 

127. Chilly Water 298 

121. Come, allof God's children.. 292 

106. Come down, angels 268 

33. Come, let us all go down 190 

77. Deep River 230 

61. Did not old Pharaoh get lost? 213 
10. Didn't my Lord deliver Dan- 
iel ? 168 

95. Don't you grieve after me... 250 

85. Down by the River 239 

66. Farewell, my brother 219 

5. From every grave-yard 163 

75. Gabriel's Trumpet's going to 

blow 229 

51. Getting ready to die 206 

109. Gideon's Band 272 

17. Give me Jesus 174 

19. Go down, Moses 176 

56. Go, chain the lion down 208 

94. Good-by, Brothers 249 



NO 

115. 

89. 
90. 
14- 

124. 
87. 
33- 



PAGB 

Good news, the chariot's 

coming 282 

Good old Chariot 244 

Grace ; 245 

Gwine to ride up in the 

Chariot ^7* 

Hail! Hail! 295 

Hard trials 241 

He arose ^94 



136. Hear de Angels singin' 307 

He rose from the dead 242 

He's the Lily of the Valley. 197 
Humble yourself, the bell 

done rung 3°^ 

I am going to die no more... 205 

I ain't got weary yet 221 

I know that my Redeemer 

lives 276 

I'll hear the trumpet sound.. 170 

I'm a rolling 167 

I'm a traveling to the grave. 180 
I'm going to live with Jesus. 207 
I'm going to sing all the way 278 

I'm so glad 189 

I'm so glad 269 

I'm troubled in mind 207 

I want to be ready ; or, walk 

in Jerusalem just like John 293 
In Bright Mansions above.... 232 

Inching along 220 

In the River of Jordan 187 

In that great getting-up 
morning • *74 



88. 

41. 

130. 

50- 

68. 

III. 

II. 

9- 
22. 

54- 
"3- 

32- 
107. 

53- 
122. 

78. 

67. 

30- 
no. 



MO. 

55. 
73- 
13- 

lOI. 

26. 

40. 

13a. 

21. 

102. 

135. 

63. 
138. 

76. 
100. 

23. 
44. 

49- 
103. 

59- 

137- 

79- 

25- 

43- 

45. 

I. 

97- 
134- 

35- 
1x8. 

Z26. 
X19. 

81. 

81. 

29. 
4- 

58. 
108, 

42 
117, 

46 
96 



PAGE 

I've been in the storm so long 208 

I've been redeemed 226 

I've just come from the Foun- 
tain 171 

John Brown's Body 257 

Judgment-day is rolling 

round 183 

Judgment will find you so..,. 194 

Keep a Moving 303 

Keep me from sinking down. 179 
Keep your lamps trimmed 

and burning 224 

Listen to the Angels 259 

Lobe an' serbe de Lord 306 

Love-feast in Heaven 216 

Love King Jesus 309 

Lord, I wish I had a come.... 230 

Lord's Prayer 256 

Many thousand gone 180 

March on 200 

Mary and Martha 204 

Move along 260 

My good Lord's been here... 211 
My Lord delibered Daniel... 308 
My Lord, what a mourning. 233 
My Lord's writing all the 

time 182 

My ship is on the ocean 199 

My way's cloudy 201 

Nobody knows the trouble I 

see 159 

Now we take this feeble body 253 
Oh, my little soul's gwine to 

shine 305 

Oh! holy Lord 191 

Oh, Brothers are you get- 
ting ready? 288 

Oh, give me the wings 297 

Oh, make a-me holy 290 

Oh, wasn't that a wide river 234 

Oh, yes ! Oh, yes! 246 

Old ship of Zion 186 

O Redeemed 162 

O! Sinner Man 210 

, Peter, goring them bells 270 

, Prepare us 198 

, Reign, Master Jesus 287 

, Ride on. King Jesus 202 

, Rise and Shine 251 



NO. 

12. 
125. 

7. 

3- 

69. 

39- 

28. 

98. 

133- 

112. 
72. 

116. 

24- 

2. 

93- 
i3i:- 

52. 

27. 
139. 

18. 
104. 

65. 

37. 
123. 
129. 

120. 

36. 
8. 
86. 
82. 
84. 
80. 

15- 
83. 
31- 

74- 

47- 

57- 
64, 
62. 

34 



PAGB 

Rise, Mourners 170 

Rise, shine, for thy light is 
a-coming 296 

Roll, Jordon, roll 165 

Room enough i6i 

Run to Jesus 222 

Save me, Lord, save me 195 

Shine, shine 185 

Shine, shine 254 

Sitting down by the side of 

the Lamb 304 

Sweet Canaan 277 

Show me the way 225 

Some of these mornings 28S 

Steal away x8i 

Swing low, sweet Chariot 160 

'Tis Jordan's River 248 

The Crucifixion 302 

The General Roll 206 

The Gospel Train 184 

The Old Ark 310 

TheRocks and theMountains 175 
The Angels changed my 

Name 261 

There's a meeting here to- 
night 218 

The Ten Virgins 193 

The work's being done 294 

These bones going to rise 

again 300 

They led my Lord away 291 

This Old Time Religion 192 

Turn back Pharaoh's army., 166 

Wait a little while 240 

Way over Jordan 236 

We are almost home 238 

We are climbing the hills of 

Zion 234 

We'll die in the Field , 173 

We'll overtake the Army 237 

We'll stand the Storm x88 

We shall walk through the 

valley 228 

What kind of shoes are you 

going to wear 202 

When Moses smote the water 209 

When shalll get there ? 217 

Wrestling Jacob 214 

Zion's Children 190 



JUBILEE SONGS. 



It will be observed that in moet of these songa the first strain is of the nature of a 
chorus or refrain, which is to be sung after each verse. The return to this chorua 
should be made without breaking the time. 

In some of the verses the syllables do not correspond exactly to the notes in the 
music. The adaptation is so easy that it was thought best to leave it to the skill of 
the singer rather than to confuse the eye by too many notes. The music is in each 
case carefully adapted to the first verse. Whatever changes may be necessary la 
singing the remaining verses will be found to involve no difficulty. 

Ko. 1. 

^ototij) fenoins tije STrouble It sec, ILorTi ! 




No-bo-dy knows the trouble I see, Lord, No-bo-dy knows the 




trou-ble I see, No - bo - dy knows the trouble I see, Lord, 

Fine. 




bo - dy knows like Je - sua. 1. Broth-ers, will you 




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pray for me. Brothers, will you pray for me, Brothers, will you 



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pray for me, And help me to drive old Sa - tan a . way. 



2 . Sisters, will you pray for me, &c. 

3. Mothers, will you pray for me, &c. 

4. Preachers, will you pray for me, &c. 



I 



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1. I looked o - ver Jor-dan, and what did I see, 

2. If you get there be - fore I do, 

3. The bright - est day that ev - er I saw, 

4. I'm som - times up and some - times down, 



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Com-ing for to car - ry me home ? A band of an - gels 

Com-ing for to car - ry me home, Tell all my friends I'm 

Com-ing for to car - ry me home, When Je - sus wash'd my 

Com-ing for to car-ry me home, But still my soul feels 



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Gom-ing af - ter, me, Com-ing- for to car - ry me home 

com - ing too, Com-ing for to car - ry me home, 

sins a - way, Com-ing for to car - ry me home. 

heaven - ly bound, Com-ing for to car-ry me home. 



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No. 3. 



Moom IBnougi). 




1. Oh, brothers, don't stay a - way. Brothers, don't stay a - "way, 
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— 1- 



N 1-7 — « « — N— 4 

L_^ ^_i ^ — 3 



For my Lord says there's room e-nough, Eoom e - nough in the 




Heav'ns for you, My Lord says there's room enough, Don't stay away 






:^2-;= 



"P' 



-» 






-h- 



r 



-0 #- 

-I \— 



i^zifcb 



5-1 

i 



2 Oh, mourners, don't stay away. 

Cho.—Fox the Bible says there's room enough, &c. 

3 Oh sinners, don't stay away. 

Cho.—'Eox the angel says there's room enough, &c. 

4 Oh, children, don't stay away. 

Cho.—Fox Jesus says there's room enough, &g. 

* The peculiar accent here makes the words Bound thus: "rooma nough.'' 

i6i II 



No. 4. 

lChobus. 



© Utxitttam. 




^ 



^—zfz. 



T=i= ::^^:t^p= :=i=ihi:i^= jiz:i?=:»=: 

•^ fed £ *^ ^^^ ^ 



redeemed, re -deemed, 



I'm waslied in tlie blood of the 







L-p=ti=l 



-» — »- 



:r: 






Fine. 



9: 



Lamb, redeemed, re-deemed. I'm wash'd in tlie blood of tlie Lamb, 

V ^ s 



-h— >- 



^J- 



-h- 



.1^.. 






-n— «-nS- 



w — *-— ^ — i — r — ^-F^-i1-l 

-h ^j h — • 1^- -1— tHH 

- 1^ — ^ — 1^ — \^ — H — ^htzzj J 



-N N- 



^ — b^^-y b 



-^- 



^ — i**— 



fi — 0- 



'0- 






i^ ^ l^ !• ^ 

1. Al-tboiigli you see me going a - long 

2. When I was a mourner just like 

3. Re - li - gion's like a bloom - ing 






-0- 
'^7 



so, Washed in 
you, Washed in 
rose, Washed in 



tiM 



-h 



V—- 



_-'^^ 



:^ 



:t^: 






.0. 



t 



---V- 

—0 — 

the 
the 
the 



i= 



m 



-0- 



■-i 






■0- 
— I — 



-I — 
-b- 






-H- 
-0- 



1- 



^v 



-0- 



u y u 



— ^H 



blood of the Lamb, I have my tri - als here be - low, 
blood of the Lamb, I mourned and prayed till I got through, 
blood of the Lamb, As none but those that feel it knows, 




D.S.-S. 



WH 



Washed in the blood of the Lamb. redeemed, re-deemed. 

« € ; f"— «— r* ^ H—r-J J--. P^- 



t 



t 






-y- 



-h- 



T- 



*==Pt; 



-Sn — rl 



\ 



* Attention is called to this characteristic maui\cr of coanecting the last strain 
With the chorus in the D. O. 

162 



No. 5. jFrum eberg (Srabegart. 




^ u I If \^ i^ J \^ f 'u iT u ^ u 



Just be-hold that number, Just be-hold that number, Just be - 



N 



W^^&^^f=\ 



EEp 



:0=t- 



-H- 



.-J •_ 



-i >- V 



li=^. 






,N N ,S 



:t^: 




131 



~^- 



-N 

9 # 



^-r~>»- 



-0- 



-y — y- 



-I— 



;^:p; 



-#-i — 



laiii^ 



1^ ^y I ' ' "^ \j ^ 

1. Going to 

2. Going to 
hold that num-ber From ev - e - ry grave-yard. { 3 Going to 

4. Going to 

5. Going to 

F rF d Fpi—-i-:d rm 1- 



„ I ^ ^ I 

^ 1 _i^ — )/ — 1_ 



-^ 






, r J+ V V 


_, I 




IS S 


w 


\ — — 1 — 1 — ——{ — 

y 


1 

e — 


— m m •"~v — w — 


0-^—0 — 


p. Cr— • » 


—9 — 

! 


4 ^ » 


-0 0-{-0 


1. meet the brothers, there. That used to join in prayer, Go-ing 


2. meet the sis-ters, there. That used to join in prayer, &c. 


3. meet the preachers, there, That used to join in praj'-er, &c. 


4. meet the mourners, there, That used to join in prayer, d'C. 


5. meet the Christians, fliere. That used to join in prayer, &c. 


A. ^ M. ^ - -«■ Jt. ^ ^* ^ #-'-^ 


lilt 


\—^ ^ 

\/ \/ 1 , 


1 1 - 


—0 • 0- '—0— 

— 1 1 ! y— 


-^ ]/ > 


1 


y y_ 




-V y — t^ ^ 





i^ 



§i 



-0- 

-I — 



-0- 



.y C^_ 



N — N- 

N — I 



-0- 

t- 



^% 



D. a 



■0- 
\-\ — 



V- 



W- K#-^- -0 J 

IJ u ^ 1 I 



up thro' great trib - u - la - tion From ev - e - ry grave-yard. 

1 



ife: 






.0- 



+-r 



i 



163 






No. 6. ffifjiltiten, toe all sljall te jFm. 



|i 



^m 



-^- 



-y — 0- 



H: 






3 












f 



tj- 



45: 



m 



Chil-dren, we all 



shall be free, Chil-dren, we all shall be 



;^ 



B:rl2iJ~y: 



:Si: 



^ 



:*: 



;te; 



5; 



I; 



^- 



:p 



g- [j 



-^ — ^ — , 



— (- 



wm 



--N ^ 

-* N- 

M — ^ 



-^— g- 









-0- 



3-— ^— ziz: 



r-i 









j: 



i 



r 



free, Children, we all shall be free, When the Lord shall appear. 
^ 



9^^^, 



fcfc 



fe 



V- 






:^: 






/TS 



tt 



ti--K--K- 



-tf — a — "--4- 



— P- 



L^ 



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1 



L> 



:tS 



-# 0~ 



-H- 



-0- 



■0- 



d: 



.J__, 

~i — 



1. We want no cowards in our band, That from their colors fly, We 



^^. 



EzEEcE 



-ft-r9- 



:pt W 



\-s/ ^ \/ y — 



J 






-0 9 g 

'~ 'Is 









? #_ 

!! 0- 






% 



::t)— tc 



fiti 



-N — ^ — 1^- 



^:^ 






call 






for 






-0 






-j:^-.-^- 



D. a 



a: 



-^ — ^- 



0- 
— ^- 



0- 



val-iant-hearted men, That are not 

-P ^— r* 0—0 0- 



-0- 
a 



rlii 



— I- 



I 



-0- 

-r- 

-«: 



S! 



f 



fraid to die. 
_« — ^_ 



— » — g— »-bb-: 



* 





I 



2. We see the pilgrim as he lies, 

With glory in his scul; 
To Heaven he lifts his longing eyes, 
* And bids this world adieu. 

Cho. —Children, we all shall be free, «$:c. 

3. Give ease to the sick, give sight to the blind 

Enable the cripple to walk; 
He'll raise the dead from under the earth, 
And give them permission to fly. 
Cho. — Children, we all shall be free, &c. 

* The words, "On Jordan's stormy banks I stand," are sometimes eung to tniB 
fltrain. 

164 



No. 7. 



i 



B2 



Or--,- 






4=J: 






3zE 



1. Roil, Jordan, roll, 



-y- 



-N-4 



^n 



^±zi^qi.-v-t 



-^-^— ^"' 






ISV^g 



roll, Jordan, roll, I want to go to 



— ^ 



y— ^- 



5^=B 



Koll, 



tefe^- 



^- 



iB^j 



-N- 



-#- 



:K: 



Si 



-* — — ' — 0- 

5 b 






H-5-7 



I 



hea - ven when I die, To hear Jor - dau roll 



i-fe^ 



ES 






■I 



:J^^-^^ '- 



:^=J: 



:as=ti-l:-r- 



U 



IS 



Tk 



R 



^ 



-- ^- 



-tf — I— 

■g-y- 



-fe" 






P=^^=± 



pi: 



.1 






_^._ 



:X 



4v 



^ V ^ 

n^^ 



-»- 
oil, brothers, you on£!;ht t'liave b«eu tliere, Yes, my Lord ! A 

s ^ .1^ :*a S 







i 



:&-E^- 




i^^: 



sit - ting 



F 



in 



the lOngdom, To hear Jor-dan roll. 



