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iTQiflQ 80 



STOCKBRIDGE 
SCHOOL OF 
AGRICULTURE 



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AMHERST 

MASS A CHUSETTS 




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SPEEIflL EVENTS PflEE 

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DEDIEflTIQN 





The 1980 Yearbook Staff 
takes great pride and 
admiration in dedicating 
the book in memory of 
James Underwood Crockett. 

He was a man of vast 
talent and intelligence 
when it came to plants. 
From the time he was a 
very young boy he showed 
an inclination towards 
horticulture. At the age of 
three he was planting seeds 
in teacups and his later 
school activities with the 
local 4-H made his 
reputation grow. He 
graduated from Stockbridge 
in 1935 with a degree in 
Ornamental Horticulture. 
After graduating he worked 
at various greenhouses and 
nurseries around the 
United States. Then went 
on to pursue horticultural 
studies at Texas A&M 
College. 

Following wartime service 
in the Navy, he started a 
retail flower business in 
Lexington, MA. He was 
able to communicate with 
his customers extensively. 
Through his contacts he 
realized that people were 
not as aware of plant care 
as he thought. He then 
began to issue a monthly 
pamphlet of instructions 
Flowery Talks. The 
pamphlets brought him 
much success and he 
pursued a full-time writing 



James Underwood Crockett 

■Jim- 
Horticulture Haverhill 

1915. Alpha Tau Gammti. 

Few of us knew the real ■Jim" in his I'irst tew months 
up here as he was a quiet, self-contained chap. But as the 
time went on his inimitable humor won many laughs. His 
favorite hobby is taking piciuies of "Mac" and exposing 
them. We arc sure that his good scholarship and willing- 
ness to uphold high ideals will win him great accomphsh- 
nitnts stimeday. 



career. In this career he 
wrote 18 books including 
the 12 volume Time-Life 
encyclopedia of gardening. 

During all his work he 
managed to travel a great 
deal to various botanical 
and private gardens around 
the country. 

In 1975 when most 
people of his age would be 
considering retirement he 
was starting a new career in 
television. A star was born 
to say the least. With 
WGBH T.V. station in 
Boston, MA. he began a 
weekly show "Crocketts 
Victory Garden". It became 
a household word in many 
homes and in 1978 he 
received a national emmy 
nomination for the series. 

His approach to 
gardening was flexible, 
experimental, practical and 
humanistic . . "There is a 
kinship among those who 
love growing things," he 
said. "Man's position in the 
scheme of things is to 
discern and use his 
judgement as to which 
things are valuable and 
which are not. And it 
certainly is true that the 
natural world has an 
enormous number of 
lessons which we would do 
well to pay attention to." 

There is much to be 
learned from a man like 
Jim Crockett. He was a 



man 'that liked to learn and 
more important liked to 
teach and has a unique 
personality to teach. He 
was a man that should be 
respected by all and all 
should be given the 
privilege of learning what 
he had to offer. 




In the spring of 1977, Mr. Crockett 
worked as a volunteer for the Phone-a- 
thon. 






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No One Ever Said It 
Would Be Easy! 

Most of my friends would sure 
agree that the road to their 
present positions was not easy or 
smooth. Even today, it is not 
easy to move ahead toward one's 
perceived goal(s). None of us 
were prepared to live with 
double digit inflation or such 
uneasiness in the world around 
us. I am quite sure most of you 
were not either. It seems to me, 
that during each and every 
week, we have to devise 
something new and/or different 
to keep abreast of the many 
changes coming at us from all 
sides. 

Well, it is most certain that 
you, the Class of 1980, are going 
to find a few snags and hurdles 
in your future paths. Obtaining 
adequate lines of credit to 
purchase or enter business will 
be tough. Going on to more 
education is going to be more 
expensive each year. Many of 
you going to work in the 
business world will find that you 



may have to start at a salary 
lower than what you think you 
are worth. Some of you may 
have to accept a job not wholly 
to your liking in order to get 
started. Like I said before, "No 
one ever said it would be easy"! 
As some would say "so what 
else is new?" I think that most 
of you understand what I am 
saying and will work hard, plan 
carefully and find the best path 
to follow to reach your goal(s). 
The faculty, staff, and those of 



us in administration are pleased 
that we have had a part in 
helping you start on that path to 
success. Our wish for you - stay 
happy, stay healthy, be 
persistent, be positive, be 
successful and be an active 
Stockbridge alumnus! 





TO THE CLASS OF 1980 

You are now leaving us to start a new life and a new decade. What kind of a life will it be? How will you 
meet this new challenge? It's all up to you. You can create a wonderful life for yourself and I hope that you 
will. On "Good Morning America", David Hartman does not say, "Have a good day!" He always says, "Make 
it a good day!" Note his deliberate choise of the verb "make". You are the one who can make a day good. And 
day by day, you can make your life a good one. 

I do not really worry about your material future. Some of you plan to go on for more schooling and some 
will find immediate employment. Whatever you do, I know you will do it to the best of your ability, for 
Stockbridge students have always been mature, well-adjusted, responsible and energetic. I also believe that 
you will continue to grow and to learn, whether formally or informally. Your education here has opened 
doors for you and I know you will continue to keep those doors open. 

Most sincerely, I wish you happiness and contentment. Happiness is mostly a matter of attitude, isn't it? 
Basically it is how we look at things. Some people see only the worst in any situation. Others look for the best 
- and find it! Strive to be one of these people. Cultivate the qualities of tolerance, compassion, enthusiasm 
and, most of all optimism. Make yourself into the kind of person you like, for if you like yourself you will be 
happy. 

We will miss you. Do not forget us, for we will not forget you. We, who remain at Stockbridge, will always be 
interested in you and your progress and we hope that you will maintain your contact with us. Good luck and 
God Bless You 








10 



FflEULTY 










11 




DOUGLAS L. AIRHART 

Asst. Prof. Plant and Soil 






JAMES F. ANDERSON 

Assoc. Prof. Plant and Soil 



WALLACE G. BLACK 

Prof. Vet. and An. Sci. 



.ACK 1 

£11 




ALFRED W. BOICOURT 

|k Prof. Plant and Soil 




"^■c- — - 




WILLIAM J. BRAMLAG^ 

Prof. Plant and Soil _ 




T. CLAYTO^ 

Prof. Food Engineering 




LYLE E. CRAK 
Assoc. Prof. Plant and Soil 




12 





^Hk Ass' 



ARION S. DUBOIS 
Asst. Prof. Rhetoric 



ROBERT T. DUBY 

Assoc. Prof. Vet. and An. Sci. 





