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Full text of "Student desegregation plan submitted by the school committee of the city of Boston, January 27, 1975"

BOSTOTSI 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 







400 



STUDENT DESEGREGATION PLAN 



Submitted by 

The School Committee 

of the 

City of Boston 



January 27, 1975 



In Accordance with the Order of October 31,1 974 

of the United States District Court 

District of Massaclmsetts 

Establishing Filing Data and General Contents 

of 

A Student Desegregation Plan 

and 

In Accordance with the Memorandum 

and Conditional Order of January X, 1975 



STUDENT DESEOSEGATION PLAN 

Submitted by 
The School Conunittee 
of the 
Cl'ty of Boston 

January 27, 1975 



In Accordance with the Order of October 31, 197U 
of the United States District Court 
District of Massachusetts 
Establishing Filing Data and General Contents 

of 

A Student Desegregation Plan 

and 

In Accordance with the Menorandun 

and Conditional Order of January 8, 1975 



TABLE Of CONTiiSiTS 



Section 
I 
II 
III 

IV 



VI 

VII 
VIII 

iX 
X 

XI 



Introduction 

Background 

Altei'native Student Desegregation Plan: 
Overview 

Altui-native Student Desegregation Plan: 
Program 

Alternative Student Desegregation Pleui: 
Zones and Districts 

Alteiimtivo Student Desegregation Plan: 
AsHigruiient Proceas 

Iinpleiiiontation Process a»id Schedule 

Metropo.l itcui Concerns 

Positive Action Office 

Future Concerns 

Jiqualiaation of Faculty- Jicperience 

Append ijf 



Section 
I 
II 
III 

IV 



VI 

VII 

VIII 

IX 

X 

XI 



- k 

- 13 

- 'J 

- 106 

- 126 

- 36 

- 2'» 

- 152 

- k 

- 10 

- 2 



NOTE: This document has been paginated in sections. 



SECTION I INTRODUCTIO:: 



I-l 



I Introduction 

A. The Order of June 21, I97I4 

On June 21, 197h, in the case of Morgan v. Eennigan, the United 
States District Court at Boston ordered the nsabers of the Boston 
School Committee and the Superintendent of Schools of the City of 
Boston "to begin forthwith the forarulation and inplementation of 
plana which shall slialoate every form of racial segregation in the 
public schools of Boston... ". The Court specifically enjoined the 
Committee and Superintendent frua "failing to canplj in any respect 
with the RacisuL Inbalance Act plan ordered by the Supreme Judicial 
Court of llassachusetts to be inplemented on or before the opening 
day of school in Septenber, 197/4.....". 

It Has Eiade clear by the Court that the Racial Imbalance Act 
plan (hereinafter called the State Plan or the Phase I Plan) was only 
a preliminary to a ccapleta desegregation plan. The State Plan which 
v/as concerned chiefly with racial balance had the result of racially 
Integrating apprcziiaately eighty schools. Kany of the rejaaining one 
hundred twenty schools were, of course, racially balanced but not 
necessarily racially integrated. 

In July 191k the staff of the School Ccmaiittee :;as granted t.ime, 
at its request, to formulate a substitute for the State Plan. Ix was 
hoped that such a substitute pla.a would desegregate fill secondarj- 
.3chools in Septenber 197U and all elementary schools in September 197.^. 
It vas further hoped that such an approach would avoid the raajor W3al<- 
nesses of the State Plan, i.e., overcrowding at the h^gh school "' jvel 



1-2 



and confused assignnents at the kindergarten level. However, the staff 
of the Boston School Conmittee was unable to complete such a substitute 
plan to its o;vn satisfaction. 

Consequently, the Boston School Coaniittee and its staff proceeded 
to inplement the State Plan or Phase I Plan in September 197^. It is 
not necessary to detail in this document the implementation efforts emd 
difficulties encountered in the first three months of this academic 
year. However, it is important to note that - putting aside the reaction 
of citizens to school desegregation - the Boston School Committee and its 
staJTf has been frustrated by the State Plan for the follov/ing reasons: 
the overcrowding of mciny high schools, the educationally bizeirre com- 
binations of schools in one high school district, the overcrowding in 
certain areas of the city at the elementairy and middle school ].evel and 
the generally erratic nature of kindergarten asr-ign.i:ents. The Commit '".ee 
and its staff resolved to address these problems in the development of 
the expected Phase II Plan. 

B. The Order of October 31 > 197^ 

On October 51, 197^ the United States District Court at Boston 
ordered the Boston School Committee and Superintendent to file with 
the Court "on or before Dscember l6, 197^ > a plan for student desegre- 
gation, for implementation in September, 1975 •" In effect, the Court 
ordered the Committer v/hich '..'as in the process of implementing the PI" ii-e 
I Plan, to develop the Phase II Plan. 



1-3 



C. December 16, 19 7 U 

On December 16, 197U, the staff of the Boston School Committee 
submitted a Student Desegregation Plan for consideration by the Com- 
mittee. The majority of the Committee, however, voted against approval 
of the plan. Nonetheless, the then-co\msel for the School Committee 
fonvarded that document to the United States District Covirt at Boston. 

On December 2?, 197 U, three members of the Boston School Committee 
were found in civil contempt by the Federal Court and on December 30, 
197U, sanctions were ordered. 

D. January 7, 1975 

At a meeting of the Boston School Committee on January'- 7, 1975, 

the members of the Committee voted: 

The Educational Planning Center is hereby directed forthwith 
to amend the plan submitted to the Committee on December 16, 197U, 
so as to achieve the objectives set forth in the U.S. District 
Court's order of October 31, 197U:, but without compulsory busing j 
said plan to provide as a substitute for forced busing alterna- 
tive magnet type learning styles schools, voluntary busing and 
any other devices designed to accomplish integration without 
forced busing. 

The Committee further voted: 

Prompt submission of such a city-wide student desegregation plan 
to the U.S. District Court is hereby authorized. 

E. January 8, 1975 

On Jajiuary 8, 1975, the Federal Court found that the three members 
of the Boston School Com.'aittee had purged themselves of civil contenpt 
"on condition that they follow up their vote to subniit an amended cityx'fide 
dese.^regation plan on or before January 20, 1975." 



i-U 



F. January Ih, 1975 

On January lU, 1975 the Federal Court granted the School Committee 
a one-week extension - until January 2?, 1975 - to submit a desegrega- 
tion plan, 

G. Purpose of the Docvment 

This document describes the efforts of the Boston School Committee 
to comply with the Order of October 31, 197U and the Memorandum and 
Conditional Order of January 8, 1975. Further, in compliance with the 
Court Order, this document details a plan which aims to: 

- provide for the greatest possible degree of actual desegrega- 
tion of all grades in all schools in all parts of the city; 
taking into accouat the safety of students a:id the practicali- 
ties of the situation 

- have in eich school a racial ratio reflective of the grade 
level ratio 

- avoid unduly burdening any racial group 

- minimize the reassignment of students who were reassigned for 
September 197U 

H. Components of the Plan of the Boston School Committee 

There follows in this document: 

- a rationale for the planning approach adopted by the Boston 
School Committee 

- a description of the plan for desegregating Boston's schools, 

- an implementation process and schedule, and 

- recommendations relative to metropolitan approaches to solving 
or erasing racial isolation. 



S?.CTICM II BACKGHOUIID 



II-l 



II Background 

This section seeks to indicat-e the process followed by the staff 
of the Boston School Conmittee during the time allotted for developing 
a Desegregation Order. Also included in this section is an analysis 
of conventional districting efforts made by the staff and a preview 
of an alternative approach. 

A. Planning Process 

1, Personnel 

In order to develop a Desegregation Plan by December 16, 197U, 
the "Superintendent of Schools assigned school department staff to .lug- 
ment the efforts of the staff of the Educational Planning Center. 
Approximately nineteen persons worked full-time on the development of 
the plan. Additionally, another thirty specialists from center support 
services in the school system assisted on a part-time basis. It should 
be noted that, when the Boston School Committee was granted permission 
by the Federal Court to submit an amended desegregation plan by January 27, 
1975, the nineteen persons noted above were directed to work on a seven- 
day week extended work-day basis. This overall effort X'fas supervised 
and coordinated by four administrators at the Educational Planning Center 
in conjunction with the Associate Superintendent for Planning and the 
Superintendent of Schools. Ultimate responsibility for the development 
of the plan and its amendment rests with the Boston School Committee. 
2. Public Information 
' In an effort to inform parents, students and other citizens of 
Boston conccrninip; the proj^ress of the desegregation plan during iJoveraber 



II-2 

and December 197I4., the staff of the ichool Coruuittee utilized the following: 

a. accessibility to the media, 

b. a series of inforaational meetings v/ith each of the six Area 
Advisory Councils chaired by the Assistant Superintendents, 

c. three public appearances before the Boston School Conraittee 
in conjunction v;ith the tvo progress reports and the final 
plan, 

d. dissemination of the two progress reports and extensive 
planning for the dissemination of the final plan and 

e. tv70 public briefing sessions for plaintiffs, other parties, 
press and cc.TuTiunity groups at the School Department's 
Campbell Ueso>urce Center. 

Furthermore, the staff of the School Committee net \-n.th represen- 
tatives of the Boston Association of School Administrators and Super- 
visors, the Boston Teachers Union and the Assistant Principals Assoc- 
iation for the purpose of eliciting reaction to the proposed plan. 

Additionally, the staff communicated cruring the planning period 
with one of the U. S. Senators from Massachusetts, the Governor-elect, 
and representatives oi' the Mayor's Office. In addition, v;ith the 
support of and xn co.-pany v/ith members of the Soston School Committee, 
tv/o staff planners visited the Minneapolis school system in v/hich a 
Program Preference Plan is in operation. This experience provided 
significant impetus and guidance to the staff in pursuing the Progra-'j 
Preference approach ior a dese;;regation plan 

Unfortunately, .r: was not possible during the limited tiae perio 1 
to meet with individual community and school groups. Further^ the Court 
did not support the eopointment of a Citi^sens' Advisory Group v;hich 

might have oiff;red organized inout to the planning -Droccss. However, 

( 

every effort was mac:" to ac::nov;lcdge the \;ritten recommendations and 



II -3 



inquiries of concernad citlze.is. In general, the staff sought fiilly to 
publicize its planning endeavors in order to make it possible for citi- 
zens* groups to be better able to subnit appropriate criticisms of the 
December loth plan to the Federal Court in the period prior to January 20, 
1975. In this regard, copies of that document, which include student 
data, facility inf orraation and a "geocode map, " were made available to 
each principal Aeadiiaster, each Hone and School Association president, 
members of the ^itywide Bi-Racial Council and to those organizational 
representatives who requested copies of that plan. Of course, the 
relatively short period of time available for the development of an 
amendment to the plan by the Boston School Committee did not make it 
possible for the staff to communicate with parents, students and other 
citizens. However, it is expected that this document will be well pub- 
licized in the weeks ahead, 

3. Student Data Preparation 

The obvious first step in the planning process was the preparation 
of student data pertaining to grade level, curricular program, residence 
and race. The Court had ordered that in developing a desegregation plan 
"defendants shall utilize the most reliable data then available to them, 
but the filing of the plan shall not preclude them from filing revisions 
necessary to adjust the plan for later changes in the data," 

The only data available to the staff of the School Committee in the 
period prior to December l6, 197U was the student enrolliiient data based. 

on the 1973-7U academic year . As indicated in Court and in Progress 

I 

Report f^l, this data x/as not only outmoded due to the normal passage of 
time a:id resultant statistical aberrations but also we.a!ce;:ed by the 
impact of the Phase I Dese^re^^ation Plan on student enrollments in the 



Il-U 



school system. Nonetheless, in compliance with the Court Order, the 
staff utilized this data to formulate the proposed Phase II Desegrega- 
tion Plan which was submitted to the School Coimaittee on December 16, 197U. 

Meanwhile, the annual process of updating the student data - a rather 
complex process - has been completed. Shortly after October 1, 197U, 
teachers proceeded to refine and, in many cases, obtain the appropriate 
student data for processing at the School Department's Data Processing 
Center. In late November 197U, the material was supplied to the Educa- 
tional Planning Center's systems programmer who utilized computer tech- 
niques, and - in some cases - manual approaches to affix geocodes (area 
identifications) to those student addresses which are new. As recently 
as the 1972-1973 academic year the updating endeavor extended from 
September to January, In this present academic year the school system - 
despite a delayed and difficult school opening - had hoped to have the 
current student data available by December 20, 197l4,or shortly there- 
after. Indeed, the data would have been available by eairly December of 
197U if it were not for the delay resulting from the slow process of 
determining which students have actually left the school system follow- 
ing the implementation of the Phase I Plan, 

The data is now available and probably will be lorifarded to the 

Court before this document is completed. However, the School Connittee 

is not utilizing the data in the de'relopment of this ameiided desegre,ia- 

tion plan for two reasons: 

1. ) Since other plans or modifications have been developed by 

orgaiiizatioas wliich used the 1973-7U acadeoic year data, it 
seems more appror>riate for the Court to examine all plans 
utilizing the sane basic data. 



II-5 



2, ) The new data does not appear to be adequate. The process 

of determining which students have actually left the school 
system following the imoleraentation of the Phase I Plan has 
been incomplete and uneven. As a result, the computerized 
data still seems to reflect a larger student enrollment than 
is believed to exist. Staff of the Educational Planning 
Center and the Data Processing Center with the cooperation of 
the Attendance Department, are striving to obtain yet another 
updated enrollment listing from individual schools. Mean- 
while, the new data is not siifficiently useful for planning 
or for the refinement of existing plains, 

U. Facility Study 

The second step in the process of developing a Desegregation Plan 
was the determination of facility needs and facility utilization. In 
this regard, the staff of the Boston School Committee focused on three 
matters: existing school facilities, proposed new schools a.id possible 
conversions of non-school facilities for school purposes. Crucial to 
the process was the assignment of a most competent f\ill-time staff 
member of the Public Facilities Department of the City of Boston to the 
Educational Planning Center. This assignment was made in accordance 
with the Court Order of October 31, 197i^ and has served to naJce it pos- 
sible for the staff of the Boston School Committee and the Mayor's 
Office to communicate freely on a matter so vitally affecting the resi- 
dents of the City of Boston. 

The facility study of necessity has not been as detailed as vrould 
be preferred but rather has been an attempt to utilize data in a most 
reasonable manner. In the body of this document the facility issue 
will be treated in greater specificity. There follows a brief indication 
of the direction of the three-part study. 
a. "iixisting school Facilities 

The staff atle-nj.;ted to update information re^ardinj^ the caj-.acities 



II-6 



of existing school facilities, to list building priorities relative to 
the age and condition of present structures and plans for replacements, 
and to consider i^hat schools might have their grade-level designation 
altered. In the tine available it was not possible to visit school 
facilities or to coirmunicate with many school officials. Instead, ref- 
erence was made to the several studies of Boston's school facilities in 
recent years. Also, specific attention was given to the matter of des- 
cribing a school's capacity by program: kindergarten space, regular 
program space and special program space. It is the expectation of the 
staff of the School Committee that the development of prograaraatic 
capacities is necessary to avoid the overcrowding of the Phase I Plan. 

b. Proposed Nex* Schools 

The staff endeavored to determine x-rhat new schools woiuld be neces- 
sary and realistically available for the academic year 1975-1976. As 
noted in the two Progress Reports subraitted to the Court, the School 
Committee of the City of Boston takes the position that: 

the completion by September 1975 of the Jackson/-Iann Elementary 
School in Brighton and the Condon Elementary School in South 
Boston is im portant to the development of a Desegregation Plan, 

the completion for the academic year 1975-1976 of Southwest I 
High School in 'West Roxbury is essential to the development of 
any Desegregation Plan and, 

the completion by September 1976 of the Hadison Park High School 
in Lower Roxbury, the Hattapan Elementary School, tie Quincy 
Elementary School in South Cove, the Blackstone Square Elementary 
School in the South End and the Barnes Middle .'School in East Boston 
is necessary for the success of a long-range Desegregation Plan, 

c. Possible Conversions of Non-School Facilities 

The stai'i of the School Committee has long felt that the prime 
weakness in the State Plan or Phase I Plan wa^. th-s ■ otential for over- 
crowding; at the hlph. school level. The State Plan mandated that all 



II-7 



high schools be four-year schools. However, the addition of the ninth 
grade to the high school structure uas not accompanied hy the addition 
of sufficient classroom spaces. 

The staff of the School Coiiutiittee concluded in its study that not 
only w-s it advisable to "retire" the aging Hart and Dean Schools as 
high school annexes, but, also to ret\irn the Rogers .School, presently 
a high school annex, to intermsdiate school usage in the Hyde Park sec- 
tion of the city. Furthermore, the staff x-ias aware that the annex for 
■'lighten High School, located at 100 Arlington Street in Boston, was 
not available after this academic year. Therefore, the staff has recom- 
nended that Southwest I High School is required for the use of 1200 
students and that non-school facilities to acconmodate 26^0 high school 
students are essential to any Desegregation Plan, 

Thus, the plan described in this document is based on the absolute 
need for such non-school facilities as: 

Bayside Hall Property near Columbia Point 

3a-.ryer Building in Boston (or alternative downtown site) 

Huntington Preparatory School in Boston (or alternative dovmtown 
site) 

Cote Ford Building in Mattapan 

As noted in Pro^jress Report "2^' if the City of Boston is to have 
any success in eliminating or -nininizing the enormous difficulties and 
tensions at the secondary school level, the above four non-school facili- 
ties and iouth'-.'est I High School are absolutely essential, F\irther there 
have been recent efforts by the Public Facilities Department of the 
City of Boston and by the Secretary of Educational ilf fairs for the Conmon- 
vrealth of Massachusetts to obtain additional space for cnergency reasons 
at the 100 Arlington Street building utilized by the Univ;^rsity of Mass- 
achuset'-s and the Conaonw;alth ilmiory near Boston University. Such space 



II-8 



can be utilized by the school system in 1975-1976 for alternative secondary 
school programs and/or "third site" prograias as described later in this 
document, 

5. Specialized Educational Programs 

Equal in importance to student data preparation and the facility 
study was the effort on the part of the staff to identify supplementary 
and substantially separate educational spaces to be reserved in school 
facilities throughout the city. Such spaces have been designated to 
accoiamodate those students who participate either on a fiill or part-tine 
basis in particular educational programs. 

The programs of concern were: Xindergarten, Special Needs, Bilingual 
Education, Advanced VJork, and Vocational Education. The staff, in coop- 
eration with representatives of the appropriate departments in the school 
system and in consultation with appropriate administrators in the Kassa- 
achusetts Department of Education, addressed the problems pec^aliar to 
each program. The main thrust of planning, however, was to coordinate the 
assignments of students to special programs with the assignments of students 
to regular programs. 

More detailed descriptions of programs and assignments will be given 
in later sections of this document. 

6, Metropolitan Concerns 

Ancillarj'- to the planning effort to comply with the Court Order con- 
cerning a Student J^esegregation Plan was the staff endeavor to fonvard 
recommendations concerning urban-suburban cooperation. Staff members 
embarked on a two-pronged effort designed to draw conclusions regarding 
metropolitan programs aimed at eliminating or reducing racial isolation: 
the acquisition of statistical data aiid program information and the analysis 
of such materials. 



II -9 
Discussions or neetinf^s v;ere held v;ith: 

Michael r>iikal<is, Govenor of the Co-m^onvrealth of Massachusetts 
Thomas Atkins, President I»Ai\C? 

Me<lill Bair, rkecutive Director Educational Collaborative, Inc. 

Dr. Joseph Cronin, outgoing Secretary of Education of the Corru-nonv/ealth 
of j-Iassachusetts 

Eep. Michael Daly, Massachusetts House Chaiman on Education 

Cecelia Di Bella, State Metropolitan Council for Educational 
Opportunity, Inc. Coordinator 

Dr. Marcia Feld, Executive Director, Metropolitan Planning Project 

Dr. Charles Glenn, Bureau of Equal Education Opportunities, 
Massachusetts Department of Education 

Dr. Peter Horoschalc, Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 
of Schools, V/illian J. Leary 

Steve Shav;, Assistant Director, Metropolitan Council for Educational 
Opportunity, Inc. 

Dr. Robert J. Sperber, Superintendent of Schools, Brookline 

Rev. Eugene Sullivan, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Arch- 
diocese of Boston 

Also, appropriate inforaation was obtained from the Council of 

Great City Schools and the school departments of Indianapolis, Denver 

and Minneapolis as well as from a number of Metropolitan Boston 



The conclusions dra'.vn and recorrxiendations made concerning 
metropolitan cooperation point to the continuing need for the Court, 
the Massachusetts Boaxd of Education cind local comaiuiitias to exa- 
mine the ultitnate neaning of Justice and equality. If racial inte- 
gration is to be meaningful - if it is to have any glin'jner of hope 
for success - then v/e must look beyond city boundaries. Leadez^s r.ust 
acknowledge that racial integration is the obligation of all strata of 



11-10 



society; it must not be limitr^d to some Americans due to the quirks 
of geogravihy, tradition or economic factors. Rather, racial integra- 
tion must be extended to al"! segments of society. The citizens of 
Massachusetts have an opDortu.iity once afi^ain to '^^^'^ 'the way and set 
a modal of integration for other Americans to emulate. So too, the 
Court has an op.uortunity to urge - in strong, emphatic and unmistakable 
language - the obligations that our suburban neighbors have concerning ■ 
racial - and class - integration. 



3I--li- 



B. Districting Effort 

The initial effort of the staff to develop a Student Desegregation 
Plan had as its goal a fairly conventional districting approach com- 
bined with a magnet program caaponent designed to enrich the plan. 

At first, the staff divided the city into zones which vere poten- 
tially racially integrated sub-divisions containing sufficient facilities 
to accommodate' student enrollaents. The purposes of the zones v/ere to 
establish new ties bet'.'feen racially different neighborhoods, to 
build on the relationships over a long period of shared educational 
experiences, to increase the potential for coordination of the programs 
between school levels ;d.thin each zone, to reduce the number of children 
requiring transportation, and to lessen the distances over v;hich 
children would be bused. 

The zoning effort did not, tmfortunately, seen to reduce trans- 
portation problems, particularly at the eler.entary level. However, 
the educational and social features of the zoning approach seemed 
validc 

Folloving the conventional districting approach the zones were 

then examined for their districting' potential. A nu-Tiber of plans 

\reTe partially developed. In each plan, the staff sought to desegregate 

all school btiildings designated for utilization. A number of conclusions 

were dravn; 

- Non-contiguous enrolLient areas could not be avoided 
in certain situations at each grade level. 



11-12 



- A Tew enrolibnant areas would hairs diameters in excess 
of four Eiiles. 

- A conssrvatlve estimate of transportation needs would 
be that 35jCC0 students would requij-e busing. 

- The nunber of students requiring reassignsient in 
September 1575 would be predictably large in any 
plan which seeks to correct some of the educational 
weaknesses of the Phase I Plan, 

Indeed, the staff of the School Canmittee strongly concluded that 
a desegregation plan based chiefly on a con7entior.al districting 
approach would neet with massive citizen resistance on a scale in 
excess of that experienced in recent months. Since the staff saw 
no useful purpose was senred in pursuing a districting plan which W'as 
so unpromising and which, indeed, was likely quickly to.' re-segregate 
the school system even in a period of national economic difficulty, 
it therefore - xd.th the support of the SupeiT_ntendent and School 
Coicaittee - directed its energies to a Program Preference Plan 
ijhich night offer the possibility of encouraging more positive 
citizen participation. 
C. Program } reference Plan 

The alternative to a conventional districting plan which night 
have some magnet e.'ucational programs seened to be-in the view of the 
staff and Boston School Committee - the reverse: a system concerned 
with educational programs in the context of some necessary zoning or 
districting. Thus, the staff devised a dessgrajratlon approach, called 
a Program r reference Plan, which sought to 

- emphasise educational values, 

- lend itself - within carefully regulated limits - to 
som.e parental and student choice of program . 



11-13 



- desegregate all schools which are to be utilized 
at all grade levels and in all parts of the city, 

- guarantee racial ratios appropriate to the Court 
Order and 

- address the issue of equity. 



The staff noted that such an approach did NOT miniBiize compulsory 
busing, student reassignments or the obligations of a court-ordered 
Student Desegrej/ation Plan as understood by the staff. 

The Program Preference Plan was not offered as a device for avoid- 
ing the desegregation of Boston's schools nor was it intended to lessen 
the psychological impact of compulsory desegregation. Rather, it was an 
attempt on the part of the staff to offer some hope to parents and students 
that the public schools of Boston CAIJ be viable educational environments 
in the years ahead. The Program Preference Plan is perceived by the staff 
as a reasonable route to compulsory integration. 

The majority of the Boston School Committee voted against the Decem- 
ber 16, 19lhf desegregation document NOT because it was educationally 
deficient but because it mandated compulsory busing. On Janusiry 7, 197$, 
therefore, the Boston School Committee directed the staff to amend the 
document of December I6, 197UjSO as to eliminate the compulsory busing 
features. Implicit in the directive of the School Committee, however, 
was supj.ort of educit-ional innovation as a tool of racial desegregation. 

The plan t-ihich is outlined in the next section and detailed in the 
later portions of this document seeks to conplv with the Order of the 
Court, the directive of the Boston School Committee and the spirit of 
viable educational alternatives. 



SECTION III ALT.^IIATIVE STUDEITT DESEGREGATION PLAN: OVERVIEW 



in-i 



li I , Alternative Student De3egregation Plan; Overview 

Alienation from schools as institutions is not a phenonenon that 
is limited to Boston as it has straggled to work out the desegregation 
of its public schools in the current school year. Public confidence 
in educational institutions is seriously eroded. Perhaps this fact of 
alienation has had a dramatic effect on the need to re- think programs 
throughout the country and has encoiiraged the growth of alternative 
structures within systems. Behi^id all of the options that are being 
explored in places like Minneapolis is the underlying philosophy that 
there are benefits to be gained f rom pluralisri. Given the rich resources 
of an urban community with many distinctive ethnic groups, the need to 
respond to the interests of children from many cultural backgrounds 
is imperative. The order to desegre,<;ate vrods the schools to redefine 
the purpose and function of educating children in a changed society. 
How do we clarify our goals? 

"The racial composition of the student body in every school should 
reflect the ratios of white and black students enrolled at that grade 
level of schools, elementary, intermediate, and secondary tbjroughout 
the system, " Starting with this reality, hov; do we persuade parents 
and students to join with school staffs to develop programs that are 
productive .and satisfying for the students involved? U'e feel strongly 
that we must give choice of program its place in the desegregation 
picture. 

Before we discuss the nature of the options, it is important to 
present certain data basic to our decision to present an alt.^rn?.tive to 
the coTi^'ontional districtin;; approach o" Phase I, 



ni-2 



The obvious difficulties of a conventional districting plan in 
Boston are comi. ounded when one studies the statistical data available. 
For exa-aple, the geocode data for the acadeaic year 1973-197U projected 
enrollment percentages are as follows: 













other 








Black 




Vfhite 




Minority 




Total 




Niimber 


% 


Number 


% 


IJumber 


% 


Nuraber 


Elementary (l) 


13U73 


35.6 


19650 


51.8 


U785 


12.6 


37913 


Middle (2) 


6306 


36.6 


3961 


52.1 


19U6 


11.3 


17213 



High School (3) 



6631 



35.9 



10325 



$^,^ 



1522 



8.2 



18U73 



(1) does not include students in examination schools. Coop courses, 
subsystem, Boston High 

(2) does not ir elude students in examination schools, subsystem 

(3) does not include students in subsystem, kindergarten 

The recent racial census completed by the j3epartment of Statistics 
of the Boston i-ublic Schools indicates the racial enrollments of students 
who have actually attended Boston schools during the current school year. 



American Indian 

Black 

Oriental 

Spanish surname 
nonwhite 

Spanish surname 
white 

Other white 

Total number of 
students in grades 1 



96 

29,120 
1,877 

1,739 

U,UoU 
33,177 
75,U13 



- 12 



III-3 



There is an exodus of white students from the school system. 
It is the contentio:i of the staff of the School Comittee that a con- 
ventional districting approach to a Phase II Plan will increase the 
flight of white students. An alternative approach may lessen the nura- 
bers of students leaving the systen. 

For sorae time Boston has been developing new prOi:rams and learning 
styles for its schools, old and new, Sone of these options have been 
limited to a fev; areas of the city. Some are well-known and favorably 
viewed by the public. Others await further development by staffs or 
will evolve fron parent and student interests. It is the intention of 
this plan to expand the options by offering them through out the city. 

Our plsm begins with a nevr look at the areas of the city and a 
proposal to divide the-e areas into zones in which the racial composi- 
tion will allow the e-iroHment of students in conformity v;ith the court 
desegregation order. Each zone will have elementary schools, middle 
schools, and local high schools. In each zone, schools will be desig- 
nated by the nature of the prO;^ram offered. The schools will be diverse 
in emphasis - for exa.iple, traditional, open space, cluster and contem- 
porary ungraded. Each type of proirram has been detailed in the educa- 
tional program section IV of this plan to inform parents and students 
of the type of teaching involved and the philosophy of the program 
approach. 

The specific zones into which the city is divided are described in 
section V. Included in that section is informs'' ion on the reocoies 
included in the nev? zones, the racial composition of the student popula- 
tioh in each zone, and an accompanying map. The descri; tive material 
will list: 



iii-U 



1. The schools to be utilized (and their progranunatic capacities) 

2. The changed utilization of certain schools, 

3. The presently un-designated schools. 
U. Potential resource center sites 

It is essential to call particular attention to the modifications 
made in the sections above from those listed in the December 16, 197U> 
submission. In addition, appropriate infonnation on transportation, 
and safety measures are outlined. 

The final topic considered in section V concerns specialized pro- 
gram assignments; advanced work, kindergartens, special needs, and bi- 
lingual classes, VJith regard to kindergartens, the geocodes assigned 
to each school are in some cases different from those assigned in the 
December plan, Safeguairds for children are discussed. Substantial 
changes have been outlined for the bilingual classes, and some alter- 
ations of the December plan for advanced i-fork classes should be noted. 

In addition to zonal options, parents and students will be invited 
to consider a number of city-wide options at all levels; elementarj-, 
middle, and high school. One option for example, addresses a recogni- 
tion of the growing multiAingual, multi/cultural interests of the city 
population by proposing a central school at the elenientary and middle 
school levels - serving those who wo'ild like to see greater concentra- 
tion on multi-lingual skills beginning in the early grades. Another 
option continues the experimental approach of the derelonmental class- 
room. At the hl^n school level, the choices become more selective as 
students begin to specialize or to seek varying life styles. 

Section '.'I of the ,\lternative Student Dese;^re~ation Plaii dascribas 



Ill -5 



how parents, students, and professionals will be iaformed of the pro- 
gra-n options available to them. This section will indicate the manner 
in which the school department will gather the information from its 
clientele to make assignments to the schools. 

Section VII develops an implementation schedule and process which 
is tailored to the plan presented in this document. 

Section VTII is a atscriT-tion of metropolitan concerns and some 
specific recommendations on ways in which the suburbs could assist the 
Boston desegregation efforts. 

Section IX outlines the kinds of services that night be performed 
by the establishment of a Positive Action Office in assisting the 
desegregation order to be implemented and in providing information to 
parents in the zones. 

Section X deals with future concerns, such as the re-verification 
of student enrollment data, program development, funding, (Chapter 636, 
E3M), changed use of facilities, new construction, and long range 
plans related to construction. 

Section XI is entitled equalization of faculty experience in the 
schools and proposes a plan that could lead to a gradual resolution 
of any experience imbalance in the schools. 



SECTION IV ALTEBMTIVE STUDENT DESEGEEGATION PLAN: PROGRAM 



IV-1 



. ALT3RJTATIVB STUDENT DrlSEGREGATION PLAJT; EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

Of necessity a progxaa design for a city educational system sast 
address itseljf to large and diverse components vrhich serve groups of 
different ages, needs and goals. Innovations in education have affected 
elementary schools in \7ays that vary fron the changes that have occurred 
in high schools, 

!I!he task that faced the v/riters of the educational prograa presented 
in this section vras to describe prograna that encouraged choice, but to 
describe tlieni so that a sense of the continuity of educational philosophies 
fimdamental to each progran choice vras evident, "e feel that a parent or 
student who selects an option at the elenentary level v/ill find a coniparable 
education a l en'/ironment in the riiddle and high school levels. Indeed, 
should a parent desire a change fron one type of educational setting to 
another because as a parent he feels that his child's developing needs 
call for a ne'.r orientation, that parent vdll find accesu.to other progra:n 
options open. 

Each section, therefore, is treated as a separate unit v/ith its ov/n 
rationale and set of program options, but each section relates to what 
follows in its emphasis on developing s^udents to the fullest of tiieir 
potential. Regard for specieil students is reflected in the segment that 
treats of particular programs for the bilingual., children v/ith special 
needs, the gifted in advanced v.ork classes, and early childhood. 

Each program onphasises mastery of basic skills, sensitivity to. 
student interests and problems, the value of supportive and supplementary 
services, the \7ldening of learning horizons, end a respect for the cultural 



IV-2 

bacJcgrounds of the diverse popiolation served. The thematic approach 
runs throUt3a all levels. 

Each prograia, thus, attempts to recognize the unique needs of 
children at different stages of gro'ivth and developmenti provide for 
these needs, and yet clearly relate to other programs as part of the 
larger netv/ork of the educational design for the total city. 

The reader's attention shotild be called to the fact that most of the 
material included in this section of the doctunent was initially prepared 
for the December 16, 1974, plan. However, this section does contain 
additional information relative to resource centers and citywide magnet 
school programs. 



IV-3 

THE ELH-ia^!TARY SCHOOL 
RATIOriALS 

The Boston Public Schools, in a concerted effort to upgrade educational 
opportunities for all Boston children, presents an opportunity for parents 
to become actively involved in the selection of educational programs for 
their children. Though all programs will differ in various ways, they 
will have certain common features: strong emphasis on basic skills and 
a multi-cultural approach. 

PHILOSOPHY 

We believe that the skills of literacy — reading and writing — develop 
more surely if they are not treated as academic exercises in a vacuum but 
are taught in rich environments which stimulate children's imagination and 
thought and foster their desire to communicate. 

We believe that if children are going to live fully in the modern 
world, the schools must embrace objectives that go far beyond literacy 
training, the dissemination of information, and the acquisition of concepts. 
The accumulating studies in early childhood education in this country and 
overseas suggest that these larger aims must be taken seriously from the 
very outset of formal schooling, smd that the environment which provides 
for them provides also a sure foundation for academic learning. 

THE ELEMENTARY CHILD 

For most children, the first formal introduction to academic learning 
is the elementary school experience. The age of the children ranges from 
5 - 12. 



IV-4 



Each of the children we are considering is a unique and variable person. 
He is not only unliie any other child, he is unlike the child he was a year 
or even a month ago. 

In offering the Alternative Student Desegregation Plan, we have con- 
sidered the physical and psychological characteristics of the children who 
will be attending the city's schools. 

proc-ra:: goals 

. \7hiie thore are sOHie differences in the various program optioios, 
the overall ob^iectires are similar. 

The Bo3toa School System has developed the follo'ffing goals to guide 
school staffs ia planning programs. All Boston public school children 
Vfill have the opportunity to: 

- learn and use the skills of coanunicating and conputicig 

- learn and use the key ideas of the social sciences, math, ccience, 
art, and nuoic; to develop an understanding of their interrelated- 
nes3 

- show grovrth in using higher levels of thinking, both critical and 
creative 

- learn and use principles basic to healthful living; develop 
physical and motor skills 

- explore values and their role as a basis for decision-making and 
action 

- acquire an enthusiasa for learning . 

- develop good feelings about self and about self in relation to 
others 



■IT-5 



We view a nulti-cultural component in each elementary school curricu- 
lum as a key feature. It is our hope that such a component will develop 
an awareness and pride in each child's heritage. Students will be exposed 
to basic origins of ethnic groups, their course of history, language develop- 
ment, song, Husic, dress and achievements. Children may learn to enjoy and 
appreciate their specific ethnic heritages, and to respect the identities 
of others. 



17-6 

TRADITIOrTJJ, PROC-RAZJ: ZOHAL OPTIO?? 

The traditional eleaentary school as we know it evolved froai the 
one-room schoolhoxise. The system of grades orig in ated in Qulncj, l^assa- 
chusetts in 1848, It vras an attempt to provide, as effeciently as possible, 
a standard . education for all. 

The traditional school^ then, is perhaps the most familiar type of 
public education offered over the past century in our country. 

This traditional type of elementary education has several distinguish- 
■ing characteristics, anong which are: 

- Children are divided and classified according to age and attain- 
ment, with a teacher having a single grade within a self-contained 
classroom, 

- The course of study is carefully planned in detail for each grade. 
Graded series of textbooks are used. Texts designed for a partic- 
ular grade are given in that grade. 

- Children who do not acquire prescribed level of skill mastery may 
be retained for another year, 

- Grade levels signify definite levels of achievement. 

The traditional school is teacher centered. Because the pupils 
spend most of the school day with one teacher, there is great potential 
for a surrogate family relationship. The traditional classroom is highly 
structured by one teacher, who selects, organizes- and disseminates the 
ciurriculuni, 

Por schools using this plan today, the basis for grouping pupils is 
quite different from the earlier conception of graded subject matter 
achievement approach amd. teaching methods have also changed. No longer 



IT-T 

does the traditional classrooa denj the individualizing of learning. I^'hen 
it becones necessary for the teacher to initiate grouping v/ithin his claos- 
rooa, there are obvious steps he nay follow. Grouping nay be based on the 
knowledge of each child's abilities and his achievement level, in the vari- 
ous subject natter axeas of the curriculum. 

The modem approach to grouping is that it should be as flexible as 
possible. Children should have an opportunity to work in many different 
groups throughout the school day, A child may work in one reading group 
and then shift to work with a different group in social studies, and still 
a different group in science, ^e elementary teacher may employ several 
different types of grouping in his classroom plans. 

The achievement level of the child might be ascertained by achieve— 
rCht tests, standardized teists, learning aptitude tests, informal tests, 
plus the teacher's observation. These tests would guide the teacher in 
selecting the various achievenent groups. After the children are grouped, 
the teacher must maintain group flexibility because some .children may 
function better in a different group. Some children may be adjusted to 
easier or moi^ difficult groups to approximate more nearly their individual 
functioning levels,- 

This recommended grouping procediure is made on the basis of achieve- 
ment rather than on the basis of ability. 

It may be discovered while working with the children throughout the 
day that several children from various groups are having difficulty in 
vmderstanding a specific problea. Por example, certain children from 
several reading groups nay be called together to form, a "special need 
group" for learning diphthongs in phonetic analysis. 



iv-e 

!rhe special need group will be disbanded when the children learn 
the specific technique or solve the problea they have in cotrmon. This 
type of grouping could involve children from each achievenent group and 
several special need groups could be organized in the classrooni at the 
sane tine. 

In team grouping, tv70 children may work together as a teaa concerning 
a particular problen which is conmon to both. Peer tutoring may also be 
utilized within the saae classrooni, 

Tb^re are many tines when the entire class will work together as 
a single \mit. Learning activities that are cooaon for all pupils in the 
classroom could be introduced to the entire class at one time. Por example, 
activities such as listening lessons, choral reading, dramatizations, re- 
porting, class and panel discxisaion are appro? Hate for the full class 
group. 

There is^then, virtxially no limit to the teaching methods and learning 
devices the creative and innovative teacher may employ within the traditional 
classroom setting. 



IV-9 



CONTgCPORAITf UrrGRj^.DDD PROGR.m: ZOITAL OFriOIf 

The basic philosophy of the Contemporary Ungraded Progran is that 
the child's progress in the basic skills will be regulated not by age or 
the calendar, but according to his need and ability. It is £in attempt 
to individualize instruction so that the right lesson reaches the right 
child at the right tine using the right approach. Continuous progress is 
made as the pupils move forward in their learning at whatever pace is 
possible and desirable, vrithout being blocked by grade barriers. Thus 
children of differing needs and learning rates will be given instruction 
at the most appropriate level. 

The school \7ill not be divided into grades 1-5. All pupils vn.ll 
be grouped on a non-graded basis into two units, Primary (Grades 1,2,3) 
and Elementary (Grades 4,5) » Sach unit will contain a number of levels to 
which pupils will be assigned according to achievement and needs. Regard- 
less of the time of year, each child moves to a new level v/hen he shows 
that he has successfully mastered the objectives and skills of that level. 
This "leveling" process will be restricted to the core subject areas of 
reading and mathematics. Pupils will return to thoir graded home rooms 
for other curriculum areas such as science, social studies, music, art, 
etc. 

The Contemporary Ungraded Program nay be more clearly understood by 
a brief outline of a typical program within a school which has adopted 
the philosophy of non-gradedness. 

The K-5 Contemporary Ungraded school may be organized into a rrimary 
and Elementary unit. There may be any .number of levels in each unit, 
depending upon pupil enrollment and staff size. 



IV-10 

A typical Contemporary Ungraded school will have several levels of 
instructioa for reading and matheniatics. Each child v/ill be assigned to 
a level, not a grade, according to demonstrated achievement. Each level 
win be composed of pupils of similar achieveaent, 

Reading instruction in this program -irill be allocated a Izxge block 
of tine . This reading block may be . xised in- the following manner.; 

The teacher, althoiogh working with a homogeneous achievement group, 
will further sub-divide the group to better meet the needs of the individ- 
ual pupil. Some of the reading time will be spent in whole group instruc- 
tion, such as the teaching of consonant blends and word attack skills* 

Following this segment of the reading period, one sub-group may be- 
gin Independent teacher-guided activities such as the SRA. reading labora- 
tory, i. second sub-group may work on reading games. The teacher is now 
available to work v/ith the sub-group more in need of basic skill mastery. 
At this period in the school year, this sub-group may benefit more from 
teacher-directed instruction than from engaging in independent activities. 

Kathematics is likely to follow the reading/language arts instruction 
in the Contemporary Ungraded school. As in reading, the teacher will work 
with an overall mathematics level which has demonstrated comparable achieve- 
ment. Again, however, in keeping with the philosophy of differing needs 
and differing learning rates, the teacher further sub-divides the mathe- 
natics level v/ith which she is vrorking. 

The mathematics period may begin with whole group instruction in the 
teaching of a fundamental concept such as the re-grouping property of addi- 
tion. As in rending, the group nay then sub-divide. 

One sub-group nay use cuisenaire rods to solve teacher prepr^rcd problems- 



I 



IV-11 

designed to reinforce the re-groupin^ concept, A second sub-group 
may view a filn strip which presents this concept in another nanner, -^s 
in reading, the teacher will work v/ith the sub-group having the most dif- 
ficulty understanding and applying the concept which had been taught on 
a whole class basis. All independent activities are teacher selected, 
guided, directed and evaluated. 

"Leveling" in the Contemporary Ungraded program will be limited to 
the core areas of reading and mathematics. In reading the progran will have 
the specific goal of ensuring that each child acqiiires the basic language 
tools of read ing , speaking, listening and writing. In mathematics the 
Contemporary Ungraded progran will have the specific goals of attempting 
to ensure that all pupils acquire basic mathematic sldlls of covmting, 
understanding what numbers mean, computation, measurer.ent, problem solving 
and the ability to apply these mathematics skills to real life situations. 

Pupils will return to their graded home room for other cvurriciilum 
areas (science, social studies, music, art, etc.). 

Personalized prescribed education Such as this attempts to develop 
independent thinkers, A multi-media, multi-text approach is utilized. The 
teacher serves in a supportive as well as instructional role; guiding the 
children ejxd. provisioning and organizing the environment. The teacher in 
this program supplies the amount of structiore needed to guide the pupils, 
their instruction and their activities in order to make the ungraded seg- 
ment of the school day productive for each child. Concomitantly, the 
teacher in this program is also capable of allowing flexibility in the 
graded portion of the day. The subjects of social studies, science, music, 
art, etc. will be taught in an atmosphere which recognizes that learning 



iVr12 
is more thaa the conauaption of information and facts. Eie curriculum is 
teacher-centered, teacher- planned and aaterials-oriented, 

Contenporary Ungraded schools may have staffing requirements some-rfhat 
unlike those in traditional programs. There is a strong need for a plan- 
ning component, necessitating frequent staff meetings. Because of the 
ungraded unit, there is an increased interdependence aaong the teaching 
staff. The prograa is enhanced by the utilization of additional supportive 
staff, however, the program is operational without such increased staffing, 

Th» Contemporary Ungraded program has advantages for the child who 
may be constricted by the highly structured traditional classroom and yet 
may be less likely to reach his potential in an Open-Space or Modified Open 
Classroom school. 

Some of the clesir advantages, of this progreia are: 

the provision for continuous progress, 
not regulated by the age of the child 
or the time of the school year 

children have an opportunity to function 
in both a graded and non-graded setting 

slower progress is accepted and provided 
for as pupils are given the opportunity 
to progress at their o'.7n rate 

the increased staff planning and the 
interdependence of teachers permit 
the fuller utilization and interaction 
of individual teacher strengths 

The Contemporary Ungraded program then, is primarily an educational 

plan which recognizes individual differences and student capabilities; 

provides the opportunity for the pupil to make continuous progress at his 

ov/n speed, and makes suitable provision for him in the teaching, the group 

airangenents, the curriculum and the materials. It discards grade labels. 



IV-i3 



replaces gr?ide standards and vinifora acadenic requirements with sequential 
subject-Eiatter levels, and provides a reporting system consistent with 
its philosophy. 



IV-14 



t)Pai S?ACg PROC-?.^.!; ZOITAL 0?TIOIT 

Generally, the term "Open, Space" has been used to describe. schools 
which fxonction without interior psirtitions between areas normally defined 
as classrooQS. A laxge open space, often defined as a learning center, is 
flexibly divided into functional activity centers to provide a suitable 
learning environaent for the instructional program. 

The Open Space Progi'am supports a philosophy which holds that education 
should encourage a diversity of interaction among students and teachers. 
This progran recognizes not only the uniqueness of each child, but the need 
for each child to proceed at a pace consoneint with his own ability and 
learning style. It contributes to the individualization of instruction 
by widening the field of educational experience to which the child is exposed 
in terns of the nuaber and kinds of contacts he aakes, it extends the module 
for learning from the solitary classrooa to a much nore expansive area. 

Pupils are grouped into large units of approximately 120-150 under the 
direction of a teaa of 4 - 6 teachers. In spite of the fact that there nay 
be such a large group of pupils In this area, the child will not feel alien- 
ated. He will spend much of the school day in a one- teacher, snail group 
setting, V/hile using soae pupil choice options, the Open Space Prograu 
uses prescribed naterials £md often uses ability level groups in basic skills. 
There is also the possibility for multi-grade combinations. Afternoon interest 
centers are an enrichment component of the Open" Space Program, The pupil 
has an opportunity to explore and receive instruction in areas of particular 
interest to him. 



The Open Space Program cay differ from other educational programs in 
areaa such as teacher role, instructional style and physical plant. 



i 



IV-15 



Interaction and cooperation anong teachers brings about a constant 
revision and refinement of ideas. There is a natural enTironiaent for 
teacher exchange of information concerning learning and teaching styles 
and student behavior. Individual teacher strengths may be capitalized 
upon. The Open Space school permits the child to adjust to several 
teachers rather than gr07/ing dependent upon one. Small group self -directed 
activity is encouraged thus freeing the teacher to work VTith smaller sized 
groups, Some pupils may be working on "contracts", that is an agreement 
between pupil and teacher to complete a specified assignment within a 
specific time — a day, a week, etc. Pupils, at times, are free to work on 
their own academic interests, but their contract must be fulfilled. Com- 
munication between teacher and teacher, teacher and student, and student 
and student is fostered. 

The Open Area School allows for a variety of flezible learning pat- • 
terns. Nongradedness, multi-aging, etc., are natural in this environment. 
The child has the opportunity to perform in a greater variety of social 
situations, enabling him to develop respect for the abilities, values, and 
attitudes of others. 

The Open Space School provides the child with a total library of re- 
soxirces v/ith an infinite variety of sight and sound stimulation. An areas 
of the Open Space School become learning areas because v^asted corridor 
space is eliminated or greatly reduced, Llore efficient use of equipment 
and machines is facilitated by increased electrical outlets, ample storage 
areas, etc. 

In summary, the Open Space School facilitates the task of providing 
organisational altoraatives. The staffing design of team teaching makes 



IV-16 



possible nore alternatives in teaching style and competence, more dimen- 
sions in grouping, and more professional know-bow in diagnosis and pre- 
scription. Team teaching, homogeneous grouping, heterogeneous grouping, 
cooperative planning, peer learning, large and small group instruction — all 
of these are possible either singularly or in combination at any time. 



i 



IV-17 



THE MODIFIED 0?Eir CI^J35?.Cai ?RCGR.'\:t: CITY-^nDS OPTION 

"rtlaat I hear, I forj;et. 
V.'hat I sea, I renenber. 
\ihsit 1 do, I understand." 

The environment we seek to create within the school is one vzhlch 
is truly responsive to the needs and interests of children; in which 
children's learning is deeply rooted in experience; where Icnowledge 
becomes important because it is relevant and put to use; and where 
children in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect can cariy on 
with each other and with adults the kind of open dialogue that is the 
essence of good education. In such aa environnent, most of the tra- 
ditional academic goals are, of course, still important, but children 
■vdll have the opportunity to pursue then in more flexible and self- 
directing ways so that their learnings beconie a part of their life- 
style outside the classroom as well as inside. 

These are sone specific educational ains or ciurricixlum objec- 
tives of the modified open classroon. In some honest fom they are 
relevant to the education of cliildren of all ages. 

- — Children will initiate activities, becoinci self- directing, and 

taico responsibility for their own learning. 
- — Children will be capable of intense involvenent and their 
curiosity vi 11 often lead to concern, and beyond concern to 
coDiaitment, 

Childron will contiaua to \-ronder and to imagine, and will 

bring their sense of h'jjior into the classroom. 

Children will be willing to face uncertainty and change, and 

to tnc'cle conplsxitics that they have not been taught how to 
man ago* 



IV-18 



— Children will challenge ideaa for the purpose of reaching 
deeper understanding, and will be open and honest with 
themselves, with adults, and with each other. 

•~- Children will respect themselves, others and the environ- 
ment, and vill leam responsibility as an integral part of 
freedom, 
Classroosis, truly responsive to the needs and interests of 
young children, will develop their unique "personalities," but they 
will also tend to have certain connon characteristics. Although it 
is difficult to know what a child is learning at any moment, one can 
desci*ibe sons of tlie characteristics of a classroom for young chil- 
dren in which good learning is likely to occur, 

— There is a rich environment of materials for children to 
explore, and there are abundant opportunities for learning 
through experience. 

—- Children's responses to the environment provide many of the- 
starting points for learning. Activities most often arise 
fl*oii the needs and interests of the group rather than from 
a prescribed curriculum, I/hen commercial materials and 
programs are used, they must be made available in ways that 
protect the children's responsibility for their o\m learning, 

— VJith guidance from the teacher, the children plan their own 
activities drawing from a range of relevant choices. 

— Each child is free to explore an interest deeply and is also 
free to disengage when an activity no longer seems appro- 
priate. 



IV-19 

-— Typically, there is a variety of activities going on sinul- 

temeoualy; each child working in ways best suited to his 

interests, talents and style, 
- — Tliere are few obvious barriers between subjects and much of 

the children's work is, in fact, interdisciplinary. 
—- The children talk with each other about their work and often 

work together. Their learning is frecjuently a cooperativo 

enterprise narked by dialogue. 

— All forms of ei^ressing representation - in the arts and in 
raoveaent as well as in language - are considered valid and 
important. 

— - Groupings are not based on fixed criteria, but are kept 

ricxLblo, shifting with' the changing needs and interests of 
the children. Groups may be conprised of a fairly wide age 
range and of heterogeneous achieveaeat levels, 

— The teacher serves in a supportive rather than a didactic role. 
Although the underlying philosophy of the modified open class- 

roora focuses on encouraging pupils to become independent, responsible, 
thinking individuals, the eleneatary school nust equip children with 
rundaient.ol skills for conpctcnce in reading, coin^-utation and coa- 
nunication. There will be times during the day which viill be highly 
strxicturcd by the teacher. Tho teacher will in fact 

— — organize a classroom suitable to herself and the pupils at 

the moment- 
—- control selection of materials and methods to meet the needs 
and interests of the pupils . 



IV-20 

establish group projects 

The ochool v/ill work to bxald a riexible schedule - 

tine blocks for pupil - interest - centered 
activities, individual and group activities 
planned hy or with the teacher, and free 
activities time in wiiich children laay 
select materials that appeal to then and 
v;ork on their acadecdc interests. 
Time blocks ma/ run Troni ten iiiinutes to several hours. At sone 
point in the total weekl/ schedule, pupils receive specific teacher 
guidance and instruction in reading, mathenatics, language arts, 
social studies, science, xausic and physical education. 

Each open classrocra varies i'n looks and operation because 
teachers are encouraged to operate individually. Generally each 
classroopi is self-contained, non-graded, heterogeneously grouped, 
both in age and achievenent levels, and naterials-oriented, Tne opea 
classrooa needs and lends itself freely to supportive roles. 

This program will be offered at the William Konroe Trotter School, the 
elementary component of "the Model Demonstration Subsystem. It will also be 
offered at the Bradford Annex and the Carter, which will be considered 
satellites of the Trotter, or mini-Trotters. They will all be citywide 
options. 



17-21 

?.iuLTI-LIIIGU.\L/'-nJLTI-CULTDTL\L PROGPA".!: CITY-V/ISS OrTIO?T 

The i.Iulti-Liagual/Mul-ti-Cultural School is based on the philosophy 
that it is desirable that children be exposed to languages and cultures 
other thaxi their OT/n, Second and third langviages and the conceptual 
framevjorks they embody are cost easily learned by young children. The 
program will afford a rich opportunity for taking advantage of each child's 
vmique resources in order to aake richer the life of the school. Some 
of the goals of such a program are: 

- acquisition of fluency in a language other than English 

- the development of a sense of identity, dignity and pride in one's 
heritage 

- an avirareness of the dignity and value of other cultures 

- acceptance of and respect for the customs and uniqueness of others 

- improvement of classroom skills related to social interaction and 
cognitive learning 

Tne program would include a blending of certain elements such as: 

- integrated general studies classes 

- .separated language study classes 

- combined ethnic studies classes 

- planned multi-cxiltural units 

Such a school will lend itself to a variety of scheduling modes, ^or 
example, children might spend the initial part of the school day in acacen:ic 
classes of language arts, math and science, the latter part of the day being 
devoted to language and ethnic group study. Throughout the v/eek, combined 
sessions may be scheduled during which one culture v/ould- serve cs host to 
others, i.e., a folk dancing demoastr.:tion by one cultural group for all 



IV-22 



other pupilu. 

Tne j.lulti-Lin^al/r.^ulti-Cultural program then, will include a coabin- 
ation of integrated general studies; in-^epth language exposure; ethnic 
studies and a sharing of cultures, ^ne program; will attempt to ta^ce aii 
honest and seaa'ching look at the probleas v/hich still remain in siapl/ 
learning to get along vTith one another. 

The MulTii-Lingual/Multi-Cultural program will be offered at the Bancroft 
in Septeniber, 1975- A new facility, the Blackstone, is scheduled to open in 
this zone in early 1976. The program will' then move to the Blackstone. The 
Nulti-Lingual/iMulti-Cultural school will be a citywide rather than zonal 
option. 



i 



IV-2p 

bilingum/bicuxtuhal prograi.i; city-mIPe option 

The Bilingual/Bi cultural program at the Rafael Hernandez School is 
based on the assumption that linguistic and cultural exchange can be the 
basis for integration. This bilingual/bicultural school would be an option 
for English- speal'Cing children v/ho want to learn Spanish and be exposed to 
Spanish culture and a place where Spanish- speaking children can acquire 
or improve their English -skills. The aim of the school vdll be to create 
a completely bilingual environment v/ithin each homeroom area by equally 
distributing English-speaking and Spanish-speaking children in each 
room and by having both groups participate jointly in instruction. 

Some of the goals of such a program are: 

- To provide a racially balanced school environment in which 
English-speaking and Spanish-speaking children can learn 
together, lae school population will include approximately 

50/0 Spanish-speaking children (of mixed Black and V.Tiite heritage) 
and approximately 50fj English-speaking children (Black and V,"nite). 
_ To expose children to the variety of cultureswhich are present 
in their community , 

- To foster understanding and appreciation of the different 
cultures represented v/ithin the school, 

- That each child, when he is competent in his native language, 
begin formal learning in both speaking and reading in the second 
language. This v/ill be facilitated by the informal interaction 
among English and Spanish-speaking students and the bilingual staff, 

- To use to the fullest potential the abilities of a completely 
bilingual staff (both native English-speaacing and native Spanish- 
speaking teachers and para- professionals) v/ho would work together 
t.n oTPAt.p a un-innp ,ind nrodut^tivG learninrr situation for all of 



IV-.24 



- To follow the Boston acaderric curriculum through a non-graded 
program in order to meet the individual learning needs of each 
child. 

To bring the parents of these children together to participate 
in the education of their children and to further understanding 
aj:nong the different cultural groups. 
The program v/ould include a blending of certain elements such as: 
integrated academic and :i.on-academic classes 

separate classes in English as a Second Language and Spanish as 
a Second Language 
combined cultural activities 
A bilingual-bi-cultural school will lend itself to a variety of 
scheduling modes. The mornings would be devoted to classes in English 
language arts, math and Spanish lajiguage arts with students grouped 
according to their language proficiency. Homerooms would reconvene after 
language instruction and a diversified program including art, music, science, 
physical education, etc. will be offered. 

It would be hoped that children who complete their elementary education 
in a bilingual/bicultura,l environment might be interested in broadening 
their knowledge of other languages and cultures by attending a multi-lingual/ 
multi-cultural middle school. 



IV-25 
The Lee Unified Arts T.Tagnet Prograa; City-Wide Option 

The Unified Arts prograua offered at the Joseph Lee School will 
provide an integrated pro-am in related arts, Pine arts, music, 
instnr::entation, drana and library services will all be components of 
the prosran, 

iuuch of the v/ork in art of a creative and constructive nature is 
very closely related to the project and activity v/ork from v/hich other 
disciplines draw learnings. Although components of a Unified Arts progrcua 
may be listed separately, efforts will be made to treat them in an inter- 
desciplinary fashion, that is to integrate the components so as to imke 
appsirent to students the relationship among them. 

For example, the total production of a dramatic performance requires 
a great variety of input. In addition to the actors, design and construc- 
tion of stage sets, art work and library reference nay all be needed. 

Facilities within the school have been erected which both aid and 
anhance the possibilities of this program. Separate art rooms have been 
equipped with special materials and necessary storage. Special space for 
instruction in music has been allotted. Such space has been constructed 
so as to be substantially resistant to the transmission of sound, 

A central library on the second level of the school is made as 
open and accessible as possible. The atmosphere here is v/axra, the 
librarian encouraging, and the library layout extremely simple. 

The facility constructed for performance is a large attractive 
Theater-Auditorium, It is extremely well equipped in terms of seating, 
stage area, lighting, etc. It has good convertibility for use either as 
a music concert hall, or a theater for dramatic productions. 

The elementary age child is afforded more opportunity for in-dcpth 
exposure to the arts than he ordinarily would have in the regular cciiool 
program. 



rv-26 



It is hoped that students who choose such a program have a sincere 
desire to explore more deeply related arts including music, drama, arts 
history and fine arts. 

In addition to facilities already described, the Lee School is 
equipped vrith a complete gyianasiuni and instructor, and a swimaing pool 
complete v/ith instructors, locker rooms and shov/ers. The school further 
offers an after school coionunity sponsored activities program. 



17-27 



The Hennlgan EiTmanitles T,!a^?iet Program; City-Wide Option 

On the elementary level the humanities magnet seeks to enrich the 
curriculum by offering a variety of disciplines which not only enhance 
one's understcmding of the larger cornmunity, but also of the v/orld 
around him. This program includes human relations, music appreciationi 
literatTjre, and art (painting, dravang, sculpture). It also includes 
liaison v.-ith the Children's iluseum, the Museum of Afro-iVmerican Arts, 
the Museum of Transportation, and the Kuseum of Pine Arts. 

The humanities approach is one of self-discovery, helping youngsters 
develop an understanding of themselves and respect for others. It 
attempts to help children relate to their world as v/ell as the larger 
community. By studying human relations, music appreciation, literature, 
and art, as well as by the use of special programs offered by the museums 
indicated, a student not only finds an outlet for youthful energies but 
begins to broaden his interests as well as expand his knowledge. Such 
a program encoiurages tlie growth of well-rounded individuals and contrib- 
utes to the development of self-confidence, poise and satisfactory 
interpersonal relationships . 



r7-28 

TrZ ::ZDDL3 SCHOOL I 

i 

s 

The rationale for the proposed middle school program is based on the 
nature of the middle school population and the educational needs of that j 
group as students EX)ve froa the ele.aentarj school with its relatively free 

atmosphere to the nore departnentalized environment of the high school. An } 

i 
effective middle school program, Grades 6 through 8, should address itself j 

to the needs of young people who are naturing at different rates, physically, j 
nentsilly, emotiona]J.y and socially. These preadolescents axe deeply concerned 
with personal relationships, the beginning of intellectual esid economic inde- 
pendence, and the adjustment socially and emotionally to the realities of 
life. As a group they are making a difficult transition from the emphasis 
on basic skills in the security of the elementary environment to the more i 
specialised program approach of the middle schools in science, the arts, 
physical growth and development, other laaguages, and the shops. It is too 
early to ezpect definitive selection of a career direction, a selection 
process that underlies the choice of a high school program, but there must 
be opportrunity for these students to gain vd.de information and appropriate 
experiences that vrill assist them in making a wise judgment relative to 
high school preference. 

THE P?JI\IKDLZSCr_TT 



Parents, educators, physicians and psychologists generally' are arrare of 
the fact that students in the age bracket 10 through 14 are passing tlirongh 
one of the most difficult and important periods in their lives. There tiro 
years of dramatic developmental change: skeletal ceasiu-ements, \7eirht, 



IV-29 

nuiSC'xLar strength, sei jolea, skills and interests — all of these are 
going throuf.h a period of transformation , There are vn.de differences 
aniong individaals, and 'n fact in no other period of school life are these 
differences .^ore draraticallj in evidence. "Early blooaers" contrast re- 
markably TTLth "late bloozners" in their physical appearance, in personality 
structures and behavior, in their attitudes toward themselves and others, 
and in nany other ways. In general, the.?'^ students in transition are exper- 
ienc.ing a general re-orientation to theii peer group and to adults. Their 
childish personality structures are giving; way to a nore cature personality 
structure, though on an uneven schedule. 

The pre-adolescent is characterized by a peculiarly strong ::x)od inten- 
sity. There is a great deal of anbivaleiue between the sophistication to 
which he aspires and the childishness which persists in him. The school 
must be In a position to allow and to provide for both, alternatively, with- 
out punishing students vridslj for occasional "regression" to childlike be- 
havior. 

BASIC VLDrL3 E3H00L PHILOSOPHY 

QiTssT FOR liJDivrpu.^ ir~~i-r7 

The philosophy of a niddle school mujt necessarily center upon the 
■ individual's quest for his individual identity within the school, every 
opportunity i:u3t exist for the student to grow and develop according to his 
unique abilities and cavabilities. rfot only the educational, but also the 
psychological and social needs of early auolescence nust be seen as a central 
concf.rri v/itri.Ln ihe niddle scbonl. 



a 



IV-30 

SSLP-SSTZLOK.ENT 

Another suprenely important philosophic consideration is that the 
school nust help the st'jdent to groTT in Independence, There must be nuo- 
erous opportunities for the student to inake genuine choices under the skill- : 
full guidance of an adult, to experiment, to explore, and otherwise to have 
sorae sense of control over his own fate. 

soci.^j:.iza?ioj 

Of particular iziportance, it v?ould seea, is that there be within the 
school setting nany opportunities for students to interact with other young 
people and with adults whose entire orientation is geared to their needs. 
The school progran should be, as much as possible, activity - oriented. 
The corriculun, itself, should be essentially ezploratorj' in nature, as 

opposed to the curriculuzi of the high school, where in-depth and concen- j 

I 

trated study in a lirited number of subjects is possible. The niddle school / 
should provide explora-^ry exposure to a great inany curriculum offerings, 

TH5 THII.3 IS EXPIOR-^nON 

It is within this framework of thought that the middle school program 
is envisioned. Stated in simple terns the r:dddle school prograj; proposes 
a design that emphasizes discovery and exploration of pupils' specialized 
interests, aptitudes, and abilities. 

