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STOSAG 76 



Stockbridge School of Agriculture 



University of Massachusetts 



Amherst, Massachusetts 




Editor-in-Chief 

Sue Morin 

Layout Editor 

Carol Aldrich 

Photograph Editor 

Sue Phillips 



Senior Editor 

Cheryl Sylvester 

Sports Editor 

Chris Browning 

Art 

Deena Grant 



Layout Staff 

Cheryl Sylvester 
Sue Phillips 
Chris Browning 
Carlyn Appleton 

Typing Staff 

Dolores Bowman 
Chris Browning 



Photography Staff 

Chris Browning 
Pat Broderick 
Steve Nietupski 
Ken Allie 
Steve Anderson 
Denise Gagnon 
Tom O'Neil 






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The 1976 STOSAG is dedicated to Mrs. John Bowman, 
student senate secretary. We won't go into her life history, 
but we would like to express our feelings as best we can. 

How can we describe Dolores? Friend, co-worker, 
"Mom", confidant; the list goes on indefinately. Most peo- 
ple would be content to do their jobs and go home, when 
their day is done. Dolores does her job, listens to us rant and 
rave, comes to all our functions and still takes the time to 
make each of of us feel her warmth. 

She understands our need to let off steam and also our 
need to be silent. In her presence, there is no need to be witty 
or "reasonable" all the time; she allows us to be ourselves. 

Dolores is the one person in the senate office who knows 
what needs to be done, and how to do it. She's the one who 
lets us joke, then in her own way, lets us know that it's time 
to get back to work. 

A sobering influence? Yes, at times, but she is there when 
we need someone to laugh and rejoice with also. 

When things go well she makes them twice as pleasurable, 
simply by being happy with us, her joy is genuine, as is her 
sympathy. 

We can't possibly begin to repay you, Dolores for all 
you've done. We can only say thank you, with all our love 
and respect, and hope that some of what we feel will reach 
your heart, as you have reached ours'. 




In the beginning 
we understand 
neither the universe, 
nor the world, 









nor the people 
nor ourselves 
blindly, we reach. 








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Nature produces the greatest results 
with the simplest means. 
These are simply 




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DEDICATION 

DEAN'S LETTER 

MISS REYNOLD'S LETTER 

FACULTY PICTURES 

SENIOR PICTURES 

MAJORS 

SPECIAL EVENTS 



3 EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 104 

10 HISTORY OF STOCKBRIDGE HALL 120 

12 OTHER 122 

14 SPECIAL THANKS 128 

24 GRADUATION 130 

48 SENIOR NAMES & ADDRESSES 137 

73 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 144 



What This Is . 



This is a short explanation of why we (The Yearbook StafO have 
placed the Minuteman next to the modern day farmer. The reason is 
quite simple, if you just read the quote on the Minuteman picture. You 
will see the relationship of the two through cultures and the ideal of past 
and present. 

In todays life styles the farmer has been and is taken for granted. But 
this year, the countries 200th Birthday, the realistic view point of the 
farmer being an intricate part of the counties heritage and freedom, 
should and will be brought out into the open and recognized. In so much 



we wish to fKjint out, that the modern day farmer is still carrying out an 
important part of the heritage and freedom of this country. If it were 
not for the modern day farmer the people of this country would not have 
half of the freedoms that they enjoy now. How many people can 
imagine having to limit how much food they purchase a week, whether 
they have money or not? So with this Question we leave you and your 
imagination, to salute the farmer of old who fought to attain our 
freedom and to the modern day farmer who still fights in his own way to 
retain our already acquired and taken for granted freedom. 







Changes 

Are you kidding? You, the Class of 1976, the Bicen- 
tennial Class, have already been a part of many changes 
occurring on campus, in Massachusetts and in the coun- 
try! If you have kept your eyes and ears open, you have 
been made aware of the tremendous changes that have 
shaped this country since 1776. You have watched 
changes going on all over the world which have and will 
continue to affect your lives. Whether you go on to other 
colleges or enter the business sector, you are going to be 
participating in many social, economic, political and edu- 
cational changes. 

In 1776, who would have believed that so many people 
from all levels of our society would have the privilege of 
attending college today? Would they have believed that 
you were being educated to be top-notch Arborists, 
Landscapers, Florists, Laboratory Animal Technicians 
or Greenskeepers? Of course they wouldn't! They lived in 
an agrarian society where the production and processing 
of food and fiber required most of their time and 
thoughts. They understood the need for the production of 
plant and animal products, not the needs of an urban, 
industrial society. I doubt if they could have ever 
dreamed of the tremendous changes brought about by 
wars; technological, agricultural and industrial revolu- 
tions. 

Today, in 1976, I wonder if any of us can dream of 
what our world will be like in 2176. I am sure there will 
be changes that to us now would be unbelievable. I do 
think that we are better equipped in 1976 to think about 
and prepare ourselves for the changes that will be needed 
as we enter the future. Many of you are already planning 
for and participating in some of these needed changes 
such as energy conservation, resource conservation, pol- 
lution control, better distribution of food, preservation of 
food producing land and producing a better environment 
for an ever increasing population. 

Changes? You bet! There are some real exciting and 
challenging ones already underway and these changes 
will cause more to follow! You, the Bicentennial Class of 
1976 of the Stockbridge School of Agriculture, have 
ahead of you some tremendous challenges, one of which 
is to help bring about some of the needed changes pre- 
viously mentioned. Those of us who have had a part in 
providing you with some of the necessary educational 
tools know that you will accept these challenges and 
create many positive, needed changes in the future. To 
this end, we all wish you the best of luck and offer you 
our continued help. 



10 






n 



The Minuteman . . . 

If the minuteman were to return today, what striking 
changes he would find in agriculture! 

Two hundred years ago, nine out often Americans lived on 
a farm. In this definitely Agrarian society, the farmer occu- 
pied a superior place on the social scale. Agriculture was a 
way of life, self-sustaining and self-reliant. Back-breaking 
physical labor, long hours, and crude tools and implements 
were the means by which crops were raised, milk and dairy 
products supplied, and clothing fibers and housing materials 
provided. The northern farmer produced just about enough 
to supply his family, with a small surplus which he bartered 
or sold for a minimal amount of goods and services that could 
not be produced on the farm. He depended totally on family 
and friends for help. On the other hand, the great southern 





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12 



plantations were more commercial and relied, 
for their greater production, on slave labor. 
Since travel was difficult and communication 
services practically nonexistent, northern com- 
munities and southern plantations had to be self- 
sufficient. This self-sufficiency fostered a spirit 
of fierce independence and a great respect for 
freedom. 

It is astonishing that the thirteen original 
colonies, so isolated from each other and so self- 
sufficient could or would unite to fight and win 
the American Revolution. But they did. They 
left their farms and plantations to fight for the 
freedom to structure and formally design the 
democrtic government they wanted for this 
country. The spirit of.freedom must have been a 
tremendously strong and cohesive force. 

This great love of freedom is the one charac- 
teristic the Minuteman would still recognize, for 
over the two hundred year interval, and especial- 
ly in the last fifty years, agriculture itself has 
changed drastically. 

The changes have occured at various times 
and at various rates of speed, but they have 
combined to produce a totally different type of 
agricultural picture. The nation expanded; in- 
dustrialization and urbanization created a large 



non-agrarian population which had to be fed; 
wars depleted the cheap labor supply requiring 
the farmer to resort to mechanization, and ge- 
netic, nutritional and chemcial experimentation 
provided for more efficient use of the land, 
shorter maturing time and fatter meat-produc- 
ing animals. More sophisticated methods of 
preservation and faster transportation expanded 
the territory to which produce could be shipped. 
Better means of communication resulted in rap- 
id exchange of methods and ideas. The farmer 
found that he could handle more acreage using 
the new technology and he enlarged his farm by 
buying or renting land from his neighbors. This 
has resulted in fewer but larger farms supplying 
the needs of the people. In fact, at present only 
about one in ten Americans live on a farm. This 
is a complete reversal of the figures in the day of 
the Minuteman. 

Today Agriculture is big business. Agricul- 
tural products are shipped all over the country 
and abroad. Diversified, specialized, mecha- 
nized and highly commercialized, the "family 
farm" today is vastly different from the farms of 
our fore-fathers, and the farmer himself has 
changed. He and his family are more dependent 
on other areas of society and there are few self- 



sufficient farms in the historic sense. Functions 
once performed on the farm have now been tak- 
en over by urban industry and trade. Large com- 
mercial farms have been forced to adopt some of 
the methods of urban enterprises. The farmer 
may maintainan elaborate accounting system, 
and he may incorporate his farm to obtain the 
advantages of other businessmen. 

Yes, the Minuteman would have a difficult 
time finding his way around a farm today. But 
he would still recognize that great feeling of 
freedom, and in very recent years the resurgence 
of agriculture as a highly respected calling. It 
seems appropriate that in this Bicentennial Year 
of 1976, more young people are interested in 
agriculture than ever before. Their interest even 
seems to extend to the smaller but workable 
farm. Can it be that someday soon the Minute- 
man may feel at home again? 



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AAmJ 



"lona Mae Reynolds, 
Assistant Director" 




13 




14 












Ward Hunting 




Byron Colby 




^ACZUULfCti 



Richard Rhode 





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William Bramlage 



Thomas Hamilton 



15 





John D. Edman 




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Gustave D. Olson Jr. 