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DUANE W. GREENE 

Assoc. Prof. Plant and Soil 



TOM S. HAMILTON 
Assoc. Prof. Land Arch. 



J 





HEINRICH FENNER 

Assoc. Prof. Vet. and An. Sci. 




WILLIAM K. HARRIS 

L Prof. Vet. and An. Sci. 




FRANCIS W. HOLMES 

Prof. Plant. Path. 



L. 





TOM HOUSTO^^ 

Tech. Asst. Ar. Pk. 







PAUL H. JENNINGS 

ssoc. Prof. Plant and Soil 



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THEODORE W. LEED 

K Prof. Food and Res. Econ. . 




■ WARD M. HUNTING 

Assoc. Prof. Food Sci. and Nutr. 




ERNEST A. JOHNSON 

Assoc. Prof. Food Engin.. 




I 



KIRK A. HURTd 

Asst. Prof. Plant and 



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id Soil J 




GORDON S. KING 
Prof. Land Arch. 



. KING 1 

Arch. ^^1 




14 





WILLIAM J. LORD 

Prof. Plant and Soil 






SIDNEY J. LYFORD 
Assoc. Prof. Vet. and An. Sci. 




^Rmes b. marcum 

-Assoc. Prof. Vet. and An. Sci. 



fc. Assoc. ] 



DONALD R. MARION 

Assoc. Prof. Food and Res. Ecor 




J. DAVID MACKENZIE 

Asst. Prof. Plant and Soil 




WILLIAM J. MANNING 

^ Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. ^ 




FARO 



AROLD E. MOSHER 

Prof. Land Arch. 



15 







EDWARD S. PIRA 
Assoc. Prof. Food Engin. 




HERBERT G. SPINDLErI 

Assoc. Prof. Food and Res. Econ. 




WILLIAM A. ROSEN^? 

_ Prof. Plant and Soil 




M J€ 

L2 



JONAS VENGRIS 

Prof. Plant and Soil 






FRANKLIN 
SOUTHWICK 

Prof. Plant and 



Soll_^| 




LESTER F. WHITnSI 
Prof. Plant and Soil 





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JOHN M. ZAK 

Prof. Plant and Soil 



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16 



FflEULTY EflNDIDi 



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Dr. Boicourt's Floral Design Class! 






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17 




MEMORIES ARE TREASURES THAT ARE 
LOCKED IN OUR MIND, AND ONLY YOU 
HOLD THE KEY THAT CAN UNLOCK 
THOSE MOMENTS THAT WERE SHARED 
WITH SOMEONE SPECIAL 



SENATE 




President Jablonski and members of Senate at work. 





Terri Peckham and Alumnist 





(I can't wait until the end of this meeting . . . . ) 

iEN-RTElRS 

•AT 

WQRK 



19 



The Student Senate of the 
Stockbridge School has had a 
productive and enjoyable year. 
Comprised of representatives 
from each major and club, the 
senate oversees the spending and 
budgeting of the RSO 
appropriated funds. The senators 
are the governing body 
representing the students, 
keeping the students up to date 
on the results of the meetings, 
announcements and encouraging 
involvement in the senate 
activities. 

The accomplishments of the 
senate are just a small part of 
the general business which the 
senate conducts throughout the 
year. It is the biggest link 
between majors, bringing 
students from different fields 
together. Without the senate, 
Stockbridge would be without 
unity. 

This year the Senate was lead 
by President, Sally Jablonski; 
Vice President, Tom Maeder; 
Executive Secretary, Kim Barter; 
Senate Secretary, Donna Lozier; 
and the group was advised by 
Dr. Doug Airhart. 



iENflTE 








20 



Senate 
Wins! 



The sixth annual Alumni 
Phonathon was held in Alumni 
Hall in November 1979 from 7- 
10pm. It was the most successful 
phonathon, raising $12,000. This 
money goes for Scholarships, 
reunions. Alumni newsletters, 
and directors. This year the 
Senate was the top winner. 




evin Hollister '78 presenting the Senate with 
le Cold Duck. 



President Sally Jablonski accepting the case of Cold Duck. 



21 




SENIORS 












S 
E 
N 
I 

R 
S 




23 



BUSINEiS 



Agricultural Business 
Management, composed of 
only a small group of 
students working hard to 
learn the intricacies of 
Agriculture as a business. 

We all know that 
agriculture is a business, 
but not all know the 
bookkeeping, accounting 
and law that lies behind 
it. It is a very important 
major and there shall 
always be a need for the 
basics that this major 
offers. 





24 




MICHEAL J. DAVIS 

Activities: Senate Parliamentarian, 
Accounting Club 




STEPHEN EDWARD TAPPER 




PHILIP J. NORRIS JR. 

Offices: President of Accounting Club 
Activities: Intramural basketball, 
Softball, soccer, and football 
Favorite Saying: Oh, Wow! 




PATRICK JOHN KELLEY 




CAMERA SHY 
CRIAG VON KOHORN 



25 



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5EIENEE 



The course of instruction of- 
fered affords the student the op- 
portunity to gain a working 
knowledge with farm animals. 
Courses in Poultry management, 
Dairy management, and Livestock 
production are among those of- 
fered. Students have a great op- 
portunity to obtain practical ex- 
perience in these fields at the 
Poultry Research Center and Rid- 
ing Academy at Tilson Farm; and 
at the Dairy Facility which is lo- 
cated in South Deerfield. With the 
need for more and more exper- 
ienced people in the Animal Sci- 
ence fields, the curriculum offered 
at Stockbridge is second to none; 
whether you want to be a Veteri- 
nary Assistant Farmer, or just 
work with animals. 




26 




BRENT BLAINE 
BREIDENSTEIN 
Activities: soccer, and basketball 



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KEVIN FOLEY 




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NORMAN RUSSELL 
DAVENPORT "Norm" 

Activities: Animal Science 

Representative 

Favorite Saying: Without Agriculture 

there is no culture. 




..ii:s 



ROBIN ANN FOWNES 



STEVEN GOULD "Gouldie" 

Activities: Promotion Chairman PDD, 
Yearbook photographer, Animal 
Science Club, Student Senate. 



27 




ERIN E. HARTLING 

Activities: Animal Science Club, Oxen 
Club 




ALLAN C. SMITH "Smitty" 
Offices: Class Vice President, Animal 
Science Vice President 
Activities: Soccer, Softball 
Favorite Saying: You'll get over it. 




