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Full text of "Stosag"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/stosag1978stoc 



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DEDICATION 




Dr. Byron E. Colby 



The Beauty Of Agriculture 



Oh, I could tell you all about the beauty we see in 
agriculture! All about sleek well fed animals on pas- 
ture, all about ripe green fields, all about well tended 
lawns and gardens. But I don't. This has all been 
done before, far better than I could do it. 

It is the INNER beauty of agriculture that intrigues 
me. it is the people found in all phases of agricul- 
ture, it is the faculty of the school. It is the alumni I 
meet. It is the students I see every day, year in and 
year out. There is a personal fulfillment and happi- 
ness that comes from participation in some area of 
agricultural sciences. To some, it is a great feeling of 
peace and contentment. To some, it is the tremen- 
dous and joyous excitement derived from sharing in 
the magic of growing things. To others, there is the 
artistic satisfaction of contributing natural beauty to 
our world. 

The hard but rewarding work involved in most 
agricultural pursuits leads to a feeling of inner vital- 
ity. Great maturity, honesty, tolerance and compas- 
sion for others, and a respect for life seem to be 
attributes gained very early in life for those working 
in the agricultural fields. Any agricultural occupa- 
tion gives the assurance of leading a life that is 
worthwhile, satisfaction in a job well done, satisfac- 
tion in helping others and happiness in being able to 
do so. 

Through agriculture, therefore, one acquires the 
fine qualities that lead toward the whole human be- 
ing - (Maturity, integrity, tolerance, compassion, re- 
spect for life, excitement and enthusiasm, peace, 
contentment, aesthetic fulfillment, respect for one- 
self in the ability to work hard, and the knowledge 
that one has contributed greatly to the well-being of 
mankind. What more could one ask of an occupa- 
tion? 

BEAUTIFUL AGRICULTURE 

MAKES BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE! 





Food, Beauty, Pleasure and Profit 

These four powerful words are an integral part of 
the Stockbridge vocabulary. As you leave the "world 
of education", I ask each one of you to become a 
public relations person on behalf of agriculture in 
Massachusetts, New England, the United States 
and/or the world! 

Remember some of those rather idealistic plans 
you had as an entering freshman? Some of these 
plans, I am sure, have been modified or changed 
completely after two years of study. Some, I hope, 
have persisted and will offer you a continual chal- 
lenge to achieve. I am sure that most of your plans 
revolved around the business of producing food and 
fiber for profit, societal need and the pleasure or 
business of beautifying our environment for profit, 
societal need and pleasure. If this is so, then you 
should qualify as an excellent public relations per- 
son, capable of informing the general public of the 
real, short and long term values of keeping these 
businesses viable, especially here in Massachusetts 
and New England. 

What are the essential attributes for public rela- 
tions work? First, perhaps I should offer my defini- 
tion of public relations. Public relations is giving 
and/or maintaining public interest, understanding 
and support for a business, an industry or the like. 
Following are the most important attributes needed 
to perform effective public relations in agriculture 
or any other industry or business? 
(1) Judgement - this is formed from your set of val- 
ues, experiences and knowledge (education); (2) Or- 
derly Thinking - this must be learned and continually 
used, such as in many of your Stockbridge courses 
(!); (3) Communicative Skills - most important is the 
ability to write properly followed by speaking ability; 
(4). Creativity - usually the broader your education 
and experience becomes, the more creative you be- 
come and; (5) Initiative - this requires a willingness to 
do more than is required (the cure-all for that dread- 
ed, infectious disease which I call Requiredistis) and 
a desire to do your job well (pursuit of excellence). 

I am quite confident that each and every one of 
you have formed and added to these five attributes 
of a good public relations person during your two 
years here at Stockbridge School of Agriculture. As 
some have said before, "Go fourth and spread the 
word!" 



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As you look through this year's STOSAG, 
we hope that you will see what an impor- 
tant part agriculture plays in today's soci- 
ety. It is often taken for granted, but our 
daily break comes from the tillage of the 
ground. We must be grateful to agriculture 
and to the farmers who toil in the fields to 
raise crops and livestock for our suste- 
nance. 

it is agriculture which also gives us the 
beauty in life. As we look around in today's 
world, we see that our rural landscapes are 
beautiful because of the greenery provided 
by fields of crops, orchards, pastures, and 
parklands. And in our more urban areas it 
is the lush green fairways of golf courses, 
public gardens, nicely landscaped proper- 
ties, and greenhouses filled with plans that 
all add to the beauty of our world! 










**ln order that he may live a man has to have 
three things: air, water and food Of the three 

necessities, air is supplied by Nature in abundance; 
water can be found everywhere except in the 
desert; but food, in a civilized society, has to be 
provided by man himself 
— Robert Trow Smith 





Opening This Fall 

HAMPSHIRE MALU 

Albert Steiger Co. 
J C Penney K-Mart 

Cafe Square 

70 STORES,SHOPS^ SERVICES 
For Leasing Information: 

PHONE COLUa 315-445-0429 PYRIHID COMPANIES 
DEWITT,N.Y.H2I4 



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The Earth has been inhabited by humans for approximately two million years. For most of this time, our ancestors 
were hunters and food gatherers who moved from one place to another in search of food. When these early hunters 
learned about sowing seeds and harvesting a crop of food, they were able to settle down into small villages. The 
village inhabitants, who no longer roamed the land for their food supply, became dependent upon agriculture as a 
food source. Today, we too are dependent upon agriculture. It is the key to our existence; therefore, we must 
continue to cultivate and preserve all good farmland. 

