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Full text of "Stosag"

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STOSAG 



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UNIVERSITY 

OF 

MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST 





STOCKBRIDGE 
SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 





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'NEATH THE ELMS 0F\ 
DEAR OLD AMHERST] 
STANDS OUR COLLEGE \ 
FAIR, HAIL TO THEE] 
OUR ALMA MATER FOR] 
OUR LOVE LIES THERE. 
WORKING EVER, FAL-Eg^W 
TER NEVER, ONWARD^ "^^ 
TOWARD OUR GOAL, 
GIVE YOUR BEST T0\ 
GOOD OLD STOCK- 
BRIDGE, BODY, HEART,\ 
AND SOUL. 




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The members of the yearbook 
staff are proud to present 
STOSAG 81 to the student body 
and faculty of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. It is our 
hope that in future years, when 
you pick up this book, it will 
bring back pleasant memories of 
the many facets of college life. 
To us, this book is more than an 
outline of events, it is a 
"memory" book in which we 
have tried to capture the 
highlights and accomplishments 
of the 1981 academic year. If 
you the reader can relate to this 
pictorial essay of events, than we 
have achieved our goal. 








DEAN JOHN 
DENISON 









lONA MAE 
REYNOLDS 



M ASSOCIATE 
e DIRECTOR 







So? What Else Is New? 



You are, my friends! You are the newest members 
of the Alumni Association of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. Many of you will also be 
new additions to a wide variety of businesses which 
may or may not be related to the great agricultural 
industry. Those of you who are not new to business 
will hopefully be taking some new ideas gained 
here in the Stockbridge School back to those busin- 
esses. 

So? What else is new? Well, there is a relatvely 
new President in the White House who has plans to 
devise new and different federal programs to serve 
the people! Here in the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusettes, the people mandated a new method of 
reducing wasting of and inefficient use of their tax 
dollars called "Proposition 2V'2". 

You new graduates/alumni are truly entering a 
new and exciting (frightening) era which will offer 
you many new challenges and undoubtedly new 
problems. So? What else is new? You entered into 
the Stockbridge School two years ago to tackle a 
new and exciting (frightening) educational exper- 
ience and you have done very well! 

I am confident that you new graduates/alumni 
will rise to the challenges which will confront you 
in the future as well as, hopefully better than, the 
thousands of successful alumni who have preceded 
you. 

From all of us who have had a small part in 
preparing you for this new experience, good luck to 
each one of you. Keep learning about all the new 
things that will affect your lives. If you will do this, 
you will succeed! 

So? What else is new? 



Q«XS 





44- ' " 






NO ONE IS INDISPENSABLE 
(What a thing to say to a new graduate!) 



The Class of 1981 has been blessed with inventive- 
ness, initiative and boundless energy. Here, at the 
Stockbridge School, this class has also received the 
very best education money can buy. Any student who 
is a member of such a class, certainly has a head start 
in making a success of his/her life. 

Many of the old-fashioned homilies are still good 
advice, even to such a student. "Give a good day's 
work for a day's pay." This homily is self-explanatory, 
and I am confident that you will follow it. "Keep to 
the middle of the road." This one applies to all things. 
Certainly we must eat to live, but we should not over- 
eat and endanger our health. Jogging is great, but not 
to the point of exhaustion. It's okay to party and to 
drink, but not to excess. Buy not the more expensive 
nor the cheapest, but the middle-priced article. Do not 
get overemotional. Sure, get angry, who doesn't at 
times? But, do not get to the point where you cannot 
get back to normal. Moderation in all you do is the 
key word. 

I think my father gave me the best piece of advice I 
ever received. When I left my first job, I was prattling 
away to him about how "they" were certainly going to 
miss me because I was such a good worker. My father 
did not say anything for a minute. Then, he calmly 
said, "But remember, no one is indispensable. Sure, 
they will miss you for a while, but they WILL man- 
age! 



I" 



At that time, I was terribly hurt that my own father 
would say such a disloyal thing to me. But, his words 
have been proven over and over through the inter- 
vening years. 

What does this mean? In one sense, it means that if 
you are not doing your job, your employer most cer- 
tainly can do without your services. But, in a bigger 
and broader sense, it means, and remember this, that 
when the opportunity for advancement arises, never 
stay in a dead-end job. Do not sacrifice your own well- 
being because "they" say they cannot do without you. 
They CAN and they WILL! 

With all my heart, I wish the Class of 1981 the best 
of everything-happiness, success, and a long, full and 
contented life. 




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DEDICATION- 



The class of 1981 proudly dedicates this year's 
Stosag to Dr. Douglas L. Airhart. Along with being a 
dedicated faculty member Dr. Airhart is actively 
involved in many student activities and can be seen 
at most Stockbridge functions. He is entering his 
fourth year as advisor to the Student Senate, a job 
he performs with great enthusiasm. 

We the class of 1981 dedicate this book to you Dr. 
Airhart to show our appreciation for your active 
involvement with the student body of the 
Stockbridge School Of Agriculture. 



14 




DOUGLAS L. AIRHART 



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F4U 
PICNIC 



The day that everyone was waiting for 
turned out to be a typical fall day, bright 
and sunny. Another annual Stockbridge 
Fall Picnic was about to begin . . . 




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People filtered in one by 
one. Before you could blink 
an eye Farley Lodge was 
filled with excited seniors 
and enthusiastic freshmen 
Stockies . . . 



25 



Along with burgers and 
beer one could enjoy 
listening and dancing to 
the music or participate in 
a rowdie game of frisbee 






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The day was a great 
success and many new 
friends were made! 
Barb and Keri 




27 



SALE 




The pumpkins were radiating a 
bright orange under the sun's rays. It 
was a great day for the Flori's to 
have their annual pumpkin sale. 

