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Full text of "Student life at Amherst College. Its organizations, their membership and history"

UC-NRLF 



SB 17 



LIBRARY 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. 




Accession ...... 1QOQ8G... Oto 




M 



STUDENT LIFE 



AT 



AMHERST COLLEGE 



ITS ORGANIZATIONS, 



THEIR MEMBERSHIP AND HISTORY. 

C M M I ^ 3 " GTC. o^J 



"O-9i Trainee 'A^vatwv ifiaXovro 




AMHEKST: 
HA.TCKC <Sc 

1871. 




PRESS OP CASE, LOCKWOOD ANI> BRAINABD, HARTFORD, CONN. 



COE^TE^TS. 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE, 

PREFATORY LETTER FROM PROFESSOR W. S. TYLER, 



CHAPTER I. 

HISTORY OF SOCIETIES, 13 

ALEXANDRIAN ATHENIAN UNITED FRATERNITY Libraries 
Places of Meeting Anonymous Department Athenaeums 
Secrecy Electioneering Allotment Prominent Members Im- 
peachment Influence Dissolution. SOCIAL UNION Founders 
Lyceum Prominent Members Esprit de Corps Dissolution. 
ACADEMIA ECLECTIC Decline of Interest Change of Name. 
MODERN SOCIAL UNION Badges Exhibitions Statement of 
Facts Presidents ALEXANDRIA ATHENE Revival of Inter- 
est New Halls Exercises Present Condition CHI DELTA 
TIIETA Pin BETA KAPPA SOPHOMORE SECRET SOCIETY 
FRESHMAN SECRET SOCIETIES TEMPERANCE SOCIETY SO- 
CIETIES OF NATURAL HISTORY RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES OTH- 
ER SOCIETIES. 

CHAPTER II. 

REVIEW OF PERIODICAL LITERATURE, 66 

Magazines Newspapers Olios Miscellaneous Sheets. 

CHAPTER III. 

COLLEGE HONORS, 79 

Valedictorians Salutatorians Tabular View of Commence- 
ment Appointments Class Day Class Day Officers. 

CHAPTER IV. 

COLLEGE CLUBS, CUSTOMS, AMUSEMENTS, ETC *91 

Musical Societies Courts Branch Societies Mission Work 
Govham Rebellion Fourth of July Celebrations Political De- 
monstrations Illuminations Flag Raisings Geological Excur- 



100086 



CONTENTS. 



sions Class Excursions Gymnastic Society Athletic Sports 
Base Ball Boating Chess Floricultural Society Presenta- 
tions Biennial Suppers Receptions Quaint Societies Fresh- 
man Visitation Rushes Book Burnings "Squirt Gun Riot" 
Minor Organizations Various Customs. 

CHAPTER V. 

GRADUATE MEMBERSHIP OF LITERARY SOCIETIES, . . .134 
Alexandrian Athenian Social Union Eclectic Academia 
Alexandria Athenae. 

CHAPTER VI. 

COMPLETE MEMBERSHIP OF ALPHA DELTA PHI Psi UPSILON 
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON CHI Psi DELTA UPSILON, . .159 

CHAPTER VII. 

STATISTICAL HISTORY OF AMHERST COLLEGE, . . . .198 
Various Statistics. 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 



USTTEODUOTORT NOTE. 

" The happiest of life's days are College days." 

The author of this work claims for it neither originality nor literary 
merit. The History of the Literary Societies was not originally designed 
for publication, but simply as a paper to be read before the Athenian 
Society. At the suggestion and urgent requests of both the Faculty 
of the College and a large number of the Graduates, it is offered to the 
Students and Alumni of Amherst College in permanent form, in the 
hope that, with all its inaccuracies and incompleteness, it may evoke 
some pleasant memories of College Days. 

It is believed that the sketch of the College Periodical Literature is 
quite complete, and it is here published that all who are interested in 
this department of College activity, may gain a comprehensive view of 
the labors of those who have striven to promote the reputation of the 
College in this field of enterprise. 

The names of those who have gained the highest College Honors at 
Commencement, and a sketch of the rise of "Class Day," with the Class 
Day Officers, are given, not only as matters of reference, but that fur- 
ther reminiscences of these occasions may be suggested in the minds of 
those to whom the mention of a name calls forth numberless recollec- 
tions. 

" College Clubs, Customs, Amusements," etc., will doubtless recall 
some scenes of college life, pleasant in themselves, doubly so in their 
memories. 

In presenting a list of the Graduate members of the Societies rep- 
resented in Chapter V., and the complete membership of those in chap- 
ter VI., we are confident that we are offering the most complete his- 
tory of these societies that could possibly be written. 

A " Statistical History of the College " is subjoined, as a partial 
table of reference, until a complete " History of Amherst College," 
now in preparation by Professor W. S. TYLER, shall appear. 



8 ARCHIVES. 

The accuracy of Chap. V. is almost wholly due to JOHN A. BEN- 
NETT, '73, Librarian of Alexandria. 

The author is especially indebted to ROBERT C. ROCKWELL, '71, for 
valuable aid in preparation of the work. 

To one and all the Alumni who have assisted us, we would extend 
our heartfelt thanks, and venture to express the hope that this meagre 
contribution to the history of Student life in Amherst College may 
afford some little pleasure to those who have spent four years of Col- 
lege life at Amherst. 

GEORGE R. CUTTING. 

Amherst College, July 1st, 1871. 



ARCHIVES OF THE SOCIETIES. 

The archives of most of the Societies are imperfectly preserved. 
No records of the Alexandrian Society previous to June 25, 1838, or 
of the Athenian Society previous to Oct. 12, 1825, are to be found. 

The archives of " Social Union," so long missing, are at length 
safely deposited in the College Library. 

We find a few allusions to sketches of these societies which have 
been written at different times in their history, but not a single trace of 
one is to be found among the scattered archives. The carelessness of 
those whose duty it has been to preserve these is without excuse. 

On May 17th, 1871, both Alexandria and Athenae passed this re- 
solve : " Hereafter, all records and papers of interest, relative to this 
Society, shall be immediately deposited in a box of archives to be 
kept in the College Library." 

A.S a result of this action we confidently hope that he who writes 
the history of our Literary Societies at the Centennial Anniversary of 
Amherst College, may have more complete data for his work. 



PREFATORY LETTER 



FROM 



PROFESSOR W. S. TYLER. 



Dear Sir : You ask my opinion of the value of the Lite- 
rary Societies to college students, and, in particular, to the 
students of Amherst College. I have no hesitation in an- 
swering that among all the collateral and auxiliary means of 
culture, which have existed in our American colleges, the 
Literary Societies, in my judgment, hold the highest place, 
the Libraries alone, perhaps, excepted. I have known a great 
many students, who have misused and abused both the Lite- 
rary Societies and the Libraries, by making them not auxil- 
iary but principal studies, and spending the greater part of 
their time in these fascinating diversions. Such students 
never lay broad and deep foundations, and seldom build 
much higher in future life, than they did in college. But I 
have known a far greater number of students, who have 
erred in the opposite direction, and neglected entirely one or 
both of these helps to a wide and useful culture. 

The Literary Societies afford an excellent opportunity for 
practice in writing and speaking ; and it is " practice " that 
"makes perfect" in every art, especially in that art of ex- 
pression, which should be cultivated simultaneously with the 
acquisition of knowledge, and without which knowledge is 
not power, to influence or inspire others. Nor are the 
friendly criticism, the generous emulation, the social culture, 



10 PREFATORY LETTER. 



the power of personal influence, the knowledge of parlia- 
mentary usages, and the management of common and public 
affairs, to which these Societies give scope and exercise, to be 
undervalued and despised. It may be a sign that I am grow- 
ing old, though I believe I am not usually regarded as much 
of an old fogy ; but I can not help sighing for " the good old 
times," when Alexandrian, Athenian, and Social Union were 
sacred names, when every student joined one or another of 
these societies, and attended the weekly meetings as regular- 
ly as he did the daily recitations, and would no more " flunk" 
an appointment in the Society, than an appearance in his 
turn on the stage, when the wealthier members vied with 
each other in their donations to the Libraries, as all the 
members did in maintaining and defending the honor and 
good name of their favorite society, with much the same 
chivalrous devotion with which the Knight fought for his 
lady love in the Middle Ages. And then such orations as 
we used to have every Commencement from such statesmen 
and orators as Everett and McDowell, and Seward and Sum- 
ner! How they stirred our youthful minds and hearts, to 
emulate their wisdom and eloquence, as Thucydides was 
stirred by the rehearsals of Herodotus, as Demosthenes was 
inspired by the eloquence of Callistratus, as Themistocles 
was moved by the laurels of Miltiades ! 

But pardon these recollections. I fear they will seem ego- 
tistic to you, to me they are sacred. You know I am living 
these days under the shadows of the half century that is 
drawing so near to its close. 

I am glad you have written the history of these societies. 
It will be read with interest by all your brothers of the 
Alumni, and by none with more interest than those of the 
earlier decades. 



PREFATORY LETTER. 11 



Your chapters on College Periodioal Literature, Col- 
lege Honors and Class-Day Officers, College Customs and 
Amusements, and your Statistical History of the College, 
will also revive pleasant memories, and cannot fail to meet a 
cordial welcome from those who assemble to celebrate our 
semi-centennial jubilee. Your little book will have the great 
merit of being timely ; and the facts which you have collect- 
ed with so much diligence and enthusiasm, touching Alma 
Mater and her family, will, I am sure, be an acceptable offer- 
ing to the sons of Amherst, at this interesting anniversary. 

Yours very truly, 

W. S. TYLER. 
MR. GEO. R. CUTTING, Amherst College. 




I. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 



THE history of Amherst College properly begins with the 
inauguration of Dr. Z. S. Moore as its first President, Sept. 
18th, 1821. The college was then known as the " Amherst 
Collegiate Institution," no charter being given to " Amherst 
College," until Feb. 25th, 1825. The history of its literary 
societies is coeval with that of the college itself. 

President Moore, coming, as he did, from Williams College, 
where he had been president two years, brought with him 
well nigh half of the students of that institution. 

The new college also attracted a few students from other 
colleges. Thus it happened that most among the upper 
classes were already acquainted with the inner life of col- 
lege, and were prepared to set on foot everything pertaining 
to college life at Amherst. They at once anticipated the 
need of such culture and discipline, as literary societies 
alone could give. The college numbered only fifty-three 
students. To establish more than two societies was imprac- 
ticable, yet the necessity for these was apparent, that a health- 
ful rivalry might stimulate the exertions of each. Hence 
arose the ALEXANDRIAN and ATHENIAN Societies. These were 
organized in the early part of October, 1821. Prof. E. S. 
Snell, and Rev. Pindar Field, then members of the Senior 
Class were prominent in their formation. By their joint 
labors, constitutions were drawn up, and other preliminaries 
arranged for permanent organizations. They arranged the 
names of the students in the order of the classes, alphabeti- 
cally in each class. The Athenian Society, by lot, obtained 
the first name on the list, and by an alternate assignment, 



14 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 

one-half of the students became members of each society. 
It was determined that the societies should have the same 
general character as the two literary societies at Williams. 
The classic names which these rival societies then assumed, 
evinced much taste in the selection. In recognition of their 
efforts and enthusiasm, and in deference to their position as 
" Senior Sophisters,'' Ebenezer S. Snell was chosen the 
first President of the Alexandrian Society, and Pindar Field, 
of the Athenian. At first the societies held their meetings in 
the small rooms of South College, the only building then 
erected. Both places of meeting were in the north entry, 
the Alexandrians occupying No. 3 ; the Athenians, No. 6. 
At these] weekly sessions, the literary exercises consisted 
chiefly of " compositions, declamations, and debate," varied, 
now and then, with such performances as were calculated to 
inspire general interest. A burlesque impeachment of Presi- 
dent Snell, for an infringement on the prescribed order of 
exercises, when Rev. Elijah Paine, then Vice-President, ap- 
peared in his defence, is still fresh in the recollection of the 
Alumni of that time. 

Soon occasions arose when it became necessary for the 
societies to act in concert. Accordingly a third organization 
known as the "United Fraternity *' was formed, which 
was made up of the Athenian and Alexandrian, as branch 
societies. Each was bound by a common compact. Both 
were^open societies to the fullest degree, and there was such 
perfect harmony for the first five years of their existence, 
that the history of one is substantially that of both. But a 
prominent feature of these early societies, was their libraries. 
The college library was then quite small, and ill-adapted to 
the growing wants of the students ; indeed, it was all con- 
tained in a single case, six feet wide, placed in the north 
entry of South College. The object of these societies gen- 
eral improvement in literature and oratory, could not be 
attained without access to a different class of books. But 
most of the students were themselves beneficiaries, and could 
ill-afford to spend large sums in their purchase. How was 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 15 

this exigency to be met ? At the close of the first term, a 
resolve was passed in each society, that each member should 
solicit donations of books from personal friends in the winter 
vacation of 1821-22. 

This, a small beginning, evinced a spirit of enthusiasm, 
which is worthy of record. The effort was a success. In a 
similar way, some funds were obtained, which, together with 
quite liberal contributions from the students themselves, were 
expended in the purchase of their first lot of new books. 

Pindar Field, '22, was delegated by the joint assembly to 
make the purchase in Hartford, as, at the very first, the socie- 
ties held their libraries in common. " We felt proud of our 
library," writes Rev. Mr. Field, " when its books were duly 
arranged for the first time in the new shelves ; and it had cost 
less than a hundred dollars." 

Soon, however, the libraries became distinct, and each 
strove to excel the other, in both the number and the excel- 
lence of the volumes, though each drew books from the 
other's library. The books of the Athenian society were 
then removed to the north-west upper corner room of South 
College, and placed under the care of a newly elected libra- 
rian, Rev. Theophilus Packard, '23, to whose enthusiastic 
labors is largely due the early prosperity of the Athenian 
Society. 

In the second collegiate year, the joint exhibitions for 
which the societies had made provision in the constitution of 
the " United Fraternity," began to be held. These were 
kept up annually, until the dissolution of the Fraternity, and 
were held in the chapel-room of North College. One exhibi- 
tion occurred early in the Fall term. At this, one Sopho- 
more, two Juniors, and three Seniors, were chosen by each 
society, " to make a display before the newly entered Fresh- 
men." Debates now and then occurred, between representa- 
tive members of the branch societies ; at one of these, 
President Humphrey presided. The societies had already 
begun to earnestly vie with each other in the enlargement of 
their libraries. Both of them, also, early adopted the plan of 



16 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 

electing honorary members. Here was a second field for 
rivalry. Many distinguished officials, members of the Facul- 
ty, eminent clergymen, and prominent citizens, received and 
accepted such elections. A number of these subsequently 
addressed their respective societies. 

The Athenians deemed it quite an occasion, when Noah 
Webster, LL.D., one of their own honorary members, at- 
tended a regular meeting of their society, and, at its close, 
delivered an address to the members. 

Rev. Mr. Packard says of this time, " The rivalry between 
the Alexandrian and Athenian Societies, in the first two 
years of their history, was earnest, active, shrewd, but friendly 
and pleasant. Though their advantages were comparatively 
meagre, yet they were eminently serviceable to the students. 
I regard these societies to have been more beneficial to their 
members in writing, declamation, and debate, than all the 
college exercises in these departments." 

In 1822, a second building was erected, (present North 
College.) In this there were two public rooms, which the 
Faculty permitted the students to use for their society meet- 
ings. One, the " chapel," was in the upper story, south 
entry ; the other, No. 3 of the same building, was known as 
the Sophomore recitation room. In the latter, with its seats 
arranged in an inclined plane, and in the former, which 
would now be considered rather close quarters for a college 
chapel, the Alexandrian and Athenian societies began (1823) 
to hold their weekly sessions. In these rooms, at the sum- 
mons of the college bell (which then hung in that isolated 
pyramidal bell-tower, so long the object of the students' ridi- 
cule), gathered well nigh every one of the students, on each 
returning Wednesday evening. 

The attendance was invariably large, as these were about 
the only meetings over which the students then had full 
control. 

As the chapel was the more commodious and desirable 
room, the societies alternated in its use, each occupying it 
for a term. 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 17 

At the commencement of the summer term in 1825 (?), 
there arose a misunderstanding, as to which society the 
chapel then belonged. Negotiation failed to settle the ques- 
tion. It was to be settled in a different, and, as it proved, a less 
commendable manner. Anticipating the summons of the 
bell, the members of each society u rushed " for the chapel, 
amid no small excitement. Both Presidents took their posi- 
tions, side by side, on the platform. Both Secretaries read 
their records at the same time. Each presiding officer called 
upon a member to declaim. Both appointees began their 
orations together. So matters progressed, each as persistent 
as the other, in its claims upon the hall. When the excite- 
ment was highest, an Alexandrian arose, moved that the 
Alexandrian Society hereby dissolve all connection with the 
" United Fraternity," which motion was easily carried amid 
the confusion, which resulted from the antagonism, growing 
bitter each moment. Thus perished the early organization 
known as the " United Fraternity." 

This was quite an era in the history of both societies. As 
a result of this action, the allotment system, which had pre- 
viously been evaded to some extent, was now wholly given 
up, together with the custom of using each other's libraries, 
of holding exhibitions in common, etc., and each entered the 
lists of competition, determined to gain a supremacy in num- 
bers and influence. Rivalry, which before was mild, now 
became intense. Each vied as it had never done before, in 
securing of new members, in the enlargement of its library, 
and in the endeavor to make its own exhibition superior. 
To secure these results, individuals sacrificed, and the socie- 
ties taxed themselves entirely beyond their means. The 
Alexandrians were ahead in the number of members and 
the volumes in their library, as they had a larger surplus of 
funds when the rupture occurred, and could offer superior 
advantages to Freshmen, in respect to library. However, a 
prominent Alumnus (Athenian), says of this time, "that 
though they had fewer men, these were acknowledged to be 
of more substantial character" Though the internal working 
3 



18 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 

of the societies, was in the main similar to that of the pres- 
ent, yet there were a few requirements, which, while they are to 
be commended, are somewhat peculiar. The critic's depart- 
ment in those early days, had a significance which meant 
something. In the Athenian Society he had to criticise all 
compositions before they could be read before the society. 

It was his duty to read " all miscellaneous pieces," which 
feature in a few years became the " Anonymous Department," 
so vividly recalled by the Alumni. All original declamations 
had to be submitted to a board of five critics, who decided on 
their merits. If judged "carelessly prepared" and "un- 
worthy of the individual," they were " summarily rejected," 
while "honorable mention" was made of any worthy produc- 
tion. One whose " piece was rejected might never be ap- 
pointed again for the same exercise." The debate was always 
conducted by four members who had volunteered to discuss 
the question, the week previous. The number of times a 
person could volunteer was limited. The " proverb writers" 
in Alexandria made much sport for the members ; also a his- 
torian who wrote the society history, modeling his narrative 
after the style of the Old Testament History. But soon 
(1827) rumors were afloat in college that all was not har- 
monious within the Alexandrian Society. The long-needed 
chapel building, with its commodious rooms, was completed 
in February, 1827. The societies had now, by their extra ex- 
ertions, by liberal contributions of money and books, collected 
very respectable libraries. At the completion of this build- 
ing, the college library, which had recently been kept at No. 
32 of the present North College, was removed thither. A 
proposition was now made and urged by the Faculty that, in- 
asmuch as the college library was quite small, both society 
libraries should also be placed in the room which was to con- 
tain the College library, though society men could take from 
the room only their own books and those of the college. 

To this proposition, the Athenian Society, with few excep- 
tions, assented. A majority of the Alexandrians, too, favored 
the measure, while a large minority were as thoroughly op- 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 19 

posed to it. The excitement, especially among the Alexan- 
drians, was intense, and the feeling quite bitter ; so much so, 
that it became evident that it would not be expedient for the 
Faculty to insist upon the removal. The only amicable solu- 
tion of the difficulty was the organization of a new society, 
permission for which was given by the Faculty. Hot discus- 
sions on the new movement characterized every meeting of 
the Alexandrians. The result was, that about two-fifths of 
the Alexandrian Society, and a few from the Athenian, seced- 
ed and formed a secret society. They were allowed to take 
with them any books from either library which they had do- 
nated as individuals, and the remainder was divided in pro- 
portion to the number of seceding members ; Prof. Jacob 
Abbott acted as umpire in the division. Hence arose the 
" Social Union" Society, a sketch of which is given on p. 31. 

The Society last mentioned was the first secret society in 
college. Here was a second epoch in the history of the Alex- 
andrians and Athenians ; however, the latter were but little 
disturbed by the agitations in the sister society. The new or- 
der of things inspired an intense interest in all three organ- 
izations, yet the bringing of the two original societies' libraries 
into one room, and making them accessible in a measure to 
each, rendered the Alexandrian and Athenian Societies more 
friendly. The Social Union members, being men of more 
ample means and of extended influence, at once gave their 
new society a high position ; besides, their fundamental doc- 
trine was " inviolable secrecy." This, too, gave them pres- 
tige. The feeling between the new society and its parent 
Alexandrian was of course bitter, while friendlier relations 
existed between Social Union and the Athenian Society. 

This secession occurred in March, 1827. From this time, 
the Alexandrians worked with redoubled vigor to regain their 
loss. At the opening of the following collegiate year, (1827 
28) the contest for members was lively, yet gentlemanly and 
generous ; but soon the strife became so great and so much 
electioneering was done, even before the students reached 
Amherst, that the Faculty had to interfere and enforce a 
strict allotment among all three societies. 



20 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 

" The whole college," to copy from the Faculty's records 
"became an arena of exasperated strife. For several 
months there was a general encroachment upon the study 
hours, and not unfrequently, unamiable, ungentlemanly, and 
unchristian deportment in the intercourse of those whose 
mutual interests demanded the exercise of mutual friendship 
and respect." 

The action on the part of the Faculty gave rise to much 
violent discussion and bitter feeling, especially in Social Un- 
ion, whose members were eager to " pick their men." The 
other societies, recognizing the prestige and preeminence which 
Social Union at once assumed and maintained, deeming that 
it was due in a great measure to her secrecy themselves 
adopted the same principle, and the Alexandrian and Athen- 
ian now (1827-28) became strictly secret societies. Thus 
the measure of secrecy was one of self-defence on the part of 
these latter. 

Mottoes and badges were adopted by each. The restora- 
tion of the allotment system worked out its legitimate, logi- 
cal result. Rivalry was in a measure abated, or rather turned 
into a different channel. The libraries again became objects 
of emulation, and members subscribed most liberally for their 
enlargement. 

It seems almost incredible that the students of those days 
should have been so earnest and liberal. Papers are now de- 
posited among the archives of the societies, which show the 
subscriptions of fifty, twenty, ten, and five dollars, which were 
then paid in for their benefit. A prominent Alexandrian of 
this time says, " that the rivalry in the matter of libraries 
was too great. Alexandrians were tempted to expend beyond 
their means to outdo the Athenians. Students of small 
means were led to contribute more than they ought, or else 
were made uncomfortable that they could do no more." 
However, the society taxes were about the only ones which 
the students then levied on themselves. Here was certainly 
a test of loyalty to their societies and indirectly to their Alma 
Mater a legacy worthy of regard from their successors. 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 21 

July 9th, 1828, the Athenians had 1,172 volumes, and Oct. 
10th, 1832, they paid Prof. Hovey four hundred and fifty dol- 
lars for books which he purchased for them in Paris. The 
Professor also made large purchases for the other societies 
and the college. 

After Feb. 20th, 1828, the societies held their weekly meet- 
ings in the " Rhetorical,"* " Philosophical,"! and " Theolog- 
ical ":f recitation rooms, one society occupying each room for 
one term in the year. The rooms in which had been kept 
the Alexandrian and Athenian libraries and whatever papers, 
magazines, etc., were taken by them, had been termed the 
" Athenaeums" of the respective societies. These previous 
to 1827 were located in rooms occupied by students. At 
the removal of the College library to the new chapel building, 
a room was fitted up by the College of sufficient size to fur- 
nish the societies an " Athenaeum " ; soon, however, Social 
Union fitted up one of their own, in South College. Quite 
early in their history, the societies instituted the custom of 
having a public oration (and sometimes a poem) pronounced 
before them on the day preceding Commencement. They 
alternated in the choice of these orators and poets. The so- 
ciety making the choice would invite the others to " walk 
with them in the procession " which was formed to escort the 
orator to the church. 

Lewis Sabin, D. D., '31, in reviewing the history of the so- 
cieties from 1827 to 1831, says : " each student at that time 
became earnestly enlisted as champion for the preeminence 
of his own society. The literary societies were the chief cen- 
ters of interest outside of the regular exercises of the college. 
Each had its own esprit de corps very distinct and well un- 
derstood. We eagerly anticipated the weekly meetings of the 
old Athenian Society, and prepared ourselves for its exercises 
with diligence. Nearly all the members attended regularly, 

* South half of "small chapel." 

t Professor Snell's old room. 

t North half of " small chapel," (then divided into two rooms.) 

Located directly over what is now known as " small chapel," and of the same 

size. 



22 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 

filling up a Recitation room of the Chapel. Debates, Ora- 
tions, Poems, and the ' Anonymous department ' constituted 
our principal exercises which were always performed with 
life and vigor. Dignity and decorum characterized its meet- 
ings. This Society was always loyal to the college." 

This " anonymous box," so-called, furnished much mirth, 
presenting such an opportunity as it did for the display of wit. 
From this were drawn forth anonymous papers, which the 
critics or " Secretary of the Anonym!" would read as the 
closing exercise of a meeting. Jokes, gibes, criticisms, sallies 
of wit, and caricatures, aimed frequently at members of the 
Faculty, were not excluded. A prominent characteristic of 
the exercises at this time was the large number of " disserta- 
tions" which were read sometimes there were so many of 
these that the debate had to be deferred ; moreover, they were 
often critical essays of high character. One peculiar feature 
of the societies in their early history was " special meetings," 
held generally every term, and most frequently in the chapel. 

Sometimes these 'were private, at other times, members of 
the Faculty and the other societies were invited. In the 
Athenian Society, the merit of the performances of each mem- 
ber was kept and summed up at the end of the term. A 
committee, who marked all appointees during the term, nom- 
inated the performers for the special meetings. At this ex- 
hibition were given Orations (" in the learned languages and 
in English,") Poems, Satires (" limited to eight minutes,") 
Forensic Disputations, Colloquies, Conferences, Eulogies, etc. 
To add that these exhibitions were anticipated with pleasure 
and entered into with a zeal characteristic of the time, would 
be a needless criticism. We might incidentally add that the 
fine for "flunking" an appointment at a " special meeting" 
was two dollars, and for leaving the room while it was in pro- 
gress, fifty cents. Alumni tell us, too, that the fines of those 
days were collected. 

The higher offices of the Society were objects of ambition, 
and by some were appreciated as highly as the chief honors 
of college rank. That member who was chosen President 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 23 

was congratulated by his fellow students as having attained 
u a preeminent distinction." Every one elected to the Presi- 
dency of either of the societies was expected to deliver two 
addresses, one at the meeting succeeding his election and a 
second at the meeting succeeding his retirement from office. 
Those were generally orations of a literary character, and 
great care and preparation were evinced in both their com- 
position and delivery. The custom of electing a member to 
deliver an oration at the beginning of each term was intro- 
duced in the Athenian Society, in 1831. Nathan Belcher, 
since a member of Congress, was first elected to the position. 
This was a custom long kept up by the societies. So inter- 
esting were the meetings that, in this year, the societies re- 
peatedly petitioned the Faculty to dispense with the Thursday 
morning recitation, that the members might devote more of 
their time to the societies. Nothing, save the most urgent 
necessities, could induce the students to give up a regular 
meeting. In the spring of '81, however, a few meetings were 
dispensed with, because of " the religious interest," and once 
(Dec. 13th, 1831) we find this upon the Athenian records: 
" The small pox having frightened most of the students from 
town, no meeting was held." 

Prominent among the many special features of interest 
which were ever and anon introduced to break the monotony 
of the regular exercises, were the comedies which were com- 
posed and acted by the members. These were always eagerly 
anticipated, and elicited hearty applause. They were of more 
frequent occurrence in the Athenian Society. David Fiske 
wrote several in 1832, which the members of that time char- 
acterized " as the ne plus ultra of the ludicrous." 

Since 1828, the Alexandrian and Athenian societies had 
been nominally secret in everything except the matter of 
"Athenaeums" and measures relative to the annual literary 
exercises of Commencement week. In July, 1832, Mr. H. 
W. Beecher moved that the article of the constitution of the 
Athenian Society, enjoining an oath of secrecy, be changed so 
as to enjoin only an oath of obedience. It was then lost by 



24 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 

a vote of 29 to 23. This, however, was the beginning of an 
agitation which, after warm and protracted discussions, led to 
the abolishment of secrecy in the Athenian Society, Nov. 12th, 
1834, by a vote of 56 to 15. The Alexandrian had thrown 
open its doors during the previous year. However, special 
votes of secrecy , relating to some special measures which arose, 
from time to time, in their rivalry with one another, were 
subsequently passed. 

In the winter of 1833, considerable difficulty arose in the 
allotment system which had been for a long time (since 1828) 
under the control of the Faculty. Though electioneering 
was nominally precluded in all societies, every possible means 
would be adopted by certain individuals to elude the rules, 
and become initiated into the society which seemed to present 
the most attractions for them. This, of course, gave rise to 
a certain jealousy in the society thus deprived of such mem- 
bers, and so great was the feeling, that the Faculty had to in- 
terfere, (Dec. 5th, 1833,) and re-affirm their law " that no 
student could connect himself in any way with any society to 
which he has not been allotted by them." Thus enforced, the 
allotment system sprinkled the material and qualifications 
impartially. 

In the year 1833-34, the college library began to increase 
and to demand more room. Hence, the " Society Athen- 
aeums" were again placed in a room,- granted them by the 
trustees, in another college building. Moreover, the plan 
of uniting with the Faculty in the support of an "Athen- 
aeum" had long met with disfavor. Accordingly, the Alex- 
andrians and Athenians fitted up an Athenaeum in the fourth 
story of Middle (now North) College. The Social Union 
room, in which were kept their library and periodicals, was, 
all the while, in the fourth story, north entry, of South Col- 
lege, and for the most part was open only to its own members. 
These two rooms were centers of resort for the students; in- 
deed, they were almost the only opportunities then afforded 
for acquiring information on the topics of the day. Indeed, 
the thorough examination of the subjects under discussion in 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 25 

the societies demanded a constant increase of library, and led 
them to sacrifice much in the support of a commodious 
" Athenaeum." 

The literary talent in college in the decade beginning with 
1830, was great, so that at this time every society interest 
was most fully sustained, and a hearty enthusiasm was the 
characteristic feature in the welfare and management of each 
of these societies. Hence they were at the very top of their 
strength and glory, each proud of its own history, all 
helping to elevate the standard of scholarship and character. 
True literary merit was sure of its reward. There existed 
a keen spirit of emulation. There were not a few who gave 
to the exercises of their societies all those powers which sub- 
sequently have made them prominent in the events of their 
time. 

Such men as Professors W. S. Tyler and H. B. Hackett of 
'30, Revs. Henry Neill and R. P. Stebbins of '34, Hons. A. 
H. Bullock and Loyal C. Kellogg of '36, Hon. Whiting Gris- 
wold, '38, Hon. E. B. Gillett and Rev. F. D. Huntington of 
'39, and Hon. Charles Delano of '40 were most zealous in 
the Alexandrian Society at this time ; while Hons. Edward 
Kirkland and Nathan Belcher of '31, Hon. Henry Morris, '32, 
Hon. H. G. Billings, Revs. H. W. Beecher and Eli Thurston 
of '34, Revs. J. H. Bocock and W. B. Homer, and Prof. 
Joseph Haven of '35, Hons. Edmund Dowse and A. B. Ely, 
and Prof. Stewart Robinson of '36, Hon. Henry W. Williams 
of '37, and Hon. Horace Maynard of '38, were earnest and 
active in the Athenian Society. Social Union, too, can justly 
claim at least an equal share of the distinguished Alumni of 
this decade. 

Supported by these men, and others of equal note (whose 
names appear elsewhere,) these societies necessarily assumed 
this high position. The society meetings of Wednesday even- 
ing were to them the most pleasant and profitable hours of the 
week. They were largely attended, uniformly interesting, 
and often enthusiastic. One, glancing over the records of 
these early meetings, can but notice the prominence which such 
4 



26 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 



men as Mr. Beecher held in their societies, during their whole 
connection with the college, serving them in well nigh every 
official capacity, and ever ready in debate. The " anonymous 
department," before alluded to, in the hands of the witty and 
humorous members, had become such a medium of caricature 
of the Faculty and others, that the Faculty prohibited it in all 
the societies in the second term of 1833-34. The tendency 
to burlesque and fun was not easily checked, and, though this 
"department" was nominally abolished, the overflow of wit. 
and humor soon found vent in various forms, and finally re- 
sumed even its former name. 

One prominent feature of society history was the custom 
of inviting members of the Faculty and clergymen of the 
vicinity to deliver addresses before the different societies, at 
different times during the year. Though each evinced a 
spirit of rivalry in securing these, special invitations were 
always extended to the rival societies. 

Altogether the most interesting event of this time, connect- 
ed with the Literary Societies, was the attempted impeachment 
of the president of the Alexandrian Society, who afterwards 
became Judge of the Supreme Court of Vermont. A dis- 
tinguished ex-governor of Massachusetts was Chief Justice 
of the Court, which was duly organized under the constitu 
tion of the society. In this trial was enlisted the best debat- 
ing talent of the College. The trial was held in the old 
" Rhetorical Room," during afternoons and evenings, contin- 
uing for several weeks. It was open to the whole college, 
which became deeply interested in the case, and many out- 
siders attended. The room was crowded at every session. 

The trial grew out of differences and prejudices which ex- 
isted between, what might be termed, the Aristocracy and De- 
mocracy of the society, using these terms in no political 
sense. 

Articles of impeachment, fourteen in number, were drawn 
up. The counsel, three or four in number on each side, were 
the ablest members of the upper classes, and the trial was 
conducted according to the statute law of Massachusetts. 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 27 

The defendant was even then a good lawyer, with a deep, 
keen, discriminating mind, a capital presiding officer, well 
versed in parliamentary tactics. He seemed to have on his 
side most of the intellectual strength of the college. 

Of course the burlesque element of the trial was prominent. 
The most amusing circumstance connected with the trial oc- 
curred just after the defendant had put in his written answer 
to the articles of the impeachment. The prosecution were 
about to adduce evidence. The defendant (special pleading 
being allowed,) called for a "replication" to his answer. 
Not understanding this technicality of the law, the prosecu- 
tion were somewhat disconcerted. The court sustained the 
point. At this adverse decision, the counsel for the prosecu- 
tion the wit of the college arose, and, for fifteen minutes, 
convulsed the house with a stream of wit, drollery, gibe, and 
ridicule, which carried everything before it, and closed by say- 
ing, "this is our ' replication? ' ' : The tables were turned, 
the "replication" subsided, the trial proceeded. Of course, 
the worthy President came successfully out of the struggle. 
The Chief Justice's decision in writing, acquitting the de- 
fendant, was as good a piece of English as any of his guberna- 
torial messages which have won for him, and deservedly too, 
so much credit at home and abroad. A prominent Alumnus 
remarks of this incident: "while the trial lasted, little else 
was thought of among the students, and great was the fun. 
Not many passages so brilliant occur in Academic life." 

Many of the Athenians were of the Opinion that their so- 
ciety had compromised its dignity somewhat, in becoming an 
open society, while the Social Union, its rival, still retained 
its secrecy. Hence discussions upon the " secrecy question " 
were again quite spirited, as early as March 1st, 1837. 
Though the bill was defeated by a vote of 42 to 16, the agita- 
tion did not cease, and, in the next collegiate year, the affirm- 
ation of secrecy was taken by the newly initiated members, 
as in the former days. This vote was not repealed until the 
summer of 1840. 

In Nov. 22d, 1837, the Athenian Society, desirous of a 



28 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 

more commodious room, took measures toward the support of 
an " Athenaeum" of their own, yielding the room, which they 
had held in common, to the Alexandrians. After a time, this 
was consummated. Their new Athenaeum was located in the 
fourth story, north entry, of Middle (now North) College. 

Every species of novelty was devised which would excite 
new interest. In 1838, instead of the " dissertations" of the 
past, we find such appointments as " Vacation Diary," "Para- 
dox," "Soliloquy," "Ode," " Panegyric," "Hyperbole," "Al- 
legory," "Historical Sketch," etc., and committees were ap- 
pointed, in the Athenian Society, to furnish weekly the select 
anecdotes and pithy sayings of literary characters. This be- 
came a regular exercise, known as the " Galaxy" and " Ad- 
disonian Letters." 

The famous " Anonymous department," with its scraps of 
fun, was revived in the Alexandrian in 1839, and always served 
to sustain the interest till the close of a meeting, and, at the 
same time, to agreeably close an evening of literary effort. 

In 1838, the Athenian Society came into possession of eleven 
" antique books" of rare value. These were originally a por- 
tion of the library belonging to the Carmelite Monastery at 
Bamberge, and bear the date of the 16th century. When 
that Monastery was broken up by Napoleon, this library was 
sold at auction by his order, and purchased by Mr. Marks, 
then American Consul at that place, who sent them to Bos- 
ton, where Hon. Horace Maynard, then President of the 
Athenian Society, secured these volumes for its library. 

The interest manifested in the Alexandrian and Athenian 
Societies, which had heretofore been so intense, though it did 
not materially subside until 1845, began to wane as early as 
1840. In 1841, we hear of the devices of certain students 
to evade the allotment as made by the Faculty. Freshmen 
were assigned to the respective societies in the order in which 
they signed the " college laws ; " hence, upper classmen would 
endeavor to arrange new comers, so as to bring them into 
their own society. 

Quite often such schemes went agley, amid no little merri- 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 29 

ment for the society which, after all the scheming of rivals, 
gained its man. The Alexandrians changed their place of 
meeting, March 23d, 1842, from the Rhetorical room to their 
Athenaeum*, while the Athenians did not hold their meetings 
in their Athenaeum, until January 31st, 1844. 

The exercises in the societies at this time (1841 1845,) 
were carefully given out at the beginning of his administra- 
tion by the newly elected President, and so arranged that all 
members had some written exercise once in a term, and two 
opportunities for debate. 

Whenever the prominent men of the time were to deliver 
orations in either of these societies, or the wits of the day 
were to read the u Oddities and Quiddities" from the " anony- 
mous box" in the Alexandrian, members from the other so- 
cieties would flock in to hear. The " wit combats" of those 
days will not soon be forgotten. Sometimes the debates 
lasted late into the night. " Society duties," says an active 
Alexandrian of '45, " were among the very first to demand 
attention, and no one stood first among college students, who 
neglected practice in these society halls." 

In 1844-45, these societies began to suffer. Their honors 
became party spoils for the secret fraternities, which now for 
the first time became multiplied in the College. Both the 
Alexandrian and Athenian records show intimations of de- 
cline. Adjournments because of fewness of numbers, 
events before unknown, now and then occur. 

As early as August, 1838, the societies began to be embar- 
rassed financially, so that the members could with difficulty 
meet the current expenses and pay existing debts. Moneys 
received from initiation fees, which heretofore had been an- 
nually appropriated for libraries, were used to liquidate stand- 
ing debts. Extensive repairs, etc., upon their Athenaeums 
increased their liabilities. Moreover, the college itself was 
at this time (1845) at its lowest ebb, there being scarcely more 
than half the old aggregate of students. 



* Fourth story, South entry, Middle College. 



30 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 



In March, 1843, the societies had themselves discussed the 
practicability of having two leading societies in College, in- 
stead of three. The plan met with favor from some, though, 
at first, with decided disfavor from the majority of students. 
The financial condition of the societies which was not im- 
proving as the terms passed by and the small number of 
students in all the classes, forced the consideration of the 
matter upon them, each returning term. Moreover, the Fac- 
ulty concurred in the proposed change. 

April 9th, 1846, committees were appointed from the Social 
Union, Athenian, and Alexandrian Societies, to consider the 
expediency of the change, and to propose the most fair 'and 
equitable method of consummating the proposed plan. 

The result of this joint investigation was substantially as 
follows : 1st. The interest in the societies was on the de- 
cline. 2d. The libraries were decreasing. 3d. Without a 
burdensome and unwarranted increase of taxes, the societies 
cannot meet the necessities of immediate outlay upon the 
Athenaeums and libraries. 4th. In their belief, the number 
of students of Amherst College could not soon be so great, as 
to warrant the hope of successfully sustaining three literary 
societies. 5th. The Faculty, and whatever honorary mem- 
bers of the societies they had consulted, " were convinced 
that two societies only should exist in Amherst College." 

Believing that these statements of their committees were 
warranted by the facts of the case, the societies immediately 
took steps toward some thorough change, in the hope of im- 
proving the present state of affairs. A committee of five, of 
which Professor Snell was chairman, was appointed to ap- 
prize the whole property of e'ach society. It was then de- 
cided that each society should pay its own debts from a sale 
of books and furniture, and that each should contribute to 
a common stock, an amount of property equal to that of the 
poorest society. 

All this was done, with the agreement that this common 
stock should afterwards be divided into two equal portions by 
a committee, and that the members of College should be di- 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. ' 31 



yided immediately after the dissolution into two equal bodies, 
and that the rooms and an equal share of the property should 
be assigned to these by lot. It was found that 

The total value of property in the Alexandrian Society was, - $1,408.64 

Social Union " " 1,551.18 

" Athenian " " 1,608.55 

Hence each society contributed $1,408.64 to this common 
stock, which was held in trust for the time, and on July 1st, 
1846, the Athenian and Alexandrian Societies of Amherst 
College DISSOLVED sine die. 



SOCIAL UNION. 

On Tuesday, March 27th, 1827, a number of persons, most 
of whom had been members of the Alexandrian Society, con- 
vened in the so-called "Rhetorical Room" in the chapel 
building, with the intent of organizing a new literary society 
in Amherst College. The organization was completed on the 
following day, when the society assumed the name of Social 
Union. Some reasons for this step have been alluded to be- 
fore. An u unpleasantness" had long existed in the Alexan- 
drian Society, resulting in the formation of two pretty well- 
defined parties. There had been an alleged illegality in the 
election of a certain President, an illegality which had been 
sustained by Professor Abbott, to whom the matter had been 
referred for arbitrament. Moreover, a respectable minority, 
of the Alexandrian Society were vehemently opposed to the 
removal of that society's library into the college library room, 
which had recently been fitted up. 

So persistent was their opposition, that they were allowed 
to secede and take with them a proportionate share of the 
library. Probably a more prominent reason was the grow- 
ing disaffection among some of the students towards the " al- 
lotment" system ; moreover, a third society, which should be 
exclusive in its character, had long been desired. At this 



32 - ALKXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 



trouble in the Alexandrian Society, the permission of the 
Faculty for the foundation of this third society so long with- 
held was given. The occasion was eagerly seized. Prom- 
inent among the original founders of Social Union were 
Joseph Howard, M. D., W. M. Johnston, M. D., S. D. Part- 
ridge, Esq., and H. F. Stockbridge, of '27; A. M. Brown, 
Thomas D. Gregg, R. B. Hubbard, Prof. E. P. Humphrey, 
William Richards, and Rev. Preserved Smith, of '28 ; Rev. 
Henry Lyman and Asa Putney, of '29. 

Its founders being men of means and influence, the society 
at once assumed a high position in the college, and an elec- 
tion to membership was a coveted honor. They at once made 
secrecy a vital principle of the society, a principle which the 
society clung to during its whole existence. In those early 
days, this was insisted upon with the greatest strictness in 
reference to everything pertaining to the society; however, 
in the last part of its history, this consisted chiefly in hold- 
ing its weekly sessions with closed doors. Through its whole 
history, Social Union was strictly a literary society, and it 
was acknowledged, even by its rivals, to surpass all others in 
its esprit de corps. 

Its members also seem to have cultivated, all the while, the 
true spirit of & literary fraternity. The other societies at the 
first had an advantage in the matter of library. That of the 
Social Union then numbered only 621 volumes, but by great 
liberality and personal effort the number of its books was in- 
creased, so that it soon furnished no inferior advantages to 
its members. 

Its literary exercises were entered into with a zest charac- 
teristic of those early days. Soon after the formation of the 
society, they were granted the use of the room in the north- 
west upper corner of South College, which they tastily fitted 
up as a library and reading-room. This was always termed 
their " Lyceum," thus distinguishing it from the similar 
rooms of the other societies, which were called " Athenaeums." 
This was subsequently enlarged to meet the growing wants of 
the society. Here were arranged its library cases, here were 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 83 

its reviews and periodicals, and many and profitable were the 
hours spent here by its members. Here hung that portrait 
of Dr. Humphrey, so highly prized by every member, which 
was presented to the society, April 6th , 1831, by Mr. Kidder, 
then in Andover Theo. Sem. This now (1871) adorns the 
hall of " Alexandria." At least for a long time, this room 
was open only to the members of Social Union. Repeated 
attempts, on the part of both Faculty and other rival societies, 
to have the " Lyceum" and " Athenaeums" united, were al- 
ways summarily rejected. The meetings of the society 
were held in the Recitation Rooms, alternating with the Al- 
exandrian and Athenian Societies in the use of those most de- 
sirable for such a purpose. The electioneering system, with 
which the society started in 1827, resulted in so much excite- 
ment, and its out-workings were so obnoxious to the Faculty, 
that they soon interfered and instituted a strict allotment, 
taking the control of this allotment into their own hands. 
This plan continued until the dissolution of the society. So- 
cial Union, however, always chafed under the allotment, and 
not a few managed to evade this rule, and become initiated 
into that society. Of course, t\ie Faculty would interfere, re- 
monstrance would follow remonstrance and, once at least, 
the Trustees of the college were appealed to, when the society 
was " aggrieved by the decision of the Faculty." 

Every third year, it became the duty of Social Union to 
select the orator for Commencement week. Then there was 
always much ambition to secure the ablest orators in the 
nation. 

Public exhibitions were given from time to time by the so- 
ciety, which were always most attractive ; indeed, the literary 
enthusiasm, which prevailed in all of the societies until after 
1840, was always especially prominent in Social Union. This 
enthusiasm ensured full meetings and literary exercises of a 
high tone. Its founders had placed the society upon a high 
plane, and such men as Hon. James Humphrey, '31, Prof. 
Samuel M. Hopkins, Hons. Lyman Gibbons, Otis P. Lord, 
Jonathan C. Perkins, and Horace P. Wakefield of '32, Hon. 
5 



34 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 



William Z. Stuart, '33, Professors C. B. Adams and Thomas 
P. Field, and George F. Homer, Esq., of '34, Charles H. 
Doolittle, Esq., Prof. Roswell D. Hitchcock, and Hon. E. H. 
Kellogg of '36, Hon. Samuel T. Spaulding and Rev. Richard 
S. Storrs of '39, and Hon. Galusha A. Grow, '44, lent their 
heartiest efforts to promote its welfare, and sustain the honor 
of its name. It thrived, not by reason of any external nur- 
ture, but by the love and interest which it inspired in its 
members. 

The oft repeated petition of Social Union, that the Faculty 
might dispense with the Thursday morning recitation, that 
more time might be given to preparation for the Society 
meetings, evinced the interest which was wide-spread. The 
famous " Anonymous Department," which has been alluded 
to in connection with the other societies, was sustained with 
much spirit, until February 2d, 1834, when the Faculty, deem- 
ing thatlcaricature of college officers was out of character, 
interfered, and declared " that who ever made the motion for 
reading the ' Anonymous Department,' put the question, 
or acted as critics, should be held answerable to them for 
known and direct resistance, to the college authorities." 
However, it was afterwards revived, though its criticisms, 
etc., were of a milder tone. April 9th, 1834, the society 
received from the Rev. Henry Lyman, then a missionary in 
Sumatra, " a box of curiosities," collected by him during his 
travels in foreign lands. Mr. Lyman, it will be remembered, 
was one of the founders of Social Union, and, after leaving 
college, he ever retained a lively interest in the organization. 

The intelligence of the murder of their esteemed friend, 
when announced at one of the society meetings, made an 
impression upon the members, not soon to be forgotten. In 
the Spring of 1835, President Humphrey delivered an ad- 
dress before the society, upon the life and character of the 
martyr-missionary. 

At the time when the other societies threw open their doors, 
and gave up secrecy, the matter underwent considerable dis- 



ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 35 

cussion in Social Union, though the plan was always rejected 
by a decided majority. 

The " Gorham Rebellion," alluded to elsewhere, occurred in 
1884. The instigator of this, Win. 0. Gorham, was a mem- 
ber of Social Union, as well as many who were prominently con- 
nected in the affair. Hence the pros and cons of the case were 
discussed in this society especially, with lively interest. A 
resolution was passed " expressive of sympathy for those men 
of talent and integrity, banished for deeds of .righteousness." 
The applause which awaited Mr. Gorham on his return to 
college, as he entered the room while Social Union was hold- 
ing a meeting, was loud and long continued. 

On the Fourth of July, 1836, the Social Union society held 
a public celebration. After prayer by President Humphrey, 
and the reading of the Declaration of Independence by R. D. 
Hitchcock, '36, E. H. Kellogg, of the Senior class, delivered 
an oration of marked power. This, a new feature in the 
celebration of " Independence Day," called forth a large and 
appreciative audience. 

The Society celebrated the tenth anniversary of its form- 
ation, March 27th, 1837, by an address, given by Professor 
Thomas P. Field, whose subject was " The Origin and Advan- 
tages of Literary Associations." Addresses on literary themes, 
from prominent men, were not infrequent all through the 
society's history. Among those who often favored the socie- 
ty with addresses, were Professors Roswell D. Hitchcock and 
W. S. Tyler. Such addresses, profitable in themselves, 
served also to incite the membership to renewed literary 
endeavors. As early as August, 1831, Social Union began 
to consider the expediency of erecting a hall, a project 
which was never fully given up, until the society dissolved. 
However, they constantly improved their rooms in South 
College. Extensive repairs were made in 1840, at an ex- 
pense of six hundred dollars, three hundred and thirty-five 
dollars being raised for the purpose, by subscription. After 
this, they held their regular meetings in the room newly 
fitted up, entering it for the first time, July 8th, 1840. In 



36 ALEXANDRIAN AND ATHENIAN SOCIETIES. 

the decline of interest in the leading public societies in 1843- 
46, Social Union suffered with the rest. The interest in 
her meetings began to flag a sure evidence of a society's 
decline. True, there were the few, ever prompt and active 
in the meetings. But the interest did not seem wide-spread. 
Early in the spring of 1846, in common with the Alexandri- 
an and Athenian, Social Union began to discuss the proposed 
plan of having but two public literary societies in College. 
To give up Social Union, met with disfavor from well-nigh 
every member, and it was not until June 10th, 1846, that 
the vote was passed to adopt the plan as proposed by the 
other societies. 

It seemed at last a matter of necessity, for the feeling in 
favor of having only two societies had become so prevalent, 
that, had Social Union failed to accede to the proposed plan, 
the Alexandrians and Athenians would have united, and, 
forming one society, would, in the language of the Committee 
from Social Union, " have been able to crush Social Union, 
or at least compel her to lay aside her secrecy;" as, from 
the allotment, those societies would receive any new members 
who were opposed to " secrecy," while Social Union could 
receive none in return. Moreover, the Society was itself in 
debt, the number of students small, and the number of 
active society members, very few. Nor did they expect a 
rapid increase of membership, or interest in the society meet- 
ings, as they then existed. Hence, Social Union yielded, 
provided there should be a DISSOLUTION of all three Societies, 
preparatory to the organization of two other entirely new 
ones. This dissolution was formally effected July 1st, 1846. 
The last exercise being an appropriate closing address, by 
Levi A. Field, '46. 

The property, as apprized by the Committee, was : 
Library, $1,227.05 

Other Property, 324.13 



Total, - $1,551.18 



ACADEMIA AND ECLECTIC SOCIETIES. 37 

All debts were cancelled, and $1,408.64 was contributed 
towards the general stock, which was to become the property 
of the new Societies. 

Social Union, among its last acts, presented a Bible to the 
College, to be kept in the Rhetorical Room. Its " curiosi- 
ties," the gift of Rev. Henry Lyman, were presented to the 
College, for its cabinets. Its records were deposited in the 
College Library, and Social Union ceased to exist. 

Judge 0. P. Lord of Salem, remarks : " Social Union will 
be remembered as long as a member of it shall survive, and 
possibly tradition may give it even a little longer lease of life." 



ACADEMIA AND ECLECTIC. 

These two Societies, which were organized immediately 
after the dissolution of the Alexandrian, Athenian, and Social 
Union Societies, are, in fact, though not in name, the " Alex- 
andria " and " Athenae " of to-day. 

The great change in societies, as before remarked, was a 
necessity brought about in the dark days of the college his- 
tory, when the number of the students was the smallest, and 
when the college itself seemed bordering on bankruptcy. 

On the day following their dissolution, the committee upon 
allotments announced that they had made an impartial 
division of all the students, for the proposed societies. 