Agriculture has been practiced since the beginning of civilization, and it has attracted the greatest numbers of 
people over the years. The people who work the land derive enjoyment, excitement, and a feeling of independence in 
their pursuits. There is no other business which can ac- 
count for the prosperity of a nation as agriculture does. 
The soil, which sustains the populations of nations, yields 
the necessities of life. In the past, where agriculture was 
neglected, populations diminished. 

It seems that agriculture is being neglected today. Each 
year 350,000 acres of farmland are taken out of food 
production and lost to developers. It is true that develop- 
ment must take place in our ever growing population; 
however, the areas to be developed should not be on 
types of land which are capable of producing renew- 
able resources, such as food, fiber, and water. Even 
here in Massachusetts we are losing 20,000 acres or 
200 farms each year, and because of this we must 
import 85% of our foodstuff. 

We are losing much of our good agricultural land 
because of the ease at which it can be developed. 
Since most farmland is cleared and has good topsoil, a 
developer can quickly and easily move in and start to 
build. Taxes are another reason why farmland is being 
lost to developers. Farmers are finding it harder to pay 
the rising property taxes on their land. If the land is 
not lost due to taxes while the farmer is alive, then it 
will most likely be lost to them when he dies. Inheri- 
tance taxes are so high that survivors are often forced to 
sell the land in order to pay them. 

We must turn the tides around and ban together for legal 
and legislative support of good land use. Some states are 
beginning to change the traditional taxing methods and 
modifying them for farm use. There have also been many 
laws and regulations passed which are protecting our re- 
newable natural resources - farmland. As graduates of 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture, we have the ability and 
knowledge to work these farmlands and provide food for 
our ever growing population, or as trained horticulturalists 
we can make our world beautiful and improve the quality of 
life around us. 



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ALMYS 







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TSCDCTY 




Douglas L. Alrhart 




Alfred W. Bolcourt 




James W. Callahan 




Lyie E. Craker 




James F. Anderson 




William J. Bramlage 




Joe T. Clayton 




Bradford D. Crossmon 




Wallace G. Blacic 




Walter H. Bumgardner 




Byron E. Colby 




Marron S. DuBols 




Robert T. Duby 




Tom S. Hamilton 




Thomas Houston 




Paul H. Jennings 




Heinrlch Fenner 




William K. Harris 




Ward M. Hunting 




Ernest A. Johnson 




Francis W. Holmes 




Kirk A. Hurto 




Gordon S. King 




Theodore W. Leed 




J. David Mackenzie 




Donald R. Marlon 





William Lord 




William J. Manning 



Edward S. PIra 




Harold E. Mosher 




William A. Rosenau 




Sidney J. Lyford 




James B. Marcum 




Gustave D. Olson 




Franklin W. Southwick 




Herbert G. Splndler 





Edward N. Tobin 



Jonas Vengris 




Lester F. Whitney 




0M, 
MM 

Joseph Troll 




John M. Zak 



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John J. Cade 
A. B. Cole 
George B. Goddard 
Robert M. G rover 
Lucille F. Helgin 
Curtis A. Johnson 
Robert L. Kent 
Deane Lee 



Peggy A. McConnell 
Robert J. Precheur 
Richard A. Rohde 
Douglas N. Stern 
Doris S. Stockton 
Robert W. Wagner 
Robert W. Walker 
Elizabeth Voter 



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> Faculty 
not 
pictured 



Professor James Callahan will retire fol- 
lowing the 1978 Spring semester after hav- 
ing taught at Stockbridge for thirty-two 
years. He has given much time and effort 
to the school by being advisor to the year- 
book for several years and teaching 
courses such as Agricultural Economics 
and Business Management. While teach- 
ing, he also authored many publications 
and bulletins which were of great help to 
many people involved with agriculture in 
New England. The Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture would like to thank him for his 
many years of dedication to the school and 
to the students. 








EVENTS 



WINE arJ aHEE§E 




P4RIT 




The school year and the many events 
that go along with it is started off each year 
with the Wine and Cheese Party. This is an 
annual event sponsored by the senior class 
to welcome the new freshmen to Stock- 
bridge. It gives everyone a chance to meet 
new people, make new friends, and rekin- 
dle old friendships. 

Wandering through the crowds, conver- 
sations ranged from seniors discussing ex- 
periences had during placement training 
to freshmen talking about their new 
courses, schedules, and dorms. Freshmen 
were also anxious to ask seniors about 
what they could expect from courses and 
professors at Stockbridge. All in all it was a 
successful event, because it had all the es- 
sential ingredients — good food, good 
drink, and especially good people. 




F4U PICNIC 







The day of the Fall Picnic came and 
the sun was shining down brightly. 
Gradually the once empty Farley Lodge 
was filled with many "Stockies" all hav- 
ing themselves a good time. Many peo- 
ple participated in playing volleyball and 
tug-of-war while others were found en- 
joying all the good food and drink that 
was provided. By the end of the after- 
noon it was apparent that everyone had 
their fill of food and fun at this annual 
event. 



