(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Strange histories : consisting of ballads and other poems / from the ed. of 1607, with an introd. and notes"

STRANGE HISTORIES 



CONSISTING OF 



anfc otfier 



PRINCIPALLY 



BY THOMAS DELONEY. 



dFrom tije Litton of 1607. 



WITH AN INTRODITCTIO 




LONDON : 
REPRINTED FOR THE PERCY SOCIETY, 

BY C. RICHARDS, ST. MARTIN'S LANE. 



MDCCCXLI. 



COUNCIL 



President. 
THE RT. HON. LORD BRAYBROOKE, F.S.A. 

THOMAS AMYOT, ESQ. F.R.S. 

WILLIAM HENRY BLACK, ESQ. 

J. A. CAHUSAC, ESQ. F.S.A. 

WILLIAM CHAPPELL, ESQ. F.S.A. Treasurer. 

JOHN PAYNE COLLIER, ESQ. F.S.A. 

T. CROFTON CROKER, ESQ. F.S.A. M.R.I.A. 

REV. ALEXANDER DYCE. 

JAMES ORCHARD HALLIWELL, ESQ. F.R.S. 

G. P. R. JAMES, ESQ. 

WILLIAM JERDAN, ESQ. F.S.A. M.R.I.A. 

CHARLES MACKAY, ESQ. 

T. J. PETTIGREW, ESQ. 

E. F. RIMBAULT, ESQ Secretary. 

JAMES WALSH, ESQ. 

THOMAS WRIGHT, ESQ. M.A. F.S.A. 



INTRODUCTION. 



ONLY two copies of the ensuing work, with the 
date of 1607, are known, and one of these is 
imperfect: our reprint is from the unique perfect 
copy. It has no name on the title-page, but 
Bishop Percy (Keliques, ii. 160, Edit. 1812) 
mentions an edition in 1612, under the same title, 
which purports to have been written " by Thomas 
Deloney," and there is little doubt that he was 
the author of the greater part of the volume. He 
was the writer of a ballad inserted in the ear- 
liest work issued by the Percy Society. That 
ballad was dated in 1586, about which year 
Deloney became a versifier, and he acquired 
great popularity before the close of the sixteenth 
century. In 1596, he was called by Thomas Nash 
(in his "Have with you to Saffron Walden") 
" the ballading silk- weaver," and that was most 
likely his trade, until he took to the unprofitable 
pursuit of poetry : " poverty (says Burton) is 
the Muse's patrimony." His "book for the silk- 



VI 

weavers" is mentioned in a letter to Lord Burgh- 
ley from Stephen Slany, Lord Mayor of London, 
dated July 25, 1596, which relates chiefly to a 
ballad on the dearth of corn, which had given 
offence (See Mr. Wright's " Elizabeth and her 
Times," ii. 462). The nature of this ballad is 
more precisely described in Stow's Survey (B. v. 
p. 333, Edit. 1720), where it is stated that De- 
loney " brought in the Queen speaking with her 
people, dialogue wise, in very fond and undecent 
sort." 

Whether any proceedings were instituted 
against him in consequence, we are not informed ; 
but we find him continuing to write until the year 
1600, when, according to the evidence of Kemp, 
the actor, at the close of his " Nine Days Won- 
der," (see the Rev. Mr. Dyce's reprint for the 
Camden Society, p. 21) Deloney was dead. His 
" Thomas of Reading," " Jack of Newbury," and 
" History of the Gentle Craft," all three men- 
tioned by Kemp in the same tract, went through 
many editions. 

The small volume in octavo, reprinted in the 
following pages, appears to contain a collection 
of most of Deloney's historical ballads, though 
not all he had separately printed before his 
decease. It is very possible that there was a 
still earlier edition of " Strange Histories" than 



VI 1 



that we have made use of, and that it ended with 
the " Speech between certain Ladies," &c. on 
Salisbury Plain. How that piece of prose came 
to be inserted we know not ; but it relates to 
events more than a century older than the period 
when the volume was published, and is not in any 
way connected with the immediate subject of 
the ballad which precedes it. The title-page 
might be new in 1607, in the same way that 
the work appears to have been reprinted in 1612 
(the edition noticed by Bishop Percy), without any 
information that the contents had ever appeared 
before. Deloney's ballad of "Fair Rosamond" was 
perhaps first added to the collection in 1607, and 
the copy we supply must be looked upon as the 
earliest and most authentic impression of that 
celebrated production : it will be found to differ 
very materially from that furnished by Bishop 
Percy. Several other ballads in the ensuing 
pages have also been inserted in different works 
of the same class, both ancient and modern, but 
never in so genuine a shape as they bear in 
" Strange Histories." 

" The Table," which follows the title-page, only 
applies to the first eight-and- thirty pages, and here, 
it is probable, one of the earlier impressions of the 
work ended. William Barley, the stationer for 
whom the edition of 1607 was printed, probably 



Vlll 

did not think the volume large enough, and there- 
fore, continuing the signatures, added twenty-two 
additional pages, making use of various short 
poems by other authors, which fell in his way, 
and which he could use with impunity. Most 
of these are not of a character accordant with 
the earlier portion of the volume, and we meet 
with productions by anonymous writers, as well as 
with others to which initials are subscribed, and 
which may be assigned to Thomas Richardson, 
and Anthony Chute. Richard Johnson's " Crown 
Garland of Golden Roses," which it is intended 
to reprint hereafter, is a publication very much 
of the same kind as that now furnished to the 
Members of the Percy Society. 



STRANGE HISTORIES, 



OR, 



SONGES AND SONETS, OF KINGS, PRINCES, 

DUKES, LORDES, LADYES, KNIGHTS, 

AND GENTLEMEN. 

Very pleasant either to be read or songe : 

and a most excellent warning 

for all estates. 



Imprinted at London for W. Barley, and 

are to be sold at his Shop in Gratious 

streete against S. Peters Church. 

1607. 



THE TABLE. 



CANT. I. 

The Kentish-men with long tayles. 

Salomons good huswife, in the 31 of his Proverbs. 

CANT. II. 
Of King Henrie the first, and his Children. 

The Dutchesse of Suffolkes calamitie. 

CANT. III. 
King Edward the 2. crowning his Sonne king of England. 

CANT. IV. 
The imprisonment of Queene Elenor. 

CANT. V. 
The death of king John, poysoned by a Frier. 

CANT. VI. 

The imprisonment of king Edward the Second. 

CANT VII. 

The murthering of king Edward the Second, being kild with a 
hot burning spit. 

CANT. VIII. 

The banishment of the Lord Matrevers, and Sir Thomas Gurney. 

CANT. IX. 

The winning of the lie of Man. 

CANT. X. 

The Rebellion of Wat Tilor and Jack Straw. 

A speech betweene Ladies, being Sheepheards on Salisburie 

plaine. 

B 2 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 



THE VALIAUNT COURAGE AND POLICIE OF THE KENTISHMEN 
WITH LONG TAYLES, WHERBY THEY KEPT THEIR ANCIENT 
LAWES AND CUSTOMES, WHICH WILLIAM THE CON- 
QUEROR SOUGHT TO TAKE FROM THEM. 



CANT. I. 

To the tune of Rogero. 

WHEN as the Duke of Normandie 

with glistring speare and shield, 
Had entred into fayre England, 

and fo[i]ld his foes in fielde, 
On Christmas day in solemne sort, 

then was he crowned here 
By Albert Archbishop of Yorke, 

with many a noble Peere. 

Which being done, he changed quite 

the custome of this land, 
And punisht such as daily sought 

his statutes to withstand: 
And many cities he subdude, 

faire London with the rest; 
But Kent did still withstand his force, 

which did his lawes detest. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 

To Dover then he tooke his way 

the Castle downe to fling, 
Which Arviragus builded there, 

the noble Britaine King. 
Which when the brave Arch-bishop bold 

of Canterburie knew, 
The Abbot of S. Austines eke, 

with all their gallant crue, 

They set themselves in armour bright 

these mischiefes to prevent, 
With all the yeomen brave and bold 

that were in fruitfull Kent. 
At Canterburie they did meete 

upon a certaine day, 
With sword and speare, with bill and bow, 

and stopt the Conquerers way. 

Let us not live like bondmen poore 

to Frenchmen in their pride, 
But keepe our auncient libertie, 

what chaunce so ere betide: 
And rather die in bloudie fielde, 

in manlike courage prest, 
Then to endure the servile yoake 

which we so much detest. 

Thus did the Kentish Commons crie 

unto their leaders still, 
And so marcht forth in warlike sort, 

and stand on Swanscombe hill; 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Where in the woodes they hid themselves 

under the shady greene, 
Thereby to get them vantage good, 

of all their foes unseene. 

And for the Conquerors comming there 

they privily laide waight, 
And thereby sodainely appald 

his lofty high conceipt. 
For when they spied his approch, 

in place as they did stand, 
Then marched they to hem him in, 

each one a bough in hand. 

So that unto the Conquerors sight, 

amazed as he stood, 
They seemed to be a walking grove, 

or els a mooving wood. 
The shape of men he could not see, 

the boughes did hide them so; 
And now his heart for feare did quake 

to see a forrest goe. 

Before, behind, and on each side 

as he did cast his eye, 
He spide these woodes with sober pace 

approch to him full nye. 
But when the Kentishmen had thus 

inclosd the Conqueror round, 
Most suddenly they drew their swordes, 

and threw the boughs to ground. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Their banners they displaide in sight, 

their trumpets sounde a charge; 
Their ratling drummes strikes up alarme, 

their troopes stretch out at large. 
The Conquerour with all his traine 

were hereat sore agast, 
And most in perill when he thought 

all perill had beene past. 

Unto the Kentishinen he sent 

the cause to understand, 
For what intent, and for what cause 

they took this warre in hand? 
To whome they made this short replie, 

for liberty wee fight, 
And to enjoy K. Edwards lawes, 

the which we hold our right. 

Then said the dreadfull Conquerour, 

you shall have what you will, 
Your ancient customes and your lawes, 

so that you will be still, 
And each thing els that you will crave 

with reason at my hand, 
So you will but acknowledge mee 

chiefe king of faire England. 

The Kentishmen agreed hereon, 

and laid their armes aside, 
And by this means king Edwards lawes 

in Kent doth still abide: 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 

And in no place in England else 
those customes do remaine, 

Which they by manly policie 
did they of Duke William gaine. 

FINIS. 



SALOMONS GOOD HOUSWIFE, IN THE 31 OF HIS PROVEBBES. 

HE that a gracious wife doth find, 
Whose life puts vertue chiefe in ure, 
One of the right good huswife kind, 
That man may well himselfe assure, 

And boasting say that he hath found 
The richest treasure on the ground. 

Who so enjoy eth such a love, 

Let him resolve with hearts consent, 

She ever constantly will prove 

A carefull nurse, want to prevent ; 

With diligence and painefull heed 
Preventing tast of beggers need. 

And while she lives will still procure, 

By true and faithful industrie, 

T* increase his wealth, and to insure 

His state in all securitie; 

To seeke his quiet, worke his ease, 
And for a world no way displease. 



10 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Her houshold folke from sloth to keepe 
Shee will endeavour with good heed; 
At worke more wakefull then asleepe, 
With place and stuffe, which houswives need 
To be employed ; her hands also 
The way to worke will others show. 

Her wit a common wealth containes 
Of needments for her houshold store, 
And like a ship her selfe explaines, 
That riches brings from forraine shore 
Arriving, with a bounteous hand 
Dispearsing treasure to the land. 

Before the day she will arise 

To order things, and to provide 

What may her family suffice, 

That they at labour may abide. 

If she have land, no paine shall want 
To purchase vines, set, sow and plant. 

No honest labour shee'le omit 

In ought she can attaine unto, 

But will endeavour strength and wit 

Adding the utmost she can do: 

And if that profit comes about, 
By night her candle goes not out. 

A willing hand to the distrest 

She lends, and is a chearefull giver: 



STKANGE HISTORIES. 11 

Come winters cold and frostie guest, 
When idle huswives quake and quiver, 
She and her housholds cloathed well, 
The weathers hardnesse to expell. 

Her skill doth worke faire tapistrie, 

With- linnen furnish'd of the best: 

Her needle workes do beautifie, 

And she in scarlet costly drest, 
When Senators assembled be, 
Her husbands honor there shall see. 

Her spinning shall her store increase, 

The finest cloth shall yeeld her gaine, 

And dayly profit shall not cease, 

Which her unidle hands maintaine: 

Her clothing shall her worth expresse, 
And honors yeares her end possesse. 

Her mouth shall never opened be, 
But wisdome will proceede from it; 
And such mild gracious wordes yeelds shee, 
Sweetnesse upon her tongue doth sit: 

In age she will her care addresse 

To eate no bread of idelnesse. 

Her children shall their dutie show 
Most reverent to her all their life, 
Her husband blesse that he did know 
The time to meete with such a wife; 



12 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

And uttring forth his happinesse 
Her vertues in this wise expresse. 

I know t'is true that more then one 

Good huswife there is to be found, 

But I may say that thou alone 

Above all women dost abound; 

Yea, I protest in all my daies 

Thou art the first, and thee ile praise. 

What thing is favour but a shade? 

It hath no certaine lasting hower. 

Whereof is w^anton beautie made, 

That withers like a sommers flower? 

When these shall end their date in daies, 
She that feares God shall live with praise. 

And such a wife of worthie worth 
Due glories lot will to her fall, 
And great assemblies will give forth 
What vertues shee's adorn'd withall: 

Her lifes renowne to fame shall reach, 
Her good example others teach. 



FINIS. 



STRANGE HISTORIES- 13 



HOW KING HENRIE THE FIRST HAD HIS CHILDREN DROWNED IN 
THE SEA, AS THEY CAME OUT OF FRAUNCE. 



CANT. HI. 
To the tune of the Ladyes Daughter. 

AFTER our royall King 

had foyld his foes in Fraunce, 
And spent the pleasant spring 

his honour to advance, 
Into faire England he returnde 

with fame and victorie, 
What time the subjectes of this land 

received him joyfully. 

But at his home returne, 

his children left he still 
In Fraunce for to sojorne 

to purchase learned skill: 
Duke William, with his brother deare, 

Lord Richard was his name, 
Which was the Earle of Chester then, 

who thirsted after fame. 