The progran: airs -o give all students .rorriculun offerings that empha- 
size exploration as a continuous process. Central to the success of the 
approach is guidance by staff nenbers to the pupils in the selection of 
curriculuTi choices ar_-J in the planning of vcried experiences that encourage 
the develop-ent of in:;ividual study skills and the related individual re- 
sponsibility of the young students Involved. Vrnether the i,chool is organized i 



IV-31 
in clusters or in the nore traditional single teacher and specialist arran-e- 
ment, the main enphasis will be on the opportunities provided for extensive 
pupil experiences in the varied fields of knor/ledge customarily presented at 
the middle school level. 

Emphasis upon the student's quest for selfhood, upon self-developnent 
and social skills, upon pleasurable activities, and upon the exploration of 
numerous intellectual and vocational interests need not be at the expense 
of training in the basic acadeniic skills usually defined as reading, rcathe- 
Eatics, science, and social studies. On the contrary, enthusiastic involve- 
nent in the other half of the curriculun can only enrich and enhance the 
student's development of conventional academic tools and skills, 

THB EMPHASIS IS 'Tri.-ri-CTJLTU?-\L 

In all niddle schools, the curriculum will develop a mult i- cultural 
approach that reflects and enhances the racial/ethnic nix of students in the 
particular school so that students not only acquire an understanding and 
appreciation of each other's roots and cultures, but also Isam to work to- 
gether. Given the rich ethnic pattern of the city and the need to provide 
a netvrork of positive comirunication aiaong groups involved in the desegrega- 
tion process, the justification for a ciirriculun that respects the back- 
grounds of all students is self-evident. 

"The school environment of a child consists of many things, ranging 
from the desk he sits at to the child who sits next to him, and including 
the teacher who stands in front of his class." ( Equality of Sducationnl 
Opporti-inity , Janss S. Colemau^, et al. ISSG page 3?). Certainly, the student 
who is to live in a m-^lti-racial, r.'olti- ethnic society, whether it be the 
national one or the staller city coTrronitj', m-jst have tha opportunity to 



IV-32 

1 
move in a school enviroraent that addresses part of its efforts to the 

development of neanin^ful iater^roup understanding. I 

If the child who sits next to hijn is different either racially or J 
ethnically, he nust learn how he is different and how he is alike if 
any co=unity of interest is to be formed betvzeen groups. 

!I!he niddle school nay vrrestle with this problem of conEcunication 
among various cultures represented in its population by positive measures. 
Language experiences and exploration cay be offered to students so that 
the different groups in the school may sample the culture of one another. 
This could be done by a school library or classroom library stocking 
materiails - boo>:3, filris trips, cassettes, posters, etc. - that appeal to 
students and offer ways to discover more about each other. A cultural 
resource center within 2 schools could be one in which a focus on a par- 
ticular culture would be presented in an in-depth way for scheduled periods 
during the school year. 

Field trips could emphasise the rich resources of the city. Boston 
students have a unique opportunity to learn about the groups that fom 
the varied pattern of An:erican society because their city retains the 
flavor 01 so cany cultures in the -neighborhoods: the Irish, the Orientals, 
the ItalicLns, the Spanish, the Greeks, the Polish, the American - every- 
where the city maintains fascinating sections tliat retain customB, foods, 
art, susic, and other aspects of the origins of groups that cane to Zoston, 
Add to these the tradition of the black jlnerican tliat goes back to the 
colonial days of the city, and the resources for a multi-cult'X^al curri- 
culun beco-e all too evident. Speakers to scliool asce-rsblies, especially 
those who offer nodel- ^c the ^.s :irationo of middle school students, pre- 
sent another -.vay of raizing full and si^;nificant use of the cultural roao.irccG 
of the citv. 



IV-33 

Whatever the mode chosen, the middle school will assume responsibility 

for an affirmative position in its curriculum offerings for the multi-cultural 
approach. The actual curriculum developed will be an outcome of student needs 
and parent/staff perceptions of how these, needs may best be met. 

It should be emphasized that the selection of one language or one culture 
for in-depth study will not be a goal of the middle school. Rather, the 
emphasis will remain true to the exploratory philosophy that encourages pupils 
to investigate many areas before making decisions on a single course of action. 
THE MAGNJr IS STTJDI!:I^fT INTSIRZSTS 

Along with this basic philosophical framework, specific schools in each 
zone will add a magnet component and several options will be made available on 
a citywide basis. The zonal elective (choice will be centered on one of three 
magnets or emphases; science, humanities and unified arts. 

The magnet school approach for specific middle schools is based on the 
assumption that the regular school program for all grades will be comparable in 
all zones to assure the students' attainment of the necessary graduation points 
that facilitate passage to a high school of the student's choice. The magnet 
time is designed to supplement and to enrich certain areas of the course of 
study and not to supplant essential course requirements. Time allotments for 
magnet options should be viewed in the light of electives directed in special 
areas. 

It should be clearly understood that the successful implerientation of 
any magnet program requires the commitm.ent to provide the support that v.'ould 
be necessary to enable the program to function in the manner envisioned. In 
essence, this program design calls for a progra-i planned to attract students 
of particular inclinations, interests, or talents, to participate in a series 
of educational experiences that allow in-depth development of student interests. 
The group v;ould be limited to 290-300 students in an integrated setting, a 
quota retained for majority and minority groups. The total school population, 
too, would be reflective of the zonal ratios. 



IV-34 
TH3 SGIE'TCE MAGIO? 

The science raagnet is designed to attract those middle school students 
who desire to pursue scientific areas of inquiry beyond those offered in 
the basic science courses of the middle school. The student who selects 
this approach will be expected to devote a segaent of his/her school day 
to increase his/her kno';?ledge of the world of science. 

"The greatest handicap faced by science teachers in the new curricula 
is that Eost students in senior high school have no experience in obser- 
vations, no basic laboratory skills, no knowledge of how to apply elemen- 
tary i::athe:::atics to experimental results; they also lack the ability to 
correlate an abstract idea with a concrete situation. Often they have no 
idea of orders of na^nitude, no feeling for approxin^tion, no ability to 
judge what is inportant and what is not," (Dt. Uri - Haber - Schaim, p. 4-1 
Curriculiij Isprove.ient and Inno\'cition, 1966) 

If this is so, then the middle school science magnet should provide 
the student with the tine to digest science teowledge, to inprove his/her 
mathematical skills and to have "hands-on" experiences in laboratory situ- 
ations. The middle school progreoa could concentrate on measurement tech- 
niques, skills in gathering scientific data and presenting this data in 
useful formats, and analyzing data on given problems. 

The field of science is a vast one, and the interests of students 
at the middle school level are a vital factor in the determination of 
whether to offer a course in plant life, water pollution, introductory 
physical science, earth science, zoology, or environmental science, in 
general., T.hatever the decision of the curriculum planners, one objective 
of the riag-net will be xo encoura-;e students to oursue theii- interests at 



IV-35 

the level of in'iopend.-.-nt projects. These projects v;ill beconie increasing;! y 

sophirtxc.-^ited as the .student moves from the sixth to the eighth grsde. 

Science teachers r.ust be involved in the specifics of curriculuni planning 
for the schools desigi^.ated to have a science magnet. Based upon the special 
skills of the staff, the plajining group will make ;curriculurri decisions geared 
to the Bcliool population they will serve. 

The involvement of science teachers necessitates the same planning time 
arrangements as' those discussed under the humanities magnet. In addition, 
the school administrator will require time prior to the summer of I975 to assess 
equipnvjnfc ;;e.?ds for a middle school science program. 

Tho Dcionco curriciilun; i'or the middle ochoolo v/ill be ctudiod to 

excerpt those Icamin^; expei-iences v/hich are best suited to opecial trcat- 
nent by inter^-isted stuucnts in an integrated setting, particularly those 
areas in v?hich inquiry by students of the age group concerned are liost 
relevant. 

The kinds of science prograirs then will vary fron ina.gnet school to 
nagnet school, dependent upon facilities, apace, and staff personnel 
assigned, but all science nagnet schools v/ill enjoy the sei^ices of the 
Science Department as consultants, will be given additional science inater- 
ials to work with, and will be encouraged to utilize such resources of the 
city as the l.'^iseum of Science, the Franlclin Park Zoo, the Hew England 
Aquarium, and the Arnold /o:boretu:n. 

In sumnary, the student v/ho selects a science magnet should have 
the following: (l) a deep interest in science (2) a v/illin^-ness to 
undert.?Jke soce definite training in the precise skills and lan^age re- 
quired of the scientist in the obsorvation of recording of an interpre- 
ting of scientific data (5) a dedication to carryixig out independent 
projects in science (■•) a general spirit of inquiry related to scienti- 
fic ouostions. 



IV-36 

TH5 HULL\'?ITI'D3 ILXGW^T 

The stuaeat who selects the humanities na,5net should be prepared to 
extend his/her knowledge of several disciplines and their relationship 
with one another. This approach seeks to direct or channel student crea- 
tive interests in the fields of languages, history, literature, the draria, 
and the arts so that the preadolescent besins to understand hiiiself or 
herself as an individual and as a neraber of jsany groups. 

TLo philosophy of a iniddle school must center upon the individual's 
quest for selfhood. Within a humanities course of study, the jo'jng student 
has the advantage of discovering hov? nea and v7onen thro'ogh the ages have 
attempted to ans-.ver the basic questions: "".Tho aa I?"; "T/laere do I coie 
froa?"; "Vrnere an I going?" The young person may express his inner feel- 
ings through the nany art areas: painting, drav/ing, sculpt-ore, and in 
this activity find an outlet for his/her energies, talents, or indeed 
emotions. Or a student nay pursue his search for identity and develop a 
sense of corrrjuity by a study of how individuals and groups have coped 
with a wide range of huoian problems. A progran built about a series of 
human probleris of interest to the young middle school student could involve 
readings in the novel, biography, autobiography, drans, and poetry. Coupled 
with a wide range of reading, the humanities magnet may present an unus'.^al 
opportunity for the young person to learn more of the culture and la.igaagos 
of other groups by further study of a langviage that is part of the basic 
curriculum of the school. The student v/ill be expected to study historical 
events, possible in thematic sequences, such as the rise of tho dcr.ocratic 
state or the development of individual rights through the ages. 



IV-37 

A- bun.^iities approach eaphani^es what ain has thou^t about; hov/ ho 
has expressod his ■thuj.^ats in vrords, ciusic, artistic creations, and deeds; 
end challen~es the yoiin^ person to think about the future and the direc- 
tion c:an is going. To be relevant in ^ niddle school environ^ient, the human- 
ities approach inust liave a solid basis in the interests of the students 
that select tliis option. 

She teachers in a laagnet prograia are challenged to produce a curri- 
culun, rich in matsricils gathered to stimulate the students' to thihlc, to 
discuss, to \7rite, and to read with increasing skills and maturitj. To 
accoriplich this goal, the teacher becomes a professional searcher of the 
subject areas fox' ideas that vTill help hid or her guide the student to a 
better understanding of himself as an individual. The teacher v/ill also 
encourage intergroup projects that will foster understandings a-ong the 
integrated group of the contributions of each culture to the life of the city. 

The humanities program, as well as the science and unified arts nuigaet, 
can be nccoinpliched only with a period of time set aside in the .-spring of 1975 
for curriculum planning. Not only do the teachers involved require the tir.e 
to research materials and develop the course requirements for each grade but 
also the school administrators must make significant changes in school nchcdul-s 
to aliov; the time for the magnet options. 

The huiriP.nities oagnet will utilize the rich and varied resortrces of 
the city to axigr.ent its in-school curriculxia: the ?;hiseum of Pine Arts, 
Penvray Court, the Boston Public Library, the Architectural Center, the 
center for the /Vrts, and many other institutions. 

In sunaary, the student vfho selects the huoanities laagnet rrost con- 
sider carefully the densjids of xhe progran: (l) a full reading program 
that will cover many subject areas - history, literatxire, language (2) 
definite standards of speech and v.-riting (?) ^ desire to express hinoeif 
in a creative ytv^y throu^-^h art, draria, ^asic, or v/ritlng (''. ) ^"^n intercut 
in developing liis abilities in ths direction not only of high school but 



IV-38 
also of post secondaLTy education - technical, art, classical, special 
skills (5) a readiness to undertake independent or self-directed projects. 

UNIPI5D AH?3 VJ.GTC? 

The unified arts inagnet provides a strong, integrated program in 
related arts. The program strives for a concentration on a varied number 
of art prograns with an effort to synthesize individual subject areas into a 
meaningful whole. Students v/ould receive exposure to such disciplines as 
fine arts, nusic and drariia as well as industrial arts arxd home economics. 
Efforts v/ould be nade to integrate these prograns so that students would 
be able to perceive the relationship a^ong thea. 

Activity orientation would be key-noted. Students v/ould participate 
in progr an s such as presenting a play, the total production of 7/hich would 
be the work of the students ther^elves. In the case of a play produ'ntion 
for exanple, various gi^oups T;ould combine their efforts. A group of stu- 
dents night do the art '.Tori: required for sets, another group could provide 
the necessary music, a third could provide the designing and the building 
of the sets, a fourth could design and make the costiising. Each group 
would not only uiai:e its o'.vn contribution but develop an understanding of 
the value of the contribution 01 each group to-.vard the production as a 
whole . 

In the case 01 individual projects a student would develop an under- 
standing of the inter-relationship ar.ong the arts, A student night niake 
a l?z;p, for e;c:-:::ple. In this '.vork he could use an appreciation of art to 
design the lanp, Icno'.vledge of aetal work in its structure, a working v/ith 
wood for finis".:inr its base and ciii understanding of electricity to nalce 
it v/oik. 



IV-39 

The deveiopinont of the cvirriculura in each raagnet incluQing the unifiocl 
arts nac;net would be responsibility of the teachers involved as they respond 
to the noeds and interests of their students. '2he flexibility of progra^m 
develor-'-^nc at the school level would be accomodated to staffing and facility 

capabilities. 

71\is program would provide a nore in-dopth involvement in the 
unified arts than v/ould bo possible in the regular school progra'a. 
Eophasis would be placed on projects and concepts rather than skill 
developsent. Students in the prograsi would be engaged in activities 
which would be both pleasurable and useful to then as they exploit 
their interests. The opportunity is then provided to participating 
students to discover aptitudes, develop interests, and receive scne 
intx^oduction to the world of work. The unified arts magnet is 
designed to eqMip the transitional age learner to cope vith decisions 
regarding future educational, and career plans as well as to develop 
interests that could greatly broaden leisure time activities. 

Students who choose the unified axts should: 

1. Have a desire to explore Bore deeply the related arts 
including fine art, industrial arts, hone economics, 
music and drama. 

2. Lilce to v.-ork cooperatively with others on projects. 

3» Recognize the value of the prograa in helping to deter- 
nine life choices in acade}nic and career areas as well 
as leisure tine activities. 

The educational pro-rari of an urban school system naact addrerjs itself 
to the-ever-changin3 nature of the city and its mobile population. Yet, 
parents look to the school to provide a stable environment in which their 



IV-40 

child say develop to the fullest their abilities and interests. 

Since the end of Torld "iTar II, /acerican educators have generated a 
wide variety of practices and ideas ained at the iEprovenent of the 
educational systen. "'"T "; of these pronising practices have had effect 
on a linited seg:aent of the system; some have altered the traditional 
irage of the little red school house in a broader v/ay. 

The options presented to students and parents at the middle school 
level represent an effort to respond to the most promising of the new 
while retaining the besx of the old as the city moves to build an educa- 
tional prograis relevant to the last decades of the 20th century and cov- 
ing forward to the developing needs of the 21st century, 
Basically, the choices are these: 

1. IThe zonal options give choice bet->veen two learning environ-rients 
that have irsny cDnzon bonds, especially in philosophy, but differ 
in the inpienentation of that philosophy v/ithin the schools. 
These choices are: 

a.) The traditional approach 

b,) The flexible cluster approach 

2. The city - rfide options pemit parents and students to select one 
of t7.-o rather 'Jinique programs that respond to nevr deniands in the 
urban corr^ini ty: 

a,) The npolti-lingual, rculti-cultural school 

b.) The developmental prograo 

3. ".Vithin the zones, a special, linited option is built about the 
interests of ziddle school students in tliree content areas: 

a.) The field of science 

b.) The hur^anities 

c) The unified arts 

"The ultir:?.te tes". of any society is the hind of citizen it proL!;:ce.'-, 



IV-41 

his intellective! and roral cosnitaent, his vision of v/bat life io reallj 
for, his underst-n^din^ of bow men and women have responded to the world 
around vrith iiza^ination and creative endeavor." (james R. Souire, 1967 
ASCD publication Tho Hur^nities and the Curriculun p. 47). 

The public school has a r^pecial function in shaping the society by tiie 
nature of the education it offers to all youth. The traditional school i^n'Jer- 
stands the needs of today and has altered its style to meet modern demands but 
has also retained the pattern that stresses the communication of subject fi-.-itter, 
academic excellence in an environment supportive of the student's iielf-iriajje. 

The key to the siVJLstion is the teacher, A traditional approach 
places great responsibility on the teacher to provide an exciting and 
stiioilating leamins ezvlrorcent for the group of students v/hoa he/che 
is directing to attain -rescriced goals, ?/ithin the graded structure 
of the school, each teacher must consider the differentiated abilities 
and backgrounds of the yovvngster aiid select appropriate niaterials to 
ensure that each student reach the learning objectives. 

The staff of the school my v/orlc together to decide on conrmon school 
procedures, but the center of the curriculua activity reirains v/ith the 
teacher. The teacher r^es every effort to fit the curriculum to the 
unique learning p.attem of each student and in so doing inay eraploy a 
variety of grouping patterns. }!ost frequently the grouping for instruc- 
tion is on the criterion of achievement and ability and students are re- 
grouped as they c03ple~e units or tei'ins. The modern jiiddle school that 
nuiintaJns stand^irds consonaiit v.ifn long-held beliefs about the educational 
process is inoving to ir.iividualised student urorrairjaing rather thr^n tho; 



IV-42 

more conventional group prograzis because teachers feel strongly that 
this type of programing does not stigmatize youngsters. The student is 
challenged in the group in terns of his/her abilities and interests and 
receives supplensntary help in areas in which he/she needs support and 
extra instruction. 

Traditional teachers also feel that the offering of Eini-courses - 
limited topics studied for brief periods of time-is not coimter to the 
instructional goals they say set. Indeed, the breaking dOTm. of traditional 
materiaJ. into smaller inits nay motivate students to learn the content 
more easily and also allow the individual teacher to introduce newer, more 
exciting material into the learning experience. 

Certainly the nini -course is a means to provide advanced work projects, 
including independent study, for students v/ho have dexonstrated a profi- 
ciency in the regularly assigned work and need the stixiulation of work 
other than that whici they have mastered. 

The visitor to the traditional program would see no wide gap between 
this type and the open school in the variety of instructional materials. 
The rigid curriculuQ of earlier days did not require a multitude of mater- 
ials to accomplish its e::ds. Today, all schools have an array of materials: 
books, films, filmstrips, programmed courses. The range of audio-visiial 
aids is as wide as budgetary limitations allow, but even v/ith restrictions 
on spending, the teacher must make many difficult decisions about the 
selections that best fit the program content, the educ-tional objectives, 
and the needs and interests of the learners. Books are an integral part 
of the curriculum, but so are contemporeiry teaching aids, 

■'That, in brief, a^e the hallmarks of the traditional approach at the 
middle school: 



IV-43 



1. The course of study is carefully planned in detail for 
each subject area offered in the tiiddle school curriculum. 

2, The school or-a^^sation is graded, 

3» The grade levels have set levels of mastery of required 
subjects for prorx)tion. 

4» The teaching staff is organized into £:roup3 of subject - 
specialists to provide for better teachin,5 in the increas- 
ing nunber of content areas explored by cdddle school 
students, 

5» Specialized services in guidance are provided to assist 
ho3ie roo=i teachers in the counseling process. 



The parent or st^odent vrho is seeirching for a stable environment v/ith 
a focus on teacher direction of student learning activities and opportuni- 
ties cormon +o all riddle schools for students to explore the groTTins " 
range of subject inatters v/ill find in the traditional approach a modem 
prograa with a' regard for established values as its keynote, 

FL5XIBI3 CLUSTER APPROACH; ZON.JJ. OPTIOIT 

The flexible cluster approach is well suited to the exploratory 
experience designed for =iiddle school students. The basic carriculuia 
is similar to that offered in the traditional approach but different 
school organization procedures and teaching techniques -are utilised to 
provide a learning environnent that is conducive to the develop:.i3nfc of 

student leariiinj^. This program, as does the traditional program, encouj-ages 
the student's search for self-awareness and the development of social skills. 
It utilizes pleasurable activities and the exploration of intellectual £i:id 
vocational interests v/hilc still maintaining a solid training in the basic 
skills. 

Tne school population is divided for a cubotantial part of tho d.:.y 
into a nuiiiber of clusters or groupings of students. This floxibil.ity 



IV-44 

permits the utilization of various techniques such as sraall ^roup instruc- 
tion, large group instruction and independent study. Teachers working in 
clusters caji also effectively separate students into various homogeneous 
groups V7hen desirable and ce.n adapt inter-disciplinary nechanisas in order 
to tetter attain their educational objectives. 

The use of teachers in: the flexible cluster approach is significantly 
different thaji in the traditional progranniing. Teams of teachers work 
together to plan and develop the program for the students in their separate 
clusters. Since a tean of teachers rather than an individual teacher work 
with each clxister of st^jidents^, a great deal of inter-disciplinary work is 
possible and the needs of students can be readily met by allo'.Ting then to 
interact regularly with various groups. 

This cluster of tean-teaching approach gives the teachers an excel- 
lent opportunity to gaij:: a greater knowledge of the students, their needs, 
interests, and abilities than would be possible v/ith the traditional 
approach . 

Especially because of its adaptability and the variety of student- 
teacher groupings that are fostered, the flexible cluster approach pro- 
vides an excellent educational choice for i:iany Boston students. 

liaXTI-LinGUAL/lainTI-CgLTIPJJ; PRCGRA;^; CITY-"i7IDS OFTIOIf 

The approach of the rrolti-lingual/Eulti-cultural prograzi is designed 
to provide a knowledge and appreciation of the various languages and cul- 
tures found in the Boston corrrronity. The variety of languages and cultures 
in a large urban conmianity is a valuable resource which can provide a 
continuous source of erjrichiient to Boston students. 



IV-45 
Although in each niddle school there will be the opportunity for 

students to develop their appreciation of languages and ciiltures other 
than their 07ra, this prograa, located in a central facility, v/ould have 
a curriculum: specifically designed to meet the needs of students inter- 
ested in a broader and deeper iavolvenent with the variety of languages 
and cultures found in the city. 

A student would be able in this program to develop a sense of 
identity and dignity by an in-depth study of his o-/ra cultural heritage, 
its origins, history, laiiguage development, song, music, art, indigenous 
foods ana its accomplishments. 

Besides increasing ids own self-awso-eness the student wovild develop 
awareness cf the cultiare of the other students who would also be attend- 
ing this school. In various types of inter-action activities students 
would have the opportunity to understand axid appreciate the richness of 
the various cultures to which they are exposed. 

Language study would be particularly emphasized in this program. 
Students would be afforded the opportunity of an in-depth exposure to 
a language, perhaps one that is their heritage or one that they might 
be particularly interested in leazning. The learning environment inher- 
ent in a — olti-lingual/multi-culpjral oriented school would be conducive 
to the development of at least the beginning of language proficiency. 

A bi-lingual component of this program vyill help non-English speak- 
ing students to develop a facility in the Sn^lish language. Bi-lingual 
students wo'old participate as zrach as possible in the school program. 
Such students would be able to cor.tribute greatly to the social inter- 
action of 'Jc? school. 



IV-46 

Although the school v/ould have a roilti-lingual/multi-cultural 
approach, a basic curriculun will also be provided. 

Such a city-wide prograa would be of special interest to those 
students who are: 

1. Interested in developing a self-awaxeness and an awareness 

of others by utilizing an appreciation of the various cultures 
of the city, 

2. Desirous of leaxning a language or languages other than their 
own in an environment favorable to its development. 

3. Amenable toward sharing experiences with fellow students of 
various ethnic backgrounds. 

THE DE^/5L0P-.gN?.^.L PR0G?-4:.I; CITY-WIDS OPTION 

A central school option open to parents and students at the middle 
school level is the developnental classroom approach. The underlying 
assumption of this approach is the obligation of the school to provide 
experiences in an educational .setting which builds on student interests. 
The broad goal of the school program is to produce students who are cap- 
able of increasing resxionsibility for their own education. 

'.That is the discovery method of teaching and learning? It is, first 
of all, a prescription of the roles that teachers and students must play 
in the classroom. Specifically, it requires that the burden of intellectual 
inquiry be caxried by the student, not the teacher or textbook. It 
requires that students become involved in processes of defining, question 
asking, data gathering, observing, classifying, generalizing, and veri- 
fying. It implies that students play an important role in determining 
v/hat lines of inquiry are worth pvursuing and an important role in deter- 
mining v/hcit conclusions are worth accepting. 

The function of the teacher is twofold: i-'irst to insure that stud- 
ents vvill en;ca;;e seriouoly in Toccsses of inquity by irjnersing them in 



IV-47 
an atmosphere of revelance; second, to guide the inquiries that the 
students cake. 

In this setting the teacher becomes a resource person, a guide, 
a facilitator. The teacher aust become involved and expert in select- 
ing materials which not only attract the student but also stimulate 
thoughtful exploration. iThe teacher has the responsibility of bringing 
about an effective, productive interaction bet'.veen the student and the 
material. The teacher provides guidance in learning how to ask aeaning- 
ful questions and hov? to set about finding ansv7ers to those questions. 

At the middle school level the teacher is faced v/ith the challenge 
of how to make a materials-oriented curriculum related to the cognitive 
skills required by the jo'Jing adolescent as he moves tov?ar"d subject spec- 
ialization and high school choices. As he or she assesses the individual 
needs of the students ax any particular stage of progress, the teacher 
may decide on more forral group or individual activities. 

The developmental program is hospitable to many organizational 
patterns, including multi-gradin.g and non-grading. Teachers may work .- 
with students in small or large groups or arrange for independent student 
projects. The program encourages a creative use of community resources, 
field trips to broaden the experimental background of the student group, 
and parental involvement in the on-going school program of activities, 

Kov/ do v/e recognize a developmental program? 

1. The teacher's role is that of a resource person who guides 
students in clis^meling their interests into productive work. 

2. The schedule is flexible as teachers v/ork with students in 
small groups, lar.~e groups, or on a one-to-one basis in guided 
activities or in pupil interest - centered activities. 

3. The school is jr. graded or provides for non-grading in certain 
sub.iect areas. 



IV-48 

4, Teaming is recognized as a teacher option exercised by staff 
aenbers who desire to work on inter-diaciplinary projects or 
to cooperate on the planning, teaching, and evaluating cycle. 

5, The appraisal of pupil progress is on-goin^ and involves the 
teacher in several modes of evaluation. 

6, The school encourages the teacher to try out promising laater- 
ials or techniques to iaprove the quality of the education 
offered. 

7, Parents are encouraged to participate in the development of 
the school prograa. 



PAa2?TT DSCISIOITS 

Parent options, then, will center about the kind of school environ- 
ment traditional organization or cluster aurrangecent in which their child- 
ren will be enrolled. Children who have worked well in an open classrooa 
environment in elementary school say wish a conti'nuation of that type of 
atmosphere at middle school, or the parent may decide that a more struc- 
tured situation is better suited to the developing needs of the growing 
child. The parent, thus, within the limits set for the racial integra- 
tion of every school, v/ill have a significant input to the typa of educa- 
tion he/she wcints his child to engage in. In this manner, the parent will 
be involved in determing the learning environment or general learning/ 
teaching style in the school. 

Concerning the specific goals of middle school education, it may be 
stated that the focus is a strong emphasis upon individualized instruction 
and the development in young people of a particularly favorable disposi- 
tion tov/ard learning at more advanced academic anl more personal levels. 
In general, students enterin^- ."iddle school have a broad though primitive 
command of the basic suoTocts and -kills vet they are several yeai's away 
from the greater academic r;p-icializ::tion t:iat i'5 ossiblc ani necesc-iry 



IV-49 

for thera at the senior high level. 

In the middle school and its program, it is important for then to 
find opr.ortunities nore varied and complex than those in the eleaentary 
school, yet not so elaborate or on the larger scale of those in the high 
school. Further, the atmosphere must be especially suited to the needs 
of the students: more opportunities for social change than are available 
in the lower school, but setting more limits than one finds in high 
school. Further, the total range of academic offerings should be readily 
accessible to all students unlike the high school where by contrast and 
largely because of the specialization that characterizses education at 
that level, a typical student participates in only a few of the many 
courses available. 

In the middle school program, regardless of learning style or admin- 
istrative organization, it is hoped and expected that: 

1, Students will make continuoiis progress through courses designed 
so that significant educational gaps or duplications are elimin- 
ated, 

2, Students v/ill progress through various courses at a rate appro- 
priate for their abilities, 

3, Educational progress will include an increasing confrontation 
with the need to make decisions and accept responsibilities. 











IV- 50 






PROPOSED PROGRAM 


PREFERENCES 


AND SITES 








School 


Site 


Type of Learning 


Style 


Magnet Program 


ZONE I 


Barnes 

Edwards 

Mackey 






Flexible Cluster 

Traditional 

Traditional 




Unified Arts 

Science 

Humanities 




Michelange] 


.0 




Traditional 




Science 




Timilty 






Traditional 








Cheverus*" 
Guild* ( 
McKay* J 






Traditional 






ZONE II 


Gavin 

McCormack 

Russell 






Traditional 
Flexible Cluster 
Traditional 




Unified Arts 

Humanities 

Science 


ZONE III 


Cleveland 






Flexible Cluster 




Science 




Holme s/Champlain 


Flexible Cluster 




Hiinanities 




King 






Traditional 




Unified Arts 




Wilson 






Traditionail 






ZONE IV 


Lewenberg 

Rogers 

Thompson 






Flexible Cluster 

TraditionsLL 

Traditional 




Humanities 
Science 
Unified Arts 


ZONE V 


Irving 

Parkraan 

Shaw 






Traditional 
Flexible Cluster 
Traditional 




Unified Arts 

Science 

Humanities 


ZONE VI 


Curley 
Edison 
Roosevelt 
Taft 






Flexible Cluster 
Traditional 
Traditionail 
Traditional 




Science 
Unified Arts 
Hvimanities 



* Pending opening of new Barnes, these schools will house middle school grades 6-8. 
No educational themes are designated. 



Schools listed above that do not have magnets assigned may have magnets that are 
specified at a later date. 



iv-51 

THE HIGH SCHOOL 
OVERVISW 

Currently, a bipartite system of secondary education is being administered 
by the Boston Public Schools. Of the School Department's sixteen high schools 
in 197'<-75i ten schools are designed as "district", i.e., designed to serve a 
specific geographic population; and six are designated as "central," i.e., 
designed to serve a citywide population. 

Alternative Student Desegregation Plan continues the bipartite system of 
secondary education with the modification that eleven high schools in 1975-76 
will be identified as "local" or "zonal" and seven high schools will be 
identified as "thematic." 

The zonal high schools eire situated within six residential zones, each of 
which is co-terminous with the elementary and middle geographic boundaries 
specified previously in this plan. The local high schools v/ill serve the 
corresponding populations of students who elect to remain within their 
residential areas (zones) for secondary schooling. 

The seven thematic high schools are situated in what are generally con- 
sidered to be central, accessible areas of the city. The programs of the 
thematic schools, based upon different philosophies of education, v;ill serve 
those populations of students who elect to leave their residential areas (zones) 
for secondary schooling. 

Assignment of students to the zonal high schools will be determined by specific 
procedures stated later in this document. One or more high schools are 
assigned to each of the six zones of the city, and each of the zonal high 
schools will be committed to develop definitive and unique programs to insure 
variety and alternatives in instruccion and learning. Emphasis will be placed 
upon integration through the educational choices of individual students, and balance 
by race and Render v/ill be addressed on a one-to-one basis at the time of 
application. 



IV-52 
Zonal High Schools 

Presently the system of secondary education within the Boston Public Schools 
is comprised of the following facilities: 

District Central 

Brighton High School Boston High School 

Charlestov/n High School Boston Latin School 

Dorchester High School Boston Technical School 

East Boston High School Boston Trade School 

The English High School Copley Square High School 

Hyde Park High School Girls' Latin School 

Jamaica Plain High School 

Jeremiah Burke High School 

Ro'=!lindale High School 

South Boston - Roxbury High School 

According to this plan for desegregation, the system of secondary education 

will be comprised of: 

Zonal Thematic 

Zone I Charlestown High School Boston Latin School 

and an annex at Huntington Building* Boston High School 

T^^T,^ TT-'.-f-^-i Boston Technical School 

East Boston High School -n ^ m j c u t 

^ ^^ T, ...J- * Boston Trade School 

and annex at Sawyer Building* -.^ „ ui-cun 

•' ^ Copley Square High School 

„ T-T- „ •ju-'ucv.T English High School 

Zone II Bayside High School ^.^,^.. „ , - 

c *.L. -D 4- u- v. c I, 1 Girls' Latin School 

South Boston High School 

Zone III Dorchester High School 

Jeremi-ah Burke High School 

Zone IV Hyde Park High School 

and annex at Cote Building 

Zone V Southwest High School 
Roslindale High School 

sZone VI Brighton High School 

Jamaica Plain High School 

and annex at Bowditch Building 

With the exception of those students who, during the school year 197'+-75i 

attend Boston High School, Boston Latin School, Boston Technical High School, 

Boston Trade School, Copley High School, Girls' Latin School, or a Cooperative 

Industrial Program, all students at the secondary level have been assigned to a 

zone by residence and will have access to a secondary school in that zone. 

* Other dov.Titown sites under consideration in lieu of these two buildings. 



IV- 5 J- 

Each zonal high school will be organized to: 

1. Provide programs consistent with the educational concept of 
"comprehensive high school;" 

2. Emphasize basic skills in reading, self-expression, reasoning and 
computation; 

3. Offer options in scheduling and methods of instruction (e.g., 
flexible campus, mini-courses, the Occupational Resource Center, 
and the like). 

In addition, each zonal high school will initiate plans to develop magnet, 
specialized areas of academic concentration beginning in September, 1975« The 
purpose of the specialization is to stimulate academic interests among students 
to attract them to consider programmatic innovations at the local school level. 
The staff at each school will be encouraged to explore areas that build on 
strengths already existent within the school and its area or suggested by the 
access to resources in the city. Business firms will be invited to work with 
schools in the development of programs that reflect special needs or interests. 
Suggested areas for exploration include transportation, oceanography, communications, 
data processing, environmental studies, community services, and cultural studies. 

Consequently, the system of secondary education will provide new 
opportunities for educational achievement and integrational enhancement by 
encouraging students to work and study together on: 

a. a citywide basis, 

b. an inter-zonal basis, or 

c. an intra-zonal basis. 

• •Central High Schools: Thematic 

In addition to the designatioii of zonal high schools for each of the six 
newly identified administrative zones of the Boston Public Schools, seven 
centrally located thematic programs will be provided at the secondary level. 
These offerings, some traditional, some revised-tradit" onal, and some very 
innovative in the City of Boston, are designed to be educationally consistent 
with this plan's emphasis upon programmatic preference. 



IV- 5^+ 

English High School 

One of these thematic schools is the English High School. The physical 
plant of English High School is favorably situated in terms of safety, trans- 
portation, and convenience in a non-residential, professional section of the 
city. These advantages, in addition to the school's newly completed building, 
afford a setting most compatible with an innovative, thematic program. 

The current enrollment district of English High School is geographically 
located in zones I, V, VI, respectively. From these zones, present English 
High School students can exercise choices either for citywide schools or high 
schools within their respective zones. The new student body will be admitted 
on an application by application basis according to race, residence, and gender 
to insure equal representation from each of the six new zones. Integration of 
the student body will be assured by the admission's procedure. 

English High School's new thematic program will: 

A. Qnphasize new divergent opportunities for secondary students; 

B. Focus upon contemporary and anticipated theories of instruction, 
curricula, sociological relationships, and behavioral objectives; 

C. Address a citywide shortage of secondary facilities; 

D. Provide new impetus for revitalization of the distinguished 
tradition of the English High School; and 

E. Seek to re-establish trends of voluntaxy attendance at ^centralized 
schools. 

The teaching/learning philosophy and course offerings at the English 
fiigh School will be congruent with an academic theme of ART AND HUMAN 
DEVELOPI-EI'JT . Subject matter will support the following curricular con- 
centrations: 



IV-55 

A. Visual and Performing Arts 

1. Film-making and photography 

2. Television production 

3. Graphic arts and print-making 

k. Music (vocal, instrionental, orchestral, choral) 

5. Drama (playwriting and production) 

6. Studio art (drawing, painting, crafts) 

7. Cer£.mics and sculpture 

B. Humanities 

1. Literature, music, science, social studies in relationship 
to the arts; 

2. Interaction with local institutions; e.g.. Institute of 
Contemporary Art; New England Conservatory of Music, 
Museum of Fine Arts 

3. Multi-lingual/Multi- cultural appreciation through the studies 
of comparative cultures. 

0, Physical Growth and Hunan Development 

1. Survey of physiological and psychological functions, changes, 
manif estat ions ; 

2. Survey of relationships between individual and self-perception, 
individual and others, individual and environment; 

3. Survey of physiological and social norms, values, disorders, 
aberrations; (e.g.. Possible interaction with Harvard School 
of Public Health); 

k. Gymnastics and inter/intra-mural athletics. 

D. Communications and Language 

1. Media Design (visual and auditory perception) 

2. Written communicative skills 

3. Oral communicative skills in English and foreign languages 

In each of the magnet high schools, emphasis upon basic skills and required 
course v/ork will be primary and complementary, not supplementary, to the 
individucil school's specialized program. At the English High School the 
thematic offerings, in conjunction with mandatory subject matter and activities, 
will stress the development of the student's awareness of himself and others 
and his personal expression as an individual as well as a member of varying 
groups. Development of expression at this school will emphasize creativity and 
sensitivity with regard to the arts, cultural uniqueness, physiological dynamics, 
and social interaction. 



IV- 56 
a:-j a:..'1':rnati\^ high school 

In accordance v/ith this plan's design to reorganize the operations 
of the Boston Public Schools by cear^ of progranuEatic preference, a 
second utilization of the building of the English High School is proposed. 

The thecatic prociran of AST AITD KUjL\}r Di'/SLOPI.SZ'iT will be administered 
during the conventional school day. At the conclusion of that school day, 
an independent and autonomously adr:inistered educational pro^rac v/ill 
be laaintatned from 4:00 ?.:'. to 10:00 P.I', in the same location. 

The independent program v/ill consist of two coiaponents: a central 
evening comprehensive high school, and an expansion of Boston Central 
Adult High School. 

A. The Evening Comprehensive High School 

1. Objectives 

a. Provision of alternative scheduling and time patterns to 
address individual needs of students 

b, Enhancement of trend tov/ard centralization of secondary 
alternatives 

c. Provision of additional secondary seats 

d, i-Iaximization of the nev/ facility on Avenue Louis i-'asteur 

2, Courses of study 

a. Business, general, college, industrial jirts 

b. Convcntion^il ancillary subject natter J-.nd cup::oi'tivc services 



5. Student body 

a. City-v/ide rcproccntcition 

b. Admission determined on an application-by-application 
basis according to race and effects upon day enrollments 
at local schools 

c. luinimua age: sixteen years 

4 . Schedule 

a. 6-hour day, 6-day weelc options within a 47-week year 



lv-57 
B» ^.oCon CencrajL Adul^ High School - ^^cpanded 

1, Covirsea of study 

a. Business 

b. Collese 

c . Avocational 
2.. Student body 

a. City-wide, sixteen years of age or older 

b. No restrictions v^ith regard to race or gender 
3. Schedule 

a. Individual prograiinins for full or part-tiae study 
(minimur. of one, zzxxnun of five courses per seaester) 

b. 6 hour day, 6 day v/eek, 4-7 week year. 
C0PL5Y HIGH SCHOOL 

Copley Square Hi,5h. School is the secondary conponent of Boston's 
Ilodel Dauionstration Subsystara, The subsystem v/as desi.cpied as a kind of 
urban laboratory coarr.itted to trying out a variety of proiaisin?;; learning 
. practices and teaching strategies. As part of its experimental approach, 
Copley hss developed a unique curriculua with a concentration on r.ini- 
cources and external experiences outside the school facilities. It has 
fron the beginning emphasized an integrated student body as a foundation 
for inplecenting an urban school. 

2his plan proposed an expansion of this high school program and these 
beginning experiences. The addition of the Prince facility to Copley 
v/oxild allow for a moderate expansion of about two hundred and fifty stu- 
dents. The Prince building is in proximity to Copley Square High and can 
adequately serve aa an annex to this school to house the additional students. 

The issue of student enrolLnent procedures at Copley High is addressed 
in conjunction with the other schools of the subsystem. Therefore, racial 
integration can be accomplished simultaneously with additional voluntary 
attendances from local high schools to this pop'olar, attractive thematic 



lv-58 

B03?0?T H: 'ORIC - b.-Jbi 

Boston -irh is specifically designed for those students whose previous 
school experiences have been less than successful. Boston High responds 
to a need for a coabination of school study and on-the-job work experience. 

For the student, the school day is divided' into two parts: a seg- 
ment of classrooa study and a segment of err-plo^Tcent supervised by the school 
staff. A factor in the success of the school is appropriate placecent 
and er:plo%-isent of the students. 1"he relationship betNveen the school and 
the employing coaisunity has been v.ell developed by the staff of the school. 
An essential elenent of this relationship is the proper supervision that 
the school has provided. 

The clacsroon portion of zhs day involves an intense reading projran. 
In addition, the curriculiui of the school iias a full ran~e of hi-:-h school 

subjects, 

A proposal of this plan is the eventual expansion of this program. 
Expansion possibilities are liaiited by the 'oresent facility. Subject to 
the eventual obtaining of a new facility, a modest expansion of about 
tv.'o hundred students should be projected for the future. An expansion 
of this order is consistent 7/ith the objectivear of the school and the 
objectives of this plan to provide options for students to leave their 
zones for voluntary, integrated education. 

Also, implementation of new v/ork-study type programs within local 
high schools is consistent with the focus of this plan on expanded and 
improved educational opportunities for all students. There are presently 
54 cooperative nerchandising work-study classes, with school half a day 
and- work experience half a day, offered in Charlestown High, Dorchester 
High, Hast Boston High, Kyde Park High, Janaica Plain High, Burke High 
and South Boston High. These classes will be continued, and expanded to 
include areas in aadition to raerchandising. 



IV-59 

Downtown High Schools 

In the event of an over subscription to Copley High and Boston High 
School type programs, a new high school will be developed. The philosophy and 
objectives of the new school will replicate either Copley High or Boston High, 
dependent on which school is over subscribed. The rationale for the astablishment 
of this school is to meet the needs of the high school students better. It is not 
the intention that the new school be an expansion of the former, but that a 
separate, different and distinct organization be developed. 

There have been firm indications of the viability of such programs over the 
past two years. For example, the operation of Brighton High School Annex at 
100 Arlington Street is illustrative of the desire of students for alternatives 
to a regular high school program. Presently, h80 students are enrolled. 
The Flexible Campus component is 125 students, and 30 students are enrolled 
at the Occupational Resource Center. In addition, at varying times all 
students participate in visits to local social, business, and cultural 
institutions located in the downto\>ni area. Also, several proposed mini-courses 
are designed to serve all students. 

At this time, a site for the school will not be identified. Several 
possible locations exist, but it is now not feasible to select a specific site, 
until the need has been established and the size of the student body can be 
projected. The site and kind of school needed will depend on the over sub- 
scription of students to dovmtown alternative schools. 



lv-60 



TH:;: Iv^-IMI^rATION SCHOOLS 

The Boston .School Department is obliged by orders of the Federal 
District Court to introduce into its long rani;e plan a "remedial" pro- 
posal relating to student assignments as its exanination schools - 
Boston Latin, Girls' Latin and Technical High. The School Committee 
through its legal counsel has already submitted a Motion to the Court 
on this subject on October 31, 197U. 

It is the purpose of this section of the plan to expand upon 
this proposal and to introduce some possible directions to be taken 
relative to the examination schools, 
A. Boston Latin Schoolj Girls' Latin School 

The Latin schools offer a secondary (7-12) school program of 
studies designed exclusively for the college preparatory student. 
Admission to either school is not restricted by sex ; but, while 
there are increasing numbers of girls attending Boston Latin, there 
has been no msirked tendency for boys to attend Girls' Latin. 

The grade structure of the Boston Public Schools has been 
drastically altered in the past year so that all elementary school 
students enter middle school at the end of the fifth grade. The 
Latin schools in 197h have maintained their traditional grade struc- 
ture of grade 7 through 12, with admissions by exanination at 
grades 7 and 9. 

In this regard, the Boston School Committee endorses the 
Student Assignment recommendations contained in the document filed 
on January 15, 1975, with the Federal District Court entitled 
"Proposal of the Boston Latin School Association and the Girls' 
Latin School Aliomnae Association Regarding Student Assignment to 



IV-61 



the Latin Schools". Included in the Coninittees' endorsement is 
the proposal that beginning in September, 1976, the Latin schools 
will admit students from grades 5, 6 and 8. Thereafter, admissions 
will be consistent with the grade level organization of all schools. 
Also included in the Committees' endorsement are the following: 

1, Student Selection Procedure . Sixty-five percent (65/o) of 
available space will be filled by students according to 
SSAT scores. In addition, thirty-five (3S%) of available 
space vrill be allocated according to a ratio of 25 black 

students to 10 vfhite students and others using the SSAT 
scores but not dropping below fifty percentile as measured 
by students applying for admission. 

a) Students chosen in the 3S% category will be required 
to attend a special summer school enrichment pro- 
gram stressing the development of study skills, 

b) Special admission program will continue for three 
years or until normal admission starts to reflect 
social composition desired, 

2, Immediate Supportive and Supplementary Programs . All middle 
schools (6-3) notify and stress to students the advantages 
of taking the examination and set up ad hoc recruiting 
committees for talcing SSAT exams. 

a) Urge students on METCO waiting list to take the 
examination, 

b) Be sure entire community is aware of the opportunity 
to talce the examination, 

3, Lonr-term 3u"^portive and Su-nlemetitarv lYoTrams, The 
formation of recruiting conmittees conposed of faculty 



IV-62 



and aliinmi to recruit students throughout the city of Boston. 

a) Increased number of advanced work classes in grades 
U, 5> 6, 1 , and 8 throughout the City of Boston, 
Include within those classes a percentage of blac':s 
and other minorities as within the general school 
popiilation, 

b) !5stablishraent of special tutorial programs. 

c) Establishment of special programs for parents of 
students v;ho talce the examination in order to aid 
them in understanding the results of the examination, 

d) On-going evaluation of the effect admission pro- 
cedures have upon the racial compositions of the 
schools. 

In addition to these student assignment proposals, it is the 
intent of the Boston School Committee to expand the number attending 
these schools by a total of 300 students over the next three yeaj^s 
in order that more parents seeking tliis option can be accommodated. 

The future status of the Girls' Latin School, with its size, 
location and high percentage of female students requires a decision 
vathin the coming year. 

Among options to be considered during 197^-76 are the follovd-ng: 
(1) The merging of the high school components of each school on one 
site at Louis Pasteur Avenue accompanied by: 

a. The phasing out of the middle school component and/or 

b. The location of the middle school component at a central 

site in the city or at the present Girls ' Latin facility and/or 

c. The location of two equally sized middle school conponents at * 
strategic locations in the city relative to the zones identified 

in the plan. 



Iv-63 



(2) The possible utilization of the Madison Park Campus School for 
sone components of the Latin schools. 

(3) The construction of an addition to the Louis Pasteur Avenue 
facility presently under study by the Public Facilities Deparfnent. 

3. Technical High School. 

Technical High is the third school whose students qualify for 
admission by rank on the SSAT. Students who enter Technical at the 
ninth and tenth grade level are required to take the SSAT exam. 
Similar to the Latin schools, the determination of those wiio are 
admitted is made on the rank they receive on that examination. 

A prime objective of Technical high is to prepare students for 
engineering colleges and post-secondary technical schools. The 
curriculum places emphasis on math and science and tJiose subjects that 
require mechaiical ability and dexterity. 

Preparation of students for college is not the exclusive goal of 
Technical High. A career education for technicians is another major 
concern of the school. The program at Technical also provides job 
entry skills in a number of technical fields. 

The essential elements of the Technical High admission policies are 
not to be altered by this plan. However, entry into the school at the 
tenth grade must be eliminated now that a junior high school structure 
no longer exists. 

This plan increases enrollment at Technical High School by approxi- 
mately t;o hundred (200) students. A definitive procedure for this 
increased enrollment and for the elimination of the tenth L'.rade entry 
must be developed in conjunction \-r±th the school administration. In 
keeping vith this plan's concept of integration through programmatic 



VI-6'+ 

preference, an even broader baatid science curriculum v.. :.i be developed 
at Technical High School. The aira oi this proposal in ".cceoin- ".vith 
today's science-oriented society is to develop a city-v/idc school that 
has gi-es-tev eiuphasis on science. Finances for irriprovcd facilities and 
for program planning are inherent in this reccnnendaticn. 

The adjT.inistration and staff of the school have already initia'ced 
planning for nev: prograTSs in the school including Advanced 3iolo,'jy, 
Earth Science, Biophysics, Pwadiation Science, and Medical Toch:iolo£y. 

Tecrinical High School is a hlglily regarded racially integrated 
school in a black neighborhood and is essentially a magnet, city-iride 
school. Special provisions shou].d be i.'.ade to enhance its popularity 
and its city-wide character. 

Insofar as the present racial ratios at Techriical High School 
reflect the city-v/ide racial coniposition, the present adrrdssion 
procedures by examination ranic will be continued. 

Of immediate concern to the naintenance of the nagnet Technical 
High School is the provision of improved tramsportation to the school 
at no cost to students frorfi many areas of the city. Thiis riattcr should 
be addressed promptly in the transportation plans developed for 
Septcriber, 1975. 
COOF>':iATIVE I--II)UST?iIAL FIlC:'R.^:iS 

Traditionally, the Boston Public Schools have offered Cooperative 
Industrial Progra'ns v;ith si.;nificant popularity and attractiveneso at 
seven district high schools. These progra^ns provide trairJ.ng in ten 
different vocational fieldsj and, at present, serve tliirtecn hundred 
students. 

These programs will bo retained as another educational choice for 
students, for the cooperatives are very conpatiblc v.'ith the plan's 



( 



IV-65 



concept of integra-tion through educational preference on both inter - 
ard intra-zonal bases. 

Because applications to these prograrr.s are nade individually, 
proportionate racial ratios can be deteriuined strictly and rriaintaincd 
at th3 tirac of adnisoion, although full integration of all grade 
levels v.'ill take a na>ciK\ini of tliree years. 

Listed belov; are the names of the schools, the co'orse offerings 
and the nuraber of students involved this school year,-::- 



JCHOOL 



PEOGllA-Vi 



..GRAPE GRADE GliJiDE 
9 10 11 12 



TOIA] 



brighton 
cilm?l:-:sto./;; 

D0RC>u;3T?.R 



2A3? B03T0I: 

hydb i'avjk 
■ja;;aic;. plain 

GOU?:i ^'J^TGN 



PRINTING 




50 


40 


55 


105 


AUTo:.:oTi';2 




73 


75 


49 


197 


3LECTRI0/vL 




113 


109 


85 


503 


CABIIIZT I-.L.\XI?TG 




80 


26 


15 


121 


PIMISHING 




n 


15 


15 


59 


u?hols?-::;ring 




33 


12 


5 


50 


::JVC!iTN:; siiop 


6 


59 


52 


18 


95 


:7vO"i;n 3H0? 


29 


47 


38 


19 


155 


Ar,.ilC':i,TJ.\2 


152 


55 


26 


25 


no 


a'j:o ?.o"oy 




11 


10 





29 


oH:, :^? .l^TAL 




lii 


19 


?2 


59 


• 


67 


^jO 


<:02 


295 


l,2i;2 



IV-^6 



7110? 0CGU?ATI0r7AL ^3oOTJS.C3 CZ^.'TZR 

The Pilot Occupational Resource Center (ORC), established in September, 
1972, is an attenpt to provide flexibility to the existing vocational educa- 
tion systen. The Center offers curriculua in the human services, business, 
and allied health fields. The pilot project presents a new, comprehensive 
orientation to occupational education and resolves some student and industry 
needs by providing occupational opportunities not presently available for 
regular, bilingual and special needs students. The prograzi was created 
to explore ways of inpleznenting the ORG "concept" and to develop 
innovative resources, curricula, and alternative scheduling methods, ORG 
T/as established also to allow students not enrolled in strictly vocational 
education programs to learn about career opportunities, to be exposed to 
particular skill areas, and to acquire a saleable skill, 

\7hen the Pilot ORG came into existence, enrollment consisted of 40 
senior students from Hyde Park High School participating in programs designed 
to eqxiip them ?rith s!-d.lls as medical transcribers and hospital assistants. 
The programs met one day per week and represented a joint effort between 
the Pilot ORG and Tufts-New England Medical Center. 

The second program, initiated in September 1971, enrolled a total of 
65 students from Dorchester and Hyde Pai-k High Schools who attended programs 
on alternating v/eeks, to train as hospital assistants or medical secretaries. 
The third series of programs began in Ilarch 1972, allo.ving an additional 
60 seniors from English, Dorchester and Hyde Park High Schools to participate. 

In school year 1972-1973, approximately 377 students enrolled in 
courses at the Pilot OP.O from Brighton High, Boston Technical High, Chorles- 
to\7n High, Dorchester High, East Boston High, Girlc' High, Hyde Park High, 



IV- 67 



Janaica Plain nigh, Roslindale High, South Soston High, Jereaiah Burke 
High, Copley Hi3h, and I.'cICinley and Curley Junior High Schools. They 
represented an integration net only of various schools but also of a 
variety of scholastic backgrounds (acadenic, business, etc.) and racial/ 
ethnic identities. Students participated in five programs: Hospital 
Assistants, L'edical Secretarial, Health Education Aides, Dietary Aides 
and Exploring Health Careers of Tosiorro'.v. 

Presently, a total of 720 students are enrolled in skill training 
and exploratory progra';is that are listed below: 



Cosmetology. 
Culinary Arts 
Dietary Assistant 
Health Education Aide 
Hospital Assistant 
Fashion Design 
Exploring Careers 
Medical Secretary 



Retailing (Spec. Ed.) 
Eestaurant/Hotel 
Exploratory Health Careers 
Bilingual Child Care 
Bilingual Business 
Bilingual Nurse Aide 



IV- 68 

The ORG is a vigorous approach to offeriBg new, exciting alternatives 
to secondary students. Listed below are redonraendations of the ORG for 
the school year 1975-76. 

a. Continuation of ORG prograns at the Jefferson School. 

b. Establishment of additional CRC type programs on a third 
site. 

c. Impleraantation of a career exploration prograa at the Jefferson 
School for up to hOO ninth grade students. TSome hi^ schools do 
not have adequate facilities to offer their 9th grade students 
equal educational opportunities in this area.) 

d. Provision for the following schools to enroll up to UO ninth grade 
students, in keeping with the racial make-up of the secondary 
schools in the career exploration programi 

Brighton High East Boston High 

South Boston High Roslindale High 

Dorchester High Copley Square High 

Jamaica Plain High Charlestown High 

South West High Jeremiah E. Burke High 

Hyde Park High Baysids School 

e» Programs to be offered in both the A.M. session and P.M. session 
each day for each participating school. 

f . Instruction in the following fields: 

Introduction to Cosmetology 

Cosmetology 

Culinary ili-ts 

Dietary Assistant 

Health Education Aide 

Exploring Careers (Bilingual) 

Hospital Assistant 

Medical Secretary 

Courses 

Fashion Design 

Restaur ant /Hotel 

Retailing (Special id.) 

Exploring Health Careers 

Bilingual Child Care 

Bilingual Business 

Bilingual Tursa /ide 

Commuiiity Health Worker 

Dietary Aide 

Emergency I'.odical Technician 

Geriatric Aide 

V.'erd Clerk 



i 





GRADE 




9 


10 


11 


1? 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 






X 


X 






X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 



IV- 69 
D^D'JSTRIAL ART3 PRCGR.JLS-E.CPI£'R.;TORY PROGRvU.S 

MLXh ths implsmentation of the court desegregation order, socce ninth 
grade students may be assigned to high schools or annexes that do not 
have either the space, staff or the equipnent to offer equal educational 
opportunities in the field of industrial arts. 

It is therefore reconmended that, all ninth grade students assigned 
to high schools that connot provide opportunities in the field of indus- 
trial arts shall be offered opportunities to participate in the exploratory 
programs located at the pilot Occupational Resource Center and the Boston 
Trade High School, 
Boston Trade 

Boston Trade did not admit any new 9th and 10th grade residential 
1974-75 school year and currently has "resident" students in only 10th, 
nth, and 12th grades. Continuing this policy, there will be no new 
admissions of full-tins students to Boston Trade School in the 1975-76 
school year. Next year there vriLll be approximately 314 resident students 
in grades 11 and 12. 

Consequently, the termination of the Boston Trade School ;\111 coin- 
cide with the emergence of the Occupational Resource Center according to 
the effectuation of the following steps: 

a. Continuation of ths jahasing out ^of the residential students at 
the Trade School. 

b. Contin^oation at Boston Trade School of ORG type exploratory' pro- 
grams in several clusters to 9th grade students, city.-rLdea 

c. Enrollnnent of tenth grade students city.dde in ORG single cluster 
exploratory programs. 

d. Enrollrrvent of eleventh and tvelth gride students citywide in OllC 
type skill training prograins. 

e. EnrolliTiont of ORG students accordin;^ to a racial convoooition that 
is in keepiiv; ulth court reco:iJ:\2ndationri I'or enroliinent procedures 
for vocational projran:S . 



IV-70 



f . Purchase of new equipment with federal funds that have been 
mads available under Project /7'D-15374. 

g. Continuation of evaluative efforts and concomitant revisions 
in program and adioissions procedures. 



IV- 71 
Stmunary 

The plan for high school programmatic choices is necessarily connected 
with those presented at the elementary and middle school levels, but the 
selection process at this stage is more linked with the student than with the 
parent. The student has much to lose if the choices are not genuine in their 
individuality because the options can assist or deter the adolescent in his 
quest for a satisfying career. High school is, indeed, "the moment of truth" 
for the student who has to decide on what his future will involve: college, 
business, a trade, a career in the arts, community service. Decisions on covirses 
may not determine final goals, but they can influence the directions the in- 
dividual takes after graduation. 

The elementary school gives the child his introduction to the school world 
of learning and group activities. The middle school encourages his exploration 
of an ever-broadening field of activities, both inside and outside of the school 
building. The high school program calls upon him to survey his range of choices 
carefully as he moves to assume duties and responsibilities in a complex adult 
society. 

Integration by programmatic preference will be effective only to the degree 
to which students value expanded educational offerings provided in this plan. 
This plan is developed with the intent of inducing young adolescents to overcome 
their previously demonstrated reluctance to travel from their local residence 
areas to relatively distant schools because they have exercised judgment in 
■•the selection of programs to fit their individual needs. 

V.'ithin comprehensive zonal high schools, the development of new options 
will require extensive staff planning and input at the local level to evoke the 
ingenuity and imagination basic to realizing the potential of the magnet concept. 
The most significant changes can be brought about by insightful and enthusiastic 
professionals within the system who know the potentials of the facility and the 
needs of the student. If it can be done, Boston high schools will move forward 
in the directions set by new societal demands and new individual personal goals. 



lV-72 
Resource Center 

A third site prograua on an integrated basis, hereinafter referred 
to as a Resource Center, will be effected as a renedial meastire In 
schools that are not considered to be sufficiently integrated » In the 
event that the initial steps of an alternative plan that excludes 
forced busing do not attract parents and students to nove to schools 
to assist the desegregation process, the essential renedial measures 
that" • address racial isolation nust be considered. The third site 
concept is based on the assumption that those schools ;;hich do not aaet 
the racial composition necessary to integration must be involved in a 
i^q\iired third sito prograjn x^hich mandates integrated learning e:q>eri- 
ences. A school tending toward a large white enrollment in a sons 
•will be paired or matched with a school tending toviard a large black 
enrollment in the same zone. 

The population of each school \-d.ll meet at a Resource Center on 
a periodic basis. For example, at the elementary level the first 
grades from each school might meet on Mondays, the second grades on 
Tuesdays, etc., on a v/eekly basis, vrnsn possible, perhaps whole 
school populations could move on the sasie day. At the middle school 
level pupils night report to a Resource Center by grade one day every 
two v;eeks. Due to the programming methods used at the high school 
level, a variety of scheduling arrangements is possible. Students 
co'jld meet at the Resource Canters for a day or any feasible portion 
of a day in any grouping of students desirable o 

The "partnership school" proposed by the Ilodel City Administration 
and the Education Cor^ittee of the Model Neighborhood Board, Inc., in 
December of 1969 suggested these schools "not only as a means of re- 



lV-73 

structuring the curriculum and expanding the physical environnent of 
students, but also as a means of broadening their exposure to children 
of other backgrounds through participation in integrated resoiirce 
center experiences." The "home school" is intended to provide the 
sense of coRinunity identification which has been traditionally avail- 
able to v.'hite students, but v/hich has only recently cone to be deaanded 
as a right by Black parents as '-.-ell. The Resource Center is intended 
to pi'ovide a forun for communication betvfeen groups. It is fundamentally 
a city-wide fora of system innovation which offers local identification ' 
and a measure of local aatonoiay to all of its parts, ^d-thout sacrificing 
that opportunity for a sense of broad identification xjhich is basic to 
a truly "public education." 

On the elementary level pemanent Resource Centers vri.ll be estab- 
lished in school facilities specefically designated as third sites. 
Resource Centers on the secondary level can be established either at 
specific school sites or on non-school sites. Cue to overcrowding at 
the secondary level, specific schools have not been designated. School 
sites nay be specified during the selecoion process. 

Each Resource Center will require a full-tine staff of teachers. 
In addition to staff riembers it is urged that the third site have a 
full-tine adninistrator. 

All third site teachers must be prepared to '.each in an intercis- 
ciplinarj'- setting and nust be enthusiastic about the Resource Center 
idea. Thsy nust be sensitive, open, and receptive to the needs of 
individual students, as should the adTiinistrator. They should be 
versatile in t: eir approach to theii' currlculuni. Teaching staff 
ivill be responsible for planning and developing cui^ricului: that would 



IV-7i|. 
encourage understanding and positive experiences between ninorit/ and 
majority races and cultures. 

The adninistrator will serve as coordinator of -ohe progra:a. As 
the person responsible for -ohe efficiency of the st-aff and the effective- 
ness of the program, the administrator should be a stimulating leader who 
has been effective in innovative educational situations. The administrator 
also will assist the teachers in obtaining and monitoring the services of 
resources outside the third site. 

Initially, each administrator v;ould be concerned with activities both 
inhouse and off site of the Resource Center. In effect, individual 
Resource Centers would plan .off site activities or field trips in the 
conventional nanner. 

As .lesource Centers progress in design and development, third site 
administrators would be encouraged to coordinate their efforts and expand 
their progranis. For exanple, joint efforts night be made to enlist the- 
suppori; of such facilities as: 

- The Arnold Arbore^UE 

- ?ne Museua of Fine /rts 

- The Kuseusi of Science 

- The Children's Kuseuia 

- The EL'na Lewis School of Fine Arts 

- Tr.e "ranklin Park Zoo 

- The :<ew hngland Aquariuia 

- The Hew :\n gland Conservatory 

- The Trailside I.useu.ri 

- Local Colleges and Universities 



iv-75 

Trips could then be arrar.ged either by single Resoiorce Centers or 
in conjunction with other Resource Centers. 