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When "Stockies" have a party, they do it right! What better placed 
for a Halloween Hoedown than a barn??! Once Grinell Arena was 
decorated with corn stalks and pumpkins it had just the right atmo- 
sphere for the costumed creatures that were going to attend. Shortly 
after people started arriving and the band began to play, the sawdust 
covered floor was packed with foot-stomping people all having them- 
selves a good time. 







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Almost everyone who was at 
the party had some type of cos- 
tume on. There was quite a vari- 
ety: hillbillies, bugs, scare- 
crows, and even a group of rab- 
bits. It was apparent that every- 
one enjoyed the country tunes 
played by the band, because the 
floor was crowded with hoe- 
downers all night long. 



HCllT J€liy 





The last event of the fall semester is the 
Stockbrldge Christmas Party, the Holly Jolly. 
This event always has a special feeling about it 
because it brings a little of the Christmas spirit 
to everyone which is usually lacking around 
campus at that time because of finals. This 
year it was held in the Student Union Ballroom 
where appropriate decorations of evergreens 
and Christmas lights were put up. A buffet din- 
ner was served first and later on there was 
dancing to the sound of Phase 11. 







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As the party continued on during the night it 
seemed that everyone was enjoying themselves 
and had put the thoughts of finals out of their 
minds. The band, Phase 11, played good music all 
night long. Even Saint Nick had time to stop by 
for a dance before the night was over. 



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EST. 



1739 



STOCKBRIDGE 





STOCKBRIDGE 

SCHOOL OF 

AGRICULTURE 
AMHERST 50 MILES ^ 




Once upon a time there was a tavern, 
where we used to raise a glass, 
or two. 




Remember how we 
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life we choose. 







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THOSE WERE THE DAYS. 
Words & Music by Gene Raskin 
TRO- Copyright 1962 & 1968 Essex Mu 
Used by permission 



, Inc.. New York. NY. 



At Stockbridge, Students Grow It! 

Finally Friday. My eyes fight against sleep during the last of my five eight o'clocks for the 
week. How Stockbridge manages to schedule me for five eight o'clock classes, three out of 
four semesters, not to mention those detestable five-thirty labs, I'll never know. Maybe it's 
all part of the practical education that made Stockbridge renown. 

Learning by doing is the name of the game with Stockbridge. Combining the knowledge 
our minds gain in lecture with the mechanical skills our hands achieve in lab, constitutes 
much of our education. During these learning experiences, Stockies manage to bring 
attention to themselves: climbing trees with harnesses and ropes behind the Health Ser- 
vices, timing engines and rebuilding lawn mowers until grease embeds itself under your 
fingernails, emptying a half-dozen apples from your pack after class (all a different variety), 
selecting a back seat in lecture because you just came from halter-breaking a heifer down in 
the barn, living in the French Hall greenhouses, sticking that cumbersome T square In your 
pack, . . . and it's another rainy day for surveying and tromping through the Belchertown 
orchards. It's all part of Stockbridge. 

Motivation towards a direction characterizes a Stockbridge student. We enter with a high 
interest level in our major fields and a sense of how a Stockbridge education will augment 
future plans. From this basis student background ranges extensively; some students have 
fished previously in other streams of education, others have returned to school after 
working several months or many years, some freshly graduated from vocational agriculture 
or public high schools, some may not have crept outside New England while others have 
given their time to the Peace Corps and traveled the Amazon. Yet, regardless of roots and 
age, all the students demonstrate their agricultural interest and direction. 

Originally, Stockbridge educated the farmer in modern methods and more efficient 
farming practices. Now, the school primarily educates the farmer-to-be or those desiring to 
pursue a life in agriculture, whether it be floriculture, landscaping, golf course manage- 
ment, arboriculture, or actual animal and crop production. No longer is the farmer's son or 
the farmer's daughter the only persons furthering their education in agriculture. As the 
public's awareness of agriculture grows, so will those desiring to satisfy their agricultural 
interest through education. These persons may not preceive a future direction for them- 
selves, but their interest abounds. Will Stockbridge honor these prospective students even 
though their direction is weak? The future of agriculture, especially for the independent 
New England farmer, teeters with each rise of the Connecticut River. Pamphlets, literature, 
Crockett's Victory Garden, and tomato articles in the Boston Sunday Globe will raise the 
public's consciousness of agriculture, but not until people develop a value for its worth and 
educate themselves through practice will our agriculture be saved and in turn benefit our 
survival. 

People must realize that classroom education only benefits when combined with our 
hands in action for a practical outcome, whatever that may be. At Stockbridge, students just 
don't learn about growing, students grow it! 

MARTHA KIMBAL 
Fruit & Veg 78 




AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

What does Agricultural Business Management have to offer? 
What kind of job can one get with this major? These are some of 
the questions we hear much too often. These may be simple 
questions, but don't expect a simple answer! 

Ag. Business Management offers a variety of courses, ranging 
from Economics, which we encounter every day of our lives, to 
Accounting Principles, Business Law, Retail Management, and 
other business related courses. With all the knowledge gained 
from these courses, the job opportunities are unlimited. How 
about going on to become a Certified Public Accountant, or the 
manager of a large firm for example. 

Agricultural Business Management is needed in any type of 
business, whether it be landscaping or owning a large dairy farm. 
One thing is certain, Ag. Business Management is essential. 