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Bernie Hilton 




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Gordon S. King 




Walter H. Bumgardner 




Sidney J. Lyford 



Francis W. Holmes 



16 




Tom Houston 




Joseph T. Clayton 



J. Havis 



Donald R. Marion 



18 




Edward S. Pira 




Elmar Jarvesoo 



Tor 1 1^<^ /ic, - /O]00 Jasi 
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James F. Anderson 



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John M. Zak 



Donald M. Vietor 



19 



Patience S. Allan, Ms. Ed, 
Lecturer of English 

P. Geoffrey Allen, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Production Economics 

James F. Anderson, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Wallace G. Black, Ph.D. 

Professor of Veterinary and Animal Scinces 

Alfred W. Boicourt, Ms. 

Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

William J. Bramlage, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Walter H. Bumgardner, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture and 

Regional Planning 

James W. Callahan, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Agriculture and Food 

Economics 

Robert N. Carrow, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Joe T. Clayton, Ph.D. 

Professor of Food and Agricultural Engineering 

and Head of Department 

Byron E. Colby, M.S. 

Professor of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Alton B. Cole, M.F. 

Assistant Professor of Forestry and Wildlife 

Management 

Bradford D. Crossmon, D.P.A. 

Professor of Food and Resource Economics 

John W. Denison, Ed.D. 

Assistant Dean of College of Food and Natural 
Resources and Director of the Stockbridge School 
of Agriculture 

Marion S. DuBois, B.A. 
Instructor of English 

Robert T. Duby, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary and Animal 

Sciences 

John D. Edman, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Entomology 

Heinrich Fenner, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Veterinary and Animal 

Sciences 

George B. Gbddard, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Duane W. Greene, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Robert Grover, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary and Animal 

Sciences 



Tom S. Hamilton, Jr., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture and 

Regional Planning 

William K. Harris, D.V.M. 

Professor of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 



Francis W. Holmes. Ph.D. 
Professor of Plant Pathology 

Ward M. Hunting, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Food Science and Nutrition 

Elmar Jarvesoo, D.Agr.Sc. 

Associate Professor of Agriculture and Food 

Economics 

Ernest A. Johnson, M.S.A.E. 

Associate Professor of Food and Agricultural 

Engineering 

Gordon S. King, M.S. 

Professor of Landscape Architecture and Regional 

Planning 

Mary Beth Kirkham, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Edward Knapp, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Food and Resource 

Economics 

William H. Lachman, M.S. 
Professor of Plant and Social Sciences 

Deane Lee, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Food 

Economics 

Theodore W. Leed, Ph.D. 

Professor of Agricultural and Food Economics 

William J. Lord, Ph.D. 

Professor of Plantand Soil Sciences 

Sidney J. Lyford, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary and Animal 

Science 

James B. Marcum, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary and Animal 

Sciences 

Donald R. Marion, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural and Food 

Economics 

Peggy A. McConnell, M.S. 

Instructor of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Harold E. Mosher, M.L.A. 

Professor of Landscape Architecture and Regional 

Planning 

Richard Mudgett, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural and Food 

Economics 

Gustave D. Olson, Jr., M.R.P. 

Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture and 

Regional Planning 



Edward S. Pira, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of food and Agricultural 

Engineering 

lona M. Reynolds, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science and 

Associate Director of the Stockbridge School of 

Agriculture 

Richard A. Rohde, Ph.D. 

Professor of Plant Pathology and Head of 

Department 

William A. Rosenaeu, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Herbert G. Spindler, M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Food 

Economics 

Douglas N. Stern, V.M.D. 

Professor of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Cecil Thompson, M.S. 

Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Joseph Troll, Ph.D. 

Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Jonas Vengris, D.Agr.Sc. 

Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Donald M. Vietor, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 

W Robert W. Walker, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Environmental Sciences 

Lester Whitney, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Food and Agricultural 

Engineering 

John M. Zak, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences 




21 




22 







23 



Class Officers 




Patricia Broderick — President Curtis LaPierre — Vice President 



Donna Thayer — Secretary 



Carol Aldrich — Treasurer 




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DAVIS HILL 
Acct. Club 



MARK MORAN 
Acct. Club, ATG Treas. 



CARLTON YOUNG 
Commuter 




CAROL ALDRICH 

An. Sci. Club Treas., Sec. 
S.S.A. Treas., Class Treas. 
STOSAG Layout Ed. 76, 
Senator Ways & Means 
Comm., Alumni Phon- 
othon, basketball, Softball, 
Livestock Classic 



MARY ANNA BOND 
Livestock Classic 



RICHARD COOPER 
Livetock Clasic 



DAVID DUPREY 
Livestock Classic, Dairy 
Judging Team 



DAVID FERESTEIN 
An. Sci. Club, Ways & 
Means Comm. Dairy 
Judging Team, Livestock 
Classic 





CYNTHIA HABERIN 

Livestock Classic 



CAROL HAYES 
Livestock Classic 



REBECCA 
HOLBERTON 

Livestock Classic, An. Sci. 
Club 



BETH LAMICA 

Livestock Classic 



GEORGE LEONHARD 

ATG, Livestock Classic 




PATRICIA 
MCELLIGOTT 
An. Sci. Club, Pres., 
Horse Juding Team, Live- 
stock Classic 



SUZANNE MORIN 
Alumni Phonothon, STO- 
SAG Editor-in-Chief "76, 
Senator, Ways & Means, 
Chairperson, Layout Ed. 
"75, UMass Judiciary, 
An. Sci. Club, Basketball, 
S.S.A., Const. Rev. 
Comm., Livestock Classic 



TIMOTHY O'BRIEN 
An. Sci. Club, Ways & 
means Comm., Livestock 
Classic 



LINDA PFAEFFLIN 
An. Sci. Club, Livestock 
Classic 



LAURA PLOURDE 
An. Sci., Club, Dairy 
Judging Team, Livestock 
Classic 










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PATRICIA WALLACE 
Livestock Classic 



JANE WATTU 
Livestock Classic 



JOHN WHOLEY 
Sen. Director An. Sci. 
Club, Ways & Means 
Comm., Livestock Classic 



CHRISTOPHER 
BROWNING, JR. 
C.C. Board of Governors, 
STOSO, STOSAG — 
Sports Editor, Senator, 
Abor. & Park Club, Stk. 
Rep. to Food Lands Pres- 
ervation Con., Ways & 
Means Comm., Const. 
Rev. Comm. Chairman, 
Alumni Phonothon 



BRIAN DOHERTY 
President Alpha Phi Ome- 
ga, Arbor & Park Club 



ROBERT FRONCZEK 

Abor. & Park Club 



PASQUALE GAMELLI 
Abor. & Park Club 



CHARLES GUERARD 
Soccer, Abor. & Park 
Club 



BRUCE HAFFNER 
Arb«r & Park Club 




GREGORY MCGUANE 
Arbor Park Club 



ROBERT MURPHY 
Abor & Park Club 



JONATHAN 
MECHLIN 
Abor & Park Club 



STEVEN NIETUPSKI 
Soccer, Senate, STOSAG 
— photog. Arbor & Park 
Club 



CHARLES PECK 

Soccer M.V.P., Basket- 
ball, Athletic Comm., Ar- 
bor & Park Club 




RICHARD PEEBLES 

Soccer, Arbor & Park 
Club 



PAUL RAGONE 
Arbor & Park Club 



DONALD 
SANDSTROM 
Soccer, Arbor & Park 
Club 



DENNIS SCHWORER 
Arbor & Park Club 



DAVID SIMMONS 
Arbor & Park Club 





DAVID SMALL 

ATG — Steward, Alumni 
Phonothon, Arbor & Park 
Club 



GEORGE SPENCER 
Arbor & Park Club 



WARREN SPINNER 
Arbor & Park Club 



JOSEPH SZCZESUIL 
Arbor & Park Club 



DAVID TAYLOR 
Arbor & Park Club 





NOEL VEILLEAUX 
Arbor & Park Club 



BRUCE YETMAN 
Arbor & Park Club 




JAMES BUCKLEY 

"Education is , , Ihc rc- 
sccding of thoughts." 



PAUL BUTYNSKI 
"It all stems from the 
same source." 



JAMES CARROLL 

"SPARKY" 

"Does a green thumb 

mean you're a petal push- 



NEIL DEBIASIO 
"It's all in how you ar- 
range it." 



RICHARD DOHERTY 

"Mums the word." 



32 



KATHLEEN EARLY 
"Education is ... like a 
flower blooming." 



FRANCES 
FITZPATRICK 

"I thought dandelions 
were from the zoo!" 



PAUL MATZ 

"Everything is a weed if 
it's not suppose to be 
there." 

Roseneau 



JON FRAGOSA 

"Let's get to the root of 
the matter." 



DENISE GAGNON 
SIOSAG — Photographer 
"Flowers never bend in the 
wind." 



THERESA LANNl 
"Flowers are human, too.' 




ELIZABETH 
PICHETTE 

"A rose, is a rose, is a 
rose" 



DEBRA RALICKI 

"Phlox and phlox of flow- 
ers." 



ANNA RONGHI 
"I beg your pardon, I nev- 
er promised you a rose 
garden." 



MARY SABIN 
"Where have all the flow- 
ers gone?" 




SANDRA SOWA 
"Roses are red 
Violets are blue 
This is the year 
For Graduates, too." 



DARREN SYKES 
"Business is picking . . . 



SUSAN WELLS 
"Having no flowers is non 
scents." 



BRENDA WHITNEY 
"Please don't eat the dai- 
sies." 



FOOD 
DIST 




THOMAS SHAPIRO 

Acct. Club-Treas. 



GEOFFRY HUBBELL 
Fruit & Veg. Club 



EDWARD ROBERTS 
"Have you thanked a 
green plant today.for the 
air you breathe tomor- 
row?" 