The students, thus allotted, soon convened, to effect tempo- 
rary organizations. One-half, which, for several meetings, 
was designated by the name of " Alpha," held their first 
meeting, July 2d, 1846, in the room formerly occupied by 
" Social Union," in the fourth story, north entry, of South 
College. The other half of the students assembled for the 



38 ACADEMIA AND ECLECTIC SOCIETIES. 

first time, in the old "Alexandrian" room, fourth story, 
south entry, of Middle (now North) College, July 6th, 1846, 
and assumed the name of " No. 1," until a more permanent 
organization could be effected, and a name decided on. At 
the outset, both Societies determined to be strictly open 
in every proceeding, and to abide strictly by an allotment, 
which should be determined by the order in which new stu- 
dents signed the College laws. Moreover, in order to shun 
the rocks upon which the previous societies had been wrecked, 
they each placed upon their records, this resolve : " The best 
interests of our society demand that pecuniary liabilities 
shall always be met as soon as incurred." 

At the suggestion of President Hitchcock, the Societies 
"Alpha" and "No. 1," after considerable discussion, on 
July 9th, 1846, adopted respectively the names of " Aca- 
demia " and " Eclectic." Timothy Stowe, '47, was elected 
the first President of Academia ; George Soule, '47, was 
the first chosen to fill that office in Eclectic. Their rooms, 
designated above, were hereafter known as the " Athenaeums " 
of Academia and Eclectic. In these were placed their libra- 
ries, as previously divided ; also, each kept in the same room, 
the papers and magazines of the day, each Athenaeum being 
accessible to all the students. 

The first initiation of new members, to the new societies, 
occurred on the evening of September 16th, 1846. 

Hon. Charles Sunnier delivered the first annual oration 
before the new societies, and W. W. Lord was poet on the 
occasion. 

The new organizations, for a time, gave evidence of in- 
creased life and vigor. More promptness actuated the mem- 
bers in the performance of the duties assigned them, and a 
new energy seemed to be infused through all the meetings. 
The novelty of the new regime wearing away, new means 
were sought to induce a fuller attendance. This want gave 
rise in 1847, to the holding of " moot courts," etc. 

One reason which may account for the want of universal 
interest in the societies, at the time, was the great number of 



ACADKMIA AND ECLECTIC SOCIETIES. 39 

societies, secret and open, which now arose in the college, 
and in the various classes ; many of which were of ephemeral 
growth. True, members were allotted, and joined the socie 
tfes, initiation fees (of $5.00) were paid, weekly meetings 
were held, questions of the day were discussed, exhibitions 
were given, and addresses by honorary members were deliv- 
ered during the term. But no great pretext was sought to 
adjourn the meetings, and quorums were rarities. The 
records of one meeting in Academia, are significant. The 
society decided that " women now receive their due political 
rights," by a vote of six to one. 

The advantages of the libraries were not overlooked. 
Few there were who did not avail themselves of their treas- 
ures. 

In the winter of 1849, efforts were successively made to 
abolish the allotment system, as a means of reviving interest, 
but the societies did not seem to be ready for the innovation. 
At any rate, the state of things seemed to demand some im- 
mediate action, if Amherst College would maintain the pre- 
vious reputation of her literary societies. Each society 
seemed to be plodding along independent of the other. 
Rivalry was dead. Let it not be overlooked, however, that 
there were the faithful few in both Academia and Eclectic, 
from every class, who were ever prompt, and ever ready with 
literary efforts carefully prepared. But an universal esprit 
de corps was wanting. In the fall of 1850, united meetings, 
literary in their character, were held with the design of 
arousing interest. 

As early as April 17th, 1850, a dissatisfaction with the 
existing names began to be manifested, and discussions upon 
a change of names were frequent ; many contending that the 
existing ones were meaningless. To awaken a wide-spread 
interest ; to accomplish the proposed change of names ; 
moreover, to bind the societies more closely together, and, at 
the same time, to implant a spirit of rivalry, and properly 
regulate competition, a second complete re-organization of the 
societies was proposed. 



40 MODERN SOCIAL UNION. 



The efficient plan of this re-organization was suggested 
by R. L. Parsons, M. D., '53, then a member of the Eclectic 
Society. 

It was proposed to form a third society, which should em- 
brace both Academia and Eclectic. However, neither society 
was to lose its identity. This third society was to hold pub- 
lic meetings, exhibitions, and debates, during the year, which 
should be participated in by an equal number of each branch 
society. 

The oration of Commencement week, a custom so long es- 
tablished, was to be given before this new society. 

With this change, the allotment system was to be wholly 
done away with, and, under certain regulations and limita- 
tions, free choice was to be given to the incoming members 
of the Freshman class. The plan immediately met with fa- 
vor, and the preliminary steps were taken to perfect such a 
re-organization. This was effected March 2d, 1853. It was, 
furthermore, a prevalent opinion that the societies, thus re- 
organized and placed on a new basis with revised constitu- 
tions, would best thrive under the old names, "Alexandri- 
an" and "Athenian," names so suggestive in themselves, 
and so widely known as the names of the two original rival so- 
cieties of the College. In deference to the other flourishing 
society of long ago, the name " Social Union" was given to 
the new organization embracing the Alexandrian and Atheni- 
an, as branch societies. 



MODERN SOCIAL UNION. 

The constitution of this society was adopted March 2, 1853, 
and copies placed in the hands of every member of the branch 
societies. The society exists at the present time in the same 
form as when first organized, and with its prominent features 



MODERN SOCIAL UNION. 41 

but slightly changed. Originally, four public meetings were 
held each year, styled the " Winter and Fall " Exhibitions, 
the " Public Debate " and an " Electioneering Meeting." At 
all of these, also at Commencement, the members were re- 
quired to wear the badges of their respective societies. 

The Alexandrian badge was a blue ribbon, on which were 
portrayed the rolls of parchment as they would be seen on 
the library shelves of ancient Alexandria, with other classic 
representations, over which was AAEZAN4PEIA. Intertwined 
in its border were the significant words BIBAIOQHKH, 
n>iA020<i>iA, FPAUMATA, MOT2EION. This badge was de- 
signed by Professor Tyler. The Athenian badge was a white 
ribbon on which were portrayed various representations, sym- 
bolic of the taste and culture of ancient Athens. 

The appointees for the " Winter Exhibition " were from 
the Junior and Sophomore classes in each society ; the exhi- 
bition consisted of " Orations, Dissertations, Essays, and Orig_ 
inal Dialogues." This was given up May, 1858. 

The "Fall Exhibition " and " Public Debate " are annually 
given at the present time. For the Exhibition, four orators 
are now chosen in each society from the Senior class, instead 
of three as formerly, and the colloquians of each society unite 
in the composition of an original "colloquy :" whereas, for- 
merly, each society furnished a dialogue. Since 1868, the 
representation of a selected farce has superceded the collo- 
quy. The appointees for the Public Debate, eight in num- 
ber, are chosen from the Senior and Junior classes respectively, 
from each society. 

Since 1860, two prizes have been awarded to those who 
are adjudged, by the committee of award, the best debaters 
of the evening. The best instrumental music which can be 
procured is now furnished at; each of these exhibitions, and 
" College Hall " is always filled on the evenings of their occur- 
rence. The annual " Electioneering Meeting," or, as it was 
afterwards called, by a wide latitude of expression, " Statement 
of Facts," was held on the first Wednesday evening of the Col- 
6 



42 MODERN SOCIAL UNION. 



legiate year. Social Union made it a law, that no members 
of the Freshman class could be pledged to either of the so- 
cieties, previous to this meeting, and that neither society could 
claim more than two-thirds of the members of any class. At 
this annual meeting, six orators three from each society- 
presented the claims of the Alexandrian and Athenian Soci- 
eties. On this evening, the Chapel was brilliantly lighted. 
Freshmen, escorted by over-solicitous upper classmen, entered 
and took seats, reserved for them, amid loud and prolonged 
cheering. A Senior orator rises, cordially welcomes the new 
comers to Amherst, with its beauties of scenery and peculiar 
educational advantages. Foremost among the latter are the 
privileges of her literary societies, and foremost among these 
stands the society whose claims he has the honor to advocate. 
Its merits are then partially presented, and he takes his seat. 
His opponent rises, and with equal confidence utters a plea 
for the rival society. 

Thus, statements and counter statements follow each other, 
the slanders of each are refuted, and the number of M. C.s, 
Judges, Presidents of Colleges, Professors, Valedictorians, 
Salutatorians, Prize Men, Clergy, etc., etc., which each soci- 
ety has furnished among its alumni and honorary members, 
is given in carefully prepared statistics, until, at a late hour, 
the President of each of the- societies closes an eloquent pan- 
egyric upon the name, history, and prosperity of his own soci- 
ety by the appeal : " Gentlemen, in view of such facts, can you 
hesitate in your decision ?" 

The opportunities here presented for the display of elo- 
quence, for sarcasm and irony, for tact in the arrangement 
and utterance of the " facts " were great, and it is no sur- 
prise that, from the first, much interest was taken in this an- 
nual exhibition. 

The orators were generally the ablest men J of their socie- 
ties, and each considered it a point of honor to make most 
diligent preparation. 

After the appeals were closed, the pledging of Freshmen, 
all of whom were supposed to have been hitherto unprejudiced, 




MODERN SOCIAL UNION. 43 



begins. Soon after, a reception or sort of banquet was 
given to the newly pledged members ; following this, came 
their initiation, and the society stood ready to begin a year of 
literary work. True, after a few years the " Statement of 
Facts" became so much of a stereotyped performance ; indeed, 
it so much degenerated into a " Statement of not Facts," that 
it was finally abandoned ; yet many Alumni cherish no more 
pleasant or vivid recollections of College days, than of this first 
Wednesday evening of the Collegiate year. 

This custom was dispensed with in 1860, when electioneer- 
ing through committees began, and May 23, 1860, Social 
Union established the rule that this electioneering must, in 
all cases, take place within the limits of the town of Amherst. 
Thus the system of electioneering continued until May 22, 
1867, when it was deemed advisable to again introduce the 
allotment system, which is in existence at the present time. 
The Presidents of the branch societies, at the beginning of the 
Collegiate year, equally divide the new class, and whatever 
additions are made to the upper classes ; one society taking 
the " odd " and the other the "even" men, as the names 
stand on the prayer bill, the choice being determined by lot. 
However, persons so allotted can change from one to another, 
if their reasons, presented in writing, shall be satisfactory to 
both Presidents. 

By a law of Social Union, passed at its formation, its act- 
ing members were entitled to equal privileges in the use of 
the libraries of the branch societies. 

Oct. 23d, 1867, in accordance with a petition of the Social 
Union, the Faculty and Trustees of the College permitted the 
libraries of the Alexandrian and Athenian Societies to be 
merged into the college library, so that rules for their regula- 
tion now have to be approved by the library committee of 
the Faculty, and they can never be withdrawn from their con- 
trol, without the permission of said committee. 

To compensate for this, all initiation fees were abolished in 
the branch societies, and a tax of $4.50 per year is collected 
upon the term bills of every member of Social Union, by the 



44 



ALEXANDRIA AND ATHENE. 



College Treasurer, for the support of the branch societies. 
The compact requires that one-third of this sum shall an- 
nually be appropriated for the use of said libraries. It was 
stipulated in this compact, that the libraries should not be re- 
moved from the society halls, until a new college library build- 
ing should be erected. 

The whole number of volumes in the Alexandrian library, 
July, 1871, is 3,754 ; in the Athenian, 4,373. 

In September, 1870, Social Union assumed the control of 
the " Students' Reading Room," which, enlarged and elegantly 
fitted up in North College, reflects no small credit upon the 
enthusiasm and taste of its members. Seldom has the society 
been more evenly divided or more eagerly interested in a vital 
question of the day, than when, on May 18th, 1871, a propo- 
sition to open this Reading-room on Sundays, was defeated, by 
a vote of 88 to 85. The larger part of- the morning recita- 
tion hour was consumed in taking the vote. 

The Presidents of the society from its foundation have been 
as follows: 



AL* Matthew W. Haskell, 

Ath.f John W. Underbill, 

Al. Ezra T. Sprague, 

Ath. James M. Ellis, 

Al. William Crawford, 

Ath. James B. Beaumont, 

Al. George L. Smead, 

Ath. Melville M. Tracy, 

Al. George W. Phillip.;, 

Ath. M. Fayette Dickinson, 



Al. Joseph A. Titus, 

Ath. Edgar L. Foster, 

Al. Joseph H. Sawyer, 

Ath. George Harris, 

Al. Elihu Root, 

Ath. A. Thomas Buchanan, 

Al. Herbert J. Cooke, 

Ath. John G. Stanton, 

Al. Samuel W. Tindell, 

Ath. Constant C. Hodgman. 



ALEXANDRIA AND ATHENE. 

Academia and Eclectic, becoming branch societies of Social 
Union, March 2d, 1853, and assuming the names " Alexan- 
drian" and <fc Athenian, "J entered upon a new era of their 



* Alexandrian, f Athenian. J Soon after called Alexandria and Athenae. 



ALEXANDRIA AND ATHENE. 45 

history. Interest was revived. The activity, which was 
necessarily called forth in the electioneering, gave rise to a 
more absorbing interest in the literary exercises of the weekly 
meetings. A generous rivalry was manifested in the election 
of honorary members, in gaining the best members from the 
new classes, and, all the while, the libraries were increasing, 
so that, in 1855, the library cases entirely surrounded the so- 
ciety halls, save the places occupied by the officers' desks. A 
prominent alumnus of that time says : " My heartiest inter- 
est in college centered in Alexandria. What elaborate essays, 
keen critiques, what humorous ' vacation diaries ' we used to 
have!" 

However, the chief society spirit of the time was expended 
in a strife which arose (1854) between the secret fraternities 
and the anti-secret society of the college ; in which conflict 
the Faculty became involved to some extent. The latter 
drew forth from the Faculty some resolutions " which were 
regarded as expressions of approval of their principles." 
The former, in a remonstrance, drew forth a second commu- 
nication (Apr. 5, 1854,) which endeavored to emphasize their 
position of " entire neutrality." 

These,*, with other communications, were printed by the 
anti-secret organization, with extended comments, and circu- 
lated through college. But we are led to believe that the bitter 
feelings to which this strife gave rise were the chief results 
of the struggle. We are happy to chronicle the existence of 
those friendly relations between all societies at the present 
time (1871,) which promise that the days of such unhappy 
strife are over. However, the public societies, during this 
time, were supported by a majority of the students. Here all 
could meet on a common footing, here free scope was given 
to the literary activity of all. 

A committee of Alexandria, who were appointed June 13th, 
1855, to repair the room in Middle (now North) College, pre- 
sented resolutions against any further expense upon their an- 
tiquated quarters, and in favor of taking preliminary steps, in 
connection with Athenae, toward the erection of a new hall. 



46 . ALEXANDRIA AND ATHENE. 

Some canvassing was done in college, and committees were 
appointed to correspond with prominent Alumni on the sub- 
ject. The matter was further agitated in the Alumni meeting 
in 1855. The project met the approval of all, and the chair- 
man of the committee reported, Aug. 6th, 1855, that $1,700 
had already been subscribed by alumni and students. An 
architect was employed to submit a plan for such a building. 
Various plans were discussed ; new schemes, for raising funds, 
were proposed ; all the while, the societies seemed bent upon 
action, yet difficulties constantly impeded their earnest efforts. 
At length the exigency was met, and in a way little antici- 
pated. North College was burned Jan. 19, 1857. Hon. Sam- 
uel Williston, to whom Amherst College is indebted for so 
many helps in times of need, at once offered to erect a build- 
ing on the site of " Old North," which should contain a 
chemical laboratory, a hall for the use of the Alumni at their 
animal gathering, and the desired halls for Alexandria and 
Athenae. As a result of this munificent donation, the socie- 
ties soon had at their disposal two spacious halls, with ample 
accommodations for their libraries, instead of the old incom- 
modious, ill-ventilated rooms in the dormitories. 

" Williston Hall" was dedicated May 19th, 1858. The ad- 
dress on the occasion was delivered by the Rev. Henry Ward 
Beecher, upon the subject, " New England, her Secrets of 
Power." 

On the evening of the 18th, the members of Alexandria 
and Athense formed a torchlight procession, marched to the 
residence of Prof. W. S. Clark, where a speech was made by 
James B. Beaumont, then President of Social Union, express- 
ing the thanks of both societies to Mr. Williston for his do- 
nation, through which they had gained their new halls. Mr. 
Williston responded. The procession then moved to the resi- 
dence of the President, where speeches were made by Presi- 
dent Stearns and Rev. Dr. Blagden of Boston, and others. 
The festivities and rejoicings of that evening will long be re- 
membered. These halls were fitted up by the cheerful and 



ALEXANDRIA AND ATHENE. 47 

united efforts of both active members and Alumni. Individ- 
uals and classes gave liberally for their respective societies. 

The Athenians entered their new hall, for the first time, 
June 1st, 1859. One week later, the Alexandrians held their 
first meeting in their new quarters. Hence, the societies were 
enabled to hold their annual re-union for social and fraternal 
enjoyment at the Commencement of 1859, under most favor- 
able auspices and with bright hopes for their future. Soon 
after the reorganization of the societies in 1853, the project 
of establishing prizes as an incentive to literary effort was 
discussed. Since June 13th, 1855, each society has offered 
three prizes to their members of the Freshman class for the 
best written and delivered orations. The exhibition, when 
eight competitors for these prizes deliver their orations, is re- 
garded as one of the most interesting exhibitions of the year. 
These were formerly given in college chapel, but since 1870 
they have occurred in " College Hall," and, with the excellent 
instrumental music now provided by the society, have annually 
called forth large audiences. 

In 1866, Hon. A. B. Ely of Newton offered two prizes of 
$15 each, to both Alexandria and Athenae, to be awarded to 
the best writer and speaker in each society during the Colle- 
giate year 1866-67. They were withdrawn by the donor after 
the first award. 

Since Nov. 15th, 1865, it has been a custom in Athenae to 
elect by ballot, at the close of every weekly meeting, the one 
who has fulfilled his appointment most creditably. Such 
members constitute the appointees for a prize debate at the 
close of the term, at which, the prize is awarded by the so- 
ciety. Since 1870, two prizes have been awarded every term 
in Alexandria, in the same manner. 

March 5, 1862, Athenae received a letter from the Rev. 
Henry Ward Beecher, who said that " in spite of the old prov- 
erb of ' carrying owls to Athens,' he had long wished to pre- 
sent the society a specimen of this classic symbol of old Ath- 
ens." Hence " Beecher's White Owl" now adorns the hall of 
the society. 



48 ALEXANDRIA AND ATHENE. 

Iii the latter years of the societies' history, various have 
been the devices to break the monotony of the literary exer- 
cises. To attain this end, " Democratic Conventions," " Sen- 
ates," " Impeachment Trials," a " Congress of Nations," 
" Joint Exercises in Parliamentary Practice," etc., have ever 
and anon been resorted to with different degrees of success. 
The " Moot Courts" of Athense have been the source of no 
little amusement and profit. The parties in these always ap- 
per " in costume," and the whole proceedings in cases of 
" Breach of Promise," "Assault and Battery," etc., are fol- 
lowed with a live interest by those who always fill the hall on 
such occasions. 

For several years previous to 1870, the Alexandrians con- 
ducted a society paper called the Koh-i-noor. Since February 
1, 1868, weekly reports of both societies have appeared as a 
regular department in the Amherst Student. 

Of late, the evenings of " Initiation," when a banquet is 
spread in " College" and "Alumni" halls, and the new class is 
greeted by an Oration of Welcome and a Poem ; and of the 
" Inauguration of the newly elected officers in the Summer 
term," when the Senior Class retire from active membership, 
and a Valedictory is delivered by one of their number, are 
made occasions of especial interest. Such meetings and 
special occasions bring out the whole membership ; yet it must 
be confessed that the average attendance at these societies at 
the present time (1871) is small, when we compare the mem- 
bers who are weekly found in the meetings, with their whole 
active membership. As in the past, so in the present, those 
who do attend with regularity, those whose interest does cen- 
ter in these societies, derive the good, gain the reward. We 
can give no better representation of the weekly exercises as 
performed from term to term, than to subjoin the following 
Programme of Literary Exercises : 



ALEXANDRIA. 



I. Select Declamation. 
II. Select Reading. 



IV. Oration. 
V. Extempore Speaking. 



III. Debate (by eight disputants, and VI. Critique, 
the house.) 



CHI DELTA THETA. 49 



ATHENE. 

I. Essay. IV. Oration. 

II. Extra (Literary Review.) V. Critique. 

III. Debate (by eight appointees, and VI. Criticisms by the Society. 

the house.) j 

The outward circumstances of Alexandria and Athenae 
were never more favorable. They have finely carpeted, 
neatly furnished, and tastily adorned halls. They have 
ample libraries, and yearly incomes of over five hundred dol- 
lars. They have the heartiest approval of the Faculty of the 
College, the co-operation of its Trustees, the regard and re- 
spect of interested Alumni. If they fail of their mission, if 
they are false to their history in the past, it cannot be from 
any want of external nurture, but must arise from a dearth of 
literary enthusiasm, which, let us earnestly hope, may never 
be found wanting in the students of Amherst College. 



CHI DELTA THETA. 

The Chi Delta Theta Society of Amherst College was formed 
July 29, 1830, by eight members of the Junior Class. Its 
charter was received from the original Chapter, at Yale Col- 
lege, which was then in a most flourishing condition. It was a 
society purely literary in its character, and strictly secret. 
The original members of the "Amherst Branch" of the soci- 
ety were Rev. Jonathan Brace, D. D., Rev. Elbridge Bradbury, 
Rev. Ebenezer Burgess, Rev. Joshua Emery, Chester Lord, 
Rev. Calvin E. Park. Rev. Lewis Sabin, D. D., and Prof. 
Daniel S. Talcott, of the class of '31. 

The Presidents and Vice-Presidents of the society were' 

always chosen from members of the Faculty, and generally 

the Professors of Rhetoric and Oratory or of Languages filled 

these positions. Professors Samuel M. Worcester and Solo- 

7 



50 CHI DKLTA THKTA. 



moh Peck, were the first officers of the society in Amherst 
College. 

Subsequent presidents from the Faculty, were Dr. He man 
Humphrey, Professors Nathan W. Fiske, E. A. Park, J. B. 
Condit, W. C. Fowler, and W. S. Tyler. 

The hasis of membership was " classical merit," and the 
members were selected only from the Senior and Junior 
classes. Nominations for membership were chiefly made by 
the President of the society, and no more than a third of 
any one class could become members. The badge of the so- 
ciety was a gold Delta (A). 

Its meetings were held fortnightly in the " President's Lec- 
ture Room," and the exercises then given consisted mainly 
of translations, in prose or verse, from classic authors, original 
poetry, dissertations on literary subjects, criticisms of ancient 
or modern works, and of discussions, upon topics of literature 
and criticism, between two or more of the members. At the 
close of the discussion, the Professor in the chair offered criti- 
cisms upon the exercises, and expressed his own opinions upon 
the subject of discussion, with his reasons therefor. 

Though the parent society at Yale had an extensive library, 
the " Amherst Branch " never felt the need of one, as the 
want was met by the privileges offered by other societies to 
which all its members belonged. 

Several successive meetings in the spring of 1838 were held 
at the house of Professor Tyler, where the evenings were 
spent in readings of, and criticisms upon, Shakspeare. 

The existence of such a society, where membership was de- 
termined in a measure by the Faculty, and whose members 
wore badges, was an innovation in the college life : hence, at 
the first, great opposition to its formation was manifested by 
the students, especially from the class of '31 ; yet this soon 
subsided, and to wear the " Delta" became an intensely cov- 
'eted honor in college. 

The last initiation of members occurred April 11, 1845 ; 
its last meeting was held July 16, of the same year. 

The society had a vigorous life, and held an honorable place 



PHI BETA KAPPA. 51 



in the estimation of the students. Its influence upon the 
literary taste of the students was highly salutary, especially 
in the early years of its history. 

During its existence, thirteen members of the Faculty were 
honorary members of the society, and the names of one hun- 
dred and fifty-nine undergraduates are enrolled upon its rec- 
ords. 

A prominent cause of its decline, was the introduction, in 
1840-45, of so many other societies which gradually absorbed 
the interest of the students. 

It numbered among its members some of the most noted 
of Amherst's Alumni, who will never cease to acknowledge its 
beneficial influences, and the inspiration which it furnished 
to a higher literary culture. 



PHI BETA KAPPA. 

<$>i\ocro(j)ia B/ou KvfiepvijTrjQ. 

Phi Beta Kappa was introduced into this country from 
France, in 1776, and, as is said, by Thomas Jefferson. The 
original chapter in America, was founded at William and 
Mary College. The Beta chapter of Massachusetts was es- 
tablished at Amherst College, August 9, 1853. 

The Society has a two-fold object ; 1st, the elevation of the 
standard of scholarship at home, and 2d, a closer fraternity 
with scholars abroad. It was originally a secret society, but 
became open in 1836. It is composed of the prominent 
members of the Faculty, graduates, honorary members, and 
undergraduates who are called "Immediate Members." 
Candidates for membership in this society are nominated by 
the Faculty of the College. 

The members to whom was granted the charter, were Abial 
R. Abbott, Esq., William H. Andrews, Esq., Rev. Edward P. 
Baker, R. M. Benjamin, Esq., Rev. Henry L. Boltwood, Bow- 
man B. Breed, M. D., Prof. Edward P. Crowell, Rev. John 
M. Greene, Prof. T. Lyman Griswold, Rev. John A. Hamilton, 
Rev. Charles F. Morse, Edwin Nelson, R. L. Parsons, M. D., 



52 PHI BETA KAPPA. 



William M. Pierce, Rev. Julius Spencer, and Prof. Richard 
S. Storrs, of the class of '53. 

From the establishment of the chapter, until August 7, 
1855, nominations were made of all those who, at the end of 
Junior year, had attained an average standing of 85 (100 
being the maximum). A second nomination from the same 
class was made in Senior year, of those who, at that time, had 
reached the average standing of 80. 

Since 1855, the Faculty have nominated, in the first choice, 
the fifth of the Junior class whose standing is highest, and, in 
the Senior year, have added to their nominations a sufficient 
number to make the whole membership embrace a third of 
the class. 

Owing to the existence of so many societies in College, 
regular literary meetings of this society are not held. How- 
ever, members are annually elected and initiated, and, recently, 
they have had an " annual supper " on the occasion of each in- 
itiation. An address is delivered before the society, on the 
Tuesday of each Commencement week. 

The society, since July 8, 1862, has annually offered a prize 
of $40 to one of its number, for excellence in the philosophical 
studies of the Senior year. The badge of the society is a 
gold key. A rosette of red and green ribbon is worn by the 
" immediate members " of the Beta Chapter, upon the pub- 
lic occasions of Commencement week. 

The honorary members of the Beta Chapter number 77; 
the number who received and accepted elections as regular 
members, in classes previous to 1853, nineteen. 

The following table shows the number of members which 
the past twenty classes have furnished : 





No. of 




No. of 




No. of 




No. of 


Class of 


Members. 


Class of 


Members. 


Class of 


Members. 


Class of 


Members. 


'53, . 


. . 15 


'58, . 


. . 15 


'63, . 


. . 11 


'68, . 


. . 12 


'54, . 


. . 16 


'59, . 


. . 12 


'64, . 


. . 8 


'69, . 


. . 18 


'55, . 


. . 31 


'60, . 


. . 14 


'65, . 


. . 17 


'70, . 


. . 15 


'56, . 


. . 22 


'61, . 


. . 12 


'66, . 


. . 15 


'71, . 


. . 19 


'57, . 


. . 11 


'62, . 


. . 11 


'67, . 


. . 18 







SOPHOMORE AND FRESHMAN LITERARY SOCIETIES. 53 



The number of immediate members from the Senior class, 
('72,) 3. Whole number of regular members, 314. Total 
membership. 391. 



SOPHOMORE SECRET LITERARY SOCIETY. 

ALPHA SIGMA PHI. 

Original Chapter founded at Yale College, 1846. 
Chapter in Amherst College established 1856. 
Charter withdrawn, 1860. 
Number of active members: 

Class of 1858. 1859. 1860. 1861. 1862. Total. 

No. of Members, 26 28 17 16 11 98 



FRESHMAN SECRET LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

DELTA KAPPA. 

Original Chapter (Yale), established 1845. 

Gamma Chapter, established at Amherst, Nov. 21, 1851. 

Charter withdrawn, July, 1870. 

Number of active members : 

No. of No. of No. of No. of 

Class of Members. Class of Members. Class of Members. Class of Members. 

'55, ... 16 '60, ... 21 '65, ... 37 '70, ... 45 

'56, ... 18 '61, ... 37 '66, ... 30 '71, ... 48 

'57, ... 30 '62, ... 29 '67, ... 27 '72, ... 49 

'58, ... 26 '63, ... 26 '68, ... 8 '73, ... 22 

'59, ... 27 '64, ... 27 '69, ... 31 '74, ... 1 
Total, 555. 



54 TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. 



KAPPA SIGMA EPSILON. 

Original Chapter (Yale), established July, 1840. 
Alpha Chapter in Amherst College, established 1851. 
Charter withdrawn, 1854. 
Number of active members : 

Class of 1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. Total. 

No. of Members, 1 20 11 3 35 

SIGMA DELTA. 

Original Chapter (Yale), established 1849. 
Alpha Chapter, established at Amherst, May 25, 
1855. 

Became extinct, September, 1867 
Number of active members : 

No. of No. of No. of 

Class of Members. Class of Members. Class of Members. 

'58, ... 12 '63, ... 27 '68, ... 32 

'59, ... 21 '64, ... 19 '69, ... 22 

'60, ... 27 '65, ... 33 '70, ... 22 

'61, ... 20 '66, ... 24 '71, ... 22 

'62, ... 18 '67, ... 25 
Total, 324. 



TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. 

ANTI-VENENEAN SOCIETY. 

' AplGTOV fJif-V V^WjO. 

Organized August, 1830. 

Early in the first term of every collegiate year, the claims 
of Temperance are presented to the members of the Fresh- 
man class. They are invited to sign either of the following 



TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. 55 



pledges, which constitute them members of the Anti-vene- 
nean Society of Amherst College : 

I. " WHEREAS, The undersigned, officers and students in 
Amherst College, are convinced that it is best for us to dis- 
pense with Ardent Spirit, Wine, Opium, and Tobacco as arti- 
cles of luxury or diet : Therefore, Resolved, That, relying 
on Divine Aid, we hereby pledge to one another our mutual 
promise, that while connected with this Institution we will 
abstain entirely from these articles, except as medicines and 
the use of wine at the Lord's Supper." 

II. " We the undersigned, officers and students of Amherst 
College, relying on Divine Aid, pledge to one another our 
mutual promise that, while connected with the Institution, we 
will not use Intoxicating Drinks as a beverage." 

This latter one was not adopted until November 15th, 1849. 
The introduction of this new and less stringent pledge was 
then deemed expedient, inasmuch as many students were 
willing to pledge themselves against the use of liquors, but 
not against tobacco, etc. Since that time, students can sign 
either pledge. Quite elegant diplomas, designed by H. Bill- 
ings, Boston, are furnished to each new member. The rise 
of the Society was largely due to that earnest advocate of 
Temperance, the late John Tappan, Esq., of Boston. In 
1830 he offered to present $500 to any association which 
might be formed in Amherst College, the members of which 
should be pledged against the use of liquors, tobacco, and 
opium. Prof. Edward Hitchcock had prepared the way for 
such an association, in the spring of 1830, by delivering a 
series of lectures, bearing on the subject. The society was 
formed immediately after Mr. Tappan's offer, yet the students 
refused the money, that they might not be open to the charge 
of being bribed. Mr. Tappan donated the money to the col- 
lege library, but never forgot the society ; indeed, he has 
constantly presented the members with books, etc., as expres- 
sions of his approval of their principles. At the formation of 
the society, there were two hundred and eight students in col- 
lege. One hundred and eighteen of these signed the pledge, 
and the names of about three-fourths of every class are found 
upon its " roll." No regular meetings of the society are 



56 SOCIETIES OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

held, yet addresses have occasionally been delivered under its 
auspices, by John B. Gough, Esq. Drs. Heman Humphrey 
and Edward Hitchcock have been the past presidents of the 
society. At present, its officers are as follows : 

President, W. A. STEARNS, D.D., LL.D. 
Secretary, EDWARD HITCHCOCK, Jr., M.D. 
Treasurer, WILLIAM L. MONTAGUE, A.M. 

The sum total of its membership is 1,827. 



SOCIETIES OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



LINN^AN SOCIETY. 

This Society was the first organization of the kind in the 
college. It was formed by a number of students in 1822, to 
facilitate their studies in Natural Science. Special attention 
was paid to the departments of Botany, Geology, and Miner- 
alogy. Papers, bearing upon these topics, were regularly 
presented by the members, and much time during its meet- 
ings was given to analyses, and descriptions of new speci- 
mens, which the members were continually finding in the 
Connecticut Valley. Prominent among the founders of this 
Society, were Professor George Shepard (its first President), 
Professor Charles U. Shepard, and Abel Packard, of '24 ; 
George White, M.D., '25 ; and Andrew H. Reed, and Rev. 
Frederic A. Willard, of '26. During the Collegiate year, 
1822-3, a prize, of scientific books, was offered by the Society, 
to that member who should collect the finest herbarium. The 
prize was awarded to Professor C. U. Shepard, '24, who 
subsequently presented the prize collection to the college. 
The Faculty granted the use of a room in South College (No. 
20) to the Society, and here were arranged the cases of 



N. L. D. SOCIETY. 57 



the Society, which contained its specimens and herbarium. 
When the founders of the Society graduated from college, in- 
terest in the Society began to die out, arid, in a few years, 
it ceased to exist. While it lived, the Linnaean Society was 
eminently useful to its members. -It exerted a salutary in- 
fluence in awakening attention to the Natural Sciences in 
those early days, and, among those who were then most in- 
terested in its welfare, are found the names of many, who 
have since become eminent in Science. 



N. L. D. 

This Society called, at first, the " Society of Natural His- 
tory," or, more generally, the " N. L. D." Society was organ- 
ized August 26th, 1831, in No. 8, Middle (now North) Col- 
lege. Its founders were Hon. Nathan Belcher, Benjamin 
Haskell, M.D., John F. Houston, Esq., and Simeon Shurtleff, 
M.D., of '32 ; Rev. Stephen T. Allen, John A. Burnham, 
Esq., and Chauncey A. Hall, M.D., of '33. 

The object of the Society was the investigation of Natural 
History, though no branch of science was excluded from its 
consideration. 

The proceedings of the Society were secret during its 
whole history. Meetings were held monthly, at first ; after- 
wards, fortnightly. At these meetings, the exercises consisted 
of Reviews, Dissertations, * Analyses, and general information 
upon Natural History. Each member was required every 
term to prepare at least one article upon some scientific topic 
of interest. 

Students, to the number of eight from each class, were 
elected from! each of the three classes, the qualifications 
being " a good moral character, respectable standing in one's 
class, and a distinguished] reputation as a naturalist." Soon 
after, it became a law, that a sixth of every class might be 
admitted. 

The badge of the Society consisted of a gold plate in the 
8 



58 N. L. D. SOCIETY. 



form of a pentagon on one side of which was the name of the 
owner; on the other, the initials, N. L. D. Feb. 22d. 1836, 
the Society adopted a new badge, which was a gold key 6f 
hexahedral form, with " N. L. D. 1831," on one side ; on the 
other, a small scroll, on which was engraved " Nature " and 
the owner's name. 

Immediately upon the formation of the Society, measures 
were taken towards a library and cabinet. It was a custom 
for every member to present at least one book to the Society. 

Their Society room, containing their library and collection, 
constituted a sort of reading-room, where the scientific periodi- 
cals of the day might be found. This was the^north-west 
corner room of the second story of North College, which has 
since been burned. The Society numbered among its mem- 
bers many who have since become eminent in the depart- 
ment of science. The Presidents of this Society were Hon. 
Nathan Belcher, and John F. Houston, '32 ; Prof. H. D. 
Humphrey, Wm. 0. Collins, Esq.,*' John Buckley, of '33 ; 
Prof. C. B. Adams, Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, of '34 ; Rev. 
Wm. B. Bond, Rev. Mortimer Blake, Rev. George P. Smith, 
and Rev. Clinton Clark, of '35; D. C. Rowell, L. L. Bruuer, 
and Hon. A. B. Ely, of '36 ; Rev. Alexander Montgomery, Rev. 
Henry J.^Van Lennep, and Prof. Nahum Gale, of '37 ; Rev. 
John A. McKinstry, Loring Johnson, .Hon. Horace Maynard, 
of '38 ; Rev. F. D. Huntington, Rev. Alden B. Robbins, and 
Rawson Yaile, of '39 ; Rev. Joel S. Everett. Rev. William 
Barrows, '40 ; Thomas S. Russell, Ephraim W. Bond, of '41 ; 
Rev. L. Armsby, Rev. Rufus P. Wells, and Roswell L. Cha- 
pin, of '42 ; Hon. Galusha A. Grow, and William Torrance, 
of '44; Marshall Henshaw, L.L.D., Prof. John S. Lee, and 
Rev. Charles L. Woodworth, of '45 ; Hon. William Howland, 
S. M. Fletcher, M.D., of '46 : Rev. Timothy Stowe and Lewis 
I. Fleming, Esq., of '47. 

The Society elected a number of the scientific men of the 
day, as its honorary members, with whom the Society kept 
up a lively correspondence. Missionaries used to send boxes 
of curiosities for its cabinet, and we. read, in its records, of 



N. L. D. SOCIETY. 59 



the Society exchanging " gods for minerals " with the 
Society of Inquiry. 

The members were also in communication with similar 
societies at Harvard and Yale. 

The Society was especially patronized by Edward Hitch- 
cock, then Professor of Natural Science in the College. The 
donations of scientific men to its cabinet were frequent, so 
that, by the additional personal effort of the members, fine 
collections of specimens in Natural History adorned the 
Society's room ; together with some carefully prepared skele- 
tons, and quite an extensive herbarium. When Mr. Beecher 
was connected with the Society, its discussions upon phrenolo- 
gy were frequent and spirited. 

When elected President, Mr. Beecher delivered " an able 
address upon the subject, expressing the futility of the ob- 
jections offered against the science, and exhibiting and 
defending its fundamental principles." 

Professors Edward Hitchcock and C. B. Adams frequently 
addressed the Society, upon topics immediately connected 
with its interests. 

Extensive repairs were made upon the Society's room, in 
the autumn of 1840, and, not long after, the Society was 
known under the name of *. B. 0., which letters were placed 
over its door. 

As early as Nov. 12th, 1847, owing to a lack of interest 
in its meetings, and the increased facilities which the College 
began to offer for study in the various departments of science, 
its cabinets, &c., the Society began to discuss the matter of 
dissolution. It dissolved sine die, Oct. 4th, 1848, when its 
cabinet, library, etc., were presented to the College, by the 
committe, to whom was intrusted the closing up of the Socie- 
ty's affairs : Edward Hitchcock, Jr., George R. Ferguson, 
and Charles Hartwell, class of '49. Its whole number of ac- 
tive members was 151. Existing, as it did, when the advan- 
tages afforded by the College for the study of Natural History 
were very meagre, N. L. D. (or tf>. B. 0.) has every reason to 
be proud of its members, its influence, and its history. 



60 SOCIKTY OF INQUIRY. 



RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES, 

SOCIETY OP INQUIRY. 

The germ of this society is found at the very beginning of 
the history of the college. 

It will be remembered, that the original object in the foun- 
dation of Amherst College was the education of "indigent 
pious youth" for the Christian ministry and the missionary 
service. Hence the attention of the students was continually 
called to these fields of labor. Accordingly, as a means of 
exciting interest and bringing out facts relative to the subject, 
a number of Christian students banded together, and formed, 
in the first weeks of the Fall Term of 1821, an association 
which, among their number, was known as the " Theological 
Society." They met informally on Sabbath evenings, in a 
quiet way, consulted with each other, compared data which 
they had acquired, communicated intelligence, and spent a 
few moments in prayer. Soon after, they perfected an organ- 
ization which became known through college as the " Society 
of Inquiry." Still, meetings were held in student's rooms. 
Their numbers were few, and the influence exerted by the so- 
ciety was chiefly felt upon its own members. One prominent 
feature in its early history was the plan of having addresses 
before the society, at least once a term. Moreover, mission- 
aries, learning of the Society and its objects, would corres- 
pond with its members, and forward curiosities, which laid 
the foundation of a Museum. But, as the college grew in 
prominence and the number of its students increased, the 
Society of Inquiry increased in numbers and influence, and, 
at length, became extremely useful to the religious students 
of the college. Its influence on the college at large has never 
been very great, but it has numbered among its officers and 
members many who have been powerful preachers of God's 
Word, and not a few who have since perished in heathen lands 
as messengers of Truth. Its object has ever been to form a 



SOCIETY OF INQUIRY. 61 



bond of union and sympathy between Christian men in col- 
lege, and it has not existed in vain. The society's correspond- 
ence with similar societies in other colleges, and with mission- 
aries in the field, has been extended and interesting. In 1857, 
its museum of curiosities had grown to be quite extensive, 
and idols, implements of various kinds, costumes ; in short, a 
multiplicity of things, illustrating the religious belief, the arts 
and customs of foreign lands, adorned its room. This room, 
situated in the Southwest corner, second story of (old) North 
College, was a frequent place of resort for visitors to the col- 
lege. In the winter of 1857, the building containing the cabi- 
net was burned to the ground, and well nigh all the society's 
records, and much of its cabinet and library, perished in the 
flames. 

Formerly, its meetings were held fortnightly and in the reci- 
tation rooms, but, since May 27th, 1859, they have occupied 
the room formerly held by Social Union and Academia 
(Athenae), in the fourth story of South College, where are 
now kept the few hundred curiosities which survived the fire, 
and their library of 250 volumes. A painting of Dr. Hitch- 
cock adorns the room. Its tables are covered with a liberal 
supply of the religious papers of the day. An oration has for 
a long time been annually delivered before this society on 
some evening of Commencement week, by some eminent di- 
vine ; recently, this has occurred on the Sabbath evening pre- 
ceding Commencement. 

Feb. llth, 1870, the Society of Inquiry assumed the name 
of the " Hitchcock Society of Inquiry," which name the so- 
ciety now bears. Since this change, its meetings are held 
every Friday evening of the term, and a new interest has 
been infused into them. They have only to be attended to 
be appreciated, for a wide range of religious topics are here 
discussed from week to week. The present order of exercises 
in the society is, 

I. Religious Intelligence. II. Extra. III. Discussion. 
IV. Extempore Speaking. V. Critique. 



62 HITCHCOCK SOCIETY. 



HITCHCOCK SOCIETY. 



"AS YE GO, PREACH." 



This society was organized by nine members from the class 
of '65, viz : Rev. Thomas E. Babb, Rev. James H. Babbitt, 
Alvin C. Campbell, V. M. Hardy, Rev. Rufus K. Harlow, 
Rev. Chas. E. Harwood, Chas. E. Lane, Rev. George R. Merrill, 
and Rev. William F. Ober. The organization took the name 
of President Edward Hitchcock, whose interest was ever 
great in those who were preparing themselves for the Gospel 
ministry. The objects of the establishment of this society 
were, (1) an intimate fellowship between those who intended 
to become ministers ; (2) to secure a more complete prepa- 
ration for this work; (3) to familiarize 'its members with 
subjects having special reference to their contemplated call- 
ing ; (4) to increase their interest in, and increase the num- 
ber of, those preparing to become ministers. The society 
held regular meetings on the Friday evening of each alternate 
week. Its exercises were of a religious character, consisting 
mainly of debates upon the vital religious questions of the 
day. Members of the Faculty used frequently to attend the 
meetings, by invitation, and, at their close, offer practical sug- 
gestions upon the topic of discussion. Its objects and inter- 
ests were so closely allied with those of the " Society of In- 
quiry," that, Feb. llth, 1870, the u Hitchcock Society" be- 
came merged into the former, which then assumed the name 
of " Hitchcock Society of Inquiry." 

Sum total of .membership : 

No. of No. of No. of 

Class of Members. Class of Members. Class of Members. 

'65, ... 9 '68, ... 2 '71, ... 13 

'66, ... 11 '69, ... 11 '72, ... 16 

'67, ... 10 '70, ... 20 '73, ... 8 
Total, 100. 



MISSIONARY BAND. 63 



MISSIONARY BAND. 



"GO YE INTO ALL THE WORLD, AND PREACH THE GOSPEL TO EVERY 
CREATCRE." 

This association was formed in the summer term of the 
collegiate year 1845-6, by Rev. Charles Hartwell, now mis- 
sionary at Foo Chow, China ; Rev. Henry Lobdell, M. D., who 
died while acting as a missionary at Mosul, in 1855 ; Rev. 
Charles D. Lothrop; Joseph D. Poland, who died soon after 
completing his Theological studies ; Professor Julius H. Seelye 
of Amherst College of '49 ; and Rev. Jacob M. Manning, '50. 
The association was the result of a visit of Rev. Dr. Scudder 
to the college, then a missionary at Madras. 

Originally, the " Band" was simply an association of those 
interested in missionary work, who used to meet weekly in 
the southwest upper corner room of South College, every 
Sabbath P. M., for a half-hour before evening prayers. Prayer, 
conference, and the communication of intelligence from mis- 
sionary fields, were the chief features of those early meet- 
ings. The "Band" was more formally organized into a 
Society, April 10th, 1859. The object of the Band is to cul- 
tivate the true missionary spirit, and to ascertain the wants 
and condition of the heathen world. For a time (1862), the 
regular meetings were held at 24 North College, every Sab- 
bath morning at 10 A. M. Since then, the society has met in 
the different rooms of its members. Its constitution says : 
" By constant watchfulness and Christian self-denial, we will 
hold ourselves in readiness to obey the command of Christ, 
(their motto) ; and if Providence direct, go as missionaries 
to the heathen." Its membership has ever been small, yet 
devoted to the noble cause nearest their hearts ; the influence 
which its members have exerted upon the world cannot easily 
be measured. Many, whose names are enrolled on its books, 
have died in the missionary work ; many more are now labor- 
ing with success on heathen shores. 

Membership, since re-organization of Band, in 1859: 



64 BIBLE SOCIETY. OTHERTsOCIETIES. 



No. of No. of No. of No. of 

Class of Members. Class of Members. Class of Members. Class of Members. 

'59, ... 4 '63, ... 2 '67, ... 6 '71, ... 6 

'60, ... 3 '64, ... 6 '68, ... 4 '72, ... 6 

'61, ... 9 '65, ... 1 '69, ! . . 5 '73, ... 2 

'62, ... 3 '66, ... 1 '70, ... 11 '74, ... 2 
Total, 71. 



BIBLE SOCIETY. 



An auxiliary branch of the American Bible Society was, for 
a long time, "[established in Amherst College. Its depository 
was at the bookstore of J. S. & C. Adams, for quite a while ; 
afterwards (1860), it was removed to 21 South College. The 
object of the society seems to have been to furnish English, 
French, and German Bibles and Testaments of all sizes, to 
the students, at low prices. It has no existence now. 



OTHER SOCIETIES. 



To enumerate all the minor societies of ephemeral existence 
which have lived during the past twenty-five years of College 
History, would be a fruitless undertaking. Some classes 
have formed organizations in the different years of their 
course, which with such classes have ceased to live, and their 
names are only traditions. The I- n. K. society existed for a 
little over a year, and was then merged into -4. 4. 0. Its badge 
was a gold plate, star-shaped, with six points, nearly plain ; on 
one side " / n. K., 1835 ; " on the other, the name of the owner. 

The 0. P. Q. society existed in 1835. Its badge was a 
hexagonal gold medal, extensively displayed as a watch key, 
on which were the letters " 0. P. Q." 

Unsuccessful attempts have been made to permanently es- 
tablish a n. K., *. A'. 4., and z. V. A " Book and Key" So- 
ciety was established by the class of 1848 in their Sophomore 



OTHER SOCIETIES. 65 



year ; however, it was short-lived, not passing beyond that 
class. 

One society which assumed the name Ti Kpi was started 
in 1834, by Rev. Uriah Balkam, D. D., S. W. Clark, Rev. S. 
W. Hanks, and Rev. H. J. Van Lennep and others, of '37. 
It was social, literary, and religious in its character, and it is 
remembered, by one of its founders, as among the most 
profitable societies of that day. It was secret in all its pro- 
ceedings. One peculiar feature of the society was, that some 
one of the members must be absent from each meeting. The 
members present were then required to state " every fault of 
the absent member, literary, social, and moral." These criti- 
cisms were, soon after, presented in writing to the absent 
member, who must at the next meeting make his defense 
if any he had to the charges, and then he might join in the 
benevolent effort to criticise his now absent successor. 

A Sophomore society Sigma Theta was extant in 1852. 
It published a sheet called the "Amherst Scorpion" 

A "chosen few" of '71, '72, and '73, will not soon forget 
the "extempore debates" of "P. J." ; much less, its "con- 
vivial banquets." This organization was secret, and flourished 
in 1868-9. " P. J." were the initials of its secret name, PAN 
JANDRUM. 




66 PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 



II. 

PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 



The first periodical of any kind, issued by students of Am- 
herst College, was the Sprite, a magazine of 32 pages, which 
appeared in 1831. This was originated by certain members 
of the class of 1832, then Juniors. Thomas J. Farnham and 
Charles Clapp were active in its formation, and, for a while 
at least, served as editors. Amos W. Stock well, Amos Bui- 
lard, Franklin- Forbes, Samuel S. Tappan, and John A. Burn- 
ham, all of the class of 1833, were also connected with the 
editorial management. There may have been others, but 
these are all we can name with certainty. The conductors 
of this magazine assumed the fanciful name of the " Elves of 
Ginnistian," and sent forth from the green fields of fairy 
land their representative, the Sprite, to gratify the taste and 
minister to the pleasure of mortals. 

Of the contributors to this early publication, we know but 
little. Those we have been able to discover, are Rev. Jona- 
than Brace and Rev. Lewis Sabin, class of 1831 ; Hon. Lyman 
Gibbons, class of 1832 ; Caleb C. Field, James M. Goodhue, 
and Francis F. Marbury, class of 1833. 

The first number of the Sprite was issued in May, 1831. 
Its life was short, only six numbers being published, the last 
in March, 1832. The causes of its early death are uncertain, 
though, probably, the want of financial success was as strong 
as any. It was started as a private enterprise, and seems 
never to have gained that general support so necessary to 



PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 67 

prosperity. There appears also to have been a lack of har- 
mony among the " Elves" themselves. However this may 
be, its fate was sealed. 

The contents of the Sprite present but little variety. Tales, 
generally of a fanciful and romantic nature, essays and poems, 
of varying degrees of merit, with now and then a humorous 
sketch, make up its pages. 

In November, 1831, was issued the first number of a new 
periodical, the Shrine. This was intended as a rival to the 
Sprite, which, at that time, was dragging out a feeble life. 
But this publication seems to have been premature, for we 
find no other numbers issued till May, 1832, when Vol. I. 
No. 1, of the Shrine appeared. This was established and 
conducted, as a private venture, by Isaac C. Pray, of the class 
of 1833, assisted in the editorial management by George F. 
Homer, class of 1834. 

The Shrine was a magazine of 32 pages, published every 
academical month. Two volumes, of six numbers each, were 
issued, and it was discontinued only at Mr. Fray's graduation. 
It was well sustained, as it numbered among its contributors 
thirty of the best writers the college afforded. We cannot 
give a complete list of these, but among them were Hon. 
Nathan Belcher, Hon. James Bell, Rev. Samuel Hunt, and 
Hon. J. C. Perkins, of the class of 1832 ; C. B. H. Fessenden, 
Prof. H. D. Humphrey, and Hon. W. Z. Stuart, class of 1833 ; 
Prof. C. B. Adams, and Rev. H. W. Beecher, class of 1834 ; 
Rev. J. H. Bocock, and Chauncey Howard, class of 1835. 

Under the direction of Messrs. Pray and Homer, the Shrine 
early assumed a high literary character. Its articles were, in 
the main, carefully written, and it had no small effect in de- 
veloping the latent ability of the college. Its corps of con- 
tributors was unusually talented, and the personal enthusiasm 
of the editors made it a success. 

But, as seemed inevitable, a strong opposition was excited 
against it. This resulted, in March, 1833, in the establish- 
ment of the G-uest, a sheet of eight pages, edited by a " Lit- 
erary Club." The members of this " Club" have preserved 



68 PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 

their secret so well that we are able to mention only one of 
them Rev. John H. Bocock, of the class of 1835. Promin- 
ent among the writers, however, were William 0. Collins, 
and Hon. W. Z. Stuart, class of 1833; and Rev. H. W. 
Beecher, class of 1834. Only a few numbers of this periodi- 
cal were issued. Its contents are of the same general char- 
acter as those of the publications preceding it. 

These early periodicals have been well characterized as 
" college ephemera." They never gained a permanent foot- 
ing, and, as soon as the personal interest of their conductors 
ceased, they disappeared. For several years after this, noth- 
ing of the kind was published. The failure of these attempts 
seems to have discouraged any further trial. This depart- 
ment of student work was wholly neglected till the establish- 
ment of the Horw Collegiance, in October, 1837. Taking 
warning by the short-lived glory of its predecessors, this 
magazine was placed upon a different, and, as was hoped, a 
more permanent basis. It was published by the Senior class, 
and was under the immediate control of a board of editors 
chosen by the class. The editors of the first volume, from 
the class of 1838, were Hon. Horace Maynard, J. S. Thayer, 
Rev. J. A. McKinstry, Dr. C. E. Washburn, and W. 0. Gor- 
ham. J. B. Marshall also assisted to some extent in the edi- 
torial duties ; acting on one occasion, when three of the board 
were absent from college. The Horce was a periodical of 32 
pages, published each collegiate month. 