The ability of the staff to conmunicate and cooperate with each 
other is essential * So that the interdisciplinary teaching approach 
night be utilized in fulfilling the needs of the students, tine for 
joint faculty planning and scheduling Vfill be built into the schedule 
on a weekly basis© It is suggested strongly that a hunan relations 
training elenient for the staff be incorporated prior to the beg-inning 
of the school year and that such a training element be continued during 
the pilot year of Resource Centers, Such an eler.ent would seive to 
develop in niembers of the staff the skills necessary if they are to 
work together effectively in a new and challenging situation o The 
training en-'/isioned \i±21 focus on the skills needed in conducting 
teaa meetings, establisbJ.ng goals, delegating responsibilities, 
problem sol"'/ing and so on, and in dealing constructively id.th the 
differences in aims, methods, and personal styles v.'hich vri.ll inevitabl;'" 
occur. It would also develop in the staff and students those inter- 
personal skills appropriate to the teaching and learning activity. 
These would include such sld.lls as an increased ability to listen 
fully to what students are saj-ing and to help students coi:ai:i-.uiic:ite 
with one another. 



IV-76 



Each school level - elenentary, middle and high - will design its 
own programs within the Resource Centers, The staffs at the Centers 
will be responsible for the specific curricula developed; however, the 
primary goal of the third site is to bring together school populations 
that are racially isolated for valid and effective intergroup experi- 
ences. 

The suggested educational focus of the elementary school curricu- 
lum offered at Resource Centers comes under the broad heading of social 
science. Possible components of a program discussed in the following 
pages are humanities, interpersonal relations and environment. 

At the middle school, the important area of interpersonal relations 
geared to a different age group could continue the elementary focus. 
In addition, the development of civic awareness among pre-adolescents 
is a possible source of curriculum emphasis. 

Finally, the high school could concentrate on a more sophisticated 
human relations course, designed for youth about to assume adult roles. 

The following; pages expand upon these programmatic suggestions, 
but are not intended to give other than possible curriculum directions. 

Neither should these suggestions be considered final decisions on the 
direction that a third site program might take. The essential fact is 
that the curriculum at the centers should not replace the home school 
courses of study in their entirety but reinforce cooperative exchan-e 
among students of different races. 



-IV-77 



Envisioned in a Humanities Component are M^lti -Heritage 
studies which could include history and geography taught fron a 
human perspective. The roots of the diverse ethnic and racial 
groups which populate a city as large as Boston might be traced. 
V/hile specific facts and figures as to national boundaries, land 
areas, rivers, etc., may be taught, the suggested focus would be 
on the effects of these demographic features on the diverse popu- 
lations. Thus it would be possible to show that the coiUinon tht.r.os 
of hope for a better life, and freedom from unfavorable local con- 
ditions led many peoples to emigrate to America. These studies can 
teach cliildren to look back with pride on the resourcefulness, per- 
severance, and ingenuity of their ancestors. 

Teachers can use their ovm creativity and innovative ideas to 
explore and understand the ethnic traditions and foUcways of v;hlte 
pupils such as the Irish, Italians, Polish, Greek and others; the 
cultural divisions ;^thin the black pupil population such as the 
Haitians, African and V/est Indians, etc.; and the racial and lan- 
guaije divisions within the Hispanic community. 

The studies may utilize the rich multi-racial heritage of the 
Boston student population to teach children to understand their ov-ti 
heritage wliile at the same time developing an awareness and respect 
for others, 

Linlcages with Multi-Heritage studies may be established by 
emphasizing opportunities for self-expression in Art, Creative 
IJriting, Literature, Music and Dance of the countries involved - 
Audio visual aides, guest spealcers, field trips, etc. may be incor- 



lv-78 



porated to aid in the development of the Ilxunanities conponent. 



The intei^ersonal component of the Resource Center Cvirriculun 
could center around the utilization of lessons and activities 
which v;ill assist students in developing a positive image of self 
and of self in relation to others; conmimi eating is one of the 
cornerstones of interpersonal relations. The progran might include 
experiences wliich v;ould foster the communication skills of listen- 
ing, openness and sharing ideas. 

Through f^roup interaction the creative teacher can structure 
discussions which touch on the need for exploration, of feelings 
£ind values of others. 

The Interpersonal Studies component, hopefully, would lead 
students to the realization that basic human similarities trans- 
cend individual differences. 

An experience centered around role play activities v;ould 
lead to an understanding of differing opinions and attitudes. 



An Ijnvironmental Component coxild encourage children to become 
aware of how we and our technology affect and are affected by our 
enviroa-nont. Approached through the use of pleasurable activities 
geared to student interests, the following studies, in broad outline, 
are envisioned: 

- Ecology of the city 

- Ecology of the countryside 

- acolorrv of the ocean 



IV-79 



-Ecology of the air 

Units in such areas could be cvilrcinated by experiences ct 
such sites as Arnold Arboretum, nuseum of Science, Franlclin Park 
Zoo, Trailsido Museum, and Hale Reservation. Parental involve- 
ment ivill bo encouraged. It is hoped that this aj.^proach which 
considers children's interests would lead not only to an urider- 
standine of the ecology of the environment but viould also lead to 
increasinply satisfying interpersonal relationships among tho-se 
students involved. 



At the middle school level resource center the , ,,,,,t,^ vo.' 

" prCi7r.;i tT.:i'j.LO be 

developed essentially with the viev/ of providing an educationally 
valid inter-racial experience that would be consonant with the 
needs and intere.'its of the total student population. The follov;- 
inc procrajas would be illustrative of the type of programs that 
would be appropriate to the fulfillment of such a commitment. 

A civic awareness program could be designed that v;ould have 
as its focus the city itself. In such a program the ctudont:; 
would leave the opportunity to study the govenunont of tho city, 
its resources, and its people in such a way that would provide an 
underst.onding of the diverse culture to be found in the coniunlty 
in which they live. The variety of points of view re;iardi,-,- tho 



lv-80 

concerns of the city of Boston could be assessed. The advanta.'cs 
of living iii a nulti-cultviral city that has so many as -sets both 
historical and contenoorary can be explored. Carefully designed 
field trips to bring about a clearer knowledge both of the city's 
heritage and of the various coraunities that comprise the city 
would be undertaken to supplement the basic program. 3uch a pro- 
gram v;ould lend itself to a super understanding and ai^preciation 
on the part of tlie students of the heritage and culture of the 
vai'ious people who share living in the city of Boston. 



The middle school resoxirce center will continue the v/ork on the 
interpersonal relations initiated in the elementary school program. i 
Stiidents at this a^^e are concerned with problems of self -identity, 
peer group relations both in and out of school, and family value 
conflicts even more than they are concerned with societal problems. 
At the resource center, the civic av/areness curriculum materials 
and approach builds the student's knowledge of the city in v/hich 
he lives and aims at a broader understanding of the pluralistic 
nature of the city and its varied ethnic groups. In turning to 
himself and his relations with others, he will have the opportunity 
to discuss at the student level problems of concern and to partici- 
pate in joint activities on projects that encourage cooperation 
between individuals. If one of the goals of the resource center is 
to draw together young people from racially isolated schools so that 
in a face-to-face situation, they may be involved in learning ex.er- ( 
iences that encourage them to act affirmatively toward one another. 



IV-81 



Sone of the kinds of experiences that youn^ people could partici- 
pate in Fdpht include sports and games, cross-age teaching, .joint 
field trips, and other activities that develop and reinforce josi- 
tive attitudes towo^'d one another. The actual curriculum vrill be 
developed at the reso\u*ce center level aiid ma^'- include a variety 
of interpersonal activities that diminish the effects of racial 
isolation on student attitudes. 



The capstone of the third site prosrara will be at the high 
school level. In providing a remedial measure for the hif~h ociioolc 
that are racially se^jregated, students from these kinds of school" 
v/ill meet at a third site for a Human Relations course. The third 
site will afford a unique opportunity for a racial mixing of stu- 
dents from sef^regated schools, 

Tlie T;rogra!-i v/ill be to prepare the students for life in a 
mvilti-racial society. Consideration will be given to the meaning 
of this multi-racial society to them as individuals and as parti- 
cipating members of this society. Broad goals of the projra:^! v/ill 
be the development of skills in interpersonal relations. Direct 
iiaprovements in communicative skills and ^roup participation will 
be sought. In the affective domain, goals will be to increase 
the appreciation for our social structure and for the multi-ethnic 
individuals vdthin this system. 



lV-8^ 



In sui-STiary, the Resource Centers propose a frajcev/ork or 
structure that locuses on the primary reason for a third site. : a 
place where inte^atea studies or experiences can occur. V.'hether 
on the eienentary or on the secondary level, the concentration of 
efforts should be aimed at creating an affirmative cliiaate in which 
young people, individually and in groups, will neet, Itoa their 
contacts with each other, hopefully they will niove forvvard to re- 
assess their needs and their responses to a pluralistic society* 



17-33 



THE KINDERGARTEN 

There follows on the next four pages a description of the 

successful kindergarten program which the Boston Public Schools 

have pioneered. Specific assignments, of course, are to be 
found in section V. 



IV-8U 



1E2 KITP3?tGAHT3N 

FJILOSOPhT 

The philosophy of the kindergarten program is two-fold: to have 
the children develop the desire to learn, rather than to naster specific 
techniques, and to develop the desire to read to learn rather than the 
ability to learn to read. T?e believe that the kindergarten prograxa should 
use the child's interests, ideas, plans, and his environment to provide 
rich experiences, and that is is also important to initiate and to plan 
learning experiences that are beyond the liiaited conception of the child 
and his irraediate environment, that vrill develop, broaden and refine atti- 
tudes, SxdJ-ls, and learnings, 

GBN3SAL 3ACZC-H0inra 

Shere is a two-year kindergairten program in every elementary school 
in the city for children from four to six years of age. It is preferred 
to as Kindergarten I and Kindergarten II. The purpose of this program 
is to give children the time and the opportunity to grow and develop phy- 
sically, socially, emotionally and intellectually. It develops a general 
background of learnings and beginning reading and math skills, 
ROLS 0? ?H3 ?S,;CZ5H 

The program begins vrith the teacher orienting the child to school. 
She teaches about school, the school routines and the safety procedures. 
She helps the children to begin to develop good relations vrith all the 
teachers, with tie entire s*£Lff in the school and with the principal. 
She begins to develop a genuine relationship betv/een herself and the child- 
ren ar.d helps them to develop good relationships with each other. 



IV-85 



Together, the teacher and the children set the liaiits of behavior 
for the class so that the children will be free to leaxn. Together, the 
teacher and the children discuss the use and care of aaterials, and the 
care of the room for these are learning situations. 

The teacher helps each child to feel good about himself, his school, 
and his ability to succeed in school. She helps hia to begin to under- 
stand hinself, his moods and his emotions, and to learn to cope with then. 
She helps him to learn to take part in the group, to take turns, to s har e 
and to value the contributions of others in the class. 

KIlfDZRGABTini PROSR/Ui SC5SDUL3 

The daily kindergarten program consists of a free-activity period, 
inusic, a story, language arts, isath, science, social studies, and a crea- 
tive arts period. In the free-activity period, the child v/orks individually 
or with a group with naterials of his ovni choice. Through this self- 
directed activity, the child develops concepts, vocabulary, comaunication 
skills and social behaviors. He learns to observe, to experiment, to 
think, and to reason. The role of the teacher in this free-activity period 
is to guide, to challenge, to listen, and to observe in order to evaluate 
the needs, interests and the feelings of the children in the class. 

PROGR.!LM PKA.?URES 

Through music, gor-es, rhythns, the children release tension and frus- 
tration, develop coordination of large and siLall nuscles, develop correct 
speech habits, vocabulary, concepts, listening skills, and the ability to 
follo'.v directions. 

Through stories and :;oetry, the children develop a love of booko and 
the desire to read. Tlirough stories the teacher teaches vocabulary, lis- 
tening skills, beriniiinfj reading skills, fjii heirs the children to develop 



IV-86 



an understanding of the world around then. 

In laoguage arts, the children progress from the developiaent of 

vocabulary to the use of simple sentences, to the understanding of language 

patterns, to the classification and relationship of objects. They learn 

i 
to express theziselves verbally and to understand others. In Kindergarten I ! 

they learn to recognize the likeness and difference in objects and in sounds, i 

the progress in Kindergarten II to recognizing the likeness and difference 

in letters and in words, and to associate the correct sound vyith the correct 

letter of the alphabet. In Kindergarten I they learn to recognize rhyming 

words and the beginning sounds of words, and -regress, in Kindergarten II 

to recognizing the letters in words, and laatching words and phrases. 

In math in Kindergarten I the children learn rational coiinting which 
is the association of the correct numeral with, the correct number of objects. 
They develop the concept of ordinals, fron "first" on. They develop cathe- 
matical concepts and relationships of parts to the whole. They learn to 
recognize shapes and sizes, and progress to the recognition of patterns. 
They develop the general concept of tine, and learn to recognize the hour 
on the clock. In Kindergarten II the children go on to the identification 
of sets, the writing of nunerals and to solving of siraple oral problems. 

In science the children, at their own level of ability, and accordixig 
to their own interest, learn about the world around them, including the 
seasons and weather, day and night, anirials, trees emd plants, and space. 
Through exrerix:enting, they leam to think, to reason, and to draw con- 
clusions. 

Social studies in the kindergarten program begins vrith the child 
himself and -.videns to include his hoce and his coniaunity. It -ro^esces 
to develop learning about the various cultures represented in the clr.ss. 



t 



IV-87 

their customs and traditions, and their contribution to the community. 

The creative arts work period is planned to provide the children 
with experiences and activities that develop sniall-auscle coordination 
through cutting, coloring, painting and pasting, and to express the learn- 
ings they have developed in language arts, science, Esth, and social 
studies. It is also the aedium through which the children creatively 
express themselves, their learnings, and their feelings. 

The prograa is carried out through the use of carefully chosen iculti- 
nedia, nulti-racial, and multi-lingual materials. It is developed through 
the means by which four- and five-year old children learn; conversation 
discussions, songs, dances, and games, dranatic play, excursions, stories, 
and the use of creative art materials. 



IV*88 
SPZCllL 'rZDS raCGR.:LM 

CKAPTJa 766 

A broad new educational refom law i^ent into effect on Sspteniber 1, 
1P7U. This far-reaching pisce of legislation is co-jinonly known as 
Chapter 766 of the .-.cts of 1972, ^nd mandates that all students partici-^ 
pate in an educational prograa that is tailored to fit Individiial needs 
as a consequence of a detailed core evaluation process. 

Chapter 766 will touch the education of all students in the city even 
if they lo not require special services. The classroom atmosphere will 
be similar to a tailor-nade suit which has been designed for each student 
with extra naterial for present activities and future adjustments, sho'old 
they be necessary. In soae ways, every student has special needs. Now, 
regardless of what those needs are, each student can pro^^ress at his ovm 
pace. The ipir>ortajit thin.- is that no ons will receive special treat-iient, 
but that each student will be treated specially. Such a mandate has 
significant space and program devslopnent in plications for all communities 
in Massachusetts, but in particular for the large urban areas. 

THE CORE EVALUATION 7ZJ-J{ 

If a referral is nade regarding a student with possible special needs 
because so^ieone feels that he cr she is unable to learn within a regular 
classroo.-ti ssttin.^, a tea.- of professionals vithin each school district \-n.ll 
try to discover the cause of zhe difficulty. Basv2 1 or. what it learns 
abyut eachst'.:de::t, this frrou? ?f people, kiiown as the Core .valuation Team, 
will decide vhether that s-.uient has special learning needs. 

The Boston Public Schools provides many sucli teai.is of professionals 



IV-89 



to assess the needs of all students who are referred to thi:m and to 
review those needs. It \s the task of these teans to develop an educa- 
tional plan for each student so that appropriate placement nay be made 
within the school aad a monitoring of progress can be ensured. 

In developing such an educational plan for each student, the team 
will recommend that he or she participate in the least restrictive of 
one or more educational alternatives. .'Ml students will be assigned to 
a program that cones closest to resembling a regular classrooia. It is 
predicted that most of these students can be assigned to a regular 
classroom with auxiliary or sup; ortive services provided either within 
the regular classrocm or in supplementary resoxtrce rooms reser/ed in 
the school. However, sone students require substantially separate spaces 
within the school Kher« a class composed entirely of other young people 
with similar needs will receive instruction from specially trained pro- 
fessionals. 

The following are brief descriptions of seme of the program services 
available to students with special needs. 

SSRVIC"-'-S FOR PHYSICALLY HAraiCA^'PZD STUDZriTS 

Students vdio are not able to attend school because of physical illness 
are tau>iht-in hospitals or in their homes by teachers. In addition, there 
are public school classes for orthopedically handicapped and/or health 
i^n paired students. Most referrals come from school building administrations, 
but requests may also be made by parents, social workers, physicians, or 
clinics. Hospital instruction is adapted to the specific needs of the 
child and nay be given at bedside or in hospital classrooms. The homo 



IV-90 



teacher serves as a lirJc betveen the school end tha student by visiting 
the school, receiving assiiru-aents and materials, and instruction the 
student as specified in his educational plan. The student's progress 
is, in this manner, maintained in all acadenic areas during his period 
of incapacitation cind until he is certified ahle to return to his reg- 
ular class. This program is available to all Boston residents, both 
public and private students. 

SSR'/ICES FO?. EEHA7I0H-T,T.T K;XSICA?PSD STUDSriTS 

This prograxa serves those students whose special needs create 
difficulties in learning due to emotional problems. Parents can initiate 
a referral to this prograa by bringinj their child to an approved clinic 
or to ai individueO. child psychiatrist. The school department can 
initiate a referral through principals, head masters, or pupil adjustment 
counselors. In either case, parental consent must be obtained for the 
state-required psychiatric evaluation. Both integrated and self-contained 
programs are available, in which students spend varj-ing amounts of time 
in the special program in combination with attendance in regxilar classes. 



lV-91 



Parental consent nust be obtained for each student's orogram of 
instruction . 

The reconunendation made by a core evaluation tean can specify that 
the student return to regular classes or te placed in one of five special 
education progrsnis, ranging from individual instruction to residential 
placement. If the . psychiatrist requests a private school placement, 
both the physician and the school department must indicate that the 
services required are not available in a public school. 

If the final recommendation is to be a public school program, the 
screening-placeaent professional will contact the parents, current 
teacher, and all appropriate persons prior to placement. 

SERVICSS FOR LSJJLNDiG DISABLED STTOSNTS 

In educational program specifies the services to be provided to 
students who have special educational needs wriic-h are not accommodated 
by programs for the deaf or hearing impaired, emotionally disturbed, 
physically handicapped, speech impaired, or visually handicapped. These 
are students who will profit from working in a small group setting 
either for the entire school day or, more often, for part of the day 
with a teacher trained to meet their needs. 

These needs are determined by a veiy specific process. Vfith parental 
permission, a fcur-part assessment is made of students who are referred 
for evaluation including, but not limited to, a psychological examination, 
a medical examination, an educational re''/iew, and a home visit. A case 
conference is than held to rtudy the assessments and develop an educational 
plan appropriate for the student, /gain, witii parental approval, this 



IV-92 
plan is implemented. The ' student • s progress is monitored and the educational 
program is revised as necessary. Usually, these students are partially or 
predominantly mainstreamed with regular class programs. In some cases, the 
specieilist consults frequently with the regular classroom teacher who, in 
turn, services the child with special needs. 

In addition, students from infancy upwards, regardless of the degree of 
involvement, receive a wide range of services. The services vary from 
minimal remedial and corrective instruction to maximal care in residential 
programs. 
Vision Resource Services 

This program is concerned with the total educational process of all 
students who have vision problems. After a review of the medical report and 
school records, the parent of each student is c onsulted. Students are then 
identified for service by itinerant teachers in their home schools or are 
assigned to vision resource rooms according to individual need. 

The educational program emcompasses Kindergarten through Grade XII. 
Instruction is given in braille, listening skills, typing, use of existing 
vision, travel skills, and other specialized areas. Support is afforded in 
subject areas. Referral is made to state and private agencies for additional 
services when needed. Students whose visual functioning may be interf erring 
v/ith the educational process are eligible, including those who are wearing 
eye patches and those with very low vision in one eye only. 

Visual acuity is not the only criterion for referral. Consideration 
must be given to the cause of the vision loss and to the use of vision in 
classroom situations. 
Speech and Hearing Services 

Students with speech defects or hearing impairments receive remedial and 
corrective help in their respective schools from itinerant speech and hearing 
therapists. Individual remediation service is provided for those students 



IV-93 
with hearing impairments while students with speech problems are grouped by- 
grade level and speech defect. 

Sujnmary 

Under Chapter 766 a legal mechanism has been created for determining 
whether or not a child is a child with special needs. If this be the case, 
then an educational plan is created for the child. The child's parents must 
consent to this plan, if they do not, the law provides for reevaluation and 
an appeal process. 

Entry into special education now means entry into one of several 
available program prototypes. Within each prototj-pe certain services, such as 
the three described above, are available. In addition, within a given program 
prototype, the visually impaired, the hearing impaired, the speech impaired, 
and those with developmental disabilities can be served. A number of children 
with special needs will receive multiple services, consistent with the indiv- 
idualized educational program developed for them and not limited to 
educational services. 



IV-9U 



ad;a::czd wo:a pro il^i-j 

PJiTIC:iAl5 

The following presentation is an abstract of significant material 
concerning the Advancei '.'ork Pro.^ran as a part of the city's total 
education prorran, A -.•.'orkinft paper that discusses the education of the 
gifted and talented in Boston in detail is presented in full as part of 
Appendix A. 

"In a denocratic society which seeks to offer educational opportujiities 
appropriate to each child's ability, it is incur±»ent to provide for the 
unique needs of the gifted and talented." (Irving Sato et al Developing 
a VJritten Plan for the jCd-Jcation of Gifted and Talented Students ,> 
California: :i=.tional/3tate Leadership Training Institute on the Gifted 
and Talented 1?73, p. 3U) 

The Boston Public Schools have gained an outstanding reputation 
over the years of heing in the fore^front in raeeting the needs of all 
the youth of Boston, a city with a proud herita-^e as a leading educational 
center in Aneri^ac The schools nust r.eet the challenges posed today in 
educatiag gifted and talented children and youth. 

Gifted and talented children and youth are found in all segments 
of society, all ethnic, racial, disadvantaged, and/or linguistic groups c 
These stu-enzs cannot ordinarily excel v;athout assistance in the forn 
of special proraro. 7h^ lack of attention to gifted children, especially 
ninority gifted children, often leads to their dropping out from school. 
Boston canno"- afford ^his erosion of its h u-ian resources 



IV-95 



It is believed that adequate attention to the gifted and teilented 
nust be part of the educational pro^raa, 

idi2:t-i?icatic:: o? ::ks simzij^s 

Gifted and talented students sire those, identified by professionally 
qualified persons, who, by virtue of outstanding abilities, are capable 
of Mgh performance. !Ihese are students beyond those normally provided 
for by the regular school prograns. Students capable of Mgh perforcance 
include those v/ith demonstrated achievenent and/or potential ability in one 
or laore areas. 

All students v;ith a denonstrated high level of achievement or 
potential ability in anx- of the follov/ing areas r.-ill be afforded an 
equal opportunity to be identified on a continuous basis: 

A. General intellectual ability 

B. Specific academic aptitude 

C. Creative or productive thinking 

D. leadership ability 

E. Talent in the terfontdng or visvial arts 

The follo-.ving guidelines v/ill be used to develop screening and 
identification procedures : 

A, Screening through the vise of multiple cethods such as: 

1, Previously demonstrated accoaplishaents including school grades. 

2. Teacher observation and nominivtion 
5. Group achievenent test scores 

4» Group intelligence test scores 

5. Der-.onstrr.ticr. of outstanding potentirJ and/or capabilities 
in the perfcrniing art3 



IV-96 



6. Interest uestionnaires 

7. Peer reccrjieniation - (Sociograns) 
3. Self-referral 

9. Parent iriforra-tion 
10, Iloriinations cv others includins principals and librarians 
ID . Pupil products 
12 « Ccn."p.unit7 agency referrals 
B. Identification with parental and student approval will be nade 

through the use of: 

1. I::divia-:el intelligence test scores 

2, Scores on tests of creativity 

3e Case studies involving teacher and parental observations 

U» Bicgraphies 

5« Pupil products 
Various instrur.ents and techniques will be selected or developed 
to identify capable children of different coLtural and linguistic -roups 
as v.'ell as children fron different econopJLc backgrounds and geographic 
areas. It is expected that over a three year period the number of 
gifted children identified xould reflect the de."T;agraphic profile of 
the cityc 

It is essential zhat special attention be given to the i. lent ifi cat ion 
and nurt'orLng of talent in ^nese students who may have high ability ar.i 
aptitude but whose fill potential is not alvfays apparent in sources obtained 
by instrui'ionts n:v: cv::ilacle. '^o stuaont v.-ho could boneTit from 5u::h 
a prO'-;r:.n is r.o . ;. overlrr't-id by too nar:-ov; a Jcf.irnlion of talentc 



IV-97 



GOALS 0? THE ?? . o -.:,:;:■: 

Boston is co^Tl.■nit^ea to the following- .^-oals regardl---s3 of language, 
racial, cultural or ecor.onic differences; 

A« Stimulating: rifted and talented students to develop 

into intellect .lally and creatively productive adults, 
B« Enriching the lives of gifted and talented students by 

involving then in a variety of intercultvtral and inter- 

disiplinary activities. 

C, Identifying at every level and in every school those studen^s 
vhose abilities, taients and potential for accomplishnent are 
so outstanding that they require special provisions to neet 
their educational needs, 

D, Initiati.ig, eirpanding and i.-nproving diversified programs 
for the gifted, 

E, Identifying resource adults, including teachers vjho possess 
the intellectual excellence and creative output to vork with 
these children. 

F, Providing opportunities for professional development for 
those involved in the education of the giftedo 

G, Creating awareness, support and coHiiiitinant ar.ong parents 
and the co:-_-nity for these programs. 

Standards for the selec^ion of the tec^chers who vjork viith the gifted 
and talented v/ilT be fornxLated bv the ao-^rouriate school authorities. 



IV-98 



The foUoivinj are recoa'nended criteria for teacher selection! 

1. Enjoys the reputation of being a highly superior teacher 

2. Possesses emotional nauurity and has a positive self-concept 

3. Is flexible and tolerant of diversity 

Uc Displays a positive attitude and comr.it me nt toward gifted and 
talented children an- their education, 

5. Demonstrates innovative approaches to teaching 

6. Shov;s evidence of superior intellectual ability. 

7. Is able to develop te -ching strategies v;hich engage children 
in the higher orders of intellectual ability. 

3. Has superior knov7led=;e and performance in at least one area 
P.-.0~R^11 0?TI0II3 

At all educational levels instruction in foreign languages vjill be 
provided for the stude:.ts. At ^he kindergarten and primary gra-es, 
the emphasis will be on early identification of the gifted and -^alented, 
an enrichnent program, and the establisluient of prooed'ores for maintaining 
contact v;ith these children. 

In the elementary grades, t..e thrust v;ill be on advanced work classes, 
partially integrated classes, individualization in the open space schools, 
and tutoring. Part of thec&y v;ill be spent on enrichment and/or saturation 
skills, Jistrict-vjide resource rooms and itinerant teachers will be used. 

At the :".iddle school level, the options will include the following: 
selective schools - Latin schools; grouping v;ithin clusters - teaming, 
flexible groipin-; ani schedol.in:;; departr/.-ntali?ei oro;r_no, tutoring, 
rr. d off c: pus pro^rnns. Ccnter.-i /.ill be esuatlis'-.c:! for tr^inVng in 
•/isu-il end .JOff or;n "ij arts, ^■J?..'^l-c-i].t-ii-iu , n f. ti-i '.'i uiil ^ro ;r:-.ns ini tlic 
scLonco 3, 



IV-99 



At the hijh school, the e.-.phasis will be on independent study, 
advanced placement, flexible car.pus, iiniversity af Tiliations, selective 
schools (Latin and Teclinical) and special centers for visioal and 
perfor.Tiing arts, hunanities and the sciences. 

All program options i;ould seek to provide* 

1. Enrichment e.cperiences which replace, supplement and enliance 
regular class projr.ns, 

2. Grouping provisions v;hich facilitate the student's access to 
learning opportunities . 

3. Acceleration activities which proiaote learning beyond regularly 
prescribed experiences. 
U. Guidance experiences v/hich promote ondersi^nding of the self 

and others, 
$, Individual tutoring, 
SJCiARY 

Detailed development of ideas in this abstract are v/orked out in 
the plan attached to this report in Appendix A. The material includes 
check lists fo. identif/im- chiliren, teacher evaluations for placement 
in advanced v.'ork classes, and a form of peer referral in a sample 
socio iraiTu 



IV-100 
THE BTLniGUAL mOGRAM 

Hi'ILOSOFKY 

Bilingual Zducation in the Boston P-iblic Schools is based on the 
philosophy that children whose native language is other than English 
are entitled to receive an education comparable to that received by 
the average English-speaking child. The child whose hone language is 
not English brings to the school another language and cultiire which 
the school must value. At the same time, the school must help him to 
make the transition into the English-speaking mainstream and to adjust 
to a new culture aid a. new value system. In broad terras, the ultimate 
goal of a bilingual education program is to make the child ai fully 
bil i ngiiaX and bicultural individual, someone who is able to function in 
both worlds a..d speak both languages. 

The bilingual education program also aims to foster in the non- 
English speaking child a sense of personal security as he goes th-rough 
the process of adjusting to a new country's customs and language, k 
bilingual education program provides a transitional learning environ- 
ment ;^ich is bicxiltural as v;ell as bilingual. In addition, the bilingual 
education program attempts to involve non-English parents in the education 
of their children. 

At present, the bilingual education prograin in the Boston Public 
Schools includes six ling-iistic groups: Spanish-speaking, Chinese, Italian,. 
Portuguese, Greek, and French-speaking Haitian students. 



IV-101 
TOE TRAIISITIOIL^L BILTI.GUAI. H)UCATIOn LAW 

Children limited English-speak-.ng ability are not able to participate 
successfully in classes taxight in English. Experience vdth students of 
limited English-speaking ability has proven that they are not able to 
conprehend naterial taught in English then fallfkr behind their classinates 
and are unable to satisfactorily complete coxirse requirements. Because of 
the problems experienced by the non-English-speaking students before the 
implementation of bilingual programs, many students were not attend5.ng 
school and the drop-6ut rate for junior high and high school students was 
extremely high. 

The Transitional Bilingual Education Law, Mass. Chapter 71A, was 
designed specifically to meet the needs of Massachusetts* non-English- 
speaking student population. It mandates instruction in reading and writing 
skills in both English and the native language, instruction in history 
and culture of the United States. Required courses must be taught using 
the native language as the medivm of instruction initially and then to an 
increasing degree in English. 

GEIIERAL CURRICUL'JH 

Students in bilingual programs are given the opportunity to continue 
their instruction in their rative language, wliile they are developing 
English -language s kills. It must be mphasiz.ed that Boston's bilingual 
program is transitional in nature^ its aim is to prepare students in as 
brief a time as possible to participate in regular classes. The curriculum 
of the billngiial education program parallels that of the regular education 
program., except for the fact that the student's nati. c language is used 



I 

initially as the nedivm of *.nstruction. Instruction in the native 
langTiage necessitates -that students spend a sign"' ficant percentage of 
their school day with a bilingToal teacher. However, for non-academic 

subjects, students are integrated into the school's program e.g., 

art, gju, shop, and nusic. In addition, students are evaluated on an 
individual basis. Given their levle of English proficiency, they part- 
icipate in regular classes to the degree possible. Such participation 
is encoxiraged and progranmed. 

STUDENT IDEIITIFTCATICII 

Students of limited English-speaking ability are identified by 
school personnel according to criteria provided by the State Department 
of Education, Bureau of Bilingual Educatr'.on, and the Bilingual Department 
Boston Fiblic Schools. The screening process takes place all through 
the year and especially during the first nonth of school, in order to have 
inforrnation for the Bilingual Census which is due on October 1 of each 
year. Usually, a parent or guardian brings the child to a school where 
his need for bilingual e ducat:' on is assessed. Initially, school person- 
nel determine whether the child's hop.e language is other than English by 
looking at his surname, his birthplace and through parent information. 
Children whose first language is not English are then screened to determine 
the linitations of their English-speaking ability and their need of a 
bilingual prcgra-T a?cording to the following criteria: 

1. The length of tijie the student has lived in mainland U.S. 

2. The length of t'ne a student has been enrolled in a mainland school, 

3. The student's so: ool records if available* 



IV-103 

li. A score on an aural/oral scale to rate the student's ability 
to speak ijiclish. 

S, Teacher infomation. 

Parents of students who are of l:'inited English-speaking ability often 
indicate that their ch3.1d needs help with Tnglish and that they want him 
enrolled in a bilingual program. 

BTLHIGUAL ELEjE>IT.\RY FROaPJJ^ 

At the elementary level, the first language of the child must be used 
as a neditm of instruction for concept developaent while the child learns 
English. For example, a six year old Spanish-speaking child is taught to 
read in his home language and gradually introduced to English through 
a\iral/oral exercises. Reading and writing in English is deferred tmtil 
the child has control of a substantial anount of English vocabulary. Ini- 
tially, raathematics and other content areas must also be taught in the 
home language. 

The bilingual elenentary program parallels that of the regular 
elementary curriculum. It consists of language skills in both the native 
language and English, social studies, including the history and culture of 
the child's honeland and of the United States, science, mathematics, art, 
music, physical e;mcation, etc. As much as possible, students of limited 
English-speaking ability are integrated with other students in the biiild- 
ing in non-academic activities, and often instruction in reading in English 
or mathematics is provided on an integrated basis. Lmphasis is placed on 
providing instruction in a transitional manner. For example, students, 
even in a first grade, learn the colors and the numbers in both Lnglish and 



iv-iou 

the home language, although nost of the explanations and the text books 
are in the hons language. Sach year, the percentage of instruction in 
English is increased vmtil in the third year at least $0^ of the in- 
structional prograa is conducted in English. 

At the eleaentary level, biling'.ial programs are offered in nany 
schools in different areas of the city. Whenever possible students are 
clustered in a particular school in order to comply vn.th the requirements 
of the TBE Act which states that no more than a three-year age span be 
allowed in a bilingual class. In order to prov-'.de quality education, the 
Bilingual Department has attempted to set up at least two or three classes 
at each program location. Otherwise, it is possible that a school or 
district night have the required twenty students but that they might range 
from kindergarten to fifth grade and have various levels of ability and 
proficiency in English. It is impossible for one teacher to provide a 
complete instructiorisl program for such a wide range of students, some of 
who:^. are entering the Boston Public Schools for the first time and some of 
whom nay have received one or too years of bilingual instruction. It is 
most important to group bilingual students according to age and grade level 
for social as well as educational reasons. 

Students at the elementary level progress rapidly in English and seem 
t:; make a smooth transition into the reg^olar educat"lonal program. 

BILIllGU.AI. i-n:DDL2 SCH'.XjL FROC-FA-M 

At the middle school level, students come to a bilingual program with 
var^-ing skills in their native language, different levels of proficiency 
in Inglish, aiid a wide range of mastery of sub.ject content areas. A 



iv-105 

Eilingxial Kiddle School Frogran provides for instruction In English as 
a Second Language for one to two periods per day, depending on the needs 
of the individvial student. Classes in English as a Second Language 
emphasize reading and writing skills as will as' oral communication. In- 
struction is also provided in the student's native language of the history 
and culture of his native land. In addition, the middle school bilingual . 
program incorporates the subjects appropriate to the grade, such as math, 
science, social studies, which are taught depending upon the needs of 
the particular group, either in the native language or bilingually. 

All students are integrated with the regular program for hone econ- 
omics, shop, art, music, and physical edxication. Because of the varjang 
levels of proficiency in English v/ithin a bilingual program, some students 
are also integrated into the regular subject areas and receive only ESL 
or history and ctilture classes in the bilingual progrcua. As a student's 
level of proficiency in I^nglish increases, he is enco-jraged to participate 
in one or txifo regular classes. 

Bilingual programs at the middle school level are offered throughout 
the city. As with elementary programs, the clnstering of students is 
necessary in order to provide a comprehensive program of instruction that 
can accommodate the educational needs of a diverse student population. The 
assignment of a team of bilingual subject specialists is necessary in 
order to insure that students will receive an equal educational opportunity, 
and that their programs will resenble those of the English-speaking students, 

BILIKGUAL RIGTl SQICOL ROC-P-AaM 

At the hir^h school li;VGl, a t;,T5ical bilin,-ual prograju atter.pts to 



apiroxinite the diverse offerings of a comprehensive high school; for 
exanple, it nay include Znglish as a Second Language, U.S. History, Latin 
American History and Literature, Biology, Chemistry and Hatheciatics. 
Often the required subjects or basic skills are o.-'fered in the native 
language. Again, English as a Second Language instruction is emphasized. 
Students at the beginner's level in English typically receive two periods 
of instruction in English a day. Students at the intermediate or advarj;ed 
level in English may take only one or two subjects in the bilingual 
program. Students are evaluated on an individual basis and given the 
opportimity to select courses within or outside the bilingual program and 
are aided in this process by bilingual student advisors and bilingual 
teachers. In sone instances, students choose as nany courses as possible 
in the regular progran to caximize their exposure to English. At the 
high school levaL, it is enphasized to students that their prograia s elec- 
tions should reflect their future vocational plans. As in the middle 
school level, all students are integrated in nnn-acadenic subjects. 

In order to offer high schcol students of limited Knglish-speaMng 
ability an equivalent educational pror^rpji, it is vital to group them 
in sizable n'-cibers. For exanple, the number of Chinese students does 
not warrant offering a Chinese bilingual program at various high schools 
in the cityj therefore, Chinese students in need of a bilingual progran 
at the high school level have been placed at one program site. The 
number of Spanish-spreakin^ high school students in need of a bilingual 
progran is much greater; rrograns for these students are offered at six 
hi.'h school sites. 



SECTION V ALTERNATIVE STUDENT DESEOKSQATION PLAN: 
ZONES & DISTRICTS 



V-1 



V, ALTERNATE STUDENT DESEGR3GATI0N PLAN: ZONES AND DISTRICTS 



This section contains information, data and naps relative to 
student population, buildin.5 use and geographic boundaries both on 
a city wide basis eind for each of the six zones. It also contains 
safety considerations and special program needs and allocations. 



V-2 




V-3 

LISTITIG OP GEOCODES BY SIX ZONES 



^Zono 1 


Zone 2 


Zone 5 


Zone 4 


Zone 5 


Zone 6 


P — 

1-155 














156-160 










161-162 














163-172 










173 










-' 




174-183 














184 










185-236 














237-244 










245-246 










1 




247 










248-252 














253-255 










256 














257-258 










259-264 










1^5-270 














271 










272 














273 










'74-302 






















3U3-3U4 


305 






















306-307 


OS-311 












1 

1 








312-523 






324-325 














326 






■^■*" 




327 














328-329 








^ 








330 








331-417 








k 






418-434 






f 




435-443' 














444-445 









446-455 












456-459 















V-A 
LISTING OF GEOCODES 



Zone 1 



Zone 2 



Zone 3 



Zone h 



Zone 5 



Zone 6 



590:^591' 
'6211^627 



"T " " ' ' ' j 



ii68-ii97 
511-5145 



» - 



u63-U67. 

U98-5p3 

51i'6-566 



"5o9-5io "'■ 

:567-5C9-;: 
■592-593""'" 
599-616 _ 
622-623 

■628-657 



"817 ■ 



"T-658-66!i ' r" - -j- 

T' " 11 r_l'665-6iS6 

667-7)48 • _ !_ 
T~ ■" " ~ i "7lj9-8i5~ 



819' 






"818 



821^22' 



82X) 



82'3 



62ir 



825-827 



828^ 



■829-830 



......^-... 



832-B'3l4 



T ' 831 





! i 835 




e36-037 ; i 


1 


i ;-— 838 




1 . 839-bUl ' i 




81i2-8h3 i - - 




r. • ■ 


Rh6-8L7, 


i ' . ; 



T"'T8Ii8-65cr" 



851-852 
"853 



.355-857 



860-861 



859 



85U 
858 



r^ 






0) -H 



o 

m 



rvj 



o 

o 

o 

CO 

o 
H 

•iH 

S 



CD 
4-> 

o 



V. 



H 

O 

o 

o 

•H 



I) 

4-> 
•H 
4^ 



O 







o 

m 



o 

CO 
VD 



rv, 
CO 



lA 
O- 
co 



rA 

-4- 



oo 

CM 
H 
tA 



ON 
lA 
fA 



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(A 

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(M 
lA 



AJ 
lA 



CO 
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ON 

H 



ON 
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-4- 



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H 



lA 
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lA 
ON 
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OO 



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-4- 



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fA 



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ON 

H 



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lA 
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VO 
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O 
00 
fvj 
rvj 



ON 
OO 



CO 

VO 



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J- 

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tA 
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CVJ 



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tA 



fA 

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VO 



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ON 

J- 



fA 

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fA 



^ 


J- 


lA 


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C>- 


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tA 


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r- 


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CVj 


V- 



T- 


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00 


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1-4 
tA 


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N 


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tsj 


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-4- 

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cq 



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+> 



(0 

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(0 

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o< 

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w 

•o 

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+> 
cS 

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w 
-p 
a 

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0) 

-d 

rH 
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+> 
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w 

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Q 



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■p 

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+> 

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(U 

xi 

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+> 

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V-6 

SPECIAL Fl^CG-RM'^S OFFtSSD IN CITY-V/ID'jI: SCHOOLS 

Speciad Needs 



Resource Sr)aces 



a.z>;L::;TAr;Y 



Blackctone * 

Hennigan 



nernanacz 



Trotter 

Bradford Aruiex 



Carter 



l-:iDDL5 

Blackstone** 
Lev/is 

HIGH oCIIGOLG 
Boston "igh 
Boston Trade 
Copley 
English 



2 

2 



2 






■ Advanced 

Substantially Separate Bilingual V/ork Clas. 



3 



5_ 
4 



_1 
7 



Coop. Ind 



Visual Ax 



' Interim sites will be the J. Bates, Bancroft and C. C. Perkins School: 
* Interim site vjill be the Bulfinch. 



V.7 



ZOlfB I 



Zone I is determined to be that geographic area that falls within an 
imaginary line beginning at the mouth of the Muddy River and proceeding to 
the Cambridge citj- lijie; along the city lines of Cambridge, Sonerville, Chelsea, 
Revere, V/inthrop to the easterly limits of the city to the mouth of the Fort 
Point Channel; the center of tlio Fort Point Channel, the center of Dorchester 
Avenue, the center of West Fourth Street, the center of East Berkley Street, 
the center of Tremont Street, the center of lenox Street, the center of East 
Lenox Street, the center of Harrison Avenue, the center of Ifessachusetts 
Avenue, the center of Albany Street, the center of Kanpden Street, the center 
of IXidley Street, the center of Blue Hill Avenue, the center of Quincy Street, 
the center of ToT.nsend Street, the center of ■iVashington Street, the center of 
Marcella Street, the center of Ritchie Street, the center of the property of 
the Pennsylvania Central Railroad, the- center of Ruggleq Street, the center of 
Louis Prang Street, the center of The Fenv/ay, the center of Park Di^ive, the 
center of Brookline Avenue, the center of Massachusetts Turnpike lixtension, 
the center of the !!uddy River to the point of beginning. 



V-8 



i 




V-10 

ZOIJE 1 - EAST B03T0H - CR1RL*i;ST0".m - ROXBURY - SOUTH END 
C0?J1^0SITI0N BY CU0C0D2S 

1-155; 161-162; 173; 265-270; 272; 274-302; 305; 308-311; 590-591; 
594-590; 617-621; 624-627; 624; 846-867; 855-857. 



i 



EimoLi:.EiiT 



BL.\CK 



WHITE 



OTirER MIMORITY 



TOTAL 



ELILIEirr.VRY SCHOOL 


2,143 


3,075 


i:iDDLS SCHOOL 


936 


1,833 


HIGH SCHOOL 


1,107 


2,240 



787 


6,805 


359 


3,128 


252 


3,599 



BDILDIUG C.^ACITIES 



4 



ELir.IE.NTARY SCHOOLS 
tilLDLE SCHOOLS 
HIGH SCHOOLS 



7,630 
3,610 
3,451 



ZONE I 



V-11 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



TRADITIONAL 
ICl Alighieri 

102 Bacon 

103 Baker, S. 
lOU Bradley 
105 Bunker Hill 
lOo Chapman 

107 Cheverus (also 6-8)** 

108 Dearborn 

109 Dudley 

110 Guild (also 6-8)** 

111 Hale 

conte:,tporaey uiigraded 



130 


Adams 


131 


Eliot 


132 


Paneuil 


133 


Kilnore*** 


OPEN 


SPACE 


150 


Condon 


151 Kent 


152 


Tynan 


RESOURCE CEIITER 




Condon Cluster 


UNDEJ 


3IGNATED 




Dillaway 




Howe 




Lyman 




Palmer 



112 Holden 

113 Kennedy, P. 
llU Lincoln 

115 Mann 

116 McKay (also 6-8)** 

117 O'Donnell 

118 Otis 

119 ' Quincy* 

120 Sheridan 

121 Warren-Prescott 



* New Quincy will become zonal option — Open Space 
** Pending opening of new Baimes 
*** Potential Resoiirce Center 



7-11 A 



Zone I 

mEimrsAm schols — city '.tide 

I, Modified Open — Subsystem 

160 Trotter 

Bradford Annex 
Carter 

II, Magnet Schools (Thematic) 

161 Blackstone (Multilingual/Multicultural) 

Bancroft * 
Bates, J. *■ 
Perkins, C. * 

162 Hennigan (Humanities) 

163 Hernandez (Bilingual/Bi cultural) 

164 I^e (Arts) 



* Interim site for the Blackstone 



V-12 



Zone I 



Middle Schools 
Zonal 



City Wide 
Subsystem 
I<1ulti-Lingual and 
Milti-Ciltural 



High Schools 
Zonal 



City Wide 
Arts 

Subsystem 

7/ork Study 



School 

Number 



170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 

177 

166 

167 



180 
182 

190 
191 
192 



School Name 



Barnes 

Cheverus 

Edwards 

Guild 

Mackey 

McKay 

Michelangelo 

Timilty 

Lewis (l) 
Blackstone (2) 



Chairlestown (3) 
East Boston (3) 

Boston English 
Copley Square 
Boston High 



(1) Potential expansion of satellite program in 1976 pending development 
of elementsiry program, 

(2) Interim facility will be the Bulfinch, 

(3) To relieve oversubscription, use will be made of such possible sites 
as Huntington Building, Sawyer Building, and 100 Arlington Street. 



v-i;> 



SPECIAL PROGRAI^ OFFERED WITHIN ZOHE I 





Special Needs 


Bin ngual 


Aavancea no: 
Class ^ 


Adams 


Resource Spaces 


Substantially Separate 
1 


Alifihieri 










Bacon 










Baker. S. 




1 


2 




Bradley 










Bunker Hill 










Chapman 










Cheverus 




1 






Pearbom 










Dudley- 






h 




Eliot 






2 




Paneuil 




3 






Guild 










Hale 




1 






Holden 








Kennedy, P. 


1 




2 


( 


Kent 


1 


1 






Lincoln 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Mann 


1 


2 






McKay 


2 


1 


2 




Ijilmore 








Q' Donne 11 


1 


2 






Otis 


1 


3 






Quincy 




3 




Sheridan 


1 








Warren-Prescott 


1 


1 






MIDDLE 
Barnes 


2 


1 


3 




Cheverus 


1 








Edwards 


1 


1 






Guild 


1 








Mackey 


1 


3 


5 




McKay 


1 


1 


2 


t 


Mi chelangelo 


1 




it 




Timilty 


2 


2 


5 





V-14 



SPECIAL PROGRALB OFFERED WITHIN ZONE I 





Special Needs 


Bilingual 




HIGH SCHOOLS 


Resoitrce Spaces 


Substantially Separate 


Coop4.In4. 


Charles town 


2 


1 




Electricity 


East Boston 


3 


3 


5 


Machine 



zorrE II 



Zone II is deterndned to be that gcbcraphic area that falls within an 
imaginary line beginning at the nouth of the Fort Point Channel and proceed- 
ing westerly along the center of the channel; the center of Dorchester Avenue, 
the center of "iTest Fourth Street, the center of East Berkley Street, the center 
of Trenont Street, the center of Lenox Street, the center of East Lenox Street, 
the center of Harrison Avenue, the center of ilassachusetts Avenue, the center 
of Albany Street, the center of Haapden Street, the center of IXidley Street, 
the center of Blue Hill Avenue, the center of Quincy Street,, the center of 
Kagnolia Street, the center of Dudley Street, the center of the property of 
the Pennsylvania Central Railroad, the center of Norfolk Avenue, the center of 
East Cottage Street, the center of Dorchester Avenue, the center of Savin Hill 
Avenue, the center of the Southeast Expressv/ay, and easterly along the high 
water line of Savin Hill Beach and I.Ialibu Beach to the city limits returning 
to the point of beginning. 



V- !6 




V-17 



V 



\ 




V~18 

ZONE 2 - SOUTH BOSTON - SOUTH END - ROXBURY - DORCHESTER 
CO.'iPOSITION BY GEOCODES 

156-160; 163-172; 174-183; 185-256; 245-246; 248-252; 236; 259-264; 
271} 273; 324-325; 327; 842-843; 851-852; 853. 



ENROLIi'EKT 

BUCK VflilTS OTHErMu^-ORITY TOTAL 

EiaZNTARY SCHOOL 1,A99 3,020 1,208 5,727 

MIDDIE SCHOOL 8^5 1,A24 A50 2,729 

HIGH SCHOOL 825 2,156 334 3,315 



BUILDING CilPACITISS 

E1ELEN2ARY SCHOOLS 6,390 

MIDDLS SCH00I5 2,690 

HIGH SCHOOLS 3,155 



V-19 

ZONE II ELEI.ENTiVRY SCHOOLS | 

TRADITIONAL 
2D1 Andrev? 

202 Burnham 

203 Dever 

204 Emerson 

205 Fenwick 

206 Hawthorne 

207 Iflason, S, 
20C Motley 

209 O'Reilly 

210 Perkins, M. 

211 Perry 

212 QJuckerman 

213 Winthrop 
CONTSg^ORjVRY TJNG-RALSD 

230 Bigelow ' 

251 Clap 
232 Hurley 
OPEN SPACE * 

250 Condon 

251 Kent 

252 Tynsji 
RES0UPC3 C31TBR 

Condon Cluster 
UHDESIGNATED 
Dean 
Hart 
Hoar 



* New Quincy will become zonal option — Open Space 



V-19A 



Zone II 

EIiBjIEin?ARY SCHOLS — CITY WIDE 

I. Modified Open — Subsystem 

260 Trotter 

Bradford Annex 
Carter 

II. Magnet Schools (Thematic) 

261 Blackstone (Multilingual/Multicultural) 

Bancroft * 
Bates, J.* 
Perkins, C, * 

262 Hennigan (Humanities) 

263 Hernandez (Bilingual/iicultural) 

264 lee (Arts) 



* Interim site for the Blackstone. 



V-20 



Zone II 



Middle Schools 
Zonal 



School 
Number 



270 
271 
272 



School Name 

Gavin 

McCormack 

Russell 



City Wide 
Subsystem 
Multi-Lingual and 
Multi-Cultural 



266 
267 



Lewis * 
Blacks tone ** 



High Schools 
Zonal 



280 
281 
282 



Bayside 
South Boston 
L Street 



City v:ide 
Arts 

Subsystem 
Work Study 



290 
291 
292 



Boston English 
Copley Square 
Boston High 



* Potential expansion of satellite program in 1976 pending 
development of elementary prograja. 



** Interim facility will be the Bulfinch. 



V-21 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS OFFERED WITHIN ZONE II 



^ Special Needs 


Advanced 7/ork 


Resource Spaces \ 
ELEMENTARY 

Andrew '' 


Substantially Separate 
1 


' Bi1ing\ial 


Class 


Bigelow 2 








Biimham 1 


1 






Clap 1 


1 






Condon 2 


3 


2 




Dever 3 


2 


h 




Emerson '^ 


1 


2 




Fenwick 1 


1 


5 




Hawthorne 1 




3 




Hurley 1 




5 


^1 


Mason, S, 1 




2 




Motley 1 








O'Reilly 1 








Perkins, M. 








▼ Perry 1 


1 






Tuckerman 1 








Tjman 1 


2 






Winthrop ^1 




3 




MIDDLE 

Gavin ^ 


^ 






McCormack 3 


1 


2 




Russell 2 




2 




HIGH SCHOOXS 






Coop, Ind, 


South Boston k 


5 




Sheet Ketal 
Auto Body 



ZOWS III 

Zone III is deterndjied to be that /jeographic erea that falls within an 
imaginary line be^^inning at the point of intersection of the center lijaes of 
Gladeside Avenue and River Street and proceeding easterly along center line of 
River Street| the'easterly ed-;e of the property of the Boston Sonatoriura, the 
rears of the easterly side of Clenhill Road, the center of Tiverton Road, the 
center of O-.ven Street, the center of Morton Street, the center of Gallivan 
Boulevard, the center of lililton Avenue, the center ot Norfolk Street, the 
center of Balina Place, the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Central 
Railroad, the center of Callender Street, the center of Blue Hill Avenue, the 
center of ^^arvard Street, the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Cen- 
tral Railroad, the center of V/ashington Street, the center of Blue Hill Avenue, 
the center of Quincy Street, the center of I>Iagnolia Street, the center of Dudley 
Street, the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad, the 
center of Norfolk Avenue, the center of East Cottage Street, the center of 
Dorchester Avenue, the center of Savin Hill Avenue, the cent.er of the South- 
east Expressvray, easterly along the high v.-ater marks of Savin Hill Beach and 
Jialibu Beach to the easterly limits of the city, easterly liiiits of the city 
to the southerly limits of the city, southerly lioits of the city to Gladeside 
Avenue extended, the center line Gladeside Avenue extended to the point of 
beginning . 



V-23 




V- 24 




ZONE III 

DORCHESTER 



V-25 

zo^ra 3 - dohcikstkr 

COITOSITICN BY GEOCODES 

184; 237-244; 247; 253-255; 257-253; 326; 320-329; 331-417; 435-443; 

446-455; 460-462; 817; 819; 823; 829-830; 036-837; 039-841; 060-861. 



ENEOLLieK'T 

BUCK miTE. OTHER lilHORITY TOTAL 

EIEISKTARY SCHOOL 3,094 4,0^4 811 7,959 

HIDDIE SCHOOL 1,499 1,662 306 3,46? 

HIGH SCHCOL 1,502 1,526 253 3,281 



BUILDIITG CAPACITIES 

EiaSHT-'JlY SCHOOLS 6,190 

IUDDLS SCHOOLS 4,060 

HIGH SCHOOLS 2,700 



v-^b 



7.n^. TTT ELESKTAHX bUh 




TRADITIONAL 




501 Gushing 




502 Dickerman 




505 Everett 




504 Kenney 




305 luather 




506 Rochambeau 




307 Richards 




508 Taylor 




nnMTK!.TP0RARY UNGRADED 




530 Pifield 




351 O'Hearn 




352 Stone 




OPEN SPACE 




550 Holland 




551 Marshall 




352 luurphy 




RESOURCE CENTERS 




Leen 




Vhittier 




UNDESIGNATED 




Brooks 




Gibson 



i 



V-26A 



Zone III 

ELEriBHTARY SCHOLS — CITY V/IDE 

I, Modified Open — Subsystem 

360 Trotter 

Bradford Annex 
Carter 

II, I.Iagnet Schools (Thematic) 

361 Blackstone (MultilingualAiulticultural) 

Bancroft * 
Bates, J. * 
Perkins, C, * 

362 Hennigan (Humanities) 

363 Hernandez (Bilingual/Bicultural) 

364 lee (Arts) 



* Interim site for the Blackstone 



V-27 



Zone III 



Kiddle Schools 
Zonal 



School 
Nvunber 



370 
371 
372 
373 



School Name 

Cleveland 

Holme s/Champlain 

King 

Wilson 



CJ.ty Wide 

Subsystem 

Kulti -Lingual and 

Multi-Cultural 



366 
367 



Lewis ♦ 
Blacks tone ** 



High Schools 
Zonal 



380 
381 



Burke 
Dorchester 



City Vide 
Arts 

Subsystem 
Work Study 



390 
391 
392 



Boston English 
Copley Square 
Boston High 



* Potential expansion of satellite program in 1976 pending 
development of elementary program. 

** Interim facility will be the Bulfinch. 



V-.28 

SPi^GliiL PR0GRAJL3 OFFERED WITHIN ZOl'E III 





Special Needs 


Bilingual 


Advajiced 


ELEMETiTA-^Y 
(^u shins 


Resource Spaces 
1 


Substantially Separate 


U'ork Class 


Dickerr.an 


1 


2 






Everett 


2 


1 


• 2 




Fif ield 


2 


1 






Holland 


3 


2 


i+ 


6 


Kenny 


1 


1 






Marshall 


3 


2 


2 




Mather 


2 


1 






Murphy 


2 


it 






O'Hearn 










Rocha^Tibeau 




1 






Richards 








* 


Taylor 




1 






§tone 




1 






I^-IIDDLE 
Qieveland 


3 


3 


5 




Holmss-Champlain 


? 


1 






King 


2 


1 






V.'ilson 


3 


1 


5 














Coop. Ind, 


HIGH SCHOOLS 






Dorchester 


if 


5 


k 


Cab ine t-LIalcina 
Finishing 

UpholsteJTF- 


I 
Burke 


3 


1 



\ 



V-29 



zo^'^ IV 



Zone IV is determined to be that geograFhic area that falls within an 
imaginary line beginning at the point of intersection of the center lines of 
Gladeside Avenue and River Street and easterly along the center of River Street; 
the easterly edge of the property of the Boston Sanatorivm, the rears of the 
easterly side of Glenhill Road, the center of Tiverton Road, the center of 
Owen Street, the center of I'^rton Street, the center of Gallivan Boulevard, 
the center of Hilton Avenue, the center of Norfolk Street, the center of Ealina 
Place, the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad, the 
center of Callender Street, the center of Blue Hill Avenue, the center of Ormond 
Street, the center of Outlook Road, the center of Hillsboro Road, the center of 
Hazleton Street, the center of Harvard Street, the center of Cummins Highr/ay, 
the resLTS of the easterly side of Chase Street, ani Chase Street extended to the 
rears of the easterly side of American legion Highrray, to the easterly end of 
Collins Street, the center of Collins Street, the center of Metropolitan Avenue, 
the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad, the center of 
West Street to the end of Poplar Street, to the rears of the southerly sides 
of Blue Ledge Drive and Highcrest Road, to the center of Enneking Parkrray, the 
center of Enneking ParkTray, the center of "iTashington Street, to the northerly 
rears of ^oodley Avenue, Blue View Road, Blue View Circuit, Ceadercrest Road, 
and Ceadercrest Lane to the easterly rears of Ceadercrest Lane, Ceadercrest 
Road, Ceadercrest Avenue, Ceadercrest Circuit, to the northerly rears of Pens- 
mere Road, to the easterly rears of willers Street and Edgei^ere Road, extended 
south to the to.fn of Dedhan, the to?m lines of Dedham and Hilton to the inter- 
section of the town line of ]Jiltoa and the extension of Gladeside Avenue, the 
center line of the extension of Gladeside Avenue to the point of beginning. 



V-30 






J 




mwl WW? ST' 







V- 31 



Z 



cc 

LU 
Q 

> 
I 




4 



«l 



7-32 

ZOHB 4 - HYDE PAPZ - I£ATT>-PAN - DORCHESTER 
COilPOSITION BY GEOCODES 
418-434; 468-497; 511-545; 825-827; 832-834. 



ENR0LI2>2NT 

BUCK VHIIE OTHER MIKORITY TOTAL 

EEEMENIAHT SCHOOL 1,991 2,1A3 199 4,333 

KIDDIE SCHOOL 906 1,035 67 2,023 

HIGH SCHOOL 917 1,274 89 2,280 



BOTLDIITS CAPACITIES 

ELEIffiZTTART SCHOOLS 4,740 

MIDDLE SCH00I5 2,820 

HIGH SCHOOLS 2,000 



V-35 



ZONE rV ELH.EirPARY SCHOOLS 

TRADITIOIIAL 

401 Bradford 

402 Charming 

403 Chittick 

404 Pairmount 

405 Henenway 

406 Roosevelt, P. D. 

407 Shaw, P. A. 

408 -.Volcott 
COITOSCPOHARY mJGRADED 

430 Greenwood, E. 
451 Grew 

432 Logue* 

433 I.!ason, L.* 

434 Tileston 
OPBII SPACE 

450 Cannon 

451 Haley 

452 Ohrenberger 
EESOIIRCS CEir-TSR 

Baker, IJ. 



* To be utilized pending construction of new llattapan Elementary School 
as zonal option — Open Space 



V-33A 



Zone IV 

EJiBI-IEiraARY SCHOLS — CITY V/IDB 

I, Modified Open — Subsystem 

460 Trotter 

Bradford Annex 
Carter 

II, I.'^gnet Schools (Thematic) 

461 Blackstone (Multilingual/Multicultural) 

Bancroft * 
Bates, J. * 
Perkins, C, * 

462 Kexmigan (Humanities) 

463 Hernandez (Bilingual/Bicultural) 

464 lee (Arts) 



* Interim site for the Blackstone. 



V-3U 



Zone IV 



Middle Schools 
Zonal 



City Wide 

Subsystem 
Kulti-Llngual aid 
Multi-Cultural 



High Schools 
Zonal' 



City Wide 
Arts 

Subsystem 
Work Study 



School 

Number 



U70 

hn 

U72 

U66 
U67 



U80 

U81 

190 
li91 
492 



School Name 



Lewenberg 

Rogers 

Thompson 

Lewis * 
Blacks tone ** 



^de Park. 
Cote Annex 

Boston English 
Copley Square 
Boston High 



* Potential ex-nansion of satellite program in 1976 pending 
development Oi elecentary program. 

** Interim facility vrill be the Bulfinch. 



V-35 

SPECIAL PliOGRAI-'iS OFFfiRED V/ITHIN ZONS-IV 



1 

ELEIIEIITARY 
Bradford 


bne 


>cial. Needs 


Bilingual ■ 
2 


Advanced 


Resource Spaces 


Substantially Separate 
1 


V/ork Class 


Charjiing 




1 






Chittick 




1 






Fairnount 










greenwood, S. 




1 






Cire-rf 




1 






iienienwav 










LoEue 










I'l^son, L. 








Ohrenberjrer 


2 


6 






^oosevei> F. D. 


1 








Shaw, ?,* A. 


2 


1 






Tileston 


1 


2 




if 


Wolcott 


1 




2 




MIDDLE 
Lev;enberf^ 


2 


2 


2 




Rogers 


5 


1 






Tho.Tinson 


2 


1 












Coop. Ind, 


HIGH SCHOO^^ 










Hyde Park 


3 


if 




I.Iachine 



> 



V-36 

Z01J3 V 

Zone V is detemined to be that geographic area that falls Tjlthin an 
iiaaginary line beginning at the point of intersection of the extension of the 
easterly rears of Edgemere Road and the tovm line of Dedham and proceeding along 
the to?na lines of Dedham, Ueedhaa, ITewton, Brookline, aloDig the rears of the 
south side of Allandale Street, the center of Centre Street, the center of Walter 
Street, the center of Bussey Street, the center of South Street, the center of 
the abandoned property of the Pennsylvania Central Eailroad to Tower Street, 
southerly along the center of the property of the Penney Ivania Central Hailroad, 
the center of Walk Hill Street, the north edge of Porest Hills Cemetery, the 
center of Cenetery Boad, easterly along the center of •'ewish War Veterans Drive, 
to the center of Pierpont Road, northerly along the center of Old Trail Road, j 
the center of Seaver Street, the center of Walnub Avenue, the center of Tovmsend ^ 
Street, the center of Quincy Street, the center of Blue Hill Avenue, the center 
of Washington Street, the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Central 
Eailroad, the center of harvard Street, the center of Blue Hill Avenue, the 
center of Ormond Street, the center of Eillsboro Road, the center of HaaHston 
Street, the center of Harvard Street, the center of Crtmmins Highway, to the 
rears of the easterly side of Chase Street and Chase Street extended to the 
rears of the easterly side of Anerican Legion Highway, to the rears of the east- 
erly end of Collins Street, the center of Collins Street, the center of I<Ietro- 
politan Avenue, the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad, 
the center of West Street to the end of Popolar Street, along the rears of the 
southerly sides of Blue Ledge Drive and Highcrest Hoad to the center of the 
Enneking Parkvray, the center of Enneking Farkvmy, the center of TTashington Stree^-^ 
to the northerly reaxs of Woodley Avenue, Blue View Rood, Blue View Circuit, 
Ceadercreat Road, Ceadercrest Lane to the easterly rears of Ceadercrest Lane, 



V-37 



Ceadercrest Road, Ceadercrest Avenue, and Ceadercrest Circuit to the northerly 
rears of Fensmere Eoad to the easterly rears of Willers Street and Edgeia-re 
Road, extended south to the point of beginning. 



