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Full text of "Student perspectives of the Junior College of Broward County (J.C.B.C.), Broward Junior College (B.J.C.), and Broward Community College (B.C.C.) between 1960-1998 by Dr. Thomas J. Ryan"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/studentperspecti01brow 



The Student Perspectives 



Broward Community College (B.C.C.) 

Between 



1960 - 1998 










Dr. Thomas J. Ryan 




,.t .■ i- >- - - • - 






Student perspectives of the Junior 

College of Broward County 
(J.C.B.C.), Broward Junior College 
(B.J.C.), and Broward Community 
College (B.C.C.) between 1960-1998 

Dr. Thomas J. Ryan 



Volume 1 



Broward Community College 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., 2000 



Copyright © Broward College. All rights reserved. 

Content is the property of Broward College and is protected by United 
States copyright and trademark laws. The content and text may not be 
copied, translated or distributed in any manner (electronic, web or printed) 
without the prior written consent of Broward College with the exception of 
properly-attributed quotations and other "fair use" exemptions provided 
for under copyright law. All scanned page images (of books, journals, 
newspapers, magazines and pamphlets) produced by Broward College, or 
its predecessors (Junior College of Broward County, Broward Junior College, 
Broward Community College) are subject to Copyright Law, and may be not 
used without restriction for any purpose whatsoever. 

Special Collections LD6501.B7 R78 2000 



Copyright © Broward College. All rights reserved. 



Disclaimer 
Comments, observations, opinions, and views compiled in this volume were 
originally published between 1960 and 1998 in various student newspapers 
including: The Venetian Crier, Phoenix, New Horizons, Polaris, and Observer. The 
text is directly transcribed from these sources and reflects the language of its day. 

Content of this volume may reflect the opinions, personal reflections and 
remembrances of the author(s) and editor(s) and may not reflect the past or current 
institutional views held by Broward College, or its predecessors (Junior College of 
Broward County, Broward Junior College, and Broward Community College). 

Broward College, or its predecessors (Junior College of Broward County, Broward 
Junior College, and Broward Community College) is not responsible for any 
comments, observations, opinions, views, personal reflections and remembrances 
found in this volume. 

This unpublished volume has not been edited or proof read. It is presented as a 
compilation of data from student newspapers and personal recollection, not as an 
official institutional document. 



Table of Contents 
Volume 1 



1. Introduction 



2. Acknowledgments 



3. Student Activities Board 



4. Student Activities Board 



5. Student Government Association 



6. Student Government Association 



7. Student Activities 



8. Student Activities 



9. Student Services 



Introduction 



INTRODUCTION 

The history of the students of the Junior College of Broward County to 1968, Broward Junior 
College to 1975, and Broward Community College to 1998 provides a diversified kaleidoscope of 
ideas, thoughts and views of the students and how they interacted with concerned faculty, 
support staff and administrators who provided direction and leadership. The perspectives and 
interpretations of how the students dealt with their campus life, student organizations and 
personnel needs. There was never a moment when the students failed to comprehend, analyze 
and express themselves. 

The life of the students as it changed from the 1960's to 1998 reflects everything from national 
issues to local advertising. Each decade had its own high and low points, but in each case the 
students tried various opinions on the public and their peers. The alternatives were fascinating as 
the institution provided a laboratory experiment to allow the students to try different methods. 
Their approaches are worth studying as the students changed the life of the students to meet 
daily needs and societal factors. 

The critical thinking that the students exhibited proved they were in partnership with the college to 
accomplish more than academics, athletics, cultural diversity and social development. Their 
changing perspectives ranged from "sharing and caring" to asking "what is in it for me?" Their 
social and community welfare efforts highlighted each decade, the difference was the delivery 
systems. 

The Junior College of Broward College was linked with the Broward County School Board. 
Broward Junior College created a variety of sources for college parallel, professional or technical 
development. Then Broward Community College showed everything from life rings of retention to 
the flexibility necessary for future burdens or opportunities. The institution has provided a true 



traffic control center for Broward County to suit needs from Camp BCC pre teens to the Speakers 
Bureau seminars in retirement condominiums. 

The leadership demonstrated by the various administrations established directions in each 
decade. The conceptualization of everything from new programs to remedial assistance served 
the community with a wide range of options. All of these different approaches were vital to meet 
a very different environment as Broward County moved demographically and required economic 
concerns as change occurred. 



The multi campus institution provided a quasi home for many underprepared traditional high 
school students to returning traumatized adult learners seeking both training and employment. 
The advisement and counseling aspects could be found from Students Affairs to minority 
mentoring. The warmth experienced by those students gave them a comfort zone, a campus 
home despite the commuter image. It was the administrator, faculty or staff as individuals who 
made retention far more personable. 

The international flavor where travel abroad or influx of students from over 150 nations made 
Broward Community College, the place to be. Never were so many countries attracted to a 2 
year institution. There was also ethnicity constructed in the fiber of our college that allowed 
"cultural diversity" to infiltrate every aspect and level. The best part of this collection is the 
students, faculty, staff and administration. Their ideas, plans and work are highlighted in 16 
topics in a chronological manner. By no means is this a total or complete collection. The interest 
was to enlighten the points that made the institution change while affording all participants past, 
present, and in the future to add additional components. This is a living narrative of where we 
were why we needed to change, and how we managed to take advantage of so many 
opportunities. 



There are almost 83 volumes of student newspapers, yearbooks and scrapbooks that provided 
this manuscript with the detailed highlights. These will be stored in the Broward Community 
College Central Campus Library as the basis for archival history. It will never end as the story 
lives with the arrival of every new student, the activity of every campus event, and the 
achievements of each organizations or college program. A 

This is a chronological index to campus life, student organizations and the results. Whether 
positive or negative the results have caused change. In the decades that have passed the 
foundation of our institution has always been the people involved. Now records of their 
challenges to accomplishments will allow those who follow to build on what we did. 



Acknowledgements 



ACKNOWLEGEMENTS 

It required almost 19 months to acquire the various materials donated to Broward Community 
College. From newspapers to individual organization scrapbooks, the various offices and 
individuals who assisted in this project were tremendous in their efforts to contribute to our 
history. 

All three campuses newspaper offices were the starting point during the summer of 1996. Jerry 
Elam was the key figure for the overall consolidated newspaper collection. His student editors 
continue in his very large footsteps. Ann Chishom his administrative assistant provided so much 
detail from Polaris files on North Campus. Pat Ellingham assisted with the efforts to revive New 
Horizons from South Campus. Max Hall's foresight in the late 1970's provided me with Venetian 
Crier to Phoenix materials of the 1960's and 1970's. So, the fourth estate provided over 26 
volumes of extremely valuable student perspectives in the writing of the decades. 

Next came the three campus Student Activities Offices. Here was everything from Orientation 
flyers to F-Troop scrapbooks. The most valuable collection were the 21 display books located in 
a sealed room in Central Campus, Building 11 that contained the only copies of 1960's and 
1970's copies of Intramural Handbooks, Student Survival Guides, Movie Brochures, Orientation 
detailed maps and systems of campus programs, and those materials that were presented to 
students for 19 years of Student Life programming. Former F-Troop Captain and current 
Hollywood elementary school teacher Mary Waters had to refurbish several due to climate 
damage. Student Life Administrative Assistant Eleanor Myers was especially helpful in the 
identification of many archival works. 

Former Broward Junior College graduate Penny Mclsaacs who served Student Activities for 12 
years on all 3 campus location as well as program director of Camp BCC had been a very active 
member of BJC Greek system and Intramurals donated many books, banners and memorabilia. 



Currently, Penny Mclsaacs serves BCC as the Director of Collegewide Student Program and 
Services. She will be in charge of the materials and how they can be utilized to show the current 
college family what occurred so the future will be better for all who come to Broward Community 
College. 

■i 
As to the manuscript the typing, revisions and development would not have been possible without 
the assistance of Leith Mazzochi who serves as the secretary for Central Campus Social 
Sciences. The work of the organization was on going for 18 months and Leith donated hundreds 
of hours to this cause. 

It was the students in the quest to acquire an education that really provided the thoughts, words 
and decades that inspired this collection. Without their constant presence, efforts to be all they 
culd be, and the challenges that they provided to the faculty, staff or administration there would 
be no History of the Perspectives of Students at the Junior College of Broward Contv or Broward 
Community College, 1960 to 1998 . 

This book is dedicated to all those faculty members, support staff and college administrators who 
donated the countless hours of volunteer time and personal resources to give our students every 
chance. 



Student Activities 

Board 



) 



) 



THE STUDENT ACTIVITIES BOARD 

A organization for the Junior College of Broward County that would account for student activities, events, 
organizations that related to either extra curricular activities, classroom activities, or business activities. The 
original Student Activities Board was made up of predominantly 2 administrators, 3 faculty members and 2 

A 

students. The initial board though, usually had 5 people mostly administrators and faculty as students received 
the appointments through the Student Government Association where there was a constant debate over who 
should represent the money that was always the issue with SGA. Ex-official officers included Nan Hutchinson 
and Jack Taylor, Dean of Women and Dean of Men, as well as the executive secretary, Director of Student 
Activities Neil Crispo. The members that made up the board were selected annually and with President Dr. Joe 
Rushing's approval. The Student Activities Board initially was to be the budget organization for all extra curricular 
events at the new college in Broward County. While at the Naval Air Barracks, several events that ranged from 
visionary events like intramurals to spectator events like piano concerts or recitals by classical artists and even a 
folk singer were paid for by the Student Activities Board. 

The funding of the board came out of the general operating fund in the early years amounting to less than 1 and 
1/2 percent of the budget was allocated towards the Social Science of the JCBC. Various student organizations 
whether service or academic as well as the student government association, athletics and journalism came before 
the board where appeals for the budgets usually in February of each had deliberations in March. 

The beginning board for the first decade of the 60's also served as a monthly tribunal to judge and establish the 
various local events used by organizations with co sponsored SAB money to attract students in a recruitment 
mode to their particular organization. This started to cause the first dissension in the students as they saw this 
board as above that of the student government and other committees that they had been asked to serve on or at 
least to consult with even if they were not allowed to have a vote. Student representation on the board was a 
must, both for accountability and credibility the appearance of a student or two at the board meetings voting on 
both the weekly or monthly events as well as the yearly budget gave the Student Activities Board a much greater 
status in the eyes of the students. 



") 



*) 



The move to the new campus in Davie brought increased power to the Student Activities Board in addition to 
activities there were various matters of protocol, decorum, conduct and attitude that were discussed by the 
Student Activities Board to what was proper, what chaperones were needed, where is the event was going to be 
held, and why was it going to be off campus if it was paid for by monies from the operating budget of the college. 

A 

What were the actual cost/charge during this event where all students related were the people coming to the 
events. Non-students as dates was a concept that asked if this was the right way to use college money. Then the 
arguments between the different cost centers arose with athletics trying to grow and develop teams that were 
responsive to the high schools in the county as well as become a spectator activity as well as a participator 
activity. Athletics saw money in intramurals as just play money. Athletics objected greatly to the large amount of 
entertainment money in the new lyceum series, that established two or three major concerts or speeches during 
entire year. 

Everyone started to look at everyone else's budgets. Everyone else started to look at everyone else's events for 
the number of people attending and the success. By the mid 60', the SGA raised another issue "why didn't they 
the students have control of all the funds like the university students did in their SGA" this caused the Student 
Activities Board to make sure that students were on the board and participating in the debates voting on the 
actual expenditures. There was more accountability than creditability as students were starting to say "well, it's 
our money we paid our tuition" the Student Activities Board debates were mostly engineered by the Executive 
Secretary Neil Crispo who constantly played the Devil's Advocate was always asking "well, what if it was done a 
different way", "why couldn't this be shared by others" and "who was responsible for the outcome." Dr. Crispo as 
the decade went on would become famous for his one sentence memos that constantly challenged every advisor 
and every student president to see that every penny was accounted for. The secretaries Marge Smith and Joyce 
Lane kept an accurate set of minutes which were allowed accessibility to all students. 

The student government continued to debate the issue of the Student Activities Board. It was the Venetian Crier 
that raised most of the concern calling the Student Activities Board mysterious, invisible and unknown guardians 
of all the students extra curricular funding. The Venetian Crier listed budgets, for everyone's scrutiny and then 



attacked in their editorials the points that they found to be challenging. The initial rival was between newspaper 
) and student government came because of the newspaper challenging the Student Activities Board funding of the 
student government association giving that student government association power to recognize and later to 
register student organizations which was a little bit beyond the idea and realm of budgetary operations. 

A 

The faculty saw the funds for extra curricular activities as a fat cow one that they could be cut up to develop their 
academic or quasi academic programs. The faculty formed their own student academic clubs either for service, or 
social or study aspects and then ask for funding for different events that ranged from bringing in international 
known speakers to serving punch and cookies at a discussion of poetry. It was the beginning of a massive 
change in the late 60's, I was a member for 2 years of the student activities board before I was elected chairman 
of that board. At first I thought it was an honor and then I realized the cat birth seat was not the one that you 
wanted to be in when the students got hostile. In the late 60's, the fraternities and sororities raised a tempo of 
student life on campus about five notches and there was serious confrontations, disagreements and arguments 
about funding and where the monies went. 



") 



} 



The Lyceum program that had been the mainstream of spending the majority of the capital, normally between 
thirty-six and thirty-eight thousand dollars was a target for athletics, journalism, student organizations, and 
especially the faculty. People counted heads at the events to see how many people were watching the Four 
Freshmen, how many people were listening to Al Capp, how many people showed up to see "Blood Sweat and 
Tears", or why was Dionne Warwick not singing and just talking to the audience. From Roberta Peters to various 
cultural entertainment, the faculty said "that's part of education". The student organization said "why can't we 
have a Christmas dance, why can't we have a prom, why can't we have bonfires, why can't we have what they 
have in high school. Here a major issue developed the students have been copying things that they learned in 
high school? The faculty were trying to push the cultural aspects of a college, perhaps Ivy League, or just perhaps 
a rural college away from all other source of entertainment on the students of JCBC which soon became Broward 
Junior College. In the late 60's, the debates increased and so did the size of the Student Activities Board that was 
listed as one of the standing thirteen committees of the college. The membership of the board was increased to 
six students and nine faculty members, which pleased the faculty who felt that they would always have a majority. 



The students were pleased they had tripled the number of representatives on the Student Activities Board, but 
) what neither side realized is that people would not show for meetings, not be consistent in their investigations and 
their voting, and here became the beginning of the rub of the 1970's. 



The student government in the 1970's launched a new wave of "why cant we control the money like the 
universities do"? The Student Activities Board felt that a professional should be in charge of the funding and 
because the SGA normally had the quickest turn over of people representing the student body the SAB felt that it 
was inappropriate for that body to have control of the funding for major events, major cost numbers, and even the 
co-sponsored events of the fraternities, sororities, service clubs, and quasi academic groups. Remaining at one 
and a half percent of the overall budget of the college, the Student Activities Board just could not slice the funding 
pie thin enough to meet all the needs by the mid 70's. Budget disagreement found itself in the newspapers the 
Phoenix on Central Campus, Polaris on North Campus and later New Horizons were constantly criticizing the fact 
that they would be told to go out and raise their own funding through selling of advertisements. The athletes and 
especially their coaches constantly were told "well why don't you charge admission for your events, people will 
pay to come and see you." Well, the attendance at the athletic events by the mid 70's had dropped off 
considerably with the high school spirit of the 60's like the bonfires, the cheerleaders, and the sock hops were 
gone and with their departure the number of peoples attending the athletic events dwindled to less than a 
hundred. The athletic administration retorted that it would cost more to collect the actual cost of admission than 
would be worth it so lets make it all free "open access". This developed the wrong perception, students 
considered anything free as not worth while and the decline of spectator sports further increased at Broward 
Junior College in the mid 70's. 



3 



) 



The cultural areas of the college were ready to start a Cultural Affairs program that was in the type where the 
faculty were trying to ask for more money. The faculty wrote letters to the editor complaining bitterly at faculty 
meetings and took to task the Association of American University Professors in saying "why can't we have the 
money, why don't we have it for different events, where are we going with these activities" or "we're leaving 
academia behind because we're not spending enough money on cultural affairs." Students weren't attending the 
cultural affairs, whether they were recitals set up by the faculty which were wonderful, but they were attended by 



) 



^ 



~) 



large segments of the community. The students' arguments were basic "why should we be paying for the 
community to attend an event on our campus, why should we use the little bit of funds that we have to put things 
others can see it, what's going to happen to our entertainment, or where are our extra curricular activities"? 

The Student Activities Board in the late 70's were involved in such a conflict of interest it was amazing that 

.A 

anything was accomplished. The Student Activities Board made up still of the faculty members, some 
administrators and the six students now were made up of saw students and faculty members who were in specific 
organizations whether they were advisors to those organizations, or whether a coach, an athletic director, a writer 
for student newspaper, or a member of the student government that was also a funded area, All became 
members of the Student Activities Board. Over and over the thoughts were projected, is this a conflict of interest, 
is this fair to the student body as a whole, is this fair to the organizations that are not represented. The faculty 
raised the issue first, they said the Art Lyceum Program was being eliminated and the Friday afternoon recitals no 
longer were funded by the Student Activities Board. They saw a need for a change and demanded. You can't 
demand of students so the student press picked it up. The Phoenix, Polaris and the new paper from South 
Campus New Horizons picked up the challenge and said "it's our money, we paid the tuition, the reason that we 
have an institution here is because we the students are going to be educated and served, why should the faculty 
control the money". 

The Student Activities Board had reached a new horizon, by the end of the 1970's they were starting to eliminate 
cost centers. Budget freezes started to occur in some cases as early as April in the year and as the 19 80's came 
on, there was a decline of student enrollment so the percent of money allocated was cut back so drastic that there 
was a budget freeze. In one year in the 1980's in December, which meant that those activities you planned for the 
rest of the year were gone. We knew the difference and understood, but we were sorry you are not going to get 
the money for the students. Trouble began in the 1980's as several organizations tried to increase their 
membership. The numbers on the Student Activities Board were lobbied for additional votes garnishing everyone 
that they could get. The new tactics made the executive director or should I say the executive secretary who was 
Director of Student Activities change his way because of the change in Student Affairs. The Director of Student 
Activities became known as the Director of Student Life who instead of looking at fun and games, concerts, 



n 



) 



entertainment now saw services being considered so the first activities started to be cut and replaced with new 
cost centers in the 1980's. New cost centers to serve the students from new Student Orientation to Leadership 
Retreats developed the new concept of the 80's that we would have to build a more complete program that our 
students if they were to be educated would be able to be part of the 1980's. 

■A 

The major change of the 1970's was the philosophy of the student activities board which no longer controlled 
every event. The SAB supported the executive secretary, the Director of Student Activities as the cost center 
administrator for the various overall student funds. The Hospitality Center programs were now suppose to contain 
the co-sponsored events, the college-wide student entertainment program, the individual campus intramural 
programs, new student orientation, leadership retreats, and some travel money put aside for organizations to 
attend statewide and national conventions. This would be the main issue of the late 1970's "what do you mean 
we send 5 Phi Delta Kappa's to a leadership conference, why do the newspaper editors have to go to San 
Francisco for the national publication conference, why are certain students receiving this money to travel and the 
rest not"? The concept of sharing ideas at the state and national conventions and conferences was suppose to 
better the various activities, events and organizations on the different campuses of Broward Junior College that 
soon would be changed to Broward Community College. The Director of Student Activities would soon change 
his name or at least title to Director of Student Life. 



For fourteen and a half year, I served as that director and in capacity of the executive secretary of the student 
activities board I saw the change from SAB meetings sometimes twice monthly to the SAB meeting once during 
the first semester to organize, once during the second semester to receive proposals and set the ground rules for 
budgetary debates and then once maybe to debate, argue, and set up a new budget for the next year. The 
chairman now became the spokesperson and accompanied the Director of Student Life to confer with the Vice- 
President of Student Affairs to recommend to him the student activities board budget for the following year to 
president and the Board of Trustees for approval. Another layer of approval was established, but no longer the 
detailed looks at co-sponsored events money, funding a particular trip, sponsoring a dance for an organization on 
Halloween. 



~) 



The philosophy of the SAB had evolved from that of total control with the end of "loco perentis" that saw the 
Student Activities Board become strictly a budgetary advisory board to the Vice-President of Student Affairs. The 
executive secretary, Director of Student Life became responsible for the various cost centers that took over or 
benefited not only the student organizations and their members, but the total student body. It created an entirely 
new debate between the newspapers and student governments. The newspapers definitely carried the most clout 
as the pen was mightier than the sword. Questionable in the 60's, debatable in the 70's now the newspapers took 
over, as the fourth estate became the ombudsman of the student mind. The student newspapers became the 
conscience of the student body. 

In the 1980's, we saw fewer student organizations, less student pressures for issues and concerns and more 
"Well, I gotta go to work", "I'll see you at the beach", "I don't wanna come back", ":no I'm not coming back to that 
baseball game" or "What do you mean a dance on campus, they don't allow alcohol". It would require a change of 
philosophy again in the 80's as the students apathy and a lackadaisical approach took over most of the interest in 
the student activities board, powers, control of funding, no longer seen as the invisible empire, no longer was 
considered the controlling force of behavior, no longer looked upon as the spear of the administration. Everything 
now fell onto the shoulders of their executive secretary, the Director of Student Life. 

The 80's came to a close with the SAB funding ;more and more students services looking to help everything from 
student recruitment to the actual beginning of college preparatory assistance with tutors and the idea of 
developing different laboratories. The SAB would be approached for everything from cardiovascular machinery in 
the wellness center to actual computers to be used by the art department to develop commercial art ventures. 
Capital outlay became an issue of the late 80's, Tigertail Lake became one of those pet projects and looked upon 
each sailboat that use to cost $1 ,800.00 that was now over $3,000.00. People were now saying "who will really 
uses that" so more and more students from the sailing club, Intramural sailing on Saturdays, and the community 
service organizations that used the equipment said "We do". Classes decreased, so various and new uses 
including a proposed challenge ropes course leadership training facility. The college saw leadership training (as a 
continuation of) the education of students with responsibility and values clarification. So orientations and 
leadership seminars took on a new role of importance. Bands and novelty acts had replaced the three major 



( 



( 



concerts of the 60's that started to disappear in the 70's, but in the 80's became a rarity for the SAB shifted their 
focus to the development of the students, their well being, and what their future could be changed to. Nobody 
imagined that the decade of the 90's, the decade of challenge, would bring to the SAB a whole new role from 
setting up and building student recreation centers on each campus to constructing child care centers to take care 
of the offspring's of students attending classes on the campus. 



Athletics in the 90's would disappear at first with consolidation so there would be only one team for the entire 
college rather than one team per campus. The 80's did that, but then in the 90's as the insurance problems and 
the cost factor of insurance became obvious to the SAB they reduced the amount money for athletics. The only 
thing to do was either cut all the budgets or eliminate a few individual sports which they considered to be 
nonessential. The primary word would be non sanction sports that meant they competed against upper division 
colleges or had to travel out of state and that would be ridiculous. 'The biggest bang for the biggest buck" or "the 
biggest bang for every buck" caused SAB to raise the student activities fees. In the 1980's what made the SAB 
was that the general fund of the college, but after 1986 the SAB no longer funded the student extra curricular 
events, activities, teams, organizations, travel, leadership, orientation etc. What came to be in the 1980's was at 
first a fifty cents a credit hour fee which brought in almost a million dollars in revenue or six times larger than the 
amount of money that the SAB had ever been responsible for. They felt like the SAB was millionaires but of 
course the faculty, organizations and students who realized it was their dollars that were listed as student 
activities fees. So they started to ask for more accountability, performance, and credibility in the operations and 
voiced what was to be offered on the campus. The SAB reluctantly listened to longer debates, more 
organizations, the establishment of new literary magazines that some would be read by only the writers and the 
3,000 copies left in the cafeteria for disposal. A special interest was in the late 1980's again with the conflict of 
issue that brought up "why is the advisor of the newspaper making motions to pass his own budgets" or "how 
come the advisor of student government is asking for a $15,000.00 increase on North Campus while the other two 
campuses are not asking anything", "where is the justice in taking care of 189 athletes for a cost of over 
$109,000.00 including scholarships and intramural that has over 5,000 athletes has less than $12,000.00." 



) 



8 






( 



( 



The SAB scratched their heads when they were entering the 1990's. They were now caught between the college- 
wide administration that looked for the development of policies and the campus based organizations that were 
emphasizing and pushing for procedures. A new set of players entered the arena for the SAB where a college 
officer would put his person on the board for three to seven years while the campus people still tried to maintain a 
rotation basis and bring new life in every year with different faculty members and students. It was obvious that 
the 1990's would belong to the strong. It was obvious also that the student activities fees would have to be 
increased, so it was raised from fifty cents an hour to $1.50 an hour, not the highest in the state of Florida for 
Jacksonville had that with $4.00 a credit hour. What were they doing in the SAB's were they paying salaries? We 
were told in the 1980's that we were not to have funding for any salaries for that would open up to would to all the 
faculty as well as some of the administrators who were looking for part-time and full-time positions. We were told 
we were not suppose to do any building or any capital outlay yet where contingency plan was set up to establish a 
building fund that was one that would draw interest which grew in size so that student unions could be established 
on each campus. 

BCC with a heavy commuter influence saw people spending less and less time on campus which meant they took 
fewer credit hours with the average was down to about six credit hours. The 53% of the students came at night 
time, they were all charged a student activities fees and the fees were raised again in the 1990's. This time to 
three dollars a credit hour, now someone taking a twelve hour load was going to have to pay thirty six dollars, 
thirty six dollars or three dollars for each of his twelve credit hours. Other things were added in the 1990's 
including a student scholarship fee that was assessed to everyone to help cover the cost of not just only the 
student athletes, but the needy students as federal funding was cut back again. Then a Technology Enhancement 
Fund (TEF) was established with the faculty taking this over both on a campus and a college-wide basis to see 
that the students got computers. The first computers, of course, went in the faculty offices then the next ones 
went in the libraries and learning resources so the students would have the opportunity to practice their computer 
science or literacy that would be so required of them in every occupation in the next century. 



) 



The efforts of the SAB to fairly balance out the budgets was questioned every which way after the early 90's. 
People not attending were pointed at and it was said, "well, they just didn't care" or "they don't know how 



( 



1 



( 



( 



) 



important this really is" but the usual thing was most of the student body didn't know where or what their money 
was going for. The Observer published one of two stories about the budget especially when it affected their cost 
center budget which now had grown in size because they had consolidated three newspapers into one, they have 
gotten their desk top publishing, but they were still bringing in tens of thousands of dollars in advertising revenue 
so they were becoming a large fundraising source, so why shouldn't they criticize. The SAB in the mid 1990's 
saw themselves controlled by the administration. The administration started to put more and more demands for 
campus improvements to change the life of the non-traditional students, the adult learner, the single parent, the 
person coming back for re-training, the judicial offender, the person who was there just to develop a certificate 
with eight months of training, or maybe just to refresh with a course or two. 

The bulk of the student body became less interested in what was going on for they were less informed. Signs that 
had been used in the 1980's to say "this is your student event, paid for by your student activities" was no longer 
necessary. There were fewer "get together" days held except for a welcome back cookout every semester, but the 
dances disappeared that had been monthly. The intramurals were cut back that had the largest group of students 
that were not aligned to any one organization participating on campus. New concepts were designed in the mid 
1990's, ones that would take care of the minority or cultural diversity. Students at a commuter base institution 
don't really take full advantage of the their services, activities, and events offered to them. As a result, student 
activities fees were something that they should know about was taken for granted, "It's just another tax on my 
schedule, it's not really serious, or it's just for something else I don't know what it is." 

The checks and balances set up by the concept of the SAB over the decades in the 60's, 70's 80's and 90's at 
JCBC, BJC & BCC made the students aware that they did have a source of funding to take care of extracurricular 
activities or needs. The interesting thing about it was that it affected the people outside the college more than the 
people inside the college. People in the community recognized the black community whose African American 
Student Union put on co-sponsored events inviting the community to the college in February that definitely made 
an impact. The same for international week from the Hispanic community to those of the Italian Americans, or to 
those Orientals, they saw events being put on for their culture whether it be culinary presentations or just showing 
static media displays. The SAB was an institution for all reasons, for the fair way it heard the voices of students, 

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faculty, and administrators and coming to a consensus or coming to form a budgetary proposal of what was best 
for the whole student. The debates would range about other concerns from the president of the institution taking 
over control of the SAB fees to the money being sub-divided into the different ten or eleven curricular areas so the 
faculty could administer it to, of course, the age old debate that the student government really should have the 
money because "aren't they the ones in charge of the students? Well they weren't, student government by the 

A 

90's even on the university campuses was not even an ombudsman, let alone the representative of the student 
body. SGA was a spokesman but the SAB membership continued to have the most vocal students they could 
find. The Director of Student Life took it upon himself to find those who could best debate the issues of need of 
the faculty and the administrators. 

The students placed on the SAB could instigate, investigate, or reform to change the philosophy, programs, and 
even procedures of student activities. The budget request sheets were changed for the first time people were 
asked to do self-evaluations of how many attended and what the activity was worth. It was the quantitative and 
qualitative approach. New Horizons in the late 1990's will include student union buildings built by state money 
probably with enough furniture and recreation equipment to satisfy the needs of a multi-cultural student body. The 
questions will include: What kind of events will be put on campus, what will be the cost, who will decide what they 
will be, will it be campus student life coordinators, will it be a new type of student advisory board to the campus 
dean of students, will the SAB become decentralized, why not have three separate student activities amounts 
based on what each campus student enrollment takes in for their revenue, or why have college-wide functioning 
when the emphasis has been on campus based management in the 1990's. 