The editors of the second volume, from the class of 1839, 
were Rev. N. A. Hewit, James H. Bancroft, Rev. F. D. Hunt- 
ington, Rev. William Wakefield, and Hon. S. T. Spaulding. 
The editors of the third volume, from the class of 1840, were 
Hon. H. M. Spofford, D. R. Arnell, G. K. Crockett, Dr. Wil- 
liam Barrows, Hon. Charles Delano, and Dr. Franklin Tut- 
hill. 

In this periodical, as in nearly all the others, we find the 
editors furnishing a large share of the contents ; yet there 
were always some to share in the glory and the toil. We 
are unable to give anything like a complete list of contrib- 



PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 69 

utors, but among them may be mentioned Rev. Richard S. 
Storrs, Jr., Rev. J. W. Ray, James 0. Smith, and Albert R. 
Palmer. 

The distinguishing feature of the Horce was the brilliant 
Symposiaca, concocted, as tradition hath it, in that myster- 
ious room, which the uninitiated approached with awe and 
trembling, known as " Ultima Thule." Of late years it has 
somewhat lost its sanctity, and is now plain No. 30, South 
College. 

Taken all in all, the Horce Collegiance may be considered 
one of the best representatives of magazine literature the col- 
lege has ever had. And no wonder, for among its editors and 
contributors were some of the keenest minds and sharpest 
intellects of which Amherst can boast. It was assuredly a 
mistake that the old Horce was ever given up. But given up 
it was : the next class (1841) voted to discontinue its publi- 
cation. Doubtless, this resolve was mainly due to the low 
state of the college at this time. It was seeing its darkest 
days, the classes were growing smaller and smaller, and the 
support of a magazine among the students was deemed a 
luxury which must be dispensed with. 

Here we find another dreary blank, extending from 1840 
to 1848. In June of the latter year, appeared the first num- 
ber of the Indicator. To the class of 1849 belongs the honor 
of reviving the college magazine. The Indicator contained 
32 pages, and was published monthly. The following were 
entrusted with the editorial management of the first volume : 
Prof. William G. Hammond, John M. Emerson, Prof. Julius 
H. Seelye, Joseph D. Poland, and Overton Young. The edi- 
tors of the second volume, from the class of 1850, were Rev. 
George H. Gould, Rev. Jacob M. Manning, John H. Thomp- 
son, Henry Shipley, and Rev. Daniel W. Faunce. Of the 
third volume, from the class of 1851, Rev. William S. Karr, 
James A. Richards, Hon. John E. Sanford, Walter H. Lyon, 
and Ethan E. Boies. The editorial room was, as in the days 
of the Horce, old " Ultima Thule." 

Among the regular or occasional contributors to the Indi- 



70 PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 

cator* were W. M. Briggs, Rev. Henry Lobdell, Prof. Edward 
Hitchcock, Rev. Sylvanus C. Kendall, and Rev. Calvin S. 
Locke, class of 1849 ; W. A. Dickinson, and L. R. Williston, 
class of 1850 ; Charles C. Fowler, and Robert Stewart, class 
of 1851 ; Prof. G. N. Webber, and Rev. F. P. Chapin, class 
of 1852. 

The Indicator lived -for three years, and then it too went 
down to join the publications that had preceded it. Perhaps 
one cause of its untimely death, was the profundity of the 
articles it contained. They were hardly of a nature to suit 
the student, reading mainly for recreation ; and the number 
of those who would study the productions of their fellows 
was limited. The popular student periodical had hardly yet 
appeared. 

In May, 1850, was issued the first number of the Experi- 
ment, a little paper of four pages. Although not strictly, 
perhaps, a college periodical, yet, as it was established and 
carried on by a student, we give it place. The history of 
this paper is quite curious and interesting. L. B. Fifield, a 
member of the class of 1853, in his Freshman year, com- 
menced its publication as a means of financial assistance. 
He was a practical printer, and did all the work on the Ex- 
periment, acting as editor, proof-reader, compositor, paste- 
boy, and carrier. He obtained a good list of subscribers in 
Amherst, and was extending it into other colleges. His 
health failing, he was obliged to leave in November, 1851, 
and the Experiment was given up. This paper contained 
literary articles, items of college news, sketches of different 
colleges, and the novel feature of selections to be used as 
declamations. The Experiment was published on the 1st and 
15th of each month. Only five numbers were issued. 

The next periodical that comes to our notice, is the Am- 
herst Collegiate Magazine, of which the first number was 
issued in October, 1853, under the special auspices of the 
Senior class. It was published monthly, during the college 
terms, each number containing not less than 32 pages. 
The principal feature of this periodical, was the department 



PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 71 

of Vollegiana, which comprised reports of the Society meet- 
ings, and such other events of college life as deserved to be 
permanently recorded. This department is, by far, the most 
interesting, and, we are inclined to think, gave the magazine 
its long lease of life. The editors of the first volume, from 
the class of 1854, were Edward A. Crane, Rev. Henry V. 
Ernmons, William W. Fowler, Rev. John C. Kimball, and 
George Partridge. Of the second volume, from the class of 
1855, Rev. John D. Bell, Hon. John C. Caldwell, Rev. Mar- 
tin 8. Howard, Prof. Henry S. Kelsey, and Rev. James C. 
Parsons. Of the third volume, from the class of 1856, 
Rev. Edward P. Goodwin, Thomas P. Herrick, Rev. E. G. 
Cobb, Rev. William H. Ward, and George W. Wheeler. In 
February, 1856, E. G. Cobb resigned, and Rev. F. P. Nor- 
ton was chosen in his place. The editors of the fourth vol- 
ume, from the class of 1857, were Rev. B. H. Abbott, Rev. 
J. W. Dodge, Rev. T. G. Grassie, Rev. W. D. Herrick, and 
Rev. Denis Wortman. 

In October, 1857, with the commencement of the fifth vol- 
ume, the name was changed to the Ichnolite, the general 
plan, however, remaining the same. The new name was in- 
troduced with a characteristic letter from President Hitch- 
cock. Henceforth, the Ichnolite bore proudly upon its cover 
a well-executed engraving of an ichnological slab. At the 
same time, the magazine was enlarged twelve pages, and 
greatly improved in outward appearance. The editors of this 
volume, from the class of 1858, were Rev. J. B. Clark, James 
Collins, Rev. Rufus Emerson, Rev. E. P. Gardner, and 
Charles C. Gates. 

The editors of the sixth volume, from the class of 1859, 
were J. L. H. Ward, Rev. H. F. Hyde, J. 0. Tiffany, Rev. 
T. M. Boss, and Rev. M, McG. Dana. 

Of the;|seventh volume, class of 1860, Rev. Nathaniel 
Mighill, W. De Forest Prentiss, Rev. J. W. Ward, Richard 
D. Douglass, and Rev. Horace Parker. 

This volume of the Ichnolite is enriched by some very cu- 
rious specimens of Latin-English, contributed by Z. C. Mon- 



72 PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 

tague of the class of 1832. These consist of English sen- 
tences, made up entirely of classical Latin words, and have 
been pronounced by an eminent author and critic, as worthy 
of a high place among the Curiosities of Literature. 

The editors of the eighth volume, from the class of 1861, 
were John Dole, M. D., W. M. Pomeroy, Rev. Elijah Harmon, 
Rev. James Lewis, and Rev. G. P. Merriam. Only four 
numbers, of 52 pages each, were comprised in this volume. 

These later periodicals the Collegiate Magazine and the 
Ichnolite are made up of rather different materials from 
any of those preceding. The romantic tales and sonnets of 
the Horce, had given place to a different style of writing. 
Essays became more popular, on subjects of more general 
interest; the poetry was more that of description than 
imagination, objective, rather than subjective ; more space 
was, from year to year, given to the department of college 
news, while the Nodes Coenceque Deorum and the Editor's 
Table, though hardly as sparkling as the Symposiaca of the 
Horce, were full of bright thoughts and brilliant sayings. It 
would be impossible to attempt a complete list of contribu- 
tors. Prominent among them, however, were men who have 
since reached eminence in their chosen professions. The 
number who wrote for these publications was large, and all 
were interested in the success of their college magazine. 

We come now to the last, though by no means the least, 
of these publications. This was the Amherst College Maga- 
zine, a continuation of the Ichnolite, the only change being 
in name. The editors of this, the ninth volume, from 
the class of 1862, were Charles H. Sweetser, Truman Tom- 
son, Rev. George G. Phipps, William J. Biimey, and Isaac 
H. Maynard. The " den " was No. 5, North College. The 
class of 1862 was exceptionally brilliant, and the best talent 
of its members was enlisted in the support of its periodical. 
The magazine of this year is characterized by an indepen- 
dence of thought and expression, seldom found in a student 
publication. Indeed, so far was this carried, that one of the 
editors was obliged to retire for a time, on account of a severe 



PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 73 

criticism upon an orator of Commencement week, published 
in the" first number. Short, sharp, spicy articles, upon in- 
teresting subjects of the day, render this the most readable 
periodical of the series. In this volume are to be found the 
famous " Blue Laws of South Hadley," compiled by C. H. 
Sweetser ; and the grand " Battle Hymn of the Republic," by 
Albert Bryant. The latter has justly been called the finest 
Class Ode ever written at Amherst College. 

This magazine, issued under various names, though in all 
essential points the same, had now completed its ninth year. 
Its progress had ever been onward. Yet its years of life, 
and the high standard it had reached, could not save it from 
the fate which had overtaken its predecessors. It died; but 
it died gloriously. The terrible struggle, through which the 
nation was then passing, engrossed the minds of the students, 
and but little inclination was felt for aught else. Editors 
were, indeed, chosen by the next class, but they never 
entered upon their duties. The last magazine had been 
issued. 

The Item, Trumpet, Bugle, Harvest Sheaf, and several 
other sheets, appeared during the years from 1859 to 1863. 
These were publications, issued on special occasions, and only 
deserve mention here because they were edited by members 
of college. Charles H. Sweetser, of the class of 1862, was 
prominently connected with these papers. Indeed, the news- 
paper-instinct was so strong in him, that, even in his collegi- 
ate life, he could not refrain from giving it expression. The 
brilliant career of the Round Table and the Mail, shows his 
success after leaving college, and, had his early death not 
prevented, we might reasonably have expected from him, far 
higher achievements in the department of letters. 

A little before this, had appeared the Undergraduate a 
literary, historical, and educational magazine, published at 
Yale College, and conducted by an "Association of Collegi- 
ate and Professional students in the United States and 
Europe." Although not strictly within our province, yet, 
as Amherst was represented in this Association, we have 
10 



74 PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 

deemed it proper to mention this periodical. It was pub- 
lished quarterly, each number containing from 150 to 200 
pages, and was made up of Literary Essays and News Arti- 
cles, from the different colleges belonging to the Association. 
It also contained articles by Professors and Professional stu- 
dents, both in America and Europe. With the issue of the 
second number, the title was changed to the University Quar- 
terly, by which name it was henceforth known. 

The editors chosen to represent Amherst were, for the year 
1860, from the class of '60, Gen. Francis A. Walker, Rev. 
J. W. Ward, Jr., and Rev. Nathaniel Mighill. For the follow- 
ing year, from the class of 1861, Rev. B. M. Fullerton, George 
W. Waite, and Rev. G. F. Merriam. Junior editor, class of 
1862, Isaac H. Maynard. For the third year, from class of 
1862, W. I. Allen, I. H. Maynard, M. F. Dickinson, Jr. 
Junior editor, class of 1863, C. D. Adams. The University 
Quarterly lived for about two years, and then " being loved 
of the gods, died young." 

For several 'years after the suspension of the Amkerst Col- 
lege Magazine, no periodical was issued. To be sure, enthu- 
siastic students had cherished hopes of its revival, but no 
one seemed willing to undertake the work. Nothing was 
done, till in February, 1868, appeared the first number of the 
Amherst Student. This was established as a college newspa- 
per, by several individuals of the Junior class ('69). The 
original projectors were Albert F. Tenney, Daniel G. Thomp- 
son, Joseph K. Chickering, Richard Goodman, Jr., John K. 
Richardson, Robert M. Woods, William C. Stokes, Henry T. 
Morse, and Marcus W. Montgomery. The three last men- 
tioned did nOt, however, take any active part in the manage- 
ment of the paper. 

The Student began as a sheet of 8 pages, the last two pages 
being devoted to advertisements : each volume containing 
twenty numbers, and published fortnightly during the collegi- 
ate sessions. It contained full reports of the Literary Society 
meetings, items of college news, correspondence from other 
colleges, poems, essays, and the like. A portion of the space 



PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 75 

was devoted to what might properly be called " magazine " 
articles. From the very first, great attention was paid to the 
record of Alumni and their doings, and, we may safely say, 
the " Personals " became invaluable to every graduate. This 
department is one no other college paper has had in the per- 
fection of the Student. 

Eighteen numbers were published by the editors from 1869, 
when the increasing duties of Senior year obliged them to 
yield the management to other hands. They chose as their 
successors from the class of 1870, the following gentlemen : 
Washington Choate, Brant Y. B. Dixon, A. Judson Tits- 
worth, George H. White, and William K. Wickes. Mr. 
Dixon soon withdrew from college, and Samuel L. Graves 
was chosen in his place. 

With number sixteen of the second volume, the connec- 
tion of the editors from 1870 ceased. They elected as editors 
from the class of 1871, William C. Brownell, W. Trowbridge 
Forbes, Dwight D. Porter, Robert C. Rockwell, Theodore 
L. Stiles, and John W. Simpson. With the beginning of the 
third volume, the outward appearance of the paper was 
greatly improved. It was hereafter printed on tinted paper, 
and entirely new type was provided. Early in this volume, 
another important change was made. Heretofore, the busi- 
ness management had rested entirely with the publishers, the 
editors having no financial responsibility. Some trouble 
having arisen in regard to the space to be devoted to adver- 
tisements, it was determined on the part of the editors, to 
take the whole charge, both of editing and publishing, into 
their own hands. A satisfactory arrangement was made with 
the publishers, and the change took place. This, of course, 
threw great personal responsibility and risk upon the mana- 
gers ; but, being nobly sustained by the whole body of 
students, they were enabled to carry out their plans success- 
fully. 

With the sixteenth number of the third volume, the newly 
chosen editors, from the class of 1872, entered upon their 
duties. The following comprised the board: Herbert B. 



76 PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 

Adams, James Ding well, David L. Holbrook, John W. 
McElhinney, W. Irving Putnam, and Harry S. Stevens. 
These gentlemen have carried forward the Student very suc- 
cessfully, increasing the subscription list, and making the 
paper of more permanent interest and value to both students 
and Alumni. The paper has quite recently been enlarged by 
the addition of four pages, making the Student now a twelve- 
page periodical. From a very humble beginning, it has be- 
come a fixed institution of the College, and is a powerful 
influencer of opinion. We cannot better express the estima- 
tion in which it is held, than by the following words from 
Prof. R. D. Hitchcock : " The present Amherst Student, I 
honestly think, is the manliest and most sensible paper we 
have ever had." 

A sketch of Periodical Literature would be incomplete 
without some account of those publications by the students 
which might, perhaps, be called "complementary'' Cata- 
logues. The Catalogue proper, gives the main facts respect- 
ing the college, but something else is needed to record the 
real student life. Such a want was early felt, but we find no 
publication of this nature till January, 1847, when the first 
number of the College Dial was issued. This is in the 
form of a newspaper of four pages, and contains lists of the 
Faculty, students, members of the various societies, musical 
associations, eating clubs, &c., &c. The second number ap- 
peared in October, 1847, in the same style, and with contents 
of the same general character. The editors of both these are 
unknown to us. 

Nothing further seems to have been attempted in this direc- 
tion, till 1855. In October, of that year, was published the 
College Olio, also in newspaper form. This, in addition 
to the usual contents, contains two poems " Cimices," and 
" A Knowde onto the appleton Kabbynet." We are unable 
to give the editors. In November, 1856, appeared the Am- 
herst Aurora, published by the Junior class ('58.) The 
editors were Rev. George S. Bishop, E. A. P. Brewster, E. S. 
Hewitt, and H. M. Sprague. This was also in newspaper 
form. 



PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 77 

Iii November, 1857, was issued the Olio, under the aus- 
pices of the class of 1859. The editors were Henry L. Clapp, 
J. Osmond Tiffany, Joshua Gr. Hawkes, and John L. H. 
Ward. This was also a newspaper of four pages, embellished 
with an engraving of the College buildings. 

The Olio of the next year, appeared in October, 1858, 
under the editorial charge of the following members of the 
class of 1860 : Charles B. Ruggles, Elliot Sanford, William 
DeForest Prentiss, and Edward R. Wheeler. This was in the 
same form as those which had preceded it, but presented a 
better typographical appearance. It was headed with a view 
of the College buildings, similar to that of the year before, 
but more clearly and correctly engraved. 

The publication of the next class was in pamphlet form, 
containing thirty-two pages. The name was changed to the 
Amherst College Olio. The editors, from the class of 1861, 
were Asa S. Hardy, M. Porter Snell, and Rev. George W. 
Phillips. 

The Olio of the following year, was in the same style, 
and size. The editors, from the class of 1862, were W. Ir- 
ving Allen, Rev. Rowland H. Allen, and Francis W. Adams. 

The editors for the succeeding year, from the class of 1863, 
were Walter M. Howland, R. D. Pratt, and Robert I. Jones. 
This also was a pamphlet of thirty-two pages. 

The editors of the next issue, were, from the class of 1864, 
F. G. McDonald, Nathan Harrington, and Rev. Calvin R. 
Fitts. This contained twenty-eight pages. 

With the succeeding class, (1865) there was some difficulty, 
and the only way to settle the matter seems to have been 
the publication of two Olios. This was accordingly done : 
one, by the editors elected by the class, who were Martin K. 
Pasco, Henry P. Moulton, and Charles E. Harwood ; the 
other, by the " Juniors of the Secret Societies," represented 
by John S. Runnells, Edward P. Smith, and James L. Bishop. 
These were both of the same size, differing slightly in con- 
tents, and appeared, the one September 11 ; the other, Sep- 
tember 12, 1863. 



78 PERIODICAL LITERATURE. 

The Olio of the next year, contained forty pages, with the 
following editors, from the class of 1866 : Rev. George Bray- 
ton, William P. Fisher, and Herbert M. Small. 

From the class of 1867, were chosen as editors : Cassius 
M. Terry, John P. Fernald, Frederick W. March, William E. 
Horton, and B. F. W. Ballard. This Olio was enlarged ten 
pages, and contains a carefully prepared " Roll of Honor." 

The editors from the class of 1868, were Waterman T. 
Hewett, Isaac W. Wood, Stephen S. Lancaster, James L. 
Terry, and George A. Coburn. This was a pamphlet of forty- 
four pages. 

The Olio of the class of 1869, contained fifty-two pages. 
The editors were Charles H. Allen, Richard Goodman, Jr., 
Edward A. Benner, Joseph B. Seabury, and Frank H. Stod- 
dard. 

The class of 1870 was represented by Brant V. B. Dixon, 
George H. White, Merritt H. Walker, Frank F. Coburn, and 
Charles H. Daniels. This number contains a brilliant page 
of " Shaksperianisms," aptly characterizing, by a short quo- 
tation, various men in college/ 

The editors, for 1871, were William C. Brownell, Henry H. 
Sawyer, Henry W. Eldredge, Frank A. Goss, and William B. 
Homer. In this number, is introduced the new feature of the 
Status Classium, which consists of a description of each class 
and its condition, furnished by some one of its members. In 
this also appears, for the first time, the "Amherst Navy," with 
four crews, Junior, Sophomore, Freshman, and " Thetis." 

In 1870, was published the largest and most complete Olio 
of the series. It contained eighty pages, and, in outward 
appearance, is the best ever published. The editors, from the 
class of 1872, were David L. Holbrook, Harry S. Stevens, W. 
Irving Putnam, Constant C, Hodgman, George Fowler, and 
Herman A. Bailey. The Status Classium is continued in this, 
and the Boating Associations occupy a prominent place. 

The Olio has become as great a necessity as the College 
Catalogue, and will, undoubtedly, be published as long as 
student institutions and customs exist to be chronicled. 



III. 
COLLEGE HONORS. 



The subjoined list gives the names of those who have gained 
the highest college honors, which have been given in each 
class by the Faculty, as rewards for scholarship : 

Valedictory. Salutatory. 

Class of 

1822. No Valedictorian. Prof. EBENEZER STRONG SNELL, 

1823. Rev. ELIJAH PAINE, Rev. THEOPHILDS PACKARD, 

1824. Prof. GEORGE SHEPARD, Rev. AUSTIN RICHARDS, 

1825. Rev. JONATHAN LEAVITT, ROBERT ALLEN COFFIN, 

1826. FRANCIS FELLOWES, Rev. HARVEY FITTS, 

1827. Rev. JOSEPH SYLVESTER CLARK, Rev. TIMOTHY DWIGHT, 

1828. WILLIAM RICHARDS, THOMAS DOUGLAS GREGG, 

1829. STILLMAN MOODY, Rev. THOMAS BOUTELLE, 

1830. Prof. HORATIO BALCH HACKETT, Prof. WILLIAM SEYMOUR TYLER, 

1831. Rev. LEWIS SABIN, Rev. EBENEZER BURGESS, 

1832. CHARLES CLAPP, Hon. JONATHAN COGSWELL PERKINS, 

1833. Rev. AMOS BULLARD, Hon. WM. ZEPHANIAH STUART,* 

1834. Prof. CHARLES BAKER ADAMS, Rev. SAMUEL HOPKINS EMERY, 

1835. Rev. CLINTON CLARK, Rev. TIMOTHY ALDEN TAYLOR, 

1836. Rev. WILLIAM BRADFORD HOMER, Hon. ALEX. HAMILTON BULLOCK, 

1837. Rev. HENRY JOHN VAN LENNEP, Rev. ROBERT STEVENS HITCHCOCK, 

1838. Hon. HORACE MAYNARD, CHARLES E. WASHBURN,M. D., 

1839. Bp. FREDERIC D. HUNTINGTON, THOMAS SPENCER MILLER, 

1840. Prof. GEORGE BAKER JEWETT, Hon. HENRY MARTYN SPOFFORD, 

1841. EPHRAIM WARD BOND, LL. B- EDWARD GRISWOLD' TYLER, 

1842. Rev. LAUREN ARMSBY, Rev. JAMES GRANGER BRIDGMAN, 

1843. Rev. DAVID TORREY, Rev. DANIEL HERBERT TEMPLE, 

1844. Rev. LEWIS GREEN, Rev. EDMUND KIMBALL ALDEN, 
1815. Prof. FRANCIS ANDREW MARCH, Prof. MARSHALL HENSHAW, 

1846. LEONARD HUMPHREY, Hon. WILLIAM ROWLAND, 

1847. Rev. TIMOTHY STOWE, Rev. HENRY LUTHER EDWARDS, 

* Substitute for John A. Burnham. 



80 



COLLEGE HONORS. 



Valedictory. 
Class of 

1848. Rev. WILLIAM C. DICKINSON, 

1849. JOHN MILTON EMERSON, 

1850. AUGUSTINE MILTON GAY, 

1851. Hon. JOHN ELLIOT SANFORD, 



Salutatory. 

Rev. SAMUEL FISK. 

Prof. WM. GARDINER HAMMOND. 

GEORGE HOWLAND. 
Rev. MILAN CYRUS STEBBINS. 



1852. THEODORE HIRAM BENJAMIN, HENRY DWIGHT ROOT. 

1853. Prof. RICHARD SALTER STORRS, Prof. EDWARD PAYSON CROWELL. 

1854. WM. WORTHINGTON FOWLER, Rev. EDWIN DIMOCK. 

1855. HASKET DERBY, M. D., Prof. WILLIAM LEWIS MONTAGUE. 



1856. WM. FROTHINGHAM BRADBURY, 

1857. Prof. RICHARD HENRY MATHER, Rev, 

1858. Prof. LYMAN SIBLEY ROWLAND, 

1859. JAMES PAUL FRENCH, 

1860. Rev. FRANCIS EMORY TOWER, 
WM. AUSTIN RICHARDS, (by lot,) 
JOHN AVERY, 

ISAAC HORTON MAYNARD, (by lot,) 
MARQUIS FAYETTE DICKINSON, 
JAMES HENRY NASH, 
CHARLES DICKINSON ADAMS, 
FARQUHARSON GRIFFITH MCDONALD, 
BENJ. KENDALL EMERSON, (by lot,) 
JOSEPH HENRY SAWYER, 
EDWARD PAYSON SMITH, 
Prof HENRY MATHER TYLER, 
C MAURICE. BENAIA BLAKE, (by lot,) 
j SAMUEL JOHNSON DIKE, 
1 NEHEMIAH HUTCHINSON GAGE, 
{ CHARLES HENRY PARKHURST, 
/ ELIHU ROOT, (by lot,) 
1867 5 WILLIAM HENRY COBB, 

( Rev. CHARLES WARE PARK, 

1868. WILLIAM WELLS EATON, 

1869. JOHN KENDALL RICHARDSON, 

1870. HARVEY PORTER, 

1871. EDWIN MUNSELL BLISS, 



1861 

1862 

1863. 
1864. 

1865 <i 



EDWARD EMERSON BRADBURY. 
WILLIAM CRAWFORD. 
GEORGE SUMNER GROSVENOR. 
JOHN LORD HAYES WARD. 
HORACE BINNEY. 
CHARLES G. GODDARD PAINE. 

GEORGE MILTON REED. 



EMMONS HUGHITT. 
WILLIAM WELLINGTON TYLER. 
JAMES LORD BISHOP, LL. B. 



CHARLES H. CHANDLER, (by lot.] 
JAMES EDWIN SPEAR. 



EDWIN AUGUSTUS GROSVENOR. 



ELIPHALET WILLIAMS TYLER. 

HENRY BULLARD RICHARDSON. 
JAMES OLNEY AVERILL, 
JOSEPH NATHANIEL BLAN CHARD. 



TABULAR VIEW OF COMMENCEMENT APPOINTMENTS * 




.2 


> 
















































j 








*OJ 






































a 










o 






< 


i 








CO 






oo 

























.2 









^ 


oi 




CLASS 


Jr: 


r who r< 

ts. 


I 


1 





Oration 


1 







.1 




| 








'3 










uoissnos 




1 


1 


j 


tation. 


1 

5 


sertatior 


3 




OF '"* 


O> r- 






^ 




X 






O 






























r/j 








=f 

-. & 

<u^ 

"1 


ole numb 
ppointme 


'? 

5 


2 

o 

1 


_o 
g 


losophica 


:- 



CJ 

-.c 


O 

g 

5 


\ 


1 


1 


putations 


sertations 


5 




i 


iterance. 


i 
1 





1 


! 

o 


K 

o 

1. 




1 


o 

~ 
- 


1 

~ 


a 




.a 
J 


CO 




*** <^ 


-C cs 


^' 


3 


5 


^ 


1 





1 




1 


E, 


Q 


LJ 







5 


| 


3 


s 


s 


TL 


g 


2 



x 


Ei 


1 


1822 


3 


2 






i 












1 


































1823 


5 


4 


i 




i 


1 
























1 




















1824 


20 


17 


i 




i 


2 










3 










2 


i 


1 


2 


















1825 


25 


18 


i 




i 


1 










2 










8 


i 




2 


2 




2 










1 


1826 


30 


21 


i 




i 


1 










, 2 




2 




1 


6 






2 
















1 


1827 


23 


23 


i 




i 


1 










4 




1 




2 


8 






2 
















1 


1828 


40 


25 


i 




i 












3 




8 




2 


3 






4 


2 














2 


1829 


39 


27 


i 




i 


2 










4 




3 




5 






1 


2 




2 


2 












1830 


32 


26 


i 




i 


1 










3 




4 




2 




2 




2 


4 


1 












1 


1831 


60 


28 


i 




i 


2 










6 




2 












7 


2 


2 




1 


l 








1832 


38 


21 


i 




i 


2 










2 


4 




1 


5 








3 


4 
















1833 


38 


22 


i 




i 


1 










4 


4 


2 


1 


5 








5 


1 


2 








1 






1834 


39 


25 


i 




i 


2 










3 


4 


4 


1 


5 










3 














1 


1835 


39 


25 






i 


2 










5 


4 


2 




3 








3 


6 












1 




1836 


38 


25 








1 










7 


S 


3 




4 


3 






4 


















1837 


53 


18 








2 










4 


2 


1 


1 


8 










4 


2 










2 


1 


1838 


42 


26 








1 










4 


2 


5 


4 


6 








3 














1 


1 


1839 


57 


29 








2 










9 




6 


r, 


























1 


1840 


44 


24 


i 






1 










9 




2 


r. 


























1 


1841 


32 


22 


i 






2 










7 




4 


:; 




























1842 


28 


23 


i 






1 










6 




6 


6 




























1843 


21 


21 


l 






1 










8 




3 


3 










4 


















1844 


29 


29 


i 






2 










8 




8 


3 






















2 






1845 


30 


30 








1 










10 




8 


4 










5 
















1 


1846 


26 


25 








1 










9 




6 


3 




























1847 


18 


17 








1 










8 




5 




























1 


1848 


30 


29 








2 










9 




8 


6 










4 












2 






1849 


32 


29 








2 










9 




10 


5 






















1 






1850 


25 


23 








2 










r 




8 


2 






















2 






1851 


41 


25 








1 










9 




18 






























1852 


42 


42 








1 










to 




17 


13 




























1853 


42 


18 


i 






2 










14 


































1854 


37 


21 


2 






2 










16 


































1855 


53 


30 


1 






2 










24 
































2 


1856 


46 


27 


1 






1 


2 








22 


































1857 


44 


24 


1 






1 










21 


































1858 


51 


22 


1 






1 










19 


















, 
















1859 


46 


23 


2 






1 










17 














1 


















1 


1860 


47 


25 


1 






1 


1 








19 














1 


















1 


1861 


49 


30 


2 






1 


1 








24 
































1 


1862 


55 


30 


3 




i 


1 


2 








21 
































2 


1863 


42 


24 




i 


i 


1 


1 


5 


10 


7 


































1 


1864 


33 


17 


1 




i 


1 


2 


6 


2 


5 


































1 


1865 


62 


33 


4 




j 


2 


1 


to 


10 


9 


































1 


1866 


51 


29 


4 


2 




2 


1 


i 


10 


3 




































1867 


48 


26 


3 


1 






2 


g 


10 


5 




































1868 


39 


26 


1 


1 




1 


1 


z 


7 


8 




































1869 


56 


36 


4 


1 




1 


2 


18 


5 


5 
















1 




















1870 


48 


35 


1 


1 




2 


3 


(i 


18 


9 




































1871 


59 


38 


3 


2 




1 


1 


10 


6 


16 




































Total, 


1927 


1235 


6( i 


ii 


44 


61 ; 


2( 


71 


7:; 


66 


372 


89 


13<5 


i;:> 


4:; 


25 


4 


6 


r.4 


28 


9 


4 


1 


l 


8 


4 


23 


Average number of Graduates, (Fifty Classes,) 38.54. 
Average number of Appointments, (Fifty Classes,) 24.70. 


*Appointments are given in the order of the grades of scholarship : the English Oration being 
"Valedictorian rank;" the Latin (or Classical), " Salutatorian," etc. Those to the right of 


the double line are assigned, not so much according to grades of scholarship, as to some peculiar 
fitness ; hence, in some classes, persons appear twice, as in 1825. 



11 



82 CLASS DAY. 



CLASS DAY, AND CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 



We purpose in this brief sketch to mention some of the 
customs connected with Class Day, and to give a list of the 
various officers as far as we have been able to obtain them. 

Class Day began with the class of 1852, though one or two 
classes preceding had set apart a day near the close of their 
course, to be devoted to intellectual and social enjoyment. 
But the exercises, heretofore, had been purely private : this 
class, for the first time, made them public, and properly 
originated the famous " Class Day." 

We shall give a particular account of the exercises of this 
the first occasion of the kind. At 7-J o'clock in the 
evening, the class gathered in front of the chapel, and, under 
escort of a band of music, marched to the rooms of each 
tutor, where these officers were serenaded and called out to 
respond. The under classes volunteered to escort the Sen- 
iors to Phoenix Hall, where the public exercises were held. 

The first performance of the evening was the delivery of 
a Poem, followed by an Oration. After this, an Ode was 
sung by the class. As the audience retired, highly pleased 
with their evening's entertainment, they gave three hearty 
cheers for the " Class of 1852." These were well received 
and earnestly reciprocated. The class, headed by the band, 
then marched to the residences of the President and the 
various Professors, where each was addressed by some mem- 
ber of the class. A pleasant feature of these exercises was 
the presentation of bouquets to each one of the Seniors. 
When these serenades had been finished, the class marched 
to the Hygeian Hotel, where a supper was in readiness. At 
just 12 o'clock, they seated themselve at the table, and the 
feasting and merriment were kept up till an early hour of the 
morning. 

The " Class Supper " has ever since been considered one 
of the pleasant occasions of the college course. At this 
time are divulged the tender secrets of the heart, till then 



CLASS DAY. 83 



unknown ; and here, also, past estrangements are forgotten, 
and the members of the class pledge each to each eternal 
friendship. 

The class of 1853 introduced some new customs. The 
class assembled early in the forenoon, to conduct what became 
known as " Mock Recitations." These consisted of a visit to 
each of the different recitation rooms, where some one of the 
class, usually chosen for his ability to imitate the peculiari- 
ties of the Professor, seated himself at the desk, and pro- 
ceeded to open the recitation, by calling upon some members 
to recite. The latter were commonly selected from those 
whose devotion to that particular department had not been 
especially marked. These recitations were, as might have 
been expected, oftentimes exceedingly amusing. On leaving 
the room, three hearty cheers were given. The public exer- 
cises were held in the afternoon at 'the chapel. These exer- 
cises were interspersed with singing by the Class Quartette 
Club. Adjournment was then made to the College Grove, 
where an hour was pleasantly spent in the enjoyment of 
pipes and lemonade. 

The programme of Class Day after this remained essen- 
tially the same, though various changes were introduced by 
succeeding classes. The class of 1854, for example, caused 
a salute to be fired in the evening for each member of the 
class. The class of 1855 introduced their Class Day by a 
business meeting, held in the Senior recitation room, at which 
a general exchange of lithographs took place. After this, a 
Class Prayer Meeting was held. The public exercises of the 
afternoon closed with the singing of " Auld Lang Syne," by 
the class. A song, composed for the occasion, was also sung. 
This was probably the origin of the " Class Ode," though 
the Odist does not appear, as a distinct Class Day officer, till 
later. 

Two years after, with the class of 1857, the germ of the 
present " Grove Oration " arose. Just as the class was going 
into the Supper, the undergraduates received a few parting 
words of a humorous, rather than of a pathetic nature 



84 CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 



from one of its members. With the class of 1860, the pub- 
lic exercises were, for the first time, held in the village 
church, that structure then familiarly known as the " Old 
Red Ark," but since dignified by the authorities with the 
name of " College Hall." The address to the lower classes 
was, in this year, delivered in the grove. The " Prophecy " 
was introduced by the class of 1861. In that year, it was a 
public exercise, but ever afterwards was delivered at the 
Class Supper, and became purely private. Owing to some 
dissensions in the class, there was no Class Day in 1866. In 
1868, the class of 1870, then Sophomore, introduced the 
plan, since kept up, of a parting song to the Seniors. The 
class of 1870 elected two new officers the " Ivy Orator," 
and " Ivy Poet." This innovation was not well received, 
and the following class did not choose these officers. The 
Class Day of 1870, also, had the novel feature of a " Japan- 
ese Oration," delivered by a native of Japan, who was a 
member of that class. 

Class Day has always excited great interest among the 
undergraduates, and its honors have been as eagerly coveted 
as any in the college course. Below we give the list of ap- 
pointments made by the different classes : 

Class of 1852. 

Date, - - Monday, June 28. 

Orator, EDWARD S. LARNED. 

Poet, - HENRY SABIN. 

Class Supper, Hygeian Hotel, Araherst. 

Class of 1858. 

Date, Tuesday, June 28. 

Orator, - - JOSHUA N. MARSHALL. 

Poet, GEORGE W. CLARK. 

Toast Master, DANIEL C. LITCHFIELD. 

Farewell Address to Faculty, - SANBORN TENNEY. 

" " THOMAS D. ADAMS. 

" " AMOS H. COOLIDGE. 

REUBEN M. BENJAMIN. 

" " DANIEL C. LITCHFIELD. 

" " EDWARD H. PRATT. 

" ELIJAH B. SMITH. 



CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 85 



Marshal, - HARVEY S. CARPENTER. 

Class Supper, Howe's Hall, Amherst. 

Class of 1854. 

Date, Tuesday, June 27. 

Orator, - HENRY V. EMMONS. 

Poet, JOHN C. KIMBALL. 

Toast Master, CHARLES A. WILSON. 

Farewell Address to Faculty, - WILLARD MERRILL. 

NORMAN A. PRENTISS. 

" EDWIN DIMOCK. 

JOHN W. UNDERBILL. 
CHARLES P. RUGG. 
HORACE P. SMITH. 
ELIHU M. MORSE. 
JAMES F. CLARKE. 

Marshal, - GEORGE PARTRIDGE. 

Class Supper, Howe's Hall, Amherst. 

Class of 1855. 

Date, Wednesday, June 27. 

Orator, MATTHEW Me CLUNG 

Poet, - CHESTER D. JEFFERDS. 

Toast Master, DIXI C. HOYT. 

Farewell Address to Faculty, HENRY S. KELSEY. 

JOHN C. CALDWELL. 

GEORGE DENISON. 

CHESTER D. JEFFERDS. 

JOHN L. GRAVES. 

MARTIN S. HOWARD. 

GEORGE WASHBURN. 

JAMES C. PARSONS. 

ELIJAH P. HARRIS. 

Marshal, - RUFUS CHOATE, JR. 

Class Supper, American House, Amherst. 

Class of 1856. 

Date, Wednesday, July 2. 

Orator, - JOSEPH ANDREWS. 

Poet, HIRAM C. HAYD'N. 

Toast Master, THOMAS P. HERRICK. 

Marshal, - . - GEORGE W. WHEELER. 

Class Supper, Pocumtuck House, Deerfield. 



86 CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 



Class of 1857. 

Date, - - Wednesday, July 1. 

Orator, - JOHN H. BOALT. 

Poet, - - ALVAH L. FRISBIE. 

Address to Lower Classes, - - HENRY W. JONES. 

Marshal, - JAMES C. CLAPP. 
Class Supper, American House, Amherst. 

Class of 1858. 

Date, Wednesday, June 30. 

Orator, - JAMES D. WILSON. 

Poet, - - KUFUS EMERSON. 
Address to Lower Classes, - - GARDNER P. STICKNEY. 

Toast Master, ETHAN A. P. BREWSTER. 

Farewell Address to Faculty, - JOSEPH B. CLARK. 

" " GEORGE S. BISHOP. 

" " SAMUEL B. SHERRILL. 

" " ALFRED A. ELLSWORTH. 

" " GEORGE C. CLARKE 

" " ETHAN A. P. BREWSTER. 

" " LYMAN S. ROWLAND. 

" " SAMUEL P. TUCK. 

Marshal, HENRY G. THOMAS. 
Class Supper, American House, Amherst. 

Class of 1859. 

" Post Prcelia Premia." 

Date, - Wednesday, June 29. 

Orator, GEORGE L. SMEAD. 

Poet, JAMES F. CLAFLIN. 

Grove Orator, - HENRY C. SKINNER. 

Odist, - GANSEVOORT D. CONSAUL. 

Marshal, - SIDNEY W. HOWE. 
Class Supper, Pocumtuck House, Deerfield. 

Class of 1860. 

"'H AXrjSeia." 

Date, - Wednesday, June 27. 

Orator, - NATHANIEL MIGHILL 

Poet, - JAMES W. WARD, JR 

Grove Orator, - NATHAN B. KNAPP 

Toast Master, - HENRY M. HOLMES 

Marshal, - SAMUEL J. STORRS 
Class Supper, Pocumtuck House, Deerfield. 



CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 87 



Class of 1861, 

" Nan Nobis Solum." 

Date, Wednesday, June 12. 

Orator, - JOHN DOLE. 

Poet, - E. PORTER DYER, JR. 

Grove Orator, - CHARLES G. KING. 

Odist, GEORGE W. WAITE. 

Prophet, JOSEPH A. LEACH. 

Marshal, THOMAS BLAGDEN. 
Class Supper, Antique House, Palmer. 

Class of 1862. 

"Cogita Fare Fac." 

Date, Wednesday, June 11. 

Orator, - CALVIN STEBBINS. 

Poet, - CHARLES H. SWEETSER. 

Grove Orator, GEORGE MACOMBER. 

Odist, ALBERT BRYANT. 

Prophet, CHARLES T. HAYNES. 
Class Supper, Mansion House, Northampton. 

Class of 1863. 

" Ou' ^ofceiv d\V etvcu." 

Date, Wednesday, June 10. 

Orator, CHARLES D- ADAMS. 

Poet, - GEORGE F. STANTON. 

Grove Orator, GEORGE H. WELLS. 

Odist, FRED. B. ALLEN. 

Prophet, - SIMEON NASH, JR. 

Toast Master, - - FRED. B. ALLEN. 
Class Supper, Mansion House, Northampton. 

Class of 1864. 

" Occupet Extremum Scabies." 

Date, Wednesday, June 15. 

Orator, - CHARLES M. LAMSON. 

Poet, - HENRY M. TENNEY 

Grove Orator, - - GEORGE H. HOLT 

Odist, WILLIAM H. WHITING. 

Prophet, EDWARD S. TOWNE. 

Class Supper, Antique House, Palmer. 



88 



CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 



Date, 
Orator, 
Poet, 

Grove Orator, 
Odist, - 
Prophet, 
Marshal, 
Toast Master, 



Class of 1865. 

' ' Finis Coronat Opus." 

Wednesday, June 14. 

ALBERT G. BALE. 

. - ' . GEORGE D. GRAY. 

- FRANK H. SAYLOR. 

EDWIN P. FROST. 

JOSEPH H. SAWYER. 

- - - ASA G. ABBOTT. 

WILLIAM S. KNOX. 

Class Supper, Mansion House, Greenfield. 



Class of 1866. 



No CLASS DAY. 



Class of 1867, 



KCl\ii)V." 



Date, 
Orator, 
Poet, 

Grove Orator, 
Odist, 
Prophet, 
Marshal, 



Wednesday, June 12. 

- JOHN W. BURGESS. 

EDWIN A. GROSVENOR. 

WILLIAM E. HORTON. 

CHARLES W. PARK. 

MICHAEL BUUNHAM. 

WILLIAM C. PECKHAM. 



Class Supper, Haynes' Hotel, Springfield. 



Class of 1868. 

" N7/ca 6'c Trowel." 



Date, - 
Orator, 
Poet, 

Grove Orator, 
Odist, 
Prophet, 
Marshal, - 

Parting Song from '70, 



Wednesday, June 10. 

FRANK W. ROCKWELL, 

HILAND H. WHEELER, JR. 

ALBERT B. MATHER. 

ALBERT H. LIVERMORE. 

JOHN H. WILLIAMS. 

- ABNER T. BUCHANAN. 



WILLIAM D. PERRY. 



Class Supper, Haynes' Hotel, Springfield. 



CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 



89* 



Class of 1869, 

" Light." 



Date, 
Orator, 
Poet, 

Grove Orator, 
Odist, - 
Prophet, 

Toast Master, - 
Marshal, 

Parting Song from '71, 



- Wednesday, June 9. 

- ROBERT M. WOODS. 

- SIDNEY T. SKIDMORE. 

WILLIAM A. REESE. 

JOSEPH K. CHICKERING. 

EDWARD A. BENNER. 

- JOSEPH K. CHICKERING. 

ALVAH B. KITTREDGE. 



SAMUEL P. BUTLER. 



Class Supper, Haynes' Hotel, Springfield. 



Class of 1870, 



Date, 
Orator, 
Poet, 

Grove Orator, 
Prophet, - 
Odist, - 

Japanese Orator, 
Ivy Orator, - 
Ivy Poet, 
Toast Master, 
Marshal, 



- Tuesday, July 12. 

A. JUDSON TITSWORTH. 

- WILLIAM K. WICKES. 

WILLIAM H. SWIFT. 

- CHARLES H. DANIELS. 

WILLIAM D. PERRY. 

JOSEPH NEE SIMA. 

WILLIAM N. NOBLE. 

FRANK F. COBURN. 

GEORGE H. WHITE. 

CHARLES H. HARRINGTON. 



Parting Song from '72, - - FREDERIC W. PACKARD. 

Class Supper, Parker House, Boston. 



Class of 1871. 

" Unus Amore, more, ore, re" 



Date, - 
Orator, - 
Poet, 

Grove Orator, 
Prophet, 
Odist, - 
Toast Master, 
Marshal, 



- Tuesday, July 11. 

JOHN W. SIMPSON. 

- SAMUEL P. BUTLER. 
MAURICE D. CLARKE. 

- S. MERRILL CLARKE. 
CHARLES W. MALLORY. 

JOSIAH R. SMITH. 
DAVID HILL. 



Parting Song from '7.3, - JAMES HAYWARD. 

Class Supper, Haynes' Hotel, Springfield. 

11* 



90* 



CLASS DAY OFFICERS. 



Class of 1872, 

" Oser: le progres est d ce prix.' 



Orator, 

Poet, 

Grove Orator, 

Prophet, 

Odist, 

Toast Master, 

Marshal, 



DAVID L. HOLBROOK. 

HARRY S. STEVENS. 

FREDERIC W. PACKARD. 

- ALBERT H. THOMPSON. 

JOHN W. McELiiiNNEY. 

HERBERT B. ADAMS. 

CONSTANT C. HODGMAN. 



IV. 

COLLEGE CLUBS, CUSTOMS, AMUSE- 
MENTS, ETC. 



Student life is the same everywhere and at every time. The 
same eager craving for amusement, the like seeking for novelty, 
is as prominently shown in the student of to-day, as ever in 
the past. The only difference is in manifestation. And even 
this is not as varied as one would imagine. The boyish feel- 
ings of the oldest Alumnus are reproduced, with but trifling 
change, in the youngest Freshman. So we find many institu- 
tions and customs, which came in with the earlier classes, 
existing in the later. But many others have wholly perished, 
and only faint traditions remain of the power they once ex- 
erted. To gather up these memorials of former days, and to 
weave them, however superficially, into some semblance of 
reality, is our endeavor. 

Under the broad heading we have chosen, we shall give 
some account, imperfect as it must necessarily be, of those 
organizations serious or comic in their character which 
have, from time to time, been prominent ; and, also, of those 
customs amusing or otherwise which have served to vary 
the monotony, and relieve the dry ness, of college duties. 
There have been many such, for it is impossible for students 
to be gathered together without devising all manner of outside 
associations for instruction or amusement, and adding to the 
regular course of study by incorporating with it somewhat of 
their own character and feelings. Of course, it would be a 
vain task to attempt any complete account of the various 
Clubs, Customs, and Amusements, which have had their 




92* MUSICAL SOCIETIES. 



day at Amherst. Every class, from that of '22 {cujus magna 
pars fuit Prof. Snell), to '74, just now assuming Sopho 
moric responsibilities, has had its organizations, other 
than literary; its customs, peculiar to itself; and its amuse- 
ments, some original ; others, which have ever been more 
or less common to all college classes. We can only hope 
to give a few, which have incidentally come to our notice. 
Suggestiveness must be the chief merit of these chronicles ; 
and the events here recorded may serve to bring up others, 
which have excited an equal amount of interest and afforded 
a like fund of enjoyment. 

We have here striven to embody everything of interest we 
have been able to find. To the graduate of many years stand- 
ing, as well as to the youthful aspirant for collegiate honors, 
these records may perhaps be of value ; to the one, they may 
recall bright moments, now long since forgotten ; to the 
other, they may give some trace of the student life of his pre 
decessors. And this account of the past by showing the 
very slight difference which there is between college genera- 
tions may tend to bring into closer harmony the student of 
early days and of the present. 

Prominent among the various organizations which have 
ever been popular, and useful too, are the 

MUSICAL SOCIETIES. 

The students of the college in its early days, were little 
familiar with the expensive instrumental music, furnished 
at the Commencements and public exhibitions of later times. 
Such music as is furnished by the " Germanias" and the " Men- 
dellsohns," of to-day was then unknown. Indeed, the only 
music, other than the " Sacred Music," which was furnished 
on the first two commencements of the college, was the duets 
of certain amateur flute players, who volunteered their ser- 
vices upon these occasions, regaling the audiences between 
the " parts" with such airs as " On the Road to Boston," 
" Washington's March," "Fresh and Fair," and similar primi- 
tive compositions which were then in vogue. 



PJSAN BAND. 89 



BAND. 

The first movement towards the organization of a band, 
which should furnish instrumental music of a higher charac- 
ter, was made by John Kelly, Esq., '25, who associated with 
him other students of musical abilities. The band was 
formed March 17th, 1824, and assumed the somewhat classi- 
cal name, " Paean Band." It was a regularly organized 
society, with constitution, by-laws, etc., and its members 
met for practice once a week, during the collegiate year; 
indeed, oftener during the summer term. Others, prominent 
in the organization of the band, were Eev. E. G. Babcock, 
and Ephraim Eveleth, of '25 ; Rev. Lucian Farnam, Rev. 
Win. P. Paine, and Hiram F. Stockbridge, of '27. The 
instruments for the use of the band, were furnished by the 
liberal contributions of both students and Faculty ; in return 
for which, the band agreed to furnish music gratuitously, at 
all exhibitions and celebrations where music was required. 
Week after week the members met in " Boltwood's Hall,"* 
and many and pleasant are the recollections of those meet- 
ings for practice. The Paean Band first appeared before the 
public, at an exhibition given by the Junior class, May llth, 
1824, when " their performance excited the admiration of a 
crowded audience." At the Commencement of 1824, the 
band furnished music, after which the graduating class pro- 
vided them " a sumptuous repast " a custom which suc- 
ceeding classes kept up, in recognition of their gratuitous 
services : at exhibitions in the college chapel (tell it not in 
Gath !), the appointees always used to provide " a jug of Port, 
et cet." which was kept in the adjoining "Rhetorical" or 
"Theological" room, that the players might refresh them- 
selves at intervals during the performance. 

The band now and then made excursions, as when, Aug. 5, 
1824, they rowed up the Connecticut River : and, occasion- 
ally, they serenaded the town's people ; e. g\, the records say 

* In " Boltwood's Hotel." 
12 



90 COLLEGE BAND. LUTHERAN SOCIETY. 

that " on Aug. 12th, 1824, the Paean Band serenaded the 
first families of East street." Thus the band flourished, and 
gained quite a local reputation for the excellence of their 
music. Its leaders were John Kelly, Esq., and Ephraim 
Eveleth, of '25; Rev. N. W. Fisher, '26; Rev. Lucian Far- 
nam, and H. F. Stockbridge, of '27 ; and Calvin B. Pratt ? 
M.D., of '28. In the summer of 1828, desiring to make some 
changes in its organization, the Paean Band dissolved sine die, 
August 19th, 1828. Its entire membership was 29. 

COLLEGE BAND. 

The organization of this band occurred August 24th, 1828. 
In every particular, save its name and a few details in its 
constitution, it was the Paean Band, which had recently dis- 
solved. Under the leadership of such men as Rev. Abner 
Goodell, '29; N. A. Fisher, M.D., '31; Zebina C. Montague, 
'32; G. M. Kimball; Erastus C. Marcy, M.D., of '34; 
and Rev. Mortimer Blake, '35, the College Band did good 
service ; arid, with new and improved instruments, gener- 
ously furnished by the college, soon became a fair rival of 
those field-bands of the day, which existed outside the cities. 
It flourished for several years, and gave no little reputation 
to the college. As late as March 15th, 1836, the band were 
again provided with new instruments and music by the 
Faculty. Several months afterward, the organization broke 
up, and its instruments and other property became scattered. 
In its list of members we find such names as Elias Riggs, 
D.D., and Hon. Anastasius Karavelles, of '31 ; Hon. Nathan 
Belcher, '32; and Rev. H. W. Beecher, '34. In August, 
1834, the band adopted as its uniform, white suits and black 
caps. As far as recorded, the whole number of its members 
was 63. Whether on college tower, or at the serenade ; 
whether in the procession, or at the hall ; its music was ever 
welcomed. 

LUTHERAN SOCIETY. 

Ever since the foundation of the college, some society has 
been in existence, which has had for its aim the advance- 



BEETHOVEN SOCIETY. GLEE CLUBS. 91 

ment and cultivation of vocal music among the students. 
The Lutheran Society was the earliest organization of this 
nature. During the years of its existence, it had charge of 
the choir singing for morning and evening prayers, and 
for the church service on the Sabbath. Its special duty was 
to provide whatever " sacred music " was required for Com- 
mencement Day, and like occasions. 

BEETHOVEN SOCIETY. 

Some years afterward (about 1830), the musical society of 
the college became known as the Beethoven Society. By 
this name, the organization was known until 1869. During 
its history, numerous teachers of vocal music have been 
employed, and, by its various instrumentalities, the musical 
talent of the students has been greatly developed. More 
or less active in the different years of its existence, its influ- 
ence, on the whole, has been salutary. 

AMHERST COLLEGE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION. 