Brian Brundrett 



AG 
BUSINESS 




RICHARD BROUSSEAU 



NEAL MONSON 



WILLIAM GRISWOLD - HRTA 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Working with animals Is one of the greatest experiences to which 
we In the Animal Science major are exposed. From the poultry 
barns at Tllson to the dairy barns In South Deerfleld, we learn the 
opportunities and rewards this field has to offer. 

in the classroom we study these different farm animals In Poul- 
try Management, Dairy Management, Livestock Production, and 
Light Horse Management. Animal Science is a fast growing major 
on school campuses all over the United States; whether you want 
to be a Veterinarian's assistant, farmer, or work in a lab, animal 
science prepares you with the basic knowledge for reaching your 
goal. 

This major will continue to attract interested students because 
of the growing awareness of the Importance of agriculture and its' 
related fields. 

Whitney Buttrick 



AN SCI 




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WHITNEY BUTTRICK 




DAVID CHAMUTKA 



JEFFREY DEAN 






CAROL DWYER 



STEVEN FELLOWS 



KATHARINE GEORGIANNA 




MARYALICE LARKIN 



57 






AMY MINTZ 



JOHN PLUMMER 



DOUGLAS PURINTON 




LESLIE RANDALL 




RICHARD STIER 



SARA WILSON 



WAYNE WOODARD 




ARBOR 
AND 

PARK 



ARBORICULTURE AND 
PARK MANAGEMENT 

What type of career can you look 
forward to in Arboriculture and Park 
Management, you ask? Well, this is a 
wide open field. Consider working for 
a tree company, possibly as a foreman 
or a tree climber if you like being on 
top of things. Whether you are a utility 
arborist, tree warden, or own a tree 
company, you will be involved in ac- 
tivities such as tree pruning, identifi- 
cation and treatment of tree diseases, 
and planting of trees. 

With today's rising population there 
is a need for more recreational areas, 
in both municipal and national parks. 
Jobs such as land-use planners, park 
managers, and city and state recrea- 
tional co-ordinators await you. 

The education at Stockbridge is so 
integrated with other related fields, it 
enables you to pursue most any field 
of horticulture that may interest you. 
When you enter the working world, re- 
member what Stockbridge has taught 
you; and give it your best. 

Glenn Jameson 
Dan Provost 






EDWARD CHISHOLM 



RICHARD FEDORCHAK 



DAVID FINCH 




STEPHEN FULLER 




PHILIP HOWARD 



GLENN JAMESON 



DANIEL JEROME 




JOHN LASH 



MICHAEL LEE 



DAVID LUCEY 






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ALLAN MAGOWAN 



DAVID MINER 



JOHN PAIGE 




GARY WRUBLESKI 



FLORICULTURE 

Floriculture, as the name implies, could best be described 
as the practical study of raising commercial flowering and 
foliage plants. Courses in greenhouse management, plant 
identification, and commercial floriculture give us the basic 
knowledge and experience for running a greenhouse. 

Although this is still a good business in New England, it 
has not been easy with the rising cost of oil, and competi- 
tion from other areas which are more suited for year round 
greenhouse production. This class has lent some diversity 
to this problem by broadening the field of study to include: 
interiorscaping, conservatory work, garden center oper- 
ations, and small vegetable farming. This step is necessary 
and profitable in securing a future in greenhouse oper- 
ations, and is shown by the devotion and dedication the 
FLORI majors have in their involvement in all agricultural 
fields. 

Kevin Walsh 



FLORI 






CHARLYN BRISTOL 



KATHLEEN FALLS 




TRUDY SCHEINOST 



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69 




BRUCE YUKL 




FRUIT 

AND 

VEG 




FRUIT AND VEGETABLES 

Vegetable farming and orchard management are the 
primary occupations sought by students majoring in 
fruit and vegetables. Many wish to be their own boss, 
developing a private business from the extent of a road- 
side stand to supplying the wholesale market. Other 
opportunities include state produce inspectors, green- 
house managers, market reporters, and extension assis- 
tants to name a few. Whether or not a "veggie" major 
pursues a career in farming or an agricultural related 
occupation, or decides to follow a completely different 
route, he'll harvest his own tomato plant in summer, 
have an apple in hand during autumn, late winter will 
find him in the orchard with pruning shears, and his 
hands will be deep in the soil come spring. 

Martha A. Kimball 




vj.^-. -«^i ^K.- 



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73 




DANIEL O'LEARY 











LAT 



LABORATORY ANIMAL TECHNOLOGY 

Laboratory Animal Technology is a multi-faceted field. It ranges 
from working in a zoo to operating a dog kennel, from assisting a 
veterinarian in surgery to searching for parasites under the micro- 
scope. Many freshmen entering LAT find their likings to be working 
strictly with pets; however, after graduating, they settle down in a 
diagnostic laboratory. 

For most of us, many times it has been a trying and a frustrating 
field of study; swearing we would never again pick up a mouse for 
injection after it has gotten the best of us time after time, or after a 
long day of classes trying to be patient with a cow after it has 
pounced on our feet for the third time that day. 

But through all this frustration, we have learned more about ani- 
mal's scientific make-up and behavioral patterns, while coming clos- 
er to our goals. 

