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STOSAG 



NEW HORIZONS 
IN AGRICULTURE 




STOCKBRIDGE 
SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



UNIVERSITY 

OF 

MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST 



10 

DIRECTORS 
MESSAGES 

12'' 
DEDICATION 






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When we first came to Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture we became aware of certain challenges that 
were ahead of us ... 







Emotional mental and even physical i 
rank amoung the Stockbridge alumni 



There's something special about the Stockbridge 
student: We know our goals; we use our potential; and 
we fulfill our dreams, not only to improve ourselves 
but to improve the industry of Agriculture as well. 








Each year the Stockbridge events 
get bigger and better because there 
is a positive input from everyone. 
This is what nnakes Stockbridge and 
its students so unique. We have used 
our resources to the fullest and have 
developed New Horizons in Agricul- 
ture. 



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It is the hope of the STOSAG staff that this yearbook will 
help us to recall the memories of both the hard work and 
the pleasures that we have all shared at The Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. 






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In the years to come as we accomplish our challenges and achieve our personal horizons we 
will never forget the time we have spent at the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 
Michael Davis 




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DIRECTORS 
MESSAGES 





Up to the present most of you 
have lived in a small, protected 
world. What exiting, but perhaps a 
littje terrifying, new lives now 
await this graduating Class of 
1979? Will you expand your world 
emotionally, mentally and yes, 
geographically or will you remain 
comfortable in your little cocoon? 
I don't know. It's all up to you! 

For some, the security of the 
familiar is a necessity. For the 
more courageous (and I hope ail 
of you are), wondrous and un- 
known adventures lie before you. 

Will you be the one to further 
expand the horizons of agricul- 
ture? Will you seek your new life 
far from home? Will you attempt 
a job that challenges every bit of 
your newly acquired expertise? 
Will you continue to learn and im- 
prove your skills? Will you 
thoughtfully seek the new, with- 
out sacrificing the solid precepts 
of the proven old? Will you accept 
the duties and responsibilities of" 
maturity? Will you bravely speak 
out against injustice? I hope so, 
for my future lies in your future. 
Make it a good one! 

lona Mae Reynolds 



Associate Director 






10 




Mr. Editor, my crystal ball has 
been on the fritz lately, but seeing 
this for the class of '79, I will ven- 
ture an educated guess as to 
some of the "new horizons ahead 
in agriculture". As I read about 
and discuss the future with you 
students, our faculty, our agribu- 
siness people and consumers, I 
continue to marvel at the com- 
plexities of agriculture. Please re- 
member as you read this that ho- 
rizons change quickly when the 
viewer is moving ahead! 

It is a little difficult for me to 
predict the many changes that 
surely will occur in the future for 
you grads in the horticultural 
fields. Much will depend on the 
energy and economic situations 
in this country. I do believe that 
people will more and more need 
the beauty, the tranquility and 
utility that is provided by grass, 
plants, shurbs, and trees. 

In the food production fields of 
agriculture, the 'new horizon' 
seems a bit clearer, for I under- 
stand it a little better! The bulk of 
our food products will be pro- 
duced by large, highly technical 
farms, using as many of the man- 
agement and marketing tools 
(business techinques) as are pos- 
sible and profitable, there will be 
an increase in the number of part- 
time and/or small producers who 
will find the best and most effi- 



cient system to service very se- 
lect markets. Society, in general, 
will become more and more cog- 
nizant of agriculture and prehaps 
one day reach a point where food 
producers, food processors and 
consumers will work together to 
reach certain goals such as pro- 
ducts for proper diets and ade- 
quate supplies at fair prices. 

I believe that each of you desir- 
ing to find a challenging and satis- 
fying in the agriculture field will 
find these opportunities just this 
side of or just over the "new hori- 
zon" presents to you. I wish each 
of you the best of luck, for the 
future is in your hands. 




11 







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Year Book Dedication 
We the class of 1979 would like to dedicate our yearbook STOSAG to 
->-• the faculty of the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 
'7 Throughout the two years we have spent here at Stockbridge we have 
- had the opportunity to relate with the faculty on a personal basis. Faculty 
'_ • members share our different work experiences in our agriculture fields, 
give pointers and suggestions to improve our future plans. 
■ - The faculty has always helped and supported many activities. Faculty 
members were most helpful in the planning of the first annual Profession- 
.' '_^ al Development Day. They support the Student Senate, act as Club 
Advisors, help students select classes and of course, always support our 
' Annual Parties. 

* Here at Stockbridge we have always noticed the different kind of 
' education we receive. The difference that comes from the dedication and 
'^ never ending support of our professors. For this we thank them and 
• * dedicate our yearbook to them. 
st The class of 1979 






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RECTED STOCkb Rl l>r; K HALL 



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Away from you we go 

to some place foreign to us,. 

We leave to learn to seek and 

to find what we will. 

We leave the memories to live on, 

till we find our place in the puzzle 

of life, and we will. 




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STUDENT life] 



15 




I Good by to yesterday, you wake up and time has slipped away 




17 



Suddenly it's hard to find tine memories you left behind . . . 





The laughter and the tears 



The shadows of misty yester-years 





The good times and the bad you have 
seen and all the others in between . . . 



Here comes the setting sun 




Gather moments while you may, collect the dreams you dream today 
Remember, will you remember the times of your life? 




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sports] 



TEAMS 



SOCCER 
Storm Carlson 
Herman Eichstaedt 

M.V.P. 
Tim Byrne 
Michael Dyer 
Joinn Gravina 
William Kirby 
P. Margson 
Jeff Otis 
Brian Sumner 
Brent Breidenstein 
James McDonogha 
Fred Churchill 
Ray Coburn 
Lindsay McMurtry 
Anthony Reelick 



BASKETBALL 
B. Fleming 
David D'Amours 
Brian O'Shea 
Kevin McShain 
J. Deaphanta 
Lindsay McMurtry 
John Stone M.V.P. 
Patrick Rosseel 













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INTRAMUKALS 



27 




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events] 



31 




The wine and cheese party is 
the first Stockbridge gettogether 
of the year. At the wine and 
cheese party, many old friends 
from the class of '79 reunite and 
discuss their summer work pro- 
jects and last year's good times. 
This is the first chance of the year 
for the freshman class to get to- 
gether out of classes and many 
new friendships are kindled. 
There was plenty of wine, cheese 
and beer for everyone. The wine 
and cheese party always offers a 
good time and signals the begin- 
ning of other good times to come 
during the Stockbridge social 
year. 

