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Full text of "Story of Lee County, Iowa;"

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HISTORY 

OF 



LEE COUNTY 

IOWA 



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ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 
THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1914 



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PUBLlL .......RY 

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L^'DATISNa 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



GEORGE DEXTER RAND. 

The record of George Dexter Rand, now deceased, is one which 
reflected credit and honor upon the commercial history of Keokuk. 
He figured prominently in business circles as a lumberman and 
also in connection with financial afifairs, and he was equally well 
known as a factor in public life, cooperating in all of those activities 
which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. He was born 
in Quincy, Illinois, February 9, 1838, and was sixty-five years of 
age when death called him. 

His father, Hon. Elbridge D. Rand, was a distinguished citizen 
of Burlington, Iowa, who owned and occupied a beautiful residence, 
known as The Pines. He ranked with the leading business men 
of the state and to that position attained by reason of ability, close 
application and determined effort. He was born in Watertown, Mas- 
sachusetts, July 22, 1 814, the eldest son of Samuel and Mary (Carter) 
Rand. The father died during the infancy of his son Elbridge, who 
from early youth was dependent upon his own resources. He was 
still a young lad when he went to Providence, Rhode Island, where 
he served an apprenticeship at the candle and soap manufacturing 
business. On attaining his majority in 1835 he removed westward 
to Hamilton, Ohio, where his ability secured for him the position of 
superintendent of the J. U. Fisher packing house. Two years later 
he removed to Lacon, Illinois, but in the same year went to Quincy, 
that state. In 1839 he arrived in Iowa and from that time forward 
until his demise was closely associated with the business development 
and substantial upbuilding of the state. He located on the Des 
Moines river, on what was known as the Black Hawk purchase, nea'r 
Keosauqua, and after remaining there for a brief period traveled by 
wagon to Burlington. On reaching that place his horses gave out 
and he perforce must remain for a time. Therefore, he sought 
employment and, believing that the city offered good business oppor- 
tunities, he at length made arrangements for embarking in business 
on his own account by borrowing money and erecting a small pack- 

5 



6 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ing house. The energy which he displayed in the conduct of his 
business and his sound judgment brought to him ahiiost immediate 
success and a little later he purchased a sawmill. This w^as the begin- 
ning of the extensive and important lumber business with which he 
was long associated. In 1842 he became actively connected with the 
lumber trade and afterward established the Burlington Lumber Com- 
pany. In 1852 he formed a partnership with Messrs. Carson and 
Eaton for the conduct of a lumber business, with mills located in 
Wisconsin, and their trade grew to mammoth proportions. Mr. Rand 
was wide-awake, alert and enterprising and readily recognized and 
utilized opportunities. The careful conduct of his business led to 
its continuous growth and he became a foremost factor in connection 
with the lumber trade of the upper Mississippi. At length he organ- 
ized the Valley Lumber Company, a part of which corporation was 
the Carson & Rand Lumber Company of Keokuk. Moreover, he 
became a prominent figure in financial circles, owning stock in a 
number of banks. 

Elbridge D. Rand was twice married. In April, 1837, he wedded 
Sarah A. Proud, of Centerville, Ohio, and unto them were born six 
children, all of whom are now deceased. This number included 
George Dexter Rand, who for an extended period was a leading lum- 
berman and financier of Keokuk. On the 13th of June, 1852, he 
wedded Mrs. Caroline A. Roberts and they became the parents of 
four children, only one of whom is now living, Horace S. Rand, a 
capitalist residing in Burlington. Elbridge D. Rand passed away 
on the loth of April, 1889, having, therefore, reached the age of 
almost seventy-five years. His political endorsement was given to 
the whig part in early life and upon its dissolution he joined the ranks 
of the new republican party, which he continued to support through- 
out his remaining days. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his 
worth and recognizing his loyalty to the best interests of the com- 
monwealth, elected him to represent his district in the state legisla- 
ture in 1856-7 and from i860 until 1863 inclusive he was a member 
of the Burlington citv council, at all times exercising his official pre- 
rogatives in support of the general good and ever placing public 
welfare befare partisanship or personal aggrandizement. 

George D. Rand supplemented a course of study in the public 
schools by attendance at Asbury LTniversity in Greencastle, Indiana, 
from which in due time he was graduated. He entered upon his 
business career in Colorado, but during the Civil war all business and 
personal interests were put aside that he might aid his country. He 
was appointed paymaster in the volunteer navy — a position of high 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 7 

honor and trust, in which he served until June 30, 1864. He was 
then made assistant paymaster in the regular navy, his commission 
being signed by Abraham Lincoln and Gideon Wells, the latter then 
secretary of the navy. 

After the war Mr. Rand engaged in business for a time in Ala- 
bama and the year 1880 witnessed his arrival in Keokuk, where he 
became an active member of the Carson & Rand Lumber Company, 
managing the local branch of their business until the withdrawal of 
the corporation from Keokuk. He had become acquainted with the 
lumber trade under the direction of his father, and in control of the 
Keokuk interests Mr. Rand displayed marked ability and undaunted 
enterprise, formulating his plans carefully and carrying them for- 
ward to successful completion. Into other fields of labor he also 
extended his efforts and became a leading figure in financial circles 
as vice president of the State Central Savings Bank and as director 
of the Keokuk National Bank and of the Iowa State Insurance 
Company. 

xMr. Rand was united in marriage to Miss Sara McGaughey, a 
daughter of Edward W. and Margaret (Matlock) McGaughey, the 
former a distinguished lawyer of Putnam county, Indiana, who was 
also a member of the state legislature and a member of the twenty- 
ninth and thirty-first congresses. He was thus actively identified 
with the law-making bodies of his state and nation. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rand had one daughter, Mary, now deceased, and the father passed 
away November 12, 1903, his remains being interred at Greencastle, 
Indiana. Sometime before his death he became a member of the 
Roman Catholic church and Mrs. Rand is still a communicant of St. 
Peter's Catholic church. 

In his political views Mr. Rand was a republican, with an earnest 
belief in the principles of the party, and at one time he served as city 
treasurer of Keokuk. In 1883 he was chosen mayor of the city and 
made an excellent record in that ofhce but declined to serve for a 
second term. It was during his incumbency in that position that 
Rand Park was completed and named in his honor. He belonged 
to the Loyal Legion and he was ever as true and loyal to his country 
and its best interests as when in the service of the government he aided 
in promoting the Union cause. His contemporaries and colleagues 
knew him as an able business man, as a progressive and public-spir- 
ited citizen and as a true and loyal friend. At his death the Keokuk 
Gate City said: 

"Mr. Rand was a large-minded, generous-hearted, public-spirited 
citizen. In every relation in life — as a man, husband, neighbor, 



8 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

friend and fellow townsmen — he was above reproach and commanded 
the highest respect. In his dealings with his fellows in the commer- 
cial world he was ever high-minded and honorable and enjoyed, as 
he deserved, the confidence of everybody. In public life — he was 
mayor of Keokuk in 1883 — he made a record for himself that is 
greatly to his credit. During his entire residence in Keokuk Mr. 
Rand took active interest in everything of a public nature and exerted 
himself earnestly and efficiently for the common good. He was 
especially interested in communal affairs and gave unsparingly of 
time and effort to advance the moral and material welfare of the city. 
His ambition was to bring Keokuk, already a good city, still nearer 
to the plane of his own ideals. To Rand Park, named in his honor, 
he gave much valuable thought and time. Ever since its establish- 
ment he has served as one of the three commissioners to whom its gen- 
eral supervision has been entrusted and the city is greatly indebted 
to him, with others, for making it what it is. Mr. Rand also advanced 
liberally of his private means for the upbuilding of Keokuk in secur- 
ing the location of new industries here. In addition to all this he 
made numerous semi-public and private benefactions. He was a 
generous contributor to the cause of religion and education and was 
never called upon in vain in the interest of charity. It is an open 
secret that St. Peter's school building was largely made possible 
through his liberality. There are scores of people in Keokuk who, if 
permitted to testify, would gladly tell of aid extended to them in time 
of trouble and need. If still living Mr. Rand would seriously object 
even to so much as this indefinite allusion to his benefactions, but now 
that he is gone from us it is not improper that the loss entailed by his 
death should receive at least the recognition here given it. His was 
a lovable character and the keynote of it, as all who know him will 
agree, was to live aright and to endeavor to make right living as 
logical and natural to others as to himself. In pursuance of this aim 
he used his means with great good judgment and gratifying results." 



WILLIAM AUGUSTUS BROWNELL. 

William Augustus Brownell was for years identified with the 
banking interests of Keokuk and was one of the prominent men of 
the city. He was a native of the state of New York, his birth occur- 
ring at Penyan, July 24, 1836. When about thirteen years of age he 
was brought to Lee county by hi parents, William and Clarissa 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY • 9 

(Brooks) Brovvnell, and here tlie father followed contracting until 
his death. He was a man of estimable character and good business 
ability and held the respect and warm regard of all those with whom 
he came in contact. 

William Augustus Brownell acquired his education in the public 
schools of this city and then turned his attention to the study of teleg- 
raphy. He later, however, learned the tinner's trade in a local hard- 
ware store, after which he removed to Muscatine and there con- 
ducted a stove establishment until 1865. At that time he moved his 
business to Keokuk, where he met with gratifying success. In 1872 
he first became interested in banking, in which field he continued 
during; the remainder of his life. For almost three decades he was 
vice president of the Keokuk National Bank and it was due in no 
small degree to his splendid business judgment and his ability to 
make and retain friends that the bank attained such notable success. 
He gave his personal attention to many details which some might 
have thought beneath their notice, but he realized that slackness in 
small things often leads to carelessness in greater aiifairs. Not only 
was he in close touch with the details of procedure within the bank 
itself, but he was a close student of the general tendencies in the com- 
mercial and financial world. He used his knowledge of general 
conditions in making the Keokuk National Bank one of the most 
progressive banks in the city, serving the inhabitants of Keokuk in 
the many ways possible for an up-to-date bank to render service. 
His death occurred on the 20th of February, 1901. 

On the 13th of February, 1861, Mr. Brownell was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary J. R. Higbie, a daughter of Silas and Hester A. 
(Ross) Higbie, at Penfield, New York. To their union the follow- 
ing children were born: William Winthrop, who was born Novem- 
ber 6, 1861, at Muscatine, and died September 2, 1862; Clara Belle, 
whose birth occurred June 18, 1865, at Muscatine and who passed 
away in Keokuk, May 18, 1870; Ralph Brooks; who was born July 
15, 1868, and died at Hailey, Idaho, from accidental poisoning on 
the 20th of February, 1903; Edwin Higbie, who was born April 8, 
1872, and is now a resident of Beverly, Washington; Emma Frances, 
born March 4, 1874, who died at San Diego, California, April 2, 
1875; Francis Raymond, born January 30, 1877, living in Hailey, 
Idaho; and Marion Harold, born June 3, 1884, also a resident of 
Hailey, Idaho. 

Mr. Brownell was a member of the Congregational church and 
was a generous contributor to the various branches of church work. 
He was a republican in politics --nd was for years chairman of the 



10 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

local republican committee. He was intensely interested in all public 
affairs of importance and took part in many movements for the wel- 
fare of his city and county. His advice was often sought upon ques- 
tions of public policy. He attained high rank in the Masonic order, 
being a Knight Templar, and was well known in that fraternity. His 
death was mourned not only by his personal friends, but by all with 
whom he had come in contact in the course of his business or through 
public service. He was a man of high principles and cast himself 
heart and soul into any movement which he believed to be for the 
general welfare. He held the respect and esteem of his fellowmen 
and in his death Lee county lost a valuable business man and an 
exemplary citizen. His widow survives and is one of the most highly 
regarded matrons of Keokuk. She is much interested in social affairs 
and is a leader of the Daughters of the American Revolution, being 
past regent of that organization. She manifests the patriotic spirit 
of her Revolutionary ancestors in many ways, being ever ready to 
assist the forces of civic progress and righteousness. Her beautiful 
home is often thrown open to her many friends and none speak of her 
save in terms of greatest este-em. 



HON. WILLIAM GUSTAVUS KENT. 

Hon. William Gustavus Kent, farmer, educator and legislator, 
left the impress of his individuality for good upon the history of 
the state in various connections. Ever honorable and upright, he 
commanded the respect of those with whom he came in contact and 
his ability, too, was of a character that made him a leader in public 
thought and action. 

A native of Pennsylvania, he was born at Bellefonte, Center 
countv, on the loth of August, 1837. His father, Josiah Kent, also 
a native of Pennsylvania, was a farmer and mechanic, and in early 
manhood he wedded Anna M. Rothrock, who was likewise born in 
the Keystone state. The year 1842 witnessed their emigration west- 
ward to Iowa, at which time they took up their abode in Fort Madi- 
son. Josiah Kent was one of the early horticulturists of the state, 
being among the first to take up the work of fruit cultivation and 
demonstrating by his success what might be accomplished along that 
line. He, too, took an active part in shaping the history of the state 
during its formative period, was a member of the second constitu- 
tional convention and also represented his district in the first general 
assembly which held an extra session at Iowa City in 1846. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 13 

William G. Kent was a little laei of but five summers when he 
came to Iowa with his parents, so that he was practically a lifelong 
resident of the state and with its development and progress along 
many lines he was closely associated. He earned his first money by 
working as a farm hand at twenty-five cents per day and much of life 
was devoted to agricultural pursuits. In his youth he pursued his 
education in one of the old-time log schoolhouses common in Iowa 
in pioneer times. When eighteen years of age he took up the pro- 
fession of teaching, which he followed continuously for eight years, 
and during a part of that period he was principal of the school at 
Fifth and Pine streets in Fort Madison. He utilized every oppor- 
tunity for advancing his own education and spent three terms of 
fourteen weeks each as a student in the Denmark Academy at Den- 
mark, Iowa. The ability which he displayed in educational fields 
led to his selection for the office of county superintendent of schools 
of Lee county and he remained in that position for two terms of 
two years each. His party would have again made him its nominee 
for the office had he not declined to become a candidate. His inter- 
est in the cause of education never ceased throughout his entire life 
and for more than a quarter of a century he was a member of the 
board of school directors in his home district. He stood at all times 
for progress and advancement along the lines of practical educa- 
tion, but did not believe in wasting time upon features of instruc- 
tion which would have little influence upon the later life of the 
student. In addition to the important educational and agricultural 
interests which at times claimed his attention and energy Mr. Kent 
also figured in financial circles, being one of the organizers of the 
Lee County Savings Bank, which was formed in 1888. He was 
elected a director and vice president and remained in that connec- 
tion with the bank for many years, his counsel proving a valued ele- 
ment in shaping its policy. 

In December, 1863, Mr. Kent was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah E. Shephard, of Lee county, a representative of one of the 
most prominent pioneer families of this section of the state. Her 
parents were George and Phebe (Hodgson) Shephard. The latter, 
a native of Yorkshire, England, was brought to the United States 
by her parents when twelve years of age and on the 14th of Febru- 
ary, 1826, in Indiana, she became the wife of George Shephard, 
who was also a native of England. In 1836 they removed westward, 
settling in Lee county, Iowa, when this state was still a part of the 
territory of Wisconsin. Mr. Shephard was a miller by trade, but 
after coming to this state turned his attention to agricultural pur- 



14 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

suits, in which he continued active to the time of his death. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Shephard were born seven children who reached adult 
age, while three passed away in early life. 

Throughout the entire period of their married life Mr. and Mrs. 
Kent resided in Lee county, and here he passed away on the 20th of 
February, 1905, when in the sixty-eighth year of his age. His life 
had been one of intense activity and usefulness. He e.xemplified in 
his career the beneficent spirit of the Masonic fraternity and was a 
prominent member of Delta Commandery, No. 51, K. T., of Fort 
Madison. 

When age conferred upon him the right of franchise, Mr. Kent 
announced himself a supporter of the democratic party and never 
faltered in his allegiance thereto as the years went on. At various 
times he filled public positions, the duties of which he ever dis- 
charged with promptness and fidelity. In 1885 popular suffrage 
made him a member of the house of representatives of the twenty- 
first general assembly of Iowa, in which position he served until 
1886, when he resigned to accept the democratic nomination for 
state senator to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of the late 
judge J. M. Casey. Endorsement of his first term service as senator 
came in the fall of 1889, when he was re-elected for a full term. He 
represented his district in the upper house of the state legislature 
during the twenty-second, twenty-third and twenty-fourth general 
assemblies, gave careful consideration to each question which came 
up for settlement and was connected with much important construct- 
ive legislation. He championed many measures which found their 
way to the statute books of the state and he was also a capable mem- 
ber of various important committees. In 1892 he suffered defeat 
with the entire democratic ticket when a candidate for railroad 
commissioner. However, other important public honors came to 
him. In 1894 Governor Jackson appointed him a member of the 
commission to plan, locate and erect a hospital for the insane in 
northwestern Iowa and following the death of General Ed. Wright 
he was made secretary of the commission, whose labors resulted in 
the erection of a splendid state hospital at Cherokee. Through ap- 
pointment of Governors Larrabee, Boies and Jackson, Mr. Kent 
served as a delegate to the national farmers congress, the commercial 
convention at Kansas City and the trans-Mississippi convention at 
St. Louis. 

His ideals of public service were high and he bent every energy 
toward their fulfillment. A contemporary writer said of him: "He 
was a man of deep thought and conservative action, who made every 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 15 

move count." There are few men who have held so prominent a 
place in public regard as did William Gustavus Kent, the warm 
esteem of his fellow townsmen being given him regardless of party 
or creed. He never deviated from what his judgment sanctioned to 
be right between himself and his fellowmen, and his position upon 
any important question was never an equivocal one. He stood firmly 
for what he believed to be for the best interest of county and state 
and his labors were far-reaching and beneficial in effect. 



REV. FATHER WILLIAM JACOBY. 

Rev. Father William Jacoby, pastor of the Catholic church of 
the Assumption at West Point since 1877, was born at Ettelbruck, 
in the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg, and celebrated the seventy-ninth 
anniversary of his birth on the 14th of June, 1914. His parents were 
Peter and Catherina (Berg) Jacoby, the former a successful shoe 
merchant. 

Their son William had little financial assistance as a young man 
and helped pay his way through college by instructing younger stu- 
dents. He was for seven years librarian of the Luxemburg public 
library, containing over one hundred thousand volumes. He com 
pleted his classical and philosophical studies in Luxemburg and came 
to this country unaccompanied by relatives or friends. Here he 
entered a theological seminary at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he 
spent two years as a student, and was then ordained to the priesthood 
by Bishop Hennesy, of Dubuque, Iowa. His first appointment was 
Lansing. Iowa, and missions, where he worked nine years, building 
two churches, schools, etc. He also answered sick calls in southern 
Minnesota and western Wisconsin. He came to West Point in 1877 
and the result of his thirty-seven years' pastorate is truly remarkable. 
The parish now includes over two hundred families, the church was 
remodeled and redecorated in 1903-1904 at an expense of twenty-four 
thousand dollars. A school had been established in early years, taught 
by the Sisters of St. Francis. The work of the church in all of its 
departments is carefully planned and its influence is strongly felt 
among the Catholic population of this section of the country. 

When Father Jacoby's pastorate began there were only one hun- 
dred and thirty-six families on the parish rolls. The history of the 
church as given in the West Point Bee is as follows: "The beautiful 
location of West Point on the southern border of Pleasant Ridge 



16 , HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

attracted Catholic settlers in the early days. Thev were visited the 
first time by a Catholic priest in the spring of 1838, when Rev. August 
Brickwedde came here from Quincy, Illinois, and from that time 
until 1841 attended West Point as one of his out-missions, generally 
making one visit in the year, during the Easter season. In 1830 he 
made this visit at West Point on April 17, and on that day baptized 
Mary E. Groner, Gerard H. Hellman, Mary E. Rump and Barbara 
Ritt. During these days the double log house of Joseph Strothman 
was generally used as chapel. Until i8i;i the priests used to make 
their home with this family and his son, Casper Strothman, and with 
Dr. Daniel Lowrey, who arrived in 1845. In 1840 Rev. J. G. AUe- 
man took charge of West Point as an out-mission and attended it 
till 1 85 1. During 1844 and 1845 he spent much of his time here, 
teaching a school for a while and making his other parochial visits 
from this place. In 1842 Father AUeman built the first church, a 
frame structure, about twenty-one by forty feet in size, with fourteen 
feet posts. At this time also a clear-toned church bell was procured 
and placed on trestles near the front door. This bell was a gift from 
Bishop Loras, and is the same bell which now marks tmie in the paro- 
chial schools. The site of the old church was near the west end of 
the present building, fronting north. West Point continued to be 
attended by the Fort Madison pastors until the close of June, 18^5, 
when Rev. B. Wolterman was appointed resident pastor, and he 
continued until February, 1856. He opened the oldest baptismal 
register now existing in St. Mary's church. The original name of 
this congregation was St. Philip's church. About the year 18^3 the 
West Pointers sent to the old fatherland in Hanover and secured a 
teacher for their parochial school in the person of Henry Krebs, a 
well educated, thoroughly Catholic young man, and an excellent 
teacher. In 1858 several families emigrating to Minnesota induced 
him to accompany them — to teach their schools. There remains in 
his handwriting, at this time, a beautifully written and complete 
census of the West Point parish in 1854. During March, April and 
May, 1856. Father Hattenberger visited here. In June Father Michel 
came, and then, until January, 1857, Father Hattenberger continued. 
In the summer of 1857 Father J. G. Refife made visits here, and from 
October, 1857, until April, 1858, Rev. Eusebius Kaiser was the resi- 
dent pastor, but his infirmity and advanced age induced him to re- 
sign. Rev. A. Hattenberger again attended until December, 1858, 
when Rev. J. G. Refife arrived as the resident pastor. He improved 
and extended the frame cottage which had been previously pur- 
chased for a parsonage. Then he began the erection of the new 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 17 

church building. In the first winter stone was hauled from the neigh- 
boring quarries. In 1859 brick was burned on the cemetery lands, the 
members contributing the wood and labor. The church was built 
in somewhat Romanesque style, forty-nine by one hundred and eight 
feet in dimensions, having sanctuary, sacristy and tower. It w'as fin- 
ished in the spring of 1862 and dedicated in honor of the Blessed 
Virgin. Now the church was attended for one year from St. Paul, 
by Father Michel, and from Fort Madison by Father Orth. In Sep- 
tember, 1867, Father Hattenberger was appointed, and remained 
until May, 1869, and it was during his time that the present brick 
parsonage was built. Then Rev. Clement Johannes came and re- 
mained till 1 87 1. He was a good pastor. In February following 
Rev. James Orth took the pastorate, administering with commend- 
able zeal. He removed to Keokuk toward the end of the year 1876. 
In March, 1877, arrived the present incumbent. Rev. William Jacoby, 
having in these years wrought a complete metamorphosis of the 
parish. The growing, promising parish needed the finishing touch 
of the master's hand. The material progress w'as begun with paint- 
ing and decorating of the church in a tasteful manner, so that the 
plain building has assumed the appearance of one of the most hand- 
some church buildings in the diocese. The altar is hand-carved and 
is a work of art. All the other decorations and statuary of the church 
are in harmony with the work above referred to. The growing and 
flourishing parish soon found that the old building used as an as- 
sembling and meeting place for the various societies of the parish — 
as well as for school and church entertainments — had outgrown its 
usefulness and was entirely too small. Quietly and unostentatiously 
Rev. Jacoby went to w'ork and made plans for a new hall, and before 
the summer had far advanced active work was commenced on the 
new building. It was pushed with great vigor and rapid progress 
was made, and early in the fall of 1895 the building was completed. 
The dedicatory exercises were held on Thanksgiving day, 1895. 
When the building was thrown open to the public for use the interior 
was not yet completed. The work of decorating followed a year or 
two later. The new meeting place was christened St. Aloysius hall. 
It has a seating capacity of about four hundred and has also a large 
stage with splendid scenery, most of which was painted by Rev. Jacoby 
and the remainder was donated by him. The drop curtain is espe- 
cially handsome. The hall has proved an exceptional popular place 
for members of the parish." The active years of Father Jacoby have 
been filled with hard labor, crowned with rich attainment. He 
built the large school now under the charge of the Sisters of St. 



18 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Francis from La Crosse, Wisconsin, and the school has an attend- 
ance of approximately two hundred. In 1890 Father Jacoby made 
a trip to Europe and while there had an audience with Pope Leo 
Xin. In 1894 he erected the mortuary, located at the cemetery, at 
a cost of seventeen hundred dollars. This structure graces the cem- 
etery and upon one of its interior walls is found the inscription: 
"Memento homo quia pulvis es et in pulverem reverteris." Father 
Jacoby is a devoted student of the church history and has ever taken 
a deep and active interest in all efforts looking to the improvement 
of society. He is much loved and respected by his own people and 
those of other faiths, who appreciate the excellent work that is con- 
tinually being accomplished by St. Mary's. 



JOHN P. HORNISH, Jr. 

John P. Hornish, one of the prominent and able representatives 
of the bar of Lee county, has practiced his profession in Keokuk 
continuously and successfully for the past third of a century. He was 
born within the present city limits of Keokuk, Iowa, on the 27th of 
October, 1856, his parents being John P. and Martha C. (Plumer) 
Hornish, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. The father, 
a graduate of Washington and Jefferson College of Washington, 
Pennsylvania, studied law in Greensburg, that state, and was admitted 
to the bar. In 1854 he came to Keokuk, then a growing and pro- 
gressive western town known as "the gate city of the great west." 
Here he was actively engaged in the practice of law throughout the 
remainder of his life, building up an extensive and lucrative clientage. 
He practiced his profession as a contemporary of such intellectual 
legal giants as Samuel F. Miller, General W. W. Belknap, George 
W. McCreary, John W. Rankin and others — men whose ability 
caused the bar of Lee county to be recognized as one of the best in 
the west. John P. Hornish, Sr., gave his political allegiance to the 
democracy and was elected and served as district attorney and also 
as a member of the board of county supervisors. His demise occurred 
on the 17th of September, 1874, after a residence of twenty years in 
Keokuk. LInto him and his wife, who still survives, were born 
seven children, five of whom are vet living. 

John P. Hornish, Jr., was reared in the place of his nativity and 
in the acquirement of an education attended the graded and high 
schools, completing his literary training as a student in the University 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY i:» 

of Wooster at Wooster, Ohio. Subscqucntlv he read hiw witli the 
firm of Craig & Collier and in September, 1881, passed exammation 
before a committee of the bar and was admitted to practice. He at 
once opened an office in Keokuk and has here followed his profes- 
sion with gratifying success to the present time. His practice is ex- 
tensive and of an important character. He is remarkable among 
lawyers for the wide research and provident care with which he pre- 
pares his cases. At no time has his reading ever been confined to the 
limitation of the questions at issue. It has gone beyond and com- 
passed every contingency and 'provided not alone for the expected 
but for the unexpected, which happens in the courts quite as fre- 
quently as out of them. 

On the i8th of September, 1901, Mr. Hornish was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Maude M. Morton, of Ipava, Illinois, by whom he 
has two children, John Morton and Armintha P. Politically he is 
identified with the democratic party and from 1890 until 1892 served 
as a member of the lower house of the Iowa state legislature. During 
this session occurred the famous deadlock over the election of speaker 
which resulted in the choice of John T. Hamilton, who is now can- 
didate for governor of Iowa on the democratic ticket, and Mr. Hor- 
nish was enabled to take advantage of the existing conditions and 
compel the granting of another representative to Lee county. His 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the First West- 
minster Presbyterian church, and fraternally he is connected with the 
Knights of Pythias. In Keokuk, where his entire life has been spent, 
he enjovs an enviable reputation as a leading attorney and highly 
respected citizen. 



JOHN C. FOGGY. 



John C. Foggy, a farmer and clerk of Pleasant Ridge township, 
was born February 13, 1873, in this county, his parents being Andrew 
and Eliza (Cooper) Foggy. His paternal grandfather, James 
Foggy, was a native of Scotland, who emigrated to Virginia, but his 
wife was born in Ireland. They made their way from Virginia 
to Lee county, Iowa, in 1836 and settled on government land, erecting 
a log cabin which remained the family home for many years. They 
had six sons and one daughter, of whom but one, Andrew Foggy, is 
still living. The last named is now eighty-five years of age and his 
wife, who also survives, is sixty-eight years old. Both are in full 



20 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

possession of their faculties and keep posted as to the happenings in 
the world, being interested in all progressive movements. To them 
were born two children, a son and a daughter, the sister of our sub- 
ject being Esther Lee, who was born January i, 1875, and is now the 
wife of William J. Singleton, a banker of Quincy, Illinois, 

John C. Foggy acquired his elementary education in the Mount 
Pleasant schools and later attended the Gem City Business College 
at Quincy, Illinois. After finishing his formal schooling he took up 
farming and is now operating his father's farm of two hundred and 
fifty-six acres and one hundred and twenty-four acres of his own. He 
specializes in Percheron horses and Hereford cattle and his stock- 
raising brings him annually a handsome income. He gives his agri- 
cultural operations the same care and thought that a business man 
bestows upon his work and finds farming not only a profitable but an 
interesting occupation and one that offers many opportunities to the 
man who is mentally alert. 

In 1898 Mr. Foggy was married to Miss Lenora K. Klopfenstein, 
a daughter of David and Elizabeth Klopfenstein. Mr. and Mrs. 
Foggy have one son, Glenn C, born February 2, 1900, and a daugh- 
ter, Fern E., born September 24, 1904. Both children are now attend- 
ing school. 

Mr. Foggy has held a number of local offices, having been presi- 
dent and treasurer ot the school board, while in 1906 he was elected 
township clerk and has served for four consecutive terms in that 
office. He is well informed as to conditions in the county and is one 
of the influential men in local politics. Those who know him well 
believe that he will give a good account of himself in the future in 
a larger field of activity as he manifests qualities of leadership. 



Cx\PTAIN IRAM ALLEN SAWYER. 

Captain Irani Allen Sawyer, who has departed this life, was for 
years identified with the Irwin-Phillips Company. He was thus 
prominently associated with commercial interests until several years 
prior to his death, when he retired. He was born February 16, 1839, 
at North Hero, Vermont, and was the third son of Allen and Clar- 
issa (Hazen) Sawyer, who were descendants of an old family founded 
in America prior to the Revolutionarv war. Colonel Ephraim Saw- 
yer, the great-grandfather of Captain I ram Allen Sawyer, and his 
five sons served with the American army in the war for independ- 





'Ouy^ 



r 



/' (-iJ-Ji 



L-,,,.. I 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 23 

ence. In 1850 the father brought his wife and children to the mid- 
dle west, making the journey to Fayette county, Iowa. 

Captain I. A. Sawyer was then a lad of but eleven years. The 
remaining period of his youth was passed in this state and in June, 

1 86 1, following the outbreak of the Civil war, he responded to the 
country's call for troops and at the age of twenty-two years enlisted 
at West Union, Fayette county, Iowa, being mustered in at Keokuk 
on the 8th of June and served for three years with the rank of cor- 
poral of Company F, Third Iowa Volunteers. He was discharged 
therefrom on the 8th of December, 1863, by reason of his promotion 
to a non-commissioned office in the Sixtieth United States Colored 
Infantry at Helena, Arkansas, and on the 24th of May, 1864, he was 
discharged therefrom, owing to the fact that he had been promoted 
from the rank of sergeant major to that of lieutenant. On the 29th of 
April, 1864, he had been made second lieutenant of the Sixtieth 
United States Colored Infantry and was assigned to Company B of 
the same regiment. He had command of that company from Feb- 
ruary, 1864, until May 25, 1865, and was honorably discharged at 
Little Rock, Arkansas, on the 25th of May of the latter year. At 
the battle of Hatchie River, or Matamora, on the 5th of October, 

1862, he was severely wounded in the right leg by a canister shot 
while near the rebel battery. He was sent to the hospital at Keokuk 
and was disabled for nearly a year. In 1863 he received a commis- 
sion as recruiting officer and recruited some men for the Eighth Iowa 
Cavalry, In whatever connection he was found he proved loyal to 
the duty reposed in him and was a most faithful follower of the 
stars and stripes. 

After the war Captain Sawyer located in Keokuk and became 
connected with the firm of Kramer-Irwin & Company, which later 
became the Irwin-Phillips Company. With that business he re- 
mained in continuous connection until he retired some time before 
his death. 

On the 6th of October, 1864, Captain Sawyer was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Crawford Irwin, a daughter of Stephen Irwin. 
She died June 20, 1903, leaving four children: Hazen I., who is 
now a practicing attorney at the Keokuk bar; S. I., who is located at 
Fort Wayne, Indiana; Mrs. T. R. Board, also of Keokuk; and Mrs. 
John A. McElroy, of East Orange, New Jersey. Having lost his 
wife, Captain Sawyer was again married on the 5th of June, 1905, 
his second union being with Miss Annette Martin, a daughter of 
Robert H. and Mary (Meara) Martin, early settlers of Lee county. 
Mrs. Sawyer still survives her husband. 



24 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Captain Sawyer held membership in Torrence Post, No. 2, G. 
A. R., and was also a member of Lexington Chapter of the Sons of 
the American Revolution and the Military Order of Loyal Legion of 
the United States, Iowa Commandery. In politics he was a repub- 
lican, but he never held office. He was ever well posted on current 
events and was a representative citizen of the community in every 
respect. He stood at all times for progress, development and im- 
provement and when death claimed him on the 12th of May, 1909, 
Lee county lost one of its representative and honored citizens — a 
man whose circle of friends was almost coextensive with the circle 
of his acquaintance. 



CLYDE ROYAL JOY. 



Among the prominent citizens of Keokuk none occupv a more 
enviable position in business affairs than Clyde Royal Joy, who 
is identified with a number of enterprises which have proved of great 
benefit to the city and surrounding country. A native of Iowa, he 
was born in Denmark, Lee county, on the 8th of June, 1867, and is 
a representative of an old and honored New England family, being 
a descendant of Thomas Joy, who landed in America in 1630 and 
built the first Massachusetts statehouse at Boston. One of his an- 
cestors was a lieutenant in the Revolutionary war and his father Cap- 
tain Royal Noah Joy, served for over three vears in the Civil war in 
command of a company belonging to the Ninety-fourth New York 
Volunteer Infantry. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name 
of Rodelia Epps. 

Clyde Royal Joy was reared and educated in Denmark, attend- 
ing the Denmark Academy for some time but not completing the 
course there. He was only seventeen years of age when, in 1884, he 
entered the office of S. F. Baker & Son as a clerk, their business being 
the manufacture and sale of family remedies to the farmers of the 
middle west. In 1889 he was admitted to the firm, the name being 
then changed to S. F. Baker & Company. With that enterprise he 
is still identified. He is, however, connected with many other busi- 
ness enterprises and is today vice president of the Kellogg-Birge Com- 
pany of Keokuk, wholesale grocers, president of the Intercity Bridge 
Company of Keokuk and a stockholder in other local companies. He 
is also a director of the Keokuk National Bank and is todav presi- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 25 

dent of the Keokuk Industrial Association, his term of office extend- 
ing from 191 1 to 1915. 

On the 24th of October, 1890, in Chicago, Mr. Joy was united in 
marriage to Miss Belle Brackett, a daughter of Gustavus B. and 
Ann Brackett. Her father was captain of a company of engineers 
during the Civil war and has for many years been pomologist of the 
department of agriculture of the United States government. Mr. 
and Mrs. Joy have three children: Ralph B., who married Viola 
Ness; Mildred A.; and Carroll. 

By his ballot Mr. Joy supports the men and measures of the repub- 
lican party, and he holds membership in the Keokuk Country Club; 
the Keokuk Club; the Keokuk Motor Boat Club; the Lakeview 
Motor Club of Hamilton, Illinois; the Chicago Athletic Association; 
and the Lawyers Club of New York. He is one of the leading mem- 
bers of the First Congregational church of Keokuk and has always 
taken a very active and prominent part in religious afifairs, being 
especially interested in the Young Men's Christian Association. For 
seventeen years he was a director in the local organization at Keokuk 
and was president of the same for fifteen years, from 1895 to 191 1. 
He is a member of the international committee of the Young Men's 
Christian Association of North America and chairman of its religious 
work department. In 1911-12 he was a member of the executive 
committee and chairman of the business and finance committee of 
the Men and Religion Forward Movement. He is a member of the 
board of trustees of the Young Men's Christian Association College 
of Chicago and Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, is a trustee of Knox 
College of Galesburg, Illinois, and for a time was also a trustee of 
the Baptist College of Burlington, Iowa. There is probably no man 
in this part of the state who is better known in the religious world 
than Mr. Jov, and his influence has been widely felt, especially by 
the young men of this and adjoining states. 



JOSEPH M. CASEY, M. D. 

Dr. Joseph M. Casey, an alumnus of the Rush Medical College 
of Chicago, has since his graduation, in 1888, been continuously 
engaged in practice in Fort Madison, his native city, and his record 
stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is never 
without honor save in his own country, for in the city of his birth and 



26 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

where his entire life has been spent, Dr. Casey has won high place as 
a physician of marked ability and power. He was born on the 3d 
of August, 1865, and is a son of Joseph M. and Sarah J. (Ward) 
Casey. The father, who was born in Adair county, Kentucky, in 
1827. came of ScotchTrish ancestry. He came to Iowa with his 
mother, his father having previously died in the early "40s, the family 
home being established at West Point, where the grandmother of 
Dr. Casev passed away in the early '50s. 

Joseph M. Casev, continuing his residence in this state, studied law 
under judge Kinney at West Point, Iowa, and was admitted to the 
bar in the 'qos. Having thus qualified for practice, he removed to 
Keokuk county, where he lived for a number of years, and in 1861 
returned to Lee county, settling in Fort Madison. He at once entered 
upon practice here and it was not long before his ability to cope 
with intricate problems of the law became recognized and brought to 
him a liberal and growing clientage. He won many notable cases 
and his knowledge recommended him for judicial honors, so that 
he was elected to the office of district judge and served upon the 
bench through the last fifteen years of his life. His decisions were 
strictlv fair and impartial, and he became one of the foremost repre- 
sentatives of the judiciary in eastern Iowa. He died in 1895 and 
for about fifteen vears was survived by his wife, who passed away in 
1910. Judge Casev was not only prominent in connection with pro- 
fessional interests, but also did much to shape the political policy of 
countv and state. He was chosen to represent his district both in 
the house of representatives and in the senate and left the impress of 
his individuality upon the laws enacted while he was connected with 
the state legislature. He was also mayor of Fort Madison in the 
years 1870 and 1871 and labored for municipal progress and advance- 
ment with the same thoroughness that he manifested in his work as 
a general assemblyman. 

Dr. Casev is one of a family of two sons and three daughters, of 
whom three are vet living. After completing his public-school edu- 
cation he decided upon the practice of medicine as a life work and 
with that end in view entered Rush Medical College of Chicago, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1888. He then located 
for practice in his native city, where he has since remained. In 1901 
he pursued post-graduate work in New York Polyclinic and he has 
always continued a close and discriminating student of his profes- 
sion, reading broadly in his leisure hours and thus continually ad- 
vancing his knowledge of the various branches of the medical pro- 
fession. He has been president of the Fort Madison Medical Society, 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 27 

and vice president of the Lee County Medical Society, and he 
is now physician for the board of health. 

On the 23d of December, 1895, Dr. Casey was married to Miss 
Sarah Zilla Johnson, a daughter of Nelson and Nancy (Porter) John- 
son. In early life her father came to Lee county and for several 
years was superintendent of the public schools of Fort Madison. 
Later he established a business college, which he conducted until 
1 91 3. Dr. and Mrs. Casey became parents of two children, of whom 
one has passed away, while the other, Robert S., is in school. Dr. 
Casey belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained 
high rank, being a Knight Templar and a member of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also identified with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. He gives his political support to the democratic party, and 
his religious faith is that of the Episcopal church, the teachings of 
which have guided him in his life's relations and gained him as high 
standing as a man and citizen as he has won in his profession through 
his able practice of medicine and surgery. 



JOHN McCANN. 



John McCann is now living retired at Montrose. For a long 
period he was closely associated with railroad and agricultural inter- 
ests and his intense and well directed activity in those connections 
brought him a success which enabled him to put aside further busi- 
ness cares. A native of the state of New York he was born in Fulton 
county, March 26, 1842, a son of William McCann, whose birth oc- 
curred in County Limerick, Ireland, and who came to the United 
States with his wife and one child. They settled in Watertown, New 
York, where the father did contracting work. He lived in the east 
for an extended period and died in Kingston, Canada. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Mary Kenny, passed away in Cleveland, 
Ohio. In their family were six children, three of whom have passed 
away, while a brother and a sister of John McCann still survive. 

John McCann remained a resident of his native county to the age 
of ten years, when the family removed to Kingston. Canada, where 
he remained until 1861. He attended school both in New York and 
in Canada, but when twelve years of age began earning his own living 
as water boy. carrying water to twenty-five men who were engaged in 
building the Grand Trunk Railroad. He was paid ten cents per day 
and the laborers received only eighty cents, while a man with a horse 



28 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

and cart could get but one dollar per day. Mr. McCann was thus 
employed for two seasons and during the second season his wages were 
increased to fifteen cents per day and he had to carry water to thirty 
men. He afterward went to work as a farm hand and in that em- 
ployment received six and eight dollars per month. His father had 
died when John McCann was but a young lad, leaving the mother 
with six small children, and it was necessary that they early start out 
in life to provide for their own support. John McCann was the 
fourth child and third son and his wages went to help support the 
family. He remained at home with his mother until his marriage and 
at eighteen years of age began railroad work in the track department 
of the Grand Trunk line. In 1861 he left Canada and worked as a 
track hand on the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad. The follow- 
ing year he returned to Canada, where he spent one year, and in 1863 
went to Bufifalo, New York, at which time he secured a position as 
steersman on an Erie canal boat, receiving a wage of forty dollars per 
month. At the end of the canal season he went into the woods at 
Constantia, Ohio, and for some time was engaged in cutting sawlogs, 
peeling bark and other work incident to the lumber camps. In the 
following spring he again took up railroad work, to which he gave his 
attention during much of the time for several years. About the latter 
part of 1864 he went to Syracuse, New York, and was employed in a 
salt works until 1865. He next went to Portage county, Ohio, and was 
employed with a construction gang on the Atlantic & Great Western 
Railroad. 

In September, 1868, Mr. McCann came to Fort Madison and 
worked under Roadmaster W. R. Haven, of the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad, remaining with that company for thirty-two 
years and six months in the capacity of foreman. His long connec- 
tion with that corporation indicates unmistakably his fidelity, ca- 
pability and reliability. About 1878 he purchased the Park Bowen 
farm in Montrose township and later sold that property and bought 
the Boyd farm of fifty acres, subsequently adding fifty-seven acres. 
He has since sold the fifty acre tract but still retains the ownership 
of the fifty-seven acres and from his property derives a gratifying 
annual income. 

In December, 1873, at Fort Madison, Mr. McCann was united in 
marriage to Miss Amanda Millhouse, who was born in Montrose, 
April 30, iSiji, and there attended school to the age of seventeen years. 
She is a daughter of David and Jemima (Johnson) Millhouse. Her 
father, who was born in Piqua, Ohio, became an early blacksmith at 
Montrose, where he engaged in shoeing the stage horses. He con- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 29 

tinued his residence there t(j the time of his death. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. McCann were born seven children: William David, who mar- 
ried Argenia Swartz and is now living in Wichita, Kansas; JXellie, a 
trained nurse residing in California; Mary, the wife of Ben Mitchell, 
of Montrose; Iva, who married Harry Osborn, a resident of the state 
of Washington; Eliza, who became the wife of Frank Horton and is 
now deceased; Osa, at home; and Ethel, the wife of Ray Anderson, 
of Montrose. 

In politics Mr. McCann is a stanch democrat but has never been 
an office seeker. For thirty-five years he has been a Mason, belonging 
to Montrose Lodge, No. 136. To its teachings he is most loyal and 
faithful and is in hearty sympathy with its purposes. Fifteen years 
ago he retired from railroad work after almost a third of a century's 
connection with the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and through the 
intervening period he has enjoyed a well earned rest. 



J. M. POHLMEYER. . 

J. M. Pohlmeyer is identified with journalistic interests of Lee 
county as editor and proprietor of The West Point Bee, which he pur- 
chased on and has published since April i, 1906. His birth occurred 
in Fort Madison, this county, January 28, 1871, his parents being 
Stephen and Anna (Ludolph) Pohlmeyer. Stephen Pohlmeyer was 
born in Westphalia, Germany, and served in the German army. In 
i860 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, making his way 
direct to Fort Madison, Iowa. Here he followed various lines of 
work. His demise, which occurred in 1908, when he was past sixty- 
five years of age, was the occasion of deep and widespread regret 
throughout the community which had been his home for almost a half 
century. He gave his political allegiance to the democracy and in 
religious faith was a Catholic, of which church his widow is also a 
devout communicant. Martin Ludolph, the maternal grandfather 
of our subject, emigrated to the United States about i860 and took up 
his abode in Lee county, Iowa, becoming an agriculturist of West 
Point township. His daughter, Mrs. Pohlmeyer, now resides at Fort 
Madison and enjoys an extensive and favorable acquaintance here. 
By her marriage she became the mother of the following children: 
J. M., George, Joseph, Conrad, Henry, Frank, Elizabeth and Cath- 
erine. The last named is deceased, but the others are all living and 
make their home in this county. 



30 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

J. M. Pohlmeyer obtained his education in a parochial school of 
his native town and when fourteen years of age entered the office of 
the Fort Madison Democrat as an apprentice, being gradually pro- 
moted until he became foreman of the press room. He remained 
with the paper for twenty-two years and during that period gained a 
thorough and comprehensive knowledge of all phases of newspaper 
publication. On the ist of April. 1906, he purchased The West Point 
Bee, of which he has since been the editor and proprietor and which 
he has maintained as a clean, bright and interesting sheet. Its col- 
umns are devoted to the dissemination of local and general news and 
it is accorded an extensive and gratifying subscription and advertis- 
ing patronage. 

On the 28th of October, 1897, at West Point, Mr. Pohlmeyer was 
united in marriage to Miss Clara Lohman of that town, her parents 
being Herman and Catherine Lohman. Her father, a basket maker 
by trade, passed away about 1897, but her mother survives and makes 
her home at West Point. Our subject and his wife have a daughter 
and two sons, namely: Catherine, Walter and Harold, all of whom 
are attending school. Mr. Pohlmeyer is a democrat in politics and a 
Catholic in religious faith. His entire life has been spent in Lee 
county and his record is that of one of its most esteemed and valued 
citizens. 



HENRY BANK, Sr. 



Henry Bank, Sr., attained a very venerable age as he lived to be 
past ninety-three years old, passing away July 22, 1906. He was 
recognized as one of the solid, substantial men of his day, possessing 
sterling qualities such as command respect in every land and clime. 
He was born in the kingdom of Hanover, Germanv, on the 8th of 
January, 1813, and was thirty-si.x years of age ere he left Europe for 
the new world, crossing the Atlantic in 1849. He did not tarrv on 
the Atlantic coast but made his wav at once into the interior of the 
country, settling at Fort Madison, Iowa, where for two years he fol- 
lowed the cooper's trade, which he had learned in his native land. 
In 185 1 he removed to a farm in Van Buren township, Lee county, and 
there followed agricultural pursuits throughout the remainder of his 
active business life. He did not seek to figure prominently in any 
public connections, being content to concentrate his energies and activ- 
ities upon the development and improvement of his farm. His meth- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 31 

ods were practical and substantial results were soon achieved. He 
kept in touch with the progress of the times in agriculture and his 
place became one of the most highly cultivated and valuable proper- 
ties of the district. 

Ere leaving his native country Henry Bank, Sr., was united in 
marriage to Miss Gollmart and they became the parents of the follow- 
ing children: William, Henry, Dorothea, August, Louisa, Henrietta 
and Julia. 

Henry Bank, Sr., was between ninety-three and ninety-four years 
of age, when in July, 1906, he was called to the home beyond. Sober, 
industrious, energetic, honest to the last penny, recognizing the respon- 
sibility of not only providing well for his family but of setting them a 
good example, and respected by all for his many sterling qualities — 
such a man was Henry Bank, Sr. 



HON. HENRY BANK, Jr. 

Hon. Henry Bank, Jr., of Keokuk, who was the first judge to pre- 
side over the Keokuk superior court, is a native of Hanover, Germany, 
his birth having there occurred on the 23d of October, 1843. The 
establishment of the family in the new world occurred during the pio- 
neer epoch in the history of Lee county, Henry Bank being a lad of 
six years when brought by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bank, 
Sr., to the new world. After a brief residence in Fort Madison cov- 
ering about two years a rerrtoval was made to a farm in Van Buren 
township, Lee county, and there the son was reared, early learning 
what hard work means. He laid the foundation of his education in 
the neighboring schools but much of the year was devoted to work 
in the fields from the time of the early spring planting until the 
crops were harvested in the late autumn. 

About the time he attained his majority Judge Bank became inter- 
ested in the sawmill and lumber business and was identified with 
activity along these lines from 1868 until 1874. He early manifested 
public spirit and became a close student of all that has to do with 
civic afifairs. He sought the betterment of the community along many 
lines and his public spirit and his keen intelligence led to his nomi- 
nation for the office of recorder of deeds of Lee county, to which he 
was elected in 1874, filling the position with credit to himself and sat- 
isfaction to his constituents until 1877. About that time he decided 
to make the practice of law his life work and became a student in the 



32 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

office of Sprague & Gibbon at Keokuk. He was admitted to tlie bar 
in 1878 but continued with his preceptors until the removal of Mr. 
Gibbon to Chicago. He afterward practiced with Mr. Sprague until 
1881, when he was elected police magistrate of the citv of Keokuk, 
remaining upon the bench of the police court until the office was abol- 
ished. Higher judicial honors, however, awaited him, tor in 1883, 
upon the organization of the superior court, he was elected its judge 
and served as such until the spring of 1895. In the fall of that year 
he was elected judge of the district court and has continuously served 
as such to the present time, so that he has been continuously upon the 
bench for a third of a century. He sinks personal prejudice and opin- 
ion in the impartiality and dignity of the office which he fills. He 
ever demands that absolute decorum be maintained in the courtroom 
and that attorneys and clients give to the court the courtesv which is 
its due. Beyond this, however, he stands for the spirit as well as the 
letter of the law, seeking that justice shall be done, vet recognizing at 
times that the public welfare can best be advanced bv tempering jus- 
tice with mercy. 

On the ist of May, i86q. Judge Bank was united in marriage to 
Miss Marv Risser, who came from Bavaria to America with her par- 
ents, Abraham and Katharme (Fletcher) Risser. in the early '50s. 
Judge Bank is a member of the German Evangelical church and of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, associations which indicate 
much of the nature of his interests. A man of high principles and 
lofty purpose, his life is the expression of his belief. 



CAPTAIN FREDERICK CORVVIN CHAMBERS. 

Captain Frederick Corwin Chambers has been a lifelong resident 
of Fort Madison, where he was born on the 4th of September, 1869, 
his parents being Thomas C. and Mary A. (Brewer) Chambers. Tht 
father is a native of Ohio and being left an orphan when quite small, 
was brought to Iowa by an aunt and has since been a resident of Fort 
Madison. During his entire business career he has been connected 
with steamboating on the Mississippi river. For forty-seven years he 
was an engineer and was licensed as chief engineer. During the dark 
days of the Civil war he manifested his patriotism bv enlisting in 
1 861 as a member of Company F, Nineteenth Iowa Volunteer Infan- 
try, with which he served for nearly three years. He was wounded 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 33 

at Prairie Grove, Arkansas, and was sent to a hospital at New Orleans, 
where he remained until sufficiently recovered to be discharged and 
then returned Iiome. Although the family always supported the dem- 
ocratic party he became a stanch republican and has since given his 
allegiance to that organization. He is an honored member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic and is connected with the Christian 
church. 

In early manhood Thomas C. Chambers married Miss Mary A. 
Brewer, who was born in Pleasant Ridge township, this county, where 
she spent her entire life. Her parents were Frederick H. and Rebecca 
(Edson) Brewer, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter 
of Ohio. They were married in Lee county, Iowa, having come here 
during the '30s. For a time her parents lived in a log cabin in Pleas- 
ant Ridge township, where the father had entered land from the gov- 
ernment, and he continued to engage in agricultural pursuits up to 
within the last few years of his life, when he renK^ved to Fort Madi- 
son. There both he and his wife died. He was a democrat in poli- 
tics and was a leader of the party in his locality. In religious faith 
he was a Methodist and fraternally was connected with the Masonic , 
order. To Thomas C. and Mary A. (Brewer) Chambers were born 
five children, as follows: Frederick Corwin, of this review; John P., 
a traveling salesman for a shoe firm and a resident of St. Louis ; W. T., 
who lives in Rock Island, Illinois, and is employed in the United 
States engineer's office there; Charles B., who is manager for a rubber 
tire company in Buffalo, New York; and Robert R., who died in Fort 
Madison at the age of twenty-three years. 

During his boyhood and youth Frederick C. Chambers pursued 
his education in the public schools of Fort Madison and after com- 
pleting the high-school course entered Johnson's Business College, 
where he was a student for a time. For seven years he was employed 
on river boats during the rafting season and for the same length of 
time was engaged in the retail shoe business. He was an engineer at 
the Fort Madison Iron Works for ten years and for three years was 
employed as guard at the Iowa state penitentiary. He was next con- 
nected with the county recorder's office and for two terms, or for four 
years, served as recorder, while at the present time he is acting as 
deputy. He has not only been prominent in public life but has also 
been identified with military afifairs, serving for tv^^elve years as a 
member of the National Guard. During the Spanish-American war 
he was in active service for nine months as captain of Company F. 
Fiftieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was inspector of rifle practice 
in the National Guard for three years after the war. 



34 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

On the i2th of January, 1891, Mr. Chambers married Miss Hattie 
Cutler, of Burlington, Iowa. They are quite prominent socially, and 
Mr. Chambers has been identified with the Masonic fraternity since 
1897. He has served as master of Clavpool Lodge, No. 13, A. F. & 
A. M., and as eminent commander of Delta Commandery, No. 51, 
K. T. He also belongs to Pottowanock Chapter, No. 28. R. A. AL ; 
and Kaaba Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Davenport, although he 
took the degrees of the shrine at Jacksonville, Florida, during the 
Spanish-American war. He also is a prominent member of other 
fraternal organizations, is past exalted ruler of the Elks, chancellor 
commander of the Knights of Pythias and captain of the tfniform 
Rank. He also belongs to the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the 
Moose. Like his father, he supports the republican party and com- 
mands the respect and esteem of all who know him. 



C. R. ARMENTROUT, M. D. 

Dr. C. R. Armentrout, recognized as an able and distinguished 
surgeon of Keokuk, whose office is in the Young Men's Christian 
Association building, was born in Iowa City, May 3, 1878, his par- 
ents being Dr. J. C. and Hattie (Claringbold) Armentrout, mention 
of whom is made elsewhere in this volume. 

Noting with boyish interest the work of his father, an interest that 
grew with the passing years, the subject of this review determined 
eventually to engage in surgical work, and with that end in view 
entered the Keokuk Medical College, from which he was graduated 
on the 19th of April, 1904. He afterward pursued a post-graduate 
course in a New York post-graduate college and later returned to 
Keokuk, where he entered upon the active practice of his profession. 
He has not only done surgical work of a most important character, but 
also taught for five years in the Keokuk Medical College, specializing 
in surgical work. At the present writing he is a member of the oper- 
ating stafT of St. Joseph's Hospital, and as a private practitioner he 
does much difficult surgical work, his pronounced skill and under- 
standing leading to the constant growth of his practice. He belongs 
to the Lee County Medical Society, the Des Moines Valley Medical 
Society, and the Southeastern Iowa Medical Society, of which he is 
the president. He also holds membership with the Iowa State Med- 
ical Association and the American Medical Association, and thus 
keeps in touch with the advanced thought of the profession. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 35 

In December, 1907, Dr. Armentrout was married to Miss Flor- 
ence Layton, a daughter of Erastus Layton, and they now have one 
child, Daisy Ethelda, who was born April 9, 191 1. Dr. Armentrout 
belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He has never 
been active in public affairs, however, devoting his entire time to his 
profession, in which he has made marked progress and gained high 
rank. 



EDWARD T. McKEE. 



Edward T. McKee is a retired farmer, residing in the village of 
Denmark, where he has made his home for the past ten years. For a 
long period he was actively engaged in general agricultural pursuits 
and is still the owner of a farm of two hundred and forty acres on 
section 17, Pleasant Ridge township. It was in that township that 
he was born in 1867, his parents being John S. and Angeline (Hart) 
McKee. The father's birth occurred in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1827, and he was, therefore, sixty-one years of age when 
he passed away in Lee county in 1888. He was reared in the east and 
in 185 1 came to this county. He was in company with his father, John 
McKee, who died in 1869. Both the grandfather and father followed 
agricultural pursuits and both settled in Pleasant Ridge township, 
where thev secured farms and remained until called to their final rest. 
The grandfather, John McKee, Sr., was a soldier in the War of 181 2 
and was always a public-spirited and patriotic citizen. He married 
a Miss Sampson, who also passed away in Lee county. Their son 
John S. McKee was the eldest in a family of six children, all of whom 
came to this county, but all are now deceased. 

While in Pennsylvania John S. McKee held membership with the 
Society of Friends and his life was ever an upright, honorable one, 
which gained for him the high regard of all with whom he was 
brought in contact. His wife was likewise a native of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, and her death occurred in this country in 1881, 
when she was fifty-one years of age. Her religious faith was that of 
the Baptist church and her life was in consistent harmony with her 
Christian belief. Edward T. McKee is the youngest of the family 
of seven children and is the only one now living, although several of 
the others reached years of maturity. These were : William, who fol- 
lowed farming and teaching; Haley, who died at the age of thirteen 
years ; John S., who was a farmer and passed away at the age of forty ; 
Margaret J., who died at the age of seventeen; George M., whose 



36 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

death occurred when he was sixteen years of age; and Charles B., 
who died at the age of twenty-four. 

Edward T. McKee was reared upon the old homestead in Pleas- 
ant Ridge township and completed his studies by a high-school course. 
He then took up the occupation to which he had been reared and made 
farming his life work. In addition to tilling the fields he also raised 
good grades of stock and both branches of his business proved profit- 
able. He brought his fields to a high state of cultivation and added 
many modern improvements and accessories to the farm, making it a 
model property of the twentieth century. He resided upon that place 
until 1904 and then, putting aside the more arduous cares of farm life,, 
removed to Denmark, where he has made his home for the past 
decade. 

Mr. McKee was married in Pleasant Ridge township, in 1894, to 
Miss Clara Burton, who was born in Pleasant Ridge township, a 
daughter of Charles and Cornelia Burton, who came from Vermont 
in 1 85 1. They were natives of the Green Mountain state and were 
there reared and married. The mother is now living at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs, McKee and is about ninety years of age. Mr. Burton, 
however, passed away in 1894, when seventy years of age. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. McKee have been born three children, Cor- 
nelia A,, Marcia B. and Carol, In his political views Mr. McKee is 
a democrat, always supporting the men and measures of the party, 
yet never seeking office as a reward for party fealtv. He belongs to 
the Masonic lodge at Danville, Iowa, and to the chapter at Fort 
Madison, and is most loyal to the teachings and tenets of the craft. 
He and his wife are members of the Congregational church of 
Denmark. 



JAMES CRUIKSHANK. 

James Cruikshank, now enjoying a well earned and well merited 
rest from business cares in a pleasant home in Donnellson, was for 
a considerable period identified with agricultural interests in Lee 
county and is today one of the oldest native sons living within its 
borders. He was born in Marion township, May 7, 1835, and has 
therefore passed the seventy-ninth milestone on life's journey- His 
father, Alexander Cruickshank, one of the early pioneers of the 
county, had settled here in 1834 and had secured a claim from 
the government. There were only a few white people living in the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 37 

county at that time and tlie work of civilization and progress seemed 
scarcely begun, while the most farsighted could hardly have dreamed 
of the wonderful changes which were to occur and bring about the 
present development. Mr. Cruickshank was acquainted with Chief 
Keokuk and with Black Hawk, and the latter visited his home and 
nursed and played with James Cruikshank of this review. Alex- 
ander Cruickshank was united in marriage to Keziah Perkins, who 
was born in Kentucky, while he was a native of Norway. His death 
occurred in 1888 and his wife survived until 1895. In their family 
were seven children. 

James Cruikshank received such educational advantages as the 
district schools afforded, continuing his studies to the age of seven- 
teen years, when he concentrated his efforts upon farm work. Dur- 
ing the periods of vacation he had assisted more and more largely in 
the work of the fields and after his school-days were over he con- 
tinued to assist his father until the latter's death. He then inherited 
a portion of the old homestead and he purchased eighty acres adjoin- 
ing, concentrating his efforts upon the further development and im^ 
provement of his farm until 1898, when he sold that property, which 
he left the following year. He then bought one hundred and twenty- 
one and one-half acres of land in Franklin township, where he car- 
ried on general farming until 1909. He then sold that place to his 
son Arthur, who still owns and operates it. Retiring from active 
business life at the age of seventy-four years, the father removed to 
Donnellson, where he purchased a nice home, which he still occupies, 
and he is now spending the evening of his life amid the comforts that 
have been secured as the result of his former toil. 

On the 5th of April, 1857, James Cruikshank was joined in wed- 
lock with Miss Mary A. Harrison, a native of Dearborn county, 
Indiana, who was reared and educated, however, in Lee county, Iowa. 
They have become th^ parents of four children who are yet living: 
Charles W., a resident of Mount Pleasant; Mrs. Jennie Reid, who 
makes her home at Long Beach, California; Arthur T., living upon 
the old homestead farm; and Mrs. Luella E. Powell, a widow resid- 
ing with her parents. 

Mr. Cruikshank is a Methodist in religious faith and has ever 
been most loyal to the teachings of that organization. There are in- 
deed few people in the county whose memory goes back to so early 
an epoch in its development. He can well remember when game of 
all kinds was plentiful, including not only the wild birds of the for- 
est but also deer. He remembers the Mormon people as they passed 
through on their way to the west. They camped out in the county 



38 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

and some of the landmarks of their stay here are still visible. There 
were many wolves and these would frequently venture upon the farm 
and kill the pigs. The pioneer settler had many difficulties and 
hardships with which to contend and it required much courage and 
fortitude to meet the conditions of that period. In the early days 
when a death occurred it was customary to bury the departed one 
near his home, for there was no regular burying ground. Mr. Cruik- 
shank has lived to witness many notable changes, has seen the county 
thickly settled, while towns and villages have sprung up, churches 
and schools have been built and the work of development and im- 
provement has been carried steadily forward until the county today 
bears little resemblance to the district in which his early youth was 
passed. 



CHARLES HUBENTHAL. 

For more than sixty years Charles Hubenthal has been a resident 
of Keokuk and for forty-two years was engaged in the butchering 
business. He became well known and has long been regarded as a 
worthy and valued citizen. He was born in Hessen-Cassel, Ger- 
many, in the town of Ober Kaufungen, June 2^, 1833. He had two 
great uncles who fought with the Hessians in the Revolutionary war, 
coming to this country in 1777 as members of the army hired by King 
George, to suppress the uprising among the colonies. When they 
learned of conditions in this country, however, they deserted the 
English ranks and fought with the American forces. Valentine 
Hubenthal, father of Charles Hubenthal, was a carpenter and cabi- 
net maker by trade and spent his entire life in Germany. Two of 
his brothers, Adolph and Peter Hubenthal, were members of the 
German army and they, too, died in the fatherland. 

Charles Hubenthal attended the schools of his native country 
until thirteen and a half years of age, after which he began learning 
the butcher's trade, which he followed for an extended period both 
in his native country and in the United States. He was quite young 
when left an orphan by the death of his parents. On crossing the 
Atlantic he settled first with an uncle at Natchez, Mississippi. He 
had been there only a short time when his uncle and aunt died of 
yellow fever and he then went to New York, where he remained for 
a year, after which he removed to Pittsburgh, where he had rela- 
tives. From that point he later went to St. Louis, making the trip 



YORK 



KY 




CHy^RLE S HUBENTHv^I-. 




M 



RS , Cl-iARLES HUBENTH /^L 



L 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 43 

down the river. He had an uncle, William Adams, who had been 
engaged in ranching in Texas from 1846 and who sent for Charles 
Hubenthal to join him. The latter was on his way to his uncle's 
ranch, but turned back when he heard the reports of yellow fever 
in Texas. He then came to Keokuk, where he arrived in 1853, find- 
ing a little straggling village. His hnancial condition rendered it 
imperative that he gain immediate employment and for some time he 
worked for others, but afterward embarked in business on his own 
account. 

When the war broke out he went to California by way of the 
Isthmus route and was accompanied by Nicholas Evers. The trip 
to the coast was made on the boat Champion to the Isthmus. He 
then crossed Panama by rail and embarked again on a vessel carry- 
ing a cargo of fruit. On the second day out of Acrapulco the ship 
was wrecked, and Mr. Hubenthal was picked up by the Golden Gate 
steamer and on that vessel proceeded to San Francisco. There he 
secured employment at his trade and also worked at his trade in 
Sacramento. He lived on the coast for the greater part of seven 
years and eight months, during which period he visited several states 
and five times crossed the plains. On one trip across the country 
to the coast he was accompanied by Captain James Daugherty of 
Keokuk. On these trips he often stopped at prominent points along 
the route and worked at his trade, being thus employed in Salt Lake 
City and in other places. He met all the usual experiences and hard- 
ships incident to travel over the desert and through the mountain 
passes, but he was stout-hearted and possessed the courage and 
strength of young manhood. For a time he prospected for gold in 
Montana, going there from Salt Lake City with a train load of flour 
and other supplies, his destination being Virginia City. Flour had 
been selling for a dollar and a quarter per pound and other com- 
modities were almost equally high. On the Bannock mountains the 
party was overtaken by a terrible storm. It was a typical blizzard 
and the snow fell to a great depth, the storm raging for forty-eight 
hours. Mr. Hubenthal lost all of his flour and the teamster lost 
thirty-two oxen. The flour would have brought Mr. Hubenthal 
three hundred and thirty-six thousand dollars. He made his way 
back to Salt Lake City, determined to try again and make a new start. 
His health remained unimpaired and this stood him in good stead. 
At Salt Lake City he joined Major Bradley, afterward governor of 
Nevada, and went with him to Lower California. He was engaged 
in the butchering business at several points in Nevada. In connec- 
tion with partners he located and partially developed a silver mine, 



44 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

without however giving up the butchering business, which he carried 
on in connection with his mining interests. 

In 1870 Mr. Hubenthal returned to Keokuk, where he has since 
made his home, and for an extended period he was connected with 
the butchering business in this city, gaining thereby a well earned 
and well merited conipetence, enabling him to provide a good living 
for his family. 

On the 9th of October, 1856, Mr. Hubenthal was married to Miss 
Anna Arnold, who was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, and came to 
the United States in 1850, having a sister living in Fort Madison. 
Mrs. Hubenthal passed away November 22, 1908, leaving a daughter, 
Anna Amelia, who was born at the homestead in Keokuk, April 13, 
1874. After attending private and public schools she became a 
student in the Normal College of Dixon, Illinois, and on the ist of 
January, 191 1, she married Paul Luedtke. In politics Mr. Huben- 
thal is a stanch democrat, unfaltering in his advocacy of the party, 
and he is a member of the German Evangelical church, to which his 
wife also belonged. He has never had occasion to regret his deter- 
mination to try his fortune in the new world, for here he has found 
the opportunities which he sought and through their improvement 
has at length reached a position among the men of affluence in 
Keokuk. 



ISAAC LEAZER. 



Isaac Leazer has resided in Cedar township for forty years and is 
well known throughout the county. He still lives upon his farm on 
section i q but has practically retired from active labor. His birth 
occurred in Washington county, Pennsylvania February 25, 1831, 
and he is a son of George and Margaret (Miller) Leazer, of Pennsyl- 
vania Dutch stock. The father was from Baltimore, Maryland, and 
the mother from Washington county, Pennsylvania. They removed 
to Coshocton county, Ohio, when their son Isaac was but ten years of 
age and remained there for many years. They came west the year 
after their son had located in Lee county and made their home in 
Wavne county, Iowa, until they passed away. Both lived to be more 
than eighty vears of age. The father followed farming throughout 
life and was highly respected wherever known. He and his wife were 
Dunkards in their religious affiliation. In their family were seven 
sons and one daughter, all of whom have passed away except the sub- 



I. 



.J 




MRS. j^NN/^ AMELIA LUEDTKE 



I 






r 




u Jl 








SIDE \IE\V OF THK HUBENTHAI. HOME 




THE CHARLES HUBEXTHAL HOME, KEOKUK 
Built in 1857 



*" 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 49 

ject of this review and a brother, Robert, who resides at Corydon, 
Wayne county. 

Isaac Leazer was taken by his parents to Coshocton county, Ohio, 
when but a child and there grew to manhood. He was attracted by , *■ 

the favorable reports which he heard of the western country and as a 
young man came to Iowa, locating near Farmington in Van Buren 
county, Iowa, in 1858. He later came to Lee county and worked by 
the month for about two years, after which he rented land in Harrison 
township for some time and subsequently purchased the farm where 
he now resides. This comprises eighty acres of fertile land and is 
situated on section 15, Cedar township. It is under a high state of 
cultivation and is one of the best developed places in the locality. 
Mr. Leazer made all of the improvements himself, except the erec- 
tion of the house. He always followed progressive methods of agri- 
culture and his well directed labors secured him a competence which 
enables him to now live retired. 

Mr. Leazer was married February 24, 1 858, in Croton, this county, 
to Miss Jane Kelley who was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, May 5, 
1836, a daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Doman) Kelley. The par- 
ents removed to Lee county, Iowa, in 1840, locating near Farmington, 
where Mr. Kelley entered land. He became the owner of two hun- 
dred and forty acres which he improved, but later sold his farm and 
made his home at Farmington until his death, which occurred in 
1869, when he was sixty-nine years of age. His widow survived him 
for many years, passing away in February, 1908, at the remarkable 
age of ninety-eight years. She retained the full use of her faculties to 
the last and was the oldest woman in the county. She was a member of 
the Christian church but Mr. Kelley was a Seventh Day Adventist in 
religious belief. They were the parents of five sons and four daugh- 
ters, those besides Mrs. Leazer being: Joshua P., a resident of Van 
Buren county; Joseph, a resident of Lee county; Lewis C, John W. 
and George J., all of Wayne county; Mrs. Catherine Whitmore, of 
Salt Lake City; Mrs. Susanna Robertson, of Oklahoma; and Mrs. 
Hannah Sawyer, deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leazer are the parents of seven sons and two daugh- 
ters as follows: Mrs. Susanna Vestaline Finger, a resident of Mount 
Pleasant, Iowa; Hamlin, a farmer residing near La Crew, Iowa; 
Cordelia, now Mrs. Kincade, living nead Donnellson, this county; 
Charles G., a farmer of Cedar township; Edward C, of Washington 
county, this state; Horace, a farmer of Van Buren county; Raymond, 
living near Hillsboro in Cedar township; Clarence, who carries on 
farming in Cedar township; and Clyde, who lives at Cottonwood, 



50 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Cedar township, and operates the home farm. There are also seven- 
teen grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leazer are members of the Presbyterian church 
and do much to aid in the furtherance of its work. Mr. Leazer has 
always stalwartly supported the republican party and believes that its 
policies are best adapted to secure the prosperity of the country. He 
has served in a number of local offices and is one of the intiuential men 
of his locality. His public spirit has never been questioned and his 
incorruptible integrity has won for him a high place in the estimation 
of his fellowmen. 



THEODORE F. BALDWIN. 

Theodore F. Baldwin, for many years engaged in the lumber 
business in Keokuk, was born in Newark, New Jersey, August 8, 1834. 
In 1846 his parents, Moses Ward and Sarah (Van Riper) Baldwin, 
removed with their family to the middle west, settling at Salem, 
Henry county, this state. In 1865 they went to Mount Pleasant, and 
there on the 12th of April, 1875, Moses Ward Baldwin died. His 
widow survived him for more than a quarter of a century, passing 
away at the advanced age of eightv-nine years, on the 30th of No- 
vember, 1900. She was a real daughter of the Daughters of the 
Revolution, for her father served in the war for Independence. 

In early manhood Theodore F. Baldwin displayed laudable am- 
bition and unfaltering energv and in his business career he learned to 
readily discriminate between the essential and the non-essential, so 
that his efiforts were most wisely directed and crowned with well 
merited success. His early scholastic training was received in an 
academy at Salem, but in 1852, when only seventeen years of age, he 
joined the army of adventurous seekers who journeyed across the 
plains to California in search of gold. He traveled with an ox train 
but as only the sick or infirm were allowed to ride in the wagons Mr. 
Baldwin made most of the journev on foot from Iowa to the coast. 
There were eight men with the wagon train and Mr. Baldwin is today 
the only survivor of the number. They crossed the Missouri river 
near the present site of the city of Omaha and from that time on did 
not see a single habitation until thev reached California. Mr. Bald- 
win met with varied success during the period of ten years which 
he spent on the Pacific coast. Three times he journeved to and from 
California by water, crossing the Isthmus by rail. The last trip was 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 51 

made in 1862. when he returned to enlist for service in the Union 
army. 

Before leaving the west he had raised part of a company of vol- 
unteers but learning that the California regiments would not be in 
active service he immediately ceased his efforts in that direction and 
took passage for New York. He enlisted at Fort Donelson, Tennes- 
see, joining Company D, Fourteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, com- 
manded by Colonel W. T. Shaw. The first important engagement in 
which he took part was at Shiloh. All day he fought with his regi- 
ment at the historic spot afterwards designated as the Hornet's Nest, 
and at that point the entire regiment was captured at six o'clock on 
the afternoon of the 6th of April, 1862. For three months he was 
imprisoned in the Confederate prison at Macon, Georgia, and then 
was paroled at Huntsville, Alabama, to the Union lines and later was 
exchanged at St. Louis. Soon thereafter he was promoted to the 
rank of second lieutenant and served as acting quartermaster of his 
regiment throughout the remainder of the struggle or until Novem- 
ber, 1864. He participated in a number of engagements besides 
Shiloh, including the battles of Pleasant Hill, Cain River, Yellow 
Bayou, Tupelo, Pilot Knob and others, and in 1864 he was honorably 
discharged by order of the war department of the United States 
government. 

Mr. Baldwin at once returned to his home in Salem, and soon 
thereafter he was united in marriage to Miss Martha L. McGavic, 
a daughter of Samuel and Phoebe (Huber) McGavic. Two chil- 
dren were born of this marriage, Martha Phoebe and Caroline May. 

Not long after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin removed to 
Pella, Iowa, and seven years later came to Keokuk, where he estab- 
lished a lumberyard for the conduct of a wholesale business, forming 
a partnership under the firm name of Hosmer & Baldwin. That 
association continued for three years, at the end of which time Mr. 
Baldwin entered into partnership with M. L. Magoun, the relation- 
ship terminating a year later. In 1878 Mr. Baldwin purchased an 
interest in the firm of Taber & Company, wholesale jobbers and man- 
ufacturers of lumber, and the partnership was continued for seventeen 
years, or until 1895, at which time Mr. Baldwin disposed of his hold- 
ings. Later for two vears he acted as manager of the Carson & Rand 
Lumber Company. He then retired altogether from active business 
and is now enjoying a well earned and well merited rest at his pleas- 
ant home at No. 123 High street. Aside from his local business inter- 
ests, Mr. Baldwin has conducted lumberyards in different parts of 
Iowa and Missouri, his business interests becoming extensive. He 



52 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

was also one of the original incorporators and stockholders of the 
Mississippi River Power Company. His has been an active and use- 
ful life, crowned with substantial results, which arc the direct out- 
come of intelligently directed effort and perseverance. He has read- 
ily discerned business opportunities and has so improved his advan- 
tages that he stands today among the prosperous and influential citi- 
zens of Keokuk — his success well earned by methods that neither seek 
nor require disguise. 

As a republican Mr. Baldwin has taken a somewhat active interest 
in public affairs and has labored untiringly to promote the welfare 
and upbuilding of his city and section. He served for a number of 
terms as a member of the city council and was among those instru- 
mental in the establishment of Rand Park, acting as chairman of 
the committee having this work in hand. He was also chairman of 
the board of health at the time the memorable epidemic of smallpox 
broke out in Keokuk and his work in that trying hour was most com- 
mendable and beneficial. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and 
also to Torrence Post, G. A. R., and to the Loyal Legion. The family 
attend the Presbyterian church. Mr. Baldwin is an American of the 
truest type. Of mingled Dutch and English ancestry dating back to 
a pre-Revolutionary period in this country, he has lived practically 
in every part of the United States but the far north and has been an 
active participant in many of the epoch-making events of its history. 
Coming to Lee county at an early day, he has seen many changes and 
through all these years he has enjoyed the respect and esteem of his 
fellowmen. Honesty has been his policy throughout life and success 
has come to him through his own unaided and h(morable efforts. 



RAYMOND S. PEASE. 

Among the progressive and well known farmers and cattle raisers 
of Lee county must be numbered Raymond S. Pease, who resides on 
section 22, Cedar township. He was b(un in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, June 15, 1850, a son of Boyd E. and Margaret J. 
(Black) Pease, the former of whom was born in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, November 10, 182 1, and was a son of John Pease. The 
mother was a native of the same county and was born in 1828 of 
Irish parentage. She was married to Boyd E. Pease in Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1849, and in 1853 they came to Lee county, 
Iowa, with their two children. Mr. Pease purchased one hundred 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 53 

and sixty acres of land on section 22, Cedar township, and devoted his 
time to its cultivation. He and his wife became the parents of ten 
children, the eight younger being natives of Lee countv- The family 
record is as follows: Raymond, Alfred, Mary, Franklin B., P>dward, 
Emma, Hattie, Fannie G., Boyd E. and Ada B. 

Raymond S. Pease was three vears of age when brought by his 
parents to Lee county and received his elementary education at the 
Center school. He subsequently graduated from the Primrose select 
school. He remained at home until his marriage and then removed 
to the farm where he now resides. He has lived upon this place for 
twenty-two years and is accounted one of the progressive and well-to- 
do agriculturists of the county. He raises registered hogs and cattle 
and, as he is thoroughly familiar with the business, he is meeting with 
success in this enterprise. He is president of a bank at Salem. Henry 
countv, Iowa, and also of a bank at Mount Hamill, Lee county. His 
connection with these financial institutions indicates his business abil- 
ity and knowledge of commercial conditions. 

Mr. Pease was united in marriage to Miss Clementine Hanna, a 
daughter of Miles and Sarah A. (Bonar) Hanna, the former born in 
Indiana, September 14, 1821, and the latter born February 5, 1826, 
in Ohio county, Virginia. She was a daughter of James and Lydia 
(Reeves) Bonar, the mother's family coming originally from New 
Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Bonar had the following children: Melissa, 
born February 19, 1814; Wesley, September 12, 1815; Emily, Feb- 
ruary 20, 1 8 17; Clementine, May 7, 1819; Maude, February 26, 
1822; Mary, November 14, 1824; Sarah A., February 5, 1826; George 
H., Januarv 25, 1828; Carolina S., December 21;, 1831; Phoebe Z., 
June 10, 1834; and Harvey O., March 3, 1836. Miles Hanna came 
to Lee county with his parents and was married at Danville, Des 
Moines county, Iowa, March 23, 1847, to Miss Bonar, who had set- 
tled in this state about 1838. He passed away January 24, 1892, but 
she survived a number of years, dying April 7, 1914. The children 
born to their union were as follows: Isabell, who was born April 
29. 1849, and who died May 29, 1908; James G., born February 17, 
1853; Clementine, born May 2, 1856; John L., who was born Septem- 
ber 9, 1858, and died December 20, 1913; and Mary Z., who was 
born November 16, 1863, and died July 29, 1865. Mrs. Pease was 
educated at Big Mound, Iowa, and at the Primrose select school. 
She remained at home until her marriage. She has become the 
mother of five children : Miles B., who was born September 13, 1885, 
and married Irene Hamilton; William R., now a resident of Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota, who was born December 26, 1887, and married 



54 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Pearl Castile, by whom he has a daughter, Harriet Agnes; Florence 
A., who was born June 13, 1892, and is the wife of E. A. Mager- 
kurth; Lena C, whose birth occurred July 30, 1894, and who is at 
home; and Carrie E., born January 15, 1897, likewise at home. 

Mr. Pease is a democrat in his politics and has been quite active 
in township and county afifairs. His open and straightforward life 
commends him to the respect and esteem of all who know him and he 
is one of the valued citizens of the county. 



JAMES REEVES. 

James Reeves, deceased, was for many years an honored resident 
of Montrose, having located here in November, 1863. He was born 
in Dresden, Ohio, on the 4th of October, 1829, and was a son of James 
Reeves, Sr., who was undoubtedly a native of the same place. His 
mother, however, was born in Germany. She bore the maiden name 
of Lucy Woodring and was comparatively young at the time of her 
death She lost her mind as the result of a serious illness and was 
sent to an asylum, where it was reported that she died. But her son 
Philip, who was then living in Montrose, returned to Ohio and with 
a cousin, John Knox, visited the asylum, where he found the mother, 
and as she was able to answer his questions was convinced of her iden- 
tity. He secured permission to bring her to Montrose, where her 
death occurred. On leaving the asylum she was totally blind. The 
father died in Ohio. He was married a second time. The children 
by his first union were: William, who enlisted in an Iowa regiment 
during the Civil war and, being wounded, was brought to Montrose, 
where he died in 1863; Oliver, who died in Kansas; Philip W., who 
passed away in Montrose ; John Wesley, whose death occurred in Cal- 
ifornia; and James, of this review. There was one daughter by his 
second marriage, Mrs. Sarah Ellen Hand, who died in Kansas. 

James Reeves passed the first seventeen years of his life in his 
native state and there acquired his education. In early life he learned 
the trade of house carpenter, joiner, cabinet-maker and undertaker 
and became an expert workman. On leaving Ohio he removed to 
Wisconsin and was married in Ozaukee county, that state, to Miss 
Jennie May Daggett, a native of Charlotte county. New Brunswick. 
She was born in a little town on the coast overlooking the beautiful 
bay and was fifteen years of age on the removal of the family to Wis- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 55 

consin. Her paternal grandfather, Aaron Daggett, was a lifelong 
resident of St. Andrews, New Brunswick, and followed the trade of 
a cabinetmaker. He was twice married and had children by each 
union. His first wife was Lucy Hillman and to them were born four 
sons, Aaron, Thomas, Seth and Leonard. At the time of his second 
marriage his son Aaron left home and went to sea, after which all 
trace of him was lost until his half-brother William found him in 
Halifax years later. At that time he was very wealthy and William 
would not make himself known. 

The Daggett family is of French Huguenot descent. Seth Dag- 
gett, the father of Mrs. Reeves, also learned the carpenter's trade and 
engaged in the manufacture of furniture and caskets, working prin- 
cipally in mahogany. In early life he was united in marriage to Miss 
Abigail Young, who at that time was only nineteen years of age and 
a very beautiful girl. She died in Fredonia, Ozaukee county, Wis- 
consin, in 1876. at the age of sixty-six years, and he passed away at the 
same place in 1855, at the age of fifty-five years. Their children 
were: Allen; Mrs. Selma Turner; Isaac Albert; Mrs. Reeves; Mrs. 
Euphenia Bradford, whose husband was killed in the battle of Cor- 
inth; Mrs. Hannah C. Taylor, whose husband was also a soldier in 
the Civil war; Hillman G., who was one of the first to enlist in the 
First Wisconsin Cavalrv and is now deceased; Abbie, the wife of 
George Bolton; Emeline L., the wife of John B. Harvey, of Evans- 
ton, Illinois; and Albert Seth and Mrs. Silvandra Henry, twins. 

When the country became involved in civil war Mr. Reeves was 
very anxious to enlist at the first call for troops, but having a family 
of small children, his wife pleaded with him to remain at home, but 
the roll of the drum, the music of the fife made his heart swell within 
him and he could not be content to remain at home. He said to his 
wife: "May, I don't think I will ever be any good at the bench again 
if I do not go to the front," and she responded: "If you think that 
way, James, you go right over and give your name to your brother- 
in-law, Edward Bradford (enrolling officer), and go down south and 
set vourself up for a target." It is needless to say that Mr. Reeves 
needed no second invitation. He enlisted at Madison in Company 
K, Sixteenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and at once went to the 
front. He was wounded by a ball in the right thigh at the battle of 
Shiloh and was first taken to the field hospital and later to Camp 
Dennison, Ohio. Learning of this, Mrs. Reeves started out to find 
him and finally located him at Camp Dennison. Securing permission 
from headquarters, she brought him home, where with the aid of the 
family physician she nursed him back to health. 



56 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

As previously stated, Mrs. Reeves was a girl of fifteen years on the 
removal of her father's family to Wisconsin and this change of resi- 
dence was made in order that the children of the Daggett family 
might be given better educational advantages. Leaving their old 
home in New Brunswick, they sailed for Boston and on the trip 
encountered some very severe storms. At one time it was thought 
that all would be lost. After spending a day and night in Boston 
they took the train for Albany and by canal proceeded to Buffalo, 
New York, where they arrived eight days later. Thev tiicn pro- 
ceeded on the Little Niagara across the lakes to Sheboygan Falls, 
Wisconsin. By wagon they then made their way to Ozaukee county, 
where Mrs. Reeves grew to womanhood. After her marriage she 
remained a resident of that state until 1863, when the family came 
to Montrose. Here Mr. Reeves opened a shop and carried on busi- 
ness quite successfully until his death, which occurred on the 19th of 
May, 1 89 1, his remains being interred in the Montrose cemetery. He 
was reared in the Congregational church and lived an upright, useful 
life, commanding the respect and confidence of all with whom he 
was brought in contact. He possessed a fine barytone voice and his 
wife was also a beautiful singer, as are their three children. In politics 
he was a whig and later a republican. Fraternally he was identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. At his death he left 
three children, namely: Lena L., now Mrs. P. W. Bowen, of Mon- 
trose; Addie, now Mrs. C. D. Leffler, of Marysville, Missouri; and 
George M., who married Myrtle Harrison and resides in Quincy, 
Illinois. 



JOHN C. DANOVER. 



John C. Danover is engaged in farming on section 17, Pleasant 
Ridge township, where he resides, and also owns and cultivates an 
eighty acre tract situated on section 27. He was born November 17. 
1867, a son of Jacob and Sarah (McKee) Danover, and is the first 
in order of birth in their family of four children, the others being as 
follows: Florence B., who was born Februarv 21, 1869, ^""^ resides 
with her father; Eva A., who was born December 18, 1870, and is the 
wife of Arthur McCabe, a farmer of Wayne countv, this state; and 
Georgia F., who was born December 10, 1877, and makes her home 
with her father. 

John C. Danover attended the public schools in the acquirement 
of an education and aided his father in the work of the homestead. 



^ HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 57 

After reaching manhood he decided that agriculture offered oppor- 
tunities for a successful, independent life to equal those afforded by 
any other occupation, and he has continued to farm. For five years 
after his marriage he rented one hundred and sixty acres of his 
father's land, but at the end of that time purchased the one hundred 
and twenty acre tract upon which he now resides. He has since be- 
come the owner of eighty acres located on section 27, Pleasant Ridge 
township, which he also operates. He is industrious and gives much 
thought to the planning of his work and, as his land is in a high 
state of cultivation, his labor is rewarded by abundant crops. 

Mr. Danover was united in marriage to Miss Belle Hosier on the 
9th of March, 1897. Her birth occurred on section 17, Pleasant 
Ridge township, and her parents were Henry and Mary (Brunson) 
Hosier. Their family numbered six children, two sons and four 
daughters, as follows: William, who died at the age of twenty-two 
years; Isaiah, whose birth occurred January 12, 1856, and who is 
mentioned elsewhere in this work in connection with Fort Madison; 
Clara L., who was born October 5, 1858, and is the wife of William 
Decker, a veterinary surgeon of Globe, Arizona; Alice C, who was 
born in 1861 and died in infancy; Rebecca Jane, who was born De- 
cember 17, 1863, and married Nathan Welch, an agriculturist by 
occupation; and the wife of the subject of this review. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Danover have been born three children : Hugh E., whose birth 
occurred December 17, 1897, ^'""^ ^^'^o is now attending the public 
school and assisting his father on the farm; Eugene M., born April 
17, 1900. and also attending school and assisting his father; and 
Virgie M., born July 27, 1910. 

Although Mr. Danover was brought up in the Presbyterian faith, 
he and his family now^ attend the Methodist church at Woolen's 
Corner. They have many friends in the county and are respected 
by all who know them because of their sterling qualities of character. 



HARRY W. HOUSTON. 

Agricultural activity finds a worthy representative in Harry W. 
Houston, who is now the owner of two hundred and sixty-five acres 
of splendidlv improved and highly cultivated land. This tract in- 
cludes the old Houston homestead, which he has owned for twenty 
years. He was born upon this farm and, although he has not resided 
thereon continuously, he has devoted much of his life to its cultivation 



58 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY . 

and improvement. He began his education in the district schools 
and afterward attended the Denmark Academy. Later he concen- 
trated his energies upon general agricultural pursuits and for seven 
years he was a resident of Page county, where for three years he 
engaged in farming, while for four years he conducted a butchering 
business. For the past twenty years, however, he has owned and 
operated the old homestead farm and to it has added until within the 
boundaries of his place are comprised two hundred and sixtv-five 
acres of rich and productive land, from which he annually gathers 
substantial harvests which return to him a good income. 

In February, 1885, Mr. Houston was married to Miss Etlie A. 
Riddle, a sketch of whose family appears elsewhere in this volume. 
She was born in Des Moines county, Iowa, in 1865, but from the age 
of twelve years was reared in Lee county and after attending the pub- 
lic schools was a student in the Denmark Academy. Mr. and Mrs. 
Houston have four children : Robert S., who was born in Page county, 
Iowa, and supplemented his public-school course by study in Elliott's 
Business College at Burlington ; Paul D., who was born in Lee countv 
and has been attending the Iowa Agricultural College at Ames for 
the past two years; and Bernice K. and Myron H., both of whom are 
natives of this county and are attending the local schools. 

In his political views Mr. Houston is a republican and is recog- 
nized as one of the local leaders of the party. He is now a trustee of 
Denmark College and was a school director for a number of vears. 
and the cause of education has alwavs found in him a stalwart cham- 
pion. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen camp at Denmark and 
his wife is a member of the Congregational church, which is the oldest 
church west of the Mississippi river. High principles and noble pur- 
poses have actuated him throughout his entire life, and in every rela- 
tion he has been found true to high standards of manhood. 



GEORGE HILL. 



George Hill, deceased, was for many years a painter and paper 
hanger in Keokuk and did work on manv of the important buildings 
of the city. He was born in Cookstown, Ireland, in 1837 '^^^^ ^^'^^ 
brought to the United States by his parents when hut a boy. The 
other children in his father's family were as follows: William, a 
railroad engineer, who in the war of 1861 carried supplies to the 
'lorthern army and who passed away in Keokuk; Mary, who became 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 59^ 

Mrs. Copeland and is deceased; Robert, who was a carpenter by 
trade and made his home in Galena, Illinois, where he died; and 
James, who is deceased, but whose family resides in Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia. The subject of this review was the second in order of birth. 
He acquired his education in Troy, New York, and there learned 
the trade of paper hanging and painting. When about twenty years 
of age he came to Keokuk, but remained only a short time, as he 
soon after located in Memphis, Tennessee. While there the Civil 
war broke out and although he was in a Confederate stronghold, 
he expressed freely his advocacy of the northern cause. He later 
went to New York and enlisted in the Federal navy. He saw serv- 
ice on a number of gunboats, including the Kearsarge, being on 
that vessel on the occasion of its memorable battle. He served 
throughout the war and when he was discharged held the rank of 
quartermaster sergeant. 

His mother was left a widows soon after the close of the war and 
she and three sons came to Keokuk, where they made their home. 
George Hill spent the years 1866 and 1867 in Leavenworth, Kansas, 
and then returned to Keokuk, where, in connection with Captain 
Flarry McQuilken, he engaged in painting and paper hanging. 
Their first shop was on the corner of Fourth and Blondran streets 
and was a little old frame building. They soon after removed to 
more commodious quarters situated on the opposite corner from 
their first shop. Captain McQuilken continued in the firm for fif- 
teen vears, after which the subject of this review was alone until his 
death. He was a painstaking workman and took a great deal of 
pride in doing well everything that he set his hand to. This char- 
acteristic brought him a large trade and he won not only a reason- 
able financial success, but also the respect of those who knew him. 
Mr. Hill was married November 25, 1869, in Keokuk, to Miss 
Annie Knight, the Rev. Crittenden and Dr. Brown officiating at 
the ceremony. Mrs. Hill w^as born in Kingston, Canada, August 
7, 1844, and was but four years of age when brought to Keokuk, 
where she attended school until sixteen and then joined a sister at 
Jefifersonville, Indiana, pursuing her studies at that place for three 
years. Her father, John Knight, was also a native of Kingston and 
was one of the first white children born in that region, his birth 
occurring in 1782. He was a farmer by occupation and for some 
time lived within two and a half miles of Kingston, but in 1849 
came to Iowa, where he died of cholera in 1855. He was a faithful 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church and a stanch follower 
of the Wesleys, though many of his people were Quakers. He was 



60 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

married in Kingston to Miss Rachel Peepells, who was born at that 
phice and was a daughter of Francis Henry and Hannah Peepells. 
Her father was born in 1776 and her mother was a native of the 
Mohawk valley. New York. Mrs. Knight, who was a Quakeress, 
died in Keokuk in 1882. The children in the Knight family were 
as follows: James, a physician practicing in the state of Washing- 
ton; Mary, who married John H. Williams and is deceased; Rachel, 
the deceased wife of Uriah Lewis; Sarah J., the wife of P. R. Sut- 
ton, of Keokuk; Annie; and Josephine, the wife of James R. Frost, 
of Dubuque, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Hill became parents of four chil- 
dren: Frances, now Mrs. Harry Pierson, of Brooklyn; Minnie and 
Florence, at home; and Sarah, now Mrs. C. H. Howell, of Denver. 
Mr. Hill attended the Congregational church and fraternally 
was a member of the Masonic order. He also held membership in 
the Grand Armv of the Republic, thus associating himself with 
others who served in the defense of the Union. He took an active 
interest in public alTairs and served as alderman from the third 
ward. He was also secretary and director of the Building & Loan 
Association. He left to his children the heritage of an honored 
name, which is to be desired rather than great riches. 



H. C. BROWN. 



H. C. Brown is prominently connected with business interests in 
Keokuk as secretary of the Kellogg-Berge Company. He is a Ca- 
nadian by birth and his natal day was October 24, 1872. He crossed 
t!ie border at the age of seventeen years and became a resident of the 
United States. He had acquired his education in the schools of 
Canada and after coming to this country entered the employ of the 
Michigan Central Railway, being in its telegraphic departpient and 
located in Chicago. He remained there for four years and then 
removed to Colchester, Illinois, where for eight years he was con- 
nected with the lumber and milling business. From Colchester he 
came to Keokuk, engaging in the milling business here until the year 
1904. At that time he became an employe of the Kellogg-Berge 
Companv as department manager. He handled the afifairs of his 
department in a most competent manner, seeing that everything was 
brought up in good condition, and his administrative ability and 
initiative won him promotion until he became secretary of the 
company. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 61 

In 1895 Mr. Brown wedded Miss Adah R. Rramer, dI Cliicago, 
who was educated in the schools of her native state — Pennsylvania. 
She is an active worker in the Young Women's Christian Association 
and also belongs to a number of social clubs. Mr. Brown is a mem- 
ber of the Congregational church and serves as deacon in the same. 
He is a prominent Mason, having served for four years as eminent 
commander of the local Commandery of Knights Templar. He is 
president of the Young Men's Christian Association and under his 
administration it has become one of the most active and beneficial 
institutions of the city. He is also a member of the Country Club and 
greatly enjoys a round on the golf course. He is interested in all out- 
door sports and has done much to foster amateur athletics in Keokuk. 



THE KELLOGG-BERGE COMPANY. " 

The Kellogg-Berge Company of Keokuk, Iowa, was founded in 
1856 by C. P. Berge and W. E. Kellogg. After many years of suc- 
cessful existence as a firm it was incorporated in 1890. The present 
officers are Ira W. Wells, president; C. R. Joy, vice president; E. M. 
Majors, treasurer; and H. C. Brown, secretary. Its affairs are most 
ably conducted and its business covers an ever increasing extent of 
territory. It is one of the largest wliolesale and manufacturing 
grocery concerns in Iowa and its representatives travel over Michigan, 
Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota, in all of which 
states the Kellogg-Berge line of groceries is well known and con- 
sidered as more than satisfactory. 



WILLIAM D. SCHULTE. 

William D. Schulte is a young business man of West Point — alert, 
wide-awake, energetic and ambitious. He is now engaged in mer- 
chandising as a dealer in clothing and shoes and is also filling the 
position of postmaster of the town, in which he was born on the 
31st of July, 1886. He is a son of William and Mary (Meyers) 
Schulte, who are still resident of West Point. In their family are 
two sons and five daughters, of whom William D. of this review is 
the eldest, the others being: Euphrosine, a graduate nurse, who is 
now connected in her professional capacity with Mercy Hospital of 



62 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Chicago; George, who is associated with his father in the grocery 
business; Louise, who is assisting the postmaster; and ALarie, Isabel 
and Dorothy, all at home. 

William D. Schulte was reared under the parental roof and after 
pursuing a course in a parochial school attended Johnson's Business. 
College at Fort Madison, where he was qualiried for the duties of a 
commercial career. For four years, or from 1905 until 1909, he acted 
as rural mail carrier and since then has been closely associated with 
commercial interests in his native town, being a member of the firm 
of William Schulte & Son. The business was established by his 
father, William Schulte, on the 20th of March, 1909, and is now 
managed by William D. Schulte, who also employs one clerk and fre- 
quently has two in his service. Their's is a well appointed store and 
the business has constantly grown and developed along substantial 
lines. 

On the 20th of November, 191 2, Mr. Schulte was married to Miss 
Jean Lite, who was born in Minnesota, a daughter of Floyd A. and 
Catherine (White) Lite, who now reside at Lowell, Des Moines 
county, Iowa. Mr. Lite's father, a veteran of the Civil war, is still 
active at the venerable age of eighty-two years. The Lite family are 
from Virginia. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Schulte has been born a son, 
Harold. The family residence is at West Point, where they have 
many friends. They are members of the Catholic church and Mr. 
Schulte gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. He has 
served as a local committeeman of his party and does all in his power 
to further its growth and promote its success. On the ist of Septem- 
ber, 1913, he was appointed postmaster at West Point by reason of his 
political affiliation and his acknowledged fitness for the office, and he 
is now making a creditable record in that connection. 



HON. JOHN ENSTER CRAIG. 

With public afifairs in Keokuk Hon. John Enster Craig has long 
been prominently, actively and helpfully identified and as a mem- 
ber of the bar he ranks among the foremost. Keen intelligence has 
directed his efforts and a recognition of the obligations and duties 
of citizenship has made his service one of value, not only in the 
legal profession but in the broader field of civics. 

A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Craig was born in Washington 
countv, March 14, 1853, and is a son of Alexander K. and Sarah 




HOX. JOHN K. C'KAIG 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 65 

(JVlcLain) Craig. The father was a man of prominence in his com- 
munity and represented the twenty-fourth district of Pennsylvania 
in congress from 1890 until 1892. At the usual age John E. Craig 
became a pupil in the public schools of his native county and later 
entered Washington and Jefferson College, becoming one of its 
alumni in 1877. During the period of his later youth and early 
manhood he was employed at farm labor through the summer sea- 
sons and engaged in teaching during the winter months in order to 
secure the money necessary to meet the expenses of a college course, 
his time being thus passed until he reached the age of twenty-four. 
The year following his graduation he came to the west, arriving in 
Keokuk on the ist of May, 1878. Here he became a law student in 
the office of his uncle, Hon. John H. Craig, and was admitted to 
practice in 1879, immediately thereafter becoming a member of the 
law firm of Craig, Collier & Craig. His advancement from that 
time to the present has been continuous, and he has long been ac- 
corded a position in the front ranks of the legal profession in Lee 
county and the state. Thoroughness in the preparation of his cases 
has been one of his strong characteristics, and his analytical mind 
enables him to readily recognize the relation between a point in evi- 
dence and the law applicable thereto. He has never deviated from 
the highest standards of the profession, and his pronounced ability 
has won him a large and distinctively representative clientage. 

Mr. Craig has been called to several offices in the line of his 
profession. He became one of the lawmakers of the state in 1886, 
when Lee county sent him as its representative to the Iowa legisla- 
ture. In 1888 he was reelected and while a member of the general 
assembly at Des Moines he took a prominent place among the law- 
makers of the state, being a recognized leader of the democratic 
partv in the house. In 1889 he was elected mayor of Keokuk and 
was reelected in 1891, both times receiving a large majority. He was 
instrumental in inaugurating street paving in Keokuk, Main street 
being paved from Second to Eighth. Various other public improve- 
ments were instituted, including a sewer system, which was estab- 
lished and put in operation. It was also during his administration 
that the union depot was built and the electric street railway was 
established. He won so high a place in the regard of his fellow 
citizens of the town and county and indeed among the people of his 
party that he was prominently named as a candidate for governor at 
the democratic convention held in Sioux City in 1889. However, 
he refused to allow his name to be used in connection with the can- 
didacy for the office. For eleven years he served as a member of 



66 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

the board of education in Keokuk and his fellow members of the 
board and the public in general strongly indorsed his services, recog- 
nizing their force as factors in the improvement of the school system 
of the citv. In 1896 he was elected county attorney and served in 
that position for four years. In 1902 and again in 1904 he was the 
democratic nominee from the first congressional district for congress 
and in 191 2 was the candidate of his party for judge of the supreme 
court of the state of Iowa. His partv recognizes him as one of its 
leaders, a man capable of directing its best interests and standing for 
its highest principles. 

The social features of Mr. Craig's nature have found expression 
in a happy home and in connection with several fraternal organiza- 
tions. He was married on October 7, 1880, to Miss Fame S. Coulter 
and to them has been born a son, M. Coulter, now a civil engineer 
at Wilmington, Delaware. Mr. Craig holds membership in the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Royal Arcanum, the National Union, the Iowa Legion of Honor 
and the Keokuk Club. He is active in every good work promoted 
bv the Westminster Presbyterian church, of which he has long been 
a devoted member. The welfare of Keokuk is dear to his heart and 
his interest therein has found tangible expression on many occasions. 
If rewards have come to him in the shape of public office they have 
been well merited. If they have not come it has not been a matter 
of deep concern to him, as he feels that the pursuits of private life 
are in themselves worthy of his best efforts. 



WILLIAM GEORGE ALBRIGHT. 

William George Albright, deceased, was one of the honored pio- 
neers of Lee county, having located here in 1839. He was born in 
Reading, Pennsylvania, June 10, 1816, and was a son of George and 
Sarah (Wilson) Albright, who spent their entire lives in that state. 
By occupation the father was a bookbinder, and in those early days 
all work in that line was done by hand. In his family were six sons 
who grew to manhood and one daughter, who died in childhood. 
Our subject was reared and educated in his native state and, as pre- 
viously stated, came to Lee county, Iowa, in 1839, by way of St. Louis, 
where he spent a year or two. Throughout his active business life 
he engaged in merchandising, beginning as clerk and subsequently 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 67 

becoming proprietor of a store in connection with one of his brothers. 
He carried on business in Fort Madison for 51 years and after a use- 
ful and well spent life passed away here November 14, 1904, honored 
and respected by all who knew him. He joined the Presbyterian 
church in 1872 and was treasurer thereof for years. He was active 
in public affairs and took a particular interest in all that would tend 
to advance the interests of the community in which he lived. 

Mr. Albright was married, November 18, 1841, in Illinois, just 
across the river from Fort Madison, to Miss Cynthia White, who 
was born near Springfield, Sangamon county, that state, September 
29, 1822, and was five years of age when she accompanied her par- 
ents on their removal to Hancock county, Illinois, residing there until 
her marriage, since which time she has made her home in Fort 
Madison. Here she occupies a fine brick residence, built by Mr. 
Albright and his brother, Jacob W. in 1858. It is a double house, 
three stories and a basement, and contains thirteen rooms. Mrs. 
Albright is today the oldest resident now living in Fort Madison, 
having made her home here for almost seventy-three years. She is 
still a well preserved woman and takes an active interest in the afi'airs 
of life. She has been a member of the Presbyterian church since 
1870, and is active in its work. She has been a member of the Mon- 
day Afternoon Club, and is now an honorary member of the club. 
Mrs. Albright has still very vigorous faculties, does unusually fine 
work with the needle, and takes part in affairs of the day. 

Mrs. Albright's parents were Edward and Nancy (Atherton) 
White, the former a descendant of Peregrine White, who was born 
on the Mayflower. Edward White died in Illinois in 1840 and sub- 
sequently his widow went to Oregon, the journey being made across 
the plains with ox teams. There she made her home with her chil- 
dren until she passed away in 1865. In the family were eleven chil- 
dren, of whom nine reached years of maturity, but Mrs. Albright 
is now the only one living. She became the mother of eleven children, 
of whom four died in infancy, the others being: Harry, who died 
in Lee county, at which time he was a grandfather; Caroline, who 
is now the widow of Robert B. Hatch and makes her home with 
her mother; Phoebe, who died at the age of three years; Grace, who 
taught three years in Council Blufts and eighteen years in Seattle, 
Washington, and who died in 1908; William George, a resident of 
Chicago; Virginia, the wife of W. W. Dearborn of Seattle, Wash- 
ington; and Cynthia, the wife of George R. Crosley of Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. Mrs. Albright has eleven grandchildren living and two 
deceased and also has eleven great-grandchildren. 



68 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Robert Boyd Hatch was born in Bangor, Maine, in 1834, a son 
of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Scott) Hatch, also natives of the Pine 
Tree state. After residing in Washington, D. C, for four years the 
family came to Fort Madison, Iowa, where both parents died. The 
father was a lumberman and claims collector and was identified with 
government wori<. as claim agent in Washington, D. C. He had 
three sons and one daughter, namely: Edward, who became a gen- 
eral in the regular army and was in command of the Second Iowa 
Cavalry all through the Civil war and died at Fort Russell while 
commanding a colored regiment, being killed in a runaway; Robert 
Boyd; Elizabeth, who died in 1887; and Frank, who was injured 
in the battle of Bull Run. 

At the age of seventeen years Robert Boyd Hatch went to Daven- 
port, Iowa, where he was identified with the lumber business, and 
later went to Muscatine, later returning to Fort Madison, where he 
was married in 1864 to Caroline Albright. Thev located in Musca- 
tine, and two years later they came to Fort Madison, but subsequently 
removed to St. Louis, where Mr. Hatch was identified with the lum- 
ber business during the last fifteen years of his life. He passed away 
in 1902. There were two children born to him and his wife, namely: 
Grace Virginia, who died in 1888, at the age of seventeen years; 
and William Albright, who was married in 1901 to Gertrude Stinger, 
of St. Louis, and now lives in Cleveland, Ohio. They have two chil- 
dren, Caroline and Joseph. Since the death of Mr. Hatch his widow 
has made her home with her mother and has become quite prominent 
socially in Fort Madison, being especially active in club work. She 
is a member of the Monday Afternoon Club, which is the oldest 
club in the city, and is limited to twenty-five members. It is a study 
club. 



PALMER TRIMBLE. 