The mid 1990's had seen campus based management and college-wide policy makers start territorial fights over 
financing pet projects and the student activities fee always a target had become a source of constant debate. The 
1990's will see an increase in student activities fees. The late 1990's fee will have to go up because now they are 
paying for all of the student life positions something that the college have always funded before with coordinators, 
directors and secretaries, renovations, not just to game areas, but to places where clubs can meet, where the 
newspaper will function, and soon child care centers will allow students of different ages to come to the campus 
day and night leaving their offspring in a place of safe environment so they can pursue their education. Is this the 

11 



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new mission of the SAB? Are we going back to student services that use to be a standing committee of the 
college that was eliminated in the 1980's? What will happen to the personal development centers, will there be 
counselors, who is going to do the advising, will everything be automated, is registration going to take on a new 
meaning a one-stop procedure instead of being spread out. We asked for the computers to be up dated in the 
1970's, they are still using basically the same system. Will this be another cost for the SAB? 

Who knows there seems to be no limit but the board has changed, in the 60's it was a controlling factor of all 
student life on campus, in the 1970's it started to become the supporting or advisory board to a director who 
would be responsible for the cost centers, and seeing that everyone got a share. In the 1980's the SAB saw the 
elements of service enter and began to try to take care of everything, but couldn't fortunately with the budgetary 
situation at the college the end of the operation funds being used for extracurricular events. The beginning 
activities fee brought a whole new kitty of money that would allow multi areas with multiple controversies from 
college and campus based sources. Repeated surveys showed the students didn't know where student life was, 
that there was a Tigertail Lake, or they didn't know what activities were sponsored so they started to create 
handbooks, calendars and brochures. Students looked at attractive announcements, but that's not a repetitive 
habit, students quickly dropped the reading of bulletin board material, flyers, brochures so a new type of 
document has to be issued in the form of a multi-purpose handbook with both calendar, directional signals, help 
and something the student gets for nothing. The student pays at least $3.00 a credit hour that will go up in the 
future and has to become more aware of this because currently he is not. The 90's will bring far more changes 
than the 60's ever imagined, but in fact it's going to be the main trust of the SAB to meet those changes, to see 
those challenges, to take advantage of opportunities never before presented to them. 



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Student Activities 

Board 



") 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES BOARD 

In 1962 there were 3 students selected by President of SGA, Maria Harris, Student of the Month and Student 
Assistant; Rus Burkhardt, Circle K, Editor Venetian Crier; and Jack Hartfiled, Jabees as members of SAB met 
weekly to coordinate activities. 

In 1963 students Pat Antones and Jeff Talbert, Jabees 2nd VP helped the Board to coordinate campus student 
activities, make regulations, discourage conduct not conducive to campus activities, and enforce regulations. 

In 1964 the SAB (3 students) included: next year's SGA President Frank Gilday; Circle K, George Meir; and 
Sophomore Sue Ann Mitchell 

In 1965 funds for publications, Lyceum, Art show and student organizations were decided by Faculty member 
and students, Editor Venetian Crier, Sid Pactor and Deanna Bayer. 

SAB was the powerful activities programming source responsible only to College President. 

First, the SAB enforced rules and regulations of all clubs and organizations. 

Second, the SAB screened all requests for new clubs or organizations. 

Third, the SAB monitored all student social events, activities, dances, Lyceum programs, contests, 
benefits and petitions for advanced approval for each event. 

Fourth, the SAB budget controlled the $15.00 student activity fee for full-time students. 

October 15, 1965 

SAB welcomed suggestions for student entertainment and enlightenment which would improve the quality 
of its offerings and expand the scope of its influence. 



October 16, 1965 

SAB served best interest of the college with five faculty appointed by the College President along with four 
students that were recommended by Student Government Association. The SAB had two purposes: a 
proposed budget to College President and screening all requests for new organizations' consideration. 

February 4, 1966 

A total of $79,000.00 collected in Activities Fees from the $15.00 activities fee paid by each full-time 
student for each semester was appropriated by the SAB. The 1965-1966 estimated total of $79,000.00 was 
appropriated in accordance to the needs and expenditures of the various activities or publications provided 
free of charge to the student body. This student fund was the only internal fund over which the student 
body had any control. The control was in the hands of the four students and five faculty who comprised the 
Student Activities Board. 



The 1965-1966 appropriations were made as follows: 
The Lyceum Programs - $12,500.00; 
Quarterly magazine, Silver Sands - $12,300.00; 
SGA- $12,000.00; 

All intercollegiate athletic teams including cheerleaders, uniforms and traveling expenses - $12,485.00; 
Venetian Crier- $6,700.00; 
Fine Arts productions - $2,000.00; 
Orientation - $2,500.00; 
Faculty-student receptions - $600.00; 

Art Lyceum that has art exhibits and faculty music recitals - $1 ,000.00; 
Instrumental Music- $1,300.00; 
Student Handbook - $1 ,000.00; 
Pan Ku- $1,200.00; 
FJC SGA Dues - $700.00 
Annual College Recognition Night - $400.00; 



Intramurals - $2,800.00; 

Forensic League - $200.00; 

Pan Ku Hour of literary discussion - $250.00. 

Two new SAB funded activities for 1965-1966 were on campus movies and club travel funds for advisors 
where SAB would match the academic departments for the cost of faculty to accompany students on trips. 
There were two end of the year recognition nights: one, an athletic banquet and the other, a scholarship 
night. 

At present, all funds went through the business office, but next year's proposal calls for these funds to go 
through the Director of Student Activities Neil Crispo's office for disposition. This permitted closer 
supervision and more effective utilization of Student Activities funds in giving an up-to-the-minute 
accounting. 

February 25, 1966 

The Mysterious SAB Poll uncovered by Dr. Dorothy Leach, faculty member on the SAB commented that 
many students and faculty members do not understand the functions and role of SAB. The board had vital 
services to perform for the college as a whole, and she welcomed the opportunity to increase "student 
awareness". A mysterious all powerful body referred to by many students and "they", the SAB was to 
"coordinate and assist campus student activities . . . and encourage wholesome group activity and 
discourage conduct which would be incompatible with . . . well being of the student". 

In reality, the board was the liaison between the President of the College and all student organizations, 
clubs, activities etc. The Board spoke for the President and all decisions of the former were final, subject to 
the veto of the President only. Voting members of the SAB were four students and five faculty members. 
Members in 1966 were Dr. Dorothy Leach, Miss Elaine Gavigan, Harry Schalemann, Leon Watts, Ronald 
Haire (elected chairman of the SAB), Jaime Hancock, Tery Van Der Helden and Matt Faison while Dr. 
Harvey Oates, Dean of Administration and Neil L. Crispo, Director of Student Activities were ex-officio with 
no vote. 



February 25, 1966 

As Director of Student Activities and Executive Secretary of the SAB, it was Crispo's duty to bring all club, 
athletic and department requests before the board. All departments, activities, etc. had to fill out a Student 
Activities Budget request that was received by the Director and presented to the SAB. Resolutions, bills, 
recommendations and petitions from SGA were also presented to the board by Crispo. 

Student members of the board were officially appointed by the President of the College upon 
recommendation by SGA. Faculty members were invited by the Director of Student Activities. Although 
the voting ratio was five to four in favor of faculty, Dr. Joe Rushing explored the possibility of alternating 
years for student dominance. 

The fact that only three students were now serving on the board when there was room for four deprived the 
students of adequate representation. According to Crispo "the fact that SGA has failed to fill the 
appointments on the board places the future possibility of student domination in jeopardy". Both student 
and faculty members were to be as devoid of bias and personal prejudice if possible. Those 
recommending or making appointments should not expect political favor or private confidences from the 
members. 



) 



Matt Faison, student member of the SAB said, "an appointment to SAB is probably the most influential 
student-held position on campus. I don't feel that the SAB has reached its full potential this year". All 
business transacted in the meetings was to be publicly displayed expect for certain disciplinary issues 
where only the individuals involved were concerned. 

October 7, 1966 

Main job of SAB's members was to assist Student Activities in keeping with the best interest of the student 
and the college. It also served as a check on the SGA providing the last approval on a bill or resolution 
before it would be officially effective. 



January 27, 1967 

Student representatives Bill Greene, former SGA President, and cheerleader David Fitzgerald gave up 

their seats as they were no longer JCBC students. 
March 10, 1967 

A 

The Student Activities Baord (SAB) coordinates and assists campus student activities. It is responsible for 
the regulations of all student social events, approved student organizations, and recommends a budget to 
Dr. Blee from the Students' Activities fee. 

March 17, 1967 

Doreen McGoldrick, secretary to Dr. Harold Hayes, Director of Student Publications and Services as well as 
the Petition and Prom Committee has been appointed to Vacant SAB Seat by SGA. 

March 23, 1967 

Student Activities Fees Budget 1996-1967: Athletics .1942%, Silver Sands .1470%, SGA .1155%, 
Lyceums .1712%, Art Lyceum .0052% ($500.00), Venetian Crier .0892%, ($8, 500. 00), Instrumental Music 
.0189%, Pan Ku .0220%, Department programs .0630%, Handbook .0105%, Reception .0052%, Advisor's 
Traveling Fund .0021%, FJCC Dues .0073%, Capital Outlay .0026%, Retreat & Orientation .0189%, 
Contingency .0112%. The combined percentage added up for this year's total amount of $90,000.00, but 
the low enrollment reduced this amount to $81,000.00. 

February 1, 1974 

SAB eyed Student Activities fees Budget of $126,000.00 that Dr. George Young estimated would take 60 
hours of deliberation for Board appropriation. 

October 15, 1974 

Serious question of separate but equal as North Campus was out voted seven to three by SAB decisions. 
The newspaper Polaris suggested an autonomous budget under the Dean who would have power over 
North Campus Student Affairs, student committees who would evaluate process of multi-campus operation, 
student leaders meetings, and Director of Student Activities. 



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March 28, 1977 

Various organizations voiced need for funds from Student Activities Board for 1977-78 budget 
recommendations to Dr. George Young, Vice President for Student Development. 



April 10, 1987 

The Student Activities Board had $200,000.00 in its budget with questions about South Campus and 
cultural clubs neglected by the SAB. 

April 24, 1987 

The SAB took the 1987-88 recommended budget to BCC's trustees who Director of Student Activities Tom 
Ryan felt supported Student Activities with about 5 times what other colleges received, but Jerry Elam felt it 
was unfair to use Observer revenue funds to support other organizations. 

April 8, 1996 

The SAB budget meeting utilized a random survey to determine the funding ratio for 53 budgeted Student 
Life Activities that accounts were funded by students' $3.00 per hour activities fee. 

SAB utilized Institutional Research survey of 265 students which may not be accurate or true 
representative of over 28,000 students to determine the distribution of money for all Student Life accounts 
for the 1996-1997 school year. 



c 






Student 
Government 
Association 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

At the Junior College of Broward County (JCBC) was designed as a laboratory experience in democracy focusing on how 
the government of the state and nation works. The Student Government Association (SGA) at JCBC. At first, all of the 
students belonged in two class levels, the division between a Freshman Senate and a Sophomore Senate with each 
having the chairperson accepted as an important position on campus in the executive branch that included president, vice 
president, secretary and treasurer. The executive branch system of officers was assigned specific tasks to work with 
functioning committees of the government. At times, work studies and scholarships were assigned to individuals that had 
to produce the paper flow of the functioning of the government. In the 60's, SGA had a great deal of responsibility in the 
recognition and registering of new student organizations, various student events, and of course, their own elections. 

To make sure that things were done in the right manner, the Student Supreme Court was set up with three justices along 
with a Director of Internal Affairs to do investigative work. They decided everything from the students' fate for parking 
tickets to any honor code infraction. The court was more or less an enforcement process for discipline issues rather than 
a measure of checks and balances for legislative acts passed by the Senate. 

The executive branch acted as the spokesperson. The legislative branch, the Senate, carried out most of the activities 
with its various committees that were formed to make things function on campus. In the Naval Air Barracks, they were 
very confined and were lucky to have two tables and a typewriter. When they moved to the Davie campus, the SGA 
found themselves without any real location and were shifted from a desk inside building one's administrative building into 
one of the small cubby hole offices near the Director of Student Activities inside the student center, which is today the 
campus bookstore. The standing committees acted in everything from parliamentary procedure to setting up the student 
social events from the prom, to the Christmas formal and from assisting with the Lyceum program that brought major 
concerts on campus to the actual rallies or special events connected with other organizations on campus. 

The power of the Student Government lied in the fact that it was the first step for approving funds for every type of 

student event. Student Government at that time had elections twice a year with any seats that were left vacant normally 

\ filled by the executive branch. Nominations and what the Senate would approve through the Ways and Means Committee 

which looked at fundraising and was more concerned how to spend funds than to check on funds. At this time with the 



move to the new campus, the mid 1960's saw the Student Government funding its own activities as well as those of the 
\ various service and academic organizations at the college. 

The major controversy that developed in the 1960's was the right for social societies to form at JCBC, A Florida Statue 
stated that there should be no secret societies that would prevent the normal procedures of education to be carried out. It 
was the interpretation of this Statue that caused the most serious controversies and the change in the membership of the 
Student Government in 1964 and 1965. Social Societies were merely local fraternities and sororities that had transferred 
in tact from a particular individual high school to the campus. These societies were not allowed to use their names, 
jerseys, signs or be part of the normal student life on campus. These "make believe" Greeks without any real authority or 
power became the biggest challenge to the Student Government's authority. When denied funds to hold dances and 
social events, money for refreshments for rush functions, the right to help with volunteerism and service acts, the Greeks 
demonstrated hostility toward the Student Government. This hostility manifested into actual Greek slates of candidates 
being nominated for the various executive offices as well as Senate seats in 1964 and 65 which would continue until 
1969. Three of the presidents during that period of time would be members of these illegal social societies. The Dean of 
) Students, Dr. Jack Taylor, would interpret the statue one way while the Greeks interpreted it a different way. Both the 
Venetian Crier, the newspaper, and the Student Government felt that it was their duty to be the "watch dogs" of the 
campus, spreading the word to inform all students that there were such societies on campus. This type of publicity and 
the way they went about it antagonized the Greeks even further. Open conflict began at Senate meetings as Greeks and 
non Greeks argued issues that had no relevance to the college campus and were filibustering to stall any form of 
legislative action that would be more meaningful to either side. The Student Government was maturing. 

The change by the School Board of Broward County and the State of Florida in their interpretation of the Statute 
concerning the social societies brought the recognition of these local Greek fraternities and sororities to the JCBC in 1966 
and 67. The constitution for the Men's Social Society Council (MSSC), Women's Social Society Council (WSSC), and 
Inter Social Society Council (ISSC) was passed and approved by the SGA and the college administration. The Student 
Government felt they were a union, while the Greeks in turn felt, that their organization was a union that should challenge 
the SGA. The newspaper's articles and the various SGA psalms of media handouts in the student center made the 
'Greeks and the Student Government grow further and further apart. During the years that the Greeks dominated the 



Student Government, the non Greeks constantly harangued and bombarded the offices of the Student Government 
^Association. In fact, the Greeks had no right to participate in any type of activity on campus because they belonged to an 
illegal society until the SGA registration and recognition process was complete. 

It was a matter of interpretation, the funding continued to be the Student Government's major weapon and the approval of 
these funds was then directed to the Student Activities Board where the executive secretary, the Director of Student 
Activities would decide whether the event would take place on or off campus, but if it was off campus they would have to 
have chaperones. If a social society had no recognized advisors then the funding was denied. This changed the focus of 
the battle between the social societies away from the Student Government and toward the Director of Student Activities. 
The 1970's brought a more moderate Student Government with elements from every aspect of the student body. Service 
clubs started to disappear with new fraternities and sororities splintering off the old ones increasing their number to 19 in 
1971 . These societies didn't try to control the Student Government, but appealed to them for co-sponsored events money 
and projects that would aid students joining fraternities and sororities as well as students in general on campus. The rule 
went forth if the event would benefit all the students of Broward Junior College. The Greeks went ahead and sponsored 
)the event. It might be the Olympics in the middle of the quadrangle with their unusual tricycle races to their tug-a-wars in 
puddles of mud, special "icebreaker" dances for orientation, to Derby weeks, and other various functions that involved all 
the students. 



Student Government not having the Greeks to fight with any longer now turned within itself for controversy and conflict. 
The various bodies included the executive branch that now numbered 23 people including work studies to do typing for 
different officers. Constantly, the executive branch bickered with the legislative branch which at sometimes numbered as 
many as 50 senators with some at large while some represented certain specific groups on campus. The disputes 
between the two were over what bits of legislation could be interpreted from the constitution to belong to which branch. 
The power of the Supreme Court still continued, but they stayed out of most of the events and activities allowing the 
Director of Internal Affairs (DIA) to investigate all activities to see that they were within the mission of the college and were 
serving the student body. In the early 70's, Robert's Rules of Order became very necessary as the debates in the Senate 
would rage for hours on one single point. Parliamentary procedures were a key to the early 70's with the different 









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presidents (including female and handicapped) were representing all types of students. Everyone had the opportunity to 
)serve as president of SGA in the 1970's. 

The Student Government of the 1970's took upon themselves to take on issues that were bigger than the campus. These 
issues were off campus concerns that affected everything from the politics of the country, the ecology, the social, political, 

A 

economic and cultural scenes. The diversity of these issues caused the end to the real effectiveness of the Senate, 
countless debates wore down the members of the Senate. These filibustering debates drove away capable members. 
The filibuster that the Greeks had once used to change Student Government was now used against the whole concept of 
this laboratory experiment that was suppose to reflect state and national government. Student Government had always 
been active in the beginning of the year running new student orientation along with developing car pooling and book 
exchanges. SGA saw their role change from student entertainment to one of helping their fellow students. Their numbers 
declined and with that decline the executive branch was unable to fill the vacancies in the legislative branch. Student 
Government became less than 20 students for the first time in their existence. Elections were cut back to once a year and 
those were very poorly attended by 1975. 

i 

The Student Government was no longer a representative government, but a voice of student concern on campus. Many 
issues that were raised as student reactions were very lackadaisical. Critics started to say "What are those people talking 
about now"? This attitude caused less respect and the Student Government Association began to lose its contact with its 
constituents. The establishment of a second campus in Pompano brought the need for a second Student Government 
that went the way of a New England town meeting which allowed everyone to voice their opinions at the same time. 
Fortunately with some guidance from counselors, the North Campus Student Government started to resemble the Central 
Campus Student Government with the same basic structure, but also the same basic problem, a lack of interest in 
membership. 

The two Student Governments formed the Student Governing Board for the first time to bring about campus interaction 
and a college-wide event which will be known as the Arts Festival. The mid 70's saw the return of many veterans and 
adult learners to campus who saw the Student Government Association as a joke, as not being meaningful, as failing to 
meet their needs, and never even considering the evening student. By the late 70's, the SGA was fighting for its very 



! 






existence. Elections were postponed to the following term on several occasions which meant that the existing officers 
would have to maintain some type of posture during the summer sessions. This postponement caused a major upheaval 
with resignation after resignation as even the president elect would resign so the vice president elect would move into the 
position, but sometimes resign before they too had the opportunity to hold the elected office. 

The third campus on the airport to the south wanted the same thing that the other two campuses had, but didn't know 
what it was or didn't know how to get it. The constitutions were not exactly the same, but after the addition of a third 
location the constitutions were each clearly separate in their form, style and interpretation. The Student Government 
Board continued to function and now 9 members sat on the board, one from each executive branch, one from each 
legislative branch and supposedly one from the student body at large, but when no one would volunteer then another 
person would be appointed from the campus Senate. 

A desire that had been so famous in the local Student Governments became the nemesis of the SGB by the mid 70's. 
The SGB wanted to become part of the Florida Junior College Student Government Association (FJCSGA). FJCSGA was 
I at that time a party institution where the different SGA's went and had a wild weekend that included film showcases, 
dance showcases, some novelty acts, a headliner performer, and maybe, maybe even a workshop on something like 
Leadership or Parliamentary Procedure. The different style of politicians inside the Student Government Association for 
the state showed the Broward students a new perspective of what Student Governments were suppose to be 
accomplishing. After our first elected representative Judy Shank, FJCSGA State Treasurer was tossed out Broward 
Junior College ceased to have very much interest in FJCSGA. The students on the campus had very little interest in the 
Student Government Association, but the SGA continued to cause skirmishes on each campus with ego trips, personal 
characteristics, lobbying, and some real interesting characteristics developed in each SGA. The effort to join the National 
Lobby of Students didn't succeed the first attempt. Then a special delegation from all 3 SGA's was sent to Nassau to 
work with the local community college. Trying to share some light on how they operated, the students had a great 
weekend at the beach. The students from the Bahamian College joined them and the administrators sat around saying 
"Why are we here?" 

| 1980 was a very bad year for Student Government, on Central Campus where Student Government had started, several 
incidents with illegal substance and activities took place in the Student Government offices located in the new cafeteria, 

5 



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Building 19 where the current Personal Development Center is located and camp BCC operates. Dr. Willis Holcombe, the 
Provost, Academic Dean, Dr. Larry MacFarlane, and Student Dean, Mrs. Kitty Tymeson threw the Student Government 
out of their offices because of their behavior which was to put it bluntly, very poor. Their on campus conduct violated rules 
and procedures as well as decency. 



On North Campus, something even more bizarre occurred, the student newspaper, Polaris, had been writing editorials for 
two years that there was no interest in Student Government. SGA was a waste of time as were the funds given SGA as a 
college funded organization. The Polaris called for their abolishment and when that was not successful, the Polaris 
decided on a plan in the Fall of 1980 to run a fictitious character that was actually a pet dog by the name of Roger Brown. 
The Polaris Editors had acquired a social security card so Scot Luft and Wynn Maxwell were able to register Roger Brown 
as a student taking 12 hours in the Fall/Spring. The constitution on North Campus allowed freshmen to run for the office 
of president, it was like "the world turned upside down" when Roger Brown, the dog, won the election as president by 66 
votes. This caused the Dean of Students Leonard Bryant to abolish the Student Government on North Campus for their 
lack of interest in what was suppose to be the purpose and mission of the SGA and the college. 

) 

On South Campus, a difference of events occurred as the student president attempted to make several out of state trips 
to lobby for SGA. This tacked several expensive bills for travel onto the SGA budget that caused the administration to 
abolish that branch of the SGA. Dr. George Young, the Vice President of Student Affairs, saw a need to re-group, to allow 
some of the people who had taken control of the different Student Governments to migrate out. Dr. Young declared a two 
year moratorium on SGA to allow the turnover and bring in a new crop of students that could represent students. Maybe 
not in the same form of Student Government, but still one able to present an image of representation. 

The return of Student Government in the 1983 was a complete rebirth with no tradition, background, leadership, or 
development skills, so each campus started an organization they felt was representative. On Central Campus, the 80's 
saw the beginning of the Student Union that served more as a high school style student council where there was a 
representative from each student organization on campus. The Student Union Organizations numbered over 30, but only 
17 were active. These students saw the need for the rest of the student body to be involved. A monthly meeting called 
! the gripe session in the cafeteria was to let the students express their feelings about their various problems. 



r 



Meanwhile on North Campus, democracy flourished in the style of the New England Town Meeting with revolving 
chairpersons to attempt to remove the egos of student leaders. The North Campus democracy was called "the Syndicate" 
where everyone had the right to speak. Unfortunately, they did it at the same time. 

-A 

South Campus though took even a different approach, not as effective as the other two, because of the lack of numbers 
interested. South resembled a monarchy with one or two person rule. This of course didn't help the situation of 
establishing a representative government. 

The intensity of the development program after 1986 definitely put the emphasis on leadership rather than a 
representative type of government. The Competitive Edge Presidential Leaders were established to recognized 12 to 20 
students from all walks of life on all campuses to develop them into a sense of bridging to the community. The President, 
Dr. Willis Holcombe would use these students as his ambassadors. They would first all shadow the actual college and 
campus administrators to learn their styles of leadership and see what was the best way to develop their own. Then these 
1 student leaders would spend some time in local community, government, civic, or business, to learn the leadership style 
of people who were successful and varied. The Competitive Edge student leaders would actually put on their own 
leadership retreats teaching other students what they had learned and how they felt their styles impacted at the college. 
After that one week in Tallahassee, in the office of a state senator or state representative as an intern where the student 
learned the workings not only of the office, but the leadership style of the individual legislator. This allowed them to see 
the workings of government and rewarded their hard work through year by giving them the opportunity to meet those who 
could help them. The end of the year saw the Competitive Edge Presidential Leaders spend two weeks in Washington in 
the office of a US senator or a US representative to develop their leadership skills to the very top. 

The 1980's came to a close with the emphasis on leadership. The impact on the campus was that we have great students 
and there they are. The mainstream of the student population went by as if the student leadership, the Student 
Government and student organizations were just those kids over there playing, taking care of themselves. The majority of 
Broward Community College's students didn't have time to do that, they had to go to work 30 hours per week or were are 
over 35 years so they didn't really fit in that development program. These Adult Learners complained, there is no one 



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here at nighttime from Student Activities to the counseling program, everything is empty. Well, the 1990's would bring 
some changes with the idea the Student Government would pose as a retention ring along with different organizations 
that would reach out. "Get together days" with welcome back cookouts where organizations would be able to show off 
what their organizations were accomplishing and trying to do as an organization whether it be athletic, academic, cultural, 
social service. The emphasis went from SGA to all organizations, but when SGA took part in these activities, SGA was no 
longer considered the governing body. SGA no longer approved funds. SGA no longer said which event or activity would 
go on campus. Those duties had been turned over completely to the Director of Student Activities now called the Director 
of Student Life along with the Student Activities Board which for the most haven't changed since the 1960's as the 
representative of all aspects of the college family. The 1990's saw Student Government try to reenact the Student 
Governing Board, a union between the various different campus organizations called SGA. 

The highlight of the 90's were two consecutive FJCSGA presidents from BCC Jenny Kampanis and Kimara Marsh in 
1995, 96 and 97. It made BCC feel like they lasted the year and we're in control, maybe we should belong to FJCSGA. 
All the answers weren't in and there were still a lot of questions about what was suppose the role of FJCSGA. In 1993- 
1994, FJCSGA made one of their two annual conventions strictly a leadership development weekend in which they 
exchanged ideas with different colleges on how to achieve certain points. FJCSGA changed quite a bit, it had changed 
into development, and actually building student leaders for the entire state. 

What goes around, comes around, Student Government in the 1990's has taken a far more active role on the campus. 
SGA serves on everything from the Campus Advisory Committees that the provosts established for campus beautification 
to actually being voting members of all nine standing committees of the college. The heavy role comes on the Student 
Activities Board where now Student Government members can say they are taking part in construction of a budget and 
that does make things different, and they do have power. Well it's empowerment, not power. Student Governments are 
still very small with advisors on each campus that try to identify themselves with a little separate flair, on North a spring 
festival was put on, on Central they tried another book exchange, on South they looked upon the student luncheons as a 
cultural gathering, each one had their own identity and each one became different in the way that they operated. Today's 
Student Government has some outstanding student leaders and the luncheons continue to be a pipeline directly to the 



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campus and college administrators. The leadership program continues with more seminars and on-campus type activities 
so as to develop a wider base of students involved in the programs. 

Tomorrow's Student Government is going to have to change as the challenges of the 90's finds them going back to the 
"meism" of the 70's. Resume building, and the co-curricular transcript will state organizations, offices, service learning, 
and volunteerism, that will inform what the students did and this is going to give a little new meaning to SGA. It will never 
be like the universities, because the students do not stay at BCC that long. The best you can hope for is 8 months for the 
average student being at one community college location. Unfortunately, the turnover rate doesn't let them complete the 
project that they try to do, and this in turn affects what they can get to and get through in the 1990's. As the faculty e 
have unionized, the students need to unionize. The students need to see what is best for the majority of the students. 
The students need to reach a point where they can find a consensus, a common denominator that will allow them to 
develop an SGA that goes back to the beginning, not an experiment, but an experience. Student Government has to 
return. 



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Student 
Government 
Association 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA) 

Student Government Association in 1962 had powers granted by faculty and administration. The SGA in 1963 had 
a President Norbert Martin, Sophomore Class Officer President Courtney Cheri, Advisor Ron Haire, and Freshman 
Class Officer President Art Kopan. 

Then in 1964 the SGA had Clint Morris as Advisor. The State Convention proved an effective self government 
that created interest in college community. The social dances at Pier 66, Gait Ocean Mile and War Memorial 
Auditorium let the students copy events of their high school. The college Rat Week with the beanies was a 
highlight along with athletics. 

The SGA in 1965 included President Frank Gildey, Advisor Mr. Neil Crispo, Freshman Class Chairman, Bill 
Greene that continued "Rat Court" Crime and "Rat Repose" as observed by Mr. Crispo 

The SGA in 1965 began with SGA President Judy Hancock meeting with 10 prospective graduates in September 
16, 1965 to inform them what was expected of them for upcoming October 4th election. The last day to register 
for office included requirements of 2.5 high school average and $2.00 registration fee. 

"The most important organization on campus and the only one where the students had a voice". Judy likened it to 
high school student council "only better because of the more complete student control". 

The campaign week of September 27th to October 1st was designed to develop a stronger bond between the 
individual student and his representative. 