The dried flowers, which were 
collected by the club, stood out in 
front of the sale waiting to be 
selected by on coming customers. 

The Flori's had a great time 
meeting customers as well as catching 
quick conversations with their many 
friends who stopped by on their way 
to classes. 



The pumpkin sale was highlighted 
by a contest which consisted of 
guessing the weight of the largest 
pumpkin. This was won by a 
Southwest resident who correctly 
guessed the weight of the 123 pound 
pumpkin! 

The day was enjoyed by all those 
involved and was extremely 
successful. 




ARBOR CHALL£NO£ 
PARK 



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To the delight"t)f all involved, the sun shone brightly on the 
Annual Tree Climbers Jamboree. The spirit of competition 
crackled in the air between the Seniors and Freshman as they 
prepared for the rigorous competition. 












The crowd was awed as the 
participants demonstrated their 
skills in the areas of ropethrowing, 
footlocking, bodythrust, and 
speedclimbing. Jeff Ruesch was the 
star of the day as winner of both 
the speedclimb and the bodythrust 
events, while Steve Lynch came 
out on top in footlocking and Andy 
Felix won the rope throw event. 

Though the Seniors won the 
competition, everyone felt like a 
winner after having a great time on 
such a beautiful fall day. 



31 



STOCKIUIIIKJI' HI 
COFl'KE S"OP 

COFFKli; (X)(X)yV 



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DONUTS 





This year the Senior Class 
held it's first weekly coffee shop 
which promises to be a 
successful tradition for future 
classes. Tom Maeder became a 
familiar site in Thompson Hall 
as he often checked the 
efficiency of the shop. This 
coffee shop not only benefited 
the Senior Class financially, but 
also helped the many students 
that staggered in to their early 
morning classes. 



32 












33 




Farley Lodge has often been the sight of many spooky characters, 
but on Halloween night these visions could be attributed to something 
more than too many spirits. Even though their balloons were popped, 
Fruit Of the Loom was flying high after winning first prize, followed 
closely by some strange characters looking for the Land of Oz. 







34 







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The Cowboys and fanners added that valuable country 
flair when it came down to foot stomping Halloween fun. 
Everyone from Angels to Devils agreed that the party had 
lived up to a unique Stockbridge tradition of good people, 
good music, and good times. 




35 



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Stockbridge students are always eager to be 
in the company of professionals from their 
related fields, and the Annual Massachusetts 
Arborists Convention provides the perfect 
opportunity to bring together Arbor/Park 
students and professional Arborists. 

The day was full of valuable and 
interesting lectures and demonstrations, but 
the highlight was the competition between 
the students and professionals. The students, 
initiators of the challenge, were quite 
confident of their abilities, and rightfully so 
as they won two of the four events. 

Dean Denison was proud to see his 
students do so well against the pro's, many of 
them Stockbridge graduates themselves! 



36 




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37 



WORK 

WEEKEND 



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NOVEMBER 1+2 




38 




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On the first and second day of November 
1980 a Stockbridge work weekend took 
place. The work weekend consisted of 
volunteer Stockbridge students doing yard 
work for homeowners such as raking 
leaves and clearing away brush. All 
proceeds from this work went to the 
Freshman and Senior classes. Many 
customers were reached through the 
numerous Radio and Newspaper 
advertisements. Students used their own 
equipment and the many rakes and 
shovels lent to them by the Superintendent 
of Grounds of U-Mass. 

Coordinator Tom Maeder said that 29 
Seniors and 13 Freshmen participated and 
the weekend was a total success. 




39 



HOIvIvT JOLI.Y 





Kegs of beer, 
Cases of beer, 
Drops of beer, 

Where's Tom Houston? 




Is anyone going to pass that 
Entomology Exam tomorrow? 

Hey Dave, I'll trade ya a 
cockroach for a grasshopper! 

Dr. Dennison, lona, and a very 
confused horse! 




40 




Stars on the walls, 
Stars in the eyes. 

Strawberry Jam. 

That potent Mistletoe 



WOW! 













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**"**;.: 



The iPSi Soccer season wa^ 
by far the most successful in 
the history of the Stockbridge 
team, with a record of 5-0-2. 
Coach Tony Williams felt that 
this was the best group of 
players that he has ever 
coached. The team had a solid 
defense backed by goalie Rob 
Allen and defensive backs Paul 
Johnson, Gerard Wilson, and 
Jeff Curran. The offense was 
sparked by midfielders Bill 
Keith and Tom Hulbert, 
strikers Ray Jones, wing Chris 
Storie and last years MVP Ken 
Botzek, all players who typified 
the expertise of this years 
squad. 




Front L-R: Bob Medieros, Bill Keefe, Bob Szymanski, Andy Quinlan, Angel Montamagni, 
Gerard Wilson, Tom Hulbert, Peter Bissell, Kenny Botzek. Standing L-R: Bob Allen, Ray Jones, 
Jeff Brown, Jeff Curran, John Van Hoogan, Chris Storie, BillEkross, Don MacNeil, Chris Pirner 
and Coach Tony Williams. 



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Front row: Steve Call, Jon Clemens, Bob Miller, Pete Bissell, 2nd row: Asst. Coach Rich 
Hehert, "Zeke" Dumas, Scott Breyer, Jeff Brown, Tim Smith, Coach Jack Leaman. 3rd 
row: Steve Van Hoogan, Dom Mannarino, Jeff Bober, George Smith. 