Palmer Trimble was born at Bloomfield, Iowa, on the 13th of 
January, 1852, a son of the late Judge Henry H. Trimble, extended 
mention of whom is made elsewhere in this work. His early educa- 
tional training was obtained in the schools of his native city and he 
supplemented this by a course at the Iowa Wesleyan University at 
Mount Pleasant in 1874-5. He took his law work at the State Uni- 
versity of Iowa at Iowa City, from which he was graduated with 
the June class of 1876. He immediately located for practice at 
Bloomfield and on July ist of the same year he became a member 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 69 

of the firm of Trimble, Carruthers & IVimble. On January i, 1882, 
he removed to Keokuk as assistant general attorney for the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railroad, a position which he has ever since 
filled. He is known to his colleagues as a lawyer of extensive read- 
ing and detailed knowledge of the fine points of the law and as a 
man who spares neither time nor pains in securing the rights of his 
clients and in safeguarding their interests in every possible way. In 
addition to his practice as a lawyer he is also acting as president of 
the Bloomfield State Bank, bringing his knowledge of financial and 
commercial conditions to bear upon the management of that institu- 
tion. - . 

On the 5th of October, 1877, Mr. Trimble married Miss Nannie 
J. Leech, of Bloomfield, and to this union has been born a daughter, 
Agnes. Mr. Trimble was a strong advocate of democratic princi- 
ples until the adoption of the silver plank in the platform of that 
party, when he became an independent democrat. He holds party 
considerations to be secondary in government and men and measures 
to be of first importance. He is a well-known member of the 
Masonic fraternity, being a Knight Templar. In his life he prac- 
tices the principles of brotherly kindness, for which the Masonic 
craft has always stood. He has won prosperity in his profession 
and has gained the good will of all who know him. 



LEE FOSTER. 

Lee Foster is one of the prosperous farmers of the county, operat- 
ing a valuable farm situated on sections 8 and 9, Pleasant Ridge town- 
ship. His birth occurred in Henry county, Iowa, April 13, 1858, and 
his parents were N. P. and Delilah (Moberly) Foster, who came 
from Highland county, Ohio. The father was born in 1822 and 
passed away at the ripe old age of eighty-four and a half years, hav- 
ing long survived his wife, who died when quite a young woman, in 
1865. In i8c;o they settled in Henry county, Iowa, and there built a 
log cabin, which remained the family residence for many years and 
where the children were reared. Rachel, the oldest child, married 
W. A. Hutchinson, a farmer of Henry county, Iowa, and has now 
passed away. Sarah is the wife of Charles Delang, an agriculturist of 
Lee county. Emily is the wife of Joe Goodie, a farmer of Lee 
county. John farms at Bloomfield, Iowa. Lee is the next in order of 
birth. Addie is now Mrs. J. Binford and lives at Fort Collins, 



70 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Colorado, where her husband is engaged in business. Delilah is the 
wife of Charles Hill, a farmer of Nebraska. Two children passed 
away in infancy. 

Lee Foster received the excellent training in agriculture common 
to sons of pioneer farmers, as from early childhood he assisted in the 
work of the homestead. His education was that afforded by the dis- 
trict schools of the neighborhood. He has found agriculture a con- 
genial occupation and has followed it continuously. He understands 
the methods of cultivation adapted to this region and his crops are 
abundant and of such qualitv as bring a good price upon the market. 
His success as a farmer is based upon experience, good judgment and 
the willingness to utilize any new discoveries of value. 

Mr. Foster was married in 1885 to Miss Emma Shelledy, who was 
born April 17, 1865. They have two children, the older being Clyde 
Newton, who was born November 8, 1886, and is now secretary of the 
township school board. He married Miss Elbertine Hampton on 
the 14th of January, 191 1. The daughter, Ola J., was born on the 4th 
of July, 1888, and is now the wife of Carl Carden, a farmer of Henry 
countv, bv whom she has one son, William Foster, whose birth oc- 
curred May 2, 1913. Mr. Foster and his family belong to the Meth- 
odist Protestant church and rank among those who in every way 
possible labor for the moral as well as the material upbuilding of 
their community. 



REV. J. M. GLICK. 



Rev. |. M. Click is pastor of the Presbyterian church of West 
Point, which is the oldest church of that denomination in the state 
of Iowa. He was born in Holt county, Missouri, June 9, 1857, and 
is a son of Rev. Daniel and Barbara (Miller) Click, who went to 
Missouri in the spring of 1857 from Virginia. The father was a 
native of the Old Dominion, born January 27, 1824, and his life 
record covering the intervening years to the 24th of July, 189 1, when 
death called him. He was a minister of the Dunkard church for 
more than twenty-five years and was a prominent factor in the up- 
building of the communitv in which he lived along various lines 
contributing most largely to its moral development. He wedded 
Barbara Miller, who was born in Virginia, November 4, 1830, and 
died September 15, 1861. By this marriage he had three children, 
two of whom are living: Rev. J. M. Click, of West Point; and John 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 71 

D., of St. Joseph, Missouri. After losing his first wife the father 
married again and by the second union had two children, both of 
whom still survive. 

Rev. J. M. Click supplemented his public-school training by 
study in the Missouri V^alley College at Marshall, Missouri, and 
also spent one year in a theological seminary at Lebanon, Tennessee. 
He won his Bachelor of Arts degree from the former institution 
and soon after his graduation from the Missouri Valley College 
entered upon the active work of the ministry, to which he has devoted 
his life, preaching in northern Missouri until 1902. He was pastor 
of the Presbyterian church at Mountain View for six years and 
then accepted a call to the pastorate of the church at Salem, Mis- 
souri, where he remained for four years. He removed from Salem 
to West Point in the spring of 1913 and entered upon the work of 
the ministry here as pastor of the oldest Presbyterian church in the 
state of Iowa. He has done good work wherever he has been located. 
He is an earnest speaker, is most zealous for his cause and has been 
the means of promoting the substantial growth of the church work 
in the different localities where he has labored. He belongs also 
to the Odd Fellov\'s society and to the Knights and Ladies of Security, 
while his political allegiance is given to the democratic party. 



ASAPH BUCK. 



For the past twenty-six years Asaph Buck has been successfully 
engaged in the wholesale grocery business at Keokuk as president of 
the Buck-Reiner Company. His birth occurred in Patriot, Switzer- 
land county, Indiana, on the 31st of August, 1844, his parents being 
Sherman A. and Urainia H. (Hicks) Buck, both of whom are de- 
ceased. In the spring of 1847 the family removed to Henry county, 
Iowa, settling on a farm. 

Asaph Buck, who is the only survivor of a family of five children, 
remained in Henry county, this state, until seventeen years of age, 
aiding in the work of the home farm and also attending the district 
schools intermittently. In the spring of 1862 he went to Van Buren 
county and for one year devoted his attention to the work of the 
fields. On the ist of April, 1863, he came to Keokuk, Iowa, and for 
a time worked at any and every honorable employment that pre- 
sented itself. In May, 1864, he enlisted as a private in Company C, 
Forty-fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and did guard duty in Ten- 



72 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

nessee until the expiration of his term of enlistment, which covered 
one hundred days, being mustered out of service at Keokuk. 

On the 17th of November, 186c;, Mr. Buck became a porter in 
the wholesale grocery establishment of Kellogg, Berge & Company, 
continuing with this concern for a period of five years or until 1870. 
when he embarked in the retail grocery business under the firm name 
of Buck& Huxley. In the spring of 1872 he sold out his business and 
returned to the firm of Kellogg, Berge & Company, purchasing an 
interest therein. For ten years he was a traveling salesman for this 
house and for six years acted as buyer and manager. In February, 
1888. he disposed of his interest in the firm and formed the corpo- 
ration of Buck-Reiner Company, of which he has served as president 
continuously since. The concern has enjoyed a steady growth under 
his able direction and he has long been numbered among the pros- 
perous and representative merchants of Keokuk. 

On the 3d of December, 1865, Mr. Buck was united in marriage 
to Miss Sarah Struthers, of Keokuk, by whom he had six children, 
two of whom survive, namely: Alfred E., who acts as vice president 
of the Buck-Reiner Company; and Elsie C. He is a republican 
in politics and has served his fellow townsmen in a number of official 
positions. He was alderman from the first ward for three consec- 
utive terms or for six years, from 1882 to 1888, and for two years held 
the office of city treasurer. In 1898 he was made postmaster and 
throughout the following eight years ably discharged the duties de- 
volving upon him in that connection. His religious faith is that of 
the Unitarian church, while fraternally he is identified with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. The period of his residence in 
Keokuk covers more than a half century and his record is that of 
one of its most esteemed and leading citizens. 



SAMUEL HOUSTON. 



Samuel Houston, deceased, was an honored pioneer settler of Lee 
county and for many years was a prominent, leading and influential 
farmer of Denmark township, making his home on section 35, where 
he owned, developed and improved a good farm. He was a native 
son of New England, his birth having occurred in Hillsboro countv, 
New Hampshire, in 1815, his parents being Ira and Elizabeth (Epps) 
Houston. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 73 

In his twenty-first year Samuel Houston came west to the terri- 
tory of Iowa and settled in Lee county, which was then a frontier 
district. He purchased a claim, on which some improvements had 
been made, and the following year he was joined by his parents, who 
settled upon an adjoining property. With them Samuel Houston 
made his home until 1848, when he completed arrangements for 
having a home of his own by his marriage to Miss Catherine Hornby. 
He secured one hundred and si.xty-five acres of land and improved 
this property, which is now owned by his son Harry W. Houston. He 
worked diligently and persistently year by year, transforming the 
tract into highly cultivated fields and adding many mode'rn improve- 
ments. His methods of farming were at once practical and pro- 
gressive and his energy resulted in the production of excellent crops. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Houston were born seven children. 
Annie M., who was born in March, 1 849, became the wife of William 
L. Morgan and died in 191 2. Her husband still survives, now mak- 
ing his home in Phillipsburg, Kansas, at the age of eighty-two years. 
Camilla J., born in May, 1851, is the widow of H. S. Dearing, who 
died in Missoula, Montana, in June, 1913. She is now a resident of 
Missoula. Charles T., born in July, 1856, makes his home at Clar- 
inda, Iowa. Edward C, born in July, 1 858, resides at Prosser, Wash- 
ington. Harry W. is the next of the family and is mentioned else- 
where in this volume. Carrie, born in January, 1864, became the 
wife of Rev. H. L. Henn, now of Denmark, but her death occurred 
in January, 1900. Arthur S., born in February, 1867, completes 
the family. 

Samuel Houston was a republican, joining that party upon its 
organization and remaining thereafter an active supporter of its 
principles to the time of his demise. He and his wife were consistent 
and faithful members of the Congregational church at Denmark. 
They joined that church on its organization and thus were active in 
forming the oldest church of that denomination in Iowa. Their 
lives, ever upright and honorable, won for them high regard and 
unqualified confidence. Their years were fraught with good deeds 
and wherever they were known they were justly held in high esteem 
and gained the friendship of all with whom they were brought in 
contact. The father of Mr. Houston of this review was also a native 
of Hillsboro county, born in 1786, and his wife's birth there occurred 
in 1792. They were parents of two sons and four daughters, all of 
whom married and settled in Iowa, either in Lee or adjoining coun- 
ties. The family came to this state in 1837, making an overland 
trip with teams, being two months upon the road. The trip was an 



74 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

arduous one, but they possessed the courage that animated the pioneers 
who laid the foundation for Iowa's present greatness and prosperity. 
They were members of the Congregational church and Ira Houston, 
who possessed considerable musical talent, acted as choir leader in 
the early days. 



JAMES KENNEDY. 

Agriculture is the leading industry of Iowa and James Kennedy, 
a well known farmer and stock raiser residing on section 29, Cedar 
township, this county, is one of the up-to-date and progressive men 
engaged in the production of crops. He owns three hundred acres 
of fine land, which his father entered from the government and which 
is now a finely improved place. 

Mr. Kennedy was born in Marion township, April 12, 1844, a 
son of josiah and Julia (Scott) Kennedy, the former born in Casey 
county, Kentucky, in January, 1817. His parents were John and 
Mary (Vandever) Kennedy, the former a native of Virginia and a 
son of a Revolutionary soldier. In 181 2 when a young man of about 
twentv-two John Kennedv was united in marriage in Kentucky to 
Miss Vandever, who was born in 1790 in Surry county. North Car- 
olina. They remained in the Bluegrass state until 1828, when a re- 
moval was made to Morgan county, Illinois, where John Kennedy 
died. In 1842 his widow and children came to this county, which 
remained her home until her death, which occurred January 16, 
1864. She was buried in a private cemetery near her home. In her 
youth she was a member of the Baptist church, but united with the 
Christian denomination after her arrival in this county. Her son 
Josiah was the third in order of birth in the family of five children, 
the two eldest being daughters and the two younger ones sons. All 
have now passed away. 

Josiah Kennedy and Miss Julia Scott were married in Scott 
county, Illinois, about 1838, the license for their wedding being the 
first one issued in that county. The bride and her twin sister, who 
were born en route while her parents were removing from Adair 
countv, Kentuckv, to Morgan county, Illinois, lived to be over sev- 
enty years of age. The family were members of the Christian church. 
Of the nine children born to Josiah Kennedy and wife, five passed 
away in infancv and the three living besides the subject of this review 
are: Mrs. Welch, the widow of the Rev. James Welch, who resides at 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 75 

Argonia, Kansas; Mrs. Jewell, a widow living at Bonaparte, Jowa; 
and Mrs. William J. Dinsmore, of Cedar township. The father 
passed away July 26, 1891, upon the home farm and his demise was 
regretted by a host of friends. 

James Kennedy was reared in this county and has always made it 
his home. He secured his education at Howe's school in Mount 
Pleasant, Iowa, and after putting aside his te.xt-books devoted him- 
self to the cultivation of the fields. After his father's death he 
bought out the other heirs to the homestead which he now owns. It 
is a tract of one hundred and twenty acres of fertile land and pro- 
duces excellent crops. He has bought other land and now owns alto- 
gether three hundred acres. In addition to his farming operations, 
he is identified with "the other business interests as president of the 
Farmers & Traders Savings Bank at Hillsboro, Iowa, one of the 
substantial and reliable financial institutions of Henry county. 

Mr. Kennedy was married July 4, 1872, to Miss Eliza Dawson, 
who was born in Lee county in 1841^, a daughter of Peyton and 
Ellen (Stoddard) Dawson. Her parents were married in 1842 in 
Lee county, her father having come here in 1840 from Shelby county, 
Kentucky. Mrs. Kennedy has three brothers and three sisters living 
as follows: Linza, of Kansas City; Lucinda, of Mount Pleasant; 
Commodore, of La Crew; Mrs. Isadore Newsam, residing near 
Mount Hamill ; Sherman, living on the old homestead where his par- 
ents passed away and where they lived for over sixty years; and Mrs. 
Minnie Belle Druse, of Revere, Missouri. Wesley B. died in June, 
1914, at the Graham Hospital in Keokuk. Five others died in 
infancy. Mrs. Kennedy has always lived in this county and has wit- 
nessed many changes which have made for the prosperity and wel- 
fare of the locality. She has become the mother of eight children, all 
of whom were born in the log house upon the home farm. They are 
as follows: May, who was born May 30, 1873, is now the wife of 
E. C. Mahler, formerly of Bonaparte, Iowa, but now a resident of 
Poison, Montana, and a carpenter by trade, by whom she has four 
children, two sons and two daughters. Bessie, born April 28, 18715. 
is now the wife of J. C. Beach, a farmer residing in Oskaloosa, Iowa, 
and they have two sons and two daughters. Jess9, born May 21, 
1876, died of disease while a member of Company G, Fiftieth Iowa 
Volunteer Infantry in the Spanish-American war. Viola Belle, born 
March 30, 1878, is the wife of Tyler Hixson, a farmer residing near 
Hillsboro and they have three sons and two daughters. William, 
born May 16, 1879, is a veteran of the Spanish-American war, having 
been a member of Company I, Fourteenth United States Infantry, 



76 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

and participating in the battle of Manila, where he was wounded. 
He married Julia Sullivan, of Butte, Montana, by whom he has a 
son and daughter. James B., born February 2, 1881, is a farmer of 
Primrose, Iowa. He married Miss Ruth Frarv, bv whom he has a 
daughter and two sons. Edgar Dwight, born December 7, 1883, is 
a farmer residing near Hillsboro. He married Miss Martie Ranson, 
by wh(Mn he has two sons and one daughter. Katie Ellen, born 
March 12, 1887, is the wife of Archie Holmes and the mother of a 
son. 

Mrs. Kennedy is a consistent member of the Christian church. 
Mr. Kennedy gives his political allegiance to the republican party 
and has served for thirty-one years as township assessor, as county 
surveyor for two terms and for a time as township clerk. He was 
elected justice of the peace but did not qualify. Fraternally he belongs 
to John R. Jordan Post, G. A. R., at Hillsboro, thus keeping up the 
associations of the Civil war. He was a member of Company E, 
Forty-fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry and served with honor, being 
mustered out with his regiment with the rank of orderly sergeant. In 
times of peace he manifests the same patriotism that compelled him 
to offer his life if need be for the defense of the Union, and his ex- 
ample as a citizen is one well worthy of emulation. 



ALBERT DELAMERE THOMAS. 

Albert Delamere Thomas, foundryman and inventor and an old- 
time business man of Keokuk, was born at Springboro, Warren 
county, Ohio, September 28, 1845. His father, Webster L. Thomas, 
was born in Adams county, Pennsylvania, and came of Quaker an- 
cestry. When a boy he removed to Springboro, Ohio, where he 
learned and followed the wagon maker's trade. In 1851 he came to 
Keokuk but in the same year returned to Ohio. The latter part of 
his life was spent in retirement from business, his home being in 
East Liberty, where he passed away in April, 1907. He belonged to 
the Masonic fraternity and in his political faith was a republican, 
joining the party in the early days of its existence. He was married 
in Springboro, Ohio, about 1843, to Miss Ellen Vail, who was born 
in Middletown, Butler county, Ohio, a daughter of Aaron Vail, 
whose father was one of the founders of Middletow^n, Ohio. The 
Vails came from Normandy and after representatives lived for some 
time in England and Wales a branch was established on American 
soil, settlement being made in New Jersey by three brothers of the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 77 

name, who crossed the Atlantic to establish their homes in what is 
now the United States. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Webster L. 
Thomas were three children, Albert Delamerc, Edwin Aaron and 
Rolla Forrest, the last named now a resident of Ohio. 

During a brief period in his boyhood Albert D. Thomas was a 
resident of Warren county, Ohio. He was about six years of age 
when, in 1851, the family came to Keokuk, but at the end of nine 
months they returned to the Buckeye state, settling at East Liberty, 
Logan county, where he attended one of the old-time schools such 
as were found upon the frontier. During vacation periods he assisted 
his father in the work of the farm and when a youth of but nine 
years he aided in getting out timber and clearing the land. The 
winter months were devoted to the acquirement of an education until 
he reached the age of seventeen. It was soon after this that he oflfered 
his services to the government in defense of the Union cause, enlist- 
ing on the 4th of July, 1863. He went to the front as a private of 
Company B, Eighty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he 
served until honorably discharged July 3, 1865, at Camp Chase, 
Ohio. He was on duty with the middle department under General 
Hentzleman. 

At the close of the war Mr. Thomas returned to the north and 
resumed farming for a year. He then learned silversmithing and 
engraving and in 1868 he came to Keokuk, where he followed his 
trade in the employ of George D. Mann, a jeweler, for one year. 
He then became associated with S. S. Vail, a pioneer foundryman 
of Keokuk and his uncle, under whose directions he thoroughly 
learned the business, gaining practical knowledge of its management 
and control in every department. When his uncle retired Mr. 
Thomas became connected with William Andrus, Joseph Loeffler 
and Thomas Hartley, foundrymen, carrying on business on Fourth 
street, and remained with that firm until 1878, when he branched 
out for himself, forming a partnership with John Huiskamp in the 
sewing machine business. This partnership was continued until 1884, 
when they discontinued. Ayear or two later Mr. Thomas rented 
the original structure on the site of his present building, and engaged 
in the foundry business for himself. With this he has since been 
identified. He is also well known as an inventor, having produced 
many useful original devices. Fifteen years ago he turned the man- 
agement of the foundry business over to his sons and went to Boston, 
being sent by the Verstrey-Grant Shoe Company of St. Louis. Mak- 
ing his headquarters in Boston, he manufactured a machine that is 
known as the Union Staple Reenforcing machine. At the end of 



78 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

1899 he returned to Keokuk and contracted with the Garton-Daniels 
Company, electricians, with whom he continued for a year. At the 
end of that time he returned to the old shop and again assumed charge 
of the business, giving little time to inventions. For a time he was 
with the Scott Alanufacturing Company and afterward went to In- 
dianapolis, where he was with the Pope-Waverly Manufacturing 
Company until 1907, in which year he again came to Keokuk. He 
possesses a marvelous technical and practical knowledge of mechanics 
and has displayed marked ingenuity not only in operating various 
plants but also in bringing forth new and original ideas that have 
taken tangible form in successful inventions. 

Mr. Thomas was married, in Keokuk, on the 4th of November, 
1869, to Miss Ella Matilda Brown, of this city, a daughter of James 
H. and Rosanna M. (Martin) Brown. The children of this mar- 
riage were: Mary, deceased; Henry W., of Keokuk; Edna M., the 
wife of Dr. William J. Harter, of Keokuk; Charles M., who died 
in boyhood; and William M., master mechanic with the Purity 
Oats Company of Keokuk. 

Mr. Thomas" memory goes back over the lapse of years to the 
period when this was largely a frontier district in which the work of 
progress and civilization had been scarcely begun. He recalls that 
on one Sunday morning in 1851, when the water was very high, his 
father took the family on a ferry boat and made his way through 
the streets of Churchville, now known as Alexandria. Mr. Thomas 
played in the brush all around the site of his present shop. He has 
lived to see marvelous changes as the work of progress and improve- 
ment has been carried forward, transforming this region from a 
pioneer district into one of the populous and prosperous sections 
of the state. 



CHRIS HAFFNER. 



Chris Haffner is a most progressive and public-spirited citizen. 
He resides in Donnellson and takes a most active part in promoting 
progress and upbuilding along various lines for the benefit of the 
communitv. He is especially a moving spirit in county alifairs. He 
was born in West Point township, February 10, 1867, a son of Walter 
J. Hafifner, also a native of this county, born in Franklin township, 
October at;, 1841. He made farming his life work and from birth 
to death continued his residence on the old homestead farm in West 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 79 

Point township. As the years progressed his well directed efforts 
brought him substantial success, and he became the owner of four 
hundred acres, which property is still owned by his sons. He mar- 
ried Magdalen Graeber, who was born near Franklin Station, in 
Charleston township, in 1848 and is now living with her son. The 
Haffner family is of German origin. The grandfather was Chris- 
topher Haft'ner, who left his native land of Germany in 1838, cross- 
ing the Atlantic to America. Lee county became his destination, 
and he cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers long before the admis- 
sion of the state into the Union. He was married ere he left the 
fatherland and was accompanied to this country by his wife, while 
si.\ of his brothers also took up their residence in Iowa at the same 
time. Christopher Haffner lived to the ripe old age of eighty-six 
years. 

His grandson and namesake, who is now a well-known resident 
of Donnellson, was educated in the country schools and in a German 
school at Franklin, pursuing his studies to the age of sixteen years. 
He afterward worked upon the home farm until he reached the age 
of twenty-three and in 1890 removed to Donnellson, where he became 
connected with a flour mill, devoting his attention to that business 
until 1897. He then turned his attention to the real estate and insur- 
ance business and has secured a large clientage. He writes a con- 
siderable amount of insurance annually and at the same time he deals 
quite extensively in farm lands and in town property, having nego- 
tiated many important realty transfers during the seventeen years 
which he has devoted to this business. He is thoroughly conversant 
with property values and knows what is upon the market, so that he 
is able to make profitable sales and judicious investments for his 
patrons. 

On the 2ist of March, 1893, Mr. Haffner was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Molly Wagner, of Montrose, and they have two chil- 
dren, Leona and Alberta M., aged respectively twenty and eleven 
years, the younger being now in school. The family attend the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Haffner belongs also to the Knights of Pythias lodge and 
the Modern Woodmen camp. His political support is given to the 
democratic party, and he has been quite active in local politics, serv- 
ing for fourteen years as city assessor. He has also done important 
work for the county as secretary of the Fair Association, and he has 
been most active in planning for and conducting the fairs, which 
are a notable and attractive annual event of Donnellson. The stu- 
dent of history cannot carry his investigations far into the annals of 



80 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Lee county without learning that the Haffner family has long been 
prominently and helpfully connected with the work of public 
progress. The efforts instituted by the grandfather were continued 
by the father and are now being carried on still farther by Chris 
Haffner, who is justly accounted one of the representative and enter- 
prising citizens of his community. 



JOHN COSGROVE. 

On the pages of memory the name of no man is written more 
indelibly than that of John Cosgrove, who was one of the well known 
and highly respected merchants and business men of Keokuk. Self- 
made in the truest and best sense of the term, he proved both the 
architect and builder of his own fortune. He was born in Belfast, 
Ireland, November ii, 1847, but in the succeeding spring was 
brought to America by his parents, who, crossing the country to the 
Mississippi valley, settled in St. Louis. Much of his boyhood, how- 
ever, was spent upon the old home farm in Hancock county, Illinois, 
and there he attended the district schools and worked in the fields 
through the summer months. 

When sixteen years of age Mr. Cosgrove came to Keokuk and 
from that time until his demise was dependent entirely upon his own 
resources. He first secured employment in the hardware establish- 
ment of Weber & Company and by thorough and conscientious work 
he mastered the details of this business and gradually advanced step 
by step, increasing responsibilities being given over to him from 
time to time. For sixteen years he was traveling salesman with that 
house and in 1884 he became a partner and vice president. He re- 
mained in that connection until his demise. In his path there arose 
obstacles and difiiculties at different times, but these were overcome 
by persistent effort. When one avenue of advancement seemed closed 
he sought out an(jther path which would bring him to the desired 
goal. He felt that industry would win and upon that broad and 
safe foundation he builded his success, winning for himself in time a 
place among the representative and valued business men of his 
adopted city. 

On the loth of April, 1874, Mr. Cosgrove was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary C. Gregg, a daughter of M. Gregg, who was a pioneer 
merchant of Keokuk. They had a family of seven children, namely: 
Cecelia, the wife of Louise Culkin, of Carthage, Illinois; John Cle- 



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HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 83 

meat; Elizabeth; Stella; Hugh Barnard; Henry Edward; and 
Harriet. 

The religious faith of Mr. Cosgrove was that of the Catholic 
church and he was also a member of the Knights of Columbus, join- 
ing De La Salle Council, No. 619, upon its organization. He also 
became a member of Keokuk Lodge, No. 106, B. P. O. E., and be- 
longed to the Travelers Protective Association. At one time he was 
president of the Keokuk branch and was local secretary and treas- 
urer of the latter organization. He likewise became a charter mem- 
ber of the Keokuk Club. He took a very active part in the work of 
the Catholic Knights of America and was state delegate to the na- 
tional convention held in Philadelphia. He was a member of the 
building committee of St. Francis Catholic church at Fourth and 
High streets and did all in his power to further the cause of the 
parish. In politics he was a democrat and at one time was a candi- 
date for alderman but met defeat in a ward strongly republican. 
His life might w'ell serve as a source of inspiration and encourage- 
ment to others, showing what may be accomplished when one has 
the will to dare and to do. He had no assistance at the outset of his 
career nof in later life, but gradually he worked his way upward 
and the qualities which he employed to bring about his advancement 
are such as may be cultivated by any. He was not content to remain, 
however, as others do in the position where fate had seemed to place 
them, and, stimulated by a commendable ambition, he advanced 
step by step until he had reached a commendable place among the 
more capable and prosperous business men of this city. He passed 
away September 28, 191 2. 



JOHN C. KOLLER. 



John C. KoUer is a well-known and highly respected farmer and 
stockman, residing on section 21, Denmark township, where he owns 
and cultivates two hundred and forty acres of land. He has greatly 
improved this property and in 1912 he erected his present residence, 
which is one of the fine country homes in Lee county. He makes 
stock raising a feature of his place and is regarded as one of the pro- 
gressive business men of the township. His birth occurred on the 
David Koller farm in Denmark township, February 5, 1875. Fur- 
ther mention of his father, David Koller, is made on another page 
of this volume. 

Vol. n— 5 



84 • HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

On the i)ld homestead the son was reared in the usual manner of 
farm lads, dividing his time between the work of the fields, the duties 
of the schoolroom and the pleasures of the playground. After mas- 
tering the common branches of learning taught in the district schools 
he spent several terms as a student in the Denmark Academy. Al- 
though he remained at home through the period of his minority, 
he began working for others when si.xteen years of age and was em- 
ployed as a farm hand in the neighborhood for six years. During 
that time he carefully saved his earnings, for he was ambitious to 
own a farm, and when he had acquired sufficient capital he made 
investment in property, becoming owner of one hundred and ten 
acres of his present place, which was then known as the Joy farm. 
He has been very successful and his prosperity is attributable entirely 
to his own industry and intelligently directed ettort. As he has suc- 
ceeded he has extended the boundaries of his place until he now has 
two hundred and forty acres of rich and arable land, the fields 
responding to the care and cultivation which he bestows upon them. 
He makes a specialty of handling full-blooded and high-grade stock. 
He has several full-blooded Polled Angus cattle and Poland China 
hogs and his stockraising is one of the profitable features of his busi- 
ness. He has erected commodious and substantial barns and sheds, 
furnishing ample shelter for grain and stock. He uses the latest 
improved farm machinery to facilitate the work of the fields and 
has made abundant and comfortable provision for his family in the 
erection of his beautiful home, which is one of the fine farm prop- 
erties of Lee county. 

Li April, 1900, Mr. Roller was united in marriage to Miss 
Helena Christensen, a daughter of Jacob Christensen, of Denmark, 
who is a poultrv fancier and raiser. He is a native of Denmark, 
and has resided in this county for thirty-five or forty years. Mrs. 
Roller was born at her present home, was reared in this county and 
attended the Denmark Academy. For several terms she successfully 
engaged in teaching. By her marriage she has become the mother 
of four children: Lillian, twelve years of age, who was graduated 
from the eighth grade in the Denmark schools in 19 14; Esther, nine 
years of age; Earl, who is in his second year; and Frank, in his first 
year. 

Mr. Roller belongs to the Modern Woodmen camp of Den- 
mark, and since age has conferred upon him the right of franchise 
he has voted with the republican party, giving earnest support to its 
principles, yet never seeking office as a reward for party fealty. He 
is a trustee of the Denmark Academv board and also of the Con- 



HISl^ORY OF LEE COUNTY 85 

gregational church of Denmark, in which he has membership. He 
has seen an active, useful and upright life, and the many sterling 
traits of character which he has displayed have been the leading 
features in winning him his success and in gaining for him the high 
regard of those with whom he has come in contact. 



JOHN P. HORNISH. 



John P. Hornish, who was a well-known lawyer of Keokuk, was 
born in Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Novem- 
ber i8, 1823, his parents being Joseph B. and Hannah (Kuntz) 
Hornish. His more specific literary education was acquired in the 
Washington and Jeliferson College, from which he was graduated. 
He then entered upon the study of law in Greensburg, with Joseph 
B. Kuntz, a distant relative, as his preceptor. After mastering many 
of the principles of jurisprudence he was admitted to the bar in 1849 
and in 1850, in connection with his brother, Joseph, came to Keokuk. 
Here he entered upon the active practice of his profession, and he 
was also interested with his brother in real estate. As the years went 
on he became more and more closely connected with the substantial 
upbuilding of the city and was one of the original stockholders of 
the Water Power Company, associated in that enterprise with Judge 
Mason of Burlington. His plans were very carefully formulated 
and promptly executed and from the beginning he seemed to recog- 
nize the utmost possibility for accomplishment in any direction. His 
efforts were largely of a character that contributed to public progress 
and prosperity as well as to individual success, and his name is closely 
interwoven with the record of development here. 

On May 3, 1855, Mr. Hornish was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha C. Plumer, a daughter of John C. and Maria (Elliott) 
Plumer, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Hornish was 
a student in the Washington Seminary and there met the man to 
whom she gave her hand in marriage. The children of this union 
were as follows: John, who is now an attorney, practicing in Keo- 
kuk; Elliott, who is living in Henry county; Martha, at home; Wal- 
ter, deceased; George P., who is located in Missouri; Samuel, who 
died in infancy; and Phillip p., who is connected wMth railway inter- 
ests and lives in St. Louis. 

Mr. Hornish was a democrat in his political views. He stood 
as a high type of American manhood and citizenship and in every 



86 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

relation of life sought the welfare and upbuilding of city, state and 
nation. He was elected prosecuting attorney and proved most capa- 
ble and faithful in that office. He saw the possibilities along all 
lines which have contributed to the welfare of Keokuk and was 
active in establishing libraries, in organizing churches and founding 
schools. He was likewise interested in Rand Park and, in a word, 
he did everything he could for the good of the community. In the 
later years of his life he was president of the board of supervisors 
of Lee county. Both he and his wife belonged to the Presbyterian 
church and in its teachings were found the motive springs of his 
conduct. His course was ever honorable and he was continually 
reaching out a helping hand to assist others to climb upward. He 
was a member of Phi Delta Gamma, a college fraternity, and he 
never ceased to feel a deep interest in the friends and associates of 
his college days. On the i8th of September, 1874, he passed away 
and in his demise the community lost a good citizen. The respect 
which was entertained for him throughout the communitv was the 
logical result of a well spent life and of honorable and effective activ- 
ity for the public good. 



JOHN HENDERSON CRAIG. 

John Henderson Craig, deceased, was regarded by many as one 
of the ablest legal practitioners in the state of Iowa, his record reflect- 
ing credit and honor upon a profession which is regarded as the con- 
servator of life and liberty and of the rights and privileges of the 
individual. A native of Pennsylvania, his birth occurred Julv 31. 
1824, near Claysville, Washington county, his parents being Hugh 
and Hannah (Henderson) Craig. In his boyhood he attended the 
common schools and also studied under the tutelage of a pastor. 
When fifteen years of age he left home and after teaching for a vear 
continued his education in the West Alexander Academv of West 
Alexander, Pennsylvania, where he remained for four years. He 
afterward taught during the school year of 1845-6 and then entered 
the junior class of what was Washington College, now Washington 
and Jefferson College, from which he was graduated in 1848. Among 
the students of Washington and Jefferson during the time that Mr. 
Craig was there were James G. Blaine, Henrv A. Wise of Virginia 
and others who become national figures. Mr. Craig was known at 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 87 

college as "Honest John Craig" and paid the expenses of his course 
by tutoring in Latin and Greek. 

His father was very anxious that the son should make the study 
and practice of the law his life work and in accordance with the 
parental wish John H. Craig in due time entered the law office of 
T. M. T. McKennen, ex-secretary of the interior and ex-member of 
congress. Soon after this, however, his health became impaired and 
he went to Natchez, Mississippi, for the purpose of teaching in a 
female seminary and incidentally benefiting his health through the 
change in climate. Owing to an epidemic of vellow fever, however, 
he left there in 1853 and returned home, his health being fully re- 
stored in the meantime. Li the succeeding year he went to Wheeling, 
West Virginia, where he resumed the study of law, but soon after- 
ward his father died, and Mr. Craig returned home to settle up the 
estate. He next entered the law office of the Hon. William Mont- 
gomery, of Washington, Pennsylvania, congressman from that dis- 
trict, under whose direction he continued his studies for a year, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1856. 

His mother died in November of that year and Mr. Craig then 
decided to go west. The following spring witnessed his arrival in 
Keokuk for the purpose of visiting friends and while here he was 
induced to form a law partnership with Judge R. P. Lowe, afterward 
governor of Iowa, and John Noble, who became a general in the 
Union army during the Civil war and was secretary of the interior 
under President Benjamin Harrison's administration. In the fall of 
1857 t^his partnership was dissolved, Mr. Craig continuing in prac- 
tice, however, until 1888, when his health failed. During these years 
he was associated at different times in the practice of law with various 
attorneys, his last connection being that of senior partner in the firm 
of Craig, McCrearv & Craig. For many vears he continued in prac- 
tice in Keokuk and each year his reputation as one of the best and 
ablest representatives of the profession became more and more pro- 
nounced. He handled his cases with masterly skill and ability, read- 
ily recognizing the relation of cause and effect, and was seldom if ever 
at fault in the application of a legal principle. For thirty years he 
was attorney for the Iowa State Insurance Companv and made a spe- 
cial study of insurance law. The onlv political offices he ever held 
were those of city attorney and county attorney, to which he was 
elected upon the democratic ticket. He concentrated his attention 
upon his profession, and his devotion to his clients' interests became 
proverbial, yet he never forgot that he owed a still higher allegiance 
to the majesty of the law. When he became a partner of Judge Lowe, 



88 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

that gentleman had just built the home now occupied by Mrs. Craig 
as it was later bought bv Mr. Craig. 

On the 24th of December, 1B63, at Madison, Wisconsin, Mr. 
Craig was united in marriage to Miss Alice Read, a daughter of 
the Hon. Daniel Read, who was connected with the Indiana State 
University and later was president of the Wisconsin State University, 
while at the time of his death he occupied the presidency of the State 
University of Missouri and was instrumental in making that institu- 
tion a coeducational school. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Craig were born 
four children: Daniel Read, now living in Aurora, Illinois; Bertha 
Read, who is instructor in history in the Keokuk high school; Theo- 
dore Alexander, who is engaged in the practice of law in Keokuk; 
and Hugh Henderson, an attorney of Riverside, California, and a 
member of the firm of Collier & Craig, the senior partner being 
William Collier, who read law in the office of J. H. Craig and was 
later associated with him in the firm of Craig, Collier & Craig. Upon 
the dissolution of this firm Mr. Collier went west and remembering 
the brilliant attainments of his former preceptor and partner ofifered 
to take the son, Hugh H. Craig, into partnership. The latter accepted 
the ofTer, went west and Collier & Craig is now one of the leading law 
firms in California. 

Mr. Craig provided his children with broad educational advan- 
tages and was always deeply interested in the cause of the schools, 
serving for about sixteen years as a member of the school board. He 
was also president of the old College of Phvsicians & Surgeons at Keo- 
kuk for a number of years. He held membership in the Westminster 
Presbyterian church, and his life was guided by the highest and most 
honorable principles. He never deviated from a course which he 
believed to be right between himself and his fellowmen and principle 
rather than policy always guided him in his conduct. He always 
used the talents with which nature endowed him and in the course of 
years won well merited prominence as a distinguished member of 
the Iowa bar. 



J. DAVID HAMILTON. 

J. David Hamilton is now living retired in Montrose. He is num- 
bered among the veterans of the Civil war and his military 
record is one of which he has everv reason to be proud. A native 
son of Lee county, he was born on the old family homestead, five miles 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 89 

north of West Point, on the ist of June, 1840. The family removed 
to Montrose in 1850, returned to the farm in 1854 and again took up 
their abode in Montrose in 1859. The ancestry has long been repre- 
sented on the American continent. The great-grandfather was a sol- 
dier under General Washington in the Revolutionary war and the 
grandfather died in Canada, while serving as an American soldier in 
the War of 1812. 

The father, George G. Hamilton, was born in Virginia and mar- 
ried Sallie Johnson. Removing westward, he settled in Lee county, 
Iowa, where he became the owner of four hundred and forty acres of 
rich farming land. Finally he disposed of his farm property and 
turned his attention to merchandising. At all times he was an active, 
prominent and influential citizen of this section of the state. He 
gave his political allegiance to the democratic party and was chosen 
to represent his district in the Iowa general assembly. He died in 
1897, at the age of eighty-six years, and in his death the county lost 
one of its valued citizens and pioneer settlers. His first wife, who 
died upon the old homestead farm in 1845, left two children: J. 
David; and Louisa, who became the wife of Isaac Stevens and died 
in this countv in 1909. After losing his first wife George G. Ham- 
ilton wedded Susan Bronson and they became the parents of five 
children. 

While living at Montrose through the period of his youth J. 
David Hamilton spent the greater part of his time upon the old 
homestead farm and attended school in Pleasant Ridge township 
and in Montrose, pursuing his education through the winter months, 
while the summer seasons were devoted to the work of the fields. 
He was not quite twenty-one years of age when in May, 1861, he 
enlisted for service in the Civil war, being enrolled in the following 
July as-a private of Company D, Seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, 
under command of Captain Harper and Colonel Lauman. At the 
termination of his first period of enlistment of three years he veteran- 
ized at Pulaski, Tennessee. He was severely wounded in the battle 
of Lays Ferrv, Georgia. When he first attempted to join the army he 
went to the camp at Burlington and there was refused on account of 
his small stature, but his persistency at length won out and he was 
accepted. He did not know a man in the company when he joined 
but was soon promoted to the rank of corporal and at Corinth, Mis- 
sissippi, was made first sergeant. At Rome, Georgia, promotion to 
the rank of first lieutenant came to him and at Savannah, Georgia, 
he was advanced to the rank of captain, although he had previously 
commanded his company for some time before. 



90 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

After his enlistment Mr. Hamilton went to Jefferson barracks, St. 
Louis, and later to Iron Mountain. The first engagement in which 
he participated was at Belmont, Missouri, on the 7th of November, 
1 86 1, on which occasion the Seventh Iowa was badly cut up. two hun- 
dred or more men being captured, wounded or killed. His ne.xt 
engagement was at Fort Donelson, where the Seventh Iowa was the 
second regiment to go over the works. They then proceeded to 
Shiloh. taking part in the battle there, and afterward participated in 
the Corinth campaign under Halleck and in the battle of Corinth. 
Mr. Hamilton was afterward engaged on guard duty until May, 
1864. It was on the 15th of that month that he was wounded at Lays 
Ferry by a minie ball which struck him in the right leg. He was sent 
first to the field hospital, afterward to Chattanooga, later to Nash- 
ville and then on to St. Louis, where he spent some time in the bar- 
racks, and was then transferred to Keokuk. He recovered sufficiently 
to permit of his return to his regiment, which was then stationed at 
Rome, Georgia, being on the march to the sea. Later Captain Ham- 
ilton participated in the Grand Review at Washington, D. C, and 
was honorably discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, July 12, 1865, 
having served for four years and one day from the time of his enroll- 
ment. He weighed but ninety pounds while in the service. He was 
a brave and valiant soldier, never faltering in the performance of any 
duty, and the record which he made as an officer was most com- 
mendable, for he encouraged the men under him and inspired them 
with much of his own zeal and bravery. 

At the close of the war Mr. Hamilton returned home, where he 
spent sometime, and then went to Chicago, where he attended Bryant 
& Stratton's Commercial College. He next engaged in the real- 
estate business, in which he continued until the time of the great fire 
in that city in October, 1871, when he was burned out, losing every- 
thing. Just prior to the fire he had allowed his insurance in the Globe 
Insurance Company of London to lapse with the intention of taking 
out insurance in an American company. He continued his residence 
in Chicago from 1865 until 1909 and then returned to his native 
county, where he e.xpects to spend the evenings of his days. 

Mr. Hamilton was married, in Chicago, to Miss Nellie Johns 
and the only child of that marriage died at the age of three years. In 
1886 Mr. Hamilton was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Janet Batty, then of Chicago but formerly of New York. 

Mr. Hamilton is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and his 
wife belongs to the Protestant Episcopal church. He has been a life- 
long republican, never faltering in his allegiance to the party which 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 9i 

was the defense of the Union during the dark days of the Civil 
war and which has always been the party of reform and progress. 
In matters of citizenship he has ever been as true and loyal to his 
country as when he followed the old flag on the battlefields of the 
south. 



A. P. MEYER. 



A. P. Meyer, who since 191 1 has filled the office of county auditor 
in Lee county, is a native son of Fort Madison, born on the 9th of 
January, 1880. His parents were Joseph J. and Alida (Stolwyk) 
Meyer. The father a native of Germany, was born January 0, 1845, 
and in the summer of 1846 was taken to Fort Madison, then a little 
town on the Mississippi, of but minor commercial and industrial im- 
portance. In this state he was united in marriage to Miss Stolwyk, 
who was born in Keokuk, Iowa, a daughter of Adrian Stolwyk, one of 
the pioneer residents of that city, where he located in the late '40s. 
Joseph J. Meyer is a harness maker by trade and has followed that 
pursuit throughout his entire life in order to provide for the support 
of himself and family. 

A. P. Meyer pursued his education in the parochial schools and in 
1897, when a youth of seventeen years, started to earn his own living 
in a clerical capacity in the courthouse. From 1901 until 1902 he was 
with the Santa Fe Railway Company and on the ist of January, 
1903, he became deputy auditor of Lee county, which position he con- 
tinuously filled until the ist of January, 191 1, when he entered upon 
his duties as auditor, to w^hich office he had been elected the previous 
fall. On the expiration of his first year's term he was reelected, so that 
he is the present incumbent in that office. For eleven years he has 
been connected with the auditor's office, seven years as deputy and 
about four years as auditor, and the record which he has made in this 
connection is most creditable. His duties are always discharged 
promptly, systematically and faithfully, and the record he has made 
has won him high encomiums from those who are familiar with his 
work. 

On the 29th of June, 1907, Mr. Meyer was united in marriage to 
Miss Pearl Wells, of West Point, Iowa, a daughter of Charles Wells, 
and they have one daughter, Ruth M. Mr. Meyer attends St. 
Joseph's Catholic church and holds membership with the Knights 
of Columbus. He is also identified with the Benevolent Protective 



92 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Order of Elks, the Moose, the Eagles and the Woodmen ot the 
World. The name of Meyer has been prominently associated with 
musical interests in Fort Madison for many decades, for Joseph J. 
Mever has been a member of the band for fiftv years and was its 
leader for an extended period. A. P. Meyer, inheriting the musical 
taste and talent of his father, also became a member of the band and 
has been its leader since 1902. He is famed as a cornetist and has 
done much choir and orchestra work as director. He is indeed a 
valuable addition to the musical circles of his native city and has 
done much to improve the public taste in this connection. 



JOHN R. KING. 



For thirty-seven years John R. King has been a resident of Keo- 
kuk, where he is now engaged in business as president and manager 
of the King Plumbing Company. He was born in Danville, Penn- 
sylvania, September iq, 1855, and was one of a family of six chil- 
dren, five of whom are now living, whose parents were Charles and 
Rebecca (Randolph) King. The father was a native of New Jersey 
and was descended from French Huguenot ancestors, who fled to 
America to escape persecution. Charles King was a blacksmith by 
trade and followed that pursuit for many years. He wedded Rebecca 
Randolph, a native of Pennsylvania, and both died in Danville, that 
state. 

John R. King was reared in Danville, where he pursued his edu- 
cation in the public and high schools. He was but twelve years of 
age, however, when he began earning his own living, working through 
the summer months and attending school in the winter seasons. In 
1870 he entered the employ of his uncle, M. S. Ridgeway, proprietor 
of a rolling mill, and began to roll rails for the Union Pacific and 
other railroads. As his skill and efficiency increased he was pro- 
moted from time to time and thus rose to the position of waterman, 
in charge of the thirty boilers of the establishment. His mechanical 
^skill developed year after year and he became familiar with many 
phases of mechanics. In 1873 he established a plumbing business in 
Danville, conducting it successfully for about five years. 

On the 20th of September, 1877, Mr. King was united in marriage 
to Miss Anna C. Antrim, and the following year he came to Keokuk, 
where two months later he was joined by his wife. They began 
keeping house at Tenth and High streets and have since made their 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 93 

home ill this city. After removing to the west Mr. King became 
foreman in the plumbing establishment of Sutton & Haldorf and 
later was employed by P. R. Sutton. In May, 1904, he organized 
the King Plumbing Company, of which he was elected president and 
manager, and so continues, with R. H. King as secretary. They 
are contractors for hot water and steam heating, sanitary plumbing, 
gas fitting, chandeliers, electrical supplies, electric wiring, sewers 
and tile and their business is now of large and gratifying proportions, 
having grown year by year. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. King have been born five sons and a daugh- 
ter, Norris Antrim, Roy Hammond, Harry Randolph, Paul Cowley, 
Charles Lavan and Hannah Hammond. The family is well known 
in Keokuk, where they have a large circle of warm friends. Mr. 
King is a republican in his political views and fraternally is con- 
nected with the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. His life has been one of industry and upon that 
foundation he has built his success, working his way steadily upward 
through his own efforts until he is now at the head of a substantial 
business enterprise of Keokuk, such as constitutes a gratifying feature 
in the development and growth of the city. 



ABRAHAM MARTIN HUTCHINSON. 

Abraham Martin Hutchinson was for years prominently identi- 
fied with the early commercial interests that used the Mississippi 
river as a public highway. He had a wide acquaintance, not only 
in the middle west, but also throughout the northwest, and he was 
captain of many of the famous old river boats running up and down 
the Mississippi river and its tributaries. He was born in Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1832, a son of Samuel Hutchinson. The , 
water seemed to have a fascination for him even in his boyhood days 
and, leaving home in early life, he entered upon an apprenticeship 
as a pilot on the Ohio river. In those days river conditions were 
vastly different from those of today and a pilot was a well-informed 
and capable man. For years Mr. Hutchinson w^as captain of boats 
on the running waters of the middle west, among them the famous 
steamer Phil Sheridan. His license was one of the broadest granted 
in those days, reading "Pilot of the Mississippi and its tributaries." 

In 1874 he came to Keokuk and later organized the corporation 
known as The Mississippi Coal & Ice Company. It remains in exist- 



94 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ence today with offices at the foot of Johnson street. Mr. Hutchin- 
son also organized the Mississippi Navigation Company, capitalized 
for twenty thousand dollars, but this concern went out of business as 
a result of the river commerce war. While actively connected with 
marine transportation interests they operated several barges and 
excursion boats, but when competition became so keen that passen- 
gers were carried by rival concerns free of charge Mr. Hutchinson 
thought it best to retire from the field. He was superintendent of 
the Northwestern Union Packet Company until after the competi- 
tive war and then ran a steamer, John Kyle, plying between St. 
Louis and New Orleans, this boat being the second largest on the 
river. It was eventually burned at New Orleans. For several years 
Mr. Hutchinson was upon that boat and he was one of the best known 
river men of the middle west. He was captain of many of the famous 
old river boats running up and down the Mississippi and its tribu- 
taries and was the hrst man to take a boat up the Yellowstone river, 
carrying soldiers on that trip to fight the Indians. There was no 
phase of river life with its connecting commercial interests unfamiliar 
to him and his life history, if written in detail, would give a vivid 
picture of the days when the greater part of freight and passenger 
traffic was transported over the river routes. 

Mr. Hutchinson was united in marriage to Miss Sarah |. Bald- 
win, a daughter of Samuel Baldwin, and they had four children: 
Charles A., who died October 27, 1909; James B.; Effie, the wife of 
George E. Marshall; and Maud S. The elder son was for years 
manager of The Mississippi Coal & Ice Company and was also a 
prominent member of the Republican Club of Keokuk, and exer- 
cised a wide influence in political afTairs. The father. Abraham 
M. Hutchinson, was also a stalwart republican, but never sought 
nor desired office. In religious faith he was a Presbyterian and was 
always loyal to the best interests of the community, co-operating 
heartily in many movements for material and mora! progress. He 
departed this life November 26, 1886, and his widow, who still sur- 
vives, now makes her home in Keokuk. 

James B. Hutchinson, the younger son, now secretary and gen- 
eral manager of The Mississippi Coal & Ice Company, was born in 
St. Paul, August 28, 1863, and when but six years of age was taken to 
St. Louis by his parents, Abraham M. and Sarah J. (Baldwin) 
Hutchinson. Several years later the family removed to Keokuk and 
after completing his education in the public schools he entered into 
business in connection with his father, taking charge of the same in 
1892. At length he disposed of the ice grounds, plant, etc., to the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 95 

water power company, but still maintains offices at the foot of John- 
son street. The name of Hutchinson has long figured prominently 
in connection with commercial interests and activity in Keokuk and 
the work instituted by the father was splendidly carried forward 
by the son until his interests were merged into those of the larger 
corporation which bought him out. His political indorsement has 
always been given to the democratic party, but the honors and emolu- 
ments of office have no attraction for him. 



THEODORE BRINCK. 

One is thoroughly unacquainted with the enterprising little city 
of West Point if they do not know of the Brinck department store 
there, of which Theodore Brinck of this review is the proprietor. 
He is both a well-known and popular business man of his section 
of the countv, esteemed because of his enterprise, his progressiveness 
and his thorough reliability. 

He was born January 17, 1861, in the town where he still makes 
his home, and is a son of Herman Brinck, of whom mention is made 
elsewhere in this volume. Reared and educated at West Point, he 
attended the parochial schools and in 1877, when a youth of sixteen 
years, took his place back of the counter and received thorough com- 
mercial training in his father's employ, remaining for eleven years 
as one of the salesmen in the store. He then purchased the business 
of which he has since been the active head. When he assumed con- 
trol the Brinck establishment was only a general store, but he quickly 
added other lines and for years has been proprietor of the only 
department store in Lee county. He today carries a full line of dry 
goods, ladies' suits and coats, clothing, millinery, ladies' and men's 
furnishings, carpets and rugs, groceries and queensware. Each 
department is well stocked and his reasonable prices, earnest desire 
to please his patrons and honorable business methods have secured 
for the house a very liberal and well-merited patronage. The store 
was located at the corner of the park in West Point twenty-five years 
ago and at that time occupied a building twenty-five by sixty feet, 
but in 1903 the building proved inadequate for the large and growing 
business and the present commodious building was erected — a brick 
structure fifty by one hundred and two feet, two stories in height 
and having a floor space of over ten thousand, square feet. The lower 
floor is used for dry goods, millinery, clothing and grocery depart- 



96 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ments, and the upper floor for glass and queensvvare, carpets, rugs, 
ladies' ready-to-wear departments and reserve stock. The storeroom 
is a handsome one, equipped with modern fixtures, well lighted and 
ventilated, and all goods are displayed in an attractive manner. Mr. 
Brinck has associated with him his three brothers, Bernard )., Wil- 
liam and Alois and his sister. Rose. This establishment would be 
a credit to a city many times the size of West Point. Mr. Brinck's 
long years of business experience has enabled him to know what the 
buying public needs and demands and he follows most progressive 
and enterprising methods in the conduct of his interests. Mr. 
Brinck is also a stockholder in the Farmers and Citizens State Bank 
at West Point, of which he is vice-president, and another line of 
activity in which he is deeply interested is that of music. For the 
past eleven years he has been the organist of St. Mary's church and 
adds much to the service through his ability in that connection. He 
has a very wide and favorable acquaintance throughout his part of 
the county and wherever he is known is justly ranked among the 
valued and representative citizens. 



CARL A. WEBER. 



Carl A. Weber holds a position of importance in the business 
world of Keokuk as president of the Weber, Kirch Company. He 
w^as born in Germany on the 24th of April, 1859, ^ son of Xavier 
Weber, also a native of Germany. 

Carl A. Weber was educated in the schools of his native land and 
came to the United States in 1876, when about seventeen vears of 
age. He made his way directly to Keokuk and became connected 
with the A. Weber CompanV, with whom he remained for many 
years. In 1900 he founded the firm of Weber, Kirch Companv and 
for the last three years he has given his entire attention to the afifairs 
of this concern. The company manufactures sheet metal goods and 
hardware specialties, selling to jobbers throughout the entire United 
States. They employ quite a large number of men and their com- 
mercial operations add not a little to the business prosperity of Keo- 
kuk. Aside from his connection with the active and successful man- 
agement of that business Mr. Weber has other important interests, 
being treasurer of the American Cement Machine Company of Keo- 
kuk, treasurer of the Fairview Realty Company and a stockholder 
and director of the Keokuk National Bank. He displavs sound busi- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 97 

ness judgment, tireless energy, keen perception and ability to plan 
and to perforin and has long been accorded a prominent position in 
the business circles of this city. He became one of the charter mem- 
bers of the old Business Men's Association and is now a member 
of the Keokuk Industrial Association. 

Mr. Weber married Miss Mary A. Meek, of Bonaparte, Iowa, on 
the 15th of May, 1889. Mrs. Weber received her early education in 
the public schools of her native city and later attended a convent 
at Milwaukee. She is much interested in social and church work 
and is one of the leaders in those lines in Keokuk. Mr. and Mrs. 
Weber are the parents of six children, as follows : Arthur J., twenty- 
three years of age; Marie C, twenty; Leonora, eighteen; Gertrude, 
fifteen; Alice, twelve; and Clare, aged nine years. Arthur ]. was 
for six years a student at St. Marys College, St. Marys, Kansas, and 
was graduated two years ago. Marie C. attended the public schools 
at Keokuk and supplemented her education thus acquired by six 
years' study at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and a year's special 
study at Chicago. Leonora is now in school at Prairie du Chien. The 
others are attending school in Keokuk. 

Mr. Weber is a Catholic in religious faith and holds member- 
ship in the church of St. Francis De Sales, of which he is a trustee, 
and he also belongs to the Knights of Columbus. He is interested 
in outdoor sports and is a member of the Keokuk Country Club. He 
has manifested the thoroughness and capacitv for detail which is one 
of the salient traits of the Teutonic race and this, united with his enter- 
prising business methods, has brought him success and also added ta 
the prosperity of the city of Keokuk. 



ARCHIE E. DICK. 



Archie E. Dick, a resident of Cedar township, this countv, was 
born on section 17 of the same township, on the 30th of March, 18715, 
a son of James and Margaret (McDonald) Dick and a grandson of 
William and Mary Dick. His father, James Dick, was born in the 
province of Connaught, Ireland, in May, 1835. In 1848, when about 
thirteen years of age, he came to the new world and located in Phili- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, but later removed to Illinois, remaining in 
that state about a year and a half, after which he came to Fort Madi- 
son, Lee county. He was one of the politicians of his time and took 
an active part in many campaigns. His wife was born in Quincy,, 



98 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Illinois, on the 25th of December, 1840, and was educated in Fort 
Madison, Iowa. She subsequently removed to Van Buren county 
with her parents and was there married. She passed away in Cedar 
township, this county, in 1908. She was the mother of nine children 
as follows: Charles, William T., Robert A., Archie E., Samuel, 
Martha, Helen, Ella and Mary. 

Archie E. Dick was given a good education, as he attended the 
Mount Pleasant Academy. Subsequently he taught school for three 
years, but later decided that farming offered better opportunities 
and assumed the management of his father's farm, which he has since 
been conducting most successfully. He operates one hundred and 
thirty-seven acres on section 17, Cedar township, carrying on mixed 
farming. His stock is of a good grade and this branch of his busi- 
ness has proven a very profitable one. 

Mr. Dick is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and stands for a high code of ethics. Fraternally he belongs 
to the Masonic order and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is 
a democrat, although he has not been very active in politics. He 
has, however, served as township trustee for six years and treasurer 
of the school board for thirteen years. He is especially interested in 
everything pertaining to the welfare of the public schools, as he 
realizes that a good system of education is the bulwark of a democ- 
racy. He has proven himself a man of good judgment and of unques- 
tioned integrity of character, and his place in the estimation of 
his fellowmen is a high one. 



STEPHEN S. WILSON. 

Stephen S. Wilson is one of that steadily decreasing company of 
veterans, who in their youth offered their strength and their lives if 
need be to secure the perpetuity of the LInion. He has resided in this 
county for twenty-four years and holds the unreserved respect of 
those who know him. His paternal grandfather, James F. Wilson, 
came from England and first settled in Virginia, being one of the 
early residents of that state and later removing to Kentuckv when it 
was on the western frontier. His son, James F., Jr., was born in Ken- 
tucky and was a farmer by occupation. He married Elizabeth Stew- 
art, likewise a native of the Bluegrass state, and later removed to 
Illinois, where both he and his wife passed away. Both were laid 
to rest at Carthage. 





ilK. AND ilRS. STEPHEN S. WILSON 



704431 



n 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 101 

Their son, Stephen S. Wilson, was born in the heart of the Blue- 
grass country, at Lexington, Kentucky, July 17, 1842, and spent the 
first six years of his life there. He was then taken by his parents to 
Hancock county, Illinois, where the father purchased land and where 
the subject of this review grew to manhood. He attended the public 
schools until he reached the age of seventeen, assisting his father on 
the home farm when not in school. When a youth of seventeen years 
he begun working for the neighboring farmers and so continued until 
the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted at Carthage as a pri- 
vate in Company D, Sixteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
proved an excellent soldier and his ability and bravery won him pro 
motion to color sergeant at the battle of Atlanta. He served until 
the close of the war in the Army of the Tennessee and was slightly 
wounded several times, but never seriously. After the cessation of 
hostilities he returned home, where he remained until 1886. In that 
year he removed to Clark county, Kansas, where he engaged in the 
drug business and later in the grocery business. He left there in 
1888, going to Huntington, Arkansas, which remained his home until 
1890, when he came to Keokuk and engaged in farming and dairy- 
ing until 1894. He then concentrated his attention upon the dairy 
business, 'which proved very successful, and he gained a reputation 
for supplying milk rich in its percentage of cream and of unques- 
tioned purity. In 1910 he retired from active business life and is 
now enjoying the leisure to which his former years of labor entitle 
him. He owns considerable property, including his comfortable 
residence. 

Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Arabella F. Brock- 
man, of Carthage, Illinois, in 1869, and she passed away in 1871, 
leaving a daughter, Lela B., now deceased. The father was married 
in August, 1873, to Mrs. Leah Johnson, nee Pickens, a native of 
Barbour county. West Virginia, born April 9, 1842, a daughter of 
George and Elizabeth (Reger) Pickens. She was first married to 
Levi Johnson. 

Mr. Wilson is an active and prominent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, having served in all the official positions and as 
chairman of the board. He has been a charter member of three dif- 
ferent Grand Army posts and is today connected with Torrence Post, 
in which he has filled all of the offices. He is a Knight Templar 
Mason, having taken the degrees of the blue lodge, chapter and com- 
mandery, and is now past master of his lodge. Both he and his wife 
are charter members of the Eastern Star chapter of Keokuk and he 
has served as patron. They have been delegates to the grand lodge 



102 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

several times. He also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and has passed through all the chairs of that lodge. His political 
support is given the republican party and his fellow citizens, recog- 
nizing his worth and ability, have called him to various official posi- 
tions. While a resident of Illinois he served as chairman of the 
county central committee and was a member of the city council of 
Carthage and also assessor. 



HERMAN BRINCK. 



Many and varied have been the business interests with which 
Herman Brinck has been associated and which have felt the stimulus 
of his enterprise and progressiveness. For many years he was a 
leading merchant of West Point and at dififerent times has been con- 
nected with other business pursuits and enterprises, which have 
proven important factors in the upbuilding, progress and prosperity 
of this section. 

He was born in the kingdom of Hanover, Germany, September 
13, 1834. and has, therefore, reached the eightieth milestone on life's 
journey. He was but eighteen months old when his parents emi- 
grated to the United States, first settling in New York city, where 
they arrived with but very limited financial resources. They after- 
ward removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where the father estab- 
lished the third match factory in the United States, calling it by the 
name of Locofoco, in honor of a political faction of that period. 
He conducted the manufacture of matches with success for four 
years and thus secured the capital with which to establish a similar 
enterprise in St. Louis, Missouri. He started for the west in 1839 
with that end in view and when within thirty miles of his destina- 
tion the boat on which he was a passenger caught fire and burned 
and he, with four thousand dollars in gold on his person, was 
drowned. In connection with this catastrophe the family lost all 
their belongings in clothing and furniture, while the mother and 
two children barely escaped with their lives. This was one of the 
notable river disasters of that period. The widow and two chil- 
dren were landed in St. Louis, entirely destitute, and Mrs. Brinck 
was compelled to put her son, Herman, in an orphan asvlum in order 
that she might earn her living by washing. Her worth soon won 
her friends, however, and finally she became the wife of Mr. 
D'Lampe, a blacksmith. They removed to the vicinity of Hanover, 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 103 

Illinois, and there Herman Brinck joined them at their new home. 
After a time the family returned to their native country, where they 
remained for three years. 

On again coming to America they settled in Quincy, Illinois, 
where they also spent three years, afterward removing to Dubuque 
county, Iowa. Subsequent to attaining his majority Herman Brinck 
came to West Point and two years later was joined by his mother 
and stepfather, who remained in Lee county until they were called 
to their final rest. 

It was on the 5th of July, 1859, that Herman Brinck was united 
in marriage to Miss Margaret Dingman, a native of West Point, 
born April 28, 1843. She was the youngest of eight children born 
unto Barney and Gertrude (Litmer) Dingman, natives of Hanover, 
Germany, in which country they were married ere their emigration 
to America in 1837. They made their way at once into the interior 
of the country, with West Point as their destination, and with their 
two children they took up their abode in West Point township. Iowa 
had not even then been organized under territorial government and 
conditions of life in every respect were very primitive. They were 
true pioneers and became actively identified with the early develop- 
ment of the county. The first mass held in West Point township 
was held in their log cabin. All of their children are now deceased 
with the exception of Mrs. Brinck. The father died July 30, 1851, 
at the age of about fifty years. He was a blacksmith by trade and 
followed that pursuit in early life, but afterward engaged in build- 
ing wagons. He also secured land and was very successful in his 
business afifairs. He also assisted many of the early settlers to get 
a start and proved a most valuable, worthy and honored resident 
of Lee county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brinck had thirteen children, namely: Theodore, 
Henry, Mary, Elizabeth, Kathrine, Lulu, Anna, Rose, Bernard, 
Josephine, William, Alois and Edward. Three of the daughters 
have passed away, Kathrine dying at the age of three months, while 
Mary and Anna died at the ages of twenty-four and eighteen years 
respectively. A sketch of Theodore appears elsewhere in this vol- 
ume. Henry, who is now living in Quincv, Illinois, and is secretary 
of the W. T. Duker Dry Goods Company, married Miss Alma 
Keifer and has one child, Helen. Mary became the wife of Charles 
Ewers. Elizabeth is the wife of Frank Schroeder, manager of the 
furniture department in the store of John Bresmer & Company at 
Springfield, Illinois, and they have one daughter, Margaret. Lulu 
is at home. Rose is the wife of Joseph Reinstein, a cigar manufac- 



104 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

turer of West Point, and they have one child, Karl. Bernard mar- 
ried Miss Laura Link and has one child, Adrian. Josephine is a 
teacher at Spring Grove, Illinois. William and Alois are both con- 
nected with the Brinck department store. Edward, who is also with 
the firm of Bresmer & Company at Springfield, Illinois, wedded 
Mary Brusing and they have one child, Mary Margaret. 

As previously stated, it was in 1859 that Herman Brinck was 
married and two years later he became associated with commercial 
interests at West Point in the purchase of a stock of merchandise. 
Since that time the Brinck store has been one of the important mer- 
cantile features of the town and was long conducted by Herman 
Brinck, who eventually, however, turned the business over to his 
son, Theodore. In 1863 he started the pork packing business, which 
he carried on for about nine years. In 1864 he secured possession 
of the West point flour mills, which he successfully operated in con- 
nection with his pork packing. A year later he opened a brewery 
and such was the success of that enterprise that he did a business 
amounting to one hundred and twenty-five thousands dollars annu- 
ally. Owing to changes brought about by the building of the Bur- 
lington & Southwestern Railroad contiguous to this vicinity, busi- 
ness of all kinds was depressed and Mr. Brinck suffered great loss 
in common with others. Finally he abandoned all of his projects 
except merchandising. The failure to build the railroad through 
West Point was the greatest disaster that has ever occurred to the 
people of this community. No one has done more for the upbuild- 
ing, development and improvement of the town of West Point than 
Mr. Brinck, who has ever been justly regarded as one of her fore- 
most citizens. For two consecutive terms he served as mayor and 
his administration was businesslike and efi'ective, bringing about 
needed reforms and public improvements. 



HIRAM J. ALVIS. 



Among the citizens of Lee county who were followers of the old 
flag when war divided the country Hiram J. Alvis was numbered 
and his splendid military record as well as his other substantial quali- 
ties made him a valued resident of this part of the state. He was 
born on the old Alvis homestead farm in Montrose township, Octo- 
ber 28, 1842, and was reared to manhood there with the usual experi- 
ences of the farm lad. He earlv became familiar with all of the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 105 

duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturists, but at the 
age of nineteen years all thought of farm work was put aside in the 
all-absorbing interest in war, for the old flag had been fired upon at 
Fort Sumter and the country had become involved in a strife that was 
to continue through four years. 

In 1861 Mr. Alvis enlisted, becoming a private in Company I, 
Twenty-first Missouri Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel Moore. 
He veteranized on the expiration of his three years' term and served 
at the front until the close of hostilities. On one occasion he was 
struck a glancing blow on the right temple by a 60-pound shell. He 
had been on the skirmish line all night and in the morning he retired, 
others taking his place. Utterly worn out, he went to sleep in a 
ditch and the shell struck him. He was sent to a hospital, where 
his injuries were treated, and when he had recovered he returned 
to his regiment. He participated in many hotly contested engage- 
ments both before and after he was wounded. In fact he experi- 
enced all of the hardships and privations of war, taking part in the 
long, hard marches and campaigns which led up to the final victory 
that crowned the Union arms. 

At the close of the war Mr. Alvis returned home and on the 28th 
of October, 1868, married Miss Nancy J. Wheatley, who was born 
September 26, 1846, in Adams county, Ohio, and came by boat to 
Iowa with her parents. She attended school near Montrose, being 
a pupil in one of the old-time log schoolhouses with crude benches, 
an immense fireplace and other primitive furnishings. In such a 
school she pursued her education to the age of eighteen years. Her 
father, Caleb Wheatley, was born in Maryland and when young 
was taken to Ohio. He made farming his life work and spent his 
last days in Lee county, Iowa, where he owned a small farm. He 
was sixty-five years of age at the time of his death. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Alvis located on a farm 
of one hundred and ten acres in Montrose township and Mrs. Alvis 
also owns sixty acres in Des Moines township. LIpon their home- 
stead property Mr. Alvis made many improvements with the assist- 
ance and advice of his wife, who was indeed a helpmate to him. 
She still occupies the old home farm, which is being operated by 
two sons. The oldest son, John, who married Miss Nannie Hardy, 
is living in Montrose. The other two, Hugh and Arthur, are prac- 
tical and representative farmers of this part of the state. The former 
married Grace Foutz and the latter wedded Miss Amelia Hersheler. 

Mr. Alvis belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
for many years and was ever loyal to its teachings. In his political 



106 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

views he was a republican from the time that age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise. His wife belongs to the Baptist church, 
and while he was not a member of any religious body he lived the 
life of a good Christian man, doing his part in all public afifairs, 
proving loyal and helpful in friendship and devoted to his family. 



REV. HENRY L. HENN. 

Rev. Henry L. Henn, a retired minister of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, resides in the village of Denmark, where he operates 
a forty-acre fruit farm, producing principally apples and pears. His 
birth occurred in Washington county, Iowa, on the loth of Novem- 
ber, 1868, his parents being William and Elizabeth (Schmitt) Henn, 
both of whom were natives of Germany, the former born September 
23, 1834, and the latter in 1837. William Henn, a farmer and stock- 
man by occupation, crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1853, 
landing in New York. A few years later he came to Iowa, locating 
in Washington county, where he engaged in stock-raising and where 
he has remained continuously to the present time. His wife, who 
took up her abode in Washington county, this state, in the '50s, was 
called to her final rest in the year 1898. They became the parents of 
ten children, as follows: William, Jr., who follows farming in 
Oklahoma; Elizabeth, who gave her hand in marriage to S. S Tate, 
an agriculturist of Oklahoma; Henry L., of this review; Emma, who 
is the wife of G. F. Smith and resides on the old Henn homestead 
in Washington county, Iowa; Lydia, who lives at home; Frederick, 
a carpenter of Denmark, Iowa; Mary, who follows the profession 
of teaching in Washington county, Iowa; John, a carpenter residing 
at Wellman, Iowa; Anna, who wedded S. M. Young and lives in 
New Mexico; and Edward, who operates the old home farm. 

Henry L. Henn spent his youth largely in the county of his nativ- 
ity and there obtained a high-school education. In 1891 he entered 
college at Mount Pleasant and after completing a four years' course 
joined the Oklahoma conference of the Methodist Episcopal church 
in i8gq. He remained in that state for about six years, preaching the 
gospel and leading many to a better conception of the higher life. 
Since 1902 he has made his home in Denmark, Lee county, Iowa, 
where he is now successfully engaged in the cultivation of a fruit 
farm, devoting his attention principally to the growing of apples 
and pears. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 107 

On the ist of January, 1896, Rev. Henn was united in marriage 
to Miss Carrie Houston, who was born in January, 1864, and 
passed away on the 4th of January, 1900. They had one son, Samuel, 
who is now sixteen years of age and attends school in Denmark. On 
the 23d of April, 1902, Rev. Henn was again married, his second 
union being with Miss Hattie E. Houston, a cousin of Carrie. A 
sketch of her parents, Ira and Olivia P. Houston, is given on another 
page of this volume. 



WILSON W. HOLMES, M. D. 

Dr. Wilson W. Holmes, who has been successfully engaged in 
the practice of medicine at Keokuk for the past twenty-two years, is 
numbered among the leading and able representatives of the profes- 
sion in Lee county. His birth occurred in Mercer county, Illinois, 
on the 30th of June, 1868, his parents being John N. and Ellen W. 
(Holmes) Holmes, natives of Somerset county, Maine. Though of 
the same name, they were not related. Their respective parents took 
up their abode in Mercer county, Illinois, just prior to the Civil war. 
John N. Holmes, the father of our subject, was a youth of seventeen 
when he enlisted for service in the Union army with his two brothers, 
who, however, did not join the same command. He served as a 
soldier for about four years, and went with Sherman on his memor- 
able march to the sea. When hostilities had ceased he returned to 
Mercer county, Illinois, and turned his attention to general agricul- 
tural pursuits. His demise occurred in that county in January, 1878, 
when he was but thirty-four years of age. Unto him and his wife 
were born four children, all of whom still survive. 

Wilson W. Holmes acquired his primary education in the district 
schools of his native county and continued his studies in the Northern 
Illinois Normal School at Fulton, later completing his literary train- 
ing at Lombard College of Galesburg. In 1890 he entered Keokuk 
Medical College, which institution conferred upon him the degree 
of M. D. in March, 1892. Throughout the intervening twenty-two 
years he has continuously maintained an office in Keokuk and has 
been accorded a liberal and lucrative practice, early demonstrating 
his ability in the field of his chosen calling. In 1896 he pursued a 
post-graduate course at the Chicago Polyclinic, and he keeps in close 
touch with the progress of the profession through his membership in 
the Lee County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society 



108 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

and the American Medical Association. Dr. Holmes now serves as 
president of the board of pension examiners. 

On the 29th of Alarch, 1892, Dr. Holmes was united in marriage 
to Miss Jessie Dickie, a daughter of John and Jane (McClintock) 
Dickie. He is a popular member of the Keokuk Club and has a 
very extensive circle of friends and acquaintances throughout the 
community. 



WILLIAM SCHULTE. 



No history of West Point would be complete without extended 
reference to William Schulte, who has long been an active business 
man of the town and is now engaged successfully in dealing in gro- 
ceries, poultry, cream, etc. He was born in Pleasant Ridge town- 
ship, this county, August 16, 1856, and is a son of Diedrich and Eliza- 
beth (Arns) Schulte. The father's birth occurred in Prussia, Ger- 
many, and he passed away in Lee county in February, 1901, when 
about seventy-five years of age. He was a son of Diedrich Schulte, 
Sr., who brought his family to Lee county at an early day, being 
among the first of the pioneers. The great state of Iowa was then still 
largely an undeveloped wilderness. There w-ere a few settlements 
along the river, but the great prairies of middle and western Iowa 
were still unclaimed and uncultivated and even Lee county was just 
in the opening stages of its development. 

Diedrich Schulte, father of William Schulte, was only about 
twenty-one years of age when he arrived in this state. He followed 
steamboatine on the river for one season, but afterward turned his 
attenti(jn to farming in Pleasant Ridge township and for many years 
actively and successfully carried on general agricultural pursuits, de- 
voting his time to farming until his death, which occurred on the old 
homestead. This farm is now owned and operated by his son Ben 
Schulte. 

Diedrich Schulte, jr., was united in marriage to Elizabeth Arns, 
who was born in Hanover, Germany, and who was about twelve or 
thirteen vears of age when the family emigrated to America. Mak- 
ing their way to Fort Madison, they soon afterward settled in Marion 
township, Lee county, near St. Paul. Elizabeth Arns was a daugh- 
ter of Henry and Elizabeth Arns, who afterward removed to Kansas, 
establishing their home near Nortonville, where their remaining days 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 109 

were passed. The mother's death occurred in October, 1906, when 
she was more than seventy years of age. For some time she liad 
survived her husband. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Diedrich 
Schulte, Jr., were nine children: Rosalia, who became the wife of 
Stephen Walljasper and is now deceased; William, of this review; 
Henry, Maggie and Theodore, all of whom have passed away; Mary, 
the wife of Henry Pohlmiller, of Pleasant Ridge township; Annie, 
the wife of Stephen Pohlmiller, of this county; Ben, who is living in 
Pleasant Ridge township; and Katherine, the wife of John Box, of 
Houghton, Iowa. 

William Schulte spent his youthful days under the parental roof 
and shared with the family in the usual experiences and hardships 
of frontier life. He was educated in a parochial school at West Point 
and afterward engaged in farming until he reached the age of twenty- ' 
three years, subsequent to which time he became a huckster. This 
was the initial step which has brought him to his present position 
as a progressive and enterprising business man of West Point, where 
he is now successfully engaged in dealing in groceries, poultry and 
cream. He has a well appointed store and he has conducted his 
creamery and engaged in making butter longer than any other dealer 
in the county, having commenced in the creamery business on his 
farm in Pleasant Ridge township in 1881. He began gathering 
cream for Thomas Currier of Denmark, Iowa, and at the same time 
engaged in huckstering over this section for a number of years. After 
two years he formed a partnership with Gerard Pollenkemper and 
established a creamery at West Point. He had teams upon the road 
gathering cream. He also acted as butter maker and operated that 
branch of the business for about a year, at the end of which time he 
turned the business over to Mr. Currier of Denmark for about a year. 
At the end of that time Mr. Schulte individually rented the old 
brewery building at West Point, fitted it up with churns and neces- 
sary machinery and resumed business, in which he continued for a 
year and a half. He then purchased the lot where the present store 
is now located and erected there in 1885 a substantial business block, 
in which he installed a small stock of groceries. He removed the 
butter making machinery to the rear of the store and conducted the 
creamery with success until ten or twelve years ago. He also con- 
tinued the store and the huckstering business, keeping three or four 
teams employed in that connection. He does not do any huckstering 
now, but manages the store and buys all sorts of produce, carrying a 
heavy line of groceries. He is also senior partner in the firm of 
William Schulte & Son, dealers in clothing, shoes and men's furnish- 



no HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ings, their store being conducted by tlie junior partner, William D. 
Schulte. 

It was on the 28th of April, 1885, that William Schulte was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary N. Meyers, who was born in Allegan 
county, Michigan, July 12, i860, a daughter of Jacob and Mary 
(Geppert) Meyers, who in 1869 became residents of West Point, 
Iowa. Her father died October 16, 1894, when sixty-two years of 
age, but her mother is still living on the home farm near West Point 
and has reached the advanced age of seventy-nine years. Mrs. Schulte 
is the second in order of birth in their family of eight children, seven 
of whom are vet living, while Joseph has passed away. Those who 
still survive are: J. E., now of Oklahoma; George, a resident of 
Omaha, Nebraska; Effie, the widow of Louis Strothman, of Okla- 
homa; Mrs. Anna Lohman, of West Point; Dorothy, the wife of 
Stephen Schroeder, of W^est Point; and Rose, the wife of Henry 
Schroeder. a farmer of this county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schulte have become the parents of seven children: 
William D., born Julv 31, 1886; Euphrosine, who was born January 
28, 1889, and is a graduate nurse, now connected with Mercy Hos- 
pital of Chicago; George, born August 24, 1892; Louise, December 
14, 1894; Marie, May 2, 1897; Isabel, March i, 1899; and Dorothy, 
^lay 5, 1903. 

Politically Mr. Schulte is a democrat and always votes the party 
ticket, yet has never been an aspirant for public office. He is a mem- 
ber of St. Mary's church at W^est Point and of the Mutual Protective 
Society. He has long been recognized as a most active, enterprising 
and energetic business man and through his efforts has contributed 
much to the development and commercial prosperity of the com- 
munitv. 



FRIEDOLIN ANSCHUTZ. 

Friedolin Anschutz, deceased, was for many vears a resident of 
Lee county, a worthy representative of that type of German-Amer- 
ican citizenship which has been such an important and valuable ele- 
ment in promoting the interests and upbuilding of the county. He 
was born at Zella, Coburg-Gotha, Germany, in 1825 and during his 
boyhood days he left the fatherland and crossed the Atlantic to 
America. The first seven years of his life on this continent were 
passed in Sauk City and in Madison, Wisconsin. He was a gunsmith 
by trade and followed that business in early manhood, but his father 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY ill 

sent from the old country means sufficient to establish a sawmill. 
This he did and conducted it for a brief period, but soon abandoned 
it and in 18157 came to Lee county, where he established a brewery, 
which he managed for about twenty-four yt-'ars, or until it was de- 
stroyed by fire in 1881. He did not rebuild it but concentrated his 
efforts upon the management of other interests. 

Mr. Anschutz was married to Miss Augusta Diemar, and five of 
their children reached adult age. The wife and mother passed away 
in April, 1914, having long survived Mr. Anschutz, who departed 
this life on the ist of August, 1889. Mr. Anschutz was the originator 
of the idea and donated freely of his time and means for the construc- 
tion of Anschutz Hill, which was named in his honor. His political 
indorsement was given the democratic party and he was much inter- 
ested in public affairs, cooperating in many movements for the gen- 
eral good. His religious faith was that of the German Lutheran 
Church, and fraternally he was connected with the Masons and the 
Odd Fellows. His military record covered an early connection with 
the German army before he crossed the Atlantic to the new world. 
He never regretted his determination to try his fortune on this side 
the Atlantic, for here he found good business opportunities and in 
their improvement gradually worked his way upward, attaining a 
substantial measure of success. 



HERMAN M. ANSCHUTZ. 

Herman M. Anschutz, son of Friedolin Anschutz, was born in 
Keokuk, November 2, 1869, and the public schools of the city af- 
forded him his educational privileges. When quite young he took 
up the study of photography under the direction of his brother-in- 
law, George Hassall, and subsequently he purchased the business and 
has since been alone. He is today at the head of the largest photo- 
graphic establishment in the state, and the work done in his gallery 
is of superior order. In 1910 he built his present fine studio, which 
is splendidly equipped with all the modern facilities and accessories 
that make for efficient, high-grade art. Possessing himself an artistic 
temperament, he readily recognizes the value of light and shade, of 
pose and of all the other things that feature as scientific forces in 
producing the best photographic results. 

In 1903 Mr. Anschutz was married to Miss Grace C. Smith, a 
daughter of John Smith, a pioneer settler of Lee county, and they 



112 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

have two children, Adelaide and John. The parents are members 
of the Methodist church and Mr. Anschutz also holds membership 
in the Masonic fraternity. In these two associations are found the 
rules which govern his conduct and the principles which guide him 
in every relation of life. He is a man of noble purpose, commanding 
the respect and confidence of all who know him. In private life, as 
in his professional career, he stands for the highest efficiencv obtain- 
able. In the field of photography he has won a most enviable repu- 
tation, his studio largely setting the standard of photographic art in 
this state. 



CHARLES L. BEVERING. 

Charles L. Bevering, deceased, was one of the early settlers of 
Lee county and a well-known brick contractor. He came to Keokuk 
in 1854 when it was merely a bustling river town and he built many 
of the earlier homes and business houses in the city. His birth 
occurred in Menden, Germany, in 1828, and he attended school until 
he was fourteen years of age, after which he learned the brick 
mason's trade. He came to the United States and about 1849 or 
1850 located in St. Louis, where he worked at his trade for a number 
of years, but about 18^4 came to Keokuk and purchased a lot, on 
which he later erected a residence. He and his wife permanently 
settled in Keokuk in 1855 and he completed his dwelling the fol- 
lowing year. As he was a stone mason as well as a brick contractor, 
he did all of the work upon his residence. At that time the land 
as far as the present site of the high school was covered with hazel 
bushes and it was not until several years later that it was cleared 
and settled. Mr. Bevering worked on a number of the leading 
buildings in Keokuk, including the Estes House. 

Mr. Bevering was married in St. Louis to Miss Mina Hiden, 
who was born in Menden, Germany, about 18^4. Her parents died 
when she was quite small and she came to the United States when 
but a girl, joining her sister who was married and living in St. Louis. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bevering became the parents of eight children, the 
eldest being Minnie A. August H. is a ranchman of Clay county, 
Te.xas, where he owns four thousand acres of land, upon which he 
raises stock. He married Miss Nellie Hooker and they have seven 
children, William, Frank, John, Merrill, Edward, Minnie and 
Sadie. Charles L. is also a resident of Texas. William F. resides 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 113 

in Fairfield, Iowa, where he is engaged in the manufacture of cigars. 
He married Miss Sadie Roomer and they have two daughters, 
Elain and Virginia. Nellie is the wife of George Neyens, of Keo- 
kuk, and they have two children, Carl and Grace. Edward J. was 
born in Keokuk fune 20, 1868, and attended St. Mary's parochial 
school in the acquirement of an education. He learned the cigar- 
making business under Fred Koechling and is successfully engaged 
in that occupation. He married Mary S. Gorman, of Keokuk, a 
daughter of John and Catherine (McGuire) Gorman, and they are 
members of St. Mary's Catholic church. Fraternally Edward J. 
Severing belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the 
Eagles, the Modern Woodmen and St. Joseph's Society, the latter 
a Roman Catholic mutual organization. He has seven children 
as follows: Mary C, Edward J., Carl Gorman, Margaret Theresa, 
Elizabeth Agnes, Alphonsina and Francis Joseph. The seventh 
child of Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Severing is George H., a native 
of Keokuk, where he is still residing. He received his education 
in St. Mary's school and is now assistant foreman at the Hubinger 
Elastic Starch Works. He married Clara Code of Keokuk, and 
thev have three children, Kenneth, Corinne and Esther. Grace H. 
is now the wife of John Joyce of Keokuk. 

Charles L. Severing was a consistent member of St. Mary's 
Roman Catholic church. His death occurred in 1884 and his pass- 
ing was much regretted by a host of friends. His wife survived until 
191 1, dying April 6th of that year. 



FRANK M. GEESE. 



Frank M. Geese is a farmer and stockman operating two hun- 
dred acres of land in Cedar township, of which he owns sixty acres 
on section 25, although his residence is on section 26. He is a suc- 
cessful breeder of Percheron horses and raises cattle and hogs for 
the market in addition to the cultivation of his fields. He was born 
at Columbus, Ohio, May 2, 1862, a son of W. A. and Clarissa 
(Powell) Geese, the former a native of Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, and the latter of Franklin county, Ohio. The father was 
taken to Coshocton county, Ohio, when but a child and was reared 
there. His marriage occurred in Franklin county, Ohio, and after 
that event he removed to the vicinity of Columbus, but in 1865 
he and his family came to Lee county, Iowa, locating on section 26, 



114 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Cedar township. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of 
land and was actively engaged in its cultivation for many years. He 
is now past the eighty-second milestone on life's journey and makes 
his home with his son Frank and other children. The mother of 
our subject passed away in Lee county in 1906 at the age of sixty- 
eight years. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
to which denomination her husband also belongs. He is a democrat 
in his political belief and served for eight years as county super- 
visor. Fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Frank 
M. Geese was the third of five children born to his parents, the others 
being: Otis T., a civil engineer, of Rogers, Arkansas; Mrs. Emma 
Tyner, a resident of Salem, Iowa; Mrs. Effie Worthington, of Au- 
rora, Illinois; and Mrs. Nannie Reid, also of Aurora. 

Mr. Geese of this review was three years of age when brought 
by his parents to Lee county and has made his home here ever since. 
He received a common-school education and assisted his father in 
the work of the farm during the summer months. Since reaching 
manhood he has continued to follow the occupation to which he 
was reared and is successfully operating the home place. He is ener- 
getic, planting his crops in good season and tending them carefully, 
and this, together with his knowledge of the best methods of agri- 
culture, insures gratifying financial returns. He was one of the 
organizers of the Mount Hamill Savings Bank, of which he is vice 
president, and the prosperity of that institution is in no small degree 
due to him. 

Mr. Geese was married in i<SHg to Miss Letta Brown, who was 
born in Fort Madison, Iowa, a daughter of John and Eliza (Bul- 
lard) Brown. Her grandfather Bullard secured land which is now 
the site of the west end of Fort Madison. Her parents came to Lee 
county in 1836 and her father carried on farming here. He and 
his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and were 
held in high esteem by all who knew them. Their children were 
as follows: Mrs. Mary Cadwell, of California; Mrs. Geese; Mrs. 
Susie Campbell, of Steamboat Rock, Iowa; Mrs. Nellie Cole, of 
Montrose, Iowa; James T., of Fort Morgan, Colorado; and Alex- 
ander, who passed away in 1899 at Portland, Oregon. 

Mr. Geese is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, belonging to the lodge at Mount Hamill, and he also holds 
membership in the Modern Woodmen of America at Mount 
Hamill. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party 
and he has served in a number of local offices to the satisfaction of 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 115 

his constituents. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of Clay Grove, Marion township, and are num- 
bered among the valued residents of the county. 



ARTHUR E. WIRSIG, D. D. S. 

Dr. Arthur E. Wirsig is successfully engaged in the practice of 
dentistry at West Point, Lee county, Iowa, and is proving himself 
thoroughly equipped for the exacting work of his profession. He 
was born in Warren, this county, July 31, 1882, a son of Paul H. 
and Ellenora (Vornkahl) Wirsig, the former a native of Rothwas- 
ser, Germany. His birth occurred in 1855 and two years later he 
was brought by his parents to Washington township, this county, 
where the father purchased three hundred and twelve acres of land. 
The paternal grandfather of our subject cultivated his extensive 
farm until he passed away at the age of seventy-two years. Paul H. 
Wirsig then assumed the management of the farm, devoting his time 
and energies to its cultivation for a number of years. Subsequently 
he removed to Van Buren township, this county, where he still re- 
sides. He is a member of the Evangelical church and is loyal in 
his support of its work. He is a republican in political allegiance 
and has been township trustee at different times and has also served 
as school director. His wife was born in Harrison township, this 
county, in 1859, and here grew to womanhood, their marriage occur- 
ring in 1879. She has become the mother of five children as follows: 
Elenora, who was born February 20, 1880; the subject of this review; 
Arnold O., born March 9, 1884; Marvin A., February 5, 1886; and 
Cora Delia, December 18, 1887. 

Dr. Arthur E. Wirsig attended the schools of Warren, Iowa, and 
later was a student in the Farmington (Iowa) high school, from 
which he graduated in 1904. He then entered the Keokuk Dental 
College, receiving the degree of D. D. S. from that institution in 
1907. He practiced for fourteen months in Mount Sterling, Iowa, 
and then for two years was located in Waterloo, Iowa. He then 
came to West Point, where he has since remained and where he is 
accorded a representative and liberal patronage. His prices are 
reasonable and his work is carefully and thoroughly done, his pros- 
perity being the merited reward of his efliciencv and conscientious- 
ness. 



116 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Dr. Wirsig was married on the 23rd of November, 1907, to Miss 
Lenora Doyle, who was born in Keokuk, a daughter of Michael and 
Norah (Burke) Doyle. Her education was received in the schools 
of Keokuk, Iowa, and she lias always resided in this county. By her 
marriage she has become the mother of two children: Dorothy, 
whose birth occurred September 29, 1908, at Waterloo, Iowa; and 
Elenore, born February 22, 191 1, at West Point. 

The Doctor is a member of the Lutheran Evangelical church, 
and fraternally he is identified with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Masonic order, being a Master Mason. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and he has held 
a number of local oflices, having served on the school board and on 
the city council. He has also been fire chief and in that capacity 
did much to insure the safety of life and property. He is yet a young 
man, but he has accomplished much, not only in the line of his own 
advancement, but also for the public welfare, and all who are asso- 
ciated with him hold him in the highest esteem. 



CAPTAIN JAMES F. DAUGHERTY. 

Captain James F. Daugherty is probably the oldest living settler 
in Keokuk in point of continuous residence. He has witnessed the 
growth of the city since the time when it was but a collection of little 
frontier houses and has been an active participant in promoting its 
material welfare and transforming it into the modern metropolis of 
the present. In the evening of life he can take a retrospective view 
of the years that have been filled with activities for the benefit of his 
fellowmen, winning him honors rarely accorded to a single individual. 

Born at Chillicothe, Ohio, on the i6tli of September, 1835, Cap- 
tain Daugherty has now passed the seventy-ninth milestone on life's 
journev. His parents were James and Sarah (Linn) Daugherty, in 
whose home his youthful days were passed in the usual manner of 
lads of that period and section. The family came to the west in 184! 
and eleven years later the father passed away. The mother remained 
for many years a resident of Lee county and was numbered among 
the oldest of its pioneer women. Her demise occurred on Sunday, 
July 24, 1904, at the age of eighty-eight years, ten months and nine- 
teen days. She was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, October i, 18 15, and 
in 1834 became the wife of James Daugherty, with whom she re- 
moved to Hillsboro, Fountain county, Indiana, where they kept a 




CAPTAIX JAMES F. DAUGHERTY 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 119 

stage station and hotel. In 1841 the family left for the west and 
spent the winter in Terre Haute, Indiana, arriving in Keokuk on the 
5th of February, 1842. Mr. Daugherty died of cholera on board the 
steamer Kansas on the Missouri river, July 15, 1852. Mrs. Daugh- 
erty passed through all the trials incident to pioneer life and was ever 
a consistent member of the Methodist church. At a meeting of Tor- 
rence Post, No. 2, G. A. R., at Keokuk on the i ith of August, 1904, 
a resolution was passed which read as follows: "Regarding the de- 
cease of Mrs. Daugherty this post desires to make recognition of the 
fact that a patriotic woman and mother of patriots, having four sons 
in the Civil war, has passed to her eternal reward. Therefore, be it 
resolved that in the passing of Mrs. Daugherty this community de- 
plores the loss of one of its oldest and most highly esteemed members; 
thq county an honored pioneer settler and the nation an ardent patriot 
and supporter, and in recording the decease of Mrs. Daugherty we 
hereby express and tender to our comrade and his family our sin- 
cere sympathy." 

The early youth of Captain Daugherty was spent in Ohio. His 
educational opportunities were somewhat limited and he early learned 
life's lessons, recognizing the fact that self-denial, self-reliance and 
industry constitute a sure foundation upon which to build character 
and success. He was of a courageous spirit and possessed a strong 
desire to make his life worth while. His laudable ambition was un- 
doubtedly a large factor in his later achievement. He was not vet 
seven years of age when, in Februarv, 1842, he was brought to Keo- 
. kuk, where for a period of nearly seventy-three years he has now 
made his home. To write his record in detail would be to repeat 
much of the history of this locality, for his life work has been closelv 
interwoven with the upbuilding and development of the city. 

As stated, it was in the year 1842 that Captain Daugherty came 
overland from Terre Haute, Indiana, with his father, who had 
come ahead of the other members of the familv to prepare a home for 
them. There were then only about one hundred residents within the 
present limits of Keokuk. There were no stores, save an establish- 
ment which was a combination of a general store and saloon. The 
houses were all log cabins and all business was done along the banks 
of the river. Stage coaches made daily trips to Des Moines and 
Burlington. James Daugherty, with his son, occupied a small cabin 
in the woods at what is now the corner of Des Moines and First 
streets until he could erect a rwo-storv frame residence on what is 
now the corner of Johnson and Fourth streets. He procured a squat- 
ter's title to a claim that covered several of the present blocks. There 



120 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

were no schools at the time of his arrival. The first school was held 
in a little log hut on the bluff, and his hrst teacher was a Miss }ones, 
while later J. C. Fletcher, a Philadelphia bachelor, came to Keo- 
kuk and took charge of the school. Captain Daugherty's school days 
ended in 1850, after which he worked in a small store for his father, 
who died in 1852, subsequent to which time he assisted his mother in 
rearing and providing for the family. At one time he was business 
manager of the first daily paper published in Keokuk known as the 
Nipentuck, which name was afterward changed to The Morning 
Glory. This was a local daily paper published in the '50s. Mr. 
Daugherty has written a very complete history of the newspapers of 
Keokuk and indeed has been well known as a writer upon many 
topics, the productions of his pen including a complete account of 
steamboating on the Mississippi. 

Until the time of the Civil war his attention was chieflv directed 
to the bakery and confectionery business and to the conduct of a 
general dry-goods and notion store, but with the opening of hostili- 
ties between the north and south business and personal considerations 
were put aside and an offer made of his services to the Union. He 
recruited a company for the war at Keokuk. All Iowa regiments 
being full, he moved with his company to St. Louis, Missouri, was 
accepted by Governor Gamble and assigned to the Tenth Missouri 
Volunteer Infantry as Company H. Mr. Daugherty was then com- 
missioned bv the governor to act as captain of the companv, which 
did guard duty on the Missouri Pacific Railroad and at block houses. 
They had many skirmishes with the bushwhackers and guerrillas until 
April, 1862, when they were ordered to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, 
and thence to Pittsburgh Landing, Tennessee. They were then at- 
tached unassigned to the Army of the Mississippi until June, 1862, 
when they became a part of the Second Brigade, Third Division of 
the Army of the Mississippi, thus continuing until July. With this 
army Captain Daugherty participated in the advance upon and the 
siege of Corinth from the 29th of April to the 30th of May, 1862; 
the action near Corinth on the 29th of May; and the occupation of 
the city on the following day. With his command he also proceeded 
to Booneville and was on duty at Corinth Hill from the 31st of May 
until the loth of June. He was likewise in the expedition to Ripley 
and Rienzi from the 27th of June to the 3d of July, and on the 8th 
of July moved on to Corinth, being on duty there until the 23d of 
the same month. He was mustered out by reason of the consolidation 
of three skeleton Missouri regiments on the 25th of July, 1862, and 
was then honorably discharged. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 121 

Following his return to Keokuk in the same year Captain Daugh- 
erty operated the steamboats Bridgeport and Imperial for a time and 
then turned his attention to the wholesale liquor business, in which 
he has since continued. In 1864 he crossed the plains to the Pacific 
coast, and the detailed account of his adventurous trip was read with 
pleasure and is yet recalled by the old-time citizens, for the story 
appeared in the "Gate City." It contains many things of thrilling 
interest, including an account of the meeting with the Indians and 
of the hardships incident to travel across the plains at that day, the 
trip being made with ox teams and prairie schooners. The history 
of the city of Keokuk and of Lee county has been enriched by many 
articles from his pen which have appeared in the press at different 
times. He has an accurate memory of early events and scenes and is 
graphic in his description of pioneer times. 

Captain Daugherty served as a member of the city council of 
Keokuk for a number of years and in 1899 was elected mayor. His 
career as chief magistrate of the city was fraught with general good. 
He avoided useless expenditure and that equally useless retrenchment 
which blocks progress. He made many speeches in Keokuk and 
other cities, all tending toward the advancement and uplift of the 
people. Especially were his services of practical value to the county 
during the nine years which he spent as chairman of the board of Lee 
county supervisors, for during that period hundreds of thousands of 
dollars were saved to the taxpayers. Regardless of political creed 
he is universally conceded to have been been one of the most pains- 
taking and competent officials ever elected to local office. He was 
chairman of the board of supervisors convention of the first congres- 
sional district, held at Burlington in 1896, and was an enthusiastic 
advocate of the famous Keokuk water power dam, and was one of the 
original promoters and stockholders of the company. He has always 
been a democrat, his allegiance to the party being unfaltering. At 
the democratic state convention held in Des Moines August 17, 1899, 
he received one hundred and six votes for governor. He stood third 
on the ticket for the nomination. 

Captain Daugherty has been three times married. By his first 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Carolina A. Langford, he had 
two children : James, now deceased ; and Alice C, the wife of Samuel 
P. Lauver, of San Francisco. To his marriage with Miss Mary 
Caldwell there were born two children, Frank and Emma. Follow- 
ing the death of his second wife he wedded Mrs. Delphine E. Resser, 
and unto them have been born the following named : Frances Maude, 
Myrtle, Delia, Ralph and Maybel. 



122 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Captain Daugherty is a Knight Templar Mason and a member 
of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
For a time he was president of the Old Settlers' Association and has 
always kept in close touch with those who early became residents of 
Lee county and have been instrumental in molding its history and 
shaping its destiny. He has always taken the lead in promoting any- 
thing and everything that would tend to the advancement of Keokuk 
or the welfare of its citizens and was especially active in promoting 
the building of the county poor house. Possibly no one man has made 
more speeches advocating improvement for Keokuk and Lee county 
and for the benefit of the people than Mr. Daugherty, advocating 
all that would improve the city along business, intellectual and moral 
lines. He has been a careful student of important public problems 
and when he has decided upon a course which he has believed to be 
right he has followed it tirelessly and fearlessly. He has been very 
active as an advocate of good roads and is president of the Keokuk 
Good Roads Association. He belongs to the old school of gentlemen, 
is a good conversationalist and story teller and a man whom it is 
a decided pleasure to meet. There is perhaps no resident of the 
county who has been here for a longer period than Captain Daugh- 
erty and certainly there is none whose record is more faultless in 
honor, fearless in conduct and stainless in reputation. 



FREDERICK BENJAMIN KREHBIEL. 

Frederick Benjamin Krehbiel resides on his splendidly improved 
farm of three hundred and seventy-eight and a fourth acres on sec- 
tion 36, Pleasant Ridge township. He also has eight and a half 
acres on section 36, Denmark township, and si.xty-eight and a quarter 
acres on section 31, Denmark township. This farm has been in his 
possession for a quarter of a century and is a splendidly improved 
property, indicating in its excellent appearance his care and super- 
vision. 

Mr. Krehbiel is a native of Lee countv, his birth having occurred 
in West Point township, January 4, i8i;r. His parents were the 
Rev. John C. and Katherine (Raber) Krehbiel. The father died 
February 26, 1886, when about seventy-five years of age, and the 
mother's death occurred in 1869. when she was but forty-four years 
of age. He came to Iowa in 1840 to take up his permanent abode. 
He had, however, visited this state in 1838 or 1839 and, being 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY . 123 

pleased with the country, resolved to return. He was a native of 
Bavaria, Germany, and was first married in that country to Miss 
Volgamuth, who passed away m West Point township, after which 
he wedded Katherine Raber. He was a minister of the Mennonite 
church and preached for forty years at West Point, having marked 
influence over the moral development of that section. In his family 
were twelve children, of whom one died at the age of two years, 
while the others reached maturity and eight are still living. Of this 
number Frederick B. and his sister Mrs. Trowbridge are still resi- 
dents of Lee county. Of the others two are in Kansas, one in Okla- 
homa and three in California, so that the family is now widely 
scattered. 

Frederick B. Krehbiel has always been a resident of Lee county, 
but has traveled quite extensively, visiting California four times. His 
educational opportunities were those accorded by the common schools 
and in the school of experience he has learned many valuable lessons, 
while reading has also aided in making him a well informed man. 
Much of his life has been devoted to general agricultural pursuits, 
but for twenty-eight years he worked at the blacksmith's trade at 
Denmark, this county. He is today the owner of a valuable farm 
property, constituting one of the most attractive features of the land- 
scape. At the present time he has his land leased. For ten years 
he resided in Fort Madison, but recently returned to the farm, which 
he has owned for twenty-five years and on which he has made many 
modern and substantial improvements. The buildings are com- 
modious, the fields are well tilled and the farm machinery is of the 
latest improved patterns. 

On the loth of September, 1876, Mr. Krehbiel was united in 
marriage to Miss Lena Linhard, who was born in West Point town- 
ship July 23, 1856, a daughter of George and Louisa (Heassig) Lin- 
hard, both of whom were natives of Alsace, Germany. Coming to 
America in early life, they were married in Lyons, New York, and 
arrived in Lee county in the winter of 1855-6. Some years later they 
removed to Kirksville, Missouri, where their remaining days were 
passed. The father died February 7, 1898, at the age of seventy-five 
years, and the mother's death occurred on the 12th of November, 
1906, when she was seventy-three years of age. Mrs. Krehbiel has 
a sister in Fort Madison, a brother in Lyons, New York, and also a 
brother and sister in Kirksville, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Krehbiel 
have become the parents of three children. George, who is the 
owner of an orange grove at Upland, California, married Mayme 
Figgins and has two sons, Leonard B. and Orville L. Mrs. J. A. 



124 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Heberer, living at Fort Madison, Iowa, has two daughters, Mildred 
and Katherine. Mrs. Lewis Mack, a twin sister of Mrs. Heberer, 
resides at Macksville, Kansas, which place was named in honor of 
her husband's grandfather. She, too, has two children, Edwin Lewis 
and Eveline Maxine. 

Politically Mr. Krehbiel is independent, voting as his judgment 
dictates without regard to party ties. He holds membership in the 
Mennonite church, and his wife is a member of the Christian church. 
They have a large circle of warm friends in the section of the county 
in which they reside and many good qualities have won for them the 
enduring regard of all with whom they have been brought in contact. 



BERNARD B. HESSE, Sr. 

Bernard B. Hesse, Sr., of Fort Madison, is the proprietor of one 
of the leading men's furnishing goods stores west of Chicago. He 
has reached his present gratifying and enviable position in business 
through his well directed efforts, his success being due to his sound 
judgment, his unfaltering enterprise and his thoroughly reliable 
methods. He was born in Germany, July 15, 1842, a son of Franz 
Joseph and Frances Hesse, who crossed the Atlantic to the new world 
with their family in 1852, making their way to Fort Madison. The 
father was a miller by trade and followed that pursuit throughout 
the period of his residence in this city, but after living here for about 
six years was called to his final rest on the 8th of March, 1858. His 
wife survived him for about twenty years, passing away March i, 
1878. They had a family of six children, all of whom have passed 
away with the exception of Bernard B. and a sister. 

Bernard B. Hesse was a lad of about ten years when the family 
left the fatherland and crossed the briny deep to the new world. He 
continued his education in the schools of Fort Madison and in his 
teens became connected with the tailoring trade, serving an appren- 
ticeship from 1855 to 1859 when he went to St. Louis, securing a 
position there on the 2i;th of September, 1859. He has since con- 
tinued in that line of business, working his way steadily upward. He 
was first made a cutter and afterward became buyer for the house 
with which he was connected. After leaving that position he entered 
into partnership with J. H. McAIpin, investing one thousand dollars 
in the enterprise. He remained for three years and three months in 
St. Louis as a partner in that business and then returned to Fort 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 125 

Madison in 1868. In tiiis city he has since made his home and his 
progress along commercial lines has been continuous and gratifying. 
On the 9th of April, 1869, he opened a store in partnership with 
J. H. Sand and that relation was maintained for a decade, or until 
1879, when on the 14th of July he sold out to his partner. He next 
opened a clothing store and tailoring shop in the Metropolitan Hotel 
block and in September, 1879, purchased a building at the corner of 
Second and Pine streets. He opened a tailoring establishment there 
in 1880, in the back part of his store, and soon afterward added a 
stock of ready-made clothing. He has since developed the business 
along substantial lines, adding to it year by year until he has one of 
the finest men's furnishing goods stores west of Chicago, occupying 
a building with a frontage of forty-seven feet and a depth of ninety- 
four feet. The upper story of the building is in part used for offices 
but a part of it is also used as a store. He carries an extensive line 
of ready-made clothing of the finest workmanship and also that of 
more medium price in order to meet the varied demands and tastes 
of his customers. His store is most pleasing and attractive in arrange- 
ment and anything in the line of men's wearing apparel may be found 
in this establishment. 

On the 9th of August, 1870, Mr. Hesse was united in marriage 
to Miss Amelia Neighbors, who was born in Fort Madison, a daugh- 
ter of Theodore Neighbors, who in 1849 came to this city from St. 
Louis and was the builder of the Metropolitan Hotel. Their mar- 
riage was unique in that it was celebrated at 4.45 in the morning in 
order that they might catch an early train. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hesse 
four children were born: J. H. McAlpin, who died at the age of 
six months; Bernard B., Jr., who is in business with his father; and 
Frank H. and J. C, who are also in the store. The boys now conduct 
the business, for Mr. Hesse has practically retired, and they are 
worthy successors of their father in the management and control of 
the enterprise, which is today one of the most important commercial 
features of the city. 