SGA Rally replaced Orientation on September 14 and 15, 1965 for all Freshmen. Student Campus and club 
leaders spoke on activities, socials, policies and campus life. JCBC cheerleaders demonstrated school pride. 
Secretary of SGA Sharon Roesch had introduced concept in previous year's Senate with SGA bill. 

The SGA planned Student Activities as Secretary Sharon Roesch presented petitions for social events and club 
services that needed SGA approval. Off campus Halloween dance was hosted jointly by Circlettes and Circle K, 
Circle K candy sale, co-sponsored Civinettes and Civitan picnic, weekly folk singing in student center. 



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The freshman senators had to have 2.0 high school average, 2.5 average for senior year, and not having belonged 
to a Fraternity or other non-acceptable organization and be able to sign their name. Because, there was not 
enough candidates anyone filling out necessary forms can join the happy world of the average SGA senator, with 
making resolutions, voting, and planning. 

A 

October 29, 1965 

The SGA honored Dr. Rushing with proposal by Freshman Class Chairman Larry Ellis to call the Junior 
College Library, the Dr. Joe B. Rushing Library. The Senate approved non-SGA students to work on 
committees which was the first time outsiders had been asked to serve. Sophomore Senator Ann Bardsley 
and Freshman Senator Chris Murphy were advocating a ban on the student center and daily marches to the 
Nova cafeteria where milk cost only 5 cents. 

President Judy Hancock resigned on October 12, 1965 and withdrew from JCBC because of illness. As she 
was the former Vice President who moved up when last year President George Verge was declared ineligible 
for not maintaining 2.0 GPA and being constitutionally disqualified. Until President and Vice President were 
elected Secretary Sharon Roesch, Treasurer Joyce Ligan, Sophomore class Chair Bonnie Fetrid and 
Freshman Class Chair Larry Ellis were to share executive powers and responsibilities. 

October 15, 1965 

Director of Student Activities Neil Crispo swore in Freshman and Sophomore Senators advising them of their 
responsibilities for sound, effective student government to present student opinions and ideas to proper 
channels so they needed to listen to and evaluate students they represented as well as introduce necessary 
bills to effect these measures. 

December 3, 1965 

SGA President Bill Greene nominated non-senate members to work on SGA committees. Freshman class 
Chairman Larry Ellis was acclaimed to act as chairman of the Petitions and Constitutions Committee. Vice 
President Rick Barnard was approved as Coordinator of Ground-breaking ceremonies at Nova Institute. "We 
are placed in this position by a small minority, but these are the people who have the interest". Freshman 
Senator Scott Anderson continued that "this Student Government should be one we can all take pride in, and 
not one for individual interest". 



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The Student Government Association in 1966 was the beginning of indifference. The apathy caused Gerry 
McManus to see SGA as a laboratory experiment. SGA was inept with no communication with student body. It 
was a political forum for 16 people that sponsored classes or workshops that SGA didn't attend. The SGA parties 
were attended by small numbers. There were complaints about BCC food situation. There were state and national 
politics that had no audiences. SGA President Terry LaBelle exhibited a veil of aloofness. Only 10 people ran 
Silver Sands, Venetian Crier, Tri-C radio and SGA. 

January 28, 1966 

SGA President Bill Greene filled 4 Senate seats leaving 6 vacancies in the Senate. The Senate voted down 
his nomination for the SAB leaving hard feelings between Senators and their President. The Editor of 
Venetian Crier openly criticized SGA Senate for using SGA President Bill Greene as "whipping boy". 

February 4, 1966 

The Senate seats are being vacated almost as fast as they are being filled by President Bill Greene who 
announced any senators missing three straight meetings would be dropped from the roster. 

February 18, 1966 

SGA felt the shock at loss of officers as Rick Barnard, former vice-president of SGA and Larry Ellis, chairman 
of the Freshman Senate, resigned at last week's meeting. Ann Bardsley, sophomore senator, was elected to 
replace Ellis as chairman of the petitions committee. Barbara Olges Freshman Senator, was chosen by a 
freshman censure to be their new chairman. Bill Greene appointed 2 more senators. Sociai and Prom 
committee reported the prom was to be held at Pier 66 which was on a Friday so SGA Advisor Neil Crispo, 
said he may be able to get a dispensation for Catholics. Campus Improvement Committee stated students did 
not like food served at the 'Pit' (Student Center now current Central Bookstore). 

February 25, 1966 

Matthew J. Faison stated SGA was weathering storm not without the efforts of President Bill Greene. If 

nothing else, student government seemed to have taken on an air of dignity however shaggy the coat might 

first appear. Greene seemed to be trying to do his job but was plagued by the futility what a student 

government really was. Cooperation from the senate was as full as it was ever to be, but cooperation from the 

student-at-large was the same depressing lack of interest that it had always been. 

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March 4, 1966 
1 The SGA election scheduled with registration dates March 9-15 where students had to pay fees in SGA Office 

in the Student Publications room. Bill Greene held meeting on March 17th for all candidates for March 24 and 
25 election in the student center. Venetian Crier Editor Matthew Faison criticized SGA President Bill Greene 
for not filling the last SAB student position. 

. March 11, 1966 

The SGA approved Anna Marie Flambouris as the fourth student to the SAB. The new SGA constitution was 
approved after President Bill Greene established a G.P.A. of 2.25 or higher for officers to an Executive Board 
to act as Senate and a Judicial Branch for emergencies. 

September 2, 1966 

Mark Markham and the Jesters played for 500 students in Gym at first SGA dance of the semester. It Was 

criticized by Crier Editor Dave Fitzgerald for the lack of attendance, so he stated that if SGA or Mr. Crispo 

abolished Student Activities he would support that decision. 



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September 16, 1966 

Julie Poole, Crier Editor-in-Chief said the SGA should create a committee to enforce campus dress code with 

long hair on men, socks and shoes, shorts and longer mini-skirts. 

September 23, 1966 

SGA President Terry LaBelle opened the SGA election for 16 freshmen and 3 sophomore Senate seats. 

President LaBelle is considering abolishing Senate for executive board but this could allow the administration 

to pass rules without student say. 

October 6, 1966 

There was a dress code meeting in the Lecture Theatre was to establish a new dress code. SGA started traffic 

court to deal with parking and speeding by students on campus. Election censures were for violation of neutral 

standing of election commission and a derogatory campaign against SGA. 

October 7, 1966 

Venetian Crier and anti-SGA students called for SGA participation to improve through committee system. 



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October 14, 1966 

SGA sponsored forum on Dress Code that saw 50+ students attending meeting to abolish the Dress Code till 

the end of semester. Many students felt it was a matter of pride to dress properly, but others said it won't pass 

SAB or School Board. 

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October 14, 1966 

SGA reactivated the Inter Club Council (ICC) under Jean Holder which did not achieve any success according 

to the Crier. 

SGA Poll by Venetian Crier uncovered a lack of unity over class discrimination for sophomore lead majority 
but concept of precincts on campus was turned down for the existing government. 

October 21, 1966 

Traffic citation polices demanded proof of guilt where students who were found guilty had the option of going 

before the college's disciplinary committee if they refused court's decision. 

October 28, 1966 

Terry LaBelle was angry that SGA delegates to Gainesville Convention were seeking new resolutions to 

change FJCSGA with inclusion of private and public 4 year schools. 

November 4, 1966 

The Social Committee headed by Karen Fruits rejected the Byrds for the Christmas formal causing a students' 

petition because music was considered inappropriate. 

A Dress Code befitting college students submitted by SGA co-chairman Coyle of the Dress Code Committee 
established a review board of 4 students and 3 faculty appointed by the President. 

November 11, 1966 

SGA election support needed for an issue of the Dress Code so student body must back SG or it will fail as 

encouraged by President Terry LaBelle who saw it as a power issue for his association. 



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November 18, 1966 

The Byrds petition was rejected with most recent discussion held by SGA to use local union band for 
"appropriate" music. Sophomore Class Chairman Larry Ellis led majority in upholding this decision for 
Christmas Formal in the La Ronde Room at the Fountainbleau Hotel in Miami Beach that will be free to all full 
time students with ID cards. a 

November 18, 1966 

Weekly SGA meeting dates were moved to every Thursday to speed bill acceptances as suggested by the 

SGA sponsor Charles Brogdon. 

January 27, 1967 

Lack of legal quorum threatens loss of SGA according to President Terry LaBelle due to forced vacating of 

seats because of low G.P.A.s (below 2.00). 

Saint Valentine Day Massacre Dance was scrapped due to the lack of funds and the "no socks" edict had been 
revoked with rest of dress code being reviewed by the President. 

February 10, 1967 

The possible cancellation of a morning class hour next year was result from the open hearing on the student 

activities hour from Tuesday to Thursday, 3:30 - 5:30 p.m. to a more beneficial time for club participation. In 

1964, the student activities hour was held from 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. when no classes were scheduled. 

March 3, 1967 

SGA upheld Circle K censorship and recommended mitigation in final approval by SAB. The failure to turn in 
itemized receipts for the Christmas formal, but the SAB reprimanded SGA for failing to improve business 
procedures and insuring good communications. 

March 17, 1967 

The newly appointed Election Commission set April 6 th and 7 th as election days for SGA officers election. 

Editor R. A. Fraser called for dissolution of the SGA for not representing students. 

March 17, 1967 

Ken Perkins, creator of the Advocate Party had labeled SGA elections a waste of time. He called for a 
commission form of government instead of current executive, legislative and judicial ineffective system. 

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March 23, 1967 

Dr. Myron Blee, President of JCBC addressed the SGA introducing the idea of forming a student advisory 
committee as well as Man-Woman of the Year Award. 

March 31, 1967 

SGA President Terry LaBelle drafted "Bill of Students Rights". 

Mud flinging featured at SGA Picnic on April 9 th included events from tricycle races to pie eating contests 
followed by dance and concluded with the Pan Ku Coffeehouse on Student Center Patio. 

April 14, 1967 

"Dark Horse" Jim Manchester pulled upset win for SGA Prexy as clubs, fraternities and sororities cast enough 

ballots to beat both SGA candidates. 

November, 1967 

The SGA was the voice of the students having 2,700 possible voters of which .37% voted in last election for 

22 students. President James Manchester planned student periodical grievance days between interested 

students and the student senate to find out what were the students' problems. 

April, 1968 

SGA sponsored Spring Dance featuring Tammy James and the Shandells. 

April, 1968 

SGA President Jim Pierson listed the basic BJCproblems as: new student orientation, necessary time 

management, and apathy. 

The SGA Election Day showed freedom to vote. 

April 8, 1970 

The SGA election was upheld after charges by Pat Thomas against SGA President Scott Johnson and Senate 

leader Tom Rasmussen over the issue of student Al McGuire who was senator who was appointed Secretary 

of Elections. 

SGA Secretary Cedric Foster resigned his post in letter to SGA President Joe Grove. 







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September 15, 1972 

Summer left the SGA minus two officers after the turmoil of contested elections which Dr. George Young 

disallowed Senate elections because of election irregularities. 

September 22, 1972 

The Student Supreme Court was not a figurehead which handled disciplinary cases involving everything from 

stealing books to parking infractions. 

November 3, 1972 

Roy Easton was elected Student Government Association Treasurer to fill in for the resigned position of Glenn 

Sylvia. 

November 17, 1972 

Chuck Bradford, student supreme court chief justice and other justices reformed the judicial system with the 

transformation of the college discipline committee's court fines developed into student loan funds. 

December 8, 1972 

SGA President Vivian Hunter was censured following charges by Senator Kevin Ordway for failing the hold 

meetings, filling 19 vacant positions to freshman senate, and not appointing committee chairmen. 

February 2, 1973 

A committee of 8 SGA senators investigated SGA President Vivian Hunter to determine if she neglected her 

duties and stopped paying her fees. 



February 9, 1973 

North students chose officers with Kathy Loper thanking counselor Leon Watts for helping the Student 

Government Board. 

February 16, 1973 

SGA Senator Bill Medlin had been appointed to succeed Gil Morera as SGA Vice President. 

$20,000.00 allocated for free medical clinic by SGA from entertainment funds. 

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February 23, 1973 

Vivian Hunter resigned as SGA President citing time with family and full time job requirements while Senate 

continued investigation for impeachment, but left VP Bill Medlin with 2 weeks experience to succeed to 

President. 

Dr. Don Nicholas, Dean of Students at Oakland Community College in Michigan was hired by SGA as 
consultant for advice on starting new Health Clinic. He stated that only 20% of the county's 1 ,061 two year 
community colleges had a health program. 

March 2, 1973 

Kevin Ordinary, SGA senator, was appointed Vice President by Bill Medlin SGA President for the last 3 weeks, 

but was given a 2 week probationary term. 

March 2, 1973 

SGA mail-out to promote clubs with a monthly magazine that was a recruitment tool for the organizations. 

Student Investigation Bureau (SIB) of SGA requested fresh, edible food, and better service. 

March 9, 1973 

SIB's food committee of SGA recommended change in Hospitality Center to Barry Thiel, ARA manager, 

including cleaning condiment stand, people's special diets, specialty days, different breakfast items, 

undesirable coffee, ash trays, conveyor belts full of trays, watery cokes and greasy french fries. 

March 9, 1973 

Director of Internal Affairs Bob Kecskemety and SGA sought store discounts for students with 10 to 20 percent 

savings. 

March 16, 1973 

SGA visited Washington, DC and joined National Student Lobby led by President Bill Medlin, Sam Becker 
Treasurer, and Senator Laura Schief. 



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March 16, 1973 

SGA Central and North had controversy over Central not acting on $20,000.00 in entertainment funds 

earmarked for Medical Center that appeared on hold when North pushed for a George Cariin appearance at 

North. 

SGA's Food Committee meaningful to students as both SGA and Food Service Director Barr;y Thiel have 
taken students concerns. 

March 30, 1973 

Miami medical team surveyed Health Clinic to consider installing residents from University of Miami Medical 

School. 

SGA heeded student poll and unfroze $20,000.00 for a guarantee SGA end of year picnic. 

April 6, 1973 

SGA sponsored day of music, food, and special events at picnic. 

April 13, 1973 

SGA asked for new $30,375.00 budget for entertainment for Central campus, not collegewide, included that 

$3,500.00 co-sponsored events, $600.00 public relations, $500.00 for 9 coffeehouses, $9,000.00 for lecture 

series, $2,700.00 for movie series, $4,600.00 for SGA executive workshops, and $7,400.00 for travel. 



April 13, 1973 

The SGA Election winners were: President Ken Miller, Vice President Dennis Shannon, Secretary Kathy 

Chesser and Treasurer Jerry Windisch. 

May 18, 1973 

SGA moved toward constitutional revision in an effort to improve effectiveness. 

SGA Supreme Court docket cleared for the summer. 



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November, 1973 

SGA elections held on North Campus with 3.5% return of ballots sent to the students' homes that showed 

apathy with Rick Wisest elected Chairperson. 

December, 1973 

SGA party with a 50's Revival Dance was a success with band, New Society that cost each'student six cartons 

or six canned foods collected for Christmas holidays. 

Student Government's Activity Day had student faculty football game, bands and free food. 

January 18, 1974 

Vice President Dennis Shannon resigned from SGA claiming his GPA as cause, but also cited some conflict 

with system for SGA not as effective as it could be. 

September 13, 1974 

SGA representative traveled to meet state lobbyists. 

September 18, 1974 

The Student Government of North Campus ceased to exist so Acting Dean of Students Dave Cox asked for 

constitutional reform to form new government. 

October 7, 1974 

The Ramoda Ranch Experience was a combined BCC and Miami Dade Leadership Retreat for learning 

experience. 

October 11, 1974 

The Student Concerns Board voted as the North Campus Governing Body that gave birth to the Activities 

Committee chaired by Dr. David Cox. 

October 15, 1974 

Resignations plagued student government with 3 SGA board seats vacated. 



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October 25, 1974 

SGA President Art Manes was still trying to fill vacancies on 17 BCC committees. 

SGA President Art Manes announced SGA Leadership Training retreat at Ramoda Ranch. 

November 31, 1974 

Enrique Casadevall was elected President of the North Student Concerns Board. 

January 24, 1975 

SGA prepared to tackle football, concerts and beer to campus. 

February 1, 1975 

SGA voted to avoid reapportionment of Senate Seats. 

April 1, 1975 

SGA's student petition brought to legislators for additional college funding. 

September 17, 1975 

Don S. Harvey and Larcelons Edwards, Jr. were the North SGA candidates. 

October 3, 1975 

SGA searched for right Supreme Court Justice with interviews conducted by SGA President Glen Lewis. 

October 17, 1975 

SGA kept vote despite opposition to remain selective rather than appointed legislative body. 

October 31, 1975 

SGA attempted voter registration program to get students to the polls. 

Dr. George Young signed the Student Governing Board's (SGB) constitution citing the vital leadership qualities 
in North and Central student government presidents. 

November 14, 1975 

New Chief Justice Robert Katz reviewed Senate election returns that saw Black Awareness Club nominations 

lost by fired Director of Internal Affairs Robert Triholske and also allowed BCCN SGA President Don Harvey to 

run and be elected to the Central Campus Senate. 



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November 19, 1975 

SGA on North held rap session after Larcelons Edwards motioned to suspend the agenda so discussion 

included Bloodi Sweat and Tears Concert, Day Care Center, bus schedule and new telephone. 

December 5, 1975 

SGA investigations voided election results with President Glen Lewis calling for new election in Spring to allow 

Black Awareness students the opportunity to run. Joe St. Peter and Charlene Lenger were elected Sophomore 

and Freshman class chairpersons in the Senate. 

January 19, 1976 

North Campus Student Government operated under town meeting form of government. 

March 1, 1976 

BCCN SGA students Don Harvey and Dusty Eddy greeted President Gerald Ford at Bahia Mar. 

March 8, 1976 

BCCN SGA issued election proclamation from SGA Chairman Don S. Harvey alond with filing application for 

upcoming elections. 

March 22, 1976 

Nick Tortorelli and Sharon Freels are running for the BCCN SGA Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson. 

March 29, 1976 

Steve Hyatt and Leslie Richman had been actively involved in BCCN activities so they also ran for SGA 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson. 

September 20, 1976 

The SGA appointed Executive Cabinet was to complement the regular town meetings focused on day car and 

mandatory attendance. 

November 1, 1976 

BCC North "Meet the Candidates" had a confrontation between GOP nominee for State Senate George 

Williamson and BCCN SGA President Nick Tortorelli. 

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March 28, 1977 

SGA campaigns underway with three sets of candidates that were extremely enthusiastic. 

April 4, 1977 

Frank "Maddog" Panzarino won BCCN SGA election by campaigning at night getting 80-100 nighttime 

students. 

January 25, 1978 

Frank Panzarino fired Pete Trematerra, former Intramural Director of SGA, for not getting anything 

accomplished. 

February 1, 1978 

SGA funds melted in tropical sun with trip to the Bahamas that left SG balance at $450.00 after a trip to see 

how the college of the Bahamas (COB) ran their student government. 

February 22, 1978 

Proposal passed despite SGA error led to questions regarding the contents of the SGA constitution at the most 

recent town meeting. 

March 1,1978 

SGA Bahamas trip termed enlightening as 4 SGA officers with Dean Leonard Bryant and Director of Student 

Activities Tom Ryan repaid the COB November exchange trip. 

March 17, 1978 

The SGA elections scheduled for April were for any students with 2.0 GPA and enrolled in 12 semester hours. 

April 12, 1978 

BCCN students elected SGA President Frank Panzarino as coordinator of FJCSGA District Five while Ric 

Cooper was legislative liaison for District Five. 

September 26, 1978 

45 candidates spoke at BCCN SG's Candidates Night including Bob Graham and Attorney General Robert 

Sherwin who were in run off gubernatorial election. 

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October 28, 1978 

BCCN SGA planned a Fall Festival for Thanksgiving with cultural displays to highlight festival. 

January 23, 1979 

Beth Gosnell assumed SGA Presidency who had ultimate goal of bringing all 3 campuses together to have 

one government. 

January 30, 1979 

Student Government planned benefits after resignation of Ric Cooper-Nurse including Muscular Dystrophy 

Dance-a-Thon, campus flea market, Jamaican exchange, and Community Arts Festival. 

February 13, 1979 

The Student Governing Board linked all three student governments with each president, vice president and 2 

campus delegates part of each element. 

February 20, 1979 

Student Government campaigning began for all students running for office on all campuses. 

March 13, 1979 

SGA election lacked competition so Connie Lobaugh was the President for North. 

April 17, 1979 

SGA maintained top billing for what they did or did not do for the student body. 

January 18, 1980 

SGA eyed need for men and women to serve on publications, communications, legislative study and student 

services committees. SGA along with Student Activities was sponsoring the Homecoming in Pompano 

Stadium before BCC and University of Miami baseball game. 

February 8, 1980 

SGA planned Community Arts Festival, Central Campus Spring Day, a blood drive and a frisbee class. 



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February 14, 1980 

New SGA VP Mike Jacobs stirred controversy over appointment of Carolyn Foley with a Senate rejection vote 

of 8-3, but President Jill Haugen said the constitution gives her the power to fill Senate vacancies. 

February 29, 1980 

SGA Vice President Mike Jacobs with only 6 members of Senate showed up for Central meeting. 

March 7, 1980 

Election was called off by SGA which failed to approve appointment of Jill Haugen as VP. 

September 26, 1980 

The Student Union replaced SGA because officers did not carry out their functions, along with too many 

problems with elections and lost Presidential power. 

October 30, 1980 

The Student leadership retreat was planned for December for students following a term of voluntary activity. 

SGA on all three campuses to be activated according to Dr. George Young, Vice President in charge of 

student development. 

November 19, 1980 

Student government reorganized into the Student Union Association as a new club forming on BCC North. 

November 21, 1980 

The Ghost of SGA haunted the Student Union as a book exchange operated by the now defunct SGA had 

become a center of controversy at Central. Student Union's Advisor Tom Ryan, Director of Student Activities 

stated the Student Union was still in the "embryo form" and the book exchange records were "terrible". 

November 15, 1985 

The new student government promised responsible action on BCCN which had been defunct since 1979 when 

a dog was elected President and a moratorium instituted for students with a pre-occupation into methods 

rather than producing results. 

October 3, 1986 

New officers and plans developed for BCCN SGA with Chris Treber President, Skip Sasson Vice President, 

and George Hricik Treasurer. 

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October 17, 1986 

South campus failed to form a Student Council that Tom Ryan, Director of Student Activities, felt was the aim 

of students to get communications flowing. 

October 31, 1986 

North Campus Student Government attacked student apathy in letter to the Editor from all BCCN SGA 

officers. 

The Student Council was better late than never on South Campus with co-chairpersons to avoid power trips. 

December 12, 1986 

South Student Council interested in recruits, help for clubs, concerns, questions, recreational facilities and their 

suggestion box. 

September 28, 1987 

Where were the SGA elections since the winners were announced? 

November 9, 1987 

Vice Presidents met with students at SGA sponsored luncheon that Jennifer Emerson, North Campus SGA 

President felt was easy way to cut through red tape and get contact done. 

February 8, 1988 

North SGA encouraged participation in Winter Fair and Spring Conference of the Florida Junior College 

Student Government Association. 

October 3, 1988 

South SGA President Charlie Lyle was concerned with raising funds for Student Union building, but also 

emphasized F-Troop for community minded students. 

North SGA made 5 more changes in its officers filling various vacancies. 

December 12, 1988 

North's SGA held open elections for first time in many years. 

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January 30, 1989 

SGA elected new officials with Suzanne Donohue selected by over 250 North Campus students. 

February 13, 1989 

North SGA hosted Vice Presidents luncheon to discuss student grievances with Drs. Young, Hamilton, Hunter 

A 

along with Dr. Tom Ryan, Director of Student Life and Dr. Leonard Bryant, Dean of Student Affairs where the 
student emphasis "was on campus marquee, student awareness of scholarships, open cafeteria for study 
location, student insurance and "no rights" on parking lots. 

North Campus Unity Day for students to meet the campus leaders and organizations sponsored by SGA. 

March 21, 1994 

SGA proposed community service as mandatory requirement with other key issues discussed at SGA 

conference including on-campus health care, reduction of full time enrollment, computerized records, and 

student representation on college board of trustees. 

September 26, 1994 

Student Government assisted better communication between administration, faculty and the student body. 

October 31, 1994 

The North Campus SGA raised $2,500.00 for the Make-a-Wish Foundation of America with Brunswick Bowling 

Alley, Plantation Jr. Women's Club, and Student Life Office Collection. 

November 28, 1994 

SGA tackled budgetary and equity issues at state SGA Convention in Ocala. 

December 12, 1994 

Central SGA president Shawn Mock looked for room to grow from location in front of cafeteria doors. 

February 6, 1995 

Central SGA led drive for child care at Welcome Back Cookout. 

March 13, 1995 

SGA excelled at state conference with BCC student Jeni Kampeas-Abraham, South SGA President sworn in 

as Florida Junior College Student Government Association President. 

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August 23, 1995 

SGA sponsored book exchange program offering students savings. 

Downtown Campus formed first organized SGA to work with administration and faculty to find solutions to 
problems and to give returning adults activities and programs. 

October 9, 1995 

SGA "bleach drive" benefits wild animal refugee center. 

March 25, 1996 ' 

SGA planned to oversee recycling program. 

August 26, 1 996 

North SGA election was a fiasco due to personal conflicts between candidates so elections were rescheduled 
for September. 

September 16, 1996 

The North SGA dilemma inspired a change in the use of student's roster with social security numbers as check 
for voters' accuracy. 

October 28, 1996 

SGA attended Clinton pep rally. 

September 16, 1997 

SGA geared up to make changes. 



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Student 
Activities 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



The Junior College of Broward County's (JCBC) Central Campus started with students copying secondary schools 
educational extracurricular activities and social functions. Homecoming queens, pep rallies, bonfires, and theme 
dances were ideas the students brought with them from South Broward, Fort Lauderdale, Stranahan, Pompano or 
Central Catholic High Schools. Ideas such as beenie "rat caps", freshmen performing thV alma mater before 
cafeteria crowds, registering for each class from the class professor were passed down from older brothers or 
sisters attending at Gainesville or Coral Gables. 

There was the spirit or pride in JCBC that the students exhibited with large turnouts at sporting events, orientations, 
and specialty dances. Their dress code was strictly enforced with shirt tails tucked in during the day time that was 
changed creatively with costumes and formal attire for social events. The students banned together forming illegal 
social societies. They called them fraternities and sororities with most students coming from the same town or high 
school. 

The active role in student government, school newspaper, and impromptu social gathering in their cafeteria which is 
today's Central Campus Bookstore. The students were not distracted by the giant areas of sand, only four 
buildings, rain ponds that took days to drain, unlandscaped areas where sand blew and old paved parking lots of a 
World War II air base. 

The cafeteria's vending machines and cubby-hole student activities office was run in a military fashion that 
channeled the students' energies to the non air-condition gym where banks of jalousie windows allowed them to 
play ping pong, billiards, volleyball or watch the "SEA HORSES". A segregated atmosphere had all students in a 
college parallel, make believe Ivy League world. The gym became the center from semester registration, the 
annual graduation, and "sock hop" where no shoes were allowed on the English tile floor. 

The students were attracted to JCBC for it was college even if it was run by the local school board as the thirteenth 
year of school. Professors were recruited from military services or existing junior or senior high schools. Students 
saw each building as a multi-purpose site. The Administration Building housed all staff: bursar with vault, registrar, 
and student services. Faculty not in Communication, English, Behavioral and Social Sciences, and Physical 



1 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



The Junior College of Broward County's (JCBC) Central Campus started with students copying secondary schools 
educational extracurricular activities and social functions. Homecoming queens, pep rallies, bonfires, and theme 
dances were ideas the students brought with them from South Broward, Fort Lauderdale, Stranahan, Pompano or 
Central Catholic High Schools. Ideas such as beenie "rat caps", freshmen performing the 4 alma mater before 
cafeteria crowds, registering for each class from the class professor were passed down from older brothers or 
sisters attending at Gainesville or Coral Gables. 

There was the spirit or pride in JCBC that the students exhibited with large turnouts at sporting events, orientations, 
and specialty dances. Their dress code was strictly enforced with shirt tails tucked in during the day time that was 
changed creatively with costumes and formal attire for social events. The students banned together forming illegal 
social societies. They called them fraternities and sororities with most students coming from the same town or high 
school. 

The active role in student government, school newspaper, and impromptu social gathering in their cafeteria which is 
today's Central Campus Bookstore. The students were not distracted by the giant areas of sand, only four 
buildings, rain ponds that took days to drain, unlandscaped areas where sand blew and old paved parking lots of a 
World War II air base. 

The cafeteria's vending machines and cubby-hole student activities office was run in a military fashion that 
channeled the students' energies to the non air-condition gym where banks of jalousie windows allowed them to 
play ping pong, billiards, volleyball or watch the "SEA HORSES". A segregated atmosphere had all students in a 
college parallel, make believe Ivy League world. The gym became the center from semester registration, the 
annual graduation, and "sock hop" where no shoes were allowed on the English tile floor. 

The students were attracted to JCBC for it was college even if it was run by the local school board as the thirteenth 
year of school. Professors were recruited from military services or existing junior or senior high schools. Students 
saw each building as a multi-purpose site. The Administration Building housed all staff: bursar with vault, registrar, 
and student services. Faculty not in Communication, English, Behavioral and Social Sciences, and Physical 



Education were included in the administration building's shared offices. The building was the center for student 
conferences and protests under a designed arch that acted as the entrance way to the sparsely built campus. 

All the students went to the classroom building or the lecture theater building on a daily basis. Each room was 
divided by movable walls that were suppose to be sound proof, but became one of the students first real academic 
complaints. The lecture theater was used for student forums, stage plays, movie viewing and general assemblies. 