The Stockbridge basketball team 
completed a great 1980-81 season with a 
highly respectable 10-3 record. Under the 
guidance of Jack Leaman, former UMass 
varsity basketball coach, the squad came 
through with many fine individual and 
team performances. Freshman forward 
Steve Call led the team in scoring and 
assists, while other outstanding players 
included freshmen Zeke Dumas and 
Steve Bober along with seniors Bob 
Miller and Jon Clemens. The high spirit 
and sincere dedication of all team 
members contributed to the all around 
winning effort. 




45 



FLQR<f1L DESIEN StiQW 



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CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR 

There is no doubt that this year's 
Floral Design Show was a smashing 
success! As if by Christmas magic, 
dreary old room 105 of French Hall 
was transformed into a flowering 
winter wonderland. After a kiss under 
the mistletoe, students, faculty, and 
residents of area nursing homes all 
left with a good dose of Christmas 
Cheer. 




46 




ORGANIZATIONS 




Every major, club, and 
organization is represented in 
tiie Senate, enabling every 
student to have a say in the 
school's student government. 
The Senate is made up of many 
committees which coordinate all 
activities. Among these 
committees are Finance and 
Budget, STOSO (Stockbridge 
Service Organization), Public 
Relations, Athletic, Election, 
Ways and Means, and the 
Constitution Committee to name 
a few. A major responsibility of 
the Senate is the preparation of 
a Student Government budget. 
The main duty of the Senate "is 
to promote the welfare of the 
students of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. " 




48 





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DAVEHARTING 
HEIDI NELSON 
SCOTT BRUNDAGE 
CHRIS PIRNER 
ROBERT MEDEIROS 
JAY WILSON 
MIKE PADUCH 
JIM PEARY 
BRIAN SLATER 
ED BEMIS 
TOM MAEDER 
DAVESEONE 
MARK TOMICH 
PHIL CONNERS 
DOM MANNARINO 
CHRIS JAR VIS 
PAUL WALKER 
JEFFRUESCH 
KIM BARTER 
STEVE GUMMING 
MARK AHRONIAN 
MIKE PIAZZO 
SANDRA FOSS 
ED ROACH 
RAY CORSE 
JANET SOTTILE 
ELMER GROOM 
ED ELDREDGE 
SUE BEARCE 



49 



S€Mf\T€ OfflCGRS 




TREASURERS Steve Gumming and Mark Ahron- 
ian 



50 



SENIOR CLHSS OFFICERS 




51 



FRESHMEN CLRSS OFFICERS 





President Ed Roach and Vice President Sandra 
Foss 



Senator at Large Bob Meideros and Treasurer Janet 
Sottile 





Secretary Susan Bearce 




52 




D£J] 








H/TA E. ANDERSON - STOCKBRIDGE HALL OFFICE 







JOAJV DAMON - SENATE OFFICE 





ELIZABETH A. WIERNASZ - STOCKBRIDGE 
HALL OFFICE 




NOT PICTURED 

KAREN H. CEROW- 
STOCKBRIDGE HALL 
OFFICE 



53 













'5i Peter Deane President 
'81 Randy Brown Vice 

President 
'81 Dan Mulloy Treasurer 
'81 Ron Trudeau Secretary 
'81 Mark Kokansky Steward 
'81 Tony Craig 
'81 Jack Bombardier 
'81 Jan Kasyjanski 
'82 Greg Barnett 
'82 Matt Clement 
'82 Rick Breedon 
'82 Scott Stagis 
'82 Dave Are! 
'82 Paul Andruk 
'82 Mark Egan 
'82 Alan Blanchette 




54 






Alpha Tau Gamma survived yet another year at 
Stockbridge but it took some effort on the part of the 
ATG class of 81. We ran into a multitude of assorted 
problems during the fall and spring semester but nothing 
we couldn't over come. The Chapter House will hopefully 
be painted by the time this Yearbook comes out plus 
other improvements to both the grounds and the interior 
of the house. We should be having more weekend parties 
in the coming years once our court case is completed. 

The attitude around ATG has always been positive even 
in the face of defeat. We didn't win any intramural 
sporting events but we did clean house on the Miller 
Drive. The graduating class from ATG numbers only 10 
but there are no finer or more devoted students then 
these 10 individuals. As spokesman for this group I would 
like to thank Stockbridge and all who make Stockbridge 
what it is today for the education, good times and 
friendships that we have gained by being Stockbridge 
Students. 



Thank you, 




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FRUIT AND VEG 
CLUB 








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flNimflL SCIENCE CLUB 






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65 









Back, L to R: Bob Miller, Mike Powers, Marc Kokansky, Nat Binns, Peter 
VanHeest, Jack Leaman. Front: Coach Mantegna, Jim Tuttle, Tom Alex, 
Mike Leising. Absent: Jan Kasyjanski and Mike Leal 



66 








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Douglas L. Airhart, 

Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of 

Plant and Soil Sciences 




James F. Anderson 

M.S. 

Associate Professor of 

Plant and Soil Sciences 




William J. Bramlage, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Plant and 

Soil Sciences 




John W. Den i son, 

Ed.D. 

Director of Stockbridge 

School 




Robert T. Duby, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of 
Veterinary and Animal 
Sciences 




N. Eugene En gel, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Food and 

Resource Economics 



68 




Heinrich Fanner, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of 
Veterinary and Animal 
Sciences 





John H. Foster, Ph.D. 
Professor of Food and 
Resource Economics 




Nancy L. Garrabrants 
Lecturer Plant and Soil 
Sciences 




George B. Goddard, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Plant and 

Soil Sciences 




Tom S. Hamilton M.S. 
Associate Professor 
Landscape Architecture 
and Regional Planning 



V 










Francis W. Holmes, 
Ph.D. 

Professor of Plant Pa- 
thology 



69 




Tom Houston M.S. 
Landscape Architecture 
and Regional Planning 




Kirk A. Hurto, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of 
Plant and Soil Sciences 




Robert L. Kent. 