Paul Donnelly 




Mad Bomber 






32 



Radar "Roll Your Own" 



Fall Picnic 




Friday afternoon, a couple of 
weeks into the fall semester, 
Stockies had only one thing on 
their minds: Having a good time. 
Why? Because that Friday after- 
noon was the Stockbridge annual 
Fall Picnic. 

The Fall Picnic gathering at Far- 
ley Lodge brought Stockies to- 
gether once again. Plenty of beer 
and food, along with volleyball, 
frisbee, and even tug of war put 
smiles on many faces, smiles that 
will never be forgotten. 

We all thank STOSO and all who 
helped in making this get together 
possible, for it was a picnic we all 
remember. 

Tom Marshall 



Drink, Drink, Drink! 





"Take My Picture, Take My PICTURE" 




Don't Bogart That 



Hundreds Herds To Hamburgers And Hotdogs 



33 




You Don't Say! 





Farley Lodge 






Favorite PastTime, Vicky? 




35 




Typical Judy. 






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Chow Down! 



"Gee Your Hair Smells Terriffic' 



36 




Halloween Party) 



The Halloween party was he! 
in the Campus Center Audito 
hum. The majority of students 
who attended wore various cos- 
tumes depicting nearly every- 
thing from old fashion farmers to 
a box of Crayola Crayons, just to 
name a few 

There was a costume contest 
judged by the faculty who attend- 
ed. The catagories included: Most 
original, ugliest, scariest, most 
unrecognizable, best couple, best 
group, and the cutest. In fact, the 
costumes were so good, there 
were ties in some catagories. 

The. auditorium was decorated 
with pumpkins, cornstalks, and 
black and orange crepe paper, all 
of which added to the Halloween 
atmosphere. 

A band was featured and the 
dance floor was filled with a vari- 
ety of charactors, all doing the 
same thing having a good time. 

Kathy Barry 



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Wish I Had A Watermellon. 




"Nice Legs!" 



Stockbrldge Spirit 



37 




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Aunt Jemina 






Hoe Down 



A-Yuh, your from Maine 



38 



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Mother Mc Murtry & Baby Hewie 



I'd rather fight than switch 





Raggetty Ann, Herbies pick up 



39 



Professional 
Develof}ment Day 



7 



Sooner or later it had to happen 
and when the 1977 freshmen 
class arrived (this years seniors) 
it did. What I am referring to is the 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture 
Annual Professional Development 
Day (P.D.D.). The very first one 
was held February 21, 1978 and 
the second was held October 24, 
1978. 

Initiated and developed by our 
class president, Peter Quinlan. 
The P.D.D. gives anyone in Stock- 
bridge the chance to get involved 
in a really big event. Student dis- 
plays are designed and built by 
members of the clubs represent- 
ing Arboriculture and Park Man- 
agement, Landscape Operations, 
Floriculture, Animal Science, La- 
bortory Animal Tech, Turf Man- 
agement, Fruit and Vegetable 
Crops, and AG Business Manage- 
ment. The displays were judged 
by members of the faculty with 
first prize awarded to the Land- 
scape Operations Club, second to 
the Arbor and Park Club and third 
prize to the Floriculture Club. The 
Fruit and Veg club won an award 
for having the display that was 
most educational minded. 

In addition to student displays, 
the October 1978 P.D.D. offered 

large inside-outside industrial 



show along with 2 speakers each 
hour of the day, speaking on very 
relevant agriculture/horticulture 
topics. In addition to the 
scheduled hourly speakers, a 
guest speaker is invited each year 
to speak on the topic of his/her 
choice. This year the guest speak- 
er was Harold Newton, president 
of the Massachusetts Farm Bu- 
reau, speaking on, "The Future of 
Agriculture in Massachusetts and 
how to get started in it." 

The Stockbridge P.D.D. is still in 
beginning stages, but between 
the first and second P.D.D. there 
was a large jump in attendence. 
The second annual P.D.D. drew a 
registered crowd of over 950 stu- 
dents and faculty. Who's to say 
where this yearly rise in atten- 
dence will end? The P.D.D. could 
turn into a monster of an event of 
which the U of Mass. campus has 
not seen in many years. 

The 1979 P.D.D. is already in 
the planning stage. It will be up to 
this years seniors and the many 
graduating seniors to come, to 
make it back to U of Mass. and 
support this interesting and very 
much growing event. 

James Valentini 




40 



The Landscape Crew. 








41 




John Who? 







I'm Bullshit! 







Who Farted? 




Take Me To Your Leader 




Alumni 
Phonathon 




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The Stockbridge Alumni Associ- 
ation thanks you for your fourth 
year of participation in our fund 
raising Phonothon. 

Almost all of the money needed 
for the annual operation of the 
association are donated as a re- 
sult of calls made at the Phon- 
othon. These four evenings of 
telephoning are a personal con- 
tact for alumni with the School 
and they enjoy the opportunity to 
say a few words and to hear of the 
School first hand. Most of these 
alumni pledged a gift. $9,090.00 
was the total pledged. This was 
our most successful Phonothon, 
topping the $8,500 of November 
1974. 

The 8 sorority Sisters of Sigma 
Sigma Alpha did a commendable 
job during their "Hell Week" for 
the freshmen. 

This is the second year that 
ATG & SSA have finished first and 
second. Everyone enjoyed speak- 
ing with alumni, eating sand- 



wiches, drinking LITE, and asking^ 
for donations. These Stockbridge 
students donated their time and 
the Stockbridge alumni donated 
their money. This is a wonderful 
relationship that hopefully will 
continue for many years. You too 
may be pleased to hear from a 
future Stockbridge Alumni Associ- 
ation. 

All alumni receive our Fall & 
Spring issues of the Alumni News 
and most of the dollars raised pay 
for these publications. If there 
were more dollars raised, the as- 
sociation could do more such as 
helping each other with informa- 
tion on jobs and providing stu- 
dents with placement training op- 
portunities. 



Sincerely, 

Stockbridge Phonothon Commit- 
tee 



44 






Party 



This year brought about a little 
extra treat for Stockbridge stu- 
dents: A party held at Grinnel Are- 
na to break up the long stretch 
between the Halloween Party and 
the Holly Jolly. 

The party was sponsored by the 
Student Senate, but special 
thanks goes to Mike Bastein who 
suggested the idea and worked 
hard to make this special party 
enjoyable for all. 