Students returned at night for dramatic plays, home basketball games usually combined with a dance without shoes 
or a concert, pep rallies complete with bon fire and music, and the special Lyceum program of current affairs or 
entertainment personalities. Parents came to some of the special presentations, but most activities emphasized 
"Loco Parentis" or the college assuming responsibility for the students activities and actions. Chaperones from 
faculty, staff or even parents were provided for chaperoning social behavior. This guidance became the first point 
of student protest as the students tried to show independence from family control. It certainly was easier to go 
away to Gainesville than to stay under your parents roof in Pembroke Pines. 

i The games began in the parking lots where students had to display an identification decal and joust for the closest 
parking spots around the classroom building. No shade or place to congregate put large numbers of students into 
the building hallways. The bulletin boards became early sources of student activities, gatherings, or sales from 
books to the first exhibition Miami-Dolphin tickets. 



) 



Dr. George W. Young, Ph.D. began at the Junior College of Broward County as the new Dean of Students 
replacing a departing Dr. Jack Taylor, who had served in that capacity for almost 7 years. Dr. Taylor had been 
concerned with being the interim president, as well as taking care of academic needs, student development and 
registration, during his time at JCBC. George Young brought with him new concepts in student development; no 
longer looking at "loco parentis" or the fact that the institution was responsible for the students, their conducts, and 
well being. Dr. Young, as the Dean of Students, began a career oriented toward student services. The services 
began with recruitment, a thorough method of introducing JCBC to the 28 public and private schools that would 
develop in Broward County over the next three decades. With a conservative concept of how the institution should 
run, he took very careful steps to implement or improve the various programs. A college parallel institution on the 



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verge of shifting to a technical vocational school, JCBC was reaching out for community; but partnerships that 
would allow them to serve more than just the people of the community, the industries, the corporations, the civic 
and fraternal groups, and all those that needed help. The recruitment effort would go after those minority 
populations, adult learners that needed retraining, and people that were in a place in their lifetime when they 
needed time to reflect or react to what was going on around them. 

Student development orientated these incoming students in a way that would assure their success. The 
counselors, advisors, support staff and additional people from athletics to student activities were all there with a 
happy face to welcome incoming students. The use of student organizations and their members permitted the 
orientation to look like a "student affair". This allowed for better communications and a voice that the students 
could feel what was to become Broward Junior College with its combination of college parallel courses and 
technical vocational programs. Dr. Young saw that the orientation should include more than just student services, 
so academic affairs, business affairs, and from security to the library; were included in the orientation program to 
introduce people not just to the physical plant of the campus, but also to the main source with exchange between 
the staff, the faculty, and the administration. Dr. Young saw the counselors, advisors and even students go back to 
high schools repeatedly where they established friendships and inquiry that permitted a bridging to make the 
orientation more successful. The transition from high school to the college confused some who felt at times that it 
was an extension of high school or the beginning of vocational school. 

Dr. Young wanted to instill more of a whole being, a whole student, a wellness that made them academically, 
physically, culturally and socially prepared for what lay ahead in a stressful world of challenges. Dr. Young's main 
strengths were that he led his staff whether they be directors or advisors to conduct what they felt was best for each 
individual student. One of the strengths that would develop everything from student testing to graduation exercises 
was a fairness and a feeling of family. The college family changes each decade bringing different concepts, 
different bearings, and of course different types of students. The complexity of the students and their problems 
increased creating a need for more counseling at times. Then there was academic advisement where nothing was 
ever enough so counseling took over the roles first of placement to see what level the students should be advised 
and then they did the actual academic advising. Mostly by individuals, but sometimes by groups the counselors 



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saw that students were placed or given the option to self register but this sometimes led to confusion or mistakes. 
The staff educationally learned as did the students. During the first week of school students, faculty, staff, and 
administrators wore "ask me" buttons, as we encouraged the students there was no dumb question except that one 
which was not asked. Students were rarely seen individually as the average approached 30 and the number of the 
hours counselors worked advising per week was over 20. The students' community, family, and social 
commitments put a great deal of stress on what was going to be their "student life". 

Young's philosophy of student retention changed from the 60's to the 70's as the change in the curriculum brought 
about a need for academic related organizations to help as a laboratory that allowed the students to understand 
and grow, from student government to horticulture clubs from water sports to actual leadership programs, Broward 
Junior College in the 1970's became a laboratory experiment. With all experiments, you have some things that are 
excellent and some that need revision. Dr. Young's perception was that when you expect the best of something 
you get the best from that something so when you expect the best from someone you get the best from that person. 
There were a few times that he was, but his laid back style permitted most students to develop at their own pace. 
The result being meant that some students were at the junior college for a longer period of time than others. There 
was the small class sizes, the individual attention, and the students activities made students feel like they were in a 
university. 

Once classes started, activities began; from competitive intramurals to student "ice breaker dances", from grand 
openings of Tigertail to fraternities and sororities with everyone looking for a sense of belonging. Service clubs 
were pretty much gone after the 60's, but the new social societies had emerged into fraternities and sororities. The 
student government, the special interest clubs, and the religious organizations provided the service that the 
students needed to become a well-rounded person. Counselors found themselves advising and advisors found 
themselves counseling, and teachers that were truly into taking care of students did both. The campus grew with it 
and the planned expansion to a multi-campus institution. The creation of North Campus made Dr. Young no 
longer able to serve the students of Central Campus without jeopardizing that touch, that feeling of "sharing and 
caring." He became the Vice President of Student Development and saw the need to develop student deans for 
each location. He would take policy and support so the deans would take of procedures and daily chores from 



I 






activities to counseling. Student activities and athletics also expanded to other campuses as did financial aid, 
veteran affairs, disability services and even a woman's center to take care of displaced homemakers. 

The college started to resemble more of a community than it did a college. They were leaning more towards more 
retention; more AS degrees, certificates, and those shorter programs that students could get in eight months time 
and move on to a better job, or a new career. Dr. Young planned a great deal that the staff contributed. Staff 
meetings, and staff leadership retreats along with and seminars proved the chance to work over everything from a 
mission statement to goals. Behavior objectives became part of every areas responsibility. Student affairs never 
really had a great budget or a large staff, not by accident as the faculty always had to be first on the campuses to 
attract attention of students and retain them which was the most necessary thing. So unfortunately, student affairs 
as it was then called was changed to Student Development and now again back to Student Affairs again in the 
1990's. 



Student Affairs operated with a very meager budget as a very tight fisted Dr. Young was an entrepreneur who 
always was trying to develop outside grants. He brought in grant writers even in the seventies to help offset some 
of the expenses for student services that was needed to allow the students growth. Athletics expanded to both 
campuses and all of a sudden rivalry started between campuses, but most of the students commuted on a very fast 
basis as they had to go to work. The students worked 30 hours a week now instead of the 20 that they had worked 
in the 1960's so this meant that they weren't there that long. The students didn't have time to take part in 
fraternities and sororities so we saw the end of social societies along with the beginning of u me -ism". The student 
always ask "What's in it for me" or "Where is this going to take me?" They were almost looking for little guarantees 
or contracts that would assure them success. 

Young's student affairs plans centered around the students who were successful belonging to student 
organizations, whether they be athletic, cultural, social, service, or a variety. More than a hundred organizations 
sprang up on the campuses. All That was needed was 6 members, a faculty, a plan, a signed petition then they 
would be recognized and registered and off and running. Broward Junior College in the early 70's started to build 
more new facilities from aquatic complex to concert halls, from classroom buildings to sailing facilities, the college 



4 



started to think about other ages than the non-traditional student which was still the majority looked upon as the 
"bread and butter." People from special segments of society were being recruited and this of course allowed for a 
much wider as well as diverse student population. 

The 1970's ended the era of experimentation in Student Affairs, we were no longer caught between the college 
curriculum or tech vocational programs we had developed a new mission statement to serve trie entire community. 
We would become Broward Community College with classes in the community service, where 20 students in a 
condominium could request any type of teacher as long as they paid with a student service type fee. We would 
have no academic classes that met in this location unless they paid the full student fees. The college did some out 
reach from St. Thomas HS to the Broward County Jail. 

The 1970's also saw the concept of expanding the college to another campus. This was a greater conflict and took 
a lot more planning as the land in South Florida became in much higher demand with a higher price. The Student 
Affairs area of the college did not expand, but the student population doubled. The problems included the lack of 
proper funding to not enough staff that stretched and stressed Student Affairs. The one on one, the small classes, 
and everything started to change at Broward Community College. The 1980's which brought a severe problem of 
over saturation, an enrollment decline in the early 1980's, some financial exigency in the mid 80's with the reduction 
of the full time staff by 13 positions. This certainly did not bring anymore hope or optimism that there would be 
more counselors, advisors, student activities people or even full time coaches. Financial aid did receive several big 
amounts of scholarship monies in the late 1 970's that allowed them to help even more deserving students. 

The situation in the 1980's required activities to be refocused that left the smorgasbord of entertainment. For the 
first time, everything from leadership to values clarification started to became part of the role of the student 
activities area which made them closer to the people in the rest of the student services from financial aid to 
veterans services. We lost the faculty in the late 70's, they had felt that they were a university all along and they 
didn't see the need to take care of the open door. The faculty felt challenged so they actually formed a union to 
bring about a more professional stance than the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) had 
presented. At the same time, the student activity staff had been into four years of NASPA (National Association of 



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Student Personnel Administrators) and Dr. Young was actually the first community college officer ever to head that 
distinguished student administrative organization. Being funded by the college was the major problem in 1980's 
causing the consolidation of everything from athletics to the student newspaper. It moved to help reduce the cost 
of student activities. The Student Activities Board made up of students, faculty, and staff, continue to distribute the 
money. Funding as best they could which they often found this to be very painful, and by the mid 80's was very 
difficult. 

Several conflicts developed and the student affairs staff found themselves doing counseling of staff and faculty as 
well as students. Never have so few done so much in such a short period of time. 

Broward Community College with a new name took a new direction that was still open to everybody, but now they 
recognized that airlines were going out of business, that divorce rate were up, that people needed more 
psychological counseling, that group advisement could work, that orientations needed to be swifter and that 
students needed to be ready to learn on their own. Academic study skills became a focus so college success 
courses were added as were college leadership classes. Student Affairs in the 80's saw the leadership retreats 
increase to an average of 17 a year hitting every type of student from individual organizations like F-Troop, the 
honorary service organizations to the Student Orientation Staff (SOS) which allowed for volunteerism to begin. 
The growth of the helpers is what made Student Affairs. The volunteers made student activities, athletics 
competed with their part-time coaches where their first attention was always for their student athletes, but 
unfortunately the part time coaches were not always on campus causing a need for advisors and counselors to 
spread out to another realm. 

The amazing part of this saga is that we continued to achieve and to meet goals, goals that develop students 
academically, culturally, physically and socially. Times changed, peoples clothing, cars, appearances, everything 
changed. Textbooks cost more, scholarships were in high demand, a scholarship fund was started in the 80's to 
help, not just student athletes, not just the needy students, but those returning students that were unable to take 
care of the cost of a college education. 



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Success rates were measured in the late 1980's as a new president brought new criteria for accomplishing the 
college's mission. Then a new mission statement, new goals and objectives, Student Affairs changed, at first it 
wasn't noticeable, but faculty started to become more, they got paid to be academic advisors, they helped with 
large group orientations. The faculty saw that Student Affairs was out manned. It started to become high priority 
for the campuses and now up to three. Student Activities found its biggest milestone and talisman in student 
activities fees. At first just fifty cents per credit hour assessed to each student registering at BCC. Accountability 
and credibility became the issues. Does the adult learner who doesn't use a racquetball court need to pay a 
student activities fee, does a member of student government have the right to go and lobby in Washington or 
Tallahassee at the expense of his fellow students. New types of get together days were organized and planned in 
the 1980's. There was more emphasis on cook-outs, novelty acts, sidewalk shows, get together type days on and 
off campus. Faculty and staff were encouraged to attend. 

Dr. Young tried to work with the Faculty Senate, tried to make things from different types of grading to the co- 
curricular transcript become a reality. He found himself having to deal with more and more variables and this is 
what caused dissension, bickering, union pacification, and senate arguments. The students were the only things 
that were real. The 90's had to look at student affairs again could we have used some more buildings maybe. 
Student Affairs definitely could have used more funding, but without additional advisors and counselors we had no 
opportunity to grow. Student Affairs had to develop different delivery tools. Registration is going to have to 
become an on-line process where the students use computers and the phone to make themselves into a more 
knowledgeable person before they come to their first class. This is going to be difficult and a great challenge. Dr. 
Young was a catalyst so his departure on January 17, 1997 will be one that will cause great concern and anxiety to 
a staff that saw him for three decades the leader, the "sugar daddy", and the man that made things happen. He 
was a visionary able to go into the community where he made people understand Broward Community College was 
theirs and for all people. The challenge of the future, it will be one that involves first academics, as the core 
curriculum changes, the deletion of physical education, and a change of the articulation agreement between 
community colleges and universities that will create even greater changes in courses that BCC offers. Its time for 
the changing of philosophy, and the old guard so we're going to see a new professional student affairs person who 
is cross trained, that's going to have a multiplicity of jobs. One that is not going to find himself able to say "this is 



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my office come here one at a time". The new professional will still have the "sharing and caring", but they are 
going to have to be trained in the deeper problems that students are bringing with them to the campuses. The 
traditional student from his disturbances at home with his parents to a lack of financial funding will have to work 
harder at becoming a student. The student will have to develop academic study skills that make him/her a learner 
before he/she visits that first class. The faculty is going to have to become aware of new procedures that are going 
change students such as how they register, how they are recruited, how they are orientated, how they get into 
classes, and how they do things that are different. This is not going to be easy this time Student Affairs will be a 
challenge. 

The Junior College of Broward County (JCBC) began operations in the Naval air barracks with a concept of student 
activities that was carried over from the various high schools and service traditions that the members of the student 
body brought to this new campus. The campus wasn't exactly new, so the first activity everyone engaged in was 
finding shade or a place to sit down as the naval barracks lacked those two things. The students had to request 
meeting rooms, or at least rooms that had windows as there was no air-conditioning so they could get some 
through ventilation or tables and chairs on the outside where they could meet, discuss things, study and wait for 
their next class. 



Student Activities at JCBC was conceived by an organized group known as the Student Activities Board. They saw 
the need for the first activities to be that of organizations, be they academic, service, or quasi social. Each one 
provided their students with on and off campus social and entertainment activities. The first director of student 
activities was a combination with Nan Hutchinson and Jack Taylor who also served as the first two deans of women 
and of men. They would both find the need for an entertainment director who understood both the philosophy and 
psychology of student activities. They picked Neil Crispo a commander from the Coast Guard who served 
weekend duties from their Miami base. 



The days at JCBC from 1960 to 1963 started early because of the weather and the heat. Classes were all 
scheduled before noon or after 7:00 PM. The first activities that were seen in the afternoons were associated 
directly to the concept of intramurals where each service organization had a flag football team, volleyball team or 



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softball team to compete for the President's Cup. The first trophy or award to be given out in the realm of student 
activities for there was no athletics, intercollegiate or extra-mural at this time. Students stayed to watch the 
competition on the field outside the naval air barracks that was filled with sand stickers and had a great deal of crab 
grass and very small amounts of real grass making it a very difficult surface to play on. As there were no coaches, 
the first referees that were hired were other students, who were paid to try to keep the peace. From the very 
beginning, the concept of intramurals as a student activity was one with a great deal of spirit and pride. 

The girls participated in the same sports as the men, powder puff flag football, volley ball and softball as afternoon 
events with one day for the males and one day for the females each week. The ladies first requested other 
activities and asked Mr. Crispo if he would not see that there would be the establishment of social hours when they 
could get together between 6:00 and 7:00, before their evening classes. The so called Student Activities Board 
now only compromised of one administrator, three faculty members and a student representative from the Student 
Government Association would provide the funding for the idea was to get a different service organization to 
sponsor each week's meeting or get together hours. The rest of the day, people were just to busy coming and 
going to school with finding a parking place in 1960 a bigger challenge than 1997. There weren't that many places 
so people would circle and wind up having to park on sand. This sugar sand provided a real liability and real 
distraction as students would get their cars stuck and get other students to help push them out. If they were really 
down deep, JCBC's one man physical plant could come out and help them with the truck, that was a leftover World 
War II surface vehicle, but the idea of using it was not appreciated by the administration because of liability 
reasons. Students at JCBC learned to live with the primitive facilities and the conditions they had for the first three 
years of the college's existence. 

The first real dances were theme dances very similar to what high school had, costume parties for Halloween, hay 
rides for the fall, bonfires at the beach parties, a Christmas formal and believe it or not a prom at the end of each 
year. These events were sponsored by the civic clubs, who received their funding for these events from co- 
sponsored money given out by the Student Government Association. Mr. Crispo had the idea that the SGA should 
be the screening board so he would not have to deal with the problems from the various organizations. He wouldn't 
realize at that time that the SGA would turn out to be his most powerful competition for the students' philosophy and 



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psychology as to why there was student activities. No organization was allowed to function on or off campus 
without a complete roaster of students identified with social security numbers and grades checked. Mr. Crispo was 
a stickler and had two secretaries, one who took care of nothing, but checking student GPA's for a minimum of 2.0 
if they were to participate in the activities. Mrs. Joyce Lane served in that capacity for more than nine years Mrs. 
Marge Smith was the lady who took care of most of the meetings of the Student Activities Board, their minutes and 
also attended meetings for Mr. Crispo when he was on his Coast Guard duties. 

The organizations quickly grew tired of the fact that they had to have all activities on campus. They wanted the 
dances held off campus, but the college insisted on the concept of "loco parentis". This required in the early 1960's 
a specific number of chaperones from the faculty and the administration be present for each and every event. 
Securing these chaperones wasn't difficult as most of the faculty saw it as a part of their role to participate in these 
student activities. 



Several primary locations: Birch State Park in Ft. Lauderdale, Cootes Ranch in Davie, with the auditoriums at 
Stranahan and South Broward High Schools used for some of the bigger events. The formal social events were all 
held either in Pier 66 or Gait Ocean Mile Hotels with the college picking up the tab for the rent of those facilities. 
The neat part about that is that JCBC dressed the part as everyone went formal with corsages, tuxedos and the 
proper air. Live music was always provided, a band was always sought out, several identified by the Venetian Crier 
were favorites and would wind up playing a series of engagements at different service groups parties as well as 
these major events of the semester. 

The early years of JCBC at the naval barracks, according to Bobby Moreland a student who actually matriculated 
during the years 61, 62 and 63 was one of camaraderie and enjoyment. The students didn't feel like they were 
members of the thirteen grade or part of the school board system, but they were for JCBC was not at that time 
associated with the State of Florida, it was run by the Broward County School Board. The School Board saw the 
budget needs for extracurricular events as necessary, just as in high school where things were more mandatory. 
The funding for these student activities came from the general operating fund which from the beginning was 
established at 1 1/2 percent of the total budget. These funds were turned over to the five people who made up the 



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Student Activities Board, unfortunately most of the time that was one administrator, one classified person and 
three faculty members. As a student member was not always elected every semester because the Student 
Government would argue over who the person should be. The SGA would filibuster and at that time the 
organization did have to meet on a weekly basis so there was no student for a lot of the years from 1960 to 1965. 

The key to change seemed to be the establishment of academic organizations from a French club to Biology 
majors, from the PE majors to the German club. The different organizations had membership rolls between twenty 
and forty-five members with the largest organization on campus for the first two years was the French Club. The 
organizations all had not one sponsor, but two faculty members as well as normally one member of the classified 
staff of the college. For having that many chaperones or people would allow more student access as they were 
headquartered in their faculty offices. The student organizations all found them enjoying or sharing that faculty 
members facility even though in the wooden naval air barracks it was a large room with a desk, a four draw filing 
cabinet and normally a conference table. It did allow these student organizations to meet on a regular basis on 
campus to plan activities. Participation in intramurals, participation a monthly social activity whether it was a 
cookies and punch tea or a beach party at John Lloyd State Park was not the main purposes of the various clubs 
and organizations. Each had to do a monthly service project where the documentation in the Silver Sands, the 
Venetian Crier or the interviews from five different individuals of that period indicate that points were given out by 
the Director of Student Activities for the quantity and quality of the service projects. The most sought after trophy 
on campus from 1960 to 1965 was that of service to the community or trying to enhance the name of JCBC. 
Organizations trying to get anyone to know that there was a JCBC. The Service Cup Award was always given 
away by the administration at a reception where members of the press, the Sun-Sentinel and the Sun-Tattler gave 
the best coverage for JCBC during the early 1960's. 

Recruitment of members seemed to be the second most important goal of the service organization. They held 
open parties for members of the student body to attend, but sometimes they charged their own members 50 cents 
to a dollar to help pay for the cost of the extra refreshments. They normally got SAB money through the SGA to 
pay for the music, any type of handouts and if it was necessary the renting of a wagon covered with hay to take 
people on a ride through the wilderness in a place called Davie that would be their new home in three years. 



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The organizations seemed to compete not just for the Service Cup Award, or for the President's cup for 
Intramurals, but mostly at the Christmas dance and the end of the year prom where everyone tried to dress up and 
show their organization spirit. They would sit at tables with their advisors and who were acting as chaperones and 
were joined by other faculty members. There was more interaction between students and faculty then ever in the 
history of this institution. 

The interesting thing about students was their activities in their camaraderie and the life that they would have on 
campus. While they were at the naval air barracks, JCBC hired their own kitchen staff and provided hot breakfast, 
lunch and dinner for the different students. This spoiled them for what would happen when the new campus was 
constructed in Davie. The food wasn't terrific, but it was hot and it did come out of the old naval facilities where 
they had enough equipment so that they could have on campus type banquets or meals which allowed the student 
organizations to present awards or to carry out cultural presentations. 

From the very beginning, the faculty saw student activities as an extension of their classroom, to build cultural 
knowledge, to increase and enhance education. They wanted t he activities of the students to be a laboratory that 
would allow the students to develop a wellness or a wholeness, but they wanted to control what those events would 
be. This started one of the most unusual controversies in student activities history. 

The Lyceum, a concept created from the mind of Mr. Crispo and different faculty members who felt that any 
entertainment, be it a large scale concert, a famous speaker, or a specialty dance that would require excessive 
funds. These events should be conducted through one cost center number that would be controlled and watched 
by the SAB the Director of Student Activities at this time did not have a responsibility to take care of the monies or 
provide assistance in the actual running of the events. It was looked upon that the advisors, the faculty members 
serving in place of the parents develop "loco parentis" and take it past its original Latin meaning. 

The Lyceum grew each year, by the end of the third year the budget for the Lyceum equaled all of the budgets for 
the other areas inside the Student Activities funds. It was larger than the newspaper Venetian Crier; yearbook, 



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Silver Sands; literary magazine, Pan Ku, and athletic activities put together. The Student Government Association 
was also a funded or budgeted area that had the second largest amount as they were put in charge of all of the co- 
sponsored events monies. This would cause a war that you wouldn't believe in the late 1960's between the social 
societies and service organizations both fighting with SGA. This was not just for recognition, but funding so they 
could conduct on and off campus activities. 

The concept of fundraising events started in the very beginning with on campus car washes, bake sales, slave 
auctions, jail houses to lock up professors to raise money for charitable ideas. This all pushed the service clubs to 
raise funds so they could go before the student government and ask for matching funds. At this time, there was no 
idea of traveling to any conferences or conventions. It was merely and embryo starting to grow and student 
activities had not yet diversified and grown any legs or arms so they could have movement. 

Mr. Crispo, Director of Student Activities tried to use both philosophy and psychology on the student leaders. As 
the official advisor to the SGA, he tried to explain to them the rationale why they should investigate each student 
organizations' use of the money of specific events. It angered the students it causing heated debate which didn't 
just take place inside of the SGA meetings. Everyone on the campus could hear it as the windows were open for 
there was no air-conditioning. Questions were asked, "why can't we have our share of the money, why do we have 
to have faculty members at off campus events, don't you trust us, why do we have to have receipts that show 
invoices of exact amounts if we're spending under $50.00, don't you think that's too much to ask"? Mr. Crispo 
explained over and over again that it was just this student government as a laboratory experiment similar to how 
they would conduct Government in Tallahassee or Washington. He tried to convince them that the Student 
Government was just an extension of political science teaching them how to be good politicians. 

The bureaucratic ideas caused a great deal of animosity between the faculty advisors who challenged Mr. Crispo to 
increase budgets and to change the way the money was given out. There was a feeling among some of the 
advisors that it would be better if the faculty decided how much money was given out rather than the SGA. As 
there was no faculty organization, such as a faculty senate or union, there was only the Association of American 
University Professors which was a far cry from any type of close knit organization. The advisors appealed directly 



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to Dr. Joe Rushing, the first president, asking him for a more liberal way of the funds being distributed. The 
administration following the statues of the State of Florida choosing not to do this which started the history of a 
paper chase with forms that requested the money, forms that itemized the expense of the money, and forms that 
actually evaluated each event with the number of participants, the number of spectators and how many the faculty 
members or administrators present. 

In 1961, President Rushing presented his plans to the School Board for the establishment of a new comprehensive 
campus. The School Board had property, a large parcel of land in Western Broward, just outside the town limits in 
the City of Davie. The idea of building the college there appealed to everybody as they saw the demographics and 
the future of Broward County growing rapidly West of Federal Highway, from US 1 all the way to State Road 7 and 
some people were thinking about further West. The funding was allocated for architects' conceptualizations of the 
campus that called for twenty three buildings. 

The first four buildings would be enough to start the campus at the new location. They saw the need for an 
administration building first so that people would recognize the identity of the college and this would serve as all 
office space for all faculty, all administrators, and all departments of student services. The second building, the 
library was looked upon as a place to hold classes, a study hall, as well as the functioning of a library. The third 
building was to be the student center the current bookstore. They would need this place where students could 
congregate between classes, where student organizations could meet. The Library and faculty said "no we don't 
want the students meeting in the Library they are too noisy, they can take pictures on the front steps by the great 
seal but, don't bring them into the building". The navy air barracks even though out-of-date, old-fashioned and 
subject to temperature control allowed a spaciousness and rooms for student organizations and students to lounge, 
organize and carry out some on-campus functions. Without real athletic fields, it was hard to think of athletics but, 
in 1962 the college started its first athletic competition using the fields at Stranahan High School and the Stranahan 
High School Gym. JCBC sports at first resembled an off shoot of intramurals as players were taken from the 
intramural teams and put onto the various intercollegiate teams trying to compete. Fortunately all of the junior 
college system started at approximately the same time, so we had no real difficulty competing as the others all had 
the same level of skills. The problem in 1962 after the construction of the first two buildings was contemplating 



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what should the fourth building be. The resolution was a classroom building attached to it a building with a large 
enough theater to accommodate the student body for auditoriums and special sessions as well as additional office 
space for a growing faculty. In 1962, the 732 students at the JCBC that were full-time were adjusting to this new 
location. 

The new student population at the permanent campus quickly reached a total of 3,400 students counting day, night 
and all semesters including our infamous summer school. Not too many students transferred into JCBC during 
those first two years on central campus. Students tried to get to Gainesville or Coral Gables, the two main 
destinations of choice. The problem with student activities was that there was a very definite lack of buildings. The 
naval air barracks had old building, without air-conditioning. There were certain times in the year when they were 
very, very tough to be in, but the new campus was in the wide-open spaces of Davie and lacked places for student 
organizations to meet with their advisors. This would be a telling problem as the campus and the college had relied 
upon the student organizations to put on the various student activities. The planning time was now removed and 
the problem was that there was no locations on the campus that they were permitted to hold big assemblies or 
large meetings. 

The Lecture Theater, Building 6, that had been designed for that purpose became the object of the fiercest battle 
between the faculty and the SAB. The faculty wanted a new cost center number, they lobbied and stack the SAB to 
establish another Lyceum series, the Cultural Lyceum series which split the entertainment money for the students 
in half. Like it or not the students of Broward County would get Opera, Classical Ballets, and famous writers in their 
eighties and nineties who could barely talk to present to them the new Cultural Lyceum Program. There was no 
space on campus for all the people who would turn up. The faculty insisted that the SAB rent either War Memorial 
Auditorium or get the Stranahan's High School gymnasium or auditorium for their purpose from one act plays to 
internationally renowned speakers. The Cultural Lyceum was to give a whole new meaning to the students' 
betterment. Well, everyone was in for a big surprise, the apathy and lackadaisical approach that the students had 
shown throughout the decades at Broward Community College didn't start in the 90's or the 80's. It started with the 
Cultural Lyceum Program some of those expensive speakers that cost thousands of dollars had 7 students there to 
listen to them, but 40 or 50 faculty members attended so therefore the event was a success. Warning that 



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accountability was greatly challenged, the SAB came under fire for paying for these speakers, hiring the hall, 
putting ads in the local newspapers, but not the Venetian Crier, but in the Sun-Sentinel and the Sun Tattler. What 
occurred, was very small attendance from Dag Hammershield to Al Capp, some of those outstanding speakers 
talked to an empty house, less than 50 people. Students wanted say in who would be their entertainment. 