Mr. Hesse has always been a member of St. Joseph's Catholic 
church, is active in its work and generous in its support. He also 
belongs to St. Joseph's Society and is a charter member of the Knights 
of Columbus. His political allegiance is given to the democratic 
partv, but he has never sought nor desired office as a reward for party 
fealtv. In Fort Madison not to know Bernard B. Hesse, Sr., is to 
argue one's self unknown, so long and prominently has he been iden- 
tified with business aflfairs of the city. He certainly deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished, for he has been the architect of 



126 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

his own fortunes and has builded wisely and well, being now in pos- 
session of a handsome competence which has come to him as the 
merited reward of his labors. 



DAVID ROLLER. 



David Roller, whose demise occurred January 27, 1914, when 
he had attained the age of almost eighty years, was one of the highly 
esteemed citizens and representative agriculturists of Denmark 
township, where he had made his home for a period covering fifty- 
seven years. He was born in Rhenish Bavaria, Germany, on the 9th 
of June, 1834. His father, the Rev. Henry Roller, was a Mennon- 
ite minister, who also owned and operated a farm and who passed 
away in Germany. 

David Roller was the seventh in order of birth in a family of 
eight sons and two daughters and was the only one who established 
his home in the new world. He was also the last surviving member 
of the family. In his youth he espoused the IMennonite faith but in 
the later years of his life attended the Congregational church. In 
1857, when a voung man of twentv-three years, he crossed the Atlan- 
tic to the United States and made his way direct to Lee county, 
Iowa, locating in Denmark township, where he spent the remainder 
of his life. He first bought a tract of eighty acres which he cleared 
of the timber and improved and subsequently extended the bound- 
aries of his farm by additional purchase. Thereon he continued to 
reside until his demise, devoting his attention to general agricul- 
tural pursuits with e.xcellent results and winning a gratifying meas- 
ure of prosperity in his undertakings. 

On the 5th of April, 1866, Mr. Roller was united in marriage 
to Miss Elizabeth Herstein, who was born near Viele, Lee county, 
Iowa, August 20, 1845, and was reared in Franklin township. It 
was in the earlv '40s that her parents emigrated to America from 
Germany, where one of their children was born, the others being 
natives of this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Roller were born nine 
children, eight of whom grew to maturity and still survive. Dan- 
iel is an agriculturist bv occupation and makes his home in Don- 
nellson, Lee county. Mrs. Emma Van Hynning resides with her 
husband on a farm two miles south of Denmark. Henry, who oper- 
ates his farm of one hundred and si.xty-five acres adjoining the 
old home place, wedded Miss Anna Christensen, a sister of Helena 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 127 

Christensen, who married his brother, John C. Keller, on the same 
date. Mrs. Henry Roller had one child who died in infancy, while 
her demise occurred on the 2d of April, 1910. Lizzie Roller still 
resides at home. John C, of whom a sketch appears on another 
page of this work, is an agriculturist residing on section 21, Den- 
mark township. Edward A., a farmer living at Havelock. North 
Dakota, wedded Miss Emma Herstein, by whom he has two chil- 
dren, a son and daughter. Anna Mae Roller is at home. William 
A. married Miss Fannie Wilder and has two daughters. 

David Roller gave his political allegiance to the republican 
party, loyally supporting its men and measures at the polls. It is 
generally conceded that in his passing the community lost one of its 
most esteemed, valued and venerable citizens. 



JAMES W. SUMMERS. 

James W. Summers is well remembered among the general con- 
tractors of Reokuk during the last quarter of the nineteenth century, 
although his last days were spent in southwestern Ransas. He was 
born in Virginia, November 12, 1835, a son of Andrew and Jane 
(McCall) Summers, who about 1840 brought their family to Lee 
county, settling where the poor farm is now located. This was sev- 
eral years before the admission of the state into the Union and the 
work of progress and development seemed scarcely begun. James 
W. Summers lived to witness many remarkable changes although his- 
residence in this section was not continuous. The family removed 
from Lee county to Clark county, Missouri, where the parents spent 
their remaining days. 

James W. Summers was educated in the public schools of Clark 
county, Missouri, and also in the public schools of Troy, Iowa. He 
then went to Ale.xandria, Missouri, and was associated with the gen- 
eral store of Maxwell & Johnson. Later he turned his attention to 
general contracting and in 1879 he came to Reokuk, where he con- 
tinued in the contracting business for some time. He later turned 
his attention to ranching in southwestern Ransas and was so engaged 
at the time of his death, which occurred on the 3d of May, 1896, at 
Burlington, as the result of a railroad accident. 

It was on the 14th of December, 1881, that Mr. Summers was 
united in marriage to Miss Emma G. Weaver, a daughter of Clark 
and Nancy (Page) Weaver, who were residents of Clark county, 



128 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Summers were not members of any re- 
ligious organization, but attended the Episcopal church and their 
lives were guided by high and honorable principles. In politics 
Mr. Summers was a democrat but not an office seeker, preferring 
to concentrate his energies upon his business. Although he devoted 
some years to general contracting he was more interested in farming. 
In the former connection, however, he built levees between Warsaw 
and Quincy and was otherwise associated with the improvement and 
development of the section in which he made his home. He pos- 
sessed a social nature and won friends wherever he went, but he never 
allowed social activities to interfere with his duty to home and busi- 
ness. He displayed manv sterling traits of character and those who 
knew him speak of him in terms of high regard. His widow survives 
him and makes her home in Keokuk. 



BENJAMIN B. JEWELL. 

Benjamin B. Jewell, who is now spending the evening of life in 
honorable retirement at Keokuk, where he has made his home for 
almost six decades, was long identified with financial interests as 
stockholder and director of the Keokuk Savings Bank and previous 
to his connection therewith devoted his attention for a number of 
years to the conduct of a wholesale grocery establishment. 

His birth occurred in Madison, Jefferson county, Indiana, on the 
loth of julv, 1839, his parents being William j. and Eliza A. (Black- 
iston) Jewell. The former, who was born in Baltimore, Maryland, 
October 1, 1812, wedded Miss Blackiston at New Albany, Indiana, 
on the 27th of May, 1834, and on November i, 1855, came to Lee 
county, Iowa, locating in Keokuk. William J. Jewell was a painter 
by trade and followed that occupation throughout his active business 
career. He painted steamboats while in Cincinnati, but in Keokuk 
was engaged in house painting. In politics he was a republican, 
but never sought nor desired office as a reward for his partv fealty. 
His demise occurred on the 12th of April, 1891, after a residence 
of more than a third of a century in Keokuk, where he had gained 
a wide and favorable acquaintance. His wife died on the 19th of 
December, 1884, passing away in the faith of the Methodist church. 
Their children were seven in number, as follows: Harriet Eliza, 
Benjamin Blackiston, Charles William, Sarah Elizabeth, Mary 
JVIargaret, John and James Edward. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 129 

Benjamin B. Jewell left school at the age of thirteen years and 
secured a position as clerk in a retail store. He was a youth of six- 
teen when his parents established their home in Keokuk, and in 
April, 1857, accepted a position as bookkeeper in a wholesale grocery 
store. On the ist of January, 1865, he became a member of a whole- 
sale grocery hrm and remained actively and successfully engaged 
in its conduct until November, 1889, when the business was discon- 
tinued. In 1890 he became general bookkeeper of the Keokuk Sav- 
ings Bank and continued with the institution as stockholder and di- 
rector for twenty-two consecutive years. For more than two decades 
he was likewise a director of the Lee County Loan & Building Asso- 
ciation and the Keokuk Loan & Building Association. He is now 
living retired. His residence is at No. 311; High street, Keokuk. 

Mr. Jewell is a public-spirited and loyal citizen who manifests 
a helpful interest in movements instituted to promote the general 
welfare and in public afifairs of importance. He made a creditable 
record in the office of city treasurer and for a period of thirty-five 
years was connected with the Library Association, acting as its vice 
president and for twenty-eight years as chairman of its book and 
catalogue committee. Mr. Jewell is a man of genial nature and 
cordial disposition who easily wins friends, while his many good 
qualities enable him to retain the high regard once gained. He has 
now passed the seventy-fifth milestone on life's journey, and his 
career has ever been such that he can look back upon the past without 
regret and forward to the future without fear. 



E. P. HAZEN, D. D. S. 



Dentistry is unique among the professions inasmuch as its fol- 
lowers if successful must possess three distinct qualities, mechanical 
ingenuity, scientific knowledge and the business ability which enables 
one to capably manage the financial interests of an undertaking. Well 
qualified in these particulars and especially well versed in the learn- 
ing of his profession, Dr. Hazen is regarded as one of the capable 
practitioners of dentistry in Fort Madison. He was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, November 22, 1857, and is a son of S. M. and Mary (Ney) 
Hazen, the former a farmer by occupation. 

The son, spending his boyhood and youth under the parental roof, 
supplemented his public-school education by a course in the Pennsyl- 
vania State Normal. He decided upon the practice of dentistry as 



130 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

a life work and to this end entered the Philadelphia Dental College, 
from which he was graduated in the spring of 1883. For four years 
prior to his graduation, however, he had engaged in active practice 
under a permit from the state and had thus had broad and valuable 
experience before he came to the middle west. In January, 1884, 
he arrived in Fort Madison, where he has since remained. He now 
has a large and well equipped dental office supplied with the latest 
improved dental appliances and instruments which greatly facili- 
tate his work. He is an expert and painstaking operator and his 
ability has brought to him a liberal and growing practice. While 
many years have passed since his graduation he has kept abreast 
with the progress of the profession through wide reading and as a 
member of the Iowa State and National Dental Associations. He 
has been chairman of the county in connection with the state society. 
At one time he was half owner of the American College of Den- 
tistry, which sold out to the Northwestern University. For many 
years he was one of the lecturers in the Keokuk Dental College and 
became widely known as an able educator as well as practitioner. 

On the ist of February, 1880, Dr. Hazen was united in marriage 
to Miss Margaret Campbell, of Pennsylvania, and unto them have 
been born two daughters, Edna G. and L. Lala. Fraternally Dr. 
Hazen is a Mason, belonging to both the blue lodge and chapter, 
and he is also connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. In politics he is a republican where national issues are in- 
volved but casts an independent local ballot, supporting the candi- 
dates whom he deems best qualified for office without regard to party 
affiliations. He holds membership in the Presbyterian church, and 
his influence is always on the side of progress and improvement, 
whether in connection with his profession or in relation to public 
affairs. 



HENRY WALLJASPER. 

Henry Walljasper is a retired carpenter and builder, owning 
and occupying a farm of fifty acres situated on the western border of 
West Point. He was formerly the owner of a farm of one hundred 
and eighty-five acres adjoining the city on the west, but has recently 
sold this property to his son Anton, who is now cultivating the land. 
His farm extended altogether a mile east and west. 

Mr. Walljasper is one of the early settlers of Lee county, having 
come here in 1851 with his two brothers and their parents. He was 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 131 

born in the province of Westphalen, Prussia, Germany, December 6, 
1837, and is, therefore, in the seventy-seventh year of his age. He 
is a son of Otto anci Katherine (Hackenkamp) Walljasper, both of 
whom were also natives of Westphalen, where they were reared and 
married. It was in the year 1846 that they bade adieu to that country 
and sailed for the new world, settling first in St. Louis, where they 
arrived in January, 1847. They resided in that city for five years, 
the father there working at the painter's trade, and in the fall of 
1 85 1 they came to West Point. The father engaged in painting signs, 
in lettering and doing other similar work. He died about twenty- 
eight years ago, having reached the age of seventy-four years and 
eight months. His wife passed away forty-eight years ago and was 
then fifty-six years of age. In their family were three children: 
Henry and Stephen, both of whom were born in Germany; and 
John, a native of West Point. 

From the age of fourteen years Henry Walljasper has resided at 
West Point. He can well remember incidents of the voyage to the 
new world and of their residence in St. Louis. He worked with his 
father at the painter's trade and later took up carpentering, which 
he mastered. Subsequently he formed a partnership with his brother 
Stephen for carpenter and contract work, and they erected the school- 
house and many other buildings at West Point, becoming recognized 
leaders in their line, a position which thev maintained for manv 
years in this vicinity and in nearby towns. Henry Walljasper was 
thus actively engaged in lousiness for half a century and many of the 
substantial structures of West Point and the surrounding country 
stand as monuments to his skill and ability. 

In the fall of 1865, at West Point, Mr. Walljasper was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Roterick, who was born in Westphalen, 
Germany, in 1840, a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Helleford) 
Roterick, who came to Lee county about 1847 and took up their 
abode near St. Paul, which is located on a part of the old home farm. 
Both the father and mother passed away upon that place. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Walljasper have been born five children, two of whom died 
in infancy. Katie is the wife of Frank Ussenbrink, a carpenter and 
builder, and they have two children, Henry and Albert. Mary is 
the wife of Frank Friedel, a farmer of Pleasant Ridge township, 
and they have one son, Leonard. Anton married Miss Katie Ding- 
man, a daughter of Barney and Margaret Dingman, and they have 
five children, Margaret, Alvin, Mary Agnes, Karl and Katie. 

Mr. Walljasper built a new set of buildings upon his farm. He 
still lives at the old home and finds that in the management of his 



132 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

small place he has all that he cares to do. His has been an active 
and useful life, crowned with a substantial measure of success, and 
he always displayed good qualities, which have won for him high re- 
gard. Politically he is a democrat, and, while he has not sought or 
held political office, he has served for several years at various times 
as school director. He is a member of St. Mary's Catholic church 
and his life has been guided by his religious faith. 



RUFUS HENRY YOUNKIN. 

Rufus Henry Younkin, president of the Montrose Savings Bank 
and a retired farmer of Montrose township, was born August 17, 
1836, in the town of Grayshot, not far from Zanesville, Muskingum 
county, Ohio. His paternal grandfather, Ralph Younkin, was a 
native of Virginia and spent his last days near Uniontown, Ohio. 
His son Joseph Younkin was born near Fortress Monroe, Virginia, 
and accompanied his parents on their removal to Ohio. He married 
Susan Meek and about 1846 removed with his family to Iowa, both 
he and his wife spending their last days in Montrose township, Lee 
county. 

Rufus Henry Younkin began his education in one of the old-time 
log schoolhouses common in frontier districts. When ten years of 
age he accompanied his parents to Iowa, most of the journey being 
made by boat by way of St. Louis and Peoria, Illinois. The family 
home was established at Farmington, Iowa, where in 1849 the father 
purchased a farm of one hundred and ten acres, upon which he lived 
for fifteen years. In 1864 a removal was made to Montrose town- 
ship, Lee county. Rufus H. Younkin completed his education in 
the public schools of Farmington, which he attended through the 
winter seasons to the age of nineteen years, devoting the summer 
months to work in the fields upon his father's farm. 

On the 31st of March, 1870, Mr. Younkin was united in mar- 
riage, in Montrose township, to Miss Blanch A. Sawyer, a daughter 
of Thomas and Eliza (Snodgrass) Sawyer. Following their mar- 
riage the young couple began their domestic life upon a farm in 
Montrose township and for thirty-five years Mr. Younkin continued 
to devote his energies to general agricultural pursuits and became 
the owner of an excellent farm of two hundred acres, which is still 
in his possession. He brought the fields to a high state of cultiva- 
tion and added all modern accessories and equipments to his farm. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 133 

At length, liowever, in 1905, he removed to the town of Montrose 
and retired from active connection with agricultural interests. He 
is now president of the Montrose Savings Bank, of which he was 
one of the organizers. This bank was established in Februarv, 1902, 
with a capital of ten thousand dollars, which was increased in 191 i 
to twenty thousand dollars. The present bank building was erected 
in 1912. The institution is now in a flourishing condition and is re- 
garded as one of the strong financial enterprises of the county. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Younkin have been born five children: 
Joseph S., who is living in Arkansas City, Kansas; Thomas S., de- 
ceased; Ralph A., who makes his home in Tacoma, Washington; 
Katy, deceased; and Susan, now the wife of Harry Wardlaw, of 
Montrose. In his political views Mr. Younkin has long been a 
stalwart republican and has served as town councilman. His re- 
ligious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbvterian 
church, in which he formerly held ofiice. His life has been guided 
by high and honorable principles, and upon his industry and his per- 
severance he has builded the success which now crowns his efforts. 



JOHN W. MEDDAUGH. 

Too much honor cannot be paid to the veterans of that great con- 
flict which decided once for all that the Union was indeed indissolu- 
ble, and as a veteran of the Civil war John W. Meddaugh is entitled 
to the veneration of those who today are enjoying the peace and se- 
curity won in the '60s. He resides on his farm on section 10, Cedar 
township, and as his former labor enabled him to secure a compe- 
tence, he now lives practically retired, doing a little farm work when- 
ever he so desires. 

His birth occurred at Farmington, Van Buren county, Iowa, on 
the 9th of July, 1847, and his parents were Benjamin and Eliza 
(Stevenson) Meddaugh. The father was born in New York in 
1 8 16 and, coming to Lee county, Iowa, in 1849, he farmed in Cedar 
township and devoted some attention to stock-raising as well. He 
passed away in 191 1. The mother of our subject was born in Mary- 
land in 1 82 1 and later removed to Ohio when the family home was 
established in that state. Her marriage occurred in Indiana, whence 
she again moved to Ohio and later to Iowa. 

John W. Meddaugh is indebted to the public-school system for his 
educational advantages, and at the age of sixteen he enlisted in Com- 



134 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

pany C, Eighth Iowa Cavalry Volunteers under the command of 
Captain E. Pickett, of Farmington, Iowa. He saw active service 
for two years and three months, being in a number of skirmishes 
and battles. He had the honor of becoming a personal friend of 
General Grant and often shared the commander's tent. He was 
mustered out at the end of the war at Clinton, Iowa, and then re- 
turned home. He has followed farming and stock-raising and has 
been very successful at those occupations. He owns seventy acres of 
productive land situated on section lo, Cedar township, and the farm 
is in an excellent condition. Besides this property he has one hun- 
dred and twenty acres in St. Louis countv, Minnesota. As previously 
stated, Mr. Meddaugh is now practically living retired, enjoying 
the comforts of life which his long years of labor made possible. 

Mr. Meddaugh was united in marriage to Miss Mary Annis 
Doane, who was born in Salem, Henrv county, Iowa, on the 17th 
of July, 1849, a daughter of Robert and Rachel (Doane) Doane. 
Her father was a native of North Carolina, born in 18 17, and her 
mother was born in Indiana in 1821. They were married in the 
latter state, but came to Lee county, Iowa, in 1851, the mother pass- 
ing away the following year. Mr. and Mrs. Meddaugh now reside 
on the old Doane homestead. They are the parents of a son, Robert 
Lee, whose natal day was July 28, 1873. He is now a resident of 
South America. Mr. Meddaugh is one of the most respected citi- 
zens of Lee county and his declining years are made bright by the 
consciousness of a life of usefulness and bv the friendship of manv. 



ERNEST CORSEPIUS. 



One of the most prominent figures in business circles of Fort 
Madison is Ernest Corsepius, who has promoted and successfully 
conducted a number of important commercial and industrial enter- 
prises. He also figures prominently in boat-racing circles and alto- 
gether is a popular citizen, highly esteemed wherever he is known 
nnd most of all where he is best known. He was born in Germany 
in 1867 and is a son of Ernest and Elizabeth Corsepius, who came 
to the United States in 1870, making their way to Rock Island, Illi- 
nois, where the father engaged in business as a contractor and builder. 
He was not long permitted to enjoy his new home, however, but 
passed away in 1873. His widow survived him for about si.x years, 
dying in 1879. 






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HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 137 

Ernest Corsepius, who was one of a family of three sons, was 
but three years of age when the family crossed the Atlantic to the 
United States. His educational privileges were such as the public 
schools afforded but his opportunities in that direction were some- 
what limited, for at the age of thirteen years he went upon the river 
as a cabin boy. He spent six years on the river and then went from 
Dubuque, Iowa, to Memphis, Tennessee, in a skiff. He next worked 
in Arkansas for one winter and was employed at Cairo, Illinois, for 
a year and a half at bridge building. On the expiration of that 
period he removed to Galesburg, Illinois, and entered the employ 
of the Purington Paving Brick Company in the capacity of mill- 
wright. He was next with the Glenwood Ice Company in the re- 
sponsible position of manager for nine years and before the expira- 
tion of that period also engaged in the building and contracting 
business, in which he was quite successful, contributing in large 
measure to the improvement of the city as well as to individual 
prosperity. He laid out the Corsepius subdivision of Galesburg. 

At length he decided to try his fortune in Iowa and took up his 
abode in Fort Madison in 1901. Here he embarked in the whole- 
sale ice business, which he is now conducting on an extensive scale, 
shipping from four hundred to nine hundred cars per year. He as- 
sisted in organizing the Fort Madison Sand & Gravel Company in 
1910, and in 1908 he organized the Auto Supply & Engine Com- 
pany, a business which has proved a success from its inception. He 
has the best garage and repair shop in Fort Madison, employing 
twelve first-class mechanics in the conduct of the business. There 
is also a paint department which is equally well conducted. He is 
a man of undaunted energy and early came to a recognition of the 
fact that persistent energy can overcome any difficulty or obstacle. 
He has thus worked his way steadily upward until he is today one 
of the most important factors in the business activity of his city. 

Mr. Corsepius helped to organize the Mississippi Power Boat 
Association and has been very active in connection with the racing- 
boat business. He has himself been connected with many notable 
racing events and held the championship of the Mississippi river 
for two years, building his own boats and operating them himself. 
He has also won eight different championship cups and an interest 
in four others. In 1914 Mr. Corsepius was elected president of the 
Fort Madison Commercial Club and as its head has instituted many 
movements tending to the material development of the city. 

In 1890 Mr. Corsepius married Miss Minnie Jacobs, of Gales- 
burg, and they have one child, Geneva, and an adopted daughter, 



138 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Lena, both of whom are at home. Mr. Corsepius has belonged to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since reaching the age of 
twenty-one years. He is connected with the Elks, the Eagles and 
the Moose, and is true and loyal to the beneficent teachings and 
principles of those organizations. In politics he is an independent 
republican. He is justly proud of his record as a champion in boat 
races and he has equal reason to be proud of his splendid record 
which he has made in business, whereby he has advanced steadily, 
step by step, to his present place of prominence in industrial and 
commercial circles of Fort Madison. 



JULIUS P. KLOPFENSTEIN. 

Julius P. Klopfenstein, an agriculturist and stock-raiser, who 
operates a farm of two hundred and ninety-six acres of rich and pro- 
ductive land on section 7, 8 and 18, Denmark township, was born 
in the same township, near his present home, on the 19th of February, 
1880. His father, the late David Klopfenstein, passed away August 
10, 1905, at the old home which he had owned and occupied for 
twentv vears. Something of the measure of respect in which he 
was held was indicated by the large attendance at his funeral, which 
was held at Long Creek church, this being probably the largest Ma- 
sonic funeral ever seen in that section of the county. He is still 
survived by his wife, who was in her maidenhood Elizabeth Melcher 
and who now resides at West Point. In their family were four 
children: Lenora, the wife of J. C. Foggy, a resident farmer of 
Pleasant Ridge township; Julius P.; George, who died when about 
three years of age; and Kathryn, who is a teacher of music and 
resides with her mother at West Point. 

Julius P. Klopfenstein spent his youthful days at the old home 
and enjoyed good educational advantages, attending the Denmark 
Academy and Elliott's Business College at Burlington. His initial 
business training of a practical character was received during a year 
spent in the service of a hardware company at Burlington and in 
the spring of 1904 he returned to Lee county and began the operation 
of the home farm of two hundred and seventy-three acres in part- 
nership with his father. Julius P. Klopfenstein purchased the prop- 
erty in the spring of 1909 and he has since added to his holdings 
until the farm has reached its present size, comprising two hundred 
and ninety-six acres. It is splendidly improved, lacking none of the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 139 

accessories of the model farm of the twentieth century. He raises 
the various cereals best adapted to soil and climate and in addition 
handles registered Hereford cattle and Poland China hogs, his live- 
stock interests constituting an important factor in his growing success. 
He has about one hundred and sixty acres of his land under cultiva- 
tion while the remainder is in pasture or in timber. 

In March, 1909, Mr. Klopfenstein was married to Miss Luella 
Stein, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stein, of Fort Madison, 
where she was reared and spent the most of her girlhood. They 
have two children, Jack Orville and Velna Lenora, aged, respect- 
ively, four and two years. In politics Mr. Klopfenstein is a democrat 
and is now serving as township trustee. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Masonic lodge at Danville and is loyal to the teachings 
and purposes of the craft. His entire life has been spent in Denmark 
township, and that he has many good qualities is attested by his 
friends, many of whom have known him from his boyhood and have 
given him their warm regard. 



J. FRANK SMITH. 



Among Keokuk's honored dead should be mentioned J. Frank 
Smith, who was well known in Lee county as an attorney. With 
the practice of law he also combined the making of abstracts, and 
his professional and other connections made him widely known. 
He was born in Ohio on the 7th of October, 1848, a son of M. D. and 
Minerva (James) Smith. The father passed away while the family 
were still in Ohio and in the fall of 1857 '^'"'^ mother came to Lee 
county, Iowa, with her family, accompanying her parents, who at 
that time emigrated westward and settled on a farm north of Keokuk. 
In 1858 they removed to the vicinity of Charleston and in 1864 a 
further removal was made to Keokuk. 

J. Frank Smith attended the public schools in the dififerent locali- 
ties where the family resided, continuing his education in the gram- 
mar and high schools of Keokuk. He afterward clerked in a shoe 
store and subsequently turned his attention to the dry-goods trade, 
with which he was connected in the capacity of salesman. Thinking, 
however, to find professional pursuits more congenial, he took up 
the study of law, reading under the direction of Joseph G. Anderson, 
of the firm of Gilmore & Anderson. He started an abstract of titles 
business and it was subsequent to that time that he began reading 



140 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

law, knowing how valuable such a course would be in connection 
with his other interests and recognizing, too, the broad held open 
to the active members of the bar. It was in 1879 that he and a sister, 
Miss Nannie M. Smith, established an abstract business under the 
firm name of |. F. & N. M. Smith, under which name the business 
has since been continued, although in 1908 J. Frank Smith retired, 
his sister remaining alone until joined by her nephew, Ralph B. 
Smith. 

J. Frank Smith was an active republican, and his opinions carried 
weight in the local councils of the party. He served as township 
committeeman and did everything in his power to promote the 
growth and insure the success of republican interests. He was not 
connected with secret societies, but was a man of social nature who 
readilv won friends and retained their high regard by reason of a 
well spent life. He attended the Congregational church, of which 
his wife was a member, and high and honorable principles guided 
him in every relation. 

In October, 1879, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Buell, a daughter of Lyman W. and N. H. (Doolittle) 
Buell, and to them were born the following children: Ralph B.; 
Margaret A., who died in infancy; and Ruth E. The death of Mr. 
Smith occurred on the 30th of June, 1908, and his wife survived him 
for less than a year, passing away May 17, 1909. They were people 
of many good traits, so that they enjoyed the warm esteem of those 
who knew them, and a large circle of friends mourn their loss. 



RALPH B. SMITH. 



Ralph B. Smith, well known in business circles of Keokuk as 
a member of the firm of J. F. & N. M. Smith, engaged in the ab- 
stract of titles business, was born in the city which is still his home, 
February 5, 1883, his parents being J. Frank and Margaret (Buell) 
Smith. At the usual age he entered the public schools, passing 
through consecutive grades, and then in preparation for a profes- 
sional career entered the law department of Drake L^niversitv, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1904. Some years before 
his father and his aunt had established an abstract of titles business 
under the firm name of J. F. & N. M. Smith and in July, 1908, Ralph 
B. Smith became a member of this firm. The business is still con- 
tinued under the old name. They have a large clientage and are 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 141 

well qualified to take care of an important business of this character. 
They are always faithful to the interests of those whom they repre- 
sent and their liberal patronage is well deserved. 

In his political views Mr. Smith is an earnest republican. He 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day and re- 
gards it the duty as well as the privilege of every American citizen 
to support those political projects which he believes to be for the best 
interests of the community, state or nation. He has served in some 
local offices, including those of deputy clerk, deputy recorder and 
city attorney. Fraternally Mr. Smith is a Mason and has taken 
the Royal Arch degrees, serving at the present time as high priest 
in the chapter. He is interested in all public movements which are 
a matter of civic virtue and civic pride and his cooperation can 
always be counted upon to further such movements. His ideas are 
progressive and his methods practical, and thus substantial work 
is achieved for the benefit of the community. 



CLARENCE L. FEEBLER. 

Clarence L. Feebler, engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business at West Foint, has 'been active along those lines for ap- 
proximately twenty years. He handles both town and farm prop- 
erty and his real estate dealings are largely in Lee countv. He is 
well known at West Foint and in other sections of the county, within 
the borders of which he has spent his entire life. He was born 
April 21, 1854, on the lot at the northeast corner of the square, where 
he now has his oflice, his parents being James D. and Mary (Ever- 
ingham) Feebler, who came to Lee County in pioneer times, the 
former arriving in 1837 and the latter in 1840. James D. Feebler 
was born in Simpson county, Kentucky, June 3, 1826, and died at 
West Foint, April 22, 1908. He was a son of John M. Feebler, who 
was born in Lexington, Kentucky, in February, 1797, and died at 
Lexington, Iowa, in 1869. He had followed farming during the 
greater part of his life, although he was a potter bv trade. It was 
in the year 1826 that John M. Feebler and his wife left the south 
and removed to Springfield, Illinois. They afterward made their 
way to Carthage, that state, and thence came to Iowa. Mrs. Feebler 
was a daughter of Thaddeus Lewis, of Virginia, who was with 
Washington in the Revolutionary army, having run away from home 
in order to join the Continental troops. John M. Feebler was united 



142 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

in marriage to Jane Bumbray Lewis, who was a cousin of Meri- 
wether Lewis, the noted explorer of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 
to the northwest. 

James D. Feebler accompanied his parents to Iowa, being about 
eleven years of age at the time of the arrival of the family in Lee 
county. He was thereafter reared here to the time of his majority 
and continued to make his home in the state throughout the re- 
mainder of his life. In 1852 he embarked in merchandising at West 
Point and for a quarter of a century prior to his death was an active 
business man there. His family were Dunkards, as are many of 
their descendants. James D. Feebler served in some local offices 
and was regarded as one of the citizens of most worth in his com- 
munity. In 1 85 1 he wedded Mary Everingham, who was born July 
29, 1829, in Beaconsfield, England, and died February 4, 1907. She 
was a daughter of Thomas and Mary Everingham. Her father came 
to West Foint in 1839 and purchased a stock of goods, after which 
he returned to England for his family, bringing his wife and children 
to the new world in 1840. Unfortunately, six months later he was 
carried over the dam at Lowell in the Skunk river, and at his death 
left a widow and four children. She continued the business for 
many years and finally passed away at West Foint. She was a mem- 
ber of the Fresbyterian church and a lady of many splendid qualities 
of heart and mind, which won for he^ the love and esteem of all 
who knew her. Mrs. Feebler saw Queen Victoria's coronation and 
her wedding processions and after coming to America witnessed 
various notable events, including General Taylor's return from the 
Mexican war. Her brother Richard Everingham saw the Confed- 
erate flag raised in Kansas City and attended the first cross-continent 
railroad meeting. He lived in Iowa before it was a state and went 
to Kansas City when it contained a population of one thousand. He 
paid taxes on an office for fifty-three years and he died June 12, 1910. 

Clarence L. Feebler is the elder of two children, having a sister, 
Miss Elizabeth Feebler, who lives at West Foint. He was reared 
in the town which is still his home and most of his life has here been 
passed. He acquired a grammar-school education and was tutored 
by the same teachers as was his mother. For years he followed the 
painter's trade and afterward engaged in different lines, until he 
entered his present field of business. For the past twenty years he 
has handled real estate and has negotiated a number of important 
realty transfers. He also represents the Springfield Fire & Marine 
Insurance Company, the Home and the Hanover, of New York, 
and the Security of Davenport, and has recently become representa- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 143 

tive for the Etiuitublc Lite Insurance Company of New York. He 
writes a large amount of insurance annually and his business in b<Jth 
of its branches is proving profitable and making heavy demands upon 
his time. 

Politically Mr. Feebler is an earnest democrat, believing firmly 
in the principles of his party, and he has served as councilman of 
West Foint. He is now secretary of the board of education, which 
office he has held for more than ten years. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Masons, his membership being in the lodge at Fort 
Madison. He has a very wide and favorable acquaintance through- 
out the county, and his circle of friends is almost coe.xtensive with 
the circle of his acquaintance. 



J. B. WEIL. 

y. B. Weil is the present representative of one of the oldest retail 
establishments in Keokuk, and under his wise guidance it has suf- 
fered no diminution of the high standard inaugurated by its founders. 
It had its beginning in 1851, as Weil & Company, Jonathan Weil' his 
father, being one of the organizers. J. B. Weil came to Keokuk in 
1875, when fourteen years old, and began on the lowest rung of the 
ladder of retail mercantile experience. When nineteen years of 
age he embarked in business on his own account and has remained a 
merchant of Keokuk continuously since. Aside from the fact that 
he has succeeded, he is widely known as a strong supporter of every 
movement or measure instituted to promote the general welfare. Mr. 
Weil is married, and in fraternal circles he is known as a thirty- 
second degree Scottish Rite Mason and a member of the Mystic 
Shrine. 



WILLIAM A. MILLER. 

William A. Miller is the owner of three hundred and forty acres 
of Iowa land, which is conceded to be of unrivaled excellence for 
agricultural purposes, and he carries on stock-raising and general 
farming successfully, being one of the well-to-do residents of Fleas- 
ant Ridge township. He was born at Mendota, La Salle county, 
Illinois, September 24, 1859, a son of Asher and Nancy D. (Church) 



1^4 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Miller, natives of Massachusetts and Connecticut, respectively. The 
subject of this review is the only one of their three children who 
survives. The family removed west in the spring of 1864, locating 
in Pleasant Ridge township, this county, where the father passed 
away eight years later at the age of sixty-one. His widow survived 
him for many years and was seventy-five years old at the time of her 
demise. 

Williain A. Miller received his education in the public schools 
and did his share of the work upon the home farm. He has remained 
an agriculturist and now operates his splendid farm of three hun- 
dred and forty acres with the assistance of his son, engaging not only 
in the raising of grain, but also in the feeding of stock for the market. 
His hogs and cattle bring him a good sum annually and he is also 
a breeder of horses of good grade. He is a splendid example of the 
modern, intelligent and businesslike farmer who finds in agriculture 
opportunities for an independent and prosperous life. 

Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Box in 
1886 in Henry county. One son, Le Roy, was born to their union, 
the date of his birth being November 3, 1889. The mother passed 
away during the succeeding year, and in 1895 Mr. Miller was again 
married. Miss Rachel E. Harvey becoming his bride. She is a native 
of Lee county and her parents are John L. and Eliza (Canada) 
Harvey, who came to the Hawkeye state from Indiana. Mrs. Miller 
was born in the same year as her husband. The son, Le Roy Miller, 
attended the public schools and subsequently the Denmark Academy, 
and has since aided his father in the cultivation of the home farm. 

The family are members of the Congregational church and con- 
form their lives to its teachings. Father and son are republicans in 
their political allegiance and take a keen interest in all affairs of 
public concern. The family hold to the fullest extent the confidence 
and good will of all who know them and are valued residents of the 
communitv. 



HENRY TIEKE. 



Henry Tieke was a man held in high regard during the period 
of his residence in Keokuk. He came to Lee county in 18^3 and 
for an extended period carried on business on his own account as 
a dealer in cigars and tobacco. As the family name indicates, he 
comes of German ancestry. He was born in Oldenburg, Germany, 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 145 

February 20, 1830, and was a son of John Tieke. When a young 
man of about sixteen or eighteen years he bade adieu to the father- 
land and sailed for the United States, with New Orleans as his des- 
tination. After landing at the Crescent city he made his way north- 
ward, settling at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he followed the cigar- 
maker's trade, which he had previously learned in his native land. 
He was also employed in that capacity at Indianapolis, Indiana, for 
several years and in 1853 crossed the Mississippi into Iowa, be- 
coming a resident of Lee county, where his remaining days were 
passed. He here worked at his trade in the employ of others for a 
time, during which he carefully saved his earnings until his industry 
afid economy had made his capital sufficient to enable him to embark 
in business on his own account. He then opened a cigar and to- 
bacco establishment and soon built up a good trade, which he suc- 
cessfully managed and controlled until 1872, when he retired from 
active business with a handsome competence that enabled him to 
spend his remaining days in the enjoyment of well earned rest. 

On the 24th of October, 1858, Mr. Tieke was united in marriage 
to Miss Sophia Schardelman, of Keokuk, who still survives, her 
home being at No. 1012 Blondeau street. They traveled life's jour- 
ney happily together for almost a half century and were then sep- 
arated by the death of Mr. Tieke on the 2d of March, 1907. He was 
a republican in his political views and was active in public affairs, 
cooperating in many movements that related to the general good. 
He served as councilman for several years and for ten years was 
path commissioner. Fraternally he was a Mason and an Odd Fel- 
low. He joined the latter organization on the 23d of November, 
1852, and was presented with a medal on the completion of fifty 
years' connection therewith. He was active in the building of the 
Odd Fellows' temple in Keokuk and did everything in his power to 
further the interests of the order. In all things he was an honest, 
upright man, whose genuine worth commended him to the confidence 
and high regard of all with whom he came in contact. 



JAMES W. CONLEY. 



James W. Conley, a liveryman of West Point, 'has in his stables 
ten head of horses and in connection with his trade keeps two auto- 
mobiles. He has been engaged in this business at West Point since 
1895 a"d was formerly identified with the hardware trade at this 



146 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

place, having been a resident of West Point tor tlie past twenty 
years. His efforts have been a salient featlire in the upbuilding 
of the town and he is a most progressive and valued citizen. 

He was born at Rochester, New York, in 1858, a son of John and 
Mary (Moran) Conley, both of whom were natives of Ireland. Cross- 
ing the Atlantic in early life, they became residents of Canada and 
were there married, after which they conducted for a number ot 
years the old Harp & Crown Hotel in Quebec. In 1856 they crossed 
the border into the United States, settling at Rochester, New York, 
where thev also conducted a tavern. Afterward they returned to 
Canada for a time and then again went to Rochester, where the 
father once more engaged in the hotel business. He passed away 
in that city in 1861, when a comparatively young man. The mother 
afterward removed to Quincy, Illinois, where she conducted a 
grocery store and was active in business for a considerable period. 
She had two brothers who were living in that locality. Her death 
occurred in Quincy when she was about seventy-four years of age. 
In the family were two sons and three daughters, but all have passed 
away with the exception of James W. and his sister, Mrs. Simon 
P. Wayne, who is a widow, residing at Decatur, Illinois, although she 
is now temporarily with her children in Springfield. 

James W. Conley was reared in Quincy, Illinois, from the age of 
ten years and there attended St. Francis College. From his youthful 
days to the present he has been an active factor in business circles. 
There have, indeed, been few idle moments in his entire career. He 
first worked with the Comstock-Castle Company at Quincy in con- 
nection with the hardware and stove business, being thus engaged 
for eight years. On leaving that city he removed to Mendon, Illi- 
nois, where he remained for a year, and then went to Perry, Illinois. 
Afterward he went to West Point, Illinois, where he was employed 
by a Mr. Schaefer as a tinner, having previously learned the trade. 
A vear later Mr. Schaefer died and Mr. Conley then purchased the 
business, which he conducted for five years. On the expiration 
of that period he sold out and removed to Loraine, Illinois, where he 
opened a hardware store. At a later date he disposed of his business 
there and returned to West Point, Illinois, where he conducted a 
shop, also carrying on business at Stronghurst, Illinois. He then 
retired for two years and in 1895 he came to West Point, Iowa, where 
he has now made his home for almost two decades. Here he again 
embarked in the hardware business, carrying at same time a line of 
farm implements and buggies. He then established his livery busi- 
ness and has good equipment for caring for his trade, wiiich is con- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 147 

stantly growing. He keeps on hand ten head of horses and 
some good vehicles and he also has two automobiles to be used in 
the trade. 

In 1882 Mr. Conley was united in marriage to Miss Laura 
Owens, formerly of Chili, Hancock, county, Illinois, and to them 
have been born five children: May, the wife of Charles Brockway, 
by whom she has one child, Irene; Dorothy, the wife of Herman 
Grimm, of Seattle, Washington; and Laura, Sterling and Matthew, 
all at home. 

The parents are members of St. Mary's Catholic church and 
Mr. Conley belongs to the Loyal Order of Moose at Fort Madison. 
Politically he is a democrat, earnest and consistent in his advocacy 
of the party principles. He is a recognized leader of his party in 
this locality and for twelve years has served as a member of the 
city council of West Point and for eight years as a member of the 
school board. He has done much to further the vital interests and 
promote the upbuilding of his town and'has been the builder of four 
houses and the owner of six at West Point, which he has sold. 
At the present time he is erecting a fine modern residence and thus 
adds much to the architectural adornment of the place. He also 
owns the Electric Theater of West Point. He is most progressive, 
carefully formulates his plans, and then by determination and inde- 
fatigable energy he carries them forward to sucessful completion. 



THOMAS P. GRAY. 



Thomas P. Gray, formerly a member of Keokuk's department of 
public safety, has had a somewhat remarkable and exciting career, 
due in large measure to his work as deputy United States marshal, 
an office which as a rule makes a life replete with stirring events and 
scenes. Born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, on the 21st of August, 
1855, he is a son of Francis A. J. and Adeline (Palmer) Gray, who 
removed westward to Iowa when their son Thomas was but nine 
years of age. They settled in Muscatine and there spent their re- 
maining days, the father devoting his life to the occupation of 
farming. 

Thomas P. Gray devoted his boyhood days to the acquirement 
of an education in the district schools and to assisting in the work of 
the home farm. He early took his place in the fields and became 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the 



148 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

crops. In September, 1894, he came to Keokuk, where he has since 
resided, and during much of the period through the intervening vears 
to the present he has hlled public office in a most capable and faithful 
manner. In March, 1894, he received appointment as deputv United 
States marshal and one of his most noteworthy acts while serving in 
that capacity was the arrest of three green goods men operating 
throughout the middle west. Fraudulent use of the mails resulted in 
their capture in Chicago after a long chase, in which energy and 
daring were skillfully brought into play. On the ist of April, 1910, 
Mr. Gray was elected to a position in the department of public safety 
and served with credit and fidelity for four years. At one time he 
owned an interest in a candy factory in Keokuk and since withdraw- 
ing from that connection has been out of business. He also at one 
time conducted the Drexel bowling alley and billiard parlor. 

On the 17th of June, 1891, Mr. Gray was united in marriage to 
Miss Helen Boyles, and they have two children, Helen Palmer and 
Thomas Francis. The parents are Episcopalians in religious faith 
and in politics Mr. Gray is a democrat of the Wilson type, believing 
firmly in the principles of the party. In his career as deputy United 
States marshal he has had many interesting and ofttimes exciting 
experiences, which, if given in detail, would impress upon one the 
old adage that truth is stranger than fiction. 



GEORGE BURK. 



|. Burk & Company, manufacturers of all kinds of carbonated 
beverages, has for almost a half century been one of the prosperous 
concerns of Keokuk. It was founded in 1865 by John Burk, who was 
one of the pioneers of Keokuk. He was born in Malmo, Sweden, in 
1833 and came to the United States at the age of twenty years, land- 
ing at New Orleans. He later became a resident of St. Louis and 
there he learned the soda-water business. He subsequently turned 
his knowledge to good account as the founder of J. Burk & Company 
of Keokuk. His death occurred in 1889. His wife, who in her maid- 
enhood was Emma A. Capson, was born in 1833 and died in 1890. 
Their marriage occurred in Sweden. 

The subject of this sketch. George Burk, was born in Keokuk 
on the 6th of April, 1867, and educated in the local schools. He 
has lived in the same ward all of his life and has thoroughly iden- 
tified himself with the progress and growth of his native city. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 149 

During his business career he has been identilied with the company 
of which his father was the founder and he has ably carried on 
the work whicli his father began. J. Burk & Company's product 
is sold throughout this entire section and the trade knows that its 
soda water, ginger ale and other carbonated beverages are always to 
be depended upon. Only the purest materials are used and great 
care is taken in their manufacture to observe all sanitary rules. The 
business is conducted at loi i to 1013 Main street. 

Mr. Burk is a member of a number of fraternal organizations and 
is popular therein. He belongs to the Eagles, Elks, Moose and the 
Owls. A resident of the city during his whole life and a son of one 
of its manufacturers and business men, he does all in his power to 
promote the welfare of Keokuk along lines of material and moral 
advancement. 



JOHN ROVANE. 



John Rovane, who has been a resident of Keokuk for a period of 
fifty-six years, covering practically his entire life, has been success- 
fully engaged in business as a merchant of the city for a third of a 
century and now conducts a well appointed retail grocery establish- 
ment at No. 500 Palean street. 

His birth occurred in New Orleans, Louisiana, on the 26th of 
March, 1857, his parents being Thomas and Mary (Havey) Rovane. 
The family of Rovane was of French origin but moved to Ireland 
for political reasons. It was in 1850 that Thomas Rovane, the father 
of our subject, left the Emerald isle to take up his abode in the 
United States. He located first at Marietta, Ohio, and subsequently 
removed to New Orleans, where he met and married Mary Havey. 
In 1857 he came to Keokuk, Iowa, and maintained his residence in 
that city throughout the remainder of his life, although he devoted 
his attention principally to farming. He worked on the old govern- 
ment lock here and was directly employed on the concrete work, 
superintending that particular branch of construction. Thomas Ro- 
vane gave his political allegiance to the democracy and was a Roman 
Catholic in religious faith. Unto him and his wife were born three 
children, of whom our subject is the only survivor. 

John Rovane was reared to manhood in Keokuk and attended the 
public and parochial schools in the acquirement of an education. 
When a youth of sixteen he began providing for his own support. 



150 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

securing a position as driver on a delivery wagon. He carefully 
saved his earnings and at the age of twenty-four years had accumu- 
lated sufficient capital to embark in the retail grocery business at 
West Keokuk. He has successfully conducted an enterprise of that 
character continuously since, removing to his present location at No. 
500 Palean street about 1907. Mr. Rovane enjoys an extensive and 
profitable trade, winning and holding customers by his reliable busi- 
ness dealings, fair prices and courteous treatment. 

On the 4th of October, 1880, Mr. Rovane was joined in wedlock 
to Miss Margaret Ann Murphy, a daughter of Patrick and Maria 
(Brady) Murphy. They are the parents of nine living children, 
namely: John, Jr., Louis A., Nellie F., Rose A., Lucy A., Inez J., 
Gertrude A., Margaret A. and Ruth J. Two others died in infancy. 

Mr. Rovane has ably served as a member of the citv council for 
si.x years and during a period of four years acted as mayor pro tern, 
giving his city a businesslike, progressive and beneficial administra- 
tion. His religious faith is that of the Roman Catholic church, of 
which he is a devout communicant. In the city where nearly his 
entire life has been spent, the circle of his friends is almost coex- 
tensive with the circle of his acquaintances. 



OTTO B. WALLJASPER. 

Otto B. VValljasper is operating the Granite Roller Mills at West 
Point, owned jointly by himself and R. Shadwell. His activity in 
this connection places him with the leading representatives of indus- 
trial activity in Lee county. In addition he has various other inter- 
ests and lie is recognized as one who has a genius for devising and 
executing the right thing at the right time. 

He was born at West Point, January 18, 1874, and is a son 
of Stephen J. and Rosalia (Schulte) Walljasper, the latter a sister 
of William Schulte, of whom mention is made on another page of 
this volume. Mrs. Walljasper died in i88q, at the age of thirty- 
two years, leaving six children, of whom Otto B. Walljasper is the 
eldest. The others are: Mrs. Lizzie Strothman, who died in IQ03; 
Dietrich, a farmer of Marion township; Mrs. Edward Strothman, 
whose husband is a teamster of West Point; Mrs. Frank FuUenkamp, 
whose husband is a farmer of Pleasant Ridge township; and Anna, 
who resides with her uncle, Ben Schulte. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 151 

Reared at West Point, Otto B. Walljasfier was educated in tlie 
parochial school and in his youthful days learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed for three years in connection with his 
father, who was an expert mechanic. He and his brother worked 
together and built many substantial structures, including the Catho- 
lic school and also did the altar work, which is most beautiful. After 
following carpentering for three years Otto B. Walljasper turned his 
attention to the milling business, with which he has since been mainly 
occupied. The mill which he now owns and operates was built by 
Adolphus Salmon, about 1846, and was operated as a gristmill in 
pioneer times, the work being carried on night and dav. The 
product was shipped to St. Louis, being hauled to Fort Madison 
and thence sent down the river by boat. Later the mill was owned 
by Alexander Stewart for a number of years. He operated it him- 
self for some time and then rented it to different parties. Later the 
property changed hands several times until finally it came into 
possession of Messrs. Walljasper and Shadwell. The building was 
erected sixty years ago and is still in substantial condition. In 1891 
R. Shadwell and Stephen J. Walljasper, father of our subject, 
installed the roller system and continued the operation of the mill 
until 1901. It was afterward conducted by Mr. Walljasper and 
William Gerber, a former mayor of Fort Madison, for about a year 
and a half. At the end of that time Mr. Walljasper was joined by 
his son. Otto B., of this review and together they operated the mill 
until the father's death, which occurred May 27, 1910, when he was 
sixty-six years of age. The business has since been conducted by 
the son in a most capable and successful manner. The mill has a 
capacity of fifty barrels and the Hour manufactured is of the most 
excellent quality and finds a ready and profitable sale upon the mar- 
ket. The elevator in connection with the mill was built in 1892-3. 
Mr. Walljasper also owns the elevator at the depot, which was built 
about twenty years ago by Mr. Everingham. He handles grain of 
all kinds and also has a wareroom for flour and feed. At the mill 
he also grinds a large amount of feed and he handles a dozen dif- 
ferent kinds of flour. The mill is well equipped with modern 
machinery and the processes which he follows in manufacture are 
such as produce excellent grades of breadstuffs. He gives careful 
attention to every phase of his business, is most energetic and his 
indefatigable industry, perseverance and reliable business methods 
have been features in his growing and gratifying success. 

Mr. Walljasper was married at West Point, to Miss Callie 
Strothman, a daughter of the late Casper Strothman, whose widow 



152 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

resides a half mile south of West Point. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Wall- 
jasper have been born four children : Adelbert, who died in infancy ; 
and Edward, Evelyn and Robert, aged respectively ten, eight and 
six years. 

Politically Mr. Walljasper is a democrat and he belongs to the 
Knights of Columbus at Fort Madison. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of St. Mary's church. They occupy an attractive residence in 
the western part of the town, which was built by Mr. Walljasper, 
and theirs is a most hospitable home, whose good cheer is greatlv 
enjoyed by their many friends. They occupy a prominent social 
position, equal to the place which Mr. Walljasper fills in the busi- 
ness life of the community. 



MAJOR WILLIAMSON B. COLLINS. 

Major Williamson B. Collins, one of the well known legal prac- 
titioners of Keokuk and a veteran of the Civil war, was born in the 
village of New Washington, Clark county, Indiana, August 22, 1841. 
His parents, Milton F. and Harriet Roberts (Sullivan) Collins, were 
natives of Clark county, Indiana, and Scott county, Indiana, respect- 
ively. Their parents were among the early settlers of the Hoosier 
state, establishing homes there at a time when the Indians were still 
hostile. They were farmers but Milton F. Collins decided that 
another occupation would be more to his liking and accordingly 
became a physician. His birth occurred October 22, 18 14, and his 
boyhood was spent upon the home farm. He was graduated from 
Hanover Academv at Hanover, Indiana, later read medicine with 
Dr. Cern in Charlestown, Indiana, and then attended a medical col- 
lege at Cincinnati, graduating therefrom in 1837. With his brother- 
in-law, John H. Sullivan, a lawyer, he went to St. Louis in the early 
summer of 1837. From that city they transported their horses and 
personal equipment to St. Joseph, Missouri, where they expected 
to locate. The town, however, did not suit them and they proceeded 
to Westport, Missouri, where thev spent the winter. In the spring 
of 1838 they rode (jn horseback across the country to Keokuk, crossed 
the river here and located in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Sullivan 
was taken ill there and was obliged to return to his Indiana home. 
Dr. Collins remained at Springfield, engaging in the practice of 
medicine until December, 1838, when an army surgeon induced him 
to go to Chicago, then a small trading town, where an epidemic was 




MAJOR \\ILLIAMSOX B. fULLIXS 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 155 

raging among the Indians. There Dr. Collins became ill and returned 
to Springfield, whence he was taken back to the Hoosier state by his 
father. He was married at New Washington, Indiana, on the 29th 
of August, 1839, and two sons were born in that state: one who died 
in infancy; and the other our subject. Dr. Collins practiced his pro- 
fession in Indiana until 1843, when he came to Keokuk, arriving 
here with his family on May 12th of that year. He continued in 
practice in this city during his active life and enjoyed a representative 
clientage, holding the full confidence of his patients. He was a pub- 
lic-spirited man and did much for the benefit of the community. He 
helped to organize the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
remained an active member. In [861 he assisted in recruiting the 
Sixtieth United States Colored Infantry, becoming lieutenant colonel 
of the regiment. He was stationed at Helena, Arkansas, where he 
remained until the spring of 1864, when, owing to failing health, he 
resigned and returned to Keokuk. Throughout his life he was de- 
voted to his profession, giving always the best that was in him to his 
patients, making no difference between rich and poor. He was quick 
in action, benevolent in spirit, and his conduct was invariably that of 
a high-minded, honorable gentleman. His death occurred February 
7, 1880. He had survived his wife for a number of years as she 
passed away on the rqth of September, 1856. 

Williamson B. Collins was reared in Keokuk, receiving his 
primary education in private and public schools of the city. In 1857 
he entered the Methodist Academy located at Charlotteville, Scho- 
harie county. New York, where he remained a student for two years, 
returning home in 18 159. He then entered Claverack Academy at 
Claverack, New York, four miles east of the Hudson. In i860 he 
attended the summer session of Troy University. 

On the I St of June, 1861, Mr. Collins enlisted in the Union army, 
being mustered into Company F, Seventh Missouri Infantry, at the 
St. Louis arsenal. He was sent back to Keokuk on recruiting service 
and enrolled enough to fill the regiment, being commissioned second 
lieutenant of his company. In the course of events and line of pro- 
motion by November, 1861, he was made" captain and in August, 
1863, he was promoted to major. He saw active service first at Boon- 
ville, Missouri, then at Rolla, that state, and then marched on to 
Springfield, Missouri, in the fall of 1861, after which he with three 
companies of his regiment, two companies of the Eighth Iowa In- 
fantrv and a part of a regiment of battery was detached and sent to 
the relief of General Hunter. He subsequently went to Kansas City, 
where his command was detached and assigned to Colonel Jennison 



156 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry and sent on an expedition to Waynes- 
boro to watch the army of General Price. In the spring of 1862 
Captain Collins with the three companies of infantry reported to his 
regiment at Lexington, Missouri, and then took a steamer to Pitts- 
burg Landing, Tennessee, arriving after the battle and remaining 
there until the ensuing July. He then marched across the country 
to Jackson, Tennessee, and back in time to participate in the last 
battle of Corinth. After this with the army under General Rose- 
crans he followed the rebel army to Oxford, Mississippi, then re- 
turned to Corinth and marched on to Holly Springs at the time of 
General Grant's first advance on Vicksburg. From there he accom- 
panied the army bevond the Tallahatchie river. After the capture 
of Holly Springs by the rebels he returned there and next went on 
to Memphis. He remained in that locality on provost duty until the 
spring of 1863, when he went to Lake Providence, Louisiana, remain- 
ing there until the latter part of April, 1863, when he advanced to 
Bruinsburg, Louisiana, with Grant's army. On the ist of May they 
crossed the river at that point and engaged in the battle of Thomp- 
son's Hill. The following day they met the rebels at Bayou Pierre 
and then followed the rebel retreat until the 12th of May, when the 
battle of Raymond was fought. This command later pursued the 
left wing of Pemberton's army and was engaged in the first battle 
of Jackson, Mississippi, on May 14th. Retracing their steps they 
participated in the battle of Champion's Hill on the i6th of May and 
the following day the battle of Black River Bridge, continuing their 
advance on Vicksburg, and taking part in the assault on Fort Hill 
on the 22d of May. The assault was repulsed and the command 
was stationed at the left of the Jackson and Vicksburg road. The reg- 
iment held this position until the fall of Vicksburg and remained 
in that vicinity for a time. Later Major Collins was in command of 
three companies of his regiment at Natchez for about three weeks, 
after which he returned to Vicksburg. In the summer of 1863 his 
command formed part of the expedition under General Stevenson 
to Monroe, Louisiana, after which our subject returned to Vicks- 
burg and in the early fall of 1863 was ordered to Raymond, Missis- 
sippi, to gather up wounded men and to return with them to Vicks- 
burg. In the spring of 1864 he was ordered to report with the non- 
veteran portion of the regiment at St. Louis, where they would be 
mustered out. When this duty was performed he came to Keokuk in 
July of the same year and has since made this city his home. 

The winter following his return from the front Major Collins 
entered the law oflice of Rankin & McCrearv, where he devoted him- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 157 

self to the reading of law. He was admitted to the bar in September, 
1865, and at once began practice. It is quite usual for young men 
upon taking up the profession of law to associate themselves with 
some older practitioner, trusting to the advice and counsel of the 
senior member of the firm to guard them against error. Major Col- 
lins, however, being of a self-reliant nature, began practice alone and 
has so continued. He has won a gratifying success, due to his knowl- 
edge of the principles of law, to his ability to investigate thoroughly 
all sides of a question and his skill in presenting his case before the 
court. In 1889 he was admitted to practice before the United States 
supreme court. His high standing in the legal profession is due not 
only to his intellectual ability and his energy but also the fairness 
and justice which dominate his character. 

On October 4, 1870, W. B. Collins was united in marriage to Miss 
Caroline E. Copelin and they became the parents of seven children, 
the eldest of whom died in infancy. The others are: William C; 
John M. ; Joseph S. ; Harry R., now associated with his father in the 
practice of law; Carrie Louise and Arthur W. 

The parents are members of St. John's Episcopal church and are 
ever ready to support the work of that organization. W. B. Collins 
is a member and past master of the Masonic lodge, while his political 
belief is that of the republican party. In 1869 he served as city attor- 
ney, safeguarding the interests of the municipality with the same 
zealous care that he gives to his clients in private practice. His 
long service in the war of the Rebellion and his honorable record 
therein entitle him to the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens, 
who realize that but for the services of such men our country would 
now be divided and the prosperity of the present impossible. 



ANDREW FOGGY. 



Andrew Foggy was identified with the pioneer development of 
this region and has always borne his part in its upbuilding and pros- 
perity. Here he has practically made his home since 1836 and has 
witnessed all of the changes that have been made since that time. 
He was born in Tyler county, West Virginia, April 24, 1830, and 
is a son of James and Margaret (Fleck) Foggv, both natives of Scot- 
land, though they were married after their emigration to America. 
Mrs. Foggy made the trip across the Atlantic with her father and 
brother, who were also accompanied by her future husband. Their 



158 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

marriage was celebrated in West Virginia, where they continued to 
reside until 1836, when James Foggy brought his family to Lee 
county, Iowa, and purchased school land in Pleasant Ridge town- 
ship, for which he paid three dollars per acre. He continued to 
reside thereon until his death, which occurred in 1864, when he was 
sixty-seven years of age. His wife had passed away in i860, about 
the age of sixty years. In their family were seven children, namely: 
George, who owned a part of the old homestead and died in 1867; 
Mrs. Margaret Damond; James and William, who both died in 
Henry county, Iowa; John, who died in Henry county, Iowa; 
Andrew, a twin to John and the subject of this review; and Adam, 
who also died in Henry county. The only one of this family now 
living is Andrew. By occupation the sons were all farmers. 

Andrew Foggy assisted his father in the cultivation and improve- 
ment of the home farm and is now the owner of two hundred and 
fifty-five acres of that place, which is worth two hundred dollars 
per acre. In this county he has made his home since 1836 with 
the exception of a few years spent in Mount Pleasant, where he 
removed in order to educate his children. He can relate many inter- 
esting incidents of early days, when this region was still in a primi- 
tive condition, and he has borne his part in its development and 
upbuilding. In the early days he hauled dressed hogs to town, 
where he received only one dollar and a half per hundred, and has 
sold venison ham for three cents per pound. At that time there 
was no sale for prairie chickens, as they were very plentiful and 
could be caught easily in traps. His father once traveled sixty miles 
into Illinois for cornmeal and had to pay one dollar and a quarter 
per bushel for the same. He was a very successful farmer and 
became the owner of nearly five hundred acres, w^hich he subse- 
quently divided among his children. In 1863 our subject drove two 
yoke of cattle to Colorado with a load of butter and two years later 
started with four yoke of cattle across the country to Montana, with 
a load of sugar, cofl^ee and bacon, but returned to this region by boat 
on the Missouri river. Throughout his active business life he fol- 
lowed farming with remarkable success and is still the owner of a 
very valuable and well improved tract of land. 

In 1871 Mr. Foggy married Miss Eliza Cooper, who was born 
in Dublin, Ireland, November 8, 1845, and in 1848 came to the 
United States with her parents, John and Eliza (Deane) Cooper, 
also natives of the Emerald isle. The family landed in New Orleans 
and proceeded up the river to St. Louis and in 1849 settled in Bur- 
lington, Iowa. A year later, however, thev removed to Illinois and 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 159 

made their home in Lomax, that state, tor many years. There the 
father acquired an excellent farm of seven hundred and twenty 
acres two miles from town. He had fifteen children, several of 
whom died in infancy before leaving Ireland, and nine started with 
their parents on the voyage to the new world, but one died and was 
buried at sea. His youngest child, W. L. Cooper, was born in Illi- 
nois and, being left motherless in 1861, he was reared by his sister, 
Mrs. Foggy, and is today a prominent attorney of Burlington, Iowa. 
The father, John Cooper, died in 1890, at the ripe old age of eighty- 
five years, from the effect of an injury sustained in a runaway. 

Mr. and Mrs. Foggy have two children, John C, born February 
13, 1873, married Lenora Klopfenstein, and they have two children, 
Glenn C. and Fern Esther. He is now operating the old home farm 
and has purchased a tract adjoining. Esther Lee, the daughter of 
our subject, was born January i, 1875, and is now the wife of Wil- 
liam J. Singleton, a banker of Quincy, Illinois, who has established 
a number of banking institutions. In order to give his children bet- 
ter educational advantages, Mr. Foggy removed to Mount Pleasant, 
but in 19 1 2 returned to Lee county and has since made his home in 
Fort Madison, his present residence being at No. 1017 Second street. 
He uses his right of franchise in support of the democratic party 
and its principles. In the early days he was very fond of hunting 
and was considered one of the best shots in this part of the coun- 
try. He has taken part in many shooting contests and has killed all 
game found in this region at an early day, besides hunting antelopes 
in Montana. He is a worthy representative of that class of pioneer 
citizens who have done so much toward making Iowa the prosperous 
state which it is today and is well deserving of prominent mention 
in a history of Lee county. 



CORYDON M. RICH. 



Corydon M. Rich came to Keokuk in May, 1909, as the control- 
ling owner of the American Rice & Cereal Company, of which he 
served as president and general manager. In June, 191 2, the name 
was changed to the Purity Oats Company. Some conception of the 
remarkable growth of the business may be gained when it is known 
that in 191 2 there were but four people on the pay roll and that there 
are at the present time between one hundred and fifty and one hun- 
dred and seventy-five employes in the Keokuk plant. Aside from 



160 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

this, Mr. Rich has been actively identified with other local enter- 
prises. He is a native of Kansas and was reared in that state. Prior 
to his removal to Keokuk he was connected with the Atchison Cereal 
Company. The Purity Oats Company, which manifests his able 
management in its phenomenal success, has its main branch in Dav- 
enport and distributes thousands of carloads of its product throughout 
every state and territory of the Union. 



JAMES SULLIVAN. 



James Sullivan, deceased, belonged to that class of self-made 
men whose life records should ever serve as a source of inspiration 
and encouragement to others, showing what may be accomplished 
through energy, determination and honesty. Born in London, Eng- 
land, on the 19th of November, 1825, he passed away in Keokuk 
on the i8th of August, 1897. He was a son of James and Elizabeth 
(Hull) Sullivan, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of 
London. In 1832 the family crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States and established their home in Peoria, Illinois. After a time 
they removed to St. Louis and there the parents died. 

James Sullivan was a little lad of scarcely seven summers when 
the family made the voyage to the new world. He had little school 
training, but always read broadly and kept abreast of the times. 
When a comparatively young lad he started out in life on his own 
account, learning the tinner's trade, which he followed for many 
years. In 1875 he came to Keokuk and again followed his trade 
until he was able to save from his earnings a sufficient sum to enable 
him to embark in business on his own account. At length his indus- 
try and economy supplied the necessary capital and in 1883 he 
opened a store and began dealing in stoves. He was joined in part- 
nership by a Mr. Gibbons and the relation was maintained until 
1895, when Mr. Sullivan retired from active business life. He had 
won substantial success through close application, through the study 
of every phase of the business and through commercial methods 
that neither sought nor required disguise, and he retired with a 
handsome competence, sufficient to supply him with all the necessi- 
ties of his later life and enable him to leave to his family a sub- 
stantial bank account. 

In 1849 Mr. Sullivan was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Le Faivre, a daughter of Antoine Le Faivre, of St. Louis. They 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 161 

became parents of tive children. Alice, Elizabeth, James, Oscar and 
William, all of whom are yet living. 

Mr. Sullivan was entitled to wear the Grand Army button, for 
he formed and was captain of the first company that left St. Louis 
for the Civil war. Later he joined a Missouri cavalry regiment, 
with which he served throughout the remainder of hostilities, mak- 
ing a most creditable military record. His religious faith was that 
of the Catholic church, and his political belief that of the demo- 
cratic party. He died August i8, 1897, and his wife survived until 
October 4, 1913. They had an extended and favorable acquaintance 
in this county and enjoyed the high regard of all with whom they 
came in contact. Mr. Sullivan ranked for some years as a leading 
representative of commercial interests in Keokuk, and his life record 
proved that success and an honored name may be won simultane- 
ously. 



DAVID KLOPFENSTEIN. 

David Klopfenstein, who was long and successfully identified 
with agricultural interests in Lee county, passed away on the old 
home farm in Denmark township, August 10, 1905. He was born 
near Fairfield, Jefferson county, Iowa, on the 30th of January, 1852, 
a son of Peter Klopfenstein. The family home was established in 
Lee county when our subject was still very small and here he spent 
the remainder of his life. Throughout his entire business career 
he devoted his attention to the pursuits of farming and stock raising, 
being very successful in his undertakings and enjoying an enviable 
reputation as one of the most prosperous and enterprising agricul- 
turists of the community. 

In 1876, in Des Moines county, Iowa, Mr. Klopfenstein was 
united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Melcher, a daughter of Den- 
nis and Mary Ann (Faust) Melcher, both of whom were natives of 
Germany, the former born in Baden and the latter in the Rhine 
section. Mrs. Klopfenstein was the third born of their six chil- 
dren, three of whom have passed away. Dennis Melcher died in 
1879, in the sixty-fourth year of his age, while his wife was called 
to her final rest in 1893, in her seventieth year. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Klopfenstein were born four children, as follows: Lenora, who 
is the wife of John Foggy, of Pleasant Ridge township, Lee county; 
Julius, mentioned at greater length on another page of this work, 
who is an agriculturist residing on section 7, Denmark township; 



162 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

George, who died when not yet three years of age; and Kathryn, 
who teaches music and who has resided at West Point with her 
widowed mother for the past five years. Mrs. and Miss Klopf en- 
stein attend the Presbyterian church and are well known and highly 
esteemed here. 

Mr. Klopfenstein was a democrat in politics and held various 
local offices, ever discharging his public duties in a most commend- 
able and capable manner. He was reared in the Mennonite faith 
but did not identify himself with any particular church, maintain- 
ing an impartial interest in all religious work and worthy causes, to 
which he contributed generously of his time and means. Fraternally 
he was connected with the Masons, being a member of the blue lodge 
at Danville. A man upright and honorable in every relation of 
life, he won the respect and esteem of all with whom he came in 
contact and his demise was therefore the occasion of deep and wide- 
spread regret. 



ISAAC BELL. 



Isaac Bell was one of the enterprising and successful farmers 
of Cedar township and his death, which occurred August i, 191 2, 
at his home on section 21, was widely regretted. He resided upon 
his farm for almost fifty years, as he located there April i, 1863, 
shortly after his marriage. He was born four miles east of that 
place, his birth occurring at the old Bell homestead in Marion town- 
ship, Lee county, May 17, 1840. His father, John Bell, is men- 
tioned elsewhere in this work. 

Isaac Bell was reared at home and became an experienced agri- 
culturist under his father's direction. After his marriage, as pre- 
viously stated, he located on section 21, Cedar township, where he 
devoted his time to farming and stock raising. He dealt extensively 
in mules, horses, cattle and hogs and, as he was a man of more than 
usual business ability, he became one of the most prominent stock 
raisers of the county. The sale of his stock and his other agricul- 
tural operations brought him in a good income and, as he was a 
man of thrift, he became the possessor of comfortable competence. 
He believed in investing in local enterprises and was a stockholder 
in the Farmers & Traders Savings Bank of Hillsboro. His family 
still retain his interest in that institution. 

Mr. Bell was married in March, 1863, to Miss Margaret Cyrena 
Fashinger, who was born near Columbus, Ohio, October 23, 1841, 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 163 

a daughter of Joseph and Eliza (Taylor) Fashinger. Her father 
was a cabinet maker and building contractor who was reared near 
Allentown, Pennsylvania. He passed away in Ohio in 1843 and 
his widow subsequently married Hiram Courtright and removed to 
Lee county, Iowa, locating in Washington township near the pres- 
ent town of Sawyer in 1855. Previous to coming to Iowa they 
had resided for five years near Peoria, Illinois. Mr. Courtright 
was a successful farmer and highly respected. He passed away upon 
his farm in 1881, and his demise was sincerely mourned by many 
friends. He and his wife were both members of the Methodist 
church. To their union were born four children: Mrs. Mary 
Smith, of Portland, Oregon; Edward, who died in Canada in 1909; 
Julia, who married William Powell, of Lents, Oregon; and Emma, 
who died in infancy. Mrs. Bell is the only child born to the mother's 
first marriage. She was reared in Lee county from the age of four- 
teen years and her schooling was acquired in the Denmark Acad- 
emy. By her marriage she became the mother of three children: 
Charles R., who looks after two adjoining farms of three hundred 
and twenty acres and one hundred and • sixty acres respectively 
besides five hundred and forty acres of land situated on sections 
8 and 9, Cedar township; Luella E., who is residing at home; and 
Delia A., the wife of Dr. Clyde Van Winkle. 

Politically Mr. Bell was a democrat and was stanch in his sup- 
port of the policies of that party. His widow and children are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are highly esteemed 
by all who know them. He was at the time of his death one of the 
largest landowners in the county and during his many years of farm- 
ing did much to raise the standard of agriculture in his locality. 
The material success which came to him was but a part of the reward 
of his well-spent life, as he possessed also those immaterial riches, 
the respect and the affectionate regard of his fellowmen. 



ISAAC C. WILLIAMS. 



Isaac C. Williams is now living retired in Keokuk, having at a 
recent date disposed of his coal business at No. 916 Orleans avenue. 
He was born in Hamilton, Hancock county, Illinois, on the 21st 
of November, 1854, and is the adopted son of Phillip and Mary 
(Jenkins) Williams, his own parents having died during his very 
early childhood, leaving also a child who was then a babe in the 



164 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

cradle, while there were also one or more children older. Mr. Wil- 
liams was taken to the home of his foster parents and, though he 
has since tried to locate his brothers and sisters, he has been unable 
to do so, not knowing their names. It is believed, however, that 
some of the family are now residents of the east. His foster parents 
were both natives of Wales and came to the United States when 
young, Mr. Williams leaving a sister in Wales. He was married 
in Ohio in 1854, his bride being at that time but sixteen years of 
age. As this was a runaway match, she was disinherited by her par- 
ents. For many years, however, she lived as the happy wife of 
Phillip Williams, they being separated by death on the i8th of Sep- 
tember, 1894, when he was called to his final rest. His widow sur- 
vived until February 27, 191 1, and was then laid by his side in the 
cemetery at Kahoka, Missouri. They were both consistent members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Williams was almost 
a lifelong member of the Odd Fellows Society, which he joined on 
the 5th of November, 1850. His political allegiance was given to 
the republican party. 

It was in the year i860 that Isaac C. Williams was taken by his 
foster parents to Keokuk and about 1861 they removed to Water- 
loo, Clark county, Missouri, which was then the countv seat. There 
Isaac C. Williams was sent to school, but after pursuing his studies 
at that place for a year the family removed to Kahoka, Missouri, 
at which time there were but five houses in the town. They occu- 
pied a little old log cabin, which was afterward removed to the five- 
acre tract which Isaac C. Williams obtained from his father's estate. 
The Simpsons, who conducted a boarding house in Keokuk during 
war times, were great friends of the family. 

Isaac C. Williams was sent to school in Kahoka, pursuing his 
studies m a small frame building in which a company of militia 
met and drilled, his father being captain of that company. He put 
aside his text-books at the age of fourteen years and began work, 
from which time forward he has depended upon his own resources. 
The father was a stone mason by trade and was emploved in the erec- 
tion of important buildings, such as the Carthage jail and the peni- 
tentiary at Fort Madison, Iowa. He was also superintendent of 
the erection of the old packing houses in Keokuk and when the 
work was completed the firm made him a present of a fine hat as 
a token of their appreciation of the value of his service. On start- 
ing out in the business world Isaac C. Williams assisted his father, 
but not finding that employment congenial, did not learn the trade 
He remained at home until twenty-one years of age and in Sep- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 165 

tember, 1876, began working for himself at Kahoka. In tlie spring 
of 1877 he arrived in Keokuk and was employed in railroading 
until 1880, but in the fall of that year returned to his old home in 
Kahoka. 

There, on the 23d of March, 1881, he married Miss Marie Made- 
line Kirchner, who was born in Kahoka, Clark county, Missouri, 
July 2, 1863, and was there educated in the public schools. She 
is a daughter of George and Margaret (Brisner) Kirchner. Her 
father learned the weaver's trade in Germany, but throughout the 
period of his life in the new world followed farming. About i860 
he settled in Clark county, Missouri, and there passed away about 
1875. His widow, who was born in Berlin, Germany, and came to 
the United States when seventeen years of age, still occupies the old 
home at Kahoka and is now about seventy-five years of age. In 
their family were the following children: Barbara, now Mrs. Mar- 
cus Wilson, of Clark county, Missouri; Mrs. Williams; Fred, who 
married Josie Henslow and makes his home in Clark county, Mis- 
souri; Ferdinand, a blacksmith at Antioch, Missouri, who married 
Miss Gertie Falkenburg; Elizabeth, the wife of James McAfee of 
Clark county, Missouri; William, who wedded Florence Bougner 
and resides in Clark county, Missouri; and Annie and George, who 
passed away in infancy. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Williams removed 
to Keokuk and for several years he did general work. He after- 
ward spent five years upon the road as a traveling salesman, repre- 
senting a company handling windmills. He next engaged in the 
plumbing business, in which he continued for twenty years, and he 
executed some important contracts in that particular, such as the 
steam-heating plant of St. Joseph's Hospital. He became very pro- 
ficient in that line and his services were sought in various parts of 
the country. He next managed the business of the National Refin- 
ing Company, dealers in oil, and subsequently established a coal- 
yard in Keokuk, which he conducted with success for two years and 
then sold out in June, 1913. He is now living retired, enjoying 
a well earned and well merited rest. 

By their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Williams have become parents 
of two children, George Fred, and Margaret Clara. The former, 
born in Keokuk, was educated in the public schools and has become 
an expert machinist. He married Ethel Hamilton, of Keokuk, and 
has a son, Fred Carl. The daughter, born in Keokuk in 1885, 
attended the public schools and is now the wife of Edward J. Peter- 
son, by whom she has one child, Mildred Marie. Throughout his 



166 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

entire life Isaac C. Williams has been a resident of the middle west 
and has displayed much of the spirit of enterprise and progress which 
has dominated this section of the country and led to its present devel- 
opment and upbuilding. The prosperity which has attended him 
has been the just reward of his labors and now makes it possible 
for him to rest from further business cares and yet enjoy all of the 
comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 



JOHN NAGEL. 



John Nagel, who died December ^i, 1872, and who enjoyed 
enviable recognition as one of the well-known and respected busi- 
ness men of Keokuk, was a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, where 
he was reared and educated. When a young man, in 18^2, he left 
the land of his nativity and, taking passage on board a sailing vessel, 
landed safely in New Orleans. On board this boat were two pas- 
sengers who, although each had previously been a stranger to the 
other, were destined to have an important interest in the career of 
John Nagel in the new world. From New Orleans he came to 
Keokuk, later taking up his abode on a farm near Charleston, in 
Lee county, Iowa, where he was engaged in the work of the fields 
and also devoted considerable attention to teaming. 

It was during this time that Mr. Nagel wedded Miss Mary May- 
bauer, who crossed the ocean to America on the same vessel in which 
he sailed and who was one of the two passengers mentioned above. 
In i860, in association with Conrad Pechstein, the other voyageur 
to whom we have referred, he embarked in the brewery business 
in Keokuk, continuing therein until his demise, which occurred at 
a comparatively early age. The period of his residence in Lee 
county covered two decades and he was widely recognized as one 
of its substantial business men and esteemed citizens. The demise 
of his widow occurred on the 15th of March, 1906. They were 
devoted members of the German Evangelical church and became 
the parents of seven children, two of whom still survive, as follows: 
Elizabeth, who is the widow of Louis Loeffler; and John, named for 
his father. 

The latter was born in Lee county, Iowa, on the 26th of June, 
1856, and practically his entire adult life has been passed in Keo- 
kuk. From an early age, owing to the untimely death of his father, 
he has been dependent upon his own resources for a livelihood, and 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 167 

as soon as his years permitted became identified with the brewing 
industry founded by his father and Mr. Pechstein, in the conduct of 
which he has remained an active factor to the present time. He now 
serves as president and treasurer of the Pechstein & Nagel Company 
and his able efforts have contributed in large degree to the continued 
growth and success of the firm. 

Mr. Nagel gives his political allegiance to the democracy and 
has served for a number of years as a member of the Keokuk city 
council and of the board of supervisors of Lee county, proving an 
efficient and trustworthy public official. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. His entire life has been spent in this 
county and he has gained an extensive and favorable acquaintance 
in both business and social circles. ' ^ 



WILLIAM BLOM. 



William Blom, who for many years prior to his death was 
regarded as one of Keokuk's most successful and enterprising busi- 
ness men, came of Holland ancestry and his entire life was exemplary 
of the thrift characteristic of the race. He was born on the 15th of 
November, 1834, ^ ^^^ ^^ Peter Blom. He came to the United 
States in 18^7 and, making his way into the interior of the country, 
established his home at Keokuk, being then a young man of twenty- 
three years. 

In his native land he had been a sailor and after arriving in 
Iowa, Mr. Blom worked diligently in an endeavor to earn an honest 
living and gain a start. For a time he was in the employ of the 
Kellogg-Berge Company, and later, in connection with a Mr. Heule, 
founded a soap factory which they conducted for a time. At length, 
however, he sold out and turned his attention to the retail grocery 
business. A desirable measure of prosperity attended him in that 
connection and made it possible for him to still further broaden the 
scope of his activities and business interests. He then embarked 
in the wholesale commission business, handling meats and other com- 
modities, and again he was successful in winning a liberal patronage. 
He afterward became interested in establishing a wholesale gro- 
cery business and founded the Blom-Collier Company. He was 
also at one time interested in the Keokuk Pickle Company. What- 
ever he undertook seemed to prosper. In business afifairs he readily, 



168 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

discriminated between the essential and the non-essential and mak- 
ing use of his opportunities, he worked his way steadily and per- 
sistently upward. He seemed to know just how to produce maxi- 
mum results with a minimum expenditure of time, effort and 
material — and this is the secret of all success. His business inter- 
ests, too, were of a character that promoted the material prosperity 
and business activity of Keokuk while adding to his individual 
wealth. 

In 1862 iMr. Blom was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Teloff, 
of Swedish nativity and descent. They had no children of their 
own but out of the kindness of their hearts they adopted a daughter. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Blom continued residents of Keokuk until called 
to their final rest, the former pasing away February 25, 1904, and 
the latter May 31, 1913. Mr. Blom was a republican, giving stal- 
wart support to the party at the polls, yet he never sought nor desired 
office as a reward for party fealty. Mr. Blom was unusually inter- 
ested in the Methodist church and was active in charitable work of 
all kinds. He and his wife gave freely of their means to assist worthy 
benevolent objects and frequently extended a helping hand to those 
less fortunate upon life's journey. Mr. Blom twice visited his native 
country after coming to the United States. He was a man of many 
sterling characteristics; in business he displayed thrift, energy and 
honesty; in friendship, trust and loyalty; and in citizenship, pro- 
gressiveness and patriotism. Thus it was that he won for himself 
high rank among the representative and valued residents of Keokuk. 



CONRAD PECHSTEIN. 

Conrad Pechstein w^as one of those sturdy, reliable citizens of 
German birth who did so much toward the upbuilding of the cen- 
tral west. His birth occurred in Bavaria, October 17, 1828. After 
doing military service in the cavalry he decided to come to America 
and accordingly sailed for this country in 1852. On board the same 
vessel were two people whom he had never previously met but whom 
he was destined to know intimately. One of them, John Nagel, was 
for years his business partner in Keokuk and Mary Maybauer sub- 
sequently became the wife of his partner. 

Mr. Pechstein made his home in New Orleans for a year after 
his arrival in the new world and then came to Keokuk, arriving in 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 169 

this city in 1853. He worked for a time as a day laborer, as it was 
necessary for him to earn his living and he could find no better open- 
ing. He was employed for a time in the Lautenschlaeger brewery 
on the corner Ninth and Fulton streets, and when the proprietor died 
Mr. Pechstein conducted it for the widow until about i860. In that 
year, in connection with John Nagel, he embarked in the brewery 
business on his own account, to which occupation he devoted the 
remainder of his life. The business founded by Mr. Pechstein and 
Mr. Nagel is now conducted by their sons, John Nagel being presi- 
dent and treasurer, Henry Pechstein, secretary, and George C. Pech- 
stein, vice president and brewmaster. The founders were honest 
and industrious and understood the business in all of its details. 
Prosperity came to them with the passing years and they had every 
reason to be glad of the fact that they had sought their fortune in 
the United States. 

Conrad Pechstein married Katharine Kirchner, who came from 
Bavaria with her father, Adam Kirchner, in 1847, when a girl of 
eleven years. Mr. Pechstein passed away on the 24th of April, 1873, 
but his widow surives at an advanced age. They were the parents 
of five children, four of whom are living, Henry, Elizabeth, John 
W. and George C. 

The parents were members of the German Evangelical church 
and manifested a laudable interest in its work. Mr. Pechstein was 
the founder of one of Keokuk's business enterprises and was known 
as a man of incorruptible honesty. He left behind him a name re- 
spected for the integrity for which it stood. 



HENRY PECHSTEIN. 



Henry Pechstein was born January 16, 1859, in Keokuk, a son 
of Conrad Pechstein. He has always made this city his home and 
succeeded his father in the brewery, with whose management he is 
connected at the present time as secretary, his brother, George C. 
Pechstein, being vice president and brewmaster. The business was 
incorporated in 1905, being capitalized for fifty thousand dollars. 
It is well managed and returns satisfactory dividends, but the qualitv 
of the product is not sacrificed to financial gain. 

On the 25th of May, 1881, Mr. Pechstein married Miss Eliza- 
beth F. Burger, a daughter of August Burger and Mrs. Johanna 
(Hopp) Schowalter. The Schowalters were among the earliest 



170 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

settlers in Lee county, arriving here in the early '30s. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lechstein became the parents of si.\ children, as follows: Albert 
Magnus, who passed away in infancy; Paul T. ; John H.; Alberta; 
George C. ; and Conrad August. 

Mr. Pechstein has been a lifelong democrat, casting his first 
presidential vote for General Hancock, but has never cared for office. 
Since 1881 he has been identified with the Independent, Order of 
Odd Fellows and is also a member of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, the Eagles and the Moose. Religiously he holds 
membership in the German Lutheran Evangelical church. 



GEORGE F. JENKINS, M. D. 

In the field of medical education and practice the name of Dr. 
George F. Jenkins was widely and favorably known. He was honored 
with the vice presidency of the American Medical Association, which 
indicates his high standing among his professional brethren. His 
honors were well earned, for he was ever a close and logical student 
and one who in the performance of his duties displayed the utmost 
conscientiousness and fidelity to high standards. He was born in 
Clark county, Missouri, July 15, 1842, a son of Robert and Elizabeth 
(Rambo) Jenkins. The family is of Welsh lineage, the ancestry 
being traced back to David Jenkins, who became a resident of Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, in {■joo. Robert Jenkins, the father of 
Dr. Jenkins, came to Missouri in 1837, settling in Clark county. His 
wife's people came to the United States with a Swedish colony in 
1665 and Ezekiel Rambo, the great-grandfather, participated in the 
American Revolution. 

Dr. Jenkins of this review, after attending the common schools 
and the high school at Alexandria, Missouri, became a student in 
Jones' Commercial College at St. Louis. He was a young man of 
twenty-three years, when, in 1861;, he started overland with a mule 
team for California. He found no satisfactory situation there and 
entered upon the study of medicine, becoming a student in what was 
then the Toland Medical College, now the medical department of 
the LIniversity of California, on the ist of August, 1865. After the 
college closed he returned to Missouri by way of Panama and New 
York and studied and practiced with Dr. R. S. McKee in Clark 
county, Missouri, for nine months. Wishing to attain still higher 
efficiency in his chosen calling, he then entered upon a course of lee- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 173 

tures at the Missouri Medical College and was graduated from that 
institution on the 28th of February, 1867. Seventeen years later Par- 
sons College of Fairfield, Iowa, conferred upon him the honorary 
degree of Master of Arts. 

In the year of his graduation from the Missouri Medical College 
Dr. Jenkins opened an office in Keokuk and remained in active prac- 
tice in this city from the 7th of April, 1867, until his death in 1914, 
or for a period of forty-seven years. He remained constantly a stu- 
dent of his profession, reading broadly and thinking deeply and thus 
keeping in touch with the advanced thought and knowledge of the 
profession and its modern-day methods. He did as excellent work 
as an educator as he did as practitioner. In 1879 he was elected 
to the chair of diseases of children, in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons at Keokuk, and in 1882 to the chair of principles and prac- 
tice of medicine, clinical medicine and physical diagnosis, in the 
same institution. In 1890 he aided in organizing the Keokuk Medical 
College, in which he was elected to the same chair, and so continued 
following the amalgamation of the two schools. He remained in 
that connection until his demise and was regarded as one of the most 
able educators in connection with medical schools of the middle west. 
In 1885 he was elected president of the faculty of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, and when the Keokuk Medical College was 
established he was elected president of that institution and thus con- 
tinued until it was merged with Drake University in 1908. He was 
also president of the Keokuk Dental College, the Keokuk College of 
Pharmacy and the Keokuk Nurses' Training School after the orga- 
nization of those departments. 

In hospital as well as in private practice Dr. Jenkins was well 
known. He aided in establishing St. loseph's Hospital in 1885 and 
from the beginning was chief of the medical stafif of that institution. 
He was president of the Keokuk Medical Society and was a charter 
member of the Lee County Medical Society. He was an active mem- 
ber of the Iowa State Medical Society from 1869 until his death and 
in 1 891 was honored with election to its presidency. He joined the 
American Medical Association in 1873 and attended the majority of 
its sessions from that time to his demise. He was elected to the house 
of delegates in 1901 and to the vice presidency of the association in 
1903. He was instrumental in organizing St. Joseph's Hospital in 
Keokuk and was the author of many articles which have been a val- 
uable contribution to medical science. 

In addition to his private practice and his efforts in the educa- 
tional field Dr. Jenkins was medical examiner for most of the old 



174 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

insurance companies and a number of fraternities. He was likewise 
president of the board of health of Keokuk and was a member of 
the Keokuk board of education. He stood at all times for progress 
and advancement. He was a man of strcjng mentality and his powers 
were well directed, productive of splendid results for the institutions 
with which he was connected and for the public interests under his 
direction. 

On the 29th of December, 1870, Dr. Jenkins was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Charlotte Elizabeth Van Wagenen, of Fulton, New 
York, a daughter of Captain Van Wagenen, a representative of one 
of the old Holland families of the Empire state, established along the 
Hudson in colonial days. The Van Wagenen, like the Jenkins family, 
was prominently represented in the Revolutionary war. Five chil- 
dren were born unto Dr. and Mrs. Jenkins. Ann Page, the eldest, 
died in infancy. Marcia L. is the deceased wife of Hazen L Sawyer, 
of Keokuk. Florence E. is the wife of Henry Boyden Blood, of 
Keokuk. George, who acquired his literary education in Parsons 
College and took the work of the sophomore year in the Keokuk 
Medical College, enlisted in 1898 in Company A, Fifty-first Iowa 
Regiment at Fairfield, Iowa, for service in the Spanish-American 
war and died in camp at Jacksonville, Florida, of typhoid fever. 
Katherine E. is the wife of Karl Kiedaisch, of Chicago, and they 
have an interesting little son, George Jenkins, named in honor of his 
grandfather, Dr. George F. Jenkins of Keokuk. 71ie demise of the 
latter on the 4th of September, 1914, was deeply mourned not only 
by his familv but also by his many friends throughout the state and 
his loss will be keenly felt in the medical circles of Iowa. 



EDWARD DE YONG. 



Edward De Yong is the owner of an excellent grocery store in 
Keokuk and is known as a progressive and reliable business man. 
His birth occurred in this city, July 27, 1887, his parents being 
Arie and Hattie (Morris) De Yong. The father is a native of Hol- 
land, but came to the United States at the age of fourteen. He came 
west to Iowa and in 1867 located at Keokuk. The mother was born 
in Utica, New York, and was married on the 12th of March, 1867, 
to Arie De Yong. They live on a farm of seventy acres near Keo- 
kuk and are accorded a high place in the regard of their fellow- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 175 

men. To them were born ten children, most of whom are now mar- 
ried. 

Edward De Yong attended the public schools in Keokuk and 
then took a course in telegraphy in a local business college. He 
became connected with the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern Rail- 
road in a professional capacity and so continued for a period of 
three years. He felt, however, that there were better opportunities 
in an independent career and so, in 1904, in connection with his 
brother, Ira, he established a grocery business. In 191 1 he bought 
his brother's share in the enterprise and is now the sole owner. He 
has an up-to-date and well-stocked store in the south end of the city, 
the building being thirty by one hundred and forty feet in dimen- 
sions. He carries a general line of merchandise and groceries and 
also does a large feed business. He studies carefully the demands of 
the neighborhood and supplies those needs in a most satisfactory 
manner. He carries standard goods, his prices are fair and his treat- 
ment of customers invariably courteous. 

Mr. De Yong was united in marriage to Miss Florence A. Usher, 
of St. Francisville, Missouri, on the 7th of June, 191 1. Their son, 
Edward, Jr., w^as born February 27, 1913. Mr. De Yong can well 
pride himself, not only upon the success which he has achieved, but 
also on the fact that his prosperity is due entirely to his own efforts 
and natural ability. He has taken advantage of the opportunities 
which America offers to all and today is a valued citizen of Keokuk. 



JOHN G. LEVELING. 



John G. Leveling farms a fertile tract of two hundred acres sit- 
uated on section 5, Pleasant Ridge township, and is known through- 
out the county as a well-to-do and eiBcient farmer. He was born 
April 3, 1855, a son of Edward and Gertrude (Naber) Leveling, 
both natives of Westphalia, Germany. They were the parents of 
four sons and seven daughters, of whom the following survive: 
Steve, Catherine, Lizzie and Barney, all of whom were born in 
Germany; Gertrude, who married Henry Lampe, of West Point; 
Margaretha, the wife of Barney Hassmann, a farmer living in 
Nebraska; John G., of this review; and Annie, wife of Joseph Holz- 
faster, who owns a fruit farm at Canyon City, Colorado. The first 
child born in America, a daughter, Mary, became the wife of Christ 
Finnhaus, a farmer of Nebraska, and passed away in 1913. 



176 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

John G. Leveling was reared under the parental roof and assisted 
his father in the operation of the home farm, thus gaining much 
practical knowledge of agriculture. He is now the owner of two 
hundred acres situated on section 5, Pleasant Ridge township, and 
there carries on mixed farming. His crops and stock which he ships 
ti5 market bring him a good annual income and, as he is thrifty and 
invests his surplus capital wisely, his material wealth is constantly 
increasing. In cultivating and improving his farm he not only 
secures prosperity for himself but aids in the agricultural develop- 
ment of the county, which ranks high in this regard among the coun- 
ties of the state. 

Mr. Leveling was married February 10, 1891, to Miss Ettie 
Kudobe, a daughter of August and Marv Kudobe, who were the 
parents of seven children, of whom Charles is a farmer and Vina 
married John Shelledy, a farmer living in Colorado. Mr. and Mrs. 
Leveling had one son who died in infancy. 

Mr. Leveling has been trustee of Pleasant Ridge township for 
seven years and has discharged the duties incumbent upon him with 
circumspection and ability. He was for a number of years trustee 
of St. Paul's church and has been trustee of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Societv. His many friends value highlv his good opinion and 
esteem him as a man of unswerving integrity and of unusual sincer- 
itv of character. 



CHARLES J. KIRCH. 



Charles J. Kirch is a typical representative of the virile, enter- 
prising and progressive business men of Keokuk who are attracting 
to the city trade and wealth and making it up-to-date in every respect. 
To these men the citv of the present is of more interest than the city 
of a generation ago, however prosperous that citv mav have been. 

Mr. Kirch was born in St. L(Hiis, Missouri, March q, 1864, and 
was taken by his parents, John and Katharine (Dewald) Kirch, who 
were of German nativity, to Kahoka, Missouri, when a lad of eight 
years. There he grew to manhood. He worked upon a farm in the 
summer time and attended common school in the winter until he 
reached the age of thirteen, when he obtained emplovment in a hard- 
ware store. He so continued until twenty-two years of age, when 
he embarked in the hardware business for himself with borrowed 
capital. In 1900 he came to Keokuk and with Carl A. Weber 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY • 177 

founded the Weber-Kirch Manufacturing Company, which is en- 
gaged in making hardware specialties, such as curry-combs, poultry 
supplies, etc. The affairs of the firm were well managed and it 
prospered so that in 1904 it was incorporated with a capital of ten 
thousand dollars. This, with the surplus accumulated in the interim, 
now amounts to eighteen thousand dollars. Carl A. Weber is presi- 
dent and treasurer of the corporation and Charles J. Kirch is vice 
president and secretary. The American Cement Machine Company 
was moved from Madison, Wisconsin, to Keokuk in 191 3 and in 
February, 1914, was reorganized and incorporated under the laws 
of Iowa with a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars. O. G. Mandt 
is the president of this company, H. S. Mandt, vice president; 
Charles J. Kirch, secretary; and Carl A. Weber, treasurer. This 
corporation has probably the best cement mixing machinery on the 
market. It finds a ready sale and orders are coming in so rapidly 
that it is necessary to work day and night shifts of workmen to sup- 
ply the demand. The machines are sold not only around Keokuk 
but throughout the whole country. Charles J. Kirch, through his 
connection with two of the aggressive manufacturing companies of 
Keokuk, is doing much to promote the growth of the city. Such 
men as he are among the most valuable citizens of any community 
and it is but just that he should be held in high esteem. 

In 1893 Mr. Kirch married Mrs. Almeda Strickler, who died 
in October, 1908, leaving one son, Ralph C. In 191 1 our subject 
was again married, iVIrs. Viola Robertson becoming his wife. The 
family are members of the Westminster Presbvterian church. Mr. 
Kirch gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
while in Kahoka, Missouri, served for four years as tax collector. 
He belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is known 
as a man of attractive social qualities. 



FRANK H. DIERKER, M. D. 

Dr. Frank H. Dierker is a well known physician and surgeon of 
West Point, where he has practiced his profession continuously and 
successfully during the past eight years. He is numbered among 
the worthy native sons of Lee county, his birth having occurred on 
the home farm on section 21, West Point township, April 2, 1878. 
His father, Barney Dierker, is a prominent farmer and stockman 



178 . HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

of that township and is mentioned at greater length on another page 
of this work. 

Frank H. Dierker was reared under the parental roof and at- 
tended the parochial schools in the acquirement of his early educa- 
tion. At the age of nineteen years he left the home farm and sub- 
sequently was engaged in various lines of work. Determining upon 
a professional career, he entered the Keokuk Medical College at 
Keokuk, Iowa, and in 1906 received the degree of M. D. from that 
institution. He at once located for practice at West Point and has 
here remained continuously since, being accorded a liberal and lucra- 
tive patronage. Dr. Dierker has demonstrated his skill and ability 
in the successful treatment of many cases and keeps in close touch 
with the progress of his profession through his membership in the 
Lee County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association. 

In his poltical views the Doctor is a democrat. He is now serv- 
ing as alderman for the second term and is likewise a member of the 
West Point school board for the second term, proving a most capable 
official in both connections. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, 
while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in St. Mary's 
Catholic church of West Point. He has always resided in Lee 
county and is well known and highly esteemed within its borders as 
an able medical practitioner and enterprising young citizen. 



JUDGE HENRY HOFFMAN TRIMBLE. 

Judge Henry Hoffman Trimble was a leader among men, upon 
the battlefield, at the bar and in the political arena. His leadership 
was founded upon an intimate and accurate knowledge of any subject 
which he handled, but more upon the strength of his character, 
which had its basis in a recognition of the right. He might sway 
men by his eloquence, but it was eloquence that had its root in truth, 
in patriotism and in manly conduct. He reached the advanced age 
of eighty-six years, remaining in active practice to the time of his 
demise, and his last illness came upon him when he was en route to 
try a law case as the legal counsel of the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad Company, in which position he had been retained 
for many years. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 179 

Judge Trimble was a native of Dearborn county, Indiana, his 
birth occurring upon a farm there when that section was a frontier 
region. Soon afterward his parents removed with their family to 
Rush county, Indiana, and afterward to Shelby county, which was 
also an undeveloped district, and upon the home farm in Shelby 
county Judge Trimble remained until he reached the age of four- 
teen years. At times he pursued the elementary branches of learn- 
ing in the little log schoolhousc near his father's home. In his early 
years he determined to attain distinction in life if possible, and he 
realized that a step in this direction was the acquirement of a better 
education. Accordingly he sold a cherished horse which had been 
given him by his grandfather and the proceeds were expended in 
meeting his tuition in a six months' term of school at Shelbyville, 
Indiana. Other expedients enabled him to spend six months as a 
student in a school at 'Woodsfield, Ohio, and then at the age of six- 
teen he began teaching in Bartholomew county, Indiana, whereby he 
•earned a sum sufficient to enable him to spend a term or two as a 
student in a little pioneer college at Franklin, Indiana. The ele- 
mentary strength of his character, shown in acquiring his education 
when great odds were against him, gave promise of what the future 
would be. Obstacles and difficulties were never so great but that he 
felt they might be overcome and this he resolutely set to work to 
do when the path of progress was blocked. While at Franklin Col- 
lege he studied music and during the next year or two, while a 
student at the State University, he met his expenses by teaching 
music. He lived most economically, taking care of his own room 
and boarding in a cheap club formed of equally poverty-stricken 
students. His outlay for meals was from forty-five to sixty cents per 
week and his other expenses covered the price of books, room rent 
and tuition. No luxuries and indeed few comforts were permitted. 
He earned money by teaching music through the college year to 
the students and by teaching the same art during the summer vaca- 
tions to the people of central Indiana. Men who afterward became 
prominent were among his pupils at the singing schools. 

His class went in a body from the State University to Asbury 
University, now De Pauw, where he was graduated in 1847. He 
ever maintained a high standard in his classes and won high scholas- 
tic honors, and he was admitted to the Beta Theta Pi Society. At 
length he came to his graduation and received his diploma. At 
that time the Mexican war was in progress and immediately after 
leaving the university he joined the Fifth Indiana Volunteers, serv- 



180 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ing with that regiment in the year that elapsed before the close of 
the JVIexican war. 

Upon his return to the north Judge Trimble engaged in teaching 
school in Shelbyville, Indiana, and devoted the hours usually termed 
leisure to the study of law under the direction of Thomas A. Hend- 
ricks, afterward vice presidential candidate, and Eden H. Davis. 
Judge Trimble arrived in Iowa in 1850, reaching Bloomfield in the 
month of February and securing admission to the bar of the state 
in April. Within six months after his arrival he was elected county 
attorney and was reelected to that office in 1852. From the begin- 
ning of his residence in Iowa his progress at the bar was rapid and 
he was chosen county attorney of Davis county and later was elected 
state senator in 1856, becoming a member of the last legislature 
that met at Iowa City and the first that convened at Des Moines. 
At a still later date following his service in the Civil war he was 
elected judge of the district court for the district which extended 
one hundred miles along the turbulent Missouri border. He was 
fearless in his conduct of the work of the court, although at times 
the courtroom was full of armed men bent upon the conviction of 
one prisoner or the release of another. On one occasion a company 
of militia undertook to rescue its captain and lieutenant, who were 
under indictment for murder, and on another occasion a crowd of 
armed men tried to prevent the release of a man on habeas corpus. 
In the first instance the officers were tried on the indictment and in 
the second case the man was released on habeas corpus proceedings. 
This indicates the kind of judge sitting upon the bench. Neither 
lear nor favor could swerve Judge Trimble from the course which 
he believed to be right, and he always appealed to the intelligence, 
loyalty and love of law in the people of Iowa. He spoke strongly, 
forcibly and convincingly and brought others to his point of view, 
recognizing the fact that there is within every individual a sense of 
justice which will come uppermost if the right appeal is made to it. 

While Judge Trimble was successful in securing election to of- 
fices in the strict path of his profession there were other times in 
which a democratic candidate had to give way before the strong 
republican majority. He always had a notable personal following, 
however, and when opposing Samuel R. Curtis as a candidate for 
congress succeeded in reducing his opponent's majority to twelve 
hundred votes. He received the democratic nomination for supreme 
justice of Iowa immediately following the war and in 1872 he was 
again a candidate for congress and reduced the republican majority 
by five thousand votes, but failed of election. In 1876 he was a 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 181 

delegate at large to the democratic convention at St. Louis which 
nominated Tilden for the presidency and his old preceptor, Hend- 
ricks, for the vice presidency. In 1879 he received the unanimous 
indorsement of the democratic party for governor of Iowa and the 
following year was a delegate to the convention which nominated 
Hancock for the presidency. Four years later he was a delegate at 
large from Iowa to the national convention and had much to do 
with the nomination of Grover Cleveland. For many years he was 
a recognized leader in democratic circles, and his efforts along 
political lines drew to his party a large following. 

The military chapter in the life record of Judge Trimble was 
a brilliant one. When the country became involved in civil war all 
political, professional and business interests were put aside, for he 
felt that duty to his country was paramount to all else. In fact, 
with Judge Trimble duty was ever foremost, and therefore in 1861 
he was active in organizing the Third Iowa Cavalry, of which he 
was made lieutenant colonel. He at once devoted himself to the 
task of making trained soldiers out of raw recruits and continued a 
system of military instruction to the end with the result that his 
regiment became one of the best drilled among the northern troops. 
One notable military movement which he led was an advance down 
a lane bordered with brush and a fence overgrown with weeds. The 
enemy was on either side and the charge has been compared to that 
of the charge of the six hundred at Balaklava. This was on the 7th 
of March, 1862, and Lieutenant Colonel Trimble was severely 
wounded in the face, his injuries being so great that the surgeons 
told him he must leave the army. The wound continued to trouble 
him throughout his life. 

Following his military experience Judge Trimble returned to 
Bloomfield, Iowa, and after serving upon the bench he began the 
building of a railroad which was an extension of the old Northern 
Missouri line, now a part of the Wabash system. The section which 
he planned was to run to Cedar Rapids, through Ottumwa and 
Bloomfield. He became the first president of the new company and 
built the road to Ottumwa. In 1878 he became attorney for the 
Burlington route and was thereafter identified with railroad law 
until his death, becoming recognized as one of the most capable in 
that branch of jurisprudence in the west. He was made general 
attorney for a part of Missouri and Iowa for the Burlington Route 
in 1882 and removed to Keokuk in that year in order that he might 
be nearer the center of his legal activities. Throughout his life he 
remained a close student of the profession and especially of railroad 



182 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

and corporation law. A feature of his professional career was his 
uniform kindness to young lawyers, to whom he was ever ready to 
extend a helping hand or assist them with legal lore or advice. It 
is said on one occasion that a lawyer now a celebrated member of the 
California bar was sick and penniless in Iowa. Judge Trimble 
found him utterly discouraged and preparing for death. He spoke 
encouraging words to him, gave him several hundred dollars and 
told him to go out west and get well. 

Judge Trimble was as well known and as successful in connection 
with agricultural pursuits and banking as he was in the practice of 
law. From time to time he made judicious investments in real 
estate and became the owner of fine farms aggregating nearly twelve 
hundred acres, situated near Bloomfield, Edina, Missouri and Keo- 
kuk. Entering banking circles, he became president of the State 
Bank of Albia, the State Bank of Bloomfield and the State Bank 
of Keosauqua, Iowa. 

In 1849, at Shelbvville, Indiana, Judge Trimble was married 
to Miss Emma M. Carruthers, who survives him together with one 
son. Palmer Trimble, who was his father's associate in law practice, 
and three daughters: Mrs. O. D. Wray, of Bloomfield; Mrs. O. S. 
Stanbro, of Keokuk; and Miss Helen Trimble. Judge Trimble was 
a Knight Templar Mason and never faltered in his fidelity to the 
teachings of the order. He attended the Episcopal church, and 
his life was a practical daily demonstration of Christianity. He was 
a statesman in that he aided in molding the destinies of Iowa and 
put forth his efiforts along the lines of civic progress and betterment. 
His judgment came to be recognized as so sound that many unhes- 
itatingly followed his leadership, knowing that his course was based 
upon keen insight, upon truth and justice. To reach the age of 
eighty-six years and carry with him all along life's journey the re- 
spect, good will and trust of his fellowmen is a record which indicates 
how noble were the principles which guided him and how com- 
mendable were his purposes. 



SAMUEL HAZEN. 



Samuel Hazen is a farmer and stockman of Denmark township, 
engaged extensively in the breeding of shorthorn cattle, in which con- 
nection he has won a wide-spread and well earned reputation. He 
now has a herd of eighty head of shorthorns and upon his stock he 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 183 

has won many premiums. In all of his business affairs he is ener- 
getic, enterprising and progressive and his success is the merited 
reward of his labors. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born in 
Beaver county in May, 1857, '^ ^^'^ "^ J- B. and Emily (Severns) 
Hazen. The father was also a native of Beaver county and was a 
representative of an old New England family, his father with his 
two brothers having removed from Vermont to Pennsylvania more 
than one hundred years ago. The grandfather of J. B. Hazen was 
the first of the family in this country. 