ROBERT RONDEAU 

"It's all in a nutshell" 





KENNETH SPATCHER 
"Don't graft me!" 



KENT STOWE 

Fruit & Veg. Club, Soccer 



KEVIN WEISER 
Fruit & Veg. Club 




A 



CINDY BARCOMB 

Livestock Classic 




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JOAN CARLSON 


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DALE BENNO 


PATRICIA 


REBECCA COOK 


JANE DAVIS 


Livestock Classic 


BRODERICK 


STOSO Chairperson, Sen- 


Senator, LAT Club, Live- 


Livestock Classic 




Senior Class Pres., Sena- 


ator, S.S.A. President 


stock Classic 






tor, Co-chairperson Educ. 


LAT Club, Shorthorn Edi- 








Qual. Comm., S.S.A. 


tor, STOSAG — staff. 








Treas., LAT Club, Chair- 


Sen. Class Activities 








person-Elect. Comm. 


Comm., Little Sister 








Alumni Phonothon, Live- 


ATG, Basketball, Soft- 








stock Classic 


ball, Livestock Classic, 
Phonothon 








DEBORAH EFFORD 
LAT Club, Livestock 
Classic, S.S.A. 



VICKI FALL 
S.S.A. — V.Pres., Shorth- 
orn, STOSO, LAT Club, 
Phonothon, Livestock 
Judging Team, Livestock 
Classic 



BETSY FRACZEK 

Livestock Classic 



SANDRA 
GALARNEAU 
LAT Club — Sec, Bas- 
ketball, Sen. Banquet 
Comm., Chairperson/Bul- 
letin Board 



DEENA GRANT 
S.S.A. — Social Chair- 
man, Pledgemaster, Live- 
stock Classic, ATG Little 
Sister, S.S.A. Senator 




MARY REDDY 

LAT Club, Livestock 
Classic, Niads 



MARY RIESS 
Livestock Classic 



JANICE ST. PIERRE 
Livestock Classic 



PAMELA SIMPSON 
Livestock Classic 




LESLIE TAFT 
Livestock Classic 




ELIZABETH 
THURBER 
Livestock Classic 



CAROLE TRIPP 
Livestock Classic 



LAND 
OP 




RUSSELL ANDREWS 
Land-Op Club 



STEPHEN BAXTER 
Land-Op Club, ATG-Sec. 



TOT* 









37 




DAVID STRAUCH 
ATG V. Pres., Land-Op 
Club 



JAMES VAILLE 
Land-Op Club 



LINDA ZIMNOWSKI 
"Who said it's an all man's 
world?" 



PETER BLY 
Turf Club 



STEPHEN BROWN 
Turf Club 



ERNEST ANASTOS 
Turf Club 




MICHAEL BRYANT 
Turf Club 



JAMES BURKE 
Turf Club 



TERENCE CAHILL 
Turf Club 



39 




^ — ^ 





MICHAEL 

CARBONNEAU 
Turf Club, Senator 



PAUL CONSOLETTI 
Turf Club 



GARY GOLEC 
ATG, Turf Club 



ANTHONY GRASSO 
Turf Club 




MARK GRENERT 

Turf Club 




KENNETH HARP 
Turf Club 




DOUGLAS HOMAN 
Turf Club 



RICHARD 
KLIMASZEWSKI 
Turf Club 




NEIL LOOMIS 
Turf Club 




STEPHEN LOUGHREY 
Turf Club 



40 



Q 



STEPHEN MACLEOD 


WALTER MENDZELA 


PAUL MIERZEJEWSKI 


JOHN NAPIERACZ 


TOM O'NEILL 


Turf Club 


Turf Club — Sec. 


Turf Club — Treas. 


Turf Club 


Turf Club, Senator 


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JOHN OTTAVIANO 
Turf Club 



STEPHEN PAYNE 
Turf Club — Pres., Grad. 
Comm., Chairperson 



GEORGE RICKARD 

Turf Club 



RICHARD SLATTERY 
Turf Club 




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Today — a day of life. 

1 behold wondrous things. 

A flower unfolding from its pod, 

A chick breaking from its egg, 

A plant sprouting from its seed. 



Yesterday — the prelude to this day. 
1 remember wondrous events; 
A friend gave a helping hand 
A stranger turned aside to help; 
A foe learned to love. 



Tomorrow — the potential of today 
I anticipate as a wondrous time: 
A moment of rebirth. 
An instant of reflection, 
A flicker of reaffirmation. 



1 am surrounded 

Today — Yesterday — Tomorrow 

Cindy Kazyaka 










49 



\ t u r a 1 





Agriculture in Massachusetts is being pressured 
and squeezed out by increasingly urbanized envi- 
ronment. Without the help of Agricultural enter- 
prise, these pressures would have been practically 
unbearable for the farmer to face alone. The Agri- 
cultural Business Management major is designed to 
prepare the student to give an understanding of 
business as it relates to agriculture. 

This understanding of business is brought forth 
in courses such as accounting, business law, mar- 
keting, retail operations, world food supply, and 
agricultural business management. 

Along with the required courses, students may 
select additional courses outside of the department 
thereby broadening the scope of their education. 



50 



Business Management 1975-1976 





Animal Science is a very diversified major. It 
provides an over all view of livestock-related indus- 
tries and farming through a wide variety of courses. 

The Animal Science major also includes, along 
with its livestock and farming courses, classes indi- 
cative to the managerial and economic aspects of 
the industry. A further understanding and applica- 
tion of principles discussed in lecture are presented 
in labs assigned to each class expecially covering 
livestock. 



"As long as there are children on this 

earth 

our livestock should not be considered 

a natural resource, 

but as a constant, cherished and 

endangered species." 



Christopher Browning, Jr. 



52 



Science 1975-1976 







Arboriculture And 





Arboriculture is tiie planting, growing and use of 
modern techniques in the care of shade and orna- 
mental trees. Park Management is the administra- 
tive operation of a Parks and Recreation system. 

Behind this two-fold major is the idea of spread- 
ing aesthetic awareness throughout our great land. 
With the use of well cared for trees and the objec- 
tive of bringing man back to nature inspired by 
many parks. It is our sincere hope that a restoration 
of man's mental as well as physical health and spirit 
be spread by the Arbor and Parks graduate. 

As "Doc" would say, "things are tough, but after 
graduation the professionally prepared graduate of 
Arbor and Park Management finds numerous op- 
portunities open to him/her in a wide and rapidly 
expanding field. Because of the wide spectrum of 
courses they have been exposed to, they can proudly 
refer to themselves as "Jacks-of-all-trades". 



54 



Park Management 1975-1976 











Floriculture focuses on the production and mar- 
keting of plants and flowers. Trips to nearby grow- 
ing and retail operations accent courses by demon- 
strating the different methods taught. 

Students get a chance to develop such skills as 
floral arranging, soil testing, and greenhouse oper- 
ations in their classes. A summer placement pro- 
gram is a requirement giving students a chance to 
apply their knowledge in a practical situation. 



56 



1975-1976 




Food " 





A Food Distribution major at Stockbridge takes 
a wide variety of courses ranging from business 
management and marketing to the food sciences 
which deal with the nutritional value of food. 

With the knowledge of these courses a student is 
able to secure a job in a wholesale or retail food 
firm. More specialized fields such as food oper- 
ations, labor relations, advertising, and personnel 
positions are also open to the food distribution ma- 
jor. 



58 



Distribution 1975-1976 




What is this life, full of care, 

We have no time to stand and stare. 

No time to stand beneath the boughs. 
And stare as long as sheep or cows. 

No time to see, when woods we pass. 
Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass. 

No time to see, in broad daylight. 
Streams full of stars, like skies at night. 

No time to turn at Beauty's glance. 
And watch her feet, how they can 
dance. 

No time to wait till her mouth 

can. 

Enrich that smile her eyes 

began. ' 

A poor life this if, full of 

care. 

We have no time to stand 

and stare. 

— W.H. DAVIES 



The spring is coming by a many 

signs; 

The trays are up, the hedges 

broken down 

That fenced the haystack, and 

the remnant shines 

Like some old antique fragment 

weathered brown. 

And where suns peep, in every 

sheltered place. 

The little early buttercups unfold 

A glittering star or two-till many 

trace 

The edges of the blackthorn clumps in 

gold. 

— JOHN CLARE 









... A chill no coat, however stout, 

Of homespun stuff could quite shut out, 

A hard, dull bitterness of cold. 

That checked, mid-vein, the circling race 

Of life-blood in the sharpened face 

The coming of the snow-storm told. 

The wind blew east; we heard the roar 

Of ocean on his wintery shore. 

And felt the strong pulse throbbing there 

Beat with low rhythm our inland air. 

Meanwhile we did our nightly chores, 

Brought in the wood from out of doors, 

Littered the stalls, and from the mows 

Raked down the herd's — grass for the cows; 

Heard the horse winnying for his 

corn; 
And, sharply clashing horn to horn, 
Impatient down the stanchion rows 
The cattle shake their walnut 
bows; . . . 

J.G. WHITTIER 




O sweet spontaneous 

earth how often have the 

the 

doting 

fingers of 

Prurient philosophers pinched 

and 

poked 

thee 

, has the naughty thumb 

of science prodded 

thy beauty , how 

often have religions taken 

Thee upon their scraggy knees 

squeezing and 

buffeting thee that thou mightest 

conceive gods 

(but true 

to the incomparable 

couch of death thy 

rhythmic 

lover 

thou answerest 

them only' with 

spring) 



E.E. CUMMINGS 



Fruit And 





Fruit and vegetable production is the backbone 
of Agriculture in any country. The Stockbridge 
program offers students experience along with book 
learning. To supplement this, the program offers 
adequate land and modern equipment for the stu- 
dents' use. 