9- 






h 






.— r—^- 






2. Oh, preachers you ought t'have been there, &c 

3. Oh, sinners, you ought, &c. 

4. Oh, mourners, you ought, &c. 

5. Oh, seekers, you ought, &c. 

6. Oh, mothers, you ought, &c. 

7. Oh, sisters, you ought, &c 

"165 



No. 8. ^Ttttn iaclt ipi)araoi)'g atmg. 

Solo. 




Moderaio. 



-N— N- 



-N- 



a- 



■A- 



— I- 



r ^- h--^ 



pits: 



3ti:i 



1 



1. Gwine to write to Mas-sa Je-sus, To send some valiant soldier, 

2. If you want your souls con verted, You'd better be a praying, 

3. You say you are a sol-dier, Fighting for your Saviour, 

4. Wlien the children were in bondage, They cried un-to the Lord, 
6. When Mo-ses smote the wa-ter, The children all passed over, 
6. When Pharaoh cross'd the water, The waters came to - gether, 



Chorus 



Faster. 
■^ N- 



ai. — ^ --h \- \-- 



I-^-HS- 



— € — ^-T-^ 



-0- 



-r- 



f: 






:1-^ 



1. To turn back Pharaoh's army, Hal-le -lu ! To turn back Pharaoh's 

2. To turn back Pharaoh's army, Ilal-le - lu ! To turn back, &c. 

3. To turn back Pharaoh's army, Plal-le - lu I To turn back, &c. 

4. He turn'd back Pharaoh's army, Hal-le - lu ! He turn'd back, &c. 

5. And turn'd back Pharaoh's army, Hal-le - lu ! And turn'd back, &c. 

6. And drown'd ole Pharaoh's army, Hal-le - lu ! And drown 'd oie, &c. 




7^ -^ . 



jah! To turn back Pharaoh's ar-m)', Hal - le - lu! 






i66 



/T\ 



zw=^ 



L^ 



-h- 



■±d^ 



?- 



m 



No. 9, 



I'm a IRoUing. 




I'm a roll-ing, I'm a roll - ing, I'm a rolling thro' an un 

p _>, ^ ^ — 1 k — Ik. — 1 — ^^"^ — ,■> 

0—0 't5> 






0- 



-0- 



e^ei:;ee 



-0- 

E 



45U-. 



-•^ — ^- -0—0 — ^—0 — — 

-A-- — 1 1 — 0—\ 1 — ,- 

p ^ — — 



4 



K--^-.-#— 5 0-'—4—~ 




friend-ly world, I'm a roll 



ing, I'm a roll - ing thro' an 




un - friend-ly world. 



1. O brothers, wont you help me, 

2. O sis - ters, wont you help me, 

3. O preachers, wont you help me, 

W b 1^ F^ 




§1^ 



^ -^ ^ ^ ' ^ \ ■^ 

O brothers, wont you help me to pray ? O brothers, wont you 
sis - ters, wont you help me to pray ? O sis - ters, &c. 
Ojpreachers,wont you help me to fight? O preachers, &c. 

fc ^ ^ U i^ ^ I J- ,N ^ i" J^ 



-GL 



V- 



Vl 



^- 



V-^z 



i- 



-y- 



—J 



S 



-sf' 



E 



H — 



V \^r- 



-d-^-#'^j-r— N— 



J^-^- 



r^^^-ji 



^-N— ^ 



D. a 



HI ■---# J- 



^--f^- 



:*-• 

'^-^- 



-0- 



:d: 






help me, Wont you help me in the service of the Lord ? * 

I i ^ ^ 1*^ ^ 1^ S K V ^ K 
•^■0-t^-f^-^'-^-0-'^^,J^^ K 



9^ 



^- 



-r- 



ZIZZII ^ ^ g_i> g. 




* Iteturu to the beginniug iu exact tiiu . 
16:7 



No. 10. MWt mg Hori tr^liber Mmitl 



Sung in Unison. 




— K- 



-K— #- 



^- 






Did-n't my Lord de - liv - er Dan - iel, D'liver 



I 



-^- 



I — I- 



-^-0 — fi — N-F#- 



-^- 



r->- 



-K--# 






Dan - iel, d'liver Dan - iel, Did - n't my Lord de - liv - er 




1st Veiise. 



■#- 



=f 






-0- 



Dan - iel, And why not a ev - e - ry man ? He de - 






:fc 



i^ 



-0- 



-0- 



liv-er'd Dan -iel from the li - on's den, Jo - nah from the 



L^. 



-0- 



-0- 






t 



p^i^ 



:S: 



:d: 



-N- 



-tf-T — ^ — N- 
— ? — « — 



-!»- 



-h- 



-h- 



y: 









bel - ly of the whale, A.nd the He-brew children from the 




Zb^- 



1^- 



fc=^=Ig 



-H- 






-^- 



-W- 



N N 



^1 



fie - ry fur-nace, And why not ev - e - ry 



man? 




Did - n*'t my Lord de - liv - er Dan - iel. D'liver 




Dan - iel, d'liver Dan-iel, Did -n't my Lord dc - liv - er 
* Go on without pause, leaving out two beats of the measure. 

i68 




-#- 

-H- 



y- 



t-J; 



^ 



^ 



-bH-^ 



^ 



Dan - iel, And why not a ey - e - ry man ? 
2d Veese. 




The moon run down in a purple-stream, The sun for - bear to 



i 



d2=i 



.p—m»p-0^ -H— K-=-^#-H 



D. C. "Didn't my Lord:' 




shine,And ev -e -ry star dis-ap-pear, King Jesus shall be mine. 
3d Vebse. 



i f\ ? * — 


^ ^ ^ # # - 


^ -^ ^ — fe - 


P^-^=3 


_4. — ^ L^ ^ ^ - 


— ^- t-j 1- # 



fe 



The wind blows East, and the wind blows West, It 



d: 



V- 



-Hr. 



M- 



L_^, 



* 



^-# 



— y — ' 



blows like the judg-ment day, And ev - ery poor soid that 

D. C. ''Didn't my Lord." 




±zEz=M=3^ 



nev - er did pray 

4th Veese. 



be glad to pray, that day. 



f^E^i 



-0- 



-0- 
Vr 



^=: 



L_^. 



set my foot on the Gos - pel ship, And the 




ship it be - gin to sail. It land-ed me o - ver on 

D. C. ''Didn't my Lard" 




Ca-naan's shore, And I'll nev-er coma back a - ny more. 

169 



■^ 



^ 




No. 11. I'll ijear tfje trumpet S^unir. 




» ^ N 



-N~N-H 



H ^0—0—0- 



5 



:S-ce 



:4;=:{^: 



You may bur-y me in the East, You may bur - y me 



1 '^0 — #— y- 



N:"& 



— (- 



ifcti* 






Z}- 



-6^ 



^ 



in the "West; But I'll hear the trumpet sound In that morning. 



fc£ 



-iZ. 



-N- 



-# 



In that morn-ing, my Lord, How I long to 



go. 



For to 




hear the trum-pet sound, In that 



•i9- 

morn 



mg. 



Father Gabriel in that day, 
He'll take wings and fly away. 
For to hear the trumpet sound 

In that morning. 
You may bury him in the East, 
You may bury him in the "West; 
But he'll hear the trumpet sound, 

In that morning. 

Chx). — In that morning, &c. 



3. Good old christians in that day, 
They'll take wings and fly away, <S:c. 

Cho. —In that morning, &c. 

4. Good old preachers in that day, 
They'll take wings and fly away,&c. 

Cho. — In that morning, &c. 

5. In that dreadful Judgement day, 
I'll take wings and fly away &c. 

Cho. — In that morning, «S:c. 



* Repeat the music of the first btrain for all the verses but the first. 



No. 12. 



^\u, iiWrmrncrg.* 




-#ir; 



:c: 



'— y- 



:J-^&= 



-g — 5— h — b — ^ 



1. llise, 

2. Rise, 

3. Ptise, 

4. Else, 



mourners, 
seekers, 
sinners, 
brothers, 



m 



rise, mourners, 
rise, seekers, 
rise, sinners, 

rise, brothers, 

Fine. 



O can't you rise and 
O can't you rise &c. 
O can't you rise &c. 
O can't you rise &c. 



-N-r 



p=jtzE»E3J^-=iEEz=i;nt=E5-!i£S 



— N- 



tell, What the Lord has done for you. Yes, he's taken my feet out of the 

J), a 




:^dz=^^f^=rzvzgzF 



- —J,- 



:ii— y- 



-^±^- 



-^ — zi- 



H— — 



mi -ry clay, And he's placed them on the right side of my Father. 
* This hymn is sung with great unction while "seekers" are going forward to 

170 



No. 13. Fbe imt come from tlje jfountain. 



^-/-A- — # 1 1—; ^-H-j 1 ! — h' * — • ^ — 

m: — _ — L^ — — 0_ •_ — — L^^ — j. L) _Ly — I i — - — s — I 



V 



1. I've just come from the fountain, I've just come from the 

2. Been drinking from the fountain, Been drinking, <fec. 



m 



rb-2- 



■R 



"f-rl 



SES 



i^Si 



-h- 



0- 

-h- 



^ 




fountain, Lord ! I've just come from the fountain. His name's so 



3^ 









-^•—•i, 



't 



Chorus. 




sweet. 



O brothers, 

N S ,N 



I love Je - sus, O brothers. 



^^ 






IS' ^ S J ^ N N . ^ 

—Hi — F= F I — ^ — g^ - ^ 




^ 1^ ^ --, . 1^ 



'>, — y W-9-0 



'V — V ^.^ — I 1^ 



U- 






B. a 



m 



W&Ei 



-0 -^ 

Je - sus, O brothers. I love Je - sus, His name's so sweet. 



3. I found free grace at the fountain, 
I found free grace, &c. 

Oho. — O preachers, I love Jesus, &c. 

4. My soul's set free at the fountain, 
My soul's set free, &c. 

Cko.—O sinners. I love Jesus, &c. 

* The Tenors usually sing the melody from tJiis point. 



No. 14. (Stoine to rare up in tfte dtijmot 

Solo. Chorus. 



iL^lE?: 



Gwine to ride up in the chariot, Soon-er in the morning. 

N S K 

,S K N S w fs 

■(^ -^ -^ J^ I ^ 



i 



_jp — P ip — ^ H 



-I- 



i 



Solo. 




^: 



^: 



Chorus. 



B k^ K ^ 



Ride up in the cha - riot, Soon-cr in the naorn-iug. 



i 



iiS 



jS 



-5- 



-a- 



^- 



:ldz-.M: 



-*- 
-I — 



P 



Eide up in the cha -riot, Soon-er in the moridng. And I 

4. 4. 4. j^ ^ ^ N h 



* — i^' — ;^— 



-I — a — a — 






» 




hope I'll join the Band. O Lord, have mcr-cy on me, 

0--- __ _ , _ , ; ^_. ^-0 y ^ 0, 









11 



-^- 



-9- 

-h- 



-y- 



:p: 




[Tiir 



Lord, have mer-cy on me; 



.t->- 



S 



,^ 



172 



-h-- 



I 



Lord, have 




D. a 




Gwine to meet my brother there, Sooner, 
Cho. — O Lord, have mercy, &c. 

3. Gwine to chatter with the Angels, Sooner, &c. 

Cho. — O Lord, have mercy, &c. 

4. Gewine to meet my massa Jesus, Sooner, &c. 

Cho. — O Lord, have mercy, &c. 

5. Gwine to walk and talk with Jesus, Sooner, &g. 

Cho. — O Lord, have mercy, &c. 

No. 15. aSEc'U iie in t!jj J='iem. 

Unison. 




what do you say, seekers, O what do you say. 




seekers; what do you say, seekers, A-bout the Gospel war? 









-9-0- 






-0- 



'.-^ 






And 



I will die 






in the field. Will die 
.^ ^ ^ — ^^ ^- 






in the field; 




iifefe 



Will die 
— c — •_• — 



2_t2zib — t- 



" — bs 



in the field, I'm on my jour-ney home. 






L_^ ? ^ 



rzzit: 



y » — » — » — »- 



' — h 



3: 



1 



U' U^ U' 

2. O what do you say, brothers, &c. 

3. what do you say, christians, &c. 

4. what do you say, preachers, &c. 



No. 16. ©fttraren, gondii it callelr on. 




1. Chil-dren, you'll be called on 

2. Preachers, you'll be called on 

3. Sinners you'll be called on 

4. Seek-ers, you'll be called on 

5. Christians, you'll be called on 



To march in 
To march in 
To march in 
To march in 
To march in 



the field, of 
the field, &c. 
the field, &o. 
the field, &c. 
the field, &c. 




N 



I 



bat - tie, When this war - fare'll be end - ed, Hal - le - lu. 



,: Chorus. 














-0 — 


_f- 




^ ^t— 


— 9 — 0— 




m «:i-' -\ 


+ 


^ 


-r 


-\;r=m 







When this war -fare'll be end- ed, I'm a sol-dier of the 



fc^ES3 






0- 

EE 



-0- 

-i — 



-0' 



-W- 



^- 



-0- 



^±~-0—-2-- 



I). a 



ju -bi-lee, This warfare'll be ended, I'm a soldier of the cross. 



No. 17. 



(gibe me Jesiuis. 




A- 



'0- 



-^ 



— I- 



LJ- 



£^ 






0- 



"«'•: 



1. O when I come to die, O when I como to die, O 

2. In the morning when 1 rise, In the morning when I rise, &c. 

3. Dark midnight was my cry, Dark midnight was my cry, &c. 

4. I heard the mourner say, I heard the mourner say, &c. 



|=?-^i 



E5 



-H- 



E3=E3 



when I come to die— Give me 



Je 



-N- 



33 



— ^- 



sus, Give me Je- 



i 



±=^- 



-A- 






1—- 



£33 



BUS, give m e Je - sus. You may have all this world, Give me Je-sus. 



I 



TTo. 18. Cfje Mocfes; anJ rtjc iWountainsJ. 




te^4^==# 



J. 
1 — i- 



:±:i- 



-S— ;. 



^— i- 



-H- 



^-v J^— * 



-H- 



-N-J- 



-H- 



«=2z^t^: 



^"^i^ — ^r 



Ob, the rocks and the mountains shall all flee a- way, And 



m^mmi 



V 1^ — i^- 



i: 



S: 



:?: 



:5fc 



cE3 




you shall have a new hid - ing - place that day. 



9^fetel 



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seek-er, give up your heart to God, And 



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you shall have 

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ing - place that day. 



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2. Doubter, doubter, give up your heart to God, 

And you shall have a new hiding-place that day. 
Oh, the rocks, &c. 

3. Mourner, Mourner, give up your heart to God, &c. 

4. Sinner, sinner, give up your heart to God, &q. 

5. Sister, sister, give up your heart to God, «fec. 

6. Mother, mother, give up your heart to God, «fec, 

7. Children, children, give up your heart to God, &c. 



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TSTo. 19. 



ffio iroton, Mo^t^. 



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Oppress'd so hard they could not stand, Let my peo-ple go. 



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Go down, Mo - ses, Way down in E - gypt land, 

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2. Thus saith the Lord, bold Moses said, 

Let mj'- people go; 
If not I'll smite your first-born dead, 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, ^. 

3. No more shall they in bondage toil, 

Let my people go ; 
Let them come out with Egypt's spoil. 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, &c. 

176 



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4- When Israel out of Egypt eame, 
Let my people go ; 
And left the proud oppressive land, 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, ef;c. 



O, 'twas a dark and dismal night, 

Let my people go ; 
When Moses led the Israelites, 

Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



'Twas good old Moses and Aaron, too, 

Let my people go ; 
'Twas they that led the armies through, 

Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



The Lord told Moses what to do. 

Let my people go ; 
To lead the children of Israel through. 

Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



8. O come along, Moses, you'll not get lost, 
Let my people go ; 
Stretch out your rod and come across, 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



As Israel stood by the water side, 

Let my people go ; 
At the command of God it did divide, 

Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



10. When they had reached the other 
shore, 
Let my people go ; 
They sang a song of triumpTi o'er, 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, et«. 



11. Pharaoh said he would go across. 
Let my people go ; 
But Pharaoh and his host were lost, 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



13. O, MosG:5, the cloud shall cleave the 
way. 
Let my neople go ; 
A tire by night, a shade by day. 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



13. You'll not get lost In the wilderness. 
Let my people go ; 
With a lighted candle in your breast, 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



VL Jordan shall stand up like a wall. 
Let my people go ; 
And the walls of Jjericho shall fall. 
Let nay people go. 
Go down. Moses, etc. 



15. Your foes shall not before you stand. 
Let my people go ; 
And you'll possess fair Canaan's land, 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



16. 'Twas just about in harvest time. 

Let my people go ; 
When Joshua led his host divine. 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 

17. O let us all from bondage flee. 

Let my people go ; 
And let us all in Christ be free. 
Let my people go. 
Gk) down, Moses, etc. 



18. We need not always weep and moan, 
Let my people go ; 
And wear these slavery chains for- 
lorn. 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



19. This world's a wilderness of woei, 
Let my people go ; 
O, let us on to Canaan go, 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



20. What a beautiful morning that will be, 
Let my people go; 
When time breaks up In eternity. 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



21. O brethren, brethren, you'd better be 
engaged, 
Let my people go ; 
For the devil he's out on a big ram- 
page. 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



22. The devil he thought he had me fast. 
Let my people go ; 
But I thought I'd break his chains at 
last. 
Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 



23. O take yer shoes from off yer feet, 
Let my people go ; 
And walk into the golden street, 
Let my people go. 
Gk) down, Moses, etc. 



24. 



25. 



177 



I'll tell you what I likes de best. 

Let my people go ; 
It is the shouting Methodist, 

Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 

I do believe without a doubi. 

Let my people go ; , ^ 

That a Christian has the right to shout. 

Let my people go. 
Go down, Moses, etc. 

12 



No. 20. 

h 



i3ef n a iListening. 




Been a 



lis - ten - ing all 



the night long, Been a 



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lis - ten - ing all the night long, Been 



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lis-ten-ing all the night long, To hear some sinner pray. 






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1. Some say that John the Baptist was nothing but a Jew, But the 

2. Go read the third of Matthew, And read the chapter thro', It 



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Ho - ly Bi - ble tells us he was a preach-er too. 
is the guide for Christians, and tells them what to do. 

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178 



No. 21. Heep tne frnm jsinfeing 3ioton. 



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Oh., Lord, Oh, 



my Lord ! Oh^ my good Lord ! Keep 

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Keep me 
Keep me 



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from sink -ing down: 









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mean to go to heav-en too; Keep me from sinking down, 
see the angel beckoning to me; Keep me from sinking doTsna. 



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3. When I was a mourner just like you; 
Keep me from sinking down : 
I mourned and mourned till I got through* 
Keep me from sinking down. 
Oh, Lord, &c. 

■1. I bless the Lord I'm gwino to die; 
Keep me from sinking down : 
I'm gwine to judgment by and-by ; 
Keep me from sinking aown. 
Oh, Lord, &c. 

1/9 



No. 22. fi'tn a trabllng to ti)t «Krabe* 

Choeus. 



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I'm a traY'ling to the graTe, I'm a trav'ling to the 

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graYe, myLordjI'm a trav'ling to the grave, For to lay this bod-y 
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down. 1. My Mas-sa died a shouting, Singing glo-ry hal - le - 






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lu - jah,The last word he said to me. Was a-bout Je -ru -sa-lem. 

2. My missis died a shouting, &c. 

3. My brother died a shouting, &c. 

4. My sister died a shouting, &c. 

No. 23. iWang STijougantr ©one. 

Plaintively. 




-SES 



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No more auc-tion block for me, 



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No more, no more; 



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No more auction block for me. Ma - ny thousand gone. 



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2. No more peck o' corn for me, &c. 

3. No more driver's lash for me, &c. 

4. No more pint o' salt for me, &c. 

5. No more hundred lash for me, &c. 

6. No more mistress' call for me, &c. 

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No.24. 



S>ttal atoag^ 




Steal a - way, steal a - way, steal a . way to Je - sus! 



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Steal a- way, steal away home, I hain't got long to stay here. 

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1. My Lord calls me. He calls me by the thunder; The 

2. Green trees are bending, Poor sin- ners stand trembling; The,&c. 

N ^-v,^ J^ I S ^ ^ i"^ N J:^ 1 



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trumpet fK)unds it in my soul: I hain't got long to stay here. 



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3 My Lord calls me, 

He calls me by the lightning; 
The trumpet sounds it in my soul: 
I hain't got long to stay here. 
Cfio. — Steal awaj', &c. 

4 Tombstones are bursting, 
Poor sinners are trembling; 

The trumpet sounds it in my soul: 
I hain't got long to stay here. 
Cho. — Steal away, &c. 

l8l 






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No. 25. Mn iLortr's toriting all tlje timt.* 

Solo. Refi-ain. 



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1. Come down,coine down.My Lord, come down,My Lord's writing all the 

2. When I was down in Egypt's land, My Lord's writing all the 

3. O christians you had bet- ter pray, My Lord's writing all the 

4. King Jesus rides in the middle of the air,My Lord's writing all the 



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time. And take me up to wear the crown, My Lord's wriiing all the time, 
time. I heard some talk of promised land, My Lord's WTiting all the time, 
time. For Satan's round you every day, My Lord's writing all the time, 
time. He's calling sinners from everywhere,My Lord's writing all the time. 



1^- • 



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* Pnhllshed in sheet form, with piano accompaniment, by Joun Church k Co., 
Cincinnati. „ 

182 



/ 



No. 26. Jutistttent ISag is rolimg Hounli. 







Judgriient, Judgment, Judi!;ment day is rolling around, Judgment, 




zfiz 1— .'-- i-pH^H— n- r ni r^: 1^^ 



Judgment, how I long to go. 1. I've a good old mother in the 



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heaven, my Lord, How I 

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long to go there too, I've a 



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good old mother in the heaven, my Lord, how I long to go. 



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2 There's no back -sliding in the heaven, my Lord, 

How I long to go there too, 
There's no back-sliding in the heaven, my Lord, 
how I long to go. 
C/to.— Judgment, &c. 

3 King Jesus sitting in the heaven, my Lord, 

How I long to go there too, 
King Jesus sitting in the heaven, my Lord, 
O how I long to go. 
Oho. — Judgment, &c. 

4 There's a big camp meeting in the heaven, my Lord, 

How I long to go there too, 
There's a big camp meeting In the heaven, my Lord, 
O how I long to go. 
CYiO.— Judgment, &c. 

J83 



No. 27. ®!)^ <ffiO!8ipel Exuin. 




Unison. 



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1. The gos- pel train is coming, I hear it just at hand, 

2. I hear the bell and whistle, The coming round the curve; 

3. No sig-nal from an -oth- er train To fol - low on the line, 



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I hear the car-wheels moving, And rumbling thro' the land. 
She's plaj'ing all her steam and pow'r And straining every nerve. 
0, sin - ner, you're forever lost. If once you're left be - hind. 




Get on board, children, Get on board, children, Get on 



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board, 



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children, For there's room for many a more 



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more. 



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4 This is the Christian banner, 

The motto's new and old, 
Salvation and Repentance 
Are burnished there in gold. 
Cho. — Get on board, children, &c. 

5 She's nearing now the station, 

O, sinner, don't be vain, 
But come and get your ticket. 
And be ready for the train. 
C%o.— Get on board, children. &c. 

6 The fare is cheap and all can go. 

The rich and poor are there, 
No second-class on board the train, 
No difference in the fare. 
Cho. — Get on board, children, &c. 

184 



7 There's Moses, Noah and Abraham, 

Aud all the prophets, too, 
Our friends in Christ are all on board. 
O, what a heavenly crew. 
CJio. — Get on board, children, &c. 

8 We soon sliall reach the station, 

O, how we then shall sing, 
With all the heavenly army. 
We'll make the welkin ring. 
Cho. — Get on board, children, &c. 

9 We'll shout o'er all our sorrows, 

And sing forever more, 
With Christ and all his army. 
On that celestial shore. 
C/io.— Get on board, children, &c. 



No. 28. 



^ijine, Sl)ine. 




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Shine, shine, I'll meet you in the morning, Shine, shine, I'll 




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meet you in the morning, Shine, shine, I'll meet you in the morning. 



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Oh! my soul's going to shine,shine, Oh! my soul's going to shiue,shine. 




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1. I'm going to sit at the welcome ta - ble, I'm going to sit at the 




welcome ta - ble, I'm going to sit at the welcome ta - ble. 



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Oh! my soul's going to shine, shine. Oh! my soul's going to skine, shine. 

2 I'm going to tell God about my trial, «i;c. 
Oh! my soul's going to shine, &c. 

C/iO.— Shine, shine, &c. 

3 I'm going to walk all about that city, &e. 
Oh ! my soul's gO'ing to shine, &c. 

Cho. — Shine, shine, &c. 

185 



No. 29. ©li" 51)iP Of ^lon. 




I I I r F I I T 

I I t 

(What ship is that a sail - ing, Hal - le - lu - 

1. -J'Tis the old... ship of Zi - on, Hal-le-lu - 

( Do you think that she is a - ble. Hal - le - lu - 



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Repeat twice for first verse, 

1 



3 






jah, What. . ship is that a sail - ing, Hal- le - lu. 
jah, 'Tis the old . . . ship of Zi - on, Hal- le - lu. 
jah, Do you think that she is a - ble, Hal- le - lu. 



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Do 


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think that she 
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is 

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car - ry us all 1 

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lome. 


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JO. 


glo - ry, Hal - le - 
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In singing the last two verses the music is not to be repeated. 

2 She has landed many a thousand, Hallelujah, 
She has landed many a thousand, Hallelu, 
She has landed many a thousand. 
And will laud as many a more. Oh glory, Hallelu. 

S She is loaded down with angels, Hallelujah, 
She is loaded down with angels, Hallelu, 
And King Jesus is the Captain, 
And he'll carry us all home. Oh glory, Hallelu. 

i86 



No. 30. 5n t!)e IJiber ot Jortran. 




■■t 






1. In the riv- er of Jordan John baptized, How I long to 



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be baptized; 


In the riv - er of Jordan John baptized, 










98 


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To the dying Lamb. Pray on. pray on, pray on, ye 



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mourning souls. Pray on, pray on, un - to the dying Lamb. 



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2 We baptize all that come by faith, 

How I long to be baptized ; 
We baptize all that come by faith, 
To the dying Lamb. 
Cho. — Pray on, &c. 

3 Here's another one come to be baptized. 

How I long to be baptized ; 
Here's another one to be baptized, 
To the dying Lamb. 
(Mo. — Pray on, &c. 

187 



No. 31. MLt'll ataxia flit g»torm. 




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1. Oh ! stand the storm, it won't be long, We'll anchor by-and-by. 



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stand the storm, it won't be long, We'll anchor by - and-by. 



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si 



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1. My ship is on the 0- cean, We'll anchor by-and-by, My 



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ship is on the - cean, We'll anchor by -and-by. 

-r^ — I — i — I — • — #— i-F' 



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It 



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2 She's making for the kingdom, 

We'll anchor, &c. 

3 I've a mother in the kingdom, 

We'll anchor, &c. 

188 



No. 32. 



Bli4 



I'm 



4— t 



80 



I'm S6 ffirlair. 



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glad, I'm so glad, I'm so glad there's 



42. ^ 



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no dy - ing there. 1. I'll tell you how I found the Lord, 



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ing there, "With a hung down head 




B. a 



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I 



and ach - ing heart, 



No 



2. I hope I'll meet my brother there, 

No dying there, 
That used to join with me in prayer, 
No dying there. 

Cho.^tm. so glad, &o. 

3. I hope I'U meet the preacher there, 

No dying there. 
That used to join with me in prayer, 
No dying there. 

Oio. — I'm so glad, &c. 

189 



-t&- 




No. 33- atomt, let us all 50 IBciton. 




1. As 1 went down in the val-ley to pray, Studying a-bout that 

2. I think I hear the sinner say, Come, let's go in the val- 

3. I tnink I hear the mourner say, Come, let's go in the val- 



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goodold waj^iYou shall wear the starry crown, GoodLord, show me the way ; 
ley to pray ; You shall wear the starry crown, GoodLord, show me the woy ; 
ley to pray ;You shall wear the starry crown, GoodLord, show me the way; 



1- 



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i 



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By ' and -by we'll all go down, all go down, all go down, 



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:i=izH=x:j=±=:ifeizs- 



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By -and -by we'll all go down, Down in the val-ley to pray. 



No. 34. 



jSion's ©Ijilxircn. 



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Oh ! Zi - on's children com-ing a - long, Com-ing a - long, 

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-A 



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trip 






12: 



Com-ing a - long, Zi - on's children com - ing a - long, 

-K- 




Talk*- ing a - bout the well - come day. 



1. I 

2. Oh! 

3. I 




hail my moth-er in the morn- ing, Com-ing a - long, 

don't you wart to live up yon - der, Com-ing, &c. 

think they are might - y hap - py, Com-ing, &c. 

190 



fe^=J^=3^- 


1 > ;i b ^^— 



I 



com - iag a - long, I hail my moth - er in the 

Z>. C. 



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I — K- 



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tzsr. 



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morn - ing, Talk - ing a - bout the wel - come day. 



No. 35. 



©!)! ?^ol8 iLurir. 



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1 




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Oh! ho - ly Lord! 



Oh! 



ho - ly Lord! 




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I — I — ^- 



Oh! 



ho - ly 



Lord ! 



Done with the sin and 



U 



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if 



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sor- row. 1. Oh! rise 



-0- 

up 



-«»- 



chil - dren, get your crown, 




Done with the sin and sor - row, And by your Saviour's 

D. a 




down, 



sor - row. 



2 What a glorious morning that will be, 

Done with the sin and sorrow; 
Our friends and Jesus we will see. 
Done with the sin and sorrow.— CAo. 

3 Oh shout, you Christians, you're gaining ground, 

Done with the sin and sorrow; 
We'll shout old Satan's kingdom down. 
Done with the sin and sorrow.— Oho. 

4 I soon shall reach that golden shore, 

Done with the sin and sorrow; 
And sing the songs we sang before, 
Done with the sin and sorrow.— C%o. 



191 



No. 36. ^Cl^te ©lir ?!i:ime tieliston. 




1^ w^ 

Oh ! this old time re - li - gion,This old time re - li - gion, This 



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old time 



is good e - noTigh for me. 






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1. It is good for the mourner, It is good for the mourner, It is 



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good for the mourner. It is good e - nough for me. 



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2. It will carry you home to heaven, 
It will carry you home to heaven, 
It will carry you home to heaven 

It is good enough for me. 

Cho. — Oh, this old time religion, &Q, 

3. It brought me out of bondage, &c. 

C%o.— Oh, this old time religion, &c. 

4. It is good when you are in trouble, &c. 

CAo.— Oh, this old time religion, &c. 

19a 






-0 . 



■+■ 



I 



No. 37. 2ri)e Etn Vixiim. 






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1. Five of them were wise wlien the bridegroom came, 

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Five of them were 

M U # « « |0 


wise when the 


1 

bride - groom 


came. 




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Repeat, pp 



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O Zion, Zion, O Zion, when the bridegroom came. 



