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Full text of "The Studentana"

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be 
Stubentana. 



publidbeb \y^ the pupils 
of tbe Tuscola, Illinois 
Higb Scbool ....•• 



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REVIEW PRINT, TUSCOLA, ILU 




Is the place to get a First-ckss Shave, a Hair-cut, 
a Bath or a Fine Cigar* The steady increase in 
my business is sufficient evidence of the excellent 
service that is being rendered in my Parlors* 



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I also keep all kinds of Lotions for the Face or Head 
Permanent cure for Dandruff by using Coofc^s Dan- 
druff Cure* Particular attention given to Childrens 
Hair Dressing* 

^ ————— ,1 



GEORGE JESSEE 



no, 9 Park Street 



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LIBRARY 

OP THE 

UNIVERSITY of ILLINOIS. 

Charles Hmmetman, 

wbo, as 
Superinten&ent ot tf3e Xluscola Scbools, 

was 

sucb an inspiration to tbe pupils 

ant) to 

flDrs. Jessie £llars==1backett, 

wbo, as 

principal of tbe Ibiob scbool, 

Mt) ber worl? 

so unselfisbl^ an& earnestly tbis 

number of Xlbe Stu5entana is 

respectfully C)eC)icateD. 



"i^S'iiS 



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LIBRARY 

OP 1M6 

UNIVERSITV of ILLINOIS. 





MRS. JES:>lE-ELLARS HACKETT. 




PROF. CHAS. AMMERMAN. 



•nn J 
'-'f fMt 



UNIVt'HSlTy Of ILLINOIS. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY 1901. 



5 



Cbarles Hmmcrman. 



Few are the teachers who have sur- 
passed Prof. Charles Ammerman in 
arousing in pupils a determination to 
make the most of life ; few are the 
superintendents w h o exceed him in 
gaining from teachers, help, praise, 
and sympathy. 

Prof. Ammerman was principal of 
our high school for the year 1897-98. 
During that time he won the respect 
and love of the pupils by his sincere, 
frank, open manner, and his careful, 
untiring efforts to render individual 
help. Every pupil will testify to the 
belief that he is an earnest champion 
of the fact that the school should ex- 
ist for the pupil, not the pupil for the 
school. 

Prof. Ammerman was our superin- 
tendent during the years 1898-99 and 
1899-19OO. In this position he proved 
that a superintendent can be and ought 
to be something more than an organ- 
izer and overseer. He went into the 
classes from the primary to the high 
school to find out their needs, and then 
he set about to help them. He was no 
autocrat who sat on the throne simply 
to dictate. He is well equipped not 
only with a knowledge of the princi- 
ples underlying educational processes 
but also with a college education. It 
is not always that a school has the good 
fortune to have a superintendent who 
has both a pedagogical and a liberal 
education. 

He resigned his positition as super- 
intendent to take the chair of mathe- 
matics in the normal at Normal, Illi- 
nois. This position, unsought by 
him, came as a great surprise to him. 



As this was a more lucrative position 
than the one he held and opened wider 
fields for him, he gave up his position 
as superintendent, much to the regret 
of pupils, teachers and citizens. 

He taught in the county Normals 
several summers, both in this county 
and other counties in the state. His 
classes were always large as his ear- 
nestness, sincerity, thoroughness and 
common sense attracted the teachers. 

As a lecturer he has won a wide rep- 
utation throughout this part of the 
state. Before he gives a talk, he knows 
what he is going to say, and when he 
is before his audience, he says it in a 
concise, clear way that all understand. 
He is especially good in his talks on 
famous books. He puts into practice 
Bacon's saying, "Some books are to be 
tasted, others to be swallowed, and 
some few to be chewed and digested." 
While he has not read as widely as 
some, yet few have read as deeply. 
Whatever he reads, he reads care- 
fully time after time until he under- 
stands it and makes it a part of him- 
self before he leaves it. As Ruskin 
says, "No book is worth anything which 
is not worth much ; nor is it servicea- 
ble until it has been read and re-read, 
and loved and loved again." Through 
this kind of reading. Prof. Ammerman 
is bringing about that self develop- 
ment that is a worthy example for any- 
one who wishes to make the most of 
life. 

Prof. Ammerman's future is certain- 
ly full of promise. His many admir- 
ers cherish the opinion that he will 
some day attain reputation as a col- 
lege professor that will win him extra- 
ordinary distinction. Wherever he goes 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901, 



and whatever he does, his earnestness 
and sincerity will arouse enthusiasm, 
and his large, sympathetic heart will 
win respect and love. 

^^^ y^^ 4^^ 

/iDrs. %. ®. 5Hacf;ctt. 

It is difficult for the pupils of the 
High School, as well as other friends, 
to think of Miss Jessie EUars as Mrs. 
Hackett. The new name may become 
a matter of fact after a time, but we 
shall always remember the old one. 

Mrs. Hackett was principal of the 
High-School during the years of '98- 
'99 and '99-'oo. For eight years previ- 
ous to that time she had been an as- 
sistant in the same institution. She 
left the school in the spring of 'oo and 
that fall was married to Mr. L. O. 
Hackett. The expressions of regret 
that attended her refusal to be an ap- 
plicant for her old posi'ion the third 
year was a compliment that any teach- 
er would be glad to have. 

Mrs. Hackett graduated from the 
University of Illinois in 1890 and after- 
wards received her Master's Degree 
from that institution. Her college 
record was an enviable one, a number 
of honors being a part of it. She has 
received honors from the University at 
different times since her graduation 
which shows that the faculty fully ap- 
preciated her work as a student. The 
years out of college have been full of 
study — study that has not been linaited 
to books. She has visited must of 
the interesting places in the United 
States. Last summer was spent in 
traveling through England, France, 
Germany and Italy. 



Mrs. Hackett was a successful princi- 
pal and instructor. During the eight 
years she was assistant she taught 
most of the subjects found in the high 
school course. After the work was 
divided into departments, she confined 
herself almost entirely to the Latin. 
The experience that came from her 
work in so many subjects was such as 
to give her a strong grasp on the 
high school work as a whole as well as 
to strengthen a scholarship already 
good, as only teaching can strengthen a 
scholarship. She had the power of 
seeing how a pupil thinks a subject and 
of presenting it so that it was clear to 
him. Careful with details, thorough at 
all times, and ever mindful of the pu- 
pil's good, it is no wonder that the 
general public greatly regreted her de- 
cision not to teach again. 

It is not an easy matter to tell what 
one person does for others. It takes 
a life time to properly estimate the 
value of influences and even a life time 
is not enough. But the immediate ef- 
fect of Mrs. Hackett's teachings must 
be very gratifying to her. Graduates 
of the High School, who have at- 
tended college, have always stood well 
in the subjects studied under her. In 
several instances the students have re- 
ceived special honors in those lines. 

Mrs. Hackett is still a student and 
always will be one. Since leaving 
school work she has devoted herself to 
the study of literature. r\>r the last 
two years she has been President of 
the Tuscola Woman's Club which de- 
votes itself to the study of literature. 
She is tireless in her efforts to get the 
best results from this organization. 
The standing of the Club and the ap- 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY ef ILLINOIS. 




JOSEPH SHIRK, 
President Board of Education. 




J. A. SLOAN, 
Secretary Board of Education. 






jjiwwp^ ^^^v 




C. C. CROSS. 







M. F. STACY. 





HEiMRY C. JONES. 



DR. W. E. RICE. 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 9f ILLINOIS. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



II 



preciation of the members show that 
she has been successful. The general 
public has profited by her efforts to- 
wards securing the City Library, good 
lecture courses, and movements of like 
nature. 

Mrs. Hackctt has been most helpful 
to her pupils and other friends. Many 
of them have felt her help when 
others did not see that help was 
needed. If gratitude and good wishes 
mean anything, she has all that one 
could wish of each, for the circle 
which gives gratitude and good wishes, 



is a large one. 



^^~ y^* %£7^ 



Ube B&ucation 1Receive^ ifrom 
®ur Hncestors. 



In all objects there is an impulse or 
tendency of some nature that causes 
all things to unfold and work steadily 
and continuously to a higher state of 
excellence. It may be so slow that it 
can scarcely be seen in ages, it may be 
indirect in its influence ; yet it is a law 
that controls the whole universe. All 
nature slowly rises under this tendency 
to a better future. 

"This is the spirit of the ages ; the 
genius of the universe" as a modern 
thinker has well expressed it. All cre- 
ation is on the move. The stars re- 
volve and even inanimate earth feels 
the necessity of some kind of motion. 
The whole vegetable kingdom moves 
onward and upward. The animal 
kingdom also feels the impulse and 
keeps pace with the advancing crea- 
tion. Man, too, hears the tread of the 
onward march, and, altho sometimes 



loath to do so, joins by necessity this 
strange procession and moves upward 
to better things. 

In everything we find this impulse 
for upward growth and everything that 
man institutes, if worthy, will prosper 
and attempt to keep pace with its 
originator. Probably the greatest thing 
man has achieved, the thing that has so 
much influenced him, is his knowl- 
edge or education. In this we can see 
a most wonderful growth. His early 
ideas of things, his thoughts of him- 
self, and all the vast creations, have 
grown from the simple conceptions of 
a child to the vast and almost bound- 
less knowledge of a man. 

When man first looked upon the 
earth, it was a vast beautiful, unex- 
plainable mystery. He found himself 
surrounded by the perfection of God's 
creation as yet unsullied by man's 
hand. He saw the wonderful workings 
of nature, the sunrise, the sunset, the 
cycle of the seasons, and was over- 
awed by its beauty and mystery. He 
knew the phenomena, but understood 
no controlling laws. Its mystery made 
it a world far above him and in his 
wonder he could not but worship it. 
Thus man's earliest conception of the 
world was a poetical one, a perfect 
adoration of nature without any ques- 
tion or doubt as to its reasons. 

But some were not satisfied. They 
observed that these phenomena of mind 
and nature occurred regularly and were 
under the control of many laws. Here 
began man's knowledge. He must 
know these laws, he must combine 
them. He saw the sun rise and set 
each day in the year and from this he 
deducted the law that it did so regular- 



12 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901, 



ly. Then instead of the sun governing 
the laws he conceived the laws as gov- 
erning the sun. He did this in all the 
phenomena that he could. These laws 
which he arranged seem strange in our 
day. He must connect these laws wiih 
his religion. The Greek connected the 
daily risii g and setting of the sun with 
the myth of AppoPo's daily diive 
across the heavens. Man's conceptions 
then, in his first stage were poetical be- 
cause of his faith or religion ; mythical 
because of the attempt to connect the 
laws and phenomena with the religion 
or first poetical worship. 

This knowledge was told to the suc- 
ceeding generation. Soon, however, 
they discovered new truths that proved 
the old theories false. This sometimes 
changed the whole trend of education 
The succeeding generation would 
doubt some principle, and in doubting 
would discover a new principle. Thus 
the knowledge grew. What some gen- 
erations would advance as a theory 
would be proved a truth. by the next 

This growth was like all other phases 
of evolution or growth. It evolved, 
not involved. It was an unfolding of 
those great poetic truths and principles 
that the first generation had discovered. 
It was a germ planted by God in the 
first man that began to grow, to enlarge 
and to be more beautiful as the ages 
passed. 

It is thought by some, and the 
thought may not be altogether incor- 
rect, that man in his march forward 
treads upon his ancestors. His truths 
and ideas fallen, the present man 
tramps upon them, glorifying and self- 
concious of his own superiority. 



This seems to be somewhat true, 
although it appears more beautiful and 
more justifiable to consider it as a 
gradual unfolding. Yet you say that 
some of the present truths have no re- 
semblance or connection with the truths 
of our ancestors This is ihe point 
that is difficult to see in any evolution. 
It is not easy to see a resemblance be- 
tween a horse and a man, yet there is 
such a thing if we can only go deep 
enough. The seed of a beautiful flow- 
er contains the power or germ of 
growth by which it furms, from its 
surroundings, the beauty and fragrance 
that we see in the full grown flower. 
The seed contains all the power of life, 
of its afterglory, yet can we blame the 
plant when it casts away the old seed 
because it is of no more use to it? It 
is the old natural law that only from 
death can there come life. This also 
holds good in the spiritual and intel- 
lectual side of life. Can we not com- 
pare the evolution of knowledge to the 
evolution of a plant? By evolution, we 
mean the growth. Knowledge is just 
such a plant. It has grown until now 
we think it has reached its greatest 
beauty and capacity ; yet it still con- 
tinues to grow. 