The program deals with sound cultural practices, 
good farm management, and marketing. A gra- 
duate of this program is qualified to be employed as 
a state produce inspector, wholesale or retail sales- 
man and in many business and industry operations 
dealing with produce. 



62 



Vegetable 1975-1976 




&, 



Laboratory Animal 






Laboratory Animal Technology trains a stu- 
dent to enter a variety of fields in the veterinary 
profession as trained assistants. 

The course is designed to train students in 
breeding, management, laboratory techniques and 
the handling of various laboratory animals. 

Students training in this field graduate with an 
Associate Degree which is certified by the Ameri- 
can Association for Laboratory Animal Science. 
They are certified to work in areas such as: pro- 
duction facilities for animals, technicians in pri- 
vate and government research, research aides in 
drug, surgical and technical sales and services. 



64 



Technology 1975-1976 




"■■■SBBiBS ^S 



Landscape ■ aSiB 



-^ 





The Land Operations major serves the needs of 
its students by exposing them to practical methods 
performed by this vocation. It provides a basic 
foundation for the first year student by teaching 
him/her courses in Botony, Soils, Entomology, and 
Plant Identification. This is followed by summer 
placement where the student is required to find a 
job in which he/she can obtain actual experience. 

The second year program includes Topographi- 
cal mapping, Arboriculture and Park Principles, 
Plant Propagation and small property development. 
The student begins to apply the skills learned by 
making a design of a given area and developing that 
into a master or sight model. 



66 



Operations 1975-1976 




Turf 





As the increase of public and private grounds, 
parks, and golf courses sweep the country, so does 
the need for more practicly trained persons in the 
field of Turf Management. 

The turf student, not only has the knowledge of 
maintaining such areas, but also the know how of 
constructing and designing these areas as well. The 
courses offered to a turf student gives them the 
rounded experiance to enter many different areas in 
their field of endeavor 

The ideals of beautiful green grassed rolling hills, 
become reality with the hiring of the students in 
this major. 

"What good is a house, without a decent planet 
to put it on." 
Henry David Thoreau 



68 



Management 1975-1976 








72 



Special Events Fall Picnic Special Events Fall Picnic 




74 



ecial Events Fall Picnic Special Events Fall Picnic Special Events Fall 




75 



pecial Events Halloween Party Special Events Halloween Party Special Ev 




76 



Halloween Party Special Events Halloween Party Special Events 




77 



Special Events Freshman Class Trip Special Events Freshman Cla ss Trip 




78 



Jpecial Events Freshmen Class Trip Special Events Freshmen Class Trip 



T-mn 







79 



Special Events Holly Jolly Special Events Holly Jolly Special Events 



'Forest" 
carol 
banquet 

evergreen centerpieces 
friendship 



mellowing out 
Santa 
dancing 
reminiscing 
Merry Xmas 




80 



Jolly Special Events Holly Jolly Special Events Holly Jolly Special 




What Ts ^^ y^^ ^^^^ through the book, you may wonder why some pictures are in Stosag. 

What we {the staff) tried to do was to show some of each major, campus life and 

This All agriculture yesterday, today and tomorrow. Catagorize them as you may we just 

want to kindle the fire. For examples: pages 100-103 Old Sturbridge Village vs. 

About / Today, the oceans = crop lands of tomorrow?, page 130 "Executive Look" (Curtis 

LaPierre) — the 'farmer" of tomorrow. 

What will your future yearbooks contain? It is up to you. Make your own collage 
of life. Do what you are trained for today but always remember tomorrow is coming. 
Flip through the pages see, read and study. We hope this yearbook will bring 
memories in the years to come and spark ideas today. 




Special Events Progress Banquet Special Events Progress Banquet Specu 




B4 



rents Progress Banquet Special Events Progress Banquet Special Events 




85 



>pecial Events Progress Banquet Special Events Progress Banquet Specie 





LEARS LIST 



Paul R. Anderson 
Joyce A. Archambault 
Dale E. Benno 
Peter R. Bly 
James F. Burke 
Joan L. Carlson 
Paul M. Christ 
Barbara L. Duffy 
William G. Duffy, Jr. 
Deborah M. Efford 
Denise A. Gagnon 
Mark W.Grenert 
Robert C. Hobin 
Rebecca L. Holberton 
James D. Horn 
Geoffrey L. Hubbell 
Robert H. Ivy III 
Kevin T. Kane 
Richard W. Klimaszewski 
Curtis R. LaPierre 
James T. Leighton 
Ted A. Maddocks 
Paul D. Matz 
Patricia A. McElligott 
Gregory K. McGuane 



Paul J. Mierzejewski 
Peter G. Olsen 
Virginia L. Pais 
Donald T. Parrott 
Stephen P. Payne 
Mary L. Reddy 
Mary E. Sabin 
Janice M. St.Pierre 
Dennis C. Schworer 
Cathy J. Shugg 
Richard W. Slattery 
Sandra J. Sowa 
Kenneth L. Spatcher 
Kent A. Stowe 
Darren H. Sykes 
Leslie J. Taft 
Mark J. Tobin 
Carole L. Tripp 
James D. Vaille 
Michael S. Van Etten 
Robert A. Walker 
Mark E. Warner 
Brenda D. Whitney 
Bruce E. Yetman 
Thomas H. Young 



I 



ents Progress Banquet Special Events Progress Banquet Special Ev 




Soccer MVP — Charles Peck 



Men's Basketball MVP — Bob Hoxie 



Womens' Basketball MVP — Dee Dee Farquhar 




Senate Certificates and award grants were also given out 




87 



Special Events Progress Banquet Special Events Progress Banquet Specia 




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89 



peciai Events Progress Banquet Special Events Progress Banquet Special 




90 



IN MEMORIAM 



Stephen Raymond Kosakowski 



Steve died suddenly on March 28. 
For many years he suffered from blind- 
ness due to glaucoma but continued 
teaching and coaching until the time of 
his death. He was born in Amherst and 
worked for UMass since his Stock- 
bridge placement training with Prof. 
Lyle Blundell in the summer of 1939, 
leaving during 1941-1945 for a tour of 
duty in the Army. Steve was Athletic 
Director at Stockbridge since 1947 as 
well as football coach and then soccer 
coach until 1968. Steve's first athletic 
love was tennis, which he began playing 
at Amherst College when he was nine 
years old. He became the teaching pro 
at the Stockbridge Country Club where 
he taught artist, Norman Rockwell, and 
actor, Edward Everett Horton. It was 
natural for him to be made Tennis 
Coach at UMass in 1949 — his teams 
had a 174-68 dual meet record and 13 
Yankee Conference championships. 
More than any other UMass coach. 

His athletic participation in High 
School as well as Stockbridge included 
baseball, basketball, football, and hock- 
ey. The 1940 SHORTHORN football 
writeup of the 12-6 win over Deerfield 
reads . . . 




Steve Kosakowski Class of 1940 



He disappeared in the dead of winter: 

The brooks were frozen, the airports almost deserted. 

And snow disfigured the public statues: 

The mercury sank in the mouth of the dying day. 

O all the instruments agree 

The day of his death was a dark cold day. 

— W. H. Auden 



"Unexcelled on the field was our own 
Steve "Murph" Kosakowski, who 
played an outstanding game at left end. 
"Murph" as well as blocking two Deer- 
field punts, which paved the way for 
both our touchdowns, upset many of the 
Deerfield threats." 

Steve studied Horticulture, was presi- 
dent of the senior class, president of the 
Horticulture Club, and played four 
sports. Steve was given a gold "S" 
award by the Alumni Association and 
Dean Jeffrey devoted a page to Steve in 
the Fall of 1969 Alumni News. 

On June 5th, 1976 an award was pre- 
sented to Steve by UMass making him 
an honorary alumnus. 

Steve Kosakowski was one of the few 
people to have the yearbook dedicated 
to him more than once. 





91 



Special Events Spring Picnic Special Events Spring Picnic Special Events 



rain 

Grinnel Arena 

Zoto Bros. 

granola w/raisins 

rude beans 

4 kegs 

chicken 

bucking barrel 

blown-out buckaroo's 

time well spent 




92 



Spring Picnic Special Events Spring Picnic Special Events Spring Picni 




93 



ivestock Classic Special Events Livestock Classic Special Events LivestocI 




94 



assic Special Events Special Events Livestock Classic Special Events 




95 



Special Events Senior Banquet Special Events Senior Banquet Sp ecial Ev t 




96 



Senior Banquet Special Events Senior Banquet Special Events 




97 



Special Events Senior Class Trip Special Events Special Events Senior CI 




excitement 

longgg party 

sauna 

midnight swimming 

Brattleboro 

hitch hiking 

tradition 

raiding 

cold white yellow 

petals 

bed stripping 

"The Bump" 

ice cold streams 

hiking 

walking sticks 

frisbee 

high complacement 

exhaustion 





rip Special Events . Senior Class Tri 



Special Events 



Special Event' 




99 




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101 




102 







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104 




105 



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Shorthorn 




communications 

typing 

machine jams 

late submissions 

large staff? 

announcements 

fold 

reports 

staple, staple,s . 

icky blue ink 

fun times!?! 




Stockbridge Student Senate 



motions 

proud 

re-allocations 

confusion 

amendments 

chocolate doughnuts 

heartburn 

concern 

Parlimentarian 

E-Board 

"for the students 

BUDGETS 

committees 

exasperation 

Dolores 

adjournment 




Senate Officers 

President — Curtis R. LaPierre 
Vice-President — Ed Pearson 
Exec. Secretary — Donna Thayer 
Trjeasurer — Lori Mancuso 



110 





SENATORS 

Carol Aldrich 

Steven Anderson 

Patricia Broderick 

Virginia Brown 

Christopher Browning, Jr. 

