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Full text of "Story of Ward-Belmont"

The Story of 



Ward-Belmont 




A JUNIOR COLLEGE, PREPARATORY SCHOOL AND CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC FOR YOUNG WOMEN • • • NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



FOREWORD 

JLhis book is simply to introduce you to Ward- 
Belmont. For the most part it is a series of 
pictures and impressions. It can only suggest 
some of those vital, fundamental things that are 
the heart of the Ward-Belmont — the friendli- 
ness, happiness and health on the campus; the 
atmosphere that surrounds the students at work 
and play; the purposes and spirit that pervade 
the school; the home background of the stu- 
dents; the character and personality of the 
faculty, staff and administration; the high scho- 
lastic standards of the school and the enviable 
records its graduates make at senior colleges 
and universities. Insight into the real spirit of 
Ward-Belmont can be had only by a visit. This 
we cordially invite you to make. 







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"OH DUSKY PILLARS, STAND FOREVER 
STRAIGHT ABOVE THE CAMPUS GREEN" 







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THE STDHY OF WARD-BELMONT 



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ard-Belmont is rich in her heritage of ideals and tra- 
ditions from Ward's Seminary, founded in 1865, and 
from Belmont College, established in 1890. Both these 
institutions deserved the fine reputations they bore. Each 
realized that education at its best is a steady, even growth 
and that much more is accordingly concerned than ac- 
quiring a few superficial skills. Both wished to touch and 
cultivate those deep-seated attitudes, loves, and hopes that 
shape our soul and color our innermost thoughts. 

While the union of Ward's Seminary and Belmont 
College in 1913 as Ward-Belmont resulted in enriched 
purposes and more abundant facilities, the two dominant 
aims of the older institutions have continued to abide. 
The first was to encourage a permanent love and respect 
for sound learning by providing courses of study based on 
the best in literature, science, music and the other arts. The 
second was to foster an equally permanent love for gentle, 
gracious living. These purposes are reflected in the aca- 
demic buildings, Acklen Hall, the dormitories, Club Village 
and the campus surroundings. All bespeak a fine academic 
and social tradition of more than three generations. The 
atmosphere is friendly and hospitable and encourages dig- 
nity and respect for all good things. 

Location 

Nashville, located in the hills of Middle Tennessee and 
readily accessible by plane and railroad, has long been 
known as a city of education and culture. It is an ideal 
home for students. Within a few minutes walk of the 
campus is the nationally recognized University Center, 
composed of Vanderbilt University with its college and 
various professional schools, George Peabody College and 
Scarritt College for Christian Workers. 

In addition to the Artist Series presented in the school 
auditorium and the Community Concerts programs, there 



is the Nashville Civic Music Association which sponsors 
the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, the Youth Orchestra 
and the Choral Society. Also, Ward-Belmont students 
enjoy the numerous other concerts, plays and lectures that 
are presented during the season. 

Art students are always particularly interested in the 
exact replica of the Parthenon in nearby Centennial Park. 
To the west of the school lies Belle Meade, for many years 
one of the South's most celebrated stock farms. It is now 
a beautiful residential suburb of Nashville. The Hermitage, 
the home of Andrew Jackson, is twelve miles to the east. 
There are many monuments and places of historical 
significance nearby. 

In this environment Ward-Belmont offers a full and 
satisfying school life where the more formal studies, music 
and the fine arts, sports and social life, all receive their 
proper attention. The setting of the school and its rich 
historic background attract many visitors to the campus 
throughout the year. The Registrar is happy to welcome 
guests at any time. 

Alumnae 

In the course of the years more than twenty-five thousand 
women in the United States and foreign countries have 
attended Ward-Belmont. Many of them have become 
famous in music, drama, art, literature, education and the 
professions. There are many active alumnae clubs through- 
out the country. 

Ward-Belmont Today 

Ward-Belmont is comprised of the Junior College, the 
Preparatory School, the Conservatory of Music and the 
Schools of Art and Dancing. The academic standards are 



uniformly high. The College and Preparatory School are 
members of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. The College is also a member of the 
American Association of Junior Colleges. The Conservatory 
is a junior college member of the National Association 
of Schools of Music; and the School of Art holds a chapter 
membership in the American Federation of Arts. Grad- 
uates enter the leading senior colleges, universities, con- 
servatories and art schools and make enviable records. 
Classes are small and the program of each student is 
carefully planned in the light of the senior college, uni- 
versity, or professional school to be attended later. Thus 
the school offers a sound academic program in surround- 
ings that reflect a fine tradition, both academic and social. 