» 



38 









/ I , •■,vT^jii.t-,t-:'*r.V i^j -On<. // //* 











::x 



ij 



< 



« 



V-39 




v-Uo 



ZOira 5 - rtEST EOXEDRY - ROSLUi'DALE - EOXBHRY - DORCHESTER 
COIilPOSITIOII BY GEOCODZS 

512-523; 350; 444-445; 456-459; 465-457; 498-503; 546-566; 658-664; 
667-748; 818; 821-822; 828; 831; 835; 838; 859. 



ENR0LI2-ENT 

BLACK WHITE OTHER MINORITY TOTAL 

EIE-ENTART SCHOOL 2,820 3,734 284 6,838 

rODDIE SCHOOL 1,121 1,636 104 2,861 

HIGH SCHOOL 1,315 1,84A 103 3,262 



BuiLDHTG capac::ties 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 7,hhS 
HIDDLS SCHOOLS 2,740 
HIGH SCHOOLS 2,450 



V-41 



ZOira V ELE.IEtTTAirr SCHOOLS 

TRADITIONAL 

501 Abrahams 

502 Audubon 

503 Beethoven 

504 Conley 

505 Endicott 

506 Garrison 

507 Greenwood, S, 

508 Kilmer 

509 Longfellow 

510 Lyndon 

511 Itorris 

512 llozart 

513 Paine 

514 Philbrick 

515 Ripley 

516 Seaver 
COIITK.IPORARY UNGRASSD 

530 Barron 

531 Bates, P. 

532 Ellis 

533 Sumner 
OPEN SPACE 

550 Cannon 

551 Haley 

552 Ohrenberger 
RESOURCE CEJTTERS 

Parker 
7/illiams 



V-41A 



Zone V j 

i 

ele:-:b:7^ary schols ~ citywide ! 

, I 

I. Modified Open — Subsystem j 

560 Trotter 

Bradford Annex 
Carter 

II. Magnet Schools (iheiaatic) 

561 Blackstone (I'lultilingual/uiulticultural) 

Bancroft * 
Bates, J. * 
Perkins, C, * 



562 Kennigan (Humanities) 

563 Hernandez (Bilingual/Bicultural) 

564 Lee (Arts) 



* Interim site for the Blackstone. 



i 



i 



7-h2 



Zone V 



Middle Schools 



Zonal 



City Wide 
Subsys tem 
Multi-Lingual and 
Multi-CulturaL 



School 
Nun^er 



570 
571 
572 

566 
567 



School Name 



Irving 
Parkman 
Shaw, R.G. 

Lewis * 
TSackstone ** 



High Schools 
Zonal 



City VJide 
Arts 

Subsystem 
Work Study 



580 
581 

590. 

591 

592 



Roslindale 
Southwest I *** 

Boston English 
Copley Square 
Boston High 



* Potential expansion of satellite program in 1976 pending 
development of elementary program, 

** Interim facility will be the Bulfinoh. 

*** Requires interim alternative in September. 



V-43 

SPECIAL PROGIUmS OFFERED WITHIN ZONE V 





Resource 


Special Needs 


p Bilingual 
2 


Ad vane f^ ; 
V/ork Clcxfli 


ELEJ-IEIITAKY 
Abrah?jns 


Spaces 


Substantially Separate 


Audubon 












Barron 












Bates, P. 












Beethoven 






1 






■a 

Gonley 












Carmon 






1 






Ellis 






1 






Endicott 












Garrison 






3 




, 


Greenv/ood, S. 












Haley 






1 






Kilmer 












Longfellov; 






1 


5 




Lyndon 






1 




^ 


Morris 










1 


Kozart 












Paine 






1 




6 


Philbrick 








Ripley 


1 










Seaver 


1 




1 






Sunns r 


1 




1 






MIDDLE 
Irving 


3 




2 


2 




Parkr.an 


1 










Ghav.' , j\ . G . 


2 




5 








k 




1 


2 


Coop. Ind, 


HIGH SCHOOLS 
Roslindale 






v-UU 

Z0N3 VI 



Zone VI is detemined to be that geographic area that falls within an 
imaginary line beginning at the mouth of the l.Iuddy River and proceeding to the 
Cambridge city line; westerly along the Cambridge city line, the tovm line of 
WatertOTra, southerly the city line of Newton, the to\ra line of Brookline to 
the rears of the southerly side of Allandale Street, along the rears of the 
southerly side of Allandale Street, the center of Centre Street, the center of 
VTalter Street, the center of Bussey Street, the center of South Street, the 
center of the abandoned property of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad to Tower 
Street, southerly along the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Central 
Railroad, the center of WedJc Hill Street, the north edge of Forest Hills Cemetery, 
the center of the Cemetery Boad, easterly along the center of Jewish TTar Veterans 
IDrive, the center of Pierpont Road, northerly along Old Tirail Road, the center 
of Seavcr Street, the center of Walnut Avenue, the center of Townsend Street, 
the center of "i^ashington Street, the center of Harcella Street, the center of 
Eitchie Street, the center of the property of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad, 
the center of Buggies Street, the center of Louis Prang Street, the center of 
The Fenway, the center of Park Drive, the center of Brookline Avenue, the center 
of the Ifessachusetts Turnpike Extension, the center of the Muddy River to the 
point of beginning* 



V-45 



/ 



--■^a 



jMr£:{'^^~ 







i 



4 



V-46 




V-U7 

ZONE 6 - BRIGHTON - JA'jIAICA PLAIN - ROXBURY 
COLTPOSITION BY GEOCODES 

303-304; 506-307; 509-510; 567-589; 592-593; 599-616; 622-625; 
628-657; 665-666; 749-816; 820; 844-845; 848-850; 854; 858, 



ENROLIi-ENT 

BUCK ^-miTE OTHSR MB-IGRITY TOTAL 

EIEM3NTAEY S"CHOOL 1,931 2,824 1,496 6,^1 

HIDDIE SCHOOL 989 1,371 64O 3,000 

HIGH SCHOOL 965 1,285 491 2,741 



BUILDING CAPACITIES 

ELELENTARY SCH00I5 6,020 

MTDDLB SCHOOLS 5,000 

HIGH SCHOOIS 2,550 



V-48 



ZONE VI ELjJ,IEUTAI{Y SCHOOLS 

TRADITIONAL 

601 Barrett 

602 Fairragut 

603 Puller 

604 Gardner 

605 Garfield 

606 Hamilton 

607 Higginson 

608 Lyon 

609 y^anning 

610 Llendell 

611 Storrow 

612 Tobin 

613 lYinship 

614 Myman 
OOKTB,n:^ORARY UNGRADED 

630 Baldwin 

631 Kennedy, J. P. 
OPEN SPACE 

650 Agassiz 

651 Curley, J. LI. 

652 Jackson 
RESOURCE CENTiPR 

McKinley 
UNDESIGNATED 
Allen 

Hamilton Annex 
Oak Square 
Washington Alls ton 



V-48A 



Zone VI 

ELEu^E^ARY SCHOLS ~ CITY '.7IDE 



I, Modified Open — Subsystem 

660 Trotter 

Bradford Annex 
Carter 

II, IJagnet Schools (Thematic) 

661 Blackstone (I'lultilingiialAiulticultural) 

Bancroft * 
Bates, J, * 
Perkins, C. * 

662 Hennigan (Humanities) 

663 Hernandez (Bilingual/Bicultural) 

664 Lee (j\rts) 



* Interim site for the Blackstone, 



4 



Y-h9 



Zone VI 



Middle Schools 



Zonal 



City VJide 
Arts 

Subsystem 
Work Study 



School 

Number 





671 




672 




673 


City V/ide 




Subsysten 
Multi-L-'ngual and 
Multi-Cultural 


666 
667 


High Schools 




Zonal 





680 
681 
682 

690 

691 

692 



School Name 



Curley, Mo 
Edison 

Roosevelt, T. 
Taft 

"Lewis-- * 
•Slackstone ** 



Brighton 
Jamaica Plain 
Bowditch Annex 

Boston English 
Copley Square 
Boston High 



* Potential expansion of satellite program in 1975 pending 
development of elementary program. 



** Interim facility vrill be the Bulfinch, 



V-50 

SPECIAL PROGRAJ-'.o OEi-'EIiED V/ITHIN ZONE Vl 





Special Needs 


Advajicej^ 




Kesource Spaces .| Substantially Separate 


1 Bilingual 


V/ork Clas% 


ELEI'ISriTAKY 










A^assiz 


1 


if 


3 




Baldv/in 


1 


1 




C/3 
O 


Barrett 




1 






Curley, J. M. 


_1 

1 


2 


1 


(t- 

B 

- H- 

- - o 


^arragut 


1 


3 


Fuller 


1 




3_ 


Gardner 
Garfield 


1 
1 


1 
1 




-o 

H 


Hamilton 

« - - — 

Kigginson 

« - . - . 

Jackson 


1 
1 
2 


1 
2 

6 





- Section 

j 


Kennedy, J. F. 


1 


2 


5 


<! 
1 


Lyon 


1 








Manning 




1 




Hendell 


1 


— _ 


3 

6 


c 

o 

H 

- _ P 
CO 

u 
' a 


Storrov; 

<« . 


Tobin 


2 


L— _,^1_. 


V/inship 


1 




3 


V/jTiian 




3 


MIDDLE 


1 






Curley, M. E. 
Edison 


3 2 

2 4 


_ 5- 

5 
.__5 





Roosevelt, T. 
Taft 


I 


1 


■ 










Coop, Ind 


HIGH SCHOOLS 






( 


Brighton 


• . 3 


5 


6 


Automotiv 


Jamaica Plain 


1 


1 


5 


Agricultu! 



V-51 



SPECIALIZED PROGRAI.iS 

BiliiXTual Fro /-Tram 

Generally, students of limited English-spealcing ability will be 
provided bilingual programs within the appropriate zone. Bilingvial pro- 
grams will be provided in the leajming style or program emphasis designated 
for a particular school. 

At the elementary level, bilingual programs will be offered in as 
many sites as necessary. However, it might be necessary to have soz.e 
grouping of students in order to provide for the maxiaum three-year age 
span required. Elementary bilingual programs will be offered in the six 
target languages according to the needs of the student population in the 
particular zone. 

Because the number of students in need of bilingual education de- 
creases in the upper grades, fewer sites for bilingual programs will be 
identified at the middle and high school level. Secondary bilingiial 
programs will be offered in the target languages depending on the needs 
of the non- English spealcing student populations. At the secondary school 
level, only one program site will be identified for the smaller linguistic 
groups. For the larger linguistic minorities several program sites v/ill 
be established and students v/ill be assigned to the site in their zone 
in accordance v/ith the procedures outlined for the city. In designing 
bilingual programs for the coming school year, the program options avail- 
able at the secondary level will be taken into account and incorporated 
into the curriculum of the specific bilingual program. 

All students needing bilingual instruction vd.ll be assigned to 
specific schools by the Bilingual Department. 



V-51 A 

It should be noted that the school designations for biling\;ial 
programs differs from the December 16th document. These refinements 
reflect additional hand-generated data regarding bilingual students 
and a proposed grade 1 through 5 elementary stmacture. 



V-52 

Special i-.'ce'.". r Frogi'anis 

In esseiicc there are three categories of students who receive these 
services in the re^jular day program: 

1. Those students who are assigned to a regular education pro-jra'.-. cU'.d 
receive auxiliary ai;d supportive services as required v/ithin that: 
setting according -co each student's educational plan. 

2. Those students who are assigned to a regular education program out 
leave this setting for a part of the school day to receive the 
auxiliary and supportive services as detailed in the individual's 
educational plaii. 

3. Thooc students who are assigned to a substantially separate class 
cor.ipor-od entirely of special needs children so that the instructional 
program as detailed in the individual's educational plan can be provided. 

Those students whose educational plan v/ould designate categories one and 
two win be mainstreaned in the regular, student assigrjnent _procedure and v/ill 
participate in the Alternative Student Desegregation Plan regardless of level. 
The nur.iber of students is presently being collated and the auxiliary space 
requirements mandated by Chapter 766 of Acts of 1972 will be reserved in school 
buildings. 

Those students who are designated by their educational plan as category 
three children will be assigned directly to the appropriate program prototype 
within a specific school building. It is anticipated, that with few exceptions, 
these school assignments will be within the attendance zones described before. 

In addition to the regular day school program students categorized above, 
a nuTiber of new substantially separate programs will be offered in regular 
Boston Public Schools during the next school year. These classes v.ill include 
diagnostic learning centers, mental health classes, clinical nursery classes, 
and a variety of progra^Tis for very seriously involved students. Assign.v.ents to 
these programs as mandated in the educational plans will be made to specific scr.co. 
buildings. It is anticipated that these programs will service students rtsidmg :.. 



V-53 

the various attendance zones mentioned previouGly, however, low-incidence 
disabilities may cross geographical sireas of the city so that appropriate 
service might be received. 

Advanced V/ork FrcTrniir^ 

Space is being reseirved in six buildings to accommodate 32 Advanced 
Work Classes (l6 Grade IV-16 Grade V) 



Pro/pram Offered 





# of classes 


Building 


ZONE 1 


6 classes 


Lincoln 


2 


4 classes 


Hurley 


5 


6 classes 


Holland 


4 


4 classes 


Tileston 


5 


6 classes 


Paine 


6 


6 classes 


Hennigan 



Traditional 
Contemporary Ungraded 
Open Space 

Contemporary Ungraded 
Traditional 



I 

Open Space and City-wide ilagnet Sch( 



Two of the buildings used are to offer ungraded programs, two are to 
offer traditional programs, and two are to offer open space programs. One 
of the six buildings to be utilized is also designated as a city-wide 
magnet school. 

The Advanced Work Classes v/ill be offered under ungraded, traditional 
and open space program structure. The thirty- two classes v/ill serve 
about 4/^ of the eligible population the same level of service offered 
this year. 

Student assignments to classes v/ill be made on the basis of zonal 
residence so as to assiure a racial composition in the classes reflecting 
the racial composition of the city population as ordered by the Court, 



4 



Zones: Safotv and Tranr,r)ortation 



V-54 



Since the Alternative Student Desegregation Pliui, by its nature, does 
not indicate specific enrollment areas or districts, it si not possible to 
list the safety and transportation concerns for each school. Care was taken, 
hov/ever, to utilize in as many cases as possible lines for the six zones' 
boundary lines such as major thoroughfares, railroads and "green belt" areas. 

The desegregation planning staff, in concert with staff of the Safety 
Department of the Boston Public Schools did attempt to address three issues: 

a) implications of an Alternative Student Desegregation Plan for 
transportation 

b) distance and safety factors concerning the involvement of 
CharlestovkTi and East Boston in a desegregation plan 

c) the process of addressing transportation and pedestrian safety. 
There follov/s then the results of staff examination of these issues. 
Trsjisnortation Imolications 

The comparatively short period of time available for developing an amend- 
ment to the December I6, 197^^ plan did not allow for a full study of the trans- 
poitation implications of this plan of the Boston School Comjnitteo. In addition, 
the very nature of the programmatic and parental preference features of this 
plan adds to the difficulty of projecting transportation ntatisticn. 

The ajialysis of the December I6, 197^ plan (see p. V5^-p. V-^S of that 
doc'jur.cut) suggested that some 31i2'+8 students might require trauKportation 
imder that plan. Admittedly, this was a minimal projection subject to increase 
v;hon safety factors would be more closely considered. 

It is the view of the School Committee that the transportation implications 
01 this plan are less significant th£m in other plans for tv.'o reasons: 

1. The enclosed plan does not require cornpulsory transportation. Parents, 
therefore, will be less concerned a.bout transportatio:! needs resulting 
from their own choices. 

2. The enclosed plan seeks to recapture as many as possible of tlie '"walking 
distance" desegregated school settings as possible. 

Admittedly, a new - or, at least expa:idcd tranr.portaLion co!,-.pr. -lent will be 
that j-cl-'tod to t)iird-sitcs or resource centers.- Again, ho\.'-ver, it i.'i th^' view 

of tho ..;..}iool Co!r.:>>ittne tlint suc>i transportation does not point tov.'avd the 

strong opposition of many jiaronts regarding forced busing. 



v-55 
Distance and Safety Factors: Charlesto\vTi and East Boston 

The Court has indicated that the desegregation plan must provide for 
the greatest possible degree of actual desegregation of all grades in all 
schools in all parts of the city taking into account the safety of the 
students and the practicalities of the situation. The staff of the School 
Committee would be remiss if it did not place before the Court certain 
facts for consideration. 

Distance Factors: Charlesto'/n and Efest Boston 
Chcirlestown: 

The mininua distance both black and white students 
would have to travel v/ould be approximately 3J4 miles. 
Some would have 6 miles to go. 

East Boston: 

The minimum distance both black and white students 
would have to travel would be k miles. Pupils from the 
fax ends of the zone may have to travel in excess of 
7 miles. 

Using 7 minutes travel time per mile in good 
traffic, some students would have a ^5 to 50 minute 
ride each way. 

Safety Factors: Charlestown and East Boston 

Chariest own: 

The major problem seems to be that of commuting 
from Charlestovm to Roxbury in the morning hours. 
Buses would either use the Expressway or the bridge 
to Causeway Street. Both approaches wovild place buses 
in extremely heavy traffic. 

Buses using Storrow Drive must exit at Arlington 
Street tmless permission from the IIDC can be obtained. 

East Boston: 

In addition to the factor of the tunnel, it appeairs 
that buses will either use the S. E. Expressway which 
could create safety problems, or go through downtown 
traffic at peak traffic time. 



v-56 



It seems ironic that tine/distance/safety factors make it less realistic 
to integrate the main part of Boston with Charlestown and East Boston than 
it does to integrate areas of Boston with Brookline and Milton. 



-'V-57 

Process of Addressing Safety 

In Section VII of this document, the Implementation Schedule and Process 
indicates the Comnittee's timetable and personnel for addressing the process 
of transportation and pedestrian safety. Further, in implementing the Phase 
I Plan, the staff has acquired sufficient expertise to enter into a larger 
and more complex effort to address the issue of safety. Clearly, the 
events of recent months have shown all the challenges of seeking to guarantee 
safety to all children. It is the obligation of the school system- supported 
by the Court and by the federal, state and city governments - to focus on 
this crucial matter. 

On December 12, 1973 the Board of Education of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts issued a revised version of its Short Term Plan to Reduce 
Racial Imbalemce in the Boston Public Schools . On pages 1^7 to ^k^ of that 
document the Board issued guidelines for the Boston Public Schools relative 
to safety and transportation. The staff of the Committee sought to adhere 
to these recommendations and offers them in this document as evidence of 
intent to address the issue of safety in the Phase II Plan. 



SAFETY 
Thj saTet^' of all sbjdsnts is a basic consideration in any school re- districting 
pUin. School officials, local police, traffic analysts and school safety offi';ers 
must dstermine what constitutes a safety hazard in a particular area and to- 
gether implennent the necessary precautions, safety education progran^.s or 
other activities to prevent accident or injury to students as much as is h-innanly 
possible. ■ The responsibility for such actions shall continue to rest with the 
local school principal . The cooperation of parents, teachers. School Depart- 
ment and Police Department officials is essential in pronnoting all aspects of 
school safety. The State Board of Education is cognizant of the excellent 
school safety record of the Boston School Department and all parents should 
be assured that the full cooperation of the School Safety Department will guarantee 
the safety of all students in the implementation of the racial balance plan. . 

Pedestrian Safety 
Basic Considerations: 

1 . As much as possible, railroad tracks, major roadways and other 

natural barriers should serve as school district boundaries and t^rvjs 
prevent students from crossing such roadways and obstacles- The 
'Task Force has followed this consideration in developing its 
recommended districts. 
2. Where such obstacles exist, determination shall be made by consul- 
tation with traffic and safety/ experts regarding precautions presently 
employed to overcome sucli hazards to safety. The Boston School 
Departm.ent should continue to work with the Boston Police Department 
to arrange appropriable measures to assure pupil zafcfy. 



3. Existing safety precautions shall be maintained to assure the con- 
tinufed safety of students currently crossing nnajor thoroughfares. 

4. School officials shall continue to determine those instances where 
transportation for reasons of safety shall be provided under the 
Racial Imbalance Act, as requir^ed by the emergency regulations 
adopted by the Board of Education on January 23, 1973. 

Recommendations: 

1 . School department safety personnel and local administrators and 

Police Department Safety Officers, and Traffic Analysts should re- 
examine deployment of school crossing guards, traffic signals and 
other equipment used in current school safety programs and re- 
assign personnel as needed. Such examination shrill include painting 
additional crosswalks, installation of tr£if fie control signals etc. 

2. Upon com.pletion of the school safety anailysis, school officials on 
all levels should design and implement safety education programs in 
each school to acquaint parents, teachers and students of the possible 
safety hazards which miay be present in a new school assignment. 
Printed materials and on-site visitations shall be included in such 
individual programs in presenting proper school crossing procedures 
and areas to students who n-;ay be unfamiliar with such areas. 

3. V\/here blind intersections exist for the motorist, adequate signs 
shall be placed to alert the pedestrian student end the motorist to 
assure the safety of students walking to school. 

4. Local and state safety instructors should continue to present s;»fety 
education programs in all schools. 



v-So 

5. The autiiority of local school ofricials to detcrmit-.s wh^rs sL-udents 

crx)ss roadways, whi-rs school monitors are dc-ployad ar\d othsr 
safety measures should be maintained to assure pupil safety. 

School Transportation 
Basic Consideration : 

1 V^here local school officials deem it necessary by reason of distance 

or safety consideration,, transportation should be provided and such 
routes shall be deten-rtined according to present practice. 

2. School bus drivers must be duly licensed and school buses must be 
validly registered in conformity with the laws of the Comnrion wealth 
of Massachusetts . 

3. Where new routes are utilized, pick-up points and points of discharge 
. should be determined which do not present hazardous conditions for 

students boarding the bus: such stops should be made in areas which 
are out of the major traffic flow and utilizing so far as possible 
present centralized points in the area, including shopping center 
parking lots or church parking areas. 
■Reconnnnendations: 

1 . School bus monitors should be provided on each bus and it should be 

the responsibility of such persons to assure the safety of the students 
while boarding and leaving thie bus. School officials and safety oiricers 
should instruct all monitors. 

2. School principals should periodically review the school bus boarding 

'areas at dismissal time in order to prevent conditions ha;:ardous to the 
safety of s^chool b'..'s riders. 



v-61 



In the event that pedestrian students and those students who are 
transported cause a safety problem because of the intern-.ix around 
waiting buses, the principal should recommend that pedestrian stu- 
dents be delayed until the buses depart. 



V - 62 



Kindergarten Enrollment 

School enrollment for both Kindergarten I and Kindergarten II 
classes, during the 1975-1976 academic year, will be based on tradi- 
tional attendance patterns. It is anticipated that v;ith few excep- 
tions, the school enrollment of kindergarten students v/ill correspond 
to their neighborhood area, 

Geocodes corresponding to each school have been noted on the 
following pages. A geocode includes approximately three to five blocks. 
In some insts.ices, one p-art of a geocode may be nearer one school, while 
the other part is nearer another school. Parents Viho live in such a 
geocode will have the opportunity to choose either school. These unique 
geocodes are noted under the split geocode heading. 

Transportation needs have also been addressed and vjHI be provided 
for children who othervfise would have to travel dangerous routes to and 
from school. 



V - 63 



School : ABH/JiAI-IS 



Rooms Needed: 2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 
563,56!4,66U 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs: NOiG 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : ADAIIS 



Rooms Needed ]_ j^qOH 



Geocodes: 



3U,35 



Transportaxion Needs: :;oiE 
(1) For Distance 



Split Geocodes: 



(2) For Safety 



V - 61; 



School: AGASSI. 



Rooms Needed: 5 koqMS and 1 TAB 



Geocodes: 

510, 569, 573-576, 6U0, 
6U2-652 



Split Geocodes: 

6U0 (Also at Kennedy) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 
573-576, 6U0 

(2) For Safety 

510 - Railroad tracks; Morton Street, Forest Hills Intersection 
569 - Pennsylvania Central Railroadj 'Jashington Street. 



School: ALI7r:i:I?.I 



Roo.T,s Needed 2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

27-29,355,356 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: I'OIS 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 6$ 



School : AUDUBON 



Rooms Needed: 2 ROQIS and ALCOVE 



Geocodes: 

U6U-U66,565,566,331 



S-olit Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 

U66 - Blue Hill Avenue and Morton Street 



School: 3AC0N 



Roo.TiS Needed ^ ROOM 



Geocodes: 

27U-276,235-2P);,?39 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School: 



3 . B/JCiiil 



V - 66 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

265,266,267,296,311 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: BAL;J.iI.\' 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

776,7SU-?87, 791, 85U 



Split Geocodes: 

776 (also at '.-'inship) 

73U (Jackson-Mann) 

788 (Hamilton) 

85U (Jackson-Mann) 



Transportation Needs; MOIE 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School : 



BARRETT 



V - 67 



Rooms Needed: 



1 Roai 



Geocodes: 
812-815 



Split Geocodes: 



811 (Also at Gardner) 



Transportation Needs: ^jqi^h 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: B-iRRON 



Roons Needed 2 ROCX'S 



Geocodes: 

U99,501,56l 



Split Geocodes: 

561 (Also at Fhilbrick) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

561 - Pennsylvania Central Railroad, Hyde Fark Avenue 



S^^°°^= J. BATES 



V - 68 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

166-169,172,352 



Split Geocode£ 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: P. BATZ3 



RooES Needed ^ ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

550-552, 66?, 6^:1, 635, "28 



Split Geocodes: 

550-552 (Also at Conley) 
681 (Also at Sumner) 



Transportation Needs: 
(l) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School: B^ETKOVE:! 



V - 69 



Rooms Needed: 2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

51^, .ai-7lU, 821 



Split Geocodes: 

322 (See Ohrenberger) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: ^'7 \ "^'■^o? T^ 



Rooms Needed 



3 ROOIiS 



Geocode; 



U2y-U32,333,?3U 



TrcLr;sportatio:i Ileedc 
(1) For Distance 



Split Geocodes; 



(2) For Safety 



School ; 



BiUDLLT 



V - 70 



Rooms Needed; 



1 Roai 



Geocodes: 
2,8-11 



Split Geocodes: 



10 (Also Guild) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: BUNKIiR HILL 



Rooms Needed -j^ rooij 



Geocodes: 
U7-53 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 71 



School ; 



BURIIILLM 



Rooms Needed: 



1 ROOM 



Geocodes: 



212,213,220,221 



Split Geocoriec: 

213 (Also Condon) 

220 (Also Perkins) 

221 (Also Tynan) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : CAMHON 



Rooms Needed 2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

695,720,73U-7U0,7U6,7U7 



Split Geocodes: 



Trar. sport at ion Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

7U6,7U7,720 

(2) For Safety 



School : C/JITSR 



V - 72 



Rooms Needed: j ROOM 



Geocodes: 

1145,1U7,1U3,15U,155, 
233,28U,59U,597 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School ; 



chai::jing 



Rooms Needed 



2 Roais 



Geocodes: 



533-53?, 539, 5U0 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



Split Geocodes; 



(2) For Safety 



School ; 



CHAK1AN 



V - 73 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 
2U-26 



Split Goocodcs; 

2U (Also O'Donnell) 
26 (Also O'Donnell) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School; 



CHE72RU3 



Rooms Needed ^ ROQ-IS 



Geocodes: 
12-15 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School: 



CHITTICK 



V - 71* 



Rooms Needed: 



3 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 
U78-U39 



Split Geocodes: 
U78 (Also Lowell Mason) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : CLAP 



Rooncs Needed 3 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

185-189, 235-237, 2Uo, 2U5 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

237 - Massachusetts Avenue, Coliimbia Road, Boston Street 

2U0 - Columbia Road, Intersection 

2U5 - Dorchester Avenue, Columbia Road Intersection 



V - 75 



School : 



COflDON 



Rooms Needed: ^ ^^^^^ 



Geocodes: 



196-207, 210, 211, 21U, 215 
853 



Split Geocodes: 

213 (See Burnham) 
216 (See Perkins) 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : CONLEY 



Rooms Needed 2 ROOliS and 1 BA33i;-lNT HXM 



Geocodes: 

5U7,5U3, 553-557 



Split Geocodes: 

550 (See P. Bates) 

551 (See P. Bates) 

552 (See P. Bates) 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School ; 



J. CURLEI 



V - 76 



Rooas Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

610,633-637, 639, 6Ul 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: GUSHING 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

3U6-3U9 



Split Geocodes: 
3U0 (Also at Mather) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 77 



School : 



DEV-CR 



Rooms Needed: 



2 RCXWS 



Geocodes: 



256,8U2,8h3 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



Split Geocodes: 



School: DICK^K-IAN 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodas: 



321-323, 326-323, 8U0 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



Split Geocodes: 



(2) For Safety 



School: ELIOT 



V - 78 



Rooms Needed: -^ 



ROCM 



Geocodes: 

79-91,95,96 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: 2LLJS 



Rooms Needed 



U ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

297, 293, 30U, 306, 307, 316 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

297,298 

(2) For Safety 

30U - Walnut Avenue, Washington Street, Dangerous Crossing 



V - 79 



School: ^i^sOU 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

175-18U,263,8U6 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

178,179 

(2) For Safety 

182 - Dudley Street, Shirley Street 

183 - Dudley Street, E. Cottage Street, Shirley Street 
18U - Railroad tracks, Dudley Street, Shirley Street 
180 - Dudley Street, Magazine Street 

16U - Dudley Street, Magazine Street 



School: E:sT)ICOTT 



Rooms Needed 2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

U56-U59 



Split Geocodes: 

U?6 - (Also S. Greenwood) 
U57 - (Also 3. Greenwood) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 80 



School : 



EVERETT 



Geocodes: 

2la-2Uli,2U7,255,257,823 



Rooms Needed: 



Split Geocodes; 



3 ROOMS 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: FAIRIIOiniT 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROaiS 



Geocodes: 

511-516 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 
(l) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 81 



School : FA!ffiUIL 



Rooms Needed: 2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

61-78, 92-9 U, 97-110, 
120,12'^-lUU,598 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

120,128-1U1|,598 

(2) For Safety 



School: FARRADGUT 



Rooms Needed 1 RoOfl and 1 ALC0\^ 



Geocodes: 



Split Geocodes: 



603-605, 611, 612, 613, 615, 616, 593 613 (Also Milmore ) 

6IU (Also Milmore) 



Transportatio:i Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 82 



School; 



FSr.VICK 



Rooms Needed; 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 



253,259,327,233,239 



Split Geocodc£ 



327 (Also at Hawthorne) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 

233 - Dudley Street, New York Central Railroad 
239 - Dudley Street, New York Central Railroad 



School: FIFIELD 



Rooms Needed 



3 Roa^s 



Geocodss: 

398,399,J4l7,U3U-U36 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 83 



School : 



FULLER 



Rooms Needed; 



2 HOOMS 



Geocodes: 



567,568,570,571 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



Split Geocodes: 



School: 



GARDrSR 



Roorr.3 Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

807,809-811,816 



Split Geocodes: 
811 (Also Barrett) 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School: GARFIELD 



V - 8U 



Rooms Needed: 2 ROQ-IS 



Geocodes: 

755-757,761,765,766, 
768 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 
755-757 . 

(2) For Safety 



School ; 



GARRISON 



Rooms Needed 



U ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

317-320,838 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



7-85 



School : 



E. GRESirWOOD 



Rooms Heeded: i d-.quc 



Geocodes: 



Split Geocorics; 



U91-l498,5l9,520 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

U98,519,520 

(2) For Safety 



School: s. GRBIilirJOOD 



Rooms Needed 3 rqCHS 



Geocodes: 



Ul4U-Ui;6,e35 



Split Geocodes: 

U56 (See Endicott) 
U57 (See Endicott) 



Triir.sportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School : GREW 



V - 86 



Rooms Needed : 2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

533, 5ia-?U6, 521-523, 

827 



Split Geocodes: 

523 (Also at Roosevelt) 
B27 (Also at Roosevelt) 



Trajisportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: GUILD 



RooiTiS Needed 2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 



1,3-7,857 



Split Geocodes: 



10 (Also Bradle7) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School: 



HALE 



V - 87 



Rooms Needed: 



1 ROOM 



Geocodes: 



291,293,300-302 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



Split Geocodes: 



School : 



HALEY 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOHi 



Geocodes: 
$00,503,818 



Split Geocodes: 



(Children from other areas are accepted as space is available, 
portation vfill be provided after registration day) 



Trans - 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

500 - Mt. Hope Street, American Legion Highway 



V - 88 



School: 



HAI-IILTON 



Rooms Needed: 



1 ROOM 



Geocodes; 



7U9, 750, 113-llS, 7^8, 789, 790 



Split Geocodes: 

750 (Also V/inshio) 
733 (Also Baldv;in) 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : ilv.<'THO?j;E 



Rooms Needed 



1 ROa'i 



Geocodos: 

260,261 



Split Geocodes: 

327 (Also at Fenwick) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

325 - Howard Avenue Intersections 



School: H3IE:r.;AI 



V - 89 



Rooms Needed: 2 ROOKS 



Geocodes: 
525-532 



Split Geocodes: 
523 (See F. Roosevelt) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: HEMIUGM 



Roorus Needed |^ j^q^.,^^ ^^ ^ j^g 



Geocodes: 

581,533-536,606-603, SU; 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

535 
586 
606 
603 



Parker Hill Avenue, Heath Street 

Parker Hill Avenue, Ilealh Street, Fisher Jtreet 

Fisher Avenue, Heath Jtreet 

So, Huntineton Avenue, lieath itreet 



School: 



HERXA:raEZ 



V - 90 



Rooms Needed: 



1 ROCSi 



Geocodes: 
331,333 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



HIGGEJSON 



Rooms Needed 



1 ROOM 



Geocodes: 



305,308,309,310 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



Split Geocodes: 



(2) For Safety 



School : H0LD2N 



V - 91 



Rooms Needed: ^ j^qq,^ ^^ -^ ALCOVE 



Geocodes: 
U6,5U,58 



Split Geocodes: 

h5 (Also '..'arren Prescott) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



HOLL\i-,T) 



Rooms Needed 



5 ROOMS and 1 LAB 



Geocodes: 

329, 330, 33^-337, 3U1, 
1460,839,3 m 



Split Geocodes: 
3UO (See Ilather) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

329,330,3141,839 

(2) For Safety 



V - 92 



School : 



HURLEY 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

156-159, 170, 171, 2-^3, 851 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: 



J ack3o:j -AAir: 



RooiTiS Needed 



U ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

779-783, 792-SOU,P20 



Split Geocodes: 

778 (Also rJonship) 
73U (Also Baldwin) 
85U (Also Baldwin) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) Foi- Distance 
779-783, SOU, 792, 793, 797 

(2) For Safety 

79U - Brighton Street, Allston Street Intersections 



V - 93 



School: 



J. F. KZIi\'2DY 



Geocodes: 



578-580, 582, 609, 633, P.U5 



Rooms Needed; 



2 ROOMS 

1 Roa-i 



Split Geocodes; 



6U0 (Also at Agassiz) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: p. ke::nedy 



Rooms Needed 2 ROCKS 



Geocodes: 

18-20, 36, 82U 



Split Geocodes: 

82U (Also Sheridan) 
17 (See Sheridam) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School : 



KEI-JNI 



V - 9U 



Rooms Heeded: 



3 ROOl^ 



Geocodes: 

379-336,339 



Split Geocodes: 

390 (Also at Richards) 

391 (Also at Richards) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

385,356,3^9 

(2) For Safety 

382-33U - Gallivan Boulevard, ^leponset Circle 



School : K^:;! 



Rooms Needed i^ poQ-.g ^^^^ -^ ^.^3 



Geocodes: 



37-39,UO-U3,57,60 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



Split Geocodes: 



(2) For Safety 

60 - City Square, Chelsea street, !'.3TA tracks 



School : 



KII^ISR 



V - 95 



Rooms Needed: 



3 iiOOMS 



Geocodes: 



710, 715-719, 721-728 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



Split GeocoricG; 



School : 



LEE 



Rooms Needed 



6 i?OOMS and 1 LAB 



Geocodes: 



Split Geocodes: 



U37-UU3, Ui7-)i50, 86o, 861 



Transportation Needs; 
(l) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 96 



School : LINCOLN 



Rooms Needed: 



3 HOOKS 



Geocodes: Split Geocodes; 

Ul, 112, 118, 119, 121, 122, 
125-127, 160-165 

Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

16C-165 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



LOGUE 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes; 



Split Geocodes; 



U67-J47O, U77 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For DistcUice 



(2) For Safety 



V - 97 



School : 



LONGFELLOW 



Geocodes: 

661-663, 665-667, 670-676 



Rooms Needed: 



U ROOMS 



Split Geocodes: 



677 (also at Lyndon) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: 



LIMDON 



Rooms Needed 



3 ilOOMS 



Geocodes: 

653-660, 669, 677, 678, 
688-69U, 696, 7U8 



Split Geocodes; 



697 (also at Longfellow) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 
658-660, 669 

(2) For Safety 

677,678 - V:. R. Parkway 



School: 



LYON 



7-98 



Rooms Needed: 



2 HOOMS 



Geocodes: 

751-75U, 758-760 



Split Geocodus; 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 
751, 753, 75U 

(2) For Safety 



School ; 



MANN 



Rooms Needed 



3 .100MS 



Geocodes: Split Geocodes: 

^66-272, 277-232, 268, 290, 292, 

29U, 295, 299, QUI 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

2.69, 270-272, 286, 290, 292, 8U7 

(2) For Safety 

282 - vrarren Street, Dangerous Ci'ossings 

29u, 295, 299 - St. Jeunes Street, V/arren Street 

268, 277-280 - Hai-rison Avenue, Dearborn Street, Dudley Street, 
Warren Street 



School: ji^TjiNG 



V - 99 



Rooms Needed: ■> oqqm 



Geocodes: 
653-657 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



MAIiSHALL 



Rooms Needed 



5 ROOMS Mm 1 LP3 



Geocodes: Split Geocodes: 

3U2-345, 352, 356, 357, U5U, U55, 
U6l, U62, 836 

Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

U5U, li55 - Washington Street, Eowdion Street 



V - 100 



School : 



L. m;5on 



Rooms Needed; 



1 .iOOM 



Geocodes: 



U71, 173-^75, U90 



Split Geocodei 



U78 (See Chittick) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 

U78, U90 - Wood Avenue, Cumraings Highway 



School: 



KAIH2R 



Rooms Needed 



k ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

332, 33U, 338, 339, 3^40, 



Split Geocodes: 

3liO (also Gushing) 



Transportation Heeds: 

(1) For Distance 
332 

(2) For Safety 

334 - Bowdion Street, Adans Street 



School : 



McKAI 



V - IQl 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 
30, 32, 33 



Split Geocodes: 



30 (also Alighieri) 
33 (also Adaiis) 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



HEND2LL 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes; 



303, 572, 577, 858 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



Split Geocodes: 



(2) For Safety 



V - 102 



School: uTri,n-,r> Rooms Needed: 

MIIilORE 1 HOOM 



Geocodes: Split Geocodes: 

591, 592, 595, 596, 599, 6lli, 613 (also at Farragut) 

6m (also at Fsurragut) 
617-632 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

591, 618, 619, 620, 621, 629, 630 

(2) For Safety 

592 - Park Drive, Parkview Drive, Boylston Street 



School: Roonis Needed 

MOPwHIS 2 ROOMS ;JJD AN ALCO'/E 



Geocodes: Split Geocodes: 

697-709 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School ; 



MOTLEY 



V - 103 



Rooms Needed: 



2 aoc^ns 



Geocodes: 

2U6, 2U8-252, 2$k 



Split Geocodc 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



MOZAilT 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 



682, 683, 681i, 686, 687 



Transportation Needs; 
(l) For Distance 



Split Geocodes; 



(2) For Safety 



V - lou 



School; 



MUZlPhT 



Rooms Needed: 



5 ilOOMS and 1 L^B 



Geocodes: 



353, 367-378, 819 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

353, 367, 372, 275, 376, 378, Dl9 

(2) For Safety 



School: 



0'D0N:J3LL 



Rooms Needed 



I ROOM 



Geocodes: 
23 



Split Geocodes: 



2k (See Chapman) 
26 (See Chapman) 



Transportation Needs; 
(l) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 105 



School: «, 



0'HEA.-UI 



Rooms Needed: 



U ROOMS 



Geocodes: Split Geocodcc: 

360, 361, 363t36$, 396, 817 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 
817 

(2) For Safety 



School ; 



OHRSirBERCSx^ 



Rooms Needed 



h ROjMS 



Geocodes: 

822, 825, 826 



Split Geocodes: 



822 (also at Beethoven) 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School: 



' RSILLI 



V - 106 



Rooms Needed: 



2 aOOMS 



Geocodes: 



17h, 190-195 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



OTIS 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 
21, 22, 31 



Split Geocodes: 



Traj:isportation Needs; 
(l) For Distsjice 



(2) For Safety 



School: 



PAINS 



V - 107 



Rooms Needed; 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 
U63, 859 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



PERKINS 



Geocodes: 
216-219 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Split Geocodes: 



216 (also Condon) 
220 (see Bumham) 



Tremsportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School : 



PERRY 



V - 108 



Rooms Needed: 



3 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

228, 231, 232, 23u 



Split Geocodes: 



23i4 (also Tynan and Tuckerman) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School; 



PHILBRICK 



Rooms Needed 



1 ROOM 



"Geocodes: 
502 



Split Geocodes: 



56l (also at Barron) 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 109 



School : 



QUINCT 



Rooms Needed; 



1 ROOM 



Geocodes; 



113-117, 123, 12U, 173 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



Split Geocodes; 



School : 



RICE 



Rooms Needed 



1 liOOM 



Geocodes: 

lii6, II49-153 



Split Geocodes: 



21ransporiation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

1U6, 1U9 - Penn Central Railroad, Colurabus Avenue 



V - no 



School ; 



RICHAilDS 



Rooms Needed: 



2 :yx)HS 



Geocodes: 

366, 390-39U 



Split Geocodes: 



390 (also Kenny) 

391 (also Kenny) 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



HIPLEI 



Rooms Needed 



2 UOOMS 



Geocodes: 



729-733, 7U1-7U5 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

729, ihS 

(2) For Safety 



V - 111 



School : 



R0CHAM3EAU 



Rooms Needed : 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

253, 350, 351, 35U, 355 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 

350- Dorchester Avenue , Fields Comer 

253- Penn Central Railroad, MBTA Lines 



School : 



F. D. ROOSEVELT 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes; 



517, 518, 52U. 



Split Geocodes: 



523 (also at Crew) 
827 (also at Grew) 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



School : 



SEAVER 



V - 112 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 
-50U-509 



Split Geocodcc: 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 
509 

(2) For Safety 

508 - Hyde Park Avenue 



School: 



SHERIDAN 



Rooms Needed 



2 ROOV^ 



Geocodes: 
16, 17 



Split Geocodes: 



17 (also P. Kennedy) 
82i; (also P. liennsdy) 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - J_LJ 



School ; 



STONE 



Rooras Needed: 



2 xlDOHS 



Geocodes: 



Split Geocodes: 



353, 359, 362, 397, 1^51-453, 837 



358 (also Marshall) 
837 (also Marshall) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

397 - Codman Square Intersection 



School ; 



STOR-iOW 



Rooms Needed 



1 iiOOM 



Geocodes: 

805, 806, 80S, 76? 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs; 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - ULii 



School: 



SUl-INER 



Rooms Needed: 



2 HOOMS 



Geocodes: 

558-^60, 562, 679-680 



Split Geocodes: 



681 (also at P. Bates) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 
681 

(2) For Safety 

558, 559 - Cumins Highway 



School : 



TAYLOR 



Rooms Needed 



6 ROOMS 



Geocodes; 



387, 388, 395, U00-U16, 
la8-J+20, 830 



Split Geocodes; 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

387, 388, 395, U0O-U03, U06, 830 

(2) For Safety 



V - J-L!> 



School: 



TILESTON 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 

Ii21-i426, U72, li76, 829 



Split Geocorics; 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 
829 

(2) For Safety 

hl2, U76 - Blue Hill Avenue, .-tailroad tracks 



School : 



TOBIN 



Rooms Needed 



h ROOMS 



Geocodes: 



Split Geocodes: 



587-590, 600-602, 81^8-650 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

590 - 3,uggles Street, Parker Street 

589 - Parker Street, Intersection 

850 - Parker Street, Intersection 



School: TROTTER 



V - U6 



Rooms Needed ; 



k ROOMS 



Geocodes: 
312-315 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School : 



TUCKERMAN 



Geocodes: 

203, 223, 22h, 227 



Rooms Needed 



2 xROOMS 



Split Geocodes: 



226 (See Tynan) 
23C (See Tynan) 
23U (See Tynan) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 117 



School: 



TYNAII 



Rooms Needed: 



h ROOMS and 1 LAB 



Geocodes: 

209, 222, 22i>, 226, 229, 230, 233 



Split Geocodes: 



226 (also 'I\ickennan) 
230 (also Tuckerman) 
23U (also Tuckerman) 
221 (see Bumham) 



Transportation Needs: 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: v.rAa.-G::-P.^":SCOTT 



Rooms Needed 



2 iiOOKS 



Geocodes: 
Uii, -*U5, i>5, i>6, 59 



Split Geocodes: 

hS (Also Kolden) 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 

59 - V;arren ^.treet, Rutherford Avenue, High Street 



Y - llB 



School : 



WINSHIP 



Rooms Needed: 



2 ROOIiS 



Geocodes: 

762-76U, 769-772, 777, 778 



Split Geocodes; 



7$0 (see Kamilton) 

776 (see Baldwin) 

778 (also Jackson-Mann) 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



School: 



WINTHROP 



Rooms Needed 



1 ROOM 



Geocodes: 

262, 26U, 32U, 325 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - lip 



School ; 



WOLCOTT 



Rooms Needed: 



3 ROOMS 



Geocodes: 



1x27, U28, h33, 832 



Transportation Needs; 

(1) For Distance 

(2) For Safety 



Split Geocodes: 



School ; 



Rooms Needed 



Geocodes; 



Split Geocodes: 



Transportation Needs: 
(1) For Distance 



(2) For Safety 



V - 120 



kuhdergarten enrollment 



Geocodes 


School 


Geocodes 


School 


1 


Guild 


58 


Koldon 


2 


Bradley 


59 


W. Prescott 


3-7 


CuUd 


60 


Kent 


8-n 


Bradley 


61-78 


Faneuil 


12-15 


Choverus 


79-91 


Eliot 


16 


Sheridan 


92-9U 


Faneuil 


^^17 


Sheridan 


95-96 


Eliot 


18-20 


P. Kennedy 


97-110 


Faneu3.1 


21 


Otis 


111-112 


Lincoln 


22 


Otis 


113-117 


Ciilncj 


23 


O'Donnell 


118-219 


Lincoln 


*2U, 2$, *26 


Chapman 


120 


Faneuil 


27-29 


Alighieri 


121-122 


Lincoln 


*30 


McKay 


123-12U 


Qu5.iicy 


31. 


Otis 


125-127 


l.l.)i(;oln 


32,53 


McICay 






3U,3$ 


Adams 


128-114; 


Fanoull 


36 


P. Kennedy 


lu5 


Carter 


37-ii3 


Kent 


1U6 


Rice 


UU-*U5 


W. Prescott 


1U7-1U8 


Carter 


he 


Holden 


149-153 


Rice 


U7-53 


Bunker iini 


.15U-155 


Cnrter 


5U 


Holden 


156-1>9 


Hurley 


J»^-56 


W. Prescott 


160-165 


Lincoln 


57 


Kent 


166-169 


J, Bates 



V - 121 



Geocodes 


School 


170-171 


Hurley 


172 


J. Bates 


173 


Qulncy 


17U 


O'Reilly 


175-l81i 


Eiiierson 


185-189 


Clap 


190-195 


O'Reilly 


196-207 


Condon 


208 


Tuckerman 


209 


Tynan 


210-211 


Condon 


212 


Burnhan 


*213 


Bumhan 


21Ii-2l5 


Condon 


*216 


Perkins 


217-219 


Perkins 


*220 


Bumham 


*221 


Bomham 


222 


Tynan 


223 


Tuckerman 


22U 


Tuckerman 


225 


Tynan 


*226 


Tynan 


227 


Tuckerman 


228 


Perry 


229 


Tynan 



Geocodes 


School 


♦230 


Tynan 


231-232 


Perry 


233 


Tynan 


*23U 


Perry 


235-237 


Clap 


238-239 


Fenwick 


2U0 


Clap 


2l4l-2Ui 


Everett 


2U5 


Clap 


2U6 


Motley 


2li7 


Everett 


2U8-252 


Motley 


253 


Rochambeau 


25U 


Motley 


255 


Everett 


256 


Dever 


257 


Everett 


256-259 


Fenwick 


260-261 


Havrthome 


262 


Winthrop 


263 


Emerson 


26a 


Winthrop 


265-267 


S. Baker 


265-272 


Mann 


273 


Hurley 


27U-276 


Bacon 



V - 122 



Geocodes 

277-282 

283-28U 

285-267 

288 

269 

290 

291 

292 

293 

29li-295 

296 

297-298 

299 

300-302 

303 

30U 
305 

306-307 
308-310 

311 
312-313 

316 
317-320 



School 

Kann 

Carter 

Bacon 

Harm 

Bacon 

Maiin 

Hale 

Mann 

Hale 

Mann 

S. Baker 

Ellis 

Mann 

Hale 

Mendell 

Sllis 

Higginson 

Ellis 

Higginson 

S. Baker 

Trotter 

Ellis 

Garrison 



Geocodes 

321-323 

32U-325 

326 

327 

328 

329-330 

331 

332 

333 

33U 

335-337 

338-339 

*3U0 

31a 

3U2-2U5 

2U6-2U9 

350-351 

352 

353 

35U-355 

356-357 

*358 

359 



School 

Dickerman 

Winthrop 

Dickennan 

Fenwick 

Dickennan 

Holland 

Hernandez 

Kather 

Hernandez 

Mather 

Holland 

Mather 

Mather 

Holland 

Marshall 

Gushing 

Roctiambeau 

Marshall 

Miirphy 

Rochambeau 

Marshall 

Stone 

Stone 



V - 123 



Geocodes 


School 


Geocodes 


School 


360-361 


0' He am 


Ii$Ii-U5i> 


Marshall 


362 


Stone 


«Uj>6-*U$7 


Endicott 


363-36$ 


O'Keam 


Ui>8-Ui>9 


Endicott 


366 


Hichards 


U60 


Holland 


367-378 


Kurphy 


l;6l-U62 


Marshall 


379-386 


Kenny 


I463 


Paine 


387-388 


Taylor 


I16U-U66 


Audubon 


389 


Kenny 


U67-U70 


Logue 


*390-*391 


Richards 


1+71 


L. Mason 


392-39h 


Richards 


li72 


Tileston 


395 


Taylor 


U73-li75 


L. Mason 


396 


D'Heeum 


hie 


Tileston 


397 


Stone 


U77 


Logue 


398-399 


Fifield 


*U78-li89 


Chittick 


Uoo-ia6 


Taylor 


h90 


L. Mason 


ai? 


Fifield 


U91-U98 


E. Greenwood 


iaB~u20 


Taylor 


li99 


Barron 


U21-ii26 


Tiles ton 


bOO 


Kaley 


l;27-ii23 


Wolcott 


501 


Barron 


U29-li32 


Bradford 


302 


Philbrick 


U33 


Wolcott 


503 


Haley 


li3U-U36 


Fifield 


i>OU-509 


i'eaver 


U37-lili3 


Lee 


510 


Agassiz 


hhh-Uh6 


S. Greenwood 


511-$16 


Fairmount 


hhl-kbO 


Lee 


517 


F. Roosevelt 


U51-U53 


Stone 


518 


F. iloosevelt 



7 - 12U 



Geocodes 

519-320 

b21-*523 

i>2U 

i>25-i>32 

533-i>37 

338 

339-5UO 

3ia-3U6 

3U7-5U5 

3U9 

*530 

*331 

*53a 

353-557 

b58-560 

*56l 

362 

363-3 6U 

365-366 

567-368 

369 

570-571 

372 

573-576 

577 

578-580 
531 



School 

E. Greenwood 
Grew 

F. Roosevelt 
Hemenway 
Charming 
Grew 

Channing 
Grew 
Conley 
Beethoven 
Pi Bates 

?, Bates 

P. Bates 

Conley 

Sunuier 

Barron 

Sumner 

Abrahams 

Audubon 

Fuller 

Agassiz 

Fuller 

Kendell 

Agassiz 

liendell 

J. F. Kennedy 

Hennigan 



Geocodes 


School 


582 


J. F. Kennedy 


5S3-536 


Hennigan 


587-590 


Tobin 


591-592 


Kilraore 


593 


Farragut 


59li 


Carter 


595-596 


Kilmore 


597 


Garter 


598 


Faneuil 


599 


Kilmore 


600-602 


Tobin 


603-665 


Farragut 


606-608 


Hennigan 


609 


J. F. Kennedy 


610 


J. Curley 


611-612 


Farragut 


«6l3 


Farragut 


*6l k 


Milmore 


615-616 


Farragut 


617-632 


Kilmore 


633-637 


J, Curley 


638 


J. F. Kennedy 


639 


J. Curley 


*6Ii0 


Agassiz 


6ia 


J. Curley 


6142-652 


Agassiz 



V - 125 



Geocodes 


School 


653-657 


Kanning 


658-660 


Lyndon 


661-663 


Longfellow 


66U 


Abrahams 


665-667 


Longfellow 


668 


P. Bates 


669 


LjTidon 


670-676 


Longfellow 


*677,678 


Lyndon 


679-680 


Sumner 


*681 


P. Bates 


682-68U 


Mozart 


685 


P. Bates 


686-687 


Kozart 


688-69U 


Lyndon 


695 


Cannon 


696 


L;,-ndon 


697-709 


Morris 


710 


Kilraer 


7II-7IU 


Beethoven 


715-719 


Ki33uer 


720 


Cannon 


721-728 


Kilmer 


729-733 


Ripley 


73U-7U0 


Cannon 



Geocodes 


School 


7ia-7U5 


Ripley 


7U6-7U7 


Cannon 


7U8 


Lyndon 


7ii9 


Hamilton 


*750 


Hamilton 


75l-751i 


Lyon 


755-757 


Garfield 


758-760 


I^on 


761 


Garfield 


762-761i 


Wlnship 


765-766 


Garfield 


767 


Storrow 


768 


Garfield 


769-772 


Winship 


773-775 


Hamilton 


*776 


Baldwin 


m 


Winship 


*778 


yinship 


779 


Jackson/Mann 


780-783 


Jackson/IIann 


->7Qh 


Baldwin 


785-787 


Baldidji 


♦738 


Hffiiilton 


789-796 


Ka-^ilton 


791 


Baldwin 


792 -3 OU 


Jackson/Mann 



V - 126 



Geocodes 


School 


Geocode 


School 


805-306 


Storrow 


*&37 


Stone 


807 


Gardner 


838 


Garrison 


808 


Storrow 


839 


Holland 


809-810 


Gardner 


8U0 


Dickenaan 


*8ll 


Gardner 


8la 


Holland 


812-815 


Barrett 


8U2 


Dever 


816 


Gardner 


8U3 


Dever 


817 


O'Heam 


Bhh 


Kennigan 


818 


Kaley 


8U5 


J. F. Kennedy 


819 


Murphy 


8U6 


Emerson 


820 


JacksonAiann 


8U7 


Kann 


821 


Beethoven 


SU8-850 


Tobin 


*822 


Ohrenberger 


851 


Hurley 


823 


Sverett 


852 


J. Bates 


82U 


P. Kennedy 


853 


Condon 


825 


Ohrenberger 


*85U 


Baldwin 


826 


Ohrenberher 


855 


Alighieri 


*827 


Grew 


856 


ATighieri 


828 


P. Bates 


857 


Guild 


829 


Tileston 


858 


Kendell 


830 


Taylor 


859 


Paine 


831 


Audubon 


860 


Lee 


832 


VJolcott 


861 


lee 


833-83U 


Bradford 






835 


S. Greenwood 






836 


Marshall 







* signifies split geocodes 



SEC?riON VI - ALTERNATIVE- STUDENT DESEGREGATION PLAN: 
ASSIGNMENT PROCESS 



VI-1 
VI. Assignment Process 
A. Preparation 

The preparation or orientation of parents, students and professionals 
for Alternative Student Desegregation Plan is essential to its effective 
implementation. The Committee has indicated in Section VII of this doc- 
ument a schedule of activities in this regard. It is the intent of the 
Committee to utilize the following approach to prepare persons to make pro- 
gram selections: 

Opinionnaires 

Media Presentations 

School Information Center 

Regional Meetings 

Brochures to Parents 

Local School Advisory Council Sessions 

Meetings of School Bi-Racial Councils 
The process of preparation has already begun. At the behest of the 
Boston School Committee, a preliminary survey entitled - Educational 
Programs Opinionnaire - was distributed on December 16, 197^+ to pai-ents, 
professionals and secondary school students. The survey v.'hich is enclosed 
in the Appendix sought to determine general interest in educational programs. 

The draft of a report on the initial results of the survey is also 
included in .the Appendix. The results of the survey have been helpful in 
formulating this Alternative Desegregation Plan. 

Efforts will be made to remind citizens of the potential of the School 
Information Center (telephone number 227-8885) as a source of information and 
guidance. Professional staff members of the School Department will augment 
the present staff at the School Information Center as the need arises. 



VI-2 
Finally, planning committees already formed by the Associate Super- 
intendent for Curriculum and Staff Development will devote the next six 
weeks to developing explanatory materials and programs for an intensive effort 
of preparation and orientation in February 1975* The month of February will 
be a period when regional and local meetings will be held and when media pre- 
sentations will be made to explain central and zonal program choices, third 
site programs and assignment procedures. Following this effort to communicate 
with parents, students, and professionals, the staff of the Boston Public 
Schools will be able to request persons to maike their choice of programs and 
schools. 



VI-3 
B. Criteria for Assignment 

The Alternative Student Desegregation Plan is based on the following 
criteria: 

1. There are many students presently in integrated schools that 
are satisfied with the educational experience offered. Parents 
of these students should be permitted priority status in this 
school. 

2. There are also many students in special programs, citywide schools, 
magnet schools who havecsought and accepted placements in the one 
school offering that program. Rather than discontinue the student 
in such particular programs, parents of these students should be 
permitted priority status in their present school. 

3. There is an interest in alternative type programs at all levels of 
instruction and, with a guarantee of quality education in an 
integrated setting, parents will choose these type of programs in 
increasing numbers. 

k. Black students should be afforded an opportunity to an integrated 
education and sufficient seats will be set aside in every school 
for this purpose. The establishment of an Office for Positive 
Action is intended to contribute toward this goal. 

5. Every student should spend some time in an integrated educational 
progrcun and provisions are made in this plan to accomplish this. 

6. Facility uses and designations can be varied depending on the 

nature of choices by parents. Many measures will be employed to allow 
for flexibility in responding to educational choices including use of 
portable type facilities, acquisition and use of non-school spaces, 
use of annexes, an extended school year, and use of third site 
facilities. 



VI-4 

7. Availability of space in suburban schools can contribute in a 
significant way to the successful implementation of the plan. 

8. Transportation will be used in the implementation of the plan. At 
the elementary and middle school levels, it will not entail 
compulsory transportation. Clearly, there is transportation 
involved in third site programs. It is the view of the School 
Committee that such transportation will not be perceived by parents 
as forced busing since they freely chose to enroll their children 
in schools that offered third site programs. 

At the secondary school level, as has always been the case in Boston, 
some students do not live within walking distance to any school. 
Parents of students in these areas have generally not viewed 
transportation as forced busing. 



vi-5 

C. Procedures - Elementary and Middle Schools 

In order to implement the Alternative Student Designation Plan, it will 
be necessary to inform and receive responses from parents of each student 
in the city. It is recommended that the following sequence of parental 
choices be followed until each student is assigned. 
1, Enrollment - Phase I (one week) 

Assignment of a Student to a Continued Educational Experience in Student's 

Present School 

In each of the following situations, parents will be 
asked to exercise a choice of whether their son or 
daughter wishes to remain in his or her present school. 
Transportation will be provided under the usual conditions, 
for parents who indicate a preference to remain in the 
school. Pending response of the parents, assignments will 
be made. 

a. Schools in which Student Population is Racially Mixed 

- Each of the following schools is classified as a racially mixed 
school. The data used to make this judgement was the racial census 
taken . November 1 , 197^+. 

- Limits were established for elementary, middle and high school 
levels within ^3% range of the citywide average as indicated 
by the following table : 

Criteria for School Classification 







Elementciry 




Middle . 


High 






W 


M 


w 


M 


W 


M 


Minimum 


33.1 


36.9 


31.9 


38.1 


kk.O 


26.0 


Average 


ifS.I 


51.9 


46.9 


53.1 


59.0 


4l.O 


Maximum 


63.1 


66.9 


61.9 


68.1 


7^.0 


56.0 



For example, a racially mixed school is identified as follows: 
Elementary - between 33.1^ and 63.1^ White, or 

between 36.9% and 66.9% Black and Minority 



VI-6 
Using this criteria, a list was compiled of all the identifiable racially 
mixed schools within each zone, A list is provided v/ith the % of white students 
indicated. The minority figure can be obtained by subtracting the white % from 
100%. This list would be used for the purpose of continued assignment at 
schools considered to be racially mixed. 



Zone I 



Zone II 



Zone III 



Ele.Tientary 



Middle 



Milmore {.k2,k) 



Clap (^8.0) 
Mason, S. (^.0) 
Motley (60.0) 
O'Reilly (62.5) 



Mackey (37.9) Gavin {hk.^) 
Michelangelo CfZ.?) 



Everett (40.6) 
Fifield (33.3) 
Holland (37.6) 
Kenny (^^3.1) 
Marshall (36.I) 
Mather (5I.8) 
Murphy (6I.3) 
O'Hearn (59.3) 
Richards (47.6) 
Stone (3'+.2) 

Cleveland (38.5) 
Holmes (3^.5) 
King (39.1) 
Wilson ^+6.1) 



VI-7 



Zone IV 



Zone V 



Zone VI 



Elementary 



Middle 



E. Greenwood (5^.3) 
Haley (^2.1) 



Lewenberg (^+3.3) 
Thompson (^.l) 



AbraharaG (55»6) 
Barron (49.5) 
Bates, P. (^+6.2) 
Chittick C+O.l) 
Conley (5'+. 2) 
Mason, L. (33.8) 
Mozart (6O.9) 
Parkman (58. 1) 
Philbrick (40.8) 
Seaver (56.5) 
Sumner (56. O) 
Tileston (33.^+) 

Curley, M. (if2.9) 
Irving (5'+.9) 
Roosevelt (^+2.0) 



Agassiz (60.3) 
Baldwin (5^.0) 
Barrett (6I.I) 
Curley, J. (59-2) 
Hamilton (59.1) 
Hamilton Annex (59. 4) 
Washington-Allston (48.7) 



Edison (40.0) 
Taft (59.7) 



VI-8 
b. Magnet Schools 

Trotter 

Sub-System Middle School 

Bancroft (Blackstone-Bvilfinch) 

Ohrenberger 

Haley 
c« Special Citywide Programs 

Mann (Specieil) 
d. Controlled Transfer Placements (other than hardship) 



VI- 9 
2. Enrollment Phase 2 (one week) 

Assignment of Students to Magnet and Alternative Schools - Citywide 
The parent ^of any student in any school in the city can apply during 
this enrollment phase for placement in one of the citywide educational programs. 
Every attempt will be made to accommodate sill students who apply to the 
extent that, in' the event of oversubscribed and racially representive schools, 
similar programs in new sites will be initiated. Racial integration will be 
a guarantee in each citywide program option school. Limits on cityvide options 
will only be set in the event of oversubscription by one race. In the event that 
limits are set, students will be selected by lot amd waiting lists established. 
Waiting list assignments will be made on a one-to-one basis in the--event of 
future applications by students of another race. Transportation will be 
offered under existing state statutes for students who choose central magnet 
school programs. 