LINDA M. SJODAHL 

Activities: Animal Science Club, Oxen 
Club 




DAVID SHEPARD "Shep" 

Activities: Animal Science Club 




DEBORAH LYNN SPANG 



28 




JOHN STEINS 
Activities: Animal Science Club 




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LINDA SULLIVAN 
Activities: Animal Science Club 



MARJORIE SUSMAN 





JAMES A. STREETER "Jim" 

Activities: Animal Science Club 






CAMERA SHY 

JEFFREY DEAN 
JAMES MCDONOUGH III 
CHRISTOPHER O'BRIEN 
JAMES PRENTICE 
RICKEY REED 
LEWIS SMOOKLER 
DAWN SNOW 
MARTHA SNOW 
BRIAN SUMNER 
JAMES TALVY 



?9 





YOU DON'T SAY 




DINNER TIME! 





30 





DON'T BE SO STUBBORN! 



1^: , ,V* 







31 







Arboriculture courses consist 
of the identification and treat- 
ment of tree diseases and insect 
pests, mechanical injuries, large 
tree removal and fertilizing. 
This program also covers learn- 
ing to climb trees, using ropes 
with safety standards and how 
to operate chainsaws. 

Park management prepares 
the student for different as- 
pects of land use. The course 
consists of general forest man- 
agement, park formation and 
expansion to meet the public 
needs. This information 
learned at Stockbridge will be 
valuable when students gra- 
duate from the school. 

Placement is required for the 
second semester freshman. The 
on the job training will expand 
their knowledge in the field. 
Some jobs that the Arbor and 
Park management students can 
look for are, working in the re- 
creational areas, in both mu- 
nicipal and national parks, 
land-use planners, park manag- 
ers, city and state recreational 
coordinater. 




ANTHONY C. ANTONUCCI 




STEVE CHAFFEE "Chafe" 
ATG 

Activities: Rush Chairman, Softball, 
football 




STEVEN BURNS "Burnsie" 
ATG 
Favorite Saying: Don't worry about it. 




ALAN BLANCHETTE "Al" 

ATG 




THOMAS EVANS 



33 




KEVIN ALLEN JOHNSON 




KATHERINE LEAB 

SSA 

Offices: SSA Treasurer 

Activities: soccer, Softball 






1 



PAUL KIRK 



WAYNE LACROIX 

ATG 

Activities: Soccer, Softball, football 




WILLIAM MORIN "Gator" 



34 




WILLIAM SAMA 



CAMERA SHY 

WILLIAM COX 
JEFFREY DECKEL 
DAVID MICHAEL FISKE 
JAMES FLIS 
MICHAEL FOY 
CHRISTOPHER FRANK 
TIMOTHY GEARIN 
JOHN GILBERT 
ROGER HALE 
DAVID HAWKINS 
MARK HICKOX 
JAMES IPPOLITO 




PETER VAN HEEST 

Favorite Saying: "Don't you ever." 





BARTLETT TAINTOR 




JOSEPH KELLEY 
JAMES LATOUR 
THOMAS MANKOWSKY 
JOHN MURRAY 
JOHN PEIRCE 
RICHARD PLOTCZIK 
JAY SOCKRITER 
STEPHEN SWETISH 
MATTHEW R. THOMPSON 
JOHN TRIPP 
SCOTT WOODS 




35 






EREW 



36 








37 




HOT SUMMER DAYS. 





38 




■ * . 



1 








40 




The Flori's were very involved 
with activities in school from the 
very beginning. As friends we 
shared many fun times, as 
classmates we helped one 
another overcome the rough 
days, as people we grew and 
learned together. 

MEMORIES . . . freshmen 
orientation, volleyball, six A.M. 
field trips, aphid, placement 
reports, pumpkin sale, "Do we 
need to know this?", Portland, 
Maine and broken fan belts, 
those crazy get togethers, and 
those good old crop rotations . . . 
We will change as the days pass 
and yet the memories will 
always stay the same — forever. 





41 




ALLEN BARTON "Bud" 

Favorite Saying: "It's much better to 
be thought a fool, than to open your 
mouth and remove all doubt!" 

M. Twaine 





ELAINE S. BROOKS 




THEODORA ANN 
BLONIARZ "Teddi" 

Favorite Saying: Stick it in your ear!! 




VIRGINIA (Belanger) 
CASWELL "Ginger" 

Activities: Soccer, Flori club. Yearbook 
Photographer, Yearbook Sports Editor 



STEVEN CALAUTTI "Steve" 
Offices: President Flori Club 79' to 80' 
Activities: Stockbridge Senate 



42 




SYLVIA CYRANOWSKI "Syl" 
Activities: Flori Club, Intramural 
Volleyball 
Favorite Saying: Later!! 





DONALD EATON "Don" 
Favorite Saying: If your gonna eat 
ham, you gotta play in the mud. 




BETTE R. DAVIS 

Offices: Yearbook Treasurer 
Activities: Intramural Volleyball, 
STOSO, Flori Club. 
Favorite Saying: Now, let's be 
reasonable .... 




WENDY EATON 

Favorite Saying: Take it easy. 



MARION R. FABISZEWSKI 

Activities: Flori Club 



43 




THERESA B. GIRARD 

"Terry" 
Offices: Editor of the Yearbook 
Activities: STOSO, Flori Club, 
Stockbridge Senate, Intramural 
Volleyball 






BRIAN P. GUILFOYLE 



MARY (Munroe) 
HARRINGTON 




SALLY E. JABLONSKI "Sal" 

Offices: President of the Senate (2), 
Vice President of the Senate (1), 
Major class representative 
Activities: STOSO, Flori Club 
Favorite Saying: A-hhh, I have an 
announcement to make 



SHARON LEWIS "Shari" 



44 




ROBERT W. LUNNY "Bob" 

Offices: Class Secretary 
Activities: Stockbridge Senate, 
Industrial Show Chairman PDD 
Favorite Saying: I beg your pardon! 




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WILLIAM D. PORTER ' "Bill" 

Favorite Saying: Smile! It makes 
everyone wonder what you've been up 
to. 




MARSHA PENAS "Babe" 

Offices: Class President 

Favorite Saying: Life isn't a bowl full 

of cherries!! Keep Smiling! 




LYNNE M. PATRUNO 




KATHLEEN M. READY 
"Kathy" 



45 




CATHY M. SENGER 

Offices: Secretary of Flori. Club 
Activities: Intramural Volleyball 






CAMERA SHY: 
ANNE M. KARLON 
CARMELLA LOMBARDI 
PAULA REIDL 




JEFFREY T. SKILLIN 
"Skiddler" 
Alpha Tau Gamma 
Offices: President of ATG 
Favorite Saying: "Don't get lost in the 
flood." 