Cindy Ryan 







AMY CAMPBELL 



JILL DANDENEAU 



APRIL DOOLITTLE 





PAMELA TRUDEAU 






PATRICIA WALLACE 




REBECCA WARNOCK 



LANDSCAPE OPERATIONS 

Landscape Operations is a demanding major which covers 
many different areas of horticulture. Landscapers learn about 
turf grasses, perennials, woody plant material and other var- 
ious subjects relating to the trade. This knowledge provides us 
with the base for entering the field of landscaping. 

This field entails so much more than the reliable standbys of 
mowing, trimming, and pruning. Landscape design and con- 
struction are other areas. For the most part, those who do not 
work for themselves, become foremen for established firms. 
After completion of this major students have the necessary 
skills to work in any field of turf, arboriculture, greenhouses, 
garden centers, or nurseries. The job opportunities In lands- 
caping are available to anyone who has self motivation and 
Ingenuity for making our outdoor spaces aesthetically pleas- 
ing. 

Geoffery MacDuff 



LAND 





BARRY COMAK 



85 




VERNON HENO 




TIMOTHY MADDEN 



87 





TURF 



TURF MANAGEMENT 

Turf Management, although not a highly 
recognized or familiar field, Is one where 
career selection Is not as restricted as It 
might seem. Turf management deals not 
only with golf course maintenance, but 
also lends itself towards the maintenance 
of a multitude of other recreational facili- 
ties such as parks, playgrounds, and athle- 
tic fields. Campus grounds, cemeteries, 
and private businesses are other areas in 
which turf maintenance takes place. 

Students In Turf Management take 
courses which teach practical skills In sur- 
veying, irrigation, and lawn mower repair. 
These courses become valuable to the stu- 
dents after graduation, when they are 
working as greenskeepers, landscapers, or 
vocational instructors. 

A wide field of opportunities exists in the 
turf industry. After completion of this 
course, students have a good basis to find 
jobs in the areas which attract them. 

John Bouchard 





GREGORY BECMER 




BRIAN CHALIFOUX 



JOSEPH CHARBONNEAU 







MICHAEL CHRZANOWSKI 



PAUL GAGNON 



JEFFREY HAMILTON 




MARK HARRINGTON 



DANIEL HIGGINS 



KENNETH INGRAM 





TODD LEMME 




ROBERT MAGEROWSKI 




ROBERT MILLER 




SUZANNE MITCHELL 




BRUCE PACKARD 




RUSSELL ST.JOHN 




STEVEN SCHMIDT 




JOHN SHERAN 





JAMES STASZOWSKI 



RICHARD STEELE 




MICHAEL STRECKFUS 



PAUL VESHI 



STEPHEN WILSON 




Seniors not photographed 



RICHARD ABBOTT ARBOR PK. 
GEORGE ALEXANDER ARBOR PK. 
ROBERT ALMQUIST FLORI. 
JONATHAN ALVORD TURF 
STEPHEN ANDERSON TURF 
WILLIAM BARCLAY FRUIT VEG. 
STEVEN BATES ARBOR PK. 
JONATHAN BEGG FRUIT VEG. 
JOHN BERTRAM AN. SCI. 
JOHN BOUCHARD TURF 
THOMAS BRODEUR TURF 
JOHN BRODERICK ARBOR PK. 
DAVID BROWNELL AN. SCI. 
ANTHONY BURNS AG. BUS. 
ROSANNE BUZZELL FRUIT VEG. 
ANDREW CAPISTRON ARBOR PK. 
WILLIAM CHAFFEE ARBOR PK. 
LYNDA COLBURN ARBOR PK. 
DAVID COMEE TURF 
ROBERT COOPER TURF 
BRIAN CORRIVEAU TURF 
LAWRENCE CROCKETT ARBOR PK. 
MICHAEL DILORENZO TURF 
THOMAS DINSMORE TURF 
JAMES DUTTING FRUIT VEG. 
RICHARD ELLSWORTH AN. SCI. 
SUSAN EQUI ARBOR PK. 
CHRISTOPHER FRAME FRUIT VEG. 
ROBERT FRANKS LAND OP. 
ROBERT GOLDEN TURF 
DANIEL GOREY FRUIT VEG. 
PAUL GRENIER ARBOR PK. 
WILLIAM HAMM TURF 
CHARLES HARCOVITZ LAND OP 
JOHN HASKELL FRUIT VEG. 
WILLIAM HICKEY ARBOR PK. 
PETER HIBBARD ARBOR PK. 
DANIEL HITT TURF 
WILLIAM HUTCHINSON FLORI. 
GUY HUTT AG. BUS. 
KEVIN JEAN TURF 
CHRISTOPHER KIBBE FRUIT VEG. 



PATRICK KRISTY TURF 

DANIEL LAFLAMME TURF 

JEFFREY LAKRITZ AG. BUS. 

DAVID LITWAK AN. SCI. 

THOMAS LOSTY AN. SCI. 

JOHN MARCHANT FRUIT VEG. 

TIMOTHY MASSUCCO TURF 

THOMAS MCAVOY TURF 

ALFRED MCKNIGHT TURF 

DENNIS MEDEIROS TURF 

RICHARD MIDDLEBROOK ARBOR PK. 

EARL MILLETT TURF 

THOMAS MORRIS TURF 

MICHAEL NAGLE TURF 

RICHARD NEGRALLE TURF 

CURTIS NIVEN TURF 

STEVEN NUGENT LAND OP. 