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iffl— r» — — — 0—r!^- 

:zziEp-[:=t=4:: 



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caul*: 



2 Five of them were foolish when the bridegroom came, 
Five of them were foolish when the bridegroom came. 

Cho.~0 Zion, &c. 

3 The wise thej^ took oil when the bridegroom came. 
The wise they took oil when the bridegroom came. 

CAo.— OZion, &c. 

4 The foolish took no oil when the bridegroom came, 
The foolish took no oil when the bridegroom came. 

Cho Zion, &c. 

6 The foolish they kept knocking when the bridegroom came. 
The foolish they kept knocking when the bridegroom came. 
Cho.—O Zion, &c. 

6 Depart, I never knew you, said the bridegroom, then, 
Depart, I never knew you, said the bridegroom, then. 
Cho. — O Zion, &c. 



193 



I^^ 



No. 38. 

Slowly. 



^t ^xom* 




1. The Jews killed poor Jesus, The Jews killed poor Jesus, The 
- — ^ -^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



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— 1 1 r-» n 1 n 

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Jews killed poor Je - sus, And laid him in the tomb. 



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He a - rose, 



He 



a 



rose, He 



a 






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Repeat, pp 



^ — ^ — ^ 






« — « — m-^ — -^-m — J y— * 



I- 



gl 



rose He a - rose and went to heaven in a cloud. 



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riz±=::.^.ii5--:: 



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■rr 



Then down came an angel. 
Then down came an angel, 
Then down came an angel, 
And rolled away the stone. 
C/iO.— He arose, «fec. 

Then Mary she came wee))ing, 
Then Mary she camo weeping, 
Then Mary she came weeping, 
A looking for her Lord. 
C7io.— He arose, «kc. 

194 



No. 39. .^abe me, Hortr, Sabc. 




± 



^ 9. — 0—1-s 



:e 



1. I called to my father, my father hearkened to me, And the 






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3 



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last word I heard him say, was, Save me, Lord, save me. 



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And I wish that heav'n was a mine, And I wish that heav'n will a 

■ -^- -0- •0' -^ -0- •*• ■0- -0- 



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be mine, And I wish that heav'n was a mine, save me, Lord, save me. 



cS^ — '■ — ^ — T" — I — n — I — C — L ~ 



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2 I called to my mother, my mother hearkened to me. 

And the last word I heard her say 
Was, save me, Lord, save me. 
C%o.— And I wish that heav'n was a mine, &c. 

3 I called to my sister, my sister hearkened to me, &c. 

Cho. — And I wish that heav'n was a mine, &c. 

4 I called to my brother, my brother hearkened to me, &c. 

C%o.— And I wish that heav'n was a mine, &c. 



195 



Ko. 40. Juirgment koill flinlr giju so. 



^2 — ^— :2iiz^zifz is-ij-ziiz: -zh^~j-9- isbi 



it:ezj[zjr 



Just as you live, just so you die, And af - ter death, 



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Judgment will find you so. 






1. O brethren, brethren, 









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watch and pray, 



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Judgment 






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will find you so, For 



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Satan's round you ev - 'ry day, Judgment will find you so. 



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2 The tallest tree in Paradise, 

Judgment will find you so; 
The Christian calls the tree of life, 
Judgment will find you so. 
Cho. — Just as you five, &,c. 

3 Oh ! Hallelujah to the Lamb, 

Judgment will find you so; 
The Lord is on Iho giving hand, 
Judgment will find you so, 
Cho. — Just as you live, Ac. 

iq6 



No. 41. W^ tbe iLilB of tf)t VMtn* 




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He's the li - ly 



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of the val - ley, 



Oh ! my 



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Lord; He's the li - ly of the val- ley, Oh, my Lord; 



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1. King Je - sus in the chariot rides, Oh! my Lord; With 



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four white hors - es side by side, 



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my Lord. 



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2 What kind of shoes are those you wear, 

Oh ! my Lord ; 
That you can ride upon the air^ 
Oh ! my Lord. 
Clio. — He's the lily of the valley, &r, 

3 These shoes I wear are gospel shoes, 

Oh ! my Lord; 
And you can wear them if you choose, 
Oh ! my Lord. 
C%o.— He's the lily of the valley, &Cc 



197 



No. 42. 



prepare u&. 




1- 



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Pre - pare me, Pre - pare me, Lord, Pre - pare me, "When 



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death shall shake this frame 
— « ^ a * ! 



go down the 



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stream of 



When death shall shake this frame. 



1 
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leave this sin- ful world behind, When death shall shake this frame. 

^ — • ^ 



-0- 
-0- 



:^zit»: 



2 The man that loves to serve the Lord, 

When death shall shake this frame; 
He will receive his just reward. 
When death shall shake this frame. 
Cho. — Prepare me, &c. 

3 Am I a soldier of the cross, 

When death shall shake this frame; 
Or must I count this soul but lost, 
When death shall shake this frame. 
Cho. — Prepare me, &c. 

4 My soul is bound to that bri,2;ht land, 

AVhen death shall shake this frame; 
And there I'll meet that happy band, 
When death shall shake this frame. 
CTio, — Prepare me, <!fcc. 

198 



:^^^^=i 



No. 43. iWs &W is on tte ©ccan. 



Is^ 



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My ship is on the oceun, My ship is on the ocean, My 



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ship is on the o - cean, Poor sin - ner, fare - you - well. 



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1. I'm go - ing a - way to see the good old Dan- iel, I'm 



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see my Lord. 



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2 I'm going to see the weeping Mary, 

I'm going away to see my Lord. 
Cho.—M.y ship, &c. 

3 Oh ! don't you want to live in that bright glory ? 

Oh ! don't you want to go to see my Lord ? 
Cho. — My ship, ice. 



199 



No. 44. 



IH^- 






:: t- — -g g — p-^ — ^ — ^^--_ ^- 



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1. Way o - ver in the E - gypt land, You shall gain the 



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You shall gain the day. March on, and you shall gain the 



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March on, and you shall gain the day. 

H — 4— ■#• •#-•#-■#-•« 



— 15? »-v 






pzipiriizt:; 



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2 When Peter was preaching at the Pentecost, 

You shall gain the victory; 
He was endowed with the Holy Ghost, 
You shall gain the day. 
Cho. — March on, &c. 

3 When Peter was fishing in the sea, 

You shall gain the victory; 
He droi)ped his net and followed me, 
You shall gain the daj'. 
Cho. — March on, &c. 

4 King Jesus on the mountain top, 

You shall gain the victory; 
King Jesus speaks and the chal ^ot stops. 
You shall gain the day. 
Cho. — March on, &c. 



200 



TSTo. 45. ii»8 fflsaag's atlouiiB. 








l-r-^-fr.J: 









Oh ! bretheren, my way, my way's cloud- y, my way, Go 



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send them an - gels down, Oh ! breth-er - en, my way, 



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my way's cloud-y, my way, Go send them an - gels down. 
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1. There's fire in the east and fire in the west, Send them angels down, And 

2. Old Sa - tan's rnad and I am glad, Send them angels down, He 

3. I'll tell you now as I told ^ou before, Send them angels down, To 

4. This is the year of Ju - bi - lee, Send them angels down, The 



m 



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fire a - mong the Meth - o - dist, O 
missed the soul he thought he had, O 
the promised land I'm bound to go, O 
Lord has come and set me free, O 

#- 



send them an -gels down. 
send them an - gels down, 
send them an - gels down, 
send them an - gels down. 



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20I 



No. 46. ^i'^t on, Hing Jesu^. 



i 



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Ride on, King Je - sus, No man c^n a hin-der me, 




Ride on, King Je 



sus, 



No man can a binder me. 




i 



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—\ N-h" 



^— ^— (* 



— "-I — ' — I — I—-' 

-0- 

1. I was but young wlien I begun, No man can a hinder me, But 



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' •0- ■0- •0- -»• 

now my race is almost done, No man can a hinder me. 



2 King Jesus rides on a milk-white horsey 

No man can a hinder me ; 
The river of Jordan he did cross, 
No man can a hinder me. 
C7iO.— Ride on, &c. 

3 If you want to find your way to God, 

No man can a hinder me; 
The gospel highway must be trod, 
No man can a hinder me. 
r//o.— Ride on, &c. 



fflgaijat feintr of g|)oe^ arc you going to toear? 

No. 47. 









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y ^ ? -y 

1. What kind of shoos you going to wear? Golden slippers! 

2. Wiiat kind of crown you going to wear? Star-ry crown! 

3. What kind of robe you going to wear? White"^ robe ! 

4. What kind of song you going to sing? New 



song ! 






f 



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* Puhlishetl in sheet form, with piano accompaniment, by 
CIucinnatL 

202 



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JouN Church & Co , 




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What kind of shoes you going to wear? Golden shlippere! Golden shlippera I'm 
What kind of crown you going to wear? Starry crown ! Star-ry crown I'm 
What kind of robe you going to wear? White robe ! Long white robe I'm 
What kind of harp you going to play ? Golden harp ! Gold-en harp I'm 




* 



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bound to wear, That out-shine the glit - ter - ing sun. 

bound to wear, That out-shines the glit -ter -ing sun. 

bound to wear, That out-shines the glit - ter - ing sun. 

bound to play, That out-shines the glit -ter -ing sun. 




Yes, yes, 




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Yes, yes, my Lord, I'm going to join the heavenly choir, 



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Yes, yes, yes, my Lord. I'm a sol - dier of 



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the cross. 



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203 



No. 49. iWarg ani iWartl)a. 



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1. Ma-ry and a Martha's just gone 'long,Ma-ry and a Martha's 



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just gone 'long, Ma - ry and a Mar-tha's just gone 'long, To 



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ring those charming bells; Cry-ing free grace and dy-ing love, 



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Free grace and dy - ing love, Free grace and dv - ing love, To 

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ring those charming bells. Oh! way o-ver Jordan, Lord, Way o -ver 

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Jordan, Lord, Way over Jordan, Lord, To ring those charming bells. 



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2 The preacher and the elder's just gone 'long, &c. 

To ring those charming bells. 
CAo.— Crying, free grace, &c. 

3 My father and mother's just gone 'long, &c. 

To ring those charming bells. 
C7io.— Crying, free grace, &c. 

4 The Methodist and Baptist's just gone 'long, &c. 

To ring those charming bells. 
Cho. — Crying, free grace, &c. 

No. 50. 5 ain't going to irie no more* 







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Oh ! ain't I glad, Oh ! ain't I glad. Oh ! ain't I glad, I 







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ain't a going to die'no more ; 1. Going to meet those happy Christians 




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soon - er in the morning. Soon - er in the morning, 




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Soon - er in the morning. Meet those hap-py Christians 

D. O. 



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soon- er in the morning, I ain't a going to die no more. 

2 Going shouting home to glory sooner in the morning, &c. 

QJw.—Ohl ain't I glad, &c. 

3 Going to wear the starry crown sooner in the morning, &c. 

Cho.—0\\ ! ain't I glad, &c. 

4 We'll sing the troubles over sooner in the morning, &c. 

Cho.— Oh ! ain't I glad, &c. 

205 



^: 



No. 51. ©^tting Mi^atig to Mit. 




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die, Get - ting read - y 



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die, Get - ting read y to die, O 



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1. When I set out, I was but young, Zi - on, 




Zi - on, But 
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now my race is ai - most run, zi - on, 

2 Religion's like a blooming rose, Zion, Zion. 

And none but those that feel it knows, Zion, Zion. 
Gio. — Getting ready to die, &c. 

3 The Lord is waiting to receive, Zion, Zion, 

If sinners only would believe, Zion, Zion Chorus. 

4 All those who walk in Gospel shoes, Zion, Zion, 

This faith in Christ they'll never lose, Zion, Zion.— CJiorus, 



No. 52. 



3Hje ffiencral ISoll. 







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I'll be there, I'll be there. Oh when the general roll is called, 







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I'll be there. 1. O hal - le - lu - jah to the Lamb, The general 
2. Old Sa - tan told me not to pray. The general 



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roll is called, I'll be there; The Lord is on the 
roll is called, I'll be there; He wants my soul at 




giv - ing hand, The general roll is called, I'll be there. 
Judgment Day, The general roll is called, I'll be there. 

2o6 



No. 53. it'm 2rroui)lrt in iHflinXr* 

[The person who furnished this song (Mrs. Brown of Nashville, formerly a slave), 
stated that she first heard it from her old father when she was a child. After lie 
(had been whipped he always went and sat upon a certain log near his cabin, and 
with the tears streaming down his checks, sang this song with so much pathos 
that few could listen without weeping from sympathy: and even his cruel oppres- 
Isors were not wholly unmoved.] 




—CEZZ^r 






I'm troubled, I'm troubled, I'm troubled in mind, If Jesus don't 



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belp me, 




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1.0 Je - sus, my Saviour, on 

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thee I'll depend, When troubles are near me, you'll be my true friend. 



2 When ladened with trouble and burdened with grief, 
To Jesus in secret I'll go for relief. 

Cho. — I'm troubled, &c. 

3 In dark days of bondage to Jesus I prayed, 
To help me to bear it, and he gave me his aid. 

Cho, — I'm troubled, &c. 



Ho. 54. i*tix going to Hibe toWj Jesu^. 




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1. I'm going to live with Je-sus, A soldier of the Ju-bi-lee, I'm 



2. I've started out for heaven, 

3. I know I love my Je - sus, 



A soldier of the Ju-bi-lee, I've 
A soldier of the Ju-bi-lee, I 




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going to live with Je - sus, 
start -ed out for heaven, 
know I love my Je - sus, 



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soldier 
soldier 
soldier 



of the cross, 
of the cross, 
of the cross. 



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when you get there re - member gone. 

207 



A soldier of the cross. 



No. 55. J'^^ ft^^w iw *ft^ Stcitm go long. 



Chorus. 




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I've been in the storm so long, I've been in the storm so long, children, I've 

1st time. 




pray. 1. Oh! let me tell my mother 

2. Oh! when 1 get to heaven, 

3. I'll go in - to heaven, 



how I came a - long, Oh, 
I'll walK all a - bout, Oh, 
and take my seat. Oh, 




give me lit - tie time to pray. With a hung down head and an 
give me lit - tie time to pray, There'll be no - bo - dy there to 
give me lit - tie time to pray, Cast my crown at 

D. a 




ach 
turn 
Je ■ 



ing heart, 
me out, 
sus' feet. 



Oh, 
Oh, 
Oh, 



give 
give 
give 



me 
me 
me 



lit - tie time 
lit - tie time 
lit - tie time 



to 
to 
to 



pray, 
pray, 
pray. 



No. 56. ®c), ci)am X\)t Hion troton. 



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Go, chain the li - on down, Go, chain the li - on down. Go 




chain the li - on down. Before the heav'n doors close. 1. Do you 




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see that grand old sister, Come a wagging up the hill so slow. She 




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wauts to get to heav'n in due time. Before the heav'n doors close. 

2 Do you Bee the good old Christians? &c. 

3 Do you see the good old preachers ? <fcc. 

208 



No. 57. ffiKtien iWosejsi smote tf\t fflZSatet. 






When Mo - ses smote tlie wa - ter, The chil-r'jen all passed 



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o - verjWhen Moses smote the wa - ter, The sea gave a - way. 



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1. O chil-dren ain't you glad You've left that sin - ful 



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ar - my ? chil-dren ain't you glad The sea gave a - way ? 



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2. Christians ain't you glad 

You've left that sinful army ? 
O Christians ain't you glad 
The sea gave away ? 
Cho. — When Moses smote, &o. 

3. brothers ain't you glad 

You've left that sinful army? 
O brothers ain't you glad 
The sea gave away? 
Qvo. — When Moses smote, Ac 



«09 



14 



No. 58. 