The courses of study are varied and many different 
combinations are possible. A majority of the students elect 
to take one of the more strictly academic programs com- 
posed of English, foreign languages, science, mathematics, 
history and the social sciences, psychology and philosophy. 
Others take special work in art, speech, home economics, 
secretarial training, or physical education. Some combine 
music with the regular college program and receive a 
certificate in piano, voice, violin, organ or harp along with 
their General Diploma. Still others, who intend to con- 
tinue their studies on a professional basis, give their full 
time to the Conservatory program. The formal catalogue 
of the school, which will be sent upon request, gives full 
descriptions of the courses of study. 

Ward-Belmont is not a large, cold impersonal institution 
with students of widely varying ages, outlooks, and back- 
grounds. The students are carefully selected, and the 
faculty and staff are chosen because of their fitness for the 
particular type of leadership and instruction that the 
school fosters. Emphasis is placed on actual teaching — 
not research. While predominantly Southern, students 
and faculty are a cosmopolitan group and come from some 
thirty-eight states and ten foreign countries. Everything 
on tne campus — from beautiful Acklen Hall to the playing 
fields and unique Club Village — has been carefully planned 
for girls. There are unlimited opportunities for pleasant 
companionship at a most impressionable age. Girls live, 
work and play together simply and naturally. 

By means of regular hours, distractions are kept at a 
minimum. When work is in order, every student is ex- 
pected to devote herself wholeheartedly to her studies. 
When studies are done, every student has ample oppor- 
tunity to participate in the numerous extra-curricular ac- 
tivities, special interest groups and sports. 

Religious Life 

The school makes an earnest effort to stimulate and 
strengthen the impulse toward Christian living. Courses 
in Bible and the religions of the world are included in the 
curriculum. There is an active Young Women's Christian 
Association in which members of the faculty cooperate 



with the students. A member of the faculty is director. 
The influences of the College and Preparatory Y. W. C. A. 
organizations are vital throughout the school. Through 
its community service program in the city of Nashville, 
students are trained for later work in their own communi- 
ties. Devotional services, conducted by clergymen and 
other religious leaders, form a regular part of the assembly 
programs. The spirit of church loyalty is fostered by each 
student attending the church of her choice. 

Special Interest Groups 

In the course of the years various special interest groups 
have been formed under the sponsorship of the faculty. 
These groups devote themselves to more informal discus- 
sions and activity than are possible in the course 
of regular classroom or laboratory instruction. First, there 
are the different departmental clubs — art, chemistry, 
Spanish, French, German, biology, speech, and home eco- 
nomics. Each has its own officers and organization and 
its own program of activities for the year. The sponsor 
is usually the head of the department. There are also 
the special music groups — the Choir and Glee Club; sev- 
eral smaller vocal ensembles such as the College Octet 
and the Preparatory School Glee Club; the Chamber Music 
Society; the Southern Belles, a small chamber music 
group; the Music Club; the Captivators, who devote them- 
selves to popular dance music; and the honorary music 
fraternity, Mu Sigma Phi. 

There are also the groups with more general campus 
interests. The various Student Government Councils play 
important roles all during the year. The Athletic Associa- 
tion is campus wide in membership. The Turf and Tan- 
bark is the honorary riding club; and the Naiades is the 
honorary swimming club. Then there are the students 
whose interest is in the publications — the Hyphen, the 
weekly campus newspaper; the Milestones, the school an- 
nual; the Chimes, the literary magazine; and the Penstaff 
Club, for preparatory students who engage in creative 
writing. Phi Theta Kappa is the college honorary scho- 
lastic fraternity; and the Beta Club is composed of those 
preparatory students who are outstanding for their scholar- 
ship, citizenship and leadership. The Round Table Club 
holds regular dinner meetings where outside guests speak 
on current problems, especially international affairs. Also 
open forums are conducted. Each class in the College and 
Preparatory School has its own officers and organization. 

Club Village 

Club Village, composed of the ten houses especially de- 
signed for the Ward-Belmont social clubs, is the center of 
student life. It is unique in that the best aspects of sorority 
life are preserved without its undesirable aspects. The 
Clubs are: Anti- Pandora, Twentieth Century, Del Vers, 
Tri K, Penta Tau, X. L., Osiron, Agora, A. K. and F. F. 
Each has a faculty sponsor. Every house has a large formal 




The main part of the Campus is centered about the famous old ante-bellum estate known as "Belmont." The 

picture above shows the mansion and its formal gardens as they appeared shortly after 1850. Preserved in 

all of its original beauty, the mansion now called Acklen Hall, overlooks the quadrangle. 



club room with fireplace, a music room, a game room, 
balcony and kitchen, and is fully equipped for all the 
various student activities and club entertaining. 

After a "rushing" period at the opening of the school year 
that provides opportunity for students to get acquainted, 
every student becomes a member of one of the Clubs in 
Club Village. Meals for special occasions, teas, dances, 
week-ends away from school and all kinds of social gather- 
ings mark the year's activities. Each club fields a team in 
every sport, thus affording school-wide intramural athletic 
competition. All Academic and citizenship awards are also 
an integral part of club life. 