The students voice, student governance, and the Student Government Association started to cry we need student 
representation on the SAB. Well there was arguing before 1963 that caused extra staff people to be put on the 
SAB instead of students. Now they were crying, but they kept the positions not for a month, not for a semester, but 
for the entire year of 1964. By 1965, they had their two students on the Student Activities Board, in fact there were 
two students appointed to the board the second semester of '64, so students were now being represented and they 
felt better about that. After all they were being charged student fees, not like today's students. There was no 
student activities fees, no scholarship fees, no technical enhancement fees, or tuition fees, JCBC was still part of 
the School Board of Broward County so the money was coming out from the tax payers' budget. The students 
wanted their share and so the lobbying started. The most competitive positions were the two student voting slots 
on the SAB in 1964. It didn't matter that the faculty had five votes which was normally one administrator, one 
classified person, three faculty members and then the two students. If the students didn't show up they didn't 
replace them right away, Mr. Crispo was always there as Director of Student Activities where he was given charges 
by the Student Activities Board that held him accountable for the student activities, not the funding, efforts, or the 
accounting. 

JCBC was on a behavior mode where the dress code had to be enforced, warning once they got to the new 
campus with the air conditioned facilities every student had to wear long pants with their shirts tucked in and socks 
and shoes on. To make it look more official the fire Marshall came up to the campus and put the rules and 
regulations up so the students had to dress appropriately. Young ladies of course were expected to wear dresses 
and after all with the air conditioning there was no excuse not to wear these garments. Well, the rain didn't stop in 
Florida in '64, '65, '66, '67 or '68, and there was no sod, no landscaping and the flooding on the campus was 
unbelievable. It didn't stay around for two or three hours, you rolled your pants up the next day and the day after to 
get to your car, or to get certain buildings. The college had an ecology problem, some of that water was stagnant 



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which created the mosquito growth in Western Davie. The local people said it's because of that darn college over 
there so let's hate that darn college. 

On campus events, during the day time classes were first, but a tradition was started that the new incoming 
Freshman were hazed at the Naval Air Barracks. They were definitely separated from the Sophomore class and 
required to wear Rat Caps, beanies with short bills with the letters JCBC across the front. The Rat court was held 
inside the student center where students had to stand on the table and sing the Alma Mater on their heads, carry 
food around, or trash cans. Simple things that Sororities and Fraternities would think of as hazing became 
everyday occurrences inside the student center, a clear violation of Florida Statute about that particular activity. On 
campus locations made things rough, the library was kept off limits. If we were going to have some classes in the 
library, Grady Drake, the first head librarian, said "OK, as long as they can come in and out of the building quietly, 
no talking". Study halls not mandatory were set up, but suggested to the students that were going on to Gainesville 
or Coral Gables. Building 5 and 6 locations had air-conditioning that meant relief so students were looking in the 
hallways, but because classes were in session their talking, dropping books, making noises, or distracting the 
faculty, was a considerable problem. 

Dr. Taylor, the first Dean of Men, later Dean of Students and later Interim President used his own budget to buy the 
first concrete tables with umbrellas around the student center for students to sit. He also put tables around Building 
5 and 6 giving the students a place to locate between classes asking them not to go inside the buildings. The 
biggest object of dissension was the Lecture Theater. It was suppose to be the place for assemblies, where the 
students would get additional entertainment, educational instruction and other opportunities to expand themselves. 
Unfortunately, the faculty had other ideas, the Cultural Arts faculty insisted that every Friday afternoon at noon until 
2:00 p.m. that the faculty put on their own recital, not charging the Student Activity Board or using any of the 
money in their Art Lyceum budget. They put on their recitals attended by a few, but it showed it was their building, 
their territory, so when requests to came through to use it they sent the request through Mr. Crispo to the President. 
Who would decide who would use the Lecture Theater. The faculty won with plays and productions for a year 
considered to be the primary purpose of that Lecture Theater. It was suppose to be a multi-purpose building. The 
faculty took over, the students went outside where it was warmer. 



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The library did allow some of the quasi academic groups to use the meeting rooms as long as their faculty 
members were in attendance to keep order. "Loco parentis" was strongly enforced on campus as well as off. 
JCBC was growing and the students wanted different type of activities. The coral fields to the north of building 5 
and 6 were used for the first physical education classes along with the first intramurals at the new campus: football, 
volleyball and softball. Once they got their equipment and a place to store it, the physical education faculty would 
push badminton, archery and tennis. It would be awhile before they would get those facilities. The intercollegiate 
athletic program was still at Stranahan High School so the JCBC students went there a lot. They had showers, 
lockers, and real grass so it became a popular place. JCBC teams stayed competitive because the competition 
was growing the same way with the activities fostered on the concept to recruit students from your county only. 
That was good, and you knew who pushed it, JCBC belonged to the school board. The school board saw the high 
schools as the feeder system of the community college teams. This would give more students a chance to 
participate than just going to Gainesville or Coral Gables. 

1965 was a pivotal year for Student Activities at the JCBC. The SAB appropriated more than $3,000.00 for the 
Venetian Crier so that they could publish on a monthly basis. The Silver Sands argued and got the money to divide 
their yearbook into four quarterly publications. Traditionally, everyone's picture had been in the yearbook up to that 
point. The yearbook vowed that they would keep the graduation issue traditional with everyone's picture that was 
graduating for the college was still that small. On the athletic front, the college started construction of a baseball 
field, locker room or field house, now building 1 1 so that the baseball team could be shifted from Stranahan High 
School to the college's campus. Plans were made for the next building, building 10 that was going to be they said, 
the largest building at BJC and the most important. It would give us a place where we could seat 2,500 people. 
The administration called it a gymnasium, with locker rooms and many classrooms it was looked upon as the 
salvation to what was the current overcrowding situation. JCBC was getting a good reputation for academic 
excellence in the community. 

A good thing about 1965 and student activities was the start of five social societies illegally subversive groups 
according to Mr. Crispo. They were popular take offs on the fraternities and sororities at Gainesville and Coral 



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Gables. They weren't the same as they were organizations with the same students coming from the same high 
schools trying to stay together to give themselves a retention ring to help them survive at a junior college that was 
making itself into an ivy league university for academic excellence. The Florida Statues clearly stated that there 
would be no secret societies on any high school or any type of public school location so as JCBC was still part of 
the public school system of Broward County. The School Board and especially Dr. Rushing, but more than 
pressure on Dr. Jack Taylor to make it impossible for any of the societies to function on campus. They would not 
be allowed to wear jerseys, put up signs, play in the intramural league in their name or go before the Student 
Government and ask for co-sponsored events funding. The hot issue was the social societies refused to give Mr. 
Crispo the names and social security numbers of all their members. 

The reason for this was simple, Mr. Crispo would have his secretary Mrs. Joyce Lane check the GPA's and they 
were not keeping an average that was academically suitable for participation under the current rules of the college. 
Their parties were the talk of the town. Their tackle football games without pads for kegs of beers were events of 
the month. They made themselves into the only thing on campus. From 5 strong fraternities and sororities they 
would develop into 19 medium size, weaker, social organizations during the next eight years, but they would 
combine and form councils and a common front. In 1965 they put up a secret slate, running Bill Greene President 
of Sigma Tau Sigma for the President of the Student Government Association. The secret slate won so Mr. Greene 
now Dr. Greene of North Campus, started an ongoing battle with his roommate who he shared a cottage on the 
beach. His roommate was the editor of the Venetian Crier and the ongoing debate centered around the same old 
thing. "You have no right to be here, you are illegal, you are messing around with the rules and regulations that are 
suppose to guarantee all the students the same privileges, you are subversive". The editorials in the papers 
passed the libel and slander stages, Bill Greene's reaction or his fraternity brothers' reaction were to bum all the 
copies of four different issues of the paper. 

The controversy was so hot by November of 1965 that it was obvious, Mr. Crispo had to do something. He kept 
supporting the Student Government, not recognizing, registering or even talking to these illegal social societies. 
Department of Transit (DOT) came to talk to Mr. Crispo about the Greek letters being painted on the State Road 84 
overpass of the newly built Turnpike. They were complaining that the letters had to be taken off by the college. 



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Different businesses in Davie from Neba Hero, the hangout for the fraternities and sororities, complained to the 
college about their rowdiness, but especially their hazing of pledges to even the removing of their clothes in public 
in Downtown Davie. Some of the Church Ministers in Davie came to visit the college administration, no one knows 
exactly what the conversation was about, but the social societies thought it was about them. 

Mr. Crispo laid down the ground work for the social societies to become legal, "it's simple" he said, "give us the 
roster of all of your members and their social security numbers (student numbers) if they deserve to be in the 
organizations we will recognize them and register them so you will be allowed to be an on campus organization". 
Three months, this one issue was debated, editorials in the newspaper called Crispo weak and soft, but said that 
the Greeks should not be allowed on campus. The Greeks retaliated by drawing bigger crowds at their functions 
than the Christmas Dance or the end of the year Prom. In the second semester, a peace treaty was signed and the 
Greeks became the replacement of the service organizations. The service organizations were still there, but 
everyone left them, saying "It's more fun being in the social societies, with better activities, and a better student 
life". 



Until the complaints started coming in from the different parents, the parents constantly bombarded Dr. Taylor and 
Mr. Crispo with complaints about their sons and their daughters change of behavior. How late they were staying 
out, these jerseys they were wearing, the money that they had to contribute so a new issue was raised no student 
organization was ever to charge any dues or fees to come to a party. They did chip in to help pay for the cost of 
refreshment, but members of the social societies not only had to pay additional money to belong annually, but 
monthly service fees. Mr. Crispo attacked this thinking he had them. He felt they weren't incorporated so that 
would stop them. It went all the way to Tallahassee where the legislature found nothing wrong with it and changed 
the law. The statue read that if it was a registered organization it could participate in "on and off campus student 
activities. The major debate and problem of the sixties were solved. 

1966, this instructor first visited this fledging campus, saw the 5 buildings that were now up and a 6th one, the gym 
was almost finished. This faculty member was interviewed by Dr. Lauderdale who was trying to become the new 
President of the college as Dr. Rushing had just announced his resignation. This writer saw very little of the 



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academic world as being that of excellence for the faculty members wouldn't talk until they went to department 
meetings. Mob rule, mob opinion, and mob ideas, sure we had a flunk quota, all universities do, this writer said, "I 
thought we were an open door community type college. They call it a junior college isn't it suppose to be for 
everyone? 

The population in 1966 saw the first 200 black students, there had been 2 or 3 the year betore but, now JCBC 
closed down their black campus at Dillard High School rather than to risk any type of investigation or incrimination 
of running a segregation type institution. The Student Body was of course all commuter, this caused some 
interesting developments in 1966. This instructor was asked to become a fraternity advisor for Phi Delta Sigma, 
whose first concept was, "well if we are going to be like a real fraternity, we've got to have a fraternity house". Off 
campus parties, events up to this point were well chaperoned by faculty members, but the social societies 
presented a new problem for their parties had beer, kegs of beer, in fact one fraternity Delta Tau actually charged 
two kegs of beer to Jack Pennick, the College Bursar. JCBC almost got into an auditing problem over those two 
kegs of beer. Delta Tau's President Phil Lindsley removed that and paid for it which ended that controversy. The 
off campus, at first it was at houses of different families. The families didn't seem to mind, but some of the groups 
had more than 10 or 20 members. The pledging was what bothered the mothers and fathers, who saw the hazing 
as more than just pranks, but as sadistic, voodoo, and above the law. The fraternities and sororities all started 
looking around for halls and houses they could use. The Knights of Columbus Halls (5 of them) and the Plantation 
Elks Lodge, became scenes of fraternities and sororities smokers, rush functions, dances, formal affairs and the 
infamous founders. Money, of course, collected for some hotels were rented, which brought a different connotation 
to off campus student activities. 

Social societies grew, their membership numbers increased to 1,100 in four years time. Those 1,100 students 
were wearing jerseys on Wednesdays, which was jersey day. They each started to claim a table place, fortunately 
the new cafeteria was constructed. The college called it a hospitality center because it was going to teach students 
how to cook for other students and use student aid instead of having to hire any more employees. 

Well, now we were the Broward Junior College. We changed our name, so the fabulous seal in front of the library 



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and the one in front of the administration building depicting JCBC became BJC Student Activities left behind the 
image of service clubs and academic clubs for a new wave of social societies. At first, there was only 5 that grew 
to 11 and then they would reach their peak in 1973 at 19. These social societies for one reason or another had 
students that had come from the same high school and they wanted to stay together. The banning together by 
them made the college campus life more active than it had ever been. The cafeteria was constantly packed, but 
Student Activities did not put on any entertainment, they didn't have to the students entertained'themselves. 

Conflicts arose in 1967 and 1968 between the so called "Greeks" with the service clubs and the academic clubs, 
they were all going to the Student Government Association asking for money for co-sponsored events. There just 
wasn't enough to go around. Mr. Crispo's latest dilemma was a major philosophy change for up to this time he 
hadn't controlled any of his cost centers or taking care of any of the individual events and preparing them or seeing 
that they were carried out. He let the club advisors and more importantly the club members take care of the events. 
He didn't have the same regard for the new social societies, he still didn't call them fraternities and sororities 
because he said, "If I did that they wouldn't be able to transfer to a university and join a national organization that 
was a real fraternity or sorority". Mr. Crispo didn't see any reason to expand intramurals. He let the physical 
education department Jane Erickson take care of women's intramurals and Will Gifford take care of men's 
intramurals. The number of sports had spread out, but it was only on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, nothing 
over by the cafeteria, nothing off campus, or nothing designed to bring about any social interaction. There were 
going to be teams, but they were going to act like teams, with managers and captains so they were going to act 
right. They were afraid that they would get too competitive and not be able to handle their own rivalries, they would 
think that those off campus tackle football games for kegs of beer would spin over into the so-called flag football, 
full contact games that weren't for kegs of beer. 

Well, the college had seen the beginning of an entire new trend, the students no longer were satisfied with one 
social event like a Halloween Dance or a Christmas Party, they wanted their own parties. We saw the last of the 
proms in 1967, and the last of the Christmas parties in 1966, the last of the Halloween parties at Coots Ranch in 
1966, and the end of those functions that were suppose to be open to all the students, but run by student 
organizations. We saw new pressure put upon the Director of Student Activities, now he was going to have to 



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orchestrate, to help set up, control, facilitate, evaluate and then show the receipts for the functions. He chose not 
to do that instead he gave his blessing for the establishment of a Men's Social Society Council which, unfortunately 
this faculty member was put in charge of, without pay, and at the same time he set up a Women's Social Society 
Council which had two co-advisors, Julie Kneoig and Donna Branson from the English Department, but these 
people also were not paid, collectively together we formed the Intersocial Society Council. We were told to go to 
the Student Government Association who refused to recognize our constitution, our legality, so Mr. Crispo chose 
not to intercede. We appealed this to the Dean of Students Dr. Jack Taylor. Dr. Taylor said, "Well listen the power 
has always been with the Student Activities Board so you need as an organization to go before them, explain to 
them what your purpose and mission is in, helping the students on this campus, and then see what they say". 

Here comes issue number two, the first had been the constitutionality of the social societies and what they meant to 
BJC. Now, we try to form a collective organization, a union of social groups, we already had had a student slate of 
Greeks elected to all the Student Government offices twice. The majority of the Student Government was the 
Senate made up of the Lower House Freshmen Senators and the Upper House Sophomore Senators who would 
debate the issue. Lower House Freshman Chairperson Larry Ellis led a very good argument, even though he 
wasn't Greek, as to why there should be an expanded interest on the campus to cover more students' needs. 
Larry's point was that Student Government was to represent all the students, not just one small faction, so why 
shouldn't we take in an organization that represented hundreds. Well, it took a lot of arguments, newspaper 
editorials, but the proof of the pudding was a couple successful dances and the Inter Social Society Counsel was 
recognized by the Student Government, but it took an entire year to get it passed. 

The dances that made the ISSC so successful, this advisor called them Ice-breaker dances, Julie Koneig and 
Donna Branson said they were orientation dances. They were held at the beginning of each semester and were 
supposed to bring about a chance for every new student to see, not just the fraternities and sororities, but every 
club on campus, from Circle K to Dido. All had booths and displays that showed scrapbooks and trophies where 
they always gave out their invitations to their next social event, whether it be a smoker, a hay ride, a rush party or a 
keg party. The problem with all of this was the Cafeteria was the only building on campus big enough to hold this. 
The coaches had developed a faculty mentality, "don't you bring that stuff over to our gym"! The coaches said "no, 



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you can't do that, you can't have it our gym". 

This advisor kept saying "wasn't the mission of Student Activities to provide for the students"? That's twice that 
bothered this writer, but we went on and we packed, in January of 1967 the cafeteria with 2,800 students. The 
chaperones ranged from counselors to faculty members to the vice-president of the college. Everyone was there 
and we gave out trophies for the best displays that were grand, creative, gigantic, with everyone's interest and 
people kept walking in and out constantly. It was amazing how they kept going in and out the doors. They went to 
the parking lot so often, this rookie advisor couldn't figure out why? The next day there would be more than a 1 ,000 
beer bottles and beer cans left in the parking lot and they said over a 1 30 different wine bottles. 

The college was a little upset with the advisors and they said, "Donna, Julie, and Tom you have to do something 
about this", but a) we weren't paid, b) there was no college regulations that said we had the right to go out and 
police something in the parking lot, c) nor did we have any power to enforce it. We had a real problem with that so, 
the first casualty Julie Koneig resigned, she said "I am doing it for free, and now they want me to put my reputation 
and my life on the line going out into a dark parking lot"! There was no such thing as security, the BJC custodians 
that rode around in golf carts certainly could not handle anything in the parking lot and at this point BJC did not 
really need any type of armed police. We had plenty of chaperones in the building with more than 20. They still 
were trying to hold on to their old ways, but the faculty realized with the first ice-breaker dance times were 
changing. 

At the end of that semester, the President's Cup took on a different meaning. The Greeks had been given there 
own category by Will Gifford, and he was replaced by his friend, Tom Burke as the Intramural Chairperson. Men's 
intramurals merged with women's intramurals and student Activities still look back at Tuesday/Thursday league 
behind the gym. They even took the pool tables and put them upstairs on the second floor, but if someone 
scratched or knocked the ball off the table they actually bounced into the bleaches and onto the gym floor. There 
was no recreation area for the students on the campus. Mr. Crispo wanted no pool tables, inside the hospitality 
center. He said "that is not a place for games, it brings about bad things like gambling, smoking, and drinking and 
we can't have that BJC". The issue became not new, but very vocalized in 1967 and 1968. 



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The ice-breaker dance was bigger in the Fall of 1968, they physically counted and signed in over 3,700 students, 
the largest event this advisor had ever been to. The Allman Brothers Concert drew more, but it was outside. The 
Fire Marshall, this advisor was warned by the Dean of Students Dr. Taylor, would probably close down this building 
if he saw how many people you had here. This Advisor said, "well Dr. Taylor this faculty member would not try to 
close this event down, they are having a great time". "They are going out to the parking lot too* much", he said, this 
advisor said, "yes sir, but they are behaving themselves and we have more than 20 chaperones". The event was a 
success. 



The new slate of Student Government officers, including Scott Johnson, Phi Delta Sigma, who this advisor 
suggested to Scott that he run for President of SGA which he won. There was a whole slate of officers strictly from 
the Fraternities and Sororities so they found themselves in control of the Student Government. 

The Greeks asked "Mr. Ryan can't we do a Carnival on campus?" and this advisor being very young and naive and 
not understanding everything that it would entail, never having done it before said "sounds like a good idea, what 
should we call it?" "well why can't we call it a Fall Festival, why can't we get the Student Government to fund it from 
their cosponsored events money which they keep giving people $300.00 for punch and cookies. They don't get 10 
people to their Science Club, or their French Club meetings, why cant we put on something that every student at 
BJC can come to"? Well this advisor said, "sounds good, you better get it approved, first by the SGA, then of 
course by Mr. Crispo, then you better take it to Dr. Taylor so that he can inform the president". He, by the way 
became acting President then, "and then as your advisor you better take it to the SAB and get their approval". This 
advisor cautiously laid out some steps, Donna Branson had said "you better do that, because this is really going to 
be a big undertaking and it could cause some outside elements to come in disturb the students." 

The 1967-68 campus turmoil, created by a new college president, who was unacceptable by the faculty, 
understood only slightly by the students, created a new wave of enthusiasm where the students took control of their 
activities. After a most successful ice-breaker dance, the Fall Festival was a huge success. It wasn't exactly what 
you call a "festival" for it didn't have Carnival rides. Mr. Crispo refused to sign off on that. It didn't have a rock 



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concert, they had a sock hop. The festival was located south of the new gym where we had to promise to take off 
our shoes (you never so many pairs of lost shoes in your life). Hundreds of students went into the gym and took off 
their shoes to dance to the sounds of two different groups. Meanwhile, each of the Fraternities and Sororities along 
with different organizations planned and built a booth from a car smash to dunking tank, from candied apples to hot 
dogs, every kind of booth imaginable. Fundraisers were started during the 1967 Fall Festival. The location was not 
ideal for the coaches were very nervous and unhappy with us being inside their gym. The two bands performed 
well and the students enjoyed turning off the lights, and that's the thing, turning off the lights. Mr. Crispo had never 
done festival before. They set up all the booths, planned for the activities to go on through the night, but forgot one 
small detail, no electricity, so no lights for any of the booths. 

The students carried on turning headlights of cars on different booths so they could stay open until 10:30 at night. 
By that time people were getting exhausted. Several fights broke out, with Greeks taking on GDIs. The ex-GI's 
were taking on anybody they could. The Veterans Club, Vietnam had just started, with the TET offensive just over. 
These first veterans came back with slight chips on their shoulders. The Gl Bill said, you can go to college and why 
don't you go to Broward Junior College. They were good students, but they were good men, mostly all men. They 
formed an organization that got involved in everything from the, tackle football game without pads for kegs of beer 
against the Greeks to going to the dances at the Elks Lodge. The GIs actually using the first Fall Festival as a 
chance to get Mr. Crispo, you couldn't exactly call it a mugging, but Mr. Crispo made the mistake of going by 
himself around the back of the gym into the parking lot to check on what was going on. The ex-GI's didn't believe in 
beer or wine for they needed a little stronger substance, Jack Daniels, but they were consuming it straight when Mr. 
Crispo happened upon them. He denied seeing this, and they deny it later having occurred, but he told them to 
break it up, move on, get out of here. Some of the members didn't realize who it was for there weren't any lights so 
three of them knocked him down. They were holding him down on the ground, just working to make him see their 
way. Dr. Crispo was a little upset by the fact that he couldn't get up, and remember, he kept yelling at them "I am a 
commander in the US Coast Guard". This advisor will never forget those words, this advisor came and pulled them 
off him. They recognized this faculty and whose size was a little different than Mr. Crispo. He never ever forgot the 
incident and got to the point where he felt that there would have to be some changes in the next Fall Festival. The 
critique that he held after the first fall festival saw the old leaving and the new coming in, completing the transition. 



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Dr. Crispo decided it was time to go back to teaching, he told me so after that event. He said, "I want you to be the 
new Director of Student Activities", this faculty member looked at him and said "no way, not a chance". Dr. Crispo 
had tried to get this advisor a tryout with the brand new Miami Dolphins because of this advisors size and 
background. He almost got this faculty member killed with that, but he continued to try to unload the directorship of 
Student Activities on top of this faculty member. He would last the rest of the year. He became famous form his 
memo writing in 1967 and 68, sending everybody one sentence memos. Constantly, Marge Smith got to the point 
where she hated the memos because she had to copy half the campus on sentence memo. 

The second ice-breaker dance went off without a hitch, but the neatest thing was the Greek Olympics. This advisor 
never saw a live horse up that close before and was never big into horses the Greeks wore togas and rode horses 
around the quadrangle. They wore hats like some of the Greek gods, not Zeus or Poseidon, but Mercury hats with 
lightening bolts on them. The Sorority girls dressed up in Togas too showing a lot of leg that created a little bit of 
stir. Dr. Taylor's words were: "What happened to the dress code"? this advisor said, "Sir, they are just advertising 
an event, we are going to have the Greek Olympics". 

The first Greek Olympics featured a tricycle race around the quadrangle with hysterical full size grown young men 
paddling little kids tricycles with some bouncing off the wall of building one as they came up the sidewalks around 
the quadrangle. The tug-a-war was neat as they had permission to dig a hole and fill it with water and mix it up so it 
was muddy, and they pulled each other into the mud both guys and girls. They were having a great time, but they 
showed the service with a can food drive. They each built their own canned food pyramids in the center of the 
quadrangle and the highest one won was a sorority Delta Chi Epsilon who took a trophy for that. There was 
trophies for each event, the SAB had said to Intramurals; "You know that should be funded, that's activities, that's 
strength, that's skills". That was another argument, but Coach Burke was great he stood up for the Fraternities, 
even though he didn't like the way they played football without pads. 

Unfortunately, all the events weren't too successful, the Chariot Race, this advisor had never seen anything like it. 
The Greeks built their own chariots, and decided which four slaves were to pull the chariot. If you see the 



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sidewalks around the Central Campus Quadrangle you will notice there is a straight away from the cafeteria down 
past the library, after that straight away there is an angle fork sidewalk that heads for the building 5 classroom, then 
another one that curves around heading back towards the administration building. They were fine on the straighta- 
ways, the turns were a little hard to maneuver at full speed, but it was the deadman's curve that killed them. 
Building one stood out and the sidewalk there went at a 90 degree angle where three chariots piled up with two kids 
receiving cuts and bruises. Coach Burke was great he helped with the first aid and a little ice. 

They didn't feel it too much so the foot races; 100 yard dash, relay races, all in the Greek style of the Olympics. 
Then came the Javelin throw, spears to me should not be on campus, even without points the javelin throw was a 
bit risky. The shot put they replaced with soft balls and the distances were grand over 300 feet. The events with 
the discus they used pie pans, this advisor wished they had taken the pies out of it first . The first Greek Olympics 
will go down in history as one of the funniest events on campus. 

The toga party afterwards was what administration didn't care for as the cafeteria became the scene of a Greek 
festival. Only some of the participants got carried away with their costumes, so there would be a formal letter sent 
to this advisor protesting the lack of the dress code. Several of the chaperones would walk out of the party and the 
day of the chaperone was almost over. It would be hard after that one to get chaperones to any event, especially 
where the social societies were concerned. Bigger things were happening at BJC at this time, they had to get rid of 
a president. There was some kind of skirmish going on between the faculty and the new president Myron Blee. 
The former school superintendent Myron Ashmore and the interim president Jack Taylor would all have the same 
problems, the School Board no longer wanted to be the controlling force of BJC, so a new system would be 
devised. 



In 1968, Tallahassee would get control of the various junior colleges around the state and form a community 
college system. It would have a different governing board, a way of accreditation, a type of bargaining unit, a way 
of selecting faculty, and the college parallel concepts were gone. For the first time, the community college would 
get vocational technical courses and offer an AS degree. Little did we know, this would be a big societal factor in 
changing the makeup of the students. Dr. Taylor also announced his retirement, before he went, he approached 



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the Student Activities Board with a new concept. In 1968, he got them to approve a Student Activities fee. For 
that year 1967-68, every full-time student had to pay $15.00 a head per semester while every part-time student that 
was defined as those taking less than 12 hours had to pay $5.00 a head per semester. There was a new item 
listed on the students' fee cards that was suppose to fund all campus and student activities. 

The first Student Activities Board at Broward Junior College brought in almost $45,000 that was equal to the entire 
budget, in fact it was over the entire budget of the Lyceum Program that was at $32,000 to 36,000 each year. The 
SAB had come to a new level, a new plateau where they were able to fund everything from a bi-weekly newspaper 
now known as the Phoenix to an actual literary magazine. The Silver Sands was still publishing four issues a year 
at $2,000.00 an issue that was one of the highest budgets. Intramurals had grown mostly because Coach Burke 
divided it into Greeks and non-Greeks into two separate divisions with more trophies, more shirts, more 
equipment, more participants and less trouble. When budget expansion, the faculty jumped on, the money and 
now the musical recitals that they had gotten and done for free so they could have control of the Lecture Theater, 
was now for three hundred dollar honorariums to perform for the few people who came that were students. A new 
concept was created "why don't we invite the community?" The faculty said "they would appreciate our cultural 
refinement" so they did and the condominium population of Broward received its first free performances that they 
enjoyed tremendously so they and told their friends, who told their friends and all of a sudden the college had a 
new element on the campuses the non-students. 

Budgets were expanded and for the first time in addition to the Lyceum and the Art Lyceum there was a hospitality 
center program budget approved. I initially, Mr. Crispo who was on his way out said it was for co-sponsored 
events. The SAB wanted to have people in to show the students how to do Arts and Crafts how to do quilting, or to 
see some of the heritage of the past. Mr. Crispo had a group that whistled different tunes of countries, that would 
go over very big in the Lecture Theater. The student population did not put up with a bunch of people whistling in 
the cafeteria. 

When Greeks rushed that year organized, Donna Branson's last year as Pan Hellenic advisor gave us a good 
parting gift, she said "instead of being cut throats where everyone had no system or organization let's have all the 



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fraternities and all the sororities have the same number of parties so then have the pledges or the perspective the 
members take their ID Cards which will be just like the registration computer cards. Their names put on the card 
will list their first three preferences, and then we will have the organizations list their preferences." The elitism had 
never been a favorite items but it was started at BJC in 1968. The rush system was far more organized and a 
much better idea then the cut throat activities that had been going on, the dirty rush, the sooner rush, and the illegal 
rush. Those were all different procedures that fraternities and sororities learned at the major universities and taught 
their little brothers and sisters at BJC how to do the same thing. 