J. B. Hazen became a successful farmer and dealer in live stock. 
He continued his residence in the Keystone state until 1866, when 
he removed westward to Iowa, settling upon a farm in Pleasant 
Ridge township, Lee county, where he continued to make his home 
until his demise. The journey west was made by rail to Burlington 
and then he drove across the country to Pleasant Ridge township. 
Securing land, he immediately bent his energies to its further devel- 
opment and improvement, and his labors resulted in making his place 
one of the finest farms of the county. He was never so busy with 
his individual affairs, however, as to neglect his public duties and 
at different times he performed important public service both for 
the community and for the state. He acted as township trustee and 
filled other local offices, and twice he was called to represent his 
district in the Iowa general assembly, to which he was elected on 
the democratic ticket. In religious faith he was a Baptist, as was his 
wife. He died in 1904, at the age of seventy-seven years, and his 
demise was deeply regretted by all who knew him because of his 
sterling personal worth and his value as a progressive citizen. 

In early manhood J. B. Hazen wedded Emily Severns, who was 
born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and who resides in Denmark, 
at the age of eighty-eight years. Her father removed to Mercer 
county, Pennsylvania, and lived near Greenville until his death. 
Mrs. Hazen is the only one of her father's family who survives. 
Her only brother died at the age of thirty-seven. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Hazen were born three sons and two daughters. Sue resides 
with her mother in Denmark. John, who died in 1883, when about 
thirty years of age, left a widow and one child, who now resides 
in Kansas. Eliza became the wife of B. F. Kennedy, of Big Mound, 
who removed to Polk county, Iowa, where his death occurred, Mrs. 
Kennedy remaining upon the homestead near Altoona until her de- 
mise in September, 1913. Samuel is the next in order of birth in 
the family. Hervey, living near Mount Pleasant, in Henry county, 
is a farmer and stockman and is married and has three children. 



184 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Samuel Hazen has been a resident of Lee county from the age 
of nine years and has spent all of the intervening period in Pleasant 
Ridge, Washington and Denmark townships. He attended the 
public schools and was thoroughly trained in farm work under the 
direction of his father. Following his marriage he began farming 
on his own account in Washington township upon land owned by 
his father and the following year he purchased that property. About 
a quarter of a century ago, however, he sold that place and purchased 
his present farm, which is situated near the corporation limits of 
Denmark. He now owns three hundred and five acres of rich and 
productive land splendidly improved, eighty acres of his property 
lying a mile to the north of his home place. He has made manv 
improvements upon his land, has installed a model heating plant, 
a waterworks system and has secured all of the latest improved ma- 
chinery to facilitate the work of the fields and promote the interests 
of the farm. In addition to carefully and successfully cultivating 
the crops best adapted to soil and climate he has engaged largely 
in stock breeding, making a specialty of handling shorthorn cattle, 
of which he now has a herd of about eighty head. He has made 
many exhibits of his stock at various fairs and has won numerous 
ribbons. His plans are carefully formed and promptly executed, 
and in all of his business dealings he is found thoroughly reliable 
as well as enterprising. 

In 1884 Mr. Hazen was united in marriage to Miss Ella McCabe, 
who was born on the old McCabe homestead, oh section i, West 
Point township, a daughter of Arthur and Susanna (Christ) Mc- 
Cabe, who came to Lee county at an early period in its development, 
removing to this state from Preble county, Ohio. Her father was 
born in Delaware and her mother in Virginia and in early life 
removed to Ohio, where they were married. Three sons were born 
unto them in the Buckeye state and afterward thev came with their 
family to Lee county, settling in West Point township, casting in 
their lot with its pioneer residents. The death of Arthur McCabe 
occurred in 1882, when he had reached the age of seventy-two years, 
while his wife passed away in July, 1888, also at the age of seventy- 
two. They had made their home with Mr. and Mrs. Hazen after 
the marriage of the young couple. They were Methodists in relig- 
ious belief, and Mr. McCabe was a republican in his political views. 
active and earnest in the work of the party. The McCabe family 
numbered eleven children, ten of whom reached adult age, while 
six arc yet living. The record of the family besides Mrs. Hazen is 
as follows: Jacob died in Mount Pleasant. Leven is also deceased. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 185 

William served in the Civil war and has now passed away. James 
has departed this life. Josiah is a resident of Revere, Clark county, 
Missouri. Eliza is the wife of Charles Brown, whose home is near 
Revere. Arthur resides near Luray, Missouri, and has fifteen chil- 
dren. Houston is now living in Mount Pleasant. Mrs. Eva TuUis 
is a resident of Meade county, Kansas, and Emma, twin to Eva, 
died in infancy. 

Mr. and Airs. Hazen are the parents of five children: Hervey, 
who is tw^enty-nine years of age and is now operating the home farm; 
Pearl, the wife of Professor Harry Stein, who is one of the teachers 
in the State Normal school at Springfield, South Dakota; Glen and 
Grace, twins, both at home, although the latter is now the wife of 
Oran Staiif and has a daughter, Lucile. Verna, at home. 

Politically Mr. Hazen is a democrat and has served in various 
local offices and as a member of the local central committee. He 
was formerly a member of the Grange, and he belongs to the Con- 
gregational church. His life has been an active and useful one, 
fraught with good results, and his career shows what may be accom- 
plished when energy and ambition point the way. He has never 
been afraid to face and meet the difficulties in his path and has 
regarded them rather as an impetus to renewed effort. 



JAMES AMOS LEE. 

James Amos Lee was one of the old-time merchants of Keokuk, 
and his life record deserves a place upon the pages of the history of 
the county, where for many years he made his home, arriving in 
i8:;i and, continuing his abode in Keokuk to the time of his death, 
which occurred forty-six years later. He was highly esteemed wher- 
ever known and most of all where he was best known. He was born 
in Montgomery county, Maryland, March 14, 1819, and was a rep- 
resentative of a well-known Lee family of the south. His father, 
James Lee, was also a native of ALiryland and made farming his 
life work. He married Letha Trundle, who was likewise born in 
Maryland and in that state their entire lives were passed. Their 
children were nine in number: Berzella, who died in Maryland; 
James A. ; Thomas, who was drowned in the ALssissippi river ; Leah ; 
Durbin; Delphina; Sophronia, deceased; Elcana; and Curtis. 

At the place of his nativity James Amos Lee was reared to man- 
hood and through the period of his boyhood and youth assisted his 



186 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

father in the cultivation and development of the home farm, alter- 
nating his work in the fields with attending the common schools, 
where he acquired a fair English education. He left Maryland in 
1849 and started westward. He had relatives in Adams county, Illi- 
nois, with whom he remained for a brief period but he was looking 
around for a favorable business opening and this brought him to 
Keokuk. He traveled to this city with a man by the name of Rice, 
who was engaged in the iron business, and entering his employ he 
continued in that position for several years. He said that he never 
had occasion to regret his determination to make Keokuk his home. 
He found it a pleasant place to live and it gave him business oppor- 
tunities. 

It was also in Keokuk on the qth of March, 1858, that Mr. Lee 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Fountain, who was born 
in Sussex county, Delaware, March 9, 1833, and was twenty-three 
vears of age when she came to the west wnth an aunt, Mrs. J. S. 
Primrose, who made her way to Keokuk but did not remain. Mrs. 
Lee was a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Pierce) Fountain, 
representatives of old Delaware families. Her father's birth oc- 
curred at the same place where Mrs. Lee was born. He was a farmer 
by occupation and thus provided for his family. Both he and his 
wife remained in their native state until called to their home beyond. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fountain were born three children: William 
H., who remained a resident of Delaware; Mrs. Lee; and Solomon 
E., who served in the navy during the Civil war and is now living 
in Philadelphia. During the days of her early womanhood prior 
to her marriage Mrs. Lee traveled quite extensively in the section 
of the east in which she lived, taking many trips up the Delaware 
river to Philadelphia and thence going bv boat through the canals 
and other water ways to Baltimore and other eastern points. Follow- 
ing their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lee began their domestic life in 
Keokuk and through the long years of their residence here they 
enjoyed the warm regard and enduring friendship of those with 
whom they came in contact. They became the parents of two sons: 
Cieorge F., who married Emma L. Male and is now living in Ver- 
milion county, Illinois; and James Trundle, who married Deborah 
Howard and resides in Omaha, Nebraska. 

Following his marriage Mr. Lee engaged in the grocery business 
in Keokuk and was active in that line of merchandising until his 
health failed him about fifteen years before his demise. Forced by 
physical reasons to retire from active life he then spent his remain- 
ing days in rest. He had long occupied a prominent and enviable 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 187 

position among the merchants of the city and was greatly respected 
by all who knew him, for he was reliable, energetic and progressive. 
In politics he was a stalwart republican, giving unfaltering support 
to the principles of the party, and his life was ever guided by the 
teachings of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he was an 
earnest and consistent member, passing away in that faith in 1897, 
when he had reached the ripe old age of seventy-eight years. 



BARNEY DIERKER. 



• Barney Dierker, engaged in farming and stock-raising, makes 
his home on section 21, West Point township, where he owns a farm 
of two hundred and twenty acres. He is busily occupied with the 
further development and improvement of this property and is living 
a life of industry that is bringing to him a creditable measure of 
success. •• . 

He was born upon this farm, September 22, 1845, and is therefore 
one of the pioneer settlers and a representative of one of the pioneer 
families of the county, his parents being Henry and Katherine 
(Druppel) Dierker. The father was born in Hanover, Germany, 
and in early manhood made his way to America, settling in Lee 
county. That this was still a frontier district is indicated by the 
fact that he was able to secure government land. He removed to 
Iowa from Quincy, Illinois, where he sojourned for a brief period, 
and after making arrangements for having a home in Lee county 
he brought his wife, a son and two daughters to Iowa. Here other 
children were added to the family. The father preempted a claim 
in West Point township, securing one hundred and sixty acres in 
connection with Henry Fullenkamp, his brother-in-law. Henrv 
Dierker made his home on section 21, West Point township, where 
he built a log cabin, which in later years was replaced by a brick 
house. He died upon the old homestead farm about thirtv-five years 
ago when he had reached the age of eighty-six years and six months. 
He was a very industrious, energetic man, and his life was crowned 
with a substantial measure of success. In his family were five daugh- 
ters and two sons, of whom three are yet living. One of the sons 
died at the age of eighty-two years. 

Barney Dierker was reared on the old homestead and attended 
a parochial school at West Point, but his educational advantages 
were very limited. His training at farm labor, however, was not 



188 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

meager, for at an early age he took, his phtce in the fields, aiding in 
the work of plowing, planting and harvesting as the years went on. 
He thus gained a practical experience which enabled him to suc- 
cessfully carry on general farming and stock-raising since starting 
out in life for himself. 

Mr. Dierker was married in June, 1874, to Miss Anna Ketman, 
who died in 1895 at the age of forty years. She was born in Mus- 
catine, Iowa, and was a daughter of one of the veterans of the Civil 
war, who lived for some years at West Point but died in San Fran- 
cisco, California, at the age of more than seventy years. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Dierker were born ten childreh, of whom five daughters 
and four sons are yet living: Katie, the wife of Henry Goebel, a 
resident of Oklahoma; Mrs. Annie Kempker, a resident of New- 
castle, Nebraska; Frank, a physician of West Point; Joseph, who 
is practicing medicine in Lawrence, Nebraska; Lizzie, who was edu- 
cated in the Denmark Academy and also continued her education 
at Highland Park, Des Moines, and is now a teacher at Jamestown, 
Missouri; Henry, a farmer living at home; Clara, also at home; 
Bernard, who is studying medicine in the St. Louis University; and 
Rose, who was recently graduated from the Fort Madison high 
school and has successfully engaged in teaching for a year. 

The family are members of St. Mary's Catholic church at West 
Point and Mr. Dierker gives his political allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party. He displays many of the sterling traits of his German 
ancestrv and has been a loyal and public-spirited citizen of Lee 
county throughout the entire period of his life. For almost seventy 
vears he has witnessed the changes which have occurred, bringing 
about the growth and development that has resulted in the present 
prosperity and progress, and he can relate many interesting incidents 
of the early davs and of the transformation that has here been 
wrought. 



A. P. BROWN. 



A. P. Brown is prominently and actively identified with the man- 
ufacturing interests of Fort Madison, being now president of the 
Brown Paper Mill and thereby controlling one of the important in- 
dustries of the city. Through the steps of an orderly progression he 
has advanced to his present position since starting out in life on his 
own account. He was born in Athens county, Ohio, in 1854, and is 






VIEWS OF THE PLANT OF THE ]?RO\\"X I'Al'l'.K COMPANY, FORT MADISON 






'- !-:J>^;.RY 



■;■ ' ■-■■'. LENOX 

■~0L.; -^ NATIONS 



■ A r, r 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 191 

a son of D. T. and Marie D. (Foster) Brown. The father, also 
a native of Athens county, acquired a public-school education and 
remained a resident of Ohio until some years after his marriage. In 
1856 he started for Iowa with his family, making Lee county his 
destination. He purchased a farm upon which he located and in 
1872 he abandoned agricultural life for commercial pursuits, estab- 
lishing a stationery business in Fort Madison. This he conducted 
successfully for about a decade and in the meantime his attention was 
attracted to paper manufacturing, in which business he embarked in 
1882, establishing a paper mill in this city. He was active in its man- 
agement and control to the time of his death, which occurred in May. 
1906. His widow still survives. In their family were five sons and 
a daughter. 

A. P. Brown, who was the fourth in order of birth, was but two 
years of age when brought by his parents to Iowa, so that his educa- 
tion was acquired in public schools of Lee county. He made his 
initial step in the business world by purchasing an interest in a book 
store in Fort Madison in 1870, buying out the firm of Webster 
Brothers, whose establishment was a branch of the first book store 
founded in this city. A few years later, or in 1876, Mr. Brown went 
upon the road as a paper salesman and since 1882 he has been con- 
tinuously with the paper mill of Fort Madison. His previous expe- 
rience upon the road gave him thorough and comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the paper trade and in 1883 he was made manager of the 
mill. Since that time he has had active voice in its control and in 
formulating its policy, and in 1900 he was chosen president of the 
company, in which capacity he has since concentrated his elTorts upon 
executive direction. He keeps in close touch with paper manufac- 
turing interests and with the trade, and studies the latest processes 
of paper making and employs the most improved methods and ma- 
chinery. His product is of an excellent grade and a reasonable price 
and honorable business dealings insure to the house a continuance 
of the liberal patronage accorded them. This enterprise is one of the 
important business concerns of the city and as its controlling spirit 
Mr. Brown's position in commercial circles is indicated. 

In 1885 Mr. Brown was married to Miss Susanna Hesser, of Lee 
countv, a daughter of Frederick and Susanna Hesser,' who wTre 
among the pioneer residents of this city, coming to Fort Madison in 
the early '3CS, the father being the first hardware merchant here. 
They made the journey westward from Pennsylvania with wagons, 
traveling- by slow stages across the country and locating in the little 
Iowa river town at a period before the territorial government was 



192 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

organized and when the work of progress and development seemed 
scarcely begun beyond the Mississippi. The father of Mr. Brown 
first made the journey from Ohio with a buggy and later he shipped 
his goods by boat down the Ohio river and up the Mississippi, for 
it was long before the era of railroad building through the middle 
west. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Brown has been born a daughter, Adelaide, 
now the wife of H. K. Dunmead, of Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown occupy one of the first brick, houses erected 
in Fort Madison. It was built in 1841 and is still a substantial resi- 
dence. A spirit of hospitality pervades the place, and their home is 
the center of a cultured society circle. Mr. Brown belongs to the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and his political allegiance is 
given to the republican party. For two terms he has served as mavor, 
filling this position at tlie present time, and in the administration of 
the office he displays the same spirit of promptness and the same 
sound judgment and enterprise which have characterized him in his 
business affairs. The citv is thus benefiting by his control, for he has 
introduced various needed reforms and improvements. 



THE BROWN PAPER COMPANY. 

The Brown Paper Company, one of the leading industrial enter- 
prises of Fort Madison, was established in 1882 and was the first busi- 
ness of the kind in the county. The stockholders at its inception were 
D. T. Brown, Morrison Brotliers, \Y. H. Kortsinger, M. Case and 
the Fort Madison National Bank. This is the only mill left in the 
southeastern part of the state engaged in the manufacture of straw 
paper. The plant is located in the southwestern section of Fort Mad- 
ison, at the corner of Hamilton and Occidental streets, and is well 
equipped, the original machinery having been replaced by that of 
more modern manufacture. Much of the stock has been owned by 
the Brown family almost from the establishment of the mill. A. P. 
Brown is the only one of the original stockholders that is still in- 
terested. 

The plant has a capacity of twentv tons of paper per day, utilizes 
thirtv-five tons of straw per day and manufactures tube and corru- 
gated paper and strawboard, supplving the Illinois Glass Company, 
the American Can Company, the Omaha Box & Fiber Company and 
the Sefton Company of Chicago, these four firms taking all the prod- 
uct of the mill, in which forty-seven people are employed. They use 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 193 

both wheat and rye straw, two-thirds of which comes from Lee county, 
thus furnishing an excellent market to straw producers. The plant 
is equipped with hve hundred electric horse power and the arrange- 
ment is such as to facilitate the work in every particular. Those in 
charge have made a study of the best methods of producing maximum 
results with minimum expenditure of time, labor and material and 
thus have found the secret of success for the business which they own 
and control. 



RAY S. HART. 



Ray S. Hart is a busy and energetic farmer who for the past 
sixteen years has resided on and cultivated a tract of eighty acres 
on section 7, Denmark township. He owns this property and it gives 
evidence in its neat and thrifty appearance of his watchful care and. 
wise supervision. He was born in Pleasant Ridge township, Lee 
county, August 30, 1841, and is a son of John H. and Phoebe (Thurs- 
ton) Hart, who came to this county in 1838 and 1840 respectively. 
The father was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1799 and in 
the paternal line came of Irish ancestry and in the maternal line 
was of Scotch lineage. His father was a cabinetmaker and died in 
Rhode Island at the remarkable old age of ninety-four years. John 
H. Hart was one of a family of five sons and two daughters. One 
of his brothers, Edward Hart, was for two years a resident of Lee 
county, Iowa. 

John H. Hart was reared and married in Rhode Island. He 
learned and followed the cabinetmaker's trade and was also an auc- 
tioneer. After his removal to the west he gave his attention largely 
to auctioneering and to farming, which he carried on in Lee countv 
in 1871, when he removed to Bates county, Missouri. There his 
death occurred within the vear. He was a Baptist in his religious 
faith, while his fraternal relations were with the Masons and the 
Odd Fellows, both of which organizations found in him a loyal and 
devoted representative. He married Phoebe Thurston, also a native 
of Rhode Island, and her death occurred in Lee countv in 1852, 
her remains being interred in the West Point cemetery. One of 
her brothers, William Thurston, came to Fort Madison, Iowa, about 
1838, thus casting in his lot with the earliest pioneers. He remained 
there to the time of his death. Unto John H. and Phoebe Hart 
were born seven children, of whom Ray S. was third in order of 



194 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

birth, and only one other is now living, Thomas H. Hart, a resident 
of Fort Madison. Having lost his first wife, the father married 
Emily Green and they had three children, two of whom survive, 
one being a resident of Illinois and the other of Osceola, Iowa. 

Ray S. Hart was reared upon the old home farm in Pleasant 
Ridge township with the usual experiences of the farm lad, who 
as his age and strength increase aids more and more largely in the 
work of the fields and thus circumscribes the time which he can 
devote to the acquirement of an education. Practical training well 
qualified him for his later duties when he began farming on his 
own account. With the outbreak of the Civil war, however, he 
put aside all personal interests, enlisting in 1861, when twenty years 
of age, as a member of Company F, First Iowa Cavalry. His regi- 
ment was assigned to the Seventh Corps of the Western Army and 
Mr. Hart was on active duty for three years and three months, the 
last year being largely spent on detached duty in connection with 
the medical department. He was never wounded, although he suf- 
fered from malarial fever and his illness so reduced his weight that 
he tipped the scales at only ninety pounds when he returned home. 

Not content with the educational opportunities that he had thus 
far received, Ray S. Hart afterward attended school in Denmark 
for a year and a half. He then went to Colorado, spending about 
a year in that state in the vicinity of Denver, where he engaged in 
freighting. Upon his return to Iowa he began farming in Denmark 
township and has since successfully followed that pursuit, being 
now the owner of a good tract of land of eighty acres on section 7, 
which he has brought to a high state of cultivation. His fields are 
carefully tilled along progressive and scientific lines, and success fol- 
lows his efforts in the production of good crops. 

Mr. Hart was married in this county, in 1878, to Miss Celia 
Stiles, who was born near Des Moines, in Warren county, Iowa, on 
the 20th of September, 1851;, a daughter of Horace and Rachel 
(Van Hyning) Stiles. The father, who was a native of New Hamp- 
shire, came to Lee county in 1838, a number of vears before the 
admission of the state into the Union — and settled upon a farm in 
what was then a frontier region. After his marriage he removed 
to Warren county, Iowa, but in 1867 returned to Denmark, where 
the mother died in 1873, at the age of forty- four years. She was 
a Baptist in religious faith and lived an earnest Christian life. Mr. 
Stiles afterward removed to Nebraska, where he passed away in 
1897, at the venerable age of eighty-one years. In their family were 
five children, of whom four are yet living: Mrs. Hart; Mrs. Mary 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 195 

McClees, whose home is in York, Nebraska; Mrs. Amelia Brewer, 
whose husband is a police officer of York, Nebraska; and Mrs. Mar- 
tha Chase, of Portland, Oregon. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hart have been born four children: Addie, 
the wife of Walter Orton, a resident of Denmark township, by 
whom she has two cliildren, Alvin and Hart; John, at home; Edith, 
who is the widow of Joseph Blindt and resides in Burlington, Iowa; 
and Carl, who married Mabel Bradfield and is employed in a but- 
ton factory in Burlington, Iowa. The parents are members of the 
Church of God of Des Moines county. 

Politically Mr. Hart is a republican, never faltering in his alle- 
giance to the party which was the defense of the Union during the 
dark days of the Civil war and which has always been regarded as 
the party of reform and progress. He holds membership with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and with the Grand Army post of Fort Madison and 
through the latter connection maintains close and pleasant relations 
with his old army comrades. He made an excellent military record 
when on the battlefields of the south and has always been equally 
loyal to the best interests of city, state and nation in days of peace. 



R. M. SCOVEL, D. D. S. 

In the practice of dentistry Dr. R. M. Scovel has won a gratify- 
ing position in Fort Madison, his native city, and his record thus 
stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is never 
without honor save in his own country. Since entering upon profes- 
sional activity here he has continually advanced and, holding to 
high standards, has made his service of value to the community. He 
was born in Fort Madison in 1882, a son of L. L. and Virginia (Car- 
son) Scovel, both of whom were natives of Lee county, born near 
West Point. The father was a son of Dewey Scovel, a native of New 
York, who removed westward in 1845, casting in his lot with the 
pioneer residents of this state, where he was actively engaged in 
farming for many years, winning a place among the leading agri- 
culturists of Lee county. He is still living and has attained the 
venerable age of ninety years. His son, L. L. Scovel, on attaining 
years of maturity wedded Virginia Carson, a daughter of Alexan- 
der Carson, who was also one of the pioneer settlers of Lee county. 



196 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

L. L. Scovel became a shipping clerk with the American Fork & 
Hoe Company and is still in that position. 

Dr. Scovel, reared in his native city, passed through the con- 
secutive grades in the public schools and was graduated from the 
high school with the class of 1902. Deciding upon a professional 
career and believing that he would find the practice of dentistry con- 
genial, he entered the Northwestern Dental College in Chicago 
and was graduated in 1905. He then returned to Fort Madison for 
practice and has since remained in his native citv. He is in touch 
with the most modern and scientific methods, thoroughly understands 
all the principles of the profession and manifests notable skill in per- 
forming the intricate and multitudinous mechanical services which 
are a feature of his calling. 

On the 2 1 St of October, 1908, Dr. Scovel was married to Miss 
Daisy Atlee, a daughter of I. R. Atlee. Dr. Scovel holds member- 
ship with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and in politics 
is independent, voting as his judgment dictates without regard to 
party ties. He has a wide acquaintance in the city where practically 
his entire life has been passed and among his best friends are those 
who have known him from boyhood — an indication that his life 
record has alwavs been a creditable one. 



SAMUEL WOOD TUCKER. 

Samuel Wood Tucker, a son of Thomas and Ann S. (Sykes) 
Tucker, was one of the early business men of Keokuk, being con- 
nected with a wholesale and retail hardware concern at a time when 
there were no railroads into the city. Although the iron horse was 
as yet unknown here, Keokuk was one of the most thriving munici- 
palities of the then new west and promised to develop into a great 
commercial center. 

Our subject was born September 21, 1819, in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and there received a liberal education. As a young man he went 
to St. Louis, where he was employed as a clerk in a hardware store. 
He was engaged in collecting for his firm when he made his first 
visit to Keokuk in the early '40s. He remembered his favorable 
impression of the thriving little town and in 1847 h^ located perma- 
nently in Keokuk and with his brother embarked in the wholesale 
and retail hardware business, their establishment being located at 
the corner of Second and Main streets. As before stated there were 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 197 

no railroads and journeys inland were made on horseback as far 
west as Des Moines, which was then little more than a frontier vil- 
lage. From the time of his coming Mr. Tucker became an integral 
part of the growth and development of Keokuk, then one of the com- 
mercial centers of this section of the country. The firm of S. W. & H. 
Tucker became widely known throughout the country and the name 
was a synonym for probity and upright dealing. Our subject con- 
tinued in the business after his brother's retirement from the firm 
and during his later years was also employed in an official capacity 
by the Iowa State Insurance Company. 

While in St. Louis, in 1848, Samuel W. Tucker was united in 
marriage to Miss Jula De Lange, by whom he had five sons, as fol- 
lows: William Penn, De Lange, George Sykes, Harrison and 
Walter Sumner. All of these have passed away save George Sykes. 

Mr. Tucker was one of the twelve founders of the local Uni- 
tarian church and remained one of its stanch supporters to the day 
of his death. He was a republican in politics and an outspoken advo- 
cate of the protection of American industries against the poorly paid 
labor of Europe which the free trade policy would admit to open 
competition with the American workman. He was of Quaker par- 
entage and inherited the virtues of his forbears. He was noted for 
his honesty, industry and public spirit. He passed away March 22, 
1905, in Keokuk, and his death was mourned by his fellow citizens, 
as he was one of those who helped lay the foundation upon which 
the prosperity and advancement of the present generation is builded. 
He could relate many interesting reminiscences of the early days 
of the city and manifested in all of life's relations that courage and 
firmness of resolution which gave to the pioneer strength for his 
arduous labors. 



GEORGE S. TUCKER. 

George S. Tucker, the only living son of Samuel Wood Tucker, 
was born in Keokuk on the 28th of January, 1856, and at the age of 
twelve went to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he was educated 
and grew to manhood. After clerking in stores for a number of 
years he went to what is now North Dakota and engaged in ranching. 
For a part of the time he was in the employ of Theodore Roosevelt, 
receiving thirty dollars per month for his services. After this expe- 
rience he returned to Keokuk and embarked in the ice business, to 



198 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

which general contracting has since been added. He is a member 
of the firm of McManus & Tucker and in addition to the two lines 
of business already named he is identified with numerous other enter- 
prises of a local character. 

Mr. Tucker married Miss Sophie E. Roche, of Warsaw, Illinois, 
and to them three children have been born, namely: Beatrice 
Thelma, Georgia Wood and Julia Anna. He was reared a repub- 
lican and still gives his political allegiance to that party. For several 
years he served as a member of the city council, doing all in his 
power to secure an efficient municipal government. He is quite 
prominent fraternally, being a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Masons. He is a 
Knight Templar in the York Rite, has taken the thirty-second degree 
in the Scottish Rite, and is also a member of the Shrine. He is popu- 
lar socially and is known as a man of unimpeachable integrity and 
of kindliness of spirit. 



IRA HOUSTON. 



Ira Houston was a representative of one of the pioneer families 
of Lee county and did his share in the early development of this 
section of the state. He passed away May 17, i88g, at his home on 
section 35, Denmark township, after having resided in this county 
for fifty-two years. His birth occurred in 1826 at Lyndeboro, New 
Hampshire, and his parents were Ira and Elizabeth (Epps) Hous- 
ton, the latter a sister of Lewis Epps, one of the earliest settlers and 
e.xtensive landowners of Lee county. Ira Houston, Sr., secured a 
farm on section 35, Denmark township, and for a number of years 
devoted his time to its cultivation. Later he turned the work of 
the farm over to his son, the subject of this review, and he engaged 
in other business. He manufactured shingles used in the construc- 
tion of the early houses and in many ways aided in transforming 
the county from a wild region to a section of well-developed farms. 
His death occurred in 1872 when he had reached the advanced age 
of eighty-six years, and his wife survived him for a year, her demise 
occurring when she was eighty-two years of age. Both were mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. 

Ira Houston of this review was one of twelve children, most 
of whom were born in the east, where three passed away. The death 
of one occurred in Lee countv not many years after the arrival of 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 199 

the family here. All have now gone to their reward. The sub- 
ject of this review was a farmer and stock raiser and as he followed 
practical and well-tried methods of agriculture he gained a compe- 
tence. He added to the homestead and eventually became the owner 
of two hundred and ten acres of valuable land, which is now the 
property of his widow, who resides in Denmark. 

Mr. Houston's marriage occ.urred October 12, 1856, in Tall- 
madge, Ohio, the lady of his choice being Miss Olivia P. Porter, a 
native of that locality. She is a daughter of a pioneer family and 
her birth occurred in a log cabin in the woods, as that part of the 
Buckeye state had not then been cleared of its standing timber. Her 
parents were Horace and Phoebe N. (Sperry) Porter, the former 
of whom died in Ohio, September 25, 1869, at the age of seventy- 
two years, and the latter survived until February 5, 1899, passing 
away at the venerable age of ninety-five. Both w-ere Presbyterians 
in their religious affiliation. Mrs. Houston is one of four children. 
Albert is now a resident of Newark, Ohio. Harriet C. married 
Miles Morris, a resident of Akron, Ohio, Edward completed the 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Houston became the parents of three chil- 
dren: Ellen Olivia, who died at the age of nine months; Herbert 
John, who died in 1876 when but three years of age; and Hattie 
Elizabeth, the wife of Rev. H. L. Henn, of Denmark, Iowa. 

Mr. Houston was a consistent member of the Congregational 
church and his widow also holds membership in that organization. 
He was a republican in his political belief and always manifested 
a laudable interest in all movements inaugurated for the welfare 
of his community. The work which he did many vears ago in devel- 
oping the county is now bearing its fruit and the present generation 
enjoy advantages which would not have been theirs if it had not 
been for such men as he. 



JUDGE WILLIAM LOGAN. 

Prominent among the energetic, farsighted and successful busi- 
ness men of Keokuk is Judge William Logan. Various corporate 
interests have benefited by his co-operation and profited by the stimu- 
lus of his energy, determination and keen sagacity. He is today 
connected with the management of various important concerns, and 
his efiforts are of wide influence in furthering the material upbuild- 
ing and advancing the prosperity of city, county and state. He has 



200 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

long been active in financial circles and since March, 1890, has been 
president of the State Central Savings Bank of Keokuk. Judge 
Logan was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, September 11, 
1848, and is a son of \Villiam P. and Sarah J. (McCombs) Logan. 
In 1852 the family went west to Hancock county, Illinois, and there 
the father engaged in general farming: 

Judge Logan spent his youthful days upon the home farm and 
attended the district schools of that locality, starting out in life on 
his own account at the age of nineteen. He first took up general 
agricultural pursuits, farming on rented land and also operating a 
threshing machine. When twenty-one years of age he removed to 
Schuyler county, Missouri, where he established and conducted a 
lumber business and also operated a sawmill during twenty years 
of his residence there. It was while in Missouri that he first became 
interested in banking, and he also figured prominently in the public 
life of the community, for from 1884 until 1890 he was presiding 
judge of the county court. The First National Bank of Macon 
elected him its president, and he organized the Logan Bank at Glen- 
wo(xl, where he lived from 1869 to 1889. Both interests prospered 
under his direction, and his broad experience gave him a compre- 
hensive knowledge of every phase of the banking business. 

From Missouri Judge Logan removed to Keokuk and purchased 
a controlling interest in the bank of which he is now the president — 
the State Central Savings Bank. He has been continuously con- 
nected with it to the present time and the policy which he inaugu- 
rated and the course which he has pursued have been the means of 
bringing it to its present high standard as one of the most substantial 
financial institutions of the state. This alone would entitle Judge 
Logan to mention as one of the representative business men of east- 
ern Iowa, vet various other interests have profited by his co-opera- 
tion, support and guidance. He is also president of the Iowa State 
Insurance Companv and before his election to that oflice served as 
its vice president. He is president of the Gate City Company and 
was one of the chief organizers of the Mississippi River Power 
Company, of which he is now a director. 

On the 26th of December, 1871, Judge Logan was married to 
Miss Sarah J. Jackson, a daughter of Archibald and Catherine Jack- 
son, and unto them were born two children: William Archibald, 
who was born June 14, 1873, and died September 6, 1905; and Eva 
Isabel, now Mrs. James W. Huiskamp. 

The familv attend the Congregational church, and Judge Logan's 
fraternal connections are with the Elks and the Masons. His politi- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 201 

cal indorsement is given to the republican party and his interest is 
that of a broad-minded, public-spirited citizen, who recognizes his 
duties and obligations as well as his privileges in the matter of the 
franchise. He is interested in all public affairs and his co-operation 
can be counted upon to further any project or measure which is a 
matter of civic virtue and civic pride. The life record of Judge 
Logan is notable in the measure of progress which has characterized 
his career. Starting out practically empty-handed, he stands today 
as one of the prosperous citizens of Keokuk. The steps in his orderly 
progression are easily discernible and an analyzation of his charac- 
ter shows that persistency of purpose, well formulated plans and 
indefatigable energy have been the basis on which his prosperity 
has been built. He possesses the power to readily coordinate forces 
and unite seemingly diverse elements into a harmonious whole. 



STATE CENTRAL SAVINGS BANK. 

The State Central Savings Bank of Keokuk is the outgrowth of 
several banking institutions. On the r3th of September, 1858, a char- 
ter was granted the Keokuk branch of the State Bank of Iowa, with 
the following incorporators and directors: John W. Cleghorn, John 
G. Floyd, Samuel F. Miller, Benjamin F. Moody, James M. Shelly, 
Smith Hamill, Charles Garber, J. C. Ramsay and James M. Billings. 
The first officers w^ere S. F. Miller, afterwards associate justice of 
the Supreme Court of the L^nited States, president, and J. W. Mc- 
Millen, cashier. E. H. Harrison was a director of the State Bank of 
Iowa on behalf of the Keokuk branch. On the loth of June, 1865, 
the name of the institution was changed to the State National Bank 
and the capital stock was increased to one hundred and fifty thou- 
sand dollars. Twenty years later, when the national bank charter 
expired, the institution was reorganized on the 23d of May, 1885, 
under the state laws as the State Bank of Keokuk, with a capital of 
one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. On the 23d of November, 
1893, it was consolidated with the Central Savings Bank and the 
name changed to the State Central Savings Bank of Keokuk, with 
a capital of one hundred thousand dollars. The success of the insti- 
tution is further indicated in the fact that on the ist of March, igi i, 
the capital stock was increased to two hundred thousand dollars. 
There is also a surplus of two hundred thousand dollars and undi- 
vided profits of one hundred and eighty thousand dollars. The pres- 



202 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ent officers are: William Logan, president; George E. Rix, first 
vice president; W. M. Irwin, second vice president; Charles J. 
Bode, cashier; and H. T. Graham and H. B. Blood, assistant cash- 
iers. This institution is in a most flourishing condition. Its growth 
has been continuous and under the guidance of Judge Logan there 
is no doubt that its present high standard will be maintained and 
that the safe, conservative yet progressive policy thus far pursued 
will be continued. 



HENRY JUDY. 



Henry Judy resides on section 29, Denmark township, on a farm 
of one hundred and thirty-four acres which has been the family home 
since 1895. He carries on general agricultural pursuits and stock- 
raising and most of the improvements upon his place have been put 
there by him and are evidences of his progressive spirit. He was 
born in West Point township, this county, on the ist of December, 
1 86 1, a son of John and Salome (Honadel) Judy. The father was a 
native of Ohio and was a son of John Judy, who brought his 
family from Ohio to Lee county, Iowa, in the year 1836, settling 
in the southwestern part of West Point township, at which time the 
work of development and improvement had scarcelv been begun. 
His son Henry had located there in 1834 and was a pioneer settler 
of the district. John Judy, Sr., at once took up the arduous task of 
developing a new farm and carried on the work persistently and 
energetically to the time of his death, transforming a tract of wild 
prairie into productive, cultivated fields. In his family were the 
following children, Henry, George, John, Michael, William, Polly, 
Christina, Eliza and Abigail. 

Of this family John Judy, Jr., was a young child when brought 
by his parents to Iowa. He resided upon the farm in West Point 
township continuously from 1836 until his death, which occurred in 
1903, when he had reached the age of seventv-one vears. He was 
a successful agriculturist, carefully tilling his fields and performing 
all the work necessary to the cultivation and development of his 
place, which he made one of the valuable farm properties of the 
township. His political allegiance was given to the republican 
party, and his religious faith was that of the United Brethren 
church, to the teachings of which he was ever loyal. His wife was 
born in Alsace and was of German parentage. She died in the winter 



' . HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 203 

of 1863-4. Their family numbered six children: Mrs. Sarah Wil- 
son, a widow now living in Donnellson, Iowa; Jacob and Charles, 
who are residents of Pottawattamie county, this state; John, who 
died in childhood; Henry, of this review; and one who died in in- 
fancy. 

Henry Judy was reared in West Point township and at the usual 
age entered the public schools, where he acquired a good education. 
He afterward removed to Jefferson township, where he lived for 
eight years, during which period he owned and cultivated a farm 
there. He subsequently sold that property and in 1895 purchased 
his present farm, upon which he has now lived for almost two 
decades. Within its boundaries are comprised one hundred and 
thirty-four acres of rich land and his fields respond readily to the 
care and labor which he bestows upon them. He also raises stock 
to a considerable extent and is an excellent judge of domestic ani- 
mals. He has never been afraid of hard work and his energy and 
ambition have constituted the incentives which have brought him 
to his present success. 

In 1886 Mr. Judy was united in marriage to Miss Mary Schoene, 
who was born in West Point township, April 26, 1866, a daughter 
of J. Philip and Ernestine (Kudebeh) Schoene. The father's birth 
occurred in Union county, Pennsylvania, in 1836 and the mother 
was born in Germany but when a child of thirteen years became a 
resident of Lee county, Iowa. J. P. Schoene was brought to this 
county in 1838, when but two years of age, being one of the oldest 
settlers of this district. He now resides at the Soldiers' Home in 
Marshalltown, at the advanced age of seventy-eight years, but still 
has property in Franklin, Lee county. For many years he was ac- 
, tively engaged in farming. At the time of the Civil war he re- 
sponded to the country's call for troops and served at the front with 
the Thirty-sixth Iowa Infantry. His wife died in Lee county, Oc- 
tober II, 191 1, at the age of seventy-five years, passing away in the 
faith of the Presbyterian church, of which Mr. Schoene is also a 
member. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Judy have been born eight children: Emma, 
who is assistant cashier of the State Bank of Burlington, Colorado, 
and who has filled the ofiice of deputy county recorder for a number 
of years; Clio, also of Burlington, Colorado, who was deputy county 
recorder for a number of years; Helen, a graduate of the Iowa State 
Teachers' College; Alice, who resides in Colorado; Gertrude, now 
attending school; and Wayne, Kenneth and Genevieve, all at home. 
The two oldest daughters attended Elliott's Business College. The 



204 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

daughters have made splendid records in their various connections 
and deserve much credit for what they have accomplished. 

Politically Mr- Judy is independent but takes little active part 
in politics. He has served, however, as trustee and has hlled the 
office of school director. He and his wife are members of the Con- 
gregational church. There are no unusual chapters in his life history, 
but it is the record of one who has always been loyal to duty, who 
is industrious, determined and persevering in business and who in 
every relation of life is thoroughly trustworthy and reliable. 



EDWIN G. VAUGHAN. 

Edwin G. Vaughan, a well known and highly esteemed citizen 
of Keokuk, holds the office of county recorder in Lee county and is 
doing most commendable work in that connection. His birth oc- 
curred in Keokuk county, Iowa, on the 21st of November, 1868, 
his parents being Erasmus G. and Mary Ann (Colleran) Vaughan, 
the former a native of Fleming countv, Kentuckv, and the latter of 
Ireland. Erasmus G. Vaughan, who came to Keokuk early in 1869, 
was a cook by occupation and was thus engaged during the greater 
part of the time until his death. He enlisted for service in the Union 
army as a member of Company K, Second Iowa Volunteer Infantry, 
and at the battle of Fort Donelson received a gun shot wound in the 
right lung. The effects of the injury were such that he was dis- 
charged on account of "total disability," but with his discharge in 
his knapsack he rejoined the armv in time to participate in the battle 
of Corinth, Mississippi. Subsequently he returned to Keokuk, resid- 
ing here continuously until called to his final rest on the 14th of 
November, 1902. He gained an extensive circle of friends during 
the long period of his residence in the city, and his demise was there- 
fore the occasion of deep and widespread regret. His political alle- 
giance was given to the republican party, while his religious faith 
was that of the Roman Catholic church. He likewise belonged to 
the Grand Army of the Republic. Unto him and his wife, who died 
in 1900, were born two children. 

"Ed" Vaughan, as he is best known, was reared in Keokuk and 
has always made that city his home. He attended the public schools 
in the acquirement of an education and when a vouth of sixteen 
began providing for his own support by driving a delivery wagon. 
Subsequently he attended Pierce Business College and afterward 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 205 

drove a delivery wagon tor one year. In February, 1889, he entered 
the shoe factory of Huiskamp Brothers, where he worked until 1908. 
In that year he became deputy county recorder under Fred C. Cham- 
bers and served in that capacity until elected to the office of county 
recorder in 191 2, the duties of which position he has since discharged 
in an efficient and highly satisfactory manner. 

On the 1 8th of October, 1892, Mr. Vaughan was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Katie Aiken, by whom he has one son, Henry Leslie. 
He is a republican in politics. He is a member of St. Francis de 
Sales Roman Catholic Church and is identified fraternally with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, the Loyal Order of Moose and the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. He stands high in the esteem of his 
fellow citizens, and those who have known him from boyhood are 
numbered among his warmest friends. 



JOHN INGERSOLL DAY. 

John Ingersoll Day, a retired agriculturist, has long been num- 
bered among the prominent and successful citizens of Denmark 
township. His birth occurred at Sheffield, Lorain county, Ohio, on 
the 27th of November, 1838, his parents being John and Cornelia 
M. (Sackett) Day, who were born and reared in Massachusetts. 
In 1816, when a youth of fifteen, the father removed to Sheffield, 
Ohio, where he met and married Miss Sackett and where he spent 
the remainder of his life. 

John I. Day, the second child born to his parents, supplemented 
his early educational training by a course of study in Oberlin Col- 
lege. He remained on the home farm until he had attained his ma- 
jority and in 1859 came west on a visit to his uncle, Kellog Day, a 
well known and successful citizen of Lee county, Iowa. He decided 
to remain here and continue the profession of teaching, which he 
had already followed in Ohio for two winters. During the summer 
months he worked as a clerk in the store of Day & Ingalls. In Oc- 
tober, i860, he started for Pike's Peak, crossing the plains with a 
cattle team. He remained in Colorado for about four years, engaging 
in mining, and subsequently spent six years in Montana, where he 
followed farming on an extensive scale. After about ten years' ab- 
sence he returned to Denmark township, Lee countv, and has here 
resided continuously since. 



206 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

In 1870 Mr. Day was united in marriage to Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Brown, her father being William Brown, an early settler of Lee 
county. She was born and reared in Denmark, township, this county, 
and obtained her education in Denmark Academy. She taught 
school for several years prior to her marriage, which was celebrated 
in the house that remained her home until she was called to her final 
rest. Mr. Day purchased the interests of the other heirs and secured 
the Brown estate of two hundred and fifty acres, improving the prop- 
erty and devoting his attention to its operation throughout the re- 
mainder of his active business career. His present residence includes 
what was the first frame house in Denmark township. Mrs. Dav 
passed away on the 14th of February, 191 1, when almost seventy 
years of age. She and her husband had no children of their own but 
adopted a daughter when she was but ten weeks old, naming her 
Lillian A. Day. She is now Mrs. Charles Wharton and the mother 
of three daughters : Mildred Day, Edith Marie and Irene Elizabeth. 
Mr. Day has given her the home farm as well as two hundred and 
forty acres in Wisconsin and a tract of eighty acres in Kansas. Her 
husband has operated the farm near Denmark since Mr. Day put 
aside the active work of the fields. 

Mr. Day is a stanch republican in politics and ablv served in the 
capacity of township trustee for seven years in Denmark township. 
While residing in Montana he held the office of justice of the peace. 
For a number of years he also acted as a trustee of Denmark Acad- 
emy, of which both Mr. and Mrs. Wharton are graduates, the former 
now serving as treasurer of the institution. Mr. Day is .a member 
of the Congregational church and deacon emeritus for life. He has 
now reached the ripe old age of seventy-six years and is well known 
and highly esteemed as one of the venerable citizens of Lee county 
whose life has been upright and honorable in every relation. 



ALFRED S. NICHOLS. 

Alfred S. Nichols, who was made manager of the Fort Madison 
Electric Company and the Dallas City Light Company on the ist 
of July, 191 3, was born in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, 
in i88r, and his record of business success is indicative of the many 
opportunities for advancement that are open to young men of foreign 
birth in this land. His parents were Caleb and Alice Jane (Sayce) 



;?L:f;:j ■ 



r-w^f-tv 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 209 

Nichols. His family has been engaged in the furniture trade in 
Cheltenham for several generations. 

Reared in his native country, Alfred S. Nichols was graduated 
from the high school and afterward entered the merchant marine 
service, with which he was connected for seven years. He was an 
active participant in the Boer war, in the Imperial service, and he 
came to the United States in 1903, making his way to Boston as 
correspondent for the Boston Herald with the Honorable Artillery 
Company of London. In 1904 he became connected with the Boston 
& Maine Railway, remaining in that position for four years or 
until 1907. He was afterward with the firm of Stone & Webster 
as assistant treasurer of the Woonsocket Gas & Electric Company 
and later was assistant treasurer of the Mississippi River Power 
Company, in which capacity he took up his abode at Keokuk, Iowa, 
in January, 1912. He was afterward made manager of the Fort 
Madison Electric Company and of the Dallas City Light Company, 
in which position he has continued since July i, 1913. He has thus 
steadily advanced in places of responsibility and power and is now 
well known in this connection throughout the middle west. 

On the 5th of May, 1905, Mr. Nichols was united in marriage 
to Miss Florence E. Ferson, of Waltham, Massachusetts. Frater- 
nally he is connected with the Masons and with the Elks, and he 
belongs to the Commercial Club, in all three of which organiza- 
tions he is highly esteemed. His worth is widely acknowledged 
and his business qualifications and ambition indicate that the future 
holds in store for him still broader opportunities. 

The Fort Madison Electric Company, of which he is now man- 
ager, was established and incorporated on the ist of April, 1913, 
succeeding the Fort Madison Electric Light Company, owned by 
the S. & J. C. Atlee Company. The new company takes its power 
from the Keokuk dam and the old generating and distributing system 
has become obsolete. The electrical energy had one hundred and 
thirty-three cycles frequency but was not suitable for power pur- 
poses. The new company has a distribution of twenty-five cycle 
energy, which is especially adapted to large power consumers. They 
are encouraging all local manufacturing interests to use this power. 
The company has erected a large number of electric signs and im- 
proved the interior lighting of many stores as well as street light- 
ing. The business is owned by the Stone & Webster Association 
of Boston, Massachusetts. The local officers are: Alfred S. Nichols, 
manager; F. D. Gwynn, assistant treasurer; and J. L. S. Scadding, 
superintendent. The Stone & Webster Management Association 



210 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

manages property in forty-five states for the hundreds of plants 
under their control. The company has faith in the industrial devel- 
opment of this section and Mr. Nichols has proven both directly 
and indirectly a factor in bringing about this development, his 
efiforts being thus an element in advancing the progress and material 
prosperity of this portion of the state. 



JOHN CALVIN ARMENTROUT, M. D. 

Dr. John Calvin Armentrout, deceased, was one of the founders 
of the Keokuk Medical College and was prominently known as a 
medical practitioner, educator and author, his efforts along these 
lines constituting a valuable contribution to medical science. A 
native of Iowa, his birth occurred at Wilton Junction, Cedar county, 
on the 25th of September, i8qi, his parents being Joseph C. and 
Mary (Long) Armentrout, who have passed away. 

Dr. Armentrout began teaching at the age of nineteen years, but 
during early manhood determined to make the study and practice 
of medicine his life work and for a time pursued his reading under 
the direction of Professor G. O. Morgridge, of Muscatine, Iowa. In 
further preparation for his chosen calling he entered the Iowa City 
Academy at Iowa City and for a time taught in that institution, but 
he did not abandon his determination to become an active representa- 
tive of the medical profession. In 1883 he was graduated from the 
medical department of the State University, which conferred upon 
him his degree. He began practice in South Bend, Indiana, but soon 
thereafter came to Keokuk, which place remained the seat of his 
activities throughout his remaining days. For a long period prior 
to 1890 he was professor of physiology, histology and diseases of the 
nervous system in the old College of Physicians and Surgeons, and 
later held the same chairs in the Keokuk Medical College, of which 
he was one of the founders. He was prominently and helpfuUv 
identified with the various medical societies and associations of 
county, state and nation, and he was the author of various articles on 
medical subjects, the most noteworthy, perhaps, being his published 
volume called Outlines in Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene. 

Dr. Armentrout was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Claring- 
bold, and two children were born unto them, of whom a daughter 
died in infancy, the other being Dr. C. R. Armentrout, now in active 
practice in Keokuk. Dr. J. C. Armentrout was a republican in his 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 211 

political views and took an active interest in local affairs of im- 
portance, but never held office, preferring to confine his attention 
to private interests. In religious faith he was a Methodist, holding 
to that belief to the time of his death, which occurred in February, 
1894. He belonged also to the Masonic fraternity and was true and 
loyal to the beneficent teachings of the craft. In his demise the pro- 
fession lost an active student and honored representative, and the 
community a valued citizen. He always held to the highest stand- 
ards in his practice and in his public relations, and he was most es- 
teemed and honored where best known. ' 



CHARLES WUSTROW. 

Charles Wustrow, deceased, was a man uniformly respected 
throughout Keokuk, where for many years he conducted a meat 
market. He possessed the sterling traits of character which every- 
where command regard and confidence, and while he did not seek 
to figure prominently in public affairs his fellow townsmen recog- 
nized his genuine worth. A native of Germany, his birth occurred 
in Berlin about 1827. In his boyhood days he left the fatherland, 
embarking on a sailing vessel bound for America, whither thousands 
of his fellow countrymen had already journeyed in search of a home. 
He did not tarry long in New York city but came almost immediatelv 
to the west, locating in Lee county. For a time he was employed 
in different business houses in Keokuk. He had learned the butcher's 
trade in Germany and after saving a sufficient sum of money from 
his earnings he opened a meat market on Main street, between Tenth 
and Eleventh streets. Later he removed to the present site of the 
Evers market and there continued in business until his death, enjoy- 
ing a large, growing and profitable trade. 

When war was declared between the north and the south Mr. 
Wustrow enlisted as a member of the Fifteenth Missouri Volunteers 
and served in that command with credit and distinction until honor- 
ably discharged at the close of the struggle. He participated in a 
number of hotly contested engagements and returned home with a 
most creditable military record. After being honorably discharged, 
he at once came to Keokuk and resumed his business, in which he 
continued until his death, in February, 1871. He left a wife and 
several children. He had been married in i8(;7 to Miss Margaret 
Lauterbach, a daughter of John Lauterbach, and they became the 



212 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

parents of four sons, August C, Henry, George and John. The 
mother passed away in February, 1912, having for forty-one years 
survived her husband. 



AUGUST C. WUSTROW. 

August C. Wustrow, son of Charles and Margaret (Lauterbach) 
Wustrow, was born in Keokuk, November 16, 1858, and has spent 
practically his entire life in Lee county. He is indebted to its public- 
school svstem for the educational opportunities afforded him. He 
assisted his father in the butcher business until his father's death 
and then for two vears followed farming. He learned the trade 
of carriage blacksmithing, and graduallv has worked his wav upward 
in that connection, erecting his present factory for the manufacture 
of wagons in 1891. He has built up an extensive and gratifying 
business, and the output of the factorv is sold either directlv or indi- 
rectly in six or eight different states. His enterprise and determina- 
tion have carried him into important relations with industrial activity 
in Keokuk, and he is today regarded as one of its substantial citizens. 

On the I 2th of October, 1882, Mr. Wustrow was married to Miss 
Mary Zobel, a daughter of John and Marv Zobel, and their children 
were: Carl, who died at the age of twenty years; Edmund; and 
Flora. He and his family attend the Trinity Methodist Episcopal 
church. His political indorsement is given to the republican party, 
and as a member of the citv council he supports various measures 
for the general good. In other ways, too, he has furthered public 
progress, and his influence is alwavs on the side of advancement and 
improvement. 



GEORGE B. STEWART. 

George B. Stewart, a law graduate of the I'niversitv of Michigan 
of the class of 1888, has since engaged continuously in practice in 
Fort Madison and ranks with the eminent members of the pro- 
fession in eastern Iowa, for his knowledge of legal principles is 
comprehensive and exact and he is seldom, if ever, at fault in their 
application. 

Mr. Stewart was born June 16, 1865, a son of the Rev. George 
D. and Emily (Walker) Stewart, the latter a daughter of Dr. Joel 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 213 

C. Walker, one of the honored pioneer residents of Fort Madison, 
who arrived in this city in 1835. He became active in molding 
public thought and action here and left the impress of his individu- 
ality upon the history of both city and state. He was chosen a dele- 
gate to the republican national convention in i860 which nominated 
Abraham Lincoln, and during Lincoln's administration he was ap- 
pointed revenue collector at Burlington, but continued to make his 
home in Fort iSLidison, of which city he was the first graduate 
physician. He also served as one of the early mayors of Fort Madi- 
son and was clerk of the court in territorial days. He lived in Fort 
Madison when Iowa was part of Michigan and later of Wisconsin. 
He lived to witness the organization of the territorial government 
and later the admission of the state into the Union. He was a native 
of Ohio and was a graduate of the Jefiferson Medical College of 
Philadelphia. He ranked with the most efficient representatives of 
the medical profession in his day, and his life was in many respects 
one of great service and usefulness to his community. The Stewart 
family is of Scotch descent, was founded in America in colonial days 
and was represented in the Revolutionary war. , 

Rev. George D. Stewart, father of George B. Stewart, was born 
in Pennsylvania and became a minister of the Presbyterian church. 
In 1859 he removed westward to Iowa, settling at West Point, and 
at different times he had pastorates in Burlington and in Omaha. 
In 1877 he came to Fort Madison and was pastor of the Presbyterian 
church of this city for twenty-seven years, or for a longer period 
than any other minister who has served in this county. His influence 
was far-reaching and beneficial, for he was not denied the full 
harvest nor the aftermath of his labors. He was earnest and logical, 
was a man of broad sympathy and kindly spirit and his memory 
remains as a blessed benediction to all who knew him. He died in 
the year 1910 and is still survived by his widow. In their family 
were four children, of whom three were daughters. 

George B. Stewart, the only son, has been a lifelong resident of 
this state and its public-school system afforded him his early edu- 
cational opportunities. He afterward continued his studies in Lake 
Forest, Illinois, and pursued his more classical course in the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. For the study of law he 
entered the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and completed 
his course there with the class of 1888. Immediately afterward he 
came to Fort Madison and entered into partnership with S. M. 
Casey, with whom he remained in continuous connection until the 
death of his partner in 1903. Since that time Mr. Stewart has prac- 



214 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ticed alone, maintaining an enviable position as one of the foremost 
lawyers of the Iowa bar. In 1898 he was appointed assistant United 
States attorney for his district and filled that position for fourteen 
years, or until 191 2, when he resigned. He then devoted his entire 
time to the practice of law and now has a large and distinctively rep- 
resentative clientage. For many years he has been connected with 
the ,most important litigated interests heard in the courts of his 
district and his ability in handling his cases is evidenced in the court 
reports, which indicate that he has won many verdicts favorable to 
his clients. 

On the 25th of June, 1889, Mr. Stewart was united in marriage 
to Miss Adele Kretsinger, of Fort Madison, and they became parents 
of two sons, but lost one in infancy. The other, Alan K., is in school. 
The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church, 
and Mr. Stewart belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
His political indorsement is given to the men and measures of the 
republican party, but outside of his profession, he has neither sought 
nor held office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his law 
practice, in whi(^i he has advanced steadily, developing his ability 
and gaining that prominence which comes onlv through merit. 



SANFORD P. POND. 



Death called from earthly activities a very enterprising and 
highly respected business man of Keokuk when Sanford P. Pond 
passed to the home beyond. For many years he had been actively, 
extensively and successfully engaged in the wholesale butter and 
egg business in Keokuk and his enterprise and his honesty were 
universally recognized and admired. He was a native of Wrentham, 
Massachusetts. In the schools of that locality he received a limited 
education and there remained until early manhood, when he went 
to Trov, New York, where he engaged in the wholesale grocery 
business. Hearing the call of the west, he then proceeded to Detroit, 
Michigan, and assumed the management of the old Jefferson Hotel 
on Woodward avenue. He continued in that capacity until 1857, 
which vear witnessed his arrival in Keokuk. Here he embarked 
in the wholesale butter and egg business, establishing an enterprise 
which was destined to become the largest of its kind in the United 
States. Possessing sound business judgment and a natural aptitude 
for the business, the firm grew and prospered and in the later '8cs, 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 215 

when Mr. Pond retired, the management was turned over to his 
sons. The business reached mammoth proportions and was a source 
of material benefit to the community, furnishing an excellent market 
for producers in this part of the state. Aside from his interest in 
that business, Mr. Pond was president of the Keokuk National Bank 
and one of the original stockholders of the waterworks. He was also 
a member of the Pond-Decker Lumber Company and the Pond- 
Decker Manufacturing Company. His ready recognition of possi- 
bilities enabled him to advance steadily and each forward step 
brought him a broader outlook and wider opportunities which he 
quickly improved not only to the benefit of his private fortune but 
to public i)rosperity as well. 

In Troy, New York, Mr. Pond married Miss Lydia A. Rickard 
and they became the parents of the following named: Jennie R., 
deceased; Charles S.; Thomas H.; Ada R. ; and Grace L., deceased. 
Mr. Pond gave his political allegiance to the republican party and 
was always actively and helpfully interested in important community 
afifairs, serving several terms as a member of the city council and 
contributing in many ways to the work of public progress. He and 
his wife were earnest, consistent and helpful members of the First 
Baptist church, of which he served as deacon for many years. He 
died February 25, 1909. He stood as a man among men, honored 
and respected by reason of the ability and integrity which he dis- 
played in his business career and by the many sterling traits of 
character which he manifested in every relation of life. As he ad- 
vanced he was willing to take others with him and was constantly 
extending a helping hand to a fellow traveler on life's journey. Those 
qualities which men most admire were his in large measure and he 
left behind him the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



CHARLES S. POND. 



Charles S. Pond, son of Sanford P. and Lydia A. (Rickard) 
Pond, was born in Keokuk, April 21, 1857, and throughout his entire 
life has made the city of his birth his home. After attending the 
public schools he entered the Illinois College at Jacksonville, Illi- 
nois, being a student there at the same time as W. J. Bryan and 
Richard Yates. Upon his return home he entered into active con- 
nection with his father's wholesale house, learning the details of 
the business. 



216 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

In the early '90s the concern was reorganized and incorporated 
with Sanford P. Pond as president and Charles S. Pond as secretary, 
treasurer and general manager. They established branch offices 
throughout the country, continuing the business successfully until 
191 1, when they disposed of their entire interest to Swift & Com- 
pany, with whom C. S. Pond remained as manager at Keokuk, occu- 
pying the position to the present time. While he entered upon a 
business already established many a man of less force of character 
and ability would have utterly failed in carrying the enterprise 
forward and enlarging its scope. He proved able to meet every 
emergency and utilized his opportunities in such a way that the 
business grew along substantial lines, placing him among the suc- 
cessful men of the county. In 191 2 he erected two large apartment 
buildings at an advantageous location overlooking the river, thus 
greatly improving the architectural adornment of the section in 
which they are located. 

On the 13th of October, 1880, Mr. Pond married Miss Laura C. 
Bartlet, a daughter of Rufus Bartlet. He is well known in fraternal 
circles as an Elk, a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Royal 
Arcanum. He also belongs to the Chicago Athletic Association. 
His political support is given to the republican party and while he 
has never sought nor desired office he supports all measures and 
movements which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. He 
is a Baptist in religious faith, while his wife is a Presbyterian. Theirs 
is an attractive and hospitable home, its good cheer being greatly 
enjoyed by their extensive circle of friends. 



E. C. WEBER. 



E. C. Weber is a well known lawyer of Fort Madison who was 
connected with the office of city attorney, serving in that position 
for three terms and who has for the past three terms been deputy 
county attorney. Phe spirit of enterprise, characteristic of the mid- 
dle west, finds expression in his life. He is entirely an Iowa product, 
for he was born, reared and educated in this state and has always 
made it his place of residence. His birth occurred at West Point, 
Iowa, May 18, 1867, a son of H. and Christina Weber, who came 
to Lee countv at an early day, the father establishing himself in busi- 
ness as a harness maker and dealer at West Point. Both he and his 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 237 

wife are now deceased. In their family were four children, of whom 
one son has passed away. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, E. C. Weber 
became a pupil in the public schools and when he had completed 
that course he continued his education in the Baptist College at 
Burlington. Thus he laid a broad foundation upon which to build 
the superstructure of professional learning. Deciding upon the prac- 
tice of law as a life work, he then entered Drake University as a 
law student and was graduated with the class of 1894. The follow- 
ing year he came to Fort Madison, where he opened an office, and 
has since been actively connected with the profession in this city. 
In the intervening period of nineteen years he has made continuous 
advancement, his ability being recognized in a large and growing 
law practice. Not only has he been accorded a good clientage, but 
has also been called to public duty along professional lines, serving 
for three terms as city attorney, his reelection coming in recognition 
of the capability and fidelity with which he had discharged the 
duties of the office in his first term. He was then appointed deputy 
county attorney and has occupied that position through the past 
three terms. 

Mr. Weber is a democrat in his political views. He holds mem- 
bership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, is a Knight 
Templar Mason and has also crossed the sands of the desert with 
the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. His is a well developed and well 
rounded character, owing to the fact that he has ever maintained 
an interest in those things which are of essential value in life as an 
individual and as a citizen. He stands for those projects which 
afifect the public welfare along beneficial lines and is interested in 
all that is a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



JOHN HOUSTON, Jr. 

John Houston, Jr., like so many of the pioneers of Lee county, 
has passed to his reward and is beyond the reach of human praise 
or blame. Nevertheless, it is but just that his name be preserved 
in the records of this county as one who aided in its development in 
the early days of its history. He was born in Lyndeboro, New 
Hampshire, December 15, 1823, a son of John and Zervia (Fields) 
Houston, the former born June 5, 1787, and the latter November i, 
1784. Their marriage occurred March 21, 181 i, and to their union 



218 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

were born the following children: Albert F., whose birth occurred 
January 15, 181 2; Laura, who was born August 13, 18 13, and mar- 
ried William DavMS; x-^bigail, who was born April 2, 1815, and be- 
came the wife of Dr. George Shedd, a pioneer physician of Den- 
mark, Iowa; Sarah, who was born October 7, 18 16, and married 
Warren Henderson; Zervia, whose birth occurred on the 13th of 
July, 1 82 1, and who married a Mr. Bell; John, the subject of this 
review; Joseph, born September 13, 1826; and Mary Jane, who 
was born May 28, 1829, and married Joseph Ingalls. 

John Houston, Jr., was a lad of ten years when he removed with 
his parents to Lowell, Massachusetts, where his father was a me- 
chanic in the woolen mills. The subject of this review was a pupil 
in the city schools of Lowell and there acquired a serviceable edu- 
cation. Subsequently the family came west, traveling by rail to 
Albany, New York, from that point on the Erie canal to Bufifalo, 
thence by the Great Lakes to Chicago and then across the prairies 
by wagon, finally arriving in Lee county, Iowa, where they settled. 
The journey was a long and tedious one, but most of the early settlers 
of this county came in some such way. The family made their home 
with Ira Houston, a relative, until a building could be erected on 
the eighty acres which they had purchased at a dollar and a quarter 
per acre. John Houston, Sr., and his wife passed the remainder of 
their lives upon their farm in this county and here departed this 
life, mourned by their many friends. They were loyal and consistent 
members of the Congregational church. 

John Houston, Jr., taught school for a number of years after 
coming to Iowa, but soon after his marriage took up his residence 
on the old homestead, which he farmed. He subsequently purchased 
an additional eighty acres and was known as one of the progressive 
and successful farmers of the county. He was always ready to utilize 
a new method or a new type of farm implement if it seemed rea- 
sonable that it would be advantageous to do so. He carried on 
general farming and stock-raising, and his farm was one of the well 
improved places of his locality. 

Mr. Houston was married in 1849 to Miss Maria Sturges, a 
daughter of Isaac and Sarah Sturges, both natives of Connecticut. 
They joined a colony from that state at Granville, Ohio, and there 
their daughter, Maria, was born, the date of her birth being April 
20, 1827. She came to Lee county with her brother, Albert A., 
who was the first teacher in Denmark Academy and one of three 
missionaries who established the foreign mission work in Micronesia. 
The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Houston were as follows: Albert 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 219 

S., born July 6, 1851, was graduated from Denmark Academy, Grin- 
nell College and a theological school in Chicago, and served for a 
number of years as missionary at Micronesia, but has passed away. 
Zervia J. was born September 8, 1853, and is the wife of Charles 
Swift, a resident of Oregon. Warren H., born November 23, 1854, 
was educated in Oberlin College and afterward became a Congre- 
gational home missionary but is now deceased. Laura M., born 
November 27, 1856, was for a number of years a successful teacher 
and married Fred Bement, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Mary 
E., born January 25, 1859, is a teacher by profession. Hattie A. was"^ TfnV ek.l'* 




years. Asa T., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work, 
completes the family. 

Mr. Houston was prominent in the ranks of the republican party 
of Lee county and held a number of minor offices, including that of 
assessor. He was a deacon in the Congregational church and was 
most active in furthering all branches of the work of that organiza- 
tion. His death occurred December 23; 1898, but his widow sur- 
vives and now makes her home with her son, Asa T. Although Mr. 
Houston has been dead for over fifteen years, the influence of his 
upright life is still potent and his friends still recall his many quali- 
ties of noble manhood. 



^^ 



JOHN R. WALKER, M. D. 

Dr. John R. Walker, engaged in the general practice of medi- 
cine at Fort Madison, is a native son of Iowa, his birth having oc- 
curred in Wayne county, April 8, 1875. His parents were James W. 
and America (Niday) Walker, the former a member of the bar. 
The father was also born in Wayne county and is a son of Saunders 
Walker, one of the pioneers of that section of the state, so that the 
family has been represented in Iowa through three generations. 

Dr. John R. Walker acquired a public-school education and aft- 
erward had the benefit of further instruction in the Lfniversity of 
Nebraska at Lincoln. He is a graduate of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons at Keokuk, where he completed his course in 1904, 
and since that time he has practiced continuously in Fort Madison. 
It was not long before he had demonstrated his ability to cope with 



220 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

the intricate and complex problems that continually confront the 
physician. He has ever been careful in the diagnosis of his cases 
and is seldom if ever at fault in foretelling the outcome of disease. 
He belongs to the city, county and state medical societies, and is now 
president of the Lee County Medical Society and of the Fort Madi- 
son Clinical Society. Broad reading keeps him in touch with the 
advanced thought of the profession and he readily adopts new meth- 
ods of practice, yet is never over-hasty in discarding the old-time and 
tried methods, the value of which has been proven. 

In 1900 Dr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Bertha 
Hutchinson, a resident of Humeston, Iowa, and they have become 
parents of two children, Robert and John. I^r. Walker belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious faith is 
that of the Christian church. He is now serving as president of the 
church board. Politically he is a republican and, while he has never 
held political office, he has served the public as a member of the 
school board for six years, his term having but recently expired. 



JOHN WESLEY BARGAR. 

John Wesley Bargar owns and operates a finely improved farm 
of two hundred and eighty acres situated mostly on section 7, Har- 
rison township. He has resided upon this place ever since his birth 
and is one of the well known farmers of the county. He was born 
April 9, 1868, a son of Marchaud Lee and Narcissa (Lee) Bargar, 
a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work, and secured his 
education in the public schools of the neighborhood and at Mount 
Pleasant, Iowa. For the past twenty years he has carried on gen- 
eral farming upon the homestead and has also devoted considerable 
attention to stock-raising. For the first eight years of this period 
he was associated with his brother, Byron, but for twelve years has 
managed the farm alone. He is one of the most progressive farmers 
of the community and his wisely directed labors have brought him 
gratifying financial success. 

Mr. Bargar was married in February, 1902, to Miss Maggie K. 
Robertson, who was born in Harrison township, March 27, 1873, 
a daughter of Thomas R. Robertson, of whom more extended men- 
tion is made elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Bargar received a good 
education, as she attended the Primrose select school. By her mar- 
riage she has become the mother of three children: Birdie E., who 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 221 

was born in April, 1903, and is attending school; Lisle L., who was 
born August 16, 1905, also in school; and Maud, born August 15, 
1910. 

The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
support all movements undertaken for the moral betterment of the 
community. Mr. Bargar is an independent republican in politics 
and has served as a trustee of Harrison township for some time. He 
takes a great interest in everything pertaining to the public schools 
and for twelve years has been secretary of the school board, doing 
much in that time to improve the local school system. His father 
did much to further the development of the county and Mr. Bargar 
of this review is carrying on the family tradition of a useful and 
upright life. 



CHARLES H. SULLIVAN. 

Charles H. Sullivan who, in October, 1912, was made deputy 
warden of the state penitentiary at Fort Madison, with which in- 
stitution he has been connected since 1908, was born in Fayette county, 
Iowa, in 1878, his parents being John and Celistie (Grey) Sullivan. 
The father, a native of Ireland, spent the first eighteen years of his 
life on the Emerald isle and then sought a home in the new world. 
He was a railway man and came to this state in the middle portion 
of the nineteenth century. 

Reared in his native county, Charles H. Sullivan attended the 
public schools of Fayette, Oelwein and New Hampton and he made 
his initial step in the business world in connection with the grocery 
trade, clerking in a store at West Union. There he remained un- 
til 1908. Acquainted with the warden of the state penitentiary at 
Fort Madison, he went to that institution as a guard and in the fol- 
lowing year, or in May, 1909, he was made receiving officer. Further 
advancement came to him in September, 19 10, when he was ap- 
pointed assistant deputy warden, and after two years, or in October, 
191 2, he was made deputy warden, thus standing second to J. C. 
Sanders, the present official head of the institution. He shares m 
the purposes and plans of Mr. Sanders, who is one of the reform 
wardens of the country, and he renders good service to his superior, 
understanding the work so thoroughly that he can at any time assume 
charge in the absence of Mr. Sanders. 



222 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

In 1906 Mr. Sullivan was united in marriage to Miss Lou Smith, 
of West Union, Iowa, and unto them has been born a son, Charles 
Kenneth. His fraternal allegiance is given the Masons. He belongs 
to the lodge, to the Knight Templar Commandery and to the Mystic 
Shrine, and the purposes and tenets of the craft find in him a stanch 
advocate and supporter. He votes with the republican party and 
has firm faith in the efficacy of its principles as factors in good gov- 
ernment. He belongs to the Presbyterian church, and his life is 
guided by its teachings, so that he stands as a man among men, strong 
in his honor and his good name. 



GEORGE RUMP, Sr. 



George Rump, Sr., deceased, was for many years one of the 
leading business men of Fort Madison and one of its highly esteemed 
citizens. A native of Lee county, he was born in Pleasant Ridge 
township, April 19, 1842, and was a representative of a very old and 
honored family of this locality, his parents being John George and 
Catharine (Peicks) Rump, both natives of Germany. Thev were 
married, however, in Lee county in 1838 and continued to make 
th'eir home here until called from this life. By occupation the 
father was a farmer. His children were: Elizabeth, who died in 
childhood; John, a resident of West Point, Lee county; George, of 
this review; Mrs. Mary Hamelman, who died in Kansas City in 
1910; Katharine, also deceased; and Anna. 

The first seventeen years of his life George Rump spent upon 
his father's farm in this countv and ace]uired his education in the 
common schools of the neighborhood and the parochial school at 
West Point, Iowa. He then went to St. Louis, where he was em- 
ployed as clerk in a grocery store for about two years, and then 
established a store in Fort Madison in partnership with his father- 
in-law, George Borches, under the firm name of Borches & Rump. 
They began business here in a small way, carrying only a limited 
stock of groceries and provisions, but as time passed they added dry 
goods and were soon at the head of one of the leading business 
concerns of the city. Their store was located on Front street until 
after the death of Mr. Borches, when Mr. Rump removed to Second 
street, there conducting a dry-goods store under his own name for 
twenty-seven years. Carrving a large and well selected stock of 
goods, he secured an excellent patronage and continued to success- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 223 

fully engage in business until about ten years prior to his death, 
when he retired. He passed awav here on the 26th of April, 1910. 
In [900 he erected the fine brick residence which his widow now 
occupies and besides this property owned three store buildings on 
Second street, which are now in her possession. 

On the 13th of May, 1862, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Rump and Miss Mary Engel Kur, who was born in St. Louis, 
Missouri, January 6, 1844, and came to Lee county, Iowa, about 
1850 and has made her home in Fort Madison ever since. Her 
parents were Henry and Elizabeth Kur, both natives of Germany. 
Her father died when she was only nine months old, and her mother 
subsequently married George Borches. To Mr. and Mrs. Rump 
were born the following children: George Harmon, now a retired 
merchant of Fort Madison; Henry William, who is engaged in the 
grocery business on Second street; John Henry, who conducts a 
saloon in Fort Madison ; Louis Henry, who is proprietor of a grocery 
store in the city and is now making preparations to enter into the 
wholesale grocery business; William Frank, who was in partnership 
with his brother, Louis H., until recently; Ella Elizabeth, at home 
with her mother; Clara Elizabeth, the wife of John Tierney of 
Fort Madison; and Minnie Loretta, the wife of V. C. Nagel of Fort 
Madison. 

The family hold membership in St. Joseph's Catholic church, to 
which Mr. Rump also belonged, and his political support was given 
the democratic party. As a business man he gained the confidence of 
the public and success came to him as the result of his own individual 
efforts, for he was ever industrious, enterprising and progressive. 



MARY J. RICHEY. 



Mary J. Richey is successfully operating eighty acres of land 
situated on section 24, Van Buren township, and has had the control 
of the farm for the last twenty years, demonstrating her ability as a 
manager in her efficient direction of the farm work. She is the 
second child of James and Rebecca (South) Richey, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. Her birth occurred Septem- 
ber 24, 1846, on the farm where she now resides, and her girlhood 
was spent- upon the homestead, where she thus unconsciously learned 
much concerning the best methods of farming. Her education was 
acquired in the Union school of Van Buren township and she has 



224 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

remained a resident of that township throughout her life. She en- 
gages in general farming, raising hogs, cattle and sheep for the mar- 
ket in addition to the grains and other crops best suited to the climate 
of Iowa, and the farm returns to her a good annual income. Her 
place compares favorably with the neighboring farms and every- 
thing about it is kept in excellent condition. 

Although not a member of any religious denomination, Miss 
Richey attends the Methodist church and conforms her life to the 
highest standard of ethics. Her parents were for many years resi- 
dents of this county and did their share in promoting the agricul- 
tural development, and Miss Richey is ably carrying on the work 
that they began. Eler many admirable traits of character have won 
her many friends and she is one of the valuable citizens of the county. 



GERHARD SANDERS. 

Germanv has furnished to the new world many of its most enter- 
prising citizens who have met with remarkable success in their under- 
takings and are today numbered among the wealthy men of their 
community. To this class belongs Gerhard Sanders, who was born 
in Furstenau, Hanover, Germany, January 2, 1842, and was left 
motherless at the early age of four years. His father, Gerhard San- 
ders, Sr., followed the tailor's trade in early life, but later engaged 
in farming. He died at the age of forty-nine years. In the family 
were six children, namely: Ardelhide, who died of cholera in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; Elizabeth, who died in Lee county, Iowa, in 1910; 
Henry, who died in the old country; Mary, who died in Fort Madi- 
son, Iowa; Theresa, who died in Lee county in 19 14; and Gerhard, 
of this review. 

Our subject was but seventeen years of age when, in the fall of 
1859, he came to the United States in company with his sisters Eliza- 
beth and Theresa, the journey being made on a sailing vessel and 
occupying nine weeks. They landed in New Orleans and were one 
week in coming up the river to Fort Madison, Iowa. They had an 
aunt who was living in this country, the wife of Barney Foeker, for 
whom Gerhard Sanders worked one year for seventy dollars. With 
this money he paid the expense of his passage to America and, 
although he and his sisters had only eleven dollars and an old gun 
remaining, they felt happy and contented. For three years he 
worked for his brother-in-law, Garrett Foeker, the husband of Eliza- 



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HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 227 

bcth, and then went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was employed 
in a hotel for about three months. At the end of that time he 
returned to Lee county and was in the employ of others as a farm 
laborer until his marriage. In Germany he had received only eight 
dollars per year. At that time the best farm laborer received only 
eighteen dollars per year, but here wages were so much better that 
at the time of his marriage he was able to purchase thirty-five acres 
of land near Pilot Grove, in Marion township, which he improved 
and subsequently sold at a profit of three hundred dollars. In con- 
nection with another man he then bought an eighty acre tract and 
upon his portion he built a small house, and as time passed and he was 
able to add to his property he extended the boundaries of his place 
until he had six hundred acres in one body. Upon that tract he 
erected two sets of farm buildings and continued in the cultivation 
of the place until six years ago, when he sold the greater part of it. 
He now has two hundred and twenty acres, which he rents. 

Leaving the farm in 1909, Mr. Sanders removed to Fort Madison, 
where he erected his present residence at No. 703 Fifth street, and 
four years ago he purchased what is now known as the Grand Hotel, 
formerly the Waverly House, which he has remodeled, making it 
an up-to-date hotel, which he conducts on the European plan. It 
has thirty-five rooms and is modern in all its appointments. Besides 
the property already mentioned Mr. Sanders owns six buildings and 
a vacant lot on Front street. Fort Madison. While engaged in 
farming he devoted considerable attention to the raising and shipping 
of stock for many years. He commenced with hogs and cattle, and 
later became quite an extensive feeder, feeding from one hundred 
to three hundred head of cattle annually. He also handled fast 
horses in connection with his son Joseph, and has been the owner of 
some valuable racers. 

On the 20th of November, 1866, Mr. Sanders married Miss Mary 
Houchtons, who was born in St. Paul, Lee county, in 1852, and is a 
daughter of Christopher Houchtons, of German birth. Her father 
was one of the pioneers of this state and died of cholera in Ottumwa, 
Iowa, at an early day. Mrs. Sanders' mother was also a native of 
Germany and she died in Lee county. To our subject and his wife 
have been born twelve children, all of whom are still living, namely: 
Margaret, now the wife of Frank Mertens of Cottonwood, Iowa; 
John, president and general manager of the German-American Tele- 
phone Company of Houghton, Iowa; Joseph, who is vice president 
of the same company and lives on a farm near Cottonwood; Mary, 
who is housekeeper for Rev. Father Jacob Meyer of Riverside, Iowa; 



228 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Henry, who is engaged in the real-estate business and in dealing in 
horses in Beemer, Nebraska; William, a farmer of Mount Hamill, 
Iowa; Ben, who is now head lineman for the German-American 
Telephone Company and resides in West Point; Christopher, a real- 
estate man and horse dealer of Lindsay, Nebraska; Elizabeth, a 
seamstress living at home; Katharine, formerly head bookkeeper for 
the German-American Telephone Company, now the wife of Charles 
Rice; Anna Marie, a trained nurse in St. John's Hospital at St. 
Louis; and Stephen Paul, manager of the Grand Hotel of Fort 
Madison. 

Mr. Sanders and his son John started the German- American 
Telephone Company, but our subject subsequently sold out to John. 
Although he has met with misfortune and hardships in the struggle 
of life, he has overcome all disadvantages and is today regarded as 
one of the prosperous citizens of the community. For ten years he 
was in ill health, but is now well and strong and able to look after 
his invested interests. Starting out in the new world without capital. 
the success that he has achieved has been due entirely to his own 
unaided efforts and excellent business ability. Since becoming a 
naturalized American citizen he has supported the democratic party 
and for twenty years most ably filled the office of county supervisor, 
at the end of which time he resigned. He has never regretted his 
emigration to the new world, for here he has prospered and has 
gained a high place in the esteem of all with whom he has come in 
contact. In religious faith he is a Catholic and fraternally belongs 
to the Knights of Columbus and the Roman Catholic Mutual Pro- 
tective Society. 



GEORGE E. RIX. 



George E. Rix was born at Gainesville, Alabama, on the 25th 
of June, 1853, his parents being George and Rebecca (Dial) Rix. 
The father was born in Royalton, Vermont, in 1806. As a young 
man he left his native state and went to Boston, whence he removed 
to Alabama, where he embarked in the mercantile business, owninii 
seven establishments. He eventually disposed of his retail concerns 
and established a wholesale grocery business under the firm name of 
Rix, Kendall & Company. This concern was located in Mobile, and, 
the Civil war coming on, he was obliged to close up his affairs and in 
1865 came to Keokuk, Iowa. Prior to his settlement here, however, 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 229 

he was one of the organizers of the private bank of Rix, Hale & 
Company, the resident manager being O. C. Hale. This firm began 
business in 1857 and it also felt the financial depression due to the 
war, closing the bank some time during that struggle, although it 
continued to loan money for a great many years thereafter. In 1872 
George Rix, with his son-in-law, established a wholesale iron concern 
under the name of Rix & Stafford. In 1881 he retired, feeling that 
he had earned a rest from active business cares, and his son, George 
E. Rix, succeeded him in the firm. The father lived in quiet retire- 
ment until his death, which occurred in 1892, when he had reached 
the venerable age of eighty-six years. He was a man of strong con- 
victions and of superior business ability. He was proud of the fact 
that his credit was unquestioned and prouder that his word was as 
good as his bond. He was a powerful factor in all concerns or 
movements with which he was identified and commanded the un- 
stinted respect of all who came in contact with him in private or 
public relations. In religion he was a Presbyterian and in politics 
a democrat. Eight children were born to his union with Rebecca 
Dial, the only one now living being our subject, George E. 

The latter came with his parents to Keokuk in 1865, at the age 
of twelve years, and attended the W. W. Jamieson school. In 1869 
he entered Williston Seminary at East Hampton, Massachusetts, and 
was graduated from that institution in June, 1872. He returned 
to Keokuk and was employed by Rix & Stafford, and in 1881 suc- 
ceeded his father in that firm, the name, however, being changed to 
Stafford & Rix. In September, 1889, he went to Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee, where he held the position of cashier in the Southern Bank & 
Trust Company. In 1896 he returned to Keokuk and became cashier 
of the State Central Savings Bank, serving in that capacitv until 1906, 
when he was made vice president of the institution. The history of 
the bank dates back to the private bank of Rix, Hale & Company, 
of which his father was a member. After it closed Mr. Hale, a 
brother-in-law of his father, became connected with a branch of the 
old State Bank of Iowa, which had been organized in 1858, and 
subsequently became interested in the State National Bank. Upon 
the expiration of the charter of the State National Bank, business 
was continued under the name of the State Bank of Keokuk until 
1893. About 1890 the Central Savings Bank had been organized 
and in 1893 this institution and the State Bank of Keokuk were 
merged into one bank under the name of the State Central Savings 
Bank, with a capitalization of one hundred thousand dollars. The 
first officers were: President, William Logan, who still holds the 



230 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

position; C. H. Mellen, first vice president; J. Fred Kiedaisch, 
second vice president; J. C. Weaver, cashier. As before stated, our 
subject became cashier in 1896, succeeding Mr. Weaver in September 
of that year and continuing in that office until he became vice presi- 
dent in March, 1906. C. J. Bode has served as cashier since 1906. 
In 191 1 the capital stock was increased to two hundred thousand 
dollars, which is its present figure. The bank is prosperous and does 
a large business annually, immense sums of money being handled. 
The officers and directors are prudent in investment and accept none 
but gilt-edged securities as collateral. Although their first care is 
the safeguarding of depositors' funds, they are also willing to extend 
financial aid to individuals or firms who can satisfy them of the 
financial soundness of their projects. The influence of George E. 
Rix in the development of the bank has been marked and has always 
been for the good of the institution. 

Mr. Rix was married, in January, 1878, to Miss Mary C. Tucker. 
He is a Presbyterian in religious belief and is much interested in the 
work of that denomination, lending his business acumen and experi- 
ence to the solving of the practical problems which arise in connection 
with the work of the church. He is one of the resourceful financiers 
of the city and also one of its public-spirited citizens, being willing 
to subordinate his interests to the community welfare. 



DIEDRICH J. MEENTS, M. D. 

Dr. Diedrich J. Meents, who has been a practicing physician and 
surgeon of West Point during the past seven years, has won and main- 
tained an enviable reputation as one of the leading and successful 
representatives of the profession in Lee county- His birth occurred 
in Hanover, Germany, on the 24th of December, 1878, his parents 
being John and Katherine (Haaren) Meents, who never left the 
fatherland. John Meents, a lawyer by profession, passed away in 
Germany in 191 1, but the mother of our subject still survives. They 
became the parents of four sons, as follows: Diedrich J., of this 
review; George, who is a sea captain with the North German Lloyd 
line; H. O., an agriculturist of Iroquois county, Illinois; and Karl, 
a furniture designer and manufacturer of Hanover, Germany. 

Diedrich |. Meents spent the first fourteen vears of his life in his 
native land and then emigrated to the United States with his brother 
George. He attended school in Chicago for about five years and 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 231 

subsequently continued his studies in Steinman College of Dixon, 
Illinois, from which institution he was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in 1903. Having determined upon a profes- 
sional career, he entered the College of Medicine of the State Uni- 
versity of Iowa and in 1907 received the degree of M. D. from that 
institution. While a student at the university he also acted as assistant 
in pathology and bacteriology for three years. Coming to West 
Point, Iowa, immediately following his graduation, he bought the 
practice of Dr. J. W. Divilbiss and has here remained to the present 
time as a successful and able representative of his profession. His 
record is that of a self-made man, for he personally met the expenses 
of his college course and his present prosperity has been builded upon 
the basis of his own untiring effort and energy. His brother George, 
with whom he came to this country, has also reached his present 
position as sea captain by his own exertions. With the steady advance- 
ment of his profession the Doctor keeps in close touch through his 
membership in the Lee County Medical Society, the Iowa State 
Medical Society, the Tri State Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association. In the summer of 1914 he pursued special 
post-graduate courses at the medical department of Harvard L^niver- 
sity, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Meents was united in marriage, at West Poipt, to Miss Violet 
Ward, of Dufur, Oregon, her father being Joseph W. Ward, a 
relative of the noted American sculptor, John Q. A. Ward. Joseph 
W. Ward removed to Oregon in the '50s as a pioneer lumberman and 
ranch owner, his becoming one of the wealthy and prominent families 
of the state. Mrs. Meents was reared in the Beaver state and edu- 
cated in St. Helen's Hall, the well known Episcopal school of Port- 
land. She is an Episcopalian in religious faith, while her husband 
belongs to the English Lutheran church at Iowa City. They are 
popular in social circles here and have many friends. 



TULEY L. PETERSON. • 

In 1888 Tuley L. Peterson entered the employ of the Brown 
Paper Company, with which he has been connected almost con- 
tinuously since, covering a period of more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury. There is no need to comment upon his fidelity and capability, 
for these are indicated in his long connection with the business. He 
was born in Sweden, November 19, 1866, and is a son of Claus and 



232 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Anna Peterson, who came to the United States in 1868, hjcating 
at Laporte, Indiana, where the father resided until his death, which 
occurred in March, 191 2. His widow still makes her home in that 
place. 

Brought to the new world when a little lad of but two vears, 
Tuley L. Peterson was reared in Laporte and acquired his education 
in the public schools there. He also pursued a business course in 
that city and afterward went to Chicago, where he made his initial 
step in the business world in connection with the paper trade, being 
appointed shipping clerk in a paper house in that citv. In 1888 he 
came to Fort Madison to enter the service of the Brown Paper Com- 
pany, with which he has sinc^ been connected save for a brief period 
which he spent in Appleton, Wisconsin. He is now superintendent 
and secretary of the company. His entire life has been devoted to 
the paper business, and he has advanced steadily, occupying now a 
prominent position in connection with the trade activities of the city. 

On the 28th of February, 1897, Mr. Peterson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Maude Ennis, of Fort Madison, a daughter of Walter 
Ennis, who came to this citv in 1887 and occupied the position of 
foreman with the firm of Knapp-Stout Company. Mr. and Mrs. 
Peterson had four children: Gladvs, deceased; \\'alter; Ennis; and 
Carl. 

Mr. Peterson holds membership with the Moose, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America, and his wife is a 
member of the Catholic church. In politics he is a republican and 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day, but does 
not seek nor desire office, feeling that his time is fully occupied with 
his business duties. In his present connection he has advanced step 
by step through intermediate positions and is familiar with every 
branch of the trade. He is a man of unquestioned business integrity 
and reliability and has contributed in no small measure to the success 
of the institution which he represents. 



MARCHAUD LEE BARGAR. 

Marchaud Lee Bargar is a pioneer of this section of the state 
and has ably done his share in advancing the welfare of Lee county. 
He is now living retired at Farmington, having abandoned his active 
business career in 1902. He still owns the old home place, however, 
which is a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres in Harrison 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 233 

township, and is now operated by his son, John W. Bargar. The 
subject of this review also owns forty acres in Van Buren county. 

He was born in Roscoe, Coshocton county, Ohio, July 7, 1836, 
a son of Dr. Valentine and Alice Chase (Lee) Bargar, the latter 
a second cousin of Lincoln's secretary of the treasury. Dr. Valentine 
Bargar was born in Cadiz, Ohio, August 23, 18 10, a son of Valentine 
Bargar, Sr., who was a native of Pennsylvania, born of German 
parentage. He removed to Harrison county, Ohio, and engaged in 
farming near Cadiz until his death. His son, Valentine, was reared 
upon the farm and attended Athens College in the pursuit of an 
education. He was graduated in medicine and practiced in New- 
castle, Coshocton county, Ohio, until 1841, when he removed to Lee 
county, Iowa. At this time he was also engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness with his brother-in-law, but upon their arrival in Lee county 
they traded their teams and goods for land. Dr. Bargar, however, 
soon returned to Ohio and met his death by drowning at Louisville, 
Kentucky, in the same year, 1841. 

The Doctor was married November 6, 1834, to Miss Alice Chase 
Lee, who was born October 16, 18 14, in Tuscarawas county, Ohio. 
Her parents were Dr. Elihu and Narcissa (Smith) Lee, the former 
a son of Zebulon and Mary (Taylor) Lee. His paternal grand- 
father was also named Zebulon Lee and the record of the family in 
America goes back to one John Lee, of Farmington, Connecticut, 
who came from England in 1634. Mrs. Narcissa (Smith) Lee was 
a daughter of Benjamin and Lois (Chase) Smith. After the death 
of Dr. Valentine Bargar his widow resided at Newcastle, Ohio, 
with her children until her demise, which occurred September 28, 
1 85 1. She was a member of the Episcopal church, but Dr. Bargar 
was not a member of any religious organization, although he was 
reared a Presbyterian. In politics he was a stanch whig, loyally 
supporting its candidates at the polls. 

Marchaud Lee Bargar is the eldest of the three sons and a 
daughter born to his parents and is the only one now living. His 
two brothers, Byron and Gilbert, both came to Lee county, Byron 
coming in 1854 at the same time as our subject and started back to 
Ohio in the fall of 1855, dying en route. Gilbert came to this county 
some time later. He too returned to Ohio and read law with an 
uncle at Newcastle. At the time of the Civil war he enlisted in the 
One Hundred and Twenty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry and 
raised a company, being elected captain of the same. He was detailed 
as judge advocate and was for a considerable time on General Maloy's 
stafif on the Potomac. He served for three vears, or until the close 



234 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

of the war, and then resumed the study of law. He was admitted 
to the bar at about the same time as his intimate friend, William 
McKinley, later president of the United States. He practiced law 
in Columbus until his demise, which occurred in August, 1904, when 
he had reached the age of sixty-four years. The sister died when 
but one year old. 

Marchaud Lee Bargar was reared in Newcastle, Ohio, and there 
received his education, but when a young man of eighteen he came 
to Lee county, Iowa, in October, 1854. He taught in the rural schools 
for four winters and farmed during the summers. In 1866 he bought 
his brother's interest in the Lee county land and later, about 1873, 
bought his uncle's interest, going into debt for all of it. The land 
was then totally unimproved, but he immediately began its develop- 
ment and after some time took up his residence upon the land. His 
first dwelling house was a log cabin, but he did not allow the incon- 
veniences of pioneer life to dishearten him and persevered in his 
efforts to improve the land and became financially independent. 
He resided upon his farm until 1902 and his labors were amply 
rewarded, as his farm became one of the most valuable in Lee 
county and his abundant crops brought him a handsome yearly 
income. In the last named year he retired and has since resided at 
Farmington, Van Buren county. 

Mr. Bargar was married March 25, 1858, in this county, to Miss 
Narcissa Lee, a native of Tuscarawas county, Ohio, born February 
23, 1835, and a daughter of Edward and Matilda (Frederick.) Lee. 
Her father was born August 22, 1810, in Genesee county. New 
York, a son of Dr. Elihu and Narcissa (Smith) Lee, who have been 
previously mentioned. Edward Lee came to Lee county, Iowa, about 
1839 with his family and located first at Fort Madison, where he 
worked upon the old courthouse. He later became the owner of a 
farm near Farmington and resided there until his death, which 
occurred April 8,1877. His wife, who was born in Virginia in 181 1, 
passed away in Iowa, January 17, 1890. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lee 
were consistent members of the Methodist church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bargar became the parents of eight children, seven 
of whom are living. Edward Valentine, born March 18, 1859, is 
now a farmer residing in the vicinity of Wakeeney, Kansas. Gilbert 
Lincoln, born February 20, 1861, is also an agriculturist of that 
section of Kansas. Mary Lee, born March 31, 1862, is now the wife 
of a Mr. Zane and resides at Farmington, Iowa. Ida Alice, born 
February 14, 1861;, is now Mrs. Bonnell and resides in Dover, Lee 
county. John Wesley, born April 9, 1868, is a farmer of Harrison 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 2;35 

township, this- county. Byron Wellington, born November 28, 1869, 
is an agriculturist of Winfield, Iowa. Elizabeth May, born April 
7, 1872, is at home. She received an excellent musical education, 
having studied under Dr. Romley and having also taken work at 
the University at Mount Pleasant. She has successfully engaged in 
teaching music for a number of years. Both of her sisters taught 
school before marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Bargar lost a son, Benjamin 
G., who was drowned when but two years of age. 

Mr. Bargar is a republican in his political belief and has held a 
number of local offices. He served as trustee of Harrison township, 
Lee county, and was secretary of the school board of that township 
for a number of years. Since moving to Farmington he has served 
as assessor for four years and is now president of the city school board. 
His daughter, Elizabeth May, is a member of the Rebekahs at 
Farmington and also holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, as do both of her sisters and her brother, John W. The 
family is well known in Lee and Van Buren counties and is accorded 
the highest respect of all who know them. , 



W. H. NEWLON, M. D. 

A graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk 
and a member of various medical societies. Dr. W. H. Newlon keeps 
in close touch with the advanced thought of the profession and his 
service to the public has been one of distinct value, gaining him wide 
recognition and a liberal practice. He was born in Dallas City, 
Illinois, November 10, 1862, and is a son of Dr. B. F. and Amanda 
(Richards) Newlon, both of whom were natives of Vermilion county, 
Illinois, and are now deceased. 

Dr. Newlon is a graduate of the Dallas City Academy and of the 
public sch9ols and upon the foundation of his literary learning he 
built the superstructure of his professional knowledge. Determining 
upon the practice of medicine as his life work, he entered the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk and was graduated therefrom 
on the 28th of February, 1890. He has since practiced at Fort 
Madison and has made continuous progress in his chosen calling. 
He was appointed local surgeon for the Santa Fe Railroad in 1890 
and has since continued in that position. He also engages in general 
practice and has demonstrated his ability to cope with intricate legal 
problems. Everything which tends to bring to man the keynote to 



236 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

the complex mystery which we call life is of interest to him and he 
reads broadly and thinks deeply upon subjects pertaining to health. 
He is a member of the American Medical Association; is ex-presi- 
dent of the Lee County Medical Society and the Fort Madison 
Medical Society; and also belongs to the Iowa State Medical Society, 
the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Medical and Surgical Society and 
others. 

On the 15th of March, 1895, Dr. Newlon was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary Hogeboom, who was born in Topeka, Kansas, a 
daughter of Dr. George W. Hogeboom, who was chief surgeon for 
the Santa Fe Railroad Company for many years. He was also the 
first surgeon and the originator of the idea of the Employes Medical 
Association, called the A. T. & S. F. Unto Dr. and Mrs. Newlon 
haye been born two children, Hclene and William H. 

Dr. Newlon belongs to the Masonic fraternity and passing up 
through both branches has attained high rank, being a Knight 
Templar and a thirty-second degree Mason. Since 1883 he has 
held membership in Dallas City Lodge, No. 231, F. & A. M., and 
is a member of Dallas Lodge, No. iii, R. A. M., both of which 
his father aided in founding. He now has membership in Delta 
Commanderv, No. qi. K. T., of Fort Madison; Kaaba Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine at Davenport; and Zarepath Consistory, No. 4, 
S. P. R. S., of Dayenport. He likewise belongs to the Elks Lodge 
at Fort Madison. His political allegiance is given to the democratic 
party, but he does not seek nor desire office, preferring to concentrate 
his energies upon his business atifairs. In 19 12 he went abroad as 
attending physician to Samuel Atlee, who traveled in Europe for 
his health. Dr. Newlon holds to high professional standards and 
his close conformity to the ethics of the profession has won him the 
high regard of his brethren of the medical fraternity. 



A. H. BANK. 



A. H. Bank, a well known citizen of Donnellson, is now engaged 
in the insurance business, but for an extended period was closely 
and actively connected with agricultural interests in Lee county. 
He was born in Hanover, Germany, April 6, 1846, and is a son of 
Henry Bank, who came from Germany to Lee county in 1848, 
casting in his lot with the pioneer settlers. On the iith of June, 
1838, he married Julia GoUmort, who died May 5, 1877. Their 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 237 

family included the following children, William, Dora, Henry, 
August, Louisa, Henrietta and Julia. They also had thirty-eight 
grandchildren and twenty-eight great-grandchildren. As previously 
stated, it was in 1848 that the parents came to Iowa, settling at Fort 
Madison in November of that year and in 1851 removing to the old 
homestead in Van Buren township. The father reached the remark- 
able old age of ninety-three years and six months, having been born 
on the 8th of January, 1813, while his death occurred July 22, 1906. 
The funeral services were held on Tuesday afternoon in St. John's 
German Evangelical Lutheran church at Farmington, of which he 
was one of the founders and had long been a most prominent, active 
and helpful member. His friends gathered in such numbers to pay 
their last tribute of respect to him that the church was inadequate 
for the attendance. He was held in high esteem wherever known 
and most of all where he was best known — a fact indicative of a 
life of uprightness and honor. 

A. H. Bank was but two years of age when brought by his parents 
to the United States, the family proceeding up the Mississippi river 
until they reached Fort Madison, where they lived for two or three 
years and then removed to Van Buren township. In his youthful 
days A. H. Bank learned the cooper's trade of his father and in 
the early days would haul barrels to Fort Madison with ox teams. 
His educational opportunities were only such as were afiforded by the 
district schools and the school building in which he pursued his studies 
was built of logs. His opportunities in that direction, however, were 
quite limited, for it was necessary that he leave school when twelve 
years of age, after which he was taught by his mother, who had been 
liberally educated in Germany. At length he turned his attention 
to farming, purchasing land three miles south of Warren, on what 
was known as the Half-Breed tract. There he secured three hundred 
acres which he cultivated, but at length sold that property and bought 
a farm near Donnellson, first securing sixty-five acres, to which he 
afterward added a tract of eighty-four acres and still later eighty 
acres, making in all about two hundred and twenty acres, which he 
still owns. He carefully and systematically cultivated his fields and 
brought his land under a high state of development, adding thereto 
many modern improvements and all the equipments and accessories 
of the model farm of the twentieth century. He continued to till 
the soil until about five years ago, when he retired and removed to 
Donnellson, purchasing a two-story residence which stands in the 
midst of a fine lawn of four lots. He still owns ten other lots in the 
town. While he has put aside the more arduous duties of the farm 



238 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

he still has business connections of importance, for he is president 
of the Peoples Mutual Insurance Company of Lee county, insuring 
against hre, lightning and tornadoes. This company is well organized 
with a secretary, treasurer and nine directors and is strictly a mutual 
insurance company. 

On the 20th of February, 1879, Mr. Bank was united in marriage 
to Miss Minnie Wendt, of Harrison township, who was educated in 
the district schools of this county. They have become the parents 
of eight children who are yet living: Edward, who is manager of a 
lumber yard at Edina, Missouri, and is now thirty-three years of 
age; Emma, twin sister of Edward, and now the wife of A. D. 
Crabill, a resident of Donnellson; August, who was born June 24, 
1884, and is living in St. Louis, Missouri, where he is head book- 
keeper for the Simmons Hardware Company; Frederick C, who was 
born February 8, 1886, and is now engaged in the express business 
at Denver, Colorado; Carl Conrad, who was born October 13, 1889^ 
and has for three years been a student in the West Point Military 
Academy; Alma, who was born July 24, 1892, and is now teaching 
school in Keokuk; Hulda, who was born November 26, 1894, ^"d has 
recently graduated from Parson's Business College at Fairfield, Iowa; 
and Luther, who completes the family. He was born June 8, 1899, 
and is now in school. 

The family are members of the German Evangelical church, and 
Mr. Bank is a democrat in his political allegiance. He has always 
enjoyed outdoor life and sports, and his has been a well rounded 
career, in which due attention has been paid to the various interests 
of life, proportionate regard being given to business, to pleasure and 
to public and private duties. 



G. A. STARKWEATHER, M. D. 

An able representative of the medical profession in Fort Madison 
is Dr. G. A. Starkweather, wdio, although one of the more recent 
additions to the medical fraternity here, came well equipped by 
previous experience, having for fifteen years followed his chosen 
calling in Pontoosuc, Illinois. Lee county, however, numbers him 
among her native sons. He was born on the 28th of September, 1867, 
his parents being G. A. and Emily (Thompson) Starkweather. The 
father, a native of Michigan, was a son of Leonard Starkweather, also 
of Michigan, who brought his family to Iowa in 1842. He settled 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 239 

upon a farm in Lee county and carried on general agricultural pur- 
suits for many years, remaining one of the active farmers of the 
district to the time of his death. His wife was a daughter of Joseph 
Thompson, who was born in Louisiana, whence he removed to 
Tennessee. On leaving that state he came to Iowa, establishing his 
home in Lee county. He, too, followed the occupation of farming. 

In May, 1864, was celebrated the marriage of G. A. Starkweather 
and Emily Thompson, and they began their domestic life upon a 
farm, the father ever devoting his time and energies to general agri- 
cultural pursuits. For an extended period he carried on farming in 
Des Moines township and was one of its progressive and representa- 
tive citizens. He died in 1906, having for ten years survived his 
wife, who passed away in 1896. In their family were four children: 
Dr. Starkweather of this review; John, who is engaged in the practice 
of medicine in Pomona, Kansas; Hattie, the wife of Henry Wash- 
burn, a resident of Argyle, Iowa; and Alta, who married E. Jenkins, 
a farmer of Lee county. 

Dr. G. A. Starkweather attended the public schools and supple- 
mented his preliminary course by study in a college at Pella, Iowa. 
A review of the many avenues of business open to him and a careful 
consideration of the opportunities thereby afforded and his own 
inclinations at length led him to the determination of studying 
medicine, and with this end in view he entered the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa, from which he was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1897. He then removed to Pontoosuc, Illinois, 
where he opened an office, remaining in practice at that place for 
fifteen years. On the expiration of that period he returned to Lee 
county and on the 15th of January, 191 2, opened an office in Fort 
Madison, where he has now been located for two and one-half years. 
His ability has won recognition here in a large and growing practice. 
He is careful in the diagnosis of his cases, neglectful of no profes- 
sional duty, and is continually reading in order that his power as a 
physician and surgeon mav be augmented. He is a member of the 
Fort Madison Medical Society, the Lee County Medical Society 
and the Iowa State Medical Association. 

In 1892 Dr. Starkweather was married to Miss Clara Washburn, 
who passed away five years later, in 1897. He was again married in 
1899, when Miss Rose Fielding, of Pontoosuc, Illinois, became his 
wife. The only child of the first marriage is deceased and there is 
one child of the second marriage, Vella F. 

Dr. and Mrs. Starkweather have gained many warm friends 
during the period of their residence in Fort Madison. He belongs 



240. HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

to the Masonic fraternity and is a past master of Herrick Lodge, 
No. 193, A. F. & A. AL, of Pontoosuc, Illinois, having filled the 
position of master for several years. He has attained the Knight 
Templar degree of the York Rite, and he belongs also to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. In politics he does not ally himself 
with any party, and he has never sought nor desired office, preferring 
to concentrate his energies upon his professional duties, which are 
of growing volume and importance. 



JOSEPH R. FRAILLY. 

Joseph R. Frailey, who was born in Fort Madison, March 2, 1876, 
is today recognized as one of the strong and able lawyers of his native 
city, where since 1905 he has served continuously as city attorney. 
His professional record has been characterized by continuous ad- 
vancement, bringing him into closer and closer relations with the 
litigated interests of his part of the state. His parents, Peter H. 
and Rebecca (Robinson) Frailey, were both early settlers here, the 
latter being a daughter of Joseph Robinson, who brought his family 
to Lee county about 1855, while Peter H. Frailey arrived about 
1867. Following their marriage they established their home in Fort 
Madison and here reared their family. 

Joseph R. Frailey passed through the consecutive grades until 
graduated from the high school. His more specifically literary 
education was act]uired in the University of Iowa, from which he 
was graduated with the class of 1898, winning the Bachelor of 
Philosophy degree. He continued his studies there in preparation 
for the bar and in 1900 became one of the alumni of the law depart- 
ment. Following his graduation and his admission to the bar he 
was with the Santa Fe Railway Company in its legal department 
for five years. In 1901; he came to Fort Madison, where he entered 
into partnership with Judge Hamilton, a relation that was main- 
tained until 1908, since which time Mr. Frailey has practiced alone. 
His clientage is now large and distinctively representative, connect- 
ing him with much of the important litigation tried in the courts of 
the district. Moreover, he is city attorney, and his ability in this 
direction is indicated in the fact that he has filled the office continu- 
ouslv since 1905. 

In October of the same year Mr. Frailey was united in marriage 
to Miss Genevieve Albright, of Fort Madison, and they have a 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 241 

daughter, Margaret Louise. Mr. Frailey belongs to various fra- 
ternal organizations, including the Masons, the Elks, the Eagles, the 
Moose, the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Woodmen, and the 
Ancient Order of United Workman, and to the teachings of these 
organizations he is most loyal, being in sympathy with their beneficent 
spirit and their underlying principle, which is the recognition of the 
brotherhood of mankind. His political allegiance has always been 
given to the republican party since age conferred upon him the right 
of franchise. 