Tom Marshall. 





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45 







My Only Friend. 



Oh, You Always Get A Headache. 



46 






The Animals 







I Feel Fine. 



When it's Time To Relax, '■Buchl' 



47 



Holly Jolly 




One of the big festivities of the school year 
is the Holly Jolly. This semiformal event 
gathers all from every major to celebrate 
the holiday season and the coming newyear. 

The evening was complete, w/ith a gener- 
ous buffet dinner, and music brought to us 
by the group "FESTIVAL". Everyone had a 
great time dancing and talking. This is the 
last event of the fall semester, where friends 
reminisce about the good times before finals 
and the oncoming intercession. 

Brian L. Brudrett 



Time for friends 
Time for cheer. 
Time for food, 
and lots of beer! 

Time for presents, 
Time for lights. 
Time for snow, 
and those cozy nights! 

Time for music, 



Time for dance. 

Time for giving 

and a little romance! 







51 



PROGRESS 
BANQUET 

7 ^ 



The twenty fifth annual Spring Progress Banquet 
was held in the student union ballroom on March 8, 
1979. The night was complete with awards, a won- 
derful dinner, and dancing. The awards were started 
with athletics, as coach Tony Williams recognized 
the players and M.V.P.s in soccer and basketball. 
The highlights of the awards banquet were the out- 
standing professor, STOSO member, and senator 
awards. The program was wrapped up with PPD 
awards, presented by PPD chairman Peter Quinlan, 
and the service award grants, presented by Douglas 
Airhart, the senate advisor. 




52 




Are you really 18? 

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54 



Hard stuff 




SERVICE AWARD GRANTS 

Kathleen M. Barry 
Michael P. Bastlen 
Brian L. Brundrett 
Richard C. Clarcla 
Victoria L. Clarcla 
Raymond E. Coburn 
Kevin F. Connolly 
Paul C. Donnelly 
Kenneth I. HIslop 
Beth Ann Jacobs 
Lindsay J. McMurtry 



Linda M. Miczek 
James B. Praplaski 
Peter F. Quinlan 
Lee A. RadwIII 
Kenneth E. Rich 
Judith L. Rousseau 
Richard A. Simmons 
Susan M. Stewart 
Steven E. Stinson 
Fredrerick M. Thompson 
James M. Valentin! 
Deborah J. Vondal 






55 



SKI 
TRIP 




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LIVESTOCK 
CLASSIC 





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CROFUT 
CONCERT 




"A Stockbridge Evening With Bill Crofut" 
was sponsored by the stockbridge student 
senate. This benefit concert raised funds 
for needed laboratory equipment and fa- 
cilities essential to maintain our schools 
record for technical and practical training. 
Also, it helped to focus attention on issues 
that face the stockbridge school, which 
are of great concern to all the students. 
Issues like the condemning and closing of 
half the fren'ch hall greenhouses, and the 
lack of lab equipment in many majors. 

Cochairpersons, Lee Radwill and Fred 
Tompson deserve nearly all the credit for 
this successful event. They came up with 
the idea and did most of the planning. 
They sold tickets, and followed through on 
everything including a punch reception at 
the campus center. 






61 



SPRING PICNIC 




62 











63 




ORGANIZATION 



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SENATE 




(Back Row): Tom Rullo, Douglas Airhart, Paul Donnelly, Cheryl Marcotte, Judy Roussaeu, Brenda Silcott, Fred Churchill, Mike Wjrtes, Tom 
Marshall. (Middle Row:) James Vallentini, Peter Quinlan, Robert Stanley, Brian Brundrett, Lori Miller, William Mclntyre, Richard Simmons, Barry 
Mackin, Kathy Barry, Ray Coburn, Lee Radwill, Cathy McDonnell, Linda Miczek. (Front Row:) Deloris Bowman, Fred Thompson, Rich Ciarcia, 
Beth-Ann Jacobs, Lindsay McMurtry, Sally Jablonski. (Not Pictured) Michael Bastien. Robert Nault, Michael Sahagian. 



66 





Pres. Lindsay McMurtry 
Sec. Beth-Ann Jacobs 
Tres. Fred Thompson 
Pari. Brian Brundrett 




SENATE COMMITTEES 
Educational Qualities co-chairman: Michael Bastien, 
Brian Brudrett 

Educational Policies chairman: Peter Quinlan 
Finance and Budget chairman: Fred Thompson 
Professional Developement Day chairman: Peter 
Quinlan, seminar chairman: Fred Thompson, exhibi- 
tors chairman: John Przybyszewski 
STOSO chairperson: Kathy Barry 
Ways and Means chairman: Richard Simmons 



68 



SENIOR CLASS 




CLASS OFFICERS 

Pres. Peter Quinlan 

V. Pres. Ray Coburn 

Tres. June Delehanty 

Sec. Peter Hasak 

Senator at large Cheryl Marcotte 



SHORTHORN 






Editor Beth-Ann Jacobs 
Assistant Editor Lee Radwill 
Reporters Gary Taub 

Robert Nault 



69 



STOSAG 




Editor Paul Donnelly 
Photo Editor Jerry D'Anello 
Section Editors: Sue Stewart 
Shelly Antes 
Lynn-Ann Smith 
Brian Brundrett 
Photographers: Ray Coburn 
Mike Wirtes 
Dan Rackliffe 
Andy Martin 
Copy Editor Tom Marshall 
Art Work Linda Micezk 



70 












71 



ALPHA TAU GAMMA 




pres. Lindsay McMurty, v.p. Herd Pollarb, tres. Edwin Babbit, sec. Fred Churchill, stew. Dave Hanson, 

Brothers: Alan Blanchette, Steve Burns. Steve Chaffee, Ray Coburn, Bill Cox, Paul Crane, Jerry D'Anello, Paul DeMatteo, Neil Flavin, Roge 
Gauthier, Tim Gearin, Chris Gormley, Steve Grafton, John Gravina, Jay Ippolito, Wayne Lacroix, Jim Latour, Paul McKenna, Ron Monroe, Marl 
Morgera,' Jim O'Kelly, Jeff Otis, Jeff Skillin, Bob Stanley, Brian Sumner, Craig Von Kohorn, Mike Wirtes, Jim Wood (house chef) 

Honorary Member: Karen McCarthy 




Alpha Tau Gamma 

We the Members of Alpha Tau Gamma band 

together as Brothers for the purpose of promoting the 

principles and ideals of the Stockbridge School of 

Agriculture, of promoting unity, responsibility, and the 

ideals of Brotherhood within the organization. We are 

proud of our Alpha Tau Gamma tradition and are 

always happy to be visited by our alumni. Our close 

bonds don't end at graduation because A.T.G. is a true 

Brotherhood for life. Our doors are always open and 

we welcome guests to visit us. 