This made this research life very uncomfortable because Crispo when he couldn't get this writer to become the 
Director of Student Activities suggested to Dr. Blee before he resigned that this writer become the Chairman of the 
SAB. I served two purposes, it taught this writer the classroom was a great place to be because it's orderly, 
organized and no one really complained to the extent that the SAB would have at times for everything changed. It 
was the SAB's time to change now, no more 5 members, now it had gone to the 7 with two new student members 
but soon went from 7 members to 10, and the 10 person SAB was an even number that was not a good idea. To 
this researcher's vote should have only been cast in case of ties, but voting on issues caused people yell at this 
chairman that a conflict of interest because of support for those fraternities and sororities. 

The departure of Myron Blee and the hiring of Dr. Hugh Adams who had been this researcher's superintendent of 
schools when at Charlotte High School for this writer had been the head football, basketball, and baseball coach at 
that high school when Dr. Adams was first hired as superintendent. This brought a new era to BJC, but mostly to 
Student Activities for Dr. Adams really liked students to have a good time. Dr. Adams really felt that that would 
make them better people so he believed student activities would keep their stress levels down and provided better 
opportunity to grow. Dr. Adams encouraged social events, off campus events, Dr. Adams even came to the Elks 
Lodge to see some of the students off campus dances that this writer sponsored. Dr. Adams came to the junior 
basketball tournaments and gave away the trophies in the gym. Dr. Adams came always to the Fall Festivals that 
BJC had that for eight straight years. Dr. Adams even cautioned this writer in the last year he said 'Tom, we have 
a new concept here, and we want you to be careful with it, the Broward County Fair wants to restart, it's been 
missing from Broward County since 1952. The fair wanted permission to set up on the campus, but they don't want 



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to compete with the Fall Festival so they have agreed to give you all the booth spaces needed so the student 
organizations can have their fundraisers. The Fair will cover the overhead of putting up the rides, hiring the 
concerts and promised $10,000 to $20,000 a year in scholarship money for this campus. Just be careful for some 
of the people are not professional and have gotten into some trouble over legal issues," 

It came several years later when this researcher was Director of Student Activities, that the"" curse of Neil Crispo 
would catch up with this writer, it would take to the year 1975 to see that, but it was coming. Adams brought with 
him a new team with Dr. Clinton Hamilton his Executive Vice President who brought to Central Campus, a 
righteous way of checking every set of receipts and every single time BJC had an ice breaker dance Dr. Hamilton 
never failed to send this writer a memo telling me exactly how many beer cans or bottles of wine that were in the 
parking lot the next day, along with a number of sprinkler heads that were damaged which he expected the student 
organization to replace at $1 1 to $30.00 a piece depending on which ones were destroyed. Dr. Adams put the 
students onto another path and made us see another form of consciousness. 

The Administration brought someone else for Dr. Adams wanted to replace Dr. Jack Taylor who had resigned, so 
Dr. Adams brought from Valdasta State College a person that he had known at Florida State university in 
Tallahassee. Dr. George Young was selected as the new Dean of Students, a lot of things would be said about Dr. 
Young and his 27 years at the institution, but this writer will tell you one thing up front, Dr. George young was a 
student activist, he would give this a free hand to let the Greeks grow. Intramurals grow, Student Activities grow, 
and leadership grow, so Dr. Young would encourage community participation. Dr. Young shifted to Student 
Services and with the opening of building 7 where he emphasized a one building operation. A place where the 
students could be tested, placed, advised, counseled, registered, pay their fees, develop financial aid, seek special 
Veteran or disabled services, find a campus nurse or get security help. The concept was good but difficulty came 
with the type of counter people who were front line people that made Student Affairs either very popular or very 
slow. Student Activities came to building 7 mostly to work lines and orientation. Student Activities tried to develop 
partnerships with counselors and advisors to encourage different programs. Seminars and everything from 
substance abuse to marriage counseling were some of the early Student Activities as Dr. Young pushed the 
counselors out to become part of campus activities and in a sense this developed a new value in Student Activities. 



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Student Activities was about to lose its director, Dr. Young and Neil Crispo had a very conflicting relationship one 
would always try to "psychout" the other. Crispo want to return to teaching sociology, finish up his coast guard duty 
and his doctorate, Dr. Young gave him his blessings and said "go for it". Dr. Young wanted to find a new Director 
of Student Activities, besides posting the position, he went out and sought people who had intercollegiate 
experience in student activities. Dr. Young was looking for an entertainer, a performer, someone who had 
experience. His next Director of Student Activities was William Vought from the University of Miami. Bill was an 
older person, but very experienced having worked under several deans who gave him the Greek system, carnigra 
and on campus life in the dormitories this created a new type of entertainment from movie series to special 'get 
together" days with food that incorporated teachers and students. His arrival at BJC came with mixed emotions for 
he got along well with the students but it was the SGA and the SAB that challenged him every step of the way for 
he was the new kid on the block Student Activities was not going to be ruling the roost as it had with Neil Crispo 
and his philosophy so Bill Vought had to show proof that he could help. 

The support for this researcher was great, Bill Vought worked with the Greek system fine, in fact he knew the 
fraternities and sororities better than this writer did. This writer got to remain as the advisor because this writer 
worked for free. The Fall Festival was enlarged with Carnival rides, Bill knew the Cohen Brothers, Bill suggested 
Dengler, Bill talked about states show, which this researcher would become associated with at the Broward County 
Fair. I in all Bill Vought just made things simpler, he showed this writer a better way for the Greeks to do their 
bookkeeping, aided the rush system, clarified the things that Donna Branson's Pan Hellenie Council had left 
behind. 



William Vought did not get along well with the faculty. The Lyceum program continued to grow with main 
entertainers were brought in every year which made up the college's entertainment. The co-sponsored money 
remained about the same, but the number of student organizations grew, so the pie was sliced thinner. Athletics 
and journalism started to compete with the Art Lyceum for funding which caused the biggest debate of the early 
seventies. The so called creative arts faculty thought they were not getting their share of funding from the SAB and 
that the Director of Student Activities was siding with the organizations, especially the social societies that had 



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become so dominant in the late sixties. Bill Vought found the Student Activities Program to be run by his 
secretary Marge Smith most of the time for she was a wealth of information who had all the minutes and records 
you could use so she was able to engineer a lot of his memos and lift off of his shoulders the burdens that 
accompanied the budgetary process for the SAB. 

Intramurals started to move away from Student Activities and toward HPRD or Athletics as the'coaches in the early 
seventies saw no attempt on the part of the Director of Student Activities to increase their funding or increase their 
publicity or support. In the early seventies, Bill Vought became like some of the dinosaurs in the faculty. Bill looked 
to be part of the "Animal House" Greek series for he no longer seemed to fit that he was behind the times. His solid 
gray hair made him look like he was a generation gap apart from the students. The Rising Star on the SAB was 
Robert Liberman who was an assistant in Learning Resources where he pushed projectors around, but he was 
young, and drove a Jaguar XKE. Bill Vought would retire in the early seventies to the Keys and take up one of his 
passions, playing his upright piano in several bars and lounges. 

Bob Liberman lacked the experience, but had enthusiasm so Student Activities became a little more vibrant with 
the people hanging around the Student Activities office instead of the fraternities and sororities. Bob attracted an 
assortment of young ladies who belonged to Student Government, to Keyettes, and to the sororities with interest in 
different projects. In the early seventies, Student Activities under Bob Liberman saw several faculty student athletic 
competitions ranging from football to soccer for Bob encouraged this because of Dr. Young and Dr. Adam's 
collegiate feelings about getting the administration visible on the campus. 

The Appearance of the second campus did bring about competition, the programs would not grow on North 
Campus with any of the speed or complexity that had been famous for Central, but the early seventies would see 
planning of the first building at North Campus. Student Activities wasnt involved at first, North campus was merely 
to try to show the people of Northern Broward that BJC was making an appearance. I was an outreach effort with 2 
counselors, 7 or 8 full time faculty members, and an administrator were assigned. The organization was there, but 
it would be 3 years before they would get into the realm of Student Activities. Bob Livermon must have had some 
kind of disagreement because he resigned as Director of Student Activities and left quicker than he came. 



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Dr. Young replaced Bob Livermon in mid year with Pat Novak, one of his counselors, who had been a counselor 
for him on North Campus and on Central Campus who agreed to take over the realm of Student Activities for the 
remaining part of the early seventies, '1974 and 1975. Pat Novak was heavy into culture for she was a throwback 
to the faculty of the early sixties who saw their or their mission to develop the students sense of culture with the 
Chinese Acrobats, Ballet Dancers, Opera, Up the People or various show stoppers that would look great in an up to 
date concert hall or as part of the cultural affairs series, but it didn't attract the students of BJC because in the early 
seventies there was a heavy emphasis on technical and vocational education. 

Most of the students on the two campuses were averaging about 30 hours a week of work while taking 9 hours of 
classes. This difficulty caused the end to Dr. Taylor's Student Activities fees as Dr. Young and Dr. Adams made an 
agreement for funding from the general operating funds of the college that was roughly one and a half percent to 
cover all of Student Activities. Journalism, athletics, but especially the Lyceum with the major concerts, the Art 
Lyceum, the cultural affairs as well as the small amount of money used for a hospitality center program and an 
intramural program which did attract the most students were the main expenditures of the mid seventies. 

The Student Activities had started to develop with mix from some of Student Personnel Services including a new 
student orientation that somehow was taken from building 7 and put into the Student Activities office. Pat Novak 
could not comprehend how she could take care of the orientation programs on two locations at the time, let alone 
Student Activities at two locations at the same time. At this time, this researcher was officially the Coordinator of 
Intramural Athletics and Recreation for the college and had seen the better days of the Greeks gone by so this 
writer started to look for replacement organizations to assist the development of Student Activities on campus. 

F-Troop, students who are rarely student activists. They could be wrong, but they tried to do the right thing. They 
made mistakes, but they learned from their mistakes. F-Troop began small in Intramurals trying to bring the athletic 
competitiveness away from the "sweat hog" leagues on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons that the coaches had 
developed behind the gym. They brought Intramurals to the cafeteria, to encourage daytime activities 5 days a 
week from the pool tables to the volleyball nets. Intramurals became a vehicle of social interaction as everything 



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went coed. There was still plenty of competition in the night time leagues in the gym with basketball and 
volleyball. It was the daytime events that really showed that Intramurals had a new face in the early 1970's. 
Intramurals as Student Activities were in fact leisure services and got into the Student Activities from 1975 to 1978. 
These activities would spread out to become nighttime and weekend activities that in 1 979 would involve a record 
8,300 students. 

F-Troop truly became Student Activities and Student Activities became F-Troop. These students were volunteers 
who would show to assist the Thursday night movies, keeping score at the Wednesday night Intramural Basketball 
games, helping cook on Saturday afternoon at Tigertail Lake or driving a van with visiting dignitaries from FACC or 
NASPA around to different college locations. These students were a group that developed from volunteers to 
become work studies. When they actually got paid for up to 15 hours per week this pushed them to help more. 
There were also three who were paid part-time money as supervisors who had the most experience. These 
Leaders knew how to get around the procedures that BJC was utilizing. There would be no way to meet and greet 
the number of people that F-Troop brought through the Student Activities office if they didn't use "Plan C" shortcuts 
to keep a door that was suppose to be always open. 

When F-Troop Hung out they stayed for hours, or worked for days. It could be New Student Orientations, the 
leadership retreats, or the Disney World trips. F-Troop had a great deal of giving, but these students always 
needed something or someplace. Some of them had some physical or psychological hang-ups which they worked 
them out by belonging. There would be 608 altogether if you count the groupies who were and the boyfriends and 
girlfriends of the ones that F-Troop brought around to be with the group. They were the strangest assortment so 
the name F-Troop fits as in the old TV shows. They blew up their own control towers, shot down their own gates, 
fell into wells, and certainly fell out of boats. . 

What was needed was a social activity for them to do, whether the monthly Friday night dances at the Elks Lodge, 
the regular weekly night activities, or the monthly dance at the court rooms. The events though would change as 
the new campus in the north caused them to have to be in Dr. George Young's word "cloned" so that they could 
take care of other students at a different location. Quantity is not quality, so it was right to have Student Activities 



36 



on North Campus, but it should have been a different group with another person to be the mentor. There was no 
budget for that, so with "Dragon Lady" Marge Smith harping and taking care of SAB records, Student Activities 
spread to another campus. The first building, reminded one of a science fiction movie because of a strange shape, 
Student Activities was given one pool table, one four draw filing cabinet, one wastebasket and one F-Trooper, 
Kathy Welch, nickname "Humming Bird" who would go up there and make things the way it should be. Never have 
so few seen so many miles, caused so many problems from the problems came joy, activities and aid. 

The late seventies saw a wonderful mixture of people that spent a lot of their time. Rick Hanaver, "The American 
Boy" was the first student Intramural coordinator to Kim Moskowitz, "Wonder Woman" who volunteered to go down 
to South Campus because John Peters "Sheep Dog" had gotten lost again. The original F-Troopers were quite a 
mixture, but the second generation, the third generation and the last group of F-Troopers all contributed something. 
The neat thing about F-Troop for it was suppose to be an honorary service society, doing service to the campuses 
first, then services off campus when time permitted. The only way to make a whole student was to marry them to a 
cause, an idea, or a charity and then with a group that had some resources like an Elks Lodge, a Kiwanis Club, or a 
rotary. This combination would allow them to carry out their projects and take care of the activities on campus at 
the same time. The only surprise was that more did not have a harder time in school. 

In the late 1970's Dr. Hugh Adams proposed a new campus to the South on BJC engineered a remarkable coup of 
occupying part of North Perry Airport to establish South Campus. BJC also finished the construction of Bailey 
Concert Hall's, first of three stages which would give a new meaning to cultural affairs as well as a new name 
Broward Community College (BCC) as Broward Junior College was no longer fitting for now BCC involved so many 
people from the youngest musicians to the oldest senior citizens to watch the young musicians. The end of the 
1970's saw Student Activities diversified, the mission statement was changed, Dr. Young thought that the student 
organizations inside student activities as well as student activities should be true retention rings, sort of like life 
jackets for the students in need of that sense of belonging. Everyone was looking for a mainstreaming but the 
students were branching off in different directions. 

Dr. Young proposed that we change the direction by implementing a larger recruitment program for the people in 



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the different organizations. The quasi academic groups merged into the honorary society Phi Theta Kappa in the 
very first years of JCBC. Through the years of BJC with all of the French Clubs, or Biology Clubs that have not 
disappeared. The 1980's brought a re-emergence of a new groups that featured technical things, from horticulture 
to computers, which again were quasi academic bringing a new aspect into student activities. Student Activities 
was almost done with the Greek system, though the very last trace of the last fraternity TKE could be seen. The 
other Greek lettered organizations were the honorary drama group, business group, and of course the academic 
group. The social scene had changed for the togetherness or sense of belonging was over and the meism's were 
relevant everywhere as people stopped joining organized activities and saying "what's in it for me"? Student 
Activities had to come up with an answer. Their answer would be different activities for different age and types of 
students on locations off campus where they could go ahead and establish themselves towards success in a social 
environment. 



Student Activities finally received some professional assistance as Dr. Young agreed to fund an assistant. A 
Student Activities Coordinator who could handle the North Campus because it was growing to such size there was 
over 5,000 students. This coordinator would have to be a "Jack of all Trades" running Intramurals, taking care of 
the office, making sure to publicize the dances and activities off the campus, the campus functions, and at the 
same time sell the collegewide activities as part of each individual student's program. So the motto was "a student 
of one campus is a student of every campus" and on Student Activities with F-Troop assisting went. 

In the 1980's F-Troop was no longer the same, no longer the intimate little group that got together for their fun and 
games. The Student Activities staff on three campuses in the 1970's and featured 22 unusual F-Troopers. Now, in 
the 1980's F-Troopers were selected from other student organizations, before this F-Troopers looked for 
volunteers, people who just wanted to get in what you called "service learning" or what we call "sharing and caring". 
Now, because it was an honor to be an F-Trooper people were taken from other organizations and given honorary 
membership if they had provided students in their organizations as well as the general student body or community 
groups with a little extra bit of service to help them. At the same time, it also became a leadership organization as 
the college lacked that, the honorary academic of course was still Phi Theta Kappa, only now instead of one 
chapter the Mu Mu Chapter on Central there were three chapters with one for each campus. They were the largest 



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organizations on each campus in numbers, equality, and their grade point average was the highest, except for 
maybe the Women's Tennis team. 

The organizations were all looking different in the 1980's for it was time for values' clarification, time to do more 
volunteerism, and time for the "sharing and caring". Conscious of the '80's got people involved in political 
campaigns, beach clean ups, as in taking care of one another. The Orientation Icebreaker bances disappeared, 
Orientation itself took on a different character for it was more like a traveling road show that opened Term I and was 
actually not the same in Term II. When there was a much a much smaller presentation and students who didn't 
care, which became more and more obvious in the 1980's. The lackadaisical apathy to just plain down right not 
caring, not caring what happened to anyone but themselves, in fact it was questioned whether they cared about 
themselves. Looking at Student Activities who was about to change its name for Dr. Young felt that it was really 
necessary than just fun and games. It was in fact Student Life. 

There were 7 areas of Student Life, the first and always was New Student Orientations. They looked different on 
each campus, but yet they had the same ingredients, meeting the needs of a lot of different students. Student 
orientation continued to be Student Activities' Welcome Wagon, only now it was called Student Life. The second 
area was a heavy emphasis on Leadership. The Leadership retreats of the 70's were fun and games, scavenger 
hunts, raccoon chases, some of the things were real and some of the things weren't, but for sure they were, the 
Student Leadership Retreats. The Leadership Seminars put on by professional counselors or, facilitators brought 
in from the outside to develop a different type of leadership for each different type of student from each different 
campus. The second area also included student leadership classes now offered for college credit and offered on 
each campus. The third area was still Student Entertainment for the Lyceum and Art Lyceum were gone, Then 
$12,000.00 to $20,000.00 a year was put aside to bring in some type of entertainment that would amaze the 
students. The student entertainment wasn't one or two big concerts that used up all the funds as it had been in the 
"70's. Now, it was a smorgasbord of daily activities, every day of the week, sometimes two and three times a day, 
and the idea was to give as many students a place and something to do. The fourth area, the Hospitality Center 
Programs still featured the co-sponsored events for those student clubs that wanted to exist. On paper, there were 
about 117 at the beginning of the eighties, it's hard to find 40 of them, but they found you. Now, the Student 



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Activities Board funded their trips, and their advisors trips so they were always coming looking for money to go to 
another leadership conference, to another leadership test, to interact with other campuses, or to get better ideas. 
Some abused it, or didn't use it. The Hospitality Center Programs put on a lot of numbers, novelty acts, or groups 
that could pass in the crowed cafeteria's and make people realize that there was more to life than just television. 
The fifth area was still the largest of all the Student Activities, Intramurals. The leisure recreation nights went on 
and on with, the numbers decreasing to about 5,500 in the 1980's, but the amount, and the variety stayed the same 
as long as they were cost effective. The competitive leagues increased with more independence than ever before. 
Fifty organizations have left BCC by the 1980's so now, instead of groups coming with their own managers and 
captains, the first night of each league had to be try out nights and of course everyone made a team. The sixth 
area was the Values Clarification a fancy name for Volunteerism, "sharing and caring", or "service learning". 
Student Life wanted a community connection long before there was an office of that name. Student Life, had the 
people volunteer who went out and did things from the Broward County Fair to Toys for Tots, from working in after 
school care centers to actually devising on the campus in 1980 Camp BCC a non-threatening environment for 
almost 400 kids, where student leaders got jobs, that taught them responsibility as there was no bigger 
responsibility than someone else's child. The sixth area was volunteerism, the do-gooders. The seventh and last 
area of Student Life was Student Governance. Student Governance for the students were speaking for the 
students, not like the SGA did as an organized body to voice of student protest. Student Governance was putting 
the students on all 13 standing committees that began the 1980's, by making them voting members and trying to 
encourage their participation. Several leadership retreats were designed just for that so the term student 
governance grew in 1986. The Competitive Edge Presidential Leaders, an honorary leadership society, would take 
the place of F-Troop. The Student Life would foster teaching certain students, how to copy other people's 
leadership styles, mentor with college administrators, apprentice with different community leaders, intern in 
Tallahassee and Washington so that their styles of leadership would all change. The Presidential Leaders would 
see the most important on a local, state and national level how they interacted with the power, controlled their 
problems, carried out investigations, and made a difference. 

Student Activities have now shifted to Student Life in the 1980's the menu had been established with the 7 
foundation points. Collegewide it had been a success, but individual campuses still found some resentment from 



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the faculty who felt that they were not getting the amount of money to set up their quasi academic organizations or 
trips. The Student Activities Board rose to the challenge and developed both a fund for travel and convention which 
was used for organizations and teams like Math Olympics or Brain Bowl to have actual trips for intermediate 
competition before they got to championships for states and regions. Also the SAB established a travel fund for the 
advisors because the academic departments could not afford to send the advisors anywhere to support their own 
students. The early 1980's saw a drop in enrollment in BCC so t there was some need for constraints of the 
budgets in Student Activities. Some were frozen as early as April when they are suppose to go to July 1 st . One 
year, the budgets were all frozen on December 12 th making quite an embarrassment for those areas that have 
already contracted acts, speakers, or trips. The SAB was given a black eye, everything was placed in the general 
fund because the money came form the declining enrollment. By mid 1985 the crisis had reached proportion where 
the college went into financial exceegency actually letting 13 full time persons go. This necessitated a change in 
the choice of funding for Student Life. BCC was about to take on a very big Student Life endeavor. 

Student Activities Fees was the 1 concept that wasn't new for it was used at universities and other colleges. BCC 
had tried it in the 1960's where it was based on whether a student was full or part time. A formula was constructed 
with Dr. Young's suggestions to put a certain amount per credit hour, so the first student activities fees in 1986 was 
set at a fifty cents per hour for every student. As Director of Student Life, the main concern was accountability and 
credibility for these fees would become a prime target for the Senior Citizen, Adult Learner or the returnee that was 
back for retraining because of a job reduction. The idea of them having to pay a Student Activities Fee for 
something they did not receive would irk and create some type of credibility problem, it wasn't credibility though as 
only a few of the adult citizens started to hold the college accountable, for the swimming pool not being open in the 
afternoons, or for movies that were a year and a half old. The students themselves that participated in the 
organizations had no problem whatsoever with the fees. Student Activities Fees increased the operating budget of 
Student Activities from just over $580,000.00 total to close to a million dollars with scholarship collection and 
Student Activities Fees collection. Scholarships got twice as much as the activities fees. The students found that 
the Federal Government had removed over three quarters of a million dollars a year in scholarship funds. So Dr. 
Young decided with Financial Aid to put a student scholarship fee in to effect to help take care of not just those 
student athletes, not just those minority students that needed Pell grants and complete financial assistance, but 



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also, the people that were cut out of the HRS System and needed a place to go for their assistance and care. 

The early 1980's gave way to the mid 1980's, the return of the SGA really sparked no interest whatsoever in the 
students running the government, the money, the activities or programs. What had been the activism of the 1960's 
with their complaining and constant bickering over small items such as how much for this dance or those punch and 
cookies. Now the students with a very lackadaisical approach even to these new student activities fees that they 
had to pay out of their own pockets. The new Student Unions, Syndicate Town Meetings and other forms of 
government resulted in failure. The student representation no longer existed for it was merely a voice like any other 
club or organization that fostered complaints. In a move to channel the actual complaints to the right place the 
Student Governments would start semester luncheons for first collegewide administrators. This irked the campus 
administrators who said "Well, aren't we the front line, don't we take care of procedures, why shouldn't we be 
included in these luncheons?" The second round would include all the administrators which overwhelmed the 
students at some of the luncheons, chasing some away. There was so few at some of the luncheons that F-Troop 
has had to be brought in make a crowd, but the SGA caught on to this pipe line. When the choreography was done 
right with follow up questions the vice presidents, provosts and deans began making actual on the spot changes of 
what was going on in their student life on campus whether it was the prices of textbooks, the number of parking 
spaces, the size of the speed bumps or the number of trigonometry classes. The student lunches became a very 
productive student activity which by the 1990's would be one of the main sources of interaction for amusement, 
entertainment, information and discussion about the developments of the college family. Then things in 1986 took 
a different tack when Dr. Adams announced that he was going to retire causing the faculty to be overjoyed, 
students apathetic, Student Affairs Staff especially the Student Life concerned. Adams was always a supporter of 
Athletics, which was always taken care of despite the consolidations and compromises made in the early '80's that 
forced our budgets to go towards the student activities fees. 

Dr. Adam's departure would mean a lot of things, but to Student Affairs and especially Student Life we felt a very 
sincere closeness to him, whether we celebrated his birthday party over at his house making special banners or 
hosting his different guests when they came into town. Dr. Adams was always very receptive for his close 
friendship and partnership with Dr. Young had made this a most amazing period of growth without funding. Dr. 



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Hugh Adams left behind his name on Central Campus which irritated the faculty just a little bit more so there would 
be no farewell party. He left behind a definite change to the technical, vocational side with 212 partnerships with 
various local industries and manufacturing to help our vo-tech students with the AS degree programs they were in. 
He left behind a lot of compassion for he enjoyed those Fat Cat student football games and basketball games. He 
encouraged everyone to interact. The departure of Adams would signal a real change for the Union that had cried 
for his ouster now needed a new start or cause. 

The search for a new president in 1986 would bring in Dr. Willis Holcombe, not exactly a stranger, he had been 
Assistant to Adams, an academic dean, the provost on central, and then gone to Brevard where he served as a 
vice president and worked his way up in the State the Community College System and in higher education. Dr. 
Holcombe's ideas were not the same as Dr. Adams, he encouraged decentralization for no longer did he want to 
control every single aspect of the college life. Dr. Holcombe put the Provost's responsible for what went on in their 
locations on each campus. Student Activities all of a sudden got a lot of attention from the Provosts and the Deans 
on the different campuses. Campus Administrators started to attend functions, answer questions, become 
involved, and saw the Student Activities budget as something that could be worked and used to increase their own 
campus status. The late 1980's saw a change in Dr. Young who had always stressed behavioral objectives. Now 
a new mission statement, a new purpose, and direction were the objectives according to Dr. Holcombe that would 
be based on budgetary needs and concerns. While the SAB got larger, Dr. Holcombe reduced the number of 
standing committees from 13 to 9, but the one with the most money was the SAB. The new fees were placed a 
building fund, knowing that in the future seed money would be very necessary to move any legislative grants in the 
right direction. The seed money that Dr. Belan said should be in an interest bearing account to produce $7,800.00 
a month in revenue. Dr. Young didn't take it all in for he just said, "As long as you don't go in the red, spend 
anything for salaries, and keep any reserve or surplus fund that looks like a contingency, you must make everything 
balance and keep it squeaky clean." 

The SAB was not a chore anymore for the people who served on it were all special interest. Young put Judith 
Berson, his director of Financial Aid, Dean Susie Matter, Registrar Roy Twilley, or Counselor Elaine Starson, so he 
could get information and direct feedback to himself via weekly phone conversations. The students on the board 



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were products of the leadership retreats and finally were starting to be concerned about how their money was 
spent. The board's policy and the budgetary controls was tightly scrutinized which angered Mr. Brumley as he had 
been made chairman of the SAB. Mr. B. thought they were questioning his personal honesty and would storm out 
of several meetings and during the week make statements about "What the heck are those darn people doing to us, 
what business do they have?" "It's their money Mr. B" 

The SAB grew in size, but the number of organizations had been diminishing on paper it looked like we had about 
40 student organizations at the college, when in fact, certain organizations were on every campus and run by the 
same advisor. They changed their names each decades, like the Black Student Union became the Brotherhood of 
Elite, then the African American Student Union. They now found themselves challenged by other blacks, this time 
Caribbean cultures and T.A.W.I.C was created which to some was very confusing, but most faculty just lumped 
them together in one group. The administrators looked upon them as "high risk" and gave them little extra special 
concessions from their trips to let them use campus facilities for holding dances to which they invited the 
community and did fundraising using college facilities, which is a violation State Statue. 

The 1980's started to come to a close, Dr. Holcombe's effects were starting to take hold after four years the 
campus based management was starting to become a reality who had won over everyone. Athletics fell and 
started to report to the deans on each campus which seemed like the Ft. Lauderdale Center was no longer in 
control of procedures on the campuses. The campus administrators found their budgets increased and able to do 
their own construction plan ten years in advance. Each meeting discussed what would go on ten years from now. 
It would have been great if the consultants that had come in, in the 1970's to tell us about the 1980's had come 
back in the 1980's to tell us about the 1990's, because no one knew the new students. 

The students of the 1990's were no longer the traditional high school graduates. The new student populations were 
the adult learners, the divorced females without any educational background, the grandparents and totally 
unprepared for high school graduates who were pushed out by social progression, and became the new students of 
the 1990's. Nobody realized that they were carrying baggage filled with stress, anxiety, worry, and grief. These 
students were pessimistic about their future, wanting contracts and guarantees that their career would have a job at 



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the end of it. That their eight month to two year degree would get them into a profession where they could make a 
lot of money. Most became very impatient and dissatisfied so they would take any quick paying job that came 
along from $8.00 an hour from UPS to $1 1 .00 an hour working in some hospitals removing bed pans. 

The 1 990's student had to be reoriented into why they were at college. The new student orientation failed to reach 
the majority of the students which caused a lot of students not to ever make it to graduation let alone through the 
first year. Faculty members did not help the situation, the attrition rate was extremely high in certain areas of the 
curriculums. 