The Kinges faire daughter eke, 

the lady Mary bright, 
With divers noble peeres, 

and many a hardy knight. 
All those were left together there 

in pleasure and delight, 
WTien that our King to England came 

after a bloody fight. 



14 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

But when faire Flora had 

drawne forth her treasure dry. 
That winter cold and sad 

with horie head drew nie, 
Those princes all with one consent 

prepared all things meete 
To passe the seas for faire England, 

whose sight to them was sweete. 

To England let us hie, 

thus every one did say, 
For Christmas draweth nie; 

no longer let us stay, 
But spend the merry Christmas time 

within our fathers court, 
Where Lady Pleasure doth attend 

with many a princely sport. 

To sea these princes went, 

fulfilled with mirth and joy, 
But this their merriment 

did turne to deare annoy. 
The saylers and the shipmen all, 

through foule excesse of wine, 
Were so disguisde that at the sea 

they shewd themselves like swine. 

The sterne no man could guide, 
the maister sleeping lay, 

The saylers all beside 
went reeling every way : 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 15 

So that the ship at randome roode 

upon the foaming flood, 
Whereby in perill of their lives 

the princes alwaies stood. 

Which made distilling teares 

from their faire eyes to fall; 
Their hearts were fild with feares, 

no helpe they had at all. 
They wisht themselves upon the land 

a thousand times and more, 
And at the last they came in sight 

of Englands pleasant shore. 

Then every one began 

to turne their sighes to smiles: 
Their colours pale and wan 

a chearefull looke exiles. 
The princely Lords most lovingly 

their Ladies do imbrace, 
For now in England shall we bee, 

quoth they, in little space. 

Take comfort now, they sayd, 

behold the land at last; 
Then be no more dismayde, 

the worst is gone and past. 
But while they thus did joyfull hope 

with comfort entertaine, 
The goodly shippe upon a rocke 

on suddaine burst in twaine. 



16 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

With that a greevous screeke 

among them there was made, 
And every one did seeke 

on something to be stayde; 
But all in vaine such helpe they sought; 

the shippe so soone did sinke, 
That in the sea they were constrained 

to take their latest drinke. 

There might you see the lords 

and ladyes for to lie 
Amidst the salt sea foame, 

with many a greevous crie, 
Still labouring for their lives defence 

with stretched armes abroad, 
And lifting up their little hands 

for helpe with one accord. 

But as good fortune would, 

the sweete young duke did get 
Into a cock-boat then, 

where safely he did sit: 
But when he heard his sister cry, 

the kings faire daughter deare, 
Hee turned his boat to take her in 

whose death did draw so neare. 



But while he strove to take 
his sweete young sister in, 

The rest such shift did make, 
in sea as they did swimme, 



STRANGE HISTORIES. J 7 

That to the boate a number got, 

so many, that at last 
The boate, and all that were therein, 

was drownd and overcast. 

Of lords and gentlemen, 

and ladies faire of face, 
Not one escaped then, 

which was a heavie case. 
Three score and ten were drownd in all, 

and none escaped death, 
But one poore butcher, which had swome 

himselfe quite out of breath. 

This was most heavie newes 

unto our comely king, 
Who did all mirth refuse, 

this word when they did bring; 
For by this means no child he had 

his kingdome to succeed, 
Whereby his sisters sonne was king, 

as you shall plainely read. 



THE DUTCHESSE OF SUFFOLKES CALAMITIE. 
To the tune of Queen Dido. 

WHEN God had taken for our sinne 
that prudent Prince K. Edward away, 



18 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Then bloudy Bonner did begin 
his raging mallice to bewray: 
All those that did the Gospell professe 
He persecuted more or lesse. 

Thus when the Lord on us did lower 

many in pryson did he throw, 
Tormenting them in Lollards tower 

whereby they might the trueth forgoe: 
Then Cranmer, Ridley and the rest 
Were burnt in fire that Christ profest. 

Smithfield was then with faggots fild, 

and many places more beside: 
At Coventry was Sanders kild, 

At Glocester eke good Hooper dyde ; 
And to escape this bloudy day 
Beyond-seas many fled away. 

Among the rest that sought reliefe, 
and for their faith in daunger stood, 

Lady Elizabeth was chiefe, 

King Henries daughter of royall blood, 

Which in the Tower prisoner did lie, 

Looking each day when she should die. 

The Dutchesse of Suffolke seeing this, 
whose life likewise the tyrant sought, 

Who in the hope of heavenly blisse, 

which in Gods word her comfort wrought, 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 19 

For feare of death was faine to flie 
And leave her house most secretly. 

That for the love of Christ alone 
her lands and goods she left behind, 

Seeking still for that pretious stone, 
the worde of trueth, so rare to find: 

She with her nurse, her husband and child 

In poore array their sights beguild. 

Thus through London they past along, 
each one did passe a severall streete; 

Thus all unknowne, escaping wrong, 
at Billings gate they all did meete: 

Like people poore in Gravesend barge 

They simply went with all their charge. 

And all along from Gravesend towne 
with easie journeyes on foote they went: 

Unto the sea-coast they came downe, 
to passe the seas was their intent; 

And God provided so that day, 

That they tooke shippe and sayld away. 

And with a prosperous gale of wind 

in Flanders safe they did arive. 
This was to their great ease of minde, 

which from their hearts much woe did drive: 
And so, with thanks to God on hie, 
They tooke their way to Germanic. 

c2 



20 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Tims as they traveld thus disguisde 

upon the high way sodainely 
By cruell theeves they were surprisde, 

assaulting their small companie; 
And all their treasure and their store 
They tooke away, and beate them sore. 

The nurse in middest of their fight 

laid downe the child upon the ground:' 

She ran away out of their sight, 
and never after that was found. 

Then did the dutchesse make great mone, 

With her good husband all alone. 

The theeves had there their horses kilde, 
and all their money quite had tooke: 

The pretty babie, almost spild, 

was by their nurse likewise forsooke; 

And they farre from their friends did stand 

All succourlesse in a strange land. 

The skies likewise began to scowle ; 

it hayld and raind in pittious sort: 
The way was long and wonderous foule; 

then may I now full well report 
Their griefe and sorrow was not small, 
When this unhappy chaunce did fall. 

Sometime the dutchesse bore the child, 
as wet as ever she could be; 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 21 

And when the lady kind and mild 
was wearie, then the child bore hee: 

And thus they one another easde, 

and with their fortunes were well pleasde. 

And after many wearied steppes, 
all wet-shod both in durt and myre, 

After much griefe their hearts yet leapes, 
for labour doth some rest require: 

A towne before them they did see, 

But lodgd therein they could not bee. 

From house to house they both did goe, 
seeking where they that night might lie, 

But want of money was their woe, 
and still the babe with cold did crie. 

With capp and knee they courtsey make, 

But none on them would pittie take. 

Loe. heere a princesse of great blood 

did pray a peasant for reliefe, 
With tears bedewed as she stood; 

Yet few or none regardes her griefe. 
Her speech they could not understand, 
But gave her a pennie in her hand. 

When all in vaine the paines was spent, 
and that they could not house-roome get, 

Into a church-porch then they went, 
to stand out of the raine and wet: 



22 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Then said the dutchesse to her deare, 
O, that we had some fier heere. 

Then did her husband so provide, 

that fire and coales he got with speede. 

She sate downe by the fiers side 

to dresse her daughter that had neede; 

And while she drest it in her lapp, 

Her husband made the infant papp. 

Anone the sexton thither came, 
and finding them there by the fire, 

The drunken knave, all voyde of shame, 
to drive them out was his desire; 

And spurning forth this noble dame, 

Her husbands wrath it did inflame. 

And all in furie as he stood, 

he wroung the church-keies out of his hand, 
And strooke him so, that all of blood 

his head ran downe where he did stand; 
Wherefore the sexton presently 
For helpe and ayde aloude did cry. 

Then came the officers in hast, 

and tooke the dutchesse and her child ; 

And with her husband thus they past, 
like lambes beset with tygers wild, 

And to the governour were they brought, 

Who understood them not in ought. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 23 

Then Maister Bartue, brave and bold, 

in Latine made a gallant speech, 
Which all their miserie did unfold, 

and their high favour did beseech: 
With that a doctor sitting by 
Did know the dutchesse presently. 

And thereupon arising straight, 

with minde abashed at this sight, 
Unto them all that there did waight, 

he thus brake forth in wordes a right. 
Behold within your sight, quoth hee, 
A princesse of most high degree. 

With that the governour and the rest 
were all amazde the same to heare, 

And welcommed these new come guestes 
with reverence great and princely cheare; 

And afterward conveyd they were 

Unto their friend Prince Cassemere. 

A sonne she had in Germanie, 

Peregrine Bartue cald by name, 
Surnamde the good Lord Willobie, 

of courage great and worthie fame. 
Her daughter young which with her went 
Was afterward Countesse of Kent. 

For when Queene Mary was deceast, 
The dutchesse home returnde againe. 



24 STRANGE HISTORIES, 

Who was of sorrow quite releast 

by Queene Elizabeths happie raigne : 
For whose life and prosperitie 
We may prayse God continually. 

FINIS. 



HOW KING HENRY THE SECOND, CROWNING HIS SON KING OF 
ENGLAND IN HIS OWNE LIFE TIME, WAS BY HIM MOST GRIEV- 
OUSLY VEXED WITH WARRES : WHEREBY HE WENT ABOUT TO 
TAKE HIS FATHERS CROWNE QUITE FROM HIM. AND HOW AT 
HIS DEATH HE REPENTED HIM THEREOF, AND ASKED HIS FA- 
THER HARTELY FORGIVENESSE. 



CANT. m. 

To the tune of Wigmores Galliard. 

You parentes whose affection fond 

unto your children doth appeare, 
Marke well the storie now in hand, 

wherein you shall great matters heare: 
And learne by this which shall be told 

to hold your children still in awe, 
Least otherwise they proove too bold, 

and set not by your state a straw. 

King Henrie, second of that name, 
for very love that he did beare 

Unto his sonne, whose courteous fame 
did through the land his credite reare, 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 25 

Did call the prince upon a day 

unto the court in royall sort, 
Attyred in most rich array, 

and there he made princely sport. 

And afterward he tooke in hand, 

for feare he should deceived be, 
To crowne him king of faire England 

while life possest his majestic: 
What time the king, in humble sort 

like to a subject, waighted then 
Upon his sonne, and by report 

Swore unto him his noble-men. 

And by this means in England now 

two kings at once together live; 
But lordly rule will not allow 

in partnership their dayes to drive. 
The sonne therefore ambitiously 

doth seeke to pull his father downe, 
By bloody warre and subtiltie 

to take from him his princely crowne. 

Sith I am king, thus did he say, 

why should I not both rule arid raigne? 
My heart disdaines for to obey; 

Yea, all or nothing will I gaine. 
Hereon he raiseth armies great, 

and drawes a number to his part, 
His fathers force downe right to beat, 

and by his speare to pierce his heart. 



26 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

In seaven set battles doth he fight 

against his loving father deare, 
To overthrow him in despight, 

to win himselfe a kingdome cleare. 
But naught at all could he prevaile ; 

his armie alwaies had the worst: 
Such griefe did then his heart assaile, 

he thought himselfe of God accurst. 

And therefore, falling wonderous sicke, 

he humbly to his father sent: 
The worme of conscience did him pricke, 

and his vile deedes he did lament; 
Requiring that his noble grace 

would now forgive all that was past, 
And come to him in heavie case, 

being at point to breath his last. 

Wlien this word came unto our king, 

the newes did make him wondrous woe; 
And unto him he sent his ring, 

where he in person would not goe. 
Commend mee to my sonne, he sayd, 

so sicke in bed as he doth lie, 
And tell him, I am well appayde 

to heare he doth for mercie crie. 

The Lord forgive his foule offence, 
and I forgive them all, quoth hee; 

His evill with good He recompence: 
beare him this message now from mee. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 27 

When that the prince did see this ring 

he kissed it in joyfull wise, 
And for his faultes his hands did wring, 

while bitter teares gusht from his eyes. 

Then to his lords that stood him nie 

with feeble voyce then did he call, 
Desiring them immediately 

to strip him from his garments all. 
Take off from me these robes so rich, 

and lap me in a cloth of haire ; 
Quoth he, my greevous sinnes are such 

Hell fiers flame I greatly feare. 

A hemton halter then he tooke, 

about his necke he put the same, 
And with a greevous pittious looke 

this speech unto them did he frame. 
You reverend bishops, more and lesse, 

pray for my soule to God on hie, 
For like a theefe I do confesse 

I have deserved for to die. 

And therefore, by this halter heere 

I yeeld my selfe unto you all. 
A wretch unworthy to appeare 

before my God celestiall. 
Therefore within your hempton bed, 

all strewd with ashes as it is, 
Let me be layde when I am dead, 

and draw me thereunto by this. 



28 STRANGE HISTORIES, 

Yea, by this halter strong and tough 

dragge foorth my carcase to the same; 
Yet is that couch not bad inough 

for my vile body wrapt in shame. 
And when you see me lie along, 

bepowdered in ashes there, 
Say, there is he that did such wrong 

unto his father every where. 

And with that word he breath'd his last ; 

wherefore according to his minde, 
They drew him by the necke full fast 

unto the place to him assignd; 
And afterward in solemne sort 

at Roan in Fraunce buried was hee, 
Where many princes did resort 

to his most royall obsequie. 

FINIS. 



THE IMPRISONMENT OF QUEENE ELINOR, WIFE TO KING HENRIE 
THE SECOND, BY WHOSE MEANES THE KING'S SONNES SO UN- 
NATURALLY REBELLED AGAINST THEIR FATHER; AND HER 
LAMENTATION, BEING XVI YEARES IN PRISON, WHOM HER SONNE 
RICHARD, WHEN HE CAME TO BE KING, RELEASED: AND HOW 
AT HER DELIVERANCE SHE CAUSED MANIE PRISONERS TO BE 
SET AT LIBERTIE. 



CANT. [IV.] 

To the tune of come live with me and be my love. 
Thrice woe is mee, unhappy queene, 
thus to offend my princely lord: 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 29 

My foule offence too plaine is scene, 

and of good people most abhord. 
I do confesse my fault it was 

these bloody warres came thus to passe. 