Debbie Buckley 

Joan Carlson 

George Clark 

Becky Cook 

Anna DeFelice 

Robert Golden 

Deena Grant 

James Horn 

Brian Kelly 

Rich Klimasewski 

Curtis LaPierre 

Richard Leahey 

Roy Lederman 

Michael Lee 

Michael Leonardo 

Rick Lilly 

Gregg MacPhearson 

Lori Mancuso 

Suzanne Morin 

Richard Morrissey 

Steven Nietupski 

Tom O'Neill 

Ed Pearson 

Mary Pepka 

Michael Rivetts 

James Roberts 

Ron Shillady 

Howard Stone 

Kevin Stuart 

Cheryl Sylvester 

Donna Thayer 



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The Stockbridge fraternity Alpha Tau Gama's is open 
only to Stockie males interested in joining. ATG offers its 
members cuisine an alternative to dorm living with home- 
cooked meals, snacks and a real home like living atmo- 
sphere than could not be obtained in a dorm situation 
with Dining Common food. 

The brothers of the house welcome anyone interested 
in looking over the house and life style to drop in for a 
visit. The door is always open and company is always 
welcome. 





In its first year, SSA the Stockbridge Sorority 
has shown tremendous growth and potential. It 
began as a far sighted idea last spring, when a 
few students decided to find an alternative living 
situation for Stockbridge women. Finally after a 
summer of planning, the idea became reality 
when the first eight girls moved into "The Red 
House" last September. 

The sorority is not a typical one. While some 
activities and meetings include all the sisters, the 
house also stresses individuality and personal 
growth. The girls run all business, finances and 
house maintenance themselves which provides a 
practical learning experience you just can't find 
in a dorm. 

This year has been a busy one as far as social 
activities go. Along with parties throughout the 
year, they also held their First Annual "Pledge 
Informal" and "Parents' Day Barbeque." Being 
a member of the Greek System, they also par- 
ticipate in Greek activities and house exchanges 
with other fraternities and sororities. But there's 
plenty of time for study, and it's reflected in the 
relatively high cums of the girls living there. The 
sisters are also animal oriented, and the house 
menagerie consists of everything from mice up to 
boa constrictors. 

The house ended its first year with a total of 
twenty-four sisters. If the enthusiasm and spirit 
that was generated this year continues, then 
SSA will definitely continue for many years to 
come. 




114 



SOCCER MVP 

Charles Peck 

Soccer is an intense sport, which 
calls for quick reactions and excel- 
lent muscle tone. Both of these quali- 
ties were met by the sure-footed Ag. 
students of Stockbridge, and with the 
Dean in the cheerleaders section; 
how could we lose! 

Teamwork is and was an impor- 
tant part of the teams experience 
playing together. In so much as 
Stockbridge being a small school and 
therefore a close knit school; so you 
can imagine how close the team be- 
came during the season. 

Many friendships were made and 
shall be remembered throughout the 
years to come, along with the exper- 
iences that will never be forgotten. 






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Basketball in Stockbridge was on a small scale, taking up much of the students 
time in practice sessions and games. But to the boys that made the team, it was all 
worth while, and the excitement of the sport was always increased tenfold when the 
Dean made an appearance. Although the number of fans at the games were low, 
the teams spirit never ceased throughout the season. The games won and lost will 
bring back many memories to those who played the game and represented Stock- 
bridge in their own way. 




117 




Team Members 

Dee Dee Farquhar 
MVP 

Carol Aldrich 
Sandy Galarneau 
Joan Carlson 
Sue Morin 
Mary Tobin 
Patty Wallace 
Margaret Ridgeway 
Marie D'Angeli 
Chris Reynolds 





The Stockbridge Girls Intramural Basket- 
ball Team got off and rolling this year and 
along the way encountered many problems. 
With no coach only two girls who had played 
before, we had lots of fun, laughs and frustra- 
tions teaching the fundamentals ten minutes 
before the first game started. We did it and 
with each game we improved our skills until 
at last we felt like a team. When the season 
ended, we felt deep satisfaction that we had 
improved and become a team which could put 
up a strong fight to win. 





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The Girls Softball Team ended their first sea- 
son with two super wins and two losses to their 
credit. For a team that never had a chance to 
practice or play together, they did remarkably 
well, improving with each game. 

The Team spirit and the will to learn and 
improve from mistakes was the strength of this 
Team. Any Stockbridge girl interested in laming 
the game and playing on the Team can become 
an active member. 




119 



The History Of 



Three years prior to the 1918 opening of the Two- Year Course of 
practical agriculture, that in 1928 became the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture, there was a grand celebration for the dedication of the then 
most important building on the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
(MAC) Campus, Stockbridge Hall. Levi Stockbridge had died in 1904 and 
now in 1915 the grandest building on campus would bear his name. It is 
then fitting that every student of the School make himself/herself familiar 
with the life and character and achievements of the Hadley farm boy, who, 
prevented from going to college himself, founded a college and became its 
president. 

Although his brother Henry was allowed to attend Amherst College and 
eventually became a successful lawyer in Maryland, Levi had to stay on the 
North Hadley farm to work with his father. However, he studied at home 
the same lessons of his brother. Then getting posession of a farm, he made it 
a success. In 1848 he began to write on agricultural subjects for the local 
newspapers. In 1855 the town of Hadley sent him to the State Legislature 
where he advocated for the establishment of an agricultural college. The 
1862 Morrill Land Grant Act signed by President Lincoln provided the 
means to finance a college. An Amherst College professor. Colonel William 
S. Clark, and Stockbridge, both successfully argued for its location in 
Amherst. 

Soon, Levi Stockbridge, now 37, was summoned from his farm to erect 
the first buildings, superintend the farm, and instruct the first students in 
1867. Without scientific apparatus, library, and training in the science of 
agriculture, he founded the department of agriculture and laid the founda- 
tion so well that in 1871 he was made the first professor of Agriculture. His 
science was built not upon theories, but upon demonstrated facts from 
which he discovered and related the underlying principles. 




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Levi Stockbridge was the shrewd, level-headed man of the faculty, the 
balance-wheel, the "father confessor", the "ever-present help in time ol 
need". That need was from the students, faculty, and the college itself. 

From his office in the chamber over the woodshed, of what we now call 
the Stockbridge House, he paid the employees, wrote lectures, planned 
experiments, and greeted students, faculty, and visitors. So great was his 
contribution and ability that Levi Stockbridge, the Hadley farmer, was 
elected fifth president of the college. It was not uncommon for Stockbridge 
to personally sign and guarantee the notes of bank loans of the college. His 
experiments with chemicals applied to growing plants led to his formula! 
for mixing fertilizers which one of his students manufactured and market- 
ed. In this, the infancy of our University, the value of such experimentatioi 
was apparent to the agricultural community. Special centers of agricultura 
research had already been established in Europe and in some parts of thf 
United States. But, Massachusetts had not yet brought itself to the point ol 
financially supporting such research. In 1878 Professor Levi Stockbridg( 
gave $1,000 of his personal funds from the sale of his fertilizers to financ( 
an experiment station for one year. Four years later, when Presiden 
Stockbridge resigned, the State Legislature finally became so convinced o: 
the value of such research as to appropriate $3,000 for the founding of thf 
Massachusetts State Agricultural Experiment Station. This act of th( 
General Court established the first State Experiment Station in the Unitee 
States connected with a State University. Three years later the Director o 
the Station, Professor Charles Goessmann, saw to the erection of a $I5,00( 
chemical laboratory that we know today as the West Experiment Statior 
(just south of the $18,000,000 Graduate Research Center). 

Soon the entire country became aware of the benefits to be derived fron 
such stations. In 1887 Congress passed the Experiment Station Law, bette 



Stockbridge Hall 




giving here, vocational education combined with practical training. He 
believed a man was trained in some degree who could do anything well, 
hold a plow or make a plow. He felt that we had held up too long as our 
ideal the Websters and Everetts, the orators and writers; placing manner 
before matter, forgetting that men at their benches could think and would 
think, as clearly and sanely as men who were trained to express themselves 
in polished English, thus, the sooner we reconized trained men in all walks 
of life, the better it would be for society." 

James E. Mulcahy, ARBORICULTURE '60 



known as the Hatch Act, which authorized the expenditure of federal funds 
for the creation of agricultural experiment stations at the Land Grant 
Colleges. 

So it was on October 2, 1915 that the MAC students informally dedi- 
cated the building with an afternoon of sport and barbecue. It may seem 
strange for an Agricultural College to wait almost fifty years for its 
Building of Agriculture. In some sister State Colleges it was the first 
building to be erected. But at MAC it was an evolution of ideas, five years 
in the planning, and two years in the building at a cost of $210,000, fully 
equipped, that has prevented it from becoming obsolete. 

The building is fireproof throughout — the walls are of brick and 
limestone, roofs of slate and metal, and floor of steel and concrete. Very 
little wood is used in the interior and all cross partitions are of gypsum 
block finished in hard plaster. Artistically it approaches in simplicity strict 
New England architecture with a touch of the Greek in the large modified 
Ionian columns that adorn the front entrance. 