In the fall term of the collegiate year 1870-71, a musical 
association was formed under the above name. Its aim, 
objects, and influence, have thus far been similar to its pre- 
decessors. By the employment of a competent instructor, 
and by more frequent rehearsals, new life has been infused 
into both chapel and church services. During the whole 
existence of these three musical societies, they have been 
materially aided by the Faculty of the college. 

GLEE CLUBS. 

The best musical talent of the various classes, especially in 
later years, has centered in their Glee Clubs. There have 
been " College Glee Clutfs," " Class Glee Clubs," Quartette 
and Quintette Clubs, with the different names ; " Donizetti," 
" Mendelssohn," " Euterpean," " Calliopean," etc. all of 
considerable excellence, and many, which have won for 
themselves and the college no little renown. The numerous 
concerts which have been given in neighboring cities and 



92 ORCHESTRAS. COLLEGE SONGS. 

towns, the many summer evenings spent in serenading, the 
many pleasant excursions of these Glee Clubs each, all, 
bring up most pleasant memories of the sunny side of Col- 
lege life. 

COLLEGE ORCHESTRAS. 

The earliest college orchestra of note, was that established 
in 1861, whose leader was Edwin R. Lewis of '61. The 
number of students in college at that time, of superior musi- 
cal ability, was large ; hence, under his leadership, the " Or- 
chestra "soon became quite famous, and the instrumental 
music which they furnished was of such superior excellence, 
that they were employed to play at nearly all the public ex- 
hibitions of the college. On the evening of March 29th, 
1861, the " Orchestra " gave a successful Promenade Con- 
cert in Howe's Hall, and a concert, complimentary to their 
leader, was given Oct. llth, 1861. The orchestra was re-or- 
ganized in 1862, under the leadership of Samuel C. Vance ; 
and various " Instrumental Clubs " of less notoriety, have 
existed in college ever since. 

" SONGS OP AMHERST." 

To the enterprising class of '62, the college is indebted for 
the first publication of the " Songs of Amherst College." 
This book met a long-felt want of the students, who showed 
their appreciation of the enterprise by so large purchases, 
that the edition was soon exhausted. The musical interest 
excited in college, by the classes of '61 and '62, was so great, 
that a second edition was soon after published, by Wm. M. 
Pomeroy, '61, and C. H. Sweetser, '62. To the singers and 
song-writers of that time (1860-63), are even the students 
of the present day indebted for many ot their most popular 
college melodies. 

CLASS SONGS. 

It has, for a number of years, been customary to provide 
original songs, to be sung in the grove after the exercises of 



COURTS. 93 



Class Day, and at the Class Supper ; yet what are now known 
as "class songs" originated with the class of 1870. These 
are designed to celebrate the great step from childhood to 
manhood ; in other words, from Freshman to Sophomore 
year. 



CODBTS. 

In the summer term of 1828, a legislative body was formed 
in college, known as the " House of Students." Its object 
was to enact such laws, in addition to the statutes of the col- 
lege, as the good of a college community would seem to re- 
quire. Closely associated with this " imperium in imperio" 
was a " Court of Justice " which the students of that time 
instituted, and which used to meet after the rhetorical exer- 
cises of Wednesday afternoon. Duly organized, with judge, 
and other officers, it tried petty cases in college, and its de- 
cisions were much respected by both Faculty and students ; 
indeed, we are told that Professor Jacob Abbott had some- 
what to do with the establishment of these courts. Before the 
" Court of Justice," were brought alleged injuries to college 
buildings, cases of discourtesy, indecorum, outrage, encroach- 
ments on the rights of students, etc., etc., and, sometimes, 
petty cases of college discipline were yielded to this court by 
the Faculty. Fines were sometimes imposed upon those 
found guilty. The judicial branch was far more successful 
than the legislative, and continued in operation for a much 
longer period. The proceedings in both of these were con- 
ducted according to the prescribed forms of law, with judge, 
associate judges, jury, counsel, witnesses, etc. Especially 
prominent in the management of these courts, were Prof. E. 
P. Humphrey, D. D., '28, Rev. John Alden and Hon. Eliab 
Ward of '31, and Hons. 0. P. Lord and J. C. Perkins of '32. 
The earnest pleadings for clients, the shrewd cross-question- 
ings of witnesses, the charges of the judges, and the decisions 
of the juries, will not soon be forgotten by the participants in 
these trials. Their influence was salutary, and a deal of 



94 BRANCH SOCIETIES. MISSION WORK. 

amusement was afforded to the spectators of their proceed- 
ings. 



BRANCH SOCIETIES. 

Among the various organizations which have existed among 
the students of the college, are a few which have been merely 
branches of some parent society, existing in either Boston or 
New York. Most of these have been short-lived, and their 
influence upon the students has never been wide-spread. 

I. The "Historical Society of Amherst College," which was 
organized in the collegiate year, 1829-30. A few public ad- 
dresses were given under its auspices in the college chapel. 

II. The " Colonization Society of Amherst College." This 
was an organization, auxiliary to the many societies which 
existed in 1828, whose object was the establishment and sup- 
port of a colony of negroes in Liberia. 

III. The " Amherst College Anti-Slavery Society," which 
existed in 1832-35. It was disbanded by the authority of 
the Faculty. 

IY. The " Amherst College Peace Society." This organiza 
tion existed in 1838. On July 4th of that year, Rev. Rufus P. 
Stebbins delivered an address before its members. 



PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

An association was formed in July, 1870, by several mem- 
bers of the graduating class, with the design of making it a 
permanent society for the investigation of psychological and 
(so-called) supernatural phenomena. Appleton P. Lyon was 
elected President, and Joseph T. Ward, Secretary. 



MISSION WORK. 

Almost from the beginning, the self-forgetful, Christian 
students of the College have taken a great and absorbing in- 
terest in all forms of missionary labor. Churches have been 



GORHAM REBELLION. 95 



organized, and Sabbath schools established, through their ef- 
forts, in places where, otherwise, these means of good had 
been wanting. Pelham, Shutesbury and Belchertown were 
early visited, and the results of such Christian labors are 
seen to-day, in these places. The establishment of " Zion 
Church," in Amherst, was largely due to such efforts. Mis- 
sion schools, too, have been established in many a locality, 
otherwise neglected, and services have been conducted in 
several pastorless churches. We mention these facts in no 
spirit of boasting, but simply to show the strong feeling of 
devotion and love that has ever animated the members of 
College. 

The little village of Packardville has long been a favorite 
field for missionary work. Twelve years ago, the members 
of the different denominations there represented, Baptist, 
Methodist, and Congregational united, and formed a " Union 
Church." For services, they were mainly dependent upon 
candidates for the ministry, who were studying at the College. 
Amoi>g those who gave much time and labor to this work, 
was Rev. Horace Parker, of the class of '60. 

In the autumn of 1867, Mr. Edward S. Fitz, '71, then a stu- 
dent in college, became deeply interested in this field. He 
found the membership small and disunited, the prayer meet- 
ings illy attended, and the general tone of the church low. 
By his zealous efforts, the members were brought into har- 
mony, a strong religious interest sprang up, and a neat and 
commodious church edifice, recently erected, affords ample 
facilities for worship. Its organ and bell were furnished by 
the generous contributions of the alumni and students of the 
College. As a crowning result of all these missionary labors, 
the "Union Church " has now (1871) a settled pastor. 



GORHAM REBELLION; 

The " rebellions " in College have been few in number. 
The summer term of 1837, however, was made memorable 
in the college annals by the famous " Gorham Rebellion." 



96 DEMONSTRATIONS. 



The facts of the case were, substantially, as follows : Some 
dissatisfaction arose in the Junior class, respecting the ap- 
pointments made by the Faculty for their " Junior Exhibi- 
tion." One of the class ('38), William 0. Gorham, a man 
zealous, energetic, and somewhat popular and influential 
among his associates, absolutely refused to perform his al- 
lotted part. " Conscientious scruples," were alleged as a 
reason for the action. This was not apparent to the " powers 
that were," and, deeming the action an open violation of Col- 
lege authority, he was removed from college. His class and 
others, openly sustaining him in his course, were considered 
equally culpable, and a like punishment was visited upon 
some and threatened to all. After the most violent discussion 
and intense excitement, all through the college, the class 
retracted, and, at length, Mr. Gorham and the rest, having 
made similar acknowledgments, were restored to college. 
For a few weeks, this matter, and other troubles in which the 
college became involved, promised to seriously reduce the 
number of students. The merits of the case have ever been 
a theme of warm discussion. 



DEMONSTRATIONS. 

The public demonstrations, political and otherwise, which 
have been made at different times by the students, seem to 
merit a passing notice. These have occurred principally on 
the national holidays, and during the war excitements of the 
rebellion. Occasionally, on the Fourth of July, or " Wash- 
ington's birthday," the students of the college have been 
wont to assemble in the chapel, where, after singing and the 
reading of the Declaration of Independence or Washington's 
Farewell Address, orations upon political themes were deliv- 
ered by the Professors and eminent men of the day. How- 
ever, on all occasions, the celebrations were not of a purely 
intellectual character. Especially was this the case in 1831, 



FOURTH OF JULY, 1831. 97 

when the students celebrated the " Fourth " in a way never 
to be forgotten, at least by the actors in the scene. 



.FOURTH OF JULY, 1831. 

On the evening preceding the return of the National Holi- 
day, a company of students were delegated to procure the 
famous gun of Gen. Mattoon, of East St., Amherst, which he 
had brought home with him after the battle of Saratoga, in 
1777. This venerable field piece had long been the sine qua 
non of all celebrations in Amherst. After no small labor in 
search for the gun, it was dragged in triumph from its hiding 
place and planted on College Hill, ready for the first salute, 
as the clock in the College tower should strike the hour of 
twelve. At this hour, peal after peal broke the stillness of 
the night, and a bon-fire, such as students alone can make, 
lighted the whole region round about. The slumbers of those 
less patriotic were disturbed. A College officer appeared on 
the spot, remonstrated with the " gunners," and, at last, 
threw himself astride the gun, endeavoring to enforce the 
command that " such demonstrations must cease." By some 
signal on the part of the students, the drag-ropes were in- 
stantly seized, and both gun and dignified Professor were 
drawn, and rapidly too, down the steep declivity. "A flying 
leap and a heavy bounce" at the bottom, unhorsed the rider, 
who declined further interference in the festivities. Soon, 
however, a town constable appeared, read the riot act by the 
light of the bonfire, and ordered the students to disperse. 
However, no active measures were used to enforce the com- 
mand, and, perhaps through spite, the celebration was kept 
up until daybreak. We may add as a sequel to this affair, 
that the effigy of the constable, with " spectacles on nose, 
and book in hand," was borne through the streets of the village 
on the following night, while the " Pagan Band" (who of 
13 



98 PRES. HITCHCOCK'S RETURN. DEATH OF WEBSTER. 

the time does not remember it ?) furnished music for the pro- 
cession. A few of the leaders in the demonstration were 
rusticated, but the old gun and the Fourth of July celebration 
will never be forgotten. After a second hilarious affair, 
somewhat similar, two members of '32 buried the gun, in 
the dead of midnight, and the place of its sepulture has baf- 
fled all the efforts of subsequent seekers for this far-famed 
relic. 



PRESIDENT HITCHCOCK'S RETURN FROM EUROPE. 

President Hitchcock arrived at Amherst from his European 
tour, Nov. 15th, 1850. It being known when he would reach 
Northampton, preparations were made for his reception, and 
a carriage was sent over by the students to meet him there. 
Meanwhile, measures were set on foot for a general illumina- 
tion of the college buildings. A procession of the various 
classes was in waiting at Amity St. for the arrival, which, at 
his coming, escorted the President to his residence on College 
Hill. A speech of welcome was here made by John E. San- 
ford, '51, which was fittingly responded to by President Hitch- 
cock. The dormitories were brilliantly illuminated, and gen- 
eral congratulations at the Doctor's return were expressed 
throughout the college. 



DEATH OF DANIEL WEBSTER. 

When the intelligence of the death of Daniel Webster reach- 
ed Amherst, in 1852, the students united in those expressions 
of national sorrow so universally manifested throughout the 
land. They met in assembly, passed appropriate resolutions, 



CLAY AND POLK" CAMPAIGN. INDIGNATION MEETING. 99 



and, at the time of his funeral, amid the tolling of bells, fired 
a salute of seventy-one guns in memory of the nation's orator 
and statesman. . 



"CLAY AND POLK" CAMPAIGN. 

Probably every one in college at the time of this memorable 
political campaign, has in vivid remembrance the mass meet- 
ing of the students, Oct. 6th, 1852. This meeting occurred 
just after " Rhetoricals." Each of the three parties had pre- 
viously appointed one of their number to represent them in 
the meeting and present the claims of the respective parties. 
Hon. J. N. Marshall represented the " Whigs;" T. D. Adams, 
Esq., the "Free Soilers," and Wm. J. Leib, Esq., the "Demo- 
crats." At the close of the discussion, a vote was taken, when 
the Whig candidate for the Presidency received 101 of the 
173 votes cast. Considerable excitement existed, though gen- 
eral good feeling prevailed. 



PRESIDENT STEARNS' INAUGURATION. 

On the evening following the inauguration of Rev. Wm. A. 
Stearns, D. D., as President of the college Nov. 21st, 1354 
the second illumination of the college buildings occurred. 
Every window, with its light in every pane, contributed to the 
splendor of the demonstration, and thus with songs, speeches, 
and joyous celebration, the administration of our worthy Pres- 
ident was ushered in with a hearty good will. 



INDIGNATION MEETING. 

When the news of the assault upon Senator Sumner reached 
the students, they held an indignation meeting in front of the 



100 PROF. SNELL'S RETURN. " WIDE AWAKE" DEMONSTRATION. 

chapel. This occurred May 23d, 1856. Preston S. Brooks 
was hung in effigy, and speeches were made by Professors, 
Tutors, and Students. 



PROF. SNELL'S RETURN FROM EUROPE. 

This demonstration occurred Oct. 25th, 1858. A procession 
was formed, which, under the command of the Marshal of the 
day, Sidney W. Howe, '59, marched to the depot, and escorted 
Professor Snell to his home. An address of welcome was de- 
livered by Thomas M. Boss, '59, and the exercises were enliv- 
ened by the singing of songs, written for the occasion. 



"WIDE AWAKE" DEMONSTRATION. 

All through the Presidential campaign, which resulted in 
the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860, the college was alive 
with enthusiasm. A "Republican," or "Wide Awake," 
Club was formed, with a membership of over two hundred. 
On the evening of Oct. llth, 1860, quite an extensive celebra- 
tion was given under the auspices of this club, the main fea- 
ture of which was a torchlight procession. Starting from the 
college at half-past six o'clock under their Marshal, Captain 
Brigham, they marched to the depot, preceded by the Hat- 
field Band. Here they met the "Palmer Wide Awakes," 
who had been invited to join in the demonstration. Returning 
to the Common, Professor Vose, Erastus Hopkins, Esq., and 
others, made stirring speeches, and a " Lincoln Flag " was 
thrown to the breeze. Barrels of tar were sacrificed, and the 
illumination was general throughout the village. One feature 
to be remembered was the admirable execution of the " Vir- 
ginia Fence Movement " by the procession in their march 
to College Hill. At the raising of the flag an original song, 
" Liiicolnia," was sung by the students. 



FLAG-RAISINGS. PRESENTATION. 101 



FLAG-RAISINGS. 

These celebrations, so common through the North at the 
commencement of the Rebellion, were of frequent occurrence 
in Amherst. Prominent among these was that of April 17th, 
1861, when a flag was raised on the college-tower. The stu- 
dents to a man, assembled in the chapel, and, after prayer, 
offered by President Stearns, and the reading of the Declara- 
tion of Independence by Prof. W. S. Clark, they proceeded to 
the Green, outside, where a platform had been erected. Other 
exercises here took place. After the singing of an original 
song, " Stars and Stripes," the flag was thrown to the breeze 
amid the prolonged cheers of the enthusiastic crowd. A simi- 
lar demonstration occurred a few days afterwards, April 29th, 
when a flag was raised at " Pel ham Springs," at the laying 
of the corner stone of the Orient House. The classes marched 
thither in uniform, the Glee Club sung national airs, and a sa- 
lute of thirty-four guns was fired. The students also assisted 
in similar celebrations at No. Amherst, Leverett, and other 
places. 



PRESENTATION TO THE COLLEGE. 

The year 1862 is memorable in the history of Amherst for 
the many outbursts of patriotism among the students ; dis- 
played in the celebrations of the national holidays, in various 
demonstrations as intelligence came from the seat of war, and 
the departure of many from all classes for active service at 
the South. One remarkable occasion was the presentation of 
a brass cannon to Amherst College, by the 21st regiment, M. 
V. M. This cannon was made in Springfield in 1842, and 
was the guri first surrendered by the Confederate forces in the 
memorable battle of Newbern, March 14th, 1862. The gun 
was presented to the regiment by General Burnside, and, 
by it, given to the college, as a memorial of the bravery of 



102 OVATION. FOURTH OF JULY, 1862. 

the " Amherst College Boys " who fell in that siege. The 
presentation occurred April 14th, 1862. A stage was erected 
in front of the chapel, on which were the speakers, faculty, 
and the ladies, also the cannon. Capt. J. D. Frazier, being 
deputed by the regiment for the purpose, made the presenta- 
tion. Hon. Edward Dickinson, Rev. Chas. L. Woodworth, 
Rev. Dr. Vaill, Profs. W. S. Tyler and J. H. Seelye, and 
others, addressed the assembly, which was quite large, as 
many were present from adjoining towns. 



OVATION TO PARSON BROWNLOW. 

On June 7th of the same year, 1862, an ovation was given to 
Parson Brownlow, on the occasion of his visit to Amherst. He 
came at the urgent invitation of the students, who met him at 
the depot, and, with bands of music, escorted him to the " Vil- 
lage Church," where he addressed them upon the topics of 
the day. 



FOURTH OF JULY, 1862. 

We have received, from " one of the mourners " on the 
occasion, the following vivid account of a Fourth of July 
celebration in war time, which we take great pleasure in pub- 
lishing. 

" On the Fourth of July, 1862, several of the students 
iiad an early morning procession, purporting to be ' The 
Funeral of Jeff Davis.' An old, worn-out hearse was 
obtained from East street, and a white horse, on which the 
crows had a mortgage, was found to draw the remains. An 
effigy of ' J. D.' was staffed, and deposited in a box. The 
hearse was driven by a student, now a lawyer of the Connec- 
ticut Valley, while a short, fat collegian sat on the rear of 
the hearse, and led 'Jeff Davis' favorite charger.' A pres- 
ent pastor of Connecticut, appropriately dressed in female 



FOURTH OF JULY, 1862. 103 



apparel, appeared as the ' weeping widow ' Mrs. Jefferson 
Davis with an infant in her arms ; while the stylish and 
antiquated 4 family vehicle ' was driven by a present North- 
ampton physician, who then personated the negro servant. 
A large ox-cart was obtained for the band, the leader of 
which is at present a Massachusetts minister, while his assist- 
ants now represent vocations as different as were the instru- 
ments of music upon which they played the various dirges 
and funeral marches on the route. The procession, constantly 
augmented by large accessions, wound through the quiet 
streets of Amherst, and finally paused at the grove south of 
College Hill. Here a funeral oration was pronounced, and 
the friends took a last view of the remains. A doleful dirge, 
written for the occasion, was then sung, and a military salute 
was fired over the grave. 

The melancholy train was led by the present jovial leader 
of a Montreal parish. As the occasion was in honor of an 
4 old ' hero, the dress of the participants corresponded' ; 
and, indeed, they closely resembled the followers of Falstaff, 
so ragged, that ' you would think them so many tattered 
prodigals, lately come from swine keeping,' ' with but a 
shirt and a half in all the company ! ' A most affecting in- 
cident of the occasion, was the distress shown by ' Mrs. J. 
D.,' at the sad accident which befell the infant she had borne 
in her arms. The child, by some unaccountable mischance, 
fell from the carriage,' and the heavy wheel passed over its 
tender head. The agony of the mother was, for a time, 
fearful ; but the child was taken up apparently uninjured, 
and able to cry as loudly as ever." 

The poster, by which this affair was announced, is a curi- 
osity in its way. At this time, specie was scarce, and postage 
stamps abounded, which will explain the reason given for 
burying Jeff. Davis with his eyes open : " Owing to the 
scarcity of coin, J. D's eyes remain unclosed." 



104 POLITICAL DEMONSTRATION. INAUGURATION. SUPPER. 



POLITICAL DEMONSTRATION OF 1864. 

Three days before the second election of Abraham Lincoln 
as President, Nov. 1, 1864, the students 'united with the citi- 
zens of Ambers t, in a public expression of their political 
sympathies. Prof. W. S. Clark marshaled the procession of 
the various classes, which marched through the village, bear- 
ing some ingeniously devised transparencies. The speeches 
of the evening were made by Prof. Yose, Rev. C. L. Wood- 
worth, and Rev. S. T. Seelye of Easthampton. 



SECOND INAUGURATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 

At noon of March 4th, 1865, the students assembled in 
the chapel, where exercises, appropriate to the event, were 
conducted by President Stearns, Profs. J. H. Seelye and W. 
S. Tyler, and Dr. Parker of Grace Church, Amherst. The 
chapel rang, as never before, with the national airs. 



POLITICAL SUPPER. 

On Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1868, a vote of the college was 
taken, to test the political preferences of the students. It 
was found, that 188, out of 216, were Republicans. On the 
following evening, the Republican members of the Senior 
class ('69), inspired by the recent triumphs of their party in 
various States, and by the overwhelming expression of Re- 
publican sentiment in college, had a supper at the "Amherst 
House." Richard Goodman, Jr., was toast-master of the occa- 
sion. After patriotic speeches, the company broke up with 
hearty cheers for " Grant and Colfax," " Liberty and Vic- 
tory." 



ILLUMINATION. COLLEGE REGIMENT. 105 

ILLUMINATION OF 1868. 

On Wednesday, Nov. 4th, 1868, a general illumination of 
all the college buildings took place, in honor of the election 
of General Grant to the Presidency. The procession, led by 
the military company of the Agricultural College, and com- 
posed of the various classes of Amherst College, under their 
respective captains, marched to the residences of President 
Stearns, the different Professors, President Clark of the Agri- 
cultural College, Rev. Mr. Jenkins, L. P. Hickok, D.D., and 
Prof. Miller of the Agricultural College. Short, patriotic 
speeches were made at these places, and general rejoicing 
characterized every feature of the evening's demonstration. 



ACQUITTAL OF PRESIDENT JOHNSON. 

At the news of the acquittal of President Johnson, in the 
famous impeachment trial of 1868, a body of students 
attempted a demonstration by ringing the chapel bell, etc. 
President Stearns, believing that most of the students would 
prefer to hear it toll, interrupted the proceedings. The 
long-to-be-remembered " Shimei " sermon, called forth by 
the acquittal, was pronounced on the following day, May 23d, 
a sermon which gave its author considerable notoriety among 
the students. 



COLLEGE REGIMENT. 

This was organized some time in 1861, and consisted, at 
the time of its establishment, of three companies. Col. Luke 
Lyman, of Northampton, instructed the students of the 
" Regiment " in company evolutions, and the manual of 
arms. For a long time, the regiment might be seen in its 
daily drill on the " Campus." The classes of '62, '63, and 
'64, supplied themselves with uniforms, and the Faculty pro- 
14 



106 "CONTINENTALS." COLLEGE BOOK STORE. 

vided muskets for their use in the regular drill. Many of 
those most prominent in the organization of this " Regi- 
ment," soon after marched to the front, and quite a number 
nobly fell, while bravely fighting for the country. 



AMHERST COLLEGE "CONTINENTALS." 

This military organization was confined to the class of 
1862. Its captain was Samuel C. Vance, who was presented 
with a sword by his class, as he left for the war. 



RELICS OF THE CIVIL WAR. 

A society was organized in the college, Feb. 10th, 1865, 
for collecting and preserving interesting relics of the Rebel- 
lion of 1861-65. It existed for a short time only. Its first 
President was John A. Emery, of '65. 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE. 

One enterprise in college, which has become a fixed insti- 
tution, is deserving of mention: the "College Bookstore." 
Started in South College in 1861, by a student desiring to help 
himself financially, it has met with different degrees of suc- 
cess, as more or less enterprise and business tact have been 
displayed by its successive proprietors. In the hands of its 
present owners it has far outstripped its former prominence. 



READING ROOM. GEOLOGICAL EXCURSIONS. 107 



READING ROOM. 

After the public societies entered their new halls (1859), they 
gave up the plan, formerly pursued, of supporting reading-rooms 
in their " Athenaeums." Hence, a reading-room was started 
(1858) in North College, as a private enterprise. Sometime 
afterward (1862), it became a college institution, all students 
being assessed a small sum each term, for its support. Here 
were found the New York and Boston dailies, and representa- 
tive papers from almost every other section of the country. On 
Sept. 9, 1870, the " Social Union " Society assumed its control ; 
and now, enlarged and refitted, with an increased supply of 
papers, it has become a college institution, of inestimable 
service to the students. 



GEOLOGICAL EXCURSIONS. 

The first mountain excursion, which afterwards, so long as 
President Hitchcock was connected with the college, were 
quite common, took place on the 4th of July, 1845. The prime 
object of this, was the constructing of a path to the top of 
Mount Holyoke. This work was successfully accomplished 
by the Senior and Junior classes. The ladies of the Seminary 
" over the mountain," had provided a repast for the indefatiga- 
ble toilers. Wheu this had been disposed of, the whole party 
ascended to the summit, where addresses were made by several 
gentlemen. 

On the 4th of July, 1846, Mount Norwottuck, the highest 
peak of the Holyoke range, and about a mile east of the 
" Notch," was christened with appropriate ceremonies by the 
class of 1846. Addresses were given by Mr. Leonard Hum- 
phrey, of the Senior class, president of the day, and by Presi- 
dent Hitchcock. 

The next attempt of the kind was the naming of a mountain 



108 GEOLOGICAL EXCURSIONS. 

in Sunderland. This had been known asMt. Toby; the class 
of 1849 proposed to substitute the more euphonious name of 
" Mettawompe," which was accordingly done in June, 1849. 
The chairman of the Class committee, Edward Hitchcock, Jr., 
gave the christening address. This change of name did not, 
however, prove acceptable to the people of Sunderland, and, 
in the next town meeting warrant, an article was inserted to 
this effect : 

" To see if the town will vote to comply with the change 
made by the Senior class of Amherst College, in calling the 
mountain, heretofore called Toby, by the name of Mettawompe." 

Resolutions, condemnatory of the action of the Class, were 
adopted by a strong majority, and voted to be sent to the 
"Amherst Express" for publication. The week following the 
appearance of these resolutions, the "Express" contained an 
amusing account of a " Mesmeric meeting of the class of 
1849," at which all were present in spirit, called by the Gen- 
ius of the class, and held on the college tower. This " meet- 
ing " was the only notice taken of the formal condemnation 
of the class by the citizens of Sunderland. . 

The " Ghor," a deep ravine near Shelburne Falls, was 
named by the Class of 1850, on October 15, 1849. The next 
peak visited and christened, by the Class of 1854, was a Rock 
Rimmon," in Belchertown. William W. Fowler delivered 
the Address on the latter occasion. 

" Mount Pocumtuck," lying in the east part of Heath, about 
midway between Amherst and Williams Colleges, was named 
by the Class of 1856. By invitation, the Senior Class of Wil- 
liams was present. Thomas P. Herrick gave the Christening 
Address, and Charles H. Hitchcock, a Geological Oration. 

" Kilburn Peak," near Bellows Falls, was named by the 
Class of 1857, John H. Boalt being the orator. " Nonotuck " 
was the name given to the northern part of the Mount Tom 
range, by the Class of 1858. A large number of persons were 
present to participate in the exercises. James E. Tower was 
the " Christening Orator," and E. A. P. Brewster delivered a 
poem. 



GEOLOGICAL EXCURSIONS. 109 

In October, 1859, " Mount Nutonk," in Greenfield, was 
named by the class of 1860. The usual oration was delivered 
by Nathaniel Mighill; the poem, by George L. Goodale. A 
geological address was also given by C. E. Dickinson. The 
literary exercises are said to have been unusually apt and in- 
teresting. 

In the autumn of the following year, " Mount Eolus," in 
East Dorset, Vermont, was visited by the class of 1861, and 
that name applied. Dr. Hitchcock says of this occasion: "It 
proved to be, perhaps, the most successful effort of this kind 
ever attempted by the classes of Amherst." 

" Mount Taurus," the southern portion of Mettawompe, was 
named by the class of 1862. This peak had originally been 
called " Bull Hill " ; so the appellation now given was not 
new, but only more classical and poetic. The "Northerner," 
" Rock Oreb," and " Rock Etam" large bowlders near Am- 
herst were also christened by the same class. 

After this year, nothing of the kind occurred, till, in the fall 
of 1869, when Prof. Edward Hitchcock, Jr., revived these pleas- 
ant "geological excursions," with the class of 1870. Six of 
these took place : the first, to Mount Holyoke ; the second , Mount 
Warner ; the third, Mettawompe ; the fourth, Hoosac Tunnel ; 
the fifth, Monson Quarries; the sixth, Turner's Falls. 

The following class ('71) also visited Hoosac Tunnel, ac- 
companied by Mr. B. K. Emerson, their geological instructor. 
In June, 1870, this class made a " miiieralogical " trip to 
Gosheii, under the guidance of Prof. Shepard. 

In connection with these events, it is proper to make 
mention of what is known as the " Class of '57 Bowlder." The 
weight of this is about ten tons, and it is very interesting, as 
presenting, on four sides, striae caused by the drift agency. It 
was found near the depot, and was placed in its present position 
south of the Wood's cabinet on June 2, 1856. Mr. L. D. 
Cowles of Amherst, who has ever been a warm friend of the stu- 
dents, kindly took charge of its transportation, and several farm- 
ers of the region gave the use of their |eams. When the mass 



110 CLASS EXCURSIONS. 



had safely reached its final destination, Dr. Hitchcock made 
some congratulatory remarks, and A. L. Prisbie, a member 
of the class, delivered a poem. 



CLASS EXCURSIONS. 

Pleasure excursions of different classes have, of late years, 
been quite common. The first, of which we have any account, 
is that of the class of 1852, to Mount Holyoke. Here, by a 
curious coincidence, they met the ladies of Mount Holyoke 
Female Seminary, who had selected the same day for a visit 
to the mountain. Of course, this accident was not allowed 
to detract from the pleasure of the day. 

The class of 1853 took a " Class Ride " to Turner's Falls. 
On their return, they visited Deerfield, taking supper at the 
Pocumtuck House, and then ascended/' Sugar Loaf," to view 
the sunset. 

The class of 1863, in their Freshman year, made an excur- 
sion to Mount Holyoke, where, as luck would have it, were 
gathered the ladies of a Northampton Female Seminary. After 
a " social hour, 1 ' the class, as in duty bound, escorted home 
their fair friends. 

The class of 1866 celebrated "Autumn holiday," October 
8, 1864, by a trip to Mount Holyoke, and a supper in the 
evening at Northampton. 

The class of 1867 observed the commencement of Sopho- 
more independence, by an excursion to Easthampton. The 
same class, in Junior year, also took advantage of the usual 
Class Day holiday (though the Seniors furnished no Class Day) 
for a supper at Brattleboro, Vt. At this time, the history for 
Junior year was read, and songs, speeches, etc., filled up the 
evening. A concert was given the same night, by the Col- 
lege Glee Club. 



GYMNASTIC SOCIETY. Ill 



GYMNASTIC SOCIETY. 

In the Summer of 1826, the students of the college peti- 
tioned the Faculty for a holiday, in which to clear up the col- 
lege grove. The petition was granted, and a second day was 
given for further completion of the work. Thus, logs, stumps, 
and rubbish were removed, and the students had a fine grove 
at their command, for out-door exercise. Several months af- 
terward, a Gymnastic Society was formed, whose chief object 
was the erection and support of gymnastic apparatus in this 
grove. The first president of the society was Joseph How- 
ard, M. D., of '27. The Faculty concurred in the plans of 
the society, and, as a result of their efforts, a variety of use- 
ful apparatus was placed here, which was eminently service- 
able to the students, and contributed not a little to their 
health and happiness. By the enthusiasm and public spirit 
of the society, a bathing house (10 M 12 feet,) was also erec- 
ted, in the southwest corner of the grove. Here shower-baths 
were provided for the members. This was afterwards burned 
down. In 1827-28, the society contemplated the erection of 
bowling alleys, but the Faculty would not suffer the innova- 
tion, because (in the words of their record), (1) " they would 
be noisy,' and, (2) " though innocent in themselves, they might 
be perverted." Addresses were occasionally pronounced be- 
fore the society, in the chapel, upon ' physical culture.' The 
society did not really cease to exist until 1859-60, when the 
present gymnasium was erected. Its apparatus, ever and 
anon increased and repaired by the liberality of the students, 
was not removed from the grove until after that time. By 
the liberality of Dr. Benjamin Barrett of Northampton, and 
others, through the efforts of Professors W. S. Tyler, and W. 
S. Clark, the college now furnishes, in the new gymnasium, 
enlarged facilities for physical exercise, a want which the 
students of earlier days, through the " Gymnastic Society," 
had to supply for themselves. 



112 ATHLETIC SPORTS. 



ATHLETIC SPORTS. 

Various athletic sports have always, to a greater or less 
degree, prevailed among the students. Prominent among 
these is, of course, the game of ball, in its different forms of 
Base Ball, Cricket, and Wicket ; though the pitching of " log- 
gerheads" and u quoits" has been, at different times, quite 
common. As the game of " loggerheads" has become obso- 
lete, in this part of the country at least, a brief description of 
it may not prove uninteresting. A "loggerhead" was a 
spherical mass of wood, with a long handle, and the game 
consisted of an attempt to hurl this towards a fixed stake, in 
such a manner as to leave it as near as possible. Of course, 
to the beginner, this was quite difficult, but, in the hands of 
an expert, the " loggerhead" was made to assume any posi- 
tion desired. This, however, was never very popular ; the 
game of " quoits " affording more opportunity for skill, and, 
at the same time, proficiency in it being more attainable. 
" Wicket" and " Round Ball," were quite common once, 
though of late years, " Base Ball " has entirely superceded 
them. The wicket ground was in the rear of the Chapel, 
occupying a part of the space now taken up by the walk 
leading from that building to East College. 

Foot ball, in the early days of the college, was a somewhat 
prominent amusement, though of late years it has given place 
to other means of recreation. The velocipede mania, which 
extended so widely in the winter of 1868-69, had its due 
effect. Many of the students spent most of their leisure 
time in learning to manage this new agent of locomotion, and, 
for a while, nothing was talked or thought of but the veloci- 
pede. The excitement, however, died away almost as quickly 
as it had arisen, and hardly a trace of it remains. 

In 1859, the "Amherst Ball Club," was organized. This 
at first included the New York game, the Massachusetts game, 
and Cricket. In the following year, the cricket players se- 
ceded, and formed a separate club. This game was played 



ATHLETIC SPORTS. 113 



considerably for a few years, on what was. known as the 
" north ground," that portion of the " campus," lying north 
of the East College walk. But Cricket was not generally 
popular, and we hear little of it after 1863. 

The " Massachusetts" game of ball was played, at least, as 
early as 1858, at which time it was no uncommon thing to 
see the Tutors engaging in the sport. 

Base ball had hardly been introduced, when certain enthu- 
siastic students conceived the idea of a " match game" with 
Williams College. Arrangements were therefore made ; a 
formal challenge was given by Amherst and eagerly accepted 
by Williams. The game took place at Pittsfield, July 1, 1859 ; 
thirteen players to represent each college were chosen by bal- 
lot ; the rules adopted were, in substance, those of the Massa- 
chusetts Association. Without attempting to give any account 
of the game, it is sufficient to say that, after a contest of 3J 
hours, Amherst was declared victorious, by a score of 73 to 32. 

On receipt of the news, the students assembled in a body on 
College Hill. The chapel bell sent forth its merriest peals, a 
large bonfire was kindled, and, to quote from a contemporary 
account, " the event was celebrated with a copious display of 
enthusiasm and rockets." The ball players reached home on 
the following day, and were received with all the honors. A 
"coach and four" was in readiness for them, and, escorted by 
the students in procession, they made a triumphal entry. The 
cavalcade finally halted in front of East College, where con- 
gratulations were showered upon the victors. Speeches were 
made in behalf of the players, and responded to in behalf of 
those who had remained at home. The enthusiasm of the 
whole college was unbounded. 

As a matter of course, Williams was not satisfied and de- 
manded another trial. This took place the following year, 
and resulted, as before, in favor of Amherst, by a score of 70 
to 30. 

In 1866, the College Ball Club assumed the name " Nicae- 
an," and on May 26th of that year, played against the " Nine" 
-of Brown University. The "Nicaeaus" were victorious by a 
score of 29 to 13. 
15 



114 ATHLETIC SPORTS. BOATING. 

In June, 1866, was played the first of a series of games be- 
tween Dartmouth and Amherst. In this, Amherst was vic- 
torious by a score of 40 to 10. The following year, Dart- 
mouth was successful. In a third contest, June, 1868, the 
Hanover boys again triumphed the score standing 47 to 20, 
in their favor. 

The " Agallians" of Wesleyan University played the " Ni- 
cseans," in October, 1866. This game resulted in favor of 
the latter club 25 to 18. 

In June, 1869, the Williams College Club visited Amherst, 
where, after a spirited contest, they were defeated by the 
"Nicaeans," the score being 28 to 21. 

In May, 1870, Amherst and Brown met at Worcester, on 
which occasion Amherst was again successful over her former 
opponent, by a score of 32 to 28. 

This comprises the list of inter-collegiate contests, though 
in July, 1869, the Freshman Nines of Brown and Amherst 
came together, and played a game, in which Brown bore off 
the laurels, scoring 25 tallies to their opponents' 24. 

The College has never had a good ball-ground, and all 
" matches" have, of late years, taken place on the grounds of 
the Hampshire Agricultural Society. To provide a suitable 
place for practising, various schemes have been tried ; among 
others, the leasing of a piece of land south of Baker's grove 
(now Hallock park) ; but this did not answer the purpose. 
Measures have recently been taken, which promise that the 
Club will have at their command, for the year 1871-72, a 
practice-ground, which shall be easy of access, and wholly de- 
voted to ball. The " Nine" have recently procured new uni- 
forms ; and under the efficient superintendence of the newly- 
elected board of directors a new feature in the management 
of ball-matters at Amherst, we can safely predict that new 
life will be infused into this popular game. The Club is offi- 
cered as follows : 

President WILLARD M. WHITE, '72. 
Vice-President CHARLES A. SIEBERT, '72. 
Secretary and Treasurer GEORGE FOWLER, '72. 

Directors ARTHUR J. BENEDICT, '72 ; JAMES'H. HOTT, '73 ; THOMAS A. 
STUART, '74. 



BOATING. 115 



BOATING. 

Boating, so marked a feature in the out-door sports of other 
leading colleges, has not, until recently, assumed any prom- 
inence atAmherst. In the College Magazine of 1858 we find 
laments at the absence of this popular amusement ; and, in 
1861, it was proposed to introduce it, using the waters of the 
" Belchertown Pond," and procuring the use of hand-cars on 
the railroad, for the conveyance of those students who should 
belong to the Navy. However, it was not until the spring of 
1870, that any definite action was taken on the matter. Some 
crews were formed at this time, and a " Naval Dramatic Asso- 
ciation" was organized, which should give dramatic entertain- 
ments for their benefit. The first exhibition, consisting of 
two popular farces, and both instrumental and vocal music, 
was given June 7th, 1870. A "Naval Association," em- 
bracing all the students, was formed June 22, 1870, and thus 
the college became identified with college boating throughout 
the country. E. K. Martin, '71, was the first President of this 
Association, and on July 4th, James A. Barnes, '71, was 
elected as Commodore of the Navy ; indeed, the introduction 
of boating in Amherst College was largely due to the enthu- 
siasm of Mr. Barnes. On the evening of June 27th, an enter- 
tainment, under the name " Athenae Minstrels," was given 
in Alumni Hall in the interest of boating. 

The first regatta, under the auspices of the Navy, occurred 
June 27th, 1870, on the Connecticut River, nearly opposite 
North Hadley. The leading feature of the regatta was the 
race between the University and Freshmen ('73) crews, which 
resulted in a victory for the latter. Distance, three miles. 
Time: Univ. 20 m. 52 sees. Freshmen: 19 m. 52 sees. The 
crew of '73, elated by this success, volunteered to represent 
Amherst in the Freshmen races, on the day of the annual 
"University Races" at Worcester, in July, 1870. This crew 
was composed of L. J. Warner, (stroke), Leverett Bradley, 
Jr., G. W. Hale, K. F. Norris, E. P. Bliss, and T. J. Gray, 
(bow). Yale, Harvard, and Brown University, were the other 



116 BOATING. 



competitors in the contest. Owing to a " foul" in the race, 
the boat of the Amherst crew was wholly disabled, and the 
victory, which promised to be theirs, was wrested from them. 
However, the wearers of the "purple and white" were proud 
of their'manly efforts on that day. 

The " Fall Regatta" of the Amherst Navy occurred Nov. 
5th, 1870. In this there were two races, (1) between the 
crews of '71 and '74, and (2) between '72 and the u University 
Crew " from the Agricultural College. Elegant prizes were 
offered by the Navy and the citizens of Amherst, which were 
awarded to the two crews that made the best time. The re- 
sult was as follows : Course, three miles ; Time, Ag. Coll. 
Crew: 19 m. 59 sees. Class crew of '72 : 20 m. 18 sees. ; Class 
crew of '74 : 20 m. 59 sees. ; Class crew of '71 : 21 m. 30 sees. 

On the evening of Nov. 10th, 1870, occurred an event 
which the boating men of the college, and indeed all others, 
will never forget. It was the attempted impeachment of the 
Commodore, by the Directors of the Navy. The latter had 
previously suspended the former on certain charges, and on 
this'jiiight was the final trial of the case before a sworn jury 
of twelve members. Witnesses were duly sworn by a Justice 
of the Peace, and the case was conducted by the counsel of 
both parties before the above named jury. The scene of this 
trial was in Alexandria Hall, and over a hundred students 
were interested observers of the whole trial, which lasted from 
eight o'clock in the evening until seven o'clock of the follow- 
ing morning. The excitement was intense, every student being 
a zealous partisan on the one side or the other. The verdict 
of the jury, " that the charges of the Directors were insuffi- 
cient to warrant suspension," was, soon after, sustained by a 
vote of the "Naval Association." This unhappy event finally 
resulted in the dissolution of the " Naval Association." The 
closing event of the year (1870), relative to Boating, was a 
"Supper," given by the ex-board of Directors to their friends, 
at the Amherst House, Nov. 15, 18 f <0, when J. H. Hoyt, '73, 
was toast-master, and "after-supper speeches" were made 
by the members present. In the Spring of 1871, a " Boating 



CHESS. 117 

Club" was organized in the college, which received the prop- 
erty and assumed the liabilities of the u Association." P. N. 
Haskell, and T. L. Stiles, of '71, have been Presidents of the 
"Club," and A. B. Morong, '71, Commodore of the Navy, 
under the new organization. At present, W. I. Putnam, '72, 
is President, and F. M. Wilkins, '72, Commodore. The total 
membership of the Club is 101. The commodious boat-house, 
located on the east side of the Connecticut River, in Hadley, 
(built June, 1870) now contains five six-oared shells and a 
lapstreak. Boating is, as yet, in its infancy at Amherst; in- 
deed, the college has many disadvantages to contend with, of 
which other colleges experience little ; but with these, over- 
balanced by the cordial support of enthusiastic students, she 
need be no less superior in contests of muscle, than of mind. 



CHESS. 

Chess was not a common game, till 1859. In July, of that 
year, however, a challenge was sent by the students of Will- 
iams College, for a game to be played on the day succeeding 
the ball match. Of the latter event, we have already given 
an account, and will now, consequently, briefly notice the 
former. 

The game was played at Pittsfield, in the rooms of the 
Pittsfield Chess Club, which had been kindly offered for the 
occasion. The players chosen to represent Amherst, were 
James F. Claflin, '59, Alfred Maddock, '61, and Arthur G. 
Biscoe, '62 ; Umpire, Frank A. Walker, '60 : those who ap- 
peared for Williams, C. E. K. Boyce, H. Anstice, Jr., and 
Edward S. Brewster ; Umpire, E. B. Parsons. George B. Hunt, 
of the Pittsfield Chess Club, was referee. The game occupied 
eleven hours, and was witnessed by a large number of persons. 
The superior mathematical discipline of Amherst triumphed 
in the end, and Williams was obliged to yield the game on the 
forty-eighth move. 

The reception, given the chess players on their return, was 
no less enthusiastic than that the ball players had already re- 



118 DANCING BOXING. 



ceived. They were greeted at the depot with hearty cheers, 
and conducted to a carriage, in which they were drawn by 
their fellow students to the residence of President Stearns, 
who addressed them in a few pleasant and appropriate words. 
Thence they were carried to the house of Dr. Hitchcock, who 
gave a pertinent speech ; and, finally, being taken to College 
Hill, they were called upon to relate the incidents ot their 
victory. After these had been listened to with enthusiasm, 
the assembly separated, with cheers for the " chess players, 
the ball players, Amherst College, Williams College, and the 
people of Pittsfield." 

The strong feeling excited by this success led to the form- 
ation of the "Amherst College Chess Club," which was in 
existence for a number of years. Of late, however, the inter- 
est in chess has been confined almost wholly to a few indi- 
viduals. In regard to the chess game, of which we have just 
given an account, it is but fair to state that the Williams rep- 
resentatives succeeded, in the following year, in winning back 
their laurels ; since which time the Colleges have never met. 



DANCING. 

We are not aware that the students of the College have 
ever participated largely in this popular amusement, previous 
to the spring of 1871. At this time, about fifty of the stu- 
dents, forming a company which should be exclusive in its 
character, leased Palmer's Hall, and procured the services of 
Mr. A. M. Loomis, of Springfield, an accomplished teacher 
in the art. Thus, all classes of students were enabled to 
spend many an enjoyable hour, and in a social, decorous 
manner. 



BOXING. 

The " manly art of self defence" has had especial atten- 
tion during the Collegiate year 1870-71. Competent teach- 
ers have secured large classes from the students. 



\ 
FLORICULTURAL SOCIETY TREES 119 



FLORICULTURAL SOICETY. 



'Poa KO.I deouri Ttpirva. Anacreon. 

The students have ever manifested considerable pride in 
the surroundings of the College, and the improvements upon 
its grounds. This spirit first displayed itself in the clearing 
up of the college grove, in the construction of the terraces 
(1828) in front of the dormitories, and various other im- 
provements of a like nature. One monument to the enter- 
prise and industry of the students of later times, is the Col- 
lege garden. This garden, which at times presents such an 
elegant floral display, was designed and made by the students, 
under the direction of Prof. W. S. Clark, now President of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College. The students, who 
were enthusiastic in the project, called themselves the " Flor- 
icultural Society." Its object was the adornment and culti- 
vation of this garden. Their efforts were crowned with suc- 
cess. Three hundred species of plants were placed in the 
garden, the first year, and a hundred varieties of peonies were 
furnished by Professor Clark, the roots of which he obtained 
in Europe. Through the efforts of Professor Clark, Joel 
Hay den, Esq., presented to the College a bronze statue of 
" Sabrina," to be placed in the center of the garden. August, 
1860. The " Botanical division " of the Senior class, under 
the direction of Professor E. P. Harris, now have the whole 
care of this much-prized ornament of the College grounds. 



TREES. 

The trees, now upon the College grounds, were almost en- 
tirely set out by the students. The class of 1847, though 
small in numbers, was very public spirited in this direction, 
and to it we are especially indebted for the fine grove of pines 
in the southwest corner of the College grounds. A few years 
later, a large number of trees (three hundred and forty, it is 



120 PRESENTATIONS. 



stated,) was transplanted to different portions of the hill, in 
which work the class of 1853 was prominent. 

The class of 1856 was the first to plant a " class tree," 
which ceremony occurred on their Class Day, an address being 
given by Franklin B. Norton. The precedent, thus estab- 
lished, was followed by the class of 1857. This event, also, 
took place after the public exercises of Class Day, the dedication 
being conducted by Daniel H. Rogan. Hon. Edward Everett 
was present, and, after this ceremony, addressed the students. 
The custom was kept up for several years, and only ceased 
when the number of trees seemed sufficiently great. The 
" Henderson Pine Tree," which was formerly the northward 
limit of the students' favorite evening walk, though not plant- 
ed by members of college, deserves mention in this place. 



PRESENTATIONS. 

Presentations by classes to favorite instructors have been 
of frequent occurrence, and, occasionally, we find instances 
where individuals of a class have thus been honored. Of this 
nature was the gift by the class of 1848 to one of its members, 
who had just entered into the " holy bonds of matrimony." 
According to the college law, then in force, he who should 
commit the heinous crime of marriage was obliged to leave 
the institution. To show their appreciation of their loss, 
though, indeed, their class-mate's gain, the members of '48, 
in class-meeting assembled, adopted appropriate resolutions and 
presented to their retiring brother, as helps in the new course 
of life he had resolved to follow, the following articles : A 
Crib, a Family Bible, and a copy of Mrs. Ellis' u Treatise on 
Domestic Economy." 

The earliest presentation, of which we have any account, 
occurred August 10, 1828, when the students presented each 
Professor a certificate of Life Membership in the Sabbath 
School Union. 



PRESENTATIONS. BIENNIAL SDPPERS. 121 

The Social Union Society, in June, 1846, presented a Bible 
to the college, to be kept in the " Rhetorical Room." The 
class of 1859 also gave a Bible, for use at Chapel services. 
Both of these are now safely deposited in the College Library. 
The one now used at all religious services was furnished by 
Mr. Alexander Strong. 

May 17, 1861, Mr. L. D. Cowles presented a flag-staff, sixty 
feet in length, to be placed on the college tower. Mr. Henry 
A. Marsh, editor of the Hampshire Express, presented a flag 
to the class of 1862. 

The class of 1862 presented a sword to Mr. Samuel C. Vance, 
who left the class for the army. The same class also sent a. 
" Coat of mail" to one of its members who had left for the 
Confederate army at the opening of the war. 

The class of 1863, on the afternoon of Saturday, Sept. 6, 
1802, presented to their smallest member, Mr. Simeon Nash, 
Jr., a splendid beaver hat. The speech of presentation was 
made by Mr. Charles S. Brooks, and appropriately replied to 
by Mr. Nash. A poem was also delivered on the occasion by 
Mr. Clarke H. Griggs. The exercises throughout were of a 
mirthful cast, and every one enjoyed the event. 

Probably the most interesting presentation ever happening 
at this college, was that in which the whole college united in 
paying a deserved tribute of respect and love to Prof. Edward 
Hitchcock, the late President of the institution. The gift 
consisted of a solid silver pitcher and salver, suitably engraved. 
President Stearns, in behalf of the Faculty and Students, 
made the speech of presentation, which was feelingly responded 
to by Prof. Hitchcock. This event took place April 12,1859, 
and the exercises of the day will ever be remembered by those 
fortunate enough to witness them. 



BIENNIAL SUPPERS. 
Biennial Suppers, on the completion of Sophomore year, 

have not been common at Amherst. The first one of which 
16 



122 BIENNIAL SUPPERS. 



we can find any account was that of the class of 1832. This 
was held at " Gilbert's Mansion House," in Amherst, a build- 
ing which was destroyed by fire a few years later. The exer- 
cises at the supper consisted of toasts, responded to by various 
members of the class, and of volunteer speeches. The meeting 
closed at a late, or rather an early hour, and general jollity 
prevailed among all present. 

We find nothing further of the kind, till the custom was 
revived by the class of 1859. This supper was held at the 
American House, August 10, 1857, and, in addition to the usual 
speeches, an oration was delivered by Thomas M. Boss, and a 
poem by James F. Claflin. 

The occasion proved so enjoyable, that the succeeding 
Sophomore class (1860) followed the example. The orator 
of the evening was Leverett S. Griggs ; the poet, Edward 0. 
Shepard. The supper, which took place at the Amherst 
House, lasted until daybreak ; and, at its close, the class 
marched to the top of the college tower, whence they beheld 
the rising of the sun. This luminary was apostrophized in 
an appropriate manner, after which the class marched down 
to " Prayers," held, at that time, in the early morning. 

This custom was further sustained by the class of 1861, 
with a supper at the Amherst House, on the night of Tues- 
day, August 9, 1859. At 10 o'clock in the evening, the 
class formed on the college grounds, and, preceded by a band 
of music, marched down to the hotel, where the supper was 
in readiness. The orator chosen was George M. Wellman, 
and the poet, E. Porter Dyer, Jr. The duties of toast-mas- 
ter were performed by John H. Evans. Original songs, com- 
posed for the occasion, were sung, while the other exercises 
were essentially the same as those of the preceding class. 

The class of 1862 held its u Biennial " at the American 
House, on the night of August 6, 1860. The orator on this 
occasion was M. P. Dickinson, Jr., with George G. Phipps 
as the poet, and Samuel C. Vance as toast-master. The 
evening was, if possible, productive of more hilarity than 
any before. 



BIENNIAL SUPPERS. RECEPTIONS. 123 

The next supper, by the class of 1863, was held July 8, 
1861, at the American House. Emmons Hughitt was the 
orator, and E. P. Jackson, the poet. After the supper had 
been sufficiently protracted, the class, headed by their " stand- 
ard bearer" for '63 possessed a flag, presented by a former 
classmate made the customary pilgrimage to the tower, 
and, thence, the customary entrance into " Prayers." 