My jealous minde hath wrought my woe; 

let all good ladyes shun mistrust: 
My Envie wrought my overthrow, 

and by my malice most unjust 
My sonnes did seeke their fathers life 

by bloody warres and cruell strife. 

What more unkindnesse could be showne 

to any prince of high renowne, 
Then by his queene and love alone, 

to stand in danger of his crowne? 
For this offence most worthely 

in dolefull prison do I lye. 

But that which most torments my minde, 
and makes my greevous heart complaine, 

Is for to thinke, that most unkind 
I brought my selfe in such disdain, 

That now the king cannot abide 
I should be lodged by his side. 

In dolefull pryson I am cast, 

debard of princely companie: 
The kings goodwill quite have I lost, 

and purchast nought but infamie: 



30 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

And never must I see him more, 

whose absence greeves my hart full sore. 

Full sixteene winters have I beene 
imprisoned in the dungion deepe, 

Whereby my joyes are wasted cleene, 
where my poore eyes have learnd to weepe; 

And never since I could attaine 
his kingly love to mee againe. 

Too much (in deed I must confesse) 

I did abuse his royall grace, 
And by my great maliciousnesse 

his wrong I wrought in every place: 
And thus his love I turnd to hate, 

which I repent, but all too late. 

Sweete Rosamond that was so faire, 
out of her curious bower I brought: 

A poysoned cup I gave her there, 

whereby her death was quickly wrought; 

The which I did with all despight 
because she was the kings delight. 

Thus often did the queene lament. 

as she in prison long did lie 
Her former deeds she did repent 

with many a watrie weeping eye; 
But at the last this newes was spread, 

the king was on a sodaine dead. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 

But when she heard this tydings told, 
most bitterly she mourned then: 

Her wofull hart she did unfold 
in sight of many noble men, 

And her sonne Richard being king 
from dolefull prison did her bring. 



31 



Who set her for to rule the 
while to Jerusalem he went, 

And while she had this charge in 
her care was great in governement 

And many a prisoner then in hold 
she set at large from yrons cold. 




THE LAMENTABLE DEATH OF KING JOHN, HOW HE WAS POYSONEU 
IN THE ABBY AT SWINSTED BY A FRYER. 



CANT. V. 

To the tune of Fortune. 

A TREACHEROUS decde forthwith I shall you tell, 
Which on King John upon a sodaine fell : 
To Lincoln-shire proceeding on his way 
At Swinsted Abbey one whole night he lay. 

There did the king appose his welcome good, 
But much deceipt lyes under abbots hood : 
There did the king himselfe in safetie thinke ; 
But there the king received his latest drinke. 



32 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Great cheere they made unto his royal grace, 
While he remaynd a guest within that place ; 
But while they smylde and laughed in his sight, 
They wrought great treason shadowed with delight. 

A flat faced monke comes with a glosing tale 
To give the king a cupp of spiced ale: 
A deadlier draught was never offered man, 
Yet this false monke unto the king began. 

Which when the king (without mistrust) did see, 
He tooke the cup of him couragiously; 
But while he held the poysoned cup in hand 
Our noble king amazed much did stand. 

For casting downe by chaunce his princely eye 
On precious jewels, which he had full nye, 
He saw the cullour of each precious stone 
Most strangely turne, and alter one by one, 

Their orient brightnesse to a pale dead hue 
Were changed quite: the cause no person knew, 
And such a sweat did overspread them all, 
As stood like deaw which on fair flowers fall. 

And hereby was their precious natures tryde, 
For precious stones foule poyson cannot abide ; 
But though our king beheld their cullour pale, 
Mistrusted not the poyson in the ale. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 33 

For why, the monke the taste before him tooke, 
Nor knew the king how ill he did it brooke; 
And therefore he a harty draught did take, 
Which of his life a quicke dispatch did make. 

Th' infectious drinke fumde up into his head, 
And through the veines into the heart it spread, 
Distempering the pure unspotted braine, 
That doth in man his memorie maintaine. 

Then felt the king an extreame griefe to grow 
Through all his entrels, being infected so: 
Whereby he knew, through anguish which he felt, 
The monks with him most trayterously had delt. 

The grones he gave did make all men to wonder: 
He cast as if his heart would split in sunder; 
And still he cald, while he thereon did thinke, 
For that false monk which brought the deadly drinke. 

And then his lords went searching round about 
In every place to find this traytor out: 
At length they found him dead as any stone, 
Within a corner lying all alone. 

For having tasted of that poysoned cup, 
Whereof our king the residue drunke up, 
The envious monke himselfe to death did bring, 
That he thereby might kill our royall king. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 



But when the king with wonder heard them tell 
The monkes dead body did with poyson swell, 
Why then, my lords, full quickly now, quoth hee, 
A breathlesse king you shall among you see. 

Behold, he sayd, my vaines in peeces cracke, 
A greevous torment feele I in my backe, 
And by this poyson deadly and accurst, 
I feele my hart-stringes ready for to burst. 

With that his eyes did turne within his head; 
A pale dead cullour through his face did spread, 
And lying gasping with a cold faint breath, 
The royall king was overcome by death. 

His mournfull lordes, which stood about him then, 
With all their force and troopes of warlike men 
To Worcester the corpes they did convey, 
With drumme and trumpet marching al the way. 

And in the faire Cathedral Church, I finde, 
They buried him according to their minde, 
Most pompiously, best fitting for a king, 
Who were applauded greatly for this thing. 



THE CRUELL IMPRISONMENT OF KING EDWARD THE SECOND, AT 
THE CASTLE OF BARKLEY, THE 22 OF SEPTEMBER, 1327. 

CANT. VI. 

To the tune of Who list to lead a Souldiers life. 
WHEN Isabell, faire England's queene, 
in wofull warres had victorious beene, 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 35 

Our comely king, her husband deare, 

Subdued by strength, as did appeare, 
By her was sent to prison strong 

for having done his countrie wrong. 
In Barkly Castle cast was hee, 

denyed of royall dignitie ; 
Where he was kept in wofull wise, 

his queene did him so much despise. 

There did he live, a wofull state, 

such is a womans deadly hate, 
When fickle fancie followes change, 

and lustfull thoughts delight to range. 
Lord Mortimer was so in minde, 

the kinges sweete love was cast behind; 
And none was knowne a greater foe 

unto king Edward in his woe, 
Then Isabell his crowned queene, 

as by the sequell shall be seene. 

While he in prison poorely lay, 

a Parliament was held straight way; 
What time his foes apace did bring 

Billes of complaint against the king, 
So that the nobles of the land, 

when they the matter throughly scand, 
Pronounced then these speeches plaine, 

Hee was unworthy for to raigne. 
Therefore they made a flat decree 

he should forthwith deposed bee; 

D 2 



36 STRANGE HISTORIES, 

And his sonne Edward, young of yeeres, 

was judged by the noble peeres 
Most meete to weare the princely crowne, 

his father being thus puld downe. 
Which words when as the queene did heare 

(dissemblingly as did appeare) 
She wept, she wayld, and wrong her hands 

before the lords where as she stands. 
Which when the prince, her sonne, did see, 

he spake these words most courteously. 

My sweete queene mother, weepe not so: 

thinke not your sonne will seeke your woe. 
Though English lords chose mee their king, 

my owne deare father yet living, 
Thinke not thereto I will consent, 

except my father be content, 
And with good will his crowne resigne, 

and graunt it freely to be mine. 
Therefore, queene mother, thinke no ill 

in mee, or them for their good will. 

Then divers lords without delay 

went to the king where as he lay, 
Declaring how the matter stood ; 

and how the peeres did thinke it good 
To choose his sonne their king to bee, 

if that he would thereto agree, 
For to resigne his princely crowne, 

and all his title of renowne : 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 37 

If otherwise, they told him plaine, 
a stranger should the same attaine. 

This dolefull tydings (most unkind) 

did sore afflict king Edwards minde; 
But when he saw no remedie 

he did unto their willes agree; 
And bitterly he did lament, 

saying the Lord this plague hath sent 
For his offence and vanitie, 

which he would suffer patiently; 
Beseeching all the lords at last 

for to forgive him all was past. 

When thus he was deposed quite 

of that which was his lawfull right, 
In prison was he kept full close, 

without all pittie or remorse; 
And those that shewd him favour still 

were taken from him with ill will. 
Which when the Earle of Kent did heare, 

who was in blood to him full neare, 
He did intreat most earnestly 

for his release and libertie. 

His words did much the queene displease, 
who sayd he liv'd too much at ease. 

Unto the bishop did she goe 
of Hereford, his deadly foe, 

And cruell letters made him write 
unto his keepers with despight: 



38 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

You are too kind to him, quoth shee; 

hencefoorth more straighter looke you bee. 
And in their writing subtiltie 

they sent them word that he should die. 

The lord Matrevers, all dismayd, 

unto Sir Thomas Gurney sayd ; 
The queene is much displeasd, quoth hee, 

for Edwards too much libertie, 
And by her letters doth bewray 

that soone he shall be made away. 
Tis best (Sir Thomas then replide) 

the queenes wish should not be denide: 
Thereby we shall have her good will, 

and keepe our selves in credite still. 




HOW THE KING WAS POYSONED, AND YET ESCAPED; AND AFTER- 
WARD, HOW WHEN THEY SAW THAT THEREBY HE WAS NOT 
DISPATCHED OF LIFE, THEY LOCKED HIM IN A MOST NOYSOME 
FILTHY PLACE, THAT WITH THE STINK THEREOF HE MIGHT BE 
CHOAKED ; AND WHEN THAT PREVAILED NOT, HOW THEY 
THRUST A HOT BURNING SPIT INTO HIS FUNDAMENT, TILL 
THEY HAD BURNT HIS BOWELS WITHIN HIS BODY, WHEREOF 
HE DYED. 



CANT. VII. 

To the tune of How can the tree. 



THE kings curst keepers, ayming at reward, 
hoping for favour of the furious queene, 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 39 

On wretched Edward had they no regard: 
far from their hearts is mercy mooved cleene. 

Wherefore they mingle poyson with his meate, 
which made the man most fearefull for to eate. 

For by the taste he often times suspected 

the venome couched in a daintie dish; 
Yet his faire body was full sore infected, 

so ill they spiced both his flesh and fish: 
But his strong nature all their craft beguiles, 

the poyson breaking foorth in blaines and biles. 

An ugly scabbe ore-spreades his lillie skinne, 
foule botches breake upon his manly face; 

Thus sore without, and sorrowful within, 

the despised man doth live in loathsome case : 

Like to a lazer did he then abide, 

that shews his sores along the highwayes side. 

But when this practise proov'd not to their mind, 
and that they saw he liv'd in their despight, 

Another damde device then they finde, 

by stinking savours for to choake him quight. 

In an odd corner they did locke him fast, 

hard by the which their carrion they did cast. 

The stinch whereof might be compared wel-nie 
to that foule lake where cursed Sodome stood, 

That poysoned birdes which over it did flie, 
even by the savour of that filthy mudd. 



40 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Even so, the smell of that corrupted den 
was able for to choake ten thousand men. 

But all in vain : it would not do (God wot) 
his good complexion still drove out the same, 

Like to the boyling of a seething pot, 

that casteth the scumme into the fierie flame. 

Thus still he liv'd, and living still they sought 
his death, whose downfal was already wrought. 

Loathing his life, at last his keepers came 

into his chamber in the dead of night, 
And without noyse they entred soone the same, 

with weapons drawne and torches burning bright, 
Where the poore prisoner fast a sleepe in bed 

lay on his belly, nothing under's head. 

The which advantage when the murderers saw, 

a heavie table on him they did throw, 
Wherewith awakt his breath be scant could draw: 

with waight thereof they kept him under so ; 
Then turning up the cloathes above his hips 

to hold his legges a couple nimbly skips. 

Then came the murtherers : one a home had got, 
Which farr into his fundament downe he thrust; 

An other with a spit all burning hot 

the same quite through the home he strongly pusht, 

Among his entrels in most cruell wise, 
forceing thereby most lamentable cryes. 




STRANGE HISTORIES. 41 

And while within his body they did keepe 
the burning spit, still rowling up and downe, 

Most mournefully the murthered man did weepe, 
whose wailefull noyse wakt many in the towne r 

Who gessing by his cryes his death drew neare, 
tooke great compassion on that noble peere. 

And at which bitter screeke which he did make, 
they prayde to God for to receive his soule: 

His gastly grones inforst their hearts to ake, 
yet none durst go to cause the bell to towle. 

Ha me, poore man ! alacke, alacke ! he cryed, 
And long it was before the time he dyed. 

Strong was his hart, and long it was, God knowes, 
eare it would stoope unto the stroke of death : 

First it was wounded with a thousand woes 
before he did resigne his vitall breath ; 

And being murdered thus, as you do heare, 
no outward hurt upon him did appeare. 

This cruell murder being brought to passe, 
the lord Matrevers to the court did hie, 

To shew the queene her will performed was : 
great recompense he thought to get thereby. 

But when the queene the sequell understands, 
dissemblingly she weeps, and wringes her hands. 

Ah, cursed traytor ! Hast thou slaine (quoth shee) 
my noble wedded lord in such a sort? 



42 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Shame and confusion ever light on thee. 

Oh, how I grieve to heare this vile report ! 
Hence, cursed cative, from my sight, (she sayde) 

that hath of mee a wofull widow made ! 

Then all abasht Matrevers goes his way, 
the saddest man that ever life did beare, 

And to Sir Thomas Gurney did bewray 

what bitter speach the queene did give him there. 

Then did the queene out-law them both together, 
and banisht them faire Englands bounds for ever. 

Thus the dissembling queene did seeke to hide 
the heynous act by her owne meanes effected : 

The knowledge of this deed she still denide, 
that she of murder might not be suspected : 

But yet for all the subtiltie she wrought, 

the trueth unto the world was after brought. 



THE DOLEFULL LAMENTATION OF THE LORD MATREVERS AND 
SIR THOMAS GURNEY, BEING BANISHED THE REALME. 