ROBERT PIKE LAND OP. 

LAWRENCE PORTER AN. SCI. 

DANIEL PROVOST ARBOR PK. 

MARK QUINN LAND OP. 

ROBERT ROGAN HRTA 

MARK ROLE LAND OP. 

WILLIAM ROSE AG. BUS. 

CHRISTOPHER RYAN ARBOR PK. 

JOHN RYAN ARBOR PK. 

DAVID SANTAGUIDA ARBOR PK. 

DALE SCEPKA FLORI. 

DAVID SCHWORER ARBOR PK. 

DAVID SMALL ARBOR PK. 

BRIAN SMITH ARBOR PK. 

JEFFREY STARR ARBOR PK. 

MICHAEL STEINLE TURF 

CHARLES STONE TURF 

LAWRENCE STRIBLEY ARBOR PK. 

WALTER STUBBS TURF 

EUGENE TIVNAN ARBOR PK. 

PETER TURNER ARBOR PK. 

JAMES UGONE ARBOR PK. 

JAMES WEAVER HRTA 

BETH WHITTINGTON FRUIT VEG. 

RICHARD YOUNG TURF 






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CLASS OFFICERS 
President: Kevin Hollister 

Vice President: Maureen Golden 

Treasurer: Trudy Scheinost 

Secretary: Pliil Howard 






It is hard to believe that two years ago the class of 
78 officers held their first official meeting at the 
T.O.C. Each one of us was thinking the same thing, 
how were we ever going to pull this class together? 
After all, didn't everyone say that college students 
were full of apathy, and that no one really wanted to 
be involved? Sure, it was fine to be involved in class 
functions in high school, but this was college. 

Well, we were soon to find out that the Stock- 
bridge Class of 78 was far from apathetic. Starting 
with our first class event, the ski trip to Vermont 
and continuing right up to the last function, the 
Senior Banquet, everyone joined in and had an ex- 
cellent time. If there was a Stockbridge party, 
someone from the class of 78 was sure to be the 
first one there and the last to leave. When it came to 
helping out with the work, someone from the class 
of 78 was there to lend a hand. 

There is a certain bond that develops between 
people who work together to accomplish some- 
thing, whether it be a party or a fund raiser. I think 
the people in the class of 78 have this bond, not 
only with their classmates but also with the school. 
The students and their attitudes help make up a 
school, and I think the class of 78 helped to make 
Stockbridge a little bit closer. Hopefully, the gradu- 
ates of the class of 78 will not forget the fun they 
had or the friends they made by becoming involved 
during their two years in Stockbridge. 

Trudy E. Scheinost 



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President: Peter Quinlan 
Vice President: Ray Coburn 
Treasurer: June Delehanty 
Secretary: Peter Hasal( 




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102 



The student senate of the Stockbridge School 
of Agriculture has had a productive and enjoy- 
able year. As the governing body representing 
the students, the senators were busy promoting 
communications between senate and student as 
well as encouraging involvement of student and 
faculty in the senate sponsored activities. 

Accomplishments of this year have included: 
high school student counselling which allowed 
senators to visit schools indicating an intrest in 
the Stockbridge curriculum; Professional Devel- 
opment Day was initiated In February providing a 
convention-type setting whereby students could 
meet and talk with representatives of agricultur- 
al related business and suppliers; a job reference 
file was completed by the educational qualities 
committee; Stockbridge night at the Pub which 
raised two hundred and thirty dollars for the 
"Blizzard Relief Fund" of the American Red 
Cross; blood donors drive which donated fifty 
dollars to four local chapters; as well as sponsor- 
ing many successful social events through the 
outstanding efforts of the Stockbridge Service 
Organization (STOSO). 

These accomplishments were just a small part 
of the general business which the senate con- 
ducted throughout the year. It is certain that the 
senators gained much from serving on the sen- 
ate this year. Hopefully others in the future will 
look at these accomplishments and continue the 
good work of the Stockbridge Student Senate. 




Senate Advisor - Dr. Douglas L. Airhart 



103 




Senators 



Thomas Barnard 
Kathy Barry 
Charlyn Bristol 
Brian Brundrett 
Richard Brousseau 
John Burnett 
Whitney Buttrick 
Rich Ciarcia 
Debby Coulthard 
June Delehanty 
Nancy Evans 
Maureen Golden 
Bruce Hamilton 
Peter Hasak 
Kevin Hollister 
Phil Howard 
Beth Jacobs 
Ron Johnson 
Michael Lee 
Geoff MacDuff 



Cheryl Marcotte 
Lindsay McMurtry 
Lori Miller 
Joe Perella 
Bill Perkins 
Dawn Proctor 
Peter Quinlan 
Dan Rackliffe 
Lee Radwill 
Ken Rich 
Cindy Ryan 
Dale Scepka 
Trudy Scheinost 
Brian Smith 
Susan Stewart 
Fred Thompson 
Kevin Walsh 
David White 
Wayne Woodard 
Gary Wrubleski 



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COPY EDITORS 
DAWN PROCTOR 
TRUDY SCHEINOST 




LAYOUT STAFF 



BRIAN BRUNDRETT STEVEN NUGENT PAUL DONNELLY 

MARK CARROLL DAN RACKLIFFE GLENN JAMESON 

RAY COBURN ELIZABETH ROGERS ROBIN SHETLER 

JERRY D'ANELLO ROBIN SHETLER BRIAN SMITH 

GLENN JAMESON NEIL SIMONI 






The Stockbridge Service Organi- 
zation (STOSO), is the committee 
that is responsible for the planning 
of all social functions during the 
school year. They plan and organize 
many activities starting with the 
Fall Picnic, and continuing with the 
Halloween Party, Holly Jolly, Pro- 
gress Banquet, and ending with the 
Spring Picnic. This group of hard- 
working students spends alot of 
time planning, advertising, decorat- 
ing, setting up, selling tickets, and 
when it is all over cleaning up. 