This seems to have been the last Biennial Supper. Wheth- 
er, the novelty having worn off, it was discontinued ; or, as 
is more probable, the occasion had become so exceedingly 
" jolly " as to demand the interference of the authorities, is 
uncertain ; but this pleasant feature of Sophomore year ap- 
pears no more. 



RECEPTIONS. 

A famous occasion, which began and ended with President 
Hitchcock, was the " Freshman Levee." This was a recep- 
tion given by the President to the Freshman class, and 
occurred about the middle of the first term. Such a fine 
opportunity as this afforded, could not, of course, be left 
unimproved by the Sophomores. These latter were in the 
habit of entering the rooms of their younger brothers, and 
re-arranging the furniture in all sorts of imaginable, and 
unimaginable, ways. A common practice was the removal 
of the lamp-wicks, thus leaving the Freshmen, on their 
return, in amazement at the unwonted conduct of their 
lights. On one occasion, also, the beds were collected and 
neatly piled before the President's house, and the Freshmen, 
on coming out from the " Levee," were greeted with a large 
placard, labeled " Take up your bed, and walk." With the 
accession of President Stearns, this reception was given up. 

Of late years, Monday evening of each week has been set 
apart by the Faculty, as a time when the students may be- 
come acquainted with the Professors, otherwise than in the 



124 RECEPTIONS. QUAINT SOCIETIES. 

class-room. " Receptions," given when some branch of 
study has been completed, are also quite common. A " Le- 
vee," given by the President to the Senior class, a few weeks 
before Commencement, has been kept up almost from the 
very foundation of the college. 



QUAINT SOCIETIES. 

A pretty well authenticated tradition tells of many quaint 
societies; some "disciplinary," others convivial in their ten- 
dencies. Of the former class, was the famous " Concatenation 
Society," whose favorite haunt was a ghostly room of " Old 
South," whence its members would come forth to "tongue" 
the bell or discipline Freshmen. Of the convivial class, was 
the Society, whose head-quarters were in the cellar* of Middle 
(now North) College. Rooms were secretly fitted up (?) in 
this under-ground apartment, and its culinary fixtures were 
said to be quite complete. The entrance was by a concealed 
trap-door, and so secret were its proceedings, that, for years, 
their midnight banquets escaped the notice of vigilant officials. 
However, it was at last discovered, in consequence of the trap- 
door being accidentally left open, and President Humphrey 
was the first one to enter and explore the mysteries of the 
place. The wine-kegs, chicken-bones, bottles, etc., found amid 
the debris, told wondrous tales. It is said that this society 
was known as the H. E. 0. T. T. Society, which motto being 
interpreted would read, "Ho Every One That Thirtieth!" 

One of the ephemeral " secret societies" is worthy of men- 
tion, as an instance of the readiness with which even college 
students, not to say officers, may be humbugged. About the 
year 1857. there was occasionally seen upon the bulletin board 
a written notice, calling a meeting of what was known as the 
Mu Kappa Sigma Society. According to the notice, such 

* Directly under the Social Union Reading Room. 



QUAINT SOCIETIES. 125 



meetings were oftenest held at a late hour of Saturday night ; 
and, as it was discovered that some act of rowdyism was often 
committed soon after, it was but natural to imagine some con- 
nection between the two things; and, more especially, as the 
notices usually contained some wood-cut from comic almanac 
or illustrated newspaper, representing scenes of dissipation 
and violence. They also contained two or three lines of cy- 
pher, which were supposed to indicate to the initiated the 
special object of each meeting. Students taxed their ingenuity 
with fruitless efforts to decipher these cabalistic signs ; and 
even the Faculty, it was said, inquired of suspected parties if 
they were in the habit of reading certain periodicals, in which 
such wood-cuts might be found. 

The fact is, that no such society existed, except in the 
brains of three or four students disposed to play a game upon 
their fellows, with, perhaps, a desire to burlesque secret socie- 
ties in college. No meetings were ever held in response to 
the notices on the board; and the cypher used had no mean- 
ing whatever. The origin of the whole thing was the acci- 
dental meeting of a few friends one Saturday afternoon, with 
an entertainment consisting of molasses candy; when it was 
proposed to meet a week later, for the purpose of again testing 
the virtues of confectionery; and to consider themselves a 
secret society, to be called the Mu Kappa Sigma Society ; the 
Greek motto being MvXaicpoi KO.I Sro^axoe, and the Latin, Post 
viscera mens. 

Such was the origin, design, and effect of an almost airy 
nothingness, which, for several weeks, mystified Faculty and 
students, and which was known, to the very few who knew 
anything about it, as the " Molasses Candy Society." 

Among the various associations formed at the college, none 
is more curious than that known as " Philopogonia." This 
was formed by the class of 1852, while Juniors, and was noth- 
ing more nor less than the agreement, on the part of its mem- 
bers, to refrain from shaving, for one term. To this proposi- 
tion, nearly every man in the class assented, A curious circu- 
lar was put forth, stating the objects of the organization ; the 



126 KNICKERBOCKER CLUB. CLASS HATS AND CANES. 

members' razors were sealed up and deposited under lock and 
key, and a " Committee of Vigilance" was appointed, to see 
that no person broke over the rule. At the close of the term 
appointed, a grand supper was held in Sweetser's Hall ; on 
which occasion, Don Carlos Taft, having the longest beard, 
delivered an oration, and Seneca Hills, having the next long- 
er, a poem. The literary performances are said to have been 
of a high order. 



KNICKERBOCKER CLUB. 

The " Knickerbocker Club " was an association, formed by 
those students who hailed from the State of New York. Their 
first annual festival was held Monday evening, the 13th of 
April, 1857. The members assembled in front of the chapel 
at 8 o'clock, and gave three cheers for the " Empire State." 
They then marched in procession to the American House, 
where a supper was provided, singing on the way a patriotic 
song, written for the occasion. Elisha G. Cobb was the Presi- 
dent for the first year, and Albert A. Porter was toast-master 
at the first annual supper. 

In 1858, the Club comprised twenty-eight members, and 
held its second celebration at the American House, April 9, 
1858. On this occasion, Edward P. Gardner delivered an 
oration, and George S. Bishop, a poem. The third supper 
was held at the American House, March 16, 1859. The club 
probably did not exist much longer. 



CLASS HATS AND CANES. 

Especially in later years, each class on the day when it is 
first entitled to the name " Sophomore," has appeared with 



FRESHMAN VISITATION. '' f 127 

hats and canes of some uniform pattern previously adopted 
by the class. These hats frequently display in some way the 
college colors " purple and white." The class of '70 intro- 
duced the well-known Oxford hat for the first time, but later 
classes have adopted other, and less peculiar, styles. 



FRESHMAN VISITATION. 

The practice of " Freshman Visitation " existed here for 
a number of years, though of its commencement no positive 
knowledge can be gained. It was a college custom, certainly 
in 1859 and probably earlier, and, at one time, had become 
so firmly established, as to have a day set apart for its observ- 
ance. It was the formal introduction of the Freshman class 
to the realities of college life, and, very appropriately, was 
entrusted to the Sophomores. Near the opening of the first 
term, the latter assembled, and commenced the round of 
"Visitations." These consisted of a call at each Freshman's 
room, where the inmates were obliged to go through certain 
forms and ceremonies, in order to prove themselves worthy 
of the college. These ceremonies were oftentimes of a severe 
and complicated nature, though, generally, if the Freshman 
was able to make a good speech, give metrical versions of the 
prose classics, and "scan" geometry in a manner satisfactory 
to his critical instructors, he was pronounced a worthy mem- 
ber of the collegiate body. Sometimes, especially if he proved 
at all contumacious, he was obliged to prove the clearness of 
his brain by his ability to endure narcotic fumes. It is but 
fair to state that this test was seldom required. 

This custom, harmless enough, and perhaps beneficial at 
first, gradually degenerated, till, in 1862, the Faculty was 
obliged to prohibit it altogether. Since then, it has never 
been revived, and now remains, among other "relics of the 
buried past." more as a tradition than a reality. 



128 RUSHES. ROPE PULL. BOOK BURNINGS. 



RUSHES. 

Encounters between the Sophomore and Freshman classes 
have been quite common, and it would be useless to attempt 
a complete enumeration. Participants will, however, readily 
recall the struggle between '65 and '66 in the Gymnasium, 
caused by an unfounded suspicion that the latter had " bathed " 
the Sophomore's beavers; the "rush" of '67 and '68, in 
Athene hall; the " Cane Row" of '69 and '70; the contest 
between '70 and '71, brought about by an attempt to confine 
a number of the latter class in an East College room ; the 
"rushes" of '71 with '72, and those of '72 with '73; and, 
notably, the "Cane Break" of '73 and '74, in front of the 
Chapel. All these are of too recent occurrence to need any 
detailed 'description. 



ROPE PULL. 

The annual " Rope Pull" was a custom which existed cer- 
tainly as early as 1850. It took place during the fall term, 
and consisted simply of a trial of strength between the Soph- 
omore and Freshman classes. A new rope was provided each 
time, especially for the occasion. This custom was given up 
in the course of a few years. 



BOOK BURNINGS. 

The custom of burning text-books, which had prevailed to 
some extent before, was renewed by the class of 1867. At 
the close of Junior year, July 9, 1866, occurred the " Burial 
Rites of Ye Classics and Mathematics." A " Hym," com- 
posed in Greek, Latin, and English, was sung during the 
march of the procession, and a " Dirge" was mournfully 
chanted at the funeral pyre. 

The class of 1870, at the close of Freshman year, July 10, 
1867, severed in like manner their connection with u Ye 
Much Revered Conies." The " Concrematio Geometric atque 



BIRTHDAY OF POCAHONTAS. SQUIRT-GUN RIOT. 129 

Algebras," celebrated by the class of 1873, May 23, 1870, was 
the last event of this kind, and probably the custom will 
never be revived. 

For each of these occasions, printed programmes, giving 
the full order of exercises, were provided, and secretly dis- 
tributed on the evening of their occurrence. 

The class of 1871 also made preparations for a burial of 
" Alcestis" at the close of Freshman year, but, the scheme 
not meeting the approval of the authorities, it was wisely 
given up. A programme of the intended exercises was, how- 
ever, quite generally posted. 



BIRTHDAY OF POCAHONTAS. 

Pocahontas' Birthday was celebrated in 1857, Wednes- 
day, October 7th. The buildings were appropriately decorated 
in honor of the occasion. In the afternoon, the students as- 
sembled in the grove, where an oration was delivered by 
James Humphrey, Jr., and a poem, by C. H. Richards. Two 
large casks of cider were then broached and their contents 
drank by the crowd, which was highly appreciative. Songs 
were composed for the occasion and sung as opportunity of- 
fered. 



SQUIRT-GUN RIOT. 

The u Funeral Services and Wake at the Burial of S. Gunn, 
X-Member of the Class of '60," excited a great deal of in- 
terest at the time, and we are happy to lay before our readers 
the following account of the ceremonies, kindly furnished by 
a member of '61 : 

" The famous ' Squirt-Gun Riot' occurred Oct. 6th, 1858. 
The class of '61 had magnanimously determined to abandon 
the practice of hazing the Freshmen, and, in token of their 
good will, proposed to bury the squirt-gun, the emblem or in- 
strument of warfare upon the lower class. Imposing cere- 
17 



130 SQUIRT-GUN RIOT. 



monies had been arranged, with all the paraphernalia of a 
funeral, a solemn procession, a funeral oration and dirge, and 
music by a tin band. The corpse was properly laid out in a 
genuine coffin, and deposited for safety in ' Ultima Thule,' 
then, as perhaps now, the favorite name of 4 South College, 
South Entry, Fourth Story, Front Corner.' It was an old 
Society Hall, had double doors, and was the safest room in 
College. Everything was ready at noon on Wednesday, and 
the ceremonies were to take place after ' Rhetoricals ' in the 
afternoon. 

The slight misunderstanding which arose between '61 and 
'60 occurred on this wise. The squirt-gun, which was a large 
and powerful one, and capable of drenching a Freshman at 
one fell squirt, had been surreptitiously obtained, not to say 
stolen, by some of the '61 boys, while they were Freshmen, 
from the room of one of the Sophomores. As the instru- 
ment had been paid for out of the class funds of '60, that 
class naturally had a general interest in the property, and de- 
termined to assert their rights, when it was known that it was 
their squirt-gun, '61 was to bury. After recitation Wednesday 
noon, the Juniors ('60) held a class meeting to deliberate 
over the affair, while the Sophomores ('61) went to dinner, 
leaving a single guard on duty at ' Ultima Thule.' The 
Sophomores were busily engaged at their ' hash,' when the cry 
of ' '61, '61,' came down the street, and in an instant every 
tempting morsel was deserted, and the class were off to the 
rescue. Arrived at South College, south entry was found to 
be thronged with Juniors in the greatest state of phrenzy. 
A few of the Sophomores succeeded in reaching the upper 
entry, by passing over through the attic from the north entry, 
and found the panels of the doors of ' Ultima Thule' broken 
in, and the plastering cut through from the attic above. But 
the Juniors were at bay, for the guardsman stood calmly with 
pistol in hand, eyeing both the gap in the door and that over- 
head. The few Sophomores who had reached the spot suc- 
ceeded in getting around the door or into the room, and, by 
dint of hard work, kept the Juniors back till their classmates 



DUTCH COMPANY. MOCK PROGRAMMES. 131 

began to come up the stairs in force. The Juniors chopped 
down the attic stairs in the early part of the fray, and armed 
themselves with the pieces, but the Sophomores, with an esprit 
de corps which the Juniors had outgrown, steadily fought 
their way up the stairs, wresting the clubs from their antag- 
onists, and dragging them by the legs down the stairs. A 
good many sore heads and bruised limbs resulted; and just 
as the Sophomores had reached the landing in sufficient force 
to make further resistance useless, the President appeared 
upon the scene. Recognizing the good intentions of the 
Sophomores, he ordered the Juniors to disperse. The stairs 
and hall showed signs of a fierce battle, while ' Ultima Thule' 
remained a wreck ; but the squirt-gun still lay there calmly 
in its coffin awaiting the ceremonies of the afternoon. The 
programme was carried through without molestation, and the 
funeral services were followed by a 4 Wake' in the grove, in 
honor of the cessation of hostilities between the Sophomores 
and Freshmen. Lemonade and the pipe of peace passed 
freely round, and an oration and poem, and several songs, 
made up a part of the festivities. The distinguished corpse 
was buried between South and East College, near the carriage- 
wav, fl-nd the bier stood over the grave unmolested for weeks." 



DUTCH COMPANY. 

The " Dutch Company," under the leadership of Henry Gr. 
Thomas, class of 1858, was a famous organization in its day. 
The " Midnight Rangers " and the " Norwottuck Brigade,' 
though ephemeral associations, were also renowned. 



MOCK PROGRAMMES. 

Mock Schedules of the different college exhibitions began 
at quite an early date. The earliest one appeared in 1845, 
on the " Summer Exhibition," and their issue has been kept 
up till quite recently. The discontinuance of these " Mocks " 



132 CATTLE SHOW. THE FINAL EXAMINATION. 

is no matter for regret, certainly, for their tendency has been 
to deterioration in wit and increase in vulgarity. 



CATTLE SHOW. 

" Cattle Show " has ever been a great day for the students, 
and a holiday on that occasion has always been granted as a 
matter of course. Perhaps at no time have the collegians 
been so successful in the way of prize-taking, as in one year 
when members of the Sophomore class ('63), bore away all 
the prizes offered for running, jumping, and heaving. 



"BLUE SKINS." 

One very curious custom, which existed during the years 
from 1821 to 1826, should be noted. It was the practice to 
hang in effigy those students who, by special attention to the 
Faculty, had gained the obnoxious name of " Blue-skins." 
How this term came to be used in the college-slang of that 
day, we have no knowledge ; the modern equivalent of the 
word is " Toady." 



GOWN PARADE. 

The " Gown Parade " of the class of '70, on the anni- 
versary of its " Cane Row" with '69, was something entirely 
unique, and, to those who witnessed it, a very comical sight. 



THE FINAL EXAMINATION. 

It has been a long-existing custom to express, in some 
way, the jubilant emotions called forth by completing the 
final examination of the college course. Before the estab- 
lishment of Class Day, classes would frequently have some 
festivities, together with refreshments, in the college grove. 
More recently, this feeling of joy has found vent in a vigor- 



COLLEGE CHARACTERS. CHAPEL NAMES. 133 

ous and prolonged pulling of the bell-rope by each member, 
successively, of the class which has thus performed its last 
college task. Sometimes to this is added the music of the 
" horse fiddle," and the long-unused horn. 



COLLEGE CHARACTERS. 

Amherst has not been wanting in its college charac- 
ters : the popular " wash " (and beer) woman Mrs. B ; 
" Sambo Coon," with his " Virginny break-downs," and 
other gyrations ; " Old does," and " Pop Corn," will long be 
remembered. The annual visits of the " G. A. T." promise 
to be continued until the " Presidential Chair " is filled by a 
worthy incumbent. 



CHAPEL NAMES. 

Before the chapel building was repaired in 1865, various 
u pet" names were applied to some of the recitation rooms. 
For example, the Freshman Mathematical Room, located in 
the basement, and, at this day, a great curiosity on account 
of its inclined floor, was commonly known as " Hades." 
A small portion of what is now the Senior Recitation Room, 
was formerly devoted to the Entomological collection, and 
was hence called the " Bug Room ; " while a little space set 
apart in the basement, for the use of Prof. Shepard, was 
termed, by the Professor himself, we believe, the " Little 
Parlor." 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. 

The happiest of all college customs are its reunions, and 
the fraternal spirit which prompts to these in college, lives 
even with the graduate. The annual reunions of the Am- 
herst Alumni Associations of Boston, New York, and Chica- 
go, are indeed most fitting occasions for recalling college 
scenes of long ago, for mutual congratulations, for the repe- 
tition of those hearty hand-shakings of the past, and for 
keeping obligations to Alma Mater fresh in mind. 



GRADUATE MEMBERS OF LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



ALEXANDRIAN SOCIETY. 



THE PRESIDENTS, AS FAR AS KNOWN, ARE MARKED THUS (t). 



Class of 1822. 

! Prof. EBENEZER S. SNELL. 

1823, 

Rev. DAVID O. ALLEN, 
Rev. ELIJAH PAINE. 



1824. 

Rev. CHARLES BENTLEY, 
SETH BURROUGHS, 
Prof. BELA B. EDWARDS, 

JOSEPH A. HALL, 
Rev. LEONARD JOHNSON, 

SOLOMON MAXWELL, 
Rev. JOHN A. NASH, 
Rev. AUSTIN RICHARDS, 
Rev. GEORGE C. SHEPARD, 
Rev. JOSEPH K. WARE. 



1825. 

Rev. ELISHA G. BABCOCK, 

I Rev. MOSES B. BRADFORD, 

GEORGE BURT, 

Rev. RALPH CLAPP, 

ROBERT A. COFFIN, 
APPLETON DICKINSON, 
EPHRAIM EVELETH, 

Rev. NAHUM GOULD, 

ELIJAH D. STRONG, 
WILLIAM M. TOWNE, 
GEORGE WHITE. 



1826, 

tRev. ELIJAH C. BRIDGMAN, 
tRev. ARTEMAS BULLARD, 
ENOCH COLBY, 
CALVIN D. ELLIS, 
tRev. HARVEY FITTS, 
t JOSEPH GOFF, 
SAMUEL F. HAVEN, 
JOSEPH PECK, 
ALBERT WILLIAMS. 



1827. 

Rev. THOMAS A. AMERMAN, 
Rev. EBENEZER G. BRADFORD, 
tKev. CHARLES G. CLARK, 
Prof. Lucius F. CLARK, 
Rev. LUCIAN FARNAM, 

JOSEPH HOWARD, 
Rev. STEPHEN JOHNSON, 

WILLIAM M. JOHNSON, 
Rev. ENOCH KINGSBURY, 
Rev. ALEXANDER W. McCLURE, 

t SAMUEL D. PARTRIDGE, 
Rev. CHARLES S. PORTER, 

HIRAM F. STOCKBRIDGE, 
Rev. MOSES WINCH. 



1828. 

Rev. ISAAC BLISS, 
Rev. ASAPH BOUTELLE, 

ANDREW M. BROWN, 
tRev. ASA BULLARD, 



ALEXANDRIAN SOCIETY. 135 


THOMAS BURNHAM, 




1831. 


Rev. SAMUEL A. FAY, 






Rev. JOHN FORBUSH, 


Rev. 


JOHN ALDEN, 


THOMAS D. GREGG, 




SAMUEL D. BARTON, 


Prof. EDWARD P. HUMPHREY, 


Rev. 


ELBRIDGE BRADBURY, 


Rev. CORBIN KlDDER, 
KeV. HOSEA KlTTREDGE, 


Hon. 
Rev. 


ORLOW M. DORMAN, 
LUTHER EMERSON, 


JOHN T. KITTREDGE, 


Rev. 


JOSHUA EMERY, 


WILLIAM L. KNIGHT, 




NATHANIEL A. FISHER, 


EZEKIEL W. LEACH, 




KENDALL FLINT, 


ARAD MOORE, 


Prof. 


JAMES GARVIN, 


WILLIAM RICHARDS, 


Rev. 


JOHN N. GOODHUE, 


Rev. PRESERVED SMITH, 


Rev. 


MOODY HARRINGTON, 


Rev. JOHN B. SPOTS WOOD, 
WILLIAM B. STETSON, 


Hon. 


ANASTASIUS KARAVELLES, 
CHESTER LORD, 


Rev. ELIPHALET STRONG, 




BENJAMIN D. NELSON, 


CHRISTOPHER C. WHEATON. 


Rev. 


CALVIN E. PARK, 




Rev. 


ALVA SPAULDING, 






WELLINGTON H. TYLER, 


tfttQ 


Prof. 


SETH H. WALDO, 


Io/6t7* 


Rev. 


ARTEMAS A. WOOD. 


JOHN F. ALLEN, 






Rev. ASIIER BLISS, 




1832. 


Rev. THOMAS BOUTELLE, 




M. Otf % 


JOSEPH B. CLAPP, 


Hon. 


JAMES BELL, 


Rev. CHARLES FORBUSH, 


Uev. 


J. ADDISON GARY, 


Rev. JEFFRIES HALL, 


Rev. 


ERASTUS DICKINSON, 


Rev. FORDYCE HARRINGTON, 




WILLIAM W. FORSYTH, 


GEORGE HUBBARD, 


Rev. 


ADIEL HARVEY, 


FRANKLIN JONES, 


Rev. 


JOHN C. F. HOES, 


Rev. GILES LEACH, 


Rev. 


SAMUEL HUNT, 


Rev. HENRY LYMAN, 




ZEBINA C. MONTAGUE, 


STILLMAN MOODY, 




GEORGE NEWCOMB, 


Prof. WILLIAM F. NELSON, 




STEPHEN A. PAINE, 


Rev. Ji: HI; MI AH POMEROY, 




SIMEON SHUR-TLEFF, 


EDMUND P. RUSSELL, 




ROBERT WILSON. 


VERNON SMITH, 






Rev. JOHN C. THOMPSON. 










1833. 


1830 


Rev. 


LUTHER H. ANGIER, 


EOOVf 


Rev. 


AMOS BULLARD, 


Rev. SAMUEL G. APPLETON, 
ALVAN W. CHAPMAN, 
Rev. CHARLES C. CORSS, 
Rev. EPHRAIM FOBES, 
THOMAS L. FURBER, 
tProf. HORATIO B. HAOKETT, 
DAVID A. HAYES, 
Rev. HENRY A. HOMES, 


Prof. 
Rev. 

Rev. 


THOMAS H. DICKINSON, 
JAMES M. GOODHUE, 
HOSEA D. HUMPHREY, 
FRANCIS F. MARBURY, 
ALBERT S. PAYSON, 
ISAAC C. PRAY, 
AMOS W. STOCKWELL, 
SAMUEL S. TAPPAN. 


Rev. STEPHEN C. MILLETT, 






EPHRAIM R. NELSON, 




1834. 


Rev. PHILANDER 0. POWERS, 






Rev. MOSES P. STICKNEY, 


Rev. 


PLINY B. DAY, 


Rev. ABNER TAYLOR, 




ORSON S. FOWLER, 


Prof. WILLIAM S. TYLER, 




TIMOTHY JACKSON, 


tJoiiN WADE, 




ERASTUS E. MARCY, 


Rev. REED WILKINSON. 




HUMPHREY MORSE, 



136 


ALEXANDRIAN SOCIETY. 


Kev. 


HENRY NEILL, 




1838. 




JAMES O. PARKER, 








THOMAS E. PAYSON, 


Rev. 


EPHRAIM W. ALLEN, 


Rev. 


RTJFTTS P. STEBBINS, 


Rev. 


JESSE K. BRAGG, 


Prof. 


ROBERT M. WHITE, 


Rev. 


DENNIS CHAPIN, 


Prof. 


WILLIAM G. WILLIAMS. 


Rev. 


MOSES K., CROSS, 






Hon. 


NATHANIEL EDDY, 




ism 


Rev. 


THOMAS A. GALE, 




lOtfttt 




CHARLES W. GOODNOW, 


Rev. 


WILLIAM B. BOND, 


Hon. 


WHITING GRISWOLD, 


Rev. 


JOHN DWIGHT, 




JAMES HOVEY, 


Rev. 


JUSTIN FIELD, 


Rev. 


CHARLES LORD, 




NICHOLAS HARRIS, 




THOMAS PLUMMER, 




CHAUNCEY HOWARD, 




CHARLES F. SMITH, 


Prof. 


JOHN HUMPHREY, 




JOHN SPARE, 


Rev. 


GEORGE LEEDS, 




HARVEY B. WILBUR. 


Prof. 


WILLIAM A. PEABODY, 






Rev. 


TIMOTHY A. TAYLOR, 




1839. 




WORTHINGTON S. WlLLIAMS, 
EDWARD WYMAN. 


Rev. 
Rev. 


WILLIAM P. AVERY, 
JOSEPH H. BAILEY, 






Rev. 


JOSEPH D. BAKER, 




1886. 




t JAMES H. BANCROFT, 






Rev. 


ELIJAH H. BONNEY, 


Rev. 


NATHAN ALLEN, 
DAVID ANDREWS, 


Rev. 


CHESTER W. CARPENTER, 
SPENCER S. CLARK 


, tHon. 


LEMUEL N. BALDWIN, 
JAMES BRADFORD, 
LYCORTAS L. BRUUER, 
ALEXANDER H. BULLOCK, 
CHARLES C. P. BURNAP, 


Rev. 
tHon. 
Rev. 
tRev. 
Rev. 


FRANCIS L. FULLER, 
EDWARD B. GILLETT, 
CHARLES F. GLEASON, 
FREDERIC D. HUNTINGTON, 
JOHN S. KIDDER, 




JOHN A. DELANO, 




ALBERT R. PALMER, 


Rev. 


JOHN E. FARWELL, 




JAMES W\ PRESTON, 




LLOYD A. HAYWARD, 


Rev. 


JOHN W. RAY, 


Rev. 
t Hon. 


LUTHER HUMPHREY, 
LOYAL C. KELLOGG, 


Rev. 
Rev. 


ALDEN B. ROBBIXS, 
RICHARD TOLMAN, 


Rev. 


DAVID S. OLIPHANT, 
NATHANIEL RICHARDSON, 


Rev. 
Rev. 


GEORGE M. TUTHILL, 
WILLIAM WAKEFIELD, 


Rev. 


JESSE G. D. STEARNS, 




HENRY L. WHITMAN. 




ISAAC TITCOMB. 








| QrtW 




1840. 




loOl * 












HORACE F. BARDWELL, 


Rev. 


JOHN L. ASHBY, 




JAMES L. BATCHELDER, 


Rev. 


JAMES AVERILL, 




ELBRIDGE G. BOWDOIN, 


Rev. 


URIAH BALK AM, 


Rev. 


GEORGE F. CUSHMAN, 




CALVIN C. BAYLEY, 


tHon. 


CHARLES DELANO, 


Rev. 


EDWIN E. BLISS, 


tRev. 


JOEL S. ETKRETT, 


Rev. 


NAHUM GALE, 




GEORGE H. MERRICK, 


Rev. 


STEDMAN W. HANKS, 




SAMUEL NEWMAN, 


Rev. 


HENRY HANMER, 


Rev. 


THOMAS S. NORTON, 


Rev. 


GEORGE LYMAN, 


Rev. 


ARIEL E. P. PERKINS, 




BENJAMIN MANN, 


Rev. 


FRANCIS G. PRATT, 


Rev. 


ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY, 




JAMES O. SMITH, 


Rev. 


WILLIAM PHIPPS, 


Rev. 


THOMAS S. VAILL, 


Rev. 


DANIEL RICE, 




EDWARD F. WATSON. 


Rev. 


CYRUS E. ROSENKRANS, 






Rev. 


GEORGE B. ROWELL, 




1 C 1 1 




FREDERIC VINTON, 




1841. 


Rev. 


EDMUND F. WALDO. 




EDWIN COBURN, 



ALEXANDRIAN SOCIETY. 



137 



tRev. No ADI AH S. DICKINSON, 
Rev. JOSHUA S. GAY, 
ABEL HARWOOD, 
Rev. WILLIAM W. ROWLAND, 

t JABEZ B. LTMAN, 
tRev. SABIN McKiNNEY, 

THEOPHILUS P. PHELPS, 
FREDERIC M. STARKWEATHER, 
tRev. WILLIAM W. WHIFFLE. 

1842, 

tRev. LAUREN ARMSBY, 
tRev. HENRY DARLING, 

JAMES S. GRENNELL, 
WALDO HUTCHINS, 
tlssACHAR LEFAVOUR, 
JOHN O. PAGE, 
Rev. JAIRUS C. SEARLE, 
Rev. SAMUEL W. WHITNEY, 
ELIJAH H. WRIGHT. 

1843. 

HAYNES H. CHILSON, 
t JOHN HARTWELL, 
\\c\-. FREDERIC A. REED, 
Rev. JOSEPH R. WHITTEMORE, 
tRev. WM. W. WILLIAMS, 
t Rev. THADDEUS WILSON. 

1844. 

t EDWARD D. BANGS, 
WILLIAM BARNARD, 
tRev. ISAAC G. BLISS, 

DANIEL D. HITCHCOCK, 
EDWARD W. OSGOOD, 
Rev. LESTER WILLIAMS. 



1845. 

Prof. MARSHALL HENSHAW, 
SAMUEL J. LEARNED, 

Prof. JOHN S. LEE, 

JOSIAH H. LONG, 

Prof. FRANCIS A. MARCH, 

Hon. BAALIS SANFORD, 

HENRY B. UNDERBILL, 
GEORGE W. WARREN. 



1846. 

JOSEPH P. DOWSE, 
Rev. GEORGE E. FISHER, 

JAMES HIBBEN, 
Hon. WILLIAM HOWLAND, 
LEONARD HUMPHREY, 
ARTHUR H. JACKSON, 
HENRY PERKINS, 
Rev. SALEM M. PLIMPTON, 
Rev. CHARLES V. SPEAR. 



1847. 

LEWIS I. FLEMING, 
Rev. JOHN HAWKS, 

ORMOND B. MARSH, 
Rev. TIMOTHY STOWE, 
Rev. JOHN R. UPTON, 
Prof. LEMUEL H. WATERS. 



1848. 

Rev. WM. S. SMITH, 
Rev. LUTHER R. WHITE. 



Whole number of graduate members, 
Non -graduate members, - 

Entire membership, 



- 301 
151 

- 452 



18 



ATHENIAN SOCIETY. 


THE PRESIDENTS, AS FAB AS KNOWN, ARE MARKED THUS (t)- 




Class of 1822, 




ARTEMAS THOMPSON, 






Rev. 


JOHN B. VAN DYCK, 


tRev. 


PINDAR FIELD. 


Rev. 


FREDERIC A. WILLARD. 




1823, 




1827, 


Rev. 


THEOPHILDS PACKARD. 


Rev. 


GEORGE W. BOGGS, 






tRev. 


JOSEPH S. CLARK, 




1824. 


Rev. 


TIMOTHY DWIGHT, 






Rev. 


JOHN B. KENDALL, 


Rev. 


EDWARDS A. BEACH, 


Rev. 


GILES LYMAN, 


Rev. 


SPENCER F. BEARD, 


tRev. 


WM. P. PAINE, 


Rev. 


JAIRUS BURT, 


Rev. 


TERTIUS REYNOLDS, 




ELISHA L. FULLER, 


tRev. 


REUBEN TINKER, 


Rev. 


FREEMAN P. HOWLAND, 


Rev. 


ALFRED WRIGHT. 


Rev. 


BEAUFORT LADD, 






Rev. 


JUSTIN MARSH, 




!Si*)Si 




ABEL PACKARD, 




loAOt 


Prof. 


GEORGE SHEPARD. 


tRev. 


HENRY ADAMS, 








WILLIAM BOLLES, 




1825. 


Rev. 


HOPE BROWN, 






Rev. 


JASON CHAPIN, 


Hon. 


LINCOLN CLARK, 


Rev. 


TIMOTHY R. CRESSEY, 


Rev. 


HORACE FLAGG, 


Rev. 


EZRA FISHER, 


Rev. 


FREDERIC W. GRAVES, 


Rev. 


EDWARD J. FULLER, 


Rev. 


JONATHAN LEAVITT, 


Rev. 


CHESTER HUMPHREY, 


Hon. 


HENRY W. STRONG, 


Rev. 


DANIEL HUNT, 


Rev. 


ASA M. TRAIN, 


tHon. 


EDWIN H. LOTHROP, 




HORACE WALDO, 




CALVIN B. PRATT, 




WALTER WHITE, 




EMILIUS K. SAYRE, 




JOEL WYMAN. 




THOMAS B. STOCKWELL, 






Rev. 


ALVIN TOBEY, 




1826. 




t WASHINGTON H. WINN. 


Rev. 


CALVIN W. BABBIT, 




1829. 


Hon. 


ISRAEL L. BARBER, 






Rev. 


HUGH CARLISLE, 


tRev. 


HARVEY BLODGETT, 




ALPHONZO CHAPIN, 


Rev. 


ERASMUS D. ELDREDGE, 


Prof. 


CHAUNCEY COLTON, 


Rev. 


ABNER GOODELL, 


Rev. 


BENJAMIN C. CRESSY, 




JOHN GRAHAM, 


Rev. 


SAMUEL DUNTON, 




MOSES B. GREENE, 


Rev. 


CALEB B. ELLIOTT, 


tRev. 


OCHUS G. HUBBARD, 




t FRANCIS FELLOWES, 


Rev. 


WILLIAM A. HYDE, 


Rev. 


NATHANIEL W. FISHER, 


Rev. 


JOHN KEEP, 


Rev. 


EDWARD JONES, 




DAVID T. LANE, 


Rev. 


MILTON KIMBALL, 




DANIEL B. LYMAN, 


Kev. 


JOHN MORRILL, 


tRev. 


SAMUEL MATTHEWS, 


tProf. 


ROBERT E. PATTISON, 


Prof. 


SAMUEL MAXWELL, 


Rev. 


LEVI PRATT, 


Hon. 


SIMEON NASH, 


Rev. 


ANDREW H. REED, 


Rev. 


ALVAH C. PAGE, 




CHARLES L. STRONG, 


Rev. 


JUSTIN PERKINS, 



ATHENIAN SOCIETY. 139 


Rev. 


ELIJAH RIGGS, 


t CHARLES B. H. FESSENDEN, 


Rev. 


EZEKIEL RUSSBLL, 


CALEB C. FIELD, 


Rev. 


CLARK SIBLEY. 


Rev. DANIEL MANSFIELD, 






Rev. PHILETUS MONTAGUE, 




tftSli 


Rev. GEORGE C. PARTRIDGE, 




1C5OV* 


MARTIN SMITH, 


Rev. 


WILLIAM ARMS, 


Rev. TIMOTHY STEARNS, 


Rev. 


ABIJAH R. BAKER, 


STEPHEN SYMONDS, 


Rev. 


GEORGE EASTMAN, 


Rev. ENOCH THOMAS. 


Rev. 


HENRY E. EASTMAN, 




Rev. 


JOB HALL, 


1 G*> 1 


Rev. 


ISRAEL HILLS, 


loo I. 


tRev. 
tRev. 
tRev. 


GEORGE L. HOLMES, 
DANIEL M. LORD, 
JAMES L. MERRICK, 
J \MKS PARSONS, 


tRev. HENRY WARD BEECHER, 
Hon. HENRY W. BILLINGS, 
BENJAMIN F. BROWN, 
NATHANIEL M. DEXTER, 


Rev. 


L. H. VAN DYCK, 


FRANKLIN DODGE 


Rev. 


FRANCIS WARRINER, 
BRADFORD D. WILLIS. 


Rev. JOHN P. FOSTER, 
Prof. ALPHONZO GRAY, 






Rev. JOHN HAVEN, 




1831. 


THOMAS HERVEY, 


Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 


JOHN L. ALEXANDER, 
HOMER BARROWS, 
JONATHAN BRACE, 
HILLYARD BRYANT, 
EBENEZER BURGESS, 
CHESTER W. COWLES, 
GALEN FOSTER, 


Rev. OTIS LOMBARD, 
Rev. WASHINGTON A. NICHOLS, 
Rev. ALPHONZO SANDERSON, 
HENRY H. SMITH, 
Rev. T. D. P. STONE, 
tRev. ELI THURSTON, 
t JAMES W. WHITE. 




THOMAS M. HOWELL, 




Rev. 


ENOCH S. HUNTINGTON, 


1835, 


Rev. 
tHon. 

Rev. 
Rev. 

Rev. 
tRev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 


WILLIAM R. JEWETT, 
EDWARD KIRKLAND, 
DANIEL E. MANTON, 
JEREMIAH MILLER, 
tJoHN ORGAIN, 
ALEXANDER G. PASPATI, 
JOSEPH L. RIGGS, 
LEWIS SABIN, 
ERASTUS W. THAYER, 
THATCHER THAYER, 
GEORGE WATERS, 
JOHN WHITNEY. 


Rev. DAVID BANCROFT, 
Rev. SETH W. BANISTER, 
JULIUS S. BARSTOW, 
Rev. MORTIMER BLAKE, 
tRev. JOHN H. BOCOCK, 
tRev. CLINTON CLARK, 
Rev. SERENO D. CLARK, 
tProf JOSEPH HAVEN, 
Rev. WILLIAM G. HOWARD, 
Rev. WILLIAM HUNTTING, 
Rev. JUSTUS L JANES, 
Rev. BENJAMIN -B. PARSONS, 






Rev. DENNIS POWERS, 




1832. 


Rev. GEORGE P. SMITH, 


tHon. 


NATHAN BELCHER, 


CHARLES F. THOMPSON, 




t CHARLES CLAPP, 


Rev. LEANDER THOMPSON. 




BENJAMIN HASKELL, 




tRev. 


OBADIAH M. JOHNSON, 


1836. 


Hon. 


HENRY MORRIS, 


A CJfcJvt 




ISRAEL W. SEARL, 


Rev. JAMES C. BRYANT, 


Rev. 


ISAAC WETHERELL, 


Rev. ROBERT T. CONANT, 




THEODORE S. WOOD. 


Hon. EDMUND DOWSE, 






Hon. ALFRED B. ELY, 




|Q9 


Rev. FREDERIC A. FISKE, 




loud* 


Prof. ISAAC S. HOLTON, 


Rev. 


JOHN C. ADAMS, 


tRev. WILLIAM B. HOMER, 


tRev. 


STEPHEN T. ALLEN, 


WOLCOTT MARSH, 


Rev. 


POMEROY BELDEN, 


t Rev. EDWARD C. PRITCHETT, 


tRev. 


RUFUS C. CLAPP, 


tProf. STEWART ROBINSON, 



140 



ATHENIAN SOCIETY. 



Kev. SAMUEL L. ROCKWOOD, 
Rev. JOHN WOOD. 



1837. 

BENJAMIN F. BROOKS, 
Rev. DAVID CALDWELL, 
Rev. LEWIS F. CLARK, 

STEPHEN W. CLARK, 
CHARLES H. CRAGIN, 
FREDERIC DICKINSON, 
Prof. JAMES GREENE, 
t Rev. ROBERT S. HITCHCOCK, 
Rev. MORRIS HOLMAN, 
Rev. WILLIAM MURDOCK, 
t Rev. JOSEPH PECKHAM, 
Rev. DANIEL J. POOR, 
Rev. DANIEL W. POOR, 

WILLIAM B. REED, 
t Rev. HENRY J. VAN LENNEP, 
Rev. JOHN H. WELLS, 
Hon. HENRY W. WILLIAMS. 



1838. 

Rev. ANDREW BIGELOW, 
HORACE T. BLAKE, 
Rev. EDWARD P. BLODGETT, 
Rev. DAVID N. COBURN, 
Rev. BENJAMIN HOWE, 
LORING JOHNSON, 
tHon. HORACE MAYNARD, 
EDWIN W. PIERCE, 
Rev. HENRY SEYMOUR, 
Rev. WILLIAM WALKER, 

t CHARLES E. WASHBURN, 
t Rev. HIRAM WASON. 



1839, 

Rev. EBENEZER ALDEN, 

GEORGE W. BEERS, 
tRev. WILLIAM A. CLIFT, 

Rev. DARIUS GORE, 

Rev. NATHANIEL A. HE WIT, 

STEPHEN E. HOLBROOK, 
TRev. HORACE HUTCHINSON, 
CHARLES P. JOHNSON, 

Rev. CHARLES KENDALL, 

Rev. JOHN LIMBER, 

Rev. THOMAS (). RICE, 
t JOHN P. SANDERSON, 
JAMES C. SHARP, 

Rev. WILLIAM B. STONE, 
JAMES A. TAYLOR, 
JAMES D. TRASK, 
ANDREW WATERS, 

Rev. WINTHROP F. WHEELER. 



1840. 

DAVID R. ARNELL, 
GEORGE BARROWS, 

Rev. WILLIAM BARROWS, 
GEORGE K. CROCKETT, 
JOSEPH CUTLER, 
PLINY FISK, 

Rev. WARREN C. FISKE, 
t Rev. WILLIAM B. HAMMOND, 
tProf. GEORGE B. JEWETT, 

Rev. JOHN H. M. LELAND, 
GEORGE R. LORD, 

Rev. FREDERIC H. PITKIN, 

Rev. PLINY F. SANBORNE, 
WILLIAM SNELL, 
ELISHA R. SPRAGUE, 
JOHN H. STRATTON, 
FRANKLIN TUTHILL. 

1841. 

tRev. SAMUEL H. ALLEN, 
Rev. ROWLAND AYRES, 

ANDREW BLAIKIE, 

SIDNEY BROOKS, 
Rev. ISAAC DAY, 

RICHARD ELY, 

tRev. CHARLES G. GODDARD, 
Rev. JAMES E. NEWLIN, 

SAMUEL J. PARKER, 

t THOMAS S. RUSSELL, 
Rev. FRANCIS V. TENNEY, 

EDWARD G. TYLER, 

AARON WALKER, 
Rev. WILLIAM W. WHIPPLE, 

ALEXANDER YERINGTON. 

1842. 

WILLIAM ALLEN, 
tRoswELL L. CHAPIN, 
tRev. JOSEPH G. COCHRAN, 
Rev. ARTEMUS DEAN, 

CHARLES B. DUFFIELD, 
Rev. DANIEL T. FISKE, 
Rev. NATHANIEL D. GRAVES, 
t CHARLES C. HAYWARD, 
VINCENT H. SMITH, 
ANDREW WILSON. 

1843. 

Hon. Lucius M. BOLTWOOD, 
Rev. DAVID GARLAND, 
CALVIN HOLMES, 
Prof. HENRY W. PARKER, 
Rev. SOLOMON D. PITKIN, 
Rev. NELSON SCOTT, 
Rev. HENRY B. SMITH. 

CHARLES E. STRONG, 
tRev. JEREMIAH TAYLOR, 



- ^ 

^^^b if n c? M i ft. 



ATHENIAN SOCIETY. 



141 



tRev. DANIEL H. TEMPLE, 
t JAMES H. WELLES. 

1844. 

Rev. EDMUND K. ALDEN, 
Rev. CHARLES M. ATKINSON, 

GEORGE C. CURTIS, 
Rev. RICHARD S. S. DICKINSON, 
Rev. JOHN L. DUDLEY, 
t Rev. LEWIS GREEN, 
t Rev. HENRY T. LOTHROP, 
t Rev. ELIPHAL MAYNARD, 

EDWARD A. RUSSELL, 
HENRY D. STONE, 
REV. JAMES WALKER. 

1845, 

CHARLES E. BRUCE, 
EMILUS BRUUER, 
FRANCIS P. COLTON, 
FREDERIC L. DEFOREST, 
Rev. JAMES C. KNAPP, 
Rev. GEORGE H. NEWHALL, 
Rev. JOSEPH T. NOYES, 
Rev. ABEL K. PACKARD, 

t HENRY S. STOCKBRIDGE, 
Rev. CHARLES TEMPLE, 
t ALBERT TOLMAN, 
Rev. JOSIAH TYLER, 
t Rev. CHARLES L. WOODWORTH. 

1846, 

Rev. SERENO E. BISHOP, 
t LORENZO P. BLOOD, 
WILLIAM HASKELL, 



t Rev. MERRICK KNIGHT, 
t HARVEY J. SKIFF, 
Rev. HENRY M. STORRS, 
Rev. WILLIAM G. TDTTLE, 

1847, 

WARREN F. DRAPER, 
Rev. HENRY L. EDWARDS, 
Rev. GEORGE SOULE. 



1848. 

Rev. MARTIN L. GAYLORD, 
Rev. FRANCIS HOMES, 

FRANCIS A. HOWE, 
Rev. Louis P. LEDOUX, 
Rev. JOHN Q. PEABODY, 
ISAAC POMEROY, 
HIRAM A. PRATT, 
Rev. JAMES W. RAYNOR, 
JOHN L. SPENCER, 
HORACE W. TAYLOR. 



1849. 

Prof. EDWARD HITCHCOCK, 

HENRY S. HUDSON, 
Rev. HENRY LOBDELL, 
Rev. CHARLES D. LOTHROP, 
Rev. WILLIAM R. PALMER, 
Rev. HENRY N. PECK. 



1850. 

Rev. ALBERT G. BEEBEE. 



SUMMARY. 

Graduate Members of Athenian Society, 
Non- Graduate Members, - 



- 332 
190 



Entire Membership, 



522 



SOCIAL UNION. 



THE PRESIDENTS ARE MARKED THUS(f). 



1827. 

t JOSEPH HOWARD, 
WILLIAM M. JOHNSTON, 
SAMUEL D. PARTRIDGE. 

1828. 

ANDREW^ M. BROWN, 
t THOMAS BURNHAM, 

Rev. SAMUEL A.FAY, 
t THOMAS D. GREGG, 

Rev. OSCAR H. GREGORY, 
t Prof. EDWARD P. HUMPHREY, 
JOHN T. KITTREDGE, 
WILLIAM L. KNIGHT, 
EZEKIEL W. LEACH. 
ARAD MOORE, 
WILLIAM RICHARDS, 

Rev. PRESERVED SMITH, 

Rev. JOHN B. SPOTTSWOOD, 
WILLIAM B. STETSON, 

Rev. ELIPHALET STRONG, 

CHRISTOPHER C. WHEATON, 

1829. 

JOSEPH B. CLAPP, 
t GEORGE HUBBARD, 
t JOSEPH WM. JENKS, 
t Rev. HENRY LYMAN. 

1830. 

Rev. SAMUEL G. APPLETON, 

ALVAN W. CHAPMAN, 
t Rev. CHARLES C. CORSS, 

THOMAS L. FURBER, 
t DAVID A. HAYES, 
t Rev. HENRY A. HOMES, 
Prof. MARCUS H. NILES, 
Rev. BENJAMIN SCHNEIDER, 

1831. 

Rev. ABEL L. BARBER, 
Rev. THOMAS C. BISCOE, 



RICHARD BLISS, 

ANDREW DENNY, 

DEXTER FALES, 
Rev. DAVID FOSDICK, 
Rev. JESSE L. FRARY, 
Rev. ALDEN GROUT, 
t Hon. JAMES HUMPHREY, 
Rev. SOLOMON B. INGRAM, 

JAMES B. JERMAIN, 

DAVID L. JOHNS, 
Rev. STILLMAN PRATT, 

CHARLES E. TENNENT, 
t Hon. ELIAB WARD, 

t CHARLES K. WHIPPLE, 

HENRY R. WOODS. 



1832. 

WILLIAM W. ADAMS, 
Rev. WILLIAM ALLEN, 

MAHLON P. CHAPMAN, 
t Hon. LYMAN GIBBONS, 

WILLIAM HALL, 
Rev. SETH HARDY, 

BENJAMIN G. HITCHINGS, 
Prof. SAMUEL M. HOPKINS, 

JOHN F. HOUSTON, 

PERLEY C. JONES, 
Hon. OTIS P. LORD, 

JOHN MORGAN, 
t Hon. JONATHAN C. PERKINS, 

EDWARD ROWLAND, 

ISAAC N. STODDARD, 
t Hon. HORACE P. WAKEFIELD, 

FRANCIS N. WATKINS. 



1833. 

Rev. SERENO T. ABBOTT, 
Rev. ISAAC BROWN, 

t JOHN A. BURNHAM, 

STANFORD R. CLARK, 
t WILLIAM O. COLLINS, 
Rev. Lucius R. EASTMAN, 

CHARLES B. H. FESSENDEN, 
CALEB C. FIELD, 



SOCIAL UNION. 



143 



FRANKLIN FORBES, 
Rev. JAMES B. HADLEY, 

CHATJNCEY A. HALL, 
Rev. ELI W. HARRINGTON, 

t WILLIAM S. REID, 
Hon. WILLIAM Z. STUART, 
Rev. ANSON Y. TDTTLE, 
Prof. JOHN F. WHITE. 

1834. 

Prof. CHARLES B. ADAMS, 

ALBKRT CLARK, 
t Rev. SAMUEL H. EMERY, 
Prof. THOMAS P. FIELD, 
fRev. MONTGOMERY S. GOODALE, 

DAVID GOULD, 
Rev. HENRY S. GREENE, 
GEORGE F. HOMER, 
t Rev. JAMES P. TERRY, 
Rev. WILLIAM THURSTON, 
Rev. JOHN WINN, 

JOHN H. WRIGHT. 

1835. 

tRev. EZRA ADAMS, 
t Rev. DAVID M. FACKLER, 
JAMES W. FASSITT, 
S \\HEL R. GERRY, 
RALPH E. GREEN, 
t AARON K. HATHAWAY, 
Rev. GEORGE K. PERKINS. 



Rev. SAMUEL C. DAMON, 

t CHARLES H. DOOLITTLE, 
Rev. ALVA G. DUNNING, 
ROBERT F. FASSITT, 
Prof. ROSWELL D. HITCHCOCK, 
SYLVANDER HUTCHINSON, 
tHon. ENSIGN H. KELLOGG, 
Rev. HENRY G. PENDLETON, 
Rev. WILLIAM C. TREADWELL. 

1837, 

Hon. LUCIAN BARBOUR, 
Rev. WARREN H. BEAMAN, 

SIDNEY BROOKS, 
tRev. AUSTIN CAREY, 
Rev. HEMINWAY J. GAY LORD, 
Rev. SAMUEL H. JAGGAR, 
Rev. JOKL KENNEY, 
Rev. SANFORD LEACH, 
DANIEL LEEDS, 
t ANDREW C. LIPPITT, 
Rev. NATHAN L. LORD, 
t GEORGE B. MORRIS, 



Rev. JOEL E. ROCKWELL, 

SAMUEL H. SHIPLEY, 
Rev. SAMUEL A. TAYLOR. 

1838. 

Rev. ERASTUS S. BARNES, 
t CHARLES EMERSON, 

THOMAS A. FARLEY, 

JOEL W. FLETCHER, 
Rev. ABRAHAM JENKINS, 
Rev. WILLIAM A. MANDELL, 
Rev. ASA MANN, 

JONATHAN B. MARSHALL, 

HENRY O. MAYO, 
t Rev. JOHN A McKiNSTRY, 

MELZAR PARKER, 
Prof. OLIVER S. ST. JOHN, 

GEORGE W. SOUTHWORTH, 

WILLIAM G. STERLING, 
t JAMES S. THAYER. 

1839. 

Rev. GEORGE W. ASH, 
Rev. LUTHER H. BARBER, 

ELLIS BARTLETT, 
Rev. DEXTER CLAPP, 

HENRY G. DEFOREST, 
Rev. DANIEL S. DICKINSON, 

GEORGE FARRAR, 

JOHN M. HARRIS, 

HENRY ROOT, 
Rev. JOSEPH A. ROSSEEL, 
t Hon. SAMUEL T. SPAULDING, 
tRev. RICHARD S. STORRS, JR., 
t GEORGE SUMNER, 

CHARLES N. TODD, 

RAWSON VAILE, 
Rev. AUGUSTUS WINO. 

1840, 

ARCHIBALD B. CAMPBELL, 
t Rev. SUMNER CLARK, 
Rev. ANDREW B. FOSTER, 

SAMUEL B. I. GODDARD, 
ALEXANDER JACKSON, 
Rev. THOMAS G. MURPHEY, 
Rev. HORACE PRATT, 
t Hon. HENRY M. SPOFFORD, 
't GEORGE M. WILLIAMS. 