Moreover, he has an interesting military chapter in his life history, 
having served with the rank of second lieutenant as a member of 
Company F, Fiftieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, in the Spanish- 
American war. Five years before the outbreak of hostilities with 
Spain he joined the Iowa National Guard, with which he was con- 
nected until 1905. He was captain of Company A, Fifty-fourth 
Regiment, Iowa National Guard, when he resigned. He has also 
been regimental quartermaster and held other prominent positions 
in the state military organization. These wide and varied interests 
have brought him an extensive acquaintance and his social qualities 
and sterling worth have firmly established him in the high regard of 
his many friends. 



VAL T. DOERING, M. D. 

Dr. Val T. Doering is one of the younger representatives of the 
medical profession in Fort Madison, where he has been engaged in 
practice since 1912. In the intervening period, however, he has 
made continuous progress and has become well established in his 
chosen work, for his ability is proven in the success which attends his 
medical ministrations. He was born in Lee county in 1880, a son of 
George J. and Mary Elizabeth Doering, who came to this county in 
the '40s, casting in their lot with the pioneer settlers. The father 
was a butcher by trade and engaged in that business for a consider- 
able period. 

The son. Dr. Val T. Doering, pursued his education in St. Mary's 
parochial schools of Fort Madison, in which he completed a course. 
He afterward attended Johnson's Business College of that city and 
then, having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, 
he entered St. Louis University, in which he completed the medical 
course, and was graduated in the class of 191 1, at which time his 



242 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

professional degree was bestowed upon him. He put his theoretical 
knowledge to practical test in fourteen months' service as interne in 
the City Hospital of St. Louis, gaining thereby the broad, varied 
and practical experience which only hospital work can bring. In 
August, 191 2, he came to Fort Madison, opened an office and has since 
followed his profession in this city. A creditable measure of success 
has been achieved and his labors have been productive of good results 
to those whom he has served. 

Dr. Doering is a member of the Catholic church, of the Knights 
of Columbus and the Iowa Mutual Protective Society, of which he 
is medical examiner, as well as a stockholder and medical examiner 
for the New World Life Insurance Company. His political alle- 
giance is given to the democratic party and he keeps well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day but does not seek nor desire public 
office. He belongs to the various local and state medical societies 
and thus keeps in touch with the advanced thought of the profession. 
He holds to high standards and is continually utilizing every advan- 
tage that will promote his skill and advance his efficiency. 



HON. EDWARD JOHNSTONE. 

Hon. Edward Johnstone, for fifty years one of the most prominent 
residents of the state of Iowa and a leader in all movements intended 
to better conditions afifecting the general interests of society, was born 
in Kingston, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, July 4, 18 15. In 
the paternal line he came of ancestry from Annandale, Scotland, the 
family having been founded in America by Robert Johnstone late in 
the seventeenth or early in the eighteenth centurv. Alexander John- 
stone, father of Edward Johnstone, was born in Ireland in 1772 and 
came to America in 1796. In this countrv he wedded Miss Eliza- 
beth Freame, also of Irish descent and a native of the Keystone state. 
They had ten sons and two daughters. The two eldest sons were 
educated at West Point and served in the regular army. Another 
son, William F. Johnstone, was the third governor of Pennsylvania, 
while still another son, James Johnstone, well known as a scholar and 
poet, served in the Mexican war and was one of the prominent mili- 
tary men of western Pennsvlvania. Still another, John W. John- 
stone, served in both the Mexican and Civil wars, attaining the rank 
of colonel, while the youngest son of the family, Richard Johnstone, 
was a lieutenant in the regular army and met his death in the Mex- 




n, 



v.H 




% 



^ 



242 HISTORY OF LE^ COUNTY 

professional degree was besti-wed upon him. He put his theoretical 
knowledge to practical test in tourtecn months' service as interne in 
the City Hospital of St. Lou.:-, gaining thereby the broad, varied 
and practical experience which only hospital work can bring, la 
August, 1912, he came to Fort Madison, opened an office and has since 
followed his profession in this city. A creditable measure of success 
has been achieved and his labors have been productive of good results 
to those whom he has served. 

Dr. Doering is a member of the Catholic church, of the Knights 
of Columbus and the Iowa Mutual Protective Society, of which he 
is medical examiner, as well as a stockholder and medical examiner 
for the New World Life Insurance Company. His political alle- 
giance is given to thi: democratic party and he keeps well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day but does not seek nor desire public 
office. He belongs to the various local and state medical societies 
and thus keeps in touch with the advanced thought of the profession. 
He holds to high standards and is continually utilizing every advan- 
tage that will promote his skill and advance his efficiency 



HON. EDWARD JOHNSTONE. 

Hon. Edward Johnstone, for hfty yeajrs one of the most prominent 
residents of the state of Iowa and a leader in all movements intended 
to better conditions affecting the general interests of society, was born 
in Kingston, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1815. In 
the paternal line he came of ancestry from Annandale, Scotland, the 
family having been founded in ^America by Robert Johnstone late in 
the seventeenth or early in the eighteenth century. Alexander John- 
stone, father of Edword Johnstone, was born in Ireland in 1772 and 
came to A In this country he wedded Miss Eliza- 

beth Freamc, also ul Irish descent and a native of the Keystone state. 
They had ten son' '- ' • • daughters. The two eldest sons were 
educated at We?;r served in the regular army. Another 

son, William ; iL>ne, was the third governor of Pennsylvania, 

while still another son, James me, well known as a scholar and 

poet, served in the Mexii uid was one of the prominent mili- 

tary men of western Per ia. Still another, John W. John- 

stone, served in both the ■> and Civil wars, attaining the rank 

of colonel, while the younycst son of tlic family, Richard Johnstone, 
was a lieutenant in tlv v army and met his death in the Mex- 



PU 



ASTH 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY • 245 

ican war. The father, who was a man of notably fine physique, died 
at the remarkable age of one hundred years. 

Edward Johnstone was educated in his native town and read law 
in Greensburg, in the same county. Admitted to the bar when 
twenty-two years of age, he made his way immediately afterward 
to Mineral Point, Wisconsin, and in the fall of the same year went to 
Burlington, then the capital of Iowa, where he served as clerk in the 
territorial legislature. During that session he was appointed one of 
three commissioners to gather testimony regarding titles to what were 
known as "half-breed" lands. The discharge of this duty was facil- 
itated by his removal to Montrose, where he remained for one vear. 
When the law under which he had been appointed was repealed in 
1839, he went to Fort Madison, where he entered the service of the 
St. Louis Land Company in connection with General Hugh T. Reid 
to institute proceedings to secure a division of the lands under the 
partition laws of the territory. This resulted in the Decree Title 
under which the lands are now held. 

Mr. Johnstone became not only a recognized leader at the bar 
but also in shaping the public history along many lines in Iowa. In 
1839 he was elected to the legislature and for two successive terms 
was speaker of the house. He was an excellent parliamentarian, his 
decisions being at all times strictly fair and impartial. In 1840 he 
was elected to the council and during President Polk's administra- 
tion was United States district attorney for the judicial district of 
Iowa. In 1851, when the board of county commissioners was estab- 
lished, he was elected judge of Lee county and served upon the bench 
for four years. In 1857 he was chosen a member of the state con- 
stitutional convention and as such did much in forming the present 
organic law of the state. His knowledge of judicial principles served 
him in good stead and he was guided, moreover, by a spirit that had 
its root in a deep interest in the welfare of the commonwealth. Upon 
his retirement from the bench he turned his attention to the banking 
business as a member of the firm of McMurphy, Johnstone & Bacon, 
which later became Johnstone & Bacon on the withdrawal of the 
senior partner. In 1868 Mr. Johnstone came to Keokuk and assumed 
management of the Keokuk Savings Bank, the policy of which he 
directed until his death, on the 17th of May, 1891. 

Mr. Johnstone was married in April, 1849, to Miss Elizabeth V. 
Richards, and they had three sons and a daughter, Alexander E., 
Edward R., Hugo R. and Mary M. Those who came within the 
close circle of Mr. Johnstone's acquaintance found him a most com- 
panionable and congenial man. His ability at all times fitted him 

Vol. 11-14 



246 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

for leadership and many there were who followed his advice, recog- 
nizing the unselfish spirit which actuated him. He was a most 
honest man, honest not only in the observance of certain well known 
rules, but honest in facing a situation squarely and informing himself 
thoroughly concerning it. He was as honest in thought as in deed 
and never allowed himself to entertain a prejudiced view of anv vital 
question. He was constantly alert to assist in works of public benefit 
and it was largely through his influence that the first state insane 
asylum was established at Mount Pleasant. When the Iowa Com- 
mission was appointed for the World's Columbian Exposition he 
was made a member and was chosen its president. During President 
Cleveland's administration he refused his consent to a movement 
which was inaugurated to have him called to a cabinet position. The 
Pioneer Lawmakers' Association of Iowa honored him with its presi- 
dency and throughout his career he felt that his profession was one 
of the highest standing, nor ever deviated from its most advanced 
standards which recognize the law as the conservator of the rights 
and privileges, the life and liberty of the individual. Keokuk's pres- 
ent standing is due in no small degree to the work of this man and 
Iowa's fair fame has been heightened by his efiforts and his public- 
spirited devotion to her welfare. 



CAPTAIN FERNANDO C. OVERTON. 

Captain Fernando C. Overton, who for a number of years has been 
identified with the insurance business in Keokuk, with eveVy phase 
of which he is thoroughly familiar, is a native of Illinois, his birth 
having occurred in Hancock county, on the 22d of September, 1844. 
His parents were John J. and Rebecca (Rigdon) Overton, both of 
whom have long since passed away. The latter was a daughter of 
Sidney Rigdon, who was an unusually interesting character and a 
power among the early Mormons. He was one of the so-called 
prophets and was a rival of Joseph Smith for leadership of the sect. 
Because of his better education and his knowledge of the printer's 
trade he set up the type and printed the book of Mormon. He 
seemed to be infatuated with the theories of the belief and among 
other activities introduced into Mormonism baptism by immersion, 
planning the fountain to be used in baptising in the temple at Nauvoo. 
About six months before the death of Joseph Smith, Mr. Rigdon 
became disgusted with the way affairs were being handled, more 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 247 

particularly on account of the proposal to adopt polygamy, renounced 
his faith and returned to the Baptist church, remaining in active 
connection with that church to the end of his days. 

Captain Overton's mother died when he was but ten years of age 
and later his father went to Arkansas. From there he journeyed to 
the west and helped to establish what is now the town of Long Beach, 
California. He there died and was buried. 

Captain Overton was still a youth in his teens when the war 
between the north and south was declared. He enlisted for the 
defense of his country as a member of Company C, Fifteenth Iowa 
Infantry, under command of Colonel Belknap, and served throughout 
the conflict as a member of Sherman's famous division. When peace 
was declared Sherman's army was at Raleigh, North Carolina, and 
when he had been honorably discharged from the army in September, 
1865, he returned to Keokuk. 

Captain Overton had first visited this city in 1863 and following 
the war he removed to Davis county, where he became agent for the 
Iowa State Insurance Company. Still later he went to Des Moines, 
but in 1899 returned to Keokuk. Soon thereafter he formed a part- 
nership with H. W. Klein and established the Overton-Klein Insur- 
ance Agency, Inc. Since the retirement of Mr. Klein from the firm 
in 1910 Captain Overton has continued the business with his son. 
He is familiar with every phase of insurance and his thorough under-' 
standing of its principles and purposes, as well as the minor details, 
have splendidly qualified him for the successful conduct of his inter- 
ests along that line. In 1904 he joined with several other prominent 
business men in organizing the Standard Fire Insurance Company 
and from the beginning its officers were: Captain F. C. Overton, 
president; W. C. Howell, vice president; Oscar W. Wise, secretary; 
Henry Strickler, and Peterson Brothers. In 1910, because of un- 
usual and unavoidable conditions, this company ceased operations, 
not, however, owing a single dollar to anyone. Out of this concern 
sprang the Overton-Klein Agency, Inc., and since that time Captain 
Overton has secured a good clientele in the insurance field. 

On the 1 2th of Julv, 1866, Captain Overton was married to Miss 
Mattie Hardin, a daughter of Thomas J. Hardin and a descendant 
of the well known Kentucky family of Hardins. To Captain and 
Mrs. Overton have been born two sons, Fred H. and Harry, the 
latter a theatrical manager and the former his father's partner in 
business. 

Aside from business afifairs Captain Overton has found time to 
cultivate the social interests of life and has become a Knight Templar 



248 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Mason and a well known Odd Fellow. He is also identified with the 
Grand Army of the Republic, thus maintaining pleasant relations 
with his old army comrades. In politics he is a republican, but has 
never sought office, preferring to concentrate his attention upon his 
private interests. In religious faith he and his wife are Presbyterians 
and take an active interest in promoting the growth of the church 
and extending its influence. 



JACOB GEORGE HONADEL. 

Jacob George Honadel is one of the well-to-do farmers of West 
Point township, where he resides upon a highly improved place of 
one hundred and sixty acres. He also owns forty acres in Jefferson 
township and has that also under a high state of cultivation. He was 
born February i6, i8i;6, on section 31, ^^'est Point township, a son 
of Jacob and Carolina (Krautwasser) Honadel. The father was a 
native of Strassburg, Germany, born November 30, 1824, when that 
city was still a French possession. He was taken by his parents to 
New York city in 1827 and the family home remained there until 
1829, when a removal was made to West Point township, this county. 
The father purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, paying 
the small sum of a dollar and a quarter per acre. At that time, how- 
ever, there was an abundance of wild land and the government was 
anxious to secure settlers who would develop this region and so offered 
unusual inducements to its citizens to locate upon the prairies. Mr. 
Honadel began the cultivation of his land and improved it from year 
to year until he was in possession of a valuable farming property. 
His wife was also a native of France, born March 26, 1825, and spent 
her childhood in the land of her nativity, coming to Lee countv, Iowa, 
with her parents in 18^2. The family home was established in West 
Point township and there the daughter Carolina met Jacob Honadel, 
whom she married in i8c;2. She became the mother of five children as 
follows: Jacob George, the subject of this review; Frederick, who 
was born July 25, 1857, and died September 6, 1894; Carolina, who 
was born December 2q, i8t;8, and is now the wife of Jacob Graber, 
a resident of Calhoun county, Iowa; Mary, who was born September 
24, i860, and married Theodore Abel, a resident of Donnellson, Iowa; 
and George, whose birth occurred June q, 1862, and who married 
Anna Speize and is living in West Point township. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 249 

Jacob George Honadel enjoyed the educational advantages of the 
pioneer boy, attending the district schools and receiving instruction 
in the fundamental branches of learning. He was the best speller 
in his class and won many prizes at spelling schools. He not only 
acquired a knowledge of books but was given excellent training in the 
work of the farm and remained at home assisting his father until 
grown. He has continued to engage in the same pursuit since starting 
out in life for himself and he is now the owner of one hundred and 
sixty acres situated on section 31, West Point township, and a forty 
acre tract on section 6, JefTferson township. He carries on mixed 
farming and his well directed labors bring him a gratifying annual 
income. 

Mr. Honadel was married March 21, 1878, to Miss Elizabeth 
Speize, a daughter of Henry and Mary Speize. Mrs. Honadel 
was born in Ohio, December 14, 1854, and died in 1897. By her 
marriage she became the mother of the following children: Dora 
K., born April 7, 1879, who is the wife of Jacob P. Graber, a 
resident of Laurier, Washington; Henry George, who was born 
October 28, 1880, and is now a resident of Menno, South Dakota; 
George C, who was born September 21, 1882, and lives at Edgemont, 
South Dakota; Louise, whose birth occurred August 31, 1885, and 
who married John Ott, a resident of Charleston, Iowa, by whom she 
has a son, born July 22, 191 1 ; Theodore J., who was born September 
18, 1888, and is a resident of Edgemont, South Dakota; and Arthur 
P., who was born August 11. 1893, and is residing at home. The 
mother was a member of the Evangelical church, was highly esteemed 
by the community and her demise was deeply regretted. 

On the 9th of November, 1898, Mr. Honadel was again married, 
his second wife being Mrs. Dena (Engemann) Roth, who was born 
at Primrose, Iowa, June 18, 1859, a daughter of Henry and Hannah 
(Clousmann) Engemann. Her father was a native of Germany and 
located in Primrose, Iowa, about 1846. He was a shoemaker and 
farmer by occupation. His death occurred in 1863. His wife was 
a native of Hanover, Germany, born in 1825, and came to Ohio with 
her parents in the early '40s. They were married in St. Louis, 
Missouri, and became the parents of the following children: Charles, 
born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1850, now lives in Fort Madison. 
Henry died at the age of sixteen years. Ernest and Dena, twins, 
born in 1859, were the next in order of birth. Ernest lives in Jefifer- 
son township, this county. Dena married George Roth on the 29th 
of Mav, 1884. He was born at Franklin, Iowa, in 1858 and died 
in 1890. To that union were born two children: Fred H., whose 



250 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

birth occurred February 28, 1886, and who resides at Charleston, 
Iowa; and Ida May, who was born October 29, 1888, and is the wife 
of Jacob M. Ott, a resident of Warren, Iowa. By his second mar- 
riage Mr. Honadel has one son, John C, whose birth occurred July 
24, 1901. 

Mr. Honadel is a member of the Evangelical church of Franklin 
and can always be depended upon to further all movements looking 
toward the moral betterment of the community. He is a democrat in 
his political belief and has held a number of local offices. He was 
for five consecutive years school director and has been for the same 
length of time township trustee. He has proven equally conscientious 
and trustworthy as a private citizen and as a public official and enjoys 
the esteem of his fellowmen. 



ALBERT KAMMERER. 

For six years Albert Kammerer has been prominently identified 
with the public affairs in Lee county and is now candidate for county 
treasurer on the democratic ticket. He has spent his entire life here, 
his birth occurring October i, i860, and he is a son of Mathias H. 
and Dorothea (Conradt) Kammerer, both of whom were natives of 
Wurtemberg, Germany, and were reared in the village of Illingen. 
Coming to the new world in the early '40s, they were married in 
Columbus, Ohio, and from that city removed to Philadelphia and 
later to St. Louis. It was in 1851 that they became residents of For! 
Madison, and they spent the remainder of their lives in this locality. 
Here the father died in December, 1888, at the age of sixty-nine years, 
and the mother in November, 1889, at the age of sixtv-one. 

At the age of fourteen years Mathias H. Kammerer learned the 
butcher's trade, which he continued to follow up to within the last 
four years of his life, when he lived retired, enjoying a well earned 
rest. He conducted one of the leading meat markets in Fort Madison 
for many years and was a man honored both in business and social 
circles. In his family were seven children, namelv: Charles J., 
deceased; Caroline J., who married W. G. Gibbs and died leaving 
one child, Frank G.; Henry, who died at the age of nine vears; 
Robert, who died in infancy; Albert, of this review; Edward, who 
died in infancy; and Emma, also deceased. When our subject 
reached the age of forty years he was the only member of the family 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 251 

Albert Kammerer passed the days of his boyhood and youth in 
Fort Madison and vicinity and is indebted to the schools of this 
locality for the educational privileges he enjoyed. He early became 
familiar with agricultural pursuits upon the home farm and through- 
out his active business life has carried on farming in connection with 
other enterprises. For the past six years he has most acceptably served 
as deputy sheriflf and is now the candidate of his partv for county 
treasurer. 

In 1888 Mr. Kammerer married Miss Clara Junge, who was also 
born in Lee county, September 3, 1869, a daughter of John Junge, 
of Fort Madison. Mr. Kammerer was reared in the Evangelical 
church, to which his parents belonged, and he holds membership in 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Moose. Since 
attaining his majority he has affiliated with the democratic party, and 
his fellow citizens, recognizing his worth and ability, have called him 
to office. He has served as alderman of Fort Madison for two years 
and has been treasurer of the school district, besides filling his present 
responsible position. His career has ever been such as to command 
the confidence and respect of those who know him. 



JOHN JUNGE. 



Among the self-made men of Lee county is numbered John 
Junge, whose success in life is due entirely to his own unaided 
efiforts, for he came to this country empty handed and has made his 
own way in the world from an early age. He was born in Schlesien, 
Prussia, Germany, October 5, 1841, his parents being Joseph and 
Johannah (Haesckel) Junge. The first fourteen years of his life 
were passed in his native land, but in October, 1855, the family 
emigrated to America and settled on a farm in Green Bay township, 
Lee county, Iowa, where the parents spent their remaining days. 
In their family were eight children who reached years of maturity, 
namely: Francisca, who became the wife of Gust Thomas and died 
in this county in 1913; August, who died in St. Louis; Josephine, the 
widow of Casper Koehler, of St. Louis; John, of this review; Carl, 
who died in Green Bay township, this county; Mary, the wife of 
Max Muelat, of Green Bay township; Joseph, who died in Lincoln, 
Nebraska; and Julius, who died in Rock Island, Illinois, in 1912. 

Coming to this county in 1855, John Junge was actively identified 
with agricultural pursuits here until about twenty years ago, when 



252 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

he laid aside all business cares and has since lived retired. He owns 
two residences which he erected in Fort Madison, and at the present 
time occupies one of these. 

In 1867 Mr. Junge was united in marriage to Miss Marie Hoff- 
mann, who died five years later, leaving one child, Clara, now the 
wife of Albert Kammerer, whose sketch appears on another page 
of this volume. Mr. Junge was again married in 1873, his second 
wife being Ida Lange, who passed away in April, 1904. Bv that 
union there were two children, namely: Amelia, who married A. M. 
Lowrey and resides with our subject; and Julius A., a resident of 
Opelousas, Louisiana. 

When age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Junge 
afiiliated with the republican party but now gives his support to the 
democratic organization. While living in the country he held school 
offices and has served as alderman of Fort Aladison for two terms. 
His course in life has ever been such as to commend him to the 
confidence of those with whom he has had business or social relations 
and, being industrious, enterprising and reliable in all things, he 
well merits the success that has come to him. 



HENRY HARNAGEL. 



Henry Harnagel, one of the most prosperous and enterprising 
agriculturists of West Point township, Lee county, resides on section 
3c, where he has remained continuously from his birth t(j the present 
time. He now cultivates one hundred and ten acres of land on 
section 30 and twenty acres on section 20. His birth occurred on the 
3rd of September, 1862, his parents being Frederick and Mary 
(Halbasch) Harnagel. The father was born in Hanover, Germany, 
in 1838, a son of Christoph Harnagel, who was also a native of 
Hanover and emigrated to the United States in 1858, settling in Lee 
county, Iowa, on section 29, West Point township, where his demise 
occurred two years later. Frederick Harnagel crossed the Atlantic 
to the new world in 1857, landing at New Orleans, whence he made 
his way to Lee county, Iowa, settling in Franklin township. During 
the ne.xt six years he devoted his attention to the cultivation of rented 
land and then purchased a tract of thirty acres. As the years passed 
and his financial resources increased, owing to his untiring industry 
and capable management, he augmented his landed holdings by addi- 
tional purchase from time to time until he owned three hundred and 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY . * 253 

twelve acres on sections 29 and 30, West Point township. In i860 
he wedded Miss Mary Halbasch, who was born in Prussia in 1840 
and was a daughter of Martin Halbasch, who emigrated to America 
about 1855. She passed away in 1892 and in the following year 
Frederick Harnagel was again married, his second union being with 
Mrs. Henrietta Rolke, with whom he now resides in Franklin town- 
ship, this county. The period of his residence in Lee county covers 
fifty-eight years and he enjoys an extensive and favorable acquaint- 
ance within its borders, being widely recognized as a prosperous and 
representative agriculturist and esteemed citizen. 

Henry Harnagel, the eldest in a family of five children, acquired 
his education in the ALiple Grove school. After putting aside his 
text-books he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and 
throughout his entire business career has devoted his time and energies 
to the work of the fields. He cultivates one hundred and ten acres 
of land on section 30 and twenty acres on section 20, West Point 
township, and has brought his fields under a high state of produc- 
tivity, annually gathering rich harvests which find a ready sale on 
the market. 

On the 3d of April, 1889, Mr. Harnagel was united in marriage 
to Miss Josephine Kast, whose birth occurred in Keokuk, Iowa, on 
the 26th of May, 1865, her parents being Fred and Mary (Harnagel) 
Kast. She received her education at Franklin, Iowa, where the 
family home was established in 1873. By her marriage she has 
become the mother of the following children: Adelaide, born April 
28, 1890, who is the wife of Herbert E. Winslow and resides in 
American Falls, Idaho; Herbert F., whose birth occurred October 
3, 1892, and who is still at home; Elsie Anna, born January 10, 
1894, who gave her hand in marriage to George Duker and lives at 
West Point, Iowa; Clara Fredonia, born December 24, 1895, who 
attends school at Fort Madison, Iowa; Verna S., whose natal day was 
February 18, 1900; Lester E., born January 30, 1902; and Ida H., 
whose birth occurred on the 17th of October, 1904. The three last 
named are still under the parental roof. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Harnagel 
has supported the men and measures of the democratic party. He 
has taken a very active part in township affairs, his fellow townsmen 
recognizing his worth and ability and calling him to public office. 
He served first as school director and also acted as secretary of the 
school board, while for four years he held the ofiice of justice of the 
peace and for three years served as a trustee. During the past 
sixteen vears he has held the office of assessor and in that connection 



254 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

has made a most creditable and commendable record. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the German Evangelical 
church of Franklin, to which his wife also belongs and in the work 
of which she takes a prominent and helpful part. JNIr. and Mrs. 
Harnagel have spent their entire lives in Lee county and are well 
known and highly esteemed within its borders. 



SYLVESTER HUGH SATTERLY. 

Sylvester Hugh Satterly is a well-to-do farmer and stockman, 
owning and operating two hundred acres on section 20, Harrison 
township. He is a native son of the township, his birth occurring 
upon the homestead located a few miles south of his present farm. 
He was born September 9, 1856, a son of Sylvester O. and Eleanor 
(Norris) Satterly. The father was born in Washington county, New 
York, August 31, 18 1 2, and the mother in Coshocton county, Ohio, 
October 2, 18 19. The maternal grandparents were Joseph and 
Martha (Wright) Norris, who came to Harrison township, Lee 
county, in the fall of 1839. The former passed away October 16, 
1871, having survived, his wife from March 30, 1870. 

Sylvester O. Satterly came to Lee county in 1838 and took up one 
hundred and sixty acres of land on section 31, Harrison township, 
later adding fortv acres. He followed the trade of wagon-making 
until his health failed and also devoted considerable time to the 
operation of his farm, which was situated two miles east of Farm- 
ington. His marriage occurred June 25, 1844, and he and his wife 
became the parents of five children as follows: Alva H., who was 
born July 17, 1845, and is a retired farmer of Harrison township; 
Cornelia L, who was born November 27, 1847, and became the wife 
of Ale.xander Johnson of Kansas and passed awav in that state in 
October, 1882; Henrietta, who was burn in March, 1850, and died 
when but three years of age; Fhjrence A., who was born May 16, 
1854, and is the wife of T. J. Jack, a farmer of Harrison township; 
and Sylvester Hugh, the subject of this review. The father passed 
away February 27, 1872, and the mother died April 9, 1896. He 
was a Baptist in religious faith, while his wife was a Presbyterian. 

Sylvester Hugh Satterly was reared in Harrison township and 
was afforded the advantage of a good education, attending the high 
school at Farmington. He removed to his present place in 1871 
and has resided there continuouslv since that date. His farm is one 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 255 

of the valuable properties of the neighborhood and he has installed 
thereon all the usual modern improvements, thus facilitating the 
work of cultivating the fields. He has made agriculture a lifelong 
study and his scientific methods insure him abundant crops. 

Mr. Satterly was married in Harrison township on the 25th of 
March, 1885, to Miss Louisa Carver, who was born at the old Carver 
home in that township, a daughter of John and Hannah (Sax) 
Carver. Her father is deceased, but her mother still resides at the 
old homestead. Mrs. Satterly was reared in that township and 
attended Denmark Academy in pursuit of an education. She subse- 
quently taught school for some time in this county and was very 
successful in that profession. By her marriage she became the 
mother of six children, as follows: William B., who died February 
13, 1906, when nearly twenty years of age; Sylvester O., who married 
Nellie Pool, by whom he has one son, Willard Burton, aged six 
months, and who resides upon the home farm; and Glenn, Grace, 
Elsie and Hugh, Jr., all at home. The mother and daughters are 
members of the Presbyterian church and are active in the work of 
that organization. 

Mr. Satterly is a republican in his political allegiance, as he 
believes that the policies of that party are calculated to promote the 
prosperity of the country. He is one of the successful farmers of 
Lee county and in cultivating his fields he contributes to the develop- 
ment of this county, which is one of the rich agricultural districts 
of the state. His upright life has commanded the respect of all who 
know him and his attractive personal qualities have won him many 
friends, who hold him in affectionate regard. 



REV. PETER J. KERN. 

Rev. Peter J. Kern, who has been in charge of St. Mary's church 
in Fort Madison since 1887, has had marked influence among his 
people in the direction of their spiritual interests and ofttimes has 
been of great assistance to them through the advice which he has 
rendered in material things. 

He was born in Germany, March 28, 1853, ^"d in May, 1869, 
when a youth of sixteen years, was brought to the United States by 
his father. He continued his collegiate work in St. Francis Seminary 
at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and afterward studied for a year in St. 
Joseph's College at Dubuque, Iowa. He determined to enter the 



256 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

priesthood and was thus qualified by liberal educational training for 
holy orders. He was ordained on the 25th of February, 1876, and 
his rirst pastorate was at Harper, Iowa, where he remained for about 
eleven years, there building a church and school. 

In 1887 Father Kern came to Fort Madison and has since been 
in charge of St. Mary's. There were about four hundred families 
here in the beginning, but in 1893 ''"'^ church was separated, the new 
church of the Sacred Heart being organized. St. Mary's now has 
three hundred and ten families. Under his guidance St. Mary's 
church has made splendid progress and he has the confidence and 
love of his people and the respect of those of other denominations. 
He has made many improvements in the church property. In 1890 
the spire of the tower, which had been blown down in 1876, was 
rebuilt and in 1892 new stained art glass windows were installed. In 
1899 the magnificent new school was erected at a cost of about 
twenty-three thousand dollars, though at the present it could not 
be duplicated for twice that amount. It is three stories in height 
and ninety-four by one hundred and twelve feet in dimensions, 
equipped with all modern improvements. In 1909 the parochial 
residence was remodeled and is today one of the handsome homes of 
the city. The Sisters' Home was built in 191 1 and the church has 
undergone many improvements in 1914. 



ASA TURNER HOUSTON. 

Asa Turner Houston, a representative agriculturist and worthy 
native son of Lee countv, resides on section 20, Denmark township, 
and devotes his attention to the pursuits of farming and stock-raising 
with excellent success. He was born on the old family homestead 
on section 34, Denmark township, August 18, 1868, a son of John 
Houston, Jr., and Maria (Sturges) Houston. A sketch of the 
father, who passed away December 23, 1898, is given on another 
page of this work. 

Asa T. Houston acquired his education in the academy at Den- 
mark and after putting aside his text-books turned his attention to 
general agricultural pursuits, which have claimed his time and ener- 
gies throughout his entire business career. The old homestead on 
which his birth occurred is now in his possession. He resides, how- 
ever, on section 20, Denmark township, and there carries on general 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 257 

farming and stock-raising, both branches of his business returning 
to him a gratifying annual income. 

In 1899 Mr, Houston was joined in wedlock, to Miss Mary 
Leverett, by whom he has two children, Clyde Leverett and Florence 
Sturges. In his political views he is a republican, having supported 
the men and measures of that party since age conferred upon him the 
right of franchise. His religious faith is indicated by his member- 
ship in the Congregational church, of which he serves as treasurer 
and to which his wife also belongs. He is likewise a trustee of 
Denmark Academy. Mr. Houston has always lived within the 
borders of Lee county and that his career has ever been upright and 
honorable is indicated in the fact that the associates of his boyhood 
and youth are still numbered among his stanch friends and admirers. 



N. J. BEVER. 



N. J. Bever, manager for the Swift interests at' Fort Madison, in 
which connection he is handling a produce business of over two 
hundred thousand dollars a year, was born in Crawfordsville, 
Indiana, July 14, 1870, a son of Henry J. and Belinda J. Bever. In 
1878 the family removed to Mercer county, Illinois, where the father 
engaged in the nursery business, but he is now a resident of Quincy, 
Illinois. The mother, however, has passed away. 

N. J. Bever acquired a high-school education and after putting 
aside his text-books became associated with his father in the nursery 
business. In 1904 he came to Iowa, settling at Keokuk as an employe 
of the S. P. Pond Company, dealers in produce, and in 1909 he was 
transferred by that company to Fort Madison as manager of the busi- 
ness at that point and so continued in that position after the business 
was sold to Swift & Company, who purchased the Fort Madison 
establishment in 191 1. The company does not handle meats but 
deals in poultry, butter and eggs, the business annually amounting to 
over two hundred thousand dollars. At the Fort Madison branch 
poultry is killed and dressed, and eggs are packed for storage. Mr. 
Bever buys mostly in Iowa. The company uses its own cars and the 
business is now one of the important and extensive commercial enter- 
prises of this section of the state, furnishing a splendid market to 
producers. 

In 1890 Mr. Bever was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude 
Logan, of Mercer county, Illinois, and to them have been born two 



258 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

children, Carl and Willard. Mr. Bever holds membership with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and in his religious belief is a 
Methodist. His political opinion coincides with the principles of 
the republican party and at the present writing he is serving as alder- 
man at lan^e. His record as a business man and citizen is most 
creditable. He has ever been loyal to the best interests of the com- 
munity, while in commercial circles he is a most reliable, enterprising 
man, who carefully formulates his plans and carries them forward to 
successful completion. That he was retained in the service of Swift 
& Company indicates the endorsement that must have been given him 
by their predecessors and that he has continued as manager is an 
expression of the entire satisfaction of the corporation which he now 
represents. 



FRANK W. DAVIS. 



A modern bank serves the community in which it is located in 
many ways unknown to the banks of a half century ago. The Keokuk 
Savings IBank is one of the most progressive institutions of the city 
and its prosperity is due in part to the efficiency and loyalty of its 
cashier, Frank W. Davis, the subject of this sketch. He is a native 
of the city, having been born May 20, i860, a son of C. F. Davis. 
The father was one of the founders of the bank of which the son is 
now cashier and was its first president. He was one of the leading 
men of Keokuk of his generation and always manifested a lively 
interest in everything pertaining to the welfare of his town and 

county. 

Frank W. Davis was educated in the public schools of Keokuk, 
attending until he was eighteen years of age, and then entered the 
business world as a collector for the Keokuk Savings Bank. He 
inherits his father's talent for financial matters and his aggressiveness 
and ability won him promotion to the position of teller, then to that 
of assistant cashier and finally to that of cashier. He has also served 
as vice president of the institution. He is a constant student of bank- 
ing in all its phases and sees to it that the business of the Keokuk 
Savings Bank is conducted in an efficient and systematic manner. He 
is largely responsible for the present standing of the bank as one of the 
reliable and prosperous moneyed institutions of the city. 

Mr. Davis is quite prominent in local club circles, belonging to 
the Elks, being one of the original charter members of the Keokuk 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 259 

lodge. He is also a member of the Keokuk Country Club and an 
enthusiastic golfer. He realizes, as do so many of our representative 
business men, that out-of-door recreation is necessary if a man is to 
do his best work and he finds in golf not only much enjoyment, but 
the means of increasing his own efficiency. He is a member of the 
Episcopal church, in whose work he takes a laudable interest. 



THOMAS R. ROBERTSON. 

Thomas R. Robertson, a farmer of Harrison township, is engaged 
in the cultivation of a finely improved farm of three hundred and 
twenty acres, to which he holds title. He was born in Jefiferson 
county, Ohio, October lo, 1848, a son of William J. and Catherine 
(Runyon) Robertson, who were married January i, 1833. The 
father was born October 28, 181 2, in Jefiferson county, Ohio, and 
was reared in the Buckeye state, but in April, 1851, removed west- 
ward, locating in Lee county, Iowa. He spent a year in Keokuk 
and- then bought eight hundred acres of land in Harrison township, 
which he farmed until i860. As his children reached maturity he 
gave each one hundred and sixty acres, retaining a similar tract for 
himself. He passed away upon his farm January 9, 1901. His 
wife, who was also born in Jefiferson county, Ohio, October 29, 1813, 
is also deceased. 

Thomas R. Robertson was brought to this county by his parents 
when a child of three years and here grew to manhood. He assisted 
his father with the work of the homestead and thus familiarized him- 
self with effective methods of agriculture. He has devoted his life 
to that occupation and his finely improved farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres is a testimony to his ability and energy. Every- 
thing about the place is kept in excellent condition and his crops are 
invariably good, while his live stock is of a high grade. 

Mr. Robertson was married January i, 1872, to Miss Mary L. 
McGoun, who was born October 21, 1849, in Jefiferson county, Ohio, 
a daughter of Thomas S. and Margaret (Sutherland) McGoun. 
Her father was born September 14, 1822, and in 1854 came to Lee 
county, where he purchased land. His demise occurred August 10, 
1906, his widow surviving until 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Robertson 
have the following children: Maggie Katherine, born March 27, 
1873, now the wife of John W. Bargar; William Willis, who was 



260 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

born July 24, 1876, married Miss Emma Cook and is farming near 
Primrose; and Thomas McGoun, born March 21, 1879, at home. 

Mr. Robertson is a democrat in his political belief and has served 
as trustee of his township for three years. He has ably carried on 
the work of development begun by his father and is one of the valued 
residents of the county. 



FELIX T. HUGHES. 



Felix T. Hughes, a prominent citizen and successful attorney of 
Keokuk, has continuously practiced his profession in this city for 
more than a third of a century. His birth occurred at Milstadt, 
Illinois, in the early '40s, his parents being Joshua William and 
Martha Staton (Askins) Hughes, whose family numbered five chil- 
dren, four of whom still survive. This particular branch of the 
Hughes family is descended from Jesse Hughes, of Welsh nativity, 
who settled in Powhatan county, Virginia, in 1600, and Orlando 
Hughes on the maternal side who came from Wales in about 1730. 
Joshua William Hughes, the father of our subject, served as a cap- 
tain in the Black Hawk war and was stationed for a time at Warsaw, 
Illinois, in 1832. 

Felix T. Hughes was reared at Milstadt, Illinois, and attended 
the public schools in early youth, subsequently pursuing an aca- 
demical course at Troy and Keosauqua, Iowa. He next took up 
the study of law at Memphis, Missouri, with Judge David Wagner, 
who afterward attained the supreme bench of that state. In i86q 
he was admitted to the bar at Memphis and there practiced his pro- 
fession for a time, while later he maintained an ofiice at Lancaster, 
Missouri. In 1880 he came to Keokuk, Iowa, where he has been 
actively engaged in the practice of law to the present time, enjoying 
an extensive and profitable clientage. In 1879, while at Lancaster, 
he became solicitor general of the Missouri, Iowa & Nebraska Rail- 
road, now the Keokuk & Western division of the Burlington system. 
In 1885, at the time of the changing of the name of the road to 
the Keokuk & Western Railroad, Mr. Hughes was elected its presi- 
dent and general counsel. This condition remained unchanged until 
1901, when the property was sold to the Burlington system. Mr. 
Hughes has since legally represented the Burlington and most of the 
roads coming to Keokuk and has long enjoyed an enviable reputation 
as a leading member of his profession in Lee county. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 263 

In 1868 Mr. Hughes was united in marriage to Miss Jean A. 
Summerlin, of Memphis, Missouri, and they had children, four 
of whom are living, as follows: Howard R., a resident of Texas, 
who has invented, among other things, a deep-well-digging apparatus 
that is of note because of the facility with which it penetrates rock; 
Greta, the wife of Herbert Witherspoon, of New York City; Rupert, 
of New York City, who is an author of unusual promise and note; 
and Felix, living in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mr. Hughes is a stalwart republican in politics and in 1894 and 
again in 1896 was elected mayor of Keokuk, giving the city a progres- 
sive, beneficial and businesslike administration. He was also judge 
of the superior court of the city. His religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church. Being of a social disposition he has the faculty 
of making friends, and the respect in which he is held wherever his 
name is known is a fitting tribute to his personal worth. 



JAMES ANTHONY. 



For four decades James Anthony has been a resident of Fort 
Madison and his position in industrial circles of the city is a promi- 
nent one inasmuch as he is master mechanic for the Iowa Farming 
Tool Company. He was born in Madison county, New York, on 
the 29th of July, 1839, and is a son of Joseph and Ann (Bowen) 
Anthony, the former a farmer by occupation. In his childhood days 
James Anthony was left an orphan and from early youth has made 
his own way in the world, advancing steadily step by step as the 
result of his diligence and determination. 

On coming to Iowa in 1874 he entered the employ of the Iowa 
Farming Tool Companv in the capacity of master mechanic. He 
had learned the trade in New York and had there worked his way 
steadily upward, until he became master mechanic for the firm of 
Merrill, Wilder & Company of Auburn, New York. His previous 
experience thus well qualified him for the duties in which he engaged 
on reaching the city. In October, 1874, he entered upon his present 
connection and that his service has been entirely satisfactory and 
that his worth is widely acknowledged is indicated in the fact that 
he remains today in active association with the house whose emplov 
he entered forty years ago. 

In 1877 James Anthony was united in marriage to Miss Marietta 
R. Finch and to them was born a daughter, Mary T., who became 



264 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

the wife of Arthur Hesbacher, of Keokuk, and died at the age of 
twenty-eight years. 

Mr. Anthony gives his political allegiance to the republican party, 
which he has supported since age conferred upon him the right of 
franchise. Fraternally, he is a Mason, belonging to both the blue 
lodge and chapter, and he served as master of his lodge when in 
New York. Those who know him, and his acquaintance is wide, 
have for him a warm regard and those with whom he has been asso- 
ciated in a business way repose the utmost confidence in him. As 
a citizen, too, he occupies a place among those who are ever loyal 
to the best interests of the community. 



GEORGE ROBERS. 



In all Fort Madison there was no one who could more justlv claim 
the friendship of all his fellow citizens than George Robers. Coming 
to Iowa when this city was a comparatively small and unimportant 
river town, he established a harness shop and with the growth and 
development of the section he advanced not only in business alfairs 
with continually increasing success but also advanced equally in the 
regard and confidence of those who knew him. A native of Holland, 
Mr. Robers was born in Enschede on the 25th of August, 1833, and 
in 1837 was brought by his parents to the United States, the family 
home being established in St. Louis, Missouri, where thev remained 
until 1840. Thev then went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where the father 
engaged in the harness-making business. His son George learned the 
trade and was the representative of the family in the fourth genera- 
tion to continue in that line of business. His grandfather was regi- 
mental saddler under Napoleon Bonaparte. 

In the year iSqo George Robers came to Iowa, settling at Fort 
Madison, where he established a harness shop. In 1854 he erected a 
building at No. 609 Front street, in which he continued his business, 
and in 18157 he built a three-story frame building at No. 616 Second 
street, where he continued in harness-making until his shop and build- 
ing were destroyed by fire on the 8th of November, 1874. He then 
rebuilt, erecting a brick structure. As his section of the state became 
more thickly settled his business grew along substantial lines, and he 
became recognized as one of the foremost representatives of trade 
interests in Fort Madison. He was a man of unfaltering energy and 
determination and diligence was ever numbered among his strong 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 265 

characteristics. He displayed marked thoroughness and efficiency in 
his work and the product turned out from his harness factory was oi 
such quality as to insure a continuance of its liberal patronage. He 
had three sons, who learned the saddlery and harness-making busi- 
ness, the boys being: Edward G., who is now conducting the busi- 
ness; Henry M., deceased; and Louis G., who is a resident of St. 
Louis. 

In 1857 Mr. Robers was united in marriage to Miss Katherine 
Shields, who was born in Philadelphia and was an early settler of 
Fort Madison. Her stepfather, Patrick Gilligan, held various city 
offices here in pioneer times and was mayor of the city when Mr. 
and Mrs. Robers were married. For thirty-six years they traveled 
life's journey happily together and were then separated by death, 
Mrs. Robers being called from this life in 1893. Their living chil- 
dren are: Gertrude A.; Edward G.; Emma, the wife of Frank 
Yotter, of Hannibal, Missouri ; Louis G., of St. Louis ; and Perpetua, 
the wife of Edward A. Miller, of Peoria, Illinois. 

For si.\tv-four years Mr. Robers was a well known, highly 
esteemed and valued resident of Fort Madison, where he passed 
away on the 8th of January, 1914, the funeral services being held at 
St. Joseph's church and conducted by Father A. J. Zaiser. Of that 
church Mr. Robers was long a valued and faithful member and was 
a liberal and generous contributor thereto. His political allegiance 
was given to the democratic party and that he was active and helpful 
in public affairs is indicated in the fact that he was retained in the 
office of alderman from the second ward for twelve years or more. 
He had been longer in the harness-making business than any other 
man west of the Mississippi, being continuously connected with the 
trade at Fort Madison for sixty-two and one-half years. He was 
a man of noble qualities and kindly spirit and everyone was his friend. 

Edward G. Robers, son of George Robers and his successor in 
business, was born in Fort Madison, June 3, 1873, and attended St. 
Joseph's parochial school until he reached the age of eleven years, 
after which he became a public-school pupil. Subsequently he 
attended Brvant & Stratton's Business College and thus had a com- 
mercial training that qualified him for later business activities. He 
received practical instruction in harness making under the direction 
of his father and has always continued in this line. One of the 
secrets of his success is the fact that he has always remained in the 
business in which he embarked as a young tradesman and that through- 
out all the years he has never deviated from the strictest standards of 
commercial honor and integrity. 



266 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

In his religious faith Mr. Robers is a Catholic, belonging to St. 
Joseph's church. Fraternally he is an Elk and in politics is a demo- 
crat. Like his father before him he has many friends here and the 
name of Robers has ever been a synonym for business energy and 
progressiveness. 



W. A. SCHERFE. 



W. A. Scherfe, a prominent representative of activity in insurance 
circles in Fort Madison, is a native of the city, born July 14, 1867, 
and is a son of August and Amelia (Springer) Scherfe. The father 
w^as born in Germany and arrived in Lee county in 1848. He was 
a son of August and Leah Scherfe, who brought their family of two 
children, a son and daughter, to the new world, and, crossing the 
eastern section of the continent, made their way to Iowa. August 
Scherfe, Sr., was one of the first butchers in the city and conducted 
a successful business in pioneer times. 

His son, August Scherfe, Jr., was reared in Fort Madison and at 
the age of seventeen years enlisted for service in the Union army 
during the Civil war. He remained at the front for four years and 
four months and during the latter part of his term was corporal of 
Company F of the Fifth Iowa Cavalry. He participated in a num- 
ber of hotly contested engagements and never faltered in the perform- 
ance of any duty whether upon the firing line or the lonely picket 
line. His valor and loyalty made his a most creditable military 
record, of which he has every reason to be proud. Following the 
war he returned home and in Des Moines county was married to Miss 
Amelia Springer, a daughter of Michael and Magdeline (Fouel) 
Springer, who in the year 1851 came to Iowa, settling at Burlington. 
Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Scherfe began their domestic 
life in Fort Madison and he became a guard at the state penitentiary, 
acting in that capacity for a year. He afterward removed to Bur- 
lington and for six years he engaged in selling groceries on the road 
as traveling representative for the firm of Hunt & Kendall. On the 
expiration of that period he entered the employ of another firm, with 
which he remained as traveling salesman for seven years. He next 
removed to Nebraska, where he spent two years, and for one year 
he was in Lincoln. In 1876 he once more became a resident of 
Burlington, Iowa, and the following year returned to Fort Madison, 
where he again accepted the position of guard at the state peni-- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 267 

tentiary, acting in that capacity for twenty-four consecutive years, 
when he retired and is now enjoying a rest which he has truly earned 
and richly deserves. In 1908 he was called upon to mourn the loss 
of his wife. 

W. A. Scherfe acquired a public-school education, yet his advan- 
tages were somewhat limited, for at the early age of eleven and one- 
half years he started to earn his living by working in a hardware 
store at Fort Madison. When seventeen years of age he began 
learning the machinist's trade and in 1888 he became a fireman on 
the Fort Madison & Des Moines Railroad, continuing in that posi- 
tion until 1892. In 1894 he opened an insurance office and today 
handles all kinds of insurance, being recognized as one of the best 
informed men on all features of insurance in this section of the 
state. In 1905 he was made special agent for the German-American 
Insurance Company, with Iowa as his territory. He continued with 
that company until 1908, when he resigned to become special agent 
for the British-American & Western Insurance Company of Toronto, 
Canada. This is a fire insurance company and he has secured for 
the corporation a large business. Through carefully directed busi- 
ness interests he has gained a position among the men of affluence 
in this section of the state. 

In 1894 Mr. Scherfe was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. 
Young, of Milton, Iowa, and theirs is an attractive and hospitable 
home. Mr. Scherfe belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks and the Presbyterian church, and these 
associations indicate much of the nature of his interests and the high 
principles which govern his conduct. His political endorsement 
is given to the republican party and he keeps well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day but does not seek nor desire office. 



JOHN W. STEWART. 



John W. Stewart, who carries on farming and stock-raising on 
section 5, Pleasant Ridge township, was born August 5, 1867, in a 
log cabin on the same section. His father, E. M. Stewart, was born 
in Ohio county, Indiana, in 1824, and when a young man of twenty- 
three went to the California gold fields by way of the Isthmus. He 
was one of the earlier gold seekers. He returned to Iowa not much 
richer than when he went except in experience. He encountered 



268 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

many hardships upon the way and would probably have perished 
had it not been for the assistance of his brother, Augustus Stewart, 
who was a physician. Upon his return he settled in Lee county, Iowa, 
where he purchased land upon which there was a log cabin. This 
rude structure remained his home for many years and there his family 
was reared. The cabin was one of the oldest in the county and also 
one of the last to be torn down. E. M. Stewart met his death in an 
accident near Fort Madison. He was twice married, his hrst wife 
being Miss Elizabeth Woods, of Indiana. Their marriage occurred 
in Muscatine county, Iowa, and to them were born five children, of 
whom three are yet livin-g, as follows: William, who is a farmer 
and stock-raiser in Oregon; C. E., a farmer at Whitney, Nebraska; 
and Mary E., the wife of George A. Childs, of Sunderland, Massa- 
chusetts. The two other children died in childhood. His second 
marriage was with Miss Julia A. Snook, a native of Pennsylvania, by 
whom he had live children, as follows: John W., the subject of this 
review; Julia A., the wife of L. C. Woollen, a farmer residing in 
Missouri; A. J., who passed away at the age of thirtv-seven years; 
A. G., who is married and resides in Fresno county, California; and 
Hattie E., a resident of Los Angeles, California. 

John W. Stewart was reared under the parental roof and acquired 
his education in the common schools of the neighborhood. He 
assisted his father in the farm work and thus became acquainted 
with practical methods of agriculture. He found farm work con- 
genial and has continued the cultivation of the fields since coming 
to years of maturity. He is now the owner of a fine farm of two 
hundred and forty acres and the neat appearance of the place and 
the fine condition of the fields testify to his energy and ability as a 
farmer. He not only raises a variety of crops, but in the last ten 
years has engaged in the breeding of blooded Duroc Jersey hogs, 
selling most of his animals at public sale. He understands stock- 
raising thoroughly and his hogs are fine specimens of the Duroc 
Jersey breed. He is an excellent judge of real-estate values and his 
opinion as to stock is almost infallible. His activities are guided 
by sound business judgment and his farm returns to him a good 
annual income. 

Mr. Stewart was married June 20, 1890, to Miss Ola Archibold, 
a native of Henry county, Iowa. Two children have been born to 
this union. Beatrice Bell, whose natal day was September 11, 1891, 
married Wilber P. Francy, a banker of Glendale, California. 
Erastus M., named for his grandfather, was born September 19, 1893, 
and is at home assisting his father. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 269 

Mr. Stewart is a democrat in politics and has served as township 
clerk and assessor, giving complete satisfaction to his constituents. 
However, he is not an office seeker and prefers to devote the greater 
part of his time to his private interests. He is a man of keen intelli- 
gence and is well informed upon all public questions as he believes 
it to be the duty of every citizen to familiarize himself with public 
affairs. 



WILLIAM F. KIEL. 



William F. Kiel has been engaged in the real-estate business in 
Fort Madison since 1908. He also has served as a public official, 
having for thirteen years filled the office of county treasurer, in 
which connection his record has been most commendable. He was 
born March 13, 1857, in the city where he still resides, his parents 
being Ferdinand and Mary (Erbrodt) Kiel, both natives of Hanover, 
Germany, whence they came to the new world in 1840, settling at 
Fort Madison. Ferdinand Kiel and his brother, George F., operated 
a wharf boat for many years and later the father embarked in the 
wholesale liquor business, in which he continued until the time of 
his death, in 1894. To him and his wife were born eight children 
two of whom died during the cholera epidemic, while one other 
passed away in childhood. Five of the number reached adult age 
and two of the sons were soldiers in the Civil war, Ferdinand and 
Lewis, both wearing the blue uniform, which indicated them to be 
stanch defenders of the Union during the darkest hours in the history 
of this country. 

William F. Kiel obtained a public-school education and made his 
initial step in the business world as a bill clerk in the employ of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company. On leaving that 
position he embarked in the grocery business in partnership with his 
brother, George Kiel, and afterward engaged in the wholesale liquor 
business with his father. He was later elected to the office of county 
treasurer and made so creditable a record in that position that he was 
again and again reelected to the office, in which he served for thirteen 
years. His duties were discharged most methodically, systematic- 
ally and capably and his ability won him high encomiums from 
those who knew aught of his official service. In 1908 he retired 
from that office as he had entered it — with the confidence and good- 
will of all concerned — and turned his attention to the real-estate 
business, in which he has since engaged. 



270 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

On the 27th of April, 1882, Mr. Kiel was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma E. Davis, of Fort Madison, and unto them have been 
born three children, Lewis G., Walter William and Caroline L., 
the last named being the wife of Guy M. Bean, of Los Angeles, 
California. 

Mr. Kiel and his family are well known in Fort Madison, being 
representatives of one of the old pioneer families that has been con- 
nected with the history of the city and its business development for 
more than three score years and ten. Mr. and Mrs. Kiel hold 
membership in the German Lutheran Evangelical church, and he 
also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political indorsement 
is given to the democratic party and for four years he filled the office 
of alderman from the third ward, exercising his official prerogatives 
in support of what he believed to be for the best interests of the 
community along lines of municipal progress and development. 



RICHARD PETER MILLER. 

In a history of the legal profession in Lee county it is imperative 
that mention be made of Richard Peter Miller, now deceased, who 
was one of the well known criminal lawyers of his section of the 
state. As a practitioner he ranked among the most able and resource- 
ful and enjoyed the respect and confidence of all the members of the 
local bar by reason of his close conformity to the highest standard of 
professional ethics. He was born at Fort Madison, Iowa, on the 
27th of May, 1855, and was one of a family of eight children whose 
parents were Daniel F. and Rebecca (Phillips) Miller. The father, 
also an attorney, specialized in the practice of criminal law and spent 
many years of his life in Keokuk, where he was uniformly regarded 
as an able member of the profession. 

Richard P. Miller studied law in Mount Pleasant and was grad- 
uated from a college in that city in the spring of 1874, when but 
nineteen years of age. Upon attaining his majority he was admitted 
to the bar, entering upon active practice in 1876. He removed to 
Keokuk and was actively identified with the practice of his profession 
in this city throughout his remaining days. He possessed notable 
oratorical powers which enabled him to strongly present his argu- 
ment, while the logical trend of his mind was seen in his deductions. 
In 1899 he was elected district judge of the superior C(jurt and served 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 271 

for two years upon the bench, his course being in harmony with his 
previous record as a man and lawyer, distinguished by unswerving 
integrity and by a masterful grasp of every problem presented for 
solution. 

On the 28th of February, 1888, Mr. Miller was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Bertha Elizabeth Leary, a daughter of John P. and 
Mary (Kenney) Leary, of Hamilton, and they have one daughter, 
Ruth, now at home. Mr. Miller was a Catholic in his religious 
faith, holding membership in St. Peter's church. He was a democrat 
in his political views and was interested in all public affairs. He 
was a great lover of children and was generous in his support of all 
worthy charitable and benevolent enterprises and projects. His tastes 
were scholarly and in addition to writing poetry he was the author 
of various interesting magazine articles and was well informed upon 
a broad variety of subjects. He traveled for five years in the west 
for the benefit of his health before his death, which occurred on the 
loth of May, 1901, when he was at the comparatively early age of 
forty-six years. He left behind him the record of a well spent life, 
a life that may well serve as a source of inspiration and encourage- 
ment to others, showing to what possibilities and heights one may 
attain when laudable and honorable ambition lead the way. 



EDWARD E. COURTRIGHT, D. D. S. 

Dr. Edward E. Courtright is engaged in the practice of dentistry 
in Fort Madison and has won gratifying recognition and a liberal 
practice. He was born in Lee county, December 6, 1872, a son of 
John C. and Virginia C. (Jarrett) Courtright. The former was a 
son of Ira Lee Courtright, a native of Franklin county, Ohio, who 
on his removal westward in 1847 made his way to Lee county, Iowa, 
where he secured a tract of land and followed the occupation of farm- 
ing. His son, John C. Courtright, was but three years of age at the 
time the familv left the Buckeye state and made their way across the 
Mississippi into Iowa. Reared to the occupation of farming, he made 
it his life work and became known as one of the representative 
agriculturists of this part of the state. Having arrived at years of 
maturity, he wedded Virginia C. Jarrett, a daughter of Elias Jarrett, 
a native of North Carolina, who was also one of the early settlers 
here and made farming his life occupation. 



272 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Dr. Edward E. Courtright was reared upon the old homestead. 
At the usual age he became a public-school pupil and after mastering 
the branches of learning that constitute the public-school curriculum 
he entered Whittier College. He was also a student in Howe's 
Academy at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and he received his professional 
training in the dental department of the Keokuk Medical College, 
where he completed his course in 1903. He afterward practiced at 
Ashland, Illinois, for fourteen months and then returned to his native 
county, establishing an office in Fort Madison, where he has since 
remained. His practice has steadily grown and is now one of gratify- 
ing and substantial proportions. He belongs to various dental 
societies, including the local organizations and those of broader scope. 

Dr. Courtright belongs to the Iowa National Guard, being a 
member of Company A, Fifty-fourth Regiment, of which he is now 
first lieutenant. Fraternally he is connected with the Elks, the Eagles, 
the Moose and the \\'oodmen, and his political allegiance is given 
to the democratic party. Practicallv his entire life has been spent in 
Lee county, where he is widely known and popular because of his 
good traits of character and his social qualities as well as bv reason 
of his ability in the line of his chosen profession. 



EDWARD KREBILL. 



Prominent among the energetic, farseeing and successful business 
men of Fort Madison is Edward Krebill, of the firm of Krebill 
Brothers, proprietors of a flour mill, in which connection they are 
conducting an extensive business. No historv of commercial activity 
in Lee county would be complete without mention of him whose 
name introduces this review. He was born in Lee county in 1873, 
a son of Peter and Madeline Krebill, who were early settlers of the 
county. Coming from Germany, they made their way across the 
country to Iowa, settling in this state in 1838. This was not only 
long before the admission of the state into the Union but also before 
its organization as a territory. The father followed farming and thus 
provided for his family. He was a democrat in his political views 
and gave active and earnest support to the principles of the party, 
doing much to further the cause which he espoused. 

Reared under the parental roof Edward Krebill had the usual 
experiences of the lads of tlie locality and period. A public-school 
education, the pleasures of the playground and the duties assigned 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 273 

by parental authority constituted the features of his early life, bring- 
ing him to the time when he felt that he should enter upon business 
activity. In 1892, when a youth of nineteen years, he and his brother, 
P. R. Krebill, embarked in the tiour-milling business at Primrose, 
Iowa, and there remained for five years, at the end of which time 
they sold out and purchased a mill at Donnellson, Iowa, where they 
remained until they came to Fort Madison, where they have since 
been closely associated with business interests. 

In 1909 Mr. Krebill was married to Miss Elsie Delabar, of 
Franklin, Iowa, and unto them has been born a daughter, Evelyn. 
The parents are members of the German Lutheran church, and Mr. 
Krebill gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. He 
stands for all that is progressive in public affairs and co-operates in 
manv movements that have resulted beneficially to the community. 
As is the law of life for man, his attention naturally is concentrated 
mostly upon his business afifairs and the interests of Krebill Brothers 
are a factor in the commercial development of the city. The ffour 
mill of which they are now the proprietors was built by B. Kent in 
1896 and was sold to the present firm of Krebill Brothers in Noveni- 
ber, 1904, since which time new machinery has been installed and 
all modern accessories and equipment added. They put in electric 
power with individual motors and also installed a new grinding 
machine in 1914. The same year they secured a new flouring machine 
at a cost of over three thousand dollars. The business is capably 
conducted and they employ from three to five men. The mill has 
a capacity of seventy-five barrels per day of wheat flour and twenty- 
five barrels per day of rye flour, together with one thousand bushels 
of chopped feed per day. They also manufacture graham Hour and 
corn meal and use mostly native grain. This furnishes an excellent 
market for the producers of this section of the country and the busi- 
ness is one which adds to the material development of the com- 
munity as well as to the success of the owners. 

P. R. Krebill, the partner of Edward Krebill in the ownership 
of the flour mill, was born in December, 1867, and his business rec- 
ord is naturally coincident with that of his brother. He married Ida 
Leisy, of Lee county, and they have seven children all of whom are 
yet living. They are members of the Lutheran church and, like 
his brother, P. R. Krebill gives his political allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party. Both are well-known business men, resourceful, pro- 
gressive and enterprising, and what they undertake they carry forward 
to successful completion. At all times they have kept up with modern 
ideas and standards and their work is productive of excellent results. 



274 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

There is no esoteric phase in all their business career, their success 
coming as the legitimate, logical and merited reward of persistent 
and honorable effort. 



FRED C. WIESEMANN. 

Whatever success has come to Fred C. Wiesemann is attributable 
entirely to his own efforts, for he started out in life empty-handed 
and by diligence and determination has gained the measure of pros- 
perity which is today his. He is now living in Keokuk, occupying 
a pleasant and attractive home, which he owns. He was born in 
Warsaw, Hancock county, Illinois, March 22, 1873. His father, 
Charles Wiesemann, also a native of the same county, died in 1899 
at the age of forty-nine years. He had been educated in the common 
schools of Hancock county and was a representative of one of the 
old families of that section, his people having come from Germany. 
After living in Pennsylvania for a time they removed westward to 
St. Louis and Charles Wiesemann, the grandfather of our subject, 
who was a carpenter by trade, finally settled in Warsaw, Illinois. 
There he lived retired for a few years, after which he was called to 
his final rest. 

His son, Charles Wiesemann, after arriving at years of maturity, 
married Anna Beck, who was born in Missouri and was a daughter 
of John Beck, but at the time of her marriage was living in Hancock 
county, Illinois. Charles Wiesemann died in September following 
his retirement from the office of sheriff. He was always active in 
public affairs in Hancock county and was a highly esteemed and 
loved citizen. He was a life-long democrat, and he held member- 
ship in the Lutheran church and in several fraternal orders. His 
widow, who was born in 1851, still survives and makes her home 
with a daughter, Mrs. Margaret Leisy, at the age of sixty-three years. 
Their children were: Henrv, who is now living in Keokuk; Fred 
C. ; Frank M., also a resident of Keokuk; and Mrs. Leisy. 

In his youthful days, Fred C. Wiesemann attended the public 
and liigh schools of Warsaw, pursuing his studies to the age of four- 
teen years, when he became self-supporting. When si.xteen years of 
age he served as deputy postmaster under his father, who was filling 
the office of postmaster during the administration of President Cleve- 
land. He continued to act as deputy under Edward Becker under 
the administration of Benjamin Harrison. After leaving the post- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 275 

office he resumed his old trade of coopering, which he had learned 
as a boy in his father's shop. At the age of twenty-two years he was 
appointed deputy sheriff under his father, filling that position during 
the term of four years. He next engaged in the liquor business in 
Warsaw for about three years and then went to Canton, Illinois, 
where he continued in the same line of business for one year. On 
the expiration of that period he sold out and came to Keokuk about 
1902. Here he engaged in the liquor business with his brother, 
Frank M., on Twelfth street, but after four years sold out to his 
brother and bought on Main street between Sixth and Seventh. In 
January, 191 1, he removed to his present location. 

Mr. Wiesemann was married in St. Louis on the 23d of May, 
19 1 2, to Mrs. Eva Thompson, nee Hall. He belongs to the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Moose and 
the Eagles, and his political allegiance is given to the democratic 
party. He has a wide acquaintance and those with whom he comes 
in contact find him genial and cordial in manner. 



NORMAN E. COLBY, D. D. S. 

Mr. Norman E. Colby, a graduate of the Keokuk Dental College, 
has been engaged in the active practice of his profession in Fort Madi- 
son since 19 12 and in the brief interim to the present time has become 
well established in his chosen calling through the ready reco.gnition 
of his learning and ability. Dr. Colby was born in Dane county, 
Wisconsin, on the 27th of August, 1882, and is a son of Eli and Helen 
Colby, the former a farmer by occupation, which pursuit he con- 
tinuously followed in order to provide for his family. 

At the usual age Dr. Colby entered the public schools and passing 
through consecutive grades as the years advanced was ultimately 
graduated from the high school. He decided to enter upon the prac- 
tice of dentistry and with that end in view became a student in the 
Keokuk Dental College, where he completed a course with the class, 
of 1908. He then located for practice in Mason City, Iowa, where he 
remained for a short time, after which he returned to Keokuk. There 
he practiced until August, 191 2, when he removed to Fort Madison, 
where he has since continued. He is now dentist for the state peni- 
tentiary and in addition has a large private practice. He is well 
qualified for the work that he has undertaken by reason of his broad 



276 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

studv and the thoroughness which he has manifested in all of his 
work. 

On the 15th of February, 1905, Dr. Colby was married to Miss 
Alma Childers, of Nauvoo, Illinois. They are members of St. 
Joseph's Catholic church and Dr. Colby holds membership with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Elks and also in the national, state, and 
county dental societies and the Phi Omega. His political allegiance 
is given to the democratic party. 



MARTIN SCHOENE. 



Investigation into the history of Lee county shows that the family 
of which Mr. Schoene is a representative figured prominently in 
connection with the pioneer settlement and development of this 
section of the state and members of the family since that time have 
taken an active and helpful part in the work of progress and improve- 
ment. Martin Schoene, whose name introduces this review, is now 
a well known farmer and live-stock dealer residing upon the old 
home place on section 29, West Point township. 

He was born April 28, 1861, on a farm a mile south of Dover, 
in Lee county, and is a son of J. P. and Ernestine (Kudebeh) Schoene. 
His paternal grandfather was Martin Schoene, who after living for 
a considerable period in L^nion county, Pennsylvania, removed west- 
ward with his family and established a home in Jefiferson township, 
Lee county, Iowa, where he resided until his death, which occurred 
in 1 88 1, when he was seventy-five years of age. He had but one 
sister, Mrs. Henry Judy, who is now living in Denmark township 
and whose family is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. As an 
early settler Martin Schoene, grandfather of our subject, took an 
active interest in the development and improvement of this section 
of the state. His wife said that only fifteen cents in actual cash 
was expended in building their first cabin home in Lee county, this 
being paid to a blacksmith for making nails with which to build 
the door. The lumber was cut in this district and the neighbors 
aided in the log raising. The family experienced all of the hard- 
ships and privations of pioneer life, but as the years went on changes 
occurred, and in the work of general improvement and develop- 
ment members of the Schoene family have always taken an active 
and helpful part. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 277 

J. P. Schoene, born in Union county, Pennsylvania, in 1836, was 
but three years old when brought by his parents to the west and 
was reared here amid the wild scenes and environment of pioneer 
life. He served nine months in the Civil war and later purchased 
a farm of eighty acres in West Point township, to which he added 
from time to time until the place now contains two hundred and 
fourteen acres. He erected thereon a substantial stone residence, 
also good barns, and made other improvements upon this property, 
which is now owned by his son Martin. He continued for an ex- 
tended period as one of the leading and influential agriculturists 
of his district. 

Martin Schoene of this review was reared upon the old home- 
stead and attended the district schools, but his educational oppor- 
tunities were somewhat limited. He has, however, always been a 
great student and reader throughout his entire life, and thus has 
become well informed, adding also to his knowledge the many les- 
sons which he has learned in the school of experience. He was early 
trained to the best methods of tilling the soil and producing crops, 
and remained at home until twenty-eight years of age. He then 
removed to Sedgwick county, Kansas, where he purchased a farm, 
but eventually he traded that property for a farm in Macon county, 
Missouri. Finally he sold out there and returned to Lee county, 
where fourteen years ago he purchased the old homestead. He has 
since given his attention to general agricultural pursuits and his labors 
have been crowned with substantial and satisfactory results. 

In 1897 Mr. Schoene was united in marriage to Miss Martha E. 
Judy, a daughter of Henry Judy, Sr., who died August 1 2. 1910, when 
almost ninety years of age. He passed away at his home in West 
Point township. There he had long resided, having secured land 
from the government, and when it came into his possession it was 
a raw and undeveloped tract, but his persistent labors transformed 
it into highlv cultivated fields. His first wife bore the maiden name 
of Rebecca Cooney and died in this county, leaving the following 
children: H. H., now deceased; Mrs. Mary Horton, who resides 
in Fort Madison; and Mrs. Emily Bullard, who has also passed 
away. For his second wife Henry Judy chose Elizabeth Emmett, 
who died in this county in February, 1913. Ten children were 
born of that marriage, of whom two sons died when seventeen or 
eighteen years of age, while two daughters died at the ages of seven 
and nine years, respectively, and others died younger. Three of 
the familv are now living: G. W., who makes his home in Jefferson 
township; W. S., of Central City, Colorado; and Mrs. Martin 



278 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Schoene. John Judy died soon after his father's death, in Clark 
county, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Schoene became the parents of 
four children: Raymond, at home; Ruth; Irene, who died at the 
age of one year and a half; and Ethel Catherine. 

Mr. Schoene has always been interested in measures and move- 
ments for the public welfare, and the cause of education has found 
in him a stalwart champion. He has served as school director and 
also as secretary of the board. In his political views he is an earnest 
republican and has never faltered in his allegiance to the party. He 
is equally loyal as a member of the Memorial Presbyterian church of 
West Point township, of which he is an elder. He was treasurer 
of the building committee at the time of the erection of the house 
of worship in 1902, when seven dollars and a half in actual cash was 
expended for mechanical labor to erect this structure, worth two 
thousand dollars. The minister was an architect and superintended 
the building, which was constructed with the aid of many volunteer 
workers. Mr. Schoene took the initiative in the organization of the 
congregation, there being a dozen others interested in the project, 
all of whom had been members of the old German Presbyterian 
church, but the membership of that organization had diminished and 
services were discontinued. The membership of the Memorial Pres- 
byterian church is now about forty. The church, built in 1902, was 
destroyed by fire in 1908 and by adding to the insurance miMiey the 
present comfortable structure was erected and furnished. 



ALEXANDER E. JOHNSTONE. 

Alexander E. Johnstone, son of Edward and Elizabeth V. R. 
Johnstone, was born at Fort Madison, Lee county, Iowa, June 5, 
1856, and in September, 1868, the family moved to Keokuk, when 
he was a lad, not yet reaching his teens. He attended the public 
schools of Keokuk and later was a student at the Iowa State Uni- 
versity. Returning to Keokuk he entered the employ of Taber & 
Company, large lumber dealers, in April, 1875, and in 1878 acquired 
an interest in this establishment with which he continued until the 
latter part of 1894. From this date until 1898 he was not engaged 
in any active business. 

On May 27, 1891, he was elected one of the directors of the 
Keokuk Savings Bank, February 5, 1895, """"'^^ elected vice president 
and Februarv 7, 1898, was elected president and has been actively 




ALEXANDER E. JOHNSTONE 



,-v/v ! 






HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 281 

engaged as the executive head of this prominent banking institution 
ever since. 

Mr. Johnstone was one of the original stockholders in the Keokuk 
& Hamilton Water Power Company, an organization formed to pro- 
mote the erection of a dam across the Mississippi river at Keokuk 
for the purpose of securing electric power for commercial purposes. 
It was a mammoth and tedious undertaking, requiring abilitv, tact, 
persistency and strenuous work. He was in at the birth of this great 
undertaking, and he remained with the gigantic enterprise at every 
stage of the progress from its inception to the end and worked with 
zeal, energy and ability for its success. He was vice president of 
the company, and at the death of the late Hon. John N. Irwin Mr. 
Johnstone was elected to succeed him as president of the companv. 

The success of the enterprise appeared wavering and a master 
effort seemed imperative. Finally John N. Irwin, then president, 
A. E. Johnstone, vice president at that time, and William Logan 
were delegated to go to Washington, D. C, Congress being in session, 
and make a strong efifort for sanction of the enterprise by the national 
government in the granting of a franchise by Congress. They went, 
and in that earnest and masterful struggle with Congress Mr. John- 
stone, in common with his colleagues, labored with tact, abilitv and 
untiring energy. The efforts were successful. As a result of the 
diplomatic and forceful campaign waged bv the committee Congress 
granted the franchise and the people of Keokuk today are grateful, 
as they should be, for the good work so well done bv its representa- 
tives. 

At the time the stock was turned over to Engineer Hugh L. 
Cooper, representing the new building company, preparatory to 
pushing the work on the dam, Mr. Johnstone was still president of 
the original companv. His work was then finished as the executive 
head of the great enterprise which now furnishes power for countless 
industries in a large number of cities and towns in several states in the 
great Mississippi valley. For his part in helping to bring this about 
Mr. Johnstone will always be held in grateful remembrance by the 
people of Keokuk and surrounding territory. 

Mr. Johnstone is a quiet, practical, cultured man. He is genial 
and courteous in all his associations with the world. There is not 
the slightest trace of the vainglorious in his nature. Quiet, modest 
and of the strictest integrity, he pursues the even tenor of his way, 
seeking no ostentatious praise, and rather shrinks from publicity. 
His spare moments are bv no means idle moments. They are used 
frugally and this is one of the principal factors in placing him 

Vol. n— iG 



282 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

before the public, and in the minds of those who know him best, as a 
leading representative man and citizen, whose word is his bond, hold- 
ing the respect and confidence of all who have social intercourse or 
business transactions with him. 

The Keokuk Savings Bank, the first savings bank established in 
Lee county, is of towering financial strength under his management, 
to which he gives the major portion of his attention and energies, 
though he is a stockholder and official with several other prominent 
and prosperous enterprises, to which he finds time to give valuable 
counsel and assistance. His name is a synonym for safety in business 
and when his name is seen connected with any business enterprise 
it is taken at once to be a safe and sound business. He takes an inter- 
est in the civic and other affairs of his city and state. 

He is an ideal home man and his residence is a model of elegance 
and comfort, bespeaking a life of intelligence and culture, furnished 
with everything to make a home pleasant and intelligent. 

On December lo, 1880, Mr. Johnstone was married to Fannie F. 
Williams, a prominent and popular young lady of Keokuk, who died 
May 12, 1884. Two children were born to this marriage, Mrs. John 
R. Irwin and Mrs. Don L. Galusha. On November i, 1887, he was 
married to Clara E. Knox of an old and prominent family of War- 
saw, Illinois, who was also prominent and popular at her home city 
and in Keokuk. She died July 19, 1914. To this marriage one son 
survives, Edward Knox Johnstone, a promising young man just 
budding into a prosperous career. 

In religion Mr. Johnstone is an Episcopalian; in politics, a 
democrat. 



FRANK B. KENT. 



Among the prosperous business men and representative citizens 
of Fort Madison is numbered Frank B. Kent, who was born in Belle- 
fonte, Center county, Pennsylvania, July 23, 1839, and is a son of 
Josiah and Anna Maria (Rothrock) Kent, also natives of the Key- 
stone state, the former born in York county, March 30, 1805, and 
the latter in Center county, November 7, 181 5. 

Leaving Bellefonte, the father came to Iowa in 1842, the journey 
being made by way of the railroad and river route. He had traded 
his property in Bellefonte for one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in Jefferson township, this county, three and a half miles west of 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 283 

Fort Madison, and the first summer here was spent in a little house 
on the banks of the river. For sixteen years he made his home upon 
that property and then purchased eighty acres in Madison township, 
upon which he built a good residence in 1858. In 1877 he took up 
his residence in Fort Madison, where he continued to live until his 
death, which occurred on the 22d of June. 1880. His wife survived 
him for some years, passing away December 14, 1893. By trade he 
was a plasterer and for manv years followed that occupation in con- 
nection with farming. He took great interest in the raising of fruit 
and flowers and in his later days devoted much of his attention to his 
garden. Public afifairs also claimed considerable of his attention and 
he represented his county in the state legislature at the time the state 
was admitted to the Union. In politics he was a democrat. He was 
a charter member of Claypole Lodge, No. 440, A. F. & A. M., of 
Fort Madison, in which he held the office of master, and to which 
his great-grandson, Lloyd F. Kent, now belongs. In his family were 
six children as follows: Charles Carroll, who died in Pennsylvania 
in infancy; William G., who died in this county; Frank B., of this 
review; Susan F., who died at the age of twenty-one years; George 
M., who died in infancy; and Ellen Iowa, who was born December 
18, 1848, and died at the age of five years. 

Frank B. Kent was only three years of age when he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to this county, and he was reared upon 
the home farm, early becoming familiar with agricultural pursuits, 
to which occupation he has devoted the greater part of his life. From 
1896 to 1904, however, he also owned and operated the flour mill 
now conducted by Krebill Brothers. At one time he was the pos- 
sessor of a half section of valuable land in this county, which is now 
owned by his sons, while he devotes his attention to looking after 
his city property. 

On the nth of February, 1864, Mr. Kent was united in marriage 
to Miss Fannie Skyles, who was born in this county, June 4, 1844, 
and died here on the 23d of December, 1897. She was a daughter 
of Benjamin and Hannah (Peak) Skyles. Her father, who was a 
native of Tennessee, came to this county about 1835 and here engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Kent has two sons. Harry J., the 
elder, was born in Madison township, November 9, 1864, and still 
resides on the farm there. He married Josephine Knock, and they 
have had nine children, namely: Helen; Gertrude, deceased; Frank; 
Beatrice; Le Roy; Harry; Celia; Minnie; and Marion. Fred B., 
the second son of our subject, has also spent his entire life in Madison 
township, where he was born, January 21, 1868. He followed farm- 



284 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ing until 1898, after which he traveled for a number of years, but 
is now conducting a cigar store, pool room and lunch counter in Fort 
Madison. On the i 1 th of September, 1889, he married Letitia Drol- 
linger, a daughter of Benjamin Drollinger. By this union were born 
two children: Lloyd F., and Fay T., at home. The former, now a 
fireman on the Santa Fe Railmad, married Helen Stenger and they 
have one child, Frederick VV. Their home is in Fort Madison at 
No. 1231; Second street, and with them our subject now makes his 
home. 

Since casting his first presidential vote for Stephen A. Douglas 
in i860, Mr. Kent has been a staunch supporter of the democratic 
party and has taken quite an active interest in public affairs. He was 
a member of the school board of Fort >Ladison at the time of the 
erection of every school building in the city, with the exception of 
the Lincoln school, and he has also served on the city council with 
credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his constituents. In 1852 
he attended the first county fair held in this state, which was con- 
ducted at Keokuk, Iowa, and he recalls many interesting incidents 
of pioneer life, for he has practically witnessed the entire develop- 
ment and upbuilding of this state and has ever borne his part in its 
advancement. Li business affairs he has pros,pered, and his life has 
been such as to gain him the respect and honor of those who know 
him. 



CRAIG ELLIS. 



Craig Ellis, who resides on section 9, West Point township, was 
born in Montrose, this county, September 18, 1881, a son of Edgar 
H. and Mary Jane (Shelly) Ellis. The father was a native of the 
same town, his birth occurring October 26, 1848, and he received 
his education at Montrose Institute. His marriage to Miss Shelly 
occurred in Montrose. The paternal grandfather was William Ellis, 
a native of Pennsylvania, who made the trip overland to Montrose 
by ox team. Later he emigrated to Oregon, residing there about seven 
years, after which he returned to Montrose, where he ran a grist 
mill until his death, which occurred when he was sixty-nine years 
of age. The mother of our subject was a daughter of Wendell and 
Elizabeth (Greer) Shelly, who settled near Montrose in the early 
'40s. She had three children: Addie, who is the wife of Russell 
Young, a button cutter of Fort Madison, Iowa, by whom she has a 
daughter. Marguerite, born September 29, 1904; Clara, a graduate 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 285 

of the St. Joe school of stenography and a resident of Detroit, Michi- 
gan; and Craig. 

The last named attended the schools of Montrose and also assisted 
his father with the work of the farm. He remained under the pa- 
rental roof until he was twenty-two years old and has continued in the 
occupation to whieh he was reared, finding farming not only prof- 
itable but congenial. His farm on section 9, West Point township, 
is one of the well kept properties of the locality and its neat appear- 
ance is an indication of the industry and efficiency of its owner. He 
carries on general farming and enjoys the prosperity which rewards 
the labors of every progressive Iowa farmer. 

In 1904 Mr. Ellis was united in marriage to Miss Frances Fich- 
tenkort, a daughter of Chris and Elizabeth (Kampschneider) 
Fichtenkort, and they have become the parents of a son, Clarence 
Hugh, whose birth occurred on the loth of November, 1905. Mr. 
Ellis is a member of the Episcopal church and gives his political 
allegiance to the democratic party. 



ERNST BURSTER. 



Ernst Burster, engaged in the wholesale liquor business in Fort 
Madison, was born here on the 27th of November, 1863, ^ son of 
Antone and Augusta (Henneberger) Burster, both natives of Ger- 
many. The father was born in Wurtemberg and the mother in Prus- 
sia. In 1847 he came to the United States, landing at New Orleans, 
and after residing in St. Louis for some time removed to Chicago, 
and in 185 1 came to Fort Madison. On her emigration to America 
his wife lived for a time in Ohio, but about 1855 came to this city, 
where they were soon afterward married. He died here in January, 
1885, at the age of sixty years, and she passed away June 23, 19 10, 
at the age of seventy-seven years. 

During his early residence here Antone Burster engaged in con- 
tracting and building, but in 1866 established the Concordia Brewery 
and continued in that business until his death. On his arrival in the 
new world he was in limited circumstances, but gradually worked 
his way upward and became quite well-to-do. He took quite an 
active interest in public aiifairs, supporting the republican party dur- 
ing the war and later affiliating with the democratic organization. 
For some years he served as a member of the city council. He 
belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and a number 



286 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

of German organizations. In his family were six children, namely: 
Adolph, who died in February, 1913; Otto, now a resident of Colo- 
rado; Julius, who died in Omaha in 1908; Louise, the wife of John 
Kettle, of Kansas City, Missouri; Ernst, of this review; and Emma, 
the wife of John Scholl, of St. Louis. 

During his boyhood and youth Ernst Burster attended the public 
schools of Fort Madison and at an early age became associated with 
his father in the brewery business. On the latter's death he succeeded 
to the enterprise and today is one of the leading wholesale dealers 
in liquors in this city. He is an enterprising and progressive busi- 
ness man who gives his support to all worthy enterprises which he 
•deems of public benefit. By his ballot he supports the men and 
measures of the democratic party, and he is an honored member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Eagles and the 
Moose. 



THOMAS W. HEMMINGS. 

Thomas W. Hemmings is a retired farmer and stock-raiser who 
is residing on his farm on section 16, Harrison township, this county. 
He was born in Northamptonshire, England, Mav 17, i8(;6, a son 
of William Hemmings, who was born in the same locality, July 18, 
1832. The latter was united in marriage to Miss Jovce Carrington 
in England in i8£;4, but in 1856 came with his wife and son to 
America, settling near Burlington, Iowa. He subsequently pur- 
chased forty acres of land near Denmark, in this county, which he 
subsequently sold, buying another tract of one hundred and sixty 
acres. He made his home thereon until 1877, when he removed to 
Big Mound, Iowa, and bought two hundred and twenty-nine acres 
in Cedar township, this county. He carried on active farming 
operations until 1897, when he retired and moved to Mt. Pleasant 
and later to Hillsboro, Henry county, Iowa. He passed away at 
Hillsboro, March 8, 1914, having survived his wife for six years, 
her demise occurring in 1908. They became the parents of six chil- 
dren : John Henry; Katherine, who is now the wife of W. W. Elder; 
William Carrington; Caleb and Rose, both of whom are deceased; 
and Thomas W. 

The last named was educated in the Denmark Academv and 
remained at home until he reached the age of thirtv. He early 
learned through practical experience modern methods of agricul- 
ture, and he did much of the work upon the homestead. Upon 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 287 

starting out in life on his own account he purchased one hundred 
and twenty acres of land on section 17, Harrison township, which 
he subsequently sold, buying instead two hundred acres on sections 
16 and 9, which he still owns. He devoted his time to general 
farming and his stock-raising interests were quite extensive. He 
applied the rules of good business to the conduct of his farm, while, 
as far as agriculture in itself is concerned, he was progressive and 
always willing to try any new methods that gave promise of value. 
His well directed labors brought him good profits and he is now able 
to live retired on the competence won in former years. 

Mr. Hemmings was married February 27, 1884, to Miss Jessie 
Beard, a daughter of William and Mary (Bristow) Beard. Her 
father was born near London, England, August 29, 18 19, and as a 
young man came to the United States. His marriage to Miss Bris- 
tow occurred in St. Louis on the 23d of October, 1847, and the fol- 
lowing year the young couple came to Lee county, where Mr. Beard 
purchased one hundred and fifty acres of land. He cultivated his 
land until 1891, when he retired and removed to Bonaparte, Iowa, 
where his death occurred July 25, 1893. His widow survived him 
for several years, dying in October, 1900. Twelve children were 
born to them, of whom Mrs. Hemmings was the fifth in order of 
birth. She was born June 14, 1859, at Big Mound, Iowa, and re- 
mained at home with her parents until her marriage. She became 
the mother of three children, of whom the eldest, Clarence W., born 
May 10, 1888, died April 12, 1889; Ethel Joyce, born December 17, 
1892, and Archie William, born February 8, 1896, are both at home. 
Mr. Hemmings is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Big Mound, and is a republican in his political allegiance. In 
the years of his residence in the countv he has won many friends 
and enjoys the unqualified respect of all with whom he has been 
brought in contact. 



y. A. TOWER. 



The name of Tower has long been identified with business enter- 
prise and activity in Fort Madison and is a synonym for reliability 
as well as progress. He of whom we write was born in Evanston, 
Illinois, November 16, 1875, and is a son of J. A. and Laura (Simons) 
Tower, both of whom were natives of New York. Throughout his 
entire life the father was connected with commercial interests and 



288 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

as a salesman upon the road traveled out of Chicago for twenty-nine 
years. In 1893 he located in Fort Madison, where he embarked in 
business on his own account, forming a partnership with H. B. Hamm 
for the sale of dry goods. That relation was maintained until 1895, 
when the firm dissolved and Mr. Tower opened a store of his own 
at No. 739 Second street, his son and namesake, J. A. Tower, join- 
ing him in the undertaking. At a later period they sought more com- 
modious quarters in order to meet the growing demands of their 
trade, occupying a store at No. 729 Second street. The business pros- 
pered from the beginning and gave indication of the enterprising 
spirit and practical methods of the founder and owners. The father 
continued in active connection with the business until his death, 
which occurred August 4, 1904, and in his passing. Fort Madison 
mourned the loss of one of her representative and valued citizens. 
In politics he was an earnest republican, but, while he was a firm 
believer in the principles of the party as factors in good government, 
never sought nor desired office as a reward for party fealty. He was 
in sympathy with all movements put forth for the upbuilding and 
benefit of the city. Unto him and his wife were born four children: 
Edith, the wife of C. L. Van Valkenberg, a resident of Cedar Rapids ; 
J. A., of this review; Lyman H., residing in Chicago; and Elizabeth, 
at home. 

J. A. Tower, Jr., became associated with the business in early man- 
hood and following the death of the founder and promoter the busi- 
ness was reorganized in 1905, at which time the son became co-partner 
and manager. In 1906 he removed the store to Nos. 728 to 730 
Second street, while the rear of the building extends back of No. 
732. He has a frontage of fifty feet and a depth of ninety feet and 
in addition to the first floor he has a stockroom in the basement. He 
employs fifteen people and the establishment constitutes one of the 
important commercial enterprises of the city. 



JAMES RICHEY. 



James Richev, deceased, was for many years a farmer and stock- 
raiser of Van Buren township, Lee county, where he owned a large 
farm. He was born in New York, September 24, 181 i, and died 
September 25, 1894, upon his farm in this county. He was reared 
in Paterson, New Jersey, by a family which adopted him at his 
mother's death, which occurred when he was quite small. He 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 289 

learned the shoemaker's trade, but after coming to Lee county, Iowa, 
in 1837, he bought three hundred and twenty acres of land in Van 
Buren township, and turned his attention to the cultivation of his 
fields and to the raising of stock, both branches of his business prov- 
ing highly profitable as he was industrious and enterprising. His 
place was well improved and the latest devices and discoveries in 
the field of agriculture were utilized, Mr. Richey being known as 
one of the progressive farmers of the countv. 

He was married to Miss Rebecca South, who was born in Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, on the 28th of December, 181 2, and died No- 
vember 23, 1892. She was educated in Pennsylvania and came to 
Lee county with her father. She was one of a family of eight children 
and by her marriage became the mother of six children, as follows: 
Robert, who was born January 20,. 1845, died September 19, 1891. 
Mary J., born September 24, 1846, is represented elsewhere in this 
work. Louis C, born October 7, 1848, died in 1850. James, a 
farmer of Argyle, Iowa, was born November 10, 1850, and married 
Mary E. Dougherty, by whom he has five children. Henry, who 
was born May 25, 1853, and died September 9, 1892, married Bernie 
E. Kellogg and had six children. John W., born August 16, 1856, has 
been engaged in the practice of law in Chicago for fifteen years. 

The father was a Presbyterian in his religious belief and a demo- 
crat in his political affiliation. He served as school director but held 
no other office, concentrating his energies upon his private afifairs, 
which were well managed and which yielded him a gratifying in- 
come. He was one of the substantial and respected citizens of Lee 
county and his demise was the occasion of much sincere regret. 



EDWIN URFER. 



Edwin Urfer is at the head of a growing business conducted under 
the name of the Fort Madison Pump Company. This was estab- 
lished in July, 191 1, and in January, 1912, was given its present 
name. The rapid growth of the business has led to the establish- 
ment of two stores and the trade now covers a large territory. Mr. 
Urfer was born in Lee county, Iowa, September 22, 1877, and is a 
son of Christian and Martha (Ezelle) Urfer, who were early set- 
tlers of this section of the state, where the father followed farming. 

The son supplemented his public-school instruction by a busi- 
ness course and in 1899 embarked in the implement and general 



290 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

merchandise business, with which he was connected until 1902. He 
then turned his attention to the insurance and real-estate business 
and in July, 1911, entered upon his present connection, forming a 
partnership with Arthur Perks. This relation was maintained for 
but a brief period when the partnership was dissolved, and in Janu- 
ary, 1912, Mr. Urfer organized the Fort Madison Pump Company, 
of which he has since been the head. The business has developed 
rapidly and along substantial lines. He now has two stories, one 
being located at No. 705 Second street, where he handles a full line 
of pumps and farm implements. The other store is at Nos. 104-108 
Pine street, and there is carried a large line of electrical goods. He 
also takes contracts for electrical work and the business in both of 
these branches is proving profitable, owing to the enterprising spirit, 
the careful management and the unfaltering diligence of the pro- 
prietor. Mr. Urfer is thoroughlv conversant with all branches of 
the trade through both practical and scientific knowledge and is con- 
stantly studying along lines that promote his efficiency and broaden 
his understanding of the business. 

On the i8th of January, 1900, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Urfer and Miss Caroline Queisner, of Lee county, and they have 
become the parents of six children, four daughters and two sons. 

Mr. Urfer belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to the Order 
of Moose. In politics he is an independent democrat. While he 
usually votes for the men and measures of the democratic party he 
does not consider himself bound to do so, but casts an independent 
ballot if his judgment so dictates. 



SETH COOK. 



Seth Cook is a representative of one of the pioneer families of 
the county and his interests are thoroughly identified with those of 
the locality, every movement looking toward the betterment of the 
county being certain of his support. He owns and operates a fine 
farm on section 10, Harrison township, and was born in that town- 
ship, November 11, 1856, a son of Benjamin and Susanna (Hill) 
Cook. The Cook family came originally from Holland. Stephen 
Cook, the grandfather of our subject, was married September 2, 
18 1 2, to Miss Elizabeth Evans, who was of Welsh descent. He was 
born in Virginia but was taken to Ohio when a child and was there 
reared. In 1844 he came to Lee county, Tcnva, and soon entered 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 291 

land in Harrison township, a part of which was owned by his son 
Benjamin and is now owned by the subject of this review. Stephen 
Cook and two of his sons took up altogether about six hundred and 
forty acres of land in Harrison township, and began the improve- 
ment of their property. The father passed away shortly after the 
close of the Civil war at an advanced age. He was a Quaker in 
religious belief. 

His son, Benjamin Cook, father of Seth, was born in Warren 
county, Ohio, January 12, 1825, and came with the family on the 
removal to Iowa. He was a farmer and stockman by occupation and 
was very successful in his undertakings. His political belief was 
that of the republican party and he was reared a Quaker. He died 
on his home farm on section 11, Harrison township, February 10. 
1898. An older brother, Jason Cook, carried on farming on section 
10, Harrison township, and passed away in February, 1894. Susanna 
(Hill) Cook, the wife of Benjamin Cook, was born January 2, 1832, 
at Richmond, Indiana, a daughter of William and Zylpha Hill, the 
latter of whom was left an orphan at an early age. William Hill 
came with his family to Lee county in the early '40s and they were 
among the first settlers of Harrison township. Mr. Hill died during 
the Civil war, but his widow survived until 1894, when she passed 
away, having attained the ripe old age of more than eighty years. 
She, too, was a Quaker in her religious belief. She was the mother 
of three daughters and two sons, including Mrs. Cook. Of these 
Edmund died while serving in the Civil war; Robert, who was a 
farmer and stock-raiser of Harrison township, is also deceased; and 
the three daughters are deceased. Mrs. Susanna (Hill) Cook was 
called to her reward September 16, 1901, and her demise was deeply 
regretted by a wide circle of friends. By her marriage she became 
the mother of five children, as follows: Evans, who was born Oc- 
tober 24, 1852, and resides in Calif ronia; Robert, who was born 
October 13, 1854, and is now a resident of Murray, Iowa; Seth, of 
this review; Elizabeth, born November 11, i860, who became the 
wife of Joel McCuUoch, and at her demise left two sons; and Ella, 
who was born April 5, 1862, and became the second wife of Joel 
McCuUoch, passing away June i, 1913. 

Seth Cook was reared upon the home farm in Harrison town- 
ship and acquired his education in the common schools of the neigh- 
borhood. He has spent his entire life in his native township and is 
today known as one of the progressive and well-to-do farmers of 
the county. His well kept buildings and grounds and the splendid 



292 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

crops growing in the fields are all indications of his energy and 
business ability. 

Mr. Cook, was united in marriage on the 21st of December, 1881, 
to Miss Maggie Williamson, who was born at Primrose, Harrison 
township, December 21, i860. Her parents were Francis and Sarah 
Elizabeth (McKeehan) Williamson. Her father is now a resident 
of Fort Madison, having reached the eighty-second milestone on 
life's journey in February, 1914. He was reared in Coshocton county, 
Ohio, but came to Lee county, Iowa, many years ago. He was a 
stock dealer while actively engaged in business and resided at Prim- 
rose. His wife was a native of Harrison township, born February 
17, 1842, and was a sister of Isaiah McKeehan, a resident of that 
township. She was called to her reward April 9, 1899, at Fort 
Madison when fifty-seven years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Williamson 
were married February 19, i860, and had five children, of whom 
Mrs. Cook is the oldest. The others are: Dollie, the wife of Norris 
McGoun, of St. Louis; Jennie, now Mrs. Sylvester Griflis, of St. 
Louis; and Ora and Roy, of the same city. Mr. and Mrs. Cook have 
a son, Benjamin Rex, who was born May 29, 1896, and is still at 
home. Politically the father gives his allegiance to the republican 
party and manifests a laudable interest in everything pertaining to 
the progress of Lee county. 



WILLIAM BALLINGER. 

William Ballinger is a native of the Blue Grass state, his birth 
occurring at Barbourville, Knox county, Kentucky, on the 10th of 
March, 1844. Frank Ballinger, his father, was a lawyer and served 
as a member of the state legislature and also as judge. While himself 
a slaveowner, he was an active supporter of Casius M. Clay in his 
candidacy for governor of the state and made speeches in behalf of 
the gradual abolishment of slavery. As Kentucky was a strong pro- 
slavery state, the public did not take kindly to his plan for the abol- 
ishment of the institution, even if done gradually. In 1853 ^""^ came 
to Iowa, locating in Keokuk. Judge Samuel F. Miller, who after- 
ward was a member of the LTnited States supreme court, had read 
law with Mr. Ballinger and it was through the Judge's advice that 
he was induced to locate here. He made his home on a farm about 
halfway between Keokuk and Montrose, and there passed the bal- 
ance of his life. He was one of the first to apply scientific princi- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 293 

pies to agriculture and, always a student, he read much along various 
phases of farming. He was far in advance of his time in this regard 
and his influence was an aid in stimulating more intensified study 
of agricultural problems. He passed away in 1870 when about 
sixty-nine years of age, his birth having occurred in April, 1801. 
He married Miss Jane Adams, and to them were born thirteen chil- 
dren. He was a whig in politics until the birth of the republican 
party and was ever afterward an ardent supporter of the principles 
of that party. He was a member of the Christian church and his 
religious principles were a potent force in shaping his life. Per- 
sonally he was genial, afifable, approachable and the soul of hos- 
pitality. He was unusually well informed on all the issues of the 
day and attracted to him the best, as he himself was of the best. To 
the day of his death his mind remained unimpaired in its clarity 
and force. < 

At two years of age William Ballinger was taken by his parents 
to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, where he lived until he was a lad of 
nine, when brought to Lee county, Iowa. He was reared on the home 
farm until eighteen and was a pupil of the district schools. These 
schools were much above the average at that time, owing to the fact 
that his father employed superior teachers, paying out of his own 
pocket the difference between the amount paid and the sum set aside 
for teachers' salaries by the school directors. 

On the 9th of August, 1862, when he was but eighteen, William 
Ballinger enlisted in Company A, Nineteenth Iowa Volunteer In- 
fantry, as a private and served for practically three years, being 
discharged July 10, 1865, at Mobile, Alabama. He participated 
in the engagement at Prairie Grove, Arkansas, where one hundred 
and ninety-eight men out of three hundred in his regiment were 
lost in killed and wounded. Following this battle he was in a raid 
on Van Buren and Fort Smith, Arkansas, and subsequently took 
active part in the siege of Vicksburg, being present at the fall of 
that rebel stronghold. After this he was sent to New Orleans, thence 
to Barrancas, Florida, then to Brownsville, Texas, to cut ofif the 
supplies for the Confederate army, and subsequently to Mobile, 
where he participated in the battles and skirmishes preceding the 
fall of that city. His bravery won him rapid promotion, being made 
first sergeant, then orderly sergeant and finally second lieutenant. 
He was often in command of a company and proved a gallant leader. 

After the close of the war Mr. Ballinger entered the University 
of Kentucky and completed his literary education, following which 
he studied law under his father's tuition. He was admitted to the 



294 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

bar and in 1867 began practicing in Keokuk, which he continued to 
follow until 1882, when he was elected president of the Keokuk 
Canning Company, which position he still holds. He was for eight 
years president of the Western Packers Can Goods Association and 
was the author of its constitution and by-laws. He is at present the 
president of the National Pickle Packers' Association of America 
and has so served for fifteen years. As president of these associa- 
tions of progress he has done much to secure intelligent cooperation 
between the individual members thereof and to do away with many 
abuses of the trade. The information secured by these associations 
relative to methods and costs from various plants has been of great 
value to all of the members in bringing about the most efficient 
system for their own purposes. 

Mr. Ballinger married, on the 20th of July, 1870, Miss Ellen 
Conn, and to this union four children were born, as follows: Mary, 
deceased; Elinor, now Mrs. William J. Fifife; William, who has 
passed away; and Lees, residing at Lansing, Michigan, the manager 
of the Keokuk Canning Company for that district. 

Mr. Ballinger is a republican in politics and for four years has 
served on the city council, where he is a factor for good govern- 
ment. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and 
the Loyal Legion, thus keeping in close touch with his comrades 
in arms. He has proven himself a worthy son of his distinguished 
father and has brought new honors to the name of Ballinger, which 
is held in the highest respect throughout this section of Iowa. 



W. B. DANIEL. 



W. B. Daniel was born in New Albany, Indiana, on the 29th of 
December, 1850. His father, Aaron Daniel, who was a pioneer of 
Lee county, arriving here in 1856, traveled for the dry-goods firm 
of Kremer, Irvin & Company. He was killed at Des Moines in 1883 
at the age of fifty-seven, his birth having occurred in 1826. His wife 
bore the maiden name of Mary Beeler and was a native of New 
Albany, Indiana. Her death occurred when her son, W. B. Daniel, 
was but six years of age. 

At the age of thirteen W. B. Daniel came to Keokuk with his 
father and continued his education in the schools of the city. At 
the age of eighteen he became an employe of A. Weber, who was 
engaged in the hardware business. For seven years he was so occu- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 295 

pied and was then a traveling representative for the Bonaparte 
Woolen Mills for two years. Later he engaged in the flour and feed 
commission business but gradually transferred his interests to the 
buying and selling of fruit, becoming a fruit commission merchant. 
In connection with that business he is now engaged in the candy 
business, being a manufacturer of confectionery. His plant is well 
equipped and turns out a high grade product. He employs three or 
four men, who sell his goods throughout Illinois, Missouri and south- 
eastern Iowa. 

On the 19th of November, 1874, Mr. Daniel married Miss Ella 
M. Meek, of Bonaparte, Iowa, who is a woman of excellent edu- 
cation, having graduated from college at Jacksonville, Illinois. Mr. 
Daniel is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Keokuk Coun- 
try Club. He is an enthusiastic golfer and greatly enjoys motoring 
and other out-door recreation. He gives his political allegiance to 
the republican party. He is one of the successful business men of 
the town and his establishment adds appreciably to the prosperity of 
the city. He is public-spirited as a citizen and does all in his power 
to advance the best interests of his city and county. 



HENRY G. HAESSIG. 

Henry G. Haessig, proprietor of a cigar store at No. 835 Second 
street, Fort Madison, has spent his entire life in this city, being 
born here on the i6th of December, 1866, a son of George Haessig, a 
native of Germany and one of the early settlers of Lee county. In 
early life the father learned the carpenter's and cabinetmaker's trades 
in his native land and continued to follow those occupations after com- 
ing to the new world. He took quite an active interest in public affairs 
and at one time served as alderman of the third ward of Fort Madi- 
son. He met with success in business afifairs and became the owner 
of some good property in this city. In religious faith he was a 
Lutheran. He married Christiana Rhode, also a native of Germany, 
and they became the parents of the following children: George 
G., a resident of Fort Madison; Charles, of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia; William, of St. Paul, Minnesota; Edward, deceased; Henry 
G., of this review; Albert, also deceased; Otto C; Catherine, de- 
ceased; Amelia, thewife of Henry Smith, of Fort Madison; Oscar, 
a resident of Washington, Pennsylvania; and Frederick. 



296 • HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Reared in Fort Madison, Henry G. Haessig is indebted to the 
public schools of this city for the educational privileges he enjoyed. 
In 1 88 1 he began learning the cigarmaker's trade and has since en- 
gaged in that occupation, having carried on business for himself 
along that line since January 9, 1897. He enjoys a good trade and 
now employs five hands in his factory. He also conducts a pool and 
billiard room. On the 13th of August, 1889, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Pauline A. Meiers, who was also born in this county 
and is a daughter of J. B. Meiers, now deceased. They have lost 
three children, namely: Marie, Catharine and Margaret. 

Mr. Haessig has taken quite an active and prominent part in 
military affairs, being identified with the state militia for seven vears. 
He entered the service as a private of Company F, Second Regi- 
ment, but was soon promoted to corporal, and was afterward made 
quartermaster, sergeant, first sergeant, second lieutenant and captain. 
He is a member of the Commercial Club, and one of the directors 
of the Fort Madison First Association. He is also identified with 
the Elks and the Eagles and casts his ballot with the democratic 
party. He was reared in the Lutheran church and stands high in 
the community where he has so long made his home. 



JOHN F. WALLJASPER. 

John F. Walljasper, a worthy native son and enterprising young 
citizen of Lee county, is already a factor in financial circles as cashier 
of The Farmers & Citizens State Bank of West Point. His birth 
occurred in that town on the 7th of February, 1890, his parents being 
John and Catherine (Hesse) Walljasper, who are still residents of 
West Point. The father is successfully engaged in the fire and life 
insurance business. To him and his wife have been born the follow- 
ing children:, John F., of this review; Joseph J., a young man of 
twenty-one, who is employed as a machinist by the Santa Fe Rail- 
way at Fort Madison; Mrs. Charles B. Supers, of Stuttgart, Arkan- 
sas, who has one son, Charles J. R., and whose husband conducts a 
large rice farm; and Cecilia and Helene, who are still under the 
parental roof. 

John F. Walljasper was reared at home and attended the parochial 
schools of West Point in the acquirement of an education. When a 
youth of thirteen he accepted the position of assistant manager at the 
local lumber yard, which was a branch of the S- & J. C. Atlee yards 




JOHN F. \'\ALLJASPER 



j}rl'hLl-: ; .cHARY 






HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 299 

at Fort Madison, ably serving in that capacity for four years. On 
the expiration of that period, in 1908, he became assistant cashier of 
the Farmers & Citizens Bank, of West Point, a private institution 
established in that year. In the spring of 1914 it was organized as 
The Farmers & Citizens State Bank, with a capital of twenty-five 
thousand dollars, and Mr. Walljasper was chosen cashier. In this 
position he has already demonstrated his ability and has won an 
enviable reputation as a capable and courteous official of the insti- 
tution. 

Mr. Walljasper gives his political allegiance to the democracy, 
while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in St. Mary's 
Catholic church of West Point. He has always resided in West 
Point and is widely recognized as one of the prosperous represent- 
ative and respected young men of the community. 



A. R. HEYING. 



The business spirit of the present age finds exemplification in 
A. R. Heying, who is now proprietor of a well-appointed furniture 
store of Fort Madison, an establishment with which the family name 
has been connected since the business, was organized. He was born 
in Rhineland, Missouri, November 21, 1883, a son of Henry and 
Clara (Scholeten) Heying, who came to Lee county in the year the 
Santa Fe Railroad was built through. The father embarked in the 
furniture business on Front street, and subsequently removed his 
store to the corner of Second and Chestnut streets. In 1903 he erected 
a building at No. 919 Second street. This was a three-story brick 
structure and he used all three floors for his stock. In July, 1909, 
he retired, A. R. Heying succeeding to the business, of which he 
has since been proprietor. Through an extended period, however, 
the father was closely associated with commercial interests in Fort 
Madison and his business enterprise was a factor in the advance- 
ment of commercial activity and success. 

After attending the public schools of Fort Madison, A. R. Heying 
continued his education in Johnson's Business College and then went 
to Chicago, where he also spent a year as a student in a business 
college. He then joined his father in the conduct of the furniture 
business and has since been identified therewith, succeeding to the 
ownership and control upon his father's retirement. He carries house 
furnishings of all description and has a large and well selected stock. 