DIANE SIRKIN 

Offices: Class Treasurer, Flori Club 
Treasurer, Class representative for 
Alumni Board of Directors 
Activities: Intramural Volleyball 
Favorite Saying: "Excuse me?" 




46 




R-U-I'T 
•HND VE6 





This two-year program at 
Stockbridge offers the basic 
principles of plant growth which 
underlie sound cultural practices 
and the economic factors which 
bear upon the marketing 
procedures and the business side 
of the students specialized 
interest in the field of friuts and 
vegatable crops. 

The job opportunities include 
a wide variety of areas in which 



to work. Skilled trained workers 
are needed as foreman, 
operators, or owners on fruits 
and vegatable farms; employees 
on private estates and 
institutions; salesmen for various 
supplies, equipment and 
machinery companies; private 
and state produce inspection 
work; wholesale and in many 
business and industry operations 
with produce. 





47 




LAUREL ELLEN FUCE 

Favorite saying: "Agies do it better 
anyway." 










JAMES SKARZYNSKI 




" .y y kii y % %i II Si 

JOSEPH PERELLA 



CAMERA SHY 

MARK AMATO 
JAMES BRADY 
JOHN LANGAN JR. 
MARTHA LATIMER 
ELAINE MORLEY 
SHARON OGLE 
DAVID STRYKER 




DOMINIC CAROLYN 
MEDUSKI 




ROBERT D. STANLEY 
"Radar" 
ATG 

Activities: Senator at large 
Favorite Saying: "Not to shabby.' 



48 





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49 





50 



In the past few years, there has 
been an increasing demand for 
formally trained personnel in the 
field of Laboratory Animal Tech- 
nology. This demand has arisen 
from a number of factors; the most 
obvious being the recent war on 
cancer where a skyrocketing num- 
ber of research animals are need- 
ed. Other factors such as drug, sur- 
gical and control work are in need 
of research animals and the labo- 
ratory animal technologist. 

Knowledge of breeding and 
management is required for these 
animals and at the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture, a two year 
program is designed to provide a 
broad base of training in the areas 
where technologists are most 
needed, i.e. breeding, management 
and laboratory techniques. The 
program meets the educational re- 
quirements for certification by the 
American Association for Labora- 
tory Animal Science and also of- 
fers an Associate Degree in Ap- 
plied Science. 

Upon completion of the course, 
the Laboratory Animal Technolo- 
gist can be employed by commer- 
cial production facilities, private 
and govermental animal research | 
laboratories, technical sales and 
services and some graduates may 
be employed as assistants to veter- 
inarians in private practice. 

Working with animals requires 
a special kind of person. The per- 
son has to be kind, yet stern, calm, 
yet quick to react. This program 
includes this type of training. The 
Laboratory Animal Technologist 
from Stockbridge is that kind of 
person. 




ROGER GAUTHIER "Maurice" 
ATG 




■^ 




NANCY HART 




CINDY HALLOWELL 

Activities: Yearbook 
Favorite Saying: No Problem! 




ELIZABETH A. HINCKLEY 
"Beth" 

Favorite Saying: Okay-Fine . . 



PAMELA H. HOROWITZ 

Offices: President of LAT Club 
Activities: Yearbook Staff 



51 




CHERYL LIBBY 





i ANNE THERESA 

I LOSPENNATO 

Offices: Vice President of LAT Club 



''*^^%i. 




BARRY J. MACKIN "Barrold" 
ZZD 

Activities: Class Senator, LAT Club 
Favorite Saying: "I am fed up about 
hearing about livestock!!" 



KAREN LOWTHER 




ANNE MINIHAN 



52 




KAREN M. MONTEIRO 

Activities: Yearbook 



CAMERA SHY 
LYNDA BURR 
CYNTHIA JABLONSKI 
ELLEN ROSENBAUM 




NEAL F. WARNER "Jones" 
Favorite Saying: Joe Walsh for 
President . . 




MARION MORTON 

Activities: Yearbook 



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WHAT DID I DO TO DESERVE THIS? 



S3 



L<flND 
I 




There is a great deal of pleasure 
to everyone, when one views a 
beautifully landscaped ground. 
Interest in this has created a de- 
mand for people trained to handle 
the problems encountered in land- 
scape construction and mainten- 
ance. 

The two-year Land Operations 
program at Stockbridge is de- 
signed to aquaint the students 
with the basic knowledge of the 
problems encountered in lands- 
caping. The courses deal with 
plant growth, soils, fertilizers and 
plant pests; with the identification 
and maintenance of herbaceous 
plants and turf grasses; with shade 
tree maintenance; and with plant 
propagation. The curriculum also 
included, a five month formal 
course work placement period. 

Job opportunities include, plant 
propagators, foreman or superin- 
tendent for nurseries; gardeners, 
foreman or superintendents on 
private estates, public parks, ce- 
metaries, botanical gardens and 
various other public and private 
institution grounds. 







54 




ROBERT BEER "Bob" 

Activities: Landscape Club 

Favorite Saying: "Let's get some coffee 

first." 




STEVEN DAVID GRAFTON 
"Caveman" 
ATG 
Activities: Athletic Chairman of ATG 





NEIL CHARLES FLAVIN 

ATG 



GAIL D. DOWD 




TODD D. HAMMOND 



55 




ROBERT LANGILLE "Bob" 

Activities: Landop Club 






STAGEY A. MCEWEN "Stace" 
Activities: Intramural Volleyball 



MARK MORGERA "Snake" 
ATG 

Activities: Football, Hockey 




KEVIN JAMES NORTON 
"Norty-Feefed" 
Activities: Landop Club 
Favorite Saying: Are you foofed again? 



DOUGLAS JAY NYDAM 
"Doug" 
Activities: Land op Club 



56 




JEFFREY OTIS "Beef 
ATG 
Activities: Soccer, Football, Softball 





THOMAS CHARLES RULLO 
"Tom" 

Offices: Landop Treasurer, Landop 
President 

Activities: Chairman of Student 
displays for PDD 

Favorite Saying: Keep it under your 
hat. 