Citywide options are offered in this Enrollment Phase to the following 
schools. 

Elementary Schools 

Trotter 

Subsystem Bradford (as needed) 
Annex 

Carter (as needed) 

Magnet Blackstone (Multi-Lingual/Multi-Cultural 
Schools 



(Thematic) 



Bancroft *^ 

\ pending completion of new facility (Blackstone) 
Perkins J 

Hennigan (Humanities) 

Hernandez (Bilingual/Bicultural) 

Lee (Arts) 



Middle Schools 



Developmental Lewis (plus additional school if needed) 

(Subsystem) 

Magnet Schools Blackstone (Multi-Lingual/Multi-Ctiltural) 

Bulf inch (pending completion of Blackstone ) 



VI-10 
3. Enrollment Phase 3 (one week) 

Assignment of Students to Magnet Schools and Magnet Programs within 
the Zone (one week) 

In this phase, parents may opt at the elementary level for Open Space and 
Contemporary Ungraded schools within the zone. At the middle school level, 
parents may opt for magnet programs of Unified Arts, Humanities and Sciences 
as offered in the zonal middle schools. 

Maximum capacities will be set for these zonal elementary schools and for 
the magnet programs within the middle schools. 

Racial quotas, reflective of the zone will be established in each of these 
schools. In the event of oversubscription of magnet zonal schools or programs, 
assignments will be made by lottery and waiting lists established. In case of 
oversubscription by white and minority students, additional admissions will be 
made on a one-to-one basis up to ^^0% of the maximum capacity. 

Transportation will be offered under the usual conditions for those who 
opt for zonal magnet schools or programs available in the following schools : 

Zone I Zone II Zone III Zone IV Zone V Zojie VI 



! 



4 



Elementary 


Adams 


Bigelow 


Fifield 


E. Greenwood 


Barron 


Baldv/in 




Eliot 


Clap 


O'Hearn 


Grew 


P. Bates 


J.F. Kenned 


onteraporary 


Faneuil 


Hurley 


Stone 


Logue 


Ellis 




Ungraded 


Milmore 






L. Mason 
Tileston 


Sumner 






Condon 


Condon 


Holland 


Cannon 


Cannon 


Agassiz 


Open 


Kent 


Kent 


Marshall 


Haley 


Haley 


J. Curley 




Tynan 


Tynan 


Murphy 


Ohrenberger 


Ohrenberc- 


Jackson 


Middle 












1 


Unified Arts* 


Barnes 


Gavin 


King 


Thompson 


Irving 


Edison ; 


Science* 


Michelangelo 
Edwards 


Russell 


Cleveland 


Rogers 


Parkman 


Curley 


Humanities* 


Mackey 


McCormack 


Holmes 


Lewenberg 


Shaw 


Roosevelt 



* Magnet program capacity to be set 



4 



VI-11 

k, Snrollment Phase k (one week) 

Assignment of Students who Wish to Enroll in a Cross Racial School in the 

Zone 

This phase relates to traditional schools at the elementary level and to 
Learning Style Schools at the middle level. It is the intent during this phase 
to guarantee to a black student or a white student an opportunity to enroll in 
a "cross racial" school within his or her zone. For purposes of determining 
eligibility, each school is designated as Predominantly White (PW), 
Predominantly Minority (PM) or Racially Mixed (RM). 

During this phase, 

white students can opt for any school designated PM 
- black and other minority students can opt for any school 
designated PW. 

Maximum enrollment will be set on minority and white enrollments in cross 
racial schools by establishing quotas that are reflective of the overall zonal 
ratios. 

In the event of oversubscription beyond these percentages, assignments 
will be made by lot and waiting lists kept. Waiting lists will be activated if 
later oversubscription of "other race" students occurs and additional assignments 
made at such a time. Special facility or scheduling arrangements will be re- 
quired in this event as described later in this section. 

Transportation will be offered under the usual conditions for students who 
opt under^this phase. 

No applications will be taken to the following schools during this phase: 

a. Racially Mixed Schools (RM) , or 

b. Schools whose racial designation geographically has been altered by 
"grandfather" assignments as ^described in part VI-C-1. 



VI-12 

The racial designation for each of the following schools is in 
accordance with the racial composition of the student body residing within 
the geocode in which the school is located. 

Cross racial offerings within the zone will be available to the 
Predominantly White and Predominantly Minority schools as listed on the 
next several pages VI-13 to VI-21. 



Vl-1^ 



50HE I 



jCHOOL 





PREDOL'IHANTLY 


PRETX)MINAITTLy 


RACIALLY 


GEOCODE 


WHITE 


MINORITY 


MIXED 


034 


X 






026 


X 






287 




X 




265 




X 




009 


X 






051 


X 






024 


X 






015 


X 






198 


X 






268 




X 




292 




X 




288 




X 




083 


X 






066 






X 


007 


X 






300 




X 




054 


X 






309 




X 




019 


X 






041 


X 






126 






X 


028 


X 






281 




X 




030 


X 






627 






X 


024 


X 






021 


X 







ADAMS 

ALIGHIERI 

BACON 

BAKER, S. 

BRADLEY 

BUNKER HILL 

CHAPMAN 

CHEVERUS 

CONDON 

DEARBORN 

DILLAWAY 

DUDLEY 

ELIOT 

PANEUIL 

GUILD 

HALE 

HOLDEN 

HOTO 

KENNEDY, P. 

KENT 

LINCOLN 

LYMAN 

MANN 

McKAY 

MLMORE 

O'DONNELL 

OTIS 



PABSR 

TYIIAN 

iVARP^IJ-PRESCOTT 

BAFJv}'IS 

CHSVEHUS 

KIST/AKDS 

GUILD 

;.'ACKEY 

MICIffiliAlIGELO 

TBIIITY 

CIIAPiSSTOWlT 

EivST BOSTOIT 



Gk,QC0j2 



847 
016 
225 
055 
023 
015 
053 
007 
152 
C«l 
290 
056 
025 



VI-lU 
'; , ? - (Contiiiued) 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 



X 
X 



aUOTHTY 






. :,L,..j.J 



SCHOOL 



GEOCODE 



ANDREW 


193 


BIGELOW 


211i 


BURNHAM 


221 


CLAJ' 


187 


CONDON 


198 


DKAJI 


229 


DEVER 


256 


EMLRSON 


181 


FENWICK 


327 


HART 


229 


HAWTHORNE 


26U 


HURLEY 


156 


KENT 


Ola 


MASON, S. 


181 


MOTLEY 


252 


C »REILLI 


19h 


PERKINS, M. 


217 


PERRY 


231 


TUCKF.RMAN 


226 


TYNAN 


225 


WINTHROP 


32i| 


GAVIN 


216 


MCCORMACK 


256 


RUSSELL 


236 


S. BOSTON HIGH 


220 


L. STR7,F,T 


233 


BAYSIDE (proposed) 


256 



VI-15 
ZONE II 

PREDOLIDIAXTLY 
V/HITE 



PREDOMINAIITLY 
KIN03ITY 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 



X 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 

X 
X 
X 



X 
X 



X 
X 



X 



RACIALLY 
MI'CED 



VI-16 



Z02G III 







PEEDOL'IlIArTTLY 


PREDOlWTNANTLy 


RACIALLY 


SCHOOL 


GEOCODE 


WHITE 


:!INORI^ 


;.TXZD 


BROOKS 


326 




X 


1 


GUSHING 


346 


Z 






DICKERMAN 


840 




z 




EVERETT 


823 


z 






PIPIELD 


435 




z 




GIBSON 


460 




z 




HOT.TiAND 


337 




z 




KENNY 


379 


z 






LEEN 


402 


z 






MARSHAT.T, 


357 






Z 


HATHKW 


339 


z 






MURPHy 


369 


z 






G'HEARN 


361 


z 






RICHARDS 


392 


z 






HOCHAMBEAU 


355 


z 






STONE 


359 






X 


TAYLOR 


412 


X 






WHITTIER 


437 








CLEVELAND 


352 






X 


HOLMES-CHAMPliAIN 


453 




X 




KING 


328 




X 




WILSON 


403 


X 






BURKB 


329 




z 




DORCHESTER 


455 




X 

1 





VI-17 



ZONE IV 



»_'oriOO.u 


GEOCODE 


predolhitaiitly 

WHITE 


PBEDOMINAiraLy 

KINORITY 


HACI/.ILY 


BAKER, M. 


U68 




X 




BRADFORD 


833 




X 




CANNON 


736 


X 






CHANNTNG 


539 


z 






CHITTICK 


U86 


X 






FAIRMONT 


$16 


X 






GREENWOOD E. 


h92 


X 






GREW 


5U3 


X 






HALEY 


$03 


X 






HEMEIWAI 


$27 


X 






LOGUE 


U68 




r 




MASON L. 


U73 






X 


POOSEVELT, F. 


$2li 


X 






SHAW, P. A. 


833 




X 




THESTON 


U2$ 




X 




WOLGOTT 


832 




X 




OHRENBERGER 


826 


X 






LEWENBERG 
ROGERS 


1;68 

$19 


X 


X 




THOMPSON 


Ul8 




X 




HYDE PKBK HIGH 


U9U 


X 






COTE 


U76 


X 






-. 











vi-18 



ZOIJE V 



SCHOOL 



ABRAHAJ^S 

AUDUBON 

BARRON 

BATES, P. 

BEETHOVEN 

CANNON 

CONIiEI 

ENDICOTT 

ELLIS 

GARRISON 

GREENWOOD, S. 

HALEI 

KILMER 

LONGFELLOW 

LYNDON 

MORRIS 

MOZART 

OHRENBERGER 

PAINE 

PHILBRICK 

RIPLEY 

SEAVER 

SUMNER 

PARKER 

WILLIAMS 

IRVING 

PARKMAN 





PREDOrJINAITTLY 


PHEDOIimTANTLY 


RACIALLY 


GEOCODE 


V.-HITE 


r.inroHiTY 


MIXED 








f 


564 


Z 






464 




X 




501 


X 






551 


X 


• 




712 


X 






736 


X 






553 


X 






457 




X 




316 




X 




318 




X 




445 




X 




503 


X 






717 


X 






674 


X 






692 


X 






702 


X 






683 


X 






826 


X 






859 


X 






502 


X 






743 


X 






506 


X 






562 


X 






677 


X 






316 




X 




558 


X 






508 


X 







SCHOOL 



iSHAW, R.G. 
\ ROSIIUDALE 



» 



GEOCODE 



734 
560 



VI-19 
ZOIvS Y 
PREDOIJIITAXTLY PREDOMIWANTLY 



X 
X 



RACIALLY 
I.nXED 



VI-20 
SOKE VI 



SCHOOL 


GSOCODE 


B.lRRiSTT 


811 


FARROGUT 


605 


F'JLLliR 


570 


G.'ilDNER 


810 


GARFIF.T.D 


761 


KAMILTON 


77U 


HI'XilNSON 


306 


LYON 


760 


MANNING 


656 


KENDELL 


577 


STORROW 


805 


TOBIK 


601 


WINSHIP 


771 


WIMAN 


578 


BALDWIN 


786 


KENNEDY, J.F. 


578 


AGGA.SIZ 


6U8 


CURLFY, J.M. 


635 


JACKSON 


795 


MGKINLtY 


630 


CURLEY, M. (middle) 


635 


ALLEN 


600 


HAMILTON ANNEX 


78U 


OAK SQUARE 


75U 


WASHINGTON ALSTON 


803 


EDISON 


750 


TAFT 


783 



PREDOMINANTLY PREDO?iIIN>\NTLY 
WHITE MINORITY 



RACIALLY 
ICEXED 



X 
X 
X 

r 
z 



X 



X 



X 



X 
X 

X 



X 
X 



X 



X 



X 

X 
X 



X 



VI-21 









ZONE VI 












PREDOMIN INTLY 


PREDOMIN.\NTLY 


RACIALLY 


SCHOOL 




GEOCODE 


WHITE 


MINORITY 


MIXED 


ROOSEVLLT, T. 




572 




Z 




BRIGHTON HIGH 




iQh 






X 


JAM.YIGA PLAIN 


HIGH 


6U7 


I 






BOWDITCK 




61;0 






X 



VI-22 



5- Snrollment Phase 5 (three weeks) 
Assignment of i\ll Remaining Students 

I>aring this phase, all parents v/ho have r.ot exercised an educational 
option may opt for any school withi:: the zone iaui'hdins traditional schools 
at the eleiaentary level, learning style schools at the middle level and arrj 
of the options in the previous four phases where seats are available. 

Kaxirr.'am capacities will be set for each elementary school and for ni:.ddle 
schools not including its magnet theme. Pending finalizatidn of a plai'i which 
locates programs such as kindergarten, advanced woi'k, bilingual, special and 
substantially separate, these capacities will be finalized. All seats v;ill be 
filled up to this program capacity in each school with students who have 
exercised a cross racial option (lV-C-'+) being accoc-jnodated first. 

In the event that a school becomes racially isolated (more than 15% 
beyond the racial ratio of the zone at that level), students attending that school 
will participate in "third-site" programs. 



VI-23 



In the event of oversubscription of a school, all assignments up to 
capacity will be made by lot and a numbered waiting list established. To 
determine the assignment of students on waiting lists, a committee will be 
convened prior to June I975 by the Positive Action Office to include the 
Assistant Superintendent, the Principal of the oversubscribed school, faculty 
representation, and representation of the Bi-Racial Council and Home and 
School Association. The Positive Action Office will prepare recommendations 
for resolution of aill oversubscribed schools. Possible courses of action 
for waiting list students are: 

- assignment to walking distance school with available seats within 
the zone or possibly outside the zone 

re-application to other schools or programs not previously selected 

- annexation of additional facilities (e.g., portables, renovations, 
use of non-school space) 

increasing maximvira capacity and accommodating students within a 
normal. school schedule 

increasing maximum', capacity and accommodating students by utilizing 
an extended school year (e.g., ^5-15 schedule over 12 months) 



VI-2U 

D. Assignment Procedures - oecondary Schools 

In general, the assignment procedures at t]ie secondary level will directly 
parallel the phases outlined for the elementary and middle schools. Insofar as 
ther.. are minor procedural differences, a separate section is included for 
secondary schools. 
1. Enrollment Phase 1 (one week) 

Assignment of a student to a Continued Educational Experience in the 

Student's Present School*. 

An Cj^)tion to remain in their present school will be offered to: 

a. High school peniors - those students who are expected to graduate 
in June 1976. 

b. Those students in attendance this year in the following racially 
mixed* secondary schools 

South Boston k6.2% white Zone II 
Hyde Park 52% white Zone IV 
Roslindale High 72.2% white Zone V 
Brighton High 3^.3% white Zone VI 

c. Those students in the following citywide high schools and programs: 

Boston Trade (residential) 

Copley Square High 

Boston High 

Boston Latin 

Boston Technical 

Girls' Latin 

Cooperative Industrial Programs 

* For criteria - cf Pg. VI-5 



VI-25 
Re: Continued Educational Ebcperience in Present Schools 

1, The number of students in schools that are 
raciailly mixed at elementary, middle and 
secondary levels is approximately 3^i3O0 » 
This figure includes students in grades 5i 
8, and 12 who will not be offered an option 

of returning to the present school. The racial 
composition is as follows: 

Black White Other Total 

High School 3103 ^^+10 ^+98 8011 

Middle 5371 5172 1^26 11 969 

Elementary 5^79 5972 1014 12465 

15953 1555^ 2958 32445 

2. The number of students in schools that are magnet 
schools, citi^vide and examination high schools and 
in cooperative industrial programs is approximately 
9200. This number also includes some students in 
grades 5i 8 and 12 who will not be offered an 
option of returning to the present school. 



71-26 

2. Enrollment Phase 2 (one week) 

Assignment of Students to Citywide High Schools 

A schedule of examination dates has been established for the Examination 
Schools which is independent of the enrollment phases described in this section. 

The assignment procedures for the Latin Schools should be in keeping with 
those described in the Program section of the plan and in accord with the document 
"Proposal of the Boston Latin School Association aind the Girls' Latin School 
Alumnae Association Regarding Student Assignment to the Latin Schools". The 
procedures for admission of new students to Technical would be as in the past. 

Enrollments at these schools would be increased over a three year period by 

approximately 550 seats beginning in September 1975- A specific proposal to 

accomplish this will be developed. 

From To 

Boston Latin 1800 2000 

Girls' Latin 1100 1200 

Boston Technical 1750 2000 

4650 5200 

Assignments to these schools will over-ride other assignments made in 
response to parental choices. Each student should exercise an option to a citywide 
or zonal high school until }ie has been formally notified of acceptance to the 
Latin Schools or Technical High. The earlier such assignments are made, the less 
complex would be the assignment procedure as it relates to other schools. 

Citywide High Schools 

Options will be offered during this enrollment phase to citywide magnet 

schools : 

English High 2200 

Copley Square 700 (Prince School as annex) 

Boston High 6Q0 

3500 



'71-27 

In the event of oversubscription of these programs, waiting lists will be 
established by lot and every attempt will be made to accommodate these applicants 
in a comparable new program and school with a separate administration and 
identity at an available downtown site. 

Students who cannot be assigned during this phase will be kept on a waiting 
list and will be directed to seek out another option at a later phase. Waiting 
lists will be activated as openings occ\ir. 

Racial -quotas reflective of the citywide secondary school population will 
be maintained in all citywide secondary schools. Zonal quotas will initially be 
established to preclude oversubscription from any one zone. 

Citywide Alternative High School After School Hours in the Building of 
English High School 

This option will be available during this assignment phase and will have 
the following features: 

1. projected enrollment of 300-1000 at 60/^^ racial balance (the 
minimum initially, the maximum over five years) 

2. an opportunity for students who left school prematurely during this 
year and who wish to retain any employment presently held 

3. an innovative program for attracting students from racially isolated 
areas 

'f. zonal or racial quotas established for thissschool. 



3. ^rollment Phase 3 

Assignment of Students to Magnet Schools and Magnet Programs Within the 

Zone 

At the secondary level, this phase will not be ir.plemented for the upcoming 
school year. The indefinite status of the development of certain facilities, both 
new and to be acquired, and the prospect of overcrowding at the secondso-y level 
precludes the possibility of setting aside, space for ma^et program activities 
in September 1975« It is proposed that magnet programs be planned and 
developed for the subsequent school year of 1976-77 and that this phase of 
parental choice be postponed pending the completion of program development and 
the readiness of a number of new and remodeled secondary facilities to include 
Madison Park, Southwest II (Forest Hills) , Charlestown High, as well as Cote 
and Bayside. 



71-29 



U. ilnrolL-uent Thase h 



Assicnraent of students who wish to enroll in a Cross- 
Racial School in the zone. 



This phase relates to the selection of comprehensive high 
schools in each zone. It is the intent during this phase to 
quarantee to a black student or a white student an opportvinity 
to enroll in a cross-racial school within the zone. At the 
secondary level, school designations are as follows: 

^^one 1 Charles town High Predominantly v.'hite 

East Boston High Predominan'tely '.Hiite 

Zone 2 South Boston High Predominantly White 

Bayside High Predominantly Minority 

Zone 3 Dorchester High Predominantly ninority 

Burke High Predominantly Kinority 

Zone U Hyde Park High Predominantly White 

Zone 5 Rosliudale High Predominantly lifhite 

West Roxbury High* Predominantly Wi^te 

Zone 6 Brighton High Predominantly White 

Jamaica Plain High Predominantly V/hite 

Maximum enrollment will be set on minority and white enroll- 
ments in cross-racial schools by establishing quotas that are 
reflective of the overall zone, 

A maximum capacity will be set for each school. In the 
event of an available "annex" such as Cote, Sawyer, Him ting ton, 
Dov.'ditch, etc. , an extended maximum capacity will also be set, 

■5K)ptions related to temporary housing of students in this school 
have been presented to the Coxirt. 



n-io 



In the event of oversubscription to a school by white and minority- 
students, an attempt will be marie to apply, wherever rossible, the 
extended capacity by definitively assignin^^ annex facilities to 
the oversubscribed school. 

No applications will be taken in any of the above schools 
whose racial dese.^regatlon has been altered by grandfather assign- 
ments as described in part IV - C - 1. 

Transportation will be offered to students who opt for schools 
under this plan of assignment. 

5. Enrollment Phase 5 (Two weeks) 



Assignment of all remaining students to schools in the 
zone. 



Students who have not exercised their options under Phases 1 - U 
will register at the schools of their choice within their residen- 
tial zones. 

A list of sites will be maintained for availability in the 
event that one or more zonal high schools is over-subscribed or is 
selected disproportionately by race, residence, and/or gender. 
From that list, new facilities can be developed as: 



1. ilnnexes for specific extant schools (e.g. 100 Arlington 
Street for East Boston High School), and/or 

2. Central, grade-level schools for existing schools in two 
or three zones, or, perhaps, for north or south sections 
of the City (e.g. a school at Cote for white and minority 
students in grade nine at Hyde Park, Dorchester, and 
Roslindale High schools and/or a school at Commonwealth 
Armory for all students in grade nine residing north of 
Franklin Park). 



Vi-31 



In the event of oversubscri} tion by one race, only the main 
high school will be utilized. Students will be accepted by lot 
(senior preferences excepted) and waiting list set up. 

A procedure for addressing schools with waiting lists has 
been outlined in section VI - C. 

Following this assignment phase, provisions will be made at 
the secondary level for inter-zonal ^plications for students who 
have been assigned to less integrated schools. Such applications 
will be accepted on a seat available basis to enhance racial pro- 
portions at the intital school of assignment and at the inter- 
zonal school being applied for. 

Third site educational programs will be an integral part of 
the schedule of any school in the event that racial isolation should 
occur. 



VI-32 

VI E Processing of Parental Choices 
For all 3eh«ol Levels* 

The Data Processing Center (d;c) will generate an IK.! card for every 
student presently enrolled in an elementary or iLiddle school. Thece card^ 
will be sent to the student's present school and will be grouped by home- 
room. It will be the responsibility of the homeroom teacher to record 
on the IWi card at the appropriate time the correct September school as- 
signment for each student in the homeroom. 

1, Phase t . Continuing in present school. Any student whose 
school falls under this category is given a notice incoming 
the parents of the opportunity to indicate at this time 
their desire to have their son or daughter return to his or 
her present school. If the parents notify the school that 
they wish the student to return to the present school, the 
homeroom teacher so marks the IBM card and returns it to DPC 
for processing. 
^« Phased. City-wide Options. Every student who has not 
indicated a school preference in Phase I will be given a 
notice informing the parents of the opportunity at this time 
to select one of the city-wide options indicated in the 
Phase II list. If the parents select one of these city 
options, they will so notify the homeroom teacher who will 
record the choice on the students IBK card. These cards 
will be sent to DPC and a tally run to determine if there 
is oversubscription to any school by any race. If there is 
such an oversubscription, students will be selected by lot 
and a waiting list established for the extra students. The 
IBM cards for these extra students will be returned to the 
students' homeroom teacher. They will be kept with the cards 
* Some minor modifications are necessary on the high school level. 



'/I-33 

of the other students who have not yet made a choice. 

3 . Phase 3 , Magnet Schools and Programs witain the Zone. 
Any student who has not indicated a school choice or 
received his or her choice under Phases I or II is given a 
notice informing tlie parents of the opportunity to select 
one of the Magnet Schools or IJagnet School Program within 
the Zone. Information on these programs will be furnished 
to the parents of each student that has not yet been as- 
signed to a school. Parents that select this option for 
their child should notify the homeroom teacher of the 
desired assignment and the homeroom teacher will record 
the selection on the student's IBM card. 

After all cards are received at DPC, a tally will be 
made to determine if oversubscription has resulted. If 
this is the case at any school, selection will be by lot 
and a waiting list established for each school. IBM cards 
will be returned to the homeroom teachers for students on 
the waiting list so that they will be eligible for the 
next phase. 

1^, Phase 4 . Cross Racial Schools- Zonal. Students who do not 
yet have a definite assignment can choose at this time a 
school in which their race is in a minority. Parents would 
be informed of which schools in their zones are an option for 
their child. Parents that select a school in which their race is 
considered a minority» should notify the homeroom teacher, 
the teacher will record the selection on the student's IBK 
card. After all the cards are received at DPC, a tally will 
be made to determine if oversubscription has occurred. 



VI-3U 

If there is oversubscription, students will be selected 
by lot and a v/aiting list established for them. The cards 
of these students will be returned to the homeroom teacher 
so that they will be eligible for the next phase . 
Phased Zonal Choices. Parents of those students who have 
not yet indicated a school preference or who have been 
placed on a waiting list will be notified of what schools 
their child may select. Parents that select a choice 
should notify the homeroom teacher, the teacher will record 
the parents' choice on the student's IBM card. All cards 
will be returned to DPC and a tally will be made. This 
tally will indicate which schools may have oversubscription. 
For any school that has been oversubscribed, students will 
be selected by lot and a waiting list established. 

After the conclusion of Phase 5 there will be 
students who have not been assigned to a school and whose 
names are on waiting lists. Every consideration will be 
given to these children so that a satisfactory assignment 
can be arranged. Assignments will be accomplished using 
the guidelines established in Section II - C, 



vi-3i> 

VI. F Status of Assignments 

As assignments are made throughout each of the five phases, they 
will be fixed assignments for the 1975-1976 school year. Student 
transfers to other schools will be made based on the then extant 
Controlled Transfer Policy adopted for the next school year. Students 
vdio move from one zone to another or students who enter the Boston 
Public School System for the first time will be offered all options 
(examination schools excepted) available during these five phases, 
provided there is space available in the program or school being sought. 

In each successive year, the assignment phase would be imple- 
mented. In response to choices made by students, new programs would 
be developed, and facilities would be designated for specific use 
dependent on need. Students who were not satisfied with the school 
or program offered could exercise a different option. 

Students in all racially mixed schools would be assured of a 
continued program in that school. 

VI. G Metropolitan Programs and their Impact 

Effective implementation of the plan as outlined in this chapter 
on Procedures can be greatly enhanced by successfiil efforts related to: 

1. Pursuit of increased placement of students from the Boston 
Public Schools to suburban schools through voluntary 
assistance and legislative intervention, 

2. Exploration of admission and financial aid for students 
from the Boston Public Schools to religious, privite, and/ 
or parochial schools, 

3. Consideration for regionalizing one or more facilities 
(extint or proposed) with one or more contiguous cities 
or towns, 

U. Inclusion of Boston in one or more suburban, regional 
consortia for vocational education. 



VI-36 
$. Submission to suburban communities of a proposal 



a. Designated groups of Boston students exchange seats 
for predetermined periods of time with designated 
groups of suburban students, and 

b. Both urban and suburban students exchange valuable 
sociological experiences, as well as educational 
variety, and 

6» Preparation for an assignment procedure Including: 

a. Development of a list of minority students interested 
in metropolitan programs by zone and by school, 

b. Initiation of a priority for students from schools 
of adverse racial and/or spatial proportions, and 

c. Establishment of a time period for visitation and 
registration at metropolitan schools. 



SECTIO-I Vn UIPLSiZ^TATIOII HICCSSS AI^iD SCHEDULE 



VII-1 



VH Imple'nentatlon F'rocesa and Jchedule 

A, Introduction 

The complexities of altering district lines, reassigning teachers 
and students, and changing the grade utilization of schools are great 
even when only one new school is opened in a given year. When all 
schools are affected by a districting plan, as was the case for the 
most part in September 197U, the complexities are enormous. The 
challenge of implementing a Phase 11 Plan in September 1975 is of far 
greater magnitude. Indeed, any Phase II Flan will require the totsil 
commitment of the professional staff of the Boston Public Schools and 
it will further demand a sophisticated and disciplined managerial 
approach by the administrators in the school system. 

The Lnpleraentation Process and Schedule described herein is de- 
signed to point toward educ\xtional commitment and administrative 
efficiency. The process, of course, is not a theoretical model. It 
has been tested in the implementation of the Phase I Plan and has been 
appropriately refined. This process and schedule addresses a most com- 
plicated social issue a.:d is consequently flexible developed so as to 
allow for later additions or tleletions. Thus, this section of the docu- 
ment should be viewed as a guideline for action and an outline of activi- 
ties to be pursued. 

Of the eleven components (parts B to L) which are detailed in this 
section all are essential and interlocking. The first component, (part 3) 
however, relates to the actual mechanism for implementation, super^/ision 
and coordination and therefore this component has prime significance. 



VII-2 



It should also be noted that this section differs very slightly 
from the comparable section (VII ) in the December l6, 197U document. 



vn-3 



B. Implementation Process 



Activities 



a. Inplecientation of the operationail components described 
in parts C through L 

b. Coordination of activities described in parts C through 
L of this section 

Formation of Advisory Council of Citizens and Professionals 
to assist in the process of coordination and impleaentation 

c. Supervision of those responsible for the operationeil 
components 

Formation of Inpleraentation Cabinet of administrators 
responsible for the operationsil coraponents 

d. Modification of plans or schedule as needed 

e. Assessment of inpleraentation activities 
2. Responsibility (Cliain of Co.-njnand) 

a. Boston School Ccinmittee 

b. Superintendent of Schools: Lnplenentation Coordinator 

c. Interira Office of Desegregation Planning 

- Assistant Inplenentation Coordinator 

- Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

- Director, Educational Planning Center 

- Associate Director, Educational Planning Center 

d. Implementation Cabinet: 

- The Associate Superintendents 

- The Assistant Superintendents 

- Business Manager 

- Chief Structural Engineer 

- Chief Plant Engineer 

- Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent: Ke^ropolican 

Liaison . ^ 

- Superintendent's Liaison to BusLnoss and University Coi.i.-.unii.; 

- Logistical Support Officer 

- Positive Action Officer 



VII-U 



e. Advisory Council of Citizens and Professionals 

- To be formed by the Interim Office of Desegregation 
Planning in consultation with the Superintendent 
and School Conraittee 

- To include citizens, professionals, representatives 
of negotiationg organizations, representatives of 
ccsnniunity groups and agencies, university personnel 
and business representatives. 

f. Cooperation 

- All personnel designated in conjponents C to L 

g. Timetable 

Implenent at ion 

Coordir^tion 

Supervision ^ I>2cember l6, 197^ - December 51 1 1975 

Modification 

Assessment 



vii-5 



C. The Phase II Plan: Urdating and Revisions 

1, Activities 

- Updating of enrollment data (utilization of student enrollment 
data for the 197U-1975 academic year) 

- Revision of the /ilternative 3tudent Desegregation Plan in the 
light of the new data 

- Revision of the Alternative Desegregation Plan as a result of 
the judicial review process described in the October 31, 197U 
Court Order and in the light of the timetable described by the 
Court on January lU, 1975 

- Final determination of facility utilization based on the selec- 
tion and assignment process of the Alternative Student Desegre- 
gation Plan 

- Re-verification of student enrollments data prior to student 
assignments 

2, Responsibility 

a. Prime 

- Interim Office of Desegregation Planning 

- Associate Superintendent for Planning 

- Educational Planning Center 

b. Supportive 

- Positive Action Office 

- Data Processing Center 

- Chief Structural Engineer 

3, Cooperation 

a. Department of Safety 

b. Department of Statistics 

c. Public Facilities Department of the City of Boston 

d. Assistant Superintendents 

e. Headmasters principals 

f. Representatives of ner.otiating organizations 



711 -6 



Timetable 

a. Updating of enrollJBent data: October 1, 197U - Teceraber 20, 197U 

b. Revision of Alternative Student Desegregation Plan: January 27, 
1975 - March 3, 1975 

c. Final Determination oi Facility Utilization: March 3, 1975 - 
April 15, 1975 

d. Re-verification of 3tident enrollment Data: 
January 6, 1975 - March lU, 1975 



VII-7 



D, Student Assignment and Orientation 

1, Activities 

a. Preparation of i arents and Students concerning options under 
the Alternative Jtudent Desegregation Plan 

b. Expression of preferences by parents and students 

c. Determination of Student Assignments 

d. Notification of Student Assignments 

- Announcement to parents and students 

- Announcenent of appropriate local school officials 

e. Preparation of Students for Integration 

- Development ajid coordination of program for orienting 
students for integration 

- Development and coordination of infonnation and counseling 
relative to program offerings and related needs 

2. Kesponsibility 

a. Prime 

- Associate Superintendent for Planning 

- Educational Planning Center 

- Assistant Superintendents 

- Headmasters and Principals 

- I'ositive Action Office 

b. Supi-'Ortive 

- Associate Superintendent for Special Services 

- Data Processing Center 

- Safety Department 

- Department of Public Information 

- Person(s) responsible for Human Interaction Activities 

- Guidance Department 

- Department of Statistics 

- Student Transfer Office 



VII-8 



3. Cooperation 

a. Faculty and student leaders 

b. Community and agency leaders 

c. Business Manager 

d. Deputy Mayor: Public Safety 

e. Mayor's Office of Human Rights 

f. Community Relations Service of the Department of Justice 
U. Timetable 

a. Preparation Period: December l6, 197U - February lU, 1975 

b. 3xpression of Preferences: March 3, 1975 - March lU, 1975 

c. Determination of Student Assignments: March 3y 1975 - 
April 15, 1975 

d. Announcement of Student Assignments: April 15, 1975 - 
April 25, 1975 

e. Preparation of Students for Integration: 

- Preliminary Planning: December 16, 197U - January 27, 1975 

- Final Planning: January 27, 1975 - April 25, 1975 

- I-rograms: April 28, 1975 - June 20, 1975 

September 2, 1975 - September 19, 1975 



vn-9 

E. Staff Assignments and Preparation 

1. Activities 

a. Description of Alternative Student Desegregation Plan to 
professionals 

- Solicitation of professioncil support 

- Explanation of implications for professionals 

b. Preliminary Determination of Staff Assignments 

- Based on Alternative Student Desegregation Plan in its present 
form 

- Based on goal of racial/ethnic integration of staff as well 
as on the matter of programmatic specialties and contractual 
obligations 

- Including early identification of local school administra- 
tive assignments 

c. Final Determination of Staff Assignments 

- Based on Finalization of Phase II Plan 

- Including both teaching and administrative assignments 

d. Preparation of Staff for implementation of Alternative Student 
Desegregation Plan 

- Development and coordination of a city-wide program for 
staff inteKration 

- In-service programs in each school focusing on staff 
implementation of Phase II Plan and on staff leadership 
relative to students and conmiinities, 

2. Responsibility 

a. Prime 

- Associate Superintendent for Personnel 

- Associate Superintendent for Curriculum and Staff Development 

- Associate Superintendent for Special Services 

b. Supportive 

- Associate Superintendent for Planning 

- Educational Planning Center 

- Curriculum -related departments 

- Positive Action Officer 



VII-10 

3. Cooperation 

a. Assistant tiuperintendents 

b. Staff Associations 

- B.A.3.A.S. 

- Boston Teachers' Union 

- Assistant Principals' Association 

- Administrative Guild 

- Others 

c. Person(s) responsible for Human Interaction Activities 

d. Community and ajency leaders 

e. Business Manager 

f. Mental Health Consultants 

g. Mayor's Office of Human Rights 

h. Community Relations Service of the U. S. Department of 

Justice 

U. Timetable 

a. Description of Alternative Student Desegregation Plan: 
January 27, 1975 - March 3, 1975 

b. Preliminary Deteraination of Staff Assignments: 
January 27, 1975 - February lU, 1975 

c. Final Tetermination of Staff Assignments: 
February 18, 1975 - April 15, 1975 

d. Preparation of Staff 

- Preliminary Planning: January 27, 1975 - March 3, 1975 

- Final Planning: March 3, 1975 - April 15, 1975 

- Programs: April 16, 1975 - June 20, 1975 

September 2, 1975 - September 19, 1975 



VII-11 



F, Parental and Cccsmvmity Orientation 
1. Activities 

a. Explanation of the Phase II Plan submitted hy Bostc 
School Connittee 

- Opiciotinaires 

- Media Presentations 

- School Inforaatiori Center (227-3335) 

- Regional lleetings 

- Local School Advisory Council Sessions 

- Meetings of School Bi-Racial Coniicils 

b. Announceaent and Explanation of finalized Phase II 
Plan 

-Media Presentation 

- Regional Meetings 

- local Meetings 

- School Infornation Center (227-6835) 

c. Orientation for Integration 

- Developaent arsd coordination of city-wida progr: "^or 
orientii^g ccnuiunities for integration 

- lapleBjentation of local-level progra-ns aimed at -eptance 
of school integration hj conr/onity neTTibers 

- Interaction of staff, students and ccnvnunity m& s at 
the local level 

2 • Pie sponsibility 

a. Priae 

- Associate Superintendent for Plannir^ 

- Associate Superintendent for Curricul^-'a and Stai. "svelopment 

- Assistant Superintendents 

- Keadmasters/Principals 

b« Supportive 

- Curriculua-related departments 

- External .A,d-/isors to the Superintendent 

- Person(s) responsible for Ku.iian Interaction Act: les 

- Department of Public Infomation 

- Educational Planning Center 



VII-12 



3. Cooperation 

a. Superintendent's Liaison to Boston Business and University 
Community 

b. Faculty and student leaders 

c. Community and agency leaders 

d. Business Manager 

e. Mayor of City of Boston 

- Office of Hvman Rights 

- Little City Ualls 

- Model Cities 

- Touth Activities Commission 

f. National Conference for Christians and Jews 

g. N.A.A.C.P., Urban League, and/or others 
h. U.S. Office of Civil Rights 

i. Archdiocese of Boston 

j. Community Relations Service of the U.S. depsirtment of Justice 

i. Positive Action Office 

Timetable 

a. Explanation of Phase II Plan of School Committee 
January 27, 1975 - March 3, 1975 

b. .*vnnouncement of Finalized Plan and Explanation 
March 3, 1975 - March lU, 1975 and beyond 

c. Orientation for Integration 

- Planning of Programs: December 16, 197U - April l5, 1975 

- Implementation of pro;^raras: April l6, 1975 - September 19, 1975 



VII-13 



G. Programmatic Considerations 

1. Activities 

a. Review of Programmatic Implications of Alternative Student 
Desegregation Plan 

b. Develoj-ment or Expansion of New Programs Related to Racisil, 
Ethnic and Social Class Integration 

d. Analysis of Fiscal, Staffing and Facility Implications of 
the plan 

e. Planning and Implementation of Staff Training Programs 
Related to the plan 

2. Responsibility 

a. Prime 

- Assistant Superintendents 

- Headmasters /i^rirtcipals 

- Associate Superintendent for Curriculum and Staff 
Development 

- Associate Superintendent for Special Services 

- Associate Superintendent for Planning 

- Associate Superintendent for Career Education 

b. Supportive 

- Associate Superintendent for Supportive Services 

- Person(s) Responsible for H;aman Interaction Activities 

- Associate Superintendent for Personnel 

- Superintendent's Liaison to Business/tlniversity Community 

3. Cooperation 

a. Faculty and Student Leaders 

b. Community and Agency Leaders 

c. Department of Planning and Engineering 

d. Appropriate personnel in Massachusetts Department of Education 

e. Staff Associations (B.A.S.A.S., etc.) 

f . Business and University Leaders 



vn-iU 



h. Timetable 

a. Review of Programmatic Implications of Alternative Student 
Desegregation Plan: January 27, 1975 - March 3, 1975 

b. Development and libqpsuision of New Programs Implicit in the 
Plan: December 16, 197U - April 15, 1975 

c. Initiation or Expansion of Programs Related to Integration 

- Preliminary Planning; December 16, 197U - April 15, 1975 

- Final Planning and Implementation: April 16, 1975 - 

September 19, 1975 

d. Analysis of Fiscal, Staffing and Facility Implications: 
January 27, 1975 - March lU, 1975 

e. Planning and Implementation of Staff Training: 

- Planning: December 16, 197U - April 15, 1975 

- Training: April 16, 1975 - June 20, 1975 

September 2, 1975 - September 19, 1975 



VII -15 



H. Facility Considerations 
1, Activities 

a. Analysis of .Alternative Student Desegrecation Plan Re: Facility Needs 

- Facility .Modi fie ations Due to Gra.-le Level Changes 

- Issue of required non-school facilities 

- Utilization of undesignated facilities 

b. Analysis of Finalized State Plan 

- Facility Modifications Due to Grade Level Chan.^es 

- IssTie of required non-school facilities 

- Utilization of undesignated facilities 

c. Implensntation of Facility I'odifications and Acquisitions 

- Deteraiination of fiscal needs 

- Determination of work schedule including bidding process 

- V'ork activity 

2. Responsibility 

a. IVime 

- Chief Stn;ctural Engineer 

- Public Facilities Department of the City of Boston 

b . Supportive 

- Associate Superintendent for Planning 

- Educational Planning Center 

3. Cooperation 

a* Businass manager 

b. Chief Plant Engineer 

c. Director of School Lunches 

d. School Buildings Assistance B^ireau, Massachusetts repar^iaent 
of Education 

e» Assistant Superintendents 

f, Keadmasters/^^lncipals 

g. Curricul;in Departments (e.g., Physical L'ducation) 



vn-16 



lu Timetable 

a. Analysis of Alternative Student Desegregation Plan: 

October 29, 197U - January 27, 1975 

b. Analysis of Finalized Plan: 

January 27, 1975 - March 3, 1975 

c. Implementation: 

- Determination of Fiscal Needs 

January 27, 1975 - March 3, 1975 

- Determination of Work Schedules 

January 27, 1975 - March lU, 1975 

- Work Activity 

March lU, 1975 - September 19, 1975 



VII-17 



I. Materials cind Supplies 

1. Activities 

a. Detcrninaticn of Needs 

- Impact of changes in grade levels or school utilization 

- Consideration of nulti-ethnic naterials 

- Fiscal Triplications 

b. Ir.pleraentation 

- Development of work schedule 

- Work activity 

2. Responsibility 

a. Prime 

- Associate Superintendent for Curriculani cuid Staff 

Development 

- Chief JStructural Engineer 

- Assistant Superintendents 

b. Supportive 

- Associate Superintendent for Special Services 

- Associate Superintendent for Supportive Services 

- Person(s) Responsible for Human Interaction Activities 

- Readnasters/Principals 

3. Cooperation 

a. Business r!anager 

b. Distribution Center 

c. Custodial Services 
h. Timetable 

a. Determination of Needs: December l6, 197^ - April 15, 1975 

b. Implementation: April 15, 1975 - September 19, 1975 



VII-18 

J. Traiisportcition and fbcternal School Safety 

1. Activities 

a. Analysis of Utemative Student -Desegregation Plan by the 

Comnittee 

- Response re: transportation needs 

- Response re: safety considerations 

b. Study of Finalized Phase II Plan 

- Response re: transportation needs 

- Response re : safety considerations 

- Study of fiscal implications 

c. Planning tmd Implementation of Transportation Activities 

- Development of Transportation Routes 

- Determination of Bus Monitor and Crossing Guard Needs 

- Bidding Process 

- Coordination with Appropriate Transportation and Public 

Safety Agencies 

- Training Progrsuns 

- Dissenination 

- Coordination of Actual Implementation of Transportation 

d. Planning and I»iplcraentation of External School Safety 

- Alternate routing 

- Emergency planning 

- Coordination of public safety services 

- Orientation Programs 

2. Responsibility 

a. Prime 

- Associate Superintendent for Planning 

- Director of Safety 

b. Supportive 

- Assistant Superintendents 

- Educational Planning Center 

- Headmasters/Principals 

3. Cooperation 

a. Logistical Support Officer 



Vll-19 

b. Department of Public Information 

c. Deputy Mayor: Public Safety 

d. Police Commissioner of Boston 

e. Director of Public Safety of Commonwealth 

f . Representatives of MBTA 

g. Transportation Planners of the BRA 

h. Secretary of Transportation of Coramonivsalth 

i. Community Relations Service of U.S. Department of Justice 

j. U. S. Office of Civil Rights 

k. Commissioner of the Metropolitan District Commission 

1. Faculty Representatives 



U. Timetable 

a.Analysis of Alternative Student Desegregation Plan: 
November 18, 197U - January 27, 1975 

b. Study of Finalized Phase II Flan: 

January 27, 191$ - March lU, 197$ 

0, Planning and Implementation of Transportation Activities 

- Preliminary planning: December 16, 197U - March lU, 1975 

- Finalized Planning 

and Implementation: March 13, 1975 - December 31, 1975 

d. Planning and Implementation of External School Safety 

- Preliminary planning: December l6, 197U - March lU, 1975 

- Finalized 1 lanning and 

Implementation: March l8, 1975 - December 31, 1975 



VII -20 



K» IntemaGL School Safety and Security 
!• Activities 

a. Preparation of Citywide Internal School Safety and 
Security Policy Statement - based on existing 
docunients. 

b. Preparation of Local (Individual Schools) Internal 
School Safety and Security Plans 

c. Coordination of Citywide Policy Statement and local 
Plana 

d. Preparation of Central Stabilization Teams 

e. Hiring and Training of School Aides 

f • Coordination of voluntaiy assistsutice efforts 

g. Liaison ;-dth Public Safety Agencies 

h. Developient of einergency strategies including third- 
site learning sites 

i» Staff Planning and Training Sessions 

2» Responsibility 

a» Prine 

- Associate Superintendent for Planning 

- Logistical Support Officer 

- Assistant Superijcitendents 

- Administrative Assistant to Superintendent for School 

Operations 

b . Supportive 

- Headmasters and Principals 

- Dii^ector of Safety 

3» Cooperation 

a. Deputy of Public Information 

b. Deputy Mayor: Public Safety 

c. Police Connissioner of Boston 

d. Conriissioner of the Metropolitan District CoiJUiission 

e. Diroctor of Public Safety of Conmonwealth 



VII-21 



\ 

f. Connunity Relations Service of the U. S. Espartnent of Justice | 

g. 7. S. Office of Civil Rights 
h. Facility Representatives 

i. Chief Plant Engineer 
j. Chief Structural Engineer 
li. Timetable 

a. Preparation of City V/icle Security Policy Statement: 

Jan-jary 2, 197^ - Narch 27, 1975 

b. Preparation of Local Security Plans: 

April 1, 1975 - Hay 2, 1975 

C» Coordination of Cityvri.de and Local Efforts: 
l^ay 5, 1975 - May 30, 1975 

d. Preparation of Central Stabilization Teams: 

June 2, 1975 - July 2, 1975 

September 2, 1975 - September 19, 1975 

e. Hiring and Training of Aides: 

April 15, 1975 - Septe.-nber 19, 1975 

f . Coordination of Volunteers 

April 15, 1975 - December 31, 1975 

g. Liaison ■vri.th Dxtemal Agencies 

January 2, 1975 - Decenber 31, 1975 

h. Emergency strategy planning 

March 3, 1975 - June 20, 1975 
September 2, 1975 - September 19, 1975 

i. Staff Planning and Training 

April 15, 1975 - June 20, 1975 
September 2, 1975 - September 19, 1975 



VII-22 



L. Financial Considerations 

1. Activities 

a. Assessncnt of Monetary Needs: July 1, 1975 - Juno JO, 1976 

- Based UT>on prior year desegregation expenditure pattern 
and the Phase II Plan 

- Determined by personnel involved in the current desegre- 
gation budget and expenditure control 

- Determined by school officials in charge of the various 
desegregation activities described in parts C thjrough L 

b. Deternination of Revenue for Desegregation Activities 

- General School Purpose Budget 

- Supplementary Appropriations fron the Mayor and City Council 

- Conirnom/ealth of Massachusetts 

- Federal Government 

- Foundations 

2. Responsibility 

a. Prime 

- Business Ilanager 

- Educational Specialist: Desegregation Financing 

b. Supportive 

- Associate Superintendent for Planning 

3. Cooperation 

a. Sclaool Department personnel responsible for rarts G 
through L 

b. Deputy Jtayor: Administrative Services 

c. Massachusetts Department of EciuCcxtion 

d. U. S. Office of Education 

e. Metropolitan Planning Project 

f. Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity (ll^CO) 

g. Educational Collaborative, Inc. (EdCo) 



VlI-23 



h. Secretary of Education's Office 
i. Community Agencies 
k. Timetables 

a. Assessment, Prclininary: Decenb:;r l6, 197'i - March 1, 1975 

Final: March 1, 1975 - April 1, 1975 

b. Determination of Revenue Availability: June 15, 1975 

It should be noted that the above financial considerations relate 
to only a segment of the entire desegregation cost and process. There 
are other costs beyond the control of the Boston School Co-u-nittee: 
construction of nev/ schools, acquisition of facilities for school 
conversion, crossing guards, police and other public safety service. 



VII-2U 

M, Summary 

Upon acceptance of a finalized Phase II Plan, the Implementation 
Process can be activated by the designation of an Interim Office of 
Desegregatioji Planning, the assembling of the Implementation Cabinet 
(including a Logistical Support Officer and a Positive Action Officer), 
and the formation of an Advisory Coxincil of Citizens and Professionals. 

It should be noted that, although immediate activity can begin in 
nearly all the components (parts C to L), first priority must be given 
to the implementation process (described in part B) which indicates a 
chain of command and managerial approach for the effective activatj.ng 
of a complex plan. 

Finally, the Implementation Process does not concern itself with 
any review process or supervision which the Court may seek or demand. 
Rather, it assumes that the Court will make known its process of moni- 
toring the implementation effort. 



SECTION Vni METROPOLITAN CONCERNS 



VIII-1 
VIII Metropolitan Concerns 
A* Introduction 

Becently this country observed the twentieth anniversary of the 
Supreme Court decision, Bi-own v. Board of Education of Topeka, which 
recognized that publicly enforced school segregation violates the 
Constitution of the United States, lEhe Supreme Coxirt has ruled that 
separate education is inherently unequal education. Even a cursory 
review of the facts presented here will indicate clearly that Boston 
is becoming furthar and further separated from its subvirban neigh- 
bors. For example, the tables on the following pages give convinoing 
testimony that the City of Boston is becoming racially, economically 
and socially Isolated from its subiurbs. In displaying this comparison, 
the Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SLISA) will be analyzed for 
contrast between the core city and the suburban cities and towns. 

It is not the intent of this paper to criticize any lurban or sub- 
urban coiniiiunity, Hather, this paper is intended to iiiuicate the ue- 
gre© of isolation between these areas and the core city and thus draa- 
atizo the need for a metropolitan approach in areas of mutual concern. 
Ehen, and then only, shall equal oppcrtimities - educational, social, 
and economic - be available to all Greater Boston citizens regardless 
of race, creed or color. 

In the past, the cottrts have ruled that racial segregation is 
illegal, that separate is not equal (Brown v. Board or Education). 
Bogardless of the legal but narrowly defined obligation concerning de- 
segregation, there exists a moral and broadly described obligation re- 
gEirding eqtial educational, social and economic opportunities on the 
part of all connnxnities. While it is true that one cannot legislate 
morality or'unaerstanding, nfeverthele8S,*'the courts can aimoooiety 
toward conditions which lead to racial understanding and cooperation. 



VIII-2 

It is indeed unfortunate that many communities have not acted in 
an affirmative manner to insure equal opportunities. The tables rela- 
ting to blacks in suburbia (Table VI) seem to suggest that most sub- 
urban communities in Greater Boston are maintaining a status quo posi- 
tion regarding racial integration. It is a matter of conjecture v;hether 
many communities are willing to end racial isolation v;ithout the com- 
pulsion of a court order. However, it is hoped by the staff of the 
Committee through cooperative planning and program efforts, signigicant 
voluntary cooperation between city and suburbs will lead to lessening 
of racial, social and economic isolation as a first step toward resolv- 
ing metropolitan isolation, 

A joint federal and state re;:ort released on January 13, 1975 
entitled "Route 128: Boston's Road to Segregation" offers additional 
evidence that Boston is becoming increasingly isolated from its suburban 
neighbors. The report states that "Housing discrimination in the suburbs 
has restricted minorities to the inner city." 

The Boston Globe of Tuesday, January lU, 1975, page 3 reports that 
"both in terms of housing and jobs, the picture drawn by the report is 
one of minorities caught between a losing situation in the city and their 
very narrow access to the suburbs where most of the metropolitan growth 
has been concentrated." 

The Globe quotes Jacques E. Ivilraore, regional director for the North- 
east for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, as pointing out that he 
does not see so many overt acts which discriminate, but rather a series of 
decisions in zoning, planning boards, and selectment. Wilraore states th^t 
what happens in totality tends to be discriminatory. 

Regarding educational issues, it is obvious that for some students 
equal educational opportunities must be found by minimizing the traditional 



vni-3 

constraints of existing geographical boundaries of their cities and 
towns. While there are some sincere attempts being made to bring the 
suburbs and city students together for educational programs, neverthe- 
less, these proerans do not as yet involve either a significant number 
o^ students or comutities to have a lasting, long-ran?:e effect. This 
is not to say thit nietropolitan programs which are i.resently operating 
serve no purpose. Rather, such programs should be used as a base and 
then expanded if they are deemed mutually beneficial to urban and 
suburban students. 

The major goals of metropolitan education should be: 

1) The reduction of racial, economic and ethnic isolation 
between urban and suburban areas. 

2) The increase, through integration, of quality education 
for both urban and suburban students. 

3) The enhancement of understanding between people, thus 
reducinf^ preiudice on the part of both blacks and whites. 

U) The greater use of urban and suburban resources to the 
benefit of all. 



VIII -U 



52io staff of the Cosmittee prcaxdly observes that the City of Boston 
is a rich, hiotorical rcsoiirco. Kany times the richness of the city in 
its human, hiotorical and scientific resources is lost to eubiirbanitcs. 
It is hoped that metropolitan interaction will allow many suburbanites 
to share what the citj' has to offer© 

It is the purpose of this section of the document to: 

1) Describe the SIJSA urban-suburban area regarding educationally 
related concerns, 

2) Analyse these concerns, 

3) Describe present programs of cooperation between Boston 
end its suburbs, 

4) Hake rccomnicndatiOES regarding the voluntary reduction of 
racial isolation which exists between the city and its 
cubinrbs; and 

5) Indicate thiit netropolitan education can contribute to the 
qxxality of life of all stxidents. 

It is expected that the sharing of knowledge gained in a search 
for joint metropolitan programs vd.11 expand the concepts of integra- 
tion. In addition, metropolitan considerations in education could den- 
onstrate that, given cooperative -urban-suburban progra:2S, adequate 
facilities, and soxmd professional relationships, teachers end others 
will be encouraged to explore new ideas, activities and teaching ceth- 
ods which could lead to increasing educational excellence for all stu- 
dents regardless of color or the econoinic status of their parents, 

Iieani}v;;ful cooperation in metropolitan efforts reqirlres conmlt- 
ment based .upon the expectation of mutual advantag e, Tkus, sugges- 
tions and plans for voluntary metropolitan efforts nust show the ad- 
vantage to both the Ui'ban and suburban communities. "I.ftatual advan- 
tage" could be financial assistance, educational enrichmicnt or other 



VIII -5 



Clctir3y; lue tropoUton education lo a priority o£ the Dopartnent 
of Education, CommonT.'cnlth of iiissaohuzjetta. Sectioa 8 of Cliapter 636 
ixiritoo the devoloixaent oi iiagnet educational progroa proposals go a 
Eieans of reducins or climinatixi^ raoiol isolation, 

A ncmoxtvndum from Dr, Charleo Glenn, Idrector of the Bureau of 
Equal Educational Opportunity of the Itossachusotto Dopartment of Edu- 
cation states in part, "In line with tho priorities of the- Corrr'.l saioner 
and the Board vre intend to put a major portion of the aYailable funds 
Into Eia^at prograns on a PGtTopolitan basis vrhlch brings together 
oubvu'ban and urban students - both non-white and white on a volim- 
tary basin," 

In Noventbor, 1973, former Masdnchusetts Governor Francis '-.i. Sargent ap- 
pointed a ToBk Force on Metropolitan Itevelopraent chaired by Dr. Prober t 
0, Wood, rresidcnt, University of Itossachusetts. The Task Force traa 
to nddross the issues and problena facing metropolitaa Boston, la 
addition, the members of the I'ask Force were to presen*; him, within 
a year, specific legislativo or admiMstrative propossLls for resolving 
those issues. 

Significantly', the Governor's Task Force on IJetro^Jolitan I^evelop- 
roent in August of 1974 presented a paper, Equity and Cluolce in the Bos- 
ton luctro poll tan nepion : A Proposed Course of Action . Interestingly, 
on page 21 of the paper, in analyzing the nature of the problea, the 
authors note: 

" In any case, residential 'do facto* sorycfration i'jnnln^cs on 
access to jobs oncl on educational opport-unities, and, \ati-zately 
furtb.ers a sennc of Isolation amom; tho motrorolltrmi rjoa'a ror.i- 
- donts. It is often argued that poor and minority ilndividuals 



VIII -6 

are at a locatlonal disadvantage when seeking Jobs, since many 
of the job opportunities are located on the metropolitan firinge, 
at some distance from the vast majority of low-incone faiailies. 
The problems associated with segregation in our educational 
system are well documented, and are reflected in a number of 
statutory and constitutional provisions prohibiting segregation 
within local school districts. Yet, within the present struc- 
ture of our educational system, residential patterns directly 
determne the composition of local school districts, matri.ng inter- 
district solutions necessary for true balancing, Unally, even 
"tiiough segregation may be largely the result of a choice which 
people make, many see it as important for the metropolitan 
"community" and for society as a whole that people not become so 
isolated fron one another that they no longer understand one 
another's problems or have any sense of larger coomunity." 

Given the will to act, both subxrrban and urban leaders could make 
meaningful the concept of metropolitan education. 



vni-7 

B. The City 

One of the major reasons for the necessity of a metropolitan educational 
plan is the dramatic change which has occurred in central cities over the 
past two decades. This change is characterized by changing racial composition, 
white flight from the city to suburban areas, and vast inequities in economic 
vealth and status, oil of which combine to place greater distance between 
the haves and the have nots. Thus, James B. Consint in his book Slums and 
jSuburbs , p. 2, states, "The contrast in money available to the schools in a 
wealthy suburb and to the schools in a large city Jjolts one*s notion of the 
meaning of equality of opportunity," 

Boston is a city which has experienced the change noted above, and is 
particularly affected by the departure of more affluent citizens. Examine 
one aspect of the haves cuid have nots. 

Children from families whose income is at or below those shown on the 
listed scales are eligible for meals free or at a reduced price. If income 
is greater than that shown but one has unusually high medical bills, shelter 
costs in excess of 30 percent of income, special educational expenses due to 
the mentcil or physical conditions of a child, or disaster or casuailty losses, 
children may still be eligible, 

INCOIdE ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA - FAJ-JILY SIZE MTD GROSS ITTCOME SCALES 



Family Size 


Maximum Gross Income 


Maximum Gross Income 




for Free Meals 


For Reduced Price Meals 


One 


to 82,7'^ 


$2,7M to 8if,280 


Two 


to 5,600 


3,601 to 4,320 


Three 


to ^,^60 


'»,'<61 to 5,360 


Four 


to 5,310 


5,311 to 6,380 


Five 


to 6,100 


5,101 to 7,320 


Six 


to 6,890 


6,891 to 8,260 


Seven 


to- 7,600 


7,601 to 9,120 


Eight 


to 8,310 


8,311 to 9,980 


Nine 


to 5,960 


5,961 to 10,750 


Ten 


to 9.600 


9,601 to 11,520 


Eleven -, 


to 10,2'*0 


10, 2M to 12,290 


Twelve 


to -10,880 


10,881 to 13,060 


Fach addt'l family 


6J^ 


770 


member 







VIlI-8 



Boston Public Schools 
VrTiite - ]:on I-fhlte Student Enrollment for 1961 through 197^ 



TABIE II 



Pupil Census 196A-197Ii 



Year 


Total 

Enrollment 


White 


61^-^^ 


91,600 


70,703 


6^-66 


93,055 


69,136 


66-67 


92,127 


68,050 


6j'6a 


92,AA1 


66,959 


68-69 


93,815 


66,366 


69-70 


94,885 


65,627 


70-71 


96,432 


65,108 


71-72 


97,227 


63,775 


72-73 


95,61^ 


.60,556 


73-74 


93,647 


57,623 


«7/f-7^ 


87,169 


U5,62U 



Non White 



Non V.'hite 



21,097 
23,919 
24,077 
25,482 
27,449 
29,258 
31,324 
33,452 
35,059 
36,024 



23 

25.7 
26.1 
27.6 

29.3 
30.8 

32.5 

34.4 
36.7 
38.5 
U7.7 



Source: Boston Public Schools 1974 



VIII- S! 

The Bureau of Nutritioncd Education reports in June 197^+. there were 
^35i873 lunches served in Boston. Of these, 379,5'tO or Z'Ti' were served 
to needy students. The statev/ide average of needy students is 25^« 

In 1973 seventy five percent of the students who attended Boston Public 
Schools which had ^0 percent or greater non-white enrollment applied for 
free or reduced price lunches. This table helps to describe the extent of 
poverty in which sone students in Boston Public Schools live. Poverty and 
its resulting hunger are educationally related factors- 

TABLE III 
Percent of Students, in Schools V/hose Non-V/hite Population Exceeds ^ Percent, 

, , ■!■ ■ I ■ I I ■ I I II I " I 

V/ho Apijlied for Free or Reduced Priced Lunch. (1973) 

I ~ ~ - - — _ _ _ — 

Boston Public Schools 

Allen, Ira %% 

Audubon ^6?» 

Bacon, Wm. 86^ 

Bancroft, George 6l^ 

Bradford, V/ra. Annex 95^ 

Brooks, Phillips 98^ 

Carter 65^ 

Baker, S. 5% 

Champlain 529» 

Deairborn ^2% 

Dickerman, Quincy 99?» 

Dillaway 81^ 

Dudley 100^ 

Eraerson 8l^ 

Farragut 82^ 

Garrison, V/m. Lloyd '♦6^ 

Gibson, 



Gibson 673^ 

Greenwood , Sareih ^% 

Hale, Nathan 7035 

Haley, Dennis ^95^ 

Lincoln, Abraham 68^ 

Mendell, Ellis 72.% 

Howe, Julia S^% 

Palmer, Albert kS% 

Quincy 77S^ 

Stone, Lucy k^'ji 

Tobin, Maurice 7^% 

Tobin Annex lOOJlS 

Williams, John 1005^ 

Boston Trade High 675^ 

Burke High hh% 

English High k9% 

Hennigan, J. W. 77% 

Hurley 72% 

Jamaica Plain High 38% 

King, Ifertin 98?^ 

Lee, Joseph 7^% 

Lewenberg Jr. High 6656 

Lewis Middle 775^ 

Marshall John 555^ 

McCormack 1005^ 

Thompson 755^ 

Dever, P. 939^ 



viii-n 



Again, Table II, page 8* demonstrates clearly the chanf:e in 
racial composition of the student body in the Boston Public Schools, 
for the period Septe-nber 196U through June 197U. During this period 
the white enrollment declined by 13,080 pupils, while the non white 
enrollment increased by lU,927. The non white public school enroll- 
ment percentage increased from 23;« in 196U to 38.5/c in 197U. Figures 
released by the Boston schools for November 197U indicate an enroll- 
ment of 87,169 students of which id, 5U5 or hl'^ are non white. If the 
present trend continues, Boston will have a majority of non white 
students in a few years, while many of the suburbs surrounding Boston 
will maintain their i^resent vfhite - non white percentages. Indeed, 
the two-part Desegregation Plan may, in all likelihood, esqaedite the 
trend. 

Also, a report published by the Boston Redevelopment Authority 
Research Department, August 197U, indicates that estimates for the 
tJiree and one half years between 1970 and 1973 shovf the number of 
non white residents in Boston grev; between 5.U and 7.8 percent from 
116,073 in April 1970 to between 122,538 and 125,000 in October, 1973. 
The proportion that non whites form of the city s population also 
increased fron 18,6 percent to about 20.3 percent. 



VIII-12 



C« Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) 



In order to compare, and thus indicate the inequities betvreen 
Boston and its suburbs, the geographic area \ih±ch. will be utilized 
is the Greater Boston Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area, as 
defined by the 1970 Census. This area Includes 78 cities and towns. 