Jerry L. D'Anello 




72 









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AN SCI. CLUB 




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ARBOR PARK CLUB 








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FLORI CLUB 





FRUIT AND VEG CLUB 





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TURF CLUB 




LAND OP CLUB 





FACULTY 



83 





Douglas L. Airhart 



James F. Anderson 




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Anthony Borton 






William J. Bramlage 






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Wallace G. Black 




Joe T. Clayton 






John W. Denison 





Alfred W. Boicourt 




Byron E. Colby 



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Helnrich Fenner 




James W. Callahan 




Marron DuBois 




John H. Foster 





Lyie E. Craker 




Robert T. Duby 




George B. Goddard 







Duane W. Greene 



Robert M. Grover 





Tom S. Hamilton 



William K. Harris 



Francis W. Holmes 



85 





Thomas F. Houston 



Ward M. Hunting 






William J. Manning 



James B. Marcum 




Kirk A. Hurto 




Curtis A. Johnson 




Sidney J. Lyford 





Paul H. Jennings 




Ernest A. Johnson 




Bruce MacDougall 




Donald R. Marion 



\86 




Gordon S. King 




David Mackenzie 




Harold E. Mosher 




Edward S. PIra 




Deane Lee 








Paul N. Procopio 



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Theodore W. Leed 



William J. Lord 





lona Reynolds 



Richard A. Rhode 



87 



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William A. Rosenau 




Herbert G. Spindler 






Edward Tobin 



Joseph Troll 





Robert W. Walker 






Franklin W. Southwick 



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Jonas Vengrls 



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Lester F. Whitney 



John M. Zak 




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MAJORS 



89 



AD BUSINESS 









90 




BRIAN BRUNDRETT 

Brian roughed it this summer; 
he was living in a little cabin at 
Camp Middlesex in Ashby, Mass . . 
He lived and worked at the camp 
with young people from cities. Bri- 
an was in charge of the barn yard 
program. He had to care for the 
animals and keep the place in top 
condition. Daily classes were also 
a part of Brians day, he would in- 
struct the kids on the care and 
maintenance of small animals Bri- 
an was also responsible for the 
"campers" he lived with. 

Brian enjoyed camp-fires, and 
many sing-a-longs. He also com- 
peted in the Ashby town fair, 
where he and the campers placed 
high in all events 

When I asked Brian what he did 
if one of the little ones misbe- 
haved he said "I sent them out to 
the barnyard and made them pick 
it up with a spoon." 

Brian plans on continuing his 
education at the university of 
Mass., majoring in Agricultural 
Education. 

The yearbook committee decid- 
ed to congratulate fellow students 
who have had outstanding sum- 
mer placements. Through out the 
"Majors" section there are stories 
about one student from each ma- 
jor, telling what they did over the 
summer of "78". These students 
were selected upon recommenda- 
tion of the advisors in the majors. 




BRIAN BRUNDRETT 
yearbook . . . accounting club 
... ag. bus. rep. . . . flori. club 



LIDSAY McMURTRY 



DOUG ROBERTS 




Not Pictured 

Harley Phelps 
Craig Vonkohorn 



MARK SIMONICH 



PHILIP STEVENS 
accounting club . . . hiking . . . 
canoeing . . . soapstone mt. 
C.S. . . . fossil spindler . . . zoo 9 
days a week partying . . . 



91 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 






92 




BERNIE BURKE 

Bernie is the fifth child of a large 
family of 7, which resides in Need- 
ham, Mass. 

Bernie spent his placement train- 
ing in Harwick, Mass., just east of 
the quabbin at Double R Acers. Dou- 
ble R Acers is a dairy farm of hol- 
stiens it averages about 70 milkers. 

Bernle's day started bright and 
early at 5 a.m. He began by herding 
the cows in from the pasture and 
then started the task of milking by 
machine. After milking, the cows re- 
turned out to pasture. Bernie, then 
had to wash all milking equipment by 
hand. After a lunchbreak, Bernie 
would spend most of the afternoon 
baling and stacking hay. He also 
spent time repairing broken-down 
equipment and fences. Before work 
ended for the day, Bernie would milk 
again and let the cows out to pas- 
ture. 

Bernie competed in the harwick 
fair, where he placed first for the 
best bale of hay. The hay was judged 
on color, age of cut, and how dry the 
hay was. 

Upon graduation from Stock- 
bridge Bernie plans to return back to 
Double R Acers, and eventually get a 
few cows to someday start his own 
farm in Vermont. 



''^- 


BiSteJ^'^ 


P^'^M r^ vl^T^^dBS^y* 




^^I^Ks. 1 




^9lv 


i^Mm 




,M 


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f. 


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MICHAEL P. BASTIEN 



BERNARD BURKE 



RICHARD CIARCIA 
an.sci.rep .... 





RAYMOND E. COBURN 
ATG ... 



AMY CURRAN 



JOHN DEVINE 
an.sci. club . . . 



94 




HOWARD DURLING 



JOEL DWIGHT 
an. sci. club 



DAVID HANSON 
ATG ... an. sci. club 




KEN HISLOP 



NANCY LAWSON 
intrannurals . . . an. sci. club 
chairman, livestock classic PDD 
committies 



CHERYL MARCOTTE 
an. sci. club . . . senator at large 



95 




ELLEN O'CONNOR . 

an.sci. club . . . livestock-classic 
. . . work weekend . . . 



BRUCE POLLARD 
an.sci. club . . . 




HERBERT L. POLLARD JR. 




RONALD L. REECE 
alpha delta phi ... crew team 
an.sci. club . . . 