Vol. II.— 17 



300 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

which prepares him to meet every demand of the public. His store 
is attractive in its arrangement and appearance and the convenience 
and wishes of the patrons are studied in his dealings with the public. 
His prices are reasonable, his methods honorable and his success is, 
therefore, assured. 

On the 27th of June, 1910, Mr. Heying was united in marriage 
to Miss May Loveless, of Fort Madison, and theirs is a pleasant 
and hospitable home, in which their many friends delight to gather. 
Mr. Heying is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and the Loyal Order of Moose. He holds membership in the Com- 
mercial Club and in the Fort Madison First Club, and is interested 
in all movements for the benefit, upbuilding and progress of the city. 
In politics he is independent, nor has he ever sought or desired office, 
preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, which, 
well conducted, are now bringing him substantial success. 



STEPHEN H. JOHNSTON. 

Stephen H. Johnston, who for years has tilled the off.ce of city 
assessor, his lovalty to the trust reposed in him being evidenced by 
the faithful and prompt performance of his duties, was born in 
Tompkins countv. New York, April 12, 1840, his parents being Wil- 
liam and Amy E. (Parker) Johnston. He was the fifth in order 
of birth in a family of ten children and in his early vouth he attended 
the public schools near his father's home. Ambitious to enjov better 
educational opportunities, he earned money that enabled him to at- 
tend Ithaca Academv and the New York Methodist Episcopal Con- 
ference Seminary at Charlotteville, Schoharie county. New York. 
From early youth his life was one of unremitting and earnest toil. 
He worked as a farm hand and when eighteen years of age began 
teaching school, boarding around among the pupils and receiving 
a salarv of eighteen dollars per month. He has always kept in touch 
with the c]uestions of the day, and by reading, observation and expe- 
rience has become a well-informed man. 

In the spring of i860 Mr. Johnston left New York and came to 
the middle west, settling first at De Kalb, Illinois. He was there 
residing at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war, when he en- 
listed for service in Company G of the Fifty-eighth Illinois Infantry. 
He taught in the winter of i860 and it was not until the fall of the 
following year that he offered his services to the government in 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 301 

defense of the Union cause. In March, 1862, he went to Tennes- 
see with his command and in the battle of Shiloh was taken prisoner. 
He was then sent to Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where after some time 
he was exchanged. He suffered all of the indignities and hardships 
of prison life. There were absolutely no comforts for the soldiers 
and the fare was very poor. Mr. Johnston now has in his possession 
a charm which he made while in prison from a mule bone from 
which he had eaten the meat. In 1863 he became hospital steward 
in St. Louis and, after learning the duties of the position, he was 
transferred to Keokuk, where he did splendid service on behalf of 
the sick and wounded. There he was at length discharged by order 
of the war department on the 25th of August, 1865. He made his 
home in Keokuk and took up the study of law, but never engaged 
in active practice. During much of his life he has carried on busi- 
ness as a collector and in 1870 he was elected to the office of city 
collector. Six years ago he was chosen city assessor and still fills 
the position in a most creditable manner. 

On the 24th of August, 1869, Mr. Johnston was united in mar- 
riage to Mrs. Mary A. Wylde, of Richmond, Indiana, and unto 
them were born three children: Frank M., a railroad man living in 
Boone, Iowa; Mrs. Amy E. Pulliam, deceased; and Stephen Mow- 
ray, a minister of the Methodist Protestant church at Selma, Iowa. 

Mr. Johnston belongs to Torrence Post, G. A. R., in which for 
twenty-two years he has served as adjutant. In 1864 he joined the 
Masonic lodge and has ever been loyal to the teachings of the craft, 
which is based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness. He 
attends the services of the Baptist church, of which his wife is a 
member. They are well known in Keokuk, where they have resided 
throughout the entire period of their married lives. The hospitality 
of the best homes is freely accorded them and they have a large 
circle of warm friends. 



REV. PETER HOFFMAN. 

A well-known representative of the Catholic priesthood in eastern 
Iowa is the Rev. Peter Hoffman, who was born in Dubuque county, 
on the iith of January, 1862, and is now devoting his life to the 
work of the church as the pastor of Sacred Heart. His parents were 
Nicholas and Anna Hoffman, natives of the grand duchy of Luxem- 
burg, who left that country in 1854 and, crossing the Atlantic, made 



302 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

their way to Iowa. The father followed farming as a life work 
and thus provided for his family, but both he and his wife are now 
deceased. 

Rev. Peter Hofifman pursued his early education in the parochial 
schools of St. Donatus, Iowa, afterward attending St. Joseph College 
at Dubuque and the St. Francis Seminary at Milwaukee. He pur- 
sued his theological course in St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore and 
was ordained to the priesthood on the 26th of May, 1888, since which 
time his life has been given to his chosen work. For four years he 
had charge of a church at West Burlington, Iowa, and in 1893 came 
to Fort Madison, where he has since remained. The cause of 
Catholicism has grown under his guidance and substantial evidence 
of his work is seen in the improvement upon the church property 
and in other ways. Sacred Heart church, of which he is the pastor, 
was established July 7, 1893, ^"'-^ services were originally held in 
the schoolhouse. In 1900 the present church edifice was erected 
at a cost of fifty thousand dollars. 

In 1912 the Sacred Heart Hospital was built and furnished, 
through his efiforts, at a cost of fifty thousand dollars, being financed by 
the Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis of Peoria. It contains 
thirty-six rooms and is most modern in all the equipments. The 
school was started in August, 1893, '^"d has since been continually 
conducted, the dedication taking place on the 8th of December, 1893. 
The parish was started with one hundred families and now there are 
one hundred and fifty-five. There are two hundred and twenty en- 
rolled pupils in the school, under the guidance of six teachers. Work 
up to and including the ninth grade is given and there is also a 
business course. The school is conducted by the Sisters of Notre 
Dame. The various branches of church work are well organized 
and the influence of Catholicism has constantly broadened. 



ALVA H. SATTERLY. 

Alva H. Satterly is a retired farmer residing upon his finely 
improved place of two hundred and forty acres of land in Harrison 
township. His farm has three sets of improvements and is now oper- 
ated by his son, Roy A. Satterly. The subject of this review was 
born July 17, 1845, a son of Sylvester and Eleanor (Norris) Sat- 
terly, who are mentioned at length in the sketch of Sylvester Hugh 
Satterly. He was reared in Harrison township and has always made 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 303 

it his place of residence. He completed a course in the common 
schools and during the fall of 1869 attended Denmark Academy. 

After leaving school Mr. Satterly farmed with his brother upon 
the home place for some time, and when he started out on his inde- 
pendent business career he decided to follow agriculture. His father 
was a wagonmaker and he had worked with liim at that trade for 
one year, but found it less congenial than farming. The first land 
Alva H. Satterly owned was eighty acres, which was a part of his 
father's estate, and twenty acres of timber land. When the place 
came into his possession it was unimproved and he has made all 
of the improvements thereon. He has purchased other land until 
he now owns two hundred and forty acres, now under a high state 
of cultivation and provided with all buildings and machinery needed 
in modern farming. His practical knowledge of agriculture and 
his industrious application of that knowledge brought him a gratify- 
ing return and he is now able to live retired. 

Mr. Satterly was married August 23, 1882, to Miss Gertrude J. 
Knapp, a native of Putnam county, New York, born January 22, . 
1849. Her parents were Newton and Margaret (Wright) Knapp, 
who came to Lee county, Iowa, in June, i860, and located in the 
northeastern part of Harrison township. Her mother passed away 
in 1867, but her father survived until December, 1885, when he died 
at the age of sixty years on a farm he owned in Wayne county, near 
Allerton, Iowa. Mrs. Satterly is the eldest in a family of eight 
children. Annie Mary became the wife of Lewis Kelly, of Allerton, 
and passed away in 1907; Sadie gave her hand in marriage to Frank 
Seward, who died in June, 1886, leaving four sons and one daugh- 
ter. His widow resides at Corydon, Iowa, with her daughter. Emma 
K. married Henry J. Foster, and both are deceased; Jessie is now 
Mrs. William Secrest, and resides six miles south of Allerton; Frank 
Knapp lives near Chillicothe, Missouri; Reuben J is a ranchman 
of Montana; William is a farmer living in the vicinity of Allerton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Satterly became the parents of two children, of 
whom the younger, a daughter, born November 24, 1889, died in 
infancy. The son, Roy A., was born July 8, 1883, and on the 22d 
of February, 1906, married Miss Lizzie Neu, who died September 
22, 191 2, leaving two children, Frederick and Margaret, who live 
with their grandparents. Roy A. Satterly is operating his father's 
homestead. 

The subject of this review is a republican in politics and takes 
a keen interest in all matters of public concern. He is particularly 
active in school matters and has served as secretary of his school 



304 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

district for the past twenty-six years and also served for five years 
in the district where he resided previous to removing to his present 
home. He and his wife are members of the First Baptist church 
of Farmington and can be counted upon to further all movements 
inaugurated for the improvement of the community. 



F. E. STERNBERG. 



F. E. Sternberg is senior partner of the firm of Sternberg & 
Lohman of Fort Madison, conducting a business that he established 
on the 15th of May, 1894. low^a claims him as a native son, his birth 
having occurred in Des Moines on the 23d of May, 1869, his parents 
being Lambert and Rosa (Fabian) Sternberg. The father came 
to Iowa in 1855 and settled in the vicinity of Des Moines, where he 
followed the occupation of farming. He is still living at the ripe 
old age of seventy-si.\ vears. 

F. E. Sternberg had the advantage of a three years' course in the 
Indianola Seminary, following the period which he spent in the 
public schools, and thus was well qualified for the practical duties 
of life Vv-hen he started out in the business world on his own account. 
Subsequently he engaged in the grocery business in Des Moines but 
eventually sold out, having in 1893 graduated from the United States 
College of Embalming, in New York. Having thus prepared for 
the undertaking business, he located in Fort Madison in 1894 2nd 
opened his present establishment with Charles Kistner as a partner. 
Not long afterward he purchased his partner's interest and was alone 
until the loth of January, 1909, when George Lohman became asso- 
ciated with him in the ownership of the business, the firm being 
known as Sternberg & Lohman. Mr. Sternberg opened his under- 
taking parlors at No. 739 Front street, where he remained for eight 
years, after which he removed to No. 721 Front street, where he con- 
tinued for eleven and one-half years. On the 25th of October, 1913, 
he removed to his present place, which is at No. 621 Second street. 
He has splendidly equipped undertaking parlors, carrying a fine 
line of caskets and undertaking goods, and his reasonable prices and 
lionorable methods, together with the tact and kindliness which he 
displays in conducting funerals has secured for him a liberal pat- 
ronage. 

In 1895 Mr. Sternberg was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
Haessig, of Fort Madison, a daughter of Jacob Haessig, an early 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 305 

settler of Lee county. Mr. Sternberg is well known in. fraternal 
connections. He is a very prominent Mason, having taken the Knight 
Templar degree of the York Rite and the thirty-second degree of 
the Scottish Rite. He is a past master of the blue lodge, past eminent 
commander of the commandery, and he has crossed the sands of the 
desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also identified 
with the Elks, while his religious faith is that of the German Evan- 
gelical church and his political belief that of the democratic party. 
His interests are wide and varied and indicate the substantial sup- 
port of many measures and movements for the general good. He 
deserves much credit for what he has accomplished as it has been 
through his own efforts that he has reached his present position. 
He is now at the head of a business that is gratifying, and his energy 
and determination are unfaltering. He is well known in commercial 
circles of the city and wherever known is highly esteemed. 



A. W. SALLANDER. 



A. W. Sallander, well known in connection with the automobile 
trade in Fort Madison, sold the first motor car of this city and in 
1903 opened a garage. He was born in Sweden on the 17th of Janu- 
ary, 1862, and after spending the first eighteen years of his life in 
the land of his nativity bade adieu to friends and the companions 
of his youth and sailed for America, thinking to have better oppor- 
tunities in the new world. It was in May, 1880, that he arrived in 
the United States, settling in Pulaski county, Missouri, where he 
remained for six months. He was a machinist bv trade and was em- 
ployed in various places. He worked for a time in Burlington, Iowa, 
and it was during his residence there that he was married. 

In 1890 Mr. Sallander came to Lee county and was employed in 
the Santa Fe Railway shops at Fort Madison. Mechanically inclined 
and developing his native powers along that direction, he has been 
able to cope with any mechanical problem and thus has steadily ad- 
vanced. In 1897 he opened a bicycle shop at Fort Madison and 
continued in that business for some years, when the bicycle trade 
was at its height. In 1903 he opened a garage and manifested much 
interest in the invention and development of the motor car. Orig- 
inally he handled the Oldsmobile, afterward the Cadillac and is now 
dealing in Buick cars. He has sold a large number of automobiles 
in this section of the country, and his business is now one of gratify- 



306 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ing proportions. His garage is situated at Nos. 631-35 Front street, 
and he is ready to make all repairs upon cars, while as a salesman he 
is doing a good business in representing the car which he handles. 

On the 27th of October, 1886, Mr. Sallander was married, m 
Burlington, to Miss Pauline Bergquist, of that city, and they have 
three children: Louisa, a teacher in the schools of the state of Wash- 
ington; Fred W., who is a practicing physician, now acting as as- 
sistant to Dr. Dean of Iowa City; and Robert P., an osteopath, who 
married Miss Dorothy Roberts. Mr. Sallander is a member of the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and in politics is a republican 
where national- issues are involved, but casts an independent local 
ballot. His life record indicates what may be accomplished when 
determination and energy lead the way. He has never had occasion 
to regret his decision to come to America; on the contrary, he has 
found the opportunities which he has sought and gradually progress- 
ing has gained a place among the substantial business men of his city. 



HON. CONRAD SCHWEER. 

The death of the Hon. Conrad Schweer, which occurred Sep- 
tember II, 1894, ^^'^s the occasion of widespread regret, as he was 
one of the prominent and highly respected citizens of Lee county. 
He was a man of note in public affairs, having served in the four- 
teenth and fifteenth general assemblies of Iowa as well as being 
influential in local politics. He was an extensive landowner and 
did much to aid in the agricultural development of the county. 

Mr. Schweer was a German by birth, born in Hanover, February 
6, 1825, a son of Christopher and Dora Schweer. He was the last 
survivor in a family of four sons and three daughters. In 1835 
the father came to the United States, making his way up the Mis- 
sissippi river to a point above St. Louis, where he purchased land 
in Lewis county, Missouri. He remained there until April, 1836, at 
which time he came to Lee county, Iowa, taking up a claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres of land. He subsequently returned to Mis- 
souri, but remained there only a short time, when he came again 
to Lee county in the spring of 1837 and began improving his land. 
He prospered and in June, 1838, returned to Germany for his wife 
and children, the family shipping from Bremen October 8th of that 
year on a sailing vessel bound for New Orleans. The voyage was 
made in safetv, and on the 4th of March, 1839, they arrived in 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 307 

Alexandria, Missouri, at which point they disembarked and pro- 
ceeded to the claim by wagon. The father was a great fruit enthu- 
siast and started the first nursery in Lee county. He brought trees 
with him from Germany, but the cold climate here killed most of 
them. He hauled his wheat to Keokuk, but prices were then so low 
that he received often no more than twenty-five cents a bushel. He 
was an active member of the Evangelical Lutheran church, as was 
also his wife. He passed away in 1886 when he was about ninety- 
one years of age, his birth having occurred October 17, 1795. He 
had survived his wife for many years, as she died October 9, 1859. 

Conrad Schweer attended school in Germany and also in a 
pioneer log school house in Lee county. He did his share of the 
work on the farm while a boy and after he grew to manhood con- 
tinued to devote much time and attention to agriculture. He became 
the owner of six hundred and ninety-three acres of fertile land in 
this county, residing on section 27, Harrison township. Although 
his farming interests were extensive, they did not monopolize his 
time and he took an active and prominent part in politics and govern- 
mental affairs. He represented his district in the fourteenth and 
fifteenth general assemblies, voting in support of many measures 
which proved to be of great benefit to the people at large. He also 
held many local offices, discharging all duties incumbent upon him 
with dispatch and efficiency. 

Mr. Schweer was married to Miss Sophia Klinder on the 24th 
of June, 1853. She was a native of Hanover, Germany, born No- 
vember 14, 1830, and has also passed to her reward. They became 
the parents of seven children, as follows : Charles resides at Spokane, 
Washington, where he is engaged in fruit raising. He is married 
and has several children. Mary passed away in 1886 at the age of 
twenty-nine years. She was the wife of Frederick Vornkahl, a 
resident of Lee county, and left four children. Louis H. is a farmer 
and stock-raiser of Harrison township and a sketch of his life appears 
elsewhere in this work. Martha resides at Salem, Oregon, and is 
the wife of Adolph Leisy, a blacksmith by trade. Sophia married 
Martin Scheuerman, a farmer residing in the vicinity of Primrose. 
Christopher passed away when about thirty years of age. Conrad, 
Jr., who was born in 1870, died in December, 191 1, leaving a widow. 

Mr. Schweer was a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church 
and a stanch democrat in his political allegiance. His extensive 
farm has been divided among his children and a part has been sold 
by them. Aside from the material wealth which their father left 
them, thev received from him the priceless heritage of a name hon- 



308 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ored and respected by all. The official record and the private life 
of Mr. Schweer were alike above reproach and his many friends 
were bound to him by his integrity and his kindness of heart. 



GEORGE LOHMAN. 

George Lohman, a well-known undertaker of Fort Madison, 
now engaged in business as a partner of F. E. Sternberg, was born 
in Lee county, March 23, 1862, his parents being Harmon and 
Catherine (Schiesbrock) Lohman. The latter was a daughter of 
Christ Schiesbrock, who brought his family to Lee county in 1859, 
becoming one of the early settlers. In the same year Harmon Loh- 
man arrived. All came from Germany on the same ship, crossing 
the Atlantic in a sailing vessel which was seventeen weeks in com- 
pleting the voyage. They landed at New Orleans and thence made 
their way up the river, settling at West Point, Iowa. The party 
was brought to this country by Harmon Schulte, who had interests 
here. For an extended period Harmon Lohman continued his resi- 
dence in Lee county, but has now passed away. His widow, how- 
ever, survives. 

• George Lohman acquired a parochial-school education and in his 
youth learned the painter's trade and also that of basketmaking, fol- 
lowing the latter in the winter seasons, while the summer months 
were devoted to the former occupation. He was thus engaged for 
fifteen years. He and his father and brother have made hundreds 
of dozens of willow baskets, having one of the largest business enter- 
prises of the kind in the county. In 1896 George Lohman pursued 
a course in Clark's School of Embalming at Burlington, Iowa, and 
also at the Hohenschuh-Carpenter School of Embalming at Des 
Moines. He now has both an Iowa and Illinois license. He em- 
barked in the undertaking business in 1896 at Fort Madison in con- 
nection with Henry Kuhn, the partnership continuing for a year and 
a half. On the expiration of that period he withdrew from that 
connection and built a place of his own at No. 1322 Fifth street, 
where he continued in business alone for five years. He was then 
with O. R. Johnson for seven years, and in 1909 he became a partner 
of F. E. Sternberg, forming the present well-known firm of Stern- 
berg & Lohman, occupying a leading position among the under- 
takers of Lee county. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 309 

In 1892 Mr. Lohman was united in marriage to Miss Therese 
Nelle, of Fort Madison, who was born in the city which is still her 
home and is a daughter of Herman Nelle, one of the old settlers of 
this county. Mr. and Mrs. Lohman had two children: Fred, at 
home; and Rhinehulda, who died at the age of two and one-half 
years. The parents are members of St. Mary's Catholic church, and 
Mr. Lohman is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. In politics he is a demo- 
crat, and for four years he served as coroner of Lee county. Other- 
wise he has never sought or desired office, preferring to concentrate 
his energies upon his business afifairs which, capably conducted, have 
brought him a substantial measure of success. 



LOUIS H. SCHWEER. 

Louis H. Schweer is a farmer and stock-raiser residing on sec- 
tion 27, Harrison township, this county, and was born upon the farm 
where he now resides. His birth occurred September 13, 1858, his 
father being the Hon. Conrad Schweer, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. Mr. Schweer of this review was reared upon 
the homestead and is indebted to the public-school system for his 
education. His experience as a farm boy in assisting with the work 
of the homestead convinced him that agriculture was a congenial 
occupation and he has continued to farm since coming to mature 
years. He owns four hundred and forty acres of fine land, four 
hundred and twenty of which is a part of the land formerly owned 
by his father. The farm was in excellent condition when it came 
into his possession and he has kept it up and added still other im- 
provements, so that it is now one of the most valuable farming prop- 
erties in the county. He derives a gratifying annual income from 
his place and has never had any cause to regret his decision to devote 
his life to agriculture. 

Mr. Schweer was married in 1885 to Miss Emma E. Leisy, who 
was born in Keokuk, February 20, 1864, a daughter of Jacob and 
Elizabeth Leisy. Her father engaged in farming in Franklin town- 
ship during his lifetime, his demise occurring about 1894. His 
widow survived him for a number of years, dying in November, 
1913. Mr. and Mrs. Schweer became the parents of eight children, 
of whom five survive. Erna Hulda, Edward William, Erich Conrad, 
Paul Jonathan and Walter Louis are all at home. Sophia Emma 



310 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

passed away March 4, 191 1, at the age of eighteen years. Ida, who 
was born April 2, 1896, died September 5, 1898. Harold Jacob, 
who was born February 22, 1904, died January 23, 1905. 

The family are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church 
of Primrose and faithfully attend its services. Mr. Schweer is a 
democrat in his political allegiance and has served in a number of 
local and township offices and has been a delegate to a number of 
county conventions of his party. His father was one of the pioneers 
and also one of the prominent men of Lee county and the subject of 
this review is ably upholding the honor and dignity of the familv 
name, his ability and manly qualities of character winning him the 
respect and honor of all who know him. 



C. F. McFARLAND. 



C. F. McFarland has been a resident of Keokuk since 1895 and 
has achieved enviable prominence as a business man and citizen. He 
is a native of Chicopee, Massachusetts, born June 19, 1861, a son of 
Corey and Mary (Woodcock) McFarland. After his primary 
schooling he entered Amherst College, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1883. For a number of years thereafter he was engaged 
in several business undertakings at various places. He was identified 
with the flour milling industry at St. Louis, Missouri; Memphis, 
Tennessee, and Charleston, Illinois. From the last named place he 
came to Keokuk, Iowa, as half owner of the paper supply house of 
William Rees & Company, a concern that had to struggle for a foot- 
hold in the commercial world owing to unscrupulous competitors who 
had taken advantage of the fact that the company had not protected 
its rights to valuable inventions. With the passing of years, however, 
the Rees & McFarland Company prospered, and in 1905 the entire 
business passed to the ownership of Mr. McFarland, who, under the 
name of the McFarland Paper Company, now conducts an extensive 
and profitable enterprise. 

During the memorable revival of 1904, held in Keokuk by Rev. 
W. A. Sunday, Mr. McFarland was converted to Christianitv. From 
that time he has felt called upon to tell to others what the Master 
has done for him, and he has thus brought hundreds to Christ. As a 
speaker he is eloquent, and his direct talk is of the most convincing 
character. It has been his endeavor to teach practical Christianity 
as applied to business and everyday life. Among the manv more 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 3ii 

notable places where he held meetings were Muscatine and Ottumwa, 
in Iowa, and Springfield and Galesburg, in Illinois. Perhaps the 
meeting he addressed in his old home town of Charleston, Illinois, is 
dearest to his recollection. To a concourse of four thousand people 
there he was a living exemplification of the change of a wholly 
worldly man to the broader and purer life of the true Christian 
gentleman. 

In 1887, at Memphis, Tennessee, Mr. McFarland was united in 
marriage to Miss Mamie D. Fizer. Her father, John C. Fizer, was 
a general of the Confederate army during the Civil war and a man 
endeared to the Southland for his deeds of bravery on the field of 
battle and his equal courage in times of peace. It was his keen fore- 
sight at the battle of Fredericksburg that saved the day for the Con- 
federate cause. When the war closed he had but one arm, the other 
having been left on the battlefield of Knoxville. The sword of 
General Fizer, which, singularly enough, was made by Mr. McFar- 
land's father at Chicopee, Massachusetts, occupies a conspicuous place 
in the home of our subject. Mr. and Mrs. McFarland have one son, 
Malcolm, who is a government inspector stationed at Rock Island. 
They are popular in social circles and have a host of friends who 
enjoy the hospitality of their attractive home. 



J. G. H. STELLERN. 



y. G. H. Stellern, who was long identified with the business and 
industrial interests of Fort Madison, but is now living retired here, 
was born in Prussia, Germany, on the 25th of December, 1830, a 
son of John Bernhard and Elizabeth Stellern. His father died in 
that country when our subject was only eight years of age and in 
1844 the mother brought her family to the new world. They lo- 
cated in St. Louis, Missouri, where she passed away in 1850. By 
occupation the father was a farmer. J. G. H. Stellern was the fifth 
in order of birth in a family of several children, four of whom accom- 
panied the mother on her removal to the United States, these be- 
ing John. Christina, J. G. H. and Richard. Joseph started with 
them, but died at sea, while Henry, who was serving as a soldier in 
the German army, did not come until eighteen months later. All 
are now deceased except the subject of this review. 

|. G. H. Stellern was only thirteen years of age when the family 
settled in St. Louis and about a year later he began learning the 



312 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

brick maker's trade, which he foUovved until he removed to Lee 
county, Iowa, in 1869. Here he located on a farm in West Point 
township and for two years devoted his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits, but at the end of that time removed to Fort Madison, where 
he has since made his home. He purchased a half interest in the 
bottling works of Frank Hesse, being in partnership with Barney 
Bellman, who died two months later. Mr. Stellern was then alone 
in business until 1902, when he was succeeded by his son, Frank. He 
now lives retired. 

While living in St. Louis, Mr. Stellern was married, November 
7, 1857, to Miss Charlotte Knippschild, who was also a native of 
Prussia, born August q, 1836, and was twenty years of age when she 
came to the new world. By this union were born the following chil- 
dren: Emma, now the wife of George H. Van Tilburg, of St. 
Louis; Joseph, a resident of Fort Madison, Iowa; Henry, of Wash- 
ington township, this county; Ida, the wife of William Dues, of Fort 
Madison; Clara, the wife of George Haessig, of Fort Madison; 
Frances, at home; Frank, who is mentioned below; Rose, the wife 
of H. D. Lawrence, of Fort Madison; Albert, who died at the age of 
eighteen years in 1891 ; and Charles, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Stellern gives his political support to the democratic party 
and in religious faith is a Catholic. During his long residence in 
Fort Madison he has made many warm friends and is highly re- 
spected and esteemed by all who know him. 



FRANK STELLERN. 



Frank Stellern, now at the head of the Stellern Bottling Works of 
Fort Madison, is an enterprising and progressive business man who 
stands high in the esteem of all who know him. He was born in Lee 
county, Iowa, February 17, 1872, and is a son of J. G. H. Stellern, 
whose sketch appears above. At the usual age he entered the public 
schools and continued his education until he was fourteen, when he 
began work in the bottling works of his father. He has since been 
identified with the business and is thoroughly conversant with the 
trade in all its departments. Since 1902 he has been sole owner and 
manager. He manufactures flavored soda waters of all kinds aild 
cmplovs on an average of six hands. He not only has built up a 
good business in Fort Madison, but ships his product to other towns 
and vicinity. Fraternally he is an honored member of the Elks, the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 313 

Eagles, the Moose and St. Joseph's Society, and by his ballot he sup- 
ports the men and measures of the democratic party. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in St. Mary's Roman Catholic 
church. 



J. H. AXT. 



For more than a quarter of a century J. H. Axt has been well 
known in business circles of Fort Madison as the proprietor of a drug 
store. His is a well appointed establishment, in which he carries a 
large and carefully selected line of drugs and druggists' sundries, 
and the neat and attractive arrangement combined with the reliable 
business methods of the proprietor have secured him a gratifying and 
growing trade. 

Mr. Axt was born in Fort Madison, July 20, 1857, a son of Charles 
and Elizabeth Axt, the father a native of the kingdom of Prussia, 
while the mother's birth occurred in Germany. She came to Fort 
Madison in the '40s and Charles Axt arrived about 1848, so that their 
marriage was celebrated in Lee county. The father was a blacksmith 
and carriage maker and continued along those lines for many years, 
or until the time of his death, which occurred in 1858. His widow 
long survived him, passing away in 1904. They had a family of six 
children, of whom four are deceased. 

J. H. Axt was reared in his native city and attended the private 
school conducted here by Wm. H. Pearson and his daughters and 
later was for two years a student in the Fort Madison Academy, which 
was a prosperous educational institution of this city at one time. 
When a young man he embarked in the drug business, securing em- 
ployment along that line about 1872. For fifteen years he remained 
in the service of others and in 1887 opened a store of his own, of 
which he has since been the proprietor. His active connection with 
the drug trade covers about forty-two years and his name has become 
almost a synonym for business of this character in Fort Madison. 
The Axt Drug Store is one of what is known as the Rexall stores, of 
which there are about seven thousand. They are always considered 
the leaders in their respective cities and each one must pass a rigid 
examination before it is admitted into the United Drug Company of 
Boston, Massachusetts, the largest cooperative concern in this country. 

In 1894 ^^^- Axt was united in marriage to Miss Katherine Janse 
and they have a pleasant home in Fort Madison, where they have so 
long resided. Politically Mr. Axt is a republican, unfaltering in his 



314 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

allegiance to the party. He is a prominent Mason, holding member- 
ship in the lodge, the Knight Templar Commandery and in the 
Mystic Shrine, while he is also connected with the Elks. His relig- 
ious faith is that of the Episcopal church. His sterling traits of 
character, which are many, have won for him the high and enduring 
regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. If one 
wants to know aught of the history of Fort Madison they have but 
to ask Mr. Axt, for he has resided in this city for fifty-seven years 
and has. therefore, witnessed the greater part of its growth and de- 
velopment, seeing the many changes which have brought the city to 
its present condition of progress and prosperity. 



H. J. KENNEDY. 



A history of business activity in Fort Madison would be incom- 
plete were there failure to make reference to H. J. Kennedy, the 
capable, efficient and popular cashier of the German-American 
State Bank. He was born in Lee county, June i, 1868, and is a son 
of W. R. and Catherine (Stroble) Kennedy, who about the year 
1864 arrived in Lee county. Here the father, who was a contractor 
and builder, embarked in business and was identified with the ma- 
terial improvement of the city to a considerable extent for a number 
of years. He is now deceased but his widow still survives. 

H. J. Kennedy is the eldest of their three children. He supple- 
mented his public-school training by a course in the Denmark Acad- 
emy and in the West End Business College. In early life he learned 
and followed the carpenter's trade, his efforts being directed by his 
father, with whom he afterward entered into partnership, conduct- 
ing a contracting business for several years. He turned from indus- 
trial to commercial pursuits, however, in the establishment of a 
grocery and meat business with his brothers, and was engaged in 
that line for several years. He has been identified with the banking 
interests of Fort Madison since 191 3 and is cashier of the German- 
American State Bank, situated at the corner of Second and Pine 
streets. The president is Dr. Maurice Wahrer and E. T. Einspanjer 
is assistant cashier. The bank is capitalized for one hundred thou- 
sand dollars and its deposits amount to six hundred and forty-nine 
thousand six hundred and eighty dollars, while the undivided profits 
are five thousand six hundred dollars. The bank has enjoyed a 
rapid growth and is widely recognized as one of the strong financial 




H. J. KKXXKDV 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 317 

institutions of the county, having as its controlling board men of 
well-known business ability and enterprise, including Dr. Maurice 
Wahrer. B. B. Hesse, Jr., H. A. Skyles, A. H. Houston and A. H. 
Kennedy, all of Fort Madison; L. M. Kaser, of Niota, Illinois; 
and E. T. McKee, of Denmark, Iowa. As cashier of the bank since 
its organization Mr. Kennedy has contributed largely to its growth 
and prosperity. His familiarity with intricate and important finan- 
cial problems is well known and his ability is widely recognized. 

Mr. Kennedy was united in marriage to Miss Cora B. Commack, 
of West Point, Iowa, and to them has been born a daughter. Hazel 
E. The parents hold membership in the Presbyterian church and 
the hospitality of the best homes of the city is freely accorded them. 
Mr. Kennedy belongs to the Masonic fraternity and passing up 
through the York Rite has become a Knight Templar. He is also 
a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine and belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His 
political allegiance is given to the democratic party and he has been 
called by appointment and election to several ollices. In the fall of 
1906 he was appointed deputy county treasurer and filled that posi- 
tion for four years. He was then elected county treasurer in 19 10 
and was re-elected in 191 2, so that his connection with the office 
covered eight years. He was also alderman of the fifth ward for 
three years and exercised his official prerogatives in support of many 
movements for municipal progress and improvement. He acted 
as school director for six years and the cause of education has found 
in him a stalwart champion. He is justly accounted one of the 
representative business men of Fort Madison, and all who know 
him speak of him in terms of high regard, appreciating his relia- 
bility and honor in business, his loyalty and progressiveness in citi- 
zenship and his sterling worth in other relations. 



O. W. ROWE, D. V. S. 



Dr. O. W. Rowe, well known in Lee county as an unusually 
capable and thoroughly trained veterinarian, is practicing in Keokuk 
with an office on Blondeau, between Third and Fourth streets. He 
was born February 20, 1866, in Van Buren county, Iowa, and was 
one of the six children whose parents were Oliver and Melinda 
(Warner) Rowe. 



318 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

In his youthful days, Dr. Rowe attended the common schools 
of his native county and eventually became a public-school teacher, 
but owing to a natural aptitude and liking for veterinary practice he 
entered the veterinary . department of the Agricultural College at 
Ames, Iowa, and was there graduated on the completion of the regu- 
lar course in the class of 1898. He then practiced for a time in Van 
Buren county and in 1900, owing to the solicitation of various citi- 
zens of Lee county, he removed to Keokuk, where he has since fol- 
lowed his profession. He is familiar with every phase of veterinary 
practice and is recognized as a most capable and successful repre- 
sentative of the profession, which he has studied from both scientific 
and practical standpoints. He belongs to the College Veterinary 
Association and to the Iowa State Veterinarian Association, and he 
is continually promoting his knowledge through reading and in- 
vestigation. 

In 1892 was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Rowe and Miss Mary 
A. Perkins, a daughter of Austin Perkins, of Van Buren county, 
and unto them have been born the following children, namely, Finley 
B., Stanley B., Hazel June and Vera May. In his political views. 
Dr. Rowe is an earnest republican and recognizes the duties and 
obligations as well as the privileges of citizenship. He has always 
kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day and is in- 
terested generally in public afifairs of importance. At a recent date 
he was reappointed by Governor Clarke assistant state veterinarian. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and the Loyal 
Order of Moose and exemplifies in his life the underlying principles 
of those organizations. 



MARCUS E. RIDDLE. 

Marcus E. Riddle is a well known and representative farmer and 
stock-raiser, who owns and cultivates one hundred and twenty acres 
of land on section 32, Denmark township, in which township he has 
made his home since 1879. The excellent appearance of his place, 
its highly cultivated fields and substantial improvements are all 
indicative of the care and supervision which he bestows upon his 
farm. 

Mr. Riddle was born in Des Moines county, Iowa, September 8, 
iSqg, and is a son of Robert F. and Ruth (Walker) Riddle. The 
father was a native of Kentucky, born in 1833, and was a son of 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 319 

Ebenezer Riddle, Sr., whose birth occurred at Nashville, Tennessee, 
and who died in Denmark, Iowa, about thirty years go, at the age 
of seventy-five. He had made farming his life work and in the 
Black Hawk war he had rendered active service under Abraham 
Lincoln. His political allegiance was given to the democratic party. 
He came of Scotch ancestry, although the family has long been repre- 
sented on American soil. His son Robert F. Riddle was only a year 
old when the family removed from Kentucky to Adams County, Illi- 
nois, settling near Quincy. He there resided until he removed to 
Des Moines county, Iowa, where he lived until 1879, when he came 
to Lee county. For an extended period he owned and cultivated 
farms in Des Moines and Lee counties and was regarded as one of 
the leading argriculturists of those districts. He, too, voted the 
democratic ticket and his religious faith was that of the Methodist 
church. 

Robert F. Riddle wedded Ruth Walker, a native of Des Moines 
county, where her father, Henry Walker, had settled in pioneer times, 
entering a large amount of land from the government, and where 
he became an influential citizen. He had come from Indiana to 
Iowa and was one of the earliest settlers of this state. In its pioneer 
development he took an active part and his labors were of immense 
value in planting the seeds of civilization and progress. In the course 
of years he became a wealthy and prominent man of his section of 
the state and his name is indelibly inscribed on the pages of its history. 
He continued a resident of Des Moines county until his death and 
there reared his family of four sons and five daughters, most of whom 
reached years of maturity. Three of his sons were soldiers in the 
Civil war. His daughter Mrs. Ruth Riddle now resides in ^Michigan 
with a daughter and has reached the age of seventy-six years. She 
has a sister, Mrs. Chestnut, who is living at Wever, Iowa, and another 
sister, Mrs. Wilson, in Des Moines. Her husband, Robert F. Riddle, 
passed away in 1908, at his home in Denmark, when about seventy- 
five years of age. They were the parents of four sons and four 
daughters, of whom six are yet living. The family record is as fol- 
lows: George died in infancy. Tennis was engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness in California, where he died about 1900. Marcus E. is the third 
of the family. Douglas is a railroad man living in Cheyenne, 
Wyoming. Tillie became the wife of Charles Leverett and resides 
in Michigan, near Ann Arbor. Effie is the wife of Harry W. 
Houston, of Denmark township. Clara is the wife of Samuel Camp- 
bell, a resident of Gleason, Arizona, and Mrs. Charles Burton makes 
her home in Fort Madison. 



320 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Marcus E. Riddle, whose name introduces this review, was reared 
and educated in Des Moines and Lee counties and supplemented his 
public-school training by study in the Denmark Academy. He has 
always followed farming as a life work and has been at his present 
place of residence through the past fourteen years. The appearance 
of his place indicates the care and labor which he bestows upon the 
fields and the practical supervision which he gives to all departments 
of the farm work. He is an energetic man and his life has been one 
of usefulness and of untiring industry. He was married in Lee 
county, in 1901, to Mrs. Georgia Bennett, nee Leming, who was born 
near Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and came to Lee county in her girlhood 
with her mother and stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Ireland, who 
now reside at Dows, this state. By her first marriage Mrs. Riddle 
has one son, Lee Bennett, who is now nineteen years of age. He is a 
member of the United States navy, on the battleship Utah, and has 
been on rec:nt duty in Mexico. Mr. and Mrs. Riddle have three 
children, Robert .^L, Clarence and Katherine, aged respectively 
twelve, nine and six years. 

In his political views Mr. Riddle is a democrat and gives unfalter- 
ing allegiance to the principles of the party because of his firm belief 
therein. He and his wife are members of the Congregational church 
at Denmark and are loyal to its teachings and generous in its sup- 
port. Mr. Riddle is widely known in this section of the state, where 
he has lived from his boyhood days to the present, and the sterling 
traits of his character have ever been such as have won for him warm 
regard and confidence. 



GEORGE E. ROGERS., 

George E. Rogers is numbered amcjng the pioneer settlers and 
native sons of Lee county, his birth having occurred October 7, i8q8, 
upon the old home farm on section 15, township 68, range 3, or what 
is now known as Green Bay township, Lee countv. His parents were 
Milward H. and Susan (Johnson) Rogers. The former was born in 
London, England, March 19, 18 19, and was of Welsh parentage. 
He learned the Welsh language, for it was spoken in his parents', 
Thomas and Elizabeth Rogers, home. He spent his childhood in 
London and accompanied his parents on their emigration to New 
York in 1832 and in the spring of 1833 the family journeyed westward 
to Delaware county, Ohio. Thomas Rogers was not long permitted 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 321 

to enjoy his home, for his death occurred in September, 1833. His 
widow survived him for forty-nine years and died at the home of 
her son Milward H. in Lee county at the very advanced age of ninety- 
one years. By her marriage she had become the mother of three sons 
and two daughters, Thomas, Milward H., Henry, Elizabeth Borden 
and one whose name is not remembered. 

Milward H. Rogers was a youth of thirteen years when the family 
came to the new world. His parents removed to Delaware county, 
Ohio, in 1833 ^"^^ ^" 1840 he came to this state, establishing his home 
in Green Bay township. For a few years he rented land and then 
purchased what was known as Big Island in the Mississippi river. 
There he conducted a wood yard, furnishing wood for fuel to the 
steamboats that plied up and down the Mississippi. In 185 1 he 
purchased land on section 15, Green Bay township. At one time 
he rode from Lee county to Fairfield, Iowa, on horseback, a dis- 
tance of about one hundred and twenty-five miles, to enter his land 
at the land office there. After purchasing his farm on section 15, 
Green Bay township, he devoted his remaining days to general 
agricultural pursuits and from time to time added to his holdings 
until he was the owner of fourteen hundred and sixty-five acres in 
the same township, all productive land. In fact, it was among the 
best in the state, being bottom land, splendidly adapted to grain 
raising. He prospered as the years went on and upon his farm 
erected a fine brick house. He was a friend of progress, was thor- 
oughly up-to-date in all of his methods and in the management of 
his business affairs displayed splendid ability and undaunted enter- 
prise. 

Mr. Rogers not only carefully and systematically cultivated his 
fields but also engaged actively in church work, being a local preacher 
and elder in the Christian church. In politics he was a lifelong 
democrat and served as county drain commissioner, as county super- 
visor and as justice of the peace for many years. It was his plan 
and purpose when possible to settle all cases that came before him out 
of court. He always advocated arbitration and sought to bring peace 
to those who wished to enter into litigation. From the time of his 
marriage until his death he lived continuously in Green Bay town- 
ship and there was no resident within its borders who more fully 
enjoyed or merited the high regard and confidence of his fellow 
citizens. It was on the 19th of December, igoo, that Mr. Rogers 
passed away. He had lived to celebrate his fiftieth wedding anni- 
versary, for he was married on the 24th of March, 1842, to Miss 
Susan Johnson, who was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, on the 21st 



322 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

of October, 1819. She passed away a few months before her hus- 
band's death, her demise occurring May 21, 1900. She was the second 
in a family of six children and had come to Lee county on the 
19th of June, 1840, in company with her parents, Shepherd and Ann 
(McDaniel) Johnson, the former a native of Long Island, New 
York, and the latter of Pennsylvania. Both lived in Iowa until called 
to their final rest. The father, however, died September 19, 1840, 
only two weeks after his arrival in Green Bay township. His wife 
survived him for four years, her death occurring April 23, 1844, 
at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Rogers. Unto Milward H. and 
Susan (Johnson) Rogers there were born eight children : Milward 
H., now living in Alberta, Canada; Johnson, whose home is in 
Green Bay township; George E. ; Arthur, who is living near Red 
Deer, Alberta, Canada; Milward S., who died in infancy; Monroe, 
who passed away at the age of twenty-five years; Rebecca, who died 
at the age of three years ; and Thomas, who died in childhood. 

George E. Rogers has been a lifelong resident of Green Bay town- 
ship and followed farming until October, 1913, when he removed to 
Wever. He then disposed of two hundred and forty acres of land 
among his children and now retains the ownership of one hundred 
acres. While in active business he largely engaged in raising grain 
and for twenty-four years he owned and operated a threshing machine. 
His work at all times was carefully and systematically done, and the 
neat and thrifty appearance of his place indicated his careful super- 
vision and his practical methods. 

On the 22d of March, 1880, Mr. Rogers was joined in wedlock to 
Miss Cordelia May Vogt, who was born in Hancock county, Illinois, 
near Nauvoo, on the i ith of October, i860. When she was five years 
of age her parents removed to Lee county, Iowa, settling in Montrose 
township, where she lived until her marriage. She is a daughter of 
Samuel H. and Elizabeth (McGregor) Vogt, the former born in 
Switzerland in 1835 and the latter in Coshocton county, Ohio, Sep- 
tember I, 1831. Mrs. Vogt went with her father to Illinois about 
1850 and when seventeen years of age Mr. Vogt had come from 
Switzerland to the new world, making his way direct to Nauvoo, 
Illinois, where he was married on the ist of January, 1857. Both he 
and his wife passed away in Green Bay township, his death occurring 
December i;, 1899, while his wife died on the 22d of February, 1903. 
They had three children: Mrs. Rogers; Anna, whcj died August 19, 
1 88 1, at the age of fifteen years; and James F., who died August i <;, 
1 88 1, at the age of thirteen years. Mr. and Mrs. Rogers have a 
family of four children. Roy V^., residing at Kramer, North Dakota, 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 323 

married Clara Kaeding, and they have three sons, Vance E., Donald 
F. and George R. Cora Elizabeth is the wife of William Sweeney, 
who occupies her father's farm in Green Bay township, and they have 
five children, George W., Millard, Edgar, Rosalie and Mildred. 
Frank K., residing on a part of the old homestead, married .Millie A. 
Liddle, and they have a daughter, Helen M. Charley Bruce mar- 
ried Cheryl B. Massie, and thev, too, occupy a part of the old home 
place. 

Mr. Rogers has been a lifelong democrat and at one time was a 
candidate for sherifif. He has held a number of township offices 
and has ever discharged his duties with promptness and fidelity. His 
wife is a member of the Christian church, and both are members of the 
Grange. Mr. Rogers belongs also to the Elks lodge at Fort Madi- 
son, is a Royal Arch Mason and is a member of both the subordinate 
lodge and encampment of Odd Fellows. His membership is in 
Wever Lodge, No. 552, I. O. O. F., and in the encampment at Fort 
Madison. He has passed through all of the chairs in the lodge and 
for four years was elected to represent his county in the grand lodge. 
His life has been one of unfaltering activity. He was early trained 
to habits of industry and economy, and his early experience consti- 
tuted the foundation upon which he has built his later success. For 
fifty-six years he has lived in Lee county, witnessing its growth and 
progress, and he takes great delight in what has been accomplished. 
While he has many pleasant recollections of pioneer times, he has 
no wish to return to the "good old days," which were fraught with 
many hardships and privations. The opportunities which came to 
him he has improved, and today he is numbered among the prosperous 
citizens of his native county. 



HARMON WILLIAM WENKE. • 

Harmon William Wenke, deceased, was for many years one of the 
leading farmers of Washington township, his home being on section 
25. He was born in Prussia, Germany, April 9, 1840, and was a son 
of John Theodore and Mary Elizabeth Wenke, who emigrated to the 
new world in 1847 and became residents of Lee county, Iowa. They 
spent the remainder of their lives upon a farm in Washington town- 
ship. In their family were the following children : Frank, who went 
to sea at the age of seventeen years and was never heard from again; 
William, deceased; Harmon, of this review; Benjamin, a resident of 



324 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Missouri; Mrs. Elizabetii Arens, deceased; and Mrs. Lena Albers, 
of Kansas. 

Harmon W. Wenke was only seven years of age when he crossed 
the Atlantic with his parents and became a resident of Lee county, 
Iowa. Here he was reared and educated in much the usual manner 
of farmer boys. When the Civil war broke out he was in Louisiana 
and was impressed in the Southern army, serving about nine months. 
At the end of that time he escaped and enlisted in the Northern 
army, becoming a member of Company C, Sixteenth Wisconsin 
Volunteer Infantry, with which he served until hostilities ceased. 
He received a bullet wound in each arm and was in a hospital for 
some time. After participating in many important engagements he 
was honorably discharged and returned to his home in this county. 
Here he followed farming throughout his active business life and 
became the owner of two hundred and fifty acres in Green Bay bot- 
toms and one hundred and fifty acres in the home place on the bluffs 
in Washington township, where his widow now resides. He erected 
a good residence upon his farm and made other improvements which 
added to its value and attractiveness. In connection with general 
farming he gave considerable attention to the raising of stock. 

On January 14, 1868, Mr. Wenke was united in marriage to Miss 
Louise Reichelt, also a native of Prussia, who was born August i, 
i8i;c, and came to this country with her parents at the age of seven 
vears. Her father, John Reichelt, was born in Prussia in 1820 and 
was there married to Marie Heince, whose birth occurred in 1824. 
On their emigration to America in 1857 they located upon a farm in 
Washington township, this county, where both died, the father m 
1876 and the mother in 1886. In his native land Mr. Reichelt had 
followed the brickrriaker's trade and after coming to this locality con- 
tinued to engage in that occupation in connection with farming, 
^establishing a brick yard here in 1865. He also owned and operated 
tvv'o hundred acres of land and became quite well-to-do. In politics 
he was a republican, and in religious faith a Catholic. His children 
were: John, now a resident of Chicago; Louise, now Mrs. Wenke; 
August, who lives on the home farm in Washington township; 
Frances, the wife of Hugo Artz, of the same township; Pauline, the 
wife of Samuel Boovier, of Denver, Colorado; Julius, also a farmer 
of Washington township; and Ida, the wife of Henry Wiebler, of 
Washington township. All of the children were born in Prussia with 
the exception of the last two, who were born in this county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wenke became the parents of ten children, as fol- 
lows: John, a resident of Washington township; August, who died at 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 325 

the age of eighteen years; Ida, the wife of James Tebbs of Fort 
Madison ; Frances, the wife of James Carney of Green Bay township ; 
Harmon, of Washington township; Marie, the wife of Benjamin 
Mansheim of the same township; Pauline, the wife of Henry Gibler 
of Washington township; Louise, at home; Julius, at home; and 
Josephine, the wife of Fred Schroeder of Washington township. 

After a useful and well spent life the father of this family passed 
away on Decoration Day, 1900. He was a devout member of St. 
Joseph's Catholic church of Fort Madison and by his ballot sup- 
ported the men and measures of the democratic party. His widow 
now occupies the old home farm, on section 25, Washington township, 
and the family is one of prominence in the community. 



MAJOR DAVID B. HAMILL. 

Major David B. Hamill belongs to one of the old and honored 
families of Lee county, where he has been a resident for over sixty- 
five years. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in March, 1843, 
and is a son of Smith and Nancy (McCandless) Hamill, of whom 
extended mention is made in another part of this work. He came 
here with his parents when six years of age and since the year 1852 
has been a resident of Keokuk. After completing his primary educa- 
tion in the public schools of that city, he took a course in Monmouth 
College at Monmouth, Illinois, and was then employed in his father's 
\vholesale grocery establishment in Keokuk. In 1864, when he was 
twenty-one years of age, he espoused the cause of the Union, ofifering 
his services to his country by enlisting in Company C, Forty-fifth 
Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He was mustered into service as first 
lieutenant and during most of the time of his enlistment was active 
captain of his company, continuing as such until honorably dis- 
charged. 

Mr. Hamill has since been identified with the S. Hamill 
Companv, wholesale grocers of Keokuk, whose establishment has 
ranked among the foremost business houses of the city for over sixty 
years. Mr. Hamill, although he is now past seventy-one years of 
age, is still very active in commercial afifairs and has proven himself 
throughout life a far-sighted, sagacious, enterprising and determined 
business man. While he has attained to individual success, he has 
ever been considerate of the interests of others and has made many 
sacrifices in order to promote the general welfare. 



326 • HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

In 1870 Major Hamill married Miss Louise M. Sullivan, of 
Evansville, Indiana, and they are parents of two daughters, Louise 
D. and Emily N., and a son. Smith. The family are communicants 
of the First Westminster Presbyterian church and have generously 
contributed to that organization. 

Mr. Hamill was commissioned major of the Iowa State Guard 
and is entitled to that prefix to his name. He is one of Keokuk's 
most enterprising citizens and has many friends, being admired for 
his simplicity of manner, the purity of his motives, his kindness 
toward his fellowmen and his public-spirited patriotism. By his 
activities he has brought honor to his city and in just retribution is 
honored by all those who know him. He is just and kind, determined 
and gentle, and, while he is most exacting in passing judgment upon 
any of his own actions, he is lenient in judging those of his fellow- 
men, ever ready to extend a helping hand to those who seek his help 
and whose burdens of life seem too heavy to carry. 



ERNEST LANGE. 



The attractive and well cultivated farm owned and operated by 
Ernest Lange on section 16, Green Bay township, testifies to his 
skill and ability in his chosen occupation. Like many of the leading 
citizens of this locality, his early home was on the other side of the 
Atlantic, for he was born in Prussia, Germany, on the 29th of Sep- 
tember, 1845, a son of Herman and Christina (Bettelthon) Lange. 
The father was born near Gultz, in Wunschendorf, Germany, in 1820, 
and the mother's birth occurred on the 2d of February, 1821. Decid- 
ing to try their fortune in the new world, they crossed the ocean 
and arrived in Burlington, Iowa, on the 4th of August, 1851. From 
there they proceeded by wagon to Fort Madison, and took up their 
abode upon a farm in Green Bay township, this county. 

Throughout his active business life Herman Lange followed farm- 
ing and became the owner of several hundred acres of very valuable 
and productive land. In connection with its cultivation he engaged 
in the buying and selling of cattle for a time and the success that he 
achieved was due entirely to his own unaided efforts, for he came to 
this country empty-handed. He died at the age of seventy-two years, 
but the mother of our subject still survives at the advanced age of 
ninety-three. He was a democrat in politics, and both he and his 
wife were members of the German Lutheran church. Their family 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 327 

numbered eight children as follows : Paulina, who is living with her 
mother; Ernest, of this review; Ernestina; Augusta, the wife of 
August Schubert, of Washington township; Robert, of Green Bay 
township; Anna, the wife of John Fletcher, of Dover, Iowa; Alice, 
the wife of John Meisel of Green Bay township; and Herman E., 
also a resident of that township. 

Since coming to this locality, in 1851, Ernest Lange has made his 
home in Green Bay township. He was only six years of age at the 
time of his arrival here and his education has therefore been acquired 
in the public schools of the county. Under the able direction of his 
father he soon became familiar with agricultural pursuits and since 
attaining manhood has followed farming with good success. He and 
his wife at one time owned one hundred and twenty-two acres, but 
have since disposed of a part of this to the Fower Company and now 
have ninety-five acres on section 16, Green Bay township, which he 
has placed under excellent cultivation. 

In 1876 Mr. Lange married Miss Allie Craig, who was born in 
Indiana in 1856 and came here with her parents when about six years 
old. Seven children were born of this union, namely: Clara, the 
wife of Charles Hunger of Burlington; Charles, a resident of Green 
Bay township; Robert, who died at the age of six years; Lydia, the 
wife of Samuel Tucker of Green Bay township; Hulda and Ernest, 
both at home; and Golda, now in Burlington. 

The democratic party finds in Mr. Lange a stanch supporter of 
its principles, and he has efficiently filled both school and road 
offices. He and his family hold membership in the Evangelical 
Lutheran church of Fort Madison, and he is also connected with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



SMITH HAMILL. 



Smith Hamill, who came to Lee county in 1846 and located in 
Keokuk in 1852, was a man of unusual force of character and left 
an indelible impress for good on all with whom he came in contact. 
Born July 23, 181 5, in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, a son of John 
Hamill, his early life was spent at hard work on the home farm, 
attending the neighboring schools to a limited extent. Perhaps the 
rigid training of his youth had much to do with his success in life; 
possibly, too, the wise counsel of God-fearing parents entered into 
this, but coupled with it all was the spirit that dared to do and to do 



328 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY ' 

right. He came west and settled on a farm in Jackson township, 
Lee county, Iowa, in 1846, being engaged in its operation for six 
years. It was during this time that his worth was recognized by his 
election to the first legislature of the state of Iowa, held at Iowa City. 
While always interested in public matters, Mr. Hamill was in no 
sense a politician, his liking being for commerce and for the pleasures 
of home. He removed from the farm to Keokuk in 1852 and founded 
the wholesale grocery house that yet bears his name. While new to 
business, his keen foresight enabled him to successfully surmount 
the panic of 1857 and subsequent panics with honor and unimpaired 
credit. His history was a part of the formative period of Keokuk. 

Mr. Hamill was a man of strong character. He belonged to the 
United Presbyterian church, in which for years he was an elder. A 
strong advocate of the temperance cause, he was an example in prac- 
ticing what he preached. For a long time he was a member of the 
Keokuk school board. Of the many that benefited by his counsel 
and sound advice was the Iowa State Insurance Company, of which 
he was president for a considerable length of time. His death, which 
occurred November 8, 1895, was a distinct loss to the city and county. 
The house he founded over sixty years ago is now being continued 
by his sons, D. B. and L. A. Hamill, under the name of the S. Hamill 
Company. 



ROBERT LANGE. 



One of the most prosperous agriculturists of Green Bay township 
is Robert Lange, whose elegant home is located on section 8. He 
was born in the township where he still resides on the 4th of Octo- 
ber, 1854, and is a son of Herman and Christina (Bettelthon) Lange, 
who emigrated to the new world in 1851. At that time the family 
were in very limited circumstances and the father afterward remarked 
that he hardly knew where his first meal in America was to come 
from. Success attended his well directed efforts, and he eventually 
became the owner of several hundred acres of very valuable and 
productive land in Green Bay township. In connection with its cul- 
tivation he also bought and sold cattle to some extent. He held mem- 
bership in the German Lutheran church and by his ballot supported 
the men and measures of the democratic party. He served as town- 
ship trustee for two terms and was honored and respected by all 
who knew him. He was born December 18, 1820, and passed away 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 329 

more than two decades ago, but his widow, who was born on the 
2d of February, 1821, is still living and continues to make her home 
in this county. Their children w^ere: Paulina, who makes her home 
with her mother; Ernest, a farmer of Green Bay township; Ernes- 
tina; Augusta, the wife of August Schubert; Robert, of this review; 
Anna, the wife of John Fletcher, of Dover, Iowa; Alice, the wife 
of John Meisel; and Herman E., whose sketch appears upon another 
page of this volume. 

Reared upon the homestead farm, Robert Lange early gained an 
excellent knowledge of agricultural pursuits, to which he has de- 
voted his life.* In connection with general farming, however, he 
has engaged in the threshing business, in baling hay and straw and 
in feeding cattle for the market. He is today the owner of a fine 
farm of two hundred and sixty-nine acres near Wever and upon the 
place has recently completed a fine home at a cost of eight thousand 
dollars. It is an eight-room residence, supplied with all modern 
conveniences, including electric lights, for which purpose he has his 
own electric light and power plant. This plant also pumps the water 
for his stock and supplies power for the washing machine, cream 
separator and churn. Upon the place is a barn forty by sixty-two 
feet, with twenty-foot posts, and it is forty feet from the ground to 
the gable. In this barn twenty head of horses can be accommodated 
and there is room for one hundred tons of hay, and there are two 
carriers which can handle two loads of hay at the same time. Mr. 
Lange keeps on hand twenty-five head of horses and mules, about 
thirty head of cattle and fifty head of hogs. He and his three sons 
do all the work upon the farm, and he has run as high as three gang 
plows and six cultivators at one time. He has upon the place three 
sets of buildings, two of which he rents. ■• ■ 

On the 25th of September, 1887, Mr. Lange was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ellen Mueller, who was born in Burlington, Iowa, 
November 3, 1863, of German parentage. Her father died while 
on a visit to the old country, but her mother is still living here. In 
the Lange family were ten children, of whom Alpha, the seventh 
injorder of birth, died in infancy. The others are: Carl A., Harry 
F., Caroline, Robert, Herbert, Edna, Nelson, Arthur and Mabel. 
The two eldest sons are operating a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, upon which the family lived until 1913, when Mr. Lange sold 
the place to the Water Power Company and bought his present farm. 
He is regarded as one of the most enterprising and progressive farm- 
ers of his community and is a man highly esteemed by all who know 
him. 



330 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

He has filled all of the chairs in Wever Lodge, No. 552, L O. 
O. F., and is also connected with the Rebekah lodge and the Grange. 
His religious faith is that of the German Lutheran church and since 
attaining his majority he has never faltered in his adherence to the 
democratic party. He has served as township trustee and road com- 
missioner and never withholds his support from any enterprise which 
he believes calculated to prove of public benefit. 



GEORGE W. VAN HYNING. * 

George W. Van Hyning, now engaged in merchandising at 
Sawyer, has practically spent his entire life in Lee county, for he was 
born in West Point township, January 17, 1847, his parents being 
Van Rensselaer and Susan (Burgman) Van Hyning. He has a 
genealogical record of the Van Hyning family dating back to the 
seventeenth century, and his great grandparents were heirs to the 
Anneke Jans Bogardus estate through Hanna Brower, a daughter of 
Michael Brower. In the early settlement of New York his ancestors 
came to the new world and located in lower Manhattan. His grand- 
father, Thomas Van Hyning, removed to Ohio in pioneer days and 
from that state came to Lee county, Iowa, with the parents of our 
subject in 1844, the family locating upon a farm here. The grand- 
father died of cholera in the '50s. 

Van Rensselaer Van Hyning underwent the usual privations and 
experiences of the pioneer farmer and in connection with the develop- 
ment of his land he also conducted a cooper shop on his farm, leaving 
the greater part of the cultivation of the place to his sons. He was a 
great Sunday school worker in the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
took great pleasure in hunting, killing many deer and a large amount 
of other game in those early days. His father had served as a soldier 
in the Me.xican war and for a number of years his mother received a 
pension. Van Rensselaer Van Hyning was born in Warren county, 
Ohio, and on reaching manhood married Susan Burgman, a native 
of Ontario, Canada, who removed to the Buckeye state with her 
parents during childhood. She died on the home farm in West 
Point township, this county, and he passed away at the home of a son 
in Des Moines. George W. Van Hyning is the eldest of their three 
children, the others being: A. O., who died in Edwardsville, Illinois; 
and Thompson, who was for a number of years assistant curator in 
the museum department at Des Moines and is now connected with 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 331 

the State University of Florida at Gainesville. A. O. Van Hyning 
is survived by his five children, all of whom are married and residents 
of Illinois, namely: Rolland, Mrs. Maud Wellington, Pearl, Ray- 
mond and Roy. 

George W. Van Hyning is indebted to the public schools of this 
county for the early educational privileges which he enjoyed, and 
here he has continued to make his home with the exception of one 
year spent in Nebraska in 1871. He then returned home and took 
care of his parents while engaged in farming until 1895. In that 
year he established a store at Sawyer, where he has since carried on 
business, and he also served as postmaster at that place until the office 
was discontinued on establishing a free rural delivery here. Besides 
his business he also owns a good home and with him now resides the 
family of his brother, Thompson, who married Mattie Pachaly of 
Lee county. They have five sons, namely, Clio, Area, Gather, Emil 
and George, the first and second being named after species of shells, 
in which their father takes a great interest. Mr. Van Hyning has 
quite an extensive and well selected library and has gathered a valu- 
able collection of Indian relics and fossils in this locality. Although 
he never had the advantages of a higher education, both he and his 
brother have always taken great pleasure in the work of the naturalist. 
In politics he is a republican, and fraternally he is connected with the 
Modern Woodmen of America. 



HERMAN E. LANGE. 

With the farming and stock-raising interests of Green Bay town- 
ship Herman E. Lange has been prominently identified since reach- 
ing manhood, and he now makes his home on section 10. He was 
born in that township on the 28th of February, 1862, and is the 
youngest of the eight children born to Herman and Christina (Bet- 
telthon) Lange, of whom extended mention is made in the sketch of 
Robert Lange on another page of this volume. 

During his boyhood our subject attended the common schools of 
the neighborhood and aided in the work of the home farm. On 
leaving the parental roof he engaged in farming upon rented land 
for three years and at the end of that time purchased eighty acres, 
which he operated until about 1903. He then sold out and bought 
Big Island, consisting of four hundred and ninety-five acres on the 
Mississippi river, belonging to Green Bay township. In the pur- 



332 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

chase of this property he was in partnership with H. D. McCahn, 
and to its cultivation and management he devoted his attention for 
three years. He then disposed of that property to the \^'ater Power 
Company and has since operated a farm of three hundred acres 
belonging to his mother-in-law. He had previously cultivated this 
place, however, in connection with the Island and has always engaged 
in farming on quite an extensive scale. He has also given con- 
siderable attention to the raising of stock and now has twentv-five 
head of horses, the same number of cattle and about one hundred and 
fifty hogs upon his place. He raises over eight thousand bushels of 
corn annually. He now owns two hundred acres of land and three 
acres inside the city limits at Milburn, Oklahoma, which property is 
among the Chickasaw Indians, and he expects to locate thereon in 

1915- 

In 1891 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Lange and Miss 
Etta May Tucker, who was born in Green Bay township, May 21, 
1872, a daughter of G. W. and Clara (Minard) Tucker, early settlers 
of this localitv, having located here in the spring of 18; i. Her 
father prospered as an agriculturist and became the owner of five 
hundred acres of very valuable land, which is now owned bv his 
widow. He was also prominent in public affairs and served as sheriff 
of Lee county for several years. He is now deceased, but Mrs. 
Tucker is still living, making her home in Fort Madison. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lange have one son, George W., at home. 

Mr. Lange is one of the leading members of Wever Lodge, No. 
552, I. O. O. F., in which he has filled a number of ofTices, and he 
also belongs to the Rebekahs and the Grange. He was reared in the 
Lutheran church and has always affiliated with the democratic party, 
taking a commendable interest in public affairs and serving as trustee 
of his township. He is a worthy representative of an old and honored 
family of this county and well deserves mention in this volume. 



AUSTIN F. PHILPOTT, M. D. 

Dr. Austin F. Philpott, successfully engaged in the general prac- 
tice of medicine and surgery in Fort Madison, keeps in touch with 
the advanced thought of the profession and has a clear understand- 
ing of those truths which are brought to light through scientific 
investigation and research. He comes from a family of physicians, 
his grandfather, father and uncle, as well as his wife's father, hav- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 335 

ing all been members of the medical profession. He was born on 
the 15th of February, 1882, at Richland, Iowa, and is a son of J. 
W. and Lucy (Bollinger) Philpott, also natives of Iowa. The for- 
mer is a son of J. H. Philpott, a native son of Kentucky, and a 
graduate of the Cincinnati College of Medicine, who about the year 
1857 established his home at New London, Iowa, where he con- 
tinued in active practice until his death a half century later. Fol- 
lowing in the professional footsteps of his father. Dr. J. W. Philpott 
took up the study of medicine in the University of Vermont, in which 
he completed his course. Returning to Iowa, he has engaged in 
practice in this state. He opened an office in Fort Madison in 1887 
and has since been identified with the active work of the profession 
here. Distinguished honors have come to him. He has been chosen 
to the presidency of the Lee County Medical Society and was also 
president of the Fort Madison Medical Society. He served as chief 
surgeon of the Chicago, Fort Madison & Des Moines Railway and 
as assistant chief surgeon of the Santa Fe. For twenty years he was 
surgeon of the Iowa state penitentiary, retiring from that position in 
1913, as well as from active practice. For years he was one of the 
foremost representatives of the profession in Fort Madison. Frater- 
nally he is connected with the Masons and in his life exemplifies 
the beneficent spirit of the craft. 

Dr. Austin F. Philpott was reared in Iowa and attended the 
public schools of Fort Madison, also the Normal School at Chilli- 
cothe, Missouri, and Highland Park College at Des Moines, Iowa. 
Determining to engage in the profession to which his father and 
grandfather had devoted their lives, he entered the St. Louis Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, from which he was graduated in 
1903. He then located for practice in Fort Madison, where he has 
since remained, and has been closely associated with his father in 
his professional activity. He specializes to a large extent in surgery 
and has developed his powers along that line to a high degree. He 
also continues in general practice and to further promote his effi- 
ciency pursued post-graduate work in the Chicago Post-Graduate 
College. L'pon the retirement of his father he assumed his prac- 
tice along with his own. 

In 1909, Dr. Philpott was united in marriage to Miss Cheryl 
Thornber, of Fort Madison, a daughter of Dr. J. M. Thornber, 
now of Ferris, Illinois, and in the social circles of the city they 
occupy an enviable place. Dr. Philpott is a member of all the va- 
rious medical societies, city, county and state, and was president of 
the Fort Madison Medical Society in 1913. He was city physician 



336 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

for six years and is now surgeon for the state penitentiary and the 
Mississippi Power Company at Fort Madison. He concentrates 
his efforts upon his chosen profession to the exclusion of all other 
business interests. He holds to high standards, conforms his prac- 
tice to the most advanced ethics of the profession, and enjoys the 
high regard and confidence of his brethren of the medical fraternity 
as well as of the general public. 



THOMAS SKYLES. 



Thomas Skyles, a well known resident of Fort Madison, was born 
near Rushville, in Schuyler county, Illinois, February 28, 1835, his 
parents being Benjamin and Hannah (Peak) Skyles, the former born 
in Jackson county, 7>nnessee, August 24, 18 10, and the latter in 
Hardin county, Kentucky, October 14, 1818. Our subject's paternal 
grandfather, William Skyles, was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, 
April 5, 1773, and in early life married Lyda Chaddie, who was born 
July 9, 1777. They spent their lives on the frontier, surrounded by 
the Indians. From Maryland they removed to Kentucky, later to 
Tennessee, from there to Arkansas, and finally came north to Illinois, 
but spent their last days in Iowa. William Skyles died in Lee county 
in 1845. By occupation he was a farmer. During the French and 
Indian war his brother, Jacob Skyles, was captured bv the Indians 
and burned at the stake. 

The parents of Mr. Skyles of this review were married in Rush- 
ville, Illinois, and remained residents of Schuyler county for four 
years, coming to Lee county in 1838. They crossed the river at 
Nauvoo, landing at Montrose, Iowa. Settling in Lee county, the 
father engaged in farming in lelferson township for some years. 
He was a soldier of the Black Hawk war. In his family were eleven 
children, namely: Thomas, whose name heads this sketch; Alexander 
T., who was a soldier of the Civil war and is now a resident of 
Nebraska; William, who died in infancy; George W., who also was 
a soldier of the Civil war and is now a resident of Nebraska; Robert, 
who makes his home in the same state and was for four years a 
member of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry during the Civil war; Fannie 
J., who married Frank B. Kent and died December 23, 1897; John 
M., a resident of Montrose; Magnolia, the wife of James Griswold of 
JefTerson township; Nancy B., who married A. C. Snively of W^est 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 337 

Point township; Franklin P., of Keokuk; and Susan, the wife of 
William H. South, of Fort Madison. 

Thomas Skyles was only three years of age when he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Lee county in 1838 and for sixty-six 
years he lived on the old homestead, but at present is residing at No. 
31 15 Chicago street, Fort Madison. As a farmer he met with success 
and is now practically living retired. 

On the 29th of April, 1858, Mr. Skyles was united in marriage to 
Miss Elizabeth Conlee, who was born in Illinois, April 23, 1830, 
and died in Fort Madison, July 2, 1909. She came to this county 
with her parents about 1836 and was a daughter of Reuben and Nancy 
Conlee. To Mr. and Mrs. Skyles six children were born: William 
B., now a resident of Memphis, Missouri; John H., of Warsaw, 
Illinois; Mary Elizabeth, at home; Harvey A., who is engaged in the 
real-estate business in Fort Madison; Adam W., of Astoria, Oregon; 
and Anna, the wife of Alexander Bullard of JefTerson township. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Skyles has been a stanch sup- 
porter of the democratic party, to which the family have always 
adhered, never scratching a ticket at election. He has held various 
township offices and takes an active interest in public alTairs. For 
sixty-two years he has been an earnest member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and conducted the largest Bible class in the Sunday 
school. Wherever known he is held in the highest esteem. 



B. P. TABER. 



B. P. Taber, for years a most prominent figure in connection 
with the lumber interests of Iowa, has throughout his business career 
displaved notable sagacity and energy. There have been no esoteric 
chapters in his entire history, but there has been a ready recognition 
and utilization of opportunity, combined with close application in 
the control and development of the business interests with which he 
has been associated. Making his home in Keokuk, he is today con- 
nected with a lumber trade that covers three states and which is con- 
ducted under the name of the Taber Lumber Company, with B. P. 
Taber as president. A native of Massachusetts, he was born in Lynn 
on the 6th of May, 1836, and is a son of Thomas and Ann (Phillips) 
Taber. The father was a manufacturer of oilcloth, but one day 
suffered severe injuries through a fall, which rendered him an invalid 
for life. In 1853 the family came to Keokuk, where the parents. 



338 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

spent their remaining days, the father dying on the 3d of February, 
1877, and the mother on the 12th of September, 1883. 

B. P. Taber had but limited educational opportunities. He at- 
tended school to some extent in Cincinnati, Ohio, but, owing to his 
father's affliction, he was early thrown upon his own resources and 
when a boy in years began earning his living. He worked at all the 
odd jobs that a poor city boy usually takes up, including the selling 
of papers, which is perhaps the most common employment among 
all city youths. In January, 1855, h^ came to Keokuk, then a young 
man of eighteen years, and on the southeast corner of Fifth and 
Blondeau streets established a retail grocery store under the firm 
name of Taber & Tisdale. He afterward removed the business to 
the present site of the Iowa Hotel and in 1859 sold out. He then 
went upon the river, becoming third clerk on the steamer William 
M. Morrison. Gradually he worked his way upward to a captaincy 
and was in command at different times of several river boats, the 
largest and best of which was the Ruth, a vessel well remembered 
by the old-time citizens. In 1866, having given up river life, he 
became interested in the lumber trade as a member of the Hosmer- 
Taber Company. This enterprise prospered and he afterward 
acquired his partner's interest, conducting the business under the 
firm name of Taber & Company until 1895. In that year the Taber 
Lumber Company was organized and incorporated by the old hrm 
and business has since been continued under that name. Their trade 
today covers three states and they have branch offices at various 
points in Illinois and Iowa. B. P. Taber is president of the company, 
B. C. Taber, secretary, and E. C. Taber, treasurer. The business 
is now one of large volume and with the trade B. P. Taber has been 
continuously connected for forty-eight years. He has watched every 
indication pointing to success, has wisely improved the advantages 
which have come to him and throughout his career has displayed 
the ability which has enabled him to succeed. He has seemed in- 
tuitively to recognize the possibilities of a situation and constantly 
he has extended his trade connections until its ramifying interests 
now cover a very extensive territory and the business brings an 
extensive and gratifying return annually. 

On the 13th of June, 1866, Mr. Taber was united in marriage to 
Miss Nellie P. Carroll, a d'aughter of Charles Carroll, of St. Louis. 
She died September 15, 1907, in the faith of the Presbyterian church, 
of which she had long been a devoted member. Mr. Taber has held 
membership in the Masonic lodge for fifty years. He is a republican, 
but has never held office. In the duties of citizenship he is never 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 339 

remiss and his cooperation can be counted upon to further many 
movements looking to a greater and better Keokuk, but he has had 
no thought of the rewards of office in all this. He is alert and enter- 
prising in business and ready at all times to meet any condition or 
any emergency that may arise. He has now passed the seventy- 
eighth milestone on life's journey, yet still gives supervision to his 
important commercial interests. 



WELLS M. IRWIN. 



Wells M. Irwin has long been a prominent factor in mercantile 
circles of Keokuk as president of the Irwin-Phillips Company, a 
wholesale dry-goods concern of which his father was one of the 
founders in 1856. His birth occurred near Hamilton, Ohio, on the 
1 2th of June, 1852, his father being Stephen Irwin, of whom extended 
mention is made on another page of this work. He was brought to 
Keokuk by his parents when four years of age and was here reared, 
receiving his primary education in the public schools and as a student 
in Professor W. W. Jamieson's Latin school. He completed his 
literary education at Miami University of Oxford, Ohio, and Dart- 
mouth College of Hanover, New Hampshire, and subsequently read 
law for a time, but abandoned that profession in order to become 
identified with commercial pursuits. From that time to the present 
he has been continuously connected with the wholesale dry-goods 
establishment of which he now serves as president. 

In 1856, Frederick Kramer and Stephen Irwin came to Keokuk 
and embarked in the wholesale dry-goods and notion business under 
the firm name of Kramer, Irwin & Company. In the '60s Stephen 
Irwin bought out his associates and conducted the enterprise under 
the name of S. Irwin until it was changed to S. Irwin & Company. 
Subsequently it became Irwin, Phillips & Company, the members of 
the firm being Stephen Irwin, Cyrus E. Phillips and Iram A. Sawyer. 
The last named passed away on the 12th of May, 1909. In 1887 the 
business was incorporated as the Irwin-Phillips Company, which 
style has been continued to the present time. Stephen Irwin died 
in 1894 and was succeeded as president by C. E. Phillips, who passed 
away in 1903 and was succeeded by John N. Irwin, son of Stephen. 
John N. Irwin was called to his final rest in 1905 and during the past 
nine years another son of Stephen, Wells M. Irwin, has been at the 
head of the establishment. The Irwin-Phillips Company is one 



340 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

of the few wholesale houses of Keokuk that has invariably discounted 
its bills in times of financial panic as well as during periods of pros- 
perity. In his important position as head of this extensive enterprise, 
Wells M. Irwin has manifested excellent executive ability and keen 
discernment that have insured its continued growth and success. He 
also served as president of the Commercial Club for more than a 
score of years and at present acts as treasurer of the Iowa State In- 
surance Company and vice president of the Central State Savings 
Bank. 

In 1881 Mr. Irwin was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Kiser, by whom he lias the following children: Mary Wells Irwin; 
La Favour,' who is now Mrs. Frank LeBron; and Stephen. His 
fraternal relations are with the Masons, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and Delta Kappa Epsilon. He has been repeatedly 
offered by the different political parties, the mayoralty of Keokuk 
and, in fact, he has been extended other political honors in this con- 
gressional district, but has declined, preferring to emplov his time 
and attention in other directions. He has spent the greater part of 
his life in Keokuk and has long enjoyed an enviable reputation as a 
leading business man and respected citizen. 



JOHN J. CRIMMINS. 



John J. Crimmins has been successfully engaged in business as an 
undertaker of Keokuk for a number of years and is also serving for 
the second term as sheriff' of Lee county. His birth occurred at La 
Fayette, Indiana, on the 7th of March, i8i;6, his parents being John 
and Mary (McDonald) Crimmins, who were natives of County 
Clare and County Kerry, Ireland, respectivelv. They came to Amer- 
ica when children, were married in Indiana and became the parents 
of four sons. The mother died at Kokomo, Indiana, and the father 
subsequently came to Lee county, Iowa, to join his mother, who 
had taken up her abode here when the Indians yet roamed within 
the borders of this countv and when Keokuk was a frontier village. 
John Crimmins is still living at the venerable age of eighty-seven 
years. 

John J. Crimmins, Sr., whose name introduces this review, was 
left motherless when about eight years of age and was reared on a 
farm among strangers. In 1874, when a young man of eighteen years, 
he came to Keokuk and here secured employment with the old Hos- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 341 

mer Lumber Company, while later he worked in the sawmill of the 
Taber Lumber Company. Subsequently he was employed in the old 
Smyth packing house and next worked in the Keokuk branch of the 
Fowler packing concern of Chicago, later being employed by the 
same company in Winthrop, Missouri. Returning to Keokuk a year 
later, he entered the packing and commission house of Patterson 
Brothers and afterward worked for Coey & Company, Limited, a 
branch of a house at Belfast, Ireland. He next became a wiper in the 
roundhouse of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway and sub- 
sequently was employed as a fireman on the road for about four 
years. On the expiration of that period he became an engineer and 
thus served for about eighteen months. In 1888 he resigned his posi- 
tion and embarked in the undertaking business, in which he has been 
successfully engaged to the present time with the exception of about 
three years. 

In 1885 Mr. Crimmins was united in marriage to Miss Ellen J. 
Flynn, by whom he had five sons, namely: George, who died at the 
age of twenty-two years; John J, Jr.; Francis V.; Harry B.; and 
Arthur B. 

Mr. Crimmins gives his political allegiance to the democracy. In 
January, 1906, he was appointed deputy sheriff of Lee county, serv- 
ing in that capacity for four years or until 19 10, when he w«s elected 
sheriff. His record in that connection proved so satisfactory to his 
constituents that he was reelected in 191 2 and is therefore still hold- 
ing the office at the present time. His religious faith is that of the 
Roman Catholic church. The prosperity which he now enjoys is all 
the more creditable by reason of the fact that it has been acquired 
entirely through his own well directed and untiring efforts. A man 
of sound judgment and keen discernment, possessing those qualities 
which make for success in the business world, he has also exemplified 
in his life those traits which win and retain warm friendships, and 
today he is numbered among the substantial, representative and 
valued citizens of Keokuk. 



E. T- BUFE. 



E. I. Bufe is one of those excellent citizens whom Germany has 
given to our western republic. His birth occurred in Wuenschen- 
dorf, near Lauban, Germany, on the 2d of August, 1851, his parents 
being Wilhelm and Pauline (Lange) Bufe, also natives of the father- 



342 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

land, where their whole lives were passed. The father engaged in 
farming and was known as a substantial agriculturist. In the family 
were eleven children, seven of whom, three sons and four daughters, 
are now living. Three of the number came to this country as follows: 
E. J., the subject of this review; Paul, who is with his brother E. J. ; 
and Amelia, the wife of Max Rudke, of Missouri. 

E. J. Bufe came directly to Lee county, Iowa, after landing on 
the shores of the new world, arriving here in September, 1866. He 
joined an uncle, Carl Lange, who was located here, and remained 
on the farm with him for a year. He believed that other w^ork would 
be more congenial than farm labor and therefore went to Pontoosuc, 
Illinois, where he learned the blacksmith's trade. He spent five 
years there and two and a half years at Colusa, Illinois. In 1875 
he located in Green Bay township, this county, and started a black- 
smith shop, which he has operated to the present time. This is the 
third shop which he has conducted and his long e.xperience makes 
him most eflicient in all lines of his trade. He started in a small way 
by himself, but in 1888 his brother joined him and has been his part- 
ner since 1907. They give such good satisfaction in the work done 
that it is necessary to employ additional men and two nephews, Carl 
and Edward Rudke, are their assistants. Mr. Bufe of this review 
was the Jirst to learn the trade and instructed his brother therein. 
They do everything in the line of blacksmithing and general repair- 
ing and the volume of their business is unusually large for a small 
town. Our subject owns a farm of sixty-seven acres, located a mile 
from his shop. 

In 1879 Mr. Bufe was married to Miss Louisa Dcrle, whose birth 
occurred in Keokuk on the 22d of March, 1852. Her parents were 
Louis and Magdalena (Haefner) Derle, the former a German by 
birth and the latter a native of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Bufe passed 
away February 17, 1908, and her sister, Mrs. Mary Gittings is now 
keeping house for our subject. The birth of Mrs. Gittings occurred 
near Dallas City, Hancock county, Illinois, on the i c;th of Septem- 
ber, 1 86 1. Her father, Louis Derle, was born in Baden, Germany, 
in 1818, and as a young man he removed to St. Louis, Missouri, 
where he married Miss Magdalena Haefner, a native of the Key- 
stone state. They located first at Keokuk, but later settled at Dallas 
City, Illinois. Mr. Derle was engaged in agricultural pursuits on 
a farm near the home of our subject and passed away in 188;; at the 
home of his daughter, Mrs. Gittings. His wife had preceded him 
in death, dying in 1883 at the age of fifty-five years. Six children 
were born to their union as follows: Mrs. Louisa Bufe, deceased; 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 343 

Caroline, the wife of A. G. Eckhardt, of Oklahoma; Louis, de- 
ceased; Euphemia, the wife of A. L Schowalter, of Halstead, 
Kansas; Leonard, who died in infancy; and Mrs. Mary M. Gittings. 
The last named is the mother of eight children, of whom one is de- 
ceased, the others being: Carrie, the wife of Charles Redfern, of 
New London, Iowa; Bernard, of Fort Madison; Walter, of Green 
Bay township; Cable, of Mount Union; Vesta and Verga, twins, 
the former of whom is preparing for the profession of nursing in 
Burlington, while the latter is at home with her mother; Edith, who 
died in infancy; and Vada, with her mother. 

Mr. Bufe was reared in the faith of the Lutheran church and is 
still an adherent of that organization. He has voted the republican 
ticket since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, and he 
is a stalwart defender of the principles and policies of the party. 
He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Modern Woodmen of America, also belonging to the Rebekahs and 
the Royal Neighbors. He is likewise a member of the Grange. He 
has never regretted becoming a citizen of the United States and has 
proved a public-spirited and useful member of the community where 
he has made his home for many years. 



WILLIAM VOGT. 



William Vogt resides on section 36, Washington township, and 
was born near his present home place, in Green Bay township, on 
the 30th of December, 1862. His father, William Vogt, was a native 
of Lauban, Prussia, born March 5, 1823, and on leaving his native 
land he made his way direct to Lee county, Iowa. He learned the 
trade of cabinetmaking in the old country and after living for a time 
in Fort Madison, where he arrived in the winter of 1848, he removed 
to Burlington, where he worked at his trade for a few vears. He 
had previously been employed at cabinetmaking on Front street in 
Forf Madison and it was through close attention to business that he 
earned the capital that enabled him to purchase land. Investing in 
a farm in Green Bay township, he then married and gave his atten- 
tion to general agricultural pursuits. He wedded Caroline Goe- 
thert, who was born in Prussia, January 30, 1831, and in 1853 came to 
Lee county with her brother, Ernest Goethert, who resided with a 
nephew, Herman Vogt. 



344 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

After living for a time upon their first farm Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Vogt, Sr., sold their place in Green Bay township and bought 
the farm upon which their son William now resides. For thirty-five 
years the father continued to live upon this place and was then called 
to his final rest on the i8th of August, 1901. He was the owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres of good land, which at his death was 
divided among his children. In politics he was a stanch republican 
and ever sought the welfare and improvement of the district in which 
he lived. His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church. He 
long survived his wife, who passed away on the 28th of Febru- 
ary, 1879. They were a most highly respected couple, displaying 
throughout their lives many good traits of character, which won for 
them the high regard and friendship of those with whom thev came 
in contact. 

Of their family of ten children William and Emma Vogt still 
reside upon the home place. They inherited thirty-seven acres of 
the land, but have since sold twenty-two acres to the Power Com- 
pany for the transmission line. A large part of the tract which the 
Power Company purchased has now become covered with Cooper 
lake. The substantial price received for their property enables 
Mr. Vogt and his sister to live in comfort. They are both advocates 
of democratic principles and keep in touch with all questions of vital 
interest, political and otherwise. They have lived for many years 
in this county and have a wide acquaintance, especially throughout 
Green Bay and Washington townships. 



DAVID J. AYRES. 



While four years have come and gone since David J. Ayres passed 
away he is yet remembered by the great majority of Keokuk's citi- 
zens as a leading business man and representative citizen closely as- 
sociated with public interests for many years. For an extended 
period he was identified with the jewelry firm of T. R. J. Ayres & 
Sons at Keokuk, coming of a family long closelv identified with the 
jewelry trade. His parents were Thomas Robinson Jamison and 
Sarah (Smith) Ayres, the former a grandson of William Ayres and 
a son of Samuel Avres, who was born in Danville, Virginia, in 1767, 
and learned and followed the jeweler's trade. Removing to Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, he there opened a jewelry store in 179^ and subse- 
quently conducted a jewelry business in Danville, Kentuckv, where 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 345 

he remained to the time of his death in 1824. He won a state-wide 
reputation as an expert watqh maker and jeweler and it was under 
his guidance that his son, T. R. J. Ay res, learned the trade. He re- 
mained in association with his father in business until the latter's 
death and then succeeded to the ownership of the store. In 1857 he 
removed to Lewis county, Missouri, where he resided for about eight 
years, coming to Keokuk in 1865. For eighteen years thereafter he 
was a resident-of this city and was an active, prominent and honored 
factor in its commercial circles, here conducting a jewelry business 
to the time of his death, which occurred in 1883. He left his busi- 
ness to his two sons, David J. and Joseph J. 

The former was born on the 2d of February, 1845, in Danville, 
Kentucky, and when twelve years of age accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Canton, Missouri, in 1857. Six years afterward he 
went to St. Louis and took a course in bookkeeping at Joseph's Busi- 
ness College and in the early '60s came to Keokuk, arriving in this 
city before his father. He purchased a little jewelry store which 
was destined to grow into a large and prosperous concern. He bent 
every energy toward the upbuilding of the trade and his enterpris- 
ing methods, his persistency and his thoroughly reliable dealing were 
features in his growing success. He was afterward joined by his 
father and following his father's death he and his brother, Joseph J. 
Ayres, became proprietors of the business, with which David J. Ayres 
was continuously connected until his demise. He was an expert 
workman in the jewelry trade and, moreover, was acquainted with 
every phase of the business so that he knew how to make judicious 
purchases. He always carried a large and well selected line and his 
efiforts to please his patrons, combined with the integrity of his 
business methods, secured him a very gratifying patronage. Beside 
being president of the jewelry firm of T. R. J. Ayres & Sons he was 
a director of the State Central Savings Bank and a director of the 
Keokuk & Hamilton Water Power Company. 

On the I St of February, 1883, Mr. Ayres was united in marriage 
to Miss Virginia Burkitt, a daughter of Dr. William Burkitt, and 
unto them were born a son and a daughter. Mr. Ayres gave his po- 
litical allegiance to the democratic party and was one of its recog- 
nized leaders in Lee county. He served as mayor of Keokuk, was 
also postmaster, and for two terms filled the office of alderman, ex- 
ercising his official prerogatives in support of various measures and 
movements for the public good, his efiforts being a tangible asset in 
municipal progress. When mayor of the city he introduced various 
needed reforms and improvements and gave to Keokuk a very busi- 



346 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ness-like administration. In politics he was a stanch democrat, and 
he enjoyed the distinction of being one of the very few members of 
that party who were elected aldermen of the first ward, which is the 
republican stronghold. His popularity as a politician was shown 
in 1880, when he overcame a large majority and was elected alder- 
man on the democratic ticket. After serving two years he became 
the popular choice for mayor and in 1882 he was elected by an over- 
whelming majority. That he retained his strength in politics after 
deserting that field was shown a few years since, when he again 
carried the ward for alderman. In the council he was a tower of 
strength and his opinion was always sought. Had he desired he 
could have climbed the ladder of politics and ascended to the highest 
rung. Not only was he a prominent democrat in this city and Lee 
county, but his popularity extended throughout the state. Several 
times he was a delegate to democratic national conventions and 
he was always the choice of the members of his party as a delegate 
to the city, county and state conventions. So, in the death of David 
J. Ayres, Keokuk lost one of her strongest and most influential citi- 
zens. He was a man of strong convictions, well posted and able to 
present his opinion intelligently and without the least hesitation. In 
business he was a success; in politics he was a success. In fact, in 
every venture he emerged victorious. And so it was that during 
his administration the city prospered and all business enterprises 
flourished under his care. 

Fraternally Mr. Ayres was connected with the Elks and his re- 
ligious faith was that of the Episcopal church. His life in all its 
relations measured up to high standards and commanded for him the 
respect and esteem of all who knew him. In his death, which oc- 
curred on the 9th of December, 1909, Keokuk recognized the fact 
that she had lost one of her most useful citizens and those with whom 
he was associated in close ties of friendship felt that their loss was 
indeed great. 



REV. EDWARD H. RUDD, S. T. D. 

Rev. Edward H. Rudd, S. T. D., who since 1903 has been rector 
of St. Luke's church of Fort Madison, was born in Kenosha, Wis- 
consin, and was graduated from Racine College in 1869 with first 
honors, receiving the degree of B. A. at that time and the degree of 
M. A. in 1872. In the latter year he was graduated from Nashotah 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 347 

with the degree of B. D., and was ordained a deacon in old St. Paul's 
church of Milwaukee on the 28th of May, that year, by Bishop Ar- 
mitage. He was a member of Bishop Armitage's brotherhood and 
in charge of Christ church, Milwaukee, in 1872-3, and of St. John's 
church of Elkhorn, Wisconsin, in 1873-4. I" the latter year he was 
made deacon in charge of St. Paul's church of Plymouth, Wiscon- 
sin, and was a member of the convention at the organization of the 
diocese of Fond du Lac. 

Dr. Rudd was ordained a priest at the cathedral at Milwaukee in 
1874, this being the first ordination of Bishop Wells. Two years 
later he was made assistant at St. Paul's church, Detroit, with 
Rev. Dr. Pitkin as rector. In 1877 '^^ '^'^^^ received into the diocese 
of Illinois and became rector of St. John's church of Knoxville and 
chaplain of St. Mary's school at the same place. He was a member 
of the primary'convention of the diocese of Quincy, December 11, 
1877, and two years later became rector of St. John's church in Ke- 
wanee, Illinois, and in charge of St. Matthew's church at Cambridge, 
that state. In 1881 he was again appointed chaplain of St. Mary's 
school, which position he filled until coming to Fort Madison in 1903. 

Dr. Rudd has held every office in the gift of the convention of the 
diocese of Quincy and was appointed one of the examining chaplains 
by Bishop Burgess at the organization of the diocese, which office he 
held until 1903. He was the first secretary of the Board of Missions 
and represented the diocese in three general conventions, being a pro- 
visional deputy for all other years. He was secretary of the diocesan 
convention up to 1903 and was also secretary of the standing com- 
mittee from 1 89 1 and has been a member of the provincial synod 
since its organization in 1880, serving as its secretary for many years. 
In 1 90 1 he was elected president of the standing committee. It was 
in 1890 that he received the degree of S. T. D. from Racine College, 
his alma mater. As previously stated. Dr. Rudd came to Fort Madi- 
son, Iowa, in 1903 to take the position of rector of St. Luke's church, 
and he has since been very active in the diocese of Iowa, which he 
has represented on several occasions in the department missionary 
conferences. He has been examining chaplain since coming to the 
diocese and is a member of the standing committee. He has also 
been dean of the Muscatine deanery and for several years chairman 
of the committee on constitutions and canons of the diocesan conven- 
tion. 

In 1879 Dr. Rudd was united in marriage to Miss Anna Francis, 
a native of England, who came to this country in childhood and was 
a teacher in St. Mary's school at Knoxville, Illinois. There they 



348 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

worked together for some time and are widely known by a large 
number of graduates from that institution. They have one son, 
Harold Huntington, who was born in Kewanee, Illinois, in 1880 and 
is now connected with the Westinghouse Electric Works at Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. There is a grandchild, Ann Francis, who was 
born in 19 14. 

Since coming to Fort Madison Dr. Rudd has taken active interest 
in the aiiairs of the city, especially along moral lines, and has been 
ready at all times with voice and pen to favor every good work. He 
is prominent in several organizations, being the present chaplain of 
the Elks lodge at this place and also chaplain of the state organiza- 
tion. He has always been a leader in the Knight Templars and has 
been prelate or eminent commander of the local commandery during 
his entire residence here, holding the latter office at the present time. 
His influence is widely felt and he is today regarded as one of the 
most prominent ministers of the Episcopal church in Iowa. 



MAJOR MONTGOMERY MEIGS. 

For many years Major Montgomery Meigs has been in the gov- 
ernment service, doing important work in various sections of the 
country. His duties for an extended period have kept him on the 
Mississippi river, and he is now a valued and esteemed resident of 
Keokuk. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1847, a son of Cap- 
tain M. C. Meigs, of the United States Corps of Engineers. When 
the son was but three years of age the father removed to Rouses 
Point, New York, building a fort at the outlet of Lake Champlain, 
close to the boundary between the L-nited States and Canada. Later 
he went to Washington, D. C, which remained the seat of his activ- 
ities until his death. He built the Washington aqueduct and various 
public works, and at the time of the Civil war was selected as quar- 
termaster general, filling that position until his retirement at the age 
of sixty-six years. He married a daughter of Commodore John 
Rodgers of the United States navy, who for a number of years was 
ranking officer of the naval station at Washington. He served as a 
soldier in the War of 1812 and he was the builder of the house in 
President Square in which the attempt to assassinate W. H. Seward 
was made by one of the members of the secession gang who killed 
Abraham Lincoln. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 349 

Major Meigs of this review was educated in private scliools in 
Washington and in Philadelphia, and afterward went to Harvard 
University, where he pursued a two years' course in engineering. 
He then went abroad and at Stuttgart, Germany, attended the Royal 
Polytechnic for two years. Upon his return home he accepted a 
position with the Northern Pacific Railway Company, then engaged 
in pioneer work from Lake Superior to Puget Sound. He located 
and built the track of the Northern Pacific from Jamestown to Bis- 
marck, North Dakota, and laid out the first squares of Bismarck so 
that lots could be sold. During three years spent with the Northern 
Pacific, Major Meigs was with two surveying expeditions up the 
Yellowstone river, being with the Stanley expedition, which pene- 
trated as far as the Musselshell and up past the mouth of the Little 
Big Horn, where the Custer massacre occurred. During these ex- 
peditions Major Meigs saw some Indian fighting. The country 
was then in a wild state, being largely unsettled. It was full of buf- 
falo, elk and other big game, and much personal bravery and deter- 
mination were required to face conditions which existed in the 
northwest at that day. 

In 1873 the failure of Jay Cook & Company of the Northern 
Pacific brought on a financial panic, resulting in the dispersing of 
the engineering corps, and Major Meigs joined his father at Rock 
Island and proceeded with him through to the western coast. On 
the way they stopped at Sidney, Nebraska, which was then a frontier 
post, and went on a bufifalo hunt through the South Platte district, 
w'here they found a great herd of buffalo. The animals were quiet 
and curious enough, feeding peacefully with Texas cattle and roam- 
ing over the plains. The party killed some bufifalo and then pro- 
ceeded on to San Francisco. At that point they boarded a steamer 
for Portland, Oregon, and thence made the trip up the Columbia 
river to the Cascades on the last boat which made the trip that season, 
for two days later the river froze over — a rare occurrence. Subse- 
quently, Major Meigs returned to Washington and was employed 
for a few months in the coast survey office in the Bureau of Weights 
and Standards. He was next appointed by the secretary of war 
United States civil engineer and stationed at Rock Island, and from 
that time to the present has been on the Mississippi. 

In 1876 Major Meigs was united in marriage to Miss Grace 
Lynde, of Rock Island, now deceased, and unto them were born six 
children, all of whom are yet living. On the ist of January, 1882, 
Major Meigs was assigned to Keokuk, in charge of the river improve- 
ments from Burlington, Iowa, to Hannibal, Missouri. His task 



350 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

also included the completion of the old Des Moines Rapids canal 
and he lived to see it submerged under Lake Cooper. In 1889 he 
built a dry dock adjacent to the middle lock of the canal and it was 
in use until [913. He has built many steamboats, dredges and mis- 
cellaneous parts of a floating plant, all used in the river imprcjvement 
of the government. He has had the local supervision of all building 
for the Mississippi River Power Company and of the locks and dry 
docks which they built. He has been continuously in the active 
service of the government since 1877, or for thirty-seven years, which 
fact is indicative of his faithfulness, capability and unfaltering 
allegiance. 

Major Meigs served for one term and part of another on the 
Keokuk school board. He was president of the old Keokuk Bicycle 
Club, afterward merged into the Keokuk Country and Golf Club 
and now about to celebrate the opening of its beautiful new home 
at Price's Creek. Major Meigs' duties have called him into various 
sections of the country and made him largely familiar with its his- 
tory and upbuilding. All who have been familiar with his career 
recognize his absolute loyalty to duty as well as to his thorough 
understanding of the great scientific principles which underlie his 
work and which have enabled him to execute the practical phases 
of the work in most capable manner. 



ABNER PALMER FLETCHER. 

Abner Palmer Fletcher is the owner of Maple Mound Farm, 
which is one of the best improved and most valuable agricultural 
properties of the county. He engages in the breeding and selling of 
stock and also ships grain and seed to the markets of the middle west, 
and is signally successful in all of his activities. 

The Fletcher family is of Scotch origin and five generations back 
the ancestors of Mr. Fletcher came to the United States from 
Acadia. The grandfather of Abner P. Fletcher was born in a log 
cabin in Ohio, which was also the birthplace of his son, John A., the 
father of the subject of this review. John A. Fletcher served four 
years in the Civil war and died at the age of seventy-two years, rich 
in the honor and esteem of his fellowmen. His wife, who in her 
maidenhood was Elizabeth Palmer, still survives and is now seventy- 
four years of age. She makes her home in Hancock county, Illinois, 
and is still active and enjoys good health, doing her own work. She 






1-^^ 



iv:.^ 



-MR. AXI5 ilRS. ABNER P. FLETCHER 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 353 

became the mother of eight children as foUows : Roy, also a resident 
of Hancock county; May, the wife of Willis Ervin, a farmer of the 
same county; Edward, a horse buyer in that county and also the 
owner of one hundred and twenty acres of land; Abner Palmer, of 
this review; Mina, the wife of P. D. Myers, a farmer and stock- 
raiser of Hancock county, Illinois; Knox, a farmer and horse buyer, 
owning one hundred and twenty acres in Missouri; Winnie, who is 
Mrs. Frank Craig, of Viola, Iowa; and one who died in infancy. 

Abner Palmer Fletcher was born in Hancock county, Illinois, 
November 28, 1871, and completed the course in the public schools 
of that county and for two terms was a student at Carthage College. 
He subsequently took a business course and was graduated from Na- 
tional Penart Hall of Delaware, Ohio. He was for one year con- 
nected with educational work as a professor at Hall Institute at 
Sharon, Pennsylvania. At the end of that time he became overseer 
of a rolling mill, but later returned to Illinois and rented a farm of 
one hundred and twenty acres, which he cultivated for three years. 
He then rented another farm and gradually became interested in 
stock-raising, in which he successfully engaged in Illinois for eight 
years. In 1904 he purchased his present farm of one hundred and 
twentv acres in Lee county, Iowa, paying for it the highest price ever 
received for farm land in the county. He has made a number of 
improvements on the place since it came into his possession, among 
other things draining the whole farm, and a crop failure is a thing 
unknown to him. He feeds much of his grain raised to his stock and 
is known as one of the extensive stock raisers and shippers of the 
county. In 1913 he fed and sold over four hundred hogs, all of which 
were in fine condition and which brought a good price upon the 
market. He also buys cattle and grain and ships the same to Chicago, 
doing an extensive and profitable business in that line. In 1912 his 
business aggregated seven hundred and fifty-five thousand dollars, 
which sum is the best evidence of his ability in his chosen line of 
work and of his material prosperity. 

On the 2d of April, 1893, Mr. Fletcher was united in marriage 
to Miss Martha E. Conn, a daughter of Isaac and Louisa Conn, of 
Muskingum county, Ohio, born March 24, 1867. Her father is liv- 
ing but her mother passed away about ten years ago. Mrs. Fletcher 
was a successful teacher for eleven years previous to her marriage.. 
She has become the mother of five daughters as follows: Ada, born 
August 9, 1895; Georgia, whose birth occurred January 13, 1897, 
and who passed away in 191 1 ; Lena, born March 2, 1901 ; Alice, No- 
vember 27, 1902; and Blanche, March 5, 1906. 



354 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

The family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. 
Fletcher is fraternally a member of the Masonic order, belonging 
to the blue lodge, and of the Elks and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is a member of the board of trustees of Pleasant 
Ridge township. In 1909 the family residence burned down on 
Sundav morning while everyone was away at church, but Mr. 
Fletcher and his youngest child, who were resting in the yard under 
a tree. Suddenly he saw flames breaking out from the house and in 
a short time the building was but an ash heap. In its place he erected 
a fine large house, up-to-date in every particular, being supplied 
with such modern conveniences as hot water heat, bath-room and run- 
ning water. Mr. Fletcher is an enthusiastic believer in the oppor- 
tunities offered bv farm life and is recognized as one of the most 
successful and most progressive of the agriculturists of Lee county. 
He has not only won individual prosperity but has done much to 
raise the standard of farming throughout his locality, thus con- 
tributing to the general welfare. 



AUSTIN D. STORMS. 



Starting out in life for himself in limited circumstances, Austin 
D. Storms has gradually worked his way upward to prosperity and 
is today a wealthy lumber broker of Fort Madison. In this city 
he has spent his entire life, being born here March 24, 1866, and he 
is a son of Jacob D. and Minnie A. (Wallace) Storms, both natives 
of Ohio. The mother was born in Columbus, November 11, 1839, 
and came to Fort Madison in 1854 with a sister and brother-in-law, 
the latter being B. R. Essex, who came here to install the first ma- 
chinery in the state prison. Her parents were at that time dead. 
Our subject's father was born on a farm near Cincinnati and in early 
life learned the printer's trade. After coming to Fort Madison he 
was connected for some time with the Democrat and Plain Dealer 
and became widely known as a newspaper man in this locality. He 
died in Fort Madison in 1888, at the age of fifty-seven years, but the 
niother of our subject is still living and now makes her home at No. 
141 1 Fifth street. In their family were seven children, three of 
whom died in early childhood, the others being: Austin D. ; Charles 
W., of Fort Madison; Katharine K., of Valley City, North Dakota; 
and Minnie A., who lives with her mother. 



• HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 355 

Having spent his entire life in Fort Madison, Austin D. Storms 
is indebted to its public schools for the early educational privileges 
he enjoyed. Being in limited circumstances and unable to pursue 
his studies further, he took up stenography at home and eventually 
perfected himself in that art, being later employed in a lumber office 
as a stenographer for eleven years. Throughout his business career 
he has practically been identified with the lumber business, serving 
as city salesman for a time and afterward as a traveling salesman for 
a lumber firm. For four years he was connected with the Iowa 
Farming Tool Company in their office and as traveling salesman, 
but in 1904 he embarked in business on his own account as a lumber 
broker. Each week he spends a part of the time on the road, cover- 
ing local territory, and he has met with remarkable success in his 
undertaking. He is thoroughly familiar with the lumber business 
in all its departments and has become identified with a number of 
different concerns, being now vice president of the Midland Lumber 
Company of Freeport, Illinois, which owns fourteen lumber yards 
at the present time, and he is a member of its board of directors. He 
is also a stockholder of the German-American State Bank of Fort 
Madison. 

In 1898 Mr. Storms married Miss Jane E. Hannum, who was 
born in Burlington, Iowa, January 5, 1873. Two children have 
been born to them, Lucy K. and Mary L. Mrs. Storms is an active 
member of the Presbyterian church and prominently identified with 
its afifairs as secretary of the Ladies' Aid Society. She is also a 
member of the King's Daughters. Politically Mr. Storms is a pro- 
gressive republican, but he has never cared for official honors, pre- 
ferring to devote his undivided attention to his business interests. 
The success that he has achieved in life is certainly well merited, 
for it has been due entirely to his own energy, industry and progressive 
methods. 



HERMAN VOGT. 



Herman Vogt is a representative of one of the pioneer families 
of Lee county and is now engaged in farming on section 36, Wash- 
ington township, owning a good tract of land which is situated on 
the Burlington road, about two miles from Fort Madison. His birth 
occurred December 29, 1859, in Green Bay township, his parents 
being William and Caroline (Goethert) Vogt, both of whom were 
natives of Prussia. The mother was born in 1831 and came with her 



356 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

brother, Ernest, to the new world in 1853. Here she gave her hand 
in marriage to William Vogt, and they took up their abode upon a 
farm in Green Bay township. The father was a cabinetmaker by 
trade and followed that pursuit in Fort Madison and in Burlington 
before purchasing land. Subsequently, however, he saved from his 
earnings a sum sufficient to enable him to invest in farm property 
and his life, therefore, was given to general agricultural pursuits. 
His wife died at the age of forty-eight years, and he passed away 
at the age of seventy-eight years. In their family were ten children: 
Bertha, now the wife of Julius Schubert, of Seattle, Washington; 
Herman; Henry and William, who are residents of Washington 
township, this county; Minnie, the wife of C. C. Cooney of Fort 
Madison; Gus, who was a railroad man and died July 23, 1903, at 
the age of thirty-si.\ years; Mary, the wife of William C. Stemple 
of Leon, Iowa; Robert, whose home is in the city of Oklahoma; 
Emma, who lives with her brother, William, upon the old home 
place; and Caroline, who is now the wife of Edward Brady of Long 
Beach, California. She was graduated from the Fort Madison high 
school with the class of 1896 and taught school until she reached 
the age of thirty-three years, when she was married in V^ictoria, 
British Columbia. 