The tovms arex 






Arlington 


lexington 


Rockland 


Aujland 


Lincoln 


Saugus 


Bedford 


Lynafield 


Scituate 


Belmont 


Manchester 


Sharon 


Braintree 


Marblehead 


SherboTO 


Brookline 


Harshfield 


Stoneham 


Burlington 


Medfield 


Stidbury 


Canton 


Middleton 


Swampscott 


Cohasset 


Mil lis 


Tops field 


Concord 


Milton 


Wakefield 


Danvers 


Nahant 


Kalpole 


Dedham 


Katick 


Watertown 


Dover 


Needhara 


Vfeyland 


Ihjzbury 


Norfolk 


Ifellesley 


Franingham 


Ho. Beading 


Ifenham 


Hamilton 


Norwell 


Weston 


Hanover 


Norwood 


Hestwood 


Hinghara 


Pembroke 


titeymouth 


Holbrook 


Randolph 


tfilinlngton 


Hun 


Reading 


Winchester 
Wi nthrop 


Total Towns 61 






The Cities are: 






Beverly 


Maiden 


Eevere 


Boston 


Medford 


Salem 


Cambridge 


Melrose 


Somerville 


Chelsea 


Newton 


Waltham 


Everett 


Peabody 


Wobum 


Lynn 


Quincy 





Total Cities 17 



VIII-:i3 
Greater Boston Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) 

MAP I 



1^^* 

^ '' 7 ^'N 

t ^S^*^ f'^ HkitiLJOH » 

/ V — "^ \ X ' ^^**' -.- ^ 

•*■ •. \ / *-^ . . » ^ 

/ \ NORTH RHAOlNG\ ; V \A^.ANCM£STEl^ 

f : ^ r-< , ! 0ANVE3S \ ejvEai.v 











•••• .>^ •• 



NEWTON 



t 



OUINCY 



J^^^iwi-o SHiaBOBH 



\ V w /""-x 7 \\ X'^'^^i 



NORWOOD 



\ Mints ,•• 

% NoarOLK V 



CANTON 



I W^IPOLE 






( 



SHARON 






t 



--' 




BOSTON 



V'' MiLTON 



\ \ '•~' -^~ 



I PEwsaoxs / 

I 

t 

% 






4. 



viii-iU 

Map 1, pagel3 indicates the location and pr o a dmi ty of the various 
cities and towns which make up the Greater Boston Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area, SMSA. 

!• iDeone Levels (Source - MPP) 

The cities and towns of the SMSA ranked hj median family income, 
Xable I^, page VL_^, indicate that only Chelsea has a lower median 
family income than Boston. 

Boston ha^ the largest of the public school enrollments, and has 
also the largest percentage of non vAiite public school enrollment 
of any of the communities of the SIISA, 

Table*f"^1TI p . Ii2 indicates that the school population for many 
suburban communities is declining. It could be that many of the 
older suburbs have peaked, in terms of student population growth. 
It is possible that many of the suburban communities listed will 
have excess school buildings* 

As can be determined from the charts the total school population of the SiSk. 
for 1972-73 was $39y^Sl of vrfiich hSh,219 {91,6%) were white and 
li^,078 (8.h^) were non white. The City of Boston's non white school 
population during 1972-73 was 3^*168. These figures indicate that the 
Boston Public Schools have enrolled 78^ of the non white school 
population for the entire SMSA district. In addition 36. 6;^ of Boston's 
school population was non white, compared to the entire SMSA districts 



VIII^l^ 



2* General Data 

The infomation presented in this unit is listed in Tabular 
Form. These data are presented however, after the Descriptive Analysis 
of the data. 

This type of presentation is employed because each chart is of 
necessity displayed on four succeeding pages. This is due to the 
large number of couEiunities which comprise the Boston Standard Metro- 
politan Statistical Area (S!SA). There are seventy-eight (78) indivi- 
dual communities. They are listed alphabetically, Ko attempt has 
been made to selectively or randomly include or exclude any community. 
Such an effort could create the possibility of sampling and/or statis- 
tical error. This concern with full data disclosure results hovrever, 
in the forementioned problem of cunbersomeness when attempting to 
compare the data of individiial communities. It is suggested that the 
Descriptive Analysis of each Chart be read, then the actual data may 
be scrutinized with greater ease and comprehension. 



VIII-15 



Social and Economic Characteristics for Boston SHSA School Districts 1970 
Aiialysis of Data . 

The table clearly shows that low family income is associated 
with the tirban environment. Boston and Chelsea are at the bottom 
of the scale in terms of median family income, Cambridge, Lynn, 
Salem and Somerville, as well as Boston and Chelsea, have median 
family income below $10,000 per year. 

^y way of contrast high median family incomes are associated 
id.th suburbia. Dover, Lexington, Lincoln, Sherbom, Sudbury, 
Wayland, Weston and Wellesley have demonstrated this fact quite 
dramatically. 

Female heads of families account for 22.6^ of all households 
in Boston. In the wealthy suburbs, it is considerably lower - 
Lexington is 7.3/?, Sudbury is h»S%f Wayland is $,9%, Weston is $*3%, 
Wellesley is 3,2%, Urbanized settings have many times more the 
number of female heads than do subvirban communities. 



TABLE IV 



VIII-17 
SOCIAL A!«D ZCOliaaC CH.\RACTERISTICS 

FOR BOSTON SllSA SCHOOL DISTRICTS 



1970 





Median 
Family 
Income 

12,2^7 

12, 1W 

_ Vf ,271 

13,559 

11,292 


Familie 
with 
Female 
Head of 
Househo 

J 

1,701 


s 

Id 
f _ 

12.1 


i 

1 

i 


.^oh'-^yl 


16^^ 
968 
982 


5.5 
12.6 
10.5 
22.6 


i 


Bsi'^oscT 


i 

i 


33'! -en-;; 


t 

t 
1 


2sv?.rl- 


t 

: 


3ozito:i 


9,133 


31,913 


1 
i 


Bra-'-.i-iOG 


13,030 


712 


8.k 


< 


r^rocIcIii*2 


13,701 


2,256 


15.9 


t 


" "■"" 


13,236 


233 


^.7 
17.9 




Caaoric-cs 


9,815 
13,753 


3,727 
•303 


< 


Csn'co-' 


7.'* 


» 


Chslaoa 


8,973 


1,298 


17.3 


r 
i 


Cc''-''^30Cv 


1^,958 


* 




\ 


Cent; era 


I6,i*63 


309 


8.3 


i 


j-onvo-'L 


12,516 


525 


.8.6 
10. *+ 


* 
1 


r-cai^on 


12,32^ 


690 


■ 
1 


Dovci' 


22,716 


* 


13.5 


i 




13,523 
10,086 

13,090 


* 

1,516 
1,352 


• 


A-^^-A-i.n.'^l'.cr. 


8.6 


t 



• FiGurcs for towns with less than 10,000 population are unpublished. 

Sources: lletro Ways to Understandin.-^, Volume II, Part 2, 197U. Metropolitan Planning 
Froject/oupport Research Table ,'iUO. U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1970 Census 
of Population, Ge neral Soc i al an-l i ^co nomic Ch.-iracter i .qtics, Mauua chuGctts, 
PC (1) - C23, 'rHbics Uc), U, U2, 01,"^, 36, ay, 102, 103;iUU,10i>, 107,117, xT3, 
U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1970 Census of i o:iulation , Characteristics, 
Massachusetts. PC (1) - D23. Tables 23.21^.29.31. 



TABLE IV 



viii-ia^ 

SOCIAL Alfl) ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 
FOR BOSTON S!iSA SCHOOL DISTRICTS 



1970 



•p 


• l-tediam 

1 Family 

income 


Families 
with 
Femade 
Head of 
Household 


; 

• 


. itefflliton 


12,797 


♦ 




; 


Haggler. 


13,071 


127 


5.3 




'■ Hiugham 


i'»,202 


^75 


8.^ 


4 

i 
t 


goibrop.k. 


t 

11,230 


207 


7.4 


i 


Hull 


10,677 


* 




t 


Lezlxtgton. 


17.558 


571 


7.^ 


■. 
• 


Uaeoia 


17,361 


♦ 






V 


9,739 


3,660 


16.1 


i 


^n field- 


16, 2't2 


152 


5.5 


t 
* 


Haden 


10, 20^* 


2,007 


13.9 


i 


Mfinchestep. 


12,677 


* 




5 
* 

..._._ ! 


■ Harblehaad 


14,222 


502 


8.8 


: 
} 


H^-^^ieid 


11,7^2 


2?>2 


7.8 


• 

i 


M:s(ift^d_ 


15,609 


* 




i 
1 
! 


>^4?ord 


11, 1*15 


2,178 


13.4 


« 


H^ippse. 


12,42'f 


823 


9.9 


■ 


Micidl^ton; 


11,307 


* 




; 


Hillis 


12,580 


* 






Klltoa 


1^.728 


837 


12.1 


< 


N^lant 


1 

12,656 [ • 




• 



?JLJ.j.-j,y 

SOCIAL AIID ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 
TABLE IV FOR BOSTON SlISA SCHOOL DISTRICTS 



1970 



Median 
Fcunily 
Income 


' Feimilies 
with 

Fenale 
Head of 
Household 


- 


mtlCt .13,1'*'* 


679 


8.9 




NeedhanE • 16,375 


^hk 


7.2 


' 


Sewton : 15,381 


2, 3^*3 


10.4 




THotSq^ i 12,015 


* 




- 


t(9o Reading •" 12,'*85 


138 


5.1 




^^9S^mi ': 13,866 


* 






3s!TV9o4. ; 12,606 


755 


10.0 




ff^p^ 11,629 


939 


7.7 




^s^s^TP^.- ■ 10,998 


177 


6.5 




<§Sa?^ ; 11,09^1 


2,95^* 


13.1 




3lanaQn.ph , 12,309 


hS3 


7.3 




3te9i^anf ■ 13,^*3^ 


3Sh 


6.6 




RfS'.^e 10,325 


1,^1*0 


''2.5 




Rocljland- 10,7^6 


3'*7 


9.7 


- ^- 


SaCea- ■ 9,861 


1,470 


14.5 




Skugus; 11,5'H 


463 


7.2 




Sfeituai*: 13, '^Ol 


367 


9.3 


_. . ^ 


^scQm • 1'f,805 


188 


6.0 




Sherban.- 17,833 


« 






Ssttervillfe. 9,59'* 


3,657 


16.5 





SOCIAL AI^D ECONOMIC C11ARACTERISTIC3 



: TABLE IV FOR BOSTOII SM3A SCHOOL DISTRICTS 



1970 





Median 
Family 
Incoae 


Fanilies 
with 
Female 
Head of 
. Household 

# % 




Stc-r.Dhsn 


12,281 


465 


8.9 




Sud u-jry 


17,798 


140 


4.5 




S-3SJ30GC0tb 


13,6'f2 


342 


9.^ 




To?3?icia 


16,550 


* 




•- 


Walcensld 


12,412 


568 


8.7 




^alpDls 


12,828 


325 


7.7 




TJalthm 


11,523 


1,557 


11.0 


- 


TTGtertov/Sl 


11,^100 


1,335 


13.0 




Uay' r->^fT 


17,755 


194 


5.9 




vTelisslsy 


19,^01 


531 


8.2 


• 


\7&rix(^ 


1^,216 


* 






T7ee^.on { 


23,530 


133 


5.3 






17, 33^^ 


199 


6.2 




W-jyjiou tb 1 


11,631 


1,225 


9.2 






11,713 


238 


6.0 




TZincbes-ts:? j 


16,339 


483 


8.8 


: 


T7in-;--;rop 


11,685 


629 


12.3 




Wobur-Ti 1 


11,7^8 


906 


10.0 




• 

i 










5 
1 




• 




• 



VIII-21. 



Family Income Distributions, Standaurdized hj Connmnity, I960 and 1970 
Analysis of Data 

In the ten years from I960 to 1970 there was a general movement 
of middle and high income persons to the suburban areas. Concomitantly 
the number of low income people increased in the cities and decreased 
in the suburbs. Boston had Ii7»6^ low income families in 1970, an 
increase from lUi.lp in I960. Other concentrations of low income people 
above l^O^ of the total population included Cambridge, Chelsea, Lynn, 
Salem and Somerville. In Chelsea, Lynn, Salem and Someirville these 
poor people are primarily white. The high income persons are clustered 
in the suburbs. 

Again, the table indicates a marked contrast between city and 
suburb. In Dover, Sudbury, and V7ellesley, for example, at least 6S% 
of the people are classified as having high incomes. 



VIIIv2 
TABLE V FAI-:iLy IIICOIS Dir.T.lLUTICI.'S AIIDA.DIZSD 

BY COll.-UrilTV, 196 D 1970 



Arlii\::-fcon 

Ashlcrid 

Bsdford 

Delnont 

Beverly 



Ho. 

of 

Fanilies 



1970 
a 

Low 

Income 



% 

Kiddle 

Irjcorie 



:ne 



No. 

of 

Families 



I960 

% 

Lovj Middle rlich 

Incone Incone Incone 



% 






Dratntroe 



Brooldir.G 



!>urlln':ton 



U4,1U6 25.9 ■ 


36.7 




2,163 22.9 


U3.0 


•3 


2,9G8 15.0 


31.3 


50 


7,876 2U.3 


29.1 


H 


9,376 30.7 


37.1 


3: 



_13,357 
_1^96^ 
2,152 



23.6 3I4.O 
2C.3 Ul.l 
16.2 35.8 



lli2,019 U7.6 
8,531 



30.6 



21.7 



36.;- 



• 21, 

'lX- 



1U,215 26.1 
5,C20 16.9 



26:u 

U2.1 



C.':nbridce 




20,902 


U2.3 


31.0 


2- 


Canton 




4,0C8- 


21.2 


31.6 


l( 


Chelcsa 




7, '470 


U8.6 


32.2 


1: 



CoI:r.coot 



1,712 13.8 



27. 8 



Ccricord 
IXinvcra 



3,757 la.l 



27.7 



5^ 



6, 06? 



22.7 



39.6 



37 



DodliTLn 


» 


6,656 


2U.5 


36.6 




Dover 


i 


1,771 


5.2 


10.2 


&■: 


Duxbiury 


I 

1 

{ 


1,921 


23.2 


30.8 


u- 


l^vcrett 


1 


ll,:::iL 
15, 303 


39.3 


3C.1 


22 


ri-rjiiiT^'ucn 


1 

i 


2h.3 


32.7 


■■x: 



J^l6_ 
9,100 



I61i,2l5 



21^ 5_ j27 .3 
31.5 36.3 
iu.l 31.9 



7,811 



ll;,079 



22.6 36.U 
2U.1 



3,078 



_2a£ 
IC .2 



li2.: 



2li,h90 



h2.1 30.3 



3,165 



27.ii 3U.9 



8,6ii8 



50. C 31. U 



1,U93 



23. C 2>.2 



li2.U 

30.6 I 
li6.0 I 

_5i^2 I 

31.7 i 

2it.o i 

3:>.o I 
27.6 1 

37^7^1 
17£_| 
I;7.6 ' 



2,975 


21.3 


25.9 


52., 1 


5,016 


27.1 


36. ii ■ 


3a. 5 1 


6,015 


25.2 


23.0 


U6.3 


775 


1U.7 


15.9 


69.1: 
'5'i.\x 


1,2 Oil 


37.6 


29.0 


_11,6S3_ 

11,02s 


3;>.0 
23.7 


35.1 


21;. 1 
ljl.2 



Source: Governor's Task Forc e On Metropolitan Dev: opaent. Equity and Choice in the 
Boston Metropolitan Region, A r^roposed Ud. 3 01 "Action, March, 197U. Revised 
August, 197U, pp. 77-79. 



t 


VIII. 23 
:iLY ij-cciuj Dir;,ui:.-jTio:::: 
IT co:-ii;x:iTY, i960 


, rTAIIDA JDIZ D 
and 1970 








I'o. 
of 

Families 


197c 

Low 
Inco-e 


.'addle 
Incone 


% 

Hi: h 
Incone 


Kg. 

of 

?anilies 


i960 

% 

Lov7 

Income 


;:ic;die 

In cone 


1 

Ki h 
Income 


■"XL-dltoa 


1,12C 


23.2 


hlul 


27.7 


1,373 


29.9- 


32.2 


37.9 


-Hanover 


2,JL7 


18.3 


39.8 


al.9 


l,hli7 


25.9 


39.1 


35.0 


UijghaQ 


1;,500 


20.1 


30.5 


h9:h 


1,3C); 


20,2 


2:.c 


1 
51.0 


iolbrook 


2,758 


27.1 


^43. 5 


29. U 


2,515 


26. L 


hi. 7 


32.3 


WLl 


2,279 


33.U 


32.7 


28.7 


1,723 


36.3 


35.9 


27.6 


L-exiEst:n 


7,C25 
1,721 


12.7 


2U.!; 


62.9 


6,5uC 


15.3 


26.6 


5?.i 


Lin;oln 


19.4 


21.0 


59.6 


1,377 


23.1; 


21. a 


55.2 


'jyrm 


22,!i71 


a2.5 


yii.9 


22.3 


2u,565 


Ul.6 


3U.7 


2I1.7 


|^T:mi"ield 


2,781 


16.3 


26,1 


57.6 


2,171) 


15. I4 


23.3 


61.3 


ialdon 


1I;.607 


39.2 


35.5 


25.3 


lii,^^9G 


37.1 


37.2 


25.7 


ranchGster 


1,272 


26.il 


29.9 


1;3.7 


1,060 


36.2 


26.5 


- 32..J_„^ 


larblehead 


5,673 


21.8 


2B„5 


I49.7 


5,0146 


22.7 


26.7 


50.6. 


fershfield 


3,578 
2,160 


26,2 


la.i 


32.7 


1,716 


30.5 


3u.9 


3h.6 


!edfield 


13.5 • 


30. 


56.5 


l,lal4 


2ii.6 


33.7 


-JA^l.^ 


Bedford 


16,317 


32.5 


hi. 9 


25.6 


16, 661 


31.5 


35.li 


33.1 


Jelrosfi 


•S,219 


25.7 


3u.7 


39.6 


7,652 


23.9 


3U.6 


LI. 5 


1 

Jiddlcton 


916 


29.5 


39." 


30.7 • 


a.c6 


35.3 


37. U 


26.0 


iillis 


1,331 


19.7 


h3.7 


36.6 


1,069 


31.7 


37.9 


30. h 


lilton 


6,:25 


2., 5 


27.2 


52.3 
I4I.S 


6, 6:1 

96a 


19.0 

2r.i 


27.1 


53.9 


fahont 


979 

■■ ■J- ■ , 


23.0 


35.2 


2;.o 


li2.9 



I 



VIII- 2li 

TABLE V FA:-:in" z:ccijk: uisT.ii-.UTioi.'s, ;t;.:ia j)iz3D 

:i coiarjiiiT:, 1^60 and 1970 



lo. 



.a?70 ,. 

fi fi fi 

of Low Iliddle Ki^h 

Families Incone Income Incone 



of Low liiddle 

Families Income Income 



I:. 



Ha-ii 



llcedhon 



Kov/ton 



llorfolk 



7,591 2C.5 36.1 !i3.a 



7,11J 



22.3 



7,563 15.6 25.9 53.5 



6,691 



l!i.8 



22,69U 19.1 26.3 5I|.6 23,C76 



19.2 



906 26.2 liO.li 33.U 



621, 



NOo Reading j 2,705 20.1, ia.l 3C.5 



i Norscll 



1,995 



1,£38 16.2 35.9 



Ii7.9 



1,290 



IJorwood 



7,5aO 2U.1 37.5 36. ti 



6,l6U 



33.U 



2U.5 



3G.8 36.9 



23.7 1:3.3 



21.6 35.2 



23.9 37.3 



Peabody 



12,220 2-3.2 33.0 



33.5 



8, ii6c 



3. .U 3C.3 



Penbroift 



2,723 2,.-. 7 hi. 8 28.5 



1,321 



Lj.2 



Quinry 



22,U96 33.1 36.5 



30.1i 



22,973 



Randolph 



I 6,559 2U.0 1,..6 35.h ii,u:o 



Reading 



5,503 19.1 51.8 29.1- 



U,850 



20. I4 



36.7 



3: .5 36.: 



25.0 Ii3.5 



3-4.? 



Revei-c ' 



i 11,509 3>\0 35.5 25.5 



Rookland 



Salem 



l-,62l| 



I4-..5 3 5.5 



3,559 30.9 Ui.O 25.1 



3,1U9 



3U.6 



10,1: 



4O.3 36.U 23.3 



10,157 



la.i 



Scituat( 



6,u53 23.7 UC.8 30.5 



3,973 21.?; 



33.8 



il4. 



2,739 



2';. 9 



Sharon 



3,0;2 15. a 31.3 53.3 



2,39U 



17.7 



SherborJi 



Somoi^villG 



798 13. !4 23.2 63.U 



176 



2)1.2 



JiL.l 



34.1 



5,U17 2 7.5 al.2 



j3._:_ 

35.6 



2C.! 



22,172 !t3.7 35.6 20.7 ■ 2h,hC:: 3S.7 37 . 3 



VIII' 2$ 
TkBlZ V FAIIILY i::C0:i2 DiST.UoUTlUIC, rTAIID/^TDIZZD 

51 co:crji:iiT, i960 and 1970 





1970 

><0 . f3 

of Lovj 
Fanilies Inco'ie 


::iddle 
Income 


% 

Incone 


IIo. 

of 

Fanilies 


196c 

% 
Lou 

Income 


iliddle 

Inccr.e 


In c one 


Sloi:,-hr»ia 


5,22U 2li.l 


39.3 


36.6 


ii,u:.2 


25.5 


37.6 


36.9 



Su<Jbary 



j 3,131 IC.l 



23.9 



66.0 



l,3ii5 



19.3 



27.5 



53.2 



Swejupscott 



3,633 2U.U 27.7 



u7.9 



3,5U7 



23.7 23. U 



ii7.9 



Topsfieia 



1,259 111. 5 25.2 60.3 



511 



16.5 3C.2 



53.3 



Wakofiold 



yDlp:»lp 



Walthaa 



6,U92 23.8 37.6 36.6 



6,306 



27. U 



U,173 20. U 36. 3 I4I.3 



3,385 



2I4.6 



3U.U 
39.2 



III, 155 3C.5 33 J. 31.1* 



13,057 29.7 36.6 



33.2 



36.2 



33.7 



T'a tart own 



yinthrop 



Wotum 



lL,la2 31. U 31.6 



39.0 



10,li55 20.I4 3a. 9 



36.7 



Waylcj^d 


3,273 


12.7 


2h.3 


63.0 


2,599 


15.5 


21; .3 


59.2 \ 


TTellssley 


6,u02 


12.1 


19.6 


63.3 


6,060 


l)».5 


17.7 


/-7 1 

1 


Wcnha-n 


379 


21.7 


23.9 


k9M 


683 


22.8 


31.9 


i45.3 


W.6-?.on 


2,563 


10.7 


15.0 


11x3 


1,398 


11.1 


1^.1 


76.6 


WesV.vood 


3,238 


15.1 


23.0 


61.9 


2,707 


15.2 


29.6 


55.2 


Wcyaiouth 


13,515 


27.U 


UC..3 


32.3 


11, 35a 


26.1 


39.6 


3U.3 i 


Wilmin^-ton 


•4,006 


25.9 


u3.2 


30.9 


2,9ii5 


3^.7 


39. u 


29.9 


T/incheolcr 


5,5U5 


15.7 


25.1 


59.2 


U,92u 


17.5 


22.7 


59.6 



! 5,CUU 



3'-. 7 



35.1 



9,010 25.8 39.1 



3I4.2 
35.1 



5,151 



7,61. 



32.7 
29.3 



33.1 



Ul.2 



34.2 

29.5 



7111-2^'^ 

TableVI., which was printed in the Boston Globe Jiine 2, 1971;, states 
that blacks have made little gain in subxirbia during the last ten years. 
For example, 91/5 of all black persons in Massachusetts live in five 
Greater Boston cities. According to the Globe article, sone theories 
which attempt to account for this isolation include: 

1) "Blacks don't want to move out of predominantly black neighbor- 
hoods either because of a desire to strengthen black neighborhoods, or 
because they aren't willing to take on the harassment a move like that 
might entail." 

2) "Some maintain that federal housing programs have contributed 
to segregated housing patterns by building almost all of the publicly- 
STibsidized low and moderate income housing in urban rather than sub- 
tirban areas, thus making it difficult for poor people both black and 
idiite to move to the suburbs." 

In i960 there jrere lll,81i2 blacks living in Massachusetts. They 
made up 2.2^ of the total population of 5*1 million, according to the 
i960 federal census. At that time 8l^ of the black population lived 
in eight cities. They were Boston, Broclcton, Cambridge, Lynn, Medford, 
New Bedford, Springfield and Worcester. 

Ten years later the black population represented 3.1^ of the total 
population of 5.7 million, but blacks were even more centralized in 
those same eight cities. Of the 175, 81^ blacks, the federal census- 
takers identified as residents of the state in 1970, 02.5^ lived in 
those cities, a statistic which suggests that housing for blacks is 
not being made avaLable in many of the suburban communities. 



vni-27 



A joint report by the Massachusetts Advisory Committee to the U. S. 
Commission on Civil Rights and the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination 
entitled, "Route 128 - Boston's Road to Segregation" clearly states the re- 
lationship between the central city and the suburbs. The report details the 
extent of racial exclusion in Boston's suburbs and examines the policies and 
practices of Federal, State, and local government, as well as the housing 
industry, private citizens and private employers. 

Glendora M. Putman, Chairman, Ifessachusetts Commission Against Dis- 
crimination , and Julius Bernstein, Acting Chairperson, Massachusetts Advisory 
Committee, U. S. Commission on Civil Rights in the preface to the report state, 
"This report is the result of effective cooperation betv/een a State's civil 
rights agency and a Federal civil rights advisory committee. We have Joined 
together to tackle one of the most important and most impervious problems con- 
fronting America today, - the increasing physical and psychological separation 
of our people on the basis of race". 

The report is based largely on public hearings and research completed in 
1970 and 1971. It documents how far v/e have traveled dovm the road to 
separation in the metropolitan area. It is hoped that the report will aid in 
blocking further expansion of the road to segregation and the recommendations 
of this report will constitute a series of steps in a program to make equal 
opportunity in the city and in the suburbs a reality for all of our citizens. 
The report attempts to show Route 128 as the road to segregation. The report 
refers to the present unpleasantness in Boston as teaching people what awaits 
them at the end of the road. Citizens in Boston have witnessed the bitter 
Jruit of segregation - misunderstanding, hatred, and violence. The report 
states that no evidence exists that discrimination has declined anywhere in 
the Greater Boston area. If anything, the records of the Massachusetts Commission 



\xii-26 

Against Discrimination and the Boston Regional Office of the U. S. Department 

of Housing cind Urban Development show that discriminatory housing practices 

are on the rise throughout the area and are of a more complex and comprehensive 

nature thaji was previously evident. The report predicts that along v;ith new 

restrictions regarding Federal involvement in local planning efforts 

the major burden of reversing the trend toward increased racial segregation 

will fall on the individuail cities and suburbs — the level at which civil 

rights enforcement is at its weakest. The report, page XII concludes that: 

"In suburban areas, public officials of narrow outlook and parochial 
interests control access to housing in such a way as to exclude 
most black and Spanish- speaking families from their communities." 

Regarding officials, the report states: 

"In an effort to maintain the status quo and preserve the 
"character" of their communities, local residents of suburban 
areas have sought to restrict the housing supply and exclude 
outsiders from the economic, environmentsil, educational, and 
social benefits related to land use," 

It might also be added to the list of benefits available to suburban residents, 

that of the educational experiences which accrue to suburbanites ^^^. 

denied to blacks because of their being barred from the suburbs. 

Page 1 states - "This report is concerned with white enclaves rather 
than black ghettos." It reflects the growing av/areness that the future of an 
urban area's minority population depends to a large degree on the decisions 
made and actions taken in the suburban communities v;here the white majority 
reside. It reflects too, the recognition that the Boston metropolitan area 
is as deeply affected by racial division as any other large northern metropolis. 
This division depends not only on the numbers of minority citizens concentrated 
in the urban core, but also on the extent of the minority vacuum in the suburbs. 

Regarding Racial Segregation in the Bo.ston Metropolitan Area (page 10) , 
the report states that using I96O census data, Teuber and Teuber in their 
study. - Negroes in Cities - found that for Boston's black population to 



VIII-29 

achieve n pattern of residential distribution throughout the city similar to that 
of non-blacks, 83.9 percent would have to relocate. Using 1970 census data, 
relocation would involve 8'+. 3 percent of the black population. 

The report states that suburban resistance to minority inclusion has been 
tacitly supported at both the State and Federal levels. Those agencies which 
have no direct mandate to enforce anti-discrimination laws often behave as if 
discrimination was not and never had been a factor in American life. It also 
states that the questions are not whether minority citizens should live in the 
suburbs or be dispersed, or whether court-ordered integration is a viable 
alternative. The questions are whether minority citizens can live in suburbs 
or whether the suburbs are going to perpetuate discriminatory practices v/ith 
the tacit consent of Gtste Government. The Commonwealth must commit itself 
to the elimination of discriminatory practices, and this fact should be clearly 
apparent in the decision of each agency. 

Thus, this report clearly supports statements made elsewhere in this 
document. The suburbs are not providing equal opportunities for all citizens 
With regard to trainsportation, housing and employment, this must end. It is 
firmly believed that if the court orders the implementation of the recommendations 
included in the Metropolitan Consideration section, educational segregation can 
end, and Route 120 could be a road to integration rather than the road to 
segregation. 



Jt^lacKs. in siiiDiariDia 



Housing .survey slio-vvs llicy have made Ultle gavA 
in 10 years — 91% live in 5 Crcaler Boston citif;5 




• 13.513 
Bedford 
1S3 



1B.1« ■ 

Concord 

20* 



7,557 

Lincoln 

231 



tf 13.S05 - 
'V Sudbury 
97 



t1 Framinghar 



Waylandj 



31.057 

Nalick 

311 



10.570 

Weston 

62 



23.C51 

V/ellesley 

201 



8.S52 
Ashland 

49 



\\ 



3.3C« 

Sherborn 
22 



<.5?9 
•Dover 

15 



5.821 

'Medfield' 

24 




31.83S 

Lexington 

274 



61.K2 

Waltham 

40? 



91.C-55 

Nev;ton 

1.fr92 



29.743 

Needham 
63 



26 933 
Dsdham 

54 

12.750^ 

Wesiwood 
15/ 

30.315 

K'or.voody 

33 



27.190 

Milton 

34 



87.555 

Ouincy 

123 



17.100 

Canton 
65 




27.035 
v.Randoipfi 

457 ' 



35.050 

Braintree 
69 



1S.S45 

Hingham' 

99 



54.510 

V\'"eymoutli 

141 




7.795 
Norwell 

43 



10.107 

Hanover 
61 




■ 11.193 
il Pembroke 



nek poj)Ml<)tioii in Greater Roston. Figures nl)o\c commuiiilics arc Iota! |)o;)iiIatio». Tisurcs Iwiluw arc black po|uilalii)n. 



vin»-3i- 



Blacks In Suburbia 
Analysis of Data 

The data vhich follows represents 1970 U. S. Census figures. This 
information documents that sixty (60) of the seventy-eight (78) 
suburban conmunities (77^) have less than one percent (.01) black 
residential population. At least k^ communities ($&%) have one 
half of one percent or less black populations. It should also be 
noted that in the ten years since the previous census the black 
residential pattern has changed little, except for the growing 
minority population percentage changes in the urban areas. 





VIII.32- 




TABLE VI BLACKS IN SUBURBIA 


Cities 
& 

Towns 


Blacks as Percentase 

of 
Total Population I960 


Blacks as Percentage 

of 
Total Population 1970 


.'.7.0.^ .;■;:•: 


ZIZI^'ZZZ 


_ .!>% 


i .':^hl'-ia .2^ 


.5^ 


1 2Gdrcr:l 1.*?^ 


1.15^ 


i DsT-.ont .1^ 


.25^ 


! 3sve.-0.y 


9.1^ 


.3^ 


t 

1 ^DSto;^ 


16.3^ 


I Braintroe •^% 


.2^ 


i . 3roo:-lii-;G .3^ 


.8^ 


i 5urliii3 i-cr. .3^ 


.65? 


1 Crj3bri.C!-o ; 5.3^ 


6.8^ 


i CcTi-inM #1^ 


_ .4^ 


i c:isiD'ji-i i #1^ 


1.75^ 


i CohcD::r;-c ! .3/^ 


.2^ 


i Ccr-nr.vvl ' »6/J 


1.35? 


; D:aircv-f! •!% 


.1^ 


i It-aiirj'. ' .1J^ 


.2^ 


rovor ; •4/S 


_'^1^^ 


I>a^bir-' 3.359 


1.1^ 


'. ::vorott 1 .5/J 


1.35^ 


1_. .-. -.•*.;- »' .; •...»_^ :: ^ 


1.1?$ 



Source: Boston Globe^ 6-2-l\^ 



TABLE VI 



vin. 3} 

BLACKS in SUBURBIA 



Cities 

& 
Towns 


*^ Blacks as Percentage 
Total Population I960 


Blacks as Percentage 

of 
Total Popvilation 1970 




.^^^^, 


•6^ 


_,„ _„_.0J( 

.65^ 


HJj-.Shan 


, 


.e% 


.5% 


Holbrook 


1.65? 


1.95$ 


H-Jli 


-^ 


.25^ 


.5^ 


I/-;yin£-'cn 


.3^ 


.9^ 


Lin- r. in 


1.9^ 


3.1^ 


LvTiT: 




1.4^ 


2.6^ ■ 


Lyn:u~.i.«lu 




.15^ 
1.2?g 


.1^ 


r.'nldsr. 




.3^ 


Ktnohpster 


.1^ 
.1^ 


lierblshopji 


.1^ 


I'-a:-orj?ield 


1 


1.9^ 
.4^ 


.9^ 


::-afinld 




.2^ 


lC^-Ator\\ 


1.7^ 


2.5^ 


1 

!:flros.-! 


.1^ 


.2^ 


i:iadV-:T. 




.2^ 
.1^ 


.2% 


Ilillip 


.2% 


liilton 




.1^ 


.1^ 


lU.hpji' ] 


.2^ 


.3^ 



TABI£ VI 



VIII -3U 
BLACKS IN SUBURBIA 



Cities 
ft 

Towufl 



Blacks as Percentage 

of 
Total Population I960 



.T; "J -.1 ;:. 



ll'ic P'. ad ins ■ 



.3^ 

4.8^ 

I?? 
.1^ 



iiOTT/l^CO 



.75^ 



Blacks as Percentage 

of 
Total Population 1970 



.1^ 
1.25$ 



4.65^ 
.25$ 

.6% 









Qd.n.?y 



Pc^inOiaph 



!?•• aair.Q 






1 

I 
' — 1~ 



Sal.-iP 



Sa-.i^vir? 



..■«-« :-:.-^.l± -wic-^-JS,-^ 






Sbt-rto-r. 



SViii.--iv.,-x>i: 



.1^ 



.5^ 


.6% 


.15^ 


.1^ 


.1^ 


1.75$ 


.1^ 


.10;^ ™'~ 


.4^ 


"■'.15^ 


.65$ 


1.4^ 


.3J^ 


.55$ 


.4^____ 


.4^ 


.35? 


.3^ 


.3^ 


2.15$ 


.65$ 


.7^ 


.4? _ _- 


.85$ 



TABLE VI 



VIII-35 
BLACKS HI SUBURBIA 



Cities 

Towns 


Blacks as Percentage 

of 
Total Popiilation I960 


Blacks as Percentage 

of 
Total Population 1970 


^.o:.-hrii 


; .2^ 


.2^ 


Svdbuiy 


.3% 


.1% 


Sweumpacott 


.^ 


.% 


T-opflficl(3 


.1^ 


.1^ 


Uakc-fitld 


.IJS 


.M> 


'^lil\>OUl 


.9^ 


.7^ 


Uaavihari 


.25^ 


.7^ 


^at^.T':ov.v. 


.1^ 


.4^ 




.1^ 


.4^ 


Wcilcal'.r.y 


.1^ 


.7^ 


Ucnhnni 


.2^ 


.5^ 




.5^ 


.6jg 


'"ostv-r-fAl 


.1^ 


.1^ 


\7oyffir.u;h 


.2^ 


.% 


TJUnington 


.25^ 


.2^ 


\7ir,i;hes-;tl' 


.45^ 


.4?^ 


V.'inv.hrop 


.25^ 


.2?5 


1 






1 

1 


, 


. ■ 



VIII-36 



Svaamary of Population Trends hy Conuatmity, I960 - 1970 

Aiaalysis of Data ____^_________ 

The movement of persons from urban to suburban areas is evident 
in the population changes in the urbanized areas. 

Boston and Chelsea lost the largest number of residents during 
the 1960's. Boston in particular lost 8,1^ or 56,126 persons. Racial 
data Indicates that this movement has been almost exclusively that of 
white persons. Towns which have experienced growth in excess of 50^ 
are: Burlington, Duxbury, Marshfield, Hedfield, Scitxiate, Sherborn, 
Sudbury and Topsfield. 



TABLE VII 



VIII.-37 

SDIif-IAHY OF lOPUMTION TiiElWS BY COrJJJUNITT 

1960 - 1970 





1970 


I960 


60-70 




Arlington 


53,534 


49,953 


7.25^ 




Achlcnd 


8,882 


7,799 


15.9^ 




Bedford 


13,513 


10,969 


25.2^ 




Dolaon-t 


28,285 


28,715 


- 1.5^ 




Beverly 


58,348 


36,108 


6,2^ 




Bocton 


641,071 


697,197 


- 8.1^ 




Braintree 


35,050 


■ 31,069 


12.8^ 




Broolcline 


58,886 


54,044 


9.0^ 




Burlington 


21,930 


12,852 


71.0^ 




Canbridce 


100,361 


107,716 


- 6.8^ 




Canton 


17,100 


12,771 


55.9:^ 




CliGlsea 


30,625 


33,749 


- 9.3^ 




Cobccoei; 


6,954 


5,840 


19.1^ 


! 


Concord 


16,148 


12,517 


29.0^ 




Danvcro 


26,151 


21,926 


19.5^ 




Xiodl^rin 


26,938 


23,869 


12.9^ 




Dover 


4,529 


2,846 


59.1^ 




Duxbiirj'" 


7,656 


4,727 


61.55^ 




Dvcrett 


42,485 


43,544 


- 2.4^ 




rrnni.iT^;;?n 


64,048 


44,526 


45.8^ 





Source: 



Metro ;;ays to Underotanding, Volume II, Part 2, 197h. Metropolitan Plaiining 
Project/Support Research Table j'f3Q. Massachusetts Department of Commerce and 
Uevelopnent, Massachusetts Population 1970-1965-1960. Massachusetts i-epartment 
Ox uomraerce and Jevelopment, Inoculation Movements in llassachus'-tts I96O-I97O 



VIII-,38 

TABLE VII SUUUARY OP POPDLATIOH TRENDS BY COIEJDNITT 

I960 - 1970 



:>rJ.l-toii 



Kanovei' 



Hir-5haa 



Holbrcoi 



Hull 






Lyra:; 



Lyr.Tif i p-ld 



lialdsn 



Hanolipster 



ILerblehsad 



llarshfield 



Mcdfield 



Bedford 



Uelrose 



Ididdlc-.on 



Hilton 



Kahaat 



90,294 



10,826 



56,127 



53,180 



4,044 

3,686 

2 7,190 

4,119 



94,478 



8,398 



57,676 



29,619 



3,718 

4 ,374 

_26^575_ 

3,960 



- 4.4^ 



28.9^ 



- 2.7^ 



12.0^ 

30.0^ 
3.1^ 
4.0$^ 





6,373 


5,488 


16.1^ 


1 




10,107 


5,923 


70. 65^ 






18,845 


15,378 


22.5$^ 






11,775 


10,104 


16.5^ 






9,961 


7,055 


41.2^ 






31,886 


27,691 


15.15^ 


■' — I 




7,567 


5,613 


34,8^ 







5,151 


3,932 


51.0;^ 




21,295 


18,521 


15.0^ 




15,223 


6,748 


125.6^ 




9,821 


6,021 


63.1^ 




64,397 


64,971 


- 0.9^ 



TABIE VII SUISJABI OP POPDLATIOH TlffiirOS BI CO.'.aOTIITY 

I960 - 1970 




Peetody 


48,080 


PembrolzP; 


11,193 



Quln~y 



Rqj-idolph 



Pf.adlng 



Rove 5 



87,966 



27,035 



22,539 



I 43,159 



Rooklar;5 



1^Jl£I±. 



Sal-^a 



Sa^j^.-c? 



Sii-tuatr. 



40,556 



15JJ0_ 



J2j202_ 
_4^919_ 



87,409 



18,900 



JL?i259_. 



_„4P}.Q80_ 



15j.1J9_ 



™.39j21J!_ 



,.20j6.66_ 



Sbarcn 



12,367 



Shercom 



SonervlllG 



._Uj_2H. 
10,070 



49.3^ _J 



27.5^ 


1 


0.6?^ 

43.0^ 


.= — 


17.0^ 





JJ.T^ 

_t9,5y1 

^5.4^ 



.21. 5i. 



3,309_ 



_1j806 



88,779 



.94j69L 



„51..45^ 

_22.8^_ 

__B3_,2fo 

» - 6 »2/o 



VIII- 1*0 

TABIE Vn SUIJIiARY OP POPULATION TREIDS BY COIilONITI 

I960 - 1970 




1970 



1960 



60-70 



- r 



^ t- 



'wc^'iinuih 



WilndjQfrton 



\7injhe3tcr 



20,725 



_54,j610 
17,102 
22,269 



I \7irithroT) 



j Wobiu-:! 



£0^33_5_ 
37,406 



17,821 



48,177 



12,475 



19,376 



20,303 



51,214 



16.3/^ 



Sudbury 


13,506 

i 


7,447 


81 .4?^ 




Svrexipscott 


13,578 


13,294 


2.1^ 




Topsaield 


5,225 


3,351 


55.9^ 




Wakefield 


25,402 


24,295 


4.6JS 




T7GlpDl(3 


18,149 


14,068 


29.0^ 




Wtil*rp,n 


61,582 


55,413 


11.1^ 




Vi'aterlo'^vn 


39,307 


39,092 


0.5^ 




\7aylcrid 


15,461 


10,444 


28.9^ 




\7ellc.sloy 


28,051 


26,071 


7.6^ 
37.6^ 




I 


3,849 


2,798 




■iTefc-bon 


10,870 


8,261 


31.6^ 




■i7Gsl^7C;od 


12,750 


10,354 


23.15^ 





13.4^ 



37.1^ 



14.9;^ 



0,253 



19.8< 



VIII-ljl 



Declining School Popoaation SKSA Between 1967-68 and 1972-73 
ATialysis of Data 

Declining enrollment can be an important indicator of potential 
available school space. The space could be utilized for voluntary 
Interdistrict educational programs. Of the 78 municipal school dis- 
tricts in the S>SA, 16 of the districts (representing 21 percent of 
the districts) had declining school enrollments. 

The total enrollment decrease in the I6 communities from 1967- 
1973 was 11,190, as indicated by Table VUI. While it would not be 
correct to state that the entire school population decrease trans- 
lates into Ujl90 seats available for student use, nevertheless, it 
is safe to assume that a percentage of the decline indicates that 
some seats are vacant and thus available for use. 



VIII-I|2 



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&,p 

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r.O O 



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■P 



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U 

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o 
u 

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en 



VIII- 1^3 



METCO Participating Cormunities 
Analysis of Data 



The ccsQBiimities that participate in >ICTCO are not lijuited by the 
geography of the Boston SKSA© Specifically, Carlisle and Foxboro are 
beyond the borders of the Boston SMSA. Most of the KETCO communities 
have had minor increases in METCO students. larger increases in METCO 
enrollments are evident in Belmont, Brookline, Framingham, Lexington, 
Lincoln, Ke^rton, Reading, Sudbury, Wayland and Veston. 

Vlhile Boston's cvirrent minority school enrollraeatb is U7«6^, only 
in Brookline, Cohasset, Lexington, Sharon, Sudbury, Kayland and 
Weston do the METCO enrollments exceed 2% of the total school popu- 
lation. Current 1-JETCO enrollments are conpared vath last year's 
total school enrollments because of the lack of data iregarding 
this year's enrollcents in cities and tovms in the Boston SMSA. 



TABI£ IX 



VIII-UU' 

METCO PARTICIPATHJG COITOTilTIES 



1974-75 



1973-74 




DeL-nont 
Beverly 



1974-75 Enrollment 



1973-74 Enrollment 



32 



21 



29 



Bocton 



Kraintroe 



Brooldins 



3\irlia':toii 



Cnnbriclc;© 



Canton 



ChelECQ 

CollCDCOt 

Concord 



.___i»- 



Carlisle 

I>cuavGrD 



3odban 



Dover 



j I>a>:biiry 



LJvcrott 

Poxboro 
rroriliY:lic.-i 



70 



61 



54 



40 



240 



219 






45 



41 



J8 
27 



45 



8 



36 

144 



101 



. < 



■■ »• K 0» J 



Source: State Department of Education 



TABLE rx 



VIII. h^ 
METCO PARTICIPATHIG COI.CuinilTIES 



1974-75 



1973-74 



T'^-J.ltCJl 



1974-75 Enrollment 



1973-74 Enrollment 




TABLE EC 



VIII-^ 
METCO PARTICIPATING COKMONITIES 



t974-75 



1973-74 



1 


1974-75 Enrollment 


1973-74 Enrollment 


ITaif'.ok 


50 


42 


Hf'&dhan 


79 


69 


Now ton 


200 


176 


ITorfolk 







NOo Reeding 



} Norwll 



Norwood 



Peaboay 



j Pemlroke 



Q>iincy 



Randolph 



Reading 



53 



Revere 



Rooklai-jd 



'r 



20 



SalftH 



Sau^-.i3 



Scituato 



Sharon 



Sherboni 



Soaci-villc 



20 
70 



16 



32 



1^ 
68 



TABLE EC 



VIII-U7s 

METCO PARTICIPATING •lOWJUWITIES 



1974-75 



1975-74 



StoiitLhani 



1974-75 Enrollment 



1973-74 Enrollnent 



SudVory 



64 



44 



ST/aQT)acott 



56 



47 



Topefiold 



T7aJ;e field 



20 



15 



TZnlpolG 



24 



23 



Waltham 










Watertovm 










WayxET.d 




80 




37 


Wollosloy 




148 




147 




iiDg_Cix» 


10 






Tfeel:on 




148 




117 


Woslvjood 




25 




25 


■ 


( ' '■' 








Wiluircton 










■ 1 .... . ...,..«.., 

V/in=hc-3tci- 










WincliTop 










Wobum 































Racial Census of Public Schools (October 1, 197U) 

Analysis of Data 

Public schools in Massachusetts are required to submit their 
Sttident Racial Census by October 1, of each school year. As of 
December 6, 197U data was on file at the State Department of Edu- 
cation for li5 of the 78 communities in the Boston SMSA. Reports 
from additional commvinities have undoubtedly been submitted since 
December 6, 197h» 

31iere are minor fluctuations of black enrollment in suburban 
schools. Some have gone up as in Belmont (+3) and Dedham (+3)# 
others have gone down as in Arlington (-11) and Canton (-3) • 

In Boston, there is a 1$% loss of vdiite students with a con- 
comitant increase of k% minority students. 



VIII- u? 

TABLE X RACIAL CENSUS OP ITJBLIC SCHOOLS AS OP OCTOBER 1, 1974* 

GRADES 1 - 12 



Achlc^id 
Bedford 
Delnont 



Beverly 



Bocton 



** 



Draintrce 



Brooliline 



Cnnbridce 



Canton 



Cliclsea 
Colicsoet 



Cone 01^1 



Danvcro 



Dodlnn 



Bovor 



Duxbiii-;;,'- 
Dvcrctt 



Indian 



Black 



Oriented 



Spanish 
N-W IB 



White 



69_ 
26 



1 



2 
1 






7,821 



2,114 



A 
102 



70 



70 



30 4,345 



42^ 
32,265 



21 



2,159 



10 



58 7,490 



7,019 45,624 



B\irlia''toi'i 



47 



40 



17 7,017 



10 



1,537 



166 



113 399 6,760 



28 



8 



1 



4,103 



119 



29 



26 



643 5,313 



46 



Unlisted 



10 



33 5,980 



76 



30 6,032 



] 



386 



78 



102 



163 12,590 



TOTAL 



8,005 



2,146 



4,518 



7,625 



87,169 



7,123 



8,985 



4,147 



4,137 



6,030 



6,156 



13,321 



Source: State Bepartaent of Education 
182 Treraont Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



♦Data was incompliete as of Decenber 6, 1974 
!Phose comauniticis reporting to the State 
Department of Ednication by this date 
are included in this Table, 



**Sourco: Boston Herald American 12/4/74 



viii-5a . 

T/LBLE X RACIAL CENSUS OP PUBLIC SCHOOLS AS OP OCTOBER 1, 1974 



GRADES 1 - 12 





Indian 


Black 


Oriental 


Spanish 


White 


TOTAL 


Tianillcn 
















Har.o-.-er 




16 




1 


2 


3,062 


3,081 


HliiGhaa 




Kolbrook 
Hull 




42 


'14 


2 


13 


2,825 


2,896 


1 


8 


2 


2 




2,936 


2,949 


Lexir-S+on 




322 


110 




37 


7,924 


8,393 


Lintiioln 
















Lynn 


5 


895 


40 


176 


165 


14,226 


15,507 


Lynnfield 




Llalden 


1 


239 


23 


14 


18 


9,064 


9,359 


Hanshpster 


1 


1 








1,223 


1,225 


KArblehead 




Uarshfield 




Uedfield 




Medfoi^a 


1 


367 


46 




10 


10,415 


10,839 


Uelroscj 


4 


86 


29 




9 


6,103 


6,231 


liLddlo^.on 




}Jilli8 


3 


4 


4 




3 


1,651 


1,665 


liilton 


1 


62 




1 


9 


4,049 


4,122 


Nahant 




2 


3 




1 


. 558 


564 



viii-51 

TABLE X RACIAL CE3ISUS OP PUBLIC SCHOOLS AS OP OCTOBER 1, I974 

GRADES 1-12 



Indian 



Black 



i<Gt:'.ck 



UotdhGia 



How ion 



Norfolk 



iroc Beading ! 
, ^. 

lior./cll i 



llor%70od 



Petitody 



Pt-mVo^.-fAfi 



Quinty 



Randolph 



Oriental Spanish 

N-W W 



White 



7 

3 



162^ 
101 



27 



48 



29 7, 762 
12 7,006 



13 



11 



,6 3,092_ 



53 



20 



16 



88 9,972 



149 



18 



24 6,544 



TOTAL 



_7,9?0_J 
7,179 I 



3,122 



10,149 I 



6,740 



Roadlng 




61 


5 




4 


5,711 


5,781 ! 


Revei-a 




8 


5 




17 
10 


7,369 

3,574 


7,399 1 


Rockland 


1 


81 


1 


1 

3,667 ; 


Salom 


3 


43 


14 


42 


57 


6,236 


6,395 i 


Sau^M5 
















Scitua'^o 




23 


1 






4,846 


1 
4,870 


Sharon 
















Shc-rtorn 
















Soaoi'vllle 





VIII-52 
TABLE I RACIAL CEMSUS OP HJBLIC SCHOOLS AS OP OCTOBER 1, 1974 

GRADES 1 - 12 



i Indian 
I 



Black 



Oriental Spanish 



White 



Total 



i S;.2,h^n: 



! bv"*,: t'Ji'*^*' 



34 



U 



2,972 



3,024 



S7lVTr,X>CiC'jt': 


» 


1 


59 


5 


1 


3,085 


3,151 


Topsfielcl 


1 
{ 






7 




825 


630 


T/alccricld 


1 

i 
1 




33 


10 


8 


5,422 


5,473 






34 



4,808 



41 



t^>\0'.^: I 



13 



TZaylai-.a 



90 



_39 
38 
32 



40 193 9,765 



54 5,153 



4,854 

10,079 

5,265 



13 3,509 



3,644 



T7cflle3?.oy 




1 


171 


34 


5 


7 


5,459 


5,677 


'.7inha:j 


















[ wce^,on 








• 











25 



Hiv-couili 



58 



18 



8 



^3,386 

J. 8_ J 5, 104 



3,418 



..13,207 



Wlliiiri^ton 
I T?in;-.hrop 



13 



3,454_ 5,476 



VIII- 53 



Racial Census of Public Schools (October 1, 1973) 

Analysis of Data 

The most recent ccapleted data available regarding the racial 
ccmposition of students attending the public schools in Massachusetts 
is the October 1, 1973 data. 

The black school population exceeds yf> in only 6 connunities in 
the Boston S'GA. They are, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Lynn, 
Bedford, and Sharon. Brookline and Sharon participate in METCO. 

A number of the remaining commimities have less than one tenth 
of one percent (.001) black school population. Most of them have 
less than one percent (.01) black stvident population, even with KETCO 
involveraent . 



TABLE XI 



VIII-^U 
RACIAL CEIISUS (PUBLIC SCIIOOIS) BOSTON - AREA SIISA 

AS OP OCTOBER 1 , 1 973 



Arlington 



I Achior.d 



8 ■ .^M-i. ■ ■ 

I 



Bsaford 
Belr.ont 



j Severlj' 



Indian 



Black 



Oriental 



Spanich. 



I Bocton 



; Brain ti'ee 



I Broolrline 



1 Burlin.-ton 



i Conbridce 



Con'ton 



Chelsea 



I Colicaoet 



! Concord 



Itanverc 



DcdLian 



Dover 



i 2>,'orott 
j Trcnlac^" 



JO^ 
106 



46 
24 



55 



52 



White -v- 

£,J710_ 
ii255_ 



TOTAl 



8,893 



.2,366^ 
12950^ 



4j903 



5,053 



116 



^0^_974 



10 




309 



346 



50 



27 



15 



,5|422_ 



6,135 



,7j',^^5. ,_ 7,638 



13 



li591 



180 



458 



8,110 



31 



_4j458_ 



4,499 



141 



29 



543 



3,743 



4,457 



33 



1,917 



1,950 



50 



13 



2,922 



2,991 



5,683 



lif58_ 



12 



6,166 



576 



582 



68 



_TL 



43 



2,930 3,002 

_6,726 §j85_6_ 



8 



-3J52 §1 



2,75 8- 11 ,649 J.4i831 J 



Mote: ---The fi.^ures in the ""..111 te" colvimn include all those students who are not Black, Na 
Anerican (Indian), Asinn-A^ierican (Oriental), or Spanish Surnarae. 

Sources: Metro Ways to Understandins - Voluns II, Part 2, 197U. Metropolitan Planninc Prj 
Support Researcli Table I'f?, Massachusetts State Department of Education, Enrolling 
m.r.n'^Trinatinn. Kv-hi hi t TT . '\9T^-7}i. received Jujie. iy7h. I 



TABLE XI 



VII 1-^5 
RACIAL CKIJSUS (PUBLIC SCHOOLS) BOSTON - AREA SMSA 

AS OP OCTOBER 1, 1973 



Vjx-Slton 



Kar:Over 



Hlnt:hEu 




Lyrm 



Lynnfield 



Halden 



Hsmcbf-ster 



IJarblehend 



Uarohfield 



Uedfield 



Indian 



Black 



Oriental 



Spanish 



VThite 



_1 
22 



Jjlil 



15 



3,336 



79 



5,359 



51 



11 



8 



2,814 



10 



2,987 



239_ 
136 



119 



29 



8,368 



16 



1,484 



847 



32 



14 



237 



23 



21 



9,885 



TOTAL 



.h^h 



3,375 



5,441 I 



'^ t' 



_2,884^ 



3,001 



„8,757^ 



230 14,112 11j126_ 

61 3,152 3 ,232 



10,168 



— 


2 


. 


., 


1,285 


1,287 


_ 


35 


7 


1 


4,600 


4,643 


_ 


47 


4 


17 


5,561 


5,629 


_ 


4 


6 


1 


2,864 


2,875 


— 


390 


16 


3 


10,919 


11,328 



LI'?dford 



l>!elroD3 



Middle ron 



miiis 



l-'ilton 



Nahent 



32 



12 



6,651 



604 



1,744 



46 



8 



4,382 



671 



6,706 



604 



1,750 



4,440 



677 



VIII- % 
TABLE n RACIAL CEL'SUS (PUBLIC SCHOOLS) BOSTON - AREA SMSA 

AS OP OCTOBER 1, 1973 



Indian 



Black 



Oriental 



Spanish 



White 



TOTAL 



ITal'.clr 
ITeedhon 



Kov/-!;on 



130 
86 



18 



22 



7,968 



8,142 



47 



7,224 



7,567 



413 



229 



75 



15,857 



16,581 



Korfolk 



UOo Reading 



i 



790 



790 



75 



22 



21 



3,297 



3,416 



Nori-.'cll 



NOTTVOOd 



2,634 



2,649 



18 



15 



24 



6,876 



6,934 



Peabody 



62 



13 



103 



11,094 



1 1 , 272 



10 



2,232 



2,244 



Quincy 



Randolph 



16 



58 



15 



16,120 



16,209 



145 



10 



21 



6,757 



6,935 



Reading 



27 



6,196 



6,231 



Reveix- 



21 



7,771 



7,805 



Rooklar.a 



69 



3,938 



4,019 



Salfim 



42 



505 



73 



6,334 



6,955 



Saus^ia 



20 



6,257 



6,286 



Soituat-i 



23 



10 



5,339 



5,372 



Sharon 


~ 


165 


10 


6 


3,457 


3,638 


Shorlom 


- 


1 


2 


_ 


631 


634 


So^er^^ll« 


14 


152 


66 


165 


12,524 


12,921 



TABLE n 



VIII-^7 
RACIAL CENSUS (PUBLIC SCHOOLS) BOSTOil - ABEA Sr:SA 



AS OP OCTOBER 1 , 1 973 



Indian 



Black 



Oriental 



Spcinish 



White 



TOTAL 



■ i.'w'j^*^"ijt*jn 



11 



35 



4,540 



4,590 



Sudt-.iry 


- 


37 


13 


7 


3,409 


3,466 


Sv/p.nosc'jtt 


- 


41 


4 


1 


3,155 


3,201 


Topcfield 


- 


3 


6 


- 


862 


871 


VTakefiGld 


5 


23 


17 


16 


5,196 


5,257 


^zlj.:>lr 


~ 


32 


.8 


19 


4,988 


5,047 


.Walthcs 


5 


37 


46 


168 


10,955 


11,211 


Water Ic-vm 




15 


43 


52 


5,756 


5,866 


Wayland 


~ 


47 


28 


6 


3,660 


3,743 


Welloaloy 


1 


115 


24 


22 


5,709 


5,871 


Yienhaxa 


- 


1 


1 


- 


559 


561 


t 'est on 


^ 


95 


23 


1 


2,767 


2,886 


Wost\7Cod 




25 


6 


2 


3,675 


3,708 


\7oyECuth 


2 


72 


21 


24 


14,238 


14,357 


WilEungtcn 


- 


25 


6 


9 


5,479 


5,519 


Wlnclicotcf 


- 


14 


34 


5 


5,395 


5,448 


Winthrop 




3 


8 


8 


3,742 


3,761 


Woburn 


3 


70 


15 


106 


9,637 


9,851 





















VIII-58 

Population by Race for School Districts in the Boston SJCA 1970 and I960 
Analysis of Data _______^______________ 

The pojmlation of non idiite individuals in the SMSA increased from 
9.82^ or 68, U93 persons to 18.1^^ or 116,362 persons in the 10 years 
of I96O-7O. Concomitantly, the white outflov; from Boston involved 
102,99$ persons. Increases in non vdiite population occxirred in 
Brookline, Lincoln, Kedford, Randolph, Rockland and Sharon. It 
should be recognized that these data reflect non viiite populations, 
not necessarily black populations. It must also be i*ecognized that 
Brookline, Lincoln, and Sharon held HETCO nerabership in 1970. 



VIII-59 
TABLE XII POPULATION BY RACE FOR SCHOOL DISTRICTS 

IN BOSTON StlSA 1970 AND I96O 





197 

Whit 

53^002^^ 

8.819 
13,22'+ 
27,966 



e 


1970 196 
Non-V/hite Whit 




e 

±_ 

99.78 


1960 

Non-Wh: 

% 

129 ^ 

17 




Aolil-na 


_99.02 

99.29 


5£2^ 
63 


_.98 
.71 

2,1^ 


49, 82^+ 
7,762 


.-J 


Betlford 

1 Delnori'c 

Beverly 


97.86 

98. 87 


289 


10,780 


98.28 


189 


2 


319 


1.13 
.72 


28, 6^ 


99.71^ 


75 


— n 


52'f,709 


__9^.28_ 
81.85 
99.60 
96.81 


277 


36,007 


99.72 


101 


-■a 

3 


BoctDn 


116,362 


18.15 


628, 70^+ 


90.18 


68.1+93 





Braintroo 


3^-911 
57,009 


139 


' .^K) 


31,007 


99.80 


62 ( 





T^roclclinc 


1,877 


3.19 


53,^85 


9S.97 
99.38 


559 

80 


3 


7);:rlnx~ton 


21,703 


98.76 


272 


1.2'+ 


12,772 


i 


Cru.'.brid^c 


91,^03 


91.08 


8,953 


8.92 


100,929 


95.70 


6,787 


\ 


Canton 


16,991 


99.36 


109 


.6'f 


12,756 


99.88 


15 




ChGlDea 

CohCCOGv 


29,860 
6,922 


97.50 


765 . 


2.50 


33,353 


93.83 


396 




99.5*^ 


52 


.1*6 


5,818 


99.62 


22 


r 


Concord 


15,8^5 


98.12 


303 


1.88 


12,^+36 


99.35 


81 


) 


Danvcrc 


26,05s 


99.6^ 


93' 


.36 


21,879 


99.79 


1*7 


\ 


1 
Dodlirm ! 


26,8'f5 


99.65 


93 


.35 


23,8to 


■ 99.88 


29 




1 

Dover i 


^,502 


99. '^0 


27 


.60 


2,83'f 


99.58 


12 


> 


" I 

Duxbury t 


7,528 


98.59 


108 


^M 


•.^,563 


56.53 


161+ 


/ 


LVorett 


it1,860 
62,986 


98.55 


625 


1.66 


1+2,850 


93.1+1 


69if 
271* '■ 




rrcniii"!!.'.-" < 


98.3'* 


1,062 


l+l+,252_ 


99.38 





orces: Metro Ways to Understanding - Volune II, Part 2, 197U. Metropolitan Planning 
Support Research Tables ,f3U - Table ;!-'3>. Table #3U - U.S. Bureau of the Cen: 
Census" of Population, Voline I, Characteristics of the •Population, Part 23, . 
Tables 21, 25. Tnhle .vlS - U.S. Bui'eau of the Census. 1970 Census of Popula 
General Social aad Scononic Characteristics, Massachusetts, PC (1) - C23, Ta; 
n .•^. MuT-Pnn nf t.hP .^Pn.sus. IVYO Census of Population, General Ponulation Cha 



Vin-66 
TABLE III POPULATIO:; BY BACL FOR SQIOOL DISTRICTS 

DJ BOSTON SMSA 1970 AKT) I960 



I 

t 

1 
1 

i 

1 


1970 
White 

# 


% 


# 


1970 
Non-White 


# 


I960 

White 


1 
I960 
Kon-White 

# % 


. TTsrUlou 


6,348 


99.61 


25 


.39 


5,477 


99.80 


11 


0.20 


! Ilar.o-.-ei' 


10,028 


99.22 


79 


.78 


5,888 


99.41 


35 


0.59 1 


! Hiiiis^i?^ 


18,709 


99.28 


136 


.72 


15,280 


99.36 


98 


0.64 


i Eclbrook 


11,497 


97.64 


278 


2.36 


9,919 


98.17 


185 


1.83 


i Hull 


9,902 


99.41 


59 


.59 


7,038 


99.76 


17 


0.24 j 


i Lexington 


31,331 
7,242 


98.26 


555 


1.74 


27,540 


99.45 


. 151 


0.55 


i Lincoln 


95.71 


325 


4.29 


5,469 


97.43 


144 


2.57 i 


1 Lynii 


87,466 


96.87 


2,828 


3.13 


92,976 


98.41 


1,502 


1.59 


Lyrmfifild 


10,808 


99.83 


18 


.17 


8,387 


99.87 


11 


0.13 


; Llalden 


55,163 


98.28 . 