Entrance 

Admission is, of course, selective. Entrance to the College 
is based upon the candidate's school record and general 
fitness for advanced academic work. This is necessarily the 
case because almost all graduates later pursue their studies 
in senior colleges and universities. Application is usually 
made well in advance of the time the student plans to 
enter. Admission to the freshman class is based upon grad- 



uation from an approved secondary school, with a mini- 
mum of fifteen acceptable units. These should be dis- 
tributed principally in the fields of English, foreign 
language, history, social sciences, mathematics and science. 

The Preparatory School offers the regular four years of 
college preparatory high school work. Students who have 
completed the eighth grade with good standing are ad- 
mitted without examination to the first year class. A stu- 
dent who has already attended an approved high school 
may apply for advanced standing. 

Admission to the Conservatory of Music is based upon 
graduation from an approved secondary school, with a 
minimum of fifteen acceptable units. Students who are to 
take a certificate or diploma in special fields such as piano, 
organ, voice, violin, harp, etc., are expected to have a 
good foundation in their particular branch of music. 

A detailed description of programs of study and indi- 
vidual classes is given in the catalogue, a copy of which 
will be sent upon request. Early application is advised, for 
each is considered in the order received. The necessary 
blanks will be sent by the Registrar upon request. 



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HISTORIC SOUTH FRONT OVERLOOKS THE SPACIOUS QUADRANGLE 



PEMBROKE HALL — THE HOME OF THE SENIORS 





The main buildings of the school are grouped around 
the quadrangle. To the south is the John Diell Blan- 
ton Academic Building, pictured above. On the north 
are Fidelity, Founders and Acklen Hall, the ante-bel- 
lum mansion of the celebrated Belmont Estate. To the 
west are Heron, Pembroke and Hail. 



THE QUADRANGLE 




SOUTHERN TRADITIONS 



The simple beauty and grace of the hanging stair- 
way in Acklen Hall recalls the dignity of the Old 
South. The stairway and the drawing rooms to 
which it leads were the center of the gracious 
living of that time. Ward-Belmont students en- 
joy their social activities in surroundings reminis- 
cent of this tradition. 




THE MAIN DRAWING ROOM IN ACKLEN HALL WHERE STUDENTS WELCOME THEIR GUESTS 



ONE OF THE SMALLER DRAWING ROOMS IN HISTORIC ACKLEN HALL 




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WARD-BELMONT STUDENTS FEEL AT HOME IN THE REALM OF GOOD BOOKS 



ACADEMIC 



All departments of Ward-Belmont are fully accredited. This assures 
the quality ol the work and successful transfer to a senior college. 
university, or lour year conservatory of music. Preparatory School 
graduates enter college without examinations, except, of course, at 
those institutions where entrance examinations are required of all 
applicants. Varied programs lead to the General Junior College Di- 
ploma. Special diplomas and certificates are awarded for intensive 
study in art, music, speech, home economics and secretarial work. The 
library contains over sixteen thousand volumes and a large number 
of current periodicals. The "Browsing Room," adjoining the main 
library, is an intormal reading room. 




ADEQUATE LABORATORIES ARE MAINTAINED FOR THE SCIENCES 




ART AT WARD-BELMONT 







Any student may become a member of 
the Art Club. The Club is affiliated with 
the American Federation of Arts and 
accordingly has representation at the 
annual national convention of the 
Federation held in Washington each 
May. The Club holds frequent exhibits. 




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MUSIC 



The Conservatory of Music is in a building of its own. 
There are numerous practice rooms, two pipe organs, a 
music library containing recordings, biographies, the 
more important works on the theory and practice of 
music, minature scores and ensemble works. The Con- 
servatory is a Junior College member of the National 
Association of Schools of Music. 




WITH THE COOPERATION OF NEARBY SCHOOLS, 
OPERETTAS ARE GIVEN. AMONG THE FAVOR- 
ITES ARE THOSE OF GILBERT AND SULLIVAN. 



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MUSIC 



Members of the Conservatory staff sponsor 
numerous vocal and instrumental ensembles and 
other music groups. Among them are the Glee 
Club, Choir, College Octet, Preparatory School 
Glee Club, Chamber Music Society, Southern 
Belles, Music Club, and the "Captivators," who 
provide popular music. 





PLAYS, PAGEANTS AND OPERETTAS ARE FREQUENTLY PRESENTED 





TO BE CHOSEN "MARTHA" OR "GEORGE" IS A HIGH HONOR 



SPEECH 



In addition to the regular work in voice and diction, 
public speaking, interpretative reading, oral interpre- 
tation and acting, the Speech Department sponsors 
numerous dramatic productions in the course of the year. 