M.L.A. 

Associate Professor of 

Plant and Soil Sciences 





Gordon S. King. M.S. 
Professor of Landscape 
Architecture and Re- 
gional Planning 




Deane Lee, M.S. 
Associate Professor of 
Food and Resource Eco- 
nomics 




William J. Lord, Ph.D. 
Professor of Plant and 
Soil Sciences 



70 




Sidney J. Lyford, 

Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of 

Veterinary and Animal 

Sciences 




Edward M. Mahoney, 

M.S. 

Assistant Professor of 

Landscape Architecture 

and Regional Planning 




James B. Mar cum, 

Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of 

Veterinary and Animal 

Sciences 



^ ^•mmmm 




Donald R. Marion, 
Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of 
Food and Resource Eco- 
nomics 




E. Bruce MacDougall, 
Ph.D. 

Professor of Landscape 
Architecture and Re- 
gional Planning 




Harold E. Mosher, 
M.L.A. 

Professor of Landscape 
Architecture and Re- 
gional Planning 



71 




Edward S. Pira, M.S. 
Associate Professor of 
Food Engineering 




Robert J. Precheur, 

Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of 

Plant and Soil Sciences 




Paul N. Procopio, M.S. 
Professor of Landscape 
Architecture and the 
Regional Planning 




lona M. Reynolds, 

M.S. 

Associate Director of 

the Stockbridge School 




William A. Rosenau, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Plant and 

Soil Sciences 




Herbert G. Spindler, 

M.B.A. 

Associate Professor of 

Food and Resource Eco- 



nomics 



72 




Franklin W. 
Southwick, Ph.D. 
Professor of Plant and 
Soil Sciences 




Joseph Troll Ph.D. 
Professor of Plant and 
Soil Sciences 




William D. Tunis, 
Ph.D. 




Roy VanDriesche, 

Ph.D. 

Extension Specialist for 

Entomology 




Jonas Vengris D. Agr. 

Sci. 

Professor of Plant and 

Soil Sciences 




John M. Zak, M.S. 
Professor of Plant and 
Soil Sciences 



73 




It was sometime back in November that Dave Harting asked me to 
write a brief address from myself to go into the yearbook. When spring 
break came along, I had drafts varying from a speech that sounded like 
it came from a pompous buffoon to a silly rendition from a foolish 
lackey (some say the latter describes me aptly, but, hey, I've got to try 
to lend a little dignity to my image). Well, here's my final draft. It goes 
like this . . . 

The two years spent at Stockbridge went by all too fast. It seems 
that just as we were getting genetics down pat and knowing our auxins 
from our gyberrilins that it was time to pick up our silver caps and 
gowns. 

We made alot of new friendships and gained knowledge not only 
about aspects of agriculture in our chosen fields but also we learned 
more about ourselves. 

Our class was an exceptional class. We started a coffeeshop, brought a 
rebirth to fall work weekend and blessed ourselves with perhaps the 
most original mug Stockbridge has ever seen, just to name a few 
accomplishmen ts. 

I would like to thank those who worked hardest to make all of our 
events enjoyable and successful. But most of all, I thank you all for 
allowing me to be the President of such an outstanding class. 

Tom Maeder, President 
Class of 1981 



74 




SENIORS 



AGRICULTURAL 
BUSII^ESS 

MAi^AGEMEJJI^T 



This program provides students with basic busi- 
ness management training for the agricultural in- 
dustry and related fields. Employment opportuni- 
ties leading to supervisory and management posi- 
tions are available in agricultural business and re- 
lated firms such as feed, seed, fertilizer, chemical, 
and farm supply manufacturers and distributors; 
credit firms; farm machinery dealers; food proces- 
sors and distributors of fruit, vegetable, dairy, 
poultry, livestock, and nursery products. 



76 






JANICE STILES 



MICHAEL CONNOR 



JON CLEMENS 




LAURIE WESTON 



CAMERA SHY 

MICHAEL 
DiPIETRO 

RAYMOND 
TAUSEVICH 

STEVEN VAN 
HOOGEN 







This program is designed to prepare students for 
careers in the broad field of the animal, dairy, and 
poultry sciences. In recent years the demand for 
graduates of this department has exceeded the 
supply. The demand continues to be strong for 
foremen, herdsmen, and managers of dairy, live- 
stock, and poultry production enterprises, as well 
as for technicians in artificial breeding units, dairy 
herd improvement associations, and animal re- 
search laboratories. 



78 




MALAH ANDERSON 





STEPHEN DEVINE 





DAVID GOLAS 

Athletic Activities: Dorm Softball. 
Favorite Saying: "Can't beat it with 
a stick" Clubs: An Sci Club. General 
Activities: Field trips to dairy and 
pig farms, Pig roast, Apple cider 
sale, fart around 




KARL HEINS 




MARC KOKANSKY 





STEPHEN PROUTY 





TIMOTHY SMITH 



JAMES SLOWINSKI 






•x 



RICHARD TAVARES 



LISA WHITMAN 



CAMERA SHY 

CAROL GIDARI 

PAULHARLEN 

CHRISTOPHER 
HOLLIS 

KRISTEN KEOGH 

AMY LOCKE 

SUSAN PHANEUF 

THOMAS PILLING 



CYNTHIA 
PLIMPTON 



MttF 




•jM* 





ARBORICULTURE 
» Ai^D PARK 
MA]^AGEMEJ!I^T 



X 



^' 





Arboriculture is the care of shade and ornamental 
trees. It includes tree planting; large tree moving; 
diagnosing and treatment of tree disease, defects, 
and mechanical injuries; identification and control of 
tree insect pest; fertilizing; pruning and repair of 
storm damaged trees; and removal of dead or 
undesirable trees. 