Thus we, in the present generation, 
possess all that the world has thought 
before us and not only that, but what 
is better, the outgrowth of the very 
best thoughts. The faults of our an- 
cestors are the guide-posts by which 
we are to direct our steps. Their truths 
are ours to add to and to give to the 
succeeding generation that they may 
have a knowledge broader than we 
ourselves received. 

How wonderful has this growth 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



13 



been from the simple poetic con- 
ceptions of a child to the broad and 
boundless knowledge of to-day. Even' 
the animal kingdom can not show a 
growth as great If this growth shall 
continue, this slow evolution still ad- 
vance, as it shall, it is beyond man's 
comprehension to realize what it shall 
be. Truly can it be said "we know not 
how great we shall be." 

Gro. C. Bowman, '02. 

^^^ %2^ 9^^ 

Ube Xlrial of tbe 'Z,0'iQ\\ Glocft. 

The court room was well filled on a 
certain warm day in spring. The 
Judge looked down from his high seat 
in front at the jury seated a little be- 
low him. At his right the lawyers 
were sitting at their tables, some talk- 
ing to their neighbors and gesticulat- 
ing savagely, some reading great books 
and trying to look wise. Beyond all 
these the seats were filled with specta- 
tors and behind the bar was the 
prisoner, the old town clock, which for 
so many years has told the people of 
Tuscola the time of day. It sat with 
downcast face and dejected attitude, 
this being quite a new experience for 
it. 

It was eight o'clock and time to be- 
gin. The Judge brought the court to 
order and called the first case which 
was that of the town clock — charged 
with being on a strike and so annoy- 
ing, not only the school but the whole 
city of Tuscola. The jury and wit- 
nesses were sworn in and the latter 
gave their testimony. 

The Judge looking over the wit- 



nesses selected a boy lounging on the 
front seat. As 'he came shuffling 
forward he smiled broadly, showing an 
uneven row of yellow teeth. His 
mouth a trifle larger than customary, 
his light brown hair tousled, left his 
dark blue eyes to be the redeeming 
feature of his eyes. 

He began his testimony — "I always 
go to bed when the clock strikes nine. 
The other evening having learned (?) 
all my lessons I waited for it to strike. 
I waited and waited but still never a 
sound did it make. After a long time 
I heard it begin — one — two — three — 
four— five. "At last" I thought I can 
go to bed" — SIX — seven — eight — nine 
— ten — eleven — twelve — thirteen! ! ! ! 
Filled with dismay I hurried off to 
bed. The next day 1 went to sleep in 
school and slept through a whole 
period! I think the prisoner should 
be severely punished as it was a dread- 
ful thing for me to lose one entire reci- 
tation." 

The whole court joined in a laugh 
but our young gentleman went to his 
seat undismayed. 

Who is this that is coming up? A 
fit representative of the High School 
Quartette to be sure, he being the 
largest fourth. When he began to testi- 
fy his extraordinary bass voice rum- 
bled through the hall like the tones of 
thunder. "We had been practicing a 
song for a long time when one day we, 
attempting to give it before the school 
and being pretty sure of ourselves, did 
not even depend on the help of an in- 
strument. As soon as we had our 
tones we began and everything went 
well until — well to make a long story 
short we lost our time someway and 



M 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



made quite a blunder. As we get our 
time from the clock we put the whole 
blame on the prisoner at the bar." 

A young girl, the President of the 
Sophomore class who acted as their 
representative, now came timidly for- 
ward. She said that the clamorous 
tones of ihe clock so worked on their 
nerves that even now the most delicate 
ones were dropping out and if this con- 
tinued there would be no class at all, 
left to graduate in 1903. 

A short, rather heavy set person, who 
was particularly good looking in spite 
of his peculiar smile and expression, 
then took the stand. He said his name 
was Sandy and that the clock so worked 
on the sentiments of a certain person 
he knew that she imagined it a wed- 
ding bell and so made it very em- 
barassing for him. The judge en- 
deavored to make him tell the person's 
name, but his sense of honor restrained 
him. 

One witness said that Lena, not to 
be outdone by the clock in striking 
effect, made her appearance recently 
with a red bow in front and a green 
beau at her side, the latter trimmed in 
pip(e)ing. 

At the thought of this the clock be- 
came so confused that it put its hands 
before its face and remained in that 
attitude until led out. 

Various other witnesses were called, 
each of whom testified to about the 
same faults. 

The judge instructed the jury, men- 
tioning some punishments that might 
be inflicted, such as hanging or suspen- 
sion from the school house or electrocu- 
tion. The jury,afterremaining out some 
time, brought in a verdict of guilty and 



sentence was passed that the prisoner 
should be imprisoned in the Tower, 
where it has been serving time ever 
since. In this way the clock case was 
wound up. 1904. 

4^" C5^ ^f^ 

Hn Unterview. 



Scene — The Superintendent's office, 
large desk with office chair before it, 
book cases on north side of room, a 
chair or two, windows in west end of 
room and telephone in southwest cor- 
ner, many physiological drawings on 
the wall, door in east end of room. 

C h a r a c t er s — The Superintendent; 
The Boy Who Was Tardy. 
First Scene. 

[Enter Superintendent, followed by 
boy who has been tardy.] Superin- 
tendent, rubbing his eye glasses, seats 
himself in chair and says with great 
dignity: 

"Now then, do you understand that 
you have broken the law? not my law, 
but that of the great state of Illinois, 
in that you have come after the last 
bell rang. Can you tell me what such 
and offence demands?" 

Boy — "Please sir, I did not mean to 
be tardy." 

Superintendent [playing with his 
watch chain]- "You did not mean to? 
Well Adam did not mean to lose the 
Garden of Eden, but he ate the stolen 
apple." 

Boy [with both fists in his eyes] — 
"I didn't eat any apple, I just — " 

Superintendent [blushing] — "That is 
enough. It is not what you did not do, 
but what you did do that I am talking 
about. Why were you tardy?" 

Boy [brightening] — "You know this 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY of ILLINOIS. 



r 


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■ ■ - ^ 


f A 


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A 


m^^ 



GEO. F. ARPS, 

Superintendent of Schools. 




F. F, JEFFERS, 

Supervisor of Music 



LIBRARy 

,,.,„ OF THE 

UNIVERSITV of ILLINOIS. 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNlVERSlTy of ILLINOIS. 




W. D. HIGDON, 

Principal of High School. 







MISS MAUD WEBSTER, 
2d Assistant High School. 




MISS CLARA OLNEY 
Jst Assistant High School. 




MISS ELIZABETH TOWN, 
3d Assistant High School. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901, 



23 



is Monday morning, and Pa allers calls 
the roll that day to see if we all starts 
the week fair, and there's so many 
older nor me that I got late waitin' my 
turn. 

Superintendent [aside] — "A likely 
story; shall I get out my spanking 
machine, or make the shaver do extra 
school work? I have it." [aloud] "Here 
boy. I am not responsible for that 
roll call. You may make up double 
time, and while you wait you may 
write a composition and leave it on my 
desk. I must go over to the north 
ward and hear their grievances." 
Second scene. 

[Superintendent returns and finds 
the following on his desk, the boy hav- 
ing disappeared:] 

THE SEASONS. 

There are six seasons, Spring, Christ- 
mas, Fall, The Fourth of July, Winter 
and Summer. In the Spring boys play 
marbles and girls cry because they 
haint boys. In the Summer cows go to 
grass, and I wisht school would too. 

In the Fall you can steal walnuts, and 
in the Winter we wash the girls' faces 
with snow and make them squeal 
awful. Christmas and Fourth of July 
we make all the noise we can and tie 
firecrackers on the dog's tale, but as 
for me, give me liberty or give me 
death. 

[Superintendent throws paper in the 
waste basket and laughs softly.] 

Laura McCarty. 

^^^ ^^V 4^^ 

The monkeys, our ancestors, were 
educated in the higher branches. 



Seniors. 

President — Carl Burggraf. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Aileen 
Jones. 

MOTTO. 

Vivimus Dicere. 

colors. 
Blue and White. 

CLASS ROLL. 

Isidor Kornblum. 
Victor Curtis Hall. 
Julia Marian Hansen. 
Grace Larimer. 
Lena Jones Elkin. 
Carl Irvin Burggraf. 
Kate Callaway. 
Aileen Jones. 
Edward Clarence Bailey. 

^^^ 9^^ ^^^ 

XTwice Uol^ Xrales**lpart II. 

HISTORY OF THE SENIOR CLASS 
BY A SENIOR. 

In September, 1997, entered into the 
High School the peerless class of 1901. 
It then consisted of thirty three bright, 
handsome, industrious boys and girls, 
who soon proved to the upper classes 
that tor general excellence, as well as 
individual worth, they were second to 
none. 

One of the special features of the 
class in its Freshman year was its short 
pants brigade, consisting of seven knee 
pants boys, the greatest number any 
class ever brought to the High School 
so young in their classical career. This 
class was also a model of quietness and 
industry, never creating a disturbance 
or wasting a moments time, although 
two of the boys were given places of 
honor and solitude in the recitation 



24 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



rooms, and two of the girls read short 
papers on the folly of noise in the as- 
sembly room. That, however, was not 
the fault of the class. 

One Monday morning the upper 
classmen were privileged to feast 
their e\-es on a sight more beautiful 
than Ma\-, of "Rose Maiden" fame. 
High upon the west wall was a work of 
art, constructed by ourasthetic girls and 
placed in position with mathematical 
precisionby the boys. This beauti- 
ful masterpiece of silk ribbon and 
pasteboard was nothing less than the 
class motto, "Vivimus Discere," done 
in the class colors, blue and white. 
Our kind principal told the president 
that the motto was "neat, very neat." 

Early in the sophomore year oc- 
curred an event which for a time cast a 
gloomy shadow over us. It was the 
death of Prof. Earle. This caused a 
radical change. Prof. Arps now came 
to us to guide our stumbling minds 
through the mtricacies of quadratic 
equations and the binomial theorem. 

Now came the great color fight be- 
tween the Freshmen and the upper 
classes. In this affair by noble fight- 
ing and strategy we headed the vic- 
torious side, although one of our num- 
ber was bothered for a few days after- 
wards with an enlarged nose. 

Two pugilists were developed this 
year, who, after using their skill on a 
Freshman, were invited by Superin- 
tendent Ammerman to take a week's 
vacation. 

The Junior year was one always to be 
remembered with pleasure. We lived 
glorifying, not in never falling, but in 
rising every time we fell. The latin 
section conversed with Cicero, while 



the scientists spilled acid on their 
clothes and grew cotton and cocoanuts 
in the laboratory. 

The Class of 1901 never let a good 
opportunity pass and when the only 
good snow of the season came we cele- 
brated its arrival by having a glorious 
sleigh ride. 

During the third year the class ac- 
quired a reputation as first-class con- 
fectioners, due largely to the skill of 
one of our girls, who was official fudge 
maker for Mr, Casler. 

In the gentle spring we had a class 
picnic, and with deviled eggs and 
chicken sandwitches repaired to a 
nearby forest. There we strolled 
through the beautiful green woods, the 
classical scholars drinking in the beauty 
of Nature and the scientific members 
searching for the indian turnip and the 
fountain of perpetual youth, which 
they intended to have copyrighted and 
sold at one dollar a bottle; the proceeds 
to be a fund for the maintenance in the 
High School of a department for the 
study of the fickleness of the human 
heart. 

When we returned to school in the 
fail we found ourselves Seniors. We 
carried ourselves uprightly as Seniors 
should, but being always so simple 
minded and unpretending we could not 
be so overbearing and egotistical as 
Seniors are usually pictured. 

For a time we allowed Prof. Higdon 
to think that we were not mathema- 
ticians in order to surprise him by our 
knowledge of geometry later on. When 
the time for the renaissance came we 
arose and demonstrated the theorems 
as well as Euclid could have done. 