1841. 



W. BOND, 
GEORGE COOK, 
Prof. SANFORD EASTMAN, 
Rev. HARRISON O. HOWLAND, 
t PROSPER K. HUTCHINSON, 



144 



SOCIAL UNION. 



t DANIEL KIMBALL, 
Kev. CHARLES SMITH. 

1842, 

Rev. EDWARD D. NEILL, 
Rev. NEHEMIAH P. PIERCE, 

HORACE D. TRAIN, 
t GEORGE WARREN, 
t Rev. RUFUS P. WELLS. 



1846. 

f Rev. LEVI A. FIELD, 

SAMUEL M. FLETCHER, 
Prof. JAMES H. P. FROST, 
t Rev. EDMUND D. HOLT, 
t Rev. GURDON W. NOTES, 

ANDREW J. WHEELER, 
Rev. ORLANDO H. WHITE, 
GEORGE S. WOODMAN. 



1843. 

t Rev. ZEPHANIAH M. HUMPHREY, 
t Rev. ASA C. PIERCE, 
t Rev. DAVID TORREY. 

1844. 

JOHN S. BELKNAP, 
DANIEL C. CHAMBERLAIN, 
t HENRY K. EDSON, 
tRev. JOHN E. EMERSON, 
t Hon. GALUSHA A. GROW, 
Rev. TIMOTHY LYMAN, 

DANIEL N. MERRIAM, 
JAMES O. STARKWEATHER, 
HENRY D. STONE, 
WILLIAM TORRANCE, 
WILLIAM E. TYLER. 

1845. 

tRev. JOSEPH L. BENNETT, 
JEROME R. BRIGHAM, 
t EDWARD J. CORNISH, 
t PLINY MOODY, 
Rev. JASON MORSE, 

ROBERT W. OLIPHANT, 
HEZEKIAH D. PERRY, 
Rev. LEVI WHEATON, 
HENRY N. WYMAN. 



1847. 

JOHN W. BELCHER, 
Rev. HENRY CUMMINGS, 

SAMUEL W. DANA, 
Rev. CHARLES H. GATES, 

FREDERIC R. GRAHAM, 

WILLIAM E. MUNDY. 

1848, 

Pres. WILLIAM S. CLARK, 
Prof. SAMUEL F. MILLER, 
Rev. HENRY J. PATRICK, 

HANSON L. READ, 
Rev. JOHN F. SEVERANCE, 

HORACE W. TAYLOR. 



1849. 

Rev. JAMES P. KIMBALL, 
Rev. WILLIAM H. LESTER, 

JOSEPH D. POLAND, 
Prof. JULIUS H. SEELYE, 

JOHN H. WASHBURN. 



1850. 

Rev. EDMUND Y. GARRETTE. 



SUMMARY. 

Graduate Members of Social Union, 
Non-Graduate Members, - 



225 
161 



Entire Membership, 



386 



ACADEMIA. 



THE PRESIDENTS ARE MARKED THUS (t). 



1847. 

Rev. RICHARD S. BILLINGS, 
Rev. HENRY CUMMINGS, 
SAMUEL W. DANA, 
Rev. HENRY L. EDWARDS, 
tLuwis I. FLEMING, 
FREDERIC K. GRAHAM, 
tRev. JOHN HAWKS, 
tRev. TIMOTHY STOWE. 

'l848. 

Pres. WILLIAM S. CLARK, 
Rev WILLIAM C. DICKINSON, 
Rev. SAMUEL FISK, 
Rev. WILLIAM A. FOBES, 
Rev. GEORGE W. GOODALE, 
tRev. JACOB IDE, 
fProf. SAMUEL F. MILLER, 
Rev. HENRY J. PATRICK, 
Rev. JOHN Q. PEABODY, 

HIRAM A. PRATT, 
Rev. JAMES W. KAYNOR, 
tHANSON L. READ, 
THOMAS SHEPARD, 
JOHN L. SPENCER, 
TYLER WEDGE. 

1849, 

EDWIN CLAPP, 

THEODORE F. FRENCH, 
Prof. WILLIAM G. HAMMOND, 
Rev. CHARLES HARTWELL, 

HENRY S. HUDSON, 
Rev. HENRY LOBDELL, 
Rev. CALVIN S. LOCKE, 
Rev. WILLIAM R. PALMER, 
Rev. HENRY N. PECK, 

MARTIN N. ROOT, 
fProf. JULIUS H. SEELYE,* 
Rev. JOHN A. SEYMOUR, 

JOHN P. SMITH, 
tRev. ELIJAH W. STODDARD, 

ROBERT E. TOPPING. 

1850, 

WILLIAM A. DICKINSON. 



Rev. DANIEL W. FAUNCE, 
THOMAS L. FENN, 

Rev. ARCHIBALD F. GILBERT, 
tRev. GEORGE H. GOULD, 

JEREMIAH L. NRWTON, 

Prof. SYLVESTER J. SAWYER, 
tJoHN H. THOMPSON, 

tl/YMAN R. WlLLISTON. 

1851, 

Rev HENRY M. ADAMS, 

Prof. JEROME ALLEN, 

EDWARD P. BATES, 
tProf. MILFORD C. BUTLER, 

Prof. Lucius D. CHAPIN, 
tWiLLiAM CLARK, 

Rev. ISAAC N. CUNDALL, 

EDWARD P. DARLING, 
tRev. EBENEZER DOUGLASS, 

Rev. LAFAYETTE DUDLEY, 

Rev. WILLIAM S. KARR, 
WALTER H. LYON, 

Rev. HUGH McLEOD, 
HENRY C. NASH, 

Rev. SIDNEY K. B. PERKINS, 
TIMOTHY D. RANNEY, 
EDWARD D. RAWSON, 
BENTLEY H. SMITH, 
HENRY M. SMITH, 
ANDREW STEWART, 
WILLIAM H STEWART. 

1852. 

JOHN F. BUFFINGTON, 
tRev. GEORGE H. COIT, 

GEORGE E. DUDLEY, 
WILLIAM W. GOODRICH, 
Rev. WILLIAM GRASSIE, 

fHENRY KlES, 

AUGUSTUS G. KIMBERLEY, 

JAMES A. LITTLEFIELD, 
Rev. CHARLES H. PAYSON, 

tCiiARLES L. PORTER, 
Pres. WILLIAM B. RANKIN, 

HENRY D. ROOT, 

SYLVANUS B. ROEL, 

HENRY SABIN, 

GORHAM TRAIN. 



* President for two terms. 



19 



146 



ATHENE SOCIETY. 



[At this point, the Society assumed the name, Athenae.] 
ATHENE. 



1853. 

WILLIAM H. ANDREWS, 
'Rev. EDWARD P. BAKER, 

REUBEN M. BENJAMIN, 
Rev. NATHANIEL B. BLANCHARD, 

BOWMAN B. BREED, 
(Rev. GEORGE W. CLARK, 
Rev. AMOS H. COOLIDGE, 
Rev. JOHN M. GREENE, 
Rev. JOHN A. HAMILTON, 

GEORGE E. HODGE, 
Rev. DANIEL C. LITCHFIELD, 
Rev. ELBRIDGE PEPPER, 

WILLIAM M. PIERCE, 
fRev. EDWARD H. PRATT, 
Rev. GEORGE E. SANBORNE. 

1854. 

GEORGE BOSWORTH, 

Prof. Lucius W. BUGBEE, 
JOHN E. COOPER, 
APPLETON DADMUN, 

Rev. EDWIN DIMOCK, 

Rev. HENRY V. EMMONS, 

Rev. HENRY C. EAY, 
t JAMES B. FORD, 
SAMUEL M. FRIERSON, 
HEMAN M. GLASS, 
ADONIRAM J. GOODNOUGH, 
FRANKLIN HUBBARD, 
fRev. JOHN C. KIMBALL, 
ALBERT MATTHEWS, 
ELIHU M. MORSE, 

Rev. ALPHEUS S. NICKERSON, 
tGEORGE PARTRIDGE, 
EDMUND M. PEASE, 
NORMAN A. PRENTISS, 

Rev. URIEL W. SMALL, 
SILAS M. SMITH, 

Rev. JOHN W. UNDERBILL. 

1855. 

Rev. JOHN D. BELL, 

En G. BENNETT, 
Rev. EDWIN C. BISSELL, 

SAMUEL E BROWN, 
fRev. CHARLES W. BUCK, 
tHon. JOHN C. CALDWELL, 

RUFUS CHOATE, Jr., 

JOHN J. COLTON, 
Rev. WILLIAM E. DICKINSON, 

ELI E. FARM AN, 



Rev. ASA S. FISK, 

EDWARD S. GILBERT, 
Rev. JOHN L. GRAVES, 
Prof. ELIJAH P. HARRIS, 

NATHANIEL C. HART, 
Rev. JOHN HARTWELL, 
Rev. MARTIN S. HOWARD, 

ISRAEL D. JOCELYN, 

JAMES B. LORD, 

MATTHEW McCLUNG, 
Prof. WILLIAM L. MONTAGUE, 
Rev. MOSES NOERR, 

LEVI S. PACKARD, 

PHILIP C. PORTER, 
tRev. ERASTUS L. PRENTICE, 
Rev. HORACE L. SINGLETON, 

EDWARD A. STRONG, 
Prof. GEORGE WASHBURN. 

1856. 

Rev. WALTER BARTON, 

Rev. JAMES A. BATES, 
JOSIAH BEARDSLEY, 
JOSEPH BLOOMER, 

Rev. CHESTER BRIDGMAN, 
RUEL B. CLARKE, 

Rev. JOHN H. DODGE, 
ADOLPH DUPRE', 
tRev. WILLIAM W. EARLE, 
JAMES M. ELLIS, 
JOSIAH H. GODDARD, 
tRev. EDWARD P. GOODWIN, 
SAMUEL A. GOULD, 
THADDEUS GRAVES, 
GEORGE M. GUERNSEY, 
THOMAS P. HERRICK, 

Prof. CHARLES H. HITCHCOCK, 
EDWARD KEMBLE, 
BENJAMIN MATTICE, 
EMERSON W. PEET, 
CYRUS H. PENDLETON, 
tJosiAH T. READ, 
CHARLES A. REED, 
STILLMAN RICE, 
JAMES RUSSELL, . 
SAMUEL C. STAPLES. 

1857. 

WILLIAM A. ABBE', 
t Rev. BENJAMIN H. ABBOTT, 
Rev. DAVID BEALS, 

JAMES T. BRIGGS, 
JAMES C. CLAPP, 



ATHENE SOCIETY. 



147 



Rev. ELISHA G. COBB, 
Rev. Lucius R. EASTMAN, 
Rev. JOHN E. ELLIOTT, 

JOHN W FAUST, 
t Rev. ALVA L. FRISBIE, 
Rev. THOMAS G. GRASSIE, 

SIMON W. HATHEWAY, 
Rev. WILLIAM D. HERRICK, 
Rev. GEORGE T. HIGLEY, 

JOSEPH KIMBALL, 
Rev. JAMES P. LANE, 
Rev. HENRY D. NORTHRUP, 

ALBERT H. SLOCOMB, 

JOHN DsWiTT WEAVER, 
tRev. DENIS WORTMAN. 

1858, 

Prof. TIMOTHY F. ALLEN, 
Rev. JAMES B. BEAUMONT, 
Rev. GEORGE S. BISHOP, 
HENRY M. BISHOP, 
Rev. WILLIAM L. BRAY, 

ETHAN A. P. BREWSTER, 
Rev. ANDREW J. CLAPP, 
tProf. GEORGE C. CLARKE, 
t Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, 
JOHN DAVENPORT, 
Rev. RUFUS EMERSON, 
Rev. STEPHEN HARRIS, 

JOSHUA H. HUNTINGTON, 
HENRY E. HUTCHINSON, 
HENRY S. JEWETT, 
RUFUS B. KELLOGG, 
Rev. FRANCIS LOBDELL, 

t JOHN D. LOCKWOOD, 
Rev. EDWIN E. MERRIAM, 
Rev. SAMUEL B. SHERRILL, 
Rev. CHARLES L. TAPPAN, 
Rev. JUSTIN E. TWITCHELL, 
JOHN WALKER. 

1859. 

WILLIAM L. APTHORP, 
DAVID BEATTIE, 
FRKDERIC A. BILLINGS, 
t SANFORD W. BILLINGS, 

Rev. THOMAS M. Boss, 

Rev. HENRY J. BRUCE, 

GANSEVOORT D. CONSAUL, 

Rev. GEORGE CONSTANTINE, 
t Rev. MALCOLM McG. DANA, 

Rev. EDWARD C. EWING, 
JAMES P. FRENCH, 
WILLIAM H. GODDARD, 

Rev. JOHN Q. HALL, 

JOSHUA G. HAWKES, 
SIDNEY W. HOWE, 

Rev. LUTHER KEENE, 



GEORGE B. KNAPP, 
t RUFUS A. MORRISON, 

Rev. SAMUEL MORRISON, 
EDWARD W. PIERCE, 

Prof. JUDSON SMITH, 

EDWARD H. SPOONER, 

Rev. HENRY M. STEVENS, 
SAMUEL G. STONE, 
JOSEPH O. TIFFANY, 
GEORGE W. WARE, 
HYLAS T. WHEELER, 
RICHARD M. WYCKOFF. 



1860. 

HORACE BINNEY, 
EDWARD S. FRISBEE, 

Prof. GEORGE L. GOODALE, 

Rev. LEVERETT S. GRIGGS, 
HENRY M. HARRINGTON, 
GEORGE A. KEENE, 
tRev. JUSTIN P. KELLOGG, 

Rev. NATHAN B. KNAPP, 
EBEN A. KNOWLTON, 
JOSEPH MASON, 

Rev. HORACE PARKER, 

BENJAMIN W. PETTIBONE, 
WILLIAM DsF. PRENTISS, 
t HENRY P. SMITH, 
SAMUEL J. STORRS, 
MELVILLE M. TRACY, 
t FRANCIS A. WALKER, 
LEWIS W, WEST. 



1861. 

Rev. EDWIN N. ANDREWS, 
JOHN P. APTHORP, 
THOMAS BLAGDEN, 
EDWARD COMSTOCK, 
t JOHN H. EVANS, 
t HENKY D. HYDE, 

Rev. JOSEPH A. LEACH, 

Rev. JAMES LEWIS, 

EDWIN R. LEWIS, 
1 Rev. GEORGE F. MERRIAM, 

Prof. DANIEL T. NELSON, 

FREDERIC SANDERSON, 
ELLIOT SANFORD, 

Rev. NATHAN THOMPSON, 
AARON E. WARNER, 
GEORGE M. WELLMAN. 



1862. 

Rev. DAVID BIGGAR, 

WILLIAM J. BINNEY, 

Rev. FRANCIS G. CLARK, 
JOSEPH C. CLIFFORD, 



148 



ATHENE SOCIETY. 



Rev. BENJAMIN A. DEAN, 

FRANCIS DEAN, 

MARQUIS F. DICKINSON, 
Rev. DANIEL W. Fox, 

Lucius A. FURNEY, 

Lucius F. C. GARVIN, 
Prof. HENRY H. GOODELL, 

CHARLES M. KITTREDGE, 

WILLARD T. LEONARD, 

RUFUS P. LINCOLN, 
Rev. WILLIAM MCGLATHEHY, 

tlsAAC H. MAYNARD, 

JAMES H. NASH, 

OTIS C. NEWCOMB, 
Rev. JONAS O. PECK, 
Rev. CYRUS M. PERRY, 
Rev. JACOB L. PRATT, 

GEORGE M. REED, 

JAMES H. ROBBINS, 
Rev. CALVIN STEBBINS, 
Rev. AUSTIN P. STOCKWELL, 
Rev. SAMUEL A. STODDARD, 

TIMOTHY P. STONE, 

tCHARLES H. SWEETSER, 
fTRUMAN TOMSON, 

SAMUEL C. VANCE, 
GEORGE WARRINGTON. 

1863. 

tCHARLES D. ADAMS, 
Rev. FREDERIC B. ALLEN, 

HOMER R. BARTON, 

JONATHAN BIGELOW, 

tTnoMAS S. BOND, 

WILLIAM M. BULLARD, 

tEowARD W. CHAPIN, 
Rev. CHARLES CUTTING, 

CHARLES G. M. DUNHAM, 

AUSTIN HARRIS, 

EMMONS HUGHITT, 

SIMEON NASH, 

CHRISTOPHER PENNELL, 

FRANKLIN C. SEVERANCE, 

BAMAN N. STONE, 

JOHN M. WHITNEY, 

JOSEPH E. WILDER. 

1864. 

WILLIAM J. CLARK, 

WHITING S. CRANE, 

JOHN A. DEADY, 

JOHN B. DUNBAR, 
Rev. EDGAR L. FOSTER, 

GEORGE H. HOLT, 

WILLIAM L. HOWE, 
fRev. CHARLES M. LAMSON, 
tRev. JAMES H. LEE, 

FARQUHARSON G. MCDONALD, 



EDWARD A. MIRICK, 
CHANDLER SAMPSON, 
tHENRY E. STORRS, 
CHARLES B. TRAVIS, 
GEORGE H. WHITCOMB. 

1865. 

FRANCIS R. ALLEN, 
Rev. THOMAS E. BABB, 
Rev. JAMES H. BABBITT, 
tRev. ALBERT G. BALE, 

JAMES L. BARKER, 
Rev. HORACE F. BARNES, 
JAMES L. BISHOP, 
CHARLES E. BOLTON, 
THOMAS BURNHAM, 
ALVIN C. CAMPBELL, 
ALFRED D. CLAPP, 
WILLIAM B. CLARKE, 
ORRIN COOLEY, 
EDWARD VV. CURRIER, 
EDWIN H. DICKINSON, 
tJoHN A. EMERY, 
Rev. SERENO D. GAMMELL, 
JOHN C. HAMMOND, 
FRANCIS H. HANNUM, 
Rev. RUFUS K. HARLOW, 
Rev. CHARLES E. HARWOOD, 
GEORGE D. KITTREDGE, 
t WILLIAM S. KNOX, 
HARLAN P. MOORE, 
Rev. WILLIAM F. OBER, 
MARTIN K. PASCO, 
FRANK W. ROCKWELL, 
FRANK H. SAYLOR, 
FRANKLIN E. SMITH, 
NATHANIEL B. SMITH, 
JOSEPH K. TAYLOR, 
Rev. PHILANDER THURSTON. 

1866. 

WILLIAM BELCHER, 
Rev. NEWTON H. BELL, 

tHENRY C. BRADBURY, 
SAMUEL J. DIKE, 
WILLIAM P. FISHER, 
EBER W. GAYLORD, 
GEORGE HARRIS, 
LEWIS F. MORRIS, 
VINCENT MOSES, 
Rev. HEMAN H. NEILL, 
STEPHEN D. NOYES, 
CHARLES R. PAINE, 
HENRY V. PELTON, 
CHARLES R. PHIPPS, 
STEPHEN B. RAND, 
tAsA A. SPEAR, 



ATHENE SOCIETY. 



149 



LEVERETT W. SPOFFORD, 
ERASTUS W. TWICHELL, 
tSAMUEL H. VALENTINE, 
STEPHEN W. WEBB, 
HENRY C. WESTON. 

1867. 

JOHN W. BURGESS, 
FRANCIS E. BURNETTE, 

JOSIAH BURNHAM, 

JAMES B. CONVERSE, 
GALEN B. DANFORTH, 
EDWARD B. EARLE, 
JAMES H. EARLE, 
JOHN B. FAIRBANK, 
EDWIN A. GROSVENOR, 
DWIGHT S. HERRICK, 

tCHARLES E. HlBBARD, 

Rev. PAYSON W. LYMAN, 
SETH W. MALTBIE, 
FREDERIC W. MARCH, 
CYRUS S. MERRILL, 

Rev. CHARLES W. PAKK, 
FREDERIC SEYMOUR, 
GEORGE SHATTUCK, 
DANIEL S. SMART, 
tCHARLES L. STORRS, 
tCASSius M. TERRY, 
JOHN C. TERRY, 
NATHANIEL M. TERRY, 
CHARLES B. TILDEN, 
MYRON T. WHITNEY. 



1868. 

ABNER T. BUCHANAN, 
GEORGE H. BUFFUM, 
GEORGE A. COBURN, 
ROBERT H. DAVIS, 
CYRUS C. DsCosTER, 
tAuRELius L. GLEASON, 
tDANiEL C. HEATH, 
ALBERT B. MATHER, 

WORTHINGTON W. MlNER, 

WILLIAM G. E. POPE, 
FRANK W. ROCKWELL, 
JOHN G. SMART, 
tJoiiN H. WILLIAMS. 



EDWARD A. ADAMS, 
CHARLES H. ALLEN, 
WILLIAM M. BENEDICT, 
EDWARD A. BENNER, 
CLARENCE F. BOYDEN, 
WILLIAM R. BROWN, 
JOSEPH K. CHICKERING, 



JAMES H. CHILDS, 
ELIJAH W. DONALD, 
HENRY K. FIELD, 
GEORGE M. GAGE, 
RICHARD GOODMAN, Jr., 
tWM. R. HOBBIE, 
CLARENCE L. HOWES, 
WM. A. KEESE, 
JOHN E. KELLOGG, 
STEPHEN H. LARNED, 
HENRY M. MATTHEWS, 
JAMES MCNEILL, 
IMARCUS W. MONTGOMERY, 
CHARLES S. NEWHALL, 
JOHN A. PAGE, 
AMOS B. PUTNAM, 

tJOHN W. QUINBY, 

WILLIAM R. SCARRITT, 
HENRY P. SMITH, 
WINTHROP SMITH, 
ALFRED E. TRACY, 
ELIHU H. VOTAW, 
WILLIAM H. WARN. 



1870. 

JOSEPH H. ADAMS, 
JAMES O. AVERILL, 
AZRO L. BLAKE, 
ARTHUR C. BRADLEY, 
FRANK F. COBURN, 
MYKON B. DANE. 
CHARLES H. DANIELS, 
WILLIAM A. DUDLEY, 
GEORGE E. GOODRICH, 
CHARLES L. HARRINGTON, 
JOEL S. IVES, 
tAppLETON P. LYON, 
JOSEPH E. MILLER, 
HARVEY PORTER, 
JOHN P. RICHARDSON, 
JOHN G. STANTON, 
GEORGE STERLING, 
WILLIAM H. SWIFT, 
GEORGE H. TILTON, 

fCORNELIUS G. TROW, 

JOSEPH T. WARD, 
GEORGE H. WATSON, 

fWlLLIAM K. WlCKES, 

EDWARD C. WINSLOW. 

1871. 

JOSEPH N. BLANCHARD, 
tCHARLES H. BROWNELL, 
WILLIAM C. BROWNELL, 
WILLIAM H. CHICKERING, 
JASON L. CURTIS, JR., 
. CUTTING, 



150 



ATHENE SOCIETY. 



JOHN E. DAY, 
EDWARD P. DEMOTT, 
CARLOS E. DUNSHEE, 
t WILLIAM T. FORBES, 
WILLIAM GREENWOOD, 
EDWARD S. HALL, 
DAVID HILL, 
WILLIAM B. HOMER, 
GEORGE M. HOWE, 
CHARLES W. MALLORY, 
EDWIN K. MARTIN, 



ARTHUR B. MORONG, 
LEONARD MORSE, 
ARTHUR R. PAINE, 
ROBERT C. ROCKWELL, 
EDWARD P. ROOT, 
HENRY H. SAWYER, 
DAVID A. SHAW, JR., 
ARTHUR R. SIMMONS, 
CHARLES S. STILES, JR. 
ISRAEL N. TERRY. 



UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS. 



1872. 

HERBERT B. ADAMS, 
HARRISON BAILEY, 
BERNADOTTE BANCROFT, 
ARTHUR J. BENEDICT, 
PATRICK CLANCY, 
EMERSON D. CORNISH, 
CHARLES A. DOOLITTLE, 
SOLON T. FRENCH, 
t HENRY A. GAYLORD, 
LEWELLIN M. GLIDDEN, 
JOHN H. HENSHAW, 
MOSES M. HOBART, 
CONSTANT C. HODGMAN, 
DAVID L. HOLBROOK, 
R. DEWITT MALLARY, 
CHARLES F. MORSE, 
WALTER NEGLEY, 
ALBERT G. PAINE, 
FRANK PARKER, 
GEORGE S. PELTON, 
WASHINGTON I. PUTNAM, 
TIMOTHY G. SPAULDING, 
HARRY S. STEVENS, 
WALTER THOMPSON, 

LOUIS B. TUCKERMAN, 

WILLARD M. WHITE, 
FRANK M. WILKINS. 



1873. 

FRANK T. BENNER, 
LEVERETT BRADLEY, JR., 
JOHN V. BROOKS, 
EDWARD W. CHASE, 
EUGENE B. COLLESTER, 
DWIGHT G. CUTLER, 
WILLIAM V. W. DAVIS, 
AUSTIN C. FIELD, 
EDWIN F. FIELD, 
LYMAN B. HALL, 
FRANKLIN S. HATCH, 



JAMES HAYWARD, 
JOHN R. HOBBIE, 
JAMES H HOYT, 
HENRY A. KING, 
ALVAH K. LAWRIE, 
ANDREW D. LAWRIE, 
HENRY A. LEWIS, 
JOHN D. McKECHNiE, 
Lucius P. MERRIAM, 
CHARLES NEGLEY, 
GRANVILLE W. NIMS, 
NORMAND S. PATTON, 
MATTHIAS N. SMITH, 
CHARLES B. STRONG, 
JOHN B. SWIFT, 
JAMES H. TORREY, 
JOHN M. TYLER, 
LUTHER J. WARNER, 
ELIJAH H. WILLIAMS. 



1874. 

WINFRED B. BANCROFT, 
CLARENCE F. BIRDSEYE, 
JOHN F. BISCOE, 
WALTER S. BISCOE, 
CHARLES R. DARLING, 
SIDNEY DICKINSON, 
SAMUEL H. FISH, 
JOSEPH E. FROST, 
WILLIAM B. GOLDSMITH, 
EDWARD H. ROWLAND, 
GEORGE A. LELAND, 
ELIHU G. LOOMIS, 
CHARLES H. MARSH, 
LEVERETT MEARS, 
NATHAN MORSE, 
JULIUS E. PHELPS, 
HERBERT H. SANDERSON, 
FREDERIC A. SAWTELLE, 



ATHENE SOCIETY. 



151 



WILLIAM F. SLOCUM, JR., 
EDMUND M. SMITH, 



FREDERIC W. WHITRIDGE, 
ABNER F. WOODWARD. 



SUMMARY. 

Number of Graduate Members under name Academia, 
Number of Graduate Members under name Athense, 
Undergraduate Members, (July, 1871,) - 
Non- Graduate Members, 



83 
431 

79 
126 



Entire Membership, ('47-'74,j 



719 



ECLECTIC. 



THE PRESIDENTS ARE MARKED THUS (t). 



Class of 1846. 

DANIEL E. BARNARD, 
Rev. SERENO E. BISHOP, 

FRANCIS 0. BLISS, 

JOSEPH P. DOWSE, 
Rev. GEORGE E. FISHER, 

SAMUEL M. FLETCHER, 
Hon. WILLIAM HOWLAND, 

ARTHUR H. JACKSON, 
Rev. MERRICK KNIGHT, 
Rev. SALEM M. PLIMPTON, 

HARVEY J. SKIFF, 
Rev. WILLIAM G. TUTTLE, 

GEORGE S. WOODMAN. 



1847. 

JOHN W. BELCHER, 
Rev. NATHANIEL H. BROUGHTON, 

fWARREN F. DRAPER, 
Rev. CHARLES H. GATES, 

ORMOND B. MARSH, 
tRev. GEORGE SOULE, 
Rev. JOHN R. UPTON, 
Prof. LEMUEL H WATERS. 



1848, 

ERASMUS D. BAKER, 
Rev. MARTIN L. GAYLORD, 
Rev. FRANCIS HOMES, 

FRANCIS A. HOWE, 
^Rev. Louis P. LEDOUX, 
("Rev. ROBERT D. MILLER, 
Rev. THOMAS MORONG, 

tlSAAC POMEROY, 

Rev. JOHN F. SEVERANCE, 
Rev. WILLIAM S. SMITH, 
HORACE W. TAYLOR, 
NEWELL WEDGE, 
Rev. LUTHER R. WHITE. 

1849. 

ISAAC B. BELKNAP, 
JOHN M. EMERSON, 
tRev. GEORGE R. FERGUSON, 



Rev. JUNIUS L. HATCH, 
Rev. HUBERT P. HERRICK, 
Prof. EDWARD HITCHCOCK, 

ELIJAH HOWE, 
Rev. SYLVANUS C. KENDALL, 
Rev. JAMES P. KIMBALL, 
Rev. WILLIAM H. LESTER, 
Rev. CHARLES D. LOTHROP, 

tJosEPH D. POLAND, 
Rev. GEORGE I. STEARNS, 
Rev. GEORGE F. WALKER, 

tJoHN H. WASHBURN. 



1850. 

Rev. WILLIAM F. AVERT, 
Rev. ALBERT G. BEEBEE, 
Rev. JOHN E. CORY, 

MINOTT S. CROSBY, 
Rev. EDMUND Y. GARRETTE, 
AUGUSTINE M. GAY, 
JAMES J. H. GREGORY, 
LEICESTER P. HODGE, 
tGEORGE HOWLAND, 
tRev. JACOB M. MANNING, 
JOSEPH NICKERSON, 
tRev. DAVID T. PACKARD, 

THOMAS M. STIMPSON. 



1851, 

Rev. WILLIAM O. BALDWIN, 
Rev. AUGUSTUS BERRY, 

ETHAN E. BOIES, 

JESSE R. DAVENPORT, 
tRev. FRANKLIN B. DOE, 
Rev. FRANCIS A. DOUGLASS, 

CHARLES C. FOWLER, 
Rev. JOHN H. MELLISH, 

FLOYD OVERTON, 
Hon. JOHN E. SANFORD, 

HENRY M. SMITH, 
tRev. MILAN C. STEBBINS, 

ROBERT STEWART, 

WILLIAM P. WASHBURN, 
tRev. JOHN S. ZELIE. 



ALEXANDRIA SOCIETY. 



153 



1852. 

WILLIAM H. ADAMS, 
Rev. ORSON P. ALLEN, 

JOHN H. ALMY, 

tRev. HERMAN N. BARNUM, 

Rev. GEORGE L. BECKER, 

THEODORE H. BENJAMIN, 
tRev. DANIEL BLISS, 

EBENEZER P. BURGESS, 
EDWARD P. BURGESS, 



Rev. FRANKLIN P. CHAPIN, 
JOSEPH M. CLARK, 

Rev. ELIJAH S. FISH, 

BRAINERD T. HARRINGTON, 
LEWIS W. HOLMES, 
EDWARD S. LARNED, 
tHENRY MOORE, 
SIDNEY K. SMITH, 
DANIEL J. SPRAGUE, 
BENJAMIN E. THURSTON, 

Prof. GEORGE N. WEBBER. 



[At this point, the Society assumed the name, Alexandria.] 



ALEXANDRIA. 



(lass of 1853, 



ABIAL R. ABBOTT, 
THOMAS D. ADAMS, 

Rev. ROBERT C. ALLISON, 
t NATHANIEL P. BAKER, 

Rev. HENRY L. BOLTWOOD, 
JAMES BUCKLAND, 
HARVEY S. CARPENTER, 

Prof. EDWARD P. CROWELL, 

Rev. SAMUEL C. DEAN, 
ENOCH K. EVANS, 

Rev. WILLIAM D. FLAGG, 

Prof. THEOPHILUS L. GRISWOLD, 

MATTHEW W. HASKELL, 
I Rev. CHARLES F. MORSE, 
EDWIN NRLSON, 
RALPH L. PARSONS, 
tHENRY R. PIERCE, 

Rev. GILBERT B. RICHARDSON, 

Rev. JULIUS SPENCER, 

Prof. RICHARD S. STORRS, 

Prof. SANBORN TENNEY. 



1854. 

AVERILL B. CANFIELD, 
Rev. JAMES F. CLARKE, 
EDWIN Coo LEY, 
ALEXANDER B. CRANE, 
t WILLIAM W. FOWLER, 
t JOSIAH HARTZEL, 
Rev. MILAN H. HITCHCOCK, 
Rev. CHARLES H. HOLLOWAY, 
CHARLES A. KIMBALL, 
ALBERT W. MAYES, 
t WILLARD MERRILL, 
EDWARD B. OLCOTT, 
CHARLES P. RUGG, 
Rev. HORACE P. SMITH, 
.CHARLES A. WILSON. 

20 



1855. 



RUFUS C. BAILEY, 
tRev. JOSEPH BOARDMAN, 

ALBERT H. BRIDGMAN, 
FRANCIS F.^BROWN, 
GEORGE E. DUNLAP, 
APPLETON H. FITCH, 
Rev. WILLIAM A. HALLOCK, 
Rev. CHARLES HARDON, 

DIXI C. HOYT, 
Hon. WILLIAM E. HUGHITT, 
Rev. CHESTER D. JEFFERDS, 

t WlLLIAM-L. JOY, 

fProf. HENRY S. KELSEY, 
tProf. HENRY B. NASON, 
Rev. JAMES C. PARSONS, 
CHARLES E. SPINNEY, 
EZRA T. SPRAGUE, 
Rev. CHAUNCEY B. THOMAS, 
BENJAMIN F. WEBSTER. 



1856. 

tRev. LYMAN BARTLETT, 

EDWARD E. BRADBURY, 
WILLIAM F. BRADBURY, 

Rev. CHESTER L. CUSHMAN, 
EDWARD GAY, 

Rev. HENRY C. GRAVES, 

Hon. CHARLES E. GRIGGS, 
EDWIN C. HAND, 

Rev. HIRAM C.^HAYD'N, 

WILLIAM B. KIMBALL, 

Rev. JOHN W. LANE, 

Rev. FRANKLIN B. NORTON, 
tRev. DANIEL PHILLIPS, 

Rev. MARTIN L. RICHARDSON, 
JOHN W. SMITH, 
FRANKLIN O. STILES, 

Rev. AMHERST L. THOMPSON, 



154 ALEXANDRIA SOCIETY. 


Prof. WILLIAM H. WARD, 


1859. 


GEORGE W. WHEELER. 






WILLIAM H. BARROWS, 




UAMES F. CLAFLIN, 


1857. 


Rev. SAMUEL E. HERRICK, 


STEPHEN G. AGNEW, 
GEORGE E. AIKEN, 
^Rev. GEORGE A. BECKWITH, 
Rev. GEORGE S. BISCOE, 
JOHN H. BOALT, 
Rev. HENRY M. BRIDGMAN, 
FRANCIS BURT, 
Rev. ASAHEL L CLARK, 
Rev. WILLIAM CRAWFORD, 
fRev. JOHN W. DODGE, 
Rev. ARTHUR FOLSOM, 
RICHARD FOLSOM, 
JEREMIAH L. FORDHAM, 


Rev. HENRY F. HYDE, 
THOMAS A. LEWIS, 
IALPHEUS R. NICHOLS,, 
Rev. PHILANDER READ, 
Rev. AMOS F. SHATTUCK, 
HENRY C. SKINNER, 
GEORGE L. SMEAD, 
HENRY W. SMITH, 
tHon. LUTHER R. SMITH, 
Rev. WESLEY SQUIER, 
Rev. JAMES N. THRESHER, 
Rev. HENRY T UPPER, 
JOHN L. H. WARD. 


Rev. HENRY W. JONES, 




Prof. RICHARD H. MATHER, 


1860, 


NATHAN R. MORSE, 




JAMES H. PALMER, 


LUTHER ARMSTRONG, 


Prof. GEORGE D. B. PEPPER, 


Rev. MOSES B. BOARDMAN, 


tRev. DANIEL H. ROGAN, 


Rev. WILLIAM BROWN, 


FERDINAND SHAW, 


Rev. HENRY BULLARD, 


Rev. HENRY A. STEVENS, 


HORACE CANNON, 


MATTHEW WALKER, 


GEORGE F. CHAPIN, 


Rev. JOHN E. WHEELER. 


JOHN J. COPP, 




Rev. GEORGE CURTIS, 




Rev. GEORGE DEXTER, 


1858, 


Rev. CORNELIUS E. DICKINSON, 


t Hon. CHARLES B. ANDREWS, 
Rev. DANIEL J. BLISS, 
Rev. LYMAN D. CHAPIN, 
ROYAL W. CLARK, 
JAMES COLLINS, 
HENRY G. DELANO, 
Rev. ALFRED A. ELLSWORTH, 
HORACE S. FULLER, 
JESSE F. FULLER, 
Rev. EDWARD P. GARDNER, 
CHARLES C. GATES, 
Rev. ALVIN B. GOODALE, 
GEORGE S. GROSVENOR, 
DANIEL W. HASKINS, 
Rev. HENRY HASTINGS, 
Rev. CHESTER W. HAWLEY, 
EDWIN HUNT, 
Rev. WILLIAM E. B. MOORE, 
SYLVANUS C. PRIEST, 


RICHARD D. DOUGLASS, 
Prof. WILLIAM C. ESTY, 
Rev. HENRY M. HOLMES, 
Rev. JOSEPH B. LITTLE, 
Rev. GEORGE O. LITTLE, 
Lucius L. MERRICK, 
OLIVER B. MERRILL, 
tRev. NATHANIEL MIGHILL, 
Rev. HIRAM B. PUTNAM, 
WILLARD PUTNAM, 
Rev. CHARLES H. RICHARDSON, 
CHARLES B. RUGGLES, 
fEDWARD O. SHEPARD, 
ALFRED STEBBINS, 
Rev. FRANCIS E. TOWER, 
tRev. JAMES W. WARD, 
EDWARD R. WHEELER, 
Rev. HORACE R. WILLIAMS, 
BENJAMIN WORMELL. 


fProf. LYMAN S. ROWLAND, 




Rev. EDWARD H. SAYRE, 


1861. 


HAVILAH M. SPRAGUE, 




t GARDNER P. STICKNEY, 


Rev. EDWIN A. ADAMS, 


JAMES E. TOWER, 


JOHN AVERY, 


SAMUEL P. TUCK, 


GEORGE C. BOWERS, 


Rev. JOHN WHITEHILL, 


WILLIAM H. BROWNE, 


Rev. JAMES D. WILSON. 


FREDERIC BROWNING, 



ALEXANDRIA SOCIETY. 



155 



SIDNEY CRAWFORD, 

Kev. AUSTIN DODGE, 
JOHN DOLE, 
E. PORTER DYER, 
SAMUEL P. FOWLER, 

Rev. BRADFORD M. FULLERTON, 

Rev. WALTER H. GILES, 

Rev. BENJAMIN F. HAMILTON, 
ASA S. HARDY, 

Rev. ELIJAH HARMON, 

ALFRED L. HASKINS, 
EDWARD HOLMAN, 

Rev. JOHN C. HOUGHTON, 

JOSIAH H. HUNT, 
tRev. WILLIAM A. LAWRENCE, 
ALFRED MADDOCK, 
tCHARLES G. G. PAINE, 

Rev. GEORGE W. PHILLIPS, 
t WILLIAM M. POMEROY, 
GRANVILLE B. PUTNAM, 
WILLIAM A. RICHARDS, 
MOSES P. SNELL, 

Rev. LYSANDER T. SPAULDING, 
GEORGE W. WAITE. 



1862. 

FRANCIS W. ADAMS, 
Rev. ROWLAND H. ALLEN, 

ARTHUR G. BISCOE, 
Rev. ALBERT BRYANT, 
Rev. FRANCIS J. FAIRBANKS, 
EBENEZER N. FERNALD, 
tWiLLiAM B. GRAVES, 
Rev. HENRY GRIDLEV, 

tCHARLES T. HAYNES, 
Rev. HERVEY C. HAZEN, 

JAMES C. HOUGHTON, 
Hon. ALVA A. KNIGHT, 

ZECHARIAH E. LEWIS, 
GEORGE MACOMBER, 
FREDERIC D. MORSE, 
Rev. GEORGE G. PHIPPS, 
Rev. WILLIAM H. PHIPPS, 
Rev. ALVAH M. RICHARDSON, 
CHARLES B. STANTON, 
IMASON W. TYLER, 
NATHAN E. WILLIS, 
OLIVER WHITE. 



1863. 

WILLIAM B. ADAMS, 
WILLIAM N. BATCHELDER, 
CHARLES M. BILLINGS, 
THOMAS D. BISCOE, 
CHARLES S. BROOKS, 
Rev. DeWiTT S. CLARK, 
LODWICK S. DAVIES, 



Prof. JOSEPH E. DICKSON, 
UUBAL C. GLEASON, 
CLARKE H. GRIGGS, 

Rev. LEAVITT H. HALLOCK, 
tALONzo P. HEYWOOD, 
WALTER M. HOWLAND, 
ROBERT I. JONES, 

WOODBURY S. KlMBALL, 

Rev. JAMES G. MERRILL, 

WILLIAM F. MERRILL, 
GEORGE W. MORRILL, 
HENRY O. SMITH, 

Rev. GEORGE F. STANTON, 
FRAZKR A. STEARNS, 
JOSEPH A. TITUS, 
SIDNEY W. TYLER, 
tRev. GEORGE H. WELLS. 



1861. 

ALBERT D. AMSDEN, 
FRANCIS A. CLARY, 
tDAviD S. FARNHAM, 

Rev. CALVIN R. FITTS, 

tEowARD W. GLOVER, 
JONAS GUILFORD, 
NATHAN HARRINGTON, 

Rev. WILLIAM E LOCKE, 

Rev. DANIEL B. LORD, 
HENRY F. SEARS. 
HORACE A. SMITH, 
tRev. FREDERIC E. STURGESS, 

Rev. HENRY M. TENNEY, 
EDWARD S. TOWNE, 
WILLIAM W. TYLER, 

Rev. MARTIN L. WILLISTON. 



1865. 

ASA G. ABBOTT, 
EDWARD N. BARTLETT, 

Prof. JAMES H. EATON, 
HENRY W. EFNER, 
BENJAMIN K. EMERSON, 
tEowiN P. FROST, 
GKORGE D. GRAY, 
HENRY M. GREENE, 
VITELLUS M. HARDY, 
FREDERIC HOLLAND, 
JOSEPH G. HOUGHTON, 
ALBERT H. HOWLAND, 
EDMUND A. JONES, 
CHARLES E. LANE, 
tDANiEL MARCH, 

Rev. DAVID O. MEARS, 

GEORGE C. MERRILL, 

Rev. GEORGE R. MERRILL, 
HENRY P. MOULTON, 



156 



ALEXANDRIA SOCIETY. 



GEORGE L. PUTNAM, 
JOHN S. RUNNELLS, 
ZABDIEL S. SAMPSON, 
JOSEPH H. SAWYER, 
EDWARD P. SMITH, 
THOMAS S. SMITH, 
ALMON U. THRESHER, 
tCnARLES W. TURNER, 
Prof. HENRY M. TYLER, 
JOHN B. TYLER. 



1866. 

fRev. LABAN W. ALLEN, 

Prof. ELISHA H. BARLOW, 
MAURICE B. BLAKE, 
JASON H. BLISS, 

Rev. GEORGE BRAYTON, 

HERBERT L. BRIDGMAN, 
SAMUEL W. BROWN, 
CHARLES H. CHANDLER, 

Rev. ROYAL M. COLE, 
NOAH S. COOLEY, 

Rev. PEREZ D. COWAN, 
JOHN E. DAME, 
t JOSEPH W. FAIRBANKS, 
NEHKMIAH H. GAGE, 
ALONZO S. KIMBALL, 
JOHN A. MOODY, 
CHARLES H. PARKHURST, 
HENRY T. PEIRCE, 
CHARLES B. ROE, 
FRANCIS D. S. SARGENT, 
HENRY F. SEIPLE, 
HERBERT M. SMALL, 
SAMUEL C. SMITH, 
t THOMAS S. SMITH, 
JAMES E. SPEAR, 
WILLIAM WESTON, 
ALFRED E. WHITAKER, 
JACOB W. WOOD, 
GEORGE F. ZIEGLER. 



1867. 

BENJAMIN F. W. BALLARD, 
GEORGE W. BARBER, 
JOSEPH BOARD, 
EDMUND C. BRAYTON, 
FRANCIS E. BURNETTE, 
t MICHAEL BURNHAM, 
JEFFERSON CLARK, 
HENRY CARMICHAEL, 
SAMUEL I. CURTISS, 
EDWARD B. FENNER, 
GEORGE F. FLICHTNER, 
CALVIN G. HILL, 
WILLIAM E. HORTON, 
FREDERIC W. MARCH, 
WILLIAM R. MEAD, 



t WILLIAM C. PECKHAM, 

t ELIHU ROOT, 
SOLOMON T. STREETER, 
EZRA F. TAFT, 
SAMUEL WARD, 
WILLIAM H. WHITE, 
WILLIAM P. WHITE, 
WILLIAM W. WILKINS. 

1868. 

WILLIAM C. BALL, 
HENRY BALLANTINE, 
EDWIN F. BAYLEY, 
CHARLES G. BROOKS, 
WILLIAM A. BROWN, 
NELSON F. COBLEIGH, 
THOMAS E. N. EATON, 

t WILLIAM W. EATON, 
CHARLES B. FELCH, 

t HARLAN P. FRENCH, 
HENRY H. HAMILTON, 
JOSEPH S. JONES, 
STEPHEN S. LANCASTER, 
ALBERT H. LIVERMORE, 
JOHN W. MARSH, 
CHARLES A. PEABODY, 
ARTEMAS B. SMITH, 
JAMES L. TERRY, 
ELIPHALET W. TYLER, 

t CHARLES F. WELLS, 
HILAND H. WHEELER, 
ISAAC W. WOOD, 
PETER B. WYCKOFF, 
LUCIEN G. YOB. 



1869. 

WILLIAM (). BALLANTINE, 
JOSKPH H. BOGART,. 
HERBERT J. COOKE, 
CHARLES F. EASTMAN, 
JOHN H. EASTMAN, 

t AMZI B. EMMONS, 
ROSELLE A. FULLER, 
WILLIAM P. HAMMOND, 
MYRON 0. HARRINGTON, 
WATERMAN T. HEWETT, 
ALVAH B. KITTREDGE, 
FRANK D. LEWIS, 
GEORGE McCoRMiCK, 
CHARLES R. PRATT, 
HENRY B. RICHARDSON, 

t JOHN K. RICHARDSON, 
JULIUS SANDERSON, 
JOSEPH B. SEABURY, 
SIDNEY T. SKIDMORE, 
WINFIELD S. SLOCUM, 
EDWIN C. STICKEL, 
FRANCIS H. STODDARD, 



ALEXANDRIA SOCIETY. 



157 



ALBERT F. TENNEY, 

t DANIEL G. THOMPSON, 

ROBERT M. WOODS. 



1870. 

CHARLES H. AMES, 
WASHINGTON CHOATE, 
GEORGE H. EATON, 
JAMES L. FOWLE, 
SAMUEL L. GRAVES, 
WILLIAM S. ROWLAND, 
SAMUEL W. HOWLAND, 
FRANK J. MARSH, 
ALBERT B. MILLER, 
JOSEPH NEE SIMA, 
WILLIAM N. NOBLE, 

t WILLIAM D. PERRY, 
HUGH B. RICE, 

t GEORGE E. SUTHERLAND, 
WILLIAM P. SPRAGUE, 
JOHN B. THURSTON, 

t A. JUDSON TlTSWORTH, 

WARDNER C. TITSWORTH, 
MERRITT II. WALKER, 
CHARLES A. WATSON, 
GEORGE H. WHITE, 
WALTER WYMAN. 



1871, 

GEORGE C. ADAMS, 
SIDNEY E. BAILEY, 
EDWIN M. BLISS, 
RAYMOND L. BRIDGMAN, 
SAMUEL P. BUTLER. 
MAURICE D. CLARKE, 
S. MERRILL CLARKE, 
HENRY W. ELDREDGE, 
EDWARD S. FITZ, 
ANDREW E. FORD, 
JESSE M. FREELS, 
WILLIAM L. HALL, 

t PLINY N. HASKELL, 
WILLIAM H. HUBBARD, 
CALVIN KEYSER, 
HERBERT G. LORD, 
ANSON D. MORSE, 

t DWIGHT D. PORTER, 
GEORGE F. SAWYER, 
JOHN W. SIMPSON, 
EDWARD T. SLOCUM, 

t JOSIAH R. SMITH, 
THEODORE L. STILES, 
EDWARD G. STONE, 
FRANK M. TAYLOR, 
EVERETT A. THOMPSON, 
SAMUEL W. TINDELL, 
CHARLES L. TOMBLEN, 
CLAUDE WILSON. 



UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS. 



1872. 

HERMAN A. BAILEY, 
NATHAN D. BARROWS, 
SPENCER R. BONNELL, 
OTIS GARY, JR., 
GEORGE E. CHURCH, 
GEORGE L. CLARK, 
PASCAL M. DOWD, 
GEORGE FOWLER, 
GORDON R. HALL, 
tLoRANUS E. HITCHCOCK, 
JOHN W. McEmiNNEY, 
FREDERIC W. PACKARD, 
LYMAN M. PAINE, 
CHARLES A. SIEBERT, 
ALBERT H. THOMPSON. 
S. ALVAH THURLOW. 



1873. 

DOANE R. ATKINS, 
JOHN A. BENNETT, 



ARTHUR M. BRIDGMAN, 
CHARLES N. CLARK, 
CHARLES W. COOPER, 
S. WOODWORTH CUNNINGHAM, 
NEWELL L. CUTLER, 
FRANK W. DAMON, 
CHARLES L. DEADY, 
GEORGE W. EDMOND, 
FRANK J. GOODWIN, 
ARTHUR B. HART, 
EDWARD M. HART WELL, 
HENRY C. HAVEN, 
ARNOLD N. HEAP, 
ANDREW J. HIRSCHL, 
FRANK H. LOUD, 
HARMON N. MORSE, 
CHARLES J. MULFORD, 
FRANK G. NELSON, 

KlNGSLEY F. NORRIS, 

FLOYD E. SHERMAN, 
LEWIS SPERRY, 
CHARLES B. STUART, 
WILLIAM J. SWIFT, 
J. BRAINERD THRALL, 



158 



ALEXANDRIA SOCIETY. 



TALCOTT WILLIAMS, 
JOHN WOODBRIDGE. 



1874, 

FRANK H. ALLEN, 
GEORGE S. ATWOOD, 
GEORGE H. BAKER, 
JOHN W. BALLANTINE, 
LINUS L. BARBOUR, 
GEORGE E. BREWER, 
CHARLES S. BROADHEAD, 
GEORGE B. COPP, 
WENDELL E. CROCKER, 
FRANK F. Dow, 
ALFRED ELY, 
JESSE F. FORBES, 
FREDERIC H. GILLETT, 



MASON A. GREEN, 
JAMES H. HAWLEY, 
FREDERIC A. HOLMES, 
JOSIAH KEEP, 
FRANCIS E. MASTEN, 
GEORGE H. MELLEN, 
WILLIAM C. MERRILL, 
ISAAC N. MILLS, 
FRANKLIN P. OWEN, 
CHARLES H. PHALEN, 
CHARLES H. K. SANDERSON, 
HOWARD B. SCOTT, 
CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN T. STODDARD, 
THOMAS A. STUART, 
HERBERT B. TURNER, 
FOSTER R. WAIT, 
HENRY A. WOLFF. 



SUMMARY. 

Graduate Members under name Eclectic, 
Graduate Members under name Alexandria, 
Undergraduate Members of Alexandria, - 
Non-Graduate Members, ('46-'71) 



97 
441 

75 
162 

775 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

Whole number of graduates of the College, ..... 1,936 
Whole number of graduate Members belonging to Alexandrian, Athenian, 

Social Union, Eclectic, Academia, Alexandria or Athente Societies, 1,910 
Number who have belonged to more than one of these Societies, 104 

Number of Graduates never in any way connected with either of these 

Societies, - 130 

Undergraduates connected with neither Alexandria nor Athense, 18 



Entire Membership of Societies, ----- - 2,854 



VI. 




ALPHA. DELTA PHI. 



AMHERST CHAPTER, 



ESTABLISHED IN 1836. 



Rev. GEORGE M. ADAMS, 
Rev. HENRY WARD BEECHER, 

CHARLES H. BRANSCOMB, 
*Prcs. E. HITCHCOCK, 
Rev. JAMES W. WARD, 

WILLIAM H. WELLS, 



Conway, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Madison, Wis. 
Chicago, 111. 



Class of 1837. 



Hon. LUCIAN BARBOUR, 
Rev. EDWIN ELISHA BLISS, 
Rev. NATHANIEL LYND LORD, 
*Rev. ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY, 

GEORGE BLISS MORRIS, 
Rev. JOSEPH PECKHAM, 

*WILLIAM BARRETT REED, M. D., 
Rev. DANIEL RICE, 



Indianapolis, Ind. 
Constantinople, Turkey. 
Rochester, Ind. 
Beloit, Wis. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Kingston, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Lafayette, Ind. 



160 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 



Kev. JOEL E. KOCKWELL, 

CURTIS B. M. SMITH, 
Hon. HENRY W. WILLIAMS, 



Stapleton, N. Y. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



Class of 1838. 