RICHARD A. SIMMONS 
an.sci club . . . club rep. live- 
stock classic . . . chairman 
ways and means comm .... 




f 







ROBERT STUDLEY 



% 




HENRY WHITLOCK 



s 





Not Picture 

Paul Champigny 

David Stevens 

Ellen White 




97 



mOS AND PARE 





98 





JEFF DANA 

Jeff Dana has been involved with the Stock- 
bridge School of Ag. for quite a while. He original- 
ly came to Stockbridge and majored in animal 
science. He graduated and stayed in the Amherst 
area, working for Asplin Tree Co., to pay bills. Jeff 
realized he liked tree climbing and he became 
very proficient at it. He wanted to learn more 
about arborculture and so he decided to go back 
to Stockbridge and major in arbor-park. 

Jeff's summer placement was with Shumway 
and Sons Landscape Co. He worked there as a 
tree climber doing "take downs' and pruning 
trees. Jeff also worked as a foreman from time to 
time. Jeff admits he really didn't learn anything 
new from this job (he had climbed and was a 
foreman at Asplin) but it was a good experience, 
"It would be excellent for someone who hasn't 
climbed." says Jeff. 

Jeff is married and has three girls, the youn- 
gest born in February '79. This has made school 
tuff and kept Jeff very busy. Professor King has 
helped Jeff a lot by telling him when people call 
with tree work. But Jeff would like to see some 
special loans or scholarships for married cou- 
ples. 

Jeff is looking forward to a job as climber/ar- 
borist in the town of Barnstable on Cape Cod, 
and maybe someday to have his own tree service 

CO. 





JEFFERY BURNS 



TOM CARDOZA 



fv^ 



JEFFREY CHAPMAN 






KEVIN CONNOLLY 
P.D.D. comm. intramurals 
work weekend . . . 



PAUL CRANE 
ATG 



JEFF D'AMICO 
intramurals . . . 



100 




JEFFREY J. DECKEL 



EDWARD DOMASINSKY 



DOUGLAS E. DONDERO 




DAVID FISKE 



JAMES GARLO 



BRIAN M. GILBERT 



101 




WILLIAM F. KELLICKER 



PAUL LEWIS 



LORRI MILLER 
senator . . . STOSO 




DAVE MONTIGNY 



ALLAN MORRIS 



STEPHEN NAGY 
phi mu delta . . . 



102 




MATTHEW J. PALMER 




STEVE PERRY 
arbor.park.club treasurer 



JOHN PIERSON 
arbor. park club . . . mass.tree 
wardens and foresters associ- 
ation . . . 




DONNA RIZZOLO 



WALTER SADOWSKI 




JOSEPH W. SHANNON 



103 




THOMAS SYLVIA 



DANIEL L TOBIN 



FRANCIS VERCHOT 
Intramurals . . . 




JAMES WELENE 



Richard Briggs 
Mark Buttner 
Storm Carlson 
Edward Casey 
Bruce Colburn 
Charles Collins 
Jeffrey Dana 
Brian Dudley 
Patrick R. Ellis 
Peter Hart 
David Hawkins^ 
Marjorie Lewis'^ 
Robert Little 
Mary Mattocks 
Brian McSweeney 
Michael Moriarty 
Gregory St. Cyr 
Peter Simpson 
Alan Stoppel 
Daniel VanStarrenburg 
Peter Whyte 
John Young 



104 



FLOBICDLTITRE 










Floriculture is a field that covers a vari- 
ety of interests. Some of us will continue 
on to UMass or another school. Others 
w/ill enter the commercial field through 
greenhouses as wholesale or retail grow- 
ers. Some will go into floral design. What- 
ever aspect of floriculture we choose we 
will always carry with us memories of our 
two years at Stockbridge. 

Summer orientation . . . Ruth Gunn's 
Place . . . Durfee Conservatory . . . tree 
hikes . . . soaring designs . . . economics 
— no free lunch . . . the "pit" . . . Profes- 
sional Development Day displays . . . let- 
ters to the editor . . . poinsettias . . . club 
meetings . . . Business Management roll 
call . . . pumpkin sales . . . petitions . . . 
French Hall . . . final exams . . . and final- 
ly, GRADUATION. 



105 








CHRISTIAN (SEAFER) MERRILL 

Chris is the middle child of a family of 
six, he resides in Brookline, Mass. 

In March of 78, Chris traveled to Oak- 
del, Florida to start his Summer Place- 
ment Training. He was hired as a full 
time employee of Oakdel Inc., the larg- 
est growers of foliage plants. 

The greenhouse range consists of 12 
acres under glass. It employs many ex- 
perienced people in the floriculture in- 
dustry. The average temperature on a 
working day was between 85 - 95 de- 
grees, even though it was not typical 
New England weather, Chris enjoyed 
the heat. 

At work he was part of a Student pro- 
gram, which enabled him to view the 
different aspects of growing foliage 
plants. He spent 1-2 weeks in areas 
such as the tissue culture lab, produc- 
tion, and stockbed replacement. Chris 
also had an opportunity to view and 
operate modern equipment such as 
overhead monorail system and the 
computer which was in charge of the 
watering. 

While in Florida, Chris' summer was 
highlighted by trips to Daytona Beach, 
Disney World, and Cypress Gardens. 

Upon graduation from Stockbridge, 
Chris plans on 2 more years of college, 
with future plans of a wholesale grower. 





BOB BARKEVICH 



JOHN GATE 
flori. club 



FRED CHURCHILL 
ATG . . . soccer team . . 





ANDREW COWLES 



DOMINIC GALLUCIO 
flori. club . . . 



JAY C. GEDENBURG 



107 




CYNTHIA GRAY 



THOMAS W. MARSHALL 



PATRICIA MAYOTTE 




CATHERINE McDONNELL THOMAS McGARR 

shorthorn . . . fiori. club . . . florl. club . . . F.F.A. 

STOSO . . . FDD. committees book . . . 



CHISTIAN MERRILL 
year- florl. club . . . 




LINDA MICZEK 
flori. club treasurer . . . flori. 
rep. . . . P.D.D. committee . . . 
STOSO . . . land. op. club . . . 






ANTHONY REELICK 




JUDITH L ROUSSEAU 
flori. club sec, pres. 



1 




^ "v. 




V 


"^ 




\ 


DEBRA J. 


RYAN 




KAREN SPARKO 
ski club . . . intermurals 



SUSAN STEWART 
flori. rep. . . . yearbook 
flori. club . . . F.F.A. . . . 