During the fourth year the class has 



LISRARV 

OF THE 

iJNIVFRSlTV of ILLINOIS. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



been a model in all respects. Our 
work has been far above the average 
and always up to to standard, and our 
undoubted superiority has been the 
envy of all the lower classes. Our man- 
ners and deportment might well be 
taken by the under classes as models, 
to be striven for, perhaps reached, but 
never excelled. 

There are now but nine in the grad- 
uating class — nine all round students, 
diligent and temperate in all things. 
The great law of life holds true with us 
and we are a living testimonial to its 
truth. That great law is that only the 
fittest survive. These nine fittest ones 
now leave the Hit;h School, first to ex- 
tend thrir already liberal educations 
and then to hold his^hly honorable and 
responsible positions in the great 
world, but they will always retain 
pleasant memories of the school where 
they first learned of classics and things 
infinitesimal. 

%^^ 4^^ t^^ 

part 11. 

HISTORY OF THE SENIOR CLASS BY A 
CONTEMPORARY. 



When I was first asked to write a 
history of the class of '01 I refused, 
shrinking from the task of writing such 
an inglorious history, besides it would 
seem belter to let them pass from the 
High School as quietly as possible. But 
after a hard struggle in my mind I de- 
cided that it was my duty to set their 
disgraceful history before the lower 
classes as a warning. 

September i, 1897, saw their entrance 
into our High School. Immediately 
there was trouble. It would not have 



been worse if each member had been a 
Pandora and opened her box of trouble 
at her seat in front of the assembly 
hall. They were a peculiar looking 
class. The boys were short and dried 
— old for freshmen, if they did wear 
short trousers. They did not behave 
as Freshmen should have done, but 
were at once on the lookout for trouble 
which they soon found. One day they 
were gazing around the room — they 
usually were gazing — when their eyes 
fell upon the beautiful piano cover 
which the class of 1900 had designed 
and placed there. They were attracted 
and tempted by its beautiful design, 
their weak natures yielded, and the 
next morning the piano cover was miss- 
ing. Immediately an ominous cry 
arose from the class of 1900, which 
boded ill for the guilty freshmen. They 
quailed, they shook in their little red 
topped boots, and in a few days the 
piano cover appeared in its usual place. 
I must not forget the motto which this 
class chose, since that explains their 
mission on this earth. The motto was, 
^* Vidimus Discere," which being trans- 
lated is — We Live to Eat. 

The next fall brought with it a mod- 
el class of Freshmen who were always 
meek and studious except when at- 
tacked, then their valiant, patriotic 
spirit asserted itself. This was the fa- 
mous class of '02, a part of whose mis- 
sion in the High School was to teach 
those treacherous and cowardly Sopho- 
mores a lesson. The class of '01 had 
hardly seen these model Freshmen be- 
fore they were scheming and planning 
some way to haze them. In the mean- 
time the Freshmen had held a class 
meeting and selected their class colors. 



28 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



Immediately there followed a color 
fight between the classes of '01 and 
'02, which, needless to say, ended in a 
total victory for the brave Freshmen 
and black eyes and swollen faces for 
the Sophomores. They had planned 
to haze unmercifully the innocent 
Freshmen, but they were trapped in 
their own traps and ensnared in their 
own snares. Indeed they were so 
crushed that they never again made an 
open attack ; but nevertheless their in- 
dolent and evil natures were constant- 
ly asserting themselves. As they grew 
older, false pride began to add itself to 
their long list of faults. As Juniors it 
was a frequent occurence to see one 
of their number the center of a group 
of the members of '03, haggling his- 
tory, which, being misepresented by 
the Junior, sounded wonderful in the 
ears of the innocent Freshmen. But 
it did not take the Freshmen long to 
see through the shallow natures of 
these Junior demagogues and they left 
them to follow in the footsteps of the 
trustworthy and robust Sophomores. 
Thus the class of '01 went through 
their Junior year, forsaken by the other 
students and thinking of what might 
have been. 

When this class entered the High 
School as Freshmen they numbered 
thirty-three, but in the fall of their 
graduating year only nine reported for 
duty. The others decided that school 
climate did not agree with them and 

left. Ah, how much better would it 
have been for our High School if they 
had never tainted its peaceful and 
studious atmosphere with their pres- 
ence. 



No one will ever know the pain it 
has caused me to record these histori- 
cal facts. This task has been undertak- 
en only from a sense of duty, 
to warn all future High School students 
to keep the straight and narrow path, 
by putting bef )re them the career of a 
class who chose the other highway, 
down which the evil and unrighteous 
disappear. 

(3^ t^^ v^ 

Junior Class. 

President — Wilda Smith. 
Vice President — Arthur Boyce. 
Secretary — Harriet Sawyer. 
Treasurer — William Wardall. 
Sergeant-at-Arms— Guy Kornblum. 

president's cabinet. 

Secretary of War — Grover Bowman. 

Argumentor General — Paul Millar. 

Keeper of the Great Seal — Myrtle 
Kitts. 

Secretary of Do-Dads — Flossie 
Maris. 

CLASS YELL. 
Phaero ! Kaero ! 

Swiss, Boom, Bah ! 
Nineteen naught two, 

Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 

Motto : To the Highest. 



HISTORY. 

"Truth is stranger than fiction," says 
an old adage; therefore, if this history 
should seem a little strange to you, in 
that it portrays truthfully the many 
excellencies of a model class, please 
remember that the old adage holds 
true in every case. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901, 



29 



One September day in 1898, the 
Freshman class gathered in the assem- 
bly room of the Tuscola High School. 
They were told to seat themselves in 
the front of the room, presumably that 
the teachers might have them under 
their eyes, for they had learned from the 
class of 1901 to beware of Freshmen. 

As we passed to our recitations the 
other classes hissed repeatedly, but we, 
undaunted, pursued the path of glory 
which led first to the class rooms. 
Here we proved our right to be called 
the brightest, most studious and well be- 
haved class in the school, or any other 
school, for that matter. 

Sometimes, which was nearly always, 
the other classes troubled us, but as we 
always came out ahead, we rather en- 
joyed it. Of course we organized our 
class and chose a motto and class col- 
ors. After we had made the letters for 
our motto, which is, "To the Highest," 
we deposited them in a recitation room 
closet. Upon opening the door of that 
fatil closet a'ter school, we discovered 
that something, presumably rats or 
mice, had carefully glued together all 
the letters of that motto. This was 
the tragic end of motto number one. 

Motto number two was laboriously 
made and left at the home of one of 
our class, safely reposing under the 
couch. Foolishly we boasted that now 
no one could get it. This shows our 
youth, and innocence of all treachery 

and crime. Two boys of 1901 called 
themselves boys of 1902, and pursuad- 
ed the lady of the house to give theni 
the motto. End of motto number two 
— at least it was the end of it as far as 
we were concerned, although some peo- 



ple sadly found out that mottos were 
not made to be worn. 

Motto number three was made in the 
dead of night, with tightly closed shut- 
ters and securely locked doors. Phan- 
tom forms glided about outside but 
dared not enter. Inside, the girls of 
1902, with the welcome aid of Mr. Arps 
and Mr. Ammerman, worked steadily 
at that motto. Never will the aid of 
the above named gentlemen be forgot- 
ten. If they ever need any election- 
eering, please tell them to call on 1902. 

By 7:30 the next morn'ng the fair 
letters of our motto shone down from 
above the clock, for as time is eternal 
so is our motto. When the other class 
saw that motto, their faces repaid us 
for all our labor. If "Puck" ever needs 
any pictures of surprised, astounded, 
overcome, etc., faces, we will be glad 
to represent these faces as they ap- 
peared on that occasion. But soon all 
the mottos were removed from the wall 
because of the further trouble they 
were making, and that was the end of 
motto number three. 

So completely in all things did we 
assert our superiority over all classes 
that our history since then has been 
one of peace and prosperity. We won 
the admiration of all, and have risen 
steadily to fame and glory. We have 
truly been marvelously successful, and 
'tis thus the teachers are accustomed 
to address their classes : "Behold the 
class of 1902 ! See. their noble work ! 
Observe their attentive attitude ! No- 
tice their animated countenances! 
Learn how to make and to win undy- 
ing fame as they have ! Take them 
for your model ! In short, be perfect!" 

All this, and yet the half has not 



30 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



been told ! Words fail to express the 
greatness of the class of 1902 "To 
the Highest" was well chosen as our 
motto, and nobly have we lived up to 
it, as is demonstrated by our latest 
achievement, the reception in honor of 
the Seniors. So, all honor and glory 
be to the class of 1902. 

9^^ %^^ 9^^ 

Sopbomores. 

Zeno, Zeni, Zupiter, Zuse, 
Keno, Keni, Polililoose ! 

Hoo Rah ! Hoo Rah ! Rip, Rap, Ree ! 

Tuscola High School, 1903 ! 

CLASS OFFICERS. 

Mabel Moon, President. 

Mabel Watkins, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Bentley VanVoorhis, Vice-President. 

HISTORY OF 1903. 

The burning rays of the summer sun 
came pouring in at the open window, 
where 1 sat idly dreaming of school 
life during the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. In fancy, methought the fa- 
miliar ringing of the first bell was sound- 
ing through the sultry air, heralding 
the morning when the glorious class of 
1903 should first make its appearance 
in the celebrated Tuscola High School, 
as the Freshman class or "Freshies" as 
we were more often termed by the up- 
per classmen. 

Tramp, tramp, tramp, and up the 
winding stairway we came, a mighty 
army, with squeaking shoes and thump- 
ing hearts, but with countenances beam- 
ing with admiration and pleasure at 
the thought of being brothers and sis- 
ters to that important band of Sopho- 
mores, Juniors, and Seniors. 



At this point I awoke with a start 
suddenly remembering the compli- 
ment bestowed upon us by a loving 
friend, who said that in name only 
were we Freshman, and not in reality, 
for that indolent and "green" look 
which had been the leading character- 
istic of so many of the preceeding 
classes (especially 1902), was found 
1 icking in us, the "stars." At another 
time we were informed that '03 was 
"alright," being wonderfully intelligent, 
wide-awake and good natured. Dear 
classmen, I am boasting, not at all, of 
our talents, but our kind friends were 
certainly not mistaken, w he n they 
passed such favorable opinions upon 
us. 

Then again my mind soared away to 
Dreamland, and "into my soul the vis- 
ion flew" — the V i s i o n of us, as the 
Freshman Latin students, reciting well 
prepared lessons before nearly the en- 
tire High School, who listened with 
eyes, ears and mouth open, drinking in 
every word with unfeigned astonish- 
ment. Ah, well they might, for with- 
out doubt we were mental prodigies, 
excelling not only in good looks, but 
knowledge also. 

Of course the picture was not com- 
plete without some mark of contrast, 
and forthwith, peering out upon the 
scene with great, blinking eyes, came 
the jovial face of the world famous 
juggler, "Joey" Butler, who, finding 
Tuscola too small for his growing 
capabilities, has now taken up his 
abode in sunny California, where he 
searches for gold, and exhibits to the 
wild westerners his wonderful sleight 
of hand tricks. 

Then, breaking in upon the stillness 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



31 



of my peaceful slumber, stole the melo- 
dious music of a bridal bell, which I 
thought betokened the marriage morn 
of one of the popular pupils, formerly 
of the class. 

Again I dreamed we were indulging 
in the important social events, which 
will always be remembered by the par- 
ticipants. Once more we were having 
the sleigh rides, so full of fun and 
excitement and our happy voices, 
singing the praises of 1903, were 
echoed back to us, as we merrily sped 
along over the reaking, creaking snow. 

The class meetings which were held 

during the Sophomore year could not 

pass by unnoticed in my dream, so I 

thought we were again assembled in 

the south recitation room, debating the 
leading questions of the day. We 
were choosing our of^cers, and when 
this was duly done to the satisfaction 
of all, the colors, black and ceris, 
were selected, as the emblem of 
the great and illustrious class of 1903. 
Then it seemed as if that little Fresh- 
man lad, who, being entirely too an- 
xious to see what could possibly be 
going on in one of our mysterious 
assemblies, was making a hasty retreat 
down the fire escape, at the point of a 
cannon. However the lesson received 
was certainly a benefit, for from that 
day peace was established, and no 
more "Freshies" went prying into '03's 
business. 