CANT. VIIL 

To the tune of Light of love. 
ALAS, that ever that day we did see, 

that false smiling fortune so fickle should be! 
Our miseries are many, our woes without end : 

to purchase us favour we both did offend. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 43 

Our deeds have deserved both sorrow and shame, 
but woe worth the persons procured the same ! 

Alacke, and alacke ! with griefe we may crie, 
that ever we forced king Edward to die ! 

The Bishop of Hereford, ill may he fare ! 

he wrought us a letter for subtiltie rare: 
To kill princely Edward feare not, it is good. 

thus much by the letter we then understood; 
But curst be the time that we tooke it in hand 

to follow such counsell and wicked commaund. 
Alacke, and alacke! with griefe we may crie, 

that ever we forced king Edward to die ! 

Forgive us, sweete Saviour, that damnable deed, 

which causeth with sorrow our hearts for to bleed, 
And taking compassion upon our distresse, 

put far from thy presence our great wickednesse. 
With teares all bedeawd for mercie we crie, 

and do not the penitent mercie denie. 
Alacke, and alacke! with griefe we may say, 

that ever we made king Edward away! 

For this have we lost our goods and our lands, 

our Castles and Towers so stately that stands ; 
Our ladyes and babyes are turned out of doore, 

like comfortlesse catives, both naked and poore : 
Both friendlesse and fatherlesse do they complaine, 

for gone are our comforts that should them maintaine. 
Alacke, and alacke! and alas may we crie, 

that ever we forced kingr Edward to die! 



44 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

And while they goe wringing their hands up and downe, 

in seeking for succour from towne unto towne, 
All wrapped in wretchednesse do we remaine, 

tormented, perplexed, in labour and paine, 
Despised, disdayned, and banished quite 

the coastes of our country so sweete to our sight. 
Alacke, and alacke! and alas may we cry, 

that ever we forced king Edward to die! 

Then farewell, faire England, wherein we were borne, 

our friends and our kindred, which hold us in scorn ; 
Our honours and dignities quite we have lost, 

both profit and pleasure our fortune hath crost : 
Our parkes and our chases, our mansions so faire, 

our jems and our jewels most precious and rare. 
Alacke, and alacke! and alas may we cry, 

that ever we forced king Edward to die! 

Then farewell, deare ladyes and most loving wives, 

might we mend your miseries with losse of our lives, 
Then our silly children, which begs in your hand, 

in griefe and calamity long should not stand ; 
Nor yet in their country despised should be, 

that lately was honoured of every degree. 
Alacke, and alacke! and alasse we may crie, 

that ever we forced king Edward to die! 

In countries unknowne we range to and fro, 
cloying mens eares with report of our woe : 

Our food is wild berries, green bancks is our bed, 
the trees serve for houses to cover our head. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 45 

Browne bread to our taste is most daintie and sweete, 
our drinke is cold water tooke up at our feete. 

Alacke, and alacke! and alas may we cry, 
that ever we forced king Edward to die ! 

Thus having long wandred in hunger and cold, 

despising lives safetie, most desperate bold, 
Sir T. Gurney toward England doth goe, 

for love of his lady distressed with woe ; 
Saying, how happy and blessed were I 

to see my sweete children and wife ere I die. 
-Alacke, and alacke ! and alas may we cry, 

that ever we forced king Edward to die! 

But three yeares after his wofull exile 

behold how false fortune his thoughts doth beguile : 
Comming toward England was tooke by the way, 

and least that he should the chiefs murderers bewray, 
Commandement was sent by one called Lea, 

he should be beheaded foorthwith on the sea. 
Alacke, and alacke ! and alasse did he crie, 

That ever we forced king Edward to die! 

Thus was Sir Thomas dispatched of life 

in comming to visit his sorrowfull wife, 
Who was cut off from his wished desire, 

which he in his heart so much did require; 
And never his lady againe did he see, 

nor his poore children in their miserie. 
Alacke, and alacke ! and alasse did he crie, 

that ever we forced king Edward to die! 



46 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

The lord Matrevers (the story doth tell) 

in Germanic after long time he did dwell 
In secret manner, for feare to be seene 

by any persons that favoured the queene: 
And there at last in great miserie 

he ended his life most penitentlie. 
Alacke, and alacke ! and alas did he say, 

that ever we made king Edward away! 




THE WINNING OF THE ILE OF MANNE BY THE NOBLE EARLE OF 
SALISBURIE. 



CANT. IX. 
To the tune of the Kings going to the Par. 

The noble Earle of Salisburie, 

with many a hardy knight, 
Most valiantly prepard himselfe 

against the Scots to fight. 
With his speare and his sheeld 

making his proud foes to yeeld, 
Fiercely on them all he can, 

to drive them from the He of Man. 
Drummes striking on a row, 

Trumpets sounding as they go, 
Tan ta ra ra ra tan. 

There silken ensignes in the field 
most gloriously were spred : 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 47 

The horsemen on their prauncing steeds 

strucke many a Scotchman dead. 
The browne-bils on their corslets ring 

the bow-men with their gray-goose wing, 
The lustie launce, the pierceing speare 

the soft flesh of their foes doe teare. 
Drummes striking on a row, 

Trumpets sounding as they goe, 
Tan ta ra ra ra tan. 

The battell was so fierce and hot, 

the Scots for feare did flic, 
And many a famous knight and squire 

in gorie blood did lie. 
Some thinking to escape away 

did drowne themselves within the sea : 
Some with many a bloody wound 

lay gasping on the clayie ground. 
Drummes striking on a row, 

Trumpets sounding as they goe, 
Tan ta ra ra ra tan. 

Thus, after many a brave exployt 

that day performd and done, 
The noble Earle of Salsburie 

the lie of Man had wonne. 
Returning then most gallantly 

with honour, fame and victorie, 
Like a conquerour of fame, 

to court this warlike champion came, 



48 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Drummes striking on a row, 
Trumpets sounding as they goe, 
Tan ta ra ra ra tan. 

Our king rejoyceing at this act, 

incontinent decreed 
To give the earle this pleasant ile 

for his most valiant deed ; 
And foorthwith did cause him than 

for to be crowned king of Man : 
Earle of famous Salsburie, 

and king of Man by dignitie. 
Drummes striking on a row, 

Trumpets sounding as they go, 
Tan ta ra ra ra tan. 

Thus was the first king of Man 

that ever bore the name, 
Knight of the princely garter blew 

and order of great fame ; 
Which brave king Edward did devise, 

and with his person royalize : 
Knights of the Garter are they cald, 

and eke at Winsor so instald : 
With princely royaltie, 

great fame and dignitie, 

this knighthood still is held. 




STRANGE HISTORIES. 49 



THE REBELLION OF WATT TYLER AND JACKE STRAW WITH 
OTHERS AGAINST K. RICHARD THE SECOND. 



CANT. X. 
To the tune of the Miller would a woing ride. 

WATT TYLER is from Darford gan, 

and with him many a proper man, 
And hee a captaine is become, 

marching in field with phife and drumme. 
Jacke Straw, an other in like case, 

from Essex flockes a mighty pace. 
Hob Carter with his stragling traine, 

Jacke Shepheard comes with him amaine ; 
So doth Tom Miller in like sort, 

as if he meant to take some fort. 
With bowes and bils, with speare and shield, 

on Black-heath have they pitcht their field: 
An hundred thousand men in all, 

whose force is not accounted small; 
And for king Richard did they send, 

much evill to him they did intend, 
For the taxe the which our king 

upon his commons then did bring. 
And now, because his royall Grace 

denyed to come within their chase, 
They spoyled Southwarke round about, 

and tooke the Marshals prisoners out. 
All those that in the kings -bench lay 

at libertie they set that day; 



50 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

And then they marcht with one consent 

through London with a lewd intent. 
And for to fit their lewd desire 

they set the Savoy all on fire; 
And for the hate that they did beare 

unto the duke of Lancasteare, 
Therefore his house they burned quite, 

through envy, malice and despight. 
Then to the Temple did they turne; 

the lawyers bookes there did they burne, 
And spoyld their lodgings one by one, 

and all they could lay hand upon. 
Then into Smithfield did they hie 

to Saint Jones place that stands thereby, 
And set the same on fier flat, 

which burned seven dayes after that. 
Unto the Tower of London then 

fast trooped these rebellious men, 
And having entred soone the same, 

with hidious cryes and mickle shame, 
The grave Lord Chauncelor thence they tooke 

amazde, with fearefull pittious looke. 
The Lord High Treasurer likewise they 

tooke from that place that present day; 
And with their hooting lowd and shrill 

stroke off their heads on Tower Hill. 
Into the cittie came they then, 

like rude disordered franticke men: 
They robd the churches every where 

And put the priestes in deadly feare. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 51 

Into the Counters then they get, 

where men in prison lay for debt: 
They broke the doores and let them out, 

and threw the Counter bookes about, 
Tearing and spoyling them each one, 

and records all they light upon. 
The doores of Newgate broke they downe, 

that prisoners ran about the towne, 
Forcing all the smiths they meete 

to knocke the irons from their feete; 
And then, like villaines voyde of awe, 

followed Wat Tyler and Jacke Straw. 
And though this outrage was not small, 

the king gave pardon to them all, 
So they would part home quietly; 

but they his pardon did defie, 
And being all in Smithfield then, 

even threescore thousand fighting men, 
Which there Wat Tyler then did bring 

of purpose for to meet our king. 
And there withall his royall grace 

sent Sir John Newton to that place, 
Unto Wat Tyler, willing him 

to come and speake with our young king ; 
But the proud rebell in despight 

did picke a quarrell with the knight. 
The Mayor of London being by, 

when he beheld this villainie, 
Unto Wat Tyler rode he then, 

being in midst of all his men, 

E2 



52 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Saying, tray tor, yield, tis best; 

in the kings name I thee arrest: 
And therewith to his dagger start, 

and thrust the rebell to the hart; 
Who falling dead unto the ground, 

the same did all the host confound, 
And downe they threw their weapons all, 

and humbly they for pardon call. 
Thus did that proud rebellion cease, 

and after followed a joyfull peace. 

FINIS. 



A SPEECH BETWENNE CERTAINE LADYES, BEING SHEPHEARDS 
ON SALISBURIE PLAINE. 

TRULY (sayd the ladyes) this was a most hardie and 
couragious Mayor, that durst, in the middest of so 
mightie a multitude of his enemies, arest so impudent 
and bold a traytor, and kill him in the face of all his 
friendes ; which was a deed worthy to be had in ever- 
lasting memorie, and highly to be rewarded. Nor did 
his majestic forget (sayd the Lady Oxenbridge) to 
dignifie that brave man for his hardie deed; for in 
remembrance of that admired exployt his majesty 
made him a knight, and five Aldermen more of the 
citie, ordaining also, that in remembrance of Sir Wil- 
liam Walworthes deed against Watt Tyler, that all the 
Mayors that were to succeed in his place should be 
knighted. And further, he granted that there should 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 53 

be a dagger added to the armes of the citie of London, 
in the right quarter of the shield for an argumentation 
of the armes. 

You have told us (quoth the ladyes) the end of 
Wat Tyler, but I pray you what became of Jacke 
Strawe and the rest of the rebellious route ? I will 
shew you (quoth shee). Jacke Straw, with the rest of 
that rude rabble, being in the end apprehended (as 
rebels never flourish long), was at last brought to be 
executed at London, where he confessed that their 
intent was (if they could have brought their vile pur- 
pose to passe) to have murdered the king and his 
nobles and to have destroyed (so neere as they could) 
all the gentilitie of the land, having especially vowed 
the death of all the bishops, abots and monkes, and 
then to have enriched themselves : they determined to 
set London on fire^ and to have taken spoyle of that 
honourable citie; but the gallowes standing betwixt 
them and home, they were there trust up before they 
could effect any thing. And such endes (sayd the lu- 
dyes) send all rebles, and especially the desperate tray- 
tors which at this present vexeth the whole state. 

With that word, one of their servants came running, 
saying, Madam, the rebels are now marched out of 
Wiltshire and Hampshire, making hasty steps towards 
London: therefore, now you need not feare to com 
home, and commit the flocks to their former keepers. 
The ladyes, being joyfull thereof, appoynted shortly 
after a banquet to be prepared, where they all met 
together againe, by which time the kings power (having 



54 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

incountered the rebels on Blackheath) overthrew their 
whole power : where the lord Awdry was taken and 
committed to Newgate, from whence he was drawne 
to the Tower-hill, in a coate of his owne armes, painted 
upon paper reversed and all to torne, and there was 
beheaded on the 24 of June. And shortly after, 
Thomas Flamocke, and Michael Joseph, the Black- 
smith, were drawne hanged and quartered after the 
manner of traytors. But when the husbands to these 
faire ladyes came home, and heard how their wives had 
dealt to save themselves in this dangerous time, they 
could not chuse but laugh at the matter, saying that 
such shepheards never kept sheepe on Salisbury plaine 
before. 

FINIS. 



A MOURNEFULL DITTIE ON THE DEATH OF FAIRE ROSAMOND, 
KING HENRIE THE SECONDS CONCUBINE. 



CANT. XL 

To the tune of Flying Fame. 

WHEN as king Henrie rul'd this land, 

the second of that name, 
(Beside the Queene) he dearly loved 

a faire and princely dame ; 
Most peerelesse was her beautie found, 

her favour and her face ; 
A sweeter creature in this world 

did never Prince imbrace. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 55 

Her crisped locks like threades of gold 

appeared to each mans sight ; 
Her comely eyes like orient pearles 

did cast a heavenly light : 
The blood within her cristall cheekes 

did such a cullour drive, 
As though the lilly and the rose 

for maistership did strive. 

Yea Rosamond, faire Rosamond, 

her name was called so, 
To whome dame Elinor, our queene, 

was knowne a cruell foe : 
The king therefore, for her defence 

against the furious queene, 
At Woodstocke buylded such a bower, 

the like was never scene. 

Most curiously that bower was buylt 

Of stone and timber strong ; 
A hundred and fiftie doores 

did to that bower belong ; 
And they so cunningly contriv'd 

with turning round about, 
That none but by a clew of thread 

could enter in or out. 

And for his love and ladyes sake. 

that was so fair and bright, 
The keeping of this bower he gave 

unto a valiant knight. 



56 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

But fortune that doth often frowne 
where she before did smile, 

The kinges delight, the ladyes joy, 
full soone she did beguile. 