109 




WILLIAM J. TOPHAM 



DEBORAH VONDAL 
flori. club . . . STOSO 



MARY JANE ZULLO 





110 





Not Pictured 
Thomas Mellish 
David Pirog 
Nina Thomashow 
Robert Trinque 











FBVIT AND VE6 





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E^S 





The "Fruit and Veggie" pro- 
gram offers to any student the 
opportunity to acquire skills that 
will enable him to grow his own 
crop, whether it is growing com- 
mercially or a small back yard 
garden. With a few fruit trees you 
can be sure that fresh pro duce 
will be on hand. 

Over the past two years we 
have all grown immensely and 
learned that much more. Our ac- 
tivities varied from pruning trees 
on a winter day, or visiting many 
orchards through out the state, 
to buying a keg, relaxing and en- 
joying each others company. The 
time spent together allowed us to 
make our bonds so much stron- 
ger. We will be leaving Stock- 
bridge with many ideas and prac- 
tices we have learned but also 
good friends and many memo- 
ries. Good Luck to ail. 
Sharon O'Donnell 



112 





RICHARD BRZOZOWSKI 



VICTORIA CIARCIA 
fruit & veg. club treasure 



ROY COTTULI 





BRENDA DAMERY 



PATRICIA HOPE 



«/V 



THOMAS LUIPPOLD 



114 




ERIN MORIARTY 
fruit & veg. club . . . 



ROBERT NAULT 



SHARON O'DONNELL 




BRECK PARKER 



RONALD SENEGAL 



¥4 
m 




lis 




VICTORIA CIARCIA 

Vicky Ciarcia stayed close to 
U Mass. for her summer place- 
ment. She was working with the 
Entemology Department as a 
pathology scout. Vicky worked 
with professors and fellow stu- 
dents on a project that sur- 
veyed the insect problems in 
the orchards of western Mass. 

Vicky is originally from Kent, 
Ohio, where she lived with her 
mom, dad, brother, and two 
sisters. After traveling around a 
bit, Vicky met Rich, who is now 
her husband and also a Stock- 
bridge student. 

Vicky hasn't always been in- 
terested in entomology, she 
was into accounting for along 
time. But she decided to go to 
Stockbridge, majoring in Fruit & 
Veg, with Rich, who was major- 
ing in animal science. Vicky has 
definitly excelled in her major 
she has made lears list and was 
highly recommended for having 
an excellent summer place- 
ment. 



Vicky was part of a team that 
worked very closely with man- 
agers of twenty area orchards 
to test Intergrated Pest Man- 
agement programs. The team 
placed their insect traps in the 
various orchards and then kept 
close watch, by counts, over 
the insect populations. The job 
also involved counting aphids 
on terminal shoots, so Vicky 
climbed many apple trees this 
summer. 

Vicky is very interested in In- 
tergrated Pest Management, 
and feels that the research that 
she was doing will help the 
growers to understnd insect 
populations and to spray only 
when there is a need to. 

Vicky especially enjoyed talk- 
ing with, and finding out about 
the problems of the orchardist. 
Vicky thinks that her exper- 
iences with the new program 
were very good and she highly 
recommends it for any Fruit & 
Veg major. 




Not Pictured 

Mark Jackson 

Kurt Kefferstan 

Dwight Miller 

Teodoro Picado 

Edward Richard 

Patrick Rosseel 

Stephen Sodekson 

Paul Zielonka 



116 




LAT 










-^■■ 



■■:^'?5^ 



' ^tf^if- v*^i:;-"' Vll*<<*v 



The Laboratory Animal Tech- 
nology program is designed to 
provide practical experience in 
small animal care. The curriculum 
covers the breeding management 
and lab techniques for these ani- 
mals. Graduates will be prepared 
for a variety of fields including, 
technicians in research labs drugs 
and veternarian assistants. 

On The Lighter Side 
Remember: 

LAT Club Meetings and 

Munchies . . . 
Paige 101 and Labs . . . 

Teeth Marks? . . . 
Farley Lodge Parties . . . 
Sister Kathy and Sister 

Ruth ... 
The Lone Male . . . 
Good Luck To You All! 



117 







Not Pictured 
Kathy Garber . 
Marie Kuchyt I 
Mary Russell '" 
Lynn Yanarella 



118 




[ '^\ *■ 




BETH-ANN JACOBS 

Beth Jacobs is from Middletown, 
Conn., where she has lived most of her 
life. Her family includes four girls, she's 
the oldest, and her parents. They train 
Field Trial and hunting dogs, which in- 
fluenced Beth's decision to go into ani- 
mal related fields. Says Beth, "My 
original goal after completeing the 
L.A.T. program was to work for a veter- 
inarian." 

Through out the summer break Beth 
was on placement. This gave her the 
opportunity to see two different as- 
pects of the L.A.T. major. "While work- 
ing at a veterinarian's I learned many 
skills that helped me in my senior year 
classes". Beth's other job was at Wes- 
lyan University, working as a laborato- 
ry assistant. There she helped with a 
research project in the psychology de- 
partment. "Over all the summer place- 
ment was a helpful learning exper- 
ience." 

"By the end of my senior year, my 
goals had changed." Beth is presently 
employed in the microbiology depart- 
ment at U MASS where she runs the 
animal rooms. She is also taking busi- 
ness courses and intends to get a de- 
gree in business. 




KATHLEEN BARRY 
STOSO chairperson 
rep. . . . 



LYNETTE BELLEMARE 
LAT. L.A.T. club . . . 



SHEILA DeVAUGHAN 
L.A.T. club . . . 




SUSAN FINERMAN 
L.A.T. club . . . intramurals 
A.E.C. ... 



JUDY GURNEY 
SSA ... L.A.T. club 
committee . . . 



P.P.D. 



CYNTHIA JABLONSKI 
SSA . . . 



119 





««v.>"' 



BETH-ANN JACOBS 


LYNN LEWANDOWSKI 


DAWN MacMILLAN 


senate exec. sec. . . . shorthorn 


LA.. CLUB . . . 


L.A.T. club pres. 


editor . . . L.A.T. club, rep . . . 






STOSO . . . 









LESLIE MATH'E 



JEANNE McDERMOTT 



DEBORAH McMENEMY 



120 




JEAN ONOFRIO 
L.A.T. club . . . 



KIMBERLY J. PAVAO 



KATHLEEN PECK 
L.A.T. club . . . SSA treasurer 





MARIA XENIA PERINI 



LEE RADWILL 
SSA pres. . . . L.A.T. club rep. 
. . . shorthorn co-editor intra- 
murals . . . 