*CHARLES EMERSON, 
Hon. WHITING GRISWOLD, 
Kev. AARON R. LIVERMORE, 

*JONATHAN BRYAN MARSHALL, 
Hon. HORACE MAYNARD, 
Eev. JOHN A. McKiNSTRY, 
*Rev. AUSTIN A. PHELPS, 

*CHARLES FULLER SMITH, 
JAMES SMITH THAYER, 

*CHARLES ELLERY WASHBURN, M. D., 

Class of 1839, 

*Rev. JAMES HENRY BANCROFT, 
Rev. DEXTER CLAPP, 
Hon. EDWARD BATES GILLETT, 

WILLIAM E. GOLDTHWAIT, 
Rev. NATHANIEL A. HEWIT, 
Rev. FREDERIC D. HUNTINGTON, 
*Rev. HORACE HUTCHINSON, 
Rev. DANIEL MARCH, 

JAMES WILLARD PRESTON, 
SAMUEL HARRISON PRICE, 
Rev. DANIEL SHEPARDSON, 
Rev. RICHARD S. STORRS, Jr., 
*GEORGE SUMNER, Jr., 

Class of 1840. 

*DAVID REEVE ARNELL, 

GEORGE KIMBALL CROCKETT, 
Hon. CHARLES DELANO, 
Prof. GEORGE BAKER JEWETT, 
Hon. HENRY MARTYN SPOFFORD, 
Rev. WILLIAM WARD WHIPPLE, 

Class of 1841. 

EPHRAIM WARD BOND, 
EDWIN COBURN, 
LEANDER MUZZY DRURY, 
Rev. WILLIAM WARE HOWLAND, 



Pittsford, N. Y. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
North Mansfield, Conn. 
Milford, Conn. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Richfield, O. 
Boston, Mass. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Hoosick, N, Y. 
Fredonia, N. Y. 



Boston, Mass. 
Salem, Mass. 
Westfield, Mass. 
Longmeadow, Mass. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Burlington, Ind. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Boston, Mass. 
Greenbrier Co., Va. 
Zanesville, O. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Detroit, Mich. 



Nashville, Tenn. 
Boston, Mass. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Salem, Mass. 
New Orleans, La. 
La Grange, Mo. 



Springfield, Mass. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Canandaigua, N. Y, 
Jaffna, Ceylon. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 


161 


PROSPER KIMBALL HUTCHINSON, 


Rice City, R. I. 


Rev. ELLIS JAMES NEWLIN, 


Newark, Del. 


*WlLLIAM S. WlTHINGTON, 


Medway, Mass. 


(lass of 1842, 




Kev. LAUREN ARMSBY, 


Candia, N. H. 


Rev. HENRY DARLING, 


Albany, N. Y. 


Rev. DANIEL TAGGART FISK, 


Newburyport, Mass. 


CHARLES CAPEN HAYWARD, 


Charlestown, Mass. 


*HENRY M. HUMPHREY, 


Am hers t, Mass. 


*VINCENT HENRY SMITH, 


Columbia, Pa. 


Rev. ANDREW WILSON, 


Watkill, N. Y. 


Class of 1843. 




*ROSWELL DICKINSON COOK, 


Hadley, Mass. 


Rev. ZEPHANIAH M. HUMPHREY, 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


*NATHAN S. LINNELL, 


Amherst, Mass. 


Rev. DAVID TORREY, 


Cazenovia, N. Y. 


Rev. THADDEUS WILSON, 


Shrewsbury, N. J. 


Class of 1844. 




Rev. EDMUND KIMBALL ALDEN, 


South Boston, Mass. 


*Rev. RICHARD S. S. DICKINSON, 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Rev. JOHN LANGDON DUDLEY, 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


Rev. CHARLES HAMMOND, 


Mo n son, Mass. 


*Rev. SAMUEL HUNTING, 


Southampton, N. Y. 


DAVID MATHER KIMBALL, 


Kingston, N. Y. 


JONATHAN EDWARD E. LINNELL, M. D., 


Norwich, Conn. 


*HENRY DWIGHT STONE, 


Worcester, Mass. 


RUSSELL M. WRIGHT, 


Easthampton, Mass. 


Class of 1845. 




Rev. GEORGE M. ADAMS, 


Portsmouth, N. H. 


JEROME RIPLEY BRIGHAM, 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


SAMUEL JULIUS LEARNED, 


Chicago, 111. 


Prof. FRANCIS ANDREW MARCH, 


Easton, Pa. 


*Rev. JASON MORSE, 


Brimfield, Mass. 


*Rev. GEORGE H. NEWHALL, 


Walpole, Mass. 


Rev. ABEL KINGMAN PACKARD, 


Anoka, Minn. 


BAALIS SANFORD, 


New York City. 


HENRY SMITH STOCKBRIDGE, 


Baltimore, Md. 


HENRY NEHEMIAH WYMAN, 


San Francisco, Cal. 


Class of 1846. 




EDWIN A. BROOKS, 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


*Rev. LEVI ALPHEUS FIELD, 


Marlboro, Mass. 


21 





162 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 



Hon. WILLIAM HOWLAND, 

*LEONARD HUMPHREY, 
Rev. SALEM MARSH PLIMPTON, 
Rev. HENRY MARTYN STORRS, 

GEORGE S. WOODMAN, M. D., 

Class of 1847. 

Rev. RICHARD SALTER BILLINGS, 
*Rev. NATHANIEL H. BROUGHTON, 

LEWIS ISIDORE FLEMING, 
Rev. TIMOTHY STOWE, 



Class of 1848, 



Prof. WILLIAM C. DICKINSON, 
*Rev. SAMUEL FISK, 

Rev. FRANCIS HOMES, 
*Prof. SAMUEL FISHER MILLER, 
*JOHN LAURENS SPENCER, 
HORACE W. TAYLOR, 

Class of 1849. 

*JOHN MILTON EMERSON, 
*THEODORE FRANCIS FRENCH, 
*THOMAS B. HARRINGTON, 
Prof. EDWARD HITCHCOCK, M. D., 
JOHN WOODBRIDGE, Jr., 

Class of 1850. 

WILLIAM AUSTIN DICKINSON, 
Rev. GEORGE HENRY GOULD, 
JACOB HARDY, 
GEORGE ROWLAND, 
ELIJAH C. SHATTUCK, 
JOHN HOWLAND THOMPSON, 

Class of 1851. 

Prof. Lucius DELISON CHAPIN, 
JOSEPH SEAVER CURTIS, 
EDWARD PARRY DARLING, 
CHARLES CHAUNCEY FOWLER, 
*WALTER HUNTINGTON LYON, 
*Prof. JAMES AUSTIN RICHARDS, M. D., 
JOHN ELLIOTT SANFORD, 
BENTLEY HOWARD SMITH, 
Rev. MILAN CYRUS STEBBINS, 

NATHAN NOYES WITHINGTON, 



Lynn, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Wells River, Vt. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Salem, Mass. 



New London, Ct. 
Boston, Mass. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
New Bedford, Mast,. 



Battle Creek, Mich. 
Madison, Conn. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Rockford, 111. 



New York City. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 
West Chester, N. Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 



Amherst, Mass. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Sandwich Islands. 
Chicago, 111. 
Boylston, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 



East Bloomfield, N. Y. 
Hadley, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Durham, Conn. 
Brookfield, Mass. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Taunton, Mass. 
Joanna Furnace, Pa. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Newbury, Mass. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 



163 



Class of 1852. 

EBENEZER PRINCE BURGESS, M. D., 
Rev. FRANKLIN PERRY CHAPIN, 
WILLIAM W. GOODRICH, 
DAVID OSHEAL HANNAFORD, 
BRAINARD TIMOTHY HARRINGTON, 
*HENRY DWIGHT ROOT, 
GORHAM TRAIN, 



Dedham, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
New York City. 
Suffolk, Va. 
West Chester, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 



Class of 1853. 

Rev. HENRY LEONIDAS BOLTWOOD, 

BOWMAN BIGELOVV BREED, M. D., 

Prof. EDWARD PAYSON CROWELL, 

GEORGE DICKINSON GOODRICH, 

Rev. JOHN MORTON GREENE, 

Rev. JOHN ALEXANDER HAMILTON, 

Prof. RICHARD SALTER STORRS, 



Princeton, 111. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
East Windsor, Conn. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Davenport, la. 
Hartford, Conn. 



Class of 1851. 

Rev. HENRY VAUGHAN EMMONS, 

WILLIAM WORTHINGTON FOWLER, 

Rev EDMUND MORRIS PEASE, M. D., 
IRA WELCH PETTIBONE, 

Rev. HORACE PAYSON SMITH, 
*Rev. JOHN WINN UNDERBILL, 



Lancaster, N. H. 
New York City. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Winchester, Conn. 
Retreat P. O., Va. 
North Amherst, Mass. 



Class of 1855. 



Rev. JOSEPH BOARDMAN, 

SAMUEL EDWARD BROWN, 
Rev. CHARLES WENTWORTH BUCK, 
*RUFUS CHOATE, Jr., 
GEORGE DENISON, 
HASKET DERBY, M. D., 
Rev. WILLIAM E. DICKINSON, 
Rev. ASA SEVERANCE FISKE, 
Rev. JOHN LONG GRAVES, 
Prof. SYLVESTER HENRY KELSEY, 



Dracut, Mass. 
Davenport, la. 
Portland, Me. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Boston, Mass. 
Canton, Mass. 
Rockville, Conn. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Holliston, Mass. 



Class of 1856. 



Rev. WALTER BARTON, 

GEORGE WARREN COPELAND, 

EDWARD GAY, 

THADDEUS GRAVES, 
Frof. CHARLES HENRY HITCHCOCK, 

STILLMAN RICE, 



Suffield, Conn. 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Hatfield, Mass. 
Hanover, N. H. 
Gloucester, Mass. 



164 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 



HENRY M. SAVILLE, M. D., 
*FRANKLIN OSGOOD STILES, 
*Rev. AMHERST LORD THOMPSON, 
Prof. WILLIAM HAYES WARD, 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN WILDER, 



Quincy, Mass. 
Adrian, Mich. 
Oroomiah, Persia. 
New York City. 
Slielburne, Mass. 



Class of 1857. 



Rev. WILLIAM ALANSON ABBE, 

T, W. BICKNELL, 

G. R. BRACKETT, 
*DANIEL H. BREED, 
*FRANCIS BURT, 
Rev. WILLIAM CRAWFORD, 
Rev. ALVAH LILLIE FRISBEE, 

JOSEPH KIMBALL, 
Rev. JAMES PILLSBDRY LANE, 
Rev. HENRY DAVENPORT NORTHUP, 

JAMES HENRY P.ALMER, 
Prof. GEORGE DANA B. PEPPER, 

THEODORE C. PRATT, 
Rev. HENRY AUGUSTUS STEVENS, 



Class of 1858. 



Rev. GEORGE SAYLES BISHOP, 
Rev. JOSEPH BOURNE CLARK, 
*HENRY GILES DELANO, 
HORACE SMITH FULLER, M. D., 
GEORGE SUMNER GROSVENOR, 
Hon. HENRY E. HUTCHINSON, 

*SYLVANUS CHICKERING PRIEST, 
Rev. LYMAN SIBLEY ROWLAND, 



Class of 1859. 



WILLIAM HENRY BARROWS, 

DAVID BEATTIE, 

JAMES FITZGERALD CLAFLIN, 
*JAMES PAULUS FRENCH, 

WILLIAM H. GODDARD, 
*THOMAS AUGUSTUS LEWIS, 

ALEXANDER MARCY, 

EDWARD WILLARD PIERCE, 
*JOHN LORD HAYES WARD, 



Class of 1860. 



JOHN OTIS BARROWS, 
Rev. CORNELIUS EVARTS DICKINSON, 



Black Hawk Point, Col. 
Barrington, R. I. 

Newton, Mass. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Danbury, Conn. 
Massilon, O. 
Bristol, R. I. 
New York City. 
Springfield, 111. 
Chester, Pa. 

South Weymouth, Mass. 
N. Bridgewater, Mass. 



Newburgh, N. Y. 
Newtonville, Mass. 
Sunderland, Mass. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Trenton, N. J. 
New York City. 
Lancaster, Mass. 
Beloit, Wis. 



Anamosa, la. 
Troy, N.Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
York, N. Y. 
Shutesbury, Mass. 
Cape Island, N. Y. 
New Orleans, La. 
Abington, Mass. 



Mansfield, Conn. 
Elgin, 111. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 



165 



Rev. HENRY MARTYN HOLMES, 
Rev. JOSEPH BREWSTER LITTLE, 
Rev. GEORGE OBADIAH LITTLE, 
BENJAMIN W. PETTIBONE, 
EDWARD OLCOTT SHEPARD, 
Rev. FRANCIS EMORY TOWER, 
Rev. JAMES WILSON WARD, JR., 
Rev. HORACE ROBBINS WILLIAMS, 



Greenwich, N. Y. 
Mankato, Minn. 
Fort Wayne, O. 
Litchfield, Conn. 
Boston, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Rochester Centre, 
Almont, Mich. 



Class of 1861, 

JOHN A. VERY, New Haven, Conn. 

EDWARD COMSTOCK, Rome, N. Y. 

Rev. SIDNEY CRAWFORD, Poultney, Vt- 

ASA STRONG HARDY, Cleveland, O. 

SAMUEL HARRINGTON, Paxton, Mass. 

Rev. JAMES LEWIS, Huraboldt, Kan. 

CHARLES GOODELL GODDARD PAINE, Boston, Mass. 

ELLIOT SANFOKD, New York City, 

GEORGE WHITE WAITE, Ashtabula, O. 

AARON WARNER, Boston, Mass. 



Class of 1862. 

WASHINGTON IRVING ALLEN, 
Rev. FRANCIS JOEL FAIRBANKS, 

XACHARIAH EDWARDS LEWIS, M. D., 
*EDWARD MAYNARD, 

WILLIAM MCGLATHERY, 

GEORGE MILTON REED, 

LUTHER DIMMICK SHEPARD, 
*TIMOTHY PORTER STONE, 
*TRUMAN TOMSON, 



Vernon, N. J. 
East Westminster, Vt. 
West Farms, N. Y. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Towanda, Pa. 
Boston, Mass. 
Salem, Mass. 
Fayette, Ind. 
Amherst, Mass. 



Class of 1863, 



*HOMER R. BARTON, 
CHARLES M. BILLINGS, M. D., 
DON FERDINAND BRIGHAM, 
AUSTIN HARRIS, 
WALTER M. HOWLAND, 
PARKER W. MCMANUS, 

*WlLLIAM P. MONTELIUS, 

EDWARD C. ROBBINS, 
Rev. GEORGE F. STANTON, 

J. AUGUSTUS TITUS, 
Rev. GEORGE HUNTINGTON WELLS, 

JOSEPH EELS WILDER, 



Granby, Mass. 
Nashua, Iowa. 
New York City. 
East Machias, Me. 
Chicago, 111. 
Davenport, la. 
Easton, Pa. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
South Weymouth, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Amboy, 111. 
Hanover, Mass. 



166 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 



Class of 1864, 



NELSON F. BOND, 
WHITING SANFORD CRANE, 
NATHAN HARRINGTON, 
LUTHER C. HOWELL, 
DAVID A. IRWIN, 
E. B. PARK, 
GEORGE H. PRATT, 
* WILLIAM P. STONE, 
HENRY E. STORRS, 
EDWARD S. TOWNE, 
WILLIAM H. WHITING, 

Glass of 

*ASA GEORGE ABBOTT, 

JAMES L. BARKER, 

JAMES L. BISHOP, 
* ALFRED D. CLAPP, 

ORRIN COOLEY, M. D., 

BENJAMIN K. EMERSON, 

GEORGE D. GRAY, 

DANIEL MARCH, Jr., 

FRANK W. ROCKWELL, M. D., 

JOSEPH H. SAWYER, 

FRANK H. SAYLOR, 

ALMON U. THRESHER, 



Class of 1866. 



Rev. 



Rev. 



MAURICE B. BLAKE, 

GEORGE BRAYTON, 

NOAH S. COOLEY, 

PEREZ DICKINSON COWAN, 

SAMUEL J. DIKE, 

JOSEPH WHITCOMB FAIRBANKS, 

JOHN FRENCH, M. D., 
*NEHEMIAH HUTCHINSON GAGE, 

GEORGE HARRIS, Jr., 

ANDREW C. LIPPITT, 

HEMAN HUMPHREY NEILL, 

STEPHEN DUTTON NOYES, 

THOMAS SNELL SMITH, 
*H. WRIGHT WILLIAMS, 



Ware, Mass. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
South Brookfield, Mass. 
Painted Post, N. Y. 
Mifflinburg, Pa. 
Walpole, N. H. 
Shrewsbury, Mass. 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
Hartford, Conn. 
St. Albans, Vt. 



Milwaukee, Wis. 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 
New York City. 
Deerfield, Mass. 
Media, Pa. 
Amherst, Mass. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Cambridge, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
Schuylkill-Haven, Pa. 
Granville, O. 



San Francisco, Cal. 
Norwood, N. J. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Ellington, Conn. 
Norwalk, Conn. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hudson, N. H. 
Auburn, Me. 
New London, Conn. 
Fort Edward, N. Y. 
Andover, Mass. 
Andover, Mass. 
Goshen, Mass. 



Class of 1867. 

EDMUND CULLEN BRAYTON, Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Prof. JOHN WILLIAM BURGESS, Galesburgh, 111. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 



167 



Rev. 



FRANCIS ELLSWORTH BURNKTTE, 
MICHAEL BURNHAM, 
JEFFERSON CLARK, 
GEORGE FREDERIC FLICHTNER, 
FREDERIC WILLIAM MARCH, 
CHARLES WARE PARK, 
WILLIAM CLARKE PECKHAM, 
JAMES FRAZER STOKES, 
WILLIAM PRESCOTT WHITE, 



Class of 1868. 



WILLIAM CREIGHTON BALL, 
CHARLES GROSVENOR BROOKS, 
ABNER THOMAS BUCHANAN, 
AARON SPOONER CORNISH, 
HENRY HARRISON HAMILTON, 
FRANK WILLIAMS ROCKWELL, 
JOHN HEALY WILLIAMS, 
ISAAC WILLARD WOOD, 
LUCIEN GURNEE YOE, 

Class of 1869. 

E. WINCHESTER DONALD, 
RICHARD GOODMAN, JR., 
WILLIAM ROSCOE HOBBIE, 
hTEPHEN HOLMES LARNED, 
FRANK DRAPER LEWIS, 
HENRY MARTIN MATTHEWS, 
CHARLES RANSOM PRATT, 
HENRY BULLARD RICHARDSON, 
JOHTI KENDALL RICHARDSON, 
* WILLIAM CAMPBELL STOKES, 
ALBERT FRANCIS TENNEY, 

Class of 1870. 

WASHINGTON CHOATE, 
*MYRON BENJAMIN DANE, 

BRANT V. B. DIXON, 

EDWIN DOUGLASS, 

SAMUEL LAWRENCE GRAVES, 

APPLETON PARK LYON, 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS MARCH, 
*ALBERT BARNES MILLER, 

WALTER WYMAN, 

Class of 1871. 

JOSEPH NATHANIEL BLANCHARD, 
EDWIN MUNSELL BLISS, 



South Woodstock, Conn. 
Fall River, Mass. 
Needham, Mass. 
New York City. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Ahmednugger, India. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 
Princeton, N. J. 



St. Louis, Mo. 
Clinton, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Boston, Mass. 
Chester, Mass. 
Lenox, Mass. 
Andover, Mass. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Chicago, 111. 



Andover, Mass. 
Lenox, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Dudley, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Wyoming, N. Y. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 
Manchester, Mass. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 
East Whateley, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Groton Centre, Mass. 
Homer, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Albany, N. Y. 
Constantinople, Turkey. 



168 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 



CHARLES HENRY BROWNELL, 
WILLIAM CRARY BROWNELL, 
SAMUEL PATTERSON BUTLER, 
WILLIAM HENRY CHICKERING, 
GEORGE CYRIL HALL, 
PLINY NELSON HASKELL, 
GEORGE SPENCER KNAPP, 
EDWIN K. MARTIN, 
LEONARD MORSE, 
THEODORE MOODY OSBORNE, 
ROBERT CAMPBELL ROCKWELL, 
HARRY SHELBY STOKES, 

Class of 1872. 

CLARENCE AUGUSTUS BURLEIGH, 
GEORGE EVERETT CHURCH, 
GORDON ROBERT HALL, 
JOHN WILLIAM MCELHINNEY, 
ALBERT GEORGE PAINE, 
LYMAN MAY PAINE, 
CHARLES ALBERT SIEBERT, 
ALBERT HENRY THOMPSON, 

Class of 1873. 

LEVERETT BRADLEY, JR., 
FRANK WILLIAMS DAMON, 
WILLIAM VAIL WILSON DAVIS, 
LYMAN BEECHER HALL, 
JAMES HAYWARD, 
ARNOLD NELSON HEAP, 
JOHN T REMINGTON HOBBIE, 
JAMES HUMPHREY HOYT, 
KINGSLEY FLAVEL NORRIS, 
JOHN PARSONS, Jr., 
ELIJAH HAWLEY WILLIAMS, 
TALCOTT WILLIAMS, 
JOHN WOODBRIDGE, Jr., 

Class of 1874, 

CHARLES Ross DARLING, 
FRANK FOWLER Dow, 
FREDERIC HUNTINGTON GILLETT, 
GEORGE ADAMS LELAND, 
ROBERT PEARMAIN LORING, 
LEVERETT MEARS, 
THOMAS REEVES, 
CHARLES SPRAGUE SMITH, 



Peru, Ind. 
New York City. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Columbus, O. 
North Bloomfield, 0. 
Chicago, 111. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Woodstock, Conn. 
South Danvers, Mass. 
Lenox, Mass. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 



Chicago, 111. 
East Windsor, Conn. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Manchester, Mo. 
East Woodstock, Conn. 
East Woodstock, Conn. 
Belleville, 111. 
Searsport, Me. 



Methuen, Mass. 
Honolulu, S. I. 
Coldwater, Mich. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Hannibal, Mo. 
Chicago, 111. 
Amberst, Mass. 
Cleveland, O. 
Sodus, N. Y. 
Saugus, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Mardin, Turkey. 
Chicago, 111. 



Newtonville, Mass. 
Fowlerville, N. Y. 
Westfield, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Brookline, Mass. 
Essex, Mass. 
Metuchen, N. J. 
Andover, Mass. 




PSI UPSILON. 



GAMMA CHAPTER. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1841. 



ALBERT BRYANT, 
ABIJAH P. CLEVELAND, 
ITHAMAR F. CONKEY, 
JOSIAH G. HOLLAND, 
JAMES G. HOUGHTON, 
JOHN G. SAXE, 
EDWIN P. WHIFFLE, 
ALPHEUS HARDY, Esq., 
Dr. GEORGE B. LORING, 



*!SAAC C. PRAY, 
Rev. HENRY NEILL, 



Class of 1833. 
Class of 1834. 
(lass of 1841. 



Rev. ROWLAND AYRES, 
JABEZ B. LYMAN, 

Class of 1842. 

*ROSWELL L. CHAPIN, 

CHARLES B. DUFFIELD, 
Hon. WAJJDO HUTCHINS, 

2.2 



Boston, Mass. 
Hampton, Conn. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Salem, Mass. 



New York City. 



New Brunswick, N. J. 



Hadley, Mass. 
Kockford, 111. 

Springfield, Mass. 
Norfolk, Va. 
New York City. 



170 



PSI UPSILON. 



ISSACHAR LEFAVOUR, 
Rev. EDWARD D. NEILL, 
Rev. RUFUS P. WELLS, 
Rev. SAMUEL W. WHITNEY, 

ELIJAH H. WRIGHT, M. D., 



Beverly, Mass. 
Dublin, Ireland. 
Southampton, Mass. 
Flushing, L. I. 

Easthampton, Mass. 



Class of 1843, 



GEORGE A. CHASE, 
*EDWARD D. MARTIN, 
Prof. HENRY W. PARKER, 
Rev. FREDERICK A. REED, 
*J. MILTON STEARNS, 
CHARLES E. STRONG, 
JAMES H. WELLES, 
Rev. WILLIAM W. WILLIAMS, 



Conway, Mass. 
Snow Hill, Md. 
Amherst, Mass. 
East Taunton, Mass. 
New Ipswich, N. H. 
New York City. 
New York City. 
Toledo, O. 



Class of 1844, 



*JOHN S. BELKNAP, 
HENRY K. EDSON, 
ERASTUS W. ELLSWORTH, 
*Rev. JOHN E. EMERSON, 
Rev. LEWIS GREEN, 
Hon. GALUSHA A. GROW, 
*ALBERT R. PALMER, 



Hartford, Conn. 
Denmark, Iowa. 
E. Windsor Hill, Conn. 
Newburyport, Mass. 
Ashfield, Mass. 
Glen wood, Penn. 
Racine, Wis. 



Class of 1845, 



Prof. MARSHALL HENSHAW, 
*EDWARD J. CORNISH, 
*JOSIAH H. LONG, 

Prof. HENRY B. UNDERBILL, 



Easthampton, Mass. 
Natchez, Miss. 
Natchez, Miss. 
Stockton, Cal. 



Class of 1846. 



*JOSEPH P. DOWSE, 

Rev. MERRICK KNIGHT, 
Rev. CHARLES V. SPEAR, 
Rev. WILLIAM G. TUTTLE, 



Sherburne, Mass. 
Rocky Hill, Conn. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Ware, Mass. 



Class of 1847, 

*JOHN W. BELCHER, 
Rev. H. LUTHER EDWARDS, 

GEORGE F. HARRINGTON, 
*Rev. GEORGE SOULE, 
GEORGE SWAN, 
LEMUEL H. WATERS, 



Kirk wood, Md. 
N. Middleboro, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Hampton, Conn. 
Worcester, Mass. 
New York City. 



PSI UPSILON. 



171 



Class of 1848. 

Pres. WILLIAM S. CLARK, 
Rev. JACOB IDE, Jr., 
Rev. THOMAS MORONG, 

ISAAC POMEROY, 

HANSON L. READ, 
*THOMAS SHEPARD, Jr., 

JOHN M. STEBBINS, 
Hon. E. MUNROE WRIGHT, 

Class of 1849. 

Rev. EDWIN CLAPP, 
Prof. WILLIAM G. HAMMOND, Jr., 
*Rev. HENRY LOBDELL, M. D., 
Rev. CHARLES D. LOTHROP, 

*JOSEPH D. POLAND, 
*Rev. HENRY N. PECK, 

BENJAMIN C. PERKINS, 
Prof. JULIUS H. SEELYE, 



Class of 1850. 



MINOTT S. CROSBY, 
AUGUSTINE M. GAY, 
Rev. JACOB M. MANNING, 
Rev. DAVID T. PACKARD, 
*HENRY SHIPLEY, 
THOMAS M. STIMPSON, 
LYMAN R. WILLISTON, 



Class of 1851. 

ETHAN E. BOIES, 
JESSE R. DAVENPORT, 
HENRY B. HAMMOND, 
WILLIAM S. KARR, 
JUSTUS SMITH, 
THOMAS M. THOMPSON, 
*GEORGE H. WARNER, 
WILLIAM P. WASHBURN, 



Rev. 



Araherst, Mass. 
Mansfield, Mass. 
Ipswich, Mass. 
Newark, N. J. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Bethlehem, Conn. 



Pawtucket, R. I. 
Iowa City, Iowa. 
Mosul, Turkey. 
Amherst, Mass. 
N. Brookfield, Mass. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Danvers, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 



Hartford, Conn. 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Brighton, Mass. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Peabody, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 



New York City. 
Oxford, Mass. 
Newport, R. I. 
Keene, N. H. 
New York City. 
Pepperell, Mass. 
Windham, Conn. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 



Class of 1852. 



xvev HERMAN N. BARNUM, 

*THEODORE H. BENJAMIN, 
AUSTIN C. BLAIR, 
ADDISON BROWN, 
JOHN F. BUFFINGTON, M. D. 
JEROME F. DOWNING, 



Kharpoot, Asiat. Tur. 
Bethel, Conn. 
Enfield, Mass. 
New York City. 
Taneytown, Md. 
Enfield, Mass. 



172 



PSI UPSILON. 



*GEORGE E. DUDLEY, 
Rev. WILLIAM GRASSIE, 

JAMES A. LITTLEFIELD, 
GEORGE G. PARKER, 
THEODORE C. SEARS, 
BENJAMIN E. THURSTON, 
Prof. GEORGE N. WEBBER, 



Bath, N. Y. 
Edinboro, Penn. 
Boston, Mass. 
Milford, Mass. 
Newport, R. I. 
Delavan, Iowa. 
Middlebury, Vt. 



Class of 1853, 

WILLIAM H. BASS, 
REUBEN M. BENJAMIN, 
AUGUSTUS H. BUCK, 
HARVEY S. CARPENTER, M. D., 
HENRY E. DANIELS, 
WILLIAM C. FARNSWORTH, 
THEOPHILUS L. GRISWOLD, 
GEORGE E. HODGE, 
HENRY C. NASH, 



Rev. Lucius H. BUGBEE, 
GEORGE PARTRIDGE, 



Class of 1854, 



Boston, Mass. 
Bloomington, 111. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
Warren, Mass. 
Windsor Locks, Conn. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Forestville, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Amherst, Mass. 



Cincinnati, O. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Class of 1855, 



Rev. JOHN D. BELL, 

Rev. EDWIN C. BISSELL, 
JAMES T. COBB, 
*WILLIAM H. DARLING, 
GEORGE E. DUNLAP, 
ELBERT E. FARMAN, 
EDWIN A. GIBBENS, 
*EDWIN S. GILBERT, 

jiev. CHARLES HARDON, 

Prof. ELIJAH- P. HARRIS, 

FRANKLIN E. HAWLEY, 
JOSEPH H. HOUGHTON, 

Hon. WILLIAM E. HUGHITT, 

Prof. JOHN W. MALLETT, 
JOHN ORNE, Jr., 

Rev. JAMES C. PARSONS, 

Rev. ERASTUS L. PRENTICE, 

JOSEPH B. REYNOLDS, M. D., 
CHARLES E. SPINNEY, 
EDWARD A. STRONG, 

Rev. CHAUNCEY B. THOMAS, 

Rev. OZIE W. WHITTAKER, 



Monticello, Iowa. 
Honolulu, Sandwich Is. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Warsaw, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 
Warsaw, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Canadice, N. Y. 
Mansfield, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Ridgetteld, Conn. 
New York City. 
Auburn, X. Y. 
Tuscaloosa, Ala- 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y 
Natrona, 111. 
Milwaukie, Wis. 
Boston, Mass. 
Peru, 111. 
Nevada Territory. 





PSI UPSILON. 


173 




Class of 1856, 






OLIVER M. ADAMS, 


Chicago, 111. 




REUEL B. CLARK, 


Fitchburg, Mass. 


Rev. 


HENRY C. GRAVES, 


Providence, R. I. 




WILLIAM H. HAILE, 


Hinsdale, N. H. 




AUGUSTUS HARRINGTON, 


Warsaw, N. Y. 




WILLIAM B. KIMBALL, 


Enfield, Mass. 




JAMES PARSONS, 


Savannah, Ga. 




JOHN W. SMITH, 


Chicago, 111. 




CHARLES H. SPRING, M. D., 


Boston, Mass. 




Class of 1857. 






GEORGE E. AIKEN, 


New York City. 


Kev. 


GEORGE A. BECKWITH 


Olathe, Kansas. 


*ORANGE C. CHADDOCK, 


Pavilion, N. Y. 


Rev. 


ELISIIA G. COBB, 


Florence, Mass. 




JOHN W. DODGE, 


Yarmouth, Mass. 


Rev. 


JOHN E. ELLIOTT, 


Columbus, Neb. 




JOHN W. FAUST, 


Little Rock, Ark. 




RICHARD FOLSOM, 


Cincinnati, O. 




WILLIAM J. FORSAITH, 


Newport, N. H. 




CHARLES E. GLIDDEN, 


Claremont, N. H. 


t Rev. 


THOMAS G. (TRASSIE, 


Methuen, Mass. 




MARSHALL M. JOHNSON, 


Northfield, Mass. 


Prof. 


RICHARD H. MATHER, 


Amherst, Mass. 




WIN SLOW L. PERKINS, 


New London, Conn. 




EDWARD K. PHILLIPS, 


Lynn, Mass. 




ALBERT H. SLOCOMB, 


Fayetteville, N. C. 




FRANK SMITH, 


Warsaw, 111. 




JOHN H. SWEETSER, 


New York City. 




Class of 1858. 




Hon. 


CHARLES B. ANDREWS, 


Litchfield, Conn. 


Rev. 


LYMAN D. CHAPIN, 


Tung Chow, China. 


Rev. 


ALFRED A. ELLSWORTH, 


S. Wey mouth, Mass. 




CHARLES C. GATES, 


Chicago, 111. 




ELIJAH S. HEWITT, 


San Antonio, Texas, 


Rev. 


FRANCIS LOBDELL, 


New Haven, Conn. 




*JOHN D. LOCKWOOD, 


Council Bluffs, Iowa. 


Prof. 


JEROME SCHNEIDER, 


Somerville, Mass. 




SAMUEL P. TUCK, 


St. John, N. S. 


Rev. 


JOHN WALKER, Jr., 


Jersey City, N. J. 




WILLIAM A. P. WILLARD, 


Sterling, Mass. 




Class of 1859. 







FELIX ANSART, Jr., 


New London, Conn. 




HENRY L. CLAPP, 


Boston, Mass. 



174 



PSI UPSILON. 



WILLIAM C. COLLAR, 
Rev. HENRY F. HYDE, 
GEORGE B. KNAPP, 
WILLIAM A. NASH, 
JAMES H. NEWBON, 
ALPHEUS R. NICHOLS, 
Rev. CYRUS P. OSBORNE, 
ALBERT A. PORTER, 
*BENJAMIN F. ROWE, 
*HENRY C. SKINNER, 

GEORGE L. SMEAD, 
Hon. LUTHER R. SMITH, 



Class of 1860. 



Hon. LUTHER ARMSTRONG, 
Rev. LINUS BLAKESLEY, 
Rev. MOSES B. BOARDMAN, 
Rev. HENRY BULLARD, 
Rev. GEORGE F. CHAPIN, 

HALLETT DOLE, 
Prof. WILLIAM C. ESTY, 
EDWARD S. FRISBEE, 
THOMAS R. GREEN, 
Rev. LEVERETT S. GRIGGS, 

OLIVER B. MERRILL, 
Rev. NATHANIEL MIGHILL, 

ELIHU F. POMEROY, 
Rev. HIRAM B. PUTNAM, 
Rev. CHARLES H. RICHARDSON, 
W. C. RITCHIE, 
ALFRED STEBBINS, 
MELVILLE M. TRACY, 



Class of 1861. 



^FREDERICK BROWNING, 

MARSHALL B. CUSHMAN, 
Rev. AUSTIN DODGE. 

E. PORTER DYER, Jr., 

ELISHA W. FENN, 
iJev. BRADFORD M. FULLERTON, 

HENRY D. HYDE, 
Rev. JOSEPH A. LEACH, 

EDWIN R. LEWIS, M. D., 
*ALFRED MADDOCK, 
Rev. GEORGE W.' PHILLIPS 

WILLIAM M. POMEROY, 

GRANVILLE B. PUTNAM, 



Boston, Mass. 
Pomfret, Conn. 
Boston, Mass. 
New York City. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Stockton, Mo. 
N. Andover, Mass. 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Gilford, N. H. 
Princeton, Mass. 
Columbus, Ohio 
Butler, Ala- 



Webster, Mo. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Brimfield, Mass. 
St. Joseph, Mo.j 
Irving, Kansas. 
Rowley, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lowell, Mich. 
Newburyport, Mass. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Chicago, 111. 
W. Concord, N. H. 
Massena, N. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Springfield, Mass. 



Lansingburgh, N. Y. 
N. Amherst, Mass. 
E. Bridgewater, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Keene, N. H 
Beirut, Syria. 
Boston, Mass. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 



PSI UPSILON. 



175 



HENRY C. ROOME, 
*LOVELL S. RUSSELL, 
Rev. LYSANDER T. SPAULDING, 
Rev. NATHAN THOMPSON, 



Class of 1862, 



Rev. ROWLAND H. ALLEN, 

JOSEPH W. BROWN, 

MARQUIS F. DICKINSON, 
Prof. HENRY H. GOODELL, 

THOMAS HENDERSON, M. D., 

RUFUS P. LINCOLN, M. D., 

EDWARD MORRIS, 

JONAS O. PECK, 

CALVIN STEBBINS, 
*CHARLES H. SWEETSER, 

MASON W. TYLER, 

SAMUEL C. VANCE, 

NATHAN E. WILLIS, 



Rev. 
Rev. 



Class of 1863, 



CHARLES D. ADAMS, 
*Rev. FREDERICK B. ALLEN, 

EDGAR L. FOSTER, 

JUBAL C. GLEASON, M. D., 
*EMMONS HUGHITT, 

ROBERT I. JONES, 
Rev. JAMES G. MERRILL, 

WILLIAM F. MERRILL, 

JAMES A. RHEA, 

JAMES B. RHEA, 
*FRAZAR A. STEARNS, 

WARREN B. STICKNEY, 
Rev. BAMAN N. STONE, 

WILLIAM G. THOMPSON, 
*JOHN M. WHITNEY, 



Class of 1864, 



Prof. JOHN B. DUNBAR, 

SERENO D. GAMMEL, 

WILLIAM B. GROVER, 
Rev. CHARLES M. LAMSON, 

FREEMAN LATHROP, 
Rev. JAMES H. LEE, 

FARQUHARSON G. MACDONALD, 

ROBERT McEwEN, 

HENRY F. SEARS, . 



New York City. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Essex, Conn. 
Boulder City, Col. T. 



Neponset, Mass. 
Abington, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
New York City. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Marlboro, Mass. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
New York City. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Boston, Mass. 



New York City. 
Canandaigua, X. Y. 
St. Stephens, N. B. 
N. Abington, Mass. 
New York City. 
Easton, Penn. 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Chicago, 111. 
Blountville, Tenn. 
Blountville, Tenn. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
London, N. H. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 



Topeka, Kansas. 
E. Boxford, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Peoria, 111. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
New York City. 
New York City. 
Charlestown, Mass. 



176 



PSI UPSILON. 



Rev. HENRY M. TEN NET, 
WILLIAM W. TYLER, 
GEORGE H. WHITCOMB, 

Class of 1865. 

FRANK R. ALLEN, 
Rev. THOMAS E. BABB, 
Rev. ALBERT G. BALE, 
Rev. HORACE F. BARNES, 

JOHN W. CLAPP, 
Prof. JAMES H. EATON, 

JOSEPH G. HOUGHTON, 

SAMUEL V. McDuFFiE, 
Prof. GEORGE C. MERRILL, 

JOHN T. POPE, 

WILLIAM J. ROLFE, 
Prof. EDWARD P. SMITH, 
Prof. HENRY M. TYLER, 

Class, of 1866. 

Rev. LABAN W. ALLEN, 

JOHN P. BARTLETT, 

EDWARD N. BISHOP, 

HERBERT L. BRIDGMAN, 

HENRY H. MERRIAM, 

CHARLES R. PAINE, 

CHARLES H. PARKHURST, 

STEPHEN B. RAND, 

HENRY ROBERTS, 

ASA A. SPEAR, 
Rev. HENRY C. WESTON, 

JACOB W. WOOD, 

GEORGE F. ZIEGLER, 



Class of 1867. 



Prof. HENRY CARMICHAEL, 
WILLIAM H. COBB, 
EDWARD B. EARLE, 
JAMES H. EARLE, 
JOHN B. FAIRBANK, 
EDWARD B. FENNER, 
JOHN P. FERNALD, 
Prof. EDWIN A. GROSVENOR, 
Prof. DWIGHT S. HERRICK, 
WILLIAM B. HOMER, 
EDWARD A. KINGSLEY, 
ELIHU ROOT, 



Winona, Min. 
Chicopee, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 



Boston, Mass. 
Eastport, Me. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Oakham, Mass. 
Beloit, Wis. 
Burlington, Vt. 
New York City. 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Halifax, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
Galesburg, 111. 



South Braintree, Mass. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Windsor, Vt. 
New York City. 
Grafton, Mass. 
Columbus, O. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
Hindostan. 
Sharon, Conn. 
New York City. 
N. Bennington, Vt. 
New York City. 
Green Castle, Pa. 



Grinnell, la. 
Andover, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Oakham, Mo. 
Henrietta, N. Y. 
S. Danvers, Mass. 
Constantinople, Tur. 
Peekskill, N. Y. 
West Point, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 



PSI UPSILON. 



177 



FREDERICK SEYMOUR, 
*JOHN C. TERRY, 
NATHANIEL M. TERRY, 
CHARLES H. THOMPSON, 
WILLIAM H. WHITE, 



Peekskill, N. Y. 
S. Weymouth, Mass. 
Gottingen, Ger. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Stoughton, Mass. 



Class of 1868, 



GEORGE A. COBURN, 
WILLIAM W. EATON, 
ARTHUR S. HARDY, 
DANIEL C. HEATH, 
JAMES M. KENISTON, 
ALBERT H. LIVERMORE, 
*OSCAR B. PARKER, 
CHARLES F. WELLS, 
HILAND H. WHEELER, Jr., 
PETER B. WYCKOFF, M. D., 



Class of 1869, 



EDWARD A. ADAMS, 
JOSEPH K. CHICKERING, 
CHARLES F. EASTMAN, 
JOHN H. EASTMAN, 
WATERMAN T. HEWITT, 
JOHN E. KELLOGG, 
THOMAS H. McGRAW, 
*JOSEPH C. B. MILLER, 
CHARLES S. NEWHALL, 
JOSEPH B. SEABURY, 
WINTHROP B. SMITH, 
DANIEL G. THOMPSON, 
HENRY P. WARREN, 
HARRY WILLIAMS, 
ROBERT M. WOODS, 



Class of 1870, 



JOSEPH H. ADAMS, 
JAMES 0. AVERILL, 
CHARLES E. COOLEDGE, 
HENRY A. DAVENPORT, 
GEORGE E. GOODRICH, 
FRANK J. MARSH, 
WILLIAM D. MOSMAN, 
HARVEY PORTER, 
HUGH B. RICE, 

23 



Boston, Mass. 
Andover, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Bangor, Me. 
E. Boston, Mass. 
Bangor, Me. 
Brimfield, Mass. 
New York City. 
Woodstock, Vt. 
New York City. 



Oakham, Mass. 
Taunton, Mass. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Galesburg, 111. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Brooklyn, L. I. 
Taunton, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Gorham, Me. 
Hamilton, Ohio. 
Enfield, Mass. 



Hadley, Mass. 
Sing Sing, N. Y. 
Chicopee Falls, Mass. 
New York City. 
Dryden, N. Y. 
Peekskill, N. Y. 
Chicopee, Mass. 
Beirut, Syria. 
Auburn, N. Y. 



178 



PSI TJPSILON. 



GEORGE H. TILTON, 
GEORGE H. WHITE, 
WILLIAM K. WICKES, 
EDWARD C. WINSLOW, 



Andover, Mass. 

Hadley, Mass. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 



Class of 1871. 



JAMES A. BARNES, 
RAYMOND L. BRIDGMAN, 
MAURICE D. CLARKE, 
SELAH M. CLARKE, 
WILLIAM L. HALL, 
WILLIAM M. LAWRENCE, 
ARTHUR B. MORONG, 
DWIGHT D. PORTER, 
HENRY H. SAWYER, 
ARTHUR R. SIMMONS, 
CHARLES S. STILES, Jr., 
THEODORE L. STILES, 
ISRAEL N. TERRY, 
CLAUDE WILSON, 



Springfield, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
E. Cambridge, Mass. 
Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ipswich, Mass. 
Pulaski, N. Y. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
New Haven, N. Y. 
Chicopee Falls, Mass. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
S. Weymouth, Mass. 
Stoughton, Mass. 



Class of 1872. 



HERBERT B. ADAMS, 
CHARLES W. CHASE, 
CHARLES A. DOOLITTLE, 
PASCAL M. DOWD, 
FREDERIC G. FINCKE, 
HYLAND C. KIRK, 
JAMES E. LANGLEY, 
R. DE WITT MALLARY, 
GEORGE R. METCALF, 
ERNEST P. MILLER, 
FREDERIC W. PACKARD, 
Louis H. PARKHURST, 
HARRY S. STEVENS, 
WILLARD M. WHITE, 
FRED. J. WILLIAMS, 



Amherst, Mass. 
Charles town, Mass. 
Utica, N. Y. 
New Haven, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Orleans, N. Y. 
Gallipolis, Ohio. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Orange, Mass. 
Leominster, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Canton Centre, Ct. 
Augusta, Ga. 



Class of 1873, 



HENRY W. BEARDSLEY, 
ARTHUR M. BRIDGMAN, 
EUGENE B. COLLESTER, 
DAVID Y. COMSTOCK, 
CHARLES W. COOPER, 
JAMES I. COOPER, 



Auburn, N. Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Gardner, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 



PSI UPSILON. 



179 



GEORGE W. EDMOND, 
EDWARD M. HARTWBLL, 
ANDREW D. LAWRIB, 
ALVAH K. LAWRIE, 
HOWARD E. PARKHURST, 
CHARLES B. STUART, 
JOHN M. TYLER, 



Class of 1874. 



GEORGE E. BREWER, 
SIDNEY DICKINSON, 
SAMUEL H. FISH, 
JESSE F. FORBES, 
FRANKLIN P. OWEN, 
EDMUND M. SMITH, 
THOMAS A. STUART, 



Portland, Me. 
Littleton, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Clinton, Mass. 
Logansport, Ind. 
Amherst, Mass. 



Southboro, Mass. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Cromwell, Conn. 
N. Scituate, B. I. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
togansport, Ind. 




DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



SIGMA CHAPTER. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1846. 



A. H. ANDREWS, 
Hon. NATHANIEL P. BANKS, 
*Hon. ANSON BURLINGAME, 
Hon. H. S. FOOTE, 

*GERARD HALLOCK, 
Hon. ENSIGN H. KELLOGG, 
EDWARD E. LYMAN, 
JOSHUA PEARL, 
JOHN H. REED, 
H. B. SARGEANT, 

D. G. SHERMAN, 

E. B. STODDARD, 
N. H. THOMPSON, 



Class of 1848, 



Rev. G. W. GOODALE, 

FRANCIS A. HOWE, M. D., 
Rev. Louis P. LEDOUX, 
Rev. HENRY J. PATRICK, 
Rev. JAMES W. RAYNOR, 
Rev. WILLIAM S. SMITH, 

ALFRED STEBBINS, 



Chicago, 111. 
Waltham, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Hinds Co., Mo. 
New Haven, Ct. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
Ware, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Ware, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 



Weston, Mo. 
Newburyport, Mass. 
Cornwall, N. Y. 
West Newton, Mass. 
Springfield, Pa. 
West Xewton, Mass. 
Monroe, Mich. 



Class of 1819, 



*!SAAC B. BELKNAP, 
Rev. GEORGE R. FERGUSON, 
Rev. SYLVANUS C. KENDALL, 
Rev. JAMES P. KIMBALL, 



Smithfield, R. I. 
Millerton, N. Y. 
Milford, Mass. 
Haydenville, Mass. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



181 



Rev. WILLIAM H. LESTER, 
ROBERT E. TOPPING, 
OVERTON YOUNG, 



lass of 1850. 



Rev. WILLIAM F. AVERT, 
Rev. EDMUND Y. GARRETTE, 
EDWARD L. HILL, M. D., 
LEICESTER P. HODGE, 
JEREMIAH L. NEWTON, 
JOSEPH NICKERSON, 
ALBERT WHITE, 



Class of 1851 



Prof. MILFORD C. BUTLER, 
FRANCIS H. CHURCH, 

Hon. J. W. M. HARRIS, 
HENRY M. SMITH, 
ANDREW STEWART, 
ROBERT STEWART, M. D., 
WILLIAM H. STEWART, 
GEORGE W. STILES, 

J. DWIGHT TORRENCE, 



Class of 1852. 



Rev. GEORGE H. COIT, 
Rev. AMBROSE DUNN, 

LEWIS W. HOLMES, M. D., 
JOSEPH JONES, 
*CHARLES W. KINGSBURY, 
EDWARD S. LARNED, M. D., 
*SYLVAJIUS B. ROEL, 



Class of 1853. 



ABIAL R. ABBOTT, 
*WILLIAM H. ANDREWS, 

Rev. EDWARD P. BAKER, 
JAMES S. HILLS, 
WILLAM J. LIEB, 

Hon. JOSHUA N. MARSHALL, 
EDWIN NELSON, 
WILLIAM M. PIERCE, 



Class of 1854. 



GEORGE BOSWORTH, 



West Alexandria, Pa. 
New York City. 
Lawrenceville, Ga. 



Huntingdon, Mass. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Williamsburg, Mass. 
Hadley, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Southampton, L. I. 



Poland, O. 
Princeton, 111. 
Natchez, Miss. 
Chicago, 111. 
New York City. 
New York City. 
Natchez, Miss. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Enfield, Mass. 



Wilmington, 111. 
Fairview, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Amhcrst, Mass. 
Framingham, Mass. 
New York City. 
West Dameston, Vt. 



Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Winthrop, Me. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Washington, D. C. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Amherst,, Mass. 
Webster Groves, Mo. 



Bristol. Wis. 



182 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



ALEXANDER B. CRANE, 

EDWARD A. CRANE, M. D., 
*APPLETON DADMUN, 

JAMES B. FORD, M. D., 
*SAMDEL M. FRIERSON, 

CHARLES HALLOCK, 

JOSIAH HARTZEL, 

SAMUEL HASKELL, 

ALBERT W. MATES, 



New York City. 
Paris, France. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Nor walk, O. 
Columbia, Tenn. 
New York City. 
Canton, O. 
Dover, N. H. 
Columbia, Tenn. 



Class of 1855. 

*CHARLES L. CONVERSE, 
JOHN J. COLTON, M. D., 
DANA I. JOCELYN, 
MATTHEW MCCLUNG, 
CHARLES W. MORSE, 
PHILLIP C. PORTER, M. D., 
ALBRA WALDRON, 



Class of 1856. 



JOSEPH ANDREWS, 
ALBERT BIGELOW, 
ROBERT H. BUCK, 
ADOLPH DUPRE', JR., 
JAMES M. ELLIS, 
SAMUEL A. GOULD, 

*EDWIN C. HAND, 
EMERSON W. PEET, 

*SAMUEL C. STAPLES, 
GEORGE W. WHEELER, 



New Orleans, La. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
West Boylston, Mass. 
Swampscott, Mass. 
Dover, N. H. 



New York City. 
Groton, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
New Orleans, La. 
New York City. 
Delhi, N. Y. 
Bridgehampton, L. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York City. 
Hackensack, N. J. 



Class of 1857. 



Rev. BENJAMIN H. ABBOTT, 
*Rev. DAVID BEALS, 

Rev. GEORGE S. BISCOE, 
JOHN H. BOALT, 
JESSE BRADFORD, 

Rev. Lucius R. EASTMAN, 
JEREMIAH L. FORDHAM, 
ALLEN B. FREEMAN, 

*WlLLIAM B. GOOCH, 

Rev. WILLIAM D. HERRICK, 
WILLIAM C. ORCUTT, 
GEORGE E. PORTER, 
GEORGE A. RAMSDELL, 

Rev. JOHN E. WHEELER, 



Whitestone, L. I. 
Charlemont, Mass. 
Tipton, la. 

Virginia City, Nevada. 
Amherst, Mass. 
East Somerville, Mass. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Westfield, O. 
Lowell, Mass. 
North Amherst, Mass. 
Malone, N. Y. 
Machias, Me. 
Milford, N. H. 
Monticello, 111. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



183 



Glass of 1858. 

Prof. TIMOTHY F. ALLEN, M. D., 

HENRY M. BISHOP, M. D., 

E. A. P. BREWSTER, M. D., 

SYDNEY H. CARNEY, 

JOSEPH W. CROSS, JR., 
Rev. ROFUS EMERSON, 
Rev. ALVIN B. GOODALE, M. D., 

DANIEL W. HASKINS, 

JOSHUA B. F. HOBBS, 

HENRY S. JEWETT, 

MYRON A. JOHNSON, 

RUFUS B. KELLOGG, 

JOSEPH W. LONG, 

GEORGE H. PICKARD, 
Rev. EDWARD H. SAYRE, 
Rev. CHARLES L. TAPPAN, 



New York City. 
New Brighton, Pa. 
Janesville, Wis. 
Lowell, Mass. 
West Boylston, Mass. 
Granby, Mass. 
Marshalltown, Pa. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Hadley, Mass. 
Oshkosh, Wis. 
Honesdale, Pa. 
Lewis Falls, Me. 
Etawah, India. 
Brighton, 111. 



Class of 1859, 

ISAAC T. AYER, 
Rev. MALCOLM Me G. DANA, 
*JOSHUA G. HAWKES, 
* SIDNEY W. HOWE, 
EBEN A. KNOWLTON, 
RUFUS A. MORRISON, 
Rev. SAMUEL MORRISON, 

EDWARD H. SPOONER, M. D., 
Gen. FRANCIS A. WALKER, 
*HYLAS T. WHEELER, 
JOHN S. WHILLDIN, M. D., 
RICHARD M. WYCKOFF, M. D., 



Buxton Centre, Me. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Lynnfield, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Kittery, Me. 
Washington, D. C. 
Prcscott, Wis. 
Reading, Pa. 
Washington, D. C. 
Newburyport, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Class of 1860. 