The formal dedication on Friday, October 29, 1 9 1 5 was given a crowning 
touch by the address of William H. Bowker, one of the pioneer class of 
1867 and a student of Levi Stockbridge. He recounted the development of 
production agricultural techniques that started out as field exercises: seed 
selection and testing, grading of fruit, field drainage, etc. Bowker went on 
to say "... To my mind, Stockbridge was an ideal field teacher. For one 
thing, he was always enthusiastic, cheerful and patient. He was never "dry 
as dust". He was a brilliant talker and writer, as most men of vision are apt 
to be. He saw beyond his work. He saw its possibilities, the ultimate 
outcome. He knew that what he was doing in the field was crude, but he 
knew it was the beginning of better things. 

Professor Stockbridge typified in a measure the kind of education we are 




Stockbridge Hall — today 



Stockbridge Hall was originally designed for: t) Basement — class rooms; soil lab; storage vaults; locker room & cement lab 2} Floor 1 — lecture rooms & 
offices 3) Floor 2 — library; reading room; large agronomy labs; rooms for poultry, an. husbandry & agronomy; production records storage 4) Floor 3 — 
agricultural museum; mech. drawing & poultry research rooms; agricultural survey lab & file room 121 



Stockbridge Hall 
Office 




STOSAG 




ADVISOR 



TO: Professor Herbert Spindler 
FROM: STOSAG Staff "76" 

Your concern and dedication, not only to us, but to the Stock- 
ridge School and student is unique. 

In sixteen years here at Stockbridge, you have contributed 
much to us — more than words can express. 

So we extend our gratitude in the most simple and sincere way 
that we know; by saying, "Thank you, Professor Spindler." 




•^ 



.^arC^T^. 




Special Thanks And 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 








Kenneth Allie 


Stream 




Page 5 


Steven Anderson 


Frosh Trip 




Pages 78-79 


Pat Carney 


Rose 

Multy Colored Flowers 

Rose 

Coleus 

Cone 


Page 4 

Page 6 

Page 7 

Page 7 

Page 25 

Page 43 

Page 130 


Mike Donovan 






Page 73 
Pages 84-90 


M. Fesco 


Fall Picnic 




Pages 74-75 


Heinrich Fenner 


Farmer 
Haying 
Flowers 
CENTER) 


(BOTTOM- 


Page 9 

Page 83 

Page 130 


Denise Gagnon 


Arranging Flowers 


Page 7 


Bob Gamache 


Field 




Page 1 





Acknowledgements 



Prosi 





Bob Gamache 


Swan 


Page 5 




Spring 


Page 60 




Fall 


Page 83 




Sun on Ocean 


Page 130 


Daniel Smith 


House 


Page 4 




Bus 


Page 4 




Experiment Station 


Page 4 




Abstract Building 


Page 5 




Sun in Tree 


Page 5 




Ocean 


Page 6 




Singer 


Page 6 




Campus Center Building Page 6 




Dandelions 


Page 6 




Campus 


Page 14 




Redcoats 


Page 83 




Two Campus Buildings 


Page 83 
Pages 106-107 

Page 130 
Pages 131-136 

Page 144 


University Archives 




Pages 120-121 


University Photo Center 


Minutemen 


Page 8 













■ '.%-^ ^ 



'"■ •*''^'*|!^'^' '^■^9^ 




Curtis LaPierre 
Verbeck Award 




Stockbridge School of Agriculture 



ADUATTO 



I tWDAY, M AY 21 f- 3u----- 
ICERT ^ACE-TINE ARTS CENTER 
" J^E^Aai^L 1 1^00 m 145 Jc>^P 
i^lS AVATLABLJ 
lOCK BR I DOE H AUL-O FEiC] 





133 



Aldrich, Carol J.; 92 West Main St. 
Westminster, MA 01473 An. Sci. 

Alessandrini, John B.; 6 Mulberry Dr. 
Clinton, MA 01510 Ar. Pk. 

Anastos, Ernest P.; 104 Laurel St. 
Newport, NH 03773 Turf 

Anderson, Paul R.; 8 Upland St. 
Auburn, MA 01501 Turf 

Andrews, Russell H.; 312 Kelly Rd. 
Whitinsville, MA 01588 Ld. Opr. 

Archambault, Joyce A.; 150 North 

St. 
Northampton, MA 01060 Flori 

Armstrong, Brett H.; 2208 

Helderberg Ave. 
Schenectady, NY 12306 Turf 

Barbato, Paul V.; 27 Pleasant St. 
Hyde Park, MA 02136 HRTA 

Barcomb, Cindy M.; Brickyard Rd. 
Southampton, MA 01073 Lab. Tech. 

Barnes, Roland S.; South St. 
Petersham, MA 01366 Flori 

Baughn, Andrea G.; 166 North St. 
Salem, MA 01970 Lab. Tech. 

Baxter, Stephen D.; 9 Haley Ave. 
Braintree, MA 02184 Ld. Opr. 

Bell, David J.; 904 Poco Cerro Se 
Albuquerque, N.M. 87123 

Benno, Dale E.; Rt 1 Box 198 
Grayslake, IL. 60030 Lab. Tec. 

Bly, Peter R.; 495 Mountain Rd. 
Concord, N.H. 03301 Turf 

Bond, Maryanna; 85 East Pleasant St. 
Amherst, MA 01002 An. Sci. 

Broderick, Patricia A.; 47 Jawl Ave. 
Scituate, MA 02060 Lab. Tec. 

Brown, Stephen G.; Box 1561 

Temahegan Ave. 
Oak Bluffs, MA 02557 Turf 

Brown, Virginia A.; 21 Baileys 

Causeway 
Minot, MA Fd. Dist. 



Browning, Christopher; Woody Hill 

Rd. 
Hope Valley, R.L 02832 Ar. Pk. 

Bryant, Michael S.; North Main St. 
Petersham, MA 01366 Turf 

Buckley, James D.; 339 Canton St. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 Flori 

Burke, James F.; 3030 Sturges Hwy. 
Westport, CT 06880 Turf 

Butynski, Paul A.; 370 Colrain Rd. 
Greenfield, MA 01301 Flori 

Cahill, Terence P.; 582 W. 

Housatonic St. 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 Turf 

Carbonneau, Michael E.; 699 N. 

Main St. 
Barre, Vermont 05641 Turf 

Carlsen, Peter L.; 10 Pagoda St. 
Milton, MA 02187 Ld. Opr. 

Carlson, Joan L.; 100 Derryfield Ave. 
Springfield, MA 01 1 18 Lab. Tec. 

Carroll, James P.; 34 Maiden Lane, 
Wayland, MA 01778 Flori. 

Catropa, Ernest M.; 690 W. Jackson 

Ave. 
Bridgeport, CT 06604 Turf 

Christ, Paul M.; 57 Thistle Lea, 
Williamsville, N.Y. 14221 Turf 

Condraski, Patricia J.; 81 Log Plain 

Rd. 
Greenfield, MA 01301 Lab. Tec. 

Consoletti, Paul B.; 5 Oakview Circle 
Medway, MA 02053 Turf 

Cook, Rebecca A.; 76 Prospect St. 
Providence, RI 02906 Lab. Tec. 

Cooper, Richard A.; 515 Henshaw St. 
Rochdale, MA 01542 An. Sci. 

D'Angeli, Marie D.; 50 Whitfield Rd. 
Somerville, MA 02144 An. Sci. 

Davies, Leatrice T.; 50 Florence Rd. 
Easthampton, MA 01027 An. Sci. 



Davis, Don P.; RFD Box 200 
Cavendish, VT 05142 Ld, Opr. 

Davis, Jane E.; 67 Woodchester Dr. 
Newton, MA 02167 Lab. Tec, 

DeB-asio, Neil M.; 66 Letendre Ave. 
Feeding Hills, MA 01030 Flori, 

DeFlorio, Donald J,; 8 Anthony Rd., 
Wayland, MA 01778 Ar.Pk. 

Dembowski, Terrence J.; R.D. 1 

Shickshinny 
Pennsylvania 18655 Turf 

Dewey, Rodney E.; 223 Billings St. 
Sharon, MA 02067 Ar. Pk. 

Dodge, Lawrence W.; 57 So. Maple 

St. 
Hadley, MA 01035 Turf 

Doherty, Brian P.; 65 Cedar Crest 

Rd. 
Canton, MA 02021 Ar. Pk. 

Doherty, Richard P.; 19 Colonial Dr. 
Arlington, MA 02174 Flori. 

Duffy, William G.; 26 Nonotuck St. 
Northampton, MA 01060 Ld. Opr. 

Duprey, David W.; West Mt. Rd. 
Bernardston, MA 01337 An. Sci. 

Early, Kathleen M.; 44 Brownell St. 
Worcester, MA 01602 Flori. 

Efford, Deborah M.; 135 

Mountainview Dr. 
Holyoke, MA 01040 Lab. Tec. 

Eulian, Bruce E.; 37 Plunkett St. 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 Turf 

Evans, Dianne; 160 GT Plains Rd. 
W. Springfield, MA 01089 Lab. Tec. 

Fall, Vicki; 897 Salem St. 
Lynnfield, MA 01940 Lab. Tec. 

Farina, Gerard J.; 63 Dearborn St. 
W. Newton, MA 02165 Ld. Opr. 

Ferestien, David A.; 356 Central St. 
Foxboro, MA 02035 An. Sci. 

Fitzpatrick, Frances E.; 25 Hillcrest 

PI. 
Amherst, MA 01002 Flori 



137 



Fraczek, Betsy J.; 23 Old Orchard 

Rd. 
W. Springfield, MA 01089 Lab. Tec. 

Fragosa, Jon R.;.State Rd. 
Vineyard Haven, MA 02568 Flori 

Fronczek, Robert T.; 173 Manning 
Chicopee, MA 01020 Ar. Pk. 

Gagnon, Denise A.; 179 State St. 
Northampton, MA 01060 Flori. 