The 1990's saw Student Life's leadership change as one of Dr. Young's deals tried to bring us into the 1990's, save 
money and put different emphasis into areas that looked like they were not succeeding. In 1991, Penny Mclsaac 
took over as the Collegewide Director of Student Life with ideas that were different in service so a para professional 
staff would be hired to take care of all locations rather than the student volunteer concept of the F-Troopers and 
student personnel running each office. The para professionals would run each office and students would assist 
them. Other ideas that were de-emphasized was the hospitality center programs, student entertainment, while 
leadership was turned up several notches because it was Dr. Holcombe and Dr. Young who saw the areas as good 
public images and a way to show the public that BCC students were everywhere and could do everything. When in 
fact we are talking about less than six dozen students a year taking part in that activity. The goal was 
accomplished by the students who did get a primary source of leadership styles, it had started in 1986 on Elliot Key 
with the Competitive Edge being organized. The new Challenge ROPES Course at Tigertail was one of Penny 
Mclsaac's biggest projects co-sponsored with the technical vocational side of the college at the Commercial 
Boulevard site. It was meant to be a corporate training center using both college students, college employees and 
the public as participants in both soft skills and hard skills training. Intramurals continued only the same people ran 
it with a lack of marketing to a different cultural Student Body who didn't understand some of the activities which 
were eliminated because of cost or attendance The early 1990's saw the Student Life offices reaching out more to 
the different organizations. Appeasement's of the faculty and the quasi academic groups was necessary to keep 
the Deans on the different campuses happy. The Deans were told by the Provost that was their mission. The 
athletic area showed little signs of improvement for the departure of Rex Brumley, the all time Athletic Director had 



45 



caused the interim Bill Porterfield to turn it over to a Dean who was too busy so business managers were selected, 
Nick Ziccardi, Jim Martens, and Tracy Toms to assist in paper chases. Each campus had attempted to find Athletic 
Directors doing a search process that caused mild disaster on North Campus with the selection of The Information 
Director one person who lasted less than 6 months. Charlie Lyle left to take a position with the Florida Elks Youth 
Camp which hurt the fan support and the buildup of 1994-95 when people were coming out to watch what had 
started back in the early sixties. "They don't charge anything for it, so is it worthwhile going to^ n The question was 
never answered so was a new emphasis in Athletics, "We will talk about that under the section called Athletics!" 

Student Activities saw the cost soar in Athletics. First, it was the insurance of the student athletes that went from 
$13,000.00 to quadrupling and then doubling the year after that. The cost of new athletic trainers would bring down 
some of those sky rocketing insurance costs, but increase the staff cost almost as much. Student Activities put so 
much emphasis in but had the fewest amount of students. So in a way to change things in 94-95, Penny Mclsaac 
brought co-sponsored events back to bring out the advisors to make other activities more noticeable. 

The role of Student Activities now Student Life, soon to be the next generation, would decide in the mid 90's on an 
identification crisis. They will need to have some way of having a common denominator, a weave through the 
various levels of the cultural diversity and that is going to become the new student services building on each 
campus. With the right type of presentations, every market, and every aspect of the Student Body can be reached. 
The challenge for Student Activities is to become so diversified in this showcase of student services that they will 
be the main entertainment facet, information, and connection for the student of the nineties. At each location they 
are going to have to be more than a traffic control center that they were in the 1960's and 1970's for they are going 
to have to be more than an attraction to student organizations for now because of the lack of belonging or 
knowledge of the organizations. The BCC students of the 1990's has connections at home whether it's a social 
organization on the streets or family ties, but most important they have economic ties through which avenue 
Student Life can reach them. The concept in the late 1970's and early 1980's was to take the activities off campus 
into the communities where the students were located is going to have to be revisited. They lack not only 
transportation, but the desire to return to the campus where their classes are located at. Some feel inconvenience, 
anxiety, or have fear so the non-threatening environment of yesterday is gone but today's student looks over his 



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shoulder, watches his books constantly and sees his money disappear with more and more fees. Whom do you 
trust? 

Student Activities was the area that was seen as the adjunct or extracurricular of the 1960's, the area that everyone 
joined in the 1970's, the area that everyone used for support in the 1980's, and must become in the 1990's the 
confidant, trustee, person or place where students go to find a friend. If that's not done the commuter image will 
indeed not expand and BCC will see a further decrease of the number of student hours. Student Life has a key role 
for the more things the amuse the student, inform the student, or help the student's progress. It can be seminars, 
success skills, a billiards table, or someone that can tell them about a fishing trip. These students of the 1990's 
need someone to talk to more and more for they are not going to counselors or advisors. They will be self 
registering as the computer is taking over that aspect. The on line registration is not doing the work so the students 
are using the phone in lines and cannot pay cash on the spot so credit card can do installment payments. The 
1990's student still can see a live person in the Student Activities area where they still can be a participant a 
spectator or if they really want to step up even a facilitator to help Student Activities in the next century become the 
soul of the campus. BCC has to have more than just a newspaper, calendar events, for now BCC has to have 
people who can communicate and be trusted. 



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Student 
Activities 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

In. 1960, there was 16 classes with 204 students. This grew in 1962 to 73 classes with 949 students of which 
721 took evening classes and only 228 took both the same program as days, however students not willing to 
fulfil any program could have enrolled in evening classes. The evening students took classes as a matter of 
intellectual stimulation, cultural enrichment or to aid them in their current employment. 

The College hired their own kitchen staff at Naval Air Barracks. The highlights in entertainment were Rat 
Week, The American Folk Trio, and The Viking Three. 

In 1962, The Silver Sands reviewed and portrayed the 1st graduating class of JCBC. Charles H. Miley, Dean of 
Students Personnel Services, and faculty member Ron Haire were the most active in student services. The 
Freshman Class had its President Tom Ferraro and student leader Joseph Patton, now head basketball coach 
at Hillsborough Community College Basketball. The Sophomore Class was led by President G. L. Bartlett and 
Sponsor Ron Haire. There were Theme parties, Social gatherings, a segregated campus and an active Choir. 

Then in 1963, The Silver Sands described how everyone moves to permanent campus. The Broward County 
Board of Public Instruction developed Junior the College of Broward County under Chairwoman Mrs. Virginia 
Young. The "Great White Father of JCBC", its Founding President was Dr. Joe B. Rushing. There were, 2 
Deans and 3 Counselors along with key faculty advisors: David Pactor, Ben Bockstege, C.E. Rhodes, Ron 
Haire, David Shaw, and Joe Capello. In 1965, JCBC had the same physical plant. The college held its 1st 
Cookout. There was a college sign on Davie Road and the first large table reel computer. The campus saw its 
1st skateboard, a large Intramural program in Athletics, a political rally for Senator Cain, a Pearl Buck Lyceum, 
extremely heavy flooding, a Toga party, theme dances and two Security officers. 

The Silver Sands in November 1966 saw Orientation in the new Gym for 3 days followed by Rat Week, 
September 9-17. The registration in the Gym with IBM cards and Freshmen Beanies (Rat Caps) gave the 
campus a collegiate spirit. The Planetarium and the New Lecture Theatre/Classroom Bldg. 15 were the main 

physical features. The Lyceum activities featured David Schoenbum with sparse attendance then Jack and 

1 



Sally Jenkins who were questionable. The prestige in the math courses and the new Planetarium that was 
compared to an Aztec temple in midst of wasteland sheltering its inhabitants in a Concentration Camp with no 
water, bathroom or air-conditioning that changed some minds as to the Collegiate Spirit. Then Classroom 
Building A (used to be C) had curtain walls that cut light, but not noise. The patios without seats, book racks or 
public telephones were considered inconveniences. The 4 day registration process was a frustrating 
experience. The timely happenings included the De Lara and Woodle concert opening of the Fine Arts Building 
with an art exhibit, foreign language movies, Pan Ku illustrations, Venetian Crier reactions, and JCBC 
professors. 

The 1966 Lyceum included Dave Brubeck, The Norman Luboff Choir, and "Romeo and Juliet" by National 
Players Touring Dramatic Company. Fine Arts featured the Sound of Music, and a Folk Music program. The 
Medical Assistance Program was started and received funds to travel to a state conference. There was a 
Recognition Night that awarded plaques to Phi Beta Lambda for Interest, Circle K for Service, Circlettes for 
Most Outstanding, and Honorable Mention Freshman - "Man of the Year" Larry Ellis. The Events included 
Finian's Rainbow, The Ruth Mitchell Dance Company, The National Opera Co. "Barber of Seville" production. 

Barb Salter described that there would no longer be "Rat Week" so rat caps were used only during the Rat 
Dance at the Student Center. The Annual Rat's Repose, semiformal dance, was on September 25, 1965 at the 
Governor's Club Hotel. This celebrated the end of open season on Rats and the formal acceptance of 
freshmen into daily life on campus. After one month, freshmen were entitled to almost equal rights with 
sophomores. Freshmen senators along with Rat King and Queen were introduced. 1964 "royal rats" were John 
Wheaton and Connie Carvett. 



The other events according to student David J. Fitzgerald who praised SGA for the Winterhurst Dance on 
Monday September 13, 1965 as a great social activity for the students finally outnumbered the faculty at the 
event. The JC Theatre spotlighted "Teahouse" Production in Campus Little Theatre in Building C with free 
tickets at Student Center for November 12-20 at 8:00 p.m. The Lyceum Program hosted Peter Nero at 
Stranahan Auditorium. The Halloween dance at the Cote Ranch in Davie with music by Jesters with 

chaperones to judge costumes. The Bam Dance with crowning of King Ugly who reigned over the dance. 

2 



Apple cider and donuts were served. One free ticket per student was available at student center with fund 
raisers of one cent per vote for charity to decide who would be King Ugly. 

January 28, 1966 

The "Sound of Music" with an adorable cast was set for April, 1966 that used the new, but empty theatre in 

A 

Building 6. The College Dance on Saturday January 29, 1966 at Cote Ranch Bam had an admission of 
$1.00 per person with college ID featuring the music of "Vandals". The SGA sponsored after the game 
"Sock Hop" on January 29, 1966 in the Stranahan Gym with "the Cavemen" providing free entertainment. 

February 4, 1966 

JCBC had a Pep Band with 25 performers playing before the home basketball games. The Lyceum Series 
presented a Shakespearean Tragedy, "Romeo and Juliet" by the National Players on February 12, 1966 in 
the Stranahan High School Auditorium. Dr. Willard S. DeLara, chairman of Fine Arts Department, 
presented a faculty recital on February 5th in the Lecture theatre. The songs and arias of classical music 
were accompanied by Jimmy Woodle, JCBC music instructor. 

February 11, 1966 

The Language Department offered full-length foreign pictures with English subtitles. They had 4 showings 
weekly of "Flamenco", "Confessions of Felix Krull", "Carnival in Flanders", "This Strange Passion", 
"Marriage of Figaro", and "The Sheep has Five Legs". 

February 18, 1966 

The "Sound of Music" set was designed, but other assistance was needed for set construction, publicity 
and costumes interested students should contact Miss Mildred Mullikin, George Cavanagh, or the Student 
Dramatic Director Tom Brown, a graduate of JCBC, now working on drama degree at FAU who had done 
the set designs for 'Sound of Music' and "The Teahouse of the August Moon". The "Swing Out, Swing In" 
for "Which Way of America" according to Pidgeon Darbo was one of the songs by a group of 100 youth 
from 17 nations who appeared on campus to express their views on Moral Re-armament. The hour long 

appearance convinced a very large wary audience of doubtful students who were impressed at the 

3 



highlights including the three leaders, Colwell Brothers; a drum solo by world's record holder for non-stop 
drumming, Bob Onesnel, and John Sayre, US Olympic Gold Medalist in rowing. The aims of the group 
were; to end dictatorship and give birth to liberty of all men, to end moral pacifism and give birth to a 
fighting spirit, and to end racial violence giving birth to a nation that speaks out with a united voice. 

February 25, 1966 

The Norman Luboff Choir presented a Concert Recital for Lyceum in the Stranahan High School 
Auditorium on March 4th. 



March 4, 1966 

Dave Brubeck Quartet set a JCBC show on March 10th as part of JCBC Lyceum program. Students were 
limited to one ticket with ID at Student Center. 



March 11, 1966 

The Silver Sands was coming soon with Vietnam featured, according to Editor Pam Edwards. Sing Out 
'66 fostered a local singing group 

September 2, 1966 

Annual President-Faculty-Student reception at the Governor's Club Ballroom honoring new students was 
attended by 1100 students. 

Rat Week in full swing included the hazing of freshmen in student center. 

September 16, 1966 

The Drama Club presented "Mad Woman" that was performed October 12-15 and 18-22 directed by 
Mildred Mullikin and George Cavanaugh. The 2 act play allowed students with ID cards to be admitted 
free. 



September 16, 1966 

Free films in the Lecture Theatre were provided through the efforts of the Assemblies and Departments 
Program Committee shared by Dr. Homer Ledbetter paid through the student activities fees. 

Semi-formal dance at the Governor's Club was official end to "Rat Week" at JCBC. Rat King and Queen 
were awarded to two students with most spirit. Sophomore used rat activities to instill some school spirit 
proving that this common bond of suffering from the harassment helped new students get acquainted with 
each other. The Rat Repose was free with student ID, the tickets were at the Student Center Student 
Activities office. 



Fine Arts increased to expand on culture by Dr. Williard de Lara that included art appreciation, music 
appreciation and drawing to enrich students' cultural background. 

September 23, 1966 

Lyceum Program was at Stranahan Auditorium with Warner, Porter and Warner. 

Johnny Poole (Rat King) was selected to inspect the bottom of the administration fountain while Queen 
Linda Palata was selected for continuous boasting: "I am a pig, because I do not wear socks". Only 228 
Freshmen showed up for the Rat's Repose. 

October 7, 1966 

American Folk Ballet performed "Great Gettin up Mornin" as second Lyceum program. 

The Name the Lake Contest included round trip plane tickets for 2 from Ft. Lauderdale to Miami was 
sponsored by Crier. 

October 14, 1966 

"Mad Women of Chaillot" was scheduled for October 13-15 and 18-22 featured fast action and humorous 
puns Directed by Miss Mildred Mulkin and George Cavanaugh with student stars, Terry Whitshire, Mike 
Beckham and Phyllis Hogan. 

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October 21, 1966 

The Noblemen performed for the SGA-Phi Theta Kappa Halloween Dance at Pioneer City. There was a 
Costume Dance in the Gold Nugget Saloon. 

Joel Whalen won the "Name the Lake Contest" with name, "Seahorse" and donated six $13.70 prizes to 
Variety of Children's Hospitals in Miami. 

Broward Community College Orchestra gave the first concert in JCBC Lecture Theatre that was conducted 
by Jimmy Woodle and free to all students. 

Folk Ballet was followed by Derek and Ray folk singing that was performed during the same week. 

November 4, 1966 

Derek and Ray concert of Lyceum Series at Stranahan High School with Derek from London and Ray from 
Brooklyn were musical instrumentalists. 

Pep band for home basketball games and stage band for jazz started by Musical Department. 

Starry American Folk Ballet performed in South Broward High School Auditorium as part of Lyceum 
Series. 



November 18, 1966 

Spirit bonfire lights Wednesday night as Circle K sponsored event with dance with music by Gas Company 
on Student Center patio. Cheerleader David J. Fitzgerald, emcee, introduced coaches, players, 
cheerleaders and campus student leaders. 

Lettermen were composers who sang at War Memorial Auditorium Lyceum concert. 



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November 18, 1966 

Christmas Carol Program presented by College Choristers on December 2 nd in the Lecture Theatre due to 
request by Student Activities Director Neil Crispo for most students would not be able to be present for 
their performance at the downtown Second Presbyterian Church. The 70 members of the College Singers 
under Director of Choral Thomas Cavendish with the 20 College Choristers performed the service. 



Art Faculty exhibits in Fine Arts Gallery enhanced by new faculty member Lawrence Kassash, Russell 
Green and La Monte Anderson. 



January 20, 1967 

Capacity crowd for Jorge Morel, noted guitarist, played at Stranahan High School auditorium in First 
Lyceum of Term II featuring Latin America and Spanish selections. 

January 20, 1967 
( Plan to hold Coffee House named "The Bent Card" sponsored by Pan Ku named to protest the IBC Card 

on January 27 in the Student Center with poetry readings and folk singing. 

"Photography As Art" was seen in new exhibit on display in the Fine Arts building featured 47 
photographers depicting everything from war, happiness and insanity to farm life and scenes in Harlem. 

January 27, 1967 

At Town and Gown theatre the hit musical, "The Boy Friend" was a Lyceum presentation on February 4, 
1967. 

Mack Douglas in Lecture Hall to speak on "How to make a habit of succeeding" was sponsored by the 
Business Department for the student body. 

Dwayne Storey started the "Bent Card" coffeehouse compliments of Gaslight Restaurant in Plantation. 






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January 27, 1967 

Peruvian television personality, Sue Behling, known as Sam, stayed with her parents in Pompano Beach. 

"Carousel" was Chorus and Drama combined effort with Cheryl Jobbins and Tom Cavendish playing lead 
roles in War Memorial Auditorium on February 24 th and 25 th . 

* 
Films upcoming from the English Department including "Plato's Apology: Life and Teachings of Socrates" 

on January 24 th and "Aristotle's Ethics: Theory of Happiness". 

February 4, 1967 

"The Boyfriend", a parody of the 1920's, was really a huge musical joke or headlong fling from wacky 
flapper age at Stranahan High School Auditorium put on by Town and Gown Theatre as second 1967 
Lyceum. 

March 3, 1967 

"Carousel" was a big hit with capacity audiences at War Memorial Auditorium starring Dr. Thomas 
Cavendish and his student Cheryl Jobbins. 

"No Such Thing as Handwriting" said Florence Paxton, Graphonnalysist, brought to JCBC by Pan Ku. 

March 17, 1967 

Saucer-Sighting newest fad at JCBC for Judy Mathis, sophomore SGA Senator and President of Psi Delta 
Chi took UFO photo from atop Fine Arts Building 

March 17, 1967 

College Radio moved to new time featured interviews, humor and songs for 25 minutes on Community 
College Calling on WSRF on Sundays at 12:30 with Alan Kent, Program Director; Joel Whalen, former 
kiddie show star; and Irm Bocchino who also worked on Nova TV. 

"Get Camel Driver's Rating" take free Arabian Eye Test as latest gimmick of Buerger's Planetarium 
marketing. 

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March 23, 1967 

The fourth annual Florida Poetry Festival held at South Florida University was held in honor of poet 
Archibald MacLeish. 

The Mitchell Trio came to Junior College for March 31 st concert at War Memorial Auditorium to highlight 
folk singing. 

March 23, 1967 

Forensics went to State, "Chances are Excellent" quoted Coach Don Nicholas as JCBC finished second in 
nation to Miami Dade led by students Criss Cross, Nanny White, Chet Mwisner, Bob Vandenberg and 
Irmgard Bocchino. 

April, 1967 

In the spring of 1967, the Speech Department established a local chapter of the National Phi Rho Pi 
Speech Fraternity at JCBC. According to Irmgard Bocchino, the purpose was to promote the interest in 
Forensic activities in the junior college which included: Debate, Reader's Theatre, Oral Interpretation, 
Persuasive Speaking, Entertaining Speaking, Impromptu Speaking, and Extemporaneous Speaking. 
Irmgard Bocchino besides being President placed 2nd in Woman's Impromptu Speaking, thus qualifying 
for the highest degree of membership. In 1967-1968 membership in Phi Rho Pi that consisted of 34 
members. The team was working with their coach Don Nicholas. 

April 14, 1967 

Coffee House was big success as topper for SGA Picnic with the first JCBC Folk Festival that featured 
gospel sounds of Williams Sisters along with 15 other acts that performed for 350 faculty and students. 
Pan Ku Club President and MC James Higgins mentioned that a few more events like this was needed for 
JCBC apathy to be gone. 



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November, 1967 

This year for the first time, there was no official "Rat Week" or "Week of the Humble Freshmen". 
Therefore, the JCBC beanies or "rat caps" were only worn on the afternoon of the "Rat Dance" held 
September 15rh at the Student Center from 12:00 TO 2:30 P.M. 

Serendipity Singers were first Lyceum stars who entertained a War Memorial capacity crowd. 

November, 1967 

Stage '67, drama workshop was open to all students presented "The Hasty Heart" and "Ladies in 
Retirement" in the last 6 weeks of the semester. 

JCBC's first Geological Expedition was a 2 day field trip under direction of instructors James Condon and 
Lucius De Yampert with 22 students in a chartered bus with geologist Dewy Stovers and geographer Harry 
Schaleman as part of a 4 hour credit course. 

Forensics and Phi Rho Pi Honorary Speech Fraternity at JCBC was open to all students interested in 
Debate, Reader's Theatre, Oral Interpretation, Persuasive Speaking, Entertaining Speaking, Impromptu 
Speaking, and Extemporaneous Speaking according to President of JCBC Phi Rho Pi Chapter Irmgard 
Bocchino. 

November, 1967 

Intramurals in 1967-1968 during the first semester included basketball, bowling, volleyball, ping pong, flag 
football and tennis was run by Judy Blucker and Tom Burke who have developed club trophy for 
organization and running point totals. 

April, 1968 

Dionne Warwick was Broward's Final Lyceum Program. 

The JCBC drama department's production of "The Miracle Worker" proved to be the most successful in 

JCBC History. 

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April, 1968 

Jimmy Woodle's development of JCBC Orchestra was major Fine Arts achievement. 

The Chamber Choir of JCBC was open to all students and worked on "The Medium" and "The Jumping 
Frog of Calaveras County". 

Al Capp answered questions on: sex, adultery, bosoms and Doris Day Movies to show wit and knowledge 
beyond "Lil Abner". 

July, 1968 

Summer Drama Workshop included Don Quixote de la Mancha, Happy Time and Death of a Salesman as 
plays directed by Mildred Mulliken and George Cavanaugh tutoring. 

December, 1970 

Pantomime one of the newest classes in Drama was the oldest form of Drama. 



BCC hosted two great groups, The Rhodes Brothers and the Association. 

The Establishment Fat Cats vs. Student Dissenters 20-13, but wait until next year. 

With the facilities expanded the productions increased to four plays since the opening of new lecture 
theatre that officially opened with "The Detective Story". 

Music talent abounded in the BCC Jazz Ensemble and BCC Symphony Orchestra. 

December, 1970 

The Reader's Theater featured group reading encouraged by Director Mrs. Julia Woods as well as 

individual effort to make this student activity a rewarding experience for both the audience and readers. 

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December, 1970 

The BCC Art Shows featured "Forms and Objects" from Lee Nordness Gallery and "Prints" from Crique 
Gallery. 

Fall Festival Fun included rides, games and contest. 

May 8, 1970 

Was this any way to run a football game? Faculty beat students 30-18 behind quarterback Hugh Adams, 
with running backs Tom Ryan and George Young. 

Local movie "The Adventurers" told the story of the Latin American Revolution. 

Capacity crowd listen to Dwain Story, Herb Kaplan, Bob Ungerer as well as Brewer and Shipley at Purple 
Crackle Coffeehouse supported by SAB. 

September 15, 1972 

The Battle of the Bands on North Campus Patio brought Coconut Creek Police to calm students. 

September 22, 1972 

No Big Name Acts planned for campus by Bob Livermon, Student Activities Director until SGA appointed 
student entertainment committee. 

November 3, 1972 

The Reader Theatre going to the Snowbird Invitational performed "Death and the Maiden" under the 
direction of Mr. Richard Quianthy and Mrs. Neda Hill. 

November 17, 1972 

Indian Arts show held in BCC's Fine Arts Gallery with cooperation from the Florida State Museum in 
Gainesville. 



Fashion Show aided crippled children sponsored by Delta Chi Epsilon, a BCC Sorority. 

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December 1, 1972 

The annual Christmas Dance sponsored by Rotaract in the hospitality Center featured a covered dish 
dinner from around the world. 



A Thurber Carnival was a collection of 10 skits in Central Campus Lecture Theatre. 

Funny, fouled-up Faculty Fatcats flattened 24-6 by undaunted, daring student dissenters made the record 
in favor of faculty 3-2. 

December 8, 1972 

Children's Theatre presented "The Magic Is Me" by students David Novak, Gar Hogan and George Kovak 
in an effort to entice children to the theatre. Music Department Jazz band swings. Cavendish was to be 
Director of new adult chorus. 



January 26, 1973 

"Cabaret International" used around the World Theme. 

Artist Series presented touring Horfe Ensemble. 

January 26, 1973 

Reverend Teeter's Flying Gospel Revival had main interests of biplanes, sweet young things and God, in 
that order. 

January 26, 1973 

La Monte Anderson "Summer Vintage" selected for show. 

"Waiting for Godot" was presented in BCC Central Lecture Theatre. 



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January 26, 1973 

BCC planned special activities for "Above Average" students in grades 6 through 8 to help exceptional 
students develop fully without boredom. 

February 9, 1973 

Mormon lecture stirred enthusiasm in Hospitality Center's Seahorse Room. 

Circle K North held Field Day to bring education and recreation to Markham Elementary and the migrants 
workers camp children. 

BCC Symphonic Band planned 2 concerts for semester. 

Students in annual Plant a Tree Day under supervision of Smokey the Bear for Campus, Clubs and SGA . 

February 16, 1973 

Poet Rie Mastem's recital gave BCC rare entertainment experience showed deep concern for humanity. 

The Department of Cultural Affairs at BCC coordinated by Mrs. Darlene Williams started Film Services in 
1972-1973 and also sponsored Artist Series at Parker Playhouse. Films were shown on Central Campus 
on Thursday nights and North Campus on Friday nights with better turnout from community rather than 
college student body. 

February 23, 1973 

BCC presented "The Magic Is Me" for Children's Theatre. 

Miss Lona Bums, English Literature at BCC was at Conference of Forum to explore religion in Literature. 

Symphonic Board Concert in Lecture Theatre had variety program. 

BCC's first Kite Day was testing ground and crash test. 

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March 2, 1973 

Jazz ensemble presented outstanding program directed by Lowell Little. 

Seminoles celebrated History and tradition with Indian Fair and Rodeo. 

March 9, 1973 

Art Exhibit featured Claire Satin, and Dave Pactor, and 21 BCC Instructors. 

March 30, 1973 

Jean Mark Edmond presented lecture advocating personal beginning. 

"Rain", an exercise in repetition, was a creation of art student David Govoni. 

Student painting repelled ghosts in James Rebstock's Monday night anthropology class using Navajo dry 
paintings. 

Pianist Eugene Istomin was fourth and final concert of the Artist Series at Parker Playhouse for 1972- 
1973. 

Central campus College Singers Lenten Week concert conducted at All Saints Episcopal Church directed 
by Thomas J. Cole. 

June 1, 1973 

College Cultural Activities scheduled for June included South Plantation High School band, BCC's Radio 
Club, South Florida Amateur Astronomer Association, Weed Control and Identification, Drama Department 
production of "The Serpent" and Planetarium's "The Voyage of Magellan". 

June 8, 1973 

"The Giants Four" featured at Buehler Planetarium during summer. 

Reader's Theatre featured Albee plays. 

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November, 1973 

The Lottie Goslar Pantomime Circus performed workshop on North Campus. 

The Whole Earth Arts Festival designed to be a cultural experience involving the community, students and 
faculty. Music provided a large part of the easy going atmosphere at the Festival. Domes, constructed by 
individuals from Re-Creation, housed Pan Ku poetry readings. Whole Earth Arts Festival not like Carne or 
Mardi Gras for it was meant to be a cultural affair. 

November 9, 1973 

Political commentator and comedian Mort Saul appeared before large audience. 

"Matchmaker" took a step through time as Thorton Wilder farce put on by Drama Department. 

November 26, 1973 

Student Activities Offices hit by rash of thefts. 

Dick Gregory and Nikki Giovanni spoke on Central Campus after SGA approval for $2,750.00. 



February 9, 1974 

Black students planned Black Culture Week open to all students featuring concert "Operation Funk", Black 
Culture speaker, Soul Food Day and "Superfly" Day "with African dress and dance to Great Train 
Robbery". 

Organist Virgil Fox played everything from Bock to Rock at War Memorial Concert. 

February 22, 1974 

BCC prepared for Whole Earth Arts Festival. 



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March 8, 1974 

The Whole Earth Arts Festival featured Virgil Fox organ concert in War Memorial Auditorium, poetry done 
organized by Pan Ku, Ft. Lauderdale Curo Ballet performance, Greek drama workshops by Paula 
Manning, displays and vendors. 

Dr. George Young received SAB funding for 75 students to attend a Social Science Seminar that featured 
rational emotional therapy were escorted by Katherine Dinnen, Associate Dean; Stewart Brown, Social 
Science Chariman; and Boyd Hilderbrand, Behavioral Science Department Head. 

October 25, 1974 

SGA brought "Canned Heat" as first of Concert Series to Campus. 

November 8, 1974 

Canned Heat played to a crowd of 2,000. 

November 11, 1974 

"Go Fly a Kite" led by Kathy Spanton and Susie Smith as experimental class won student approval. 

November 13, 1974 

BCCN's first major social event was the Halloween Masquerade Ball for 35 or 45 cents and moved to 
Phil's Pizzeria on Sample Road after midnight. 

December 2, 1974 

Kite Day hoped to attract more contestants and become a yearly activity according to Art Instructor Steve 
Elliot. 

January 23, 1975 

Dr. Leo Buscaglia, the "Love Professor", from USC left a little love at BCC-N with a captivated audience at 
Pompano Beach High School. 

February 4, 1975 

Two BCC Artists displayed their works at Central Fine Arts Gallery after Lecture Theatre presentation. 