For why, the king's ungracious sonne, 

whom he did high advance, 
Against his father raised warres 

within the realme of France; 
But yet before our comely king 

the English land forsooke, 
Of Rosamond, his ladye faire, 

his fare-well thus he tooke. 

My Rosamond, my onely Rose, 

that pleaseth best mine eye, 
The fairest Rose in all the world 

to feed my fantasie ! 
The flower of my affected heart, 

whose sweetnes doth excell, 
My royall Rose, a hundred times 

I bid thee now farewell. 

For I must leave my fairest flower, 

my sweetest Rose, a space, 
And crosse the seas to famous France, 

proude rebels to abace : 
But yet, my Rose, be sure thou shall 

my comming shortly see, 
And in my heart, while hence I am, 

lie beare my Rose with mee. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 57 

When Rosamond, that lady bright, 

did heare the King say so, 
The sorrow of her greeved heart 

her outward lookes did show ; 
And from her cleare and cristall eyes 

the teares gusht out apace, 
Which like the silver pearled deaw 

ran downe her comely face. 

Her lippes like to a corrall red 

did waxe both wan and pale, 
And for the sorrow she conceived 

her vitall spirits did fayle ; 
And falling downe all in a sound 

before King Henries face, 
Full oft betweene his princely armes 

her corpes he did irnbrace. 

And twenty times with waterie eyes 

he kist her tender cheeke, 
Untill she had received againe 

her senses milde and meeke. 
Why grieves my Rose, my sweetest Rose ? 

(the king did ever say) 
Because (quoth she) to bloody warres 

my Lord must part away. 

But sith your Grace in forraine coastes, 

among your foes unkind, 
Must go to hazard life and limrne, 

why should I stay behind ? 



58 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Nay, rather let me like a page 
your shield and target beare, 

That on my breast the blow may light, 
which should annoy you there. 

O, let me in your royall tent 

prepare your bed at night, 
And with sweet baths refresh your grace 

at your returne from fight. 
So I your presence may enjoy, 

no toyle I must refuse ; 
But wanting you my life is death, 

which doth true love abuse. 

Content thy selfe, my dearest friend, 

thy rest at home shall bee, 
In England, sweete and pleasant soyle, 

for travaile fits not thee. 
Faire ladyes brooke not bloody warres, 

sweete peace their pleasures breede, 
The nourisher of hearts content, 

which fancie first doth feede. 

My Rose shall rest in Woodstocke bower, 

with musickes sweete delight, 
While I among the pierceing pikes 

against my foes do fight : 
My Rose, in robes and pearles of gold 

with diamonds richly dight, 
Shall daunce the galliards of my love, 

while I my foes do smite. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 59 

And you, Sir Thomas, whom I trust 

to beare my loves defence-^ 
Be carefull of my gallant Rose, 

when I am parted hence. 
And therewithal! he fetcht a sigh, 

as though his heart would breake, 
And Rosamond for inward griefe 

not one plaine word could speake. 

And at their parting well they might 

in heart be grieved sore. 
After that day faire Rosamond 

the King did see no more ; 
For when his Grace had past the seas 

and into France was gone, 
Queene Elinor with envious heart 

to Woodstocke came anone. 

And foorth she cald this trusty knight 

which kept the curious bower, 
Who with his clew of twined threed 

came from that famous flower ; 
And when that they had wounded him, 

the queene his threed did get, 
And went where lady Rosamond 

was like an angell set. 

And when the queene with stedfast eye 

beheld her heavenly face, 
She was amazed in her minde 

at her exceeding grace. 



60 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Cast off from thee thy robes, she sayd, 

that rich and costly be, 
And drinke thou up this deadly draught, 

which I have brought for thee. 

But presently upon her knees 

sweet Rosamond did fall, 
And pardon of the queene she crav'd 

for her offences all. 
Take pittie of my youthfull yeares, 

faire Rosamond did cry; 
And let me not with poyson strong 

inforced be to die. 

I will renounce this sinfull life, 

and in a cloyster bide, 
Or else be banisht, if you please, 

to range the world so wide : 
And for the fault which I have done, 

though I was forst thereto, 
Preserve my life, and punish me, 

as you thinke good to do. 

And with these words her lilly hands 

she wrang full often there, 
And downe along her lovely cheekes 

proceeded many a teare ; 
But nothing could this furious queene 

therewith appeased bee : 
The cup of deadly poyson filld, 

as she sat on her knee, 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 61 

She gave the comely dame to drinke, 

who tooke it in her hand, 
And from her bended knee arose, 

and on her feet did stand ; 
And casting up her eyes to heaven 

she did for mercy call, 
And drinking up the poyson then, 

her life she lost withall. 

And when that death through every lim 

had done his greatest spite, 
Her chiefest foes did plaine confesse 

she was a glorious wight. 
Her body then they did intombe, 

when life was fled away, 
At Godstow, neere Oxford towne, 

as may be seene this day. 

FINIS. 



A SONNET. 

CANT. XII. 

ALL you yong men that faine wold learne to woe, 
And have no meanes, nor* know not how to doe, 
Come you to mee, and marke what I shall say, 
Which being done will beare the wench away. 
First, seeme thou wise and deck thyselfe not meanly, 
For women they be nice, and love to have men clenly. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Next, shew thy self that thou hast gone to schoole, 
Commende her wit, although she be a foole. 
Speake in her prayse, for women they be proud ; 
Looke what she sayes for troth must be aloude. 
If she be sad, seeme thou as sad as shee; 
But if that she be glad, then joy with merry glee. 

And in this mood these women must be clawde. 

Give her a glasse, a phan, or some such gawde; 

Or (if she like) a hood, a capp, or hatt, 

Draw to thy purse, and straight way give her that. 

This being done, in time thou shalt her win, 

And when that she is won, let tricks of love begin. 

If at the borde you both sit side by side, 

Say to her this, that Jove hath no such bride ; 

Or if it chaunce you both sit face to face, 

Say to her this, her looke alone sayes grace. 

Such tricks as this use oft to her at meat, 

For nought doth better please then doth a good conceit. 

But if it chaunce you sit at severall bordes, 
Send her such cates as your messe affordes ; 
A pidgions hart upon a butchers picke, 
A larkes long heelde i' the middest of it sticke. 
Send this alone, let this the message bee, 
There is a plovers bone to picke, without a P. 

If when you meet, of this if she intreat, 
First pardon crave, then utter thy conceit : 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 63 

Then proove the minde is in the hart alone, 
And as the hart, such was the ininde upon. 
Then seeme to yeeld a reason for the rest, 
And say how maydes lark-heeld doth pierce thee 
through the brest. 

If she mislike the picke above the rest, 
Say thus, you thoght she had lov'd Chaucers jest. 
If she would know what by this jest is ment, 
Say, with good will, if she thereto consent. 
This is the meanes and way to win the wench : 
Keepe wel thine owne language, what ere thou do the 
French. 

FINIS. 



SONNETTA XIII. 

FAIRE sweete, if you desire to know, 
And would the meaning understand, 
Wherefore on you I do bestow 
This ring of gold with hart in hand, 
Read these few lines that are behind, 
And there my meaning you shall find, 

The gift betokeneth my good will ; 
The ring, the wish of endles joy; 
The gold, the worldly wealth, which still 
Defendeth friendship from annoy. 
The hart in hand, my heart in hold, 
Which pittie craves, as reason would. 



64 STRANGE HISTORIES, 

The hand betokeneth love and might, 

As chiefest member that defendes . 

Shake handes, then frendes; bend fist, then fight; 

Thus love or hate the hand offendes. 

In proofe of perfect amitie 

I give this hand in hand to thee. 

The heart thus plac'd betwixt two hands, 
If friendship breake, the heart is slaine : 
Even so the case with mee now standes ; 
My heart doth in your hands remaine. 
My life is yours to save or spill : 
I say no more ; do what you will. 

FINIS. T. R. 



A MAYDES LETTER. 

CANT. XIV. 
HASTE commendations, and passe with speed, 

and litle writing, to my love : 
Spare not to speake for any dread, 

For why, no man can mee remove. 
Say this unto my turtle-dove ; 

although my body absent bee, 
There is no man can mee remove, 

for in conceit I am with thee. 

The gladsome day shall loose his light, 
and be as darke as dungeon deepe : 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 65 

Phoebus shall rule the irkesome night, 
and banish Morpheus from my sight, 

Ere ever I from my love leppe, 
although my body absent bee, 

The wormes shall flie which now do creepe, 
for in conceit I am with thee. 

The sea and land shall be alike ; 

both fish and fowle it shall be one ; 
The litle lambe the wolfe shall strike, 

and then began the greater drone. 
The feathers shall be turnd to stone, 

although my body absent bee, 
Or I against my true-love hold, 

for in conceit I am with thee. 

The tree shall florish in the fire, 

bringing foorth fruite ten thousand fold ; 
So shall the horse in dirt and myre 

bring foles past count for to be told. 
All kind of mettle shall be gold, 

although my body absent bee, 
Or I against my true-love hold, 

for in conceit I am with thee. 

The flowers that smel deliciously 

shall stinke, no man may them abide, 

And oyles and oyntments preciously 
shall be corrupt, and never tride, 



66 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Ere I my selfe I do deny, 

although my body absent bee, 

Morpheus to mee shall be one guide, 
for in conceit I am with thee. 

When all these thinges be come to passe 

which I on spake, then, be assured, 
You'l find these women brittle as glasse, 

but not till then, if life be pure. 
Constant still I will endure, 

whiles there's any life in my body; 
If I speake the words, lie make them sure, 

and in conceit He end with thee. 

FINIS. A. C. 



A NEW DITTIE IN PRAYSE OF MONEY. 

CANT. XV. 

To a new tune called The Kings Jigge. 
MONEY'S a lady ; nay, she is a princesse ; 

Nay more, a goddesse adorned on earth. 
Without this Money who can be merry, 

Though he be never so noble by byrth ? 
Her presence breeds joy, her absence breeds annoy: 

where Money lacketh, there wanteth no dearth. 

Vertue is nothing if Money be wanting, 
vertue is nothing esteemed or set by. 
Wisedom is folly, and so accounted, 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 67 

if it be joyned with base povertie. 
Learnings contemned, wit is condemned, 
both are derided of rich miserie. 

He that is wealthy is greatly regarded, 

though he be never so simple a sot: 
He that is needy, he is despised, 

tho' he have wisedome which th' other hath not. 
Though he have wisedome (which many wanteth) 

yet is his credit not worth a grot. 

When thou hast Money then friendes thou hast many; 

when it is wasted their friendship is cold: 
Goe by Jeronimo; no man then will thee know, 

knowing thou hast neither silver nor gold. 
No man will call thee in, no man will set a pin 

for former friendship, though never so old. 

Money doth all things, both great things and small 
things, 

Money doth all things, as plainely we see: 
Money doth each thing, want can do nothing 

Povertie parteth stiU good companie: 
When thou hast spent all, or els hast lent all, 

who then is loving or kind unto thee. 

Money makes soldiers to serve their prince truly, 
Money hyres souldiers and serving-men too: 

Money makes lawyers plead the case duly; 
without this Money what can a man do? 

This auncient lesson I learned newly, 
if Money misseth in vaine thou dost sue. 



68 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

Money subdueth where force can not conquer, 
Shee overcommeth both castle and towne; 

Her power quayleth where valour fayleth, 
never was lady of greater renowne. 

Many a towne is so betraid unto the foe; 
her wals are razed, and turrets puld downe. 

Beautie, that standeth on pride and opinion, 

by lady Lucre oft catcheth a fall; 
And though she scornes desart, and have a flinty heart, 

yet is she ready when Money doth call. 
The clowne for Money may have a coney, 

when the poore gallant can get none at all. 

Thus we see Money makes every place sunny; 

each place is shady that wanteth her shine : 
Phoebus is not so bright, nor gives such store of light, 

as this faire lady whose beauty's divine. 
Of night she maketh day, all care she drives away, 

her fame and glory nere yet did decline. 

Riches bewitches the minde of a miser, 

Money enchaunteth both young age and old ; 

Yet cannot Money purchase thee heaven : 
Heavens not purchas'd with silver nor gold ; 

But to the godly, righteous and blessed, 
the joyes of heaven are given, not sould. 

FINIS. 



STRANGE HISTORIES. 69 

AN EPIGRAM. 

Dull says, he is so weake he can not rise, 
Nor stand, nor goe : if that be true, he lyes. 
True-lie well sed, for so the case now standes, 
He keepes his bed, yet lies i' the surgions hands. 

FINIS. Quoth R. 



A LOVER BEING COMMAUNDED BY HIS BELOVED TO GIVE PLACE 
TO THE DISDAYNED CRUE, HE WRITETH AS FOLLOWETH. 

With heavie hart, and many a dole, adue; 
I doe give place to the disdained crue : 

But, 

When you command, who may command the best, 
Shall I denie, who may the worst of all ? 
I rather wish the hart within my brest 
Lie dround in death, and soule to hell be thrall. 
With wiUing minde I to your hest agree : 
You did command ; that was enough for mee. 



HEE that in time refuseth time, 
when time well offered is, 

An other time shall misse of time, 
but then of time shall misse. 

Mans life by time, try it who shall, 
shall find his time no time to trust 

Some time to rise, some time to fall, 
till life of man be brought to dust. 



70 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

WISE SENTENCES. 

Two things doth prolong thy lyfe : 
A quiet heart, and a loving wife. 

The scarlet cloth doth make the bull to feare ; 
The cullour white the Ollivant doth shunne : 
The crowing cocke the lion quakes to heare ; 
The smoake of cloth doth make the stag to runne. 
All which do shew, we no man should despise, 
But thinke how harme the simplest may devise. 

THIS SENTENCE MAY BE SET IN A BED-CHAMBER. 

Why flyest thou hence, thou glory bright, 

that men with fame doth crowne ? 
Because I loath the place, where follies men 

do sleepe on beds of downe: 
And where as filthy lust doth dwell 

with foule excesse, 
There is no place, that is no house 

for glory to possesse. 

A word once spoke, it can returne no more, 

But flieth away and oft thy bayle doth breed. 

A wise man, then, sets hatch before the dore, 

And, whilst he may, doth square his speech with heed. 