109 











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The Shorthorn was put together this year by 
the sole effort of Charlyn Bristol. She was a 
one woman team who kept busy writing, typ- 
ing, mimeographing, and distributing the 
newsletter. The students are grateful onto her 
for all the time and hard work she devoted in 
keeping us informed on the various activities 
which were going on at Stockbridge. 







Coach: Tony Williams 



Bill Barclay 
Phil Cabral 
Fred Churchill 
Bruce Clarke 
Ray Coburn 
Dennis Duquette 
Chris Frame 
Richard Griffith 
Bruce Hamilton 
Richard Hartbarger 



Chris Kibbe 

Martha Kimball 

Richard LaFlamme 

Lindsay McMurtry 

Joe Perella 

Anthony Reellich - MVP 

Doug Roberts 

John Ryan 

Peter Simpson 

Donald Smith 






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Coach: Tony Williams 
Mgr: Ray Coburn 

Paul Gagnon Kevin McShane 

Richard Hartbarger Brian O'Shea 

Daniel Higgons Daniel Provost 

Tod Lemme Peter Turner 

Lindsay McMurtry Gary Wrubleski 




lis 




117 





Sigma Sigma Alplia started out four years ago as an 
idea a few students shared in forming an alternative 
living situation for Stockbridge women, who desired 
more than just a dormroom. So with the help of ATG 
and their corporation, SSA became a reality. 

Although our history is brief, the house has estab- 
lished itself in the Greek system and become quite active 
in Stockbridge functions. 

The sisterhood is unique among campus sororities. 
Being just for a two year agricultural school, members 
are engaged in similar fields of study, thus have similar 
attitudes. We are a close house, work hard and manage 
without a housemother. 

We are not without problems. Female enrollment is 
barely thirty percent at Stockbridge and most who do 
attend commute, this leaves us hard pressed for pledges 
at the end of every year. Past Stockbridge sororities have 
failed for these reasons. 

For the present, we are holding our own. New mem- 
bers become just as enthusiastic and determined, while 
graduating sisters strengthen the alumni association. 
Hopefully, future years will prove prosperous and the 
sisterhood will continue. One thing is for sure. We be- 
lieve in SSA! 

Amy Campbell 





Sisters: 

Michele Antes 
Deborah Coulthard 
Cynthia Jablonski 
Kathy Peck 
Lee Radwill 



119 



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Alpha Tau Gamma is the Stockbridge fraternity. We 
offer excellent home-cooked meals, a place to live and a 
lifelong bond of Brotherhood with other people in agri- 
culture. We also have parties and other social events. But 
there is more to ATG. Belonging to ATG means extra 
work and responsibility, for running a house is no easy 
task. There are many decisions to make, people to orga- 
nize, meetings to attend, newsletters to send, a kitchen 
to run, and a house to keep. It takes alot of your time and 
work. 

But it does not end there, because we are proud of our 
school and work hard for Stockbridge. You will find us as 
class officers, senators, and committee members. We 
help out with Stockbridge parties and work with the 
alumni on their events. 

At times it seems as if the work will never end, but as 
graduation nears, it went by too fast. In your two years as 
a Brother of ATG, you have gained alot. You are a more 
responsible person, better matured and more aware of 
yourself and of other people. You learned more about 
agriculture from your Brothers. But most important is 
the friendships you have made and will keep for the rest 
of your life. 

Brian L. Smith 





BROTHERS: 
Edwin Babbit 
Mark Beaty 
Fred Churchill 
Raymond Coburn 
Paul Crane 
Jerry D'Anello 
Christopher Gormley 
Richard Griffith 
Bruce Hamilton 
David Hansen 
Brian McCarthy 
Lindsay McMurtry 
Mark Morgera 
Ronald Munro 
Herbert Pollard 
Donald Smith 
Craig Vonkohorn 
James Wood 



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EVENTS 



PRCCRE§§ BANCUEI 




The Progress Banquet is an annual event which is held 
each spring before the freshmen leave on placement. Both 
students and faculty are presented with various awards in a 
ceremony which is followed by a delicious meal. 

Some of the awards which are given out are for athletic 
achievment, service to Stockbridge and to the outstanding 
professor in each major. 

After all the awards were given out and all speeches were 
made, the band started to play the good music which con- 
tinued for the rest of the night. Everyone celebrated the 
giving and receiving of awards and enjoyed dancing and 
socializing with faculty and friends. 