Careers for graduates of this program include: 
operators; formen and salesmen for arboriculture 
firms; utility line clearance foremen; tree wardens; 
tree care personnel in estates, parks, highways, 
campuses, etc. * 

Park management offers many opportunities with 
municipal, county, and state groups dealing with 
parks. Many towns and cities need personnel who 
have an understanding of Arboriculture and Park 
Management. 




82 





MARK AMOLING 

Favorite Saying; "Hey Astro!" 
"Dave gets baggecl again!" Clubs: 
Arbor and Park. General Activities: 
Pegging Astro with anything and 
everything 




KIMBERLY BARTER 

Favorite Place: Grandfather's home 
in Maine(Keenaydin Lake). Favor- 
ite Saying: "These things do hap- 
pen" "Hit the fan" Clubs: Senate 
President, Arbor Park club treasur- 
er. Activities: everything. 




ALLEN BIRD 




JOHN BOMBARDIER 

Class offices: Freshman Class Presi- 
dent. General Activities: ATG, pho- 
tography, skiing, drugs 




KENNETH BOTZEK 

Athletic Activities: Soccer and in- 
tramural volleyball Favorite Saying: 
"If the shoe fits wear it" Clubs: Ar- 
bor Park, Yearbook. General Activi- 
ties: Studies? Soccer, Skiing (when 
in season), Girl-hunting (also when 
in season) 




-^- 





j 




DANIEL ROSSI 



JEFFREY RUESCH 

Athletic Activities: Speed running 
(back from ttie D.C.) Favorite Say- 
ing: "I can talcejust tliis much more 
of Gorden King! Clubs: Arbor and 
Park, club major rep to Senate. 




CRAIG WHITING 

Favorite Saying: "Enjoy life, its the, 
only one you have!" Clubs: Arbor 
Park, General Activities: Hunting, 
lisbing, being outdoors, skiing, 
women partying, playing guitar, and 
trying to enjoy myself 





CAMERA SHY 
JOSEPH ALONGI 

BRADLEY CORMAN 

STEPHEN COSWELL 

ANNE DEMPSEY 

EDWARDO FALCAO 

EDWARD 

GARVULENSKI 

ROBERT LaBOMBARD 

MARK McDonald 

ROBERT MEANEY 
ARTHUR MURPHY 
JEFFREY NISSENBAUM 
JAMES PROBST 
KARL SCHMUCKI 
JAMES TOOMEY 
JOHN TRIPP 
MICHAEL WINSTON 



JOHN YOUNG 



SPECIAL 
RBCOOIH^ITIOJ^ 



r.^:-^«i::j)HK-i'!s:x 





DeWhirst W. Wade 



The compulsion to finish what they start is one of the characteris- 
tics and also one of the secrets of successful people and they seem to 
be more disturbed than most about not completing a project no 
matter how small. 

In the fall of 1935, a happy little freshman entered the Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture majoring in General Horticulture. He 
had already been out in the world working in the area and had 
graduated from the Bartlett School of Tree Surgery but he wanted to 
know more about everything! So he came to school, where he re- 

cieved good grades and was instrumental in establishing the Ornamental Horticulture Club. Between his 
freshman and senior years, he married a lovely young girl, came back to school in the fall and finished his fall 
semester but only went through March 1937 in his senior semester. Anyone who dates back that far will 
remember that finances were a BIG problem in those days and so, for various reasons, Dewey had to leave his 
education unfinished. He left incomplete courses in machinery, uses of herbaceous plants, surveying and 
planning, and plant materials and their care. It would certainly seem that bad mastered the content of these 
courses by now, for in the intervening 44 years, he established and operated a highly successful Tree Care and 
Landscaping business. He is the author of numerous articles on tree care, was founder and editor of the 
magazine ARBOR DAY, and received a citation for a section he wrote for the ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITAN- 
NICA. He was Vice president and later President of the New York Arborist's Association and also served as 
Treasurer and Director of the national Arborist's Association. He has been called in repeatedly by governers 
of New York as an expert on tree care and also served the federal government in the same capacity. At one 
point in his life, he and President Harry Truman planted a tree together. 

Meanwhile he continued to educate himself while also raising two fine sons. He took 36 credits at the New 
York Botanical Gardens. He attended winter and summer schools at Cornell University, the Syracuse College 
of Forestry, at the Long Island Institute of Agriculture and Technology at Farmington, N.Y. and at the 
University of Connecticut. He took the Dale Carnegie Course. But all this was not enough. He had not 
finished what he started here in 1935. He had not received his degree from the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture. He tried- oh yes, he tried! But the old rules were hard and fast- if you didn't finish the courses at 
Stockbridge, you didn't graduate. Doesn't it sound a little silly to expect a man with Dewey's background to 
come back and take courses in machinery, plants and their care and such??? And he certainly had enough 
additional college credit to transfer in to the School to add to the 58 credits he earned here. Also, they were in 
his field of expertise. This past year, Dewey's transcripts and history were looked in to and it was concluded 
that he was qualified for the Associate Degree in Arboriculture and Park Management. 

On May 29, 1981, 46 years after he started school, Dewhirst W. Wade walked across the stage and received 
his Associate Degree. 



Reprinted from Stockbridge Alumni News 
Volume 49 -Number 2 
Fall 1981 



FIvORICUI^TURE 



'^ 




Excellent job opportunities for graduates are 
available as skilled workers in commercial green- 
houses, arboreta, and educational garden centers 
as wholesale and retail florists; as salesmen for 
florist and home garden suppliers; and as sales 
agents or operators of commercial garden centers. 
Students also have the opportunity to go into busi- 
ness for themselves. 