964 


1.72 


56,880 


98.62 


796 


1.38 


! ^'^anchpster 


5,128 


99.55 


23 


.45 


3,921 


99.72 


11 


0.28 


1 liarblchecd 


21,251 


99.70 


64 


.30 


18,489 


99.83 


32 


0.17 


! narshfield 


15,031 


98.74 


192 


1.26 


6,613 


98.00 


135 


2.00 


: Medfield 


9,768 


99.46 


53 


.54 


5,986 


99.42 


35 


0.58 


; L!edford 


62,475 


97.02 


1,922 


2.98 


63,817 


98.22 


1,154 


1.78 

1 


Uelrose 


32,950 


99.31 


230 


.69 


29,542 


99.74 


77 


0.26 


>iiddleton 


4,023 


99.48 


21 


.52 


3,712 


99.84 


6 


0.16 


liillis 


5,652 


99.40 


34 


.60 


4,572 


99.95 


2 


0.05 


Hilton 


27,113 


99.72 


77 


.28 


26,336 


99.85 


39 


0.15 


i:ah?-nt 


4,080 


99.05 


39 


.95 


3,930 


99.24 


30 


0.76 



TABLE XII 



P 



VIII-61 

POPULATION BY RACE FOR SCHOOL DISTRICTS 
IN BOSTON SMSA 1970 AlfD I960 





1970 

White 
# 


98.57 


1970 

Non-Whit 
# 


e 


I960 

White 
# 


^ 


I960 

Non-Wh1 te 
# - 5^ 


i:at:."k 


30,614 
1 
i 29,555 

89,257 


443 


1.43 
.65 


28,691 


99.51 


140 


0.49 j 


Nov? ton 


99.35 


193 


25,719 


99.71 


74 


0.29 


97.99 


1,829 


2.01 


91,518 


99.06 


866 


0.94 


JlorroUc 


4,417 


94.87 


239 


5.15 


3,300 


95.07 


171 


4.93 


UOc Rtndtns 


11,210 


99.52 


54 


.48 


8,309 
5,143 


99.74 


22 


0.26 

1 


Iforf/cll 


7,734 


99.20 


62 


.80 


98.77 


64 


1.25 : 


Norwood 


30,704 


99.64 


111 


.36 


24,835 


99.75 


63 


0.25 i 


fieabody 


47,714 


99.24 


366 


.76 


32,135 


99.79 


67 


0.21 I 




11,078 


98.97 


115 


1.03 


4,881 


99.23 


58 


0.77 


J'Jin-.y 


87,491 


99.46 


475 


.54 


87,234 


99.80 


175 


0.20 


Sandnlph 


26,471 


97.91 


564 


2.09 


18,690 


98.89 


210 


1.11 


RoadlTis 


•22,441 


99.57 


98 


.43 


19,216 


99.78 


43 


0.22 1 


Severe 


43,066 


99.78 


93 


.22 


39,910 


99-58 


170 


0.42 1 


dockland 


15,412 


98.33 


262 


1.67 


13,010 


99-17 


109 


0.85 j 


3alca 


40,193 


99.10 


363 


.90 


39,040 


99.56 


171 


0,44 


p&US^.TtJ 


24,949 


99.36 


161 


.64 


20,571 


99-54 


95 


0.46 1 


5cituatG 


16,844 


99.24 


129 


.76 
2.41 


11,177 


99-67 


37 


T ^ 

0.35 


jhai'on 


12,069 


97:59 


298 


10,033 


99-63 


37 


0.57 


>bcrborn 


3,274 


98.94 


35 


1.06 


1,796 


99-45 


10 


0.55 


ionorvillc 


87,388 


98.43 


1,391 


1.57 


94,227 


99-50 


470 


0.50 



f 



VIII-62- 
TABLE XII POPULATIOII BI RACE FOR SCHOOL DISTRICTS 

IK BOSTON SMSA 1970 Alffi I96O 




SudboTy 



Sv/aiipscott 



Topefield 



1970 
White 



# 



% 



1970 

Non-White 

# 



^ 



# 



I960 
White 



I960 
Non-White 

# 



20,586 99.33 139 



.67 



13,364 98.95 142 1.05 



17,753 99.62 



68 



7,416 99.58 



31 



13,491 99.36 



87 



.64 



5,207 99.66 



18 



.34 



13,258 99.73 



36 



3,344 



99.79 



0.38 
0.42 



0.27 



0.21 



WoJcOiicld 



25,328 99.71 



74 



.29 



24,268 



99.89 



27 



0.11 



WdIpoIg 



Walthaa 



Watf.rtov.'n 



j Way land 



r 



WcllGsley 



Wcnham 



Wvistc-n 



Wostvrood 



17,986 99.10 



163 



.90 



13,935 



99.05 



133 



i-0, 816 98.^83 106 Lrl5 53^ ZOA_ S9..6a 



^09- 



-3.8^859 98..5.4 . , 418 1*06. 



JL3,314. 
27,693 



98.72 



■1^7 



Jl.4 



358 



.1*09„ 
1.28 



3,808 98.^3 



41 



1.07 



10,758 98.75 



138 



1.27 



1 12,699 99.60 



Wej-Eiouth 



54,324 99.48 



51 
286 



.40 
.52 



1,-023 99.82... 



j69- 



_1Q,42D„ 
25,968 



-.93^ 7Z 



.24- 



99.60 103 



2,787 



99.61 



11 




44 



26 



48,019 



99.67 158 



0.95 



-Q.38- 



.0^18. 



-.0.23- 
0.40 



0.39 



0.53 



0.25 



0.33 



Wilmagton 


17,037 


99.62 


65 


.38 


12,443 


93.74 


32 


0.26 


Winchester 


22,059 


99.06 


210 


.94 


19,264 


99.42 


112 


0.58 


Winthrop 


20,251 


99.59 


84 


.41 


20,240 


99.69 


63 


0.31 


Wol^vim 


37,067 


99.09 


339 


.91 


30,992 


99.29 


222 


0.71 



























VIII-63; 



3# Summarization of Tables 

More than a decade ago the U. S. Commission on CJril Rights 
(1961) noted the develoment of a "white noose" of new STiburban 
housing on the peripheries of decaying cities with an "ever increasing 
concentration of non whites in racial ghettoes." Today, that pattern 
has continued and is becoming even more pronounced in the Boston SICA. 
The exodus of affluent whites from the city has continued along with 
the large scale movement of jobs and wealth. Poor people (black or 
vidte) have not had the same migration potential or activity. 

A Boston Globe article, "Blacks in Suburbia" (6/2/7I1) outlines 
the predicament. 

"In i960, there were lll,8ii2 blacks living in Massachusetts. 
They made up 2.2 percent of the total population of 5.1 million, 
according to the I960 Federal census. Almost 81 percent of the 
black pop-ulation lived in eight cities. Those cities were Boston, 
Brockton, Cambridge, Lynn, Kedford, New Bedford, Springfield, and 
Worcester. 

Ten years later, the black population had si-rollen by almost 
61i,000 persons and represented 3.1 percent of the total popula- 
tion of 5»7 million. But blacks were even more centralized in 
those sane eight cities. Of the 175^817 blacks the Federal cen- 
sus taZ-cers found in the state in 1970, 82.5 percent lived in 
those cities. 

In the metropolitan area of Boston, the same pattern of 
racial isolation in urban areas emerged. 

The census bureau refers to metn^politan areas as "Standard 
Metropolitan Statistical Areas," the acronym for -.-hich is SJiSA. 
In 1970, the Boston S!3A, according to the census^ included 78 
cities and towns extended to Framingham on the west, Topsfield 
to the north ar/i D-o^rbury to the south. 

The Boston S:SA in 1970 had a population of 2,7>3,000 of 
which 127,035 or li.6 percent were black. But the vast majority 
of blacks were located in just five of the 78 coELT.unities in 
the Boston S^ISA. 

- Almost 60 percent of the black population in the state 
lived in Boston prop-er. 

- \ath fo^jT exceptions, the other communitiec in the Boston 
SV3k all had black pop^olations of less than lOCO persons. These 
exceptions were C;tmbridge, Lynn, Hedford and Newton. 



viii^U 



- In fact, in 1970 more than 91 percent of the blacks living 
in the Boston area lived in either Boston, Cambridge, Lynn, Medford 
or Kowton; 

- And aliaost three quarters of the conununities in the Boston 
area had black populations vjhich nade up less than one percent of 
the conraunity's total population.,. 

There is little inforniation on what has happened sinco 1970 
because the Federal census is taken only once every 10 years. 
Local head counts, when they are taken, don't always show the 
race of residents. 

Black housing patterns have changed veiy little,,. 

The non-viiite school population in the Boston school syste.i 
was 38,5 percent this year, according to State Board of Lducation 
statistics. V."ith the exception of four cosnunities, all other 
school systems in Boston SlISA had non white populations of less 
than five percent." 

An evaluation of current data for Boston indicates that Boston has 
had a loss of 1$ percent of its white students \d.th a concomitant U 
percent increase in minority students. (Herald American; l2/li/7). 

Boston indeed has a tightening "vrtiite noose". The suburban areas 
aro bccc:sing whiter and wealthier, Boston is beconins the hozie of the 
poor and ninorities. 



VIII-65 



D, Reglonallzation 

The concept of regionalized planning by conmiuiities for the pur- 
pose of serving the public has been utilized throughout the United 
States. Indeed many authoi*ities concerned with the future of urban 
Anerica have called for an increase in this regional planning. Cal- 
dwell, in his book "Kow to Save Urban America" ( 1973> p. 7 ) is con- 
cerned vdth issues of housing, transportation, poverty and education. 
Ee states: 

"If we persist in the course we are taking, our cities will 
turn into Indian resei-vations walled off from the rest of 
society, guarded by police, with welfare checks nailed in 
to keep them from exploding. We have the opportunity - 
perhros unique in history - to create a truly pluralistic, 
multiracial society in the Urban Region. Are we going to 
blow it?" 

For years in Kassachusetts, metropolitan services as exemplified by 
the Metropolitan District Police, Sewage and V/ater Commissions, 
Metropolitan Park Districts, Mass. Bay Transportation Authority, 
Metropolitan Air Pollution Control District, Uetropolitan Re- 
gional Planning Agencies, etc. have been created by the pooling of 
resources to create greater and nore efficient delivery of services 
to communities without the redundancy, and, in so~e cases, inefficiency, 
inherent if each community were to provide these same sendees in- 
dividually. Increased regional planning and collaboration is also 
recommended by the Governor's Task Force on Metropolitan 
Development (A Proposed Course of Action. 197h, pp. U8-50). 



vin-66 



1. Regional School Planning 

This transcendence of nunicipal lines for general educational 
(not vocational) purposes has not had the success as have other 
metropolitanized efforts. J, Harold Flannery, head of the Lawj'ers 
Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, offered a reason. He stated: 
"Metropolitan reorganization (of schools) would have happened a long 
time ago if it weren't for the question r^f integration." (Education 
U.S.A., I97U, p.ljl). In the November 197U issue of Connonweal , Paul 
Hazelton contends that the present Supreme Court decision "makes 
suburban public schools a de facto systen of private schools which 
have been freed by the court of responsibility for integrating or 
equalizing resources." There are those however, such as Marjorie 
Hames, Civil Rights-NAACF Lawyer, and Jesse Choper, Constitutional 
Law Professor, The .University of California at Berkeley, who believe 
that the Supreme Court's Detroit decision did not mile out cross- 
district movement. The decision just made it mandatory that spe- 
cific discriminator^" actions be shown as having been promulgated by 
suburban towns against the cities. (Jones, Education U.S.A., 7U, p. 259). 

There is consequently an increasing interest in metropolitan 
solutions to racial segregation and isolation based on the above 
opinions. 



VIiI-67 



2, Proponents of Metropolitan! zati on of School Districts. 

Terroll Boll, U.S. Commissioner of Education, vhile discussing 
the duties of State Boards of Education said, "large urban areas 
covering raany districts should be regrouped into units reflecting ir.ore 
econoniic social and racial balance." He placed the responsibility for 
this metropolitan action with the State Boards of Education. (Education 
U.S.A., 197h, p. Ul). ■ 

Fori.ier Francis Sargent has stated "Irabalanced schools are not 
just a Boston problem,. Vfliy should the burdon fall only on these 
people in the inner city.., VJhat about outside the city,." (Globe= 
March 29, 197h). 

Dr. Joseph Cronin, outgoing Secretary' of Education for the Coa- 
monvealtJi also has stated, "Racial integration in the northeast is a 
suburban and metropolitan responsibility, not just an urban problem." 
(Heath, 1973). 

Umborto Cardinal Medeiros, Archbishop of the Catholic Archdiocese 
of Boston, has indicated, "Inequalities in housing and employment are 
at least as significant as inequalities in education and every effort 
must be made to eliminate them (Speech, April 197U). 

Massachusetts Governor Michael Dulcakis, during a 
television interview on October 21, 197ii stated, "The suburbs have 
an obligation to participate in the education of Boston school 
children,." 



VIII-63 



Metropolitan ochool District 

In the Boston Globe of Tuesday, January 1'+, 1975 » John J. HcDonough, 
Chairman of the Boston School Committee, discussing the creation of new school 

dyitems said: "Thsre is no reason why the state could not set up a aetro- 
politan school district for education in the came v/ay the IIDC (Metropolitsm. 
District Commission) was created for a variety of other public cervices." 

According to the Boston Herald jbierican of Friday, January 17/ 1975, 
Governor Duka.kis gave his full support to legislation which would transport 
20,000 Boston students to UO suburban communities, teming the proposal 
"a genuine desegregation plan for the successful and peaceful opening of 
Boston schools next September." 

The Governor also said, "But it is very unfair to compel Boston to bear 
the brunt of this (school integration) by itself," 



VIII-^9 



3o School Metropolitanlzation and the Courts 

The concept of netropolitanization of school districts is not 
new. Conmunities have collaborated for years to provide the voca- 
tional educational experiences that none of them coiild provide individ- 
ually - or provide as veil individually. General educational collabor- 
tion is now being advocated as the only realistic lon^ terra approach t: 
provide something that xirban and suburban areas cannot in and of the 
selves provide - integrated education. The develoment of this problc-n 
is illustrated by lIcKelvey (1972) in his book Metropolitan School 
Organization . Ke states, 

"The conditions of educational crises found in almost 
p11 of America's major cities are relatively well kno^m. 
These conditions stea in part from far-reaching changes in 
the envirorcaent of schools. The racial mix of student pop- 
xilations for exaraple has changed substantially. Even two 
decades ago school populations in the large cities were 
largely v.'hite. Today, hoi;ever, student populations in the 
large cities have becone largely black. Accompanying the 
change in racial mix and contributing to it has been the 
flight of citizens and business frou the cities to the 
suburbs. The flight of citizens has resulted in lessened 
leadership in tlie urban settingsj business transfers have 
cut needed tax revenues." (P VIl) 

The condition although recognized by scholars for years has, unfortu- 
nately, not been brought to the forefront of goven:aental or general 
public awareness until recently. 

George Roraney, formerly Secretary'- of Housing and Urban De\^lopsen-' 
acknowledged his belated awareness of the urban dilem:::a in his o\-ra 
state of l-lichigan. He connients about the 196? riots and urban effort. 
since then and says: 



^11-70 



"Like others, I was not aware of the seriousness of the 
vrban situation. V/e're doing some things better than we did 
then, but I do not believe we're making as much progress as 
we need to maJce, I don't think there's any question we still 
have not resolved many of the basic questions that brought on 
the riots." (Friedaan, 1972, P 9A.) 

Green (1972, P 27li-76) adopts a more direct reason for the failxu^ 

of America, He states: 

"V.'e have closed our eyes to the real problems of blacks 
in cities. Token efforts have been made to build a multi- 
racial society, but Axiericans have failed to make the nece- 
ssary moral ccrmitncnt. America boa.<=*'' of being a nation 
iftiere anything is possible. Through -vast expenditures of 
time, money, and hunan effort it has sent men to the moon 
and brought then back safely, yet it has been enable to 
bring equality of and quality in education to all its chil- 
dren. Racism continues to pervade American life cuid each 
day destroys a little more the promise of real eqxiaJLity for 
the black man." 

The Earner Commission spoke more strongly noting that "U.S. schools 

have failed to provide the educational experience \Adch could help 

overcome the effects of discrimination and deprivation." (Report 

of the national Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, p. h2h-2$) 

Clark (1965, p. 151-2) offers an explanation: 

"The public schools,,, are beginning to betray the 
purpose for which they were Ibunded; to give each child 
an equal chance to ed-'acation and to serve as an iapstus 
for progress of the poor and neglected into the circle 
of democratic opportunity. Instead, the public schools 
are beccning an instrument for the perpetuation - and 
strengthening - of class and caste, while the elite 
cluster in their safe suburban schools, or in the ex- 
clusive private schools." 

louis R. Lucas, chief JiAACP attorney in both the Detroit and Richmond 
Bchool desegregation cases, points out that the real issue in these 
court tests ist 

"are we going to have another South Afirica in this country- 
are we going to bo another nation of apartheid?" (Franklin, 1972, p. 32) 



VIII-,71 



In the Boston Globe, FVlday, October 18, 197h, William Taylor, 
Director of the Center for National Policy Review in Washington, D.C. 
stated that the Supreme Court refused to order metro po lit anizat ion 
unless a city can show the Court that one of three conditions exist: 

- City school discrinr^nation has some kind of interdistrict effect. 

- Boundary nanipulation and district line changes contribute to 

segregation. 

- Housing patterns in the state are purposefaLly discriminatory. 
Xf any of these conditions could be sho^vn to exist, apparently the 
City of Boston would have a strong legal argument for netropolitaniza- 
tion. The staff of the Conmittee believes that - at minimum - the 
moral argument persists. 

The issue of discrimination by subui^ban areas against the cities 
has created sonc excitement amongst civil rights lav;yers. Sone of 
them believe that the Supreme Court is leading the way towards the 
real probleias of desegregation - that of discrimination in' housing, 
so called "snob zoning" and other efforts to maintain the "ecological 
balance" in the suburbs. (Jones, Nathaniel; Education U.S.A. , 
Washington, D.C. Vol l6, i:o. h, August 5, 1971;) 

The U. S. Comnission on Civil Rights (1971;) has recently compiled 
data which will \mdoubtedly be used in litigation to '■;how that suburban 
areas have indeed participated in active and willing efforts to deny 
civil rights to ninority and poor people. The Coniuiasion has concluded: 

1. Minorities, particularly blacks have been largely excluded 
frcn the developnent of the Nation's suburban areas. 

2. This exclusion was created primarily by explicit discrimina- 
tion in the sale and rental of housing. 



VIII-72 



3. This exclusion is perpetuated today by both racial and econonic 
discrimination. Econonic discrimination is often intentionally 
directed at, and falls aost heavily upon minorities, whose 
incomes generally are significantly below the national average ♦ 

k» Suburban govemnents have acted almost exclusively in their 
own economic interests, often to the detriment of the central 
city and of the metropolitan area as a vriiole. Such devices 
as exclusionary zoning, failure to enact or enforce fair 
housing ordinances, and failure to utilize Federal housing 
assistance programs have been the mechanisms for preserving 
Insular suburban interests* 

5» Past policies of the Federal government, which openly encouraged 
racial separation, were instrumental in establishing today's 
patterns of racial polarization. Present policies of racial 
neutrality or of encouraging racial integration have failed 
to alter racially separate patterns. 

6. Present Federal programs often are administered so as to con- 
tinue rather than reduce racial segregation. 

The problems of racial isolation are evident in the table presented 

below. 

The American Sociological Review of October, 1973, feature an article: 
"Potential for Residential Integration in Cities and Suburbsj Implications 
for the Busing Controversy." The article demonstrates in tab'jlar fora that 
racial isolation in Greater Boston is substantially more evident than in 
nost najor metropolitan areas across the country, North or South. 

TABLE XIII 

BUCKS AS FROPORTIC:! 0? POPgiATION — 1970 FiEpires 

Urban Area % Gore City % Suburban Rin.? % Total Pon-gl ation 
Metropolitan 1950 I960 1970 1950 I960 1970 1950 1960' 1970 

Philadelphia 18.1 26. U 33.6 6.7 6.1 6.7 lU.8 17.3 19.8 

Chicago 13.9 23.0 32.8 2,9 3.0 3.U 11.6 16.1 19.6 

Detroit 16.2 28.9 U3.6 5.8 3.8 3.7 12.8 l5.6 19.0 

New Tork 9.7 lli.9 22.6 3.9 k*$ $,9 8.1 10.9 Vix.9 

Los /oigeles 7.9 12.2 16.5 2.3 3.2 li.8 5.U 7.1 9.2 



Boston 5.0 9.1 16.3 0.8 0.8 1.1 2.3 3.2 U.7 



VIII-73 



The non-vdiite population of the core city, Boston is smaller, but 
growing at a coa parable rate. Houever, excepting Detroit, the rate 
of Boston's suburban non-white grov-rth is significantly less. 



VIII-7-ij 



\u Regionalisn - Vocational Education 

One of the few areas of regionalization in public educations is 
that concerned with vocational education, usually at the high school 
level. Ironically, the evidence seeras to suggest that not only is 
regional vocational education practical and efficient but it is 
hardly ever available to city students or non-white students. 



VIII-75 



Enrollment By Race For Regional Vocational Schools Which Serve Boston 

SMSA Students 1973-7U 

Analysis of Data 



The infonnation contained in this table indicates that none of the 
schools for vhich there is infonnation available have more than a 5.5 
percent non-white student enrollment, A comparison between the pro- 
portion of non-white students in these schools and the proportion of 
non-v4iite students in the contributing school districts shows which 
sector of the student population was receiving vocational training. 
None of these regional vocational schools serve Boston students. 



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VIII-79 



£• Existing and Proposed Prograna 

This part of the section on metropolitan concerns seeks to de- 
scribe the voluntary suburban-urban educational programs currently 
existing or in development in the Greater Boston area. Various a- 
gencies have experienced some success by utilizing a variety of ap« 
preaches. These agencies have encouraged innovation and experimenta- 
tion through cooperative planning and ths establishment of pilot 
or demonstration prograns involving several school systems. 

An exa'Tiination of these metropolitan programs coupled with 
interviews with many who are involved in such endeavors would indi- 
cate that suburban communities seem to be receptive to voluntary 
programs of an interesting and productive nature. 

It beconies quite apparent that most metropolitan programs in 
Greater Boston have^been initiated by agencies or persons external to 
the Boston Public Schools, The desegregation planning staff of the 
Commit^ee has concluded that SDme initiative must be taken by the 
city itself to further metropolitan education programs vd;ich are 
attractive and fiscally practical. 

In my event, the programs described herein are positive models 
for replication. They point toward desirable interaction between 
suburban and urban school systems. They point el so towfird the inher- 
ent limitations of voluntary endeavors of this natxire. 



V1H-J30 

1, Education Collnbomtive for Greater Boston (SdCo) 

EdCo 1b a collaborative of thirteen (l3) ocbool districts de- 
signed to develop and implement educational programs for students and 
to provide educational eervices to school systens, liajor active pro- 
grams involve the folloTrin^ coanunities: Bedford, Boston, Boston 
Diocesan Schools, Brookline, Cambridge, Lexington, Tiincoln, Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional, Medford, Newton, Sudbuiy, Walthaa and Waterto\7n. 

Within these comcsunitiee, Boston students, teachers, reading 
Bpecialists, and community advilts participate in integrated learning 
activities, 

Ihe program models include training sessions for students and 
teachers as well as for commxuiity adults. 

Dissemination of inforination on new and emerging 'educational, prac- 
tices is coordinated and developed through in-service programs. Work- 
shops, and seminars for teachers, administrators and community adults 
provide a very tangible v.-ay for the sharing of ideas s^nd materials a- 
cross district and toT,n Tines. 

EdCo Is also designed to provide both programming; and services to 
schools at a lov?er cost with provisions for higlior qusxlity programs 
than that T7hich can be provided by a single school district. 

SIhree percent of the funding for programs is pro"wided by membeav 
ship fees and 97 percent is provided by grants to EdCo. 

See part G of this section for a more detailed description of 
EdCo programs. 



viii-ai 

J>. Motropollt'-ia Cov.ncll for Educational Opportunity (lETOO) 

In 1965 the UaBsachusetta Legislature passed Chapter 641, "An 
act providing for the clin.1 nation of racial inbalance in public 
schools." It vras concerned primarily with the correction of racial 
imbalance \7ithin any particular city cr tovm and required that the 
school connmittee of any tovm in vrhich the State Board of Education 
determined there vras racial imbalance mist subniit a plan for the elin- 
ination of such imbalance to the Jiassachusette State Board of Educa- 
tion* The chapter also included the following provision: 
"Said plan may proYide for voluntary cooperation 
by other cities and towns in rendering assistance 
and in making available facilities to effectuate 
said plan." 

In addition, the 1865 act provided that the Massachusetts State 
Conmissioner of E<iucation end the School Building Assistance Connis- 
eion could authorize the withholding of State aid for education or 
construction from any local school cosiniittee r,'hich was not maiing 
progress toT/ard the elimination of racial imbalance. Other provisions 
provided for co-art ro^'ie'.v of decisions of the Massachusetts State 
Board of Education and for a Llassachusetts State Advisory Cor:mittee 
on Eacial Imbalance. 

In 1966, the Legislature passed Chapter 506, "An act providing 
for the attendance of certain children in public schools of cities 
and tOTtns other than the cities or to7/ns in 77hich they reside." It 
is through this act that the local school cocmittccs receive the funds 
to operate LIEDTCO. This cliapter provides that a child nay attend a 



VIII- 8? 

3, Metropolitan Plannlc^ Project (?aPP ) 

The Ketropolitaa Planning Pro;)ect is a collaborative of 56 school 
dletricta, 17 of which are actively involved, within the Boston metro- 
politan area. Its mandate vms to develop a Ten Year Plan for the 
phased elimination of racial and ethnic isolation In the schools of 
the area through school districts collaborating on a voluntaLry basis. 
The Project has been funded by the U.S. Office of Education under the 
Emergency School Aid Act of 1972. 

METRO WAYS TO UiroSHSIAJffiErG: A Plan for the_ Voluntary Elimination 
of Racial and Ethnic Isolation in the Schools of the Boston Ketropoli- 
tan Area is the phased Ten Year Plan which is a result of the process 
that the lietropolitan Planning Project has undergone during this year 
of planning. The Project has worked to achieve effective comniunity 
participation in an effort to design quality leamlng-enviror^mcnt pro- 
graas for students,. As a resvilt of a city and suburban exchange of 
ideas, the Metropolitan Planning Project has helped to promote the 
developaent of over 70 proposals in 32 cities and towns for the design 
of new innovative learning environrents, VTith a S300,000 allocation 
for pilot progrocning, 14 pilot projects were funded to test IJPP ob- 
jectives. The Projects included students fron pre-kindergarten through 
high school age and focused on such topics as business end economics, 
American history, art, ecology, energy, diverse life styles, and cur- 
riculum and naterialG relating to -Ifro-Anerican, Hispanic, Native-.'Vmer- 
ican, and Asian- American cultures. 

The Project has also compiled extensive data on the educational, 
demographic, housing, fiscal, socio-economic, land use and ethnic and 
racial charactoriotics of the 73 towns and cities in the Greater Boston 



poiblic school in a tovTn in which he docs not reside provided that this 
attendance is psirt of a plan adopted by the local school committee to 
aid in the elimination of racial imbalance in some other tovm. 

The lETCO prograa which voluntarily places non-white students in- 
to suburban classroons brings about a neasvire of equal educational op- 
portunity and educational justice for hundreds of non-white children 
and their parents who live in the cities of Boston and Sprin^ield, 
One must not overlook the siniultaneouB human relations benefits occur- 
ring to hundreds of white students, teachers, and educators who share 
the integrated experiences made possible by the UETCO concept. 

For a nxmber of years, black parents had attempted to focus of- 
ficial attention on the problems faced by their children in the Boston 
I^iblic Schools, UETCO and the many other programs now in existence 
trere bom out of the frustrations of black parents, who looked to sub- 
urban school sj'stems for assistance, 

METCO in 1966 had 220 students v;ho were accepted into seven sub- 
urban communities. The number has increased from 7 to 34 communities, 
and the student enrollment to 2300 in grades K - 12. Table PC , 



VIII-3> 

Standard ?L'etropolitan Statistical Area (S!JSA). This inforaation Tras 
developed as a needs analysis and resource inventory and has been util- 
ized in the development of the reconzaended educational prograjus. It 
provides the basis for program inpleaentation. The Ten Year Plan, 
METHO TTAYS TO TODERSTAlIDBtG, is air.ed at proaotlng voluntary colla- 
toration between tirban and suburban school districts and includes stu- 
dents, parents, teachers, school principals, superintendents, coa- 
nxmlty organisations and others concerned with education, 

During the fall of 1974, the Metropolitan Planning Project will 
pilot some of the policy reconr::endations developed through this par- 
ticipatory planning process. These recoaaendations include: 

METROPATHWAYS - Quality innovative educational programs which 
will be accessible to secondary school student of different socio— eco- 

utilizing mass transit routes. 

METR0PAIR7?AYS - Parents and school personnel froa pairs or triads 
of city and subvirban districts vtIII meet to formulate educational pro- 
grams of eqiaal benefit to the students. Learning centers ^vill be de- 
veloped in schools and on third sites and each will serve as a supple- 
ment to the educational programs of each indi%T.dual school, 

METRO ETTilTIC EERITAGE RESCURCS CSITEP^ - These centers will be 
coordinated within !ISTR0CE:IT3R and \7ill promote the st-udy, coapila- 
tlon, production and distribution of naterials and inTonna-tion related 
to minorities and ethnic groups of the SI.SA, They \Till also be an ac- 
tion program for the development of other resource centers in the 
metropolitan area, 

METROCEinER FOR CCJ.COTIICATIOITS , COUirSELI.IITG , A?rD EES0URC3 VEYEL- 



VIII-314 

OPMZirr - This center will coordinate the netropoliton educational pro- 
grams and serve as on information and resource "bank" for students, 
pairents, coisnunity £p-oups and educators throughout the metropolitan 
area trho wish to be involved in urban- suburb an educational programs 
and staff development programs oined at elininatlns racial and ethnic 
isolation of students. 



VIII-fl5. 

4, ARCHDIOCESE OF BOSTO!T 

At present, the Archdiocesan schools are not involved in a pupil 
exchange program, however, the Archdiocesan school administrators have 
Indicated their vrillin^ness to become Involved if a mutually satis- 
factory plan can be developed. 

TABLE XT 
Boston Parochial Schools 
Enroll!nent by Race as of December 6, 197U 





White 


Black 


TOTAL 


Elementary 


Ui,7Ui^ 


1,30? 


16,051 


Secondary 


8,U7U 


39h 


8,868 


TOTAL 


23,218 


1,701 


2h,919 



Suburban Parochial Schools 
Enrollment by Race as of Deceniber 6, 197h 





White 


Black 


TOTAL 


Elementary 


39,l51i 


ia2 


39,566 


Secondary 


16,898 


157 


17,055 


TOTAL 


56,052 


^69 


56,6a 



Source; Boston Archdiocese Education Department 



VIII-86 



5, PRIVATE SCnOOLS 

The National AcDociation of Independent Schools in the Lletropol- 
itan area report that school enrollaent by race is imavailable. Their 
authorities report that they do not take a racial census. 



VIII-97 



6, COOPER-ATING B0ST0:?-SU3UnE^N PRCGPjUtS 

A» The Boston-Newton Cooperative Education PrograTi is part of the 
Newton METCO program to reduce racial and ethnic isolation and is an 
outgrowth of a successful pilot program conducted in cooperation with 
Boston College and Ilewton Community Service Centers at Hale Reserva- 
tion in VJestwood, an outdoor education program betvreen fourth (Uth) 
grade classrooms in Kewton and Boston. 

The program includes a day of integrated, planned outdoor education 
activities relating to science, social studies, and physical education. 
A trained staff, vrorking in cooperation with Boston College Departnent 
of Urban ilducation and Science Zducation supervise activities jointly 
planned by teachers from Boston and Newton. 

B« The Social Discover:.'- Program - The Primary'' emphasis of the program 
is to have students participate in actual social experiences. Social 
Discoveries integrates £ui academic approach with a first-hand analysis 
of the study of social systems and life styles. 

A week of intensive classroom preparation precedes each week 
epent out of the classroom. 

C. The Snp,lish Hij:h School - Urban Studies Center - Y.k.L.U.'Z. - The 
Visual Arts Laboratory in Urban Education (V.A.L.U.E.) is a collaborative 
program of the Bostpn Public Schools and the Institute of Contemporary 
Art (I.C.A.). The program is designed to study the urban environment 
through visual means. The school year is divided into five (5) cycles 
vdiich are then divided between general introductory and overview 



VIIT-38 



material, nedia training, and project work. The concepts are more 
fxilly developed for students vdth particular reference to Boston 
by the addition of specific learning activities, supplementaly readings, 
guest speakers, and audio-visual materials. 

The piKjgraa is a city wide program as well as being a metropolitan 
program. Students participate in the program from private and parocial 
suburban schools. The structure of the program is such that students 
participate for four (U) days per week and spend one day back in their 
home schools. Possibly the raost significant feature of the program is 
the wide spread participation of various schools and the collaborative 
natxire of the program. 



VIII~89 



7. CHAPTER 636 

Section 8 of Chapter 636 authorizes funds for "}laf;net School Facilities " 

and " }iagnet Educational Fro?ra-Tis «" 

a* A Ilagnet School Facility is a public school or part of a public 
school v.-hich attracts pupils from outside the district established 
for the school on a voluntary basis to reduce racial imbalance or 
racial isolation. 

b. Ha<^Det Educational Proprgjis are programs which nay be part of the 
public school systen or be operated by another public or private 
Organization and vhich provide students with a racially.' integrated 
educational experience on a part-time basis. 

Approximately 1.? million dollars has been appropriated for Magnet School 

Facilities and Ms :;net ]?ducational Pror^rans statev.'ids* 

ao School systeKs intending to apply for funds for Har.net School 
Facilities shouJ.d estimate a cost of $1;00 per pupil over the 
regular per pupil cost, for each pupil attending from outside 
the district established for the school. This funding need not 
be targeted to serve those students alone, but should support 
the r.annet pro;:ran in r;encral » 

b. School systems or other public or private organizations intending 
to apply for funds for Magnet Educational Prograns should estimate 
A per pupil cost of $10-$20 a day, depending upon the nature of 
the program. 

Funds may also bo expended for tho purpose of planninr; for magnet 

school facilities or magnet educational programs, and for facility 

impi'ovecent* 



vni-91 

9 Daly - Sunivan Bill ( House No, 21439 ) 

AN ACT REQUIRING CERTAIN SCHOOLS TO OPEN EMPTY SKATS TO INlv-ER 
CITY CHIIDREN. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: 

Any community within a twenty mile radius of a city of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and with a median income above the 
average income in its Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area, shall 
open ten percent (10^) of its school seats to inner city children, 
black and white, insofar as these seats are available* 

The State shall pick up the incremental cost of the education, 
support services, and trsuisportation needed by these children. 

Additional information regarding this bill will be fovmd in 
the recoiamendations section of this document. However the main 
features of the bill include; 

1 - It offers the children oS Boston and ether cities broad 
educational options and alternatives currently not available, 

Z - There is no compulsory busing. 

3 - Ten percent is a figure which will help many children 
without putting an unfair responsibility on any one group or com- 
munity within the metropolitan area, 

U - The plan hopes to build on the many strengths of Ketco, 

5 - Both Inner city and suburban children will benefit educa- 
tionally and socially o 



VIII^O 



8. DALT BILL 

Tho Boston Globe, 12A1/7U, reports that a magnet program au- 
thorizing state funding for city and suburban ashools to buy vari- 
ons educational services from museums and cultural institutions has 
been proposed in a bill filed bj State Rep, Michael Daly (D-Boston). 

The proposal calls for the Massachusetts Department of Educa- 
tion to assist collaboratives of cities, tovms and regional schools 
to utilize the services of cultural institutions across the state. 
It v/ould authorize the department to approve state funding for pro- 
grams ranging from 2-10 weeks. Students would go to classes planned 
jointly by teachers and museum staffs, 

A dozen museums and six school systems — Boston, Burlington, Ran- 
dolph, S (/OucLiara, II a {j^T oO'^nVi olid II ali/hsTi —already have designed learning 
packages, ranging from "The American Experience" to "Transportation," 



VIII- 92 



P - }.IETR0r01IT.'uI COOrULVTIOII 
Reco n nsn'jp.tions t 

The reccimendations contained within this document are based in 
part upon the findin{js revealed in studying the deno^raphic statistics 
of Boston and its suburbs, intervievfs with personnel involved in metro- 
politan education, and a review of pertiinent research. 

It should be noted that nothing contained herein is designed to 
relieve Boston of its obligations, either legal or moral, with regard 
to tho Court ordered desegregation effort. Neither are the r^cormendations 
designed to punish or retaliate against subiurban areas. Rather they are 
designed to achieve a rational, peaceful, and mutually beneficial inte- 
gration of the city and its suburbs. The programs and policies are 
intended to be voluntarT." for both city and suburb. It is felt that 
through nutually developed plans and proposal;), sufficient interest 
in a netropolitan approach to education will be generated v;hich \rill 
enable meaningful, large scale student integration efforts to begin. 

Voluntary educational approaches can offer an enriching experience 
for both urban and suburban students. Forced integration for educa- 
tional purposes is nuch less desirable. Involuntary educational inte- 
gration can breed racial hatred; voluntary'" educational integration can 
lead to understanding betvreen people of different races and econo^iic 
levels. 

If prograras are begun with urban-suburban students, care rcust be 
talcen to insure reasonable and proper grade level introduction. It 
is record-ended that the integration of students bortin at naturaJ. 



VIII-93 



starting levels snch as grade 1, grade h, grade 7 and grade 10 or 
tdiatever the starting levels of a particular school system might 
be» Integration should begin at the first level of elementary school, 
Junior or middle school and high school. It is reconmended that pupil 
integration be thoughtfully planned so as to insure m a x i m um benefit 
for \xrban fi^H suburban students. Gradual integration could relieve 
potential fears of parents both black and white. This would not 
jireclude a different student body integration should it be deemed 
helpful to both black and \Aite students. The intent of the recom- 
jaendatiorB is to minimize the potential fears of parents who might be 
apprehensive that integration efforts will harm their children either 
physically or academically. 

Onj^oini' Fro.:^ra-~s 

In commending the various existing programs to the Court for 
additional or continued funding, it should be noted that there has 
been no attempt made to internally evaluate the various programs 
^diich are now ongoing. It is expected that the various agencies, 
EdCo, MPP and others, will evaluate their own programs. Rather it 
is felt that programs which promote urban-suburban cooperation 
be encouraged. However, seme guidelines for evaluation can include: 

1. Programs which are so unique that they would serve only 
a limited number of pupils be given a low priority. 

2. Programs i^iich require an extraordinary pupil-teacher 
ratio also be given low priorities. For exaraple, a 
program designed to promote urban-suburban cooperation 



VIII-9U 



vhich might have ten students and fcnir staff members is 
probatly too expensive to continue on a large scale. 
3» Encouragenent be given by the Court to those programs which 
are designed to include a large nursber of students, perhaps 
at least 100. 

Alternatives 

The alternatives to the concept of metropolitan interaction are 
abhorrent to many people. Should Massachusetts be unable to agree 
on a voluntary comprehensive metropolitan plan, the following results 
will most likely occuri 

1. The city vd.ll become mostly minority and low income, 

2. Eq\ial social, economic and educational opportunity will be 
denied most of the population of the city. 

3» Mistrust, €^d perhaps violence can. occur between the city 
and its suburbs. 

Should the isolation between Boston and its suburbs continue^ 
the stage could be set for the classic confrontation between the haves 
(suburbs) and the have nots (city). This possible confrontation can 
be halted by meaningful, voluntary integration. 

We must learn the lesson of recent history and plan now to remove 
those barriers \Aiich separate the suburbs from the city. We should 
integrate because it is morally right. Integration should not be 
Eorally and legally right for urban areas only. 

Educational and political officials in cooperation with the 
Courts must provide the leadership which will set in motion those 
conditions whici: v.111 insure oqial educational opport\inity for all 
students. 



1-1 "VV 



Roc07nrien d atioc3 

!♦ Tho school co7u3iittee in each city and tovn in the CoCTnonv;c:alth 
bo directed by the Covirt to establish an office of netropoiitan 
cooperation or to name a coordinator for rcetropolitan efforts. 

An Office of Metropolitan Cooperation should be established in 
the Boston Public Schools. As the city becoaes less and less able 
to dQj)end upon its own resources, both human and industrial, it 
jnust seek to end econoralc/racial isolation through cooperative 
urban-suburban efforts. The Office of Metropolitan Cooporation 
vould be tho catalyst which would attempt to end the educationali* 
isolation of the city fi-om the suburbs. 

If the integration of uxban and suburban cormunitles is a Yazh 
priority of the Coiu'ts and the Boston Public Schools, then both 
agencies must establi.sh vehicles through which the goa2. can be 
realized. The Boston Public Schools should become directly involved 
in the process of seckin;^ urbsin-suburban cooperation. At present 
most of the direct contacts which seek urbsLn-suburban cooperation 
in educational programs are accomplished through agencies ejrtemal 
to the Boston schools, such as EdCo, >!ETCO and the Metropolitan 
Plamoing Project, and the Dopartiient of Education, Coruionwealth of 
Massachusetts. The Boston Public Schools should have spokespeoplo 
wlio aro thoroughly faniliar ^vith and sensitive to the goals, needs and! 

Officio of Metropolitan Cooperation, which v;ith a]:ipropriate stafrin^:, V7oiild 
bo ai\ ijidication of the degree of coraraitiacnt of the Bsostoa Public 
Schools to engngo in cetmingful ciotropolitan efforts- It would bo 



VIII.96 

tho intent of this Orflce of Hetropolitan Cooperation to work with, 
acsibt and provide leadership in tho development of urban-suburban 
effcr+.G. The Office of Metropolitan Cooperation vdll vork with, 
assist and provide leadership in the devclopnent of urban-suburban 
ef forte. In no way would the Office of Metropolitan Cooperation 
replace existing metropolitan agencies. 

Tae chief goals of the Office of Metropolitan Cooperation would 



bet 



1. To encourage volxmtary cooperation between school systens 

in Boston and cities and towns in the SJ'ISA. 
2» To develop metropolitan plans of education significance 

in cooperation with the suburbs. 
3. To be a liaison in educational affairs between the Boston 

Public Schools and 

a) the suburbs 

b) local universities 

c) state agencies 

d) federal govern'^ent and other 

e) business/industry 

f) metropolitan planners 

g) metropolitan ongoing prograns such as METCO, 
in order to coordinate educational efforts. 

li. To develop proposals in cooperation with the suburbs which would 

seek funding for worthy programs. 
5. To develop in coopei-ation with the suburbs a master educational 

plan for quality urban-suburban integration, 
6.. To explain Boston Public School programs to suburban corJaunitiea 

and to receive and disseminate information relative to suburban 



VIII-97 

2» Tiio Coui-t strongly reconunend that the r:etropolitan coordinators 
attend a series of ceiiinars hosted by the Boston Public Schools, 
Orfic(i of Metropolitan Cooperation and sponsored by an. external 
agency suc"h as TIPP, EdCoT^-rOr the Department of Education, 
Co:ninoawealth of Massachusetts. 

Ono of the initial efforts of the Office of Metropolitan Cooperation 
would be to plan a series of seminars for urban-snbnrban personnel, in 
particular for the newly naaied suburban coordinators of netropoUtan 
planning. 

Isolation of one school system froci another can lead to feelings 
o£ mistrust^ tminosity, and fear. In addition, quality education can 
Buffer from separation. 

If \arban end suburban school systems are going to cooperate effec- 
tively to provide quality education for students, there should be soae 
degree of ^ direct contact and cooperation between them. 

Although therff has been a degree of cooperation betueen some cub- 
urban coCTiunities and the Boston Public Schools, there is a need for 
a comnitnent frcn those cormumities which have not as yet joined in 
educational efforts vri.th the Boston Schools and an increased conmit- 

ment from some communities which are presently interacting with the 
Bos''^n r-:bli\; ochooij. 

A series of possibly three seminars, hosted by the Boston Public 
Schools Office of lletropolitan Cooperation and s ponGored by an external 
agency such as MPP, EdGo, the IDepsirtment of Education, Commonwealth of 
Massachucistt.T, or other aj-^encies is supf^osted. Those seminars woiald be 
held for rppro:3ontatlvQS of suburban school committees, suburban teacher 
associations nnd sujiorintondents of the SIISA, and the metropolitan plan- 
ners of each comnimity In the Greater Boston SM3A, 



VJIAA-J^O 



Having these seroinars sponsored by an agency other than the Boston 
Public Schools is advisable because these agencies have been dealing 
vith both urban and suburban school systems and would already have 
established contacts in the school systens. In addition, a third 
party night lessen sorae of the possible suspicion or animosity which 
covild be addressed toward Boston. 

The seminars would have the following purpose:' 
1* To acquaint suburban superintendents, representatives of 
school ccDLTiittees and representatives of teacher organiza- 
tions, and the metropolitan planners vith some personnel, 
programs, and facilities of each other's school" departisents. 
2» To explore, in a relaxed, informal atmostiere, some possible 
methods and reasons for cooperation between Boston and its 
suburbs. 
3« To develop, in cooperation with suburban teains meaningful 

efforts in metropolitan education. 
Each workshop could explore a theme such as: 

a. Educational value of raetropolitanisn. 

b. Social value of raetropolitanism, 

c. Legal issues and possible trends in metropolitanisn. 

d. Existing metropolitan programs. 

e. Factors which inhibit suburban-tirban cooperation. 

In order to attract suburban representation, it is expected that 
a nationally, known personality such as Senator Kennedy (D-Mass.) present 
the keynote address. In addition, if the initial meeting were held at 
Boston's new-English High School, , the suburban educators migiit be 



VTII-99 



attracted to the building. 

It could be stated that seminars such as the type describfd here 
have been held before, and thus this effort would be duplication of 
other efforts. In ansv;er, it is felt that the nature and scope of the 
eeminars is of sufficient importance to be presented to suburban ccn- 
Kunities. The personnel who will be chosen as the coordinators for 
metropolitan cooperation would be given their first opport^jjiity to 
meet as a group. The image of the Boston Public SchooHs would be en- 
hanced by being co-host of the seminars. It is imperative that Boston's 
image be upgraded in order to facilitate metropolitan education. Many 
eubui'banites have only an unbalanced image of Boston which has been formed 
by watching the recent unpleasantness on tclcrisicn. 

Prior to the program, Boston Public School personnel would be in- 
vited to indicate the type of programmatic involvement they desii-^, thus 
Bpecific proposals would be made to the suburban representatives and Boston 
could request help for these specific programs. 

Considerable cupport has been received from various individuals and 
groups regarding the proposed seminars. It is expected that letters of 
support for the proposed seminars could be secured if needed. 

Should permission be granted to explore the feasibility of esta- 
blishing these seminars, we will, in cooperation with interested indi- 
viduals and groups, develop in greater detail the nature and scope of 
the proposed seminars. 

It should be noted that these seminars would lose much of their 
value if the concept of metropolitan planning coordinators is -^ot ordered 
by the Courts, 

I 



vni-100 



3. ieco;'Jieiid amendnents In lecisiation dealing vri.th racial ccncCiTic 
ii'i ecucation. 1) itedefine the terra racial imbalance and 2) 
anend Chanter 71 oi the 1971 General L-ws so that "racial 
isolation" rather than "racial ir,ibalance" in schools is a 
violation of the law. 

At pi-escnt only those schools which ere racially inbalanccd aro 
in violation of the la;-?. The intent of this recoFu-iendation is to 
encourage a more equal distribution of non-white students throughout 
the metropolitan ax'ea. 

The current definitions of sone tenas relating to raciaJL balance 
are: 

racial ir.balance is the condition of a public school in \:hich 

nox'e than fifty psrcent of the pupils attending such school 

are non-white. 

racial balanco, the condition of a public school in which rr.ore 
than tl'iirty percent, but not r.ore than fifty percent of the 
pupils attending such school are non-v:hite, 

racial isolation , the condition of a public school in v;hich 

not r.ore than thirty percent of the pupils attending such school ax^e 

non- white . 

Racial balance law. as presently written encourage racial secure- 
gation, i.e., as long as corj-.unities do not permit or encourage non- 
whites to live in their cities or towns, i-hey are in no danger of being 
in violation of the Racial Imbalance Act. These towns benefit from the 
wording of the law. 

It is requested that the Department of Education be instructed to 



VIII-101 



develop a plan for legislation which will amend the term "racial iso- 
lation," and accomplish the goal of racial integration rather than 
racial isolation. It should be the design of the Department of 
Education's plan that aooirjaunity would be racially isolated when its 
school population fell below approxojnately U^ non-white. Those 
connunities in violation would bo encoura-ed to cevelop plans which 
would reduce their racial isolation. 

Table XIT, pago 59 ^, clearly indicates that racial isolation 
is becciuing more pronounced in the Greater Boston SMSA. Table VI , 
P^Z^ 32 , indicates the current projections for non v;hites in sub- 
virbia. It om be assumed that racial isolation \ri.ll continue unless 
positive action is taJ:en by governmental agencies. 

In addition, it is requested that the Departraeat of Education 
review its responsibilities and duties relative to school district 
boundaries. 

In the November 1971; issue of the School AdT.ini5;trator , the United 
States CoEL-iissioner of Education, Terrell Bell, states he thinks \^ are 
operating fcr too many scliool districts. He says vrc- also ought to look 
at some of our major metropolitan areas, not just the old corporate 
lliaits of the city, but the whole standard netropoli.ltan area. 

Bell thinks the legislature ought to ask itselT if it couldn't 
redefine those boundaries and do a bettor job of gotlLing a better nix 
of the ricli and the poor, the niiddle class and the lc3v;er class. 



VIII-102 



h* TnQ Coi-^-n on wealth of Massachusetts, Dcpartnent of Education bo 
in.structed by the Court to develop a plan for {l£iDj2i:£]i£ii:LiYii. 
voluntary metiropolltan education. 



In keeping with tho viewpoint expressed in the Jo^ie 21, 197li 
Order that 

"Vriiile this division of authority between the state depart- 
nent of education and local school conrrdttees nay bo tradi- 
tional, preferred, and most politically feasible, it is not 
required. The state has the authority. If the legislature 
should so enact, to take education out of tho hands of local 
officials conplotely. Thus local officials derive all of 
"their authority froa the state ultimately, " (p. 18 - Order) 
It io requested that the Connonwealth of I'iassachusetts, Depart- 
ioont of Education, be instructed by the Court to develop a plan for 
con pre-':! ■3 nsir e voluntar-/ netropolitan education. The departnient 
should be i^qvdred to put its resources, both hunan and fiscal into 
the developnient of such a plan. This plan sho'old be submitted to 
the Court by June 1, 1975 for approval and further action.-- Tne plan 
sliould be designed for inplesiontation by September 15'76. 



VII 1-105 
$, Kc'coijnond exi>';ns3on of the Metropolitan Co\ir.cil for Zducaticnal 

'ilic j'oirojxjiitan Council for Educatlon:il Opportr:nlty, Inc. 

(KETCO) is a private, non profit organization ir^orporatcd in 2SC6 

wcdor the law3 of the Co:r:onwealth of Massachusetts. 
'Zuo ^'>u*po:;c:j of }ErCO arej 

a. xo provide the oppoi^turAty for a q\:LiilJ.t7 iritcgi\-.tcd pu";:lic 

uchool educcition for \u*ban black and other jiinorit/ childr-:-* 

i!jrO}^ rRci-Ctlly ir/oalanced schools in. Boston ty placir.- the::; 

lil subiirbaa schools. 

1). To pro^^do a nev learning experience for suburban childrc;-., 

c. To provide closer understanding and cooperation bet-.;ec:, 

xu'bv.ua and suburbaa parents and other citizens in the h'ctrc- 

polltnn area. 

i'iliTCO iias been a successful raodol of voluntary urban-suburb-.n 

intojration. l-KTCO officials indicate that, as of October IJY^y'choy 

prosentli' have 2337 students, K - 12 in 3u coriT.unities and that •^hirc ic; a 

V7aiti:'i£; list of over 2000 :uinority studeiits. 

This projjriun should be encouraged to expaiid. The state and 'ILTCO 

program admiiiit^trators should be requested to develop a plan fcr the 

proposed expansion. JETCO should be expanded or.iy vrlth the coo.:oratic:i 

of its leadership, in ox'der to insure the continvii^/ and lesson the 

possibility of doin^ arviihii^g "bich wi^lit r.ar-^ the e:>D.st:Ln;; pre. "::-.:.;, 

- Tno Coui'-b should order that sufficient r-iOiiies be nadc avail- 
able to the niiiCO planners in order that their plans beca".e 

a reality. 

- A .jointly developed prooodxiro bo established in coo;ju •:.vlo.. 
between JliiTCO and the Boston Schools whicli will ensure ti^.o 
speedy transfer of records aiid other necessary infor,;. ii^lon. 



viii-iou 



6. It is recommended that support be £<iven to the Daly-3ullivan House 
Bill Ko. 2U39. 



On Saturday, January 18, 1;'7U, Kathleen Stillivan, a meiuber of the 
Boston School Connittee, released findings fron a study in sup;5ort of 
legislation, House Bill '.'.o. 2U3?, which she and Representative Daly filed. 

The proposed bill see!:s that "Any ccnnunity within a tv;enty nile 
radius of a city of the Conmonv.'ealth of Massachusetts and v/ith a nedian 
income above the average incone in its Standard Metropolitan Statistical 
Area, shall open ten percent (I0,t) of its school seats to inner city 
children, black and vjhite, insofar as these seats are available. 

The State shall pick up the incremental cost of the education, support 
ser\T.ces, and transportation needed b" these children." 

The study is based upon a public opinion survey conducted by Pro- 
fessor Gar^- R. Orren of the Departjnent of Government at Harvard University, 
in vrhich representative sanples of 800 subm-banites and 500 city residents 
were ask^d a battery of questions concerning their views on school 
integration. 

The subiorban respondents, who live in tliirty-six towns in the metro- 
politan area outside Boston, expressed strong support for integrated 
schooling, i-ighty-three per cent endorsed the reneral idea of integrated 
schools, and 5>$ per cent said that they would be vzilling to send their 
ovm children to such schools. Hov;ever, only 30 per cent of these sarue 
people approves of compulsor;;,'' busi:ig. 



vn 1-105 

Nonethelesr, fully 69 per cent of those living in the suburbs at 
in favor of accepting inner city children into their schools, provid 
that no suburban children are bused into Boston . More specifically, 
almost 7 out of 10 suburban residents are in favor of accepting 3 ini 
city children in a typical 30 student suburban classroom. Only 24 pc 
cent are opposed, and 7 per cent are currently undecided. Additional 
evidence suggests that suburban residents would strongly support as 
many as 5 inner city children per 30 student classroom, but that the' 
support begins to drop off sharply at about 6 or 7 per classroom. 

The suburban survey was conducted between December 2 and 19. T' 
thirty-six communities sampled are within a 20-mile radius of Bosto; 
are above the median income of Boston suburbs. Eight hundred person 
v/ere interviewed in randomly selected telephone calls. An addition 
sample of 800 Boston residents was interviewed at the polls on elect 
day on November 5, and by telephone over the following two weeks. 1 
surveys have a sampling error of about 3 per cent. That is, one cci. 
with 95 per cent certainty that the results err by no more than 3 p. 
cent in each direction. 

Significantly, support among Boston's black community for the '. 
of black children to the suburbs is just as strong as that among th 
ceiving suburbanites: Sixty-nine per cent of blacks in Boston repr 
that they favor city-to-suburb busing of black children, and onl^ 
per cent are opposed. 

Of course, the level of support for the city-to-suburb busing ; 
as for busing generally, varies from one social group to another, 
example, better educated suburbanites, those who call themselves "'i 
erals," and younger ones tend to be more favorable towards the pit 



VIII -106 

while those with less schooling, self-described conservatives, and older 
persons express less enthusiasm for the plan. However, differences be- 
tween social and political groups are not great. Indeed, although sup- 
port for compulsory school busing never reachers a majority among any 
social group, support for the proposed voluntary city-suburb busing plan 
is expressed by. a majority of every social group - liberals and conser- 
vatives alike, young and old, well-educated and poorly-educated. 

The study revealed virtually no difference in attitudes between 
suburban respondents with children and those without children, and very 
little difference between wealthy and not-so-wealthy suburbanites. Nor 
are Democrats, Republicans, or Independents any more or less favorable 
toward busing from the city to the suburbs. Indeed, a high level of 
support for this idea is found across the board in the suburbs. In 
only 3 tov;ns are residents divided in their views, in 5 towns the level 
of support is between 50 and 60 per cent, and in the remaining 28 towns 
support ranged between 61 and 88 per cent. 

According to Professor Orren, "It has been clear to academic peo- 
ple and policy analysts that in the long run an effective and equitable 
school integration plan in a large U.S. city must involve-; the entire 
metropolitan area. What is so encouraging about the results of this 
survey is that it provides strong evidence that Boston suburbanites do 
not represent a barrier to this kind of enlightened solution. Indeed, 
our suburban residents favor involvement under certain conditions . The 
city and state need a plan that will take advantage of this sentiment." 

Kathleen Sullivan noted that the Daly-Sullivan Bill No. 2439 con- 
tains the following features which could make it attractive to both sub- 
urban-, and city residents: 



VIII-IC 7 

1) The Daly-Sullivan Plan will offor the children of Boston and 
other cities broad educational options and alternatives cur- 
rently not available. 

2) There is no compulsory busing. 

3) 10^.' is a figure which will help many children without putting 
an unfair responsibility on any one group or community within 
the Metropolitan area. 

4) This plan hopes to build on the many strengths of Metco. 

5) Both inner city and suburban children will benefit educationally 
and socislly. 



VITI-IC 8 



7. A voluntary bucir./^ proj^ra-n to suburban comiranities be developed 
by the vepsriricriT, of I:^ducation which will include najority £--.d 
ninority inner city children. 



It ±3 also recoiimended that voluntary busing progran to suburb^ji 
communities be developed which ;-n.ll include majority and minority 
injier city cliildren. The integration effort should include both vrhite 
and non v:hite students. It is requested that a plan be dravrn up v.hich 
v/ill include the option for najority students to join voluntary' busing 
programs. The plan would have to be designed in such a way so that 
majority involvement in the plan does not contribute to the "white 
flight" of students from Boston. 



VIII-1C9 



3, Reconrriend encoura;einent of the Educational Collaborative of Greater 
Bon ton rrojects 

The i'!;d\icational Collaborative of Greater Boston is an actica- 
orientateu concern. According; to recent EdCo literat'urej increased 
collaboration between city and suburb in areas where both can bene- 
fit is the ■pTxmary goal of EdCo's projects. It is their basic assunp- 
tion that r.any educational problens in the metropolitan area schools 
can be solved by a cooperative approach. EdCo develops ideas, inple- 
ments then, Tnodifies the pilot procran according to an on-£;oin,'^ eval- 
uation, and then passes on information about the nodels' successes so 
that -they t;-^-"» be renlic^t-^d by many school systems. 

- It is recon'Ti ended that the Court sugf^est that all v/orthy EdCo 
educational prograras which involved urban-suburban students 
be funded. It is hoped that funding v;lll be granted for the 
Government Center - Political Discovery f'rotjrajTi. This is 
an annex - t^^pe program centered in Government Center. It 
vrovild involve 900 students in a se.'iior year study. 
It is hoped t)iat pro.'jramG such as the P'olitical Discovery Project 
'rfill enable students both black and vrtilte to engage in meaningful educa- 
tional efforts, and tlirouch these efforts cone to understand each other. 



VII I -110 



9.. Kceonrsend cncoui'sjeacnt of Metropolitan Plannda:!^ Projects. 

xho Ketropolltan Pla'aning Project is a collaborative of 1? 
school dijitricts v;iihin the Boston Kotropolitan Area. Its nandcte 
was to dcvolop a "en Year Plan for the phased elirdjjuition of racial 
and etiwac isolation in tho schools of the area tlirou^h cchool 
districtri collaboratir,^^ on a vol-ontary basis. Tiie project has been 
funded by tho U. S. Office of Education under the ii-ercGnc/ School 
Aid Act o: 1972. 

It t'j reconiTiendod that tho programs vnich KP? and the Boston 
Public Schools deea worthy should be expanded if possible t 
It is expected that tv-o KP? prOj'^^raj^s^ I'etropathv;ays and ;Ietro- 
pain-'ay should be encouraged. (See pa^e 63 ^°^ ^^ eirplar-a-c-.-Loa 
of Metrop&tli^mys and Metropairv.'ay), 



VIII-IAJ 



10^ It 15.'; rccorrjnendcd that a pl.ia be dcvclop-:;d Jointly vLt.h t'rj-.^ 
ArchcIioror.';n ."^criools nnd ohc Boston Public Sc;.oo...3 ;:.'.: c\. '..'1- 
■on.'Ooj.''! ..i;<o:'iLy :^tudoijty frori the Boston Public Gchocl:; vo 
oiiroU iu Arohdiocoocn :johool3. 



Such a pl^wi \.-ould or/iblo id-norit/ group studcntii to r.:.vc ;:. 
cho.'-.cc- u.'Ct;r.i'din^ attcridir.^ either irSoLLo or nor*- public Gc'r.oolv^. T..o 
ya'c;hnioco;:;f'n Gohool cid.:ii5uatration h£is indicated an intcrcct in ac~i:::,tir.~ 
in the dosci-renatioa of the public schools. Accordirj^ to a, dir-ctor/ i-re. 
by the luc'v^-oi^cilttan llciXJiir^ Project, the Archdiocecc oi Ixjlxo:. i^c.u^V-'ii 
C20j400 to oimd the xollovdrvs project, 

DI^SCIvIl :,70:;o O? riiOroOl^ rao>:i"i:C23: CCo detcmiine the possibili'.y o.^ 
Olid to plcui the ncsistance of, the PiOnan Catholic /archdiocese o2 
Boston, ir. dcse^recatinj public schools in the i^etropolitcj-. Tootcii 
area , 

It is por.rdble that a plan could be developed which v/ovC:". o:".blc 
the iioals of the pro;;oct to be net, yet at little or no coct for the 
devolopnicr.t of the plan. 



VIII-112 



11» Reconnend the Court request massive a-nounts of resources, 

both hunan and economic, for Boston from the I'ederal govern- 
ment. 



The Federal governnent should be requested to provide massive 
amounts of resources, both human and economic to Boston. The Citj of 
Boston, particularly as it approaches its bicentennial will become 
increasingly a center of attention, Boston is generaHj' acknowledged 
to be an \irban area that is manageable. However, as with many urbcin 
areas, it is becoming increasingly imraanageable. There should be a 
concentrated effort, undertaken by the Federal government, to make 
urban centers such as Boston, a place where suburbanites will want to 
send their children. 

Monies could be spent on safety, schooling, developing resources, 
model neighborhoods, e.g. waterfront. A project of this tj-pe could 
require the expen iiture of billions of dollars. It could be done if 
the Federal governnent made the improving of urban areas a high priority. 
It should not be thought that the above recommendation indicates that the 
problem of urban areas can be solved by "throv;ing money at tham," rather 
it is an attempt to begin to solve those jirobleras which can be solved. 
The United States has spent billions of dollars rebuilding countries 
after wars, such as Europe after V.'orld V/ar II. Surely the countrj^ will 
want to rebuild its neglected cities. 



7ni-i3' 



12. The Court reconnend that Federal funding for edxication be 

allocated such that local connunities which encourage inte- 
gration are regarded. 



It is possible that the Departn)ent of ileal th, education and 
Welfare could assist the Massachusetts Department of Education in 
developing a model integration plan for Standard lletropolitan Statis- 
tical Areas. Part of the model plan could include provisions for 
rewards, perhaps nunicipal Improvement projects for those connunities 
which agree to integrate their schools on a voluntarj"- basis. Uhile 
the concept of offering a reward for doing what many people consider 
to be a moral, - and perhaps a legal, - obligation on the part of 
suburban connunities night be repugnant, nevertheless a reward system 
might be a reasonable procedure for attaining the goal of metropolitan 
integration. 



vin-n'+ 



13. It is recomnended that the Court order sone school buildings 

in the Sl'.oA be jurchased, built or remodeled with a view tov;ard 
establishir.'' ref ionn.1 lear'^inr centers, adninistsred by the 
Departraent of "ducr.tion. 

Because the regional learnin^t^ cent-^r, : erhaps a hif-;h school, \vould 
not have set geographical district lines, 't would thus be able to 
attract a racially balanced student body fro:^. v'.rious geographical areas. 