LEAR LIST 



William W. Barclay 
David A. Brownell 
Jadene L. Bump 
Cynthia J. Cabral 
David P. Chamutka 
Robert D. Cooper 
Kathleen M. Falls 
Christopher L. Frame 
Stephen A. Fuller 
Steven M. Gill 
Maurene H. Golden 
Richard W. Griffith 
Joy L. Harrington 
Mark W. Harrington 
John M. Haskell, Jr. 
Carole A. Hetherington 
Kenneth B. Ingram 
Glenn C. Jameson 
Daniel J. Jerome 
Ronald V. Johnson 
Christopher D. Kibbe 
Martha A. Kimball 
Charles P. Kozlowski 
Patrick M. Kristy 
David W. Lane 
John E. Lash 



Gerald V. Litchfield 
David Litwak 
Thomas R. Losty 
Barbara C. Lucas 
Robert R. Magerowski 
Timothy P. Massucco 
Alfred F. McKnight 
David P. Miner 
Amy L. Mintz 
Michael F. Nagle 
Steven J. Nugent 
James S. O'Kelly 
Dawn E. Proctor 
Douglas P. Purinton 
Elizabeth M. Rogers 
John J. Ryan 
Dale A. Scepka 
Trudy E. Scheinost 
Roberta A. Shetler 
Neil E. E. Simoni 
James J. Staszowski 
Charles W. Stone 
Gay S. Theriot 
Rebecca M. Warnock 
Sara J. Wilson 






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The Spring Picnic was blessed with a nice day this 
year, which is a rare occasion. Without the rain we had 
last year, we were able to enjoy softbail, volleyball, and 
frisbee. This along with plenty of good food and drink 
made for a fun afternoon for everyone. 



§ENI€R BANCUil 




The Senior Banquet was 
held at Wiggins Tavern in 
Northampton on a beautiful 
warm spring night. A deli- 
cious dinner was followed 
by the good music of Phase 
II. Everyone was busy social- 
izing or trying to get that 
last dance with their special 
friends and classmates be- 
fore graduation day. 




llVi^ICCI^ C14§§IC 




The livestock classic is an annual event which involves almost every 
animal science senior and their instructors. Lasting only a day and a 
half, it represents weeks of planning, preperation and most of all, 
hard work! With the help of faculty advisors, the students learn to 
work with their assigned animal whether it be a sheep, pig, cow, or 
horse. Everyone is kept busy training and grooming their animal for 
the show. 

The hectic weeks prior to the show is a time for sharing many 
memories. Many friendships are made as the experienced ones 
helped the beginners with their animals. Laughter rang through the 
barn constantly due to a run away pig or when eight people tried to 
clean their cows at the same time in the washroom. 

As the time for showing drew near, there was always someone 
around with a calming word or a helping hand. After your class had 
shown, you could relax, and while the ribbons were nice for those who 
received them, everyone knew that the real reward was all the good 
times shared by being together for the livestock classic of 1978. 

Amy Campbell 




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139 





Beyond the East the sunrise, 

beyond the West the sea, 
And East and West the wander-thirst 

that will not let me be; 
It works in me like madness, 

dear, to bid me say good-by! 
For the seas call and the stars call, 

and oh, the call of the sky! 

I know not where the white road runs, 

nor what the blue hills are. 
But man can have the sun for friend, 

and for his guide a star; 
And there's no end of voyaging 

when once the voice is heard. 
For the river calls and the road calls, 

and oh, the call of a bird! 

Yonder the long horizon lies, 

and there by night and day 
The old ships draw to home again, 

the young ships sail away; 
And come I may, but go I must, 

and if men ask you why. 
You may put the blame on the stars and the 

sun and the white road and the sky! 

"WANDER-THIRST" 
by Gerald Gould 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

Alfred Boicourt 
Bob Gamache 
Maurene Golden 



Thomas Houston 
George Johnson 

Sydney Lyford 



Rus Mariz 

Brian Silvers 
Joseph Troll 

Staff Photographers: 
Brian Brundrett 
Mark Carroll 
Ray Coburn 
Jerry D'Anello 
Maurene Golden 
Glenn Jameson 
Steven Nugent 
Dan Rackliffe 
Elizabeth Rogers 
Robin Shetler 
Neil Simoni 

Mike Donovan 



University Photo 
Center 

G. Fox Portrait Studio 



Floral Design 
Horses 
Dean & lona 
Greenhouse 
Mums 
Corn 

Tree Climber 
Garden Scene 
Garden Scene 
Cows Grazing 
Cows Eating 
Drill Team 
Pasture Scene 
LAT Labs 
Flori Labs 
Golf Course 
Golf Green 



Black & White 
Film Developing 
and Processing 
Black & White 
Film Developing 
and Processing 
Senior & Faculty 
Portraits 



ARTWORK 

Diana Brown Pen & Ink Sketches of 
Majors 

LAYOUT 

Amy Campbell 
Paul Donnelly 
Glenn Jameson 
Robin Shetler 
Brian Smith 

COPY 

Dawn Proctor 
Trudy Scheinost 



p. 11 
p. 13 
p. 6-7 
p. 10 
p. 12 

13 

12 

10 

13 

8-9 
p. 10 
p. 11 
p. 12 
p. 78-83 
p. 70 
p. 11 
p. 12 




Rita, Elizabeth, Karen - Stocltbridge School Office 




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yNJV. OF MASS. 
ARCHIVES. 

AUG 1 7 1981 




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