RUTH SCHMOLLINGER 



121 



LAND DP 







JERRY D'ANELLO 

Jerry D'Anello comes from Bel- 
mont, Mass . . Over the past sum- 
mer he lived at the ATG fraternity, 
where he is a brother. 

Jerry got up Bright and early ev- 
eryday, had breakfast, and w/ould 
start the five mile bicycle ride to Pel- 
ham. He didn't have to be to work at 
Shumway and Sons until seven 
o'clock but he liked to be there early. 
As he bounced up the long dirt road 
to the farm, sheep scattered and the 
dogs barked and chased him. This 
was the main base, a farm in Pelham. 

When the other members of the 
crew arrived the day would start. 
Jerry already had the assignments 
so they would load the truck with 
tools and be off. Sometimes they 
would be building walls with stone or 
rail road ties, laying sod, or doing 
plantings, but Jerry says that there 
was never a dull moment. 

One time the crew wanted to finish 
a job for the week, so they stayed at 
the site until ten o'clock on a friday 
night to finish. They had to use the 
truck headlights and flashlights to 
see what they were doing. Jerry was 
also involved in one job of clearing 
land. He worked with Jeff Dana an- 
other Stockbridge student in Arbor 
Park. 

Jerry really enjoys the hot sum- 
mer weather. He said that at lunch, 
while the other guys were in the 
shade, he would be in the sun getting 
rays. Another thing that Jerry liked 
about his summer placement was 
the people that he was working for. 
Jerry worked for "Earl the pearl". 
"Earl was a really good guy", says 
Jerry. "He really liked to teach the 
employees, if you made a mistake, 
he would show you what you did 
wrong, you wouldn't get fired!" 

Jerry highly recommends Shum- 
way and Sons as a placement for 
Land Oppers. He says that you learn 
a lot there, about the business and 
the work. 





ELIZABETH ANDRES 



SHELLY ANTES 
SSA . . . yearbook 



SCOTT BAKER 




JIM BENEVIDES 
basketball team . 



WAYNE BERNARDO 



GERALD CANNON 



124 




JAMES COFFEY 
land. op. club . . . PDD commit- 
tee . . . work weekend . . . 
WOOF . . . 



JERRY D'ANELLO 
ATG. pledgemaster, rush chair- 
man yearbook photo edi- 
tor ... land. op. club . . . hang 
gliding club . . . 



GARY DOIG 
land. op. club pres. . . . PDD 
committee . . . 





PAUL C. DONNELLY 
yearbook editor . . . land. op. 
club . . . F.F.A. . . . senator . . . 



HERMAN EICHSTAEDT 



CHARLES J. GAMBALE 



125 





ANDREW R. GIBBONS 



ALEXANDER B. HAMILTON 




CHRIS HARLOW 





NICHOLAS R. JANE 



RON JOHNSON 



JOHN MARSTERS 



126 






WILLIAM J. McNeill 



MARK MORGERA 
ATG ... 



DONALD PERRY 
land. op. club . . . PDD 
committee . . . u.mass. crew 
team . . . 




EDWARD PHELAN 



PETER F. QUINLAN 
class pres. . . . PDD chairman 



MICHAEL SAHAGIAN 
land. op. club . . . senator 



127 




LYNNE-ANN SMITH 
land. op. club . . . yearbook 



STEVEN E. STINSON 



DANIEL F. SULLIVAN 
land. op. club . . . PDD commit- 
tee . . . 




MICHAEL SULLIVAN 



FREDERICK THOMPSON 
senate treasurer . . . land. op. 
club pres. . . . PDD seminar 
chairman . . . 



BROOK TODD 
land. op. club ... PDD COM- 
MITTEE . . . 



128 




^&s^^ 









Not Pictured 
Peter Annulli 
James Caputo 
David Dane 
Steve Grabow/ski 



129 




DAVID HEROIAN 

David Heroian is a Turf IVIange- 
ment Major who resides in Auburn, 
Mass. 

Dave spent Inis summer project 
working liard (?) at the Broadmoor 
Golf Course in Colorado Springs, 
Colorado. He was part of a crew that 
mowed the turf areas of the 3,000 
acre resort. Dave had to be ready for 
work by 6:30 A.M. and work until 
3:30. He learned how to operate 
some very large and potentially dan- 
gerous equipment. He had to be very 
careful and stop mowing when he 
was around people. David sadly re- 
members a fellow worker who died 
from a mishap with a piece of equip- 
ment. 

During the summer many famous 
and rich people stayed at the hotel. 
Dave said he learned alot about deal- 
ing with these people. He remem- 
bers in particular, seeing Gerald Ford 
at one of the many tournaments. 

Dave started out living in a dormi- 
tory arrangement that was on the 
golf course. After three months he 
had saved enough money to buy a 
car, and he got out of the dorm and 
rented an apartment with some of 
the other workers. 

Dave is planning on continuing his 
education and then to work as a golf 
course superintendent. 




BRUCE ADAMS 
instigator of the great food fight 
of '78' 



WILLIAM ARGONISH 
SAE ... 



EDWIN BABBITT 
ATG treasurer . . . turf club 





DONALD CARNEY 



DAVE COPELAND 
turf club . . . interests: mary- 
ellen . . . favorite expression: 
"never can tell" . . . pet gripe: 
home work .... 



DOUGLAS COYLE 



132 



I 




JUNE M. DELEHANTY 
turf club sec. . . . class treasur- 
er .. . 




KEVIN DOWNING 
turf club . . . PDD committee 



ALBERT EIDELMAN 





MICHAEL HARRISON 



CHARLES HARUKEWICZ 
turf club . . . 



PETER A. HASAK 
class secretary . . . turf club 
intramurals . . . 



133 




DAVID MERCIAN 



STEPHEN LYON 



WILLIAM MclNTYRE 
turf club rep. . . . 





KEVIN P. McSHANE 
turf club . . . basketball team 
. . . took the rap for the great 
food fight of "78" . . . 



JOHN J. O'KEEFE 



KEVIN OSGOOD 
turf club . . . 



134 





BRIAN F. O'SHEA 
turf club . . . basketball team 
... food fight of "78" ... 



DEBORAH PIEZ 





''t 



^ 



K 



KEVIN JOHN POWELL 
turf club . . . intramurals 




STANLEY PROVENCHER 



JOHN F. PRZYBYSZEWSKI 
turf club pres. . . . PDD exhibi- 
tors chairman . . . 