The bird in hand we may at will restraine, 

But being flowne, we call her backe in vaine. 




STRANGE HISTORIES. 71 



THESE SENTENCES FOLLOWING WERE SET UPON CONDUITS IN 

LONDON, AGAINST THE DAY THAT KING JAMES CAME THROUGH 

THE CITIE, AT HIS FIRST COMMING TO THE CROWNE. 



UPON THE CONDUIT IN GRATEOUS STREET WERE 
THESE VERSES. 

KINGDOMS change, worlds decay, 

But trueth continewes till the last day. 

Let money be a slave to thee, 
Yet keepe his service, if you can : 
For if thy purse no money have, 
Thy person is but halfe a man. 

IN CORNEWELL. 

To be wise, and wealthy too, 

Is sought of all, but found of few. 

All on this worlds Exchange do meete, 

But when deaths Burse-bell rings, away ye fleete. 

When a kinges head but akes 

Subjectes should mourne, 
For under their crownes 

A thousand cares are worne. 

Bread earned with honest laboring hands, 
Tastes better then the fruite of ill got lands. 

Hee that wants bread, and yet lyes still, 
It's sinne his hungry cheekes to fill. 



72 STRANGE HISTORIES. 

As man was first framed and made out of clay, 
So must he at length depart hence away. 

A man without mercy of mercy shall misse, 
And he shall have mercy that mercifull is. 

IN CHEAP-SIDE. 

Life is a drop, a sparke, a span, 
A bubble ; yet how proude is man. 

Life is a debt, which at that day 
The poorest hath enough to pay. 

This worlds a stage, whereon to day 
Kings and meane-men parts do play. 

To morrow others take their roomes, 
While they do fill up graves and toomes. 

Learning lives, and vertue shines, 
When follie begs, and ignorance pines. 

To live well is happinesse ; 
To die well is blessednesse. 



FINIS. 



NOTES. 



P. 3. The Table.'] It will be seen that this " Table" only relates 
to the earlier portions of the volume. It is printed precisely as 
it stands in the original, but some of thej " cantos " are misnum- 
bered, and the work seems to have been got up without much 
attention to the Table. 

P. 5. " Kentish long-tails " are often referred to in old writers. 
See the commencement of the " Mad Pranks and Merry Jests 
of Robin Goodfellow," where the custom is attempted to be both 
historically and jocosely accounted for. 

P. 9, 1. 4. Did they of Duke William gaine.~] The pronoun 
" they " is redundant in this line, but we have printed it as it is 
given in the original edition. 

P. 13. This ballad, according to the Table, and the regular 
succession of the cantos, ought to be numbered II instead of III : 
otherwise there is no Cant. II. 

P. 17. A play on the same subject as this ballad was written 
by Thomas Drew, or Drue, early in the reign of James I ; and 
it was printed in 1631, under the title of "The Duchess of Suf- 
folk, her Life." The incidents are nearly the same in the ballad 
and the play, and both were founded upon the narrative of Fox, 
anno 1558. The popularity of the ballad probably led Drew to 
adopt the subject. 



P. 24. This ballad, and the history of the period to which it 
relates, also furnished the subject of a historical play, under the 
title of "Look about you." It was acted by Henslowe and 
Alleyn's company, and was printed in 1600. It is a good play, 
and it will form one of the series to be reprinted by the Percy 
Society. 

P. 28. This ballad has no number ; but, following the number 
of that which precedes it, it ought to be marked IV. They are 
connected in subject. 

P. 31. This ballad on the death of King John is interposed 
here between others which relate to events of about the same 
period, though none of them seem arranged* with any precise 
regard to chronology. 

P. 34. This ballad, and two others by which it is followed, are 
upon events included in Christopher Marlowe's celebrated and 
powerful tragedy of "Edward the Second," which must have 
been written before 1593, as its author was killed in that year. 
It was first printed in 1598. 

P. 38. They sent him word that he should die.'] Alluding to the 
letter containing these words : Edwardum occidere nolite timere 
bonum est, which conveys an opposite meaning according as a 
comma is placed after nolite or timere. Sir John Harington, in 
B. I. Epigr. 33 of his Epigrams, has one " Of writing with double 
pointing," in the introduction to which he quotes the Bishop of 
Hereford's letter, referred to in the ballad. Marlowe, near the 
close of his tragedy, makes Mortimer jun. say that this letter was 
written by " a friend," but he does not impute it to the Bishop 
of Hereford. 

P. 46. This ballad was probably written (of course not by 
Deloney, who was then dead) after James I came to the throne, 
and after a ballad had been published, which was sung to a tune 



75 



invented at the time, and known by the name of " The King 's 
going to the Parliament." Unless we suppose James I to be in- 
tended, it would carry the composition of the tune to the time of 
Edward VI, and, in that case, the ballad might be older than the 
date we have given to it. 

P. 49. This also is a dramatic, as well as a historical, ballad. 
A play, called " Jack Straw's Life and Death," was printed in 
1593, and again in 1604. It is a mere fragment of a drama, and 
only in four acts. 

P. 52. The revolt, in which Lord Audley, Flamocke, and 
Joseph were concerned, occurred in the year 1497, according to 
Stow, to whose authority the author of this " Speech " resorted, 
and whose words he has in more than one place employed. 

P. 54. The popular ballad of " Fair Rosamond " may be found 
in various collections ; but Bishop Percy printed it " with con- 
jectiiral emendations," from " four ancient copies in black letter," 
observing however that it was "first published" in 1612: there- 
fore, the four black letter copies he employed were of a more 
recent date. 

P. 63. It may be conjectured (as stated in the Introduction), 
that the remainder of this volume was made up of short pieces 
by various authors, whose initials are sometimes given, and that 
they were not the writing of Deloney. 

P. 64. The initials T.R. may be assigned to Thomas Richard- 
son, student in Cambridge, in 1584, who wrote "A proper new 
Song," to the tune of " I wish to see those happy daies," in the 
" Handefull of Pleasant Delites," printed in that year. 

P. 65, 1. 10. And then began the greater drone.~] There is probably 
some misprint in this line, the correction of which must be left 
to the ingenuity of the reader, as no other copy of this " Maydes 
Letter" is known. 



76 



P. 66. The initials A. C. will apply to Anthony Chute, or 
Anthony Copley, both writers of verse prior to the death of 
Queen Elizabeth. Chute was dead in 1596, bnt nevertheless this 
" Maydes Letter" is more in his style than that of Copley, who 
survived him. 

P. 66, 1. 18. For " adorned" we ought probably to read adored. 

P. 66, 1. 19. The original reads " With without this money," 
&c. but " with" is clearly surplusage. 

P. 67, 1. 12. " Goe by Jeronimo" became a proverbial phrase, 
and is used and ridiculed by Shakespeare, and many writers sub- 
sequent to the publication of Thomas Kyd's " Spanish Tragedy," 
where it is first found. It occurs in Act IV. (See Dodsley's Old 
Plays, III. 163, last edit.) 

P. 69. An Epigram, subscribed " R," is here omitted, on ac- 
count of its coarseness, as well as some stanzas, beginning " My 
mistris loves no woodcocks," for a similar reason. 

P. 71, The title to these " Sentences" fixes the date of them 
very exactly, and shows that " Strange Histories", in the present 
shape of the work, and, supposing our edition of 1607 to be only a 
reimpression of a preceding edition with the same contents, was 
not published until after James I ascended the throne. 

P. 71, 1. 12. "In Cornewell" of course means Cornhill, where 
stood the Royal Exchange from the earliest date of its con- 
struction. 

P. 71, 1. 16. But when deatlis Burse-bell rings, away ye fleete.~] It 
need scarcely be mentioned that the Royal Exchange was also 
called the Burse. 



C. IIICIIAMDS, PIUNTKK, ST. MARTl>f S LANE. 



PUBLICATION OF ANCIENT BALLADS, SONGS, 

PLAYS, MINOR PIECES OF POETRY, 

AND POPULAR LITERATURE. 



AT a General Meeting of the PERCY SOCIETY, held at 
the Rooms of the Royal Society of Literature, No. 4, 
St. Martin's Place, Trafalgar Square, on Saturday, the 
1st of May 1841, 

JOHN PAYNE COLLIER, ESQ. F.S.A. 
In the Chair, 

The Chairman having opened the business of the day, 
and the Laws having been read and confirmed, 

The Secretary read the Report of the Council, dated 
the 1st of May, whereupon it was 

Resolved, That the said Report be received, and printed 
for the use of the Members. 

The Report of the Auditors, dated the 30th of April, 
was then read by THOMAS AMYOT, ESQ. F.R.S. Treas. S.A . 
whereupon it was 

Resolved, That the said Report be received, and printed 
for the use of the Members. 



The Meeting then proceeded to the election of a 
Council for the year next ensuing; and the Secretary 
having read a proposal that 



THOMAS AMYOT, Esq. F.R.S. 
WILLIAM HENRY BLACK, Esq. 
J. A. CAHUSAC, Esq. F.S.A. 
WILLIAM CHAPPELL, Esq. F.S.A. 

( Treasurer) 

JOHN PAYNE COLLIER, Esq. F.S.A. 
T. CROFTON CROKER, Esq. F.S.A., 

M.E.I.A. 
JAMES ORCHARD HALLiwELL,Esq. 

F.B.S., F.S.A. 



Rev. ALEXANDER DYCE 

G. P. R. JAMES, Esq. 

WILLIAM JERDAN, Esq. F.S.A., 

M.R.S.L. 

CHARLES MACKAY, Esq. 
T. J. PETTIGREW, Esq. F.R.S. 
EDWARD F. RIMBAULT, Esq. 

(/Secretary) 
JAMES WALSH, Esq. 
THOMAS WRIGHT, Esq. 



be elected the Council of the Society for the second 
year, 

It was resolved, That the above-named gentlemen be the 
Council of the PERCY SOCIETY from the 1st of May 
1841, to the 1st of May 1842. 

The Secretary then read a proposal that 

SEPTIMUS BURTON, ESQ. 

C. PURTON COOPER, ESQ. Q.C., D.C.L., F.R.S., F.S.A. 

The REV. WILLIAM HARNESS, 

be elected Auditors of the Society for the second year, 
whereupon 

It was resolved, That the said gentlemen be elected 
Auditors of the PERCY SOCIETY for the year then 
ensuing. 

Thanks were voted to the Council, to the Editors of 
the Society's Publications, to the Auditors, to the 
Treasurer, to the Secretary, to the Chairman, and to 
the Royal Society of Literature for the liberal manner 
in which they granted the use of their Rooms for the 
General Meeting of the Society. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



COUNCIL OF THE PERCY SOCIETY. 



May 1, 1841. 

AT the close of their first year of office, the Council of 
the Percy Society feel great satisfaction in directing 
the attention of the members to the progressive pros- 
perity of its affairs. During the nine months which have 
transpired since the present Council entered upon its 
labours, they have been enabled to supply the members 
with a new work every month ; and, notwithstanding 
the extraordinary expenses incident to the first year, 
this has been accomplished with less than two-thirds of 
the annual income. 

As the number of members, limited by the laws of 
the Society to five hundred, is rapidly filling, there 
appears to be no doubt that the Council will be able 
not only to continue the monthly issue of their publi- 
cations throughout the year, but also considerably to 
increase the average size of the volumes. The number 
of books which are thus issued in the course of a year, 
render it impossible for the Council to take upon itself 
the expenses of delivery. The books may be had, as 
hitherto, on application at Mr. Richards' Printing 
Office, No. 100, St. Martin's Lane; but, instead of 
the printed forms hitherto used, it has been resolved 



that the book of each month shall be given on the 
production of a written order by the member applying. 
Measures have also been taken to insure the regularity 
of publication on the first day of every month. 

The interests of the Society have been much for- 
warded by the exertions of the following gentlemen, 
who have kindly volunteered their services as Local 
Secretaries in different parts of the kingdom. 

JAMES MAIDMENT, ESQ. Edinbro 1 . H. G. ADAMS, ESQ. Chatham. 

JOHN KERR, ESQ. Glasgow. JOHN MATHEW GUTCH, ESQ. Wor- 
EEV. J. E. WREFORD, Bristol. cester. 

M. DECK, ESQ. Cambridge. HENRY S. STOKES, ESQ. Truro. 



The publications of the Society during the first year 
have been : 

1 . A Collection of Old Ballads anterior to the reign of Charles I, 
by John Skelton, Stephen Peel, Churchyard, Tarlton, Elderton, 
Deloney, &c. &c. Edited by J. Payne Collier, Esq. F.S.A. 

2. " A search for Money ; or the lamentable Complaint for the 
losse of the waudring Knight Mounsieur 1' Argent ; or Come along 
with me, I know thou lovest Money, &c. By William Rowley. 
Imprinted at London for Joseph Hunt, &c. 1609." Reprinted 
from the only extant copy. 

3. " The Payne and Sorowe of evyll Maryage." From a copy 
believed to be unique, printed by Wynkyn de Worde; vrith an 
Introduction regarding other works of the same class, and from the 
same press. 

4. A Selection from the Miscellaneous Poems of John Lydgate. 
Edited by James Orchard Halliwell, Esq. F.R.S. and English Cor- 
respondent of the Royal Historical Commission of France. 

5. " The King and a Poore Northerne Man. Shewing how a 
poore Northumberland man, &c. went to the King himself to make 
known his grievances. Full of simple mirth and merry plaine 
jests." By Martin Parker. Printe-'l at London by Tho. Coates, 
1640. 

6. The Revolution of 1688, illustrated by the popular Ballads of 
the period. Edited, with Introductions and Notes, by T. Crofton 
Croker, Esq. F.S.A. M.R.I.A. 



7. Songs of the London Prentices and Trades, during the Reigns 
of Henry VII, Henry VIII, Elizabeth, and James I. Edited by 
Charles Mackay, Esq. 

8. A Collection of early Ballads relating- to Naval Afiairs. Edited 
by James Orchard Halliwell, Esq. F.R.S. 

9. Robin Good-fellow ; his Mad Pranks, and Merry Jests. Ful 
of honest Mirth, and is a fit Medicine for Melancholy. London, 
printed for F. Grove. 1628. 