For exar.ple, the Connonwealth Armory, near Boston University could 
serve as a regional high school. This facility could serve approximately 
1^00-2000 students. A program could be developed 'xhich would serve as 
a model for other high schools in Massachusetts. The department of Edu- 
cation would be able to ^.rovide economic and human reso-orces which individual 
communities alone could not provide. The regionale liigh school should 
not be a vocational school, rather it should serve to prepare s .udents for 
the professions, tl^us it should be an academic high school. 



VII 1-115 



lU. Court order the department of Zducitio.-i to ir.clu'-'c Boston 
Public School students in the enrollment for :'.e2ional 
Vocational Schools which serve the standard :'.etrci clitan 
Statistical .u'ea (SiiSA) of Greater Boston. 



The regional vocational schools arc clearly racially isolated 
according to Table XIV, pa^e 76, ■'■^e Jepartnent of >x?ucaticr. should 
be directed to take corrective measures v/hlch will insure a ^^^eater 
degree of minority representation in the regional vocational schools. 
Each regional vocational school should enroll a minority }-cpulation 
of at least 10^ of its total J^tudent body. Such a pro.-ra.T. s!;o\Lld be 
fimded by the Corjnon-realth of ^Massachusetts, Depart-nent of ^'Juration. 



VI 11-136 



l5, iieconmend that suburban school departments with declinini; popu- 
lations be e;iCoura~ed to enter into a[:reenents vfith the Jity of 
Boston which will provide that Boston i ublic Jchool students 
would be eligible to attend certain suburban schools. The l^epart- 
ment of "fducation ^^ould pay all costs involved. 



For example, if a suburban coTOiunity was goin^ to close a school 
due to declinin" student pofulation and the resulting higher costs of 
operating this school, the parents of students in the school v.'ho night 
want the school to re^riain open could invite enrollment, from Boston 
Public School students. The L;epartment of Education should be directed 
to pay the costs of the teachers and other costs which could accrue to 
the suburban school as a result of the enrollment of Boston Public 
School students. 

Suburban school systems ;^th declining population can serve to 
indicate potential vacant seats in schools - see Table VII p. 38. As 
an alternative to closing a school, many suburban parents might welcone 
the enrollment of city students, llany suburban parents would prefer 
that their children attend their neighborhood schools. However, if 
schools are underutilized, it is expected that a school system v;culd 
consolidate, scid thus close certain schools. Operating a school which 
is significantly under-enrolled is economically unsound. The above 
plan v;oula oblige the lepartment of education to assume all costs rela- 
tive to the integration of the'^e schools. 



VIII-117 



l5. The L^ourt stronjily encouraf-e business/industry and local colleges 
and universities in the 3II3A area to become actively involved in 
solving urban-suburban problems. 



For example, a business concern on route 128 could lend space for 
the teaching and training of both virban and suburban students. This 
type of program could be developed in cooperation v/lth the Department 
of Education, Boston and interested suburbs. Inthis-tj^De of project, 
integration comes about naturally, through the program, rather than 
artificially. Only programs which could provide for a ninimvun of 
students should be considered. 

Local colleges and vmiversities could develop plans which will 
contribute significantly to enhancing quality education in the 3H3A. 
Such plans could include third site learning, use of athletic facili- 
ties, teacher exchange and other worthy programs. 

In view of the unpleasantness v/hich is occurring in Boston as a 
result of the desegregation order, the combining of talents from the 
^os ton Public Jchools, business/industiy and local colleges and univer- 
sities should be suggested in order to curb the crises. Thus business/ 
industry and local colleges could work separately on quality education 
issues and combine their talents to solve an immediate problem. Such 
plans should include a program of human understanding. 



VIII -118 



17, The Court should Ticoura-:e the active recruitment .f minority- 
group teachers, staff an>i administrators in all cities and 
towns in the Commonwealth. 



The Court should request from each city and town in the Connon- 
wealth a detailed plan vjhich vfould indicate its recruiting process. 

These minority people rai^ht, serve as role models for minority 
students. Recruitment of minority teachers could also tend t o eliminate 
minority teacher isolation. 



vir. 119 



13. The Cohort should authorize t' 
seats for suburban students • 
tions be made available to s 



ston Public Schools to set aside 
ahat educational pro^'ran descrip- 
jan students. 



The intent of this reconjnendai 
students to enroll in and to benefi 
its schools. Seats could be set at 
schools and Boston Technical High T 
magnet schools. 

Suburban and urban students c 
politan educational e^cperiences sh 
only slioul-i Weston's students have 
suburban students should be urged t'- 
environnent. 



vjould be t o encourage ?ubiirban 
:"0in the richness of Boston, and 
in the exam schoolsj the Latin 
j1, advanced vork classes and 

^arn much from each other, I'etro- 
not be one-way ventures, iiot 
■ss to suburban prorjrans but 
;rtake of Boston's educational 



VIII -] 20 



19. Recommend that all school persoanel in the SI-ISA be required to 
participate in a value clarification - hu.-nan relations program. 

This reconmendation is intended to explore the interaction of human 
relations and value judgement which would be applied to leadership 
development v/ithin the realms of administration and teaching. 

Its intent would also be to help participants to .perceive the need 
to remove coranranication barriers and build an atmosphere of mutual trust 
in leadership roles in order to provide additional stable models for 
students. 

This recommendation is entered under Metropolitan Concerns because 
it is the School Committee's position that with school integration 
encompassing the SMSA school districts, school personnel in the SllSA school 
districts should have an opportunity to participate in this type of program. 



20. A survey conducted in the Greater Boston Stexndard Metropolitaji Statiribictil 
Area (oi'oA) which will determine opinion regarding a recom'nendation that the 
State goverrnient authori;io incentive payments to parents or students v.-l-^o 
voliintiiri.ly attend schools \/here their presence contributes to racial integration. 

In order to bring about the peaceful, court ordered de.'jecrei^atioa 
of the Boston Public Schools, it will be necessary to attract white 
students. The Boston 1-ublic Schools are currently perilously close to 
being irnbalanced. Ficures released for November, 197U, indicate that 
the Boston Public Schools are merely 52;l' vjhite. Should the dese^^rega- 
tion effort expand to include previously excluded white sections of the 
city, then it is predictable that the enrollment of white students vill 
fall belo'.-: SO)i» Thus Boston will be unable to balance its schools within. 
its projected enrolLTient. 

i-'ethods of attracting white students vary, but they generally group 
themselves around magnet educational programs, unique courses of study 
or other innovative educational experiences. To date these inaovative 
pror;ra'ns have not attracted a sufficient number of I'hite students from 
the suburbs which would enable the Boston Public Schools to racially 
balance its, schools. Thus newer, more attractive incentives must be 
. developed. . 

However, prior to the planning of incentives, a survey which would 
indicate the types of incentives which would attract parents and students to 
schools where their presence contributes to racial balance should be conducted 
by a firm which is expert in obtaining information from surveys. 

While. the concept of paying parents directly for their assistance in 
racial balajic-e, might be abhorrent to some, nevertheless there is precedence 
for the payment of educational-related incentives, even though payment might 
not have been made directly to parents. Chapter 636 provides payment for 
racially-related education. In the past an incentive of 3500 each was paid 



to teachers of special classes. Ban'rs many times ivill use incentives to 
attract new depositors. The U. S. Government pays a bonus to those who will 
stay in the service. The G. I. Bill is a fom of ince:itive or bonus. History 
is replete with exanjiles of the ]"a:,Tient of ince-:tives in order to attract people 
to become acquainted with a product or service. 

It should be clearly understood that the programs vjhich will be offered 
to all students will be the very best educational experience which can be 
devised. Thus, suburban and city students \^Jlll benefit. 

Exa.-nples of the t^-pes of ince;itives which could be offered to parents 
or students include: 

- Fron Septenber 1975 - September 1979 (Five Tear Plan) 

The sum of 05OO yearly vjould be paid directly to the pare its of 
white suburban students and white students fron non-public schools 
who e roll full-time in certain Boston Public Schools. (The Latin 
Schools, Boston Techrxical School, Boston High School and certain 
other schools or prop;rans would be excludedj e.g.* programs for 
students v/ith special learning needs). 

- Free college scholarships to state supported institutions could be 
offered to suburban students vfho attend high school in Boston for 
fo'or years, or . 

- Tax credits could be allowed to parents of students who voluntairily 
attei.d school in Boston, and wliose presence contributes to racial 
integration. 



VIII -123 



21. ' Reconnend that the Ckjurt endorse city/suburban value clarifica- 
tion progran to commence not later than April 15, 1975. 

Many of the citizens in the suburbs and the city of Boston, are 
upset, confused, and concerned regarding the court ordered desegrega- 
tion efforts. Racial incidents and violence have occured. In some of 
the Boston schools police are stationed on a regular basis, Fomer 
Governor Sargeant felt it was necessary to alert the National Guard 
to be ready in case of wide spread violence. Many parents and students 
who are not participating in the overt violence are rejecting integrated 
education. Suburban people are fearful of violence if forced busing 
spreads to their comnunities. Thus the genereil corununity attitude 
toward the desegregation efforts tends to reflect a confusion regard- 
ing values. Many people are unsure of what action, if any, to take. 

An extensive effort in value clarification directed by experts in 
the field, such as Dr. John Santusuosso of State College of Boston, 
could help to reduce the feelings of confusion. It should be noted 
that a program of this type would not be a panacea for all the problems 
related to desegregation, rather the progran in its initial stages 
would attempt to help citizens master a "valuing process," Once citi- 
zens master this valuing i-rocess then they can begin to apply the pro- 
cess in their own lives. It could bring their behavior in line with 
their stated beliefs. Briefly, the valuing process can be a personal 
guide wliich gives direction to life. The entire program can be developed 
by the experts. However, highlights of the program v/ill be: 

-Ebctensive use of television and radio to introduce the valuing 
process to urban and suburban citizens, A progran, perhnps on Channel 2, 
conducted by an expert, followed up by expert appearances on radio talk 



VIII-12.i+ 



shows would do a great deal to disseminale the message of valuing, 

-Citizens will learn value clarification strategies which 
could help them think through and decide on their values, 

-A teacher-training sub\irban-urban curriculum progra-n would assist 
students in choosing values, 

-The main thrust of tlie intial effort would be directed towaird all 
the citizens of a comiiunity, not just the parents of children who attend 
school, Thiis, the proposed effort is very far reaching. 

-The program is not designed to promote pro or anti feelings regard- 
ing forced busing. Rather it is designed to help citizens make decisions 
based on alternatives, 

-The program should begin as soon as possible. Therefore approval 
should be given immediately for the planning process to begin. 

-An initial cost of $50,000 should be appropriated in order to 
cover start up costs. An additional budget will be proposed for any 
other stages which may develop, Fvmding could be sought in cooperation 
with agencies external to the Boston Schools, 

-The poposed program will be imique and thus will not interfere 
in any ongoing efforts in the same area, 

-The sub'orban effort would be preventive as well as interventive. 
ifewspaper headlines which tend to instill fear" and hatred into suburban 
peoples due to their proposed future involvement in the desegregation 
effort can set up a communication barrior which could take years to 
brealc. An effective program aini3d at the city and the suburbs could 
help many of these people to clarify their values, and thus to nalce 
choices of behavior based on their beliefs. 



TLll-12hA 



22. Recoramend that certain suburban scnool systems within the 
SKfjA area enter into agreement with the City of Boston to 
lease any space (school buildings) that night be avail- 
able to be used by inner city children as proposed by the 
State Education Secretarj', Paul Parks . 



Suburban comnunities who close a school for reasons such as: 

1. Declining student population 

2. High cost of operating such a school 

3. Consolidation of schools 

agree to lease to the City of Boston these buildings to be used by 
Boston Public School students. 



vnl-l25 

MLTROPOI.ITAN COOPERATION 

Summary of Recommendations 

1, The school comniittee in each city and town in the Commonwealth be 
directed by the Court to establish an office of metropolitan 
cooperation or to name a coordinator for metropolitan efforts. 



2. The Court strongly recommends that the metropolitan coordinators 
attend a series of seminars hosted by the Boston Public Schools, 
Office of Metropolitaix Cooperation and sponsored by an external 
agency such as IIPP, EDCO, or the Department of Education, Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. 



5. Recommend'ajnendments in legislation dealing with racial concerns in 
education. 1) Redefine the term racial imbalance, and 2) amend 
Chapter 71 of the 1971 General Laws so that "racial isolation" rather 
than "racial imbalance" in schools is a violation of the law. 



h. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Education be 
instructed by the Court to develop a plan for comprehensive 
volimtary metropolitan education. 



5. Recommend expansion of the Metropolitan Council for Educational 
Opportunity (MSTCO). 



6. It is recommended that support be given to the Daly-Sullivan House 
Bill No. 2^+39. 



7» A voluntary busing program to suburban communities be developed 
by the Department of Education which will include majority and 
minority inner city children. 



8. Recommend encouragement of the Educational Collaborative of Greater 
Boston Projects. 

9. Reco;iu-.iend encouragement of lietroiiolitan Planning Projects. 



10. It is recon^mended that a plan be developed jointly with the 

Archdiocesan Schools and the Boston Public Schools which will enable 
minority students from the Boston Public Schools to enroll in 
Archdiocesan schools. 



11. Recommend the Court request massive a-ounts of resources, both 
human ;md economic, for Boston from the Federal government. 



VI-126 

12. The Court recommend that Federal funding for education be allocated 
such that local coamunities which encoirrage integration are rev.-arded. 



13. It is recommended that the Court order some school buildings in the 

SMSA be purchased, built or remodeled with a view toward establishing 
regional learning centers, administered by the Department of Education, 



1^. Court order the Department of Education to include Boston Public School 
students in -the enrollment for Regional Vocational Schools which serve 
the Standard MetroTjolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) of Greater Boston 



15. Recommend that suburban school departments with declining populations 
be encouraged to enter into agreements with the City of Boston which 
will provide that Boston Public School students would be eligible to 
attend certain suburban schools. The Department of Education wo'old pay 
all costs involved. 



16. The Court strongly encourage business/industry cuid local colleges 
and universities in the SMSA area to become actively involved in 
solving urban- suburban problems. 



17. The Court should encouraige the active recruitment of minority group 
teachers, staff and administrators in all cities and towns in the 

Commonwealth. 

18. The Court should authorize the Boston Public Schools to set aside 
seats for suburban students and that educational program descriptions 
be made available to suburban students. 



19. Recommend that all school personnel in the SMSA be required to 
participate in a value clarification - human relations progran. 



20. A survey conducted in the Greater Boston Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area (SJ-LSA) which will determine opinion regarding a 
recommendation that the State government authorize incentive paj^ments 
to parents or students who voluntarily attend schools where their 
presence contributes to racial integration. 



21. Recommend that the Court endorse city/suburban value clarification 
program to commence not later than April 15, I975. 

22. Recommend that certain suburban school systems within the SMSA area 
enter into agreement with the City of Boston to lease any space 
(school buildings) that might be available to be used by inner city 
children as proposed by the State Education Secretary, Paul Parks. 



Vlll- 1^/ 



0. Supportive Katerial And References 

This part of the section attempts to elaborate on the existing 
metropolitan programs referred to in previous parts of this section. 
Also included is a reference or source list relating to stateirients in 
this section. 



UST OF TABLES 



TABLE I 
TP3IE II 
TABLE in 

TABLE IV 

TABLE V 

TABLE VI 
TABLE VH 
TABLE VIII 

TABIE X 
TABLE n 
TABLE XII 

TABLE XIV 

TABLE XV 



Incone Eligibility Criteria Faraily Size and Gross Income 
Scales 

Boston Public Schocls- .'.."aite and Hon-Khite Student Enroll- 
Eent for 19614 throueh 1973 

Percent of Students in Schools IThose Non-Vhite Population 
Exceeds hO Percent V/ho Applied For Free or Reduced Priced 
Lunch 

Social and Economic Characteristics for Boston SI^SA School 
Districts 1970 

Faaily Incojie Distribution, Standarized by Comnunity, I960 
and 1970 

Blacks in Suburbia 

Suranary of Population Trends by Conmunity 1960-1970 

Declining School Population SliSA 



iiiJx v/w 






TOTt, 7^. ■yO'7-)n\, 



Racial Census of Public Schools as of October 1, 1971^ 
Racial Census-Boston S14SA Area as of October 1, 1973 

Population by Race for School Districts in Boston SMS'i 1970 
and I960 

Enrollment by Race for Regional Vocational Schools VJhich Sei^e 
Boston SlISA Students 1973-7li 

Archdiocesean Schools 



VIII-129 
EDUCATION COLLABORATIVE FOR GREATER BOSTON (EDCO ) 

Eelc* has beea involved Ifi urban/suburban programs for a 
number of years, currently operating and involving najor active 
programs in the following 13 communities: Bedford, Boston, Boston 
Diocesan Schools, Brookline, Carabridjie, Lexington, Lincoln, Lincoln- 
Sudbury, Regional, Medford, Hevrton, Sudbury, Walthall, and Watertown, 
It is estimated that more than 5000 participate in these programs, 

Boston students, teachers, reading specialists, and coiTcnunity 
adults participate in the following activities. In all cases the activi- 
ty is carried out in integrated groups, Sorae of the interaction is within 
Boston - for example, Roxbury, Dorchester, East Boston, and Mattapan 
personnel work together. The rest of the interacti£,a is between Boston 
and other EdCo comunities. 
EDCO ACTIVE- PROC-R.*^M MOD"LS 
1, Training sessions for school reading specialists who are in the 

process of changing or expanding their roles from remedial reading 
teachers to school reading specialists/consultants/resource parsons. 
Meetings are conducted each month throughout the school year. Visits 
to each others' schools are encouraged, expecially across tovm lines, 
2* Community adults are trained as tutor coordinators. The training 

sessions average once a week. About 30^ of the sessions combine all 
personnel across district and town lines. The remaining sessions for 
smaller groups deliberately conbine personnel from diverse areas and 
meetingH are frequently held at representative schools, 
3, Materials sharing. Tutor coordinators, teachers and reading specialists 
attend frequent materials sharing sessions providing a very tangible 
way for idea exchange across district and to\m boundaries. In addition 
to the coa-nunitiea listed in the first paragraph, this idea/materials 



viii-130 

sharing for teachers has also included Northboro, Walthara, Watertown, 

Chelsea, Stanehan, Frarainghara, Oxford, and Plymouth. 
U. High School students are trained as tutors of younger children. While 

they tutor children in their own neighborhood, their training sessions 

put thera in contact with students fron other school districts and to'.fns- 

for example, Arlington, Dorchester, and Lexington. 
$» Teacher drop-in center is open to all EdCo-aember teachers. An informal 

voluntary gathering for getting advice, sharing materials and development. 

The drop-in center is both staffed and attended by personal representing 
very different school systems and neighborhoods, 
6, Parent workshops developed in inner city Boston neighborhood school 

contexts are being dispersed through Cable T.V. in Soraerville, 
7» Diagnostic tests, training materials developed collaboratively have 

been printed and distributed throughout the Greater Boston School systens 

as well as to many other communities with Massachusetts and beyond. 



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vni-133 

VOCATIOrii\L S'rT^AV.v3IS3 "OR GPJiJCIAL NEEDS STUDr-TrTS 
Vocational Strategies for Special Needs Students is a federally funded 
planning project, sponsored by SDCO, to develop mechanisms for improved 
delivery of employment-related education services to handicapped youn^ people. 
In its initial planning stages, ZDCO is concentrating on special ne&ds students 
in Boston secondary schools to better prepare them - and their teachers - for 
skill development programs leading to independent work roles. Vocational 
Strategies seeks to encourage education that aims at the optimal functioning of 
each individual, and planning efforts in the project vill emphasise ths integra- 
tion of liandicapped students into training, learning, and v/orking situations 
of the noi"Tiinl population, where the handicap presents no bar to such integration. 
Once an effective process has been established for delivery of these services 
to pilot TDodels of Boston school students - with greatest need at this tine - 
this planning process will bs able to be replicated fcr a. broader pcp-ulaticn, 
encompassing the entire spectrura of special needs students in not only Boston, 
but in other EdCo coaniunities, urban and suburban. 

To firmly secure an overall planning nechanisra as vfell as to develop 
a clear focus for pilot models, EdCo is working closely with Boston school 
departments of planning and special services, With the full and active coop- 
eration of Mr. Charles Leftwich, Associate Superintendent for Planning and Dr. 
Alice Casey, Associate Superintendent for Special Sendees in the Boston Schools, 
target school populations, liaison personnel and planners fron within the school 
system have been designated. Dr. Vincent Corjiors, in charge of Special Classes 
and Ms. Pat Nolan, Assistant Director for Special Classes have selected, with 
Dr. Casey's guidance a member of their own staff to work full time with t'ne 
Vocatio«al,Strateg.ies project* 

Boston Trade High School has been selected as the sile for the Vocational 
Strategies pilot teaching model, with Special Needs students as well as the 



vin-i3li 

naiii toachor, and traininc site for initial dicsenvination of vocatlcr.rJ./ 
epecial needs teaching tcchaiq-ues, Mr, John TregaJcis, Headnaster nt Boston 
Ti'ude, alons with ^^r, John Koonoy, resource person In Speci&l Educ-ilion at 
Trade High, are orrar-^ing to select one of their fajculty to join the Voc- 
ational Strategies project in the cooperative planning capacity. Hr. -'ocney 
will serve as school department planning liaison bctveen the dcrjart-.ents 
of Special Education and Vocation Education. 

Current research indicates a higher concentration of special noods/ 
handicapped persons of school age in urban settings. As a res-alt, naiiy sub- 
urban EdOo coniraunities have expressed interest in the Vocational Strategies 
PrograTi, as their declining - yet conplex - special meeds populations require 
new planning procedures for access to supportive servu.ce3» EdCo, for e>:a.^.ple, 
previously sponsored a planning project, under the diarection of Dr. Richard 
Thojupson, in educational programs for deaf yoxingsters; in Hewton. Tae first 
coKiiJi'.ohensive secondary school program for hard of hesaring youngsters in 
Massachusetts was established by EdCo as a result of ■this study. Vocational 
Strategies will be working with staff members at Bostton's Horace Mir.n School 
for the Deaf and with Dr. Thompson to design pre-voca.tt.ional prograr.s fcr deaf 
and hearing impaired youngsterG. 

The pilot model planned for Boston Trade School serving students v;ic;\ 
special needs will investigate methods of better relating bucinesc; a:';d industry to 
early planning stages in the education of the handicapped. Brookline and 
Lincoln-Sudbury, both EDCO memberc, have specifically roque:;tod inforiiation 
about this program 'and one town has suggested a tuitioh-payiiig r>rrr.r;;~or.;erit 
where suburban youngsters might contact with such a Boston pilo:; r.oucl pro-ra;.-. 
rather'than attempting to deci-gn a similar model in the 3uburb.-jn {;o.r,«.uaity 
■for a much smaller school population of st-udentc with special ncoc-. 



VIII -135 

EdCo intends to develop and present several training workshops to 
facult7 members of Boston Trade High on techniques for better serving the 
handicapped student coranunitj. Training will focus on sensitivity to special 
needs education, flexibility in scheduling brought on by services to special 
needs students, as well as infonnation on functional job and task analysis. 
These sessions will provide teachers and adninistrations with guidelines on 
develpping curriculuia and teaching strategies for special needs youngsters 
so that they will engage in designing skills for students related to employment 
and independent living. Teachers and guidance personnel will also receive 
Information related to job restructuring and improved co-operation with 
business and industry related to work exposure, work-study, and ejiployment of 
special needs youngsters. These workshops will provide a foundation for 
similar workshops to be conducted through EdCo participating ccraunilies. 



* VIII-136 

SUCCESSFUL MSTROPOLITAM VOLUNTARY CPLLASORATIVES 



Ramon E. Rodriquez 
Public Inforraation Coordinator' 



The following voluntary collaborative educational projects were successfully 
tested by Metropolitan Planning Project during the past year and will provide 
the bases for the prograraraatic reconnendations of a phased Ten Tear Plan to 
reduce minority student isolation in the schools of the Boston metropolitan 
area which was presented at a "REPORT Conference" to metropolitan school 
districts affiliated to Metropolitan Planning Project, 



Each project involved a minijiura of two school districts, community groups or 
parent and teacher advisory councils; each was developed to include students 
of different racial and ethnic backgrounds. 



PROJECT 

E,N.E.R.G.Y 

Experimental School System 
of the Corinonwealth of 
Massachusetts • 

Participating Districts 
Boston, Lincoln, Sudbury, 
and Cambridge 

Students In/olved 

no 



PRODUCT 

The experimental School System of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts planned and piloted a project 
that involved high school students from a variety 
of racisil and ethnic backgrounds in a cooperative 
and productive study focusing on the issue of the 
energy crisis. This issue was selected for its 
relevance to the lives of the individual students, 
the participating communities and national 
interest. The students developed a report on the 
energy crisis as it is perceived as an issue by 
different groups of people especially around the 
problem of transportation. It produced an educa- 
tional program involving students from different 
cultural environments who worked together to collect- 
and report data relating to the use of energy re- 
Bources, The methodology by which the, students 



VIT 1-137 



Theatre Conpany of Boston 



PartlciDatinf Districts 

I ■*■ - — — - _ - - 

Lincoln, Sudb'jry, Boston, 
Hatertown, Brookline 

Students Invol ved 

50 



^ 



eatre Corapany of Boston 
continued 



\ 

\ 



(Cases and Studies of 
Economic Situations) 

Participating^ Districts 
Boston and Leain^ton 

Students Inv olved 
.^ 



operated can be used with other ecology and 
envlronraent issues. 

The Theatre Conpany of Boston taught a theatre 
production course for academic credit to fifty 
students fron Boston, Watertovfn, Brookline, and 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School. The purpose 
of the pilot was to serve as a model for intro- 
ducing theatre arts into the school curricxilum and 
for establishing a professional companj-- of actor/ 
teachers supported on a metropolitan basis. Araong 
the final products of this project was a student 
production entitled "lletropliner" which toured 
Brookline, Roxbury, Water town, and Lincoln -Sudbury. 
In its final evaluation of this project the Theatre 
Conpany of Boston concluded, ",,, .students in the 
drama program appear to have greater concerns about 
thfe need for understanding and interacting with 
people of all races and backgrounds. It is only by 
talcing every opportunity to learn fron and under- 
stand each other that the barriers isolating in- 
dividual races and cultures can be eliminated." 
The aim of this program was to join with the National 
Alliance of Businessmen, the Federal Reserve Bank 
and the Cambridge and Boston school departments to 
plan aiid pilot a course for high school students in 
the basic principles of economics, utilizing a case 
study method and the connunity as the classroom, 
.The project ro.sulted in three cases produced by the 



vni-138 



Boston Street Acpdeny 

Particiriatinn' Districts 
Boston and Canbridge 

Students Involved 

16 on planning teans 



Social Discovery 

Participatin"^ Districts 
Boston and iieading 

Students Involved 

— 50 



students based upon their visits to educational 
institutions, banks, electronics firros, major 
department stores, insurance companies and other 
business fims. 

The aim of this progran was to involve parents, 
staff and students of high schools in the two 
coraraunities to plan a drop-out prevention progran. 
The program planned to use a flexible canpus 
approach aiaed at helping to improve the self ij.age 
and image of other groups for both rJ.nority and non- 
minority students. With eighteen students on the 
planning team, this program produced a program for 
potential school dropouts '..'hich included a curr- i 
iculun and instruction strategies for prevention 
which meets some of the need for basic skills 
programs. 

Social Discovery, an alternate senester rrogrnr., 
provided an opportunity for students to dcvelcp 
greater knowledge of the basic forms of social 
organization which fona the fabric of Ansricxn 
Society, This was achieved by not only ha\'lng the 
students read and research a variety of lifestyles 
and social conditions, but also by actually part- 
icipating in the living situations they were stud;,! 
The support from parents and community was extrcr.el 
good^ with parents providing valuable suggestions ( 
for reading lists and placement aites. 



.xx-x;(y 



Chinese American Resource 
Center 



Participating Districts 

Lexington, Experinental 
School System of the Conn- 
onwealth of Massachusetts, 
and Marshfield, 



Boston Indian Council 



Particioatinr Districts 
Boston, Brool-rline and 
Hingham 

Students Involved 

"To 



Storefront Video Prelect 

111 II ^ - r 

Parti cioatin." Districts 
Boston and Ganbridge 

Students Invol ved 

25 



Further, this program developed and published 
a curriculum guide for exploring diverse social 
structures, cultures, and lifestyles, which is 
available for schools who wish to establish a 
similar program 

The Chinese-American Resource Center annotated 
and packaged units of printed and audio-visual 
materials on the Chinese and Chinese-American 
experience for classroon use. They developed 
Chinese-American studies curricula for ele- 
mentary. Junior high and high school, including 
Mandarin and Cantonese language lesson plans 
and a curriculum guide for a program exploring 
diverse social structvires, cultures, and life 
styles 

The Boston Indian Council had teachers and students 
meet to develop curriciiluin and materials explicitly 
portraying Indian people and life in a positive 
manner, as v;ell as instructions on their usage by 
Angelo teachers. Their project led the participants 
to a greater understanding of Indian cultvire and 
historj'. The involvement of parents and teachers 
greatly facilitated the successful outcome of this 
project. 

The Storefront Learninc Center Video ^reject, con- 
sisted of a twelvo-weefc cross-cultural education 

program utilizing the techniques and potentials 
of half-inch video-tape production as a learning 



VIII-IUO 



i 



Hispanic Culture Curriciiltm 
!t*ro3 ect 

Participating Idstrlcts 
Randolph, Brookline and 
Boston 



Mobile Museum 

Participating^ Districts 
Brockllno and »<eston 



i 



and production procedures of the curriculum. 
The project was conceived by H.O.P.E., the 
Hispanic Office of Planning and Evaluation, 
as the first step in the development of a 
billngual/bicultural curriculum for the Social 
Studies programs at the junior and senior high 
school level. They developed and tested resource 
Tinits which Included the study of American 
societies, land, people, cultures, and the 
Hispanic cormunities in the United States, An 
important part of the project included the identi 
fication and production of educational materials 
related to the Hispanic experience in Mew Englano 
It was discovered that existing materials in | 
bilingual prograns in such places as Puerto Rico, 
New lork and the southwest for the most part coulj 
not be transferred to Boston due to the part- \ 
ioularities of the Hispanic comrounities to v;hich 
they were addressed, Reading materials, and 

visual aids were produced and compiled. 
The Elma Lewis School of Fine Arts, Inc. (ELFA) 
developed a cross-cultural program involving 
schools in Brookline and Weston, Initially, the 
EL3FA stsiff presented a series of seminars and 
workshops to teachers, parents, and students in ^ 
these districts. The purpose of these seminars 
was to orient these groups to the personnel and 
curriculum resources of the ELSFA In the areas of 



VIII -llj. 



!/oapgrative Seninars Frogrejn 

Parti clp a tint; Districts 
Boston and Cambridge 



Students Involved 
20 



Afro-American, West Idnian, and African music, 
drams, art, dance, and cos^uming, As a result of 
these workshops, teachers made use of EISFA resourc 
For example, when a class was studying connunicatio 
a person from ELSFA who was an expert of African 
drums was utilized. . ELSFA developed a Mobile Museuj 
that contained exhibits of sculptures, masks, head- 
dresses, and other traditional items that are part 
of the African way of life. This museum, which also 
contains a number of audio-visual aids, presents 
Bix week activity programs at interested school 
districts. The exhibits in this Mobile Museum are 
\ised by teachers in such curriciolu.'" areas as Social 
Studies, Art, Music and Dance. 

This program was developed by the Cambridge Montes- 
sori School and the Federation of Boston ConuQunity 
Schools. Ten students Cron each participating conm- 
unlty between the ages cuf nine and twelve were in- 
volved in a twelve week: seminar program. The first 
six weeks were spent at the Cambridge Montesoori 
School; the last six weire spent at the Highland Perk 
Free School, Students met one day a week during this 
period for the followingj activities; academic 
seminars (Drama, Historjr of Games, African FoUctales, 
and ilistory of the Earth-.), group meetings (Discussion, 
reeources sharing, and sfimulation games), a physical 
education program, imd an afternoon arts-^ program giver 



7111- J-A2 



i 



\ 



at art resource organizations in each comminity. 
The project ended vriLth a weekend retreat that provl 

• 

students and staff the opportunity to interact and, 
cooperate on an even closer basis, and to share the 
learning experiences, A main objective of this 
program was to ziake use of the unique resources o 
the two comnxinities involved (Cambridge and Rozbur 
and to involve parents, students and teachers in t 
developiaent and on-going planning and evaluation o 
the program, 
Afro-Anerican Resource Center The Afro-American Resource Center has provided 

programs in teacher training in Afro-American Stud 
fi yy^ j_Tj curriculum develc^nent thro^^'^hout Masscich 
as well as publishing and producing related educ- 
ational mateidals. The I'useum of Afro-American 
History has compiled an extensive collection of 
doc\unents and pieces reflecting New England's maj 
role during the abolitionist era and has developed 
Black Heritage trail to train students as junior 
curators in the necessary research and technical 
skills. Their joint project involved taking the 
initial steps tov;ard merging the two organizations 
in order to establish a pemanent institution that 
will use the Roxbury ccrjiunity as a learning envin 
nent in minority and Afro-American history. 






( 



Hotropolitan Cultural Alliance 

Participating Districts 

^iurlincton, litoncliam, '.•■'altha-a, 
V/atertov;n, Randolpli and Boston 



VIII.1)43 



Metropolitan Cultural Alliance 
Continued 



Roxb\iry-Dorchester Communities 
As An Knvlro.T.enx,al Lcarinin;; 



Laboratorv 
i ■ 



Participating: Districts 
Weston, Boston 



Students Involved 



50 



Metropolitan Cultural Alliance developed several 
prograns for students in the conmunities of Boston, 
Burlington, Randolph, Stonehan, V/altham, and 'Jater- 
town. In the past, schools in the Greater Boston a 
have used the resources of many cultural institutic- 
and performing groups to provide enrichnent ezperie, 
for their students but most of these were designed 
as one-tine field trips to an institution or single 
performances by a company at the school. In coll- 
aboration with a number of cultural institutions, 
such as the Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of 
Transportation, Pocket Mime, Stage One Theatre, the 
children's Museus, and Concert Dcincc, MCA developed 
curriculum packages that provided for a more exten- 
sive and systematic programs ai'e geared for elem- 
entary, junior high and high school students. They 
include: "Waterways, Celebration of the Sun, Tribe, 
Americans, Environmental Puppet Drama, Moving Game, 
Movement & Dance, Doctor Opera and American Exper- 
ience, 

The Roxbury-Dorchester Community Beautification 
Program conducted a program for sixth a.nd seventh 
grade students from Weston and Boston. The aim of 
this program was to bring together students from 
diverse racial, socio-economic and cultural back- 
grounds in a learning cavironment in which hort- 
icultural skills "and krjowledge could bo developed ' 
and human relations skills acquired. The participa 



VIII- lUi; 



Continued 

oxbirry-Dorchester Comunitlea 



students met for a six week period at the Frarfclln 
Park Rose Garden, Through the process of rejuvena- 
ting this garden, the students acquired skills 
necessary for planting, preparing and maintaining 
a garden site. In addition to these tangible skills^, 
they developed an introductory knowledge of plant 
biology, soil composition, and soil care. By the 
end of the project, interchange was quite free and 
animated; the stadents enjoyed the project and their 
new and very different acquaintances. 



( 



viii-1145 

C00PF.R;.TI}JG BOSTO!I-!:aJDOnBAH PROGRAMS 

The Boston-!'cvtoD Cooperative Educntlon Prof^rsm 

The Boston-Nevrton Cooperative Education Progrnm is part of the Newton 
Metco Program to reduce racial and ethnic isolation and is an outgrowth of 
a successful pilot p:ograiii conducted in cooperation with Boston College 
and Nevrton Community Sei^ce Centers at Hale Reservation in Westwood, an 
outdoor education program between fourth (Uth) grade classrooms in Nevrton 
and" Boston. 

The program includes a day of integrated, planned outdoor education 
activities relating to science, social studies, and physical education. A 
trained staff, working in cooperation with Boston College Department of 
urban education and science supervise activities Jointly planned by teachers 
j.roi!i jjosoOu aiiCi. iicVjoon* 

By pro\'iding an urban classroom of predominately black students and a 
suburban classroom,* which includes METCO students, with an opportunity to 
participate in shared learning experiences on neutral turf, it is hoped 
that an outdoor education program not only will promote sustained relation- 
ships, but also will promote growth of children in self-esteem, in physical 
and social skills, and in cognitive development as well. 

Camp-Sito 

The Halo Reservation in Westwood, Jlassachusctts (fifteen (l5) miles 
west of Boston), includes a camp-site of over one thousand (l,OCO) acres 
of woods, ponds, hiking trails, winteriaed camp buildings, and developed 
outdoor recreational areas. 

Time Frane 

Two (2) cycioE during school year. 



VIII. -1U6 

Fifteen (1$) sessions per cycle. 
One (l) day per week (Thurcday). 

Participants 

One (1) Boston fourth (Uth) grade classroon cycle and teacher. 

One (1) Newton fourth (I^th) grade classroom cycle and teacher. 

Two (2) M3TC0 staff members. 

Two (2) graduate students from Boston Collese. 

Four ik) undergraduate students from Boston College. 

Transportation 

By school bus. 

Boston and Newton students will be picked up at their schools, where 

they will be transported to Hale Reservation 

The Social Discovery Program 

The primary emphasis of the program is to have students participate 
in actual social experiences. 

Social Discoveries integrates an acederaic approach with a first-hand 
analysis of the study of social systems and life styles. 

A week of intensive classroom preparation precedes each week spent 
out of the classroom. 

A preliminary report of expectations precedes the work at the scattered 
sites: grades nine (9) through twelve (12) participate, but only one student 
visits each place at a time to increase self-reliance. At the end of the 
coxirse, the students will collectively design a utopia which is put into 
effect for two weeks at a spot agreed upon by all. Students will be offered 
six (6) different locations from which he can choose, including sites in 
Maine, Berkeley V/oods, Cuttyhunk (an island off the Cape), a hone in the 



viii-iU? 

South End offered by Boston Low-Cost Housing or Dorchester, Each experi- 
ence ostensibly teaches a different goal. A first-hand look at the Navy 
(the women's and nen's OCS in Newport, Rhode Island) focuses attention on 
social or^^anizations, eabodying a more authoritarian node. Factory work..i 
allows for occupational skills... as we.11 as close scrutiny of factory 
life... the value of privacy is the result of a week's visit with a hermit. 

Students say that the experience has helped open their minds. Some 
who went to visit a monastery to confirm their prejudices wound up request- 
ing an extension of their stay. 



VIII- l!v8 

THE BTGLISH inCH SCHOOL - URBAJi STUDIES CENTER - V.A.L.U.E , ^ 

The Yicual Arts Laboratory in Urban Education (V.A.l.U.E.) is a collaborative 
program of the Boston Public Schools and the Institute of Contemporary Art (l.C.A.) 
The program is designed to study the Urban Environment through visual neans. The 
school year is divided into five (5) cycles is divided betv/een general introductory 
and overview material, media training, and project work. The concepts are more 
fully developed for students with particular reference to Boston by the addition of 
specific learning activities, supplemental readings, guest speakers and audo-visual 
materials • 

The program is a city wide program as well as being a metropolitan program. 
Students participate in the Program from private and parochial suburban schools. 
The structure of the program in such that students participate for fovir (4) days i 
per week and spend one day back in their home schools. Possibly the most signi- 
ficant feature of the program is the wide spread participation of various schools 
and the collaborative nature of the program. 

STRUCTURE 

SITE lOCATIOIT 

Headquarters ; The New English High School 
Annex Site ; 45 Myrtle Street, or similar site 
Personnel; Boston - 3 Pull-Time Staff 



Suburban Schools - One (l) teacher 

Number varies depending upon the number of students involved, 

Student Uumbero; English High Students per cycle - 15 

Boston Students per cycle - 25 
Suburban students per cycle - 15 per school system 



VIII. Ik9 



Participatin/^ Schools ; 

Boston - English High 
Brighton High 
J. E. Burke High 
Charlesto-.vn High 
• East Boston High 
5yde Park High 

Parochial - Pitton Acadeny 
Private - Thompson Acadeny 

Subvirban - Erookline High 
Praaiinghain High 
Ipswich High 
Ner/ton High 
VTatertown High 

The Center will expand in scope to three major components, 

a* Urban Studies Component: This component v/ill continue to emphasize 
the Urban Geography approach, this year the focus STill be on the 
political, economic and cultural geography of the city of Boston. 



b. Bicentennial Studies Component: This laboratory will concern it- 
self with an in-depth study of the Bicentennial celebration, Boston '200'. 
Eased on the previous experiences with "The City' and the Urban 
Studies Center's VALUE Program it will have as its major emphasis 
Cross Age Teaching. 

It is hoped to utilize the skills and interest of high school students in 
urban studies and the communicative arts fields to put together resource and media 
packages on the Bicentennial for: 

1* Use in elementary and secondary schools 

2. For presentation to old age and community groups 

5« For utilization by the Boston Public Libraries 

4. For other community BiCentennial activities, 

0. City Resources: Utilizing the experienced Flexible Ccimpus Staff of 
English Hi^j this program will follow up. 

ki a "refinement of the Flexible Campus Program It will .offer in depth 
activities, tutorial help, independent study and community activity utilising 



VIII -i5o 

the urban studies offerings of the Center. Upon completion of participation 

In the Center's full time program, a student will be provided the opportiinity 

to continue on a part time basis in the City Resources component of the program 

if he or she so desires. 

The City Resources Laboratory will serve each student individually by: 

1* Laying a foundation for a broad urban studies background 

2» Providing progracmed independent study as a supportive experience 
to the student's academic experience. 

3. Pre vocational exploration of possible careers, 

4« Vocational Training and experience: The City Resource Program 

iTill offer greater flexibility to the student desiring experience. 
Likewise it v/ill allow greater opportunity to tne student to 
integrate his field experience into the classroom and the real 
world. 



VIII- 151 



References 

American Soclolofjical Review: October 1973. 

Poter;tiaI for Rea. dential Intspration In Cities and Suburban 
Inplications for the Busing Controversy . 

Archdiocese of Boston 

Boston Globe 3-29-7U 6-2-714 10-13-7U 

Boston Herald-Araei'ican 12-U-7U 

Boston Redevelopnient Authority Research Department Avigust 197U 

Bureau of lIutrltionaL Education, June 197U 

Caldwell, James. "How To Save Urban America". 

The IJew American Library. Signet. New York. 1973. p. 7 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts - Department of Education. 

Conant, James B. , "Slums and Suburbs". McGraw-Hill Book Coapar^T', Inc. 
New York. 1961. p. 2 

Cronin, Josqjh. A Study of the Boston School Department, 
D. C. Heath Pubiishinij Company. 1973 

Education Collaborative for Greater Boston, 

Education, U.S.A. 197U p.l|l 

FranJiLn, Ben A. Rights, Lmr/ers, Ha. 1 Richmond Decision. 
New York Times. 1-13-72 p. 32 

Friedman, Saul, Politics of the Riot . Detroit Free Press. 
July 27, 1972. p. 9 

Governors' Task Force on Metropolitan Development 197U. p.21-50 

Green, Robert L. , "Northern School Desegregation. Educational, 
Legal, and Political Issues, 197h." The Year Book of the National 
Society for the Study of Education. Chicago. 197U 

Hazelton, Paul, Coirponwedl. November. 197U 

Jones, Nathaniel. Education, U.S.A. Washington D.C. Vol, l6 No. U 

McKelvey, Troy, "Metropolitan School Organization". McCutchan 
Publishing Corporation. Berkeley, Calif, 1972 p.YII 



VIII- 1^2 



Metropolitan Coimcil for Educational Opportunities 

Metro Ways To Understanding. Volume II. Resources for Implementation, Part 2, 1974 
Metropolitan Planning Project 

National Advisory Committee on Civil Disorder, p. 42^-25 ^^^-2 

National Association of Independent Schools 

Order Establishing Filing Date and General Contents of Student 
Desegregation Plan. October 51, 197^+ 

School Administrator November 197^+ 

The U. S. Commission on Civil Rights 
Equal Opportunity in Suburbia. July, 197^ 

Wall Street Journal. 11-22-7^ 



. 



SECTION IX POSITIVE ACTION OFFICE 



U-l 
Positive Action Office 

We recommend the establlstment of a Positive Action Office to 
monitor and assist the desegregation efforts in each zone of the city 
as an essential factor in a successful desegregation operation. 

• The Positive Action Office would consist of a small staff; a 
director, two assistants, and a United number of minority persons. 
It is important to have commimlty input to the selection of minority 
staff members. The significant fact is that the staff of a Positive 
Action Office should reflect the racial composition that has been set 
for students and school staffs in order to have a consistent action 
in the selection process. 

The activities urged for this office should be definitely related 
to fostering the idea and the attainment of voluntary desegregation 
efforts. There is a need for an office to review ideas and to imple- 
ment those whicn have validity or to present them to the agencies 
which must approve them before implementation can be achieved. 

As a starting point, the Office should support the continuation 
of on-going or previously initiated human relations training efforts 
for school staffs, both teachers, support personnel, and administrators < 
Programs would be conducted by a qualified and appropriate human rela- 
tions staff, not by the office staff. Workshops on a regular schedule 
should be arranged for each zone. The Positive Action* Office would 
neither conduct the actual workshops nor supei*vise its program, but 
it would maintain strong communication with the workshop staff and ex- 
ercise its good ofrice? In any efforts that would stimulate interest 
and participation in training sessions. For example, the Office would 
assist the hxiraan relations staff in setting up the schedules and places 



II-^ 

within the zone, publicizing the activities, and, in general, per- 
forming support serrices to the workshop staff© 

The Office would investigate any actions that have promise of 
encouraging ci*03s-racial choices in each zone or across each zone© 
?or example, this office, while not primarily responsible for trans- 
fer of students, could be a center for current information on open 
seats within the zone, a place iriiejre parents within the zone could 
comrnxmicate with knowledgeable staff on the steps set for cross-racial 
enroll went. 

Another basic activity for a Positive Action Office would center 
about liaison with the school department's personnel office and with 
the school department's minority recruitment officer in matters relative 
to the court orders on staff assignments and the recruitment process* 

The Office would maintain a local information line for inquiries 
from each zone. The infoination activities would be directly connected 
with the central school information center, but its primary function 
would be to answer specific zonal desegregation questions and to refer 
items not within its Jurisdiction to the appropriate office of the 
school department.* 

The Positive Action Office would organize a series of zonal monthly 
meetings of the bi-racial councils within each zone* The purpose of 
these meetings would be to progaote understanding of the desegregation 
plan as it applied to a particular zone and to encourage better communi- 
cation among the minority-majority members of the councils in matters 
particularly relevant to cross-racial opportunities within the zone and 
city-wide • 



II-3 

The Positive Action Office would issue a bi-monthly newsletter to 
all parents within each zone, informing them of the progress of volun- 
tary desegregation efforts within the zone. In addition, the Office 
would submit a record of the year's activities f6r the annual report 
of the Superintendent. 

The Positive Action Office would not be responsible for the normal 
school business for the zones j; the prime supervision of the schools 
would remain with the Area Superintendent, Clearly, the Positive Action 
Office would have a strong liaison with the Area Superintendent in 
order to maintain clear lines of authority and responsibility. 

In summary, the functions of the Positive Action Office would be 
the following; 

1. To answer inquiries from parents and community members concern- 
ing the implementation of the court order© To provide this seirvice, 
the Office would gather information which would include program options 
within each zone and city-wide, seats available, pertinent school poli- 
cies concerned with desegregation, and lists of school locations, tele- 
phone numbers, and pidncipals. This material and all other relevsint 
material to the desegregation process would be maintained in a section 
of the office for ready accessibility. 

2. To disseminate information within each zone through meetings, 

a bi-«ionthly newsletter, articles in the local press, and school tours. 

3. To establish conanunication and interaction with appropriate 
school department members and other agencies such as: 

a. Personnel Office 

b. Minority Recruitcient Office 



n-U 

o* Area Superintendent 

d. Student Transfer Office 

e. Department of Public Infomaticn 

f. Bi -racial Councils. 

U* To assist logistically the workshops of the persons responsible 
for Human Interaction Activities. 

5. To be cognizant and supportive of current legislation and activ- 
ities which seek to foster voluntary student desegregation both within 
the city and in the metropolitan areas* 

6. To initiate a program to involve the business and vmiversity 
ccauminities in specific efforts which. support promising voluntary 
student desegregation activities. 



SECTION X FUTUHE CONCERNS 



X-1 

X >'uturc Cor.cfrns 

A. Student Enrollment Data 

As indicated in section II of this doca-ncnt, the sti\dent enrollment 
data upon which this plan is based is that of the academic year 1973-197''+ 
projected to the present school year. Indeed, the student enrollment data 
listed in the Appendix of this document is also that of the acacior.ic year 
1973-19?^ » On approximately January 17, 1975i the computerized student 
enrollment data for the academic year 197'+-1975 was completed and forwarded 
to the Court and appropriate parties. 

Although the new data was not utilized in the development of this 
plaji for the reasons cited in section II of this document, the staff of the 
Committee will begin to examine the new data to determine whether it shall 
make any revisions to its plan of January 27, 1975. 

Finally, as noted earlier in the document, the Committee will direct 
its staff - as a normal process - to re-verify student enrollment data 
prior to new student assignments which would be made in April, 1975. 



X-2 



B. Program Planning 

The process of educational program planning in effect has already 
commenced . The desegregation planning staff - as this document attests - 
has addressed the initial phases of program development. Also, planning 
committees have been formed by the Associate Superintendent for Curriculum 
ajid Staff Development. 

Shortly after submission of this document, the Interim Office of 
Desegregation Planning, in conjvinction with the appropriate Associate 
Superintendents, will enter a pre-planning phase relative to this 
document. Clearly, such planning is crucial to the success of any deseg- 
regation plan. Not only will every effort be made to raarshall the resources 
of the school system but also invitations will be extended to business and 
university representatives and others to Join in this endeavor. 



X-3 

C, Funding 

In order to implement the options and magnets suggested in this 
document, funding will be necessary from several sources to develop new 
progrcuns and expand already successful one. Potential sources of funding, 
at the State level (Chapter 636) and Federal level ESAA are discussed in 
this section. 

1. Chapter 636 - Magnet Schools and Magnet Programs 

In July 197^1 an Act amending the Racial Imbalance Law Chapter 636 
was passed by the Massachusetts legislature. It v;as approved by the 
Governor on July 26 v;ith the stipulation that it take effect immediately . 
One provision of that statute - Section 8 - relates to the funding of 
magnet school programs and facilities. 

The State Department of Education has set aside approximately 1.9 
million dollars statewide for the implementation of Section 8 with a 
major share apportioned to Boston. 

It is the position of the Boston School Department that the Alternative 
Student Desegregation Plan, proposed by the Boston School Committee as the 
Phase II Desegregation Plan, is based on the development and placement of 
magnet-type prograjns and magnet facilities throughout the six zones at each 
level of instruction. 

The funds under Section 3 axe iinmediately available and can measurably 
support the detailed planning that must take place at central, zonal, 
and local school levels prior to implementation of the plan in September, 
1975. The School Department has already indicated an intent to seek funding 
under this Section 3. Specific proposals for program planning, staff 
development, curriculum development, and community relations services will 



be developed over the next four weeks. A substantive portion of the 1,9 

million dollarc may be requested for these proposals. 

In order for the school system to provide the necessary funding for 
the proper exploration and development of alternative educational offeririr;s 
in each of the zones, the Federal District Court is requested to order a 
temporary vaiver of regulations pertaining to Section 8 of Public Law 
636 as they apply to local school earmarked proposal dollars. (It is 
estimated that this action would make available between 550^^300 and 
S75O1OOO). The purpose of this action would be to msike it possible for the 
Boston Public Schools to maximize local input to zonal options. 



X-5 

2. Znerf^oncy Special Assistance Act (ESAA) 

Another potential .':ource of f'onding lies in the rl-ncrt^ency Special 
Assistance Act of the Department of Health, ikiucation and V/elfare. Boston 
has been av/anicd a il ,^DD ,000 gran",, nuch of which f.-.ould be expended prior 
to the opening of school in Septo-ber, 1975. Funds vere released to Boston 
on January 1^, 1^75. The money will be expended in the following areas: 

A. The training of all new teachers in "lethods and strategics to be used 
in addressing the needs of th'" students, in light of the programmatic 
options offered by this desegregation plan. 

B. The provision of additional training and support services for guidance 
personnel and the expar;sion through training of teachers of available 
guidance-oriented assistance to students. 

C. The provision of specific training and staff development activities for 
key Boston School Department personnel and resource people who are 
planning a new kind of occupational anc career education program. 

D. A Bilingual component v/ill deliver direct services to the middle and 
high schools v/hose linguistic populations have undergone chang-:^. The 
program will include staff training and the development of curricula 

and materials for multi-ethnic, nulti-cultural studies for administrators, 
teachers, students and parents. 

E. Two components focus on the improvement of comjr.v.nication skills and 
development of instructional strategies which will enable professionals 
to teach new students more effectively. 

F. The Ikiucation and Training Strategies Task Force and the City-V.'ide 
Advisory Coi:-jnittee will serve to increase communication among all segments 
of the city interested in education. The Advisory Comriittco will also 
maintain ongoing informational contact with the Bi-racial Citywide Parcr.t 
Advisory Council. 



X-6 



D. Facilities 

On October 31) 197'+ in the "Order Establishing Filing Date and General 

Content of the Student Desegregation Plan", one specific directive was that 

All changes planned for September 1975 in use of physical 
facilities, other them new schools already under con- 
struction, shall promote desegregation. The plan shall 
include a proposal for the reviev; and consideration of 
the long-range desegregation of the location, capacity 
and other characteristics of new construction or additions, 
planned for occupancy after September, 1975- 

In this section, the plan will briefly address issues inherent in this 
directive. 
1 . Changed Use of Facilities 

Relative to the changed use of physical facilities, the following 
schools have been specified by the plan to be desegregated schools. Pro- 
visions for their integration has been described: 



Zone I 

Horace Msinn 

Zone II 

Fenv;ick 

Hawthorne 

Russell 

Winthrop 

Zone III 
Hernandez 

Zone IV 

P. A. Shaw 
Rogers 

Zone V 

ParVmah 

Zone VI 

Bowditch 
McKinley 



Previous Use 



Special-Deaf 



Bilingual Cluster 
Not in Use 
Elementary 
Not in Use 



Bilingual Cluster 



Middle 

High School Annex 



Elementary 



Elementary 
Special Education 



Proposed Use 



Elementary 



Elementary 
Elementary 
Middle 
Elementary 



Citywide 
Elementary/Bilingual 

Bi-cultural 



Elementary 
Middle 



Middle 



Jamaica Plain Annex I 
Elem. Resource Center 



X-7 



Citywide 

Hennigan 

Eulfinch 
Prince 

Bradford Annex 
Bancroft 



C. C. Perkins 



Previour. Use 



Elem. /Middle 
High School Annex 
Elementary 
Middle School Annex 
Elem. /Middle 



Not in Use 



Proposed Use 



Elementary 
Cityv.'idc Kiddle 
Copley High Arjiex 
Git\'v/ide Elementary 
Cityi'.'ide L'leL;entary 
Multi-cultural 
:;ulti-lir^gu:;l 
Multi-linrual 



2. New Construction FroJectG - September 197^ 

At the present time, the plan for 1975 is based on the completion of 
construction on the following new school projects, each to open on a deseg- 
regated basis. 

Southv/est I High School 
Jaclvson/Msinn School 
Norci-oss School 
Since the October 31st order, there has been sone discussion about the 
readiness of the Southwest I project. If it is not to be available, the 
high school plan proposed will be considerably weakened. 

3. Nev; FaciJitJps for September 1975 - Acquisition and Renovation 

The plan is also based on the readiness of other facilities that require 
acquisition and, in some cases, physical and structural development. Public 
Facilities and the School Department plai:ners have been working cooperatively 
on the requirements for those facilities. Counsel for the School Committee 
requested a formal report be made by Public Facilities to the Court on 
December 16 addressing the readiness of these facilities v.'hich include: 

a. Bayside Mall, 276,000 sq. ft. complex on a 25 acre site at the inter- 
section of nt. Vernon Street and V.'m. Day Boulevard; the property near 
Columbia Park and facilities, also Carson Beacli. Estimated capacity 

■ 1200-1500 otudentp. 

b. Sawyer Building - a building located at ^kO-^kk Berkeley Street at the 
corner ol Berkeley Street arid Columbus Avenue. A five-story masonary 
strUi-lT-o, (K.' .ntov.n. Estimates ca)>a.-;ity ^t50-700 stu-ionts . 



X-8 

c. Cote Ford, 65,300 so. ft. building on y,'i-h acre site, corner of Regis 
Road and C'XTir.ins Highway, Mattanrai. Estimated capacity ;^00 students . 

d. Huntington i repa'^atory on a site of the fcrni.er Huntington Preparatory 
School at J'ij-"T3 Huntin£;;to:i yivonue, Bacfk Bay. Estimated capacity 
?00-2hO students . 

It is n&v; our lindcrst.anding that the Public Facilities Dopartir.ent of the 
City of Boston has tal-ten some action or. the above fjicilities. Hov.'ever, it 
still appears that the issue of reiraburser.ient for facility renovation under 
Chapter IClS of the Laws of the Cominonv/ealth has not been resolved. The 
Court ic urged to support the City of Boston in its attempt to obtain fur.'Js 
for school acquisitions and renovations. 

In addition to the above-named facilities, the School Connittec notes 
the intent of the Governor of Massachusetts to make available as alternate 
learning sites the Commonwealth Armory auid the University of Massachusttts 
building at 100 Arlington Street. The School Committee supports such action 
and states its intent to utilize such sites in the Alternative Student 
Desegregation Flan. 



X-9 

h' ■'•'-■v> ;:-:h':- 0. '".rir'.r.trw.ti'iw Con i,^1/; tc-^l After 5;.ovt..'mb'-'', 1'}V') - T.;->n-v'\-.:' . :■- T? v: 

T)iorc arc a number of othor projoctc vhich have been imdor coristrucLi.on 

and, as sMc.h, v;ore approved for cc;.-.-.pletion by the Court in Auj'.ii;t , I':??'*. 

Thoi>e, accorcUr.:^ to tho cor.c traction fichcculeG for th.ei.o projcctr., './ill 

not be coMploLed by 5jeptcr,ber of I975 and are not specif. Icnlly i:-i;o.'-poratcd 

into th.-i plan. 

Tha plan does, to some decree, anticipate t;icir sor.pletion after 

September 1975 and before school opening in 197o. Briefly, thene schools 

ajid their future anticipated use are: 

a. Quincy - iJler'.entary (l-'O conponent started in. tlie present Quincy 

Present 'i-th graders in Quincy Nschool 'ha,vc option to re' 

b. Blackstone 

a. Elementary (1-'0 component started in the J. Bates School 

b. Multi-Linsual co.Tipoaent (1-^) started in the Bancroft School ■ 
C. Ccvr.pus Hir;h 

Ultimate use subject to detailed planninj; of potential uses 

a. District school 

b. Distiict/nov/ Magnet School 

c. Cityvido Procrain P?uacement 

d. JCxa-Mination School 

d. Barnes-, MiddJ.e School 

Keplaccinent for the present Earues School \;ith additional seats 
available ba::ed on parental proi^ram choices in Zone I ucon its 
cor.iplc-tion. 

e.:'att-.a:>jn 'i;ier.-.y:itary - Elementary component started in the J.ov.-?ll llacon, 
C:iittick and I-ojue Schools 



X-10 



-f • K'jv. rvoj-'fl.r. I \-> i"_n j'.v W .-.I ; f. T Ccnr.tr-.ictio-t 



'i'hv'-ro aj-o a(lfliticr;;il pi-oj(;cLo in varioac z,L:x-jfi:--, of pl'uii;ii,j Hint }ijvj 
nob rccciv'fi tho Tina], appi-ovil oT ti;o court nr/l aro not yet uri''^T con- 
atruction. K'iiiy of thc:;f> projects aro cxlro,r--!l.y comprxtibj.o to L!!ir, pr^;- 
poiiori f,l:u!. It ?.;•■ reccirin'.ondcd ho'.;cvcr that, pc.idin^ a final I'ooolutlon of 
the plan a:u'- iho av.i Liability of nc\.' ctuoent datr», thsrc be a rnovatori.-.i;-. 
of fo^-nl a]>proval of tlic rcn-.ainin-; projoctG. Bo^innin(; v;it.h tlir? cub.-i-,-;icjn 
of the plun, it ir; r£conv:!:onflod that r.taff of the School Department meet 
re--ularly v;ith rcprcoentativen of the Public Facilitiej; JJfip^ircrnj-'t .-^nd Stats 
School }3uil'Jinj Ar.sistatice Bureau to rc-vicv; each of t)iese projootij. 
Re c oinncr. (l:'ti on i> cnanatiug fro:n those discussions should be prcoonted 
to the court oil or before April 1, 1975» 

Projects under re-evaluation during this period v/ould include: 



Charles tov;n Ili^h School 

Occupational Ivosourco Center 

Carter Elementary 

Carter Middle 

New B'-Uiker }Iill Eltmantary 

Nev; Fuller 'Slcnentary 

Ii'ow Andrev;/G'Keilly EloiTientai'y 

Southwest High School If 

liyde Park Jli^h Renovation/Addition 

J.>orchester High Kenovatioii/Addition 

fJoslindale Hi(;h lyenovation 

South Booton Kijj:! Henovatiori 

Tiioodoro IJoosevelt I'idalo Nanovation 

Kotley Klci'.ientary i?eaovation 

I.'cw Lynnn/Ali-hieri Elementary 

Now "JjT.a:)/Bovfditch Elensntary 

Ilifjh Point IJlOMontaiv t,x\<\ Middle 

Lo'.'er P.oxbii ry Elementary 



Charlec-.tovm 
? 

Soutii End 
South End 
Charlestov/n 
Ja.T.aica Plain 
South Boston 
Forest Hills 



Ja;r.aica Plain 
Dorchester 
East Booton 
Jamaica Plain 
V/est K'oxbury 
Koxbury 



XI EQUALIZATION OF FACULTY TJCPERIENCE IN THE SCHOOLS 



XI-1 

XI TQUALIZATION CI' FACULTY ZXPJIIKNCE IH THL SCHOOLS 

Menbers of the Boston School Committee have expressed a desire 
to address the issue of equalization of faculty experience in indi- 
vidual schools. Staff members were directed to meet with officials 
of the Boston Teachers Union (B.T.U, )j and on Monday, January 20, 1975 
such a meeting was held. 

Union officials are of the view that the Federal Court addressed 
the issue of staff desegregation and experience equalization in 
August and September of 197U. It is the opinion of B.T.U. officials 
that faculty experience can be best examined by contrasting the num- 
ber of tenured teachers with the number of non- tenured and provisional 
teachers. In this regard, 76 out of 81i school units have faculties 
in excess of 67% teniired teachers, and the remaining eight units have 
faculties in excess of $0% tenured teachers. A contrasting point 
of view, of course, would be that faculty experience should be exam- 
ined on the basis of actual years of teaching experience. In any 
event, the union officials expressed no formal position on the matter 
in the absence of an official proposal from the School Committee. It 
was the belief of the school department staff members that the B.T.U. 
leaders woxild be willing to discuss the contents of such a proposal 
with the School Committee even though technically there is no obligation 
on their part to do so, and further, the iinion position against forced 
transfers has been a firm and consistent one. 

The School Committee, therefore, is informing the Court that it 
will seek to negotiate with the Boston Teachers Union relative to the 
equalization of faculty experience in the schools. 



Al-2 



The possible components of such a plan might be: 

A* The introduction of experience equalization in the re- 
assignment of te \chers as the result of grade level 
changes or school closings in certain schools in the 
Phase II plan, 

B. The encouragement of experienced teachers to voluntarily 
transfer to magnet or thematic schools in the Phase II plan, 

C. A limitation be placed on the number of vacancies in certain 
schools to be filled by transfers so that some non-tenured 
teachers may be appointed directly to such schools, and 

D. The utilization of an experience factor as a determinant 
relative to allowable transfers to certain schools. 

Clearly, these components point toward a gradual resolution of 
any experience imbalance in the schools. Such an approach is less 
likely to be a threat to faculty stabilization at a time i^en desegre- 
gated schools especially require unified staffs. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRABV 



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