AUGUSTUS ALVORD, 
*GEORGE H. BUCKMASTER, 

JOHN J. COPP, 

RICHARD D. DOUGLASS, 
*SAMUEL A. FITCH, 

ALDEN GAGE, 

JOSEPH W. GALE, 
Prof. GEORGE L. GOODALE, M. D., 

HERMAN D. GOULD, 
Rev. JUSTIN P. KELLOGG, 

CHARLES B. RUGGLES, 

CYRUS WALKER, 

BENJAMIN WORMELL, 



Bolton, Conn. 
Ludlow, Vt. 
New London, Conn. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Delhi, N. Y. 
Norfolk, N. Y. 
Rockport, Mass. 
Brunswick, Me. 
Delhi, N. Y. 
Newburgh, N. Y. 
Springfield, O. 
Scituate, R. I. 
Abington, Mass. 



184 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



Class of 1861. 



Rev. EDWIN A. ADAMS, 
Rev. EDWIN N. ANDREWS, 

GEORGE C. BOWERS, 

JOHN H. EVANS, 

EDWIN B. FLAGG, M. D., 
Rev. WALTER H. GILES, 
Rev. BENJAMIN F HAMILTON, 
Rev. ELIJAH HARMON, 

ALFRED L. HASKINS, M. D., 
*EDWARD HOLMAN, 
Kev. JOHN C. HOUGHTON, 

JOSIAH H. HUNT, 
Rev. WILLIAM A. LAWRENCE, 
* WILLIAM A. RICHARDS, 



North Manchester, Conn. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Chicago, 111. 
Centerville, O. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Rockport, Mass. 
North Aridover, Mass. 
Winchester, N. H. 
Boston, Mass. 
Newton, Mass. 
Island Pond, Vt. 
Clinton, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Plainfield, Mass. 



Class of 1862. 

FRANCIS W. ADAMS, M. D., 

ARTHUR G. BISCOE. 

JAMES B. FINCH, 
Rev. DANIEL W. Fox, 

Lucius F. C. GARVIN, M. D., 

WILLIAM B. GRAVES, 
*HENRY GRIDLEY, 

CHARLES M. KITTREDGE, M. D., 

WILLARD T, LEONARD, 
*GEORGE MACOMBER, 

ISAAC II. MAYNARD, 

FREDERIC D. MORSE, M. D., 

JAMES H. NASH, 
Rev. GEORGE G. PHIPPS, 
Rev. WILLIAM H. PHIPPS, 

JAMES H. ROBBINS, M. D., 



Royalston, Mass. 
Westboro, Mass. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Flanders, N. J. 
Lonsdale, R. I. 
Marietta, O. 
Wassaic, N. Y. 
Fishkill, N. Y. 
Petersham, Mass. 
Washington, D. C. 
Stamford, N. Y. 
Lawrence, Kansas. 
Charleston, West Va. 
Wellesley, Mass. 
Empire City, Col. 
Machias, Me. 



Class of 1863. 



JOHN T. ALDEN, 
THOMAS D. BISCOE, 
THOMAS S. BOND, M. D., 
EDWIN W. CHAPIN, 
Rev. DEWITT S. CLARK, 
Prof, JOSEPH E. DICKSON, 
GEORGE E. FULLER, 
*ALONZO P. HEYWARD, 
HENRY E. JEWETT, 
HENRY O. MARCY, 
SIMEON NASH, JR., 



Cincinnati, O. 
Uxhridge, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Clinton, Mass. 
Annapolis, Md. 
Wilbraham, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Otis, Mass. 
Gallipolis, 0. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



185 



ALONZO B. NKWELL, 
^CHRISTOPHER FENNELL, 
RANSOM D. PRATT, 
FRANKLIN C. SEVERANCE, 
ALBERT B. W ATKINS, 



Class of 1864, 



Rev. CALVIN R. FITTS, 

EDWARD W. GLOVER, 
GEORGE H. HOLT, 

*WlLLIAM L. HOWE, 

EDWARD A. MIRICK, 
HENRY M. ROGERS, 
JOHN F. SCOTT, 
WILLIAM A. SLATMAKER, 
Rev. FREDERICK E. STURGESS, 



South Wilbraham, Mass. 
West Stockbridge, Mass. 
Middleboro, Mass. 
Chici>go, 111. 
Fuirficld, N. Y. 



Slatersville, R. I. 
New York City. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Orange, Mass. 
Bloomer, Wis. 
Ware, Mass. 
Elgin, 111. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Skowhegan, Me. 



Class of 1865, 



CHARLES A. AMES, 
Rev. JAMES H. BABBITT, 
EBENEZER DRAPER, 
HENRY W. EFNER, 
JOHN A. EMERY, 
Rev. RUFLS K. HARLOW, 
EDMUND A. JONES, 
GEORGE D. KITTREDGE, 
WILLIAM S. KNOX, 
*ELLIS A. LAWRENCE, 
SAMUEL E. NICHOLS, 
JOHN S. RUNNELLS, 
ZABDIEL S. SAMPSON, 
CHARLES W. TURNER, 
*THADDEDS C. WELLES, 



Class of 1866. 



Prof. ELISHA H. BARLOW, 
WILLIAM R. BOND, 
SAMUEL W. BROWN, 
CHARLES H. CHANDLER, 
JOHN E. DAME, 
WILLIAM P. FISHER, 
THOMAS HORTON, 
JULIUS A. MERRILL, 
HENRY T. PEIRCE, M. D., 
JAMES E. SPEAR, 
SAMUEL C. SMITH, 

24 



Peterboro, N. H. 
Waitsfield, Vt. 
Wrentham, Mass. 
New York City. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Portland, Me. 
Lake Forest, 111. 
New York City. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
East Machias, Me. 
Brookfield, Mass. 
Trent, Austria, 
New Orleans, La. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 
Greenfield, Mass. 



Easton, Pa. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Easthampton, Mass. 
New Hampton, N. H. 
New York City. 
Amherst, Mass. 
St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Randall's Island, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 
North Andover, Mass. 



186 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



SAMUEL H. VALENTINE, 
WILLIAM WESTON, 
ALFRKD E. WHITTAKER, 



Class of 1867, 



Rev. 



JOSEPH BOARD, 
SAMUEL I. CUKTISS, 
SAMUEL S. DRAKE, 

E. A. FIELD, 
CALVIN G. HILL, 
A. L. JENNESS, 
WILLIAM R. MEAD, 

*HENRY M. PAGE, 
SOLOMON T. STREETER, 
EZRA F. TAFT, 
CASSIUS M. TERRY, 

F. W. THOMPSON, 
SAMUEL WARD, 
SAMUEL B. WIGGINS, 
MYRON T. WHITNEY, 



New York City. 
Middleton, Muss. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Chester, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Malone, N. Y. 
New London, Conn. 
Bangor, Me. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
New York City. 
Milford, N. H. 
Vernon, Vt. 
Dedham, Mass. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
New Salem, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Malone, N. Y. 



Class of 1808, 



E. C. ALLEN, 
EDWIN F. BAYLEY, 
HENKY BALLANTINE, 
GEORGE H. BUFFUM, 
CYRUS C. DECOSTER, 
HARLAN P. FRENCH, 
AURELIUS L. GLEASON, 
G. W. HERSEY, 
JAMES HEWINS, 
ALFRED G. IVES, 
STEPHEN S. LANCASTER, 
ALBERT B. MATHER, 
ELIPHALET W. TYLER, 



Calais, Me. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Bombay, India. 
Winchester, N. H. 
Beloit, Wis. 
Sterling, HI. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Belfast, Me. 
Medfield, Mass. 
Castine, Me. 
New York City. 
West Meriden, Conn. 
New York City. 



(lass of 1869, 



EDWARD A. BENNER, 
WILLIAM R. BROWN, 
HERBERT J. COOK, 
HENRY K. FIELD, 
WILLIAM A. KEESE, 

*ALVAH B. KITTREDGE, 
LEWIS MEACHAM, 

*HENRY T. MORSE, 
JOHN W. QUINBY, 



Cornwall Landing, N. Y. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Oxford, N. Y. 
Brattlcboro', Vt. 
West Newton, Mass. 
Westboro, Mass. 
Middlebury, Vt. 
Westminster, Vt. 
St. Johnsville, N. Y. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



187 



WINFIELD S. SLOCUM, 
HENRY P. SMITH, 
ALFRED E. TRACY, 

Class of 1870. 

CHARLES H. AMES, 
ARTHUR C. BRADLEY, 
A. G BOOTH, 
CHARLES H. DANIELS, 
WILLIAM A. DUDLEY, 
GEORGE H. EATON, 
JAMES L. FOWLE, 
CHARLES L. HARRINGTON, 
HENRY C. HUMPHREY, 
MYRON W. HUNT, 
JOEL L. IVES, 
*GEORGE W. SEAVER, 
JOHN G. STANTON, 
JOHN B. THURSTON, 
ADONIRAM J. TITSWORTH, 
WARDNER C. TITSWORTH, 
CORNELIUS G. TROW, 
JONAS E. VAN DUZER, 
MERRITT H. WALKER, 
GEORGE H. WATSON, 
W. H. WINCHESTER, 

Class of 1871, 

HOBART L. CHEE6EMAN, 

JOHN B. CLARK, 
JOHN E. DAY, 
EDWARD P. DEMOTT, 
HENRY W. ELDREDGE, 
WILLIAM T. FORBES, 
WILLIAM GREENWOOD, 
DAVID HILL, 
ANSON D. MORSE, 
ARTHUR R. PAINE, 
ALWYN H. PARTRIDGE, 
C. H. PITKIN, 
L. 0. ROBERTSON, 
GEORGE F. SAWYER, 
JOHN W. SIMPSON, 
FRANK M. TAYLOR, 
CHARLES L. TOMBLEN, 

Class of 1872, 

BERNADOTTE BANCROFT, 



Nevvtonville, Mass. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Andover, Mass. 



Boston, Mass. 
New York City. 
Meriden, N. H. 
New York City. 
Providence, R. I. 
St. Stephen, N. B. 
Waltham, Mass. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
Stamford, Conn. 
New York City. 
West Meriden, Conn. 
Taftsville, Vt. 
Vienna, Austria. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
New York City. 
Walworth, Wis. 
New York City. 
New York City. 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Sedgwick, Me. 
Malone, N. Y. 



Theresa, N. Y. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Webster, Mass. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Kensington, N. H. 
Westboro', Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Fairfield, N. Y. 
East Cambridge, Vt. 
Holden, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
Boston, Mass. 
West Minot, Me. 
East Craftsbury, Vt 
New York City. 
Amherst, Mass. 



Prescott, Mass. 



188 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. 



NATHAN D. BARROWS, 
SPENCER R. BONNELL, 
GEORGE L. CLARK, 
EMERSON D. CORNISH, 
JAMES DING WELL, 
LEWELLIN M. GLIDDEN, 
OSCAR HOSMER, 
W. IRVING PUTMAN, 
THOMAS ROBINSON, 



(lass of 1873, 



DOANE R. ATKINS, 

FRANK T. BENNER, 

JOHN V. BROOKS, 

S. WOODWORTH CUNNINGHAM, 

ROGER E. DODGE, 

ANDRKW J. HIRSCHL, 

HARMON N. MORSE, 

FREDERIC C. ROBERTSON, 

JOSEPH B. THRALL, 

C. E. WOODMAN, 

RUSSELL WOODMAN, 



East Otisfield, Me. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Tewksbury, Mass. 
Weatogue, Conn. 
Providence, R. I. 
Panama, N. Y. 
Baldwinsville, Mass. 
New York City. 
Salisbury, Eng. 



Truro, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Concord, N. H. 
Davenport, Pa. 
East Cambridge, Vt. 
Minot, Me. 
Galesburg, 111. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Bucksport, Me. 



Class of 1874, 



ELLORY A. BALDWIN, 
EARLE G. BALDWIN, 
JOHN W. BALLANTINE, 
JOHN F. BISCOE, 
WALTER S. BISCOE, 
MELVILLE DEWEY, 
JAMES H. HAWLEY, 
ISAAC N. MILLS, 
CHARLES H. PHALEN, 
FREDERIC A. SAWTELLE, 
WILLIAM F. SLOCUM, Jr., 
SIDNEY P. SMITH, 



Coventry, Vt. 
Coventry, Vt. 
Araherst, Mass. 
Uxbridge, Mass. 
Uxbridge, Mass. 
Oneida, N. Y. 
Shelden, Vt. 
Webster, Mass. 
Adams Center, N. Y. 
Charlestown, Mass. 
Newtonville, Mass. 
Princeton, 111. 




CHI PSI. 

ALPHA CHI. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1864. 



(lass of 1866, 

WILLIAM BELCHER, 
Rev. HENRY C. BRADBURY, 
HENRY V. PELTON, 
F. D. S. SARGENT, 
HKRBERT M. SMALL, 

Class of 1867. 

JAMES B. CONVERSE, 
CHARLES E. HIBBARD, 
WILLIAM EDGAR HORTON, 
CYRUS S. MERRILL, 
DANIEL S. SMART, 
CHARLES B. TILDEN, 



Class of 1868. 



WILLIAM A. BROWN, 
WILLIAM A. MCDONALD, 
WILLIAM G. E. POPE, 
JOHN G. SMART, 
JAMES L. TERRY, M. D., 



New London, Conn. 
Hudson, N. Y. 
N. York City. 
Brookline, N. H, 
Newton Centre, Mass. 



Boston, Mass. 
Tnma City, Iowa. 
Canton, Mass. 
Bridport, Vt. 
Leavcnworth, Kansas. 
Washington, D. C. 



N. York City. 
York, N. Y. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Princeton, N. J. 
Randall Island, N. Y. 



190 



CHI PSI. 



Class of 1869. 



CHARLES H. ALLEN, 
GEORGE M. GAGE, 
JULIUS SANDERSON, 



Class of 1870. 



JAMES T. ABBE, 
CHARLES A. BOAKE, 
FRANK F. COBURN, 
A. BARKER DAVIS, 
E. LLEWELLYN PARKER, 



Class of 1871. 



FRANK W. BENDER, 
GEORGE R. CUTTING, 
JESSE M. FREELS, 
FRANK A Goss, 
HENRY E. HAMMOND, 
WILLIAM BRADFORD HOMER, 
WILLIAM H. MOORE, 
JOSIAH R. SMITH, 
SAMUEL W. TINDELL, 



Class of 1872. 



GID ALEXANDER, 
JOHN S. BAGG, 
GEORGE D. CLIFT, 
MOSES M. HOBART, 
C. COOK HODGMAN, 
WALTER THOMPSON, 



EDWARD P. BLISS, 
THOMAS J. GRAY, 
HENRY C. HAVEN, 
JOHN D. McKECHNiE, 
FRANK G. NELSON, 
JOHN W. SWIFT, 
WILLIAM J. SWIFT, 



Class of 1873, 



Class of 1874, 



CLARENCE F. BIRDSEYE, 
CHARLES H. MARSH, 
HENRY K. SANDERSON, 
HAROLD SMITH, 
JOHN T. STODDARD, 
HERBERT B. TURNER, 
FREDERIC W. WHITRIDGE, 



Lowell, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Troy, ~N. Y. 



Springfield, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Champaign, 111. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



Albany, N. Y. 
Waltham, Mass. 
Clinton, Tcnn. 
Vergennet, Vt. 
Hadley, Mass. 
Brimfield, Mass. 
Ban Claire, Wis. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Church Grove, Tenn. 



Chapel Hill, Tenn. 
West Springfield, Mass. 
Mystic Bridge, Conn. 
N. Amherst, Mass. 
Bath, N. Y. 
Troy, N. Y. 



Cambridgeport, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
New London, Conn. 
Canaudaigua, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Portland, Maine. 
Northampton, Mass. 
Brooklyn, Mass. 
New York City. 




DELTA UPSILON* 



AMHERST CHAPTER, 



ESTABLISHED IN 1847. 



(lass of 1848. 



Rev. In A CASK, 

Rev. WILLIAM A. FOBES, 

Rev. MARTIN L. GAY LORD, 

Mi RON .7. HAZELTINE, 
Rev. ROBERT D. MILLER, 
Rev. JOHN Q PEABODY, 

HIRAM A. PRATT, 



Mass of 1849. 



*GEORGE W. CURRIER, 
Rev. DANIEL F. GODDARD, 
Rev. CHARLES HARTWEL.L, 
Rev. JUNIUS L. HATCH, 
*Rev. HUBERT P. HEXUICK, 

ELIJAH HOWE, 
Rev. WILLIAM R. PALMER, 

MARTIN N. ROOT, M. D., 



Claremont, N. H. 
Halifax, Mass. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Hawley, Mass. 
Ipswich, Mass. 
Hightstown, N. J. 



West Boylston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Foochow, China. 
Concord, N. H. 
Gaboon, Africa. 
Dedham, Mass. 
Chicopee, Mass. 
Somerville, Mass. 



* Known successively as "Anti-Secret Society," "Delta Sigma," " Equitahle 
Fraternity," and " Delta Upsilon." 



192 



DELTA UPSILON. 



Rev. JOHN A. SEYMOUR, 
*Rev. GEORGE I. STEARNS, 
Rev. ELIJAH W. STODDARD, 
Rev. GEORGE F. WALKER, 



Class of 1850. 



Rev. ALBERT G. BEEBEE, 
*Rev. JOHN E. CORY, 
Rev. .DANIEL W. FAUNCE, 

SIDNEY S. MERRILL, M. D., 
IRA L. MOORE, M. D., 



Class of 1851, 



*Rev. HENRY M. ADAMS, 
Prof. JEROME ALLEN, 
Rev. WILLIAM O. BALDWIN, 

EDWARD P. BATES, 
Rev. MARCUS M. CARLETON, 
Rev. ISAAC N. CUNDALL, 
Rev. FRANKLIN B. DOE, 
Rev. EBENEZER DOUGLASS, 
Rev. FRANCIS A. DOUGLASS, 
Rev. PRESCOTT FAY, 
Rev. LEVI G. MARSH, 
Rev. HUGH MCLEOD, 
Rev. SIDNEY K. B. PERKINS, 
*EDWARD D. RAWSON, , 



Class of 1852, 



Rev. OSBORN P. ALLEN, 
Rev. GEORGE L. BECKER, 
Rev. DANIEL BLISS, 

JOSEPH M. CLARK, M. D., 
Rev. ELIJAH S. FISH, 

BUEL J. HAWKINS, 
*HENRY KIES, 

FAYETTE MAYNARD, 
Rev. MASON MOORE, 
Rev. CHARLES H. PAYSON, 

CHARLES L. PORTER, 
Pres. WILLIAM B. RANKIN, 

SYDNEY K. SMITH, 



Class of 1853, 



THOMAS D. ADAMS, 
Rev. ROBERT C. ALLISON, M. D., 
*Rev. NATHANIEL B.BLANCHARD, 



Cleveland, O. 
Windham, Conn. 
Saccasuna, N. J. 
Little Corapton, R. I. 



Oak Park, 111. 
Chesterfield, Mass. 
Maiden, Mass. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Lowell, Mass. 



Gaboon, Africa. 
New York City. 
West Groton, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Penn. 
Marshfield, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Fon Du Lac, Wis. 
Woonsocket, R. I. 
Piqua, O. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Brewer, Me. 
Colebrook, N. H. 
Glover, Vt. 



Harpoot, West Asia. 
Powhattan, Kan. 
Peirut, Syria. 
Metamora, 111. 
North Livermore, Me. 
Conneaut, O. 
Troy, la. 
Potsdam, N. Y. 
Lee, N. H. 
New York City. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Greenville, Tenn. 
Columbia, S. C. 



Newark, N. J. 
Greensborough, Md. 
Plymouth, Mass. 



DELTA UPSILON. 



193 



JAMES BUCKLAND, 
Rev. GEORGE W. CLARK, 
Rev. AMOS H. COOLIDGE, 
Rev. SAMUEL C. DEAN, 

ENOCH K. EVANS, 
Rev. JOSEPH L. A. FISH, 
*Rev. WILLIAM D. FLAGG, 

JAMES R. HALE, 
Rev. DANIEL C. LITCHFIELD, 
Rev. CHARLES F. MORSE, 

RALPH L. PARSONS, M. D., 
Rev. EL BRIDGE PEPPER, 
*HENRYR. PIERCE, 
Rev. EDWARD H. PRATT, 
Rev. GILBERT B. RICHARDSON, 
Rev. GEORGE E. SANBORNE, 
Rev. JULIUS SPENCER, 
Prof. SAN BORN TENNEV, 

ABNER H. WEN/ELL, 



Class of 1854, 



Rev. ISRAEL BRFNDAGE, 

EDWIN COOLEY, 
*Rev. EDWIN DIMOCK, 

Rev. HENRY C. FAY, 

HERMAN M. GLASS, 
ADONIRAM J. GOODNOUGH, 
GEORGE D. A. HEBARD, 

Rev. MILAN H. HITCHCOCK, 

Rev. CHARLES H. HOLLOWAY, 

FRANKLIN HUBBARD, 
*CHARLES A. KIM BALL, 

Rev. JOHN C. KIMBALL, 
WILLARD MERRILL, 
NORMAN A. PRENTISS, 
CHARLES P. RUGG, 

Rev. URIEL W. SMALL, 
*SiLAsM. SMITH, 



Class of 1855, 



ELI G. BENNETT, 
ALBERT H. BRIDGMAN, 
FRANCIS F. BROWN, M. D., 
Gen. JOHN C. CALDWELL, 
Gen. MICAH S. CROSWELL, 
CHARLES H. CROWELL, 

25 



St. Louis, Mo. 
Ballston Spa, N. Y. 
Leicester, Mass. 
Narcooehee, Ga. 
Fallsburg, N. Y. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Barton, Vt. 
Canton, N. Y. 
Bricksburg, N. J. 
Esk Zagra, Turkey. 
Blackwell's Island, N. Y. 
Ware, Mass. 
Oxbridge, Mass. 
East Woodstock, Conn. 
Sheepscot, Mass. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Irondale, Mo, 
Williamstown, Mass. 
Marlboro, Mass. 



Prompton, Penn. 
North Amherst, Mass. 
Orange, Mass. 
Harwichport, Mass. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Dayton, O. 
Iowa City, la. 
Constantinople, Turkey. 
Salem Centre, N. Y. 
Toledo, O. 
Ipswich, Mass. 
Beverly, Mass. 
Janesville, Wis. 
La Salle, 111. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Lisbon, 111. 
Waterloo, N. Y. 



Georgetown, Conn. 
Kier, la. 
Reading, Mass. 
Valparaiso, Chili, S. A. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Windham, N. H. 



194 DELTA UPSILON. 


JAMES W. CROWELL, 


Londonderry, N. H. 


APPLETON H. FITCH, 


Maples, Ind. 


Rev. JOHN HART WELL, 


Becket, Mass. 


Rev. MARTIN S. HOWARD, 


Wilbraham, Mass. 


SAVILIAN R. HULL, 


Cheshire, Conn. 


*Rev. CHESTER B. JEFFERDS, 


Chester, Vt. 


J. BROWN LORD, 


Boston, Mass. 


Prof. WILLIAM L. MONTAGUE. 


Amherst, Mass. 


Rev. MOSES NOERR, 


Cold Valley, 111. 


LEVI S. PACKARD, 


Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 


Rev. HENRY J. RICHARDSON, 


Lincoln, Mass. 


Rev. HORACE L. SINGLETON, 


Wilmington, N. C. 


EZRA T. SPRAGUE, 


Depere, Wis. 


Prof. GEORGE WASHBURN, 


Constantinople, Turkey. 


Class of 1856. 




Rev. LYMAN BARTLETT, 


Csesarea, Turkey. 


Rev. JAMES A. BATES, 


Belpre, 


JOSIAH BEARDSLEY, 


Ellsworth, O. 


*JOSEPH BLOOMER, 


McGregor's, la. 


WILLIAM F. BRADBURY, 


Cambridge, Mass. 


EDWARD E. BRADBURY, 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Rev. CHESTER BRIDGHAM, 


Ifumi, South Asia. 


Rev. CHESTER L. CUSHMAN, 


Ludlow, Mass. 


JOSIAH H. GODDARD, 


Huntingdon, Mas>. 


Rev. EDWARD P. GOODWIN, 


Chicago, 111. 


Hon. CHARLES E. GRIGGS, 


Chaplin, Conn. 


GEORGE M. GUERNSEY, 


Plattville, Wis. 


Rev. HIRAM C. HAYDEN, 


Painesville, O. 


THOMAS P. HERRICK, 


Canandaigua, N. Y. 


*JAMES E. HUTCHINSON, 


Jacksonville, Penn. 


EDWARD KEMBLE, 


Boston, Mass. 


*FREDERICK W. LANE, 


North Brookfield, Mass. 


Rev. JOHN W. LANE, 


Whately, Mass. 


JOEL LINSLY, 


Millville, N. Y. 


BENJAMIN MATTICE, 


Middleburgh, N. Y. 


Rev. FRANKLIN B. NORTON, 


Oshkosh, Wis. 


CYRUS H. PENDLETON, 


Bozrah, Oonn. 


NATHAN C. POND, 


E. Brookfield, Mass. 


Rev. MARTIN L. RICHARDSON, 


Star bridge, Mass. 


JAMES RUSSELL, 


Winchester, Mass. 


T T? 




(JOSKPH. XvUSSEIjLj 

WILLIAM SWINTON, 


Montreal, L. C. 


Class of 1857. 




CHARLES E. ALLEN, 


Princeton, Mass. 


HENRY F. BLODGETT, 


Stafford, Conn 



DELTA UPSILON. 


195 


J. THEODORE BRIGGS, 


Sutherland Springs, Tex. 


Rev. WILLIAM 0. CARR, 


Barnstead Parade, N. H. 


JACOB C. CLAPP, 


Newton, N. C. 


Rev. ASAHEL L. CLARK, 


W. Hoboken, N. J. 


Rev. GEORGE T. HIGLEY, 


Ashland, Mass. 


Rev. HENRY W. JONES, 


Hingharn, Mass. 


DANIEL W. RICHARDSON, 


Middleton, Mass. 


Rev. DANIEL H. ROGAN, 


Orange, Mass. 


"F\ T? O 




JJANIEL -T . SAVAGE, 

ABIEL H. SLEIGHTON, 


Woodstock, Vt. 


Rev. DENIS WORTMAN, Jr., 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Class of 1858. 




Rev. JAMES BEAUMONT, 


Waverly, N. Y. 


Rev. DANIEL J. BLISS, 


Holland, Mass. 


Rev. WILLIAM L. BRAY, 


Marshalltown, la. 


*Rev. ANDREW J. CLAPP, 


. 


Prof. GEORGE C. CLARKE, 


Chicago, 111. 


Rev. ROYAL W. CLARKE, 


Amherst, Mass. 


JAMES COLLINS, M. D., 


Philadelphia, Penn. 


Rev. EDWARD P. GARDNER, 


Hoboken, N. J. 


Rev. STEPHEN HARRIS, 


West Suffield, Conn. 


*Rev. HENRY HASTINGS, 


. 


Rev CHESTER W. HAWLEY, 


Waterville, N. Y. 


EDWIN HUNT, 


Utica, N. Y. 


HENRY M. KELLOGG, 


Oshkosh, Wis. 


*Rev. EDWIN E. MERRIAM, 


Salem, Penn. 


GEORGE H. MILES, 


Rutland, Mass. 


Rev. SAMUEL B. SHERRILL, 


Bellevue, O. 


HAVILAH M. SPRAGUE, M. D., 


Westchester, N. Y. 


* JAMES E. TOWER, 


Groton, Mass. 


Rev. JUSTIN E. TWITCHELL, 


E. Cleveland, O. 


Rev JOHN WHITEHALL, 


Attleboro, Mass. 


CHARLES B. WHITTLESEY, 


Berlin, Conn. 


Rev. JAMES D. WILSON, 


New York City. 


Class of 1859. 




SANFORD W. BILLINGS, 


Sharon, Mass. 


Rev. HENRY J. BRUCE, 


Rehoori, Hindoostan. 


Rev. GEORGE CONSTANTINE, 


Athens, Greece. 


JOHN F. GLEASON, 


Bedford, Mass. 


Rev. SAMUEL E. HERRICK, 


Boston, Mass. 


Rev. LUTHER KEENE, Jr , 


Franklin, Mass. 


FREDERIC W. PIKE, 


Mercer, Me. 


*WILLARD J. PUTNAM, 


Hopkinton, Mass. 


Rev. PHILANDER REED, 


Harrisonville, Mo. 



196 



DELTA UPSILON. 



Rev. 



Rev. 



AMOS F. SHATTUCK, 
WESLEY SQUIER, 
HENRY M. STEVENS, 
Rev. JAMES N. THRESHER, 
J. OSMAND TIFFANY, 
HENRY TUPPER, 



Class of 1860, 



HENRY E. BARNES, 
Rev. WILLIAM BROWN, 
*HORACE CANNON, 
Rev. GEORGE CURTIS, 
Rev. GEORGE DEXTER, 

Lucius H. HIGGINS, 
Rev CLINTON M. JONES, 
*GEORGE A. KEKNE, 
*JOSEPH MASON, 
*Lucius L. MERRICK, 
Rev. HORACE PARKER, 
WILLARD PUTNAM, 
S. JOHN STORRS, 
EDWARD R. WHEELER, M. D., 



Rev. 



Rev. 



Prof. 



Class of 1801. 

FRANCIS H. BOYNTON, 
WILLIAM J. CLARK, 
FRANKLIN C. FLINT, 
JAMES LAIRD, 
GEORGE F. MERRIAM, 
DAVID S. MORGAN, 
DANIEL T. NELSON, M. D., 
M. PORTER SNELL, 



(ass of 1802. 



Rev. 



BENJAMIN A. DEAN, 
HENRY A. FORD, 
JOHN GODDARD, 
HERVEY C. HAZ^N, 
EBEN POPE, 



Class of 1810. 



JOSEPH E. MILLER, 
JOHN P. RICHARDSON, 
WILLIAM H. SWIFT, 

Class of 1871. 

ELISHA P. BARTHOLOMEW, 
AUSTIN P. GARY, 



Durham, Me. 
Wales, Mass. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Fair Haven, Minn. 
Attleboro', Mass. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Plantsville, Conn. 
S her born, Mass. 
Wareham, Mass. 
Harwinton, Conn. 
Walpole, N. H. 
Plautsville, Conn. 
North Madison, Vt. 
Atkinson, Me. 
Attleboro', Mass. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Pepperell, Mass. 
New Salem, Mass. 
New York City. 
Elmira, N. Y." 



Assonet, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Shrewsbury, Mass. 
Clinton, Mass. 
Mason Village, N. H. 
Andover, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Washing-ton, Mass. 



Garmaville, Pa. 
Lacon, 111. 

N. Bridgewater, Mass. 
Belchertown, Mass 
Dorchester, Mass. 



Amherst, Mass. 
Dracut, Mass. 
Unionville, N. Y. 



West Springfield, Mass. 
Amherst, Mass. 



DELTA CPSILON. 



197 



ANDREW E. FORD, 
WILLIAM H. HARTXELL, 
GEORGE M. HOWE, 
HERBERT G. LORD, 
CHARLES W. MALLORY, 
WILLIAM W. MORTON, 
EDWARD P. ROOT, 
DAVID A. SHAW, Jr , 

Class of 1872, 

HARRISON BAILEY, 
ARTHUR J. BENEDICT, 
OTIS GARY, Jr., 
GEORGE FOWLER, 
Lo it AN u s E. HITCHCOCK, 
WILLIAM R. LORD, 
CHARLES F. MOKSK, 
WALTER NEGLEY, 
FRANK PARKER, 
STEPHEN A. THURLOW, 

(lavs of 1873. 

JOHN A. BENNETT, 
SALEM D. CHARLES, 
EDWARD W. CHA>I , 
HENRY GIBBONS, 
GEORGE W. HALE, 
WILLIAM H. HALL, 
HENRY A. KING, 
CALEB .i. LAYTON, 
Lucius P. MERRIAM, 
CHARLES NEGLEY, 
GRANVILLE W. NIMS, 
FLOYD E. SHERMAN, 
LEWIS SPERRY, 
DAVID H. WOODS, 

Class of 1874. 

WINFRED B. BANCROFT, 
CHARLES S. BROADHEAD, 
GEORGE B. COPP, 
GEORGE H. MELLEN, 
WILLIAM C. MERRILL, 
NATHAN MORSE, 
HOWARD B. SCOTT, 
FOSTER R. WAIT, 



North Abington, Mass. 
Washington, Perm. 
Charlton, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hamden, N. Y. 
Upper St. Clair, Penn. 
Montague, Mass. 
Fiskdale, Mass. 



Fitchburg, Mass. 
Bethel, Conn. 
Foxboro, Mass. 
Gouverueur, N. Y. 
Chicopee, Mass, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Union, Conn. 
Hagarstown, M<1. 
Gloucester, Mass. 
West Auburn, Me. 



South Wilbraham, Mass 
Brimfield, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Brownsville, Penn. 
Montague Center, Mass. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Monson, Mass. 
Georgetown, Del. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Hagarstown, Md. 
Keene, N. H. 
Douglas, Mass. 
E. Windsor Hill, Conn. 
Elraira, N. Y. 



Boston, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Brookfield, Mass. 
Andover, Mass. 
Union, Conn. 
Danbury, Conn. 
W. Spring-field, Mass. 



VTI. 

STATISTICAL HISTORY OF AMHERST COLLEGE. 



Amherst Academy incorporated, February 13th, 1816. 

A Professorship in connection with this Academy proposed, November, 1816. 
A $10,000 fund started, but soon relinquished for more extended plans, 

August 18th, 1818. 
The Trustees of the Academy vote a fund of $50,000, for the foundation of 

a classical institute, apart from the Academy, for the education of indigent 

young men, who have the ministry, in view, September llth, 1818. 

Convention at Amherst, of delegates from thirty-six towns, to consider the 

expediency of founding a College at Amherst, immediately, 

September 29th, 1818. 
Petition sent to Williams College, to seek a union of the proposed college 

with that college, October 26th, 1818. 

The $50,000 fund completed in March, 1820. 

The Corner Stone of South College (the first college building,) was laid, (Dr. 

Noah Webster delivering the oration), August 9th, 1820. 

Three Professorships established, (Latin, Greek, and Mathematics,) 

November 8th, 1820. 

First President's House built, 1820. 

Dr. Zephaniah Swift Moore inaugurated President, September 18th, 1821. 

South College dedicated, (first term began with fifty-three students,) 

September 18th, 1821. 

First Anniversary of Collegiate Charity Institution, August 28th, 1822. 

Middle College (present North,) erected, 1822. 

First application for Charter, winter of 1822-23. 

First Revival occurred, spring of 1823. 

President Moore died, June 30th, 1823. 

Dr. Heman Humphrey inaugurated President of College, October 15th, 1823. 
Second attempt to procure a Charter, December, 1823. 

Charter granted to the College, February 25th, 1825. 

First meeting of the Trustees of "Amherst College," April 13th, 1825. 

A new Faculty formed, April 13th, 1825. 

Dr. Edward Hitchcock became Professor of Chemistry and Natural History, 

April 13th, 1825. 
First Commencement of "Amherst College," (under the Charter), 

August 24th, 1825. 
Mr. E. S. Snell became Tutor, 1825. 



STATISTICAL HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE. 199 



Pyramidal bell tower demolished, 1826- 

College Church formed, March 7th, 1826. 

College Chapel dedicated, ' February 28th, 1827. 

Installation of Dr. Humphrey as first pastor of the College Church, 

February 28th, 1827. 

Mr. E. S. Snell became Profi<>r, ' 1827. 

First application for aid from the State, 1827. 

"Old North College" erected, Autumn, 1827. 

Parallel course of study (English and Classical,) adopted, 1827. 

''House of Students" organized, summer term, 1828. 

IJev. Dr. Joseph Vaill appointed permanent agent for solicitation of funds 

for the College, 1829. 

Old parish Meeting House taken down, 1829. 

First impulse -riven to the College Library, Summer of 1830. 

First periodical (Sprite,) published, May,. 1831. 

Mr. Wm. S. Tyler became instructor, 1832. 

Second President's House built, 1834-5. 

Mr. Wm. S. Tyler became Professor of "Greek and Latin," 1836. 

Gorham Rebellion, 1837. 

Commencements held in July, 1841 and 1842. 

Last Commencement in which exercises continued through Morning and 

Afternoon, August, 1843. 

The "Sears foundation of literature and benevolence" established by Hon. 

David Sears of Boston, 1844. 

Plan of soliciting funds through agents given up, 1845. 

Number of Students only 118, April, 1845. 

Kdward Hitchcock inaugurated President of College, April 15, 1845. 

Appeal made to the Massachusetts Legislature for aid, and $25,000 

granted, December, 1846. 

Hon. Samuel Williston began his donations to the college, with a gift of 

$20,000, 1845. 

Debts of the College cancelled, August, 1847. 

Woods (Octagonal) Cabinet dedicated, (Henry A. Sykes, Esq., Architect,) 

June 28th, 1848. 
Amherst College Independent Scientific Department established, 

January 5th, 1852. 

Library building dedicated, (Henry A. Sykes, Esq., Architect,) Nov. 22d, 1853. 
Rufus Bullock, Esq., of Royalston, presents the college with a Telescope, 1853. 
Ten Thousand Dollars obtained from estate of Hon. Samuel Appleton, for 

a Cabinet of Natural History, August, 1854. 

President Hitchcock resigned, 1854. 

Rev. Wm. A. Stearns installed pastor of the College Church, 

November 21st, 1854. 

President Hitchcock left the Presidency, . November 22d, 1854. 

Rev. Wm. A. Stearns inaugurated President, November 22d, 1854. 

Appleton Cabinet erected, 1855. 

Geological Lecture room erected, Autumn, 1855. 

Old North College burned, January 19th, 1857- 



200 STATISTICAL HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE. 



Nineveh Gallery completed, . November, 1857. 

Williston Hall and East College dedicated (sermon by Rev. Henry Ward 

Beecher,) May 19th, 1858. 

College Garden commenced, Summer of 1859. 

Hardy Prizes first given, 1859. 

Trustees vote to build Gymnasium, August 12th, 1859. 

Corner Stone of Barrett Gymnasium laid, October 13th, 1859. 

Gymnasium completed, Autumn of I860- 

New department of "Hygiene and Physical Culture" established, (John W. 

Hooker, M. D., appointed Professor,) August 10th, 1860. 

"Vital Statistics" of the students began to be taken, September, 1860. 

"Study hours" given up, 1860. 

Permanent change in time of Commencement, from August to July, 1861. 

Class Uniforms for Gymnasium exercise introduced, April 5th, 1861. 

Dr. W. J. Walker donated $20,000, 1 862 . 

Dr. Edward Hitchcock died, February 27th, 1864. 

Chapel Building renovated, Winter of 1865. 

Students adopted "Mauve and White" as College Colors, October 19th, 1866. 
College purchase "Village Church;" ($8,000,) October 24th, 1867. 

First Stone of Walker Hall laid by Senior Class, April 21st, 1868. 

Hallock Grove presented to College, 1868. 

Students vote to adopt "Purple and White" as College Colors, April 30th, 1868. 
Corner Stone of Walker Hall laid by Class of '68, June 10th, 1868. 

Alumni propose to establish Class Scholarships, July, 1869. 

Evening Prayers abolished, April, 1869. 

Junior Exhibition abolished, Spring of 1869. 

Corner Stone of the College Chinch laid by Class of '71, September 22d, 1870. 
Class Day changed to Commencement Week, 1870. 

Hyde Prize, ($100,) first awarded, July, 1870. 

Opening of Walker Hall, (George Hathorne, Esq., Architect,) Address by 

President Stearns, October 20th, 1870. 

Revivals occurred, 1823, 1827, 1828, 1731, 1835, 1839, 1842,1846, 1850, 

1853, 1855, 1857, 1858, 1862, 1865, 1868, 1870. 

College Church completed, (Wm. A. Potter, Esq , Architect,) 1871. 

Semi-Centennial Festivities, July 12th, 1871. 



Summary of Membership of Classes and of Graduates. 


Table showing the number of students and graduates in the different Classes 
of Amherst College for each year since its establishment. * 


Years of 


Seniors. 


Juniors. 


Sopho- 
mores. 


Fresh- 
men. 


Total. 


Graduates in 
Acad'l Course. 


1821-22 


3 


6 


19 


31 


59 


__ 


1822-23 


5 


21 


32 


40 


98 


3 


1823-24 


19 


29 


41 


37 


126 


5 


1824-25 


25 


41 


31 


39 


136 


20 


1825-26 


33 


24 


45 


50 


152 


25 


1826-27 


24 


40 


55 


51 


170 


30 


1827-28 


42 


47 


53 


67 


209 


23 


1828-29 


40 


47 


72 


52 


211 


40 


1829-30 


33 


74 


47 


53 


207 


39 


1830-31 


61 


40 


50 


37 


188 


32 


1831-32 


39 


46 


50 


60 


195 


60 


1832-33 


41 


50 


64 


72 


227 


38 


1833-34 


44 


50 


60 


85 


239 


38 


1834-35 


44 


52 


77 


70 


243 


39 


1835-36 


41 


63 


72 


76 


252 


39 


1836-37 


60 


50 


73 


76 


25'.> 


38 


1837-38 


40 


59 


57 


50 


206 


53 


1838-39 


57 


48 


47 


37 


189 


42 


18:39-40 


47 


43 


41 


38 


169 


57 


1840-41 


30 


35 


40 


52 


157 


44 


1841-42 


28 


27 


43 


44 


142 


32 


1842-43 


21 


34 


42 


32 


129 


28 


1843-44 


30 


33 


29 


32 


124 


21 


1844-45 


30 


27 


30 


34 


121 


29 


1845-46 


26 


23 


35 


34 


118 


30 


1846-47 


19 


30 


36 


35 


120 


26 


1847-48 


29 


36 


35 


50 


150 


18 


1848-49 


33 


29 


52 


52 


166 


30 


1849-50 


25 


43 


55 


53 


176 


32 


1850-51 


41 


52 


49 


40 


182 


25 


1851-52 


43 


43 


41 


63 


190 


41 


1852-53 


42 


35 


61 


57 


195 


42 


1853-54 


33 


54 


58 


56 


211 


42 


1854-55 


53 


59 


59 


66 


237 


37t 


1855-56 


49 


50 


65 


54 


218 


53t 


1856-57 


45 


60 


60 


64 


229 


46J 


1857-58 


52 


49 


54 


66 


221 


44 


1858-59 


47 


43 


61 


74 


235 


51 


1859-60 


48 


56 


71 


67 


242 


46 


1860-61 


51 


56 


60 


53 


220 


47 


1861-62 


58 


49 


50 


78 


235 


49 


1862-63 


42 


42 


76 


60 


220 


55 


1863-64 


30 


58 


64 


50 


202 


42 


1864-65 


57 


56 


54 


45 


212 


33 


1865-66 


54 


51 


44 


54 


203 


62 


1866-67 


49 


44 


62 


70 


225 


51 


1867-68 


41 


61 


69 


73 


244 


48 


1868-69 


57 


58 


71 


65 


251 


39 


1869-70 


53 


64 


63 


75 


255 


56 . 


1870-71 


65 


49 


76 


71 


261 


48 














59 














1927 


Whole Number of Graduates in Scientific Course, 


. . . 


9 


Sum Total, .... 


1936 


*As the collegiate year has always begun in summer or autumn, the number of Seniors 
who graduate in any given year, is found in the column " Graduates," opposite the succeeding 
year, e. g., the number of Seniors in 1836-37 was 60, the number who graduated was 53. 


tAlso 3 in "Scientific Course." $ Also 1 in " Scientific Course." Also 2 in " Scientific 


Course." 



202 


BARRETT GYMNASIUM. 


BARRETT GYMNASIUM, 


Statistics in the Department of 


Physical 


Education and Hygiene in Amherst 


College, arranged 


for ten years ending July, 


1871. 






VITAL STATISTICS TEN 


YEARS. 














r 






_j 




r ^ 


tif'O 


H Q} ^ M* 1 "* 


3 W 




C ^ 


~!= 03 


Q 

EJ* 


H C . 


|| 1 


i M ^ ^ 


CLASSES. 


f^T ?2 2 


K ^ 'S 


HI 


Jjf 




1 Ip 




^ >' 


fl 


H 5 *S3 

^- O (D 


s.s"S 


H!? t" 


jTi ^g 




.S ^ 


.2** 


j> P-T3 


B c 


ce o ~ # 


3 feCO 








5 


^^ "^H 


M W Cu ^ . 


O 

















Seniors, 


22.925 


5.705 


140.181 


36.473 


256.757 11. 


848 10.412 




22.221 


5.656 


138.652 


36.197 


254.697 11. 


731 10.565 


Sophomores, 


21.022 


5.655 


137.967 


36.270 


254.419 11. 


308 10.368 


Freshmen 


19.789 


5.583 


132.207 


35.366 


234.992 11. 


394 8.857 
















Averages, 


21.489 


5.649 


137.251 


36.076 


250.216 11. 


595 10.050 






























COLLEGE CABINETS. 


Shepard Mineralogical Collection 


in Walker Hall 


(third 














1 FS O 


DO specimens. 














Amherst College 


Geological Collection in Woods Octag- 


onal Cabinet 


18,000 


Hitchcock Ichnological Collection 


in Appleton Cabinet, 1,400 " 


Number of tracks of 


animals in stone, 


- 20,000 


Shepard Collection of Meteorites 


and Fossils in Woods 


Octagonal Cabinet,, 


- 10,500 


The Adams' Zoological Collection in Appleton Cabinet, - 5,000 " 


Gilbert Museum of Indian Relics in 


Appleton Cabinet, - 4,000 " 


Dickinson Nineveh Gallery in Wood's Octagonal Cabinet, 


sculptured slabs, antique coins, 


seals, cylinders, etc., etc., 200 " 


The total number of s 


pecimens in all 


the Cabinets now, [1871,] is over 


100,000. 














COLLEGE LIBRARY. 


Whole number of volumes July 1, 


1871, 






- 26 75 










INDEX. 



Acadcmia, Change of name, 

Decline in, 

Graduate members of, 

Organization of, 

Re-organization of, 

Summary of Membership, 
Alexandria, Badge of, 

Exercises of, - 

Graduate members of, 

Hall of, - 

History of, - 

Prizes, - 

Summary of Membership, 

Undergraduate members of, 
Alexandrian Society, Decline of, 

Dissolution of, 

Formation of, - 

Graduate members of, 



PAGE. 
40 
39 
145 
37 
40 
151 
41 
48 
153 
46 
44 
47 
158 
157 
29 
31 
13 
134 

Secrecy of, - 20, 23 

Summary of Membership, 137 

Allotment System, 13, 19, 24, 28, 43 
Alpha Delta Phi, membership of, 159 
Alpha Sigma Phi, - - - 53 
Alumni Associations, - - 133 

Amherst, Songs of, - - - 92 
Amherst College, Statistical History 

of, 198 

Anonymous Department, 

13, 22, 26, 28, 34 

Anti-Secret Society, Controversy, 45 

Membership of, - - 191 

Anti- Slavery Society, - - 94 

Antivenenean Society, 54 

Archives, Society, - 8 

Athenee, Badge of, 41 

Exercises of, - - - 49 

Graduate membership of, - 146 

Hall of, - 46 

History of, - - - - 44 

Prizes, - ... 47 

Summary of Membership, 151 

Undergraduate members of, 150 

Athemeums, - - - 21, 24, 28 

Athenian Society, Decline of, - 29 

Dissolution of, - - - 31 

Formation of, - - - 13 

Graduate members of, - 138 

Secrecy of, - - 20, 23, 27 



PAGE 

Athenian Society : 

Summary of Membership, 141 

Base Ball, - - - - - 112 

Beethoven fc Society, 91 

Bible Society, 64 

Biennial Suppers, - - - 121 

"Blue Skins," - - - 132 

Boating, 115 

" Book and Key" Society, 64 

Book Burnings, - - - 128 

Book Store, College, - - - 1 06 

Boxing, 118 

Cabinets, Statistics of, - - 202 

Cattle Show, .... 132 

Chapel Names, 133 

Chess, 117 

Chi DeltaJTheta, ... 49 

Chi Psi, membership of, - - 189 

Civil War, Relics of, - - 106 

Class Day, Officers of, - - 84 

Sketch of, ... 82 

Class Hats and Canes, - - 126 

Mottoes, .... 86 

Songs, -. - - - 92 

Suppers, - - - - 82, 84 

Trees, 119 

Classes, membership of, - - 201 

College Band, .... 90 

Characters, - - - 133 

Garden, 119 

Orchestras, ... 92 

Regiment, - - - 105 

Colonization Society, - - 94 

Commencement Appointments, 

Tabular View of, - - 81 

Concatenation Society, - - 124 

Contents, .... 5 

"Continentals," - - - 106 

" Court of Justice," - - 93 

Cricket, 112 

Dancing, 118 

Delta Kappa, 53 

Delta Kappa Epsilon, membership of,l 80 

Delta Sigma Society, - - 191 

Delta Upsilon, membership of, - 191 
Demonstrations, Political, 

98, 99, 100, 102, 104, 105 

Dutch Company, - - - 131 



204 



INDEX. 



Eclectic Society, Change of Name, 40 

Decline in, - - - - 39 

Graduate Members of, - 152 

Organization of, 37 

Re-organization of, - - 40 

Summary of Membership, - 158 

Electioneering, - - - 19, 43 

Equitable Fraternity, - - - 191 

Examination, The Final, - 132 

Excursions, Class, - - - 110 

Geological, - - - 107 

Flag Raisings, - - - - 101 

Floricultural Society, - - 119 

Fourth of July, Celebration of 

35, 96, 97, 102 

Freshman Visitation, - - 127 

Glee Clubs, - 91 
" Gorham Rebellion," - 35, 95 

Gown Parade, - - - - 132 

Gymnastic Society, 111 

Gymnasium, Vital Statistics, - 202 

H. E. p. T. T. Society, 124 

Historical Society, 94 
Hitchcock, Pres. E., Presentation to, 121 

Return of, ... 98 

Hitchcock Society, ... 62 

" House of Students," - - 93 
Impeachments, - - - - 14, 26 

Inquiry, Society of, 60 

Introductory Note, - 7 

Iota Pi Kappa, - 64 

Kappa Sigma Epsilon, - - 54 

Knickerbocker Club, - - 126 
Libraries, Society, - 14, 17, 20, 43 

Linnasan Society, 56 

Literary Societies, - - - 158 

History of, - - - - 13 

General Summary of, 158 

"Loggerheads"- - - - 112 

Lutheran Society, - - - 90 

" Midnight Rangers," - - 131 

Mission Work, ... 94 

Missionary Band, ... 63 

Mock Programmes, - - 131 

Moot Courts, - 38 

Mountain Christenings, - - 107 

"Mu Kappa Sigma," - - 124 

Musical Association, Amh. Coll., 91 

Musical Societies, - - - *92 

N. L. D. Society, - 57 

Natural History, Society of - 57 

" Norwottuck Brigade," - - 131 

O. P. Q. Society, ... 64 

Olios, 76 

P. J. Society, 65 

Paean Band, ... 89 

Peace Society, - - - - 94 

Periodicals : Amherst Aurora, - 76 

Amherst College Magazin^, - 72 

Amherst Collegiate Magazine, 70 

Amherst Scorpion, - - 65 



Periodicals : Amherst Student, - 74 

Bugle, 73 

College Dial, - - 76 

Experiment, - - - - 70 
Guest, - ... 67 

Harvest Sheaf, - 73 

Horae Collegian, - - 68 
Ichnolite, - - - - 71 
Indicator, 69 

Item, 73 

Olio, --.. 76 

Shrine, - , - - - - 67 

Sprite, - 66 

Trumpet, ... 73 

Undergraduate, 73 

University Quarterly, - - 74 

Phi Beta Kappa, - - - 51 

Phi Beta Theta, - - - - 59 

Phi Chi Delta, .... 64 

Philopogonia, .... 125 

Pocahontas' Birthday, - - 129 

Presentation to the College, - - 101 

Presentations, - - 120 

Psi Upsilon, membership of, - - 169 

Psychological Society, - - 94 

Quoits, - - 112 

Reading Room, - - - 107 

Receptions, 123 

Rope Pull, .... 128 

Rushes, 128 

Salutatorians, List of, - - 79 

Sigma Delta, - 54 

Sigma Theta, ... 65 

Snell, Prof. E. S., Return of, - 1<:0 

Social Union /Dissolution of, - 36 

Formation of, - - - 31 

Graduate members of, 142 

" Lyceum " of, ... 32 

Origin of, - 19 

Summary of Membership, - 144 

Social Union (Modern), Exhibitions 

of, - 41 

Formation of, - - - 40 

Presidents of, - - - - 44 

Reading Room, - - 44, 107 

Society Meetings, Place of, 14, 16, 21, 29 

" Special Meetings/' - - 22 

Squirt-Gun Riot, - - - 129 

" Statement of Facts," - - - 41 

Stearns, Pres. W. A., Inauguration of, 99 

Theta Pi Kappa, - . - - 64 

" Tt Kp*," 65 

Tyler, Prof. W. S., Prefatory Letter 

of, 9 

" Ultima Thule," 69 

United Fraternity, Dissolution of, 1 7 

Exhibitions of, - - - 15 

' Formation of, - - - 14 

Valedictorians, List of, - - - 79 

Wicket, - - - - 112 

ZetaPsi, 64 





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