Presently the delightful slumber was 
brought to an end, for I was awakened 

by a voice shouting the class yell. 

Mabel Watkins, '03. 



ifrcsbmcn. 



MOTTO : 

"Launched but not Anchored." 

OFFICERS. 

President, Bert Parker. 
Vice President, Jennie Garheau. 
Secretary, Marguerite Louthan. 
Treasurer, Ralph Callaway. 
Sergeant-at-Arms, Grover Helm. 

COLORS. 

Royal Purple and Scarlet. 

CLASS HISTORY. 

The brilliant class of 1904 was organ- 
ized September 10, 1900. Since that 
time, we are very sad to say, there 
has been lost, strayed, or stolen some 
of our most brilliant members. How- 
ever, by no means all of them. 

The fates must have taken some 
offence at something the class has 
done, and, after hindering it to their 
utmost capability, leave it a strong and 
united body to "go it alone." 

This class has been taken through to 
the present day with the most proper 
authority, and given much praise on 
account of its highly developed char- 
acter. 

We are glad to say that this class 
has some sense (also cents). Is 
there a day that passes that we do not 
get some commendations, either from 
our kind principal or from outsiders? 

We are considered the best class of 
the school being strongest in numbers, 
body, mind, and soul. Probably the 
class, which has gone on four years be- 
fore us, think that they, alone, know it 
all (as all seniors do), but we are 



32 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901, 



pleased to say that as we have now 
launched with such honors, we will 
graduate with a starry crown three 
years hence. 

Another thing about the class of 
1904! Our principal tells us that there 
should exist an everlasting friendship 
between the Grammar Grades and the 
High School. We are glad to say that 
we have laid a plank for this plat- 
form and trust that the following 
classes will continue 10 build till the 
platform of friendship reaches from 
the Grammar Grades to the Seniors in 
the High School. 

In conclusion, we must say that this 
is a grand place to be; so in behalf of 
the Freshman class of 1901, we'll give 
three cheers and a hurrah. 

ti^^ 9^^ ^^^ 

H Sopbomore's ifate. 



Once until a midnight dreary, sat a Soph'more 

sad and teary, 
Scowling o'er a Julius Caesar, which in vain he 

tried to read. 
While his eyes were nearly napping, and his 

mouth was widely gapping, 
Came a hollow sound of rapping, rapping 

would he gladly heed, 
"Surely 'tis the aid," he muttered, "aid that I 

so sorely need." 

And his heart from care was freed. 

Quickly to the door he hurried, by his fears no 
longer worried, 

But, alas, his very vitals froze with horror as 
he gazed. 

Pale and sad before him standing, saw he one 
of form commanding 

'Twas the shade of Julius Caesar, filled with 
grief and much amazed, 

Sternly to the Soph'more said he, "By stu- 
pidity I'm dazed. 

By your work I'm fairly crazed." 

"Far off in the fields Elysian was I pained by 
your derision, 



Heard your murderous translations of my bat- 
tles bravely fought. 
Of your sins, now quick repent, quickly cease 

this sad lament. 
Par too late is now your praying, on your 

head revenge you've brought. 
Far from out your body straying shall your 
spirit soon be sought." 

P''ain1ed Soph, and answered naught. 
Lai:ra MoCarty, 
Madel Watkins. 

t^^ 9^^ t£^ 

Bnnual poem. 



TO THE SCHOOL HOUSE. 

How we revere thee, standing there 
So nobly grand; so stately fair 

Upon the campus green; 
And oft our fancies backward go 
To times of ignorance and woe 

Before thou first wast seen. 

Long years thy vigil thou hast kept, 
Long nights, while all around thee slept 

Faithfully thou gavest the hour; 
And each one blest thee as he heard 
That sound which like some phantom bird 

Came stealing through his bower. 

What tales could not thy walls relate 
If, aided by some kindly fate. 

They might be heard to speak 
Of prowling Sophs on mischief bent, 
Of Juniors murmuring discontent, 

Or Freshmen falsely meek. 

Thy walls have rung with laughter gay 
With lusty shouts of boisterous play 

Also with stern commands. 
Within thy doors the laggard slept 
And also there the idler wept 

At sundry harsh demands. 

Three decades' winds o'er thee have passed 
But thou unmindful of the blast 

Hast raised thy head sublime; 
Yet, followed by regrets and tears. 
Thou, too, must fall in future years 

By the wasting hand of Time. 

V. C. H. '01 



LiBRARV 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY of ILLINOIS. 




VKORtA^^-^^ 



STUDENTANA BOARD. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



35 



xrbe IRa&lcal Club. 



It was considered a special privilege 
by the people of Elizabethtown to be- 
long to the Radical Club. The mem- 
bership was limited, each one, before 
becoming a real factor, having to serve 
a short term of probation. 

Additions to the club were made by 
the subtraction of the best people of the 
town, without any division as to motive, 
but requiring a multiplication of good 
ideas. 

The object of the club was character 
study and as a consequence, they soon 
became a great power in society. At 
this time it was a trinomial, the mem- 
bers being Messrs. X, Y, and Z, 

One evening while at the club, Mr. 
Y, being a minus quantity, Mr. X and 
Mr. Z determined to begin their char- 
acter study by discussing his faults and 
good traits. 

Says Mr. Z, "The other day I met 
Mr. Y returning from a political speech 
on expansion. Saying 'Good afternoon,' 
I was about to pass on, when he 
grabbed me fiercely by the arm and 
pointing his index finger at me, said, 
"Do you believe in expansion!' and 
when I answered in the nee:ative he re- 
plied that by the powers he would 
bring me down a degree. Yes, this was 
his identical expression, and he said that 
if I did not get at the root of the mat- 
ter at once, he would show me some of 
the signs of operation. I told him not to 
go to extremes but he gave utterance to 
such a burst of irrational expressioTis 
that I almost made him a homogeneous 
answer." 

Mr. X and Mr. Z were directly op- 
posite in their analysis of Mr. Y's 



character, Mr. X being variable; not 
having made a decided solution of his 
friend's peculiarities. The other being 
constant was very positive in his state- 
ments concerning him. After this, 
both took him as a symbol of the 
politicians of the day. So after an 
imagi?iary em| ihey left the club room 

and went to the | to refresh them- 
selves. 

%^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

pessimus ifrater Jim. 



A puer amavit a pulchram maid 

Puella amavit him; 
But she a pessimum fratrem had, 

Whose nomen erat Jim, 

Puer et puella una went 

One nox upon a drive. 
Sed frater Jim, on mischief bent, 

A dolum did contrive. 

He latuit se sub sedibus 
Erat crowded you may be sure; 

Sed erat quietus as any mouse 
Et didicit lover's love. 

On postero die vocavit Jim 

His comites half a score. 
Et post they circum dederunt him 

He spoke of the evening before. 

Pro a penny apiecehe narrabat them, 

Omnia that he had heard, 
Et the puer's parvus frater Clem 

Edit his every word 

He lusit his fratrem cum ivit home, 

Et dixit who told him 
He putavit puellam alone 

Posse narrare Jim. 

In ira requisivit puellam, 

Who in turn requisivit Jim, 
Et he in terrore approached eam 

And confessed it all to them. 

Rursus puer amavit puellam, 

Puella amavit him. 
Sed she punished severely her young 
fratrem, 
Whose nomen erat Jim. 

V. C. H„ '01. 



36 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



zhc 5tu6entana 



Published by the ^igh School Students. 



EDITORIAL BOARD. 



VICTOR HALL ('01) 
ISIDOR KORNBLUM ('01) 



Editor in Chief 
Business Manager 



ASSISTANTS. 

Haeeiet Sawyee ('02) Representative Jnnior Class 
L.AUEA McCaety ('03)Representative Sophomore Class 
Maboie LiOUTHAN ('04) Representative Freshmen Class 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Per Annum, in Advance 50c 

Single Copies - - • 15c 

Extra copies of this number can be obtained by appli- 
cation to the Business Manager, the Postoffice Book 
Store or City Drug Store. 



During the present year, laboratory- 
work has been used a great deal more 
in connection with the science course 
than ever before. The benefits from 
this are incalculable. The student 
learns by actual experiment rather 
than by mere reading and retains his 
knowledge proportionately. Every 
patron of the school should be inter- 
ested in the laboratory system of teach- 
ing and should visit our laboratory 
and make themselves familiar with it. 
Much new apparatus has been added 
this year, greatly enhancing the re- 
sources of that department. 

1 
Why does not some John Golfe ap- 
pear to lead our High School athletes 
to victory? The state of athletics in 
our school is very deplorable, and 
needs a general awakening. We have 
plenty of good material, and past years 
have shown what we can do. All that 
we need is some competant person to 



direct the training and encourage the 
boys. Let all the public-spirited 
pupils join the Athletic Association 
and give local athletics such a boom 
that our prestige will again be known 
all over Illinois. 

The members of the High School 
have attempted to make this issue of 
The Studentana the very best possible. 
To this end they have striven earnestly, 
and humbly submit to their readers the 
result of their labor. The Editing 
Board wish to extend their sincere 
thanks to all who have so generously 
aided them in their work and espec- 
ially to Prof. Higdon who, b>- his untir- 
ing assistance, has made this number 
possible. 

If 
Mr. Jeffers and the pupils of the 
High School are to be commended for 
the masterly manner in which the 
musical program on the evening of 
May i6, was presented. It was indeed 
a treat to the audience and shows what 
can be done when we try. The "Rose 
Maiden" is a very beautiful cantata, 
and was presented well. We trust this 
will not be the last effort of the depart- 
ment of music along this line. 

Four years ago, a course in music 
was added to the school curriculum. 
This experiment has been found advan- 
tageous for many obvious reasons. 
Pupils who have a talent along that 
line are given an opportunity to better 
it, and those who have not are en- 
couraged to acquire it. The half-hour 
devoted to music enlivens the whole 
day and makes everything brighter. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



37 



Simion's 2)i'cam of if air ©iiis 
ant) JBovs, 



He dreamed that Freshmen did not pony their 

books. 
Nor at Senior girls ever cast shy looks. 
He dreamed Lizzie Owen was ugly and old, 
And toward Carl Burggraf cast a shoulder 

cold. 
He dreamed that Grace Larimer was not con- 
ceited. 
And Higdon to "cheaters" just punishment 

meter! . 
He dreamed that Edith Hall was graceful and 

tall, 
And her favorite sport was playing base ball. 
He dreamed Grover Helm had never blushed. 
Nor over one fortunate girl ever gushed. 
He dreamed Mr. Arps' hair was not red; 
And Jeannette's love for Parker was not yet 

dead. 
He dreamed that Carl Burggraf cut his long 

curls. 
Much to the sorrow of all the girls. 
He dreamed Isidor Kornblum a good man at 

the bat, 
But he surely doesn't think we'll swallow all 

that ! 
He dreamed Hackett Wilder once knew his 

latin. 
Now, say, are you willing to take all that in? 
He dreamed Fred Wilson began to move. 
But the truth of that statement he'll have to 

prove. 
He was fast in the arms of slumber deep. 
When Professor Arps through the door took a 

peep. 
E Tempore! Simion thought himself in the 

sky, 
But he had to awake or Mr. Arps would know 

why. 
And as he was trying his wits to restore 
A big bottle of ink fell onto the floor, 
And then, I must tell it for 'tis true, poor 

thing! 
A bran new bottle of ink he must bring. 

^^^ ^^ 9^^ 

Edith, can't you really decide which one 
you want the more ? Well, it is too bad to be 
so popular, isn't it? 



jEicbanoes. 

College maid, ere we part, 

Give me back — no, not my heart; 

But my class pin; and that ring. 

Football picture, everthing 

That I bought and gave to you 

When our college love was new. — Ex. 

A number of exchanges have come 
to our High School during the year, 
all of which we were glad to receive. 
Two, "The Rambler," and "The Wes- 
leyan Argus," are re^>ular visitors, and 
have been read with interest. Besides 
these we have received one or more 
numbers of the "Varsity F'ortnighily" 
from the state University, "The Pal- 
ladium" from DePauw University, and 
the "Herald" from Westfield (Mass.) 
High School. We regret very much 
that more numbers were not re- 
ceived and hope that next year will 
find them regularly upon our desk. 
We desire to mention especially "The 
Rambler." It more nearly approaches 
our icieal of a college paper than any 
other which we receive. We note in 
particular its poetry and literary arti- 
cles. Taken as a whole it is very 
readable. 