Herman Vogt has spent his entire life in the county of his na- 
tivity and after attending the public schools in his boyhood he began 
working as a farm hand for neighbors, being thus employed for 
about five years. Anxious, however, that his labors should benefit 
himself, he then began renting land, which he cultivated for five 
years. He then purchased his present farm, comprising one hundred 
and fifty-seven acres on section 36, Washington township. It is a 
good tract of land, carefully cultivated and pleasantly and conven- 
iently situated two miles from Fort Madison. He went in debt 
four thousand dollars when he purchased the farm, but does not owe 
a dollar upon the place at the present time and, moreover, he has 
put substantial improvements thereon, erecting good buildings and 
otherwise adding to the excellent appearance of his property. His 
methods of cultivation, too, are productive of excellent results, so 
that he annually harvests good crops. He takes great interest in 
stock and is acknowledged an excellent judge of horses. 

On the 17th of January, 1889, Mr. Vogt was married to Miss 
Rebecca Risinger, who was born in Lee county, April 30, 1865, a 
daughter of George Washington and Julia (Hoskins) Risinger, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. Her parents 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 357 

came to Lee county with their respective families in early life in 
1846 and were married here. The mother now resides in Fort Madi- 
son, but the father passed away in 1882, at the age of fifty-four years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Vogt have had a family of five children: Robert, now 
in Oklahoma; Harry, at home; Myrtle, the wife of Pearl Weaver 
of Fort Madison; Edward, who died September 14, 1907, at the age 
of twelve years; and Caroline. 

Mrs. Vogt and the children are members of the Christian church 
of Fort Madison, and Mr. Vogt was reared in the Lutheran faith 
but is not identified with any church at the present. His political 
support is given the democratic party, and for the past six years he 
has been township trustee. He has also filled road and school offices 
and is interested in the substantial improvement of the community 
to the extent of giving earnest indorsement and cooperation to all 
plans and projects for the public good. 



A. C. RICHMOND, M. D. 

Dr. A. C. Richmond has been successfully engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine in Fort Madison since 1898. He is a native of 
Iowa, born near Cantril, in Van Buren county, June 13, 1854. His 
birthplace was a log house on a farm where his father had pre- 
empted land at an early day. His parents, Theodore and Elvira 
(Irish) Richmond, were both born near Indianapolis, in Hamilton 
county, Indiana, the former August 23, 1830, and the latter Octo- 
ber 23, 1830. It was in 1851 that they removed to Van Buren county, 
Iowa. Our subject was two years old when the family became resi- 
dents of Keosauqua, where the father followed his trade as a harness 
maker and saddler for about ten years. During the Civil war he 
enlisted in Company H, Nineteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and 
rose to the rank of captain, but after serving for two years he was 
forced to resign during the siege of Vicksburg on account of ill 
health. He then returned to his home in Iowa, but subsequently 
removed to Memphis, Missouri, where he died in 1901. His wife 
passed away there in December, 1907. Their children were: Sarah, 
who died at the age of twenty-one years; A. C, of this review; Mrs. 
Kate Bull, a resident of Montana; Frank, of Nebraska; Carrie, of 
Fresno, California; William and Emmett, also of Fresno, Cali- 
fornia; and Ella, who died at the age of thirty-three years at Mem- 
phis, Mo. 



358 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

During his boyhood Dr. Richmond attended the public schools 
and remained under the parental roof until about twenty-three years 
of age. Having received a good practical education, he taught in the 
country schools for ten years and for one year attended the normal 
school at Kirksville. One year was devoted to teaching in Minne- 
sota, after which he spent one year with his parents and then went to 
Kansas, where he taught for a time. For three years he engaged in 
prospecting at Leadville, Colorado, and then again returned to his 
father's home. For six years he lived on a homestead in western 
Nebraska and at the end of that time returned to Missouri. He 
next entered the Keokuk Medical College, having read medicine 
for years previously, and was graduated in 1898 and at once located 
for practice in Fort Madison. Here he has met with success in his 
chosen profession and is regarded as one of the leading phvsicians of 
the city. He is examining physician for the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Royal Neighbors of America, the Mutual Protective 
League, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Ladies of the Maccabees 
and the Railroad Engineer's Pension Society. He is a member of 
the American Medical Association, the Iowa State Medical Society 
and the Lee County Medical Society. 

Dr. Richmond was married December 17, 1886, to Miss Etta E. 
Racey, of Scotland county, Missouri, by whom he has five children, 
Ernest, Theodore, Frank, Glenn and Arthur. Ernest and Frank are 
now students at the State Agricultural College at Ames, where the 
former has taken up electrical engineering, while the latter devotes 
his time to the study of agriculture. Theodore has become interested 
in newspaper work. 

The family are all members and the doctor is a trustee of the 
Santa Fe Avenue Methodist Episcopal church and is serving as dis- 
trict steward. He is also a Master Mason and holds membership in 
the Modern Woodmen of America. 



WILLIAM H. SOUTH. 



William H. South has been a lifelong resident of Lee countv, his 
birth occurring in Charleston township, October 24, 1852. His 
father, John South, was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, May 
20, 1827, and was only four years of age when the familv removed 
to Montgomery county, Indiana, whence they came to Lee county, 
Iowa, arriving here on the 15th of June, 1840. In this county our 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 359 

subject's grandfather, John South, Sr., passed away. For a time the 
family lived in Van Buren township and from there removed to 
Franklin township and later to Charleston township in 1856. 

On the 2 1 St of June, 1849, John South, Jr., married Miss Nancy 
A. Martin, who was born in Monongalia county, West Virginia, June 
6, 1829, and died here January 4, 1897. His death occurred Novem- 
ber 13, 1 89 1, and his body was laid to rest in Charleston cemetery. 
In early life he concentrated his energies upon farming, but for 
twenty-five years prior to his death he was engaged in the agricul- 
tural implement business in connection with farming, under the firm 
name of John South & Company, our subject being in partnership 
with him. He owned a valuable farm of two hundred acres in 
Charleston township, which property is still undivided, being owned 
by our subject and his brother. The father was an earnest Christian 
man and for a quarter of a century served as a deacon in the Baptist 
church and also as superintendent of the Sunday school. His po- 
litical support was given to the democratic party and for several 
terms he served as justice of the peace. As a pioneer of this locality 
he took an active part in its early development and improvement and 
bore the hardships and privations of frontier life. The first hogs 
that he marketed in this county brought him only a dollar and seventy- 
five cents per hundred and corn but twelve and one-half cents per 
bushel. He had four children, namely: Daniel, a farmer of Lee 
county; William H., of this review; Theodosia E., who died at the 
age of two years; and John Mitchell, who died at the age of five 
years. 

William H. South was reared in the usual manner of farm boys 
and attended the country schools when opportunity afforded. Later 
he was for two years a student at Whittier College, this state, gradu- 
ating from the commercial department of that school. For fifteen 
years he engaged in teaching school during the winter months, while 
the summer season was devoted to farm work. As before stated, he 
was engaged in the implement business with his father for some time, 
but the greater part of his life has been devoted to agricultural pur- 
suits and he is still part owner of the old homestead in Charleston 
township and also has other real estate interests. 

On the 1 8th of September, 1877, Mr. South married Miss Susan 
I. Skyles, who was born in Jefiferson township, this county, June 16, 
1855. and is a daughter of Benjamin Skyles. They have become the 
parents of five children, namely: Ada, the wife of Bert E. Brown 
of St. Louis; Nellie Maude, who married C. W. Slingerland of Eg- 
bert, Wyoming; Ruby May, the wife of M. J. Campbell of Fort 



360 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Madison; Anna Dora, who married Lowell King of Egbert, Wy- 
oming; and John William, at home. 

Mr. South remained on the farm until December, 1906, when he 
was elected county auditor and removed to Fort Madison. He 
served in that capacity for two terms to the entire satisfaction of all 
concerned and for one term of two years he w^as deputv auditor. 
Since his retirement from business he has been engaged in the life- 
insurance business for a short time. While living in the country he 
served as justice of the peace for sixteen years, was clerk of his town- 
ship for two terms and treasurer of the school district for twentv-one 
years. Public-spirited and progressive, he has made a most com- 
petent official and has left the office as he entered it, with the entire 
confidence and respect of those with whom he has come in contact. 
For eleven years he served as secretary of the Odd Fellows lodge in 
Charleston and has been a member of the Baptist church since 1872, 
serving as deacon of the church at Charleston and as treasurer of the 
church in Fort Madison. He also served as treasurer of the Keokuk 
Baptist Association for about ten years. He has ever commanded 
the respect of all who know him and is prominent both in public and 
private life. 



JOHN M. KENNEY 



The chief of police of anv citv is charged with grave responsibil- 
ities, the safety of life and property being largely in his hands, and 
great credit is due to the man who fulfills his duties in a satisfactory 
manner. Keokuk has such a chief in John AL Kenney, a native son, 
who was born February 13, 1858. His father, John Kenney, was 
a native of Ireland, born in 1833. He passed away at the compara- 
tively early age of thirty-five and was survived by his widow, who 
was in her maidenhood Catherine Skellev, also a native of Ireland. 
She departed this life at the age of sixty-two years. Besides our 
subject there are two daughters and two sons living. One brother, 
James, died in 1910. The eldest sister is Margaret and the younger 
Catherine. 

John M. Kennev was a student in the Catholic schools of Keokuk 
until he was twelve years of age. As his father had died a year or 
so before this, our subject was obliged to go to work at the age of 
twelve. He learned the trade of ironmolder and at the age of nine- 
teen accepted a position with the Globe Iron Works and after two 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 361 

years was given cliarge of the foundry department. He held that 
place for seventeen years, which record shows him to be efficient and 
loyal. In 1889 he was elected to the city council from the sixth ward 
and served in that capacity for four years. He was an alert and 
public-spirited alderman, zealously serving the best interests of the 
city. In 1889 he was made deputy city oil inspector under the ad- 
ministration of Governor Boise and so continued for four years. 
He was appointed deputy sherillf of the county in 1898 and served 
four years. He was elected sheriff in 1901 and served two years, 
and was appointed deputy marshal in 1905, in which capacity he 
also served two years. He was then elected chief of police, for a 
term of two years, and in September, 191 2, he was appointed chief 
of police by the commission, served the balance of the term and was 
reappointed on the 4th of May, 1914, so that he is now acting in that 
important capacity. 

Mr. Kenney's two sisters live with him in a comfortable home 
and their hospitality is enjoyed by their friends. He is a member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of 
Moose and the Knights of Columbus. He has always been prom- 
inent in organized labor and has belonged to the Ironmolders Union 
for thirty-two years, taking a great interest in the effort to secure 
justice for American working men. He has been quite prominent 
in the various labor organizations of which he has been a member, 
holding offices in most of them. He deserves great credit in that his 
success is due entirely to his own energy and natural ability. He was 
obliged to go to work at the early age of twelve, as his father was 
deceased and he was the eldest in the family. His first work was 
that of water boy on the old government canal, and his ambition 
and capability enabled him to work his way upward until he now 
holds a position of trust and honor in his native city and is respected 
bv its citizens. 



GREEN HENRY COLVIN. 

Among the farmers of Lee county whose labors have added to 
the splendid reputation borne by Iowa as a great agricultural state 
is Green Henry Colvin, one of the native sons of the county and one 
who by close application, unfaltering perseverance and capablv di- 
rected effort has gained a substantial measure of success in the work 
of the fields. He was born in Montrose township. May i, 1859, and 



362 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

is a son of William and Catherine (Van Ausdall) Colvin, both of 
whom were natives of Kentucky. Several years after their marriage, 
or in 1854, tli^y came direct to Lee county, settling two miles north 
of Montrose, where their remaining days were passed upon a farm. 
The father's birth occurred in Lincoln countv, Kentuckv, August 6, 
1826, and he had, therefore, passed the eigthy-third milestone on 
life's journey when he was called to his final rest on the 19th of 
August, 1909. It was in 1847 that he wedded Catherine Van Ausdall 
and they lived to celebrate their golden wedding. William Colvin 
ranked with the most highly respected men of this county, honored 
by all because of an upright life. One who knew him long and well 
said of him : 

"I am proud to say that William Colvin was my friend and it 
is as his friend that I wish to speak. There is nothing I could say 
or that anyone could say that could heighten your esteem of him, 
nor is there any need for panegyric or eulogy to keep his memory 
forever green in our minds and hearts. Least of all is there need 
for fulsome praise. His life has been an open book before us all 
for many years and the stainless record it presents is better than any 
laudation that could be voiced by human lips. But it seems fitting 
that some acknowledgment should be made of the virtues he exem- 
plified in his long career. 

"His qualities were such as to command admiration and esteem. 
He' rang true in every particular. He was genuine from center to cir- 
cumference. There was entire absence of pretense in his make-up. 
What he professed to be, that he was — a plain, kindly, earnest, honest, 
upright. God-fearing man. As such he lived his life and drew to 
himself friends who became bound to him as with bands of steel. 
He could not profess what he did not believe, nor would he suppress 
speech if he felt that he ought to speak out in the interest of truth 
and justice. Under all circumstances, whatever the issue or the 
emergency, he had the courage of his convictions. He never forced 
his opinions on anyone and he had the largest respect and tolerance 
for the opinions of others. But nothing ever tempted him to de- 
ceive for the sake of popularity or gain for anv consideration what- 
soever. Men implicitly felt they could trust such a man and they 
made no mistake in giving him their confidence. 

"William Colvin was strictly honest and he believed in exact jus- 
tice. He wanted every cent due him and he invariably met everv 
obligation to the last farthing. He had no sympathy with schemes 
of 'high finance,' many of which appeared to him to be a kind of 
ornamental stealing. Sophistries, ancient or modern, never confused 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY ^63 

him. In passing judgment he split no hairs, lo him a thing was 
either right or else it was wrong. There was no half-way house be- 
tween the two where he was content to abide. He accepted condi- 
tions as they exist in this world, but did all in his power to better them 
both by precept and example. He was no visionary — no impractical 
idealist. On the contrary, he was intensely practical. His judg- 
ment was as sound as his perception of right was clear. Without 
parading his professions, he was intrinsically a religious man. The 
basic principles of Christianity were ingrained in his daily life. He 
loved the right and did right for right's sake. The phrase 'a true 
Christian' is often misapplied, but the criticism does not hold good 
in his case. If there ever was a genuine Christian William Colvin 
was one. Honest, candid, truthful, high-minded, honorable, loyal to 
the right as God gave him light to see the right, he was an exemplar 
to all and an honor to the community in which he lived. As citi- 
zen, neighbor, friend, husband and father — in all the varied rela- 
tions of life — he performed well his part. On taking leave of us after 
a long, active and useful life he has left no known duty undischarged. 
He was faithful to every interest committed to his care — faithful 
even unto death. That he is now numbered among the glorified 
ones need not be said. He fought a good fight and kept the faith, 
and the reward of such is sure." 

Since the death of her husband Mrs. Colvin has resided upon the 
home place with her married daughter, Mrs. Davis. In the family 
were seven children: Malissa, the wife of Austin Wright, of Keo- 
kuk; Amanda, the wife of J. G. Boyd, of Montrose township; Mary, 
who became the wife of Zach Boyd and died in Clark county, Mis- 
souri; Martha, who married William Grimes and died while on a 
visit in Iowa from her home in Indiana; Green H., of this review; 
Sallie, the wife of Frank Davis, living on the old home place; and 
Nancy, the wife of Robert Grimes, of Montrose township. 

Upon the old family homestead Green Henry Colvin spent his 
youthful days, with the usual experiences of the farm boy of the 
period. He worked in the fields and early became familiar with 
the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He 
continued to assist his father until his marriage and then removed 
to his present home on section 6, Washington township, where he 
has a farm of one hundred and sixty acres of rich and productive 
land. He was formerly well known as a breeder of thoroughbred 
Polled Durham cattle, but now concentrates his attention upon 
general farming and annually gathers good crops as^a result of the 
care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. 



364 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

In 1884 Mr. Colvin was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Rice, 
who was born in Washington township, November 19, 1859, a daugh- 
ter of Jonas Rice. Their two children are: Flossie, the wife of 
Alexander Foggy of Washington township ; and Elma, at home. In 
his political views Mr. Colvin is a republican, and he and his family- 
are members of the Christian church. He is interested in all that 
pertains to public progress and is a stanch advocate of Lee county 
and her best interests. For fifty-five years he has been a witness of 
her growth and development and is a representative of one of the 
pioneer families, connected with the county through six decades. 



JOHN G. RICE. 



The agricultural interests of Lee county find a worthy repre- 
sentative in John G. Rice, who lives in Washington township, where 
his birth occurred on the 23d of August, 1865. He is a son of Jonas 
and Harriet N. (Cowles) Rice. The father was born in Massachu- 
setts, November 28, 1823, at Hubbardston, Worcester county, and 
was a son of Colonel Jonas and Grata (Partridge) Rice, who were 
also natives of the old Bay state. Coming to Iowa in 1839, Colonel 
Jonas Rice entered land from the government and developed the 
farm, upon which he and his wife spent their remaining days. Their 
children were as follows: Mrs. Elizabeth Eaton, Mrs. Augusta 
Stephenson, Mrs. Jerusha Caufman, Artemus L., Jonas, William O., 
Mrs. Julia Stephenson and Mrs. Amanda Tibbetts. All of them 
came to Lee county and most of them spent their remaining days 
within its borders. 

When four years of age Jonas Rice, father of John G. Rice, ac- 
companied his parents on their removal to Templeton. He was a 
youth of sixteen years when, in 1839, he came with his father to 
Iowa, the family home being established on section 5, Washington 
township, Lee county, where the grandfather of our subject pur- 
chased a quarter section of land. Upon that farm the father of our 
subject continued to make his home until his death, which occurred 
June 30, 191 2. He lived a busy and useful life and became recog- 
nized as one of the leading agriculturists of the community. To 
his original possessions he added until he had three hundred and 
eighty-five acres at the time of his death. In addition to cultivating 
the fields he raised many dairy cattle, hogs and horses and for a num- 
ber of years he made the manufacture of cheese a special feature of 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 365 

his farm. On the 14th of June, 1849, he wedded Harriet N. Cowles, 
who was born in Cattaraugus county, New York, October 22. 1828. 
a daughter of Dr. Josiah Cowles. Jonas Rice was a staunch repub- 
lican in his political views for many years and became a foremost 
factor in the prohibition movement. He belonged to the Christian 
church, and his life in every relation was upright and honorable. 

Mrs. Rice survived her husband for but a few months and died 
on the old home place October 31, 191 2, at the age of eighty-tour 
years and nine days. Her parents were Josiah and Phoebe (Merri- 
man) Cowles, who brought their family to Iowa in 1839, when their 
daughter, Harriet N., was but eleven years of age. The journey 
west was made on a raft by way of the Ohio and the Mississippi 
rivers, and Mr. Cowles established his home near Fort Madison. 
His life was of benefit to the community by reason of his professional 
and public service. He was a physician and carpenter and superin- 
tended the building of the roofs of the Iowa State Penitentiary. He 
also filled the ofiice of government inspector of weights and meas- 
ures. Frontier conditions existed at the time of the arrival of the 
family. Indians were still in the neighborhood and would frequently 
go to the town to beg and trade. The Drake family also lived in Lee 
county at that time and among Mrs. Rice's early school teachers was 
Francis Marion Drake, afterward governor of Iowa and the founder 
of Drake University. On the 14th of June, 1849, she gave her hand 
in marriage to Jonas Rice, and for sixty-three years they traveled 
life's journey together, Mrs. Rice surviving her husband, as previ- 
ously stated, only a few months. She lived a quiet, unassuming life, 
given wholly to the good of others. Her Christian character was 
noble and pure, and the hours devoted to her own comfort and in- 
terests were all too few. She gave strong evidence of her Christian 
faith and when upon her deathbed she penned a poem which again 
and again breathes the spirit of Christian faith in the words, "All 
is well." In the family of Jonas and Harriet N. (Cowles) Rice were 
six children: Oscar J., deceased; Harriet A., who became the wife 
of William Benbow and has passed away; Lillian, the wnfe of I. B. 
Dow of Denmark, Iowa; Lucy I., the wife of Green H. Colvin, 
mentioned elsewhere in this work; John G. ; and Edward J., who 
is living on the old homestead. 

The youthful days of John G. Rice were spent on the old home 
farm, but when about twenty-two years of age he went to Des Moines, 
where he was employed as a stenographer by the Bankers Life Asso- 
ciation for six years. He had supplemented a public school educa- 
tion by six terms of study in the Denmark Academy and by a com- 



366 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

mercial course at the Capital City Commercial College at Des 
Moines. After six years spent in stenographic work in that citv he 
returned to the farm and has since concentrated his energies upon 
general agricultural pursuits. He today owns and cultivates one 
hundred and forty-eight acres of rich and productive land, situated 
on section 7, Washington township. The place is well improved 
with the accessories and conveniences of a model farm of the twen- 
tieth century and in addition to cultivating the fields Mr. Rice 
engages extensively in butter making and in the raising of stock. 
The work of the farm is carefully and systematically conducted and 
substantial results accrue. 

On the 17th of April, 1889, Mr. Rice was married to Miss Alice 
H. Haigh, who was born in Polk county, Iowa, May 6, 1861;, a 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Askew) Haigh, who were natives 
of England and died in Polk county, Iowa. To Mr. and Mrs. Rice 
have been born three children, Oscar H., Esther Irene and Dorothy 
May. 

Mr. Rice votes with the republican party and has served as as- 
sessor, but, while he keeps well informed on the questions and issues 
of the day, he has given little time to seeking or desiring office. He 
holds membership in the Christian church, and his life is guided by 
its teachings, so that in his dealings with his fellowmen and in all 
of his relations with the public he is found honorable, reliable and 
true. 



GEORGE G. HAESSIG. 

George G. Haessig, who for manv years has been prominently 
identified with public affairs of Fort Madison, was born in this city 
on the 17th of June, 1856, and is a son of George and Christiana 
(Rhode) Haessig. The father was born in Alsace Merzweiler, 
France, now a part of Germany, March 24, 1829, and the mother 
in Liebenstadt, Brunswick, Germany, September 20, 1835. Both 
came to the United States in early life, the father landing in New 
York in 1847 ^^^ taking up his residence in Fort Madison in 1851. 
The mother arrived here with her parents in December, 1849, the 
voyage across the Atlantic being made on the same ship with Judge 
Bank. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Haessig were married in Fort Madison 
on the 28th of November, 1854, and continued to make this city their 
home throughout the remainder of their lives, the father dying De- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY :i67 

ccmbcr 15, 1892, and the mother August 5, 1902. He was a cabinet- 
maker by trade but later turned his attention to contracting and 
building and erected many of the principal blocks in this city. Dur- 
ing the early part of his residence here he supported the republican 
party, voting for its candidates until after Garfield's election, at 
which time he became a democrat. He served for a number of years 
as alderman of his ward and took a very active and prominent part 
in public afifairs. Fraternally he was connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, and religiously 
was a member of the German Evangelical Lutheran church, his wife 
and daughter also taking a prominent part in the work of that organ- 
ization. In his family were the following children: George G., of 
this review; Charles, now a resident of Los Angeles, California; 
William, of St. Paul, Minnesota; Edward IVL, who was born Janu- 
ary I, 1863, and died September 6, 1904, leaving a wife and two 
children; Henry G., who is mentioned elsewhere in this work; 
Albert, who was born January 2, 1873, and died January 20, 1909, 
leaving a wife and two sons; Otto C, a resident of Fort Madison; 
Amelia, the wife of Henry F. Smith of Fort Madison; Oscar S., 
of Washington, Pennsylvania; Frederick, who died at the age of 
thirteen years; and one daughter who died in infancy. 

Having spent his entire life in Fort Madison, George G. Haessig 
is indebted to the public schools of the city for the educational priv- 
ileges he enjoyed. In early life he learned the blacksmith's trade 
and continued to follow the same until 1887, when he turned his at- 
tention to the butchering business in partnership with his brother, 
William. In 1888, however, he disposed of the business and became 
a member of the police force. In 1891 he was elected chief of police 
and served in that capacity for four years and then served as con- 
stable until 1899. He was next engaged in the implement business 
and from 1906 to 1913 acted as steward for the Elks Club. At 
present he is not engaged in any particular business, but he and his 
three brothers now own the estate left by their father. 

On the 2ist of November, 1878, Mr. Haessig was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Lizzie Hesse, who was born in Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, in 1852, but was brought to Fort Madison by her parents 
during her infancy. She is a daughter of Henry Hesse, who died 
when she was only two years old. 

Mr. Haessig has ever taken an active interest in public affairs 
and in 1874 became a member of the volunteer fire department. He 
was made foreman of the hook and ladder company and continued 
to serve as such during the greater part of the time he was connected 



368 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

with the department. He was made president of the Gem City Fire 
Department, No. i, and is at present serving in that capacity. The 
democratic party has always found in him a stanch supporter of 
its principles, and he served as chairman of the democratic central 
committee of Lee county in 1885 and as treasurer of the same from 
1889 to 1906. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and is prominent in business and political affairs. 



ISAAC W. TRAVERSE, M. D. 

Fort Madison has known Dr. Isaac W. Traverse since 1889 and 
has continuously accorded him honor in his profession since he quali- 
fied for the practice of medicine and surgery. His ability and suc- 
cess are based upon comprehensive knowledge of the principles of the 
science and the truths which investigation and research have brought 
to light through all the ages to the present time concerning the laws 
of health. He reads widely, thinks deeply, his conclusions are logi- 
cal and he today occupies a position as one of the distinguished 
practitioners of Iowa. 

A native of the neighboring state of Illinois, Dr. Traverse was 
born in Hancock county on the 22d of October, 1872, his parents 
being W. F. and Emily J. (Wilsey) Traverse. The former was a 
son of Dr. Hiel Andrew and Jane (Sprout) Traverse, the latter's 
father coming from Scotland, he for many years practicing medicine 
in Hancock county, where he passed away at the age of ninety years. 
His son, W. F. Traverse, followed the occupation of farming, on 
which pursuit he depended for the support of his family. His labors, 
intelligently directed, won him substantial success and he became the 
owner of four hundred acres of land. His life's labors were ended 
in death on the 4th of October, 1901. For a long period he had 
survived his wife, who passed away in June, 1878. They were the 
parents of three sons and a daughter: John, now deceased; William, 
who resides upon the old home farm in Illinois; Dr. Isaac W., of 
this review; and Jean, the wife of Curt Silberschmidt, a broker of 
Los Angeles, California. 

Dr. Traverse assisted in the work of the home farm through the 
period of boyhood and youth, alternating his work in the fields with 
attendance at the public schools. Other pursuits, however, made 
stronger appeal to him than agriculture and after mentally reviewing 




DR. ISAAC W. TRAVERSE 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 371 

the opportunities open to him he decided upon the practice of medi- 
cine as a life work. In preparation therefor he entered the Keokuk. 
Medical College, in which he completed the regular course and was 
graduated on the 7th of March, 1893. He first located at Fort Madi- 
son, but after two months removed to Wapello, Iowa, where he 
continued in practice for eight months. In 1894 he returned to Forf 
Madison, where he has since made his home, devoting his attention 
to general practice. Progress is a cumulative process. Where there 
is. no advancement there has been no effort. The career of Dr. 
Traverse is indicative of this fact. He has advanced steadily with 
the passing years, for he has kept in touch with the most modern 
methods of medical and surgical practice, readily recognizing the 
worth of new ideas and advanced thought, yet not hastily discarding 
old and time-tried methods. His ability places him in the foremost 
rank among distinguished representatives of the profession in Iowa 
and his opinions are an influencing factor in the professional activities 
of many younger men. In early life Dr. Traverse served as health 
officer at Fort Madison and at one time was president of the Fort 
Madison Medical Society. He is often an active participant in the 
discussions of the Iowa State Medical Society, to which he belongs, 
and of the American Medical Association. Analyzation of his life 
work and character shows that he is a man of sympathetic nature, 
which, as a supplement to broad scientific knowledge, enables him to 
readily understand the various features and phases of medical practice 
that rest upon a knowledge of the mental and temperamental condi- 
tions of a patient as well as upon the actual physical condition. For 
many years Dr. Traverse has enjoyed an extensive private practice 
among the best people of Lee county and in addition he is medical 
examiner for the New York Life Insurance Company and the Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company, both of New York; the Union 
Mutual of Portland, Maine; the Massachusetts Mutual Insurance 
Company, the Hartford Insurance Company of New York, the Life 
Extension Institute of New York and several fraternal insurance 
companies. That his ability has brought him success finds evidence 
in the fact that he is now the owner of several fine farms and valuable 
city property and he has one of the most beautiful homes in Fort 
Madison. 

On the 28th of December, 1891, Dr. Traverse was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Daisy L. Ehart, of Fort Madison, a daughter of Philip 
and Sarah E. (Jarrett) Ehart, the former one of the old-time settlers 
of this city, where he conducted business as a wagonmaker. The 
mother was a daughter of Elias and Fanny Jarrett. The latter lived 



372 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

to the advanced age of nearly one hundred years and resided at West 
Point, Lee county, up to the time of her death. Mr. Ehart departed 
this life July 30, 1876, and his wife, long surviving, passed away 
February 13, 1914, at the home of Dr. Traverse. They were the 
parents of six children, three of whom are living: John, who is 
express agent at Fort Madison; Maggie, the wife of Frank Swanson, 
foreman of the Santa Fe shops; and Mrs. Traverse. Two sons, John 
W. and Philip E., have been born of the marriage of Dr. and Mrs. 
Traverse. The younger is now attending school, while the elder. is 
engaged in agricultural pursuits on his father's farm of two hundred 
acres in Scotland county, Missouri. He married Geraldine Thorn- 
ber and they have one son, John William. 

Politically Dr. Traverse is a democrat, but the honors and emolu- 
ments of office have no attraction for him. His life is largely guided 
by his faith in the teachings of the Presbyterian church, in which he 
holds membership, and by his oath of allegiance to the Masonic 
fraternity. He belongs to Claypoole Lodge, No. 13, A. F. & A. M.; 
Potowonok Chapter, No. 28, R. A. ^L ; Delta Commandery, No. 51, 
K. T. ; the Consistory and Kaaba Temple of the Mystic Shrine of 
Davenport, Iowa. He is also identified with several other fraternal 
organizations, among them the Modern Woodmen and Knights and 
Ladies of Security. His life exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the 
craft and he has utilized the opportunities so frequently ofifered 
in the medical profession to aid his fellow travelers upon life's jour- 
ney. Like her husband, Mrs. Traverse is a devoted member of the 
Presbyterian church and is a most active worker in its missionary 
society. In her home she is a devoted wife and mother and those 
who meet her socially find her a loyal friend. Both Dr. and Mrs. 
Traverse have an extensive acquaintance in Fort Madison, where the 
hospitality of the best homes is accorded them. No practitioner in 
southeastern Iowa stands higher in the regard of his professional 
brethren and none are more deserving of the success and honor which 
have come to them. 



JOHN P. KENNEDY. 



John P. Kennedy is well known in Montrose, where he has filled 
the office of postmaster and where he has made his home since his 
infancy, having been brought hither by his parents. His paternal 
grandfather, William Kennedy, died in Westport, Ireland, at the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 373 

age of sixty-two years. He had a family of three children, \\'illiam, 
Elizabeth and John, the last named being now in Dublin, Ireland. 
Of this family William Kennedy was born in County Mayo, at the 
town of Westport, July 15, 1831. His father was in the British 
army in the East Indies for twenty-two years and was retired on 
full pay. 

William Kennedy became a shoemaker, learning the trade at 
Westport, Ireland., He became a well informed man and recog- 
nized as a citizen of intelligence and public spirit, and during his 
residence in Ireland he served in the revenue police for three years. 
In 1853 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States and worked at 
his trade in Chicago, Dubuque and Keokuk. In the last named 
city he was married in June, 1859, to Mrs. Mina (Williams) Burns, 
who was born December 18, 1839, in Dublin, Ireland. She lost her 
father during her early girlhood and afterward came to the United 
States with her grandfather, who brought his family to the new 
world and settled at Port Jervis, New York. He was a stonemason 
by trade. Mrs. Kennedy acquired her education in the schools of 
Ireland and of Port Jervis, being but twelve years of age when taken 
to the latter city. In New York she married a Mr. Burns, who died 
in that state, and she afterward removed to Keokuk with her one 
child, Timothy. Here she met and married William Kennedy. In 
October, i860, he came to Montrose and established a shoe shop on 
the levee, conducting the business continuously to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1885. He was active in township affairs 
and served on the school board and was a member of the town council, 
cooperating in manv movements and measures which contributed to 
the public welfare. His political allegiance was given to the repub- 
lican party and his religious faith was that of the Protestant Epis- 
copal church. His widow still resides in Montrose. By their mar- 
riage they had eight children: John P.; William, now living in 
Tacoma, Washington; Eva, who became the wife of N. J. Chapman 
and passed away; Jennie, the wife of F. D. Butzer of Los Angeles, 
California; Charles A., a member of congress; George W., who 
married Doris Carnes and is principal of the Montrose schools; 
Annie, the wife of Frank Kerr of Montrose; and Lillie, at home. 

John P. Kennedy was brought to Montrose when but six weeks 
old. He attended the public schools here, afterward becoming a 
student in the Eastern Iowa Normal school, and was graduated from 
the law department of the Iowa State University with the class of 
1892. He never practiced law, always preferring to attend to his 
extensive nursery business, in which he has been engaged in connec- 



374 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

tion with his brother Charles since 1883. The company still remains 
intact and the business of the firm is now one of large proportions. 
His business connections, important and prominent as they are, have 
made Mr. Kennedy well known and the integrity and enterprise of 
his methods have gained for him the high regard of all with whom 
he has been brought into contact. This is the only line of business in 
which he has engaged save that of teaching, which profession he took 
up at the age of twenty years and followed at intervals for fourteen 
years, during part of which time, however, he attended school. 
During six years of that period he was principal of the schools of 
Montrose. 

Mr. Kennedv was united in marriage to Miss Marjorie Ballou, 
June 14, 1893, and they became the parents of three children, Cath- 
erine, Margaret and Eleanor. Fraternally Mr. Kennedy is well 
known as a Mason and Odd Fellow. He also has membership with 
the Knights of Pvthias and the Modern Woodmen of America. His 
political allegiance has always been given to the republican party, 
and he has long been a recognized leader in its local ranks. In 1897 
he was appointed postmaster by President McKinley and for fifteen 
years was continued in that office through ensuing administrations, 
making a most creditable record by the prompt and faithful manner 
in which he discharged his duties. He served as a chairman of the 
republican county committee in 1894, 1895 and 1896, and his opin- 
ions carry weight in the councils of his party. In fact, he is a recog- 
nized leader in his community and his influence is always on the side 
of progress, advancement and improvement. 



KEOKUK INDUSTRIAL ASSOCIATION. 

A real appreciation of the amount of work done by the Industrial 
Association, as well as an appreciation of the value of the association 
to the city, can best be determined by a careful survey of the amount 
of work handled in the office, by officials and by committees. There 
are hundreds of items of business which come up for consideration 
in every city which demand careful and immediate attention. They 
do not pertain to any one particular business, otherwise they would 
be looked after by that particular business. These items do not 
come before the city officials for consideration, because they have 
more to do with the united commercial interests of the city than they 
do with any municipal matter in itself. A large compilation of data 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 375 

covering the entire field of the city's commercial activity, a study of 
the manner in which other cities and other commercial organizations 
are developing commerce and industry are necessary and do not come 
under the regulation program of activity of any one of the standard 
old time organizations governing municipalities. 

Individuals often wonder what was done in the old times to look 
after these particular things. Investigation develops the fact that 
they were either neglected entirely or were handled in a half hearted 
manner bv the municipal organization itself, at the same time that 
they were burdened w^ith the legitimate afifairs of the city. As a 
consequence many of the important details of municipal development 
were neglected, seriously, in the old times because of the lack of a 
specific organization having as its purpose the development of the 
entire business interests of the municipality. 

The Keokuk Industrial Association has demonstrated the value of 
such organizations by the constant and untiring effort put forth to 
take care of just those particular things which are so often neglected. 
To appreciate the real value of the Industrial Association a careful 
survey should be made of the demands of the city's commercial inter- 
ests and the numberless items of business directly handled by the 
Industrial Association, in order to take care of every phase of modern 
development and meet every demand. 

Comparative information in regard to the cities of the country is 
necessary in order that the people of Keokuk may know where they 
stand as a city, as compared with the other cities of the state and 
other states of the Union. This information is on hand at the Indus- 
trial Association office for the use of the general public. 

Complete information as to the amount of business handled, the 
number of men employed, the factories operated, the amount of busi- 
ness transacted, the amount of freight handled, in and out of the 
city, in any one year and a period of years, a knowledge of the actual 
conditions, sanitary and otherwise, which prevail within the corpo- 
rate limits, and in addition to all of these a definite knowledge of 
the best plans and methods whereby all undesirable conditions may 
be changed and the proper and logical development of every depart- 
ment of municipal growth can be brought about. 

The Industrial Association during the last four years has accom- 
plished nothing of a spectacular nature. At the same time the asso- 
ciation has been one of the busiest organizations in the city and has 
taken care of an enormous amount of detailed work, which municipal 
growth, under ordinary circumstances, requires. In addition to this 
it has had the extra burden of taking advantage of the most modern 



376 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

and scientific methods in power production and the utilization of 
the results of these methods in order to produce the best results and to 
make them of value, not only to individual and commercial firms, 
but to the city as a whole. , 

This work so far has been largely preliminary. Not one item of 
business handled by the association can be termed final in its accom- 
plishment. It has all been foundation work for the development 
of the city, even to the securing and the provision of proper housing 
for the few industries which have been located here. 

The Industrial Association oflice is a veritable bureau of informa- 
tion regarding the city of Keokuk, its advantages as a location and 
the means whereby the city's growth can be accomplished in the most 
satisfactory manner. At the office can be found outlines of the most 
successful plans adopted by other cities of the countrv and of the 
world for the accomplishment of the municipal growth and for the 
proper care and protection of the city's commerce and industry. 
Visitors bv the hundred have been entertained and have been given 
a just outline of the city's assets. Thousands of letters have been 
written in response to inquiries regarding Keokuk and Keokuk's citi- 
zens, in addition to the letters written to industries which we are 
endeavoring to locate here. 

All of this information, together with hundreds of items vet 
unmentioned, can be found in tabulated form at the office of the 
Industrial Association, collected for the benefit of Keokuk citizens 
and Keokuk industries. 

The officials of the Industrial Association are: President, C. R. 
Joy; first vice president, J. A. Kiedaisch; second vice president, C. F. 
McFarland; secretary, J. F. Elder, and treasurer, Ira W. Wills; 
and on the board of directors are A. D.' Avres, T. A. Craig, J. F. 
Elder, L. A. Hamill, A. Hollingsworth, Stephen Irwin, C. R. Joy, 
J. A. Kiedaisch, J. T. McCarthy, C. F. McFarland, C. A. Mc- 
Namara, L. F. Rollins, Jacob Schouten, G. S. Tucker and Ira W. 
'Wills. 

There is a tendency on the part of manv to complain that Keokuk 
has not developed as rapidly as it should have done. On the other 
hand, the more thoughtful people take into consideration the fact 
that up until five years ago Keokuk was not well known beyond the 
limits of the state of Iowa and outside of the railroad time tables 
and the river maps. Those who did know it remembered Keokuk 
as one of the small old-fashioned Mississippi river towns which was 
holding its own, primarily, by doing a fair amount of wholesale 
and retail business. It is recognized as one of the oldest towns in 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 377 

the state and its history is replete with events of antebellum and Civil 
war days. People remembered when the canal was built and referred 
to that event as the one great event in the history of the city. The 
canal and a few smaller incidents in railroad historv and in the com- 
mercial development of the town constituted the claim to public 
notice on the part of this city. 

In the early seventies the United States government constructed 
the canal between here and Montrose, in order to make it possible 
for shipping to get by the rapids of the Mississippi river at this place. 
Following that the efiforts of our people to develop Keokuk into a 
metropolitan city have been confined largely to occasional series and 
successful attempts at publicity, industrial development and the like. 
The great efTort was securing the government franchise for the con- 
struction of a dam across the great river at this place. 

Of course, some of the industrial efforts of the association were 
successful. Several factories were located here which have given 
rise to considerable publicity. These factories are a source of satis- 
faction to the city because of their success. Occasionally efforts 
were made at the entertainment of visitors. The annual street fair 
was widely known over this section of the country. The reputation 
of the city for the hospitality of its citizens was a source of pride to 
all those living here. In fact, Keokuk in the early days was simply 
a small going Mississippi river city, which had been left somewhat 
in the shadow by the development of great inland cities as the result 
of the extension of the railway systems of the country. 

In order to appreciate what has really been accomplished by 
the Industrial Association it is urged that the conditions previous to 
the organization of this association should be taken into considera- 
tion. It is wise to compare the amount of business done today with 
that conducted here, both in a retail and in a wholesale way, previous 
to 1 910. With this comparison in view it is possible to gain a better 
understanding of Keokuk as it is going to be than in any other man- 
ner. When the blues come because business does not increase con- 
stantly it is wise to remember these things and to note that there is a 
great increase in business generally over what it used to be. 

The only real claim upon the city for wide publicity and the only 
real chance it has had to become a city of great importance came 
when a committee of Keokuk and Hamilton men, through a long 
period of effort, secured the government franchise for the power 
project on the river at this place. 

From February 9, 1905, Keokuk has had its chance. The oppor- 
tunity took on a concrete form in 19 10 when the money and the force 



378 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

were landed in the city and the construction of the dam and power 
plant began. 

Keokuk during the last four years has become a city of world- 
wide importance. It has a chance to grow which few cities in the 
world have possessed. Its ability to attract moneyed interests has 
been but recently discovered. It is because of this opportunity and 
this ability that the Keokuk Industrial Association was called into 
being. The work it has done can only be truly appreciated, as a con- 
sequence, by a careful comparison of the conditions that exist today 
with those which existed previous to 19 lo. 

Few people realize the extent of the publicitv which has resulted 
from the efifort the association has put forth. Beginning with only 
a provincial reputation Keokuk is now a city of world-wide repu- 
tation. 

This has all been brought about by two means. Both of these 
are positive efforts of the Keokuk Industrial Association. To begin 
with the publicity campaign, which was conducted by the Industrial 
Association, beginning in the spring of igio, placed Keokuk and 
Keokuk opportunities before the world. This was an expensive 
campaign and cost the association a large initial outlay. The great 
magazines of the world published the advantages of the city, the 
things being done here, and expounded the future possibilities. As 
a consequence people began to notice Keokuk. Publications began 
to ask questions about the possibilities here. 

Then the second efifort was made. The publicitv received 
through the news columns of the various papers and magazines was 
directly called forth by the space advertising for which the associa- 
tion paid. 

During the summer of 1913 the Industrial Association emploved 
Will P. Green of Warsaw to take charge of the publicity department 
of the association work. Through his efiforts an enormous amount of 
news space was given over to the publication of information con- 
cerning Keokuk, the men who are responsible for the power project 
being located here and to the man in charge of construction. Eight 
thousand newspapers, printed in every civilized country in the world, 
gave space to the news about Keokuk and the Keokuk project. The 
project has vied with the Panama Canal for the head lines in the big 
newspapers of the country. 

In addition to the newspapers' space, magazines have sent men 
here for the special purpose of ascertaining the details of the immense 
project and the opportunities here. Window cards, moving picture 
films, stereopticon lectures and every conceivable kind of publicity 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 379 

has been asked for by tlie public and given by the association. It 
can be seen from this that the attention of the world has been focused 
on Keokuk and what the people here have been attempting to do. 

This is the start. The foundation for the growth of every city 
is said, by those interested in city development, to be publicity. Peo- 
ple must know that a city is in existence, that it has something the 
world is demanding, that it is awake and that all of its opportunities 
are of a permanent nature. 

The second thing necessary to the development of the city was 
some means wherebv interested capital and industry might receive 
proper attention and the proper care when conditions developed 
which would attract them permanently to the city. This efTort 
resulted in the purchase of land to be used for factory sites and in 
the movement to erect a new hotel for the accommodation of the 
guests and prospective residents of the city. 

How this second efifort resulted in tangible results is well known 
to all who live here and to the majority of those who have read the 
newspapers and who have had occasion to visit here or write to us. 

A tract of land located on a branch of the Burlington system was 
purchased by the association and platted for factory sites. The 
Mississippi River Power Company purchased a large tract of land 
on the Des Moines river bottoms for the accommodation of factories. 
One of the finest hotels in this section of the west has been constructed 
and is now taking care of all visitors in the city. These efforts were 
necessary, although expensive. Resulting from the manner in which 
the local people through the association met the emergency, Keokuk 
has prepared itself to take advantage of the publicity received through 
the Industrial Association. 

The third necessary step in the development of the city has been 
the adoption of a plan on which the city could grow and grow in the 
least expensive, as well as the most scientifically efficient manner. 

The majority of the cities of the world have developed along 
accidental lines. The contour of the country and primeval conditions 
governed very largely the lines along which streets have been 
extended and buildings constructed. They also governed very 
largely the manner in which traffic was handled and business dis- 
tricts layed out. Their results, however, have in nearly every case 
been ill advised and as a consequence their transformation has caused 
terrific expense when the city has developed to such an extent that the 
old fashioned by-ways and accidental lay outs of districts have become 
inadequate. 



380 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY' 

Seattle, Washington, authorities have spent millions of dollars to 
replan the city, in order to make its dev^elopment symmetrical and 
adequate to the demands. Cleveland, Ohio, has done the same thing. 
Indianapolis, Indiana, and Erie, Pennsylvania, are attempting the 
same thing. New York city has always been an accidental growth 
and the replanning of the city has cost millions and millions of dol- 
lars simply by the methodless change in the development of its busi- 
ness and manufacturing districts. 

Keokuk, Iowa, is the only city in the state which is planning its 

' development beforehand. It has taken counsel from the mistakes of 

other cities and is planning its development so that in future time, 

regardless of the size of the city, there will be no unnecessary 

changes and no unnecessary e.xpense. 

Washington, D. C, considered one of the most beautiful cities in 
the world, is a city which has developed from a plan carefully layed 
out from the beginning. The only mistakes made in the development 
■ of the citv of Washington, as our capitol city, were made by those 
officials whii disregarded the original plans drafted by Le Enfant, 
the French landscape architect. 

It is peculiar that one of the officials to make a mistake in the 
growth of Washington was one of the presidents of the United States. 
When Andrew Jackson located the treasury building of the United 
States government, he did not have the plan before him at all. It is 
reported that he went out with a committee from congress and the 
United States senate, and, walking over the capitol grounds looking 
for a site for the treasury building, picked out a place which he 
thought was large enough, and sticking his walking stick into the 
ground said, "we will locate the treasury building here." As a con- 
sequence the treasurv building has been out of place, it is not in 
keeping with the general plan for the city of Washington, it obstructs 
the view and is a jar upon the artistic sense of every person visiting 
the city, and, in addition lessens facilities for handling the affairs of 
the citv of Washington. 

The Industrial Association in its efforts to secure the proper plans 
for the development of Keokuk was exceptionally successful. The 
right man was secured to do the work and the completed plans were 
accepted by the people of Keokuk at a mass meeting and were adopted 
by the citv officials in due Course of time. 

This has been a serious attempt on the part of the association 
and, unless phvsical conditions change and the business of the city 
develops along lines which it is impossible for any individual to 
foresee, the plan for the citv of Keokuk as drafted by John Nolen 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 381 

under the auspices of the Keokuk Industrial Association will be 
carried out in detail. 

With these preliminary steps taken the next work of the Indus- 
trial Association was to look after those particular facilities which 
are required bv industries locating here for handling their output 
to the greatest advantage. 

Freight rates were enjoyed by neighboring cities which prac- 
tically made fair competition by local industries an impossibility. 
It is said, by many familiar with the case, that the shipping and 
rate conditions in the city of Keokuk constituted one of the most 
flagrant cases of discrimination that had been put up to the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. As a result of the efifort on the part 
of the Industrial Association to remedy this condition, joined by the 
upper Mississippi river crossings in Iowa, a freight rate situation 
prevails which makes it possible for industries in Keokuk to compete 
favorablv with every other city in this vicinity. Incidentally, it has 
been made possible for us to ship our freight in the future with some 
degree of justice to the local people. It is estimated, by conservative 
authorities, that this one victory will net the shippers of Keokuk a 
saving of approximately thirty thousand dollars the first year. 

As a result of this one more advantage, one more substantial asset 
has been added to Keokuk as a business and manufacturing city and 
it has one more claim to metropolitan growth and development. 

So much for the preliminary etiforts made by the Industrial Asso- 
ciation in order to take care of the future growth of the city, as well 
as to make future growth possible. These have been necessary steps 
and if they had not been accomplished it would be impossible to con- 
tinue the work of the association for the development of the city with 
any assurance of success. 

Speaking specifically the association has accomplished the fol- 
lowing along industrial lines : 

It permanently located the Standard Oil distributing station at 
this place. The Standard Oil Company could not find the site it 
wanted on which to locate its plant. As a consequence it was looking 
elsewhere and, had it not been for the activity of the members of 
the Industrial Association, this plant would have been located else- 
where. 

The Mills-Ellsworth Company, located on land which is now 
under the water of Lake Cooper, was planning to go elsewhere 
because it could not find the site it desired on which to re-establish 
its plant. The efiforts of the executive committee of the Industrial 



382 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Association located this plant on Commercial Alley in its present 
splendid building. 

The American Cement Machine Company, formerly of Madison, 
Wisconsin, was moved to Keokuk and established through the efforts 
of the Industrial Association. This is one of the very successful 
factories operating in Keokuk at the present time and is rapidly 
increasing. A large addition to this plant is to be built soon. 

The John DeWitt Washing Machine Company has been founded 
through efforts of members of the Industrial Association. Mr. De- 
Witt, the former manager of the Industrial Association, became 
interested in manufacturing while he was working to secure factories 
for the city. On severing his relations with the association he 
launched in the manufacturing business himself, thereby showing his 
faith in the future of Keokuk as a manufacturing center. 

During the last four years the Industrial Association has investi- 
gated hundreds of factory propositions. It is peculiar that in this 
day and age of the factory which is hard up for funds immediately 
makes arrangements to move elsewhere and puts out feelers, testing 
out the different Industrial Associations and Chambers of Commerce 
throughout the country in an effort to find additional capital to safe- 
guard the industry itself and for protection against failure. 

Every man who has a patent feels that Chambers of Commerce 
and industrial organizations are the ones to whom he should go, in 
order to interest capital in his project and in order to establish him- 
self in an industrial way. His supposition is correct in this regard, 
the only unfavorable element being that the majority of inventions 
are of such a nature and are so dependent upon other manufacturing 
concerns that it is practically suicidal for anyone to invest in these 
patents without first carefully going into the details and ascertaining 
the reliability and value of the patent, the proper protection it has 
and the possible demand for the article. Some patents are gold 
mines but the majority of them are not. 

As a consequence the great majority of inventions presented to 
the Industrial Association for consideration have not called for 
organized industrial effort because on investigation they are apt to 
be found impractical and it would be unsafe to attempt the organiza- 
tion of a company to manufacture them. And yet this field affords 
a wonderful opportunity for idle capital to make itself useful and 
valuable, and incidentally is a splendid way in which the industrial 
department of Keokuk's growth could be increased. 

Out of hundreds of factory projects investigated ninety-five per 
cent are propositions it would be foolish for Keokuk to attempt to 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 883 

handle. In the remaining five per cent there is occasionally a good 
proposition. However, the demands made by nearly all of them are 
such that they cannot possibly be considered. 

Because of the great effort made by the average sized cities the 
countrv over to increase their industrial growth, factorv propositions 
have found pretty easy picking. Some cities have secured surpris- 
ingly large sums and have given the money awav in the form of 
bonuses to attract industrial projects. This has resulted in the 
development of numerous tramp factories, which will agree to locate 
in a city for a certain length of time for a certain bonus. When the 
contracts have been fulfilled they plan to move elsewhere in order to 
receive more bonuses. Still other factories make unreasonable 
demands, not caring where they locate so long as they get the bonus 
or the stock subscription. 

As a consequence the country is infested with a hoard of pro- 
moters with every conceivable kind of a factory proposition. Some 
of these propositions are good, but the very large majority of them 
are not. Naturally then every proposition has to be investigated 
carefully in order that the good ones may not be overlooked. 

Thousands of letters have been written by the Industrial Associa- 
tion during the four years. Hundreds of personal investigations have 
been made and everything has been done to bring the legitimate 
factory project into touch with Keokuk. 

Many local people have believed all that was necessary, after the" 
power project was completed, was to sit on front porches, mark up 
prices on property and receive unthinkable prices for real estate, 
factorv buildings and residences. There has been much disappoint- 
ment and some hardship as a result of this unnatural belief. Some 
have become so badly discouraged that they are ready to throw up 
their hands, cease to try to do anything and let the city take care of 
itself. 

This never develops anything and is very apt to result in hard- 
ship, as well as hindrance to the real growth of the city. It will take 
years to develop the city, a fact which is commonly known. In order 
to realize the full benefits the people of Keokuk have discovered that 
they must put their shoulders to the wheel and assist in the work being 
done. It is the only way, so experts have discovered, to make a city 
metropolitan. But it will take a constant effort. 

A great deal of effort has been expended by the association in 
the entertainment of conventions. Since the organization of the 
Industrial Association approximately twenty conventions a year have 
been entertained in this city. The effort on the part of the associa- 



384 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

tion to secure conventions has been so successful that at the present 
time the association is having all it can do to meet the demands inci- 
dent to their entertainment. Conventions and excursions are now 
coming to the city weekly. 

An important event of 1913 was the celebration commemorating 
the opening of the great Mississippi hydro-electric project, held on 
the 26th, 27th and 28th of August. This celebration had the backing 
of the Industrial Association and was handled through its officers, 
being one of the largest of its kind known in the central west. On 
that occasion there were present the governors of Missouri, Illinois 
and Iowa, besides engineers and scientific men of high reputation 
from all parts of the world, together with several thousand visitors, 
making the occasion a notably successful one. 

Because of the increase in traffic between Keokuk and the east 
agitation was started soon after the construction of the dam, looking 
toward the establishment of a railway bridge on the top of the dam, 
around the north end of the power house across the forebay and 
extending to the Union station. The discussion of the subject led 
to the organization of a company of citizens of Keokuk and Hamilton 
for the purpose of securing from congress the right to build this 
bridge. The Industrial Association has stood behind the efifort to 
secure the final consent of the national government and is at present 
continuing its interest along this line. During January, 1914, a sub- 
committee of the congressional committee on interstate and foreign 
commerce visited Keokuk as the guests of the Industrial Association 
for the purpose of going over the dam and power plant in person 
with an eye to determine the suitability of the present installation for 
that purpose. An entire day was spent with this committee, together 
with representatives of the war department, river engineers and 
government officials, in making this investigation and inspection. 
The result was satisfactory, but the committee felt that the old bridge 
company should rebuild its bridge and make it capable of handling 
the increased traffic. This the old bridge company has agreed to do. 

During the spring of 191 i the first clean-up campaign of the 
citv was instituted under the auspices of the committee on parks, 
playgrounds and general improvements of the association, resulting 
so successfully that it has become a part of the regular calendar of 
the association for each year. During the summer of 1913 the streets 
and alleys committee began a campaign for oiling the streets in the 
residence portions of the city in an efifort to better the conditions, 
permanently lay the dust and thereby render driving much more 
pleasant during the dry season. About sixteen bl(K^ks in the residence 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 385 

part of the city were oiled during that summer and Keokuk's people 
gratefully acknowledged the worth of the improvement. 

The association is at present agitating the improvement of the 
river front and has assisted the city council in raising funds for this 
purpose. At present a fund of considerable size is in the treasury of 
the city for the construction of a harbor wall at the levee running 
south from Main street and the river. This wall will be put in during 
the dry months of this present summer; the complete equipment for 
passenger and freight traffic will be installed as soon thereafter as 
possible. 

Ever since the association was established considerable interest 
has been taken by its members in the improvement of the Mississippi 
river and navigation. On October 15th last the annual convention of 
the Upper Mississippi River Improvement Association was held at 
Hannibal, Missouri, to consider the latest developments and improve- 
ments and to make recommendations for the future work to be done. 
Fifteen citizens from Keokuk attended this convention and took an 
active part. Since then members of the board of directors attended 
similar conventions at St. Paul and at St. Louis for further considera- 
tion of the same general plans. It is the hope of the association to 
have some definite work done along this line this summer. 

What the future of Keokuk may be we can only conjecture because 
we cannot see into the future. However, it is wise for us to judge 
largely by the assets of the city, both natural and artificial, in the 
light of the strenuous effort being made. Very little elTort is being 
wasted. The field for development is so vast and there are so many 
weeds to be put out of the way that it is a difficult proposition to find 
all of the real fruit in a shape to be handled at once. This need not 
discourage anvone because it is the same with every city that has ever 
been developed. It is the same with every private business. Conse- 
quently it is only a matter of time and a continuation of the present 
strenuous ettort being put forth before we will see the hopes of the 
citizens of Keokuk realized to the fullest extent. 



WILLIAM PAUL SHERLOCK, PH. G., PH. C, M. D. 

Dr. William Paul Sherlock was born in Palo Alto county, Iowa, 
April 30, 1884. He received his early education in the district 
schools of his native county and remained there until fifteen years 
of age. He first located in Clare, Iowa, where he worked on a 



386 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

farm and later was employed in a drug store at that place. He 
moved to Fort Dodge about 1902, where he secured employment in 
a grocery store and later in a baker shop, attending school as best 
he could during this time. Subsequently he was connected with 
Severin Drug Company at Fort Dodge, but later in the year entered 
the employ of the Fort Dodge Daily Chronicle, being city reporter 
for that paper. In the spring of 1903 he entered Highland Park 
College of Des Moines, taking up preparatory and didactic work, 
later courses in pharmacy and chemistry. After graduating he was 
for some time associated with the Namur-Vincent Drug Company, 
and from there he moved to Lenox, Iowa, where he assumed man- 
agement of a drug store. He desired to see something of the coun- 
try, so accepted a position as detail man, representing the Water- 
berry Chemical Company throughout the south. In 1901; he began 
the study of medicine, entering Keokuk Medical College. College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, and, receiving a year's credit for ad- 
vanced work done in chemistry and pharmacy, was graduated in 
1908. He is now engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery 
at Keokuk. He is a member of County, State and District Medical 
Societies and of the American Medical Association, keeping in touch 
with modern developments of medicine and surgery. He is a mem- 
ber of the staff of St. Joseph's Hospital and a member of the medical 
staff in the Iowa National Guards; examining surgeon for the local 
company of the organized militia and United States Civil Service 
examiner. 

Dr. Sherlock has taken an active part in hygiene and sanitation 
and in the aft'airs of the city health problems. In iqii was ap- 
pointed as local state milk inspector, later appointed city inspector. 
He has also taken an active interest in military affairs and in the 
autumn of 1910 he founded a military organization now known as 
L Company, Fifty-fourth Infantry Iowa National Guards, and was 
elected first lieutenant of same, serving three years. 



WILLIAM N. SAGE. 



William N. Sage has been a resident of Lee county throughout 
the greater part of his lifetime, but his birth occurred in Clark 
county, Missouri, April 10, 1872. His parents were Orrin C. and 
Mary Jane (Black) Sage, the latter a daughter of Hamilton Black, 
who came to Lee county in 1838. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY ;J87 

William N. Sage was reared in his native countv and there 
received his education, attending the public schools. When fifteen 
years of age he left the home farm and for a number of years was 
engaged "in various occupations. In 1904 he came to Keokuk as 
grain buyer for J. C. Hubinger & Bros. Company, and a year later 
made this city his permanent residence. He has given his best to 
the business with which he is connected and his energy and capacity 
for work have brought him steady advancement until he is now 
general manager for J. C. Hubinger & Bros. Company. He has 
given public-spirited service to Keokuk in connection with the mam- 
moth dam across the Mississippi, which is one of the wonders of 
modern engineering. When the project of building the dam was 
first given serious consideration Mr. Sage was employed to ascertain 
the value of the land which would probably be submerged. He 
investigated conditions so thoroughly that when the enterprise was 
finally financed he was empowered to obtain title to those lands and 
is yet engaged in that capacity. He is also a director of the State 
Central Savings Bank and of the Iowa State Insurance Company, 
using his influence in both corporations to secure a steady normal 
growth. 

In 1894 Mr. Sage was married to Miss Florence M. Stafiford, of 
Kahoka, Missouri. They are both well known in social circles of 
the city and are often hosts to their many friends. He is a promi- 
nent member of the Masonic order, being a Knight Templar and a 
Noble of the Mystic Shrine. 



ELLSWORTH B. CRANE. 

Ellsworth B. Crane, residing upon the Crane homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres located on section 24, Montrose township, 
is one of the highly respected farmers of his locality. His father, 
Jabez Tunis Crane, was one of the pioneers of the county and built 
a two story brick residence, which was the first or second brick house 
in the county. It was destroyed by fire some years later. His birth 
occurred in Harrison, Hamilton county, Ohio, in 1819, but when a 
child he removed to Jackson county, Indiana. In 1844 he located in 
St. Charles, Missouri, whence he came to Lee county in 1857. Upon 
his arrival in this county he settled permanently in Montrose. His 
marriage occurred in 1847, Miss Mary A. Franklin, a native of 
Indiana and a daughter of Anderson Franklin, becoming his wife. 

Vol. 11—2 2 



388 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Mr. Crane died upon his farm in June, 1890, and was buried in 
Keokuk. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
was a republican in his political belief, serving as township trustee 
for a number of years. His widow removed to California and passed 
away in Los Angeles in 1903. The paternal grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this review passed away in Indiana. 

Ellsworth B. Crane was born August 27, 1862, upon the home- 
stead and as a boy attended the Ashland school near his home, his 
first teacher being Miss Mooney. He continued to make his home 
under the parental roof after he grew to manhood, with the excep- 
tion of two years spent in California. From his youth he has been 
accustomed to farm work and early became acquainted with practical 
methods of agriculture. After the death of his father Mr. Crane 
inherited the farm and is still devoting his time and energy to its 
operation. He emplovs modern methods in the cultivation of the 
fields and, as the land is rich and fertile, he harvests annually boun- 
tiful crops, which bring him a good income. 

The marriage of Mr. Crane and Miss Belle Grimes was 
solemnized April 8, 1891. Mrs. Crane is a daughter of William 
and Ruth (Reed) Grimes, residents of Montrose township. By her 
marriage she has become the mother of three children: Mary 
Hazelton, a graduate of the Keokuk high school with the class of 
191 2; and William LeRoy and Ruth, both of whom will graduate 
from the same school in 19 15. Mrs. Crane is a member of the Pres- 
byterian church of Montrose, which Mr. Crane also attends. He is a 
member of the Masonic order and of the Woodmen, while his 
political allegiance is given to the republican party. A son of a 
pioneer, his cooperation has always been given to all projects having 
for their purpose the advancement of the county. 



ROBERT F. RACEY. 



The development of the automobile business has furnished a 
profitable field for many enterprising men. Among the representa- 
tives of the trade in Fort Madison was until very recently Robert 
F. Racey, who in 1913 opened a garage and sold the Herfif-Brooks 
car. In the intervening period, covering a little more than a year, 
he built up a growing and substantial business. He was born in 
Missouri on the loth of November, 1894, •^■""^ '^ ^ ^'^^ of ]. L. and 
Emma (Arnold) Racev, who were farming people. The mother 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY :589 

is a sister of W. A. and G. L. Arnold, well known citizens of Fort 
Madison. 

Robert F. Racey was educated in the public schools and his 
entrance into the business world was made as an apprentice to the 
machinist's trade, for which he thoroughly qualified. He possesses 
much natural skill and ingenuity in this direction and his subsequent 
business experience and study have greatly promoted his efficiency. 
Removing to Fort Madison on the ist of March, 1913, he soon after- 
ward made arrangements for engaging in business here and equipped 
and opened a garage at No. 81 1 Front street. In 1913 he handled the 
HershofY car and in 1914 sold the Hertif-Brooks car. This is a four 
cylinder, thirty-eight horse power car, retailing at eleven hundred 
dollars, and also a six cylinder, forty-eight horse power, the sales 
price of which is thirteen hundred and seventy-five dollars. His 
garage was well equipped and he was capable of doing extra repair 
work. He is a young man who is just entering his third decade, but 
already he has demonstrated his business ability and by reason of his 
energy, enterprise and laudable ambition will no doubt win larger 
success in the future. 



ALONZO B. HUGHES, M. D. 

Dr. Alonzo B. Hughes, who has been engaged in the general 
practice of medicine at Keokuk since 1897, was a prominent factor 
in educational circles of Nebraska for a number of years prior to 
1894, when he came to Keokuk as professor of the chair of chemistry 
in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. After the consolidation 
of the Keokuk and the Physicians and Surgeons Colleges he became 
professor of materia medica and therapeutics. 

Dr. Hughes was born in Scotland county, Missouri, on the 9th 
of August, 1856, his parents being W. P. and Elizabeth Ann (Hol- 
land) Hughes, who took up their abode in Ottumwa, Wapello county, 
Iowa, when our subject was a small boy and subsequently removed 
to Des Moines, Polk county. In those two cities Alonzo B. Hughes 
acquired his literary training, and subsequently he followed the pro- 
fession of teaching for a period of twenty years. He also served as 
city superintendent of schools at Villisca, Montgomery county, this 
state, and at Schuyler, Nebraska. Prior to this time he acted as ward 
superintendent for the schools at Atlantic, Cass county, Iowa. Dur- 
ing a period of four years he was the editor of the Nebraska School 



390 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Journal. When thirty-six years of age he read medicine and after 
coming to Keokuk as professor of chemistry also attended lectures. 
At the age of forty he was graduated from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons and had the unusual distinction of signing his own 
diploma. In 1897 he embarked in the general practice of medicine 
at Keokuk and has since been accorded an extensive and gratifying 
patronage. 

Dr. Hughes was president of the State Association of Superin- 
tendents and Principals of the State of Nebraska in 1888; president 
of the North Nebraska Teachers' x-Yssociation in iS8q; president of 
the State Teachers' Association of Nebraska in i8go; delegate to the 
National Teachers' Association from Nebraska in 1890; and a 
member of the educational council of Nebraska in 1893 ^'^d '894. 
In 1899 he was elected a member of the board of education of the 
city of Keokuk and has continued to serve in that capacity to the 
present time with the exception of one year, acting for six years as 
president of the body. In 1913 he was sent as a delegate from the 
city of Keokuk to the International Congress of School Hygiene at 
Buffalo, which was the first convention of its kind in the United 
States and the fourth to be held in any country. 

In 188 1 Dr. Hughes was united in marriage to Miss Tennie 
Anderson, of Atlantic, Iowa, by whom he has two children: Ger- 
trude, who is now Mrs. George S. Yant; and Horace C. He belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias 
and other social and benevolent organizations. In his life are the 
elements of greatness because of the use he has made of his talents 
and his opportunities, because his thoughts are not self-centered but 
are given to the mastery of life problems and the fulfillment of his 
duty as a man in his relations to his fellowmen and as a citizen in his 
relations to his city, state and country. 



FRANK DAVIS. 



Frank Davis is a resident farmer of Montrose township, owning 
and cultivating eighty acres. He was born in Green Bay, Lee 
county, Iowa, November 24, 1863. His father, Armstead Davis, was 
a native of Ohio, born December 9, 18 18, and in that state he wedded 
Anna McGregor, who was born May 30, 1829. They came to Iowa 
at an early period in the development of Lee county, and secured 
a farm in Montrose township, remaining residents of this section of 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 391 

the state throughout their remaining days, the father passing away 
May i8, 1883, while his wife died April 6, 1896, their remains being 
interred in a cemetery at Sandusky. Both were consistent members 
of the Christian church. They are survived by two sons, Albert and 
Frank, both residents of Montrose township. 

The latter was reared in the township where he still makes his 
home and attended the public schools of Ashland a part of each year 
until he reached the age of eighteen. He worked upon his father's 
farm from early boyhood and continued to assist in its cultivation 
until the time of his marriage'. On the 19th of January, 1898, he 
wedded Miss Sadie Colvin, the marriage ceremony being performed 
by the Rev. Sanderson, of the Christian church of Keokuk. Mrs. 
Davis was Iporn at the old Colvin home in Montrose township on the 
6th of November, 1865, and acquired her education in the public 
schools. Her parents were William and Catherine (Van Arsdell) 
Colvin. Her father, who was born in Kentucky, came to Iowa at an 
early day with his wife and three children, driving across the country 
to Lee county. He settled in Montrose township and finally pur- 
chased the farm upon which Mr. and Mrs. Davis now reside, remain- 
ing thereon to the time of his death, which occurred in August, 1909. 
He was a faithful member of the Christian church and he exercised 
his right of franchise in support of the republican party. His widow 
still makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. Davis, who is one of 
a family of seven children, namely: Malissa, the wife of Austin 
Wright of Keokuk; Amanda, who married John Boyd of Montrose; 
Mary, who became the wife of Zach Boyd and died in Missouri; 
Martha, who became the wife of William Grimes and died in 
Indiana; Mrs. Davis; Nannie, the wife of Robert Grimes of Mon- 
trose; and J. H. Colvin. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Davis located upon his farm of 
one hundred and twenty acres in Montrose township and continued 
to cultivate and improve that property until 19 10, when he sold out. 
He then purchased his present farm and erected a residence thereon. 
The interior finishing of the house is of walnut grown upon this 
place. The home is an attractive one and the excellent appearance 
of the place indicates the careful supervision and practical methods 
of the owner, who is justly accounted one of the progressive farmers 
of his part of the county. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Davis has been born a daughter, Catherine, 
whose birth occurred in 1900 and who is now attending the public 
schools of Ashland. The parents are members of the Christian 
church at Summitville and do all in their power to further the moral 



392 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

development of the community. Mr. Davis is a republican in his 
political views and while he has not sought public office he has served 
on the school board for nineteen years. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Modern Woodmen of America. He has a wide acquaintance 
in this county, where his entire life has been passed, and that his 
record has ever been an honorable and commendable one is indicated 
in the fact that many of his stanchest friends are those who have 
known him from his boyhood to the present time. 



CHARLES J. HYDE. 



Charles J. Hyde was born on the 6th of March, 1855, on the farm 
which he now owns and occupies on sections 33 and 34, Washington 
township. Here he has always made his home and in connection 
with general farming he has for the past twelve years conducted a 
dairy, milking twelve cows and selling the milk himself from his own 
wagon. He owns one hundred and fiifty-five acres of very valuable 
and productive land on sections 33 and 34, Washington township, 
conveniently located one mile from the city limits of Fort Madison. 

Charles J. Hyde, our subject's father, was born in New York 
city in 1801 and in 1836 became a resident of Nauvoo, Illinois, where 
he married the mother of our subject, Miss Elizabeth Laub, in 1844. 
She was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in i8iq, and became 
a resident of Nauvoo in 1842. At that place Mr. Hyde conducted a 
livery stable for some time, but at the time of the troubles there he 
was driven out and came to Fort Madison, where he followed the 
same business for a time. He also secured a quarter section of land 
in this county and, making his home thereon, devoted considerable 
attention to agricultural pursuits. In connection with general farm- 
ing he also engaged in stock-raising here. In politics he was a demo- 
crat and for several terms most acceptably served as countv super- 
visor from his township. At one time he was a member of the 
Baptist church. He died on his farm in Washington township, 
August 14, 1886, and his wife passed away there December 31, 1903. 
He first married Lucy Sherwood, who died in this countv, and 
the four children born to them — Jane, Adaline, Udney and Henry — 
are also deceased. His second wife was the mother of our subject, 
and bv that union there were two children, the elder being Emma 
Louise, now the wife of D. H. Kern of Fort Madison. While 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 393 

engaged in business in Nauvoo the father owned his farm in this 
county, and the family resided thereon. 

Charles J. Hyde was reared and educated in much the usual 
manner of farm boys of his time and locality, and he remained under 
the parental roof until after reaching man's estate. In 1886 he was 
married to Miss Minnie Mumme, who was born in Fort Madison, 
September 21, 1855, a daughter of Christ and Sophia Mumme, who 
were from Brunswick, Germany, and were early settlers of this 
county, where their last days w'ere passed. The children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Hyde are: Elizabeth, who is now employed as a 
stenographer in the office of James C. Davis, attorney for the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railroad at Des Moines; Edna, court reporter in 
Fort Madison; Alice, who is employed as stenographer by Herming- 
hausen & Herminghausen, of Fort Madison; Fred R., who is now 
operating the home farm and is serving as secretary of the township 
school board; Emma, who is employed as stenographer by George 
B. Stewart, an attorney of Fort Madison; Minnie, at home; and 
Charles J., Jr., who is attending high school in Fort Madison. 

Mr. Hyde has never wavered in his support of the men and 
measures of the democratic partv and has taken a very active and 
prominent part in local politics. He served for fifteen years as town- 
ship clerk and is one of the influential and enterprising citizens of 
his community. 



WILLIAM STRUTHERS. 

William Struthers is an active, energetic farmer, owning and 
cultivating one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 32, Mon- 
trose township. He was born in the same township, on the old 
familv homestead three miles west of his present residence, the prop- 
erty being now owned by William Runer. There he spent his youth- 
ful days, with the usual experiences of the farm lad. He is of Scotch 
lineage, being a grandson of John Struthers, who was born in Scot- 
land but was reared in Lancashire, England. On crossing the 
Atlantic he took his family to St. Louis. His children were as fol- 
lows: Alexander; James, who died in St. Louis; Mrs. Isabelle 
Humphrey; and Jane, who married and went to California. 

Alexander Struthers, the father of William Struthers, was born 
in Lancashire, England, about 1834, and came to the United States 
soon after his marriage to Mary Nightingalg. They sailed from 
Liverpool and landed at New Orleans, whence they proceeded up 



394 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

the river by boat to Keokuk. Later Alexander Struthers was a boat- 
man on the river for several years, but afterward turned his attention 
to farming in Montrose township and became one of the leading 
agriculturists of the district, continuing upon his farm until his death, 
which occurred when he was about sixty-five years of age. His wife 
died twenty years later, when seventy-four years of age. They 
belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church when in England, but 
after coming to the United States joined the Latter Uay Saints. In 
his political faith Mr. Struthers was a democrat. The children in 
the family were: Agnes, who became the wife of Jonathan Rankin; 
Sarah, who married Asaph Buck and lives in Keokuk; Ellen, who 
became the wife of Riley EUerton and is deceased; William, of this 
review; Elizabeth, who became the wife of S. B. Wright of Montrose 
township; and Margaret, who married James Kite of Louisiana. 

Upon the old homestead farm William Struthers spent the days 
of his boyhood and youth and attended the Ambrosia public school, 
about two miles from his home, walking that distance. Among his 
teachers of early days was Mr. Hitchcock and his last teacher was 
Edward Haskett. He was a farm boy, with the usual experiences 
that fall to the lot of the youth who is reared amid an agricultural 
environment. 

On the 26th of March, 1879, Mr. Struthers was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ella Kite, who was born on a ranch near Buena Vista, 
in Amador county, California. Her father, John Kite, was born in 
Boone countv, Kentucky, in 1824, and there remained until about 
sixteen years of age. He acquired a limited education in one of the 
old-time schoolhouses of the early period. During his boyhood the 
Indians were numerous in Kentucky and he became a great hunter. 
When sixteen years of age he drove a herd of sheep through to 
McDonough county, Illinois, accompanied by his uncle William 
Jackson, a Methodist Episcopal preacher, who settled there. Mr. 
Kite afterward returned to Kentucky and later came to Iowa with 
another uncle, Addison Miller, who afterward returned, but Mr. 
Kite remained. He lived in that section until the time of his mar- 
riage and afterward settled on the prairie near Nashville. During 
his active life he had many exciting and ofttimes hazardous experi- 
ences, living much of the time upon the frontier. He was for several 
years a pilot over the rapids. He crossed the plains to California at 
an earlv day with an emigrant train bound for the gold fields of the 
Pacific coast. He was accompanied by his wife and children and 
they were almost a year upon the way, stopping for the winter on 
the shores of Salt Lake. There the government officials refused to 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 395 

allow them to proceed further on account of the deep snows in the 
mountains. During that winter the father boiled the briny water 
containing the salt, which he peddled over the country. In the 
spring, accompanied by two companions, he started on ahead of the 
train on foot in order to blaze the way, for the canyons would fill 
up with snow and it was difficult to find the road. At length they 
returned to the train and led them over the mountains into California 
through the Jackson and lone valleys. They arrived right in the 
heart of the placer mines. Mr. Kite purchased a squatter's claim of 
three hundred acres. His first peep into the valley gave him the 
impression that it was one vast field of oats. These were not the 
cultivated variety but grew wild. Upon his claim Mr. Kite built a 
frame house, for there was much fine pine timber there. With char- 
acteristic energy he set to work and developed his farm. Around 
him were many Digger Indians and it was not an unusual sight to see 
a grizzly bear. After remaining for twelve years he returned to 
Iowa and traded his California place for a farm in Lee county, owned 
by George Wirtz and Mr. Struthers. It was in May, 1865, fh^t 
the family started back, having two wagons, each drawn by a team 
of horses. They also rode and drove eight loose horses, and they 
overtook several wagons on the return trip. By the time they reached 
Salt Lake City the train consisted of eight wagons. At Fort Halleck 
they joined a government freight train and there met a train that had 
been attacked three miles from there by the Indians and had lost 
three of their wagons. It was three or four days later that the train 
with which Mr. Kite traveled left Fort Halleck. He and his family 
remained with the train until they reached Nebraska City on the 
Missouri river, after which they struck out alone, crossing Iowa. 
They were but three months in making their return journey. It was 
in 1850 that Mr. Kite married Miss Angeline Graham, who was 
born in Huron county, Ohio, in 1830, a daughter of Carter and Eliza 
(Green) Graham, who were married in Huron county, Ohio, and 
died in Lee county, Iowa. They were members of the Latter Day 
Saints. They removed to Iowa when their daughter Mrs. Kite was 
three years of age and settled at Nashville. Their family numbered 
ten children, seven of whom reached adult age, namely: Mrs. Kite; 
Mrs. Mary A. Horton, who died in Amador county, California; 
George H., who went to California at an early day and was never 
heard from again; Edward and Benjamin, who also went to Cali- 
fornia; William, who went to British Columbia; and Lenora, who 
became the wife of Benjamin Herrick and died in Montrose town- 
ship. 



396 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Mrs. Struthers was but three years of age when her parents 
removed to Lee county, establishing tlieir home in Montrose town- 
ship. She attended the Summitville school, taught by Miss Sawyer 
and others, her last teacher being Mr. Van Papplendam. Following 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Struthers lived first upon the old Kite 
farm for a year and then removed to the Younkin farm, on which they 
also lived for a year. They afterward resided on different places and 
then rented their present place until 1893, when Mr. Struthers pur- 
chased the property and in 1901 erected his present attractive resi- 
dence. At first he had one hundred and eighty-seven acres of land, 
but he has since sold a portion, retaining possession of one hundred 
and twenty acres. All that he possesses is attributable entirely to 
his own persistency of purpose, indefatigable energy and good man- 
aa:ement. He has led a busv and useful life and his success is well 
merited. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Struthers have been born four children. Verna 
NLiy is now the wife of William Dupy, who resides at Ottumwa, 
L:i\va, and they have four children. Rita, William Vernon, Lafayette 
Struthers and Lea Maxine. Lulu Angeline is now the wife of Lee 
Wilson Wright of Montrose township, and they have two children, 
Ella Janet and Kenneth Lee. Gladys Fay is the wife of Isaac 
Carrick of Montrose township, Lee county, and they have three 
children, Dorothy Maria, Hugh Isaac and William Earl. Mabel 
Clair, the youngest member of the Struthers family, is at home. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Struthers are widely and favorably known in 
Lee county, wdiere they have now long resided and where his well 
spent life has won him not only a good property but also the merited 
regard of those with whom he has come in contact. 



REV. FATHER ARTHUR J. ZAISER. 

Rev. Father Arthur J. Zaiser, pastor of St. Joseph's cluirch at 
Fort Madison, was born in Fowler, near Quincy, Illinois, January 
25, 1862, a son of the Hon. John and Margaret (Funk) Zaiser. The 
father was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, December 16, 1835, and 
was the youngest in a family of ten children. He was seventeen years 
of age when he accompanied his brother Henry and his sister Hen- 
rietta to America. Arrived at New York, they proceeded westward, 
going down the Ohio river to Cairo and up the Mississippi to 
Quincy 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 397 

Rev. John Zaiser, the father, was a profound student and a most 
scholarly man. At the age of eighteen he became a minister of the 
Methodist church, with which he was actively connected until 1865, 
when he retired. On the 25th of September, i860, in Burlington, 
Iowa, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Funk, the eldest 
daughter of John Funk, who in 1835 became a resident of Burlington, 
becoming a pioneer of that city. To Hon. John and Margaret 
(Funk) Zaiser were born the following named: Arthur J., Laura, 
Fred H., Lillian, Albert C, Esther, Adam F. and Harry E. Of 
these, Albert C. and Harry E. are now physicians. In 1865 the 
father, John Zaiser, became a member of the Orchard City Wagon 
Company and continued in that connection until his death. His 
political allegiance was given to the democratic party and he served 
for two years as a member of the city council of Burlington, while 
from 1880 until 1884 he was mayor of the city. He was of the old 
school of gentlemen, punctilious, energetic, thoroughly honest in 
business and always endeavored to follow the Golden Rule. 

The Rev. Arthur J. Zaiser was a little lad of about four years 
when he accompanied his parents to Burlington. He began his edu- 
cation in a private Methodist institution and at the age of ten years 
entered the Burlington public schools, in which he passed through 
the consecutive grades until graduated from the high school at the 
age of sixteen years. During the three succeeding years, 1877-80, he 
was a student in the Wesleyan LIniversity at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, 
and later he taught instrumental music for about a year. He was 
afterward emploved for a year in a bank at Burlington. In the 
meantime he had given the subject of religion much thought and 
after wide reading and careful consideration he decided he would 
enter a religious life and became a student in the Jesuit College at 
Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, where he devoted four years, 1883-87, 
to the study of the classics and other branches. Another year was 
spent studying philosophy in the Jesuit College at Bufifalo, New 
York, and for three years he was a student in St. Francis Theological 
Seminary at Milwaukee. It was here that he was ordained to the 
priesthood by Archbishop Katzer, June 21, 1 891. He was assigned 
to the teaching of language and mathematics in St. Ambrose College 
at Davenport, Iowa, where he remained for three years and was then 
sent to Exira, Iowa, as first resident pastor of the church at that place. 
Under his direction the congregation grew and while there he erected 
a parochial residence and school. 

In 1898, following the death of Father De Cailly, Father Zaiser 
was named as the former's successor at Fort Madison. His success 



398 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

in the work of the church here has been most pronounced from the 
first. The parish owns a handsome church, a beautiful parochial 
residence, a sisters' home and a modern school building and the 
church property has continuously increased in value. Father Zaiser 
was also instrumental in the establishment of the sisters' hospital. 
He has thoroughly organized the work of the church in its different 
departments and his efforts have greatly promoted the interests of 
Catholicism in Fort Madison. Moreover, he takes an active interest 
in all that tends to the advancement of the community in which he 
lives and few are the prominent public gatherings in which he is not 
asked to take a part. 



ALBERT LEE CONNABLE. 

Albert Lee Connable was a man whose career was closely inter- 
woven with the early history of Keokuk and its present-day pros- 
perity. His birth occurred at Bernardstown, Massachusetts, on the 
loth of August, 1811. He was of New England parentage, being a 
son of Ezra and Abigail (Stevens) Connable, and he traced his 
ancestry in a direct line to John Cunnabell, who came from London, 
England, and settled in Boston, Massachusetts, about the year 1674. 
Ensign John Cunnabell served the colonies in their struggle for 
independence from Great Britain. In several walks of life various 
members of the family achieved prominence and renown and while 
the name has been spelled in numerous ways the present generation 
has generally adopted the spelling Connable. 

When twenty-one years of age Albert Lee Connable left his 
father's home and went west to Eaton, Ohio, where he remained 
until 1843, when he came to Iowa, settling in Jefferson county. He 
was a man of more than average intelligence and of superior educa- 
tion and was therefore one of the leaders in that county during its 
formative period. He was elected a member of the board of county 
supervisors and his advice was listened to with the greatest respect 
and as a rule followed. In 1848 Keokuk, which was then attracting 
considerable attention because of its favorable geographical posi- 
tion, drew his attention and he moved to this city. He was awarded 
the contract for the construction of the Des Moines and Keokuk 
slack water navigation canal, the division of the canal which he con- 
structed being a three hundred and fifty thousand dollar proposition. 
He was also engaged in the wholesale grocery business for a time as 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 399 

well as in pork and beef packing. He was prominently connected 
with other business enterprises of the city, being an organizer of the 
Iowa State Insurance Company in 1856 and of the Keokuk Savings 
Bank in 1868, serving as a director and vice president of the latter. 
He was likewise one of the founders and a director of the Keokuk 
Canning Company. His many important business and financial con- 
nections proved him to have been a man with the true business 
instinct, farsighted in recognizing business opportunities and prompt 
in taking advantage of them. 

On the 9th of October, 1849, Mr. Connable was united m mar- 
riage to Miss Sarah Hurst Finney, who was born on the 15th of 
November, 1822, in Baltimore, Maryland, a daughter of Louis H. 
and Annie (Hurst) Finney. They became the parents of three 
children, as follows: Albert E., Edwin H. and Howard L. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Connable were members of the Unitarian 
churcli and scrupulously conformed their lives to its high standard 
of ethics. Mr. Connable was a republican in politics but was never 
desirous of holding office. It was only as a matter of public duty 
that he consented to serve for three years as a member of the board 
of Lee county supervisors and as a director of the Waterworks Com- 
pany. His sound business judgment enabled him to accumulate a 
considerable amount of property and he was always liberal in his 
support of laudable public enterprises. He passed away April 15, 
1894, having survived his wife for a number of years, her death 
occurring on the 21st of January, 1885. They were among that band 
of pioneers who laid so firmly the foundation of the city's present 
prosperity and few left to their descendants a better record or a more 
honored name. 



HOWARD L. CONNABLE. 

Howard L. Connable was born in Keokuk, January 14, 1858, a 
son of Albert Lee Connable. He has always made this city his home 
and received his education in its public schools. Since reaching 
adult vears he has engaged in mercantile pursuits, winning pros- 
perity therein. He is a man of business sagacity and this enables 
him to manage his afifairs wisely, while his pleasing personality aids 
in securing patronage. He is also connected with financial alTairs of 
the city as vice president of the Keokuk Savings Bank. 



400 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Mr. Connable was married, October 31, 1898, to Miss Rose 
McKenzie, by whom he has two children, Madeline H. and Ray- 
mond J. In politics he is a republican and he carries on the family 
tradition of honesty, uprightness and public-spirited interest in 
municipal affairs. 



IRA STEPHENS SIMS. 

The name of Ira Stephens Sims is closely associated with the 
history of Jackson township and Lee county, where for many vears he 
made his home and was widely and favorably known as an enter- 
prising farmer and a man upright and honorable in all his dealings. 
He was born in Wayne county, New York, June 14, 1836, and there 
resided until fourteen years of age, acquiring a public-school educa- 
tion during that period. He came of a family in whom the spirit 
of patriotism was strong. All were stanch advocates of the Union 
cause during the Civil war and two of his brothers and a brother- 
in-law were soldiers on the field of battle. The familv was estab- 
lished in America by two brothers, William and Andrew Sims, 
who emigrated to the new world from Scotland and fought uptin 
opposite sides in the war of the Revolution, one remaining loval to 
King George and the other espousing the cause of the colonies 
and serving under General Washington. The former later went to 
Canada. 

When sixteen years of age Ira S. Sims started for the west to 
try his fortune in that section of the country. He settled first in 
Illinois, where he became a trusted agent for a contractor who was 
engaged in the construction of the Illinois Central Railroad between 
Centralia and St. Louis. His employer, Mr. Brigham, induced him 
to come to Lee county, where he owned a verv large farm, which 
Mr. Sims managed for six or eight years. He afterward went to 
Keokuk and subsequently was superintendent of the Hines farm, in 
Jackson township. He also became superintendent of the freight 
lighters business at Des Moines rapids on the Mississippi river. Thus 
the years w^ent on, years in which activity and energy counted for 
success. In 1870 he purchased the farm in Jackson township upon 
which his remaining days were passed. He developed and improved 
the land and thereon engaged in the raising of fine horses, meeting 
with good success in that undertaking. He was an energetic agri- 
culturist, and the methods which he employed in tilling the soil 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 40i 

brought to him a measure of success which he well merited and 
which enabled him to leave his family in comfortable financial cir- 
cumstances. 

It was on the 14th of June, 1859, that Mr. Sims was united in 
marriage to Miss Eliza Thompson, who was born in Birmingham, 
England, and in 1848 came to the United States with her parents, 
settling in Bond county, Illinois, where she lived for five vears 
before removing to Iowa. Her father in his native countrv was a 
hardware merchant but after coming to the new world engaged in 
bookkeeping. After living in Illinois for some time the father 
removed with his familv to Des Moines, where both he and his wife 
passed away. Mrs. Sims always proved of great assistance to her 
husband. She was indeed a helpmate as well as a companion to 
him on life's journey, and he greatly valued her advice and counsel. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Sims were born the following children: George, 
now living in Minot, Montana; Clara, a resident of Colorado 
Springs, Colorado; Ira Lambert, of Burke, South Dakota; Samuel, 
of Keokuk; Lucy Elis, the wife of George C. Bold of this county; 
James, of Seattle, Washington; and Fred, who died at the age of 
five years. 

Mr. Sims was a member of the Baptist church. Words of com- 
mendation were spoken of him on all sides, for he was a reliable 
business man, a progressive citizen, a faithful friend and a good 
neighbor. He took an active interest in county afYairs and was instru- 
mental in getting Jackson township separated from the city. To his 
family he was most devoted, spending all of his leisure hours at 
home, and he was never away from home but once in all of his 
married life. For twenty-two years of his life he was a patient suf- 
ferer, having had a stroke of paralysis. He was a most temperate 
man in all that he did and never used into.xicants in any form. He 
displayed many sterling traits of character, and his many friends and 
neighbors spoke of him in terms of high regard and since his death 
have cherished his memory. 



ISAAC CLIFFORD CARRICK. 

Isaac Clifford Carrick follows farming in Montrose township, 
upon a farm of fifty-six acres situated on section 36, near the town of 
Summitville. Lee county numbers him among her native sons, his 
birth having occurred in Jackson township on the 29th of September, 



402 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

1882. He comes of a family of English lineage. His grandfather, 
William Carrick, was a native of England and a farmer boy of that 
country. He and a brother came to the United States together, land- 
ing in New York, where the brother died soon afterward of cholera. 
William Carrick began work in a vineyard owned bv a Mr. Burn- 
ham and continued in his employ for several years, or until his mar- 
riage. He wedded Mary Sulina and afterward came to Iowa, 
settling in Montrose township, Lee county, where he purchased and 
developed a farm, devoting many years to the cultivation and 
improvement of that property. Eventually he retired from active 
business life, selling his farm, and took up his abode in Keokuk, 
where his last days were spent. His wife also passed awav in that 
city about 1887, at the age of fifty-one years. She had long survived 
her husband, who was born about 1826 and who died in 1862. Their 
children were: James Burnham; Hiram, who is living in the city 
of Fresno, California; Ida, the wife of James Chenoweth, of Keokuk; 
and William, who married Miss Anderson and resides in Peoria, 
Illinois. 

James Burnham Carrick, the father of Isaac C. Carrick, was born 
on the old homestead farm in Summitville on the 3d of February, 
1856. He attended the Summitville and Reed schools, his first 
teacher being Lottie Mooney. When he had mastered the branches 
of learning taught in the district schools he attended the old high 
school of Keokuk, taught by Mrs. Kilbourne. The experiences of 
his youth were such as usually fall to the lot of the farm lad. From 
an early age he began assisting in the development of the old home- 
stead farm in Jackson township and became familiar with every 
feature of farm life. Eventually he started out in business on his 
own account, first renting land in Jackson township and afterward 
cultivating different rented farms for nine years. On the 2Qth of 
February, 1898, he purchased a farm from Robert Jewett and has 
since greatly improved this place. It comprises one hundred and 
three acres of rich and productive fields, in the midst of which stand 
fine buildings. In 1901 he erected his present residence, a two-story 
house containing eight rooms. He has also built substantial barns 
and other buildings, there being no buildings upon the place when 
it came into his possession. He has also set out orchards and, in fact, 
carried forward every feature of farm work that results in the attain- 
ment of success. He deserves much credit for what he has accom- 
plished, for he started out in life empty-handed when eighteen years 
of age. Leaving home, he went west to Kansas, where he spent one 
year, but, not liking it, he returned to Lee county and, as previously 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 403 

indicated, began for himself by renting land. Today he is one of the 
substantial farmers of the county, owning a property which is valu- 
able and from which he derives a substantial annual income. 

On the 25th of December, 1881, Mr. Carrick was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Maria Van Ausdall, who was born August 29, 1851, 
in Eaton, Preble county, Ohio. Her great-grandparents were Peter 
and Rachel Van Ausdall, who spent their last days in Ohio. Her 
father, Isaac Van Ausdall, was born in Pennsylvania, but in his early 
boyhood was taken by his parents to Ohio, and in that state was united 
in marriage to Miss Eliza Grafift. In 1853 they arrived in Lee 
county, Iowa, settling in Jackson township, about two miles east of 
where the Carrick home was established. Mr. Van Ausdall followed 
butchering in Ohio, but carried on farming after coming to this 
county, and he and his wife spent their remaining days upon the old 
homestead farm. Their children were as follows : Peter, David and 
Martin, all now deceased; Rachel, the wife of Henry Smith of 
Indiana; Caroline, who became Mrs. L. W. Hawkins and has passed 
away; Mary, who became the second wife of L. W. Hawkins and now 
lives in Indiana; Mrs. Carrick; John, deceased; Isaac, living in 
Oklahoma; Harvey, a resident of Lee county; Lydia and Hattie, 
twins, the latter the wife of Roy Brown of Lake Charles, Louisiana; 
and Lillie, the wife of Robert Kerr of Warsaw, Illinois. 

Mrs. James B. Carrick was but two years of age when brought to 
Iowa by her parents, who settled in Jackson township, where she was 
reared and educated, attending the public schools. She remained 
at home until she gave her hand in marriage to James Burnham Car- 
rick, who then rented the Judge Chenoweth farm, upon which they 
took up their abode. They became the parents of a son and daughter, 
Isaac Clififord and Mary E., the latter the wife of William Younkin, 
of Montrose, by whom she has two sons. Glen and Stewart. The 
father has always given his political allegiance to the democratic 
party and has served as road supervisor. 

Upon the old home farm Isaac ClilTord Carrick was reared and 
acquired his education in the district schools and the schools of Keo- 
kuk. His text-books were put aside when he reached the age of 
seventeen or eighteen years. He continued upon the home farm 
until twenty-two years of age, giving his father the benefit of his 
services, and was married on the 6th of February, 1908, to Miss 
Gladys Fay Struthers, a daughter of William and Ella (Kite) 
Struthers. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Carrick purchased a sixty acre 
farm adjoining his father's place and thereon resided for three years. 



404 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

He next bought a farm of two hundred and twelve acres in Summit- 
ville and continued upon that place for three years. At the end of 
that time he mvested in his present property, which is a farm of 
fifty-six acres on section 36, Montrose township. This is one of the 
prettiest farms in his section of the county. It is pleasantly located, 
carefully cultivated and well improved and gives every evidence in 
its excellent appearance of the careful, practical and progressive 
supervision of the owner. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Carrick have been born three children : Dorothy 
Maria, six years of age; Hugh Isaac, aged four; and William Earl, 
a little lad of two summers. The parents hold membership in the 
United Presbyterian church, in the work of which they take an active 
and helpful part, Mr. Carrick serving at the present time as one of 
its trustees. In politics he is a stalwart democrat, and fraternally he 
is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. He also 
belongs to the Anti-Horsethief Association No. 230. He represents 
one of the old families of the county, established here in pioneer times 
by his grandparents, and the work instituted by his grandfather and 
continued by his father is now being carried on bv him, the family 
having through three generations been prominently connected with 
the agricultural development of Lee county. 



SAMUEL W. MOORHEAD, M. D. 

Dr. Samuel W. Moorhead. a prominent and successful representa- 
tive of journalistic interests in Lee county, has since 1902, with the 
exception of about one year, remained the able editor of the Keokuk 
Gate City. He took up his permanent abode in Keokuk in 1885, 
having in the previous year been appointed to the chair of materia 
medica and therapeutics in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 
His birth occurred in Blairsville, Indiana county, Pennsvlvania, on 
the 4th of March, 1849, and he received his primarv education in 
the public schools. Subsequently he attended the Blairsville Acad- 
emy and later pursued a course of study in the Edinboro State Nor- 
mal School, near Erie, Pennsylvania. In the spring of 1870 he 
removed to Batavia, Jefiferson county, Iowa, where his father had 
previously taken up his abode, publishing the Batavia Herald. The 
following year he located at Afton, this state, there publishing the 
Afton News until 1872, when he sold out and became city editor 
of the Council Blufifs Nonpareil, while in 187c; he became editor of 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 405 

that paper. While a resident of Council Bluffs he took up the 
study of medicine, attending lectures at the Medical Department of 
the State University of Iowa at Iowa City and later entering the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk, from which institution 
he graduated in March, 1883. He began the practice of his chosen 
profession at Eagle Grove, Wright county, Iowa, and in 1884 became 
a member of the faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Keokuk, but still continued his residence and practice at Eagle 
Grove until taking up his permanent abode in Keokuk in 1887. That 
city has remained his home for nearly three decades. He continued 
as a college lecturer and also practiced medicine until 1902, when 
he resigned his chair. In 1892 he was elected alderman from the 
fifth ward and in 1903 was chosen mayor of Keokuk. In addition 
to discharging the duties devolving upon him in this connection he 
also cared for his private practice for a time, gave medical lectures 
and acted as editor of the Keokuk Gate City. He first became con- 
nected with the Gate City in 1896, but severed the relations after a 
short time. In 1902 he again became editor of the paper and has 
been actively identified therewith to the present time with the excep- 
tion of about one year. Under his able management the sheet has 
maintained a large and gratifying advertising and subscription pat- 
ronage and ranks with the leading publications of the county. In 
1906 Dr. Moorhead was appointed postmaster at Keokuk, and at the 
end of his four years' term was reappointed in 1910, making a credit- 
able and highly commendable record in that connection. In 1914 he 
was again elected mayor of Keokuk, which position he now holds. 
He is recognized as one of the leading and representative citizens of 
Lee county and enjoys an enviable reputation in social and profes- 
sional circles. , • - 



FREEMAN ALFRED DUNN. 

Freeman Alfred Dunn, a contractor of Keokuk, conducting busi- 
ness as a member of the firm of Dunn & Matheney, was born August 
6, 1877, in Clark county, Missouri, upon the farm of his maternal 
grandfather. His parents are William and Dora (Hayes) Dunn, 
vvho now reside upon a farm near Seaton, Illinois. The former is a 
son of Alfred T. Dunn, who is now living at the age of eighty-three 
years and makes his home with William Dunn, having lost his wife 
a few years ago. 



406 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Freeman A. Dunn spent the first nine years of his life upon a 
farm and attended the public schools of his native county. He after- 
ward became a student in the Keokuk Business College, but in the 
meantime had taken up the tinner's trade and when he finished his 
education he returned to that trade, working under the supervision 
of Mr. Thomas and Mr. Brady of the Dupont Powder Companv. 
His loyalty, capability and efficiency are indicated in the fact that 
he was connected with the Dupont Company for ten years. He 
afterward entered the employ of the Weber-Kirch Manufacturing 
Company, with which he was connected for some years, having 
charge of the shop much of the time. In March, 19 12, he entered 
into partnership with T. P. Matheney and began a contracting busi- 
ness, in which he is still engaged. The firm has been accorded a 
liberal patronage and their trade is growing as the result of the 
exxellence of their work and their reliable business methods. 

Mr. Dunn was united in marriage in Keokuk, September 30, 1907, 
to Miss Birdie Matheney, of this city, and unto them have been 
born two children, Burdette and Gertrude. Mr. Dunn is an inde- 
pendent voter, casting his ballot for men and measures rather than 
party. He belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge, and his wife is a 
member of the Baptist church. They are well known in Keokuk, 
where Mr. Dunn has now made his home for eleven years. His 
advancement along business lines is attributable to his own efforts. 
Gradually he has worked his way upward, proving his worth in 
various connections and earning his advancement though indefati- 
gable industry. 



JOHN L. KEETHLER. 



Among those whose loyalty to the Union was tested upon south- 
ern battlefields John L. Keethler is numbered. He makes his home 
in Montrose township, Lee county, and for a long period has been 
engaged in blacksmithing at Summitville. He was born at the old 
family homestead in Montrose township on the 6th of October, 1848, 
and was there reared to manhood. His father, Andrew Keethler, 
was a native of Bracken county, Kentucky, born in 1807, and was a 
son of John Keethler, a native of Pennsylvania and of Dutch descent. 
The last named died in Clermont county, Ohio, where he had settled 
in pioneer times, aiding in the early development and improvement 
of that section of the state. Both he and his wife were devout mem- 



' HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 407 

bers of the Christian church and led earnest, consistent Christian 
lives, in harmony with their religious professions. Their son An- 
drew Keethler, the father of John L. Keethler, spent his boyhood 
and earlv manhood in Kentucky and afterward went to Clermont 
county, Ohio, where he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jones. 
In 1847 he removed to Iowa, making the trip by the river route, and 
in Lee county he made large investments in land, adding to his prop- 
erty from time to time until his holdings aggregated si.x hundred 
acres. He had also learned the blacksmith's trade in Ohio or in 
Kentucky and was a good workman along mechanical lines. He 
died in Summitville in 1888 and his remains were interred in the 
Dudley cemetery. His religious faith was that of the Christian 
church and to its teachings he was ever loyal. He had long survived 
his wife, who passed away in 1862. They were the parents of thir- 
teen children, only two of whom are living: Sarah, the wife of 
Christian Harader and a resident of Arkansas City, Kansas; and 
John L. 

The latter was reared to manhood on the old homestead farm 
and attended the neighboring school, pursuing his studies under the 
direction of Mr. Wilson. He went to school a part of each year 
until he enlisted for service in the Union army when sixteen years 
of age. It was in the latter part of February, 1865, that he enrolled 
as a private of Company A, Nineteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, 
under command of Captain Thomas L. Spratt and Colonel John 
Bruce. He joined his regiment at Navy Cove, Alabama, and was 
with that command until the 4th of July, 1865, when he was trans- 
ferred to Company A, Twenty-ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, com- 
manded by Colonel Stone, with Lieutenant Kirkpatrick in charge of 
the company. Mr. Keethler was honorably discharged at New 
Orleans in September, 1865. He then returned to Davenport., where 
he was mustered out. He then returned home and through the suc- 
ceeding winter again attended school. He then took up his trade in 
his father's shop at Sandusky, his father having conducted the shop 
there at the time of the building of the canal. At intervals John L. 
Keethler also worked on the home farm. He started in business on 
his own account when his father became too old to longer conduct 
the business, at which time John L. Keethler took his place at the 
anvil. That was thirty-seven years ago and he still remains in the 
same smithy, although his trade has greatly changed in that time. 
In the olden days he also built wagons, but now confines his attention 
solely to the blacksmithing trade and enjoys a good business in that 
connection. 



408 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 



On the 24th of November, 1878, Mr. Keethler was married to 
Miss Mary Manning, a native of Van Buren county, Iowa, and a 
daughter of Andrew and Louisa (Davis) Manning.' To Mr. and 
Mrs. Keethler have been born four children. Andrew M., now a 
practicing physician of Memphis, Missouri, married Maud Steph- 
enson, and their children are Andrew Ray, James Clarence and Mary 
Louisa. John L., who is cashier of a bank in Newark, Missouri, 
married Mabel Morris, and they have one child, Florence. Maytie 
Louise and Florence L. are both deceased. 

Mr. Keethler has taken an active part in local politics as a sup- 
porter of the republican party and was local committeeman for thirty 
years, doing much to shape the policy of the party and promote its 
success in the locality in which he makes his home. He is a member 
of Torrence Post, G. A. R.,"of Keokuk, in which he has served as 
vice commander, and he is a loyal and consistent member of the 
Christian church, exemplifying its teachings in his upright life. He 
has led an active, busy, useful and honorable life and to him is ac- 
corded the respect and good-will of all who know him. 



ROBERT N. JOHNSON. 

Robert N. Johnson, a well known representative of the legal pro- 
fession in Fort Madison, has practiced here continuously since 1898. 
He was born in this city on the 6th of April, 1875, and is a son of 
Nelson and Nancy (Porter) Johnson, the former a native of Ohio 
and the latter of Kentucky. The father came to Lee county in 1854 
and here his father, Seth Johnson, purchased a farm. Nelson John- 
son was then quite young. He took up the profession of teaching in 
early manhood and for ten years was superintendent of the schools 
of Fort Madison, proving a capable educator with the abilitv to 
impart clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he had 
acquired. He afterward established Johnson's Business College, 
which he conducted successfully for thirty vears. This institution 
met a long-feh want in the community in preparing young people 
for the duties and responsibilities of business life and many of the 
graduates of the school are now active and prominent in the business 
world. At the termination of thirty years' connection with this 
school Mr. Johnson retired. He was married in this county to Miss 
Nancy Porter, who on removing to Iowa purchased a farm near 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 409 

Fort Madison. Unto them were horn two children: Sarah Z., now 
the wife of Dr. J. M. Casey; and Robert N. 

The last named is a graduate of his father's school and also of 
the University of Michigan. Having determined to make the prac- 
tice of law his life work, he entered that institution and completed 
his course with the class of 1898. He then returned to Fort Madison 
and opened an office and his record is a contradiction of the old say- 
ing that a prophet is not without honor save in his own country, for 
in the city of his birth, where his entire life has been passed, Mr. 
Johnson has made continuous progress and is today one of the most 
capable and successful lawyers of Fort Madison, having worked his 
way steadily upward in a calling where advancement depends en- 
tirelv upon merit and ability. He has ever prepared his cases with 
thoroughness and care and readily recognizes the relation of cause 
and effect, so that he is seldom if ever at fault in the application of 
legal principles. He served as deputy county attorney from 1905 
until 1909. 

On the 3d of January, 1900, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage 
to Miss Mabel Morrison, a daughter of J. B. Morrison, of Fort 
Madison, and they became the parents of six children: Joseph and 
Genevieve, twins, both of whom have passed away; and Margaret, 
Sara, Robert and Virginia. In his political view^s Mr. Johnson has 
always been a republican. He belongs to the Benevolent Progres- 
sive Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He is always concerned in matters 
relative to the welfare and upbuilding of the community and his 
worth is acknowledged as a man, as a lawyer and as a citizen, his 
fellow townsmen bearing testimony to his ability, his loyalty and his 
straightforward and honorable purpose. 



JOEL CALVIN WALKER. 

One of the distinguished citizens of Fort Madison and eminent 
politicians of Iowa at an early day was Dr. Joel Calvin Walker, who 
was born in Springfield, Ohio, February 7, 18 12, and came of an 
old and honored family, being a son of Joel and Margaret (Arm- 
strong) Walker, both natives of Virginia. His father was born in 
Rockbridge county and his mother in Bath county. The former was 
a son of Samuel and Jane (Patterson) Walker, also natives of the 
Old Dominion. The parents of Samuel Walker were John and 



410 • HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Katharine (Rutherford) Walker, who were born in Wigtown, Scot- 
land, where they were reared and where they were married January 
7, 1702. They subsequently came to America, leaving the old country 
in May, 1726, stopping first in Pennsylvania and from there remov- 
ing to Virginia. Elizabeth Graham Walker, the eldest child of 
Joel and Margaret Walker, was born near Natural Bridge, in Rock- 
bridge county, Virginia, June 14, 1793, and at a very early day she 
and her sister Jane traveled on horseback three hundred miles when 
the family moved to Ohio. It was on account of slavery that John 
Walker left his native state and went to Ohio, which was a free 
state. 