90 







CHESTER DZIEDZIC 




ROBERT EATON, JR. 

Favorite Saying "Back off." Clubs: 
Flori, Campus Crusade for Christ "I 
encourage you all to accept the 
peace of Jesus Christ" John 14:27 









CAMERA SHY 



JEANNETTE ALLEN 
ALAN BLANCHETTE 

ANN CHIN 

MICHAEL 
KONJOIAN 

JAY WILSON 



FRUIT Ai^D 
VEGETABLE CROPS 



This course emphasizes the basic principles of 
plant growth which underlie sound cultural prac- 
tices, the economic factors which bear upon the 
marketing procedures, and the business aspect of 
the student's specialized interest. 

For Fruit and Vegetable Crops majors, there is a 
wide variety of jobs including the following: fore- 
men, operators, or owners of fruit and vegetable 
farms; employees on private estates and institu- 
tions; and salesmen for various supplies, equip- 
ment, and machinery companies. There is also 
work in private and state produce inspection; 
wholesale and retail sales with various market 
agencies; and in many business and industry oper- 
ations dealing with produce. 



94 




MARYMcNAMARA 





MICHAEL PIAZZO 



CAMERA SHY 



ROBERT DALURY 



MICHAEL HANSON 
ED WARD HA YWARD 



STEVEN HELLER 



BRIAN McIVER 




IvABORATORT 

Ai^IMAIv 
TECHJ^OLOGY 





This program is designed to provide a broad base 
of training in the areas where technologists are 
most needed, these being breeding, management, 
and laboratory techniques. ««*»- 

Upon completion of the course the LAT gra- 
duate can be employed by commercial production 
facilities, private and governmental animal re- 
search laboratories, technical sales and services 
and some graduates may be employed as assistants 
to veterinarians in private practice. 

On a sad note, this is the last year that this major 
is being offered due to lack of enrollment. 





OPERATIOiJIJ^S 



The courses within this department deal with the 
study of drafting room practices and field techniques 
necessary for the landscape development of grounds, 
including the measuring of walks, drives, terraces and 
walls. Graduates of this program are qualified for posi- 
tions as plant propagators, foremen, or superintendents 
for nurseries; gardeners, foremen, or superintendents 
on private estates, public parks, cemeteries, botanical 
gardens, and various other public and private institu- 
tional grounds; foremen with landscape contractors 
and real estate developers; owners of their own land- 
scape firms, nurseries, and garden centers; and sales- 
men for seed and nursery concerns. 








/'4 



WAYNE 
LAMOUREUX 



DANIEL LENOX 

Athletic Activities: Old Mill-Swill. 
Favorite Saying: "Ya know what I'm 
saying?" General Activities: Work 
weekend, Soil Damage by Propane 
Committee, National Nectria Can- 
ker Foundation, Charter Member 



-Wk 



THOMAS MAEDER 

Athletic: Running, 12 Oz curls w/ 
Bud, Snake hunting with Y. Jack 
Favorite Saying: "Uh, the Kiwi, it's 
a brown thing, doesn't look like 
much" 

Land Op Club, Pres Class of '81 
Have V.W. will travel. Infirmary 
Hill. N.H. on Sunday. Fritz in '80. 
Coffee Shop, Work weekend. Spring 
Clean Up 






CAMERA SHY 
SCOTT ANDERSEN 



RANDOLPH BROWN 



SUSAN DONOVAN 




JOHN GAMELIN 
NORMAN ROWE 



s^ 



TURF MAJ^AGEMEJJI^T 



There is an immediate need for skilled supervisors 
and assistants to superintendents of parks, cemeteries, 
and recreational areas. Municipal and private golf 
clubs expect their superintendents to be trained in turf 
maintenance. Students who major in Turf Manage- 
ment find jobs as these assistants and superintendents 
of golf courses, parks, cemeteries, commercial nurser- 
ies, and landscape service companies and equipment 
supply dealers. 




CAMERA SHY 



WALTER BILOWZ 
NATHANIEL BINNS 
JAMES CAPUTO 
THOMAS FULVI 
JOSEPH KIRVIN 
MICHAEL LEAL 
STEPHEN MALLOY 
ROBERT MILLER 
MATTHEW PARASCAND 
JOHN PENDERGAST 
MICHAEL POWERS 
KEVIN SCANLON 
TIMOTHY SCHILLING 
THOMAS SCHWARTZ 
ERNEST SHAW 
JONATHAN STARR 







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Stockbridgc School of Agriculture 



4th Annual 

PROFESSIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT DAY 




Campus Center, University of Massachusetts 



February 18, 1981 



Theme : 



Energy in Agriculture 




119 



OPENING CEREMONY 




HtH ANNUAL 



PROFESS 
DEVELOPM 

:: ;.~ORED BY: 



ONAL 
ENT DAM 

5T0C^BR!DGE 



120 



WED. FEB. IB 

CAMPUS CENTER AUDTORIUM 

FREE ADMISSON 

opfn to all 

ehfrbj in 

ARRF'I f.TI IRF 



THEME-. 



The Fourth Annual Stockbridge 
Professional Development Day was held on 
Wednesday, February 18, 1981 in the 
Campus Center Auditorium. 

FDD is a one day event solely organized, 
funded and run by Stockbridge students 
interested in providing a convention for 
students, alumni, faculty, and professionals 
of agricultural and horticultural fields. 
This year's attendance was nearly one 
thousand people. 