©i)! pinner jmau. 






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sin-ner, Oli ! 

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sin-ner man, Oh ! sin-uer Oh ! 



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which way are you go-ing? 1. Oh! come back, sinner, and 






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don't go there, Which v/ay are you going ? For hell is deep, and 



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dark des - pair. Oh ! which way are you go - ing ? 



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2. Though days be dark, and nights be long, 

Which way are you going ? 
We'll ^hout anrJ sing till we get home, 
Which way are you going '? 
CVio.— Oh! sinner, &c. 

3. 'Twas just about the break of day, 

Which way are you going ? 
My sins forgiven and soul set fi*ee, 
Which wa,^' are you going? 
Cho. — Oil ! sinner, <fcc. 



^10 



No. 59. Mn ioo^ Hotti'^ bttn tere. 



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My good Lord's been here, been here, been here, 









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My good Lord's been here, And he's blessed my soul and gone. 






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1, brothers, where were you, broth- ers, where were you, 

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broth - ers, where were you When my good liOrd was here? 



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2 sinners, where were you. &c. 

Clio. —My good Lord's been here, <fec. 

3 Christians, where were you, &c. 

Cho. — My good Lord's been here, &c. 

4 mourners, where were you, &c. 

Cho.—Uy good Lord's been here, <fec. 



211 



No. 60. a little more Jfaitl) in Je^ug. 




want, 



want, 



want 



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lit - tie more faith in Je - sus. 



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1. When-ev-er we meat 



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you here we saj^ A lit - tie more faith in Je - sus, Pray 



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what's the order of the clay ? A lit - tie more faith in Jesus- 



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I tell you now as I told you before, 

A little more faith in Jesus, 
To tlie promised land I'm bound to go, 

A little more faith in Jesus. 
C/io.— All I want. &c. 

3. 

Oh! Hallelujah to the Lamb, 
A little more faith in Jesua, 

TOie Lord is on the giving hand, 
A little more faitti in .lei^ua. 
0%o.— All X want, &c. 



^ -F- -F- -r- ■<►- - - 

— — — ffi 1 1- — r--f - -J 



I do believe without a doubt, 
A little more faith in Jesus, 

That Ciiristians have a right to shout, 
A little more faith in Jesus. 
Cho. — All I want, &c. 



Shout, you children, shout, you're free, 

A little more faith In Jesus, 
For Christ has bought this liberty, 

A little more faith in Jesus. 
e7to.— All I want, <feG. 



212 



No. 61. 29ft not oltr ^Ijaraolj get lost? 



z4z:E— [zih zmz: 0—trs _gr~»~ » ~^~ b»zz: # — ^ — r - 



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saac a ran-som, while he lay Up - oii au al - tar 




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bound, Mo- ses, an infant cast away, By Pharaoh's dau<2;hter found. 



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Did cot old Pharaoh get lost, get lost, get lost, Did 



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2 Joseph, by his false brethren sold, 
God I'aised above them all; 
To Hannah's child the Lord foretold 
How Eli's house should Jail. 
C/io.— Did not old Pharaoh, &c. 

8 The Lord said unto Moses. 
Go unto Pharaoh now, 
For I have hardened Pharaoh's heart, 
To me he will not bow. 
C/io.— Did not old Pharaoh, &c. 

4 Then Moses and Aaron, 
To Pharaoh did go, 
Thus says the God of Israel, 
Let my people go. 
CAo.— Did not old Pharaoh, &c. 

6 Old Pharaoh said who is the Lord, 
That I should him obey? 
His name it is Jehovah, 
For he hears his people pray. 
C/io.— Did not old Pharaoh, &c. 

6 Then Moses numbered Israel, 
Through all the land abroad. 
Saying, children, do not murmur. 
But hear the word of God. 
CAo.— Did not old Pharaoh, &c. 



7 Hark! hear the children murmur. 

They cry aloud for bread, 
Down came the hidden manna, 
The hungry soldiers fed. 
C/io.— Did not old Pharaoh, Ac. 

8 Then Moses said to Israel, 

As they stood along the shore, 
Your enemies you see to-day, 
You Will never see no more. 
C/io.— Did not old Pharaoh, &c. 

9 Then down came ragiug Pharaoh, 

That you may plainly see, 
Old Pharaoh and his host, 
Got lost in the Red Sea. 
C/to.— Did not old Pharaoh, <fcc. 

10 Then men, and women, and children 

To Moses they did flock; 
They cried aloud for water. 
And Moses smote the rock. 
C/io.— Did not old Pharaoh, Sec. 

11 And the Lord spoke to Moses, 

From Sinai's smoking top, 
Saving, Moses, lead the peop?«, 
till I shall bid you stop. 
CAo.— Did not old Pharaoh, k,c. 



213 



No. 62, 



fflgftregitling Jacot. 



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1. Wrestling Ja - cob, Ja - cob, day is a breaking, 



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Wrestling Ja - cob, Ja - cob, I will not let thee go. 

C « 0- » m m N N 



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Let me go, Ja - cob. 



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not let thee go. 



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Let rae go, Ja - cob. 



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I will not let thee go, Un 



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Wrest - ling Ja - cob, Ja - cob, day is a -break -ing, 



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"Wrest- ling Ja - cob, Ja - cob, I will not let thee go. Ill 

{Or this.) I'll 

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hold thee till the break of day, I 
wres - tie till the break of day, I 


will not let thee go, TJu - 
will not let thee go, Un - 


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til thou tell me what's thy name, I will not let thee go. 
til thou come and bless my soul, I will not let thee go. 



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215 



NO. 63. ILoht^Uam in S^eaben. 



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There's a love - feast in the heav - en by - and - by, 




> 1 
chil-dred, There's a love - feast in the heav-en by - and 




by. Yes a love - feast in the heav - en by - and - by, 

Fine, 




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chil - dren, There's a love-feast in the heav - en by - and -by. 



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1. Oh! run up, chil-dren, get your crown, There's a love-feast in the 



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heav - en by - and - by. And by your Sav-iour's side sit down. 

D. S. 




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There's a love - feast in the heav-en by - and - by. Yes, a 

* 

2 Old Satan told me not to pray, &c. 

He wants my soul at the Judgment-day, &c. 

3 Oh, brethren, and sisters, how do you do, &c. 
And does your love continue true, &c. 

4 Oh, brethren, brethren, how do you know, &c. 
Because my diesiis toM m© sc, <fec. 

216 



No. 64. fflSaijen gljall i get tt)ete. 




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There's a heaven - ly home up yon-der, There's a heaven - ly 



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home up yon - der, There's a heaven - ly home up yon - der, Oh 



Fine. 



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when shall I get there? 1. Old Pi - late says, I 



Chorus. 



Solo. 




wash my hands; When shall 



get there? 




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Chorus. 



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find no fault in this just man ; When shall I get there ' 



2 John and Peter ran to see, 
When shall I get there ? 
But Christ had gone to Galilee, 
When shall I get there ? 



3 Paul and Silas bound in jail. 

When shall I get there ? 
They sang and prayed both night and day. 
When shall I get there ? 

4 I'm bred and born a Methodist, 

When shall I get there ? 
I carry the witness in my breast, 
When shall I get there ? 

5^17 



No. 65. ^i)nt'^ a imectius Ijea So^nigijt. 




Get ycu rea - dy, there's a meet-ing here to-night, Come a 



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long, there's a meet-ing here to-night; I know you by your 






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dai - ly walk, There's a meeting here to-night. 1. Camp-meeting 












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down in the wilderness, There's a meeting here to-night; 



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know it's among the Methodist .There's a meeting here to-night. 



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218 



2 Those angel wings are tipped with gold, &c. 
That brought glad tidings to my soul, &c. 

3 My father says it is the best, &c. 
To live and die a Methodist, &c. 

4 I'm a Methodist bred, and a Methodist born, &c. 
And when I'm dead there's a Methodist gone, &c. 



No. 66. jFatetoell, mg iBmhet. 



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— g.^—^—a — W-i — \-hj — h — H — «— 

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Farewell, my brother,"^ farewell for-ev- er. Fare you well, my 






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brotlier, now, For I am going home. Oh 1 good-bye, good-bye, For 

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I am bound to leave you, Oh, good-bye, good -bye, for I am going home 



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J/ifer 1)6? (Japo sing this : 
Shake hands, shake hands, for I am bound to leave you. 
Oh, shake hands, &c. 

* Or Sister. 
219 



No. 67. 



Jncfting along. 



[AttentioB is called to the appropriateness of the melody for the expression of 
these singular words. It is all embraced within the first three tones of the scale, 
and thus may be said to be itself not more than an inch long,] 
Chorus. 




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Keep a inch-ing a - long. Keep a inch-ing a - long ; 



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23 



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Je-suswillcomeby'nd-bye ; Keepa incliing a-long like a 

Fine. Solo. 



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poor inch.- worm, Jesus will come by'nd-bye. 1. 'Twas a inch by inch I 

Choeus. Solo, 




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sought the Lord, 




Je - sus will come by'nd-bye ; And a 

Chorus. I). G< 






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inch by inch He bless'd my soul, Je-sus will come by'nd-bye. 



2 The Lord is coming to take us home, 
Jesus will come by'nd-bye ; 
And then our work will soon be done, 
Jesus will come by'nd-bye, 

S Trials and troubles are on the way, 
Jesus will come by'nd-bye ; 
But we must watch and always pray, 
Jesus will come by'nd-bye. 

We'll inch and inch and inch along, 
Jesus will come by'nd-bye ; 

And inch aad inch till we get home, 
Jesus will come by'nd-bye. 

220 



No. 68. 31 ain't got toearg ^tt 









fc: 



BH 



And I ain't got weary yet, And I ain't got weary yet ; Been 






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down in the val-ley so long, And 1 ain't got wea - ry yet. 






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Chorus. 






y— y— y- 



1. Been praying for the sinner so long, And I ain't got weary yet ; 



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Been praying for the sinner so long, And I ain't got weary yet. 

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2 Been praying for the mourner so long, &g. 

3 Been going to the sitting-up bo long, &c. 



No. 69. 



Eun to 3fei5us. 



[This song was given to the Jubilee Singers by Hon. Frederick Douglass, 
at Washington, D. C, with the interesting sti.ternent, that it first suggested 
to him the thought of escaping from slavery.] 



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Hun to Je « sus^ shuji the dan > ger, 



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don't ex - pect to stay mucii long = or Iiers. L He will 



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be our dear- est friend, And will help us to the end ; I 






don't ex-pect to stay much long - er here. Run to Je - sus 



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shun the dan - ger, I don't ex-pect to stay much long-er herCc 

* 2 Oh, I thought I heard them say, 

There were lions in the way. 
I don't expect, etc. 






Many mansions there will be. 
One for you and one for me,, 
X don't expect, etc. 

232 



No, *^o ^.mtU toaiting at t&e ©ooSc 



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7 



1. My sis - ter's took her flight and gone horae, And the 

2. She has laid down her cross and gone home, And, &c. 

3. She has taken up her crown and gone home, And, &c. 



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an - gels wait-ing at the door. My sis-ter's took her 



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flight and gone home, And the an-gels wait-ing at the door. 






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Tell all my father's children, Don't you grieve for me ; 



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Tell all my father's children, Don't you grieve for me. 



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223 



No. 71. feeep gout lamps trimmeD* 



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Keep your lamps trimm'd and a-burmiig,Keep your lamps trimm'd and a- 



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burning, Keep your lamps trimm'd and a-burning, For this work's almost done. 



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Brothers, don't grow wea - ry, Brothers, don't grow wea - ry, 
Preachers, &c. 



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Fine, 



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Brothers, don't grow wea - ry. For this work's al-most done. 



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Keep your lamps trimm'd and a-burning, Keep your lamps trimm'd and a- 




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buming, Keep your Mmps trimm'd and a-burning. For tbis work's almost done. 




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_^'Tis re - lig-ion makes us hap-py, 'Tis re - lig - ion makes us 
We are climbing Jacob's ladder, &c. 
Ev-'ry round goes higher and higher, &c. 



g ^g%r^ ^p ^-%^j^^ 



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happy, 'Tie religion makes us happy, For this work's almost done. 

224 



jifo. 73, ©ftoto me tbe aajag. 



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1. Broth - er, have you come to show me the 

2. Sis - ter, have you come to show me the 

3. Yes,.... my good Lord, show me the 



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way? 
way? 
way; 



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Broth - er, 
Sis - ter, 

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have 

have 

my 

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you 
you 
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come 
eome 
Lord, . 



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show 
show 



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me 
me 



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way? 
way? 
way. 



Show 
Show 
Show 



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me the 
me the 
me the 



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15 



No. 73. Jt)e been BleDeemeti* 





I've 


been 


re - 


deem'd, . . 






I've been 


re • 


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I've 


been 


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re- deem'd, I've 


been 


re - deem'd 


I've been 


re 


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deem'd, . 



I've been re - deem'd, I've been re- 



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J \i 'i ^j ^ iv li iv r^ ^ ^ ^ .( L 1^ r 
deem'd, I've been redeem'd, I've been redeem'd, I've been redeem'd, I've been re - 

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deem'd, . 



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I've been re • deem'd, I've been re 

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deem'd, I've been redeem'd, I've been redeem'd, I've been redeem'd, I've been re - 



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deem'd, I've been redeem'd, Been wasb'd in the blood of the Lamb. 



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226 



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Been washed in the blood of the Lamb, Been 

There is a . . . . fount - ain. . . filled with blood, Drawn 
The dy - ing . . . thief re - joiced to see That 



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washed in the blood of the 
from. ... Im - man - uel's. . . . 
fount • - ain in his 



Lamb, 
veins ; 
day;.. 



I 
Been 
And 
And 



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there may I, though 



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washed in the blood of the Lamb, That 

sin - ners plung'd be - - neath that flood. Lose 



as he, Wash 



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B.C.* 






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flows from Cal - va 
all their guilt - y 
all my sins a 






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ry. .. 

stains. 

way.. 

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* Da Capo in ejtact time. 
227 



No. 74. Mt sWl ttaft tfjro" tfee Oallej. 






f:^i=::|i=:^zi|i 






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We shall walkthro' the valley and the shadow of death, W e shaU 







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\valk thro' the val - ley in peace ; If Jesus Himself ehaJl beouf 



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lead • er, We shall waJk through the val • ley in peace. 



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e shall meet thoae Ohris-tians there, meet them there, We shall 



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meet those Chris - tians 



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there, meet them 

EEEF 



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lem there ; If 



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Je . BUS Him - self shall be our lead 



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er, We sliall 



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walk. . 



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through the 



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peace. 



2. II : There will be no sorrow there, :| 
If Jesus Himself shall be our leader, 
We shall walk through the valley in peace. 
Chorus. — We shall, &c. 

No. 75. ©atitierg Crumper0 going to filoto, 

(As Bung by Miss Jennie t,''ACKSON. ) 



P 



h-h— N 



4=5E£i£fc-ii=? 



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1. Gabriel's trumpet's going to blow, By awd by, ly and by; Yes, 




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Gabriel's trumpet's going to blow * At the end of time. 



3. 
Oh, get you all ready for to go 

By and by, by and by ; 
Oh, get you all ready for to go 

At the end of time. 



The first sounding of the trumpet 
for the righteous 
At the end of time. 



Go, wake the sleeping nations, 

3. By and by, by and by ^ 
Then my Lord will say to Gabri-el, Go, wak e the sleeping nations 

By and by, by and by ; it the end of time. 

Go, get you down your silver trum- « 

At the end of time. [pet, ^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^.^^^^^ ^^^^ ^j^l ^^^ ^^ , 

4. By and by, by and by ; 

The first sounding of the trumpet Yoa'U run for the mountaine to hide 
for the righteous, you, 

By and by, by and by ; At the end of time. 