The following works, for publication during the en- 
suing year, are ordered for press, and some are in an 
advanced state of preparation : 

1. " Strange Histories or Songes and Sonets of Kings, Princes, 
Dukes, Lordes, Ladyes, Knights, and Gentlemen. Very pleasant 
either to be read or songe," &c. By Thomas Deloney. Imprinted 
at London for W. Barley, &c. 1607. 

2. Political Ballads of the age of Cromwell, collected and edited 
by Thomas Wright, Esq. M.A. F.S.A. 

3. " The Pleasant History of the two angry Women of Abington. 
With the humorous mirth of Dicke Coomes and Nicholas Proverbs, 
two Servingmen. As it was lately playde by the Lord High Ad- 
mirall his servants." Written by Henry Porter. 1599. The first 
of a series of old plays, to be edited by the Rev. A. Dyce. 

4. A Collection of Old English Ballads, from the Reign of 
Henry VI to that of Edward VI. To be edited by William 
Chappell, Esq. F.S.A. 

5. " Vinegar and Mustard, or Worm-wood Lectures for every 
Day in the Week. Being exercised and delivered in several 
Parishes both of Town and City, on several dayes, &c. Taken 
verbatim in short writing by J. W." Reprinted from the edition of 
1673. 

6. The French Invasions of Ireland, illustrated by popular 
Songs, in three Parts, with an Introduction. To be edited by 
T. Crofton Croker, Esq. F.S.A. M.R.I.A. 

7. " Pleasant Quippes for Upstart newfangled Gentlewomen, 
1596." A satirical and humorous production inverse by Stephen 
Gosson, printed from a copy presented by the author to a contem- 
porary. 

8. The " Boke of Curtasye;" an English Poem illustrative of the 
Domestic Manners of our forefathers. To be edited, from a MS. 
of the fifteenth century in the British Museum, bv James Orchard 
Halliwell, Esq. F.R.S., Hon. M.R.I.A., F.S.A., &c. 



9. " Kind-Harts Dream. Containing five Apparitions, with their 
Invectives against abuses raigning. Delivered by severall Ghosts 
unto him to be publisht, after Piers Penilesse Post had refused the 
carriage." Printed without date in 1592. 



In addition to these, the following works have been 
suggested for publication, and the Council look forward 
to the zealous co-operation of the members of the So- 
ciety to enable them to add other works of general 
interest to the list. 

1. Crawford's Poems, transcribed from the Tea-table Miscellany 
of Allan Ramsay, with an Introduction and Notes by Peter Cun- 
ningham, Esq. 

2. Historical Ballads, in the Scottish Dialect, relating to events 
in the years 1570, 1571, and 1572 : from the Originals. Printed by 
Robert Lekpreuik ; preserved in the Library of the Society of Anti- 
quaries, London. 

3. Songs and Poems by known and unknown Authors, to be 
found in Musical Miscellanies published during the reigns of 
Elizabeth and James I. 

4. The Pleasant and sweet History of Patient Grissell. Shewing 
how she, from a poore man's Daughter, came to be a great Lady in 
France, being a patterne to all vertuous Women, &c. London, 
printed by E. P. for John Wright, &c. No date. In prose and 
verse. 

5. " A most pleasant and merie new Comedie, intituled a Knack 
to knowe a Knave. Newlie set foorth, as it hath sundrie tymes bene 
played by Ed. Allen and his companie. With Kemp's applauded 
Merrimentes of the Men of Goteham in receiving the King into 
Goteham, 1594." 

6. A Selection of Stories, Anecdotes, and Jokes, from various 
Jest Books printed prior to the end of the reign of Charles I ; with 
an account of the origin of many of them, and of the manner in 
which they are to be traced through several European languages. 

7. The Batcheler's Banquet, or a Banquet for Batchelers. 
Wherein is prepared sundry dainty dishes, &c. Pleasantly dis- 
coursing the variable humours of Women, &c. By Thomas Dekker. 
London. Printed by T. C. &c. 1603. 

8. Latin Stories written in England during the 13th and 14th 
Centuries, illustrative of the History of Fiction. Edited from the 
original MSS. with translations by Thomas Wright, Esq. M.A. 
F.S.A. 



9. A Collection of Lyrical Pieces contained in Old Plays of a 
date prior to the suppression of Theatrical Representations in 1647. 
To be edited by Edward F. Rimbault, Esq. 

10. A Collection of Jacobite Ballads and Fragments, many of 
them hitherto unpublished. To be edited by William Jerdan, Esq. 
F.S.A., M.R.S.L. 

11. " A Marriage Triumphe. Solemnized in an Epithalamium 
in memorie of the happie Nuptials betwixt the Count Palatine and 
the Lady Elizabeth. Written by Thomas Heywood. London. 
Printed for Edward Marchant, &c. 1613." With an introduction, 
giving an account of other poems by different authors on the same 
event. 

12. A Collection of Christmas Carols, from the 12th to the 15th 
Century. To be edited by Thomas Wright, Esq. M.A., F.S.A. 

13. The Nursery Rhymes of England, arranged in Classes, with 
an Historical Introduction. To be edited by James Orchard Halli- 
well, Esq. 

14. Grange's " Garden of Golden Aphroditis." To be reprinted 
from the edition of 1577. 

15. Ballads and Songs illustrative of the Fairy Mythology of 
England. To be edited by Thomas Wright, Esq. M.A., F.S.A. 

16. A Collection of Good-nights, or Highwaymen's Farewells. 
To be edited by Charles Mackay, Esq. 

17. The Robin Hood Ballads ; a new and more complete Edition, 
with an Introductory Essay. 

18. A Collection of Ballads relating to May-day and May-games. 



The Society have to regret, during the first year, the 
loss of two members by death, John Miller, Esq. M.D. 
Edinburgh, and Thomas Hill, Esq. London. 

The Council of the first year, in resigning their func- 
tions, think it right to state that they feel great satis- 
faction with their printer, Mr. Richards, to whom the 
Society is also indebted for the loan of the room in 
which the Council hold their meetings. 

Signed by order of the Council, 

JOHN PAYNE COLLIER, Chairman. 
EDWARD F. RIMBAULT, Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE AUDITORS, 

Dated 30th April 1841. 



WE the Auditors appointed by the Council 
of the PERCY SOCIETY, to examine the Accounts of 
the Treasurer, from the institution of the Society to 
the 30th of April 1841, certify that the Treasurer 
has exhibited his Accounts to us, and that we have 
examined the same, together with his Receipts 
and other vouchers, and that we find the same to 
be correct and satisfactory. 

And we further report that the following is 
a correct abstract of the Receipts and Expenditure 
of the Society during the period to which we have 
referred. 





pp.. 


O 




h^ 






p 







M 






p 







a 






^ 




g 


p 
P^ 






* Gfl 


- 


4 








H- J ^ 


o* 


1 _ 1 


pi 






GO gf 


3 


00 


o 4 






^ 

^ 2. 


cc 


s 


s. 






r-t- 

o* 


I 




o' 




(_^ 


13 


M 








1 


. O" 


g 





pu 


w 


5 


p! 




s 






o 


b 


1. 


3 


1 




p 


i 


H" 


* 






o 


H 


GO 


t , 






,__, 


CO 




s 






s 






S> 






o 




1 


N- 











00 


*. 


o 


hf^ 







O 


o 





o 




- 


O 


o 










(*. 




to 






H 



















*"d w 


H 


^ 


^ 






S- y* 




"i 


^j^ 








H 


QQ 


.' 






!' p 1 

tr 1 

Ct> fy 1 


GO 


co 

1 


w 

1 






3 | ' 

50 ^d 




SP 


1 


M 

a 




d S . 


. 




*^ 


g 




>j CO 

CD CD 




tr 1 


JTJ 


o 




i-j GO 




o 


h-> 






cc" 




3 


P 


H 




1 




g 


5' 

on? 


I 




& 




"-^ 








oo 










P^ 








S 3 






Ha 








^d 
c> 







to 






^i 


.__^ 




CD 

00 


i i 
00 i^- CD 


1 i 


Oi 

CD 


00 
CO 


h 





Ot O5 0^ 


t i 

o 


-j 


t ' 


- 





C7i O ^ 


00 


Oi 


o 


a. 



WE also certify that the Treasurer has 
reported to us, that about the sum of ^16. part of 
the several sums paid for paper and transcripts has 
been paid on account of the expenses of the second 
year. 

And also, that there remains outstanding 
in the hands of Local Secretaries, of whose accounts 
only two have yet been received, and in Subscrip- 
tions of Members who have not yet paid for the 
first year, the sum of ^60, which last sum is ex- 
pected to be shortly received. 

THOMAS AMYOT. 
JOHN BRUCE. 
E. R. MORAN. 
WILLIAM J. THOMS. 

Dated the '30th April, 1841. 



PUBLICATION OF ANCIENT BALLADS, SONGS, 

PLAYS, MINOR PIECES OF POETRY, 

AND POPULAR LITERATURE. 



, 1841-2. 

President 
THE RT. HON. LORD BRAYBROOKE, F.S.A. 

THOMAS AMYOT, ESQ. F.R.S. 

WILLIAM HENRY BLACK, ESQ. 

J. A. CAHUSAC, ESQ. F.S.A. 

WILLIAM CHAPPELL, ESQ. F.S.A. Treasurer 

JOHN PAYNE COLLIER, ESQ. F.S.A. 

T. CROFTON CROKER, ESQ. F.S.A., M.R.I.A. 

REV. ALEXANDER DYCE 

JAMES ORCHARD HALLIWELL, F.S.A. 

G. P. R. JAMES, ESQ. 

WILLIAM JERDAN, ESQ. F.S.A., M.R.S.L. 

CHARLES MACKAY, ESQ. 

T. J. PETTIGREW, ESQ. F.R.S. 

EDWARD F. RIMBAULT, ESQ., Secretary 

JAMES WALSH, ESQ. 

THOMAS WRIGHT, ESQ. M.A., F.S.A. 



The Society is limited to Five Hundred Members. 

Persons wishing to become Members, are requested to send 
their names to the SECRETARY, 9, Denmark Street, Soho 
Square, London. 

Subscriptions received at Mr. Richards' Printing Office, 
100, St. Martin's Lane. 

BANKERS. The London and Westminster Bank, No. 155, 
Oxford Street. 



of tfte 




1. That the Society be called "The Percy Society." 

2. That the Publications of the Society shall consist of 
Ancient Ballads, Songs, Plays, minor pieces of Poetry, and 
Popular Literature, or works illustrative of the above-mentioned 
subjects. 

3. The Society shall consist of Members being Subscribers 
of One Pound annually, such Subscription to be paid in 
advance, on or before the day of General Meeting in each year, 
The General Meeting to be held on the 1st of May, in every 
year, unless it should fall on a Sunday, when some other day 
is to be named by the Council. 

4. That the affairs of the Society be conducted by a Council 
consisting of fifteen Members, including a Treasurer and Secre- 
tary, all of whom shall be elected at the Annual General 
Meeting of the Society. 

5. That any Member may compound for his future Sub- 
scriptions by the payment of Ten Pounds over and above his 
Subscription for the current year. 

6. That the Accompts of the Receipts and Expenditure of 
the Society be audited annually by three Auditors, to be elected 
at the General Meeting; and, in case of any of these three 
Auditors being unable to act, his place is to be supplied by a 
Member of the Society, to be elected by the Council. 

7. That any Member who shall be one year in arrear of his 
subscription, shall no longer be considered as belonging to the 
Society. 

7. That every Member, not in arrear of his Annual Sub- 
scription, be entitled to a copy of each of the works published 
by the Society. 



' flamed. 



Those Members to whose Names (c.) is prefixed have compounded for their Annual 

Subscriptions. 
The Members whose Names are printed in Capitals are on the Council of the 

present Year. 



Adams, H. G. Esq. Chatham, Local Sec. 

Adolphus, J. Esq. F.S.A. 

Advocates' Library, Edinburgh 

AMYOT, T. Esq. F.R.S. Treas. S.A. 

Aspland, A. S. Esq. 

Aspland, Rev. R. Brook 

Atkinson, Henry, Esq. Manchester 

Aubyn, Rev. R. H. 

Aungier, G. J. Esq. 

Ayrton, W. Esq. F.R.S , F.S.A. 

Bagot, the Hon. Alfred 

Bartlett, J. Esq. 

Barton, Thomas P. Esq. 

Beasant, John J. Esq. 

Bell, F. J. Esq. 

Benecke, R. Esq. 

Bentley, Richard, Esq. 

Bentley, Rev. John Charles 

Berridge, Samuel, Esq. Leicester 

Betham, Sir William, Ulster King-at- 

Arms, For. Sec. R.I. A., F.S.A., Dublin, 

Local Secretary 
Bevan, Edward, Esq. 
Bibliotheque du Roi, Paris 
Black, John, Esq. 
BLACK, WILLIAM HENRY, Esq. 
Black, William, Esq. 
Blood, Bindon, Esq. F.R.S.E., F.S.A. 

Scot., M R.I.A. Edinburgh 
Bompas, Charles S, Esq. 
(c.) Botfield Beriah, Esq. M. A., F.R.S., 

F.S.A., M.P. 
BRAYBROOKE, THE RIGHT HON. LORD, 

President 

Bright, Benjamin Heywood, Esq. 
Brown, W. M. Esq. 
Bruce, John, Esq. F.S.A. 
Bremridge, J. Esq. 
Brown, William, Esq. Aberdeen 
Buchanan, Walter, Esq. 
Burn, James, Esq. W.S. Edinburgh 
Burton, Septimus, Esq. Chiswick Grove 

CATIUSAC, J. A. Esq. F.S.A. 



Caldecott, Captain 

Caldwell, Davis, Esq. 

Carraichael, Arch. Esq. M.A. Edinburgh 

Chadwick, Elias, Esq. Swinton, near 

Manchester 
Chapman, T. Esq. 
Chapman, W. Esq. 
(c.) CHAPPELL, WILLIAM, Esq. F.S.A. 

Treasurer 

Chappell, J. C. Esq. 
Chappell, T. P. Esq. 
Chater, George, Esq. 
Christy, Alexander, Esq. 
Clard, Edward, Esq. 
Clark, C. Esq. 