In an examination, the students were 
required to give the principal parts of 
to skate. One of them did it as fol- 
lows: "Skate, slipere, falleri, bump- 
tum." The professor mrirked his 
paper, "Fail, failere, flunxi, sus- 
pensum.".— Wesleyan Argus. 

"A rolling pin gathers no dough." 
—Ex. 

The Cornel glee clubs have an an- 
nual spending fund of 5i8,000.— Ex. 

It is now possible to obtain a degree 
at Yale in three years. — Ex. 



38 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



Hlumnl. 

Since our last issue a number of our 
graduates have knelt at Hymen's altar: 

Miss Jessie Ellars, '89, (Mrs. Leon- 
ard Hackett.) 

Miss Dot Cross, '97, (Mrs, Julius 
Luhrsen.) 

Miss Anna Smith, '98, (Mrs. Fred 
Phillips.) 

Miss Ethel Van Dyke, '00, (Mrs. 
Joseph McBeath.) 

Mr. Bert Specs, '91, (Miss Johnson, 
Chicago, 111.) 

Miss Mattie Beall, (Mrs. H. T. 
Baker.) 

Miss Hattie Ewers, '95, (Mrs. Ernest 
S. Lyon, Singapore, S. S.) 

Mrs. Leonard Hackett, '86, Misses 
Gertrude Ervin, '98, Ora Goff, '99, and 
Lucy Jones, '99, spent last summer 
travelling in Europe. The Paris Expo- 
sition and Passion Play at Oberam- 
mergau were among the season's un- 
usual attractions which they visited. 

Dr. Mary Frahm, '95, has located in 
Tuscola during the past winter. She 
is our only lady physician. 

Miss Lena Lyrla, '96, of Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn., spent part of April with 
her parents in Tuscola. Miss Lena is 
meeting with success in her work as 
stenographer. 

Miss Hattie Frahm, '96, will grad- 
uate from the Law Department of the 
University of Illinois in June. 

The following alumni have been pur- 
suing higher courses of study the past 
year: 

Irwin Lester, '93, Northwestern Law 
College. 

Alfred Sluss, '96, University of Illi- 
nois. 



Granville Calhoun, '97, Wesleyan 
University, Bloomington, 111. 

Clyde Compton, '97, University of 
Chicago. 

Maude Peters, '97, Northwestern 
University. 

Henley Calvert, '98, Georgetown 
Law School, Washington, D. C. 

Gertrude Ervin, '98, Ohio W«sleyan 
University. 

Ora Goff, '99, Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity. 

Lucy Jones, '99, Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity. 

Eva Dragoo, '99, (Mrs. Derby) 
Northwestern University. 

Miss Lora Howe, '97, has recently 
returned from an extended trip to our 
South Atlantic states and Cuba. We 
are pleased to record that Miss Lora's 
health was greatly benefitted by the 
change. 

1900 IN THE WORLD. 

Wilbur Goodspeed is a student in 
the Agricultural College of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. He is distinguishing 
himself in University athletics, having 
gained a place on the track team. He 
was one of the strongest members of 
the High School team. 

Miss Mayme Watkins is teaching at 
the Pleasant Ridge school, north of 
Tuscola. 

Fred Stiver is bookkeeper for the 
Tuscola Grain Co. 

Miss Eva Coley is operator in the 
Bell telephone office at Tuscola. 

John McCarty is studying Agricul- 
ture at the University of Illinois. He 
was selected to conduct agricultural 
experiments at the Sibley Experiment 
Station. This work will require most 
of the summer vacation. 




BIOLOGY CLASS AND LABORATORY. 




PHYSICS CLASS AND LABORATORY. 



LIBRARV 

OF THE 

UNIVLRSITY of ILLINOIS. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



41 



Herbert Bush is attending the 
Indianapolis Business College. 

Mrs. Ethel McBeath, nee VanDyke, 
is residing in Tuscola. Her husband, 
Joseph McBeath, ex-'97, '^ practicing 
law. 

Miss Iva Murphy is in charge of the 
Pleasant Grove school, near Oakland, 
Illinois. 

Miss Edith Paddleford is a student 
at the State Normal School in Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

Mrs. Grace Clark, nee Cooper, is now 
residing at Racine, Wis. 

Miss Eva Fulwider is teaching the 
Sulphur Springs school, near Tuscola. 

Miss Lillian Jones is taking this 
year as a vacation. She will probably 
attend the Ohio Wesleyan University 
next year. 

Miss Leta McNeer is taking a vaca- 
tion this year before attending college. 

Miss Mae VanVoorhis is at her home 
this year. She will visit in Pennsyl- 
vania during the summer. 

Miss Ina Gregg has remained at 
home this year. She is contemplating 
a college course in music. 

Miss Grace Maris is at the home of 
her parents near Tuscola. 

Everett Stacy is a student at the 
University of Illinois and has done 
excellent work during the past year. 

^^^ 9^^ %^^ 

Went to see a foot-ball game. 

Thought I would play the same, 

So in ha.ste I joined the 'leven, 

And I'm writing this from heaven. — Ex. 

Prof. Higdon — "How do you make negative 
electricity?" 
VanDyke— "Use glass and RED flannel." 

Wardall likes physics, he says, all but the 
mathematical part. 



JEicbanoes. 



Read on, good reader, 

I ask your grace. 
For I'm only here 
To fill up space. — Ex. 

Dr. Hadley, President of Yale, has 
begun radical changes in that institu- 
tiou. With the exception of the 
Freshman year, the course is now en- 
tirely elective, and has been shortened 
to three years. Greater attention is 
directed to specializing, and a student 
may elect a course consistent with the 
course he intends to follow. — College 
Transcript. 

Ten hours of study, eight of sleep, 
two for exercise and four for meals 
and social duties is what President 
Eliot, of Harvard, recommends to 
students. — Ex. 

The seven richest colleges of Amer- 
ica with their endowments are Gicard, 
^15,250,000; Leland Stanford, Jr., $13,- 
500,000; Harvard, $10,000,000; Colum- 
bia, $9,500,000; Cornel, $8,000,000: 
Chicago, $6,500,000; Yale, $4,200,000. 
—Ex. 

Teacher: "Johnny, repeat after me, 
Moses was an austere man, who made 
atonement for the sins of his people." 
John: "Moses was an oyster man and 
made ointment for the shins of his 
people." 

Rags make paper, 

Paper makes money. 

Money makes banks, 

Banks make loans. 

Loans make poverty, 

Poverty makes rags. 

—Ex. 
Gov. Yates is the youngest and only 
native born governor Illinois has ever 
had. — Ex. 



42 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



Htbletlc IRotes. 

The following officers were elected 
by the Association at the first of the 
terrrt : 

Victor Hall — President. 

RoscoE VanDyke — Vi ce-President. 

Grover Bowman — Secretary. 

Bert Parker —Treasurer. 

FOOT BALL. 

Edward Bailey — Captain. 
Isidor Kornblum — Manager. 

BASE BALL. 

Bert Parker — Captain. 

Fred Wilson — Manager. 

The first thing in which our interest 
was aroused last fall was football. 

Luck was always on the other side 
in the six game-5 we played for we 
were defeated in each, except the one 
with Atwood, in which the result was 
an even score, 5 to 5. 

The first match game was with Ar- 
eola, they winning only by kicking 
goal, the score being 6 to 5. Areola, 
as did every town with whom we 
played, scored a touch down in less 
than five minutes, then we held them 
and in the last half made a touchdown 
but failed to kick goal. There were 
eight of our boys who had never 
played in a game before and some of 
them had never seen a game. So, for a 
starter we did well, really better than 
we did any time after that, as is shown 
by our game with Champaign. 

The last game was with Mattoon, 
the score being 15 to o. The stars of 
the game were Sloan and Bailey, all 
the rest of the team doing good work. 
This game showed a great improve- 
ment in the team, and it is hoped by 



next fall we may have a foot ball team 
to be proud of. 

A lawn tennis court will not be lack- 
ing any longer, as arrangements have 
been made for an up-to-date one on 
the schoolyard. 

More interest is needed in the ath- 
letics. We hope to be represented by 
a good team next year at the annual 
Interscholastic meet. The As-ociotion 
will have some good timber from 
which to select. VanDyke will be 
able to capture a place in the high 
jump, as his record at Paris was over 
five feet this year. Wilson will also 
have a good show in the half-mile run. 

At the Eastern Illinois Athletic meet 
this year, Charleston carried away the 
banner with 85 points, Tuscola getting 
fifth place with 5 points. Bailey cap- 
tured first in the ball throw, by hurl- 
ing the sphere 268 feet and 7 inches. 
VanDyke said that he would have 
gotten a place in the high jump if 
they would have given him a few more 
trials. 

The base ball team has not as yet 
played any games except with the 
town team. They defeated us two 
games out of three. The team this 
year is the best we have been able to 
have for two or three years. It is com- 
posed of the following good players: 
O'Neal, Merry, Vandement, VanVoor- 
his, VanDyke, McKee, Smith, Bailey 
and Wilson. 

AFTER THE GAME. 

The game is over, and darkness falls on our 

defeated team 
Like balm upon our bruises, or plaster, or cold 

cream. 
And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me, that 

is almost akin to pain. 
As I silently count the dollars we lost on that 

foot ball game. 

Bert Parker, '04. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



43 



H)i3putc of HUicbra au& JEnoltsb 
tor m\? Uime. 

"How are you this evening, friends?" 

I had gone to bed wiih two books 

lying on my desk, one an algebra, the 

other an English book, and had almost 

gone to sleep when I was startled by 
these words. 

"She did not even look at us to- 
night," said a croaking voice. "Al- 
though she went to the concert, she 
studied you about an hour. Yet you 
are nothing but a jumble of letters, 
while my companions and I are selec- 
tions from some of the most noted 
authors of America." 

"Mr. Raven, do you mean that for an 
insult? I am sure that my brothers 
and I are just as full of meaning as 
any of you poems, and much more 
practical. You only give pleasure, 
and some of you very little of that, I 
fear, while we shall be of use all 
through life." 

"You must excuse me, Miss Expo- 
nent, I meant nothing personal, but 
what characteristics have you to boast 
of in general ?" 

"We straighten out tangled problems 
with a simple use of my brothers, x 
and y; we develop the reasoning 
powers, and render the mind more 
ready to take up the problems of life. 
We teach people to find any unknown 
quantity, and to be exact in all their 
undertakings." 

"That may all be true, but we show 
the customs of the people for centuries 
past, and teach many useful truths of 
life; we cultivate a taste for good 
literature, and place the best writings 



before every student; we also give a 
bettf r knowledge of good English." 

"Yes, but what aid are you to the 
poor boy who is to become a book 
keeper or something similar? You 
may hinder him in his occupation by 
creating a taste for literature, and he 
may neglect his business to read some- 
thing which you have suggested to 
him. You may even make him so dis- 
contented with his work that he will 
give it up for authorship, in which 
about one out of every thousand suc- 
ceeds, and the other nine hundred and 
ninety-nine ingloriously fail." 

"On the other hand, of what use are 
you to the young society lady who is 
obliged to study you while going to 
scho '1? She probably never opens an 
algebra book after her graduation, and 
simply wastes her time in studying 
you when she might employ it in 
something much better. Now, when 
she studies literature, every word she 
reads will be an aid to her in after 
life." 

A loud yawn was heard and just 
then Rip VanWinkle came up. 

"Yes, the way we are treated is 
dreadful." 

"Who said anything about the way 
we are treated?" 

"The last thing I heard when I went 
to sleep last " 

"We are talking about the respective 
merits of algebra and English," ex- 
plained Sir Launfal, good-humoredly, 
because no one could be ill-natured to 
easy-going Rip. 

"What is the difference, so we have 
as little work to do as possible." 

"There is very much difference," 
angrily exclaimed the Raven. "That 



44 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



algebra crowd is of no earthly use, and 
they know it, but are unwilling to own 
up. Algebra books are almost alike, 
while every book of literature you pick 
up is different. Every epoch has its 
famous authors, but who ever heard 
of an author who wrote original alge- 
bra books, and who would have read 
them if they had been written?" 