329 



No. 76. lorD, 3[ toi0f) 31 ban a^come. 




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1. Lord, i wish I had a - come when you call'd ine, Lord ; T 
3. There's no temp-ta - tions in the heav - ens, There's 
3. My fa - ther and my moth-er in the heav - ens, My fa- 




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wish I had a - come when you call'd me, Lord, I 

no temp-ta - tions in the heav - ens. There's 

ther and my moth - er in the heav - ens, My fa 



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wish I had a - come when you 

no temp - ta - tions in the 

ther and my moth - er in the 



call'd 

heav 
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Sit* ting by tbf side of my Je - siis. Way o-verin the 



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lieav - ens. Way o - ver in tlie heav - ens, Way o - ver in the 




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heav • ens. Sit -ting by the side of my Je - sua. 



No. 77. 



Deep iRitier. 





Deep. . . riv-er^ My home is o - ver Jor- dan, Deep. . . . 
f PP 



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riv-er, Lord. I want to cross o - ver in-to camp-ground, LordJ 

230 




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want to cross o - ver in - to camp- ground Lord, I 



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want to cross o - ver in - to camp - gromid, Lord, I 

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want to cross 



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ver in - to camp - ground. 







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1. Oil, don't you want to go to that Gos - pel - feast, That 

2. I'll go in - to heav-en, and take my seat, 

3. Oh, when I get to heav'n, I'll walk all a - bout, There's 




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prom - is'd land where all is peace ? Lord, I 

Cast my crown at Je - sus' feet. Lord, I 

nobody there for to turn me out. Lord, I 




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want to cross o - ver in - to camp- ground, Lord, I 



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want to cross o - ver in - to camp- ground, Lord, I 

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v/ant to cross o - ver in - to camp- ground, Lord, I 

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want to cross o - ver in 

231 



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to camp ground. 



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Ko. 78. 3In bmU mansions afiotie* 






In bright mansions above, In briglit mansions above. Lord, I 



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want to live up yon- der, In bright man- sions a - bove. 



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1. My fa-ther's gone to glo-ry; 

2. My broth-er's gone to glo - ry ; |- 1 want to live there too, Lord, I 

3. The Christian's gone to glo - ry ; 



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want to live up yon - der, In bright man - sions a - bove. 



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333 



No. 79. 8©g Lorn, tobat a a^ourning. 



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My Lord, what a mourning, My Lord, what a mourning, 






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( 1. You'll 

My Lord, what a mourning. When the stars begin to fall. \ 2. You'll 

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hear the trum-pet sound To wake the nations un-der ground, 
hear the sin - ner mourn. To wake the nations un-der ground, 
hear the Christian shout, To wake the nations un-der ground, 



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Looking to my God's right hand, When the stars be-gin to fall. 



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No. 80. Wz are climbing: tfje l^iU^ of ^ion* 

(As sung by Miss Jennie Jackson.) 

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We are climbing the hilis of Zi-on, the bills of Zi-on, the 




hills of Zi-on, We are climbing the bills of Zi-on, 



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With Je - BUS in our souls. 



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brethren, do get ready, 
seek-er, do get ready, 
sin-ner, do get ready. 




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Oh, brethren, do get ready, 
Oh, seek - er, do get ready, 
Oh, sin - ner, do get ready, 



Oh, breth - ren, 
Ob, seek - er, 
Ob, sin - ner, 




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do get read-y, With Je - sus in your souls. 

No. 81. ©f), toasn't tf)at a toiDe Eitiet? 




Oh, was - n't that a 




Jor - dan, Lord? wide 



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one more riv-er to cross, cross. 



j^ ^ - - - ■• ^ 

1. Oil, the riv-er of Jor - dan 

3. I. . . . have some friends be- 

3. Shout,.... shout, 

4. Old Sa - tan is a 



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Satan's a - bout, 
snake in the grass. 



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don't know how to get 

grace .... of ... . God I'll . . . . 

Shut .... your . . door and. . . . 

you don't mind . . he'll get . . . 







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oth - er side 
fol - low 

keep him out ; i 

you at last ; ; 



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235 



to 






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cross. 



No. 82. ana? otiet 3[orDan» 




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Oh, way o • ver Jor - dan, View the land, view the land ; 



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Way o - ver Jor - dan, Oh, view the heav'nly land. 



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want to go to heaven when I die, "View the land,view the land ; To 



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shout sal - va - tion as I fiy. Oh, view the heav'nly land. 



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2 Old Satan's mad, and I am glad, 
View the land, view the land ; 
He miss'd that soul be thought he had, 
Oh view the heav'nly land. 
Oh, way over Jordan, &c. 



3 You say yon're aiming for the skies, 
View the land, view the land ; 
Why don't you stop your telling lies f 
Oh view the heav'nly land. 
Oh, way over Jordan, &c. 



4 You say your Lord has set you free, 
View the land, view the land; 
Why don't you let your neighbors be ? 
Cm view the heav'nly land. 
Oh, way over Jordan, &c. 



236 



No. 83. (LOe'll otimafee tfee armg. 




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We'll • ver - take the ar • my, o - ver-take the ar - my, 



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1. I've list - ed, and 1 mean to fight; Yes, my Lord. Till 

2. Tho' I may fall, I'll bless Hij name ; Yes, my Lord. I'll 

3. The God I serve is a man of war ; Yes, my Lord. He 



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ev - 'ry foe is put to flight, Yes my Lord. 

trust in God, and rise a - gain, Yes, my Lord. 

fights and con - quers ev - er - more. Yes, my Lord. 



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237 



No. 84. COe ate almost 5)ome» 




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We are al - most home, We are al - most home. We are 






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al - most home to ring those charming bells, j n' Qh* 






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come along, brothers, come along, come along, brothers, come along, 
come along, sis-ters, come along, come along, sis-ters, come a-long, 



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come along, brothers, come along, To ring those cb arming bells, 
come along, sis - ters, come along, To ring those charming bells. 



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238 



No. 85. Ooton Og tbt JRitJCt. 



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Oh, we'll wait till Je ■ sus comes Down by the riv - er ; We'll 



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1. Oh, 

wait till Je - sua comes Down by the river side. \ 2. Oh, 

3. Oh, 



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hal - le - lu - jah to the Lamb, Down by the river ; The 
we are pil-grims here be - low, Down by the river ; Oh, 
little did I think that He was so nigh, Down by the river ; He 



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Lord is on the giv-ing hand, Down by the riv-er side. 

soon to glo - ry we will go, Down by the riv-er side. 

spake, and made me laugh and cry, Down by the riv - er side. 



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239 



No. 86. mait a little mUU. 



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Wait a lit - tie while, Then we'll slug the new song ; 



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heavenly home is bright and fair, We will sing the new song ; No 
2. Jesus, my Lord, to heav'n is gone, We will sing the new song ; He 



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pain or sor - row en-ter there ; We will sinpr the new song, 
whom I fix my hopes up-on ; We will sing the new song. 



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240 



No. 87. 



5)arD Crials. 



e-a.m N — N— J- — ' ^ — b-*-r— ^ .-9—0 1 N ■ V -4-— J-J 

1 — ^-^-\j — y — — *— 2- J 



1, The foxes have holes in the ground. The birds have nests in the air. The 






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Christians liave a hiding-place. But we poor sinners have none ; 




Now ain't them hard tri - als, 



trib - u - Ifltions? Ain't them 

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hard tri - als ? I'm going to live with God 1 




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8 Old Satan tempted Eve, 
And Eve, she tempted Adam ; 
And that's why the sinner has to j^ray 30 hard 
To get his sins forgiven. 

8 Oh, Methodist, Methodist is my name, 
Methodist till I die ; 
I'll be baptized on the Methodist side, 
And a Methodist will I die. 

4 Oh, Baptist, Baptist is my name, 
Baptist till I die ; 

I'll be baptized on the Baptist side, 
And a Baptist will I die. 

5 While marching on the road, 
A-hunting for a home, 

You had better stop your different 
And travel on to God. 



241 



16 



Fo. 88. I^e rD0e from tU Oeao, 



He rose, 




He rose, 

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He rose, He rose, He rose, He rose, He rose from the dead ; He 



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rose. 



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rose. He rose. He rose. He rose. He rose from the dead, And the 



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chil - dren home. 1. The 



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Jews cru - ci - fied Him, and nail'd Hiin to the tree, The 

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tree, And the Lord shall bear His cliil - dren home. 



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2 Joseph begged His body, and laid it in the tomb, 
And the Lord shall bear His children home. 

8 Down came an angel, and rolled the sfcono away, 
And the Lord shall bear His children home. 

4 Mary, she came weeping, her Loid for to see, 
But Christ had gone to Galilee. 

243 



No. 89. 



©ooD olD Cfjariot. 



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Swing low, sweet char - i - ot, Swing low, sweet cliar- i - ot. 



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Good old chariot, swing so low, Good old chariot, swing so low, 
Good old chariot, take us all home,Good old chariot, take us all home, 



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No. 90. 



<©tace. 



[The following, " Grace before Meat," is printed at the request of numerous friends 

of tlie Jubilee Singers.] 

Arr.from P. P. Bliss. 

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Thou art great, and Thou art good. And we thank Thee 



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for tliis food; By Thy hand must all be fed, 



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Give us, Lord, our dai - ly bread. A - men. 

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No. 91. 



ffl>f), pes ! ob, ges I 

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j I come this night for to sing and pray, Oh, yes 1 oh. yes ! To 
( That heavenly home is brigiit and fair. Oh, yes 1 oh, yes 1 But 




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drive old Sa-tan far a -way. Oh, yes I oh, yes!) q^ 
ver • y few can en - ter there, Oh, yes 1 eh, yes ! J * 



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wait till I get on my robe. Wait till I get on my robc^ 

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Wait 



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get on 

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my robe, Oh, yes! 



oh, 



yes! 



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S As I went down in the valley to pray. Oh, yes I 
I mel old Satan on the way. Oh, yes I 
And what do you think he said to me. Oh, yes ! 
•' You're too young to pray, and too young to die," Oh, ^es 

3 If you want to catch that lieavenly breeze. Oh, yes I 
Go down in the valley on your kneos, Oh, yes ! 
Go, bow your knees upon the ground. Oh, yes ! 
And ask your Lord to turn you round. Oh, yes ! 

246 



No. 92. 9 8)appp BetD gear. 



^=^1: 




What a liap-py new year, What a hap-py new year, What a 



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hap - py, what a hap - py, what a hap - py new year. 

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1. I'm run-ning tliro' grace To that liap - py place ; Thro' 

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grace I'm de • ter - min'd To see my Lord's face, 



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2 One thing I do find, 
I'll keep it in mind. 
He won't live in glory 
And leave me behind. 



3 O sinner, believe 

Christ will you receive. 
For all things are ready, 
And you stand in need. 



247 



No. 93. 'Cis 3lorDan'g Kitier. 



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Jor - dan's riv - er. 



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I must go 'cross, "Tis 



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er, and I must go 'cross ; 'Tis 



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must go 'cross ; Poor 



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sin-ner, fare you well. 1. Am 



I a sol - dier of tlie Cross ? 



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Yes, my Lord ! . . Or must I count this soul as lost ? Yes, my Lord I 



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248 



I I 



2 As I go down tli« stream of time. Yes, my Lord \ 
I leave this sinful world behind, Yes, my Lord I 

3 Old Satan thinks he'll get us all. Yes, my Lord ! 
Because in Adam we did fall, Yes, my Lord 1 

4 If you want to see old Satan run. Yes, my Lord 1 
Just shoot him with a (iospel-gun, Yes, my Lord I 



No. 94. ©ooD^tJge, TBtotbers, 



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1. Good - bye, broth - ers, good - bye, sis - ters, If 



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I don't see you a - ny more ; I'll meet you in heav en. 



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in the blessed kingdom, If I don't see you a - ny more. 



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2 We'll part in the body, we'll meet in the spirit. 
If I don't see you any more ; 
So now God bless you, God bless you. 
If I don't see you any more. 

Then good-bye, brothers, &c. 



24Q 



No. 95. Don't pou Qm\)t after mz. 







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who 
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that 



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a - com- ing ? Don't you grieve aft 

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Lord, I 

— ^-^ Jeiq 




2 It looks like Gabriel ; don''t you gneve after me, 
Lord, I don't want you to grieve after me. 

3 Oh, who is that behind him ? don't you grieve after me, 
Lord, I don't want you to grieve after me. 

4 It looks like Jesus ; don't you grieve after me, 
Lord, I don't want you to grieve after me. 

5 Go, blow your trumpet, Gabriel, don't you grieve after me, 
Lord, I don't waut you to grieve after me. 

6 How loud must I blow it ? don't you grieve after me, 
Lord, T don't want you to grieve after me. 

7 Loud as seven claps of thunder ! don't you grieve after me, 
Lord, 1 don't want you to grieve after me. 

8 To wake the sleeping nations ; don't you grieve after me, 
Lord-, I don't want yt.u to grieve after nie. 



250 



No. 96, 



JRm anD ^i)inz. 



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« — « — « — « — N — ^ — N- 



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Oil, brethren, rise and shine, and give God the glo-ry, glo - ry, 






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Then you must rise, &c. 






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Rise and shine, and give God the glo - ry, glo - ry, 



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Rise and shine, and give God the glory, for the year of Ju- bi - lee. 



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1, Don't you want to be a sol-dier, sol-dier, sol -dier, Don't you 



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want to be a sol-dier, sol-dier, sol - dier ? Don't you 



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want to be a sol-dier, sol-dier, sol-dier For the 



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year of Ju - bi 



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2 Do you think I will make a soldier 
For the year of Jubilee ? 

3 Yes, I think you will make a soldier 
For the year of Jubilee ! 

Sing tJie three verses in succession, and after the third verse go ba^k t0 
the beginning, and sing the words, '- Then you must rise," dtc. 



252 



No. 97. iI3oto toe take tftfe fee&le llBoDp. 

[This hymn is much used at funerals, and especially while bearing the body and 

lowering it into the grave.] 



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1. Now we 

2. Now we 

3. Now we 


take 
take 
lift 


— \/ "^ 1^ 

this fee - ble 
tliis dear old 
our mournful 


bod - y, 
fa - ther, 
voic - es, 


And 

And 

As 


we 
we 
we 


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car - ry it to the grave. And we all leave it there, Hal - le 
car-ry him to the grave. And we all leave him there, Hal-le 
gather around the grave. And we weep as we sing Hal - le 



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lu - jah, And a Hal - le - lu - jah, and a Hal-le - lu - jah, 
lu - jah, And a Hal - le - lu - jah, and a Hal-le - lu - jah, 
lu - jah, And a Hal - le- lu - jah, and a Hal-le - lu - jah. 



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And we 
And we 
And we 

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all leave it there, Hal-le -lu jah, And a Hal-le-lujah, and a Hal-le- 
all leave him there, Hallelujah, And a Hal-le-lujah, and a Hal-le- 
weep as we sing Hal-le-lu- jah. And a Hal-le-lujah, and a Hal-lu- 



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lu - jah, 
]u - jah, 
iu - jah, 

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— ^-' ^-::-* • 1 ^ S^^i-^) ^^^=^ 

And we all leave it there, Hal - le - Iu - jah. 
And we all leave him there, Hal - le - Iu - jah. 
And we weep as we sing Hal-le - Iu - jah. 


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II 



No. 98. 