WILLIAM A. REINERTSON 
"Rhino" 

Activities: Basketball 




STEVEN SWANBERRY 



LAWRENCE J. WATT 
Offices: President of Landop Club 



57 







CAMERA SHY 
NORMAN ANDERSON 
WILLIAM CAHILL 
JON COWAN 
JEFFREY DECKEL 
JEFFREY ELLIS 
DAVID HAWKINS 
CLAYTON HUTCHINS 
CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON 
LAWRENCE MACKEIL 
KEVIN POWELL 
THOMAS ROGERS 
MARK SANDERSON 
KIRILL SENOFF 
JUDITH SHERMAN 
MICHAEL SILVEIRA 
LEONARD TURBINI 
RICHARD WHITTINGTON 
ROBERT YOUNG 



L-HND 
np 



58 











59 






MEMORIES B¥ 
STQEI^BRIDGE D'HYS 



60 




Our first year courses deal with the basics of 
understanding soils and plants, with specific courses 
dealing with turf management. In the short spring 
semester more specific courses are covered again, such as, 
golf course green construction and drainage. 

Each spring during the first week of March all turf 
majors attend the Massachusetts Turf -grass Conference at 
the Springfield Civic Center for three days. The 
conference consists of a large industrial show, and daily 
speakers covering topics in the field. It is a very good 
happening where much can be learned and jobs can be 
gained. 




61 




JAMES CLARK "Jim" 

Offices: President of Turf Club 





ROBERT DELVECCHIO "Del" 




\ C, 



MICHAEL COLLINS 




STEPHEN H. DOLAN "Steve" 

Activities: Intramural Hockey 



ERNEST FARRINGTON 
"Ernie" 

Activities: Turf Club 



62 




LAWRENCE GRASSO "Larry" 





sssssi^:. 



JOSEPH GUILES "Joe" 

Offices: Turf club treasurer 
Activities: Senator 

Favorite Saying: A Stockie's word is as 
good as gold. 





JOHN ANTHONY GRAVINA 

"Stringer" 

ATG 

Activities: soccer, intramural hockey, 

basketball, football, volleyball 




WADE HAYNES 



NIALL HURLBURT 



63 




DONALD INGLIS I 

Activities: FDD Committee, Turf Club 





KENNETH LALLIER "Ken" 

Favorite Saying: You only go around 
once in life. 




WILLIAM KIRBY "Mad Dog" 

Activities: Soccer, Intramural Hockey 




CHRISTOPHER J. LEMOINE 

"Buggs" 



PETER LEWIS 



64 




BRIAN MCCULLOUGH 





ROBERT NICHOL 





PAUL MUHLBERG 




BRIAN POPE 

Activities: Turf Club, basketball, soccer 



DENZIL D. RICE "Denny" 



b5 




MICHAEL TRIBOU "Mike" 

Offices: Secretary of Turf Club 





HARRY WARD 



DAVID WARE "Sparky" 
Activities: Golf, Intramural Hockey 
Favorite Saying: Don't let school get in 
the way of your education. M. Twaine 




KARL R. VOGELL "Vogs" 
Favorite Saying: When the musics over 
turn out the lights. 



CAMERA SHY 
RICHARD ALLEN 
JOHN BOARDMAN 
JOSEPH BORDEN 
JAMES DELLASANTA 
DANIEL FISK 
CHESTER GRABOWSKI JR. 
EDWIN HAZNER 
PETER HULL 
MICHAEL MINER 
GERARD O'CONNER 
STEVE PERRY 
TIMOTHY RYMASZ 
ROBERT SARASIN 



66 



STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL 
OF AGRICULTURE 

The following students 
received the Associate Degree in 
the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture at the University of 
Massachusetts on January 2, 
1980. 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Paul Michael Champigny 
Thomas James Curran 

ARBORICULTURE & 
PARK MANAGEMENT 

William Anthony DeMore 
Matthew Jerome Gulla 
Robert Michael Little 
Daniel C. Von Starrenburg 

FRUIT & VEGETABLE 
CROPS 

Paul Byron Minard 
Joseph Robert Perella 

HOTEL. RESTAURANT 
& TRAVEL 

ADMINISTRATION 

Paul Anthony Amaral 
John Raphael Pace 

LANDSCAPE 
OPERATIONS 

John Peter Caputo 

TURF MANAGEMENT 

Gregory Thomas Aldrich 
David Albert D'Amours 




67 



GETTIN6 TtiRQU64H 
TtiE WEEK 



MONDAY 





THURSDAY 



TUESDAY 





FRIDAY 



J] 



WEDNESDAY 





68 








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73 



THE CLASS OF 1980 WOULD LIKE 
TO DEDICATE THIS PAGE TO 
PROFESSOR AL BOICOURT, WHO 
RETIRED THIS YEAR AFTER SERVING 
STOCKBRIDGE FAITHFULLY FOR MANY 
YEARS. 




M 






liMMuM^uww 





SPQRTS 



75 



SOCCER 



This years Soccer Squad put 
together a successful season. 
Finishing with a satisfying 
record of 3-2-1. Team members 
were overly enthusiastic and 
could be found practicing in the 
fields rain or shine. The players 
devotion to the game enabled 
them to accept their losses as 
well as their wins. Team 
members enjoyed each others 
company on and off the field 
and the returning Freshmen are 
anxious to begin another season 
next fall. 







^•^ 



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ftfcb. 














1979 Team 
Storm Carlson 
Brent Breidenstein 
John Chase 
Ken Botzek 
Robert Johnson 
Tim Weir 
James Foster 
Robert Dalbeck 
Gerard Wilson 
Paul Johnson 
Gary Auger 
David D'Amours 
Jeff Curran 
Ginger Belanger 
Anne Dempsey 
Kathy Leab 
Michael Collins 
William Kirby 
Trudy Beauchamp 
Jeff Otis 
Wayne LaCroix 
Richard Whittington 





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77 



B 
i 
E 
B 







This years Basketball team 
had a trying season with a 
seasonal record of 3-9. The team 
proved to be a hard working 
group. Together they practiced, 
played games, and worked well 
to fight against more advanced 
and tougher teams. Most games 
ended in a close score of a two 
or three point difference. 

With many returning players, 
and maybe a better cheering 
section, the Stockbridge team 
should be able to have a good 
season next year. 

The team was coached by, Mr. 
Tony Williams. 



78 




^ 



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\ \ -, 



1979-80 TEAM 

Jim Flis 

David D'amounds 
Randy Brown 
Ed Falcoa 
Bill Reinertson 
Tom Alex 
Jon Clemens 
Bob Miller 
Brian Pope 
Mike Miner 
Dan Rossi 
Steve Van Hogen 
Brent Breidenstein 

MANAGERS 
Gary Auger 
John Chase 






ASSISTANT COACH 
Brian O'Shea 





79 



SQFTBflLL 








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During the spring many 
Stockies enjoyed the warm 
days out playing softball. 