"That very fact proves that algebra 
is the best and most enduring. Would 
people keep using the same book year 
after year if it were not correct? No; 
most assuredly not. Yet a new book 
of literature is given to the world 
every week. Any one may prove any- 
thing we say for himself, but they 
must take your statements on faith." 

Aroused by this argument, I was un- 
able to keep quiet longer. 

"Friends, all of these arguments are 
vain, for we acknowledge the value of 
both of you. Let me beg of you to 
become reconciled." 

There was a faint rustle, the Raven 
murmured "Nevermore," and all was 
again quiet. 

Laura McCarty. 

^^W ^^^ t^' 

H 3Buncb of IDiolets. 

"Oh! I hope those children won't 
pull me," cried a violet. "Don't you?" 
this to her neighbor. 

"No," the other answered quietly. 
"I know they will take us from our 
home and beautiful surroundings, and 
we will soon die, but perhaps we can 
do some little good to some one, and 
that should make us happy." 

Just at this moment, the sharp eyes 
of the children spied the violets. 



Running to the spot they plucked 
every one. Then, hurrying to their 
home, they placed the flowers in a vase 
of water on a table near the window. 
On the same table was a vase of large 
red roses. In a few moments they be- 
gan talking to each other. 

The violets told their life-history, 
back as far as they remembered; how 
when they first began to peep through 
the ground, they were chilled by a 
little damp snow that was resting on 
them. Then, as the days went on, the 
snow melted and it grew warmer, they 
blossomed into full-blown flowers. 
Just as they began to tell of their 
home, a young girl came in, hesitated 
before the flowers, looking first at one 
and then the other. Finally, taking 
the violets, she left the room. 

She took them upstairs, and entered 
a large, cool room. Before the win- 
dow was seated a boy. Smiling, he 
asked her to place the flowers near 
him. "I love violets so well," he said, 
"they are so quiet and gentle, they 
help me bear my pain more patiently." 

The next day, a city friend and her 
daughter drove out to spend the day 
in the country. The violets were re- 
moved from the invalid's room and 
placed on the dining room table. 
"How beautiful, yet so simple and 
modest!" exclaimed the daughter 
when she saw them. The violets 
could feel themselves change color at 
the compliment. When the visitors 
departed, the violets were given to 
them. After a long, pleasant ride, 
they reached their new home. 

But they were not to remain there, 
for the next afternoon they were worn 
down town by the daughter. On 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



45 



meeting a friend, she divided the 
bunch with her. After the giver had 
disappeared, the girl threw them half 
scornfully on the walk, they did not 
match her dress and she did not want 
them. 

Almost instantly, they were seized 
by two little claw-like hands. "You 
sweet little things," the waif cried, 
hugging them closely. She hurried 
home and gave them to her mother, 
but the mother laid them carelessly 
on the table, saying she could see 
nothing so pretty about them. 

"I wonder why it is some people do 
not care for these little flowers," pon- 
dered the child, putting them carefully 
in some water, and placing them in the 
open window. 

By an accident they fell out of the 
window. In a few moments, a small 
ragged boy picked them up, and ran 
eagerly home to give them to his little 
three-year-old sister, who was very ill. 
Going softly to the wretched cot on 
which she was lying, he offered her 
the flowers. Stretching out her hands 
she cried faintly, "Pitty flowers" 
Then clasping them weakly in both 
little hands, she died. She was buried 
holding the violets. 

Grace McBeath. 

^^^ ^^^ 9^^ 

Enocb HrDen. 

When a boy, playing with Annie 
Lee and Philip Ray upon the beach, 
Enoch Arden manifested a strong will 
and an ability to do what he willed. 
He was the orphan of a sailor, and 
realized thas he must make himself 
what he would be. 



As he grew older, he determined to 
save all he could and buy himself a 
boat; and so determined and persistent 
was he that he owned his own boat 
before he was twenty-one. When 
Enoch married Annie Lee, and was 
father of a child, he determined to 
give the child a gfood education, and 

the son, too, who was born later. 

But it happened that Enoch fell 
from a mast, breaking a limb; he lay 
long, recovering, and realized that his 
family would soon be in poverty. 
Therefore, when offered a berth as 
boatswain on a China-bound vessel, he, 
against his wife's will, assented. 

On her homeward voyage, the ves- 
sel was wrecked, and only two others, 
beside Enoch, escaped death. Two of 
these three died, and Enoch lived a 
lonely life for ten years. He wanted 
nothing, physically, only a strong de- 
sire to hear the human voice again, 
and see Annie and his children. Had 
he not had faith in Christ, he surely 
would have lost all hope of escaping 
from the island on which he was cast, 
and would have died of solitude. 

But he was not without hope, and 
finally a ship, stopping at the isle for 
water, took Enoch to a port near his 
home. When Enoch reached the 
home where Annie and he had lived, 
no person was there, and a bill of sale 
was on the door. 

From the gossip of the landlady of 
the house where he staid, Plnoch 
gathered the fact that his wife had 
married Philip Ray, but Enoch did 
not betray himself. He, one night, 
crept to Phillip's home and, seeing 
how cheerful and happy the family 



46 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



were, determined not to mar its 
happiness by making himself known. 

With his wife married to another 
man, his children under another fath- 
er's care, it was a constant temptation 
to claim them, but Enoch kept his re- 
solve and lived a year in the port, 
known to none. He labored at many 
trades, but finally became too weak to 
work, then slightly ill, and gradually 
became seriously sick. 

Then, thinking that he would live 
but a short time, he told his htory to 
his landlady. She would fain have 
told it aloud in the port, but Enoch 
forbade it. Then she wanted to bring 
his children to see him, before he died. 
This greatly tempted Enoch for a 
moment, but he kept his resolve and 
told her "No," thus showing his strong 
will, and how completely he had con- 
quered self. 

Albert Sawyer. 

9^^ ^^^ 9^^ 

Biobtb GraOe Xocals. 



Hazel, don't you want to go violet hunting? 
Grace McBeath is a model of the Eighth 
Grade. 

George Chase has closed his school work, 
and has gone into the railroad business. 

Frank Weatherford and Corda Hart, have 
withdrawn from school to help work on the 
farm. 

A well-known girl of the Eighth Grade has 
discovered an excellent stimulant for the 
mind. 

Charley Smiley, a pupil of the Eighth 
Grade, has removed from Tuscola, and is now 
living in Sullivan. 

Everett Me.—: "Say, ma said I'd look per- 
fectly lovely in long pants, so just as soon as I 
wear my short ones out, I'll show you," 

If McCormick is the inventor of the binder 



why is it that he did not invent the ladder? 
"Because, necessity is the mother of inven- 
tion." 

The Eighth Grade has enrolled this year, 
fifty-two pupils, forty-one have remained un- 
til the close of school. This is the largest 
number that has been recorded for several 
years. 

We were represented in the Foot Ball 
Team last fall, by some of our boys, and we 
hope next fall when we are "Freshies" to 
make our stand at the head of "The Glorious 
Foot Ball Team." 

Instead of studying the Constitution of the 
United States all the time, for the last month, 
some of us have studied the maps, to see 
where we can go to spend our vacation, to im- 
prove our Constitution. 

Thomas is furnishing us with frog's and 
toad's eggs, which he secures from our lake, 
just east of town. He said the other evening 
he was out about the middle of the lake, on 
his private raft, when he saw a large bunch of 
eggs in the water. He reached over and 
picked them out. He saw on the edge of the 
raft, a bull-frog that was looking so sorrow- 
ful, he was afraid it was going to ask for the 
eggs, so he turned around, took a hop, step 
and jump and reached the shore. When he 
looked around the bull-frog had vanished. 

^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ 

Dainty maid with golden tress, 

Studies Latin, such a stress, 
Learning disco, awfnl mess, 

So irreg'lar, great distress, 
Wishes help, just more or less; 

Pouting lips invite caress; 
Didicissem? — Well I guess. 

He— "The papers say as how Ezra Bliggins 
has broken out in Poetry." 

She— "You don't say! Well I remember 
telling Mrs. Bliggins when Ezra was a little 
boy, that he ought to be vaccinated." — Ex. 
Lives of base ball men remind us. 

That they get their fingers broke. 
And departing leave behind them. 
Half their b'longings in the soak. 

Gushing girl— "Oh, I'm so interested in such 
things, and did you see the celebrated watch 
on the Rhine?" 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



47 



Xocals anb Johes- 



Artha says "You'11-have-to hurry." 

Jeannette Jones '03 entertained April 5. 

Miss C — "Miss Hans (Porch) you may please 
recite!" 

Miss Nelle Miller, '97, was a High School via- 
tor April 2:3. 

Grace seems to be developing quite an ap- 
petite for cheese. 

Roscoe took a week oflF this spring to study 
practical farming. 

Too bad these desperate cases don't last 
long, isn't it Lizzie? 

Cora Roberts ex--'03 gave a party in honor of 
Albert Sandwiger April 9. 

Miss Caraway has taken the work of Miss 
Webster, in the high school. 

Grace Murphy, ex--'03 entertained a large 
number of her friends May 2. 

Prof. Higdon said he could tell by the sound 
of the room that Lena was absent. 

Someone please ask Estella S. what the 
boys do in playing clap in and clap out. 

Why is Florence heard muttering to herself, 
"Be still Johnnie and let your mother talk?" 

"Well, I don't know" but it seems as if the 
Sophs, are "sorta" a smart class and every- 
thing. 

Helm — (to Junior boy who is explaining the 
induction coil to him.) "For Heaven's sake 
turn it ofif." 

"I have a few more points to touch upon" 
said Bentley as he awkwardly climbed a barbed 
wire fence. 

Jeannette says it sometimes pays to use the 
old maxim "If at first you don't succeed, try, 
try again." 

Many a man who believes that the earth 
revolves on its axis also believes he is the 
axis. 

Lady who had been abroad — "One of the 
things that interested me most was the great 
clock at Straasburg." 

A baker has invented a new kind of yeast 



which makes bread so light that a pound of 
it only weighs eight ounces. 

A number of the H. S. Students attended 
the "Katzenjammer Club dance," May 10. All 
report a most enjoyable time. 

Miss O — "In what tense is the phrase 'I am 
beautiful?' " 
Laura — "In the remote past." 

Excited man — "Judge, I've lost my hat!" 
Judge — "That's nothing, young man, whole 
suits are lost here in a day." — Ex. 

That deep thinking junior threatens to riv- 
al Sam Weller in letter writing, especially 
when the recipient is a senior girl. 

Miss Webster — "William you may give the 
principle parts of the verb 'succeed.' " 
William — "Gelingen, glucken, geraten." 

A ventriloquist in Georgia imitates so 
closely the crowing of a cock that he can 
cause the sun to rise two hours earlier than 
usual.— Ex. 

Smart Youth: "What made a little fly fly?" 
Friend: "Give it up." 

Smart Youth: "Because a little spider 
spider."— Ex. 

Young Lady (buying sheet music) "Have 
you, "'Kissed Me in the Moonlight?'" 

Clerk— "Why — er— no; guess it was it some- 
body else."— Ex. 

I thought I knew I knew it all 

But now I must confess. 
The more I know I know I know, 

I know I know the less. — Ex. 

Mamma— "Johnny, I hear you were not at 
school yesterday." 

Johnny — "H'm; I'll bet the teacher told you. 
A woman can never keep a secret." — Ex. 

There was a crowd, and there were three, 

The girl, the parlor lamp and he- 
Two is company, and no doubt. 
That's why the parlor lamp went out. — Ex. 

Miss Town — "You may take to page 79 to- 
morrow." 

Mable P— "That is too long." 

Miss Town — "Then take to the bottom of 
page 78." 

An Irish brakeman being hurt on a trafa 



48 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



his friends offered to send for a physician. 
Thev asked, "Do you want an allopath or a 
homeopath?" He replied, "It don't matter, 
all paths lead to the grave."— Ex. 

The announcement of the death of Miss 
Webster's father, and her departure some 
three weeks since, came as a great surprise to 
her many friends, who sympathize with her in 
her great bereavement. 