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P/)D ii.js three main facets: u 
series of Seminars. Industrial 
Displays, and Student Displays. 
Brian Slater (Land OP 'SD was 
this year's Seminar Chairman and 
put together a program consisting 
of nine seminars. These speakers 
gave interesting presentations i)n 
widely varied subjects. The 
seminars are ongoing thr<nigh()ut 
the day so there is plenty of 
opportunity to hear the ones in 
which you are interested. The 
exhibiting companies in the 
Industrial Displays represent a 
cross section of the School's 
curriculum. 




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STUDENT DISPLAYS 




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This year's Student Displays were 
under the guidance of Kim Barter 
(Arbor Park '81 ). Each major is 
allotted a space in the auditorium to 
set up a display to show something 
about their major. The displays are 
judged for educational value as well 
as aesthetics. Floriculture took first 
place, Land Op and Turf tied for 
second place, Arbor Park finished 
third, and Honorable mention went 
to the Animal Science Club and Fruit 
and Vegetable Club for their displays. 

Edward Bemis (Land Op '81) 
General Chairman 1981 PDD 



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Keri Kerichenko accepting the First Place ribbon for Floriculture 



AWARDS 



FIRST PLACE - 
FLORICULTURE 

SECOND PLACE - LAND OP, 
TURF 

THIRD PLACE - ARBOR 
PARK 

HONORABLE MENTION - 
ANIMAL SCIENCE, FRUIT 
AND VEGETABLE 




Honorable Mention-Ray Corse for Fruit and Veg (left) and Bob Medeiros 
for Animal Science (right) 



123 




This page is dedicated to professor Herbert Spindler who is 
retiring at the end of this year. We the class of 1981 would 
like to thank you Professor Spindler for your many years of 
dedication to the Stockhridge School of Agriculture. We wish 
you the best of luck in your retirement years and we hope 
that you will continue to attend Stockbridge events in the 
future. 




Professor Spindler accepting the 
"Outstanding Teacher of 
Stockbridge" Award at this years 
Progress Banquet. 



MA 




horthorn 



THE NEWSLETTER OF THE STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL OF AGRICl . TURE 





BRIAN J. SLATER, 

EDITOR 

EDWARD G. BEMIS, 

LAYOUT 

HEIDI NELSON, STAFF 

JANET SOTTILE, STAFF 

DAVID G. SEONE, STAFF 

CHRIS JARVIS, GRAPHICS 

JIM HOFFSTETTER, 

STAFF 



125 



STOSRC STHFF 






Dave Harting 



Editor-in-Chief, 
layout, photography, 
graphics, color 
photography 

Ken Botzek - Photography Editor, 
layout, color 
photography 

Heidi Nelson - Assistant Editor, 

layout, photography 

Wendy Vaillancourt - Layout 

Jim Peary - Photography, layout 

Jim Krupa - Photography 

Liz Hamilton - Layout 

Janet Sottile - Layout 

Susan Bearce - Layout 

Sandra Foss - Graphics, layout 

Yvonne O'Hern - Layout 

Carol Noel - Layout 







■P 


i^Ni^EZl/*****'''^- - 






CONTRIBUTORS 
Ed Bemis - Photography 
Kim Barter - Photography, 
writing 

Tom Maeder - Writing 
Sue Tuttle - Photography 
Keri Kerichenko - Photography, 

layout 
Sue Von Flattern - Photography 
James Hoffstetter - Writing 
Chris Jarvis - Graphics 

Special thanks to Mark 
Ahronian and Steve Cumming 
for their handling of our 
financial problems. 



YEARBOOK 
ADVISOR 




ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EDWARD PIRA 



The STOSAG SI staff mnild 
like to thank Professor Edward 
Pira for all his help in the produc- 
tion of this book. He is a man 
who's dedication to the student 
body is unquestionable and is al- 
ways there when needed. We 
thank you. Professor Pira for your 
assistance at our meetings and 
with your handling of many of our 
administrative problems. 



128 



PKOtjKSSS 

nAMusz 




The twenty seventh annual Spring Progress 
Banquet was held in the Student Union 
Ballroom on March 16, 1981. The night 
consisted of awards, a dinner, and 
entertainment by the foot-stomping band 
Willow Creek. Highlights of the awards 
consisted of outstanding teacher of each major, 
outstanding professor for the school, 
outstanding STOSO person, outstanding 
senator, MVP's of the sports teams, and the 
yearbook dedication. Service award grants and 
senator certificates were also given out to 
students who actively participated in the extra 
curricular activities associated with the 
Stockbridge school. 



130 





AWARDS 



OUTSTANDING TEACHERS 
LAT- Peggy McConnell 

AN SCI- Dr. Heinrich Fenner 
FLORI- Dr. Douglas Airhart 
AG BUS- Herbert Spindler 
LAND OP-John Zak 
TURF- Dr. Joseph Troll 
AR PK- Tom Houston 
FRUIT + James Anderson 

VEG- 
OUTSTANDING 
PROFESSOR 

Herbert Spindler 
OUTSTANDING 
STOSO MEMBER 

Kim Barter 
OUTSTANDING SENATOR 

Ed Bemis 
MVP SOCCER 

Gerard Wilson 
MVP BASKETBALL 
Steve Call 
STOSAG DEDICATION 

Dr. Douglas Airhart 





131 




After all the speeches were 
given and awards presented, 
Willow Creek caught everyone's 
attention with some "down 
home" music. Dancing, partying, 
and just plain socializing with 
good friends made for a perfect 
evening for all. 




132 



65E 




^i 



The livestock Classic consists of students competing in livestock 
showmanship. The animals are assigned to particular students 
who train and work with them individually for months in prepara- 
tion for the Classic. Livestock shown consist of beef, dairy cattle, 
sheep, swine, horses and oxen teams. The event also consists of the 
very popular Baby Animal Parade in which the young animals are 
brought into the general audience to allow everyone the chance to 
see and pet the animals. This year's Classic was held on April 24 
and 25 in Grinnell Arena and was a tremendous success. 