Clements, J. Esq. Oriel College, Oxford 
Cobbin, J. I. Esq. 
COLLIER, J. PAYNE, Esq. F.S.A. 
Collier, J. Py croft, Esq. 
Coombes, Thomas, Esq. 
Cooper, Charles Purton, Esq. Q.C., 

D.C.L., F.R.S., F.S.A. 
Cooper. W. Durrant, Esq. F.S.A. 
Corner, G. R. Esq. F.S.A. 
Corney, Bolton, Esq. 
Corser, Rev. Thomas 
Coventry, A Esq. 
CROKER, T. CROFTON, Esq. F.S.A., 

M.R.I.A. 

Croomes, John, Esq. 
Crossely, James, Esq. 
Cunningham, George, Esq. Glasgow 
Cunningham, Peter, Esq. 
Currer, Miss Richardson, Asheton Hall 
Curzon, The Hon. Edward Cecil 

Dalzell, Sir John Graham, Edinburgh 

Daniel, George, Esq. 

Davies, Thomas Stevens, Esq. F.R.S., L. 

& E., F.S.A., R.M.A. Woolwich. 
Dawson, T. C. Esq. 

Deane, Rev. John Bathurst, M.A. F.S.A. 
Deck, N. Esq. Cambridge, Local Sec. 
Dent, J. Esq. Worcester 
Dike, C. W. Esq. L.L.B. 



14 



Disney, John, Esq. F.R.S., F.S.A. 

Dixon, J. H. Esq. 

Dixon, R. W. Esq. 

Dodd, George, Esq. F.S.A. 

Dolman, Mr. 

Dovaston, J. F. M. Esq. A.M. 

Driffield, Rev. G. Townsend, B.A. Oxford 

Dudgeon, George, Esq. 

Duncan, James, Esq. 

Duncan, Richard, Esq. Glasgow 

Duncan, William J. Esq. Glasgow 

Dunkins, jun. Esq. Dartford 

Dunn, J. Esq. Paisley 

Duyckinck, Evert A. Esq. New York 

DYCE, REV. ALEXANDER 

Dyke, Rev. Henry 

Edgeworth, William, Esq. Wrexham 

Elderton, C. Merrick, Esq. 

Ellis, Barrow Helbert, Esq. 

Exton, Rev. R. B. 

Eyton, Joseph W. King, Esq. 

Fairholt, Frederick W. Esq. 
Fitch, William Stevenson, Esq. Ipswich 
Fitch, Robert. Esq. F.G.S. Norwich 
Fleming, Rev. William, D.D. Professor 

of Moral Philosophy at the University 

of Glasgow 

Fletcher, Thomas W. Esq. F.R.S., F.S.A. 
Ford, Henry, Esq. Manchester 
Forett, David, Esq. 

Forster, W. E. Esq. Bradford, Yorkshire 
Francis, Charles Larkin, Esq. 
Fraser, Thomas, Esq. 
Frend, Henry Tyrwhitt, Esq. 
Frewin, Thomas, Esq. 
Fripp, Charles Bowles, Esq. Bristol 

Gaskin, Rev. John, Kingswood, near 
Bristol 

Getty, Edmund, Esq. 

Glen, J. P. Esq. Radnorshire 

Goldsmid, Isaac L. Esq. F.R.S., F.S.A. 

Goodall, Edward, Esq. Coventry 

Gooding, John, Esq. Southwold 

Gowen, J. R. Esq. 

Gracie, J. B. Esq. F.S.A. Edinburgh 

Greenwell, William, Esq. 

Gregory, R. Esq. Oxford 

Gutch, John Mathew, Esq. F.S.A. Wor- 
cester, Local Secretfiri/. 



Haggard, W. D. Esq. F.S.A., F.R.A 

M.N.S. 
HALLIWELL, JAMES ORCHARD, Esqu 

F.R.S., F.R.A.S.,M.R.S.L.,M.R S.N.A. 

F.S.A.L. & E., &c. 
HALLIWELL, RICHARD, Esq. F.S.A. 
Hannah, John, Esq. B.A. Oxford 
Harding, Joseph, Esq. 
Hardy, A. William, Esq. 
Harness, Rev. William, M.A. 
Harrison, W. F. Esq. 
Heath, J. B. Esq. F.S.A. 
Heseltine, Samuel R. Esq. 
Hewett, J. Esq. Leamington 
Hiles, J. Esq. Shrewsbury 
Hill, Henry, Esq. 
Hogarth, George, Esq. 
Hollond, Robert, Esq. M.P. 
Holme, Edward, Esq. M.D. 
Hopper, A. M. P^sq. 
How, Jeremiah, Esq. 
Hunter, Rev. Joseph, F.S A. 

Ingraham, Edward D. Esq. 
Irving, David, LL.D. Edinburgh 
Islington Literary & Scientific Institution 

Jackson, Rev. S. M A. Ipswich 

Jackson, Henry, Esq. Sheffield 

Jacob, B. Esq. Dorchester 

JAMES, G. P. R. Esq. 

JEEDAN, WM., Esq. F.S.A., M.R.S.L. 

Jermyu, James, Esq. 

Johns, Richard, Esq. Lieut. R.M. 

Kerr, John, Esq. Glasgow, Local Sec. 
Kerr, Robert M. Esq. Glasgow 
Kidsten, Robert, Esq. Glasgow 
King, R. J. Esq. Exeter College, Oxford 
KHngemann, C. Esq. 
Knight, William, Esq. F.S.A. 

Laing, David, Esq. F.S.A. L. & Sc. 
(c.) Lappenberg, Dr. J. M. Hamburg 
Law, W. Esq. 
Leatham, W. H. Esq. 
Lever, Charles, Esq. 
Lilly, J. Esq. 

Lloyd, George, Esq. 

Logan, W. H. Esq. Edinburgh 



15 



London, City of, Literary and Scientific 

Institution 
London Institution 
London Library, The 
Lover, Samuel, Esq. 
(c.) Lucas, Esq. Stirling 
Ludlow, Ebenezer, Esq. M.A., Serjeant. 

at-law. 

M'Gregor, Alexander, Esq. Glasgow 
MAC KAY, CHABLES, Esq. 

Mackenzie, John Whitefoord, Esq. Edin. 

Macknight, James, Esq. Edinburgh 

Maconochie, James Allan, Esq. Edinb. 

Macauley, Colin Campbell, Esq. 

Madden, Sir Fred. K.H., F.R S , F.S.A , 
Keeper of the Manuscripts in the Bri- 
tish Museum, &c. &c. 

Mahon, William Mac, Esq. 

Maidment, James, Esq. Edinburgh, Lo- 
cal Secretary 

Major, C. J. Esq. 

Martin, Rev. Robert, B.A. Anstey Pas- 
tures, Leicester 

Manchee, T. 1. Esq. Bristol 

Manly, W. Esq. 

Maude, Hartwell I. Esq. 

Maude, Thomas, Esq. 

Mewburn, Francis, Esq. 

Miland, John, Esq. 

Mitchison, H. Esq. 

Mitford, Rev. John 

Moginie, N. C. Esq. 

Moran, E. Raleigh, Esq. 

Morrison, Rev. A. 

Morton, Rev. James, B.D. Prebendary ol 
Lincoln, Holbeach 

Muggeridge, Nathaniel, Esq. 

Murch, Rev. Jerome 

Muskett, Charles, Esq. Norwich, Loca> 
Secretary 

Nichols, John Gough, Esq. F.S.A. 
Nicholson, Alexander, Esq. F.S.A. 

London and Scotland, Ufford, Suffolk 
Nott, Rev. G. F. F.S.A., D.D. Wincheste: 

Oliphant, Thomas, Esq. 
Oldershaw, R. Esq. 
Ottley, Henry, Esq. 
Ouvry, Frederic, Esq. 



Ormerod, George, Esq. D.C.L. F.R.S. 
F.S.A. F.G.S. 

Pagan, J. M. Esq. M.D. Edinburgh 
Palgrave, Sir Francis, K.H., F.R.S. 
Palmer, Arthur, Esq. Bristol 
Parkes, Joseph, Esq. 
Parkinson, Rev. Richard, M.A. Canou 
of Christ Church College, Manchester 
Parry, Thomas, Esq. 
Pattison, Rev. M. Lincoln Coll. Oxford 
Peacock, Reginald, Esq. 
Perkins, Henry, Esq. F.S.A. 
Petheram, John, Esq. F.S.A. 
Petit, Louis Hayes, Esq. F.R.S. 
PETTIGREW, THO. J. Esq. F.R.S., F.S.A. 
Phillipps, Sir Thomas, Bt. F.R.S., F.S.A. 
Pichot, Dr. A. Paris 
Pickering, William, Esq. 
Pickslay, E. J. Esq. 
Pinsent, Savery, Esq. Cheltenham 
Pitcairn, Robert, Esq. Edinburgh 
Pocock, Charles Innes, Esq. Bristol 
Pocock, Lewis, Esq. F.S.A. 
Poison, Archer, Esq. 
Pollock, Charles M. Innes, Esq. 
Ponton, Thomas, Esq. M.A., F.S.A. 
Portal, Melville, Esq. Oxford 
Portico Library, Manchester 
Priaulx, Osmond de Beauvoir, Esq. 
Prideaux, W. Esq. 
Prior, James, Esq. 
Proctor, Rev. George, D.D. 
Proctor, George H. Esq. Oxford 
Proctor, Robert, Esq. 
Pyper, Hamilton, Esq. Edinburgh 

Rackham, Hamvorth E. Esq. B.A. 

Rackham, Richard, Esq. 

Read, John, Esq. Dorwent Hall, near 

Sheffield 

Reed, James, Esq. Sunderland 
Reed, S. J. Esq. 

Repton, John Adey, Esq. F.S.A. 
Rhodes, Richard, Esq. 
Richards, Charles, Esq. 
Richardson, M. A. Esq. Newcastle, Local 

Secretary. 
Rickards, C. Esq. 
Rickards, Samuel, Esq. 
Riddell, Henry M. Esq. 



16 



RIMBAULT, EDWARD F. Esq. SECRETAR 
Robertson, A. Esq. 
Robertson, John, Esq. Edinburgh 
Robinson, Henry Crabb, Esq. F.S.A 
Robson, E. Capper, Esq. 
Rodges, Robert, Esq. Glasgow 
Rodwell, George Herbert, Esq. 
Rogers, Samuel, Esq. F.R.S., F.S.A. 
Row, James Yeeles, Esq. 

Sandys, William, Esq. F.S.A. 

Scott, J. J. Esq. 

Shackell, William, Esq. M.R.S.L. 

Sharp, Rev. Lancelot, M.A., F.S.A. 

Sharp, R. S. Esq. 

Sharpe, Sir Cuthbert 

Shaw, Henry, Esq. F.S.A. 

Sheddon, Thomas, Esq. Glasgow 

Sheward, George, Esq. 

Shipp, W. Esq. 

Shirreff, James Hales, Esq. M.D. 

Sly, S. Esq. 

Smets, A. A. Esq. Savannah 

Smith, Alexander, Esq. Edinbui'gh 

Smith, Richard John, Esq. 

Smith, W. J. Esq. 

(c.) Smith, Thomas, Esq. F.S.A. Birstall 

House, Leicestershire 
Smith, Mr. J. R. 
Smith, H. B. Esq. Sheffield 
Smith, John, Esq. L L.D. Secretary to 

the Maitland Club, Glasgow 
Smith, Charles Roach, Esq. F.S.A. 
Snaith, Frederick, M.D. Holbeach 
Society Library, New York 
Sotheby, S. Leigh, Esq. 
Spalding, J. Esq. Edinburgh 
Spencer, Mr. G. B. 
Stanfield, Clarkson, Esq. R.A. 
Stephenson, G. H. Esq. 
Stewart, Duncan, Esq. Edinburgh 
Stokes, Henry Sewell, Esq. Truro, Local 

Secretary 

Stokes, George, Esq. 
Strang, Jno. Esq. Chamberlain of Glasgow 
Strickland, G. Esq. 
Swanston, C. T. Esq. F.R.S , F.S.A., Q.C. 

Taylor, Richard, Esq. F.S.A. 



Thompson, Rev. George Hodgson 

Thomas, Willim John, Esq. F.S.A. 

Thompson, Jonathan, Esq. 

Thorby, Thomas, Esq. 

Thornhill, Walter, Esq.. 

Thompson, F. Esq. 

(c.) Tite, William, Esq. F.R.S., F.S.A. 

Pres. Architectural Soc., Hon. Sec. of 

the London Institution 
Tomlins, F. G. Esq. 
Trubshaw, Thos. Esq. F.S.A. Hey wood 
Turnbull, W. B. D.D. Esq. Edinburgh 
Turner, R. S. Esq. 
Turner, J. Esq. 
Turner, Francis, Esq. 

Utterson, Edward Vernon, Esq. F.S.A. 

Valle, Frederick, Esq. 

Van de W T eyer, His Excellency M. Syl- 

vain 

Vincent, G. Esq. 
Vines, Samuel, Esq. 

WALSH, JAMES, Esq. F.S.A. 

W T ansey, William, Esq. F.S.A. 

Warner, P. Esq. 

Warren, Joseph, Esq. 

Watson, William, Esq. Sheriff Substitute 

of Aberdeenshire 

Watt, Fitzjames, Esq. Caius Coll. Cam. 
Way, Albert, Esq. F.S.A. 
White, W. A. Esq. 
White, George, Esq. 
VVillement, Thomas, Esq. F.S.A. 
Wilson, Walter, Esq. Bath 
Wilson, Arthur, Esq. 
Windus, Benjamin Godfrey, Esq. 
Wolf, M. Ferdinand, Mem. For. S.A. 
Secretary of the Imperial Library at 
Vienna 

Worship, Francis, Esq. 
Wreford, Rev. J. Reynell, F.S.A. Bristol, 
Local Secretary. 

BRIGHT, THOMAS, Esq. M.A., F.S.A. 

bright, J. H. C. Esq. 
Wylde, Rev. Charles Edmund 

Vylie, A. H. Esq. 



ifoung, Charles M. Esq 



Total 332. 



C. RICHARDS, ST. MARTINIS LANK, CHARING CROSS. 




Deloney, Thomas, 
Strange histories. 



PR 
1120 

38 






f