Generally it was the Turf 
guys against Land Op. but 
many others also joined in the 
fun. 




V 




What a great way to end a 
hectic school day! 



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80 



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82 



NEW GQNEEPT 

'HYDRQPEINIE G-RRDENING 



Jack Topham, a former 
Stockbridge student, gave a 
demonstration at Twillingate 
Gardens in Sudbury, Mass to the 
Floriculture class. The 
demonstration concerned the 
process of Hydroponic gardening. 
So far, he has been producing 
cucumbers and selling them to 
nearby Grocers. 

This is a relatively new 
concept in growing and so far 
seems to be working very well. 
The cukes are grown in troughs 
of a mineral solution and water. 
Supported by horizontal strings, 
the plants are able to get the 
maximum benefits from the 
light. Sanitation in hydroponic 
gardening is of the utmost 
importance. 

Good Luck, Jack! 




You Don't Say . . . 



Jack Topham, class of 1979 







83 



5 
R 

N 





The Shorthorn was put 
together this year by the sole 
effort of Bill Cybulski. He was 
the one man team who kept the 
Shorthorn on its feet. The work 
includes writing, typing, 
printing, stapling and 
distributing.He succeeded in 
keeping the students informed 
on school activities, poetry, 
humor, school policy decisions 
and short stories. As with any 
school activity, there are always 
complications and problems with 
budget cuts, but Bill has 
managed to work around these 
hurdles and put out a very 
unique paper. The students of 
the Stockbridge School are 
grateful for all the time and 
hard work which Bill has put 
into keeping us informed. 




84 



FREStlMEN FflEES 




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85 






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87 








89 




mm 



SPEEI'RL 
EVENTS 




''■W!!^--' 







FALL P I C NI 









The Fall Picnic was held at 

Farley Lodge on a sunny 

October day. Entertainment was 

provided by "Mr. Bill", a local 

D.J. from the Pub. 

Hamburgers, hotdogs, soda 

and munchies were enjoyed by 

all. After everyone's stomach 

was full volleyball, dancing and 

partying were the events of the 

evening. 




91 



PUMPKIN 
iflLE 










The Pumpkin Sale, sponsored 
by the Floriculture Club, was 
another success this year. A ton 
of pumpkins, along with dried 
flowers were sold in front of the 
Student Union Building. The 
profits from the sale were used 
for activities in the club. 






92 




The Halloween Party was one of 

the better parties held this year. It 

was held in room 1009 of the Campus 

Center. The room was colorfully 

decorated with streamers, balloons 

and a pumpkin on each table. The 

band, "Sail Cats" provided a variety 

of tunes. By the end of the night 

everyone was feeling pretty good!! 

Clowns, Q-tips, cats, mice, libraries, 

babies, "Miss Piggy", a lime and a 

lemon, and the Frat hobo's, were to 

name a few of the costumes that were 

worn. 

Prizes were given out to the best 

costume, the most artistic, cutest, the 

most original, funniest and ugliest. 

It is not to be left unsaid, "That 

people in Stockbridge know how to 

have a good time." 






94 









95 



tlQLLY 
eJQLLY 



The Holly Jolly was a quiet 
event that started off with a 
delicious meal of Steamed chip 
Beef, with the Chef himself 
serving it. There was even 
enough for seconds to be enjoyed 
by all. 

The band, Martian Highway, 
provided a different type of 
Christmas cheer and after awhile 
managed to get people moving. 

The highlight of the evening 
was a Pinata. A colorful object 
was brought to the ground by 
Laurel Fuce, and a bunch of 
goodies scattered about. 





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96 












97 



VALENTINE'S DAY BflNEE 





The annual Valentine's dance was held on 
Wednesday, Feb. 13th, in the S.UB. Disc jockey, 
"Mr. Bill", provided great dancing music from 
8:00-12:00 p.m., which ranged in styles to please 
all tastes. Varieties included everything from 
modern disco, Rock-n-Roll, and Country, right 
down to the most appropriate mellow tunes. 
Yes, Cupid certainly left his mark this night as 
many couples gathered during the slower sets. 

Refreshments were provided to satisfy weary 
dancers, including free drafts and munchies all 
night. AH in all, a good time was had by 
everyone attending, certainly a night to 
remember. 



98 



PRQFESSIGNfIL 
DEVELQPMENT DAY 







The Student Senate of the Stockbridge School 
of Agriculture held its Third Annual Professional 
Development Day on February 20, 1980. 

PDD was a one day event solely organized, 
funded, and run by Stockbridge Students 
interested in providing a convention for fellow 
students, faculty, and professionals of agricultural 
related fields. The objective was to give students 
an opportunity to meet with established 
professionals in the fields they will be entering 
upon graduation. It was hoped to express the 
importance of education after graduation because 
maintaining a knowledge of new methods and 
concepts is important to all agricultural industries. 



99 





The PDD show was initiated 
three years ago by students who 
felt there was a need for a 
professional convention in which 
students and members of 
professional organizations could 
get together and discuss business 
trends, new practices, problems 
of the profession and 
employment opportunities. This 
first show, held in 1978, was an 
overwhelming success. Last 
year's convention doubled in size 
along with attendance. An 
audience of over 1,000 people 
attended with 90% of the 
student body present. This year 
the show was advertised in 
many trade and agricultural 
magazines or newsletters 
allowing more professionals to 
become aware of the show. This 
gave students an opportunity to 
talk with exhibitors, speakers, 
professional association 
representatives, as well as 
spectators in agricultural 
professions. 

PDD was composed of an 
industrial show, featuring indoor 
and outdoor commercial 
exhibits, educational displays, 
demonstrations, club projects 



and seminars. Seminars were 
held hourly throughout the day 
with each being 45 minutes long. 
There was one seminar directly 
related to each of the 
departments within Stockbridge 
along with a guest speaker in the 
middle of the day and a closing 
speaker. The late morning also 
offered an additional seminar in 
which organizations in 
Massachusetts or New England 
were represented. This gave 
tudents, along with other 
interested people, an opportunity 
to find out more about these 
existing organizations. 

Linda Miczek organized PDD 
this year and was helped by 
Robert Lunny, Steve Gould and 
Tom RuUo. 

Awards were given out to 
clubs for their displays. Fruit 
and Veg. won first prize, 
Floriculture won second. Turf 
won third, while Animal Science 
won honorable mention. 

The day was a big success, 
much was gained by all and it is 
hoped by all that in the years to 
come it will be a continued 
success. 