Galarneau, Sandra L.; 118 Janet St. 
W. Springfield, MA 01089 Lab. Tec. 

Gamelli, Pasquale V.; Belden Tavern, 

Rt 20 
Lee, MA 01238 Ar. Pk. 

Geller, Joseph T.; 464 Newton St. 
Brookline, MA 02167 Ld. Opr. 

Gingras, Mark R.; 332 Hinsdale Rd. 
Dalton, MA. 01226 Turf. 

Golec, Gary A.; 151 North Maple 
Florence, MA 01060 Turf. 

Grant, Deena M.; 135 Lealand Ave. 
Agawam, MA 01001 Lab. Tec. 

Grasso, Anthony L.; 3452 Flanders 

Dr. 
Yorktown, N.Y. 10598 Turf 

Graves, Mark D.; Barnes Rd. 
Ashfield, MA 01330 Turf 

Grenert, Gregg T.; 124 Boynton St. 
Manchester N.H. 03102 Turf 

Grenert, Mark W.; 124 Boynton St. 
Manchester, N.H. 03102 Turf 

Guerard, Charles K.; 58 Andover St. 
Worcester, MA 01606 Ar. Pk. 

Haberin, Cynthia J.; Box 143 A 

Nelson Rd. 
Colrain, MA 01340 An. Sci. 

Haffner, Bruce L.; 45 Town St. 
Braintree, MA 02184 Ar. Pk. 

Hale, Joseph A.; 47 Summit Rd. 
Wellesley, MA 02181 Flori. 

Hall, Michael J.; 204 Hillcrest Rd. 
Needham, MA 02192 Ar. Pk. 



Hardy, David A.; Pine Hill Rd. 
Maynard, MA 01754 An. Sci. 

Harp, Kenneth M.; 452 Meadow St. 
Agawam, MA 01001 Turf 

Hayes, Carol J.; 79 Main St. 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 An. Sci. 

Hennessy, Gregory; 198 Southfield 

Rd. 
Concord, MA 01742 Turf 

Hill, Davis E.; Bullitt Rd. 
Ashfield, MA 01330 Ag. Bus. Mgt. 

Hobin, Robert C; 873 Grove St. 
Worcester, MA 01605 Ld. Opr. 

Holberton, Rebecca L.; 168 Main St. 
Sandwich, MA 02563 An. Sci. 

Homan, Douglas J.; Country Club 

Rd. 
New London, N.H. 03257 Turf 

Horn, James D.; 1 Manor Dr. Apt. 6 
Stoughton, MA 02072 An. Sci. 

Hoxie, Robert E.; 226 Pleasant St. 
Whitman, MA 02382 Ar. Pk. 

Hubbell, Geoffrey L.; 341 

Whipporwill Rd. 
Chappaqua, N.Y. 10514 Fr. Veg. 

Ivy, Robert H.; 620 Appletree Ct. 
Deerfield, 111. 60015 Fr. Veg. 

Johnson, Nancy E.; 2330 Sands Dr. 
Decatur, 111. 62526 An. Sci. 

Johnston, Thomas IV; Main St. 
Bolton, MA 01740 Ar. Pk. 

Kane, Kevin T.; 103 Laurel St. 
Longmeadow, MA 01106 Fr. Veg. 

Keyes, Robert A.; Box 119 

Palm Coast, Florida 32037 Ar. Pk. 

Kibe, Daniel E.; City View Rd. 
Westfield, MA 01085 Lab. Tec. 

Klimaszewski, Richard W.; 311 

Prospect St. 
Naugatuck, CT 06770 Turf 

Klos, Keverne K.; River Rd. Pine 

Nook 
Deerfield, MA 01342 Lab. Tec. 



Lamica, Beth M.; 779 Ryan Rd. 
Northampton, MA 01060 An. Sci. 

Landry, Leonard P.; 69 Tolman Ave. 
Shirley, MA 01464 Ar. Pk. 

Langevin, Mark R.; 32 Ramah St. 
Springfield, MA 01104 Ar. Pk. 

Lanni, Theresa A.; 31 Holbrook Rd. 
North Andover, MA 01845 Flori. 

LaPierre, Curtis R.; 
30 Dresser St.; Southbridge, MA 
01550 Ld. Opr. 

Laushway, Mark G.; 121 Hawthorn 

St. 
Longmeadow, MA 01106 Ag. Mgt. 

Lawson, Andrew W.; 53 Trident Ave. 
Winthrop, MA 02152 Ar. Pk. 

Leahey, Richard K.; 1219 North 

Main St. 
Acushnet, MA 02743 Ld. Opr. 

Lederman, Roy, I.; 187 Manomet St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 Ld. Opr. 

Leighton, James T.; 7 Gerard Way 
Holyoke, MA 01040 Turf 

Leonard, Michael F.; 48 Waverly St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 Ar. Pk. 

Leonhard, George A.; 1000 Dale St. 
No. Andover, MA 01845 An. Sci. 

Loomis, Neil B.; 15 Margaret Rd. 
Sharon, MA 02067 Turf 

Loskamp, Susan D.; R.F.D.#1 S. 

Main St. 
Brookline, N.H. 03033 Lab. Tec. 

Lottero, William J.; 15 Maple St. 
West Roxbury, MA 02132 Fr. Veg. 

Loughrey, Stephen R.; 245 Sargeant 

St. 
Holyoke MA 01040 Turf 

MacKenzie, Robert A.; 48 Abbott St. 
So. Weymouth, MA 02190 Ar. Pk. 

MacLeod, Stephen L.; Box 245 Old 

Boston Post 
Amherst, N.H. 03031 Turf 



138 



MacPherson, Ian; 46 Nagog Hill Rd. 
Acton, MA 01720 An. Sci. 

Maddocks, Ted A.; 1429 Bridge St. 
Dracut, MA 01826 Turf 

Malikowski, Steven T.; 5 Hepburn St. 
W. Warwick, R.I. 02893 Turf 

Maloney, Sean M.; 113 Pond St. 
So. Weymouth, MA. 02190 Ld. Opr. 

Mancuso, Lori V.; 9 Olive St. 
Ashland, MA 01721 Lab. Tec. 

Mastrangelo, Kristina L.; 200 

Prospect St. 
Lunenburg, MA 01462 Ld. Opr. 

Maynes, Peter C; 1 Blackbriar Rd. 
Woodstock, Vt. 05091 Turf 

McElligott, Patricia A.; 79 Plimpton 

St. 
Walpole, MA 02081 An. Sci. 

McGuane, Gregory K.; 806 Ocean St. 
Marshfield, MA 02050 Ar. Pk. 

Mechlin, Jonathan N.; Burnam Rd. 
Bolton, MA 01740 Ar. Pk. 

Mendzela, Walter J.; 36 No. Center 

St. 
Bellingham, MA 02019 Turf 

Mengel, Dennis R.; 8 E. Green St. 
Easthampton, MA 01027 Ld. Opr. 

Mierzejewski, Paul J.; 1100 

Wallingford Rd. 
Cheshire, CT 06410 Turf 

Moore, James B.; 122 High Street 
Norwell, MA 02061 Fr. Veg. 

Moran, Mark T.; 5 Park Ave. 
Dalton, MA 01226 Ag. B. Mgt. 

Morin, Suzanne L.; 56 Deerfoot Dr. 
E. Longmeadow, MA 01028 An. Sci. 

Mulrey, Robert E.; 89 Chandler Dr. 
Marshfield, MA 02050 Ld. Opr. 

Murphy, Robert A.; 41 Argyle Ave. 
Holyoke, MA 01040 Ar. Pk. 

Napieracz, John M.; 235 Farmington 

Ave. 
New Britain, CT 06053 Turf 



Nietupski, Steven J.; 24 Bates St. 
Northampton, MA 01060 Ar. Pk. 

Norton, Frank T. Ill; 181 Reservoir 

Rd. 
Lunenburg, MA 01462 Ld. Opr. 

O'Brien, Timothy J.; 66 McArthur 

St. 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 An. Sci. 

O'Connor, Michael J.; Box 428 Oak 

Hill Ter. 
Bellows Falls, VT 05101 Turf 

Ojanen, Marjorie, J.; Byfield, Rd. 
Ashburnham, MA 01430 Lab. Tec. 

O'Neill, Thomas D.; 130 Center St. 
Stamford, CT 06906 Turf 

Ottaviano, John T.; 121 Jefferson 

Ave. 
Bennington, Vt. 05201 Turf 

Pais, Virginia L.; 465 E. Mountain 

Rd. 
Westfield, MA 01085 Lab. Tec. 

Pajak, Robert G.; 19 West Main St. 
Ware, MA 01082 Ar. Pk. 

Parrott, Donald T.; 691 Elm Street 
Somerset, MA 02726 Ar. Pk. 

Paulini, Paul A.; 6 Manor Ave. 
Natick, MA 01760 Turf 

Payne, Stephen P.; 528 Julia Ave. 
Belmont, NC 28012 Turf 

Peck, Charles A.; P.O. Box 58 Main 

St. 
Hinsdale, MA 01235 Ar. Pk. 

Peebles, Richard J.; Water St. 
Granville, MA 01034 Ar. Pk. 

Pfaefflin, Linda L.; Smith Hill 
Winsted, Ct 06098 An. Sci. 

Piatczyc, David S.; Box 115 Prospect 

Hill 
Stockbridge, MA 01262 Turf 

Pichette, Elizabeth R.; 30 Drewsen 

Dr. 
Florence, MA 01060 Flori. 

Plourde, Laura A.; 117 Glendale St. 
Chicopee Fls, MA 01020 An. Sci. 