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March 5, 1975 

Coffee House II had variety of acts including Scott March, George Clark and Mike Coffee. 

BCCN Arts and Crafts Activity Hour coordinated by Kathy Spanton included students favorite hobby or 

craft. 

* 
April, 1975 

WAN - Wednesday Activity Hour at Noon featured music, recitals, athletic events, and social interaction 

became a North Campus tradition. 

September 10, 1975 

Home Grown Coffee House debuted with great turnout and good student talent under direction of Larry 
Ellis, BCCN Librarian. 

September 24, 1975 

North Campus Blood Drive was a great success led by Provost Dr. Crawford, English Department Head 
Shelby Lee and President Hugh Adams. 

October 1, 1975 

Paula Manning was leading lady of Classical Greek Theatre performed in Central Campus Hospitality 
Center. 

October 15, 1975 

"Music at Noon" featured Dr. Thomas Cavendish and other North musicians conducting Wednesday noon 
time recitals. 

Lorin Hollander, internally known concert pianist visited BCCN. 

October 15, 1975 

Seminar in International Travel (HIS 290) toured Europe with 45 BCCN students with history instructor Bill 
Greene and his former BCC Central instructor Tom Ryan. 

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October 17, 1975 

Tickets were available for "Blood, Sweat and Tears" Concert in Central Gym. 

October 23, 1975 

Bicentennial close up on Ethan Allen headlined American Revolution Bicentennial 1776-1976. 

-» 
Tom Ryan held a party for North Campus students at the Plantation Elks Lodge. 

October 24, 1975 

Symphony Orchestra played free for all in BCC Central Campus Gym. 

November 5, 1975 

BCCN first play, "The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail", opened at the Pompano Recreation Center directed by 
Ed Reardon. 

December 6, 1975 

Activities Hour featured band Uranus. 

January 26, 1976 

"Up With People" appeared at BCCN's Wednesday Activity Hour to promote communication, to break 
racial barriers, and to get people involved. 

February 2, 1976 

John Day, a popular singer and guitarist of Ft. Lauderdale appeared at a North Campus Activity Hour. 

February 9, 1976 

Plantation leaped into Bicentennial celebrations when Mayor Frank Veltri appointed committee to beautify 
their city. "Star Spangled Broward", Broward Community College's Town Meeting on Wheels spent one 
week in each of Broward County's 20 municipalities. A Boy Scout Camporee was planned for Lauderdale 
"Heritage 76". 



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February 17, 1976 

Black History Week was highlighted by pageant for Miss Student for Black Awareness. 

March 1, 1976 

Count Basie and His Orchestra played in concert on BCC Central Campus. 

March 8, 1976 

Air Force Chorale came to BCCN and joined the BCC Youth Symphony under the direction of Dr. James 
A. Brooks, Jr. 

March 22, 1976 

Ft. Lauderdale held street dance to celebrate its 65 th birthday immediately after the Las Olas Arts Festival. 

Pianist Michael Scherperel appeared at BCCN. 

March 29, 1976 

College of the Bahamas (COB) Reps visited BCC in an effort to establish a reciprocal exchange between 
BCC and COB. 

April 12, 1976 

Alexander Scourby performed with BCC Youth Symphony in Honegyer's King David at the Second 
Presbyterian Church in Ft. Lauderdale. 

April 12, 1976 

The Cultural Horizons Club of the North Campus sponsored its annual World celebration in the BCCN 
Quad. 



September 13, 1976 

Music at Noon returned to BCCN with baritone Dr. Thomas Cavendish who ranged from folk songs to 
opera. 



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October 4, 1976 

Jazz Greats Stan Kenton and Maynard Ferguson appeared at Dania Jai-Alai for BJC Concert. 

October 1 1 , 1 976 

Youth Symphony season was best ever with invitation to National Jazz Festival in Daytona for January, 
National Mid-East Clinic in Pittsburgh for March as well as several local concerts. 

Vincent Price presented a special dramatic performance of Halloween in Central's Gym. 

North Quad was scene of Home grown Coffeehouse that included Mike Barra, Jeff Blake, Rebecca 
Boggess, the Irvine Brothers and Prairie Dog under the direction of Librarian Larry Ellis. 

October 25, 1976 

Plantation Elks Lodge sponsored multi campus dance with the music of Dream City that featured dance 
contest that packed the hall organized by Director of Student Activities Tom Ryan. 

November 1, 1976 

Fatcats, Student Flag Football, Student Wacky Olympics, and jazz highlighted November activities. 

November 1, 1976 

On October 17, 1976 Vice President Clinton Hamilton formally dedicated Tigertail Lake Aquatic Center 
including built up shoreline, picnic table areas, and boat storage pavilion to host sailing, canoeing and 
some unexpected swimming. 

November 22, 1976 

BCC Central hosted a variety show including the comedy of "Edmonds and Curiey" and the music by 
Tristam n . 

The second Home-Grown Coffee House in quiet lounge of Building 8 was anything but quiet. 

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November 22, 1976 

The students slaughtered the faculty in a football game during the North Student Activities Hour that had a 
great turnout, which was referred by Andy Andrews and Bill Porterfield. 

January 24, 1977 

Icebreaker Dance featured St. Petersburg disco band "Clockwork" that got over ioo students up to 
"Boogie" while students Kim Moskowitz and Tammy Shark had to be rescued by security guard Dennis 
Dempsey and the Coconut Creek Police from building 48 elevator. 

January 31, 1977 

Black Culture week featured disco-Jazz of hit musical group "Brick" in concert with Tristan and the 
Voshays in Central Campus Gym. 

January 31, 1977 

The Plantation Elks and Director of Student Activities Tom Ryan hosted multi campus dance with rock 
group Nightshirt. 

Auditions for spring play plagued by the lack of rehearsal space and need for more students cited Director 
Ed Reardon. 

February 14, 1977 

The sound of Latitude rocked the Hospitality Center during BCCN Student Activities Hour while a men's 
disco fashion show featured Donald "Cleve the Cat" Cleveland. 

March 7, 1977 

World Day featured at BCCN including cultural experience, free food, and displays of various countries. 

March 14, 1977 

Art Festival was the "best ever" with headliner Metropolitan Opera Star Roberta Peters in a War Memorial 

Concert. 

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April 4, 1977 

Maya Angeleau visited BCCN to speak at Women's Center. 

Coffee House quality was higher than the prices with Gamble Rogers, Mike Barra and the Irvine Brothers 
attracting students and community people. 

April 11, 1977 

"ACES", a pro-frisbee team performed at BCCN Student Activities Hour. 

Spring Day at Central Campus consisted of live music by "Flyer", softball tournament, food and prizes. 

October 12, 1977 

"The Bermuda Triangle: An Incredible Saga of Unexplained Disappearances" was topic of discussion by 
Charles Berlitz, author of book The Bermuda Triangle spoke to public and students at BCC Central. 

November 16, 1977 

The Broward County Youth Fair was again held on Central Campus with entertainers Johnny Rodriguez, 
Johnny Rivers, the Haneferd Circus and Argentine high diver Oscar Biscione. 

March 22, 1978 

Pianist Michael Scherperel appeared at BCCN. 

April 5, 1978 

Noon Activities Hour was investigated by committee led Academic Dean Dr. Patricia Dyer with the report 
written by librarian Larry Ellis on how the program could be improved. 

April 12, 1978 

The 12 th Annual Spring Day sponsored by SGA was held on Central Campus with free food, band Illusions 
WAXY radio, and sports from Softball to a swimming meet. 

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October 10, 1978 

Big Mama Blue entertained at Student Activities Hour at BCCN. 

October 30, 1978 

Photographer Stan Waterman lectured on the movie "The Deep" at the Central 6ampus Hospitality 
Center. 



January 30, 1979 

Four Time world trick Shot Champion, Paul Geme, performed at each campus performing his famous trick 
shot of sinking 10 balls with one shot. 

February 6, 1979 

Black Awareness Group planned Black Awareness Week with $4,000.00 help from Dean Leonard Bryant. 

John Day and Travis appeared on campuses with a special blend of music originating from top 
contemporary singles. 

March 6, 1979 

The determination of Tom Ryan and a group of people known as F-Troop, created Tigertail Lake as a 
weekend retreat for BCC students where they built up shoreline, picnic table areas, and a boat storage 
pavilion. 

March 13, 1979 

Community Arts Festival drew crowd despite adverse wind conditions. 

November 16, 1979 

125 singers who had previously performed in a production of the "Messiah" were selected by Dr. Thomas 

Cavendish to participate in holiday performances. 

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January 30, 1980 

BCC Jazz Band performed at "Freedom and Solidarity Day" at Yankee Stadium sponsored by WFTL radio 
and several civic groups including a petition addressed to the Iranian Embassy to release our hostages. 



County services needed funding for Alcohol and Drug Abuse programs. 



March 7, 1980 

Marathon runner Bill Rogers spoke to 500 dedicated runners in Central Gym at the Arvida 
Communities/Miami Herald-sponsored Tun Run" 

December 3, 1980 

Broward County Fair was an 1 1 day variety event held at Gulfstream Race Track in Hallandale that 
attracted about one half million people. 

February 4, 1981 

Former Black Panther organizer Bobby Seale lectured on the "Perspectives in Black Liberation" in BCC 
North Campus Omni auditorium. 

February 18, 1981 

Vincent Price appeared in the Omni for a presentation "The Villains Still Pursue Me" that combined his 
classic films "The Fly", "Theatre of Blood" and some evil poetry readings. 

Rosey Grier appeared at Central Bailey Hall for the Brotherhood of Man Series. 

April 1, 1981 

Balalaika Dance Troupe enthralled BCCN. 

The country/rock band "Alabama" performed in BCCN Omni for $8.00 per person. 

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April 1, 1981 

"Carmine" was performed in Bailey Hall with television star Eddie Mekka performing music, song and 
dance at Central Campus. 

January 22, 1982 

The "Royal Lipizzan Stallion Show" pranced through the doors of the BCCN Omni. 

March 1, 1982 

$ IRALOP, an April's Fools Day, edition of the Polaris spoofed all campus and college problems. 

April 4, 1983 

Students celebrated with Spring Day with variety of fun filled festivities sponsored by Behavioral Science 
Department and Student Activities. 

March 18, 1983 

Banquet awarded student achievers held in OMNI with largest turnout to date. 

October 18, 1983 

Family Day at BCCN featured a balloon stuffing competition and pie eating contests that raised funds for 
Billy Ricks, a BCCN bookstore employee who was undergoing expensive bone marrow transplants. 

October 4, 1984 

Family Day encouraged student-staff friendship with cookout featuring chef Dr. Carl Crawford, BCCN 
Provost and Reggae artist, Ernie Smith coordinated by Student Activities Coordinator Penny Mclsaac. 

September 27, 1985 

10 th Annual Broward County Fair opened at Gulfstream. 



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October 11, 1985 

Omni hosted bodybuilding advocates with Gold Coast Bodybuilding Championship in the BCCN facilities 
with over 1 ,000 spectators. 

February 14, 1986 

Students competed with their minds in annual Brain Bowl challenge to recruit team for inter-collegiate 
competition coached by Mary Jo Carl, Director of the Honors Institute. 

March 14, 1986 

Spring Break where thousands of college students migrated to the Strip for Lauderdale's annual blowout. 

October 3, 1986 

Student Activities Director Tom Ryan stated only 17 percent of student body was involved in last year's 
activities and an increase was a major goal for 1986-1987. 

Whirlyball gave you kicks on a bizarre court with a combination of wiffleball, bumper cars and basketball in 
one fun activity. 

December 1, 1986 

This Children's Theatre was really "kid stuff that was directed by Milidred Mullikin at BCC for over 16 
years. 

December 12, 1986 

Acclaimed entertainment arrived when John Patterson's dynamic college show of poetry, dance, music, 
and mime in "The Dream Keeper Speaks: The World of Langston Hughes" in Bailey Hall on Central 
Campus. 

January 30, 1987 

Students discussed key issues including expansion to meet increased enrollment, South Pavilion, late 

report cars, postponement of registration, and AIDS as topics discussed at Administrators' SGA lunch. 

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March 27, 1987 

Students enjoyed first BCCN Award presentation due to efforts of F-Trooper Rick Erens. 

September 28, 1987 

Student Life promoted involvement by a widening scope that according to Tom Ryan, Director of Student 
Life was the development of student communities. 

October 12, 1987 

The Laser show Voyager IV stunned students in Omni presentation. 

November 9, 1987 

Congressman Larry Smith hosted a lecture entitled "A New Constitutional Convention" on South Campus. 

February 8, 1988 

Video library was a boom to all student couch potatoes with over 250 VHS format videotapes that were 
checked out of Student Activities office for two days with $25.00 deposit. 

John Patterson's highly acclaimed rendition of Langston Hughes' poetry in a powerful one-man show 
entitled "The Dream Keeper Speaks" entertained 300 in the Omni Auditorium. 

February 8, 1988 

The Student Entertainment Committee, an advisory board for Student Activities, promised a mix of 
exciting affairs. 

Broward Ski Team traveled to Crested Butte, Colorado. 

March 14, 1988 

Winter Fair was a success hosted by BCCN SGA that raised $1,300.00 for the Student Help Fund (SHF) 
scholarships. 

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October 3, 1988 

"Sexy" Legs contest at a recent Plantation Elks Lodge party was won by Trish Gould. 

October 24, 1988 

The World Game was held presenting a whole new perspective where each player represented 1 percent 
of humanity (50 million people). 

BCC North hosted International Festival that featured a different region each day of the week. 

November 21, 1988 

Student Life's video lending library made tapes available to students. 

December 12, 1988 

Tom Gustafson, State Representative addressed the graduates in the Omni celebration. 

BCC celebrated Afro-American History Month with "Beyond the Dream"; telecommunications event; 
Booker T. Coleman's "Classical African American History"; Comedian Melvin George, Ethnobiologist Dr. 
Wade Davis "Drugs and America"; Black Pioneers "History of Blacks in Broward County"; Poet Lawrence 
Flakes; Denise Mathews "Black Seminoles"; Singer Jane Powell; Congressman Bill Clark's "The Black 
Experience in Pre-Colonial Florida"; Irwin Heffier and Katherine Davis "The Blues With a Touch of Jazz" 
concert; and Robert Thompson "The Role of the African-American Artist in Florida". 

February 13, 1989 

February was proclaimed as Community College Month so BCC joined over 1,200 community, technical 
and junior colleges with theme: "Community Colleges: Where America Goes to College". 

February 27, 1989 

BCC's Student Life program had diversified to meet the needs of an institution that was commuter based 
with non-traditional students and an average age of 30 years. 

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March 13, 1989 

Culture Fest brought the world concept to 2,000 BCC students that was sponsored by the International 
Club and Student Life on Central Campus with food and decor from the homes of the international 
students according to their sponsor Elena Starson. 

April 3, 1989 

Formal Dance to be held at Oakland Park Ramada sponsored by SGA. 

April 17, 1989 

The Second Annual Spring Fling formerly known as Winter Fair was sponsored by North's SGA in order to 
raise funds to provide textbooks for needy students. 

Graduation ceremony held in Omni for about 450 participants with Executive Director of Florida 
Community College Clark Maxwell as Speaker. 

April 17, 1989 

South Campus recognized outstanding students who received awards from Dr. Willis Holcombe, Dr. Hettie 
Williams and Susan Matter while student Life and F-Troop provided refreshments supervised by Tom 
Ryan and Penny Mclsaac. 

South's first annual Human Awareness Day opened students' minds with a series of lectures, displays and 
buffet lunch to raise money for charitable organizations. 

August 23, 1993 

A Bailey Bonanza included Cloris Leachman, Cabaret, Joseph Holmes Chicago Dance Theatre, Lainie 
Kazan and Diana Regg. 



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August 23, 1993 

Student Life offered free activities including the Grand Opening Tigertail Lake, bowling, Lester the Clown 
Comedian Randy Leori, charicatures, movies at the Cinema in Drafthouse and Bob Harris, authority on the 
Kennedy assassination. 

March 7, 1994 

Couples caused havoc in Ayckborn's "Bedroom Farce" as BCC student adaptation of play that showed 
there was still life left in the old story of a not so blissful married life presented in Central Campus Lecture 
Theatre. 



March 21, 1994 

Colonel Danny Zeevi of Israeli Defense Force spoke on state of Middle East spoke that Israel had to make 
peace with its enemies at a symposium on South Campus. 

Writes of Spring Fair featured southern writers presented by North Campus English Department. 
March 21, 1994 

Schendier's List author Thomas Keneally lectured at Bailey Hall. 

April 25, 1994 

Sports "Spring Thing" where students, faculty and staff competed in tournaments evoked the sleepy spirits 
of old fashioned school pride and camaraderie in 25 th annual event. 

Term II graduates prepared to walk at the Omni Auditorium on North Campus 

Outstanding students recognized at the annual BCC Student Life Awards Night held on Central Campus 
for the 93-94 school year. 

The North Campus Jazz Combo and Big Band under the direction of Bernard Switzer released their debut 

album titled Broward Community College North Campus Jazz Ensemble. 

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Septembers, 1994 

Fun and games at South Campus with opening of new game room funded by Student Activities Board 
funding and supervised by Student Life Coordinator Tony Roberts. 

October 31, 1994 

Halloween celebration in Central Cafeteria included pumpkin carving contest, fundraising booths for 
college organizations, entertainment by "Big Love" and "Solomon Grundy" that made a safe Halloween for 
a lot of kids. 



November 28, 1994 

Varied works and paintings exhibited at Central's Bailey Hall presented by the Gold Coast Watercolor 
Society. 

December 12, 1994 

Bailey Hall brought in showbiz's best for January including Kim Hunter and D.L. Colburn in "The Gin 
Game", Joseph Holmes Chicago Dance Theatre, and Freddy Cole with the Amherst Saxophone Quartet. 

January 23, 1995 

Student Life made the difference for students with everything from cultural affairs, religions, sports and 
community service clubs. 

February 6, 1995 

Student Life Department presented Craig Anton, Fettucini Brothers along with Davis and Winfield each 
week during February on all three campus. 

September 25, 1995 

Rock and Roll Cartoonist Steve Gipson poked fun at politicians in Central Campus cafeteria. 

Magic hit BCC campus as new trading card craze required a lot more creativity and energy than baseball 

cards or poker. 

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October 9, 1995 

Students participated in Ropes adventure course. 

February 19, 1996 

Congressman Alcee Hastings addressed about three dozen students, faculty and staff members at South 

* 

Campus on "The African-American Male; An Endangered Species". 

Student Life new activities are free to students including Cinema-N-Drafthouse, Brunswick Lanes Bowling, 
Gran Prix Go-Carts, and Whirly Ball at Laser Storm. 

March 25, 1996 

The Rib-A-Thon benefited local charities with the BCC team consuming 82 ribs to beat Nova Blanche 
Forman team that consumed 78 ribs. 



Student Life roared at a nights out with discounts for the Florida Panther Games at the Miami Arena and 
later Marlins games at Joe Robbie Stadium. 

April 22, 1996 

Spring Thing, the 8 th annual Student Life celebration was won by team SGA with team AASU North 
coming in close second. 

Writes of Spring brought the turmoil of future to literary enthusiasts in annual literary festival. 

September 16, 1996 

Student Life cookout promoted club awareness, student souvenirs, and various activities. 

October 28, 1996 

Raven, a stage hypnotist enthralled audiences with psychic hypnotism. 

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Student 
Services 



STUDENT SERVICES 

The student club that emerged the strongest because of its leadership potential was F-Troop an honorary service 
and leadership organization of the 1970's that became dominant in the area of Intramurals because that's how they 
got their start. The F-Troop organization soon was recruiting student leaders from each student organization, the 
president of DECA, the treasurer of Student Government Association, the president of Phi Theta Kappa and the 
editor of the Observer. The newspapers had been consolidated so the New Horizons, the Phoenix and the Polaris 
were now one collegewide source and the pen was still mightier than the sword. The club page in all of the student 
newspapers had become a most important communication style for the people involved. Editorial letters would take 
the students even further in their quest mostly for funding. The SAB was the new target and people would 
approach them for budgets, office space and all kinds of ideas, but they stuck to their guns continuing to be a Board 
that recommended budgetary amounts to the Vice President of Student Development so that these organizations 
could be maintained. 

The students in 1980's were met with the fact that there was no real voice on the campuses. They saw that as a 
way of going their separate ways. They had higher cost of living, higher student fees, they found themselves 
having to put money into their student organizations as well as their own student education so they began working 
more. Student Activities put on a variety of leadership retreats, the purpose to train the student leaders how to 
keep their student clubs alive. These leadership retreats held in such exotic places such as Elliot Key, Caya Costa 
the Peace, New River or Fort Wilderness, where student leaders came before a facilitator who tried to teach them 
communication styles, teambuilding, networking and other ideas that would allow their organizations to be 
sustained throughout the 1980's. 

F-Troop took on another role for it became in the 1980's the campus organization that the administration went to if 
they needed a cookout for a visiting dignitary, if they needed a van driver to take a candidate for a search 
committee, if they needed a Christmas project at the Ft. Lauderdale Downtown Center, that was new and needed 
exposure. F-Troop, call F-Troop they will help, the service organization aspect of F-Troop was a carryover back to 
the early 1960's when the volunteerism and the service award were the keys, but F-Troop had a social side to it, it 
had it's own retreats with water skiing and various activities, from scavenger hunts to pushing kids in wheelchairs 
through Disney World. F-Troop in slides and later on in videos became the epiphany of what all students wanted to 



do, live, good involvement, or an active way to get to know somebody. F-Troop had hundreds of people come to 
their recruitment table at Orientation because they always had the best prepared table in the 1980's. Their 
functions at Tigertail lake were historical and hysterical, as hundreds of people would show up because they 
thought it was party time. 



With the demise of the social societies, the loss of the local fraternities and sororities, the end gf the service clubs it 
was good bye Circle K, hello F-Troop. You see a new organization that made Student Life on campus look very 
involved. They passed out shirts to different organizations, they sponsored different nighttime recreational events, 
not for competition, just for social interaction. F-Troop became the main game, F-Troop in the 1980's was the 
Student Activities office, they weren't paid, but they had fun and what they did was to provide a base for all of the 
students on the campuses. Not just organizations, who eyed F-Troop very wearily because they were taking their 
leaders for F-Troop always seemed to dominate newspapers, and off-campus and on-campus events, because 
they had the most spirit. 

That's the way it was intended to be, the creation of F-Troop was a necessity, a need to fill a void created by the 
end of the social societies, the Animal House of BCC. It was a need to fill the service clubs, the volunteer spirit had 
to be kept alive. There had to be someone to do the Broward County Fair Charity Booths to raise money selling hot 
dogs, to give out food baskets at Christmastime. F-Troop did unusual projects from washing the Ft. Lauderdale 
Tunnel to giving and holding blood drives, or just to help community based organizations with their own service 
necessities. 

F-Troop became quite an enigma, and that is really an oxymoron, it was F-Troop this and F-Troop that, the 
administration said, "we ought to clone them and make more of them", in the 1980's that quantity really actually 
killed the quality of F-Troop. What was small in the 1970's, three to eight to maybe eleven members a year, now 
spread to thirty to forty, as they spread from campus to campus they lost the intimate contact they had. They 
continued to have their yearly and semester functions, they continued to do all of the Orientations, soon only F- 
Troop showed up or members of F-Troop as Student Orientation staff on their shirts were all that you saw, as the 
other organizations said "why bother, why compete, they are going to get everything, they are going to get every 
\ new student" that was the wrong way to look at it. F-Troop were the non paid volunteers who organized the 
monthly dances at the Elks Lodge, the annual week long orientation activities, the Toys for Tots parties and 



programs, all those activities connected with the Broward County Fair and the contest for the Spelling Bees. They 
took part in pushing kids around Disney World, Boardwalk and Baseball, Circus World, Busch Gardens or Seaworld 
F-Troop was involved as the nucleus of Camp BCC. 

F-Troop became probably the best student organization because it took the best from the service aspects, enough 
social to get people really interested to attract them and they showed leadership. They showed leadership by 
actually doing things, they had leadership seminars and retreats to talk about the practical side of leadership, the 
cognitive skills, various aspects of value qualification. It's another thing to go out there and actually do the function, 
F-Troop did the function, there should be a separate chapter onto itself. 

F-Troop became the major source of student entertainment. They had already been active in Intramurals, social 
welfare work, in student life for now they became the people who put on the video buttons, the entertainers at noon, 
or cooked all the hamburgers so that other clubs could recruit. F-Troop became known as the doers, by the mid 
1980's they had taken over every major function that had been student government's at an earlier time. F-Troop 
found themselves in the drivers seat, because they were individually identified, they didn't pay any dues, they didn't 
have to have any type of weekly meeting, they didn't even have a constitution, they just had a phone number in the 
Student Handbook, if you needed help call F-Troop. All student activities started to focus around them. The 
history of F-Troop can be seen in the Scrapbooks in the Library's Archives. The history of F-Troop in the early 
years can be seen in the slide collection or the video tapes on the second floor of the Library. The history of F- 
Troop will live, in the memory that will be constant in a lot of organizations that have lasted more than 20 years at 
BCC, but they never had such a wider variety of people, all types, and especially those that were troubled. The 
person that might have had problem with drugs, or a problem with going to school, or the students who needed 
some guidance and direction. 

F-Troop served many purposes for many different reason. Up until 1992, F-Troop was the dominating organization. 
There were better organizations to join like Phi Theta Kappa if you wanted to get a scholarship, the Honors 
Institute, the Brain Bowl, DECA who always won and helped students get jobs. There were several organizations 
better than F-Troop they just didn't have the very wide range of service to the student body, the community. They 
didn't show the college off as well as no one rivaled F-Troop for that. In the late 1980's, the Competitive Edge, 
Presidential Leaders started to take over some of the functions of F-Troop, the leadership parts. The part that was 



connected directly to leadership, for the administration wanted that, they felt the need to have that so the President 
got his own leadership organization, no sense having two leadership groups. 

F-Troop became mostly service orientated and the type of students that were selected for F-Troop changed in the 
late 1980's early 1990's. Instead of the student who was from each individual organization that was their officer or 
leader, they took people from different organizations that had troubles, had different kinds of problems. It didn't 
help to perpetuate the organization for once it lost its advisor to other duties they found themselves unable to 
perpetuate what F-Troop stood for by themselves. They didn't understand the real reason for leadership that was 
recruitment of new members, followers, people who would do the work. 

The Competitive Edge President Leaders, Dr. Willis Holcombe had an organization similar to that at the College he 
previously worked in Brevard County and he thought that there should be one at BCC. Dr. George Young 
concurred, so Dr. Tom Ryan got the job of getting it organized at a leadership retreat on Eliot Key. Phi Beta Lamba 
put a big fuss because their slogan was "Phi Beta Lamba, the Competitive Edge" so they saw their name or their 
competitive spirit being hustled away, well there was enough of that for everybody. The beginning was rough, but 
they had to have a mission. The mission was to connect the leadership development with a type of structure on the 
top, that would grow to show itself as a symbol to the community that the college had a certain group that was able 
to be a public relations' enhancement for the President. The Competitive Edge would be showing off to the local 
press with mentoring by college and campus administrators, they would bridge out into the community to deal with 
the local leaders to show them that BCC was a source. 

Then came Tallahassee with a week long internship with a representative or State Senator. The Presidential 
Leaders would work in Legislators local offices in Broward County and help at some of the town meetings, this 
concept put on for the public after which they would go to Tallahassee where they would actually work in the office 
to try to glean some of the leadership styles from that state senator or that state representative. They became very 
good in the work that they performed, getting good recognition and became well known and identified throughout 
the entire state of Florida. 

The Competitive Edge went a step further, Dr. Ryan took them to Washington the first few years and whether they 
were in Congressman Clay Shaw's office as a worker or in Senator Graham's office, the Competitive Edge now had 






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a two week leadership program inside Washington DC where the top leaders were supposed to be. It gave them 
experience to shoot for, not all the Competitive Edge members made it to Washington, only twelve were selected a 
year to start from a student population that could be over almost over 60,000. The Competitive Edge was a very 
selective organization with an interview process, an application process, certain advisors of clubs pushed most of 
their members into it, because they saw it as a chance to get their club or organization recognized in the 1990's. 
They didn't have the material that went into the Competitive Edge, some of the students lacked, purpose. 

The Competitive Edge in the '90' became the top organization, F-Troop passed from the scene and the Competitive 
Edge became the organization for everyone to belong to. Clubs existed through the mid 1990's. The change in the 
clubs now was they were all by themselves, they didn't belong to Student Government, F-Troop, or the Competitive 
Edge. They saw themselves forming their own little entities, basing their power, with strength, wealth and future on 
their advisor and what they could attain. Trouble began to develop, with a loss where after 1996 of the students 
having any common denominator, just like the culture in South Florida where there was no real ties that bind them 
the organization's members together. They still would hit the SAB for travel money. They still would go to the 
Student Activities Office, now known as Student Life to find what they could get whether transportation, help or 
assistance from a piece of banner paper to money for a leadership seminar. These clubs hosted some of the 
students' functions during the 1990's, but they did that because of their own selfish reasons of perpetuating their 
membership. The student clubs of Broward Community College had come a very long way, they had gone full 
cycle. The new organizations after 1996 emphasized service so they got a community connection going, that was 
the name of an office at BCC, but what they found was that the new community connection would get them sources 
of revenue that they could use to develop and grow and survive and be positive in the 1990's. 1997 saw all the 
organizations headed in that direction. 









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