W^ 




100 



DIFFERENT FACES AT P.D.D, 








101 



SEMINARS AND DISPLAYS 








102 








Dean Denison presents President Sally Jablonski with a Gavel and half 
a dozen roses. 



The 26th Annual Progress Banquet 
was held this spring in the Student- 
Union Ballroom on March 6; just one 
week before the freshmen left to go 
on placement. Students selected the 
most outstanding professor from their 
major and each of them received an 
award. Other awards were given out 
for athletic participation and service 
to the Stockbridge School, after a 
delicious meal. 

After all the awards were given out 
and all the speeches were made, the 
band began to play and kept 
everyone going for the rest of the 
evening. Everyone celebrated the 
giving and receiving of awards and 
enjoyed dancing and socializing with 
faculty and friends. 

lona Reynolds presents Linda Miczek the award 
for outstanding Senator. 





In memory of her husband, James Crockett, 
Yearbook Dedication Award. 



Mrs. Margaret Crockett accepts the 





103 



PRGGRESi BflNq.UET 






Soccef 










Linda Miczek and Steve Gould present the award given for Professional 
Development Day . . 







Douglas Airhart presents the Service Award 
Grants. 




Steve Calautti accepts Senate award. 



Mrs. Margaret Crockett accepts award for 
late husband. 



104 



NN^-^N "^X "^ 




Gary Auger presents Donna Lozier with the Secretaries award 
and a bouquet of roses. 






Margaret Crockett 




"MR. STOCKBRIDGE" 



"' yyir J^Jr^J'-i*- 




105 



SPRING PtiQNQTiiEIN 





"You've got to be kidding!" 




Terry chats away 





The spring Alumni Phonothon 
was held in April eighth through 
the tenth, in the Alumni Hall. It is 
a very successful fund raising 
activity where you have the chance 
to talk to Stockbridge Alumnists 
about their years' here. Everyone 
has a good time partying and 
sharing with one another. 



106 



BAY STATE 
LIVESTQEI^ ELflSSIE 



The Bay State Livestock 
Classic, put on by the Animal 
Science Department, was held on 
April 25 and 26 in the Grinnel 
Arena. The students really 
worked hard for weeks, but their 
efforts certainly paid off. There 
was judging and showing of 
cattle, pigs, sheep and horses. 
The students groomed and 
trained their animals before the 
show, then paraded them around 
the arena while the judges 
inspected them. 

There was quite a bit of 
excitement after the hog show, 
because some of the slippery 
creatures decided they weren't 
going back into their trailer. 
Their trainers kept cool and 
finally got their squealing pigs 
back where they belonged. 

In the evenings, there was a 
bucking bronco ride, made from 
a barrel with a saddle strung 
from the ceiling with ropes. Four 
or five guys tugged on the ropes, 
giving you quite a ride. Very few 
people were able to hold on long 
before winding up in the 
sawdust! 

Refreshments were served to 
the audience; all around, 
everyone had a great time. 






A proud trainer. 







Third Place! 







Unsuspecting photographer, Steve Gould. 




* *>*&^* 




108 




S:»:s*[!=f 



"Come on, Smile!" 





"Hold on tight, Brian." 










■ ' A,-- ■,'■♦■ .i'li .*!■ • 'V 




109 



iPRINQ PIGNIE 



The Spring Picnic was held on a 
beautiful sunny day in April at 
Farley Lodge. It began in the 
afternoon and continued well into 
the night. The picnic started off 
with a volleyball game, and a deli- 
cious barbecue of hamburgers and 
hotdogs. Later in the evening, ev- 
eryone was dancing to music put 
on by D.J., Mr. Bill. Much of the 
faculty came to enjoy the fun, 
even the Dean was there checking 
out the motorcycles. 

One thing can be said for Stock- 
bridge students, they know how 
to have good parties! 





_y 



Hi There! 





"Mr. Bill" 



Dean Denison, ready to ride. 




no 





"BIG BEEF" 






Hey! Wait a Minute Don't take my picture. 





I dare you to take my picture like this 



Come on Elaine, SMILE! 



m 





Have a coke and a smile! 






\lbs 





112 



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113 




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114 



PLEDGE FQRMfIL FQR 'flTQ 



The brothers of ALPHA 
TAU GAMMA, the only frater- 
nity founded by and exclusively 
for Stockbridge students in 
1919; held their Pledge Formal 
on March 8, 1980. It is only one 
of their many parties and social 
events. 

The evening began with a 
toast to ATG, and all its broth- 
ers. Then came a delicious sir- 
loin steak dinner proceeding 
the Awards presentation. Fol- 
lowing the various awards, the 
freshmen were given their 
Brother Certificates. 

At the head table were seat- 
ed the Master of Ceremonies, 
and Vice President of ATG; 
Wayne LaCroix. House Presi- 
dent, Jeffrey T. Skillin, Corre- 
sponding President, John G. 
Boldebook, class of 1965, and 
guests. 

After awards were presented, 
drinks and dancing finished out 
a super evening. 










115 



ENcIQY T-HE 










116 



STQGKBRIDGE LIFE 









Campus Life 
1980 



117 



Lunch! 



•HN 

SEI 

ELUB 




Special Problems 





This is the worst! 



What's up ....? 



ne 



-HRBQRIEULTURE -RND P-flRI^ 
M'RN'flGEMENT 



Arboriculture and Park Man- 
agement are two closely related 
fields. 

Arboriculture majors study care 
and maintenance of shade and or- 
namental trees. People are becom- 
ing more interested in their land- 
scapes, whether its their home, 
city or recreation areas. 

Park Management is closely 
identified with Arboriculture. 
Students study various aspects of 
land use and planning, general 
forest management, park forma- 
tion and expansion. 

In addition. Arbor students are 
taught to skillfully and safely use 
ropes and operate a chainsaw. 

Though the job market is tough, 
these students are professionally 
prepared to meet the needs of the 
public. 











119 



FLQRI GLUB 






The Floriculture Club, led this 
year by President, Steve Calautti, 
put together and sponsored sever- 
al events. In the fall, the club sold 
a ton of pumpkins along with 
dried flowers in front of the SUB. 
It was a beautiful day to sell 
pumpkins and everyone had a 
good time. 

In November, the club took a 
weekend field trip to Falmouth, 
Maine. They visited many green- 
houses in the area, all of which 
had many unique features. At 
night they partied and made the 
weekend, a trip they will never 
forget. 

In December, the club spon- 
sored the French Hall Christmas 
open house. On display were many 
beautiful arrangements, wreaths 
and alcove displays; all of which 
were made by the Retail Design 
Class. The response was over- 
whelming and the whole show was 
a great success. 