@f)me, 0f)me» 




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1. I don't care where you bur - y my bod - y, 

2. You may bury my body in the E - gypt. . . . gar - den, 

3. I'm. . going to join. . . . the forty - four-thousand, 

4. Great big stars... way up.... yon- der, 




Don't care where you bur - y my bod - y, Don't care where you 
Bury my body in the E - gypt gar-den, Bury my body in the 
Going to join the forty-four -thousand, Going to join the 
Great big stars. . . . way up. . . .yon - der, Great big stars 



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bur - y my bod - y, 
E - gypt 
for-ty-f( 
way up 



gar-den 



for-ty-four thousand, i 
yon- der, } 



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my lit-tle soul's going to shine, shine. 



fc^:: 



^u.1 <R — — ^ — 9. — e_i_^ ^ — I *-— * — ^ * — 9. — I 



O my little soul's going toshine,shine,All around the heav'n going to 




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shine, shine, All a - round the heav'n going to shine, shine. 

254 



No. 99. ancftot in t&e LotD. 




Ancli-or, be-liev-er, anch-or, anch • or in the Lord, 



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Throw your anch-or a - ny way, anch - or in *\he Lord. 



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1. Throw it to my dear mother's door, 1 

3. Throw it to my dear father's door, > Anch - or in the Lord ; 

3. Throw it to my dear sis-ter's door, ) 



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Throw it to ray dear mother's door, ) 

Throw it to my dear father's door, >■ Anch - or in the Lord. 

Throw it to my dear sis-ter's door, ) 



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53 






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255 



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King Je - sus says lie will come a-gain, ] ""^ 

King Je- sus makes the cripple to walk, > Anch- or in the Lord ; 

King Je- sus makes the blind to see, ) 



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SiEteE! 



King Je - sus says be will come a-gain, ) 

King Je- sus makes the cripple to walk, >• Anch- or in the 

King Je- sus makes the blind to see, ) 



I 

Lord 



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No. 100. 



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iLorD'0 Prager. 



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Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed, be Thy name. 

Give us this day our. . , dai - ly bread. 

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. 



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Thy*kingdom come, Thy \ 

will be done on f earth as it is in heaven. 

And forgive us our tres- f 

passes, as we forgive . . J them that tresspass a-gainst us. 



For Thine is the kingdom, / 



and the power, and the J glory, for 



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256 



ever and ever. A -men. 

— I — 

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I 



No. 101. Iof)n Teroton'0 TBoDg^ 



[Sing the verses in the order in which they are numbered. Do not sing the chorus 
after the third verse, but go at once to the fourth, and then close with the chorus.] 



f 



£ 



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=|: 



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3 



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1. John Brown's bod - y 
3. John Brown died . . 
* 4. Now lias come . . 



r — F^ — ^— ^ — L^— 



lies a - mould'ring in the grave, 
that the slave .... might he free, 
the .... glo - rious j u - bi - lee. 



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Jolin Brown's bod-y lies a - mould'ring in the grave, 
John Brown died . . that the slave . . . might be free. 
Now has come . the .... glo - rious ju - bi - lee, 
••• •#- ■»■ -^ ' ■»- ' -0- -^ ' -0- -0- ' -fi- -1^^ 

-^ ^r J^ 




John Brown's bod-y lies 
John Brown died that 
Now has come the . 



a - mould'ring in the grave, But his 
the slave . . . might be free. But his 
. . . glo - rious ju - bi - lee. When all 




i 



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A- 



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soul's marching on. 
soul's marching on. 
man - kind are free. 



i 



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Glo ■ ry, glo - ry, Hal - le 



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v~v—^ — p — ^-^ 

* The words of the fourth verse do not correspond fully to the notes, but the 
adfq;)ta.tion can be easily made by the singer. 

257 17 



p 



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4 



d — ::^-^-:fcj^--fc-] rn s— ^J^ 



li 



u - jail, Glo-ry, glo-rj, Hal-le - lu - jab, Glo-ry, glo-ry, Hal - le- 

5^" *1^^ ^^^ ^^" "^^ ^^* ^P" ^^" T!^?" ^^* ^^^ ^^" "^^ ■^P" •^^ 



-I — « "1 1 — • H — 



-lu-jan, utio-ry, gio-ry, nai -le- 






lujah, His soul's marching on. 2. He captured Harper's Ferry with his 






> 



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# — ^i 



4_ — 1 1__ 1_ 



nineteen men so true, And he frightened old Vir-gin-ia till she 












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— d — lift — *- 
trembled thro' and thro'; They hung him for a traitor, them- 






^ 



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selves the trait -or crew. But his soul's marching on. 



rf^ 



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— «>- 






258 



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No. 102. listen to tfjc angels. 



I 



-H- 
-0- 



r^gifeS 



A— N- N S 



■0—0 — 0-—^ — 






I 



Where do you think I found my eoul, 



List-en to the an -gels 




shouting, I found my soul at hell's dark door, List-cn to the an - gels 




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shouting ; Be- fore I lay in hell one day, Listen to the angels shouting, I 



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sing and pray my soul a - way, List en to the an - gels shout-ing. 




Run all the way,., run all the way, Kun all the way, my Lord, 




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I 



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List-en to the an - gels shout-ing. Blow, Ga - briel, blow, Blow, Ga - briel, 



^L L L — J_^ — — — d—^^ •—J 



blow. Tell all the joy - fol news, List-en to the an -gels shouting. I 



-i 



w^^ 



.0 — — — 0— 



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don't know what sinners want to stay here for, List-en to the an - gols 




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3; 



I 



shout • ing ; When he gets home he will sor • row no more, 




^ 



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List -en to the an • gels shout-ing. Run all the way, etc. 

Brethren, will you come to the promised land, See arch, t&c. 
CJome all and sing with the heavenly band, S^e arch, dkc 



No. 103. 



^ot)e along. 



^— V — F w I— "T^ V i- 1 ^ ^ ^ -^— ^-h^-^^F^ 

u fj -0-, -0- -9- -#■ -#■ 



b I u 

Let us move a - long, move a - long, move a - loug to the heav-en - ly 



ii]t3: 









Fine. 






home, Let us move a - long, move a- long, I am bound to meet you there. 



s 






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= ::p:i-_-=iziij= 



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1. We are on the o - cean sail-ing, A.nd a while must face the stormy 

2. Yonder see the gold - en cit - y, And the light-house gleaming on the 

3. There we'll meet our friends in Je - sus, Who are wait-ing on the gold-en 



^^ 



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ttiL- 



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D. C. 



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blast, But if Je - sus is our cap-tain, We will make the port at last, 
shore, Hear the an- gels sweetly eing-ing, Soon our jour-ney will be o'er, 
shore, With a shout of joy they'll greet us, When we meet to part no more. 



Ha 



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260 



No. 1 04. Cfje angels cftangeD mp iSame* 



^^^ ^=T:Ef^^^ 



^4=t 



^—■^0 



1. I went to tlie Mil - side, I went to pray, I 
3. I looked at my hands and my hands were new, I 



'^^=^= ±=^E ^==U=^^=^ 



know the an - gels done changed my name. Done 
know the an - gels done changed my name, I 






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changed my name for the com - ing day ; Thank 
looked at my feet and my feet were too ; Thank 



Chorus. 



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God, the an - gels done changed my name. ) -p. 
God, the an - gels done changed my name. J -^^^^ 



I 






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changed my name for the com-ing day, I know the angels done 



*: 



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t: 



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changed my name, Done changed my name for the 



i 



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^ — ^-zl— 

com-ing day ; Thank God, the an- gels done changed my name- 

261 



TBmU sparkles in tbt Cl)utcl)garD, 

N"0. 105. (As sung by the " Hampton Students.") 







May the Lord, He will be glad of me, . . . May tlie Lord, He 






:^F&i^tq 



\- J ^ W: A. 



22: 



^ 1 



22; 






z1z:l:|z:z+=z1-ih=: 



— ^ — h — I — i— I 1 



will be glad of me, . . . May the Lord, He will be glad of me,. 



iElEfEfE^=|E|ESEiEEEElEEE^E 



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In tiie Leav-en He'll re - joice. . . In tke heaven once, In the 



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Dvo— Soprano and Tenor. 






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Bright sparkles in the church-yard Give light un - to the tomb ; 

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tomb; Bright summer, spring's over, Sweet flowers in their bloom. 



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Mother, rock me in the era - die all the day, Mother, 

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cradle, Mother, rock me in the cra-dle all the day. 



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Mother, day, . . All the day, all the day, . 

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No. 106. 

Chorus. 



Come Doton, angeR 




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Come down, angels, trouble the water, Come down, angels, trouble the water, 



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Come down, angels, trouble the water, Let God's saints come in, Oh, 



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1. 1 love to shout, I love to sing. Let God's 
2. I think I hear the sin - ner say, Let God's 
3. 1 hope to meet my brother there, Let Grod's 
4. Didn't Jesus tell you once be - fore, Let God's 



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saints tome in, I love to praise my heav'nly King, Let God's saints come in. 
saints come in, My Saviour taught me how to pray. Let God's saints come in. 
saints come in, That used to join with me in prayer, Let God's saints come in. 
saints come in. To go in peace and sin no more. Let God's saints come in. 

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No. 107. 

Chobus. 



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glad, I'm hunting for a home. Oh, hunting for a home. 



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1. You'll not get lost in the wil-der-ness. Hunting for a home, 

2. Oh, Chris - tians, you had better pray. Hunting for a home, 

3. A lit - tie long-er here be -low. Hunting for a home, 

4. The an- gels sang in Beth -le- hem. Hunting for a home. 






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With the love of Je - sus in your breast, Hunting for a home. 

For Satan's round you eVry day. Hunting for a home. 

And then to glo- ry we will go. Hunting for a home. 

Peace on earth, good-will to men, Hunting for a home. 





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269 



No. 108. Petet, 00 ting tftem TBelte. 



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1. Oh, Peter, go ring- them bells, Peter, go ring them bells, Peter,go 






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I wonder where sister Mary's gone— 

I heard from heaven to-day ; 
I wonder where sister Martha's gone — 

I heard from heaven to-day ; 
It's good news, and I thank God— ■ 

I heard from heaven to day ; 
Ob, Peter, go ring them bells — 

I heard from heaven to-day. 
Chorus. — I heard from heaven, &c 

3. 

I wonder where brother Moses's gone — 

I heard from heaven to-day ; 
I wonder where brother Daniel's gone— ^• 

I heard from heaven to-day ; 
He's gone where Elijah has gone — ■ 

I heard from heaven to-day ; 
Oh, Peter, go ring them bells — 

I heard from heaven to-day. 
Chorus. — I heard from heaven, &c 



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No. 109. 



(Silicon's TBanD. 



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Oh, the band of Gid-e-on, band of Gid-e-on, band of Gid-e-on, 
Oh, the milk-white horses, milk-white horses, milk-white horses, 



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o - ver in Jor-dan, Band of Gid-e - on, band of Gid-e - on, 
o - ver in Jor-dan, Milk-white hors - es, milk-white hors - es. 



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sis-ter she bow low. Say, don't you want to go to heav-en ?. . 



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„ ^ , .■> X J > Oh, the twelve white hors - es. 

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twelve white hors - es, twelve white hora - es, o - ver injor-dan; 
hitch 'em to the char- i- ot, hitch 'em to the char - i - ot, o - ver in Jor-dan ; 



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Hitch 'em to the chariot, hitch 'em to the chariot, How I long to see that day 1 






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Duet. — I hail to my brother, my brother he bow lew ; 
Say, don't you want to go to heaven ? 

How I long to see that day ! 
Chorus. — Oh, ride up in the chariot, ride up in tho chariot. 

Ride up in the chariot over in Jordan ; 
Ride up in the chariot, ride up in the chariot, 

How I long to see that day ! 
It's a golden chariot, a golden chariot, 

Golden chariot over in Jordan ; 
Golden chariot, a golden chariot — 

How I long to see that day ! 



Duet. — I hail to the mourner, the mourner he bow iol^j 
Say, don't you want to go to heaven ? 

How I long to see that day ! 
Chorus. — Oh, the milk and honey, milk and honey, 

Milk and honey over in Jordan ; 
Milk and honey, milk and honey — 

How I long to see that day ! 
Oh, the healing water, the healing water. 

Healing water over in Jordan ; 
Healing water, the healing water — 

How I long to see that day 1 

273 i8 



3ln t&at (Steat (©ettingnip a0otning< 

K"0. 110* -^* ^^^ ^y the " Hampton Students." 




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1. I'm a-going to tell you about the coming of tlie Saviour, 






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Fare you well ! Fare you well ! Fare you well ! Fare you well 1 










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For the last soul's converted, 



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In that great getting up morning, Fare you well ! Fare you well 1 






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3. 

The Lord spoke to Gabriel : 
Go look behind the altar. 
Take down the silver trumpet 
Blow your trumpet, Gabriel. 
Lord, how loud shall I blow it 
Blow it right calm and easy. 
Do not alarm My people. 
Tell them to come to judgment ; 
Gabriel, blow your trumpet. 
Lord, how loud shall I blow it*. 
Loud as seven peals of thundei 
Wake the sleeping nations. 



3. 

Then you'll see poor sinners rising; 

Then you'll see the world on fire ; 

See the moon a-bleediug, 

See the stars falling. 

See the elements melting. 

See the forked lightning. 

Hear the rumbling thunder ; 

Earth shall reel and totter. 

Then you'll see the Christians rising ; 

Then you'll see the righteous marching, 

See them marching home to heaven. 

Then you'll see my Jesus coming 

With all his Holy angels, 

Take the righteous home to heaven. 

There they'll live with God for ever. 

275 



No. 111. 31 ItnotD tljat mj iReueemec lities. 



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Oh, Dan-iel in the li - on's den, I 

Oh, Ca - leb and Joshua, the very ones, I 

Just watch that sun, and see how it runs, I 




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know that my Redeemer lives. 



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Oh, none but Je-sus is 
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Oh, don't let it catch you with your 






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LL Chorus. 



^toeet Canaan. 




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Oh, my sister, did you come for to help me ? Oh, my sis-ter," ' did you 



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1. We'll raise the Christian banner, The motto's new and old, Re- 

2. We want no cowards in our band. That from their colors fly, We 

3. We soon shall reach the other shore, O, how we then shall sing, With 

4. We'll shout o'er aU our sorrows, And sing for ev - er-more, With 



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pentance and sal-va - tion, Are burnished there in gold. 

call for val-iant-heart-ed men, That are not a - fraid to die. 

all the heavenly cho - rus We'll make the arch- es ring. 
Christ and all His arm - 7, . . On that ce - les - tial shore. 

279 



a great €amp=meetmg in tfte PromiseD LanB. 



No. 114. 



From '■'Hampton and its Students,'''' by per. 



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Oh, walk to-getli-er, cliil-dren. Don't you get wea - rj, 
Oh, talk to-geth-er, chil-dren, Don't you get wea - ry. 
Oh, sing to-geth-er, chiUdren, Don't you get wea - ry. 



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Talk to - geth - er, chil - dren, 
Sing to - geth - er, chil - dren, 



Don'i you get wea - ry. 
Don't you get wea - ry, 
Don't you get wea - ry. 



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Sing to-geth-er, chil-dren, 



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Oh, get you ready, children, Don't you 

you get weary, 
Get you ready, children, Don't you get 

weary, {bis.) 
There's a great camp-meeting in the 

Promised Land. 
For Jesus is a-coming, Don't you get 

weary, 
Jesus is a-coming, Don't you get weary, 

(6is.) 
There's a great camp-meeting in the 

Promised Land. 
Cho.— Going to pray and never tire, 
Pray and never tire, (6i5.) 
There's a great camp-meeting In 
the Promised Land. 