THE SCHOOL OF HANGING 



Dancing, the oldest of the arts, plays an im- 
portant role at Ward-Belmont. Among the 
more popular branches are ballet, character, 
toe, plastique, modern and tap. 






THE GOVERNING COUNCIL OF THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL IN SESSION. 





MEMBERS OF THE BIOLOGY CLUB AT WORK 




MANY STUDENTS ENJOY WORKING ON PUBLICATIONS 



SPECIAL 
INTERESTS 




THE COLLEGE GOVERNING ORGANIZATION MEETS TO DISCUSS STUDENT AFFAIRS 



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CLUB VILLAGE 



The ten houses in Club Village and their furnishings were 
especially designed for club purposes. Each has a spacious 
living room with large open fireplace, a music room, a game 
room, balcony and kitchenette, and is fully equipped for all 
student activities and club entertaining. After a "rushing" 
period at the opening of school, every student becomes a 
member. Thus in Club Village one finds all the best features 
of sorority life without any of its undesirable aspects. 




CLUB VILLAGE ACTIVITIES 





Beginning with "rushing," the year's activities include 
Fag Day initiations, meals for special occasions, teas, 
dances, week-ends away from school, banquets, all 
kinds of social gatherings and quiet evenings with 
congenial club mates. Each club fields a team in 
every sport, thus affording school-wide competition. 









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SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 



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THREE OF THE YOUNGER FACULTY MEMBERS RELAX AT TEA 



STUDENTS FROM NEIGHBORING SCHOOLS AND UNIVERSITIES ARE FREQUENT GUESTS 







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The school owns and operates its own stable of gaited horses. 
There are regular shows in the fall and spring. In addition 
to riding simply for pleasure, some students elect to take the 
full two year course in the theory and technique of riding 
in order to qualify themselves as instructors in summer camps. 






RIDERS ENJOY THE HILLS OF BEAUTIFUL TENNESSEE 





OUTDOOR SPORTS 



The climate of Middle Tennessee encourages year-round 
sports. In addition to the regular physical education pro- 
gram, there is a club team in every sport. Competition among 
these teams is always keen and is matched only by the en- 
thusiasm of the spectators. 




STUDENTS STRIVE TO WIN A COVETED LETTER IN THEIR FAVORITE SPORTS 





EVERY ONE ENJOYS THE SPRING AND FALL TENNIS TOURNAMENTS 



FIELD HOCKEY IS ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR OUTDOOR SPORTS IN THE FALL 





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SWIMMING 



Many happy moments are spent 
in the light, white-tiled pool. 
Instruction is given in all aquatic 
sports. The water in the pool 
circulates constantly and is puri- 
fied by ultra-violet rays. No 
chlorine or other irritating chemi- 
cals are ever used. 




MJOOR SPORTS 



Each student can choose from a wide variety of sports, select- 
ing those she likes best and frequently taking part in several. 
The Physical Education Building is a complete unit. On 
the ground floor are the bowling alleys, shampoo room, 
lockers, dressing rooms and showers. The large gymnasium, 
the apparatus room and the offices of the staff are on the 
main floor. A spectators' balcony surrounds the main gym- 
nasium. Adjoining the balcony are the dance studios. 



THE BOWLING ALLEYS ARE ALWAYS 



FAVORITE MEETING PLACE 








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THE GYMNASIUM PROVIDES ABUNDANT SPACE 
AND EQUIPMENT FOR ALL INDOOR GAMES 






MAY DAY 



One of the outstanding events of the spring is the traditional May 
Day Festival. This marks the culmination of the Physical Edu- 
cation Program, in which every student participates. The grand 
parade, picturesque costumes of the dancers and the May Queen 
with her Court add a dramatic touch to the celebration which is 
viewed by several thousand friends, parents and alumnae. 




SCENES FROM MAY DAY 





TO BE CHOSEN QUEEN OR A MEMBER OF THE COURT IS ONE OF THE HIGHEST HONORS 



EVERY STUDENT TAKES PART IN THE TRADITIONAL MAY DAY CELEBRATION 




STUDENT LIFE 




THE STUDENT COUNCIL ENTERTAINS AT AN INDOOR PICNIC 




HOLD A SPECIAL MEETING CORSAGES JUST BEFORE THE FORMAL DANCE 




THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES WITH CHICKEN AND CHATTER IN THE TEA ROOM 




FAG DAY'' FUN CELEBRATES PLEDGING IN CLUB VILLAGE 




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The marble statues and wrought iron summer houses, collected 

in Europe by Colonel and Mrs. Acklen for the formal gardens 

of their ante-bellum estate, are still on the campus.