KENNETH RICH 
turf club rep. . . . PDD commit- 
tee . . . turf club treasurer . . . 
work weekend . . . 



135 




MICHAEL JOSEPH RYAN 
turf club . . . 



JEFFERY SMITH 
intramurals . . . PDD 



NORMAN TESSIER JR. 
intramurals . . . turf club ... fa- 
vorite expression: pin head . . . 
pet gripe: home work . . . 




JAMES VALENTINI 



Not picture- 
Gregory Aldrich 
Robert Belfield 
Stephen Blended 
Donald Coole 
David D'Amours 
Denis Duquette 
Cornelius Flynn 
Thomas Grimac 
Matthew Jankowski 
Joseph Kennedy 
Clifford Kelly 
Donald King 
James Lapham 
Michael Legere 
Peter Lund 
Timothy Madden 
Lawrence McKeary 
Gary Moulton 
David Parmigiane 
Mark Peabody 
James Praplaski 
Dan Rackliffe 
Curtis Roberts 
Shawn Samuels 
Richard Schock 




^ ^««.«J««=.„-4, 



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GlJADUATIOJVl 



SENIOR BANQUET 





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138 





COMMENCEMENT 



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140 




Class of 1979 

+LEAR - Honorary Scholastic Society 
(Those seniors with 3,40 or higher cumulative averages for three semesters) 




*DEAN'S LIST 
(Those seniors with 3.00-4.00 cumulative averages for any given semester) 



*Gregory T. Aldrich 
**+Elizabeth J. Andres 

*Peter A. Annulli 
**+Robert S. Barkevich 

**Kathleen M. Barry 
*-~-*Robert M. Belfield 
**+Lynette M. Bellemare 

**Wayne E. Bernardo 
**+Stephen Blendell 
**+Richard J. Brzozowski 
*Bernard E. Burke 

**Mark E. Buttner 
***-Storm Carlson 
***Edward P. Casey 
*-+John M. Cate 

*^Jeffrey E. Chapman 
**+Victoria L. Ciarcia 

**Raymond E. Coburn 
*James E. Coffey 

**Charles E. Collins 
*Kevin F. Connolly 
**+Donald W. Coole 
***Roy E. Cottuli 
***Douglas A. Coyle 
***Amy Curran 

*Brenda S . Damery 
***Jeffrey J. D'Amico 

^'Gary L. Doig 
*---+Paul C. Donnelly 
**+Howard J. Durling 
**+Joel V. Dwight 
**+Herman J. Eichstaedt 

**R. Patrick Ellis 
**+Susan R. Finerman 

**Andrew R. Gibbons 

*+Brian M. Gilbert 
**+Thomas I . Grimac 



**+B. Alexander Hamilton 
**+Peter A. Hasak 
**+David A. Heroian 
**+Patricia J. Hopf 
**4Mark G. Jackson 
**+Beth-Ann Jacobs 
**+Nicholas R. Jane 

**MatthewA. Jankowski 
**+Ronald V. Johnson 
***Kurt L. Kefferstan 
**+Joseph D. Kennedy 
***Marie A. Kuchyt 
***James N. Lapham 
***Michael R. Legere 

*Lynn G. Lewandowski 

*Petcr A. Lund 

*Stephen W. Lyon 
**+Ilawn M. MacMillan 
**+Thomas W. Marshall 
**Leslie A. Ma the 
**Mary C. Mattocks 
***Catherine M. McDonnell 
***Thomas S. McGarr 
***William A. Mclntyre 
***Lawrence McKeary 
***Deborah L. McMenemy 

*Lindsay J. McMurtry 
**William J. McNeill 
***Thomas J. Mellish 
**+Christian A. Merrill 
**+Linda M. Miczek 
***Lorri J. Miller 

*Erin E. Moriarty 
***Michael K. Moriarty 
**+Stephen A. Nagy 
**+Ellen J. O'Connor 
**+ShaEon E. O'Donnell 




**+John J. O'Keefe 

***Jean R. Onofrio 
*Brian F. O'Shea 

***Matthew J. Palmer 

***Breck 0. Parker 
**Mark E. Peabody 

**-HCathleen J. Peck 
*Harley P. Phelps 

**+Teodoro Picado 

**+John H. Pierson 

***David M. Pirog 

***Stanley J. Provencher 

*"-^-John F, Przybyszewski 

***Dan E. Rackliffe 

**+Lee A. Radwill 
*Anthony M. Reelick 
*John F. Rhodes 
**Edward L. Richard 

**+Curtis L. Roberts 
**Walter J. Sadowski 
*+Gregory V. St. Cyr 
**Peter 0. Simpson 
**Jeffrey H. Smith 

**+Stephen H. Sodekson 

**+Karen L. Sparko 

***David Stevens 

**-*Steven E. Stinson 

**+Daniel F. Sullivan 

**+Frederick M. Thompson 

***Brook P. Todd 
**William J. Topham 

***James M. Valentini 

***Francis X. Verchot 

**+Deborah J. Vondal 
*+Ellen E. White 

<"--*Henry E. Whit lock 
*''-Mary J. Zullo 







CONGRATULATIONS 




143 




SPECIAL THANKS 



It is my happy duty as editoi co 
thank all those who have helped 
in the yearbook. It makes me hap- 
py for two reasons, 1. this is the 
last page of the book, a great re- 
lief, and 2. this gives me the op- 
portunity to express my gratitude 
to all the people that have made 
this yearbook possible. 

1 would like to thank very much: 
the writers and the photogra- 
phers, who have contributed sto- 
ries and pictures, the senate 
members and Deloris, who have 
helped greatly in budgeting and 
publicity, the stockbridge office 
secretarys (Karin, Rita, and Liz) 
who have helped with many 
things and are always there with 
encouragement and suggestions, 
Don Lendry (yearbook business- 
man) for putting up with missed 
deadlines and meetings, but most 
of all the yearbook staff (Sue 
Stewart, Brian Brundrett, Lynn- 
Ann Smith, Shelly Antes, Linda 
Miczek, and Ron Johnson) who 
have given what they could to the 
book; their ideas, time, and skills. 
I would especially like to thank 
Jerry D'Anello, who has taken the 
great responsibility of Photo edi- 
tor and done a wonderful job. 

I have really enjoyed being STO- 
SAG's editor. It has been reward- 
ing most of the time and frustrat- 
ing some of the time, but it has 
always been an honor and a privi- 
ledge, and for this I thank YOU!. 






144