LATIN. 

All the people died who spoke it. 
All the people died who wrote it. 
All the people died who learned it. 
Blessed death, they surely earned it. 

—Ex. 

P. W. "I am going to call Jimmie feathers 
now." 
Miss E. "Why?" 
F. W. I am tired of calling hi m down. 

—Ex. 

Wife — (to husband returning at 3 a. m.) — 
"What time is it dear?" 

"One o'clock, I think." (Clock strikes 
three.) 

Wife — Why, it just struck three, sir!" 

Husband — Ridiculous, my dear, that clock 
must stutter." 

She is a Freshman; she sits on the front 
seat; she wears a pencil in her mouth; her 
complexion is like a peach blossom; her facial 
expression is too variable to be described; she 
shakes the room whenever she moves; she al- 
ways moves; her name is known by all, it is 
spelled with four letters and is also a large 
part of the school building. 

A maid, a man, 

An open fan, 

A seat upon the stair. 

A stolen kiss. 

Six weeks of bliss. 

And forty years of care. 

—Ex. 

We are the Juniors, four; 

Just us, that's all, 

We're the largest and the smallest, 

The brightest and the dullest. 

Bowman, Boyce, 

Bill and Paul. 

It is said that VanDyke will soon publish a 



book on electricity. A large part will be de- 
voted to "The Proper Methods of Taking an 
Electric Shock." 

Into her hard, unyielding heart 

A little spark of love there came! 
He blew himself, and lo! 
The spark was made a flame! 
W. W. (to small Freshie) "Why don't you 
get up and give one of those ladies a seat?" 

Small F. "Why don't you get up and give 
them both a seat?" 

The Commencement speaker this year will 
be Dr. Clark of Chicago University. He is a 
popular man and an entertaining talker. All 
should hear him. 

English Pupil — "He might have thought 
about this, too, before he returned." 

Teacher — "To what two by four were you 
referring, Julia?" 

Miss O. (irritably) "Can't you pick up 

your book? Is it so much exertion?" 

Pupil (slowly) "Yes. Latin is a very heavy 
study." 

Paul Millar of the Junior class, has com- 
menced his work on a farm. He will take his 
examinations and resume membership in his 
class. 

Teacher, "You form more habits in school 
than you will outside." 

Bright Junior, "Better quit then." 

Great praise has come to the pupils of the 
High School on account of the musical canta- 
ta given May 16 at the opera house. 

Robert Hansen makes a fine business man, 
but Robert you should not hasten the cares of 
life and neglect your preparation. 

Blanche Wright announces that her health 
is better and that she will be in school again 
next year. 

Ralph C, "Studying is not in my line, es- 
pecially the foreign lauguages." 

Prof. Arps is developing into quite an ora- 
tor and is in great demand. 

Lena, "I'll hold my tougue until Commence- 
ment day and then " 

Fred W., "As content as can be when not 
forced to move." 

Grover Helm, "Just me and her, us two and 
no more." 




HIGH SCHOOL STUDY ROOM. 






'if^tt— 







.i.JJR,l. 



HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING. 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITV of ILLINOIS. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



51 



ITHE REAL THING 

• 

The art of imitation in Jewelry has 
been brought to such a high degree of 
perfection that the cheap "gilt" stuff 
found in general stores can with diffi- 
culty be told from fine rolled plate or 
solid gold. ::::::::::::::: 

WEAR WILL DEMONSTRATE 

THE DIFFERENCE j* j>t jt ^ 

Appearance will not. The only safe 

course in buying Jewelry of any sort is 

!%^ to rel}' upon the experience and hon- 

'^•1^" esty of the established dealer, who can 

3 not afford to misrepresent his goods. 




e 



C B. lyomrighous 



Busy Jewekt 



tuscoh, 7IL 

One Dcor West of the Tirst national Bank 



New Stock of Summer 

Dress Goods 


Linings... 


trimmings.... 



Latest Things in Shirt Waist Materials 

FANCY WHITE GOODS FOR WAISTS AND THE 
VERY NEWEST OF THINGS IN WOMAN'S WEAR 

A most complete line of both Ladies' and Gents' Furnishings. Prices are 
right. Investigate before buying. We have taken the agency for the New 
Idea Pattern. All sizes, all style>, 10 cents. 



MLLER & SLOAN 



52 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



Zhc Hmedcan Minboo 
nDebicine Co. 



IS A HOME 
ENTERPRISE 



and as such solicits the patronage of 
the Tuscola people. Our goods are 
guaranteed. Our line consists of our 

Toilet Soap 

Flavoring Extracts 

and Remedies 

Ask your merchant for our goods or 
call at the Laboratory 

No. 624 N. Main Street^ Tuscola. 

tailoring ($^ 

Suits and Pants 
Made to Order 

Novelties in Summer and 
Fall Styles.... 

PRICES THE LOWEST. 

Tirst Door West 0f RO. 



Tagprt & Williams, 

]furniturean& 
XnnbcrtakinG 




No. 7 West Sale Street 
TUSCOLA, ILL. 



Thone 1582. 



Bdugbman, Bragg 



Individual HespcnsibiJity $500,000 
Cash and Surplus $30,000 



Do a General Banking Business and 

Solicit a Share of Your Patrontge. 

Largest Resources of any Bank 

in Douglas County. 



JV. W. Bragg, President. 

9. C. Baughman, Cashier* 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



53 



ii■■^\:f^ gi ^v.:f^■:mi■•y.^^^ ■^■■•■.:.'^■•aii■■r.\.^•^■■:^ :«ii-i. .v. /•(■•.v..V:«^ ■.«;^v.^'•^ ■•.;■..•• •;.i(r;.;:.T; 

:•.•.•.•.•• •'.•:;•.•.■.•.•:• ■>:•.::■: :m- %•::;•.•.;.•:• •?::;•.•.•.•.•:• ■?.•:;•.•.■.••:• •.•::;•.•.■;.•• ■j:t;».-.-i«- •»•:;•.•.;•: *.•«•.•.•;•• ■;::;•.•.■;.•:• *.-n».-.- JR- •?.•;;•.■.■;•• ♦.•n».-.;.«.- ♦.•.••^.■.■..«- 

Tuscola! 
Business 






•••v.: 



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m 



i 

m 

••"••.V 




m 



College 



g Fall term begins Monday, 

g September 2, 1901 : : : : 

^ Night School October i, 

1901, to May I, 1902 : : : 



:.i»l|ij:"lijll,..i.i:a^' 



F. F. LEONARD 

Manager^ Tuscola, III. 



Book Keeping:, Shorthand, Telegraphy, 
Touch Typewriting... 



:••;• 

m 

1 

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m 

m. 

ft?: 



< 

For Reliable Goods 

Jft Heliable Prices 
Call en... 

SOUTH SIDE GROCERS 
'PHONE :::::::: 33 


S. S. GOEHRING 

CONTRACTOR AND 
BUILDER^^^^^.3*^^ 
BRICK and SAND FOR 
SALE jtjtj^jtjtjfkj^j^jtjt 


Jill Truits Tresh in Season 

Honest Goods, Honest Prices and 
Honest Treatment is our Motto. 


SjT 



54 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



Dr, 6e0. d^ Tulkr 

Second Thcr 

Worth^m Building 


m. M. IReeves 

ATTORNEY- A T-LAW 


Office, j» ^ jl ^ Second Floor 

WORTHAM BLOCK 


'Phone no, 104 


^ ^ jX Phone 66 ,J* ,^ ^ 


Joseph M. McBeath 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 


JOHN H. CHADWICK 

Attorney-at-Law 

AND STATES ATTORNEY. 


Rooms No. ^ Jt jt 204 and 205 

WORTHAM BLOCK 


All kinds of legal business promptly attended 
to. OflBce, Court House, third floor. 

TUSCOLA, ILL. 



THE TUSCOLA 



Benefit and B 
Jlssociation... 




OF TUSCOLA, ILL.. 



Loans mad* on tht most 
favorable terms .... 



Dues.. ..Payable Weekly 
and Interest.. .Wontbfy 



E. C. FINNEY, President. A. W. WALLACE, Secretary. 



THK STUDENTAXA, MAY, igoi 



55 




Geo. C Schmitt ^ 



Thnst 



tuscola, Illinois 



(3iowcr of 1l3iob Grabe Cut jflowcrs 

Designs for Banquets, Weddings, Funerals, etc.. Artistically Arranged. Palms 
and Ferns; also Bedding Plants in Season. 



Cbas, Cross & Bro, 



...Dealers in. 



Tnsb <ind Cured Weats, Perk, Sausage 

B^ms and Lard 



Cash Paid for lyides and Zaihw 



telephone S6 



65 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901 



Contents, 

Dedication 1 

Chas. Animerman 5 

Mrs. L. O. Hackett 6 

The Education Received From Our Ancestors 11 

The Trial of the Town Clock 13 

An Interview 14 

Senior Class History. No. 1 23 

Senior Class History, No. 2 27 

Junior Class History 28 

Sophomore Class History 30 

Freshman Class History 31 

A Sophomore's Fate 32 

Annual Poem -'To the School House" 32 

The Radical Club 35 

Pessimus Frater Jim 35 

Editorials 36 

Simion's Dream of Pair Girls and Boys 37 

Exchanges 37 

Alumni 38 

Exchanges 41 

Athletic Notes 42 

Dispute of Algebra and English for my Time 43 

A Bunch of Violets 44 

Enoch Arden 45 

Eighth Grade Locals 46 

Locals and Jokes 47-48 

Advertisements 51 — 



[■.M ■:•»'■■'•'■'■■■' 






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If you want to Look Nice 

and clean, bring all 



your 



DIRTY CLOTHES 

To the Tuscola Steam Laun- 
dry. Work called tor and de- 
livered any hour in the week. 

IisGola Steam Laundry 

A. L. CANTRAL, Prop. 



'Pljcne no. 7.... 



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•^•: ./.•■.:••■^•: ..V-"-- ^•=■• ••.:■••.• ^•= •."■•••• ^•= •■•■••■••••• ••^•■■V•■•••••••^^ 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



S7 





LADIES'... 


Jicady=to=ivcar 


Garments... 


Tailor-Made SUITS, WAISTS and SKIRTS 

High class merchandise at popular prices. Bijr departments 
full of New Summer DRESS FABRICS. Everything in 
TIn-tn-datp DRY GOODS 


Canful Jttkntion to Wail Orders. fr/f/r««;."! 


Willis' . . Philadelphia Store 

\ 5 and \ 7 Main Street, Champaign, III. 



I. M. SMITH |Geo.H.Kirby 



Dealer in Staple 
and 



pai^ey 
((ro(;eries 



Jlrccia SUam Bread 



telephone 1633. 



fov J^ineet 

AT POPULAR PRICES 



WAMSLEY BLOCK 



TUSCOLA, UJU 



58 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



5)r. ma. 3E. TRice 

OFFICE : : : OVER NEW 

BAUGHMAN, BRAGG BANK 
i)hone0iSf?.'c°E??"'NS°5i 



Park Street Restaurant, 

J. V. SPCXDN ^ J/t Proprietof. 

BOARDING, LODGING, 
LUNCHING. ^ ^ ^ 



TKae iDavc a Xarae 
Complete Stoch of 



FINEL 







UL 



I 



AS WELL AS ALL 
KINDS OF BUILD- 
ING MATERIAL 

IT IS OUR DESIRE 
TO PLEASE EACH 
OF OUR PATRONS 



F. H. JONES 

LUMBER COMPANY. 



E. B. Bar den 



THE LATEST STYLES 
EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS 

SOUTH SIDE AVENUE 
TUSCOLA : ILLINOIS 




]f ine /UbilUncr^ 

Ifiret 
IHational 



Capital Stock, $60,000 

Surplus .... $65,000 



Accounts Received on the Most 
Liberal Terms. 