Dr. Walker was the eleventh child of a family of twelve children, 
ten of whom came to Fort Madison, but he was the first to arrive 
here, making the journey from Ohio on horseback in Januarv, 1836. 
He returned, however, to Ohio on a visit in 1841, traveling in the 
same manner. From 1836 until his death, which occurred on the 
17th of October, 1888, he made his home in Fort Madison and was 
regarded as one of its most prominent citizens. After acquiring his 
literary education he took up the study of medicine in the office of 
Drs. Olds and Gibson at Circleville, Ohio, and attended lectures 
at the JefTerson Medical College of Philadelphia for some time. 
He was engaged in practice for only a short time in Fort Madison, 
however, as he early became prominently identified with public 
afifairs, serving as clerk of Lee county and collector of internal 
revenue, being the first collector of the first district of this state, under 
appointment by President Lincoln. He became one of the organizers 
of the republican party in Iowa and was a delegate to the national 
convention at Chicago, where the martyred president was nominated. 
Previous to this time he had been an anti-slavery democrat and had 
visited the home of Andrew Jackson. He also attended the con- 
vention where James K. Polk was nominated for the presidencv and 
was present when that executive was inaugurated. The greater part 
of his life was devoted to politics, and he was a recognized leader in 
public affairs. He was a man of wide intelligence, a constant reader 
of retentive memory and remained active throughout his entire life. 
He was reading a paper at the time of his death, just seven days after 
the fiftieth anniversary of his marriage. He and his wife were 
charter members of what is now the Union Presbvterian church of 
Fort Madison, which was organized in March, 1838, and of which 
he was an elder for many years, and he was a liberal contributor to 
its support as well as to other enterprises which he deemed would 
prove of public benefit. The bridging of the Mississippi river at 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 411 

this point was a project the consummation of which he much desired 
to see and he contributed seven hundred dollars to the fund given the 
Santa Fe Railroad as an inducement for it to construct its line through 
Fort Madison. 

It was on the loth of October, 1838, in Fort Madison, Iowa, that 
Dr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Martha Maria Stewart, 
who was born in Florisant, Missouri, January 20, 1820. Her grand- 
father, Abram Stewart, was born in Scotland in 1742. Her father, 
also Abram Stewart, was a native of Vermont and was assistant sur- 
geon in the United States army at St. Louis. He died in Hannibal, 
Missouri, in October, 1834, and subsequently his widow, Mrs. Emily 
(Ayres) Stewart, born in Marietta, Ohio, January 22, 1795, came to 
Fort Madison with her children, Joseph Bufifon and Martha Maria, 
who subsequently became Mrs. Walker. Here Mrs. Stewart joined 
her father, Ebenezer Ayres, who had located here in May, 1834, and 
had taken up government land. His wife bore the maiden name of 
Deborah Davenport and was a representative of an old Connecticut 
family. They were members of the Connecticut colony who settled 
in Marietta, Ohio, in 1793. Mrs. Ayres died in St. Charles county, 
Missouri. Mrs. Stewart died in Fort Madison, July 18. 1879. She 
became a charter member of the Presbyterian church in March, 1838. 
She had come to this city in October, 1835, at which time there was 
only one frame house and three log houses in the place. 

Six children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Walker. James Douglas 
was born January 3, 1841, and died in infancy. He was named for 
the Doctor's brother-in-law, who was the first postmaster of Fort 
Madison and who was killed on the boat Moselle at Cincinnati April 
27, 1838, while on a business trip to secure his reappointment as post- 
master of Fort Madison. He was the father of Mrs. John Van Val- 
kenburg. Emily Stewart Walker, the next of the family, is now the 
widow of George D. Stewart, D. D., and resides in the old home, 
which has been the family residence since April, 1864. Miss Mar- 
garet Armstrong Walker is also a resident of Fort Madison. Chal- 
mers and Helen both died in infancy. Bufifon Stewart Walker is 
a resident of Des Moines and is vice president of the Chamber of 
Commerce, of which he was president for two years, and is a man of 
great public spirit, interested in all philanthropic and civic matters. 
Mrs. Martha M. Walker, the widow of Dr. G. C. Walker, died May 
14, 1905. "Her children arise up and call her blessed; her husband 
also and he praiseth her." 

In Fort Madison, October 4, 1864, Miss Emily Stewart Walker 
was united in marriage to Rev. George D. Stewart, pastor of the 



412 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

First Presbyterian church of Burlington, Iowa, and in the latter city 
they made their home for six and a half years. He then became 
pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Omaha, Nebraska, and 
on the ist of April, 1877, came to Fort Madison as pastor of the 
Union Presbyterian church here. He continued to fill that pulpit 
until entering his eightieth year, having for over a quarter of a 
century devoted his life to the moral development of this community. 
He passed away April i, 1910, and his death was widely and sincerely 
mourned. Mrs. Stewart was born in Fort Madison, Julv 8, 1843, 
and began her education in private schools here, but after the public 
schools were established attended them for a time. Subsequently 
she was a student at Denmark Academy and in 18^7 entered the 
female seminary at Steubenville, Ohio, established by Mr. and Mrs. 
C. C. Beatty and one of the oldest schools for girls west of the AUe- 
ghenies. She was graduated there in March, i860. In 1901 she 
made a tour of Europe as a guest of one of Dr. Stewart's former 
parishioners in Omaha. Four years later she and her husband 
visited the Holy Land and Egypt, while she spent the winter of 
1910-11 with her daughter Anna in Italv. She has also traveled 
extensively over the United States and has thus broadened her 
knowledge of places and events, as onlv travel can do. She has always 
taken an active interest in literary affairs and is one of the charter 
members of the Monday Afternoon Club as well as the Woman's 
Missionary Societv of the Presbyterian church. She still occupies 
the old family residence at No. 833 Third street, where she was mar- 
ried and which has been the familv home for over fiftv years. Here 
she is surrounded bv a host of warm friends and is prominent in both 
social and literary circles. 

Dr. and Mrs. Stewart became the parents of four children, George 
Bourdillion, Helen Walker, Anna and Miriam. Helen Walker died 
when five years of age, December 29, 1872, at Omaha, Nebraska. 
George B. Stewart received his general education at the Denmark 
Academy, Iowa, and Cheltenham Academy, near Philadelphia, and 
the University of Pennsylvania, and subsequently took a law course 
at the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, graduating in the 
class of 1888. He has since practiced his profession in this city. 
He married Miss Adele Kretsinger and they became the parents of 
two sons: Kretsinger, who died when four months old; and Alan, 
who is attending school at Lake Forest, Illinois. Miss Anna Stewart 
attended the high school of Fort Madison, was a student in the Berk- 
ley school at Cambridge, Massachusetts, and also at Rockford College 
in Illinois. She has made several trips to Europe. On October i, 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 413 

1903, Miriam married Thomas P. Hollowell, who was for eight 
years postmaster of Fort Madison and is now the proprietor of the 
Fort Madison Gem City, an evening daily. They have two sons, 
Thomas Patrick Hollowell 3d and George Stewart Hollowell. 



NELSON COMMTNS ROBERTS. 

Nelson Commins Roberts has been a resident of Lee county, 
Iowa, since three years of age and, so far as his personal recollection 
goes, has never known any other home than this. His birth occurred 
in Otsego, Michigan, on the nth of October, 1856, his parents being 
Dr. Abel C. and Emily (Cole) Roberts, who in 1859 established 
their home at Fort Madison, Iowa. There the father practiced medi- 
cine, became actively identified with newspaper work, held public 
office and otherwise became prominent and influential. 

Nelson C. Roberts grew to manhood at Fort Madison and 
acquired his early education in private schools and in the old acad- 
emy, which has since passed out of existence. In 1874, when a young 
man of eighteen years, he began his journalistic career on the Fort 
Madison Democrat and, having determined to devote his life to the 
"art preservative," he gradually mastered every detail of the news- 
paper work. In 1893, by appointment of President Cleveland, he 
became postmaster at Fort Madison, holding that position for four 
years. On the expiration of that period he spent about a year as 
business manager of the Keokuk Constitution-Democrat and then 
became the active directing head of the Fort Madison Democrat, a 
daily and weekly publication which has remained under his manage- 
ment to the present time. Summarizing his career, it is not too much 
to sav of Mr. Roberts that his influence has invariably been for the 
best interests of Lee county, regardless of religion, politics or frater- 
nalism. He has been a decided factor in helping to mold public 
opinion and his potentiality for good is recognized far beyond the 
confines of the county of his adoption. For years he has realized 
the importance of rescuing the early history of Lee county that was 
fast passing into oblivion with the deaths of the early settlers, and 
many characteristic sketches of pioneer life have appeared from his 
pen and been eagerly read by an appreciative public. 

Mr. Roberts is happily married and is the father of three chil- 
dren. In spite of his many activities he has found time to cultivate 
the gentler amenities of life by identifying himself with various be- 



-114 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

nevolent organizations, clubs and fraternities. He is a prominent 
figure in Masonic circles, being a member of Claypoole Lodge, No. 
13, Free and Accepted Masons; Potowonok Chapter, No. 28, Royal 
Arch Masons; Delta Commandery, No. 51, Knights Templars, all 
of Fort Madison; Zarepath Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite, and Kaaba Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, of Davenport. He is also a member of Fort Madison 
Lodge, No. 374, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
holds membership in the Episcopal church. He is at present serv- 
ing his second term as mayor of Keokuk. 



ROBERT H. HART. 



Rojjert H. Hart, who has served as superintendent of the county 
home for the past decade, is a well known and respected citizen of 
Lee county, where he has resided continuously throughout the past 
thirty-five years. His birth occurred in Sangamon county, Illinois, 
on the 2ist of May, 1865, his parents being Samuel B. and P. J. 
Hart, both of whom were natives of that state. Thev came to Lee 
county, Iowa, in 1879 and here the father passed away six years 
later. Throughout his active life Samuel B. Hart followed the 
profession of school teaching. His widow, who is now in her seventy- 
fourth year, makes her home with her sons in Keokuk. To them 
were born five children, as follows: two daughters, who died in 
infancy; Robert H., of this review; Curtis M., who now serves as 
clerk of the district court of Lee county; and Otis S., who is a resi- 
dent of Keokuk, Iowa. L. N. Hahn, a half brother of our subject, 
is engaged in the insurance business at Keokuk. 

Robert H. Hart acquired his education in the common schools 
and was seventeen years of age when in 1883 he began working on 
the county farm here. In 1904 he was made superintendent and has 
since had full charge of the farm and home, displaving in its able 
management excellent executive ability and a thorough knowledge 
of the best methods of agriculture. 

Mr. Hart was united in marriage to Miss Hannah B. Laurinson, 
a native of Lee county and a daughter of William and Melissa 
Laurinson, who were born in England and Clermont countv, Ohio, 
respectively. Emigrating to the United States, the father first took 
up his abode in Ohio, where he was married and continued to reside 
until some time in the early '50s, when he settled on a farm in Lee 



HISTORY OF LP:E COUNTY 415 

county, Iowa. William Laurinson passed away in 1868 and his wife, 
long surviving him, was called to her final rest in 1911, when seventy- 
four years of age. They became the parents of eight children, as 
follows: Mary E., who is the wife of George N. Wright; Elizabeth, 
who gave her hand in marriage to John Dupy and makes her home 
in Oklahoma; Britton, who is a resident of Oregon; Mrs. Hannah 
B. Hart; and four who are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Hart have two 
children: Sherman E., born August 3, 1886, who is married and 
works on the county farm as assistant manager; and Hazel H.,'born 
March 28, 1888, who is the wife of Clifford H. Bear of Keokuk, 
Iowa. Our subject also has four grandchildren, two boys and two 
girls, namely: Vernette Hart, Dora B. Hart, Robert Hart Bear and 
Bonnie May Bear. 

Mr. Hart gives his political allegiance to the democracy and 
has served as a delegate to conventions for the past ten years, being 
an active worker in the local ranks of the party. Fraternally he is 
identified with the following organizations: Montrose Lodge, No. 
136, A. F. & A. M., of Montrose; Chapter No. 7, R. A. M., of 
Keokuk, Iowa; Lodge No. 106, B. P. O. E. ; Lodge No. 704, L. O. 
M., of Keokuk; Camp No. 4594, M. W. A.; and the A. H. T. A. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Baptist 
church, to which his wife also belongs. In all matters of citizen- 
ship relating to the material, intellectual and moral welfare of the 
community he is deeply interested, and his efforts have been a sub- 
stantial element in bringing about desired results. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DROLLINGER. 

Benjamin Franklin DroUinger, a well known farmer and a highly 
respected citizen of Jefferson township, was born January 16, 1869, 
on the farm where he still resides, it comprising two hundred and 
forty acres on sections 11 and 12. Besides this property, he also owns 
forty acres two miles northwest of that place in Jefferson township. 
His father was Benjamin Wesley DroUinger, who was born in In- 
diana, December 4, 1830, and was a son of a Mormon preacher. 
When four years of age the father was taken by his parents to Mis- 
souri and at the age of thirteen removed to Illinois. His father had 
died in Clay county, Missouri, and for some time Benjamin Wesley 
DroUinger lived with his mother in Quincy, Illinois, and later in 
Nauvoo, that state. 



•116 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Benjamin W. Drollingcr married in Lee county December 14, 
1850, Susan L. Wilson, who was born in Hancock county, January 
'3' 1834. and they became the parents of nine children, of whom 
two died in infancy. The others are: George Monroe, a resident 
of Clark county, Missouri; Burrel Perry, of Kalispell, Montana; 
Emma Louisa, the wife of Frank Holmes of Jefiferson township; 
Frances Ellen, the wife of C. W. Stewart of Kahoka, Clark county, 
Missouri; Mary Melvina, the wife of L. P. Conlee of the same 
county; Benjamin Franklin, of this review; and Anna Letitia, the 
wife of Fred B. Kent. During the pioneer days the mother of these 
children spun, wove and made all of their clothes by hand and per- 
formed many other arduous tasks that the housewife of the present 
day is not called upon to do. She was familiar with Indian manners 
and customs, as her early life was spent upon the frontier. She was 
a daughter of George and Rebecca Wilson. The father of our sub- 
ject came to Lee county in 1844 when only fourteen vears of age. 
His father had died previous to this time and his mother accom- 
panied the Mormons on their removal from Nauvoo to Utah. On 
becoming a resident of this county he worked at anything that he 
could find to do and attended school when the opportunity presented 
itself. For a time he was employed on steamboats plying up ami 
down the river and learned the plasterer's trade with Josiah Kent, 
to which occupation he continued to devote his attention until his 
marriage, when he located on a farm and engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. As a farmer he met with most excellent success and even- 
tually became the owner of over si.xteen hundred acres of valuable 
land in this state and in Missouri. After a well spent and useful life 
he passed away on the 2gth of September, igo6. His wife survived 
him a few years, dying June 3, 191 2. 

Benjamin Franklin Drollinger was reared and educated in the 
usual manner of farm lads and since attaining his manhood has de- 
voted his attention to general farming and stock-raising. He is one 
of the most progressive agriculturists of his county and success has 
attended his well directed eflforts. On the loth of September, 1891, 
he wedded Miss Mary Alora Bullard, who was born in Jefferson 
township, January 6, 1871, and they have become parents of five 
children, namely: Lucret, Pauline, Pearl, Mildred and Marion. 
Like her husband, Mrs. Drollinger comes of an old and honored 
family of Lee county, being a daughter of Alexander and Martha 
(Dodson) Bullard. Her father was born in Putnam countv, In- 
diana, December 25, 1835, and was only two vears of age when 
brought to Lee county by his parents, the family locating on a farm 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 417 

two and a half miles from Fort Madison. There he was reared and 
on reaching manhood was married. He died on his farm in Jeffer- 
son county in 1900, and his widow now makes her home in Fort 
Madison. 



ARTHUR SAN FORD STEVENS. 

Arthur Sanford Stevens is a well known and highly respected 
farmer of Des Moines township, who owns and occupies a farm of 
eighty acres on section 2. He was born upon the old family home- 
stead, just over the line in Jackson township, November 6, 1863, a 
son of Manning Winchell and Julia (Wadsworth) Stevens, both 
representatives of worthy old New England families. The mother 
was educated in Mount Holyoke College and was a daughter of John 
P. and Minerva (Stoddard) Wadsworth. The most famed New 
England poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, was a representative 
of one branch of the family. 

At the usual age Arthur Sanford Stevens was sent to the public 
schools near his home and pursued his studies to the age of eighteen 
years, after wdiich he concentrated his energies upon the work of 
assisting his father upon the home place. He had previously had 
trajning in farm work during the periods of vacation and after school 
hours and made a hand in the field when a youth of but ten years. 
In school he was an apt pupil and the same studious habits have 
characterized him throughout life. He has read broadly, thinks 
deeply and arrives at just conclusions. 

On the 5th of September, 1888, Mr. Stevens was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Elizabeth Coit, who was born in Americas, Georgia, 
and became a resident of Illinois when seven years of age. Her 
father. Rev. George Coit, was a Presbyterian minister and accord- 
ing to the custom of the church moved around from place to place. 
Eventually he became president of Columbia College at Columbia, 
South Carolina, and was closely associated with the educational and 
moral progress of the communities in which he lived. His daugh- 
ter Mrs. Stevens taught school for a few years in CoUinsville, Illi- 
nois, prior to her marriage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stevens began their domestic life upon the farm 
which is still their home, the property being purchased from Ernest 
Haisch. In 1899 he erected a fine new residence, and he has made 
other substantial improvements upon the place, adding all the mod- 



418 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

ern equipments and accessories that are usually found upon a model 
farm of the twentieth century. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Stevens were born seven children: Carolyn, 
at home; Elizabeth, who was graduated from the Keokuk high 
school with the class of 19 12 and is now a teacher in the schools of 
Lee county; Arthur, who died when fourteen years of age; Vera, at 
home; Lois, who is attending the high school of Keokuk; Gladys, 
who is also in school; and Richard, who died in infancy. Mrs. 
Stevens passed away on the 29th of December, 1907. The family 
are members of the Presbyterian church of Keokuk and its teach- 
ings are the guiding principles of their lives. In the church work 
they take an active interest and to its support contribute generously. 
In politics Mr. Stevens is a stanch republican and keeps well versed 
on the questions and issues of the day. His attention, however, has 
been concentrated upon his business afTairs, and he stands as one of 
the representative and progressive farmers of Lee county. 



. T. P. HOLLOWELL. 



T. P. HoUowell owns the major interest in the Gem City Daily 
and Weekly, which paper was established in 1886 and is the oldest 
daily in Fort Madison. In his editorial capacity and as an office 
holder in Fort Madison Mr. Hollowell is widely known. He was 
born in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, April 28, 1878, and is a son of T. P. 
and Nettie (Charles) Hollowell, who in 1882 brought their family 
to Lee county, where Mr. Hollowell served as deputy warden in the 
prison until his death. His wife has also passed away. 

T. P. Hollowell was but four vears of age when brought to this 
city and when a lad of six he entered the public schools, passing 
through the consecutive grades as the years advanced. He also at- 
tended Johnson's Business College and likewise pursued a commer- 
cial correspondence course. He made his initial step in the business 
world as a contractor with the Morrison Plow Company and in 1899 
he entered the United States mail service in the capacity of letter 
carrier. He served in that position for several years and on the 6th 
of March, 1906, was appointed postmaster of Fort Madison, which 
position he continuously occupied for eight years, or until the 17th 
of April, 1914. In the meantime he had become interested in the 
newspaper publishing business, having in 1910 organized the Gem 
City Publishing Company, which purchased a half-interest from the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 419 

Nauer & Barnes Publishing Company, owners of the Gem City 
Daily and Weekly. He has since been identified with this paper 
and now concentrates his energies upon its publication. This paper 
was established in 1886 and is now one of the leading dailies of south- 
eastern Iowa. 

Mr. Hollowell is now practically the proprietor of the paper, 
owning the major interest in the stock. The daily is a six-page, 
seven-column paper of home print and the weekly edition is eight 
pages of seven columns. Both are an excellent advertising medium 
because of the large subscription list, and the paper under the guid- 
ance of Mr. Hollowell has long since become a paying proposition. 
It is devoted to the dissemination of local and general news and its 
editorials, while treating a subject comprehensively, are always terse 
and to the point. 

On the nth of October, 1904, Mr. Hollowell was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Miriam Stewart, of Fort Madison, a daughter of the 
Rev. George D. and Emily (Walker) Stewart, who were early resi- 
dents of this county. The father was pastor of the Presbyterian 
church and they were long honored and esteemed residents of this 
city. Mr. and Mrs. Hollowell have two children, Thomas Patrick 
and George S. 

Fraternally Mr. Hollowell is connected with the Elks, while his 
political allegiance is given to the republican party, and his religious 
faith is that of the Presbyterian church. He has an interesting mili- 
tary chapter in his life history. He joined the Iowa National Guard 
and became major of the Fifty-fourth Infantry. He is also a veteran 
of the Spanish-American war, having served with Company F of 
the Fiftieth Iowa Volunteers. Practically his entire life has been 
passed in this county, where he has a large acquaintance and a circle 
of warm friends almost coextensive therewith. 



NICHOLAS PRANGER. 

Nicholas Pranger, a representative of an old and honored pioneer 
family of Lee county, whose home is on section 22, Washington town- 
ship, comes from the other side of the Atlantic, for he was born in 
Siigel, Hanover, Germany, December 3, 1840, his parents being Ber- 
nard H. and Thakle (Sabers) Pranger, also natives of the same 
place. The father was born in 1813 and the mother in 1818. Decid- 
ing to try their fortune in America, they took passage for New Or- 



voi n- 



420 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY ' 

leans in 1849 and on reaching that port proceeded up the Mississippi 
river to St. Louis, where they landed on the ist of December. Early 
in the year 1850, however, they came to Lee county and settled in 
Fort Madison, but the following year took up their residence in 
Washington township, occupying an old house until a more suitable 
home could be built. The father hewed logs for his residence and 
split clapboards to make a roof. He became the owner of one hun- 
dred and forty acres of very valuable land and after living in this 
countv more than two decades passed away in 1872. His wife sur- 
vived him many years, dying in 1900. Of their six children Nicholas 
is the eldest, the others being: Bernhard and William H., both de- 
ceased; John Theodore, now a resident of Fort Madison; Mary, the 
deceased wife of Stephen Meyer; and Anna Mary, the wife of Her- 
man Shulte of Fort Madison. 

Nicholas Pranger was a boy of nine years when he crossed the 
ocean with his parents, and since the family reached Fort Madison 
he has made his home in this county with the exception of two years. 
Throughout his active business life he has followed farming with 
marked success and at one time owned five hundred acres of very 
valuable and productive land, but has since divided with his sons, still 
retaining, however, two hundred and ten acres in Washington town- 
ship. In connection with general farming he has devoted consider- 
able attention to raising and dealing in stock. 

Mr. Pranger married Miss Catharine Hellman, who was born in 
St. Paul, Marion township, this county, April 9, 1850, and is a 
daughter of G. H. and Mary A. (Colber) Hellman, both natives of 
Hanover, Germany. Coming to the United States in 1836, they set- 
tled in St. Paul, Iowa, at which time Fort Madison was only a village 
of three log cabins. Their son Henry was the first white child born 
in Marion township and in the early development and improvement 
of that locality Mr. Hellman bore an active part. Both he and his 
wife died in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Pranger became the parents 
of ten children, namely: Bernard H., now a resident of Washington 
township; George H., a telegraph operator living in Nebraska; John 
J. and William H., both residents of Washington township, this 
county; Stephen, deceased; Louis, at home; Nicholas S., also de- 
ceased; Annie W., who died at the age of thirteen years; Rose, the 
wife of George H. Cooper, of Ottumwa, Iowa; and one child who 
died in infancy. 

In politics the father of our subject was a republican until the 
Know-nothing party started into existence, at which time he became 
a democrat and the family have since supported that great political 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 421 

organization. In religious faith they are all Catholics. Our subject 
is regarded as one of the leading farmers of his community and to 
his own well directed efiforts has been due his enviable success in life. 
He is not only a man of business ability, who has been able to carry 
forward to successful completion whatever he has undertaken, but 
his course in life has been such as to win him the confidence and ap- 
proval of those with whom he has been brought in contact. 



GEORGE COLLINGWOOD TUCKER. 

George Collingwood Tucker, secretary of the Iowa State Insur- 
ance Company, is a native of Keokuk, his birth occurring in the house 
which is still his place of residence. His parents were Howard and 
Mary Collingwood (Dixon) Tucker, who were numbered among the 
pioneers of Lee county. The father was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
August 3, 1828, a son of Thomas and Ann (Sykes) Tucker. The 
family is of English extraction. 

Howard Tucker was reared and educated in Cincinnati, but came 
to Keokuk in 185 1 as a young man of about twenty-three years. He 
became connected with a wholesale importing hardware store and so 
continued until he was elected director in the Iowa State Insurance 
Company in 1858. On the 7th of January, 1865, he was elected sec- 
retary of the company. In October, 1906, he retired from active busi- 
ness cares and passed the remainder of his life in well merited leisure. 
His death occurred on the ist of August, 1909. He was a member 
of the Episcopal church and always manifested a deep interest in its 
work. He was elected vestryman for fifty-one consecutive years in 
the same parish, a record unparalleled in the United States, and he 
served as senior warden of the church for many years. He was also 
interested in the erection of the church building. He was a repub- 
lican in politics and was quite prominent fraternally. He was a 
Knight Templar Mason, also took the thirty-second degree in the 
Scottish Rite and was a member of the Shrine. Although he was of 
a social nature, he spent many of his leisure hours at home, enjoying 
the companionship of his family and the contentment to be found in 
domestic life. His marriage occurred in Keokuk, July 12, 1854, 
when Miss Mary Collingwood Dixon became his bride. She was a 
daughter of George C. and Henrietta Dixon. Four children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Tucker as follows: Mary Cooper, who mar- 



422 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 



ried George Edward Rix; George Collingwood ; Arthur Howard, 
who passed away in infancy; and Willia Dixon, also deceased. 

George Collingwood Tucker was reared and educated in Keokuk 
and has always made this city his home. He has been a forceful 
factor in insurance circles of Iowa and at present is serving as secre- 
tary of the Iowa State Insurance Company, one of the most reliable 
and most progressive companies doing business in the state. His 
exact and detailed knowledge of the business and his natural farsight- 
edness and business acumen have been of untold value in the devel- 
opment of the company, and his associates agree that his place would 
be hard to fill satisfactorily. 

Mr. Tucker was married to Miss Katharine Mackv Dickinson, a 
daughter of Laurence T. and Nanny (Tidball) Dickinson. The 
ceremony took place at St. Paul's Episcopal church afChattanooga, 
Tennessee, the Rev. Thomas A. Tidball officiating. To Mr. and Mr;. 
Tucker two children have been born, Mary Collingwood and Kath- 
arine. Mr. Tucker is a republican in politics and is an earnest 
student of the many forces which are afifecting our modern life. The 
welfare of the city is a matter of great concern to him, and he is 
always to be found in the front rank of any movement for the better- 
ment of the community. He is a member of the Episcopal church 
and is quite prominent in the official life of his parish. He is junior 
warden, vestryman and treasurer and discharges the duties pertain- 
ing to these offices with efficiency and fidelity. As was his father 
before him, he is a successful business man, a public-spirited citizen 
and a loyal friend. 

The Iowa State Insurance Company, with which the Tuckers, 
father and son. have been identified for so many years, was originated 
in 1855, the preliminary meeting being held in Januarv in the office 
of Judge George Collingwood Dixon. Dr. Freeman Knowles pre- 
sided as chairman and William Turner was secretarv. A short time 
afterward the company was incorporated and began business. The 
first policy was dated July 25, 1855, and was underwritten for eight 
hundred dollars, the holder being John Rankin. During the first 
year about eight thousand, two hundred and eighteen dollars worth 
of business was written and the growth of the company can be gauged 
by a comparison of that amount with the volume of business done in 
1913. In the last named year in Iowa and Missouri, the premiums 
on policies brought in six hundred and fiftv thousand dollars. A 
report of the business of the company issued in that vear shows that 
since the organization of the company losses totaling three million, 
six hundred and sixty-four thousand, seven hundred and twentv-six 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY - 423 

dollars and twenty-three cents have been paid and that the participa- 
tive policies issued by the company have saved policy holders nine 
hundred and forty-seven thousand, four hundred and ninety-nine dol- 
lars and thirty-eight cents on the amount of their premiums. The 
company is conservatively managed and because of this the general 
public is assured of its ability to fully meet all obligations. To this 
confidence is due its steady growth and its present prosperity. 

The first officers were: C. H. Perry, president, and William 
Turner, secretary. The incorporators were E. H. Harrison, J. W. 
Rankin, A. Bridgman, William F. Turner, George B. Smyth, E. R. 
Ford, A. B. Chittenden, R. P. Creel, John McCune, C. Garber, and 
C. H. Perry. The present officers are William Logan, president; 
W. N. Sage, assistant to the president; Alexander E .Johnstone, vice 
president; G. C. Tucker, secretary; J. L Annable, assistant secretary; 
Wells M. Irwin, treasurer; and James C. Davis, counsel. The pres- 
ence of such men as these at the head of affairs is sufficient guarantee 
that the company will be conducted upon the same sound basis as in 
the past and that its prosperity will continue. 



CYRUS KENNEDY. 



Cyrus Kennedy, a well known citizen of Fort Madison, residing 
at No. 906 Fifth street, was born on the 12th of October, 1853, in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, which was also the birthplace 
of his parents, James and Jane (Wilson) Kennedy. His grandpar- 
ents on both sides came from Ireland and were early settlers of the 
Keystone state. In 1864 his parents brought their family to Lee 
county, Iowa, and located in Pleasant Ridge township, but they spent 
their last years in Fort Madison, where the father died in 1893, ^^ 
the age of seventy-nine, and the mother in 1895, at the age of eighty. 
Throughout his active business life he had followed agricultural pur- 
suits. In the family were four sons and six daughters, of whom one 
son and one daughter died in infancy. The others were: W. R., 
who died in this county in 1899; Mrs. Mary Macklin, who died in 
Pennsylvania; Amanda, who died in this county; Elizabeth, the wife 
of Stewart Valentine, of Missouri ; Ellen, the wife of W. B. Braden, 
of Nebraska; Lila, the wife of S. W. Morow, of Nebraska; Hiram, 
who lives with our subject; and Cyrus. 

The last named passed the first eleven years of his life in the 
countv of his nativity and was then brought by his parents to- Iowa, 



^2* HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

remaining on the home farm until 1888, when he removed to Fort 
Madison. Here he engaged in contracting and building houses in 
partnership with his brother W. R. Kennedy for a short time. In 
1 89 1 he was made a member of the police force, with which he has 
been connected at intervals for ten years, and in the meantime has 
served as a guard at the state penitentiary. His fidelity to duty has 
made him a most trustworthy official, and he has become quite prom- 
inent in the local ranks of the democratic party, being now a candi- 
date for the office of county supervisor. 

Mr. Kennedy married Miss Sarah A. Schantz, who was born in 
this county, January 16, 1853, a daughter of Peter and Anna (Roth) 
Schantz. Her father was a native of Germany and her mother of 
France. In 1837 they came to this county and here spent the remain- 
der of their lives, the father being engaged in farming and also act- 
ing as a local preacher. Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy have three daugh- 
ters: Victoria Nellie, who is a graduate of the high school of Fcrt 
Madison and the Iowa College at Grinnell and is now employed as 
a Latin teacher in Kewanee, Illinois; Delia May, the wife of H. A. 
Heil of Burlington, Iowa; and Edith Jane, the wife of Nathan 
Tucker of Wever, Iowa. The two younger daughters are graduates 
of the Fort Madison high school and also followed teaching prior to 
their marriage. 

Since early boyhood Mr. Kennedy has been a consistent member 
of the Presbyterian church, and fraternally he is connected with the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, the Royal Neighbors and the Moose. His life has ever been 
such as to gain him the confidence and high regard of those with 
whom he is brought in contact, and he well merits the esteem in 
which he is held. 



LEWIS W. FAETH. 



Lewis W. Faeth is successfully engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising and his activities along these lines may well serve as an 
example to others, for he follows most progressive methods and be- 
lieves at all times in advancement and development. He makes his 
home on section 2, Jefferson township, and his farm, with its manv 
improvements, constitutes one of the attractive features in the land- 
scape. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 425 

Mr. Faeth was born in Jefferson township, this county, Septem- 
ber 6, 1875, and is a son of Adam and Anna (Eberman) Faeth. The 
former is a representative of one of the oldest pioneer families of this 
section of the state and he, too, was born in Jefferson township, his 
natal year being 1848. His wife is a native of Germany and was 
brought to Iowa by her parents in her childhood days. Mr. and 
Mrs. Faeth are still residents of Jefferson township, where he is ex- 
tensively engaged in farming, being reckoned as one of the leading 
agriculturists of his native county, in which his entire life has been 
passed. His father began the work of development and improve- 
ment here in pioneer times and Adam Faeth has carried forward the 
work thus instituted and by his well directed business affairs has con- 
tributed much to the material prosperity of the county, especially 
along agricultural lines. To him and his wife were born four chil- 
dren : Lewis W. ; Robert, who is living in Jefferson township ; Cora, 
the wife of Howard Whitcomb of the same township; and Herbert, 
at home. 

Lewis W. Faeth has spent his entire life in Jefferson township 
and has always carried on farming and stock-raising. He remained 
with his parents until his marriage and then rented land from his 
father. Eventually he purchased his present place of four hundred 
and forty acres on section 2, Jefferson township, and section 35, West 
Point township. Though divided by the township boundary lines, 
the land is all in one tract and constitutes one of the fine farms of 
that section of the county. All of the improvements upon the place 
have been made by Mr. Faeth. His home is a beautiful modern 
residence, containing ten rooms, is comfortably and tastefully fur- 
nished and is surrounded by a well kept lawn. In the rear of the 
house are large barns, one being forty-eight by fifty-two feet, while 
the cattle barn is forty-four by forty-eight feet. Every modern con- 
venience of farm life is to be found upon this place, including the 
latest improved machinery and all the equipments that facilitate farm 
work. The place is known as the Cloverdale stock farm and during 
the past six years Mr. Faeth has been successfully engaged in the 
raising of Aberdeen Angus cattle, having now seventy-five head, in- 
cluding calves, all of which are registered except the calves. He 
also raises thoroughbred Chester White hogs, having one hundred 
head. He likewise has thoroughbred sheep and twenty head of high 
grade horses. He raises most of the feed for his stock, but has also 
purchased some corn for stock feeding. He likewise raises wheat, 
harvesting about a carload annually. He is a most progressive, ener- 
getic agriculturist, and his labors are attended with excellent results 



^26 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

because his methods are practical and progressive. In addition to his 
other interests he is a director in the Donnellson Mutual Fire and 
Lightning Insurance Association. 

On the 20th of March, 1901, Mr. Faeth was married to Miss 
Lucretia Bullard, who was born in Jefferson township, March 5, 
1873, a daughter of Alexander and Martha (Dodson) Bullard. The 
mother is now living in Fort Madison, but the father has passed 
away. Mr. and Mrs. Faeth have two children, Agnes and Gertrude. 
They are worthy Christian people, holding membership in Eden 
Chapel of the Methodist Protestant church, in which Mr. Faeth is 
a trustee. He belongs to the Anti-Horse Thief Association, and he 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is never 
remiss in the duties of citizenship, cooperating in many measures and 
movements for the public good, but he does not seek otlice, prefer- 
ring to concentrate his efforts and energies upon business affairs, 
which are bringing to him substantial return. He has never sought 
to change his occupation and has always kept in touch with the pro- 
gressive trend of the times, as improvements have been made in the 
methods of farming and as investigation has brought a knowledge of 
the scientific principles which underlie the work. 



CURTIS M. HART. 



Curtis M. Hart, who has been a resident of Keokuk for three 
decades, is now serving as clerk of the district court of Lee countv. 
His birth occurred in Neosho, Newton county, Missouri, on the 28th 
of October, 1870, his parents being Samuel B. and Jennie P. (Neece) 
Hart, whose family numbered three sons. When very small he was 
taken to Morgan county, Illinois, by his parents, and from there to 
Charleston, Lee county, Iowa, in 1878, the father following the pro- 
fession of school teaching in this county. In 1884 the family took 
up their abode in Keokuk, where Samuel B. Hart died in August of 
the same year. 

Curtis M. Hart received the major part of his scholastic training 
in the public schools of Keokuk, and the better and more practical 
part of his education as a printer on the Gate City and the Constitu- 
tion-Democrat. For a time he was an employe of the Chicago, Bur- 
lington & Quincy Railroad Company, but owing to the vacancy in 
the oflice of clerk of the district court, he was appointed to fill that 
position and has discharged his duties in an efficient and highly com- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 427 

mendable manner. He is the present democratic nominee for the 
office. 

On the 27th of August, 1890, Mr. Hart was united in marriage 
to Miss Anna Dora Korschgen, by whom he has four children as 
follows: Elsie Dora, who is the wife of Ernest E. Robinson; H. 
Lloyd; Harold L. ; and Byron L. His religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the United Presbyterian church, of which he 
serves as trustee, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons, 
the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, the Loyal Order of Moose 
and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Mr. Hart is widely known here, 
and his substantial qualities of manhood and of character have gained 
for him an enviable position in the regard of those with whom he 
has come in contact. 



F. A. WOODMANSEE, D. D. S. 

Dr. F. A. Woodmansee, engaged in the practice of dentistry in 
Fort Madison, was born in Westerly, Rhode Island, in 1872, a son 
of Albert P. and Elizabeth (Eaton) Woodmansee. The father was 
a gold refiner, conducting business along that line through the greater 
part of his life. Both he and his wife are now deceased. 

In the public schools of his native city Dr. Woodmansee pursued 
his early education and in preparation for a professional career he 
entered the Medico-Chirurgical College at Philadelphia, where he 
spent one year. Later he became a student in the State University 
at Buffalo, New York, and was graduated from the dental depart- 
ment of that institution with the class of 1898. He then located for 
practice in Wayne county. New York, where he remained for three 
years, or until 1901, w^hen he came to the middle west, settling at 
Fort Madison, where he has since remained. He has a well equipped 
office, and he possesses all of the qualities which make the practice 
of dentristry unique among the professions, for the successful dentist 
must not only possess comprehensive knowledge of the science of the 
profession but also must have expert mechanical skill and ingenuity, 
with the addition of that power for the direction of business that in 
any connection spells success. Almost from the beginning of his 
residence here he has been accorded a liberal patronage, and his prac- 
tice is now extensive. 

In March, 1901, Dr. Woodmansee was united in marriage to 
Miss Flora L. Scutt, of Marion, New York, and unto them have 



428 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

been born three children, Albert S., F. A. and Walter R. Dr. Wood- 
mansee is prominent in Masonic circles and belongs to Poultneyville 
Lodge, No. 159, A. F. & A. ^L During the War of 181 2 a cannon 
ball was shot through the lodge building. He has also taken the 
chapter degrees in Masonry, is an Eagle, and Elk and is now exalted 
ruler of the Elks lodge No. 374. In politics he is a progressive re- 
publican, being allied with that wing of the party which does not 
believe in the domination of machine rule, but is in sympathy with 
the more advanced standards of party leaders who believe that polit- 
ical activity should bring about reform and improvement in govern- 
mental policies and privileges. His religious faith is that of the 
Episcopal church, and a well spent life has won him high and en- 
during regard. 



L. H. VAN AUSDALL. 



L. H. Van Ausdall, a successful voung agriculturist residing on 
section 2, Jackson township, is the owner of twenty-three acres of 
valuable land and makes a specialty of fruit and berries. He is num- 
bered among the worthy native sons of Lee county, his birth having 
here occurred on the ist of January, 1883. His parents were Martin 
and Hester E. (Marshall) Van Ausdall, the former a native of Ohio 
and the later of Lee county, Iowa. Martin Van Ausdall came to 
this countv in boyhood and here spent the remainder of his life, pass- 
ing away in 1910. His widow, who still survives, is well known and 
highly esteemed, having won an extensive circle of friends during 
her lifelong residence in Lee county. They became the parents of 
ten children, eight of whom are yet living. 

L. H. Van Ausdall attended the common schools in. the acquire- 
ment of an education and spent the period of his minority under the 
parental roof. After attaining his majority he carried mail for a 
period of six years and subsequently purchased twenty-three acres of 
land on section 2, Jackson township, taking up his abode thereon in 
1913. He makes a specialty of the production of fruit and berries 
and because of their excellent quality finds a profitable and ready 
market. 

In 1908 Mr. Van Ausdall was united in marriage to Miss Ellen 
C. Atterburg, a native of Lee county and a daughter of August and 
Gustava Atterburg, who are natives of Sweden. Thev emigrated to 
the United States in an early day, settling in Lee county, Iowa, where 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 429 

they still reside. Our subject and his wife have three children, 
namely: Kenneth E., Esther D. and Arnold. Mr. Van Ausdall 
gives his political allegiance to the democracy and now holds the 
office of assessor, making a most creditable record in that connection. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America. 
Both he and his wife have always remained within the borders of 
Lee county and are a very well known and popular young couple. 



HENRY C. LANDIS. 



Henry C. Landis, who has passed to his reward, was one of the 
old-time residents of Keokuk and served as justice of the peace for 
a number of years. He was a sutler in the Union army and was 
stanch in his allegiance to the northern cause. He was born in Cir- 
cleville, Ohio, about 1827 and came to Iowa with his parents when 
he was quite young. The father, a farmer by occupation, was born 
in Germany and died at La Grange, Iowa, and the mother, who bore 
the maiden name of Eva Murphy, was a native of Circleville. To 
them were born five or six children. The family home was main- 
tained in Ottumwa for a year, after which they removed to Keokuk. 
The subject of this review received an excellent education, attending 
the public schools and also college. He was a baker by trade and 
after coming to Keokuk hired out in that capacity to a Mr. Rapley 
and to others and won their approval by his faithfulness and by his 
skill at his trade. At the time of the Civil war he was a sutler and 
performed well the duties allotted to him. The proper provisioning 
of an armv is a task of no small magnitude and importance and 
those who aid in its performance should be given credit accordingly. 
After the close of the war he returned to Keokuk and resumed his 
trade and he became the owner of considerable realty, holding title 
to property on High and Fulton streets and also upon the boulevard. 

Mr. Landis was married at St. Francisville, Missouri, in 1850 to 
Miss Mary Rogers, born in Antioch, Ohio. Her father was James 
M. Rogers, also a native of Ohio and a son of a distiller. When his 
father married a second time he ran away from home and later be- 
came a proprietor of a general store in Antioch. When his daugh- 
ter Mary was about twelve years of age he removed to Keosauqua, 
Van Buren county, Iowa, and one year later came to Keokuk._ He 
carried on farming operations after his removal to Iowa and passed 
away in Knoxville, this state. He and his wife were the parents of 



430 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

six children. Mrs. Landis was educated in Keokuk and by her mar- 
riage became the mother of one child, William, who is deceased. 
He was a well known theatrical man and married Miss Bertha 
Husuker, by whom he had one child, Mayme Edna. 

Henry C. Landis was a Lutheran in his religious belief, and his 
widow is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He served 
in the volunteer fire company and always manifested a praiseworthy 
interest in public afifairs. His demise was much regretted by many, 
who had learned to value him highly for his fine traits of character. 



AMOS HENKLE. 



Amos Henkle, deceased, was a progressive and prosperous farmer 
and a man of many admirable traits of character, which won him a 
host of friends. His demise, which occurred at his home in Van 
Buren township, this county, on the 3d of October, 1909, was widely 
regretted and deprived the county of one of its respected and sub- 
stantial citizens. He was born on the 15th of June, 1817, in Pendle- 
ton county. West Virginia, and in 1829, when but twelve years of age, 
he accompanied his parents, Abraham and Mary (Harper) Henkle, 
on their removal to Vermilion county, Illinois. Seven years later, 
or in 1836, the family came to Lee county, Iowa, and located in Van 
Buren township. They were among the very earliest pioneers of the 
township as only one family, that of Josiah Roberts, had preceded 
them there. Mr. Roberts had entered government land here previous 
to the arrival of the Henkle family. Mr. and Mrs. Abraham 
Henkle lived in this county for some years but later removed to 
Taylor county, Iowa. They passed away at the home of Mrs. Mary 
Hoover, their youngest daughter. 

Amos Henkle had been trained by his father in the work of the 
farm and never saw fit to follow any other occupation, devoting his 
life to agriculture. He became one of the prosperous farmers of 
Van Buren township, and was recognized by those who knew him 
as a man of ability, industry and absolute integritv. He was married 
on the 2 1 St of February, 1839, to Miss Martha McGreer, of Harri- 
son township, who was born February 13, 1821, in Fayette county, 
Indiana, and died on the iith of November, 1848, leaving two chil- 
dren; Anna, who was born January 12, 1842, and is now the widow 
of Daniel Hoover and a resident of Warren, this county; and John, 
who was born November 29, 1843, and resides in Union county, this 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 431 

state. One child died in infancy- On December 31, 1S48. Mr. 
Henkle was again married, his second union being with Miss Sarah 
McGreer, a sister of his first wife. She was born February 5, 1826, 
in Favette county, Indiana, and by her marriage she became the 
mother of the following children : Mary J., of Donnellson, this state, 
who was born October 9, 1849, and is now the widow of Butler Chap- 
man ; and xAlbert, who was born June 23, 1853, and is now a farmer 
of Van Buren township; and W. L., now living in Donnellson, whose 
sketch appears on another page of this work. John Henkle was in 
the Union army during the Civil war, being a member of Company 
A, First Illinois Volunteer Cavalry. 

Amos Henkle served for a number of years as justice of the peace 
and was at different times township trustee, proving an able oflicial. 
He first belonged to the Cumberland church and when it dissolved 
he joined the Methodist Episcopal church. In his early life his 
political allegiance was given to the republican party but he later 
voted the democratic ticket and supported Cleveland. As before 
stated, he died at his home farm on the 3d of October, 1909, having 
for almost two years survived his second wife, who passed away on the 
15th of December, 1907. 



HENRY STELLERN. 



Henry Stellern, a representative of a well known and honored 
family of Lee county, which has been identified with agricultural and 
industrial interests of the community since 1869, was born in St. 
Louis, Missouri, on the 5th of September, 1861, and is a son of John 
G. H. and Charlotte Stellern. He was only eight years of- age when 
the family arrived here and has, therefore, been identified with the 
interests of Fort Madison during the greater part of his life. He was 
principally educated in the German Catholic schools, but also at- 
tended a business college in Chicago for a time. He is now the 
owner of a good farm adjoining the corporation limits of Fort Madi- 
son on the north, and there he has made his home since his marriage, 
occupying a fine brick residence. In connection with agricultural 
pursuits, he is also engaged in the manufacture of brick, his plant 
having a capacity of twenty thousand per day. He^ has given con- 
siderable attention to this industry since 1910, although he still en- 
gages in farming and is the owner of a fine tract of land in Caddo 
county, Oklahoma. 



^32 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

On the 28th of November, 1897, ^^r- Stellern was united in mar- 
riage to iMiss Bertha White, a native of Bulifalo, New York, who 
was born in 1871 and in childhood came to this county with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Patrick White. Her father was a native of 
Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Stellern have two children, Harry P. and 
Mabel Bertha. 

As a democrat, Mr. Stellern has taken quite an active interest in 
public affairs and at one time was the candidate of his party for 
county supervisor. For six years he has acceptably served as treas- 
urer of the West Point Agricultural Society, and as a public-spirited 
citizen does all in his power to advance the general welfare. He is 
a member of the Catholic church and fraternally is connected with 
the Knights of Columbus, the Moose and the Eagles. 



JAMES BURWELL PAUL. 

On the list of Keokuk's honored dead appears the name of James 
Burwell Paul, who was one of the pioneer lumbermen of Lee county 
and a man who enjoyed the respect and esteem of all who knew him. 
He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, August i, 1832. a son of James 
Paul, who died when his son, James Burwell, was but seven years of 
age. The latter was thus early thrown upon his own resources and 
when still quite young entered upon an apprenticeship to the car- 
penter's trade, mastering all of the details as well as the principal 
features of the business. For a time he followed his trade in Cin- 
cinnati and at certain seasons of the year he would go south and con- 
tract for the building of homes on southern plantations. About the 
year 1851, however, he heard the call of the west and made his way 
to Keokuk, where for years he was prominently known as a con- 
tractor and builder. He erected the first sawmill in the citv and 
operated it until the hard times of 1856 and 1857. Following the 
outbreak of the Civil war he obtained the privilege of selling sup- 
plies, as a sutler, to the Third Iowa Cavalry, and while in the south 
with the troops from this district he also saw and improved his op- 
portunities of making money in other ways. 

Following the close of hostilities Mr. Paul returned to Keokuk 
and in partnership with A. Hosmer continued the operation of his 
sawmill for a few years. At the end of that time Mr. Hosmer was 
succeeded by Captain Taber and the business was then managed 
under the new partnership relation. At a later date Messrs. John- 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 433 

stone and Baldwin acquired an interest and for years the business 
was conducted under the firm name of Taber & Company. At length 
the interests of Mr. Paul, Mr. Johnstone and Mr. Baldwin were 
absorbed by a stock company formed by Captain Taber and at that 
time Mr. Paul virtually retired from active business. He had ad- 
hered most closely to his industrial activities and by capable manage- 
ment, close application and persistent effort had gained a place 
among the more substantial residents of his city. He was seldom if 
ever at fault in matters of business judgment and his energy, deter- 
mination and ambition carried him beyond the point of mediocrity 
to success. 

In 1853, iri Cincinnati, Mr. Paul was united in marriage to Miss 
Ellen Elizabeth Taber and unto them were born five c^iildren: 
Emma Hiatt and Harry Burwell, both of whom are now deceased; 
Thomas Stevens; and Annie Winslow and Allen Taber, both of 
whom have passed away. 

Mr. Paul was a stanch republican in politics and attended the 
first convention of the party ever held in the state of Iowa. He 
twice served as alderman and for one term filled the position of 
mayor, giving to the city a public-spirited and businesslike adminis- 
tration. He was importuned to run again for the latter office but 
refused. At all times he was public-spirited and cooperated in many 
efficient plans and purposes for the public good. He died Novem- 
ber 30, 1903, and in his death the county lost a worthy man and 
citizen. His wife has also passed away. Mr. Paul was a liberal con- 
tributor to many worthy enterprises and benevolent projects. His 
life was broad in its sympathies, honorable in its purposes and 
straightforward in conduct, and he received the respect and good- 
will that are instinctively given as a reward of noble conduct. 



THOMAS S. PAUL. 



Thomas S. Paul, son of James B. Paul, was for some years in 
charge of lumber yards, thoroughly learning the business, but since 
his father's demise has not been engaged in active business interests 
in Keokuk. He was born in this city, December 7, 1856, and here 
wedded Miss Mary E. Tigue, a daughter of Thomas and Mary 
Tigue. Their children were; Sidney, now deceased; E. A., of 
Des Moines; and Irvin, who has also passed away. Like his father 
Mr. Paul is interested in public afifairs and his cooperation can be 



434 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

counted upon to further many progressive public movements. He 
is stalwart in his support of republican men and measures but does 
not seek office as a reward for party fealty. 



DAVID WELLS KILBOURNE. 

No history of Lee county would be complete and satisfactory were 
there failure to make prominent reference to David Wells Kilbourne, 
who was one of the first white men to locate where the city of Keokuk 
now stands. He arrived here when but one or two buildings had 
been ergcted upon the present site of the city and much of Keokuk's 
early growth and development was brought about through his activi- 
ties. 

New England claims Mr. Kilbourne as a native son. He was born 
in Hartford, Connecticut, and spent his youth in the east. At Albany, 
New York, he was married to Miss Harriett Rice. He became a 
commission merchant, operating in New York city until he suffered 
heavy losses through a disastrous fire. He became interested with 
others in western lands and as a representative of several prominent 
eastern business men of that day made his way to the Mississippi val- 
ley, taking up his abode where the city of Peoria, Illinois, now stands. 
Later he came to Keokuk and here acquired large property holdings, 
investing in real estate when land sold at a nominal figure as compared 
with the prices of the present. As the years passed on this property 
grew in value and he profited thereby. Mr. Kilbourne died in 1876, 
leaving behind a large circle of friends, whose good-will and respect 
he enjoyed in an unusual degree. He was one of the real pioneers, 
those who blazed the way for others to come after, and his work as 
an early settler was of material advantage to the city of today. 



GEORGE ERSKINE KILBOURNE. 

George Erskine Kilbourne, son of David Wells Kilbourne, was 
born in New York city, May 26, 1832, and was brought to Iowa by 
his parents, after which his remaining days were passed in Keokuk. 
In 1854 he married Augusta Wells, a daughter of Albert Wells, who 
is now one of the oldest living pioneers of the county. The death 
of George E. Kilbourne occurred Februarv 26, 1889, after a residence 



J 





GEORGK E.KILBOUR.NE 




MRS. AUGUSTA V/F.LLS KIUBOURNE 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 439 

of many years in Keokuk. His widow still resides here. She has been 
a witness of wonderful changes in this section. She knew all the 
famous Indians of the early days and, while she has now reached an 
advanced age, she possesses a remarkable memory and relates many 
interesting incidents concerning events which occurred in her girl- 
hood. 



GEORGE MARKLE. 



George Markle, city weighmaster of Keokuk for the past five 
years, was born on Carroll street, between Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
streets, in Keokuk, in the old Markle home which was built by his 
father sixty or more years ago. He is a son of Christian and Christina 
Markle. The father was born near Wittenberg, Germany, and in 
early manhood came to the United States, bringing with him his wife 
and children. He settled in Keokuk, when the city contained onlv 
a few log cabins and gave little indication of ever reaching its present 
attractive condition and proportions. His home, too, was a log cabin, 
which he built at what is now the corner of Sixteenth and Oak 
streets. Throughout the period of his residence in the city -he was 
actively and helpfully interested in its upbuilding and development 
and contributed to its growth and progress along various lines. He 
was one of the builders of the German Evangelical church and acted 
as one of the ofiicers in that denomination for a number of years. His 
political allegiance was given to the democratic party. Both he and 
his wife died in Keokuk when eighty-four years of age. 

George Markle, who was one of a family of twelve children, 
began his education in the old Carey school on Des Moines street, 
between Twelfth and Thirteenth streets, his first teacher being Miss 
Lottie Mooney. He continued his studies there until twelve years 
of age, when the family removed to a farm a mile and a half north- 
west of the city. He then became a student in what is known as the 
White Oak school, taught by a Mrs. Gorgas He was eighteen years 
of age when he put aside his text-books, but throughout life he has 
learned many lessons in the school of experience. Through the 
periods of vacation and after leaving school he worked in the truck 
garden of his father, remaining at home until twenty-nine years of 

age. 

On the ist of January, 1881, Mr. Markle was united m marriage 
to Miss Louisa Leslie, of Keokuk, a daughter of Christian and 
Johanna Leslie, the former a well known florist of this city. Mr. 



4W HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

Markle spent five years in the milk business, purchasing about the 
time of his marriage the old Occidental dairy. He afterward bought 
a farm of eighty acres in Jackson township and continued its cultiva- 
tion for two years. He then leased the farm and joined his father- 
in-law, who was engaged in the florist business, this association being 
maintained for two years. For twelve years thereafter Mr. Markle 
conducted a retail oil business and during that period was called to 
public ofiice, serving for six years from the sixth ward on the city 
council, to which he was elected on the democratic ticket, his oppo- 
nent being Edward Booth, a strong republican, whom Mr. Markle 
defeated by a vote of about forty-three. While in the council he 
served on important committees, including streets, lights and wharves, 
and was chairman of the committees on sewers and fire. He was 
again called to public office when he was made bailifif in the superior 
court, acting in that capacitv for one year and nine months. On the 
expiration of that period he was elected to his present position and 
for five years has been the efiicient weighmaster of Keokuk, making a 
creditable record in this oflice, as he had done in his previous con- 
nections with the public service. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Markle is well known, holding 
membership with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Loyal Order of Moose. He has never faltered in his allegiance to 
the democratic partv, and he is equally faithful as a member of the 
German Evangelical church. His entire life has been passed in this 
countv and that his life record is a creditable one is indicated in the 
fact that manv of his stanchest friends are those who have known him 
from his boyhood to the present time. 



WILLIAM E. SLOAT, M. D. 

Dr. William E. Sloat has been a practicing physician and sur- 
geon of Denmark for about three decades and is widely recognized 
as an able and successful representative of the profession in Lee 
county. His birth occurred in Westchester county, New York, in 
1842, his parents being William B. and Elizabeth D. (Closson) 
Sloat, the former born at Vergennes, Vermont, July 4, 18 14, and the 
latter in Rockingham, Vermont, on the qth of July, 181 8. The 
family comes of Holland ancestry. William B. Sloat, the father 
of our subject and a son of Piatt Sloat, of New York, New York, was 
a marble cutter by trade. He passed away on the loth of September, 




DA-VIDV/. KIL.BOUR.NE 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 443 

1842, while his wife was called to her final rest on the 28th of March, 

1875- _ 

William E. Sloat, their only child, removed to Wisconsin at the 
age of twelve and after spending five years at Patch Grove, that state, 
took up his abode in Lancaster, Wisconsin, where he continued his 
studies in the Lancaster Institute. During the Civil war he enlisted 
in Company F, Seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and was serv- 
ing as first lieutenant when discharged, in September, 1864, on account 
of wounds received in action. Later he served as sheriff of Grant 
county, Wisconsin, during the years 1871 and 1872. Having 
determined upon a professional career, he entered the Long Island 
College Hospital Medical College of Brooklyn, New York, and was 
graduated from that institution with the degree of M. D. in 1873. 
He then located for practice at Mount Hope, Wisconsin, which 
remained the scene of his professional labors for ten years. In 1885 
he came to Denmark, Lee county, Iowa, and here he has continued 
to the present time, having built up an extensive and lucrative prac- 
tice that has been accorded him in recognition of his skill and ability 
in the field of his chosen profession. 

On the 19th of August, 1874, Dr. Sloat was united in marriage 
to Miss Charlotte Elizabeth Kirk, of Huntington, West Virginia, 
her parents being Joseph S. and Charlotte Elizabeth (Meyer) Kirk. 
She has one brother and two sisters, namely: Joseph L., who is a 
resident of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Mrs. S. B. Dewey, living in 
Sawyer, Iowa; and Mrs. George S. Dye, who makes her home in 
Carson, this state. Dr. and Mrs. Sloat are the parents of seven chil- 
dren. William E., Jr., who was born June 11, 1871;, and is now a 
professor in the Northwestern Territorial Normal School, of Alva, 
Oklahoma, was married on the 2d of September, 191 2, to Miss Agnes 
Bond, of Morrisville, Missouri. Joseph Wilbur, whose birth oc- 
curred July 17, 1877, and who now resides at Woodriver, Illinois, 
is employed as clerk bv the Standard Oil Companv. He married 
Miss Emily Lucile Wempen and has two children: Ellen, born 
March 10, 1910; and William Preston, whose natal day was August 
28, 1913. Charlotte Elizabeth, born August 11, 1880, gave her hand 
in marriage to Joseph H. MofUtt and resides in Denmark, Iowa. 
Charles Justus, whose birth occurred on the 25th of December, 1883, 
wedded Miss Lucy E. Arnold, on the 29th of March, 1906, and has 
a son, Will Emerson, born July i, 1907. Olga Celestia was born 
July 27, 1890, and is still at home. Edwin Kirk, whose birth occurred 
March I, 1895, is also yet under the parental roof. Esther Alida, 
who was born September 27, 1897, is likewise at home. 



iii HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

In politics Dr. Sloat is independent, supporting men and measures 
rather than party.. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church. 
He has now passed the seventy-second milestone on life's journey and 
can look back upon an active, useful and honorable career. The 
period of his residence in Lee county covers almost three decades, and 
he has long enjoyed an enviable reputation as a prominent and able 
medical practitioner as well as an esteemed and representative 
citizen. 



RALPH N. ROUSSEAU. 

Many business activities are found as features in the commercial 
life of a city and all if wiselv and honorably conducted add to the 
commercial stability and the commercial upbuilding of the city in 
which they are situated. Well known among the enterprising busi- 
ness men of Keokuk is Ralph N. Rousseau, engaged in the manu- 
facture of ice cream and ices. He comes of a country famous for 
its products of that character, being a native of Portiers. France, 
born September lo, 1888. His parents were Louis and Albertine 
(Johan) Rousseau. The father was assistant manager of a large 
bakery in Paris to the time of his death and the mother still resides 
in that city. They had a family of four children. 

Ralph N. Rousseau was educated in one of the Catholic schools 
of Paris, to which citv his parents removed when he was but two 
vears of age. His text-books were put aside when he reached the age 
of fourteen, and he then learned the ice cream and candy-making 
trade. Thinking to find still broader business opportunities in the 
new world, he came to the United States in 1906, when a youth of 
eighteen years, and after landing in New York made his way to 
Washington, D. C, where he worked at his trade in the employ of 
Rancher, a well known and prominent French caterer of the capital 
city. He went from Washington to Minneapolis in 1910 and there 
opened the Roddeson Hotel and engaged in the ice-cream business 
as a manufacturer. Soon afterward, however, he removed to Esther- 
ville, Iowa, where he worked at his trade for three years. In March, 
1913, he purchased a half interest in the Hartman ice cream business 
at Keokuk and on the 24th of December, 191 3, took over the entire 
business, of which he is now the sole proprietor. In June, 1914, he 
bought a dairv and milk plant, known as SolwerdelTs Milk Depot, 
and is now conducting both lines of business. He has become promi- 
nently known as a manufacturer of fine ice creams and ices of every 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 445 

description, which he guarantees to be pure. Everything about the 
factory is conducted along the most sanitary and cleanly lines, and he 
uses recipes which result in the production of most delectable iced 
delicacies. 

In Estherville, on the 30th of April, 1913, Mr. Rousseau was 
married to Miss Lyda Nicholson, a daughter of George Nicholson, 
of that place. Their religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, 
and Mr. Rousseau also holds membership in the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. His political allegiance is given the repub- 
lican party and he keeps well informed on the questions and issues 
of the day. He has never had occasion to regret his determination 
to come to the new world, for in this land he has found the oppor- 
tunities which he sought and in their improvement has made sub- 
stantial advancement, leading to desirable success. 



CHARLES RENARD. 

Charles Renard is now living in Keokuk and is numbered among 
its valued and respected citizens. He was for thirty years a member 
of the United States army and has well earned the rest which has 
come to him. He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, October 15. 1853, 
a son of Mr. and Mrs. Adam Renard, of whom mention is made else- 
where in this volume in connection with the sketch of their son, 
Henry Renard. 

When a small boy Charles Renard accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Lee county, Iowa, and pursued his education in the 
schools of Charleston until he reached the age of ten years, when 
the family home was established in Kahoka, Missouri. There he 
attended school to the end of the year, after which he returned to 
Keokuk and completed his education in the German parochial school 
and the Lutheran parochial school. He devoted a portion of each 
year to his studies, but when quite young began to earn his own 
living and as a boy worked at anything that he could find to do which 
would yield him an honest dollar. He drove a mule team on the 
canal for seventy-five cents a day and also worked at farm labor, 
but military life attracted him and on the i^th of March, 1871, he 
enlisted for service in the United States army. For eight months he 
remained at Newport, Kentucky, drilling and doing other military 
duty, and was then assigned to the Ninth Infantry, which was 
stationed at Fort D. A. Russell in Cheyenne, Wyoming. He did 



446 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

guard duty and scouting for about two years and then began building 
forts in Wyoming. Upon the western frontier he also engaged hi 
fighting the Indians and had the usual experiences of a soldier 
stationed in the far west. He was afterward transferred to Buffalo, 
New York, where he remained for three years. He was on active 
duty in the Spanish-American war in Cuba under General Shalter, 
and at various times he was stationed in different parts of this country, 
doing bravely, faithfully and loyally any task of a military character 
that was assigned him. He was promoted to the rank of sergeant 
and was popular with his comrades in arms. 

At the end of thirty years Mr. Renard returned to Keokuk, where 
he now makes his home. He married on the 30th of June, 1903, Miss 
Sophia Haessig, who was born in Keokuk June 11, 1862, a daughter 
of William and Sophia Haessig. Mrs. Renard was educated in the 
public schools of Keokuk and by her marriage has one son, Charles 
H., who was born December 4, 1905. 

The parents are members of the Evangelical church and in the 
city where they make their home are highly esteemed, warm friend- 
ship being accorded them by many with whom thev have come in 
contact. Mr. Renard votes with the republican party, but has never 
been an aspirant for office. Since returning to Keokuk he has lived 
retired and well has he earned this rest after thirty years of active 
service in connection with the military affairs of the nation. 



W. L. HENKLE. 



Until the summer of 1914 W. L. Henkle carried on farming and 
stock-raising on his fine farm of five hundred and seven acres in Van 
Buren township, this county, which was his birthplace and which 
he sold at that time. He was born October 20, 1864, and is a son of 
Amos Henkle, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work. 

W. L. Henkle was educated in the public schools of Lee county 
and assisted his father during the summer periods in the work of the 
farm, thus learning practical agriculture. After reaching maturity 
he decided that the life of a farmer was the one most congenial to 
him and he continued to assist in the operation of the home farm, 
which came into his possession upon the death of his father. He used 
excellent judgment in his farming operations and as he utilized new 
inventions and new machinery which seemed adapted to his needs and 
as he was always willing to give a new method a fair trial he proved 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 447 

an efficient agriculturist, his fields yielding him abundant harvests. 
He was also well known as a breeder of Aberdeen Angus cattle and 
had a herd of about fifty head of pure blooded animals. 

Mr. Henkle was married in Lee county, on the 4th of May, 1892, 
to Miss Anna E. Herron, a daughter of the late David Herron, an 
early resident of this county. Her father was born October 15, 1834, 
in Columbus, Ohio, and was a son of John and Nancy (Ross) Herron, 
who in 1846 removed to Lee county, Towa, and located in Van Buren 
township. John Herron served in the Civil war as a member of the 
Iowa Volunteer Infantry and died while in the service at Island No.' 
10, Missouri. He had secured government land upon moving to 
Lee county and gave his time to its operation until he joined the 
army. His widow spent her last years at Quincy, Illinois, and died 
there in 1889 or 1890, when she had passed her ninety-second birth- 
day. She was a stanch Presbvterian in her religious belief. She 
was the mother of four sons and one daughter, as follows: David; 
William and James, of Nebraska; John, of Davenport, Iowa; and 
Mrs. Sarah Wilson, a widow living at Davenport at the age of eighty- 
two. David Herron attended school in Lee county and assisted his 
father in the work of the farm. He continued to follow that occupa- 
tion and remained the greater part of his life a resident of Van Buren 
township, this county. On the i6th of September, 1857, he married 
Miss Paulina Richardson, who was born September 27, 1836, in 
Indiana, and in 1848 came to Lee county with her parents, John and 
Lvdia Richardson. Mr. and Mrs. Richardson remained in Van 
Buren township for a short time and then removed to the vicinity 
of Kirksville, Adair county, Missouri, where they passed the re- 
mainder of their lives. David Herron died at his home in Van 
Buren township, August 8, 1912, having for a number of years sur- 
vived his wife, whose demise occurred on the 26th of November. 1901. 
They were the parents of seven children, as follows: William and 
Levi, farmers of Osborne county, Kansas; Mary E., the wife of Scott 
Christy, of Farmington, Iowa; John, of Yuma, Colorado; Mrs. 
Anna Henkle ; Charles, who is operating the Herron farm ; and James 
B.. who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Henkle are the parents of 
three children, all of whom were born in Van Buren township: Roy 
L., who was born May 30, 1893, and is a high-school student; Lillian 
M , who was born in May, 1 896, and is likewise a high-school student ; 
and Leila G., born August 2, 1898, in school. 

Mr. Henkle gives his political allegiance to the democratic party 
and has served in a number of township offices, discharging the 
duties devolving upon him with conscientiousness and ability. He is 



448 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

now a member of the school board and his influence is always used 
to promote the interests of the public schools of the district. He is a 
member of the Anti-Horse Thief Association. He has not only been 
a successful farmer and won prosperity for himself but he has been 
at all times a public-spirited citizen and has lent his aid to many 
projects for the public welfare. 



PETER HOTT. 



The demise of Peter Hott, which occurred April 15, 1912, at the 
home of his son, Isaac Henry Hott, was sincerely mourned, as he was 
one of the representative and honored citizens of the county. He was 
born in Pickaway county, Ohio. September 29, 1834, a son of George 
and Jane (Dean) Hott, both of German descent. The father was 
born in the same county, February 22, 1812, and the mother's birth 
occurred in Robinson county, Tennessee, September 6, 181 1. The 
parents left Ohio with their family, September 6, 1839, and drove 
through to Harrison township, this county, with team and wagon. 
The father purchased a claim of forty acres, later receiving a patent 
from the government for the same. The mother passed away the 
March following their arrival in this county, and was buried near the 
home farm on the old Poole place. They had four children: Isaac; 
Peter, the subject of this review; Aaron, who died when but six years 
of age; and Henry, who died in infancy. The father subsequently 
married Mrs. Jane Warren and removed to Cedar township, locat- 
ing on section 6. He prospered in his agricultural operations and 
at the time of his death owned four hundred and twenty-five acres, 
having bought out the heirs of Mr. Warren, the first husband of 
Mrs. Hott. For a number of years Mr. Hott worked at the cooper's 
trade in Farmington, Iowa, and was successful at that as well as in the 
cultivation of the fields. He passed away January 19, 1889, at the 
age of seventy-seven years, and was buried in the Boyles cemetery, 
as was his second wife, who preceded him in death, her demise occur- 
ring February 27, 1885. His political allegiance was given to the 
democratic party. 

Peter Hott enjoyed but limited educational opportunities in youth, 
but his fine intelligence and habit of close observation made him a 
man of great practical wisdom. He was successful as a farmer and 
owned a valuable farm of si.x hundred acres, upon which were six 
houses. Much of his land he rented to others, as it was more than one 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 449 

person could cultivate. He received therefrom a handsome annual 
income and he enjoyed the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 
At times he met with misfortune, as when his house was burned, but, 
as he invariably set himself to retrieving his losses, he erected a new 
and handsome residence, which embodied in its construction the most 
modern ideas and which was provided with the conveniences of an 
up-to-date dwelling. 

Mr. Hott was married January 18, 1855, to Miss Mary Harlan, 
a native of Ohio, who passed away March 6, 1865, leaving two chil- 
dren. Dora married William Shaw and they had one child, Florence 
M., who became the wife of Lute Hixon and the mother of a son, 
Lester. Mr. Shaw is deceased and his widow is now the wife of 
Samuel Huddleston, of Hillsboro, Iowa. Cyrena, the second 
daughter, passed away at the age of twenty-eight years. Mr. Hott 
was again married December 7, 1865, Miss Anna Lane becoming his 
wife. She was a native of Highland county, Ohio, and a daughter of 
Jacob and Charlotte Lane, who drove from Ohio to this county, 
settling on a farm near that of Mr. Hott. They later removed to 
Clark county, Iowa, where Mr. Lane entered eighty acres of land, 
and they spent their last days with Mr. and Mrs. Hott and are buried 
in the Boyles cemetery. One son, Isaac Henry, was born to the second 
marriage of Mr. Hott. 

The latter was a republican and a member of the Christian 
church. He did his part in the agricultural development of Lee 
county and his sterling traits of character won for him many warm 
friends, who were sincerely grieved when he passed away. 



J. C. SANDERS. 



}. C. Sanders needs no introduction to the readers of this volume 
and his name is a familiar one to many throughout the country who 
are studying the grave problems that afTect mankind, especially those 
which have to do with uplift work in the lowest stratas of society. 
He was called to his present position as warden of the state peniten- 
tiary at Fort Madison in 1908 and none can question the efficacy 
and the value of his labors. Mr. Sanders was born in Vinton, Iowa, 
January 23, 1865, his parents being Jonathan B. and Mary Jane 
Sanders. The father, who was born in Virginia, removed to Illinois 
upon leaving the Old Dominion and in 1846 arrived in Iowa, becom- 
ing one of the pioneers of Benton county. 



450 , HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

• J. C. Sanders acquired a public-school education and afterward 
entered Western College at Toledo, Iowa, where he won the degree 
of Bachelor of Science. He is also a graduate of the State Normal 
School at Cedar Falls and further continued his education in Coe 
College at Cedar Rapids and in the State University. In 1884 he 
took up the profession of teaching and was active in educational 
circles for twenty-one years, serving much of that time as principal 
of schools. He was thus connected with the schools at Traer, Newell, 
Rockford and West Union, Iowa, and did splendid work in each con- 
nection. His professional standards were high. He inspired teachers 
and pupils with much of his own zeal and interest in the work and 
he imparted clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he had 
acquired. All through the years he was a student, not onlv of his 
particular profession, but of many of the vital questions which afifect 
public life and sociological and economic conditions in the country. 

In 1908 Mr. Sanders was appointed warden of the state peni- 
tentiary and became a pioneer in prison reform movements, being 
among the first to introduce the parole system. He grasped the 
broader truth hitherto scarcely recognized — that imprisonment 
should be a source of benefit as well as of punishment to the 
individual, preparing him if liberty came later to enter upon a life 
of worth and value without returning to the haunts of crime. With 
this end in view he sought to promote uplift work among the prisoners 
and introduced music and athletics and gave special attention to 
sanitation. He developed the prison farm of one thousand acres, 
working this with the view of giving a portion of the earnings of 
convicts to their families, and twenty-five per cent of the net income 
goes to the men. He meets and knows the men who are in his custodv 
and works with them from an individual standpoint. In addition 
to the medical attention furnished he has added to the corps of 
attending physicians a specialist in the treatment of diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat and also competent dentists, knowing that 
good health gives a better and more cheerful outlook upon life and 
enables the individual to throw ofT sordid and lowering thoughts. In 
a word, he studies the men from the standpoint of humanity and is 
now well kncnvn throughout the entire country as one of the noted 
prison reformers. 

In 1887 Mr. Sanders married Miss Lura M. Snider, of Kilbourn, 
Wisconsin. They have no children of their own but their kindness 
has prompted the adoption of two whom they are now rearing, 
Rodger Clay and Grace Harris. Mrs. Sanders is in entire sympathy 
with her husband in his reform work and discusses with him all the 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 451 

methods and plans which he has for benefiting the unfortunate class 
under his control. 

Mr. Sanders is prominent in Masonic circles, having attained 
the Knight Templar degree of the York Rite and the Thirty-second 
degree of the Scottish Rite. He is also a member of the Mystic Shrine 
and is most loyal to the teachings of the craft which recognizes the 
brotherhood of man. He is also connected with the Knights of 
Pythias and is an ex-chancellor commander of the Rockford, Iowa, 
lodge. Who can measure the extent of his influence and his work? 
Many a man has been heartened and encouraged by his sympathy and 
his understanding, and long after he has ceased from active con- 
nection with this state penal institution his good deeds will live in 
the lives of those whom he has sought to help. 



GEORGE W. PHILLIPS. 

George W. Phillips, one of the veterans of the Civil war, now 
living in Summitville, has made his home in Lee county since 1869 
and in the intervening period, covering forty-five years, has enjoved 
in large measure the respect and good-will of those with whom he 
has been brought in contact. He is now practically living retired, 
enjoying a well earned rest after many years of active labor. 

He was born on a farm in Clermont county, Ohio, February 10, 
1844. His father, Samuel H. Phillips, was also a native of the same 
county, born about 1816 or 1818. The grandfather, John Phillips, 
was a native of Pennsvlvania, but removed to Ohio and spent his last 
days in Clermont county, where he had settled during pioneer times. 
He married Susanna Wyatt, a native of Maryland, who died in Cler- 
mont county, Ohio. They were the parents of four children, Samuel 
H., Thomas H., Jackson, and Mrs. Maria Hill, who died in Iowa. 
In fact, all of the children have now passed away. The eldest, 
Samuel H. Phillips, made farming his life work and always con- 
tinued his residence in his native countv. He there married Rebecca 
Davis and he died when his son George was but ten years of age. 
To him and his wife had been born four children: John D., who 
married Josie Bredwell and died in Clermont county; Malissa, who 
became the wife of William Lorenson and died in this county; 
Thomas G., who became a bugler of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry and was afterward promoted to the rank of sergeant of his 



452 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

company, serving for three years during the Civil war. He was 
married in Illinois and died in Ohio. 

George W. Phillips, the youngest of the family, spent the first 
twenty-five years of his life in his native county and there acquired 
a public-school education. He was reared upon the home farm and 
following the outbreak of the Civil war responded to the country's 
call for troops, enlisting at Bethel, Ohio. While at Chillicothe he was 
mustered in as a member of Company L, Ninth Ohio Cavalry. This 
was (jn the 2d of September, 1864, when he was but twenty years of 
age. He was mustered out on the 13th of June, 1865, at Concord, 
North Carolina. He had gone with Sherman on the campaign from 
Atlanta to the sea and was on continuous duty from the time of his 
enlistment until his discharge, rendering gallant aid to his countrv. 

At the close of the war Air. Phillips returned to his home and 
engaged in teaming between Bethel and Cincinnati, Ohio, until 1869, 
when he came to Iowa, settling on a tract of land in Montrose town- 
ship, which he rented. There he continued to live for five years, 
devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits. He then 
accepted a position as foreman at the county farm, under Superin- 
tendent John Sapp, and filled the office under everv succeeding super- 
intendent for four decades. When the heating and pumping plant 
was installed he was placed in charge of it and so continued until 
February, 1914, when he retired after a long period of usefulness 
as a soldier and citizen. For more than forty years he was foreman 
at the county home and was most highly esteemed by the superin- 
tendents, both democrats and republicans. He was most faithful 
and loyal to his duty and made a most excellent record in office. 

Mr. Phillips was reared in the Methodist Episcopal faith. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and fraternally 
he is connected with Torrence Post, No. 2, G. A. R., at Keokuk, that 
organization finding in him a loyal supporter. In days of peace he 
has always been as true and faithful to his country and to public 
duty as when he followed the old flag upon southern battlefields. 



ISAAC HENRY HOTT. 

Isaac Henry Hott is a well-to-do farmer and stockman, residing 
on section 6, Cedar township, where his birth occurred in February, 
1867. His father was the late Peter Hott, whose demise occurred 
April 15, 1912, and the last three years of whose life were spent with 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 453 

the subject of this review. Our subject has a half sister living. Mrs. 
Samuel Huddleston, of Hillsboro. 

Mr. Hott was reared upon the home farm and since reaching 
mature years has continued in the calling in which he was trained as 
a youth. He owns five hundred acres of land in Cedar township, 
located on sections 5, 6, 7 and 8, and operates all of it except a tract 
of one hundred and eighty acres, which he rents. He raises grain and 
also stock, buying and selling some cattle and hogs in addition to what 
he raises. He resides upon his farm, forty acres of which was entered 
from the government by his grandfather. In December, 1898, the 
house was burned and the subject of this review erected his present 
fine modern residence. He keeps everything upon the place in ex- 
cellent condition and his land is under a high state of cultivation. 

Mr. Hott was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Yargus in 
1887. She was a daughter of Michael Yargus, a pioneer of Henry 
county, and her demise occurred June 3, 1903. The two children 
born to that union are: Boyd, who assists in the operation of the 
home farm and who married Miss Pearl Wright, a daughter of 
Andrew Wright, of this county; and Edith, at home. 

Mr. Hott is a member of the Christian church and is helpfully 
interested in its work. Politically he belongs to the republican party 
and fraternally is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
as is his son Boyd. Mr. Hott has ably carried on the work of develop- 
ing the fine farm, which was begun by his grandfather and continued 
by his father. He holds to the fullest extent the confidence and good- 
will of all who know him, as they recognize in him a man of sterling 
integrity. 



. JOHN M. HOBBS. D. D. S. 

The dental profession of Fort Madison finds a worthy representa- 
tive in Dr. John M. Hobbs, who, practicing successfully, is today well 
established, being accorded a liberal patronage. He was born in 
Hancock county, Illinois, on the 4th of June, 1871, and is a son of 
L. A. and J. A. Hobbs, the former a farmer by occupation. 

Spending his youthful days in his parents' home, Dr. Hobbs 
attended the public schools and, passing through the consecutive 
grades, was eventually graduated from the high school at Nauvoo, 
Illinois. He decided upon the practice of dentistry as a life work 
and with, that end in view entered the Northwestern Dental College. 



454 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

He was graduated from the Keokuk. Medical College on a comple- 
tion of a course in its dental department in 1899 and for five years 
practiced at Fort Madison in connection with Dr. Hazen. In 1904 
their business association was discontinued, and Dr. Hobbs has since 
practiced alone. He has a well equipped office, displaying all of the 
latest facilities known to dental practice, and that his work is of a 
most satisfactory character is indicated by the constant demands made 
upon his time and energies for professional services. He is a member 
of the Iowa State Dental Society and of the Burlington Dental 
Society and is thoroughly conversant with the most advanced ideas 
of the profession. 

On the 13th of September, 1894, Dr. Hobbs was married to Miss 
Emily Hibbard, a native of Nauvoo, Illinois, and to them have been 
born two sons, William L. and John Richard. Dr. Hobbs votes with 
the democratic party and keeps well informed on the questions and 
issues of the day. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, the 
Elks and the Eagles, in all of which organizations he is highly 
esteemed. 



HENRY RENARD, 



Henry Renard, who for many years was actively and successfully 
engaged in farming in Des Moines township, is now living retired in 
Montrose township, enjoving in well earned rest the fruits of his 
former toil. He was born January 5, i860, in Charleston, Lee county, 
and in this section of the state has spent his entire life. He was 
reared in Keokuk to the age of twelve years and during that period 
was a pupil in the public schools. When fifteen years of age he went 
to live with Mr. Harisch, of Jackson township,, wath whom he 
remained for seven years. He was paid twelve dollars per month 
and board and also given the opportunity to attend school for a 
limited period each year. At the end of seven years he entered the 
employ of others, continuing to work by the month as a farm hand 
until 1891, when the capital which he had saved through his industry, 
frugality and careful expenditure was invested in a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Des Moines township. Upon that place 
he erected a comfortable residence, a good barn and other sub- 
stantial outbuildings and otherwise improved the place, bringing 
the fields under a high state of cultivation. Carefully he cultivated 
his crops year by year and in time his substantial harvests made him 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 455 

possessor of a handsome competence. In tlic fall of 191 3, therefore, 
he put aside further business cares and is now living retired in Mon- 
trose township. Although reared in the faith of the Catholic church, 
he is not a member of any religious organization at the present time. 
In politics he is a stanch progressive and believes in the careful con- 
sideration of the capability of a candidate rather than in the support 
of a party merely for the party's sake. 

It will be interesting in this connection to note something of the 
family of which Mr. Renard is a representative. His father, Adam 
Renard, was born in Strasburg, Germany, in 1809, attended school 
there and afterward served in the Germany army. In early man- 
hood he learned the carpenter's trade and while still in the father- 
land he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Wolfe, who was born in 
Strasburg, Germany, about 1821. In the year 1852 Mr. and Mrs. 
Adam Renard sailed for the United States and made their way to 
Cincinnati, Ohio, where they lived for eight vears. At the end of 
that period they took up their abode upon a farm at Charleston, Iowa, 
where they resided until 1864. In that year they removed to Keokuk, 
where the father worked at his trade of carpentering, being thus 
identified with industrial pursuits to the time of his death, which 
occurred in 1884. He was a democrat in his political views and a 
Catholic in his religious belief. For twelve years he had survived his 
wife, who passed away in Keokuk in 1872. In their family were six 
children: Charles, extended mention of whom will be found on an- 
other page of this volume; Agnes, the wife of Robert Evers, in the 
same city; Henry, of this review; John, living in Nebraska; George, 
who makes his home in Keokuk; and Mary, the wife of Edward 
Willis, likewise a resident of Keokuk. 



ALLEN PETTINGILL THOMAS. 

Allen Pettingill Thomas, deceased, was a well known leather 
merchant of Keokuk, who ranked with the prominent residents and 
business men of this city. He possessed a determination that enabled 
him to overcome difficulties and obstacles and at all times his record 
was squared by the strictest principles of business honor and integrity. 
He spent a part of his youthful days in Canada and was living in 
that country at the time he attained his majority. 

Mr. Thomas was twice married. First in Ontario, Canada, he 
wedded Miss Jones, who died in that country, leaving two children. 



456 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

At a later date he crossed the border into the United States, settling 
in Buffalo, New York, his children, however, remaining in Canada. 
After living for some time in Buffalo he made his way westward 
to St. Louis and was there married again, his second union being with 
Margaret Thompson, the widow of Rev. William x^very Beers. 

Mr. Thomas was a tanner by trade, having learned the business 
in early life. After his removal to St. Louis he owned and operated 
a tanyard in that city, carrying on the business continually until his 
removal to Keokuk about 1850. In this city he established a leather 
store on Main, between Fourth and Fifth streets, and became a well 
known leather merchant in the period of pioneer development in 
the city. He remained in active business up to the time of his death, 
which occurred in Keokuk on the 4th of April, 1856. He is yet 
remembered bv the older citizens here as an enterprising, progressive 
business man, a valued citizen and a faithful friend. His native 
intelligence, his upright character and his sterling traits of manhood 
won him the warm esteem of all with whom he came in contact. He 
was a candidate for mayor of Keokuk at the time of his demise. He 
possessed many friends among the business men and in every rela- 
tion of life and his good qualities were, indeed, many. His political 
allegiance was given to the republican party, and he belonged to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He owned a fine home on Sixth 
and Morgan streets and none figured more prominently in the early 
historv of the city than did Mr. Thomas. 

Following the death of her husband Mrs. Thomas built a fine new 
residence in which she lived until she removed to the farm now owned 
by Laura Thomas, a daughter. Upon that place she spent her re- 
maining days, passing away February 7, 1897, ^^ which time she was 
laid to rest by the side of her husband in the Keokuk cemetery. Mrs. 
Thomas was born in Brompton, Yorkshire, England, in 1817, and 
when twelve years of age accompanied her parents on the voyage 
across the Atlantic to New York, where the family home was estab- 
lished. It was in that state that Mrs. Thomas grew to womanhood 
and was first married, becoming the wife of the Rev. Mr. Beers, who 
was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. He died in 
Clarksville, Missouri, leaving his widow and one son, William A., 
who is now living retired in San Diego, California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas had four children, the eldest of whom, 
Emma, became the wife of William Gilfillan, of Seligman, Missouri. 
Laura, born in St. Louis, was an infant when brought to Keokuk. 
She was educated in the common schools and afterward took care of 
her widowed mother and uncle and aunt in their declining years. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 457 

her mother reaching the age of eighty years before death called her. 
The third member of the family was Henry Howland Thomas, who 
died in San Diego, California. He had married Kate Burns and 
was filling one of the county offices at the time of his demise. The 
youngest of the family, Iowa Lee, died in 1857. Throughout the 
latter half of the eighteenth century and unto the present day repre- 
sentatives of the Thomas family have figured prominently in Lee 
county and as one of the early merchants Allen Pettingill Thomas 
contributed largely to the material development and upbuilding of 
the city of Keokuk, in pioneer times. 



ISAIAH HOSIER. 



Prosperity has attended the well directed efforts of Isaiah Hosier 
and he is today ranked among the representative and w-ell-to-do citi- 
zens of Lee county, where he has spent his entire life. He was born 
in Pleasant Ridge township on the 12th of January, 1857, and is a 
son of Henry and Mary (Brunson) Hosier. The birth of his father 
occurred in Henry county, Indiana, June 3, 1832, and in 1852 he 
came to Iowa with his father, Isaiah Hosier, Sr., his mother having 
previously passed away in Indiana. Locating in Pleasant Ridge 
township, Lee county, Henry Hosier was there married to Miss 
Mary Brunson, a native of Ohio, who had come to this state with her 
parents, Thomas and Susannah Brunson, in 1842. Her family also 
settled in' Pleasant Ridge township, this county, and on the home 
farm there she died in October, 1908. The father of our subject 
subsequently removed to West Point township, where his death oc- 
curred on the 31st of January, 191 1. Throughout his active business 
life he followed farming and was the owner of some valuable land. 
In politics he was a republican. His children were: William, 
deceased; Isaiah, of this review; Clara L., the wife of William 
Decker of Arizona; Mrs. Rebecca Welch, of Lee county; Alice, 
who died in childhood; and Belle, the wife of John Danover of 
Pleasant Ridge township. 

Upon the home farm in Pleasant Ridge township Isaiah Hosier 
was reared to manhood, and in the schools of the neighborhood he 
acquired his education. After reaching manhood he engaged in farm- 
ing there until 191 1, when he retired from agricultural pursuits and 
removed to Fort Madison, buying his present comfortable residence 
at No. 904 Fifth avenue. He still owns his home farm, however, and 



^58 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

other tracts aggregating four hundred and sixty-five acres, and his 
wife has two hundred acres and an interest in another one hundred 
acres. On starting out in life for himself he operated rented land 
and at the end of the second year after his marriage found himself 
seven hundred dollars in debt. Not becoming discouraged, however, 
he steadily worked his way upward and success attended his well 
directed efforts, so that he is today numbered among the most pros- 
perous citizens of the community. In connection with general farm- 
ing he gave considerable attention to stock and for twenty years 
shipped stock to both Chicago and St. Louis, handling large numbers 
annually. 

In 1885 Mr. Hosier married Miss Sophia Tempe, who was born 
in West Point township, this county, May 29, 1857, a daughter of 
J. F. and Henrietta (Schultz) Tempe, both natives of Germany. 
Her father was born June 18, 1824, and was twenty years of age when 
he came to the United States, and here he was married in December, 
1851, becoming the father of six children. In i860 he purchased 
a farm in Pleasant Ridge township and so successful was he in agri- 
cultural pursuits that he eventually became the owner of one thousand 
acres of very valuable land, though he had only five cents left on his 
arrival in this county. He died June 12, 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Hosier 
have two sons: Fred L., now a resident of California; and Harland 
I., who is living on the home farm in Pleasant Ridge township. 

The republican party has always found in Mr. Hosier a stanch 
supporter of its principles and while living in the country he filled 
several school offices and also served as road commissioner. In 1908 
he was elected county supervisor, and he is now serving his second 
term, being appointed to that position to fill a vacancy. He has most 
capably discharged the duties of his official positions and is a man 
who stands high both in business and public life. 



ABRAHAM HOLLINGSWORTH. 

Abraham Hollingsworth holds high rank among the lawvers of 
Keokuk; is reputed to be one of the best read members of the pro- 
fession in the state; and is recognized as an able advocate of what- 
ever cause he espouses. His birth occurred in this county on the 
1 2th of October. 1865. His father was one of the pioneers of the 
county and was numbered among its most prominent citizens. He 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 459 

was also the author of several articles concerning the early history 
of this section of the state. 

Abraham Hollingsworth attended the district schools until he was 
a youth of about sixteen. Later he was under private tuition for a 
time and has always been an inveterate reader, thus acquiring much 
valuable knowledge. He remained upon the home farm until he was 
grown, in the meantime beginning the reading of law. In 1887 he 
read law in the office of Anderson, Davis & Hagerman and in the 
latter part of the same year he entered the State University at Iowa 
Citv, graduating from that institution in 1890. On September ist of 
that year he opened his office in Keokuk. His thorough prepara- 
tion, his knowledge of court procedure and his legal ability secured 
for him a profitable clientage. He was also city attorney under Dr. 
Moorhead for two years and for one year under Mayor F. D. Hughes. 
He has contributed a number of articles to legal periodicals and is 
thus known to the profession throughout the country. He has also 
been an instructor in law to a large number of the younger mem- 
bers of the bar in this county. His practice is of a general nature, yet 
he has one of the largest corporation practices in the city, representing 
most of the public utilities companies in this section of Iowa. He is a 
member of the county and state bar association and takes an important 
part in their proceedings. On the 27th of December, 1894, ^Ii"- 
Hollingsworth was united in marriage to Miss Stella Ried, of 
Keokuk, who attended the public schools and then took a collegiate 
course at Fulton, Missouri, in the Presbyterian College for Women, 
located there. She is prominent in social afifairs of Keokuk, being 
president of the Alpha Trist Club. Three children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Hollingsworth, as follows: James A., who is seventeen 
years of age; Mary M., aged thirteen; and William Z., a lad of ten. 
James is an alumnus of the high school and the others are yet in 
school. James is to enter the State University at Iowa City in the 
fall of 1914. 

Mr. Hollingsworth has been president of the library board for 
a number of years and takes an interest in the welfare of the public 
library. He has one of the largest and most complete law libraries 
in the state, consisting of some two thousand volumes, and also has 
a well chosen and comprehensive general library of about fifteen 
hundred volumes. He is a lover of nature and has a farm near 
Keokuk of three hundred acres, where he spends considerable time. 
He is a member of the Unitarian church and confo'rms his life to the 
high ethical standards of that organization. He is a believer in 
progress in political and social conditions but is also convinced of the 



460 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 



wisdom of holding on to that which is good in the old order of things. 
Politically he is a progressive republican. As a lawyer he has won 
for himself eminence and a financial competence and is one of the 
leaders of Keokuk in all matters pertaining to civic growth and 
betterment. 



ELMER D. SEAMANS. 

Elmer D. Seamans owns a fine farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres, where he carries on stock breeding, raising shorthorn cattle, 
Percheron horses, Shropshire sheep and Poland China hogs. He is 
particularly proud of his splendid herd of cattle, as they are all pedi- 
greed stock. He was born in Lee county, January ii, 1862. the only 
child of David and Lydia (Dehaven) Seamans. The father was 
a native of New York, born near Fish Lake, and the mother was born 
in Richmond, Indiana, in 1826. David Seamans came to Lee county 
in 1840 before his marriage and settled on a farm which he operated 
for a time. He was also for many years a teacher, following that 
profession in the winter and farming during the summer. He later 
became a preacher and was one of the prominent ministers of the 
Baptist church. He died April, 1871;, leaving his widow and son to 
niDurn his loss. Mrs. Seamans passed away April 13, 1903. 

The subject of this review was reared to manhood upon his father's 
farm and was given excellent educational advantages, as after com- 
pleting the course in the common schools, he attended high school at 
Pilot Grove. LTpon the death of his father he took complete charge 
of the old homestead, which he has since operated and improved. He 
has devoted a great deal of attention to stock raising, and his herd 
of shorthorn cattle is known to include some of the finest animals 
in the county, for he is recognized as one of the most successful 
breeders in this section of the state. His stock is of the breed known 
as the Golden Drop, which originated in Kentucky and was brought 
to this county by Harvey Lusk. Mr. Seamans started his herd with 
two splendid animals, both registered in the state herd book. The 
sire, Max, was a three-year-old thoroughbred of deep red color and 
the dam, Ladv Washington, was of equally fine blood and was also 
deep red in color. Mr. Seamans' present herd of shorthorns are 
descended from tnis pair and are as fine stock as can be found in Lee 
countv. He also breeds Poland China hogs, the strain which he 
raises being descended from the Ohio herd brought to this county by 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 461 

John Blackford. He likewise raises Shropshire sheep and Percheron 
horses of good stock. Mr. Seamans has done much to raise the 
standard of stock breeding in the county and in this way has aided 
in the agricultural development of this section of the state as well 
as gained a financial success for himself. 

Mr. Seamans has always supported the republican party at the 
polls and manifests a keen and intelligent interest in all matters of 
public concern. He is willing to do anything within his power to 
further the material and moral progress of his community and holds 
the respect of all who know him. 



HERBERT C. SIEMER. 

Herbert C. Siemer is the proprietor of one of the largest furni- 
ture establishments in Fort Madison. An initiative spirit, progres- 
siveness and keen sagacity have featured largely in his growing suc- 
cess and made him one of the foremost merchants of this his native 
city. He was born July 30, 1875, and is a son of Clement and 
Sadonia (Ranembuehler) Siemer, the latter a native of Fort Madi- 
son and a daughter of Melcher Ranembuehler, who came to Lee 
county in pioneer times. Clement Siemer was born in Germany 
and the year 1866 witnessed his arrival in Fort Madison, where he 
conducted business as a brick-mason and contractor, becoming closely 
identified with the building interests of this city. His family num- 
bered seven children, of whom two have passed away. 

Herbert C. Siemer is a graduate of the parochial school at Fort 
Madison and of Johnson's Business College, where he received a 
thorough commercial training that well fitted him for the duties of 
later life. He first became connected with the grocery trade, con- 
ducting a business along that line for ten years. He then embarked 
in the furniture business in partnership with his brother, Clem F. 
Siemer, who had previously been engaged in the tea and cofifee trade. 
They opened their furniture store in 1904 and now have one of the 
largest stocks of furniture in the city, the business being located at 
Nos. 814-816 second street. The store has a frontage of fifty feet and 
they occupy two stories and basement. Their purchases are carefully 
made and their sales are growing year by year, for they carry an 
attractive stock of furniture which is reasonably priced and which 
meets the demands of the city and surrounding country. 



462 HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 

On the 14th of June, 1904, Mr. Siemer was united in marriage 
to Miss Josephine Neighbors, who was born in Fort Madison, a 
daughter of Theodore and Elizabeth Neighbors, who were early 
settlers of this part of the state and for a long period conducted the 
Metropolitan Hotel. 

Mr. Siemer votes with the democratic party and gives his earnest 
support to all measures and movements which he believes will prove 
beneficial to his community. He is a member of the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and St. Joseph's 
Catholic church, associations which indicate much of the nature of 
his interests and the rules which govern his conduct. 



FRANK W. SWAN. 



Frank W. Swan has been a continuous resident of Keokuk for the 
past twenty-seven years and has erected some of the best buildings in 
the city. His birth occurred at Alexandria, in Clark countv, Mis- 
souri, November 9, 1864. He was the only child born to the marriage 
of Bryant and Margaret (Kime) Swan, both of whom are now de- 
ceased. 

When Frank W. Swan was very small his parents moved to Illi- 
nois and his early education was acquired in the public schools of that 
state. After graduating from the common schools he attended for a 
part of two terms the high school at Nauvoo. At eleven vears of age 
he began learning the carpenters' trade and before he was twelve years 
old he and a half brother, who was but thirteen, built a store building 
entirely by themselves. For a number of vears he worked at his trade 
and for one year was employed in a lumber yard at Nauvoo. When 
nineteen vears of age he engaged in farming for a vear, after which 
he resumed his trade. He later removed to Keokuk as he had previ- 
ously visited here at various times and was convinced of the city's 
desirability as a place of residence. He continued to work at his trade 
after coming here and some of the best buildings in Keokuk were 
built by him. In 1890 he began contracting and was so engaged until 
1913. In 1908, in partnership with F. L. Griffey, he entered the 
lumber business, but sold out in 1912 and then established his present 
lumber concern. He knows the lumber business thoroughly, being 
acquainted with all of its phases, and as a result his enterprise has 
prospered and returns to him good profits annually. 



HISTORY OF LEE COUNTY 463 

On the 26th of September, 1888, Mr. Swan was married to Miss 
Matilda Twesten, of Keokuk, by whom he has four children : Grace 
M., now Mrs. Herman Wirth; Clarence; Frank; and Helen Iowa. 
Mr. Swan is an independent republican in politics and fraternallv is 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pvthias and the Modern Woodmen. He has made many friends, all 
of whom respect and honor him for his high qualities of character. f^ 



INDEX 



Albright. W. G 66 

Alvis, H. J 104 

Anschutz, Friedolin 110 

Ansclmtz, H. M Ill 

Aiithonv, James 263 

^iraentVout. C. R 34 

Armenhout. J. C 210 

Axt. J. H 313 

Ayres, D. J 344 

Baldwin. T. F 50 

Ballinger, William 292 

Bank. A. H 236 

Bank, Henry. Jr 31 

Bank, Henry. Sr 30 

Bargar, J. W 220 

Bargar. M. L 232 

Bell. Isaac 162 

Bever, Jv. J 257 

Bevering, C. L 112 

Blora, William 167 

Brinck. Herman 102 

Brinck. Theodore ' 95 

Brown. A. P 1S8 

Brown. H. C 60 

Brown Paper Co 192 

Brownell, W. A 8 

Buck, Asaph 71 

Bufe, E. J 341 

Burk. George 148 

Burster, Ernst 285 

Carrick, I. C. 401 

Casey, J. M 25 

Chambers. F. C 32 

Colby. X. E 275 

Collins. W. B 152 

Colvin, G. H 361 

Conley. J. W 145 

Connable, A. L 398 

Connable. H. L 399 

Cook. Seth 290 

Corsepius, Ernest 134 

Cosgrove, John 80 

Courtright. E. E 271 

Craig, J . E 62 

Craig, J. H 86 

Crane. E. B 387 

Crimmins. J. J 340 

Cruikshank, James 36 

Daniel, W. B : . 294 

Danoyer, J. C 56 

Daugherty, J. F 116 

Dayis, Frank 390 

Dayis, F. W 258 

Day, J. 1 205 

De Yong. Edward 174 

yoi. n— 27 



Dick. A. E 97 

Dierker. Barney 187 

Dierker. F. H 177 

Doering. V. T 241 

Drollinger, B. F 415 

Dunn. F. A 405 

Ellis. Craig 284 

Faeth. L. W 434 

Fletcher, A. P 350 

Foggy, Andrew 157 

Foggy, J. C 19 

Foster. Lee 69 

Frailey. J. R 240 

Geese, F. il 113 

Click, J. M 70 

Gray, T. P 147 

Haessig, G. G 366 

Haessig, H. G 295 

HalTner, Chris 78 

Hamill, D. B 325 

Hamill, Smith 327 

Hamilton, J. D 88 

Harnagel, Henry 252 

Hart, C'. JI, . . ■ 426 

Hart, R. H 414 

Hart, R, S 193 

Hazen, E. P 129 

Hazen, Samuel 182 

Hemraings, T. W 286 

Henkle, Amos 430 

Henkle, W. L 446 

Henn, H. L 106 

Hesse, B. B„ Sr 124 

Heying, A. R 299 

Hiil, George 58 

Hobbs, J. M 453 

Hoflman. Peter 301 

Hollingsworth, Abraham 458 

HoUowell, T. P 418 

Holmes, W. W 107 

Honadel, J. G 248 

Hornisli, J. P., Jr 18 

Hornish, J. P 85 

Hosier, Isaiah 457 

Hott, I. H 452 

Hott, Peter ' 448 

Houston, A, T 256 

Houston, H. W 57 

Houston, Ira 198 

Houston, John, .Jr 217 

Houston, Samuel 72 

Hubenthal, Charles 38 

Huglies, A, B 389 

Hughes, F, T 260 



465 



466 



INDEX 



Hutchinson, A. M 93 

Hyde, C. J 392 

Irwin. W. 51 330 

Jacobv, William 15 

Jenkiiis, G, F H*' 

.Jewell, B. B 128 

.Johnson, R. N 408 

.Johnston, S, H 300 

.Johnstone, A. E 278 

.Johnstone, Edward 242 

.Tov, C. R 24 

.Judy. Henry 202 

Junge, .John 251 

Kammerer, Albert 250 

Keethler. .J. L 40ti 

Kellogg-Berge Co 61 

Kennedy, Cyrus 423 

Kennedy. H, J 314 

Kennedy. .James T4 

Kennedy, .J. P 372 

Kennev. J. M 360 

Kent, F. B 282 

Kent, W. G 10 

J\eokuk Industrial Association 374 

Kern, P. ,J 255 

Kiel. W. F 269 

Kilbourne. D. W 434 

Kilbourne, G, E 434 

King. .7. R 92 

Kirch, C. ,1 176 

Klopfenstein, David 161 

Klopfenstein. .1. P 138 

Roller, David 120 

KoUer. J. C 83 

Krebill. Edward 272 

Krehbiel. F. B 122 

Landis, H, C 429 

Lange, Ernest 326 

Lange, H. E 331 

Lange. Robert 328 

Leazer, Isaac 44 

Lee, J, A ,185 

Leveling. .J, G 175 

Logan. \Yilliam 199 

Lohman, George 308 

McCann, .John 27 

JlcFarland. C. F 310 

McKee. E. T 35 

Markle, George 439 

Meddaugh. .J. W 133 

Meents. D. .J 230 

Meigs. Montgomery 348 

Mever. A. P. 91 

Miller. R. P 270 

Miller, W. A 143 

Moorhead, S. W 404 

Nagel, .John 166 

Newlon, W. H 335 

Nichols. A. S 306 

Overton, F. C 246 

Paul. .J. B 432 

Paul, T, S 433 

Pease, R, S 52 

Pechstein, Conrad 168 

Pechstein, Henry 169 



Peebler, C. L 141 

Peterson. T. L 231 

Pliilli|is. G. W 451 

Philpott. A. F 332 

Pohlmever. J. M 29 

Pond, d S 315 

Pond, S, P 314 

Pranger, Nicholas 419 

Racey, R. F 388 

Rand. G. D 5 

Reeves, James 54 

Renard, Charles 445 

Renard, Henry 454 

Rice. .L G 364 

Rich, CM 159 

Richey, .James 288 

RicheV. Mary J ' 223 

Richmond, A'. C 357 

Riddle. M. E 318 

Rix. G. E 228 

Robers, George 364 

Roberts. N. C 413 

Robertson, T. R 259 

Rogers, G. E 320 

Rousseau. R. N 444 

Rovane. .John, 149 

Rowe, O. W 317 

Rudd. E. H 346 

Rump, George, Sr 222 

Sage, W. N 386 

Sallander, A. W 305 

Sanders, Gerhard 224 

Sanders, J. C 449 

Satterly, A. H 303 

Satterly, S. H. 354 

Sawyer. LA 20 

Scherfe, W. A 266 

Schoene, Martin 376 

Schulte. William 108 

Schulte. W. D 61 

Schweer, Conrad 306 

Schweer, L. H 309 

Scovel, R. M 195 

Seamans, E. D 460 

Sherlock, W. P 385 

Siemer. H. C 461 

Sims, I, S 400 

Skvles. Thomas 336 

Slo'at. W. E 440 

Smith. .J. F 139 

Smith. R. B 140 

South. W. H 358 

Starkweather, G. A 338 

.State Central Savings Bank, Keokuk. . . . 301 

Stellern. Frank 312 

Stellern. Henrv 431 

Stellern. .T. (;.'H 311 

Sternberg. F. E 304 

Stevens, A. S 417 

Stewart. G, B 212 

Stewart, .J. W 367 

Storms, A. D 354 

Struthers. W^illiam 393 

Sullivan, C. H 321 

Sullivan. .James 160 

Summers. .J. W 137 

Swan. F. W 462 

Taber. B. P 337 

Thomas, A. D 76 

Thomas. A. P 455 



INDEX 



467 



Tieke, Henry 144 

Tower, J. A 287 

Traverse, I. W 368 

Trimble, H. H 178 

Trimble, Palmer 68 

Tucker, G. C 431 

Tucker, G. S 197 

Tucker, S. W 196 

Urfer, Edwin 289 

Van Ausdall, L. H 428 

Van Hyning, G. W 330 

Vaughiin, E. G 204 

Vogt, Herman 355 

Vogt, William 343 

Walker, J. C 409 

Walker, J. R 219 



Walljasper, Henry 130 

Wall'jasper, J. F 296 

Walljasper. 0. B 150 

Weber, C. A 96 

Weber, E. C 216 

Weil, J. B 143 

Wenke, H. W 333 

Wicscmann, F. C 274 

Williams, I. C 163 

Wilson, S. S 98 

Wirsig, A. E 115 

Woodmansee, F. A 427 

Wustrow, A. C 212 

Wustrow, Charles 211 

Youiikin. R, H 132 

Zaiser, A. J 396 



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