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There's a better day coming, Don't you 

get weary. 
Better day a-coming, Don't yoxi get 

weary, Qns?^ 
There's a great camp-meetmg in the 

Promised Land. 
Oh, clap your hands, children, Don't you 

get weary, 



Clap your hands^ children. Don't you 

get weary, {f)is.) 
There's a great camp-meeting in the 

Promised Ldnd. 
Oh. will you go with me, Don't, &c. 
Will you go with me, Don't, &c. (bis."S 
Will you go with me, Don't, &c. IjAs^ 
There's a great camp-meeting, &c. 
Cho. — Going to shout and never tire, 
Shout and never tire, (fti^.) 
There's a great camp-meeting in 
the Promised Land. 



4. 

Oh, feel the Spirit a-moving, Don't you 

get weary. 
Feel the Spirit a-moving, Don't you get 

weary, (6i«.) 
There's a great camp-meeting in the 

Promised Land. 
Oh, now I'm getting happy, Don't you 

get weary, 
Now I'm getting happy, Don't you gel 

get weary. (6i5.) 
Cho.— Oh, iTy and never tire, 

Fly and never lire, (6is.) 
There's a great camp-meeting in 
the Promised Land. 



281 



($000 JI3eiDS, tl)Z Cfjatiot's coming:. 



No. 115. 

Chobus. 



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A long wliite robe in the heaven, I know, 
A long white robe in the heaven, I know. 

And I don't want her leave-a me behind. 
There's a golden crown in the heaven, I know, 
A golden crown in the heaven, I know, 
A golden crown in the heaven, I know, 
And I don't want her leave-a me behind. 
Chorus. — Good news, the chariot's coming. &c 

8 There's a golden harp in the heaven, I know, 
A golden harp in the heaven, I know, 
A golden harp in the heaven, I know, 

And I don't want her leave-a me behind. 
There's silver slippers in the heaven, I know, 
Silver slippers in the heaven, I know, 
Silver slippers in the heaven, I know. 
And I don": want her leave a me behind. 
Chorus. — Good news, the chariot's coming, &t. 

283 



No. 116. ^ome Of tftese 9@ormng0. 



From " Hampton and its Students^'' by per. 



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Oh, sitting in the kingdom some of these mornings, sitting in the kingdom 

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* 2 Going to see my brother some of these morningfs, &c. 
Oh, snouting in the heaven some of these mornings, «&c. 
Chorus. — Look away in the heaven, «fec. 

3 Going to walk about in Zion some of these moniings, &c. 
Going to chatter with the angels some of thece mornings, «fcc. 

Chorus.— Look away in the heaven, «&c, 

4 Going to talk the troubles over some of thepe mornings, &c. 
Going to see my Jesus some of these momiugs, «&c. 

Chorus.— Look away in the heaven, &c. 

286 



No. 117. 



Keign, Qgastet 3fe0us» 



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reign, O reign, O reign, my Sav - lour, 

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1. I tell you now as I told you be - fore, 
3. I'll tell you how I souj^ht the Lord, 
3. I nev-er shall for - get that day, 

4. 1 look'd at my hands,and aiy hands looked new, 
5. I nev-er felt such love be - fore, 



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287 



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To the promised land I'm bound to go, 
Pray'd a little by day, and all night long, 
When Je-Bus washed my sins a -way. 
I looked at my feet, and they looked so too, 
Saying, " Go in peace, and sin no more," 



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Oh, brothers, are you getting ready, ready, Brothers, are you 
Oh, sis - ters, are you getting ready, ready. Sis ters, are you 
Oh, fa-thers, are you getting ready, ready, Fathers, are you 
Oh, preachers, are you getting ready, ready, Preachers, are you 



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getting ready, ready, Brothers, are you getting ready, ready, 
getting ready, ready, Sisters, are you getting ready, ready, 
getting ready, ready, Fa-thers, are you getting ready, ready, 
getting ready, ready. Preachers, are you getting ready, ready, 



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For the year of Ju - bi - lee. Oh, rise, shine, and give God the 

rise, shine, 
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1. Young people, I tell you, one and ail, I do love, 

2. I picked up my hymn-book and Bible too, I do love, 

3. Oil, away up yonder, round the throne, I do love. 






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2. They led Him up to Pilate's bar, Tell me where to find Him, But the 

3. Pilate said, " I'll wash my hands," Tell me where to find Him, I. . 

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cru - ci - fied the Son of man, 
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find no fault in this just man. 



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S. Oh, you must bow low to get In the field. Oh, 
3. Oh, we mil shout when we get In the field, Oh, 



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you must bow low to get In the field, Oh, you must bow low to 
we will shout when we get In the field, Oh, we will shout when we 

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get In the field of 
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No. 122. 3f toant to fie reaDpj 

Or, Walk in Jerusalem just like John. 




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2. Oh, John I oh, John 1 what do you say ? [ Walk in Je-ru- sa- lem just Hkc Joim ; 

3. When Peter was preaching at Pentecost, ) 



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No. 123. Cf)e moth's fieing; none. 



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2. We need more workers in the tar- vest field, < whprpthp work's hpino- 
8. We need more teachers in the har-vest field, f >^nere t ne wo r]^ s bemg 
4. We need more preachers in the bar- vest field, » ■ ■ ■ - "P" "T"" 



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done : We need more oreachers in the harvest field. ) 



done ; We need more preachers in the harvest field, ; 



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2. When I get on my golden B}ioes,You know I 

3. When I get in the middle of the air. You know I 



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can't stay here. You know I can't stay here. 

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can't stay here, I'll walk about heaven and tell the news,You know I can't stay here, 
can't stay here. Not a sin-ner will be thei-e. You know I can't stay here. 



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iRise, %Unz, for ftp ti^tt is a^cominff. 

No. 125. 



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light is a - coming, My Lord says He's coming by 'nd-by. 



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1. Oh* wet or dry, I intend to try, My Lord says He's 

2, We'll build our tent on this camp-gnround,My Lord says He's 
2. I intend to shout and nev - er stop, My Lord says He's 



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coming by'nd-bye, To serve the Lord un - til I die, 

coming by'nd-bye, And give old Satan an - oth- er round, 

coming by'nd-bye, Un - til I reach the mountain - top, 



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Oh I givemethe wings. Oh, good Lord, give me the wings, And oh! 



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give me the wings, My good Lord, give me the wings for t@ move a - long. 




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1. Oh, Method - ist it is my name, And oh,. . glo-ry ! I in- 

2. I love the shouting Method - ist, And oh,., glo-ry! Be- - 

3. I'm bom of God, I know I am, Andoh, .. glo-ry! And.. 



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tend to live and die the same, 
cause they sing and pray the best, \ And oh, 
you de - ny it if you can, 

297 






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Hal - le - lu - jah. to tliat Lamb ; to that Lamb. I 




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know that wa - ter is cbil - ly and cold, And - a 
I have Je - - sus in - a my soul, And - a 



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le - lu - jah to that Lamb, But 



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to that Lamb. 






2 In a-tliat ark, the little dove mourned, 

And hallelujah to that Lamb ; 
Christ Jesus standing as the corner-stone, 
And hallelujah to that Lamb. 

3 Old Satan's just like a snake in the grass, 

And hallelujah to that Lamb ; 
Watching for to bite you as a -you pass, 
And hallelujah to that Lamb. 

4 Oh, brothers and sisters, one and all, 

And hallelujah to that Lamb ; 
You had better be ready when the roll is called, 
And hallelujah to that Lamb, 

298 



No. 128. 



IBeneDiction. 



[As Bung by the Jubilee Singers.] 






With much expression. 



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The Lord bless thee,and keep thee, | J^^^ ^j^^n^ S'pon^thTe! [ ^^^ ^® 






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299 



No. 129. ZTbeae bonce Qoing to rtee agalm 

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1. O I know, yes iii-deed I know, my Lord, I know, 



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These bones going to rise again. Hal-le-lu - jah to the Lamb! 



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giv-ing hand, These bones going to rise a-gain. 

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If you get tliere before I do. 

These bones going to rise again; 
Tell all my friends I'm coming too. 

These bones going to rise again. Chorus. 

300 



IbumDIe i^ourself, tbe bell bone rung. 

No. 130. 



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2 If you want to see old Satan fall, 

Load and shoot him with the Gospel ball; 
If you want to see old Satan fall. 
Live humble, etc. 

3 See the hearse a-come rolling around, 

Carrying of the body to the new burying ground; 
See the hearse a-come rolling around, 
Live humble, etc. 

4 Behold I stand on the sea of glass. 

The sea of glass all mingled with fire; 
God's going to raise-a my soul up higher, 
Live humble, etc. 

301 



No. 131. tj;be Crudfiylon. 






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2 Were you there when they crowned him with the thorns ? etc. 

3 Were you there when they pierced him in the side? etc. 

4 Were you there when they laid him in the tomb ? ete. 

302 



No. 132. 



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Keep a-mov-ing, keep a-moving, My Lord's a-niovingin the air; 



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2 0, there's preaching here, there's preaching there, 

My Lord's a-moving in tlie air; 
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My Lord's a-moving in the air. 
Chorus.— Keep amoving, etc. 

3 0, brethren, don't you think it best. 

My Lord's a-moving in the air; 
To carry the witness in your breast? 
My Lord's a-moving in the air. 

Chohus.— Keep a-moving. etc. 

303 



sitting bown bi? tbe albe of tbe lamb. 

No. 133. 




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But you ain't got God Almighty in your mind; 
Sitting down by the side of that Lamb 

On your mind, 
Sitting down by the side of that Lamb. 

3 Deacon, deacon, I tell you the fact: 

Some of your members are living mighty slack 
Sitting down by the side of that Lamb, 

Living mighty slack, 
Sitting down by the side of that Lamb. 

304 



®b, t>en m? little Soul's gwlne to Sbine. 
No. 134. 

"This was sung by a boy who was sold down South by his master ; and when 
he parted from his mother, these were the words he sang."— J. II. Bailky. 

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to climb up Jacob's ladder, Den mj' little soul, etc. 
to climb up higher and higher, Den my little soul, etc. 
to sit down at the welcome table, Den my little soul, etc. 
to feast off milk and honey, Den my little soid, etc. 
to tell God how-ayou sarved me, Den my little soul, etc. 
to jine de big baptizin'. Den my little soul, etc. 

305 20 



No. 135. Xobe an' eerbe ^e Xorb* 



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:Q: Come go to glo-ry with me, 



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Corae, go to glory with me. 



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bound for Canaan's happy land, And de en~chant-ed ground. 

2 Oh, when I was a sinner, 

I liked my way so w ell ; 
But when I come to find out, 
I was on de road to hell. 
Cho. — I fleed to Jesus — Hallelujah!, etc. 

Oh, Jesus, received me. Hallelujah, etc' 

3 De Father, He looked on de Son, and smiled, 

De Son, He looked on me; 
De Father, redeemed my soul from hell; 
An' de Son, He set me free. 
♦ Cho. — I shouted Hallelujah! Hallelujah, etc. 
I praised my Jesus, Hallelujah, etc 

4 Oh, when we all shall get dere. 

Upon dat-a lieavenly sho', 
We'll walk about dem-a golden streets, 
An' nebber part no nio'. 
Cho. — No rebukin' in de churches — Hallelujah, 
Ebery day be Sunday — Hallelujah, etc 

306 



No. 1 36. Ibear be angels etneln * 



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2 Now all things well, an' I don't dread hell;— 

Hear de angels singin', 
I am goin' up to Hebben, where my Jesus dwell;— 

Hear de angels singin'. 
For de angels are callin' me away,— 

Hear de angels singin'. 
An' I must go, I cannot stay,— 

Hear de angels singin'. Cho.— Oh, sing, etc. 

3 Now take your Bible, an' read it through,— 

Hear de angels singin'. 
An' ebery word you'll find is true;— 

Hear de angels singin'. 
For in dat Bible you will see,— 

Hear de angels singin', 
Dat Jesus died for you an' me,— 

Hear de angels singin'. Cho.— Oh, sing, etc 

4 Say, if my memory sarves me right,— 

Hear de angels singin'. 
We're sure to hab a little shout to-night,— 

Hear de angels singin'. 
For I love to shout. I love to sing.— 

Hear de angels singin', 
I love to praise my llebbenly King,— 

Hear de angels singin'. Cho.— Oh, sing, el& 

307 



No. 137. m^ Xor& belibereb Daniel 



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My Lord de-lib-ered Dan-iel, My Lord de-lib-ered Dan-iel, My 






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lib - er me? 



Lord de-lib-ered Dan-iel; Why can't he de 
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bound for Canaan's happy Ian', An' dis is de shouting band, Go on ! 



Some say dat John de Baptist 

Was nothing but a Jew, 
But de Bible doth inform us 

I>at he was a preacher, too; 
Yes, he was! 

Cno.-^My Lord deliberert Daniel. 



Oh, Daniel cast in de lions' den. 
He pray both night an' day, 

De angel came from Galilee, 
Aa' lock de lions' jaw. 

Dat's so. 
Cho.— My Lord delibered Daniel. 



He delibered Daniel from de lions' den, 

Jonah from de belly ob de whale. 
An' de Hebrew children from de flery 
furnace. 
And why not ebery man? 

Oh, yps! 
CiTo.— My Lord delibered Daniel. 



De richest man dat eber I saw 
Was de one dat beg de most, 

His soul was filled wid Jesus. 
An' wid de Holy Ghost. 

Yes it was! 
Cho.— My Lord delibered Daniel. 



308 




%ove Iking 3e6U0* 



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1. El-der, you say you love King Je -sus, Elder, you say you 



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love the Lord. Lord. 



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love Kinji Je-sus, Come and let us know how you love the Lord. 

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2 Sister, you say you love King Jesus, 
Sister, you say you love the Lord. 

Rkfraix.— Oh, shout and let us know how you love King Jesus, 
Shout and let us know how you love the Lord. 

3 Deacon, you say you love King Jesus, 
Deacon, you say you love the Lord. 

Rkfkain.— Oh, preach and let us know how you love King Jesus, 
Preach and let us know how you love the Lord. 

4 Brother, you say you love King Jesus, 
Brother, you say you love the Lord. 

Refrain.— Oh, pray and let us know how you love King Jesus, 
Pray and let us know how you love the Lord. 

5 Mourner, you say you loye King Jesus, 
Mourner, you say you love the Lord. 

Refrain.— Oh, mourn and let us know how you love King Jesus, 
Mourn and let us know how you love the Lord. 

6 Children, you say you love King Jesus, 
Children, you say you love the Lord. 

Refrain.— Oh, sing and let us know how you love King Jesus, 
Si.ng and let us know how you love the Lord. 

309 



No. 139. 



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Oh, the old ark's a-mov-ing, move a-long, chil-dren, The 

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old ark's a-moving, move a-long home. home. 1. "When Jesus Christ con- 



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vert-ed my soul, In a my soul was a lit - tie white stone, 

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those re-ceived it, I re-ceiveJ it and I could read it; 

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Just let me tell you what the stone did say, Ke 



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deemed, redeemed a been Son of God, Been washed in the blood of the Lamb. 



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2 When I was lying at hell's dark door, 
Never did lie so low before, 
Massa Jesus, He came riding by 
Oh! He gave me the wings for to rise and fly.- 



-Chorus. 



When I was walking along one day, 

I met an old hypocrite on my way, 

She's always right and never is wrong. 

She's always up and never is down, 

Just watch that sun how study she runs, 

Don't you never let her catch you with your work undone .- 



-Chorus. 



You take your sister right by ttie hand. 

And lead her 'long down in\he Promise Land. 

If my sister should have a fall, 

Just get on your knees and carry 'er case to the Lord. — Chorus. 

311 



■ w will V t^noi I T 



ML400.M34 190^ 3 9097 01271343 

Marsh, J. B. T. 

The story of the Jubilee 



Singers 


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BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 
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