DIRECTORS: 

J, G, Cannon, Geo. Callaway, ' 

A, B. Sawyer, F. W. Hammbtt, 
Albert W. Wallace. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



59 



;•.•.;.•■ ■?:r.».-.i.*:- ■f:::;'.dk- ■fjr.v.;.*- •?.■::•.•.■.•.•:• •?:?.•.•.• i«- ■t;::::-:M-f::.:::!K- -tiiv.-.Jt.- 4:r.::jK- •.•;:;».-.i,«- •rni'.-.i.m- <f;;v».-.;j»' «;;:•.•.• i.«- ♦.•€;•.•..■•:• 



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Ml* 

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Whenever you feel th^t M 
your €yes trouble you i 
you should consult us 



DOES YOUR HEAD ACHE 
Do Your Eyes Blur at Reading 
Do Things Appear to be Misty 
DO YOUR EYES WATER 
Do Things Appear Double 
Do Things Appear Mixed Up 



We will make a careful examination 
of your Eyes FREE OF CHARGE 
and Furnish Glasses when necessary 
at reasonable prices ::::::::: 






#1' 



«^«^ 



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m 



Trank S. TisberM 

OPTICIAN and JEVELER 
H Sale Street TUSCOLA, ILL« 

••;;:;• ■■#!.*•*•:;;;• ■»:.••'••.:;.'» •»*:.*■*•:;;.*• »"r.''V.:.v .^•■:/■V^v^■•f;/•v,;;•^^1•^•/.'•::;^•:*^^•••••::,^■»^••••::;,^^■•^^••VI;••^^•^^^ '•"'■*:'*?c^ i':!»*ii 

• .^.7>- w. .••.^..••■w. ■•..^..•.■^. ••..^..•.-^. -•■•^•••■^- ■•••^..■■■». ■•..^— •.-^. ■•••^., •.-^. -•••^..•.-V. .•..^..■.■^. ■•.•^..•.■^. ■•..^.. ■•^* •••JA*^ •■••a-»i '• *^.'. • 2JBV. U.'*^ 



Wii^ 



WE BUY YOUR 



Books... 



CASH OR TRADE 



Savings Bank Store 



dugh Tisber 

Progressive ♦♦♦ 
Photographer 

Wishes to announce to the public that 
he is capable of doing all kinds of 
Portrait work at his new Studio, situa- 
ted on Main Street, north of Douglas 
Hotel. Call and examine some of his 
work. You will be cordially treated. 



€nlarqinq....a Specialty 



6o 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 







i^ ^ ^^ e^ t^ %^ 


— t/^w ft/^w ft/^w ^^m e/^(5 ft/^f^ 




"^ Uwentietb Ccnturi^ 


||^^nting 

• • 
• 

• 
• • 

• • anb lEngraving 

Bstabllsbment 


Am^ Special Httention 

M^ to furnisbing ver^ 

Jwt jflne Stationers 


- — SlL 





THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



61 



For Latest Books and Stationery 

CALL : : : : : : : AT Til K 

POSTOFFICE BOOK STORE 

We also buy and sell 

SECOND-HAND SCHOOL BOOKS 

: : : Also carry a fine line of : : : 
HAMMOCKS, PIPES AND CIGARS 

jH jt ji Call and see our stock Ji ji Jt 

Post Office Book Store 



pJi'fT 'r'^^'*^' ^-"^ 



"Tf 



[i^lh^-'.. 



^Il5^' '',.■? ^'-ii?' ''A?- ''ji\^.' '/„? -/,„" 



C. B^"E] 




Alexander Lumber Go. 

ROB'T. L ANDERSON, Manager. 



THE LEADING SHOE MAN 
of the City, carries the largest stock of 
Shoes in Douglas County. He has the 
Herrick celebrated Lady's Shoe in two 
qualities, S2.50 and S3, the best Lady's 
Shoe in the United States for the money. 



Lumber^ Sash^ Doors^ 

MOULDING, BLOCKS 
BRICK, PLASTER 
HAIR, LIME, C E- 
MENT. SAND. ALSO 

Building tile, etc. 

Jin Orders Prcmtip Tilled. 



©fflcc on Bast Central Hvcnue, 
Uuscola, f Uinots. 



62 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



-\Kr. T. X-j^fL-^NTE. 



SPEES BUILDING, 

UP-STAIRS. 
TUSCOLA - - - ILLINOIS. 

DR. FRED. F. RICE 
H)enti8t 

Crown and Bridge Work 
a Specialty. 

♦ ♦ 

All Work Guaranteed. 

♦ ♦ 

Office over new Baughman, Bragg & Co. bank. 

TUSCOLA, ILLINOIS. 



nidcbine and 
Repair Shop 

CHAS. B HAMMET, Prop. 



MACHINE REPAIRS 

Of all Kinds, Boiler Work and 
Blaekswithing, lyorse Shoeing a 
Specialty. .''Last Year Employed 
1 Wan.... How Employ 15 Wen 



MERIT WINS.... 



Ldundr^ Work 


BiQh 6rad^ 


Only... 


AT NORMAN'S AGENCY AT 

Reinheimer s.... Book Store 


Wagon Calls for and Delivers Work. 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



63 



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•••.>\^; • *••:••.>;><■• *n->;?.-i •:* ^ini;: 









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Ci^r/s Sp^ce 1*5 Jieserucd for 

X. C. Wardall & ^ 



S5 



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Ask Your Neighbor [ XuSCok Coal 



**Mbere ie tbe beet place 
to QO for 0t)?li0b an^ re** 
liable pbotO0?" : : : 

And its 20 to 1 that you will be 
directed to tbe Studio of 

D. N. BOYCE 

tbt Old J^ellable Photcgrapher. 

PROMPT SERVICE AND 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

14 parfte Street, Corner 
Sale, - * - ^u5cola. 



COMPANY 

The "White Man's Burden Can be Made 
Much Lighter by Using ©Ur Coal. 
It ii HU Coal. That a the whole 
Story. Being all Coal, it Lasts Longer 
and is less Expensive in the End. 

i£qq, 1Rut, Xump, 

36ra3il BlocP?, TlUllnefrebe 

Splint anb 1bar^ Coal. 

Pricts JllwayM Waht. 

G. F. WISEGARVER. 

'PHONE 1593. 



64 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



J. M. FULLER 

ATTORNEY - AT-LAW 

ALL LEGAL BUSINESS WILL 
RECEIVE PROMPT ATTEN- 
TION. : : COLLECTIONS 
WILL BE PROMPTLY MADE 

Rooms 304-5 : : : Wortham Block 



VISIT 



MlWlindauer 



TOwlioiiiitmay 




And it concerns everyone who 
needs a new Hat, or has to pay 
the bill. Then call at No. 36 
Sale street. Prices the lowest, 
styles the latest, yards the 
longest. 

M* Grace Alexander, 



f^;r your 



^lott^ii^d 



AND SHOES 



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Sis 

^^ 



•v.:«;-.i; .^;v:ai-i::.V. v:|t;-.v.vv:a. ■■••■• ^••••••■•■'■:0'V'--'v^ •.•:••■•••; ■.v'.:••■^•:•.i■;T••^•• ••.•«"■.•.••»; .•■■•f.«.Vi. 



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Tine WiWmry 

23 WEST SALE STREET 
TUSCOLA : : : : ILLINOIS 

Wrs. W, Tlinn 



M 



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THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



65 



c E. COX & CO. T F. YEAW 



Marbware 
anb Stovce 

Granite and Tinware, Refrigerators, 
Gasoline Stoves, Lawn Mowers, Ice 
Cream Freezers, Paints, Oils and Var- 
nishes, Grates and Mantles. Furnaces 
and Plumbing. 



DEALER IN 




Headquarters for good 
Goods and Low Prices 



the monarch and Teathtrston 
Bicycles 



Harness, Nets and Dusters, D. M. Sechler and 
Ames Surries and Buggies. COAL, both 
hard and soft. We are taking orders for coal 
and can save you money on same if orders are 
placed in June. Prices are advancing each 
month. 



1Rcb jfront S)ruG Store, 



m 

m 

m 

1 
m 

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m 



We are Beadquarters for all 
Kinds of Drugs, Patent 
medicines and toilet Jlr* 

tides, M m m m 

family l^tctipts and Pby^lclans 
Prtscripilons Carefully TUhd. J» 

WE HANDLE A NICE LINE 
OF GIFT BOOKS FROM 15c up 

PAYNE & ALEXANDER, 



m 

m 
m 












m 



"Wo. 8 Sale Street, 



Tuscola. 






t 



66 



THE STUDENTANA, MAY, 1901. 



tb^ Cify Drug Store 



tablets In White, Cream 
and Blue, with Envelopes 
of the new sizes to match 



w 



*■ 



Kokaks .... and Kodak 
Supplies . . . Eastman's 
line In stock. 



Zbc Bewest XTbings in 
Stationery a Specialty 



m. T. Stacp & C 



-Proprietors- 



120. 5 West Sale Street... tuscola, 711. 



da try Itladison & (£ 



Shirts to Order 



Suits to Order 



OAK HALL..>a-OTHiERs 



Clothing, d^ts, Caps, and 6ents' 
Turnishings, trunks and Valises 

Everp JItticIe that is Sold is Guaranteed Worth the Itloney.... 



Summer Dr($$ 6ood$. 



-o- 



striped Satin Berbers, 

Forty-two inch wool, all solid colors— rose, grey, new blue, taus and modes, per 

yard, at 29c 

Silk Striped Ohallies, 

Very choice assortment, yer yard, at 33 

Waist Cloths. 

special offering- in Waist Cloths this week. All wool, silk and wool and fine silk- 
embroidered fabrics, all in waist patterns, at 39c, 50c, 75c and 85c 

All Wool Grey Homespuns, 

So very desirable in light colors for skirts, per yard, at 58c 

Silk and Wool Striped Challies 

Solid colors, per yard, at 65c 

Printed Wash Poplins, 

Silk warp, very desirable for waists or skirts, per yard, at 75c 

Pin Head Wool Poplins, 

Forty-four inches wide, warranted to wash; so popular this season for waists, per 
yard, at S8c 

Colored All- Wool Albatross 

For summer suitings, ten shades, per yard, at 48c 

Nun's Veiling, 

Fine all-wool quality, forty-two inches wide, every shade desirable, per yard. . . .75c 
Nuns' Veiling in black, forty-two inches wide, all grades to select from, per yard, 
40c, 45c, 50c, 58c, 65c 75c 85c and $1.0o 

Fine Black Brilliantine, 

Forty-four inch, a special 75c quality; this week, per yard 50c 

100 Pieces Assorted Spring Dress Goods, 

In odd colors, worth 75c to SI. 00 per yard, almost every weave included in this lot. 
Assortment of colors broken. Will be sold Monday at, per yard 50c 

BRADLEIY BROS., Decatur, III. 






The Tuscola High School 



TUSCOLA, ILL. 



w 



!»• 



Courses Offered**^ 

I. German-English course 

II. Latin-English course 

III. Latin-Grammar course 

I V. College Preparatory course 



Instruction based on modern Pedagogical principles! 
Standard, high ! Elective course offered ! Thor- 
oughly equippcyi Laboratory ! Ample facilities for 
practice. 

Our students are thoroughly prepared for profes- 
sional and technical courses and are admitted with- 
out examination to the leading western Universities. 
All instructors are University prepared teachers — 
specialists in their departments. For information 
address 

G. F. ARPS, Superintendent. 







- ;v- ■ ■ wi 




Is Shov/ing the STRONGEST line and BEST 
values in every Department that has ever been 
brought to Tuscola 

S)r^ <500?>S — Right now our Wash Goods and White Goods dc^-'-rM- espec- 
ial attention — the finest line you have ever seen in Tuscola Large line 
of Fine Dropped Stitched Hosiery and Fitve Shirt Waists are on sale. 
All the novelties of the season in this department. Don't fail to visit 
our Millinery Department. 

ClOtbinQ — Extra values in Mens' and Boys' Suits, Shirts, Underwear and 
Neckwear ; also Straw Hats. Don't fail to see us for your Fine Straw 
Hats. 

SbOCS— Large stock of Fine Goods. Patent Leather in swellest styles. 

"fcat^WatC — Just now Paints, Oils, Refrigerators, Gasoline Stoves, Ice Cream 
Freezers, are in demand. We always lead in the low prices. 

ifUttlitUtC — Largest Stock and Lowest Prices. All the latest novelties. 

^ewclt^ — Stock right up to date. Our Low Prices will be a surprise to 
you. AH repair work at a big saving to you? 




wm