For FDD the club set up a booth 
on conservation in the green- 
house. The booth was very infor- 
mative and drew much attention. 
They were awarded the second 
place ribbon. The other officers in 
the club include: Vice President, 
Tom Ahern; Secretary, Cathy 
Senger; and Treasurer, Diane Sir- 
kin. 






120 







'HE'nDEMlEi 



PERiQNflLITlEi 







122 




STOCKBRIDGE 



123 







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The Freshman semester the Turf Club was 
very active, having bi-weekly meetings which 
consisted of bringing in a speaker from the turf 
field, and then having a short meeting 
afterwards covering current issues. A yearly turf 
outing takes place each Fall for all members of 
the club. The outing consists of playing a golf 
tournament, then a dinner, and a meeting 
concluding with a party. 

Every year a meeting takes place covering 
placement training. It's an informal meeting in 
which all seniors tell about their placement 
experience. 




124 






125 



5 
i 



8Q* 






Steve hard at work . . . . 



You want to talk about frustration? 




The 3 Stooges? 



126 



YE-nRBQQR 



His concern and dedication, 
not only to us, but to the 
students and the Stockbridge 
School is unique. Something 
special can be said for those 
people who put themselves out 
that much move and volunteer 
to help in student activities, 
when others would shudder at 
the idea. It is a rewarding 
experience to work with someone 
personally as well as 
professionally, because everyone 
benfits from the experience. 

Associate Professor Edward 
Pira, is one of those people who 
has always stepped forward 
when organizations have needed 
assistance in their endeavors. He 
has taken on a difficult task this 
year of putting together a 
successful collection of memories 
for the past two years of our 
college life. The STOSAG Staff 
would like to extend our sincere 
thanks and gratitude for his 
assistance at the staff meetings 
and hope he will continue to be 
involved with student activities. 
Thank you, Dr. Pira. 



FROM THE YEARBOOK 
STAFF OF 1980 . . . 



flDVISQR 






127 



STQS-flG 
STAFF 




1980 STOSAG STAFF 

Advisor: Dr. Edward Pira 

Editor: Terry Girard 

Photo Editors: Dave Harting 

Steve Gould 
Treasurer: Bette Davis 
Layout Editor: Diane Sirkin 
Sports Editor: Ginger Belanger 
Copy Editor: Bette Davis 
Writers: Anne Lospennato 
Steve Calautti 
Bette Davis 
Pam Horrowitz 
Artwork: Linda Miczek 

Ginger Belanger 
Terry Girard 
Staff Photographers: 
Ginger Belanger 
Anne Lospennato 
Pam Horrowitz 
Marion Morton 
Andy Martin 







128 



Editor's Note; 

First off, I'd like to thank the 
staff. All the photographers and 
writers; (Dave Harting, Steve 
Gould, Ginger Belanger, Diane Sir- 
kin, Anne Lospennato, and Steve 
Callautti). Also, I'd like to express 
my appreciation to Professor Ed- 
ward Pira for all his support and 
encouragement. We owe thanks to 
last year's editor, Paul Donnelly 
and Jerry D'Annello who 
thoughtfully gave their time and 
advice to us. 

Everyone put in a lot of hours 
and some frustrating moments. 
But with cooperation we succeed- 
ed in finishing, (later than we had 
hoped), an interesting yearbook. 

I'd like to give a special thanks 
to Bette Davis, for all her time and 
effort in this project. 

I would like to personally thank 
each and every person who contri- 
buted to this yearbook. But since 
I'm limited in space, I hope this 
serves as a great big THANKS TO 
ALL OF YOU!!!!! 

THANK YOU, 

TERRY GIRARD 










129 












'mi 







130 



SPRIN6 EQNEERT 



The 1980 Spring Concert 
was held on a hot, sunny day 
in April in the football 
stadium. 

Bonnie Raitt and the 
AUman Brothers provided 
excellent tunes for everyone 
to party to. 



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STUDENT 




GOVERNMENT 








134 



STQEKBRIDGE EL-HSS GIFT 



The Graduating Class 
of 1980 presented their 
class gift to Stockbridge 
late in May. The gift was 
a lovely Schwedler 
Maple, which is a variety 
of the Crimson King 
Maple. It is a handsome, 
hardy tree with reddish- 
green foliage. 

Many seniors and 
faculty members got 
together to lend a hand 
planting the tree. 





Supervisors? 





AND UP IT GOES! 




A Job Well Done. 




135 





^" Kday the road, ris& up to meet ybu, 
^ May the y/irid'be. always at your back, 

Mayvthe sunshlne-^arm upon your face, 
. The rains fall soft upon yoiir fields, 

and until we meet a:gain . . .'. 

May God-hoM yo^i Jn the palni of his 






BEiT WIStiEi 
ELflii QF laSQ 




YOUR flLUMNI fISSQEIflTIGN 
STQEKBRIQGE 5G<HQQL QF -HGRIEULTURE 

fILUMNI fISSQEmTIQN 




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BUTlER&UlUnRn, Inc. 

FioiueR/ 



HADLEY. MASS 01036 



RETAIL 
1413) 584 0220 

WHOLESALE 
(413) 584 2110 



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138 



SENIOR DAY 













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1980 









5ENIQR 
B-flNBUET 






STOCKBRIDGE SENIOR BANQUET 

May 13, 1980 - Tuesday Nite 

COLONIAL HILTON - Northampton 
Dinner - Prime Rib or Broiled Scrod 



6-7 Cocktails 



7:30 - 8:30 Dinner 





140 
















141 



EQNGRflTULflTIQNS TQ THE 
Eh'm^ QF laSQ . . . 





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Class President, Marsha Penas welcomes guests and 
graduates. 




President of the Senate: Sally Jablonski. 



142 



GQMMENEEMENT 

On May 23, 1980, Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture held its 
Fifty-Eighth Commencement in 
the beautifully decorated Concert 
Hall in the Fine Arts Center. 

It was a very warm ceremony 
with guest speaker. Congressman 
Silvio Conte, and a speech from 
class President, Marsha Penas. 

With all the guests and relatives 
present Assistant Dean lona Mae 
Reynolds, and Dean John Denison 
gave out the Diplomas and re- 
ceived kisses and handshakes in 
return. 

Even though for many of us it 
meant Good-byes to close friends, 
it was a very enjoyable graduation 
which we'll remember for many 
years to come. 





,^^, JtW A^ ' •-i'^ ^^V*i*iljito; 





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