Quinn, Daniel L.; 92 Bellevue Rd. 
Watertown, MA 02172 Turf 

Ragone, Paul A.; 540 Laurelton Ave. 
Maple Shade, N.J. 08052 Ar. Pk. 

Ralicki, Debra A.; No. Silver Lane, 
Sunderland, MA 01375 Flori. 

Reddy, Mary L.; 82 Canoe Brook Rd. 
Trumbull, CT 06611 Lab. Tec. 

Reidel, Peter G.; 90 Vine St. 
Wrentham, MA 02093 An. Sci. 

Remington, Nancy S.; 8 Newbrook 

Dr. 
Barrington, R.I. 02806 An. Sci. 

Rickard, George T.; 9 Flagg Dr. 
Framingham, MA 01701 Turf 

Ridgway, Margaret A.; 73 Pond St. 
Franklin, MA 02038 An. Sci. 

Riess, Mary E.; 48 Highland St. 
Walpole, MA 02081 Lab Tec. 

Roberts, Edward C; South Lane Rd. 
Granville, MA 01034 Fr. Veg. 

Rondeau, Robert G.; 160 Amesbury 

St. 
Dracut, MA 01826 Fr. Veg. 

Ronghi, Anna G.; 672 Amostown, Rd. 
W. Springfield, MA 01089 Flori. 

Sabin, Mary E.; 33 Trumbull Rd. 
Northampton, MA 01060 Flori. 

Sandstrom, Donald R.; 9 Anthony Dr. 
Rutland, MA 01543 Ar. Pk. 

Sanicki, Thomas S.; 51 Eastern Ave. 
So. Deerfield, MA 01373 An. Sci. 

Schworer, Dennis C; 28 Lake St. 
Sherborn, MA 01770 Ar. Pk. 

Seguin, Marc L.; 728 Main St. 
Southbridge, MA 01550 Ld. Op. 

Seidenberg, Susan W.; 1 Forestdale 
Rd. 

Rockville Ctr. N.Y. 11570 An. Sci. 

Shapiro, Thomas R.; 342 Auburn St. 
Cranston, R.I. 02910 Fd. Dist. 



139 



Shaw, John L.; 112 Firetown Rd., 
Simsbury, CT 06070 Turf 

Shugg, Cathy J.; 80 Highland Ave. 
Westfield, MA 01085 An. Sci. 

Simmons, David H.; 9 Norcroft St. 
So. Dartmouth, MA 02748 Ar. Pk. 

Simpson, Pamela J.; Stafford Rd. 
Wales, MA 01081 Lab. Tec. 

Sirica, Andrew J.; 41 Culver St. 
Naugatuck, CT 06770 Ag. B. Mngt. 

Slattery, Richard W., 32 So. State St. 
Concord, N.H. 03301 Turf 

Slosek, Stephen M.; Polpis Rd. 
Nantucket, MA 02554 Fr. Veg. 

Small, David H.; 89 Lake Ellis Rd. 
Athol, MA 01331 Ar. Pk. 

Sowa, Sandra J.; 19 Gary Circle 
Westborough, MA 01581 Flori. 

Spatcher, Kenneth L.; 372 Wilson 

Ave. 
Westwood, N.J. 07675 Fr. Veg. 

Spencer, George K.; 282 Wilson St. 
Clinton, MA 01510 Ar. Pk. 

Spies, Mark S.; 34 Kittredge Rd. 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 Ld. Opr. 

Spinner, Warren L.; 1 Murray Rd. 
Essex Jet., VT 05452 Ar. Pk. 

Springer, Earl T.; 171 Palmer Rd. 
Plympton, MA 02367 Ld. Opr. 

Starkey, Robert F.; 12 Capital St. 
Boston, MA 02132 Ag. B. Mgt. 

Stowe, Kent A.; Carleton Rd. 
West MiUbury, MA 01586 Fr. Veg. 

St. Pierre, Janice M.; Rand Road 
Shelburne Fls, MA 01370 Lab. Tec. 

Slrauch, David A.; 6 Lincoln Rd. 
Woburn, MA 01801 Ld. Opr. 

Sykes, Darren H.; 1302 Lawrence St. 
Lowell, MA 01852 Flori. 

Szczesuil, Joseph S.; 35 Oak 
Foxboro, MA 02035 Ar. Pk. 

Taft, Leslie J.; 4401 Kennedy Blvd. 
No. Bergen, N.J. 07047 Lab. Tec, 



Taylor, John T.; 10091 Amherst Ave. 
Silver Spring, Maryland 20902 Ar. 
Pk. 

Teter, Raymond, D.; 432 Lake Rd. 
Wyckoff, New Jersey 07481 Ar. Pk. 

Thayer, Donna L.; 28 Brenda Dr. 
Westfield, MA 01085 An. Sci. 

Thomas, Jonathan R.; 108 North St. 
Norfolk, MA 02056 Ar. Pk. 

Thompson, Peter R.; 2 Jonathan Ln. 
Sandwich, MA 02563 Fr. Veg. 

Thurber, Elizabeth R.; 494 Western 

Ave. 
Westfield, MA 01085 Lab. Tec. 

Tobin, Mark J.; 228 Farm St. 
Millis, MA 02054 Ar. Pk. 

Tobin, Mary A.; 7 Bowditch Rd. 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 An. Sci. 

Tobin, Stephen J.; 76 Beacon St. 
Arlington, MA 02174 Ar. Pk. 

Tomusko, Joan M.; 71 Caughey St. 
Waltham, MA 02154 An. Sci. 

Toomey, Jerome W.; P.O. 25 Ireland 

Rd. 
Worthington, MA 01098 An. Sci. 

Tripp, Carole L.; 64 Ocean Dr. 
Humarock, MA 02047 Lab. Tech. 

Trippi, Charles F.; 90 Coolidge Rd. 
Worcester, MA 01602 Turf 

Vaille, James D.; 222 Central St. 
So. Weymouth, MA 02190 Ld. Opr. 

VanEtten, Michael S.; 295 Winter St. 
Ashland, MA 01721 Ar. Pk. 

Veilleux, Noel P.; 436 Maple St., 
Winchendon, MA 01475 Ar.Pk. 

Walak, Peter A.; Brough Rd. 
Cheshire, MA 01225 Ar. Pk. 

Walker, Robert A.; 179 Main St. 
Northfield, MA 01360 Ar. Pk. 



Wallace, Kathleen A.; 63 Patton Ave. 
Somerset, MA 02725 Ld. Opr. 



Wallace, Patricia M.; 276 No. Beacon 

St. 
Brighton, MA 02135 An. Sci. 

Warner, Mark E.; Adams Rd. 
Haydenville, MA 01039 An. Sci. 

Wattu, Jane E.; 5 Hird St. 
Maynard, MA 01754 An. Sci. 

Weiser, Kevin W.; Box 226 
Westminster, VT 05158 Fr. Veg. 

Wells, Susan A.; 41 Arbor Way 
Scituate, MA 02066 Flori. 

Wendell, Neil M.; 102 Tyler St. 
Attleboro MA 02703 Turf 

Wenzel, Gary P.; 72 Pleasant St. 
Wakefield, MA 01880 Ag. B. Mgt. 

Wheeler, Timothy D.; 107 Maple St. 
Greenfield, MA 01301 Fr. Veg. 

Whitney, Brenda D.; 369 S. Branch 

Pkwy. 
Springfield, MA 01118 Flori. 

Wholey, John F.; Bardwell Ferry Rd. 
Shelburne, MA 01370 An. Sci. 

Wightman, Paul C; 117 Patterson St. 
Attleboro, MA 02703 Turf 

Woodis, Steven R.; Rufus Putnam 
Rd. 

No. Brookfield, MA 01535 An. Sci. 

Yelin, Gary D.; RR 3 Box 10 
Southwick, MA 01077 An. Sci. 

Yetman, Bruce E.; 1275 Washington 

St. 
Walpole, MA 02081 Ar. Pk. 

Young, Thomas H.; 215 Oak St. 
Holyoke, MA 01040 Ag. B. Mgt. 

Zimnowski, Linda L.; RFD#3 
Amherst, MA 01002 Ld. Opr. 

Conant, Roger S.; 8 Berwick Rd. 
Lexington, MA. 02178 HRTA 

Dole, Alan P.; R.F.D. #1, Box 243 
Chatham, N.Y. 12037 An. Sci. 

Reynolds, Christine A.; 12 Clarence 
St., Worchester, MA. 01605 An. Sci. 



140 




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143 



Editor's Note 





It is July and besides being the last page in this bock this is also one of my last jobs as editor. 
It is both a sad and happy time. 

As I look back upon the past year I remember times of a warm and helpful staff, of 
circumstances easy and hard, of experiences I will never forget. With these memories I only 
hope that within these pages you will find in words and pictures the good times you have had 
here at Stockbridge. 

I also hope that you will believe in the important role your ancestors have played in the past 
200 years and your even more important role in the years to come. 

People say that the next frontier is space, but in agriculture, I believe, that our deserts and. 
oceans will become the frontiers of greater importance. With the knowledge you have taken 
from this school I am sure you will better agriculture for today and tomorrow whether it be 
for food, research, beauty or pleasure. 

Special thanks to Chris, Cheryl, Sue and Dolores for their extra help that makes my job 
much easier. Thanks also to Don Lendry (American Publishing Representative) and his 
help with tying the staff together, new ideas for layout and special effects and his coopera- 
tion. 



Good luck to you all in the world. 



//i/yAyJJ^y^^^ i . /^MAA/^ 



Suzanne L. Morin 
Editor-in-Chief 






144 




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