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Associate Director lona Reynolds Director John Denison 





Class President Thomas Maeder 

SPEAKERS 

MASSACHUSETTS COM- 
MISSIONER OF AGRI- 
CULTURE 
Frederic Winthrop, Jr. 

UNIVERSITY CHANCEL- 
LOR 

Henry Koffler 

ACTING DEAN COLLEGE 

OF FOOD AND NA TURAL 

RESOURCES 

Dr. James B. Kring 



139 






ROLAND H. VERBECK ALUMNI AWARD- Edward 

Bemis 

Presented to the student who best typifies the ideals and 

spirit of the Stockbridge School 






140 



Commencement 1981 



Lear 




Graduated January 2, 1981 



Stockbridge School of Agriculture 
Honorary Scholastic Society 
(Cumulative averages of 3.40 or higher 
through third semester) 



Arboriculture and Park Management 
Jeffrey Elsmore Cfiapman Gregory Vincent St. Cyr 

Robert t\/lichael Hagerty Kevin Joseph Scanlon 

James Paul Ippolito Dewfiirst W. Wade 

Edward Conant Pearson 



Heather Bargeron 
Edward G. Bemis 
Diane R. Berthiaume 
Peter G. Deane 
Diane M. Ferrazzi 
David B. Foster 
Thomas L. Fulvl 
Peter J. Gilmore 
David F. Harting 
Karl W. Heins 
Peter G. House 
Robert J. LaBombard, Jr. 
Mary F. Macdonald 
Andrew S. Martin 



Mary T. McNamara 
Scott H. Miller 
Jeffery B. NIssenbaum 
Theresa M. Olanyk 
Michael L. Paduch 
Jeffery E. Ruesch 
Georgy V.'St. Cyr 
Edward M. Salminen 
Timothy A. Schilling 
Paul W. Walker 
Craig H. Whiting 
Steven J. Whittemore 
Alethea A. Yates 



Floriculture 
Carol Jeannette Smith 

Fruit and Vegetable Crops 
Andrew Studley Martin Scott Hayes Miller 

Hotel. Restaurant, and Travel Admmistration 
Linda Jane Peterson 

Landscape Operations 
Christopher Clark Johnson Thomas Linwood Pierce 

William Alan Mclntyre Leonard Louis Turbini 

Turf Management 
Michael Turnbull Harrison Sidney Daniel Pierson, Jr. 

Michael Leon Miner 



Dean's List 



Stockbridge Alma Mater 



(Cumulative averages of 3.00-3.34 
through third semester) 



Thomas R. Alex 
Jeannette A. Allen 
Malah Anderson 
Craig M. Bloodgood 
Gary P. Briggs 
Theodore E. Butynski 
Ann M. Chin 
Stephen P. Coswell 
Robert G. Dalury 
John P. Gamelin 
Susan B. Goldstein 
Bryan L. Goulet 
Christopher M. Graziano 
Edward W. Hayward 
Linda D. Jackson 
Robert K. Johnson 
Leslie P. Jones 
Thomas E. Maeder 
Richard A. Malloy 
William A. Mclntyre 



Robert Meany 
Susan R. Morgan 
Teresa C. Peckham 
Leonard G. Peltier 
Stephen A. Prouty 
Shaun P. Quilty 
Norman O. Rowe 
Kevin J. Scanlon 
David G. Seoane 
Christine M. Singleton 
Brian J. Slater 
James J. Slowinski 
Carol J. Smith 
Bernard L. Smolkovich 
Janice L. Stiles 
James P. Toomey 
Robert M. Turecek 
James E. Tuttle 
Peter M. VanHeest 
John B. Young 



Neath the elms of dear old Amherst 
Stands our college fair. 
Hail to thee our Alma Mater 
Stockbridge men go there. 
Working ever, falter never. 
Onward to our goal. 
Give your best to dear old Stockbridge. 
Body, heart, and soul. 

Tho' the hours are quickly passing 

And we soon must part. 

Thy great halls will not be lonely 

They contain our hearts. 

In the future thought will wander 

Back, and we will see 

Scenes we knew at dear old Stockbridge; 

Always dear they'll be. 

Words by: Charles F. Mandell S'39 
Russell S. Shaw S'39 
Timothy C. Sullivan S'40 



141 





Kill t^tHI' »» 



FROM 
THE EDITOR 



Well here it is, at last, the 1981 STOSAG! 
I hope that your expectations of this book 
have been fulfilled. 




We ran into numerous difficulties in the 
production of this year's STOSAG but all problems were eventually 
resolved. To name a few, we were stuck with a frozen budget first 
semester, we lost many rolls of film when our developing company went 
out of business (only to have them appear again later), and the strange 
disappearance of all the Senior Portraits for well over a year. Well all 
obstacles were eventually overcome and the book finally went to press. 



I would like to take this time to thank some people who were instru- 
mental in the production of this yearbook. First Fd like to thank last 
year's editor, Terri Girard for her support. Next Fd like to thank my 
staff, and especially my assistants, Heidi Nelson and Ken Botzek (a big 
thanks to your car also. Ken). To Don Lendry, our American Yearbook 
representative, thanks for your guidance, to Professor Pira, thanks a 
million for your help with our administrative problems, and I would also 
like to give a big thanks to everyone who contributed along the way. 



Fd like to give a very special thanks to Wendy Vaillancourt for all your 
help and for always being there when needed. I really never would have 
made it without you. 



In closing Fd like to wish each and every one of you the best of luck in 
everything in the years to come. 



Dave Harting 
Editor STOSAG 81 



143 



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